WorldWideScience

Sample records for marrow radiation therapy

  1. A methodology for incorporating functional bone marrow sparing in IMRT planning for pelvic radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGuire, Sarah M.; Menda, Yusuf; Boles Ponto, Laura L.; Gross, Brandie; Juweid, Malik; Bayouth, John E.

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: The purpose of this study was to design a radiation therapy treatment planning approach that would spare hematopoietically active bone marrow using [ 18 F]FLT PET imaging. Materials and methods: We have developed an IMRT planning methodology to incorporate functional PET imaging using [ 18 F]FLT scans. Plans were generated for two simulated cervical cancer patients, where pelvic active bone marrow regions were incorporated as avoidance regions based on the ranges: SUV4 ≥ 4; 4 > SUV3 ≥ 3; and 3 > SUV2 ≥ 2. Dose objectives were set to reduce bone marrow volume that received 10 (V 10 ) and 20 (V 20 ) Gy. Results: Active bone marrow regions identified by [ 18 F]FLT with an SUV ≥ 2, SUV ≥ 3, and SUV ≥ 4 represented an average of 43.0%, 15.3%, and 5.8%, respectively of the total osseous pelvis for the two cases studied. Improved dose-volume histograms for all identified bone marrow SUV volumes and decreases in V 10 , and V 20 were achieved without clinically significant changes to PTV or OAR doses. Conclusions: Incorporation of [ 18 F]FLT PET in IMRT planning provides a methodology to reduce radiation dose to active bone marrow without compromising PTV or OAR dose objectives in pelvic malignancies.

  2. Melanin-Covered Nanoparticles for Protection of Bone Marrow During Radiation Therapy of Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schweitzer, Andrew D.; Revskaya, Ekaterina; Chu, Peter; Pazo, Valeria; Friedman, Matthew; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.; Cahill, Sean; Frases, Susana; Casadevall, Arturo; Dadachova, Ekaterina

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Protection of bone marrow against radiotoxicity during radioimmunotherapy and in some cases external beam radiation therapy such as hemi-body irradiation would permit administration of significantly higher doses to tumors, resulting in increased efficacy and safety of treatment. Melanin, a naturally occurring pigment, possesses radioprotective properties. We hypothesized that melanin, which is insoluble, could be delivered to the bone marrow by intravenously administrated melanin-covered nanoparticles (MNs) because of the human body's 'self-sieving' ability, protecting it against ionizing radiation. Methods and Materials: The synthesis of MNs was performed via enzymatic polymerization of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine and/or 5-S-cysteinyl-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine on the surface of 20-nm plain silica nanoparticles. The biodistribution of radiolabeled MNs in mice was done at 3 and 24 h. Healthy CD-1 mice (Charles River Laboratories International, Inc., Wilmington, MA) or melanoma tumor-bearing nude mice were given MNs intravenously, 50 mg/kg of body weight, 3 h before either whole-body exposure to 125 cGy or treatment with 1 mCi of 188 Re-labeled 6D2 melanin-binding antibody. Results: Polymerization of melanin precursors on the surface of silica nanoparticles resulted in formation of a 15-nm-thick melanin layer as confirmed by light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, and immunofluorescence. The biodistribution after intravenous administration showed than MN uptake in bone marrow was 0.3% and 0.2% of injected dose per gram at 3 and 24 h, respectively, whereas pre-injection with pluronic acid increased the uptake to 6% and 3% of injected dose per gram, respectively. Systemic MN administration reduced hematologic toxicity in mice treated with external radiation or radioimmunotherapy, whereas no tumor protection by MNs was observed. Conclusions: MNs or similar structures provide a novel approach to protection of bone marrow from ionizing radiation based

  3. Serial MR imaging evaluation of effects of radiation therapy on bone marrow and liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yankelevitz, D.; Henschke, C.I.; Chu, F.; Hayt, D.B.; Whalen, J.P.; Cahill, P.T.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on baseline and serial MR imaging studies obtained on 20 patients (lung cancer and lymphoma) who were receiving radiation therapy as their only form of treatment. Quantitative and qualitative MR signal intensity measurement were made on bone marrow and liver. Additionally, changes in signal intensity were correlated with laboratory values including both complete blood count and liver function tests. The spine showed increased signal intensity on T1-weighted images. MR signal intensity increased rapidly in the first 6 weeks and continued to rise slowly thereafter. In three of 10 cases in which the liver was included in the radiotherapy field, areas of increased activity in the liver were seen on T2-weighted images. These areas were in the field of radiation and sharply demarcated from nonirradiated liver. This area of abnormality gradually returned to normal after completion of therapy

  4. Fat Composition Changes in Bone Marrow During Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmona, Ruben; Pritz, Jakub [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Bydder, Mark [Department of Radiology, University of California San Diego Medical Center, San Diego, California (United States); Gulaya, Sachin; Zhu, He; Williamson, Casey W. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Welch, Christian S. [Department of Radiology, University of California San Diego Medical Center, San Diego, California (United States); Vaida, Florin [Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, University of California San Diego Medical Center, San Diego, California (United States); Bydder, Graeme [Department of Radiology, University of California San Diego Medical Center, San Diego, California (United States); Mell, Loren K., E-mail: lmell@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: To quantify changes in bone marrow fat fraction and determine associations with peripheral blood cell counts. Methods and Materials: In this prospective study, 19 patients received either highly myelotoxic treatment (radiation therapy plus cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil mitomycin C [FU/MMC], or cisplatin/5-FU/cetuximab) or less myelotoxic treatment (capecitabine-radiation therapy or no concurrent chemotherapy). Patients underwent MR imaging and venipuncture at baseline, midtreatment, and posttreatment visits. We performed mixed effects modeling of the mean proton density fat fraction (PDFF[%]) by linear time, treatment, and vertebral column region (lumbar [L]4-sacral [S]2 vs thoracic [T]10-L3 vs cervical[C]3-T9), while controlling for cumulative mean dose and other confounders. Spearman rank correlations were performed by white blood cell (WBC) counts versus the differences in PDFF(%) before and after treatment. Results: Cumulative mean dose was associated with a 0.43% per Gy (P=.004) increase in PDFF(%). In the highly myelotoxic group, we observed significant changes in PDFF(%) per visit within L4-S2 (10.1%, P<.001) and within T10-L3 (3.93%, P=.01), relative to the reference C3-T9. In the less myelotoxic group, we did not observe significant changes in PDFF(%) per visit according to region. Within L4-S2, we observed a significant difference between treatment groups in the change in PDFF(%) per visit (5.36%, P=.04). Rank correlations of the inverse log differences in WBC versus the differences in PDFF(%) overall and within T10-S2 ranged from 0.69 to 0.78 (P<.05). Rank correlations of the inverse log differences in absolute neutrophil counts versus the differences in PDFF(%) overall and within L4-S2 ranged from 0.79 to 0.81 (P<.05). Conclusions: Magnetic resonance imaging fat quantification is sensitive to marrow composition changes that result from chemoradiation therapy. These changes are associated with peripheral blood cell counts. This study supports a

  5. Fat Composition Changes in Bone Marrow During Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmona, Ruben; Pritz, Jakub; Bydder, Mark; Gulaya, Sachin; Zhu, He; Williamson, Casey W.; Welch, Christian S.; Vaida, Florin; Bydder, Graeme; Mell, Loren K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify changes in bone marrow fat fraction and determine associations with peripheral blood cell counts. Methods and Materials: In this prospective study, 19 patients received either highly myelotoxic treatment (radiation therapy plus cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil mitomycin C [FU/MMC], or cisplatin/5-FU/cetuximab) or less myelotoxic treatment (capecitabine-radiation therapy or no concurrent chemotherapy). Patients underwent MR imaging and venipuncture at baseline, midtreatment, and posttreatment visits. We performed mixed effects modeling of the mean proton density fat fraction (PDFF[%]) by linear time, treatment, and vertebral column region (lumbar [L]4-sacral [S]2 vs thoracic [T]10-L3 vs cervical[C]3-T9), while controlling for cumulative mean dose and other confounders. Spearman rank correlations were performed by white blood cell (WBC) counts versus the differences in PDFF(%) before and after treatment. Results: Cumulative mean dose was associated with a 0.43% per Gy (P=.004) increase in PDFF(%). In the highly myelotoxic group, we observed significant changes in PDFF(%) per visit within L4-S2 (10.1%, P<.001) and within T10-L3 (3.93%, P=.01), relative to the reference C3-T9. In the less myelotoxic group, we did not observe significant changes in PDFF(%) per visit according to region. Within L4-S2, we observed a significant difference between treatment groups in the change in PDFF(%) per visit (5.36%, P=.04). Rank correlations of the inverse log differences in WBC versus the differences in PDFF(%) overall and within T10-S2 ranged from 0.69 to 0.78 (P<.05). Rank correlations of the inverse log differences in absolute neutrophil counts versus the differences in PDFF(%) overall and within L4-S2 ranged from 0.79 to 0.81 (P<.05). Conclusions: Magnetic resonance imaging fat quantification is sensitive to marrow composition changes that result from chemoradiation therapy. These changes are associated with peripheral blood cell counts. This study supports a

  6. Involved field radiation therapy for Hodgkin's disease autologous bone marrow transplantation regimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pezner, Richard D.; Nademanee, Auayporn; Niland, Joyce C.; Vora, Nayana; Forman, Stephen J.

    1995-01-01

    From 1986 through 1992, involved-field radiation therapy (IF-RT) was administered to 29 of 86 patients with recurrent Hodgkin's disease (HD) who received a high-dose cyclophosphamide/etoposide regimen with autologous bone marrow transplantation (A-BMT). Patients without a significant history of prior RT received total body irradiation (TBI), initially as a single dose 5-7.5 Gy, and subsequently with fractionated TBI (F-TBI) delivering 12 Gy. Previously irradiated patients received a high-dose BCNU regimen instead of TBI. IF-RT was employed selectively, usually for sites of bulky disease (> 5 cm). IF-RT doses were typically 20 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction for TBI patients and 30-40 Gy at 1.8-2.0 Gy per fraction for non-TBI Patients. Fatal complications developed in four patients while second malignancies have developed in two. The region which received IF-RT was the site of first recurrence in only two cases (7%). With a median follow-up of 28 months, the two-year disease-free survival rate was 44%. For the 22 patients treated by either F-TBI or high-dose BCNU, the 2-year disease-free survival rate was 50% with a median follow up of 29 months. Selective use of IF-RT may increase the chances of complete remission and disease free survival in HD patients with a history of bulky disease

  7. Impact of Drug Therapy, Radiation Dose, and Dose Rate on Renal Toxicity Following Bone Marrow Transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Jonathan C.; Schultheiss, Timothy E.; Wong, Jeffrey Y.C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate a radiation dose response and to determine the dosimetric and chemotherapeutic factors that influence the incidence of late renal toxicity following total body irradiation (TBI). Methods and Materials: A comprehensive retrospective review was performed of articles reporting late renal toxicity, along with renal dose, fractionation, dose rate, chemotherapy regimens, and potential nephrotoxic agents. In the final analysis, 12 articles (n = 1,108 patients), consisting of 24 distinct TBI/chemotherapy conditioning regimens were included. Regimens were divided into three subgroups: adults (age ≥18 years), children (age <18 years), and mixed population (both adults and children). Multivariate logistic regression was performed to identify dosimetric and chemotherapeutic factors significantly associated with late renal complications. Results: Individual analysis was performed on each population subgroup. For the purely adult population, the only significant variable was total dose. For the mixed population, the significant variables included total dose, dose rate, and the use of fludarabine. For the pediatric population, only the use of cyclosporin or teniposide was significant; no dose response was noted. A logistic model was generated with the exclusion of the pediatric population because of its lack of dose response. This model yielded the following significant variables: total dose, dose rate, and number of fractions. Conclusion: A dose response for renal damage after TBI was identified. Fractionation and low dose rates are factors to consider when delivering TBI to patients undergoing bone marrow transplantation. Drug therapy also has a major impact on kidney function and can modify the dose-response function

  8. Bone marrow-sparing intensity-modulated radiation therapy for Stage I seminoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zilli, Thomas; Boudreau, Chantal; Doucet, Robert; Alizadeh, Moein; Lambert, Carole; Van Nguyen, Thu; Taussky, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Background. A direct association between radiotherapy dose, side-effects and secondary cancers has been described in patients with seminoma. A treatment planning study was performed in order to compare computed tomography-based traditional radiotherapy (CT-tRT) versus bone marrow-sparing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (BMS-IMRT) in patients with Stage I seminoma. Material and methods. We optimized in 10 patients a CT-tRT and a BMS-IMRT treatment plan to deliver 20 Gy to the para-aortic nodes. CT-tRT and IMRT consisted of anteroposterior-posterioranterior parallel-opposed and seven non-opposed coplanar fields using 16 and 6-MV photon energies, respectively. Dose-Volume Histograms for clinical target volume (CTV), planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OARs) were compared for both techniques using Wilcoxon matched-pair signed rank-test. Results. Dmean to CTV and PTV were similar for both techniques, even if CT-tRT showed a slightly improved target coverage in terms of PTV-D95% (19.7 vs. 19.5 Gy, p 0.005) and PTV-V95% (100 vs. 99.7%, p = 0.011) compared to BMS-IMRT. BMS-IMRT resulted in a significant reduction (5.2 Gy, p = 0.005) in the Dmean to the active bone marrow (ABM). The V100% and V75% of the OARs were reduced with BMS-IMRT by: ABM-V100% = 51.7% and ABM-V75% = 42.3%; bowel-V100% = 15.7% and bowel-V75% = 16.8%; stomach-V100% = 22% and stomach-V75% = 27.7%; pancreas-V100% = 37.1% and pancreas-V75% = 35.9% (p = 0.005 for all variables). Conclusions. BMS-IMRT reduces markedly the dose to the OARs compared to CT-tRT. This should translate into a reduction in acute and long-term toxicity, as well as into the risk of secondary solid and hematological cancers

  9. Thoracic radiation therapy before autologous bone marrow transplantation in relapsed or refractory Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, R.W.; Gospodarowicz, M.K.; Sutcliffe, S.B.; Crump, M.; Keating, A.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between radiation therapy (RT) and treatment-related mortality in patients receiving high-dose chemotherapy (HDCT) and autologous bone marrow transplantation (ABMT) for recurrent/refractory Hodgkin's disease (HD). Between December 1986 and December 1992, 59 patients previously treated at the Princess Margaret Hospital underwent HDCT (etoposide 60 mg/kg, melphalan 160 mg/m 2 ) and ABMT, performed for refractory (13 patients) or relapsed (46 patients) HD. RT was incorporated in the salvage treatment with the intent to achieve complete control of disease prior to ABMT. RT was given before ABMT in 33 patients, and after ABMT in 4 patients. Treatment-related (TR) mortality was defined as any death occurring within 100 days of ABMT. Autopsies were performed for all patients with TR deaths. With a median follow-up of 4.6 years (range 1.2-7.4 years), the actuarial overall survival was 41%±14% at 5 years. We observed 37 deaths, and 10 of these were TR deaths. Among the 24 patients who received thoracic RT before ABMT, there were 8 TR deaths, 3 of these solely attributable to radiation pneumonitis. The remaining 5 TR deaths all had respiratory failure with complicating sepsis as a major medical problem. The interval from RT to ABMT was shorter for 8 patients dying of TR death (mean 37 days; range 0-103 days), than for the 16 survivors (mean 105 days; range 0-263 days) (P=0.026). Among 9 patients with ABMT within 50 days of thoracic RT, 6 had TR death. In contrast, among the 35 patients without thoracic RT (26 no RT, 9 non-thoracic RT), there were only 2 TR deaths. The 4 patients treated with mantle RT post-ABMT had no serious pulmonary complications. The use of thoracic RT before HDCT and ABMT was associated with a high post-transplant mortality rate. It was most evident in patients who received thoracic RT within 50 days prior to ABMT, or when the target volume included large volume of lung. We recommend that the use of

  10. Risk of Subsequent Leukemia After a Solid Tumor in Childhood: Impact of Bone Marrow Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allodji, Rodrigue S., E-mail: rodrigue.allodji@gustaveroussy.fr [Inserm, Radiation Epidemiology Team, CESP-Unit 1018, Villejuif (France); Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Paris Sud University, Orsay (France); Schwartz, Boris; Veres, Cristina; Haddy, Nadia; Rubino, Carole; Le Deley, Marie-Cécile; Labbé, Martine; Diop, Fara; Jackson, Angela; Dayet, Florent; Benabdennebi, Aymen; Llanas, Damien; Vu Bezin, Jérémi [Inserm, Radiation Epidemiology Team, CESP-Unit 1018, Villejuif (France); Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Paris Sud University, Orsay (France); Chavaudra, Jean; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri [Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Deutsch, Eric [Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Inserm, UMR 1030, Villejuif (France); Oberlin, Odile [Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Vathaire, Florent de; Diallo, Ibrahima [Inserm, Radiation Epidemiology Team, CESP-Unit 1018, Villejuif (France); Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Paris Sud University, Orsay (France)

    2015-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate the roles of radiation therapy and chemotherapy in the occurrence of subsequent leukemia after childhood cancer. Methods and Materials: We analyzed data from a case-control study with 35 cases and 140 controls. The active bone marrow (ABM) was segmented into 19 compartments, and the radiation dose was estimated in each. The chemotherapy drug doses were also estimated to enable adjustments. Models capable of accounting for radiation dose heterogeneity were implemented for analysis. Results: Univariate analysis showed a significant trend in the increase of secondary leukemia risk with radiation dose, after accounting for dose heterogeneity (P=.046). This trend became nonsignificant after adjustment for doses of epipodophyllotoxins, alkylating agents, and platinum compounds and the first cancer on multivariate analysis (P=.388). The role of the radiation dose appeared to be dwarfed, mostly by the alkylating agents (odds ratio 6.9, 95% confidence interval 1.9-25.0). Among the patients who have received >16 Gy to the ABM, the radiogenic risk of secondary leukemia was about 4 times greater in the subgroup with no alkylating agents than in the subgroup receiving ≥10 g/m{sup 2}. Conclusions: Notwithstanding the limitations resulting from the size of our study population and the quite systematic co-treatment with chemotherapy, the use of detailed information on the radiation dose distribution to ABM enabled consideration of the role of radiation therapy in secondary leukemia induction after childhood cancer.

  11. Risk of Subsequent Leukemia After a Solid Tumor in Childhood: Impact of Bone Marrow Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allodji, Rodrigue S.; Schwartz, Boris; Veres, Cristina; Haddy, Nadia; Rubino, Carole; Le Deley, Marie-Cécile; Labbé, Martine; Diop, Fara; Jackson, Angela; Dayet, Florent; Benabdennebi, Aymen; Llanas, Damien; Vu Bezin, Jérémi; Chavaudra, Jean; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri; Deutsch, Eric; Oberlin, Odile; Vathaire, Florent de; Diallo, Ibrahima

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the roles of radiation therapy and chemotherapy in the occurrence of subsequent leukemia after childhood cancer. Methods and Materials: We analyzed data from a case-control study with 35 cases and 140 controls. The active bone marrow (ABM) was segmented into 19 compartments, and the radiation dose was estimated in each. The chemotherapy drug doses were also estimated to enable adjustments. Models capable of accounting for radiation dose heterogeneity were implemented for analysis. Results: Univariate analysis showed a significant trend in the increase of secondary leukemia risk with radiation dose, after accounting for dose heterogeneity (P=.046). This trend became nonsignificant after adjustment for doses of epipodophyllotoxins, alkylating agents, and platinum compounds and the first cancer on multivariate analysis (P=.388). The role of the radiation dose appeared to be dwarfed, mostly by the alkylating agents (odds ratio 6.9, 95% confidence interval 1.9-25.0). Among the patients who have received >16 Gy to the ABM, the radiogenic risk of secondary leukemia was about 4 times greater in the subgroup with no alkylating agents than in the subgroup receiving ≥10 g/m"2. Conclusions: Notwithstanding the limitations resulting from the size of our study population and the quite systematic co-treatment with chemotherapy, the use of detailed information on the radiation dose distribution to ABM enabled consideration of the role of radiation therapy in secondary leukemia induction after childhood cancer.

  12. Bone marrow dosimetry for monoclonal antibody therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigler, R.E.; Zanzonico, P.B.; Leonard, R.

    1986-01-01

    Immunoglobulins must permeate through the basement membrane of capillaries in order to enter the extracellular space (ECS) of tissue. Since the process is quite slow, the blood plasma activity in various organs contributes considerably to the radiation dose of the dose-limiting tissues. In bone marrow the basement membrane is absent and the blood circulation is functionally open. Therefore, blood plasma and marrow ECS maintain equal concentrations of labeled immunoglobulins. A combination of factors including intravenous administration, slow absorption into most tissues, slow breakdown and elimination of labeled immunoglobulin, and rapid entry into bone marrow ECS as well as known radiosensitivity of marrow led the authors to expect this tissue would prove to be the primary tissue at risk for systemic monoclonal antibody therapy. They have developed and applied in a Phase I clinical study of 131 I labeled CEA antibody a procedure for estimation of radiation dose to red bone marrow. Serieal measurements of blood plasma and total body retention are carried out. Binding of labeled antibody to the cellular components of blood is verified to be very low. They have observed bone marrow depression at doses greater than 400 rad. If no special procedures are used to reconstitute marrow after radiation treatment, this level represents a much greater than generally recognized limitation to radiolabeled monoclonal antibody therapy. 25 references, 4 tables

  13. Distribution Atlas of Proliferating Bone Marrow in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Measured by FLT-PET/CT Imaging, With Potential Applicability in Radiation Therapy Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Belinda A., E-mail: Belinda.Campbell@petermac.org [Department of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Callahan, Jason [Centre for Molecular Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Bressel, Mathias [Centre for Biostatistics and Clinical Trials, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Simoens, Nathalie [Centre for Molecular Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Everitt, Sarah [Radiotherapy Services, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Hofman, Michael S.; Hicks, Rodney J. [Centre for Molecular Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Burbury, Kate [Department of Haematology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); MacManus, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia)

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: Proliferating bone marrow is exquisitely sensitive to ionizing radiation. Knowledge of its distribution could improve radiation therapy planning to minimize unnecessary marrow exposure and avoid consequential prolonged myelosuppression. [18F]-Fluoro-3-deoxy-3-L-fluorothymidine (FLT)–positron emission tomography (PET) is a novel imaging modality that provides detailed quantitative images of proliferating tissues, including bone marrow. We used FLT-PET imaging in cancer patients to produce an atlas of marrow distribution with potential clinical utility. Methods and Materials: The FLT-PET and fused CT scans of eligible patients with non-small cell lung cancer (no distant metastases, no prior cytotoxic exposure, no hematologic disorders) were reviewed. The proportions of skeletal FLT activity in 10 predefined bony regions were determined and compared according to age, sex, and recent smoking status. Results: Fifty-one patients were studied: 67% male; median age 68 (range, 31-87) years; 8% never smokers; 70% no smoking in the preceding 3 months. Significant differences in marrow distribution occurred between sex and age groups. No effect was detected from smoking in the preceding 3 months. Using the mean percentages of FLT uptake per body region, we created an atlas of the distribution of functional bone marrow in 4 subgroups defined by sex and age. Conclusions: This atlas has potential utility for estimating the distribution of active marrow in adult cancer patients to guide radiation therapy planning. However, because of interindividual variation it should be used with caution when radiation therapy risks ablating large proportions of active marrow; in such cases, individual FLT-PET scans may be required.

  14. Distribution Atlas of Proliferating Bone Marrow in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Measured by FLT-PET/CT Imaging, With Potential Applicability in Radiation Therapy Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, Belinda A.; Callahan, Jason; Bressel, Mathias; Simoens, Nathalie; Everitt, Sarah; Hofman, Michael S.; Hicks, Rodney J.; Burbury, Kate; MacManus, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Proliferating bone marrow is exquisitely sensitive to ionizing radiation. Knowledge of its distribution could improve radiation therapy planning to minimize unnecessary marrow exposure and avoid consequential prolonged myelosuppression. [18F]-Fluoro-3-deoxy-3-L-fluorothymidine (FLT)–positron emission tomography (PET) is a novel imaging modality that provides detailed quantitative images of proliferating tissues, including bone marrow. We used FLT-PET imaging in cancer patients to produce an atlas of marrow distribution with potential clinical utility. Methods and Materials: The FLT-PET and fused CT scans of eligible patients with non-small cell lung cancer (no distant metastases, no prior cytotoxic exposure, no hematologic disorders) were reviewed. The proportions of skeletal FLT activity in 10 predefined bony regions were determined and compared according to age, sex, and recent smoking status. Results: Fifty-one patients were studied: 67% male; median age 68 (range, 31-87) years; 8% never smokers; 70% no smoking in the preceding 3 months. Significant differences in marrow distribution occurred between sex and age groups. No effect was detected from smoking in the preceding 3 months. Using the mean percentages of FLT uptake per body region, we created an atlas of the distribution of functional bone marrow in 4 subgroups defined by sex and age. Conclusions: This atlas has potential utility for estimating the distribution of active marrow in adult cancer patients to guide radiation therapy planning. However, because of interindividual variation it should be used with caution when radiation therapy risks ablating large proportions of active marrow; in such cases, individual FLT-PET scans may be required

  15. Prospective Study of Functional Bone Marrow-Sparing Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Chemotherapy for Pelvic Malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Yun; Bydder, Mark; Yashar, Catheryn M.; Rose, Brent S.; Cornell, Mariel; Hoh, Carl K.; Lawson, Joshua D.; Einck, John; Saenz, Cheryl; Fanta, Paul; Mundt, Arno J.; Bydder, Graeme M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) can reduce radiation dose to functional bone marrow (BM) in patients with pelvic malignancies (phase IA) and estimate the clinical feasibility and acute toxicity associated with this technique (phase IB). Methods and Materials: We enrolled 31 subjects (19 with gynecologic cancer and 12 with anal cancer) in an institutional review board-approved prospective trial (6 in the pilot study, 10 in phase IA, and 15 in phase IB). The mean age was 52 years; 8 of 31 patients (26%) were men. Twenty-one subjects completed 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) simulation and magnetic resonance imaging by use of quantitative IDEAL (IDEAL IQ; GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI). The PET/CT and IDEAL IQ were registered, and BM subvolumes were segmented above the mean standardized uptake value and below the mean fat fraction within the pelvis and lumbar spine; their intersection was designated as functional BM for IMRT planning. Functional BM-sparing vs total BM-sparing IMRT plans were compared in 12 subjects; 10 were treated with functional BM-sparing pelvic IMRT per protocol. Results: In gynecologic cancer patients, the mean functional BM V 10 (volume receiving ≥10 Gy) and V 20 (volume receiving ≥20 Gy) were 85% vs 94% (P 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose-PET/CT and IDEAL IQ. The efficacy of BM-sparing IMRT is being tested in a phase II trial.

  16. A set cover approach to fast beam orientation optimization in intensity modulated radiation therapy for total marrow irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chieh-Hsiu Jason; Aleman, Dionne M; Sharpe, Michael B

    2011-01-01

    The beam orientation optimization (BOO) problem in intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning is a nonlinear problem, and existing methods to obtain solutions to the BOO problem are time consuming due to the complex nature of the objective function and size of the solution space. These issues become even more difficult in total marrow irradiation (TMI), where many more beams must be used to cover a vastly larger treatment area than typical site-specific treatments (e.g., head-and-neck, prostate, etc). These complications result in excessively long computation times to develop IMRT treatment plans for TMI, so we attempt to develop methods that drastically reduce treatment planning time. We transform the BOO problem into the classical set cover problem (SCP) and use existing methods to solve SCP to obtain beam solutions. Although SCP is NP-Hard, our methods obtain beam solutions that result in quality treatments in minutes. We compare our approach to an integer programming solver for the SCP to illustrate the speed advantage of our approach.

  17. A set cover approach to fast beam orientation optimization in intensity modulated radiation therapy for total marrow irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chieh-Hsiu Jason; Aleman, Dionne M [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto, 5 King' s College Road, Toronto, ON M5S 3G8 (Canada); Sharpe, Michael B, E-mail: chjlee@mie.utoronto.ca, E-mail: aleman@mie.utoronto.ca, E-mail: michael.sharpe@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Princess Margaret Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, ON M5G 2M9 (Canada)

    2011-09-07

    The beam orientation optimization (BOO) problem in intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning is a nonlinear problem, and existing methods to obtain solutions to the BOO problem are time consuming due to the complex nature of the objective function and size of the solution space. These issues become even more difficult in total marrow irradiation (TMI), where many more beams must be used to cover a vastly larger treatment area than typical site-specific treatments (e.g., head-and-neck, prostate, etc). These complications result in excessively long computation times to develop IMRT treatment plans for TMI, so we attempt to develop methods that drastically reduce treatment planning time. We transform the BOO problem into the classical set cover problem (SCP) and use existing methods to solve SCP to obtain beam solutions. Although SCP is NP-Hard, our methods obtain beam solutions that result in quality treatments in minutes. We compare our approach to an integer programming solver for the SCP to illustrate the speed advantage of our approach.

  18. High-dose therapy and autologous bone marrow transplantation for Hodgkin's disease patients with relapses potentially treatable by radical radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pezner, Richard D.; Nademanee, Auayporn; Forman, Stephen J.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: A retrospective review evaluated the results of autologous bone marrow transplantation (A-BMT) for patients with relapsed Hodgkin's disease (HD) who were potentially treatable by radical radiation therapy (RRT). Methods and Materials: Evaluated patient cases met the following criteria: initial treatment with chemotherapy (with or without involved field radiation therapy 20 Gy to spinal cord); HD at time of salvage therapy limited to lymph nodes, Waldeyer's ring, liver, spleen, direct extension sites, and/or one lung. Results: There were 23 A-BMT patients treated between 1986 and 1991 who fulfilled the criteria. Three (13%) patients died from treatment-related complications and eight (35%) developed nonfatal Grade 3-4 complications. The 3-year actuarial disease-free survival rate was 61%. The 3-year disease-free survival rate was 55% for the nine patients with at least one prior disease-free interval (DFI) > 12 months, 67% for nine patients with DFI 0.10). These results are comparable to retrospective studies of RRT results in selected relapsed HD patients. Conclusions: Long-term disease-free survival is frequently possible with either A-BMT or RRT appropriately selected relapsed HD patients. In considering treatment options, important prognostic factors include initial stage of disease, number of prior relapses, DFI, and extent of relapsed disease

  19. Bone marrow transplantation and other treatment after radiation injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balner, H.

    1977-01-01

    This review deals mainly with current concepts about bone marrow transplantation as therapy for serious radiation injury. Such injury can be classified according to the following broadly defined dose ranges: (1) the supralethal range, leading mainly to the cerebral and intestinal syndromes; (2) the potentially lethal or therapeutic range which causes the bone marrow syndrome, and (3) the sublethal range which rarely leads to injury requiring therapy. The bone marrow syndrome of man and animals is discussed in detail. The optimal therapy for this syndrome is bone marrow transplantation in conjunction with conventional supportive treatment. The principal complications of such therapy are Graft versus Host Disease and a slow recovery of the recipient's immune system. Concerted research activities in a number of institutions have led to considerable progress in the field of bone marrow transplantation. Improved donor selection, new techniques for stem-cell separation and preservation, as well as effective barrier-nursing and antibiotic decontamination, have made bone marrow transplantation an accepted therapy for marrow depression, including the aplasia caused by excessive exposure to radiation. The review also contains a number of guidelines for the handling of serious radiation accidents. (Auth.)

  20. Evaluation of dual energy quantitative CT for determining the spatial distributions of red marrow and bone for dosimetry in internal emitter radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodsitt, Mitchell M.; Shenoy, Apeksha; Howard, David; Christodoulou, Emmanuel; Dewaraja, Yuni K.; Shen, Jincheng; Schipper, Matthew J.; Wilderman, Scott; Chun, Se Young

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate a three-equation three-unknown dual-energy quantitative CT (DEQCT) technique for determining region specific variations in bone spongiosa composition for improved red marrow dose estimation in radionuclide therapy. Methods: The DEQCT method was applied to 80/140 kVp images of patient-simulating lumbar sectional body phantoms of three sizes (small, medium, and large). External calibration rods of bone, red marrow, and fat-simulating materials were placed beneath the body phantoms. Similar internal calibration inserts were placed at vertebral locations within the body phantoms. Six test inserts of known volume fractions of bone, fat, and red marrow were also scanned. External-to-internal calibration correction factors were derived. The effects of body phantom size, radiation dose, spongiosa region segmentation granularity [single (∼17 × 17 mm) region of interest (ROI), 2 × 2, and 3 × 3 segmentation of that single ROI], and calibration method on the accuracy of the calculated volume fractions of red marrow (cellularity) and trabecular bone were evaluated. Results: For standard low dose DEQCT x-ray technique factors and the internal calibration method, the RMS errors of the estimated volume fractions of red marrow of the test inserts were 1.2–1.3 times greater in the medium body than in the small body phantom and 1.3–1.5 times greater in the large body than in the small body phantom. RMS errors of the calculated volume fractions of red marrow within 2 × 2 segmented subregions of the ROIs were 1.6–1.9 times greater than for no segmentation, and RMS errors for 3 × 3 segmented subregions were 2.3–2.7 times greater than those for no segmentation. Increasing the dose by a factor of 2 reduced the RMS errors of all constituent volume fractions by an average factor of 1.40 ± 0.29 for all segmentation schemes and body phantom sizes; increasing the dose by a factor of 4 reduced those RMS errors by an average factor of 1.71 ± 0.25. Results

  1. Bone marrow transplantation for treatment of radiation disease. Problems involved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fliedner, T.M.

    1992-01-01

    Transplantation of bone marrow cells still is one of the major means available for treatment of radiation injuries. The decisive indication is the diagnostic of irreversible damage to the hemopoietic stem cells, which becomes manifest about 5 or 6 days after exposure, by severe granulocytopenia and simultaneous, progressive thrombopenia. The radiation dose provoking such severe injury is estimated to be at least 9-10 Gy of homogeneous whole-body irradiation. Preparatory measures for transplantation include proof of tissue compatibility of donor and patient, sufficient immunosuppression prior to and/or after irradiation and bone marrow transplantation. The donor's marrow should be free of T-cells. In spite of preparatory treatment, complications such as immunological reactions or disturbance of organ functions are to be very probable. These are treated according to therapy protocols. (orig./MG) [de

  2. Radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peschel, R.E; Fisher, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    The new insights and controversies concerning the radiobiological properties of malignant melanoma and how these relate to new clinical approaches are reviewed. The recent clinical experience with large individual fraction sizes is analyzed. The treatment of malignant melanoma in certain specialized sites is also described. An attempt is made to place in perspective the usefulness of radiation therapy in the treatment of this complex disease. Finally, certain new applications for radiation therapy both alone and in combustion with other treatment modalities are proposed that may ultimately prove appropriate for clinical trials

  3. Radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bader, J.L.; Glatstein, E.

    1987-01-01

    The radiation oncologist encounters the critically ill immunosuppressed patient in four settings. First, the newly diagnosed cancer patient presents for initial evaluation and treatment, with immunosuppression from the cancer itself, malnutrition, concomitant infectious disease, prior drug or alcohol abuse or other medical problems. Second, the previously treated cancer patient presents with metastatic or recurrent primary cancer causing local symptoms. Immune dysfunction in this setting may be due to prior chemotherapy and/or radiation as well as any of the original factors. Third, the patient previously treated with radiation presents with a life-threatening problem possibly due to complications of prior therapy. In this setting, the radiation oncologist is asked to evaluate the clinical problem and to suggest whether radiation might be causing part or all of the problem and what can be done to treat these sequelae of radiation. Fourth, the patient with a benign diagnosis (not cancer) is seen with a problem potentially emeliorated by radiation (e.g., kidney transplant rejection, preparation for transplant, or intractable rheumatoid arthritis). This chapter reviews these four issues and presents clinical and radiobiologic principles on which recommendations for therapy are based

  4. Effect of Rosiglitazone on Radiation Damage in Bone Marrow Hemopoiesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benko', Klara; Pintye, Eva; Szabo, Boglarka; Geresi, Krisztina; Megyeri, Attila; Benko, Ilona

    2008-01-01

    To study radiobiological effects and drugs, which can modify radiation injury, has an importance if we would like to avoid harmful effects of radiation due to emergency situations or treat patients with malignant diseases by radiotherapy. During the long treatment schedules patients may be treated by not only anticancer but many other drugs because of accompanying diseases. These drugs may also modify radiobiological effects. Rosiglitazone pre-treatment proved to be myeloprotective and accelerated recovery of 5-fluorouracil-damaged bone marrow in our previous experiments. Our new studies are designed to evaluate whether rosiglitazone has similar beneficial effects in radiation-damaged hemopoiesis. Bone marrow damage was precipitated by total body irradiation (TBI) using single increasing doses (2-10 Gy) of γ--irradiation in groups of mice. Lethality was well correlated with damage in hemopoiesis measured by cellularity of bone marrow (LD 50 values were 4.8 and 5.3 gray respectively). Rosiglitazone, an insulin-sensitizing drug, had no significant effect on bone marrow cellularity. Insulin resistance associated with obesity or diabetes mellitus type 2 is intensively growing among cancer patients requiring some kind of radiotherapy. Therefore it is important to know whether drugs used for their therapy can modify radiation effects.

  5. Effect of Rosiglitazone on Radiation Damage in Bone Marrow Hemopoiesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benkő, Klára; Pintye, Éva; Szabó, Boglárka; Géresi, Krisztina; Megyeri, Attila; Benkő, Ilona

    2008-12-01

    To study radiobiological effects and drugs, which can modify radiation injury, has an importance if we would like to avoid harmful effects of radiation due to emergency situations or treat patients with malignant diseases by radiotherapy. During the long treatment schedules patients may be treated by not only anticancer but many other drugs because of accompanying diseases. These drugs may also modify radiobiological effects. Rosiglitazone pre-treatment proved to be myeloprotective and accelerated recovery of 5-fluorouracil-damaged bone marrow in our previous experiments. Our new studies are designed to evaluate whether rosiglitazone has similar beneficial effects in radiation-damaged hemopoiesis. Bone marrow damage was precipitated by total body irradiation (TBI) using single increasing doses (2-10 Gy) of γ—irradiation in groups of mice. Lethality was well correlated with damage in hemopoiesis measured by cellularity of bone marrow (LD50 values were 4.8 and 5.3 gray respectively). Rosiglitazone, an insulin-sensitizing drug, had no significant effect on bone marrow cellularity. Insulin resistance associated with obesity or diabetes mellitus type 2 is intensively growing among cancer patients requiring some kind of radiotherapy. Therefore it is important to know whether drugs used for their therapy can modify radiation effects.

  6. Radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Keiichi; Miyoshi, Makoto; Jinguu, Ken-ichi

    1982-01-01

    Of the cases of lung cancer in which radiation therapy was given between 1961 and November 1981, 399 cases for which histological type was confirmed, and irradiated as follows were reviewed. The cases of squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma irradiated with more than 5,000 rad or more, those of undifferentiated carcinoma irradiated with 3,000 rad or more, and those irradiated pre- and post-operatively with 3,000 rad or more. The actual 5 year survival rate for stages I, II, III and IV were 29.6, 9.3, 7.5 and 1.9% respectively, and the survival rate tended to be better for adenocarcinoma than squamous cell carcinoma at stages I, II and III, but not different at stage IV. There was no difference between large cell, small cell and squamous cell carcinomas. Irradiation with 200 rad every other day or 150 rad daily was better than that with 200 rad, and daily irradiation with 150 rad was used since 1976. The therapy of stage III small cell carcinoma at the age of up to 80 years was improved with the combination of anticancer agents, maintenance therapy and immunotherapy, but these combined therapies were not significantly effective for the cancers with other histological types or at other stages. Although there was no significant difference in statistics for resectable cases, clinically, the results were experienced to be better after resection, and surgery was done in combination as much as possible. (Kaihara, S.)

  7. Thoracic radiation therapy (RT) before autologous bone marrow transplantation (ABMT) in relapsed or refractory Hodgkin's disease (HD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, Richard W.; Gospodarowicz, Mary K.; Sutcliffe, Simon B.; Crump, Michael; Keating, Armand

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the relationship between peri-ABMT RT and treatment-related mortality in patients receiving high-dose chemotherapy (HDCT) and ABMT for recurrent/refractory HD. Materials and Methods: Between 12/1986 and 12/1992, 90 patients (pts) with HD were treated with HDCT (etoposide 60 mg/kg, melphalan 160 mg/m 2 ) +ABMT in Toronto. Fifty-nine of these had all or part of their treatment (RT and/or CT) at the PMH, and they form the basis of this report. HDCT + ABMT was performed for refractory (11 pts) or relapsed (48 pts) HD. The median age at ABMT was 29 (range 16-47), F:M ratio was 1:1.2. Salvage chemotherapy consisted of DHAP (36), mini-BEAM (7), both (8), other chemotherapy (5), and no chemotherapy (3). RT have been incorporated in the salvage treatment with the intent to achieve complete disease control of active disease at relapse or disease progression. RT was given pre-ABMT in 33 pts (3 mantle, 8 mantle with lung, 7 modified mantle excluding axillae, 4 involved field, 1 mantle with TBI, 1 TBI, and 9 non-thoracic), and post-ABMT in 4 pts (2 mantle, 2 modified mantle). Planned RT tumor dose was 35 Gy over 4 weeks (median 35 Gy, range 25-40 Gy), lower doses were used for lung RT (15-17.5 Gy). Treatment-related (TR) mortality was defined as any death occurring within 100 days of ABMT. Autopsies were performed for all patients with TR deaths. Results: We observed 36 deaths, and 10 of these were treatment-related (TR) deaths. With an average follow-up of 4.9 years (range 1.2-7.4 years), the actuarial overall survival was 52% ± 13% at 3 years, and 41% ± 14% at 5 years. Among the 24 patients who received thoracic RT before ABMT, there were 8 TR deaths, with 3 solely attributable to radiation pneumonitis. The remaining 5 TR deaths all had respiratory failure as a major medical problem with complicating sepsis and pancytopenia. The interval from RT to ABMT was shorter for 8 patients dying of TR death (mean 37 days; range 0-103 days), than for the 16 pts with

  8. Effects of smoke and tea on radiation-induced bone marrow cell mutation and marrow inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Yong; Zhang Weiguang

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To provide scientific information for the prevention and treatment of the radiation damage by analyzing the effects of smoke and tea on radiation-induced bone marrow cell mutation and marrow inhibition. Methods: 7 group mice were exposed to smoke and/or tea and/or radiation respectively. There were also b blank control group and a cyclophosphamide positive control group. The frequencies of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MPCE), the ratio of polychromatic erythrocytes (PCE) to mature erythrocytes (RBC) in marrow, and the count of peripheral blood hemoleukocyte were observed. Results: The frequencies of MPCE in the groups irradiated with γ-rays were significantly higher than that in the blank control group (P<0.05 or 0.01). The smoke + radiation group's frequency was significantly higher than single radiation group (P<0.05). The ratios of PCE to RBC in the groups irradiated were significantly lower than that in the blank control group (P<0.01). The counts of peripheral blood hemoleukocyte in the groups irradiated were significantly lower than the blank control group (P<0.01). Conclusion: Radiation were able to cause marrow cell mutation and induce marrow inhibition. Smoke increases the effect of radiation-induced marrow cell mutation. Tea and smoke could not affect radiation-induced bone marrow inhibition

  9. Autologous cell therapy as a new approach to treatment of radiation-induced bone marrow aplasia: preliminary study in a baboon model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herodin, F.; Drouet, M. [Radiohematology Unit, Centre de Recherches du Service de Sante des Armees, La Tronche CEDEX (France)

    2002-07-01

    The sparing of viable hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells located in underexposed bone marrow territories associated with the relative radioresistance of certain stem cell populations is the rationale for autologous cell therapy consisting of ex vivo expansion of residual cells after collection postirradiation. The feasibility of this treatment mainly depends on time constraints and hematopoietic cell threshold. We showed in this study that in the absence of early-acting mobilizing agent administration, subliminar amounts of CD34{sup +} cells can be collected (1 x 10{sup 6} CD34{sup +} cells/100 mL bone marrow or for 1 L apheresis) from 6-Gy {gamma} globally irradiated baboons. Residual CD34{sup +} cells were successfully expanded in serum-free medium in the presence of antiapoptotic cytokine combination (stem cell factor + FLT-3 ligand + thrombopoietin + interleukin 3, 50 ng/mL each, i.e., 4F): K{sub CD34{sup +}} = x2.8 and x13.7 (n=2). Moreover, we demonstrated the short-term neutrophil engraftment potential of a low-size mixed expanded graft (1.5 x 10{sup 6} final CD34{sup +}cells/kg) issued from the coculture of unirradiated (20%) and 2.5-Gy in vitro irradiated (80%) CD34{sup +} cells on an allogeneic stromal cell layer in the presence of 4F. Further preclinical research needs to be performed to clearly establish this therapeutic approach that could be optimized by the early administration of antiapoptotic cytokines. (author)

  10. Hendee's radiation therapy physics

    CERN Document Server

    Pawlicki, Todd; Starkschall, George

    2016-01-01

    The publication of this fourth edition, more than ten years on from the publication of Radiation Therapy Physics third edition, provides a comprehensive and valuable update to the educational offerings in this field. Led by a new team of highly esteemed authors, building on Dr Hendee’s tradition, Hendee’s Radiation Therapy Physics offers a succinctly written, fully modernised update. Radiation physics has undergone many changes in the past ten years: intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has become a routine method of radiation treatment delivery, digital imaging has replaced film-screen imaging for localization and verification, image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) is frequently used, in many centers proton therapy has become a viable mode of radiation therapy, new approaches have been introduced to radiation therapy quality assurance and safety that focus more on process analysis rather than specific performance testing, and the explosion in patient-and machine-related data has necessitated an ...

  11. Radiation Therapy for Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiation therapy is a type of cancer treatment that uses high doses of radiation to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. Learn about the types of radiation, why side effects happen, which ones you might have, and more.

  12. Effects of radiations on bone marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tubiana, M.; Frindel, E.; Croizat, H.; Parmentier, C.

    1979-01-01

    After total body irradiation for kidney transplant, the initial decrease of circulating blood cells is more rapid, the nadir is reached sooner and the regeneration occurs earlier when the doses are higher than a few hundred rads. The LD 50 in man seems to be higher than 450 rads. The in vivo and in vitro assays of hemopoietic stem cells have greatly increasedd the understanding of acute and late effects. Multipotential stem cells are very radiosensitive, furthermore the differentiation of the surviving stem cells is accelerated after irradiation. This results in a severe depletion of the stem cell compartment. When this stem cell number falls below a critical value, the stem cell no longer differentiates till the completion of the regeneration of the stem cell compartment. Stem cell proliferation is regulated by inhibitors and stimulators. Release of stimulators by irradiated bone marrow has been demonstrated. Severe sequellae are observed after irradiation of animal and human bone marrow. They seem to be due either to the damage of the stromal cell or to the stem cell population. In patients, four compensating mechanisms are observed after a regional bone marrow irradiation: stimulation of non irradiated bone marrow, extension of hemopoietic areas, regeneration of irradiated bone marrow when the irradiated volume is large and increase in the amplification factor resulting in an increase in the output of mature cells for one stem cell input. Assay of progenitor cells provides useful information and a reduction in their number is still observed many years after a large regional irradiation

  13. Treatment of Radiation Induced Biological Changes by Bone Marrow Transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Missiry, M.A.; Shehata, G.; Roushdy, H.M; Fayed, Th.A.

    1999-01-01

    Preventing the propagation of radiation induced oxidative damage has been a subject of considerable investigations. The ultimate goal of the present study is to use bone marrow cells to ameliorate or to treat the radiation sickness. Transplantation of bone marrow cell has shown promising results in the present experimental radiation treatment. In this report, suspension of bone marrow cells was injected into rats 12 h. after exposure to 4.5 Gy whole body gamma irradiation. Significant results were recorded on the successful control of the radiation induced disorders in a number of biochemical parameters including certain enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidants (superoxide dismutase and glutathione) and certain parameters related to kidney function including creatinine, urea as well as Atpase Activity in blood serum, urine and kidney tissue

  14. Bone marrow and bone marrow derived mononuclear stem cells therapy for the chronically ischemic myocardium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waksman, Ron; Baffour, Richard

    2003-01-01

    Bone marrow stem cells have been shown to differentiate into various phenotypes including cardiomyocytes, vascular endothelial cells and smooth muscle. Bone marrow stem cells are mobilized and home in to areas of injured myocardium where they are involved in tissue repair. In addition, bone marrow secretes multiple growth factors, which are essential for angiogenesis and arteriogenesis. In some patients, these processes are not enough to avert clinical symptoms of ischemic disease. Therefore, in vivo administration of an adequate number of stem cells would be a significant therapeutic advance. Unfractionated bone marrow derived mononuclear stem cells, which contain both hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells may be more appropriate for cell therapy. Studies in animal models suggest that implantation of different types of stem cells improve angiogenesis and arteriogenesis, tissue perfusion as well as left ventricular function. Several unanswered questions remain. For example, the optimal delivery approach, dosage and timing of the administration of cell therapy as well as durability of improvements need to be studied. Early clinical studies have demonstrated safety and feasibility of various cell therapies in ischemic disease. Randomized, double blind and placebo-controlled clinical trials need to be completed to determine the effectiveness of stem cell

  15. Advances in Bone Marrow Stem Cell Therapy for Retinal Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Susanna S.; Moisseiev, Elad; Bauer, Gerhard; Anderson, Johnathon D.; Grant, Maria B.; Zam, Azhar; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Werner, John S.; Nolta, Jan A.

    2016-01-01

    The most common cause of untreatable vision loss is dysfunction of the retina. Conditions, such as age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma remain leading causes of untreatable blindness worldwide. Various stem cell approaches are being explored for treatment of retinal regeneration. The rationale for using bone marrow stem cells to treat retinal dysfunction is based on preclinical evidence showing that bone marrow stem cells can rescue degenerating and ischemic retina. These stem cells have primarily paracrine trophic effects although some cells can directly incorporate into damaged tissue. Since the paracrine trophic effects can have regenerative effects on multiple cells in the retina, the use of this cell therapy is not limited to a particular retinal condition. Autologous bone marrow-derived stem cells are being explored in early clinical trials as therapy for various retinal conditions. These bone marrow stem cells include mesenchymal stem cells, mononuclear cells and CD34+ cells. Autologous therapy requires no systemic immunosuppression or donor matching. Intravitreal delivery of CD34+ cells and mononuclear cells appears to be tolerated and is being explored since some of these cells can home into the damaged retina after intravitreal administration. The safety of intravitreal delivery of mesenchymal stem cells has not been well established. This review provides an update of the current evidence in support of the use of bone marrow stem cells as treatment for retinal dysfunction. The potential limitations and complications of using certain forms of bone marrow stem cells as therapy are discussed. Future directions of research include methods to optimize the therapeutic potential of these stem cells, non-cellular alternatives using extracellular vesicles, and in vivo high-resolution retinal imaging to detect cellular changes in the retina following cell therapy. PMID:27784628

  16. Bone marrow dosimetry in peptide receptor radionuclide therapy with [177Lu-DOTA0,Tyr3]octreotate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forrer, Flavio; Krenning, Eric P.; Kooij, Peter P.; Bernard, Bert F.; Bakker, Willem H.; Teunissen, Jaap J.M.; Jong, Marion de; Kwekkeboom, Dik J.; Konijnenberg, Mark; Lom, Kirsten van; Herder, Wouter W. de

    2009-01-01

    Adequate dosimetry is mandatory for effective and safe peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). Besides the kidneys, the bone marrow is a potentially dose-limiting organ. The radiation dose to the bone marrow is usually calculated according to the MIRD scheme, where the accumulated activity in the bone marrow is calculated from the accumulated radioactivity of the radiopharmaceutical in the blood. This may underestimate the absorbed dose since stem cells express somatostatin receptors. We verified the blood-based method by comparing the activity in the blood with the radioactivity in bone marrow aspirates. Also, we evaluated the absorbed cross-dose from the source organs (liver, spleen, kidneys and blood), tumours and the so-called ''remainder of the body'' to the bone marrow. Bone marrow aspirates were drawn in 15 patients after treatment with [ 177 Lu-DOTA 0 ,Tyr 3 ]octreotate. Radioactivity in the bone marrow was compared with radioactivity in the blood drawn simultaneously. The nucleated cell fraction was isolated from the bone marrow aspirate and radioactivity was measured. The absorbed dose to the bone marrow was calculated. The results were correlated to the change in platelet counts 6 weeks after treatment. A strong linear correlation and high agreement between the measured radioactivities in the bone marrow aspirates and in the blood was found (r=0.914, p 177 Lu-DOTA 0 ,Tyr 3 ]octreotate, the radioactivity concentration in the bone marrow is identical to that in the blood; (2) There is no significant binding of the radiopharmaceutical to bone marrow precursor stem cells; (3) The contribution of the cross dose from source organs and tumours to the bone marrow dose is significant; and (4) There is considerable variation in bone marrow absorbed dose between patients. These findings imply that for individual dose optimization, individual calculation of the bone marrow absorbed dose is necessary. (orig.)

  17. Effect of salidroside on radiation-induced bone marrow adipogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Jincan; Chen Xiaoyu; Liu Chengcheng; Zhu Aizhen; Liu Shantao; Liu Gexiu

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the potential and underlying molecular mechanism of salidroside in ameliorating radiation-induced bone marrow adipogenesis and stimulating hematopoiesis. Methods: The female BALB/c mice aged 6-7 weeks were randomly divided into normal control group, radiation group and salidroside group. The radiation group and salidroside group were irradiated with 6.0 Gy of "6"0Co γ-rays. The salidroside group was intraperitoneally injected with 30 mg·kg"-"1·d"-"1 salidroside at 12 h and then every day until 8th d after radiation. The normal control group and radiation group were treated with equal volume of saline as control of salidroside. At 14 d after radiation, the mice weight, peripheral blood count, femur bone marrow histology, and the proportion of adipocyte area were measured, and the expressions of PPAR-γ and FABP4 were detected by q-PCR. Results: After irradiation, the numbers of white blood cells, hemoglobin and platelet in peripheral blood were reduced obviously, and the percentage of adipocyte area was increased significantly. Compared with mice in the radiation group, salidroside inhibited adipogenesis and reduced the proportion of adipocyte area (t = 13.31, P < 0.05) by reducing the expressions of PPAR-γ and FABP4 (t = 8.64, 13.19, P < 0.05). The number of white blood cells was partly recovered at 7 d after irradiation (t = 5.80, P < 0.05). Both white blood cells and hemoglobinin in peripheral blood of the salidroside group were higher than those in the radiation group at 14 d after irradiation. Conclusions: Salidroside could inhibit radiation-induced bone marrow adipogenesis and regulate bone marrow microenvironment, thereby promotes hematopoietic recovery in mice after radiation injury. (authors)

  18. Radiation Therapy - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... W XYZ List of All Topics All Radiation Therapy - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on this page, ... Information Translations Vietnamese (Tiếng Việt) Expand Section Radiation Therapy - Tiếng Việt (Vietnamese) ... Health Information Translations Characters not displaying correctly on this page? See language display issues . Return to the MedlinePlus Health Information ...

  19. Radiation Therapy Side Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiation therapy has side effects because it not only kills or slows the growth of cancer cells, it can also affect nearby healthy cells. Many people who get radiation therapy experience fatigue. Other side effects depend on the part of the body that is being treated. Learn more about possible side effects.

  20. Sci-Fri PM: Radiation Therapy, Planning, Imaging, and Special Techniques - 07: Transitioning from extended-distance total body irradiation to optimized VMAT total marrow irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherpak, Amanda; Chytyk-Praznik, Krista; Yewondwossen, Mammo; Schella, Jason; Davis, Carol-Anne; Day, Allan; DeGiobbi, Jennifer; McAloney, Dave; Mulroy, Liam [Nova Scotia Cancer Centre, Halifax, NS (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: TMI targets only the bone marrow, with the intent of sparing normal tissues. The NSCC has recently implemented a TMI protocol which includes VMAT fields to treat the bone marrow from head to mid-thigh and extended SSD POP fields to treat the lower legs. This work describes the commissioning and initial clinical results of the first reported VMAT TMI treatments in Canada. Methods: Detailed CT simulation, imaging, planning and treatment procedures were developed by a multi-disciplinary team. Patients have 1 cm of bolus over the lower legs and 0.5 cm of bolus around the lower arms. The PTV includes all bone, except mandible, facial bones and hands, with the objective of V(12 Gy) > 90%. Detailed analysis of the influence of field overlap was performed to determine optimal field placement and image-guidance tolerances. Results: PTV coverage was achieved for all cases as V(12 Gy) ranged from 90.4–96.3%. The minimum dose to the PTV, D(99%), ranged from 91.4–97.87% and V(90%Rx=10.8 Gy) ranged from 99.1–100.0%. The lungs, liver and heart had an average D{sub mean} of (7.8±0.3)Gy/(65±2)%, (7.6±0.7)Gy/(63±5)%, and (6.8±0.4)Gy/(56±4)% respectively. Conclusions: Commissioning required input and collaboration from all team members. Transitioning from TBI to TMI requires additional time for contouring, treatment planning, QA, and treatment. Patient benefit can however be seen in the quality of OAR sparing.

  1. Sci-Fri PM: Radiation Therapy, Planning, Imaging, and Special Techniques - 07: Transitioning from extended-distance total body irradiation to optimized VMAT total marrow irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherpak, Amanda; Chytyk-Praznik, Krista; Yewondwossen, Mammo; Schella, Jason; Davis, Carol-Anne; Day, Allan; DeGiobbi, Jennifer; McAloney, Dave; Mulroy, Liam

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: TMI targets only the bone marrow, with the intent of sparing normal tissues. The NSCC has recently implemented a TMI protocol which includes VMAT fields to treat the bone marrow from head to mid-thigh and extended SSD POP fields to treat the lower legs. This work describes the commissioning and initial clinical results of the first reported VMAT TMI treatments in Canada. Methods: Detailed CT simulation, imaging, planning and treatment procedures were developed by a multi-disciplinary team. Patients have 1 cm of bolus over the lower legs and 0.5 cm of bolus around the lower arms. The PTV includes all bone, except mandible, facial bones and hands, with the objective of V(12 Gy) > 90%. Detailed analysis of the influence of field overlap was performed to determine optimal field placement and image-guidance tolerances. Results: PTV coverage was achieved for all cases as V(12 Gy) ranged from 90.4–96.3%. The minimum dose to the PTV, D(99%), ranged from 91.4–97.87% and V(90%Rx=10.8 Gy) ranged from 99.1–100.0%. The lungs, liver and heart had an average D mean of (7.8±0.3)Gy/(65±2)%, (7.6±0.7)Gy/(63±5)%, and (6.8±0.4)Gy/(56±4)% respectively. Conclusions: Commissioning required input and collaboration from all team members. Transitioning from TBI to TMI requires additional time for contouring, treatment planning, QA, and treatment. Patient benefit can however be seen in the quality of OAR sparing.

  2. Prostate Cancer (Radiation Therapy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be considered carefully, balancing the advantages against the disadvantages as they relate to the individual man's age, ... therapy with photon or x-rays: Uses advanced technology to tailor the x-ray or photon radiation ...

  3. Bone Marrow Gene Therapy for HIV/AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Herrera-Carrillo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow gene therapy remains an attractive option for treating chronic immunological diseases, including acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS caused by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. This technology combines the differentiation and expansion capacity of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs with long-term expression of therapeutic transgenes using integrating vectors. In this review we summarize the potential of bone marrow gene therapy for the treatment of HIV/AIDS. A broad range of antiviral strategies are discussed, with a particular focus on RNA-based therapies. The idea is to develop a durable gene therapy that lasts the life span of the infected individual, thus contrasting with daily drug regimens to suppress the virus. Different approaches have been proposed to target either the virus or cellular genes encoding co-factors that support virus replication. Some of these therapies have been tested in clinical trials, providing proof of principle that gene therapy is a safe option for treating HIV/AIDS. In this review several topics are discussed, ranging from the selection of the antiviral molecule and the viral target to the optimal vector system for gene delivery and the setup of appropriate preclinical test systems. The molecular mechanisms used to formulate a cure for HIV infection are described, including the latest antiviral strategies and their therapeutic applications. Finally, a potent combination of anti-HIV genes based on our own research program is described.

  4. Radiation biology and radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wideroee, R.

    1975-01-01

    Radiation biology and radiation therapy can be compared with investigations in different layers of earth. Radiation biology works upwards from the elementary foundations, therapy works downwards with roots to secure and improve the clinical 'surface work'. The Ellis formula (Strandquist), which is a collection of clinical experience, is suited to form connections with radiobiology in the middle layers, and cooperation can give impulses for research. The structure and conditions of tumours and the complicated problems met with are discussed, based on the Carmel symposium of 1969. The oxygen problem in anoxic tumours is not yet solved. Experimental investigations of the effect itself give partly contradictory results. From a clinical viewpoint reoxygenation is of the utmost significance for obtaining control over the primary tumour, and advanced irradiation programmes will here give better results than the traditional ones. New chemicals, e.g. R 0 -07-0582, appear to reduce the OER value to 1.5, thereby making neutron therapy superfluous. Finally a problem from fundamental research is dealt with, wherein two hypotheses explaining the β-effect are described. The repair hypothesis gives a simple explanation but leaves many questions unanswered. The other hypothesis explains the β-effect as two neighbouring single breaks of the DNA molecule. It still presents difficulties, and is scarcely the correct explanation. (JIW)

  5. Increased FDG bone marrow uptake after intracoronary progenitor cell therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doebert, N.; Menzel, C.; Diehl, M.; Hamscho, N.; Zaplatnikov, K.; Gruenwald, F. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. of Frankfurt (Germany)

    2005-02-01

    Patients with coronary artery disease who undergo FDG PET for therapy monitoring after intracoronary progenitor cell infusion (PCT) show an increased bone marrow uptake in some cases. Aim of the study was to evaluate the systemic bone marrow glucose metabolism in this patient group after PCT. Patients, methods: FDG bone marrow uptake (BMU), measured as standardized uptake value (SUVmax) in the thoracic spine, was retrospectively evaluated in 23 control patients who did not receive PCT and in 75 patients who received PCT 3{+-}2.2 days before PET scanning. Five out of them were pretreated with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) 5 days prior to PCT and 10{+-}1.2 days before PET scanning. In 39 patients who received only PCT without G-CSF and underwent PET therapy monitoring 4 months later, baseline and follow up bone marrow uptake were measured. Leucocytes, C-reactive protein (CRP) levels and the influence of nicotine consumption were compared with the BMU. Results: In patients (n=70) who received PCT without G-CSF, BMU media (1.3) was slightly, but significantly higher than in the controls (1.0) (p=0.02) regardless nicotine consumption. BMU did not change significantly 4 months later (1.2) (p=0.41, n.s.). After G-CSF pretreatment, patients showed a significantly higher bone marrow uptake (3.7) compared to patients only treated with PCT (1.3) (p=0.023). Leucocyte blood levels were significantly higher in patients with a BMU {>=}2.5 compared to patients with a bone marrow SUVmax<2.5 (p<0.001). CRP values did not correlate with the BMU (rho -0.02, p=0.38). Conclusion: Monitoring PCT patients, a slightly increased FDG BMU may be observed which remains unchanged for several months. Unspecific bone marrow reactions after PCT may be associated with increased leucocyte blood levels and play a role in the changed systemic glucose BMU. In addition, pretreatment with G-CSF shows an intense amplitifcation of BMU. (orig.)

  6. Radiation Therapy for Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can cause pain. Radiation given to shrink a tumor near the esophagus , which can interfere with a patient’s ability to eat and drink. How is radiation therapy planned for an individual ... show the location of a patient’s tumor and the normal areas around it. These scans ...

  7. Bone marrow stromal cell transplantation mitigates radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhrajit Saha

    Full Text Available Nuclear accidents and terrorism presents a serious threat for mass casualty. While bone-marrow transplantation might mitigate hematopoietic syndrome, currently there are no approved medical countermeasures to alleviate radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome (RIGS, resulting from direct cytocidal effects on intestinal stem cells (ISC and crypt stromal cells. We examined whether bone marrow-derived adherent stromal cell transplantation (BMSCT could restitute irradiated intestinal stem cells niche and mitigate radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome.Autologous bone marrow was cultured in mesenchymal basal medium and adherent cells were harvested for transplantation to C57Bl6 mice, 24 and 72 hours after lethal whole body irradiation (10.4 Gy or abdominal irradiation (16-20 Gy in a single fraction. Mesenchymal, endothelial and myeloid population were characterized by flow cytometry. Intestinal crypt regeneration and absorptive function was assessed by histopathology and xylose absorption assay, respectively. In contrast to 100% mortality in irradiated controls, BMSCT mitigated RIGS and rescued mice from radiation lethality after 18 Gy of abdominal irradiation or 10.4 Gy whole body irradiation with 100% survival (p<0.0007 and p<0.0009 respectively beyond 25 days. Transplantation of enriched myeloid and non-myeloid fractions failed to improve survival. BMASCT induced ISC regeneration, restitution of the ISC niche and xylose absorption. Serum levels of intestinal radioprotective factors, such as, R-Spondin1, KGF, PDGF and FGF2, and anti-inflammatory cytokines were elevated, while inflammatory cytokines were down regulated.Mitigation of lethal intestinal injury, following high doses of irradiation, can be achieved by intravenous transplantation of marrow-derived stromal cells, including mesenchymal, endothelial and macrophage cell population. BMASCT increases blood levels of intestinal growth factors and induces regeneration of the irradiated

  8. Apoptosis of bone marrow leukemia cells in mice after low dose radiation at different time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Guangyu; Yu Mingming; Li Xianjun; Liu Zhixiang

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the apoptosis of bone marrow leukemia cell in mice after low dose radiation (LDR) at different time and the experimental basis for LDR auxiliary therapy on leukemia. Methods: WEHI-3 cells were injected into BALB/c mice through tail veins to make an experimental mice model of myelornonocytic leukemia. 60 leukemia mice models were divided half-and half. 30 mice models in experimental group were irradiated with LDR of 75mGy at the same time while the others 30 in the control group were not. 6 mice models with LDR and 6 mice models without LDR would be killed at the time the 1st day, the 2nd day, the 3rd day, the 5th day- and the l0th day after LDR in order to extract bone marrow samples. The apoptosis percentage of leukemia cells in bone marrow was examined. Results: The apoptosis percentage of leukemia cells in experimental group was increasing after LDR and went to top on the 2nd day and the 3rd day. The apoptosis percentage of leukemia cells was remarkably different between experimental and control group, all P<0.05. Conclusion: LDR could significantly increase the apoptosis percentage of bone marrow leukemia cells in mice. Its mechanism is remarkably different in kill and wound of big dose radiation to tumour cells. It is probably related to of the increase immune exciting response as to promote some cytokine secretion, in leukemia mice. (authors)

  9. New experimental approach to treatment of radiation-induced bone marrow aplasia: ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herodin, F.; Mathieu, J.; Drouet, M.; Grenier, N.; Grange, L.; Bourin, P.; Vetillard, J.; Thierry, D.; Mestries, J.C.

    1995-01-01

    The management of bone marrow aplasia secondary to accidental exposure to high doses of ionizing radiations requires new therapeutic protocols in addition to cytokine therapy. The in vitro incubation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells from irradiated nonhuman primates with negative and positive regulators of hematopoiesis may lead to helpful products of transfusion. (author)

  10. Involved Node Radiation Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maraldo, Maja V; Aznar, Marianne C; Vogelius, Ivan R

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: The involved node radiation therapy (INRT) strategy was introduced for patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) to reduce the risk of late effects. With INRT, only the originally involved lymph nodes are irradiated. We present treatment outcome in a retrospective analysis using this strategy...... to 36 Gy). Patients attended regular follow-up visits until 5 years after therapy. RESULTS: The 4-year freedom from disease progression was 96.4% (95% confidence interval: 92.4%-100.4%), median follow-up of 50 months (range: 4-71 months). Three relapses occurred: 2 within the previous radiation field......, and 1 in a previously uninvolved region. The 4-year overall survival was 94% (95% confidence interval: 88.8%-99.1%), median follow-up of 58 months (range: 4-91 months). Early radiation therapy toxicity was limited to grade 1 (23.4%) and grade 2 (13.8%). During follow-up, 8 patients died, none from HL, 7...

