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Sample records for mass matrix shukusho

  1. Study on the effect of measurement points upon reduced added mass matrix; Shukusho fuka shitsuryo matrix ni okeru kansokuten no eikyo ni kansuru kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funaki, T.; Hayashi, S. [Osaka University, Osaka (Japan). Faculty of engineering

    1996-12-31

    It is known in estimating vibration characteristics of a ship that fluid range affects largely a structure. A parameter calculation was performed on node vibration in the vertical direction of a rotating elliptic body such as a ship to investigate the effect of an arranging method of the measurement points upon the result of the analysis. As a result, it is thought that equivalent interval arrangement of 21 measurement points would be sufficient in a lower order side mode of vibrations with less than four nodes. An analysis of calculations performed by arranging measurement points in experimental measurement points revealed that analysis accuracy would not increase even if the number of measurement points is increased if it is done so without considering rotation vector. An experiment was carried out with the number of measurement points increased to verify the above fact, with which the analysis was verified correct. Therefore, as has been forecasted in the previous report, the cause for the analysis accuracy deterioration in a high order mode may be estimated as the effect of the rotation vector. However, since it is not the situation that an analysis considering the rotation vector has been conducted, it cannot be concluded yet that the effect of the rotation vector is the sole cause. 4 refs., 14 figs., 7 tabs.

  2. Neutrino Mass Matrix with Approximate Flavor Symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Riazuddin, M

    2003-01-01

    Phenomenological implications of neutrino oscillations implied by recent experimental data on pattern of neutrino mass matrix are disscussed. It is shown that it is possible to have a neutrino mass matrix which shows approximate flavor symmetry; the neutrino mass differences arise from flavor violation in off-diagonal Yukawa couplings. Two modest extensions of the standard model, which can embed the resulting neutrino mass matix have also been discussed.

  3. Neutrino masses from an approximate mixing matrix with $\\theta_{13}\

    CERN Document Server

    Damanik, Asan

    2016-01-01

    An approximate neutrino mixing matrix is formutated by using the standard neutrino mixing matrix as a basis and experimental data of neutrino oscillations as inputs. By using the resulted approximate neutrino mixing matrix to proceed the neutrino mass matrix and constraining the resulted neutrino mass matrix with zero texture: $M_{\

  4. Neutrino Mass Matrix Predicted From Symmetric Texture

    CERN Document Server

    Bando, M; Bando, Masako; Obara, Midori

    2003-01-01

    Within the framework of grand unified theories, we make full analysis of symmetric texture to see if such texture can reproduce large neutrino mixings, which have recently been confirmed by the observed solar and atmospheric neutrino oscillation experiments. It is found that so-called symmetric texture with anomalous U(1) family symmetry with Froggatt-Nielsen mechanism does not provide a natural explanation of two large mixing angles. On the contrary we should adopt "zero texture" which have been extensively studied by many authors and only this scenario can reproduce two large mixing angles naturally. Under such "zero texture" with minimal symmetric Majorana matrix, all the neutrino masses and mixing angles, 6 quantities, are expressed in terms of up-quark masses, $m_t,m_c,m_u$ with two adjustable parameters. This provides interesting relations among neutrio mixing angles, $\\tan^2 2\\theta_{12} \\simeq \\frac{144m_c}{m_t} \\tan^2 2\\theta_{23} \\cos^2 \\theta_{23}, \\quad \\sin^2 \\theta_{13} \\simeq \\frac{4m_c}{m_t}\\s...

  5. Radiative fermion mass matrix generation in supersymmetric models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papantonopoulos, E.; Zoupanos, G.

    1984-01-01

    Supersymmetric SU(2)sub(L)xU(1) horizontal models are studied. The non-renormalisation theorems of sypersymmetry are used to make the mass generation and flavour mixing natural. For three families, the fermion mass matrix generation mechanism is studied as a radiative effect due to horizontal interactions, using various representations of the gauge horizontal groups SU(2)sub(H) and SU(3)sub(H). An attractive possibility leading to a realistic mass matrix is found.

  6. General Neutrino Mass Matrix Patterns and Its Underlying Family Symmetries

    CERN Document Server

    Damanik, Asan; Anggraita, Pramudita; Muslim,

    2014-01-01

    Baseon on current experimental results, such as neutrino oscillations and the neutrinoless double beta decays (i.e. data from Super Kamiokande, KamLAND, SNO, etc.), the neutrino mixing matrix can be adequately determined. Though there are still certain parameters that have possibility limits, but based on the current experimental results it is possible to construct a general form of neutrino mass matrix. Starting from this general form of the neutrino mass matrix we put certain conditions in the context of the seesaw mechanism model to determine the possible pattern of the neutrino mass matrix that has a texture zero. From the obtained neutrino mass matrix pattern, there are three class of patterns, where two of the class are known to be realized in literature by the underlying family symmetries of the $D_{4}$ and $A_{4}$ groups, the dihedral and tetrahedral symmetry groups.

  7. Texture of a Four-Neutrino Mass Matrix

    CERN Document Server

    Mohanty, S; Sarkar, U; Mohanty, Subhendra; Sarkar, Utpal

    1998-01-01

    We propose a simple texture of the neutrino mass matrix with one sterile neutrino along with the three standard ones. It gives maximal mixing angles for with only four parameters, this mass matrix can explain the solar neutrino anomaly, atmospheric neutrino anomaly, LSND result and the hot dark matter of the universe, while satisfying all other Laboratory constraints. Depending on the choice of parameters, one can get the vacuum oscillation or the large angle MSW solution of the solar neutrino anomaly.

  8. Correlations of the elements of the neutrino mass matrix

    CERN Document Server

    Grimus, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Assuming Majorana nature of neutrinos, we re-investigate, in the light of the recent measurement of the reactor mixing angle, the allowed ranges for the absolute values of the elements of the neutrino mass matrix in the basis where the charged-lepton mass matrix is diagonal. Apart from the derivation of upper and lower bounds on the values of the matrix elements, we also study their correlations. Moreover, we analyse the sensitivity of bounds and correlations to the global fit results of the neutrino oscillation parameters which are available in the literature.

  9. Neutrinos: recent developments and origin of neutrino mass matrix

    CERN Document Server

    Riazuddin

    2004-01-01

    Certainly one of the most exciting areas of research at present is neutrino physics. The neutrinos are fantastically numerous in the universe and as such they have bearing on our understanding of the universe. Therefore, we must understand the neutrinos, particularly their mass. There is compelling evidence from solar and atmospheric neutrinos and those from reactors for neutrino oscillations implying that neutrinos mix and have nonzero mass but without pinning down their absolute mass. This is reviewed. The implications of neutrino oscillations and mass squared splitting between neutrinos of different flavor on pattern of neutrino mass matrix is discussed. In particular, a neutrino mass matrix, which shows approximate flavor symmetry where the neutrino mass differences arise from flavor violation in off-diagonal Yukawa couplings is elaborated on. The implications in double beta decay are also discussed.

  10. Democratic Seesaw Mass Matrix Model and New Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Koide, Y

    1998-01-01

    A seesaw mass matrix model is reviewed as a unification model of quark and lepton mass matrices. The model can understand why top-quark mass m_t is so singularly enhanced compared with other quark masses, especially, why m_t >> m_b in contrast to m_u = O(m_d), and why only top-quark mass is of the order of the electroweak scale Lambda_W, i.e., m_t = O(Lambda_W). The model predicts the fourth up-quark t' with a mass m_{t'}= O(m_{W_R}), and an abnormal structure of the right-handed up-quark mixing matrix U_R^u. Possible new physics is discussed.

  11. Probing Models of Neutrino Masses via the Flavor Structure of the Mass Matrix

    CERN Document Server

    Kanemura, Shinya

    2015-01-01

    We discuss what kinds of combinations of Yukawa interactions can generate the Majorana neutrino mass matrix. We concentrate on the flavor structure of the neutrino mass matrix because it does not depend on details of the models except for Yukawa interactions while determination of the overall scale of the mass matrix requires to specify also the scalar potential and masses of new particles. Thus, models to generate Majorana neutrino mass matrix can be efficiently classified according to the combination of Yukawa interactions. We first investigate the case where Yukawa interactions with only leptons are utilized. Next, we consider the case with Yukawa interactions between leptons and gauge singlet fermions, which have the odd parity under the unbroken Z_2 symmetry. We show that combinations of Yukawa interactions for these cases can be classified into only three groups. Our classification would be useful for the efficient discrimination of models via experimental tests for not each model but just three groups ...

  12. Neutrino mass sum rules and symmetries of the mass matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehrlein, Julia [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institut fuer Theoretische Teilchenphysik, Karlsruhe (Germany); Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Fisica Teorica UAM/CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Spinrath, Martin [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institut fuer Theoretische Teilchenphysik, Karlsruhe (Germany); National Center for Theoretical Sciences, Physics Division, Hsinchu (China)

    2017-05-15

    Neutrino mass sum rules have recently gained again more attention as a powerful tool to discriminate and test various flavour models in the near future. A related question which has not yet been discussed fully satisfactorily was the origin of these sum rules and if they are related to any residual or accidental symmetry. We will address this open issue here systematically and find previous statements confirmed. Namely, the sum rules are not related to any enhanced symmetry of the Lagrangian after family symmetry breaking but they are simply the result of a reduction of free parameters due to skillful model building. (orig.)

  13. Modified Zee mass matrix with zero-sum condition

    CERN Document Server

    Brahmachari, B; Brahmachari, Biswajoy; Choubey, Sandhya

    2006-01-01

    We modify the Zee mass matrix by adding a real one parameter perturbation which is purely diagonal and trace-less. We show that in this way we can explain both solar and atmospheric neutrino oscillation data. There is a correlation between the deviation from strict maximality of $|U_{\\mu 3}|= 1/\\sqrt{2}$, with the emergence of a small but non-zero $U_{e3}$. We calculate how big a value can $U_{e3}$ get when we restrict ourselves within the allowed regions of solar and atmospheric neutrino masses and mixing angles. We also discuss the impact of a $S_2$ permutation symmetry on our mass matrix and show how a small $U_{e3} \

  14. Modified Zee mass matrix with zero-sum condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brahmachari, Biswajoy [Department of Physics, Vidyasagar Evening College, 39, Sankar Ghosh Lane, Kolkata 700006 (India)]. E-mail: biswajoy.brahmachari@cern.ch; Choubey, Sandhya [Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Oxford, 1 Keble Road, Oxford, OX1 3NP (United Kingdom) and Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Chhatnag Road, Jhunsi, Allahabad 211019 (India)]. E-mail: s.choubey1@physics.ox.ac.uk

    2006-11-23

    We modify the Zee mass matrix by adding a real one parameter perturbation which is purely diagonal and trace-less. We show that in this way we can explain both solar and atmospheric neutrino oscillation data. There is a correlation between the deviation from strict maximality of vertical bar U{sub {mu}}{sub 3} vertical bar =1/2, with the emergence of a small but non-zero U{sub e3}. We calculate how big a value can U{sub e3} get when we restrict ourselves within the allowed regions of solar and atmospheric neutrino masses and mixing angles. We also discuss the impact of a S{sub 2} permutation symmetry on our mass matrix and show how a small U{sub e3}<>0 can emerge when this S{sub 2} permutation symmetry between the second and the third generation is broken.

  15. On Matrix-Valued Monge–Kantorovich Optimal Mass Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Lipeng; Georgiou, Tryphon T.; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2016-01-01

    We present a particular formulation of optimal transport for matrix-valued density functions. Our aim is to devise a geometry which is suitable for comparing power spectral densities of multivariable time series. More specifically, the value of a power spectral density at a given frequency, which in the matricial case encodes power as well as directionality, is thought of as a proxy for a “matrix-valued mass density.” Optimal transport aims at establishing a natural metric in the space of such matrix-valued densities which takes into account differences between power across frequencies as well as misalignment of the corresponding principle axes. Thus, our transportation cost includes a cost of transference of power between frequencies together with a cost of rotating the principle directions of matrix densities. The two endpoint matrix-valued densities can be thought of as marginals of a joint matrix-valued density on a tensor product space. This joint density, very much as in the classical Monge–Kantorovich setting, can be thought to specify the transportation plan. Contrary to the classical setting, the optimal transport plan for matrices is no longer supported on a thin zero-measure set. PMID:26997667

  16. A top quark mass measurement using a matrix element method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linacre, Jacob Thomas [St. John' s College, Annapolis, MD (United States)

    2009-01-01

    A measurement of the mass of the top quark is presented, using top-antitop pair (t$\\bar{t}$) candidate events for the lepton+jets decay channel. The measurement makes use of Tevatron p$\\bar{p}$ collision data at centre-of-mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV, collected at the CDF detector. The top quark mass is measured by employing an unbinned maximum likelihood method where the event probability density functions are calculated using signal (t$\\bar{t}$) and background (W+jets) matrix elements, as well as a set of parameterised jet-to-parton mapping functions. The likelihood function is maximised with respect to the top quark mass, the fraction of signal events, and a correction to the jet energy scale (JES) of the calorimeter jets. The simultaneous measurement of the JES correction (ΔJES) provides an in situ jet energy calibration based on the known mass of the hadronically decaying W boson. Using 578 lepton+jets candidate events corresponding to 3.2 fb -1 of integrated luminosity, the top quark mass is measured to be mt = 172.4± 1.4 (stat+ΔJES) ±1.3 (syst) GeV=c2, one of the most precise single measurements to date.

  17. A top quark mass measurement using a matrix element method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linacre, Jacob Thomas [St. John' s College, Annapolis, MD (United States)

    2009-01-01

    A measurement of the mass of the top quark is presented, using top-antitop pair (t$\\bar{t}$) candidate events for the lepton+jets decay channel. The measurement makes use of Tevatron p$\\bar{p}$ collision data at centre-of-mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV, collected at the CDF detector. The top quark mass is measured by employing an unbinned maximum likelihood method where the event probability density functions are calculated using signal (t$\\bar{t}$) and background (W+jets) matrix elements, as well as a set of parameterised jet-to-parton mapping functions. The likelihood function is maximised with respect to the top quark mass, the fraction of signal events, and a correction to the jet energy scale (JES) of the calorimeter jets. The simultaneous measurement of the JES correction (ΔJES) provides an in situ jet energy calibration based on the known mass of the hadronically decaying W boson. Using 578 lepton+jets candidate events corresponding to 3.2 fb -1 of integrated luminosity, the top quark mass is measured to be mt = 172.4± 1.4 (stat+ΔJES) ±1.3 (syst) GeV=c2, one of the most precise single measurements to date.

  18. RAID-M: A high performance RAID Matrix mass storage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Peng; LI Sanli; Francis C.M.Lau; SHI Yao; HUANG Feng

    2005-01-01

    In the light of the increasingly serious I/O bottleneck problem, the paper puts forward a method named RAID-M (RAID Matrix) to build high performance mass storage from cheap PC components based on the idea of multi-channel I/O and parallel access.Theoretical analyses prove that different RAID-M configurations vary their performance,space utilization and reliability, meeting various application goals. Experiments show that both the sequential read performance and sequential write performance of a RAID-M prototype machine have broken through the limitation of 32 bit/33 MHz PCI bus.

  19. Matrix effects in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiaoshan [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1995-07-07

    The inductively coupled plasma is an electrodeless discharge in a gas (usually Ar) at atmospheric pressure. Radio frequency energy generated by a RF power source is inductively coupled to the plasma gas through a water cooled load coil. In ICP-MS the "Fassel" TAX quartz torch commonly used in emission is mounted horizontally. The sample aerosol is introduced into the central flow, where the gas kinetic temperature is about 5000 K. The aerosol is vaporized, atomized, excited and ionized in the plasma, and the ions are subsequently extracted through two metal apertures (sampler and skimmer) into the mass spectrometer. In ICP-MS, the matrix effects, or non-spectroscopic interferences, can be defined as the type of interferences caused by dissolved concomitant salt ions in the solution. Matrix effects can be divided into two categories: (1) signal drift due to the deposition of solids on the sampling apertures; and/or (2) signal suppression or enhancement by the presence of the dissolved salts. The first category is now reasonably understood. The dissolved salts, especially refractory oxides, tend to deposit on the cool tip of the sampling cone. The clogging of the orifices reduces the ion flow into the ICP-MS, lowers the pressure in the first stage of ICP-MS, and enhances the level of metal oxide ions. Because the extent of the clogging increases with the time, the signal drifts down. Even at the very early stage of the development of ICP-MS, matrix effects had been observed. Houk et al. found out that the ICP-MS was not tolerant to solutions containing significant amounts of dissolved solids.

  20. Probing Models of Dirac Neutrino Masses via the Flavor Structure of the Mass Matrix

    CERN Document Server

    Kanemura, Shinya; Sugiyama, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    We classify models of the Dirac neutrino mass by concentrating on flavor structures of the mass matrix. The advantage of our classification is that we do not need to specify detail of models except for Yukawa interactions because flavor structures can be given only by products of Yukawa matrices. All possible Yukawa interactions between leptons (including the right-handed neutrino) are taken into account by introducing appropriate scalar fields. We also take into account the case with Yukawa interactions of leptons with the dark matter candidate. Then, we see that flavor structures can be classified into seven groups. The result is useful for the efficient test of models of the neutrino mass. One of seven groups can be tested by measuring the absolute neutrino mass. Other two can be tested by probing the violation of the lepton universality in $\\ell \\to \\ell^\\prime \

  1. Advective-diffusive mass transfer in fractured porous media with variable rock matrix block size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi Haddad, Amin; Hassanzadeh, Hassan; Abedi, Jalal

    2012-05-15

    Traditional dual porosity models do not take into account the effect of matrix block size distribution on the mass transfer between matrix and fracture. In this study, we introduce the matrix block size distributions into an advective-diffusive solute transport model of a divergent radial system to evaluate the mass transfer shape factor, which is considered as a first-order exchange coefficient between the fracture and matrix. The results obtained lead to a better understanding of the advective-diffusive mass transport in fractured porous media by identifying two early and late time periods of mass transfer. Results show that fractured rock matrix block size distribution has a great impact on mass transfer during early time period. In addition, two dimensionless shape factors are obtained for the late time, which depend on the injection flow rate and the distance of the rock matrix from the injection point.

  2. An algorithm for mass matrix calculation of internally constrained molecular geometries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryanpour, Masoud; Dhanda, Abhishek; Pitsch, Heinz

    2008-01-28

    Dynamic models for molecular systems require the determination of corresponding mass matrix. For constrained geometries, these computations are often not trivial but need special considerations. Here, assembling the mass matrix of internally constrained molecular structures is formulated as an optimization problem. Analytical expressions are derived for the solution of the different possible cases depending on the rank of the constraint matrix. Geometrical interpretations are further used to enhance the solution concept. As an application, we evaluate the mass matrix for a constrained molecule undergoing an electron-transfer reaction. The preexponential factor for this reaction is computed based on the harmonic model.

  3. Seeking Texture Zeros in the Quark Mass Matrix Sector of the Standard Model

    CERN Document Server

    Giraldo, Yithsbey

    2015-01-01

    Here we show that the Weak Basis Transformation is an appropriate mathematical tool that can be used to find texture zeros in the quark mass matrix sector of the Standard Model. So, starting with the most general quark mass matrices and taking physical data into consideration, is possible to obtain more than three texture zeros by any weak basis transformation. Where the most general quark mass matrices considered in the model, were obtained through a special weak basis wherein the mass matrix $M_u$~(or $M_d$) has been taken to be diagonal and only the matrix $M_d$~(or $M_u$) is considered to be most general.

  4. CP violating phase from minimal texture neutrino mass matrix: Test of the phase relevant to leptogenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Fukugita, Masataka; Shimizu, Yusuke; Tanimoto, Morimitsu; Yanagida, Tsutomu T

    2016-01-01

    The model of neutrino mass matrix with minimal texture is now tightly constrained by experiment so that it can yield a prediction for the phase of CP violation. This phase is predicted to lie in the range $\\delta_{CP}=0.77\\pi - 1.24\\pi$. If neutrino oscillation experiment would find the CP violation phase outside this range, this means that the minimal-texture neutrino mass matrix, the element of which is all real, fails and the neutrino mass matrix must be complex, i.e., the phase must be present that is responsible for leptogenesis.

  5. Explicit versus Dynamical Chiral Symmetry Breaking and Mass Matrix of Quarks and Leptons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handa, O.; Ishida, S.; Sekiguchi, M.

    1992-02-01

    By recourse to an analogy between strong and weak interactions, quark mass-matrices consisting of the two parts are proposed, which represent, respectively, dynamical chiral symmetry breaking and explicit one due to small preon mass. The sum rules among quark masses and mixing-matrix elements derived from it seem consistent with present experiments.

  6. Non-diagonal charged lepton mass matrix and non-zero {theta}{sub 13}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acosta, J. Alberto, E-mail: kripton0x@gmail.com [Facultad de Ciencias, CUICBAS, Universidad de Colima, Colima (Mexico); Aranda, Alfredo, E-mail: fefo@ucol.mx [Facultad de Ciencias, CUICBAS, Universidad de Colima, Colima (Mexico); Dual C-P Institute of High Energy Physics (Mexico); Buen-Abad, Manuel A., E-mail: manuelbuenabadnajar@gmail.com [Facultad de Ciencias, CUICBAS, Universidad de Colima, Colima (Mexico); Rojas, Alma D., E-mail: alma.drp@gmail.com [Facultad de Ciencias, CUICBAS, Universidad de Colima, Colima (Mexico)

    2013-01-29

    Assuming that the neutrino mass matrix is diagonalized by the tribimaximal mixing matrix, we explore the textures for the charged lepton mass matrix that render a U{sub PMNS} lepton mixing matrix consistent with data. In particular we are interested in finding the textures with the maximum number of zeros. We explore the cases of real matrices with three and four zeros and find that only ten matrices with three zeros provide solutions in agreement with data. We present the successful Yukawa textures including the relative sizes of their non-zero entries as well as some new and interesting relations among the entries of these textures in terms of the charged lepton masses. We also show that these relations can be obtained directly from a parametrization of the charged lepton mixing matrix U{sub l}.

  7. Homogeneous matrix deposition on dried agar for MALDI imaging mass spectrometry of microbial cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Thomas; Dorrestein, Pieter C

    2015-11-01

    Matrix deposition on agar-based microbial colonies for MALDI imaging mass spectrometry is often complicated by the complex media on which microbes are grown. This Application Note demonstrates how consecutive short spray pulses of a matrix solution can form an evenly closed matrix layer on dried agar. Compared with sieving dry matrix onto wet agar, this method supports analyte cocrystallization, which results in significantly more signals, higher signal-to-noise ratios, and improved ionization efficiency. The even matrix layer improves spot-to-spot precision of measured m/z values when using TOF mass spectrometers. With this technique, we established reproducible imaging mass spectrometry of myxobacterial cultures on nutrient-rich cultivation media, which was not possible with the sieving technique. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  8. Abnormal Structure of Fermion Mixings in a Seesaw Quark Mass Matrix Model

    CERN Document Server

    Koide, Y

    1997-01-01

    It is pointed out that in a seesaw quark mass matrix model which yields a singular enhancement of the top-quark mass, the right-handed fermion-mixing matrix U_R^u for the up-quark sector has a peculiar structure in contrast to the left-handed one U_L^u. As an example of the explicit structures of U_L^u and U_R^u, a case in which the heavy fermion mass matrix M_F is given by a form [(unit matrix)+(rank-one matrix)] is investigated. As a consequence, one finds observable signatures at projected high energy accelerators like the production of a fourth heavy quark family.

  9. Homogeneous Matrix Deposition on Dried Agar for MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry of Microbial Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Thomas; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2015-11-01

    Matrix deposition on agar-based microbial colonies for MALDI imaging mass spectrometry is often complicated by the complex media on which microbes are grown. This Application Note demonstrates how consecutive short spray pulses of a matrix solution can form an evenly closed matrix layer on dried agar. Compared with sieving dry matrix onto wet agar, this method supports analyte cocrystallization, which results in significantly more signals, higher signal-to-noise ratios, and improved ionization efficiency. The even matrix layer improves spot-to-spot precision of measured m/z values when using TOF mass spectrometers. With this technique, we established reproducible imaging mass spectrometry of myxobacterial cultures on nutrient-rich cultivation media, which was not possible with the sieving technique.

  10. On the Formulation of Flexible Multibody Systems with Constant Mass Matrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Niels Leergaard

    1997-01-01

    A flexible body in a multibody system isdescribed only by the position of the nodes in theinertial frame. With this description we can formulatethe mass matrix of the flexible multibody as aconstant matrix. This matrix can be inverted in apreprocessing stage which yields a more efficientaccelerat...... of this formulation is that neither thecentrifugal nor the Coriolis forces appear in theequations due to the description of the flexible body....

  11. Hybrid Textures of Neutrino Mass Matrix under the Lamppost of Latest Neutrino and Cosmology Data

    CERN Document Server

    Kalita, Rupam

    2015-01-01

    We study all possible neutrino mass matrices with one zero element and two equal non-zero elements, known as hybrid texture neutrino mass matrices. In the diagonal charged lepton basis, we consider thirty nine such possible cases which are consistent with the latest neutrino data. Using the two constraints on neutrino mass matrix elements imposed by hybrid textures, we numerically evaluate the neutrino parameters like the lightest neutrino mass $m_{\\text{lightest}}$, one Dirac CP phase $\\delta$ and two Majorana CP phases $\\alpha, \\beta$ by using the global fit $3\\sigma$ values of three mixing angles and two mass squared differences. We then constrain this parameter space by using the cosmological upper bound on the sum of absolute neutrino masses given by Planck experiment. We also calculate the effective neutrino mass matrix for this region of parameter space which may have relevance in future neutrinoless double beta decay experiments. We finally discriminate between these hybrid texture mass matrices from ...

  12. Neutrinoless Double Beta Nuclear Matrix Elements Around Mass 80 in the Nuclear Shell Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga, Naotaka; Higashiyama, Koji; Taguchi, Daisuke; Teruya, Eri

    The observation of the neutrinoless double-beta decay can determine whether the neutrino is a Majorana particle or not. In its theoretical nuclear side it is particularly important to estimate three types of nuclear matrix elements, namely, Fermi (F), Gamow-Teller (GT), and tensor (T) types matrix elements. The shell model calculations and also the pair-truncated shell model calculations are carried out to check the model dependence on nuclear matrix elements. In this work the neutrinoless double-beta decay for mass A = 82 nuclei is studied. It is found that the matrix elements are quite sensitive to the ground state wavefunctions.

  13. Biological Matrix Effects in Quantitative Tandem Mass Spectrometry-Based Analytical Methods: Advancing Biomonitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panuwet, Parinya; Hunter, Ronald E.; D’Souza, Priya E.; Chen, Xianyu; Radford, Samantha A.; Cohen, Jordan R.; Marder, M. Elizabeth; Kartavenka, Kostya; Ryan, P. Barry; Barr, Dana Boyd

    2015-01-01

    The ability to quantify levels of target analytes in biological samples accurately and precisely, in biomonitoring, involves the use of highly sensitive and selective instrumentation such as tandem mass spectrometers and a thorough understanding of highly variable matrix effects. Typically, matrix effects are caused by co-eluting matrix components that alter the ionization of target analytes as well as the chromatographic response of target analytes, leading to reduced or increased sensitivity of the analysis. Thus, before the desired accuracy and precision standards of laboratory data are achieved, these effects must be characterized and controlled. Here we present our review and observations of matrix effects encountered during the validation and implementation of tandem mass spectrometry-based analytical methods. We also provide systematic, comprehensive laboratory strategies needed to control challenges posed by matrix effects in order to ensure delivery of the most accurate data for biomonitoring studies assessing exposure to environmental toxicants. PMID:25562585

  14. Scaling in the Neutrino Mass Matrix, mu-tau Symmetry and the See-Saw Mechanism

    CERN Document Server

    Joshipura, Anjan S

    2009-01-01

    The scaling hypothesis postulates proportionality of two columns of the Majorana neutrino mass matrix in the flavor basis. This Ansatz was shown to lead to an inverted hierarchy and U_{e3} = 0. We discuss theoretical and phenomenological properties of this hypothesis. We show that (i) the neutrino mass matrix with scaling follows as a consequence of a generalized mu-tau symmetry imposed on the type-I see-saw model; (ii) there exists a unique texture for the Dirac mass matrix m_D which leads to scaling for arbitrary Majorana matrix M_R in the context of the type-I see-saw mechanism; (iii) unlike in the mu-tau symmetric case, a simple model with two right-handed neutrinos and scaling can lead to successful leptogenesis both with and without the inclusion of flavor effects.

  15. Scaling in the neutrino mass matrix, {mu}-{tau} symmetry and the see-saw mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshipura, Anjan S. [Physical Research Laboratory, Navrangpura, Ahmedabad 380 009, Gujarat (India)], E-mail: anjan@prl.res.in; Rodejohann, Werner [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Postfach 103980, D-69029 Heidelberg (Germany)], E-mail: werner.rodejohann@mpi-hd.mpg.de

    2009-07-20

    The scaling hypothesis postulates proportionality of two columns of the Majorana neutrino mass matrix in the flavor basis. This ansatz was shown to lead to an inverted hierarchy and U{sub e3}=0. We discuss theoretical and phenomenological properties of this hypothesis. We show that (i) the neutrino mass matrix with scaling follows as a consequence of a generalized {mu}-{tau} symmetry imposed on the type-I see-saw model; (ii) there exists a unique texture for the Dirac mass matrix m{sub D} which leads to scaling for arbitrary Majorana matrix M{sub R} in the context of the type-I see-saw mechanism; (iii) unlike in the {mu}-{tau} symmetric case, a simple model with two right-handed neutrinos and scaling can lead to successful leptogenesis both with and without the inclusion of flavor effects.

  16. Sublimation as a method of matrix application for mass spectrometric imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankin, Joseph A; Barkley, Robert M; Murphy, Robert C

    2007-09-01

    Common organic matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) matrices, 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 3,5-dimethoxy-4-hydroxycinnamic acid, and alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid, were found to undergo sublimation without decomposition under conditions of reduced pressure and elevated temperature. This solid to vapor-phase transition was exploited to apply MALDI matrix onto tissue samples over a broad surface in a solvent-free application for mass spectrometric imaging. Sublimation of matrix produced an even layer of small crystals across the sample plate. The deposition was readily controlled with time, temperature, and pressure settings and was highly reproducible from one sample to the next. Mass spectrometric images acquired from phospholipid standards robotically spotted onto a MALDI plate yielded a more intense, even signal with fewer sodium adducts when matrix was applied by sublimation relative to samples where matrix was deposited by an electrospray technique. MALDI matrix could be readily applied to tissue sections on glass slides and stainless steel MALDI plate inserts as long as good thermal contact was made with the condenser of the sublimation device. Sections of mouse brain were coated with matrix applied by sublimation and were imaged using a Q-q-TOF mass spectrometer to yield mass spectral images of very high quality. Image quality is likely enhanced by several features of this technique including the microcrystalline morphology of the deposited matrix, increased purity of deposited matrix, and evenness of deposition. This inexpensive method was reproducible and eliminated the potential for spreading of analytes arising from solvent deposition during matrix application.

  17. Probing the neutrino mass matrix in next generation neutrino oscillation experiments

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    We review the current status of the neutrino mass and mixing parameters needed to reconstruct the neutrino mass matrix. A comparative study of the precision in the measurement of oscillation parameters expected from the next generation solar, atmospheric, reactor and accelerator based experiments is presented. We discuss the potential of $0\

  18. Predictive flavour symmetries of the neutrino mass matrix

    CERN Document Server

    Hirsch, M; Kaneko, S; Valle, J W F; Joshipura, Anjan S.

    2007-01-01

    Here we propose an $A_4$ flavour symmetry model which implies a lower bound on the neutrinoless double beta decay rate, corresponding to an effective mass parameter $M_{ee} \\gsim 0.03$ eV, and a direct correlation between the expected magnitude of CP violation in neutrino oscillations and the value of $\\sin^2\\theta_{13}$, as well as a nearly maximal CP phase $\\delta$.

  19. General structure of democratic mass matrix of quark sector in E{sub 6} model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciftci, R., E-mail: rciftci@cern.ch [Ankara (Turkey); Çiftci, A. K., E-mail: abbas.kenan.ciftci@cern.ch [Ankara University, Ankara (Turkey)

    2016-03-25

    An extension of the Standard Model (SM) fermion sector, which is inspired by the E{sub 6} Grand Unified Theory (GUT) model, might be a good candidate to explain a number of unanswered questions in SM. Existence of the isosinglet quarks might explain great mass difference of bottom and top quarks. Also, democracy on mass matrix elements is a natural approach in SM. In this study, we have given general structure of Democratic Mass Matrix (DMM) of quark sector in E6 model.

  20. The neutrino mass matrix and (selected) variants of A4

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Martin Hirsch

    2009-01-01

    Recent neutrino oscillation experiments have measured leptonic mixing angles with considerable precision. Many theoretical attempts to understand the peculiar mixing structure, observed in these measurements, are based on non-Abelian flavour symmetries. This talk concentrates exclusively on models based on the non-Abelian symmetry 4 . 4 is particularly well suited to describe three family mixing, and allows to explain the near tri-bimaximal mixing observed. Special emphasis is put here on the discussion of the neutrinoless double beta decay observable $\\langle m_{} \\rangle$ . Different models based on 4 with very similar predictions for neutrino angles can yield vastly different expectations for $\\langle m_{} \\rangle$ . Neutrinoless double beta decay can thus serve, in principle, as a discriminator between different neutrino mass models.

  1. Automated MALDI Matrix Coating System for Multiple Tissue Samples for Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mounfield, William P.; Garrett, Timothy J.

    2012-03-01

    Uniform matrix deposition on tissue samples for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) is key for reproducible analyte ion signals. Current methods often result in nonhomogenous matrix deposition, and take time and effort to produce acceptable ion signals. Here we describe a fully-automated method for matrix deposition using an enclosed spray chamber and spray nozzle for matrix solution delivery. A commercial air-atomizing spray nozzle was modified and combined with solenoid controlled valves and a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) to control and deliver the matrix solution. A spray chamber was employed to contain the nozzle, sample, and atomized matrix solution stream, and to prevent any interference from outside conditions as well as allow complete control of the sample environment. A gravity cup was filled with MALDI matrix solutions, including DHB in chloroform/methanol (50:50) at concentrations up to 60 mg/mL. Various samples (including rat brain tissue sections) were prepared using two deposition methods (spray chamber, inkjet). A linear ion trap equipped with an intermediate-pressure MALDI source was used for analyses. Optical microscopic examination showed a uniform coating of matrix crystals across the sample. Overall, the mass spectral images gathered from tissues coated using the spray chamber system were of better quality and more reproducible than from tissue specimens prepared by the inkjet deposition method.

  2. Neutrinoless double beta nuclear matrix elements around mass 80 in the nuclear shell-model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga, N.; Higashiyama, K.; Taguchi, D.; Teruya, E.

    2015-05-01

    The observation of the neutrinoless double-beta decay can determine whether the neutrino is a Majorana particle or not. For theoretical nuclear physics it is particularly important to estimate three types of matrix elements, namely Fermi (F), Gamow-Teller (GT), and tensor (T) matrix elements. In this paper, we carry out shell-model calculations and also pair-truncated shell-model calculations to check the model dependence in the case of mass A=82 nuclei.

  3. Neutrinoless double beta nuclear matrix elements around mass 80 in the nuclear shell-model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinaga N.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The observation of the neutrinoless double-beta decay can determine whether the neutrino is a Majorana particle or not. For theoretical nuclear physics it is particularly important to estimate three types of matrix elements, namely Fermi (F, Gamow-Teller (GT, and tensor (T matrix elements. In this paper, we carry out shell-model calculations and also pair-truncated shell-model calculations to check the model dependence in the case of mass A=82 nuclei.

  4. Quark and Lepton Mass Matrix Model with Only Six Family-Independent Parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Koide, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    We propose a unified mass matrix model for quarks and leptons, in which sixteen observables of mass ratios and mixings of the quarks and neutrinos are described by using no family number-dependent parameters except for the charged lepton masses and only six family number-independent free parameters. The model is constructed by extending the so-called ``Yukawaon" model to a seesaw type model with the smallest number of possible family number-independent free parameters. As a result, once the six parameters is fixed by the quark mixing and the mass ratios of quarks and neutrinos, no free parameters are left in the lepton mixing matrix. The results are in excellent agreement with the neutrino mixing data. We predict $\\delta_{CP}^\\ell =-68^\\circ$ for the leptonic $CP$ violating phase and $\\langle m\\rangle\\simeq 21$ meV for the effective Majorana neutrino mass.

  5. Derivatization of small biomolecules for optimized matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tholey, Andreas; Wittmann, Christoph; Kang, Min-Jung; Bungert, Ditte; Hollemeyer, Klaus; Heinzle, Elmar

    2002-09-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOFMS) is a powerful tool for the measurement of low molecular mass compounds of biological interest. The limitations for this method are the volatility of many analytes, possible interference with matrix signals or bad ionization or desorption behavior of the compounds. We investigated the application of well-known and straightforward one-pot derivatization procedures to circumvent these problems. The derivatizations tested allow the measurement and the labeling of alcohols, aldehydes and ketones, carboxylic acids, alpha-ketocarboxylic acids and amines.

  6. The decoupling of second-order linear systems with a singular mass matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Daniel T.; Morzfeld, Matthias; Ma, Fai

    2013-12-01

    It was demonstrated in earlier work that a nondefective, linear dynamical system with an invertible mass matrix in free or forced motion may be decoupled in the configuration space by a real and isospectral transformation. We extend this work by developing a procedure for decoupling a linear dynamical system with a singular mass matrix in the configuration space, transforming the original differential-algebraic system into decoupled sets of real, independent, first- and second-order differential equations. Numerical examples are provided to illustrate the application of the decoupling procedure.

  7. Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Drosophila Brain Using Matrix Sublimation versus Modification with Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Nhu T N; Mohammadi, Amir Saeid; Dowlatshahi Pour, Masoumeh; Ewing, Andrew G

    2016-02-02

    Laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS) is used to image brain lipids in the fruit fly, Drosophila, a common invertebrate model organism in biological and neurological studies. Three different sample preparation methods, including sublimation with two common organic matrixes for matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) and surface-assisted laser desorption ionization (SALDI) using gold nanoparticles, are examined for sample profiling and imaging the fly brain. Recrystallization with trifluoroacetic acid following matrix deposition in MALDI is shown to increase the incorporation of biomolecules with one matrix, resulting in more efficient ionization, but not for the other matrix. The key finding here is that the mass fragments observed for the fly brain slices with different surface modifications are significantly different. Thus, these approaches can be combined to provide complementary analysis of chemical composition, particularly for the small metabolites, diacylglycerides, phosphatidylcholines, and triacylglycerides, in the fly brain. Furthermore, imaging appears to be beneficial using modification with gold nanoparticles in place of matrix in this application showing its potential for cellular and subcellular imaging. The imaging protocol developed here with both MALDI and SALDI provides the best and most diverse lipid chemical images of the fly brain to date with LDI.

  8. Three loop massive operator matrix elements and asymptotic Wilson coefficients with two different masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablinger, J.; Blümlein, J.; De Freitas, A.; Hasselhuhn, A.; Schneider, C.; Wißbrock, F.

    2017-08-01

    Starting at 3-loop order, the massive Wilson coefficients for deep-inelastic scattering and the massive operator matrix elements describing the variable flavor number scheme receive contributions of Feynman diagrams carrying quark lines with two different masses. In the case of the charm and bottom quarks, the usual decoupling of one heavy mass at a time no longer holds, since the ratio of the respective masses, η = mc2 / mb2 ∼ 1 / 10, is not small enough. Therefore, the usual variable flavor number scheme (VFNS) has to be generalized. The renormalization procedure in the two-mass case is different from the single mass case derived in [1]. We present the moments N = 2 , 4 and 6 for all contributing operator matrix elements, expanding in the ratio η. We calculate the analytic results for general values of the Mellin variable N in the flavor non-singlet case, as well as for transversity and the matrix element Agq(3). We also calculate the two-mass scalar integrals of all topologies contributing to the gluonic operator matrix element Agg. As it turns out, the expansion in η is usually inapplicable for general values of N. We therefore derive the result for general values of the mass ratio. From the single pole terms we derive, now in a two-mass calculation, the corresponding contributions to the 3-loop anomalous dimensions. We introduce a new general class of iterated integrals and study their relations and present special values. The corresponding functions are implemented in computer-algebraic form.

  9. Implications of measured properties of the mixing matrix on mass matrices

    CERN Document Server

    Chaturvedi, S; Sánchez-Colón, G; Chaturvedi, Subhash; Gupta, Virendra; Sanchez-Colon, Gabriel

    2006-01-01

    It is shown how the two experimentally measurable properties of the mixing matrix $V$, the asymmetry Delta(V)=|V_{12}|^2- |V_{21}|^2 of V with respect to the main diagonal and the Jarlskog invariant J(V)=Im(V_{11}V_{12}^*V_{21}^*V_{22}), can be exploited to obtain constraints on possible structures of mass matrices in the quark sector. Specific mass matrices are examined in detail as an illustration.

  10. Three loop massive operator matrix elements and asymptotic Wilson coefficients with two different masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ablinger, J.; Hasselhuhn, A.; Schneider, C. [Johannes Kepler Univ., Linz (Austria). Research Inst. for Symbolic Computation (RISC); Bluemlein, J.; Freitas, A. de [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Wissbrock, F. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Johannes Kepler Univ., Linz (Austria). Research Inst. for Symbolic Computation (RISC); IHES, Bures-sur-Yvette (France)

    2017-05-15

    Starting at 3-loop order, the massive Wilson coefficients for deep-inelastic scattering and the massive operator matrix elements describing the variable flavor number scheme receive contributions of Feynman diagrams carrying quark lines with two different masses. In the case of the charm and bottom quarks, the usual decoupling of one heavy mass at a time no longer holds, since the ratio of the respective masses, η=m{sup 2}{sub c}/m{sup 2}{sub b}∝1/10, is not small enough. Therefore, the usual variable flavor number scheme (VFNS) has to be generalized. The renormalization procedure in the two-mass case is different from the single mass case derived earlier (I. Bierenbaum, J: Bluemlein, S. Klein, 2009). We present the moments N=2,4 and 6 for all contributing operator matrix elements, expanding in the ratio η. We calculate the analytic results for general values of the Mellin variable N in the flavor non-singlet case, as well as for transversity and the matrix element A{sup (3)}{sub gq}. We also calculate the two-mass scalar integrals of all topologies contributing to the gluonic operator matrix element A{sub gg}. As it turns out, the expansion in η is usually inapplicable for general values of N. We therefore derive the result for general values of the mass ratio. From the single pole terms we derive, now in a two-mass calculation, the corresponding contributions to the 3-loop anomalous dimensions. We introduce a new general class of iterated integrals and study their relations and present special values. The corresponding functions are implemented in computer-algebraic form.

  11. Unusual Fragmentation of Peptide and Protein in Matrix-assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mitsuo Takayama

    2001-01-01

    Unusual amine - bond fragmentation on the peptide/protein backbone has been reported using matrix - assisted laser desorption/ionization time - of- flight mass spectrometry (MALDI - TOFMS)The amine - bond cleavage occurred without metastable decay, while the peptide - bond cleavage occurred with metastable decay of peptide ions in a drift region of TOF mass analyzer. It was presumed that the amine - bond cleavage occurred as a non - ergodic process independent of the ionization under MALDI conditions.

  12. Characterisation of bacteria by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation and electrospray mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baar, B.L.M. van

    2000-01-01

    Chemical analysis for the characterisation of micro-organisms is rapidly evolving, after the recent advent of new ionisation methods in mass spectrometry (MS): electrospray (ES) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation (MALDI). These methods allow quick characterisation of micro-organisms, ei

  13. Identification of Bacteria Using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedney, Mollie G.; Strunk, Kevin B.; Giaquinto, Lisa M.; Wagner, Jennifer A.; Pollack, Sidney; Patton, Walter A.

    2007-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS or simply MALDI) has become ubiquitous in the identification and analysis of biomacromolecules. As a technique that allows for the molecular weight determination of otherwise nonvolatile molecules, MALDI has had a profound impact in the molecular…

  14. Automated MALDI matrix deposition method with inkjet printing for imaging mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baluya, Dodge L; Garrett, Timothy J; Yost, Richard A

    2007-09-01

    Careful matrix deposition on tissue samples for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) is critical for producing reproducible analyte ion signals. Traditional methods for matrix deposition are often considered an art rather than a science, with significant sample-to-sample variability. Here we report an automated method for matrix deposition, employing a desktop inkjet printer (printer tray, designed to hold CDs and DVDs, was modified to hold microscope slides. Empty ink cartridges were filled with MALDI matrix solutions, including DHB in methanol/water (70:30) at concentrations up to 40 mg/mL. Various samples (including rat brain tissue sections and standards of small drug molecules) were prepared using three deposition methods (electrospray, airbrush, inkjet). A linear ion trap equipped with an intermediate-pressure MALDI source was used for analyses. Optical microscopic examination showed that matrix crystals were formed evenly across the sample. There was minimal background signal after storing the matrix in the cartridges over a 6-month period. Overall, the mass spectral images gathered from inkjet-printed tissue specimens were of better quality and more reproducible than from specimens prepared by the electrospray and airbrush methods.

  15. Salt Tolerance Enhancement of Liquid Chromatography-Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization-Mass Spectrometry Using Matrix Additive Methylenediphosphonic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Yuki; Iwamoto, Shinichi; Kawabata, Shin-ichirou; Tanimura, Ritsuko; Tanaka, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is a highly sensitive analytical technique that is often coupled with liquid chromatography (LC). However, some buffering salts used in LC (e.g., phosphate and tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris)) are incompatible with MS since they cause ion-source contamination and signal suppression. In this study, we examined salt tolerance of MALDI and applied a matrix additive methylenediphosphonic acid (MDPNA) to reduce salt-induced signal suppression. MDPNA significantly improved the salt tolerance of MALDI-MS. Using ammonium formate buffer at pH 5.0, the effective range of buffering salt concentration in MALDI-MS using MDPNA was estimated up to 250 mM. MDPNA reduced signal suppression caused by buffering salts at pH 4.0 to 8.0. We observed that MDPNA effectively worked over a wide range of buffer conditions. MDPNA was further applied to hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) and chromatofocusing-MALDI-MS. As a result, the analytes in the eluent containing high-concentration salts were detected with high sensitivity. Thus, our study provides simple and fast LC-MALDI-MS analysis technique not having strict limitation of buffering condition in LC by using matrix additive MDPNA. PMID:26819873

  16. Bi-large Neutrino Mixing See-Saw Mass Matrix with Texture Zeros and Leptogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHAO Wei; HE Xiao-Gang; LI Xue-Qian

    2006-01-01

    We study constraints on neutrino properties for a class of bi-large mixing See-Saw mass matrices with texture zeros and with the related Dirac neutrino mass matrix to be proportional to a diagonal matrix of the form diag(e, 1, 1). Texture zeros may occur in the light (class a)) or in the heavy (class b)) neutrino mass matrices. Each of these two classes has 5 different forms which can produce non-trivial three generation mixing with at least one texture zero. We find that two types of texture zero mass matrices in both class a and class b can be consistent with present data on neutrino masses and mixing. None of the neutrinos can have zero masses and the lightest of the light neutrinos has a mass larger than about 0.046 eV for class a and 0.0027 eV for class b. In these models although the CKM CP violating phase vanishes, the non-zero Majorana phases can exist and can play an important role in producing the observed baryon asymmetry in our universe through leptogenesis mechanism. The requirement of producing the observed baryon asymmetry can further distinguish different models and also restrict the See-Saw scale to be in the range of 1012 ~ 1015GeV. We also discuss RG effects on V13.

  17. Matrix assisted ionization in vacuum, a sensitive and widely applicable ionization method for mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimpin, Sarah; Inutan, Ellen D

    2013-05-01

    An astonishingly simple new method to produce gas-phase ions of small molecules as well as proteins from the solid state under cold vacuum conditions is described. This matrix assisted ionization vacuum (MAIV) mass spectrometry (MS) method produces multiply charged ions similar to those that typify electrospray ionization (ESI) and uses sample preparation methods that are nearly identical to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI). Unlike these established methods, MAIV does not require a laser or voltage for ionization, and unlike the recently introduced matrix assisted ionization inlet method, does not require added heat. MAIV-MS requires only introduction of a crystalline mixture of the analyte incorporated with a suitable small molecule matrix compound such as 3-nitrobenzonitrile directly to the vacuum of the mass spectrometer. Vacuum intermediate pressure MALDI sources and modified ESI sources successfully produce ions for analysis by MS with this method. As in ESI-MS, ion formation is continuous and, without a laser, little chemical background is observed. MAIV, operating from a surface offers the possibility of significantly improved sensitivity relative to atmospheric pressure ionization because ions are produced in the vacuum region of the mass spectrometer eliminating losses associated with ion transfer from atmospheric pressure to vacuum. Mechanistic aspects and potential applications for this new ionization method are discussed.

  18. Comprehensive Assignment of Mass Spectral Signatures from Individual Bacillus atrophaeus Spores in Matrix-Free Bioaerosol Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, A; Pitesky, M; Steele, P; Tobias, H; Fergenson, D P; Horn, J; Russell, S C; Czerwieniec, G; Lebrilla, C; Gard, E E; Frank, M

    2004-10-22

    We have conducted studies to fully characterize the mass spectral signature of individual Bacillus atrophaeus, previously known as Bacillus subtilis var niger or Bacillus globigii, spores obtained in matrix-free bioaerosol mass spectrometry (BAMS). Mass spectra of spores grown in unlabeled, {sup 13}C-labeled and {sup 15}N-labeled growth media are used to determine the number of carbon and nitrogen atoms associated with each mass peak. To determine the parent ion structure associated with fragment ions present in the spore spectra, the mass-to-charge (m/z) fragmentation pattern of several chemical standards was obtained. Our results agree with prior assignments of dipicolinic acid, amino acids and calcium complex ions made in the spore mass spectra. Identity of several previously unidentified mass peaks, key to recognition of Bacillus spore by matrix-free BAMS, is revealed. Specifically, a set of fragment peaks in the negative polarity is shown to be consistent with the fragmentation pattern of purine nucleobase containing compounds. The identity of m/z=+74, a marker peak that helps discriminate Bacillus atrophaeus from Bacillus thuringiensis spores grown in rich medium, is surprisingly a non-description, viz. [N{sub 1}C{sub 4}H{sub 12}]{sup +}. A probable precursor molecule for the [N{sub 1}C{sub 4}H{sub 12}]{sup +} ion observed in spore spectra is trimethyl glycine ({sup +}N(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}CH{sub 2}COOH) that produces a m/z=74 peak in presence of dipicolinic acid.

  19. Measurement of Chiral Recognition Properties of Crown Ethers Using Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    SAWADA, Masami; Harada, Manabu; TAKAI, Yoshio; NAKANO, Kazurou; Kuroda, Masao; ARAKAWA, Ryuichi; 荒川, 隆一

    2000-01-01

    Hydrogen bonding host-guest complex ions between chiral crown ethers and chiral amino acid ester salts, detected by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) with a DHBA or MSA matrix, were studied on the view point of chiral recognition properties of the chiral crown hosts. The chiral recognition property (IR/IS-dn value≅1.0) obtained by the present MALDI-MS is sharply different from the IR/IS-dn value obtained by FAB-MS or ESI-MS (≠1.0) in the same host-gues...

  20. Amino Acids Analysis by MALDI Mass Spectrometry Using Carbon Nanotube as Matrix

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张菁; 王昊阳; 郭寅龙

    2005-01-01

    Twenty common amino acids have been analyzed successfully by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) using carbon nanotubes as matrix. From the spectra, little or no background interference or fragmentation of the analytes has been observed. This method was also applied to the analysis of amino acid mixture successfully. Carbon nanotubes have some features such as large surface area to disperse the analyte molecules sufficiently and prevent the sample aggregation and strong ultraviolet absorption to transfer energy easily to the analyte molecules. The present method has potential application for the rapid and sensitive analysis of amino acids and their mixture.

  1. Two-dimensional graphene as a matrix for MALDI imaging mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, William L; Schultz, Brian J; Destino, Joel F; Alivio, Theodore E G; Steet, Joseph R; Banerjee, Sarbajit; Wood, Troy D

    2015-11-01

    Here, a matrix using two-dimensional (2D) graphene is demonstrated for the first time in the context of MALDI IMS using a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer. Although graphene flakes have been used previously in MALDI, it is described here how a single 2D layer of graphene is applied directly on top of rat brain sections and soybean leaves. Several classes of molecules are desorbed and ionized off of the surface of the tissues examined using 2D graphene, with minimal background interference from the matrix. Moreover, no solvents are employed in application of 2D graphene, eliminating the potential for analyte diffusion in liquid droplets during matrix application. Because 2D graphene is an elemental form of carbon, an additional advantage is its high compatibility with the long duration needed for many IMS experiments. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  2. Two-Dimensional Graphene as a Matrix for MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, William L.; Schultz, Brian J.; Destino, Joel F.; Alivio, Theodore E. G.; Steet, Joseph R.; Banerjee, Sarbajit; Wood, Troy D.

    2015-11-01

    Here, a matrix using two-dimensional (2D) graphene is demonstrated for the first time in the context of MALDI IMS using a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer. Although graphene flakes have been used previously in MALDI, it is described here how a single 2D layer of graphene is applied directly on top of rat brain sections and soybean leaves. Several classes of molecules are desorbed and ionized off of the surface of the tissues examined using 2D graphene, with minimal background interference from the matrix. Moreover, no solvents are employed in application of 2D graphene, eliminating the potential for analyte diffusion in liquid droplets during matrix application. Because 2D graphene is an elemental form of carbon, an additional advantage is its high compatibility with the long duration needed for many IMS experiments.

  3. Viability of bi-maximal solution of the Zee mass matrix

    CERN Document Server

    Brahmachari, B; Brahmachari, Biswajoy; Choubey, Sandhya

    2002-01-01

    We know $L_e-L_\\mu-L_\\tau$ symmetry gives $m^2_1= m^2_2 >> m^2_3$ pattern in Zee model. $\\Delta m^2_\\odot$ emerges from a small breaking of this symmetry. Because this symmetry is broken very weakly $\\theta_\\odot$ does not deviate much from $\\tan^2 \\theta_\\odot=1$ which is its value in the symmetric limit. This gives a mismatch with LMA solution where mixing is large but not exactly maximal. We confront this property of Zee mass matrix by phenomenologically analyzing recent results from solar and atmospheric neutrino oscillation experiments at various confidence levels. We conclude that LOW type solution is compatible with the Zee mass matrix at 99% confidence level when atmospheric neutrino deficit is explained by maximal $\

  4. The mass spectrum of the Schwinger model with matrix product states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banuls, M.C.; Cirac, J.I. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik (MPQ), Garching (Germany); Cichy, K. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Poznan Univ. (Poland). Faculty of Physics; Jansen, K. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Cyprus Univ., Nicosia (Cyprus). Dept. of Physics

    2013-07-15

    We show the feasibility of tensor network solutions for lattice gauge theories in Hamiltonian formulation by applying matrix product states algorithms to the Schwinger model with zero and non-vanishing fermion mass. We introduce new techniques to compute excitations in a system with open boundary conditions, and to identify the states corresponding to low momentum and different quantum numbers in the continuum. For the ground state and both the vector and scalar mass gaps in the massive case, the MPS technique attains precisions comparable to the best results available from other techniques.

  5. The mass spectrum of the Schwinger model with Matrix Product States

    CERN Document Server

    Bañuls, M C; Jansen, K; Cirac, J I

    2013-01-01

    We show the feasibility of tensor network solutions for lattice gauge theories in Hamiltonian formulation by applying matrix product states algorithms to the Schwinger model with zero and non-vanishing fermion mass. We introduce new techniques to compute excitations in a system with open boundary conditions, and to identify the states corresponding to low momentum and different quantum numbers in the continuum. For the ground state and both the vector and scalar mass gaps in the massive case, the MPS technique attains precisions comparable to the best results available from other techniques.

  6. The mass spectrum of the Schwinger model with matrix product states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banuls, M.C.; Cirac, J.I. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik (MPQ), Garching (Germany); Cichy, K. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Poznan Univ. (Poland). Faculty of Physics; Jansen, K. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Cyprus Univ., Nicosia (Cyprus). Dept. of Physics

    2013-07-15

    We show the feasibility of tensor network solutions for lattice gauge theories in Hamiltonian formulation by applying matrix product states algorithms to the Schwinger model with zero and non-vanishing fermion mass. We introduce new techniques to compute excitations in a system with open boundary conditions, and to identify the states corresponding to low momentum and different quantum numbers in the continuum. For the ground state and both the vector and scalar mass gaps in the massive case, the MPS technique attains precisions comparable to the best results available from other techniques.

  7. Matrix-assisted ionization vacuum for high-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Beixi; Tisdale, Evgenia; Trimpin, Sarah; Wilkins, Charles L

    2014-07-15

    Matrix-assisted ionization vacuum (MAIV) produces charge states similar to electrospray ionization (ESI) from the solid state without requiring high voltage or added heat. MAIV differs from matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) in that no laser is needed and abundant multiply charged ions are produced from molecules having multiple basic sites such as proteins. Here we introduce simple modifications to the commercial vacuum MALDI and ESI sources of a 9.4 T Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer to perform MAIV from both intermediate and atmospheric pressure. The multiply charged ions are shown for the proteins bovine insulin, ubiquitin, and lysozyme using 3-nitrobenzonitrile as matrix. These are the first examples of MAIV operating at pressures as low as 10(-6) mbar in an FT-ICR mass spectrometer source, and the expected mass resolving power of 100000 to 400000 is achieved. Identical protein charge states are observed with and without laser ablation indicating minimal, if any, role of photochemical ionization for the compounds studied.

  8. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass Using the Matrix Element Technique in Dilepton Final States

    CERN Document Server

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Agnew, James P; Alexeev, Guennadi D; Alkhazov, Georgiy D; Alton, Andrew K; Askew, Andrew Warren; Atkins, Scott; Augsten, Kamil; Aushev, Volodymyr; Aushev, Yegor; Avila, Carlos A; Badaud, Frederique; Bagby, Linda F; Baldin, Boris; Bandurin, Dmitry V; Banerjee, Sunanda; Barberis, Emanuela; Baringer, Philip S; Bartlett, JFrederick; Bassler, Ursula Rita; Bazterra, Victor; Bean, Alice L; Begalli, Marcia; Bellantoni, Leo; Beri, Suman B; Bernardi, Gregorio; Bernhard, Ralf Patrick; Bertram, Iain A; Besancon, Marc; Beuselinck, Raymond; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bhatia, Sudeep; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Blazey, Gerald Charles; Blessing, Susan K; Bloom, Kenneth A; Boehnlein, Amber S; Boline, Daniel Dooley; Boos, Edward E; Borissov, Guennadi; Borysova, Maryna; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Oleg; Brochmann, Michelle; Brock, Raymond L; Bross, Alan D; Brown, Duncan Paul; Bu, Xue-Bing; Buehler, Marc; Buescher, Volker; Bunichev, Viacheslav Yevgenyevich; Burdin, Sergey; Buszello, Claus Peter; Camacho-Perez, Enrique; Casey, Brendan Cameron Kieran; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; Caughron, Seth Aaron; Chakrabarti, Subhendu; Chan, Kwok Ming Leo; Chandra, Avdhesh; Chapon, Emilien; Chen, Guo; Cho, Sung-Woong; Choi, Suyong; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Cihangir, Selcuk; Claes, Daniel R; Clutter, Justace Randall; Cooke, Michael P; Cooper, William Edward; Corcoran, Marjorie D; Couderc, Fabrice; Cousinou, Marie-Claude; Cuth, Jakub; Cutts, David; Das, Amitabha; Davies, Gavin John; de Jong, Sijbrand Jan; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Deliot, Frederic; Demina, Regina; Denisov, Dmitri S; Denisov, Sergei P; Desai, Satish Vijay; Deterre, Cecile; DeVaughan, Kayle Otis; Diehl, HThomas; Diesburg, Michael; Ding, Pengfei; Dominguez, DAaron M; Dubey, Abhinav Kumar; Dudko, Lev V; Duperrin, Arnaud; Dutt, Suneel; Eads, Michael T; Edmunds, Daniel L; Ellison, John A; Elvira, VDaniel; Enari, Yuji; Evans, Harold G; Evdokimov, Anatoly V; Evdokimov, Valeri N; Faure, Alexandre; Feng, Lei; Ferbel, Thomas; Fiedler, Frank; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Fisk, HEugene; Fortner, Michael R; Fox, Harald; Franc, Jiri; Fuess, Stuart C; Garbincius, Peter H; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Garcia-Gonzalez, Jose Andres; Gavrilov, Vladimir B; Geng, Weigang; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Gershtein, Yuri S; Ginther, George E; Gogota, Olga; Golovanov, Georgy Anatolievich; Grannis, Paul D; Greder, Sebastien; Greenlee, Herbert B; Grenier, Gerald Jean; Gris, Phillipe Luc; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gruenendahl, Stefan; Gruenewald, Martin Werner; Guillemin, Thibault; Gutierrez, Gaston R; Gutierrez, Phillip; Haley, Joseph Glenn Biddle; Han, Liang; Harder, Kristian; Harel, Amnon; Hauptman, John Michael; Hays, Jonathan M; Head, Tim; Hebbeker, Thomas; Hedin, David R; Hegab, Hatim; Heinson, Ann; Heintz, Ulrich; Hensel, Carsten; Heredia-De La Cruz, Ivan; Herner, Kenneth Richard; Hesketh, Gavin G; Hildreth, Michael D; Hirosky, Robert James; Hoang, Trang; Hobbs, John D; Hoeneisen, Bruce; Hogan, Julie; Hohlfeld, Mark; Holzbauer, Jenny Lyn; Howley, Ian James; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hynek, Vlastislav; Iashvili, Ia; Ilchenko, Yuriy; Illingworth, Robert A; Ito, Albert S; Jabeen, Shabnam; Jaffre, Michel J; Jayasinghe, Ayesh; Jeong, Min-Soo; Jesik, Richard L; Jiang, Peng; Johns, Kenneth Arthur; Johnson, Emily; Johnson, Marvin E; Jonckheere, Alan M; Jonsson, Per Martin; Joshi, Jyoti; Jung, Andreas Werner; Juste, Aurelio; Kajfasz, Eric; Karmanov, Dmitriy Y; Katsanos, Ioannis; Kaur, Manbir; Kehoe, Robert Leo Patrick; Kermiche, Smain; Khalatyan, Norayr; Khanov, Alexander; Kharchilava, Avto; Kharzheev, Yuri N; Kiselevich, Ivan Lvovich; Kohli, Jatinder M; Kozelov, Alexander V; Kraus, James Alexander; Kumar, Ashish; Kupco, Alexander; Kurca, Tibor; Kuzmin, Valentin Alexandrovich; Lammers, Sabine Wedam; Lebrun, Patrice; Lee, Hyeon-Seung; Lee, Seh-Wook; Lee, William M; Lei, Xiaowen; Lellouch, Jeremie; Li, Dikai; Li, Hengne; Li, Liang; Li, Qi-Zhong; Lim, Jeong Ku; Lincoln, Donald W; Linnemann, James Thomas; Lipaev, Vladimir V; Lipton, Ronald J; Liu, Huanzhao; Liu, Yanwen; Lobodenko, Alexandre; Lokajicek, Milos; Lopes de Sa, Rafael; Luna-Garcia, Rene; Lyon, Adam Leonard; Maciel, Arthur KA; Madar, Romain; Magana-Villalba, Ricardo; Malik, Sudhir; Malyshev, Vladimir L; Mansour, Jason; Martinez-Ortega, Jorge; McCarthy, Robert L; Mcgivern, Carrie Lynne; Meijer, Melvin M; Melnitchouk, Alexander S; Menezes, Diego D; Mercadante, Pedro Galli; Merkin, Mikhail M; Meyer, Arnd; Meyer, Jorg Manfred; Miconi, Florian; Mondal, Naba K; Mulhearn, Michael James; Nagy, Elemer; Narain, Meenakshi; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer A; Negret, Juan Pablo; Neustroev, Petr V; Nguyen, Huong Thi; Nunnemann, Thomas P; Hernandez Orduna, Jose de Jesus; Osman, Nicolas Ahmed; Pal, Arnab; Parashar, Neeti; Parihar, Vivek; Park, Sung Keun; Partridge, Richard A; Parua, Nirmalya; Patwa, Abid; Penning, Bjoern; Perfilov, Maxim Anatolyevich; Peters, Reinhild Yvonne Fatima; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrillo, Gianluca; Petroff, Pierre; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Podstavkov, Vladimir M; Popov, Alexey V; Prewitt, Michelle; Price, Darren; Prokopenko, Nikolay N; Qian, Jianming; Quadt, Arnulf; Quinn, Gene Breese; Ratoff, Peter N; Razumov, Ivan A; Ripp-Baudot, Isabelle; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rominsky, Mandy Kathleen; Ross, Anthony; Royon, Christophe; Rubinov, Paul Michael; Ruchti, Randal C; Sajot, Gerard; Sanchez-Hernandez, Alberto; Sanders, Michiel P; Santos, Angelo Souza; Savage, David G; Savitskyi, Mykola; Sawyer, HLee; Scanlon, Timothy P; Schamberger, RDean; Scheglov, Yury A; Schellman, Heidi M; Schott, Matthias; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwienhorst, Reinhard H; Sekaric, Jadranka; Severini, Horst; Shabalina, Elizaveta K; Shary, Viacheslav V; Shaw, Savanna; Shchukin, Andrey A; Simak, Vladislav J; Skubic, Patrick Louis; Slattery, Paul F; Snow, Gregory R; Snow, Joel Mark; Snyder, Scott Stuart; Soldner-Rembold, Stefan; Sonnenschein, Lars; Soustruznik, Karel; Stark, Jan; Stefaniuk, Nazar; Stoyanova, Dina A; Strauss, Michael G; Suter, Louise; Svoisky, Peter V; Titov, Maxim; Tokmenin, Valeriy V; Tsai, Yun-Tse; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tuchming, Boris; Tully, Christopher George T; Uvarov, Lev; Uvarov, Sergey L; Uzunyan, Sergey A; Van Kooten, Richard J; van Leeuwen, Willem M; Varelas, Nikos; Varnes, Erich W; Vasilyev, Igor A; Verkheev, Alexander Yurievich; Vertogradov, Leonid S; Verzocchi, Marco; Vesterinen, Mika; Vilanova, Didier; Vokac, Petr; Wahl, Horst D; Wang, Michael HLS; Warchol, Jadwiga; Watts, Gordon Thomas; Wayne, Mitchell R; Weichert, Jonas; Welty-Rieger, Leah Christine; Williams, Mark Richard James; Wilson, Graham Wallace; Wobisch, Markus; Wood, Darien Robert; Wyatt, Terence R; Xie, Yunhe; Yamada, Ryuji; Yang, Siqi; Yasuda, Takahiro; Yatsunenko, Yuriy A; Ye, Wanyu; Ye, Zhenyu; Yin, Hang; Yip, Kin; Youn, Sungwoo; Yu, Jiaming; Zennamo, Joseph; Zhao, Tianqi Gilbert; Zhou, Bing; Zhu, Junjie; Zielinski, Marek; Zieminska, Daria; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2016-01-01

    We present a measurement of the top quark mass in ppbar collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The data were collected by the D0 experiment corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.7 fb-1. The matrix element technique is applied to ttbar events in the final state containing leptons (electrons or muons) with high transverse momenta and at least two jets. The calibration of the jet energy scale determined in the lepton + jets final state of ttbar decays is applied to jet energies. This correction provides a substantial reduction in systematic uncertainties. We obtain a top quark mass of mt = 173.93 +- 1.84 GeV.

  9. Enhanced Ionization of Phosphatidylcholines during MALDI Mass Spectrometry Using DCTB as Matrix

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张莹; 陆豪杰

    2012-01-01

    Phosphatidylcholines (PCs) are the most abundant phospholipids constituents of the cellular membrane, which exhibit a variety of biological functions. The distinct critical roles in cellular function make their analysis quite de- manding. Although MALDI-MS is one of the most powerful tools for biomolecules identification, it is still limited to phospholipids studies. The ionization of phosphatidylcholines is insufficient, and signals of PCs are frequently confused and suppressed by matrix clusters occurring in the same mass range. As an alternative matrix, T-2-(3-(4-t-butyl-phenyl)-2-methyl-2-propenylidene) malononitrile (DCTB) was introduced to overcome these problems in our study. Specifically, the signal intensity of phosphatidylcholines from soybean was enhanced more than several ten-folds using DCTB during positive ion MALDI-TOFMS. Peak overlaps caused by the wide distri- butions of series fatty acid residues from phospholipids were separated by introducing cesium cation. The occurred mass shift of 131.90 Da between [M+Cs]+ and [M+H]~ ("M" represents the molecular weight of the corre- sponding neutral hosphatidylcholine) was approved to be helpful in the assignments of ambiguous peaks of PCs from soybean. For real sample analysis, employing cesium chloride as an auxiliary reagent successfully facilitated the profiling and characterizing of PCs extracted from mouse lung and egg yolk followed by analysis with MALDI-TOFMS using DCTB as matrix.

