WorldWideScience

Sample records for marker development annual

  1. Towards the Development of a Molecular Map in Switchgrass: I. Microsatellite Marker Development; ANNUAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunter, L.E.

    2001-01-01

    The long-term goal of the switchgrass breeding program is to improve regionally adapted varieties and increase biomass yield and feedstock quality. Although, to some extent, biomass yields are dependent on environmental constraints, increased yield can be achieved through the development of genotypes with improved seasonal adaptation, tolerance to unfavorable environmental conditions, and improved resistance to pest and disease. To date, improvement in switchgrass has relied on recurrent breeding strategies based on phenotypic or genotypic selection. Yield improvements have been modest by this method. If we expect to make significant increase in yields, we need tools that will allow us to map complex traits and uncover the genes that influence them. A genetic linkage map could be a powerful tool for accelerating switchgrass development through marker-assisted selection, breeding and recombination. This type of mapping requires the development of markers that can be associated with phenotypic traits in a population of known pedigree. The most commonly used markers for mapping include restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) and simple sequence repeats (SSR). At ORNL, we have been concentrating on the development of SSR markers, while our colleagues at the University of Georgia are developing RFLP markers in order to select parents to produce a mapping population and from there to create a framework map from(approx)100 F1 progeny

  2. Development and characterization of microsatellite markers for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This species is threatened throughout its range in West- ern Ghats as a result of overexploitation and habitat destruc- tion, which have reduced local population sizes and has led many populations to local extinction. In this study, we report the development of microsatellite markers and discuss the utility of these markers in ...

  3. Tumor markers kits development for use in radioimmunometric assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, B.

    1997-01-01

    The immunoassays such as RIA and IRMA are now widely used through the world for the quantitation of a variety of substances in the biological fluid for their high sensibility and specificity which required simple equipments. These techniques are also very used in Algeria for an effective amelioration of public heath The assays kits of RIA/IRMA of thyroid hormones are the most used, followed by peptidic hormones, steroids hormones and IRMA Tumor Markers (T.M) kits. In spite of the important demand, of tumor markers kits for the diagnosis and follow up of cancers their use are always insufficient due to the high cost. The research contract programme proposed by IAEA on the theme 'The Developments of IRMA Tumor Markers Kits' of prostate specific Antigen (PSA) and Tissue Polypeptide Specific Antigen (TPS) will allowed us to produce locally with best quality-price, the main reagents for PSA and TPS IRMA assays kits for diagnosis and follow up the prostate and breast cancers which are very spready in the country. This report include the following points: Generalities on the use of tumor markers in Algeria, programme for the Development of the PSA IRMA assay (schedule of protocols applied for each reagents; annual planning for assessing the programme activities) and conclusion

  4. Development of stable marker-free nuclear transformation strategy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Development of stable marker-free nuclear transformation strategy in the green microalga Chlorella vulgaris. ... into Chlorella by electroporation has very low stability and it is hard to screen the transformants without antibiotic marker genes.

  5. Development and characterization of genic SSR markers from low ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Development and characterization of genic SSR markers from low depth genome ... A variety of molecular markers are currently ... chloroform method (Sambrook et al. 1989). ..... Available online, http://www.iucnredlist.org/details/168255/0.

  6. Development of optical marker for polyolefin processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchini, Leonardo Guedes

    2013-01-01

    Research and publications about luminescent polymers have been developed in the last years for the academic innovation; however the industrial application has been very limited in this area. Processed Optical markers are few explored due the difficult to process luminescent polymeric materials with stable luminescence. The materials used to process luminescent polypropylene (PP) were polyamide 6 (PA6) doped with europium complex [Eu(tta) 3 (H 2 O) 2 ] obtained through the dilution and casting process. The polyolefins because they are inert, do not fit the common procedure of doping, in consequence, in this work luminescent polypropylene was indirectly prepared by polyamide 6 doped with europium complex through extrusion process. Product characterization was done using Thermal gravimetry analysis (TG), Differential Scanning Calorimetric (DSC), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and spectro fluorescence of emission and excitation. The blend PP/PA6:Eu(tta) 3 presented luminescent properties, after semi-industrial process, as observed in the narrow bands of intra configuration transitions- 4f 6 relatives to energy levels 7 F 0 → 5 L 6 (394nm), 7 F 0 → 5 D 3 (415nm), 7 F 0 → 5 D 2 (464nm), 7 F 0 → 5 D 1 (525nm) e 7 F 0 → 5 D 0 (578nm) of emission spectrum. Red light of the pellets or film is emitted when excited in UV lamp (365nm). TG results showed under O 2 atmosphere that PP doped with PA6:Eu(tta) 3 was more stable than pure PP. In this work was processed luminescent PP/PA6:Eu(tta) 3 with properties of thermal and photo stability which can be used as optical marker in polymer processing. (author)

  7. Research and Development Annual Report, 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Issued as a companion to Johnson Space Center's Research and Technology Annual Report, which reports JSC accomplishments under NASA Research and Technology Operating Plan (RTOP) funding, this report describes 42 additional JSC projects that are funded through sources other than the RTOP. Emerging technologies in four major disciplines are summarized: space systems technology, medical and life sciences, mission operations, and computer systems. Although these projects focus on support of human spacecraft design, development, and safety, most have wide civil and commercial applications in areas such as advanced materials, superconductors, advanced semiconductors, digital imaging, high density data storage, high performance computers, optoelectronics, artificial intelligence, robotics and automation, sensors, biotechnology, medical devices and diagnosis, and human factors engineering.

  8. Australian Industry Development Corporation annual report 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-01

    AIDC is a statutory corporation wholly owned and guaranteed by the Commonwealth of Australia. Its objects are to promote Australian industry and Australian ownership in industry. The corporation is a financial enterprise operating on commercial principles. It is engaged in the business of borrowing money, making loans and making equity investments. It also provides related financial advisory and other services, including lead management of syndicated project financings. This annual report looks at the highlights of 1983/84; a five year summary of operations; lists the Board of Directors; some executives; includes a Directors report on development finance, industry and funds management; a management structure; statistical tables; executives and a 22 page financial statement.

  9. Markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Schools Network, Inc., 2011

    2011-01-01

    Dry erase whiteboards come with toxic dry erase markers and toxic cleaning products. Dry erase markers labeled "nontoxic" are not free of toxic chemicals and can cause health problems. Children are especially vulnerable to environmental health hazards; moreover, schools commonly have problems with indoor air pollution, as they are more densely…

  10. Developing markers for Sigatoka leaf spot disease (Mycosphaerella ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-07-06

    Jul 6, 2011 ... Developing markers for Sigatoka leaf spot disease ... OPERON primer pairs were used to screen genomic DNA from two resistant cultivars: Calcutta 4 ( ..... Blomme G, Eden-Green S, Mustaffa M, Nwauzoma B, Thangavelu R.

  11. Annual reports | IDRC - International Development Research Centre

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC publishes an annual report presenting our financial statements and results. It also profiles IDRC-funded researchers, and highlights key projects and achievements. It is the main way we report to Parliament and inform Canadians. Download our most recent annual report, or select from the following list, dating back ...

  12. Development of diagnostic markers from disease resistance QTLs for marker-assisted breeding in peanut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breeding for disease resistance in peanut cultivars has been constrained due to both a narrow genetic base and a low degree of polymorphism. Earlier attempts have resulted in the development of a few hundreds of simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers in peanut that could define broad QTL on the physic...

  13. Workforce Training and Economic Development Fund: 2015 Annual Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iowa Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    The Department of Education, Division of Community Colleges, will annually provide the State Board of Education with The Workforce Training and Economic Development (WTED) Fund Annual Progress Report. Administration and oversight responsibility for the fund was transferred from the Iowa Economic Development Authority to the Iowa Department of…

  14. Geothermal Energy Development annual report 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-08-01

    This report is an exerpt from Earth Sciences Division Annual Report 1979 (LBL-10686). Progress in thirty-four research projects is reported including the following area: geothermal exploration technology, geothermal energy conversion technology, reservoir engineering, and geothermal environmental research. Separate entries were prepared for each project. (MHR)

  15. Development and use of molecular markers: past and present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Atul; Sharma, P C

    2016-01-01

    Molecular markers, due to their stability, cost-effectiveness and ease of use provide an immensely popular tool for a variety of applications including genome mapping, gene tagging, genetic diversity diversity, phylogenetic analysis and forensic investigations. In the last three decades, a number of molecular marker techniques have been developed and exploited worldwide in different systems. However, only a handful of these techniques, namely RFLPs, RAPDs, AFLPs, ISSRs, SSRs and SNPs have received global acceptance. A recent revolution in DNA sequencing techniques has taken the discovery and application of molecular markers to high-throughput and ultrahigh-throughput levels. Although, the choice of marker will obviously depend on the targeted use, microsatellites, SNPs and genotyping by sequencing (GBS) largely fulfill most of the user requirements. Further, modern transcriptomic and functional markers will lead the ventures onto high-density genetic map construction, identification of QTLs, breeding and conservation strategies in times to come in combination with other high throughput techniques. This review presents an overview of different marker technologies and their variants with a comparative account of their characteristic features and applications.

  16. Early Markers of Vulnerable Language Skill Development in Galactosaemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Fiona M.; Coman, David J.; Syrmis, Maryanne

    2014-01-01

    There are no known biomedical or genetic markers to identify which infants with galactosaemia (GAL) are most at risk of poor language skill development, yet pre-linguistic communicative "red flag" behaviours are recognised as early identifiers of heightened vulnerability to impaired language development. We report on pre-linguistic…

  17. Development of simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers that are ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) markers were developed through data mining of 3,803 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) previously published. A total of 144 di- to penta-type SSRs were identified and they were screened for polymorphism between two turnip cultivars, 'Tsuda' and 'Yurugi Akamaru'. Out of 90 EST-SSRs for ...

  18. Supplementary data: Development of nuclear DNA markers for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Supplementary data: Development of nuclear DNA markers for evolutionary studies in Plasmodium falciparum. Celia Thomas, Sneh Shalini, N. Raghavendra, Meenakshi Choudhary, Anju Verma, Hema Joshi,. A. P. Dash and Aparup Das. J. Genet. 86, 65–68. Primer sequences for amplification of putatively neutral ...

  19. Simple sequence repeat marker development and genetic mapping ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    polymorphic SSR (simple sequence repeats) markers from libraries enriched for GA, CAA and AAT repeats, as well as 6 ... ers for quinoa was the development of a genetic linkage map ...... Weber J. L. 1990 Informativeness of human (dC-dA)n.

  20. Supplementary data: Development of SSR markers and construction ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Supplementary data: Development of SSR markers and construction of a linkage map in jute. Moumita Das, Sumana Banerjee, Raman Dhariwal, Shailendra Vyas, Reyazul R. Mir, Niladri Topdar, Avijit Kundu, Jitendra P. Khurana, Akhilesh K. Tyagi,. Debabrata Sarkar, Mohit K. Sinha, Harindra S. Balyan and Pushpendra K.

  1. Development of cost-effective Hordeum chilense DNA markers: molecular aids for marker-assisted cereal breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, P; Dorado, G; Ramírez, M C; Laurie, D A; Snape, J W; Martín, A

    2003-01-01

    Hordeum chilense is a potential source of useful genes for wheat breeding. The use of this wild species to increase genetic variation in wheat will be greatly facilitated by marker-assisted introgression. In recent years, the search for the most suitable DNA marker system for tagging H. chilense genomic regions in a wheat background has lead to the development of RAPD and SCAR markers for this species. RAPDs represent an easy way of quickly generating suitable introgression markers, but their use is limited in heterogeneous wheat genetic backgrounds. SCARs are more specific assays, suitable for automatation or multiplexing. Direct sequencing of RAPD products is a cost-effective approach that reduces labour and costs for SCAR development. The use of SSR and STS primers originally developed for wheat and barley are additional sources of genetic markers. Practical applications of the different marker approaches for obtaining derived introgression products are described.

  2. Development of Microsatellite Markers for Isodon longitubus (Lamiaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadashi Yamashiro

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Microsatellite markers were developed for Isodon longitubus to study the natural hybridization of the species and its congeners. Methods and Results: A total of 10 primer sets were developed for I. longitubus. From the initial screening, all of 10 loci were polymorphic with five to 19 alleles per locus in the Mt. Ishizuchi population, whereas nine loci were polymorphic with two to 12 alleles per loci in the Toon population. Although one locus was monomorphic at one population, the observed and expected heterozygosity values estimated from 34 I. longitubus samples ranged from 0.273 to 1.000 and from 0.483 to 0.918, respectively. Six primer sets could amplify all three species examined in this study (I. inflexus, I. japonicus, and I. shikokianus. Conclusions: The 10 microsatellite markers developed here will be useful in analyzing the population genetic structure of I. longitubus and in studying the natural hybridization between Isodon species.

  3. A Diagnostic Marker to Discriminate Childhood Apraxia of Speech from Speech Delay: I. Development and Description of the Pause Marker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shriberg, Lawrence D.; Strand, Edythe A.; Fourakis, Marios; Jakielski, Kathy J.; Hall, Sheryl D.; Karlsson, Heather B.; Mabie, Heather L.; McSweeny, Jane L.; Tilkens, Christie M.; Wilson, David L.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this article (PM I) is to describe the rationale for and development of the Pause Marker (PM), a single-sign diagnostic marker proposed to discriminate early or persistent childhood apraxia of speech from speech delay. Method: The authors describe and prioritize 7 criteria with which to evaluate the research and clinical…

  4. FY2015 ceramic fuels development annual highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcclellan, Kenneth James [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-09-22

    Key challenges for the Advanced Fuels Campaign are the development of fuel technologies to enable major increases in fuel performance (safety, reliability, power and burnup) beyond current technologies, and development of characterization methods and predictive fuel performance models to enable more efficient development and licensing of advanced fuels. Ceramic fuel development activities for fiscal year 2015 fell within the areas of 1) National and International Technical Integration, 2) Advanced Accident Tolerant Ceramic Fuel Development, 3) Advanced Techniques and Reference Materials Development, and 4) Fabrication of Enriched Ceramic Fuels. High uranium density fuels were the focus of the ceramic fuels efforts. Accomplishments for FY15 primarily reflect the prioritization of identification and assessment of new ceramic fuels for light water reactors which have enhanced accident tolerance while also maintaining or improving normal operation performance, and exploration of advanced post irradiation examination techniques which will support more efficient testing and qualification of new fuel systems.

  5. FY2016 Ceramic Fuels Development Annual Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcclellan, Kenneth James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-01-24

    Key challenges for the Advanced Fuels Campaign are the development of fuel technologies to enable major increases in fuel performance (safety, reliability, power and burnup) beyond current technologies, and development of characterization methods and predictive fuel performance models to enable more efficient development and licensing of advanced fuels. Ceramic fuel development activities for fiscal year 2016 fell within the areas of 1) National and International Technical Integration, 2) Advanced Accident Tolerant Ceramic Fuel Development, 3) Advanced Techniques and Reference Materials Development, and 4) Fabrication of Enriched Ceramic Fuels. High uranium density fuels were the focus of the ceramic fuels efforts. Accomplishments for FY16 primarily reflect the prioritization of identification and assessment of new ceramic fuels for light water reactors which have enhanced accident tolerance while also maintaining or improving normal operation performance, and exploration of advanced post irradiation examination techniques which will support more efficient testing and qualification of new fuel systems.

  6. Radiation application on development of marker genes for genetic manipulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Il

    1997-04-01

    This state of art report was dealt with the recent progress of genetic engineering techniques and prospect of gene manipulation. Especially the selection of new genetic marker genes such as variants to environmental stress, pest or insect resistance, herbicide resistance and nutritional requirement was reviewed by using plant cell and tissue culture combined with radiation mutation induction. Biotechnology has taken us from the era hybrid plants to the era of transgenic plants. Although there are still many problems to solve in transformation method and the regeneration of transformed cell and tissue. Genetic marker genes are very important material to improve the technique of genetic manipulation. Most of the genes have been developed by radiation. (author). 180 refs., 6 tabs

  7. Development of microsatellite markers from loquat, Eriobotrya japonica (Thunb.) Lindl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gisbert, A D; Lopez-Capuz, I; Soriano, J M; Llacer, G; Romero, C; Badenes, M L

    2009-05-01

    Loquat (Eriobotrya japonica) is a minor fruit which has become an interesting alternative into the European fruit industry. This interest resulted in a loquat germplasm collection established at the Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Agrarias, Valencia, Spain. Currently, it is the main reservoir of this species outside Asia. We developed and characterized the first 21 polymorphic microsatellite loci from a CT/AG-enriched loquat genomic library. The observed heterozygosity ranged between 0.20 and 1.00, expected heterozygosity ranged between 0.17 and 0.81, three markers were multilocus and eight loci departed significantly from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. These markers will facilitate diversity and genetic studies into the species. © 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Research and Development. Annual Report 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This report discusses the research and development activities in which NVE has been involved in 2000. These activities fall into three categories: watercourse research, hydrological research and energy related research. The HYDRA research programme, which studied flooding and human intervention, is discussed in particular. The report includes a list of research and development reports that were published in 2000.

  9. Towards personalizing treatment for depression : developing treatment values markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittink, Marsha N; Morales, Knashawn H; Cary, Mark; Gallo, Joseph J; Bartels, Stephen J

    2013-01-01

    While 'personalized medicine' commonly refers to genetic markers or profiles associated with pharmacological treatment response, tailoring treatments to patient preferences and values is equally important. To describe and demonstrate a method to develop 'values markers,' or profiles based on the relative importance of attributes of depression treatment. Discrete choice analysis was used to assess individuals' relative preferences for features of depression treatment. Preference profiles were developed using latent profile analysis. Eighty-six adults participating in an internet-based discrete choice questionnaire. Participants were presented with two depression scenarios representing mild and severe depression. For each scenario, they were asked to compare 18 choice sets based on the type of medication side effect (nausea, dizziness, and sexual dysfunction) and severity (mild, moderate, and severe); and for counseling frequency (once per week or every other week) and provider setting (the office of a mental health professional, primary care doctor, or spiritual counselor). Three profiles were identified: profile 1 was associated with a preference for counseling and an avoidance of medication side effects; profile 2 with an avoidance of strong medication side effects and for receiving counseling in medical settings; and profile 3 with a preference for medication over counseling. When presented with a severe depression scenario, there was a higher prevalence for profile 1 and patients were more likely to prefer mental health over primary care and spiritual settings. Values markers may provide a foundation for personalized medicine, and reflect current initiatives emphasizing patient-centered care. Next steps should assess whether values markers are predictive of treatment initiation and adherence.

  10. Studies in development immunogenetics. Annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, R D

    1975-03-26

    This contract provides the research support for a group concerned with a relatively large range of problems. The integrating thread that runs through it is that of an interest in development and its genetic regulation, mainly in complex organisms and with an emphasis on the immune system as a model for developmental analysis and as a tool for following the development of other systems, especially the brain. It includes studies of biochemical genetics, primarily from a developmental viewpoint and with particular regard to defense mechanisms, and cellular aspects of the immune system. It extends into the area of cancer immunology and cell specificities as related to tumor systems, primarily from an immunogenetic viewpoint and with particular reference to leukemias in the mouse, and to disruptions of genetic control mechanisms in tumor development, especially as approached through the reappearance of fetal antigens associated with tumor development.

  11. Oil for development initiative annual report 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    In 2010, Oil for Development continued to develop its role as a key actor within the field of petroleum related development assistance. Five years after the programme started, we experience a steady demand for our product, which is to provide advice and competence building within petroleum sector management. Our cooperating partners are government agencies and to a lesser extent civil society organizations and parliamentary committees.Main trends in 2010 include the following: OfD continued to be a high priority programme in Norwegian development cooperation. The budget spending was Nok 222 million, 15 million higher than in 2009. The programme provided tailor made assistance to more than 20 countries, taking a holistic approach towards petroleum sector management. This implies that resource management, revenue management and environmental management are addressed in a coordinated manner, and that principles of good governance, such as anti-corruption, transparency and accountability, are cross-cutting. The funding for regional initiatives and South-South cooperation was doubled. (au)

  12. Oil for development initiative annual report 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    In 2010, Oil for Development continued to develop its role as a key actor within the field of petroleum related development assistance. Five years after the programme started, we experience a steady demand for our product, which is to provide advice and competence building within petroleum sector management. Our cooperating partners are government agencies and to a lesser extent civil society organizations and parliamentary committees.Main trends in 2010 include the following: OfD continued to be a high priority programme in Norwegian development cooperation. The budget spending was Nok 222 million, 15 million higher than in 2009. The programme provided tailor made assistance to more than 20 countries, taking a holistic approach towards petroleum sector management. This implies that resource management, revenue management and environmental management are addressed in a coordinated manner, and that principles of good governance, such as anti-corruption, transparency and accountability, are cross-cutting. The funding for regional initiatives and South-South cooperation was doubled. (au)

  13. Imperial County geothermal development annual meeting: summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-01-01

    All phases of current geothermal development in Imperial County are discussed and future plans for development are reviewed. Topics covered include: Heber status update, Heber binary project, direct geothermal use for high-fructose corn sweetener production, update on county planning activities, Brawley and Salton Sea facility status, status of Imperial County projects, status of South Brawley Prospect 1983, Niland geothermal energy program, recent and pending changes in federal procedures/organizations, plant indicators of geothermal fluid on East Mesa, state lands activities in Imperial County, environmental interests in Imperial County, offshore exploration, strategic metals in geothermal fluids rebuilding of East Mesa Power Plant, direct use geothermal potential for Calipatria industrial Park, the Audubon Society case, status report of the Cerro Prieto geothermal field, East Brawley Prospect, and precision gravity survey at Heber and Cerro Prieto geothermal fields. (MHR)

  14. High-throughput development of genome-wide locus-specific informative SSR markers in wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers are not new, they are still useful and often used markers in molecular mapping and marker-assisted breeding, particularly in developing countries. However, locus-specific SSR markers could be more useful and informative in wheat breeding and genetic stud...

  15. Group EDF annual report 2005 sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-05-01

    The EDF Group's Sustainable Development Report for 2005 is designed to report on Group commitments particularly within its Agenda 21, its ethical charter, and the Global Compact. It has also been prepared with reference to external reference frameworks: the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) guidelines and the French New Economic Regulations (NRE) contained in the May 15, 2001 French law. It contents the Chairman's statement, the evaluation of renewing and sharing commitments with all stakeholders, the managing local issues, EDF responses to the challenges of the future. Indicators are also provided. (A.L.B.)

  16. Annual report 1974. Sodium technology development programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The sodium technology development program comprises a number of separate research programs in the field of designing and testing parts and components for the SNR-300 reactor. Design studies and theoretical studies on cold trapping and the behavior of hydrogen in sodium circuits are reported. A preliminary test program for fighting sodium fires is completed. Results of research done on vibration measurements and counter-current mixing in a dummy tube bundle of a S.N.R. spiralized steam generator with counter-current flow are reported briefly. Research done in the field of heat transfer, pressure drop and bubble dynamics of a straight pipe steam generator are also briefly reported. To determine the influence of spiral diameter of the spiralized pipe on heat transfer in a spiralized pipe heat exchanger, a second testsection will be built in 1975. Research was reported on pump viscoseals, bearing stability, rotordynamics and bearing materials for sodium pumps. Research done on the properties of SNR-construction materials at high temperature and long time exposure and corrosion in sodium are reported. Fundamental research on corrosion accompanied this research. The report closes with results of weldability, mechanized-welding and remote welding of sodium-wetted surfaces

  17. Development, distribution and application of DNA markers for cereal research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi, X.; Stephenson, P.; Devos, K.M.; Gale, M.D.

    2001-01-01

    DNA probes and primers are important resources for molecular genetic research and molecular breeding. Presently, more than 2500 wheat probes, 400 barley probes, 800 foxtail, pearl millet and finger millet probes, and approximately 150 wheat microsatellite (SSR) primer pairs have been developed and maintained in our DNA Resource Centre at the John Innes Centre (JIC). To accelerate probe and primer distribution, an 'anchor set' and a 'supplementary anchor set', containing 73 and 31 wheat RFLP probes, respectively, and a standard set of 42 primer pairs for wheat SSR markers were selected. Similarly, a set of 52 pearl millet probes has been selected for distribution. More than 8000 wheat RFLP probes, 2000 wheat SSR primer pairs, 700 millet probes and 200 barley probes have been distributed to more than 250 research groups in 40 countries. Our wheat and millet probes and other grass cDNA probes have been used for comparative genetic studies. The revealed conservation of gene content and gene order has been used to construct maps of many grass species and to predict the locations of key genes from one crop species to another. Developed SSR and AFLP markers in wheat, barley and millet are particularly suited for genetic diversity analyses and map construction. (author)

  18. Development of Sequence-Based Microsatellite Marker for Phalaenopsis Orchid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FATIMAH

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Phalaenopsis is one of the most interesting genera of orchids due to the members are often used as parents to produce hybrids. The establishment and development of highly reliable and discriminatory methods for identifying species and cultivars has become increasingly more important to plant breeders and members of the nursery industry. The aim of this research was to develop sequence-based microsatellite (eSSR markers for the Phalaenopsis orchid designed from the sequence of GenBank NCBI. Seventeen primers were designed and thirteen primers pairs could amplify the DNA giving the expected PCR product with polymorphism. A total of 51 alleles, with an average of 3 alleles per locus and polymorphism information content (PIC values at 0.674, were detected at the 16 SSR loci. Therefore, these markers could be used for identification of the Phalaenopsis orchid used in this study. Genetic similarity and principle coordinate analysis identified five major groups of Phalaenopsis sp. the first group consisted of P. amabilis, P. fuscata, P. javanica, and P. zebrine. The second group consisted of P. amabilis, P. amboinensis, P. bellina, P. floresens, and P. mannii. The third group consisted of P. bellina, P. cornucervi, P. cornucervi, P. violaceae sumatra, P. modesta. The forth group consisted of P. cornucervi and P. lueddemanniana, and the fifth group was P. amboinensis.

  19. Transcriptome Characterization and Functional Marker Development in Sorghum Sudanense.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jieqin Li

    Full Text Available Sudangrass, Sorghum sudanense, is an important forage in warm regions. But little is known about its genome. In this study, the transcriptomes of sudangrass S722 and sorghum Tx623B were sequenced by Illumina sequencing. More than 4Gb bases were sequenced for each library. For Tx623B and S722, 88.79% and 83.88% reads, respectively were matched to the Sorghum bicolor genome. A total of 2,397 differentially expressed genes (DEGs were detected by RNA-Seq between the two libraries, including 849 up-regulated genes and 1,548 down-regulated genes. These DEGs could be divided into three groups by annotation analysis. A total of 44,495 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were discovered by aligning S722 reads to the sorghum reference genome. Of these SNPs, 61.37% were transition, and this value did not differ much between different chromosomes. In addition, 16,928 insertion and deletion (indel loci were identified between the two genomes. A total of 5,344 indel markers were designed, 15 of which were selected to construct the genetic map derived from the cross of Tx623A and Sa. It was indicated that the indel markers were useful and versatile between sorghum and sudangrass. Comparison of synonymous base substitutions (Ks and non-synonymous base substitutions (Ka between the two libraries showed that 95% orthologous pairs exhibited Ka/Ks<1.0, indicating that these genes were influenced by purifying selection. The results from this study provide important information for molecular genetic research and a rich resource for marker development in sudangrass and other Sorghum species.

  20. Economic and Workforce Development Program Annual Report, 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    California Community Colleges, Chancellor's Office, 2016

    2016-01-01

    The California Community Colleges, through the Economic and Workforce Development Program (EWD), continue to propel the California economy forward by providing students with skills to earn well-paying jobs. At the same time, EWD helps provide California companies with the talent they need to compete on a global scale. This annual report for…

  1. Development of a marker assisted selection program for cacao.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, R J; Kuhn, D N; Brown, J S; Olano, C T; Phillips-Mora, W; Amores, F M; Motamayor, J C

    2007-12-01

    ABSTRACT Production of cacao in tropical America has been severely affected by fungal pathogens causing diseases known as witches' broom (WB, caused by Moniliophthora perniciosa), frosty pod (FP, caused by M. roreri) and black pod (BP, caused by Phytophthora spp.). BP is pan-tropical and causes losses in all producing areas. WB is found in South America and parts of the Caribbean, while FP is found in Central America and parts of South America. Together, these diseases were responsible for over 700 million US dollars in losses in 2001 (4). Commercial cacao production in West Africa and South Asia are not yet affected by WB and FP, but cacao grown in these regions is susceptible to both. With the goal of providing new disease resistant cultivars the USDA-ARS and Mars, Inc. have developed a marker assisted selection (MAS) program. Quantitative trait loci have been identified for resistance to WB, FP, and BP. The potential usefulness of these markers in identifying resistant individuals has been confirmed in an experimental F(1) family in Ecuador.

  2. Negative emotional reactivity as a marker of vulnerability in the development of borderline personality disorder symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepp, Stephanie D; Scott, Lori N; Jones, Neil P; Whalen, Diana J; Hipwell, Alison E

    2016-02-01

    Negative emotionality is a distinguishing feature of borderline personality disorder (BPD). However, this person-level characteristic has not been examined as a marker of vulnerability in the development of this disorder. The current study utilized a multimethod approach to examine the interplay between negative emotional reactivity and cumulative exposure to family adversity on the development of BPD symptoms across 3 years (ages 16-18) in a diverse, at-risk sample of adolescent girls (N = 113). A latent variable of negative emotional reactivity was created from multiple assessments at age 16: self-report, emotion ratings to stressors from ecological assessments across 1 week, and observer-rated negative affectivity during a mother-daughter conflict discussion task. Exposure to family adversity was measured cumulatively between ages 5 and 16 from annual assessments of family poverty, single parent household, and difficult life circumstances. The results from latent growth curve models demonstrated a significant interaction between negative emotional reactivity and family adversity, such that exposure to adversity strengthened the association between negative emotional reactivity and BPD symptoms. In addition, family adversity predicted increasing BPD symptoms during late adolescence. These findings highlight negative emotional reactivity as a marker of vulnerability that ultimately increases risk for the development of BPD symptoms.

  3. Negative emotional reactivity as a marker of vulnerability in the development of borderline personality disorder symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepp, Stephanie D.; Scott, Lori N.; Jones, Neil P.; Whalen, Diana J.; Hipwell, Alison E.

    2015-01-01

    Negative emotionality is a distinguishing feature of borderline personality disorder (BPD). However, this person-level characteristic has not been examined as a marker of vulnerability in the development of this disorder. The current study utilized a multi-method approach to examine the interplay between negative emotional reactivity and cumulative exposure to family adversity on the development of BPD symptoms across three years (ages 16–18) in a diverse, at-risk sample of adolescent girls (N=113). A latent variable of negative emotional reactivity was created from multiple assessments at age 16: (1) self-report, (2) emotion ratings to stressors from ecological assessments across one week, and (3) observer-rated negative affectivity during a mother-daughter conflict discussion task. Exposure to family adversity was measured cumulatively between ages 5 and 16 from annual assessments of family poverty, single parent household, and difficult life circumstances. Results from latent growth curve models demonstrated a significant interaction between negative emotional reactivity and family adversity, such that exposure to adversity strengthened the association between negative emotional reactivity and BPD symptoms. Additionally, family adversity predicted increasing BPD symptoms during late adolescence. These findings highlight negative emotional reactivity as a marker of vulnerability that ultimately increases risk for the development of BPD symptoms. PMID:25925083

  4. Development of Pineapple Microsatellite Markers and Germplasm Genetic Diversity Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suping Feng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Two methods were used to develop pineapple microsatellite markers. Genomic library-based SSR development: using selectively amplified microsatellite assay, 86 sequences were generated from pineapple genomic library. 91 (96.8% of the 94 Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR loci were dinucleotide repeats (39 AC/GT repeats and 52 GA/TC repeats, accounting for 42.9% and 57.1%, resp., and the other three were mononucleotide repeats. Thirty-six pairs of SSR primers were designed; 24 of them generated clear bands of expected sizes, and 13 of them showed polymorphism. EST-based SSR development: 5659 pineapple EST sequences obtained from NCBI were analyzed; among 1397 nonredundant EST sequences, 843 were found containing 1110 SSR loci (217 of them contained more than one SSR locus. Frequency of SSRs in pineapple EST sequences is 1SSR/3.73 kb, and 44 types were found. Mononucleotide, dinucleotide, and trinucleotide repeats dominate, accounting for 95.6% in total. AG/CT and AGC/GCT were the dominant type of dinucleotide and trinucleotide repeats, accounting for 83.5% and 24.1%, respectively. Thirty pairs of primers were designed for each of randomly selected 30 sequences; 26 of them generated clear and reproducible bands, and 22 of them showed polymorphism. Eighteen pairs of primers obtained by the one or the other of the two methods above that showed polymorphism were selected to carry out germplasm genetic diversity analysis for 48 breeds of pineapple; similarity coefficients of these breeds were between 0.59 and 1.00, and they can be divided into four groups accordingly. Amplification products of five SSR markers were extracted and sequenced, corresponding repeat loci were found and locus mutations are mainly in copy number of repeats and base mutations in the flanking region.