  11. Radiation therapy physics

    CERN Document Server

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this book is to provide a uniquely comprehensive source of information on the entire field of radiation therapy physics. The very significant advances in imaging, computational, and accelerator technologies receive full consideration, as do such topics as the dosimetry of radiolabeled antibodies and dose calculation models. The scope of the book and the expertise of the authors make it essential reading for interested physicians and physicists and for radiation dosimetrists.

  12. Modeling Internal Radiation Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, Egon; Schouten, Theo E.; Pellegrini, M.; Fred, A.; Filipe, J.; Gamboa, H.

    2011-01-01

    A new technique is described to model (internal) radiation therapy. It is founded on morphological processing, in particular distance transforms. Its formal basis is presented as well as its implementation via the Fast Exact Euclidean Distance (FEED) transform. Its use for all variations of internal

  13. SU-F-R-55: Early Detection of Treatment Induced Bone Marrow Injury During Chemoradiation Therapy Using Quantitative CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, X; Song, Y; Erickson, B; Li, X [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Acute hematologic toxicity associated with bone marrow injury is a common complication of chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for pelvic malignancies. In this work, we investigate the feasibility of using quantitative CT to detect bone marrow injury during CRT. Methods: Daily CTs were acquired during routine CT-guided radiation therapy using a CT-on-rails for 15 cervical cancer patients. All patients treated with a radiation dose of 45.0 to 50.4 Gy in 1.8 Gy/fraction along with chemotherapy. For each patient, the contours of bone marrow were generated in L4, L5 and sacrum on the first daily CT and then populated to other daily CTs by rigid registration using MIM (MIM Software Inc., Cleveland, OH) with manual editing if possible. A series of CT texture parameters, including Hunsfield Unit (HU) histogram, mean HU, entropy, energy, in bone marrow contours were calculated using MATLAB on each daily CT and were correlated with the completed blood counts (CBC) collected weekly for each patient. The correlations were analyzed with Pearson correlation tests. Results: For all patient data analyzed, mean HU in bone marrow decreased during CRT delivery. From the first to the last fraction the average mean HU reduction is 58.1 ± 13.6 HU (P<0.01). This decrease can be observed as early as after first 5 fractions and is strongly associated with the changes of most CBC quantities, such as the reductions of white and blood cell counts (r=0.97, P=0.001). The reduction of HU is spatially varied. Conclusion: Chemoradiation induced bone marrow injury can be detected during the delivery of CRT using quantitative CT. Chemoradiation results in reductions in mean HU, which are strongly associated with the change in the pretrial blood cell counts. Early detection of bone marrow injury with commonly available CT opens a door to improve bone marrow sparing, reducing risk of hematologic toxicity.

  14. Current perspectives of radiation therapy. History of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itami, Jun

    2011-01-01

    More than 100 years have passed since the discovery of X-Strahlen by Roentgen. The history of radiation therapy has evolved under mutual stimulating relationships of the external beam radiation therapy by X-ray tubes and accelerators, and the internal radiation therapy employing radium and other radionuclides. The currently employed technologies in radiation therapy have its origin already till nineteen sixties and the development of physics and engineering have realized the original concept. (author)

  15. MRI marrow observations in thalassemia: the effects of the primary disease, transfusional therapy, and chelation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, T.L.; Sheth, S.S.; Ruzal-Shapiro, C.; Abramson, S.; Piomelli, S.; Berdon, W.E.

    1995-01-01

    The magnetic resonance bone marrow patterns in thalassemia were evaluated to determine changes produced by transfusion and chelation therapy. Thirteen patients had T1- and T2-weighted images of the spine, pelvis and femurs. Three received no therapy (age range 2.5-3 years). Three were ''hypertransfused'' (transfused to maintain a hemoglobin greater than 10 g/dl) and not chelated because of age (age range 6 months-8 years). Seven were ''hypertransfused'' and chelated (age range 12-35 years). Signal characteristics of marrow were compared with those of surrounding muscle and fat. Fatty marrow (isointense with subcutaneous fat) was compared with red marrow (hypointense to fat and slightly hyperintense to muscle). Marrow hypointense to muscle was identified as iron deposition within red marrow. The untreated group demonstrated signal consistent with red marrow throughout the central and peripheral skeleton. Hypertransfused but not chelated patients demonstrated marked iron deposition in the central and peripheral skeleton. Hypertransfused and chelated patients demonstrated iron deposition in the central skeleton and a mixed appearance of marrow in the peripheral skeleton. The MR appearance of marrow in thalassemia is a reflection of the patient's transfusion and chelation therapy. Iron deposition occurs despite chelation therapy in sites of active red marrow. As red marrow retreats centrally with age, so does the pattern of iron deposition. The long-term biological effects of this iron deposition are unknown. (orig.). With 8 figs., 1 tab

  16. Effect of nephrotoxic drugs on the development of radiation nephropathy after bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawton, C.A.; Fish, B.L.; Moulder, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    Chronic renal failure is a significant cause of late morbidity in bone marrow transplant patients whose conditioning regimen includes total body irradiation (TBI). Radiation is a major cause of this syndrome (bone marrow transplant nephropathy), but it may not be the only cause. These studies use a rat syngeneic bone marrow transplant model to determine whether nephrotoxic agents used in conjunction with bone marrow transplantation (BMT) could be enhancing or accelerating the development of radiation nephropathy. Rats received 11-17 Gy TBI in six fractions over 3 days followed by syngeneic bone marrow transplant. In conjunction with the bone marrow transplants, animals received either no drugs, cyclosporine, amphotericin, gentamicin, or busulfan. Drugs were given in schedules analogous to their use in clinical bone marrow transplantation. Drug doses were chosen so that the drug regimen alone caused detectable acute nephrotoxicity. Animals were followed for 6 months with periodic renal function tests. Gentamicin had no apparent interactions with TBI. Amphotericin increased the incidence of engraftment failure, but did not enhance radiation nephropathy. Cyclosporin with TBI caused late morbidity that appeared to be due to neurological problems, but did not enhance radiation nephropathy. Busulfan resulted in a significant enhancement of radiation nephropathy. Of the nephrotoxins used in conjunction with bone marrow transplantation only radiation and busulfan were found to be risk factors for bone marrow transplant nephropathy. 34 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  17. Principles of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, M.P.; Share, F.S.; Goodman, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Radiation oncology now represents the integration of knowledge obtained over an 80-year period from the physics and biology laboratories and the medical clinic. Such integration is recent; until the supervoltage era following World War II, the chief developments in these three areas for the most part were realized independently. The physics and engineering laboratories have now developed a dependable family of sources of ionizing radiations that can be precisely directed at tumor volumes at various depths within the body. The biology laboratory has provided the basic scientific support underlying the intensive clinical experience and currently is suggesting ways of using ionizing radiations more effectively, such as modified fractionation schedules relating to cell cycle kinetics and the use of drugs and chemicals as modifiers of radiation response and normal tissue reaction. The radiation therapy clinic has provided the patient stratum on which the acute and chronic effects of irradiation have been assessed, and the patterns of treatment success and failure identified. The radiation therapist has shared with the surgeon and medical oncologist the responsibility for clarifying the natural history of a large number of human neoplasms, and through such clarifications, has developed more effective treatment strategies. Several examples of this include the improved results in the treatment of Hodgkin's disease, squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix, seminoma, and epithelial neoplasms of the upper aerodigestive tract

  18. Radiation therapy for digestive tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piedbois, P.; Levy, E.; Thirion, P.; Martin, L.; Calitchi, E.; Otmezguine, Y.; Le Bourgeois, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    This brief review of radiation therapy of digestive tumors in 1994 seeks to provide practical answers to the most commonly asked questions: What is the place of radiation therapy versus chemotherapy for the treatment of these patients ? What are the approved indications of radiation therapy and which avenues of research are being explored ? Radiation therapy is used in over two-thirds of patients referred to an oncology department for a gastrointestinal tract tumor. The main indications are reviewed: cancer of the rectum and anal canal and, to a lesser extent, cancer of the esophagus and pancreas. The main focuses of current research include radiation therapy-chemotherapy combinations, intraoperative radiation therapy, and radiation therapy of hepatobiliary tumors. (authors). 23 refs., 1 fig

  19. Radiation Induced Apoptosis of Murine Bone Marrow Cells Is Independent of Early Growth Response 1 (EGR1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karine Z Oben

    Full Text Available An understanding of how each individual 5q chromosome critical deleted region (CDR gene contributes to malignant transformation would foster the development of much needed targeted therapies for the treatment of therapy related myeloid neoplasms (t-MNs. Early Growth Response 1 (EGR1 is a key transcriptional regulator of myeloid differentiation located within the 5q chromosome CDR that has been shown to regulate HSC (hematopoietic stem cell quiescence as well as the master regulator of apoptosis-p53. Since resistance to apoptosis is a hallmark of malignant transformation, we investigated the role of EGR1 in apoptosis of bone marrow cells; a cell population from which myeloid malignancies arise. We evaluated radiation induced apoptosis of Egr1+/+ and Egr1-/- bone marrow cells in vitro and in vivo. EGR1 is not required for radiation induced apoptosis of murine bone marrow cells. Neither p53 mRNA (messenger RNA nor protein expression is regulated by EGR1 in these cells. Radiation induced apoptosis of bone marrow cells by double strand DNA breaks induced p53 activation. These results suggest EGR1 dependent signaling mechanisms do not contribute to aberrant apoptosis of malignant cells in myeloid malignancies.

  20. Histological investigations on the effect of zytostatica, ionizing radiation and a radioprotective substance on spleen, lung, lymphatic nodes, bone marrow, skin and muscles on rats under drugs suitable for gynacological cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeueler, R.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of radiation, zytostatica and on radiation protective substance on the organs: spleen, lung, lymphatic nodes, skin and muscles of the rat were examined. High-voltage gamma radiation, zytostatica cyclophosphamide, podophyllinic acid ethyl hydrazide and VM26, as well as N-acetyl homocystein thiol actone were applied as radioprotective substance in several combinations. The doses were adapted to those commonly used in human medicine. The different combinations are compared regarding side effects, as well as advantages and disadvantages of different doses. Podophyllinic acid ethyl hydrazide is found to be well suited as zytostatic substance for combination therapy. The histologically detectable side effects on the organs examined by adding N-acetyl homocystein thiol actone were not greatly reduced compared to the sole or combined application of radiation and cytostatica therapy. (orig.) [de

  1. Radiation therapy for chordomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Hajime; Takahashi, Takeo; Nakamura, Yuji; Niibe, Hideo

    1995-01-01

    Chordomas are slow-growing primary malignant bone tumors which originate from remnants of the fetal notochordal system. They are difficult to control by surgery alone. Four patients with chordomas treated with radiation therapy were studied, and the effectiveness of radiotherapy was evaluated. These 4 (3.8%) patients were among 106 patients with primary malignant bone tumors referred to us from 1959 to 1987. Primary sites were the sacrococcygeal region in three patients and the clivus in one. The patients' ages ranged from 51 to 75 years. The male : female ratio was 1 : 1. Patients received 48 to 60 Gy of radiation to the primary sites. Because the radiosensitivity of the tumors was low, the responses were poor. The duration of survival was 6, 33, 68, and 125 months. The cause of death in each case was local recurrence of tumor. As a result, a dose greater than 60 Gy is thought to be necessary for curative radiotherapy. Proton beam therapy seems to be best choice for chordomas in the clivus, and mixed-beam (proton and megavolt age X-ray) therapy or multiportal irradiation, which gives an ideal spatial dose distribution, seems to be most suitable for sacrococcygeal chordomas. (author)

  2. Reconversion of bone marrow in Gaucher disease treated with enzyme therapy documented by MR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allison, J.W.; James, C.A.; Arnold, G.L.; Stine, K.C.; Becton, D.L.; Bell, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    Background. Skeletal complications are responsible for significant morbidity in Gaucher patients. Plain radiographs have been unreliable in assessing bone marrow infiltration and activity. A way to assess bone marrow improvement is needed during enzyme therapy. Objective. The purpose of this paper is to assess the usefulness of MR in following improvement of abnormal bone marrow in Gaucher patients on enzyme therapy. Materials and methods. Three patients aged 2, 7, and 24 years underwent serial MR scans of the lower extremities before and during treatment with Alglucerase (two patients) and Imiglucerase (one patient). T1-weighted, T2-weighted, STIR and FSE T2-weighted images were utilized. Two patients were imaged after 16 months of therapy, and one patient was imaged after 6 months of therapy. Results. All patients had improvement in marrow signal consistent with partial reconversion to fatty marrow during treatment. The findings were more marked after prolonged therapy. T1-weighted images demonstrated findings most clearly. Conclusion. MR consistently showed improvement in marrow signal in Gaucher patients on enzyme therapy. As smaller doses of enzyme therapy are the trend, MR can be utilized to determine if therapy is effecting a change in the bone marrow. (orig.)

  3. Technical advances in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sause, W.T.

    1986-01-01

    Substantial advances have been made in radiation therapy. Many of these advances can be applied in most radiation therapy departments without expensive improvements in equipment. Changes in radiation fractionation, chemotherapeutic sensitization, intraoperative radiation, and interstitial implants can be performed with experience and improved physician training in most medium-sized departments. Advances that require investments in expensive equipment such as particle radiation and hyperthermia will need to be evaluated at designated treatment centers. 106 references

  4. Internal Radiation Therapy for Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    When getting internal radiation therapy, a source of radiation is put inside your body, in either liquid or solid form. It can be used treat different kinds of cancer, including thyroid, head and neck, breast, cervix, prostate, and eye. Learn more about how what to expect when getting internal radiation therapy.

  5. Hemopoietic stem cell niches, recovery from radiation and bone marrow transfusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cronkite, E.P.; Carsten, A.L.; Brecher, G.; Feinendegen, L.

    1979-01-01

    Studies were conducted on the appearance of cells in recipient bone marrow with chromosome markers after bone marrow transfusion to recipients that had different treatments. Investigators tried to replete the bone marrow CFV spleen at various times after recovery from maximal sublethal doses of x radiation or during continuous exposure to tritiated water. Studies were made on the effect of diverse treatments on the acceptance of bone marrow transfusions as shown by chromosomal markers. Results showed that the bone marrow of animals rescued by transfusion of 4 x 10 6 bone marrow cells will accept from 0 to 25% of the second transfusion of bone marrow cells given one to 4 months after the first transfusion and examined 2 to 3 weeks after the second transfusion. This may be due to the second transfusion filling up empty niches

  6. Absorbed dose to active red bone marrow from diagnostic and therapeutic uses of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, S.B.

    1980-06-01

    The bone-marrow dose arising from radiological procedures as carried out in Australia have been determined as part of a survey of population doses. This paper describes the method of calculation of the radiation doses to the active bone marrow from diagnostic radiography, fluoroscopy and radiotherapy. The results of the calculations are compared with the results of other models of bone-marrow dose for a number of diagnostic X-ray procedures

  7. Radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Katsumasa

    2001-01-01

    In Japan, where the mortality rate of prostate cancer is lower than in Western countries, radical prostatectomy or hormonal therapy has been applied more frequently than radiation therapy. However, the number of patients with prostate cancer has been increasing recently and the importance of radiation therapy has rapidly been recognized. Although there have been no randomized trials, results from several institutions in Western countries suggest that similar results of cancer control are achieved with either radiation therapy or radical prostatectomy. For higher-risk cases, conformal high-dose therapy or adjuvant hormonal therapy is more appropriate. In this article, the results of radiation therapy for prostate cancer were reviewed, with a view to the appropriate choice of therapy in Japan. (author)

  8. Stereotactic body radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, Simon S. [Univ. Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center, Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Case Comprehensive Cancer Center; Teh, Bin S. [The Methodist Hospital Cancer Center and Research Institute, Houston, TX (United States). Weill Cornell Medical College; Lu, Jiade J. [National Univ. of Singapore (Singapore). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Schefter, Tracey E. (eds.) [Colorado Univ., Aurora, CO (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2012-11-01

    Comprehensive an up-to-date account of the physical/technological, biological, and clinical aspects of SBRT. Examines in detail retrospective studies and prospective clinical trials for various organ sites from around the world. Written by world-renowned experts in SBRT from North America, Asia and Europe. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has emerged as an innovative treatment for various primary and metastatic cancers, and the past five years have witnessed a quantum leap in its use. This book provides a comprehensive and up-to-date account of the physical/technological, biological, and clinical aspects of SBRT. It will serve as a detailed resource for this rapidly developing treatment modality. The organ sites covered include lung, liver, spine, pancreas, prostate, adrenal, head and neck, and female reproductive tract. Retrospective studies and prospective clinical trials on SBRT for various organ sites from around the world are examined, and toxicities and normal tissue constraints are discussed. This book features unique insights from world-renowned experts in SBRT from North America, Asia, and Europe. It will be necessary reading for radiation oncologists, radiation oncology residents and fellows, medical physicists, medical physics residents, medical oncologists, surgical oncologists, and cancer scientists.

  9. Smart Radiation Therapy Biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngwa, Wilfred; Boateng, Francis; Kumar, Rajiv; Irvine, Darrell J; Formenti, Silvia; Ngoma, Twalib; Herskind, Carsten; Veldwijk, Marlon R; Hildenbrand, Georg Lars; Hausmann, Michael; Wenz, Frederik; Hesser, Juergen

    2017-03-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is a crucial component of cancer care, used in the treatment of over 50% of cancer patients. Patients undergoing image guided RT or brachytherapy routinely have inert RT biomaterials implanted into their tumors. The single function of these RT biomaterials is to ensure geometric accuracy during treatment. Recent studies have proposed that the inert biomaterials could be upgraded to "smart" RT biomaterials, designed to do more than 1 function. Such smart biomaterials include next-generation fiducial markers, brachytherapy spacers, and balloon applicators, designed to respond to stimuli and perform additional desirable functions like controlled delivery of therapy-enhancing payloads directly into the tumor subvolume while minimizing normal tissue toxicities. More broadly, smart RT biomaterials may include functionalized nanoparticles that can be activated to boost RT efficacy. This work reviews the rationale for smart RT biomaterials, the state of the art in this emerging cross-disciplinary research area, challenges and opportunities for further research and development, and a purview of potential clinical applications. Applications covered include using smart RT biomaterials for boosting cancer therapy with minimal side effects, combining RT with immunotherapy or chemotherapy, reducing treatment time or health care costs, and other incipient applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The physics of radiation therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, Faiz M

    2009-01-01

    Dr. Khan's classic textbook on radiation oncology physics is now in its thoroughly revised and updated Fourth Edition. It provides the entire radiation therapy team—radiation oncologists, medical physicists, dosimetrists, and radiation therapists—with a thorough understanding of the physics and practical clinical applications of advanced radiation therapy technologies, including 3D-CRT, stereotactic radiotherapy, HDR, IMRT, IGRT, and proton beam therapy. These technologies are discussed along with the physical concepts underlying treatment planning, treatment delivery, and dosimetry. This Fourth Edition includes brand-new chapters on image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) and proton beam therapy. Other chapters have been revised to incorporate the most recent developments in the field. This edition also features more than 100 full-color illustrations throughout.

  11. Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome (Bone marrow syndrome, Aplastic Anemia): Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Dmitri

    Key Words: Aplastic Anemia (AA), Pluripotential Stem Cells (PSC) Introduction: Aplastic Anemia (AA) is a disorder of the pluripotential stem cells involve a decrease in the number of cells of myeloid, erythroid and megakaryotic lineage [Segel et al. 2000 ]. The etiology of AA include idiopathic cases and secondary aplastic anemia after exposure to drugs, toxins, chemicals, viral infections, lympho-proliferative diseases, radiation, genetic causes, myelodisplastic syndromes and hypoplastic anemias, thymomas, lymphomas. [Brodskyet al. 2005.,Modan et al. 1975., Szklo et al. 1975]. Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome (or Bone marrow syndrome, or Radiation-Acquired Aplastic Anemia) is the acute toxic syndrome which usually occurs with a dose of irradiation between 0.7 and 10 Gy (70- 1000 rads), depending on the species irradiated. [Waselenko et al., 2004]. The etiology of bone morrow damage from high-level radiation exposure results depends on the radiosensitivity of certain bone marrow cell lines. [Waselenko et al. 2004] Aplastic anemia after radiation exposure is a clinical syndrome that results from a marked disorder of bone marrow blood cell production. [Waselenko et al. 2004] Radiation hematotoxicity is mediated via genotoxic and other specific toxic mechanisms, leading to aplasia, cell apoptosis or necrosis, initiation via genetic mechanisms of clonal disorders, in cases such as the acute radiation-acquired form of AA. AA results from radiation injury to pluripotential and multipotential stem cells in the bone marrow. The clinical signs displayed in reticulocytopenia, anemia, granulocytopenia, monocytopenia, and thrombocytopenia. The number of marrow CD34+ cells (multipotential hematopoietic progenitors) and their derivative colony-forming unit{granulocyte-macrophage (CFU-GM) and burst forming unit {erythroid (BFU{E) are reduced markedly in patients with AA. [Guinan 2011, Brodski et al. 2005, Beutler et al.,2000] Cells expressing CD34 (CD34+ cell) are normally

  12. Different Approaches in Radiation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf-Dieter eKortmann

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy is a cornerstone in the therapeutic management of craniopharyngioma. The close proximity to neighbouring eloquent structures pose a particular challenge to radiation therapy. Modern treatment technologies including fractionated 3-d conformal radiotherapy, intensity modulated radiation therapy and recently proton therapy are able to precisely cover the target while preserving surrounding tissue,Tumour controls between 80 and in access of 90 % can be achieved. Alternative treatments consisting of radiosurgery, intracavitary application of isotopes and brachytherapy also offer an acceptable tumour control and might be given in selected cases. More research is needed to establish the role of each treatment modality.

  13. Radiation-induced aneusomic clones in bone marrow of rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohno, Sei-Ichi; Ishihara, Takaaki

    1976-01-01

    Wistar rats 3 months old were given a single whole-body X-irradiation with 700 R. They were killed 9.3 months, on average, after irradiation. From the bone marrows of the 23 irradiated rats, 54 clones of cells with radiation-induced chromosome abnormalities ranging from 3.3 to 78.3% in size were obtained. Karyotype analysis at the banding level showed that 43 out of the 54 clones had balanced chromosome constitutions and that the remaining 11 clones were unbalanced. The 43 balanced clones consisted of 33 clones with reciprocal translocations, 6 with inversions and 4 with both translocations and inversions. The 11 unbalanced clones were made up of 7 aneuploid clones and 4 pseudo-diploid clones. Of the 54 clones, 15 were large with frequencies of more than 25%. Contrary to general belief that cells with unbalanced chromosome constitutions have less capacity to proliferate than those with balanced ones, 8 of the 15 large clones, especially all, except 1, of the largest 6 clones were unbalanced, either aneuploid or pseudo-diploid

  14. Effects of ionizing radiation on differentiation of murine bone marrow cells into mast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Sho; Yoshino, Hironori; Ishikawa, Junya; Yamaguchi, Masaru; Tsujiguchi, Takakiyo; Nishiyama, Ayaka; Yokoyama, Kouki; Kashiwakura, Ikuo

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells, immune effector cells produced from bone marrow cells, play a major role in immunoglobulin E–mediated allergic responses. Ionizing radiation affects the functions of mast cells, which are involved in radiation-induced tissue damage. However, whether ionizing radiation affects the differential induction of mast cells is unknown. Here we investigated whether bone marrow cells of X-irradiated mice differentiated into mast cells. To induce mast cells, bone marrow cells from X-irradiated and unirradiated mice were cultured in the presence of cytokines required for mast cell induction. Although irradiation at 0.5 Gy and 2 Gy decreased the number of bone marrow cells 1 day post-irradiation, the cultured bone marrow cells of X-irradiated and unirradiated mice both expressed mast cell–related cell-surface antigens. However, the percentage of mast cells in the irradiated group was lower than in the unirradiated group. Similar decreases in the percentage of mast cells induced in the presence of X-irradiation were observed 10 days post irradiation, although the number of bone marrow cells in irradiated mice had recovered by this time. Analysis of mast cell function showed that degranulation of mast cells after immunoglobulin E–mediated allergen recognition was significantly higher in the X-irradiated group compared with in the unirradiated group. In conclusion, bone marrow cells of X-irradiated mice differentiated into mast cells, but ionizing radiation affected the differentiation efficiency and function of mast cells. (author)

  15. Optimization of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtsubo, Masaaki

    1990-01-01

    In radiotherapy, dose optimization is to give adequate dose uniformly over target volume and minimize the dose to normal and adjacent critical organs. Therefore, it is necessary to analyze dose distribution in detail. This paper presents a method for quantitatively assessing treatment planning by analysis of dose distribution. For this purpose, several parameters were introduced, such as D T, min (minimum target absorbed dose), NUF (nonuniformity factor), volume rate of damaged lung and spinal cord, R T/T (ratio of target volume to treatment volume), LE (local efficiency), integral dose, etc. And some criteria were made using these parameters, and were applied to evaluate various plans in external beam radiation therapy for lung and esophagus cancer. In these parameters, NUF was especially useful to obtain three-dimensional dose information of target volume, and value of NUF was in agreement with the information provided by dose volume histogram. AP-PA parallel opposed fields technique was inferior in D T,min and NUF. In lung cancer, there was no spinal cord injury in oblique parallel opposed fields technique, and this technique is particularly useful when target volume is in posterior. In these two techniques, R T/T was small and hot spots were frequently observed. R T/T was largest in oblique wedged two-fields technique, but this technique was inferior in D T, min and NUF. About D T, min and NUF, four fields technique was the best, but in this technique spinal cord complication often occurred in case that target volume was in the middle. In moving beam technique (360deg rotation or arc), integral dose is large, and the more target volume is in posterior, the more often spinal cord complication occurs. In esophageal cancer, three fields technique was the best to avoid spinal cord injury. It seems that this method is very useful for optimization in radiation treatment planning. (author)

  16. Late health effects of chronic radiation exposure of bone marrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarmoshenko, Ilia V.; Malinovsky, Georgy P.; Konshina, Lidia G.; Zhukovsky, Michael V. [Institute of Industrial Ecology UB RAS, 620219, 20, Sophy Kovalevskoy St., Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Tuzankina, Irina A. [Institute of Immunology and Physiology UB RAS, 620049, 106, Pervomayskaya St., Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    infectious etiology, which are unexpected due to low doses absorbed in those organs and tissues. To analyze the unexpected results recent findings on strong attributability of stomach, liver and cervix cancers to bacterial and viral infections was taken into account. According to IARC, stomach cancer relative risk associated with helicobacter pillory is 5.6, liver cancer relative risks associated with HBV and HCV are 23 and 17 respectively, cervix cancer relative risk associated with HPV is >100. At the same time association of lung cancer, colon cancer and some other common malignancies with infections is either not established or of low significance. To explain observed effects we suggested that excess mortality due to cancer and non-cancer diseases of infectious etiology is associated with radiation exposure of bone marrow due to Sr-90. Irradiation of hematopoietic stem cells and progenitor cells damages hematopoiesis and suppresses the immune response. Secondary immune deficiency induced by chronic radiation increases susceptibility to the bacterial and viral infections. Such late effect of radiation exposure can be considered within the concept of deterministic tissue reactions. (Under support of UB RAS project 12-P-2-1033). (authors)

  17. Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is almost always due to smoking. TREATING LUNG CANCER Lung cancer treatment depends on several factors, including the ... org TARGETING CANCER CARE Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer Lung cancer is the second most common cancer in ...

  18. Radiation therapy for gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobelbower, R.R.; Bagne, F.; Ajlouni, M.I.; Milligan, A.J.

    1988-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the stomach is a moderately radioresponsive neoplasm. Attempts to treat patients with unresectable disease with external beam radiation therapy alone have generally failed because of problems with tumor localization and adequate dose delivery as well as the inherent radioresponsiveness of the gastric mucosa and the organs intimately related to the stomach. Combining external beam therapy and chemotherapy (acting as a systemic agent and as a radiosensitizer) seems to be of some (albeit limited) benefit in the management of unresectable adenocarcinoma of the stomach. Optimum combinations of radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and radiation sensitizers in this situation remain to be determined. The authors discuss strides which have been made in the treatment of gastric cancer. They also address the unanswered clinical questions which remain regarding the use of radiation therapy in the treatment of this highly lethal disease

  19. Effect of insulin on the mitotic activity of bone marrow cells after irradiation. [Gamma radiation, rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkalaya, A I

    1976-02-01

    A total of 236 white rats were given a whole-body gamma dose of 750 R. Part of the rats were given a subcutaneous insulin injection of 0.2 units/kg. After 10, 20, 30 min, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 10 and 12 hours the mitotic index was determined in both groups of rats in the bone marrow of the femur. The content of glucose and insulin in the blood was determined. The mitotic index was found to be higher on administering insulin. The use of insulin in radiation sickness intensifies the mitotic activity of bone marrow cells and stimulates the recovery of bone marrow hematopoiesis. 5 references.

  20. Animal experiments to investigate biological-chemical radiation protection and the therapy of radiolesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brueckner, V.

    1974-01-01

    The influence of a combined therapy of radiation protection agents and erythropoetin on the radiation-induced suppression of erythropoiesis in mice is studied with the aid of the radioiron utilization test. After whole-body irradiation with 500 R, the erythropoietic system is so severely affected that erythropoetin application alone does not yield any results. AET (significant) and Cysteamin (insignificant), on the other hand, protect the bone marrow to a certain degree. The protected bone marrow provides a better base for erythropoetin therapy than the bone marrow of the irradiated and unprotected animals. Compared to the application of radiation protection agents alone, the combined therapy with AET and erythropoetin increases the radioiron incorporation in the erythrocytes by 7.5% while the therapy with Cysteamin and erythropoetin results in a 19.3% increase. In spite of these methods, however, the radioiron incorporation rate of the control animals was not reached. (BSC/AK) [de

  1. Radiation Therapy (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... dose given. Radiation on the brain may affect learning and memory. Your doctor can offer advice and may prescribe medications to make your child more comfortable during radiation treatment. Make sure you avoid giving your child any medicines, including herbal medicines or over-the-counter (OTC) ...

  2. Telomerase gene therapy rescues telomere length, bone marrow aplasia, and survival in mice with aplastic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bär, Christian; Povedano, Juan Manuel; Serrano, Rosa; Benitez-Buelga, Carlos; Popkes, Miriam; Formentini, Ivan; Bobadilla, Maria; Bosch, Fatima; Blasco, Maria A

    2016-04-07

    Aplastic anemia is a fatal bone marrow disorder characterized by peripheral pancytopenia and marrow hypoplasia. The disease can be hereditary or acquired and develops at any stage of life. A subgroup of the inherited form is caused by replicative impairment of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells due to very short telomeres as a result of mutations in telomerase and other telomere components. Abnormal telomere shortening is also described in cases of acquired aplastic anemia, most likely secondary to increased turnover of bone marrow stem and progenitor cells. Here, we test the therapeutic efficacy of telomerase activation by using adeno-associated virus (AAV)9 gene therapy vectors carrying the telomerase Tert gene in 2 independent mouse models of aplastic anemia due to short telomeres (Trf1- and Tert-deficient mice). We find that a high dose of AAV9-Tert targets the bone marrow compartment, including hematopoietic stem cells. AAV9-Tert treatment after telomere attrition in bone marrow cells rescues aplastic anemia and mouse survival compared with mice treated with the empty vector. Improved survival is associated with a significant increase in telomere length in peripheral blood and bone marrow cells, as well as improved blood counts. These findings indicate that telomerase gene therapy represents a novel therapeutic strategy to treat aplastic anemia provoked or associated with short telomeres. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  3. Complication of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imajo, Yoshinari; Suematsu, Toru; Narabayashi, Isamu; Gose, Kyuhei; Takimoto, Saeko

    1984-01-01

    The radiation pneumonitis is a major complication for patients recieving thoracic irradiation. This report describe the radiographic recognition, pathological change and imapired pulmonary functions of radiation pneumonitis. The 57 patients with lung cancer treated with radiation are analyzed on the pneumonitis by chest X-P. Among these, 50 patients (88%) develop radiation pneumonitis. Repeated CT scans give more detailed information than conventional radiograms as to exdative changes. The pathological analysis are made on the 35 patients of which affected lungs are resected after pre-operative irradiation. Three phases are recognized in the evolution of pneumonitis, the ongestive, the degenerative, and the fibrotic. Adding to the morphorogical damage, pulmonary functions also detrieorate both in ventilation and perfusion scans. (author)

  4. Investigation of the pharmacokinetics of 3'-deoxy-3'-[18F]fluorothymidine uptake in the bone marrow before and early after initiation of chemoradiation therapy in head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menda, Yusuf; Boles Ponto, Laura L.; Dornfeld, Kenneth J.; Tewson, Timothy J.; Watkins, G. Leonard; Gupta, Anjali K.; Anderson, Carryn; McGuire, Sarah; Schultz, Michael K.; Sunderland, John J.; Graham, Michael M.; Buatti, John M.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The kinetics of the bone marrow uptake of 3'-deoxy-3'-[ 18 F]fluorothymidine (FLT) before and early after initiation of chemoradiation therapy was investigated in patients with head and neck cancer. Methods: Fourteen subjects with head and neck cancer underwent FLT positron emission tomography (PET) at baseline and after 10 Gy of radiation therapy. Thirteen subjects also received one cycle of platinum-based chemotherapy before the second FLT PET. Kinetic parameters, including the flux constant based on compartmental analysis (K FLT ) and the Patlak constant (K Patlak ) for cervical marrow, were calculated. Standardized uptake values (SUVs) for the cervical marrow (inside the radiation field) and lumbar spine marrow (outside the radiation field) were also determined. Results: There was a significant drop in FLT uptake in the bone marrow inside the radiation field. Mean pretreatment uptake values for the cervical spine were SUV=3.08±0.66, K FLT =0.045±0.016 min -1 and K Patlak =0.039±0.013 min -1 . After treatment, these values were SUV=0.74±0.19, K FLT =0.011±0.005 min -1 and K Patlak =0.005±0.002 min -1 . Compartmental analysis revealed a significant drop in k 3 in irradiated cervical marrow. FLT uptake in the bone marrow outside the radiation field exhibited a significantly smaller decrease. Conclusions: There is a marked decrease in FLT uptake in irradiated bone marrow after 10 Gy of radiation therapy to the head and neck. The drop in FLT uptake in irradiated marrow is due to a significant decrease in the net phosphorylation rate of FLT.

  5. Radiation Therapy of Pituitary Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Moon Baik; Hong, Seong Eong [Kyunghee University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-12-15

    Radiation treatment results were analyzed in a retrospective analysis of 47 patients with pituitary adenoma treated with radiation alone or combined with surgery from 1974 through 1987 at the Department of Therapeutic Radiology of Kyung Hee University. The 5-year overall survival rates for all patients was 80.4%. Radiation therapy was effective for improving visual symptoms and headache, but could not normalize amenorrhea and galactorrhoea. There was no difference of survival rate between radiation alone and combination with surgery. Prognostic factors such as age, sex, disease type, visual field, headache and surgical treatment were statistically no significant in survival rates of these patients.

  6. Radiation Therapy of Pituitary Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Moon Baik; Hong, Seong Eong

    1989-01-01

    Radiation treatment results were analyzed in a retrospective analysis of 47 patients with pituitary adenoma treated with radiation alone or combined with surgery from 1974 through 1987 at the Department of Therapeutic Radiology of Kyung Hee University. The 5-year overall survival rates for all patients was 80.4%. Radiation therapy was effective for improving visual symptoms and headache, but could not normalize amenorrhea and galactorrhoea. There was no difference of survival rate between radiation alone and combination with surgery. Prognostic factors such as age, sex, disease type, visual field, headache and surgical treatment were statistically no significant in survival rates of these patients

  7. Survival of bone marrow-engrafted mice subsequent to protection from lethal radiation by WR 2721

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinnamon, K.E.; Ketterling, L.L.; Ledney, G.D.; Lorenz, G.B.; Mioduszewski, R.J.; Stampfli, H.F.

    1980-01-01

    For the first time data are presented for animals treated with bone marrow cells after lethal radiation exposure while protected with WR 2721 (the single radioprotective chemical compound with the highest known dose reduction factor). The LD 50 30 (lethal dose to 50% in 30 days) for mice exposed to whole-body 60 Co radiation was elevated from 824 +- 8 rad in unprotected and untreated mice to (a) 1181 +- 33 rad in animals which received syngeneic bone marrow cells after exposure; (b) 1342 +- 27 rad in animals which received WR 2721 before radiation exposure; and (c) 1608 +- 33 rad in animals receiving both the radioprotective agent before exposure and bone marrow engraftment after exposure

  8. Activity of carbohydrate metabolism enzymes of bone marrow cells of rats affected by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukhomlinov, B.F.; Grinyuk, Yu.S.; Sibirnaya, N.A.; Starikovich, L.S.; Khmil', M.V.

    1990-01-01

    The influence of ionizing radiation (154.8 mC/kg on activity of some carbohydrate metabolism dehydrogenases in cells of the whole and fractionated rat bone marrow has been investigated. Different glucose metabolism units differently responded to radiation, the highest radiation response being exhibited by pentosophosphate cycle processes. The pattern of changes in the enzyme activity of different myelocaryocyte populations was shown to depend directly on the functional specilization of cells and the energy exchange types predominated in them

  9. Dose rate and fractionation: Relative importance in radiation for bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarbell, N.J.; Rosenblatt, M.; Mauch, P.; Hellman, S.

    1987-01-01

    The optimal dose rate and fractionation schedules for total body irradiation (TBI) in bone marrow transplantation (BMT) are presently unknown. This study compares several fractionation and dose rate schedules that are currently in clinical use. C/sub 3/H/HeJ were given TBI and the bone marrow survival fraction was calculated using the CFU's assay. Irradiation was given as low dose rate (LDR) at 5 cGy/min or high dose rate (HDR) at 80 cGy/min, in single fraction (SF) and fractionated (FX) regimens. These results indicate no increase in survival for the normal bone marrow stem cells with fractionation either at high or low dose-rates. In fact, fractionation seemed to decrease the bone marrow survival over single fraction radiation

  10. Effect of Increasing Doses of γ-Radiation on Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Grown on Smooth and Rough Titanium Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy for oral and maxillofacial tumors could damage bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs in jaw, which caused dental implant failure. However, how radiation affects BMSCs on SLA (sandblasted with large-grits, acid-etched surfaces is still unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate effect of different dose of γ-radiation on BMSCs on SLA and PT (polished titanium surfaces. Rat BMSCs were radiated with 2, 4, and 8 Gy γ-radiation and then seeded on both surfaces. Cell adhesion, spreading, and proliferation were tested. The osteogenesis and the adipogenesis ability were examined by Alizarin-Red and Oil-Red staining, respectively. Real-time PCR was performed to detect osteogenic (osteocalcin, OCN; runt-related transcription factor 2, Runx2 and adipogenic (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma, PPARγ gene expression at days 7 and 14 postirradiation. Results showed that γ-radiation reduced cell proliferation, adhesion, spreading, and osteogenic differentiation. 2 Gy radiation promoted adipogenic differentiation, but it was significantly decreased when dosage reached 4 Gy. In conclusion, results suggest that γ-radiation influenced BMSCs behaviors in a dosage-dependent manner except adipogenic differentiation, low dose promoted it, and high dose inhibited it. This effect was influenced by surface characteristics, which may explain the different failure rate of various implants in patients after radiation.

  11. Radiation therapy in pseudotumour haemarthrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lal, P.; Biswal, B.M.; Thulkar, S.; Patel, A.K.; Venkatesh, R.; Julka, P.K. [Institute Rotary Cancer Hospital, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, New Delhi (India). Departments of Radiation Oncology, Radiodiagnosis and Haematology

    1998-11-01

    Total or partial deficiency of factor VIII and IX in the coagulation cascade leads to haemophilia. Haemophilia affecting weight-bearing joints gives a `pseudotumour` or haemarthrosis-like condition. Surgery and cryoprecipitate infusions have been the treatment for this condition. Radiocolloids and radiation therapy have been used with some benefit. One case of ankle pseudotumour which was treated by low-dose external beam radiation is presented here. Copyright (1998) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd 14 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Radiation therapy in pseudotumour haemarthrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lal, P.; Biswal, B.M.; Thulkar, S.; Patel, A.K.; Venkatesh, R.; Julka, P.K.

    1998-01-01

    Total or partial deficiency of factor VIII and IX in the coagulation cascade leads to haemophilia. Haemophilia affecting weight-bearing joints gives a 'pseudotumour' or haemarthrosis-like condition. Surgery and cryoprecipitate infusions have been the treatment for this condition. Radiocolloids and radiation therapy have been used with some benefit. One case of ankle pseudotumour which was treated by low-dose external beam radiation is presented here. Copyright (1998) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  13. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffman, Thomas E; Glatstein, Eli

    2002-07-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is an increasingly popular technical means of tightly focusing the radiation dose around a cancer. As with stereotactic radiotherapy, IMRT uses multiple fields and angles to converge on the target. The potential for total dose escalation and for escalation of daily fraction size to the gross cancer is exciting. The excitement, however, has greatly overshadowed a range of radiobiological and clinical concerns.

  14. Dose to red bone marrow of infants, children and adults from radiation of natural origin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kendall, G M [Childhood Cancer Research Group, University of Oxford, 57 Woodstock Road, Oxford OX2 6HJ (United Kingdom); Fell, T P; Harrison, J D [Health Protection Agency, Radiation Protection Division, CRCE, Chilton, Didcot OX11 0RQ, Oxon (United Kingdom)], E-mail: Gerald.Kendall@ccrg.ox.ac.uk

    2009-06-15

    Natural radiation sources contribute much the largest part of the radiation exposure of the average person. This paper examines doses from natural radiation to the red bone marrow, the tissue in which leukaemia is considered to originate, with particular emphasis on doses to children. The most significant contributions are from x-rays and gamma rays, radionuclides in food and inhalation of isotopes of radon and their decay products. External radiation sources and radionuclides other than radon dominate marrow doses at all ages. The variation with age of the various components of marrow dose is considered, including doses received in utero and in each year up to the age of 15. Doses in utero include contributions resulting from the ingestion of radionuclides by the mother and placental transfer to the foetus. Postnatal doses include those from radionuclides in breast-milk and from radionuclides ingested in other foods. Doses are somewhat higher in the first year of life and there is a general slow decline from the second year of life onwards. The low linear energy transfer (LET) component of absorbed dose to the red bone marrow is much larger than the high LET component. However, because of the higher radiation weighting factor for the latter it contributes about 40% of the equivalent dose incurred up to the age of 15.

  15. Monte Carlo simulation of age-dependent radiation dose from alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides to critical trabecular bone and bone marrow targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dant, James T.; Richardson, Richard B.; Nie, Linda H.

    2013-05-01

    Alpha (α) particles and low-energy beta (β) particles present minimal risk for external exposure. While these particles can induce leukemia and bone cancer due to internal exposure, they can also be beneficial for targeted radiation therapies. In this paper, a trabecular bone model is presented to investigate the radiation dose from bone- and marrow-seeking α and β emitters to different critical compartments (targets) of trabecular bone for different age groups. Two main issues are addressed with Monte Carlo simulations. The first is the absorption fractions (AFs) from bone and marrow to critical targets within the bone for different age groups. The other issue is the application of 223Ra for the radiotherapy treatment of bone metastases. Both a static model and a simulated bone remodeling process are established for trabecular bone. The results show significantly lower AFs from radionuclide sources in the bone volume to the peripheral marrow and the haematopoietic marrow for adults than for newborns and children. The AFs from sources on the bone surface and in the bone marrow to peripheral marrow and haematopoietic marrow also varies for adults and children depending on the energy of the particles. Regarding the use of 223Ra as a radionuclide for the radiotherapy of bone metastases, the simulations show a significantly higher dose from 223Ra and its progeny in forming bone to the target compartment of bone metastases than that from two other more commonly used β-emitting radiopharmaceuticals, 153Sm and 89Sr. There is also a slightly lower dose from 223Ra in forming bone to haematopoietic marrow than that from 153Sm and 89Sr. These results indicate a higher therapy efficiency and lower marrow toxicity from 223Ra and its progeny. In conclusion, age-related changes in bone dimension and cellularity seem to significantly affect the internal dose from α and β emitters in the bone and marrow to critical targets, and 223Ra may be a more efficient

  16. Pion radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kligerman, M.M.

    1975-01-01

    Results are summarized from studies on the relative biological effects as compared with x or γ radiation and OER of negative pi mesons produced by the Berkeley 184-inch synchrocyclotron or the NIMROD 7-GeV proton synchrocyclotron at the Rutherford High Energy Laboratory in England using cultured animal cells or Vicia faba cells as the test system. Preliminary results are reported from similar radiobiological studies at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility. The relative response of human tissues to peak pion irradiation was compared with 140 kV x rays in a single patient with multiple malignant melanoma by observing the acute response of the skin surrounding metastatic modules following exposure to either pions or x radiation. Color photographs of the irradiated areas made at least twice weekly and densitometry measurements and observations by radiation therapists indicated that maximum erythemia occurred during the fifth, sixth, or seventh week after the start of a schedule of fractionated exposure to 15 fractions over 19 elapsed days. X irradiation was delivered at a dose rate of 500 rads/min to modules to deliver 55, 66, or 75 percent of a skin surface dose of 5,200 rads and pion irradiation, at doses numerically 50 percent of the x ray dose, was delivered at a dose rate of 5 to 7 rads/min. Dose response curves were plotted. Results of histological examinations of skin samples taken 24 weeks following irradiation are reported. Results are discussed relative to the destruction of melanoma cells following pion or x ray treatment

  17. Experimental study of low dose radiation stimulate the haematogenesis reconstitution of the recipient after bone marrow transplantation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Liyuan; Yang Shun; Zhang Ye; Zhang Mingzhi; Jiang Jiagui; Jiang Jianping

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate if low dose radiation can stimulate the haematogenesis reconstitution of the recipient after bone marrow transplantation in mice. Methods: Bone marrow cells were irradiated in vitro by different low dose radiation and then cultured in vitro. 3 H-TdR incorporation was used to measure the reproductive activity of cells, and then the radiation dose with the best stimulating effect was determined. The donator myeloid cells were exposed to low dose radiation before the recipient mice received bone marrow transplantation; then the irradiated myeloid cells were infused to the recipient; and lastly, the counts of peripheral blood cells (PBC) and bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNC) were monitored in order to observe the effect of low dose radiation on haematogenesis reconstitution of the recipient animal after bone marrow transplantation. Results: The reproductive activity of the bone marrow cells irradiated by 6 and 8 cGy could be improved significantly in vitro. When the recipient mice received bone marrow transplantation of the myeloid cells after low dose radiation, the counts of BMMNC and PBC were higher than those in the control group (P<0.05). Conclusions: Low dose radiation can stimulate the haematogenesis reconstitution of the recipient after bone marrow transplantation. (authors)

  18. Radiation therapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, Bridget F; Lee, W Robert

    2013-07-01

    Radiation therapy is an effective treatment for newly diagnosed prostate cancer, salvage treatment, or for palliation of advanced disease. Herein we briefly discuss the indications, results, and complications associated with brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy, when used as monotherapy and in combination with each other or androgen deprivation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Radiation therapy and herpes zoster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Itsuo; Matsushima, Hideno; Yamada, Teruyo; Moriya, Hiroshi

    1975-01-01

    The relationship between herpes zoster and radiation therapy was discussed and the combination of herpes zoster with malignancies was observed. Reported were five cases of herpes zoster (four breast and one lung carcinoma) out of 317 cases of malignancies which were irradiated in our clinic and include considerations about the etiologic relationship. (J.P.N.)

  20. Hemopoietic stem cell niches, recovery from radiation and bone marrow transfusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cronkite, E.P.; Carsten, A.L.; Brecher, G.

    1979-01-01

    The long term hematologic effects of single whole body sublethal X-ray exposure, 525 rad, and the low level chronic exposure from 137 Cs gamma ray and ingested HTO were investigated in mice. The single X-ray exposure had early severe effect on bone marrows both in terms of total cellularity and the number of pluripotent stem cells. How do animals maintain normal cellularity in the absence of a normal number of the pluripotent stem cells[ The following 3 different mechanisms may be involved: additional division in the cytologically identifiable divisible pool of bone marrows; shortening of cycle time allowing more divisions in the same time with great amplification of a small number of colony-forming unit spleens; and the recruitment of G 0 stem cells into proliferation. The reduction in the number of bone marrow stem cells might be attributed to stromal injury in the marrows such that they cannot support as many stem cells as those before the radiation exposure. As an alternate to the ''niche'' hypothesis, the injury to the stem cell pool such that self-replication was not sufficient to restore normal cell concentration is a possibility. The time sequence of the transfusion of marrows may be important to the ultimate effect. Attempts to fill empty niches 10 and 12 weeks after a single and severe radiation injury may be impossible due to stromal changes which in effect have eliminated the niches. The bone marrows of animals rescued by the transfusion of 4 x 10 6 bone marrow cells will accept 0 to 25% of the second transfusion of 4 x 10 7 cells. (Yamashita, S.)

  1. Recovery From Radiation-induced Bone Marrow Damage by HSP25 Through Tie2 Signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hae-June [Division of Radiation Effects, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Hee-Chung [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Hee-Yong [College of Medicine, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yoon-Jin [Division of Radiation Effects, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yun-Sil, E-mail: yslee0425@ewha.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy and Division of Life and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Ewha Woman' s University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Whole-body radiation therapy can cause severe injury to the hematopoietic system, and therefore it is necessary to identify a novel strategy for overcoming this injury. Methods and Materials: Mice were irradiated with 4.5 Gy after heat shock protein 25 (HSP25) gene transfer using an adenoviral vector. Then, peripheral blood cell counts, histopathological analysis, and Western blotting on bone marrow (BM) cells were performed. The interaction of HSP25 with Tie2 was investigated with mouse OP9 and human BM-derived mesenchymal stem cells to determine the mechanism of HSP25 in the hematopoietic system. Results: HSP25 transfer increased BM regeneration and reduced apoptosis following whole-body exposure to ionizing radiation (IR). The decrease in Tie2 protein expression that followed irradiation of the BM was blocked by HSP25 transfer, and Tie2-positive cells were more abundant among the BM cells of HSP25-transferred mice, even after IR exposure. Following systemic RNA interference of Tie2 before IR, HSP25-mediated radioprotective effects were partially blocked in both mice and cell line systems. Stability of Tie2 was increased by HSP25, a response mediated by the interaction of HSP25 with Tie2. IR-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of Tie2 was augmented by HSP25 overexpression; downstream events in the Tie2 signaling pathway, including phosphorylation of AKT and EKR1/2, were also activated. Conclusions: HSP25 protects against radiation-induced BM damage by interacting with and stabilizing Tie2. This may be a novel strategy for HSP25-mediated radioprotection in BM.

  2. Cell therapy with bone marrow mononuclear cells in elastase-induced pulmonary emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhini-Dos-Santos, Nathalia; Barbosa-de-Oliveira, Valter Abraão; Kozma, Rodrigo Heras; Faria, Carolina Arruda de; Stessuk, Talita; Frei, Fernando; Ribeiro-Paes, João Tadeu

    2013-04-01

    Emphysema is characterized by destruction of alveolar walls with loss of gas exchange surface and consequent progressive dyspnea. This study aimed to evaluate the efficiency of cell therapy with bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMC) in an animal model of elastase-induced pulmonary emphysema. Emphysema was induced in C57Bl/J6 female mice by intranasal instillation of elastase. After 21 days, the mice received bone marrow mononuclear cells from EGFP male mice with C57Bl/J6 background. The groups were assessed by comparison and statistically significant differences (p pulmonary emphysema.

  3. Radiation nephritis following total-body irradiation and cyclophosphamide in preparation for bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergstein, J.; Andreoli, S.P.; Provisor, A.J.; Yum, M.

    1986-01-01

    Two children prepared for bone marrow transplantation with total-body irradiation and cyclophosphamide developed hypertension, microscopic hematuria, proteinuria, diminished renal function, and anemia six months after transplantation. Light microscopy of the kidneys revealed mesangial expansion, glomerular capillary wall thickening, and lumenal thrombosis. Electron microscopy demonstrated widening of the subendothelial space due to the deposition of amorphous fluffy material. In one patient, immunofluorescence microscopy revealed glomerular capillary wall deposition of fibrin and immunoglobulins. The clinical and histologic findings support the diagnosis of radiation nephritis. Patients prepared for bone marrow transplantation with total-body irradiation and cyclophosphamide should be followed closely after transplantation for the development of hypertension, proteinuria, and renal insufficiency

  4. Radiation block of bone marrow cell mitoses and the effect of insulin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkalaya, A I

    1976-01-01

    Insulin (0.15 - 0.2 units/kg) has been administered to white rats immediately after the exposure to 750 R, at the background of hypercorticoidism. This resulted in the inhibition of the development of the post-irradiation-stress-hyperglycemia; and the mitotic index of the bone marrow cells at the time of the mitosis block was higher than in the control irradiated rats. Insulin administration at the peak of radiation sickness during hypercorticoidism levelled hyperglycemia, stimulated the mitotic activity of cells of the bone marrow and the regeneration of the latter.

  5. The role of radiation therapy in childhood acute leukemia. A review from the viewpoint of basic and clinical radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozaki, Miwako

    2003-01-01

    Radiation therapy has been playing important roles in the treatment of childhood acute leukemia since the 1970s. The first is the preventive cranial irradiation for central nervous system therapy in acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The second is the total body irradiation as conditioning before bone marrow transplantation for children with acute myeloid leukemia in first remission and with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in second remission. Although some late effects have been reported, a part of them could be overcome by technical improvement in radiation and salvage therapy. Radiation therapy for children might have a successful outcome on a delicate balance between efficiencies and potential late toxicities. The role of radiation therapy for childhood acute leukemia was reviewed from the standpoint of basic and clinical radiation oncology in this paper. (author)

  6. Radiation therapy for carcinoma of the endometrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potish, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    Carcinoma of the endometrium is the most common malignant tumor in the female genital tract. Radiation therapy continues to play a major role in the management of endometrial carcinoma, both as primary therapy and as adjuvant treatment. The utility of pelvic external beam therapy and intracavitary therapy is long established. However, the modern era of surgical staging has lead to an appreciation of the role of radiation therapy beyond the pelvis. Radiation therapy has been shown to be of particular benefit in peritoneal and nodal spread. The classic management of endometrial cancer is reviewed and relatively new and somewhat controversial topics, such as preoperative intracavitary therapy followed by external beam therapy are discussed

  7. Effects of massage therapy on pain and anxiety arising from intrathecal therapy or bone marrow aspiration in children with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelebioğlu, Ayda; Gürol, Ayşe; Yildirim, Zuhal Keskin; Büyükavci, Mustafa

    2015-12-01

    Cancer and its treatment are stressful and reduce the quality of life in children. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of massage therapy on pain and anxiety arising from intrathecal therapy or bone marrow aspiration in children with cancer. We conducted a controlled pretest/posttest quasi-experimental study at a paediatric oncology unit in Turkey. Twenty-five children were enrolled in this study. Their pain and anxiety were determined using a visual analogue scale. When the pretest and posttest pain and anxiety levels of the groups were compared, no statistically significant difference was found (P > 0.05). It was determined that pain and anxiety levels in the experimental group decreased significantly. This study provides preliminary evidence for the effectiveness in children of massage in reducing pain and anxiety arising from intrathecal therapy or bone marrow aspiration. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  8. Radiation therapy of brain metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sauer, R; Huenig, R [Kantonsspital Basel (Switzerland). Universitaetsinstitut fuer Medizinische Radiologie

    1975-08-01

    Experiences are reported obtained with radiation therapy of brain metastases in 121 patients during the last 15 years. The treatment to a lesser extent aimed at prolongation of survival but much more at the attempt to alleviate troubles and to spare pain. The indication thus involved medical points of view as well as ethical ones. The radiotherapy of cerebral metastases comprises the whole cranial volume and requires a focal dose of minimally 4,000 R within four weeks. In 53% of the patients, the regression of neurological symptoms was considerable, in 18% even complete, partly beginning already after a few days of treatment. The number of recurrences was small. Under conditions of rigorous indication, the radiation therapy of brain metastases offers a rewarding palliative measure.

  9. Oray surgery and radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carl, W

    1975-07-01

    Clinical evidence seems to indicate that careful oral surgery after radiation therapy contributes little, if anything at all, to the onset of osteoradionecrosis. In many cases the process of bone dissolution has already well progressed before teeth have to be extracted. The bone changes can be demonstrated radiographically and clinically. The teeth in the immediate area become very mobile and cause severe pain during mastication. Whether this condition could have been prevented by extractions before radiation therapy is difficult to establish. Osteoradionecrosis may be encountered in edentulous jaws. It manifests itself clinically by bone segments which break loose and penetrate through the mucosa leaving a defect which does not heal over. More research and more comparative studies are needed in this area in order to make reasonably accurate predictions.

  10. Radiation Therapy and Hearing Loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhandare, Niranjan; Jackson, Andrew; Eisbruch, Avraham; Pan, Charlie C.; Flickinger, John C.; Antonelli, Patrick; Mendenhall, William M.

    2010-01-01

    A review of literature on the development of sensorineural hearing loss after high-dose radiation therapy for head-and-neck tumors and stereotactic radiosurgery or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for the treatment of vestibular schwannoma is presented. Because of the small volume of the cochlea a dose-volume analysis is not feasible. Instead, the current literature on the effect of the mean dose received by the cochlea and other treatment- and patient-related factors on outcome are evaluated. Based on the data, a specific threshold dose to cochlea for sensorineural hearing loss cannot be determined; therefore, dose-prescription limits are suggested. A standard for evaluating radiation therapy-associated ototoxicity as well as a detailed approach for scoring toxicity is presented.

  11. Radiation therapy of gynecological cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nori, D.; Hilaris, B.S.

    1987-01-01

    This book consists of three parts: General Principles; Clinical Applications; and Special Topics. Some of the papers are: Introduction to Basic Radiobiology; Staging and Work-up Procedures for Patients with Gynecological Cancers; Radiation Therapy in the Treatment of Cancer of the Cervix; Role of Interstitial Implantation in Gynecological Cancer; Role of Radiocolloids in Gynecological Cancer; Radiosensitizers and Protectors; and Management of Lymphoma Associated with Pregnancy

  12. Phenotypic characterization of early events of thymus repopulation in radiation bone marrow chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharrow, S.O.; Singer, A.; Hammerling, U.; Mathieson, B.J.

    1983-01-01

    The phenotype of murine thymocytes repopulating the thymus of radiation bone marrow chimeras shortly after irradiation and bone marrow reconstitution was analyzed by immunofluorescence and flow microfluorometry. Thymuses in these chimeras, while essentially devoid of lymphoid cells at day 7, were repopulated by days 10 to 12 after irradiation. It was found that this initial repopulation arose from a radioresistant intrathymic precursor that expanded to an almost complete complement of host-type thymocytes. However, these host-derived thymocytes were unusual in that they were relatively deficient in Lyt 1+2- and peanut agglutinin ''dull'' cells as compared with normal thymocytes. Donor bone-marrow-derived cells first appeared in the irradiated chimeric thymuses between days 12 and 15 after irradiation and bone marrow transfer. By day 19, chimeric thymuses contained more than 98% donor cells. This course was identical for three chimeric combinations, each made across different genetic barriers. In contrast to the cells that populate the fetal thymus during normal ontogeny, the first donor bone-marrow-derived cells that can be detected within the irradiated chimeric thymuses already expressed phenotypically normal adult T cell subpopulations in that they contained significant numbers both of Lyt 1+2- and of Lyt 1+2+ thymocytes. Thus, the Lyt phenotype of donor cells that initially repopulate an adult thymus after irradiation is markedly different from the Lyt phenotype of cells that initially populate the fetal thymus. The differences between adult and fetal thymic development that are observed in radiation bone marrow chimeras may be important in our understanding of T cell differentiation in these animals

  13. Systemic sarcoidosis with bone marrow involvement responding to therapy with adalimumab: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Supen R

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Sarcoidosis is an inflammatory disorder characterized by the presence of non-caseating granulomas in affected organs. The presence of CD4-positive T lymphocytes and macrophages in affected organs suggests an ongoing immune response. Systemic corticosteroids remain the mainstay of treatment, but therapy is often limited by adverse effects. This is the first report of the use of adalimumab (HUMIRA®, Abbott Laboratories, North Chicago, IL, USA, an anti-tumor necrosis factor monoclonal antibody, in a patient with systemic sarcoidosis with bone marrow involvement. Case presentation A 42-year-old African-American man with a medical history significant for hypertension and diabetes mellitus presented with anemia and thrombocytopenia of two months duration. The patient underwent physical examination, bone marrow aspiration and biopsy, chest X-ray, acid-fast bacilli stain, computed tomography with contrast, and additional laboratory tests. He was diagnosed with systemic sarcoidosis with splenomegaly and bone marrow involvement. Drug therapy included prednisone, which had to be discontinued owing to adverse effects, and adalimumab. Conclusion This is the first report describing the use of adalimumab in a patient with systemic sarcoidosis with bone marrow involvement. Tumor necrosis factor antagonism with adalimumab was efficacious and well-tolerated in this patient and may be considered as a treatment option for similar cases.

  14. Systemic sarcoidosis with bone marrow involvement responding to therapy with adalimumab: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Supen R

    2009-07-29

    Sarcoidosis is an inflammatory disorder characterized by the presence of non-caseating granulomas in affected organs. The presence of CD4-positive T lymphocytes and macrophages in affected organs suggests an ongoing immune response. Systemic corticosteroids remain the mainstay of treatment, but therapy is often limited by adverse effects. This is the first report of the use of adalimumab (HUMIRA((R)), Abbott Laboratories, North Chicago, IL, USA), an anti-tumor necrosis factor monoclonal antibody, in a patient with systemic sarcoidosis with bone marrow involvement. A 42-year-old African-American man with a medical history significant for hypertension and diabetes mellitus presented with anemia and thrombocytopenia of two months duration. The patient underwent physical examination, bone marrow aspiration and biopsy, chest X-ray, acid-fast bacilli stain, computed tomography with contrast, and additional laboratory tests. He was diagnosed with systemic sarcoidosis with splenomegaly and bone marrow involvement. Drug therapy included prednisone, which had to be discontinued owing to adverse effects, and adalimumab. This is the first report describing the use of adalimumab in a patient with systemic sarcoidosis with bone marrow involvement. Tumor necrosis factor antagonism with adalimumab was efficacious and well-tolerated in this patient and may be considered as a treatment option for similar cases.

  15. Radiation therapy for pleural mesothelioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seydel, H.G.

    1986-01-01

    There is clear evidence that both pleural and peritoneal malignant mesothelioma are increasing in incidence in the United States. There is a recognized long period of latency from asbestos exposure to the emergence and diagnosis of tumor. Considering the levels of asbestos utilization in the mid-20th century, we must expect that the number of cases will continue to increase until the end of this century. Evaluation of treatment options is thus a critical issue in determining treatment approaches for this disease. Recognized only recently, mesothelioma has no effective treatment, and patients are reported only anecdotally as cured. Pleural mesothelioma is the more common presentation, but even here the reports are from small, uncontrolled series. Only one study is available in which a concomitant comparison of treatment methods was carried out. Randomized clinical studies regarding treatment of pleural mesothelioma have only recently been initiated by the clinical cooperative groups. There is thus a paucity of information on treatment in general and radiation therapy specifically for malignant mesothelioma. This chapter reviews the reported experience using radiation therapy alone and combined with other modalities for the treatment of malignant pleural mesothelioma and considers the potential for improvement of the results of current methods of radiation therapy

  16. Multibeam radiation therapy treatment application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manens, J.P.; Le Gall, G.; Chenal, C.; Ben Hassel, M.; Fresne, F.; Barillot, C.; Gibaud, B.; Lemoine, D.; Bouliou, A.; Scarabin, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    A software package has been developed for multibeam radiation therapy treatment application. We present in this study a computer-assisted dosimetric planning procedure which includes: i), an analytical stage for setting up the large volume via 2D and 3D displays; ii), a planning stage for issue of a treatment strategy including dosimetric simulations; and iii), a treatment stage to drive the target volume to the radiation unit isocenter. The combined use of stereotactic methods and multimodality imagery ensures spatial coherence and makes target definition and cognition of structure environment more accurate. The dosimetric planning suited to the spatial reference (the stereotactic frame) guarantees optimal distribution of the dose, computed by the original 3D volumetric algorithm. A computer-driven chair-framework cluster was designed to position the target volume at the radiation unit isocenter [fr

  17. Late complications of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masaki, Norie

    1998-01-01

    There are cases in which, although all traces of acute radiation complications seem to have disappeared, late complications may appear months or years to become apparent. Trauma, infection or chemotherapy may sometimes recall radiation damage and irreversible change. There were two cases of breast cancer that received an estimated skin dose in the 6000 cGy range followed by extirpation of the residual tumor. The one (12 y.o.) developed atrophy of the breast and severe teleangiectasis 18 years later radiotherapy. The other one (42 y.o.) developed severe skin necrosis twenty years later radiotherapy after administration of chemotherapy and received skin graft. A case (52 y.o.) of adenoidcystic carcinoma of the trachea received radiation therapy. The field included the thoracic spinal cord which received 6800 cGy. Two years and 8 months after radiation therapy she developed complete paraplegia and died 5 years later. A truly successful therapeutic outcome requires that the patient be alive, cured and free of significant treatment-related morbidity. As such, it is important to assess quality of life in long-term survivors of cancer treatment. (author)

  18. Late complications of radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masaki, Norie [Osaka Prefectural Center for Adult Diseases (Japan)

    1998-03-01

    There are cases in which, although all traces of acute radiation complications seem to have disappeared, late complications may appear months or years to become apparent. Trauma, infection or chemotherapy may sometimes recall radiation damage and irreversible change. There were two cases of breast cancer that received an estimated skin dose in the 6000 cGy range followed by extirpation of the residual tumor. The one (12 y.o.) developed atrophy of the breast and severe teleangiectasis 18 years later radiotherapy. The other one (42 y.o.) developed severe skin necrosis twenty years later radiotherapy after administration of chemotherapy and received skin graft. A case (52 y.o.) of adenoidcystic carcinoma of the trachea received radiation therapy. The field included the thoracic spinal cord which received 6800 cGy. Two years and 8 months after radiation therapy she developed complete paraplegia and died 5 years later. A truly successful therapeutic outcome requires that the patient be alive, cured and free of significant treatment-related morbidity. As such, it is important to assess quality of life in long-term survivors of cancer treatment. (author)

  19. Development of local radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Hoon; Lim, Sang Moo; Choi, Chang Woon; Chai, Jong Su; Kim, Eun Hee; Kim, Mi Sook; Yoo, Seong Yul; Cho, Chul Koo; Lee, Yong Sik; Lee, Hyun Moo

    1999-04-01

    The major limitations of radiation therapy for cancer are the low effectiveness of low LET and inevitable normal tissue damage. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a form of potent radiation therapy using Boron-10 having a high propensityof capturing theraml neutrons from nuclear reactor and reacting with a prompt nuclear reaction. Photodynamic therapy is a similiar treatment of modality to BNCT using tumor-seeking photosenistizer and LASER beam. If Boron-10 and photosensitizers are introduced selectively into tumor cells, it is theoretically possible to destroy the tumor and to spare the surrounding normal tissue. Therefore, BNCT and PDT will be new potent treatment modalities in the next century. In this project, we performed PDT in the patients with bladder cancers, oropharyngeal cancer, and skin cancers. Also we developed I-BPA, new porphyrin compounds, methods for estimation of radiobiological effect of neutron beam, and superficial animal brain tumor model. Furthermore, we prepared preclinical procedures for clinical application of BNCT, such as the macro- and microscopic dosimetry, obtaining thermal neutron flux from device used for fast neutron production in KCCH have been performed

  20. Development of local radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Hoon; Lim, Sang Moo; Choi, Chang Woon; Chai, Jong Su; Kim, Eun Hee; Kim, Mi Sook; Yoo, Seong Yul; Cho, Chul Koo; Lee, Yong Sik; Lee, Hyun Moo

    1999-04-01

    The major limitations of radiation therapy for cancer are the low effectiveness of low LET and inevitable normal tissue damage. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a form of potent radiation therapy using Boron-10 having a high propensityof capturing theraml neutrons from nuclear reactor and reacting with a prompt nuclear reaction. Photodynamic therapy is a similiar treatment of modality to BNCT using tumor-seeking photosenistizer and LASER beam. If Boron-10 and photosensitizers are introduced selectively into tumor cells, it is theoretically possible to destroy the tumor and to spare the surrounding normal tissue. Therefore, BNCT and PDT will be new potent treatment modalities in the next century. In this project, we performed PDT in the patients with bladder cancers, oropharyngeal cancer, and skin cancers. Also we developed I-BPA, new porphyrin compounds, methods for estimation of radiobiological effect of neutron beam, and superficial animal brain tumor model. Furthermore, we prepared preclinical procedures for clinical application of BNCT, such as the macro- and microscopic dosimetry, obtaining thermal neutron flux from device used for fast neutron production in KCCH have been performed.