  10. Dithranol as a matrix for matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging on a fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Cuong H; Han, Jun; Borchers, Christoph H

    2013-11-26

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) determines the spatial localization and distribution patterns of compounds on the surface of a tissue section, mainly using MALDI (matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization)-based analytical techniques. New matrices for small-molecule MSI, which can improve the analysis of low-molecular weight (MW) compounds, are needed. These matrices should provide increased analyte signals while decreasing MALDI background signals. In addition, the use of ultrahigh-resolution instruments, such as Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometers, has the ability to resolve analyte signals from matrix signals, and this can partially overcome many problems associated with the background originating from the MALDI matrix. The reduction in the intensities of the metastable matrix clusters by FTICR MS can also help to overcome some of the interferences associated with matrix peaks on other instruments. High-resolution instruments such as the FTICR mass spectrometers are advantageous as they can produce distribution patterns of many compounds simultaneously while still providing confidence in chemical identifications. Dithranol (DT; 1,8-dihydroxy-9,10-dihydroanthracen-9-one) has previously been reported as a MALDI matrix for tissue imaging. In this work, a protocol for the use of DT for MALDI imaging of endogenous lipids from the surfaces of mammalian tissue sections, by positive-ion MALDI-MS, on an ultrahigh-resolution hybrid quadrupole FTICR instrument has been provided.

  11. Normal response function method for mass and stiffness matrix updating using complex FRFs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, S.; Modak, S. V.

    2012-10-01

    Quite often a structural dynamic finite element model is required to be updated so as to accurately predict the dynamic characteristics like natural frequencies and the mode shapes. Since in many situations undamped natural frequencies and mode shapes need to be predicted, it has generally been the practice in these situations to seek updating of only mass and stiffness matrix so as to obtain a reliable prediction model. Updating using frequency response functions (FRFs) has been one of the widely used approaches for updating, including updating of mass and stiffness matrices. However, the problem with FRF based methods, for updating mass and stiffness matrices, is that these methods are based on use of complex FRFs. Use of complex FRFs to update mass and stiffness matrices is not theoretically correct as complex FRFs are not only affected by these two matrices but also by the damping matrix. Therefore, in situations where updating of only mass and stiffness matrices using FRFs is required, the use of complex FRFs based updating formulation is not fully justified and would lead to inaccurate updated models. This paper addresses this difficulty and proposes an improved FRF based finite element model updating procedure using the concept of normal FRFs. The proposed method is a modified version of the existing response function method that is based on the complex FRFs. The effectiveness of the proposed method is validated through a numerical study of a simple but representative beam structure. The effect of coordinate incompleteness and robustness of method under presence of noise is investigated. The results of updating obtained by the improved method are compared with the existing response function method. The performance of the two approaches is compared for cases of light, medium and heavily damped structures. It is found that the proposed improved method is effective in updating of mass and stiffness matrices in all the cases of complete and incomplete data and

  12. Nuclear matrix elements of the double beta decay for mass around 80

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga, Naotaka; Higashiyama, Koji; Teruya, Eri

    2014-09-01

    In nature there are 30 kinds of nuclei which are expected to have double beta decays. Among them ten nuclei are actually observed for the neutrino double beta decays. Still no observation is made for the neutrinoless double beta decays (0 νββ) . The 0 νββ decay is expected to occur only when neutrinos have masses and they are Majorana particles. In that respect observation of 0 νββ is to determine whether neutrinos are Majorana particles or not. In theoretical side in order to estimate the half life of 0 νββ determination of the nuclear matrix elements are essential. They were calculated in many theoretical frameworks, but the results are not consistent in various models. In this study we carry out shell model calculations for 82Se and 82Kr nuclei. After obtaining the wavefunctions, we calculate the nuclear matrix elements. For comparison we make pair truncated shell model calculations.

  13. Direct Surface Analysis of Fungal Species by Matrix-assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentine, Nancy B.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Wahl, Jon H.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Kingsley, Mark T.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Wahl, Karen L.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

    2001-12-01

    Intact spores and/or hyphae of Aspergillus niger, Rhizopus oryzae, Trichoderma reesei and Phanerochaete chrysosporium are analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). This study investigates various methods of sample preparation and matrices to determine optimum collection and analysis criteria for fungal analysis by MALDI-MS. Fungi are applied to the MALDI sample target as untreated, sonicated, acid/heat treated, or blotted directly from the fungal culture with double-stick tape. Ferulic acid or sinapinic acid matrix solution is layered over the dried samples and analyzed by MALDI-MS. Statistical analysis of the data show that simply using double stick tape to collect and transfer to a MALDI sample plate typically worked as well as the other preparation methods, but requires the least sample handling.

  14. Carbon Dots and 9AA as a Binary Matrix for the Detection of Small Molecules by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yongli; Gao, Dan; Bai, Hangrui; Liu, Hongxia; Lin, Shuo; Jiang, Yuyang

    2016-07-01

    Application of matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS) to analyze small molecules have some limitations, due to the inhomogeneous analyte/matrix co-crystallization and interference of matrix-related peaks in low m/z region. In this work, carbon dots (CDs) were for the first time applied as a binary matrix with 9-Aminoacridine (9AA) in MALDI MS for small molecules analysis. By 9AA/CDs assisted desorption/ionization (D/I) process, a wide range of small molecules, including nucleosides, amino acids, oligosaccharides, peptides, and anticancer drugs with a higher sensitivity were demonstrated in the positive ion mode. A detection limit down to 5 fmol was achieved for cytidine. 9AA/CDs matrix also exhibited excellent reproducibility compared with 9AA matrix. Moreover, by exploring the ionization mechanism of the matrix, the influence factors might be attributed to the four parts: (1) the strong UV absorption of 9AA/CDs due to their π-conjugated network; (2) the carboxyl groups modified on the CDs surface act as protonation sites for proton transfer in positive ion mode; (3) the thin layer crystal of 9AA/CDs could reach a high surface temperature more easily and lower transfer energy for LDI MS; (4) CDs could serve as a matrix additive to suppress 9AA ionization. Furthermore, this matrix was allowed for the analysis of glucose as well as nucleosides in human urine, and the level of cytidine was quantified with a linear range of 0.05-5 mM (R(2) > 0.99). Therefore, the 9AA/CDs matrix was proven to be an effective MALDI matrix for the analysis of small molecules with improved sensitivity and reproducibility. This work provides an alternative solution for small molecules detection that can be further used in complex samples analysis. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  15. Carbon Dots and 9AA as a Binary Matrix for the Detection of Small Molecules by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yongli; Gao, Dan; Bai, Hangrui; Liu, Hongxia; Lin, Shuo; Jiang, Yuyang

    2016-07-01

    Application of matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS) to analyze small molecules have some limitations, due to the inhomogeneous analyte/matrix co-crystallization and interference of matrix-related peaks in low m/z region. In this work, carbon dots (CDs) were for the first time applied as a binary matrix with 9-Aminoacridine (9AA) in MALDI MS for small molecules analysis. By 9AA/CDs assisted desorption/ionization (D/I) process, a wide range of small molecules, including nucleosides, amino acids, oligosaccharides, peptides, and anticancer drugs with a higher sensitivity were demonstrated in the positive ion mode. A detection limit down to 5 fmol was achieved for cytidine. 9AA/CDs matrix also exhibited excellent reproducibility compared with 9AA matrix. Moreover, by exploring the ionization mechanism of the matrix, the influence factors might be attributed to the four parts: (1) the strong UV absorption of 9AA/CDs due to their π-conjugated network; (2) the carboxyl groups modified on the CDs surface act as protonation sites for proton transfer in positive ion mode; (3) the thin layer crystal of 9AA/CDs could reach a high surface temperature more easily and lower transfer energy for LDI MS; (4) CDs could serve as a matrix additive to suppress 9AA ionization. Furthermore, this matrix was allowed for the analysis of glucose as well as nucleosides in human urine, and the level of cytidine was quantified with a linear range of 0.05-5 mM (R2 > 0.99). Therefore, the 9AA/CDs matrix was proven to be an effective MALDI matrix for the analysis of small molecules with improved sensitivity and reproducibility. This work provides an alternative solution for small molecules detection that can be further used in complex samples analysis.

  16. 1,8-Bis(dimethylamino)naphthalene/9-aminoacridine: A new binary matrix for lipid fingerprinting of intact bacteria by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvano, C.D., E-mail: cosimadamiana.calvano@uniba.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università degli Studi di Bari Aldo Moro, Via Orabona, 4, 70126 Bari (Italy); Monopoli, A.; Ditaranto, N. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università degli Studi di Bari Aldo Moro, Via Orabona, 4, 70126 Bari (Italy); Palmisano, F. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università degli Studi di Bari Aldo Moro, Via Orabona, 4, 70126 Bari (Italy); Centro Interdipartimentale di Ricerca S.M.A.R.T., Università degli Studi di Bari Aldo Moro, Via Orabona, 4, 70126 Bari (Italy)

    2013-10-10

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •New binary matrix for less ionizable lipid analysis with no interfering peaks. •Combined MALDI and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses. •Fast lipid fingerprint on Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria by MALDI MS. •Mapping of phospholipids by XPS imaging. •Very fast membrane lipid extraction procedure. -- Abstract: The effectiveness of a novel binary matrix composed of 1,8-bis(dimethylamino)naphthalene (DMAN; proton sponge) and 9-aminoacridine (9AA) for the direct lipid analysis of whole bacterial cells by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS) is demonstrated. Deprotonated analyte signals nearly free of matrix-related ions were observed in negative ion mode. The effect of the most important factors (laser energy, pulse voltage, DMAN/9AA ratio, analyte/matrix ratio) was investigated using a Box–Behnken response surface design followed by multi-response optimization in order to simultaneously maximize signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio and resolution. The chemical surface composition of single or mixed matrices was explored by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Moreover, XPS imaging was used to map the spatial distribution of a model phospholipid in single or binary matrices. The DMAN/9AA binary matrix was then successfully applied to the analysis of intact Gram positive (Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis) or Gram negative (Escherichia coli) microorganisms. About fifty major membrane components (free fatty acids, mono-, di- and tri-glycerides, phospholipids, glycolipids and cardiolipins) were quickly and easily detected over a mass range spanning from ca. 200 to ca. 1600 m/z. Moreover, mass spectra with improved S/N ratio (compared to single matrices), reduced chemical noise and no formation of matrix-clusters were invariably obtained demonstrating the potential of this binary matrix to improve sensitivity.

  17. Basic matrices in the analysis of non-covalent complexes by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jespersen, S.; Niessen, W.M.A.; Tjaden, U.R.; Greef, J. van der

    1998-01-01

    A number of potential matrix candidates were investigated with regard to the importance of the pH in the matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI/MS) analysis of non-covalently bound protein complexes. The matrices examined were 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB), 4-hydroxy-

  18. Basic matrices in the analysis of non-covalent complexes by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jespersen, S.; Niessen, W.M.A.; Tjaden, U.R.; Greef, J. van der

    1998-01-01

    A number of potential matrix candidates were investigated with regard to the importance of the pH in the matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI/MS) analysis of non-covalently bound protein complexes. The matrices examined were 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB), 4-hydroxy-

  19. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry identification of mycobacteria in routine clinical practice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    El Khéchine, Amel; Couderc, Carine; Flaudrops, Christophe; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel

    2011-01-01

    .... Matrix-assisted laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has previously been proven to effectively identify mycobacteria grown in high-concentration inocula from collections...

  20. Cosmetic Analysis Using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging (MALDI-MSI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Ramos Catharino

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A new “omic” platform—Cosmetomics—that proves to be extremely simple and effective in terms of sample preparation and readiness for data acquisition/interpretation is presented. This novel approach employing Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging (MALDI-MSI for cosmetic analysis has proven to readily identify and quantify compounds of interest. It also allows full control of all the production phases, as well as of the final product, by integration of both analytical and statistical data. This work has focused on products of daily use, namely nail polish, lipsticks and eyeliners of multiple brands sold in the worldwide market.

  1. Electrospray ionization and matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry: powerful analytical tools in recombinant protein chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens S.; Svensson, B; Roepstorff, P

    1996-01-01

    Electrospray ionization and matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization are effective ionization methods for mass spectrometry of biomolecules. Here we describe the capabilities of these methods for peptide and protein characterization in biotechnology. An integrated analytical strategy is presen......Electrospray ionization and matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization are effective ionization methods for mass spectrometry of biomolecules. Here we describe the capabilities of these methods for peptide and protein characterization in biotechnology. An integrated analytical strategy...

  2. Radiative and seesaw threshold corrections to the S3 symmetric neutrino mass matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivani Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We systematically analyze the radiative corrections to the S3 symmetric neutrino mass matrix at high energy scale, say the GUT scale, in the charged lepton basis. There are significant corrections to the neutrino parameters both in the Standard Model (SM and Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM with large tan⁡β, when the renormalization group evolution (RGE and seesaw threshold effects are taken into consideration. We find that in the SM all three mixing angles and atmospheric mass squared difference are simultaneously obtained in their current 3σ ranges at the electroweak scale. However, the solar mass squared difference is found to be larger than its allowed 3σ range at the low scale in this case. There are significant contributions to neutrino masses and mixing angles in the MSSM with large tan⁡β from the RGEs even in the absence of seesaw threshold corrections. However, we find that the mass squared differences and the mixing angles are simultaneously obtained in their current 3σ ranges at low energy when the seesaw threshold effects are also taken into account in the MSSM with large tan⁡β.

  3. Mass matrix Ansatz and lepton flavor violation in the THDM-III

    CERN Document Server

    Díaz-Cruz, J L; Rosado, A

    2004-01-01

    Predictive Higgs-fermion couplings can be obtained when a specific texture for the fermion mass matrices is included in the general two-Higgs doublet model. We derive the form of these couplings in the charged lepton sector using a Hermitian mass matrix Ansatz with four-texture zeros. The presence of unconstrained phases in the vertices phi-li-lj modifies the pattern of flavor-violating Higgs interactions. Bounds on the model parameters are obtained from present limits on rare lepton flavor violating processes, which could be extended further by the search for the decay tau -> mu mu mu and mu-e conversion at future experiments. The signal from Higgs boson decays phi -> tau mu could be searched at the large hadron collider (LHC), while e-mu transitions could produce a detectable signal at a future e mu-collider, through the reaction e mu -> h0 -> tau tau.

  4. Changes in the sugar composition and molecular mass distribution of matrix polysaccharides during cotton fiber development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokumoto, Hayato; Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Kamisaka, Seiichiro; Hoson, Takayuki

    2002-04-01

    Cotton (Gossypium herbaceum L.) fiber development consists of a fiber elongation stage (up to 20 d post-anthesis) and a subsequent cell wall thickening stage. Cell wall analysis revealed that the extractable matrix (pectic and hemicellulosic) polysaccharides accounted for 30-50% of total sugar content in the fiber elongation stage but less than 3% in the cell wall thickening stage. By contrast, cellulose increased dramatically after the fiber elongation ceased. The amounts of extractable xyloglucans and arabinose- and galactose-containing polymers per seed increased in the early fiber elongation stage and decreased thereafter. The amounts of extractable acidic polymers and non-cellulosic beta-glucans (mainly composed of beta-1,3-glucans) increased in parallel with fiber elongation and then decreased. The molecular masses of extractable non-cellulosic beta-glucans, and arabinose- and galactose-containing polymers decreased during both fiber elongation and cell wall thickening stages. The molecular mass of extractable xyloglucans also decreased during the fiber elongation stage, but this decrease ceased during the cell wall thickening stage. Conversely, the molecular size of acidic polymers in the extractable pectic fraction increased during both stages. Thus, not only the amounts but also the molecular size of the extractable matrix polysaccharides showed substantial changes during cotton fiber development.

  5. Identification of Fatty Acids, Phospholipids, and Their Oxidation Products Using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry and Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Christopher W.; Mang, Stephen A.; Greaves, John; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J.

    2010-01-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) have found increasing application in the analysis of biological samples. Using these techniques to solve problems in analytical chemistry should be an essential component of the training of undergraduate chemists. We…

  6. Identification of Fatty Acids, Phospholipids, and Their Oxidation Products Using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry and Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Christopher W.; Mang, Stephen A.; Greaves, John; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J.

    2010-01-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) have found increasing application in the analysis of biological samples. Using these techniques to solve problems in analytical chemistry should be an essential component of the training of undergraduate chemists. We…

  7. A measurement of the top quark mass with a matrix element method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibson, Adam Paul [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    The authors present a measurement of the mass of the top quark. The event sample is selected from proton-antiproton collisions, at 1.96 TeV center-of-mass energy, observed with the CDF detector at Fermilab's Tevatron. They consider a 318 pb-1 dataset collected between March 2002 and August 2004. They select events that contain one energetic lepton, large missing transverse energy, exactly four energetic jets, and at least one displaced vertex b tag. The analysis uses leading-order t$\\bar{t}$ and background matrix elements along with parameterized parton showering to construct event-by-event likelihoods as a function of top quark mass. From the 63 events observed with the 318 pb-1 dataset they extract a top quark mass of 172.0 ± 2.6(stat) ± 3.3(syst) GeV/c2 from the joint likelihood. The mean expected statistical uncertainty is 3.2 GeV/c2 for m $\\bar{t}$ = 178 GTeV/c2 and 3.1 GeV/c2 for m $\\bar{t}$ = 172.5 GeV/c2. The systematic error is dominated by the uncertainty of the jet energy scale.

  8. Comparative mass spectrometric analyses of Photofrin oligomers by fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry, UV and IR matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and laser desorption/jet-cooling photoionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, M M; Tabei, K; Tsao, R; Pastel, M J; Pandey, R K; Berkenkamp, S; Hillenkamp, F; de Vries, M S

    1999-06-01

    Photofrin (porfimer sodium) is a porphyrin derivative used in the treatment of a variety of cancers by photodynamic therapy. This oligomer complex and a variety of porphyrin monomers, dimers and trimers were analyzed with five different mass spectral ionization techniques: fast atom bombardment, UV and IR matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization, electrospray ionization, and laser desorption/jet-cooling photoionization. All five approaches resulted in very similar oligomer distributions with an average oligomer length of 2.7 +/- 0.1 porphyrin units. In addition to the Photofrin analysis, this study provides a side-by-side comparison of the spectra for the five different mass spectrometric techniques.

  9. Application of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization to on-line aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stowers, M.A.; Wuijckhuijse, A.L. van; Marijnissen, J.C.M.; Scarlett, B.; Baar, B.L.M. van; Kientz, Ch.E.

    2000-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectra were obtained from single biological aerosol particles using an aerosol time-of- flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS). The inlet to the ATOFMS was coupled with an evaporation/condensation flow cell that allowed the aerosol to be coated wi

  10. A novel sample preparation method of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry for polystyrene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu Zhang; Zhen Wen Zhao; Lei Xiong; Bin Xin; Wei Hua Hu; Shao Xiang Xiong

    2007-01-01

    A novel sample preparation method of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry for polystyrene was reported.Compared to the conventional dried-droplet method, the efficiency of ionization and signal intensity of mass spectra were improved.The mechanism was also analyzed.

  11. Overview literature on matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectroscopy (MALDI MS): basics and its applications in characterizing polymeric materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R N Jagtap; A H Ambre

    2005-10-01

    Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectroscopy (MALDI MS) is a technique which allows the measurement of molecular mass > 200,000 Daltons by ionization and vapourization without degradation. This technique is useful for the mass analysis of synthetic polymers, which have very low volatility. The basic principles of and its applications for polymer characterization have been discussed in this paper. In addition, the possibilities of combining MALDI MS with chromatographic and other analytical techniques have also been discussed.

  12. Top Quark Mass Measurement in the Lepton plus Jets Channel Using a Modified Matrix Element Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Adelman, J.; /Chicago U., EFI; Akimoto, T.; /Tsukuba U.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /CSIC, Catalunya; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U.; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2008-12-01

    The authors report a measurement of the top quark mass, m{sub t}, obtained from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron using the CDF II detector. They analyze a sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.9 rfb{sup -1}. They select events with an electron or muon, large missing transverse energy, and exactly four high-energy jets in the central region of the detector, at least one of which is tagged as coming from a b quark. They calculate a signal likelihood using a matrix element integration method, where the matrix element is modified by using effective propagators to take into account assumptions on event kinematics. The event likelihood is a function of m{sub t} and a parameter JES that determines in situ the calibration of the jet energies. They use a neural network discriminant to distinguish signal from background events. They also apply a cut on the peak value of each event likelihood curve to reduce the contribution of background and badly reconstructed events. Using the 318 events that pass all selection criteria, they find m{sub t} = 172.7 {+-} 1.8 (stat. + JES) {+-} 1.2(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  13. Ionic liquid matrix-enhanced secondary ion mass spectrometry: the role of proton transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dertinger, Jennifer J; Walker, Amy V

    2013-03-01

    Room temperature ionic liquids (ILs) are effective matrices in secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI). In this paper, we examine the role of proton transfer in the mechanism of secondary ion enhancement using IL matrices in SIMS. We employ hydrogenated and deuterated 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) as analytes to investigate the origin of proton transfer. The data indicate that protons from the IL anion transfer to the analyte in solution leading to an increase in the secondary ion intensity of the protonated molecular ion. The chemical identity of the matrix cation also affects analyte signal intensities. Using deuterated DPPC we observe that protons (deuterium) from the DPPC tail group react with the cation of the IL liquid leading to an increase in (cation + D)(+) ion intensities. Further, the data suggest that the transfer kinetics of deuterium (hydrogen) is correlated with the secondary ion enhancements observed. The highest secondary ion enhancements are observed for the least sterically hindered cation. Neither the proton affinity nor the pKa of the IL cation have a large effect on the analyte ion intensities, suggesting that steric factors are important in determining the efficacy of IL matrices for a given analyte.

  14. Decellularization of intact tissue enables MALDI imaging mass spectrometry analysis of the extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessel, Megan; Spraggins, Jeffrey M; Voziyan, Paul; Hudson, Billy G; Caprioli, Richard M

    2015-11-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI IMS) is a powerful molecular mapping technology that offers unbiased visualization of the spatial arrangement of biomolecules in tissue. Although there has been a significant increase in the number of applications employing this technology, the extracellular matrix (ECM) has received little attention, likely because ECM proteins are mostly large, insoluble and heavily cross-linked. We have developed a new sample preparation approach to enable MALDI IMS analysis of ECM proteins in tissue. Prior to freezing and sectioning, intact tissues are decellularized by incubation in sodium dodecyl sulfate. Decellularization removes the highly abundant, soluble species that dominate a MALDI IMS spectrum while preserving the structural integrity of the ECM. In situ tryptic hydrolysis and imaging of tryptic peptides are then carried out to accommodate the large sizes of ECM proteins. This new approach allows the use of MALDI IMS for identification of spatially specific changes in ECM protein expression and modification in tissue.

  15. Beer fingerprinting by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionisation-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šedo, Ondrej; Márová, Ivana; Zdráhal, Zbyněk

    2012-11-15

    A method allowing parallel fingerprinting of proteins and maltooligosaccharides directly from untreated beer samples is presented. These two classes of compounds were detected by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionisation-Time of Flight-Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) analysis of beer mixed with 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid solution. The maltooligosaccharide profiles acquired from the MALDI sample spot center were not found characteristic for beers of different source and technology. On the other hand, according to profiles containing protein signals acquired from crystals formed on the border of the MALDI sample spot, we were able to distinguish beer samples of the same brand produced by different breweries. The discriminatory abilities of the method were further examined on a set of 17 lager beers, where the fingerprints containing protein signals enabled resolution of majority of examined brands. We propose MALDI-TOF-MS profiling as a rapid tool for beer brewing technology process monitoring, quality control, and determination of beer authenticity.

  16. Ion exchange separation of chromium from natural water matrix for stable isotope mass spectrometric analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, J.W.; Bassett, R.L.

    2000-01-01

    A method has been developed for separating the Cr dissolved in natural water from matrix elements and determination of its stable isotope ratios using solid-source thermal-ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). The separation method takes advantage of the existence of the oxidized form of Cr as an oxyanion to separate it from interfering cations using anion-exchange chromatography, and of the reduced form of Cr as a positively charged ion to separate it from interfering anions such as sulfate. Subsequent processing of the separated sample eliminates residual organic material for application to a solid source filament. Ratios for 53Cr/52Cr for National Institute of Standards and Technology Standard Reference Material 979 can be measured using the silica gel-boric acid technique with a filament-to-filament standard deviation in the mean 53Cr/52Cr ratio for 50 replicates of 0.00005 or less. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Top Quark Mass Measurement Using a Matrix Element Method with Quasi-Monte Carlo Integration

    CERN Document Server

    Lujan, Paul J

    2008-01-01

    We report an updated measurement of the top quark mass obtained from ppbar collisions at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron using the CDF II detector. Our measurement uses a matrix element integration method to obtain a signal likelihood, with a neural network used to identify background events and a likelihood cut applied to reduce the effect of badly reconstructed events. We use a 2.7 fb^-1 sample and observe 422 events passing all of our cuts. We find m_t = 172.2 +/- 1.0 (stat.) +/- 0.9 (JES) +/- 1.0 (syst.) GeV/c^2, or m_t = 172.2 +/- 1.7 (total) GeV/c^2.

  18. Matrix-enhanced surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (ME-SALDI-MS) for mass spectrometry imaging of small molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Victoria L; Liu, Qiang; He, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (SALDI-MS), a parallel technique to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS), utilizes inorganic particles or porous surfaces to aid in the desorption/ionization of low-molecular-weight (MW) analytes. As a matrix-free and "soft" LDI approach, SALDI offers the benefit of reduced background noise in the low MW range, allowing for easier detection of biologically significant small MW species. Despite the inherent advantages of SALDI-MS, it has not reached comparable sensitivity levels to MALDI-MS. In relation to mass spectrometry imaging (MSI), intense efforts have been made in order to improve sensitivity and versatility of SALDI-MSI. We describe herein a detailed protocol that utilizes a hybrid LDI method, matrix-enhanced SALDI-MS (ME-SALDI MS), to detect and image low MW species in an imaging mode.

  19. Can four-zero-texture mass matrix model reproduce the quark and lepton mixing angles and CP violating phases?

    CERN Document Server

    Matsuda, K; Matsuda, Koichi; Nishiura, Hiroyuki

    2006-01-01

    We reconsider an universal mass matrix model which has a seesaw-invariant structure with four-zero texture common to all quarks and leptons. The CKM quark and MNS lepton mixing matrices of the model are analyzed analytically.We show that the model can be consistent with all the experimental data of neutrino oscillation and quark mixings by tuning free parameters of the model. It is also shown that the model predicts a relatively large value for (1,3) element of the MNS lepton mixing matrix, |(U_{MNS})_{13}|^2 \\simeq 2.6 \\times 10^{-2}. Using the seesaw mechanism, we also discuss the conditions for the components of the Dirac and the right-handed Majorana neutrino mass matrices which lead to the neutrino mass matrix consistent with the experimental data.

  20. Investigation of matrix effects in bioanalytical high-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometric assays: application to drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Hong; Hsieh, Yunsheng; Nardo, Cymbylene; Xu, Xiaoying; Wang, Shiyong; Ng, Kwokei; Korfmacher, Walter A

    2003-01-01

    A series of studies was performed to investigate some of the causes for matrix effects ('ion suppression' or 'ion enhancement') in bioanalytical high-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS/MS) assays. Previous studies have reported that matrix effects are mainly due to endogenous components in biological fluids and are a greater concern for electrospray ionization (ESI) than for atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI). In this report we demonstrate that: (1) matrix effects can also be caused by exogenous materials, such as polymers contained in different brands of plastic tubes, or Li-heparin, a commonly used anticoagulant; (2) matrix effects are not only ionization mode (APCI or ESI) dependent, but also source design (Sciex, Finnigan, Micromass) dependent; and (3) for at least one vendor's design, we found the APCI mode to be more sensitive to matrix effects than the ESI mode. Based on these findings, we have proposed the following simple strategies to avoid matrix effects: (1) select the same brand of plastic tubes for processing and storing plasma samples and spiked plasma standards; (2) avoid using Li-heparin as the anticoagulant; and (3) try switching the ionization mode or switching to different mass spectrometers when matrix effects are encountered. These three strategies have allowed us to use protein precipitation and generic fast LC techniques to generate reliable LC/MS/MS data for the support of pharmacokinetic studies at the early drug discovery stage. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. A new matrix assisted ionization method for the analysis of volatile and nonvolatile compounds by atmospheric probe mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarty, Shubhashis; Pagnotti, Vincent S; Inutan, Ellen D; Trimpin, Sarah; McEwen, Charles N

    2013-07-01

    Matrix assisted ionization of nonvolatile compounds is shown not to be limited to vacuum conditions and does not require a laser. Simply placing a solution of analyte dissolved with a suitable matrix such as 3-nitrobenzonitrile (3-NBN) or 2,5-dihydroxyacetophenone on a melting point tube and gently heating the dried sample near the ion entrance aperture of a mass spectrometer using a flow of gas produces abundant ions of peptides, small proteins, drugs, and polar lipids. Fundamental studies point to matrix-mediated ionization occurring prior to the entrance aperture of the mass spectrometer. The method is analytically useful, producing peptide mass fingerprints of bovine serum albumin tryptic digest consuming sub-picomoles of sample. Application of 100 fmol of angiotensin I in 3-NBN matrix produces the doubly and triply protonated molecular ions as the most abundant peaks in the mass spectrum. No carryover is observed for samples containing up to 100 pmol of this peptide. A commercial atmospheric samples analysis probe provides a simple method for sample introduction to an atmospheric pressure ion source for analysis of volatile and nonvolatile compounds without using the corona discharge but using sample preparation similar to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization.

  2. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry method for selectively producing either singly or multiply charged molecular ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimpin, Sarah; Inutan, Ellen D; Herath, Thushani N; McEwen, Charles N

    2010-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) is noted for its ability to produce primarily singly charged ions. This is an attribute when using direct ionization for complex mixtures such as protein digests or synthetic polymers. However, the ability to produce multiply charged ions, as with electrospray ionization (ESI), has advantages such as extending the mass range on mass spectrometers with limited mass-to-charge (m/z) range and enhancing fragmentation for structural characterization. We designed and fabricated a novel field free transmission geometry atmopsheric pressure (AP) MALDI source mounted to a high-mass resolution Orbitrap Exactive mass spectrometer. We report the ability to produce at will either singly charged ions or highly charged ions using a MALDI process by simply changing the matrix or the matrix preparation conditions. Mass spectra with multiply charged ions very similar to those obtained with ESI of proteins such as cytochrome c and ubiquitin are obtained with low femtomole amounts applied to the MALDI target plate and for peptides such as angiotensin I and II with application of attomole amounts. Single scan acquisitions produce sufficient ion current even from proteins.

  3. A Lie-Theoretic Perspective on O(n) Mass Matrix Inversion for Serial Manipulators and Polypeptide Chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kiju; Wang, Yunfeng; Chirikjian, Gregory S

    2007-11-01

    Over the past several decades a number of O(n) methods for forward and inverse dynamics computations have been developed in the multi-body dynamics and robotics literature. A method was developed in 1974 by Fixman for O(n) computation of the mass-matrix determinant for a serial polymer chain consisting of point masses. In other recent papers, we extended this method in order to compute the inverse of the mass matrix for serial chains consisting of point masses. In the present paper, we extend these ideas further and address the case of serial chains composed of rigid-bodies. This requires the use of relatively deep mathematics associated with the rotation group, SO(3), and the special Euclidean group, SE(3), and specifically, it requires that one differentiates functions of Lie-group-valued argument.

  4. Alkaloid profiling of the Chinese herbal medicine Fuzi by combination of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, J.; Heijden, R. van der; Spijksma, G.; Reijmers, T.; Wang, M.; Xu, G.; Hankemeier, T.; Greef, J. van der

    2009-01-01

    A matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) method was developed for the high throughput and robust qualitative profiling of alkaloids in Fuzi-the processed lateral roots of the Chinese herbal medicine Aconitum carmichaeli Debx (A. carmichaeli). After optimization, pow

  5. Calibration of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight peptide mass fingerprinting spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjernø, Karin; Højrup, Peter

    2007-01-01

    This chapter describes a number of aspects important for calibration of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight spectra prior to peptide mass fingerprinting searches. Both multipoint internal calibration and mass defect-based calibration is illustrated. The chapter describes ho...... potential internal calibrants, like tryptic autodigest peptides and keratin-related peptides, can be identified and used for high-precision calibration. Furthermore, the construction of project/user-specific lists of potential calibrants is illustrated....

  6. Application of nanodiamonds in human body fluid analysis by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xianglei Kong

    2008-01-01

    Direct mass spectrometric analysis of complex biological samples is very important and challenging. In this paper, nanodiamonds have been successfully used in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric analysis of human serum and urine. As a practical tool and platform, it can be widely used in the field of humoral proteomics, and it plays a very promising role in clinical diagnosis, including identification of novel disease-associated biomarkers.

  7. Investigation of colloidal graphite as a matrix for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry of low molecular weight analytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Alexander D; Conway, Ulric; Arthur, Christopher J; Gates, Paul J

    2016-07-01

    The analysis of low molecular weight compounds by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry is problematic due to the interference and suppression of analyte ionisation by the matrices typically employed - which are themselves low molecular weight compounds. The application of colloidal graphite is demonstrated here as an easy to use matrix that can promote the ionisation of a wide range of analytes including low molecular weight organic compounds, complex natural products and inorganic complexes. Analyte ionisation with colloidal graphite is compared with traditional organic matrices along with various other sources of graphite (e.g. graphite rods and charcoal pencils). Factors such as ease of application, spectra reproducibility, spot longevity, spot-to-spot reproducibility and spot homogeneity (through single spot imaging) are explored. For some analytes, considerable matrix suppression effects are observed resulting in spectra completely devoid of matrix ions. We also report the observation of radical molecular ions [M(-●) ] in the negative ion mode, particularly with some aromatic analytes. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Large molecular mass materials in coal derived liquids by {sup 252}Cf-plasma and matrix assisted laser desorption mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domin, M. [School of Pharmacy, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Pharmaceutical and Biological Chemistry; Li, S.; Herod, A.A.; Larsen, J.W. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Lazaro, M.J.; Kandiyoti, R. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Chemical Technology

    1997-12-31

    A Point of Ayr coal extract, its hydrocracked product and the pyridine solubles/insolubles of a coal tar pitch have been examined using {sup 252}Cf-plasma desorption-mass spectrometry (PDMS) and matrix assisted laser desorption-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). Comparison of molecular masses (MMs) between the coal extract and its hydrocracked product by PDMS indicated ranges of masses in the product to be considerably smaller, with number and weight average MMs reduced by approximately a factor of two. MALDI-mass spectra of the same samples indicated a greater reduction in mass. Similar comparison of the pyridine soluble/insoluble fractions of the coal tar pitch showed smaller differences by PD-MS than by MALDI-MS. (orig.)

  9. Neutrino mixing matrix and masses from a generalized Friedberg-Lee model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzaghi, N.; Gousheh, S. S.

    2014-02-01

    The overall characteristics of the solar and atmospheric neutrino oscillation are approximately consistent with a tribimaximal form of the mixing matrix U of the lepton sector. Exact tribimaximal mixing leads to θ13=0. However, recent results from the Daya Bay and RENO experiments have established a nonzero value for θ13. Keeping the leading behavior of U as tribimaximal, we use a generalized Friedberg-Lee neutrino mass model along with a complementary ansatz to incorporate a nonzero θ13 along with CP violation. We generalize this model in two stages: In the first stage, we assume μ -τ symmetry and add imaginary components which leads to nonzero phases. In the second stage, we add a perturbation with real components which breaks the μ-τ symmetry, and this leads to a nonzero value for θ13. The combination of these two generalizations leads to CP violation. Using only two sets of the experimental data, we can fix all of the parameters of our model and predict not only values for the other experimental data, which agree well with the available data, but also the masses of neutrinos and the CP-violating phases and parameters. These predictions include the following: ⟨mνe⟩≈(0.033-0.037) eV, ⟨mνμ⟩≈(0.043-0.048) eV, ⟨mντ⟩≈(0.046-0.051) eV, and 59.21°≲δ ≲59.34°.

  10. Engineering matrix-free laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry using glancing angle deposition films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Reshma; Bezuidenhout, Louis W; Jemere, Abebaw; Wang, Zhen; Brett, Michael; Harrison, D Jed

    2017-04-15

    Thin, nanoporous films fabricated using Glancing Angle Deposition (GLAD) technology are demonstrated for solid matrix laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (SMALDI-MS). GLAD allows facile engineering of nanoporosity, film thickness, post alignment, and material composition, as demonstrated here by the fabrication of Co-GLAD and Si-GLAD films for SMALDI, and by exploration of the SMALDI performance as a function of thickness, post density, and angle of the post relative to surface normal. GLAD films were prepared by electron beam evaporation onto silicon substrates, using steep angles of incidence for the vacuum deposition, with computer controlled substrate rotation. LDI from the GLAD films was evaluated using an MDS-Sciex time-of-flight (TOF) MALDI mass spectrometer. Co-GLAD films give a limit of quantitation of 6 fmol for complex carbohydrate derivatives, and slanted-post Si-GLAD films show up to three times higher sensitivity than vertical post structures. Reproducibility of both Si and Co films is much higher than conventional MALDI methods for m/z below at least 2100 Da. Both reproducibility and detection limits are comparable to or better than other nano-structured materials. Co-GLAD films are significantly better in performance than Co powders or Co thin films on silicon substrates previously evaluated. The flexibility of GLAD for thin film fabrication of LDI materials is demonstrated by the range of nanoporous materials that can be grown, and the fine control over structural conformation, thickness and porosity. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Performance of matrix-assisted laser desorption-time of flight mass spectrometry for identification of clinical yeast isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenvinge, Flemming S; Dzajic, Esad; Knudsen, Elisa;

    2013-01-01

    Accurate and fast yeast identification is important when treating patients with invasive fungal disease as susceptibility to antifungal agents is highly species related. Matrix-assisted laser desorption-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) provides a powerful tool with a clear potential...

  12. Development of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) for plant metabolite analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korte, Andrew R [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2014-12-01

    This thesis presents efforts to improve the methodology of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) as a method for analysis of metabolites from plant tissue samples. The first chapter consists of a general introduction to the technique of MALDI-MSI, and the sixth and final chapter provides a brief summary and an outlook on future work.

  13. Off-diagonal structure of neutrino mass matrix in see-saw mechanism and electron-muon-tau lepton universality

    CERN Document Server

    Riazuddin, M

    2001-01-01

    By a simple extension of the standard model in which ($e-\\mu -\\tau $) universality is not conserved, we present a scenario within the framework of see-saw mechanism in which the neutrino mass matrix is strictly off-diagonal in the flavor basis. We show that a version of this scenario can accomodate the atmospheric $\

  14. SOURCE APPORTIONMENT OF PM 2.5 AND CARBON IN SEATTLE USING CHEMICAL MASS BALANCE AND POSITIVE MATRIX FACTORIZATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three years of PM2.5 speciated data were collected and chemically analyzed using the IMPROVE protocol at the Beacon Hill site in Seattle. The data were analyzed by the Chemical Mass Balance Version 8 (CMB8) and Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) source apportionment models. T...

  15. Aspects of matrix effects in applications of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to forensic and clinical toxicology--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Frank T; Remane, Daniela

    2012-06-01

    In the last decade, liquid chromatography coupled to (tandem) mass spectrometry (LC-MS(-MS)) has become a versatile technique with many routine applications in clinical and forensic toxicology. However, it is well-known that ionization in LC-MS(-MS) is prone to so-called matrix effects, i.e., alteration in response due to the presence of co-eluting compounds that may increase (ion enhancement) or reduce (ion suppression) ionization of the analyte. Since the first reports on such matrix effects, numerous papers have been published on this matter and the subject has been reviewed several times. However, none of the existing reviews has specifically addressed aspects of matrix effects of particular interest and relevance to clinical and forensic toxicology, for example matrix effects in methods for multi-analyte or systematic toxicological analysis or matrix effects in (alternative) matrices almost exclusively analyzed in clinical and forensic toxicology, for example meconium, hair, oral fluid, or decomposed samples in postmortem toxicology. This review article will therefore focus on these issues, critically discussing experiments and results of matrix effects in LC-MS(-MS) applications in clinical and forensic toxicology. Moreover, it provides guidance on performance of studies on matrix effects in LC-MS(-MS) procedures in systematic toxicological analysis and postmortem toxicology.

  16. Matrix effects of calcium on high-precision sulfur isotope measurement by multiple-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chenhui; Bian, Xiao-Peng; Yang, Tao; Lin, An-Jun; Jiang, Shao-Yong

    2016-05-01

    Multiple-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) has been successfully applied in the rapid and high-precision measurement for sulfur isotope ratios in recent years. During the measurement, the presence of matrix elements would affect the instrumental mass bias for sulfur and these matrix-induced effects have aroused a lot of researchers' interest. However, these studies have placed more weight on highlighting the necessity for their proposed correction protocols (e.g., chemical purification and matrix-matching) while less attention on the key property of the matrix element gives rise to the matrix effects. In this study, four groups of sulfate solutions, which have different concentrations of sulfur (0.05-0.60mM) but a constant sequence of atomic calcium/sulfur ratios (0.1-50), are investigated under wet (solution) and dry (desolvation) plasma conditions to make a detailed evaluation on the matrix effects from calcium on sulfur isotope measurement. Based on a series of comparative analyses, we indicated that, the matrix effects of calcium on both measured sulfur isotope ratios and detected (32)S signal intensities are dependent mainly on the absolute calcium concentration rather than its relative concentration ratio to sulfur (i.e., atomic calcium/sulfur ratio). Also, for the same group of samples, the matrix effects of calcium under dry plasma condition are much more significant than that of wet plasma. This research affords the opportunity to realize direct and relatively precise sulfur isotope measurement for evaporite gypsum, and further provides some suggestions with regard to sulfur isotope analytical protocols for sedimentary pore water.

  17. Enrichment of Extracellular Matrix Proteins from Tissues and Digestion into Peptides for Mass Spectrometry Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naba, Alexandra; Clauser, Karl R; Hynes, Richard O

    2015-07-23

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex meshwork of cross-linked proteins that provides biophysical and biochemical cues that are major regulators of cell proliferation, survival, migration, etc. The ECM plays important roles in development and in diverse pathologies including cardio-vascular and musculo-skeletal diseases, fibrosis, and cancer. Thus, characterizing the composition of ECMs of normal and diseased tissues could lead to the identification of novel prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers and potential novel therapeutic targets. However, the very nature of ECM proteins (large in size, cross-linked and covalently bound, heavily glycosylated) has rendered biochemical analyses of ECMs challenging. To overcome this challenge, we developed a method to enrich ECMs from fresh or frozen tissues and tumors that takes advantage of the insolubility of ECM proteins. We describe here in detail the decellularization procedure that consists of sequential incubations in buffers of different pH and salt and detergent concentrations and that results in 1) the extraction of intracellular (cytosolic, nuclear, membrane and cytoskeletal) proteins and 2) the enrichment of ECM proteins. We then describe how to deglycosylate and digest ECM-enriched protein preparations into peptides for subsequent analysis by mass spectrometry.

  18. 4-Chloro-α-cyanocinnamic acid is an efficient soft matrix for cyanocobalamin detection in foodstuffs by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvano, Cosima Damiana; Ventura, Giovanni; Palmisano, Francesco; Cataldi, Tommaso R I

    2016-09-01

    4-Chloro-α-cyanocinnamic acid (ClCCA) is a very useful matrix able to give the protonated adduct [M+H](+) of intact cyanocobalamin (CNCbl) as the base peak (m/z 1355.58) in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS). The only fragment observed is [M-CN + H](+•) formed through the facile (•) CN neutral loss reflecting the fairly low Co-C bond energy. All other investigated proton transfer matrices, including α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid, para-nitroaniline and 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, give rise to a complete decyanation of CNCbl with concomitant formation of [M-CN + H](+•) , [M-CN + Na](+•) and [M-CN + K](+•) adducts at m/z 1329.57, 1351.55 and 1367.51, respectively. Depending on the matrix used, a variable degree of fragmentation involving the α-side axial ligand was observed. A plausible explanation of the specific behaviour of 4-chloro-α-cyanocinnamic acid as a soft matrix is discussed. Tandem mass spectra of both [M + H](+) and [M-CN + H](+•) ions were obtained and product ions successfully assigned. The possibility of detecting the protonated adduct of intact CNCbl was exploited in foodstuff samples such as cow milk and hen egg yolk by MALDI tandem MS upon sample extraction. We believe that our data provide strong basis for the application of MALDI tandem MS in the qualitative analysis of natural CNCbl, including fish, liver and meat samples. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Pigments and proteins in green bacterial chlorosomes studied by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, S; Sönksen, C P; Frigaard, N-U

    2000-01-01

    homologs in a small amount of green bacterial cells. In addition to information on pigments, the MALDI spectra also contained peaks from chlorosome proteins. Thus we have been able with high precision to confirm the molecular masses of the chlorosome proteins CsmA and CsmE which have been previously......We have used matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) for mass determination of pigments and proteins in chlorosomes, the light-harvesting organelles from the photosynthetic green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum. By applying a small volume (1...

  20. Pigments and proteins in green bacterial chlorosomes studied by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, S; Sönksen, C P; Frigaard, N U

    2000-01-01

    We have used matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) for mass determination of pigments and proteins in chlorosomes, the light-harvesting organelles from the photosynthetic green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum. By applying a small volume (1...... homologs in a small amount of green bacterial cells. In addition to information on pigments, the MALDI spectra also contained peaks from chlorosome proteins. Thus we have been able with high precision to confirm the molecular masses of the chlorosome proteins CsmA and CsmE which have been previously...

  1. Structural characterization of phospholipids by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marto, J A; White, F M; Seldomridge, S; Marshall, A G

    1995-11-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry provides for structural analysis of the principal biological phospholipids: glycerophosphatidylcholine, -ethanolamine, -serine, and -inositol. Both positive and negative molecular or quasimolecular ions are generated in high abundance. Isolated molecular ions may be collisionally activated in the source side of a dual trap mass analyzer, yielding fragments serving to identify the polar head group (positive ion mode) and fatty acid side chains (negative ion mode). Azimuthal quadrupolar excitation following collisionally activated dissociation refocuses productions close to the solenoid axis; subsequent transfer of product ions to the analyzer ion trap allows for high-resolution mass analysis. Cyro-cooling of the sample probe with liquid nitrogen greatly reduces matrix adduction encountered in the negative ion mode.

  2. Diamond Nanowires: A Novel Platform for Electrochemistry and Matrix-Free Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Szunerits

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decades, carbon-based nanostructures have generated a huge interest from both fundamental and technological viewpoints owing to their physicochemical characteristics, markedly different from their corresponding bulk states. Among these nanostructured materials, carbon nanotubes (CNTs, and more recently graphene and its derivatives, hold a central position. The large amount of work devoted to these materials is driven not only by their unique mechanical and electrical properties, but also by the advances made in synthetic methods to produce these materials in large quantities with reasonably controllable morphologies. While much less studied than CNTs and graphene, diamond nanowires, the diamond analogue of CNTs, hold promise for several important applications. Diamond nanowires display several advantages such as chemical inertness, high mechanical strength, high thermal and electrical conductivity, together with proven biocompatibility and existence of various strategies to functionalize their surface. The unique physicochemical properties of diamond nanowires have generated wide interest for their use as fillers in nanocomposites, as light detectors and emitters, as substrates for nanoelectronic devices, as tips for scanning probe microscopy as well as for sensing applications. In the past few years, studies on boron-doped diamond nanowires (BDD NWs focused on increasing their electrochemical active surface area to achieve higher sensitivity and selectivity compared to planar diamond interfaces. The first part of the present review article will cover the promising applications of BDD NWS for label-free sensing. Then, the potential use of diamond nanowires as inorganic substrates for matrix-free laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry, a powerful label-free approach for quantification and identification of small compounds, will be discussed.

  3. Principles of hydrogen radical mediated peptide/protein fragmentation during matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakawa, Daiki

    2016-07-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization in-source decay (MALDI-ISD) is a very easy way to obtain large sequence tags and, thereby, reliable identification of peptides and proteins. Recently discovered new matrices have enhanced the MALDI-ISD yield and opened new research avenues. The use of reducing and oxidizing matrices for MALDI-ISD of peptides and proteins favors the production of fragmentation pathways involving "hydrogen-abundant" and "hydrogen-deficient" radical precursors, respectively. Since an oxidizing matrix provides information on peptide/protein sequences complementary to that obtained with a reducing matrix, MALDI-ISD employing both reducing and oxidizing matrices is a potentially useful strategy for de novo peptide sequencing. Moreover, a pseudo-MS(3) method provides sequence information about N- and C-terminus extremities in proteins and allows N- and C-terminal side fragments to be discriminated within the complex MALDI-ISD mass spectrum. The combination of high mass resolution of a Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) analyzer and the software suitable for MALDI-ISD facilitates the interpretation of MALDI-ISD mass spectra. A deeper understanding of the MALDI-ISD process is necessary to fully exploit this method. Thus, this review focuses first on the mechanisms underlying MALDI-ISD processes, followed by a discussion of MALDI-ISD applications in the field of proteomics. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., Mass Spec Rev 35:535-556, 2016.

  4. Reduction of matrix effects in polystyrene/poly(methylene methacrylate) blends by metal-assisted secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Nora; Wirtz, Tom

    2012-07-17

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is a very surface sensitive analysis technique with low detection limits. The main drawback of SIMS is its inherent incapability of providing quantitative information about sample compositions due to the frequent occurrence of ionization- and sputter-induced matrix effects. Metal-assisted SIMS (MetA-SIMS) is an experimental approach that consists in covering an organic sample with a minute amount of a noble metal prior to a static SIMS analysis, the main objective being an increase of the characteristic secondary ion intensities. We show in this article that MetA-SIMS is also a simple and efficient tool for reducing matrix effects in a set of polymer blend samples containing different relative concentrations polystyrene (PS) and poly(methylene methacrylate) (PMMA). These findings can be explained by diffusion processes leading to a sample surface configuration consisting of individual polymer chains embedded in a common Ag matrix.

  5. Automated coupling of capillary-HPLC to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry for the analysis of small molecules utilizing a reactive matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brombacher, Stephan; Owen, Stacey J; Volmer, Dietrich A

    2003-07-01

    This study describes the application of a novel, reactive matrix for the mass spectral analysis of steroids by capillary-high performance liquid chromatography (capillary-HPLC) coupled to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI). The mass spectral analysis of steroids was accomplished after fully automated peak deposition of chromatographic peaks onto MALDI targets. The seven corticosteroids used as test compounds were: triamcinolone, prednisone, cortisone, fludrocortisone, dexamethasone, deoxycorticosterone, and budesonide. They were separated using a PepMap C(18) (3 microm particle size, 100 A pore width) column at five different concentration levels of 25, 15, 7.5, 2.5 and 1 ng/microL, and the peaks were detected at a wavelength of 237 nm. The column effluent was mixed with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) directly following the UV detector. The chromatographic peaks were then deposited onto the MALDI target with a robotic micro-fraction collector triggered by the UV detector signals. A special hydrophobic surface coating allowed the deposition of up to 4 microL (up to 90 % of the chromatographic peak volume) onto one sample spot. The compounds were then identified by MALDI mass spectrometry. Depending on the nature of the analyte, radical cations ([M](+.)) and sodium adduct ions ([M+Na](+)) of the steroids as well as protonated steroid-dinitrophenylhydrazone derivatives ([M(D)+H](+)) were detected in positive ion mode. The detection limits were between 0.5 and 15 ng injected with capillary-HPLC-MALDI-TOF-MS and between 0.3 and 3 ng on target with MALDI-TOF when deposited manually.

  6. Structural mass irregularities and fiber volume influence on morphology and mechanical properties of unsaturated polyester resin in matrix composi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalil Ahmed

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the comparative results of a current study on unsaturated polyester resin (UPR matrix composites processed by filament winding method, with cotton spun yarn of different mass irregularities and two different volume fractions. Physical and mechanical properties were measured, namely ultimate stress, stiffness, elongation%. The mechanical properties of the composites increased significantly with the increase in the fiber volume fraction in agreement with the Counto model. Mass irregularities in the yarn structure were quantitatively measured and visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Mass irregularities cause marked decrease in relative strength about 25% and 33% which increases with fiber volume fraction. Ultimate stress and stiffness increases with fiber volume fraction and is always higher for yarn with less mass irregularities.

  7. The (Z_2)^3 symmetry of the non-tri-bimaximal pattern for the neutrino mass matrix

    CERN Document Server

    Lashin, E I; Chamoun, N; Nasri, S

    2012-01-01

    In view of the recent neutrino oscillation data pointing to a non-vanishing value for the smallest mixing angle ($\\theta_z$), we derive and find explicit realizations of the $(Z_2)^3$ flavor symmetry which characterizes, for the neutrino mass matrix, uniquely a variant of the tripartite form, originally conceived to lead to the tri-bimaximal mixing with $\\theta_z=0$, so that to allow now for a non-tri-bimaximal pattern with non-zero $\\theta_z$. We impose this flavor symmetry in a setting including the charged leptons and we see that it can make room, through higher order terms involving new SM-singlet scalars, for the mass hierarchy of charged leptons. Moreover, within type-I seesaw mechanism augmented with the flavor symmetry, certain patterns occurring in both the Dirac and the Majorana neutrino mass matrices can accommodate all types of mass hierarchies in the effective neutrino mass matrix, but no lepton/baryon asymmetry can be generated. Finally, we discuss how type-II seesaw mechanism, when supplemented...

  8. [The nuclear matrix proteins (mol. mass 38 and 50 kDa) are transported by chromosomes in mitosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murasheva, M I; Chentsov, Iu S

    2010-01-01

    It was shown by immunofluorescence method that serum M68 and serum K43 from patients with autoimmune disease stain interphase nuclei and periphery of mitotic chromosomes of pig kidney cells. Western blotting reveals the polypeptide with mol. mass of 50 kDa in serum M68, and the polypeptide with mol. mass of 38 kDa in serum K43. In the nuclear protein matrix, the antibodies to protein with mol. mass of 38 kDa stained only nucleolar periphery, while the antibodies to the protein with mol. mass of 50 kDa stained both the nucleolar periphery and all the interphase nucleus. It shows that among all components of nuclear protein matrix (lamina, internuclear network, residual nucleoli) only nucleolar periphery contains the 38 kDa protein, while the 50 kDa protein is a part of residual nucleolar periphery and takes part in nuclear protein network formation. In the interphase cells, both proteins were in situ localized in the nuclei, but one of them with mol. mass of 50 kDa was in the form of small clearly outlined granules, while the other (38 kDa) was in the form of small bright granules against the background of diffusely stained nuclei. Both proteins were also revealed as continuous ring around nucleolar periphery. During all mitotic stages, the 50 kDa protein was seen on the chromosomal periphery as a cover, and the 38 kDa protein formed separate fragments and granules around them. After nuclear and chromosome decondensation induced by hypotonic treatment, both antibodies stain interphase nuclei in diffuse manner, but in mitotic cells they stained the surface of the swollen chromosomes. The polypeptide with mol. mass of 50 kDa maintained strong connection with chromosome periphery both in norm and under condition of decondensation induced by hypotonic treatment and at subsequent recondensation in isotonic medium. In contrast, the protein with mol. mass of 38 kDa partially lost the contact with a chromosome during recondensation appearing also in the form of granules in

  9. Pigments and proteins in green bacterial chlorosomes studied by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, S; Sönksen, C P; Frigaard, N U;

    2000-01-01

    We have used matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) for mass determination of pigments and proteins in chlorosomes, the light-harvesting organelles from the photosynthetic green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum. By applying a small volume (1...... proportional to peak areas obtained from HPLC analysis of the same sample. The same result was also obtained when whole cells of Chl. tepidum were applied to the target, indicating that MALDI-MS can provide a rapid method for obtaining a semiquantitative determination or finger-print of the bacteriochlorophyll...... homologs in a small amount of green bacterial cells. In addition to information on pigments, the MALDI spectra also contained peaks from chlorosome proteins. Thus we have been able with high precision to confirm the molecular masses of the chlorosome proteins CsmA and CsmE which have been previously...

  10. Analysis of chlorophylls and their derivatives by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Toshiyuki; Midonoya, Hitoshi; Shioi, Yuzo

    2009-07-01

    The analysis of chlorophylls and their derivatives by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry is described. Four matrices-sinapinic acid, a-cyano-4-hydroxycinnnamic acid, terthiophene, and 3-aminoquinoline-were examined to determine optimal conditions for analysis of the molecular mass and structure of chlorophyll a as a representative chlorophyll. Among them, terthiophene was the most efficient without releasing metal ions, although it caused fragmentation of the phytol-ester linkage. Terthiophene was useful for the analyses of chlorophyll derivatives as well as porphyrin products such as 8-deethyl-8-vinyl-chlorophyll a, pheophorbide a, pyropheophorbide a, bacteriochlorophyll a esterified phytol, and protoporphyrin IX. The current method is suitable for rapid and accurate determination of the molecular mass and structure of chlorophylls and porphyrins.

  11. Matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry in the subunit stoichiometry study of high-mass non-covalent complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moniatte, M.; Lesieur, C.; Vecsey-Semjen, B.; Buckley, J. T.; Pattus, F.; van der Goot, F. G.; van Dorsselaer, A.

    1997-12-01

    This study explores the potential of MALDI-TOF MS for the mass measurement of large non-covalent protein complexes. The following non-covalent complexes have been investigated: aerolysin from Aeromonas hydrophila (335 kDa) and [alpha]-haemolysin from Staphylococcus aureus (233 kDa) which are both cytolytic toxins, three enzymes known to be homotetramers in solution: bovine liver catalase (235 kDa), rabbit muscle pyruvate kinase (232 kDa), yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (147 kDa) and finally a lectin, concanavalin A (102 kDa). Three different matrix preparations were systematically tested under various conditions: ferulic acid dissolved in THF, 2,6-dihydroxyacetophenone in 20 mM aqueous ammonium citrate and a two-step sample preparation with sinapinic acid. It was possible to find a suitable combination of matrix and preparation type which allowed the molecularity of all complexes tested to be deduced from the MALDI mass spectrum. Trimeric and tetrameric intermediates accumulating during the formation of the active heptameric aerolysin complex were also identified, this allowing a formation mechanism to be proposed. The observation of large specific non-covalent complexes has been found to be dependent on the choice of matrix, the type of sample preparation used, the solvent evaporation speed, the pH of the resulting matrix-sample mixture and the number of shots acquired on a given area. From this set of experiments, some useful guidelines for the observation of large complexes by MALDI could therefore be deduced. Fast evaporation of the solvent is particularly necessary in the case of pH sensitive complexes. An ESMS study on the same non-covalent complexes indicated that, rather surprisingly, reliable results could be obtained by MALDI-TOF MS on several very large complexes (above 200 kDa) for which ESMS yielded no clear spectra.

  12. Matrix-assisted laser desorption mass spectrometry of gas-phase peptide-metal complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortal, Ana R.; Hurtado, Paola; Martínez-Haya, Bruno

    2008-12-01

    Cation attachment to a model peptide has been investigated in matrix-assisted laser desorption experiments. Angiotensin I (Asp-Arg-Val-Tyr-Ile-His-Pro-Phe-His-Leu) is chosen as a system for study, and Cu2+ and K+ salts are used as cationizing agents. Three fundamentally different types of samples are investigated: (1) a crystalline sample of Ang I, metal salt and MALDI matrix, prepared with the conventional dried droplet method; (2) a solvent-free fine powder mixture of the same three compounds, and (3) a solution of the angiotensin and the metal salt in an ionic liquid matrix (a molten organic salt that acts as a MALDI active solvent). Effective protonation and cationization of the peptide are achieved with the three methods. The transition metal systematically provides more efficient cationization than the alkali metal. At sufficiently high concentration of the salt, the attachment of up to four copper cations to the angiotensin is observed in the MALDI spectrum. In contrast, only one K+ cation is efficiently bound to the peptide. For a given salt concentration, the highest degree of cationization is obtained in the laser desorption from the ionic liquid matrix. This is attributed to the efficient transfer of free metal cations to the desorption plume, where the complexation takes place.

  13. Considerations for quantification of lipids in nerve tissue using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landgraf, Rachelle R; Garrett, Timothy J; Conaway, Maria C Prieto; Calcutt, Nigel A; Stacpoole, Peter W; Yost, Richard A

    2011-10-30

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometric imaging is a technique that provides the ability to identify and characterize endogenous and exogenous compounds spatially within tissue with relatively little sample preparation. While it is a proven methodology for qualitative analysis, little has been reported for its utility in quantitative measurements. In the current work, inherent challenges in MALDI quantification are addressed. Signal response is monitored over successive analyses of a single tissue section to minimize error due to variability in the laser, matrix application, and sample inhomogeneity. Methods for the application of an internal standard to tissue sections are evaluated and used to quantify endogenous lipids in nerve tissue. A precision of 5% or less standard error was achieved, illustrating that MALDI imaging offers a reliable means of in situ quantification for microgram-sized samples and requires minimal sample preparation.

  14. Direct analysis of textile fabrics and dyes using infrared matrix-assisted laser desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, Kristin H; Barry, Jeremy A; Muddiman, David C; Hinks, David

    2013-01-15

    The forensic analysis of textile fibers uses a variety of techniques from microscopy to spectroscopy. One such technique that is often used to identify the dye(s) within the fiber is mass spectrometry (MS). In the traditional MS method, the dye must be extracted from the fabric and the dye components are separated by chromatography prior to mass spectrometric analysis. Direct analysis of the dye from the fabric allows the omission of the lengthy sample preparation involved in extraction, thereby significantly reducing the overall analysis time. Herein, a direct analysis of dyed textile fabric was performed using the infrared matrix-assisted laser desorption electrospray ionization (IR-MALDESI) source for MS. In MALDESI, an IR laser with wavelength tuned to 2.94 μm is used to desorb the dye from the fabric sample with the aid of water as the matrix. The desorbed dye molecules are then postionized by electrospray ionization (ESI). A variety of dye classes were analyzed from various fabrics with little to no sample preparation allowing for the identification of the dye mass and in some cases the fiber polymer. Those dyes that were not detected using MALDESI were also not observed by direct infusion ESI of the dye standard.

  15. Measurement of the top quark mass in the lepton+jets final state with the matrix element method

    CERN Document Server

    Abazov, V M; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agelou, M; Aguiló, E; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Askew, A; Åsman, B; Assis-Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barnes, C; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benítez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Berntzon, L; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Binder, M; Biscarat, C; Black, K M; Blackler, I; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Blumenschein, U; Böhnlein, A; Boeriu, O; Bolton, T A; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Bühler, M; Büscher, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Busato, E; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Claes, D; Clement, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Coppage, D; Corcoran, M; Cousinou, M C; Cox, B; Crepe-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; Da Motta, H; Das, A; Das, M; Davies, B; Davies, G; Davis, G A; De, K; de Jong, P; De Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Demine, P; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Doidge, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Edwards, T; Ellison, J; Elmsheuser, J; Elvira, V D; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Fatakia, S N; Feligioni, L; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fleck, I; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; García, C; García-Bellido, A; Gardner, J; Gavrilov, V; Gay, A; Gay, P; Gelé, D; Gelhaus, R; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Yu; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, P; Grivaz, J F; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutíerrez, G; Gutíerrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Hansson, P; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jenkins, A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J M; Kalk, J R; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kasper, P; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A I; Kharzheev, Yu M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kotcher, J; Kothari, B; Koubarovsky, A; Kozelov, A V; Kroninger, K; Krop, D; Kryemadhi, A; Kühl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G L; Lazoflores, J; Le Bihan, A C; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Lesne, V; Lévêque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajícek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lynker, M; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Magnan, A M; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martens, M; McCarthy, R; Meder, D; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Michaut, M; Miettinen, H; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mondal, N K; Monk, J; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Mutaf, Y D; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nöding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Oguri, V; Oliveira, N; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Otec, R; Oteroy-Garzon, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Parashar, N; Park, S J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Perea, P M; Pérez, E; Peters, K; Petroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M E; Pompos, A; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S D; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rangel, M S; Rani, K J; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F K; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Rud, V I; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A F S; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, A D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schmitt, C; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Sen-Gupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shephard, W D; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Siccardi, V; Sidwell, R A; Simák, V; Sirotenko, V I; Skubic, P L; Slattery, P F; Smith, R P; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Song, X; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Towers, S; Trefzger, T; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Turcot, A S; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; vanden Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; Van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vartapetian, A H; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Séguier, F; Vint, P; Vlimant, J R; Von Törne, E; Voutilainen, M; Vreeswijk, M; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Wang, M H L; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Weerts, H; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Womersley, J; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Xuan, N; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, C; Yu, J; Yurkewicz, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G; al, et

    2006-01-01

    We present a measurement of the top quark mass with the Matrix Element method in the lepton+jets final state. As the energy scale for calorimeter jets represents the dominant source of systematic uncertainty, the Matrix Element likelihood is extended by an additional parameter, which is defined as a global multiplicative factor applied to the standard energy scale. The top quark mass is obtained from a fit that yields the combined statistical and systematic jet energy scale uncertainty. Using a data set of 370 pb-1 taken with the D0 experiment at Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, the mass of the top quark is measured using topological information to be: mtop(topo) = 169.2 +5.0-7.4 (stat.+JES) +1.5-1.4 (syst.) GeV, and when information about identified $b$ jets is included: mtop(b-tag) = 170.3 +4.1-4.5 (stat.+JES) +1.2-1.8 (syst.) GeV. The measurements yield a jet energy scale consistent with the reference scale.

  16. Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry Identification of Mycobacteria in Routine Clinical Practice: e24720

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Amel El Khéchine; Carine Couderc; Christophe Flaudrops; Didier Raoult; Michel Drancourt

    2011-01-01

    .... Matrix-assisted laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has previously been proven to effectively identify mycobacteria grown in high-concentration inocula from collections...

  17. Current status of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation-time of flight mass spectrometry in the clinical microbiology laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, Jen; Chen, Sharon C A; Dwyer, Dominic E; Iredell, Jonathan R

    2013-01-01

    The integration of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) into many clinical microbiology laboratories has revolutionised routine pathogen identification. MALDI-TOF MS complements and has good potential to replace existing phenotypic identification methods. Results are available in a more clinically relevant timeframe, particularly in bacteraemic septic shock. Novel applications include strain typing and the detection of antimicrobial resistance, but these are not widely used. This review discusses the technical aspects, current applications, and limitations of MALDI-TOF MS.

  18. Authenticity assessment of beef origin by principal component analysis of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaima, Nobuhiro; Goto-Inoue, Naoko; Hayasaka, Takahiro; Enomoto, Hirofumi; Setou, Mitsutoshi

    2011-06-01

    It has become necessary to assess the authenticity of beef origin because of concerns regarding human health hazards. In this study, we used a metabolomic approach involving matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry to assess the authenticity of beef origin. Highly accurate data were obtained for samples of extracted lipids from beef of different origin; the samples were grouped according to their origin. The analysis of extracted lipids in this study ended within 10 min, suggesting this approach can be used as a simple authenticity assessment before a definitive identification by isotope analysis.

  19. Identification and Classification of Rhizobia by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Rui Zong; Zhang, Rong Juan; Wei, Qing; Chen, Wen Feng; Cho, Il Kyu; Chen, Wen Xin; Li, Qing X

    Mass spectrometry (MS) has been widely used for specific, sensitive and rapid analysis of proteins and has shown a high potential for bacterial identification and characterization. Type strains of four species of rhizobia and Escherichia coli DH5α were employed as reference bacteria to optimize various parameters for identification and classification of species of rhizobia by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight MS (MALDI TOF MS). The parameters optimized included culture medium states (liquid or solid), bacterial growth phases, colony storage temperature and duration, and protein data processing to enhance the bacterial identification resolution, accuracy and reliability. The medium state had little effects on the mass spectra of protein profiles. A suitable sampling time was between the exponential phase and the stationary phase. Consistent protein mass spectral profiles were observed for E. coli colonies pre-grown for 14 days and rhizobia for 21 days at 4°C or 21°C. A dendrogram of 75 rhizobial strains of 4 genera was constructed based on MALDI TOF mass spectra and the topological patterns agreed well with those in the 16S rDNA phylogenetic tree. The potential of developing a mass spectral database for all rhizobia species was assessed with blind samples. The entire process from sample preparation to accurate identification and classification of species required approximately one hour.