  5. Development of Pineapple Microsatellite Markers and Germplasm Genetic Diversity Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Helin; Chen, You; Wang, Jingyi; Chen, Yeyuan; Sun, Guangming; He, Junhu; Wu, Yaoting

    2013-01-01

    Two methods were used to develop pineapple microsatellite markers. Genomic library-based SSR development: using selectively amplified microsatellite assay, 86 sequences were generated from pineapple genomic library. 91 (96.8%) of the 94 Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) loci were dinucleotide repeats (39 AC/GT repeats and 52 GA/TC repeats, accounting for 42.9% and 57.1%, resp.), and the other three were mononucleotide repeats. Thirty-six pairs of SSR primers were designed; 24 of them generated clear bands of expected sizes, and 13 of them showed polymorphism. EST-based SSR development: 5659 pineapple EST sequences obtained from NCBI were analyzed; among 1397 nonredundant EST sequences, 843 were found containing 1110 SSR loci (217 of them contained more than one SSR locus). Frequency of SSRs in pineapple EST sequences is 1SSR/3.73 kb, and 44 types were found. Mononucleotide, dinucleotide, and trinucleotide repeats dominate, accounting for 95.6% in total. AG/CT and AGC/GCT were the dominant type of dinucleotide and trinucleotide repeats, accounting for 83.5% and 24.1%, respectively. Thirty pairs of primers were designed for each of randomly selected 30 sequences; 26 of them generated clear and reproducible bands, and 22 of them showed polymorphism. Eighteen pairs of primers obtained by the one or the other of the two methods above that showed polymorphism were selected to carry out germplasm genetic diversity analysis for 48 breeds of pineapple; similarity coefficients of these breeds were between 0.59 and 1.00, and they can be divided into four groups accordingly. Amplification products of five SSR markers were extracted and sequenced, corresponding repeat loci were found and locus mutations are mainly in copy number of repeats and base mutations in the flanking region. PMID:24024187

  6. Development of RIA kits for tumor-markers monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suprarop, P.

    1997-01-01

    All reagents for tumor markers assays are imported from various manufacturers mainly CIS bio international. The average cost of these reagents is ranged from 80-150 bath/test (2-4 dollars test). The screening test for cancers could not be done especially in other regions of Thailand whose budgets and resources are so limited. If the reagents are made locally, many laboratories can perform the tests and use as primary diagnosis, screening or monitor the course of the disease following treatment. In addition, these reagents could help clinicians and give complementary information on the tumor status to improve quality of life in Thailand. Research objectives include: 1. Development of IRMA reagent kits suitable for diagnosing staging and monitoring prostrate and breast cancer. 2. Transfer of technology and reagent kits to relevant laboratories in Thailand. 3. Routine distribution of the reagents kits to the end users

  7. Development of microsatellite markers for identifying Brazilian coffee arabica varieties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vieira, E.S.N.; Pinho, Von E.V.R.; Carvalho, M.G.G.; Esselink, G.; Vosman, B.

    2010-01-01

    Microsatellite markers, also known as SSRs (Simple Sequence Repeats), have proved to be excellent tools for identifying variety and determining genetic relationships. A set of 127 SSR markers was used to analyze genetic similarity in twenty five Coffea arabica varieties. These were composed of

  8. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY-10 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dena Tomchak

    2011-03-01

    The FY 2010 Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Annual Report is a compendium of the diverse research performed to develop and ensure the INL's technical capabilities can support the future DOE missions and national research priorities. LDRD is essential to the INL -- it provides a means for the laboratory to pursue novel scientific and engineering research in areas that are deemed too basic or risky for programmatic investments. This research enhances technical capabilities at the laboratory, providing scientific and engineering staff with opportunities for skill building and partnership development.

  9. Development of genomic SSR and potential EST-SSR markers in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In addition, forty four EST-SSRs which can be amplified with expected sizes were identified from a B. chinense root cDNA library. The genomic SSR markers and potential EST-SSR markers developed in the present study should be useful for genetic diversity and molecular marker assistant selection breeding research in ...

  10. Risk markers for development of small and large nerve fiber lesion in patients with diabetes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malá, S.; Potočková, V.; Hoskovcová, L.; Brabec, Marek; Brož, J.; Kvapil, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 59, 1 Suppl (2016), S462-S462 ISSN 0012-186X. [EASD Annual Meeting /52./. 12.09.2016-16.09.2016, Munich] Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : diabetes * markers Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition

  11. Structured Annual Faculty Review Program Accelerates Professional Development and Promotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley J. Robboy MD

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This retrospective observational study on faculty development analyzes the Duke University Pathology Department’s 18-year experience with a structured mentoring program involving 51 junior faculty members. The majority had MD degrees only (55%. The percentage of young women faculty hires before 1998 was 25%, increasing to 72% after 2005. Diversity also broadened from 9% with varied heritages before 1998 to 37% since then. The mentoring process pivoted on an annual review process. The reviews generally helped candidates focus much earlier, identified impediments they individually felt, and provided new avenues to gain a national reputation for academic excellence. National committee membership effectively helped gain national exposure. Thirty-eight percent of the mentees served on College of American Pathologists (CAP committees, exponential multiples of any other national society. Some used CAP resources to develop major programs, some becoming nationally and internationally recognized for their academic activities. Several faculty gained national recognition as thought leaders for publishing about work initiated to serve administrative needs in the Department. The review process identified the need for more protected time for research, issues with time constraints, and avoiding exploitation when collaborating with other departments. This review identified a rigorous faculty mentoring and review process that included annual career counseling, goal-oriented academic careers, monitored advancement to promotion, higher salaries, and national recognition. All contributed to high faculty satisfaction and low faculty turnover. We conclude that a rigorous annual faculty review program and its natural sequence, promotion, can greatly foster faculty satisfaction.

  12. 2015 Fermilab Laboratory Directed Research & Development Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wester, W. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2016-05-26

    The Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) is conducting a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program. Fiscal year 2015 represents the first full year of LDRD at Fermilab and includes seven projects approved mid-year in FY14 and six projects approved in FY15. One of the seven original projects has been completed just after the beginning of FY15. The implementation of LDRD at Fermilab is captured in the approved Fermilab 2015 LDRD Annual Program Plan. In FY15, the LDRD program represents 0.64% of Laboratory funding. The scope of the LDRD program at Fermilab will be established over the next couple of years where a portfolio of about 20 on-going projects representing approximately between 1% and 1.5% of the Laboratory funding is anticipated. This Annual Report focuses on the status of the current projects and provides an overview of the current status of LDRD at Fermilab.

  13. Development and characterization of genomic microsatellite markers in Prosopis cineraria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashi Shekhar Anand

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of genetic diversity is a must for exploring the genetic resources for plant development and improvement. Prosopis cineraria is ecologically imperative species known for its innumerable biological benefits. Since there is a lack of genetic resources for the species, so it is crucial to unravel the population dynamics which will be very effective in plant improvement and conservation strategies. Of the 41 genomic microsatellite markers designed from (AGn enriched library, 24 were subsequently employed for characterization on 30 genotypes of Indian arid region. A total of 93 alleles with an average 3.875 could be amplified by tested primer pairs. The average observed and expected heterozygosity was 0.5139 and 0.5786, respectively with 23 primer pairs showing significant deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Polymorphic information content average to 0.5102 and the overall polymorphism level was found to be 93.27%. STRUCTURE analysis and DARwin exhibited the presence of 4 clusters among 30 genotypes.

  14. Development and validation of new SSR markers from expressed regions in the garlic genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meryem Ipek

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Only a limited number of simple sequence repeat (SSR markers is available for the genome of garlic (Allium sativum L. despite the fact that SSR markers have become one of the most preferred DNA marker systems. To develop new SSR markers for the garlic genome, garlic expressed sequence tags (ESTs at the publicly available GarlicEST database were screened for SSR motifs and a total of 132 SSR motifs were identified. Primer pairs were designed for 50 SSR motifs and 24 of these primer pairs were selected as SSR markers based on their consistent amplification patterns and polymorphisms. In addition, two SSR markers were developed from the sequences of garlic cDNA-AFLP fragments. The use of 26 EST-SSR markers for the assessment of genetic relationship was tested using 31 garlic genotypes. Twenty six EST-SSR markers amplified 130 polymorphic DNA fragments and the number of polymorphic alleles per SSR marker ranged from 2 to 13 with an average of 5 alleles. Observed heterozygosity and polymorphism information content (PIC of the SSR markers were between 0.23 and 0.88, and 0.20 and 0.87, respectively. Twenty one out of the 31 garlic genotypes were analyzed in a previous study using AFLP markers and the garlic genotypes clustered together with AFLP markers were also grouped together with EST-SSR markers demonstrating high concordance between AFLP and EST-SSR marker systems and possible immediate application of EST-SSR markers for fingerprinting of garlic clones. EST-SSR markers could be used in genetic studies such as genetic mapping, association mapping, genetic diversity and comparison of the genomes of Allium species.

  15. Development and characterization of microsatellite markers for Berberis thunbergii (Berberidaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jenica M; Obae, Samuel G; Brand, Mark H; Silander, John A; Jones, Kenneth L; Nunziata, Schyler O; Lance, Stacey L

    2012-05-01

    Microsatellite markers were isolated and characterized in Berberis thunbergii, an invasive and ornamental shrub in the eastern United States, to assess genetic diversity among populations and potentially identify horticultural cultivars. A total of 12 loci were identified for the species. Eight of the loci were polymorphic and were screened in 24 individuals from two native (Tochigi and Ibaraki prefectures, Japan) and one invasive (Connecticut, USA) population and 21 horticultural cultivars. The number of alleles per locus ranged from three to seven, and observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.048 to 0.636. These new markers will provide tools for examining genetic relatedness of B. thunbergii plants in the native and invasive range, including phylogeographic studies and assessment of rapid evolution in the invasive range. These markers may also provide tools for examining hybridization with other related species in the invasive range.

  16. Development and genetic mapping of SSR markers in foxtail millet [Setaria italica (L.) P. Beauv.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xiaoping; Zhang, Zhongbao; Liu, Yinghui; Zhang, Chengwei; Shi, Yunsu; Song, Yanchun; Wang, Tianyu; Li, Yu

    2009-02-01

    SSR markers are desirable markers in analysis of genetic diversity, quantitative trait loci mapping and gene locating. In this study, SSR markers were developed from two genomic libraries enriched for (GA)n and (CA)n of foxtail millet [Setaria italica (L.) P. Beauv.], a crop of historical importance in China. A total of 100 SSR markers among the 193 primer pairs detected polymorphism between two mapping parents of an F(2) population, i.e. "B100" of cultivated S. italica and "A10" of wild S. viridis. Excluding 14 markers with unclear amplifications, and five markers unlinked with any linkage group, a foxtail millet SSR linkage map was constructed by integrating 81 new developed SSR markers with 20 RFLP anchored markers. The 81 SSRs covered nine chromosomes of foxtail millet. The length of the map was 1,654 cM, with an average interval distance between markers of 16.4 cM. The 81 SSR markers were not evenly distributed throughout the nine chromosomes, with Ch.8 harbouring the least (3 markers) and Ch.9 harbouring the most (18 markers). To verify the usefulness of the SSR markers developed, 37 SSR markers were randomly chosen to analyze genetic diversity of 40 foxtail millet accessions. Totally 228 alleles were detected, with an average 6.16 alleles per locus. Polymorphism information content (PIC) value for each locus ranged from 0.413 to 0.847, with an average of 0.697. A positive correlation between PIC and number of alleles and between PIC and number of repeat unit were found [0.802 and 0.429, respectively (P < 0.01)]. UPGMA analysis revealed that the 40 foxtail millet cultivars could be grouped into five clusters in which the landraces' grouping was largely consistent with ecotypes while the breeding varieties from different provinces in China tended to be grouped together.

  17. Development of genomic SSR markers for fingerprinting lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) cultivars and mapping genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauscher, Gilda; Simko, Ivan

    2013-01-22

    Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) is the major crop from the group of leafy vegetables. Several types of molecular markers were developed that are effectively used in lettuce breeding and genetic studies. However only a very limited number of microsattelite-based markers are publicly available. We have employed the method of enriched microsatellite libraries to develop 97 genomic SSR markers. Testing of newly developed markers on a set of 36 Lactuca accession (33 L. sativa, and one of each L. serriola L., L. saligna L., and L. virosa L.) revealed that both the genetic heterozygosity (UHe = 0.56) and the number of loci per SSR (Na = 5.50) are significantly higher for genomic SSR markers than for previously developed EST-based SSR markers (UHe = 0.32, Na = 3.56). Fifty-four genomic SSR markers were placed on the molecular linkage map of lettuce. Distribution of markers in the genome appeared to be random, with the exception of possible cluster on linkage group 6. Any combination of 32 genomic SSRs was able to distinguish genotypes of all 36 accessions. Fourteen of newly developed SSR markers originate from fragments with high sequence similarity to resistance gene candidates (RGCs) and RGC pseudogenes. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) of L. sativa accessions showed that approximately 3% of genetic diversity was within accessions, 79% among accessions, and 18% among horticultural types. The newly developed genomic SSR markers were added to the pool of previously developed EST-SSRs markers. These two types of SSR-based markers provide useful tools for lettuce cultivar fingerprinting, development of integrated molecular linkage maps, and mapping of genes.

  18. The 10th Annual Bioassays and Bioanalytical Method Development Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Mark; Tudan, Christopher; Koltchev, Dolly

    2015-01-01

    The 10th Annual Bioassays and Bioanalytical Method Development Conference was hosted in Boston, MA, USA on 20-22 October 2014. This meeting brought together scientists from the biopharmaceutical and life sciences industries, the regulatory agency and academia to share and discuss current trends in cell-based assays and bioanalysis, challenges and ideas for the future of the bioassays and bioanalytical method development. The experiences associated with new and innovative technologies were evaluated as well as their impact on the current bioassays methodologies and bioanalysis workflow, including quality, feasibility, outsourcing strategies and challenges, productivity and compliance. Several presentations were also provided by members of the US FDA, sharing both scientific and regulatory paradigms including a most recent update on the position of the FDA with specific aspects of the draft Bioanalytical Method Validation guidance following its review of the industry's responses. The meeting was jointly coincided with the 15th Annual Immunogenicity for Biotherapeutics meeting, allowing for attendees to also familiarize themselves with new and emerging approaches to overcome the effect of immunogenicity, in addition to investigative strategies.

  19. Development of a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) marker for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The nature of the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) marker was validated by DNA sequencing of the parental PCR products. Using high resolution melt (HRM) profiles and normalised difference plots, we successfully differentiated the homozygous dominant (wild type), homozygous recessive (LPA) and heterozygous ...

  20. Development of a simple sequence repeat (SSR) marker set to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGORY

    2010-08-23

    Aug 23, 2010 ... varieties. Tuber seeds of most of these varieties are not produced and distributed in an organized way ... races from Canary Islands using 19 SSR markers. The ... The aim of the current study was to determine a set of.

  1. Laboratory Directed Research and Development annual report, fiscal year 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    The Department of Energy Order 413.2(a) establishes DOE`s policy and guidelines regarding Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) at its multiprogram laboratories. As described in 413.2, LDRD is research and development of a creative and innovative nature which is selected by the Laboratory Director or his or her designee, for the purpose of maintaining the scientific and technological vitality of the Laboratory and to respond to scientific and technological opportunities in conformance with the guidelines in this Order. DOE Order 413.2 requires that each laboratory submit an annual report on its LDRD activities to the cognizant Secretarial Officer through the appropriate Operations Office Manager. The report provided in this document represents Pacific Northwest National Laboratory`s LDRD report for FY 1997.

  2. Laboratory Directed Research and Development 1998 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pam Hughes; Sheila Bennett eds.

    1999-07-14

    The Laboratory's Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program encourages the advancement of science and the development of major new technical capabilities from which future research and development will grow. Through LDRD funding, Pacific Northwest continually replenishes its inventory of ideas that have the potential to address major national needs. The LDRD program has enabled the Laboratory to bring to bear its scientific and technical capabilities on all of DOE's missions, particularly in the arena of environmental problems. Many of the concepts related to environmental cleanup originally developed with LDRD funds are now receiving programmatic support from DOE, LDRD-funded work in atmospheric sciences is now being applied to DOE's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program. We also have used concepts initially explored through LDRD to develop several winning proposals in the Environmental Management Science Program. The success of our LDRD program is founded on good management practices that ensure funding is allocated and projects are conducted in compliance with DOE requirements. We thoroughly evaluate the LDRD proposals based on their scientific and technical merit, as well as their relevance to DOE's programmatic needs. After a proposal is funded, we assess progress annually using external peer reviews. This year, as in years past, the LDRD program has once again proven to be the major enabling vehicle for our staff to formulate new ideas, advance scientific capability, and develop potential applications for DOE's most significant challenges.

  3. The JSC Research and Development Annual Report 1993

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Issued as a companion to Johnson Space Center's Research and Technology Annual Report, which reports JSC accomplishments under NASA Research and Technology Operating Plan (RTOP) funding, this report describes 47 additional projects that are funded through sources other than the RTOP. Emerging technologies in four major disciplines are summarized: space systems technology, medical and life sciences, mission operations, and computer systems. Although these projects focus on support of human spacecraft design, development, and safety, most have wide civil and commercial applications in areas such as advanced materials, superconductors, advanced semiconductors, digital imaging, high density data storage, high performance computers, optoelectronics, artificial intelligence, robotics and automation, sensors, biotechnology, medical devices and diagnosis, and human factors engineering.

  4. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY 2000 Annual Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2001-05-01

    This is the FY00 Annual Progress report for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It gives an overview of the LDRD Program, summarizes progress on each project conducted during FY00, characterizes the projects according to their relevance to major funding sources, and provides an index to principal investigators. Project summaries are grouped by LDRD component: Directed Research and Exploratory Research. Within each component, they are further grouped into the ten technical categories: (1) atomic, molecular, optical, and plasma physics, fluids, and beams, (2) bioscience, (3) chemistry, (4) computer science and software engineering, (5) engineering science, (6) geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, (7) instrumentation and diagnostics, (8) materials science, (9) mathematics, simulation, and modeling, and (10) nuclear and particle physics.

  5. Lower Churchill Development Corporation Limited: 1998 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-06-01

    This is the 20th annual report to the Board of Directors of the Lower Churchill Development Corp. Ltd. for the year ending Dec. 31, 1998. The Corp. remains ready to proceed with hydroelectric power developments at Gull Island and/or Muskrat Falls following definitive shareholder direction. The accounting policy followed by the Corp. is in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles in Canada. It follows the practice of capitalizing the cost related to studies in respect of the development of the Lower Churchill Basis, as well administrative and other costs. Pursuant to the provisions of the Principal Agreement, Newfoundland agreed to enter into an Option Agreement, dated Nov. 24, 1978, with the Corp. in respect of the Gull Island Power Corp. Ltd. assets and the hydroelectric development rights to the Lower Churchill River. The Class A shares issued in the Corp. as of Dec. 31, 1998 are listed. Under an agreement between Hydro and the Corp., Hydro provides certain administrative and engineering services to the Corp. as needed. No fees were paid to Hydro for 2 years. In connection with the Y2K problem, management developed and is implementing a plan designed to identify and address the expected effects of the Year 2000 issue on the company

  6. Genome-wide microsatellite characterization and marker development in the sequenced Brassica crop species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jiaqin; Huang, Shunmou; Zhan, Jiepeng; Yu, Jingyin; Wang, Xinfa; Hua, Wei; Liu, Shengyi; Liu, Guihua; Wang, Hanzhong

    2014-02-01

    Although much research has been conducted, the pattern of microsatellite distribution has remained ambiguous, and the development/utilization of microsatellite markers has still been limited/inefficient in Brassica, due to the lack of genome sequences. In view of this, we conducted genome-wide microsatellite characterization and marker development in three recently sequenced Brassica crops: Brassica rapa, Brassica oleracea and Brassica napus. The analysed microsatellite characteristics of these Brassica species were highly similar or almost identical, which suggests that the pattern of microsatellite distribution is likely conservative in Brassica. The genomic distribution of microsatellites was highly non-uniform and positively or negatively correlated with genes or transposable elements, respectively. Of the total of 115 869, 185 662 and 356 522 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers developed with high frequencies (408.2, 343.8 and 356.2 per Mb or one every 2.45, 2.91 and 2.81 kb, respectively), most represented new SSR markers, the majority had determined physical positions, and a large number were genic or putative single-locus SSR markers. We also constructed a comprehensive database for the newly developed SSR markers, which was integrated with public Brassica SSR markers and annotated genome components. The genome-wide SSR markers developed in this study provide a useful tool to extend the annotated genome resources of sequenced Brassica species to genetic study/breeding in different Brassica species.

  7. 2014 Fermilab Laboratory Directoed Research & Development Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wester, W. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2016-05-26

    After initiation by the Fermilab Laboratory Director, a team from the senior Laboratory leadership and a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Advisory Committee developed an implementation plan for LDRD at Fermilab for the first time. This implementation was captured in the approved Fermilab 2014 LDRD Program Plan and followed directions and guidance from the Department of Energy (DOE) order, DOE O 413.2B, a “Roles, Responsibilities, and Guidelines, …” document, and examples of best practices at other DOE Office of Science Laboratories. At Fermilab, a FY14 midyear Call for Proposals was issued. A LDRD Selection Committee evaluated those proposals that were received and provided a recommendation to the Laboratory Director who approved seven LDRD projects. This Annual Report focuses on the status of those seven projects and provides an overview of the current status of LDRD at Fermilab. The seven FY14 LDRD approved projects had a date of initiation late in FY14 such that this report reflects approximately six months of effort approximately through January 2015. The progress of these seven projects, the subsequent award of six additional new projects beginning in FY15, and preparations for the issuance of the FY16 Call for Proposals indicates that LDRD is now integrated into the overall annual program at Fermilab. All indications are that LDRD is improving the scientific and technical vitality of the Laboratory and providing new, novel, or cutting edge projects carried out at the forefront of science and technology and aligned with the mission and strategic visions of Fermilab and the Department of Energy.

  8. Development and characterization of polymorphic microsatellite markers in Dysosma pleiantha (Berberidaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Bi-Cai; Gong, Xi; Zhou, Shi-Liang

    2011-08-01

    The development of compound microsatellite markers was conducted in Dysosma pleiantha to investigate genetic diversity and population genetic structure of this threatened medicinal plant. Using the compound microsatellite marker technique, 14 microsatellite markers that were successfully amplified showed polymorphism when tested on 38 individuals from three populations in eastern China. Overall, the number of alleles per locus ranged from 2 to 14, with an average of 7.71 alleles per locus. These results indicate that these microsatellite markers are adequate for detecting and characterizing population genetic structure and genetic diversity in Dysosma pleiantha.

  9. Laboratory directed research and development FY98 annual report; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Ayat, R; Holzrichter, J

    1999-01-01

    In 1984, Congress and the Department of Energy (DOE) established the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program to enable the director of a national laboratory to foster and expedite innovative research and development (R and D) in mission areas. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) continually examines these mission areas through strategic planning and shapes the LDRD Program to meet its long-term vision. The goal of the LDRD Program is to spur development of new scientific and technical capabilities that enable LLNL to respond to the challenges within its evolving mission areas. In addition, the LDRD Program provides LLNL with the flexibility to nurture and enrich essential scientific and technical competencies and enables the Laboratory to attract the most qualified scientists and engineers. The FY98 LDRD portfolio described in this annual report has been carefully structured to continue the tradition of vigorously supporting DOE and LLNL strategic vision and evolving mission areas. The projects selected for LDRD funding undergo stringent review and selection processes, which emphasize strategic relevance and require technical peer reviews of proposals by external and internal experts. These FY98 projects emphasize the Laboratory's national security needs: stewardship of the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile, responsibility for the counter- and nonproliferation of weapons of mass destruction, development of high-performance computing, and support of DOE environmental research and waste management programs

  10. Development of marker-based tracking methods for augmented reality applied to NPP maintenance work support and its experimental evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, H.; Fujino, H.; Bian, Z.; Sekiyama, T.; Shimoda, H.; Yoshikawa, H.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, two types of marker-based tracking methods for Augmented Reality have been developed. One is a method which employs line-shaped markers and the other is a method which employs circular-shaped markers. These two methods recognize the markers by means of image processing and calculate the relative position and orientation between the markers and the camera in real time. The line-shaped markers are suitable to be pasted in the buildings such as NPPs where many pipes and tanks exist. The circular-shaped markers are suitable for the case that there are many obstacles and it is difficult to use line-shaped markers because the obstacles hide the part of the line-shaped markers. Both methods can extend the maximum distance between the markers and the camera compared to the legacy marker-based tracking methods. (authors)

  11. Development of Genetic Markers for Triploid Verification of the Pacific Oyster,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Ha Kang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The triploid Pacific oyster, which is produced by mating tetraploid and diploid oysters, is favored by the aquaculture industry because of its better flavor and firmer texture, particularly during the summer. However, tetraploid oyster production is not feasible in all oysters; the development of tetraploid oysters is ongoing in some oyster species. Thus, a method for ploidy verification is necessary for this endeavor, in addition to ploidy verification in aquaculture farms and in the natural environment. In this study, a method for ploidy verification of triploid and diploid oysters was developed using multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR panels containing primers for molecular microsatellite markers. Two microsatellite multiplex PCR panels consisting of three markers each were developed using previously developed microsatellite markers that were optimized for performance. Both panels were able to verify the ploidy levels of 30 triploid oysters with 100% accuracy, illustrating the utility of microsatellite markers as a tool for verifying the ploidy of individual oysters.

  12. Development and characterization of EST-SSR markers in Bombax ceiba (Malvaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Miao-Miao; Ma, Huan-Cheng; Xin, Pei-Yao; Zhou, Zhi-Li; Tian, Bin

    2015-04-01

    Bombax ceiba (Malvaceae), commonly known as silk cotton tree, is a multipurpose tree species of tropical forests. Novel expressed sequence tag-simple sequence repeat (EST-SSR) markers were developed and characterized for the species using transcriptome analysis. A total of 33 new EST-SSR markers were developed for B. ceiba, of which 13 showed polymorphisms across the 24 individuals from four distant populations tested in the study. The results showed that the number of alleles per polymorphic locus ranged from two to four, and the expected heterozygosity and observed heterozygosity per locus varied from 0.043 to 0.654 and from 0 to 0.609, respectively. These newly developed EST-SSR markers can be used in phylogeographic and population genetic studies to investigate the origin of B. ceiba populations. Furthermore, these EST-SSR markers could also greatly promote the development of molecular breeding studies pertaining to silk cotton tree.

  13. Development and Molecular Characterization of Novel Polymorphic Genomic DNA SSR Markers in Lentinula edodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Suyun; Lee, Hwa-Yong; Shim, Donghwan; Kim, Myungkil; Ka, Kang-Hyeon; Ryoo, Rhim; Ko, Han-Gyu; Koo, Chang-Duck; Chung, Jong-Wook; Ryu, Hojin

    2017-06-01

    Sixteen genomic DNA simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers of Lentinula edodes were developed from 205 SSR motifs present in 46.1-Mb long L. edodes genome sequences. The number of alleles ranged from 3-14 and the major allele frequency was distributed from 0.17-0.96. The values of observed and expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.00-0.76 and 0.07-0.90, respectively. The polymorphic information content value ranged from 0.07-0.89. A dendrogram, based on 16 SSR markers clustered by the paired hierarchical clustering' method, showed that 33 shiitake cultivars could be divided into three major groups and successfully identified. These SSR markers will contribute to the efficient breeding of this species by providing diversity in shiitake varieties. Furthermore, the genomic information covered by the markers can provide a valuable resource for genetic linkage map construction, molecular mapping, and marker-assisted selection in the shiitake mushroom.

  14. Development of a Prognostic Marker for Lung Cancer Using Analysis of Tumor Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0243 TITLE: Development of a Prognostic Marker for Lung Cancer Using Analysis of Tumor Evolution PRINCIPAL...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Development of a Prognostic Marker for Lung Cancer Using Analysis of Tumor Evolution 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...derive a prognostic classifier. 15. SUBJECT TERMS NSCLC; tumor evolution ; whole exome sequencing 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF

  15. Development of EST-derived markers in Dendrobium from EST of related taxa

    OpenAIRE

    Narisa Juejun; Chataporn Chunwongse; Julapark Chunwongse

    2013-01-01

    Public databases are useful for molecular marker development. The major aim of this study was to develop expressedsequence tag (EST)-derived markers in Dendrobium from available ESTs of Phalaenopsis and Dendrobium. A total of 6063sequences were screened for simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and introns. Primers flanking these regions were generated andtested on genomic DNAs of Phalaenopsis and Dendrobium. Twenty-three percent of amplifiable Phalaenopsis EST-derivedmarkers were cross-genera trans...

  16. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY2010 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, K J

    2011-03-22

    A premier applied-science laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has at its core a primary national security mission - to ensure the safety, security, and reliability of the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile without nuclear testing, and to prevent and counter the spread and use of weapons of mass destruction: nuclear, chemical, and biological. The Laboratory uses the scientific and engineering expertise and facilities developed for its primary mission to pursue advanced technologies to meet other important national security needs - homeland defense, military operations, and missile defense, for example - that evolve in response to emerging threats. For broader national needs, LLNL executes programs in energy security, climate change and long-term energy needs, environmental assessment and management, bioscience and technology to improve human health, and for breakthroughs in fundamental science and technology. With this multidisciplinary expertise, the Laboratory serves as a science and technology resource to the U.S. government and as a partner with industry and academia. This annual report discusses the following topics: (1) Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation; (2) Biological Sciences; (3) Chemistry; (4) Earth and Space Sciences; (5) Energy Supply and Use; (6) Engineering and Manufacturing Processes; (7) Materials Science and Technology; Mathematics and Computing Science; (8) Nuclear Science and Engineering; and (9) Physics.

  17. FY2007 Laboratory Directed Research and Development Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craig, W W; Sketchley, J A; Kotta, P R

    2008-03-20

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) annual report for fiscal year 2007 (FY07) provides a summary of LDRD-funded projects for the fiscal year and consists of two parts: An introduction to the LDRD Program, the LDRD portfolio-management process, program statistics for the year, and highlights of accomplishments for the year. A summary of each project, submitted by the principal investigator. Project summaries include the scope, motivation, goals, relevance to Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) mission areas, the technical progress achieved in FY07, and a list of publications that resulted from the research in FY07. Summaries are organized in sections by research category (in alphabetical order). Within each research category, the projects are listed in order of their LDRD project category: Strategic Initiative (SI), Exploratory Research (ER), Laboratory-Wide Competition (LW), and Feasibility Study (FS). Within each project category, the individual project summaries appear in order of their project tracking code, a unique identifier that consists of three elements. The first is the fiscal year the project began, the second represents the project category, and the third identifies the serial number of the proposal for that fiscal year.