  1. Radiation therapy for primary orbital lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, Cliff K.S.; Lin Hsiusan; Rao Devineni, V.; Smith, Morton

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: The influence of tumor size, grade, thoroughness of staging workup, and radiation dose on disease control, radiation-related complications, and incidence of systemic progression of primary orbital lymphoma is analyzed. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients with Stage I primary orbital lymphoma were treated from August 1976 through August 1991 at Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology. Staging workups included physical examination, chest x-ray, complete blood count (CBC), liver function test, and computerized tomography (CT) scan of the orbit, abdomen, and pelvis. Nineteen patients had bone marrow biopsy. The histological types based on the National Cancer Institute working formulation were 9 low-grade and 11 intermediate-grade, including five lymphocytic lymphomas of intermediate differentiation. The extension of disease and the volume of tumor were evaluated by CT scan of the orbit. The most commonly used radiation therapy technique was single anterior direct field with 4 MV or 6 MV photons. Lens was shielded or not treated in eight patients. Dose ranged from 20 to 43.2 Gy. Thirteen of 20 patients received 30 Gy. Minimum follow-up was 24 months (median, 4 years). Results: Local control was achieved in all 20 patients. One patient with lymphocytic lymphoma with intermediate differentiation developed disseminated disease. Actuarial disease-free survival (DFS) was 100% and 90% at 2 and 5 years, respectively. No retinopathy was observed. Cataracts were noted in seven patients at 1 to 10 years following irradiation (median, 2 years). Three patients developed lacrimal function disorder, however, no corneal ulceration occurred. Conclusions: Thirty Gy in 15 fractions appears to be a sufficient dose for local control with acceptable morbidity, especially for low-grade, as well as certain types of intermediate-grade lymphomas, such as diffuse small cleaved cell and lymphocytic lymphoma of intermediate differentiation. Systemic dissemination is minimal, provided local

  2. Radiation therapy for primary orbital lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, Cliff K.S.; Hsiusan, Lin; Rao Devineni, V; Smith, Morton

    1995-02-15

    Purpose: The influence of tumor size, grade, thoroughness of staging workup, and radiation dose on disease control, radiation-related complications, and incidence of systemic progression of primary orbital lymphoma is analyzed. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients with Stage I primary orbital lymphoma were treated from August 1976 through August 1991 at Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology. Staging workups included physical examination, chest x-ray, complete blood count (CBC), liver function test, and computerized tomography (CT) scan of the orbit, abdomen, and pelvis. Nineteen patients had bone marrow biopsy. The histological types based on the National Cancer Institute working formulation were 9 low-grade and 11 intermediate-grade, including five lymphocytic lymphomas of intermediate differentiation. The extension of disease and the volume of tumor were evaluated by CT scan of the orbit. The most commonly used radiation therapy technique was single anterior direct field with 4 MV or 6 MV photons. Lens was shielded or not treated in eight patients. Dose ranged from 20 to 43.2 Gy. Thirteen of 20 patients received 30 Gy. Minimum follow-up was 24 months (median, 4 years). Results: Local control was achieved in all 20 patients. One patient with lymphocytic lymphoma with intermediate differentiation developed disseminated disease. Actuarial disease-free survival (DFS) was 100% and 90% at 2 and 5 years, respectively. No retinopathy was observed. Cataracts were noted in seven patients at 1 to 10 years following irradiation (median, 2 years). Three patients developed lacrimal function disorder, however, no corneal ulceration occurred. Conclusions: Thirty Gy in 15 fractions appears to be a sufficient dose for local control with acceptable morbidity, especially for low-grade, as well as certain types of intermediate-grade lymphomas, such as diffuse small cleaved cell and lymphocytic lymphoma of intermediate differentiation. Systemic dissemination is minimal, provided local

  3. Ionizing Radiation Stimulates Expression of Pro-Osteoclastogenic Genes in Marrow and Skeletal Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwood, J. S.; Shahnazari, M.; Chicana, B.; Schreurs, A. S.; Kumar, A.; Bartolini, A.; Shirazi-Fard, Y.; Globus, R. K.

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation can cause rapid mineral loss and increase bone-resorbing osteoclasts within metabolically-active, cancellous-bone tissue leading to structural deficits. To better understand mechanisms involved in rapid, radiation-induced bone loss, we determined the influence of total-body irradiation on expression of select cytokines known both to stimulate osteoclastogenesis and contribute to inflammatory bone disease. Adult (16wk), male C57BL/6J mice were exposed to either 2Gy gamma rays (137Cs, 0.8Gy/min) or heavy ions (56Fe, 600MeV, 0.50-1.1Gy/min); this dose corresponds to either a single fraction of radiotherapy (typical total dose is =10Gy) or accumulates over long-duration, interplanetary missions. Serum, marrow, and mineralized tissue were harvested 4hrs-7d later. Gamma irradiation caused a prompt (2.6-fold within 4hrs) and persistent (peaking at 4.1-fold within 1d) rise in the expression of the obligate osteoclastogenic cytokine, receptor activator of nuclear factor kappaB-ligand (Rankl) within marrow cells over controls. Similarly, Rankl expression peaked in marrow cells within 3d of iron exposure (9.2-fold). Changes in Rankl expression induced by gamma irradiation preceded and overlapped with a rise in expression of other pro-osteoclastic cytokines in marrow (e.g., monocyte chemotactic protein-1 increased 11.9-fold, tumor necrosis factor-alpha increased 1.7- fold over controls). Marrow expression of the RANKL decoy receptor, osteoprotegerin (Opg), also rose after irradiation (11.3-fold). The ratio Rankl/Opg in marrow was increased 1.8-fold, a net pro-resorption balance. As expected, radiation increased a serum marker of resorption (tartrate resistant acid phosphatase) and led to cancellous bone loss (16% decrease in bone volume/total volume) through reduced trabecular struts. We conclude that total-body irradiation (gamma or heavy-ion) caused temporal, concerted regulation of gene expression within marrow and mineralized tissue for

  4. Histamine protects bone marrow against cellular damage induced by Ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina, Vanina; Sambuco, Lorena; Massari, Noelia; Cricco, Graciela; Martin, Gabriela; Bergoc, Rosa; Rivera, Elena S.

    2008-01-01

    After surgery, radiotherapy is arguably one of the most important treatments for cancer, especially for localized disease that has not spread. However, ionizing radiation is toxic not only to tumor cells but also to healthy tissues causing serious adverse effects to patients. We have recently reported that histamine prevents ionizing radiation-induced toxicity on mouse small intestine. The aim of the present work was to determine whether histamine is able to protect bone marrow cells against ionizing radiation damage. For that purpose 56 mice were divided into 4 groups. Histamine and Histamine-10Gy groups received a daily subcutaneous histamine injection (0.1 mg/kg) starting 20 hours before irradiation and continued till the end of experimental period; untreated group received saline. Histamine-10Gy and untreated-10Gy groups were irradiated with a single dose on whole-body using Cesium-137 source (7 Gy/min) and were sacrificed 3 days after irradiation. Bone marrow was removed, fixed and stained with hematoxylin and eosin. The number of megacariocytes per 40x field, bone marrow tropism, edema, vascular damage, and other histological characteristics of bone marrow cells were evaluated. We further determined by immunohistochemistry the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and cells in the S phase of the cell cycle were identified by immunohistochemical detection of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation. Results indicate that histamine treatment substantially reduced the grade of aplasia, the edema and the vascular damage induced by ionizing radiation on bone marrow. Additionally, histamine preserved medullar components increasing significantly the number of megacariocytes per field (5.4 ± 0.4 vs. 2.8 ± 0.4 in Control-10 Gy, P<0.01). This effect was associated with an increased proliferation rate determined by the augmented PCNA expression and BrdU incorporation of bone marrow cells. On the basis of these results, we conclude that histamine

  5. UMF-synthetase activity in rat tissue extracts with the bone 4 marrow form of radiation sickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levitova, E.N.; Koshcheenko, N.N.; Romantsev, E.F.

    1986-01-01

    Whole-body γ-irradiation of rats with a dose inducing bone marrow radiation syndrome caused phase organospecific chages in UMP-synthase activity. Disturbances of enzymic activity in the bone marrow and spleen well correlated with the dynamics of interphase and reproductive cell death. In brain extracts, UMP biosynthesis from orotic acid did not undergo essential changes

  6. Radiation therapy for the solitary plasmacytoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esengül Koçak

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasma-cell neoplasms are classically categorized into four groups as: multiple myeloma (MM, plasma-cell leukemias, solitary plasmacytomas (SP of the bone (SPB, and extramedullary plasmacytomas (EMP. These tumors may be described as localized or diffuse in presentation. Localized plasma-cell neoplasms are rare, and include SP of the skeletal system, accounting for 2-5% of all plasma-cell neoplasms, and EMP of soft tissue, accounting for approximately 3% of all such neoplasms. SP is defined as a solitary mass of neoplastic plasma cells either in the bone marrow or in various soft tissue sites. There appears to be a continuum in which SP often progresses to MM. The main treatment modality for SP is radiation therapy (RT. However, there are no conclusive data in the literature on the optimal RT dose for SP. This review describes the interrelationship of plasma-cell neoplasms, and attempts to determine the minimal RT dose required to obtain local control.

  7. Stem cell-based therapies for acute radiation syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guha, Chandan

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation in the event of accidental or intentional incident such as nuclear/radiological terrorism can lead to debilitating injuries to multiple organs resulting in death within days depending on the amount of radiation dose and the quality of radiation. Unfortunately, there is not a single FDA-licensed drug approved against acute radiation injury. The RadStem Center for Medical Countermeasures against Radiation (RadStem CMGR) program at Einstein is developing stem cell-based therapies to treat acute radiation syndrome (ARS). We have demonstrated that intravenous transplantation of bone marrow-derived and adipose-derived stromal cells, consisting of a mixture of mesenchymal, endothelial and myeloid progenitors can mitigate mice exposed to whole body irradiation of 12 Gy or whole abdominal irradiation of up to 20 Gy. We identified a variety of growth and differentiation factors that individually is unable to improve survival of animals exposed to lethal irradiation, but when administered sequentially mitigates radiation injury and improves survival. We termed this phenomenon as synthetic survival and describe a new paradigm whereby the 'synthetic survival' of irradiated tissues can be promoted by systemic administration of growth factors to amplify residual stem cell clonogens post-radiation exposure, followed by a differentiation factor that favors tissue stem cell differentiation. Synthetic survival can be applied to mitigate lethal radiation injury in multiple organs following radiation-induced hematopoeitic, gastrointestinal and pulmonary syndromes. (author)

  8. Ghrelin Therapy Improves Survival after Whole-Body Ionizing Irradiation or Combined with Burn or Wound: Amelioration of Leukocytopenia, Thrombocytopenia, Splenomegaly, and Bone Marrow Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliann G. Kiang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to ionizing radiation alone (RI or combined with traumatic tissue injury (CI is a crucial life-threatening factor in nuclear and radiological events. In our laboratory, mice exposed to 60Co-γ-photon radiation (9.5 Gy, 0.4 Gy/min, bilateral followed by 15% total-body-surface-area skin wounds (R-W CI or burns (R-B CI experienced an increment of ≥18% higher mortality over a 30-day observation period compared to RI alone. CI was accompanied by severe leukocytopenia, thrombocytopenia, erythropenia, and anemia. At the 30th day after injury, numbers of WBC and platelets still remained very low in surviving RI and CI mice. In contrast, their RBC, hemoglobin, and hematocrit were recovered towards preirradiation levels. Only RI induced splenomegaly. RI and CI resulted in bone-marrow cell depletion. In R-W CI mice, ghrelin (a hunger-stimulating peptide therapy increased survival, mitigated body-weight loss, accelerated wound healing, and increased hematocrit. In R-B CI mice, ghrelin therapy increased survival and numbers of neutrophils, lymphocytes, and platelets and ameliorated bone-marrow cell depletion. In RI mice, this treatment increased survival, hemoglobin, and hematocrit and inhibited splenomegaly. Our novel results are the first to suggest that ghrelin therapy effectively improved survival by mitigating CI-induced leukocytopenia, thrombocytopenia, and bone-marrow injury or the RI-induced decreased hemoglobin and hematocrit.

  9. Impact of Bone Marrow Radiation Dose on Acute Hematologic Toxicity in Cervical Cancer: Principal Component Analysis on High Dimensional Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun Liang; Messer, Karen; Rose, Brent S.; Lewis, John H.; Jiang, Steve B.; Yashar, Catheryn M.; Mundt, Arno J.; Mell, Loren K.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To study the effects of increasing pelvic bone marrow (BM) radiation dose on acute hematologic toxicity in patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy, using a novel modeling approach to preserve the local spatial dose information. Methods and Materials: The study included 37 cervical cancer patients treated with concurrent weekly cisplatin and pelvic radiation therapy. The white blood cell count nadir during treatment was used as the indicator for acute hematologic toxicity. Pelvic BM radiation dose distributions were standardized across patients by registering the pelvic BM volumes to a common template, followed by dose remapping using deformable image registration, resulting in a dose array. Principal component (PC) analysis was applied to the dose array, and the significant eigenvectors were identified by linear regression on the PCs. The coefficients for PC regression and significant eigenvectors were represented in three dimensions to identify critical BM subregions where dose accumulation is associated with hematologic toxicity. Results: We identified five PCs associated with acute hematologic toxicity. PC analysis regression modeling explained a high proportion of the variation in acute hematologicity (adjusted R 2 , 0.49). Three-dimensional rendering of a linear combination of the significant eigenvectors revealed patterns consistent with anatomical distributions of hematopoietically active BM. Conclusions: We have developed a novel approach that preserves spatial dose information to model effects of radiation dose on toxicity, which may be useful in optimizing radiation techniques to avoid critical subregions of normal tissues. Further validation of this approach in a large cohort is ongoing.

  10. Basal cell carcinoma after radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimbo, Keisuke; Terashi, Hiroto; Ishida, Yasuhisa; Tahara, Shinya; Osaki, Takeo; Nomura, Tadashi; Ejiri, Hirotaka

    2008-01-01

    We reported two cases of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) that developed after radiation therapy. A 50-year-old woman, who had received an unknown amount of radiation therapy for the treatment of intracranial germinoma at the age of 22, presented with several tumors around the radiation ulcer. All tumors showed BCC. A 33-year-old woman, who had received an unknown amount of radiation therapy on the head for the treatment of leukemia at the age of 2, presented with a black nodule within the area of irradiation. The tumor showed BCC. We discuss the occurrence of BCC after radiation therapy. (author)

  11. Bone marrow stromal cell therapy for ischemic stroke: A meta-analysis of randomized control animal trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qing; Wang, Yuexiang; Demaerschalk, Bart M; Ghimire, Saruna; Wellik, Kay E; Qu, Wenchun

    2017-04-01

    Background Results of animal studies assessing efficacy of bone marrow stromal cell therapy for ischemic stroke remain inconsistent. Aims The aims are to assess efficacy of bone marrow stromal cell therapy for ischemic stroke in animal studies. Methods Randomized controlled animal trials assessing efficacy of bone marrow stromal cell therapy were eligible. Stroke therapy academic industry round table was used to assess methodologic quality of included studies. Primary outcomes were total infarction volume and modified Neurological Severity Score. Multiple prespecified sensitivity analyses and subgroup analyses were conducted. Random effects models were used for meta-analysis. Results Thirty-three randomized animal trials were included with a total of 796 animals. The median quality score was 6 (interquartile range, 5-7). Bone marrow stromal cell therapy decreased total infarction volume (standardized mean difference, 0.897; 95% confidence interval, 0.553-1.241; P animals treated with bone marrow stromal cell and controls was 2.47 (95% confidence interval, 1.84-3.11; P animal studies. Conclusions Bone marrow stromal cell therapy significantly decreased total infarction volume and increased neural functional recovery in randomized controlled animal models of ischemic stroke.

  12. DNA repair related to radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, W.

    1979-01-01

    The DNA excision repair capacity of peripheral human lymphocytes after radiation therapy has been analyzed. Different forms of application of the radiation during the therapy have been taken into account. No inhibition of repair was found if cells were allowed a certain amount of accomodation to radiation, either by using lower doses or longer application times. (G.G.)

  13. External Beam Radiation Therapy for Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    External beam radiation therapy is used to treat many types of cancer. it is a local treatment, where a machine aims radiation at your cancer. Learn more about different types of external beam radiation therapy, and what to expect if you're receiving treatment.

  14. Radiation therapy of humeroscapular periarthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassenstein, E; Nuesslin, F; Renner, K [Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Germany, F.R.). Abt. fuer Strahlentherapie und Spezielle Onkologie; Hartweg, H [Basel Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. fuer Medizinische Radiologie

    1979-02-01

    The effectiveness of radiation therapy in 233 cases with periarthritis humeroscapularis is reviewed in a prospective study from the Basel canton hospital. The patients are studied with regard to different parameters, such as duration of the anamnesis, importance of the dose, moment of evaluation of the results and influence of a 2-series technique. The total result, comprising 43.3% cases without complaints, 30.9% being better, and 25.8% whose troubles had not changed, is compared with the compiled statistical data of 4957 cases found in literature. The gonadal load is discussed on the basis of our own investigations.

  15. Insufficiency fracture after radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Dong Ryul; Huh, Seung Jae [Dept.of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    Insufficiency fracture occurs when normal or physiological stress applied to weakened bone with demineralization and decreased elastic resistance. Recently, many studies reported the development of IF after radiation therapy (RT) in gynecological cancer, prostate cancer, anal cancer and rectal cancer. The RT-induced insufficiency fracture is a common complication during the follow-up using modern imaging studies. The clinical suspicion and knowledge the characteristic imaging patterns of insufficiency fracture is essential to differentiate it from metastatic bone lesions, because it sometimes cause severe pain, and it may be confused with bone metastasis.

  16. Radiation Therapy for Chloroma (Granulocytic Sarcoma)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakst, Richard; Wolden, Suzanne [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Yahalom, Joachim, E-mail: yahalomj@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Objectives: Chloroma (granulocytic sarcoma) is a rare, extramedullary tumor of immature myeloid cells related to acute nonlymphocytic leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome. Radiation therapy (RT) is often used in the treatment of chloromas; however, modern studies of RT are lacking. We reviewed our experience to analyze treatment response, disease control, and toxicity associated with RT to develop treatment algorithm recommendations for patients with chloroma. Patients and Methods: Thirty-eight patients who underwent treatment for chloromas at our institution between February 1990 and June 2010 were identified and their medical records were reviewed and analyzed. Results: The majority of patients that presented with chloroma at the time of initial leukemia diagnosis (78%) have not received RT because it regressed after initial chemotherapy. Yet most patients that relapsed or remained with chloroma after chemotherapy are in the RT cohort (90%). Thirty-three courses of RT were administered to 22 patients. Radiation subsite breakdown was: 39% head and neck, 24% extremity, 9% spine, 9% brain, 6% genitourinary, 6% breast, 3% pelvis, and 3% genitourinary. Median dose was 20 (6-36) Gy. Kaplan-Meier estimates of progression-free survival and overall survival in the RT cohort were 39% and 43%, respectively, at 5 years. At a median follow-up of 11 months since RT, only 1 patient developed progressive disease at the irradiated site and 4 patients developed chloromas at other sites. RT was well tolerated without significant acute or late effects and provided symptom relief in 95% of cases. Conclusions: The majority of patients with chloromas were referred for RT when there was extramedullary progression, marrow relapse, or rapid symptom relief required. RT resulted in excellent local disease control and palliation of symptoms without significant toxicity. We recommend irradiating chloromas to at least 20 Gy, and propose 24 Gy in 12 fractions as an appropriate regimen.

  17. Dominance and persistence of donor marrow in long-lived allogeneic radiation chimeras obtained with unmanipulated bone marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierpaoli, W.; Maestroni, G.J.M.

    1983-01-01

    Allogeneic, H-2-incompatible irradiation chimeras (H-2sup(d) → H-2sup(b)) constructed with normal, unmanipulated bone marrow and with marrow-derived factors live long and do not manifest a GvH disease. Their response to primary immunization is deficient but their alloreactivity is normal. This chimeric allotolerance cannot be passively transferred from chimeric donors to normal irradiated recipients. Passive transfer of both donor- or recipient-type immuno-competent T-cells into the chimeric mice does not lead to syngeneic reconstitution, rejection of the engrafted marrow or GvH disease, and the mice maintain permanently their chimerism. This new model demonstrates that chimerism is not eradicable in long-lived chimeras reconstituted with unmanipulated bone marrow, and that the bone marrow itself plays a dominant role in maintenance of chimerism. (Auth.)

  18. Measurement of absorbed radiation doses during whole body irradiation for bone marrow transplants using thermoluminescent dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giordani, Adelmo Jose; Segreto, Helena Cristina Comodo; Segreto, Roberto Araujo; Medeiros, Regina Bitelli; Oliveira, Jose Salvador R. de

    2004-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate the precision of the absorbed radiation doses in bone marrow transplant therapy during whole body irradiation. Two-hundred CaSO 4 :Dy + teflon tablets were calibrated in air and in 'phantom'. These tablets were randomly selected and divided in groups of five in the patients' body. The dosimetric readings were obtained using a Harshaw 4000A reader. Nine patients had their entire bodies irradiated in parallel and opposite laterals in a cobalt-60 Alcion II model, with a dose rate of 0.80 Gy/min at 80.5 cm, {(10 ? 10) cm 2 field. The dosimetry of this unit was performed using a Victoreen 500 dosimeter. For the determination of the mean dose at each point evaluated, the individual values of the tablets calibrated in air or 'phantom' were used, resulting in a build up of 2 mm to superficialize the dose at a distance of 300 cm. In 70% of the patients a variation of less than 5% in the dose was obtained. In 30% of the patients this variation was less than 10%, when values obtained were compared to the values calculated at each point. A mean absorption of 14% was seen in the head, and an increase of 2% of the administered dose was seen in the lungs. In patients with latero-lateral distance greater than 35 cm the variation between the calculated doses and the measured doses reached 30% of the desired dose, without the use of compensation filters. The measured values of the absorbed doses at the various anatomic points compared to the desired doses (theoretic) presented a tolerance of ± 10%, considering the existent anatomical differences and when using the individual calibration factors of the tablets. (author)

  19. Radiation therapy of thoracic and abdominal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaRue, S.M.; Gillette, S.M.; Poulson, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    Until recently, radiotherapy of thoracic and abdominal tumors in animals has been limited. However, the availability of computerized tomography and other imaging techniques to aid in determining the extent of tumor, an increase in knowledge of dose tolerance of regional organs, the availability of isocentrically mounted megavoltage machines, and the willingness of patients to pursue more aggressive treatment is making radiation therapy of tumors in these regions far more common. Tumor remission has been reported after radiation therapy of thymomas. Radiation therapy has been used to treat mediastinal lymphoma refractory to chemotherapy, and may be beneficial as part of the initial treatment regimen for this disease. Chemodectomas are responsive to radiation therapy in human patients, and favorable response has also been reported in dogs. Although primary lung tumors in dogs are rare, in some cases radiation therapy could be a useful primary or adjunctive therapy. Lung is the dose-limiting organ in the thorax. Bladder and urethral tumors in dogs have been treated using intraoperative and external-beam radiation therapy combined with chemotherapy. These tumors are difficult to control locally with surgery alone, although the optimal method of combining treatment modalities has not been established. Local control of malignant perianal tumors is also difficult to achieve with surgery alone, and radiation therapy should be used. Intraoperative radiation therapy combined with external-beam radiation therapy has been used for the management of metastatic carcinoma to the sublumbar lymph nodes. Tolerance of retroperitoneal tissues may be decreased by disease or surgical manipulation

  20. New radiation mitigators to reduce bone marrow death of mice by post-irradiation administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anzai, Kazunori

    2009-01-01

    We have found recently that heat-treated mineral yeast preparations and water-soluble analogs of vitamin E are potent radiation mitigator to reduce bone marrow death of mice by post-irradiation administration. When administered immediately after whole-body X-irradiation (7.5 Gy), both Zn-yeast and γ-tocopherol dimethylglycine ester (TDMG) significantly increased the viability of mice from 0% (control) to more than 90% (treated). Zn-yeast did not inhibit the tumor-regulation by γ-rays but even sensitize the radiation effect in mice xenografts of HeLa cells. (author)

  1. Radiation therapy for operable rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondar, G.V.; Semikoz, N.G.; Bashejev, V.Kh.; Borota, O.V.; Bondarenko, M.V.; Kiyashko, O.Yu.

    2012-01-01

    The authors present a review of the literature on modern tendencies of radiation therapy application to treatment of operable rectal cancer. Many randomized control studies compared the efficacy of combination of radiation therapy (pre-operative or post-operative) and surgery versus surgery only demonstrating various results. Meta-analysis of the data on efficacy of combination of radiation therapy and standard surgery revealed 22 randomized control studies (14 with pre-operative radiation therapy and 8 with post-operative radiation therapy) with total number of 8507 patients (Colorectal Cancer Collaborative Group, 2000). The use of combination treatment reduced the number of isolated locoregional relapses both with pre-operative (22.5 - 12.5 %; p < 0.00001) and post-operative radiation therapy (25.8 - 16.7 %; p - 0.00001). The influence on total survival was not significant (62 % vs. 63 %; p - 0.06).

  2. Postoperative Radiation Therapy of Craniopharyngioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Il Han; Park, Charn Il; Cho, Byung Kyu [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Hyong Geln [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-06-15

    Between December 1979 and September 1989, 23 patients with craniopharyngioma who underwent surgery and postoperative radiation therapy were retrospectively evaluated to assess the efficacy of this management at the Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital. Total removal of tumor was attempted in all patients. Of these, surgeons tried total removal in eight patients, but revealed residual mass by postoperative CT, and partial removal was done in 15 patients. The morphology of tumor on the operative finding was grouped into three types : cystic 13 (57%), solid 4 (17%), and mixed 6 (26%). Cystic type was predominant in {<=}20 years old group. Actuarial overall survival rates at 5 and 10 years were 95% and 81% respectively and actuarial tumor control rates were 74% and 50%. Surgical extent was not related to the survival rates(p=0.41). Pediatric and adolescent Patients(age of {<=}20 year) had a trend of better survival than that of adult patients(p=0.10). The results indicated that limited surgical excision followed by radiation therapy is recommended when total excision is not possible.

  3. Postoperative Radiation Therapy of Craniopharyngioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Il Han; Park, Charn Il; Cho, Byung Kyu; Yun, Hyong Geln

    1993-01-01

    Between December 1979 and September 1989, 23 patients with craniopharyngioma who underwent surgery and postoperative radiation therapy were retrospectively evaluated to assess the efficacy of this management at the Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital. Total removal of tumor was attempted in all patients. Of these, surgeons tried total removal in eight patients, but revealed residual mass by postoperative CT, and partial removal was done in 15 patients. The morphology of tumor on the operative finding was grouped into three types : cystic 13 (57%), solid 4 (17%), and mixed 6 (26%). Cystic type was predominant in ≤20 years old group. Actuarial overall survival rates at 5 and 10 years were 95% and 81% respectively and actuarial tumor control rates were 74% and 50%. Surgical extent was not related to the survival rates(p=0.41). Pediatric and adolescent Patients(age of ≤20 year) had a trend of better survival than that of adult patients(p=0.10). The results indicated that limited surgical excision followed by radiation therapy is recommended when total excision is not possible

  4. Radiation therapy of peritoneal mesothelioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lederman, G.; Recht, A.

    1986-01-01

    The role of radiation therapy in the treatment of peritoneal mesotheliomas remains ill-defined despite its association with the few long-term survivals reported for this disease. The rationale for local therapy is clear as the disease most often is confined to the peritoneal cavity at the time of initial diagnosis and remains there for much of the subsequent course. Effective local treatment of this intra-abdominal disease would likely improve survival. The absence of randomized studies has made analysis of the various treatments of the disease and the few reported success difficult. Nonetheless, scrutiny of the available data may offer insights and guide future clinical trials, as well as the clinician responsible for the treatment of current patients with peritoneal mesothelioma. The radiotherapeutic approach to oncology stresses anatomic considerations in an attempt to understand the patterns of spread of the primary tumor. The observed location and bulk of disease by clinical examination, radiologic study, surgical exploration, and autopsy suggest mechanisms of metastases (direct extension, lymphatic or hematogenous). This dictates the administration of radiation that best achieves a successful outcome

  5. Risk analysis of external radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arvidsson, Marcus

    2011-09-01

    External radiation therapy is carried out via a complex treatment process in which many different groups of staff work together. Much of the work is dependent on and in collaboration with advanced technical equipment. The purpose of the research task has been to identify a process for external radiation therapy and to identify, test and analyze a suitable method for performing risk analysis of external radiation therapy

  6. Missed Radiation Therapy and Cancer Recurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patients who miss radiation therapy sessions during cancer treatment have an increased risk of their disease returning, even if they eventually complete their course of radiation treatment, according to a new study.

  7. Radiobiology of systemic radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, David; McEwan, Alexander J

    2007-02-01

    Although systemic radionuclide therapy (SRT) is effective as a palliative therapy in patients with metastatic cancer, there has been limited success in expanding patterns of utilization and in bringing novel systemic radiotherapeutic agents to routine clinical use. Although there are many factors that contribute to this situation, we hypothesize that a better understanding of the radiobiology and mechanism of action of SRT will facilitate the development of future compounds and the future designs of prospective clinical trials. If these trials can be rationalized to the biological basis of the therapy, it is likely that the long-term outcome would be enhanced therapeutic efficacy. In this review, we provide perspectives of the current state of low-dose-rate (LDR) radiation research and offer linkages where appropriate with current clinical knowledge. These include the recently described phenomena of low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity-increased radioresistance (LDH-IRR), adaptive responses, and biological bystander effects. Each of these areas require a major reconsideration of existing models for radiation action and an understanding of how this knowledge will integrate into the evolution of clinical SRT practice. Validation of a role in vivo for both LDH-IRR and biological bystander effects in SRT would greatly impact the way we would assess therapeutic response to SRT, the design of clinical trials of novel SRT radiopharmaceuticals, and risk estimates for both therapeutic and diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals. We believe that the current state of research in LDR effects offers a major opportunity to the nuclear medicine community to address the basic science of clinical SRT practice, to use this new knowledge to expand the use and roles of SRT, and to facilitate the introduction of new therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals.

  8. Radiation therapy for prostatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Akira; Minowada, Shigeru; Tomoishi, Junzo; Kinoshita, Kenji; Matsuda, Tadayoshi

    1983-01-01

    A conformation radiotherapy system with collimators, whose openings can be controlled symmetrically by computerized techniques during rotational irradiation by a linear accelerator, has been developed for routine use in our hospital. Forty-four patients underwent radiation therapy, including this particular modality of radiotherapy, for prostatic cancer during the period of July 1976 through December 1981. Eight patients were classified as stage A, 10 stage B, 10 stage C, and 16 as stage D. Twenty-nine patients underwent conformation radiotherapy, two rotation radiotherapy, eight 2-port opposing technique radiotherapy, one 4-field radiotherapy, and four underwent a combination of 2-port opposing technique and conformation radiotherapy. Transient mild side effects such as diarrhea occurred in seven cases, while severe side effects such as rectal stricture or contracted bladder occurred in three cases. The latter occurred only in one case among 29 of conformation radiotherapy and in two among eight of 2-port opposing technique radiotherapy. The results of the treatment of short intervals in stage B, C, and D are as follows: prostatic size was reduced in 26 cases among 36, serum acid phosphatase level was reduced in 15 among 18 who had showed high acid phosphatase levels before treatment, although almost all cases underwent simultaneous hormonal therapy. The effects of radiotherapy alone were verified in two cases of stage B in which radiotherapy preceded hormonal therapy. Prostatic size and serum acid phosphatase level were reduced by radiotherapy alone. (author)

  9. New experimental approach to treatment of radiation-induced bone marrow aplasia: ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic cells; Nouvelle approche experimentale du traitement de l`aplasie medullaire radio-induite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herodin, F.; Mathieu, J.; Drouet, M.; Grenier, N.; Grange, L.; Bourin, P.; Vetillard, J.; Thierry, D.; Mestries, J.C.

    1995-12-31

    The management of bone marrow aplasia secondary to accidental exposure to high doses of ionizing radiations requires new therapeutic protocols in addition to cytokine therapy. The in vitro incubation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells from irradiated nonhuman primates with negative and positive regulators of hematopoiesis may lead to helpful products of transfusion. (author).

  10. Capacity of bone marrow colony forming unit-fibroblasts in vitro from mice with combined radiation-burn injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xinghua; Luo Chengji; Guo Chaohua; Wang Ping

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the capacity of bone marrow colony forming unit-fibroblasts (CFU-F) from mice with combined radiation-burn injury. Methods: Mice were treated with 5.0 Gy γ-ray radiation alone, 15% total body surface area (TBSA) III degree burn alone or combined radiation-burn. The numbers of CFU-Fs were assayed by Dexter's method. Results: The numbers of CFU-Fs from mice with radiation and combined radiation-burn injury were significantly decreased, compared with those of controls and mice with burn injury alone (P<0.05-0.01). conclusion: The results reveal that the repairing process of bone marrow stromal cells from mice with radiation injury and combined radiation-burn injury is slow, and the combined radiation-burn injury inflicted on the stromal cells possesses the characteristic of radiation injury

  11. Radiation therapy sources, equipment and installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-03-01

    The safety code for Telegamma Therapy Equipment and Installations, (AERB/SC/MED-1) and safety code for Brachytherapy Sources, Equipment and Installations, (AERB/SC/MED-3) were issued by AERB in 1986 and 1988 respectively. These codes specified mandatory requirements for radiation therapy facilities, covering the entire spectrum of operations ranging from the setting up of a facility to its ultimate decommissioning, including procedures to be followed during emergency situations. The codes also stipulated requirements of personnel and their responsibilities. With the advent of new techniques and equipment such as 3D-conformal radiation therapy, intensity modulated radiation therapy, image guided radiation therapy, treatment planning system, stereotactic radiosurgery, stereotactic radiotherapy, portal imaging, integrated brachytherapy and endovascular brachytherapy during the last two decades, AERB desires that these codes be revised and merged into a single code titled Radiation Therapy Sources, Equipment, and Installations

  12. Bone marrow transplantation rescues intestinal mucosa after whole body radiation via paracrine mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Ya Hui; Lin, Li-Mei; Lou, Chi-Wen; Chou, Chuan-Kai; Ch’ang, Hui-Ju

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Our previous study reveals bone marrow transplantation (BMT) recruits host marrow-derived myelomonocytic cells to radiation-injured intestine, enhancing stromal proliferation, leading secondarily to epithelial regeneration. In this study, we propose BMT ameliorates intestinal damage via paracrine mechanisms. Materials and methods: Angiogenic cytokines within the intestinal mucosa of mice after whole body irradiation (WBI) with or without BMT were measured by cytokine array and ELISA. BM conditioned medium (BMCM) with or without treatment with neutralizing antibodies to angiogenic cytokines were continuously infused into mice for three days after radiation. Carrageenan was used to deplete myelomonocytic cells of mice. Results: BMT increased VEGF, bFGF and other angiogenic and chemotactic cytokines in the intestinal mucosa within 24 h after WBI. Infusion of BMCM ameliorated radiation-induced intestinal damage with improved stromal activity and prolonged survival of mice. Neutralization of bFGF, PDGF and other angiogenic cytokines within BMCM abolished the mitigating effect to the intestine. Pretreatment of carrageenan to recipient mice reversed some of the cytokine levels, including VEGF, bFGF and IGF within the intestinal mucosa after BMT. Conclusions: Our result suggests BMT recruits host myelomonocytic cells and enhances intestinal stroma proliferation after radiation by secreting cytokines enhancing angiogenesis and chemotaxis. Host myelomonocytic cells further uplift the paracrine effect to enhance intestinal mucosal recovery.

  13. Protection of the patient in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    In the ICRP report (ICRP-Pub-44) a broad picture of radiotheraphy is presented useful to all involved in the care of cancer patients, for instance to physicians, including medical oncologists, and to medical physicists, radiographers, dosimetrists, and administrators. Information is given on the general principles of radiation therapy including external beam therapy and brachytherapy; the accuracy of radiation delivery and quality assurance; the biological radiation response; the expected risk to specific organs or tissues from therapeutic irradiation; the absorbed dose to tissues inside and outside the useful radiation beams; the organization and planning of radiation oncology services; radiation therapy staff education, training and duties; and finally medical research involving the use of radiation therapy. (orig./HP) [de

  14. Melioidosis: reactivation during radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jegasothy, B.V.; Goslen, J.B.; Salvatore, M.A.

    1980-01-01

    Melioidosis is caused by Pseudomonas pseudomallei, a gram-negative, motile bacillus which is a naturally occurring soil saprophyte. The organism is endemic in Southeast Asia, the Philippines, Australia, and parts of Central and South America. Most human disease occurs from infection acquired in these countries. Infection with P pseudomallei may produce no apparent clinical disease. Acute pneumonitis or septicemia may result from inhalation of the organism, and inoculation into sites of trauma may cause localized skin abscesses, or the disease may remain latent and be reactivated months or years later by trauma, burns, or pneumococcal pneumonia, diabetic ketoacidosis, influenza, or bronchogenic carcinoma. The last is probably the commonest form of melioidosis seen in the United States. We present the first case of reactivation of melioidosis after radiation therapy for carcinoma of the lung, again emphasizing the need to consider melioidosis in a septic patient with a history of travel, especially to Southeast Asia

  15. Phenotypic characterization of the bone marrow stem cells used in regenerative cellular therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macias Abraham, Consuelo; Valle Perez, Lazaro O del; Baganet Cobas, Aymara

    2011-01-01

    Regenerative medicine is a novel therapeutic method with broad potential for the treatment of various illnesses, based on the use of bone marrow (BM) stem cells, whose phenotypic characterization is limited. The paper deals with the expression of different cell membrane markers in mononuclear BM cells from 14 patients who underwent autologous cell therapy, obtained by medullary puncture and mobilization to peripheral blood, with the purpose of characterizing the different types of cells present in that heterogeneous cellular population and identifying the adhesion molecules involved in their adhesion. A greater presence was observed of adherent stem cells from the marrow stroma in mononuclear cells obtained directly from the BM; a larger population of CD90 +c ells in mononuclear cells from CD34 -/ CD45 -p eripheral blood with a high expression of molecules CD44 and CD62L, which suggests a greater presence of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) in mobilized cells from the marrow stroma. The higher levels of CD34 +c ells in peripheral blood stem cells with a low expression of molecules CD117 -a nd DR -s uggests the presence of hematopoietic stem cells, hemangioblasts and progenitor endothelial cells mobilized to peripheral circulation. It was found that mononuclear cells from both the BM and peripheral blood show a high presence of stem cells with expression of adhesion molecule CD44 (MMC marker), probably involved in their migration, settling and differentiation

  16. Review of Preclinical and Clinical Studies of Bone Marrow-Derived Cell Therapies for Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Henrique Rosado-de-Castro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is the second leading cause of mortality worldwide, causing millions of deaths annually, and is also a major cause of disability-adjusted life years. Hemorrhagic stroke accounts for approximately 10 to 27% of all cases and has a fatality rate of about 50% in the first 30 days, with limited treatment possibilities. In the past two decades, the therapeutic potential of bone marrow-derived cells (particularly mesenchymal stem cells and mononuclear cells has been intensively investigated in preclinical models of different neurological diseases, including models of intracerebral hemorrhage and subarachnoid hemorrhage. More recently, clinical studies, most of them small, unblinded, and nonrandomized, have suggested that the therapy with bone marrow-derived cells is safe and feasible in patients with ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke. This review discusses the available evidence on the use of bone marrow-derived cells to treat hemorrhagic strokes. Distinctive properties of animal studies are analyzed, including study design, cell dose, administration route, therapeutic time window, and possible mechanisms of action. Furthermore, clinical trials are also reviewed and discussed, with the objective of improving future studies in the field.

  17. Radiation therapy of brain tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, K. J.; Lee, D. H.; Park, C. Y.

    1980-01-01

    One hundred and six cases of brain tumors were treated at the Yonsei Cancer Center from January 1972 to August 1978 by Co-60 teletherapy unit. We analyses their clinical findings, histopathological findings, treatment and results. In those cases which computerized tomography had been used before and after radiation therapy, changes in tumor size and the presence of edema or necrosis following treatment was evaluated. 1. Among 106 cases, 90 cases were primary brain tumors and 16 cases were metastatic brain tumors. Pituitary tumors (38), glioma (34) and pinealoma (10) composed of most of primary brain tumors. 2. Post treatment follow-up was possible in 38 cases more than 1 years. Four among 11 cases of giloma expired and survivors had considerable neurological symptoms except 2 cases. Sixty five percent (12/20) of pituitary tumors showed improvement of visual symptoms and all cases (7) of pinealoma which post treatment follow-up was possible, showed remarkable good response. 3. Findings of CT scan after radiation treatment were compatible with results of clinical findings and post treatment follow-up. It showed complete regression of tumor mass in one case of pinealoma and medulloblastoma. One case of pituitary tumor showed almost complete regression of tumor mass. It also showed large residual lesion in cases of glioblastoma multiforme and cystic astrocytoma.

  18. Targeted drugs in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favaudon, V.; Hennequin, C.; Hennequin, C.

    2004-01-01

    New drugs aiming at the development of targeted therapies have been assayed in combination with ionizing radiation over the past few years. The rationale of this concept comes from the fact that the cytotoxic potential of targeted drugs is limited, thus requiring concomitant association with a cytotoxic agent for the eradication of tumor cells. Conversely a low level of cumulative toxicity is expected from targeted drugs. Most targeted drugs act through inhibition of post-translational modifications of proteins, such as dimerization of growth factor receptors, prenylation reactions, or phosphorylation of tyrosine or serine-threonine residues. Many systems involving the proteasome, neo-angiogenesis promoters, TGF-β, cyclooxygenase or the transcription factor NF-κB, are currently under investigation in hopes they will allow a control of cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle progression, tumor angiogenesis and inflammation. A few drugs have demonstrated an antitumor potential in particular phenotypes. In most instances, however, radiation-drug interactions proved to be strictly additive in terms of cell growth inhibition or induced cell death. Strong potentiation of the response to radiotherapy is expected to require interaction with DNA repair mechanisms. (authors)

  19. SU-F-J-222: Using PET Imaging to Evaluate Proliferation and Blood Flow in Irradiated and Non-Irradiated Bone Marrow 1 Year After Chemoradiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGuire, S; Ponto, L; Menda, Y [University Of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To compare proliferation and blood flow in pelvic and thoracic bone marrow 1 year after pelvic chemoradiation. Methods: Sixteen pelvic cancer patients were enrolled in an IRB-approved protocol to acquire FLT PET images during radiation therapy simulation (baseline) and 1 year after chemoradiation therapy. Three subjects also had optional O-15 water PET images acquired 1 year after chemoradiation therapy. Baseline FLT PET images were used to create IMRT plans to spare pelvic bone marrow identified as regions with FLT SUV ≥ 2 without compromising PTV coverage or OAR sparing. Marrow VOIs were defined using a 50% maximum pixel value threshold on baseline FLT PET images (VIEW, PMOD version 3.5) in the sacrum and thoracic spine representing irradiated and non-irradiated regions, respectively. FLT PET and O-15 water PET images acquired 1 year after therapy were co-registered to baseline images (FUSION PMOD) and the same VOIs were used to measure proliferation (FLT SUV) and blood flow (O-15 water uptake). Separate image-based input functions were used for blood flow quantitation in each VOI. Results: Mean 1 year FLT SUV in sacral and thoracic VOIs for were 1.1 ± 0.4 and 6.5 ± 1.7, respectively for N = 16 subjects and were 1.2 ± 0.2 and 5.6 ± 1.6, respectively for N = 3 subjects who also underwent O-15 water imaging. Blood flow measures in equivalent sacral and thoracic marrow regions (N = 3) were 21.3 ± 8.7 and 18.3 ± 4.9 mL/min/100mL respectively. Conclusion: Decreased bone marrow proliferation measured by FLT SUV does not appear to correspond to decreased blood flow as measured by O-15 water PET imaging. Based on this small sample at a single time point, reduced blood supply does not explain reductions in bone marrow proliferative activity 1 year after chemoradiation therapy.

  20. Nonsurgical treatment for cancer using radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogi, Yasuo

    2012-01-01

    The number of people who are dying from cancer has been increasing in association with population aging. Radiation therapy is now one of the three major cancer treatment methods, along with surgery and chemotherapy. People used to consider radiation therapy only as a ''noninvasive cancer treatment''; however, with the ceaseless effort by medical experts and corporations, different radiation therapy types and techniques including the latest technical advances have come out one after another, and the improvements in radiation therapies have provided treatments that are not only less traumatizing to patients but also as effective and therapeutic as surgery in certain body regions. The importance of radiation therapy has become and will become even greater in the society with more elderly cancer patients who do not have the physical strength to undergo surgery. In this article, the history of radiation therapy, rapidly developed high-precision radiation therapy techniques, and unsolved issues are discussed, and then, ''MHI vero4DRT'', which is the high-precision image-guided radiation therapy equipment developed for solving such issues, is introduced. (author)

  1. Job satisfaction among radiation therapy educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swafford, Larry G; Legg, Jeffrey S

    2007-01-01

    Job satisfaction is one of the most consistent variables related to employee retention and is especially relevant considering the shortage of radiation therapists and radiation therapy educators in the United States. To investigate job satisfaction levels among radiation therapy educators certified by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists and employed in programs accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology. The long form of the Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire (MSQ) was mailed to 158 radiation therapy educators to measure job satisfaction. Overall job satisfaction and subscales were calculated based on MSQ methodology. A total of 90 usable surveys were returned for a 56.9% response rate. With a "general satisfaction" score of 69.64, radiation therapy educators ranked in the lowest 25th percentile of the nondisabled norm scale for job satisfaction. Respondents reported higher degrees of job satisfaction on the moral values, social service and achievement subscales. Lower job satisfaction levels were associated with the company policies and practices, advancement and compensation subscales. Radiation therapy educators report low job satisfaction. Educational institutions must tailor recruitment and retention efforts to better reflect the positive aspects of being a radiation therapy educator. Furthermore, improving retention and recruitment efforts might help offset the current shortages of radiation therapy educators and, ultimately, clinical radiation therapists.

  2. Chemotherapy and molecular target therapy combined with radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimoto, Tetsuo

    2012-01-01

    Combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy has been established as standard treatment approach for locally advanced head and neck cancer, esophageal cancer and so on through randomized clinical trials. However, radiation-related morbidity such as acute toxicity also increased as treatment intensity has increased. In underlining mechanism for enhancement of normal tissue reaction in chemo-radiation therapy, chemotherapy enhanced radiosensitivity of normal tissues in addition to cancer cells. Molecular target-based drugs combined with radiation therapy have been expected as promising approach that makes it possible to achieve cancer-specific enhancement of radiosensitivity, and clinical trials using combined modalities have been performed to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of this approach. In order to obtain maximum radiotherapeutic gain, a detailed understanding of the mechanism underlying the interaction between radiation and Molecular target-based drugs is indispensable. Among molecular target-based drugs, inhibitors targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and its signal transduction pathways have been vigorously investigated, and mechanisms regarding the radiosensitizing effect have been getting clear. In addition, the results of randomized clinical trials demonstrated that radiation therapy combined with cetuximab resulted in improvement of overall and disease-specific survival rate compared with radiation therapy in locally advanced head and neck cancer. In this review, clinical usefulness of chemo-radiation therapy and potential molecular targets for potentiation of radiation-induced cell killing are summarized. (author)

  3. Modern Radiation Therapy for Hodgkin Lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Specht, Lena; Yahalom, Joachim; Illidge, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is the most effective single modality for local control of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and an important component of therapy for many patients. These guidelines have been developed to address the use of RT in HL in the modern era of combined modality treatment. The role of reduced...... on Radiation Units and Measurements concepts of gross tumor volume, clinical target volume, internal target volume, and planning target volume are used for defining the targeted volumes. Newer treatment techniques, including intensity modulated radiation therapy, breath-hold, image guided radiation therapy......, and 4-dimensional imaging, should be implemented when their use is expected to decrease significantly the risk for normal tissue damage while still achieving the primary goal of local tumor control. The highly conformal involved node radiation therapy (INRT), recently introduced for patients for whom...

  4. The effect of radiation therapy on bone scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kado, Bunmei; Nakajima, Tetsuo; Sakura, Mizuyoshi; Ishihara, Akinori; Sasaki, Yasuhito; Nagai, Teruo.

    1982-01-01

    With the purpose to evaluate effect of radiation therapy on bone scintigraphy, ninety nine bone scans and Ga-67 citrate tumor scans were performed on 67 patients, including 42 with lung cancer, 5 with esophageal cancer, 4 malignant lymphoma and 15 with other malignancy. The spinal uptake of Tc-99m diphosphonate and Ga-67 citrate were evaluated during or after radiation therapy involving thoracic and lumbar spines. The correlation among the spinal uptake of radioactivity in the radiation field, the irradiation dose and the interval after radiotherapy was investigated. The results revealed that 34 of 99 bone scans (34%) showed ''decreased'' radioactivity in the irradiated spines. Twenty six of 41 bone scans (63%) performed more than three months after radiotherapy showed ''decreased'' spinal uptake. Among the same 41 bone scans, 16 of 21 bone scans (76%) taken in patients who received more than 5000 rads showed ''decreased'' spinal uptake. The decreased spinal uptake was irreversible. Eight cases changed to ''decreased'' from ''equilibrated'' during follow up study after radiotherapy. Twenty two of 31 cases (71%) with Ga tumor scans, which were performed in the earlier periods and with less dose of radiotherapy as compared with bone scans, showed ''decreased'' spinal uptake, which suggests impaired Ga-67 uptake by the bone marrow rather than the spinal bone. The factors causing decreased uptake of radioactivity in bone scan after irradiation were discussed in view of irradiation effect on bone tissue. The descrepancy of uptake of radioactivity between bone scan and Ga tumor scan was also discussed reviewing difference of radiation effect on bone and bone marrow cells. (author)

  5. Mechanical Loading Attenuates Radiation-Induced Bone Loss in Bone Marrow Transplanted Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govey, Peter M.; Zhang, Yue; Donahue, Henry J.

    2016-01-01

    Exposure of bone to ionizing radiation, as occurs during radiotherapy for some localized malignancies and blood or bone marrow cancers, as well as during space travel, incites dose-dependent bone morbidity and increased fracture risk. Rapid trabecular and endosteal bone loss reflects acutely increased osteoclastic resorption as well as decreased bone formation due to depletion of osteoprogenitors. Because of this dysregulation of bone turnover, bone’s capacity to respond to a mechanical loading stimulus in the aftermath of irradiation is unknown. We employed a mouse model of total body irradiation and bone marrow transplantation simulating treatment of hematologic cancers, hypothesizing that compression loading would attenuate bone loss. Furthermore, we hypothesized that loading would upregulate donor cell presence in loaded tibias due to increased engraftment and proliferation. We lethally irradiated 16 female C57Bl/6J mice at age 16 wks with 10.75 Gy, then IV-injected 20 million GFP(+) total bone marrow cells. That same day, we initiated 3 wks compression loading (1200 cycles 5x/wk, 10 N) in the right tibia of 10 of these mice while 6 mice were irradiated, non-mechanically-loaded controls. As anticipated, before-and-after microCT scans demonstrated loss of trabecular bone (-48.2% Tb.BV/TV) and cortical thickness (-8.3%) at 3 wks following irradiation. However, loaded bones lost 31% less Tb.BV/TV and 8% less cortical thickness (both pbones also had significant increases in trabecular thickness and tissue mineral densities from baseline. Mechanical loading did not affect donor cell engraftment. Importantly, these results demonstrate that both cortical and trabecular bone exposed to high-dose therapeutic radiation remain capable of an anabolic response to mechanical loading. These findings inform our management of bone health in cases of radiation exposure. PMID:27936104

  6. Transfer of innate resistance and susceptibility to Leishmania donovani infection in mouse radiation bone marrow chimaeras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crocker, P.R.; Blackwell, J.M.; Bradley, D.J. (London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (UK))

    1984-07-01

    Reciprocal radiation bone marrow chimaeras were made between H-2-compatible strains of mice innately resistant or susceptible to visceral leishmaniasis. In initial experiments, susceptibility but not resistance to Leishmania donovani could be transferred with donor bone marrow into irradiated recipients. In subsequent experiments it was possible to transfer both resistance and susceptibility. This was achieved either by selecting more radiosensitive mouse strains as susceptible recipients, or alternatively by increasing the irradiation dose for the susceptible recipients used in the initial experiments. Using the higher irradiation dose, successful transfer of resistance and susceptibility between congenic mice carrying the Lshsup(r) and Lshsup(s) alleles on the more radioresistant B10 genetic background provided firm evidence that the results obtained in this study were specifically related to expression of the Lsh gene. It is concluded that Lsh gene-controlled resistance and susceptibility to L. donovani is determined by bone marrow-derived cells. The cell type(s) involved is likely to be of the macrophage lineage.

  7. Transfer of innate resistance and susceptibility to Leishmania donovani infection in mouse radiation bone marrow chimaeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crocker, P.R.; Blackwell, J.M.; Bradley, D.J.

    1984-01-01

    Reciprocal radiation bone marrow chimaeras mere made between H-2-compatible strains of mice innately resistant or susceptible to visceral leishmaniasis. In initial experiments, susceptibility but not resistance to Leishmania donovani could be transferred with donor bone marrow into irradiated recipients. In subsequent experiments it was possible to transfer both resistance and susceptibility. This was achieved either by selecting more radiosensitive mouse strains as susceptible recipients, or alternatively by increasing the irradiation dose for the susceptible recipients used in the initial experiments. Using the higher irradiation dose, successful transfer of resistance and susceptibility between congenic mice carrying the Lshsup(r) and Lshsup(s) alleles on the more radioresistant B10 genetic background provided firm evidence that the results obtained in this study were specifically related to expression of the Lsh gene. It is concluded that Lsh gene-controlled resistance and susceptibility to L. donovani is determined by bone marrow-derived cells. The cell type(s) involved is likely to be of the macrophage lineage. (author)

  8. Radioprotection against radiation induced bone marrow syndrome by a semi-synthetic derivative of chlorophyll

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suryavanshi, Shweta; Sharma, Deepak; Checker, Rahul; Santosh Kumar, S.; Sainis, Krishna B.

    2014-01-01

    A plethora of biological properties have been attributed to chlorophyllin (CHL), the water soluble derivative of the green plant pigment chlorophyll. Several studies are available describing its ability to modify genotoxic effects. It has been shown that administration CHL to human lymphopenic individuals led to the recovery and restoration of the immune system and also inhibited aflatoxin B1-DNA binding in individuals residing in high risk exposure to this liver carcinogen. The present study is aimed at establishing radioprotective efficacy of CHL against ionizing radiation induced hematopoietic syndrome. CHL offered complete protection against whole body irradiation (WBI, 7 Gy) induced mortality in mice. This observation was supported by increase in the number of macroscopic endogenous colonies enumerated on the surface of the spleens taken from CHL+WBI group as compared to WBI group. Radioprotection by CHL was found to be mediated by increasing the frequency of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) as evaluated by side population assay. Administration of CHL induced G1 arrest in bone marrow cells, increased number of granulocytes and neutrophils in the peripheral blood. At the molecular level, activation of ERK was observed in bone marrow cells obtained from CHL administered mice. In conclusion, CHL mediated radioprotection was attributed to increased stem cell numbers, G1 arrest in bone marrow cells, increased neutrophil numbers and ERK activation. (author)

  9. Radiation therapy facilities in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballas, Leslie K.; Elkin, Elena B.; Schrag, Deborah; Minsky, Bruce D.; Bach, Peter B.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: About half of all cancer patients in the United States receive radiation therapy as a part of their cancer treatment. Little is known, however, about the facilities that currently deliver external beam radiation. Our goal was to construct a comprehensive database of all radiation therapy facilities in the United States that can be used for future health services research in radiation oncology. Methods and Materials: From each state's health department we obtained a list of all facilities that have a linear accelerator or provide radiation therapy. We merged these state lists with information from the American Hospital Association (AHA), as well as 2 organizations that audit the accuracy of radiation machines: the Radiologic Physics Center (RPC) and Radiation Dosimetry Services (RDS). The comprehensive database included all unique facilities listed in 1 or more of the 4 sources. Results: We identified 2,246 radiation therapy facilities operating in the United States as of 2004-2005. Of these, 448 (20%) facilities were identified through state health department records alone and were not listed in any other data source. Conclusions: Determining the location of the 2,246 radiation facilities in the United States is a first step in providing important information to radiation oncologists and policymakers concerned with access to radiation therapy services, the distribution of health care resources, and the quality of cancer care

  10. Late radiation damage in bone, bone marrow and brain vasculature, with particular emphasis upon fractionation models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitkaenen, Maunu.

    1986-04-01

    X-ray induced changes in rat and human bone and bone marrow vasculature and in rat brain vasculature were measured as a function of time after irradiation and absorbed dose. The absorbed dose in the organ varied from 5 to 25 Gy for single dose irradiations and from 19 to 58 Gy for fractionated irradiations.The number of fractions varied from 3 to 10 for the rats and from 12 to 25 for the human. Blood flow changes were measured using an ''1''2''5I antipyrine or ''8''6RbCl extraction technique. The red blood cell (RBC) volume was examined by ''5''1Cr labelled red cells. Different fractionation models have been compared. Radiation induced reduction of bone and bone marrow blood flow were both time and dose dependent. Reduced blood flow 3 months after irradiation would seem to be an important factor in the subsequent atrophy of bones. With a single dose of 10 Gy the bone marrow blood flow returned to the control level by 7 months after irradiation. In the irradiated bone the RBC volume was about same as that in the control side but in bone marrow the reduction was from 32 to 59%. The dose levels predicted by the nominal standard dose (NSD) formula produced about the same damage to the rat femur seven months after irradiation when the extraction of ''8''6Rb chloride and the dry weight were concerned as the end points. However, the results suggest that the NSB formula underestimates the late radiation damage in bone marrow when a small number of large fractions are used. In the irradiated brains of the rats the blood flow was on average 20.4% higher compared to that in the control group. There was no significant difference in brain blood flow between different fractionation schemes. The value of 0.42 for the exponent of N corresponds to the average value for central nervous system tolerance in the literature. The model used may be sufficiently accurate for clinical work provided the treatment schemes used do not depart too radically from standard practice

  11. Origanum vulgare leaf extract protects mice bone marrow cells against ionizing radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Ghasemnezhad Targhi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Ionizing radiation produces free radicals which induce DNA damage and cell death. Origanum vulgare leaf extract (OVLE is a natural compound and its capability of scavenging free radicals and its antioxidant activity have been demonstrated by many researchers. In this study, using micronucleus assay, radioprotective effect of OVLE against clastogenic and cytotoxic effect of gamma irradiation has been investigated in mice bone marrow cells. Materials and Methods: OVLE was injected intraperitoneally to the BALB/c mice 1hr prior to gamma irradiation (3Gy at the doses of 100 and 200 mg/kg. Twenty four hours after irradiation or treatment, animals were killed and smears were prepared from the bone marrow cells. The slides were stained with May Grunwald–Giemsa method and analyzed microscopically. The frequency of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MnPCEs, micronucleated normochromatic erythrocyte (MnNCEs and cell proliferation ratio PCE/PCE+NCE (polychromatic erythrocyte/polychromatic erythrocyte + normochromatic erythrocyte were calculated. Results: The results showed that gamma irradiation (3Gy increased the frequency of MnPCEs, MnNCEs and  reduced the PCE/PCE+NCE ratio in mice bone marrow compared to the non-irradiated control group (p< 0.0001. Injection of OVLE significantly reduced the frequency of MnPCEs (p< 0.0001 and MnNCEs (p< 0.05 and increased the PCE/PCE+NCE ratio as compared to the irradiated control group (p< 0.05. Conclusion: It seems that OVLE with its antioxidant properties and its capability of scavenging free radicals and reactive oxygen species can reduce the cytotoxic effects of gamma irradiation in mice bone marrow cells.

  12. Risk management of radiation therapy. Survey by north Japan radiation therapy oncology group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Masahiko; Abe, Yoshinao; Yamada, Shogo; Hareyama, Masato; Nakamura, Ryuji; Sugita, Tadashi; Miyano, Takashi

    2004-01-01

    A North Japan Radiation Oncology Group (NJRTOG) survey was carried out to disclose the risk management of radiation therapy. During April 2002, we sent questionnaires to radiation therapy facilities in northern Japan. There were 31 replies from 27 facilities. Many incidents and accidents were reported, including old cases. Although 60% of facilities had a risk management manual and/or risk manager, only 20% had risk management manuals for radiation therapy. Eighty five percent of radiation oncologists thought that incidents may be due to a lack of manpower. Ninety percent of radiation oncologists want to know the type of cases happened in other facilities. The risk management system is still insufficient for radiation therapy. We hope that our data will be a great help to develop risk management strategies for radiation therapy for all radiation oncologists in Japan. (author)

  13. Recruitment of bone marrow derived cells during anti-angiogenic therapy in GBM : Bone marrow derived cell in GBM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, Jennifer C.; Walenkamp, Annemiek M. E.; den Dunnen, Wilfred F. A.

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a highly vascular tumor characterized by rapid and invasive tumor growth, followed by oxygen depletion, hypoxia and neovascularization, which generate a network of disorganized, tortuous and permeable vessels. Recruitment of bone marrow derived cells (BMDC) is crucial for

  14. Neutrophils, a candidate biomarker and target for radiation therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schernberg, Antoine; Blanchard, Pierre; Chargari, Cyrus; Deutsch, Eric

    2017-11-01

    Neutrophils are the most abundant blood-circulating white blood cells, continuously generated in the bone marrow. Growing evidence suggests they regulate the innate and adaptive immune system during tumor evolution. This review will first summarize the recent findings on neutrophils as a key player in cancer evolution, then as a potential biomarker, and finally as therapeutic targets, with respective focuses on the interplay with radiation therapy. A complex interplay: Neutrophils have been associated with tumor progression through multiple pathways. Ionizing radiation has cytotoxic effects on cancer cells, but the sensitivity to radiation therapy in vivo differ from isolated cancer cells in vitro, partially due to the tumor microenvironment. Different microenvironmental states, whether baseline or induced, can modulate or even attenuate the effects of radiation, with consequences for therapeutic efficacy. Inflammatory biomarkers: Inflammation-based scores have been widely studied as prognostic biomarkers in cancer patients. We have performed a large retrospective cohort of patients undergoing radiation therapy (1233 patients), with robust relationship between baseline blood neutrophil count and 3-year's patient's overall survival in patients with different cancer histologies. (Pearson's correlation test: p = .001, r = -.93). Therapeutic approaches: Neutrophil-targeting agents are being developed for the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Neutrophils either can exert antitumoral (N1 phenotype) or protumoral (N2 phenotype) activity, depending on the Tumor Micro Environment. Tumor associated N2 neutrophils are characterized by high expression of CXCR4, VEGF, and gelatinase B/MMP9. TGF-β within the tumor microenvironment induces a population of TAN with a protumor N2 phenotype. TGF-β blockade slows tumor growth through activation of CD8 + T cells, macrophages, and tumor associated neutrophils with an antitumor N1 phenotype. This supports

  15. Study on external beam radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Mi Sook; Yoo, Seoung Yul; Yoo, Hyung Jun; Ji, Young Hoon; Lee, Dong Han; Lee, Dong Hoon; Choi, Mun Sik; Yoo, Dae Heon; Lee, Hyo Nam; Kim, Kyeoung Jung

    1999-04-01

    To develop the therapy technique which promote accuracy and convenience in external radiation therapy, to obtain the development of clinical treatment methods for the global competition. The contents of the R and D were 1. structure, process and outcome analysis in radiation therapy department. 2. Development of multimodality treatment in radiation therapy 3. Development of computation using networking techniques 4. Development of quality assurance (QA) system in radiation therapy 5. Development of radiotherapy tools 6. Development of intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) tools. The results of the R and D were 1. completion of survey and analysis about Korea radiation therapy status 2. Performing QA analysis about ICR on cervix cancer 3. Trial of multicenter randomized study on lung cancers 4. Setting up inter-departmental LAN using MS NT server and Notes program 5. Development of ionization chamber and dose-rate meter for QA in linear accelerator 6. Development on optimized radiation distribution algorithm for multiple slice 7. Implementation on 3 dimensional volume surface algorithm and 8. Implementation on adaptor and cone for IORT

  16. Study on external beam radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Mi Sook; Yoo, Seoung Yul; Yoo, Hyung Jun; Ji, Young Hoon; Lee, Dong Han; Lee, Dong Hoon; Choi, Mun Sik; Yoo, Dae Heon; Lee, Hyo Nam; Kim, Kyeoung Jung

    1999-04-01

    To develop the therapy technique which promote accuracy and convenience in external radiation therapy, to obtain the development of clinical treatment methods for the global competition. The contents of the R and D were 1. structure, process and outcome analysis in radiation therapy department. 2. Development of multimodality treatment in radiation therapy 3. Development of computation using networking techniques 4. Development of quality assurance (QA) system in radiation therapy 5. Development of radiotherapy tools 6. Development of intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) tools. The results of the R and D were 1. completion of survey and analysis about Korea radiation therapy status 2. Performing QA analysis about ICR on cervix cancer 3. Trial of multicenter randomized study on lung cancers 4. Setting up inter-departmental LAN using MS NT server and Notes program 5. Development of ionization chamber and dose-rate meter for QA in linear accelerator 6. Development on optimized radiation distribution algorithm for multiple slice 7. Implementation on 3 dimensional volume surface algorithm and 8. Implementation on adaptor and cone for IORT.