  20. High Sensitivity Analysis of Nanoliter Volumes of Volatile and Nonvolatile Compounds using Matrix Assisted Ionization (MAI) Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Khoa; Pophristic, Milan; Horan, Andrew J.; Johnston, Murray V.; McEwen, Charles N.

    2016-10-01

    First results are reported using a simple, fast, and reproducible matrix-assisted ionization (MAI) sample introduction method that provides substantial improvements relative to previously published MAI methods. The sensitivity of the new MAI methods, which requires no laser, high voltage, or nebulizing gas, is comparable to those reported for MALDI-TOF and n-ESI. High resolution full acquisition mass spectra having low chemical background are acquired from low nanoliters of solution using only a few femtomoles of analyte. The limit-of-detection for angiotensin II is less than 50 amol on an Orbitrap Exactive mass spectrometer. Analysis of peptides, including a bovine serum albumin digest, and drugs, including drugs in urine without a purification step, are reported using a 1 μL zero dead volume syringe in which only the analyte solution wetting the walls of the syringe needle is used in the analysis.

  1. Matrix-Free UV-Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry as a Versatile Approach for Accelerating Dereplication Studies on Lichens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Pogam, Pierre; Schinkovitz, Andreas; Legouin, Béatrice; Le Lamer, Anne-Cécile; Boustie, Joël; Richomme, Pascal

    2015-10-20

    The present study examined the suitability of laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LDI-MS) for the rapid chemical fingerprinting of lichen extracts. Lichens are known to produce a wide array of secondary metabolites. Most of these compounds are unique to the symbiotic condition but some can be found in many species. Therefore, dereplication, that is, the rapid identification of known compounds within a complex mixture is crucial in the search for novel natural products. Over the past decade, significant advances were made in analytical techniques and profiling methods specifically adapted to crude lichen extracts, but LDI-MS has never been applied in this context. However, most classes of lichen metabolites have UV chromophores, which are quite similar to commercial matrix molecules used in matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI). It is consequently postulated that these molecules could be directly detectable by matrix-free LDI-MS. The present study evaluated the versatility of this technique by investigating the LDI properties of a vast array of single lichen metabolites as well as lichen extracts of known chemical composition. Results from the LDI experiments were compared with those obtained by direct ESI-MS detection as well as LC-ESI-MS. It was shown that LDI ionization leads to strong molecular ion formation with little fragmentation, thus, facilitating straightforward spectra interpretation and representing a valuable alternative to time-consuming LC-MS analysis.

  2. Evaluation of dried blood spots as sample matrix for gas chromatography/mass spectrometry based metabolomic profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Sing Teang; Lin, Hai-Shu; Ching, Jianhong; Ho, Paul C

    2011-06-01

    We propose using dried blood spots (DBS) as sample matrix for gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) based metabolomic profiling for the benefits of higher sample stability, more convenient sample acquisition with DBS, higher analyte separation power, and more readily biomarker identification with GC/MS. To establish this proposition, the metabolomic profiles generated from DBS were compared with that obtained from the conventional whole blood and plasma matrixes and also with dried plasma spots (DPS) as another covariate control. Our findings indicated that whole blood produced the most number of detectable markers (866), whereas DPS yielded the least number (614). DBS and plasma matrix, on the other hand, produced the most similar numbers of detectable (695 vs 749) and identifiable markers (137 vs 147, matching with Fiehn library). From the analysis of the DBS and plasma metabolomic profiles, it was concluded that when l-lysine 2, iminodiacetic acid 2, dl-threo-beta-hydroxyaspartic acid, citric acid, or adenosine-5-monophosphate 2 are not involved as markers, DBS could be a suitable substitute for plasma for metabolomic profiling.

  3. Measurement of the top quark mass with the matrix element method in the semileptonic decay channel at D0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haefner, Petra

    2008-07-31

    The top quark plays a special role in the Standard Model of Particle Physics. With its enormous mass of about 170 GeV it is as heavy as a gold atom and is the only quark with a mass near the electroweak scale. Together with the W boson mass, the top quark mass allows indirect constraints on the mass of the hypothetical Higgs boson, which might hold the clue to the origin of mass. Top pair production with a semileptonic decay t anti t{yields}W{sup {+-}}W{sup -+}b anti b{yields}q anti ql{nu}b anti b is the ''golden channel'' for mass measurements, due to a large branching fraction and a relatively low background contamination compared to other decay channels. Top mass measurements based on this decay, performed with the matrix element method, have always been among the single best measurements in the world. In 2007, the top mass world average broke the 1% level of precision. Its measurement is no longer dominated by statistical but instead by systematic uncertainties. The reduction of systematic uncertainties has therefore become a key issue for further progress. This thesis introduces two new developments in the treatment of b jets. The first improvement is an optimization in the way b identification information is used. It leads to an enhanced separation between signal and background processes and reduces the statistical uncertainty by about 16%. The second improvement determines differences in the detector response and thus the energy scales of light jets and b jets. Thereby, it addresses the major source of systematic uncertainty in the latest top mass measurements. The method was validated on Monte Carlo events at the generator level, calibrated with fully simulated events, including detector simulation, and applied to D0 Run II data corresponding to 1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. Possible sources of systematic uncertainties were studied. The top mass is measured to be: m{sub t}=(169.2{+-}3.5(stat.){+-}1.0(syst.)) GeV. The

  4. Modal correlation of test and finite element results using cross orthogonality with a reduced mass matrix obtained by modal reduction and NASTRAN's Generalized Dynamic Reduction solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Derek; Budynas, Richard G.

    A common procedure for performing a cross orthogonality check for the purpose of modal correlation between the test and the finite element analysis results incorporates the Guyan reduction method to obtain a reduced mass matrix. This paper describes a procedure which uses NASTRAN's Generalized Dynamic Reduction solution routine which is much more accurate than the standard Guyan reduction solution and which offers the advantage of not requiring the selection of mdof. Using NASTRAN's DMAP programming methods, a modal reduction of the full analytical mass matrix is performed based on the accelerometer locations and the analytical modal matrix results. The accuracy of the procedure is illustrated in two case studies.

  5. Furoic and mefenamic acids as new matrices for matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-(MALDI)-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelhamid, Hani Nasser; Wu, Hui-Fen

    2013-10-15

    The present study introduces two novel organic matrices for matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) for the analysis of small molecules. The first matrix is "2-amino-4,5-diphenylfuran-3-carboxylic acid" (also called furoic acid, FA) which was synthesized and then characterized by ultraviolet (UV), infrared (FTIR), nuclear magnetic resonance NMR ((1)H and (13)C) and mass spectrometry. The compound has organic semiconductor properties and exhibits intense UV-absorption which is suitable for the UV-MALDI laser (N2 laser, 337 nm). The second matrix is mefenamic acid (MA). The two matrices can be successfully applied for various classes of compounds including adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP, 0.5 µL(10.0 nmol)), spectinomycin (spect, 0.5 µL(14.0 nmol)), glutathione (GSH, 0.5 µL(9.0 nmol)), sulfamethazole (SMT, 0.5 µL(2.0 nmol)) and mixture of peptides gramicidin D (GD, 0.5µL (9.0 nmol)). The two matrices can effectively absorb the laser energy, resulting in excellent desorption/ionization of small molecules. The new matrices offer a significant enhancement of ionization, less fragmentation, few interferences, nice reproducibility, and excellent stability under vacuum. Theoretical calculations of the physical parameters demonstrated increase in polarizability, molar volume and refractivity than the conventional organic matrices which can effectively enhance the proton transfer reactions between the matrices with the analyte molecules. While the reduction in density, surface tension and index of refraction can enhance homogeneity between the two new matrices with the analytes. Due to the sublimation energy of mefenamic acid is (1.2 times) higher than that of the DHB, it is more stable to be used in the vacuum.

  6. Carbapenemase Activity Detection by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrabák, Jaroslav; Walková, Radka; Študentová, Vendula; Chudáčková, Eva; Bergerová, Tamara

    2011-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry is used for the determination of molecular weights of different chemical compounds. We describe here the use of MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry to detect a carbapenem antibiotic, meropenem, and its degradation products. Buffered meropenem solution (0.1 mM Tris-HCl, pH 6.8) was mixed with an overnight culture of bacteria. After 3-h incubation, the reaction mixture was centrifuged, and the supernatant was analyzed by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. The presence or absence of peaks representing meropenem and its sodium salts was crucial. The average turnaround time of this test, considering the use of overnight culture, is 4 h. We validated this method for the detection of resistance to carbapenems in Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa mediated by carbapenemase production. A total of 124 strains, including 30 carbapenemase-producing strains, were used in the study. The sensitivity of this method is 96.67%, with a specificity of 97.87%. Our results demonstrate the ability of this method to routinely detect carbapenemases in Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas spp. in laboratories. This assay is comparable with a labor-intensive imipenem-hydrolyzing spectrophotometric assay that is a reference method for the detection of carbapenemase. As demonstrated here, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry may be used in microbiological laboratories not only for microbial identification but also for other applications, such as studies of mechanisms of antibiotic resistance. PMID:21775535

  7. Bioaerosol detection by aerosol TOF-mass spectrometry: Application of matrix assisted laser desorption/ionisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wuijckhuijse, A.L. van; Stowers, M.A.; Kientz, Ch.E.; Marijnissen, J.C.M.; Scarlett, B.

    2000-01-01

    In previous publications the use of an aerosol time of flight mass spectrometer was reported for the on-line measurements of aerosols (Weiss 1997, Kievit 1995). The apparatus is capable of measuring the size as well as the chemical composition, by the use of Laser Desorption/Ionisation (LDI), of an

  8. Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging for Peptide and Protein Analyses: A Critical Review of On-Tissue Digestion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cillero-Pastor, B.; Heeren, R.M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) has established itself among the plethora of mass spectrometry applications. In the biomedical field, MALDI-MSI is being more frequently recognized as a new method for the discovery of biomarkers and targets of treatme

  9. A SIMPLE AND RAPID MATRIX-ASSISTED LASER DESORPTION/IONIZATION TIME OF FLIGHT MASS SPECTROMETRY METHOD TO SCREEN FISH PLASMA SAMPLES FOR ESTROGEN-RESPONSIVE BIOMARKERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, we describe and evaluate the performance of a simple and rapid mass spectral method for screening fish plasma for estrogen-responsive biomarkers using matrix assisted laster desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) couopled with a short...

  10. Evaluation of matrix effect in isotope dilution mass spectrometry based on quantitative analysis of chloramphenicol residues in milk powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiu Qin; Yang, Zong; Zhang, Qing He, E-mail: qhzhang204@gmail.com; Li, Hong Mei

    2014-01-07

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •We develop a strategy to evaluate matrix effect and its impact on the IDMS results. •Matrix effect and IDMS correction factor from different conditions are evaluated. •Ion suppression effect is observed in LLE and HLB pre-treated sample solutions. •Ion enhancement effect is found in MCX pre-treated sample solution. •IDMS correction factor in HLB and MCX solutions in three instruments is close to 1 -- Abstract: In the present study, we developed a comprehensive strategy to evaluate matrix effect (ME) and its impact on the results of isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) in analysis of chloramphenicol (CAP) residues in milk powder. Stable isotope-labeled internal standards do not always compensate ME, which brings the variation of the ratio (the peak area of analyte/the peak area of isotope). In our investigation, impact factors of this variation were studied in the extraction solution of milk powder using three mass spectrometers coupled with different ion source designs, and deuterium-labeled chloramphenicol (D5-CAP) was used as the internal standard. ME from mobile phases, sample solvents, pre-treatment methods, sample origins and instruments was evaluated, and its impact on the results of IDMS was assessed using the IDMS correction factor (θ). Our data showed that the impact of ME of mobile phase on the correction factor was significantly greater than that of sample solvent. Significant ion suppression and enhancement effects were observed in different pre-treated sample solutions. The IDMS correction factor in liquid–liquid extraction (LLE) and molecular imprinted polymer (MIP) extract with different instruments was greater or less 1.0, and the IDMS correction factor in hydrophilic lipophilic balance (HLB) and mix-mode cation exchange (MCX) extract with different instruments was all close to 1.0. To the instrument coupled with different ion source design, the impact of ME on IDMS quantitative results was

  11. Reduction of matrix effects in liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry by dilution of the sample extracts: how much dilution is needed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahnke, Helen; Kittlaus, Stefan; Kempe, Günther; Alder, Lutz

    2012-02-01

    In this study, the relationship between matrix concentration and suppression of electrospray ionization (matrix effects) was investigated. Ion suppression of pesticides present in QuEChERS extracts was used as an example. Residue-free extracts of four different commodities, avocado, black tea, orange, and rocket (arugula), were fortified with 39 pesticides each. For many of the resulting 156 pesticide/matrix combinations, considerable matrix effects were observed if the coextracted matrix of 8 mg of equivalent sample (in the case of tea: 1.6 mg) was injected with the undiluted extracts. The reduction of these matrix effects was measured at 10 levels of dilution up to 1000-fold. The results obtained indicate a linear correlation between matrix effects and the logarithm of matrix concentration (or dilution factor) until the zero-effect level of further dilution was reached. Using the logarithmic equations, it could be shown that a dilution of extracts by a factor of 25-40 reduces ion suppression to less than 20% if the initial suppression is ≤80%. For stronger matrix effects or complete elimination of suppression, higher dilution factors were needed. The observed correlation was independent from the two instrument platforms used, but the degree of matrix effects differed slightly between the two mass spectrometers in this study.

  12. Direct matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric imaging of cellulose and hemicellulose in Populus tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunsford, Kyle Ann; Peter, Gary F; Yost, Richard A

    2011-09-01

    Imaging applied toward lignocellulosic materials requires high molecular specificity to map specific compounds within intact tissue. Although secondary ionization mass spectrometry (SIMS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) with a single stage of MS have been used to image lignocellulosic biomass, the complexity of the plant tissue requires tandem MS, which limits the interpretation of simple MS. MALDI linear ion trap (LIT) tandem MS offers the high molecular specificity needed for lignocellulosic analyses. MALDI-LIT MS analyses of cellulose and xylan (hemicellulose) standards were performed to determine mass-to-charge ratios and fragmentation pathways for identification of these compounds in intact tissue. The MALDI-LIT-MS images of young Populus wood stem showed even distribution of both cellulose and hemicellulose ions; in contrast, the tandem MS images of cellulose and hemicellulose generated by plotting characteristic fragment ions resulted in drastically different images. This demonstrates that isobaric ions are present during MALDI-LIT-MS analyses of wood tissue and tandem MS is necessary to distinguish between isobaric species for selective imaging of carbohydrates in biomass.

  13. Targeted comparative proteomics by liquid chromatography/matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization triple-quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melanson, Jeremy E; Chisholm, Kenneth A; Pinto, Devanand M

    2006-01-01

    Here we report the first application of a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer for targeted proteomics. Employing an amine-specific isotopic labelling approach, the technique was validated using five randomly selected bovine serum albumin peptides differentially labelled at known ratios. An indirect benefit of the isotopic labelling technique is a significant enhancement of the a1 ion in tandem mass (MS/MS) spectra of all peptides studied. Therefore, the a1 ion was selected as the fragment ion for multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) in all cases, eliminating tedious method development and optimization. Accurate quantification was achieved with an average relative standard deviation (RSD) of 5% (n = 5) and a detection limit of 14 amol. The technique was then applied to validate an important virulence biomarker of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans, which was not accurately quantified using global proteomics experiment employing two-dimensional liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (2D-LC/ESI)-MS/MS. Using LC/MALDI-MRM analysis of five tryptic peptides, the protein PHR1 was found to be upregulated in the hyphal (pathogenic) form of C. albicans by a factor of 7.7 +/- 0.8.

  14. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ion trap mass spectrometry: efficient isolation and effective fragmentation of peptide ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, J; Chait, B T

    1996-07-01

    Effective analysis of the sequence of peptides using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) tandem ion trap mass spectrometry requires efficient mass isolation and the ability to induce extensive sequence-specific fragmentation. The present paper describes a new excitation scheme, which we term red-shifted off-resonance large-amplitude excitation (RSORLAE), that can deposit higher amounts of internal energy in ions than is feasible with conventional resonant excitation. The new method provides an effective means for inducing fragmentation of MALDI-produced peptide ions with m/z values up to 3500. Prior to excitation, it is necessary to isolate ions of interest with high efficiency. We demonstrate that isolation efficiencies of > 95% can be achieved by careful design of the rf scan functions used during ion isolation. In particular, sudden transitions in the amplitude of the rf field (from low to high amplitudes) must be avoided. The combined improvements in the efficiency for ion isolation and the efficacy of ion activation make MALDI tandem ion trap mass spectrometry a practical tool for the characterization of proteins with high sensitivity.

  15. The Charged Lepton Mass Matrix and Non-zero θ13 with TeV Scale New Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashed, Ahmed; Datta, Alakabha

    2012-03-01

    We provide an explicit structure of the charged lepton mass matrix which is 2-3 symmetric except for a single breaking of this symmetry by the muon mass. We identify a flavor symmetric limit for the mass matrices where the first generation is decoupled from the other two in the charged lepton sector while in the neutrino sector the third generation is decoupled from the first two generations. The leptonic mixing in the symmetric limit can be, among other structures, the bi-maximal (BM) or the tri-bimaximal (TBM) mixing. Symmetry breaking effects are included both in the charged lepton and the neutrino sector to produce corrections to the leptonic mixing and explain the recent θ13 measurements. A model that extends the SM by three right handed neutrinos, an extra Higgs doublet, and two singlet scalars is introduced to generate the leptonic mixing.[4pt] This work was supported in part by the US-Egypt Joint Board on Scientific and Technological Co-operation award (Project ID: 1855) administered by the US Department of Agriculture, summer grant from the College of Liberal Arts, University of Mississippi and in part by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1068052 and 1066293 and the hospitality of the Aspen Center for Physics.

  16. Characterizing changes in snow crab (Chionoecetes opilio) cryptocyanin protein during molting using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demian, Wael L L; Jahouh, Farid M; Stansbury, Don; Randell, Edward; Brown, Robert J; Banoub, Joseph H

    2014-02-28

    We report the matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric (MALDI-MS) characterization of the cryptocyanin proteins of the juvenile Chionoecetes opilio crabs during their molting and non-molting phases. In order to assess the structural cryptocyanin protein differences between the molting and non-molting phases, the obtained peptides were sequenced by MALDI low-energy collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry (CID-MS/MS). The cryptocyanin protein was isolated by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and analyzed by MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS. The purified cryptocyanin protein was sequenced, using the 'bottom-up' approach. After tryptic digestion, the peptide mixture was analyzed by MALDI-QqTOF-MS/MS and the data obtained were used for the peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF) identification by means of the Mascot database. It was demonstrated using MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS that the actual molecular weights of the non-molting and molting cryptocyanin proteins were different; these were, respectively, 67.6 kDa and 68.1 kDa. Using low-energy CID-MS/MS we have sequenced the trytic peptides to monitor the differences and similarities between the cryptocyanin molecular structures during the molting and non-molting stages. We have demonstrated for the first time that the actual molecular masses of the cryptocyanin protein during the molting and non-molting phases were different. The MALDI-CID-MS/MS analyses allowed the sequencing of the cryptocyanins after tryptic digestion, during the molting and non-molting stages, and showed some similarities and staggering differences between the identified cryptocyanin peptides. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Mass Casualty Incidents in the Underground Mining Industry: Applying the Haddon Matrix on an Integrative Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engström, Karl Gunnar; Angrén, John; Björnstig, Ulf; Saveman, Britt-Inger

    2017-06-08

    Underground mining is associated with obvious risks that can lead to mass casualty incidents. Information about such incidents was analyzed in an integrated literature review. A literature search (1980-2015) identified 564 modern-era underground mining reports from countries sharing similar occupational health legislation. These reports were condensed to 31 reports after consideration of quality grading and appropriateness to the aim. The Haddon matrix was used for structure, separating human factors from technical and environmental details, and timing. Most of the reports were descriptive regarding injury-creating technical and environmental factors. The influence of rock characteristics was an important pre-event environmental factor. The organic nature of coal adds risks not shared in hard-rock mines. A sequence of mechanisms is commonly described, often initiated by a human factor in interaction with technology and step-wise escalation to involve environmental circumstances. Socioeconomic factors introduce heterogeneity. In the Haddon matrix, emergency medical services are mainly a post-event environmental issue, which were not well described in the available literature. The US Quecreek Coal Mine incident of 2002 stands out as a well-planned rescue mission. Evaluation of the preparedness to handle underground mining incidents deserves further scientific attention. Preparedness must include the medical aspects of rescue operations. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2017;page 1 of 9).

  18. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric analysis of aliphatic biodegradable photoluminescent polymers using new ionic liquid matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Carlos A; Zhang, Yi; Yang, Jian; Schug, Kevin A

    2011-05-15

    In this study, two novel ionic liquid matrices (ILMs), N,N-diisopropylethylammonium 3-oxocoumarate and N,N-diisopropylethylammonium dihydroxymonooxoacetophenoate, were tested for the structural elucidation of recently developed aliphatic biodegradable polymers by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). The polymers, formed by a condensation reaction of three components, citric acid, octane diol, and an amino acid, are fluorescent, but the exact mechanism behind their luminescent properties has not been fully elucidated. In the original studies, which introduced the polymer class (J. Yang et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 2009, 106, 10086-10091), a hyper-conjugated cyclic structure was proposed as the source for the photoluminescent behavior. With the use of the two new ILMs, we present evidence that supports the presence of the proposed cyclization product. In addition, the new ILMs, when compared with a previously established ILM, N,N-diisopropylethylammonium α-cyano-3-hydroxycinnimate, provided similar signal intensities and maintained similar spectral profiles. This research also established that the new ILMs provided good spot-to-spot reproducibility and high ionization efficiency compared with corresponding crystalline matrix preparations. Many polymer features revealed through the use of the ILMs could not be observed with crystalline matrices. Ultimately, the new ILMs highlighted the composition of the synthetic polymers, as well as the loss of water that was expected for the formation of the proposed cyclic structure on the polymer backbone.

  19. Natural products in Glycyrrhiza glabra (licorice) rhizome imaged at the cellular level by atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem mass spectrometry imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Bin; Bhandari, Dhaka Ram; Janfelt, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The rhizome of Glycyrrhiza glabra (licorice) was analyzed by high-resolution mass spectrometry imaging and tandem mass spectrometry imaging. An atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging ion source was combined with an orbital trapping mass spectrometer in order...... to obtain high-resolution imaging in mass and space. Sections of the rhizome were imaged with a spatial resolution of 10 μm in the positive ion mode, and a large number of secondary metabolites were localized and identified based on their accurate mass and MS/MS fragmentation patterns. Major tissue...

  20. Recent Advances in Bacteria Identification by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry Using Nanomaterials as Affinity Probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai-Chia Chiu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Identifying trace amounts of bacteria rapidly, accurately, selectively, and with high sensitivity is important to ensuring the safety of food and diagnosing infectious bacterial diseases. Microbial diseases constitute the major cause of death in many developing and developed countries of the world. The early detection of pathogenic bacteria is crucial in preventing, treating, and containing the spread of infections, and there is an urgent requirement for sensitive, specific, and accurate diagnostic tests. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS is an extremely selective and sensitive analytical tool that can be used to characterize different species of pathogenic bacteria. Various functionalized or unmodified nanomaterials can be used as affinity probes to capture and concentrate microorganisms. Recent developments in bacterial detection using nanomaterials-assisted MALDI-MS approaches are highlighted in this article. A comprehensive table listing MALDI-MS approaches for identifying pathogenic bacteria, categorized by the nanomaterials used, is provided.

  1. Analysis and Quantitation of Glycated Hemoglobin by Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattan, Stephen J; Parker, Kenneth C; Vestal, Marvin L; Yang, Jane Y; Herold, David A; Duncan, Mark W

    2016-03-01

    Measurement of glycated hemoglobin is widely used for the diagnosis and monitoring of diabetes mellitus. Matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time of flight (TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of patient samples is used to demonstrate a method for quantitation of total glycation on the β-subunit of hemoglobin. The approach is accurate and calibrated with commercially available reference materials. Measurements were linear (R(2) > 0.99) across the clinically relevant range of 4% to 20% glycation with coefficients of variation of ≤ 2.5%. Additional and independent measurements of glycation of the α-subunit of hemoglobin are used to validate β-subunit glycation measurements and distinguish hemoglobin variants. Results obtained by MALDI-TOF MS were compared with those obtained in a clinical laboratory using validated HPLC methodology. MALDI-TOF MS sample preparation was minimal and analysis times were rapid making the method an attractive alternative to methodologies currently in practice.

  2. Matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) for direct visualization of plant metabolites in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturtevant, Drew; Lee, Young-Jin; Chapman, Kent D

    2016-02-01

    Direct visualization of plant tissues by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) has revealed key insights into the localization of metabolites in situ. Recent efforts have determined the spatial distribution of primary and secondary metabolites in plant tissues and cells. Strategies have been applied in many areas of metabolism including isotope flux analyses, plant interactions, and transcriptional regulation of metabolite accumulation. Technological advances have pushed achievable spatial resolution to subcellular levels and increased instrument sensitivity by several orders of magnitude. It is anticipated that MALDI-MSI and other MSI approaches will bring a new level of understanding to metabolomics as scientists will be encouraged to consider spatial heterogeneity of metabolites in descriptions of metabolic pathway regulation.

  3. Free vibration analysis of elastically supported Timoshenko columns with attached masses by transfer matrix and finite element methods

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Oktay Demirdaǧ

    2008-02-01

    This paper deals with the free vibration of Timoshenko columns with attached masses having rotary inertia. The support of the model is elastically restrained against rotation. The concept of fixity factor is used to define the stiffness of the elastic connection relative to that of the column. The governing equation of the column elements is solved by applying the separation of variables method in the transfer matrix method (TMM) algorithm. The same problems are solved, also, by finite element method (FEM) algorithm in which the matrices in equation of motion are obtained for Timoshenko column, and the results are compared with the ones of TMM. The comparison graphs are presented in numerical analysis to show the effectiveness of the considered methods, and it is resulted that FEM gives closer results to TMM.

  4. Determination of phenolic compounds in wines by novel matrix solid-phase dispersion extraction and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minuti, Lucio; Pellegrino, Roberto

    2008-03-21

    A novel matrix solid-phase dispersion (MSPD) extraction method was developed to extract simultaneously 23 phenolic compounds from wine samples prior to determination by gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection in the selected ion monitoring mode. Different parameters of the MSPD technique such as dispersant solid-phase, eluting solvent, and sample ionic strength and pH were optimized. The optimized MSPD procedure requires a small volume of wine (1 mL), commercial silica gel (1.5 g) as dispersant solid-phase and a small volume of ethyl acetate (5 mL) as eluting solvent. Under these conditions, the extraction of the studied compounds was almost complete (mean values of recoveries between 87 and 109%) in a short time (15 min). Moreover, satisfactory standard deviations of repeatability (RSD0.993) and detection limits (wines. Application was illustrated by analysis of different wine samples.

  5. On plate graphite supported sample processing for simultaneous lipid and protein identification by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvano, Cosima Damiana; van der Werf, Inez Dorothé; Sabbatini, Luigia; Palmisano, Francesco

    2015-05-01

    The simultaneous identification of lipids and proteins by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) after direct on-plate processing of micro-samples supported on colloidal graphite is demonstrated. Taking advantages of large surface area and thermal conductivity, graphite provided an ideal substrate for on-plate proteolysis and lipid extraction. Indeed proteins could be efficiently digested on-plate within 15 min, providing sequence coverages comparable to those obtained by conventional in-solution overnight digestion. Interestingly, detection of hydrophilic phosphorylated peptides could be easily achieved without any further enrichment step. Furthermore, lipids could be simultaneously extracted/identified without any additional treatment/processing step as demonstrated for model complex samples such as milk and egg. The present approach is simple, efficient, of large applicability and offers great promise for protein and lipid identification in very small samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Affinity labeling coupled with matrix assistant laser desorption tandem time of flight mass spectrometry for quantitative proteomies research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Qingfang; ZHANG Yangjun; CAI Yun; QIAN Xiaohong

    2007-01-01

    A relative quantitative method for differential proteomics by cleavable isotope-coded atTmity tag (cICAT)and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) was estab-lished. The accuracy and reproducibility of the method were evaluated by bovine serum albumin (BSA) digest as having a relative standard deviation of less than 30% and good reproducibility. The dynamic range was als0 evaluated by analyzing two mixtures of several standard proteins with dif-ferent concentration. The experimental results showed that in the dynamic range of 1:30, the quantitation error of the method was less than 30%. Although the quantitation error becomes very large when used beyond this range, it does not affect the derivation of information on the differential proteins. All the work provides an alternative method for differential proteomics analysis in biological samples from different origins.

  7. Quantitative matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis of synthetic polymers and peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyzak, Lukas; Moos, Rebecca; von Rath, Friederike; Wulf, Volker; Wirtz, Michaela; Melchior, David; Kling, Hans-Willi; Köhler, Michael; Gäb, Siegmar; Schmitz, Oliver J

    2011-12-15

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) is a very powerful and widely used mass spectrometric technique to ionize high molecular weight compounds. The most commonly used dried droplet (DD) technique can lead to a concentration distribution of the analyte on the target and is therefore often not suitable for reproducible analyses. We developed a new solvent-free deposition technique, called compressed sample (CS), to prevent the distribution of the analytes caused by the crystallization of the compounds. The CS technique presented in this work allows the quantitative analysis of synthetic polymers such as derivatized maltosides with correlation coefficients of 0.999 and peptides up to 3500 Da with correlation coefficients of at least 0.982 without the use of stable-isotope-labeled standards.

  8. Identification of Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus haemolyticus by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruin, J P; Kostrzewa, M; van der Ende, A; Badoux, P; Jansen, R; Boers, S A; Diederen, B M W

    2014-02-01

    Generally accepted laboratory methods that have been used for decades do not reliably distinguish between H. influenzae and H. haemolyticus isolates. H. haemolyticus strains are often incorrectly identified as nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). To distinguish H. influenzae from H. haemolyticus we have created a new database on the matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) bio-typer 2 and compared the results with routine determination of Haemophilus (growth requirement for X and V factor), and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). In total we have tested 277 isolates, 244 H. influenzae and 33 H. haemolyticus. Using MLST as the gold standard, the agreement of MALDI-TOF MS was 99.6 %. MALDI-TOF MS allows reliable and rapid discrimination between H. influenzae and H. haemolyticus.

  9. Analysis and Quantitation of Glycated Hemoglobin by Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattan, Stephen J.; Parker, Kenneth C.; Vestal, Marvin L.; Yang, Jane Y.; Herold, David A.; Duncan, Mark W.

    2016-03-01

    Measurement of glycated hemoglobin is widely used for the diagnosis and monitoring of diabetes mellitus. Matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time of flight (TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of patient samples is used to demonstrate a method for quantitation of total glycation on the β-subunit of hemoglobin. The approach is accurate and calibrated with commercially available reference materials. Measurements were linear (R2 > 0.99) across the clinically relevant range of 4% to 20% glycation with coefficients of variation of ≤ 2.5%. Additional and independent measurements of glycation of the α-subunit of hemoglobin are used to validate β-subunit glycation measurements and distinguish hemoglobin variants. Results obtained by MALDI-TOF MS were compared with those obtained in a clinical laboratory using validated HPLC methodology. MALDI-TOF MS sample preparation was minimal and analysis times were rapid making the method an attractive alternative to methodologies currently in practice.

  10. Facile Synthesis of N-Doped Carbon Dots as a New Matrix for Detection of Hydroxy-Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons by Negative-Ion Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wenjing; Li, Yong; Li, Ruijin; Shuang, Shaomin; Dong, Chuan; Cai, Zongwei

    2016-05-25

    N-doping carbon dots (N-CDs) were prepared by microwave-assisted pyrolysis of dl-malic acid and ethanolamine as precursors. The material served as an excellent matrix for the detection of the environmental pollutants hydroxy-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (OH-PAHs) by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) in negative ion mode. The obtained N-CDs exhibited good UV absorption capacity and favorable solubility. The use of the N-CDs matrix exhibited low matrix background interference and was beneficial to improve the signal response due to the specific π-conjugated polyaromatic structure and the doping of nitrogen atoms. The developed method was found to have good reproducibility and sensitivity. The N-CDs as a new matrix also were employed for the detection of OH-PAHs in real PM2.5 samples. The mass concentrations of Σ-hydroxy-pyrene, Σ-dihydroxy-anthraquinone, and Σ-dihydroxy-benzo(a)pyrene on the collected PM2.5 samples ranged from 0.125 to 0.136 ng/m(3), 0.039 to 0.052 ng/m(3), and 0.053 to 0.072 ng/m(3), respectively. This work extends the application field of N-CDs and provides a good candidate of matrix for MALDI-TOF MS detection of environmental pollutants.

  11. Sub-ppt Mass Spectrometric Detection of Therapeutic Drugs in Complex Biological Matrixes Using Polystyrene-Microsphere-Coated Paper Spray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Teng; Zheng, Yajun; Wang, Xiaoting; Austin, Daniel E; Zhang, Zhiping

    2017-08-01

    Polystyrene (PS) is a class of polymer materials that offers great potential for various applications. However, the applications of PS microspheres in paper spray mass spectrometry are largely underexplored. Herein we prepared a series of PS microspheres via a simple dispersion polymerization and then used them as coating materials for paper spray mass spectrometry (MS) in high-sensitivity analysis of various therapeutic drugs in complex biological matrixes. In the preparation of PS-coated papers, the coating method was found playing a key role in determining the performance of the resulting paper substrate in addition to other parameters (e.g., starch type and amount, PS coating amount, and spray solvent). We also found that as a solvent was applied on PS-coated paper for paper spray, the analytes of interest would be first extracted out and then moved to the tip of paper triangle for spray along with the applied solvent. In the process, the surface energy of PS particles had a strong impact on the desorption performance of analytes from PS-coated paper substrate, and the PS with a high surface energy favored the elution of analytes to allow a high MS sensitivity. When the prepared PS coated paper was used as a substrate for paper spray, it gave high sensitivity in analysis of therapeutic drugs in various biological matrixes such as whole blood, serum, and urine with excellent repeatability and reproducibility. In contrast to uncoated filter paper, an improvement of 10-546-fold in sensitivity was achieved using PS-coated paper for paper spray, and an estimated lower limit of quantitation (LLOQs) in the range of 0.004-0.084 ng mL(-1) was obtained. The present study is significant in exploring the potential of PS for high-sensitivity MS analysis, and it provides a promising platform in the translation of the MS technique to clinical applications.

  12. Rapid Identification of the Foodborne Pathogen Trichinella spp. by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer-Scholl, Anne; Murugaiyan, Jayaseelan; Neumann, Jennifer; Bahn, Peter; Reckinger, Sabine; Nöckler, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    Human trichinellosis occurs through consumption of raw or inadequately processed meat or meat products containing larvae of the parasitic nematodes of the genus Trichinella. Currently, nine species and three genotypes are recognized, of which T. spiralis, T. britovi and T. pseudospiralis have the highest public health relevance. To date, the differentiation of the larvae to the species and genotype level is based primarily on molecular methods, which can be relatively time consuming and labor intensive. Due to its rapidness and ease of use a matrix assisted laser desorption / ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) reference spectra database using Trichinella strains of all known species and genotypes was created. A formicacid/acetonitrile protein extraction was carried out after pooling 10 larvae of each Trichinella species and genotype. Each sample was spotted 9 times using α-cyano 4-hydoxy cinnamic acid matrix and a MicroFlex LT mass spectrometer was used to acquire 3 spectra (m/z 2000 to 20000 Da) from each spot resulting in 27 spectra/species or genotype. Following the spectra quality assessment, Biotyper software was used to create a main spectra library (MSP) representing nine species and three genotypes of Trichinella. The evaluation of the spectra generated by MALDI-TOF MS revealed a classification which was comparable to the results obtained by molecular methods. Also, each Trichinella species utilized in this study was distinct and distinguishable with a high confidence level. Further, different conservation methods such as freezing and conservation in alcohol and the host species origin of the isolated larvae did not have a significant influence on the generated spectra. Therefore, the described MALDI-TOF MS can successfully be implemented for both genus and species level identification and represents a major step forward in the use of this technique in foodborne parasitology.

  13. Rapid Identification of the Foodborne Pathogen Trichinella spp. by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Mayer-Scholl

    Full Text Available Human trichinellosis occurs through consumption of raw or inadequately processed meat or meat products containing larvae of the parasitic nematodes of the genus Trichinella. Currently, nine species and three genotypes are recognized, of which T. spiralis, T. britovi and T. pseudospiralis have the highest public health relevance. To date, the differentiation of the larvae to the species and genotype level is based primarily on molecular methods, which can be relatively time consuming and labor intensive. Due to its rapidness and ease of use a matrix assisted laser desorption / ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS reference spectra database using Trichinella strains of all known species and genotypes was created. A formicacid/acetonitrile protein extraction was carried out after pooling 10 larvae of each Trichinella species and genotype. Each sample was spotted 9 times using α-cyano 4-hydoxy cinnamic acid matrix and a MicroFlex LT mass spectrometer was used to acquire 3 spectra (m/z 2000 to 20000 Da from each spot resulting in 27 spectra/species or genotype. Following the spectra quality assessment, Biotyper software was used to create a main spectra library (MSP representing nine species and three genotypes of Trichinella. The evaluation of the spectra generated by MALDI-TOF MS revealed a classification which was comparable to the results obtained by molecular methods. Also, each Trichinella species utilized in this study was distinct and distinguishable with a high confidence level. Further, different conservation methods such as freezing and conservation in alcohol and the host species origin of the isolated larvae did not have a significant influence on the generated spectra. Therefore, the described MALDI-TOF MS can successfully be implemented for both genus and species level identification and represents a major step forward in the use of this technique in foodborne parasitology.

  14. Measurement of the top quark mass with the matrix element method in the semileptonic decay channel at D0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haefner, Petra [Ludwig Maximilian Univ., Munich (Germany)

    2008-07-31

    The top quark plays a special role in the Standard Model of Particle Physics. With its enormous mass of about 170 GeV it is as heavy as a gold atom and is the only quark with a mass near the electroweak scale. Together with theW boson mass, the top quark mass allows indirect constraints on the mass of the hypothetical Higgs boson, which might hold the clue to the origin of mass. Top pair production with a semileptonic decay t $\\bar{t}$ →W±W b$\\bar{b}$ →q $\\bar{t}$lnb$\\bar{b}$ is the ”golden channel” for mass measurements, due to a large branching fraction and a relatively low background contamination compared to other decay channels. Top mass measurements based on this decay, performed with the matrix element method, have always been among the single best measurements in the world. In 2007, the top mass world average broke the 1% level of precision. Its measurement is no longer dominated by statistical but instead by systematic uncertainties. The reduction of systematic uncertainties has therefore become a key issue for further progress. This thesis introduces two new developments in the treatment of b jets. The first improvement is an optimization in the way b identification information is used. It leads to an enhanced separation between signal and background processes and reduces the statistical uncertainty by about 16%. The second improvement determines differences in the detector response and thus the energy scales of light jets and b jets. Thereby, it addresses the major source of systematic uncertainty in the latest top mass measurements. The method was validated on Monte Carlo events at the generator level, calibrated with fully simulated events, including detector simulation, and applied to D0 Run II data corresponding to 1 fb-1 of integrated luminosity. Possible sources of systematic uncertainties were studied. The top mass is measured to be: mt = (169.2±3.5(stat.)±1.0(syst.)) GeV . The

  15. Large molecular mass materials in coal-derived liquids by {sup 252}Cf-plasma and matrix-assisted laser desorption mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domin, M.; Li, S.; Lazaro, M.-J.; Herod, A.A.; Larsen, J.W.; Kandiyoti, R. [School of Pharmacy, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Parmaceutical and Biological Chemistry

    1998-05-01

    The paper compares responses of {sup 252}Cf-plasma desorption MS (PD-MS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption (MALDI) MS to identical samples. The two pairs of samples selected for the comparison were known from previous work to differ significantly in their high mass contents. MALDI-MS showed large differences in MM distributions within both pairs of samples. The PD-MS data showed a degree of similarity between one pair of samples (pyridine soluble/insoluble fractions of a coal tar pitch); for the second pair (a coal extract and its hydrocracked product), trends from the two MS techniques agreed closely. The MM range observed by PD-MS was somewhat narrower, extending to between 3000 and 5000 u. Significant differences within pairs of samples were observed by SEC and by UV-fluorescence spectroscopy, providing somewhat closer agreement with the MALDI spectra. The two MS instruments differ in two important respects: the ionization system (i.e., plasma vs laser desorption) and the maximum available ion extraction voltage: 30 kV for the MALDI-MS instrument and 15 kV for the PD-MS. The comparison of plasma vs laser desorption mass spectroscopy could not therefore take place at high ion extraction voltages. Work at up to 30 kV in the MALDI instrument indicated better sensitivity to high-mass materials at higher ion extraction voltages. The qualitative similarity of results from the two MS techniques is nevertheless apparent; the range of MMs observed in PD-MS as well as in MALDI-MS were, furthermore, far larger than those reported by any MS technique, to date. 38 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation, time-of-flight mass spectrometry in genomics research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiannis Ragoussis

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The beginning of this millennium has seen dramatic advances in genomic research. Milestones such as the complete sequencing of the human genome and of many other species were achieved and complemented by the systematic discovery of variation at the single nucleotide (SNP and whole segment (copy number polymorphism level. Currently most genomics research efforts are concentrated on the production of whole genome functional annotations, as well as on mapping the epigenome by identifying the methylation status of CpGs, mainly in CpG islands, in different tissues. These recent advances have a major impact on the way genetic research is conducted and have accelerated the discovery of genetic factors contributing to disease. Technology was the critical driving force behind genomics projects: both the combination of Sanger sequencing with high-throughput capillary electrophoresis and the rapid advances in microarray technologies were keys to success. MALDI-TOF MS-based genome analysis represents a relative newcomer in this field. Can it establish itself as a long-term contributor to genetics research, or is it only suitable for niche areas and for laboratories with a passion for mass spectrometry? In this review, we will highlight the potential of MALDI-TOF MS-based tools for resequencing and for epigenetics research applications, as well as for classical complex genetic studies, allele quantification, and quantitative gene expression analysis. We will also identify the current limitations of this approach and attempt to place it in the context of other genome analysis technologies.

  17. Proteomic-based prognosis of brain tumor patients using direct-tissue matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Sarah A; Weil, Robert J; Thompson, Reid C; Shyr, Yu; Moore, Jason H; Toms, Steven A; Johnson, Mahlon D; Caprioli, Richard M

    2005-09-01

    Clinical diagnosis and treatment decisions for a subset of primary human brain tumors, gliomas, are based almost exclusively on tissue histology. Approaches for glioma diagnosis can be highly subjective due to the heterogeneity and infiltrative nature of these tumors and depend on the skill of the neuropathologist. There is therefore a critical need to develop more precise, non-subjective, and systematic methods to classify human gliomas. To this end, mass spectrometric analysis has been applied to these tumors to determine glioma-specific protein patterns. Protein profiles have been obtained from human gliomas of various grades through direct analysis of tissue samples using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MS). Statistical algorithms applied to the MS profiles from tissue sections identified protein patterns that correlated with tumor histology and patient survival. Using a data set of 108 glioma patients, two patient populations, a short-term and a long-term survival group, were identified based on the tissue protein profiles. In addition, a subset of 57 patients diagnosed with high-grade, grade IV, malignant gliomas were analyzed and a novel classification scheme that segregated short-term and long-term survival patients based on the proteomic profiles was developed. The protein patterns described served as an independent indicator of patient survival. These results show that this new molecular approach to monitoring gliomas can provide clinically relevant information on tumor malignancy and is suitable for high-throughput clinical screening.

  18. Analysis of Microbial Mixtures by Matrix-assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization time-of-flight Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahl, Karen L.; Wunschel, Sharon C.; Jarman, Kristin H.; Valentine, Nancy B.; Petersen, Catherine E.; Kingsley, Mark T.; Zartolas, Kimberly A.; Saenz, Adam J.

    2002-12-15

    Many different laboratories are currently developing mass-spectrometric techniques to analyze and identify microorganisms. However, minimal work has been done with mixtures of bacteria. To demonstrate that microbial mixtures could be analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS), mixed bacterial cultures were analyzed in a double-blind fashion. Nine different bacterial species currently in our MALDI-MS fingerprint library were used to generate 50 different simulated mixed bacterial cultures similar to that done for an initial blind study previously reported.(1) The samples were analyzed by MALDI-MS with automated data extraction and analysis algorithms developed in our laboratory. The components present in the sample were identified correctly to the species level in all but one of the samples. However, correctly eliminating closely related organisms was challenging for the current algorithms, especially in differentiating Serratia marcescens, Escherichia coli, and Yersinia enterocolitica, which have some similarities in their MALDI-MS fingerprints. Efforts to improve the specificity of the algorithms are in progress.

  19. A novel approach for computing glueball masses and matrix elements in Yang-Mills theories on the lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Della Morte, Michele

    2011-01-01

    We make use of the global symmetries of the Yang-Mills theory on the lattice to design a new computational strategy for extracting glueball masses and matrix elements which achieves an exponential reduction of the statistical error with respect to standard techniques. By generalizing our previous work on the parity symmetry, the partition function of the theory is decomposed into a sum of path integrals each giving the contribution from multiplets of states with fixed quantum numbers associated to parity, charge conjugation, translations, rotations and central conjugations Z_N^3. Ratios of path integrals and correlation functions can then be computed with a multi-level Monte Carlo integration scheme whose numerical cost, at a fixed statistical precision and at asymptotically large times, increases power-like with the time extent of the lattice. The strategy is implemented for the SU(3) Yang--Mills theory, and a full-fledged computation of the mass and multiplicity of the lightest glueball with vacuum quantum ...

  20. A novel approach for computing glueball masses and matrix elements in Yang-Mills theories on the lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Morte, Michele; Giusti, Leonardo

    2011-05-01

    We make use of the global symmetries of the Yang-Mills theory on the lattice to design a new computational strategy for extracting glueball masses and matrix elements which achieves an exponential reduction of the statistical error with respect to standard techniques. By generalizing our previous work on the parity symmetry, the partition function of the theory is decomposed into a sum of path integrals each giving the contribution from multiplets of states with fixed quantum numbers associated to parity, charge conjugation, translations, rotations and central conjugations Z N 3. Ratios of path integrals and correlation functions can then be computed with a multi-level Monte Carlo integration scheme whose numerical cost, at a fixed statistical precision and at asymptotically large times, increases power-like with the time extent of the lattice. The strategy is implemented for the SU(3) Yang-Mills theory, and a full-fledged computation of the mass and multiplicity of the lightest glueball with vacuum quantum numbers is carried out at a lattice spacing of 0.17 fm.

  1. Identification and localization of trauma-related biomarkers using matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kirstin; Reilly, Matthew A.; Glickman, Randolph D.

    2017-02-01

    Current treatments for ocular and optic nerve trauma are largely ineffective and may have adverse side effects; therefore, new approaches are needed to understand trauma mechanisms. Identification of trauma-related biomarkers may yield insights into the molecular aspects of tissue trauma that can contribute to the development of better diagnostics and treatments. The conventional approach for protein biomarker measurement largely relies on immunoaffinity methods that typically can only be applied to analytes for which antibodies or other targeting means are available. Matrix assisted laser-assisted desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-IMS) is a specialized application of mass spectrometry that not only is well suited to the discovery of novel or unanticipated biomarkers, but also provides information about the spatial localization of biomarkers in tissue. We have been using MALDI-IMS to find traumarelated protein biomarkers in retina and optic nerve tissue from animal models subjected to ocular injury produced by either blast overpressure or mechanical torsion. Work to date by our group, using MALDI-IMS, found that the pattern of protein expression is modified in the injured ocular tissue as soon as 24 hr post-injury, compared to controls. Specific proteins may be up- or down-regulated by trauma, suggesting different tissue responses to a given injury. Ongoing work is directed at identifying the proteins affected and mapping their expression in the ocular tissue, anticipating that systematic analysis can be used to identify targets for prospective therapies for ocular trauma.

  2. Thermal decomposition of CH3CHO studied by matrix infrared spectroscopy and photoionization mass spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiliou, AnGayle K.; Piech, Krzysztof M.; Reed, Beth; Zhang, Xu; Nimlos, Mark R.; Ahmed, Musahid; Golan, Amir; Kostko, Oleg; Osborn, David L.; David, Donald E.; Urness, Kimberly N.; Daily, John W.; Stanton, John F.; Ellison, G. Barney

    2012-10-01

    A heated SiC microtubular reactor has been used to decompose acetaldehyde and its isotopomers (CH3CDO, CD3CHO, and CD3CDO). The pyrolysis experiments are carried out by passing a dilute mixture of acetaldehyde (roughly 0.1%-1%) entrained in a stream of a buffer gas (either He or Ar) through a heated SiC reactor that is 2-3 cm long and 1 mm in diameter. Typical pressures in the reactor are 50-200 Torr with the SiC tube wall temperature in the range 1200-1900 K. Characteristic residence times in the reactor are 50-200 μs after which the gas mixture emerges as a skimmed molecular beam at a pressure of approximately 10 μTorr. The reactor has been modified so that both pulsed and continuous modes can be studied, and results from both flow regimes are presented. Using various detection methods (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and both fixed wavelength and tunable synchrotron radiation photoionization mass spectrometry), a number of products formed at early pyrolysis times (roughly 100-200 μs) are identified: H, H2, CH3, CO, CH2=CHOH, HC≡CH, H2O, and CH2=C=O; trace quantities of other species are also observed in some of the experiments. Pyrolysis of rare isotopomers of acetaldehyde produces characteristic isotopic signatures in the reaction products, which offers insight into reaction mechanisms that occur in the reactor. In particular, while the principal unimolecular processes appear to be radical decomposition CH3CHO (+M) → CH3 + H + CO and isomerization of acetaldehyde to vinyl alcohol, it appears that the CH2CO and HCCH are formed (perhaps exclusively) by bimolecular reactions, especially those involving hydrogen atom attacks.

  3. Benefits of 2.94 μm infrared matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization for analysis of labile molecules by Fourier transform mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Budnik, Bogdan A.; Jensen, Kenneth Bendix; Jørgensen, Thomas J. D.

    2000-01-01

    A 2.94 microm Er:YAG laser was used together with a commercial Fourier transform mass spectrometer to study labile biomolecules. The combination has shown superior performance over conventional 337 nm ultraviolet matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (UV-MALDI) Fourier transform mass...... spectrometry (FTMS), especially for the analysis of peptides with post-translational modifications. With succinic acid as a matrix, the sensitivity of the single-shot analysis was increased by an order of magnitude to the low femtomole level, with significantly less fragmentation observed. Intact molecular...

  4. Exploring the frontiers of synthetic eumelanin polymers by high-resolution matrix-assisted laser/desorption ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reale, Samantha; Crucianelli, Marcello; Pezzella, Alessandro; d'Ischia, Marco; De Angelis, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    New trends in material science and nanotechnologies have spurred growing interest in eumelanins black insoluble biopolymers derived by tyrosinase-catalysed oxidation of tyrosine via 5,6-dihydroxyindole (DHI) and its 2-carboxylic acid (DHICA). Efficient antioxidant and photoprotective actions, associated with peculiar optoelectronic properties, are recognised as prominent functions of eumelanin macromolecules within the human and mammalian pigmentary system, making them unique candidates for the realisation of innovative bio-inspired functional soft materials, with structure-based physical-chemical properties. An unprecedented breakthrough into the mechanism of synthetic eumelanin buildup has derived from a detailed investigation of the oxidative polymerization of DHI and its N-methyl derivative (NMDHI) by linear and reflectron matrix-assisted laser/desorption ionization mass spectrometry. Regular collections of oligomers of increasing masses, spanning the entire m/z ranges up to 5000 Da (>30-mer) and 8000 Da (> 50-mer) for the two building blocks, respectively, were disclosed. It is the first time that the in vitro polymerisation of dihydroxyindoles to form synthetic eumelanins is explored up to its high mass limits, giving at the same time information on the polymerisation mode, whether it follows a stepwise pattern (being this the conclusion in our case) or a staking sequencing of small-sized entities. It also highlighted the influence of the N-methyl substituent on the polymerization process; this opens the way to the production of N-functionalized, synthetic eumelanin-inspired soft materials, for possible future technological applications. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Capillary-induced Homogenization of Matrix in Paper: A Powerful Approach for the Quantification of Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients Using Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Menezes, Maico; de Oliveira, Diogo Noin; Catharino, Rodrigo Ramos

    2016-07-01

    Herein we present a novel approach for the quantification of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) using mass spectrometry imaging. This strategy uses a filter paper previously “eluted” with a MALDI matrix solution as a support for analyte application. Samples are submitted to mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) and quantification through characteristic fingerprints is ultimately performed. Results for the content of rosuvastatin from a known formulation are comparable to those obtained with a validated HPLC method.

  6. Matrix influence on derivatization and ionization processes during selenoamino acid liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebane, Riin; Oldekop, Maarja-Liisa; Herodes, Koit

    2014-04-01

    Considering the importance of derivatization in LC/ESI/MS analysis, the objective of this work was to develop a method for evaluation of matrix effect that would discriminate between matrix effect due to the derivatization reaction yield and from the ESI. Four derivatization reagents (TAHS, DEEMM, DNS, FMOC-Cl) were studied with respect to matrix effects using two selenoamino acids and onion matrix as model system. A novel method for assessing matrix effects of LC/ESI/MS analyses involving derivatization is proposed, named herein post-derivatization spiking, that allows evaluating effect of matrix on ESI ionization without derivatization reaction yield contribution. The proposed post-derivatization spiking method allowed to demonstrate that the reason of reduced analytical signal can be signal suppression in ESI (as in case of DNS derivatives with matrix effects 38-99%), alteration of derivatization reaction yield (TAHS, matrix effects 92-113%, but reaction yields 20-50%) or both (FMOC-Cl, matrix effects 28-88% and reaction yields 50-70%). In case of DEEMM derivatives, matrix reduces reaction yield but enhances ESI/MS signal. A method for matrix effect evaluation was developed. It was also confirmed that matrix effects can be reduced by dilution.

  7. Discrimination between bacterial spore types using time-of-flight mass spectrometry and matrix-free infrared laser desorption and ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullom, J N; Frank, M; Gard, E E; Horn, J M; Labov, S E; Langry, K; Magnotta, F; Stanion, K A; Hack, C A; Benner, W H

    2001-05-15

    We demonstrate that molecular ions with mass-to-charge ratios (m/z) ranging from a few hundred to 19 050 can be desorbed from whole bacterial spores using infrared laser desorption and no chemical matrix. We have measured the mass of these ions using time-of-flight mass spectrometry and we observe that different ions are desorbed from spores of Bacillus cereus, Bacillus thuringiensis, Bacillus subtilis, and Bacillus niger. Our results raise the possibility of identifying microorganisms using mass spectrometry without conventional sample preparation techniques such as the addition of a matrix. We have measured the dependence of the ion yield from B. subtilis on desorption wavelength over the range 3.05-3.8 microm, and we observe the best results at 3.05 microm. We have also generated mass spectra from whole spores using 337-nm ultraviolet laser desorption, and we find that these spectra are inferior to spectra generated with infrared desorption. Since aerosol analysis is a natural application for matrix-free desorption, we have measured mass spectra from materials such as ragweed pollen and road dust that are likely to form a background to microbial aerosols. We find that these materials are readily differentiated from bacterial spores.

  8. Identification of beer-spoilage bacteria using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieme, Anneleen D; Spitaels, Freek; Aerts, Maarten; De Bruyne, Katrien; Van Landschoot, Anita; Vandamme, Peter

    2014-08-18

    Applicability of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for identification of beer-spoilage bacteria was examined. To achieve this, an extensive identification database was constructed comprising more than 4200 mass spectra, including biological and technical replicates derived from 273 acetic acid bacteria (AAB) and lactic acid bacteria (LAB), covering a total of 52 species, grown on at least three growth media. Sequence analysis of protein coding genes was used to verify aberrant MALDI-TOF MS identification results and confirmed the earlier misidentification of 34 AAB and LAB strains. In total, 348 isolates were collected from culture media inoculated with 14 spoiled beer and brewery samples. Peak-based numerical analysis of MALDI-TOF MS spectra allowed a straightforward species identification of 327 (94.0%) isolates. The remaining isolates clustered separately and were assigned through sequence analysis of protein coding genes either to species not known as beer-spoilage bacteria, and thus not present in the database, or to novel AAB species. An alternative, classifier-based approach for the identification of spoilage bacteria was evaluated by combining the identification results obtained through peak-based cluster analysis and sequence analysis of protein coding genes as a standard. In total, 263 out of 348 isolates (75.6%) were correctly identified at species level and 24 isolates (6.9%) were misidentified. In addition, the identification results of 50 isolates (14.4%) were considered unreliable, and 11 isolates (3.2%) could not be identified. The present study demonstrated that MALDI-TOF MS is well-suited for the rapid, high-throughput and accurate identification of bacteria isolated from spoiled beer and brewery samples, which makes the technique appropriate for routine microbial quality control in the brewing industry. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Quantification of matrix metalloprotease-9 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid by selected reaction monitoring with microfluidics nano-liquid-chromatography-mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prely, Laurette M.; Paal, Krisztina; Hermans, Jos; van der Heide, Sicco; van Oosterhout, Antoon J. M.; Bischoff, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative protein analysis by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in the selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode was used to quantify matrix metalloprotease-9 (MMP-9; similar to 90 kDa) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) from patients having undergone lung transplantatio

  10. Identification of Wheat Varieties Using Matrix-assisted Laser Desorption/Ionisation Time-of-flight Mass Spectrometry and an Artificial Neural network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloch, Helle Aagaard; Kesmir, Can; Petersen, Marianne Kjerstine;

    1999-01-01

    A novel tool for variety identification of wheat (Triticum aestivum L,) has been developed: an artificial neural network (ANN) is used to classify the gliadin fraction analysed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOFMS). The robustness...

  11. Analysis of Phospholipid Mixtures from Biological Tissues by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption and Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS): A Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eibisch, Mandy; Fuchs, Beate; Schiller, Jurgen; Sub, Rosmarie; Teuber, Kristin

    2011-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption and ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is increasingly used to investigate the phospholipid (PL) compositions of tissues and body fluids, often without previous separation of the total mixture into the individual PL classes. Therefore, the questions of whether all PL classes are detectable…

  12. Differentiation of Raoultella ornithinolytica/planticola and Klebsiella oxytoca clinical isolates by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, Eefje de; Jong, A.S. de; Smidts-van den Berg, N.; Rentenaar, R.J.

    2013-01-01

    Ninety-nine clinical isolates previously identified as Klebsiella oxytoca were evaluated using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Eight isolates were identified as Raoultella spp., being 5 Raoultella spp. and 3 K. oxytoca, by 16S rRNA sequenc

  13. Analysis of Phospholipid Mixtures from Biological Tissues by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption and Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS): A Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eibisch, Mandy; Fuchs, Beate; Schiller, Jurgen; Sub, Rosmarie; Teuber, Kristin

    2011-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption and ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is increasingly used to investigate the phospholipid (PL) compositions of tissues and body fluids, often without previous separation of the total mixture into the individual PL classes. Therefore, the questions of whether all PL classes are detectable…

  14. Differentiation of Clinically Relevant mucorales Rhizopus microsporus and R. arrhizus by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolatabadi, S.; Kolecka, A.; Versteeg, Matthijs; de Hoog, Sybren G; Boekhout, Teun

    2015-01-01

    This study addresses the usefulness of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for reliable identification of the two most frequently occuring clinical species of Rhizopus, namely R. arrhizus with its two varieties arrhizus and delemar and R. micro

  15. DIFFERENTIATION OF AEROMONAS ISOLATES OBTAINED FROM DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM USING MATRIX-ASSISTED LASER DESCRIPTION/IONIZATION-MASS SPECTROMETRY (MALDI-MS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The genus Aeromonas is one of several medically significant genera that have gained prominence due to their evolving taxonomy and controversial role in human diseases. In this study, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) was used to analyze the...

  16. Solid Matrix Transformation and Tracer Addition using Molten Ammonium Bifluoride Salt as a Sample Preparation Method for Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grate, Jay W.; Gonzalez, Jhanis J.; O' Hara, Matthew J.; Kellogg, Cynthia M.; Morrison, Samuel S.; Koppenaal, David W.; Chan, George C.; Mao, Xianglei; Zorba, Vassilia; Russo, Richard

    2017-09-08

    Laser ablation (LA) is a means of sample introduction to inductively coupled plasma (ICP) mass spectrometry (MS) that avoids acid dissolution and chemical separation steps conventionally associated with solid sample analysis. At the same time, certain features of LA-ICP-MS are often mentioned in critical reviews including solid matrix variability and its influence on the ablation process, matrix dependent elemental fractionation, lack of matrix matched standards for external calibration, and limitations to internal calibration because it is challenging to add and distribute spikes into solid samples. In this paper we introduce the concept of a synergistic minimal sample preparation method that is used in combination with LA-ICP-MS as a means to overcome these limitations. The aim of this minimal sample preparation procedure is to reactively transform the original matrix to a more consistent matrix for LA-based analysis, thus reducing the effects of matrix variability, while enabling the addition of tracers. In conjunction with ICP-MS, we call this MTR-LA-ICP-MS, where MTR is derived from matrix transformation including the option to add tracers

  17. Analysis of four toxic metals in a single rice seed by matrix solid phase dispersion -inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiufen; Chen, Lixia; Chen, Xin; Yu, Huamei; Peng, Lixu; Han, Bingjun

    2016-12-01

    Toxic metals in rice pose great risks to human health. Metal bioaccumulation in rice grains is a criterion of breeding. Rice breeding requires a sensitive method to determine metal content in single rice grains to assist the variety selection. In the present study, four toxic metals of arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr) and lead (Pb) in a single rice grain were determined by a simple and rapid method. The developed method is based on matrix solid phase dispersion using multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as dispersing agent and analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The experimental parameters were systematically investigated. The limits of detection (LOD) were 5.0, 0.6, 10 and 2.1 ng g‑1 for As, Cd, Cr, and Pb, respectively, with relative standard deviations (n = 6) of microwave digestion. The amount of sample required was reduced approximately 100 fold in comparison with the microwave digestion. The method has a high application potential for other sample matrices and elements with high sensitivity and sample throughput.

  18. Study on dissolution mechanism of cortisol and cortisone from hair matrix with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Xue; Chen, Zheng; Li, Jifeng; Zhang, Jing; Deng, Huihua; Lu, Zuhong

    2013-06-05

    Hair cortisol has been used as a biomarker of chronic stress. The detected contents of hair cortisol might depend on the incubation duration in solvents for no-milled hair samples with 3-layer structure. However, there was no research on the dissolution mechanism of hair analytes. After uniform mixture, no-milled hair samples were incubated in methanol and water for the 12 different durations and milled hair was done as comparison. Hair cortisol and cortisone were determined with high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The measured concentrations of hair cortisol and cortisone showed ≥2 maxima during the entire incubation in methanol and water from 5 min to 72 h for no-milled hair. Hair cortisol concentration measured by LC-MS/MS was increased with the incubation duration. Conversely, it was not held when hair was powdered prior to the incubation in methanol. Hair cortisol and cortisone were dissolved from hair matrix through the 2-stage or multistage mechanism, which might depend on the hair 3-layer structure and its degree of damage. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Direct matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry improves appropriateness of antibiotic treatment of bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlek, Anne L M; Bonten, Marc J M; Boel, C H Edwin

    2012-01-01

    Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) allows the identification of microorganisms directly from positive blood culture broths. Use of the MALDI-TOF MS for rapid identification of microorganisms from blood culture broths can reduce the turnaround time to identification and may lead to earlier appropriate treatment of bacteremia. During February and April 2010, direct MALDI-TOF MS was routinely performed on all positive blood cultures. During December 2009 and March 2010 no direct MALDI-TOF MS was used. Information on antibiotic therapy was collected from the hospital and intensive care units' information systems from all positive blood cultures during the study period. In total, 253 episodes of bacteremia were included of which 89 during the intervention period and 164 during the control period. Direct performance of MALDI-TOF MS on positive blood culture broths reduced the time till species identification by 28.8-h and was associated with an 11.3% increase in the proportion of patients receiving appropriate antibiotic treatment 24 hours after blood culture positivity (64.0% in the control period versus 75.3% in the intervention period (p0.01)). Routine implementation of this technique increased the proportion of patients on adequate antimicrobial treatment within 24 hours.

  20. Direct matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry improves appropriateness of antibiotic treatment of bacteremia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne L M Vlek

    Full Text Available Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS allows the identification of microorganisms directly from positive blood culture broths. Use of the MALDI-TOF MS for rapid identification of microorganisms from blood culture broths can reduce the turnaround time to identification and may lead to earlier appropriate treatment of bacteremia. During February and April 2010, direct MALDI-TOF MS was routinely performed on all positive blood cultures. During December 2009 and March 2010 no direct MALDI-TOF MS was used. Information on antibiotic therapy was collected from the hospital and intensive care units' information systems from all positive blood cultures during the study period. In total, 253 episodes of bacteremia were included of which 89 during the intervention period and 164 during the control period. Direct performance of MALDI-TOF MS on positive blood culture broths reduced the time till species identification by 28.8-h and was associated with an 11.3% increase in the proportion of patients receiving appropriate antibiotic treatment 24 hours after blood culture positivity (64.0% in the control period versus 75.3% in the intervention period (p0.01. Routine implementation of this technique increased the proportion of patients on adequate antimicrobial treatment within 24 hours.

  1. Novel ionic liquid matrices for qualitative and quantitative detection of carbohydrates by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaoyong; Shen, Shanshan; Wu, Datong; Cai, Pengfei; Pan, Yuanjiang

    2017-09-08

    Analysis of carbohydrates based on matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) is still challenging and researchers have been devoting themselves to efficient matrices discovery. In the present study, the design, synthesis, qualitative and quantitative performance of non-derivative ionic liquid matrices (ILMs) were reported. DHB/N-methylaniline (N-MA) and DHB/N-ethylaniline (N-EA), performing best for carbohydrate detection, have been screened out. The limit of detection for oligosaccharide provided by DHB/N-MA and DHB/N-EA were as low as 10 fmol. DHB/N-MA and DHB/N-EA showed significantly higher ion generation efficiency than DHB. The comparison of capacity to probe polysaccharide between these two ILMs and DHB also revealed their powerful potential. Their outstanding performance were probably due to lower proton affinities and stronger UV absorption at λ = 355 nm. What is more, taking DHB/N-MA as an example, quantitative analysis of fructo-oligosaccharide mixtures extracted and identified from rice noodles has been accomplished sensitively using an internal standard method. Overall, DHB/N-MA and DHB/N-EA exhibited excellent performance and might be significant sources as the carbohydrate matrices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Determination of microcystin-LR in drinking water using UPLC tandem mass spectrometry-matrix effects and measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Duan, Jinming; Niu, Chaoying; Qiang, Naichen; Mulcahy, Dennis

    2011-10-01

    A simple detection method using ultra-performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-ESI-MS-MS) coupled with the sample dilution method for determining trace microcystin-LR (MC-LR) in drinking water is presented. The limit of detection (LOD) was 0.04 µg/L and the limit of quantitation (LOQ) was 0.1 µg/L. Water matrix effects of ionic strength, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and pH were examined. The results indicate that signal detection intensity for MC-LR was significantly suppressed as the ionic strength increased from ultrapure water condition, whereas it increased slightly with solution pH and DOC at low concentrations. However, addition of methanol (MeOH) into the sample was able to counter the signal suppression effects. In this study, dilution of the tap water sample by adding 4% MeOH (v/v) was observed to be adequate to compensate for the signal suppression. The recoveries of the samples fortified with MC-LR (0.2, 1, and 10 µg/L) for three different tap water samples ranged from 84.4% to 112.9%.

  3. Matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry for the identification of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, R; Ball, D; Dolphin, H; Dave, J

    2016-09-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) was compared with the API NH biochemical method for the identification of Neisseria gonorrhoeae in routine clinical samples. A retrospective review of laboratory records for 1090 isolates for which both biochemical and MALDI-TOF MS identifications were available was performed. Cases of discrepant results were examined in detail for evidence supportive of a particular organism identification. Of 1090 isolates, 1082 were identified as N. gonorrhoeae by API NH. MALDI-TOF MS successfully identified 984 (91%) of these after one analysis, rising to 1081 (99.9%) after two analyses, with a positive predictive value of 99.3%. For those isolates requiring a repeat analysis, failure to generate an identifiable proteomic signature was the reason in 76% of cases, with alternative initial identifications accounting for the remaining 24%. MALDI-TOF MS identified eight isolates as N. gonorrhoeae that were not identified as such by API NH-examination of these discrepant results suggested that the MALDI-TOF MS identification may be the more reliable. MALDI-TOF MS is at least as accurate and reliable a method of identifying N. gonorrhoeae as API NH. We propose that MALDI-TOF MS could potentially be used as a single method for N. gonorrhoeae identification in routine cases by laboratories with access to this technology.