  18. Development and characterization of highly polymorphic long TC repeat microsatellite markers for genetic analysis of peanut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macedo Selma E

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L. is a crop of economic and social importance, mainly in tropical areas, and developing countries. Its molecular breeding has been hindered by a shortage of polymorphic genetic markers due to a very narrow genetic base. Microsatellites (SSRs are markers of choice in peanut because they are co-dominant, highly transferrable between species and easily applicable in the allotetraploid genome. In spite of substantial effort over the last few years by a number of research groups, the number of SSRs that are polymorphic for A. hypogaea is still limiting for routine application, creating the demand for the discovery of more markers polymorphic within cultivated germplasm. Findings A plasmid genomic library enriched for TC/AG repeats was constructed and 1401 clones sequenced. From the sequences obtained 146 primer pairs flanking mostly TC microsatellites were developed. The average number of repeat motifs amplified was 23. These 146 markers were characterized on 22 genotypes of cultivated peanut. In total 78 of the markers were polymorphic within cultivated germplasm. Most of those 78 markers were highly informative with an average of 5.4 alleles per locus being amplified. Average gene diversity index (GD was 0.6, and 66 markers showed a GD of more than 0.5. Genetic relationship analysis was performed and corroborated the current taxonomical classification of A. hypogaea subspecies and varieties. Conclusions The microsatellite markers described here are a useful resource for genetics and genomics in Arachis. In particular, the 66 markers that are highly polymorphic in cultivated peanut are a significant step towards routine genetic mapping and marker-assisted selection for the crop.

  19. Exploiting Illumina Sequencing for the Development of 95 Novel Polymorphic EST-SSR Markers in Common Vetch (Vicia sativa subsp. sativa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhipeng Liu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The common vetch (Vicia sativa subsp. sativa, a self-pollinating and diploid species, is one of the most important annual legumes in the world due to its short growth period, high nutritional value, and multiple usages as hay, grain, silage, and green manure. The available simple sequence repeat (SSR markers for common vetch, however, are insufficient to meet the developing demand for genetic and molecular research on this important species. Here, we aimed to develop and characterise several polymorphic EST-SSR markers from the vetch Illumina transcriptome. A total number of 1,071 potential EST-SSR markers were identified from 1025 unigenes whose lengths were greater than 1,000 bp, and 450 primer pairs were then designed and synthesized. Finally, 95 polymorphic primer pairs were developed for the 10 common vetch accessions, which included 50 individuals. Among the 95 EST-SSR markers, the number of alleles ranged from three to 13, and the polymorphism information content values ranged from 0.09 to 0.98. The observed heterozygosity values ranged from 0.00 to 1.00, and the expected heterozygosity values ranged from 0.11 to 0.98. These 95 EST-SSR markers developed from the vetch Illumina transcriptome could greatly promote the development of genetic and molecular breeding studies pertaining to in this species.

  20. Development of 12 Chloroplast Microsatellite Markers in Vigna unguiculata (Fabaceae and Amplification in Phaseolus vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Pan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Vigna unguiculata is an economically important legume, and the complexity of its variability and evolution needs to be further understood. Based on publicly available databases, we developed chloroplast microsatellite primers to investigate genetic diversity within V. unguiculata and its related species Phaseolus vulgaris. Methods and Results: Twelve polymorphic chloroplast microsatellite markers were developed and characterized in 62 V. unguiculata individuals. The number of alleles per locus varied between two and four, the unbiased haploid diversity per locus ranged from 0.123 to 0.497, and the polymorphism information content varied from 0.114 to 0.369. In cross-species amplifications, nine of these markers showed polymorphism in 29 P. vulgaris individuals. Conclusions: The newly developed chloroplast microsatellite markers exhibit variation in V. unguiculata as well as their transferability in P. vulgaris. These markers can be used to investigate genetic diversity and evolution in V. unguiculata and P. vulgaris.

  1. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2008 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    editor, Todd C Hansen

    2009-02-23

    consideration and review by the Office of Science Program Offices, such as LDRD projects germane to new research facility concepts and new fundamental science directions. Berkeley Lab LDRD program also play an important role in leveraging DOE capabilities for national needs. The fundamental scientific research and development conducted in the program advances the skills and technologies of importance to our Work For Others (WFO) sponsors. Among many directions, these include a broad range of health-related science and technology of interest to the National Institutes of Health, breast cancer and accelerator research supported by the Department of Defense, detector technologies that should be useful to the Department of Homeland Security, and particle detection that will be valuable to the Environmental Protection Agency. The Berkeley Lab Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY2008 report is compiled from annual reports submitted by principal investigators following the close of the fiscal year. This report describes the supported projects and summarizes their accomplishments. It constitutes a part of the LDRD program planning and documentation process that includes an annual planning cycle, project selection, implementation, and review.

  2. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2008 Annual Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, Todd C.

    2009-01-01

    Office of Science Program Offices, such as LDRD projects germane to new research facility concepts and new fundamental science directions. Berkeley Lab LDRD program also play an important role in leveraging DOE capabilities for national needs. The fundamental scientific research and development conducted in the program advances the skills and technologies of importance to our Work For Others (WFO) sponsors. Among many directions, these include a broad range of health-related science and technology of interest to the National Institutes of Health, breast cancer and accelerator research supported by the Department of Defense, detector technologies that should be useful to the Department of Homeland Security, and particle detection that will be valuable to the Environmental Protection Agency. The Berkeley Lab Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY2008 report is compiled from annual reports submitted by principal investigators following the close of the fiscal year. This report describes the supported projects and summarizes their accomplishments. It constitutes a part of the LDRD program planning and documentation process that includes an annual planning cycle, project selection, implementation, and review

  3. Immunohistochemical markers for corneal stem cells in the early developing human eye

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngholm, Mikkel; Høyer, Poul E; Vorum, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    niche (week 14) in human embryos and fetuses. The expression of SOD2 and CK15 was investigated together with other recently identified limbal proteins. Previously suggested LSC and differentiation markers (PAX6, aquaporin-1 and nestin) were also investigated. Both SOD2 and CK15 were present...... markers and potential markers for LSCs and early transient amplifying cells in human adults. In this study, we describe the development of the ectodermally derived LSCs and the mesodermally derived niche cells from the time at which the cornea is defined (week 6) until the formation of the early limbal...

  4. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY2008 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kammeraad, J E; Jackson, K J; Sketchley, J A; Kotta, P R

    2009-03-24

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program, authorized by Congress in 1991 and administered by the Institutional Science and Technology Office at Lawrence Livermore, is our primary means for pursuing innovative, long-term, high-risk, and potentially high-payoff research that supports the full spectrum of national security interests encompassed by the missions of the Laboratory, the Department of Energy, and National Nuclear Security Administration. The accomplishments described in this annual report demonstrate the strong alignment of the LDRD portfolio with these missions and contribute to the Laboratory's success in meeting its goals. The LDRD budget of $91.5 million for fiscal year 2008 sponsored 176 projects. These projects were selected through an extensive peer-review process to ensure the highest scientific quality and mission relevance. Each year, the number of deserving proposals far exceeds the funding available, making the selection a tough one indeed. Our ongoing investments in LDRD have reaped long-term rewards for the Laboratory and the nation. Many Laboratory programs trace their roots to research thrusts that began several years ago under LDRD sponsorship. In addition, many LDRD projects contribute to more than one mission area, leveraging the Laboratory's multidisciplinary team approach to science and technology. Safeguarding the nation from terrorist activity and the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction will be an enduring mission of this Laboratory, for which LDRD will continue to play a vital role. The LDRD Program is a success story. Our projects continue to win national recognition for excellence through prestigious awards, papers published in peer-reviewed journals, and patents granted. With its reputation for sponsoring innovative projects, the LDRD Program is also a major vehicle for attracting and retaining the best and the brightest technical staff and for establishing collaborations with

  5. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY2008 Annual Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kammeraad, J.E.; Jackson, K.J.; Sketchley, J.A.; Kotta, P.R.

    2009-01-01

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program, authorized by Congress in 1991 and administered by the Institutional Science and Technology Office at Lawrence Livermore, is our primary means for pursuing innovative, long-term, high-risk, and potentially high-payoff research that supports the full spectrum of national security interests encompassed by the missions of the Laboratory, the Department of Energy, and National Nuclear Security Administration. The accomplishments described in this annual report demonstrate the strong alignment of the LDRD portfolio with these missions and contribute to the Laboratory's success in meeting its goals. The LDRD budget of $91.5 million for fiscal year 2008 sponsored 176 projects. These projects were selected through an extensive peer-review process to ensure the highest scientific quality and mission relevance. Each year, the number of deserving proposals far exceeds the funding available, making the selection a tough one indeed. Our ongoing investments in LDRD have reaped long-term rewards for the Laboratory and the nation. Many Laboratory programs trace their roots to research thrusts that began several years ago under LDRD sponsorship. In addition, many LDRD projects contribute to more than one mission area, leveraging the Laboratory's multidisciplinary team approach to science and technology. Safeguarding the nation from terrorist activity and the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction will be an enduring mission of this Laboratory, for which LDRD will continue to play a vital role. The LDRD Program is a success story. Our projects continue to win national recognition for excellence through prestigious awards, papers published in peer-reviewed journals, and patents granted. With its reputation for sponsoring innovative projects, the LDRD Program is also a major vehicle for attracting and retaining the best and the brightest technical staff and for establishing collaborations with universities

  6. Development and characterization of polymorphic EST based SSR markers in barley (Hordeum vulgare).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Won-Sam; Kim, Hye-Yeong; Kim, Kyung-Min

    2017-08-01

    In barley, breeding using good genetic characteristics can improve the quality or quantity of crop characters from one generation to the next generation. The development of effective molecular markers in barley is crucial for understanding and analyzing the diversity of useful alleles. In this study, we conducted genetic relationship analysis using expressed sequence tag-simple sequence repeat (EST-SSR) markers for barley identification and assessment of barley cultivar similarity. Seeds from 82 cultivars, including 31 each of naked and hulled barley from the Korea Seed and Variety Service and 20 of malting barley from the RDA-Genebank Information Center, were analyzed in this study. A cDNA library of the cultivar Gwanbori was constructed for use in analysis of genetic relationships, and 58 EST-SSR markers were developed and characterized. In total, 47 SSR markers were employed to analyze polymorphisms. A relationship dendrogram based on the polymorphism data was constructed to compare genetic diversity. We found that the polymorphism information content among the examined cultivars was 0.519, which indicates that there is low genetic diversity among Korean barley cultivars. The results obtained in this study may be useful in preventing redundant investment in new cultivars and in resolving disputes over seed patents. Our approach can be used by companies and government groups to develop different cultivars with distinguishable markers. In addition, the developed markers can be used for quantitative trait locus analysis to improve both the quantity and the quality of cultivated barley.

  7. An assessment of the use of molecular markers in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonnino, A.; Carena, M.J.; Guimaraes, E.P.; Baumung, R.; Pilling, D.; Rischkowsky, B.

    2007-01-01

    Four different sources of information were analysed to assess the current uses of molecular markers in crops, forest trees and livestock in developing countries: the FAO Biotechnology in Developing Countries (FAO-BioDeC) database of biotechnology in developing countries; country reports evaluating the current status of applied plant breeding and related biotechnologies; country reports on animal genetic resources management for preparing the First Report on the State of the World's Animal Genetic Resources (SoW-AnGR); and the results of a questionnaire survey on animal genetic diversity studies. Even if still largely incomplete, the current data show that molecular markers are widely used for plant breeding in the developing world and most probably their use will increase in the future. In the animal sector the use of molecular markers seems less developed and limited or absent in most developing countries. Major differences exist among and within regions regarding the application of molecular marker techniques in plant and animal breeding and genetics. These can be explained by the relatively high investments in infrastructure and human resources necessary to undertake research in these fields. The spectrum of application of molecular markers in crop plants is quite wide, covering many plants relevant to the enhancement of food security, but other important plant species are still neglected. The practical results of marker-assisted selection (MAS) in the field are disappointingly modest, possibly due to: low levels of investment; limited coordination between biotechnologists and practical breeders; instable, non-focused or ill-addressed research projects; and the lack of linkages between research and farmers. Partnerships between developed and developing countries may be a means of better realizing the potential of molecular marker techniques for improving both animal and crop production. (author)

  8. Development and use of microsatellite markers in Marama bean ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Recently, the development of SSR enrichment techniques has increased the efficiency of SSR characterisation in new species. The aim of the study was to develop SSR's for detection of polymorphisms in Marama bean. The microsatellite regions of the genome were the main focus for potential to be used in Marama bean ...

  9. Development of Novel SSR Markers for Flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) Using Reduced-Representation Genome Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jianzhong; Zhao, Qian; Wu, Guangwen; Zhang, Shuquan; Jiang, Tingbo

    2016-01-01

    Flax ( Linum usitatissimum L.) is a major fiber and oil yielding crop grown in northeastern China. Identification of flax molecular markers is a key step toward improving flax yield and quality via marker-assisted breeding. Simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers, which are based on genomic structural variation, are considered the most valuable type of genetic marker for this purpose. In this study, we screened 1574 microsatellites from Linum usitatissimum L. obtained using reduced representation genome sequencing (RRGS) to systematically identify SSR markers. The resulting set of microsatellites consisted mainly of trinucleotide (56.10%) and dinucleotide (35.23%) repeats, with each motif consisting of 5-8 repeats. We then evaluated marker sensitivity and specificity based on samples of 48 flax isolates obtained from northeastern China. Using the new SSR panel, the results demonstrated that fiber flax and oilseed flax varieties clustered into two well separated groups. The novel SSR markers developed in this study show potential value for selection of varieties for use in flax breeding programs.

  10. Development and experimental evaluation of an automatic marker registration system for tracking of augmented reality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Wei-da; Yang Shou-feng; Ishii, Hirotake; Shimoda, Hiroshi; Izumi, Masanori

    2010-01-01

    In order to apply augmented reality in plant maintenance activities it is necessary to use real-time high accuracy tracking technology. One of the most efficient tracking methods is using paper-based markers and computing the relative position and orientation between a vision sensor (camera) and the markers through image processing and geometry calculations. In this method, the 3D-position of each marker is needed before tracking, but it is inefficient to measure all the markers manually. In this study, an automatic marker registration system was developed so as to measure the 3D-position of each marker automatically. The system is composed of a camera, a laser rangefinder and a motion base, which is used to control the pose of the laser rangefinder. A computer, connected to them, is used for controlling the system and for data transport. The results of the experimental evaluations show that the measurement takes about 21 seconds per marker and that the Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) of the position measurements is 3.5 mm. The feasibility evaluation of the system was conducted in Fugen nuclear plant. The results show that the system can largely reduce the preparatory workload of an AR application in a Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). (author)

  11. Development and mapping of DArT markers within the Festuca - Lolium complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopecký, David; Bartoš, Jan; Lukaszewski, Adam J; Baird, James H; Černoch, Vladimír; Kölliker, Roland; Rognli, Odd Arne; Blois, Helene; Caig, Vanessa; Lübberstedt, Thomas; Studer, Bruno; Shaw, Paul; Doležel, Jaroslav; Kilian, Andrzej

    2009-01-01

    Background Grasses are among the most important and widely cultivated plants on Earth. They provide high quality fodder for livestock, are used for turf and amenity purposes, and play a fundamental role in environment protection. Among cultivated grasses, species within the Festuca-Lolium complex predominate, especially in temperate regions. To facilitate high-throughput genome profiling and genetic mapping within the complex, we have developed a Diversity Arrays Technology (DArT) array for five grass species: F. pratensis, F. arundinacea, F. glaucescens, L. perenne and L. multiflorum. Results The DArTFest array contains 7680 probes derived from methyl-filtered genomic representations. In a first marker discovery experiment performed on 40 genotypes from each species (with the exception of F. glaucescens for which only 7 genotypes were used), we identified 3884 polymorphic markers. The number of DArT markers identified in every single genotype varied from 821 to 1852. To test the usefulness of DArTFest array for physical mapping, DArT markers were assigned to each of the seven chromosomes of F. pratensis using single chromosome substitution lines while recombinants of F. pratensis chromosome 3 were used to allocate the markers to seven chromosome bins. Conclusion The resources developed in this project will facilitate the development of genetic maps in Festuca and Lolium, the analysis on genetic diversity, and the monitoring of the genomic constitution of the Festuca × Lolium hybrids. They will also enable marker-assisted selection for multiple traits or for specific genome regions. PMID:19832973

  12. Development and Characterization of 37 Novel EST-SSR Markers in Pisum sativum (Fabaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofeng Zhuang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Simple sequence repeat markers were developed based on expressed sequence tags (EST-SSR and screened for polymorphism among 23 Pisum sativum individuals to assist development and refinement of pea linkage maps. In particular, the SSR markers were developed to assist in mapping of white mold disease resistance quantitative trait loci. Methods and Results: Primer pairs were designed for 46 SSRs identified in EST contiguous sequences assembled from a 454 pyrosequenced transcriptome of the pea cultivar, ‘LIFTER’. Thirty-seven SSR markers amplified PCR products, of which 11 (30% SSR markers produced polymorphism in 23 individuals, including parents of recombinant inbred lines, with two to four alleles. The observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0 to 0.43 and from 0.31 to 0.83, respectively. Conclusions: These EST-SSR markers for pea will be useful for refinement of pea linkage maps, and will likely be useful for comparative mapping of pea and as tools for marker-based pea breeding.

  13. Development of Multiplexed Marker Sets to Identify the Most Relevant Poplar Species for Breeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilke Schroeder

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Within the genus Populus, about 30 species are classified into six sections, of which some are cross-compatible. Besides naturally occurring hybrids, huge breeding programs have led to a high number of artificially produced hybrids, for which the determination of genetically involved species by morphological characteristics is often difficult. This necessitates the use of molecular markers for the identification of both maternal as well as paternal species, and in the case of complex hybrids, the genealogy. For this reason, we developed new chloroplast and nuclear markers for the differentiation of up to 19 poplar species, with one to 32 individuals per species regularly used in breeding programs based on already known barcoding, other chloroplast regions, and nuclear genes of interest. We developed methods to identify species by either species-specific nucleotide variations or, when no initial information for the species was given, by using a set of markers either in a procedure of exclusion or in a multiplexed marker set. The developed markers can all be used with low-cost equipment, and some can additionally be applied using a genetic analyzer. We combined these markers in multiplexes for a very fast and easy-to-use application for the identification of poplar species and their hybrids.

  14. Development of novel genic microsatellite markers from transcriptome sequencing in sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Monica; Lane, Thomas; Staton, Margaret; Coggeshall, Mark V; Best, Teodora; Chen, Chien-Chih; Liang, Haiying; Zembower, Nicole; Drautz-Moses, Daniela I; Hwee, Yap Zhei; Schuster, Stephan C; Schlarbaum, Scott E; Carlson, John E; Gailing, Oliver

    2017-08-08

    Sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) is a hardwood tree species native to northeastern North America and economically valued for its wood and sap. Yet, few molecular genetic resources have been developed for this species to date. Microsatellite markers have been a useful tool in population genetics, e.g., to monitor genetic variation and to analyze gene flow patterns. The objective of this study is to develop a reference transcriptome and microsatellite markers in sugar maple. A set of 117,861 putative unique transcripts were assembled using 29.2 Gb of RNA sequencing data derived from different tissues and stress treatments. From this set of sequences a total of 1068 microsatellite motifs were identified. Out of 58 genic microsatellite markers tested on a population of 47 sugar maple trees in upper Michigan, 22 amplified well, of which 16 were polymorphic and 6 were monomorphic. Values for expected heterozygosity varied from 0.224 to 0.726 for individual loci. Of the 16 polymorphic markers, 15 exhibited transferability to other Acer L. species. Genic microsatellite markers can be applied to analyze genetic variation in potentially adaptive genes relative to genomic reference markers as a basis for the management of sugar maple genetic resources in the face of climate change.

  15. Development of EST-derived markers in Dendrobium from EST of related taxa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narisa Juejun

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Public databases are useful for molecular marker development. The major aim of this study was to develop expressedsequence tag (EST-derived markers in Dendrobium from available ESTs of Phalaenopsis and Dendrobium. A total of 6063sequences were screened for simple sequence repeats (SSRs and introns. Primers flanking these regions were generated andtested on genomic DNAs of Phalaenopsis and Dendrobium. Twenty-three percent of amplifiable Phalaenopsis EST-derivedmarkers were cross-genera transferable to Dendrobium. Forty-one markers from both Phalaenopsis and Dendrobium thatamplified in Dendrobium were assessed on six commercial cultivars and six wild accessions. All of them were transferableamong Dendrobium species. High polymorphism and heterozygosity were observed within wild accessions. Sixteen polymorphic markers were evaluated for linkage analysis on an F1 segregating population. Seven markers were mapped into threelinkage groups, two of which showed syntenic relationship between dendrobium and rice. This relationship will facilitatefurther quantitative trait loci (QTL mapping and comparative genomic studies of Dendrobium. Our results indicate thatPhalaenopsis EST-derived markers are valuable tools for genetic research and breeding applications in Dendrobium.

  16. Development and characterization of genomic SSR markers in Cynodon transvaalensis Burtt-Davy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chengcheng; Wu, Yanqi; Taliaferro, Charles M; Bell, Greg E; Martin, Dennis L; Smith, Mike W

    2014-08-01

    Simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers are a major molecular tool for genetic and genomic research that have been extensively developed and used in major crops. However, few are available in African bermudagrass (Cynodon transvaalensis Burtt-Davy), an economically important warm-season turfgrass species. African bermudagrass is mainly used for hybridizations with common bermudagrass [C. dactylon var. dactylon (L.) Pers.] in the development of superior interspecific hybrid turfgrass cultivars. Accordingly, the major objective of this study was to develop and characterize a large set of SSR markers. Genomic DNA of C. transvaalensis '4200TN 24-2' from an Oklahoma State University (OSU) turf nursery was extracted for construction of four SSR genomic libraries enriched with [CA](n), [GA](n), [AAG](n), and [AAT](n) as core repeat motifs. A total of 3,064 clones were sequenced at the OSU core facility. The sequences were categorized into singletons and contiguous sequences to exclude redundancy. From the two sequence categories, 1,795 SSR loci were identified. After excluding duplicate SSRs by comparison with previously developed SSR markers using a nucleotide basic local alignment tool, 1,426 unique primer pairs (PPs) were designed. Out of the 1,426 designed PPs, 981 (68.8 %) amplified alleles of the expected size in the donor DNA. Polymorphisms of the SSR PPs tested in eight C. transvaalensis plants were 93 % polymorphic with 544 markers effective in all genotypes. Inheritance of the SSRs was examined in six F(1) progeny of African parents 'T577' × 'Uganda', indicating 917 markers amplified heritable alleles. The SSR markers developed in the study are the first large set of co-dominant markers in African bermudagrass and should be highly valuable for molecular and traditional breeding research.

  17. Development and mapping of SSR markers linked to resistance-gene homologue clusters in common bean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luz; Nayibe; Garzon; Matthew; Wohlgemuth; Blair

    2014-01-01

    Common bean is an important but often a disease-susceptible legume crop of temperate,subtropical and tropical regions worldwide. The crop is affected by bacterial, fungal and viral pathogens. The strategy of resistance-gene homologue(RGH) cloning has proven to be an efficient tool for identifying markers and R(resistance) genes associated with resistances to diseases. Microsatellite or SSR markers can be identified by physical association with RGH clones on large-insert DNA clones such as bacterial artificial chromosomes(BACs). Our objectives in this work were to identify RGH-SSR in a BAC library from the Andean genotype G19833 and to test and map any polymorphic markers to identify associations with known positions of disease resistance genes. We developed a set of specific probes designed for clades of common bean RGH genes and then identified positive BAC clones and developed microsatellites from BACs having SSR loci in their end sequences. A total of 629 new RGH-SSRs were identified and named BMr(bean microsatellite RGH-associated markers). A subset of these markers was screened for detecting polymorphism in the genetic mapping population DOR364 × G19833. A genetic map was constructed with a total of 264 markers,among which were 80 RGH loci anchored to single-copy RFLP and SSR markers. Clusters of RGH-SSRs were observed on most of the linkage groups of common bean and in positions associated with R-genes and QTL. The use of these new markers to select for disease resistance is discussed.

  18. KFK annual report on research and development activities in 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This annual report on R and D activities in the year 1988 is published by the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre in compliance with section 13.4 of the corporate statutes. The presentation adopts the arrangement of the subjects and items as given in the R and D programme planning of the centre. The reports given by the various institutes and main departments have been collected in their relevant subject groups, with reference being given to the reporting source. Summary reports of activities are obtainable direct from the relevant institutes or main departments. The annual report reviews the progress achieved in every of the R and D projects listed in the KfK programms, and the material is arranged so as to facilitate a comparison between planned and achieved purposes, and to show activities within their entire context, as the R and D programm frequently distributes research tasks for a common project to various institutes. Detailed accounts can be found in the numerous scientific-technical publications listed, or in the KfK status reports. In compliance with the underlying programme budgeting report, the annual report, upon decision by the competent bodies, also presents a summary report of R and D activities in 1988. (orig.) [de

  19. Large-scale development of PIP and SSR markers and their complementary applied in Nicotiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, L; Cao, H; Yang, L; Yu, Yu; Wang, Yu

    2013-08-01

    PIP (Potential Intron Polymorphism) and SSR (Simple Sequence Repeats) were used in many species, but large-scale development and combined use of these two markers have not been reported in tobacco. In this study, a total of 12,388 PIP and 76,848 SSR markers were designed and uploaded to a web-accessible database (http://yancao.sdau.edu.cn/tgb/). E-PCR analysis showed that PIP and SSR rarely overlapped and were strongly complementary in the tobacco genome. The density was 3.07 PIP and 1.72 SSR markers per 10 kb of the known sequences. A total of 153 and 166 alleles were detectedby 22 PIP and 22 SSR markers in 64 Nicotiana accessions. SSR produced higher PIC (polymorphism information content) values and identified more alleles than PIP, whereas PIP could identify larger numbers of rare alleles. Mantel testing demonstrated a high correlation coefficient (r = 0.949, P SSR. The UPGMA dendrogram created from the combined PIP and SSR markers was clearer and more reliable than the individual PIP or SSR dendrograms. It suggested that PIP and SSR can make up the deficiency of molecular markers not only in tobacco but other plant.

  20. Development and Validation of EST-SSR Markers from the Transcriptome of Adzuki Bean (Vigna angularis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Honglin; Liu, Liping; Wang, Lixia; Wang, Suhua; Somta, Prakit; Cheng, Xuzhen

    2015-01-01

    The adzuki bean (Vigna angularis (Ohwi) Ohwi and Ohashi) is an important grain legume of Asia. It is cultivated mainly in China, Japan and Korea. Despite its importance, few genomic resources are available for molecular genetic research of adzuki bean. In this study, we developed EST-SSR markers for the adzuki bean through next-generation sequencing. More than 112 million high-quality cDNA sequence reads were obtained from adzuki bean using Illumina paired-end sequencing technology, and the sequences were de novo assembled into 65,950 unigenes. The average length of the unigenes was 1,213 bp. Among the unigenes, 14,547 sequences contained a unique simple sequence repeat (SSR) and 3,350 sequences contained more than one SSR. A total of 7,947 EST-SSRs were identified as potential molecular markers, with mono-nucleotide A/T repeats (99.0%) as the most abundant motif class, followed by AG/CT (68.4%), AAG/CTT (30.0%), AAAG/CTTT (26.2%), AAAAG/CTTTT (16.1%), and AACGGG/CCCGTT (6.0%). A total of 500 SSR markers were randomly selected for validation, of which 296 markers produced reproducible amplicons with 38 polymorphic markers among the 32 adzuki bean genotypes selected from diverse geographical locations across China. The large number of SSR-containing sequences and EST-SSR markers will be valuable for genetic analysis of the adzuki bean and related Vigna species.

  1. Development of SSR markers and construction of a linkage map in jute

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We recently initiated a programme to develop simple sequence repeat markers and reported a set of 2469 SSR that were developed using four SSR-enriched libraries (Mir et al. 2009). In this communication, we report an additional set of 607 novel SSR in 393 SSR containing sequences. However, primers could be ...

  2. Development of microsatellite markers in Gonystylus bancanus (Ramin) useful for tracing and tracking of wood of this protected species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smulders, M.J.M.; Westende, van 't W.P.C.; Diway, B.; Esselink, G.D.; Meer, van der P.J.; Koopman, W.J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Ten polymorphic microsatellite markers have been developed for Gonystylus bancanus (Ramin), a protected tree species of peat swamp forests in Malaysia and Indonesia. Eight markers were also shown to be polymorphic in other Gonystylus species. The markers will enable assessing the amount of genetic

  3. Director's Discretionary Research and Development Program: Annual Report, Fiscal Year 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2007-03-01

    The Director's Discretionary Research and Development Program, Annual Report Fiscal Year 2006 is an annual management report that summarizes research projects funded by the DDRD program. The NREL DDRD program comprises projects that strengthen NREL's four technical competencies: Integrated Systems, Renewable Electricity, Renewable Fuels, and Strategic Analysis.

  4. Annual Progress Report, 1975. Southern Rural Development Center, Mississippi State University. SRDC Series Publication No. 10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southern Rural Development Center, State College, MS.

    Included in this second annual report on the Southern Rural Development Center's (SRDC) 1974-75 plan of work are data re: orientation visits; regional workshops; technical consultants; liaison with regional agencies and organizations; information dissemination; annual evaluation; functional networks in the areas of land use issues, citizen…

  5. Development of Microsatellite Markers for the Coastal Shrub Scaevola taccada (Goodeniaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruko Ando

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Microsatellite markers were developed for the coastal shrub species Scaevola taccada to estimate the population genetic structure, which may reflect different seed dispersal patterns. Methods and Results: Thirteen microsatellite primer sets were developed for S. taccada using 454 pyrosequencing. The primer sets were tested on 64 individuals sampled from two populations in Japan. Fragments were amplified using the primers, with one to 10 alleles per locus, and the expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.00 to 0.85. Conclusions: These results indicate the utility of markers in S. taccada for broad estimations of the population genetic structure of this species.

  6. The somatic marker theory in the context of addiction: contributions to understanding development and maintenance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olsen VV

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Vegard V Olsen,1 Ricardo G Lugo,1 Stefan Sütterlin1,2 1Section of Psychology, Lillehammer University College, Lillehammer, 2Department of Psychosomatic Medicine, Division of Surgery and Clinical Neuroscience, Oslo University Hospital – Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway Abstract: Recent theoretical accounts of addiction have acknowledged that addiction to substances and behaviors share inherent similarities (eg, insensitivity to future consequences and self-regulatory deficits. This recognition is corroborated by inquiries into the neurobiological correlates of addiction, which has indicated that different manifestations of addictive pathology share common neural mechanisms. This review of the literature will explore the feasibility of the somatic marker hypothesis as a unifying explanatory framework of the decision-making deficits that are believed to be involved in addiction development and maintenance. The somatic marker hypothesis provides a neuroanatomical and cognitive framework of decision making, which posits that decisional processes are biased toward long-term prospects by emotional marker signals engendered by a neuronal architecture comprising both cortical and subcortical circuits. Addicts display markedly impulsive and compulsive behavioral patterns that might be understood as manifestations of decision-making processes that fail to take into account the long-term consequences of actions. Evidence demonstrates that substance dependence, pathological gambling, and Internet addiction are characterized by structural and functional abnormalities in neural regions, as outlined by the somatic marker hypothesis. Furthermore, both substance dependents and behavioral addicts show similar impairments on a measure of decision making that is sensitive to somatic marker functioning. The decision-making deficits that characterize addiction might exist a priori to addiction development; however, they may be worsened by ingestion of substances with

  7. Development of Microsatellite Markers for Lagerstroemia indica (Lythraceae and Related Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Microsatellite markers were developed and characterized to analyze genetic diversity within Lagerstroemia cultivars and related species. Methods and Results: Using simple sequence repeat (SSR-enriched libraries, 11 species-specific polymorphic genomic SSRs were developed from L. indica ‘Hong Die Fei Wu’. All primers were tested on 48 L. indica individuals from China, the United States, and France. The primers amplified four to 12 alleles per locus, including di-, tri-, and tetranucleotide repeats. Observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.1875 to 0.7609 and 0.2836 to 0.8385, respectively. The primers were also highly cross-transferrable to L. subcostata, L. limii, L. fauriei, L. caudata, and L. speciosa. Conclusions: The new primers will enlarge the bank of SSRs available to genetic research of Lagerstroemia. These SSR markers will facilitate population genetics and molecular marker-assisted selection of L. indica.