  17. Cardiovascular effects of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, Jose A.G.; Leiva, Gustavo

    2001-01-01

    Therapeutic mediastinal irradiation can induce heart disease with variable degree of cardiac engagement. Heart disease manifestations depend on the grade of involvement of the different cardiac structures. During the first two years following irradiation, pericarditis with or without pericardial effusion is the most common manifestation of toxicity related to radiation therapy. Later on, after a latency period of five to ten years, a constrictive pericarditis may develop. Other type of late cardiac toxicities due to irradiation are restrictive cardiomyopathy, multiple valvular disease, coronary artery disease and different atrioventricular conduction disturbances. The therapeutic approach to this kind of heart disease has to be focused on its progressive course and in the possibility of a global involvement of all the cardiac structures. Pericardiectomy is strongly recommended for recurrent pericardial effusion with cardiac tamponade. Cardiac surgery for myocardial revascularization or valvular disease can be performed with variable results; the presence of myocardial fibrosis can significantly affect perioperative management and long-term results. Cardiac transplantation is a promissory option for those patients with end-stage cardiac failure. Immunosuppressive regimens are not associated with recurrence of malignancy. (author) [es

  18. Dietary protection during radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bounous, G.; Le Bel, E.; Shuster, J.; Gold, P.; Tahan, W.T.; Bastin, E.; Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Sherbrooke; Montreal General Hospital, Quebec

    1975-01-01

    Eighteen patients receiving Cobalt 60 irradiation for abdominal or pelvic malignancies were assigned at random to eat either a semi-hydrolyzed diet (Flexical: 10 g% casein hydrolsate; 14 g% triglycerides, 20% of which medium chain; 66% disaccharides) or a normal diet. There are no significant differences between these two groups with respect to age and the ratio of ideal to actual caloric intake. The patients in the control group received on the average a total of 3,900 rd and those in the Flexical group 4,040 rd. Generally, Flexical appeared to have a significant positive effect on body weight. In addition, radiation-induced diarrhea was not a problem in the Flexical group. In the latter-group, serum proteins including immunoglobulins remained essentially unchanged during therapy while a moderate but significant fall was observed in all control patients. No significant difference between the two groups was observed with respect to peripheral blood hematocrit, red and white cell counts. However, the drop in blood lymphocytes following irradiation was significantly less in the Flexical group. The mechanisms of radioprotection are discussed. These preliminary data indicate that the nutritional and perhaps the immunological status of cancer patients receiving intensive irradiation can be maintained by dietary measures. (orig.) [de

  19. Radiation effect on the generation and expression of bone marrow stromal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Xiaoya; Jin Weilao; Gao Jianjun; Zhou Yi; Sheng Hui

    2009-01-01

    In order to investigate focal flushing dose radiation effect on the generation, differentiation and gene expression of bone marrow stromal cells the femoral head of rats was irradiated at 30 Gy by 137 Cs γ-rays (dose rate: 0.83 Gy/min). Then the bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) was cultured. The ability of proliferation and colony formation was observed and the expression level of Cbf-α1, PPAR-γ, VEGF-a and KDR was detected by RT-PCR technology in two weeks later. It has been found that after partly irradiated by 137 Cs γ-rays the proliferation and the number of colony of BMSCs in irradiated group decreases obviously meanwhile the expression level of Cbf-α1, PPAR-γ and VEGF-a in irradiated BMSCs obviously decreases by 18.98 %, 9.46 %, 57.34 % and 5.56 % respectively compared to the normal BMSCs (p<0.05). It shows that the focal great radiation could damage the BMSCs and depress the generation, differentiation and the expression of the related genes obviously. (authors)

  20. Gene therapy/bone marrow transplantation in ADA-deficient mice: roles of enzyme-replacement therapy and cytoreduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiangyang; Wang, Xingchao; Yu, Xiao-Jin; Rozengurt, Nora; Kaufman, Michael L.; Wang, Xiaoyan; Gjertson, David; Zhou, Yang; Blackburn, Michael R.; Kohn, Donald B.

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy (GT) for adenosine deaminase–deficient severe combined immune deficiency (ADA-SCID) can provide significant long-term benefit when patients are given nonmyeloablative conditioning and ADA enzyme-replacement therapy (ERT) is withheld before autologous transplantation of γ-retroviral vector-transduced BM CD34+ cells. To determine the contributions of conditioning and discontinuation of ERT to the therapeutic effects, we analyzed these factors in Ada gene knockout mice (Ada−/−). Mice were transplanted with ADA-deficient marrow transduced with an ADA-expressing γ-retroviral vector without preconditioning or after 200 cGy or 900 cGy total-body irradiation and evaluated after 4 months. In all tissues analyzed, vector copy numbers (VCNs) were 100- to 1000-fold greater in mice receiving 900 cGy compared with 200 cGy (P < .05). In mice receiving 200 cGy, VCN was similar whether ERT was stopped or given for 1 or 4 months after GT. In unconditioned mice, there was decreased survival with and without ERT, and VCN was very low to undetectable. When recipients were conditioned with 200 cGy and received transduced lineage-depleted marrow, only recipients receiving ERT (1 or 4 months) had detectable vector sequences in thymocytes. In conclusion, cytoreduction is important for the engraftment of gene-transduced HSC, and short-term ERT after GT did not diminish the capacity of gene-corrected cells to engraft and persist. PMID:22833548

  1. Gene therapy/bone marrow transplantation in ADA-deficient mice: roles of enzyme-replacement therapy and cytoreduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonaro, Denise A; Jin, Xiangyang; Wang, Xingchao; Yu, Xiao-Jin; Rozengurt, Nora; Kaufman, Michael L; Wang, Xiaoyan; Gjertson, David; Zhou, Yang; Blackburn, Michael R; Kohn, Donald B

    2012-11-01

    Gene therapy (GT) for adenosine deaminase-deficient severe combined immune deficiency (ADA-SCID) can provide significant long-term benefit when patients are given nonmyeloablative conditioning and ADA enzyme-replacement therapy (ERT) is withheld before autologous transplantation of γ-retroviral vector-transduced BM CD34+ cells. To determine the contributions of conditioning and discontinuation of ERT to the therapeutic effects, we analyzed these factors in Ada gene knockout mice (Ada(-/-)). Mice were transplanted with ADA-deficient marrow transduced with an ADA-expressing γ-retroviral vector without preconditioning or after 200 cGy or 900 cGy total-body irradiation and evaluated after 4 months. In all tissues analyzed, vector copy numbers (VCNs) were 100- to 1000-fold greater in mice receiving 900 cGy compared with 200 cGy (P < .05). In mice receiving 200 cGy, VCN was similar whether ERT was stopped or given for 1 or 4 months after GT. In unconditioned mice, there was decreased survival with and without ERT, and VCN was very low to undetectable. When recipients were conditioned with 200 cGy and received transduced lineage-depleted marrow, only recipients receiving ERT (1 or 4 months) had detectable vector sequences in thymocytes. In conclusion, cytoreduction is important for the engraftment of gene-transduced HSC, and short-term ERT after GT did not diminish the capacity of gene-corrected cells to engraft and persist.

  2. Removing the cells from adult bone marrow derived stem cell therapy does not eliminate cardioprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasin, Mohammed

    2013-04-01

    The debate as to whether adult stem cell therapy is regenerative or not continues. The non-regenerative benefits of adult bone marrow-derived stem cell therapy were investigated by testing whether the supernatant derived from unfractionated bone marrow mononuclear cells might be cardioprotective in an animal model of myocardial ischaemia-reperfusion injury. Regional myocardial reperfusion injury was acquired by 25 min reversible left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) occlusion followed by 2 h reperfusion, in anaesthetized Wistar male rats. Unfractionated bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNC) isolated from sibling Wistar male rat whole bone marrow were phenotyped by fluorescence activated cell sorting flowcytometry for the haematopoietic stem cell surface markers c-kit, CD34, CD45 and CD133. Animals subjected to regional myocardial reperfusion injury received either 10 million BMMNC or BMMNC supernatant (BMS); both were collected in 0.5 ml phosphate-buffered saline and delivered by intravenous bolus at the onset of reperfusion. The left ventricular region distal to the LAD occlusion point was excised for measurement of myocardial infarct size and proteomic analysis, which was used to identify whether there were any differences in myocardial proteins associated with intravenous injection of either BMMNC or BMS. BMMNC were phenotyped to be c-kit(+) (7 ± 1%), CD34(+) (7 ± 1%), CD45(+) (54 ± 6%), CD133(+) (15 ± 1%). The supernatant reduced myocardial infarct size (BMS 34 ± 2%, n = 15 vs control 57 ± 2%, n = 7, P < 0.0001), which was comparable to the reduction in infarct size afforded by the injection of cells (BMMNC 33 ± 3% vs control 57 ± 2%, n = 10, P < 0.0001). Proteomics of hearts treated with either BMS or BMMNC demonstrated higher expression of (i) anti-apoptotic signal transduction protein: 14-3-3-epsilon (1.5-fold); (ii) anti-oxidants: peroxiredoxin-6 (2.1-fold); (iii) heat shock proteins: alpha B-crystallin (1.7-fold), heat shock protein 72 (2

  3. Extramammary Paget's disease: role of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerrieri, M.; Back, M.F.

    2002-01-01

    Extra mammary Paget's disease (EMPD) is an uncommon premalignant skin condition that has been traditionally managed with surgery. A report of long-standing Paget's disease with transformation to invasive adenocarcinoma definitively managed with radiation therapy is presented. A review of cases of extramammary Paget's disease treated with radiation therapy is discussed. The use of radiation therapy should be considered in selected cases, as these studies demonstrate acceptable rates of local control when used as an adjunct to surgery, or as a definitive treatment modality. Copyright (2002) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  4. Detoxication and antiproteolytic therapy of radiation complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakhontov, N.E.; Klimov, I.A.; Lavrikova, L.P.; Martynov, A.D.; Provorova, T.P.; Serdyukov, A.S.; Shestakov, A.F.

    1984-01-01

    49 patients with uterine cervix and ovarian carcinomas were treated with detoxication and antiproteolytic therapy of radiation-induced side-effects. The therapy permits to complete without interruption the remote gamma-therapy course and to reduce patients in-hospital periods by 10+- 1 days. The prescription of hemoder intravenous injection in a dose of 450 ml and contrical intramuscular injection (10000 AtrE) in cases of pronounced manifestations of radiation-induced side-effects (asthenia, leukopenia, enterocolitis) for 3 days should be considered an efficient therapy

  5. Radiation-Induced Leukemia at Doses Relevant to Radiation Therapy: Modeling Mechanisms and Estimating Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuryak, Igor; Sachs, Rainer K.; Hlatky, Lynn; Mark P. Little; Hahnfeldt, Philip; Brenner, David J.

    2006-01-01

    Because many cancer patients are diagnosed earlier and live longer than in the past, second cancers induced by radiation therapy have become a clinically significant issue. An earlier biologically based model that was designed to estimate risks of high-dose radiation induced solid cancers included initiation of stem cells to a premalignant state, inactivation of stem cells at high radiation doses, and proliferation of stem cells during cellular repopulation after inactivation. This earlier model predicted the risks of solid tumors induced by radiation therapy but overestimated the corresponding leukemia risks. Methods: To extend the model to radiation-induced leukemias, we analyzed in addition to cellular initiation, inactivation, and proliferation a repopulation mechanism specific to the hematopoietic system: long-range migration through the blood stream of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from distant locations. Parameters for the model were derived from HSC biologic data in the literature and from leukemia risks among atomic bomb survivors v^ ho were subjected to much lower radiation doses. Results: Proliferating HSCs that migrate from sites distant from the high-dose region include few preleukemic HSCs, thus decreasing the high-dose leukemia risk. The extended model for leukemia provides risk estimates that are consistent with epidemiologic data for leukemia risk associated with radiation therapy over a wide dose range. For example, when applied to an earlier case-control study of 110000 women undergoing radiotherapy for uterine cancer, the model predicted an excess relative risk (ERR) of 1.9 for leukemia among women who received a large inhomogeneous fractionated external beam dose to the bone marrow (mean = 14.9 Gy), consistent with the measured ERR (2.0, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.2 to 6.4; from 3.6 cases expected and 11 cases observed). As a corresponding example for brachytherapy, the predicted ERR of 0.80 among women who received an inhomogeneous low

  6. Heavy ion facility for radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leemann, C.; Alonso, J.; Clark, D.; Grunder, H.; Hoyer, E.; Lou, K.; Staples, J.; Voelker, F.

    1977-03-01

    The accelerator requirements of particle radiation therapy are reviewed and a preliminary design of a heavy ion synchrotron for hospital installation is presented. Beam delivery systems and multi-treatment room arrangements are outlined

  7. Effect of radiation therapy against intracranial hemangiopericytoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uemura, Shozaburo; Kuratsu, Jun-ichi; Hamada, Jun-ichiro; Yoshioka, Susumu; Kochi, Masato; Ushio, Yukitaka [Kumamoto Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Nakahara, Tadashi; Kishida, Katsuaki

    1992-06-01

    Seven cases of intracranial hemangiopericytoma were studied retrospectively to investigate the efficacy of radiation therapy. Tumor response evaluated by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging was obvious after 20-30 Gy irradiation. The total reduction rate was 80-90% and continued as long as 5-7 months after treatment. In five patients receiving radiation therapy before radical removal, the tumors were easily removed without massive hemorrhage. Histological inspection of specimens after irradiation showed a significant disappearance of tumor cells. Pyknosis frequently occurred in endothelial cells, and proliferating vessels with hyalinoid degeneration were also seen. Reticulin fibers between tumor cells were fewer, split, or absent. Preoperative radiation therapy is useful in the treatment of hemangiopericytoma involving considerable surgical risk. Postoperative radiation therapy should be given even if removal is complete. (author).

  8. Radiation therapy services in South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    available were pooled according to health regions and related to population ... Megavoltage radiation therapy units in South Africa. Photon. Electron. Machine energy beam. Tvl .... Remote afrerloading brachytherapy devices have developed ...

  9. Pediatric radiation therapy. A Japanese nationwide survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemoto, Kenji; Nagata, Yasushi; Hirokawa, Yutaka

    2006-01-01

    A national survey on the current status of pediatric radiation therapy was performed in October 2004. We sent questionnaires to 638 radiotherapy facilities in Japan (except for Kansai area) and 245 responses were analyzed. According to the database of committee of Japanese Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (JASTRO), the number of pediatric patients who received radiation therapy during 2003 in Japan was 1,101. The most frequent pediatric malignancy was brain tumor, followed by leukemia and lymphoma. The total effort of radiation therapy for children was two to six times larger than that for adult patients. An additional fee seems to be necessary for the highly technical and laborious radiation therapy required for children. (author)

  10. Effect of radiation therapy against intracranial hemangiopericytoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uemura, Shozaburo; Kuratsu, Jun-ichi; Hamada, Jun-ichiro; Yoshioka, Susumu; Kochi, Masato; Ushio, Yukitaka; Nakahara, Tadashi; Kishida, Katsuaki.

    1992-01-01

    Seven cases of intracranial hemangiopericytoma were studied retrospectively to investigate the efficacy of radiation therapy. Tumor response evaluated by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging was obvious after 20-30 Gy irradiation. The total reduction rate was 80-90% and continued as long as 5-7 months after treatment. In five patients receiving radiation therapy before radical removal, the tumors were easily removed without massive hemorrhage. Histological inspection of specimens after irradiation showed a significant disappearance of tumor cells. Pyknosis frequently occurred in endothelial cells, and proliferating vessels with hyalinoid degeneration were also seen. Reticulin fibers between tumor cells were fewer, split, or absent. Preoperative radiation therapy is useful in the treatment of hemangiopericytoma involving considerable surgical risk. Postoperative radiation therapy should be given even if removal is complete. (author)

  11. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... type your comment or suggestion into the following text box: Comment: E-mail: Area code: Phone no: Thank ... Accelerator Prostate Cancer Treatment Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Introduction to Cancer Therapy (Radiation Oncology) ...

  12. Autologous Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cell Therapy for Autism: An Open Label Proof of Concept Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular therapy is an emerging therapeutic modality with a great potential for the treatment of autism. Recent findings show that the major underlying pathogenetic mechanisms of autism are hypoperfusion and immune alterations in the brain. So conceptually, cellular therapy which facilitates counteractive processes of improving perfusion by angiogenesis and balancing inflammation by immune regulation would exhibit beneficial clinical effects in patients with autism. This is an open label proof of concept study of autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNCs intrathecal transplantation in 32 patients with autism followed by multidisciplinary therapies. All patients were followed up for 26 months (mean 12.7. Outcome measures used were ISAA, CGI, and FIM/Wee-FIM scales. Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography (PET-CT scan recorded objective changes. Out of 32 patients, a total of 29 (91% patients improved on total ISAA scores and 20 patients (62% showed decreased severity on CGI-I. The difference between pre- and postscores was statistically significant (P<0.001 on Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed rank test. On CGI-II 96% of patients showed global improvement. The efficacy was measured on CGI-III efficacy index. Few adverse events including seizures in three patients were controlled with medications. The encouraging results of this leading clinical study provide future directions for application of cellular therapy in autism.

  13. Modern radiation therapy for primary cutaneous lymphomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Specht, Lena; Dabaja, Bouthaina; Illidge, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Primary cutaneous lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of diseases. They often remain localized, and they generally have a more indolent course and a better prognosis than lymphomas in other locations. They are highly radiosensitive, and radiation therapy is an important part of the treatment......, either as the sole treatment or as part of a multimodality approach. Radiation therapy of primary cutaneous lymphomas requires the use of special techniques that form the focus of these guidelines. The International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group has developed these guidelines after multinational...... meetings and analysis of available evidence. The guidelines represent an agreed consensus view of the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group steering committee on the use of radiation therapy in primary cutaneous lymphomas in the modern era....

  14. Targeted Radiation Therapy for Cancer Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-08-2-0174 TITLE: Targeted Radiation Therapy for Cancer Initiative PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dusten Macdonald, MD...for Cancer Initiative 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Dusten Macdonald, MD 5d. PROJECT NUMBER...Cancer Initiative Final Report INTRODUCTION: The full potential of radiation therapy has not been realized due to the inability to locate and

  15. Nursing care update: Internal radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowdermilk, D.L.

    1990-01-01

    Internal radiation therapy has been used in treating gynecological cancers for over 100 years. A variety of radioactive sources are currently used alone and in combination with other cancer treatments. Nurses need to be able to provide safe, comprehensive care to patients receiving internal radiation therapy while using precautions to keep the risks of exposure to a minimum. This article discusses current trends and issues related to such treatment for gynecological cancers.20 references

  16. 42 CFR 410.35 - X-ray therapy and other radiation therapy services: Scope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false X-ray therapy and other radiation therapy services... Other Health Services § 410.35 X-ray therapy and other radiation therapy services: Scope. Medicare Part B pays for X-ray therapy and other radiation therapy services, including radium therapy and...

  17. 3'-deoxy-3'-[18F]fluorothymidine PET Quantification of Bone Marrow Response to Radiation Dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGuire, Sarah M.; Menda, Yusuf; Boles Ponto, Laura L.; Gross, Brandie; Buatti, John; Bayouth, John E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to quantify the relationship of bone marrow response to radiation dose, using 3'-deoxy-3'-[ 18 F]fluorothymidine ([ 18 F]FLT)-labeled uptake quantified in positron-emission tomography (PET) scans. Methods and Materials: Pre- and post-Week 1 treatment [ 18 F]FLT PET images were registered to the CT images used to create the radiation treatment plan. Changes in [ 18 F]FLT uptake values were measured using profile data of standardized uptake values (SUVs) and doses along the vertebral bodies located at a field border where a range of radiation doses were present for 10 patients. Data from the profile measurements were grouped into 1 Gy dose bins from 1 to 9 Gy to compare SUV changes for all patients. Additionally, the maximum pretreatment, the post-Week 1 treatment, and the dose values located within the C6-T7 vertebrae that straddled the field edge were measured for all patients. Results: Both the profile and the individual vertebral data showed a strong correlation between SUV change and radiation dose. Relative differences in SUVs between bins >1 Gy and 18 F]FLT PET images for identifying active bone marrow and monitoring changes due to radiation dose. Additionally, the change in [ 18 F]FLT uptake observed in bone marrow for different weekly doses suggests potential dose thresholds for reducing bone marrow toxicity.

  18. Clinical report of an extremely severe bone marrow form of acute radiation sickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiao Jianhui; Yu Changlin; Luo Weidong; Guo Mei; Wang Danhong; Sun Qiyun; Zhang Shi; Zhang Xigang; Li Guang; Niu Wenkai; Chen Jiankui; Li Xiaobing; Ge Feijiao; Ai Huisheng

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To sum up the experiences from the diagnosis and treatment of patient B subjected to an accidental 60 Co exposure on October 21st, 2004, in Jining, Shandong Province, China. Methods: Radiation dose of B was assessed by analysis of chromosome aberration and microneucleus assay, simulation test of the accident site, autopsy and electron spin resonance (ESR). The ultimate clinical diagnosis was based on analysis of irradiation dose, clinical manifestations and laboratory results. In therapeutical aspects, total environmental protection, HLA-identical allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT), anti- infection and protection managements of organs were given. Results: Patient B was diagnosed as extremely severe bone marrow form of acute radiation sickness (ARS). HLA-identical allogeneic PBSCT was performed on the patient from his brother on the 7th day after the accident. The hematopoietic recovery began on the 9th day after transplantation. The patient acquired permanent full donor' engraftment without graft versus host disease (GVHD), But the radiation injury was continuing and the patient complicated with polyinfection in lung, and cardiac insufficiency. On the 45th day after the accident, patient B was performed with tracheotomy and maintained ventilation with respirator. On the 75th day after the accident, patient B died of multiple organ failure. Conclusions: Early triage diagnosis and total environmental protection should be performed as soon as possible for extremely severe bone marrow form of ARS. It is very important to perform a successful HLA-identical allogeneic PBSCT, in order to extend the life time of the patient. Multiple organ injuries and infections of bacteria and fungi usually occurred on this kind of patients, so intense measures of anti-infection and protection of multiple organs should be taken. The important and difficult point in the treatment of this kind ARS might be for help the immune-reconstruction and tissue

  19. Reversal of acute (''malignant'') myelosclerosis by allogeneic bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, J.L.; Spruce, W.E.; Bearman, R.M.; Forman, S.J.; Scott, E.P.; Fahey, J. L.; Farbstein, M.J.; Rappaport, H.; Blume, K.G.

    1982-01-01

    A 28-yr-old woman with acute malignant myelosclerosis received, as primary treatment, ablative chemotherapy and total body radiation therapy followed by bone marrow transplantation from her histocompatible brother. The patient is now well more than 15 mo after bone marrow transplantation, with normal peripheral blood counts, a normal bone marrow, no evidence of graft-versus-host disease, and is on no therapy. In light of the poor results obtained with conventional chemotherapy in this disease, bone marrow transplantation may represent the treatment of choice for patients who have an appropriate donor

  20. Longitudinal Changes in Active Bone Marrow for Cervical Cancer Patients Treated With Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noticewala, Sonal S.; Li, Nan; Williamson, Casey W. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Hoh, Carl K. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Shen, Hanjie [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); McHale, Michael T.; Saenz, Cheryl C. [Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Reproductive Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Einck, John [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Plaxe, Steven [Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Reproductive Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Vaida, Florin [Division of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Department of Family Medicine and Public Health, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Yashar, Catheryn M. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Mell, Loren K., E-mail: lmell@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Purpose: To quantify longitudinal changes in active bone marrow (ABM) distributions within unirradiated (extrapelvic) and irradiated (pelvic) bone marrow (BM) in cervical cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: We sampled 39 cervical cancer patients treated with CRT, of whom 25 were treated with concurrent cisplatin (40 mg/m{sup 2}) and 14 were treated with cisplatin (40 mg/m{sup 2}) plus gemcitabine (50-125 mg/m{sup 2}) (C/G). Patients underwent {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomographic/computed tomographic imaging at baseline and 1.5 to 6.0 months after treatment. ABM was defined as the subvolume of bone with standardized uptake value (SUV) above the mean SUV of the total bone. The primary aim was to measure the compensatory response, defined as the change in the log of the ratio of extrapelvic versus pelvic ABM percentage from baseline to after treatment. We also quantified the change in the proportion of ABM and mean SUV in pelvic and extrapelvic BM using a 2-sided paired t test. Results: We observed a significant increase in the overall extrapelvic compensatory response after CRT (0.381; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.312, 0.449) and separately in patients treated with cisplatin (0.429; 95% CI: 0.340, 0.517) and C/G (0.294; 95% CI: 0.186, 0.402). We observed a trend toward higher compensatory response in patients treated with cisplatin compared with C/G (P=.057). Pelvic ABM percentage was reduced after CRT both in patients receiving cisplatin (P<.001) and in those receiving C/G (P<.001), whereas extrapelvic ABM percentage was increased in patients receiving cisplatin (P<.001) and C/G (P<.001). The mean SUV in pelvic structures was lower after CRT with both cisplatin (P<.001) and C/G (P<.001). The mean SUV appeared lower in extrapelvic structures after CRT in patients treated with C/G (P=.076) but not with cisplatin (P=.942). We also observed that older age and more intense chemotherapy

  1. Longitudinal Changes in Active Bone Marrow for Cervical Cancer Patients Treated With Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noticewala, Sonal S.; Li, Nan; Williamson, Casey W.; Hoh, Carl K.; Shen, Hanjie; McHale, Michael T.; Saenz, Cheryl C.; Einck, John; Plaxe, Steven; Vaida, Florin; Yashar, Catheryn M.; Mell, Loren K.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify longitudinal changes in active bone marrow (ABM) distributions within unirradiated (extrapelvic) and irradiated (pelvic) bone marrow (BM) in cervical cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: We sampled 39 cervical cancer patients treated with CRT, of whom 25 were treated with concurrent cisplatin (40 mg/m"2) and 14 were treated with cisplatin (40 mg/m"2) plus gemcitabine (50-125 mg/m"2) (C/G). Patients underwent "1"8F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomographic/computed tomographic imaging at baseline and 1.5 to 6.0 months after treatment. ABM was defined as the subvolume of bone with standardized uptake value (SUV) above the mean SUV of the total bone. The primary aim was to measure the compensatory response, defined as the change in the log of the ratio of extrapelvic versus pelvic ABM percentage from baseline to after treatment. We also quantified the change in the proportion of ABM and mean SUV in pelvic and extrapelvic BM using a 2-sided paired t test. Results: We observed a significant increase in the overall extrapelvic compensatory response after CRT (0.381; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.312, 0.449) and separately in patients treated with cisplatin (0.429; 95% CI: 0.340, 0.517) and C/G (0.294; 95% CI: 0.186, 0.402). We observed a trend toward higher compensatory response in patients treated with cisplatin compared with C/G (P=.057). Pelvic ABM percentage was reduced after CRT both in patients receiving cisplatin (P<.001) and in those receiving C/G (P<.001), whereas extrapelvic ABM percentage was increased in patients receiving cisplatin (P<.001) and C/G (P<.001). The mean SUV in pelvic structures was lower after CRT with both cisplatin (P<.001) and C/G (P<.001). The mean SUV appeared lower in extrapelvic structures after CRT in patients treated with C/G (P=.076) but not with cisplatin (P=.942). We also observed that older age and more intense chemotherapy regimens were

  2. Care of the patient receiving radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasko, J.M.

    1982-12-01

    External radiation therapy, or teletherapy, is the use of ionizing radiation to destroy cancer cells. Clinical use of ionizing radiation as treatment for cancer began with the discovery of x-rays in 1895, the identification of natural radioactivity (radium) in 1896, and the first reported cure of cancer, a basal cell epithelioma, induced by radiation in 1899. Initially, radiation was administered as a single large dose and produced severe, life-threatening side effects. The basis for the use of ionizing radiation in daily increments for a period of weeks was provided by Regaud in 1922; ten years later, Coutard clinically developed the method of dose fractionation, which remains in use today. Although the use of ionizing radiation as a treatment is over eighty years old, only in recent years have advancements in its clinical application been based on research related to the biologic effect of radiation on human cells. To effectively care for the patient prior to, during, and at the completion of external radiation therapy, the nurse must know the physical and biologic basis of external radiation therapy and its clinical application.

  3. Care of the patient receiving radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasko, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    External radiation therapy, or teletherapy, is the use of ionizing radiation to destroy cancer cells. Clinical use of ionizing radiation as treatment for cancer began with the discovery of x-rays in 1895, the identification of natural radioactivity (radium) in 1896, and the first reported cure of cancer, a basal cell epithelioma, induced by radiation in 1899. Initially, radiation was administered as a single large dose and produced severe, life-threatening side effects. The basis for the use of ionizing radiation in daily increments for a period of weeks was provided by Regaud in 1922; ten years later, Coutard clinically developed the method of dose fractionation, which remains in use today. Although the use of ionizing radiation as a treatment is over eighty years old, only in recent years have advancements in its clinical application been based on research related to the biologic effect of radiation on human cells. To effectively care for the patient prior to, during, and at the completion of external radiation therapy, the nurse must know the physical and biologic basis of external radiation therapy and its clinical application

  4. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group clinical trials with misonidazole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasserman, T.H.; Stetz, J.; Phillips, T.L.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the progressive clinical trials of the hypoxic cell radiosensitizer, misonidazole, in the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG). Presentation is made of all the schemas of the recently completed and currently active RTOG Phase II and Phase III studies. Detailed information is provided on the clinical toxicity of the Phase II trials, specifically regarding neurotoxicity. With limitations in drug total dose, a variety of dose schedules have proven to be tolerable, with a moderate incidence of nausea and vomiting and mild peripheral neuropathy or central neuropathy. No other organ toxicity has been seen, specifically no liver, renal or bone marrow toxicities. An additional Phase III malignant glioma trial in the Brain Tumor Study Group is described

  5. Diagnostic problems of MRI in studying the effect of G-CSF therapy in bone marrow of patients with malignoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Layer, G.; Sander, W.; Traeber, F.; Block, W.; Koenig, R.; Vahlensieck, M.; Schild, H.H.; Ko, Y.; Ziske, C.G.

    2000-01-01

    Aim. To study the effect of G-CSF therapy directly by MRI and 1 H MRS in the lumbar and femoral bone marrow and differentiate between malignant bone marrow infiltration (MBMI) and reconversion of red marrow. Methods. Thirteen patients could be examined twice, before and during G-CSF medication and another six only during treatment. T1 weighted spin-echo and opposed-phase gradient-echo images as well as the spectroscopic data (T2 values, water content) were analysed. Results. After G-CSF a pathologic bone marrow signal intensity was seen in 8/13 (lumbar) and 11/13 (femoral) patients respectively. The majority of the signal alterations were diffuse (6 and 8), the minority focal (2 and 3). If a patient was successfully stimulated, a significant increase in water content occurred (21% lumbar, 34% femoral). T2 values did not change significantly, nor did they correlate with the stimulation success. Conclusions. MR tomography and -spectroscopy are suitable to detect lumbar and femoral bone marrow stimulation by G-CSF quantitatively and qualitatively. The changes may simulate MBMI. The adequate judgement of G-CSF treated bone marrow without pretherapeutic images is not possible. (orig.) [de

  6. In vitro radiation response studies on bone marrow fibroblasts (CFU-F) obtained from normal and chronically irradiated dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, A.K.; Stitzel, K.A.; Greenberg, B.; Woo, L.

    1984-01-01

    The radiation resistance of bone marrow fibroblasts as measured by their proliferative potential was evaluated in chronically irradiated dogs. Bone marrows were obtained from eight dogs that had been chronically irradiated beginning at 21 days of gestation or after birth and eight age-matched controls. Of these irradiated dogs, four were either preleukemic or exhibited frank acute nonlymphocytic leukemia. The other four were clinically normal but demonstrated abnormalities in their marrow that could be attributed to radiation effects and/or other pathologic changes. Fibroblasts from six of the irradiated dogs were significantly more radioresistant than those of their controls. Five of these six dogs subsequently succumbed to hematopathologic disease, while the two irradiated dogs with normal fibroblasts remained clinically normal, suggesting that this observed radioresistance may be linked to the disease process. (author)

  7. Radiation therapy apparatus having retractable beam stopper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coad, G.L.

    1983-01-01

    This invention relates to a radiation therapy apparatus which utilized a linear translation mechanism for positioning a beam stopper. An apparatus is described wherein the beam stopper is pivotally attached to the therapy machine with an associated drive motor in such a way that the beam stopper retracts linearly

  8. Anti-leukemic therapies induce cytogenetic changes of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Su-Peng; Lo, Wen-Jyi; Lin, Chiao-Lin; Liao, Yu-Min; Lin, Chen-Yuan; Bai, Li-Yuan; Liang, Ji-An; Chiu, Chang-Fang

    2012-02-01

    Both bone marrow hematopoietic cells (BM-HCs) and mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) may have cytogenetic aberrations in leukemic patients, and anti-leukemic therapy may induce cytogenetic remission of BM-HCs. The impact of anti-leukemic therapy on BM-MSCs remains unknown. Cytogenetic studies of BM-MSCs from 15 leukemic patients with documented cytogenetic abnormalities of BM-HCs were investigated. To see the influence of anti-leukemic therapy on BM-MSCs, cytogenetic studies were carried out in seven of them after the completion of anti-leukemic therapy, including anthracycline/Ara-C-based chemotherapy in two patients, high-dose busulfan/cyclophosphamide-based allogeneic transplantation in two patients, and total body irradiation (TBI)-based allogeneic transplantation in three patients. To simulate the effect of TBI in vitro, three BM-MSCs from one leukemic patient and two normal adults were irradiated using the same dosage and dosing schedule of TBI and cytogenetics were re-examined after irradiation. At the diagnosis of leukemia, two BM-MSCs had cytogenetic aberration, which were completely different to their BM-HCs counterpart. After the completion of anti-leukemic therapy, cytogenetic aberration was no longer detectable in one patient. Unexpectedly, BM-MSCs from three patients receiving TBI-based allogeneic transplantation acquired new, clonal cytogenetic abnormalities after transplantation. Similarly, complex cytogenetic abnormalities were found in all the three BM-MSCs exposed to in vitro irradiation. In conclusion, anti-leukemic treatments induce not only "cytogenetic remission" but also new cytogenetic abnormalities of BM-MSCs. TBI especially exerts detrimental effect on the chromosomal integrity of BM-MSCs and highlights the equal importance of investigating long-term adverse effect of anti-leukemic therapy on BM-MSCs as opposed to beneficial effect on BM-HCs.

  9. Bone marrow derived stem cell therapy for type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehbe, Tarek; Chahine, Nassim Abi; Sissi, Salam; Abou-Joaude, Isabelle; Chalhoub, Louis

    2016-01-01

    In this study, 6 patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) underwent autologous bone marrow mononuclear stem cell (BM-MNSC) infusion into the celiac and superior mesenteric arteries without pretreatment with any myeloablative or immune-suppressive therapy. Five of 6 (83%) showed normalization of their fasting glucose and the glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C) with significant reduction of their medication requirements. The HbA1C dropped on average 2.2 points. The three patients with diabetic complications showed improvement or stabilization and most patients reported improved energy and stamina. The durations of response varied between 6 months and 2 years. No patients had any significant adverse effects.

  10. Bone marrow sparing in intensity modulated proton therapy for cervical cancer: Efficacy and robustness under range and setup uncertainties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinges, Eric; Felderman, Nicole; McGuire, Sarah; Gross, Brandie; Bhatia, Sudershan; Mott, Sarah; Buatti, John; Wang, Dongxu

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose: This study evaluates the potential efficacy and robustness of functional bone marrow sparing (BMS) using intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for cervical cancer, with the goal of reducing hematologic toxicity. Material and methods: IMPT plans with prescription dose of 45 Gy were generated for ten patients who have received BMS intensity-modulated X-ray therapy (IMRT). Functional bone marrow was identified by 18 F-flourothymidine positron emission tomography. IMPT plans were designed to minimize the volume of functional bone marrow receiving 5–40 Gy while maintaining similar target coverage and healthy organ sparing as IMRT. IMPT robustness was analyzed with ±3% range uncertainty errors and/or ±3 mm translational setup errors in all three principal dimensions. Results: In the static scenario, the median dose volume reductions for functional bone marrow by IMPT were: 32% for V 5Gy , 47% for V 10Gy , 54% for V 20Gy , and 57% for V 40Gy , all with p < 0.01 compared to IMRT. With assumed errors, even the worst-case reductions by IMPT were: 23% for V 5Gy , 37% for V 10Gy , 41% for V 20Gy , and 39% for V 40Gy , all with p < 0.01. Conclusions: The potential sparing of functional bone marrow by IMPT for cervical cancer is significant and robust under realistic systematic range uncertainties and clinically relevant setup errors

  11. Bone Marrow Sparing in Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy for Cervical Cancer: Efficacy and Robustness under Range and Setup Uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinges, Eric; Felderman, Nicole; McGuire, Sarah; Gross, Brandie; Bhatia, Sudershan; Mott, Sarah; Buatti, John; Wang, Dongxu

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose This study evaluates the potential efficacy and robustness of functional bone marrow sparing (BMS) using intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for cervical cancer, with the goal of reducing hematologic toxicity. Material and Methods IMPT plans with prescription dose of 45 Gy were generated for ten patients who have received BMS intensity-modulated x-ray therapy (IMRT). Functional bone marrow was identified by 18F-flourothymidine positron emission tomography. IMPT plans were designed to minimize the volume of functional bone marrow receiving 5–40 Gy while maintaining similar target coverage and healthy organ sparing as IMRT. IMPT robustness was analyzed with ±3% range uncertainty errors and/or ±3mm translational setup errors in all three principal dimensions. Results In the static scenario, the median dose volume reductions for functional bone marrow by IMPT were: 32% for V5GY, 47% for V10Gy, 54% for V20Gy, and 57% for V40Gy, all with p<0.01 compared to IMRT. With assumed errors, even the worst-case reductions by IMPT were: 23% for V5Gy, 37% for V10Gy, 41% for V20Gy, and 39% for V40Gy, all with p<0.01. Conclusions The potential sparing of functional bone marrow by IMPT for cervical cancer is significant and robust under realistic systematic range uncertainties and clinically relevant setup errors. PMID:25981130

  12. Reduction of radiation-induced damage to salivary gland by bone marrow derived stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coppes, R.P.; Wierenga, P.K.; Kampinga, H.H.; De Hann, G.

    2003-01-01

    marrow-derived cells home to severely damaged salivary glands after transplantation/mobilisation. Hence, BMSC transplantation could become a promising modality to ameliorate radiation-induced complications in salivary glands after radiotherapy

  13. Evolution of radiation therapy: technology of today

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrivastava, S.K.; Mishra, Shagun

    2013-01-01

    The three well established arms of treatment are surgery, radiation therapy and chemotherapy. The management of cancer is multidisciplinary; Radiation Oncologists along with Surgical Oncologists and Medical Oncologists are responsible for cancer therapeutics. They all work in close collaboration with Pathologists and Radiologists for cancer diagnosis and staging and rely on Oncology Nurses, Physiotherapists, Occupational Therapists, Nutritionists and Social Workers for optimal treatment and rehabilitation of cancer patients. Therefore cancer management is a team work for getting the best results. Radiation therapy is one of the most effective methods of treating cancer

  14. Protective prostheses during radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poole, T.S.; Flaxman, N.A.

    1986-01-01

    Current applications and complications in the use of radiotherapy for the treatment of oral malignancy are reviewed. Prostheses are used for decreasing radiation to vital structures not involved with the lesion but located in the field of radiation. With a program of oral hygiene and proper dental care, protective prostheses can help decrease greatly the morbidity seen with existing radiotherapy regimens

  15. Radiation therapy for metastatic spinal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kida, Akio; Fukuda, Haruyuki; Taniguchi, Shuji; Sakai, Kazuaki

    2000-01-01

    The results of radiation therapy for metastatic spinal tumors were evaluated in terms of pain relief, improvement of neurological impairment, and survival. Between 1986 and 1995, 52 symptomatic patients with metastatic spinal tumors treated with radiation therapy were evaluated. The patients all received irradiation of megavoltage energy. Therapeutic efficacy was evaluated in terms of pain relief and improvement of neurological impairment. Pain relief was observed in 29 (61.7%) of 47 patients with pain. Therapy was effective for 17 (70.8%) of 24 patients without neurological impairment, and efficacy was detected in 12 (52.2%) of 23 patients with neurological impairment. Improvement of neurological symptoms was obtained in seven (25.0%) of 28 patients with neurological impairment. Radiation therapy was effective for pain relief in patients with metastatic spinal tumors. In patients with neurological impairment, less pain relief was observed than in those without impairment. Improvement of neurological impairment was restricted, but radiation therapy was thought to be effective in some cases in the early stage of neurological deterioration. Radiation therapy for metastatic spinal tumors contraindicated for surgery was considered effective for improvement of patients' activities of daily living. (author)

  16. Radiation-induced enlargement of granulocytic and macrophage progenitor cells in mouse bone marrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metcalf, D; Johnson, G R; Wilson, J [Walter and Eliza Hall Inst. of Medical Research, Parkville (Australia)

    1977-01-01

    The peak sedimentation velocity of C/sub 57/BL mouse bone marrow progenitors of granulocytes and macrophages (GM-colony-forming cells, GM-CFC's) increased from 4.3 mm/h to 7 to 8 mm/h by 2 days after 250 rad whole body irradiation and slowly returned to normal over the next 3 weeks. Preliminary irradiation and/or endotoxin injection did not prevent this radiation-induced change. Some change in sedimentation velocity was seen with as little as 100 rad irradiation. Neither buoyant density nor cell cycle changes could account for the sedimentation velocity data which therefore indicate a major volume increase in the GM-CFC's. This size enlargement affected all subpopulations of GM-CFC's which consequently maintained their size relationship with one another.

  17. Modern radiation therapy for extranodal lymphomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yahalom, Joachim; Illidge, Tim; Specht, Lena

    2015-01-01

    Extranodal lymphomas (ENLs) comprise about a third of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL). Radiation therapy (RT) is frequently used as either primary therapy (particularly for indolent ENL), consolidation after systemic therapy, salvage treatment, or palliation. The wide range of presentations of ENL...... and treatment planning for the most frequently involved organs. Specifically, detailed recommendations for RT volumes are provided. We have applied the same modern principles of involved site radiation therapy as previously developed and published as guidelines for Hodgkin lymphoma and nodal NHL. We have...... there is a lack of guidelines for the use of RT in the management of ENL. This report presents an effort by the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG) to harmonize and standardize the principles of treatment of ENL, and to address the technical challenges of simulation, volume definition...

  18. Pathological changes after bone marrow and skin allograft transplantation in rats inflicted with severe combined radiation-burn injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Huaien; Cheng Tianmin; Yan Yongtang

    1994-01-01

    Bone marrow and skin allografts from the same donor were transplanted to rats inflicted with 8 Gy γ-radiation combined with third degree burns of 15% body surface area within 6 hr post injury. Pathological changes of hematopoietic tissues and skin allografts were studied. All injured controls died within 7 days post injury without bone marrow regeneration; 50% of treated rats survived with living skin allografts on 50th day post injury. On days 100 and 480 post operation, grafted skin still survived well on recipients with normal ultrastructure. Epidermic cells of skin allografts proliferated on day 5, developed and repaired on day 10. Histological structure of the skin returned to normal on day 30 post operation. The regeneration of bone marrow appeared on 5th day, increased markedly on day 10, and almost completed on day 15 after bone marrow transplantation. However, the regeneration of lymphocytes in cortex of spleen and lymph nodes did not appear until day 15 of BMT. The results show that bone marrow and skin allograft transplantation at early time post injury in most severe combined radiation-burn injury have tremendous beneficial effects, and the skin allograft can survive for a long time

  19. Bone marrow stem cells assuage radiation-induced damage in a murine model of distraction osteogenesis: A histomorphometric evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheutlin, Alexander R; Deshpande, Sagar S; Nelson, Noah S; Kang, Stephen Y; Gallagher, Kathleen K; Polyatskaya, Yekaterina; Rodriguez, Jose J; Donneys, Alexis; Ranganathan, Kavitha; Buchman, Steven R

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine if intraoperatively placed bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) will permit successful osteocyte and mature bone regeneration in an isogenic murine model of distraction osteogenesis (DO) following radiation therapy (XRT). Lewis rats were split into three groups, DO only (Control), XRT followed by DO (xDO) and XRT followed by DO with intraoperatively placed BMSCs (xDO-BMSC). Coronal sections from the distraction site were obtained, stained and analyzed via statistical analysis with analysis of variance (ANOVA) and subsequent Tukey or Games-Howell post-hoc tests. Comparison of the xDO-BMSC and xDO groups demonstrated significantly improved osteocyte count (87.15 ± 10.19 vs. 67.88 ± 15.38, P = 0.00), and empty lacunae number (2.18 ± 0.79 vs 12.34 ± 6.61, P = 0.00). Quantitative analysis revealed a significant decrease in immature osteoid volume relative to total volume (P = 0.00) and improved the ratio of mature woven bone to immature osteoid (P = 0.02) in the xDO-BMSC compared with the xDO group. No significant differences were found between the Control and xDO-BMSC groups. In an isogenic murine model of DO, BMSC therapy assuaged XRT-induced cellular depletion, resulting in a significant improvement in histological and histomorphometric outcomes. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Combined effect of radiation and YM-881 (SMANCS) on murine tumors and bone marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, K.; Wandl, E.; Sasai, K.; Tsutsui, K.; Shibamoto, Y.; Takahashi, M.; Abe, M.; Vienna Univ.

    1990-01-01

    The combined effect of radiation and YM-881 (SMANCS) was studied in vitro and in vivo. When 0.25 μg/ml of YM-881 was simultaneously combined with radiation, during and after irradiation for 30 min in total, D q decreased from 3.3 Gy to 1.4 Gy without changing D 0 in the dose-survival curve of exponentially growing SCC VII tumor cells. Five or ten times administrations of 0.1 mg/kg YM-881 at an interval of 24 h did not inhibit tumor growth. However, administration of 0.1 mg/kg YM-881 just before every irradiation which was repeated five times at an interval of 24 h yielded dose modifying factors (DMFs) of 1.8-1.2 when the tumor response to treatment was evaluated by the time for the tumors to regrow to three times the original volume. Administration of YM-881 ten times just before every irradiation yielded DMFs of 1.3-1.2. Adverse effects of the combination on bone marrow were examined by spleen colony assay. After five injections of 0.1 mg/kg YM-881, the mean number of CFU-S per femur decreased to 77% of the pretreatment level, but this was not significant statistically (0.1>p>0.05). The slope of radiation response curve for CFU-S per femur was not affected by the combination. (orig.)

  1. MarCell trademark software for modeling bone marrow radiation cell kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasan, J.S.; Jones, T.D.; Morris, M.D.

    1997-01-01

    Differential equations were used to model cellular injury, repair, and compensatory proliferation in the irradiated bone marrow. Recently, that model was implemented as MarCell trademark, a user-friendly MS-DOS computer program that allows users from a variety of technical disciplines to evaluate complex radiation exposure. The software allows menu selections for different sources of ionizing radiation. Choices for cell lineages include progenitor, stroma, and malignant, and the available species include mouse, rat, dog, sheep, swine, burro, and man. An attractive feature is that any protracted irradiation can be compared with an equivalent prompt dose (EPD) in terms of cell kinetics for either the source used or for a reference such as 250 kVp x rays or 60 Co. EPD is used to mean a dose rate for which no meaningful biological recovery occurs during the period of irradiation. For human as species, output from MarCell trademark includes: risk of 30-day mortality; risk of whole-body cancer and leukemia based either on radiation-induced cytopenia or compensatory cell proliferation; cell survival and repopulation plots as functions of time or dose; and 4-week recovery following treatment. copyright 1997 American Association of Physicists in Medicine

  2. Impaired skin integrity related to radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratliff, C.

    1990-01-01

    Skin reactions associated with radiation therapy require frequent nursing assessment and intervention. Preventive interventions and early management can minimize the severity of the skin reaction. With the understanding of the pathogenesis of radiation skin reactions, the ET nurse can determine who is at risk and then implement preventive measures. Because radiation treatment is fractionated, skin reactions do not usually occur until midway through the course of therapy and will subside within a few weeks after completion of radiation. Many patients and their families still fear that radiation causes severe burns. Teaching and anticipatory guidance by the ET nurse is needed to assist patients and their families to overcome this fear, and to educate them on preventive skin care regimens

  3. Radiation therapy for cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mileikowsky, C.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes an apparatus for irradiating a patient comprising: a source of a radiation beam directed along a radiation axis; means mounting the source for pivotal movement about a first horizontal axis which intersects the source, is stationary with respect to the apparatus, and extends in a direction substantially normal to the radiation axis, whereby the beam is capable of an angular scan in a vertical plane; table means adapted to support a patient to be irradiated; and suspension means mounted the table means for arcuate movement to any positions angularly spaced about the first horizontal axis and for pivoting movement about a second horizontal axis displacement from and substantially parallel to the first horizontal axis. The suspension means maintain the second horizontal axis in substantially intersecting relation to the radiation axis in each of the positions while maintaining a fixed angular position of the table means with respect to the environment

  4. Resistance to infection with Eimeria vermiformis in mouse radiation chimeras is determined by donor bone-marrow cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joysey, H.S.; Wakelin, D.; Rose, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    The course of infection with Eimeria vermiformis was determined in BALB/b, BALB/c, and C57BL/10ScSn (B10) mice and in radiation chimeras prepared from the H-2-compatible BALB/b and B10 mice. The BALB strains, irrespective of H-2 haplotype, were resistant, the B10 mice were susceptible, and in the chimeras infection was characterized by the genotype of the donated bone-marrow cells and not by the phenotype of the recipient. Thus, the genetic control of relative resistance or susceptibility to infection with this parasite is expressed through bone-marrow-derived cells

  5. Cancer of the larynx: radiation therapy. III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.C.

    1976-01-01

    Radiation therapy is the treatment of choice for a T1 and T2 tumor with normal cord mobility and/or an exophytic lesion. It not only provides excellent control of the disease, but also preserves a good, useful voice in approximately 90 percent of the irradiated patients. For a T2 lesion with impaired cord mobility and/or moderate ulceration, a trial course of radiotherapy is initially given. If the tumor shows good regression and/or a return of normal cord mobility after a dose of 4000 rads, radiation therapy may be continued to a curative dose level, about 6500 rads. Surgery is reserved for treating residual disease six to eight weeks after radiation therapy or for recurrence. A T3 lesion with complete cord fixation and/or deep ulceration with nodes does not respond favorably to radiation therapy, and a planned combination of irradiation and laryngectomy is advised. Disease that extends beyond the larynx, T4, is rarely curable by radiation therapy alone. If the lesion is still operable, a combined approach of radiation and surgery is preferred; if not, palliative radiation therapy is given. Lymph node metastases from laryngeal carcinoma indicate advanced disease and is managed by preoperative irradiation and radical neck dissection. Under a program of therapeutic individualization, two-thirds to three-quarters of patients with cancer of the larynx can be cured by irradiation with preservation of a good, useful voice. In the remainder, the larynx must be sacrificed to save the patient's life. The ultimate control of laryngeal cancer lies in eradicating the extensive primary lesion and metastatic nodes, a common problem in the management of squamous cell carcinoma elsewhere in the body

  6. Impact of radiation therapy on sexual life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leroy, T.; Gabelle Flandin, I.; Habold, D.; Hannoun-Levi, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of radiation therapy on sexual life. The analysis was based on a Pubmed literature review. The keywords used for this research were 'sexual, radiation, oncology, and cancer'. After a brief reminder on the anatomy and physiology, we explained the main complications of radiation oncology and their impact on sexual life. Preventive measures and therapeutic possibilities were discussed. Radiation therapy entails local, systematic and psychological after-effects. For women, vaginal stenosis and dyspareunia represent the most frequent side effects. For men, radiation therapy leads to erectile disorders for 25 to 75% of the patients. These complications have an echo often mattering on the patient quality of life of and on their sexual life post-treatment reconstruction. The knowledge of the indications and the various techniques of irradiation allow reducing its potential sexual morbidity. The information and the education of patients are essential, although often neglected. In conclusion, radiation therapy impacts in variable degrees on the sexual life of the patients. Currently, there are not enough preventive and therapeutic means. Patient information and the early screening of the sexual complications are at stake in the support of patients in the reconstruction of their sexual life. (authors)

  7. Monoclonal antibody-purged bone marrow transplantation therapy for multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, K C; Andersen, J; Soiffer, R; Freedman, A S; Rabinowe, S N; Robertson, M J; Spector, N; Blake, K; Murray, C; Freeman, A

    1993-10-15

    Forty patients with plasma cell dyscrasias underwent high-dose chemoradiotherapy and either anti-B-cell monoclonal antibody (MoAb)-treated autologous, anti-T-cell MoAb-treated HLA-matched sibling allogeneic or syngeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT). The majority of patients had advanced Durie-Salmon stage myeloma at diagnosis, all were pretreated with chemotherapy, and 17 had received prior radiotherapy. At the time of BMT, all patients demonstrated good performance status with Karnofsky score of 80% or greater and had less than 10% marrow tumor cells; 34 patients had residual monoclonal marrow plasma cells and 38 patients had paraprotein. Following high-dose chemoradiotherapy, there were 18 complete responses (CR), 18 partial responses, one non-responder, and three toxic deaths. Granulocytes greater than 500/microL and untransfused platelets greater than 20,000/microL were noted at a median of 23 (range, 12 to 46) and 25 (range, 10 to 175) days posttransplant (PT), respectively, in 24 of the 26 patients who underwent autografting. In the 14 patients who received allogeneic or syngeneic grafts, granulocytes greater than 500/microL and untransfused platelets greater than 20,000/microL were noted at a median of 19 (range, 12 to 24) and 16 (range, 5 to 32) days PT, respectively. With 24 months median follow-up for survival after autologous BMT, 16 of 26 patients are alive free from progression at 2+ to 55+ months PT; of these, 5 patients remain in CR at 6+ to 55+ months PT. With 24 months median follow-up for survival after allogeneic and syngeneic BMT, 8 of 14 patients are alive free from progression at 8+ to 34+ months PT; of these, 5 patients remain in CR at 8+ to 34+ months PT. This therapy has achieved high response rates and prolonged progression-free survival in some patients and proven to have acceptable toxicity. However, relapses post-BMT, coupled with slow engraftment post-BMT in heavily pretreated patients, suggest that such treatment strategies

  8. Bone Marrow Cell Therapy on 1,2-Dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-Induced Colon Cancer in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Khadragy, Manal F; Nabil, Heba M; Hassan, Basmaa N; Tohamy, Amany A; Waaer, Hanaa F; Yehia, Hany M; Alharbi, Afra M; Moneim, Ahmed Esmat Abdel

    2018-01-01

    Stem cell based therapies are being under focus due to their possible role in treatment of various tumors. Bone marrow stem cells believed to have anticancer potential and are preferred for their activities by stimulating the immune system, migration to the site of tumor and ability for inducting apoptosis in cancer cells. The current study was aimed to investigate the tumor suppressive effects of bone marrow cells (BMCs) in 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced colon cancer in rats. The rats were randomly allocated into four groups: control, BMCs alone, DMH alone and BMCs with DMH. BMCs were injected intrarectally while DMH was injected subcutaneously at 20 mg/kg body weight once a week for 15 weeks. Histopathological examination and gene expression of survivin, β-catenin and multidrug resistance-1 (MDR-1) by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in rat colon tissues. This is in addition to oxidative stress markers in colon were performed across all groups. The presence of aberrant crypt foci was reordered once histopathological examination of colon tissue from rats which received DMH alone. Administration of BMCs into rats starting from zero-day of DMH injection improved the histopathological picture which showed a clear improvement in mucosal layer, few inflammatory cells infiltration periglandular and in the lamina propria. Gene expression in rat colon tissue demonstrated that BMCs down-regulated survivin, β-catenin, MDR-1 and cytokeratin 20 genes expression in colon tissues after colon cancer induction. Amelioration of the colon status after administration of MSCs has been evidenced by a major reduction of lipid peroxidation, nitric oxide, and increasing of glutathione content and superoxide dismutase along with catalase activities. Our findings demonstrated that BMCs have tumor suppressive effects in DMH-induced colon cancer as evidenced by down-regulation of survivin, β-catenin, and MDR-1 genes and enhancing the antioxidant

  9. Results of radiation therapy in periarthritis humeroscapularis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultze, J.; Schlichting, G.; Galalae, R.; Kimmig, B.; Koltze, H.

    2004-01-01

    Background: radiation therapy is applied in painful degenerative shoulder diseases. Aim of this work was to evaluate the contribution of radiation therapy to symptomatic improvement in periarthritis humeroscapularis. Methods: ninety-four patients with periarthritis humeroscapularis were treated in two institutions. Mean age was 68 years, sex distribution were 32 men and 62 women. In 58 cases the right side was affected, left in 36 cases. At single doses of 0,75 Gy once a week a total dose of 6 Gy was applied The treatment effect was evaluated by the standardized von Pannewitz-score at the end of the treatment up to 6 months thereafter. Results: the treatment results of all the 94 patients were documentated at the end of therapy. Seventy-one patients were followed at least for further 4 months. Radiogenic side-effects were not noticed. The symptoms of 54 patients (57.4%) were improved or vanished, in 40 cases the symptoms were not significantly affected (42.6%). Four months after therapy 42 of 71 patients were improved (59.2%), 29 unchanged (40.8%). The treatment effect occured typically up to 2 months after therapy, there were no age-related differences. Also in recurrent radiation therapies the symptoms improved, in 80 percent after one preceding therapy, however only in 31.2 percent after multiple prior radiotherapies. (orig.)

  10. Radiation therapy of gastric carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asakawa, Hiroshi; Yamada, Shogo

    1980-01-01

    A total of 136 cases with gastric cancer was treated with radiation and some anti-cancer drugs. The tumor responded markedly to radiation in 37% of 92 cases, irradiated more than 5000 rad and regressed completely in only 5% of them. Out of them, the permanent cure was achieved in 3% of T2-4 M0 cases. Serious complications, such as hemorrhagic gastritis, massive bleeding, chronic ulcer of the stomach and perforation, were also observed in a few per cent of them. It was suggested that in the treatment of inoperable gastric cancer, the combination treatment of radiation and chemotherapy should be chosen as a valuable therapeutic procedure to get a good palliation. (author)

  11. Radiation therapy of gastric carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asakawa, H; Yamada, S [Miyagi Prefectural Adult Disease Center, Natori (Japan)

    1980-10-01

    A total of 136 cases with gastric cancer was treated with radiation and some anti-cancer drugs. The tumor responded markedly to radiation in 37% of 92 cases, irradiated more than 5000 rad and regressed completely in only 5% of them. Out of them, the permanent cure was achieved in 3% of T2-4 M0 cases. Serious complications, such as hemorrhagic gastritis, massive bleeding, chronic ulcer of the stomach and perforation, were also observed in a few per cent of them. It was suggested that in the treatment of inoperable gastric cancer, the combination treatment of radiation and chemotherapy should be chosen as a valuable therapeutic procedure to get a good palliation.

  12. Possible mechanisms of retinal function recovery with the use of cell therapy with bone marrow-derived stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubens Camargo Siqueira

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow has been proposed as a potential source of stem cells for regenerative medicine. In the eye, degeneration of neural cells in the retina is a hallmark of such widespread ocular diseases as age-related macular degeneration (AMD and retinitis pigmentosa. Bone marrow is an ideal tissue for studying stem cells mainly because of its accessibility. Furthermore, there are a number of well-defined mouse models and cell surface markers that allow effective study of hematopoiesis in healthy and injured mice. Because of these characteristics and the experience of bone marrow transplantation in the treatment of hematological disease such as leukemia, bone marrow-derived stem cells have also become a major tool in regenerative medicine. Those cells may be able to restore the retina function through different mechanisms: A cellular differentiation, B paracrine effect, and C retinal pigment epithelium repair. In this review, we described these possible mechanisms of recovery of retinal function with the use of cell therapy with bone marrow-derived stem cells.

  13. Radiation therapy in elderly patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durdux, C.; Boisserie, T.; Gisselbrecht, M.

    2009-01-01

    Cancer is a disease that predominantly occurs in older patients who represent a quarter of the population in western countries. Numerous types of cancer are observed in elderly people. Radiotherapy is one of the most powerful treatment against cancer. Most of published studies have demonstrated feasibility of radiotherapy in curative or palliative intent whatever cancer types are considered. Complete geriatric assessment and a multidisciplinary approach are the key points. The purpose of this review is to highlight sights of radiation oncology specifically related to aging. Particular emphasis is placed on logistic and technical aspects of radiation, as dose, irradiated volume and fractionation. (authors)

  14. Multiple myeloma among atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, 1950-76: relationship to radiation dose absorbed by marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichimaru, M.; Ishimaru, T.; Mikami, M.; Matsunaga, M.

    1982-01-01

    The relationship between atomic bomb exposure and the incidence of multiple myeloma has been examined in a fixed cohort of atomic bomb survivors and controls in the life-span study sample for Hiroshima and Nagasaki. From October 1950 to December 1976, 29 cases of multiple myeloma were confirmed in this sample. Our analysis shows that the standardized relative risk (RR) adjusted for city, sex, and age at the time of bombings (ATB) increased with marrow-absorbed radiation dose. The increased RR does not appear to differ between cities or sexes and is demonstrable only for those survivors whose age ATB was between 20 and 59 years. The estimated risk in these individuals is approximately 0.48 cases/million person-years/rad for bone marrow total dose. This excess risk did not become apparent in individuals receiving 50 rad or more in marrow total dose until 20 years or more after exposure

  15. Adaptive response to ionizing radiation in bone marrow mouse cells (CFU-s) in vivo. Oxygen effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saenko, A.S.; Semina, O.V.; Semenets, T.N.; Smirnova, S.G.; Orlova, N.V. [Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Kaluga Region (Russian Federation). Medical Radiological Research Centre

    1997-03-01

    An acute gamma-irradiation of mice in small doses of 0.003-0.05 Gy results in elevated radioresistance of bone marrow CFU-s to challenge dose of 1.5 Gy. Hypoxia during exposure to conditioning dose abolishes or strongly decreases AR in CFU-s of mice marrow. Ascorbic acid and menadione induce cross-adaptation of mouse bone marrow CFU-s to action of gamma-radiation. The increase radioresistance was observed during 4 days after orally administration of vitamins C and K in doses of 1 mg and 0.06 mg/animal, accordingly, AR in Lewis lung carcinoma cells did not be observed in two independent experiments. (authors)

  16. Adaptive response to ionizing radiation in bone marrow mouse cells (CFU-s) in vivo. Oxygen effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saenko, A.S.; Semina, O.V.; Semenets, T.N.; Smirnova, S.G.; Orlova, N.V.

    1997-01-01

    An acute gamma-irradiation of mice in small doses of 0.003-0.05 Gy results in elevated radioresistance of bone marrow CFU-s to challenge dose of 1.5 Gy. Hypoxia during exposure to conditioning dose abolishes or strongly decreases AR in CFU-s of mice marrow. Ascorbic acid and menadione induce cross-adaptation of mouse bone marrow CFU-s to action of gamma-radiation. The increase radioresistance was observed during 4 days after orally administration of vitamins C and K in doses of 1 mg and 0.06 mg/animal, accordingly, AR in Lewis lung carcinoma cells did not be observed in two independent experiments. (authors)

  17. Doses to the red bone marrow of young people and adults from radiation of natural origin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kendall, G M [Childhood Cancer Research Group, University of Oxford, Richards Building, Old Road Campus, Headington, Oxford OX3 7LG (United Kingdom); Fell, T P, E-mail: Gerald.Kendall@ccrg.ox.ac.uk [Health Protection Agency, CRCE, Chilton, Didcot OX11 0RQ, Oxon (United Kingdom)

    2011-09-01

    Natural radiation sources comprise cosmic rays, terrestrial gamma rays, radionuclides in food and inhaled isotopes of radon with their decay products. These deliver doses to all organs and tissues including red bone marrow (RBM), the tissue in which leukaemia is thought to originate. In this paper we calculate the age-dependent annual RBM doses from natural radiation sources to young people and to adults at average levels of exposure in the UK. The contributions to dose are generally less complex than in the case of doses to foetuses and young children where it is necessary to take into account transfer of radionuclides across the placenta, intakes in mother's milk and changes in gut uptake in young infants. However, there is high uptake of alkaline earths and of similar elements in the developing skeleton and this significantly affects the doses from radioisotopes of these elements, not just in the teens and twenties but through into the fifth decade of life. The total equivalent dose to the RBM from all natural sources of radiation at age 15 years is calculated to be about 1200 {mu}Sv a year at average UK levels, falling to rather less than 1100 {mu}Sv per year in later life; the gentle fall from the late teens onwards reflects the diminishing effect of the high uptakes of radioisotopes of the alkaline earths and of lead in this period. About 60% of the equivalent dose is contributed by the low linear energy transfer (LET) component. Radionuclides in food make the largest contribution to equivalent doses to RBM and much the largest contribution to the absorbed dose from high LET radiation (mainly alpha particles).

  18. Doses to the red bone marrow of young people and adults from radiation of natural origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendall, G M; Fell, T P

    2011-01-01

    Natural radiation sources comprise cosmic rays, terrestrial gamma rays, radionuclides in food and inhaled isotopes of radon with their decay products. These deliver doses to all organs and tissues including red bone marrow (RBM), the tissue in which leukaemia is thought to originate. In this paper we calculate the age-dependent annual RBM doses from natural radiation sources to young people and to adults at average levels of exposure in the UK. The contributions to dose are generally less complex than in the case of doses to foetuses and young children where it is necessary to take into account transfer of radionuclides across the placenta, intakes in mother's milk and changes in gut uptake in young infants. However, there is high uptake of alkaline earths and of similar elements in the developing skeleton and this significantly affects the doses from radioisotopes of these elements, not just in the teens and twenties but through into the fifth decade of life. The total equivalent dose to the RBM from all natural sources of radiation at age 15 years is calculated to be about 1200 μSv a year at average UK levels, falling to rather less than 1100 μSv per year in later life; the gentle fall from the late teens onwards reflects the diminishing effect of the high uptakes of radioisotopes of the alkaline earths and of lead in this period. About 60% of the equivalent dose is contributed by the low linear energy transfer (LET) component. Radionuclides in food make the largest contribution to equivalent doses to RBM and much the largest contribution to the absorbed dose from high LET radiation (mainly alpha particles).

  19. Monte Carlo techniques in radiation therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Verhaegen, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Modern cancer treatment relies on Monte Carlo simulations to help radiotherapists and clinical physicists better understand and compute radiation dose from imaging devices as well as exploit four-dimensional imaging data. With Monte Carlo-based treatment planning tools now available from commercial vendors, a complete transition to Monte Carlo-based dose calculation methods in radiotherapy could likely take place in the next decade. Monte Carlo Techniques in Radiation Therapy explores the use of Monte Carlo methods for modeling various features of internal and external radiation sources, including light ion beams. The book-the first of its kind-addresses applications of the Monte Carlo particle transport simulation technique in radiation therapy, mainly focusing on external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy. It presents the mathematical and technical aspects of the methods in particle transport simulations. The book also discusses the modeling of medical linacs and other irradiation devices; issues specific...