  4. Direct analysis of pharmaceutical tablet formulations using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionisation Mass Spectrometry Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earnshaw, Caroline J; Carolan, Vikki A; Richards, Don S; Clench, Malcolm R

    2010-06-15

    Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionisation Mass Spectrometry Imaging (MALDI MSI) has been used to directly analyse a range of tablets in order to assess the homogeneity of the active drug compound throughout the excipients contained within the tablets studied. The information gained from the imaging experiments can be used to improve and gain a greater understanding of the manufacturing process; such knowledge will enable improvements in finished product quality to make safer and more efficacious tablet formulations. Commercially available and prescription tablet formulations have been analysed, including aspirin, paracetamol, sildenafil citrate (Viagra(R)) and a batch of tablets in development (tablet X: placebo; 1 mg; 3 mg and 6 mg). MALDI MSI provides semi-quantitative information that is related to ion abundance, therefore Principal Component Analysis (PCA), a multivariate analysis technique, has been used to differentiate between tablets containing different amounts of active drug ingredient. Aspects of sample preparation have also been investigated with regard to tablet shape and texture. The results obtained indicate that MALDI MSI can be used effectively to analyse the spatial distribution of the active pharmaceutical component (API) in pharmaceutical tablet formulations.

  5. Whole Reproductive System Non-Negative Matrix Factorization Mass Spectrometry Imaging of an Early-Stage Ovarian Cancer Mouse Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin R L Paine

    Full Text Available High-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC is the most common and deadliest form of ovarian cancer. Yet it is largely asymptomatic in its initial stages. Studying the origin and early progression of this disease is thus critical in identifying markers for early detection and screening purposes. Tissue-based mass spectrometry imaging (MSI can be employed as an unbiased way of examining localized metabolic changes between healthy and cancerous tissue directly, at the onset of disease. In this study, we describe MSI results from Dicer-Pten double-knockout (DKO mice, a mouse model faithfully reproducing the clinical nature of human HGSC. By using non-negative matrix factorization (NMF for the unsupervised analysis of desorption electrospray ionization (DESI datasets, tissue regions are segregated based on spectral components in an unbiased manner, with alterations related to HGSC highlighted. Results obtained by combining NMF with DESI-MSI revealed several metabolic species elevated in the tumor tissue and/or surrounding blood-filled cyst including ceramides, sphingomyelins, bilirubin, cholesterol sulfate, and various lysophospholipids. Multiple metabolites identified within the imaging study were also detected at altered levels within serum in a previous metabolomic study of the same mouse model. As an example workflow, features identified in this study were used to build an oPLS-DA model capable of discriminating between DKO mice with early-stage tumors and controls with up to 88% accuracy.

  6. Whole Reproductive System Non-Negative Matrix Factorization Mass Spectrometry Imaging of an Early-Stage Ovarian Cancer Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jaeyeon; Bennett, Rachel V.; Parry, R. Mitchell; Gaul, David A.; Wang, May D.; Matzuk, Martin M.; Fernández, Facundo M.

    2016-01-01

    High-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC) is the most common and deadliest form of ovarian cancer. Yet it is largely asymptomatic in its initial stages. Studying the origin and early progression of this disease is thus critical in identifying markers for early detection and screening purposes. Tissue-based mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) can be employed as an unbiased way of examining localized metabolic changes between healthy and cancerous tissue directly, at the onset of disease. In this study, we describe MSI results from Dicer-Pten double-knockout (DKO) mice, a mouse model faithfully reproducing the clinical nature of human HGSC. By using non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) for the unsupervised analysis of desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) datasets, tissue regions are segregated based on spectral components in an unbiased manner, with alterations related to HGSC highlighted. Results obtained by combining NMF with DESI-MSI revealed several metabolic species elevated in the tumor tissue and/or surrounding blood-filled cyst including ceramides, sphingomyelins, bilirubin, cholesterol sulfate, and various lysophospholipids. Multiple metabolites identified within the imaging study were also detected at altered levels within serum in a previous metabolomic study of the same mouse model. As an example workflow, features identified in this study were used to build an oPLS-DA model capable of discriminating between DKO mice with early-stage tumors and controls with up to 88% accuracy. PMID:27159635

  7. Characterization of phenol and alkyl phenols in organic matrixes with monoethylene glycol extraction and multidimensional gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luong, J; Gras, R; Cortes, H J; Shellie, R A

    2013-07-02

    The use of monoethylene glycol as an extraction medium for removing phenol and alkyl phenols in organic matrixes such as hydrocarbons is introduced and combined with a practical analytical multidimensional gas chromatography approach. The analytical approach has been successfully developed for the characterization of phenol, cresols, xylenols, and alkyl phenols like 4-ethylphenol and 2,3,5-trimethylphenol. The technique employs a single-step extraction of the analytes with monoethylene glycol and sonication, followed by multidimensional gas chromatography with mass spectrometry in selected ion monitoring mode for the detection and quantitation. Extraction efficiency of phenol approached 100% while cresols, xylenols, and 4-ethylphenol were 97% or higher and 2,3,5-trimethylphenol was better than 91% under the analytical conditions used. With the technique described, a complete analysis can be conducted in less than 16 min. Reproducibility of area counts at two levels, namely, 5 ppm(w) and 50 ppm(w) over a period of 2 days were found to be less than 4% (n = 20). The analytes of interest was found to be linear over a range from 100 ppb(w) to 250 ppm(w) with correlation coefficient of at least 0.999 and detection limit of 50 ppb(w) . Spike recoveries from 500 ppb(w) to 250 ppm(w) for all analytes range from 96 to 102%.

  8. Rapid differentiation of Panax ginseng and Panax quinquefolius by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ying-Han; So, Pui-Kin; Lo, Samual Chun-Lap; Ng, Eddy Wing Yin; Poon, Terence Chuen Wai; Yao, Zhong-Ping

    2012-11-13

    A matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS)-based method has been developed for rapid differentiation between Panax ginseng and Panax quinquefolius, two herbal medicines with similar chemical and physical properties but different therapeutic effects. This method required only a small quantity of samples, and the herbal medicines were analyzed by MALDI-MS either after a brief extraction step, or directly on the powder form or small pieces of raw samples. The acquired MALDI-MS spectra showed different patterns of ginsenosides and small chemical molecules between P. ginseng and P. quinquefolius, thus allowing unambiguous differentiation between the two Panax species based on the specific ions, intensity ratios of characteristic ions or principal component analysis. The approach could also be used to differentiate red ginseng or P. quinquefolius adulterated with P. ginseng from pure P. ginseng and pure Panax quinquefolium. The intensity ratios of characteristic ions in the MALDI-MS spectra showed high reproducibility and enabled quantitative determination of ginsenosides in the herbal samples and percentage of P. quinquefolius in the adulterated binary mixture. The method is simple, rapid, robust, and can be extended for analysis of other herbal medicines. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. omniSpect: an open MATLAB-based tool for visualization and analysis of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization and desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, R Mitchell; Galhena, Asiri S; Gamage, Chaminda M; Bennett, Rachel V; Wang, May D; Fernández, Facundo M

    2013-04-01

    We present omniSpect, an open source web- and MATLAB-based software tool for both desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) that performs computationally intensive functions on a remote server. These functions include converting data from a variety of file formats into a common format easily manipulated in MATLAB, transforming time-series mass spectra into mass spectrometry images based on a probe spatial raster path, and multivariate analysis. OmniSpect provides an extensible suite of tools to meet the computational requirements needed for visualizing open and proprietary format MSI data.

  10. Structure Determination of β-Glucans from Ganoderma lucidum with Matrix-assisted Laser Desorption/ionization (MALDI Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Bin Yang

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available A novel method that uses matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI mass spectrometry to analyze molecular weight and sequencing of glucan in Ganoderma lucidum is presented. Thus, β-glucan, which was isolated from fruiting bodies of G. lucidum, was measured in a direct and fast way using MALDI mass spectrometry. In addition, tandem mass spectrometry of permethylated glucans of G. lucidum, dextran, curdlan and maltohexaose were also pursued and different fragment patterns were obtained. The G. lucidum glucan structure was determined and this method for linkage analysis of permethylated glucan has been proven feasible.

  11. Stationary phase thickness determines the quality of thin-layer chromatography/matrix-assisted laser desorption and ionization mass spectra of lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesinger, Hans; Fuchs, Beate; Süß, Rosmarie; Matheis, Katerina; Schulz, Michael; Schiller, Jürgen

    2014-04-15

    Normal phase thin-layer chromatography (NP TLC) is an established method of (phospho)lipid analysis. The determination of the fatty acyl composition is, however, a more challenging task by NP TLC. The direct coupling of TLC separation with mass spectrometric detection (e.g., matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry, MALDI MS), however, enables a detailed characterization of complex lipid mixtures. Here we show that the thickness of the silica gel layer has a considerable effect on the quality of the mass spectra recorded directly from the TLC plate. In particular, the intensity of the matrix background signals can be reduced if "thinner" TLC layers are used. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Simplified sample preparation method for protein identification by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry: in-gel digestion on the probe surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensballe, A; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2001-01-01

    Identification and detailed characterization of complex mixtures of proteins separated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) require optimized and robust methods for interfacing electrophoretic techniques to mass spectrometry. Peptide mapping by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-......Identification and detailed characterization of complex mixtures of proteins separated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) require optimized and robust methods for interfacing electrophoretic techniques to mass spectrometry. Peptide mapping by matrix-assisted laser desorption...... for protein identification similar to that obtained by the traditional protocols for in-gel digestion and MALDI peptide mass mapping of human proteins, i.e. approximately 60%. The overall performance of the novel on-probe digestion method is comparable with that of the standard in-gel sample preparation...

  13. MoS2/Ag nanohybrid: A novel matrix with synergistic effect for small molecule drugs analysis by negative-ion matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yaju; Deng, Guoqing; Liu, Xiaohui; Sun, Liang; Li, Hui; Cheng, Quan; Xi, Kai; Xu, Danke

    2016-09-21

    This paper reports a facile synthesis of molybdenum disulfide nanosheets/silver nanoparticles (MoS2/Ag) hybrid and its use as an effective matrix in negative ion matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The nanohybrid exerts a strong synergistic effect, leading to high performance detection of small molecule analytes including amino acids, peptides, fatty acids and drugs. The enhancement of laser desorption/ionization (LDI) efficiency is largely attributed to the high surface roughness and large surface area for analyte adsorption, better dispersibility, increased thermal conductivity and enhanced UV energy absorption as compared to pure MoS2. Moreover, both Ag nanoparticles and the edge of the MoS2 layers function as deprotonation sites for proton capture, facilitating the charging process in negative ion mode and promoting formation of negative ions. As a result, the MoS2/Ag nanohybrid proves to be a highly attractive matrix in MALDI-TOF MS, with desired features such as high desorption/ionization efficiency, low fragmentation interference, high salt tolerance, and no sweet-spots for mass signal. These characteristic properties allowed for simultaneous analysis of eight different drugs and quantification of acetylsalicylic acid in the spiked human serum. This work demonstrates for the first time the fabrication and application of a novel MoS2/Ag hybrid, and provides a new platform for use in the rapid and high throughput analysis of small molecules by mass spectrometry.

  14. ARTICLES: Influence Factors on Particle Growth for On-line Aerosol Matrix-assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-flight Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Wei-wei; Ti, Ru-fang; Zhang, Zi-Iiang; Zheng, Hai-yang; Fang, Li

    2010-06-01

    An evaporation/condensation flow cell was developed and interfaced with the matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight mass spectrometer for on-line bioaerosol detection and characterization, which allows matrix addition by condensation onto the laboratory-generated bioaerosol particles. The final coated particle exiting from the condenser is then introduced into the aerodynamic particle sizer spectrometer or home-built aerosol laser time-of-flight mass spectrometer, and its aerodynamic size directly effects on the matrix-to-analyte molar ratio, which is very important for MALDI technique. In order to observe the protonated analyte molecular ion, and then determine the classification of biological aerosols, the matrix-to-analyte molar ratio must be appropriate. Four experimental parameters, including the temperature of the heated reservoir, the initial particle size, its number concentration, and the matrix material, were tested experimentally to analyze their influences on the final particle size. This technique represents an on-line system of detection that has the potential to provide rapid and reliable identification of airborne biological aerosols.

  15. Simultaneous determination of phenolic compounds in Equisetum palustre L. by ultra high performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry combined with matrix solid-phase dispersion extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zuofu; Pan, Youzhi; Li, Lu; Huang, Yuyang; Qi, Xiaolin; Luo, Meng; Zu, Yuangang; Fu, Yujie

    2014-11-01

    A method based on matrix solid-phase dispersion extraction followed by ultra high performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry is presented for the extraction and determination of phenolic compounds in Equisetum palustre. This method combines the high efficiency of matrix solid-phase dispersion extraction and the rapidity, sensitivity, and accuracy of ultra high performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. The influential parameters of the matrix solid-phase dispersion extraction were investigated and optimized. The optimized conditions were as follows: silica gel was selected as dispersing sorbent, the ratio of silica gel to sample was selected to be 2:1 (400/200 mg), and 8 mL of 80% methanol was used as elution solvent. Furthermore, a fast and sensitive ultra high performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry method was developed for the determination of nine phenolic compounds in E. palustre. This method was carried out within <6 min, and exhibited satisfactory linearity, precision, and recovery. Compared with ultrasound-assisted extraction, the proposed matrix solid-phase dispersion procedure possessed higher extraction efficiency, and was more convenient and time saving with reduced requirements on sample and solvent amounts. All these results suggest that the developed method represents an excellent alternative for the extraction and determination of active components in plant matrices.

  16. Matrix effect in the analysis of drugs of abuse from urine with desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization-mass spectrometry (DAPPI-MS) and desorption electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (DESI-MS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suni, Niina M.; Lindfors, Pia; Laine, Olli [Division of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 56, Helsinki FI-00014 (Finland); Ostman, Pekka; Ojanperae, Ilkka [Hjelt Institute, Department of Forensic Medicine, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 40, Helsinki FI-00014 (Finland); Kotiaho, Tapio [Division of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 56, Helsinki FI-00014 (Finland); Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 55, Helsinki FI-00014 (Finland); Kauppila, Tiina J. [Division of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 56, Helsinki FI-00014 (Finland); Kostiainen, Risto, E-mail: risto.kostiainen@helsinki.fi [Division of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 56, Helsinki FI-00014 (Finland)

    2011-08-05

    Highlights: {yields} DAPPI-MS and DESI-MSI in the analysis of drugs of abuse from urine. {yields} DAPPI-MS has better urine matrix tolerance over DESI-MS. {yields} Urine matrix can affect the ionization mechanism in DAPPI. {yields} DAPPI-MS/MS can be used for screening of drugs from urine after sample pretreatment. - Abstract: We have studied the matrix effect within direct analysis of benzodiazepines and opioids from urine with desorption electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) and desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization-mass spectrometry (DAPPI-MS). The urine matrix was found to affect the ionization mechanism of the opioids in DAPPI-MS favoring proton transfer over charge exchange reaction. The sensitivity for the drugs in solvent matrix was at the same level with DESI-MS and DAPPI-MS (LODs 0.05-6 {mu}g mL{sup -1}) but the decrease in sensitivity due to the urine matrix was higher with DESI (typically 20-160-fold) than with DAPPI (typically 2-15-fold) indicating better matrix tolerance of DAPPI over DESI. Also in MS/MS mode, DAPPI provided better sensitivity than DESI for the drugs in urine. The feasibility of DAPPI-MS/MS was then studied in screening the same drugs from five authentic, forensic post mortem urine samples. A reference measurement with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) (including pretreatment) revealed 16 findings from the samples, whereas with DAPPI-MS/MS after sample pretreatment, 15 findings were made. Sample pretreatment was found necessary, since only eight findings were made from the same samples untreated.

  17. [Characterization of matrix effects in microanalysis of sulfide minerals by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry based on an element pair method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ji-hai; Zhan, Xiu-chun; Hu, Ming-yue; Zhao, Ling-hao; Sun, Dong-yang

    2015-02-01

    Matrix effect between reference materials and samples is one of the major factors affecting the accuracy of analytical results by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). However, there is no method or calculation formula to quantify matrix effect between standards and samples up to date. In this paper, the linear correlation coefficient r of the Ii/I(is-Ci)/Cis graphs of element pairs were used to characterize the matrix effect, which took the ratios of concentrations (ci/ c(is)) and intensities (Ii/Iis) of the analytical element and internal standard element as x-axis and gamma-axis, respectively. Matrix effects of 6 element pairs in 13 glass reference materials, 2 sulfide reference materials and 2 sulfide minerals using Fe as internal standard was studied, with the linear correlation coefficient r of Fe-Cu, Fe-Zn element pairs both less than 0. 999 and trace Fe--Mn, Fe--Co, Fe--Ga, Fe--Pb element pairs all better than 0.999. Matrix effects of 3 major element pairs in 2 sulfide ref- erence materials and 6 sulfide minerals using S as internal standard was also studied, with the linear correlation coefficient r of S--Fe, S--Cu, S--Zn all less than 0.999. The great majority of relative errors of EMPA analytical results for major elements in sulfide minerals were greater than 10%, whether analyzed using Fe as internal standard with glass reference materials as external standard, or S as internal standard with sulfide reference materials MASS-1, IMER-1 as external standard, respectively. But the most analytical results for trace elements calibrated by glass reference materials using Fe as internal standard were well agreed with sulfide standard MASS-1, with the relative errors less than 15%. The results showed that matrix effects existed in glass reference materials, sulfide reference materials and sulfide minerals, and it also proved a certain rationality and practicability for quantification of matrix effect using the linear

  18. Localization of ergot alkaloids in sclerotia of Claviceps purpurea by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dopstadt, Julian; Vens-Cappell, Simeon; Neubauer, Lisa; Tudzynski, Paul; Cramer, Benedikt; Dreisewerd, Klaus; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich

    2017-02-01

    The fungus Claviceps purpurea produces highly toxic ergot alkaloids and accumulates these in the hardened bodies of fungal mycelium. These so-called sclerotia, or ergot bodies, replace the crop seed of infected plants, which can include numerous important food- and feedstuff such as rye and wheat. While several studies have explored details of the infection process and development of ergot bodies, little information is available on the spatial distribution of the mycotoxins in the sclerotia. Here we used matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) at a lateral resolution of 35 μm to visualize the distribution of two representative alkaloids, ergocristine and ergometrine, produced by Ecc93 and Gal 310 variants of C. purpurea, respectively, after infection of rye. To improve cryosectioning of this fragile biological material tissue with complex texture, we developed a practical embedding protocol based on cellulose polymers. The MALDI-MS images recorded from the so produced intact tissues sections revealed that ergometrine exhibited a relatively homogeneous distribution throughout the ergot body, whereas ergocristine was found to be enriched in the proximal region. This finding can be correlated to the morphological development of sclerotia as ergot alkaloids are only produced in the sphacelial stage. The ability to localize toxins and other secondary metabolites in intact sections of crop-infecting fungi with high lateral resolution renders MALDI-MSI a powerful tool for investigating biosynthetic pathways and for obtaining a deeper understanding of the parasite-host interaction. Graphical abstract Workflow for identification and spatial localization of ergot alkaloids in infected rye grains.

  19. Structural Characterization of Neutral Saccharides by Negative Ion MALDI Mass Spectrometry Using a Superbasic Proton Sponge as Deprotonating Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvano, Cosima Damiana; Cataldi, Tommaso R. I.; Kögel, Julius F.; Monopoli, Antonio; Palmisano, Francesco; Sundermeyer, Jorge

    2017-08-01

    The superbasic proton sponge 1,8-bis(tripyrrolidinylphosphazenyl)naphthalene (TPPN) has been successfully employed for the structural characterization of neutral saccharides, cyclodextrins, and saccharide alditols by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS/MS). Owing to its inherently high basicity, TPPN is capable of deprotonating neutral carbohydrates (M) providing an efficient and simple way to produce gas-phase [M - H]- ions. Highly informative negative ions MS/MS spectra showing several diagnostic fragment ions were obtained, mainly A-type cross-ring and C-type glycosidic cleavages. Indeed, cross-ring cleavages of monosaccharides with formation of 0,2A, 0,3A, 2,4A, 2,5A, 3,5A, and 0,3X product ions dominate the MS/MS spectra. A significant difference between reducing (e.g., lactose, maltose) and non-reducing disaccharides (e.g., sucrose, trehalose) was observed. Though disaccharides with the anomeric positions blocked give rise to deprotonated molecules, [M - H]-, at m/ z 341.1, reducing ones exhibited a peak at m/ z 340.1, most likely as radical anion, [M - H•- H]-•. The superiority of TPPN was clearly demonstrated by comparison with well recognized matrices, such as 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid and 2',4',6'-trihydroxyacetophenone (positive ion mode) and nor-harman (negative ion mode). MALDI MS/MS experiments on isotopically labeled sugars have greatly supported the interpretation of plausible fragmentation pathways.

  20. Rapid screening of mixed edible oils and gutter oils by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, Tsz-Tsun; So, Pui-Kin; Zheng, Bo [Food Safety and Technology Research Centre, State Key Laboratory of Chirosciences and Department of Applied Biology and Chemical Technology, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom Kowloon, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (China); Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Food Biological Safety Control and State Key Laboratory of Chinese Medicine and Molecular Pharmacology (Incubation), Shenzhen Research Institute of The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Shenzhen (China); Yao, Zhong-Ping, E-mail: zhongping.yao@polyu.edu.hk [Food Safety and Technology Research Centre, State Key Laboratory of Chirosciences and Department of Applied Biology and Chemical Technology, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom Kowloon, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (China); Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Food Biological Safety Control and State Key Laboratory of Chinese Medicine and Molecular Pharmacology (Incubation), Shenzhen Research Institute of The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Shenzhen (China)

    2015-07-16

    Highlights: • Simplified sample preparation method for direct analysis of edible oils by MALDI-MS. • Establishment of a preliminary MALDI-MS spectral database of edible oils. • Rapid screening of mixed edible oils and gutter oils. - Abstract: Authentication of edible oils is a long-term issue in food safety, and becomes particularly important with the emergence and wide spread of gutter oils in recent years. Due to the very high analytical demand and diversity of gutter oils, a high throughput analytical method and a versatile strategy for authentication of mixed edible oils and gutter oils are highly desirable. In this study, an improved matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) method has been developed for direct analysis of edible oils. This method involved on-target sample loading, automatic data acquisition and simple data processing. MALDI-MS spectra with high quality and high reproducibility have been obtained using this method, and a preliminary spectral database of edible oils has been set up. The authenticity of an edible oil sample can be determined by comparing its MALDI-MS spectrum and principal component analysis (PCA) results with those of its labeled oil in the database. This method is simple and the whole process only takes several minutes for analysis of one oil sample. We demonstrated that the method was sensitive to change in oil compositions and can be used for measuring compositions of mixed oils. The capability of the method for determining mislabeling enables it for rapid screening of gutter oils since fraudulent mislabeling is a common feature of gutter oils.

  1. Measurement of macrocyclic trichothecene in floor dust of water-damaged buildings using gas chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry-dust matrix effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Rena; Park, Ju-Hyeong; LeBouf, Ryan; Green, Brett J; Park, Yeonmi

    2016-01-01

    Gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) was used to detect fungal secondary metabolites. Detection of verrucarol, the hydrolysis product of Stachybotrys chartarum macrocyclic trichothecene (MCT), was confounded by matrix effects associated with heterogeneous indoor environmental samples. In this study, we examined the role of dust matrix effects associated with GC-MS/MS to better quantify verrucarol in dust as a measure of total MCT. The efficiency of the internal standard (ISTD, 1,12-dodecanediol), and application of a matrix-matched standard correction method in measuring MCT in floor dust of water-damaged buildings was additionally examined. Compared to verrucarol, ISTD had substantially higher matrix effects in the dust extracts. The results of the ISTD evaluation showed that without ISTD adjustment, there was a 280% ion enhancement in the dust extracts compared to neat solvent. The recovery of verrucarol was 94% when the matrix-matched standard curve without the ISTD was used. Using traditional calibration curves with ISTD adjustment, none of the 21 dust samples collected from water damaged buildings were detectable. In contrast, when the matrix-matched calibration curves without ISTD adjustment were used, 38% of samples were detectable. The study results suggest that floor dust of water-damaged buildings may contain MCT. However, the measured levels of MCT in dust using the GC-MS/MS method could be significantly under- or overestimated, depending on the matrix effects, the inappropriate ISTD, or combination of the two. Our study further shows that the routine application of matrix-matched calibration may prove useful in obtaining accurate measurements of MCT in dust derived from damp indoor environments, while no isotopically labeled verrucarol is available.

  2. The high-mass component (>m/z 10 000) of coal tar pitch by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry and size-exclusion chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millan, Marcos; Morgan, Trevor J; Behrouzi, Mahtab; Karaca, Fatma; Galmes, Carolina; Herod, Alan A; Kandiyoti, Rafael

    2005-01-01

    The size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) of acetone-soluble, pyridine-soluble and pyridine-insoluble fractions of a coal tar pitch indicates a bimodal distribution in each fraction. The proportion of high-mass material excluded from the SEC column porosity increases with solvent polarity. The polymer calibration of SEC shows the mass range of the small molecules to be from approximately 100 u to approximately 6000 u, with the mass range of the large excluded molecules above 200 000 u and up to several million u. In contrast, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) shows a similar low-mass range of ion abundances (< m/z 6000), but with a smaller range of high-mass ion abundances, from approximately m/z 10 000 to 100 000. The large molecules may have three-dimensional structures to allow molecules of relatively low mass to behave as if they are of large size in SEC. Laser desorption mass spectrometry of the acetone- and pyridine-soluble fractions produced molecular ions of polycyclic aromatics that can be related to the known compositions from gas chromatography (GC) mass spectrometry. The experimental conditions used to generate the bimodal distribution by MALDI-MS involve reducing the ion signal intensities to avoid overload of the detector and enable detection of the high-mass ions, by reducing the high-mass detector voltage (i.e. sensitivity) and increasing the laser power.

  3. Sublimation of new matrix candidates for high spatial resolution imaging mass spectrometry of lipids: enhanced information in both positive and negative polarities after 1,5-diaminonapthalene deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Aurélien; Charbonneau, Jade Laveaux; Fournaise, Erik; Chaurand, Pierre

    2012-02-21

    Matrix sublimation has demonstrated to be a powerful approach for high-resolution matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) imaging of lipids, providing very homogeneous solvent-free deposition. This work presents a comprehensive study aiming to evaluate current and novel matrix candidates for high spatial resolution MALDI imaging mass spectrometry of lipids from tissue section after deposition by sublimation. For this purpose, 12 matrices including 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB), sinapinic acid (SA), α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA), 2,6-dihydroxyacetphenone (DHA), 2',4',6'-trihydroxyacetophenone (THAP), 3-hydroxypicolinic acid (3-HPA), 1,8-bis(dimethylamino)naphthalene (DMAN), 1,8,9-anthracentriol (DIT), 1,5-diaminonapthalene (DAN), p-nitroaniline (NIT), 9-aminoacridine (9-AA), and 2-mercaptobenzothiazole (MBT) were investigated for lipid detection efficiency in both positive and negative ionization modes, matrix interferences, and stability under vacuum. For the most relevant matrices, ion maps of the different lipid species were obtained from tissue sections at high spatial resolution and the detected peaks were characterized by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight/time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF) mass spectrometry. First proposed for imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) after sublimation, DAN has demonstrated to be of high efficiency providing rich lipid signatures in both positive and negative polarities with high vacuum stability and sub-20 μm resolution capacity. Ion images from adult mouse brain were generated with a 10 μm scanning resolution. Furthermore, ion images from adult mouse brain and whole-body fish tissue sections were also acquired in both polarity modes from the same tissue section at 100 μm spatial resolution. Sublimation of DAN represents an interesting approach to improve information with respect to currently employed matrices providing a deeper analysis of the lipidome by IMS.

  4. Solvent selection for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometric analysis of synthetic polymers employing solubility parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Heike; Ehmann, Thomas; Otto, Matthias

    2010-08-30

    The principle relating to the selection of a proper matrix, cationization reagent, and solvent for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) of synthetic polymers is still a topic of research. In this work we focused on the selection of a suitable MALDI solvent. Polystyrene PS7600 and poly(ethylene glycol) PEG4820 were analyzed by MALDI-TOF MS using various solvents which were selected based on the Hansen solubility parameter system. For polystyrene (PS), dithranol was used as the matrix and silver trifluoroacetate as the cationization reagent whereas, for poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), the combination of 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid and sodium trifluoroacetate was used for all experiments. When employing solvents which dissolve PS and PEG, reliable MALDI mass spectra were obtained while samples in non-solvents (solvents which are not able to dissolve the polymer) failed to provide spectra. It seems that the solubility of the matrix and the cationization reagent are less important than the polymer solubility.

  5. Ionic matrices pre-spotted matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization plates for patient maker following in course of treatment, drug titration, and MALDI mass spectrometry imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnel, David; Franck, Julien; Mériaux, Céline; Salzet, Michel; Fournier, Isabelle

    2013-03-01

    In the current study, we compared plastic matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) plates pre-spotted with different solid ionic matrices. Data reflect that after 3 months of storage, the standards were oxidized in α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (HCCA) whether or not in HCCA/3-acetylpyridine (3APY) and HCCA/aniline, and certain peptides, such as ubiquitin, were not detected using the HCCA matrix, whereas they were detected in pre-spotted ionic matrices. Application in peptidomics of these MALDI matrices pre-spotted plates (after 3 months of storage) with ovarian cyst fluid showed less intense signals with HCCA than with solid ionic matrices. We show that these pre-spotted ionic matrices plates can be used for relative drug quantification, high mass protein detection, and MALDI mass spectrometry imaging.

  6. Characterization of some synthetic Ru and Ir complexes by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lou, X.; Buijtenen, J. van; Bastiaansen, J.J.A.M.; Waal, B.F.M. de; Langeveld, B.M.W.; Dongen, J.L.J. van

    2005-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOFMS) was applied to the analysis of Ru(OCOCF 3)2(CO)(PPh3)2, Ru(OCOC 3F7)2(CO)(PPh3)2, Ir(tBuppy)3 and Ir(ppy)2(acac) complexes. A troublesome problem in the MALDI-TOFMS characterization of these metal complexes is

  7. Evaluation of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry for species identification of nonfermenting Gram-negative bacilli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almuzara, Marisa; Barberis, Claudia; Traglia, Germán; Famiglietti, Angela; Ramirez, Maria Soledad; Vay, Carlos

    2015-05-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) to identify 396 Nonfermenting Gram-Negative Bacilli clinical isolates was evaluated in comparison with conventional phenotypic tests and/or molecular methods. MALDI-TOF MS identified to species level 256 isolates and to genus or complex level 112 isolates. It identified 29 genera including uncommon species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A Measurement of the Top Quark Mass with the D0 Detector at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV using the Matrix Element Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroeninger, Kevin Alexander; /Bonn U.

    2004-04-01

    Using a data set of 158 and 169 pb{sup -1} of D0 Run-II data in the electron and muon plus jets channel, respectively, the top quark mass has been measured using the Matrix Element Method. The method and its implementation are described. Its performance is studied in Monte Carlo using ensemble tests and the method is applied to the Moriond 2004 data set.

  9. Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry for Differentiation of the Dimorphic Fungal Species Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and Paracoccidioides lutzii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Negro, Gilda M. B.; Grenfell, Rafaella C.; Vidal, Monica S. M.; Thomaz, Danilo Y.; de Figueiredo, Dulce S. Y.; Bagagli, Eduardo; Juliano, Luiz; Benard, Gil

    2015-01-01

    Isolates of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and Paracoccidioides lutzii, previously characterized by molecular techniques, were identified for the first time by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). All isolates were correctly identified, with log score values of >2.0. Thus, MALDI-TOF MS is a new tool for differentiating species of the genus Paracoccidioides. PMID:25631803

  10. Does the Capsule Interfere with Performance of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry for Identification of Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenfell, Rafaella C.; Vidal, Monica S. M.; Giudice, Mauro C.; Del Negro, Gilda M. B.; Juliano, Luiz; Benard, Gil; de Almeida Júnior, João N.

    2015-01-01

    We described the impact of the capsule size for Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii identification at the species level by Bruker matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). After experimental capsule size modulation, we observed that reducing the capsule size resulted in improved identification by Bruker MALDI-TOF MS across all of the reference strains analyzed. PMID:26659203

  11. A Measurement of the Top Quark Mass with the D0 Detector at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV using the Matrix Element Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroeninger, Kevin Alexander; /Bonn U.

    2004-04-01

    Using a data set of 158 and 169 pb{sup -1} of D0 Run-II data in the electron and muon plus jets channel, respectively, the top quark mass has been measured using the Matrix Element Method. The method and its implementation are described. Its performance is studied in Monte Carlo using ensemble tests and the method is applied to the Moriond 2004 data set.

  12. Characterization of some synthetic Ru and Ir complexes by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lou, X.; Buijtenen, J. van; Bastiaansen, J.J.A.M.; Waal, B.F.M. de; Langeveld, B.M.W.; Dongen, J.L.J. van

    2005-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOFMS) was applied to the analysis of Ru(OCOCF 3)2(CO)(PPh3)2, Ru(OCOC 3F7)2(CO)(PPh3)2, Ir(tBuppy)3 and Ir(ppy)2(acac) complexes. A troublesome problem in the MALDI-TOFMS characterization of these metal complexes is

  13. Identification of non-diphtheriae corynebacterium by use of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alatoom, Adnan A; Cazanave, Charles J; Cunningham, Scott A; Ihde, Sherry M; Patel, Robin

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the Bruker Biotyper matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry for identification of 92 clinical isolates of Corynebacterium species in comparison to identification using rpoB or 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Eighty isolates (87%) yielded a score of ≥1.700, and all of these were correctly identified to the species level with the exception of Corynebacterium aurimucosum being misidentified as the closely related Corynebacterium minutissimum.

  14. Assessment of Reproducibility of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry for Bacterial and Yeast Identification

    OpenAIRE

    Westblade, Lars F.; Garner, Omai B.; MacDonald,Karen; Bradford, Constance; Pincus, David H.; Mochon, A. Brian; Jennemann, Rebecca; Manji, Ryhana; Bythrow, Maureen; Lewinski, Michael A.; Burnham, Carey-Ann D.; Ginocchio, Christine C.

    2015-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) has revolutionized the identification of clinical bacterial and yeast isolates. However, data describing the reproducibility of MALDI-TOF MS for microbial identification are scarce. In this study, we show that MALDI-TOF MS-based microbial identification is highly reproducible and can tolerate numerous variables, including differences in testing environments, instruments, operators, reagent lots, and ...

  15. Differentiation of Raoultella ornithinolytica/planticola and Klebsiella oxytoca clinical isolates by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Eefje; de Jong, Arjan S; Smidts-van den Berg, Nathalie; Rentenaar, Rob J

    2013-04-01

    Ninety-nine clinical isolates previously identified as Klebsiella oxytoca were evaluated using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Eight isolates were identified as Raoultella spp., being 5 Raoultella spp. and 3 K. oxytoca, by 16S rRNA sequencing. These isolates were correctly identified by applying the 10% differential rule for the MALDI-TOF MS score values. This approach might be useful to discriminate Raoultella species from K. oxytoca.

  16. Influence of Culture Media on Detection of Carbapenem Hydrolysis by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Ana Carolina; Carvalhaes, Cecília Godoy; Cordeiro-Moura, Jhonatha Rodrigo; Rockstroh, Anna Carolina; Machado, Antonia Maria Oliveira; Gales, Ana Cristina

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we evaluated the influence of distinct bacterial growth media on detection of carbapenemase hydrolysis by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry. False-negative results were observed for OXA-25-, OXA-26-, and OXA-72-producing Acinetobacter baumannii isolates grown on MacConkey agar medium. The other culture media showed 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity for detecting carbapenemase.

  17. Evaluation and prevention of the negative matrix effect of terpenoids on pesticides in apples quantification by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacinti, Géraldine; Raynaud, Christine; Capblancq, Sophie; Simon, Valérie

    2017-02-03

    The sample matrix can enhance the gas chromatography signal of pesticide residues relative to that obtained with the same concentration of pesticide in solvent. This paper is related to negative matrix effects observed in coupled gas chromatography-mass spectrometry ion trap (GC/MS(2)) quantification of pesticides in concentrated extracts of apple peel prepared by the Quick Easy Cheap Effective Rugged and Safe (QuEChERS) method. It is focused on the pesticides most frequently used on the apple varieties studied, throughout the crop cycle, right up to harvest, to combat pests and diseases and to improve fruit storage properties. Extracts from the fleshy receptacle (flesh), the epiderm (peel) and fruit of three apple varieties were studied by high-performance thin-layer chromatography hyphenated with UV-vis light detection (HPTLC/UV visible). The peel extracts had high concentrations of triterpenic acids (oleanolic and ursolic acids), reaching 25mgkg(-1), whereas these compounds were not detected in the flesh extracts (<0.05mgkg(-1)). A significant relationship has been found between the levels of these molecules and negative matrix effects in GC/MS(2). The differences in the behavior of pesticides with respect to matrix effects can be accounted for by the physicochemical characteristics of the molecules (lone pairs, labile hydrogen, conjugation). The HPTLC/UV visible method developed here for the characterization of QuEChERS extracts acts as a complementary clean-up method, aimed to decrease the negative matrix effects of such extracts.

  18. Evaluation of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry for identification of Candida parapsilosis, C. orthopsilosis and C. metapsilosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiles-Melero, I; García-Rodríguez, J; Gómez-López, A; Mingorance, J

    2012-01-01

    We have evaluated matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry for the rapid identification of Candida parapsilosis, C. orthopsilosis and C. metapsilosis. A total of 103 isolates, including reference strains and clinical isolates, were identified by pyrosequencing of the ITS1 region and then assay by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Concordance between the two methods was 100%, showing that MALDI-TOF may be useful as a rapid and reliable method for discrimination of species within the C. parapsilosis group.

  19. A novel type of matrix for surface-assisted laser desorption-ionization mass spectrometric detection of biomolecules using metal-organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Chien-Ping; Lirio, Stephen; Liu, Wan-Ling; Lin, Chia-Her; Huang, Hsi-Ya

    2015-08-12

    A 3D metal-organic framework (MOF) nanomaterial as matrix for surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (SALDI-MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) was developed for the analysis of complex biomolecules. Unlike other nanoparticle matrices, this MOF nanomaterial does not need chemical modification prior to use. An exceptional signal reproducibility as well as very low background interferences in analyzing mono-/di-saccharides, peptides and complex starch digests demonstrate its high potential for biomolecule assays, especially for small molecules.

  20. Reconstruction of the Higgs mass in events with Higgs bosons decaying into a pair of tau leptons using matrix element techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Bianchini, Lorenzo; Conway, John; Fowlie, Andrew; Marzola, Luca; Veelken, Christian; Perrini, Lucia

    2017-08-01

    We present an algorithm for the reconstruction of the Higgs mass in events with Higgs bosons decaying into a pair of tau leptons. The algorithm is based on matrix element (ME) techniques and achieves a relative resolution on the Higgs boson mass of typically 15-20%. A previous version of the algorithm has been used in analyses of Higgs boson production performed by the CMS collaboration during LHC Run 1. The algorithm is described in detail and its performance on simulated events is assessed. The development of techniques to handle tau decays in the ME formalism represents an important result of this paper.

  1. Laserspray and Matrix-Assisted Ionization Inlet Coupled to High-Field FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry for Peptide and Protein Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyadong, Leonard; Inutan, Ellen D.; Wang, Xu; Hendrickson, Christopher L.; Trimpin, Sarah; Marshall, Alan G.

    2013-03-01

    We present the first coupling of laser spray ionization inlet (LSII) and matrix assisted ionization inlet (MAII) to high-field Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) for generation of electrospray-like ions to take advantage of increased sensitivity, mass range, and mass resolving power afforded by multiple charging. We apply the technique to top-down protein analysis and characterization of metalloproteins. We also present a novel method for generation of multiply-charged copper-peptide complexes with varying degrees of copper adduction by LSII. We show an application of the generated copper-peptide complexes for protein charge state and molecular weight determination, particularly useful for an instrument such as a linear ion trap mass analyzer. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  2. Superfluid phase transition and effects of mass imbalance in the BCS-BEC crossover regime of an ultracold Fermi gas: A self-consistent T-matrix theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanai, Ryo; Ohashi, Yoji

    2014-03-01

    We investigate a two-component Fermi gas with mass imbalance (m↑ ≠m↓ , where mσ is an atomic mass in the σ-component) in the BCS-BEC crossover region. Including pairing fluctuations within a self-consistent T-matrix theory, we examine how the superfluid instability is affected by the presence of mass imbalance. We determine the superfluid region in the phase diagram of a Fermi gas in terms of the temperature, the strength of a pairing interaction, and the ratio of mass imbalance. The superfluid phase transition is shown to always occur even when m↑ ≠m↓ .[2] This behavior of Tc is quite different from the previous result in an extended T-matrix theory,[3] where Tc vanishes at a certain value of m↑ /m↓ > 0 in the BCS regime. Since Fermi condensates with mass imbalance have been discussed in various systems, such as a cold Fermi gas, an exciton(polariton) condensate, as well as color superconductivity, our results would be useful for further understandings of these novel Fermi superfluids. R.H. was supported by Graduate School Doctoral Student Aid Program, Keio University.

  3. An integrated high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry system for the activity-dependent analysis of matrix metalloproteases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freije, Robert; Klein, Theo; Ooms, Bert; Kauffman, Henk F.; Bischoff, Rainer

    2008-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) comprise a family of enzymes that play important roles in mediating angiogenesis, the remodelling of tissues and in cancer metastasis. Consequently, they are attractive targets for therapeutic intervention in chronic inflammation, cancer and neurological disorders. In

  4. Determination of perfluorinated compounds in mollusks by matrix solid-phase dispersion and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaverde-de-Sáa, Eugenia; Quintana, José Benito; Rodil, Rosario; Ferrero-Refojos, Raúl; Rubí, Elisa; Cela, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) have been used for over 40 years in different commercial and industrial applications mainly as surfactants and surface protectors and have become an important class of marine emerging pollutants. This study presents the development and validation of a new analytical method to determine the simultaneous presence of eight PFCs in different kinds of mollusks using matrix solid-phase dispersion (MSPD) followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Simplicity of the analytical procedure, low volume of solvent and quantity of sample required, low global price, and integration of extraction and clean-up into a single step, are the most important advantages of the developed methodology. Solvent, solid support (dispersing agent), clean-up sorbent, and their amounts were optimized by means of an experimental design. In the final method, 0.5 g of sample are dispersed with 0.2 g of diatomaceous earth and transferred into a polypropylene syringe containing 4 g of silica as clean-up sorbent. Then, analytes are eluted with 20 mL of acetonitrile. The extract is finally concentrated to a final volume of 0.5 mL in methanol, avoiding extract dryness in order to prevent evaporation losses and injected in the LC-MS/MS. The combination of this MSPD protocol with LC-MS/MS afforded detection limits from 0.05 to 0.3 ng g(-1). Also, a good linearity was established for the eight PFCs in the range from limit of quantification (LOQ) to 500 ng mL(-1) with R(2) > 0.9917. The recovery of the method was studied with three types of spiked mollusk and was in the 64-126% range. Moreover, a mussel sample was spiked and aged for more than 1 month and analyzed by the developed method and a reference method, ion-pair extraction, for comparison, producing both methods statistically equal concentration values. The method was finally applied to the determination of PFCs in different kinds of mollusks revealing concentrations up to 8.3 ng g(-1) for

  5. Generation of highly charged peptide and protein ions by atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted infrared laser desorption/ionization ion trap mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Simone; Kollas, Oliver; Dreisewerd, Klaus

    2007-07-15

    We show that highly charged ions can be generated if a pulsed infrared laser and a glycerol matrix are employed for atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry with a quadrupole ion trap. Already for small peptides like bradykinin, doubly protonated ions form the most abundant analyte signal in the mass spectra. The center of the charge-state distribution increases with the size of the analyte. For example, insulin is detected with a most abundant ion signal corresponding to a charge state of four, whereas for cytochrome c, the 10 times protonated ion species produces the most intense signal. Myoglobin is observed with up to 13 charges. The high m/z ratios allow us to use the Paul trap for the detection of MALDI-generated protein ions that are, owing to their high molecular weight, not amenable in their singly protonated charge state. Formation of multiple charges critically depends on the addition of diluted acid to the analyte-matrix solution. Tandem mass spectra generated by collision-induced dissociation of doubly charged peptides are also presented. The findings allow speculations about the involvement of electrospray ionization processes in these MALDI experiments.

  6. Structural studies of the allelic wheat glutenin subunits 1Bx7 and 1Bx20 by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry and high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunsolo, Vincenzo; Foti, Salvatore; Saletti, Rosaria; Gilbert, Simon; Tatham, Arthur S; Shewry, Peter R

    2004-01-01

    Structural studies of the high molecular mass (HMM) glutenin subunits 1Bx7 (from cvs Hereward and Galatea) and 1Bx20 (from cv. Bidi17) of bread wheat were conducted using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOFMS) and reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (RP-HPLC/ESI-MS). For all three proteins, MALDI-TOFMS analysis showed that the isolated fractions contained a second component with a mass about 650 Da lower than the major component. The testing and correction of the gene-derived amino acid sequences of the three proteins were performed by direct MALDI-TOFMS analysis of their tryptic peptide mixture. Analysis of the digest was performed by recording several MALDI mass spectra of the mixture at low, medium and high mass ranges, optimizing the matrix and the acquisition parameters for each mass range. Complementary data were obtained by RP-HPLC/ESI-MS analysis of the tryptic digest. This resulted in coverage of about 98% of the sequences. In contrast to the gene-derived data, the results obtained demonstrate the insertion of the sequence QPGQGQ between Trp716 and Gln717 of subunit 1Bx7 (cv. Galatea) and a possible single amino acid substitution within the T20 peptide of subunit 1Bx20. Moreover, the mass spectrometric data demonstrated that the lower mass components present in all the fractions correspond to the major components but lack about six amino acid residues, which are probably lost from the protein C-terminus. Finally, the results obtained provide evidence for the lack of glycosylation or other post-translational modifications of these subunits. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Metabolomic profiling of prostate cancer by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry imaging using Matrix Coating Assisted by an Electric Field (MCAEF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaodong; Han, Jun; Hardie, Darryl B; Yang, Juncong; Pan, Jingxi; Borchers, Christoph H

    2017-07-01

    In this work, we combined the use of two MALDI matrices (quercetin and 9-aminoacridine), a recently developed new matrix coating technique - matrix coating assisted by an electric field (MCAEF), and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization - Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (MALDI-FTICRMS) to detect and image endogenous compounds in the cancerous and non-cancerous regions of three human prostate cancer (stage II) tissue specimens. After three rounds of imaging data acquisitions (i.e., quercetin for positive and negative ion detection and 9-aminoacridine for negative ion detection), and metabolite identification, a total of 1091 metabolites including 1032 lipids and 59 other metabolites were routinely detected and successfully localized. Of these compounds, 250 and 217 were only detected in either the cancerous or the non-cancerous regions respectively, although we cannot rule out the presence of these metabolites at concentrations below the detection limit. In addition, 152 of the other 624 metabolites showed differential distributions (pPeter Hoffmann. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Composite glycerol/graphite/aromatic acid matrices for thin-layer chromatography/matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry of heterocyclic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esparza, Cesar; Borisov, R S; Varlamov, A V; Zaikin, V G

    2016-10-28

    New composite matrices have been suggested for the analysis of mixtures of different synthetic organic compounds (N-containing heterocycles and erectile dysfunction drugs) by thin layer chromatography/matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TLC/MALDI-TOF). Different mixtures of classical MALDI matrices and graphite particles dispersed in glycerol were used for the registration of MALDI mass spectra directly from TLC plates after analytes separation. In most of cases, the mass spectra possessed [M+H](+) ions; however, for some analytes only [M+Na](+) and [M+K](+) ions were observed. These ions have been used to generate visualized TLC chromatograms. The described approach increases the desorption/ionization efficiencies of analytes separated by TLC, prevent spot blurring, simplifies and decrease time for sample preparation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Study of bisphosphonates by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry--influence of alkali atoms on fragmentation patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guénin, Erwann; Lecouvey, Marc; Hardouin, Julie

    2009-05-01

    1-hydroxymethylene-1,1-bisphosphonic acids (or bisphosphonates) are compounds that have interesting pharmacological applications. However, few mass spectrometric investigations have been carried out to determine their fragmentation patterns. Herein, we evaluated different matrices for the study by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOFMS) of the formation and fragmentation of the protonated, the cationized (MNa+ and MK+) and the deprotonated bisphosphonates. Some in-source fragmentations were observed both in positive and in negative ion modes. The fragmentation patterns obtained in post-source decay mode are also discussed. In contrast to previous electrospray ionization/multi-stage mass spectrometry (ESI-MSn) studies, some new fragmentation pathways were deduced and the effects of alkali ions on the fragmentation patterns were shown. The results summarized here completed the data previously recorded by ESI-MSn and could be used for the characterization of bisphosphonates as alkali complexes in biological mixtures.

  10. Multiresidue analysis of multiclass pesticides and polyaromatic hydrocarbons in fatty fish by gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry and evaluation of matrix effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Niladri S; Utture, Sagar; Banerjee, Kaushik; Ahammed Shabeer, T P; Kamble, Narayan; Mathew, Suseela; Ashok Kumar, K

    2016-04-01

    This paper reports a selective and sensitive method for multiresidue determination of 119 chemical residues including pesticides and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in high fatty fish matrix. The novel sample preparation method involved extraction of the target analytes from homogenized fish meat (5 g) in acetonitrile (15 mL, 1% acetic acid) after three-phase partitioning with hexane (2 mL) and the remaining aqueous layer. An aliquot (1.5 mL) of the acetonitrile layer was aspirated and subjected to two-stage dispersive solid phase extraction (dSPE) cleanup and the residues were finally estimated by gas chromatography mass spectrometry with selected reaction monitoring (GC-MS/MS). The co-eluted matrix components were identified on the basis of their accurate mass by GC with quadrupole time of flight MS. Addition of hexane during extraction and optimized dSPE cleanup significantly minimized the matrix effects. Recoveries at 10, 25 and 50 μg/kg were within 60-120% with associated precision, RSD<11%.

  11. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight-mass spectrometry profiling of trace constituents of condom lubricants in the presence of biological fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Sandra E; Kim, Sin Young; Kim, Seoung Bum; Schug, Kevin A

    2011-04-15

    The use of condoms in sexual assault cases has become increasingly common due to the heightened awareness of the use of DNA as evidence in criminal investigations. The ability to identify and differentiate the polymers and additives found in lubricant residues can provide investigators leads and insights as to the perpetrator of a sexual assault. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight-mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) is ideal for detecting condom lubricants and additives; the instrument is capable of surveying analytes across a wide mass range and is a preferred technique for the analysis of polymers. Three MALDI-TOF-MS methods directed toward the detection and differentiation of condom and personal lubricant residues, as well as their mixtures with biological fluids, were developed and compared: (a) a sample premixed with aqueous matrix; (b) a sample premixed with an ionic liquid matrix; and (c) a layering method that incorporates a cationization reagent. Of the three, the layered method that utilized sodium chloride as a cationization reagent showed the best sensitivity and selectivity. This method allowed for the segregation of the various lubricant formulas into a discrete number of groups. Infrared spectroscopy was used to support and clarify the MALDI data. Principal component analysis was used to further demonstrate the ability of this method to segregate various lubricant types into a limited number of classes. Additionally, lubricant residues could be detected in the presence of biological fluids down to a fraction of a percent.

  12. Independent assessment of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) sample preparation quality: A novel statistical approach for quality scoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooijman, Pieter C; Kok, Sander J; Weusten, Jos J A M; Honing, Maarten

    2016-05-05

    Preparation of samples according to an optimized method is crucial for accurate determination of polymer sample characteristics by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization (MALDI) analysis. Sample preparation conditions such as matrix choice, cationization agent, deposition technique or even the deposition volume should be chosen to suit the sample of interest. Many sample preparation protocols have been developed and employed, yet finding the optimal sample preparation protocol remains a challenge. Because an objective comparison between the results of diverse protocols is not possible, "gut-feeling" or "good enough" is often decisive in the search for an optimum. This implies that sub-optimal protocols are used, leading to a loss of mass spectral information quality. To address this problem a novel analytical strategy based on MALDI imaging and statistical data processing was developed in which eight parameters were formulated to objectively quantify the quality of sample deposition and optimal MALDI matrix composition and finally sum up to an overall quality score of the sample deposition. These parameters can be established in a fully automated way using commercially available mass spectrometry imaging instruments without any hardware adjustments. With the newly developed analytical strategy the highest quality MALDI spots were selected, resulting in more reproducible and more valuable spectra for PEG in a variety of matrices. Moreover, our method enables an objective comparison of sample preparation protocols for any analyte and opens up new fields of investigation by presenting MALDI performance data in a clear and concise way.

  13. Enhanced visualization of small peptides absorbed in rat small intestine by phytic-acid-aided matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-imaging mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seong-Min; Tanaka, Mitsuru; Yoshii, Saori; Mine, Yoshinori; Matsui, Toshiro

    2013-11-05

    Enhanced visualization of small peptides absorbed through a rat intestinal membrane was achieved by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-IMS) with the aid of phytic acid as a matrix additive. Penetrants through intestinal peptide transporter 1, i.e., glycyl-sarcosine (Gly-Sar, 147.1 m/z) and antihypertensive dipeptide, Val-Tyr (281.2 m/z), were chosen for MALDI-IMS. The signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios of dipeptides Gly-Sar and Val-Tyr were seen to increase by 2.4- and 8.0-fold, respectively, when using a 2',4',6'-trihydroxyacetophenone (THAP) matrix containing 5.0 mM phytic acid, instead of the THAP matrix alone. Owing to the phytic-acid-aided MALDI-IMS method, Gly-Sar and Val-Tyr absorbed in the rat intestinal membrane were successfully visualized. The proposed imaging method also provided useful information on intestinal peptide absorption; to some extent, Val-Tyr was rapidly hydrolyzed to Tyr by peptidases located at the intestinal microvillus during the absorption process. In conclusion, the strongly acidic additive, phytic acid, is beneficial for enhancing the visualization of small peptides using MALDI-IMS, owing to the suppression of ionization-interfering salts in the tissue.

  14. Investigation of endogenous blood plasma phospholipids, cholesterol and glycerides that contribute to matrix effects in bioanalysis by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismaiel, Omnia A; Zhang, Tianyi; Jenkins, Rand G; Karnes, H Thomas

    2010-12-01

    Matrix effects caused by compounds endogenous to the biological sample are a primary challenge in quantitative LC/MS/MS bioanalysis. Many approaches have been developed to minimize matrix effects such as optimization of sample extraction procedures and use of isotopically labeled internal standards. Unexpected matrix components may still remain undetected, however, because of the selective mass transitions monitored during MS/MS analysis. Glycerophosphocholines are the major phospholipids in plasma that have been widely shown to cause significant matrix effects on electrospray ionization efficiencies for target analytes. The purpose of this work was to investigate potential matrix effects resulting from different endogenous lipid classes, including phospholipids, acylglycerols and cholesterols, in order to establish a library for the relative presence of these components in biological sample extracts obtained by commonly used sample preparation techniques. Thirteen compounds were selected which were representatives of eight phospholipids classes, mono, di, triacylglycerols, cholesterol and cholesterol esters. Post-column infusion experiments were carried out to compare relative ion suppression effects of these compounds. Chlorpheniramine and loratadine were selected as model test analytes. A Concentration Normalized Suppression Factor (%CNSF) was defined to allow comparison of ion suppression effects resulting from different endogenous lipids according to their typical concentrations in human plasma and erythrocytes. A simple LC/MS/MS method was developed to monitor these endogenous components in sample extracts and their extraction recoveries from a plasma pool were compared using protein precipitation, liquid-liquid extraction, supported-liquid extraction, solid phase extraction and Hybrid SPE-precipitation methods. Endogenous lipid components other than GPChos, such as cholesterols and triacylglycerols, may result in significant matrix effects and should be

  15. Advanced stored waveform inverse Fourier transform technique for a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doroshenko, V M; Cotter, R J

    1996-01-01

    The stored waveform inverse Fourier transform (SWIFT) technique is used for broadband excitation of ions in an ion-trap mass spectrometer to perform mass-selective accumulation, isolation, and fragmentation of peptide ions formed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization. Unit mass resolution is achieved for isolation of ions in the range of m/z up to 1300 using a two-step isolation technique with stretched-in-time narrow band SWIFT pulses at the second stage. The effect of 'stretched-in-time' waveforms is similar to that observed previously for mass-scan-rate reduction. The asymmetry phenomenon resulting from the stretched ion-trap electrode geometry is observed during application of normal and time-reversed waveforms and is similar to the asymmetry effects observed for forward and reverse mass scans in the resonance ejection mode. Mass-selective accumulation of ions from multiple laser shots was accomplished using a method described earlier that involves increasing the trapping voltage during ion introduction for more efficient trapping of ions.

  16. Natural products in Glycyrrhiza glabra (licorice) rhizome imaged at the cellular level by atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem mass spectrometry imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Bhandari, Dhaka Ram; Janfelt, Christian; Römpp, Andreas; Spengler, Bernhard

    2014-10-01

    The rhizome of Glycyrrhiza glabra (licorice) was analyzed by high-resolution mass spectrometry imaging and tandem mass spectrometry imaging. An atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging ion source was combined with an orbital trapping mass spectrometer in order to obtain high-resolution imaging in mass and space. Sections of the rhizome were imaged with a spatial resolution of 10 μm in the positive ion mode, and a large number of secondary metabolites were localized and identified based on their accurate mass and MS/MS fragmentation patterns. Major tissue-specific metabolites, including free flavonoids, flavonoid glycosides and saponins, were successfully detected and visualized in images, showing their distributions at the cellular level. The analytical power of the technique was tested in the imaging of two isobaric licorice saponins with a mass difference of only 0.02 Da. With a mass resolving power of 140 000 and a bin width of 5 ppm in the image processing, the two compounds were well resolved in full-scan mode, and appeared with different distributions in the tissue sections. The identities of the compounds and their distributions were validated in a subsequent MS/MS imaging experiment, thereby confirming their identities and excluding possible analyte interference. The use of high spatial resolution, high mass resolution and tandem mass spectrometry in imaging experiments provides significant information about the biosynthetic pathway of flavonoids and saponins in legume species, combing the spatially resolved chemical information with morphological details at the microscopic level. Furthermore, the technique offers a scheme capable of high-throughput profiling of metabolites in plant tissues.

  17. Reproducibility of serum protein profiling by systematic assessment using solid-phase extraction and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callesen, Anne K; Christensen, René Depont; Madsen, Jonna S

    2008-01-01

    for serum protein profiling we investigated a range of sample preparation techniques and developed a statistical method based on repeated analyses for evaluation of protein-profiling performance of MALDI MS. Two different solid-phase extraction (SPE) methods were investigated, namely custom......Protein profiling of human serum by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS) is potentially a new diagnostic tool for early detection of human diseases, including cancer. Sample preparation is a key issue in MALDI MS and the analysis of complex samples such as serum......-made microcolumns and commercially available magnetic beads. Using these two methods, nineteen different sample preparation methods for serum profiling by MALDI MS were systematically tested with regard to matrix selection, stationary phase, selectivity, and reproducibility. Microcolumns were tested with regard...

  18. A Measurement of the Top Quark Mass in 1.96 TeV Proton-Antiproton Collisions Using a Novel Matrix Element Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, John [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    A measurement of the top quark mass in t$\\bar{t}$ → l + jets candidate events, obtained from p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron using the CDF II detector, is presented. The measurement approach is that of a matrix element method. For each candidate event, a two dimensional likelihood is calculated in the top pole mass and a constant scale factor, 'JES', where JES multiplies the input particle jet momenta and is designed to account for the systematic uncertainty of the jet momentum reconstruction. As with all matrix element techniques, the method involves an integration using the Standard Model matrix element for t$\\bar{t}$ production and decay. However, the technique presented is unique in that the matrix element is modified to compensate for kinematic assumptions which are made to reduce computation time. Background events are dealt with through use of an event observable which distinguishes signal from background, as well as through a cut on the value of an event's maximum likelihood. Results are based on a 955 pb-1 data sample, using events with a high-pT lepton and exactly four high-energy jets, at least one of which is tagged as coming from a b quark; 149 events pass all the selection requirements. They find Mmeas = 169.8 ± 2.3(stat.) ± 1.4(syst.) GeV/c2.

  19. First Industrial Tests of a Drum Monitor Matrix Correction for the Fissile Mass Measurement in Large Volume Historic Metallic Residues with the Differential Die-away Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoni, R.; Passard, C.; Perot, B.; Batifol, M.; Vandamme, J.C. [CEA, DEN, Cadarache, Nuclear Measurement Laboratory, F-13108 St Paul-lez-Durance, (France); Grassi, G. [AREVA NC, 1 place Jean-Millier, 92084 Paris-La-Defense cedex (France)

    2015-07-01

    The fissile mass in radioactive waste drums filled with compacted metallic residues (spent fuel hulls and nozzles) produced at AREVA La Hague reprocessing plant is measured by neutron interrogation with the Differential Die-away measurement Technique (DDT. In the next years, old hulls and nozzles mixed with Ion-Exchange Resins will be measured. The ion-exchange resins increase neutron moderation in the matrix, compared to the waste measured in the current process. In this context, the Nuclear Measurement Laboratory (NML) of CEA Cadarache has studied a matrix effect correction method, based on a drum monitor ({sup 3}He proportional counter inside the measurement cavity). A previous study performed with the NML R and D measurement cell PROMETHEE 6 has shown the feasibility of method, and the capability of MCNP simulations to correctly reproduce experimental data and to assess the performances of the proposed correction. A next step of the study has focused on the performance assessment of the method on the industrial station using numerical simulation. A correlation between the prompt calibration coefficient of the {sup 239}Pu signal and the drum monitor signal was established using the MCNPX computer code and a fractional factorial experimental design composed of matrix parameters representative of the variation range of historical waste. Calculations have showed that the method allows the assay of the fissile mass with an uncertainty within a factor of 2, while the matrix effect without correction ranges on 2 decades. In this paper, we present and discuss the first experimental tests on the industrial ACC measurement system. A calculation vs. experiment benchmark has been achieved by performing dedicated calibration measurement with a representative drum and {sup 235}U samples. The preliminary comparison between calculation and experiment shows a satisfactory agreement for the drum monitor. The final objective of this work is to confirm the reliability of the

  20. A measurement of the top quark mass in 1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions using a novel matrix element method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, John C [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    A measurement of the top quark mass in t$\\bar{t}$ → l + jets candidate events, obtained from p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron using the CDF II detector, is presented. The measurement approach is that of a matrix element method. For each candidate event, a two dimensional likelihood is calculated in the top pole mass and a constant scale factor, 'JES', where JES multiplies the input particle jet momenta and is designed to account for the systematic uncertainty of the jet momentum reconstruction. As with all matrix elements techniques, the method involves an integration using the Standard Model matrix element for tt production and decay. however, the technique presented is unique in that the matrix element is modified to compensate for kinematic assumptions which are made to reduce computation time. Background events are dealt with through use of an event observable which distinguishes signal from background, as well as through a cut on the value of an event's maximum likelihood. Results are based on a 955 pb-1 data sample, using events with a high-pT lepton and exactly four high-energy jets, at least one of which is tagged as coming from a b quark; 149 events pass all the selection requirements. They find Mmeas = 169.8 ± 2.3(stat.) ± 1.4(syst.) GeV/c2.

  1. Calculation of isotopic mass and energy production by a matrix operator method. [Volterra method of the multiplicative integral

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, C.E.

    1976-08-01

    The Volterra method of the multiplicative integral is used to determine the isotopic density, mass, and energy production in linear systems. The solution method, assumptions, and limitations are discussed. The method allows a rapid accurate calculation of the change in isotopic density, mass, and energy production independent of the magnitude of the time steps, production or decay rates, or flux levels.

  2. Direct identification of trypanosomatids by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (DIT MALDI-TOF MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, C C; Almeida, F G; Palmisano, G

    2016-08-01

    Accurate and rapid determination of trypanosomatids is essential in epidemiological surveillance and therapeutic studies. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has been shown to be a useful and powerful technique to identify bacteria, fungi, metazoa and human intact cells with applications in clinical settings. Here, we developed and optimized a MALDI-TOF MS method to profile trypanosomatids. trypanosomatid cells were deposited on a MALDI target plate followed by addition of matrix solution. The plate was then subjected to MALDI-TOF MS measurement to create reference mass spectra library and unknown samples were identified by pattern matching using the BioTyper software tool. Several m/z peaks reproducibly and uniquely identified trypanosomatids species showing the potentials of direct identification of trypanosomatids by MALDI-TOF MS. Moreover, this method discriminated different life stages of Trypanosoma cruzi, epimastigote and bloodstream trypomastigote and Trypanosoma brucei, procyclic and bloodstream. T. cruzi Discrete Typing Units (DTUs) were also discriminated in three clades. However, it was not possible to achieve enough resolution and software-assisted identification at the strain level. Overall, this study shows the importance of MALDI-TOF MS for the direct identification of trypanosomatids and opens new avenues for mass spectrometry-based detection of parasites in biofluids. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. On-Tissue Derivatization via Electrospray Deposition for Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Endogenous Fatty Acids in Rat Brain Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qian; Comi, Troy J; Li, Bin; Rubakhin, Stanislav S; Sweedler, Jonathan V

    2016-06-07

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is used for the multiplex detection and characterization of diverse analytes over a wide mass range directly from tissues. However, analyte coverage with MALDI MSI is typically limited to the more abundant compounds, which have m/z values that are distinct from MALDI matrix-related ions. On-tissue analyte derivatization addresses these issues by selectively tagging functional groups specific to a class of analytes, while simultaneously changing their molecular masses and improving their desorption and ionization efficiency. We evaluated electrospray deposition of liquid-phase derivatization agents as a means of on-tissue analyte derivatization using 2-picolylamine; we were able to detect a range of endogenous fatty acids with MALDI MSI. When compared with airbrush application, electrospray led to a 3-fold improvement in detection limits and decreased analyte delocalization. Six fatty acids were detected and visualized from rat cerebrum tissue using a MALDI MSI instrument operating in positive mode. MALDI MSI of the hippocampal area allowed targeted fatty acid analysis of the dentate gyrus granule cell layer and the CA1 pyramidal layer with a 20-μm pixel width, without degrading the localization of other lipids during liquid-phase analyte derivatization.