  8. Development of microsatellite markers using next-generation sequencing for the columnar cactus Echinopsis chiloensis (Cactaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossa, Carmen G; Larridon, Isabel; Peralta, Gioconda; Asselman, Pieter; Pérez, Fernanda

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to develop microsatellite markers as a tool to study population structure, genetic diversity and effective population size of Echinopsis chiloensis, an endemic cactus from arid and semiarid regions of Central Chile. We developed 12 polymorphic microsatellite markers for E. chiloensis using next-generation sequencing and tested them in 60 individuals from six sites, covering all the latitudinal range of this species. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 3 to 8, while the observed (Ho) and expected (He) heterozygosity ranged from 0.0 to 0.80 and from 0.10 to 0.76, respectively. We also detected significant differences between sites, with F ST values ranging from 0.05 to 0.29. Microsatellite markers will enable us to estimate genetic diversity and population structure of E. chiloensis in future ecological and phylogeographic studies.

  9. Development and characterization of EST-SSR markers for Ottelia acuminata var. jingxiensis (Hydrocharitaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-Zhong; Lu, Meng-Xue; Saina, Josphat K; Gichira, Andrew W; Wang, Qing-Feng; Chen, Jin-Ming

    2017-11-01

    Simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were derived from transcriptomic data for Ottelia acuminata (Hydrocharitaceae), a species comprising five endemic and highly endangered varieties in China. Sixteen novel SSR markers were developed for O. acuminata var. jingxiensis . One to eight alleles per locus were found, with a mean of 2.896. The observed and expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.000 to 1.000 and 0.000 to 0.793, respectively. Interestingly, in cross-varietal amplification, 13 out of the 16 loci were successfully amplified in O. acuminata var. acuminata , and 12 amplified in each of the other three varieties of O. acuminata . These newly developed SSR markers will facilitate further study of genetic variation and provide important genetic data needed for appropriate conservation of natural populations of all varieties of O. acuminata .

  10. Development of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy monitoring of fuel markers to prevent fraud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Timothy; Clarkson, John; White, Peter C.; Meakin, Nicholas; McDonald, Ken

    2013-05-01

    Governments often tax fuel products to generate revenues to support and stimulate their economies. They also subsidize the cost of essential fuel products. Fuel taxation and subsidization practices are both subject to fraud. Oil marketing companies also suffer from fuel fraud with loss of legitimate sales and additional quality and liability issues. The use of an advanced marking system to identify and control fraud has been shown to be effective in controlling illegal activity. DeCipher has developed surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy as its lead technology for measuring markers in fuel to identify and control malpractice. SERS has many advantages that make it highly suitable for this purpose. The SERS instruments are portable and can be used to monitor fuel at any point in the supply chain. SERS shows high specificity for the marker, with no false positives. Multiple markers can also be detected in a single SERS analysis allowing, for example, specific regional monitoring of fuel. The SERS analysis from fuel is also quick, clear and decisive, with a measurement time of less than 5 minutes. We will present results highlighting our development of the use of a highly stable silver colloid as a SERS substrate to measure the markers at ppb levels. Preliminary results from the use of a solid state SERS substrate to measure fuel markers will also be presented.

  11. Development of SSR markers for a Tibetan medicinal plant, Lancea tibetica (Phrymaceae), based on RAD sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zunzhe; Zhang, Faqi; Liu, Hairui; Gao, Qingbo; Chen, Shilong

    2016-11-01

    Lancea tibetica (Phrymaceae), a Tibetan medicinal plant, is endemic to the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. The over-exploitation of wild L. tibetica has led to the destruction of many populations. To enhance protection and management, biological research, especially population genetic studies, should be carried out on L. tibetica . Simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers of L. tibetica were developed to analyze population diversity. Four thousand four hundred and forty-one SSR loci were identified for L. tibetica based on restriction-site associated DNA (RAD) sequencing on the Illumina HiSeq platform. One hundred SSR loci were arbitrarily selected for primer design, and 38 of them were successfully amplified. These markers were tested on 56 individuals from three populations of L. tibetica , and 10 markers displayed polymorphisms. The total number of alleles per locus ranged from three to eight, and observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.200 to 1.000 and 0.683 to 0.879, respectively. We tested for cross-amplification of these 10 markers in the related species L. hirsuta and found that nine could be successfully amplified. The SSR markers characterized here are the first to be developed and tested in L. tibetica . They will be useful for future population genetic studies on L. tibetica and closely related species.

  12. GMATA: An Integrated Software Package for Genome-Scale SSR Mining, Marker Development and Viewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuewen; Wang, Le

    2016-01-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs), also referred to as microsatellites, are highly variable tandem DNAs that are widely used as genetic markers. The increasing availability of whole-genome and transcript sequences provides information resources for SSR marker development. However, efficient software is required to efficiently identify and display SSR information along with other gene features at a genome scale. We developed novel software package Genome-wide Microsatellite Analyzing Tool Package (GMATA) integrating SSR mining, statistical analysis and plotting, marker design, polymorphism screening and marker transferability, and enabled simultaneously display SSR markers with other genome features. GMATA applies novel strategies for SSR analysis and primer design in large genomes, which allows GMATA to perform faster calculation and provides more accurate results than existing tools. Our package is also capable of processing DNA sequences of any size on a standard computer. GMATA is user friendly, only requires mouse clicks or types inputs on the command line, and is executable in multiple computing platforms. We demonstrated the application of GMATA in plants genomes and reveal a novel distribution pattern of SSRs in 15 grass genomes. The most abundant motifs are dimer GA/TC, the A/T monomer and the GCG/CGC trimer, rather than the rich G/C content in DNA sequence. We also revealed that SSR count is a linear to the chromosome length in fully assembled grass genomes. GMATA represents a powerful application tool that facilitates genomic sequence analyses. GAMTA is freely available at http://sourceforge.net/projects/gmata/?source=navbar.

  13. Microsatellite marker development by partial sequencing of the sour passion fruit genome (Passiflora edulis Sims).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araya, Susan; Martins, Alexandre M; Junqueira, Nilton T V; Costa, Ana Maria; Faleiro, Fábio G; Ferreira, Márcio E

    2017-07-21

    The Passiflora genus comprises hundreds of wild and cultivated species of passion fruit used for food, industrial, ornamental and medicinal purposes. Efforts to develop genomic tools for genetic analysis of P. edulis, the most important commercial Passiflora species, are still incipient. In spite of many recognized applications of microsatellite markers in genetics and breeding, their availability for passion fruit research remains restricted. Microsatellite markers in P. edulis are usually limited in number, show reduced polymorphism, and are mostly based on compound or imperfect repeats. Furthermore, they are confined to only a few Passiflora species. We describe the use of NGS technology to partially assemble the P. edulis genome in order to develop hundreds of new microsatellite markers. A total of 14.11 Gbp of Illumina paired-end sequence reads were analyzed to detect simple sequence repeat sites in the sour passion fruit genome. A sample of 1300 contigs containing perfect repeat microsatellite sequences was selected for PCR primer development. Panels of di- and tri-nucleotide repeat markers were then tested in P. edulis germplasm accessions for validation. DNA polymorphism was detected in 74% of the markers (PIC = 0.16 to 0.77; number of alleles/locus = 2 to 7). A core panel of highly polymorphic markers (PIC = 0.46 to 0.77) was used to cross-amplify PCR products in 79 species of Passiflora (including P. edulis), belonging to four subgenera (Astrophea, Decaloba, Distephana and Passiflora). Approximately 71% of the marker/species combinations resulted in positive amplicons in all species tested. DNA polymorphism was detected in germplasm accessions of six closely related Passiflora species (P. edulis, P. alata, P. maliformis, P. nitida, P. quadrangularis and P. setacea) and the data used for accession discrimination and species assignment. A database of P. edulis DNA sequences obtained by NGS technology was examined to identify microsatellite repeats in

  14. Annual report of Fusion Research and Development Directorate of JAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, Hirotaka; Hoshino, Katsumichi; Isei, Nobuaki; Nakamura, Hiroo; Sato, Satoshi; Shimada, Katsuhiro; Sugie, Tatsuo

    2009-01-01

    This annual report provides an overview of major results and progress on research and development (R and D) activities at Fusion Research and Development Directorate of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) from April 1, 2007 to March 31, 2008, including those performed in collaboration with other directorates of JAEA, research institutes, and universities. The JT-60U operation regime was extended toward the long sustainment of high normalized beta (β N ) with good confinement (β N =2.6 x 28 s). Effectiveness of real-time control of current profile was demonstrated in high β plasmas. Toroidal momentum diffusivity and the convection velocity were systematically clarified for the first time, and intrinsic rotation due to pressure gradient was discovered. Effects of toroidal rotation and magnetic field ripple on type 1 ELM size and pedestal performance were clarified, and type I ELM control was demonstrated by toroidal rotation control. Variety of inter-machine experiments, such as JT-60U and JET, and domestic collaborations were performed. In theoretical and analytical researches, for the NEXT (Numerical Experiment of Tokamak) project, numerical simulations of a tokamak plasma turbulence progressed and a zonal field generation was investigated. Also, nonlinear MHD simulations found the Alfven resonance effects on the evolution of magnetic islands driven by externally applied perturbations. Integrations of several kinds of element codes progressed in the integrated transport/MHD model, the integrated edge/pedestal model and the integrated SOL/divertor model. In fusion reactor technologies, R and Ds for ITER and fusion DEMO plants have been carried out. For ITER, a steady state operation of the 170GHz gyrotron up to 800 s with 1 MW was demonstrated. Also extracted beam current of the neutral beam injector has been extended to 320 mA at 796 keV. In the ITER Test Blanket Module (TBM), designs and R and Ds on Water and Helium Cooled Solid Breeder TBMs were progressed. For

  15. Development of functional markers associated with phenotypic characteristics for identification of soy variety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibarra, M.; Castro, A; Capdevielle, F.

    2013-01-01

    The organization of agricultural systems requires the verification of the genetic identity and purity of cultivars. The increase in the number of soy varieties to be evaluated, and the narrow genetic base of soybean cultivars, make the identification using phenotypic descriptors very difficult. The International Union for the Protection of New Varieties of Plants (UPOV) has recognized the utility of molecular markers associated with descriptive phenotypic characteristics. With the goal of developing this kind of markers, six genic or genomic S SR were selected in silico (Sat286, Satt229, GmPrx1, GMES1173, Satt571 and Gm Hi), plus two previously reported markers (GmF35H and SoyF3H). All were evaluated in 35 soybean cultivars. The SSRs GmPrx1 and Gm Hi selected for seed coat peroxidase and hilum color respectively were monomorphic. The mean Polymorphism Information Content (PI C) value within the selected group of polymorphic markers was 0.48 with an average of 3.12 allele per locus. GmF35H discriminated the soybean varieties according to the flower color (white and purple). Discrimination tests showed a high percentage of accurate classification of growth habit (95.8%) and pubescence color (80.6%) with Sat286 and Soy F3H, respectively. The classification values for pod color (74.2%) and leaflet size (73.5%) were intermediate using GMES1173 and Satt571, respectively. The marker Satt229 was not discriminating for flowering time (50%) and maturity (42.8%). Molecular markers selected in or close to sequences of interest can be integrated into a genetic identification system as complementary markers to the classic phenotypic descriptors of soybean varieties

  16. Development and mapping of DArT markers within the Festuca - Lolium complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Studer Bruno

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Grasses are among the most important and widely cultivated plants on Earth. They provide high quality fodder for livestock, are used for turf and amenity purposes, and play a fundamental role in environment protection. Among cultivated grasses, species within the Festuca-Lolium complex predominate, especially in temperate regions. To facilitate high-throughput genome profiling and genetic mapping within the complex, we have developed a Diversity Arrays Technology (DArT array for five grass species: F. pratensis, F. arundinacea, F. glaucescens, L. perenne and L. multiflorum. Results The DArTFest array contains 7680 probes derived from methyl-filtered genomic representations. In a first marker discovery experiment performed on 40 genotypes from each species (with the exception of F. glaucescens for which only 7 genotypes were used, we identified 3884 polymorphic markers. The number of DArT markers identified in every single genotype varied from 821 to 1852. To test the usefulness of DArTFest array for physical mapping, DArT markers were assigned to each of the seven chromosomes of F. pratensis using single chromosome substitution lines while recombinants of F. pratensis chromosome 3 were used to allocate the markers to seven chromosome bins. Conclusion The resources developed in this project will facilitate the development of genetic maps in Festuca and Lolium, the analysis on genetic diversity, and the monitoring of the genomic constitution of the Festuca × Lolium hybrids. They will also enable marker-assisted selection for multiple traits or for specific genome regions.

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF EST-SSR MARKERS TO ASSESS GENETIC DIVERSITY OF BROCCOLI AND ITS RELATED SPECIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Kholilatul Izzah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of Expressed Sequence Tag-Simple Sequence Repeat (EST-SSR markers derived from public database is known to be more efficient, faster and low cost. The objective of this study was to generate a new set of EST-SSR markers for broccoli and its related species and their usefulness for assessing their genetic diversity. A total of 202 Brassica oleracea ESTs were retrieved from NCBI and then assembled into 172 unigenes by means of CAP3 program. Identification of SSRs was carried out using web-based tool, RepeatMasker software. Afterwards, EST-SSR markers were developed using Primer3 program. Among the identified SSRs, trinucleotide repeats were the most common repeat types, which accounted for about 50%. A total of eight primer pairs were successfully designed and yielded amplification products. Among them, five markers were polymorphic and displayed a total of 30 alleles with an average number of six alleles per locus. The polymorphic markers were subsequently used for analyzing genetic diversity of 36 B. oleracea cultivars including 22 broccoli, five cauliflower and nine kohlrabi cultivars based on genetic similarity matrix as implemented in NTSYS program. At similarity coefficient of 61%, a UPGMA clustering dendrogram effectively separated 36 genotypes into three main groups, where 30 out of 36 genotypes were clearly discriminated. The result obtained in the present study would help breeders in selecting parental lines for crossing. Moreover, the novel EST-SSR markers developed in the study could be a valuable tool for differentiating cultivars of broccoli and related species.

  18. GLOBAL EXPRESSION PROFILING AS A TOOL TO DEVELOP MOLECULAR MARKERS LINKED TO HERBICIDE STRESS IN ARABIDOPSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbicide drift (unintentional physical movement from target to off-target plants) is a cause of crop loss in US. Low-dose, high-potency herbicides that have short environmental persistence times constrain efforts to develop or identify metabolite or biochemical markers of exposu...

  19. Development and characterization of 35 single nucleotide polymorphism markers for the brown alga Fucus vesiculosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Canovas, Fernando; Mota, Catarina; Ferreira-Costa, Joana; Serrao, Ester; Coyer, Jim; Olsen, Jeanine; Pearson, Gareth

    2011-01-01

    We characterized 35 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers for the brown alga Fucus vesiculosus. Based on existing Fucus Expressed Sequence Tag libraries for heat and desiccation-stressed tissue, SNPs were developed and confirmed by re-sequencing cDNA from a diverse panel of individuals. SNP

  20. Development and characterization of nine new microsatellite markers in Taraxacum (Asteraceae).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasut, R.; Dijk, P.J.; Falque, M.; Trávnicek, B.; Jong, de J.H.S.G.M.

    2004-01-01

    This study aims at developing and characterizing new microsatellite primer pairs in Taraxacum officinale auct. to produce polymorphic markers for genetical and evolutionary studies on apomixis in this sexual-apomictic complex. A total of 24 diploid plants were tested for allelic polymorphism and

  1. Characterization and development of EST-derived SSR markers in cultivated sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yujun

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Currently there exists a limited availability of genetic marker resources in sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas, which is hindering genetic research in this species. It is necessary to develop more molecular markers for potential use in sweetpotato genetic research. With the newly developed next generation sequencing technology, large amount of transcribed sequences of sweetpotato have been generated and are available for identifying SSR markers by data mining. Results In this study, we investigated 181,615 ESTs for the identification and development of SSR markers. In total, 8,294 SSRs were identified from 7,163 SSR-containing unique ESTs. On an average, one SSR was found per 7.1 kb of EST sequence with tri-nucleotide motifs (42.9% being the most abundant followed by di- (41.2%, tetra- (9.2%, penta- (3.7% and hexa-nucleotide (3.1% repeat types. The top five motifs included AG/CT (26.9%, AAG/CTT (13.5%, AT/TA (10.6%, CCG/CGG (5.8% and AAT/ATT (4.5%. After removing possible duplicate of published EST-SSRs of sweetpotato, a total of non-repeat 7,958 SSR motifs were identified. Based on these SSR-containing sequences, 1,060 pairs of high-quality SSR primers were designed and used for validation of the amplification and assessment of the polymorphism between two parents of one mapping population (E Shu 3 Hao and Guang 2k-30 and eight accessions of cultivated sweetpotatoes. The results showed that 816 primer pairs could yield reproducible and strong amplification products, of which 195 (23.9% and 342 (41.9% primer pairs exhibited polymorphism between E Shu 3 Hao and Guang 2k-30 and among the 8 cultivated sweetpotatoes, respectively. Conclusion This study gives an insight into the frequency, type and distribution of sweetpotato EST-SSRs and demonstrates successful development of EST-SSR markers in cultivated sweetpotato. These EST-SSR markers could enrich the current resource of molecular markers for the sweetpotato community and would

  2. Development of genic-SSR markers by deep transcriptome sequencing in pigeonpea [Cajanus cajan (L.) Millspaugh

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Pigeonpea [Cajanus cajan (L.) Millspaugh], one of the most important food legumes of semi-arid tropical and subtropical regions, has limited genomic resources, particularly expressed sequence based (genic) markers. We report a comprehensive set of validated genic simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers using deep transcriptome sequencing, and its application in genetic diversity analysis and mapping. Results In this study, 43,324 transcriptome shotgun assembly unigene contigs were assembled from 1.696 million 454 GS-FLX sequence reads of separate pooled cDNA libraries prepared from leaf, root, stem and immature seed of two pigeonpea varieties, Asha and UPAS 120. A total of 3,771 genic-SSR loci, excluding homopolymeric and compound repeats, were identified; of which 2,877 PCR primer pairs were designed for marker development. Dinucleotide was the most common repeat motif with a frequency of 60.41%, followed by tri- (34.52%), hexa- (2.62%), tetra- (1.67%) and pentanucleotide (0.76%) repeat motifs. Primers were synthesized and tested for 772 of these loci with repeat lengths of ≥18 bp. Of these, 550 markers were validated for consistent amplification in eight diverse pigeonpea varieties; 71 were found to be polymorphic on agarose gel electrophoresis. Genetic diversity analysis was done on 22 pigeonpea varieties and eight wild species using 20 highly polymorphic genic-SSR markers. The number of alleles at these loci ranged from 4-10 and the polymorphism information content values ranged from 0.46 to 0.72. Neighbor-joining dendrogram showed distinct separation of the different groups of pigeonpea cultivars and wild species. Deep transcriptome sequencing of the two parental lines helped in silico identification of polymorphic genic-SSR loci to facilitate the rapid development of an intra-species reference genetic map, a subset of which was validated for expected allelic segregation in the reference mapping population. Conclusion We developed 550 validated genic

  3. De novo transcriptomic analysis of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp.) for genic SSR marker development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Honglin; Wang, Lixia; Liu, Xiaoyan; Hu, Liangliang; Wang, Suhua; Cheng, Xuzhen

    2017-07-11

    Cowpea [Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.] is one of the most important legumes in tropical and semi-arid regions. However, there is relatively little genomic information available for genetic research on and breeding of cowpea. The objectives of this study were to analyse the cowpea transcriptome and develop genic molecular markers for future genetic studies of this genus. Approximately 54 million high-quality cDNA sequence reads were obtained from cowpea based on Illumina paired-end sequencing technology and were de novo assembled to generate 47,899 unigenes with an N50 length of 1534 bp. Sequence similarity analysis revealed 36,289 unigenes (75.8%) with significant similarity to known proteins in the non-redundant (Nr) protein database, 23,471 unigenes (49.0%) with BLAST hits in the Swiss-Prot database, and 20,654 unigenes (43.1%) with high similarity in the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) database. Further analysis identified 5560 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) as potential genic molecular markers. Validating a random set of 500 SSR markers yielded 54 polymorphic markers among 32 cowpea accessions. This transcriptomic analysis of cowpea provided a valuable set of genomic data for characterizing genes with important agronomic traits in Vigna unguiculata and a new set of genic SSR markers for further genetic studies and breeding in cowpea and related Vigna species.

  4. Technetium-99m carboxymethylcellulose: A newly developed fibre marker for gastric emptying studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schade, J.H.; Hoving, J.; Brouweres, J.R.B.J.; Riedstra-van Gent, H.G.; Zijlstra, J.; Dijkstra, J.P.H.

    1991-01-01

    We report a study of technetium-99m-labelled carboxymethyl-cellulose ( 99m Tc-CMC) as a newly developed non-digestible marker of the solid phase of gastric contents. The radiosynthesis is simple and shows a high labelling efficiency. In vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrated stability of the marker in the gastrointestinal tract during the process of gastric emptying. The gastric half-emptying time in ten healthy volunteers of both sexes was 105±17 min (mean±SD). This rate of gastric emptying is similar to that of non-digestible solid-phase markers such as in vivo labelled 99m Tc-chicken liver or radio-iodinated cellulose. In comparison with digestible solid-phase markers such as 99m Tc-labelled pancake or 99m Tc-cooked egg, gastric emptying of 99m Tc-CMC occurred more slowly, confirming the expected behaviour of a non-digestible solid-phase marker. We conclude that 99m Tc-CMC has the advantage of a simple and rapid labelling procedure and may be useful for clinical studies of gastric emptying. (orig.)

  5. Development of marker vaccines for rinderpest virus using reverse genetics technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parida, S.; Walsh, E.P.; Anderson, J.; Baron, M.D.; Barrett, T.

    2005-01-01

    Rinderpest is an economically devastating disease of cattle (cattle plague), but a live-attenuated vaccine has been very successfully used in a global rinderpest eradication campaign. As a consequence, the endemic focus of the virus has been reduced to an area in eastern Africa known as the Kenya-Somali ecosystem. Although the vaccine is highly effective, it has a drawback in that vaccinated animals are serologically indistinguishable from those that have recovered from natural infection. In the final stages of the eradication campaign, when vaccination to control the spread of disease will only be used in emergencies to contain an outbreak, a marker vaccine would be a very useful tool to monitor possible wild virus spread outside the vaccination area. Marker vaccines for rinderpest, and other viruses with negative-sense RNA genomes, can now be produced using reverse genetics, and the development of such marker vaccines for rinderpest virus is described. (author)

  6. Development of ITS sequence based molecular marker to distinguish, Tribulus terrestris L. (Zygophyllaceae) from its adulterants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramani, Subramani Paranthaman; Murugan, Ramar; Ravikumar, Kaliamoorthy; Venkatasubramanian, Padma

    2010-09-01

    Tribulus terrestris L. (Zygophyllaceae) is one of the highly traded raw drugs and also used as a stimulative food additive in Europe and USA. While, Ayurvedic Pharmacopoeia of India recognizes T. terrestris as Goksura, Tribulus lanuginosus and T. subramanyamii are also traded by the same name raising issues of quality control. The nuclear ribosomal RNA genes and ITS (internal transcribed spacer) sequence were used to develop species-specific DNA markers. The species-specific markers efficiently amplified 295bp for T. terrestris (TT1F and TT1R), 300bp for T. lanuginosus (TL1F and TL1R) and 214bp for T. subramanyamii (TS1F and TS1R). These DNA markers can be used to distinguish T. terrestris from its adulterants. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Development of microsatellite markers in Cordia bifurcata (Boraginaceae) and cross-species amplification in Cordia inermis and Cordia pringlei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoon, Tracey R; Kesseli, Rick V

    2008-09-01

    We developed 16 microsatellite markers in Cordia bifurcata, a Central and South American shrub. The markers show low polymorphism in C. bifurcata, a species suspected of self-fertilization or apomixis. Of four polymorphic loci, three had only two alleles. However, current research indicates that these markers hold value for interpopulational comparisons of C. bifurcata and for analyses of congeners. In Cordia inermis, a dioecious or subdioecious shrub, seven of the markers produced interpretable amplification products of which five showed polymorphism. In Cordia pringlei, a distylous shrub, nine of the markers produced interpretable amplification products of which six showed polymorphism. © 2008 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2008 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Report on the development of putative functional SSR and SNP markers in passion fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, Zirlane Portugal; Munhoz, Carla de Freitas; Vieira, Maria Lucia Carneiro

    2017-09-06

    Passionflowers Passiflora edulis and Passiflora alata are diploid, outcrossing and understudied fruit bearing species. In Brazil, passion fruit cultivation began relatively recently and has earned the country an outstanding position as the world's top producer of passion fruit. The fruit's main economic value lies in the production of juice, an essential exotic ingredient in juice blends. Currently, crop improvement strategies, including those for underexploited tropical species, tend to incorporate molecular genetic approaches. In this study, we examined a set of P. edulis transcripts expressed in response to infection by Xanthomonas axonopodis, (the passion fruit's main bacterial pathogen that attacks the vines), aiming at the development of putative functional markers, i.e. SSRs (simple sequence repeats) and SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms). A total of 210 microsatellites were found in 998 sequences, and trinucleotide repeats were found to be the most frequent (31.4%). Of the sequences selected for designing primers, 80.9% could be used to develop SSR markers, and 60.6% SNP markers for P. alata. SNPs were all biallelic and found within 15 gene fragments of P. alata. Overall, gene fragments generated 10,003 bp. SNP frequency was estimated as one SNP every 294 bp. Polymorphism rates revealed by SSR and SNP loci were 29.4 and 53.6%, respectively. Passiflora edulis transcripts were useful for the development of putative functional markers for P. alata, suggesting a certain level of sequence conservation between these cultivated species. The markers developed herein could be used for genetic mapping purposes and also in diversity studies.

  9. Fine mapping of the rice Bph1 gene, which confers resistance to the brown planthopper (Nilaparvata lugens stal), and development of STS markers for marker-assisted selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Young-Soon; Ji, Hyeonso; Yun, Doh-Won; Ahn, Byoung-Ohg; Lee, Myung Chul; Suh, Seok-Cheol; Lee, Chun Seok; Ahn, Eok Keun; Jeon, Yong-Hee; Jin, Il-Doo; Sohn, Jae-Keun; Koh, Hee-Jong; Eun, Moo-Young

    2008-08-31

    The brown planthopper (BPH) is a major insect pest in rice, and damages these plants by sucking phloem-sap and transmitting viral diseases. Many BPH resistance genes have been identified in indica varieties and wild rice accessions, but none has yet been cloned. In the present study we report fine mapping of the region containing the Bph1 locus, which enabled us to perform marker-aided selection (MAS). We used 273 F8 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) derived from a cross between Cheongcheongbyeo, an indica type variety harboring Bph1 from Mudgo, and Hwayeongbyeo, a BPH susceptible japonica variety. By random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis using 656 random 10-mer primers, three RAPD markers (OPH09, OPA10 and OPA15) linked to Bph1 were identified and converted to SCAR (sequence characterized amplified region) markers. These markers were found to be contained in two BAC clones derived from chromosome 12: OPH09 on OSJNBa0011B18, and both OPA10 and OPA15 on OSJNBa0040E10. By sequence analysis of ten additional BAC clones evenly distributed between OSJNBa0011B18 and OSJNBa0040E10, we developed 15 STS markers. Of these, pBPH4 and pBPH14 flanked Bph1 at distances of 0.2 cM and 0.8 cM, respectively. The STS markers pBPH9, pBPH19, pBPH20, and pBPH21 co-segregated with Bph1. These markers were shown to be very useful for marker-assisted selection (MAS) in breeding populations of 32 F6 RILs from a cross between Andabyeo and IR71190, and 32 F5 RILs from a cross between Andabyeo and Suwon452.

  10. Problems of genetic diagnosis: serological markers in the prognosis of the development of human speed abilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serhiyenko Leonid Prokopovich

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the study of correlation between blood groups system AB0 and Rh with the peculiarities of the development of human speed abilities. Complex of genetic markers is defined. It is possible to use this complex in the individual prognosis of the development of human motor abilities. With 0(I and A(II blood groups and Rh+ have a high inclination to the physical development. Better identify trends in the phenotypic expression of high-speed abilities in people with 0(I and A(II blood groups in comparison with people with the AB(IV and B(III blood group. The pattern of decreasing susceptibility to the development of high-speed abilities as follows: 0(I>A(II>B(III>AB (IV. It is established that a complex system of genetic markers AB0 and Rh blood has no gender differences.

  11. Mining and Development of Novel SSR Markers Using Next Generation Sequencing (NGS Data in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sima Taheri

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Microsatellites, or simple sequence repeats (SSRs, are one of the most informative and multi-purpose genetic markers exploited in plant functional genomics. However, the discovery of SSRs and development using traditional methods are laborious, time-consuming, and costly. Recently, the availability of high-throughput sequencing technologies has enabled researchers to identify a substantial number of microsatellites at less cost and effort than traditional approaches. Illumina is a noteworthy transcriptome sequencing technology that is currently used in SSR marker development. Although 454 pyrosequencing datasets can be used for SSR development, this type of sequencing is no longer supported. This review aims to present an overview of the next generation sequencing, with a focus on the efficient use of de novo transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq and related tools for mining and development of microsatellites in plants.