  20. Imaging Radiation-Induced Gastrointestinal, Bone Marrow Injury and Recovery Kinetics Using 18F-FDG PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Tien T; Rendon, David A; Zawaski, Janice A; Afshar, Solmaz F; Kaffes, Caterina K; Sabek, Omaima M; Gaber, M Waleed

    2017-01-01

    Positron emission tomography using 18F-Fluro-deoxy-glucose (18F-FDG) is a useful tool to detect regions of inflammation in patients. We utilized this imaging technique to investigate the kinetics of gastrointestinal recovery after radiation exposure and the role of bone marrow in the recovery process. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were either sham irradiated, irradiated with their upper half body shielded (UHBS) at a dose of 7.5 Gy, or whole body irradiated (WBI) with 4 or 7.5 Gy. Animals were imaged using 18F-FDG PET/CT at 5, 10 and 35 days post-radiation exposure. The gastrointestinal tract and bone marrow were analyzed for 18F-FDG uptake. Tissue was collected at all-time points for histological analysis. Following 7.5 Gy irradiation, there was a significant increase in inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract as indicated by the significantly higher 18F-FDG uptake compared to sham. UHBS animals had a significantly higher activity compared to 7.5 Gy WBI at 5 days post-exposure. Animals that received 4 Gy WBI did not show any significant increase in uptake compared to sham. Analysis of the bone marrow showed a significant decrease of uptake in the 7.5 Gy animals 5 days post-irradiation, albeit not observed in the 4 Gy group. Interestingly, as the metabolic activity of the gastrointestinal tract returned to sham levels in UHBS animals it was accompanied by an increase in metabolic activity in the bone marrow. At 35 days post-exposure both gastrointestinal tract and bone marrow 18F-FDG uptake returned to sham levels. 18F-FDG imaging is a tool that can be used to study the inflammatory response of the gastrointestinal tract and changes in bone marrow metabolism caused by radiation exposure. The recovery of the gastrointestinal tract coincides with an increase in bone marrow metabolism in partially shielded animals. These findings further demonstrate the relationship between the gastrointestinal syndrome and bone marrow recovery, and that this interaction can be studied

  1. Imaging Radiation-Induced Gastrointestinal, Bone Marrow Injury and Recovery Kinetics Using 18F-FDG PET.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tien T Tang

    Full Text Available Positron emission tomography using 18F-Fluro-deoxy-glucose (18F-FDG is a useful tool to detect regions of inflammation in patients. We utilized this imaging technique to investigate the kinetics of gastrointestinal recovery after radiation exposure and the role of bone marrow in the recovery process. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were either sham irradiated, irradiated with their upper half body shielded (UHBS at a dose of 7.5 Gy, or whole body irradiated (WBI with 4 or 7.5 Gy. Animals were imaged using 18F-FDG PET/CT at 5, 10 and 35 days post-radiation exposure. The gastrointestinal tract and bone marrow were analyzed for 18F-FDG uptake. Tissue was collected at all-time points for histological analysis. Following 7.5 Gy irradiation, there was a significant increase in inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract as indicated by the significantly higher 18F-FDG uptake compared to sham. UHBS animals had a significantly higher activity compared to 7.5 Gy WBI at 5 days post-exposure. Animals that received 4 Gy WBI did not show any significant increase in uptake compared to sham. Analysis of the bone marrow showed a significant decrease of uptake in the 7.5 Gy animals 5 days post-irradiation, albeit not observed in the 4 Gy group. Interestingly, as the metabolic activity of the gastrointestinal tract returned to sham levels in UHBS animals it was accompanied by an increase in metabolic activity in the bone marrow. At 35 days post-exposure both gastrointestinal tract and bone marrow 18F-FDG uptake returned to sham levels. 18F-FDG imaging is a tool that can be used to study the inflammatory response of the gastrointestinal tract and changes in bone marrow metabolism caused by radiation exposure. The recovery of the gastrointestinal tract coincides with an increase in bone marrow metabolism in partially shielded animals. These findings further demonstrate the relationship between the gastrointestinal syndrome and bone marrow recovery, and that this

  2. Cell surface appearance of unexpected host MHC determinants on thymocytes from radiation bone marrow chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharrow, S.O.; Mathieson, B.J.; Singer, A.

    1981-01-01

    The phenotypic appearance of cell surface antigens on murine thymocytes from long-term radiation bone marrow chimeras was analyzed using indirect immunofluorescence and flow microfluorometry. Cells maturing in the thymi of these mice were typed for MHC (Kk, I-Ak, H-2b, Kb, and Ib) and non-MHC (Lty 1, Ly 9, and TL) determinants. All cells were of donor origin as determined by non-MHC (Ly) phenotype in P1 leads to P2, P1 x P2 leads to P1, and P1 leads to P2 radiation chimeras. In contrast, the MHC phenotypes of these thymocytes were markedly affected by the host environment. Specifically, H-2 and I-A determinants of both parental phenotypes were detected on thymocytes from P1 leads to P1 x P2 chimeras; I-A determinants of host phenotype were present, whereas I-A determinants of donor phenotype were reduced on thymocytes from P1 x P2 leads to P1 chimeras; and thymocytes from P1 leads to P2 chimeras possessed H-2 and I-A determinants of host phenotype but showed reduction of donor I-A phenotype determinants. The appearance of host cell surface H-2 and I-A determinants on thymocytes from chimeras closely parallels the functional recognition of MHC determinants by T cells from chimeric mice and thus may be significantly related to the development of the self-recognition repertoire by maturing T cells

  3. Survival of allografts from bone marrow donors in temporary dog radiation chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vriesendorp, H.M.

    Complete radiation chimeras accept indefinitely a skin or a kidney graft from the bone marrow (BM) donor. The advantages of this method of inducing graft acceptance are that it does not require the use of toxic post-operative immunosuppressive agents and that the immune reactivity against antigens other than the ones carried by the BM donor remains intact. The disadvantages of this approach are that supralethal total body irradiation (TBI) causes toxicity and that allogeneic BM cells can cause lethal Graft versus Host reactions. Attempts were made to diminish the significance of these disadvantages by using lower dose TBI and giving fewer BM cells. It is shown that, in dogs, 7.5 Gy TBI followed by 4 X 10 8 BM cells.kg -1 body weight of a DLA identical sibling leads to the development of complete radiation chimeras. The exclusive presence of donor type haemopoiesis can be demonstrated by determinations of 'informative' genetic markers, i.e., markers that show different genotypes in donor and recipient. (Auth.)

  4. Radiation Therapy of Suprasellar Germ Cell Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Woo Yoon; Choi, Doo Ho; Choi, Eun Kyung; Kim, Il Han; Ha, Sung Whan; Park, Charn Il

    1988-01-01

    A retrospective study was performed on 15 patients with suprasellar germ cell tumors treated by megavoltage external beam irradiation between Feb. 1979 and Dec. 1985. Follow-up period of survivors was 30 to 91 months. Histologic diagnosis was obtained before radiation therapy in 10 patients (9 germinomas and 1 mixed). Five patients were treated without histologic verification. In 9 patients with biopsy-proven germinomas radiation therapy was delivered to the craniospinal axis in 6, to the whole brain in 3. In 5 patients with mixed germ cell tumor or elevated tumor marker, irradiation was delivered to the craniospinal axis in 2, to the whole brain in 2, and to the primary site only in 1. Total doses ranged from 5,000 to 5,500 cGy to the primary site, 3,000 to 4,400 cGy to the whole brain, and 1,300 to 3,000 cGy to the spine. In these 14, local tumor was controlled and primary or spinal failure was not observed. One patient without elevated tumor marker was treated to the whole brain, The tumor was not controlled and he had spinal recurrence. It is proven that radiation therapy is an effective treatment for suprasellar germ cell tumors. The neuroendocrinologic presentation, tumor marker status, early response to radiation measured on CT seem to be useful means for selecting patients for radiation therapy when tissue diagnosis is not available

  5. Radiological protection effect on vanillin derivative VND3207 radiation-induced cytogenetic damage in mouse bone marrow cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chuangao; Wang Li; Zhou Pingkun; Wang Zhongwen; Hu Yongzhe; Jin Haiming; Zhang Xueqing; Chen Ying

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To study the protection of vanillin derivative VND3207 on the cytogenetic damage of mouse bone marrow cell induced by ionizing radiation. Methods: BALB/c mice were randomly divided into five groups: normal control group, 2 Gy dose irradiation group, and three groups of 2 Gy irradiation with VND3207 protection at doses of 10, 50 and 100 mg/kg, respectively. VND3207 was given by intragastric administration once a day for five days. Two hours after the last drug administration, the mice were irradiated with 2 Gy γ-rays. The changes of polychromatophilic erythroblasts micronuclei (MN), chromosome aberration (CA) and mitosis index (MI) of mouse bone marrow cells were observed at 24 and 48 h after irradiation. Results: Under the protection of VND3207 at the dosages 10, 50, 100 μmg/kg, the yields of poly-chromatophilic erythroblasts MN and CA of bone marrow cells were significantly decreased (t=2.36-4.26, P<0.05), and the marrow cells MI remained much higher level compared with the irradiated mice without drug protection (t=2.58, 2.01, P<0.05). The radiological protection effect was drug dose-dependent, and the administration of VND3207 at the dosage of 100 mg/kg resulted in reduction by 50 % and 65% in the yields of MN and CA, respectively. Conclusions: VND3207 had a good protection effect of on γ-ray induced cytogentic damage of mouse bone marrow cells. (authors)

  6. Advanced Small Animal Conformal Radiation Therapy Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sunil; Narayanasamy, Ganesh; Przybyla, Beata; Webber, Jessica; Boerma, Marjan; Clarkson, Richard; Moros, Eduardo G; Corry, Peter M; Griffin, Robert J

    2017-02-01

    We have developed a small animal conformal radiation therapy device that provides a degree of geometrical/anatomical targeting comparable to what is achievable in a commercial animal irradiator. small animal conformal radiation therapy device is capable of producing precise and accurate conformal delivery of radiation to target as well as for imaging small animals. The small animal conformal radiation therapy device uses an X-ray tube, a robotic animal position system, and a digital imager. The system is in a steel enclosure with adequate lead shielding following National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements 49 guidelines and verified with Geiger-Mueller survey meter. The X-ray source is calibrated following AAPM TG-61 specifications and mounted at 101.6 cm from the floor, which is a primary barrier. The X-ray tube is mounted on a custom-made "gantry" and has a special collimating assembly system that allows field size between 0.5 mm and 20 cm at isocenter. Three-dimensional imaging can be performed to aid target localization using the same X-ray source at custom settings and an in-house reconstruction software. The small animal conformal radiation therapy device thus provides an excellent integrated system to promote translational research in radiation oncology in an academic laboratory. The purpose of this article is to review shielding and dosimetric measurement and highlight a few successful studies that have been performed to date with our system. In addition, an example of new data from an in vivo rat model of breast cancer is presented in which spatially fractionated radiation alone and in combination with thermal ablation was applied and the therapeutic benefit examined.

  7. The present value of the diagnosis and therapy of the acute radiation syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fliedner, T.M.

    1975-01-01

    The pathophysiological understanding of the acute radiation syndrome could be distinctly improved by the new research results in cell system physiology. It was thus possible to assign radiation-damaged persons to categories reflecting the most probable course of the disease within a few hours or days. This assignment has consequences for the therapeutical measures. Either nor measures or at least no stationary measures are necessary (recovery 'certain' or 'probable'), or the exposure was so great that death occurs within 2-3 days (recovery 'impossible'). The assigning to the category recovery 'improbable' or 'possible' leads to introducing special therapeutical measures where firstly an infection prophylaxis with antibiotics difficult to absorb in an isolation bed system ('sterile therapy') is necessary. Then, however, (in cases of certain inability to regenerate the bone marrow) a stem-call (bone marrow) transplantaion must be performed. (orig.) [de

  8. Radiation therapy for resistant sternal hydatid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulger, S.; Barut, H.; Tunc, M.; Aydinkarahaliloglu, E.; Aydin, E.; Karaoglanoglu, N.; Gokcek, A.

    2013-01-01

    Hydatid disease is a zoonotic infectious disease for which there are known treatment procedures and effective antibiotics; however, there are resistant cases that do not respond to medication or surgery. We report a case diagnosed as hydatid disease of the chest wall and treated with radiation therapy (RT) after medical and surgical therapy had failed. In conclusion, RT represents an alternative treatment modality in resistant cases. (orig.)

  9. Primary observation on adherent function of bone marrow stromal cells in mice post combined radiation-burn injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xinghua; Luo Chengji; Guo Chaohua; Wang Ping; Deng Xuecai

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the adherent function of bone marrow stromal cells in hematopoietic inductive microenvironment post combined radiation-burn injury. Methods: The expression of cell adhesion molecules including vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), fibro-connection (Fn), laminin (Ln) and collagen type IV (Col IV) on bone marrow stromal cells cultured in vitro was detected by flow cytometry and the binding capacity of bone marrow mononuclear cells to stromal cell adherence layer was tested by cell binding assay and cell binding blocking assay respectively from mice treated with 5.0 Gy γ-ray 15% of total body surface area (TBSA), third-degree burn injury and combined irradiation-burn injury, respectively. Results: 1. The expression levels of molecules mentioned above in burn-injured mice were the highest. The molecules levels in control mice were greater than those in radiation-injured mice, which were lower than those in mice with combined radiation-burn injury. 2. The binding capacity of stromal cell adherence layer in burn-injured mice was greater than that in control mice, and significantly increased from 3 to 7 days post injury as compared with that in controls, radiation-injured mice and combined radiation-burn-injured mice, respectively (P < 0.05-0.01). Contrarily, the capacity of binding in the radiation-injured and combined radiation-burn-injured mice was the lowest from 3 to 7 days post injury. 3. The binding rate of bone marrow mononuclear cells to stromal cell adherence layer descended in different degrees after pre-treatment with monoclonal antibodies directed to VCAM-1, Fn, Ln, or Col IV respectively or VCAM-1 combined with anti-Fn, anti-Ln or anti-Col IV, respectively, in stromal cell adherence layer. Conclusion: The damage of cell adherent function for bone marrow hematopoietic inductive microenvironment post combined radiation-burn injury might be one of the important factors in hematopoietic disorder in combined radiation-burn injury

  10. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell therapy in ischemic stroke: mechanisms of action and treatment optimization strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guihong Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Animal and clinical studies have confirmed the therapeutic effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on cerebral ischemia, but their mechanisms of action remain poorly understood. Here, we summarize the transplantation approaches, directional migration, differentiation, replacement, neural circuit reconstruction, angiogenesis, neurotrophic factor secretion, apoptosis, immunomodulation, multiple mechanisms of action, and optimization strategies for bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in the treatment of ischemic stroke. We also explore the safety of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation and conclude that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation is an important direction for future treatment of cerebral ischemia. Determining the optimal timing and dose for the transplantation are important directions for future research.

  11. Oral complications of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lockhart, P.B.

    1986-01-01

    Comprehensive management of patients receiving radiotherapy to the head and neck dictates that they have a thorough dental evaluation as part of their overall treatment planning. Early and appropriate patient education and dental treatment, along with careful management during and after radiotherapy, will significantly decrease the incidence and severity of complications, improve quality of life, and increase tolerance to therapy. 49 refs.; 16 figs.; 1 table

  12. Thyorid function after mantle field radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daehnert, W.; Kutzner, J.; Grimm, W.

    1981-01-01

    48 patients with malignant lymphoma received a 60 Co-radiation dose of 30 to 50 Gy using the mantle field technique. Thyroid function tests were performed 34 to 92 months after radiation therapy. One patient developed myxedema, ten (20.8%) had subclinical hypothyroidism and six (12.5%) latent hypothyroidism. The incidence of hypothyroidism after treatment of malignant lymphomas is summarized in a review of the literature. Discrepancies on the incidence of hypothyroidism were found, and their possible cause is discussed. Periodic examinations of all patients with thyroid radiation exposure are recommended. The examination can be limited to measurement of TSH concentration and palpation of the thyroid for nodules. (orig.) [de

  13. Postoperative radiation therapy for adenoid cystic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oguchi, Masahiko; Shikama, Naoto; Gomi, Koutarou; Shinoda, Atsunori; Nishikawa, Atsushi; Arakawa, Kazukiyo; Sasaki, Shigeru; Takei, Kazuyoshi; Sone, Syusuke

    2000-01-01

    The authors retrospectively assessed the usefulness of postoperative radiation therapy after local resection of adenoid cystic carcinoma, with emphasis on organ-conserving treatment and the cosmetic results. Between 1985 and 1995, 32 patients underwent local resection followed by postoperative radiation therapy with curative and organ-conserving intent. None of patients received any form of chemotherapy as part of their initial treatment. Radiation therapy was carried out by techniques that were appropriate for the site and extension of each tumor. The 5-year local control, disease-free, and overall survival rates of all patients were 76%, 68%, and 86%, respectively. The 5-year local control rate and disease-free survival rate of patients with microscopically positive margins were 89% and 75%, respectively, and higher than in patients with macroscopically residual disease, but no significant difference in 5-year overall survival rate was observed. The postoperative cosmetic results in 29 patients with head and neck lesions were evaluated. No difference was documented between the cosmetic results postoperatively setting and after postoperative radiotherapy, and no significant differences in cosmetic results were observed according to radiation dose. The combination of local resection with organ-conserving intent and postoperative radiation therapy provided good cosmetic results in patients with T1 or T2 lesions. Postoperative radiation therapy with smaller fractions is useful, because good local control can be achieved in patients with adenoid cystic carcinoma having microscopically positive margins without inducing any late adverse reactions. However, the number of patients was too small and the follow-up period was too short to draw any definite conclusion in regard to fraction size. A much longer follow-up study with a larger number patients will be required to accurately determine the optimal treatment intensity and duration of treatment. (K.H.)

  14. Individual differences in post radiation regeneration of the bone marrow in nonuniform irradiation (experimental investigation)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalandarova, M.P.

    1980-01-01

    Reparative regeneration in bone marrow of sternum and iliac bone in each of 20 dogs was studied after single and two-time total X-ray irradiation. Extreme dose rates in bodies differed 5 and 8 times. It was shown that bone marrow repair did not depend on its composition before irradiation. Dogs whose bone narrow was rich of cellular elements before irradiation had both active and sharply reduced bone marrow regeneration after single and two-time irradiation in 0.75-1.45 Gy doses (sternum). Animals with a poor total cellular composition of bone marrow of sternum before irradiation also had differences in the course of reparative processes: in some of them they were considerably pronoUnced and in others bone marrow aplasia lasted for one month. IndiVidual differences in the bone marrow (iliac bone) irradiated with 1.85-3.2 Gy doses were less marked during the reparative regeneration

  15. Radiation therapy in old patients. Side effects and results of radiation therapy in old patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geinitz, H.; Zimmermann, F.B.; Molls, M.

    1999-01-01

    Background: Despite a growing number of elderly patients receiving radiation therapy little is known about side effects and outcome of irradiation in this section of the population. Methods: In a review article epidemiologic data, aspects of radiation-biology as well as side effects and outcome of radiation therapy of elderly patients are discussed. Results: Cancer incidence rises with age and is exceeding 3.5% for males older than 85 years. With a life expectancy of more than 4 years, curative therapy is indicated even at this age. Furthermore, several retrospective studies indicate that local control and disease-Specific survival after radiation therapy of elderly patients is comparable with that of younger persons. The exception contains elderly patients with grade-III to IV gliomas or with rectal carcinoma who show a reduced survival which is perhaps caused by less aggressive combined treatment (tumor resection). Although some biological and molecular data indicate a rise in radiation sensitivity with growing age like the reduction of the capacity of some DNA-repair enzymes, there is no convincing evidence in animal studies or in retrospective clinical studies that radiation therapy is generally less well tolerated by older individuals. Some age-depending differences in organ toxicities are described in 3 large studies, which evaluate the data of patients who were enrolled in different EORTC-trials: Older patients suffer more of functional mucositis in case of radiation therapy to the head and neck, they have an increased weight loss and a higher frequency of late esophageal damage when irradiated in the thorax, and they show a higher prevalence of sexual dysfunction when treated with radiation therapy to the pelvis. On the other hand younger patients suffer more from acute toxicity like skin damage, nausea, and deterioration of the performance status during pelvic radiotherapy. When discussing the dose intensity of radiation therapy concomitant disease which

  16. Supplementation of bone marrow aspirate-derived platelet-rich plasma for treating radiation-induced ulcer after cardiac fluoroscopic procedures: A preliminary report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soh Nishimoto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The frequency of encountering radiodermatitis caused by X-ray fluoroscopic procedures for ischaemic heart disease is increasing. In severe cases, devastating ulcers with pain, for which conservative therapy is ineffective, emerge. Radiation-induced ulcers are notorious for being difficult to treat. Simple skin grafting often fails because of the poor state of the wound bed. A vascularized flap is a very good option. However, the non-adherence of the well-vascularized flap with the irradiated wound bed is frequently experienced. Aim: To ameliorate the irradiated wound bed, bone marrow-derived platelet-rich plasma (bm-PRP was delivered during the surgery. Materials and Methods: Four patients with severe cutaneous radiation injury accompanied by unbearable pain after multiple fluoroscopic procedures for ischaemic heart disease were treated. Wide excision of the lesion and coverage with a skin flap supplemented with bm-PRP injection was performed. Results: All patients obtained wound closure and were relieved from pain. No complication concerning the bone marrow aspiration and delivery of bm-PRP was observed. Conclusions: Supplementation of bm-PRP can be an option without major complications, time, and cost to improve the surgical outcome for irradiated wounds.

  17. Long-term effects of localized spinal radiation therapy on vertebral fractures and focal lesions appearance in patients with multiple myeloma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecouvet, Frederic; Richard, Francoise; Berg, B. Vande; Malghem, Jacques; Maldague, Baudouin; Ferrant, Augustin; Michaux, J.-L.

    1997-01-01

    The occurrence of new vertebral fractures and focal marrow lesions was determined and compared in irradiated and nonirradiated vertebrae of 12 patients with multiple myeloma (MM), prospectively followed using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the thoraco-lumbar spine after localized spinal radiation therapy. During follow-up (mean 35 months), fractures appeared in 5% of irradiated vertebrae and in 20% of nonirradiated vertebrae; new focal lesions appeared in 4% of irradiated vertebrae and in 27% of nonirradiated vertebrae. This study demonstrates a beneficial long-term effect of localized radiation therapy, consisting of a reduced incidence of vertebral fractures and focal marrow lesions in irradiated vertebrae. (author)

  18. Radiation therapy for esophageal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatani, Masashi; Matayoshi, Yoshinobu; Masaki, Norie

    1992-01-01

    From 1977 through 1989, 149 patients with esophageal carcinoma were treated with external irradiation (EI) with or without high-dose rate intraluminal irradiation (HDRII) using remote afterloading system. Concerning complete response group EI alone showed higher local control rate than EI + HDRII, especially in ulcerative type. Another problem is the EI field. Fourteen of 22 patients who were salvaged by surgery due to local recurrence after EI showed marginal or out-field metastasis of the lymph node. These preliminary results suggest that HDRII is not effective for the local control of the ulcerative lesion as a boost therapy, EI should be given for the entire regional lymph nodes. (author)

  19. Electron beams in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruinvis, I.A.D.

    1987-01-01

    Clinical electron beams in interaction with beam flattening and collimating devices are studied, in order to obtain the means for adequate electron therapy. A treatment planning method for arbitrary field shapes is developed that takes the properties of the collimated electron beams into account. An electron multiple-scattering model is extended to incorporate a model for the loss of electrons with depth, in order to improve electron beam dose planning. A study of ionisation measurements in two different phantom materials yields correction factors for electron beam dosimetry. (Auth.)

  20. Cytogenetic evidence of metastatic myxoid liposarcoma and therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome in a bone marrow biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Sabrina; Canal, Fabio; Licci, Stefano; Zanatta, Lucia; Laurino, Licia; Gottardi, Michele; Gherlinzoni, Filippo; Dei Tos, Angelo Paolo

    2009-07-01

    Myxoid liposarcoma exhibits a peculiar clinical behavior, with a tendency to spread to serosal membranes, distant soft tissues, and bones, even in the absence of lung metastases. Therapy-related hematological neoplasms are well-known side effects of cytotoxic chemotherapy. We describe an exceptional case of metastatic myxoid liposarcoma of the spine associated with therapy-related refractory anemia with excess of blasts in a 37-year-old woman who underwent multi-agent chemotherapy for a myxoid liposarcoma of the left thigh. Microscopic examination of the bone marrow biopsy revealed dysplastic features, with abnormal localization of immature precursors and micromegakaryocytes, and islands of undifferentiated oval small/medium-size cells, suggestive of acute myeloid leukemia arising in the setting of a myelodysplastic syndrome. Immunohistochemistry was not discriminant. Cytogenetic analyses of bone marrow aspirate disclosed the presence of 2 different rearrangements, subsequently confirmed by fluorescent in situ hybridization and was crucial in making the correct diagnosis.

  1. Hemostatic radiation therapy in advanced gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novaes, P.E.R.S.; Possik, R.A.; Peres, O.; Abrao, A.

    1987-01-01

    Nine patients with advanced bleeding gastric cancer are treated with 4MVC linear accelerator or cobaltotherapy inparallel opposed fields to epigastric region. The radiation therapy is employed as an hemostatic procedure and the results of treatment are analysed. The doses ranged of 1000 rad to 4000 rad, 150 to 300 rad/day, five days a week. (M.A.C.) [pt

  2. Preoperative breast radiation therapy: Indications and perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lightowlers, S V; Boersma, L J; Fourquet, A

    2017-01-01

    Preoperative breast radiation therapy (RT) is not a new concept, but older studies failed to change practice. More recently, there has been interest in revisiting preoperative RT using modern techniques. This current perspective discusses the indications, summarises the published literature and t...

  3. Results of radiation therapy for vulvar carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirtoli, L; Rottoli, M L [Florence Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Radiologia

    1982-01-01

    Radical radiation therapy was given to 19 patients with vulvar squamous cell carcinoma, and as a palliative to 17. Complete regression of the tumor was achieved in 17 patients (47%). The 5-year survival rate was 8/31 patients (26%) in the overall series and 8/19 patients (42%) in the radically irradiated group.

  4. Radiation therapy in patients with hematologic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennequin, C.; Maylin, C.

    1995-01-01

    Radiation therapy has a significant place in the treatment of hematologic diseases. Irradiation is a key component of the treatment strategy for Hodgkin's disease and has benefited from clinical studies aimed at improving its therapeutic index. There have been many recent improvements, in particular with regard to accuracy of techniques, imagery, dosimetry, and implementation of quality-control procedures. In localized non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, the gold-standard treatment is radiation therapy coupled with a short course of chemotherapy. In contrast, the place of irradiation in disseminated lymphomas remains to be defined. Prophylactic irradiation of the brain is still used in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Radiation therapy is of value as palliative treatment of bone lesions of myeloma, in chemo-resistant lymphomas, and in relapses of leukemia. Total body irradiation is a cumbersome but irreplaceable method, which has also benefited from recent clinical and biological studies. Optimal radiation therapy with the best possible therapeutic index requires adequate technological and human resources. (authors). 30 refs., 1 tab

  5. PET/CT in Radiation Therapy Planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Specht, Lena; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil

    2018-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is an important component of the management of lymphoma patients. Most lymphomas are metabolically active and accumulate 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). Positron emission tomography with computer tomography (PET/CT) imaging using FDG is used routinely in staging and treatment...

  6. Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Overexpression Restores the Efficiency of Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cell-Based Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mees, Barend; Récalde, Alice; Loinard, Céline; Tempel, Dennie; Godinho, Marcia; Vilar, José; van Haperen, Rien; Lévy, Bernard; de Crom, Rini; Silvestre, Jean-Sébastien

    2011-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells (BMMNCs) enhance postischemic neovascularization, and their therapeutic use is currently under clinical investigation. However, cardiovascular risk factors, including diabetes mellitus and hypercholesterolemia, lead to the abrogation of BMMNCs proangiogenic potential. NO has been shown to be critical for the proangiogenic function of BMMNCs, and increased endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) activity promotes vessel growth in ischemic conditions. We therefore hypothesized that eNOS overexpression could restore both the impaired neovascularization response and decreased proangiogenic function of BMMNCs in clinically relevant models of diabetes and hypercholesterolemia. Transgenic eNOS overexpression in diabetic, atherosclerotic, and wild-type mice induced a 1.5- to 2.3-fold increase in postischemic neovascularization compared with control. eNOS overexpression in diabetic or atherosclerotic BMMNCs restored their reduced proangiogenic potential in ischemic hind limb. This effect was associated with an increase in BMMNC ability to differentiate into cells with endothelial phenotype in vitro and in vivo and an increase in BMMNCs paracrine function, including vascular endothelial growth factor A release and NO-dependent vasodilation. Moreover, although wild-type BMMNCs treatment resulted in significant progression of atherosclerotic plaque in ischemic mice, eNOS transgenic atherosclerotic BMMNCs treatment even had antiatherogenic effects. Cell-based eNOS gene therapy has both proangiogenic and antiatherogenic effects and should be further investigated for the development of efficient therapeutic neovascularization designed to treat ischemic cardiovascular disease. PMID:21224043

  7. Planning of radiation therapy for esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwata, Takeo

    1981-01-01

    The esophageal malignant tumors occur mostly at the pulmonary esophagus, whereas such tumors also occur at the cervical and abdominal esophagus. Moreover, histologically, such malignant tumors are mostly carcinoma planocellulare and yet, there are not a few cases of adenomatous carcinoma and indifferentiated carcinoma. X-ray pictures reveal various types, such as infundibular, spiral and serrated forms, which are related to the radioactive therapuetic effects. However, the most difficult condition in radioactive therapies for the esophagus is that this organ is adjacent to important viscera at the surroundings, thus the most irradiating field covers the normal tissues. For such radiating sites, instead of the conventional simple radiation by 2 guns, a further progress was considered by trying to pursue more efficient and effective methods for radiating therapies in classfication by the generating or causing sites of carcinoma, in application of computers. (author)

  8. Drug delivery system and radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Tokushi

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the review of radiation therapy, neutron capture therapy (NCT) and drug delivery system for the latter. In cancer radiation therapy, there are problems of body movement like breathing, needless irradiation of normal tissues, difficulty to decide the correct irradiation position and tumor morphology. NCT has advantages to overcome these, and since boron has a big cross section for thermal neutron, NPT uses the reaction 10 B(n, α) 7 Li in the target cancer which previously incorporated the boron-containing drug. During the period 1966-1996, 246 patients were treated with this in Japan and the treatment has been continued thereafter. The tasks for NCT are developments of drug delivery system efficient to deliver the drug into the tumor and of convenient neutron source like the accelerator. (S.I.)

  9. Combined therapy of urinary bladder radiation injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaderin, V.P.; Polyanichko, M.F.

    1982-01-01

    A scheme of therapy of radiation cystitis is suggested. It was developed on the basis of evaluation of literature data and clinical of 205 patients with radiation injury of the urinary bladder. The method is based on general and local therapy of damaged tissues by antiinflammatory drugs, anesthetics and stimulators of reparative regeneration. Severe ulcerative and incrustation cystites, refractory to conservative therapy, were treated by surgery, using antiseptics and reparation stimulators before, during and after operation. As a result, there were hardly any complications after reconstruction of the bladder with intestinal and peritoneal tissues. 104 patients (96.1%) were cured completely and ability to work was restored in 70 patients (76.9%) [ru

  10. Radiation therapy of Graves' ophthalmopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, Toshiki; Koga, Sukehiko; Anno, Hirofumi; Komai, Satoshi (Fujita-Gakuen Health Univ., Toyoake, Aichi (Japan))

    1992-01-01

    During the decade from 1978 to 1987, 20 patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy were treated with irradiation of 2000 cGy to the orbital tissue. We examined the effects of the therapy on 17 such patients. Exophthalmos tended to decrease. When the degree of deviation of the exophthalmic eye was small, the effect of therapy tended to be better than when it was large. Two cases that showed an increase in retrobulbar fatty tissue without thickening of the extraocular muscles did not respond as well as those that had thickening of the extraocular muscles. Diplopia tended to improve both subjectively and objectively. Ocular movement improved in 11 of the 17 patients. There were no serious radiation injuries after the radiation therapy, except for some transient swelling of the eyelid. (author).

  11. Computer models for optimizing radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duechting, W.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this contribution is to outline how methods of system analysis, control therapy and modelling can be applied to simulate normal and malignant cell growth and to optimize cancer treatment as for instance radiation therapy. Based on biological observations and cell kinetic data, several types of models have been developed describing the growth of tumor spheroids and the cell renewal of normal tissue. The irradiation model is represented by the so-called linear-quadratic model describing the survival fraction as a function of the dose. Based thereon, numerous simulation runs for different treatment schemes can be performed. Thus, it is possible to study the radiation effect on tumor and normal tissue separately. Finally, this method enables a computer-assisted recommendation for an optimal patient-specific treatment schedule prior to clinical therapy. (orig.) [de

  12. Database for radiation therapy images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shalev, S.; Cosby, S.; Leszczynski, K.; Chu, T.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have developed a database for images acquired during simulation and verification of radiation treatments. Simulation images originate as planning films that are digitized with a video camera, or through direct digitization of fluoroscopic images. Verification images may also be digitized from portal films or acquired with an on-line portal imaging system. Images are classified by the patient, the fraction, the field direction, static or dynamic (movie) sequences, and the type of processing applied. Additional parameters indicate whether the source is a simulation or treatment, whether images are digitized film or real-time acquisitions, and whether treatment is portal or double exposure for beam localization. Examples are presented for images acquired, processed, stored, and displayed with on-line portal imaging system (OPIUM) and digital simulation system (FLIP)

  13. Modulation of Radiation Injury in Pregnant Rats by Bone Marrow Transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, E.M.; Abd Rabu, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    This Work aims to point out the influence of bone marrow transplantation (BMT) in protection of irradiated pregnant rats and suppression of oxidative stress. BMT was administered to rats, 1 h post gamma irradiation at the dose level of 2 Gy given at the 7th or 14th day of gestation. Rats were examined after 20 days from gestation to detect the physiological parameters of the mother and number of implantation sites and resorption as well as length of foetuses and tails. Pregnant rats irradiated at the 7th and 14th day of gestation showed reduction in live foetuses and length of foetuses and their tails and significant decrease in erythrocytes (RBCs), leucocytes (WBCs), haemoglobin content (Hb), and hematocrit percentage (Ht). Irradiation-induced an elevation in aldosterone and a drop in calcium (Ca). Glutathione levels showed significant decreases in blood while the content of serum thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) showed significant increases. Lipid profile exhibited an increase in the concentrations of total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG) and low lipoproteins cholesterol (LDL-C) with a significant decrease in high lipoproteins cholesterol (HDL-C) in both groups. BMT to irradiated pregnant rats induced significant amelioration in radiation- induced changes. BMT was shown to be effective in reducing physiological disorders and oxidative stress in pregnant rats reflected on minimizing embryonic injuries

  14. Damage of chromosomes in mouse bone marrow cells after combined treatment with gamma radiation and cyclophosphamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rupova, Ivanka

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Current approaches to successful management of malignancy include combined modalities of treatment with ionizing radiation and anticancer drugs. Together with tumor cells normal tissues and cells are also submitted to the damaging effect of these agents, creating thus a probability for development of secondary neoplastic processes. The aim of the present study was to investigate the rate of chromosome damage at different modalities of combined exposures to gamma irradiation and cyclophosphamide(CY) of mice. Chromosomal aberration frequency in metaphase bone marrow cells was used as a measure to evaluate the effect. Combination treatments with 3 Gy gamma irradiation and 20 mg/kg cyclophosphamide were given at different intervals - simultaneously or at 12 hr interval, in order to establish the conditions and factors influencing the rate of chromosome damage. The distribution of different types of chromosome aberrations, such as chromatid fragments, chromatid exchanges, chromosome fragments and chromosome exchanges was analyzed. The results showed a high synergistic effect at simultaneous treatment with both agents if assessed by the index of aberrations per cell (%). An attempt has been made to suggest a possible explanation of the effects at different combined treatments related to the type of induced chromosomal aberrations. (author)

  15. The separation of a mixture of bone marrow stem cells from tumor cells: an essential step for autologous bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, P.; Wheeler, K.T.; Keng, P.C.; Gregory, P.K.; Croizat, H.

    1981-01-01

    KHT tumor cells were mixed with mouse bone marrow to simulate a sample of bone marrow containing metastatic tumor cells. This mixture was separated into a bone marrow fraction and a tumor cell fraction by centrifugal elutriation. Elutriation did not change the transplantability of the bone marrow stem cells as measured by a spleen colony assay and an in vitro erythroid burst forming unit assay. The tumorogenicity of the KHT cells was similarly unaffected by elutriation. The data showed that bone marrow cells could be purified to less than 1 tumor cell in more than 10 6 bone marrow cells. Therefore, purification of bone marrow removed prior to lethal radiation-drug combined therapy for subsequent autologous transplantation appears to be feasible using modifications of this method if similar physical differences between human metastatic tumor cells and human bone marrow cells exist. This possibility is presently being explored

  16. Estimating {sup 131}I biokinetics and radiation doses to the red marrow and whole body in thyroid cancer patients: probe detection versus image quantification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willegaignon, Jose; Pelissoni, Rogerio Alexandre; Lima, Beatriz Christine de Godoy Diniz; Coura-Filho, George Barberio; Queiroz, Marcelo Araujo, E-mail: j.willegaignon@gmail.com [Instituto do Cancer do Estado de Sao Paulo Octavio Frias de Oliveira (ICESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Sapienza, Marcelo Tatit; Buchpiguel, Carlos Alberto [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FM/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Departamento de Radiologia

    2016-05-15

    Objective: to compare the probe detection method with the image quantification method when estimating {sup 131}I biokinetics and radiation doses to the red marrow and whole body in the treatment of thyroid cancer patients. Materials and methods: fourteen patients with metastatic thyroid cancer, without metastatic bone involvement, were submitted to therapy planning in order to tailor the therapeutic amount of {sup 131}I to each individual. Whole-body scans and probe measurements were performed at 4, 24, 48, 72, and 96 h after {sup 131}I administration in order to estimate the effective half-life (T{sub eff}) and residence time of {sup 131}I in the body. Results: the mean values for T{sub eff} and residence time, respectively, were 19 ± 9 h and 28 ± 12 h for probe detection, compared with 20 ± 13 h and 29 ± 18 h for image quantification. The average dose to the red marrow and whole body, respectively, was 0.061 ± 0.041 mGy/MBq and 0.073 ± 0.040 mGy/MBq for probe detection, compared with 0.066 ± 0.055 mGy/MBq and 0.078 ± 0.056 mGy/MBq for image quantification. Statistical analysis proved that there were no significant differences between the two methods for estimating the T{sub eff} (p = 0.801), residence time (p = 0.801), dose to the red marrow (p = 0.708), and dose to the whole body (p = 0.811), even when we considered an optimized approach for calculating doses only at 4 h and 96 h after {sup 131}I administration (p > 0.914). Conclusion: there is full agreement as to the feasibility of using probe detection and image quantification when estimating {sup 131}I biokinetics and red-marrow/whole-body doses. However, because the probe detection method is ineffective in identifying tumor sites and critical organs during radionuclide therapy and therefore liable to skew adjustment of the amount of {sup 131}I to be administered to patients under such therapy, it should be used with caution. (author)

  17. Some method for teaching physics to residents in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, D.B.

    A method is presented for teaching physics to residents in radiation therapy. Some of the various responsabilities of a hospital physicist are listed, with particular reference to radiation therapy departments [pt

  18. External and internal radiation therapy: Past and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadeghi Mahdi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the modern world. Treatment modalities comprise radiation therapy, surgery, chemotherapy and hormonal therapy. Radiation therapy can be performed by using external or internal radiation therapy. However, each method has its unique properties which undertakes special role in cancer treatment, this question is brought up that: For cancer treatment, whether external radiation therapy is more efficient or internal radiation therapy one? To answer this question, we need to consider principles and structure of individual methods. In this review, principles and application of each method are considered and finally these two methods are compared with each other.

  19. Pulsed laser radiation therapy of skin tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozlov, A.P.; Moskalik, K.G.

    1980-11-15

    Radiation from a neodymium laser was used to treat 846 patients with 687 precancerous lesions or benign tumors of the skin, 516 cutaneous carcinomas, 33 recurrences of cancer, 51 melanomas, and 508 metastatic melanomas in the skin. The patients have been followed for three months to 6.5 years. No relapses have been observed during this period. Metastases to regional lymph nodes were found in five patients with skin melanoma. Pulsed laser radiation may be successfully used in the treatment of precancerous lesions and benign tumors as well as for skin carcinoma and its recurrences, and for skin melanoma. Laser radiation is more effective in the treatment of tumors inaccessible to radiation therapy and better in those cases in which surgery may have a bad cosmetic or even mutilating effect. Laser beams can be employed in conjunction with chemo- or immunotherapy.

  20. Comparison of particle-radiation-therapy modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairchild, R.G.; Bond, V.P.

    1981-01-01

    The characteristics of dose distribution, beam alignment, and radiobiological advantages accorded to high LET radiation were reviewed and compared for various particle beam radiotherapeutic modalities (neutron, Auger electrons, p, π - , He, C, Ne, and Ar ions). Merit factors were evaluated on the basis of effective dose to tumor relative to normal tissue, linear energy transfer (LET), and dose localization, at depths of 1, 4, and 10 cm. In general, it was found that neutron capture therapy using an epithermal neutron beam provided the best merit factors available for depths up to 8 cm. The position of fast neutron therapy on the Merit Factor Tables was consistently lower than that of other particle modalities, and above only 60 Co. The largest body of clinical data exists for fast neutron therapy; results are considered by some to be encouraging. It then follows that if benefits with fast neutron therapy are real, additional gains are within reach with other modalities

  1. Study on human mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow pretreated with low dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yan; Wang Guangjun; Wang Juan

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To study effects of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSC) from bone marrow pretreated with low dose radiation (LDR). Methods: The cells were the hBM-MSC. They were exposed to X rays at the dose of 50 mGy, 75 mGy, 100 mGy (dose rate 12.5 mGy/min). The growth curve, cell cycle and apoptosis of hBM-MSC treated by LDR were investigated. The content changes of stem cell factor(SCF), interleukin-6 (IL-6), macrophage colony stimulating factor(M-CSF) secreted by hBM-MSC after treated by LDR were determined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay method. Results: The growth rates of hBM-MSC treated by LDR obviously increase from 72 h. The cell cycle and apoptosis were examined with FORTRAN Atomatic Checkout Systom. The results show that the G 0 /G 1 stage cells decrease after exposure to LDR, the percent of G 0 /G 1 stage cells of 75 mGy at 72 h is the lowest(30.86%). However, the S stage cells percentage gradually increase at 48 h and 72 h. The most one is 75 mGy group at 72 h, which reaches to 68.88%. The apoptosis percentages have increased tendency at 24 h and 48h in all dose groups, especially in 100 mGy at 24 h(25.99%), while have decreased tendency at 72 h and the most decreased group is the 50 mGy(6.8%), transient enhancement of apoptosis in the early stage and soon being decreased. The contents of SCF have increased tendency at 24 h, 48 h. As for IL-6, the contents in different dose groups at 24 h and 48 h have up-regulation. These groups, 50 mGy at 24 h, 48 h, 75 mGy at 24 h, 48 h, 100 mGy at 24 h have statistical difference compared with their control groups respectively. The content of IL-6 has greatest enhancement at dose of 50 mGy. The contents of M-SCF in all the groups at 24 h, 48 h and 72 h except for the 50 mGy dose at 72 h have also been found increased. The greatest increased content occur in the 75 mGy dose group at 72 h. Conclusion: This conclusion show that LDR has hormesis effect on hBM-MSC in cell growth, cell cycle and content

  2. A bone marrow toxicity model for 223Ra alpha-emitter radiopharmaceutical therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobbs, Robert F; Song Hong; Sgouros, George; Watchman, Christopher J; Bolch, Wesley E; Aksnes, Anne-Kirsti; Ramdahl, Thomas; Flux, Glenn D

    2012-01-01

    Ra-223, an α-particle emitting bone-seeking radionuclide, has recently been used in clinical trials for osseous metastases of prostate cancer. We investigated the relationship between absorbed fraction-based red marrow dosimetry and cell level-dosimetry using a model that accounts for the expected localization of this agent relative to marrow cavity architecture. We show that cell level-based dosimetry is essential to understanding potential marrow toxicity. The GEANT4 software package was used to create simple spheres representing marrow cavities. Ra-223 was positioned on the trabecular bone surface or in the endosteal layer and simulated for decay, along with the descendants. The interior of the sphere was divided into cell-size voxels and the energy was collected in each voxel and interpreted as dose cell histograms. The average absorbed dose values and absorbed fractions were also calculated in order to compare those results with previously published values. The absorbed dose was predominantly deposited near the trabecular surface. The dose cell histogram results were used to plot the percentage of cells that received a potentially toxic absorbed dose (2 or 4 Gy) as a function of the average absorbed dose over the marrow cavity. The results show (1) a heterogeneous distribution of cellular absorbed dose, strongly dependent on the position of the cell within the marrow cavity; and (2) that increasing the average marrow cavity absorbed dose, or equivalently, increasing the administered activity resulted in only a small increase in potential marrow toxicity (i.e. the number of cells receiving more than 4 or 2 Gy), for a range of average marrow cavity absorbed doses from 1 to 20 Gy. The results from the trabecular model differ markedly from a standard absorbed fraction method while presenting comparable average dose values. These suggest that increasing the amount of radioactivity may not substantially increase the risk of toxicity, a result unavailable to the

  3. START: an advanced radiation therapy information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocco, A; Valentini, V; Balducci, M; Mantello, G

    1996-01-01

    START is an advanced radiation therapy information system (RTIS) which connects direct information technology present in the devices with indirect information technology for clinical, administrative, information management integrated with the hospital information system (HIS). The following objectives are pursued: to support decision making in treatment planning and functional and information integration with the rest of the hospital; to enhance organizational efficiency of a Radiation Therapy Department; to facilitate the statistical evaluation of clinical data and managerial performance assessment; to ensure the safety and confidentiality of used data. For its development a working method based on the involvement of all operators of the Radiation Therapy Department, was applied. Its introduction in the work activity was gradual, trying to reuse and integrate the existing information applications. The START information flow identifies four major phases: admission, visit of admission, planning, therapy. The system main functionalities available to the radiotherapist are: clinical history/medical report linking function; folder function; planning function; tracking function; electronic mail and banner function; statistical function; management function. Functions available to the radiotherapy technician are: the room daily list function; management function: to the nurse the following functions are available: patient directing function; management function. START is a departmental client (pc-windows)-server (unix) developed on an integrated database of all information of interest (clinical, organizational and administrative) coherent with the standard and with a modular architecture which can evolve with additional functionalities in subsequent times. For a more thorough evaluation of its impact on the daily activity of a radiation therapy facility, a prolonged clinical validation is in progress.

  4. Radiation therapy: age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Carlos A Medina; Ehlers, Justis P

    2013-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of severe irreversible vision loss in patients over the age of 50 years in the developed world. Neovascular AMD (NVAMD) is responsible for 90% of the cases with severe visual loss. In the last decade, the treatment paradigm for NVAMD has been transformed by the advent of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy. Despite the excellent results of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy, frequent injections remain a necessity for most patients. The burden of these frequent visits as well as the cumulative risks of indefinite intravitreal injections demand continued pursuit of more enduring therapy that provides similar functional results. Radiotherapy has been studied for two decades as a potential therapy for NVAMD. Because of its antiangiogenic properties, radiation therapy remains a promising potential adjunctive resource for the treatment of choroidal neovascularization secondary to NVAMD. This review considers the past, present and future of radiation as a treatment or combination treatment of NVAMD. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Effect of Apis mellifera bee venom and gamma radiation on bone marrow cells of wistar rats treated in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varanda, E.A.; Takahashi, C.S.; Soares, A.E.E.; Barreto, S.A.J.

    1992-01-01

    To determine whether the venom of Apis mellifera can exert a radioprotective effect, by reducing the frequency of chromosomal aberrations induced by radiation, five different experiments were performed on bone marrow cells of Wistar rats. Animals weighing about 100 g were injected intraperitoneally with different venom concentrations (1.0 or 0.5 μ1) 1 or 24 h before, or 30 min after being submitted to three or four Gy of gamma radiation, and sacrificed 24 h after the last treatment. (author)

  6. Radiation therapy with fast neutrons: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, D.T.L.; Wambersie, A.

    2007-01-01

    Because of their biological effects fast neutrons are most effective in treating large, slow-growing tumours which are resistant to conventional X-radiation. Patients are treated typically 3-4 times per week for 4-5 weeks (sometimes in combination with X-radiation) for a variety of conditions such as carcinomas of the head and neck, salivary gland, paranasal sinus and breast; soft tissue, bone and uterine sarcomas and malignant melanomas. It is estimated that about 27,000 patients have undergone fast neutron therapy to date

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of bone marrow changes in Gaucher disease during enzyme replacement therapy: first German long-term results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poll, L.W.; Koch, J.A.; Scherer, A.; Boerner, D.; Moedder, U.; Dahl, S. vom; Niederau, C.; Haeussinger, D.; Willers, R.

    2001-01-01

    Objective:. Since 1991, enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) has been available for patients with Gaucher disease in Germany. The aim of this study was to analyse the MR pattern of bone marrow involvement and response to ERT in Gaucher disease type I. Patients and design:. Thirty patients with Gaucher disease type I had MRI examinations prior to initiation of ERT with alglucerase/imiglucerase and during follow-up. Median MR follow-up and duration of ERT were 36 months. Coronal T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo images of the lower extremities were obtained to evaluate changes in the appearance of yellow marrow. MR images were categorized as having either a homogeneous (type A) or non-homogeneous patchy (type B) appearance of bone involvement and response to ERT was assessed by two radiologists. Results:. Overall, 19 of 30 patients (63%) showed an increased signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted images after 36 months of ERT, consistent with partial reconversion of fatty marrow during treatment. Focal bone lesions surrounded by a low signal intensity (SI) rim did not respond to ERT, suggesting bone infarcts. Of the 11 patients with bone infarcts (low SI rim lesion), 82% had the non-homogeneous type B pattern (P=0.0021). In 86% of patients with splenectomy, bone infarcts were seen (P<0.05). Conclusions:. MRI using T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo sequences is a valuable, non-invasive method for monitoring bone marrow response in patients receiving ERT. A non- homogeneous patchy signal intensity of bone marrow involvement correlates with the presence of bone infarcts (P=0.0021). (orig.)

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of bone marrow changes in Gaucher disease during enzyme replacement therapy: first German long-term results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poll, L.W.; Koch, J.A.; Scherer, A.; Boerner, D.; Moedder, U. [Duesseldorf Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische Radiologie; Dahl, S. vom; Niederau, C.; Haeussinger, D. [Duesseldorf Univ. (Germany). Medizinische Fakultaet; Willers, R. [Duesseldorf Univ. (Germany). Rechenzentrum

    2001-09-01

    Objective:. Since 1991, enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) has been available for patients with Gaucher disease in Germany. The aim of this study was to analyse the MR pattern of bone marrow involvement and response to ERT in Gaucher disease type I. Patients and design:. Thirty patients with Gaucher disease type I had MRI examinations prior to initiation of ERT with alglucerase/imiglucerase and during follow-up. Median MR follow-up and duration of ERT were 36 months. Coronal T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo images of the lower extremities were obtained to evaluate changes in the appearance of yellow marrow. MR images were categorized as having either a homogeneous (type A) or non-homogeneous patchy (type B) appearance of bone involvement and response to ERT was assessed by two radiologists. Results:. Overall, 19 of 30 patients (63%) showed an increased signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted images after 36 months of ERT, consistent with partial reconversion of fatty marrow during treatment. Focal bone lesions surrounded by a low signal intensity (SI) rim did not respond to ERT, suggesting bone infarcts. Of the 11 patients with bone infarcts (low SI rim lesion), 82% had the non-homogeneous type B pattern (P=0.0021). In 86% of patients with splenectomy, bone infarcts were seen (P<0.05). Conclusions:. MRI using T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo sequences is a valuable, non-invasive method for monitoring bone marrow response in patients receiving ERT. A non- homogeneous patchy signal intensity of bone marrow involvement correlates with the presence of bone infarcts (P=0.0021). (orig.)

  9. Radiation therapy for head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillette, S.M.; Gillette, E.L.

    1995-01-01

    Radiation therapy may be indicated for larger invasive tumors of the head and neck that may be difficult to surgically excise or for which surgery would be significantly disfiguring. Previous studies of oral squamous cell carcinomas indicate that it should be possible to control approximately 80% of all but the most advanced local or locoregional tumors. Aggressive radiation therapy to total doses of 56 Gy or greater may be required. That can be done by using smaller doses per fraction and gradually reducing the size of the field so that the highest dose is given only to the tumor with a relatively tight margin. Malignant melanomas can be controlled locally apparently with a few large fractions. Metastatic disease limits survival; therefore, some type of systemic therapy seems to be needed to improve survival of those patients. Canine oral fibrosarcomas require a very high dose for a reasonable probability of control. It seems that a dose of 56 Gy given in 3.3 Gy fractions might provide local control of 50% of the tumors. It is likely that a combination of surgery and radiation would significantly improve the probability for control. Oral squamous cell carcinomas of cats must also be treated very aggressively to improve local control. Tumors of the nasal cavity are usually very large and invasive at the time of diagnosis. Radiation therapy has been shown to be effective in some instances. It is possible that with better definition of the tumor through computerized tomography imaging and improved treatment planning, control of these difficult to manage nasal tumors can be improved

  10. Radiation Therapy in Elderly Skin Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Hee [Keimyung University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-06-15

    To evaluate the long term results (local control, survival, failure, and complications) after radiation therapy for skin cancer in elderly patients. The study spanned from January 1990 to October 2002. Fifteen elderly patients with skin cancer were treated by radiotherapy at the Keimyung University Dongsan Medical Center. The age distribution of the patients surveyed was 72 to 95 years, with a median age of 78.8 years. The pathologic classification of the 15 patients included squamous cell carcinoma (10 patients), basal cell carcinoma (3 patients), verrucous carcinoma (1 patient) and skin adnexal origin carcinoma (1 patient). The most common tumor location was the head (13 patients). The mean tumor diameter was 4.9 cm (range 2 to 9 cm). The radiation dose was delivered via an electron beam of 6 to 15 MeV. The dose range was adjusted to the tumor diameter and depth of tumor invasion. The total radiation dose ranged from 50{approx}80 Gy (mean: 66 Gy) with a 2 Gy fractional dose prescribed to the 80% isodose line once a day and 5 times a week. One patient with lymph node metastasis was treated with six MV photon beams boosted with electron beams. The length of the follow-up periods ranged from 10 to 120 months with a median follow-up period of 48 months. The local control rates were 100% (15/15). In addition, the five year disease free survival rate (5YDFS) was 80% and twelve patients (80%) had no recurrence and skin cancer recurrence occurred in 3 patients (20%). Three patients have lived an average of 90 months (68{approx}120 months) without recurrence or metastasis. A total of 9 patients who died as a result of other causes had a mean survival time of 55.8 months after radiation therapy. No severe acute or chronic complications were observed after radiation therapy. Only minor complications including radiation dermatitis was treated with supportive care. The results suggest that radiation therapy is an effective and safe treatment method for the treatment of skin

  11. Cell cycle kinetics and radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendelsohn, M.L.

    1975-01-01

    Radiation therapy as currently practiced involves the subtle largely empirical art of balancing the recurrence of cancer due to undertreatment against severe damage to local tissues due to overtreatment. Therapeutic results too often fall short of desired success rates; yet, the therapist is continually tantalized to the likelihood that a slight shift of therapeutic ratio favoring normal tissue over cancer would have a profoundly beneficial effect. The application of cell cycle kinetics to radiation therapy is one hope for improving the therapeutic ratio; but, as I will try to show, kinetic approaches are complex, poorly understood, and presently too elusive to elicit confidence or to be used clinically. Their promise lies in their diversity and in the magnitude of our ignorance about how they work and how they should be used. Potentially useful kinetic approaches to therapy can be grouped into three classes. The first class takes advantage of intracyclic differential sensitivity, an effect involving the metabolism and biology of the cell cycle; its strategies are based on synchronization of cells over intervals of hours to days. The second class involves the distinction between cycling and noncycling cells; its strategies are based on the resistance of noncycling cells to cycle-linked radiation sensitizers and chemotherapeutic agents. The third class uses cell repopulation between fractions; its strategies are based on the relative growth rates of tumor and relevant normal tissue before and after perturbation

  12. Perspectives of radiation therapy in benign diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultze, J.; Eilf, K.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: the numbers of patients with nonmalignant diseases referred for radiation therapy had to be evaluated for the last 4 years. Patients and methods: in the years 2002, 2004, and 2005 radiation therapy was performed in 61, 40, and 26 patients, respectively. Regularly, more women than men were treated, median age annually was 57, 54, and 55 years, respectively (table 1). The radiotherapy scheme was not modified within the evaluated period. Results: the proportion of nonmalignant diseases among all patients treated decreased from 4.7% in 2002 to 3.3% in 2004 and 2.2% in 2005, respectively. A shift was noticed toward the treatment of four main diseases (endocrine orbitopathy, prevention of heterotopic ossification, meningeoma, tendinitis, table 2). The number of referring physicians decreased from 19 to six. Conclusion: due to administrative restrictions for treatment in hospitals, budget restrictions in private practices and lasting, insufficient revenues for radiotherapy in nonmalignant diseases, radiation therapy for the entire group of benign diseases is endangered. (orig.)

  13. Bone Marrow-Derived Mononuclear Cell Therapy in Papain-Induced Experimental Pulmonary Emphysema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana N. Machado

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Murine papain-induced emphysema is a model that reproduces many of the features found in patients. Bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells (BMMC have already been used to repair the alveolar epithelium in respiratory diseases, but not in the papain model. Thus, we hypothesized that BMMC could prevent the pathophysiological processes in papain-induced experimental emphysema. Female BALB/c mice received intratracheal instillation of 50 μL of saline (S groups or papain (P groups, 10 IU/50 μl of saline on days 1 and 7 of the experimental protocol. On the 14th day, 2 × 106 BMMC of male BALB/c mice (SC21 and PC21 or saline (SS21 and PS21 were injected by the jugular vein. Analyses were done on days 14 (S14 and P14 and 21 (SS21, PS21, SC21, and PC21 of the protocol. qPCR evaluated the presence of the Y chromosome in the lungs of BMMC recipient animals. Functional residual capacity (FRC, alveolar diameter, cellularity, elastic fiber content, concentrations of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, MIP-2, KC, IFN-γ, apoptosis, mRNA expression of the dual oxidase (DUOX1 and DUOX2, production of H2O2 and DUOX activity were evaluated in lung tissue. We did not detect the Y chromosome in recipients' lungs. FRC, alveolar diameter, polymorphonuclear cells (PMN and levels of KC, MIP-2, and IFN-γ increased in P14 and PS21 groups; the changes in the latter were reverted by BMMC. TNF-α, IL-1β e IL-6 were similar in all groups. The amount of elastic fibers was smaller in P14 and PS21 than in other groups, and BMMC did not increase it in PC21 mice. PS21 animals showed increased DUOX activity and mRNA expression for DUOX1 and 2. Cell therapy reverted the activity of DUOX and mRNA expression of DUOX1. BMMC reduced mRNA expression of DUOX2. Apoptosis index was elevated in PS21 mice, which was reduced by cell therapy in PC21. Static compliance, viscoelastic component of elastance and pressure to overcome viscoelasticity were increased in P14 and PS21 groups. These changes and the

  14. Chronic neuroendocrinological sequelae of radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sklar, C.A. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Constine, L.S. [Univ. of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY (United States)

    1995-03-30

    A variety of neuroendocrine disturbances are observed following treatment with external radiation therapy when the hypothalamic-pituitary axis (HPA) is included in the treatment field. Radiation-induced abnormalities are generally dose dependent and may develop many years after irradiation. Growth hormone deficiency and premature sexual development can occur following doses as low as 18 Gy fractionated radiation and are the most common neuroendocrine problems noted in children. Deficiency of gonadotropins, thyroid stimulating hormone, and adrenocorticotropin are seen primarily in individuals treated with > 40 Gy HPA irradiation. Hyperprolactinemia can be seen following high-dose radiotherapy (>40 Gy), especially among young women. Most neuroendocrine disturbances that develop as a result of HPA irradiation are treatable; patients at risk require long-term endocrine follow-up. 23 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Generalized Morphea after Breast Cancer Radiation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Kushi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a 69-year-old woman who received external beam radiation for the treatment of breast cancer. Seven months later, she developed generalized morphea involving the area of irradiated skin of the breast as well as distant sites of the groin and distal lower extremity. Postirradiation morphea is an uncommon yet well-documented phenomenon, usually confined to the radiated site and the immediate surrounding tissue. To our knowledge, this is only the fourth reported case of morphea occurring distant from the radiation field. While most cases of postirradiation morphea have been shown to either resolve spontaneously or respond to topical corticosteroids, our patient required systemic therapy with methotrexate, which resulted in clinical improvement. With this paper, we hope to bring further awareness to this phenomenon and demonstrate a successful treatment response with the use of methotrexate in postirradiation generalized morphea.

  16. Dose distribution following selective internal radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, R.A.; Klemp, P.F.; Egan, G.; Mina, L.L.; Burton, M.A.; Gray, B.N.

    1991-01-01

    Selective Internal Radiation Therapy is the intrahepatic arterial injection of microspheres labelled with 90Y. The microspheres lodge in the precapillary circulation of tumor resulting in internal radiation therapy. The activity of the 90Y injected is managed by successive administrations of labelled microspheres and after each injection probing the liver with a calibrated beta probe to assess the dose to the superficial layers of normal tissue. Predicted doses of 75 Gy have been delivered without subsequent evidence of radiation damage to normal cells. This contrasts with the complications resulting from doses in excess of 30 Gy delivered from external beam radiotherapy. Detailed analysis of microsphere distribution in a cubic centimeter of normal liver and the calculation of dose to a 3-dimensional fine grid has shown that the radiation distribution created by the finite size and distribution of the microspheres results in an highly heterogeneous dose pattern. It has been shown that a third of normal liver will receive less than 33.7% of the dose predicted by assuming an homogeneous distribution of 90Y

  17. Radiation therapy of hemangiomas, 1909-1959

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuerst, C.J.; Lundell, M.; Holm, L.E.; Karolinska Sjukhuset, Stockholm

    1987-01-01

    Radium and roentgen therapies for hemangiomas of the skin (mainly strawberry hemangiomas) were used between 1909 and 1959 at Radiumhemmet, Stockholm. The total number of admitted patients with hemangioma of the skin during this period was 20012. About 90% were treated with irradiation and radium therapy was the most commonly used modality. Needles, tubes and flat applicators containing radium were used. Roentgen therapy was given by using standard machines available at the time. A small number of patients were treated with 32 P plaques. Most hemangiomas were located in the head-neck region (47%) and 30% were located on the thorax and upper part of the abdomen. The median age at the first treatment was 6 months and 90% of all patients were younger than 2 years of age at the time of treatment. The purpose of the investigation was to define a cohort, useful for studies on possible late effects following exposure to ionizing radiation in childhood. (orig.)

  18. Image-guided radiation therapy: physician's perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, T.; Anand Narayan, C.

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of radiotherapy has been ontogenetically linked to medical imaging. Over the years, major technological innovations have resulted in substantial improvements in radiotherapy planning, delivery, and verification. The increasing use of computed tomography imaging for target volume delineation coupled with availability of computer-controlled treatment planning and delivery systems have progressively led to conformation of radiation dose to the target tissues while sparing surrounding normal tissues. Recent advances in imaging technology coupled with improved treatment delivery allow near-simultaneous soft-tissue localization of tumor and repositioning of patient. The integration of various imaging modalities within the treatment room for guiding radiation delivery has vastly improved the management of geometric uncertainties in contemporary radiotherapy practice ushering in the paradigm of image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Image-guidance should be considered a necessary and natural corollary to high-precision radiotherapy that was long overdue. Image-guided radiation therapy not only provides accurate information on patient and tumor position on a quantitative scale, it also gives an opportunity to verify consistency of planned and actual treatment geometry including adaptation to daily variations resulting in improved dose delivery. The two main concerns with IGRT are resource-intensive nature of delivery and increasing dose from additional imaging. However, increasing the precision and accuracy of radiation delivery through IGRT is likely to reduce toxicity with potential for dose escalation and improved tumor control resulting in favourable therapeutic index. The radiation oncology community needs to leverage this technology to generate high-quality evidence to support widespread adoption of IGRT in contemporary radiotherapy practice. (author)

  19. Fiber-optic dosimeters for radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Enbang; Archer, James

    2017-10-01

    According to the figures provided by the World Health Organization, cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide, accounting for 8.8 million deaths in 2015. Radiation therapy, which uses x-rays to destroy or injure cancer cells, has become one of the most important modalities to treat the primary cancer or advanced cancer. The newly developed microbeam radiation therapy (MRT), which uses highly collimated, quasi-parallel arrays of x-ray microbeams (typically 50 μm wide and separated by 400 μm) produced by synchrotron sources, represents a new paradigm in radiotherapy and has shown great promise in pre-clinical studies on different animal models. Measurements of the absorbed dose distribution of microbeams are vitally important for clinical acceptance of MRT and for developing quality assurance systems for MRT, hence are a challenging and important task for radiation dosimetry. On the other hand, during the traditional LINAC based radiotherapy and breast cancer brachytherapy, skin dose measurements and treatment planning also require a high spatial resolution, tissue equivalent, on-line dosimeter that is both economical and highly reliable. Such a dosimeter currently does not exist and remains a challenge in the development of radiation dosimetry. High resolution, water equivalent, optical and passive x-ray dosimeters have been developed and constructed by using plastic scintillators and optical fibers. The dosimeters have peak edge-on spatial resolutions ranging from 50 to 500 microns in one dimension, with a 10 micron resolution dosimeter under development. The developed fiber-optic dosimeters have been test with both LINAC and synchrotron x-ray beams. This work demonstrates that water-equivalent and high spatial resolution radiation detection can be achieved with scintillators and optical fiber systems. Among other advantages, the developed fiber-optic probes are also passive, energy independent, and radiation hard.

  20. Clinical experience of radiation therapy for Graves` ophthalmopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Takeo; Mitsuhashi, Norio; Nagashima, Hisako; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Murata, Osamu; Ishizeki, Kei; Shimaya, Sanae; Hayakawa, Kazushige; Niibe, Hideo [Gunma Univ., Maebashi (Japan). School of Medicine

    1996-11-01

    The effect of radiation therapy for Graves` ophthalmopathy was evaluated. Ten patients with Graves` ophthalmopathy were treated with radiation therapy between 1992 and 1993 in Gunma University Hospital. All patients had a past history of hyperthyroidism and received 2,000 cGy to the retrobulbar tissues in 20 fractions. Nine of ten patients were treated with radiation therapy after the failure of corticosteroids. Six patients (60%) showed good or excellent responses. The exophthalmos type was more responsive to radiation therapy than the double vision type in this series. Two of five patients with the exophthalmos type demonstrated excellent responses, and their symptoms disappeared almost completely. The improvement of symptoms appeared within 3-6 months, and obvious clinical effects were demonstrated after 6 months of radiotherapy. Radiation therapy was well tolerated, and we have not observed any side effects of radiation therapy. In conclusion, radiation therapy is effective treatment for Graves` ophthalmopathy. (author)

  1. Clinical experience of radiation therapy for Graves' ophthalmopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Takeo; Mitsuhashi, Norio; Nagashima, Hisako; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Murata, Osamu; Ishizeki, Kei; Shimaya, Sanae; Hayakawa, Kazushige; Niibe, Hideo

    1996-01-01

    The effect of radiation therapy for Graves' ophthalmopathy was evaluated. Ten patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy were treated with radiation therapy between 1992 and 1993 in Gunma University Hospital. All patients had a past history of hyperthyroidism and received 2,000 cGy to the retrobulbar tissues in 20 fractions. Nine of ten patients were treated with radiation therapy after the failure of corticosteroids. Six patients (60%) showed good or excellent responses. The exophthalmos type was more responsive to radiation therapy than the double vision type in this series. Two of five patients with the exophthalmos type demonstrated excellent responses, and their symptoms disappeared almost completely. The improvement of symptoms appeared within 3-6 months, and obvious clinical effects were demonstrated after 6 months of radiotherapy. Radiation therapy was well tolerated, and we have not observed any side effects of radiation therapy. In conclusion, radiation therapy is effective treatment for Graves' ophthalmopathy. (author)

  2. Treatment of radiation exposure and regeneration medicine. Regeneration treatment of blood vessels by transplantation of autologous marrow monocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagai, Kazuhiro; Kamihira, Shimeru; Matsumaru, Ichiro; Fukushima, Takuya; Yamaguchi, Hakuichiro; Miyazaki, Yasushi; Yamachika, Shiro; Eishi, Kiyoyuki; Tomonaga, Masao

    2007-01-01

    Described are usefulness and future view of regenerative medicine in the treatment of radiation exposure as exemplified by the vascular regeneration by autologous marrow cell transplantation. Vascular endothelial cells (VEC), possessing a high ability to divide, are known sensitive to radiation, which gives damage of blood vessel to alter its permeability leading to apoptosis of VEC, organ/tissue injuries and final damages in the cerebral blood vessels, central nervous system and skin, the acute radiation syndrome (ARS). Authors present successful cases of patients with chronic limb ischemia in the Therapeutic Angiogenesis using Cell Transplantation Trial (TACT), to whom the treatment is conducted with transplantation of autologous marrow monocyte fraction containing endothelial progenitor cells that differentiate to VEC. As well, they touch on a case of the patient encountered in a nuclear accident, mentioning that VEC are found partly derived from the donor after heamatopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Efficacy of HSCT in a literature is reviewed and commented to be an only limited one in 31 patients of various radiation accidents. However, treatment of ARS where stem cells are target, with regenerative medicine will become more useful in future, as basic and clinical researches will provide requisite findings. (T.I.)