  4. A study of common discovery dosing formulation components and their potential for causing time-dependent matrix effects in high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoying; Mei, Hong; Wang, Shiyong; Zhou, Qiao; Wang, Ganfeng; Broske, Lisa; Pena, Adrienne; Korfmacher, Walter A

    2005-01-01

    Hydroxyproyl-beta-cyclodextran (HPBCD), methyl cellulose (MC), Tween 80 and PEG400 are commonly used in dosing formulations in pharmacokinetic (PK) studies during the early drug discovery stage. A series of studies was designed to evaluate the potential matrix effects of these dosing vehicles when the samples are assayed by high-performance liquid chromatography combined with tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS/MS). These dosing vehicles were dosed into the rats via either an intravenous (IV) or an oral route (PO) and plasma samples were collected for a 24-h post-dose period. Five test compounds with CLog P values ranging from 0.9 to 5.4 were spiked into the collected rat plasma. After protein precipitation, these samples were analyzed using a generic fast-gradient HPLC/MS/MS method. Three popular mass spectrometers (Thermo-Finnigan Quantum with ESI and APCI, AB-Sciex API 3000 with ESI and APCI, and Waters-Micromass Quattro Ultima with ESI) were used to test these plasma samples. Results indicated that there was no observed matrix effect for all five compounds when 20% HPBCD or 0.4% MC was used as the vehicle in either the IV or the PO route, respectively. In addition, 0.1% Tween 80 dosed either IV or PO caused significant ion suppression (50-80%, compared to results obtained from plasma samples free from vehicles) for compounds that eluted at the beginning of the chromatogram. Also, PEG400 when used in an oral formulation caused significant ion suppression (30-50%) for early eluting compounds. These matrix effects were not only ionization mode (ESI or APCI) dependent, but also source design (Thermo-Finnigan, AB-Sciex or Waters-Micromass) dependent. Overall, the APCI mode proved to be less vulnerable to matrix effects than the ESI mode. Some possible mechanisms of these matrix effects are proposed and simple strategies to avoid these matrix effects are discussed. Copyright (c) 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Chemical analysis of pharmaceuticals and explosives in fingermarks using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan-Sandquist, Kimberly; LeBeau, Marc A; Miller, Mark L

    2014-02-01

    Chemical analysis of latent fingermarks, "touch chemistry," has the potential of providing intelligence or forensically relevant information. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI/TOF MS) was used as an analytical platform for obtaining mass spectra and chemical images of target drugs and explosives in fingermark residues following conventional fingerprint development methods and MALDI matrix processing. There were two main purposes of this research: (1) develop effective laboratory methods for detecting drugs and explosives in fingermark residues and (2) determine the feasibility of detecting drugs and explosives after casual contact with pills, powders, and residues. Further, synthetic latent print reference pads were evaluated as mimics of natural fingermark residue to determine if the pads could be used for method development and quality control. The results suggest that artificial amino acid and sebaceous oil residue pads are not suitable to adequately simulate natural fingermark chemistry for MALDI/TOF MS analysis. However, the pads were useful for designing experiments and setting instrumental parameters. Based on the natural fingermark residue experiments, handling whole or broken pills did not transfer sufficient quantities of drugs to allow for definitive detection. Transferring drugs or explosives in the form of powders and residues was successful for preparing analytes for detection after contact with fingers and deposition of fingermark residue. One downfall to handling powders was that the analyte particles were easily spread beyond the original fingermark during development. Analyte particles were confined in the original fingermark when using transfer residues. The MALDI/TOF MS was able to detect procaine, pseudoephedrine, TNT, and RDX from contact residue under laboratory conditions with the integration of conventional fingerprint development methods and MALDI matrix. MALDI/TOF MS is a nondestructive

  6. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass at D0 Run II with the Matrix Element Method in the Lepton+Jets Final State

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schieferdecker, Philipp [Ludwig Maximilian Univ. of Munich (Germany)

    2005-08-05

    The mass of the top quark is a fundamental parameter of the Standard Model. Its precise knowledge yields valuable insights into unresolved phenomena in and beyond the Standard Model. A measurement of the top quark mass with the matrix element method in the lepton+jets final state in D0 Run II is presented. Events are selected requiring an isolated energetic charged lepton (electron or muon), significant missing transverse energy, and exactly four calorimeter jets. For each event, the probabilities to originate from the signal and background processes are calculated based on the measured kinematics, the object resolutions and the respective matrix elements. The jet energy scale is known to be the dominant source of systematic uncertainty. The reference scale for the mass measurement is derived from Monte Carlo events. The matrix element likelihood is defined as a function of both, m{sub top} and jet energy scale JES, where the latter represents a scale factor with respect to the reference scale. The top mass is obtained from a two-dimensional correlated fit, and the likelihood yields both the statistical and jet energy scale uncertainty. Using a dataset of 320 pb-1 of D0 Run II data, the mass of the top quark is measured to be: m$ℓ+jets\\atop{top}$ = 169.5 ± 4.4(stat. + JES)$+1.7\\atop{-1.6}$(syst.) GeV; m$e+jets\\atop{top}$ = 168.8 ± 6.0(stat. + JES)$+1.9\\atop{-1.9}$(syst.) GeV; m$μ+jets\\atop{top}$ = 172.3 ± 9.6(stat.+JES)$+3.4\\atop{-3.3}$(syst.) GeV. The jet energy scale measurement in the ℓ+jets sample yields JES = 1.034 ± 0.034, suggesting good consistency of the data with the simulation. The measurement forecasts significant improvements to the total top mass uncertainty during Run II before the startup of the LHC, as the data sample will grow by a factor of ten and D0's tracking capabilities will be employed in jet energy reconstruction and flavor identification.

  7. Quantitation of peptides and proteins by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry using (18)O-labeled internal standards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirgorodskaya, O A; Kozmin, Y P; Titov, M I;

    2000-01-01

    A method for quantitating proteins and peptides in the low picomole and sub-picomole range has been developed using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) with internal (18)O-labeled standards. A simple procedure is proposed to produce such internal standards...... for the tested sample by enzymatic hydrolysis of the same sample (with known concentration) in (18)O-water. A mathematical algorithm was developed which uses the isotopic patterns of the substance, the internal standard, and the substance/internal standard mixture for accurate quantitation of the substance...

  8. Semiconductor Nanomaterials-Based Fluorescence Spectroscopic and Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization (MALDI Mass Spectrometric Approaches to Proteome Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Kumar Kailasa

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs or nanoparticles (NPs exhibit very unusual physico-chemcial and optical properties. This review article introduces the applications of semiconductor nanomaterials (NMs in fluorescence spectroscopy and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS for biomolecule analysis. Due to their unique physico-chemical and optical properties, semiconductors NMs have created many new platforms for investigating biomolecular structures and information in modern biology. These semiconductor NMs served as effective fluorescent probes for sensing proteins and cells and acted as affinity or concentrating probes for enriching peptides, proteins and bacteria proteins prior to MALDI-MS analysis.

  9. Discovery of rifampicin as a new anti-glycating compound by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry-based insulin glycation assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golegaonkar, Sandeep B; Bhonsle, Hermangi S; Boppana, Ramanamurthy; Kulkarni, Mahesh J

    2010-01-01

    An in vitro insulin glycation assay was developed for screening glycation inhibitors. The assay involves the use of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry for monitoring the formation of glycated insulin. The assay is simple, rapid and amenable for high throughput screening. Using this assay we have discovered a strong anti-glycation activity for the anti-tuberculosis drug rifampicin. These results were compared with bovine serum albumin glucose fluorescence assay. In addition, the IC(50) of rifampicin was lower than that of aminoguanidine, a known anti-glycating agent, suggesting that rifampicin is a more potent glycation inhibitor.

  10. Assessment of Reproducibility of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry for Bacterial and Yeast Identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westblade, Lars F; Garner, Omai B; MacDonald, Karen; Bradford, Constance; Pincus, David H; Mochon, A Brian; Jennemann, Rebecca; Manji, Ryhana; Bythrow, Maureen; Lewinski, Michael A; Burnham, Carey-Ann D; Ginocchio, Christine C

    2015-07-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) has revolutionized the identification of clinical bacterial and yeast isolates. However, data describing the reproducibility of MALDI-TOF MS for microbial identification are scarce. In this study, we show that MALDI-TOF MS-based microbial identification is highly reproducible and can tolerate numerous variables, including differences in testing environments, instruments, operators, reagent lots, and sample positioning patterns. Finally, we reveal that samples of bacterial and yeast isolates prepared for MALDI-TOF MS identification can be repeatedly analyzed without compromising organism identification.

  11. Evaluation of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry for Identification of KPC-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaibani, Paolo; Galea, Anna; Fagioni, Marco; Ambretti, Simone; Sambri, Vittorio; Landini, Maria Paola

    2016-10-01

    We evaluated a real-time single-peak (11.109-Da) detection assay based on matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for the identification of Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)-producing K. pneumoniae Our results demonstrated that the 11.109-Da peak was detected in 88.2% of the KPC producers. Analysis of blaKPC-producing K. pneumoniae showed that the gene encoding the 11.109-Da protein was commonly (97.8%) associated with the Tn4401a isoform.

  12. Evaluation of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry for Identification of KPC-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galea, Anna; Fagioni, Marco; Ambretti, Simone; Sambri, Vittorio; Landini, Maria Paola

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated a real-time single-peak (11.109-Da) detection assay based on matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for the identification of Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)-producing K. pneumoniae. Our results demonstrated that the 11.109-Da peak was detected in 88.2% of the KPC producers. Analysis of blaKPC-producing K. pneumoniae showed that the gene encoding the 11.109-Da protein was commonly (97.8%) associated with the Tn4401a isoform. PMID:27413192

  13. Development and Evaluation of an Externally Air-Cooled Low-Flow torch and the Attenuation of Space Charge and Matrix Effects in Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Praphairaksit, Narong [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2000-09-12

    An externally air-cooled low-flow torch has been constructed and successfully demonstrated for applications in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The torch is cooled by pressurized air flowing at ~70 L/min through a quartz air jacket onto the exterior of the outer tube. The outer gas flow rate and operating RF forward power are reduced considerably. Although plasmas can be sustained at the operating power as low as 400 W with a 2 L/min of outer gas flow, somewhat higher power and outer gas flows are advisable. A stable and analytical useful plasma can be obtained at 850 W with an outer gas flow rate of ~4 L/min. Under these conditions, the air-cooled plasma produces comparable sensitivities, doubly charged ion ratios, matrix effects and other analytical merits as those produced by a conventional torch while using significantly less argon and power requirements. Metal oxide ion ratios are slightly higher with the air-cooled plasma but can be mitigated by reducing the aerosol gas flow rate slightly with only minor sacrifice in analyte sensitivity. A methodology to alleviate the space charge and matrix effects in ICP-MS has been developed. A supplemental electron source adapted from a conventional electron impact ionizer is added to the base of the skimmer. Electrons supplied from this source downstream of the skimmer with suitable amount and energy can neutralize the positive ions in the beam extracted from the plasma and diminish the space charge repulsion between them. As a result, the overall ion transmission efficiency and consequent analyte ion sensitivities are significantly improved while other important analytical aspects, such as metal oxide ion ratio, doubly charged ion ratio and background ions remain relatively unchanged with the operation of this electron source. This technique not only improves the ion transmission efficiency but also minimizes the matrix effects drastically. The matrix-induced suppression of signal for even the most

  14. Development and Evaluation of an Externally Air-Cooled Low-Flow torch and the Attenuation of Space Charge and Matrix Effects in Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Praphairaksit, N.

    2000-09-12

    An externally air-cooled low-flow torch has been constructed and successfully demonstrated for applications in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The torch is cooled by pressurized air flowing at {approximately}70 L/min through a quartz air jacket onto the exterior of the outer tube. The outer gas flow rate and operating RF forward power are reduced considerably. Although plasmas can be sustained at the operating power as low as 400 W with a 2 L/min of outer gas flow, somewhat higher power and outer gas flows are advisable. A stable and analytical useful plasma can be obtained at 850 W with an outer gas flow rate of {approximately}4 L/min. Under these conditions, the air-cooled plasma produces comparable sensitivities, doubly charged ion ratios, matrix effects and other analytical merits as those produced by a conventional torch while using significantly less argon and power requirements. Metal oxide ion ratios are slightly higher with the air-cooled plasma but can be mitigated by reducing the aerosol gas flow rate slightly with only minor sacrifice in analyte sensitivity. A methodology to alleviate the space charge and matrix effects in ICP-MS has been developed. A supplemental electron source adapted from a conventional electron impact ionizer is added to the base of the skimmer. Electrons supplied from this source downstream of the skimmer with suitable amount and energy can neutralize the positive ions in the beam extracted from the plasma and diminish the space charge repulsion between them. As a result, the overall ion transmission efficiency and consequent analyte ion sensitivities are significantly improved while other important analytical aspects, such as metal oxide ion ratio, doubly charged ion ratio and background ions remain relatively unchanged with the operation of this electron source. This technique not only improves the ion transmission efficiency but also minimizes the matrix effects drastically. The matrix-induced suppression

  15. Measurement of the top-quark mass in the lepton+jets channel using a matrix element technique with the CDF II detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V.E.; Barnett, B.A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, G.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K.R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Brisuda, A.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Bucciantonio, M.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H.S.; Budd, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y.C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J.P.; Chung, W.H.; Chung, Y.S.; Ciobanu, C.I.; Ciocci, M.A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M.E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C.A.; Cox, D.J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; De Cecco, S.; De Lorenzo, G.; Dell'Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; d'Errico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J.R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H.C.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J.P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M.J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J.C.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garcia, J.E.; Garfinkel, A.F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C.M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gonzalez, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A.T.; Goulianos, K.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R.C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, S.R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J.Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R.F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R.E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E.J.; Jha, M.K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K.K.; Jun, S.Y.; Junk, T.R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P.E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D.H.; Kim, H.S.; Kim, H.W.; Kim, J.E.; Kim, M.J.; Kim, S.B.; Kim, S.H.; Kim, Y.K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D.J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A.V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A.T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R.L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H.S.; Lee, J.S.; Lee, S.W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J.D.; Limosani, A.; Lin, C.J.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D.O.; Liu, C.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martinez, M.; Martinez-Ballarin, R.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mattson, M.E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K.S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M.N.; Moon, C.S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M.J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M.S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S.H.; Oh, Y.D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Griso, S.Pagan; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A.A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D.E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T.J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Potamianos, K.; Poukhov, O.; Prokoshin, F.; Pronko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Pueschel, E.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Riddick, T.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rubbo, F.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W.K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E.E.; Schmidt, M.P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shalhout, S.Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P.F.; Shimojima, M.; Shiraishi, S.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sissakian, A.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J.R.; Snider, F.D.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Squillacioti, P.; Stancari, M.; Stanitzki, M.; Denis, R.St.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G.L.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P.K.; Thom, J.; Thome, J.; Thompson, G.A.; Thomson, E.; Ttito-Guzman, P.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Tu, Y.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Varganov, A.; Vazquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vidal, M.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vizan, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R.L.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S.M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Wester, W.C., III; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A.B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Wick, F.; Williams, H.H.; Wilson, J.S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B.L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yang, T.; Yang, U.K.; Yang, Y.C.; Yao, W.M.; Yeh, G.P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G.B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S.S.; Yun, J.C.; Zanetti, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.

    2011-01-01

    A measurement of the top-quark mass is presented using Tevatron data from proton-antiproton collisions at center-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV collected with the CDF II detector. Events are selected from a sample of candidates for production of $t\\bar t$ pairs that decay into the lepton+jets channel. The top-quark mass is measured with an unbinned maximum likelihood method where the event probability density functions are calculated using signal and background matrix elements, as well as a set of parameterized jet-to-parton transfer functions. The likelihood function is maximized with respect to the top-quark mass, the signal fraction in the sample, and a correction to the jet energy scale (JES) calibration of the calorimeter jets. The simultaneous measurement of the JES correction ($\\JES$) amounts to an additional \\textit{in situ} jet energy calibration based on the known mass of the hadronically decaying $W$ boson. Using the data sample of 578 lepton+jets candidate events, corresponding to 3.2 $fb^{-1}...

  16. Measurement of the top-quark mass in the lepton+jets channel using a matrix element technique with the CDF II detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aaltonen, T; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barriaee, P; Bartos, P; Baucecc, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettinidd, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisellocc, D; Bizjakii, I; Bland, K R; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Braua, B; Brigliadoribb, L; Brisuda, A; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Bucciantoniodd, M; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busettocc, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Cabrerax, S; Calancha, C; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillok, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castrobb, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliereee, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerrif, A; Cerritoq, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocciee, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostellacc, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Cresciolidd, F; Almenar, C Cuenca; Cuevasv, J; Culbertson, R; Dagenhart, D; d'Ascenzot, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orsodd, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Dengc, J; Deninno, M; Devoto, F; d'Erricocc, M; Di Cantodd, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donatidd, S; Dong, P; Dorigo, T; Ebina, K; Elagin, A; Eppig, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Ershaidataa, N; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazzaff, C; Field, R; Flanaganr, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Garosiee, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagugg, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; da Costa, J Guimaraes; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamaguchi, A; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hocker, A; Hopkinsg, W; Horn, D; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Hurwitz, M; Husemann, U; Hussain, N; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iorigg, M; Ivanovo, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Katon, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, H W; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Klimenko, S; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnackl, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyovd, V; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannonu, K; Lath, A; Latinoee, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Leew, S W; Leodd, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C -J; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Lucchesicc, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maksimovic, P; Malik, S; Mancab, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Mastrandrea, P; Mathis, M; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNultyi, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mondragonk, M N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlock, J; Fernandez, P Movilla; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussinibb, M; Nachtmanm, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neuz, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsene, J; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Grisocc, S Pagan; Pagliarone, C; Palenciaf, E; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Patrick, J; Paulettahh, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Potamianos, K; Poukhov, O; Prokoshiny, F; Pronko, A; Ptohosh, F; Pueschel, E; Punzidd, G; Pursley, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondibb, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Ruffiniee, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Santihh, L; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savelievt, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribanoee, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforzadd, F; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojimas, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shreyber, I; Simonenko, A; Sinervo, P; Sissakian, A; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Denis, R St; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thomg, J; Thome, J; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Ttito-Guzmán, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totarohh, P; Trovatoff, M; Tu, Y; Turiniee, N; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Varganov, A; Vatagaff, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vidal, M; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vogel, M; Volpidd, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R L; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whitesonc, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Wick, F; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittichg, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, T; Yangp, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W -M; Yeh, G P; Yim, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshidaj, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanetti, A; Zeng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2011-01-01

    A measurement of the top-quark mass is presented using Tevatron data from proton-antiproton collisions at center-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV collected with the CDF II detector. Events are selected from a sample of candidates for production of $t\\bar t$ pairs that decay into the lepton+jets channel. The top-quark mass is measured with an unbinned maximum likelihood method where the event probability density functions are calculated using signal and background matrix elements, as well as a set of parameterized jet-to-parton transfer functions. The likelihood function is maximized with respect to the top-quark mass, the signal fraction in the sample, and a correction to the jet energy scale (JES) calibration of the calorimeter jets. The simultaneous measurement of the JES correction ($\\JES$) amounts to an additional \\textit{in situ} jet energy calibration based on the known mass of the hadronically decaying $W$ boson. Using the data sample of 578 lepton+jets candidate events, corresponding to 3.2 $fb^{-1}...

  17. Direct Analysis of Textile Fabrics and Dyes Using IR Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Electrospray Ionization (MALDESI) Mass Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Cochran, Kristin H.; Barry, Jeremy A.; Muddiman, David C.; Hinks, David

    2012-01-01

    The forensic analysis of textile fibers uses a variety of techniques from microscopy to spectroscopy. One such technique that is often used to identify the dye(s) within the fiber is mass spectrometry (MS). In the traditional MS method, the dye must be extracted from the fabric and the dye components are separated by chromatography prior to mass spectrometric analysis. Direct analysis of the dye from the fabric allows the omission of the lengthy sample preparation involved in extraction, ther...

  18. The U(1) symmetry of the non-tribimaximal pattern in the degenerate mass spectrum case of the neutrino mass matrix

    CERN Document Server

    Lashin, E I; Nasri, S

    2012-01-01

    On account of the new neutrino oscillation data signalling a non-zero value for the smallest mixing angle ($\\theta_z$), we present an explicit realization of the underlying U(1) symmetry characterizing the maximal atmospheric mixing angle ($\\theta_y = \\pi / 4$) pattern with two degenerate masses but now with generic values of $\\theta_z$. We study the effects of the form invariance with respect to U(1), and/or $Z_3$, $Z_2$ subgroups, on the Yukawa couplings and the mass terms. Later on, we specify $\\theta_z$ to its experimental best fit value ($ \\sim 8^o$), and impose the symmetry in an entire model which includes charged leptons, and many Higgs doublets or standard model singlet heavy scalars, to show that it can make room for the charged lepton mass hierarchies. In addition, we show for the non-tribimaximal value of $\\theta_z \

  19. The U(1) symmetry of the non-tribimaximal pattern in the degenerate mass spectrum case of the neutrino mass matrix

    OpenAIRE

    Lashin, E. I.; N. Chamoun; Nasri, S.

    2012-01-01

    On account of the new neutrino oscillation data signalling a non-zero value for the smallest mixing angle ($\\theta_z$), we present an explicit realization of the underlying U(1) symmetry characterizing the maximal atmospheric mixing angle ($\\theta_y = \\pi / 4$) pattern with two degenerate masses but now with generic values of $\\theta_z$. We study the effects of the form invariance with respect to U(1), and/or $Z_3$, $Z_2$ subgroups, on the Yukawa couplings and the mass terms. Later on, we spe...

  20. Evaluation of Four Fingerprint Development Methods for Touch Chemistry Using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization/Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry(.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan-Sandquist, Kimberly A; LeBeau, Marc A; Miller, Mark L

    2015-05-01

    Four preparation techniques for MALDI/TOF mass spectrometry were compared to determine the ability to gather intelligence for investigations through the chemical analysis of latent fingerprints, defined as "touch chemistry." Compatible fingerprint development processes used for identification along with new techniques are necessary to evaluate touch chemistry. Ten volunteers deposited fingerprints from solvent residues containing drugs and explosives onto microscope slides. The developers included (A) fingerprint powder, (B) MALDI matrix, (C) fingerprint powder and lifting, and (D) cyanoacrylate fuming with fingerprint powder. Qualitative identification was based on ion images and spectra. The highest average detection rates (88%) were found using methods A and B. Methods C (52%) or D (18%) had limited success. Results demonstrate the importance of imaging coupled to extracted mass spectral data in detecting analytes in deposited fingerprints. Overall, the results suggest continued development of touch chemistry applications could prove useful for gathering intelligence and forensically relevant information.

  1. Towards high-precision mass measurements on $^{74}$Rb for a test of the CVC hypothesis and the unitarity of the CKM matrix

    CERN Document Server

    Kellerbauer, Alban G; Beck, D; Blaum, Klaus; Bollen, Georg; Delahaye, P; Herfurth, F; Kluge, H J; Kolhinen, V; Mukherjee, M; Rodríguez, D; Schwarz, S

    2004-01-01

    At the highest possible precisions, atomic-mass measurements can be used to perform fundamental studies. Examples for such studies are a check of the conserved-vector-current (CVC) hypothesis and the unitarity of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix, both postulates of the Standard Model. The comparative half-lives $Ft$ of superallowed $\\beta$-decays constitute the nuclear-physics access to these tests. The $Q$ value of the $\\beta$-decay of $^{74}$Rb, one of the three experimentally accessible parameters that enter into the $Ft$ values, has been measured with the ISOLTRAP experiment at ISOLDE /CERN. The ultimate mass precision requirement and the way to achieve it are outlined.

  2. Studies on extracting solutions of endohedral rare-earth metallofullerenes by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙大勇; 刘志强; 刘子阳; 郭兴华; 徐文国; 刘淑莹

    1997-01-01

    Thirteen extracting solutions of rare-earth metallofullerenes containing La,Ce,Pr,Nd Sm,Eu,Gd,Tb,Dy,Ho,Er,Tm and Yb respectively have been investigated by means of matrix-assisted laser desorpuon/ ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.The influences of the positive-ion/negative-ion mode,laser intensity,ma trix and mass discrimination to the analytical results are studied,based on which the optimal analytical conditions have been determined.The results show that the extracting solutions contain large quantities of rare-earth metallofullerenes besides empty fullerenes.On the basis of comparing their relative intensities,the different structure stabilities and solubilities of metallofullerenes with different rare-earth metals encapsulated into the fullerene cages,as well as some possible reasons to those differences,are discussed.

  3. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry as a tool for fast identification of protein binders in color layers of paintings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynek, Radovan; Kuckova, Stepanka; Hradilova, Janka; Kodicek, Milan

    2004-01-01

    Identification of materials in color layers of paintings is necessary for correct decisions concerning restoration procedures as well as proving the authenticity of the painting. The proteins are usually important components of the painting layers. In this paper it has been demonstrated that matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOFMS) can be used for fast and reliable identification of proteins in color layers even in old, highly aged matrices. The digestion can be easily performed directly on silica wafers which are routinely used for infrared analysis. The amount of material necessary for such an analysis is extremely small. Peptide mass mapping using digestion with trypsin followed by MALDI-TOFMS and identification of the protein was successfully used for determination of the binder from a painting of the 19th century.

  4. Investigation of endogenous blood lipids components that contribute to matrix effects in dried blood spot samples by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismaiel, Omnia A; Jenkins, Rand G; Karnes, H Thomas

    2013-08-01

    Dried blood spot (DBS) sampling coupled to liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) is a rapidly developing approach in the field of biopharmaceutical analysis. DBS sampling enables analysis of small sample volumes with high sensitivity and selectivity while providing a convenient easy to store and ship format. Lipid components that may be extracted during biological sample processing may result in matrix ionization effects and can significantly affect the precision and accuracy of the results. Glycerophosphocholines (GPChos), cholesterols and triacylglycerols (TAG) are the main lipid components that contribute to matrix effects in LC-MS/MS. Various organic solvents such as methanol, acetonitrile, methyl tertiary butyl ether, ethyl ether, dichloromethane and n-hexane were investigated for elution of these lipid components from DBS samples. Methanol extracts demonstrated the highest levels of GPChos whereas ethyl ether and n-hexane extracts contained less than 1.0 % of the GPChos levels in the methanol extracts. Ethyl ether extracts contained the highest levels of cholesterols and TAG in comparison to other investigated organic solvents. Acetonitrile is recommended as an elution solvent due to low lipid recoveries. Matrix effects resulted from different extracted lipid components should be studied and assessed carefully in DBS samples.

  5. Evaluation of zirconium dioxide-based sorbents to decrease the matrix effect in avocado and almond multiresidue pesticide analysis followed by gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, Ana; Rajski, Łukasz; Uclés, Samanta; Belmonte-Valles, Noelia; Mezcua, Milagros; Fernández-Alba, Amadeo R

    2014-01-01

    Two sorbents containing ZrO₂ (Z-Sep and Z-Sep+) were tested as a d-SPE clean-up in combination with the QuEChERS and ethyl acetate multiresidue method in the pesticide residues extraction in avocado. All extracts were analysed using gas chromatography coupled with a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer working in multi-reaction monitoring mode. GC QToF was used to compare the amount of matrix compounds present in the final extracts, prepared according to different protocols. The highest number of pesticides with acceptable recoveries and the lowest amount of coextracted matrix compounds were provided by QuEChERS with Z-Sep. Subsequently, this method was fully validated in avocado and almonds. Validation studies were carried out according to DG Sanco guidelines including: the evaluation of recoveries at two levels (10 and 50 μg/kg), limit of quantitation, linearity, matrix effects, as well as interday and intraday precision. In avocado, 166 pesticides were fully validated compared to 119 in almonds. The method was operated satisfactorily in routine analysis and was applied to real samples.

  6. Influence of secondary structure on in-source decay of protein in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Mitsuo; Osaka, Issey; Sakakura, Motoshi

    2012-01-01

    The susceptibility of the N-Cα bond of the peptide backbone to specific cleavage by in-source decay (ISD) in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS) was studied from the standpoint of the secondary structure of three proteins. A naphthalene derivative, 5-amino-1-naphtol (5,1-ANL), was used as the matrix. The resulting c'-ions, which originate from the cleavage at N-Cα bonds in flexible secondary structures such as turn and bend, and are free from intra-molecular hydrogen-bonded α-helix structure, gave relatively intense peaks. Furthermore, ISD spectra of the proteins showed that the N-Cα bonds of specific amino acid residues, namely Gly-Xxx, Xxx-Asp, and Xxx-Asn, were more susceptible to MALDI-ISD than other amino acid residues. This is in agreement with the observation that Gly, Asp and Asn residues usually located in turns, rather than α-helix. The results obtained indicate that protein molecules embedded into the matrix crystal in the MALDI experiments maintain their secondary structures as determined by X-ray crystallography, and that MALDI-ISD has the capability for providing information concerning the secondary structure of protein.

  7. (E)-Propyl α-Cyano-4-Hydroxyl Cinnamylate: A High Sensitive and Salt Tolerant Matrix for Intact Protein Profiling by MALDI Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng; Xiao, Zhaohui; Xiao, Chunsheng; Wang, Huixin; Wang, Bing; Li, Ying; Chen, Xuesi; Guo, Xinhua

    2016-04-01

    Low-abundance samples and salt interference are always of great challenges for the practical protein profiling by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). Herein, a series of carboxyl-esterified derivatives of α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA) were synthesized and evaluated as matrices for MALDI-MS analysis of protein. Among them, (E)-propyl α-cyano-4-hydroxyl cinnamylate (CHCA-C3) was found to exhibit excellent assay performance for intact proteins by improving the detection sensitivity 10 folds compared with the traditional matrices [i.e., super2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (superDHB), sinapic acid (SA), and CHCA]. In addition, CHCA-C3 was shown to have high tolerance to salts, the ion signal of myoglobin was readily detected even in the presence of urea (8 M), NH4HCO3 (2 M), and KH2PO4 (500 mM), meanwhile sample washability was robust. These achievements were mainly attributed to improved ablation ability and increased hydrophobicity or affinity of CHCA-C3 to proteins in comparison with hydrophilic matrixes, leading to more efficient ionization of analyte. Furthermore, direct analysis of proteins from crude egg white demonstrated that CHCA-C3 was a highly efficient matrix for the analysis of low-abundance proteins in complex biological samples. These outstanding performances indicate the tremendous potential use of CHCA-C3 in protein profiling by MALDI-MS.

  8. Identification of Enterobacteriaceae by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry using the VITEK MS system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, S S; Sercia, L; Branda, J A; Burnham, C-A D; Bythrow, M; Ferraro, M J; Garner, O B; Ginocchio, C C; Jennemann, R; Lewinski, M A; Manji, R; Mochon, A B; Rychert, J A; Westblade, L F; Procop, G W

    2013-12-01

    This multicenter study evaluated the accuracy of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry identifications from the VITEK MS system (bioMérieux, Marcy l'Etoile, France) for Enterobacteriaceae typically encountered in the clinical laboratory. Enterobacteriaceae isolates (n = 965) representing 17 genera and 40 species were analyzed on the VITEK MS system (database v2.0), in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions. Colony growth (≤72 h) was applied directly to the target slide. Matrix solution (α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid) was added and allowed to dry before mass spectrometry analysis. On the basis of the confidence level, the VITEK MS system provided a species, genus only, or no identification for each isolate. The accuracy of the mass spectrometric identification was compared to 16S rRNA gene sequencing performed at MIDI Labs (Newark, DE). Supplemental phenotypic testing was performed at bioMérieux when necessary. The VITEK MS result agreed with the reference method identification for 96.7% of the 965 isolates tested, with 83.8% correct to the species level and 12.8% limited to a genus-level identification. There was no identification for 1.7% of the isolates. The VITEK MS system misidentified 7 isolates (0.7 %) as different genera. Three Pantoea agglomerans isolates were misidentified as Enterobacter spp. and single isolates of Enterobacter cancerogenus, Escherichia hermannii, Hafnia alvei, and Raoultella ornithinolytica were misidentified as Klebsiella oxytoca, Citrobacter koseri, Obesumbacterium proteus, and Enterobacter aerogenes, respectively. Eight isolates (0.8 %) were misidentified as a different species in the correct genus. The VITEK MS system provides reliable mass spectrometric identifications for Enterobacteriaceae.

  9. The use of matrix coating assisted by an electric field (MCAEF) to enhance mass spectrometric imaging of human prostate cancer biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaodong; Han, Jun; Hardie, Darryl B; Yang, Juncong; Borchers, Christoph H

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we combined a newly developed matrix coating technique - matrix coating assisted by an electric field (MCAEF) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) to enhance the imaging of peptides and proteins in tissue specimens of human prostate cancer. MCAEF increased the signal-to-noise ratios of the detected proteins by a factor of 2 to 5, and 232 signals were detected within the m/z 3500-37500 mass range on a time-of-flight mass spectrometer and with the sinapinic acid MALDI matrix. Among these species, three proteins (S100-A9, S100-A10, and S100-A12) were only observed in the cancerous cell region and 14 proteins, including a fragment of mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase kinase 2, a fragment of cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein 19, 3 apolipoproteins (C-I, A-I, and A-II), 2 S100 proteins (A6 and A8), β-microseminoprotein, tumor protein D52, α-1-acid glycoprotein 1, heat shock protein β-1, prostate-specific antigen, and 2 unidentified large peptides at m/z 5002.2 and 6704.2, showed significantly differential distributions at the p < 0.05 (t-test) level between the cancerous and the noncancerous regions of the tissue. Among these 17 species, the distributions of apolipoprotein C-I, S100-A6, and S100-A8 were verified by immunohistological staining. In summary, this study resulted in the imaging of the largest group of proteins in prostate cancer tissues by MALDI-MS reported thus far, and is the first to show a correlation between S100 proteins and prostate cancer in a MS imaging study. The successful imaging of the three proteins only found in the cancerous tissues, as well as those showing differential expressions demonstrated the potential of MCAEF-MALDI/MS for the in situ detection of potential cancer biomarkers. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. UV-MALDI mass spectrometric quantitation of uracil based pesticides in fruit soft drinks along with matrix effects evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Bojidarka; Spiteller, Michael

    2014-02-01

    This study focused on the development of the accurate and precise quantitative method for the determination of pesticides bromacil (1), terbacil (2), lenacil (3), butafenacil (4) and flupropacil (5) in fruit based soft drinks. Three different types of drinks are bought from market; huddled orange fruit drink (100%) (I), red-oranges (II) and multivitamin drink containing strawberry, orange, banana and maracuja (III). Samples were analyzed "with" and "without" pulp utilizing LC-ESI (or APCI) MS/MS, HPLC-ESI-(or APCI)-MS/MS and UV-MALDI-Orbitrap-MS methods. The effect of high complexity of the food matrix on the analysis was discussed. Study focuses on the advantages of the UV-MALDI-Orbitrap-MS method compared to the traditionally involved GC alone or hybrid methods such as GC-MS and LC-MS/MS for quantification of pesticides in water and soft drinks. The developed method included the techniques performed for validation, calibration and standardization. The target pesticides are widely used for the treatment of citrus fruits and pineapples, but for soft drink products, there are still no clear regulations on pesticide residues limits. The matrix effects in the analysis of fruit drinks required implementation of the exact standard reference material corresponds to the variety of food matrices. This paper contributed to the broad analytical implementation of the UV-MALDI-Orbitrap-MS method in the quality control and assessment programs for monitoring of pesticide contamination in fruit based sodas.

  11. Enhanced capabilities for imaging gangliosides in murine brain with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization and desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry coupled to ion mobility separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Škrášková, Karolina; Claude, Emmanuelle; Jones, Emrys A; Towers, Mark; Ellis, Shane R; Heeren, Ron M A

    2016-07-15

    The increased interest in lipidomics calls for improved yet simplified methods of lipid analysis. Over the past two decades, mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) has been established as a powerful technique for the analysis of molecular distribution of a variety of compounds across tissue surfaces. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) MSI is widely used to study the spatial distribution of common lipids. However, a thorough sample preparation and necessity of vacuum for efficient ionization might hamper its use for high-throughput lipid analysis. Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) is a relatively young MS technique. In DESI, ionization of molecules occurs under ambient conditions, which alleviates sample preparation. Moreover, DESI does not require the application of an external matrix, making the detection of low mass species more feasible due to the lack of chemical matrix background. However, irrespective of the ionization method, the final information obtained during an MSI experiment is very complex and its analysis becomes challenging. It was shown that coupling MSI to ion mobility separation (IMS) simplifies imaging data interpretation. Here we employed DESI and MALDI MSI for a lipidomic analysis of the murine brain using the same IMS-enabled instrument. We report for the first time on the DESI IMS-MSI of multiply sialylated ganglioside species, as well as their acetylated versions, which we detected directly from the murine brain tissue. We show that poly-sialylated gangliosides can be imaged as multiply charged ions using DESI, while they are clearly separated from the rest of the lipid classes based on their charge state using ion mobility. This represents a major improvement in MSI of intact fragile lipid species. We additionally show that complementary lipid information is reached under particular conditions when DESI is compared to MALDI MSI.

  12. Coumarins as new matrices for matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometric analysis of hydrophobic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hang, E-mail: hangwang@sjtu.edu.cn [Instrumental Analysis Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Dongchuan Road 800, Shanghai 200240 (China); Dai, Bona [Instrumental Analysis Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Dongchuan Road 800, Shanghai 200240 (China); Liu, Bin [Key Laboratory of Kidney Disease Pathogenesis and Intervention of Hubei Province, College of Medicine, Hubei Polytechnic University, Huangshi, Hubei 435003 (China); Lu, Han [Department of Anesthesiology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine (SJTU-SM), 197, Rui Jin Er Road, Shanghai 200025 (China)

    2015-07-02

    Highlights: • Coumarins were used as new MALDI matrices. • Coumarins were used for MALDI-FT ICR MS detection of hydrophobic compounds. • DCA had improvement in detection sensitivity, stability, selectivity and reproducibility. • DCA was applied to sterols detection in yeast cells. - Abstract: Hydrophobic compounds with hydroxyl, aldehyde or ketone groups are generally difficult to detect using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS), because these compounds have low proton affinity and are poorly ionized by MALDI. Herein, coumarins have been used as new matrices for MALDI-MS analysis of a variety of hydrophobic compounds with low ionization efficiency, including steroids, coenzyme Q10, a cyclic lipopeptide and cholesterol oleate. Five coumarins, including coumarin, umbelliferone, esculetin, 7-hydroxycoumarin-3-carboxylic acid (HCA) and 6,7-dihydroxycoumarin-3-carboxylic acid (DCA), were compared with the conventional matrices of 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) and α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA). Coumarins with hydroxyl or carboxylic acid groups enabled detection. Taking DCA as an example, this matrix proved to be superior to DHB or CHCA in detection sensitivity, stability, spot-to-spot and sample-to-sample reproducibility, and accuracy. DCA increased the stability of the target compounds and decreased the loss of water. The [M + Na]{sup +} peaks were observed for all target compounds by adding NaCl as an additive, and the [M − H{sub 2}O + H]{sup +} and [M + H]{sup +} peaks decreased. DCA was selected for the identification of sterols in yeast cells, and thirteen sterols were detected by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT ICR) mass spectrometry. This work demonstrates the potential of DCA as a new matrix for detection of hydrophobic molecules by MALDI-MS and provides an alternative tool for screening sterols in antifungal research.

  13. Detection of Lipid Induced Structural Changes of the Marburg Virus Matrix Protein VP40 Using Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijesinghe, Kaveesha J; Urata, Sarah; Bhattarai, Nisha; Kooijman, Edgar E; Gerstman, Bernard S; Chapagain, Prem P; Li, Sheng; Stahelin, Robert V

    2017-02-06

    Marburg virus (MARV) is a lipid-enveloped virus from the Filoviridae family containing a negative sense RNA genome. One of the seven MARV genes encodes the matrix protein VP40, which forms a matrix layer beneath the plasma membrane inner leaflet to facilitate budding from the host cell. MARV VP40 (mVP40) has been shown to be a dimeric peripheral protein with a broad and flat basic surface that can associate with anionic phospholipids such as phosphatidylserine. While a number of mVP40 cationic residues have been shown to facilitate binding to membranes containing anionic lipids, much less is known on how mVP40 assembles to form the matrix layer following membrane binding. Here we have used hydrogen-deuterium exchange (H/DX) mass spectrometry to determine the solvent accessibility of mVP40 residues in the absence and presence of phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate. H/DX analysis demonstrates two basic loops in the mVP40 C-terminal domain make important contributions to anionic membrane binding and also revealed a potential oligomerization interface in the C-terminal domain as well as a conserved oligomerization interface in the mVP40 N-terminal domain. Lipid binding assays confirm the role of the two basic patches elucidated with HD/X measurements while molecular dynamics simulations and membrane insertion measurements complement these studies to demonstrate mVP40 doesn't appreciably insert into the hydrocarbon region of anionic membranes in contrast to the matrix protein from Ebola virus. Taken together, we propose a model by which association of the mVP40 dimer with the anionic plasma membrane facilitates assembly of mVP40 oligomers.

  14. Design and Performance of a Novel Interface for Combined Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization at Elevated Pressure and Electrospray Ionization with Orbitrap Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belov, Mikhail E; Ellis, Shane R; Dilillo, Marialaura; Paine, Martin R L; Danielson, William F; Anderson, Gordon A; de Graaf, Erik L; Eijkel, Gert B; Heeren, Ron M A; McDonnell, Liam A

    2017-07-18

    Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization, MALDI, has been increasingly used in a variety of biomedical applications, including tissue imaging of clinical tissue samples, and in drug discovery and development. These studies strongly depend on the performance of the analytical instrumentation and would drastically benefit from improved sensitivity, reproducibility, and mass/spatial resolution. In this work, we report on a novel combined MALDI/ESI interface, which was coupled to different Orbitrap mass spectrometers (Elite and Q Exactive Plus) and extensively characterized with peptide and protein standards, and in tissue imaging experiments. In our approach, MALDI is performed in the elevated pressure regime (5-8 Torr) at a spatial resolution of 15-30 μm, while ESI-generated ions are injected orthogonally to the interface axis. We have found that introduction of the MALDI-generated ions into an electrodynamic dual-funnel interface results in increased sensitivity characterized by a limit of detection of ∼400 zmol, while providing a mass measurement accuracy of 1 ppm and a mass resolving power of 120 000 in analysis of protein digests. In tissue imaging experiments, the MALDI/ESI interface has been employed in experiments with rat brain sections and was shown to be capable of visualizing and spatially characterizing very low abundance analytes separated only by 20 mDa. Comparison of imaging data has revealed excellent agreement between the MALDI and histological images.

  15. Study of Phospholipids in Single Cells Using an Integrated Microfluidic Device Combined with Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Weiyi; Gao, Dan; Jin, Feng; Jiang, Yuyang; Liu, Hongxia

    2015-07-21

    Single-cell trapping and high-throughput mass spectrometry analysis remain challenging now. Current technologies for single-cell analysis have several limitations, such as throughput, space resolution, and multicomponent analysis. In this study, we demonstrate, for the first time, the combination of microfluidic chip and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) for high-throughput and automatic single-cell phospholipids analysis. A microwell-array-based microfluidic chip was designed and fabricated for cell array formation on an indium tin oxide (ITO)-coated glass slide. Mass spectrometry imaging measurement with 25 μm pixel size was performed with a MALDI ion source. Eight phospholipids in a single A549 cell were detected, and their structures were further identified by MS/MS spectra. Selected ion images were generated with a bin width of Δm/z ± 0.005. The selected ion images and optical images of the cell array showed excellent correlation, and mass spectrometry information on phospholipids from 1-3 cells was extracted automatically by selecting pixels with the same fixed interval between microwells on the chip. The measurement and data extraction could be processed in several minutes to achieve a high-throughput analysis. Through the optimization of different microwell sizes and different matrices, this method showed potential for the analysis of other metabolites or metabolic changes at the single-cell level.

  16. Paraffin-wax-coated plates as matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization sample support for high-throughput identification of proteins by peptide mass fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannu, Nilesh S; Wu, Jian; Rao, Vamshi K; Gadgil, Himanshu S; Pabst, Michael J; Gerling, Ivan C; Raghow, Rajendra

    2004-04-15

    We compared trysin-digested protein samples desalted by ZipTip(C18) reverse-phase microcolumns with on-plate washing of peptides deposited either on paraffin-coated plates (PCP), Teflon-based AnchorChip plates, or stainless steel plates, before analysis by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight-mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). Trypsinized bovine serum albumin and ovalbumin and 16 protein spots extracted from silver-stained two-dimensional gels of murine C(2)C(12) myoblasts or human leukocytes, prepared by the above two methods, were subjected to MALDI on PCP, AnchorChip plates, or uncoated stainless steel plates. Although most peptide mass peaks were identical regardless of the method of desalting and concentrating of protein samples, samples washed and concentrated by the PCP-based method had peptide peaks that were not seen in the samples prepared using the ZipTip(C18) columns. The mass spectra of peptides desalted and washed on uncoated stainless steel MALDI plates were consistently inferior due to loss of peptides. Some peptides of large molecular masses were apparently lost from samples desalted by ZipTip(C18) microcolumns, thus diminishing the quality of the fingerprint needed for protein identification. We demonstrate that the method of washing of protein samples on paraffin-coated plates provides an easy, reproducible, inexpensive, and high-throughput alternative to ZipTip(C18)-based purification of protein prior to MALDI-TOF-MS analysis.

  17. Ammonia-treated N-(1-naphthyl) ethylenediamine dihydrochloride as a novel matrix for rapid quantitative and qualitative determination of serum free fatty acids by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yaping [Department of Biophysics and Structural Biology, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and School of Basic Medicine, Peking Union Medical College, 5 Dongdan San Tiao, Beijing 100005 (China); Wang, Yanmin [Department of Clinical Laboratory, Heze Municipal Hospital, Shandong (China); Guo, Shuai; Guo, Yumei; Liu, Hui [Department of Biophysics and Structural Biology, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and School of Basic Medicine, Peking Union Medical College, 5 Dongdan San Tiao, Beijing 100005 (China); Li, Zhili, E-mail: lizhili@ibms.pumc.edu.cn [Department of Biophysics and Structural Biology, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and School of Basic Medicine, Peking Union Medical College, 5 Dongdan San Tiao, Beijing 100005 (China)

    2013-09-10

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •A novel MALDI matrix for the detection of serum free fatty acids is ammonia-treated N-(1-naphthyl) ethylenediamine dihydrochloride. •Multiple point internal standard calibration curves were constructed for nine FFAs, respectively, with excellent correlation coefficients between 0.991 and 0.999. •The MALDI-MS approach was used to rapidly differentiate the patients with and without hyperglycemia and healthy controls. -- Abstract: The blood free fatty acids (FFAs), which provide energy to the cell and act as substrates in the synthesis of fats, lipoproteins, liposaccharides, and eicosanoids, involve in a number of important physiological processes. In the present study, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (MALDI-FTICR MS) with ammonia-treated N-(1-naphthyl) ethylenediamine dihydrochloride (ATNEDC) as a novel MALDI matrix in a negative ion mode was employed to directly quantify serum FFAs. Multiple point internal standard calibration curves between the concentration ratios of individual fatty acids to internal standard (IS, C{sub 17:0}) versus their corresponding intensity ratios were constructed for C{sub 14:0}, C{sub 16:1}, C{sub 16:0}, C{sub 18:0}, C{sub 18:1}, C{sub 18:2}, C{sub 18:3}, C{sub 20:4}, and C{sub 22:6}, respectively, in their mixture, with correlation coefficients between 0.991 and 0.999 and limits of detection (LODs) between 0.2 and 5.4 μM, along with the linear dynamic range of more than two orders of magnitude. The results indicate that the multiple point internal standard calibration could reduce the impact of ion suppression and improve quantification accuracy in the MALDI mode. The quantitative results of nine FFAs from 339 serum samples, including 161 healthy controls, 118 patients with hyperglycemia and 60 patients without hyperglycemia show that FFAs levels in hyperglycemic patient sera are significantly higher than those in healthy

  18. Characterisation of botulinum toxins type A and B, by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation and electrospray mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baar, B.L.M. van; Hulst, A.G.; Jong, A.L. de; Wils, E.R.J.

    2002-01-01

    A method earlier developed for the mass spectrometric (MS) identification of tetanus toxin (TTx) was applied to botulinum toxins type A and B (BTxA and BTxB). Botulinum toxins are extremely neurotoxic bacterial toxins, likely to be used as biological warfare agent. Biologically active BTxA and BTxB

  19. Characterisation of botulinum toxins type A and B, by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation and electrospray mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baar, B.L.M. van; Hulst, A.G.; Jong, A.L. de; Wils, E.R.J.

    2002-01-01

    A method earlier developed for the mass spectrometric (MS) identification of tetanus toxin (TTx) was applied to botulinum toxins type A and B (BTxA and BTxB). Botulinum toxins are extremely neurotoxic bacterial toxins, likely to be used as biological warfare agent. Biologically active BTxA and BTxB

  20. Improved Cd determination in glasses by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry using nitrogen as a matrix modifier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian Ni; Zhao Chu Hu; Zheng Yu Bao; Ya Feng Zhang

    2009-01-01

    The addition of 5-10 mL min-1 nitrogen to the central channel of plasma in Laser ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) increases the sensitivities of Cd by a factor of 3 and decreases oxide interferences by one order of magnitude, which allows the direct analysis of trace levels of Cd in glass samples. This simple method shows a great potential for the direct determination of Cd in various kinds of samples.

  1. Direct analysis of sterols by derivatization matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hailat, Iyad; Helleur, Robert J

    2014-01-30

    Free sterols are neutral molecules that are difficult to analyze by MALDI or ESI and their molecular ions easily fragment. In order to increase their ionization efficiency and selectivity, sterols were derivatized by different reagents. Selected sterols were converted into their corresponding picolinyl esters, N-methylpyridyl ethers and sulphated esters. The derivatives were optimized for MALDI-TOFMS analysis through proper selection of the matrix. MALDI-TOF/TOF experiments were carried out to study the fragmentation pathways of the derivatives and their use in structural elucidation. Lipid extracts from mussels were used as test samples for MALDI analysis of sterols in biological samples also analyzed by GC/MS for comparison. Sterol picolinyl esters were identified as sodiated adducts [M+Na](+) and the signal significantly enhanced after addition of sodium acetate (20 mM). Sterol N-methylpyridyl ethers were easily detected as [M](+) while sulphated sterols were best detected as [M-H](-). The ester bonds of picolinyl and sulphated esters easily cleaved in MS/MS resulting in diagnostic derivative fragments at m/z 146.03 and 96.89, respectively. Cleavage of the ether bond of N-methylpyridyl ethers gave a diagnostic fragment ion at m/z 110.04. Sterol profiles in mussels obtained by MALDI-TOFMS were in close agreement with those obtained by GC/MS. Two sterols (cholesterol and β-sitosterol) were selected for quantification as their sulphated and picolinyl esters. Calibration curves gave excellent correlation coefficients. Suitable matrices for picolinyl esters are DHB and THAP, for N-methylpyridyl ethers THAP, and for sulphated esters p-nitroaniline and dithranol. Using cholesterol, the limits of detection (LODs) for sulphated esters were 0.2 µg/mL and for picolinyl esters, 1.5 µg/mL. N-Methylpyridyl ethers were found unsuitable for sterol quantitation. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Exploring matrix effects in liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry determination of pesticide residues in tropical fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botero-Coy, Ana María; Marín, José M; Serrano, Roque; Sancho, Juan Vicente; Hernández, Félix

    2015-05-01

    Tropical fruits are being increasingly consumed around the world because of their appreciated characteristics, particularly their high nutritional value and distinctive taste, which are different from those of traditional fruits. Owing to their introduction into international markets it is necessary to have a reliable analytical methodology available for the sensitive determination of pesticide residues in order to monitor the compliance of maximum residue limits (MRLs). From an analytical point of view, tropical fruits have generally been far less studied than other fruits frequently consumed in the European Union or USA, which are among the most important markets. In this work, LC-MS/MS-based methodology using a triple quadrupole analyzer was developed for the multi-residue determination of selected pesticides and metabolites in tropical fruits, which were selected among the most popular in Colombia, one of the most important suppliers of tropical fruits around the world. After selection of a QuEChERS (Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged, and Safe)-based sample treatment, the study focused on the evaluation of matrix effects, in order to find a simple way for their correction. Twelve different food matrices were selected to perform this study: the seven Colombian tropical fruits of highest value for domestic and international markets (uchuva, tamarillo, granadilla, gulupa, maracuya, papaya, and pithaya), and five more matrices highly consumed in Colombia (lulo, carambolo, feijoa, mangostan, and guayaba). Twenty compounds, including pesticides widely applied in tropical fruits pest control and several metabolites considered in residue definition, were used as model compounds in this work. Correction factors were used on the basis of calibration graphs obtained with standards in solvent and in matrix, and their usefulness was supported by validation of the method in all the matrices tested at 0.01 and 0.1 mg/kg. The analysis of real-world samples revealed the

  3. Evaluation of Aerosol Mixing State Classes in the GISS Modele-matrix Climate Model Using Single-particle Mass Spectrometry Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Susanne E.; Ault, Andrew; Prather, Kimberly A.

    2013-01-01

    Aerosol particles in the atmosphere are composed of multiple chemical species. The aerosol mixing state, which describes how chemical species are mixed at the single-particle level, provides critical information on microphysical characteristics that determine the interaction of aerosols with the climate system. The evaluation of mixing state has become the next challenge. This study uses aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ATOFMS) data and compares the results to those of the Goddard Institute for Space Studies modelE-MATRIX (Multiconfiguration Aerosol TRacker of mIXing state) model, a global climate model that includes a detailed aerosol microphysical scheme. We use data from field campaigns that examine a variety of air mass regimens (urban, rural, and maritime). At all locations, polluted areas in California (Riverside, La Jolla, and Long Beach), a remote location in the Sierra Nevada Mountains (Sugar Pine) and observations from Jeju (South Korea), the majority of aerosol species are internally mixed. Coarse aerosol particles, those above 1 micron, are typically aged, such as coated dust or reacted sea-salt particles. Particles below 1 micron contain large fractions of organic material, internally-mixed with sulfate and black carbon, and few external mixtures. We conclude that observations taken over multiple weeks characterize typical air mass types at a given location well; however, due to the instrumentation, we could not evaluate mass budgets. These results represent the first detailed comparison of single-particle mixing states in a global climate model with real-time single-particle mass spectrometry data, an important step in improving the representation of mixing state in global climate models.

  4. 87Sr/86Sr isotope ratio measurements by laser ablation multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry: Reconsidering matrix interferences in bioapatites and biogenic carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irrgeher, Johanna; Galler, Patrick; Prohaska, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    This study is dedicated to the systematic investigation of the effect of interferences on Sr isotopic analyses in biological apatite and carbonate matrices using laser ablation multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-MC ICP-MS). Trends towards higher 87Sr/86Sr ratios for LA-MC ICP-MS compared to solution-nebulization based MC ICP-MS when analysing bioapatite matrices (e.g. human teeth) and lower ratios in case of calcium carbonates (e.g. fish ear stones) were observed. This effect can be related to the presence of significant matrix-related interferences such as molecular ions (e.g. (40Ca-31P-16O)+, (40Ar-31P-16O)+, (42Ca-44Ca)+, (46Ca40Ar)+) as well as in many cases concomitant atomic ions (e.g. 87Rb+, 174Hf2 +). Direct 87Sr/86Sr ratio measurements in Ca-rich samples are conducted without the possibility of prior sample separation, which can be accomplished routinely for solution-based analysis. The presence of Ca-Ar and Ca-Ca molecular ion interferences in the mass range of Sr isotopes is shown using the mass resolving capabilities of a single collector inductively coupled plasma sector field mass spectrometer operated in medium mass resolution when analysing bioapatites and calcium carbonate samples. The major focus was set on analysing human tooth samples, fish hard parts and geological carbonates. Potential sources of interferences were identified and corrected for. The combined corrections of interferences and adequate instrumental isotopic fractionation correction procedures lead to accurate data even though increased uncertainties have to be taken into account. The results are discussed along with approaches presented in literature for data correction in laser ablation analysis.

  5. Hydrophilic interaction chromatography coupled matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry for molecular analysis of organic compounds in medicines, tea, and coffee

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Renqi

    2013-01-01

    Natural occurring organic compounds from food, natural organic matter, as well as metabolic products have received intense attention in current chemical and biological studies. Examination of unknown compounds in complex sample matrices is hampered by the limited choices for data readout and molecular elucidation. Herein, we report a generic method of hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) coupled with matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) for the rapid characterization of ingredients in pharmaceutical compounds, tea, and coffee. The analytes were first fractionated using a cationic HILIC column prior to MALDI-MS analyses. It was found that the retention times of a compound arising from different samples were consistent under the same conditions. Accordingly, molecules can be readily characterized by both the mass and chromatographic retention time. The retention behaviors of acidic and basic compounds on the cationic HILIC column were found to be significantly influenced by the pH of mobile phases, whereas neutral compounds depicted a constant retention time at different pH. The general HILIC-MALDI-MS method is feasible for fast screening of naturally occurring organic compounds. A series of homologs can be determined if they have the same retention behavior. Their structural features can be elucidated by considering their mass differences and hydrophilic properties as determined by HILIC chromatogram. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  6. Evaluation of a Semiquantitative Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry Method for Rapid Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Positive Blood Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jette S; Hamacher, Christina; Gross, Birgit; Sparbier, Katrin; Lange, Christoph; Kostrzewa, Markus; Schubert, Sören

    2016-11-01

    With the increasing prevalence of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria, rapid identification of the pathogen and its individual antibiotic resistance is crucial to ensure adequate antiinfective treatment at the earliest time point. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry for the identification of bacteria directly from the blood culture bottle has been widely established; however, there is still an urgent need for new methods that permit rapid resistance testing. Recently, a semiquantitative MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry-based method for the prediction of antibiotic resistance was described. We evaluated this method for detecting nonsusceptibility against two β-lactam and two non-β-lactam antibiotics. A collection of 30 spiked blood cultures was tested for nonsusceptibility against gentamicin and ciprofloxacin. Furthermore, 99 patient-derived blood cultures were tested for nonsusceptibility against cefotaxime, piperacillin-tazobactam, and ciprofloxacin in parallel with MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry identification from the blood culture fluid. The assay correctly classified all isolates tested for nonsusceptibility against gentamicin and cefotaxime. One misclassification for ciprofloxacin nonsusceptibility and five misclassifications for piperacillin-tazobactam nonsusceptibility occurred. Identification of the bacterium and prediction of nonsusceptibility was possible within approximately 4 h.

  7. Rapid Characterization of Microalgae and Microalgae Mixtures Using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbano, Duane; Diaz, Regina; Zhang, Lin; Sandrin, Todd; Gerken, Henri; Dempster, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Current molecular methods to characterize microalgae are time-intensive and expensive. Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) may represent a rapid and economical alternative approach. The objectives of this study were to determine whether MALDI-TOF MS can be used to: 1) differentiate microalgae at the species and strain levels and 2) characterize simple microalgal mixtures. A common protein extraction sample preparation method was used to facilitate rapid mass spectrometry-based analysis of 31 microalgae. Each yielded spectra containing between 6 and 56 peaks in the m/z 2,000 to 20,000 range. The taxonomic resolution of this approach appeared higher than that of 18S rDNA sequence analysis. For example, two strains of Scenedesmus acutus differed only by two 18S rDNA nucleotides, but yielded distinct MALDI-TOF mass spectra. Mixtures of two and three microalgae yielded relatively complex spectra that contained peaks associated with members of each mixture. Interestingly, though, mixture-specific peaks were observed at m/z 11,048 and 11,230. Our results suggest that MALDI-TOF MS affords rapid characterization of individual microalgae and simple microalgal mixtures. PMID:26271045

  8. Graphene coated silica applied for high ionization matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry: A novel approach for environmental and biomolecule analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasser Abdelhamid, Hani; Wu, Bo-Sgum; Wu, Hui-Fen

    2014-08-01

    The integration of nanotechnology with mass spectrometry for sensitive and selective detection of molecules is a hot/important field of research. Synthesis of graphene (G) coated with mesoporous silica (SiO2, G@SiO2) for mass spectrometric application has been demonstrated. For the first time, we proposed the significant role of surfactant that used during the synthesis of mesorporous silicate (SiO2) in mass spectrometry. It was noticed that G could initiate SiO2 via surfactants which work as initiators for further ionization. The porosity of SiO2 trapped the analytes that was released and ionized with the surfactant fragments. Undoubtedly, strong background interferences were present in the case of organic matrix, which greatly obscured the detection of low molecular weight compounds. G@SiO2 nanocomposite affords several advantages, such as the ability to detect small molecules (SiO2 is not only due to the large surface area but also due to high desorption/ionization efficiency of inevitably surfactant (cetyltrimethylammonium chloride, CATB). Unlike the conventional MALDI-MS, the G@SiO2-MS is capable of generating multiply charged polysaccharides. The present method was validated to detect surfactants with low limits of detection.

  9. Discrimination of Bacillus anthracis Spores by Direct in-situ Analysis of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Youngsu; Lee, Jonghee; Kim, Seongsoo [Agency for Defense Development, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    The rapid and accurate identification of biological agents is a critical step in the case of bio-terror and biological warfare attacks. Recently, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry has been widely used for the identification of microorganisms. In this study, we describe a method for the rapid and accurate discrimination of Bacillus anthracis spores using MALDI-TOF MS. Our direct in-situ analysis of MALDI-TOF MS does not involve subsequent high-resolution mass analyses and sample preparation steps. This method allowed the detection of species-specific biomarkers from each Bacillus spores. Especially, B. anthracis spores had specific biomarker peaks at 2503, 3089, 3376, 6684, 6698, 6753, and 6840 m/z. Cluster and PCA analyses of the mass spectra of Bacillus spores revealed distinctively separated clusters and within-groups similarity. Therefore, we believe that this method is effective in the real-time identification of biological warfare agents such as B. anthracis as well as other microorganisms in the field.

  10. Determination of trace amounts of ethylene glycol and its analogs in water matrixes by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Buu N; Okoniewski, Richard; Bucciferro, Anthony; Jansing, Robert; Aldous, Kenneth M

    2014-01-01

    Contamination of drinking water by ethylene glycol (EG) is a public health concern. EG causes adverse health effects in humans and animals, including cardiopulmonary and acute renal failure. EG and other glycols, such as propylene glycol (PG) are major components in antifreeze liquids, which may be the main source of contamination of ground water. A sensitive LC/electrospray ionization (ESI)-MS/MS method was developed to measure trace amounts of EG, diethylene glycol, and 1,2- and 1,3-PG in several water sources, including municipal tap, lake, river, and salinated water. In this method, glycols in water samples were derivatized with benzoyl chloride by the Schotten-Baumann reaction, followed by liquid-liquid extraction using pentane as the organic solvent prior to the LC/ESI-MS/MS determination. QC included analysis of a method blank and samples fortified at low and high levels. Analytical data showed excellent linear calibration for all observed glycols, with good precision and accuracy. The method detection limits for the studied glycols ranged from 1.9 to 6.1 ng/mL across the water matrixes tested. This method is suitable to help assess water quality in areas that may be prone to glycol contamination.

  11. Serum protein profiling by miniaturized solid-phase extraction and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callesen, Anne K; Mohammed, Shabaz; Bunkenborg, Jakob;

    2005-01-01

    for translation of MALDI-MS based diagnostic methods to clinical applications. We have investigated a number of MALDI matrices and several miniaturized solid-phase extraction (SPE) methods for serum protein concentration and desalting with the aim of generating reproducible, high-quality protein profiles by MALDI...... mass spectra (m/z 1000-12,000) to be obtained from serum. In a proof-of-principle application, SPE with chelating material and MALDI-MS identified protein peaks in serum that had been previously reported for distinguishing a person diagnosed with breast cancer from a control. These preliminary results...

  12. Analysis of metal-binding proteins separated by non-denaturating gel electrophoresis using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, J Susanne; Mounicou, Sandra; Zoriy, Miroslav V; Becker, J Sabine; Lobinski, Ryszard

    2008-09-15

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) have become established as very efficient and sensitive biopolymer and elemental mass spectrometric techniques for studying metal-binding proteins (metalloproteins) in life sciences. Protein complexes present in rat tissues (liver and kidney) were separated in their native state in the first dimension by blue native gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE). Essential and toxic metals, such as zinc, copper, iron, nickel, chromium, cadmium and lead, were detected by scanning the gel bands using quadrupole LA-ICP-MS with and without collision cell as a microanalytical technique. Several proteins were identified by using MALDI-TOF-MS together with a database search. For example, on one protein band cut from the BN-PAGE gel and digested with the enzyme trypsin, two different proteins - protein FAM44B and cathepsin B precursor - were identified. By combining biomolecular and elemental mass spectrometry, it was possible to characterize and identify selected metal-binding rat liver and kidney tissue proteins.

  13. Approaching the CDF Top Quark Mass Legacy Measurement in the Lepton+Jets channel with the Matrix Element Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tosciri, Cecilia [Univ. of Pisa (Italy)

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of the bottom quark in 1977 at the Tevatron Collider triggered the search for its partner in the third fermion isospin doublet, the top quark, which was discovered 18 years later in 1995 by the CDF and D=0 experiments during the Tevatron Run I. By 1990, intensive efforts by many groups at several accelerators had lifted to over 90 GeV=c2 the lower mass limit, such that since then the Tevatron became the only accelerator with high-enough energy to possibly discover this amazingly massive quark. After its discovery, the determination of top quark properties has been one of the main goals of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, and more recently also of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Since the mass value plays an important role in a large number of theoretical calculations on fundamental processes, improving the accuracy of its measurement has been at any time a goal of utmost importance. The present thesis describes in detail the contributions given by the candidate to the massive preparation work needed to make the new analysis possible, during her 8 months long stay at Fermilab.

  14. Matter power spectrum covariance matrix from the DEUS-PUR ΛCDM simulations: mass resolution and non-Gaussian errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blot, L.; Corasaniti, P. S.; Alimi, J.-M.; Reverdy, V.; Rasera, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The upcoming generation of galaxy surveys will probe the distribution of matter in the Universe with unprecedented accuracy. Measurements of the matter power spectrum at different scales and red shifts will provide stringent constraints on the cosmological parameters. However, on non-linear scales this will require an accurate evaluation of the covariance matrix. Here, we compute the covariance matrix of the three-dimensional matter density power spectrum for the concordance ΛCDM cosmology from an ensemble of N-body simulations of the Dark Energy Universe Simulation - Parallel Universe Runs (DEUS-PUR). This consists of 12 288 realizations of a (656 h-1 Mpc)3 simulation box with 2563 particles. We combine this set with an auxiliary sample of 96 simulations of the same volume with 10243 particles. We find the N-body mass resolution effect to be an important source of systematic errors on the covariance at high redshift and small intermediate scales. We correct for this effect by introducing an empirical statistical method which provide an accurate determination of the covariance matrix over a wide range of scales including the baryon oscillations interval. Contrary to previous studies that used smaller N-body ensembles, we find the power spectrum distribution to significantly deviate from expectations of a Gaussian random density field at k ≳ 0.25 h Mpc-1 and z < 0.5. This suggests that for the finite-volume surveys, an unbiased estimate of the ensemble-averaged band power at these scales and red shifts may require a more careful assessment of non-Gaussian errors than previously considered.

  15. Interfacing droplet microfluidics with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry: label-free content analysis of single droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küster, Simon K; Fagerer, Stephan R; Verboket, Pascal E; Eyer, Klaus; Jefimovs, Konstantins; Zenobi, Renato; Dittrich, Petra S

    2013-02-05

    Droplet-based microfluidic systems have become a very powerful tool to miniaturize chemical and biological reactions. However, droplet content analysis remains challenging and relies almost exclusively on optical methods such as fluorescence spectroscopy. Hence, labeling of the analyte is typically required which impedes a more universal applicability of microdroplets. Here we present a novel interface coupling droplet microfluidics and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry for label-free content analysis of single droplets. Nanoliter aqueous droplets immersed in perfluorinated oil are created in a microfluidic T-junction, transferred into a capillary, and deposited on a high-density microarray MALDI plate mounted on a motorized xy-stage. The fully automated system is robust and reliable due to two unique features. First, a simple optical droplet detection system is used to synchronize stage movement and exit of droplets from the capillary. Second, the microarray plate contains an array of over 26,000 hydrophilic spots within a hydrophobic coating, each spot acting as a recipient to confine the droplets and to prevent cross-contamination. The MALDI matrix can also be applied using our system by spotting matrix droplets on the microarray in a separate run. To demonstrate the potential of our system, we studied the enzymatic cleavage of angiotensin I by angiotensin converting enzyme and monitored the increasing concentration of the product angiotensin II over time. The interface provides a robust and fully automated method for rapid label-free and information-rich content analysis of single droplets. With the high number of droplets per plate, this method is particularly suitable for high-throughput screening applications.

  16. Mass spectrometry based lipid(ome) analyzer and molecular platform: a new software to interpret and analyze electrospray and/or matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric data of lipids: a case study from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabareesh, Varatharajan; Singh, Gurpreet

    2013-04-01

    Mass Spectrometry based Lipid(ome) Analyzer and Molecular Platform (MS-LAMP) is a new software capable of aiding in interpreting electrospray ionization (ESI) and/or matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometric data of lipids. The graphical user interface (GUI) of this standalone programme is built using Perl::Tk. Two databases have been developed and constituted within MS-LAMP, on the basis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) lipid database (www.mrl.colostate.edu) and that of Lipid Metabolites and Pathways Strategy Consortium (LIPID MAPS; www.lipidmaps.org). Different types of queries entered through GUI would interrogate with a chosen database. The queries can be molecular mass(es) or mass-to-charge (m/z) value(s) and molecular formula. LIPID MAPS identifier also can be used to search but not for M. tb lipids. Multiple choices have been provided to select diverse ion types and lipids. Satisfying to input parameters, a glimpse of various lipid categories and their population distribution can be viewed in the output. Additionally, molecular structures of lipids in the output can be seen using ChemSketch (www.acdlabs.com), which has been linked to the programme. Furthermore, a version of MS-LAMP for use in Linux operating system is separately available, wherein PyMOL can be used to view molecular structures that result as output from General Lipidome MS-LAMP. The utility of this software is demonstrated using ESI mass spectrometric data of lipid extracts of M. tb grown under two different pH (5.5 and 7.0) conditions.