  12. ESAP plus: a web-based server for EST-SSR marker development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponyared, Piyarat; Ponsawat, Jiradej; Tongsima, Sissades; Seresangtakul, Pusadee; Akkasaeng, Chutipong; Tantisuwichwong, Nathpapat

    2016-12-22

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) have become widely used as molecular markers in plant genetic studies due to their abundance, high allelic variation at each locus and simplicity to analyze using conventional PCR amplification. To study plants with unknown genome sequence, SSR markers from Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs), which can be obtained from the plant mRNA (converted to cDNA), must be utilized. With the advent of high-throughput sequencing technology, huge EST sequence data have been generated and are now accessible from many public databases. However, SSR marker identification from a large in-house or public EST collection requires a computational pipeline that makes use of several standard bioinformatic tools to design high quality EST-SSR primers. Some of these computational tools are not users friendly and must be tightly integrated with reference genomic databases. A web-based bioinformatic pipeline, called EST Analysis Pipeline Plus (ESAP Plus), was constructed for assisting researchers to develop SSR markers from a large EST collection. ESAP Plus incorporates several bioinformatic scripts and some useful standard software tools necessary for the four main procedures of EST-SSR marker development, namely 1) pre-processing, 2) clustering and assembly, 3) SSR mining and 4) SSR primer design. The proposed pipeline also provides two alternative steps for reducing EST redundancy and identifying SSR loci. Using public sugarcane ESTs, ESAP Plus automatically executed the aforementioned computational pipeline via a simple web user interface, which was implemented using standard PHP, HTML, CSS and Java scripts. With ESAP Plus, users can upload raw EST data and choose various filtering options and parameters to analyze each of the four main procedures through this web interface. All input EST data and their predicted SSR results will be stored in the ESAP Plus MySQL database. Users will be notified via e-mail when the automatic process is completed and they can

  13. Development of genic SSR markers from transcriptome sequencing of pear buds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Xiao-yan; Liu, Guo-qin; Zong, Yu; Teng, Yuan-wen; Cai, Dan-ying

    2014-04-01

    A total of 8375 genic simple sequence repeat (SSR) loci were discovered from a unigene set assembled from 116282 transcriptomic unigenes in this study. Dinucleotide repeat motifs were the most common with a frequency of 65.11%, followed by trinucleotide (32.81%). A total of 4100 primer pairs were designed from the SSR loci. Of these, 343 primer pairs (repeat length ≥15 bp) were synthesized with an M13 tail and tested for stable amplification and polymorphism in four Pyrus accessions. After the preliminary test, 104 polymorphic genic SSR markers were developed; dinucleotide and trinucleotide repeats represented 97.11% (101) of these. Twenty-eight polymorphic genic SSR markers were selected randomly to further validate genetic diversity among 28 Pyrus accessions. These markers displayed a high level of polymorphism. The number of alleles at these SSR loci ranged from 2 to 17, with a mean of 9.43 alleles per locus, and the polymorphism information content (PIC) values ranged from 0.26 to 0.91. The UPGMA (unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic average) cluster analysis grouped the 28 Pyrus accessions into two groups: Oriental pears and Occidental pears, which are congruent to the traditional taxonomy, demonstrating their effectiveness in analyzing Pyrus phylogenetic relationships, enriching rare Pyrus EST-SSR resources, and confirming the potential value of a pear transcriptome database for the development of new SSR markers.

  14. The Economic and Workforce Development Program (ED>Net) Annual Report, 2001-02 [and] Addendum to FY 01-02 Annual Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California Community Colleges, Sacramento. Economic Development Coordination Network (EDNet).

    This document contains an annual report and its addendum from the Economic and Workforce Development Program of California Community Colleges. The annual report provides an overview of the Program's evaluation processes, regional centers, short-term projects, legislation, strategic plan, etc. It also provides vital facts about the program such as…

  15. Development and validation of genic-SSR markers in sesame by RNA-seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haiyang; Wei, Libin; Miao, Hongmei; Zhang, Tide; Wang, Cuiying

    2012-07-16

    genic-SSRs could be integrated into 9 main linkage groups. 2,164 genic-SSR markers have been developed in sesame using transcriptome sequencing. 276 of 300 validated primer pairs successfully yielded PCR amplicons in 24 cultivated sesame accessions. These markers increase current SSR marker resources and will greatly benefit genetic diversity, qualitative and quantitative trait mapping and marker-assisted selection studies in sesame.

  16. Genic Microsatellite Markers in Brassica rapa: Development, Characterization, Mapping, and Their Utility in Other Cultivated and Wild Brassica Relatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramchiary, Nirala; Nguyen, Van Dan; Li, Xiaonan; Hong, Chang Pyo; Dhandapani, Vignesh; Choi, Su Ryun; Yu, Ge; Piao, Zhong Yun; Lim, Yong Pyo

    2011-01-01

    Genic microsatellite markers, also known as functional markers, are preferred over anonymous markers as they reveal the variation in transcribed genes among individuals. In this study, we developed a total of 707 expressed sequence tag-derived simple sequence repeat markers (EST-SSRs) and used for development of a high-density integrated map using four individual mapping populations of B. rapa. This map contains a total of 1426 markers, consisting of 306 EST-SSRs, 153 intron polymorphic markers, 395 bacterial artificial chromosome-derived SSRs (BAC-SSRs), and 572 public SSRs and other markers covering a total distance of 1245.9 cM of the B. rapa genome. Analysis of allelic diversity in 24 B. rapa germplasm using 234 mapped EST-SSR markers showed amplification of 2 alleles by majority of EST-SSRs, although amplification of alleles ranging from 2 to 8 was found. Transferability analysis of 167 EST-SSRs in 35 species belonging to cultivated and wild brassica relatives showed 42.51% (Sysimprium leteum) to 100% (B. carinata, B. juncea, and B. napus) amplification. Our newly developed EST-SSRs and high-density linkage map based on highly transferable genic markers would facilitate the molecular mapping of quantitative trait loci and the positional cloning of specific genes, in addition to marker-assisted selection and comparative genomic studies of B. rapa with other related species. PMID:21768136

  17. Development of 23 novel polymorphic EST-SSR markers for the endangered relict conifer Metasequoia glyptostroboides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yuqing; Bi, Quanxin; Guan, Wenbin; Mao, Jian-Feng

    2015-09-01

    Metasequoia glyptostroboides is an endangered relict conifer species endemic to China. In this study, expressed sequence tag-simple sequence repeat (EST-SSR) markers were developed using transcriptome mining for future genetic and functional studies. We collected 97,565 unigene sequences generated by 454 pyrosequencing. A bioinformatics analysis identified 2087 unique and putative microsatellites, from which 96 novel microsatellite markers were developed. Fifty-three of the 96 primer sets successfully amplified clear fragments of the expected sizes; 23 of those loci were polymorphic. The number of alleles per locus ranged from two to eight, with an average of three, and the observed and expected heterozygosity values ranged from 0 to 1.0 and 0.117 to 0.813, respectively. These microsatellite loci will enrich the genetic resources to develop functional studies and conservation strategies for this endangered relict species.

  18. Workforce and Economic Development Annual Report, 2011-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    California Community Colleges, Chancellor's Office, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The California Community Colleges Workforce and Economic Development program (WED program) helps students, incumbent workers, business partners and industries develop skilled competencies in critical industry sectors. As a source for developing and implementing training and curriculum, the WED program is instrumental in helping the community…

  19. Development of SSR Markers Linked to Low Hydrocyanic Acid Content in Sorghum-Sudan Grass Hybrid Based on BSA Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao-Xia, Yu; Zhi-Hua, Liu; Zhuo, Yu; Yue, Shi; Xiao-Yu, Li

    2016-01-01

    Sorghum-Sudan grass hybrid containing high hydrocyanic acid content can cause hydrocyanic acid poisoning to the livestock and limit the popularization of this forage crop. Molecular markers associated with low hydrocyanic acid content can speed up the process of identification of genotypes with low hydrocyanic acid content. In the present study, 11 polymorphic SSR primers were screened and used for bulked segregant analysis and single marker analysis. Three SSR markers Xtxp7230, Xtxp7375 and Bnlg667960 associated with low hydrocyanic acid content were rapidly identified by BSA. In single marker analysis, six markers Xtxp7230, Xtxp7375, Bnlg667960, Xtxp67-11, Xtxp295-7 and Xtxp12-9 were linked to low hydrocyanic acid content, which explained the proportion of phenotypic variation from 7.6 % to 41.2 %. The markers identified by BSA were also verified by single marker analysis. The three SSR marker bands were then cloned and sequenced for sequence homology analysis in NCBI. It is the first report on the development of molecular markers associated with low hydrocyanic acid content in sorghum- Sudan grass hybrid. These markers will be useful for genetic improvement of low hydrocyanic acid sorghum-Sudan grass hybrid by marker-assisted breeding.

  20. Development of a set of SNP markers present in expressed genes of the apple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chagné, David; Gasic, Ksenija; Crowhurst, Ross N; Han, Yuepeng; Bassett, Heather C; Bowatte, Deepa R; Lawrence, Timothy J; Rikkerink, Erik H A; Gardiner, Susan E; Korban, Schuyler S

    2008-11-01

    Molecular markers associated with gene coding regions are useful tools for bridging functional and structural genomics. Due to their high abundance in plant genomes, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are present within virtually all genomic regions, including most coding sequences. The objective of this study was to develop a set of SNPs for the apple by taking advantage of the wealth of genomics resources available for the apple, including a large collection of expressed sequenced tags (ESTs). Using bioinformatics tools, a search for SNPs within an EST database of approximately 350,000 sequences developed from a variety of apple accessions was conducted. This resulted in the identification of a total of 71,482 putative SNPs. As the apple genome is reported to be an ancient polyploid, attempts were made to verify whether those SNPs detected in silico were attributable either to allelic polymorphisms or to gene duplication or paralogous or homeologous sequence variations. To this end, a set of 464 PCR primer pairs was designed, PCR was amplified using two subsets of plants, and the PCR products were sequenced. The SNPs retrieved from these sequences were then mapped onto apple genetic maps, including a newly constructed map of a Royal Gala x A689-24 cross and a Malling 9 x Robusta 5, map using a bin mapping strategy. The SNP genotyping was performed using the high-resolution melting (HRM) technique. A total of 93 new markers containing 210 coding SNPs were successfully mapped. This new set of SNP markers for the apple offers new opportunities for understanding the genetic control of important horticultural traits using quantitative trait loci (QTL) or linkage disequilibrium analysis. These also serve as useful markers for aligning physical and genetic maps, and as potential transferable markers across the Rosaceae family.

  1. [The development of a new marker of the training status in athletes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statsenko, E A; Kovkova, A V; Nekhaĭ, E V

    2012-01-01

    The present study was based on the mathematical modeling of the middle molecular weight peptides (MMWP) concentration in the blood. On the one hand, MMWP are the products of partial protein catabolism, on the other hand, they act as inductors of protein synthesis. We have developed a complex hormonal marker that allows estimating the adaptive reactions in the organism of the athletes. The marker integrates the known hormonal indices, such as testosterone to cortisol ratio and aldosterone to cortisol ratio (-1,271 + 0,206 x 1n(testosterone) + 1,108 x 1n(aldosterone))/1n(cortisol). The use of a mathematical model for the prediction of MMWP levels in the rowers' blood provides a basis for the application of the new marker for the evaluation of physical conditions of the high-class athletes engaged in other sports. By way of example, the estimation of its informative value for the examination of swimmers has demonstrated significant positive correlation between the predicted and observed MMWP levels (r = 0,4187; p = 0,050). Practicability of applying the newly proposed hormonal marker for monitoring adaptative reactions in athletes is confirmed by significant correlation of calculated values with the real time the freestyle swimmers spend to cover a 50 m distance (r = - 0,4454; p = 0,001).

  2. Development of Genome-Wide SSR Markers from Angelica gigas Nakai Using Next Generation Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Jinsu; Um, Yurry; Kim, Serim; Kim, Ok Tae; Koo, Sung Cheol; Reddy, Chinreddy Subramanyam; Kim, Seong-Cheol; Hong, Chang Pyo; Park, Sin-Gi; Kim, Ho Bang; Lee, Dong Hoon; Jeong, Byung-Hoon; Chung, Jong-Wook; Lee, Yi

    2017-09-21

    Angelica gigas Nakai is an important medicinal herb, widely utilized in Asian countries especially in Korea, Japan, and China. Although it is a vital medicinal herb, the lack of sequencing data and efficient molecular markers has limited the application of a genetic approach for horticultural improvements. Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are universally accepted molecular markers for population structure study. In this study, we found over 130,000 SSRs, ranging from di- to deca-nucleotide motifs, using the genome sequence of Manchu variety (MV) of A. gigas, derived from next generation sequencing (NGS). From the putative SSR regions identified, a total of 16,496 primer sets were successfully designed. Among them, we selected 848 SSR markers that showed polymorphism from in silico analysis and contained tri- to hexa-nucleotide motifs. We tested 36 SSR primer sets for polymorphism in 16 A. gigas accessions. The average polymorphism information content (PIC) was 0.69; the average observed heterozygosity ( H O ) values, and the expected heterozygosity ( H E ) values were 0.53 and 0.73, respectively. These newly developed SSR markers would be useful tools for molecular genetics, genotype identification, genetic mapping, molecular breeding, and studying species relationships of the Angelica genus.

  3. Max Planck Institute for Human Development and Education: Annual Report 1990.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Max-Planck-Institut fuer Bildungsforschung, Berlin (West Germany).

    The Max Planck Institute for Human Development and Education in Germany consists of four research centers dealing with the following topics: sociology and the study of the life course; development and socialization; psychology and human development; and school systems and instruction. This English-language annual report of the Planck Institute,…

  4. Workforce Training and Economic Development Fund: 2014 Annual Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iowa Department of Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The Workforce Training and Economic Development (WTED) Fund was established in 2003 as part of the Grow Iowa Values Fund and is currently funded through the Iowa Skilled Worker and Job Creation Fund. This fund has become an important source of financing for community college new program innovation, development, and capacity building, particularly…

  5. DOMINO: development of informative molecular markers for phylogenetic and genome-wide population genetic studies in non-model organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frías-López, Cristina; Sánchez-Herrero, José F; Guirao-Rico, Sara; Mora, Elisa; Arnedo, Miquel A; Sánchez-Gracia, Alejandro; Rozas, Julio

    2016-12-15

    The development of molecular markers is one of the most important challenges in phylogenetic and genome wide population genetics studies, especially in studies with non-model organisms. A highly promising approach for obtaining suitable markers is the utilization of genomic partitioning strategies for the simultaneous discovery and genotyping of a large number of markers. Unfortunately, not all markers obtained from these strategies provide enough information for solving multiple evolutionary questions at a reasonable taxonomic resolution. We have developed Development Of Molecular markers In Non-model Organisms (DOMINO), a bioinformatics tool for informative marker development from both next generation sequencing (NGS) data and pre-computed sequence alignments. The application implements popular NGS tools with new utilities in a highly versatile pipeline specifically designed to discover or select personalized markers at different levels of taxonomic resolution. These markers can be directly used to study the taxa surveyed for their design, utilized for further downstream PCR amplification in a broader set taxonomic scope, or exploited as suitable templates to bait design for target DNA enrichment techniques. We conducted an exhaustive evaluation of the performance of DOMINO via computer simulations and illustrate its utility to find informative markers in an empirical dataset. DOMINO is freely available from www.ub.edu/softevol/domino CONTACT: elsanchez@ub.edu or jrozas@ub.eduSupplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Development of SRAP, SRAP-RGA, RAPD and SCAR markers linked with a Fusarium wilt resistance gene in eggplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutlu, Nedim; Boyaci, Filiz Hatice; Göçmen, Münevver; Abak, Kazim

    2008-11-01

    Fusarium wilt (Fusarium oxysporum Schlecht. f. sp. melongenae) is a vascular disease of eggplant (Solanum melongena L.). The objectives of this work were (1) to confirm the monogenic inheritance of fusarium wilt resistance in eggplant, (2) to identify molecular markers linked to this resistance, and (3) to develop SCAR markers from most informative markers. We report the tagging of the gene for resistance to fusarium wilt (FOM) in eggplant using SRAP, RGA, SRAP-RGA and RAPD markers. Analysis of segregation data confirmed the monogenic inheritance of resistance. DNA from F(2) and BC(1) populations of eggplant segregating for fusarium wilt resistance was screened with 2,316 primer combinations to detect polymorphism. Three markers were linked within 2.6 cM of the gene. The codominant SRAP marker Me8/Em5 and dominant SRAP-RGA marker Em12/GLPL2 were tightly linked to each other and mapped 1.2 cM from the resistance gene, whereas RAPD marker H12 mapped 2.6 cM from the gene and on the same side as the other two markers. The SRAP marker was converted into two dominant SCAR markers that were confirmed to be linked to the resistance gene in the F(2,) BC(1) and F(2) of BC(3) generations of the same cross. These markers provide a starting point for mapping the eggplant FOM resistance gene in eggplant and for exploring the synteny between solanaceous crops for fusarium wilt resistance genes. The SCAR markers will be useful for identifying fusarium wilt-resistant genotypes in marker-assisted selection breeding programs using segregating progenies of the resistant eggplant progenitor used in this study.

  7. Development of Microsatellite Markers for a Tropical Seagrass, Syringodium filiforme (Cymodoceaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra L. Bijak

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: A total of 17 polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed for the tropical Atlantic seagrass Syringodium filiforme (Cymodoceaceae, enabling analysis of population genetic structure in this species for the first time. Methods and Results: The 17 primers amplified di- and trinucleotide repeats revealing two to eight alleles per locus among the South Florida populations tested. In the analysis of two populations from the Florida Keys (Florida, USA, observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.063 to 0.905, although sampling was from relatively closely located populations so heterozygosity is expected to be higher across larger spatial scales. Multiplex PCRs consisting of two 6-plex and one 5-plex reactions were developed to maximize genotyping efficiency. Conclusions: We present here 17 polymorphic markers that will be useful for the study of clonality and population structure of S. filiforme, a marine plant that forms extensive habitat throughout the tropical Atlantic and Caribbean.

  8. Development and characterization of genomic SSR markers for Anneslea fragrans (Pentaphylacaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lijing; Meng, Kaikai; Liao, Boyong; Li, Chunmei; Zhang, Yue; Liao, Wenbo; Chen, Sufang

    2017-10-01

    The genus Anneslea (Pentaphylacaceae) contains four species and six varieties, most of which are locally endemic. Here, simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were developed for the conservation of these species. The genome of A. fragrans was sequenced and de novo assembled into 445,162 contigs, of which 30,409 SSR loci were detected. Primers for 100 SSR loci were validated with PCR amplification in three populations of A. fragrans . Seventy-nine loci successfully amplified, and 30 were polymorphic. The mean number of alleles, observed heterozygosity, and expected heterozygosity were 7.01 ± 1.60, 0.817 ± 0.241, and 0.796 ± 0.145, respectively. Most primers could be amplified in Ternstroemia gymnanthera , T. kwangtungensis , and Cleyera pachyphylla . Our study demonstrated that shotgun genome sequencing is an efficient way to develop genomic SSR markers for nonmodel species. These genomic SSR loci will be valuable in population genetic studies in Anneslea and its relatives.

  9. Intermittent food restriction initiated late in life prolongs lifespan and retards the onset of age-related markers in the annual fish Nothobranchius guentheri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xia; Du, Xiaoyuan; Zhou, Yang; Wang, Su; Su, Feng; Zhang, Shicui

    2017-06-01

    Two of the most studied and widely accepted conjectures on possible aging mechanisms are the oxidative stress hypothesis and the insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) signaling (IIS) pathway. Intermittent fasting (IF) is known to modulate aging and to prolong lifespan in a variety of organisms, but the mechanisms are still under debate. In this study, we first demonstrated that late-onset two consecutive days a week fasting, a form of IF, termed intermittent food restriction (IFR), exhibited a time-dependent effect, and long-term late-onset IFR extended the mean lifespan and maximum lifespan by approximately 3.5 and 3 weeks, respectively, in the annual fish Nothobranchius guentheri. We also showed that IFR reduced the accumulation of lipofuscin in the gills and the protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation levels in the muscles. Moreover, IFR was able to enhance the activities of antioxidant enzymes catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase in the fish. Finally, IFR was also able to decelerate the decrease of SirT1 and Foxo3A, but accelerate the decrease of IGF-1. Collectively, our findings suggest that late-onset IFR can retard the onset of age-related markers, and prolong the lifespan of the aging fish, via a synergistic action of an anti-oxidant system and the IIS pathway. It also proposes that the combined assessment of anti-oxidant system and IIS pathway will contribute to providing a more comprehensive view of anti-aging process.

  10. Annual report of the Japan Nuclear Ship Development Agency, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The pending repair work of the shielding of the nuclear ship ''Mutsu'' was started at long last, and the development of nuclear ships in Japan is to be accelerated again. The Agency intends to exert more efforts to execute the repair of shielding and the works of the general inspection on safety for ''Mutsu'' rapidly and surely and to attain the expected objective. The energy situation in the world is still in confusion, and all countries, advanced and developing alike, are carrying out the researches to develop and utilize substitute energy. Especially large expectation is entertained in atomic energy which can fill the energy gap for the time being, and the policy to promote positively the improvement of safety and the development of the application to new fields is being taken. In such situation, the Atomic Energy Commission clarified the policy to positively promote the research and development on nuclear ships including the design of new nuclear reactors considering their necessity to relax the restriction of energy supply. As for the ''Mutsu'', the AEC insists that the repair should be completed and the operation test must be executed urgently. Concerning the organization for the research and development, the Agency is to undertake the solution of the pending problems related to the ''Mutsu'', and also is required to have the functions of the research and development aiming at the improvement of the economy and reliability of nuclear ships. In this report, the works of the Agency carried out in 1979 are described. (Kako, I.)

  11. Annual Report to Parliament Privacy Act International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Larocque, Samia

    IDRC is a Crown corporation that was established in 1970. It is guided by a ... positive change for those who need it most. The President's Office supports .... Name of institution: International Development Research Centre. Reporting period:.

  12. Laboratory directed research and development 2006 annual report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westrich, Henry Roger

    2007-03-01

    This report summarizes progress from the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program during fiscal year 2006. In addition to a programmatic and financial overview, the report includes progress reports from 430 individual R&D projects in 17 categories.

  13. Scintillating fiber detector development for the SSC: Annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruchti, R.C.

    1989-01-01

    During the past year, considerable effort has been applied to the development of scintillating fiber detectors in several areas: new scintillation liquids and studies of their fluorescence properties; new fluorescent dyes based on non-intramolecular proton transfer; new dyes based on intramolecular proton transfer; incorporation of these new dyes in plastic (polystyrene) and liquid scintillation solutions; development of small cross section glass capillaries for the containment of liquid scintillators; studies of waveguide characteristics; studies of image intensifier phosphor screen characteristics; initial steps to form a collaboration to study and develop appropriate new properties of the Solid State Photomultiplier; construction of a new laboratory at Notre Dame to enhance our capabilities for further measurements and studies; and organization of and execution of a Workshop on Scintillating Fiber Detector Development for the SSC, held at Fermilab, November 14--16, 1988

  14. Laboratory directed research development annual report. Fiscal year 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    This document comprises Pacific Northwest National Laboratory`s report for Fiscal Year 1996 on research and development programs. The document contains 161 project summaries in 16 areas of research and development. The 16 areas of research and development reported on are: atmospheric sciences, biotechnology, chemical instrumentation and analysis, computer and information science, ecological science, electronics and sensors, health protection and dosimetry, hydrological and geologic sciences, marine sciences, materials science and engineering, molecular science, process science and engineering, risk and safety analysis, socio-technical systems analysis, statistics and applied mathematics, and thermal and energy systems. In addition, this report provides an overview of the research and development program, program management, program funding, and Fiscal Year 1997 projects.

  15. Development and bin mapping of a Rosaceae Conserved Ortholog Set (COS) of markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Antonio; Kozik, Alex; Howad, Werner; Arus, Pere; Iezzoni, Amy F; van der Knaap, Esther

    2009-11-29

    Detailed comparative genome analyses within the economically important Rosaceae family have not been conducted. This is largely due to the lack of conserved gene-based molecular markers that are transferable among the important crop genera within the family [e.g. Malus (apple), Fragaria (strawberry), and Prunus (peach, cherry, apricot and almond)]. The lack of molecular markers and comparative whole genome sequence analysis for this family severely hampers crop improvement efforts as well as QTL confirmation and validation studies. We identified a set of 3,818 rosaceaous unigenes comprised of two or more ESTs that correspond to single copy Arabidopsis genes. From this Rosaceae Conserved Orthologous Set (RosCOS), 1039 were selected from which 857 were used for the development of intron-flanking primers and allele amplification. This led to successful amplification and subsequent mapping of 613 RosCOS onto the Prunus TxE reference map resulting in a genome-wide coverage of 0.67 to 1.06 gene-based markers per cM per linkage group. Furthermore, the RosCOS primers showed amplification success rates from 23 to 100% across the family indicating that a substantial part of the RosCOS primers can be directly employed in other less studied rosaceaous crops. Comparisons of the genetic map positions of the RosCOS with the physical locations of the orthologs in the Populus trichocarpa genome identified regions of colinearity between the genomes of Prunus-Rosaceae and Populus-Salicaceae. Conserved orthologous genes are extremely useful for the analysis of genome evolution among closely and distantly related species. The results presented in this study demonstrate the considerable potential of the mapped Prunus RosCOS for genome-wide marker employment and comparative whole genome studies within the Rosaceae family. Moreover, these markers will also function as useful anchor points for the genome sequencing efforts currently ongoing in this family as well as for comparative QTL

  16. Novel and Stress Relevant EST Derived SSR Markers Developed and Validated in Peanut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosamia, Tejas C.; Mishra, Gyan P.; Thankappan, Radhakrishnan; Dobaria, Jentilal R.

    2015-01-01

    With the aim to increase the number of functional markers in resource poor crop like cultivated peanut (Arachis hypogaea), large numbers of available expressed sequence tags (ESTs) in the public databases, were employed for the development of novel EST derived simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. From 16424 unigenes, 2784 (16.95%) SSRs containing unigenes having 3373 SSR motifs were identified. Of these, 2027 (72.81%) sequences were annotated and 4124 gene ontology terms were assigned. Among different SSR motif-classes, tri-nucleotide repeats (33.86%) were the most abundant followed by di-nucleotide repeats (27.51%) while AG/CT (20.7%) and AAG/CTT (13.25%) were the most abundant repeat-motifs. A total of 2456 EST-SSR novel primer pairs were designed, of which 366 unigenes having relevance to various stresses and other functions, were PCR validated using a set of 11 diverse peanut genotypes. Of these, 340 (92.62%) primer pairs yielded clear and scorable PCR products and 39 (10.66%) primer pairs exhibited polymorphisms. Overall, the number of alleles per marker ranged from 1-12 with an average of 3.77 and the PIC ranged from 0.028 to 0.375 with an average of 0.325. The identified EST-SSRs not only enriched the existing molecular markers kitty, but would also facilitate the targeted research in marker-trait association for various stresses, inter-specific studies and genetic diversity analysis in peanut. PMID:26046991

  17. Asian Development Bank–Japan Scholarship Program: Annual Report 2011

    OpenAIRE

    Asian Development Bank (ADB); Asian Development Bank (ADB); Asian Development Bank (ADB); Asian Development Bank (ADB)

    2012-01-01

    The Japan Scholarship Program (JSP) was established in 1988 to provide well-qualified citizens of developing member countries an opportunity to undertake postgraduate studies in economics, management, science and technology, and other development-related fields at 27 educational institutions in 10 countries in Asia and the Pacific. Between 1988 and 2011, Japan contributed more than $126 million to the JSP. A total of 2,818 scholarships have been awarded to recipients from 35 member countries,...

  18. Asian Development Bank–Japan Scholarship Program: Annual Report 2010

    OpenAIRE

    Asian Development Bank (ADB); Asian Development Bank (ADB); Asian Development Bank (ADB); Asian Development Bank (ADB)

    2011-01-01

    The Japan Scholarship Program (JSP) was established in 1988 to provide well-qualified citizens of developing member countries an opportunity to undertake postgraduate studies in economics, management, science and technology, and other development-related fields at 27 educational institutions in 10 countries in Asia and the Pacific. Between 1988 and 2010, Japan contributed more than $116 million to the JSP. A total of 2,695 scholarships have been awarded to recipients from 35 member countries,...

  19. Development of Gene-Based SSR Markers in Rice Bean (Vigna umbellata L. Based on Transcriptome Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honglin Chen

    Full Text Available Rice bean (Vigna umbellata (Thunb. Ohwi & Ohashi is a warm season annual legume mainly grown in East Asia. Only scarce genomic resources are currently available for this legume crop species and no simple sequence repeat (SSR markers have been specifically developed for rice bean yet. In this study, approximately 26 million high quality cDNA sequence reads were obtained from rice bean using Illumina paired-end sequencing technology and assembled into 71,929 unigenes with an average length of 986 bp. Of these unigenes, 38,840 (33.2% showed significant similarity to proteins in the NCBI non-redundant protein and nucleotide sequence databases. Furthermore, 30,170 (76.3% could be classified into gene ontology categories, 25,451 (64.4% into Swiss-Prot categories and 21,982 (55.6% into KOG database categories (E-value < 1.0E-5. A total of 9,301 (23.5% were mapped onto 118 pathways using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genome (KEGG pathway database. A total of 3,011 genic SSRs were identified as potential molecular markers. AG/CT (30.3%, AAG/CTT (8.1% and AGAA/TTCT (20.0% are the three main repeat motifs. A total of 300 SSR loci were randomly selected for validation by using PCR amplification. Of these loci, 23 primer pairs were polymorphic among 32 rice bean accessions. A UPGMA dendrogram revealed three major clusters among 32 rice bean accessions. The large number of SSR-containing sequences and genic SSRs in this study will be valuable for the construction of high-resolution genetic linkage maps, association or comparative mapping and genetic analyses of various Vigna species.

  20. Successful development of microsatellite markers in a challenging species: the horizontal borer Austroplatypus incompertus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S; Joss, T; Stow, A

    2011-10-01

    The analysis of microsatellite loci has allowed significant advances in evolutionary biology and pest management. However, until very recently, the potential benefits have been compromised by the high costs of developing these neutral markers. High-throughput sequencing provides a solution to this problem. We describe the development of 13 microsatellite markers for the eusocial ambrosia beetle, Austroplatypus incompertus, a significant pest of forests in southeast Australia. The frequency of microsatellite repeats in the genome of A. incompertus was determined to be low, and previous attempts at microsatellite isolation using a traditional genomic library were problematic. Here, we utilised two protocols, microsatellite-enriched genomic library construction and high-throughput 454 sequencing and characterised 13 loci which were polymorphic among 32 individuals. Numbers of alleles per locus ranged from 2 to 17, and observed and expected heterozygosities from 0.344 to 0.767 and from 0.507 to 0.860, respectively. These microsatellites have the resolution required to analyse fine-scale colony and population genetic structure. Our work demonstrates the utility of next-generation 454 sequencing as a method for rapid and cost-effective acquisition of microsatellites where other techniques have failed, or for taxa where marker development has historically been both complicated and expensive.

  1. Biofuels Feedstock Development Program annual progress report for 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, L.L.; Cushman, J.H.; Ehrenshaft, A.R.; McLaughlin, S.B.; McNabb, W.A.; Ranney, J.W.; Tuskan, G.A.; Turhollow, A.F.

    1992-12-01

    This report provides an overview of the ongoing research funded in 1991 by the Department of Energy`s Biofuels Feedstock Development Program (BFDP). The BFDP is managed by the Environmental Sciences Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and encompasses the work formerly funded by the Short Rotation Woody Crops Program and the Herbaceous Energy Crops Program. The combined program includes crop development research on both woody and herbaceous energy crop species, cross-cutting energy and environmental analysis and integration, and information management activities. Brief summaries of 26 different program activities are included in the report.

  2. Biofuels Feedstock Development Program annual progress report for 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, L.L.; Cushman, J.H.; Ehrenshaft, A.R.; McLaughlin, S.B.; McNabb, W.A.; Ranney, J.W.; Tuskan, G.A.; Turhollow, A.F.

    1992-12-01

    This report provides an overview of the ongoing research funded in 1991 by the Department of Energy's Biofuels Feedstock Development Program (BFDP). The BFDP is managed by the Environmental Sciences Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and encompasses the work formerly funded by the Short Rotation Woody Crops Program and the Herbaceous Energy Crops Program. The combined program includes crop development research on both woody and herbaceous energy crop species, cross-cutting energy and environmental analysis and integration, and information management activities. Brief summaries of 26 different program activities are included in the report.