  3. Radiation therapy in Africa: distribution and equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, C.V.; Meghzifene, A.; Gueddari, B. el

    1999-01-01

    Africa is the least developed continent as regards radiation oncology resources. The documented ASR of cancer is of the order of 1 to 2 per 1000. With improving health care this is becoming more significant. This review was undertaken to help develop priorities for the region. Radiation Oncology departments in Africa were identified and a survey of their equipment performed. These were compared to the reported situation in 1991. Population tables for the year 2000 were compared to available megavoltage machines. Of 56 countries in Africa, only 22 are confidently known to have megavoltage therapy concentrated in the southern and northern extremes of the continent. The 155 megavoltage machines operating represents over 100% increase over the past 8 years. The population served by each megavoltage machine ranges from 0.6 million to 70 million per machine. Overall, only 50% of the population have some access to Radiation Oncology services. Progress has been made in initiating radiation oncology in Ghana, Ethiopia and Namibia. There has been some increase in machines in Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Morocco and Tunisia. However, a large backlog exists for basic radiation services. (author.)

  4. Human gingiva-derived mesenchymal stem cells are superior to bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells for cell therapy in regenerative medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomar, Geetanjali B.; Srivastava, Rupesh K.; Gupta, Navita; Barhanpurkar, Amruta P.; Pote, Satish T. [National Center for Cell Science, University of Pune Campus, Pune 411 007 (India); Jhaveri, Hiral M. [Department of Periodontics and Oral Implantology, Dr. D.Y. Patil Dental College and Hospital, Pune (India); Mishra, Gyan C. [National Center for Cell Science, University of Pune Campus, Pune 411 007 (India); Wani, Mohan R., E-mail: mohanwani@nccs.res.in [National Center for Cell Science, University of Pune Campus, Pune 411 007 (India)

    2010-03-12

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are capable of self-renewal and differentiation into multiple cell lineages. Presently, bone marrow is considered as a prime source of MSCs; however, there are some drawbacks and limitations in use of these MSCs for cell therapy. In this study, we demonstrate that human gingival tissue-derived MSCs have several advantages over bone marrow-derived MSCs. Gingival MSCs are easy to isolate, homogenous and proliferate faster than bone marrow MSCs without any growth factor. Importantly, gingival MSCs display stable morphology and do not loose MSC characteristic at higher passages. In addition, gingival MSCs maintain normal karyotype and telomerase activity in long-term cultures, and are not tumorigenic. Thus, we reveal that human gingiva is a better source of MSCs than bone marrow, and large number of functionally competent clinical grade MSCs can be generated in short duration for cell therapy in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering.

  5. Human gingiva-derived mesenchymal stem cells are superior to bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells for cell therapy in regenerative medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomar, Geetanjali B.; Srivastava, Rupesh K.; Gupta, Navita; Barhanpurkar, Amruta P.; Pote, Satish T.; Jhaveri, Hiral M.; Mishra, Gyan C.; Wani, Mohan R.

    2010-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are capable of self-renewal and differentiation into multiple cell lineages. Presently, bone marrow is considered as a prime source of MSCs; however, there are some drawbacks and limitations in use of these MSCs for cell therapy. In this study, we demonstrate that human gingival tissue-derived MSCs have several advantages over bone marrow-derived MSCs. Gingival MSCs are easy to isolate, homogenous and proliferate faster than bone marrow MSCs without any growth factor. Importantly, gingival MSCs display stable morphology and do not loose MSC characteristic at higher passages. In addition, gingival MSCs maintain normal karyotype and telomerase activity in long-term cultures, and are not tumorigenic. Thus, we reveal that human gingiva is a better source of MSCs than bone marrow, and large number of functionally competent clinical grade MSCs can be generated in short duration for cell therapy in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering.

  6. Quantification of late complications after radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Horst; Beck-Bornholdt, Hans-Peter; Svoboda, Vladimir; Alberti, Winfried; Herrmann, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    Background: An increasing number of patients survive cancer after having received radiation therapy. Therefore, the occurrence of late normal tissue complications among long-term survivors is of particular concern. Methods: Sixty-three patients treated by radical surgery and irradiation for rectal carcinoma were subjected to an unconventional sandwich therapy. Preoperative irradiation was given in four fractions of 5 Gy each applied within 2 or 3 days; postoperative irradiation consisted mostly of 15x2 Gy (range, 20-40 Gy). A considerable proportion of these patients developed severe late complications (Radiother Oncol 53 (1999) 177). The data allowed a detailed analysis of complication kinetics, leading to a new model which was tested using data from the literature. Results: Data on late complications were obtained for eight different organs with a follow-up of up to 10 years. For the various organs, the percentage of patients being free from late complications, plotted as a function of time after start of radiation therapy, was adequately described by exponential regression. From the fit, the parameter p a was obtained, which is the percentage of patients at risk in a given year of developing a complication in a given organ during that year. The rate p a remained about constant with time. Following sandwich therapy, the annual incidence of complications in the bladder, ileum, lymphatic and soft tissue, and ureters was about the same (p a =10-14%/year), whereas complications in bone or dermis occurred at lower rates (4.7 or 7.5%/year, respectively). Discussion: Numerous data sets collected from published reports were analyzed in the same way. Many of the data sets studied were from patients in a series where there was a high incidence of late effects. Three types of kinetics for the occurrence of late effects after radiotherapy were identified: Type 1, purely exponential kinetics; Type 2, exponential kinetics, the slope of which decreased exponentially with time

  7. Radiation therapy following targeted therapy in oligometastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravis, Gwenaelle; Faure, Marjorie; Rybikowski, Stanislas; Dermeche, Slimane; Tyran, Marguerite; Calderon, Benoit; Thomassin, Jeanne; Walz, Jochen; Salem, Naji

    2015-11-01

    Up to 40% of patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with initially localized disease eventually develop metastasis following nephrectomy. The current standard of care for metastatic RCC (mRCC) is targeted therapy. However, complete response remains rare. A state of oligometastatic disease may exist, in which metastases are present in a limited number of locations; such cases may benefit from metastasis-directed local therapy, based on the evidence supporting resection of limited-volume metastases, allowing for improved disease control. We retrospectively analyzed 7 cases of response of RCC metastases, in patients treated with targeted therapies followed by radiation therapy (RT) of residual metastatic lesions in Paoli-Calmettes Institute (Marseille, France). We analyzed disease response rates, response to sequential strategy, relapse at the irradiated locations and disease evolution. The median follow-up was 34.1 months (range, 19.2-54.5 months). No progression at the irradiated sites was observed. A total of 5 patients had stable disease at the irradiated locations at the last follow-up; 3 remained in complete remission at the assessment, and 2 were stable. Excellent local response and clinical benefit may be achieved without added toxicity. In conclusion, sequential therapeutic strategies with RT following systemic treatment using sunitinib appear to be highly effective in patients with progressive mRCC and prompt the conduction of further confirmatory trials.

  8. External beam radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forman, Jeffrey D.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The intent of this course is to review the issues involved in the management of non-metastatic adenocarcinoma of the prostate. -- The value of pre-treatment prognostic factors including stage, grade and PSA value will be presented, and their value in determining therapeutic strategies will be discussed. -- Controversies involving the simulation process and treatment design will be presented. The value of CT scanning, Beams-Eye View, 3-D planning, intravesicle, intraurethral and rectal contrast will be presented. The significance of prostate and patient movement and strategies for dealing with them will be presented. -- The management of low stage, low to intermediate grade prostate cancer will be discussed. The dose, volume and timing of irradiation will be discussed as will the role of neo-adjuvant hormonal therapy, neutron irradiation and brachytherapy. The current status of radical prostatectomy and cryotherapy will be summarized. Treatment of locally advanced, poorly differentiated prostate cancer will be presented including a discussion of neo-adjuvant and adjuvant hormones, dose-escalation and neutron irradiation. -- Strategies for post-radiation failures will be presented including data on cryotherapy, salvage prostatectomy and hormonal therapy (immediate, delayed and/or intermittent). New areas for investigation will be reviewed. -- The management of patients post prostatectomy will be reviewed. Data on adjuvant radiation and therapeutic radiation for biochemical or clinically relapsed patients will be presented. This course hopes to present a realistic and pragmatic overview for treating patients with non-metastatic prostatic cancer

  9. Optical Tracking Technology in Stereotactic Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, Thomas H.; Meeks, Sanford L.; Bova, Frank J.; Friedman, William A.; Willoughby, Twyla R.; Kupelian, Patrick A.; Tome, Wolfgang

    2007-01-01

    The last decade has seen the introduction of advanced technologies that have enabled much more precise application of therapeutic radiation. These relatively new technologies include multileaf collimators, 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy planning, and intensity modulated radiotherapy in radiotherapy. Therapeutic dose distributions have become more conformal to volumes of disease, sometimes utilizing sharp dose gradients to deliver high doses to target volumes while sparing nearby radiosensitive structures. Thus, accurate patient positioning has become even more important, so that the treatment delivered to the patient matches the virtual treatment plan in the computer treatment planning system. Optical and image-guided radiation therapy systems offer the potential to improve the precision of patient treatment by providing a more robust fiducial system than is typically used in conventional radiotherapy. The ability to accurately position internal targets relative to the linac isocenter and to provide real-time patient tracking theoretically enables significant reductions in the amount of normal tissue irradiated. This report reviews the concepts, technology, and clinical applications of optical tracking systems currently in use for stereotactic radiation therapy. Applications of radiotherapy optical tracking technology to respiratory gating and the monitoring of implanted fiducial markers are also discussed

  10. Palliative radiation therapy for multiple myeloma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minowa, Yasushi; Sasai, Keisuke; Ishigaki, Takashi; Nagata, Yasushi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    1996-01-01

    Radiation therapy is a useful palliative modality for refractory lesions of multiple myeloma. It has been reported that total doses of 10 to 20 Gy are usually adequate to obtain some degree of pain relief. However, there are many patients who need additional doses to obtain sufficient pain relief. In this study. we retrospectively analyzed the records of patients with multiple myeloma irradiated at our department, in an attempt to develop an effective treatment policy for this disease. Twenty-nine patients with 53 lesions were treated between 1968 and 1993. Total irradiation doses were 4 to 60 Gy (median 40 Gy) with daily fractions of 2 Gy or less, and 16 to 51 Gy (median 30 Gy) with daily fractions greater than 2 Gy. Evaluated were 59 symptoms, including pain (68%), neurological abnormalities (15%), and masses (28%). Symptomatic remission was obtained in 33 of 36 (92%) lesions with pain, 6 of 8 (75%) with neurological abnormalities, and 13 of 15 (87%) mass lesions. Pain was partially relieved at a median TDF of 34, and completely at a median TDF of 66 (equivalent to 40-42 Gy with daily fractions of 2 Gy). Radiation therapy is an effective and palliative treatment method for symptomatic multiple myeloma. However, the treatment seems to require higher radiation doses than those reported to obtain adequate relief of symptoms. (author)

  11. Autologous bone marrow-derived stem cell therapy in heart disease: discrepancies and contradictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Darrel P; Mielewczik, Michael; Zargaran, David; Cole, Graham D

    2013-10-09

    Autologous bone marrow stem cell therapy is the greatest advance in the treatment of heart disease for a generation according to pioneering reports. In response to an unanswered letter regarding one of the largest and most promising trials, we attempted to summarise the findings from the most innovative and prolific laboratory. Amongst 48 reports from the group, there appeared to be 5 actual clinical studies ("families" of reports). Duplicate or overlapping reports were common, with contradictory experimental design, recruitment and results. Readers cannot always tell whether a study is randomised versus not, open-controlled or blinded placebo-controlled, or lacking a control group. There were conflicts in recruitment dates, criteria, sample sizes, million-fold differences in cell counts, sex reclassification, fractional numbers of patients and conflation of competitors' studies with authors' own. Contradictory results were also common. These included arithmetical miscalculations, statistical errors, suppression of significant changes, exaggerated description of own findings, possible silent patient deletions, fractional numbers of coronary arteries, identical results with contradictory sample sizes, contradictory results with identical sample sizes, misrepresented survival graphs and a patient with a negative NYHA class. We tabulate over 200 discrepancies amongst the reports. The 5 family-flagship papers (Strauer 2002, STAR, IACT, ABCD, BALANCE) have had 2665 citations. Of these, 291 citations were to the pivotal STAR or IACT-JACC papers, but 97% of their eligible citing papers did not mention any discrepancies. Five meta-analyses or systematic reviews covered these studies, but none described any discrepancies and all resolved uncertainties by undisclosed methods, in mutually contradictory ways. Meta-analysts disagreed whether some studies were randomised or "accepter-versus-rejecter". Our experience of presenting the discrepancies to journals is that readers may

  12. Autologous Bone Marrow Stem Cell Infusion (AMBI therapy for Chronic Liver Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajkumar JS

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Liver Cirrhosis is the end stage of chronic liver disease which may happen due to alcoholism, viral infections due to Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C viruses and is difficult to treat. Liver transplantation is the only available definitive treatment which is marred by lack of donors, post operative complications such as rejection and high cost. Autologous bone marrow stem cells have shown a lot of promise in earlier reported animal studies and clinical trials. We have in this study administered in 22 patients with chronic liver disease, autologous bone marrow stem cell whose results are presented herewith.

  13. State of the art of radiation therapy for esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itasaka, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Radiation therapy has a critical role in the treatment of esophageal cancer. To improve the treatment outcome of radiotherapy, not only strengthening the treatment intensity but also decreasing the long term toxicity is needed. To reduce the long term cardiopulmonary toxicity of chemoradiation, JCOG is now running a clinical trial which combines three dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and mild irradiation dose. New techniques of radiation therapy, such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or particle therapy are also promising in both treatment intensity and decreased toxicity. (author)

  14. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy: dynamic MLC (DMLC) therapy, multisegment therapy and tomotherapy. An example of QA in DMLC therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, S.

    1998-01-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy will make a quantum leap in tumor control. It is the new radiation therapy for the new millennium. The major methods to achieve IMRT are: 1. Dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) therapy, 2. multisegment therapy, and 3. tomotherapy. The principles of these 3 techniques are briefly reviewed. Each technique presents unique QA issues which are outlined. As an example this paper will present the results of a recent new study of an important QA concern in DMLC therapy. (orig.) [de

  15. Radiation therapy in the treatment of hilar cholangiocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing Jin; Zhai Renyou

    2007-01-01

    The incidence of hilar cholangiocarcinoma is very rare worldwide. Radical resection is the only prognostic factor for long survival in patients with hilar cholangiocarcinoma. Postoperative radiation therapy can improve local control and survival rates for patients with palliative resection, but it remains controversial in patients with radical resection. Biliary drainage can effectively release bile duct obstruction for the majority of patients with locally advanced disease, and may even prolong survival when combined with radiation therapy. Radiation therapy includes extrernal beam therapy alone, external beam therapy with intraluminal brachytheapy and new radiation technique, such as three dimentional conformal therapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy. The propective randomized clinical study is needed for further investigation in the role of combined modality therapy especially for hilar cholangiocarcinoma. (authors)

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging in diffuse malignant bone marrow diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyman, R.; Rehn, S.; Glimelius, B.; Hagberg, H.; Hemmingsson, A.; Jung, B.; Simonsson, B.; Sundstroem, C.

    Twenty-four patients with malignant bone marrow involvement or polycythemia vera, 8 patients with reactive bone marrow and 7 healthy individuals were examined with spin-echo magnetic resonance imaging at 0.35 T and 0.5 T. Signs of an increased longitudinal relaxation time, T1, were found when normal bone marrow was replaced by malignant cells, polycythemia vera or reactive marrow. A shortened T1 was indicated in 4 patients in bone marrow regions treated by radiation therapy; the marrow was most likely hypocellular in these cases. The estimated T1 relaxation times were highly correlated to the cellularity of the bone marrow as assessed by histology. Among patients with close to 100% cellularity neither T1 nor T2 discriminated between the various malignancies or between malignant and reactive, non-malignant bone marrow. Characterization of tissues in terms of normalized image intensities was also attempted, the motive being to avoid approximations and uncertainties in the assessment of T1 and T2. The normalization was carried out with respect to the image of highest intensity, i.e. the proton density weighted image. The results were in agreement with those for T1 and T2. It was concluded that MRI is valuable for assessing bone marrow cellularity, but not for differentiating between various bone marrow disorders having a similar degree of cellularity.

  17. Megavoltage radiation therapy: Meeting the technological needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Dyk, J.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: In its simplest description, the purpose of radiation therapy is to hit the target and to miss all other parts of the patient. While there are multiple technological methods available for doing this, the actual radiation treatment needs to be considered in the broader context of the total radiation treatment process. This process contains multiple steps, each of which has an impact on the quality of the treatment and on the possible clinical outcome. One crucial step in this process is the determination of the location and extent of the disease relative to the adjacent normal tissues. This can be done in a variety of ways, ranging from simple clinical examination to the use of complex 3-D imaging, sometimes aided by contrast agents. As part of this localization process, it is very important that patient immobilization procedures be implemented to ensure that the same patient position will be used during both the planning and the daily treatment stages. With the knowledge of the location of the target and the critical tissues, decisions can be made about the appropriate beam arrangements to provide adequate tumour coverage while sparing the healthy tissues. This beam arrangement may have to be confirmed on a therapy simulator prior to actual implementation of the radiation treatment. In summary, the treatment process includes diagnosis, patient immobilization, target and normal tissue localization, beam selection, beam shaping, dose calculation, technique optimization, simulation, prescription, treatment verification and, finally, treatment. Dependent on the type of disease, it is not necessary that every patient undergoes all of the steps in the process; however, it is necessary that each step of the process used for a particular patient be carried out with the greatest accuracy. Uncertainties at any stage of the process will be carried through to subsequent stages and have an impact on clinical outcome. It is, therefore, important to recognize, when

  18. Management of unicameral bone cyst by using freeze dried radiation sterilized bone allograft impregnate with autogenous bone marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, N K; Das, K P; Alam, M S; Kaiser, M S

    2014-07-01

    Unicameral bone cyst is a common benign bone tumor and most frequent cause of the pathological fracture in children. We have started a prospective study for that treatment of unicameral bone cyst by using freeze dried radiation sterilized bone allograft impregnated with autogenous bone marrow in the department of Orthopaedics, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU) during May 1999 to April 2012. Aim of this study was to see Freeze dried radiation sterilized bone allograft impregnate with autogenous bone marrow a satisfactory graft material in the treatment of unicameral bone cyst as well as factors such as patients age, sex, cyst size and site of lesion influence on cyst healing. A total 35 patients of unicameral bone cyst were operated. In this study out of 35 patients, male were 22(62.86%) and female were 13(37.14). Male Female ratio 22:13(1.70:1) Age of the patients ranging from 2 years 6 month to 20 years, mean age 12.18 years more common 11 years to 20 years 29(82.86%) patients. Common bones sites involvements are proximal end of Humerus 20(57.14%), proximal end of Femur 7(20 %), proximal end of Tibia 3(8.57%), Calcanium 2(5.71%), proximal end of Ulna 1(2.86%), shaft of Radius 1(2.86%) and Phalanx 1(2.86%). Final clinical outcome of unicameral bone cyst treated by thorough curettage of cavity and tightly filled with freeze dried radiation sterilized bone allograft impregnate with autogenous bone marrow in which healed (success rate) 88.57% (31) and recurrence rate is 11.43% (4). P value is unicameral bone cyst.

  19. Why do patients drop out during radiation therapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huh, Seung Jae; Ahn, Yong Chan; Kim, Dae Yong; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Kyu Chan; Chong, Won A; Kim, Hyun Joo; Wu, Hong Gyun

    1998-01-01

    This study is to see how much proportion of the patients receiving radiation therapy drop out during radiation therapy and to analyze the reason for the incomplete treatment. The base population of this study was 1,100 patients with registration numbers 901 through 2,000 at Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. Authors investigated the incidence of incomplete radiation therapy, which was defined as less than 95% of initially planned radiation dose, and the reasons for incomplete radiation therapy. One hundred and twenty eight patients (12%) did not complete the planned radiation therapy. The performance status of the incompletely treated patients was generally poorer than that of the base population, and the aim of radiation therapy was more commonly palliative. The most common reason for not completing the planned treatment was the patients' refusal of further radiation therapy because of the distrust of radiation therapy and/or the poor economic status. Careful case selection for radiation therapy with consideration of the socioeconomic status of the patients in addition to the clinical indication would be necessary for the reduction of incomplete treatment, especially in the palliative setting

  20. Oral care of the cancer patient receiving radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holtzhausen, T [Medical Univ. of Southern Africa, Pretoria (South Africa). Dept. of Community Dentistry

    1982-07-01

    Radiation therapy is frequently being used for the patient with oral cancer. The survival rate is increasing, due to more effective treatment technique. The question of whether any teeth should be extracted, the mode of therapy and the side effects of radiation like Xerostomia, caries, stomatitis, trismus and osteo-radionecrosis and also post radiation care are discussed.

  1. Radiation therapy for carcinoma of the eyelid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchiya, Miwako; Takahashi, Mitsuhiro; Shinozaki, Jun; Kaneda, Koichi; Oda, Norio; Tabuchi, Yoshiko

    1987-01-01

    Between 1969 and 1985, 30 patients with carcinomas of the eyelid were treated by radiation, including 19 primary cases and 11 secondary cases. The latter were less controlable than the former. According to histology, there were 21 squamous cell carcinomas, 6 basal cell carcinomas and 3 adenocarcinomas. Among the 21 patients with squamous cell carcinomas, 5 had local recurrences, 10 had lymph node metastasis and 3 had distant metastasis. Patients with other histological classifications had no local recurrences, except for one who received incomplete therapy due to diabetes. Almost all of the controlled patients with squamous cell carcinomas were treated with a TDF value greater than 90. Although the visual function was damaged by irradiation in seven patients, the lesions of 6 of them were too advanced to avoid radiation injuries. (author)

  2. 21 CFR 892.5300 - Medical neutron radiation therapy system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... therapy system. (a) Identification. A medical neutron radiation therapy system is a device intended to... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical neutron radiation therapy system. 892.5300... analysis and display equipment, patient and equipment support, treatment planning computer programs...

  3. Radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, W.J.; Richardson, G.; Hafermann, M.D.

    1979-01-01

    Since 1965, 401 patients with prostate cancer have received intensive local pelvic radiation therapy at the Virginia Mason Medical Center. Two hundred twenty-one of this series were in the Stage C category. The 36 Stage B cancers were either medically nonoperable, or advanced extent, or had high-grade histopathology. Ten patients each were in diffuse Stage A or Stage D groups, the latter receiving local palliative inensive treatment to the prostate area. The mean age of the patients was 67.6 years. The five year survival of the Stage C group was 57.7%. There was no apparent influence on the survival of irradiated Stage C patients who received estrogen therapy. Current treatment techniques employ 10 megavolt photon beam with whole pelvic nodal fields and bilateral are rotational boost fields. The incidence of reactions and complications is presented

  4. Imaging after radiation therapy of thoracic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghaye, B.; Wanet, M.; El Hajjam, M.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced lung disease (RILD) is frequent after therapeutic irradiation of thoracic malignancies. Many technique-, treatment-, tumor- and patient-related factors influence the degree of injury sustained by the lung after irradiation. Based on the time interval after the completion of the treatment RILD presents as early and late features characterized by inflammatory and fibrotic changes, respectively. They are usually confined to the radiation port. Though the typical pattern of RILD is easily recognized after conventional two-dimensional radiation therapy (RT), RILD may present with atypical patterns after more recent types of three or four-dimensional RT treatment. Three atypical patterns are reported: the modified conventional, the mass-like and the scar-like patterns. Knowledge of the various features and patterns of RILD is important for correct diagnosis and appropriate treatment. RILD should be differentiated from recurrent tumoral disease, infection and radiation-induced tumors. Due to RILD, the follow-up after RT may be difficult as response evaluation criteria in solid tumours (RECIST) criteria may be unreliable to assess tumor control particularly after stereotactic ablation RT (SABR). Long-term follow-up should be based on clinical examination and morphological and/or functional investigations including CT, PET-CT, pulmonary functional tests, MRI and PET-MRI. (authors)

  5. Intraoperative radiation therapy for glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsutani, Masao; Tanaka, Yoshiaki; Matsuda, Tadayoshi

    1986-01-01

    Intraoperative radiation therapy (IOR) is quite applicable for radioresistant malignant gliomas, because of precise demarcations of the treatment volume under direct vision, minimum damage to surrounding normal tissues, and a high target absorbed dose of 1500 to 2000 rad. Fifteen patients with glioblatoma were treated with IOR, and the 2-year survival rate was 61.1 %. The result apparently indicate that areas adjacent to the margin of almost complete removal should be irradated with a sufficient dose to sterilize the remaining malignant remnants, and IOR is one of the logical treatment modalities for local control of malignant gliomas. (author)

  6. Impact of radiation therapy for benign diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kantor, G.; Van Houtte, P.; Beauvois, S.; Roelandts, M.

    1997-01-01

    Radiation therapy of benign diseases represent a wide panel of indications. Some indications are clearly identified as treatment of arteriovenous malformations (AVM), hyperthyroid ophthalmopathy, postoperative heterotopic bone formations or keloid scars. Some indications are under evaluation as complications induced by neo-vessels of age-related macular degeneration or coronary restenosis after angioplasty. Some indications remain controversial with poor evidence of efficiency as treatment of bursitis, tendinitis or Dupuytren's disease. Some indications are now obsolete such as warts, or contra-indicated as treatment of infant and children. (authors)

  7. Memory and survival after microbeam radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schueltke, Elisabeth; Juurlink, Bernhard H.J.; Ataelmannan, Khalid; Laissue, Jean; Blattmann, Hans; Braeuer-Krisch, Elke; Bravin, Alberto; Minczewska, Joanna; Crosbie, Jeffrey; Taherian, Hadi; Frangou, Evan; Wysokinsky, Tomasz; Chapman, L. Dean; Griebel, Robert; Fourney, Daryl

    2008-01-01

    Background: Disturbances of memory function are frequently observed in patients with malignant brain tumours and as adverse effects after radiotherapy to the brain. Experiments in small animal models of malignant brain tumour using synchrotron-based microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) have shown a promising prolongation of survival times. Materials and methods: Two animal models of malignant brain tumour were used to study survival and memory development after MRT. Thirteen days after implantation of tumour cells, animals were submitted to MRT either with or without adjuvant therapy (buthionine-SR-sulfoximine = BSO or glutamine). We used two orthogonal 1-cm wide arrays of 50 microplanar quasiparallel microbeams of 25 μm width and a center-to-center distance of about 200 μm, created by a multislit collimator, with a skin entrance dose of 350 Gy for each direction. Object recognition tests were performed at day 13 after tumour cell implantation and in monthly intervals up to 1 year after tumour cell implantation. Results: In both animal models, MRT with and without adjuvant therapy significantly increased survival times. BSO had detrimental effects on memory function early after therapy, while administration of glutamine resulted in improved memory

  8. Stem cell therapy for the treatment of radiation-induced normal tissue damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapel, A.; Benderitter, M.; Gourmelon, P.; Lataillade, J.J.; Gorin, N.C.

    2013-01-01

    Radiotherapy may induce irreversible damage on healthy tissues surrounding the tumour. In Europe, per year, 1.5 million patients undergo external radiotherapy. Acute adverse effect concern 80% of patients. The late adverse effect of radiotherapy concern 5 to 10% of them, which could be life threatening. Eradication of these manifestations is crucial. The French Institute of Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) contribute to understand effect of radiation on healthy tissue. IRSN is strongly implicated in the field of regeneration of healthy tissue after radiotherapy or radiological accident and in the clinical use of cell therapy in the treatment of irradiated patients. Our first success in cell therapy was the correction of deficient hematopoiesis in two patients. The intravenous injection of Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSC) has restored bone marrow micro-environment after total body irradiation necessary to sustain hematopoiesis. Cutaneous radiation reactions play an important role in radiation accidents, but also as a limitation in radiotherapy and radio-oncology. We have evidenced for the first time, the efficiency of MSC therapy in the context of acute cutaneous and muscle damage following irradiation in five patients. Concerning the medical management of gastrointestinal disorder after irradiation, we have demonstrated the promising approach of the MSC treatment. We have shown that MSC migrate to damaged tissues and restore gut functions after radiation damage. The evaluation of stem cell therapy combining different sources of adult stem cells is under investigation

  9. Succesful therapy of viral leukemia by transplantation of histocompatibly unmatched marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meredith, R.F.; OKunewick, J.P.; Kuhnert, P.M.; Brozovich, B.J.; Weaver, E.V.

    1978-01-01

    The therapeutic effectiveness on murine viral-leukemia of allogeneic or hybrid hematopoietic cells transplanted from leukemia-virus resistant donors was evaluated and compared with that of syngeneic cells. Transplantation of syngeneic cells gave no protection to the viral-leukemic mice. Transplantation of spleen cells from allogeneic donors resulted in early deaths of both leukemic and non-leukemic recipients. Transplantation of hybrid spleen cells resulted in no long-term survival of the leukemic mice. However, there were a number of long-term survivors among the leukemic recipients of allogeneic or hybrid marrow cells. Engraftment of allogeneic marrow resulted in a large number of survivors. Hybrid marrow recipients showed an even better survival, but some leukemia relapses. Tests of the longterm survivors revealed that even though they gave no evidence of leukemia they still harbored the active virus. This suggests that the mechanism of protection may be related to some inherent characteristic of the donor cells rendering them refractory to viral transformation. A difference in graft-versus-host (GvH) response between the leukemic and control mice was also found after transplantation of allogeneic cells. While all of the controls died of GvH reaction, none of the leukemic recipients showed severe GvH response, suggesting a possible effect of the leukemia on histocompatibility. No GvH reaction was found with hybrid marrow engraftment, although some of the leukemic recipients reconstituted with F 1 cells did die of leukemic relapse. (author)

  10. A case showing a blistering disorder in radiation dermatitis during radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonoshita, Takeshi; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki

    2007-01-01

    We experienced a case showing a blistering disorder in radiation dermatitis during radiation therapy for thymic cancer. Application of steroid to the lesion improved blisters. The literature on bullous eruption including radiation-induced bullous pemhigoid was critically reviewed. (author)

  11. Gene expression profiles in cervical cancer with radiation therapy alone and chemo-radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyu Chan; Kim, Joo Young; Hwang, You Jin; Kim, Meyoung Kon; Choi, Myung Sun; Kim, Chul Young

    2003-01-01

    To analyze the gene expression profiles of uterine cervical cancer, and its variation after radiation therapy, with or without concurrent chemotherapy, using a cDNA microarray. Sixteen patients, 8 with squamous cell carcinomas of the uterine cervix, who were treated with radiation alone, and the other 8 treated with concurrent chemo-radiation, were included in the study. Before the starting of the treatment, tumor biopsies were carried out, and the second time biopsies were performed after a radiation dose of 16.2-27 Gy. Three normal cervix tissues were used as a control group. The microarray experiments were performed with 5 groups of the total RNAs extracted individually and then admixed as control, pre-radiation therapy alone, during-radiation therapy alone, pre-chemoradiation therapy, and during chemoradiation therapy. The 33P-labeled cDNAs were synthesized from the total RNAs of each group, by reverse transcription, and then they were hybridized to the cDNA microarray membrane. The gene expression of each microarrays was captured by the intensity of each spot produced by the radioactive isotopes. The pixels per spot were counted with an Arrayguage, and were exported to Microsoft Excel. The data were normalized by the Z transformation, and the comparisons were performed on the Z-ratio values calculated. The expressions of 15 genes, including integrin linked kinase (ILK), CDC28 protein kinase 2, Spry 2, and ERK 3, were increased with the Z-ratio values of over 2.0 for the cervix cancer tissues compared to those for the normal controls. Those genes were involved in cell growth and proliferation, cell cycle control, or signal transduction. The expressions of the other 6 genes, including G protein coupled receptor kinase 6, were decreased with the Z-ratio values of below -2.0. After the radiation therapy, most of the genes, with a previously increase expressions, represented the decreased expression profiles, and the genes, with the Z-ratio values of over 2.0, were

  12. Protective effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells combined with erythropoietin therapy on spinal cord injury rat model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Xie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the protective effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells combined with erythropoietin therapy on spinal cord injury rat model. Methods: SD rats were selected as experimental animals, spinal cord injury rat model was built by striking spinal cord with Hatteras Instruments PCI3000, and model rats were divided into control group, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs group, erythropoietin (EPO group and BMSCs combined with EPO group according to different treatment methods. Then number of apoptotic cells in spinal cord tissue, contents of neural markers and neurotrophic factors as well as expression of apoptosis and injury molecules was detected. Results: Number of apoptotic cells as well as mRNA contents of Caspase-3 and c-fos of BMSCs group, EPO group and BMSCs+EPO group was lower than those of control group, and number of apoptotic cells as well as mRNA contents of Caspase-3 and c-fos of BMSCs+EPO group were lower than those of BMSCs group and EPO group; mRNA contents of NF-200 and MBP as well as protein contents of NGF and BDNF in spinal cord tissue of BMSCs group, EPO group and BMSCs+EPO group were higher than those of control group, and mRNA contents of NF-200 and MBP as well as protein contents of NGF and BDNF in spinal cord tissue of BMSCs+EPO group were higher than those of BMSCs group and EPO group. Conclusions: Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells combined with erythropoietin therapy can inhibit cell apoptosis in the injured spinal cord tissue, increase neurotrophic factor levels and inhibit apoptosis and injury molecule expression; it has protective effect on spinal cord injury.

  13. Clinical applications of continuous infusion chemotherapy ahd concomitant radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenthal, C.J.; Rotman, M.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: theoretical basis and clinical applications of 5-FU as a radiosensitizer; treatment of hepatic metastases from gastro intestingal primaries with split course radiation therapy; combined modality therapy with 5-FU, Mitomycin-C and radiation therapy for sqamous cell cancers; treatment of bladder carcinoma with concomitant infusion chemotherapy and irradiation; a treatment of invasiv bladder cancer by the XRT/5FU protocol; concomitant radiation therapy and doxorubicin by continuous infusion in advanced malignancies; cis platin by continuous infusion with concurrent radiation therapy in malignant tumors; combination of radiation with concomitant continuous adriamycin infusion in a patient with partially excised pleomorphic soft tissue sarcoma of the lower extremeity; treatment of recurrent carcinoma of the paranasal sinuses using concomitant infusion cis-platinum and radiation therapy; hepatic artery infusion for hepatic metastases in combination with hepatic resection and hepatic radiation; study of simultaneous radiation therapy, continuous infusion, 5FU and bolus mitomycin-C; cancer of the esophagus; continuous infusion VP-16, bolus cis-platinum and simultaneous radiation therapy as salvage therapy in small cell bronchogenic carcinoma; and concomitant radiation, mitomycin-C and 5-FU infusion in gastro intestinal cancer

  14. Pre-administration of safe exogenous substance minimizes radiation induced bone-marrow aplsia which may otherwise lead to hematopoietic disaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Manju Lata; Verma, Savita; Ranjan, Rajiv

    2014-01-01

    Radiation induces injuries to biological system primarily by producing free radicals and also by directly interacting with cellular entities. In irradiated animals hematopoietic system gets severely affected leading to inactive microenvironment, damaged blood vessels and non functional endothelial cells of the marrow. Vascular damage inhibits the efficacy of stem cells to proliferate and differentiate. Release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and activation of fibroblast further contribute to the development of radiation-induced fibrosis. Various findings have revealed the occurrence of radiation induced aplasia and vascular damage cause large number of RBCs occupying the space and intrusion of fibrotic cells in the marrow of irradiated mice. Administration of effective radioprotective agents prior to irradiation has been amply reported for significant decline in the grade of vascular damage and inclusion of marrow fibrous tissues in these animals. In addition the formulations have also shown the presence stem cell population which is efficient to proliferate, differentiate and ultimately enrich bone marrow cellularity within 25-40 days depending on type of radiation and its dose and dose rate. Protection to bone marrow is multi-factorial phenomenon out of which inhibition of radiation induced free radical generation has been recognized as the key factor but essentially not the lone one. Protection to colony forming ability of bone marrow is also critically important which occurs mainly due to DNA protection and up-regulation of repair pathways. Preservation of microenvironment for providing stem cells to remain functional is lately reported as equally prominent factor. Our studies on a combination of two compounds of natural origin, administered to lethally irradiated animals have shown recovery in stem/precursor cells of all hematopoietic lineages. Major entities related to hematopoietic system were found nearly 90% recovered within 30 days. Current talk is focused

  15. Bone marrow necrosis in a patient with acute promyelocytic leukemia during re-induction therapy with arsenic trioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishitsuka, Kenji; Shirahashi, Akihiko; Iwao, Yasuhiro; Shishime, Mikiko; Takamatsu, Yasushi; Takatsuka, Yoshifusa; Utsunomiya, Atae; Suzumiya, Junji; Hara, Syuji; Tamura, Kazuo

    2004-04-01

    Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) therapy at a daily dose of 0.15 mg/kg was given to a 60-yr-old Japanese male with refractory acute promyelocytic leukemia. White blood cell (WBC) of 6.6 x 10(3)/microl increased to 134 x 10(3)/microl following the administration of As2O3. Daily hydroxyurea (HU), and 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) were added on days 7 and 19, respectively. Both HU and 6-MP were discontinued on day 28, when WBC declined to 54.0 x 10(3)/microl. He developed unexplained fever and profound cytopenia requiring multiple blood products transfusions. Bone marrow examination on day 42 revealed massive necrosis. Pharmacokinetics confirmed a mean maximum plasma arsenic concentration (Cpmax) and a half-life time (t1/2) of 6.9 microm and 3.2 h, respectively, in the therapeutic range. This is the first case of bone marrow necrosis after standard-dose As2O3 therapy.

  16. Radiation protection principles for radioiodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiners, C.; Lassmann, M.

    1999-01-01

    In Germany, approximately 30,000 treatments with radioiodine are performed yearly on patients with benign or malignant thyroid diseases. These are carried out generally in specialized therapy wards which are equipped with radiation protection facilities. Ambulant (fractionated) radioiodine treatment is not permitted in Germany. More recently, the situation has been that the discharge of patients is permitted, when they have spent a stay of at least 48 hours in the ward without the dose rate exceeding 3.5 μSv/hour at 2 meters distance from them, corresponding to 1 mSv/year (this correlates to a residual activity in the body of the patient of 250 MBq). The radiation exposure of personnel in the therapy ward due to both external and internal exposure lies within a range of a few mSv per year. According to recent studies, the exposure to family members and close friends via external exposure, inhalation or incorporation does not exceed the effective dose of 1 mSv/year. This value has been laid down in a recommendation by the European Union as the dose constraint for children; for adults younger than 60 years of age, 3 mSv are recommended, for older persons 15 mSv. (orig.) [de

  17. Mapping the literature of radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delwiche, Frances A

    2013-04-01

    This study characterizes the literature of the radiation therapy profession, identifies the journals most frequently cited by authors writing in this discipline, and determines the level of coverage of these journals by major bibliographic indexes. Cited references from three discipline-specific source journals were analyzed according to the Mapping the Literature of Allied Health Project Protocol of the Nursing and Allied Health Resources Section of the Medical Library Association. Bradford's Law of Scattering was applied to all journal references to identify the most frequently cited journal titles. Journal references constituted 77.8% of the total, with books, government documents, Internet sites, and miscellaneous sources making up the remainder. Although a total of 908 journal titles were cited overall, approximately one-third of the journal citations came from just 11 journals. MEDLINE and Scopus provided the most comprehensive indexing of the journal titles in Zones 1 and 2. The source journals were indexed only by CINAHL and Scopus. The knowledgebase of radiation therapy draws heavily from the fields of oncology, radiology, medical physics, and nursing. Discipline-specific publications are not currently well covered by major indexing services, and those wishing to conduct comprehensive literature searches should search multiple resources.

  18. Gene therapy strategy to reduced bone marrow aplasia: evaluation in cynomolgus macaque exposed to a gamma total body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becard, N.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this work was to assess whether direct intra-marrow injection of an adeno-viral vector expressing human IL-1α gene stimulates hematopoiesis in healthy non-irradiated and gamma irradiated cynomolgus macaques. In the first hand, we have evaluated the feasibility of this gene therapy strategy in two healthy non-irradiated macaques. In this work, we have observed an increase of neutrophil, monocyte and platelets in the two animals treated with the therapeutic construct. This effect was associated with no abnormal clinical side effect. On the other hand, we have evaluated this strategy in non-human primate exposed to a sublethal gamma irradiation. Two of three animals treated by the therapeutic construct reduced significantly the neutropenia, thrombocytopenia and anemia radio-induced. In conclusion, this gene therapy strategy gave a similar clinical benefit comparatively to systemic administration of huIL-1α but without severe side effect. (author) [fr

  19. Better Efficacy of Synchrotron Spatially Microfractionated Radiation Therapy Than Uniform Radiation Therapy on Glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchet, Audrey; Bräuer-Krisch, Elke; Prezado, Yolanda; El Atifi, Michèle; Rogalev, Léonid; Le Clec'h, Céline; Laissue, Jean Albert; Pelletier, Laurent; Le Duc, Géraldine

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Synchrotron microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is based on the spatial fractionation of the incident, highly focused synchrotron beam into arrays of parallel microbeams, typically a few tens of microns wide and depositing several hundred grays. This irradiation modality was shown to have a high therapeutic impact on tumors, especially in intracranial locations. However, mechanisms responsible for such a property are not fully understood. Methods and Materials: Thanks to recent progress in dosimetry, we compared the effect of MRT and synchrotron broad beam (BB) radiation therapy delivered at comparable doses (equivalent to MRT valley dose) on tumor growth control and on classical radiobiological functions by histologic evaluation and/or transcriptomic analysis. Results: MRT significantly improved survival of rats bearing 9L intracranial glioma compared with BB radiation therapy delivered at a comparable dose (P<.001); the efficacy of MRT and BB radiation therapy was similar when the MRT dose was half that of BB. The greater efficacy of MRT was not correlated with a difference in cell proliferation (Mki67 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen) or in transcriptomic stimulation of angiogenesis (vascular endothelial growth factor A or tyrosine kinase with immunoglobulin-like and epidermal growth factor-like domains 2) but was correlated with a higher cell death rate (factor for apoptosis signals) and higher recruitment of macrophages (tyrosine kinase with immunoglobulin-like and epidermal growth factor-like domains 1 and CD68 transcripts) a few days after MRT. Conclusions: These results show the superiority of MRT over BB radiation therapy when applied at comparable doses, suggesting that spatial fractionation is responsible for a specific and particularly efficient tissue response. The higher induction of cell death and immune cell activation in brain tumors treated by MRT may be involved in such responses.

  20. Better Efficacy of Synchrotron Spatially Microfractionated Radiation Therapy Than Uniform Radiation Therapy on Glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouchet, Audrey, E-mail: audrey.m.bouchet@gmail.com [Université Grenoble Alpes, Grenoble Institut des Neurosciences, Grenoble (France); Biomedical Beamline, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Bräuer-Krisch, Elke; Prezado, Yolanda [Biomedical Beamline, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); El Atifi, Michèle [Université Grenoble Alpes, Grenoble Institut des Neurosciences, Grenoble (France); Grenoble University Hospital, Grenoble (France); Rogalev, Léonid; Le Clec' h, Céline [Biomedical Beamline, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Laissue, Jean Albert [University of Bern, Bern (Switzerland); Pelletier, Laurent, E-mail: laurent.pelletier@ujf-grenoble.fr [Université Grenoble Alpes, Grenoble Institut des Neurosciences, Grenoble (France); Grenoble University Hospital, Grenoble (France); Le Duc, Géraldine [Biomedical Beamline, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France)

    2016-08-01

    Purpose: Synchrotron microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is based on the spatial fractionation of the incident, highly focused synchrotron beam into arrays of parallel microbeams, typically a few tens of microns wide and depositing several hundred grays. This irradiation modality was shown to have a high therapeutic impact on tumors, especially in intracranial locations. However, mechanisms responsible for such a property are not fully understood. Methods and Materials: Thanks to recent progress in dosimetry, we compared the effect of MRT and synchrotron broad beam (BB) radiation therapy delivered at comparable doses (equivalent to MRT valley dose) on tumor growth control and on classical radiobiological functions by histologic evaluation and/or transcriptomic analysis. Results: MRT significantly improved survival of rats bearing 9L intracranial glioma compared with BB radiation therapy delivered at a comparable dose (P<.001); the efficacy of MRT and BB radiation therapy was similar when the MRT dose was half that of BB. The greater efficacy of MRT was not correlated with a difference in cell proliferation (Mki67 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen) or in transcriptomic stimulation of angiogenesis (vascular endothelial growth factor A or tyrosine kinase with immunoglobulin-like and epidermal growth factor-like domains 2) but was correlated with a higher cell death rate (factor for apoptosis signals) and higher recruitment of macrophages (tyrosine kinase with immunoglobulin-like and epidermal growth factor-like domains 1 and CD68 transcripts) a few days after MRT. Conclusions: These results show the superiority of MRT over BB radiation therapy when applied at comparable doses, suggesting that spatial fractionation is responsible for a specific and particularly efficient tissue response. The higher induction of cell death and immune cell activation in brain tumors treated by MRT may be involved in such responses.

  1. Selective use of adjuvant radiation therapy in resectable colorectal adenocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, A.M.; Gunderson, L.L.; Welch, C.E.

    1981-01-01

    Colorectal cancer recurs within the operative field in 10-20 per cent of patients undergoing potentially curative surgery. In certain subgroups, the recurrence rate is 20-50 per cent. There are some data to suggest either preoperative or postoperative radiation therapy as an adjuvant to potentially curative surgery can reduce the local operative failure rate. However, since radiation therapy has significant side effects, patient selection to maximize the therapeutic ratio is important. This report defines the criteria at the Massachusetts General Hospital for selection of patients with colorectal cancer for adjuvant radiation therapy, defines radiation therapy-surgery sequencing alternatives used, and describes techniques to reduce radiation side effects. Over a period of three and a half years, 196 patients received adjuvant radiation therapy: 51 patients received either moderate or low dose preoperative radiation therapy to rectal or rectosigmoid cancers, and 161 patients received postoperative radiation therapy to the pelvis or extrapelvic colonic tumor-lymph node beds. Some patients who received low-dose preoperative radiation therapy also received moderate-dose postoperative radiation therapy. We prefer moderate-dose postoperative radiation therapy as the approach most likely to decrease the local recurrence rate with minimal interference with surgical procedures and late small-bowel complications. Patients who received postoperative radiation therapy were those without distant metastases, whose primary tumor pathology revealed macroscopic or extensive microscopic transmural tumor penetration into extraperitoneal tissues. Careful case selection, multiple field techniques, the use of reperitonealization, omental flaps, and retroversion of the uterus into the pelvis were combined with postoperative small-bowel x-rays, bladder distention, and lateral portals to minimize radiation damage to normal structures

  2. Effect of Leaked Radiation from Microwave Oven on Bone Marrow of Male Rats in Pre and Post Pubertal Stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Jelodar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Increasing hematological diseases along with increased use of microwaves in different systems proposed possible correlation between them. Age of exposure to wave is also an important factor. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of radiation leakaged from microwave oven on hemopoitic bone marrow cells at pre and post pubertal. Methods: Fourteen male mature (2 months old and 14 male immature rats(one month old were randomly divided in to four groups (control and test. Test groups were exposed, three times a day each time 30 min for 60 days, to microwaves produced by microwave oven. After sixty days, animals were sacrified and bone marrow samples were collected from femural bones. Percent of variose cells type and their morphology were evaluated in 500 cells of each smear. Results: exposure to microwave did not exert visible morphological alteration. In the immature experimental group significant decrease in percent of basophilic rubricyte, polychromatic rubricyte, meta rubricyte and all the erythroid cell types observed(P<0.05, whereas, meta myelocyte, notrophilic band, total myeloid cell types and prolifrative cells, other cell types and the myeloid/erythroid ratio significantly increased(P<0.05. In the mature group, however, a significant decrease in percent of meta rubricyte and myelocyte cells observed(P<0.05, although prolifrative cells and all other cell types were significantly increasing in this group. Conclusion: In conclusion, the radiation leaked from microwave oven in the experimental conditions had no effect on the morphology of hemopoitic bone marrow cells, though the number of these cells was altered especially in immature group.

  3. Image Guidance and Assessment of Radiation Induced Gene Therapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pelizzari, Charles

    2004-01-01

    Image guidance and assessment techniques are being developed for combined radiation/gene therapy, which utilizes a radiation-inducible gene promoter to cause expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha...

  4. Correlation Between Radiation Dose to 18F-FDG-PET Defined Active Bone Marrow Subregions and Acute Hematologic Toxicity in Cervical Cancer Patients Treated With Chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, Brent S.; Liang Yun; Lau, Steven K.; Jensen, Lindsay G.; Yashar, Catheryn M.; Hoh, Carl K.; Mell, Loren K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that radiation dose to 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ( 18 F-FDG-PET)-defined active bone marrow (BM ACT ) subregions is correlated with hematologic toxicity in cervical cancer patients treated with chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The conditions of 26 women with cervical cancer who underwent 18 F-FDG-PET before treatment with concurrent cisplatin and intensity-modulated radiation therapy were analyzed. BM ACT was defined as the subregion of total bone marrow (BM TOT ) with a standardized uptake value (SUV) equal to or above the mean for that individual. Inactive bone marrow (BM INACT ) was defined as BM TOT − BM ACT . Generalized linear modeling was used to test the correlation between BM ACT and BM INACT dose–volume metrics and hematologic nadirs, particularly white blood cell count (WBC) and absolute neutrophil count (ANC). Results: Increased BM ACT mean dose was significantly associated with decreased log(WBC) nadir (β = −0.04; 95% CI, −0.07to −0.01; p = 0.009), decreased log(ANC) nadir (β = −0.05; 95% CI, −0.08 to −0.02; p = 0.006), decreased hemoglobin nadir (β = −0.16; 95% CI, −0.27 to −0.05; p = 0.010), and decreased platelet nadir (β = −6.16; 95% CI, −9.37 to −2.96; p INACT mean dose and log(WBC) nadir (β = −0.01; 95% CI, −0.06 to 0.05; p = 0.84), log(ANC) nadir (β = −0.03; 95% CI, −0.10 to 0.04; p = 0.40), hemoglobin nadir (β = −0.09; 95% CI, −0.31 to 0.14; p = 0.452), or platelet nadir (β = −3.47; 95% CI, −10.44 to 3.50; p = 0.339). Conclusions: Irradiation of BM subregions with higher 18 F-FDG-PET activity was associated with hematologic toxicity, supporting the hypothesis that reducing dose to BM ACT subregions could mitigate hematologic toxicity. Future investigation should seek to confirm these findings and to identify optimal SUV thresholds to define BM ACT .

  5. Film Dosimetry for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benites-Rengifo, J.; Martinez-Davalos, A.; Celis, M.; Larraga, J.

    2004-01-01

    Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) is an oncology treatment technique that employs non-uniform beam intensities to deliver highly conformal radiation to the targets while minimizing doses to normal tissues and critical organs. A key element for a successful clinical implementation of IMRT is establishing a dosimetric verification process that can ensure that delivered doses are consistent with calculated ones for each patient. To this end we are developing a fast quality control procedure, based on film dosimetry techniques, to be applied to the 6 MV Novalis linear accelerator for IMRT of the Instituto Nacional de Neurologia y Neurocirugia (INNN) in Mexico City. The procedure includes measurements of individual fluence maps for a limited number of fields and dose distributions in 3D using extended dose-range radiographic film. However, the film response to radiation might depend on depth, energy and field size, and therefore compromise the accuracy of measurements. In this work we present a study of the dependence of Kodak EDR2 film's response on the depth, field size and energy, compared with those of Kodak XV2 film. The first aim is to devise a fast and accurate method to determine the calibration curve of film (optical density vs. doses) commonly called a sensitometric curve. This was accomplished by using three types of irradiation techniques: Step-and-shoot, dynamic and static fields

  6. Potential for heavy particle radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raju, M.R.; Phillips, T.L.

    1977-03-01

    Radiation therapy remains one of the major forms of cancer treatment. When x rays are used in radiotherapy, there are large variations in radiation sensitivity among tumors because of the possible differences in the presence of hypoxic but viable tumor cells, differences in reoxygenation during treatment, differences in distribution of the tumor cells in their cell cycle, and differences in repair of sublethal damage. When high-LET particles are used, depending upon the LET distribution, these differences are reduced considerably. Because of these differences between x rays and high-LET particle effects, the high-LET particles may be more effective on tumor cells for a given effect on normal cells. Heavy particles have potential application in improving radiotherapy because of improved dose localization and possible advantages of high-LET particles due to their radiobiological characteristics. Protons, because of their defined range, Bragg peak, and small effects of scattering, have good dose localization characteristics. The use of protons in radiotherapy minimizes the morbidity of radiotherapy treatment and is very effective in treating deep tumors located near vital structures. Fast neutrons have no physical advantages over 60 Co gamma rays but, because of their high-LET component, could be very effective in treating tumors that are resistant to conventional radiations. Negative pions and heavy ions combine some of the advantages of protons and fast neutrons

  7. Radiation therapy for epithelial ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dembo, A.J.

    1987-01-01

    Several principles governing the cure of patients with ovarian cancer by radiotherapy were established during the last decade. The author reviews some of the studies at The Princess Margaret Hospital (PMH), which led to the establishment of the following principles: The entire peritoneal cavity should be encompassed by the treatment field, because once the disease has spread beyond the ovary, the entire peritoneal cavity is at risk for recurrent cancer. The moving-strip and open-field techniques are equally effective in tumor control. Late complications can be kept to a minimum (<5% bowel surgery, <1% radiation hepatitis, < 1% treatment mortality), but their frequency increases with increasing total radiation dosage, increasing fraction size, and possibly the extent of the previous surgical procedures (Dembo 1985a). Optimal selection of patients for radiotherapy compared with other forms of treatment is based on grouping of patients according to prognostic factors, including presenting stage of disease, amount and site of residual tumor, and histophatologic features. The potential exists for abdominopelvic radiation to be applied curatively as consolidation or as salvage therapy for patients whose disease has not been completely eradicated by chemotherapy;however, further study is needed to clarify the magnitude of this benefit, the situations in which radiotherapy is indicated, and factors that determine the toxicity of the combined-modality treatment

  8. Radiation therapy of psoriasis and parapsoriasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiskemann, A.

    1982-01-01

    Selective UV-Phototherapy with lambda 300-320 nm (SUP) as well as oral photochemotherapy with 8-methoxy-psoralen plus UVA-radiation (PUVA intern) are very effective in clearing the lesions of the generalized psoriasis and those of the chronic forms of parapsoriasis. Being treated with 4 suberythemal doses per week psoriasis patients are free or nearly free of symptoms after averagely 6.3 weeks of SUP-therapy or after 5.3 weeks of PUVA orally. The PUVA-therapy is mainly indicated in pustular, inverse and erythrodermic psoriasis as well as in parapsoriasis en plaques and variegata. In all other forms of psoriasis and in pityriasis lichenoides-chronica, we prefer the SUP-therapy because of less acute or chronic side effects, and because of its better practicability. X-rays are indicated in psoriais of nails, grenz-rays in superficial psoriatic lesions of the face, the armpits, the genitals and the anal region. (orig.) [de

  9. Low-level laser therapy with helium-neon laser improved viability of osteoporotic bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells from ovariectomy-induced osteoporotic rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallahnezhad, Somaye; Piryaei, Abbas; Tabeie, Faraj; Nazarian, Hamid; Darbandi, Hasan; Amini, Abdoldllah; Mostafavinia, Ataroalsadat; Ghorishi, Seyed Kamran; Jalalifirouzkouhi, Ali; Bayat, Mohammad

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influences of helium-neon (He-Ne) and infrared (IR) lasers on the viability and proliferation rate of healthy and ovariectomy-induced osteoporotic (OVX) bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) in vitro. MSCs harvested from the BM of healthy and OVX rats were culture expanded. He-Ne and IR lasers were applied three times at energy densities of 0.6, 1.2, and 2.4 J/cm2 for BMMSCs. BMMSCs viability and proliferation rate were evaluated by MTT assay on days 2, 4, 6, 14, and 21. The results showed that healthy BMMSCs responded optimally to 0.6 J/cm2 using an IR laser after three times of laser radiation. Moreover, it was found that OVX-BMMSCs responded optimally to 0.6 J/cm2 with He-Ne laser and one-time laser radiation. It is concluded that the low-level laser therapy (LLLT) effect depends on the physiological state of the BMMSCs, type of the laser, wavelength, and number of laser sessions. The biostimulation efficiency of LLLT also depends on the delivered energy density. LLLT can enhance the viability and proliferation rate of healthy and especially osteoporotic autologous BMMSCs, which could be very useful in regenerative medicine.

  10. Whole-brain hippocampal sparing radiation therapy: Volume-modulated arc therapy vs intensity-modulated radiation therapy case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Katrina; Lenards, Nishele; Holson, Janice

    2016-01-01

    The hippocampus is responsible for memory and cognitive function. An ongoing phase II clinical trial suggests that sparing dose to the hippocampus during whole-brain radiation therapy can help preserve a patient's neurocognitive function. Progressive research and advancements in treatment techniques have made treatment planning more sophisticated but beneficial for patients undergoing treatment. The aim of this study is to evaluate and compare hippocampal sparing whole-brain (HS-WB) radiation therapy treatment planning techniques using volume-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). We randomly selected 3 patients to compare different treatment techniques that could be used for reducing dose to the hippocampal region. We created 2 treatment plans, a VMAT and an IMRT, from each patient's data set and planned on the Eclipse 11.0 treatment planning system (TPS). A total of 6 plans (3 IMRT and 3 VMAT) were created and evaluated for this case study. The physician contoured the hippocampus as per the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0933 protocol atlas. The organs at risk (OR) were contoured and evaluated for the plan comparison, which included the spinal cord, optic chiasm, the right and left eyes, lenses, and optic nerves. Both treatment plans produced adequate coverage on the planning target volume (PTV) while significantly reducing dose to the hippocampal region. The VMAT treatment plans produced a more homogenous dose distribution throughout the PTV while decreasing the maximum point dose to the target. However, both treatment techniques demonstrated hippocampal sparing when irradiating the whole brain.

  11. In vitro radiation studies on Ewing's sarcoma cell lines and human bone marrow: application to the clinical use of total body irradiation (TBI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinsella, T.J.; Mitchell, J.B.; McPherson, S.; Miser, J.; Triche, T.; Glatstein, E.

    1984-01-01

    Patients with Ewing's sarcoma who present with a central axis or proximal extremity primary and/or with metastatic disease have a poor prognosis despite aggressive combination chemotherapy and local irradiation. In this high risk group of patients, total body irradiation (TBI) has been proposed as a systemic adjuvant. To aid in the design of a clinical TBI protocol, the authors have studied in the in vitro radiation response of two established cell lines of Ewing's sarcoma and human bone marrow CFUc. The Ewing's lines showed a larger D 0 and anti-n compared to the bone marrow CFU. No repair of potentially lethal radiation damage (PLDR) was found after 4.5 Gy in plateau phase Ewing's sarcoma cells. A theoretical split dose survival curve for both the Ewing's sarcoma lines and human bone marrow CFUc using this TBI schedule shows a significantly lower surviving fraction (10 -4 -10 -5 ) for the bone marrow CFUc. Based on these in vitro results, two 4.0 Gy fractions separated by 24 hours is proposed as the TBI regimen. Because of the potentially irreversible damage to bone marrow, autologous bone marrow transplantation following the TBI is felt to be necessary. The details of this clinical protocol in high risk Ewing's sarcoma patients are outlined

  12. Melanomas: radiobiology and role of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peschel, Richard E.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: This course will review the radiobiology of malignant melanoma (MM) and the clinical use of radiation therapy for metastatic melanoma and selected primary sites. The course will emphasize the scientific principles underlying the clinical treatment of MM. Introduction: The incidence of malignant melanoma has one of the fastest growth rates in the world. In 1991, there were 32,000 cases and 7,000 deaths from MM in the United States. By the year 2000, one of every 90 Americans will develop MM. Wide local excision is the treatment of choice for Stage I-II cutaneous MM. Five-year survival rates depend on (a) sex: female-63%, male-40%; (b) tumor thickness: t 4 mm-25%; (c) location: extremity-60%, trunk-41%; and (d) regional lymph node status: negative-77%, positive-31%. Despite adequate surgery, 45-50% of all MM patients will develop metastatic disease. Radiobiology: Both the multi-target model: S = 1-(1-e-D/Do)n and the linear quadratic mode: -In(S) = alpha x D + beta x D2 predict a possible benefit for high dose per fraction (> 400 cGy) radiation therapy for some MM cell lines. The extrapolation number (n) varies from 1-100 for MM compared to other mammalian cells with n=2-4. The alpha/beta ratios for a variety of MM cell lines vary from 1 to 33. Other radiobiologic factors (repair of potentially lethal damage, hypoxia, reoxygenation, and repopulation) predict a wide variety of clinical responses to different time-dose prescriptions including high dose per fraction (> 400 cGy), low dose per fraction (200-300 cGy), or b.i.d. therapy. Based on a review of the radiobiology of MM, no single therapeutic strategy emerges which could be expected to be successful for all tumors. Time-Dose Prescriptions: A review of the retrospective and prospective clinical trials evaluating various time-dose prescriptions for MM reveals: (1) MM is a radiosensitive tumor over a wide range of diverse time-dose prescriptions; and (2) The high clinical response rates to a

  13. Radiation therapy in extrahepatic bile duct carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahe, Marc; Romestaing, Pascale; Talon, Bernard; Ardiet, J.M.; Salerno, Nathalie; Sentenac, Irenee; Gerard, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    Fifty-one patients with carcinoma of the extrahepatic bile ducts (EHBD) received radiation therapy between Jan 1980-Dec 1988. The location of the tumors was: proximal third, 20 patients; middle third, 23; distal third, 3; diffuse, 5 patients. Thirty-six patients underwent surgery with complete gross resection in 14 (10/14 with positive margins), incomplete gross resection in 12 and only biopsy in 10. Fifteen patients had only biliary drainage without laparotomy after cytologic diagnosis of malignancy in 11/15. Radiation therapy was done with curative intent after complete or incomplete resection (n=26) and it was palliative in patients who had no resection or only biliary drainage (n=25). Twenty-five patients received external radiation-therapy (ERT) alone to the tumor and lymph nodes (mean dose 45 Gy/2Gy per fraction for cure, 35 Gy/10 fractions for palliation), 8 patients had only iridium-192 ( 192 Ir) implant (50-60 Gy at a 1 cm radius for cure, 30 Gy for palliation), 17 patients had both ERT + 192 Ir(ERT 42.5 Gy + 192 Ir 10-15 Gy for cure; ERT 20 Gy/5 fractions + 192 Ir 20-30 Gy for palliation) and one intra-operative irradiation + ERT. The overall survival rate for the entire group was 55, 28.5 and 15 percent at 12, 24, 36 months and median survival 12 months. Median survival was 22 months in patients treated with curative intent and only 10 months after palliative treatment (p0.03). Among patients who had curative treatment, median survival was 27.5 months after complete gross resection and 13 months after incomplete gross resection (p0.045). After complete gross resection 5/14 patients were alive without evolutive disease at 11, 19, 20, 23 and 41 months, 2 were alive with metastases at 25 and 27 months and 7/14 died of cancer from 7 to 59 months. The rate of complications was low: 3 cholangitis responsive to antibiotics, 1 hemobilia and 2 gastric ulcers. These results are encouraging especially for patients with complete gross resection but they must be

  14. Exposure Risks Among Children Undergoing Radiation Therapy: Considerations in the Era of Image Guided Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hess, Clayton B.; Thompson, Holly M.; Benedict, Stanley H.; Seibert, J. Anthony; Wong, Kenneth; Vaughan, Andrew T.; Chen, Allen M.

    2016-01-01

    Recent improvements in toxicity profiles of pediatric oncology patients are attributable, in part, to advances in the field of radiation oncology such as intensity modulated radiation (IMRT) and proton therapy (IMPT). While IMRT and IMPT deliver highly conformal dose to targeted volumes, they commonly demand the addition of 2- or 3-dimensional imaging for precise positioning—a technique known as image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). In this manuscript we address strategies to further minimize exposure risk in children by reducing effective IGRT dose. Portal X rays and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) are commonly used to verify patient position during IGRT and, because their relative radiation exposure is far less than the radiation absorbed from therapeutic treatment beams, their sometimes significant contribution to cumulative risk can be easily overlooked. Optimizing the conformality of IMRT/IMPT while simultaneously ignoring IGRT dose may result in organs at risk being exposed to a greater proportion of radiation from IGRT than from therapeutic beams. Over a treatment course, cumulative central-axis CBCT effective dose can approach or supersede the amount of radiation absorbed from a single treatment fraction, a theoretical increase of 3% to 5% in mutagenic risk. In select scenarios, this may result in the underprediction of acute and late toxicity risk (such as azoospermia, ovarian dysfunction, or increased lifetime mutagenic risk) in radiation-sensitive organs and patients. Although dependent on variables such as patient age, gender, weight, body habitus, anatomic location, and dose-toxicity thresholds, modifying IGRT use and acquisition parameters such as frequency, imaging modality, beam energy, current, voltage, rotational degree, collimation, field size, reconstruction algorithm, and documentation can reduce exposure, avoid unnecessary toxicity, and achieve doses as low as reasonably achievable, promoting a culture and practice of “gentle IGRT.”

  15. Exposure Risks Among Children Undergoing Radiation Therapy: Considerations in the Era of Image Guided Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hess, Clayton B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University California Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, California (United States); Thompson, Holly M. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, California (United States); Benedict, Stanley H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University California Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, California (United States); Seibert, J. Anthony [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, California (United States); Wong, Kenneth [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California (United States); Vaughan, Andrew T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University California Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, California (United States); Chen, Allen M., E-mail: allenmchen@yahoo.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Recent improvements in toxicity profiles of pediatric oncology patients are attributable, in part, to advances in the field of radiation oncology such as intensity modulated radiation (IMRT) and proton therapy (IMPT). While IMRT and IMPT deliver highly conformal dose to targeted volumes, they commonly demand the addition of 2- or 3-dimensional imaging for precise positioning—a technique known as image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). In this manuscript we address strategies to further minimize exposure risk in children by reducing effective IGRT dose. Portal X rays and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) are commonly used to verify patient position during IGRT and, because their relative radiation exposure is far less than the radiation absorbed from therapeutic treatment beams, their sometimes significant contribution to cumulative risk can be easily overlooked. Optimizing the conformality of IMRT/IMPT while simultaneously ignoring IGRT dose may result in organs at risk being exposed to a greater proportion of radiation from IGRT than from therapeutic beams. Over a treatment course, cumulative central-axis CBCT effective dose can approach or supersede the amount of radiation absorbed from a single treatment fraction, a theoretical increase of 3% to 5% in mutagenic risk. In select scenarios, this may result in the underprediction of acute and late toxicity risk (such as azoospermia, ovarian dysfunction, or increased lifetime mutagenic risk) in radiation-sensitive organs and patients. Although dependent on variables such as patient age, gender, weight, body habitus, anatomic location, and dose-toxicity thresholds, modifying IGRT use and acquisition parameters such as frequency, imaging modality, beam energy, current, voltage, rotational degree, collimation, field size, reconstruction algorithm, and documentation can reduce exposure, avoid unnecessary toxicity, and achieve doses as low as reasonably achievable, promoting a culture and practice of “gentle IGRT.”.