  17. Matter Power Spectrum Covariance Matrix from the DEUS-PUR {\\Lambda}CDM simulations: Mass Resolution and non-Gaussian Errors

    CERN Document Server

    Blot, Linda; Alimi, Jean-Michel; Reverdy, Vincent; Rasera, Yann

    2014-01-01

    The upcoming generation of galaxy surveys will probe the distribution of matter in the universe with unprecedented accuracy. Measurements of the matter power spectrum at different scales and redshifts will provide stringent constraints on the cosmological parameters. However, on non-linear scales this will require an accurate evaluation of the covariance matrix. Here, we compute the covariance matrix of the matter power spectrum for the concordance $\\Lambda$CDM cosmology from an ensemble of N-body simulations of the Dark Energy Universe Simulation - Parallel Universe Runs (DEUS-PUR). This consists of 12288 realizations of a $(656\\,h^{-1}\\,\\textrm{Mpc})^3$ simulation box with $256^3$ particles. We combine this set with an auxiliary sample of 96 simulations of the same volume with $1024^3$ particles to assess the impact of non-Gaussian uncertainties due to mass resolution effects. We find this to be an important source of systematic errors at high redshift and small intermediate scales. We introduce an empirica...

  18. Improvement of chlorophyll identification in foodstuffs by MALDI ToF/ToF mass spectrometry using 1,5-diaminonaphthalene electron transfer secondary reaction matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvano, Cosima Damiana; Ventura, Giovanni; Cataldi, Tommaso R I; Palmisano, Francesco

    2015-08-01

    Chlorophylls (Chls) are important pigments responsible for the characteristic green color of chloroplasts in algae and plants. In this study, 1,5-diaminonaphthalene (DAN) was introduced as an electron transfer secondary reaction matrix for the identification of intact chlorophylls and their derivatives, by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS). DAN was proved to drastically outperform conventional matrices such as α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnnamic acid, dithranol, antracene, and even terthiophene, since loss of the metal ion and fragmentation of the phytol-ester linkage are negligible. Absence of significant fragmentation of radical cations of Chls a and b at m/z 892.529 and 906.513, respectively, makes MALDI MS capable of following natural degradation of intact porphyrin-based pigments whose initial steps are just represented by demetalation and dephytylation. Chl by-products, such as pyropheophytins, have been identified in dried tea leaves showing the potential of MALDI MS to follow chlorophyll biotransformation occurring in processed foodstuffs. Finally, preliminary results show the potential of MALDI MS to detect illegal vegetable oil re-greening practices.

  19. Peptidylation for the determination of low-molecular-weight compounds by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Feng; Cen, Si-Ying; He, Huan; Liu, Yi; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2016-05-23

    Determination of low-molecular-weight compounds by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) has been a great challenge in the analytical research field. Here we developed a universal peptide-based derivatization (peptidylation) strategy for the sensitive analysis of low-molecular-weight compounds by MALDI-TOF-MS. Upon peptidylation, the molecular weights of target analytes increase, thus avoiding serious matrix ion interference in the low-molecular-weight region in MALDI-TOF-MS. Since peptides typically exhibit good signal response during MALDI-TOF-MS analysis, peptidylation endows high detection sensitivities of low-molecular-weight analytes. As a proof-of-concept, we analyzed low-molecular-weight compounds of aldehydes and thiols by the developed peptidylation strategy. Our results showed that aldehydes and thiols can be readily determined upon peptidylation, thus realizing the sensitive and efficient determination of low-molecular-weight compounds by MALDI-TOF-MS. Moreover, target analytes also can be unambiguously detected in biological samples using the peptidylation strategy. The established peptidylation strategy is a universal strategy and can be extended to the sensitive analysis of various low-molecular-weight compounds by MALDI-TOF-MS, which may be potentially used in areas such as metabolomics.

  20. Preparation of porous styrenics-based monolithic layers for thin layer chromatography coupled with matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometric detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yongqin; Lin, Zhixing; Tan, Tianwei; Svec, Frantisek

    2013-11-01

    Monolithic 50 μm thin poly(4-methylstyrene-co-chloromethylstyrene-co-divinylbenzene) layers attached to 6.0 cm × 3.3 cm glass plates have been prepared, using a thermally initiated polymerization process. These layers had a well-defined porous structure with a globular morphology demonstrated with SEM images and exhibited superhydrophobic properties characterized with a water contact angle of 157°. They were then used for thin-layer chromatography of peptides and proteins fluorescently labeled with fluorescamine. The spots of individual separated compounds were visualized using UV light, and their identities were confirmed with a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry. The presence of chloromethylstyrene units in the polymer enabled hypercrosslinking via a Friedel-Crafts alkylation reaction, and led to monoliths with much larger surface areas, which were suitable for separations of small dye molecules.

  1. Analysis of carbohydrates and glycoconjugates by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry: An update for 2003-2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, David J

    2009-01-01

    This review is the third update of the original review, published in 1999, on the application of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry to the analysis of carbohydrates and glycoconjugates and brings the topic to the end of 2004. Both fundamental studies and applications are covered. The main topics include methodological developments, matrices, fragmentation of carbohydrates and applications to large polymeric carbohydrates from plants, glycans from glycoproteins and those from various glycolipids. Other topics include the use of MALDI MS to study enzymes related to carbohydrate biosynthesis and degradation, its use in industrial processes, particularly biopharmaceuticals and its use to monitor products of chemical synthesis where glycodendrimers and carbohydrate-protein complexes are highlighted.

  2. Feasibility of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) networking in university hospitals in Brussels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martiny, D; Cremagnani, P; Gaillard, A; Miendje Deyi, V Y; Mascart, G; Ebraert, A; Attalibi, S; Dediste, A; Vandenberg, O

    2014-05-01

    The mutualisation of analytical platforms might be used to address rising healthcare costs. Our study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of networking a unique matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) system for common use in several university hospitals in Brussels, Belgium. During a one-month period, 1,055 successive bacterial isolates from the Brugmann University Hospital were identified on-site using conventional techniques; these same isolates were also identified using a MALDI-TOF MS system at the Porte de Hal Laboratory by sending target plates and identification projects via transportation and the INFECTIO_MALDI software (Infopartner, Nancy, France), respectively. The occurrence of transmission problems (helpdesk to manage potential connectivity problems.

  3. Detection of Radical Adducts with Small Molecular Weights by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization with Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN,Yao-Wei; SUN,Shi-Hao; XIE,Jian-Ping; ZONG,Yong-Li; NIE,Cong; GUO,Yin-Long

    2007-01-01

    As an alternative method, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization with Fourier transform mass spectrometry (MALDI-FTMS) has been successfully used to detect and identify free radical adducts with small molecular weights of hydroxyl and 2-cyano-2-propyl radicals trapped with 5,5-dimethylpyrroline N-oxide (DMPO). The detection and identification by MS/MS experiments using sustained offresonance irradiation collision-induced dissociation (SORI-CID) of [(DMPO+·OH-·H)+H+] (m/z 130.0868) and [DMPO+2 ·CH(CH3)2CN+H+] (m/z 250.1917) have demonstrated that MALDI-FTMS could be an effective method for detection and identification of free radical adducts. Other radical adducts have been also detected and identified. The approach of MALDI-FTMS is simple, fast, and sensitive which has potential for high-throughput analysis.

  4. Microbial typing by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry: do we need guidance for data interpretation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinali, Sébastien; van Belkum, Alex; Goering, Richard V; Girard, Victoria; Welker, Martin; Van Nuenen, Marc; Pincus, David H; Arsac, Maud; Durand, Géraldine

    2015-03-01

    The integration of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) in clinical microbiology has revolutionized species identification of bacteria, yeasts, and molds. However, beyond straightforward identification, the method has also been suggested to have the potential for subspecies-level or even type-level epidemiological analyses. This minireview explores MALDI-TOF MS-based typing, which has already been performed on many clinically relevant species. We discuss the limits of the method's resolution and we suggest interpretative criteria allowing valid comparison of strain-specific data. We conclude that guidelines for MALDI-TOF MS-based typing can be developed along the same lines as those used for the interpretation of data from pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE).

  5. Non-zero $\\theta_{13}$ with Unbroken $\\mu-\\tau$ Symmetry of the Active Neutrino Mass Matrix in the Presence of a Light Sterile Neutrino

    CERN Document Server

    Borah, Debasish

    2016-01-01

    We revisit the possibility of generating non-zero reactor mixing angle in a scenario where there is a sterile neutrino at the eV scale apart from the usual three sub-eV scale active neutrinos. We show that the $3\\times3$ active neutrino mass matrix can possess a $\\mu-\\tau$ symmetry and can still be consistent with non-zero value of the reactor mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$, provided the symmetry is broken in the sterile neutrino sector. We first propose a simple $A_4$ realisation of such a scenario and then numerically evaluate the complete $3+1$ neutrino parameter space that allows such a possibility. We also discuss the possible implications at neutrinoless double beta decay $(0\

  6. Structural determination of the conjugate of human serum albumin with a mitomycin C derivative, KW-2149, by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuzawa, T; Tomer, K B

    1997-01-01

    A new mitomycin C derivative, KW-2149, is known to form a covalent conjugate with human serum albumin (HSA). This conjugate exhibits 1/20 of the anticellular activity of unconjugated KW-2149. Structural studies of this conjugate were carried out using a combination of enzymatic digestion, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry. The tryptic peptide T5 (residues 21-41) was the only peptide found to be modified by KW-2149 moieties, the [(gamma-L-glutamylamino)ethyl]thio group or the (2-aminoethyl)thio group, through a disulfide bond. Although the latter peptide lost its mitomycin C moiety in the course of tryptic digestion, these data strongly suggest that KW-2149 was bound to Cys-34, the only free cysteine on HSA.

  7. An extraction method of positive blood cultures for direct identification of Candida species by Vitek MS matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavergne, Rose-Anne; Chauvin, Pamela; Valentin, Alexis; Fillaux, Judith; Roques-Malecaze, Christine; Arnaud, Sylvie; Menard, Sandie; Magnaval, Jean-François; Berry, Antoine; Cassaing, Sophie; Iriart, Xavier

    2013-08-01

    Candida spp. are an important cause of nosocomial bloodstream infections. Currently, complete identification of yeasts with conventional methods takes several days. We report here the first evaluation of an extraction method associated with the Vitek MS matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry for direct identification of Candida species from positive blood cultures. We evaluated this protocol with blood cultures that were inoculated with reference and routine isolates (eight reference strains, 30 patients isolates and six mixed cultures containing two strains of different Candida species), or from patients with candidemia (28 isolates). This method performed extremely well (97% correct identification) with blood cultures of single Candida spp. and significantly reduced the time of diagnosis. Nevertheless, subculture remains indispensable to test fungal resistance and to detect mixed infections.

  8. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry for rapid identification of fungal rhinosinusitis pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yanfei; Wang, Jinglin; Zhang, Mingxin; Zhu, Min; Wang, Mei; Sun, Yufeng; Gu, Haitong; Cao, Jingjing; Li, Xue; Zhang, Shaoya; Lu, Xinxin

    2017-03-01

    Filamentous fungi are among the most important pathogens, causing fungal rhinosinusitis (FRS). Current laboratory diagnosis of FRS pathogens mainly relies on phenotypic identification by culture and microscopic examination, which is time consuming and expertise dependent. Although matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) MS has been employed to identify various fungi, its efficacy in the identification of FRS fungi is less clear. A total of 153 FRS isolates obtained from patients were analysed at the Clinical Laboratory at the Beijing Tongren Hospital affiliated to the Capital Medical University, between January 2014 and December 2015. They were identified by traditional phenotypic methods and Bruker MALDI-TOF MS (Bruker, Biotyper version 3.1), respectively. Discrepancies between the two methods were further validated by sequencing. Among the 153 isolates, 151 had correct species identification using MALDI-TOF MS (Bruker, Biot 3.1, score ≥2.0 or 2.3). MALDI-TOF MS enabled identification of some very closely related species that were indistinguishable by conventional phenotypic methods, including 1/10 Aspergillus versicolor, 3/20 Aspergillus flavus, 2/30 Aspergillus fumigatus and 1/20 Aspergillus terreus, which were misidentified by conventional phenotypic methods as Aspergillus nidulans, Aspergillus oryzae, Aspergillus japonicus and Aspergillus nidulans, respectively. In addition, 2/2 Rhizopus oryzae and 1/1 Rhizopus stolonifer that were identified only to the genus level by the phenotypic method were correctly identified by MALDI-TOF MS. MALDI-TOF MS is a rapid and accurate technique, and could replace the conventional phenotypic method for routine identification of FRS fungi in clinical microbiology laboratories.

  9. Negative Ion In-Source Decay Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Sequencing Acidic Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillen, Chelsea L.; Wright, Patience M.; Cassady, Carolyn J.

    2016-05-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) in-source decay was studied in the negative ion mode on deprotonated peptides to determine its usefulness for obtaining extensive sequence information for acidic peptides. Eight biological acidic peptides, ranging in size from 11 to 33 residues, were studied by negative ion mode ISD (nISD). The matrices 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 2-aminobenzoic acid, 2-aminobenzamide, 1,5-diaminonaphthalene, 5-amino-1-naphthol, 3-aminoquinoline, and 9-aminoacridine were used with each peptide. Optimal fragmentation was produced with 1,5-diaminonphthalene (DAN), and extensive sequence informative fragmentation was observed for every peptide except hirudin(54-65). Cleavage at the N-Cα bond of the peptide backbone, producing c' and z' ions, was dominant for all peptides. Cleavage of the N-Cα bond N-terminal to proline residues was not observed. The formation of c and z ions is also found in electron transfer dissociation (ETD), electron capture dissociation (ECD), and positive ion mode ISD, which are considered to be radical-driven techniques. Oxidized insulin chain A, which has four highly acidic oxidized cysteine residues, had less extensive fragmentation. This peptide also exhibited the only charged localized fragmentation, with more pronounced product ion formation adjacent to the highly acidic residues. In addition, spectra were obtained by positive ion mode ISD for each protonated peptide; more sequence informative fragmentation was observed via nISD for all peptides. Three of the peptides studied had no product ion formation in ISD, but extensive sequence informative fragmentation was found in their nISD spectra. The results of this study indicate that nISD can be used to readily obtain sequence information for acidic peptides.

  10. Direct demonstration of tissue uptake of an inhaled drug: proof-of-principle study using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehniger, Thomas E; Végvári, Akos; Rezeli, Melinda; Prikk, Kaiu; Ross, Peeter; Dahlbäck, Magnus; Edula, Goutham; Sepper, Ruth; Marko-Varga, György

    2011-11-01

    Drug therapy is often directed to specific organ and tissue compartments where the mode of action of the compound affects specifically targeted biological processes. However, the direct measurement of drug uptake in terms of a time kinetic and concentrations attained at the local sites has not been readily available as a clinical index for most drugs. A proof-of-principle study was conducted to test the utility of applying matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) to demonstrate the qualitative distribution pattern of a locally administered drug within tissue sites of targeted action. Here we have measured the occurrence of an inhaled bronchodilator, the muscarinic receptor antagonist ipratropium, within human bronchial biopsies obtained by fiber optic bronchoscopy shortly after dosing exposure. Cryo-preserved biopsy samples from five subjects being evaluated for airway obstruction or potential tumor development were prepared as thin frozen sections. Samples coated with a MALDI matrix were analyzed by a MALDI LTQ Orbitrap XL mass spectrometer at large (100 μm) and small (30 μm) raster sizes. Our results demonstrate that ipratropium is rapidly absorbed into the airway wall. Ipratropium parent ion (m/z 332.332) and daughter ions (m/z 166.2 and 290.2) were coincidently partitioned within submucosal spaces containing targeted airway smooth muscle in four out of five subjects. The signal intensity of ipratropium fragment ions provided estimates that local drug concentrations between 3 and 80 nM were achieved within the airway wall. To our knowledge, this is the first reported study in applying MALDI-MSI to demonstrate the localization of a drug administered at therapeutic levels. The study highlights the potential benefit of MALDI-MSI to provide important measurements of drug efficacy in clinical settings.

  11. Prediction Models of Retention Indices for Increased Confidence in Structural Elucidation during Complex Matrix Analysis: Application to Gas Chromatography Coupled with High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dossin, Eric; Martin, Elyette; Diana, Pierrick; Castellon, Antonio; Monge, Aurelien; Pospisil, Pavel; Bentley, Mark; Guy, Philippe A

    2016-08-02

    Monitoring of volatile and semivolatile compounds was performed using gas chromatography (GC) coupled to high-resolution electron ionization mass spectrometry, using both headspace and liquid injection modes. A total of 560 reference compounds, including 8 odd n-alkanes, were analyzed and experimental linear retention indices (LRI) were determined. These reference compounds were randomly split into training (n = 401) and test (n = 151) sets. LRI for all 552 reference compounds were also calculated based upon computational Quantitative Structure-Property Relationship (QSPR) models, using two independent approaches RapidMiner (coupled to Dragon) and ACD/ChromGenius software. Correlation coefficients for experimental versus predicted LRI values calculated for both training and test set compounds were calculated at 0.966 and 0.949 for RapidMiner and at 0.977 and 0.976 for ACD/ChromGenius, respectively. In addition, the cross-validation correlation was calculated at 0.96 from RapidMiner and the residual standard error value obtained from ACD/ChromGenius was 53.635. These models were then used to predict LRI values for several thousand compounds reported present in tobacco and tobacco-related fractions, plus a range of specific flavor compounds. It was demonstrated that using the mean of the LRI values predicted by RapidMiner and ACD/ChromGenius, in combination with accurate mass data, could enhance the confidence level for compound identification from the analysis of complex matrixes, particularly when the two predicted LRI values for a compound were in close agreement. Application of this LRI modeling approach to matrixes with unknown composition has already enabled the confirmation of 23 postulated compounds, demonstrating its ability to facilitate compound identification in an analytical workflow. The goal is to reduce the list of putative candidates to a reasonable relevant number that can be obtained and measured for confirmation.

  12. Simultaneous Counter-Ion Co-Deposition a Technique Enabling Matrix Isolation Spectroscopy Studies Using Low-Energy Beams of Mass-Selected Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Ryan M.; Moore, David T.

    2014-06-01

    Matrix isolation spectroscopy was first developed in Pimentel's group during the 1950's to facilitate spectroscopic studies of transient species. Cryogenic matrices of condensed rare gases provide an inert chemical environment with facile energy dissipation and are transparent at all wavelengths longer than vacuum UV, making them ideal for studying labile and reactive species such as radicals, weakly bound complexes, and ions. Since frozen rare gases are poor electrolytes, studies of ions require near-equal populations of anions and cations in order to stabilize the number densities required for spectroscopic experiments. Many techniques for generation of ions for using in matrix isolation studies satisfy this criterion intrinsically, however when ion beams generated in external sources are deposited, the counter-ions typically arise via secondary processes that are at best loosely controlled. It has long been recognized that it would be desirable to stabilize deposition of mass-selected ions generated in an external source using simultaneous co-deposition of a beam of counter-ions, however previous attempts to achieve this have been reported as unsuccessful. The Moore group at Lehigh has demonstrated successful experiments of this type, using mass-selected anions generated from a metal cluster source, co-deposited with a balanced current of cations generated in a separate electron ionization source. This talk will focus on the details of the technique, and present some results from proof-of-concept studies on anionic copper carbonyl complexes formed in argon matrices following co-deposition of Cu- with Ar+ or Kr+. Funding support from NSF CAREER Award CHE-0955637 is gratefully acknowledged. Whittle et al., J. Chem. Phys. 22, p.1943 (1954); Becker et al., J. Chem. Phys. 25, p.224 (1956). Godbout et al., J. Chem. Phys. 96, p.2892 (1996). Sabo et al., Appl. Spectrosc. 45, p. 535 (1991).

  13. Selective reduction of C=C double bonds in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry of microcystins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deleuze, Christelle; De Pauw, Edwin; Quinton, Loic

    2010-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic bacteria encountered in various aquatic environments. Some of them are able to produce powerful toxins called cyanotoxins. Among cyanotoxins, microcystins (MCs) constitute a group of closely related cyclic heptapeptides. Their sequences are made up of classical amino acids as well as post- translational modified ones. Interestingly, in vivo metabolism of microcystins seems to be greatly dependent on various minor structural differences and particularly those of the seventh amino acid, which can be either dehydroalanine (or a derivative), dehydroaminobutyric acid (or a derivative), serine or alanine. As a consequence, microcystins have been classified on the basis of the nature of this singular amino acid. A major difficulty in the classification of such toxins is that some of them share the same molecular masses and the same molecular formulas. Consequently, a simple mass measurement is not sufficient to determine the structure and the class of a toxin of interest. Heavy and expensive techniques are used to classify them, such as multi-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance and amino acid analysis. In this work, a new matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight method leading to an easy classification of MCs is proposed. The methodology relies on the reductive properties of the matrix 1,5-diaminonaphtalene (1,5-DAN) which appears to be able to selectively reduce the double carbon-carbon bond belonging to the seventh amino acid. Moreover, the yield of reduction seems to be influenced by the degree of substitution of this double bond, allowing a discrimination between dehydroalanine and dehydroaminobutyric acid. This selective reduction was confirmed by the study of three synthetic peptides by mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry. According to these results, the use of reductive matrices seems to be promising in the study of microcystins and in their classification. More generally, 1,5-DAN allows the selective

  14. Global optimization of the infrared matrix-assisted laser desorption electrospray ionization (IR MALDESI) source for mass spectrometry using statistical design of experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Jeremy A; Muddiman, David C

    2011-12-15

    Design of experiments (DOE) is a systematic and cost-effective approach to system optimization by which the effects of multiple parameters and parameter interactions on a given response can be measured in few experiments. Herein, we describe the use of statistical DOE to improve a few of the analytical figures of merit of the infrared matrix-assisted laser desorption electrospray ionization (IR-MALDESI) source for mass spectrometry. In a typical experiment, bovine cytochrome c was ionized via electrospray, and equine cytochrome c was desorbed and ionized by IR-MALDESI such that the ratio of equine:bovine was used as a measure of the ionization efficiency of IR-MALDESI. This response was used to rank the importance of seven source parameters including flow rate, laser fluence, laser repetition rate, ESI emitter to mass spectrometer inlet distance, sample stage height, sample plate voltage, and the sample to mass spectrometer inlet distance. A screening fractional factorial DOE was conducted to designate which of the seven parameters induced the greatest amount of change in the response. These important parameters (flow rate, stage height, sample to mass spectrometer inlet distance, and laser fluence) were then studied at higher resolution using a full factorial DOE to obtain the globally optimized combination of parameter settings. The optimum combination of settings was then compared with our previously determined settings to quantify the degree of improvement in detection limit. The limit of detection for the optimized conditions was approximately 10 attomoles compared with 100 femtomoles for the previous settings, which corresponds to a four orders of magnitude improvement in the detection limit of equine cytochrome c.

  15. Rapid Profiling of Bovine and Human Milk Gangliosides by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyeyoung; An, Hyun Joo; Lerno, Larry A; German, J Bruce; Lebrilla, Carlito B

    2011-08-15

    Gangliosides are anionic glycosphingolipids widely distributed in vertebrate tissues and fluids. Their structural and quantitative expression patterns depend on phylogeny and are distinct down to the species level. In milk, gangliosides are exclusively associated with the milk fat globule membrane. They may participate in diverse biological processes but more specifically to host-pathogen interactions. However, due to the molecular complexities, the analysis needs extensive sample preparation, chromatographic separation, and even chemical reaction, which makes the process very complex and time-consuming. Here, we describe a rapid profiling method for bovine and human milk gangliosides employing matrix-assisted desorption/ionization (MALDI) Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometry (MS). Prior to the analyses of biological samples, milk ganglioside standards GM3 and GD3 fractions were first analyzed in order to validate this method. High mass accuracy and high resolution obtained from MALDI FTICR MS allow for the confident assignment of chain length and degree of unsaturation of the ceramide. For the structural elucidation, tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), specifically as collision-induced dissociation (CID) and infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) were employed. Complex ganglioside mixtures from bovine and human milk were further analyzed with this method. The samples were prepared by two consecutive chloroform/methanol extraction and solid phase extraction. We observed a number of differences between bovine milk and human milk. The common gangliosides in bovine and human milk are NeuAc-NeuAc-Hex-Hex-Cer (GD3) and NeuAc-Hex-Hex-Cer (GM3); whereas, the ion intensities of ganglioside species are different between two milk samples. Kendrick mass defect plot yields grouping of ganglioside peaks according to their structural similarities. Gangliosides were further probed by tandem MS to confirm the compositional and structural assignments

  16. Solution for blank and matrix difficulties encountered during phthalate analysis of edible oils by high performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavrouš, Adam; Pavloušková, Jana; Ševčík, Václav; Vrbík, Karel; Čabala, Radomír

    2016-07-22

    Worldwide production of phthalates has led to their undesirable presence in the food chain. Particularly edible oils have become an area of growing concern owing to numerous reported occurrences of phthalates. The analytical methods used in this field face difficulties associated mainly with matrix complexity or phthalate contamination which this study has aimed to describe and resolve. The proposed procedure consisting of liquid-liquid extraction, solid phase extraction and high performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry allowed us to analyze simultaneously 6 individual phthalates and 2 phthalate isomeric mixtures. DSC-18 SPE phase was selected for cleanup owing to the most efficient co-extract removal (assessed using high resolution mass spectrometry). Several sources of phthalate contamination were identified, however, the mobile phase was the most serious. The key improvement was achieved by equipping a contamination trap, a 50-mm reverse phase HPLC column, generating a delay between target and mobile phase peaks of the same compounds. RSDs ranging between 2.4 and 16 % confirm good precision and LOQs between 5.5 and 110μgkg(-1) reflect satisfactory blank management. With up to 19 occurrences in 25 analyzed edible oil samples and levels up to 33mgkg(-1), bis(2-ethylhexyl), diisononyl and diisodecyl phthalates were the most important contaminants.

  17. Detection of bacteria from biological mixtures using immunomagnetic separation combined with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madonna, A.J.; Basile, F.; Furlong, E.; Voorhees, K.J.

    2001-01-01

    A rapid method for identifying specific bacteria from complex biological mixtures using immunomagnetic separation coupled to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry has been developed. The technique employs commercially available magnetic beads coated with polycolonal antibodies raised against specific bacteria and whole cell analysis by MALDI-MS. A suspension of a bacterial mixture is mixed with the immunomagnetic beads specific for the target microorganism. After a short incubation period (20 mins) the bacteria captured by the beads are washed, resuspended in deionized H2O and directly applied onto a MALDI probe. Liquid suspensions containing bacterial mixtures can be screened within 1 h total analysis time. Positive tests result in the production of a fingerprint mass spectrum primarily consisting of protein biomarkers characteristic of the targeted microorganism. Using this procedure, Salmonella choleraesuis was isolated and detected from standard bacterial mixtures and spiked samples of river water, human urine, and chicken blood. Copyright ?? 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Evaluation of the Andromas matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry system for identification of aerobically growing Gram-positive bacilli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farfour, E; Leto, J; Barritault, M; Barberis, C; Meyer, J; Dauphin, B; Le Guern, A-S; Leflèche, A; Badell, E; Guiso, N; Leclercq, A; Le Monnier, A; Lecuit, M; Rodriguez-Nava, V; Bergeron, E; Raymond, J; Vimont, S; Bille, E; Carbonnelle, E; Guet-Revillet, H; Lécuyer, H; Beretti, J-L; Vay, C; Berche, P; Ferroni, A; Nassif, X; Join-Lambert, O

    2012-08-01

    Matrix-associated laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is a rapid and simple microbial identification method. Previous reports using the Biotyper system suggested that this technique requires a preliminary extraction step to identify Gram-positive rods (GPRs), a technical issue that may limit the routine use of this technique to identify pathogenic GPRs in the clinical setting. We tested the accuracy of the MALDI-TOF MS Andromas strategy to identify a set of 659 GPR isolates representing 16 bacterial genera and 72 species by the direct colony method. This bacterial collection included 40 C. diphtheriae, 13 C. pseudotuberculosis, 19 C. ulcerans, and 270 other Corynebacterium isolates, 32 L. monocytogenes and 24 other Listeria isolates, 46 Nocardia, 75 Actinomyces, 18 Actinobaculum, 11 Propionibacterium acnes, 18 Propionibacterium avidum, 30 Lactobacillus, 21 Bacillus, 2 Rhodococcus equi, 2 Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae, and 38 other GPR isolates, all identified by reference techniques. Totals of 98.5% and 1.2% of non-Listeria GPR isolates were identified to the species or genus level, respectively. Except for L. grayi isolates that were identified to the species level, all other Listeria isolates were identified to the genus level because of highly similar spectra. These data demonstrate that rapid identification of pathogenic GPRs can be obtained without an extraction step by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

  19. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging: a powerful tool for probing the molecular topology of plant cutin polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veličković, Dušan; Herdier, Hélène; Philippe, Glenn; Marion, Didier; Rogniaux, Hélène; Bakan, Bénédicte

    2014-12-01

    The cutin polymers of different fruit cuticles (tomato, apple, nectarine) were examined using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI MSI) after in situ release of the lipid monomers by alkaline hydrolysis. The mass spectra were acquired from each coordinate with a lateral spatial resolution of approximately 100 μm. Specific monomers were released at their original location in the tissue, suggesting that post-hydrolysis diffusion can be neglected. Relative quantification of the species was achieved by introducing an internal standard, and the collection of data was subjected to non-supervised and supervised statistical treatments. The molecular images obtained showed a specific distribution of ions that could unambiguously be ascribed to cutinized and suberized regions observed at the surface of fruit cuticles, thus demonstrating that the method is able to probe some structural changes that affect hydrophobic cuticle polymers. Subsequent chemical assignment of the differentiating ions was performed, and all of these ions could be matched to cutin and suberin molecular markers. Therefore, this MALDI-MSI procedure provides a powerful tool for probing the surface heterogeneity of plant lipid polymers. This method should facilitate rapid investigation of the relationships between cuticle phenotypes and the structure of cutin within a large population of mutants.

  20. Applications of whole-cell matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry in systematic microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welker, Martin; Moore, Edward R B

    2011-02-01

    In the last few years matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has been increasingly studied and applied for the identification and typing of microorganisms. Very recently, MALDI-TOF MS has been introduced in clinical routine microbiological diagnostics with marked success, which is remarkable considering that not long ago the technology was generally seen as being far from practical application. The identification of microbial isolates by whole-cell mass spectrometry (WC-MS) is being recognized as one of the latest tools forging a revolution in microbial diagnostics, with the potential of bringing to an end many of the time-consuming and man-power-intensive identification procedures that have been used for decades. Apart from applications of WC-MS in clinical diagnostics, other fields of microbiology also have adopted the technology with success. In this article, an over-view of the principles of MALDI-TOF MS and WC-MS is presented, highlighting the characteristics of the technology that allow its utilization for systematic microbiology.

  1. Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Clinical Specimens by Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-flight Mass Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ye Ru; CHEN Qian; CUI Sheng Hui; LI Feng Qin

    2013-01-01

    Objective To develop a matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) approach to identify Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and differentiate methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) from methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA). Methods A total of 100 S. aureus strains isolated from clinical specimens and farm workers were collected and analyzed by MALDI-TOF-MS. And data obtained were interpreted with biotyper software. Results Ninety-two strains were identified by MALDI-TOF-MS as S. aureus at a level of secure genus and probable species, and 4 strains were identified at probable genus after their cultivation, spectral collection and data preprocessing. One strain was identified as S. aureus with lower score. It was revealed that identification of S. aureus by MALDI-TOF-MS was highly correlated with typing by biochemical and serological methods with an accuracy as high as 97%. The biotyper cluster analysis showed that 100 isolates were divided into 2 types at the distance level of 400. Higher peak intensity in the mass of both 3784 Da and 5700 Da was observed in MRSA, whereas that was absent from MSSA. Conclusion MALDI-TOF-MS is considered as a simple, rapid and highly reproducible technique with high-throughput and accuracy for the identification of S. aureus and it can reliably differentiate MRSA from MSSA.

  2. Rapid detection of high-risk Enterococcus faecium clones by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Ana R; Sousa, Clara; Novais, Carla; Silva, Liliana; Ramos, Helena; Coque, Teresa M; Lopes, João; Peixe, Luísa

    2017-04-01

    We aimed to explore the potential of matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for early identification of dominant Enterococcus faecium (Efm) clones involved in human infections. Well-characterized Efm isolates (n=77), analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing(eBURST and BAPS [Bayesian analysis of population structure] algorithms), and belonging to different hospital (n=53) and community (n=24) phylogenomic groups, were tested. Mass spectra (Bruker) were analyzed by visual inspection and different chemometric tools. Discrimination between groups comprising isolates commonly found in hospitals (BAPS 2.1a, 3.3a1, 3.3a2) and community (BAPS 2.1b and 3.2) was achieved with >99% accuracy, while identification of sequence types belonging to different BAPS subgroups was associated with >95% correct predictions. Our work is a proof of concept with regard to the suitability of MALDI-TOF MS in the identification of high-risk Efm clones. Further studies including strains from a wider variety of clones and sources will strengthen the potential of the workflow here described.

  3. Localization of ginsenosides in Panax ginseng with different age by matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Hangrui; Wang, Shujuan; Liu, Jianjun; Gao, Dan; Jiang, Yuyang; Liu, Hongxia; Cai, Zongwei

    2016-07-15

    The root of Panax ginseng C.A. Mey. (P. ginseng) is one of the most popular traditional Chinese medicines, with ginsenosides as its main bioactive components. Because different ginsenosides have varied pharmacological effects, extraction and separation of ginsenosides are usually required for the investigation of pharmacological effects of different ginsenosides. However, the contents of ginsenosides vary with the ages and tissues of P. ginseng root. In this research, an efficient method to explore the distribution of ginsenosides and differentiate P. ginseng roots with different ages was developed based on matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-TOF-MSI). After a simple sample preparation, there were 18 peaks corresponding to 31 ginsenosides with distinct localization in the mass range of m/z 700-1400 identified by MALDI-TOF-MSI and MALDI-TOF-MS/MS. All the three types of ginsenosides were successfully detected and visualized in images, which could be correlated with anatomical features. The P. ginseng at the ages of 2, 4 and 6 could be differentiated finely through the principal component analysis of data collected from the cork based on the ion images but not data from the whole tissue. The experimental result implies that the established method for the direct analysis of metabolites in plant tissues has high potential for the rapid identification of metabolites and analysis of their localizations in medicinal herbs. Furthermore, this technique also provides valuable information for the component-specific extraction and pharmacological research of herbs.

  4. [The research and application of pretreatment method for matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry identification of filamentous fungi].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Y F; Chang, Z; Bai, J; Zhu, M; Zhang, M X; Wang, M; Zhang, G; Li, X Y; Tong, Y G; Wang, J L; Lu, X X

    2017-08-08

    Objective: To establish and evaluate the feasibility of a pretreatment method for matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry identification of filamentous fungi developed by the laboratory. Methods: Three hundred and eighty strains of filamentous fungi from January 2014 to December 2016 were recovered and cultured on sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA) plate at 28 ℃ to mature state. Meanwhile, the fungi were cultured in liquid sabouraud medium with a vertical rotation method recommended by Bruker and a horizontal vibration method developed by the laboratory until adequate amount of colonies were observed. For the strains cultured with the three methods, protein was extracted with modified magnetic bead-based extraction method for mass spectrum identification. Results: For 380 fungi strains, it took 3-10 d to culture with SDA culture method, and the ratio of identification of the species and genus was 47% and 81%, respectively; it took 5-7 d to culture with vertical rotation method, and the ratio of identification of the species and genus was 76% and 94%, respectively; it took 1-2 d to culture with horizontal vibration method, and the ratio of identification of the species and genus was 96% and 99%, respectively. For the comparison between horizontal vibration method and SDA culture method comparison, the difference was statistically significant (χ(2)=39.026, Pfilamentous fungi, which can be applied in clinic.

  5. Matrix-assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) Can Precisely Discriminate the Lineages of Listeria monocytogenes and Species of Listeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojima-Kato, Teruyo; Yamamoto, Naomi; Takahashi, Hajime; Tamura, Hiroto

    2016-01-01

    The genetic lineages of Listeria monocytogenes and other species of the genus Listeria are correlated with pathogenesis in humans. Although matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has become a prevailing tool for rapid and reliable microbial identification, the precise discrimination of Listeria species and lineages remains a crucial issue in clinical settings and for food safety. In this study, we constructed an accurate and reliable MS database to discriminate the lineages of L. monocytogenes and the species of Listeria (L. monocytogenes, L. innocua, L. welshimeri, L. seeligeri, L. ivanovii, L. grayi, and L. rocourtiae) based on the S10-spc-alpha operon gene encoded ribosomal protein mass spectrum (S10-GERMS) proteotyping method, which relies on both genetic information (genomics) and observed MS peaks in MALDI-TOF MS (proteomics). The specific set of eight biomarkers (ribosomal proteins L24, L6, L18, L15, S11, S9, L31 type B, and S16) yielded characteristic MS patterns for the lineages of L. monocytogenes and the different species of Listeria, and led to the construction of a MS database that was successful in discriminating between these organisms in MALDI-TOF MS fingerprinting analysis followed by advanced proteotyping software Strain Solution analysis. We also confirmed the constructed database on the proteotyping software Strain Solution by using 23 Listeria strains collected from natural sources.

  6. Direct Analysis of hCGβcf Glycosylation in Normal and Aberrant Pregnancy by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray K. Iles

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG in clinical chemistry laboratories by specific immunoassay is well established. However, changes in glycosylation are not as easily assayed and yet alterations in hCG glycosylation is associated with abnormal pregnancy. hCGβ-core fragment (hCGβcf was isolated from the urine of women, pregnant with normal, molar and hyperemesis gravidarum pregnancies. Each sample was subjected to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI TOF MS analysis following dithiothreitol (DTT reduction and fingerprint spectra of peptide hCGβ 6–40 were analyzed. Samples were variably glycosylated, where most structures were small, core and largely mono-antennary. Larger single bi-antennary and mixtures of larger mono-antennary and bi-antennary moieties were also observed in some samples. Larger glycoforms were more abundant in the abnormal pregnancies and tri-antennary carbohydrate moieties were only observed in the samples from molar and hyperemesis gravidarum pregnancies. Given that such spectral profiling differences may be characteristic, development of small sample preparation for mass spectral analysis of hCG may lead to a simpler and faster approach to glycostructural analysis and potentially a novel clinical diagnostic test.

  7. Comparing inactivation protocols of Yersinia organisms for identification with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couderc, Carine; Nappez, Claude; Drancourt, Michel

    2012-03-30

    It is recommended that harmful Biosafety Level 3 (BSL-3) bacteria be inactivated prior to identification by mass spectrometry, yet optimal effects of inactivation protocol have not been defined. Here, we compare trifluoroacetic acid inactivation (protocol A) with ethanol inactivation (protocol B) of Yersinia organisms prior to identification by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). The total number of peaks detected was 10.5 ± 1.7 for protocol A and 15.7 ± 4.2 for protocol B (ρ Yersinia isolates was 9.7 ± 3.1 for protocol A and 18.1 ± 4.6 for protocol B (ρ Yersinia spp., including 20 strains of Y. pestis, the identification score was 1.79 ± 0.2 for protocol A and 1.97 ± 0.19 for protocol B (ρ = 0.0024). Our observations indicate that for the identification of Yersinia organisms, ethanol inactivation yielded MALDI-TOF-MS spectra of significantly higher quality than spectra derived from trifluoroacetic acid inactivation. Combined with previously published data, our results permit the updating of protocols for inactivating BSL-3 bacteria. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Discrimination of different species from the genus Drosophila by intact protein profiling using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gröger-Arndt Helke

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of molecular biology-based methods for species identification and establishing phylogenetic relationships has supplanted traditional methods relying on morphological characteristics. While PCR-based methods are now the commonly accepted gold standards for these types of analysis, relatively high costs, time-consuming assay development or the need for a priori information about species-specific sequences constitute major limitations. In the present study, we explored the possibility to differentiate between 13 different species from the genus Drosophila via a molecular proteomic approach. Results After establishing a simple protein extraction procedure and performing matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI mass spectrometry (MS with intact proteins and peptides, we could show that most of the species investigated reproducibly yielded mass spectra that were adequate for species classification. Furthermore, a dendrogram generated by cluster analysis of total protein patterns agrees reasonably well with established phylogenetic relationships. Conclusion Considering the intra- and interspecies similarities and differences between spectra obtained for specimens of closely related Drosophila species, we estimate that species typing of insects and possibly other multicellular organisms by intact protein profiling (IPP can be established successfully for species that diverged from a common ancestor about 3 million years ago.

  9. Enhanced reliability of avian influenza virus (AIV) and Newcastle disease virus (NDV) identification using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Ho Bin; Sung, Haan Woo; Nho, Seong Won; Park, Seong Bin; Cha, In Seok; Aoki, Takashi; Jung, Tae Sung

    2011-03-01

    In-solution enzymatic and nonenzymatic digestion methods have been successfully implemented in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS)-based virus identification, extending to typing/subtyping of deadly influenza viruses. However, these methods are inefficient in obtaining more precise information on surface proteins of myxovirus particles, not only the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase of influenza virus but also the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase of Newcastle disease virus (NDV). Imbalances in viral protein composition cause ion suppression of tryptic fragments from low-abundant target proteins (surface proteins), adversely affecting reproducibility of mass spectra. Additionally, the coexistence of tryptic peptides from several proteins requires sophisticated statistical solutions for precise result interpretations. To circumvent these, we apply detergent-based (gel-free) partitioning of whole viruses into soluble surface proteins and insoluble virus materials, using differential centrifugation. MALDI-TOF or MALDI-TOF/TOF MS was applied to analyze tryptic peptides from separated viral proteins. In this study, we achieved type/subtype of avian influenza virus (AIV) within 5 h, based on 4 major proteins, by significantly reducing ion suppression and signal overlap from various protein sources. Hence, our approach can both yield dependable results and allow Web-based search engines to be directly employed, obviating the need for additional statistical strategy. Additionally, we demonstrate the utility of the method using NDV.

  10. Capillary-channeled polymer (C-CP) films as processing platforms for protein analysis by matrix-assisted laser/desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittman, Jennifer J; Manard, Benjamin T; Kowalski, Paul J; Marcus, R Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Polypropylene (PP) capillary-channeled polymer (C-CP) films have parallel, μm-sized channels that induce solution wicking via capillary action. Efficient mass transport from the solution phase to the channel surface leads to adsorption of hydrophobic protein solutes. The basic premise by which C-CP films can be used as media to manipulate analyte solutions (e.g., proteins in buffer), for the purpose of desalting or chromatographic separation prior to MALDI-MS analysis is presented here. Cytochrome c and myoglobin prepared in a Tris-HCl buffer, and ribonuclease A, lysozyme, and transferrin prepared in phosphate buffered saline (PBS), are used as the test solutions to demonstrate the desalting concept. Protein analysis is performed after deposition on a C-CP film with and without a water washing step, followed by spray deposition of a typical sinapinic acid matrix. Extracted MALDI mass spectra exhibit much improved signal-to-noise characteristics after water washing. A mixture of cytochrome c and myoglobin (2 μL of 2.5 μM each in Tris-HCl buffer) was applied, washed with water and spatially separated via simple capillary action (wicking) using a reversed-phase solvent composition of 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) in 50:50 acetonitrile (ACN):H(2)O. Subsequent application of sinapinic acid followed by imaging of the film using MALDI-MS reveals that as the protein solution is wicked down the film, separation occurs.

  11. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) coupled to XAD fractionation: Method to algal organic matter characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolau, Rudy; Leloup, Maud; Lachassagne, Delphine; Pinault, Emilie; Feuillade-Cathalifaud, Geneviève

    2015-05-01

    This work is focused on the development of an analytical procedure for the improvement of the Organic Matter structure characterization, particularly the algal matter. Two fractions of algal organic matter from laboratory cultures of algae (Euglena gracilis) and cyanobacteria (Microcystis aeruginosa) were extracted with XAD resins. The fractions were studied using laser desorption ionization (LDI) and Matrix-Assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF). A comparison with the natural organic matter characteristics from commercial humic acids and fulvic acids extracted from Suwannee River was performed. Results show that algal and natural organic matters have unique quasi-polymeric structures. Significant repeating patterns were identified. Different fractions extracted from organic matter with common origin had common structures. Thus, 44, 114 and 169Da peaks separation for fractions from E. gracilis organic matter and 28, 58 and 100Da for M. aeruginosa ones were clearly observed. Using the developed protocol, a structural scheme and organic matter composition were obtained. The range 600-2000Da contained more architectural composition differences than the range 100-600Da, suggesting that organic matter is composed of an assembly of common small molecules. Associated to specific monomers, particular patterns were common to all samples but assembly and resulting structure were unique for each organic matter. Thus, XAD fractionation coupled to mass spectroscopy allowed determining a specific fingerprint for each organic matter.

  12. Detection of Staphylococcus aureus using 15N-labeled bacteriophage amplification coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Carrie L; Rees, Jon C; Fernández, Facundo M; Barr, John R

    2011-03-15

    A novel approach to rapid bacterial detection using an isotopically labeled (15)N bacteriophage and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is introduced. Current phage amplification detection (PAD) via mass spectrometric analysis is limited because host bacteria must be inoculated with low phage titers in such a way that initial infecting phage concentrations must be below the detection limit of the instrument, thus lengthening incubation times. Additionally, PAD techniques cannot distinguish inoculate input phage from output phage which can increase the possibility of false positive results. Here, we report a rapid and accurate PAD approach for identification of Staphylococcus aureus via detection of bacteriophage capsid proteins. This approach uses both a wild-type (14)N and a (15)N-isotopically labeled S. aureus-specific bacteriophage. High (15)N phage titers, above our instrument's detection limits, were used to inoculate S. aureus. MALDI-TOF MS detection of the (14)N progeny capsid proteins in the phage-amplified culture indicated the presence of the host bacteria. Successful phage amplification was observed after 90 min of incubation. The amplification was observed by both MALDI-TOF MS analysis and by standard plaque assay measurements. This method overcomes current limitations by improving analysis times while increasing selectivity when compared to previously reported PAD methodologies.

  13. Thermal decomposition of CH{sub 3}CHO studied by matrix infrared spectroscopy and photoionization mass spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasiliou, AnGayle K. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0215 (United States); National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 Cole Blvd., Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Piech, Krzysztof M.; Reed, Beth; Ellison, G. Barney [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0215 (United States); Zhang Xu [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, California 91109-8099 (United States); Nimlos, Mark R. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 Cole Blvd., Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Ahmed, Musahid; Golan, Amir; Kostko, Oleg [Chemical Sciences Division, LBNL MS 6R-2100, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Osborn, David L. [Combustion Research Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 969 MS 9055, Livermore, California 94551-0969 (United States); David, Donald E. [Integrated Instrument Design Facility, CIRES, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0216 (United States); Urness, Kimberly N.; Daily, John W. [Center for Combustion and Environmental Research, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0427 (United States); Stanton, John F. [Institute for Theoretical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2012-10-28

    A heated SiC microtubular reactor has been used to decompose acetaldehyde and its isotopomers (CH{sub 3}CDO, CD{sub 3}CHO, and CD{sub 3}CDO). The pyrolysis experiments are carried out by passing a dilute mixture of acetaldehyde (roughly 0.1%-1%) entrained in a stream of a buffer gas (either He or Ar) through a heated SiC reactor that is 2-3 cm long and 1 mm in diameter. Typical pressures in the reactor are 50-200 Torr with the SiC tube wall temperature in the range 1200-1900 K. Characteristic residence times in the reactor are 50-200 {mu}s after which the gas mixture emerges as a skimmed molecular beam at a pressure of approximately 10 {mu}Torr. The reactor has been modified so that both pulsed and continuous modes can be studied, and results from both flow regimes are presented. Using various detection methods (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and both fixed wavelength and tunable synchrotron radiation photoionization mass spectrometry), a number of products formed at early pyrolysis times (roughly 100-200 {mu}s) are identified: H, H{sub 2}, CH{sub 3}, CO, CH{sub 2}=CHOH, HC{identical_to}CH, H{sub 2}O, and CH{sub 2}=C=O; trace quantities of other species are also observed in some of the experiments. Pyrolysis of rare isotopomers of acetaldehyde produces characteristic isotopic signatures in the reaction products, which offers insight into reaction mechanisms that occur in the reactor. In particular, while the principal unimolecular processes appear to be radical decomposition CH{sub 3}CHO (+M) {yields} CH{sub 3}+ H + CO and isomerization of acetaldehyde to vinyl alcohol, it appears that the CH{sub 2}CO and HCCH are formed (perhaps exclusively) by bimolecular reactions, especially those involving hydrogen atom attacks.

  14. A Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry Method for the Identification of Anthraquinones: the Case of Historical Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatini, Francesca; Lluveras-Tenorio, Anna; Degano, Ilaria; Kuckova, Stepanka; Krizova, Iva; Colombini, Maria Perla

    2016-08-01

    This study deals with the identification of anthraquinoid molecular markers in standard dyes, reference lakes, and paint model systems using a micro-invasive and nondestructive technique such as matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (MALDI-ToF-MS). Red anthraquinoid lakes, such as madder lake, carmine lake, and Indian lac, have been the most widely used for painting purposes since ancient times. From an analytical point of view, identifying lakes in paint samples is challenging and developing methods that maximize the information achievable minimizing the amount of sample needed is of paramount importance. The employed method was tested on less than 0.5 mg of reference samples and required a minimal sample preparation, entailing a hydrofluoric acid extraction. The method is fast and versatile because of the possibility to re-analyze the same sample (once it has been spotted on the steel plate), testing both positive and negative modes in a few minutes. The MALDI mass spectra collected in the two analysis modes were studied and compared with LDI and simulated mass spectra in order to highlight the peculiar behavior of the anthraquinones in the MALDI process. Both ionization modes were assessed for each species. The effect of the different paint binders on dye identification was also evaluated through the analyses of paint model systems. In the end, the method was successful in detecting madder lake in archeological samples from Greek wall paintings and on an Italian funerary clay vessel, demonstrating its capabilities to identify dyes in small amount of highly degraded samples.

  15. A Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry Method for the Identification of Anthraquinones: the Case of Historical Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatini, Francesca; Lluveras-Tenorio, Anna; Degano, Ilaria; Kuckova, Stepanka; Krizova, Iva; Colombini, Maria Perla

    2016-11-01

    This study deals with the identification of anthraquinoid molecular markers in standard dyes, reference lakes, and paint model systems using a micro-invasive and nondestructive technique such as matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (MALDI-ToF-MS). Red anthraquinoid lakes, such as madder lake, carmine lake, and Indian lac, have been the most widely used for painting purposes since ancient times. From an analytical point of view, identifying lakes in paint samples is challenging and developing methods that maximize the information achievable minimizing the amount of sample needed is of paramount importance. The employed method was tested on less than 0.5 mg of reference samples and required a minimal sample preparation, entailing a hydrofluoric acid extraction. The method is fast and versatile because of the possibility to re-analyze the same sample (once it has been spotted on the steel plate), testing both positive and negative modes in a few minutes. The MALDI mass spectra collected in the two analysis modes were studied and compared with LDI and simulated mass spectra in order to highlight the peculiar behavior of the anthraquinones in the MALDI process. Both ionization modes were assessed for each species. The effect of the different paint binders on dye identification was also evaluated through the analyses of paint model systems. In the end, the method was successful in detecting madder lake in archeological samples from Greek wall paintings and on an Italian funerary clay vessel, demonstrating its capabilities to identify dyes in small amount of highly degraded samples.

  16. Precision measurement of the top quark mass in the lepton + jets channel using a matrix element method with Quasi-Monte Carlo integration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lujan, Paul Joseph [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2009-12-01

    This thesis presents a measurement of the top quark mass obtained from p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron using the CDF II detector. The measurement uses a matrix element integration method to calculate a t$\\bar{t}$ likelihood, employing a Quasi-Monte Carlo integration, which enables us to take into account effects due to finite detector angular resolution and quark mass effects. We calculate a t$\\bar{t}$ likelihood as a 2-D function of the top pole mass mt and ΔJES, where ΔJES parameterizes the uncertainty in our knowledge of the jet energy scale; it is a shift applied to all jet energies in units of the jet-dependent systematic error. By introducing ΔJES into the likelihood, we can use the information contained in W boson decays to constrain ΔJES and reduce error due to this uncertainty. We use a neural network discriminant to identify events likely to be background, and apply a cut on the peak value of individual event likelihoods to reduce the effect of badly reconstructed events. This measurement uses a total of 4.3 fb-1 of integrated luminosity, requiring events with a lepton, large ET, and exactly four high-energy jets in the pseudorapidity range |η| < 2.0, of which at least one must be tagged as coming from a b quark. In total, we observe 738 events before and 630 events after applying the likelihood cut, and measure mt = 172.6 ± 0.9 (stat.) ± 0.7 (JES) ± 1.1 (syst.) GeV/c2, or mt = 172.6 ± 1.6 (tot.) GeV/c2.

  17. Identification of Haemophilus influenzae Type b Isolates by Use of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Månsson, Viktor; Kostrzewa, Markus; Nilson, Bo; Riesbeck, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) is, in contrast to non-type b H. influenzae, associated with severe invasive disease, such as meningitis and epiglottitis, in small children. To date, accurate H. influenzae capsule typing requires PCR, a time-consuming and cumbersome method. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) provides rapid bacterial diagnostics and is increasingly used in clinical microbiology laboratories. Here, MALDI-TOF MS was evaluated as a novel approach to separate Hib from other H. influenzae. PCR-verified Hib and non-Hib reference isolates were selected based on genetic and spectral characteristics. Mass spectra of reference isolates were acquired and used to generate different classification algorithms for Hib/non-Hib differentiation using both ClinProTools and the MALDI Biotyper software. A test series of mass spectra from 33 Hib and 77 non-Hib isolates, all characterized by PCR, was used to evaluate the algorithms. Several algorithms yielded good results, but the two best were a ClinProTools model based on 22 separating peaks and subtyping main spectra (MSPs) using MALDI Biotyper. The ClinProTools model had a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 99%, and the results were 98% reproducible using a different MALDI-TOF MS instrument. The Biotyper subtyping MSPs had a sensitivity of 97%, a specificity of 100%, and 93% reproducibility. Our results suggest that it is possible to use MALDI-TOF MS to differentiate Hib from other H. influenzae. This is a promising method for rapidly identifying Hib in unvaccinated populations and for the screening and surveillance of Hib carriage in vaccinated populations. PMID:25926500

  18. Identification of Haemophilus influenzae Type b Isolates by Use of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Månsson, Viktor; Resman, Fredrik; Kostrzewa, Markus; Nilson, Bo; Riesbeck, Kristian

    2015-07-01

    Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) is, in contrast to non-type b H. influenzae, associated with severe invasive disease, such as meningitis and epiglottitis, in small children. To date, accurate H. influenzae capsule typing requires PCR, a time-consuming and cumbersome method. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) provides rapid bacterial diagnostics and is increasingly used in clinical microbiology laboratories. Here, MALDI-TOF MS was evaluated as a novel approach to separate Hib from other H. influenzae. PCR-verified Hib and non-Hib reference isolates were selected based on genetic and spectral characteristics. Mass spectra of reference isolates were acquired and used to generate different classification algorithms for Hib/non-Hib differentiation using both ClinProTools and the MALDI Biotyper software. A test series of mass spectra from 33 Hib and 77 non-Hib isolates, all characterized by PCR, was used to evaluate the algorithms. Several algorithms yielded good results, but the two best were a ClinProTools model based on 22 separating peaks and subtyping main spectra (MSPs) using MALDI Biotyper. The ClinProTools model had a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 99%, and the results were 98% reproducible using a different MALDI-TOF MS instrument. The Biotyper subtyping MSPs had a sensitivity of 97%, a specificity of 100%, and 93% reproducibility. Our results suggest that it is possible to use MALDI-TOF MS to differentiate Hib from other H. influenzae. This is a promising method for rapidly identifying Hib in unvaccinated populations and for the screening and surveillance of Hib carriage in vaccinated populations.

  19. Matrix and energy effects during in-situ determination of Cu isotope ratios by ultraviolet-femtosecond laser ablation multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazarov, Marina, E-mail: m.lazarov@mineralogie.uni-hannover.de; Horn, Ingo

    2015-09-01

    Copper isotope compositions in Cu-bearing metals and minerals have been measured by deep (194 nm) ultraviolet femtosecond laser ablation multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (UV-fsLA-MC-ICP-MS). Pure Cu-metal, brass, and several Cu-rich minerals (chalcopyrite, enargite, covellite, malachite and cuprite) have been investigated. A long-term reproducibility of better than 0.08‰ at the 95% confidence limit on the NIST SRM 976 (National Institute of Standards and Technology) Cu-metal standard has been achieved with this technique. The δ{sup 65}Cu values for all samples have been calculated by standard-sample-standard bracketing with NIST SRM 976. All analyses have been carried out using Ni as a mass discrimination monitor added by nebulization prior to entering the plasma torch. For further verification samples have been analysed by conventional solution nebulization MC-ICP-MS and the results obtained have been compared with those from UV-fsLA-MC-ICP-MS. Several potential matrix-induced molecular interferences on the mineral copper isotope ratio, such as ({sup 32}S{sup 33}S){sup +} and ({sup 32}S-{sup 16}O{sup 17}O){sup +} do not affect the Cu isotope measurements on sulfides, while hydrides, such as Zn–H or doubly-charged Sn{sup 2+} that interfere Ni isotopes can be either neglected or stripped by calculation. Matrix independent Cu-isotope measurements are sensitive to the energy density (fluence) applied onto the sample and can produce artificial shifts in the obtained δ{sup 65}Cu values which are on the order of 3‰ for Cu-metal, 0.5‰ for brass and 0.3‰ for malachite when using energy density of up to 2 J/cm{sup 2} for ablation. A positive correlation between applied energy density and the magnitude of the isotope ratio shift has been found in the energy density range from 0.2 to 1.3 J/cm{sup 2} which is below the ablation threshold for ns-laser ablation. The results demonstrate that by using appropriate low fluence it is possible

  20. Determination of osteocalcin in meat and bone meal of bovine and porcine origin using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/time-of-flight mass spectrometry and high-resolution hybrid mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balizs, Gabor; Weise, Christoph; Rozycki, Christel; Opialla, Tobias; Sawada, Stefanie; Zagon, Jutta; Lampen, Alfonso

    2011-05-05

    A method has been developed for determining the origin of meat and bone meal (MBM) by detecting species-specific osteocalcin (OC) using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/time-of-flight (MALDI/TOF) and high-resolution hybrid mass spectrometry (HR-Q/TOF MS). The analysis is based on the detection of typical species-specific OC and its tryptic peptide fragments which differ in mass due to differences in the amino-acid sequences between species. After dissolving the MBM samples in EDTA buffer, purification after ultrafiltration was performed using two methods: solid-phase extraction using Zip-Tip C(18) or size exclusion coupled with reverse-phase chromatography. Fractions containing partially purified intact OC were analyzed using LC-Q/TOF and MALDI/TOF mass spectrometry. Species-specific OC was detected at the typical protonated and doubly protonated molecular ions. Furthermore, typical porcine- and bovine-derived tryptic fragments from MBM were detected after enzymatic digestion. In order to determine the underlying amino-acid sequences and to confirm the assignment to OC-derived peptides, MS/MS analysis was carried out. In conclusion, we were able to detect OC in bovine and porcine MBM with high sensitivity and the MS-based method described here by which total OC mass and marker peptides of digested OC are recorded can be used as an alternative approach to detect genus-specific differences in MBM and can be applied as a confirmatory method to mainly immunological osteocalcin screening methods.

  1. Determination of osteocalcin in meat and bone meal of bovine and porcine origin using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/time-of-flight mass spectrometry and high-resolution hybrid mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balizs, Gabor, E-mail: gabor.balizs@bfr.bund.de [Federal Institute for Risk Assessment, Thielallee 88-92, D-14195 Berlin (Germany); Weise, Christoph [Freie Universitaet Berlin, Institute for Chemistry and Biochemistry, Thielallee 63, D-14195 Berlin (Germany); Rozycki, Christel; Opialla, Tobias; Sawada, Stefanie; Zagon, Jutta; Lampen, Alfonso [Federal Institute for Risk Assessment, Thielallee 88-92, D-14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2011-05-05

    A method has been developed for determining the origin of meat and bone meal (MBM) by detecting species-specific osteocalcin (OC) using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/time-of-flight (MALDI/TOF) and high-resolution hybrid mass spectrometry (HR-Q/TOF MS). The analysis is based on the detection of typical species-specific OC and its tryptic peptide fragments which differ in mass due to differences in the amino-acid sequences between species. After dissolving the MBM samples in EDTA buffer, purification after ultrafiltration was performed using two methods: solid-phase extraction using Zip-Tip C{sub 18} or size exclusion coupled with reverse-phase chromatography. Fractions containing partially purified intact OC were analyzed using LC-Q/TOF and MALDI/TOF mass spectrometry. Species-specific OC was detected at the typical protonated and doubly protonated molecular ions. Furthermore, typical porcine- and bovine-derived tryptic fragments from MBM were detected after enzymatic digestion. In order to determine the underlying amino-acid sequences and to confirm the assignment to OC-derived peptides, MS/MS analysis was carried out. In conclusion, we were able to detect OC in bovine and porcine MBM with high sensitivity and the MS-based method described here by which total OC mass and marker peptides of digested OC are recorded can be used as an alternative approach to detect genus-specific differences in MBM and can be applied as a confirmatory method to mainly immunological osteocalcin screening methods.

  2. Simultaneous analysis of 45 pharmaceuticals and personal care products in sludge by matrix solid-phase dispersion and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mingyue; Sun, Qian; Li, Yan; Lv, Min; Lin, Lifeng; Wu, Yang; Ashfaq, Muhammad; Yu, Chang-Ping

    2016-07-01

    Pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) are a class of emerging contaminants widely distributed in the wastewater treatment system. The simultaneous analysis of multiple PPCPs in the sludge, which is a complex matrix, is still not fully studied. In this study, a procedure based on matrix solid-phase dispersion (MSPD) for the extraction of PPCPs from the sludge with determination by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was investigated. Forty-five PPCPs, including antibiotics, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, β-blockers, antidepressants, antimicrobial agents, preservatives, UV filters, and so on, were studied. MSPD parameters, including the sorbent materials, the ratio of sample to sorbent, the eluent composition, and the elution volumes, were sequentially optimized. Best results were achieved by 0.1 g of sludge homogenized with 0.4 g of C18-bonded silica sorbent and elution by 6 mL methanol and 10 mL acetonitrile/5 % oxalic acid (8/2, v/v). The method quantification limits for the 45 PPCPs ranged 0.117-5.55 μg/kg. The PPCP recoveries ranged from 50.3 to 107 % with relative standard deviation lower than 15 %. The proposed method was applied to analyze PPCPs in the sludge collected from a domestic wastewater treatment plant over 1 year. Thirteen PPCPs were detected, with the concentrations of ofloxacin and triclocarban more than 1000 μg/kg. Temporal variations of the PPCP levels were observed. Thus, MSPD-LC-MS/MS method could achieve good sensitivity and recovery for the target PPCP analysis in the sludge samples, while MSPD provided one-step sample preparation which was easier and faster to perform compared to the commonly used methods. Graphical abstract Workflow of MSPD and LC-MS/MS chromatograms for PPCP analysis.

  3. Determination of the fatty acid composition of saponified vegetable oils using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayorinde, F O; Garvin, K; Saeed, K

    2000-01-01

    A method using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOFMS) for the determination of the fatty acid composition of vegetable oils is described and illustrated with the analysis of palm kernel oil, palm oil, olive oil, canola oil, soybean oil, vernonia oil, and castor oil. Solutions of the saponified oils, mixed with the matrix, meso-tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl)porphyrin, provided reproducible MALDI-TOF spectra in which the ions were dominated by sodiated sodium carboxylates [RCOONa + Na]+. Thus, palm kernel oil was found to contain capric acid, lauric acid, myristic acid, palmitic acid, oleic acid, and stearic acid. Palm oil had a fatty acid profile including palmitic, linoleic, oleic, and stearic. The relative percentages of the fatty acids in olive oil were palmitoleic (1.2 +/- 0.5), palmitic (10.9 +/- 0.8), linoleic (0.6 +/- 0.1), linoleic (16.5 +/- 0.8), and oleic (70.5 +/- 1.2). For soybean oil, the relative percentages were: palmitoleic (0.4 +/- 0.4), palmitic (6.0 +/- 1.3), linolenic (14.5 +/- 1.8), linoleic (50.1 +/- 4.0), oleic (26.1 +/- 1.2), and stearic (2.2 +/- 0.7). This method was also applied to the analysis of two commercial soap formulations. The first soap gave a fatty acid profile that included: lauric (19.4% +/- 0.8), myristic (9.6% +/- 0.5), palmitoleic (1.9% +/- 0.3), palmitic (16.3% +/- 0.9), linoleic (5.6% +/- 0.4), oleic (37.1% +/- 0.8), and stearic (10.1% +/- 0.7) and that of the second soap was: lauric (9.3% +/- 0.3), myristic (3.8% +/- 0.5), palmitoleic (3.1% +/- 0.8), palmitic (19.4% +/- 0.8), linoleic (4.9% +/- 0.7), oleic (49.5% +/- 1.1), and stearic (10.0% +/- 0.9). The MALDI-TOFMS method described in this communication is simpler and less time-consuming than the established transesterification method that is coupled with analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The new method could be used routinely to determine the qualitative fatty acid composition of vegetable oils

  4. Sequencing of phosphopeptides sulfonated by 4-sulfophenyl isothiocyanate using post-source decay matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Jianguang; WANG Yongjun; ZHANG Hainan; WANG Chunyu; HU Zhiping; XUE Zhigang; XIA Kun; SHI Xiaoliu

    2006-01-01

    Phosphorylation/dephosphorylation is probably the most common and important reversible post-translational modificaion of proteins. Analyzing the functional effects of phosphorylation is helpful for understanding the biological functions of proteins. Identification of the phosphorylation sites of phosphorylated protein is a prerequisite for research on phosphorylation. In this work, an effective and simple method of identification of protein phosphorylation sites has been developed. Phosphopeptides were selectively enriched with immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) and subsequently chemically modified by 4-sulfophenyl isothiocyanate, and then the chemically modified phosphopeptides were sequenced with post-source decay (PSD) matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)time-of-flight mass spectrometry for detecting phosphorylation sites. The charge of derivatization by 4-sulfophenyl isothiocyanate introduces a negative sulfonic acid group at the N-terminus of a peptide, and enables the selective detection of only a single series of C-terminal y-type ions. This chemically assisted method greatly simplifies the extremely complex pattern of PSD fragment ions and makes the PSD spectra more easier to be interpreted. The phosphorylation sites of a synthesized model phosphopeptide and human c-myc protein have been successfully identified by this method.Phosphorylation/dephosphorylation is probably the most common and important reversible post-translational modificaion of proteins. Analyzing the functional effects of phosphorylation is helpful for understanding the biological functions of proteins. Identification of the phosphorylation sites of phosphorylated protein is a prerequisite for research on phosphorylation. In this work, an effective and simple method of identification of protein phosphorylation sites has been developed. Phosphopeptides were selectively enriched with immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) and subsequently chemically

  5. Structure determination of two conotoxins from Conus textile by a combination of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and biochemical methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalume, D E; Stenflo, J; Czerwiec, E

    2000-01-01

    Two highly modified conotoxins from the mollusc Conus textile, epsilon-TxIX and Gla(1)-TxVI, were characterized by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization and electrospray mass spectrometry and also by electrospray ionization tandem and triple mass spectrometry in combination with enzymatic c...... esterification was found necessary for the site-specific assignment of the Gla residues in the peptides....

  6. Matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization mass spectrometry peptide mass fingerprinting for proteome analysis: identification efficiency after on-blot or in-gel digestion with and without desalting procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamer, S; Jungblut, P R

    2001-03-10

    In theory, peptide mass fingerprinting by matrix assisted laser desorption-ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) has the potential to identify all of the proteins detected by silver staining on gels. In practice, if the genome of the organism investigated is completely sequenced, using current techniques, all proteins stained by Coomassie Brilliant Blue can be identified. This loss of identification sensitivity of ten to hundred-fold is caused by loss of peptides by surface contacts. Therefore, we performed digestion and transfer of peptides in the lower microl range and reduced the number of steps. The peptide mix obtained from in-gel or on-blot digestion was analyzed directly after digestion or after concentration on POROS R2 beads. Eight protein spots of a 2-DE gel from Mycobacterium bovis BCG were identified using these four preparation procedures for MALDI-MS. Overall, on-blot digestion was as effective as in-gel digestion. Whereas higher signal intensities resulted after concentration, hydrophilic peptides are better detected by direct measurement of the peptide mix without POROS R2 concentration.