  3. Genome-wide characterization of microsatelittes and marker development in the carcinogenic liver fluke Clonorchis sinensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thao T.B.; Arimatsu, Yuji; Hong, Sung-Jong; Brindley, Paul J.; Blair, David; Laha, Thewarach; Sripa, Banchob

    2015-01-01

    Clonorchis sinensis is an important carcinogenic human liver fluke endemic in East and Southeast Asia. There are several conventional molecular markers have been used for identification and genetic diversity, however, no information about microsatellites of this liver fluke published so far. We here report microsatellite characterization and marker development for genetic diversity study in C. sinensis using genome-wide bioinformatics approach. Based on our search criteria, a total of 256,990 microsatellites (≥ 12 base pairs) were identified from genome database of C. sinensis with hexa-nucleotide motif being the most abundant (51%) followed by penta-nucleotide (18.3%) and tri-nucleotide (12.7%). The tetra-nucleotide, di-nucleotide and mononucleotide motifs accounted for 9.75 %, 7.63% and 0.14%, respectively. The total length of all microsatellites accounts for 0. 72 % of 547 Mb of the whole genome size and the frequency of microsatellites were found to be one microsatellite in every 2.13 kb of DNA. For the di-, tri, and tetra-nucleotide, the repeat numbers redundant are six (28%), four (45%) and three (76%), respectively. The ATC repeat is the most abundant microsatellites followed by AT, AAT and AC, respectively. Within 40 microsatellite loci developed, 24 microsatellite markers showed potential to differentiate between C. sinensis and O. viverrini. Seven out of 24 loci showed heterozygous with observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.467 to 1. Four-primer sets could amplify both C. sinensis and O. viverrini DNA with different sizes. This study provides basic information of C. sinensis microsatellites and the genome-wide markers developed may be a useful tool for genetic study of C. sinensis. PMID:25782682

  4. Genome-wide characterization of microsatellites and marker development in the carcinogenic liver fluke Clonorchis sinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thao T B; Arimatsu, Yuji; Hong, Sung-Jong; Brindley, Paul J; Blair, David; Laha, Thewarach; Sripa, Banchob

    2015-06-01

    Clonorchis sinensis is an important carcinogenic human liver fluke endemic in East and Southeast Asia. There are several conventional molecular markers that have been used for identification and genetic diversity; however, no information about microsatellites of this liver fluke is published so far. We here report microsatellite characterization and marker development for a genetic diversity study in C. sinensis, using a genome-wide bioinformatics approach. Based on our search criteria, a total of 256,990 microsatellites (≥12 base pairs) were identified from a genome database of C. sinensis, with hexanucleotide motif being the most abundant (51%) followed by pentanucleotide (18.3%) and trinucleotide (12.7%). The tetranucleotide, dinucleotide, and mononucleotide motifs accounted for 9.75, 7.63, and 0.14%, respectively. The total length of all microsatellites accounts for 0. 72% of 547 Mb of the whole genome size, and the frequency of microsatellites was found to be one microsatellite in every 2.13 kb of DNA. For the di-, tri-, and tetranucleotide, the repeat numbers redundant are six (28%), four (45%), and three (76%), respectively. The ATC repeat is the most abundant microsatellites followed by AT, AAT, and AC, respectively. Within 40 microsatellite loci developed, 24 microsatellite markers showed potential to differentiate between C. sinensis and Opisthorchis viverrini. Seven out of 24 loci showed to be heterozygous with observed heterozygosity that ranged from 0.467 to 1. Four primer sets could amplify both C. sinensis and O. viverrini DNA with different sizes. This study provides basic information of C. sinensis microsatellites, and the genome-wide markers developed may be a useful tool for the genetic study of C. sinensis.

  5. Training for Agriculture: Annual Review of Selected Developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization, Rome (Italy).

    The topics covered by review articles are: Training for Rural Development (with special reference to Chile); Field Training--Theory into Practice (for women extension workers in Malaysia); A New Look is Needed for Extension (Latin America); 4-D Rural Youth Clubs in Dahomey; Sociological Aspects of Rural Training; Population Education in the…

  6. Economic and Workforce Development Program Annual Report, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    California Community Colleges, Chancellor's Office, 2014

    2014-01-01

    California's community colleges continue to play a crucial role in the state's economy by providing students with the skills and knowledge to succeed and by advancing the economic growth and global competitiveness of California and its regional economies through the Economic and Workforce Development Program (EWD). The EWD program invests in the…

  7. Laboratory directed research and development annual report: Fiscal year 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The Department of Energy Order DOE 5000.4A establishes DOE's policy and guidelines regarding Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) at its multiprogram laboratories. As described in 5000.4A, LDRD is ''research and development of a creative and innovative nature which is selected by the Laboratory Director or his or her designee, for the purpose of maintaining the scientific and technological vitality of the Laboratory and to respond to scientific and technological opportunities in conformance with the guidelines in this order. Consistent with the Mission Statement and Strategic Plan provided in PNL's Institutional Plan, the LDRD investments are focused on developing new and innovative approaches to research related to our ''core competencies.'' Currently, PNL's core competencies have been identified as: integrated environmental research; process science and engineering; energy distribution and utilization. In this report, the individual summaries of Laboratory-level LDRD projects are organized according to these corecompetencies. The largest proportion of Laboratory-level LDRD funds is allocated to the core competency of integrated environmental research. The projects described in this report represent PNL's investment in its future and are vital to maintaining the ability to develop creative solutions for the scientific and technical challenges faced by DOE and the nation. The report provides an overview of PNL's LDRD program and the management process used for the program and project summaries for each LDRD project

  8. Annual report of Japan Nuclear Ship Development Agency, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Japan Nuclear Ship Development Agency executed the works centering around the repair of shielding and the general inspection on safety of the nuclear-Ship Mutsu in the fiscal year 1980. On the other hand, the law revising the law concerning Japan Nuclear Ship Development Agency was enforced, and the Agency was entitled to carry out the research and investigation required for the development of new nuclear ships. As for the repair of reactor shielding, the alteration of the reactor installation was permitted in November, 1979, and the design and the method of construction were approved in August, 1980. The preparatory works were carried out from April to August, 1980, prior to the main works. The repair works were started in August, and the new shields have been manufactured, while the existing shields and the equipments in the containment vessel were removed. The completed new shields have been installed successively in the containment vessel. It was confirmed that there is no problem in the safety of the nuclear ship Mutsu, as the result of the general inspection on safety completed in June, 1980. Maintenance works were carried out for the Mutsu and the normally berthing port. The periodic measurement of radiation dose rate, the selection of the new normally berthing port, the research and development of nuclear ships and others are also reported. (Kako, I.)

  9. Annual Review of Selected Developments; Agricultural Education and Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization, Rome (Italy).

    This document is the second in a series designed to describe agricultural education projects and practices which have been successful in promoting agricultural change and improvement in areas of the world where subsistance agriculture predominates. The projects are included here because of their emphasis on development of human resources and…

  10. Laboratory directed research and development annual report: Fiscal year 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-01-01

    The Department of Energy Order DOE 5000.4A establishes DOE`s policy and guidelines regarding Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) at its multiprogram laboratories. As described in 5000.4A, LDRD is ``research and development of a creative and innovative nature which is selected by the Laboratory Director or his or her designee, for the purpose of maintaining the scientific and technological vitality of the Laboratory and to respond to scientific and technological opportunities in conformance with the guidelines in this order. Consistent with the Mission Statement and Strategic Plan provided in PNL`s Institutional Plan, the LDRD investments are focused on developing new and innovative approaches to research related to our ``core competencies.`` Currently, PNL`s core competencies have been identified as: integrated environmental research; process science and engineering; energy distribution and utilization. In this report, the individual summaries of Laboratory-level LDRD projects are organized according to these corecompetencies. The largest proportion of Laboratory-level LDRD funds is allocated to the core competency of integrated environmental research. The projects described in this report represent PNL`s investment in its future and are vital to maintaining the ability to develop creative solutions for the scientific and technical challenges faced by DOE and the nation. The report provides an overview of PNL`s LDRD program and the management process used for the program and project summaries for each LDRD project.

  11. Laboratory directed research and development annual report: Fiscal year 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-01-01

    The Department of Energy Order DOE 5000.4A establishes DOE's policy and guidelines regarding Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) at its multiprogram laboratories. As described in 5000.4A, LDRD is research and development of a creative and innovative nature which is selected by the Laboratory Director or his or her designee, for the purpose of maintaining the scientific and technological vitality of the Laboratory and to respond to scientific and technological opportunities in conformance with the guidelines in this order. Consistent with the Mission Statement and Strategic Plan provided in PNL's Institutional Plan, the LDRD investments are focused on developing new and innovative approaches to research related to our core competencies.'' Currently, PNL's core competencies have been identified as: integrated environmental research; process science and engineering; energy distribution and utilization. In this report, the individual summaries of Laboratory-level LDRD projects are organized according to these corecompetencies. The largest proportion of Laboratory-level LDRD funds is allocated to the core competency of integrated environmental research. The projects described in this report represent PNL's investment in its future and are vital to maintaining the ability to develop creative solutions for the scientific and technical challenges faced by DOE and the nation. The report provides an overview of PNL's LDRD program and the management process used for the program and project summaries for each LDRD project.

  12. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program. Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogeka, G.J.

    1991-12-01

    Today, new ideas and opportunities, fostering the advancement of technology, are occurring at an ever-increasing rate. It, therefore, seems appropriate that a vehicle be available which fosters the development of these new ideas and technologies, promotes the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and which develops new ``fundable`` R&D projects and programs. At Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), one such method is through its Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community, fostering new science and technology ideas, which is the major factor achieving and maintaining staff excellence, and a means to address national needs, with the overall mission of the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Brookhaven National Laboratory. The Project Summaries with their accomplishments described in this report reflect the above. Aside from leading to new fundable or promising programs and producing especially noteworthy research, they have resulted in numerous publications in various professional and scientific journals, and presentations at meetings and forums.

  13. Local variation in embryo development rate in annual fish

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Polačik, Matej; Reichard, Martin; Vrtílek, Milan

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 92, č. 5 (2018), s. 1359-1370 ISSN 0022-1112 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP505/12/G112 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : diapause * erratic development * escape embryo * killifish * Mozambique * secondary pool Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 1.519, year: 2016

  14. Laboratory Directed Research and Development annual report, Fiscal year 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The Department of Energy Order DOE 5000.4A establishes DOE's policy and guidelines regarding Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) at its multiprogram laboratories. As described in 5000.4A, LDRD is ''research and development of a creative and innovative nature which is selected by the Laboratory Director or his or her designee, for the purpose of maintaining the scientific and technological vitality of the Laboratory and to respond to scientific and technological opportunities in conformance with the guidelines in this Order. LDRD includes activities previously defined as ER ampersand D, as well as other discretionary research and development activities not provided for in a DOE program.'' Consistent with the Mission Statement and Strategic Plan provided in PNL's Institutional Plan, the LDRD investments are focused on developing new and innovative approaches in research related to our ''core competencies.'' Currently, PNL's core competencies have been identified as integrated environmental research; process technology; energy systems research. In this report, the individual summaries of Laboratory-level LDRD projects are organized according to these core competencies. The largest proportion of Laboratory-level LDRD funds is allocated to the core competency of integrated environmental research. A significant proportion of PNL's LDRD funds are also allocated to projects within the various research centers that are proposed by individual researchers or small research teams. The projects are described in Section 2.0. The projects described in this report represent PNL's investment in its future and are vital to maintaining the ability to develop creative solutions for the scientific and technical challenges faced by DOE and the nation. In accordance with DOE guidelines, the report provides an overview of PNL's LDRD program and the management process used for the program and project summaries for each LDRD project

  15. Laboratory Directed Research and Development annual report, Fiscal year 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    The Department of Energy Order DOE 5000.4A establishes DOE`s policy and guidelines regarding Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) at its multiprogram laboratories. As described in 5000.4A, LDRD is ``research and development of a creative and innovative nature which is selected by the Laboratory Director or his or her designee, for the purpose of maintaining the scientific and technological vitality of the Laboratory and to respond to scientific and technological opportunities in conformance with the guidelines in this Order. LDRD includes activities previously defined as ER&D, as well as other discretionary research and development activities not provided for in a DOE program.`` Consistent with the Mission Statement and Strategic Plan provided in PNL`s Institutional Plan, the LDRD investments are focused on developing new and innovative approaches in research related to our ``core competencies.`` Currently, PNL`s core competencies have been identified as integrated environmental research; process technology; energy systems research. In this report, the individual summaries of Laboratory-level LDRD projects are organized according to these core competencies. The largest proportion of Laboratory-level LDRD funds is allocated to the core competency of integrated environmental research. A significant proportion of PNL`s LDRD funds are also allocated to projects within the various research centers that are proposed by individual researchers or small research teams. The projects are described in Section 2.0. The projects described in this report represent PNL`s investment in its future and are vital to maintaining the ability to develop creative solutions for the scientific and technical challenges faced by DOE and the nation. In accordance with DOE guidelines, the report provides an overview of PNL`s LDRD program and the management process used for the program and project summaries for each LDRD project.

  16. Laboratory-Directed Research and Development 2016 Summary Annual Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillai, Rekha Sukamar; Jacobson, Julie Ann

    2017-01-01

    The Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2C, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development' (April 19, 2006), which establishes DOE's requirements for the program while providing the laboratory director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all INL programs. This report includes summaries of all INL LDRD research activities supported during Fiscal Year (FY) 2016. INL is the lead laboratory for the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE). The INL mission is to discover, demonstrate, and secure innovative nuclear energy solutions, other clean energy options, and critical infrastructure with a vision to change the world's energy future and secure our critical infrastructure. Operating since 1949, INL is the nation's leading research, development, and demonstration center for nuclear energy, including nuclear nonproliferation and physical and cyber-based protection of energy systems and critical infrastructure, as well as integrated energy systems research, development, demonstration, and deployment. INL has been managed and operated by Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC (a wholly owned company of Battelle) for DOE since 2005. Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, is a partnership between Battelle, BWX Technologies, Inc., AECOM, the Electric Power Research Institute, the National University Consortium (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Ohio State University, North Carolina State University, University of New Mexico, and Oregon State University), and the Idaho university collaborators (i.e., University of Idaho, Idaho State University, and Boise State University). Since its creation, INL's research and development (R&D) portfolio has broadened with targeted programs supporting national missions to advance nuclear energy, enable clean

  17. Institutional Research and Development: [Annual report], FY 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strack, B.

    1987-01-01

    The Institutional Research and Development (IR and D) program was established at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) by the Director in October 1984. The IR and D program fosters exploratory work to advance science and technology; disciplinary research to create varied, innovative approaches to selected scientific fields; and long-term research in support of the defense and energy missions at LLNL. Each project in the IR and D program was selected after personal interviews by the Director and his delegates and was deemed to show unusual promise. These projects include research in the following fields: chemistry and materials science, computation, earth sciences, engineering, nuclear chemistry, biotechnology, environmental consequences of nuclear war, geophysics and planetary physics, and supercomputer research and development. A separate section of the report is devoted to research projects receiving individual awards

  18. Institutional Research and Development: (Annual report), FY 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strack, B. (ed.)

    1987-01-01

    The Institutional Research and Development (IR and D) program was established at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) by the Director in October 1984. The IR and D program fosters exploratory work to advance science and technology; disciplinary research to create varied, innovative approaches to selected scientific fields; and long-term research in support of the defense and energy missions at LLNL. Each project in the IR and D program was selected after personal interviews by the Director and his delegates and was deemed to show unusual promise. These projects include research in the following fields: chemistry and materials science, computation, earth sciences, engineering, nuclear chemistry, biotechnology, environmental consequences of nuclear war, geophysics and planetary physics, and supercomputer research and development. A separate section of the report is devoted to research projects receiving individual awards.

  19. Native Fish Sanctuary Project - Sanctuary Development Phase, 2007 Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Gordon A.

    2007-01-01

    Notable progress was made in 2007 toward the development of native fish facilities in the Lower Colorado River Basin. More than a dozen facilities are, or soon will be, online to benefit native fish. When this study began in 2005 no self-supporting communities of either bonytail or razorback sucker existed. Razorback suckers were removed from Rock Tank in 1997 and the communities at High Levee Pond had been compromised by largemouth bass in 2004. This project reversed that trend with the establishment of the Davis Cove native fish community in 2005. Bonytail and razorback sucker successfully produced young in Davis Cove in 2006. Bonytail successfully produced young in Parker Dam Pond in 2007, representing the first successful sanctuary established solely for bonytail. This past year, Three Fingers Lake received 135 large razorback suckers, and Federal and State agencies have agreed to develop a cooperative management approach dedicating a portion of that lake toward grow-out and (or) the establishment of another sanctuary. Two ponds at River's Edge Golf Course in Needles, California, were renovated in June and soon will be stocked with bonytail. Similar activities are taking place at Mohave Community College, Cerbat Cliffs Golf Course, Cibola High Levee Pond, Office Cove, Emerald Canyon Golf Course, and Bulkhead Cove. Recruitment can be expected as fish become sexually mature at these facilities. Flood-plain facilities have the potential to support 6,000 adult razorback suckers and nearly 20,000 bonytail if native fish management is aggressively pursued. This sanctuary project has assisted agencies in developing 15 native fish communities by identifying specific resource objectives for those sites, listing and prioritizing research opportunities and needs, and strategizing on management approaches through the use of resource-management plans. Such documents have been developed for Davis Cove, Cibola High Levee Pond, Parker Dam Pond, and Three Fingers Lake. We

  20. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2006 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjoreen, Terrence P [ORNL

    2007-04-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the US Departmental of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2B, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development' (April 19, 2006), which establishes DOE's requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report includes summaries all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2006. The associated FY 2006 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2007/2) provides financial data about the FY 2006 projects and an internal evaluation of the program's management process.

  1. SSI's International Development Co-operation (SIUS). Annual report 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szendroe, G.; Grapengiesser, S.; Johansson, Gunnar

    1999-04-01

    SSI's International Development Co-operation (SIUS), the Swedish program for radiation protection work in Central and Eastern Europe, has since its start in 1992 been granted SEK 109 million by the Swedish government. The projects are accessed, planned and performed in close co-operation with partner organisations in Eastern Europe. This report presents the financial status and a summary of the projects, their status and distribution over the countries and project areas. The presentation is updated as of December 1998

  2. FY 2016 Site-Directed Research & Development Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, Howard [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States)

    2017-04-01

    As the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) continues to evolve and transition its mission to a broader scope, significant challenges lie ahead that present unique opportunities for our research and development (R&D) enterprise. At the juncture, we are poised to create a different future investment strategy. Our decisions at the beginning of a new tri-decade span must be guided as expertly as possible given the greater complexity and multifaceted nature of our work.

  3. Waste form development program. Annual report, October 1982-September 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colombo, P.; Kalb, P.D.; Fuhrmann, M.

    1983-09-01

    This report provides a summary of the work conducted for the Waste Form Development/Test Program at Brookhaven National Laboratory in FY 1983 under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy's Low-Level Waste Management Program. The primary focus of this work is the investigation of new solidification agents which will provide improved immobilization of low-level radioactive wastes in an efficient, cost-effective manner. A working set of preliminary waste form evaluation criteria which could impact upon the movement of radionuclides in the disposal environment was developed. The selection of potential solidification agents for further investigation is described. Two thermoplastic materials, low-density polyethylene and a modified sulfur cement were chosen as primary candidates for further study. Three waste types were selected for solidification process development and waste form property evaluation studies which represent both new volume reduction wastes (dried evaporator concentrates and incinerator ash) and current problem wastes (ion exchange resins). Preliminary process development scoping studies were conducted to verify the compatibility of selected solidification agents and waste types and the potential for improved solidification. Waste loadings of 60 wt % Na 2 SO 4 , 25 wt % H 3 BO 3 , 25 wt % incinerator ash and 50 wt % dry ion exchange resin were achieved using low density polyethylene as a matrix material. Samples incorporating 65 wt % Na 2 SO 4 , 40 wt % H 3 BO 3 , 20 wt % incinerator ash and 40 wt % dry ion exchange resin were successfully solidified in modified sulfur cement. Additional improvements are expected for both matrix materials as process parameters are optimized. Several preliminary property evaluation studies were performed to provide the basis for an initial assessment of waste form acceptability. These included a two-week water immersion test and compressive load testing

  4. Laboratory directed research and development annual report. Fiscal year 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-02-01

    The Department of Energy Order DOE 5000.4A establishes DOE`s policy and guidelines regarding Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) at its multiprogram laboratories. This report represents Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s (PNL`s) LDRD report for FY 1994. During FY 1994, 161 LDRD projects were selected for support through PNL`s LDRD project selection process. Total funding allocated to these projects was $13.7 million. Consistent with the Mission Statement and Strategic Plan provided in PNL`s Institutional Plan, the LDRD investments are focused on developing new and innovative approaches in research related to our {open_quotes}core competencies.{close_quotes} Currently, PNL`s core competencies have been identified as integrated environmental research; process science and engineering; energy systems development. In this report, the individual summaries of LDRD projects (presented in Section 1.0) are organized according to these core competencies. The largest proportion of Laboratory-level LDRD funds is allocated to the core competency of integrated environmental research. Projects within the three core competency areas were approximately 91.4 % of total LDRD project funding at PNL in FY 1994. A significant proportion of PNL`s LDRD funds are also allocated to projects within the various research centers that are proposed by individual researchers or small research teams. Funding allocated to each of these projects is typically $35K or less. The projects described in this report represent PNL`s investment in its future and are vital to maintaining the ability to develop creative solutions for the scientific and technical challenges faced by DOE and the nation. The report provides an overview of PNL`s LDRD program, the management process used for the program, and project summaries for each LDRD project.

  5. FY 1999 Laboratory Directed Research and Development annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PJ Hughes

    2000-01-01

    A short synopsis of each project is given covering the following main areas of research and development: Atmospheric sciences; Biotechnology; Chemical and instrumentation analysis; Computer and information science; Design and manufacture engineering; Ecological science; Electronics and sensors; Experimental technology; Health protection and dosimetry; Hydrologic and geologic science; Marine sciences; Materials science; Nuclear science and engineering; Process science and engineering; Sociotechnical systems analysis; Statistics and applied mathematics; and Thermal and energy systems

  6. FY 1999 Laboratory Directed Research and Development annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PJ Hughes

    2000-06-13

    A short synopsis of each project is given covering the following main areas of research and development: Atmospheric sciences; Biotechnology; Chemical and instrumentation analysis; Computer and information science; Design and manufacture engineering; Ecological science; Electronics and sensors; Experimental technology; Health protection and dosimetry; Hydrologic and geologic science; Marine sciences; Materials science; Nuclear science and engineering; Process science and engineering; Sociotechnical systems analysis; Statistics and applied mathematics; and Thermal and energy systems.

  7. Developing Exon-Primed Intron-Crossing (EPIC) markers for population genetic studies in three Aedes disease vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Vanessa Linley; Endersby, Nancy Margaret; Chan, Janice; Hoffmann, Ary Anthony; Weeks, Andrew Raymond

    2015-03-01

    Aedes aegypti, Aedes notoscriptus, and Aedes albopictus are important vectors of many arboviruses implicated in human disease such as dengue fever. Genetic markers applied across vector species can provide important information on population structure, gene flow, insecticide resistance, and taxonomy, however, robust microsatellite markers have proven difficult to develop in these species and mosquitoes generally. Here we consider the utility and transferability of 15 Ribosome protein (Rp) Exon-Primed Intron-Crossing (EPIC) markers for population genetic studies in these 3 Aedes species. Rp EPIC markers designed for Ae. aegypti also successfully amplified populations of the sister species, Ae. albopictus, as well as the distantly related species, Ae. notoscriptus. High SNP and good indel diversity in sequenced alleles plus support for amplification of the same regions across populations and species were additional benefits of these markers. These findings point to the general value of EPIC markers in mosquito population studies. © 2014 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  8. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Annual Report FY 2017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, Kelly O.

    2018-03-30

    A national laboratory must establish and maintain an environment in which creativity and innovation are encouraged and supported in order to fulfill its missions and remain viable in the long term. As such, multiprogram laboratories are given discretion to allocate a percentage of their operating budgets to support research and development projects that align to PNNL’s and DOE’s missions and support the missions of other federal agencies, including DHS, DOD, and others. DOE Order 413.2C sets forth DOE’s Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) policy and guidelines for DOE multiprogram laboratories, and it authorizes the national laboratories to allocate up to 6 percent of their operating budgets to fund the program. LDRD is innovative research and development, selected by the Laboratory Director or his/her designee, for the purpose of maintaining the scientific and technological vitality of the Laboratory. The projects supported by LDRD funding all have demonstrable ties to DOE/DHS missions and may also be relevant to the missions of other federal agencies that sponsor work at the Laboratory. The program plays a key role in attracting the best and brightest scientific staff, which is needed to serve the highest priority DOE mission objectives. Individual project reports comprise the bulk of this LDRD report. The Laboratory focuses its LDRD research on scientific assets that often address more than one scientific discipline.

  9. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Annual Report FY 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, Kelly O. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-03-30

    A national laboratory must establish and maintain an environment in which creativity and innovation are encouraged and supported in order to fulfill its missions and remain viable in the long term. As such, multiprogram laboratories are given discretion to allocate a percentage of their operating budgets to support research and development projects that align to PNNL’s and DOE’s missions and support the missions of other federal agencies, including DHS, DOD, and others. DOE Order 413.2C sets forth DOE’s Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) policy and guidelines for DOE multiprogram laboratories, and it authorizes the national laboratories to allocate up to 6 percent of their operating budgets to fund the program. LDRD is innovative research and development, selected by the Laboratory Director or his/her designee, for the purpose of maintaining the scientific and technological vitality of the Laboratory. The projects supported by LDRD funding all have demonstrable ties to DOE/DHS missions and may also be relevant to the missions of other federal agencies that sponsor work at the Laboratory. The program plays a key role in attracting the best and brightest scientific staff, which is needed to serve the highest priority DOE mission objectives. Individual project reports comprise the bulk of this LDRD report. The Laboratory focuses its LDRD research on scientific assets that often address more than one scientific discipline.

  10. ANDRA - Annual sustainable development and activity report 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-11-01

    After two texts on the themes of change and dialogue signed by ANDRA's CEO and CBA (Chairman of the Board of Administrators), this report proposes a large overview of the French national radioactive waste management Agency, ANDRA, in the fields of governance (missions, installations, institutional representatives, customers, launching of the Meuse/Haute-Marne inter-district development scheme, 2009 report on the Cigeo project), of human resources (place of women and men, payroll, the Customer Industrial Solutions department, a new approach to customer relations, Cigeo project), of public service missions (site cleaning up, containment of radioactive wastes, radium diagnosis), of industry (Cigeo project, Manche disposal facility, very-low-level waste disposal facility in the Aube district, a crane to move a roof-canopy, low- and intermediate-level waste disposal facility in the Aube district, test of crisis communication, ASN inspections), of the environment (permanent environmental observatory, radiological impact of disposal facilities), of scientific policy (strategic research agenda, relationships with higher education, opinion of experts on ANDRA research), of technological research (new experiments in laboratory, patent in metrology, computer tools, geological knowledge and modelling of the Meuse and Haute-Marne districts, radioactive waste behaviour, issues of intellectual property), of experiments and development, of international commitment and relationships (with South Korea, Eastern Europe, Hungary and Morocco, European directive on radioactive wastes), of sustainable development (local contracts, sponsorship and partnership), of dialogue, transparency and communication, of commitment for future generations, and of future perspectives

  11. SAT, a flexible and optimized Web application for SSR marker development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rami Jean-François

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Simple Sequence Repeats (SSRs, or microsatellites, are among the most powerful genetic markers known. A common method for the development of SSR markers is the construction of genomic DNA libraries enriched for SSR sequences, followed by DNA sequencing. However, designing optimal SSR markers from bulk sequence data is a laborious and time-consuming process. Results SAT (SSR Analysis Tool is a user-friendly Web application developed to minimize tedious manual operations and reduce errors. This tool facilitates the integration, analysis and display of sequence data from SSR-enriched libraries. SAT is designed to successively perform base calling and quality evaluation of chromatograms, eliminate cloning vector, adaptors and low quality sequences, detect chimera or partially digested sequences, search for SSR motifs, cluster and assemble the redundant sequences, and design SSR primer pairs. An additional virtual PCR step establishes primer specificity. Users may modify the different parameters of each step of the SAT analysis. Although certain steps are compulsory, such as SSR motifs search and sequence assembly, users do not have to run the entire pipeline, and they can choose selectively which steps to perform. A database allows users to store and query results, and to redo individual steps of the workflow. Conclusion The SAT Web application is available at http://sat.cirad.fr/sat, and a standalone command-line version is also freely downloadable. Users must send an email to the SAT administrator tropgene@cirad.fr to request a login and password.

  12. Development and characterization of EST-SSR markers for Artocarpus hypargyreus (Moraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haijun; Tan, Weizheng; Sun, Hongbin; Liu, Yu; Meng, Kaikai; Liao, Wenbo

    2016-12-01

    Polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed for Artocarpus hypargyreus (Moraceae), a threatened species endemic to China, to investigate the genetic diversity and structure of the species. Based on the transcriptome data of A. hypargyreus , 63 primer pairs were preliminarily designed and tested, of which 34 were successfully amplified and 10 displayed clear polymorphisms across the 67 individuals from four populations of A. hypargyreus . The results showed the number of alleles per locus ranged from three to 10, and the observed heterozygosity and expected heterozygosity per locus varied from 0.000 to 0.706 and from 0.328 to 0.807, respectively. These microsatellite markers will be useful in exploring genetic diversity and structure of A. hypargyreus . Furthermore, most loci were successfully cross-amplified in A. nitidus and A. heterophyllus , indicating that they will be of great value for genetic study across this genus.

  13. Development and characterization of EST-SSR markers for Artocarpus hypargyreus (Moraceae)1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haijun; Tan, Weizheng; Sun, Hongbin; Liu, Yu; Meng, Kaikai; Liao, Wenbo

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed for Artocarpus hypargyreus (Moraceae), a threatened species endemic to China, to investigate the genetic diversity and structure of the species. Methods and Results: Based on the transcriptome data of A. hypargyreus, 63 primer pairs were preliminarily designed and tested, of which 34 were successfully amplified and 10 displayed clear polymorphisms across the 67 individuals from four populations of A. hypargyreus. The results showed the number of alleles per locus ranged from three to 10, and the observed heterozygosity and expected heterozygosity per locus varied from 0.000 to 0.706 and from 0.328 to 0.807, respectively. Conclusions: These microsatellite markers will be useful in exploring genetic diversity and structure of A. hypargyreus. Furthermore, most loci were successfully cross-amplified in A. nitidus and A. heterophyllus, indicating that they will be of great value for genetic study across this genus. PMID:28101438

  14. Development and characterization of 27 microsatellite markers for the mangrove fern, Acrostichum aureum (Pteridaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Takashi; Tsuda, Yoshiaki; Mori, Gustavo Maruyama; Cruz, Mariana Vargas; Shinmura, Yoshimi; Wee, Alison K S; Takayama, Koji; Asakawa, Takeshi; Yamakawa, Takeru; Suleiman, Monica; Núñez-Farfán, Juan; Webb, Edward L; Watano, Yasuyuki; Kajita, Tadashi

    2016-09-01

    Twenty-seven nuclear microsatellite markers were developed for the mangrove fern, Acrostichum aureum (Pteridaceae), to investigate the genetic structure and demographic history of the only pantropical mangrove plant. Fifty-six A. aureum individuals from three populations were sampled and genotyped to characterize the 27 loci. The number of alleles and expected heterozygosity ranged from one to 15 and 0.000 to 0.893, respectively. Across the 26 polymorphic loci, the Malaysian population showed much higher levels of polymorphism compared to the other two populations in Guam and Brazil. Cross-amplification tests in the other two species from the genus determined that seven and six loci were amplifiable in A. danaeifolium and A. speciosum, respectively. The 26 polymorphic microsatellite markers will be useful for future studies investigating the genetic structure and demographic history of of A. aureum, which has the widest distributional range of all mangrove plants.