  16. The Effect of Therapy Oriented CT in Radiation Therapy Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Kyu; Shin, Sei One; Kim, Myung Se

    1987-01-01

    The success of radiation therapy depends on exact treatment of the tumor with significant high dose for maximizing local control and excluding the normal tissues for minimizing unwanted complications. To achieve these goals, correct estimation of target volume in three dimension, exact dose distribution in tumor and normal critical structures and correction of tissue inhomogeneity are required. The effect of therapy oriented CT (planning CT) were compared with conventional simulation method in necessity of planning change, set dose, and proper distribution of tumor dose. Of 365 new patients examined, planning CT was performed in 104 patients (28%). Treatment planning was changed in 47% of head and neck tumor, 79% of intrathoracic tumor and 63% of abdominal tumor. In breast cancer and musculoskeletal tumors, planning CT was recommended for selection of adequate energy and calculation of exact dose to critical structures such as kidney or spinal cord. The average difference of tumor doses between CT planning and conventional simulation was 10% in intrathoracic and intra-abdominal tumors but 20% in head and neck tumors which suggested that tumor dose may be overestimated in conventional simulation. Although some limitations and disadvantages including the cost and irradiation during CT are still criticizing, our study showed that CT planning is very helpful in radiotherapy planning

  17. MRI of the marrow in the paediatric skeleton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foster, K.; Chapman, S.; Johnson, K.

    2004-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has greatly advanced evaluation of marrow diseases of the paediatric skeleton. As with many other aspects of paediatric radiology it is important to recognize the normal variations in the appearance of the marrow that occur in the growing child. These normal variations need to be differentiated from diseases and conditions that affect the marrow. This review describes the normal changes that occur in children with age, and the appearances of the pathological changes seen in infection, infiltration, haematological disorders, transplantation and radiation therapy

  18. Quantifying murine bone marrow and blood radiation dose response following {sup 18}F-FDG PET with DNA damage biomarkers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manning, Grainne [Biological Effects Department, Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards, Public Health England, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 ORQ (United Kingdom); Taylor, Kristina [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Finnon, Paul [Biological Effects Department, Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards, Public Health England, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 ORQ (United Kingdom); Lemon, Jennifer A.; Boreham, Douglas R. [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Badie, Christophe, E-mail: christophe.badie@phe.gov.uk [Biological Effects Department, Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards, Public Health England, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 ORQ (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Mice received either a range of {sup 18}F-FDG activities or whole body X-ray doses. • Blood samples were collected at 24 and 43 h for MN-RET and QPCR analysis. • Regression analysis showed that both types of exposure produced a linear response. • BM doses of 33 mGy ({sup 18}F-FDG) and 25 mGy X-rays were significantly higher than controls. • No significant difference between internal ({sup 18}F-FDG) and external (X-ray) was found. - Abstract: The purpose of this study was to quantify the poorly understood radiation doses to murine bone marrow and blood from whole-body fluorine 18 ({sup 18}F)-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET), by using specific biomarkers and comparing with whole body external low dose exposures. Groups of 3–5 mice were randomly assigned to 10 groups, each receiving either a different activity of {sup 18}F-FDG: 0–37 MBq or whole body irradiated with corresponding doses of 0–300 mGy X-rays. Blood samples were collected at 24 h and at 43 h for reticulocyte micronucleus assays and QPCR analysis of gene expression in peripheral blood leukocytes. Blood and bone marrow dose estimates were calculated from injected activities of {sup 18}F-FDG and were based on a recommended ICRP model. Doses to the bone marrow corresponding to 33.43 mGy and above for internal {sup 18}F-FDG exposure and to 25 mGy and above for external X-ray exposure, showed significant increases in radiation-induced MN-RET formation relative to controls (P < 0.05). Regression analysis showed that both types of exposure produced a linear response with linear regression analysis giving R{sup 2} of 0.992 and 0.999 for respectively internal and external exposure. No significant difference between the two data sets was found with a P-value of 0.493. In vivo gene expression dose–responses at 24 h for Bbc3 and Cdkn1 were similar for {sup 18}F-FDG and X-ray exposures, with significant modifications occurring for doses over 300 mGy for Bbc3

  19. Post-irradiation treatment with OK432 can prevent radiation-induced bone marrow death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurishita, A.; Uehara, Y.; Tohoku Univ., Sendai; Katoh, H.; Hirose, S.; Uchida, A.; Mizutani, Y.; Okada, S.; Ono, T.

    1991-01-01

    The radioprotective effect of OK432, a Streptocuccus haemolyticus preparation, on bone marrow death was examined in mice. The LD 50 value was increased from 7.55 Gy in controls to 8.45 Gy in mice treated once with OK432 immediately after irradiation. Multiple administration of the agent further elevated the LD 50 value to 9.56 Gy. The radioprotective effect was also apparent when multiple treatments were commenced as late as 72 h after irradiation. (author)

  20. Guidelines for radiation therapy in clinical research on bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipley, W.U.; VanderSchueren, E.; Kitagawa, T.; Gospodarowicz, M.K.; Frommhold, H.; Magno, L.; Mochizuki, S.; VanderBogaert, W.; VanderWerf-Messing, B.

    1986-01-01

    Bladder cancer is a heterogeneous disease and that there are important tumor characteristics that will predict significant differences in radiation responsiveness. These should in all instances be well documented prospectively in any treatment protocol. However, in this chapter the authors stress a number of factors related to the tumor at presentation as well as the administration of the radiation therapy that can importantly affect the efficacy of the radiation on the patient's tumor, as well as on his or her normal tissues. As Radiation Oncologists, they are most interested in the conducting and reporting of prospective clinical investigations in the use of radiation therapy in the treatment of patients with bladder carcinoma who will be treated with planned preservation of their bladder, but whose radiation therapy may be combined with additional planned bladder-sparing surgery, intraoperative radiation therapy, or chemotherapy

  1. Quality assurance in radiation therapy: clinical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souhami, L.

    1984-01-01

    A survey was conducted in Latin America to evaluate the clinical aspects of quality assurance in radiotherapy. A questionnaire was prepared and sent to 46 institutions. Twenty-seven centers (58.5%), from nine countries, answered the questionnaire. The study was divided into three topics: a) patient-related statistics; b) staffing and education; and c) equipment and facilities. Radiotherapy training programs are available in only 37% of the centers studied. A large number of megavoltage units are old, operating at a shorter than optimum distance with sources of very low activity. The number of high energy linear accelerators is unsatisfactory. Problems in treatment planning facilities were also identified. Regionalization of radiation therapy services is recommended as a possible way to improve quality at a reasonable cost

  2. Radiation therapy of the nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatani, M.; Matayoshi, Y.; Masaki, N.; Fujii, T.; Umatani, K.; Yoshino, K.; Sato, T.

    1993-01-01

    Between September 1977 and December 1989, 89 consecutive patients of nasopharyngeal carcinoma were treated with radiation therapy. The study comprized of 66 males and 23 females; their ages ranged 17 to 80 years (mean 55 years). Five-years survival rates according to stage were as follows: stages I and II (n=10), 90%; stage III (n=10), 43%; stage IV (n=69), 47%. The important prognostic factors for predicting poor prognostic in this series, which were shown by stepwise proportional hazard (Cox) model, were the level of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and neck node involvement. LDH level also influenced nodal failure (p=0.0002) and distant metastatis (p=0.006). (orig.) [de

  3. Clinical results of radiation therapy for thymoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masunaga, Shin-ichiro; Ono, Koji; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Sasai, Keisuke; Kitakabu, Yoshizumi; Abe, Mitsuyuki (Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine); Takahashi, Masaji; Tsutsui, Kazushige; Fushiki, Masato

    1992-05-01

    From August 1968 to December 1989, 58 patients with thymoma were treated by radiotherapy using cobalt-60 gamma ray. Eleven cases were treated by radiothrapy alone, 1 by preoperative radiotheapy, 43 by postoperative radiotherapy, and 3 in combination with intraoperative radiotherapy. The following points were clarified: (a) Postoperative and intraoperative radiotherapy were effective; (b) For postoperative radiotherapy, operability was the major factor influencing survival and local control, and Stage I and II tumors resected totally or subtotally as well as Stage III tumors resected totally were good indications for such therapy; (c) The patients with complicating myasthenia gravis had a longer survival time and better local control rate than those without it. Radiation pneumonitis was observed in 17 patients, and none of them died of this complication. In all cases in combination with intraoperative radiotherapy, dry desquamation was observed within the irradiated field. (author).

  4. Clinical results of radiation therapy for thymoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masunaga, Shin-ichiro; Ono, Koji; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Sasai, Keisuke; Kitakabu, Yoshizumi; Abe, Mitsuyuki; Takahashi, Masaji; Tsutsui, Kazushige; Fushiki, Masato.

    1992-01-01

    From August 1968 to December 1989, 58 patients with thymoma were treated by radiotherapy using cobalt-60 gamma ray. Eleven cases were treated by radiothrapy alone, 1 by preoperative radiotheapy, 43 by postoperative radiotherapy, and 3 in combination with intraoperative radiotherapy. The following points were clarified: (a) Postoperative and intraoperative radiotherapy were effective; (b) For postoperative radiotherapy, operability was the major factor influencing survival and local control, and Stage I and II tumors resected totally or subtotally as well as Stage III tumors resected totally were good indications for such therapy; (c) The patients with complicating myasthenia gravis had a longer survival time and better local control rate than those without it. Radiation pneumonitis was observed in 17 patients, and none of them died of this complication. In all cases in combination with intraoperative radiotherapy, dry desquamation was observed within the irradiated field. (author)

  5. Radiation therapy in the elderly patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, L.W.; Markoe, A.M.

    1986-01-01

    Since cancer is primarily a disease of the older population, the major questions relate to the stage of the disease at the time of initial presentation, a decision as to whether the tumor can be cured or only palliated, and how best to design a treatment program which maximizes the potential for cure or palliation with the minimum in terms of complications as a consequence of the treatment program being pursued. Within this decision, specific emphasis is to be placed on treatment programs that can be tolerated by the older patient without compromising the potential for tumor control. Therefore, the basic goals in cancer management using radiation therapy techniques relate to the potential for cure of the patient, emphasis on improvement in the quality of life as related to improvement relative to symptoms and the potential for preservation of anatomy and function

  6. Method of radiation therapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodes, L.

    1976-01-01

    A technique of radiation therapy treatment planning designed to allow the assignment of dosage limits directly to chosen points in the computer-displayed cross-section of the patient. These dosage limits are used as constraints in a linear programming attempt to solve for beam strengths, minimizing integral dosage. If a feasible plan exists, the optimized plan will be displayed for approval as an isodose pattern. If there is no feasible plan, the operator/therapist can designate some of the point dosage constraints as ''relaxed.'' Linear programming will then optimize for minimum deviation at the relaxed points. This process can be iterated and new points selected until an acceptable plan is realized. In this manner the plan is optimized for uniformity as well as overall low dosage. 6 claims, 6 drawing figures

  7. Radiation Therapy in Peru: Achievements and Challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerrero, P.; Má, C.; Venegas, D.; Bustamante, R.

    2015-01-01

    Peru is the fastest growing economy in Latin America (sustained increase in GDP, low inflation and poverty reduction). The health system is fragmented and until 2012, almost half of the population had no health insurance. The current government poses: Improved access to health and education, employment and social security, reducing extreme poverty, within a context of social inclusion. The Plan for Prevention and Control of Cancer (“Plan Esperanza”) was established in 2012 in order to reduce cancer mortality and morbidity, with greater access to oncology services (promotion, prevention, early diagnosis, treatment and palliative care). With an area of 1 285 216 square kilometers and almost 30 million inhabitants, cancer treatment resources are scarce. Regarding Radiation Therapy, until 2007, it existed only in Lima, the capital city (over 9 million inhabitants). Later, another services were established in two more regions. At present, there is 23 radiotherapy machines in whole country. In this regard, Plan Esperanza is working on strengthening Radiation Therapy Services nationwide. Considering the population demand and availability of other cancer services (chemotherapy, oncologic surgery), the regions where need create new radiotherapy services were identified: 3 Hospitals in Lima (in peripheral areas: Cayetano Heredia at the North, Hipólito Unanue at East and Maria Auxiliadora at South). Also, other Regions of the country: Piura, Lambayeque, La Libertad at North; Junín in the Central Highland, Cusco in the Southern Highland, and Loreto in the Northern Forest. Each with 2 linear accelerators, except Loreto, where they will consider two 60 Cobalt bomb instead, due to the geographical conditions. Moreover, one linear accelerator in Arequipa Region will be acquired. In Lima, the Hospitals are projected to become operational in 2016, while in the Regions, the Ministry of Health is providing them technical assistance in needs identification, planning and

  8. Definition of treatment geometry in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaltonen, P.

    1996-01-01

    When accurate systems for quality assurance and treatment optimization are employed, a precise system for fixation and dosimetric and portal verification are as important as a continued and standardized code of practice for dosimetry and patient follow-up, including registration of tumour responses and acute and late normal tissue reactions. To improve the accuracy of existing dose response relations in order to improve future therapy the treatment geometry and dose delivery concepts have to be accurately defined and uniformly employed. A Nordic working group was set up in 1991 (by Nordic Association of Clinica Physics) to standardize the concepts and quantities used during the whole radiotherapy process in the Nordic countries. Now the group is finalizing its report ''Specification of Dose Delivery in Radiation Therapy''. The report emphasizes that the treatment geometry shall be consistent with the geometry used during the diagnostic work up. The patient fixation is of importance early in the diagnostic phase to ensure that the same reference points and patients position will be used both during the diagnostic work up, simulation and treatment execution. Reference Coordinate System of the patient is a concept based on defined anatomic reference points. This Patient Reference System is a local system which has validity for the tissues, organs and volumes defined during radiotherapy. The reference points of the Patient Reference System should in turn be used for beam set-up. The treatment geometry is then defined by using different concepts describing tissues which are mobile in the Patient Reference System, and finally, volumes which are fixed in this coordinate system. A Set-up Margin has to be considered for movements of the volumes defined in the Reference Coordinate System of the Patient in relation to the radiation beam. The Set-up Margin is dependent on the treatment technique and it is needed in the treatment planning procedure to ensure that the prescribed

  9. Definition of treatment geometry in radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaltonen, P [Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK), Helsinki (Finland)

    1996-08-01

    When accurate systems for quality assurance and treatment optimization are employed, a precise system for fixation and dosimetric and portal verification are as important as a continued and standardized code of practice for dosimetry and patient follow-up, including registration of tumour responses and acute and late normal tissue reactions. To improve the accuracy of existing dose response relations in order to improve future therapy the treatment geometry and dose delivery concepts have to be accurately defined and uniformly employed. A Nordic working group was set up in 1991 to standardize the concepts and quantities used during the whole radiotherapy process in the Nordic countries. Now the group is finalizing its report ``Specification of Dose Delivery in Radiation Therapy``. The report emphasizes that the treatment geometry shall be consistent with the geometry used during the diagnostic work up. The patient fixation is of importance early in the diagnostic phase to ensure that the same reference points and patients position will be used both during the diagnostic work up, simulation and treatment execution. Reference Coordinate System of the patient is a concept based on defined anatomic reference points. This Patient Reference System is a local system which has validity for the tissues, organs and volumes defined during radiotherapy. The reference points of the Patient Reference System should in turn be used for beam set-up. The treatment geometry is then defined by using different concepts describing tissues which are mobile in the Patient Reference System, and finally, volumes which are fixed in this coordinate system. A Set-up Margin has to be considered for movements of the volumes defined in the Reference Coordinate System of the Patient in relation to the radiation beam. The Set-up Margin is dependent on the treatment technique and it is needed in the treatment planning procedure to ensure that the prescribed dose to the Target Volume is delivered.

  10. Effects of low dose radiation combined with cyclophosphamide on tumor cell apoptosis, cell cycle and proliferation of bone marrow in tumor-bearing mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Hongsheng; Fei Conghe; Shen Fangzhen; Liang Jun

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of low dose radiation (LDR) combined with cyclophosphamide on tumor cell apoptosis, cell cycle, and proliferation of bone marrow in mice tumor-bearing mice. Methods: Kunming strain male mice were implanted with S180 sarcoma cells in the left hind leg subcutaneously as an experimental animal model. Five and 8 days after implantation, the mice were given 75 mGy whole-body γ-ray radiation and CTX(300 mg/kg) by intraperitoneal injection 36 hour after LDR. All mice were sacrificed to measure the tumor volume, tumor cell apoptosis, and cell cycle; the proliferation of bone marrow was analyzed by flow cytometry. Results: Tumor growth was significantly slowed down in the treated groups. The apoptosis of tumor cells increased significantly after LDR. The tumor cells were arrested in G 1 phase in CTX and CTX+LDR groups, more significantly in the latter group than in the former group. Concentration of bone marrow cells and proliferation index in CTX + LDR group were higher than those in CTX group, although concentration of bone marrow cells in CTX and CTX+LDR groups were much lower than that in normal mice. Conclusion: Low dose radiation combined with cyclophosphamide causes more significant G 1 -phase arrest than cyclophosphamide alone and enhances anti-tumor effect markedly. At the same time LDR significantly protects hematopoietic function of bone marrow, which is of practical significance as an adjuvant chemotherapy

  11. Hypothalamic Leptin Gene Therapy Reduces Bone Marrow Adiposity in ob/ob Mice Fed Regular and High Fat Diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence B Lindenmaier

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Low bone mass is often associated with increased bone marrow adiposity. Since osteoblasts and adipocytes are derived from the same mesenchymal stem cell progenitor, adipocyte formation may increase at the expense of osteoblast formation. Leptin is an adipocyte-derived hormone known to regulate energy and bone metabolism. Genetic (e.g., leptin deficiency and high fat diet-induced (e.g., leptin resistance obesity are associated with increased marrow adipose tissue (MAT and reduced bone formation. Short-duration studies suggest that leptin treatment reduces MAT and increases bone formation in leptin-deficient ob/ob mice fed a regular diet. Here, we determined the long-duration impact of increased hypothalamic leptin on marrow adipocytes and osteoblasts in ob/ob mice using recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV gene therapy. In a first study, eight- to ten-week-old male ob/ob mice were randomized into 4 groups: (1 untreated, (2 rAAV-Lep, (3 rAAV-green fluorescent protein (rAAV-GFP, or (4 pair-fed to rAAV-Lep. For vector administration, mice were placed in a Kopf stereotaxic apparatus, and injected intracerebroventricularly with either rAAV-Lep or rAAV-GFP (9 × 107 particles in 1.5 µl. The mice were maintained for 30 weeks following vector administration. In a second study, the impact of increased hypothalamic leptin levels on MAT was determined in mice fed high fat diets. Eight- to ten-week-old male ob/ob mice were randomized into 2 groups and treated with either rAAV-Lep or rAAV-GFP. At 7 weeks post-vector administration, half the mice in each group were switched to a high fat diet for 8 weeks. Wild type (WT controls included age-matched mice fed regular or high fat diet. Hypothalamic leptin gene therapy increased osteoblast perimeter and osteoclast perimeter with minor change in cancellous bone architecture. The gene therapy decreased MAT levels in ob/ob mice fed regular or high fat diet to values similar to WT mice fed regular diet. These

  12. Experimental frontiers in radiation therapy of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, H.S.

    1979-01-01

    Eighty years of the history of radiation therapy are reviewed. Discovery of X-ray, radioactivity and radium was made at the end of the 19th Century. The products of nuclear fission reactions such as 60 Co and the high-energy beam generated by megavoltage devices are used as effective tools to ionize beneath the skin surface where cancerous change is present. Development of more selective devices was performed from both the irradiating means and chemically sensitive and selective sensitizers. Differential radioprotection is also a valid means to improve therapeutic gain. The radiosensitivity of mammalian cells is reduced approximately 3-fold when they are irradiated in nitrogen atmosphere rather than in air or in oxygen. As the differential modification of radiosensitivity currently used, the following means are practiced: (a) increased yield of irreversible radiation lesions, (b) increased intrinsic sensitivity of target DNA, (c) inhibition of repair, (d) optimization of dose fractionation schedules and (e) differential radioprotection of normal tumors. With 156 references up to 1978. (Yamashita, S.)

  13. Influencing programmable pacemakers by radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilm, M.; Kronholz, H.L.; Schuetz, J.; Koch, T.

    1994-01-01

    More than 300,000 pacemakers are implanted worldwide. During radiation therapy a damage of the pacemaker elektronic is possible. Twenty pacemakers have been irradiated with photons or electrons experimentally in three different situations: a) pacemaker and pacemaker electrode outside of the irradiation field; b) pacemaker outside, pacemaker electrode inside the irradiation field; c) all things inside the irradiation field. The voltage in the pacemaker electrode produced by the electric field of the accelerator did not exceed 0.8 mV if the electrode was outside the irradiation field. Induced voltage was up to 1.2 mV during irradiation with electrons (18 MeV) and the electrode being inside the treatment field with more than two thirds of its length. After delivering of not more than 10 Gy (photons) to the pacemaker, a decreasing amplitude of the pacemaker pulse occurred. The pulse frequency did not show any deviation. This seems to signal a severe early irreversible damage of the pacemaker that may cause sudden breakdown days or weeks after radiation. Two pacemakers showed a complete breakdown after irradiation with not more than 10 Gy. The others had a complete breakdown beyond doses of 50 Gy. (orig./MG) [de

  14. Diagnostic imaging and radiation therapy equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1990-05-01

    This is the third edition of CSA Standard C22.2 No. 114 (now CAN/CSA-C22.2 No. 114), which is one of a series of standards issued by the Canadian Standards Association under Part II of the Canadian Electrical Code. This edition marks an important shift towards harmonization of Canadian requirements with those of the European community and the United States. Also important to this edition is the expansion of its scope to include the complete range of diagnostic imaging and radiation therapy equipment, rather than solely radiation-emitting equipment. In so doing, equipment previously addressed by CSA Standard C22.2 No. 125, Electromedical Equipment, specifically lasers for medical applications and diagnostic ultrasound units, is now dealt with in the new edition. By virtue of this expanded scope, many of the technical requirements in the electromedical equipment standard have been introduced to the new edition, thereby bringing CSA Standard C22.2 No. 114 up to date. 14 tabs., 16 figs.

  15. Diagnostic imaging and radiation therapy equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-05-01

    This is the third edition of CSA Standard C22.2 No. 114 (now CAN/CSA-C22.2 No. 114), which is one of a series of standards issued by the Canadian Standards Association under Part II of the Canadian Electrical Code. This edition marks an important shift towards harmonization of Canadian requirements with those of the European community and the United States. Also important to this edition is the expansion of its scope to include the complete range of diagnostic imaging and radiation therapy equipment, rather than solely radiation-emitting equipment. In so doing, equipment previously addressed by CSA Standard C22.2 No. 125, Electromedical Equipment, specifically lasers for medical applications and diagnostic ultrasound units, is now dealt with in the new edition. By virtue of this expanded scope, many of the technical requirements in the electromedical equipment standard have been introduced to the new edition, thereby bringing CSA Standard C22.2 No. 114 up to date. 14 tabs., 16 figs

  16. Ultraviolet radiation therapy and UVR dose models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimes, David Robert, E-mail: davidrobert.grimes@oncology.ox.ac.uk [School of Physical Sciences, Dublin City University, Glasnevin, Dublin 9, Ireland and Cancer Research UK/MRC Oxford Institute for Radiation Oncology, Gray Laboratory, University of Oxford, Old Road Campus Research Building, Oxford OX3 7DQ (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-15

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) has been an effective treatment for a number of chronic skin disorders, and its ability to alleviate these conditions has been well documented. Although nonionizing, exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation is still damaging to deoxyribonucleic acid integrity, and has a number of unpleasant side effects ranging from erythema (sunburn) to carcinogenesis. As the conditions treated with this therapy tend to be chronic, exposures are repeated and can be high, increasing the lifetime probability of an adverse event or mutagenic effect. Despite the potential detrimental effects, quantitative ultraviolet dosimetry for phototherapy is an underdeveloped area and better dosimetry would allow clinicians to maximize biological effect whilst minimizing the repercussions of overexposure. This review gives a history and insight into the current state of UVR phototherapy, including an overview of biological effects of UVR, a discussion of UVR production, illness treated by this modality, cabin design and the clinical implementation of phototherapy, as well as clinical dose estimation techniques. Several dose models for ultraviolet phototherapy are also examined, and the need for an accurate computational dose estimation method in ultraviolet phototherapy is discussed.

  17. Ultraviolet radiation therapy and UVR dose models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimes, David Robert

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) has been an effective treatment for a number of chronic skin disorders, and its ability to alleviate these conditions has been well documented. Although nonionizing, exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation is still damaging to deoxyribonucleic acid integrity, and has a number of unpleasant side effects ranging from erythema (sunburn) to carcinogenesis. As the conditions treated with this therapy tend to be chronic, exposures are repeated and can be high, increasing the lifetime probability of an adverse event or mutagenic effect. Despite the potential detrimental effects, quantitative ultraviolet dosimetry for phototherapy is an underdeveloped area and better dosimetry would allow clinicians to maximize biological effect whilst minimizing the repercussions of overexposure. This review gives a history and insight into the current state of UVR phototherapy, including an overview of biological effects of UVR, a discussion of UVR production, illness treated by this modality, cabin design and the clinical implementation of phototherapy, as well as clinical dose estimation techniques. Several dose models for ultraviolet phototherapy are also examined, and the need for an accurate computational dose estimation method in ultraviolet phototherapy is discussed

  18. Radiation therapy tolerance doses for treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyman, J.T.

    1987-01-01

    To adequately plan acceptable dose distributions for radiation therapy treatments it is necessary to ensure that normal structures do not receive unacceptable doses. Acceptable doses are generally those that are below a stated tolerance dose for development of some level of complication. To support the work sponsored by the National Cancer Institute, data for the tolerance of normal tissues or organs to low-LET radiation has been compiled from a number of sources. These tolerance dose data are ostensibly for uniform irradiation of all or part of an organ, and are for either 5% (TD 5 ) or 50% (TD 50 ) complication probability. The ''size'' of the irradiated organ is variously stated in terms of the absolute volume or the fraction of the organ volume irradiated, or the area or the length of the treatment field. The accuracy of these data is questionable. Much of the data represent doses that one or several experienced therapists have estimated could be safely given rather than quantitative analyses of clinical observations. Because these data have been obtained from multiple sources with possible different criteria for the definition of a complication, there are sometimes different values for what is apparently the same end point. 20 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  19. Liver cancer and selective internal radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutton, C.

    2002-01-01

    Liver cancer is the biggest cancer-related killer of adults in the world. Liver cancer can be considered as two types: primary and secondary (metastatic). Selective Internal Radiation Therapy (SIRT) is a revolutionary treatment for advanced liver cancer that utilises new technologies designed to deliver radiation directly to the site of tumours. SIRT, on the other hand, involves the delivery of millions of microscopic radioactive spheres called SIR-Spheres directly to the site of the liver tumour/s, where they selectively irradiate the tumours. The anti-cancer effect is concentrated in the liver and there is little effect on cancer at other sites such as the lungs or bones. The SIR-Spheres are delivered through a catheter placed in the femoral artery of the upper thigh and threaded through the hepatic artery (the major blood vessel of the liver) to the site of the tumour. The microscopic spheres, each approximately 35 microns (the size of four red blood cells or one-third the diameter of a strand of hair), are bonded to yttrium-90 (Y-90), a pure beta emitter with a physical half-life of 64.1 hours (about 2.67 days). The microspheres are trapped in the tumour's vascular bed, where they destroy the tumour from inside. The average range of the radiation is only 2.5 mm, so it is wholly contained within the patient's body; after 14 days, only 2.5 percent of the radioactive activity remains. The microspheres are suspended in water for injection. The vials are shipped in lead shields for radiation protection. Treatment with SIR-Spheres is generally not regarded as a cure, but has been shown to shrink the cancer more than chemotherapy alone. This can increase life expectancy and improve quality of life. On occasion, patients treated with SIR-Spheres have had such marked shrinkage of the liver cancer that the cancer can be surgically removed at a later date. This has resulted in a long-term cure for some patients. SIRTeX Medical Limited has developed three separate cancer

  20. Radiation therapy of early glottic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neri, S.

    1987-01-01

    The control of early glottic cancer is equally satisfactory with either surgical resection or radiation therapy; this last method gives the patient good functional results. During the period from 1/1978 to 12/1985, 73 patients with early glottic carcinoma (T1 N0 M0) were treated in the Institute of Radiotherapy L. Galvani, University of Bologna; 45 were stage T1a (tumor limited to one vocal cord) and 28 were stage T1b (tumor of both vocal cords or involving anterior commissure); radiation treatment utilized a 60 Co machine and 5x5 cm fields; the median dose was 67.2 Gy (range 50-76) with conventional fractionation. Ten patients had local recurrence; the median time of recurrence was 13.4 months; 9/10 were treated by surgery and 2/10 died, so the overall control by radiotherapy with surgery in reserve was 100% in T1a tumers and 90.6% in T1b ones. The 5-years disease free survival rate was 93.1% in T1a tumors and 69% in T1b; lesions involving anterior commissure had the worst prognosis, independent of the dose and time-dose factor (3/10 recurrences in the group treated with TDF less than 110 and 4/18 recurrences in the group with TDF more than 110)

  1. Precise positioning of patients for radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verhey, L.J.; Goitein, M.; McNulty, P.; Munzenrider, J.E.; Suit, H.D.

    1982-01-01

    A number of immobilization schemes which permit precise daily positioning of patients for radiation therapy are discussed. Pretreatment and post-treatment radiographs have been taken with the patient in the treatment position and analyzed to determine the amount of intratreatment movement. Studies of patients in the supine, seated and decubitus positions indicate mean movements of less than 1 mm with a standard deviation of less than 1 mm. Patients immobilized in the seated position with a bite block and a mask have a mean movement of about 0.5 mm +/- 0.3 mm (s.d.), and patients immobilized in the supine position with their necks hyperextended for submental therapy evidence a mean movement of about 1.4 mm +/- 0.9 mm (s.d.). With the exception of those used for the decubitus position, the immobilization devices are simply fabricated out of thermoplastic casting materials readily available from orthopedic supply houses. A study of day-to-day reproducibility of patient position using laser alignment and pretreatment radiographs for final verification of position indicates that the initial laser alignment can be used to position a patient within 2.2 mm +/- 1.4 mm (s.d.) of the intended position. These results indicate that rigid immobilization devices can improve the precision of radiotherapy, which would be advantageous with respect to both tumor and normal tissue coverage in certain situations

  2. Proton-beam radiation therapy dosimetry standardization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gall, K.P.

    1995-01-01

    Beams of protons have been used for radiation therapy applications for over 40 years. In the last decade the number of facilities treating patients and the total number of patients being treated has begun go grow rapidly. Due to the limited and experimental nature of the early programs, dosimetry protocols tended to be locally defined. With the publication of the AAPM Task Group 20 report open-quotes Protocol for Dosimetry of Heavy Charged Particlesclose quotes and the open-quotes European Code of Practice for Proton-Beam Dosimetryclose quotes the practice of determining dose in proton-beam therapy was somewhat unified. The ICRU has also recently commissioned a report on recommendations for proton-beam dosimetry. There have been three main methods of determining proton dose; the Faraday cup technique, the ionization chamber technique, and the calorimeter technique. For practical reasons the ionization chamber technique has become the most widely used. However, due to large errors in basic parameters (e.g., W-value) is also has a large uncertainty for absolute dose. It has been proposed that the development of water calorimeter absorbed dose standards would reduce the uncertainty in absolute proton dose as well as the relative dose between megavoltage X-ray beams and proton beams. The advantages and disadvantages are discussed

  3. Intraoperative radiation therapy for malignant glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, Noboru; Yamada, Hiromu; Andoh, Takashi; Hirata, Toshifumi; Nishimura, Yasuaki; Miwa, Yoshiaki; Shimizu, Kotoyuki; Yanagawa, Shigeo [Gifu Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1991-11-01

    Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) was used as part of the initial therapy for malignant glioma in 32 of 73 patients with histologically verified anaplastic astrocytoma (grade III astrocytoma) and glioblastoma multiforme. The initial treatment for all cases was subtotal or total tumor resection combined with external irradiation and chemotherapy. IORT was performed 1 week after tumor resection, with doses of 10-50 Gy (mean 26.7 Gy) in one session. Fourteen of 32 cases had IORT two times because of tumor recurrence. The IORT patients had survival rates at 24 and 36 months after initial treatment of 57.1 and 33.5% (median survival 26.2 months). The other 41 patients had 23.6 and 13.1% survivals (median survival 20.7 months), which were significantly lower (p<0.01). Tumor recurrence within the original lesion site was suspected because of clinical condition, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging studies in 65.6% of the IORT group (21 cases) 12 months after initial treatment. Twenty cases of death in the IORT group, including five autopsy cases, demonstrated regional tumor recurrence with a high incidence of intraventricular tumor invasion. The authors consider IORT is beneficial for selected malignant glioma patients, including tumor recurrence, because of prolonged survival. (author).

  4. Radiation therapy for malignant lid tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Totsuka, Seiichi; Itsuno, Hajime

    1991-01-01

    The case of a 42-year-old man with Meibomian gland carcinoma in his right lower lid is reported. The tumor found in the nasal part of the lower lid, was 12 mm x 13 mm in size. First, surgical resection was performed. The pathological diagnosis of the frozen section was 'undifferentiated basal cell epithelioma'. Second, cryotherapy was performed all over the cut surface. Later, the permanent section was pathologically diagnosed as 'undifferentiated Meibomian gland carcinoma'. Total 50 Gy irradiation therapy was therefore performed using a 9 Mev Linac electron beam, 25 x 20 mm field, with a lead protector for the cornea and lens. A lead contact lens did not afford good results because it was too easily shifted on the cornea, owing to its weight. Therefore, we made a racket-shaped lead protector. Fixed well with tape, this protector afforded good protective effect. Three years after treatment, the patient has good visual function, with no recurrence. This racket-shaped lead protector is thought to be useful in radiation therapy for malignant lid tumors. (author)

  5. Sister chromatid exchanges in the bone marrow cells of in vivo rats induced by gamma radiation and chemical mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez R, R.G.

    1981-01-01

    Sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) in the bone marrow of in vivo rats induced by gamma radiation doses and by the chemical mutagens, mitomycin C (MMC), cyclophosphamide (CP), and sulphonate-methylmethane (SMM), were studied. The purpose was to evaluate the sensitivity and reproducibility of a simplified SCE in vivo detecting system developed in our laboratory and to compare the results obtained with those reported elsewhere. Simplification consisted in administering the amounts of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) necessary to observe the SCE, after first adsorbing the BrdU in activated carbon and then injecting it interperitoneally, into the rats. The results were a longer time in vivo ADN incorporation without convulsions in the rats, and a reduction in the time course as compared to other methods. We observed a basal rate of 3.6+-0.37 SCE/cell and that: 0.44 Gy of gamma radiation induced 7.7+-0.73 SCE/cell; 1.6 μg/g of MMC induced 8.1+-1.20 SCE/cell; 5 μg/g of CP induced 8.25+-1.5 SCE/cell, 40 μg/g of SMM induced 22.0+-5 SCE/cell and 380 μg/g of sulphonate-ethylmethane induced 8.6+-1.2 SCE/cell. This showed that all the agents were capable of inducing SCE in the bone marrow cells of rats in vivo under our conditions. We noted a greater induced efficiency for gamma radiation than the obtained by other investigators and a relatively similar efficiency in the case of chemical mutagens as reported in other studies. (author)

  6. 21 CFR 892.5750 - Radionuclide radiation therapy system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... system. (a) Identification. A radionuclide radiation therapy system is a device intended to permit an... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radionuclide radiation therapy system. 892.5750... patient's body. This generic type of device may include signal analysis and display equipment, patient and...

  7. DOE Research Contributions to Radiation and Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    dropdown arrow Site Map A-Z Index Menu Synopsis DOE Research Contributions to Radiation and Cancer Therapy Possible: DOE Advanced Biomedical Technology Research, page 10 Over the time span of many years, DOE's research has made many contributions to radiation and cancer therapy, including PEREGRINE and Boron Neutron

  8. Influence of radiation therapy on T-lymphocyte subpopulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Job, G.

    1984-01-01

    The author claims this to be the first time where monoclonal antibodies are used in a long-term study in order to determine the influence of radiation therapy on T-lymphozyte-subpopulations in patients suffering from malignant growths. The influence of radiation therapy on B-cells, T-cells and macrophages was also checked. Two groups of patients were given two different radiation doses, and examined separately in order to discover possible effects of the dosage. Radiation therapy reduced B- and T-lymphocytes to the same degree as the total lymphozyte population so that their shares in percent remained unchanged. The same was also found for macrophages. Determination of clones and suppressor T-lymphozytes before, during and after radiation showed T-lymphozytes to have a higher resistance against the influence of radiation than clones. Suppressor cells also regenerated more quickly than clones after the end of the therapy. While radiation therapy was applied the clone/suppressor cell ratio dropped to values lower than those of the healthy reference group. After the end of the therapy this quotient dropped even further in some cases while in others it began to rise slowly, but even 6 months after the end of the therapy it was still lower than normal. As a number of diseases show an increased 'immunoregulatory quotient' it would be conceivable to influence this quotient with radiation therapy in order to achieve a therapeutic effect. (orig./MG) [de

  9. Source book of educational materials for radiation therapy. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pijar, M.L.

    1979-08-01

    The Source Book is a listing of educational materials in radiation therapy technology. The first 17 sections correspond to the subjects identified in the ASRT Curriculum Guide for schools of radiation therapy. Each section is divided into publications and in some sections audiovisuals and training aids. Entries are listed without endorsement

  10. Physics fundamentals and biological effects of synchrotron radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prezado, Y.

    2010-01-01

    The main goal of radiation therapy is to deposit a curative dose in the tumor without exceeding the tolerances in the nearby healthy tissues. For some radioresistant tumors, like gliomas, requiring high doses for complete sterilization, the major obstacle for curative treatment with ionizing radiation remains the limited tolerance of the surrounding healthy tissue. This limitation is particularly severe for brain tumors and, especially important in children, due to the high risk of complications in the development of the central nervous system. In addition, the treatment of tumors close to an organ at risk, like the spinal cord, is also restricted. One possible solution is the development of new radiation therapy techniques exploiting radically different irradiation modes and modifying, in this way, the biological equivalent doses. This is the case of synchrotron radiation therapy (SRT). In this work the three new radiation therapy techniques under development at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), in Grenoble (France) will be described, namely: synchrotron stereotactic radiation therapy (SSRT), microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) and minibeam radiation therapy. The promising results in the treatment of the high grade brain tumors obtained in preclinical studies have paved the way to the clinical trials. The first patients are expected in the fall of 2010. (Author).

  11. Scalp Dose Evaluation According Radiation Therapy Technique of Whole Brain Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Joon Yung; Park, Soo Yun; Kim, Jong Sik; Choi, Byeong Gi; Song, Gi Won

    2011-01-01

    Opposing portal irradiation with helmet field shape that has been given to a patient with brain metastasis can cause excess dose in patient's scalp, resulting in hair loss. For this reason, this study is to quantitatively analyze scalp dose for effective prevention of hair loss by comparing opposing portal irradiation with scalp-shielding shape and tomotherapy designed to protect patient's scalp with conventional radiation therapy. Scalp dose was measured by using three therapies (HELMET, MLC, TOMO) after five thermo-luminescence dosimeters were positioned along center line of frontal lobe by using RANDO Phantom. Scalp dose and change in dose distribution were compared and analyzed with DVH after radiation therapy plan was made by using Radiation Treatment Planning System (Pinnacle3, Philips Medical System, USA) and 6 MV X-ray (Clinac 6EX, VARIAN, USA). When surface dose of scalp by using thermo-luminescence dosimeters was measured, it was revealed that scalp dose decreased by average 87.44% at each point in MLC technique and that scalp dose decreased by average 88.03% at each point in TOMO compared with HELMET field therapy. In addition, when percentage of volume (V95%, V100%, V105% of prescribed dose) was calculated by using Dose Volume Histogram (DVH) in order to evaluate the existence or nonexistence of hotspot in scalp as to three therapies (HELMET, MLC, TOMO), it was revealed that MLC technique and TOMO plan had good dose coverage and did not have hot spot. Reducing hair loss of a patient who receives whole brain radiotherapy treatment can make a contribution to improve life quality of the patient. It is expected that making good use of opposing portal irradiation with scalp-shielding shape and tomotherapy to protect scalp of a patient based on this study will reduce hair loss of a patient.

  12. Scalp Dose Evaluation According Radiation Therapy Technique of Whole Brain Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Joon Yung; Park, Soo Yun; Kim, Jong Sik; Choi, Byeong Gi; Song, Gi Won [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    Opposing portal irradiation with helmet field shape that has been given to a patient with brain metastasis can cause excess dose in patient's scalp, resulting in hair loss. For this reason, this study is to quantitatively analyze scalp dose for effective prevention of hair loss by comparing opposing portal irradiation with scalp-shielding shape and tomotherapy designed to protect patient's scalp with conventional radiation therapy. Scalp dose was measured by using three therapies (HELMET, MLC, TOMO) after five thermo-luminescence dosimeters were positioned along center line of frontal lobe by using RANDO Phantom. Scalp dose and change in dose distribution were compared and analyzed with DVH after radiation therapy plan was made by using Radiation Treatment Planning System (Pinnacle3, Philips Medical System, USA) and 6 MV X-ray (Clinac 6EX, VARIAN, USA). When surface dose of scalp by using thermo-luminescence dosimeters was measured, it was revealed that scalp dose decreased by average 87.44% at each point in MLC technique and that scalp dose decreased by average 88.03% at each point in TOMO compared with HELMET field therapy. In addition, when percentage of volume (V95%, V100%, V105% of prescribed dose) was calculated by using Dose Volume Histogram (DVH) in order to evaluate the existence or nonexistence of hotspot in scalp as to three therapies (HELMET, MLC, TOMO), it was revealed that MLC technique and TOMO plan had good dose coverage and did not have hot spot. Reducing hair loss of a patient who receives whole brain radiotherapy treatment can make a contribution to improve life quality of the patient. It is expected that making good use of opposing portal irradiation with scalp-shielding shape and tomotherapy to protect scalp of a patient based on this study will reduce hair loss of a patient.

  13. Radiation therapy among atomic bomb survivors, Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinkston, J.A.; Antoku, Shigetoshi; Russell, W.J.

    1980-10-01

    In the continuing evaluations of atomic bomb survivors for late radiation effects, not only doses from the A-bombs but those from other radiation sources must be considered, for the latter may be concomitantly acting factors causing bias among these investigations. In the present study, among 73 Hiroshima and 22 Nagasaki Adult Health Study (AHS) subjects who reported receiving radiation therapy, from 1970 through 1979, the medical records of 72 and 20, respectively, were reviewed, and 41 Hiroshima and 14 Nagasaki subjects were confirmed to have received radiation therapy. The data obtained in the present study were pooled with those of the previous investigation on radiation therapy exposures of AHS subjects prior to 1970. A total of 190 subjects have been documented as receiving radiation therapy and their doses were estimated. Energies used in treatments and diseases treated are discussed. Malignancies developed subsequent to radiation therapy in seven cases; five after treatment for malignancies and two after treatment for benign diseases. Neoplasms of 12 AHS subjects may have been induced by earlier radiation therapy; 5 in the earlier study and 7 in the present one. These investigations underscore the need for continued documentation of exposures to ionizing radiation for medical reasons, especially from sources incurring relatively high doses. Bias in assessments of late radiation effects among A-bomb survivors can thus be avoided. (author)

  14. Inhibiting TGFβ1 has a protective effect on mouse bone marrow suppression following ionizing radiation exposure in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Heng; Yan Hao; Wang Xinzhuo; Niu Jingxiu; Wang Hui; Wang Yingai; Meng Aimin; Li Jin

    2013-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) causes not only acute tissue damage but also residual bone marrow (BM) suppression. The induction of residual BM injury is primarily attributable to the induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) pressure in hematopoietic cells. In this study, we examined if SB431542, a transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1) inhibitor, can mitigate IR-induced BM suppression in vitro. Our results showed that treatment with SB431542 protected mice bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNCs), hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) and hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from IR-induced suppression using cell viability assays, clonogenic assays and competitive repopulation assays. Moreover, expression of gene-related ROS production in hematopoietic cells was analyzed. The expression of NADPH oxidative 1 (NOX1), NOX2 and NOX4 was increased in irradiated BMMNCs, and that of NOX2 and NOX4 was reduced by SB431542 treatment. Therefore, the results from this study suggest that SB431542, a TGFβ1 inhibitor, alleviates IR-induced BM suppression at least in part via inhibiting IR-induced NOX2 and NOX4 expression. (author)

  15. Immunohistochemical localization of host and donor-derived cells in the regenerating thymus of radiation bone marrow chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceredig, R.; Schreyer, M.

    1984-01-01

    The anatomical distribution of CBA (Thy-1.2) host and AKR (Thy-1.1) donor-derived cells in the regenerating thymus of AKR → CBA radiation bone marrow chimeras was investigated. Cryostat sections of chimeric thymuses were incubated with biotin-conjugated monoclonal anti-Thy-1 antibodies specific for host and donor-derived cells and the distribution of the corresponding Thy-1 antigen revealed by the immunoperoxidase staining technique. The thymus was initially repopulated by Thy-1.2 + host-derived cells, but by 28 days following bone marrow reconstitution the few remaining host cells were found mostly in the thymus medulla. However, occasional Thy-1.2 + cells were still present in extramedullary, primarily cortical, sites. Donor-derived (Thy-1.1 + ) cells were first seen in the 11-day chimeric thymus as single cells frequently closely associated with blood vessels in medullary areas. By 17 days, the cortex contained many Thy-1.1 + cells, although occasional single positive cells were still present in the medulla. Changes in the anatomical distribution of host and donor-derived cells in the regenerating chimeric thymus appeared to correlate with changes in their Thy-1 fluorescence profile as determined by flow microfluorometry. (Auth.)

  16. Modern role and issues of radiation therapy for benign diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyashita, Tsuguhiro; Tateno, Atsushi; Kumazaki, Tatsuo

    1999-01-01

    Cases of radiation therapy for benign diseases have diminished in number because of recent alternative methods and knowledge about radiation carcinogenesis. In contrast to this tendency, our cases of benign diseases have recently increased. The facts made us reconsider today's radiation therapy of benign diseases. We reviewed 349 patients who were diagnosed as having benign tumors or non-neoplastic conditions and treated by radiation therapy in the past sixteen years. Analyzed items were the annual transition of treatment number, sorts of diseases, patients' age and sex, and the goal of therapy. Of all radiation therapy patients, benign diseases account for 9.26%. The annual percentages were 0.5%, 6.0%, 11.2% and 13.7% at intervals of five years since 1982. The majority was 246 post-operative irradiation for keloids (71%) and 41 pituitary adenomas (12%). Compared with malignant tumors, benign disease patients were statistically younger and female-dominant. Applications of radiation therapy in keloids and pituitary adenomas had definite goals, but were unclear in other rare diseases. Benign diseases should be treated by radiation therapy as the second or third option, provided the patients have serious symptoms and their diseases do not respond to other modalities. It seems to be widely accepted that favorite cases such as keloids and pituitary adenomas are treated by radiation therapy. But, optimal radiation therapies for other rare benign diseases have not been established. Therefore, the building of databases on radiation therapy on benign diseases should be pursued. Since benign disease patients were young and female-dominant and had many remaining years, their carcinogenicity potential should be considered. (author)

  17. First-line treatment for severe aplastic anemia in children: bone marrow transplantation from a matched family donor versus immunosuppressive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Nao; Kobayashi, Ryoji; Yabe, Hiromasa; Kosaka, Yoshiyuki; Yagasaki, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Ken-Ichiro; Kudo, Kazuko; Morimoto, Akira; Ohga, Shouichi; Muramatsu, Hideki; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Kato, Koji; Suzuki, Ritsuro; Ohara, Akira; Kojima, Seiji

    2014-12-01

    The current treatment approach for severe aplastic anemia in children is based on studies performed in the 1980s, and updated evidence is required. We retrospectively compared the outcomes of children with acquired severe aplastic anemia who received immunosuppressive therapy within prospective trials conducted by the Japanese Childhood Aplastic Anemia Study Group or who underwent bone marrow transplantation from an HLA-matched family donor registered in the Japanese Society for Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Registry. Between 1992 and 2009, 599 children (younger than 17 years) with severe aplastic anemia received a bone marrow transplant from an HLA-matched family donor (n=213) or immunosuppressive therapy (n=386) as first-line treatment. While the overall survival did not differ between patients treated with immunosuppressive therapy or bone marrow transplantation [88% (95% confidence interval: 86-90) versus 92% (90-94)], failure-free survival was significantly inferior in patients receiving immunosuppressive therapy than in those undergoing bone marrow transplantation [56% (54-59) versus 87% (85-90); Paplastic anemia. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  18. CT follow-up after radiation therapy for pituitary adenomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rush, S.C.; Newall, J.

    1988-01-01

    Between 1973 and 1985, 105 patients received radiation therapy as all or part of their treatment for pituitary tumor at the New York University Medical Center. Of these, 48 patients underwent computed tomography (CT) at a minimum of 2 years following treatment, with detailed reports available for analysis of tumor regression. There were 28 men with a median age of 46 years (range, 18-71 years) and 20 women with a median age of 53 years (range, 28-80 years). Tumors were classified as secretory in 23 patients, nonsecretory in 21, and undetermined in four. Sixteen patients were treated with radiation therapy alone, 23 patients with surgery and radiation therapy, and the other with bromocriptine and radiation therapy, with or without surgery. With a median follow-up of 5 years (range, 2-14 years), 16 patients developed an empty sella, 25 patients had residual sellar mass, and seven patients had persistent extrasellar components or no change in their intrasellar mass. Among patients who did not have hypopituitarism at the inception of radiation therapy, five of 13 with empty sellas and 12 of 22 with residual mass subsequently required therapy. The authors conclude that residual mass is commonly found in long-term follow-up after radiation therapy, that isolated imaging studies revealing such findings after treatment in no way herald a diagnosis of recurrence, and that hypopituitarism following pituitary radiation therapy does not correlate with the ablation or persistence of tissue within the sella

  19. Inadvertent destruction of the spinal cord by radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhavilai, D.

    1974-01-01

    A case of radiation myelopathy following cobalt therapy of a carcinoma of the esophagus is presented. A permanent quadriplegia resulted. Radiation myelopathy can result from treatment with x-rays or radioactive cobalt regardless of whether the condition being treated involves the spinal cord. No effective treatment is known. Prevention requires keeping the radiation at low level

  20. Treatment of Recurrent Chordomas by Percutaneous Ethanol Injection Therapy and Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajo, M.; Ohkubo, K.; Fukukura, Y.; Nandate, T.; Nakajo, M.

    2006-01-01

    We report a case of recurrent sacral chordomas that have been successfully controlled by the combination therapy of percutaneous ethanol injection therapy (PEIT) and radiation therapy in a 71-year-old man. PEIT may be one of the adjuvant therapies for recurrent chordomas

  1. Stimulating effect of low dose radiation expression of G-CSF receptors in bone marrow cells in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Honglai; Liu Shuzheng; Zhang Ming

    1993-01-01

    The expression of G-CSF receptors in bone marrow cells (BMC) was studied by using 125 I labelled G-CSF ( 1 '2 5 I-G-CSF). The results showed that the reaction equilibrium of 125 I-G-CSF bound to BMC at 37 degree C was reached in 60 minutes, the maximum binding (Bmax) to 3 x 10 6 BMC being 15.1 pmol, the dissociation constant (Kd) being 78.6 pmol, and the estimated number of G-CSF receptors per cell being about 3100. The number of G-CSF receptors in BMC in mice 48 hours after whole body exposure to doses of 50, 75 and 100 mGy X-rays increased significantly to 161%, 169% and 342% of controls, respectively. The results suggested that the expression of G-CSF receptors in BMC was enhanced markedly following low dose radiation, which would lead to stimulation of BMC proliferation

  2. Effect of 2-mercaptopropionylglycine (MPG) on the radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in the bone marrow of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uma, D.P.; Gupta, R.

    1984-01-01

    The radioprotective effect of MPG, a SH compound used clinically as detoxicating agent, was investigated in vivo on adult whole-body exposed mice to 3 Gy of 60 Co radiation 15 to 20 min after a single i.p. injection of MPG. Animals pretreated with colchicine were autopsied at various intervals from 2 to 28 days and bone marrow metaphases were scored. Significantly less number of cells were found to carry aberrations in the MPG-treated animals at 24 hr as compared to the non-drug treated irradiated ones. However, at all the other earlier and later intervals, both groups of animals showed approximately the same frequency of aberrant cells. It appears that MPG protection to the chromosome is at the reparation stage rather than at the initial stage of breakage. (author)

  3. Low-dose radiation-induced adaptive response in bone marrow cells of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farooqi, Zeba; Kesavan, P.C.

    1993-01-01

    Using bone marrow cells of whole body irradiated mice, the cytogenetic adaptive response induced by low conditioning doses of gamma-rays was investigated. The conditioning doses (0.025 and 0.05 Gy) were given at a dose-rate of 1.67 Gy/min. The challenging dose of 1 Gy was given at a dose-rate of 0.045 Gy/s. The challenging dose was given at different time intervals after the conditioning dose. The time intervals between the conditioning dose and challenging dose were 2, 7.5, 13, 18.5 and 24 h. When the time interval between the conditioning dose and the challenging dose was 2 h, both conditioning doses (0.025 and 0.05 Gy) reduced the frequency of MNPCEs and chromosomal aberrations in the bone marrow cells. The data collected at different time intervals (7.5, 13, 18.5 h) reveal that the radioadaptive response persisted for a longer time when the lower conditioning dose (0.025 Gy) was given. With the higher conditioning dose (0.05 Gy), the radioadaptive response disappeared after a time interval of 13 h. When the time interval between the conditioning dose and the challenging doses was 18.5 or 24 h, only the lower conditioning dose appeared effective in inducing the radioadaptive response

  4. A virtual radiation therapy workflow training simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bridge, P.; Crowe, S.B.; Gibson, G.; Ellemor, N.J.; Hargrave, C.; Carmichael, M.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Simulation forms an increasingly vital component of clinical skills development in a wide range of professional disciplines. Simulation of clinical techniques and equipment is designed to better prepare students for placement by providing an opportunity to learn technical skills in a “safe” academic environment. In radiotherapy training over the last decade or so this has predominantly comprised treatment planning software and small ancillary equipment such as mould room apparatus. Recent virtual reality developments have dramatically changed this approach. Innovative new simulation applications and file processing and interrogation software have helped to fill in the gaps to provide a streamlined virtual workflow solution. This paper outlines the innovations that have enabled this, along with an evaluation of the impact on students and educators. Method: Virtual reality software and workflow applications have been developed to enable the following steps of radiation therapy to be simulated in an academic environment: CT scanning using a 3D virtual CT scanner simulation; batch CT duplication; treatment planning; 3D plan evaluation using a virtual linear accelerator; quantitative plan assessment, patient setup with lasers; and image guided radiotherapy software. Results: Evaluation of the impact of the virtual reality workflow system highlighted substantial time saving for academic staff as well as positive feedback from students relating to preparation for clinical placements. Students valued practice in the “safe” environment and the opportunity to understand the clinical workflow ahead of clinical department experience. Conclusion: Simulation of most of the radiation therapy workflow and tasks is feasible using a raft of virtual reality simulation applications and supporting software. Benefits of this approach include time-saving, embedding of a case-study based approach, increased student confidence, and optimal use of the clinical environment

  5. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester preferentially sensitizes CT26 colorectal adenocarcinoma to ionizing radiation without affecting bone marrow radioresponse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Y.-J.; Liao, H.-F.; Tsai, T.-H.; Wang, S.-Y.; Shiao, M.-S.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), a component of propolis, was reported capable of depleting glutathione (GSH). We subsequently examined the radiosensitizing effect of CAPE and its toxicity. Methods and Materials: The effects of CAPE on GSH level, GSH metabolism enzyme activities, NF-κB activity, and radiosensitivity in mouse CT26 colorectal adenocarcinoma cells were determined. BALB/c mouse with CT26 cells implantation was used as a syngeneic in vivo model for evaluation of treatment and toxicity end points. Results: CAPE entered CT26 cells rapidly and depleted intracellular GSH in CT26 cells, but not in bone marrow cells. Pretreatment with nontoxic doses of CAPE significantly enhanced cell killing by ionizing radiation (IR) with sensitizer enhancement ratios up to 2.2. Pretreatment of CT26 cells with N-acetyl-L-cysteine reversed the GSH depletion activity and partially blocked the radiosensitizing effect of CAPE. CAPE treatment in CT26 cells increased glutathione peroxidase, decreased glutathione reductase, and did not affect glutathione S-transferase or γ-glutamyl transpeptidase activity. Radiation activated NF-κB was reversed by CAPE pretreatment. In vivo study revealed that pretreatment with CAPE before IR resulted in greater inhibition of tumor growth and prolongation of survival in comparison with IR alone. Pretreatment with CAPE neither affected body weights nor produced hepatic, renal, or hematopoietic toxicity. Conclusions: CAPE sensitizes CT26 colorectal adenocarcinoma to IR, which may be via depleting GSH and inhibiting NF-κB activity, without toxicity to bone marrow, liver, and kidney

  6. Postoperative radiation therapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teshima, Teruki; Chatani, Masashi; Inoue, Toshihiko; Kurokawa, Eiji; Kodama, Ken; Doi, Osamu

    1987-01-01

    From January 1978 through December 1982, a total of 241 cases with lung cancer underwent surgery. Twenty-nine cases (operative death: 7, relative non-curative operation: 13, exploratory thoracotomy: 9) were excluded because they did not receive radiation therapy (RT). The remaining 212 cases were available for this analysis. Forty-two of them were treated with RT postoperatively. Three-year survival rates according to curability in the non-RT and RT groups were 83 % and 71 % (NS) in the curative operation group. In the relatively curative operation group, the corresponding figures were 40 % and 33 % (NS), and in the absolutely non-curative operation group, 3 % and 20 % (p < 0.01), respectively. The analysis of background factors revealed that in the curative operation group the rate of combined resection and in the relatively curative operation group pT3 and combined resection were significantly higher in the RT group than non-RT group. In the absolutely non-curative operation group, the rate of pM1 was significantly lower in RT group than the non-RT group. The pattern of failure of the RT group by histology was analysed. Local and regional failure was most common in the squamous cell carcinoma group and distant failure in the adenocarcinoma group. However, in the adenocarcinoma group local and regional or supraclavicular lymph node failure was also frequently noted. The relationship between the radiation field and local and regional or supraclavicular lymph node failure was analysed. In the squamous cell carcinoma group, in-field failure was most common, whereas in the adenocarcinoma group, outside (marginal) failure was common, especially in the supraclavicular lymph nodes. Concerning squamous cell carcinoma, microscopic or macroscopic residual tumor at the surgical margin, which includes the chest wall, stump (BS or VS) and pericardium was well controlled in each operation group with more than 50 Gy of RT. (J.P.N.)

  7. Scatter Dose in Patients in Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, W. F. O.

    2003-01-01

    Patients undergoing radiation therapy are often treated with high energy radiation (bremsstrahlung) which causes scatter doses in the patients from various sources as photon scatter coming from collimator, gantry, patient, patient table or room (walls, floor, air) or particle doses resulting from gamma-particle reactions in the atomic nucleus if the photon energies are above 8 MeV. In the last years new treatment techniques like IMRT (esp the step-and-shoot- or the MIMIC-techniques) have increased interest in these topics again. In the lecture an overview about recent measurements on scatter doses resulting from gantry, table and room shall be given. Scatter doses resulting from the volume treated in the patient to other critical parts of the body like eyes, ovarii etc. have been measured in two diploma works in our institute and are compared with a program (PERIDOSE; van der Giessen, Netherlands) to estimate them. In some cases these scatter doses have led to changes of treatment modalities. Also an overview and estimation of doses resulting from photon-particle interactions is given according to a publication from Gudowska et al.(Gudowska I, Brahme A, Andreo P, Gudowski W, Kierkegaard J. Calculation of absorbed dose and biological effectiveness from photonuclear reactions in a bremsstrahlung beam of end point 50 MeV. Phys Med Biol 1999; 44(9):2099-2125.). Energy dose has been calculated with Monte Carlo-methods and is compared with analytical methods for 50 MV bremsstrahlung. From these data biologically effective doses from particles in different depths of the body can be estimated also for energies used in normal radiotherapy. (author)

  8. Intraoperative radiation therapy for malignant glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, Noboru; Yamada, Hiromu; Andoh, Takashi; Takada, Mitsuaki; Hirata, Toshifumi; Funakoshi, Takashi; Doi, Hidetaka; Yanagawa, Shigeo [Gifu Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1989-04-01

    Intraoperative radiation therapy (IOR) is an ideal means of exterminating residual tumor after surgical resection. In this study, the clinical results of IOR using a Scanditronix Microtron MM-22 were evaluated in 14 patients with malignant glioma, five of whom had recurrent tumors. Between July, 1985 and October, 1986, 11 patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GB) were irradiated 18 times (mean, 1.6 times/case), and three with astrocytoma (Kernohan grade III) underwent IOR once each. The target-absorbed dose at 1 to 2 cm deeper than the tumor resection surface was 15 to 50 Gy. During irradiation, a cotton bolus was placed in the dead space after over 91% of the tumor had been resected. As a rule, external irradiation therapy was also given postoperatively at a dose of 30 to 52 Gy. One patient died of pneumonia and disseminated intravascular coagulation syndrome 1 month postoperatively. The 1- and 2-year survival rates of the ramaining 13 patients were 84.6% and 61.5%, respectively; among the 10 with GB, they were 80% and 50%. Generally, the smaller the tumor size, the better the results. There were no adverse effects, despite the dose 15 to 50 Gy applied temporally to the tumor bed. IOR was especially effective against small, localized tumors, but was not always beneficial in cases of large tumors, particularly those with a contralateral focus. The improved survival rate in this series demonstrates that IOR is significantly effective in the 'induction of remission' following surgical excision of malignant gliomas. (author).

  9. Whole-brain hippocampal sparing radiation therapy: Volume-modulated arc therapy vs intensity-modulated radiation therapy case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Katrina, E-mail: Trinabena23@gmail.com; Lenards, Nishele; Holson, Janice

    2016-04-01

    The hippocampus is responsible for memory and cognitive function. An ongoing phase II clinical trial suggests that sparing dose to the hippocampus during whole-brain radiation therapy can help preserve a patient's neurocognitive function. Progressive research and advancements in treatment techniques have made treatment planning more sophisticated but beneficial for patients undergoing treatment. The aim of this study is to evaluate and compare hippocampal sparing whole-brain (HS-WB) radiation therapy treatment planning techniques using volume-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). We randomly selected 3 patients to compare different treatment techniques that could be used for reducing dose to the hippocampal region. We created 2 treatment plans, a VMAT and an IMRT, from each patient's data set and planned on the Eclipse 11.0 treatment planning system (TPS). A total of 6 plans (3 IMRT and 3 VMAT) were created and evaluated for this case study. The physician contoured the hippocampus as per the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0933 protocol atlas. The organs at risk (OR) were contoured and evaluated for the plan comparison, which included the spinal cord, optic chiasm, the right and left eyes, lenses, and optic nerves. Both treatment plans produced adequate coverage on the planning target volume (PTV) while significantly reducing dose to the hippocampal region. The VMAT treatment plans produced a more homogenous dose distribution throughout the PTV while decreasing the maximum point dose to the target. However, both treatment techniques demonstrated hippocampal sparing when irradiating the whole brain.

  10. Whole-brain hippocampal sparing radiation therapy: Volume-modulated arc therapy vs intensity-modulated radiation therapy case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Katrina; Lenards, Nishele; Holson, Janice

    2016-01-01

    The hippocampus is responsible for memory and cognitive function. An ongoing phase II clinical trial suggests that sparing dose to the hippocampus during whole-brain radiation therapy can help preserve a patient׳s neurocognitive function. Progressive research and advancements in treatment techniques have made treatment planning more sophisticated but beneficial for patients undergoing treatment. The aim of this study is to evaluate and compare hippocampal sparing whole-brain (HS-WB) radiation therapy treatment planning techniques using volume-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). We randomly selected 3 patients to compare different treatment techniques that could be used for reducing dose to the hippocampal region. We created 2 treatment plans, a VMAT and an IMRT, from each patient׳s data set and planned on the Eclipse 11.0 treatment planning system (TPS). A total of 6 plans (3 IMRT and 3 VMAT) were created and evaluated for this case study. The physician contoured the hippocampus as per the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0933 protocol atlas. The organs at risk (OR) were contoured and evaluated for the plan comparison, which included the spinal cord, optic chiasm, the right and left eyes, lenses, and optic nerves. Both treatment plans produced adequate coverage on the planning target volume (PTV) while significantly reducing dose to the hippocampal region. The VMAT treatment plans produced a more homogenous dose distribution throughout the PTV while decreasing the maximum point dose to the target. However, both treatment techniques demonstrated hippocampal sparing when irradiating the whole brain. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Predicting Radiation Pneumonitis After Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy in Patients Previously Treated With Conventional Thoracic Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Hui; Zhang Xu; Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy Y.; Swisher, Stephen G.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Chang, Joe Y.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of and risk factors for radiation pneumonitis (RP) after stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) to the lung in patients who had previously undergone conventional thoracic radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Seventy-two patients who had previously received conventionally fractionated radiation therapy to the thorax were treated with SABR (50 Gy in 4 fractions) for recurrent disease or secondary parenchymal lung cancer (T 10 and mean lung dose (MLD) of the previous plan and the V 10 -V 40 and MLD of the composite plan were also related to RP. Multivariate analysis revealed that ECOG PS scores of 2-3 before SABR (P=.009), FEV1 ≤65% before SABR (P=.012), V 20 ≥30% of the composite plan (P=.021), and an initial PTV in the bilateral mediastinum (P=.025) were all associated with RP. Conclusions: We found that severe RP was relatively common, occurring in 20.8% of patients, and could be predicted by an ECOG PS score of 2-3, an FEV1 ≤65%, a previous PTV spanning the bilateral mediastinum, and V 20 ≥30% on composite (previous RT+SABR) plans. Prospective studies are needed to validate these predictors and the scoring system on which they are based.