  7. Subunit analysis of bovine heart complex I by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography, electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry, and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemma-Gray, Patrizia; Valusová, Eva; Carroll, Christopher A; Weintraub, Susan T; Musatov, Andrej; Robinson, Neal C

    2008-11-15

    An effective method was developed for isolation and analysis of bovine heart complex I subunits. The method uses C18 reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and a water/acetonitrile gradient containing 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid. Employing this system, 36 of the 45 complex I subunits elute in 28 distinct chromatographic peaks. The 9 subunits that do not elute are B14.7, MLRQ, and the 7 mitochondrial-encoded subunits. The method, with ultraviolet (UV) detection, is suitable for either analytical (250 microg protein) applications. Subunits eluting in each chromatographic peak were initially determined by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight/mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS) with subsequent positive identification by reversed-phase HPLC-electrospray ionization (ESI)/tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) analysis of tryptic digests. In the latter case, subunits were identified with a 99% probability using Mascot for database searching and Scaffold for assessment of protein identification probabilities. The reversed-phase HPLC subunit analysis method represents a major improvement over previous separation methods with respect to resolution, simplicity, and ease of application.

  8. Correlation of skin blanching and percutaneous absorption for glucocorticoid receptor agonists by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry imaging and liquid extraction surface analysis with nanoelectrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Peter; Toteu-Djomte, Valerie; Bareille, Philippe; Perry, Hayley; Brown, Gillian; Baumert, Mark; Biggadike, Keith

    2010-09-15

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) and liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA) with nanoelectrospray ionization mass spectrometry (nESI-MS) have both been successfully employed to determine the degree of percutaneous absorption of three novel nonsteroid glucocorticoid receptor (GR) agonists in porcine ear sections. Historically, the ability of a glucocorticoid to elicit a skin blanching response when applied at low dose in ethanol solution to the forearms of healthy human volunteers has been a reliable predictor of their topical anti-inflammatory activity. While all three nonsteroidal GR agonists under investigation caused a skin blanching effect, the responses did not correlate with in vitro GR agonist potencies and different time courses were also observed for the skin blanching responses. MALDI MSI and LESA with nESI-MS were used to investigate and understand these different responses. The findings of the investigation was that the depth of porcine skin penetration correlates to the degree of skin blanching obtained for the same three compounds in human volunteers.

  9. Rapid, simple, and highly sensitive analysis of drugs in biological samples using thin-layer chromatography coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwayama, Kenji; Tsujikawa, Kenji; Miyaguchi, Hajime; Kanamori, Tatsuyuki; Iwata, Yuko T; Inoue, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    Rapid and precise identification of toxic substances is necessary for urgent diagnosis and treatment of poisoning cases and for establishing the cause of death in postmortem examinations. However, identification of compounds in biological samples using gas chromatography and liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry entails time-consuming and labor-intensive sample preparations. In this study, we examined a simple preparation and highly sensitive analysis of drugs in biological samples such as urine, plasma, and organs using thin-layer chromatography coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (TLC/MALDI/MS). When the urine containing 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) without sample dilution was spotted on a thin-layer chromatography (TLC) plate and was analyzed by TLC/MALDI/MS, the detection limit of the MDMA spot was 0.05 ng/spot. The value was the same as that in aqueous solution spotted on a stainless steel plate. All the 11 psychotropic compounds tested (MDMA, 4-hydroxy-3-methoxymethamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine, methamphetamine, p-hydroxymethamphetamine, amphetamine, ketamine, caffeine, chlorpromazine, triazolam, and morphine) on a TLC plate were detected at levels of 0.05-5 ng, and the type (layer thickness and fluorescence) of TLC plate did not affect detection sensitivity. In addition, when rat liver homogenate obtained after MDMA administration (10 mg/kg) was spotted on a TLC plate, MDMA and its main metabolites were identified using TLC/MALDI/MS, and the spots on a TLC plate were visualized by MALDI/imaging MS. The total analytical time from spotting of intact biological samples to the output of analytical results was within 30 min. TLC/MALDI/MS enabled rapid, simple, and highly sensitive analysis of drugs from intact biological samples and crude extracts. Accordingly, this method could be applied to rapid drug screening and precise identification of toxic substances in poisoning cases and

  10. Efficient Detection of Carbapenemase Activity in Enterobacteriaceae by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization−Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry in Less Than 30 Minutes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasserre, Camille; De Saint Martin, Luc; Cuzon, Gaelle; Bogaerts, Pierre; Lamar, Estelle; Glupczynski, Youri; Naas, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    The recognition of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) isolates is a major laboratory challenge, and their inappropriate or delayed detection may have negative impacts on patient management and on the implementation of infection control measures. We describe here a matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization−time of flight (MALDI-TOF)-based method to detect carbapenemase activity in Enterobacteriaceae. After a 20-min incubation of the isolate with 0.5 mg/ml imipenem at 37°C, supernatants were analyzed by MALDI-TOF in order to identify peaks corresponding to imipenem (300 Da) and an imipenem metabolite (254 Da). A total of 223 strains, 77 CPE (OXA-48 variants, KPC, NDM, VIM, IMI, IMP, and NMC-A) and 146 non-CPE (cephalosporinases, extended-spectrum β-lactamases [ESBLs], and porin defects), were tested and used to calculate a ratio of imipenem hydrolysis: mass spectrometry [MS] ratio = metabolite/(imipenem + metabolite). An MS ratio cutoff was statistically determined to classify strains as carbapenemase producers (MS ratio of ≥0.82). We validated this method first by testing 30 of our 223 isolates (15 CPE and 15 non-CPE) 10 times to calculate an intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC of 0.98), showing the excellent repeatability of the method. Second, 43 strains (25 CPE and 18 non-CPE) different from the 223 strains used to calculate the ratio cutoff were used as external controls and blind tested. They yielded sensitivity and specificity of 100%. The total cost per test is <0.10 U.S. dollars (USD). This easy-to-perform assay is time-saving, cost-efficient, and highly reliable and might be used in any routine laboratory, given the availability of mass spectrometry, to detect CPE. PMID:25926485

  11. Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Gram-Positive, Catalase-Negative Cocci Not Belonging to the Streptococcus or Enterococcus Genus and Benefits of Database Extension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jens Jørgen; Dargis, Rimtas; Hammer, Monja;

    2012-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry with a Bruker Daltonics microflex LT system was applied to 90 well-characterized catalase-negative, Gram-positive cocci not belonging to the streptococci or enterococci. Biotyper version 2.0.43.1 software was...

  12. Classification of wheat varieties: Use of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis for varieties that can not be classified by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight-mass spectrometry and an artificial neural network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Susanne; Nesic, Ljiljana; Petersen, Marianne Kjerstine;

    2001-01-01

    Analyzing a gliadin extract by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight-mass spectrometry (MALDI- TOF-MS) combined with an artificial neural network (ANN) is a suitable method for identification of wheat varieties. However, the ANN can not distinguish between all different wheat...

  13. Localization of an O-glycosylated site in the recombinant barley alpha-amylase 1 produced in yeast and correction of the amino acid sequence using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry of peptide mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens S.; Søgaard, M; Svensson, B

    1994-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) of peptide mixtures was used to characterize recombinant barley alpha-amylase 1, produced in yeast. Three peptide mixtures were generated by cleavage with CNBr, digestion with endoproteinase Lys-C and Asp-N, respectively, an...

  14. Bacteriophage cell lysis of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli for top-down proteomic identification of Shiga toxin 1 & 2 using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem time-of-light mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    RATIONALE: Analysis of bacteria by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) often relies upon sample preparation methods that result in cell lysis, e.g. bead-beating. However, Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) can undergo bacteriophage...

  15. Quantitative mass barcode-like image of nicotine in single longitudinally sliced hair sections from long-term smokers by matrix-assisted laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometry imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Toyofumi; Nirasawa, Takashi; Takubo, Takayuki

    2014-01-01

    The matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) imaging mass spectrometric technique (IMS) offered a new breakthrough perspective in the analysis of drug abuse in forensic science; however, it only produced barcode-like images, semi-quantitative analysis. In order to develop intermittent monitoring by this IMS for forensic and medical sciences, it is important to quantitatively measure the contents of longitudinally sliced hair sections. We developed quantitative imaging mass spectrometry (QIMS) of nicotine (NC) in longitudinally sliced hairs by MALDI-IMS with the selected reaction monitoring mode using a labeled NC ((13)C3-NC) standard for the serially chronological monitoring and traceability of NC intake in heavy smokers. The calibration curve of NC/(13)C3-NC was virtually a linear equation at ranges from 1 to 50 ng/mL, the slope was 0.020, and the intercept was almost 0.023 and the R(2) was 0.9965. The limit of quantitation of NC was calculated as 1.6 ng/mg hair (an average weight of the hair would be assumed 0.06 mg/cm) by QIMS. Moreover, NC concentrations in two separate heavy smokers (n = 3) were 8.5 ± 1.2 and 34.5 ± 2.8 ng/mg hair, respectively, and covariations were ∼10% using a single hair. Quantitative mass barcode-like image of sliced section of hair allowed for the quantitative assessment of NC concentrations in long-term smokers similar to drugs and medicines during drug histories.

  16. Evaluation of a simple protein extraction method for species identification of clinically relevant staphylococci by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Naoto; Matsuda, Mari; Notake, Shigeyuki; Yokokawa, Hirohide; Kawamura, Yoshiaki; Hiramatsu, Keiichi; Kikuchi, Ken

    2012-12-01

    In clinical microbiology, bacterial identification is labor-intensive and time-consuming. A solution for this problem is the use of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). In this study, we evaluated a modified protein extraction method of identification performed on target plates (on-plate extraction method) with MALDI-TOF (Bruker Microflex LT with Biotyper version 3.0) and compared it to 2 previously described methods: the direct colony method and a standard protein extraction method (standard extraction method). We evaluated the species of 273 clinical strains and 14 reference strains of staphylococci. All isolates were characterized using the superoxide dismutase A sequence as a reference. For the species identification, the on-plate, standard extraction, and direct colony methods identified 257 isolates (89.5%), 232 isolates (80.8%), and 173 isolates (60.2%), respectively, with statistically significant differences among the three methods (P extraction method is at least as good as standard extraction in identification rate and has the advantage of a shorter processing time.

  17. An evaluation of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry for the identification of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius isolates from canine infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Marcella Braga; Ferreira, Fabienne Antunes; Garcia, Luize Neli Nunes; Silva-Carvalho, Maria Cícera; Botelho, Larissa Alvarenga Batista; Figueiredo, Agnes Marie Sá; Vieira-da-Motta, Olney

    2015-03-01

    It has been proposed, based on taxonomic and molecular studies, that all canine isolates belonging to Staphylococcus intermedius group (SIG) should be renamed Staphylococcus pseudintermedius. However, isolates of SIG and other coagulase-positive staphylococci share many phenotypic characteristics, which could lead to misidentification. The accuracy of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for identifying S. pseudintermedius isolates obtained from canine infections was evaluated, using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based identification as the gold standard. In addition, MALDI-TOF MS was compared with conventional biochemical tests. A central problem was the incorrect identification of S. pseudintermedius isolates as S. intermedius by either MALDI-TOF MS or biochemical identification. From the 49 S. pseudintermedius isolates identified by the molecular method, only 21 could be assigned to this species by the biochemical approach and only 12 by MALDI-TOF MS. The 6 S. aureus isolates were correctly identified by all 3 techniques. However, using biochemical tests, 9 S. pseudintermedius were mistakenly classified as S. aureus, indicating a reduced specificity relative to the MALDI-TOF MS system. Analysis with the MALDI-TOF MS platform allowed rapid and accurate identification of the 49 isolates to the S. intermedius group but the approach was very limited in identifying S. pseudintermedius isolates, as only 12 of 49 isolates were correctly identified, a sensitivity of 0.24 (95% confidence interval: 0.13-0.39).

  18. Differentiation of Lactobacillus brevis strains using Matrix-Assisted-Laser-Desorption-Ionization-Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry with respect to their beer spoilage potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Carola C; Vogel, Rudi F; Behr, Jürgen

    2014-06-01

    Lactobacillus (L.) brevis is one of the most frequently encountered bacteria in beer-spoilage incidents. As the species Lactobacillus brevis comprises strains showing varying ability to grow in beer, ranging from growth in low hopped wheat to highly hopped pilsner beer, differentiation and classification of L. brevis with regard to their beer-spoiling ability is of vital interest for the brewing industry. Matrix-Assisted-Laser-Desorption-Ionization-Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has been shown as a powerful tool for species and sub-species differentiation of bacterial isolates and is increasingly used for strain-level differentiation. Seventeen L. brevis strains, representative of different spoilage types, were characterized according to their tolerance to iso-alpha-acids and their growth in wheat-, lager- and pilsner beer. MALDI-TOF MS spectra were acquired to perform strain-level identification, cluster analysis and biomarker detection. Strain-level identification was achieved in 90% out of 204 spectra. Misidentification occurred nearly exclusively among strains belonging to the same spoilage type. Though spectra of strongly beer-spoiling strains showed remarkable similarity, no decisive single markers were detected to be present in all strains of one group. However, MALDI-TOF MS spectra can be reliably assigned to the corresponding strain and thus allow to track single strains and connect them to their physiological properties. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry based identification of Edwardsiella ictaluri isolated from Vietnamese striped catfish (Pangasius hypothalamus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nhu, Truong Quynh; Park, Seong Bin; Kim, Si Won; Lee, Jung Seok; Im, Se Pyeong; Lazarte, Jassy Mary S.; Seo, Jong Pyo; Lee, Woo-Jai; Kim, Jae Sung

    2016-01-01

    Edwardsiella (E.) ictaluri is a major bacterial pathogen that affects commercially farmed striped catfish (Pangasius hypothalamus) in Vietnam. In a previous study, 19 strains of E. ictaluri collected from striped catfish were biochemically identified with an API-20E system. Here, the same 19 strains were used to assess the ability of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS; applied using a MALDI Biotyper) to conduct rapid, easy and accurate identification of E. ictaluri. MALDI-TOF MS could directly detect the specific peptide patterns of cultured E. ictaluri colonies with high (> 2.0, indicating species-level identification) scores. MALDI Biotyper 3.0 software revealed that all of the strains examined in this study possessed highly similar peptide peak patterns. In addition, electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and subsequent immuno-blotting using a specific chicken antibody (IgY) against E. ictaluri revealed that the isolates had highly similar protein profiles and antigenic banding profiles. The results of this study suggest that E. ictaluri isolated from striped catfish in Vietnam have homologous protein compositions. This is important, because it indicates that MALDI-TOF MS analysis could potentially outperform the conventional methods of identifying E. ictaluri. PMID:26726022

  20. Novel approach for differentiating Shigella species and Escherichia coli by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khot, Prasanna D; Fisher, Mark A

    2013-11-01

    Shigella species are so closely related to Escherichia coli that routine matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) cannot reliably differentiate them. Biochemical and serological methods are typically used to distinguish these species; however, "inactive" isolates of E. coli are biochemically very similar to Shigella species and thus pose a greater diagnostic challenge. We used ClinProTools (Bruker Daltonics) software to discover MALDI-TOF MS biomarker peaks and to generate classification models based on the genetic algorithm to differentiate between Shigella species and E. coli. Sixty-six Shigella spp. and 72 E. coli isolates were used to generate and test classification models, and the optimal models contained 15 biomarker peaks for genus-level classification and 12 peaks for species-level classification. We were able to identify 90% of E. coli and Shigella clinical isolates correctly to the species level. Only 3% of tested isolates were misidentified. This novel MALDI-TOF MS approach allows laboratories to streamline the identification of E. coli and Shigella species.

  1. Determination of paraben preservatives in seafood using matrix solid-phase dispersion and on-line acetylation gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djatmika, Rosalina; Hsieh, Chih-Chung; Chen, Jhih-Ming; Ding, Wang-Hsien

    2016-11-15

    An effective method for determining four commonly detected paraben preservatives (methyl, ethyl, propyl and butyl paraben) in marketed seafood is presented. This method employs matrix solid-phase dispersion (MSPD) before identification and quantification of the paraben preservatives via on-line acetylation gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Parameters affecting the extraction efficiency of MSPD were optimized through a Box-Behnken design method. Under optimal condition, 0.5-g of freeze-dried seafood was mixed with 0.5-g of anhydrous sodium sulfate, and dispersed with 1.0-g of Florisil using vortex. After that, the blend was transferred to a glass column containing 1.5-g of silica gel+C18 (w/w, 9:1), which acted as clean-up co-sorbents. Then, target analytes were eluted with 12mL of acetonitrile. The extract was then derivatized on-line in the GC injection-port through reaction with acetic anhydride, and the identity and quantity of the target analytes were determined by the GC-MS system. The limits of quantitation (LOQs) were 0.2 to 1.0ng/g (dry weight). Preliminary results showed that the total concentrations of four selected parabens ranged from 16.7 to 44.7ng/g (dry weight).

  2. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry for the rapid identification of yeasts causing bloodstream infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, A K; Paul, S; Sood, P; Rudramurthy, S M; Rajbanshi, A; Jillwin, T J; Chakrabarti, A

    2015-04-01

    Few studies have systematically standardised and evaluated matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for identification of yeasts from bloodstream infections. This is rapidly becoming pertinent for early identification of yeasts and appropriate antifungal therapy. We used 354 yeast strains identified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) sequencing for standardisation and 367 blind clinical strains for validation of our MALDI-TOF MS protocols. We also evaluated different sample preparation methods and found the on-plate formic acid extraction method as most cost- and time-efficient. The MALDI-TOF assay correctly identified 98.9% of PCR-sequenced yeasts. Novel main spectrum projections (MSP) were developed for Candida auris, C. viswanathii and Kodamaea ohmeri, which were missing from the Bruker MALDI-TOF MS database. Spectral cut-offs computed by receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis showed 99.4% to 100% accuracy at a log score of ≥ 1.70 for C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, C. pelliculosa, C. orthopsilosis, C. albicans, C. rugosa, C. guilliermondii, C. lipolytica, C. metapsilosis, C. nivariensis. The differences in the species-specific scores of our standardisation and blind validation strains were not statistically significant, implying the optimal performance of our test protocol. The MSPs of the three new species also were validated. We conclude that MALDI-TOF MS is a rapid, accurate and reliable tool for identification of bloodstream yeasts. With proper standardisation, validation and regular database expansion, its efficiency can be further enhanced.

  3. Flexible xxx-asp/asn and gly-xxx residues of equine cytochrome C in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization in-source decay mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Mitsuo

    2012-01-01

    The backbone flexibility of a protein has been studied from the standpoint of the susceptibility of amino acid residues to in-source decay (ISD) in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS). Residues more susceptible to MALDI-ISD, namely Xxx-Asp/Asn and Gly-Xxx, were identified from the discontinuous intense peak of c'-ions originating from specific cleavage at N-Cα bonds of the backbone of equine cytochrome c. The identity of the residues susceptible to ISD was consistent with the known flexible backbone amides as estimated by hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) experiments. The identity of these flexible amino acid residues (Asp, Asn, and Gly) is consistent with the fact that these residues are preferred in flexible secondary structure free from intramolecular hydrogen-bonded structures such as α-helix and β-sheet. The MALDI-ISD spectrum of equine cytochrome c gave not only intense N-terminal side c'-ions originating from N-Cα bond cleavage at Xxx-Asp/Asn and Gly-Xxx residues, but also C-terminal side complement z'-ions originating from the same cleavage sites. The present study implies that MALDI-ISD can give information about backbone flexibility of proteins, comparable with the protection factors estimated by HDX.

  4. [Determination of gibberellins in Arabidopsis thaliana by matrix solid-phase dispersion extraction and high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Wu, Qian; Duan, Chunfeng; Wu, Dapeng; Guan, Yafeng

    2011-09-01

    A method for the analysis of gibberellin A1 (GA1), gibberellin A3 (GA3) and gibberellin A4 (GA4) in Arabidopsis thaliana by matrix solid-phase dispersion extraction (MSPD) and high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) was developed. The solid sample of Arabidopsis thaliana was gently blended with C18 to obtain a homogeneous mixture. This mixture was transferred to an SPE cartridge filled with 0.5 g C18 to form a MSPD column. GA1, GA3 and GA4 were eluted with cold 80% methanol aqueous solution. The target compounds were separated on a C18 column with a gradient elution of 0.05% formic acid aqueous solution and acetonitrile as the mobile phase. The identification and quantification were carried out by using electrospray ionization in negative ion mode (ESI-) with multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). The linear ranges for GA1, GA3 and GA4 were all from 10 to 300 ng/g with correlation coefficients greater than 0.98. The limits of detection were in the range of 1.1-4.1 ng/g. The average recoveries and relative standard deviations were 54.7%-102.6% and 3.2%-12.8% respectively in the spiked range of 10-50 ng/g. The method is simple, sensitive, efficient and accurate. It is suitable for the confirmation and quantitative determination of GA1, GA3 and GA4 in Arabidopsis thaliana.

  5. Nonzero θ13 with unbroken μ -τ symmetry of the active neutrino mass matrix in the presence of a light sterile neutrino

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borah, Debasish

    2017-02-01

    We revisit the possibility of generating a nonzero reactor mixing angle in a scenario where there is a sterile neutrino at the eV scale apart from the usual three sub-eV scale active neutrinos. We show that the 3 ×3 active neutrino mass matrix can possess a μ -τ symmetry and can still be consistent with the nonzero value of the reactor mixing angle θ13 if this μ -τ symmetry is broken in the sterile neutrino sector. We first propose a simple model based on the discrete flavor symmetry A4×Z3×Z3' to realize such a scenario and then numerically evaluate the complete 3 +1 neutrino parameter space that allows such a possibility. We show that the possibility of generating a nonzero θ13 can, in general, remain valid even if the present 3 +1 neutrino global fit data get ruled out by future experiments. We also discuss the possible implications at neutrinoless double beta decay (0 ν β β ) experiments in view of the latest results from the KamLAND-Zen experiment.

  6. Classification algorithm for subspecies identification within the Mycobacterium abscessus species, based on matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fangous, Marie-Sarah; Mougari, Faiza; Gouriou, Stéphanie; Calvez, Elodie; Raskine, Laurent; Cambau, Emmanuelle; Payan, Christopher; Héry-Arnaud, Geneviève

    2014-09-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus, as a species, has been increasingly implicated in respiratory infections, notably in cystic fibrosis patients. The species comprises 3 subspecies, which can be difficult to identify. Since they differ in antibiotic susceptibility and clinical relevance, developing a routine diagnostic tool discriminating Mycobacterium abscessus at the subspecies level is a real challenge. Forty-three Mycobacterium abscessus species isolates, previously identified by multilocus sequence typing, were analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). A subspecies identification algorithm, based on five discriminating peaks, was drawn up and validated by blind identification of a further 49 strains, 94% of which (n = 46) were correctly identified. Two M. abscessus subsp. massiliense strains were misidentified as M. abscessus subsp. abscessus, and for 1 other strain identification failed. Inter- and intralaboratory reproducibility tests were conclusive. This study presents, for the first time, a classification algorithm for MALDI-TOF MS identification of the 3 M. abscessus subspecies. MALDI-TOF MS proved effective in discriminating within the M. abscessus species and might be easily integrated into the workflow of microbiology labs. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Identification of pathogenic microorganisms directly from positive blood vials by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nonnemann, Bettina; Tvede, Michael; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is a promising and fast method for identifying fungi and bacteria directly from positive blood cultures. Various pre-treatment methods for MALDI-TOF MS identification have been reported for this purpose. In......-house results for identification of bacterial colonies by MALDI-TOF MS using a cut-off score of 1.5 did not reduce the diagnostic accuracy compared with the recommended cut-off score of 1.8. A 3-month consecutive study of positive blood cultures was carried out in our laboratory to evaluate whether...... the Sepsityper™ Kit (Bruker Daltonics) with Biotyper 2.0 software could be used as a fast diagnostic tool for bacteria and fungi and whether a 1.5 cut-off score could improve species identification compared with the recommended score of 1.8. Two hundred and fifty-six positive blood vials from 210 patients and 19...

  8. Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry: a Fundamental Shift in the Routine Practice of Clinical Microbiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Andrew E.; Kaleta, Erin J.; Arora, Amit

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Within the past decade, clinical microbiology laboratories experienced revolutionary changes in the way in which microorganisms are identified, moving away from slow, traditional microbial identification algorithms toward rapid molecular methods and mass spectrometry (MS). Historically, MS was clinically utilized as a high-complexity method adapted for protein-centered analysis of samples in chemistry and hematology laboratories. Today, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight (MALDI-TOF) MS is adapted for use in microbiology laboratories, where it serves as a paradigm-shifting, rapid, and robust method for accurate microbial identification. Multiple instrument platforms, marketed by well-established manufacturers, are beginning to displace automated phenotypic identification instruments and in some cases genetic sequence-based identification practices. This review summarizes the current position of MALDI-TOF MS in clinical research and in diagnostic clinical microbiology laboratories and serves as a primer to examine the “nuts and bolts” of MALDI-TOF MS, highlighting research associated with sample preparation, spectral analysis, and accuracy. Currently available MALDI-TOF MS hardware and software platforms that support the use of MALDI-TOF with direct and precultured specimens and integration of the technology into the laboratory workflow are also discussed. Finally, this review closes with a prospective view of the future of MALDI-TOF MS in the clinical microbiology laboratory to accelerate diagnosis and microbial identification to improve patient care. PMID:23824373

  9. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry: a fundamental shift in the routine practice of clinical microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Andrew E; Kaleta, Erin J; Arora, Amit; Wolk, Donna M

    2013-07-01

    Within the past decade, clinical microbiology laboratories experienced revolutionary changes in the way in which microorganisms are identified, moving away from slow, traditional microbial identification algorithms toward rapid molecular methods and mass spectrometry (MS). Historically, MS was clinically utilized as a high-complexity method adapted for protein-centered analysis of samples in chemistry and hematology laboratories. Today, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) MS is adapted for use in microbiology laboratories, where it serves as a paradigm-shifting, rapid, and robust method for accurate microbial identification. Multiple instrument platforms, marketed by well-established manufacturers, are beginning to displace automated phenotypic identification instruments and in some cases genetic sequence-based identification practices. This review summarizes the current position of MALDI-TOF MS in clinical research and in diagnostic clinical microbiology laboratories and serves as a primer to examine the "nuts and bolts" of MALDI-TOF MS, highlighting research associated with sample preparation, spectral analysis, and accuracy. Currently available MALDI-TOF MS hardware and software platforms that support the use of MALDI-TOF with direct and precultured specimens and integration of the technology into the laboratory workflow are also discussed. Finally, this review closes with a prospective view of the future of MALDI-TOF MS in the clinical microbiology laboratory to accelerate diagnosis and microbial identification to improve patient care.

  10. Subtype determination of Blastocystis isolates by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martiny, D; Bart, A; Vandenberg, O; Verhaar, N; Wentink-Bonnema, E; Moens, C; van Gool, T

    2014-04-01

    The pathogenic role of the enteric parasite Blastocystis remains controversial. Recent studies have suggested that various subtypes (STs) found in human samples could be correlated to the presence or absence and variability of clinical manifestations, and that STs can differ with respect to drug sensitivity. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques used to determine these STs are expensive and are usually restricted to research laboratory settings. This study evaluates the potential application of the inexpensive matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) technique to discriminate Blastocystis STs. A database of parasitic protein signatures was constructed for five Blastocystis STs, and the reference spectra were challenged with those from 19 axenic cultures of ST1, ST2, ST3, ST4 and ST8 and those from nine xenic liquid cultures of ST3 and ST4. Samples from axenic cultures were prepared using standard formic acid extraction and direct deposition procedures. The reference spectra revealed five distinct spectral profiles, and the database library allowed for discrimination between all of the cultures with reliability indices ranging from 2.038 to greater than 2.8 when an extraction was performed. The direct deposition procedure resulted in greater variability in the discrimination and direct MALDI-TOF MS identification from xenic liquid cultures was effective in 3 out of 9 samples. MALDI-TOF MS proved to be an effective technology for efficiently discriminating Blastocystis STs in axenic cultures.

  11. Evaluation of synthase and hemisynthase activities of glucosamine-6-phosphate synthase by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaucher-Wieczorek, Florence; Guérineau, Vincent; Touboul, David; Thétiot-Laurent, Sophie; Pelissier, Franck; Badet-Denisot, Marie-Ange; Badet, Bernard; Durand, Philippe

    2014-08-01

    Glucosamine-6-phosphate synthase (GlmS, EC 2.6.1.16) catalyzes the first and rate-limiting step in the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway, leading to the synthesis of uridine-5'-diphospho-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, the major building block for the edification of peptidoglycan in bacteria, chitin in fungi, and glycoproteins in mammals. This bisubstrate enzyme converts D-fructose-6-phosphate (Fru-6P) and L-glutamine (Gln) into D-glucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcN-6P) and L-glutamate (Glu), respectively. We previously demonstrated that matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) allows determination of the kinetic parameters of the synthase activity. We propose here to refine the experimental protocol to quantify Glu and GlcN-6P, allowing determination of both hemisynthase and synthase parameters from a single assay kinetic experiment, while avoiding interferences encountered in other assays. It is the first time that MALDI-MS is used to survey the activity of a bisubstrate enzyme.

  12. Increased detection rate of melamine-containing calcium urolithiasis by using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry technique in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chia-Fang; Liu, Chia-Chu; Chou, Yii-Her; Shiea, Jentaie; Shen, Jung-Tsung; Wang, Shiun-Shiuan; Wu, Ming-Tsang

    2014-04-20

    Background: Studies have shown that melamine may be associated with urolithiasis. A more sensitive method is needed to analyze melamine in urinary stones to identify potential causes of urolithiasis.Methods: Here we compare the analytical methods of detecting melamine in urinary stones by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry(MALDI-TOF MS) in the laboratory and clinic. First, we established the melamine detection limit in melamine cyanurate standard by the methods of FTIR spectrophotometer and MALDI-TOF MS. Subsequently, we applied these two methods to 54 adult patients with upper urinary tract calcium urolithiasis.Results: We found that the detection limit of melamine in melamine cyanurate standard by MALD-TOF MS was~10,000-fold more sensitive than FTIR.We applied both instruments to 54 stone specimens from 54 calcium urolithias is patients. In those without distinctive melamine pattern in the FTIR spectra,melamine could be detected by MALD-TOF MS in an additional 12 out of 42 subjects' stone specimens (28.6%). Compared to MALD-TOF MS negative subjects (n = 30), those positive subjects (n = 12) excreted significantly higher urinary melamine levels (P melamine in melamine-containing kidney stones

  13. Monitoring the enzymatic polymerization of 4-phenylphenol by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry: a novel approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Peng; Kumar, Jayant; Samuelson, Lynne; Cholli, Ashok L

    2002-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry is a powerful tool for polymer characterization. It has been used to understand the enzymatic polymerization of 4-phenylphenol and to monitor number average molecular weight and weight average molecular weight of the polymer as a function of systematic addition of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) in the reaction. A novel method, an introduction of internal standard for quantification of data, has been developed for MALDI-TOF MS to investigate the fate of each mers during the reaction. The preliminary data suggest that this approach provides new insight on the enzymatic synthesis, which is not available by other techniques. For the first time, we are able to understand the fate of several mers as a function of reaction conditions. The relative content of each mer increases with the addition of H(2)O(2), except for dimer and trimer. For example, the concentration of dimer species decreases as a function of H(2)O(2). On the other hand, the concentration of trimer species increases first and then decreases in the course of the reaction.

  14. Accuracy of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry for identification of clinical pathogenic fungi: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Huazhi; Yuan, Zhijie; Shen, Jilu; Wang, Zhongxin; Xu, Yuanhong

    2014-07-01

    Fungal infections in the clinic have become increasingly serious. In many cases, the identification of clinically relevant fungi remains time-consuming and may also be unreliable. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectroscopy (MALDI-TOF MS) is a newly developed diagnostic tool that is increasingly being employed to rapidly and accurately identify clinical pathogenic microorganisms. The present meta-analysis aimed to systematically evaluate the accuracy of MALDI-TOF MS for the identification of clinical pathogenic fungi. After a rigorous selection process, 33 articles, involving 38 trials and a total of 9,977 fungal isolates, were included in the meta-analysis. The random-effects pooled identification accuracy of MALDI-TOF MS increased from 0.955 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.939 to 0.969) at the species level to 0.977 (95% CI, 0.955 to 0.993) at the genus level (P meta-analysis and some of the subanalyses. In parallel, significant differences in heterogeneity among different systems and among different methods for calculating the identification ratios were found by multivariate metaregression, but none of the factors, except for the moderator of outcome, was significantly associated with heterogeneity by univariate metaregression. In summary, the MALDI-TOF MS method is highly accurate for the identification of clinically pathogenic fungi; future studies should analyze the comprehensive capability of this technology for clinical diagnostic microbiology.

  15. Decision peptide-driven: a free software tool for accurate protein quantification using gel electrophoresis and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Hugo M; Reboiro-Jato, Miguel; Glez-Peña, Daniel; Nunes-Miranda, J D; Fdez-Riverola, Florentino; Carvallo, R; Capelo, J L

    2010-09-15

    The decision peptide-driven tool implements a software application for assisting the user in a protocol for accurate protein quantification based on the following steps: (1) protein separation through gel electrophoresis; (2) in-gel protein digestion; (3) direct and inverse (18)O-labeling and (4) matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry, MALDI analysis. The DPD software compares the MALDI results of the direct and inverse (18)O-labeling experiments and quickly identifies those peptides with paralleled loses in different sets of a typical proteomic workflow. Those peptides are used for subsequent accurate protein quantification. The interpretation of the MALDI data from direct and inverse labeling experiments is time-consuming requiring a significant amount of time to do all comparisons manually. The DPD software shortens and simplifies the searching of the peptides that must be used for quantification from a week to just some minutes. To do so, it takes as input several MALDI spectra and aids the researcher in an automatic mode (i) to compare data from direct and inverse (18)O-labeling experiments, calculating the corresponding ratios to determine those peptides with paralleled losses throughout different sets of experiments; and (ii) allow to use those peptides as internal standards for subsequent accurate protein quantification using (18)O-labeling. In this work the DPD software is presented and explained with the quantification of protein carbonic anhydrase.

  16. Investigations of the lysophospholipid composition of human neutrophils under different stimulation conditions by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JURGEN ARNHOLD

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Matrix-assisted laser desorption / ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS is usually used for the analyses of proteins, carbohydrates and oligonucleotides. In spite of the number of advantages that MALDI-TOF MS exhibits for lipid analysis, this method has not often been applied in this field. In this paper we have extended our previous studies on the suitability of MALDI-TOF MS for the investigation of changes in the content of lipid-derived second messengers in organic extracts of human neutrophils. Qualitative differences in the lysophospholipid composition in organic extracts of the human neutrophils under different stimulation conditions could be easily observed by MALDI-TOF MS. Although there are still some methodological problems to be solved before this method can be routinely applied for the quantification of different lipid classes in complex biological mixtures (such as organic extracts of human neutrophils it is shown here that MALDI-TOF MS possesses the capability to be used as a simple screening method for the investigation of the content of lipid-derived second messengers and of signalling pathways in cells.

  17. Visualization of phosphatidylcholine, lysophosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin in mouse tongue body by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enomoto, Hirofumi; Sugiura, Yuki; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Zaima, Nobuhiro

    2011-06-01

    The mammalian tongue is one of the most important organs during food uptake because it is helpful for mastication and swallowing. In addition, taste receptors are present on the surface of the tongue. Lipids are the second most abundant biomolecules after water in the tongue. Lipids such as phosphatidylcholine (PC), lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) and sphingomyelin (SM) are considered to play fundamental roles in the mediation of cell signaling. Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is powerful tool for determining and visualizing the distribution of lipids across sections of dissected tissue. In this study, we identified and visualized the PC, LPC, and SM species in a mouse tongue body section with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-IMS. The ion image constructed from the peaks revealed that docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-containing PC, LPC, linoleic acid-containing PC and SM (d18:1/16:0), and oleic acid-containing PC were mainly distributed in muscle, connective tissue, stratified epithelium, and the peripheral nerve, respectively. Furthermore, the distribution of SM (d18:1/16:0) corresponded to the distribution of nerve tissue relating to taste in the stratified epithelium. This study represents the first visualization of PC, LPC and SM localization in the mouse tongue body.

  18. Cultivable Methylobacterium species diversity in rice seeds identified with whole-cell matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Marie; Fujitani, Yoshiko; Maekawa, Masahiko; Charoenpanich, Jittima; Murage, Hunja; Kimbara, Kazuhide; Sahin, Nurettin; Tani, Akio

    2017-02-01

    Methylobacterium species are methylotrophic bacteria that widely inhabit plant surfaces. In addition to studies on methylotrophs as model organisms, research has also been conducted on their mechanism of plant growth promotion as well as the species-species specificity of plant-microbe interaction. We employed whole-cell matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (WC-MS) analysis, which enables the rapid and accurate identification of bacteria at the species level, to identify Methylobacterium isolates collected from the rice seeds of different cultivars harvested in Japan, Thailand, and Kenya. Rice seeds obtained from diverse geographical locations showed different communities of Methylobacterium species. We found that M. fujisawaense, M. aquaticum, M. platani, and M. radiotolerans are the most frequently isolated species, but none were isolated as common species from 18 seed samples due to the highly biased communities in some samples. These findings will contribute to the development of formulations containing selected species that promote rice growth, though it may be necessary to customize the formulations depending on the cultivars and farm conditions.

  19. Improved sample preparation to determine acrylamide in difficult matrixes such as chocolate powder, cocoa, and coffee by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delatour, Thierry; Périsset, Adrienne; Goldmann, Till; Riediker, Sonja; Stadler, Richard H

    2004-07-28

    An improved sample preparation (extraction and cleanup) is presented that enables the quantification of low levels of acrylamide in difficult matrixes, including soluble chocolate powder, cocoa, coffee, and coffee surrogate. Final analysis is done by isotope-dilution liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) using d3-acrylamide as internal standard. Sample pretreatment essentially encompasses (a) protein precipitation with Carrez I and II solutions, (b) extraction of the analyte into ethyl acetate, and (c) solid-phase extraction on a Multimode cartridge. The stability of acrylamide in final extracts and in certain commercial foods and beverages is also reported. This approach provided good performance in terms of linearity, accuracy and precision. Full validation was conducted in soluble chocolate powder, achieving a decision limit (CCalpha) and detection capability (CCbeta) of 9.2 and 12.5 microg/kg, respectively. The method was extended to the analysis of acrylamide in various foodstuffs such as mashed potatoes, crisp bread, and butter biscuit and cookies. Furthermore, the accuracy of the method is demonstrated by the results obtained in three inter-laboratory proficiency tests.

  20. Turnaround time of positive blood cultures after the introduction of matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeletti, Silvia; Dicuonzo, Giordano; D'Agostino, Alfio; Avola, Alessandra; Crea, Francesca; Palazzo, Carlo; Dedej, Etleva; De Florio, Lucia

    2015-07-01

    A comparative evaluation of the turnaround time (TAT) of positive blood culture before and after matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) introduction in the laboratory routine was performed. A total of 643 positive blood cultures, of which 310 before and 333 after MALDI-TOF technique introduction, were collected. In the post MALDI-TOF period, blood culture median TAT decreased from 73.53 hours to 71.73 for Gram-positive, from 64.09 hours to 63.59 for Gram-negative and from 115.7 hours to 47.62 for anaerobes. MALDI-TOF significantly decreased the TAT of anaerobes, for which antimicrobial susceptibility test is not routinely performed. Furthermore, the major advantage of MALDI-TOF introduction was the decrease of the time for pathogen identification (TID) independently from the species with an improvement of 93% for Gram-positive, 86% for Gram-negative and 95% for anaerobes. In addition, high species-level identification rates and cost savings than conventional methods were achieved after MALDI-TOF introduction.

  1. Flexible Xxx–Asp/Asn and Gly–Xxx Residues of Equine Cytochrome c in Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization In-Source Decay Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Mitsuo

    2012-01-01

    The backbone flexibility of a protein has been studied from the standpoint of the susceptibility of amino acid residues to in-source decay (ISD) in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS). Residues more susceptible to MALDI-ISD, namely Xxx–Asp/Asn and Gly–Xxx, were identified from the discontinuous intense peak of c′-ions originating from specific cleavage at N–Cα bonds of the backbone of equine cytochrome c. The identity of the residues susceptible to ISD was consistent with the known flexible backbone amides as estimated by hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) experiments. The identity of these flexible amino acid residues (Asp, Asn, and Gly) is consistent with the fact that these residues are preferred in flexible secondary structure free from intramolecular hydrogen-bonded structures such as α-helix and β-sheet. The MALDI-ISD spectrum of equine cytochrome c gave not only intense N-terminal side c′-ions originating from N–Cα bond cleavage at Xxx–Asp/Asn and Gly–Xxx residues, but also C-terminal side complement z′-ions originating from the same cleavage sites. The present study implies that MALDI-ISD can give information about backbone flexibility of proteins, comparable with the protection factors estimated by HDX. PMID:24349908

  2. Detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus using phage amplification combined with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Jon C; Barr, John R

    2017-02-01

    Antibiotic resistance continues to contribute significantly to morbidity and mortality across the world. Developing new tests for antibiotic-resistant bacteria is a core action to combat resistant infections. We describe a method that uses phage amplification detection (PAD) combined with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) to rapidly identify Staphylococcus aureus and determine phenotypic susceptibility to cefoxitin. Samples tested for S. aureus are incubated together with bacteriophage in the presence and absence of cefoxitin and subjected to rapid trypsin digestion followed by MALDI-MS analysis. Tryptic peptides derived from amplified phage proteins can be detected by MALDI-MS, as validated by time-of-flight (TOF)/TOF analysis of each peptide combined with database searching. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus show significant phage amplification in the presence of cefoxitin, while methicillin-sensitive S. aureus show no phage amplification relative to a no-antibiotic control. We also show that PAD methodology can be implemented on an FDA-approved commercial MALDI-MS bacterial identification system to identify S. aureus and determine antibiotic susceptibility. The novelty of this assay includes the use of phage-derived tryptic peptides as detected by MALDI-MS to monitor the results of PAD on an instrument common to many modern microbiology laboratories.

  3. Probing chain-end functionalization reactions in living anionic polymerization via matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnould, Mark A.; Polce, Michael J.; Quirk, Roderic P.; Wesdemiotis, Chrys

    2004-11-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) is applied to examine the products arising upon the preparation of chain-end functional polymers via living anionic polymerization techniques. Both post-polymerization functionalizations as well as the use of functionalized initiators are investigated. MALDI-TOF MS is shown to be a sensitive probe for the qualitative analysis of the major and minor oligomers from novel functionalization reactions whose mechanisms are not yet well established. The method is particularly valuable for the identification of the end groups of the minor, and often unexpected, distributions that may be undetectable by other analytical means. Complete characterization of all oligomers generated during functionalization reactions provides an essential tool to the synthetic chemist for understanding the corresponding mechanisms. This insight is necessary for selecting alternative routes or making modifications to the reaction conditions. It is demonstrated that MALDI-TOF MS can convey quantitative information about the yields of the chain-end groups introduced during functionalization. From the cases presented it is evident that post-polymerization reactions allow for better control of chain-end functionality and molecular weight than functionalization with the limited number of currently available protected functionalized initiators.

  4. Examination of the translocation of sulfonylurea herbicides in sunflower plants by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, David M G; Carolan, Vikki A; Crosland, Susan; Sharples, Kate R; Clench, Malcolm R

    2010-11-30

    Pesticides are widely used in agriculture to control weeds, pests and diseases. Successful control is dependent on the compound reaching the target site within the organism after spray or soil application. Conventional methods for determining uptake and movement of herbicides and pesticides include autoradiography, liquid scintillation and chromatographic techniques such as high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Autoradiography using radiolabelled compounds provides the best indication of a compound's movement within the plant system. Autoradiography is an established technique but it relies on the synthesis of radiolabelled compounds. The distribution of four sulfonylurea herbicides in sunflower plants has been studied 24  h after foliar application. The use of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) images of protonated molecules and fragment ions (resulting from fragmentation at the urea bond within the sulfonylurea herbicides) has provided evidence for translocation above and below the application point. The translocation of nicosulfuron and azoxystrobin within the same plant system has also been demonstrated following their application to the plant stem. This study provides evidence that MALDI-MSI has great potential as an analytical technique to detect and assess the foliar, root and stem uptake of agrochemicals, and to reveal their distribution through the plant once absorbed and translocated.

  5. Identification of different respiratory viruses, after a cell culture step, by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderaro, Adriana; Arcangeletti, Maria Cristina; Rodighiero, Isabella; Buttrini, Mirko; Montecchini, Sara; Vasile Simone, Rosita; Medici, Maria Cristina; Chezzi, Carlo; De Conto, Flora

    2016-01-01

    In this study matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), a reliable identification method for the diagnosis of bacterial and fungal infections, is presented as an innovative tool to investigate the protein profile of cell cultures infected by the most common viruses causing respiratory tract infections in humans. MALDI-TOF MS was applied to the identification of influenza A and B viruses, adenovirus C species, parainfluenza virus types 1, 2 and 3, respiratory syncytial virus, echovirus, cytomegalovirus and metapneumovirus. In this study MALDI-TOF MS was proposed as a model to be applied to the identification of cultivable respiratory viruses using cell culture as a viral proteins enrichment method to the proteome profiling of virus infected and uninfected cell cultures. The reference virus strains and 58 viruses identified from respiratory samples of subjects with respiratory diseases positive for one of the above mentioned viral agents by cell culture were used for the in vitro infection of suitable cell cultures. The isolated viral particles, concentrated by ultracentrifugation, were used for subsequent protein extraction and their spectra profiles were generated by MALDI-TOF MS analysis. The newly created library allowed us to discriminate between uninfected and respiratory virus infected cell cultures. PMID:27786297

  6. Proteomic profiling of hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma with magnetic bead-based matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Taotao Liu; Ruyi Xue; Xiaowu Huang; Danying Zhang; Ling Dong; Hao Wu; Xizhong Shen

    2011-01-01

    Proteomic techniques are promising strategies in the surveillance of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). This study aimed to investigate the serum profiling with magnetic bead (MB) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) and to further identify the biomarkers for HCC. Serum samples from 80 chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients, 94 HCC concomitant with HBV patients and 24 healthy subjects were examined by MALDI-TOF MS after peptide enrichment on MBs. Based on the genetic algorithm,diagnostic models for HCC were established between 30HCC patients and 24 healthy subjects/30 CHB patients.Validations were done with the remaining cases. Markers in the models were identified through liquid chromatography (LC)/MS-MS. The three groups were well separated from each other and two discrimination models were established for HCC. The overall recognition capability of these two models was 96.25% and 93.33%, respectively.Validations showed the misdiagnosis ratio for HCC was 1.6% and 23.4%, respectively. The identified biomarkers for HCC included prothrombin precursor (fragment),calcium-dependent secretion activator 1, Baculoviral inhibitor of apoptosis repeat-containing protein 6, etc.MB-based MALDI-TOF MS is applicable in identifying the serum biomarkers and can be used in the surveillance of HCC among HBV-infected patients.

  7. Application of Whole-Cell Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry for Rapid Identification and Clustering Analysis of Pantoea Species ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezzonico, Fabio; Vogel, Guido; Duffy, Brion; Tonolla, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    Pantoea agglomerans is an ecologically diverse taxon that includes commercially important plant-beneficial strains and opportunistic clinical isolates. Standard biochemical identification methods in diagnostic laboratories were repeatedly shown to run into false-positive identifications of P. agglomerans, a fact which is also reflected by the high number of 16S rRNA gene sequences in public databases that are incorrectly assigned to this species. More reliable methods for rapid identification are required to ascertain the prevalence of this species in clinical samples and to evaluate the biosafety of beneficial isolates. Whole-cell matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) methods and reference spectra (SuperSpectrum) were developed for accurate identification of P. agglomerans and related bacteria and used to detect differences in the protein profile within variants of the same strain, including a ribosomal point mutation conferring streptomycin resistance. MALDI-TOF MS-based clustering was shown to generally agree with classification based on gyrB sequencing, allowing rapid and reliable identification at the species level. PMID:20453125

  8. Simultaneous determination of 13 phytohormones in oilseed rape tissues by liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry and the evaluation of the matrix effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Sufang; Wang, Xiupin; Li, Peiwu; Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Wen

    2011-03-01

    In the experiment, a high-performance liquid chromatography and electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry with selected reaction monitoring was used to simultaneously determine various classes of phytohormones, including indole-3-acetic acid, α-naphthaleneacetic acid, 2-chlorobenzoic acid, 4-chlorobenzoic acid, indole-3-butyric acid, gibberellic acid, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, 2-naphthoxyacetic acid, abscisic acid, 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid, uniconazole, paclobutrazol and 2,4-epibassinolide in rape tissues. The analyses were separated by an HPLC equipped with a reversed-phase column using a binary solvent system composed of methanol and water, both containing 0.1% of formic acid. The matrix effect was also considered and determined. The technology was applied to analyze rape tissues, including roots, stems, leaves, flowers, immature pods and rape seeds. The rape tissues were subjected to ultrasound-assisted extraction and purified by dispersive solid-phase extraction, and then transferred into the liquid chromatography system. The detection limit for each plant hormone was defined by the ratio of signal/background noise (S/N) of 3. The results showed perfect linearity (R(2) values of 0.9987-1.0000) and reproducibility of elution times (relative standard deviations, RSDs,<1%) and peak areas (RSDs,<7%) for all target compounds.

  9. Comparison of Hair Fatty Alcohols by N-Alkylpyridinium Isotope Quaternization and Matrix-assisted Laser Desorptionl ionization Mass Spectrometry for Drug Abuse Monitoring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪航; 王昊阳; 张立; 张菁; 卓先义; 黄懿; 郭寅龙

    2012-01-01

    Based on our previous report on N-alkylpyridinium isotope quaternization (NAPIQ) for the analysis of alcoholic and α,β-unsaturated ketone compounds, we have further applied NAPIQ method in the screening of hair lipids in drug abusers. Relative isotopic quantification was used for comparison of fatty alcohols between normal and drug abuse group, The NAPIQ strategy was proven to be a high-throughput method in the metabolic comparison studies of different group samples. The attached N-cationic pyridinium significantly improved the detection sensitivity for these fatty alcohols in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometric (MALDI-FTMS) analysis. The experimental results showed that the levels of fatty alcohols in the hair of heroin abuse group decreased significantly compared with the normal groups, which may be the results of the inducing of peroxidation enzyme. NAPIQ was proven to be an effective and alternative method in the research of fatty alcoholic metabolism for drug abuse monitoring.

  10. Application of porous metal enrichment probe sampling to single cell analysis using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiang; Tang, Jun; Cui, Meng; Xing, Junpeng; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Shuying

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing need for analyzing metabolism in a single cell, which is important to understand the nature of cellular heterogeneity, disease, growth and specialization, etc. However, single cell analysis is often challenging for the traces of samples. In the present study, porous metal enrichment probe sampling combined with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) has been applied for in situ analysis of live onion epidemic cell. Porous probe, treated by corroding copper wire with HCl, was directly inserted into a single cell to get cell solution. A self-made linear actuator was enough to control the penetration of probe into the target cell accurately. Then samples on the tip of probe were eluted and detected by a commercial MALDI-TOF-MS directly. The formation of porous microstructure on the probe surface increased the adsorptive capacity of cell solution. The sensitivity of porous probe sampling was 6 times higher than uncorroded probes generally. This method provides a sensitive and convenient way for the sampling and detection of single cell solution. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. A novel cluster of Mycobacterium abscessus complex revealed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Hiromichi; Yoshida, Shiomi; Yoshida, Atsushi; Okuzumi, Katsuko; Fukusima, Atsuhito; Hishinuma, Akira

    2015-12-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus complex is a rapidly growing mycobacterium consisting of 3 subspecies, M. abscessus, Mycobacterium massiliense, and Mycobacterium bolletii. However, rapid and accurate species identification is difficult. We first evaluated a suitable protocol of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for distinguishing these subspecies. Then, we studied spectral signals by MALDI-TOF MS in 59 M. abscessus, 42 M. massiliense, and 2 M. bolletii. Among several specific spectral signals, 4 signals clearly differentiate M. massiliense from the other 2 subspecies, M. abscessus and M. bolletii. Moreover, 6 of the 42 M. massiliense isolates showed a spectral pattern similar to M. abscessus. These isolates correspond to the distinctive class of M. massiliense (cluster D) which is closer to M. abscessus by the previous variable number tandem repeat analysis. These results indicate that MALDI-TOF MS is not only useful for the identification of 3 subspecies of M. abscessus complex but also capable of distinguishing clusters of M. massiliense.

  12. [Identification of mycobacteria by matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry--using reference strains and clinical isolates of Mycobacterium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niitsuma, Katsunao; Saito, Miwako; Koshiba, Shizuko; Kaneko, Michiyo

    2014-05-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) method is being played an important role for the inspection of clinical microorganism as a rapid and the price reduction. Mass spectra obtained by measuring become points of identification whether the peak pattern match any species mass spectral pattern. We currently use MALDI-TOF MS for rapid and accurate diagnosis of inactivated reference and clinical isolates of Mycobacterium because of the improved pretreatment techniques compared with former inspection methods that pose a higher risk of infection to the operator. The identification matching rate of score value (SV) peak pattern spectra was compared with that of conventional methods such as strain diffusion/amplification. Also, cultures were examined after a fixed number of days. Compared with the initial inspection technique, the pretreatment stage of current MALDI-TOF MS inspection techniques can improve the analysis of inactivated acid-fast bacteria that are often used as inspection criteria strains of clinical isolates. Next, we compared the concordance rate for identification between MALDI-TOF MS and conventional methods such as diffusion/amplification by comparison of peak pattern spectra and evaluated SV spectra to identify differences in the culture media after the retention period. In examination of 158 strains of clinical isolated Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC), the identification coincidence rate in the genus level in a matching pattern was 99.4%, when the species level was included 94.9%. About 37 strains of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), the identification coincidence rate in the genus level was 94.6%. M. bovis BCG (Tokyo strain) in the reference strain was judged by the matching pattern to be MTC, and it suggested that they are M. tuberculosis and affinity species with high DNA homology. Nontuberculous mycobacterial M. gordonae strain JATA 33-01 shared peak pattern spectra, excluding the

  13. Rapid identification of Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei by intact cell Matrix-assisted Laser Desorption/Ionisation mass spectrometric typing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karger Axel

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia (B. pseudomallei and B. mallei are genetically closely related species. B. pseudomallei causes melioidosis in humans and animals, whereas B. mallei is the causative agent of glanders in equines and rarely also in humans. Both agents have been classified by the CDC as priority category B biological agents. Rapid identification is crucial, because both agents are intrinsically resistant to many antibiotics. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS has the potential of rapid and reliable identification of pathogens, but is limited by the availability of a database containing validated reference spectra. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of MALDI-TOF MS for the rapid and reliable identification and differentiation of B. pseudomallei and B. mallei and to build up a reliable reference database for both organisms. Results A collection of ten B. pseudomallei and seventeen B. mallei strains was used to generate a library of reference spectra. Samples of both species could be identified by MALDI-TOF MS, if a dedicated subset of the reference spectra library was used. In comparison with samples representing B. mallei, higher genetic diversity among B. pseudomallei was reflected in the higher average Eucledian distances between the mass spectra and a broader range of identification score values obtained with commercial software for the identification of microorganisms. The type strain of B. pseudomallei (ATCC 23343 was isolated decades ago and is outstanding in the spectrum-based dendrograms probably due to massive methylations as indicated by two intensive series of mass increments of 14 Da specifically and reproducibly found in the spectra of this strain. Conclusions Handling of pathogens under BSL 3 conditions is dangerous and cumbersome but can be minimized by inactivation of bacteria with ethanol, subsequent protein extraction under BSL 1 conditions and MALDI-TOF MS

  14. Using Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry to analyze differentially expressed brain polypeptides in scrapie strain 22L-infected BALB/c mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiangyu Liao; Chuanjing Ju; Jiayu Wan; Wensen Liu; Xin Tang; Wufei Zhu; Na Xu; Jing Xu; Nan Li; Yaping Chang

    2011-01-01

    Differentially expressed polypeptides in the brain of a BALB/c mouse model infected with scrapie strain 22L were analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The results showed that 21 peptides were down-regulated, with peptides of mass-to-charge ratio 758.772 5 and mass-to-charge ratio 5 432.206 9, demonstrating the most significant decreases. These finding suggest that these peptides are candidate biomarkers and may play an important role in the pathogenesis of prion disease.

  15. Restricted access supramolecular solvents for removal of matrix-induced ionization effects in mass spectrometry: Application to the determination of Fusarium toxins in cereals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Fonseca, Sergio; Rubio, Soledad

    2016-02-01

    Ion suppression/enhancement caused by matrix effects continues being a major concern in liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). This research explores the ability of a supramolecular solvent (SUPRAS) made up of inverted hexagonal aggregates of oleic acid to behave as a liquid with restricted access properties (SUPRAS-RAM). Fusarium toxins in cereals were extracted with the oleic acid-based SUPRAS-RAM prior to their quantification by LC-electrospray ionization (ESI)-ion trap-MS (LC-ESI-IT-MS) in order to investigate the capability of this solvent to remove or reduce ionization suppression and/or enhancement in the analysis of complex samples by MS. The method involved the vortex-shaking of 300 mg of cereal with 600 μL of the SUPRAS-RAM for 15 min, centrifugation for separation of the supernatant and quantitation by LC-ESI-IT-MS. Macromolecules such as proteins and carbohydrates were excluded from extraction by chemical and physical mechanisms. Extraction of analytes and sample clean-up were thus carried out in a single step. No evaporation of the extracts was needed. Method detection limits for the legislated Fusarium toxins [i.e. deoxynivalenol (DON), zearalenone (ZEA) and fumonisins B1 (FB1) and B2 (FB2)] were 15 μg kg(-1) for DON and ZEA and 8 μg kg(-1) for fumonisins. These values were far below the maximum levels set by the European Commission for these toxins in foodstuffs. The method was successfully applied to the determination of these toxins in wheat and maize harvested in the South of Spain. No contamination of Fusarium toxins was found in samples at detectable levels. Recoveries in spiked samples were in the range 87-105%, with relative standard deviations between 1 and 7%. The use of the oleic acid-based SUPRAS-RAM effectively removed matrix interferences and allowed reliable quantitation of Fusarium toxins in cereals using solvent-based calibration.

  16. Method development for compositional analysis of low molecular weight poly(vinyl acetate) by matrix-assisted/laser desorption-mass spectrometry and its application to analysis of chewing gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisdale, Evgenia; Wilkins, Charles

    2014-04-11

    The influence of the sample preparation parameters (the choice of the solvent and of the matrix:analyte ratio) was investigated and optimal conditions were established for MALDI mass spectrometry analysis of the pristine low molecular weight polyvinyl acetate (PVAc). It was demonstrated that comparison of polymer's and solvent's Hansen solubility parameters could be used as a guide when choosing the solvent for MALDI sample preparation. The highest intensity PVAc signals were obtained when ethyl acetate was used as a solvent along with the lowest matrix-analyte ratio (2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid was used as a matrix in all experiments). The structure of the PVAc was established with high accuracy using the matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-Fourier transform mass spectrometry (MALDI-FTMS) analysis. It was demonstrated that PVAc undergoes unimolecular decomposition by losing acetic acid molecules from its backbone under the conditions of FTMS measurements. Number and weight average molecular weights as well as polydispersity indices were determined with both MALDI-TOF and MALDI-FTMS methods. The sample preparation protocol developed was applied to the analysis of a chewing gum and the molecular weight and structure of the polyvinyl acetate present in the sample were established. Thus, it was shown that optimized MALDI mass spectrometry could be used successfully for characterization of polyvinyl acetate in commercially available chewing gum.

  17. Gas-phase thermolysis of a guanidinate precursor of copper studied by matrix isolation, time-of-flight mass spectrometry, and computational chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, Jason P; Johnson, Paul A; DiLabio, Gino A; Barry, Seán T; Müller, Jens

    2010-03-15

    The fragmentation of the copper(I) guanidinate [Me(2)NC(NiPr)(2)Cu](2) (1) has been investigated with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF MS), matrix-isolation FTIR spectroscopy (MI FTIR spectroscopy), and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Gas-phase thermolyses of 1 were preformed in the temperature range of 100-800 degrees C. TOF MS and MI FTIR gave consistent results, showing that precursor 1 starts to fragment at oven temperatures above 150 degrees C, with a close to complete fragmentation at 260 degrees C. Precursor 1 thermally fragments to Cu((s)), H(2)(g), and the oxidized guanidine Me(2)NC(=NiPr)(N=CMe(2)) (3). In TOF MS experiment, 3 was clearly indentified by its molecular ion at 169.2 u. Whereas H(2)(+) was detected, atomic Cu was not found in gas-phase thermolysis. In addition, the guanidine Me(2)NC(NiPr)(NHiPr) (2) was detected as a minor component among the thermolysis products. MI thermolysis experiments with precursor 1 were performed, and species evolving from the thermolysis oven were trapped in solid argon at 20 K. These species were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy. The most indicative feature of the resulting spectra from thermolysis above 150 degrees C was a set of intense and structured peaks between 1600 and 1700 cm(-1), an area where precursor 1 does not have any absorbances. The guanidine 2 was matrix-isolated, and a comparison of its FTIR spectrum with the spectra of the thermolysis of 1 indicated that species 2 was among the thermolysis products. However, the main IR bands in the range of 1600 and 1700 cm(-1) appeared at 1687.9, 1668.9, 1635.1, and 1626.6 cm(-1) and were not caused by species 2. The oxidized guanidine 3 was synthesized for the first time and characterized by (1)H NMR and FTIR spectroscopy. A comparison of an FTIR spectrum of matrix isolated 3 with spectra of the thermolysis of 1 revealed that the main IR bands in the range of 1600 and 1700 cm(-1) are due to the presence of 3. The isomers exhibit the NMe(2

  18. Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry for Combined Species Identification and Drug Sensitivity Testing in Mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceyssens, Pieter-Jan; Soetaert, Karine; Timke, Markus; Van den Bossche, An; Sparbier, Katrin; De Cremer, Koen; Kostrzewa, Markus; Hendrickx, Marijke; Mathys, Vanessa

    2017-02-01

    Species identification and drug susceptibility testing (DST) of mycobacteria are important yet complex processes traditionally reserved for reference laboratories. Recent technical improvements in matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has started to facilitate routine mycobacterial identifications in clinical laboratories. In this paper, we investigate the possibility of performing phenotypic MALDI-based DST in mycobacteriology using the recently described MALDI Biotyper antibiotic susceptibility test rapid assay (MBT-ASTRA). We randomly selected 72 clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis and nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) strains, subjected them to MBT-ASTRA methodology, and compared its results to current gold-standard methods. Drug susceptibility was tested for rifampin, isoniazid, linezolid, and ethambutol (M. tuberculosis, n = 39), and clarithromycin and rifabutin (NTM, n = 33). Combined species identification was performed using the Biotyper Mycobacteria Library 4.0. Mycobacterium-specific MBT-ASTRA parameters were derived (calculation window, m/z 5,000 to 13,000, area under the curve [AUC] of >0.015, relative growth [RG] of drug resistance profiles which corresponded to standard testing results. Turnaround times were not significantly different in M. tuberculosis testing, but the MBT-ASTRA method delivered on average a week faster than routine DST in NTM. Databases searches returned 90.4% correct species-level identifications, which increased to 98.6% when score thresholds were lowered to 1.65. In conclusion, the MBT-ASTRA technology holds promise to facilitate and fasten mycobacterial DST and to combine it directly with high-confidence species-level identifications. Given the ease of interpretation, its application in NTM typing might be the first in finding its way to current diagnostic workflows. However, further validations and automation are required before routine implementation can be envisioned

  19. Analysis of Antiretrovirals in Single Hair Strands for Evaluation of Drug Adherence with Infrared-Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Elias P; Thompson, Corbin G; Bokhart, Mark T; Prince, Heather M A; Sykes, Craig; Muddiman, David C; Kashuba, Angela D M

    2016-01-19

    Adherence to a drug regimen can be a strong predictor of health outcomes, and validated measures of adherence are necessary at all stages of therapy from drug development to prescription. Many of the existing metrics of drug adherence (e.g., self-report, pill counts, blood monitoring) have limitations, and analysis of hair strands has recently emerged as an objective alternative. Traditional methods of hair analysis based on LC-MS/MS (segmenting strands at ≥1 cm length) are not capable of preserving a temporal record of drug intake at higher resolution than approximately 1 month. Here, we evaluated the detectability of HIV antiretrovirals (ARVs) in hair from a range of drug classes using infrared matrix-assisted laser desorption electrospray ionization (IR-MALDESI) mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) with 100 μm resolution. Infrared laser desorption of hair strands was shown to penetrate into the strand cortex, allowing direct measurement by MSI without analyte extraction. Using optimized desorption conditions, a linear correlation between IR-MALDESI ion abundance and LC-MS/MS response was observed for six common ARVs with estimated limits of detection less than or equal to 1.6 ng/mg hair. The distribution of efavirenz (EFV) was then monitored in a series of hair strands collected from HIV infected, virologically suppressed patients. Because of the role hair melanin plays in accumulation of basic drugs (like most ARVs), an MSI method to quantify the melanin biomarker pyrrole-2,3,5-tricarboxylic acid (PTCA) was evaluated as a means of normalizing drug response between patients to develop broadly applicable adherence criteria.

  20. Liquid chromatography electrospray ionization and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization tandem mass spectrometry for the analysis of lipid raft proteome of monocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Nan [Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Shaw, Andrew R.E. [Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)], E-mail: andrewsh@cancerboard.ab.ca; Li Nan; Chen Rui [Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Mak, Allan; Hu Xiuying [Department of Oncology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Young, Nelson; Wishart, David [Department of Computing Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Li Liang, E-mail: Liang.Li@ualberta.ca

    2008-10-03

    Lipid rafts are dynamic assemblies of cholesterol and glycolipid that form detergent-insoluble microdomains within membrane lipid bilayers. Because rafts can be separated by flotation on sucrose gradients, interrogation by mass spectrometry (MS) provides a valuable new insight into lipid raft function. Here we combine liquid chromatography (LC) electrospray ionization (ESI) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) MS/MS to corroborate and extend our previous description of lipid raft proteomes derived from the monocytic cell line THP-1. Interestingly, LC-ESI and MALDI MS/MS identify largely non-overlapping, and therefore, potentially complementary protein populations. Using the combined approach, we detected 277 proteins compared to 52 proteins obtained with the original gel-based MALDI MS. We confirmed the presence of 47 of the original 52 proteins demonstrating the consistency of the lipid raft preparations. We demonstrated by immunoblotting that Rac 1 and Rac 2, two of the 52 proteins we failed to confirm, were indeed absent from the lipid raft fractions. The majority of new proteins were cytoskeletal proteins and their regulators, proteins implicated in membrane fusion and vesicular trafficking or signaling molecules. Our results therefore, confirm and extend previous evidence indicating lipid rafts of monocytic cells are specialized for cytoskeletal assembly and vesicle trafficking. Of particular interest, we detected SNAP-23, basigin, Glut-4 and pantophysin in lipid rafts. Since these proteins are implicated in both vesicular trafficking and gamete fusion, lipid rafts may play a common role in these processes. It is evident that the combination of LC-ESI and LC-MALDI MS/MS increases the proteome coverage which allows better understanding of the lipid raft function.

  1. Optimizing identification of clinically relevant Gram-positive organisms by use of the Bruker Biotyper matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElvania Tekippe, Erin; Shuey, Sunni; Winkler, David W; Butler, Meghan A; Burnham, Carey-Ann D

    2013-05-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) can be used as a method for the rapid identification of microorganisms. This study evaluated the Bruker Biotyper (MALDI-TOF MS) system for the identification of clinically relevant Gram-positive organisms. We tested 239 aerobic Gram-positive organisms isolated from clinical specimens. We evaluated 4 direct-smear methods, including "heavy" (H) and "light" (L) smears, with and without a 1-μl direct formic acid (FA) overlay. The quality measure assigned to a MALDI-TOF MS identification is a numerical value or "score." We found that a heavy smear with a formic acid overlay (H+FA) produced optimal MALDI-TOF MS identification scores and the highest percentage of correctly identified organisms. Using a score of ≥2.0, we identified 183 of the 239 isolates (76.6%) to the genus level, and of the 181 isolates resolved to the species level, 141 isolates (77.9%) were correctly identified. To maximize the number of correct identifications while minimizing misidentifications, the data were analyzed using a score of ≥1.7 for genus- and species-level identification. Using this score, 220 of the 239 isolates (92.1%) were identified to the genus level, and of the 181 isolates resolved to the species level, 167 isolates (92.2%) could be assigned an accurate species identification. We also evaluated a subset of isolates for preanalytic factors that might influence MALDI-TOF MS identification. Frequent subcultures increased the number of unidentified isolates. Incubation temperatures and subcultures of the media did not alter the rate of identification. These data define the ideal bacterial preparation, identification score, and medium conditions for optimal identification of Gram-positive bacteria by use of MALDI-TOF MS.