  15. Development and Characterization of Microsatellite Markers from the Transcriptome of Firmiana danxiaensis (Malvaceae s.l.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Fan

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Firmiana consists of 12–16 species, many of which are narrow endemics. Expressed sequence tag (EST–simple sequence repeat (SSR markers were developed and characterized for size polymorphism in four Firmiana species. Methods and Results: A total of 102 EST-SSR primer pairs were designed based on the transcriptome sequences of F. danxiaensis; these were then characterized in four Firmiana species—F. danxiaensis, F. kwangsiensis, F. hainanensis, and F. simplex. In these four species, 17 primer pairs were successfully amplified, and 14 were polymorphic in at least one species. The number of alleles ranged from one to 13, and the observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0 to 1 and 0 to 0.925, respectively. The lowest level of polymorphism was observed in F. danxiaensis. Conclusions: These polymorphic EST-SSR markers are valuable for conservation genetics studies in the endangered Firmiana species.

  16. Development and Characterization of Microsatellite Markers for Central American Begonia sect. Gireoudia (Begoniaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex D. Twyford

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Transcriptome sequence data were used to design microsatellite primers for two widespread Central American Begonia species, B. heracleifolia and B. nelumbiifolia, to investigate population structure and hybridization. Methods and Results: The transcriptome from vegetative meristem tissue from the related B. plebeja was mined for microsatellite loci, and 31 primer pairs amplified in the target species. Fifteen primer pairs were combined in two multiplex PCR reactions, which amplified an average of four alleles per locus. Conclusions: The markers developed will be a valuable genetic resource for medium-throughput genotyping of Central American species of Begonia sect. Gireoudia. A subset of these markers have perfect sequence matches to Asian B. venusta, and are promising for studies in other Begonia sections.

  17. Development of Novel Microsatellite Markers in the Omei Treefrog (Rhacophorus omeimontis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Wu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Eleven novel microsatellite markers were developed and characterized for the Omei treefrog (Rhacophorus omeimontis using the fast isolation by AFLP of sequences containing repeats method. Polymorphism of each locus was tested in 24 individuals from two wild populations. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 4 to 15, the average observed and expected heterozygosity per locus ranged from 0.250 to 0.839 and from 0.562 to 0.914, respectively. Two of the 11 microsatellite loci showed significant deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Two locus pairs showed significant linkage disequilibrium. Neither evidence of scoring error due to stuttering nor evidence of large allele dropout was found at all of the 11 loci, but evidence of null alleles was indicated at two loci because of general excess of homozygotes for most allele size classes. These polymorphic loci will be useful markers in studying mate choice of the Omei treefrog.

  18. Laboratory-Directed Research and Development 2016 Summary Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pillai, Rekha Sukamar [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Jacobson, Julie Ann [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2C, “Laboratory Directed Research and Development” (April 19, 2006), which establishes DOE’s requirements for the program while providing the laboratory director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all INL programs. This report includes summaries of all INL LDRD research activities supported during Fiscal Year (FY) 2016. INL is the lead laboratory for the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE). The INL mission is to discover, demonstrate, and secure innovative nuclear energy solutions, other clean energy options, and critical infrastructure with a vision to change the world’s energy future and secure our critical infrastructure. Operating since 1949, INL is the nation’s leading research, development, and demonstration center for nuclear energy, including nuclear nonproliferation and physical and cyber-based protection of energy systems and critical infrastructure, as well as integrated energy systems research, development, demonstration, and deployment. INL has been managed and operated by Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC (a wholly owned company of Battelle) for DOE since 2005. Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, is a partnership between Battelle, BWX Technologies, Inc., AECOM, the Electric Power Research Institute, the National University Consortium (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Ohio State University, North Carolina State University, University of New Mexico, and Oregon State University), and the Idaho university collaborators (i.e., University of Idaho, Idaho State University, and Boise State University). Since its creation, INL’s research and development (R&D) portfolio has broadened with targeted programs supporting national missions to advance nuclear energy

  19. Annual Progress Report, 1976. Southern Rural Development Center, Mississippi State University. SRDC Series Publication No. 15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southern Rural Development Center, State College, MS.

    Covering the 1976 activities of the Southern Rural Development Center (SRDC), this third annual report describes SRDC's: history; organization; regional workshops; functional networks; network bibliographies and other publications; Title V reports; grant received for training in rural development; orientation visits; consultants; information…

  20. A general pipeline for the development of anchor markers for comparative genomics in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stougaard Jens

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complete or near-complete genomic sequence information is presently only available for a few plant species representing a large phylogenetic diversity among plants. In order to effectively transfer this information to species lacking sequence information, comparative genomic tools need to be developed. Molecular markers permitting cross-species mapping along co-linear genomic regions are central to comparative genomics. These "anchor" markers, defining unique loci in genetic linkage maps of multiple species, are gene-based and possess a number of features that make them relatively sparse. To identify potential anchor marker sequences more efficiently, we have established an automated bioinformatic pipeline that combines multi-species Expressed Sequence Tags (EST and genome sequence data. Results Taking advantage of sequence data from related species, the pipeline identifies evolutionarily conserved sequences that are likely to define unique orthologous loci in most species of the same phylogenetic clade. The key features are the identification of evolutionarily conserved sequences followed by automated design of intron-flanking Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR primer pairs. Polymorphisms can subsequently be identified by size- or sequence variation of PCR products, amplified from mapping parents or populations. We illustrate our procedure in legumes and grasses and exemplify its application in legumes, where model plant studies and the genome- and EST-sequence data available have a potential impact on the breeding of crop species and on our understanding of the evolution of this large and diverse family. Conclusion We provide a database of 459 candidate anchor loci which have the potential to serve as map anchors in more than 18,000 legume species, a number of which are of agricultural importance. For grasses, the database contains 1335 candidate anchor loci. Based on this database, we have evaluated 76 candidate anchor loci

  1. Laboratory directed research and development annual report 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Not Available

    2005-01-01

    This report summarizes progress from the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program during fiscal year 2004. In addition to a programmatic and financial overview, the report includes progress reports from 352 individual R and D projects in 15 categories. The 15 categories are: (1) Advanced Concepts; (2) Advanced Manufacturing; (3) Biotechnology; (4) Chemical and Earth Sciences; (5) Computational and Information Sciences; (6) Differentiating Technologies; (7) Electronics and Photonics; (8) Emerging Threats; (9) Energy and Critical Infrastructures; (10) Engineering Sciences; (11) Grand Challenges; (12) Materials Science and Technology; (13) Nonproliferation and Materials Control; (14) Pulsed Power and High Energy Density Sciences; and (15) Corporate Objectives

  2. 1995 Laboratory-Directed Research and Development Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cauffman, D.P.; Shoaf, D.L.; Hill, D.A.; Denison, A.B.

    1995-12-31

    The Laboratory-Directed Research and Development Program (LDRD) is a key component of the discretionary research conducted by Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company (Lockheed Idaho) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The threefold purpose and goal of the LDRD program is to maintain the scientific and technical vitality of the INEL, respond to and support new technical opportunities, and enhance the agility and flexibility of the national laboratory and Lockheed Idaho to address the current and future missions of the Department of Energy.

  3. 1996 Laboratory directed research and development annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyers, C.E.; Harvey, C.L.; Lopez-Andreas, L.M.; Chavez, D.L.; Whiddon, C.P. [comp.

    1997-04-01

    This report summarizes progress from the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program during fiscal year 1996. In addition to a programmatic and financial overview, the report includes progress reports from 259 individual R&D projects in seventeen categories. The general areas of research include: engineered processes and materials; computational and information sciences; microelectronics and photonics; engineering sciences; pulsed power; advanced manufacturing technologies; biomedical engineering; energy and environmental science and technology; advanced information technologies; counterproliferation; advanced transportation; national security technology; electronics technologies; idea exploration and exploitation; production; and science at the interfaces - engineering with atoms.

  4. 1995 Laboratory-Directed Research and Development Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cauffman, D.P.; Shoaf, D.L.; Hill, D.A.; Denison, A.B.

    1995-01-01

    The Laboratory-Directed Research and Development Program (LDRD) is a key component of the discretionary research conducted by Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company (Lockheed Idaho) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The threefold purpose and goal of the LDRD program is to maintain the scientific and technical vitality of the INEL, respond to and support new technical opportunities, and enhance the agility and flexibility of the national laboratory and Lockheed Idaho to address the current and future missions of the Department of Energy

  5. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program: FY 2015 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SLAC,

    2016-04-04

    The Department of Energy (DOE) and the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC) encourage innovation, creativity, originality and quality to maintain the Laboratory’s research activities and staff at the forefront of science and technology. To further advance its scientific research capabilities, the Laboratory allocates a portion of its funds for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program. With DOE guidance, the LDRD program enables SLAC scientists to make rapid and significant contributions that seed new strategies for solving important national science and technology problems. The LDRD program is conducted using existing research facilities.

  6. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY-15 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pillai, Rekha Sukamar [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2B, “Laboratory Directed Research and Development” (April 19, 2006), which establishes DOE’s requirements for the program while providing the laboratory director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all INL programs. This report includes summaries of all INL LDRD research activities supported during Fiscal Year (FY) 2015.

  7. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Annual Report - Fiscal Year 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, Darrell R.; Hughes, Pamela J.; Pearson, Erik W.

    2001-04-01

    The projects described in this report represent the Laboratory's investment in its future and are vital to maintaining the ability to develop creative solutions for the scientific and technical challenges faced by DOE and the nation. In accordance with DOE guidelines, the report provides, a) a director's statement, b) an overview of the laboratory's LDRD program, including PNNL's management process and a self-assessment of the program, c) a five-year project funding table, and d) project summaries for each LDRD project.

  8. 1997 Laboratory directed research and development. Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyers, C.E.; Harvey, C.L.; Chavez, D.L.; Whiddon, C.P. [comps.

    1997-12-31

    This report summarizes progress from the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program during fiscal year 1997. In addition to a programmatic and financial overview, the report includes progress reports from 218 individual R&D projects in eleven categories. Theses reports are grouped into the following areas: materials science and technology; computer sciences; electronics and photonics; phenomenological modeling and engineering simulation; manufacturing science and technology; life-cycle systems engineering; information systems; precision sensing and analysis; environmental sciences; risk and reliability; national grand challenges; focused technologies; and reserve.

  9. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program. Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogeka, G.J.; Romano, A.J.

    1992-12-01

    This report briefly discusses the following research: Advances in Geoexploration; Transvenous Coronary Angiography with Synchrotron X-Rays; Borehole Measurements of Global Warming; Molecular Ecology: Development of Field Methods for Microbial Growth Rate and Activity Measurements; A New Malaria Enzyme - A Potential Source for a New Diagnostic Test for Malaria and a Target for a New Antimalarial Drug; Basic Studies on Thoron and Thoron Precursors; Cloning of the cDNA for a Human Serine/Threonine Protein Kinase that is Activated Specifically by Double-Stranded DNA; Development of an Ultra-Fast Laser System for Accelerator Applications; Cluster Impact Fusion; Effect of a Bacterial Spore Protein on Mutagenesis; Structure and Function of Adenovirus Penton Base Protein; High Resolution Fast X-Ray Detector; Coherent Synchrotron Radiation Longitudinal Bunch Shape Monitor; High Grain Harmonic Generation Experiment; BNL Maglev Studies; Structural Investigations of Pt-Based Catalysts; Studies on the Cellular Toxicity of Cocaine and Cocaethylene; Human Melanocyte Transformation; Exploratory Applications of X-Ray Microscopy; Determination of the Higher Ordered Structure of Eukaryotic Chromosomes; Uranium Neutron Capture Therapy; Tunneling Microscopy Studies of Nanoscale Structures; Nuclear Techiques for Study of Biological Channels; RF Sources for Accelerator Physics; Induction and Repair of Double-Strand Breaks in the DNA of Human Lymphocytes; and An EBIS Source of High Charge State Ions up to Uranium.

  10. Fiscal 1978 annual report of Japan Nuclear Ship Development Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    In October, 1978, the nuclear ship Mutsu was moved to Sasebo Port from Ominato Port for shield repair and comprehensive safety check-up and repair; and this was a long-standing problem for the ship. In face of a new energy age, Japan Nuclear Ship Development Agency is endeavoring to bring up the nuclear ship technology in Japan to the top level in the world by successfully completing the n.s. Mutsu through perfect safety and reliability. For Japan, which is a leading country of shipbuilding and merchant shipping, the development of nuclear ships is extremely important. On the activities of the agency from April, 1978, to March, 1979, the following matters are described: safety check and shielding repair of the n.s. Mutsu; Maintenance of the n.s. Mutsu at Ominato and Sasebo ports and its sailing to Sasebo port; works at Sasebo port before and after the arrival of the n.s. Mutsu; maintenance works of the Mutsu facilities at Ominato port; governmental formalities for permission and approval; training of ship crew; administrative works. (J.P.N.)

  11. Development and evaluation of microsatellite markers for Acer miyabei (Sapindaceae), a threatened maple species in East Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeki, Ikuyo; Hirao, Akira S; Kenta, Tanaka

    2015-06-01

    Twelve microsatellite markers were developed and characterized in a threatened maple species, Acer miyabei (Sapindaceae), for use in population genetic analyses. Using Ion Personal Genome Machine (PGM) sequencing, we developed microsatellite markers with perfect di- and trinucleotide repeats. These markers were tested on a total of 44 individuals from two natural populations of A. miyabei subsp. miyabei f. miyabei in Hokkaido Island, Japan. The number of alleles per locus ranged from two to eight. The observed and expected heterozygosities per locus ranged from 0.05 to 0.75 and from 0.05 to 0.79, respectively. Some of the markers were successfully transferred to the closely related species A. campestre, A. platanoides, and A. pictum. The developed markers will be useful in characterizing the genetic structure and diversity of A. miyabei and will help to understand its spatial genetic variation, levels of inbreeding, and patterns of gene flow, thereby providing a basis for conservation.

  12. Work-family life courses and metabolic markers in mid-life: evidence from the British National Child Development Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMunn, Anne; Lacey, Rebecca E; Kumari, Meena; Worts, Diana; McDonough, Peggy; Sacker, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous studies have found generally better health among those who combine employment and family responsibilities; however, most research excludes men, and relies on subjective measures of health and information on work and family activities from only 1 or 2 time points in the life course. This study investigated associations between work-family life course types (LCTs) and markers of metabolic risk in a British birth cohort study. Methods Multichannel sequence analysis was used to generate work-family LCTs, combining annual information on work, partnership and parenthood between 16 and 42 years for men and women in the British National Child Development Study (NCDS, followed since their birth in 1958). Associations between work-family LCTs and metabolic risk factors in mid-life (age 44–45) were tested using multivariate linear regression in multiply imputed data. Results Life courses characterised by earlier transitions into parenthood were associated with significantly increased metabolic risk, regardless of attachment to paid work or marital stability over the life course. These associations were only partially attenuated by educational qualifications, early life circumstances and adult mediators. The positive association between weak labour markets ties and metabolic risk was weaker than might be expected from previous studies. Associations between work-family LCTs and metabolic risk factors did not differ significantly by gender. Conclusions Earlier transitions to parenthood are linked to metabolic risk in mid-life. PMID:26659761

  13. Laboratory directed research and development annual report: 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    This report summarizes progress from the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program during fiscal year 2005 for Sandia National Laboratories. In addition to a programmatic and financial overview, the report includes progress reports from 410 individual R and D projects in 19 categories. The categories and subheadings are: Science, Technology and Engineering (Advanced Components and Certification Engineering; Advanced Manufacturing; Biotechnology; Chemical and Earth Sciences; Computational and Information Sciences; Electronics and Photonics; Engineering Sciences; Materials Science and Technology; Pulsed Power Sciences and High Energy Density Sciences; Science and Technology Strategic Objectives); Mission Technologies (Energy and Infrastructure Assurance; Homeland Security; Military Technologies and Applications; Nonproliferation and Assessments; Grand Challanges); and Corporate Objectives (Advanced Concepts; Seniors' Council; University Collaborations)

  14. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2007 Annual Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sjoreen, Terrence P.

    2008-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National LaboratoryLaboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2B, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development' (April 19, 2006), which establishes DOE's requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report includes summaries for all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2007. The associated FY 2007 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2008/2) provides financial data and an internal evaluation of the program's management process. ORNL is a DOE multiprogram science, technology, and energy laboratory with distinctive capabilities in materials science and engineering, neutron science and technology, energy production and end-use technologies, biological and environmental science, and scientific computing. With these capabilities ORNL conducts basic and applied research and development (R and D) to support DOE's overarching mission to advance the national, economic, and energy security of the United States and promote scientific and technological innovation in support of that mission. As a national resource, the Laboratory also applies its capabilities and skills to specific needs of other federal agencies and customers through the DOE Work for Others (WFO) program. Information about the Laboratory and its programs is available on the Internet at http://www.ornl.gov/. LDRD is a relatively small but vital DOE program that allows ORNL, as well as other DOE laboratories, to select a limited number of R and D projects for the purpose of: (1) maintaining the scientific and technical vitality of the Laboratory; (2) enhancing the Laboratory's ability to address future DOE missions; (3) fostering creativity and stimulating exploration of forefront science

  15. SMD Technology Development Story for NASA Annual Technology report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seablom, Michael S.

    2017-01-01

    The role of the Science Mission Directorate (SMD) is to enable NASA to achieve its science goals in the context of the Nation's science agenda. SMD's strategic decisions regarding future missions and scientific pursuits are guided by Agency goals, input from the science community-including the recommendations set forth in the National Research Council (NRC) decadal surveys-and a commitment to preserve a balanced program across the major science disciplines. Toward this end, each of the four SMD science divisions-Heliophysics, Earth Science, Planetary Science, and Astrophysics-develops fundamental science questions upon which to base future research and mission programs. Often the breakthrough science required to answer these questions requires significant technological innovation-e.g., instruments or platforms with capabilities beyond the current state of the art. SMD's targeted technology investments fill technology gaps, enabling NASA to build the challenging and complex missions that accomplish groundbreaking science.

  16. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2005 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjoreen, Terrence P [ORNL

    2006-04-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2A, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development' (January 8, 2001), which establishes DOE's requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report describes all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2005 and includes final reports for completed projects and shorter progress reports for projects that were active, but not completed, during this period. The FY 2005 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2006/2) provides financial data about the FY 2005 projects and an internal evaluation of the program's management process. ORNL is a DOE multiprogram science, technology, and energy laboratory with distinctive capabilities in materials science and engineering, neutron science and technology, energy production and end-use technologies, biological and environmental science, and scientific computing. With these capabilities ORNL conducts basic and applied research and development (R&D) to support DOE's overarching national security mission, which encompasses science, energy resources, environmental quality, and national nuclear security. As a national resource, the Laboratory also applies its capabilities and skills to the specific needs of other federal agencies and customers through the DOE Work For Others (WFO) program. Information about the Laboratory and its programs is available on the Internet at . LDRD is a relatively small but vital DOE program that allows ORNL, as well as other multiprogram DOE laboratories, to select a limited number of R&D projects for the purpose of: (1) maintaining the scientific and technical vitality of the

  17. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2004 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjoreen, Terrence P [ORNL

    2005-04-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2A, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development' (January 8, 2001), which establishes DOE's requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report describes all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2004 and includes final reports for completed projects and shorter progress reports for projects that were active, but not completed, during this period. The FY 2004 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2005/2) provides financial data about the FY 2004 projects and an internal evaluation of the program's management process. ORNL is a DOE multiprogram science, technology, and energy laboratory with distinctive capabilities in materials science and engineering, neutron science and technology, energy production and end-use technologies, biological and environmental science, and scientific computing. With these capabilities ORNL conducts basic and applied research and development (R&D) to support DOE's overarching national security mission, which encompasses science, energy resources, environmental quality, and national nuclear security. As a national resource, the Laboratory also applies its capabilities and skills to the specific needs of other federal agencies and customers through the DOE Work For Others (WFO) program. Information about the Laboratory and its programs is available on the Internet at . LDRD is a relatively small but vital DOE program that allows ORNL, as well as other multiprogram DOE laboratories, to select a limited number of R&D projects for the purpose of: (1) maintaining the scientific and technical vitality of the

  18. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2007 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjoreen, Terrence P [ORNL

    2008-04-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2B, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development' (April 19, 2006), which establishes DOE's requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report includes summaries for all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2007. The associated FY 2007 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2008/2) provides financial data and an internal evaluation of the program's management process. ORNL is a DOE multiprogram science, technology, and energy laboratory with distinctive capabilities in materials science and engineering, neutron science and technology, energy production and end-use technologies, biological and environmental science, and scientific computing. With these capabilities ORNL conducts basic and applied research and development (R&D) to support DOE's overarching mission to advance the national, economic, and energy security of the United States and promote scientific and technological innovation in support of that mission. As a national resource, the Laboratory also applies its capabilities and skills to specific needs of other federal agencies and customers through the DOE Work for Others (WFO) program. Information about the Laboratory and its programs is available on the Internet at http://www.ornl.gov/. LDRD is a relatively small but vital DOE program that allows ORNL, as well as other DOE laboratories, to select a limited number of R&D projects for the purpose of: (1) maintaining the scientific and technical vitality of the Laboratory; (2) enhancing the Laboratory's ability to address future DOE missions; (3) fostering creativity and stimulating

  19. Site-Directed Research and Development FY 2012 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ,

    2013-04-01

    The reports included in this report are for project activities that occurred from October 2011 through September 2012. These reports describe in detail the discoveries, achievements, and challenges encountered by our talented and enthusiastic principal investigators (PIs). Many of the reports describe R&D efforts that were “successful” in their pursuits and resulted in a positive outcome or technology realization. As we’ve stated before, and continue to stress, in some cases the result is a “negative” finding, for instance a technology is currently impractical or out of reach. This can often be viewed erroneously as a “failure,” but is actually a valid outcome in the pursuit of high-risk research, which often leads to unforeseen new paths of discovery. Either result advances our knowledge and increases our ability to identify solutions and/or likewise avoid costly paths not appropriate for the challenges presented. The SDRD program continues to provide an unfettered mechanism for innovation and development that returns multifold to the NNSS mission. Overall the program is a strong R&D innovation engine, benefited by an enhanced mission, committed resources, and sound competitiveness to yield maximum benefit. The 23 projects described exemplify the creativity and ability of a diverse scientific and engineering talent base. The efforts also showcase an impressive capability and resource that can be brought to find solutions to a broad array of technology needs and applications relevant to the NNSS mission and national security.

  20. Development of Novel Polymorphic EST-SSR Markers in Bailinggu (Pleurotus tuoliensis for Crossbreeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueting Dai

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Identification of monokaryons and their mating types and discrimination of hybrid offspring are key steps for the crossbreeding of Pleurotus tuoliensis (Bailinggu. However, conventional crossbreeding methods are troublesome and time consuming. Using RNA-seq technology, we developed new expressed sequence tag-simple sequence repeat (EST-SSR markers for Bailinggu to easily and rapidly identify monokaryons and their mating types, genetic diversity and hybrid offspring. We identified 1110 potential EST-based SSR loci from a newly-sequenced Bailinggu transcriptome and then randomly selected 100 EST-SSRs for further validation. Results showed that 39, 43 and 34 novel EST-SSR markers successfully identified monokaryons from their parent dikaryons, differentiated two different mating types and discriminated F1 and F2 hybrid offspring, respectively. Furthermore, a total of 86 alleles were detected in 37 monokaryons using 18 highly informative EST-SSRs. The observed number of alleles per locus ranged from three to seven. Cluster analysis revealed that these monokaryons have a relatively high level of genetic diversity. Transfer rates of the EST-SSRs in the monokaryons of closely-related species Pleurotus eryngii var. ferulae and Pleurotus ostreatus were 72% and 64%, respectively. Therefore, our study provides new SSR markers and an efficient method to enhance the crossbreeding of Bailinggu and closely-related species.

  1. Development of swine-specific DNA markers for biosensor-based halal authentication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, M E; Hashim, U; Kashif, M; Mustafa, S; Che Man, Y B; Abd Hamid, S B

    2012-06-29

    The pig (Sus scrofa) mitochondrial genome was targeted to design short (15-30 nucleotides) DNA markers that would be suitable for biosensor-based hybridization detection of target DNA. Short DNA markers are reported to survive harsh conditions in which longer ones are degraded into smaller fragments. The whole swine mitochondrial-genome was in silico digested with AluI restriction enzyme. Among 66 AluI fragments, five were selected as potential markers because of their convenient lengths, high degree of interspecies polymorphism and intraspecies conservatism. These were confirmed by NCBI blast analysis and ClustalW alignment analysis with 11 different meat-providing animal and fish species. Finally, we integrated a tetramethyl rhodamine-labeled 18-nucleotide AluI fragment into a 3-nm diameter citrate-tannate coated gold nanoparticle to develop a swine-specific hybrid nanobioprobe for the determination of pork adulteration in 2.5-h autoclaved pork-beef binary mixtures. This hybrid probe detected as low as 1% pork in deliberately contaminated autoclaved pork-beef binary mixtures and no cross-species detection was recorded, demonstrating the feasibility of this type of probe for biosensor-based detection of pork adulteration of halal and kosher foods.

  2. Quantification of the fate of dietary fiber in humans by a newly developed radiolabeled fiber marker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carryer, P.W.; Brown, M.I.; Malagelada, J.R.; Carlson, G.L.; McCall, J.T.

    1982-01-01

    A radiolabeled cellulose ( 131 I-fiber) that retains the essential physical and chemical properties of this class of fiber was developed in our laboratory. Researchers quantified the fate of orally ingested 131 I-fiber in healthy individuals by external gamma camera monitoring and fecal collections. The marker passes virtually intact through the human gastrointestinal tract with negligible release and absorption of the label in the gut. Comparison of the gastric emptying rate of 131 I-fiber with that of a predominantly aqueous marker, 99 mTc-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid ( 99 mTc-DTPA), showed that 131 I-fiber strands were evacuated more slowly than intragastric fluids. An important finding was that some 131 I-fiber emptying occurred during most time periods, even before liquids were completely evacuated. This suggests that the human stomach is able to empty simultaneously liquids and fiber strands (1-15 mm in length) that are resistant to grinding by antral mechanical forces and to digestion by acid-peptic secretion. Thus, some nondigestible solids may be emptied with the bulk of a meal, although at a slower rate. 131 I-Fiber may be a useful marker for quantifying gastric emptying of nondigestible solids. Further, the stability of 131 I-fiber in the gut, as opposed to most other physiologic solid labels, should enable future investigation of intestinal and colonic transit of fiber, which is an important component of the human diet

  3. Development of Genetic Markers in Eucalyptus Species by Target Enrichment and Exome Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Modhumita Ghosh; Dharanishanthi, Veeramuthu; Agarwal, Ishangi; Krutovsky, Konstantin V.

    2015-01-01

    The advent of next-generation sequencing has facilitated large-scale discovery, validation and assessment of genetic markers for high density genotyping. The present study was undertaken to identify markers in genes supposedly related to wood property traits in three Eucalyptus species. Ninety four genes involved in xylogenesis were selected for hybridization probe based nuclear genomic DNA target enrichment and exome sequencing. Genomic DNA was isolated from the leaf tissues and used for on-array probe hybridization followed by Illumina sequencing. The raw sequence reads were trimmed and high-quality reads were mapped to the E. grandis reference sequence and the presence of single nucleotide variants (SNVs) and insertions/ deletions (InDels) were identified across the three species. The average read coverage was 216X and a total of 2294 SNVs and 479 InDels were discovered in E. camaldulensis, 2383 SNVs and 518 InDels in E. tereticornis, and 1228 SNVs and 409 InDels in E. grandis. Additionally, SNV calling and InDel detection were conducted in pair-wise comparisons of E. tereticornis vs. E. grandis, E. camaldulensis vs. E. tereticornis and E. camaldulensis vs. E. grandis. This study presents an efficient and high throughput method on development of genetic markers for family– based QTL and association analysis in Eucalyptus. PMID:25602379

  4. Development of genetic markers in Eucalyptus species by target enrichment and exome sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Modhumita Ghosh Dasgupta

    Full Text Available The advent of next-generation sequencing has facilitated large-scale discovery, validation and assessment of genetic markers for high density genotyping. The present study was undertaken to identify markers in genes supposedly related to wood property traits in three Eucalyptus species. Ninety four genes involved in xylogenesis were selected for hybridization probe based nuclear genomic DNA target enrichment and exome sequencing. Genomic DNA was isolated from the leaf tissues and used for on-array probe hybridization followed by Illumina sequencing. The raw sequence reads were trimmed and high-quality reads were mapped to the E. grandis reference sequence and the presence of single nucleotide variants (SNVs and insertions/ deletions (InDels were identified across the three species. The average read coverage was 216X and a total of 2294 SNVs and 479 InDels were discovered in E. camaldulensis, 2383 SNVs and 518 InDels in E. tereticornis, and 1228 SNVs and 409 InDels in E. grandis. Additionally, SNV calling and InDel detection were conducted in pair-wise comparisons of E. tereticornis vs. E. grandis, E. camaldulensis vs. E. tereticornis and E. camaldulensis vs. E. grandis. This study presents an efficient and high throughput method on development of genetic markers for family- based QTL and association analysis in Eucalyptus.

  5. Quantification of the fate of dietary fiber in humans by a newly developed radiolabeled fiber marker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carryer, P.W.; Brown, M.I.; Malagelada, J.R.; Carlson, G.L.; McCall, J.T.

    1982-06-01

    A radiolabeled cellulose (/sup 131/I-fiber) that retains the essential physical and chemical properties of this class of fiber was developed in our laboratory. Researchers quantified the fate of orally ingested /sup 131/I-fiber in healthy individuals by external gamma camera monitoring and fecal collections. The marker passes virtually intact through the human gastrointestinal tract with negligible release and absorption of the label in the gut. Comparison of the gastric emptying rate of /sup 131/I-fiber with that of a predominantly aqueous marker, /sup 99/mTc-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (/sup 99/mTc-DTPA), showed that /sup 131/I-fiber strands were evacuated more slowly than intragastric fluids. An important finding was that some /sup 131/I-fiber emptying occurred during most time periods, even before liquids were completely evacuated. This suggests that the human stomach is able to empty simultaneously liquids and fiber strands (1-15 mm in length) that are resistant to grinding by antral mechanical forces and to digestion by acid-peptic secretion. Thus, some nondigestible solids may be emptied with the bulk of a meal, although at a slower rate. /sup 131/I-Fiber may be a useful marker for quantifying gastric emptying of nondigestible solids. Further, the stability of /sup 131/I-fiber in the gut, as opposed to most other physiologic solid labels, should enable future investigation of intestinal and colonic transit of fiber, which is an important component of the human diet.

  6. Development of Novel Polymorphic EST-SSR Markers in Bailinggu (Pleurotus tuoliensis) for Crossbreeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yueting; Su, Wenying; Song, Bing; Li, Yu; Fu, Yongping

    2017-01-01

    Identification of monokaryons and their mating types and discrimination of hybrid offspring are key steps for the crossbreeding of Pleurotus tuoliensis (Bailinggu). However, conventional crossbreeding methods are troublesome and time consuming. Using RNA-seq technology, we developed new expressed sequence tag-simple sequence repeat (EST-SSR) markers for Bailinggu to easily and rapidly identify monokaryons and their mating types, genetic diversity and hybrid offspring. We identified 1110 potential EST-based SSR loci from a newly-sequenced Bailinggu transcriptome and then randomly selected 100 EST-SSRs for further validation. Results showed that 39, 43 and 34 novel EST-SSR markers successfully identified monokaryons from their parent dikaryons, differentiated two different mating types and discriminated F1 and F2 hybrid offspring, respectively. Furthermore, a total of 86 alleles were detected in 37 monokaryons using 18 highly informative EST-SSRs. The observed number of alleles per locus ranged from three to seven. Cluster analysis revealed that these monokaryons have a relatively high level of genetic diversity. Transfer rates of the EST-SSRs in the monokaryons of closely-related species Pleurotus eryngii var. ferulae and Pleurotus ostreatus were 72% and 64%, respectively. Therefore, our study provides new SSR markers and an efficient method to enhance the crossbreeding of Bailinggu and closely-related species. PMID:29149037

  7. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY2011 Annual Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craig, W.; Sketchley, J.; Kotta, P.