  12. On probabilistically defined margins in radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papiez, Lech; Langer, Mark [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2006-08-21

    Margins about a target volume subject to external beam radiation therapy are designed to assure that the target volume of tissue to be sterilized by treatment is adequately covered by a lethal dose. Thus, margins are meant to guarantee that all potential variation in tumour position relative to beams allows the tumour to stay within the margin. Variation in tumour position can be broken into two types of dislocations, reducible and irreducible. Reducible variations in tumour position are those that can be accommodated with the use of modern image-guided techniques that derive parameters for compensating motions of patient bodies and/or motions of beams relative to patient bodies. Irreducible variations in tumour position are those random dislocations of a target that are related to errors intrinsic in the design and performance limitations of the software and hardware, as well as limitations of human perception and decision making. Thus, margins in the era of image-guided treatments will need to accommodate only random errors residual in patient setup accuracy (after image-guided setup corrections) and in the accuracy of systems designed to track moving and deforming tissues of the targeted regions of the patient's body. Therefore, construction of these margins will have to be based on purely statistical data. The characteristics of these data have to be determined through the central limit theorem and Gaussian properties of limiting error distributions. In this paper, we show how statistically determined margins are to be designed in the general case of correlated distributions of position errors in three-dimensional space. In particular, we show how the minimal margins for a given level of statistical confidence are found. Then, how they are to be used to determine geometrically minimal PTV that provides coverage of GTV at the assumed level of statistical confidence. Our results generalize earlier recommendations for statistical, central limit theorem

  13. On probabilistically defined margins in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papiez, Lech; Langer, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Margins about a target volume subject to external beam radiation therapy are designed to assure that the target volume of tissue to be sterilized by treatment is adequately covered by a lethal dose. Thus, margins are meant to guarantee that all potential variation in tumour position relative to beams allows the tumour to stay within the margin. Variation in tumour position can be broken into two types of dislocations, reducible and irreducible. Reducible variations in tumour position are those that can be accommodated with the use of modern image-guided techniques that derive parameters for compensating motions of patient bodies and/or motions of beams relative to patient bodies. Irreducible variations in tumour position are those random dislocations of a target that are related to errors intrinsic in the design and performance limitations of the software and hardware, as well as limitations of human perception and decision making. Thus, margins in the era of image-guided treatments will need to accommodate only random errors residual in patient setup accuracy (after image-guided setup corrections) and in the accuracy of systems designed to track moving and deforming tissues of the targeted regions of the patient's body. Therefore, construction of these margins will have to be based on purely statistical data. The characteristics of these data have to be determined through the central limit theorem and Gaussian properties of limiting error distributions. In this paper, we show how statistically determined margins are to be designed in the general case of correlated distributions of position errors in three-dimensional space. In particular, we show how the minimal margins for a given level of statistical confidence are found. Then, how they are to be used to determine geometrically minimal PTV that provides coverage of GTV at the assumed level of statistical confidence. Our results generalize earlier recommendations for statistical, central limit theorem

  14. New modalities in radiation therapy for treatment of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is a generic term for a large group of diseases characterized by rapid creation of abnormal cells that grow beyond their usual boundaries, and which can then invade adjoining parts of the body and spread to other organs. Cancer mortality is the second and most common cause of death in the USA and in most European countries. In India, it is the fourth leading disease and the major cause of death. Cancer remains one of the most dreadful disease and approximately ten million cases of cancer occur in the world every year. The course of cancer treatment depends on the type of cancer, its location, and its state of advancement. Cancer is treated with surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, hormone therapy, biological therapy and targeted therapy. Radiation therapy is an important an affordable modality for cancer treatment with minimal side effects. Radiation kills cancer cells with high-energy rays targeted directly to the tumor. Radiation therapy works by damaging the DNA and preventing its replication: therefore, it preferentially kills cancer cells, which rapidly divides. Radiation therapy is used for cure, control, and palliation of cancers in more than 60% of cancer patients. The goal of radiotherapy is to treat the cancer and spare the normal tissue as much as possible. Advances have been made in radiotherapy that allow delivery of higher doses of radiation to the tumor while sparing a greater amount of surrounding tissue, thus achieving more cures and fewer acute and long-term side effects. Technological advances and research are being continued to result in improvements in the field. Several new devices and techniques are used these days in radiotherapy for accurate treatment of cancer. Teletherapy (external radiation therapy) used focused radiation beams targeting well defined tumor through extremely detailed imaging scans. Conventional external beam radiation therapy (2DXRT) is delivered via two-dimensional beams using linear accelerator machines (X

  15. Two case reports of a cerebrovascular disorder after radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Jiro; Mimaki, Takashi; Tagawa, Tetsuzo

    1985-01-01

    The use of radiation therapy has significantly improved the prognosis of certain brain tumors. However, a few patients have been reported who developed cerebrovasculopathy accompanying transient ischemic attacks several months to several years after radiation therapy. The present report described cerebrovascular disorders after radiation therapy for brain tumors. The first case was an 8-year-6-month-old boy treated with a total dose of 5,200 rads after partial removal of a right periventricular astrocytoma extending into the thalamus. Two years and 7 months after completion of the radiation therapy, he showed transient ischemic attacks of numbness in the right upper limb and right hemiparesis. Arteriography revealed stenosis or occlusion of the anterior and middle cerebral arteries. Preoperative arteriography did not show occlusion nor narrowing of the cerebral arteries. The second case was a 2-year-8-month-old boy diagnosed as diencephalic syndrome, because of marked emaciation and a huge tumor mass expanding into the diencephalon and frontal lobe on the brain CT scan. He was irradiated with up to 5,000 rads. Seven months after radiation therapy, he developed transient right hemiparesis. Arteriography revealed stenosis or occlusion of the middle sized cerebral arteries. Although radiation therapy is acceptable in children with certain brain tumors, and very few patients develop postradiation vasculopathy, the risk of radiation therapy requires more careful consideration in the treatment of intracranial tumors. (author)

  16. Insufficiency fractures following radiation therapy for gynecologic malignancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikushima, Hitoshi; Takegawa, Yoshihiro; Matsuki, Hirokazu; Yasuda, Hiroaki; Kawanaka, Takashi; Shiba, Atsushi; Kishida, Yoshiomi; Iwamoto, Seiji; Nishitani, Hiromu [Tokushima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the incidence, clinical and radiological findings of insufficiency fractures (IF) of the female pelvis following radiation therapy. We retrospectively reviewed the radiation oncology records of 108 patients with gynecologic malignancies who underwent external beam radiation therapy of the whole pelvis. All patients underwent conventional radiography and computed tomography (CT) scan every 6 months in follow-up after radiation therapy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and radionuclide bone scan were added when the patients complained of pelvic pain. Thirteen of 108 patients (12%) developed IF in the irradiated field with a median interval of 6 months (range 3-51) from the completion of external beam radiation therapy. All patients who developed IF were postmenopausal women. Age of the patients who developed IF was significantly higher than that of the other patients. The parts of IF were sacroiliac joints, pubis, sacral body and 5th lumbar vertebra and six of 14 patients had multiple lesions. Treatment with rest and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs lead to symptomatic relief in all patients, although symptoms lasted from 3 to 20 months. Radiation-induced pelvic IF following radiation therapy for gynecologic malignancies were frequently observed in the post-menopausal patients within 1 year after external beam radiation therapy. Symmetrical fractures of the bilateral sacroiliac joint and pubis were the characteristic pattern of pelvic IF. All patients healed with conservative treatment, and nobody became non-ambulant. (author)

  17. The Indiana University proton radiation therapy project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloch, C.; Derenchuk, V.; Cameron, J.; Fasano, M.; Gilmore, J.; Hashemian, R.; Hornback, N.; Low, D.A.; Morphis, J.; Peterson, C.; Rosselot, D.; Sandison, G.; Shen, R.N.; Shidnia, H.

    1993-01-01

    A fixed horizontal beam line at the Indiana University cyclotron facility (IUCF) has been equipped for proton radiation therapy treatment of head, neck, and brain tumors. The complete system will be commissioned and ready to treat patients early in 1993. IUCF can produce external proton beams from 45 to 200 MeV in energy, which corresponds to a maximum range in water of 26 cm. Beam currents over 100 nA are easily attained, allowing dose rates in excess of 200 cGy/min, even for large fields. Beam spreading systems have been tested which provide uniform fields up to 20 cm in diameter. Range modulation is accomplished with a rotating acrylic device, which provides uniform depth dose distributions from 3 to 18 cm in extent. Tests have been conducted on detectors which monitor the beam position and current, and the dose symmetry. This report discusses those devices, as well as the cyclotron characteristics, measured beam properties, safety interlocks, computerized dose delivery/monitoring system, and future plans. (orig.)

  18. Postoperative radiation therapy for malignant glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teshima, Teruki; Inoue, Toshihiko; Chatani, Masashi; Hata, Kiyoshi; Taki, Takuyu; Nii, Yasuo; Nakagawa, Hidemitsu

    1987-01-01

    From December 1977 through September 1984, a total of 39 cases of malignant glioma were treated with radiation therapy (RT) postoperatively. Twenty-nine cases were classified into glioblastoma (GM) and 10 astrocytoma (AS) (low grade : 6 and anaplastic : 4) histologically. One third of cases received 50 Gy/25 FRX/5 WKS of whole brain RT. Another two thirds of cases underwent 60 Gy/30 FRX/6 WKS of whole brain or 50 Gy/25 FRX/5 WKS of whole brain + additional 20 Gy/10 FRX/2 WKS of localized field RT. Chemotherapy (BLM, MeCCNU and ACNU) was given for 34 cases. Survivals at 3 years for GM and AS were 12 % and 68 %, respectively (p < 0.01). Prognostic factors for GM were age (p < 0.02), neurologic function (RTOG) (p < 0.01), AJC-staging T-factor (p < 0.05), pre-RT LDH level (p < 0.05) and volume of residual tumor (p < 0.05). Corresponding factors for AS were histological subclassification (p < 0.05) and neurologic function (RTOG) (p < 0.05). However, RT dose and field did not impact on survival significantly. Acute adverse effects of RT were otitis media or externa (70 %) and conjunctivitis (8 %). Retinal bleeding was noted in three long-term survivors at 2 years after RT. (author)

  19. Radianttrademark Liquid Radioisotope Intravascular Radiation Therapy System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eigler, N.; Whiting, J.; Chernomorsky, A.; Jackson, J.; Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Litvack, F.

    1998-01-01

    RADIANTtrademark is manufactured by United States Surgical Corporation, Vascular Therapies Division, (formerly Progressive Angioplasty Systems). The system comprises a liquid β-radiation source, a shielded isolation/transfer device (ISAT), modified over-the-wire or rapid exchange delivery balloons, and accessory kits. The liquid β-source is Rhenium-188 in the form of sodium perrhenate (NaReO 4 ), Rhenium-188 is primarily a β-emitter with a physical half-life of 17.0 hours. The maximum energy of the β-particles is 2.1 MeV. The source is produced daily in the nuclear pharmacy hot lab by eluting a Tungsten-188/Rhenium-188 generator manufactured by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Using anion exchange columns and Millipore filters the effluent is concentrated to approximately 100 mCi/ml, calibrated, and loaded into the (ISAT) which is subsequently transported to the cardiac catheterization laboratory. The delivery catheters are modified Championtrademark over-the-wire, and TNTtrademark rapid exchange stent delivery balloons. These balloons have thickened polyethylene walls to augment puncture resistance; dual radio-opaque markers and specially configured connectors

  20. Stereotactic radiation therapy for large vestibular schwannomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandl, Ellen S.; Meijer, Otto W.M.; Slotman, Ben J.; Vandertop, W. Peter; Peerdeman, Saskia M.

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: To evaluate the morbidity and tumor-control rate in the treatment of large vestibular schwannomas (VS) after stereotactic radiation therapy in our institution. Material and methods: Twenty-five consecutive patients (17 men, 8 women) with large VS (diameter 3.0 cm or larger), treated with stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) between 1992 and 2007, were retrospectively studied after a mean follow-up period of three years with respect to tumor-control rate and complications. Results: Actuarial 5-year maintenance of pre-treatment hearing level probability of 30% was achieved. Five of 17 patients suffered permanent new facial nerve dysfunction. The actuarial 5-year facial nerve preservation probability was 80%. Permanent new trigeminal nerve neuropathy occurred in two of 15 patients, resulting in an actuarial 5-year trigeminal nerve preservation probability of 85%. Tumor progression occurred in four of 25 (16%) patients. The overall 5-year tumor control probability was 82%. Conclusion: Increased morbidity rates were found in patients with large VS treated with SRT or SRS compared to the published series on regular sized VS and other smaller retrospective studies on large VS.

  1. Bone marrow stromal cells spontaneously produce Flt3-ligand: influence of ionizing radiations and cytokine stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertho, Jean Marc; Demarquay, Christelle; Mouiseddine, Moubarak; Douenat, Noémie; Stefani, Johanna; Prat, Marie; Paquet, François

    2008-08-01

    To define the ability of human bone marrow (BM) stromal cells to produce fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (Flt3)-ligand (FL), and the effect of irradiation, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) or tumour growth factor beta (TGFbeta) on FL production. Primary BM stromal cell cultures were irradiated at 2-10 Gy or were stimulated with TNFalpha or TGFbeta1. The presence of FL was tested in culture supernatants and in cell lysate. The presence of a membrane-bound form of FL and the level of gene expression were also tested. Primary BM stromal cells spontaneously released FL. This production was increased by TNFalpha but not by TGFbeta1 or by irradiation. Chemical induction of osteoblastic differentiation from BM stromal cells also induced an increase in FL release. Our results suggest that the observed increase in FL concentration after in vivo irradiation is an indirect effect. The possible implication of BM stromal cells in these mechanisms is discussed.

  2. Chondronecrosis of the cricoid cartilage following radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, Masahiro; Isshiki, Nobuhiko; Kojima, Hisayoshi

    1979-01-01

    Chondronecrosis of the laryngeal cartilage following radiation therapy is a rare but serious complication. We report herein a case of post-radiation chondronecrosis and discuss factors predisposing to its development. A 67-year-old man received telecobalt therapy for cancer of the right vocal cord. A year after the radiation therapy given in a dose of 7,000r, the patient developed dysphagia and dyspnea. Following tracheotomy, he underwent total laryngectomy. The surgical specimen showed no cancer but chondronecrosis of the cricoid cartilage was present. After laryngectomy he developed progressive soft tissue necrosis of the neck and died following a carotid hemorrhage. (author)

  3. Radiation therapy quality control in MRCCC radiotherapy units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fielda Djuita; Rina Taurisia; Andreas Nainggolan

    2011-01-01

    Increasing cancer patients in Indonesia is not supported with the number of equipment that is able to treat cancer patients, especially in the radiation therapy field. Therefore, several private hospitals have joined to provide radiation therapy services and one of them is MRCCC. As a new hospital providing services in radiotherapy field, the writer tries to present our quality control program that we have done in our hospital. Purpose: As quality control to radiation therapy clinical practice. Methods: Descriptive essay of what we do in our institution. Conclusion: Average output photon and electron lower more than tolerance dose. (author)

  4. Late-onset persistent retinal microvascular changes after bone marrow transplantation: 3-year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muccioli Cristina

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To describe a case of persistent retinopathy after bone marrow transplantation in the absence of radiation therapy. Methods: Case Report. Results: A 42 year-old man developed bilateral visual loss 15 months after receiving a bone marrow transplant for acute leukemia. The patient was treated with a high dose of cyclosporin A and oral corticosteroids. No radiation therapy was given. Late-onset, multiple, bilateral cotton-wool spots developed 15 months after the bone marrow transplantation and still persist. After three years other cotton-wool spots arose in the absence of any immunosuppressive therapy. Conclusions: Bone marrow transplantation microvasculopathy of the retina may be related to certain combinations of chemotherapy drugs or immunosuppression itself and may persist in the absence of these immunosuppressive drugs.

  5. Bone marrow aspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliac crest tap; Sternal tap; Leukemia - bone marrow aspiration; Aplastic anemia - bone marrow aspiration; Myelodysplastic syndrome - bone marrow aspiration; Thrombocytopenia - bone marrow aspiration; Myelofibrosis - bone marrow aspiration

  6. COMPARISON OF HYPOFRACTIONATED RADIATION THERAPY VERSUS CONVENTIONAL RADIATION THERAPY IN POST MASTECTOMY BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhilash

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide and a leading cause of cancer death in females and accounts for 1.8 million new cases and approximately 0.5 million deaths annually. Patients who present with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC require multidisciplinary team approach that incorporates diagnostic imaging, surgery, chemotherapy and histopathological assessment, including molecular-based studies, radiation, and, if indicated, biologic and hormonal therapies. Hypofractionated radiation therapy following mastectomy has been used in many institutions for several decades and have demonstrated equivalent local control, cosmetic and normal tissues between 50 Gy in 25 fractions and various hypofractionated radiotherapy prescriptions employing 13-16 fractions. Evidence suggests that hypofractionated radiotherapy may also be safe and effective for regional nodal disease. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES To compare the local control and side effects of hypofractionated radiation therapy with conventional radiation therapy in post mastectomy carcinoma breast with stage II and III and to compare the tolerability and compliance of both schedules. MATERIALS AND METHODS The study was conducted on 60 histopathologically proven patients of carcinoma of breast, treated surgically with modified radical mastectomy. Group I patients were given external radiation to chest flap and drainage areas, a dose of 39 Gy/13 fractions/3.1 weeks, a daily dose 3 Gy for 13 fractions in 4 days a week schedule and Group II patients were given external radiation to chest flap and drainage areas, a dose of 50 Gy/25 fractions/5 weeks, to receive a daily dose 2 Gy for 25 fractions in a 5 days a week schedule. RESULTS The median age at presentation in Group I and II was 48 and 50 years respectively. Locoregional control after completion of radiotherapy in Group I vs. Group II was 26/30 (86.7% vs. 27/30 (90% respectively. Acute reactions and their grades in Group

  7. G-CSF therapy with mobilization of bone marrow stem cells for myocardial recovery after acute myocardial infarction - a relevant treatment?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ripa, R.S.; Kastrup, J.

    2008-01-01

    -CSF treatment. Current controversies in interpretation of the results include 1) importance of direct cardiac effect of G-CSF vs indirect through bone marrow stem and progenitor cell mobilization, 2) importance of timing of G-CSF therapy, 3) importance of G-CSF dose, and 4) importance of cell types mobilized...... from the bone-marrow. Cell-based therapies to improve cardiac function remain promising and further experimental and clinical studies are warranted to determine the future role of G-CSF Udgivelsesdato: 2008/6......This review of adjunctive therapy with subcutaneous granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) to patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) focus on the cardioprotective effects and potential mechanisms of G-CSF and discuss the therapeutic potential of G-CSF. All clinical trials published...

  8. Good manufacturing practice-compliant expansion of marrow-derived stem and progenitor cells for cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastens, Martin H; Goltry, Kristin; Prohaska, Wolfgang; Tschöpe, Diethelm; Stratmann, Bernd; Lammers, Dirk; Kirana, Stanley; Götting, Christian; Kleesiek, Knut

    2007-01-01

    Ex vivo expansion is being used to increase the number of stem and progenitor cells for autologous cell therapy. Initiation of pivotal clinical trials testing the efficacy of these cells for tissue repair has been hampered by the challenge of assuring safe and high-quality cell production. A strategy is described here for clinical-scale expansion of bone marrow (BM)-derived stem cells within a mixed cell population in a completely closed process from cell collection through postculture processing using sterile connectable devices. Human BM mononuclear cells (BMMNC) were isolated, cultured for 12 days, and washed postharvest using either standard open procedures in laminar flow hoods or using automated closed systems. Conditions for these studies were similar to long-term BM cultures in which hematopoietic and stromal components are cultured together. Expansion of marrow-derived stem and progenitor cells was then assessed. Cell yield, number of colony forming units (CFU), phenotype, stability, and multilineage differentiation capacity were compared from the single pass perfusion bioreactor and standard flask cultures. Purification of BMMNC using a closed Ficoll gradient process led to depletion of 98% erythrocytes and 87% granulocytes, compared to 100% and 70%, respectively, for manual processing. After closed system culture, mesenchymal progenitors, measured as CD105+CD166+CD14-CD45- and fibroblastic CFU, expanded 317- and 364-fold, respectively, while CD34+ hematopoietic progenitors were depleted 10-fold compared to starting BMMNC. Cultured cells exhibited multilineage differentiation by displaying adipogenic, osteogenic, and endothelial characteristics in vitro. No significant difference was observed between manual and bioreactor cultures. Automated culture and washing of the cell product resulted in 181 x 10(6) total cells that were viable and contained fibroblastic CFU for at least 24 h of storage. A combination of closed, automated technologies enabled

  9. Long-Term Bone Marrow Suppression During Postoperative Chemotherapy in Rectal Cancer Patients After Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, Neil B.; Sidhu, Manpreet K.; Baby, Rekha [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Moss, Rebecca A.; Nissenblatt, Michael J. [Division of Medical Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Chen, Ting [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Lu, Shou-En [Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey (United States); Jabbour, Salma K., E-mail: jabbousk@cinj.rutgers.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): To quantify ensuing bone marrow (BM) suppression during postoperative chemotherapy resulting from preoperative chemoradiation (CRT) therapy for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively evaluated 35 patients treated with preoperative CRT followed by postoperative 5-Fluorouracil and oxaliplatin (OxF) chemotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer. The pelvic bone marrow (PBM) was divided into ilium (IBM), lower pelvis (LPBM), and lumbosacrum (LSBM). Dose volume histograms (DVH) measured the mean doses and percentage of BM volume receiving between 5-40 Gy (i.e.: PBM-V5, LPBM-V5). The Wilcoxon signed rank tests evaluated the differences in absolute hematologic nadirs during neoadjuvant vs. adjuvant treatment. Logistic regressions evaluated the association between dosimetric parameters and ≥ grade 3 hematologic toxicity (HT3) and hematologic event (HE) defined as ≥ grade 2 HT and a dose reduction in OxF. Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed to determine optimal threshold values leading to HT3. Results: During OxF chemotherapy, 40.0% (n=14) and 48% (n=17) of rectal cancer patients experienced HT3 and HE, respectively. On multivariable logistic regression, increasing pelvic mean dose (PMD) and lower pelvis mean dose (LPMD) along with increasing PBM-V (25-40), LPBM-V25, and LPBM-V40 were significantly associated with HT3 and/or HE during postoperative chemotherapy. Exceeding ≥36.6 Gy to the PMD and ≥32.6 Gy to the LPMD strongly correlated with causing HT3 during postoperative chemotherapy. Conclusions: Neoadjuvant RT for rectal cancer has lasting effects on the pelvic BM, which are demonstrable during adjuvant OxF. Sparing of the BM during preoperative CRT can aid in reducing significant hematologic adverse events and aid in tolerance of postoperative chemotherapy.

  10. Long-Term Bone Marrow Suppression During Postoperative Chemotherapy in Rectal Cancer Patients After Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Neil B; Sidhu, Manpreet K; Baby, Rekha; Moss, Rebecca A; Nissenblatt, Michael J; Chen, Ting; Lu, Shou-En; Jabbour, Salma K

    2016-04-01

    To quantify ensuing bone marrow (BM) suppression during postoperative chemotherapy resulting from preoperative chemoradiation (CRT) therapy for rectal cancer. We retrospectively evaluated 35 patients treated with preoperative CRT followed by postoperative 5-Fluorouracil and oxaliplatin (OxF) chemotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer. The pelvic bone marrow (PBM) was divided into ilium (IBM), lower pelvis (LPBM), and lumbosacrum (LSBM). Dose volume histograms (DVH) measured the mean doses and percentage of BM volume receiving between 5-40 Gy (i.e.: PBM-V5, LPBM-V5). The Wilcoxon signed rank tests evaluated the differences in absolute hematologic nadirs during neoadjuvant vs. adjuvant treatment. Logistic regressions evaluated the association between dosimetric parameters and ≥ grade 3 hematologic toxicity (HT3) and hematologic event (HE) defined as ≥ grade 2 HT and a dose reduction in OxF. Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed to determine optimal threshold values leading to HT3. During OxF chemotherapy, 40.0% (n=14) and 48% (n=17) of rectal cancer patients experienced HT3 and HE, respectively. On multivariable logistic regression, increasing pelvic mean dose (PMD) and lower pelvis mean dose (LPMD) along with increasing PBM-V (25-40), LPBM-V25, and LPBM-V40 were significantly associated with HT3 and/or HE during postoperative chemotherapy. Exceeding ≥36.6 Gy to the PMD and ≥32.6 Gy to the LPMD strongly correlated with causing HT3 during postoperative chemotherapy. Neoadjuvant RT for rectal cancer has lasting effects on the pelvic BM, which are demonstrable during adjuvant OxF. Sparing of the BM during preoperative CRT can aid in reducing significant hematologic adverse events and aid in tolerance of postoperative chemotherapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Optimization of adaptive radiation therapy in cervical cancer: Solutions for photon and proton therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Schoot, A.J.A.J.

    2016-01-01

    In cervical cancer radiation therapy, an adaptive strategy is required to compensate for interfraction anatomical variations in order to achieve adequate dose delivery. In this thesis, we have aimed at optimizing adaptive radiation therapy in cervical cancer to improve treatment efficiency and

  12. Efficient natural defense mechanisms against Listeria monocytogenes in T and B cell-deficient allogeneic bone marrow radiation chimeras. Preactivated macrophages are the main effector cells in an early phase after bone marrow transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roesler, J.; Groettrup, E.B.; Baccarini, M.; Lohmann-Mattes, M.L.

    1989-01-01

    Radiation chimeras in the early phase after bone marrow transplantation are a good model to study the efficiency of the body's nonspecific defense system represented by macrophages (M phi), polymorphonuclear cells (PMN), and NK cells. These cell types are present in large numbers in spleen and liver at that time, whereas the specific immune system represented by T and B cells is functionally deficient. We previously reported enhanced activities in vitro of M phi (and PMN) from recipient animals in an early phase after allogeneic bone marrow transfer. We here demonstrate that these activities result in enhanced spontaneous resistance against Listeria monocytogenes in vivo: CFU of L. monocytogenes in spleen and liver 48 h after infection were about 1 or 2 to 4 log steps less than in untreated control mice of donor or host haplotype. This enhanced resistance decreased over the 4-mo period after marrow transfer. Preactivated M phi were identified as the most important effector cells. Isolated from spleen and peritoneal cavity, they performed enhanced killing of phagocytosed Listeria. Such preactivated M phi occurred in recipient animals after transfer of allogeneic but not of syngeneic bone marrow. The precise mechanism of M phi activation in the allogeneic radiation chimera in the complete absence of any detectable T cell function is not clear at present. However, these preactivated M phi display an important protective effect against L. monocytogenes: chimeras could eliminate Listeria without acquisition of positive delayed-type sensitivity when infected with 10(3) bacteria. An inoculum of 5 . 10(3) L. monocytogenes resulted either in prolonged survival compared with normal mice of the recipient haplotype or in definitive survival accompanied by a positive delayed-type sensitivity

  13. Radiation therapy and late reactions in normal tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoyama, Takashi; Kuroda, Yasumasa

    1998-01-01

    Recent developments in cancer therapy have made us increasingly aware that the quality of life of a patient is as valuable as other benefits received from therapy. This awareness leads to an emphasis on organ and/or function preservation in the course of therapy. In line with this new thinking, greater consideration is placed on radiation therapy as an appropriate modality of cancer therapy. Possible complications in normal tissues, especially those of late reaction type after the therapy must be overcome. This review, therefore, focuses on recent progress of studies on mechanisms of the complications of the late reaction type. An observation of a clinical case concerning a late reaction of spinal cord (radiation myelopathy) and surveys of experimental studies on the mechanisms of late reactions (including radiation pneumonitis and lung fibrosis, and radiation response of vascular endothelial cells) provide a hypothesis that apoptosis through the pathway starting with radiation-induced sphingomyelin hydrolysis may play an important role in causing a variety of late reactions. This insight is based on the fact that radiation also activates protein kinase C which appears to block apoptosis. The mechanisms of late reactions, therefore, may involve a balance between radiation-induced apoptotic death and its down regulation by suppressor mechanisms through protein kinase C. (author)

  14. Planning guide for radiologic installations. fascicle 1 -- radiation therapy installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuddenham, W.J.

    1976-01-01

    Five articles dealing with the development and operation of radiation therapy facilities present recommendations for the design of various types of radiation therapy facilities, including the university center, the free-standing private oncology center, and the community hospital radiation therapy department. Different concepts of department design are represented. In one article, the planning room is conceived to be the central feature of a facility; in another article, radiation therapy is designed around examination rooms. Shielding requirements are also discussed, as are the advantages and space and licensing requirements of various types of equipment. There is a need for planning appropriate computer facilities in conjunction with other equipment plans, and a critique of one radiation therapy unit is provided. The concept of a regional network for the delivery of radiation therapy services is then explored. The volume contains extensive illustrations in the form of floor plans, drawings, figures, and tables. Many of the articles include a bibliography. This is the first in a series of publications on radiation department design which will be useful to architects, engineers, and hospital planners

  15. Target volumes in gastric cancer radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caudry, M.; Maire, J.P.; Ratoanina, J.L.; Escarmant, P.

    2001-01-01

    The spread of gastric adenocarcinoma may follow three main patterns: hemato-genic, lymphatic and intraperitoneal. A GTV should be considered in preoperative or exclusive radiation therapy. After non-radical surgery, a 'residual GTV' will be defined with the help of the surgeon. The CTV encompasses three intricated volumes. a) A 'tumor bed' volume. After radical surgery, local recurrences appear as frequent as distant metastases. The risk depends upon the depth of parietal invasion and the nodal status. Parietal infiltration may extend beyond macroscopic limits of the tumor, especially in dinitis plastica. Therefore this volume will include: the tumor and the remaining stomach or their 'bed of resection', a part of the transverse colon, the duodenum, the pancreas and the troncus of the portal vein. In postoperative RT, this CTV also includes the jejuno-gastric or jejuno-esophageal anastomosis. b) A peritoneal volume. For practical purposes, two degrees of spread must be considered: (1) contiguous microscopic extension from deeply invasive T3 and T4 tumors, that remain amenable to local sterilization with doses of 45-50 Gy, delivered in a CTV including the peritoneal cavity at the level of the gastric bed, and under the parietal incision; (2) true 'peritoneal carcinomatosis', with widespread seeds, where chemotherapy (systemic or intraperitoneal) is more appropriate. c) A lymphatic volume including the lymph node groups 1 to 16 of the Japanese classification. This volume must encompass the hepatic pedicle and the splenic hilum. In proximal tumors, it is possible to restrict the lover part of the CTV to the lymphatic volume, and therefore to avoid irradiation of large intestinal and renal volumes. In distal and proximal tumors, involvement of resection margins is of poor prognosis -a radiation boost must be delivered at this level. The CTV in tumors of the cardia should encompass the lover part of the thoracic esophagus and the corresponding posterior mediastinum. In

  16. Radiation therapy among A-bomb survivors, Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, W J; Antoku, S

    1971-01-01

    The hospitals and clinics responsible for radiation therapy reported by ABCC-JNIH Adult Health Study subjects were surveyed to confirm treatment and estimate doses they received. Of 426 cases, 137 were documented by hospital records. Their ABCC medical records were also reviewed for pertinent clinical information. Excluding the cases not verified because of unavailability of records, confirmation rates were 0.46 in Hiroshima and 0.67 in Nagasaki. Radiation therapy doses according to date of treatment, diagnosis, body site, and source of exposure are included. These data are recorded routinely for future reference, along with doses from diagnostic roentgenology for evaluating overall ionizing radiation exposure of A-bomb survivors and their comparison subjects. Radiation therapy by source and by lesion treated is included. There were three cases with malignancies possibly related to their earlier radiation therapy. One was an A-bomb survivor with lung cancer previously reported as due to ionizing radiation from the A-bomb. Radiation therapy she received for breast cancer 11 years earlier was more likely the cause of the lung lesion than was her relatively small A-bomb dose. The importance of recording all diagnostic and therapeutic radiation, especially that received by those under continuing surveillance for late A-bomb effects, is stressed. (auth)

  17. RADIATION THERAPY COMMUNICATION-REIRRADIATION OF A NASAL TUMOR IN A BRACHYCEPHALIC DOG USING INTENSITY MODULATED RADIATION THERAPY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rancilio, Nicholas J; Custead, Michelle R; Poulson, Jean M

    2016-09-01

    A 5-year-old spayed female Shih Tzu was referred for evaluation of a nasal transitional carcinoma. A total lifetime dose of 117 Gy was delivered to the intranasal mass in three courses over nearly 2 years using fractionated intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to spare normal tissues. Clinically significant late normal tissue side effects were limited to bilaterally diminished tear production. The patient died of metastatic disease progression 694 days after completion of radiation therapy course 1. This case demonstrates that retreatment with radiation therapy to high lifetime doses for recurrent local disease may be well tolerated with IMRT. © 2016 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  18. Radiation dermatitis following electron beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, N.M.

    1978-01-01

    Ten patients, who had been treated for mycosis fungoides with electron beam radiation ten or more years previously, were examined for signs of radiation dermatitis. Although most patients had had acute radiation dermatitis, only a few manifested signs of mild chronic changes after having received between 1,000 and 2,800 rads

  19. Radiation therapy in the management of childhood cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kun, L.E.

    1987-01-01

    Over the past two decades, multimodality treatment regimens have produced significant improvement in survival rates for most types of childhood cancer. The role of radiation therapy has been critically evaluated in prospective clinical trials that established the importance of irradiation in assuring local and regional control of disease central to ultimate survival. Indications for cranial and craniospinal irradiation in acute lymphoblastic leukemia are reviewed, as is difficult technical factors important for successful management. The role of radiation therapy in neuroblastoma and Wilms tumor is reviewed in the context of tumor biology and increasing data from multi-institutional trials. Interactions of irradiation with surgery and chemotherapy are stressed in childhood rhabdomyosarcoma and Ewing sarcoma. Current results in the more common central nervous tumors of childhood are presented, including the central role of radiation therapy in medulloblastoma, astrocytoma, and craniopharyngioma. Concerns regarding late effects of radiation therapy are balanced with the importance of achieving disease control

  20. Review of the afterloading techniques in gynecologic radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotte, K.

    1975-01-01

    A review of clinically used afterloading techniques - remote controlled and manually operated ones - is given by tables. The advantages of afterloading techniques are discussed with regard to radiation protection as well as to the therapy of gynecologic carcinomas. (orig.) [de

  1. Mitigating HZE Radiation-Induced Deficits in Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells and Skeletal Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Globus, Ruth K.; Schreurs, Ann-Sofie; Shirazi-Fard, Yasaman; Terada, Masahiro; Alwood, Joshua; Halloran, Bernard; Tahimic, Candice

    2016-01-01

    Future long-duration space exploration beyond the earths magnetosphere will increase human exposure to space radiation and associated risks to skeletal health. We hypothesize that oxidative stress resulting from radiation exposure causes progressive bone loss and dysfunction in associated tissue. In animal studies, increased free radical formation is associated with pathological changes in bone structure, enhanced bone resorption, reduced bone formation and decreased bone mineral density, which can lead to skeletal fragility.

  2. Thyroid neoplasia following radiation therapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHenry, C.; Jarosz, H.; Calandra, D.; McCall, A.; Lawrence, A.M.; Paloyan, E.

    1987-01-01

    The question of thyroid neoplasia following high-dose radiation treatment to the neck and mediastinum for malignant neoplasms such as Hodgkin's lymphoma in children and young adults has been raised recently. Five patients, 19 to 39 years old, were operated on for thyroid neoplasms that developed following cervical and mediastinal radiation therapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma. Three patients had papillary carcinomas and two had follicular adenomas. The latency period between radiation exposure and the diagnosis of thyroid neoplasm ranged from eight to 16 years. This limited series provided strong support for the recommendation that children and young adults who are to receive high-dose radiation therapy to the head, neck, and mediastinum should receive suppressive doses of thyroxine prior to radiation therapy in order to suppress thyrotropin (thyroid-stimulating hormone) and then be maintained on a regimen of suppression permanently

  3. Role of radiation therapy for 'juvenile' angiofibroma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gudea, F.; Vega, M.; Canals, E.; Montserrat, J.M.; Valdano, J. (Univ. Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain). Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau (Spain))

    1990-09-01

    Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) is a rare benign neoplasm which occurs primarily in male adolescents and is characterized by aggressive local growth. The controversy concerning appropriate treatment for patients with juvenile angiofibroma persists. Radiation therapy and survival resection have both been reported to be effective to control a high proportion of these tumours. The case reported here demonstrates a locally advanced JNA controlled by radiation therapy. (author).

  4. Macrophage function in murine allogeneic bone marrow radiation chimeras in the early phase after transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roesler, J.; Baccarini, M.; Vogt, B.; Lohmann-Matthes, M.L.

    1989-01-01

    We tested several of the functions of macrophages (M phi) in the early phase after allogeneic bone marrow transfer to get information about this important aspect of the nonspecific immune system in the T-cell-deficient recipient. On days 3-5 after transfer, the number of M phi was reduced in the spleen, liver, lungs, and peritoneal cavity (Pe). The phagocytosis of sheep red blood cells (SRBC) by these M phi was normal or even enhanced, as in the case of Pe-M phi. Already on days 8-12 after transfer, the number of M phi in spleen and liver exceeded that of controls, whereas the number was still reduced in lungs and Pe. We examined their ability to kill P815 tumor cells, to produce tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha), to phagocytose SRBC, to produce reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) in vitro and to kill Listeria monocytogenes in vivo. Most functions were normal and often even enhanced, depending on the organ origin, but the ability of Pe-M phi to produce ROI was reduced. Proliferative response to macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and killing of YAC-1 tumor cells revealed a high frequency of macrophage precursor cells in the spleen and liver and a high natural killer (NK) activity in the liver. Altogether, enhanced nonspecific immune function, especially preactivated M phi, may enable chimeras to survive attacks by opportunistic pathogens

  5. Radiation optic neuropathy after external beam radiation therapy for acromegaly: report of two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergh, Alfons C.M. van den; Hoving, Marjanke A.; Links, Thera P.; Dullaart, Robin P.F.; Ranchor, Adelita V.; Weeme, Cees A. ter; Canrinus, Alof A.; Szabo, Ben G.; Pott, Jan-Willem R.

    2003-01-01

    For diagnosing radiation optic neuropathy (RON) ophthalmological and imaging data were evaluated from 63 acromegalic patients, irradiated between 1967 and 1998. Two patients developed RON: one patient in one optic nerve 10 years and another patient in both optic nerves 5 months after radiation therapy. RON is a rare complication after external beam radiation therapy for acromegaly, which can occur after a considerable latency period

  6. Music therapy CD creation for initial pediatric radiation therapy: a mixed methods analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Philippa; O'Callaghan, Clare; Wheeler, Greg; Grocke, Denise

    2010-01-01

    A mixed methods research design was used to investigate the effects of a music therapy CD (MTCD) creation intervention on pediatric oncology patients' distress and coping during their first radiation therapy treatment. The music therapy method involved children creating a music CD using interactive computer-based music software, which was "remixed" by the music therapist-researcher to extend the musical material. Eleven pediatric radiation therapy outpatients aged 6 to 13 years were randomly assigned to either an experimental group, in which they could create a music CD prior to their initial treatment to listen to during radiation therapy, or to a standard care group. Quantitative and qualitative analyses generated multiple perceptions from the pediatric patients, parents, radiation therapy staff, and music therapist-researcher. Ratings of distress during initial radiation therapy treatment were low for all children. The comparison between the two groups found that 67% of the children in the standard care group used social withdrawal as a coping strategy, compared to 0% of the children in the music therapy group; this trend approached significance (p = 0.076). MTCD creation was a fun, engaging, and developmentally appropriate intervention for pediatric patients, which offered a positive experience and aided their use of effective coping strategies to meet the demands of their initial radiation therapy treatment.

  7. Can radiation therapy treatment planning system accurately predict surface doses in postmastectomy radiation therapy patients?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Sharon; Back, Michael; Tan, Poh Wee; Lee, Khai Mun; Baggarley, Shaun; Lu, Jaide Jay

    2012-01-01

    Skin doses have been an important factor in the dose prescription for breast radiotherapy. Recent advances in radiotherapy treatment techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and new treatment schemes such as hypofractionated breast therapy have made the precise determination of the surface dose necessary. Detailed information of the dose at various depths of the skin is also critical in designing new treatment strategies. The purpose of this work was to assess the accuracy of surface dose calculation by a clinically used treatment planning system and those measured by thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) in a customized chest wall phantom. This study involved the construction of a chest wall phantom for skin dose assessment. Seven TLDs were distributed throughout each right chest wall phantom to give adequate representation of measured radiation doses. Point doses from the CMS Xio® treatment planning system (TPS) were calculated for each relevant TLD positions and results correlated. There were no significant difference between measured absorbed dose by TLD and calculated doses by the TPS (p > 0.05 (1-tailed). Dose accuracy of up to 2.21% was found. The deviations from the calculated absorbed doses were overall larger (3.4%) when wedges and bolus were used. 3D radiotherapy TPS is a useful and accurate tool to assess the accuracy of surface dose. Our studies have shown that radiation treatment accuracy expressed as a comparison between calculated doses (by TPS) and measured doses (by TLD dosimetry) can be accurately predicted for tangential treatment of the chest wall after mastectomy.

  8. Pelvic Normal Tissue Contouring Guidelines for Radiation Therapy: A Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Consensus Panel Atlas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gay, Hiram A., E-mail: hgay@radonc.wustl.edu [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Barthold, H. Joseph [Commonwealth Hematology and Oncology, Weymouth, MA (United States); Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (Israel); O' Meara, Elizabeth [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bosch, Walter R. [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); El Naqa, Issam [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Al-Lozi, Rawan [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Rosenthal, Seth A. [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States); Lawton, Colleen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Lee, W. Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Sandler, Howard [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Zietman, Anthony [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Myerson, Robert [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Dawson, Laura A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Willett, Christopher [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Kachnic, Lisa A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Jhingran, Anuja [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Portelance, Lorraine [University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States); Ryu, Janice [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States); and others

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To define a male and female pelvic normal tissue contouring atlas for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trials. Methods and Materials: One male pelvis computed tomography (CT) data set and one female pelvis CT data set were shared via the Image-Guided Therapy QA Center. A total of 16 radiation oncologists participated. The following organs at risk were contoured in both CT sets: anus, anorectum, rectum (gastrointestinal and genitourinary definitions), bowel NOS (not otherwise specified), small bowel, large bowel, and proximal femurs. The following were contoured in the male set only: bladder, prostate, seminal vesicles, and penile bulb. The following were contoured in the female set only: uterus, cervix, and ovaries. A computer program used the binomial distribution to generate 95% group consensus contours. These contours and definitions were then reviewed by the group and modified. Results: The panel achieved consensus definitions for pelvic normal tissue contouring in RTOG trials with these standardized names: Rectum, AnoRectum, SmallBowel, Colon, BowelBag, Bladder, UteroCervix, Adnexa{sub R}, Adnexa{sub L}, Prostate, SeminalVesc, PenileBulb, Femur{sub R}, and Femur{sub L}. Two additional normal structures whose purpose is to serve as targets in anal and rectal cancer were defined: AnoRectumSig and Mesorectum. Detailed target volume contouring guidelines and images are discussed. Conclusions: Consensus guidelines for pelvic normal tissue contouring were reached and are available as a CT image atlas on the RTOG Web site. This will allow uniformity in defining normal tissues for clinical trials delivering pelvic radiation and will facilitate future normal tissue complication research.

  9. TH-F-202-00: MRI for Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    MRI has excellent soft tissue contrast and can provide both anatomical and physiological information. It is becoming increasingly important in radiation therapy for treatment planning, image-guided radiation therapy, and treatment assessment. It is critically important at this time point to educate and update our medical physicists about MRI to prepare for the upcoming surge of MRI applications in radiation therapy. This session will review important basics of MR physics, pulse sequence designs, and current radiotherapy application, as well as showcase exciting new developments in MRI that can be potentially useful in radiation therapy. Learning Objectives: To learn basics of MR physics and understand the differences between various pulse sequences To review current applications of MRI in radiation therapy.To discuss recent MRI advances for future MRI guided radiation therapy Partly supported by NIH (1R21CA165384).; W. Miller, Research supported in part by Siemens Healthcare; G. Li, My clinical research is in part supported by NIH U54CA137788. I have a collaborative research project with Philips Healthcare.; J. Cai, jing cai

  10. TH-F-202-00: MRI for Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-06-15

    MRI has excellent soft tissue contrast and can provide both anatomical and physiological information. It is becoming increasingly important in radiation therapy for treatment planning, image-guided radiation therapy, and treatment assessment. It is critically important at this time point to educate and update our medical physicists about MRI to prepare for the upcoming surge of MRI applications in radiation therapy. This session will review important basics of MR physics, pulse sequence designs, and current radiotherapy application, as well as showcase exciting new developments in MRI that can be potentially useful in radiation therapy. Learning Objectives: To learn basics of MR physics and understand the differences between various pulse sequences To review current applications of MRI in radiation therapy.To discuss recent MRI advances for future MRI guided radiation therapy Partly supported by NIH (1R21CA165384).; W. Miller, Research supported in part by Siemens Healthcare; G. Li, My clinical research is in part supported by NIH U54CA137788. I have a collaborative research project with Philips Healthcare.; J. Cai, jing cai.

  11. Spontaneous pneumothorax after upper mantle radiation therapy for Hodgkin disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paszat, L.; Basrur, V.; Tadros, A.

    1986-01-01

    Between 1967 and 1981, 158 of 256 consecutive adult patients received upper mantle (UM) radiation therapy as part of initial treatment of Hodgkin disease at the Hamilton Regional Cancer Centre. Chemotherapy was also part of the initial treatment in 21 of 158 patients who received UM radiation therapy. Spontaneous pneumothorax was observed in six of 158 patients during remission after UM radiation therapy in this series. Three cases were incidental findings on follow-up radiographs, but three other patients were seen initially with symptoms of spontaneous pneumothorax. The entity occurred in three of 21 patients (14%) treated with UM radiation therapy and chemotherapy, and in three of 137 (2%) treated with UM radiation therapy (P < .05). Within the range of UM doses (3,500-4,000 cGy in 4 weeks), higher dose was not associated with higher risk of spontaneous pneumothorax. Although these cases of spontaneous pneumothorax are clustered in an age range classic for this entity, the incidence of spontaneous pneumothorax in this group of patients is higher than the anticipated lifetime incidence of 1:500 for the general population. This risk of spontaneous pneumothorax after UM radiation therapy may be even higher in patients who also receive chemotherapy

  12. High-dose therapy followed by bone marrow transplantation for relapsed follicular non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, IC; Raemaekers, JJM; Kluin-Nelemans, HC; vanKamp, H; Mellink, WAM; vantVeer, MB

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze whether, in addition to survival, and disease-free survival progression-free interval after transplantation would be longer than the last progression-free interval before transplantation, supporting the argument that high-dose therapy may change the biologic behavior of the

  13. Blood and bone marrow response following total body irradiation in patients with lymphosarcomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qasim, M.M.

    1977-01-01

    Marrow depression and associated peripheral blood changes following fractionated T.B.I. are considerable and appear alarming. However, provided the marrow reserve is good and is not compromised by previous chemotherapy and radiation therapy, recovery occurred in all cases and appeared to be complete. Bone marrow of 3 patients with previous T.B.I. did not show recovery after the second course of T.B.I. Extreme caution is indicated when such a therapy is repeated, as this may lead to progressive marrow hypoplasia. Fractionated low dose T.B.I. could be utilized as a useful therapeutic modality in the management of disseminated lymphosarcoma provided the marrow reserve is good. (author)

  14. Prevention of radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations in bone marrow of mice by Indian medicinal plant, Alstonia scholaris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahan, Swafiya; Ranuchaudhary; Goyal, P.K.

    2007-01-01

    for chromosomal study and were autopsied between 12 hrs to 30 days and chromosomal preparations were made from their bone marrow. Chromosomal aberrations including aberrant cells, chromatid breaks, centric rings, chromosomal exchanges, dicentrics and acentric fragments were scored higher at early intervals (12 hrs and 24 hrs) but later decreased gradually towards normalcy at the last autopsy interval. The pattern of change in chromosomal aberrations is almost similar as irradiated control but their frequency is found to be significantly lesser in Alstonia treated irradiated animals. From the results it is concluded that such plant extract has the potentiality to reduce radiation-induced cytogenetic lesions

  15. The Radiation Therapy Oncology in the context of oncological practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasdorf, P.

    2010-01-01

    This work is about the radiation therapy oncology in the context of oncological practice. The radiotherapy is a speciality within medicine that involves the generation, application and dissemination of knowledge about the biology, causes, prevention and treatment of the cancer and other pathologies by ionising radiation

  16. Coronary artery calcium in breast cancer survivors after radiation therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takx, Richard A P; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Schoepf, U Joseph; Pilz, Lothar R; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Morris, Pamela B; Henzler, Thomas; Apfaltrer, Paul

    The purpose of the current study is to investigate whether breast cancer survivors after radiation therapy have a higher burden of coronary artery calcium as a potential surrogate of radiation-induced accelerated coronary artery disease. 333 patients were included. 54 patients underwent chest CT ae

  17. Radiation therapy: model standards for determination of need

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagasse, L.G.; Devins, T.B.

    1982-03-01

    Contents: Health planning process; Health care requirements (model for projecting need for megavoltage radiation therapy); Operational objectives (manpower, megavoltage therapy and treatment planning equipment, support services, management and evaluation of patient care, organization and administration); Compliance with other standards imposed by law; Financial feasibility and capability; Reasonableness of expenditures and costs; Relative merit; Environmental impact

  18. Hematological effects: comparative studies on the radiation survival characteristics in vivo and in vitro of bone marrow-derived clonogenic populations (CFU-C and PFU-C) and some observations on bone marrow cellularity in beagles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, F.D.; O'Grady, L.; Momeni, M.; Wheeling, J.A.; Klein, K.; Graham, R.; Jow, N.; Di Bartola, S.

    1975-01-01

    Data accumulated for the hematological effects program are reviewed. Particular emphasis is given to the effects of acute and chronic irradiation on hematopoietic progenitor populations (CFU-C, colony-forming units in culture) and ''candidate'' mesenchymal progenitors (PFU-C, plaque-forming units in culture) using methylcellulose bone marrow culture systems and both in vivo and in vitro radiation exposure protocols. Preliminary results of studies on the temporal effects of acute x-irradiation on the capacity of PFU-C to generate colony stimulating activity (CSA) are also presented. The results of such experiments are providing the basis upon which future RBE studies on a variety of nuclides will be structured. Data (including age related changes) is also presented on in vivo bone marrow cellularity determinations, as well as for marrow stem cell quantitative studies using nondestructive techniques for normal Beagles. In these studies, two techniques for correction of variable effects of hemodilution are compared. Such studies are also providing baseline data for the 60 Co hematological effects program

  19. Once-Daily Radiation Therapy for Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Lindsay; Harmsen, William; Blanchard, Miran; Goetz, Matthew; Jakub, James; Mutter, Robert; Petersen, Ivy; Rooney, Jessica; Stauder, Michael; Yan, Elizabeth; Laack, Nadia

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is a rare and aggressive breast cancer variant treated with multimodality therapy. A variety of approaches intended to escalate the intensity and efficacy of radiation therapy have been reported, including twice-daily radiation therapy, dose escalation, and aggressive use of bolus. Herein, we examine our outcomes for patients treated with once-daily radiation therapy with aggressive bolus utilization, focusing on treatment technique. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review of patients with nonmetastatic IBC treated from January 1, 2000, through December 31, 2010, was performed. Locoregional control (LRC), disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS) and predictors thereof were assessed. Results: Fifty-two women with IBC were identified, 49 (94%) of whom were treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. All underwent mastectomy followed by adjuvant radiation therapy. Radiation was delivered in once-daily fractions of 1.8 to 2.25 Gy (median, 2 Gy). Patients were typically treated with daily 1-cm bolus throughout treatment, and 33 (63%) received a subsequent boost to the mastectomy scar. Five-year Kaplan Meier survival estimates for LRC, DFS, and OS were 81%, 56%, and 64%, respectively. Locoregional recurrence was associated with poorer OS (P<.001; hazard ratio [HR], 4.1). Extracapsular extension was associated with worse LRC (P=.02), DFS (P=.007), and OS (P=.002). Age greater than 50 years was associated with better DFS (P=.03). Pathologic complete response was associated with a trend toward improved LRC (P=.06). Conclusions: Once-daily radiation therapy with aggressive use of bolus for IBC results in outcomes consistent with previous reports using various intensified radiation therapy regimens. LRC remains a challenge despite modern systemic therapy. Extracapsular extension, age ≤50 years, and lack of complete response to chemotherapy appear to be associated with worse outcomes. Novel strategies are needed in IBC

  20. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy: first reported treatment in Australasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corry, J.; Joon, D.L.; Hope, G.; Smylie, J.; Henkul, Z.; Wills, J.; Cramb, J.; Towns, S.; Archer, P.

    2002-01-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is an exciting new advance in the practice of radiation oncology. It is the use of non-uniform radiation beams to achieve conformal dose distributions. As a result of the high initial capital costs and the time and complexity of planning, IMRT is not yet a widely available clinical treatment option. We describe the process involved in applying this new technology to a case of locally advanced nasopharyngeal cancer. Copyright (2002) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  1. Guidelines for respiratory motion management in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Yukinori; Onishi, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory motion management (RMM) systems in external and stereotactic radiotherapies have been developed in the past two decades. Japanese medical service fee regulations introduced reimbursement for RMM from April 2012. Based on thorough discussions among the four academic societies concerned, these Guidelines have been developed to enable staff (radiation oncologists, radiological technologists, medical physicists, radiotherapy quality managers, radiation oncology nurses, and others) to apply RMM to radiation therapy for tumors subject to respiratory motion, safely and appropriately. (author)

  2. Transformation of bone marrow stem-cells and radiation-induced myeloid leukemia in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirashima, K.; Bessho, M.; Hayata, I.; Nara, N.; Kawase, Y.; Ohtani, M.

    1982-01-01

    After a single whole-body X-irradiation of 300R to male RFM/MsNrs strain mice, the occurrence of myeloid leukemia initiated since four months and ceased at eleven months after irradiation. The cumulative incidence reached 24.5%. A time course study on the kinetics of pluripotential stem-cells (CFU-S) and granuloid committed stem-cells (CFU-C) in the marrow after 300R was also performed. The repopulation of CFU-S was accomplished within one month whereas that of CFU-C needed 210 days after irradiation. The incidence of leukemia was very rare after the complete repopulation of CFU-C. Simultaneously, collected spleen cells from the irradiated mice without overt leukemia were transplanted into 300-600R irradiated recipients of another sex. Three months thereafter, recipients were sacrificed to detect leukemic changes and the origin of leukemic cells by chromosome analysis. The results revealed that leukemic cell transformation of donor cells began 18 days after irradiation and on an average, 37.1% of the irradiated mice carried potentially leukemic cells for seven months after exposure, whereas none of the unirradiated mice carried leukemic cells at 7 months after irradiation. To investigate host factor(s) contributing to the proliferation of leukemic cells, the suppression of cellular immunity after 300R was measured by GVH mortality assay. However, the recovery of cellular immunity was observed until three months after irradiation and the role of cellular immunity to proliferation of leukemic cells after three months was negligible. (author)

  3. Radiation injuries of the spinal marrow of rats after irradiation with fast electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruce-Micah, B.

    1973-01-01

    Twenty rats were fractionated irradiated on five days of the week with fast electrons of 42 MeV energy with a single dose of 200 r/day. After 1,000 r, 2,000 r, 3,000 r and 4,000 r HD, the animals were supravitally fixed and the spinal marrow was removed. The histological investigation already showed after 1,000 r HD distinct changes of the nerve cells and nerve fibers whereas the vessels appeared not to be injured. After 2,000 r HD, vessel changes with edemas occured for the first time. After 3,000 r HD, all nerve cells were severely injured, the glia tissue was denser and the vessels were enlarged despite endothelial proliferations. Furthermore, there were big edemas around the vessels and a beginning of demyelinisation in the dorsal column. After 4,000 r HD, a great part of the nerve cells and also a few glia cells were destroyed. The remaining glia cells were pyknotic and had partly several nucleoli. The tractus of the white matter consisted almost only now of a glia felt. With a survival time of six weeks, the glia had greatly regenerated and numerous new capillaries had sprouted in the grey matter. The white matter was strongly demyelinised. In the front lateral column, small round necrosis centres were visible. 18 weeks after irradiation, the glia tissue had greatly rebuilt itself. There were only very few nerve cells present. The strong sprouting of new capillaries in the grey matter was most noticeable. The results show that the application of fast electrons is of no advantage as regards injuring the nerve tissue compared to X-rays. (orig./LH) [de

  4. Neurologic complications of radiation therapy and chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenfeld, Myrna

    1998-01-01

    Radiation induced toxicities are due to the effect of irradiation of normal surrounding tissue which is included in the radiation port. The mechanisms of radiation induced damage have not been completely elucidated. Hypotheses include direct damage to neural cells versus damage to the vascular endothelium with secondary effects on nervous system structures. Another hypothesis is that radiation damaged glial cells release antigens that are able to evoke and antimmune response against the nervous system resulting in both cellular necrosis and vascular damage. The clinical diagnosis of radiation induced neurotoxicity may be difficult especially in patients who had neurologic signs prior to treatment. It is helpful to determine if the clinical signs correlate with the irradiated site and to know the total dose received and the dose per fraction. Prior or concomitant chemotherapy may act to increase the toxicity produced by radiation. The age of the patient at the time of radiation is important as the very young and the elderly are more likely to develop toxicities. Finally, concurrent neurologic diseases such as demyelinating disorders appear to sensitize neural tissue to radiation damage. Radiation injury can occur at almost any time, from immediately after irradiation to years later. The side effects can generally be divided into those that are acute (within days), early -delayed (within 4 weeks to 4 months after treatment) and late- delayed (months to years after treatment). (The author)

  5. Anesthesia for pediatric external beam radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortney, Jennifer T.; Halperin, Edward C.; Hertz, Caryn M.; Schulman, Scott R.

    1999-01-01

    Background: For very young patients, anesthesia is often required for radiotherapy. This results in multiple exposures to anesthetic agents over a short period of time. We report a consecutive series of children anesthetized for external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Methods: Five hundred twelve children ≤ 16 years old received EBRT from January 1983 to February 1996. Patient demographics, diagnosis, anesthesia techniques, monitoring, airway management, complications, and outcome were recorded for the patients requiring anesthesia. Results: One hundred twenty-three of the 512 children (24%) required 141 courses of EBRT with anesthesia. Anesthetized patients ranged in age from 20 days to 11 years (mean 2.6 ± 1.8 ). The frequency of a child receiving EBRT and requiring anesthesia by age cohort was: ≤ 1 year (96%), 1-2 years (93%), 2-3 years (80%), 3-4 years (51%), 4-5 years (36%), 5-6 years (13%), 6-7 years (11%), and 7-16 years (0.7%). Diagnoses included: primary CNS tumor (28%), retinoblastoma (27%), neuroblastoma (20%), acute leukemia (9%), rhabdomyosarcoma (6%), and Wilms' tumor (4%). Sixty-three percent of the patients had been exposed to chemotherapy prior to EBRT. The mean number of anesthesia sessions per patient was 22 ± 16. Seventy-eight percent of the treatment courses were once daily and 22% were twice daily. Anesthesia techniques included: short-acting barbiturate induction + inhalation maintenance (21%), inhalation only (20%), ketamine (19%), propofol only (12%), propofol induction + inhalation maintenance (7%), ketamine induction + inhalation maintenance (6%), ketamine or short-acting barbiturate induction + inhalation maintenance (6%). Monitoring techniques included: EKG (95%), O 2 saturation (93%), fraction of inspired O 2 (57%), and end-tidal CO 2 (55%). Sixty-four percent of patients had central venous access. Eleven of the 74 children with a central line developed sepsis (15%): 6 of the 11 were anesthetized with propofol (55%), 4 with a

  6. Systemic sarcoidosis with bone marrow involvement responding to therapy with adalimumab: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Supen R

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Sarcoidosis is an inflammatory disorder characterized by the presence of non-caseating granulomas in affected organs. The presence of CD4-positive T lymphocytes and macrophages in affected organs suggests an ongoing immune response. Systemic corticosteroids remain the mainstay of treatment, but therapy is often limited by adverse effects. This is the first report of the use of adalimumab (HUMIRA®, Abbott Laboratories, North Chicago, IL, USA), an anti-tumor necrosis facto...

  7. Dynamic characteristics of serum bioluminescence in dogs with bone marrow radiation sickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Douwan

    1990-01-01

    A theory of competition between biological light and heat, the principle of shift of serum peak and valley and the shift constant ( -0.333) are proposed. The principle of shift of peak and valley may be used as a simple, quick and accurate method for the classification of radiation dose in nuclear accident

  8. Prototype demonstration of radiation therapy planning code system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, R.C.; Adams, K.J.; Estes, G.P.; Hughes, L.S. III; Waters, L.S.

    1996-01-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Radiation therapy planning is the process by which a radiation oncologist plans a treatment protocol for a patient preparing to undergo radiation therapy. The objective is to develop a protocol that delivers sufficient radiation dose to the entire tumor volume, while minimizing dose to healthy tissue. Radiation therapy planning, as currently practiced in the field, suffers from inaccuracies made in modeling patient anatomy and radiation transport. This project investigated the ability to automatically model patient-specific, three-dimensional (3-D) geometries in advanced Los Alamos radiation transport codes (such as MCNP), and to efficiently generate accurate radiation dose profiles in these geometries via sophisticated physics modeling. Modem scientific visualization techniques were utilized. The long-term goal is that such a system could be used by a non-expert in a distributed computing environment to help plan the treatment protocol for any candidate radiation source. The improved accuracy offered by such a system promises increased efficacy and reduced costs for this important aspect of health care

  9. Radiation therapy for primary spinal cord tumors in adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeremic, B.; Grujicic, D.; Jovanovic, D.; Djuric, L.; Mijatovic, L.

    1990-01-01

    This paper evaluates the role of radiation therapy in management of primary spinal cord tumors in adults. Records of 21 patients with primary spinal cord tumors treated with radiation therapy after surgery were retrospectively reviewed. Histologic examination showed two diffuse and 10 localized ependymomas, six low-grade gliomas, and three malignant gliomas. Surgery consisted of gross tumor resection in six patients, subtotal resection in three patients, and biopsy in 12 patients. Three patients also received chemotherapy. Radiation dose range from 45 to 55 Cy

  10. Development of medical application methods using radiation. Radionuclide therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Chang Woon; Lim, S. M.; Kim, E.H.; Woo, K. S.; Chung, W. S.; Lim, S. J.; Choi, T. H.; Hong, S. W.; Chung, H. Y.; No, W. C.; Oh, B. H.; Hong, H. J.

    1999-04-01

    In this project, we studied following subjects: 1. development of monoclonal antibodies and radiopharmaceuticals 2. clinical applications of radionuclide therapy 3. radioimmunoguided surgery 4. prevention of restenosis with intracoronary radiation. The results can be applied for the following objectives: 1) radionuclide therapy will be applied in clinical practice to treat the cancer patients or other diseases in multi-center trial. 2) The newly developed monoclonal antibodies and biomolecules can be used in biology, chemistry or other basic life science research. 3) The new methods for the analysis of therapeutic effects, such as dosimetry, and quantitative analysis methods of radioactivity, can be applied in basic research, such as radiation oncology and radiation biology

  11. Development of medical application methods using radiation. Radionuclide therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Chang Woon; Lim, S. M.; Kim, E.H.; Woo, K. S.; Chung, W. S.; Lim, S. J.; Choi, T. H.; Hong, S. W.; Chung, H. Y.; No, W. C. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul, (Korea, Republic of); Oh, B. H. [Seoul National University. Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, H. J. [Antibody Engineering Research Unit, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-04-01

    In this project, we studied following subjects: 1. development of monoclonal antibodies and radiopharmaceuticals 2. clinical applications of radionuclide therapy 3. radioimmunoguided surgery 4. prevention of restenosis with intracoronary radiation. The results can be applied for the following objectives: (1) radionuclide therapy will be applied in clinical practice to treat the cancer patients or other diseases in multi-center trial. (2) The newly developed monoclonal antibodies and biomolecules can be used in biology, chemistry or other basic life science research. (3) The new methods for the analysis of therapeutic effects, such as dosimetry, and quantitative analysis methods of radioactivity, can be applied in basic research, such as radiation oncology and radiation biology.

  12. The pitfalls of dosimetric commissioning for intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tohyama, Naoki; Kodama, Takashi; Hatano, K.

    2013-01-01

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) allows higher radiation dose to be focused to the target volumes while minimizing the dose to OAR. To start of clinical treatment in IMRTvwe must perform commissioning strictly than 3D-conformal radiotherapy (CRT). In this report, pitfalls of dosimetric commissioning for intensity modulated radiation therapy were reviewed. Multileaf collimator (MLC) offsets and MLC transmissions are important parameters in commissioning of RTPS for IMRT. Correction of depth scaling and fluence scaling is necessary for dose measurement using solid phantom. (author)

  13. Management of stage III thymoma with postoperative radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krueger, J.B.; Sagerman, R.H.; King, G.A.

    1987-01-01

    The results of postoperative radiation therapy in 12 patients with Stage III thymoma treated during the period 1966-1986 were reviewed. Surgical therapy consisted of total resection in one, subtotal resection in seven, and biopsy only in four. Megavoltage irradiation in the dose range of 3,000-5,600 cGy was employed, with the majority receiving a dose of at least 5,000 cGy. The local control rate was 67%. The actuarial 5-year observed and adjusted survival rates were 57% and 75%, respectively. These results indicate that postoperative radiation therapy is an effective therapeutic modality in the control of Stage III thymoma

  14. Bone marrow involvement in Gaucher disease at MRI: what long-term evolution can we expect under enzyme replacement therapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedida, Benjamin; Touraine, Sebastien; Laredo, Jean-Denis; Stirnemann, Jerome; Belmatoug, Nadia; Petrover, David

    2015-01-01

    To study the long-term evolution of the bone marrow burden (BMB) score at MRI in patients with Gaucher disease (GD) under enzyme replacement therapy (ERT). Forty patients treated for GD were retrospectively studied in a referral centre. BMB scores were assessed on spine and femur MR examinations performed between January 2003 and June 2014. The long-term evolution of the BMB scores was analyzed using a linear mixed model. A total of 121 MRI examinations were performed during the study period with a mean follow-up of 7.1 years ± 5.6, an average rate of 3.1 MR examinations ± 1.7 per patient and an interval of 2.3 years ± 1.1 between examinations. Patients had received ERT during 12 years on average ± 6.7. The trend of BMB scores with time decreased significantly by 15 % (P = 0.008) during the total study period and 39 % (P = 0.01) during the first 5 years of treatment. No changes in BMB scores were observed after five years of treatment. In Gaucher patients, the trend of MRI BMB scores with time decreased significantly under ERT the first 5 years of treatment before a long-term stabilization. (orig.)

  15. Impact of laser therapy on the condition of oral cavity mucosa in chemotherapy treated patients who underwent bone marrow transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Krzysztof Bąk

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Patological disorders within oral mucosa (so called mucositis are the most common stomatological complications among chemotherapy treated leukemic patients scheduled for bone marrow transplantation. Early diagnosis of such oral disorders leads to numerous side effects, decreasing quality of life and systemic complications is required. Furthermore, most patients require analgesic treatment, very often using narcotic pain medications. Presently the largest role of prevention and treatment of mucositis is preventative dentistry along with maintaining strict oral hygiene. This course of action aims to reduce pain and prevention of infections. Investigation of novel non-invasive therapeutic methods that could improve treatment outcomes seems justified. Among the most promising methods, the Low-level Laser Therapy (LLLT treatment demonstrates many beneficial effects for patients suffering from chemotherapy complications. It promotes mucosal healing and helps improve patients' quality of life. These advantages may be a result of a LLLT anti-inflammatory and analgesic effect. LLLT also promotes tissue regeneration through chemical changes in cells (cell repair. In recent clinical studies conducted on a group of patients with oral mucositis, the significant acceleration of mentioned disorders regression was noted. Moreover, reduction of pain after application of LLLT was recorded. Discussed in the article LLLT is easily accessible for clinical practice . Mentioned arguments justify a wider use of such a tool in non-invasive treatment of acute oral cavity inflammation.

  16. Bone marrow involvement in Gaucher disease at MRI: what long-term evolution can we expect under enzyme replacement therapy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedida, Benjamin; Touraine, Sebastien; Laredo, Jean-Denis [Hopital Lariboisiere, AP-HP, Department of Musculoskeletal Im