  2. Validation of a New Web Application for Identification of Fungi by Use of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normand, A C; Becker, P; Gabriel, F; Cassagne, C; Accoceberry, I; Gari-Toussaint, M; Hasseine, L; De Geyter, D; Pierard, D; Surmont, I; Djenad, F; Donnadieu, J L; Piarroux, M; Ranque, S; Hendrickx, M; Piarroux, R

    2017-09-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry has emerged as a reliable technique to identify molds involved in human diseases, including dermatophytes, provided that exhaustive reference databases are available. This study assessed an online identification application based on original algorithms and an extensive in-house reference database comprising 11,851 spectra (938 fungal species and 246 fungal genera). Validation criteria were established using an initial panel of 422 molds, including dermatophytes, previously identified via DNA sequencing (126 species). The application was further assessed using a separate panel of 501 cultured clinical isolates (88 mold taxa including dermatophytes) derived from five hospital laboratories. A total of 438 (87.35%) isolates were correctly identified at the species level, while 26 (5.22%) were assigned to the correct genus but the wrong species and 37 (7.43%) were not identified, since the defined threshold of 20 was not reached. The use of the Bruker Daltonics database included in the MALDI Biotyper software resulted in a much higher rate of unidentified isolates (39.76 and 74.30% using the score thresholds 1.7 and 2.0, respectively). Moreover, the identification delay of the online application remained compatible with real-time online queries (0.15 s per spectrum), and the application was faster than identifications using the MALDI Biotyper software. This is the first study to assess an online identification system based on MALDI-TOF spectrum analysis. We have successfully applied this approach to identify molds, including dermatophytes, for which diversity is insufficiently represented in commercial databases. This free-access application is available to medical mycologists to improve fungal identification. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  3. High-Throughput Identification of Bacteria and Yeast by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry in Conventional Medical Microbiology Laboratories ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Veen, S. Q.; Claas, E. C. J.; Kuijper, Ed J.

    2010-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is suitable for high-throughput and rapid diagnostics at low costs and can be considered an alternative for conventional biochemical and molecular identification systems in a conventional microbiological laboratory. First, we evaluated MALDI-TOF MS using 327 clinical isolates previously cultured from patient materials and identified by conventional techniques (Vitek-II, API, and biochemical tests). Discrepancies were analyzed by molecular analysis of the 16S genes. Of 327 isolates, 95.1% were identified correctly to genus level, and 85.6% were identified to species level by MALDI-TOF MS. Second, we performed a prospective validation study, including 980 clinical isolates of bacteria and yeasts. Overall performance of MALDI-TOF MS was significantly better than conventional biochemical systems for correct species identification (92.2% and 83.1%, respectively) and produced fewer incorrect genus identifications (0.1% and 1.6%, respectively). Correct species identification by MALDI-TOF MS was observed in 97.7% of Enterobacteriaceae, 92% of nonfermentative Gram-negative bacteria, 94.3% of staphylococci, 84.8% of streptococci, 84% of a miscellaneous group (mainly Haemophilus, Actinobacillus, Cardiobacterium, Eikenella, and Kingella [HACEK]), and 85.2% of yeasts. MALDI-TOF MS had significantly better performance than conventional methods for species identification of staphylococci and genus identification of bacteria belonging to HACEK group. Misidentifications by MALDI-TOF MS were clearly associated with an absence of sufficient spectra from suitable reference strains in the MALDI-TOF MS database. We conclude that MALDI-TOF MS can be implemented easily for routine identification of bacteria (except for pneumococci and viridans streptococci) and yeasts in a medical microbiological laboratory. PMID:20053859

  4. Cost Analysis of Implementing Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry Plus Real-Time Antimicrobial Stewardship Intervention for Bloodstream Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Twisha S; Kaakeh, Rola; Nagel, Jerod L; Newton, Duane W; Stevenson, James G

    2017-01-01

    Studies evaluating rapid diagnostic testing plus stewardship intervention have consistently demonstrated improved clinical outcomes for patients with bloodstream infections. However, the cost of implementing new rapid diagnostic testing can be significant, and such testing usually does not generate additional revenue. There are minimal data evaluating the impact of adding matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for rapid organism identification and dedicating pharmacy stewardship personnel time on the total hospital costs. A cost analysis was performed utilizing patient data generated from the hospital cost accounting system and included additional costs of MALDI-TOF equipment, supplies and personnel, and dedicated pharmacist time for blood culture review and of making interventions to antimicrobial therapy. The cost analysis was performed from a hospital perspective for 3-month blocks before and after implementation of MALDI-TOF plus stewardship intervention. A total of 480 patients with bloodstream infections were included in the analysis: 247 in the preintervention group and 233 in the intervention group. Thirty-day mortality was significantly improved in the intervention group (12% versus 21%, P cost per bloodstream infection was lower in the intervention group ($42,580 versus $45,019). Intensive care unit cost per bloodstream infection accounted for the largest share of the total costs in each group and was also lower in the intervention group ($10,833 versus $13,727). Implementing MALDI-TOF plus stewardship review and intervention decreased mortality for patients with bloodstream infections. Despite the additional costs of implementing MALDI-TOF and of dedicating pharmacy stewardship personnel time to interventions, the total hospital costs decreased by $2,439 per bloodstream infection, for an approximate annual cost savings of $2.34 million. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Microbiology.

  5. Use of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry for identification of molds of the Fusarium genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triest, David; Stubbe, Dirk; De Cremer, Koen; Piérard, Denis; Normand, Anne-Cécile; Piarroux, Renaud; Detandt, Monique; Hendrickx, Marijke

    2015-02-01

    The rates of infection with Fusarium molds are increasing, and a diverse number of Fusarium spp. belonging to different species complexes can cause infection. Conventional species identification in the clinical laboratory is time-consuming and prone to errors. We therefore evaluated whether matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is a useful alternative. The 289 Fusarium strains from the Belgian Coordinated Collections of Microorganisms (BCCM)/Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology Mycology (IHEM) culture collection with validated sequence-based identities and comprising 40 species were used in this study. An identification strategy was developed, applying a standardized MALDI-TOF MS assay and an in-house reference spectrum database. In vitro antifungal testing was performed to assess important differences in susceptibility between clinically relevant species/species complexes. We observed that no incorrect species complex identifications were made by MALDI-TOF MS, and 82.8% of the identifications were correct to the species level. This success rate was increased to 91% by lowering the cutoff for identification. Although the identification of the correct species complex member was not always guaranteed, antifungal susceptibility testing showed that discriminating between Fusarium species complexes can be important for treatment but is not necessarily required between members of a species complex. With this perspective, some Fusarium species complexes with closely related members can be considered as a whole, increasing the success rate of correct identifications to 97%. The application of our user-friendly MALDI-TOF MS identification approach resulted in a dramatic improvement in both time and accuracy compared to identification with the conventional method. A proof of principle of our MALDI-TOF MS approach in the clinical setting using recently isolated Fusarium strains demonstrated its validity.

  6. Matrix solid-phase dispersion combined to liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for the determination of paraben preservatives in mollusks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaverde-de-Sáa, Eugenia; Rodil, Rosario; Quintana, José Benito; Cela, Rafael

    2016-08-12

    A method for the extraction and determination of seven parabens, esters of 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, widely used as preservatives in personal care products, pharmaceuticals, etc., and two chlorinated derivatives (mono- and di-chloro methyl paraben) from mollusk samples was developed by combining matrix solid-phase dispersion (MSPD) and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. MSPD parameters, such as solvent, solid support and clean-up sorbent, were optimized. Besides, since blank problems were observed for some parabens, these were investigated and blanks were tackled by precleaning all sorbents prior to use. Under final conditions, 0.5g of freeze-dried mollusk were dispersed with 1.2g of silica and packed into a cartridge containing 3g of C18, as on-line clean-up sorbent. This cartridge was eluted with 10mL of acetonitrile, evaporated and reconstituted in methanol for analysis. In the validation stage, successful linearity (R(2)>0.999), recoveries (between 71 and 117% for most analytes), precision (RSD lower than 21%) and limits of detection and quantification (LOD and LOQ, lower than 0.4 and 1.4ngg(-1) dry weight respectively) levels were achieved. Finally, the new methodology was applied to mussel, clam and cockle samples. Methyl paraben was above the LOQ in five of the six samples (not found in one clam sample) at concentrations up to 7ngg(-1) dry weight. Ethyl paraben was found above the LOQ in mussel and cockle samples at a concentration level around 0.3ngg(-1). n-Propyl paraben was only above the LOQ in one mussel sample.

  7. Evaluation of the Vitek MS Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry System for Identification of Clinically Relevant Filamentous Fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullen, Allison R.; Wallace, Meghan A.; Pincus, David H.; Wilkey, Kathy

    2016-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections have a high rate of morbidity and mortality, and accurate identification is necessary to guide appropriate antifungal therapy. With the increasing incidence of invasive disease attributed to filamentous fungi, rapid and accurate species-level identification of these pathogens is necessary. Traditional methods for identification of filamentous fungi can be slow and may lack resolution. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has emerged as a rapid and accurate method for identification of bacteria and yeasts, but a paucity of data exists on the performance characteristics of this method for identification of filamentous fungi. The objective of our study was to evaluate the accuracy of the Vitek MS for mold identification. A total of 319 mold isolates representing 43 genera recovered from clinical specimens were evaluated. Of these isolates, 213 (66.8%) were correctly identified using the Vitek MS Knowledge Base, version 3.0 database. When a modified SARAMIS (Spectral Archive and Microbial Identification System) database was used to augment the version 3.0 Knowledge Base, 245 (76.8%) isolates were correctly identified. Unidentified isolates were subcultured for repeat testing; 71/319 (22.3%) remained unidentified. Of the unidentified isolates, 69 were not in the database. Only 3 (0.9%) isolates were misidentified by MALDI-TOF MS (including Aspergillus amoenus [n = 2] and Aspergillus calidoustus [n = 1]) although 10 (3.1%) of the original phenotypic identifications were not correct. In addition, this methodology was able to accurately identify 133/144 (93.6%) Aspergillus sp. isolates to the species level. MALDI-TOF MS has the potential to expedite mold identification, and misidentifications are rare. PMID:27225405

  8. Evaluation of the Vitek MS Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry System for Identification of Clinically Relevant Filamentous Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullen, Allison R; Wallace, Meghan A; Pincus, David H; Wilkey, Kathy; Burnham, C A

    2016-08-01

    Invasive fungal infections have a high rate of morbidity and mortality, and accurate identification is necessary to guide appropriate antifungal therapy. With the increasing incidence of invasive disease attributed to filamentous fungi, rapid and accurate species-level identification of these pathogens is necessary. Traditional methods for identification of filamentous fungi can be slow and may lack resolution. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has emerged as a rapid and accurate method for identification of bacteria and yeasts, but a paucity of data exists on the performance characteristics of this method for identification of filamentous fungi. The objective of our study was to evaluate the accuracy of the Vitek MS for mold identification. A total of 319 mold isolates representing 43 genera recovered from clinical specimens were evaluated. Of these isolates, 213 (66.8%) were correctly identified using the Vitek MS Knowledge Base, version 3.0 database. When a modified SARAMIS (Spectral Archive and Microbial Identification System) database was used to augment the version 3.0 Knowledge Base, 245 (76.8%) isolates were correctly identified. Unidentified isolates were subcultured for repeat testing; 71/319 (22.3%) remained unidentified. Of the unidentified isolates, 69 were not in the database. Only 3 (0.9%) isolates were misidentified by MALDI-TOF MS (including Aspergillus amoenus [n = 2] and Aspergillus calidoustus [n = 1]) although 10 (3.1%) of the original phenotypic identifications were not correct. In addition, this methodology was able to accurately identify 133/144 (93.6%) Aspergillus sp. isolates to the species level. MALDI-TOF MS has the potential to expedite mold identification, and misidentifications are rare. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Development of a rapid and simplified protocol for direct bacterial identification from positive blood cultures by using matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-of- flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakovljev, Aleksandra; Bergh, Kåre

    2015-11-06

    Bloodstream infections represent serious conditions carrying a high mortality and morbidity rate. Rapid identification of microorganisms and prompt institution of adequate antimicrobial therapy is of utmost importance for a successful outcome. Aiming at the development of a rapid, simplified and efficient protocol, we developed and compared two in-house preparatory methods for the direct identification of bacteria from positive blood culture flasks (BD BACTEC FX system) by using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI TOF MS). Both methods employed saponin and distilled water for erythrocyte lysis. In method A the cellular pellet was overlaid with formic acid on the MALDI TOF target plate for protein extraction, whereas in method B the pellet was exposed to formic acid followed by acetonitrile prior to placing on the target plate. Best results were obtained by method A. Direct identification was achieved for 81.9 % and 65.8 % (50.3 % and 26.2 % with scores >2.0) of organisms by method A and method B, respectively. Overall concordance with final identification was 100 % to genus and 97.9 % to species level. By applying a lower cut-off score value, the levels of identification obtained by method A and method B increased to 89.3 % and 77.8 % of organisms (81.9 % and 65.8 % identified with scores >1.7), respectively. Using the lowered score criteria, concordance with final results was obtained for 99.3 % of genus and 96.6 % of species identifications. The reliability of results, rapid performance (approximately 25 min) and applicability of in-house method A have contributed to implementation of this robust and cost-effective method in our laboratory.

  10. Comparison of Vitek Matrix-assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry Versus Conventional Methods in Candida Identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keçeli, Sema Aşkın; Dündar, Devrim; Tamer, Gülden Sönmez

    2016-02-01

    Candida species are generally identified by conventional methods such as germ tube or morphological appearance on corn meal agar, biochemical methods using API kits and molecular biological methods. Alternative to these methods, rapid and accurate identification methods of microorganisms called matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDİ-TOF MS) has recently been described. In this study, Candida identification results by API Candida kit, API 20C AUX kit and identifications on corn meal agar (CMA) are compared with the results obtained on Vitek-MS. All results were confirmed by sequencing internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of rDNA. Totally, 97 Candida strains were identified by germ tube test, CMA, API and Vitek-MS. Vitek-MS results were compatible with 74.2 % of API 20C AUX and 81.4 % of CMA results. The difference between the results of API Candida and API 20C AUX was detected. The ratio of discrepancy between Vitek-MS and API 20C AUX was 25.8 %. Candida species mostly identified as C. famata or C. tropicalis by and not compatible with API kits were identified as C. albicans by Vitek-MS. Sixteen Candida species having discrepant results with Vitek-MS, API or CMA were randomly chosen, and ITS sequence analysis was performed. The results of sequencing were compatible 56.2 % with API 20C AUX, 50 % with CMA and 93.7 % with Vitek-MS. When compared with conventional identification methods, MS results are more reliable and rapid for Candida identification. MS system may be used as routine identification method in clinical microbiology laboratories.

  11. Rapid identification of Bacillus anthracis spores in suspicious powder samples by using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dybwad, Marius; van der Laaken, Anton L; Blatny, Janet Martha; Paauw, Armand

    2013-09-01

    Rapid and reliable identification of Bacillus anthracis spores in suspicious powders is important to mitigate the safety risks and economic burdens associated with such incidents. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a rapid and reliable laboratory-based matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) analysis method for identifying B. anthracis spores in suspicious powder samples. A reference library containing 22 different Bacillus sp. strains or hoax materials was constructed and coupled with a novel classification algorithm and standardized processing protocol for various powder samples. The method's limit of B. anthracis detection was determined to be 2.5 × 10(6) spores, equivalent to a 55-μg sample size of the crudest B. anthracis-containing powder discovered during the 2001 Amerithrax incidents. The end-to-end analysis method was able to successfully discriminate among samples containing B. anthracis spores, closely related Bacillus sp. spores, and commonly encountered hoax materials. No false-positive or -negative classifications of B. anthracis spores were observed, even when the analysis method was challenged with a wide range of other bacterial agents. The robustness of the method was demonstrated by analyzing samples (i) at an external facility using a different MALDI-TOF MS instrument, (ii) using an untrained operator, and (iii) using mixtures of Bacillus sp. spores and hoax materials. Taken together, the observed performance of the analysis method developed demonstrates its potential applicability as a rapid, specific, sensitive, robust, and cost-effective laboratory-based analysis tool for resolving incidents involving suspicious powders in less than 30 min.

  12. Comparison of the Microflex LT and Vitek MS systems for routine identification of bacteria by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martiny, Delphine; Busson, Laurent; Wybo, Ingrid; El Haj, Rachid Ait; Dediste, Anne; Vandenberg, Olivier

    2012-04-01

    This study compared the performance of three matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry systems: Microflex LT (Bruker Daltonics, Bremen, Germany), Vitek MS RUO (Axima Assurance-Saramis database; bioMérieux, Marcy l'Etoile, France), and Vitek MS IVD (bioMérieux). A total of 1,129 isolates, including 1,003 routine isolates, 73 anaerobes, and 53 bacterial enteropathogens, were tested on the Microflex LT and Axima Assurance devices. The spectra were analyzed using three databases: Biotyper (Bruker Daltonics), Saramis, and Vitek MS (bioMérieux). Among the routine isolates requiring identification to the species level (n = 986), 92.7% and 93.2% were correctly identified by the Biotyper and Vitek MS databases, respectively. The Vitek MS database is more specific for the identification of Streptococcus viridans. For the anaerobes, the Biotyper database often identified Fusobacterium isolates to only the genus level, which is of low clinical significance, whereas 20% of the Bacteroides species were not identified or were misidentified by the Vitek MS database. For the enteropathogens, the poor discrimination between Escherichia coli and Shigella explains the high proportion of unidentified organisms. In contrast to the Biotyper database, the Vitek MS database properly discriminated all of the Salmonella entrica serovar Typhi isolates (n = 5). The performance of the Saramis database was globally poorer. In conclusion, for routine procedures, the Microflex LT and Vitek-MS systems are equally good choices in terms of analytical efficiency. Other factors, including price, work flow, and lab activity, will affect the choice of a system.

  13. The use of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry in the identification of Francisella tularensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatuna, Onur; Çelebi, Bekir; Can, Simge; Akyar, Işın; Kiliç, Selçuk

    2016-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is the cause of the zoonotic disease tularemia and is classified among highly pathogenic bacteria (HPB) due to its low infection dose and potential for airborne transmission. In the case of HBP, there is a pressing need for rapid, accurate and reliable identification. Phenotypic identification of Francisella species is inappropriate for clinical microbiology laboratories because it is time-consuming, hazardous and subject to variable interpretation. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) was recently evaluated as a useful tool for the rapid identification of a variety of microorganisms. In this study, we evaluated the use of MALDI-TOF MS for the rapid identification of Francisella tularensis and differentiation of its subspecies. Using national collection of Francisella isolates from the National Tularemia Reference Laboratory (Public Health Institution of Turkey, Ankara), a total of 75 clinical isolates were investigated by species and subspecies-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test and MALDI-TOF MS. All isolates were originally identified as F. tularensis subsp. holarctica according to region of difference 1 (RD1) subspecies-specific PCR results. For all isolates MALDI-TOF MS provided results in concordance with subspecies-specific PCR analysis. Although PCR-based methods are effective in identifying Francisella species, they are labor-intensive and take longer periods of time to obtain the results when compared with MALDI-TOF MS. MALDI-TOF MS appeared to be a rapid, reliable and cost-effective identification technique for Francisella spp. Shorter analysis time and low cost make this an appealing new option in microbiology laboratories. PMID:26773181

  14. Comparison of the Vitek MS and Bruker Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry Systems for Identification of Rhodococcus equi and Dietzia spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Alegría Puig, Carlos Ruiz; Pilares, Lilian; Marco, Francesc; Vila, Jordi; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Navas, Jesús

    2017-07-01

    Rhodococcus equi causes pyogranulomatous pneumonia in domesticated animals and immunocompromised humans. Dietzia spp. are environmental bacteria that have rarely been associated with human infections. R. equi and Dietzia spp. are closely related actinomycetes. Phenotypic discrimination between R. equi and Dietzia on the basis of their Gram stain morphology and colony appearance is problematic. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is a fast, reliable, and cost-effective method for identification of a wide variety of microorganisms. We have evaluated the performance of Bruker Biotyper versus that of Vitek MS for identification of a collection of 154 isolates identified at the source as R. equi that includes isolates belonging to the genus Dietzia PCR amplification of the choE gene, encoding a cholesterol oxidase, and 16S rRNA sequencing were considered the reference methods for R. equi identification. Biotyper identified 131 (85.1%) of the 154 isolates at the species level, and this figure increased to 152 (98.7%) when the species cutoff was reduced from a score of ≥2.000 to ≥1.750. Vitek MS correctly identified at the species level 130 (84.4%) isolates as long as bacteria were extracted with ethanol but only 35 (22.7%) isolates when samples were prepared by direct extraction from colonies. The two systems allowed differentiation between R. equi and Dietzia spp., but identification of all Dietzia sp. isolates at the species level needed sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  15. Rapid detection of enterobacteriaceae producing extended spectrum beta-lactamases directly from positive blood cultures by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oviaño, M; Fernández, B; Fernández, A; Barba, M J; Mouriño, C; Bou, G

    2014-11-01

    Bacteria that produce extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) are an increasing healthcare problem and their rapid detection is a challenge that must be overcome in order to optimize antimicrobial treatment and patient care. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) has been used to determine resistance to β-lactams, including carbapenems in Enterobacteriaceae, but the methodology has not been fully validated as it remains time-consuming. We aimed to assess whether MALDI-TOF can be used to detect ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae from positive blood culture bottles in clinical practice. In the assay, 141 blood cultures were tested, 13 of them were real bacteraemias and 128 corresponded to blood culture bottles seeded with bacterial clinical isolates. Bacteraemias were analysed by MALDI-TOF after a positive growth result and the 128 remaining blood cultures 24 h after the bacterial seeding. β-lactamase activity was determined through the profile of peaks associated with the antibiotics cefotaxime and ceftazidime and its hydrolyzed forms. Clavulanic acid was added to rule out the presence of non-ESBL mechanisms. Overall data show a 99% (103 out of 104) sensitivity in detecting ESBL in positive blood cultures. Data were obtained in 90 min (maximum 150 min). The proposed methodology has a great impact on the early detection of ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae from positive blood cultures, being a rapid and efficient method and allowing early administration of an appropriate antibiotic therapy.

  16. Rapid Identification of microbes in positive blood cultures by use of the vitek MS matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Arnold G W

    2013-11-01

    Sepsis is a major cause of death worldwide among nonhospitalized people and hospitalized patients. A wide range of pathogens are involved, and the correct identification and correct antimicrobial therapy are critical to ensure optimal clinical outcomes. With the recent introduction of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), rapid identification of bacteria and fungi is now possible. The purpose of this study was to develop a rapid technique for identifying organisms in positive blood cultures using the Vitek MS system (bioMérieux). This technique is a lysis centrifugation method which involves a four-step washing and centrifugation procedure. A total of 253 positive monomicrobial blood cultures (Bactec Plus aerobic, anaerobic, and pediatric bottles) were tested using the Vitek MS system (KnowledgeBase version 2.0), with 92.1% and 88.1% of organisms overall being identified to the genus level and the species level, respectively. Of 161 Gram-positive bacterial isolates, 95.7% and 90.1% were identified to the genus level and the species level, respectively; of 92 Gram-negative bacterial isolates, 84.7% and 83.7% were identified to the genus level and the species level, respectively. The results obtained using this method demonstrate that the Vitek MS system can be used for rapid and effective identification of bacteria from positive blood cultures within 30 to 45 min after the positive signal has been provided by the Bactec FX blood culture system (Becton, Dickinson). This will lead to faster administration of the appropriate antimicrobial therapy and increase the chances for optimal clinical outcomes for patients.

  17. Rapid detection of carbapenem resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Kempf

    Full Text Available Rapid detection of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii strains is critical and will benefit patient care by optimizing antibiotic therapies and preventing outbreaks. Herein we describe the development and successful application of a mass spectrometry profile generated by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF that utilized the imipenem antibiotic for the detection of carbapenem resistance in a large series of A. baumannii clinical isolates from France and Algeria. A total of 106 A. baumannii strains including 63 well-characterized carbapenemase-producing and 43 non-carbapenemase-producing strains, as well as 43 control strains (7 carbapenem-resistant and 36 carbapenem-sensitive strains were studied. After an incubation of bacteria with imipenem for up to 4 h, the mixture was centrifuged and the supernatant analyzed by MALDI-TOF MS. The presence and absence of peaks representing imipenem and its natural metabolite was analyzed. The result was interpreted as positive for carbapenemase production if the specific peak for imipenem at 300.0 m/z disappeared during the incubation time and if the peak of the natural metabolite at 254.0 m/z increased as measured by the area under the curves leading to a ratio between the peak for imipenem and its metabolite being <0.5. This assay, which was applied to the large series of A. baumannii clinical isolates, showed a sensitivity of 100.0% and a specificity of 100.0%. Our study is the first to demonstrate that this quick and simple assay can be used as a routine tool as a point-of-care method for the identification of A. baumannii carbapenemase-producers in an effort to prevent outbreaks and the spread of uncontrollable superbugs.

  18. Rapid Detection of Carbapenem Resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii Using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaudrops, Christophe; Berrazeg, Meryem; Brunel, Jean-Michel; Drissi, Mourad; Mesli, Esma; Touati, Abdelaziz; Rolain, Jean-Marc

    2012-01-01

    Rapid detection of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii strains is critical and will benefit patient care by optimizing antibiotic therapies and preventing outbreaks. Herein we describe the development and successful application of a mass spectrometry profile generated by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) that utilized the imipenem antibiotic for the detection of carbapenem resistance in a large series of A. baumannii clinical isolates from France and Algeria. A total of 106 A. baumannii strains including 63 well-characterized carbapenemase-producing and 43 non-carbapenemase-producing strains, as well as 43 control strains (7 carbapenem-resistant and 36 carbapenem-sensitive strains) were studied. After an incubation of bacteria with imipenem for up to 4 h, the mixture was centrifuged and the supernatant analyzed by MALDI-TOF MS. The presence and absence of peaks representing imipenem and its natural metabolite was analyzed. The result was interpreted as positive for carbapenemase production if the specific peak for imipenem at 300.0 m/z disappeared during the incubation time and if the peak of the natural metabolite at 254.0 m/z increased as measured by the area under the curves leading to a ratio between the peak for imipenem and its metabolite being <0.5. This assay, which was applied to the large series of A. baumannii clinical isolates, showed a sensitivity of 100.0% and a specificity of 100.0%. Our study is the first to demonstrate that this quick and simple assay can be used as a routine tool as a point-of-care method for the identification of A. baumannii carbapenemase-producers in an effort to prevent outbreaks and the spread of uncontrollable superbugs. PMID:22359616

  19. Evaluation of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry for species identification of Acinetobacter strains isolated from blood cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishii, K; Kikuchi, K; Matsuda, N; Yoshida, A; Okuzumi, K; Uetera, Y; Yasuhara, H; Moriya, K

    2014-05-01

    The clinical relevance of Acinetobacter species, other than A. baumannii, as human pathogens has not been sufficiently assessed owing to the insufficiency of simple phenotypic clinical diagnostic laboratory tests. Infections caused by these organisms have different impacts on clinical outcome and require different treatment and management approaches. It is therefore important to correctly identify Acinetobacter species. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has been introduced to identify a wide range of microorganisms in clinical laboratories, but only a few studies have examined its utility for identifying Acinetobacter species, particularly those of the non-Acinetobacter baumannii complex. We therefore evaluated MALDI-TOF MS for identification of Acinetobacter species by comparing it with sequence analysis of rpoB using 123 isolates of Acinetobacter species from blood. Of the isolates examined, we identified 106/123 (86.2%) to species, and 16/123 (13.0%) could only be identified as acinetobacters. The identity of one isolate could not be established. Of the 106 species identified, 89/106 (84.0%) were confirmed by rpoB sequence analysis, and 17/106 (16.0%) were discordant. These data indicate correct identification of 89/123 (72.4%) isolates. Surprisingly, all blood culture isolates were identified as 13 species of Acinetobacter, and the incidence of Acinetobacter pittii was unexpectedly high (42/123; 34.1%) and exceeded that of A. baumannii (22/123; 17.9%). Although the present identification rate using MALDI-TOF MS is not acceptable for species-level identification of Acinetobacter, further expansion of the database should remedy this situation.

  20. Identification of rare pathogenic bacteria in a clinical microbiology laboratory: impact of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seng, Piseth; Abat, Cedric; Rolain, Jean Marc; Colson, Philippe; Lagier, Jean-Christophe; Gouriet, Frédérique; Fournier, Pierre Edouard; Drancourt, Michel; La Scola, Bernard; Raoult, Didier

    2013-07-01

    During the past 5 years, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) has become a powerful tool for routine identification in many clinical laboratories. We analyzed our 11-year experience in routine identification of clinical isolates (40 months using MALDI-TOF MS and 91 months using conventional phenotypic identification [CPI]). Among the 286,842 clonal isolates, 284,899 isolates of 459 species were identified. The remaining 1,951 isolates were misidentified and required confirmation using a second phenotypic identification for 670 isolates and using a molecular technique for 1,273 isolates of 339 species. MALDI-TOF MS annually identified 112 species, i.e., 36 species/10,000 isolates, compared to 44 species, i.e., 19 species/10,000 isolates, for CPI. Only 50 isolates required second phenotypic identifications during the MALDI-TOF MS period (i.e., 4.5 reidentifications/10,000 isolates) compared with 620 isolates during the CPI period (i.e., 35.2/10,000 isolates). We identified 128 bacterial species rarely reported as human pathogens, including 48 using phenotypic techniques (22 using CPI and 37 using MALDI-TOF MS). Another 75 rare species were identified using molecular methods. MALDI-TOF MS reduced the time required for identification by 55-fold and 169-fold and the cost by 5-fold and 96-fold compared with CPI and gene sequencing, respectively. MALDI-TOF MS was a powerful tool not only for routine bacterial identification but also for identification of rare bacterial species implicated in human infectious diseases. The ability to rapidly identify bacterial species rarely described as pathogens in specific clinical specimens will help us to study the clinical burden resulting from the emergence of these species as human pathogens, and MALDI-TOF MS may be considered an alternative to molecular methods in clinical laboratories.

  1. Imaging Mass Spectrometry by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization and Stress-Strain Measurements in Iontophoresis Transepithelial Corneal Collagen Cross-Linking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Vinciguerra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To compare biomechanical effect, riboflavin penetration and distribution in transepithelial corneal collagen cross-linking with iontophoresis (I-CXL, with standard cross linking (S-CXL and current transepithelial protocol (TE-CXL. Materials and Methods. The study was divided into two different sections, considering, respectively, rabbit and human cadaver corneas. In both sections corneas were divided according to imbibition protocols and irradiation power. Imaging mass spectrometry by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI-IMS and stress-strain measurements were used. Forty-eight rabbit and twelve human cadaver corneas were evaluated. Results. MALDI-IMS showed a deep riboflavin penetration throughout the corneal layers with I-CXL, with a roughly lower concentration in the deepest layers when compared to S-CXL, whereas with TE-CXL penetration was considerably less. In rabbits, there was a significant increase (by 71.9% and P=0.05 in corneal rigidity after I-CXL, when compared to controls. In humans, corneal rigidity increase was not significantly different among the subgroups. Conclusions. In rabbits, I-CXL induced a significant increase in corneal stiffness as well as better riboflavin penetration when compared to controls and TE-CXL but not to S-CXL. Stress-strain in human corneas did not show significant differences among techniques, possibly because of the small sample size of groups. In conclusion, I-CXL could be a valid alternative to S-CXL for riboflavin delivery in CXL, preserving the epithelium.

  2. Use of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry for Identification of Molds of the Fusarium Genus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbe, Dirk; De Cremer, Koen; Piérard, Denis; Normand, Anne-Cécile; Piarroux, Renaud; Detandt, Monique; Hendrickx, Marijke

    2014-01-01

    The rates of infection with Fusarium molds are increasing, and a diverse number of Fusarium spp. belonging to different species complexes can cause infection. Conventional species identification in the clinical laboratory is time-consuming and prone to errors. We therefore evaluated whether matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is a useful alternative. The 289 Fusarium strains from the Belgian Coordinated Collections of Microorganisms (BCCM)/Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology Mycology (IHEM) culture collection with validated sequence-based identities and comprising 40 species were used in this study. An identification strategy was developed, applying a standardized MALDI-TOF MS assay and an in-house reference spectrum database. In vitro antifungal testing was performed to assess important differences in susceptibility between clinically relevant species/species complexes. We observed that no incorrect species complex identifications were made by MALDI-TOF MS, and 82.8% of the identifications were correct to the species level. This success rate was increased to 91% by lowering the cutoff for identification. Although the identification of the correct species complex member was not always guaranteed, antifungal susceptibility testing showed that discriminating between Fusarium species complexes can be important for treatment but is not necessarily required between members of a species complex. With this perspective, some Fusarium species complexes with closely related members can be considered as a whole, increasing the success rate of correct identifications to 97%. The application of our user-friendly MALDI-TOF MS identification approach resulted in a dramatic improvement in both time and accuracy compared to identification with the conventional method. A proof of principle of our MALDI-TOF MS approach in the clinical setting using recently isolated Fusarium strains demonstrated its validity. PMID:25411180

  3. High-throughput identification of bacteria and yeast by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry in conventional medical microbiology laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Veen, S Q; Claas, E C J; Kuijper, Ed J

    2010-03-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is suitable for high-throughput and rapid diagnostics at low costs and can be considered an alternative for conventional biochemical and molecular identification systems in a conventional microbiological laboratory. First, we evaluated MALDI-TOF MS using 327 clinical isolates previously cultured from patient materials and identified by conventional techniques (Vitek-II, API, and biochemical tests). Discrepancies were analyzed by molecular analysis of the 16S genes. Of 327 isolates, 95.1% were identified correctly to genus level, and 85.6% were identified to species level by MALDI-TOF MS. Second, we performed a prospective validation study, including 980 clinical isolates of bacteria and yeasts. Overall performance of MALDI-TOF MS was significantly better than conventional biochemical systems for correct species identification (92.2% and 83.1%, respectively) and produced fewer incorrect genus identifications (0.1% and 1.6%, respectively). Correct species identification by MALDI-TOF MS was observed in 97.7% of Enterobacteriaceae, 92% of nonfermentative Gram-negative bacteria, 94.3% of staphylococci, 84.8% of streptococci, 84% of a miscellaneous group (mainly Haemophilus, Actinobacillus, Cardiobacterium, Eikenella, and Kingella [HACEK]), and 85.2% of yeasts. MALDI-TOF MS had significantly better performance than conventional methods for species identification of staphylococci and genus identification of bacteria belonging to HACEK group. Misidentifications by MALDI-TOF MS were clearly associated with an absence of sufficient spectra from suitable reference strains in the MALDI-TOF MS database. We conclude that MALDI-TOF MS can be implemented easily for routine identification of bacteria (except for pneumococci and viridans streptococci) and yeasts in a medical microbiological laboratory.

  4. Performances of the Vitek MS matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry system for rapid identification of bacteria in routine clinical microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Damien; Grare, Marion; Prere, Marie-Françoise; Segonds, Christine; Marty, Nicole; Oswald, Eric

    2012-08-01

    Rapid and cost-effective matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS)-based systems will replace conventional phenotypic methods for routine identification of bacteria. We report here the first evaluation of the new MALDI-TOF MS-based Vitek MS system in a large clinical microbiology laboratory. This system uses an original spectrum classifier algorithm and a specific database designed for the identification of clinically relevant species. We have tested 767 routine clinical isolates representative of 50 genera and 124 species. Vitek MS-based identifications were performed by means of a single deposit on a MALDI disposable target without any prior extraction step and compared with reference identifications obtained mainly with the VITEK2 phenotypic system; if the identifications were discordant, molecular techniques provided reference identifications. The Vitek MS system provided 96.2% correct identifications to the species level (86.7%), to the genus level (8.2%), or within a range of species belonging to different genera (1.3%). Conversely, 1.3% of isolates were misidentified and 2.5% were unidentified, partly because the species was not included in the database; a second deposit provided a successful identification for 0.8% of isolates unidentified with the first deposit. The Vitek MS system is a simple, convenient, and accurate method for routine bacterial identification with a single deposit, considering the high bacterial diversity studied and as evidenced by the low prevalence of species without correct identification. In addition to a second deposit in uncommon cases, expanding the spectral database is expected to further enhance performances.

  5. Analysis of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus major clonal lineages by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tingting; Ding, Jinya; Rao, Xiancai; Yu, Jingbo; Chu, Meiling; Ren, Wei; Wang, Lu; Xue, Wencheng

    2015-10-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an important pathogen associated with nosocomial infections in many countries. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) is one of the genetic typing methods used to type MRSA with a high discriminatory power, however, it is labor-intensive, timely, and costly. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) coupled with ClinProTools is a potential tool to discover biomarker peaks and to generate a classification model based on highly sophisticated mathematical algorithms to discriminate clonal lineages. We investigated the performance of MALDI-TOF MS for discriminating 154 MRSA-ST239, 72 MRSA-ST5, 30 MRSA-ST59, 14 MRSA-ST45, and 20 MRSA-OST (other clonal lineages). Our results indicate that the model construction and validation have good potency to discriminate ST45 from other lineages with a sensitivity and a specificity of both 100%, and a sensitivity of 95.80% and a specificity of 94.62% to identify ST239. For Biotyper classification, the sensitivity and specificity were more than of 90% for ST239, ST59 and ST45, whereas only 81.94% sensitivity for ST5. By single-peak analysis, the peaks m/z 4808 and 9614 can correctly discriminate ST45 a sensitivity and a specificity of both 100%; the peak m/z 6554 can also discriminate ST239 with a sensitivity of 91.9% and a specificity of 85.4%. In conclusion, MALDI-TOF MS coupled with ClinProTools has a high detection performance for MRSA typing with obvious advantages of being rapid, highly accurate, and being a low cost in comparison with MLST.

  6. Teaching Microbial Identification with Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS and Bioinformatics Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenfa Ng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ever since the first observation of “animalcules” under a microscope, and the subsequent discovery of microorganisms of myriad size, shape, pigmentation and motility modes, classification in aid of microbial identification is key to understanding inter-relationships between diverse microbes. Combining universal applicability with robustness, 16S rRNA sequencing is the gold standard for microbial typing; however, recent developments in clinical diagnostics have called attention to a shift towards PCR-independent instrumentation and methods given PCR’s requirement for expensive and complex sample preparation. Using ribosomal proteins as biomarkers for evolutionary relatedness, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS - originally developed for the soft ionization of proteins and peptides in proteomics studies - has been successfully applied to identifying bacteria, archaea, fungi and viruses to the species, and, on occasions, sub-species level. Though experimentally proven and increasingly adopted in the clinic, the relatively low-cost (on a per sample basis and rapid MALDI-TOF MS microbial identification technique, along with its theoretical principles and methodology, is a conspicuous absentee in contemporary microbiology curricula. Motivated by a desire to close the curriculum gap, this article describes a discovery-based activity for teaching microbial identification - using MALDI-TOF MS in combination with open-source genomics and proteomics search tools – while providing tips on mass spectra interpretation and activity implementation for lowering the barrier for classroom adoption. Infused with inquiry-based learning concepts guiding students in identifying microbes from environmental water samples with unknown species diversity, the activity spurs students’ learning by igniting their spirit of inquiry, which leads to better mastery of concepts; a significant departure from

  7. Matrix theory

    CERN Document Server

    Franklin, Joel N

    2003-01-01

    Mathematically rigorous introduction covers vector and matrix norms, the condition-number of a matrix, positive and irreducible matrices, much more. Only elementary algebra and calculus required. Includes problem-solving exercises. 1968 edition.

  8. Comparison of the Accuracy of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry with That of Other Commercial Identification Systems for Identifying Staphylococcus saprophyticus in Urine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tai-Fen; Lee, Hao; Chen, Chung-Ming; Du, Shin-Hei; Cheng, Ya-Chih; Hsu, Chen-Ching; Chung, Meng-Yu; Teng, Shih-Hua; Teng, Lee-Jene

    2013-01-01

    Among 30 urinary isolates of Staphylococcus saprophyticus identified by sequencing methods, the rate of accurate identification was 100% for Bruker Biotyper matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), 86.7% for the Phoenix PID and Vitek 2 GP systems, 93.3% for the MicroScan GP33 system, and 46.7% for the BBL CHROMagar Orientation system. PMID:23390286

  9. Rapid Identification of Bacteria Directly from Positive Blood Cultures by Use of a Serum Separator Tube, Smudge Plate Preparation, and Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Porter, Vanessa; Mubareka, Samira; Kotowich, Leona; Simor, Andrew E

    2015-10-01

    We analyzed the matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) of smudge plate growth for bacterial identification from 400 blood cultures. Ninety-seven percent of Gram-negative bacilli and 85% of Gram-positive organisms were correctly identified within 4 h; only eight isolates (2.0%) were misidentified. This method provided rapid and accurate microbial identification from positive blood cultures.

  10. Comparison of the accuracy of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry with that of other commercial identification systems for identifying Staphylococcus saprophyticus in urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tai-Fen; Lee, Hao; Chen, Chung-Ming; Du, Shin-Hei; Cheng, Ya-Chih; Hsu, Chen-Ching; Chung, Meng-Yu; Teng, Shih-Hua; Teng, Lee-Jene; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2013-05-01

    Among 30 urinary isolates of Staphylococcus saprophyticus identified by sequencing methods, the rate of accurate identification was 100% for Bruker Biotyper matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), 86.7% for the Phoenix PID and Vitek 2 GP systems, 93.3% for the MicroScan GP33 system, and 46.7% for the BBL CHROMagar Orientation system.

  11. Fragmentation study of rutin, a naturally occurring flavone glycoside cationized with different alkali metal ions, using post-source decay matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kéki, S; Deák, G; Zsuga, M

    2001-12-01

    A post-source decay matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric (PSD-MALDI-MS) study of rutin, a naturally occurring flavone glycoside cationized with different alkali metal ions, is reported. The fragmentations of rutin were performed by selecting the [R + Cat]+ peaks for PSD, where R represents a rutin molecule and Cat an alkali metal ion (Li+, Na+, K+). The PSD-MALDI mass spectra showed, depending on Cat, different fragmentation patterns with respect to both the quality and quantity of the fragment ions formed. The intensity of fragmentation decreased in the order Li+ > Na+ > K+. The fragmentation mechanism and an explanation for the observed differences are suggested.

  12. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometric analysis of degradation products after treatment of methylene blue aqueous solution with three-dimensionally integrated microsolution plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirafuji, Tatsuru; Nomura, Ayano; Hayashi, Yui; Tanaka, Kenji; Goto, Motonobu

    2016-01-01

    Methylene blue can be degraded in three-dimensionally integrated microsolution plasma. The degradation products have been analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI TOF) mass spectrometry to understand the degradation mechanisms. The results of MALDI TOF mass spectrometry have shown that sulfoxide is formed at the first stage of the oxidation. Then, partial oxidation proceeds on the methyl groups left on the sulfoxide. The sulfoxide is subsequently separated to two benzene derivatives. Finally, weak functional groups are removed from the benzene derivatives.

  13. Axino mass

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Jihn E

    2012-01-01

    I will talk on my recent works. Axino, related to the SUSY transformation of axion, can mix with Goldstino in principle. In this short talk, I would like to explain what is the axino mass and its plausible mass range. The axino mass is known to have a hierarchical mass structure depending on accidental symmetries. With only one axino, if G_A=0 where G=K+ 2ln|W|, we obtain axino mass= gravitino mass. For G_A nonzero, the axino mass depends on the details of the Kaehler potential. I also comment on the usefulness of a new parametrization of the CKM matrix.

  14. A new strategy to screen molecular imaging probe uptake in cell culture without radiolabeling using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhen; Winant, Richard C; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2005-05-01

    Numerous new molecular targets for diseases are rapidly being identified and validated in the postgenomic era, urging scientists to explore novel techniques for accelerating molecular probe development. In this study, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) was investigated as a potential tool for high-throughput screening and characterization of molecular imaging probes. Specifically, MALDI-TOF-MS was used to screen a small library of phosphonium cations for their ability to accumulate in cells. C6 cells incubated with phosphonium cations at room temperature were collected and lysed for experiments. Calibration curves for the internal standard, methyltriphenyl phosphonium, and for tetraphenylphosphonium bromide (TPP) and other phosphonium cations were first established. The time course of TPP uptake by C6 cells was then quantified using both MALDI-TOF-MS and liquid scintillation counting with (3)H-TPP. In addition, MALDI-TOF-MS was used to screen a library of 8 phosphonium cations and subsequently rank their ability to penetrate membranes and accumulate in cells. Finally, the accumulation of 4-fluorophenyltriphenyl phosphonium (FTPP) in the membrane potential-modulated cells was also measured by MALDI-TOF-MS. MALDI-TOF-MS spectra clearly revealed that TPP was easily identified from cell lysates even as early as 10 min after incubation and that levels as low as 0.11 fmol of TPP per cell could be detected, suggesting the high sensitivity of this technique. The time course of TPP influx determined by both MALDI-TOF-MS and radioactivity counting showed no statistically significant difference (P > 0.05 for all time points). These data validated MALDI-TOF-MS as an alternative approach for accurately measuring uptake of phosphonium cations by cells. TPP and FTPP demonstrated greater accumulation in cells than did the other cations evaluated in this study. Furthermore, uptake profiles suggested that FTPP preserves the

  15. Ceria nanocubic-ultrasonication assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled with matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry for pathogenic bacteria analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelhamid, Hani Nasser; Bhaisare, Mukesh L; Wu, Hui-Fen

    2014-03-01

    A new ceria (CeO2) nanocubic modified surfactant is used as the basis of a novel nano-based microextraction technique for highly sensitive detection of pathogenic bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus). The technique uses ultrasound enhanced surfactant-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (UESA-DLLME) with and without ceria (CeO2) followed by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). In order to achieve high separation efficiency, we investigated the influential parameters, including extraction time of ultrasonication, type and volume of the extraction solvent and surfactant. Among various surfactants, the cationic surfactants can selectively offer better extraction efficiency on bacteria analysis than that of the anionic surfactants due to the negative charges of bacteria cell membranes. Extractions of the bacteria lysate from aqueous samples via UESA-DLLME-MALDI-MS were successfully achieved by using cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB, 10.0 µL, 1.0×10(-3) M) as surfactants in chlorobenzene (10.0 µL) and chloroform (10.0 µL) as the optimal extracting solvent for P. aeruginosa and S. aureus, respectively. Ceria nanocubic was synthesized, and functionalized with CTAB (CeO2@CTAB) and then characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and optical spectroscopy (UV and FTIR). CeO2@CTAB demonstrates high extraction efficiency, improve peaks ionization, and enhance resolution. The prime reasons for these improvements are due to the large surface area of nanoparticles, and its absorption that coincides with the wavelength of MALDI laser (337 nm, N2 laser). CeO2@CTAB-based microextraction offers lowest detectable concentrations tenfold lower than that of without nanoceria. The present approach has been successfully applied to detect pathogenic bacteria at low concentrations of 10(4)-10(5) cfu/mL (without ceria) and at 10(3)-10(4) cfu/mL (with ceria) from bacteria suspensions. Finally, the

  16. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry identification of yeasts is contingent on robust reference spectra.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angie Pinto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS for yeast identification is limited by the requirement for protein extraction and for robust reference spectra across yeast species in databases. We evaluated its ability to identify a range of yeasts in comparison with phenotypic methods. METHODS: MALDI-TOF MS was performed on 30 reference and 167 clinical isolates followed by prospective examination of 67 clinical strains in parallel with biochemical testing (total n = 264. Discordant/unreliable identifications were resolved by sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer region of the rRNA gene cluster. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Twenty (67%; 16 species, and 24 (80% of 30 reference strains were identified to species, (spectral score ≥2.0 and genus (score ≥1.70-level, respectively. Of clinical isolates, 140/167 (84% strains were correctly identified with scores of ≥2.0 and 160/167 (96% with scores of ≥1.70; amongst Candida spp. (n = 148, correct species assignment at scores of ≥2.0, and ≥1.70 was obtained for 86% and 96% isolates, respectively (vs. 76.4% by biochemical methods. Prospectively, species-level identification was achieved for 79% of isolates, whilst 91% and 94% of strains yielded scores of ≥1.90 and ≥1.70, respectively (100% isolates identified by biochemical methods. All test scores of 1.70-1.90 provided correct species assignment despite being identified to "genus-level". MALDI-TOF MS identified uncommon Candida spp., differentiated Candida parapsilosis from C. orthopsilosis and C. metapsilosis and distinguished between C. glabrata, C. nivariensis and C. bracarensis. Yeasts with scores of <1.70 were rare species such as C. nivariensis (3/10 strains and C. bracarensis (n = 1 but included 4/12 Cryptococcus neoformans. There were no misidentifications. Four novel species-specific spectra were obtained. Protein extraction was essential for reliable results

  17. Bruker biotyper matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry system for identification of Nocardia, Rhodococcus, Kocuria, Gordonia, Tsukamurella, and Listeria species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsueh, Po-Ren; Lee, Tai-Fen; Du, Shin-Hei; Teng, Shih-Hua; Liao, Chun-Hsing; Sheng, Wang-Hui; Teng, Lee-Jene

    2014-07-01

    We evaluated whether the Bruker Biotyper matrix-associated laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) system provides accurate species-level identifications of 147 isolates of aerobically growing Gram-positive rods (GPRs). The bacterial isolates included Nocardia (n = 74), Listeria (n = 39), Kocuria (n = 15), Rhodococcus (n = 10), Gordonia (n = 7), and Tsukamurella (n = 2) species, which had all been identified by conventional methods, molecular methods, or both. In total, 89.7% of Listeria monocytogenes, 80% of Rhodococcus species, 26.7% of Kocuria species, and 14.9% of Nocardia species (n = 11, all N. nova and N. otitidiscaviarum) were correctly identified to the species level (score values, ≥ 2.0). A clustering analysis of spectra generated by the Bruker Biotyper identified six clusters of Nocardia species, i.e., cluster 1 (N. cyriacigeorgica), cluster 2 (N. brasiliensis), cluster 3 (N. farcinica), cluster 4 (N. puris), cluster 5 (N. asiatica), and cluster 6 (N. beijingensis), based on the six peaks generated by ClinProTools with the genetic algorithm, i.e., m/z 2,774.477 (cluster 1), m/z 5,389.792 (cluster 2), m/z 6,505.720 (cluster 3), m/z 5,428.795 (cluster 4), m/z 6,525.326 (cluster 5), and m/z 16,085.216 (cluster 6). Two clusters of L. monocytogenes spectra were also found according to the five peaks, i.e., m/z 5,594.85, m/z 6,184.39, and m/z 11,187.31, for cluster 1 (serotype 1/2a) and m/z 5,601.21 and m/z 11,199.33 for cluster 2 (serotypes 1/2b and 4b). The Bruker Biotyper system was unable to accurately identify Nocardia (except for N. nova and N. otitidiscaviarum), Tsukamurella, or Gordonia species. Continuous expansion of the MALDI-TOF MS databases to include more GPRs is necessary. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Bruker Biotyper Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry System for Identification of Nocardia, Rhodococcus, Kocuria, Gordonia, Tsukamurella, and Listeria Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tai-Fen; Du, Shin-Hei; Teng, Shih-Hua; Liao, Chun-Hsing; Sheng, Wang-Hui; Teng, Lee-Jene

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated whether the Bruker Biotyper matrix-associated laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) system provides accurate species-level identifications of 147 isolates of aerobically growing Gram-positive rods (GPRs). The bacterial isolates included Nocardia (n = 74), Listeria (n = 39), Kocuria (n = 15), Rhodococcus (n = 10), Gordonia (n = 7), and Tsukamurella (n = 2) species, which had all been identified by conventional methods, molecular methods, or both. In total, 89.7% of Listeria monocytogenes, 80% of Rhodococcus species, 26.7% of Kocuria species, and 14.9% of Nocardia species (n = 11, all N. nova and N. otitidiscaviarum) were correctly identified to the species level (score values, ≥2.0). A clustering analysis of spectra generated by the Bruker Biotyper identified six clusters of Nocardia species, i.e., cluster 1 (N. cyriacigeorgica), cluster 2 (N. brasiliensis), cluster 3 (N. farcinica), cluster 4 (N. puris), cluster 5 (N. asiatica), and cluster 6 (N. beijingensis), based on the six peaks generated by ClinProTools with the genetic algorithm, i.e., m/z 2,774.477 (cluster 1), m/z 5,389.792 (cluster 2), m/z 6,505.720 (cluster 3), m/z 5,428.795 (cluster 4), m/z 6,525.326 (cluster 5), and m/z 16,085.216 (cluster 6). Two clusters of L. monocytogenes spectra were also found according to the five peaks, i.e., m/z 5,594.85, m/z 6,184.39, and m/z 11,187.31, for cluster 1 (serotype 1/2a) and m/z 5,601.21 and m/z 11,199.33 for cluster 2 (serotypes 1/2b and 4b). The Bruker Biotyper system was unable to accurately identify Nocardia (except for N. nova and N. otitidiscaviarum), Tsukamurella, or Gordonia species. Continuous expansion of the MALDI-TOF MS databases to include more GPRs is necessary. PMID:24759706

  19. Metabolite localization by atmospheric pressure high-resolution scanning microprobe matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging in whole-body sections and individual organs of the rove beetle Paederus riparius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Dhaka Ram; Schott, Matthias; Römpp, Andreas; Vilcinskas, Andreas; Spengler, Bernhard

    2015-03-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging provides for non-targeted, label-free chemical imaging. In this study, atmospheric pressure high-resolution scanning microprobe matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (AP-SMALDI MSI) was used for the first time to describe the chemical distribution of the defensive compounds pederin, pseudopederin, and pederon in tissue sections (16 μm thick) of the rove beetle Paederus riparius. The whole-insect tissue section was scanned with a 20-μm step size. Mass resolution of the orbital trapping mass spectrometer was set to 100,000 at m/z 200. Additionally, organ-specific compounds were identified for brain, nerve cord, eggs, gut, ovaries, and malpighian tubules. To confirm the distribution of the specific compounds, individual organs from the insect were dissected, and MSI experiments were performed on the dissected organs. Three ganglia of the nerve cord, with a dimension of 250-500 μm, were measured with 10-μm spatial resolution. High-quality m/z images, based on high spatial resolution and high mass accuracy were generated. These features helped to assign mass spectral peaks with high confidence. Mass accuracy of the imaging experiments was pederin and its analogues could be visualized in the whole-insect section. Without any labeling, we assigned key lipids for specific organs to describe their location in the body and to identify morphological structures with a specificity higher than with staining or immunohistology methods.

  20. Evaluation of the matrix effect on gas chromatography--mass spectrometry with carrier gas containing ethylene glycol as an analyte protectant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiyoshi, Tomoharu; Ikami, Takahito; Sato, Takashi; Kikukawa, Koji; Kobayashi, Masato; Ito, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Atsushi

    2016-02-19

    The consequences of matrix effects in GC are a major issue of concern in pesticide residue analysis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the applicability of an analyte protectant generator in pesticide residue analysis using a GC-MS system. The technique is based on continuous introduction of ethylene glycol into the carrier gas. Ethylene glycol as an analyte protectant effectively compensated the matrix effects in agricultural product extracts. All peak intensities were increased by this technique without affecting the GC-MS performance. Calibration curves for ethylene glycol in the GC-MS system with various degrees of pollution were compared and similar response enhancements were observed. This result suggests a convenient multi-residue GC-MS method using an analyte protectant generator instead of the conventional compensation method for matrix-induced response enhancement adding the mixture of analyte protectants into both neat and sample solutions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Identification of oxidised proteins in the matrix of rice leaf mitochondria by immunoprecipitation and two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, B.K.; Askerlund, P.; Bykova, N.V.

    2004-01-01

    Highly purified mitochondria were isolated from green 7-day-old rice leaves. The mitochondria were sonicated and the matrix fraction isolated as the 100,000g supernatant. Part of the matrix fraction was left untreated while the other part was subjected to a mild oxidative treatment (0.5 mM H2O2 + 0.......2 mM CuSO4 for 10 min at room temperature). The oxidised proteins in both samples were tagged with dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNP), which forms a covalent bond with carbonyl groups. The DNP-tagged proteins were immunoprecipitated using anti-DNP antibodies and digested with trypsin. The mixture...

  2. Matrix Factorization and Matrix Concentration

    OpenAIRE

    Mackey, Lester

    2012-01-01

    Motivated by the constrained factorization problems of sparse principal components analysis (PCA) for gene expression modeling, low-rank matrix completion for recommender systems, and robust matrix factorization for video surveillance, this dissertation explores the modeling, methodology, and theory of matrix factorization.We begin by exposing the theoretical and empirical shortcomings of standard deflation techniques for sparse PCA and developing alternative methodology more suitable for def...

  3. Characterization of O-glycosylated precursors of insulin-like growth factor II by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jespersen, S.; Koedam, J.A.; Hoogerbrugge, C.M.; Tjaden, U.R.; Greef, J. van der; Brande, J.L. van den

    1996-01-01

    High molecular weight precursors of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) were isolated from Cohn fraction IV of human plasma by ultrafiltration, affinity chromatography and reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Molecular weight determination by matrix-assisted laser

  4. Performance and matrix effect observed in QuEChERS extraction and tandem mass spectrometry analyses of pesticide residues in different target crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucini, Luigi; Molinari, Gian Pietro

    2011-10-01

    The method performance and matrix effect related to quantitative determination of pesticide residues was assessed after QuEChERS extraction and LC-MS-MS analysis. Dicloran, phosmet and phosmet-oxon, pirimiphos-methyl, and BNOA were analyzed in peach, apple, melon, cereals, tomato, and strawberry. The matrix effects, as well as recovery and process efficiencies, were determined for a fungicide, two insecticides, and a plant growth regulator. Crop samples were spiked either pre- or post-extraction, then the peak area was compared with the peak area in neat solvent. The mean recovery ranged from 73% to 98%, and repeatability (as RSD) was between 3% and 16%, depending on the compound and spiking level. The matrix effect occurred as ionic suppression and was found in the range of 5% to 22% depending on the compound. Recovery efficiencies were good and substantially comparable, being in the range of 93-96%. Although the suppression observed still appears to be acceptable considering the overall process efficiency, it seems evident that the matrix effect is important when a reliable quantitative method must be applied.

  5. Rapid identification of bacillus anthracis spores in suspicious powder samples by using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dybwad, M.; Laaken, A.L. van der; Blatny, J.M.; Paauw, A.

    2013-01-01

    Rapid and reliable identification of Bacillus anthracis spores in suspicious powders is important to mitigate the safety risks and economic burdens associated with such incidents. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a rapid and reliable laboratory- based matrix-assisted laser desorptio

  6. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass in the Dilepton Channel using a Matrix Element Method and Neuroevolution Selection with 2.0 fb$^{-1}$

    CERN Document Server

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. Batavia

    2007-01-01

    We report a measurement of the top quark mass using events collected by the CDF II Detector from $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt s = 1.96$ TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron. We calculate a likelihood function for the top mass in events that are consistent with $t\\bar{t} \\to \\bar{b}\\ell^{-}\\bar{\

  7. Chemical characterization of latent fingerprints by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry, mega electron volt secondary mass spectrometry, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic imaging: an intercomparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Melanie J; Bright, Nicholas J; Croxton, Ruth S; Francese, Simona; Ferguson, Leesa S; Hinder, Stephen; Jickells, Sue; Jones, Benjamin J; Jones, Brian N; Kazarian, Sergei G; Ojeda, Jesus J; Webb, Roger P; Wolstenholme, Rosalind; Bleay, Stephen

    2012-10-16

    The first analytical intercomparison of fingerprint residue using equivalent samples of latent fingerprint residue and characterized by a suite of relevant techniques is presented. This work has never been undertaken, presumably due to the perishable nature of fingerprint residue, the lack of fingerprint standards, and the intradonor variability, which impacts sample reproducibility. For the first time, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry, high-energy secondary ion mass spectrometry, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy are used to target endogenous compounds in fingerprints and a method is presented for establishing their relative abundance in fingerprint residue. Comparison of the newer techniques with the more established gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic imaging shows good agreement between the methods, with each method detecting repeatable differences between the donors, with the exception of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization, for which quantitative analysis has not yet been established. We further comment on the sensitivity, selectivity, and practicability of each of the methods for use in future police casework or academic research.

  8. Matrix calculus

    CERN Document Server

    Bodewig, E

    1959-01-01

    Matrix Calculus, Second Revised and Enlarged Edition focuses on systematic calculation with the building blocks of a matrix and rows and columns, shunning the use of individual elements. The publication first offers information on vectors, matrices, further applications, measures of the magnitude of a matrix, and forms. The text then examines eigenvalues and exact solutions, including the characteristic equation, eigenrows, extremum properties of the eigenvalues, bounds for the eigenvalues, elementary divisors, and bounds for the determinant. The text ponders on approximate solutions, as well

  9. Characterization of Achromobacter Species in Cystic Fibrosis Patients: Comparison of blaOXA-114 PCR Amplification, Multilocus Sequence Typing, and Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Elenice R. A.; Ferreira, Alex G.; Leão, Robson S.; Leite, Cassiana C. F.; Carvalho-Assef, Ana Paula; Albano, Rodolpho M.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular methodologies were used to identify 28 Achromobacter spp. from patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) identified 17 Achromobacter xylosoxidans isolates (all blaOXA-114 positive), nine Achromobacter ruhlandii isolates (all blaOXA-114 positive), one Achromobacter dolens isolate, and one Achromobacter insuavis isolate. All less common species were misidentified as A. xylosoxidans by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Chronic colonization by clonally related A. ruhlandii isolates was demonstrated. PMID:26400790

  10. Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry Meropenem Hydrolysis Assay with NH4HCO3, a Reliable Tool for Direct Detection of Carbapenemase Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Študentová, Vendula; Izdebski, Radoslaw; Oikonomou, Olga; Pfeifer, Yvonne; Petinaki, Efthimia; Hrabák, Jaroslav

    2015-01-01

    A comparison of a matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometric (MALDI-TOF MS) meropenem hydrolysis assay with the Carba NP test showed that both methods exhibited low sensitivity (approximately 76%), mainly due to the false-negative results obtained with OXA-48-type producers. The addition of NH4HCO3 to the reaction buffer for the MALDI-TOF MS assay dramatically improved its sensitivity (98%). Automatic interpretation of the MALDI-TOF MS assay, using the MBT STAR-BL software, generally agreed with the results obtained after manual analysis. For the Carba NP test, spectrophotometric analysis found six additional carbapenemase producers. PMID:25694522

  11. Rapid Detection and Identification of Candidemia by Direct Blood Culturing on Solid Medium by Use of Lysis-Centrifugation Method Combined with Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idelevich, Evgeny A; Grünastel, Barbara; Becker, Karsten

    2017-01-01

    Candida sepsis is a life-threatening condition with increasing prevalence. In this study, direct blood culturing on solid medium using a lysis-centrifugation procedure enabled successful Candida species identification by matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time of flight mass spectrometry on average 3.8 h (Sabouraud agar) or 7.4 h (chocolate agar) before the positivity signal for control samples in Bactec mycosis-IC/F or Bactec Plus aerobic/F bottles, respectively. Direct culturing on solid medium accelerated candidemia diagnostics compared to that with automated broth-based systems. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Microbiology.

  12. How Suitable is Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization-Time-of-Flight for Metabolite Imaging from Clinical Formalin-Fixed and Paraffin-Embedded Tissue Samples in Comparison to Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization-Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Achim; Balluff, Benjamin; Voss, Andreas; Langer, Rupert; Zitzelsberger, Horst; Aichler, Michaela; Walch, Axel

    2016-05-17

    In research and clinical settings, formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue specimens are collected routinely and therefore this material constitutes a highly valuable source to gather insight in metabolic changes of diseases. Among mass spectrometry techniques to examine the molecular content of FFPE tissue, mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is the most appropriate when morphological and histological features are to be related to metabolic information. Currently, high-resolution mass spectrometers are widely used for metabolomics studies. However, with regards to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) MSI, no study has so far addressed the necessity of instrumental mass resolving power in terms of clinical diagnosis and prognosis using archived FFPE tissue. For this matter we performed for the first time a comprehensive comparison between a high mass resolution Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer and a time-of-flight (TOF) instrument with lower mass resolving power. Spectra analysis revealed that about one-third of the detected peaks remained unresolved by MALDI-TOF, which led to a 3-5 times lower number of m/z features compared to FTICR measurements. Overlaid peak information and background noise in TOF images made a precise assignment of molecular attributes to morphological features more difficult and limited classification approaches. This clearly demonstrates the need for high-mass resolution capabilities for metabolite imaging. Nevertheless, MALDI-TOF allowed reproducing and verifying individual markers identified previously by MALDI-FTICR MSI. The systematic comparison gives rise to a synergistic combination of the different MSI platforms for high-throughput discovery and validation of biomarkers.

  13. A microwave-mediated saponification of galactosylceramide and galactosylceramide I3-sulfate and identification of their lyso-compounds by delayed extraction matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taketomi, T; Hara, A; Uemura, K; Kurahashi, H; Sugiyama, E

    1996-07-16

    Small amounts of galactosylceramide (cerebroside) and galactosylceramide I3-sulfate (sulfatide) obtained from porcine spinal cord and equine kidney were deacylated by a rapid method of microwave-mediated saponification to prepare their lyso-compounds. Mass spectra of their protonated or deprotonated molecular ion peaks were detected by recently developed new technology of a delayed extraction matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer with reflector detector in positive or negative ion mode. Long chain bases of lysocerebroside and lysosulfatide were different between porcine spinal cord and equine kidney, but similar to each other in the same organ, suggesting their common synthetic pathway. It is noted that the new rapid method can be similarly applied to the deacylation of both cerebroside and sulfatide in contrast to our classical method which was able to be applied to cerebroside, but not to sulfatide.

  14. Mesoporous Silica Gel-Based Mixed Matrix Membranes for Improving Mass Transfer in Forward Osmosis: Effect of Pore Size of Filler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jian-Yuan; Wang, Yining; Tang, Chuyang Y; Huo, Fengwei

    2015-11-23

    The efficiency of forward osmosis (FO) process is generally limited by the internal concentration polarization (ICP) of solutes inside its porous substrate. In this study, mesoporous silica gel (SG) with nominal pore size ranging from 4-30 nm was used as fillers to prepare SG-based mixed matrix substrates. The resulting mixed matrix membranes had significantly reduced structural parameter and enhanced membrane water permeability as a result of the improved surface porosity of the substrates. An optimal filler pore size of ~9 nm was observed. This is in direct contrast to the case of thin film nanocomposite membranes, where microporous nanoparticle fillers are loaded to the membrane rejection layer and are designed in such a way that these fillers are able to retain solutes while allowing water to permeate through them. In the current study, the mesoporous fillers are designed as channels to both water and solute molecules. FO performance was enhanced at increasing filler pore size up to 9 nm due to the lower hydraulic resistance of the fillers. Nevertheless, further increasing filler pore size to 30 nm was accompanied with reduced FO efficiency, which can be attributed to the intrusion of polymer dope into the filler pores.

  15. Mesoporous Silica Gel-Based Mixed Matrix Membranes for Improving Mass Transfer in Forward Osmosis: Effect of Pore Size of Filler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jian-Yuan; Wang, Yining; Tang, Chuyang Y.; Huo, Fengwei

    2015-11-01

    The efficiency of forward osmosis (FO) process is generally limited by the internal concentration polarization (ICP) of solutes inside its porous substrate. In this study, mesoporous silica gel (SG) with nominal pore size ranging from 4-30 nm was used as fillers to prepare SG-based mixed matrix substrates. The resulting mixed matrix membranes had significantly reduced structural parameter and enhanced membrane water permeability as a result of the improved surface porosity of the substrates. An optimal filler pore size of ~9 nm was observed. This is in direct contrast to the case of thin film nanocomposite membranes, where microporous nanoparticle fillers are loaded to the membrane rejection layer and are designed in such a way that these fillers are able to retain solutes while allowing water to permeate through them. In the current study, the mesoporous fillers are designed as channels to both water and solute molecules. FO performance was enhanced at increasing filler pore size up to 9 nm due to the lower hydraulic resistance of the fillers. Nevertheless, further increasing filler pore size to 30 nm was accompanied with reduced FO efficiency, which can be attributed to the intrusion of polymer dope into the filler pores.

  16. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometric micro-analysis: the first non-immunological alternative attempt to quantify gluten gliadins in food