    2012-01-01

    A premier applied-science laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has earned the reputation as a leader in providing science and technology solutions to the most pressing national and global security problems. The LDRD Program, established by Congress at all DOE national laboratories in 1991, is LLNL's most important single resource for fostering excellent science and technology for today's needs and tomorrow's challenges. The LDRD internally directed research and development funding at LLNL enables high-risk, potentially high-payoff projects at the forefront of science and technology. The LDRD Program at Livermore serves to: (1) Support the Laboratory's missions, strategic plan, and foundational science; (2) Maintain the Laboratory's science and technology vitality; (3) Promote recruiting and retention; (4) Pursue collaborations; (5) Generate intellectual property; and (6) Strengthen the U.S. economy. Myriad LDRD projects over the years have made important contributions to every facet of the Laboratory's mission and strategic plan, including its commitment to nuclear, global, and energy and environmental security, as well as cutting-edge science and technology and engineering in high-energy-density matter, high-performance computing and simulation, materials and chemistry at the extremes, information systems, measurements and experimental science, and energy manipulation. A summary of each project was submitted by the principal investigator. Project summaries include the scope, motivation, goals, relevance to DOE/NNSA and LLNL mission areas, the technical progress achieved in FY11, and a list of publications that resulted from the research. The projects are: (1) Nuclear Threat Reduction; (2) Biosecurity; (3) High-Performance Computing and Simulation; (4) Intelligence; (5) Cybersecurity; (6) Energy Security; (7) Carbon Capture; (8) Material Properties, Theory, and Design; (9) Radiochemistry; (10) High-Energy-Density Science; (11) Laser Inertial

  8. Development of a set of SSR markers for genetic polymorphism detection and interspecific hybrid jute breeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipnarayan Saha

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Corchorus capsularis (white jute and C. olitorius (dark jute are the two principal cultivated species of jute that produce natural bast fiber of commercial importance. We have identified 4509 simple sequence repeat (SSR loci from 34,163 unigene sequences of C. capsularis to develop a non-redundant set of 2079 flanking primer pairs. Among the SSRs, trinucleotide repeats were most frequent (60% followed by dinucleotide repeats (37.6%. Annotation of the SSR-containing unigenes revealed their putative functions in various biological and molecular processes, including responses to biotic and abiotic signals. Eighteen expressed gene-derived SSR (eSSR markers were successfully mapped to the existing single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP linkage map of jute, providing additional anchor points. Amplification of 72% of the 74 randomly selected primer pairs was successful in a panel of 24 jute accessions, comprising five and twelve accessions of C. capsularis and C. olitorius, respectively, and seven wild jute species. Forty-three primer pairs produced an average of 2.7 alleles and 58.1% polymorphism in a panel of 24 jute accessions. The mean PIC value was 0.34 but some markers showed PIC values higher than 0.5, suggesting that these markers can efficiently measure genetic diversity and serve for mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTLs in jute. A primer polymorphism survey with parents of a wide-hybridized population between a cultivated jute and its wild relative revealed their efficacy for interspecific hybrid identification. For ready accessibility of jute eSSR primers, we compiled all information in a user-friendly web database, JuteMarkerdb (http://jutemarkerdb.icar.gov.in/ for the first time in jute. This eSSR resource in jute is expected to be of use in characterization of germplasm, interspecific hybrid and variety identification, and marker-assisted breeding of superior-quality jute.

  9. Development of marker-free transgenic lettuce resistant to Mirafiori lettuce big-vein virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawazu, Yoichi; Fujiyama, Ryoi; Imanishi, Shunsuke; Fukuoka, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Hirotaka; Matsumoto, Satoru

    2016-10-01

    Lettuce big-vein disease caused by Mirafiori lettuce big-vein virus (MLBVV) is found in major lettuce production areas worldwide, but highly resistant cultivars have not yet been developed. To produce MLBVV-resistant marker-free transgenic lettuce that would have a transgene with a promoter and terminator of lettuce origin, we constructed a two T-DNA binary vector, in which the first T-DNA contained the selectable marker gene neomycin phosphotransferase II, and the second T-DNA contained the lettuce ubiquitin gene promoter and terminator and inverted repeats of the coat protein (CP) gene of MLBVV. This vector was introduced into lettuce cultivars 'Watson' and 'Fuyuhikari' by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Regenerated plants (T0 generation) that were CP gene-positive by PCR analysis were self-pollinated, and 312 T1 lines were analyzed for resistance to MLBVV. Virus-negative plants were checked for the CP gene and the marker gene, and nine lines were obtained which were marker-free and resistant to MLBVV. Southern blot analysis showed that three of the nine lines had two copies of the CP gene, whereas six lines had a single copy and were used for further analysis. Small interfering RNAs, which are indicative of RNA silencing, were detected in all six lines. MLBVV infection was inhibited in all six lines in resistance tests performed in a growth chamber and a greenhouse, resulting in a high degree of resistance to lettuce big-vein disease. Transgenic lettuce lines produced in this study could be used as resistant cultivars or parental lines for breeding.

  10. Meninges harbor cells expressing neural precursor markers during development and adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bifari, Francesco; Berton, Valeria; Pino, Annachiara; Kusalo, Marijana; Malpeli, Giorgio; Di Chio, Marzia; Bersan, Emanuela; Amato, Eliana; Scarpa, Aldo; Krampera, Mauro; Fumagalli, Guido; Decimo, Ilaria

    2015-01-01

    Brain and skull developments are tightly synchronized, allowing the cranial bones to dynamically adapt to the brain shape. At the brain-skull interface, meninges produce the trophic signals necessary for normal corticogenesis and bone development. Meninges harbor different cell populations, including cells forming the endosteum of the cranial vault. Recently, we and other groups have described the presence in meninges of a cell population endowed with neural differentiation potential in vitro and, after transplantation, in vivo. However, whether meninges may be a niche for neural progenitor cells during embryonic development and in adulthood remains to be determined. In this work we provide the first description of the distribution of neural precursor markers in rat meninges during development up to adulthood. We conclude that meninges share common properties with the classical neural stem cell niche, as they: (i) are a highly proliferating tissue; (ii) host cells expressing neural precursor markers such as nestin, vimentin, Sox2 and doublecortin; and (iii) are enriched in extracellular matrix components (e.g., fractones) known to bind and concentrate growth factors. This study underlines the importance of meninges as a potential niche for endogenous precursor cells during development and in adulthood.

  11. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY2011 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craig, W; Sketchley, J; Kotta, P

    2012-03-22

    A premier applied-science laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has earned the reputation as a leader in providing science and technology solutions to the most pressing national and global security problems. The LDRD Program, established by Congress at all DOE national laboratories in 1991, is LLNL's most important single resource for fostering excellent science and technology for today's needs and tomorrow's challenges. The LDRD internally directed research and development funding at LLNL enables high-risk, potentially high-payoff projects at the forefront of science and technology. The LDRD Program at Livermore serves to: (1) Support the Laboratory's missions, strategic plan, and foundational science; (2) Maintain the Laboratory's science and technology vitality; (3) Promote recruiting and retention; (4) Pursue collaborations; (5) Generate intellectual property; and (6) Strengthen the U.S. economy. Myriad LDRD projects over the years have made important contributions to every facet of the Laboratory's mission and strategic plan, including its commitment to nuclear, global, and energy and environmental security, as well as cutting-edge science and technology and engineering in high-energy-density matter, high-performance computing and simulation, materials and chemistry at the extremes, information systems, measurements and experimental science, and energy manipulation. A summary of each project was submitted by the principal investigator. Project summaries include the scope, motivation, goals, relevance to DOE/NNSA and LLNL mission areas, the technical progress achieved in FY11, and a list of publications that resulted from the research. The projects are: (1) Nuclear Threat Reduction; (2) Biosecurity; (3) High-Performance Computing and Simulation; (4) Intelligence; (5) Cybersecurity; (6) Energy Security; (7) Carbon Capture; (8) Material Properties, Theory, and Design; (9) Radiochemistry; (10) High

  12. Development of an MRI/x-ray/ultrasound compatible marker for pre-operative breast tumour localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yangmei; Wang, Jianxiong; Holloway, Claire; Plewes, Donald B

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes an in vitro investigation into the composition, structure and development of an magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound (US) and x-ray imaging compatible marker for breast tumour localization. The marker is composed of 0.4-0.6 mm glass and iron-containing aluminium microspheres suspended in a gelatin matrix. The final form of the marker is a cylindrical shape 7 mm long with 2.05 mm diameter to facilitate delivery through a 12 gauge biopsy needle. To get optimal reflectivity for the US contrast, the glass microsphere concentration was found to be 40% by weight. US contrast is independent of marker orientation and the cylindrical shape made its US signal appearance distinctive thus ensuring confident identification. To control the MRI contrast, iron content was varied to generate a clear and local susceptibility signal void to reflect the marker position. Optimal iron content was found to be 52 μg iron which produced a clear signal void in spoiled gradient recalled MR images. The appearance of the susceptibility artefact is determined by the marker's shape, orientation and echo time. The final marker produces a dark artefact in MRI while appears as a clear hyperintense structure with acoustic shadowing in US images. The x-ray image showed the marker as a radio-opaque structure. This in vitro study demonstrates that the marker forms an alternative to traditional wire localization currently used for breast surgical procedures and creates new opportunities for US guided surgical procedures

  13. Rapid Development of Microsatellite Markers for Plantago ovata Forsk.: Using Next Generation Sequencing and Their Cross-Species Transferability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranbir Singh Fougat

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Isabgol (Plantago ovata Forsk. is an important medicinal plant having high pharmacological activity in its seed husk, which is substantially used in the food, beverages and packaging industries. Nevertheless, isabgol lags behind in research, particularly for genomic resources, like molecular markers, genetic maps, etc. Presently, molecular markers can be easily developed through next generation sequencing technologies, more efficiently, cost effectively and in less time than ever before. This study was framed keeping in view the need to develop molecular markers for this economically important crop by employing a microsatellite enrichment protocol using a next generation sequencing platform (ion torrent PGM™ to obtain simple sequence repeats (SSRs for Plantago ovata for the very first time. A total of 3447 contigs were assembled, which contained 249 SSRs. Thirty seven loci were randomly selected for primer development; of which, 30 loci were successfully amplified. The developed microsatellite markers showed the amplification of the expected size and cross-amplification in another six species of Plantago. The SSR markers were unable to show polymorphism within P. ovata, suggesting that low variability exists within genotypes of P. ovata. This study suggests that PGM™ sequencing is a rapid and cost-effective tool for developing SSR markers for non-model species, and the markers so-observed could be useful in the molecular breeding of P. ovata.

  14. Microsatellite marker isolation and development for the giant Pacific Octopus (Enteroctopus dofleini)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toussaint, Rebecca K.; Sage, G. Kevin; Talbot, Sandra L.; Scheel, David

    2012-01-01

    We isolated and developed 18 novel microsatellite markers for the giant Pacific octopus (Enteroctopus dofleini) and examined them for 31 individuals from Prince William Sound (PWS), Alaska. These loci displayed moderate levels of allelic diversity (averaging 11 alleles per locus) and heterozygosity (averaging 65%). Seven loci deviated from Hardy–Weinberg Equilibrium (HWE) due to heterozygote deficiency for the PWS population, although deviations were not observed for all these loci in other populations, suggesting the PWS population is not in mutation-drift equilibrium. These novel microsatellite loci yielded sufficient genetic diversity for potential use in population genetics, individual identification, and parentage studies.

  15. Development and bin mapping of a Rosaceae Conserved Ortholog Set (COS of markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozik Alex

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Detailed comparative genome analyses within the economically important Rosaceae family have not been conducted. This is largely due to the lack of conserved gene-based molecular markers that are transferable among the important crop genera within the family [e.g. Malus (apple, Fragaria (strawberry, and Prunus (peach, cherry, apricot and almond]. The lack of molecular markers and comparative whole genome sequence analysis for this family severely hampers crop improvement efforts as well as QTL confirmation and validation studies. Results We identified a set of 3,818 rosaceaous unigenes comprised of two or more ESTs that correspond to single copy Arabidopsis genes. From this Rosaceae Conserved Orthologous Set (RosCOS, 1039 were selected from which 857 were used for the development of intron-flanking primers and allele amplification. This led to successful amplification and subsequent mapping of 613 RosCOS onto the Prunus TxE reference map resulting in a genome-wide coverage of 0.67 to 1.06 gene-based markers per cM per linkage group. Furthermore, the RosCOS primers showed amplification success rates from 23 to 100% across the family indicating that a substantial part of the RosCOS primers can be directly employed in other less studied rosaceaous crops. Comparisons of the genetic map positions of the RosCOS with the physical locations of the orthologs in the Populus trichocarpa genome identified regions of colinearity between the genomes of Prunus-Rosaceae and Populus-Salicaceae. Conclusion Conserved orthologous genes are extremely useful for the analysis of genome evolution among closely and distantly related species. The results presented in this study demonstrate the considerable potential of the mapped Prunus RosCOS for genome-wide marker employment and comparative whole genome studies within the Rosaceae family. Moreover, these markers will also function as useful anchor points for the genome sequencing efforts currently

  16. ENRESA : Second plan of research and development (1991-1995): Annual report 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The annual report are articulated into following chapters: 1.- Technical management summary. 2.- Economical management summary. 3.- Participation in international projects. 4.- Low and medium Level radioactive wastes. 5.- High level radioactive wastes. 6.- Research and development in high level radioactive wastes: biosphere and geosphere-7.- Radiation protection. 8.- Decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear and radioactive installations

  17. Research and Clinical Center for Child Development Annual Report, 1995-1996, No. 19.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakai, Kunio, Ed.; Chen, Shing-Jen, Ed.; Furutsuka, Takashi, Ed.; Shirotani, Yukari, Ed.

    This annual report discusses several topics related to the work of the Research and Clinical Center for Child Development at Hokkaido University in Japan. The articles are: (1) "Heart to Heart (Inter "Jo") Resonance: Taking Japanese Concept of Intersubjectivity Out of Everyday Life" (Shigeru Nakano); (2) "Intersubjectivity…

  18. Research and Clinical Center for Child Development Annual Report, 1994-1995, No. 18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakai, Kunio, Ed.; Chen, Shing-Jen, Ed.

    This annual report discusses several topics related to the work of the Research and Clinical Center for Child Development. Seven topics are covered in the report. The articles are: (1) "Fathers' Participation in the Lives of Their 4-Month-Old Infants: The United States and Japan" (Marguerite Stevenson Barratt, Koichi Negayama and…

  19. The Center for Community Development Annual Report, FY 1984-85. Volume II, Addendum 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Tom

    A variety of information is included in this 1984-85 annual report of Humboldt State University's Center for Community Development (California), which has been instrumental in establishing a wide range of community services and has worked extensively to preserve the language and culture of four northwestern California tribes--Hupa, Karuk, Tolowa,…

  20. FY2011 Annual Progress Report for Advanced Combustion Engine Research and Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2011-12-01

    Annual Progress Report for the Advanced Combustion Engine Research and Development (R&D) subprogram supporting the mission of the Vehicle Technologies Program by removing the critical technical barriers to commercialization of advanced internal combustion engines (ICEs) for passenger and commercial vehicles that meet future federal emissions regulations.

  1. Development of unigene-derived SSR markers in cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) and their transferability to other Vigna species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S K; Gopalakrishna, T

    2010-07-01

    Unigene sequences available in public databases provide a cost-effective and valuable source for the development of molecular markers. In this study, the identification and development of unigene-based SSR markers in cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.) is presented. A total of 1071 SSRs were identified in 15 740 cowpea unigene sequences downloaded from the National Center for Biotechnology Information. The most frequent SSR motifs present in the unigenes were trinucleotides (59.7%), followed by dinucleotides (34.8%), pentanucleotides (4%), and tetranucleotides (1.5%). The copy number varied from 6 to 33 for dinucleotide, 5 to 29 for trinucleotide, 5 to 7 for tetranucleotide, and 4 to 6 for pentanucleotide repeats. Primer pairs were successfully designed for 803 SSR motifs and 102 SSR markers were finally characterized and validated. Putative function was assigned to 64.7% of the unigene SSR markers based on significant homology to reported proteins. About 31.7% of the SSRs were present in coding sequences and 68.3% in untranslated regions of the genes. About 87% of the SSRs located in the coding sequences were trinucleotide repeats. Allelic variation at 32 SSR loci produced 98 alleles in 20 cowpea genotypes. The polymorphic information content for the SSR markers varied from 0.10 to 0.83 with an average of 0.53. These unigene SSR markers showed a high rate of transferability (88%) across other Vigna species, thereby expanding their utility. Alignment of unigene sequences with soybean genomic sequences revealed the presence of introns in amplified products of some of the SSR markers. This study presents the distribution of SSRs in the expressed portion of the cowpea genome and is the first report of the development of functional unigene-based SSR markers in cowpea. These SSR markers would play an important role in molecular mapping, comparative genomics, and marker-assisted selection strategies in cowpea and other Vigna species.

  2. Recent developments in the use of 2-alkylcyclobutanones as markers for irradiated lipid-containing foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, E.M.; Department of Agriculture for Northern Ireland, Belfast; Moore, S.; Graham, W.D.; McRoberts, W.C.; Hamilton, J.T.G.

    1998-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The use of 2-alkylcyclobutanones as markers for irradiated fat-containing foods has been well documented in the recent years. Initial development of the method concentrated on the detection of 2-dodecylcyclobutanone (2-DCB) in irradiated chicken meat with the methodology being subsequently modified to also detect 2-tetradecylcyclobutanone (2-TCB). The method has been validated by interlaboratory blind trials for chicken meat, pork and liquid whole egg, and was finally adopted as a European Standard (en1785) for the detection of irradiated fat-containing foods by the European Committee for Standardization (CEN) in 1996. Work has continued to further extend the applicability of this irradiation detection test to other fat-containing foods. Experimental work has shown that 2-DCB and 2-TCB can be used as markers for irradiated salmon meat, Camembert cheese, mango and papaya. The effects of irradiation dose and storage on the cyclobutanone concentration of Camembert cheese, mango and papaya have been studied while the effects of dose and temperature of irradiation were investigated for salmon meat. Other recent studies have included the investigation of the supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) technique as an alternative means of fat extraction from irradiated foods and, in addition, for extraction of the cyclobutanones directly from samples. Work is also progressing on the development of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of cyclobutanones with the view to developing a rapid screening test for irradiated fat-containing foods

  3. Development of a Behavioural Marker System for Rating Cadet’s Non-Technical Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Fernando PlÁcido da ConceiçÌo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite the adoption of crew resource management training for bridge teams over the last decades, the training is still heavily focussed on technical achievements. In an educational context, the situation is more problematical, since with requirement of developing the technical skills, there is a need to build and evaluate the non-technical skills of cadets with little experience in bridge team management. In parallel with the application of team leadership models, the Portuguese Naval Academy conducted a research to improve the development and assessment of non-technical skills in bridge simulators. This paper describes the method used to identify the key non-technical skills required for naval cadets and to develop a behavioural marker system for their measurement. A literature review of behavioural marker systems was supplemented with an analysis of interviews conducted with students and simulator instructors. Additionally, further analysis of Portuguese Navy accidents reports was made, applying the HFACS framework to identify the relevant non-technical skills involved in the accidents. The resulting rating system covers five skill categories (leadership, situational awareness, communication, team work and decision making, each one with three rating elements. The framework is currently under evaluation tests in bridge simulators sessions, within an educational context.

  4. Development of an antibiotic marker-free platform for heterologous protein production in Streptomyces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevillano, Laura; Díaz, Margarita; Santamaría, Ramón I

    2017-09-26

    The industrial use of enzymes produced by microorganisms is continuously growing due to the need for sustainable solutions. Nevertheless, many of the plasmids used for recombinant production of proteins in bacteria are based on the use of antibiotic resistance genes as selection markers. The safety concerns and legal requirements surrounding the increased use of antibiotic resistance genes have made the development of new antibiotic-free approaches essential. In this work, a system completely free of antibiotic resistance genes and useful for the production of high yields of proteins in Streptomyces is described. This system is based on the separation of the two components of the yefM/yoeBsl (antitoxin/toxin) operon; the toxin (yoeBsl) gene, responsible for host death, is integrated into the genome and the antitoxin gene (yefMsl), which inactivates the toxin, is located in the expression plasmid. To develop this system, the toxin gene was integrated into the genome of a strain lacking the complete operon, and the antibiotic resistance gene integrated along with the toxin was eliminated by Cre recombinase to generate a final host strain free of any antibiotic resistance marker. In the same way, the antibiotic resistance gene from the final expression plasmid was removed by Dre recombinase. The usefulness of this system was analysed by checking the production of two hydrolases from different Streptomyces. Production of both proteins, with potential industrial use, was high and stable over time after strain storage and after serial subcultures. These results support the robustness and stability of the positive selection system developed. The total absence of antibiotic resistance genes makes this system a powerful tool for using Streptomyces as a host to produce proteins at the industrial level. This work is the first Streptomyces antibiotic marker-free system to be described. Graphical abstract Antibiotic marker-free platform for protein expression in Streptomyces

  5. Spatiotemporal analysis of putative notochordal cell markers reveals CD24 and keratins 8, 18, and 19 as notochord-specific markers during early human intervertebral disc development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues-Pinto, Ricardo; Berry, Andrew; Piper-Hanley, Karen; Hanley, Neil; Richardson, Stephen M; Hoyland, Judith A

    2016-08-01

    In humans, the nucleus pulposus (NP) is composed of large vacuolated notochordal cells in the fetus but, soon after birth, becomes populated by smaller, chondrocyte-like cells. Although animal studies indicate that notochord-derived cells persist in the adult NP, the ontogeny of the adult human NP cell population is still unclear. As such, identification of unique notochordal markers is required. This study was conducted to determine the spatiotemporal expression of putative human notochordal markers to aid in the elucidation of the ontogeny of adult human NP cells. Human embryos and fetuses (3.5-18 weeks post-conception (WPC)) were microdissected to isolate the spine anlagens (notochord and somites/sclerotome). Morphology of the developing IVD was assessed using hematoxylin and eosin. Expression of keratin (KRT) 8, KRT18, KRT19, CD24, GAL3, CD55, BASP1, CTGF, T, CD90, Tie2, and E-cadherin was assessed using immunohistochemistry. KRT8, KRT18, KRT19 were uniquely expressed by notochordal cells at all spine levels at all stages studied; CD24 was expressed at all stages except 3.5 WPC. While GAL3, CD55, BASP1, CTGF, and T were expressed by notochordal cells at specific stages, they were also co-expressed by sclerotomal cells. CD90, Tie2, and E-cadherin expression was not detectable in developing human spine cells at any stage. This study has identified, for the first time, the consistent expression of KRT8, KRT18, KRT19, and CD24 as human notochord-specific markers during early IVD development. Thus, we propose that these markers can be used to help ascertain the ontogeny of adult human NP cells. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Orthopaedic Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1327-1340, 2016. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Orthopaedic Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Spatiotemporal analysis of putative notochordal cell markers reveals CD24 and keratins 8, 18, and 19 as notochord‐specific markers during early human intervertebral disc development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues‐Pinto, Ricardo; Berry, Andrew; Piper‐Hanley, Karen; Hanley, Neil; Richardson, Stephen M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In humans, the nucleus pulposus (NP) is composed of large vacuolated notochordal cells in the fetus but, soon after birth, becomes populated by smaller, chondrocyte‐like cells. Although animal studies indicate that notochord‐derived cells persist in the adult NP, the ontogeny of the adult human NP cell population is still unclear. As such, identification of unique notochordal markers is required. This study was conducted to determine the spatiotemporal expression of putative human notochordal markers to aid in the elucidation of the ontogeny of adult human NP cells. Human embryos and fetuses (3.5–18 weeks post‐conception (WPC)) were microdissected to isolate the spine anlagens (notochord and somites/sclerotome). Morphology of the developing IVD was assessed using hematoxylin and eosin. Expression of keratin (KRT) 8, KRT18, KRT19, CD24, GAL3, CD55, BASP1, CTGF, T, CD90, Tie2, and E‐cadherin was assessed using immunohistochemistry. KRT8, KRT18, KRT19 were uniquely expressed by notochordal cells at all spine levels at all stages studied; CD24 was expressed at all stages except 3.5 WPC. While GAL3, CD55, BASP1, CTGF, and T were expressed by notochordal cells at specific stages, they were also co‐expressed by sclerotomal cells. CD90, Tie2, and E‐cadherin expression was not detectable in developing human spine cells at any stage. This study has identified, for the first time, the consistent expression of KRT8, KRT18, KRT19, and CD24 as human notochord‐specific markers during early IVD development. Thus, we propose that these markers can be used to help ascertain the ontogeny of adult human NP cells. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Orthopaedic Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1327–1340, 2016. PMID:26910849

  7. Development of a Swine-Specific Fecal Pollution Marker Based on Host Differences in Methanogen mcrA Genes▿

    OpenAIRE

    Ufnar, Jennifer A.; Ufnar, David F.; Wang, Shiao Y.; Ellender, R. D.

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate methanogen diversity in animal hosts to develop a swine-specific archaeal molecular marker for fecal source tracking in surface waters. Phylogenetic analysis of swine mcrA sequences compared to mcrA sequences from the feces of five animals (cow, deer, sheep, horse, and chicken) and sewage showed four distinct swine clusters, with three swine-specific clades. From this analysis, six sequences were chosen for molecular marker development and initial testin...

  8. Microsatellite markers of water buffalo, Bubalus bubalis - development, characterisation and linkage disequilibrium studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaidhegi R

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microsatellite markers are highly polymorphic and widely used in genome mapping and population genetic studies in livestock species. River buffalo, Bubalus bubalis is an economically important livestock species, though only a limited number of microsatellite markers have been reported thus far in this species. Results In the present study, using two different approaches 571 microsatellite markers have been characterized for water buffalo. Of the 571 microsatellite markers, 498 were polymorphic with average heterozygosity of 0.51 on a panel of 24 unrelated buffalo. Fisher exact test was used to detect LD between the marker pairs. Among the 137550 pairs of marker combination, 14.58% pairs showed significant LD (P Conclusion The high conservation of cattle microsatellite loci in water buffalo promises the usefulness of the cattle microsatellites markers on buffalo. The polymorphic markers characterised in this study will contribute to genetic linkage and radiation hybrid mapping of water buffalo and population genetic studies.

  9. Genome-wide distribution and organization of microsatellites in plants: an insight into marker development in Brachypodium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humira Sonah

    Full Text Available Plant genomes are complex and contain large amounts of repetitive DNA including microsatellites that are distributed across entire genomes. Whole genome sequences of several monocot and dicot plants that are available in the public domain provide an opportunity to study the origin, distribution and evolution of microsatellites, and also facilitate the development of new molecular markers. In the present investigation, a genome-wide analysis of microsatellite distribution in monocots (Brachypodium, sorghum and rice and dicots (Arabidopsis, Medicago and Populus was performed. A total of 797,863 simple sequence repeats (SSRs were identified in the whole genome sequences of six plant species. Characterization of these SSRs revealed that mono-nucleotide repeats were the most abundant repeats, and that the frequency of repeats decreased with increase in motif length both in monocots and dicots. However, the frequency of SSRs was higher in dicots than in monocots both for nuclear and chloroplast genomes. Interestingly, GC-rich repeats were the dominant repeats only in monocots, with the majority of them being present in the coding region. These coding GC-rich repeats were found to be involved in different biological processes, predominantly binding activities. In addition, a set of 22,879 SSR markers that were validated by e-PCR were developed and mapped on different chromosomes in Brachypodium for the first time, with a frequency of 101 SSR markers per Mb. Experimental validation of 55 markers showed successful amplification of 80% SSR markers in 16 Brachypodium accessions. An online database 'BraMi' (Brachypodium microsatellite markers of these genome-wide SSR markers was developed and made available in the public domain. The observed differential patterns of SSR marker distribution would be useful for studying microsatellite evolution in a monocot-dicot system. SSR markers developed in this study would be helpful for genomic studies in Brachypodium

  10. Development of new strains and related SCAR markers for an edible mushroom, Hypsizygus marmoreus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang Y; Park, Jeong-Eun; Lee, Jia; Kim, Jong-Kuk; Ro, Hyeon-Su

    2012-02-01

    New fast-growing and less bitter varieties of Hypsizygus marmoreus were developed by crossing monokaryotic mycelia from a commercial strain (Hm1-1) and a wild strain (Hm3-10). Six of the better tasting new strains with a shorter cultivation period were selected from 400 crosses in a large-scale cultivation experiment. We attempted to develop sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers to identify the new strain from other commercial strains. For the SCAR markers, we conducted molecular genetic analysis on a wild strain and the eight most cultivated H. marmoreus strains collected from various areas in East Asia by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA. Ten unique DNA bands for a commercial Hm1-1 strain and the Hm3-10 strain were extracted and their sequences were determined. Primer sets were designed based on the determined sequences. PCR reactions with the primer sets revealed that four primer sets successfully discriminated the new strains from other commercial strains and are thus suitable for commercial purposes. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Development of 16 Microsatellite Markers within the Camassia (Agavaceae Species Complex and Amplification in Related Taxa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa M. Culley

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: The North American genus Camassia is an ecologically important group whose variability and evolution are little understood, being influenced by hybridization and geographic isolation. We developed microsatellite markers to investigate patterns of gene flow, population structure, and taxonomic relationships within this group. Methods and Results: Using a traditional approach with biotin-labeled probes, we developed 16 microsatellite primers in three species of Camassia: C. howellii, C. leichtlinii, and C. quamash. The number of alleles per locus averaged 3.94 per species, and levels of heterozygosity ranged from 0.000 to 1.00 and 0.033 to 0.917 for observed and expected heterozygosities, respectively. All primers amplified to varying extents in additional species (C. angusta, C. cusickii, C. scilloides and in putative species in a related genus (Hastingsia alba, H. atropurpurea, H. bracteosa, H. serpentinicola. Conclusions: These microsatellite markers exhibit variation and are useful for ongoing studies of integrative taxonomy and population differentiation within this species complex.

  12. [EST-SSR identification, markers development of Ligusticum chuanxiong based on Ligusticum chuanxiong transcriptome sequences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Can; Peng, Fang; Yang, Ze-Mao; Zhong, Wen-Juan; Mou, Fang-Sheng; Gong, Yi-Yun; Ji, Pei-Cheng; Pu, De-Qiang; Huang, Hai-Yan; Yang, Xiao; Zhang, Chao

    2017-09-01

    Ligusticum chuanxiong is a well-known traditional Chinese medicine plant. The study on its molecular markers development and germplasm resources is very important. In this study, we obtained 24 422 unigenes by assembling transcriptome sequencing reads of L. chuanxiong root. EST-SSR was detected and 4 073 SSR loci were identified. EST-SSR distribution and characteristic analysis results showed that the mono-nucleotide repeats were the main repeat types, accounting for 41.0%. In addition, the sequences containing SSR were functionally annotated in Gene Ontology (GO) and KEGG pathway and were assigned to 49 GO categories, 242 KEGG pathways, among them 2 201 sequences were annotated against Nr database. By validating 235 EST-SSRs,74 primer pairs were ultimately proved to have high quality amplification. Subsequently, genetic diversity analysis, UPGMA cluster analysis, PCoA analysis and population structure analysis of 34 L. chuanxiong germplasm resources were carried out with 74 primer pairs. In both UPGMA tree and PCoA results, L. chuanxiong resources were clustered into two groups, which are believed to be partial related to their geographical distribution. In this study, EST-SSRs in L. chuanxiong was firstly identified, and newly developed molecular markers would contribute significantly to further genetic diversity study, the purity detection, gene mapping, and molecular breeding. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  13. Development of Novel Piezoelectric Biosensor Using PZT Ceramic Resonator for Detection of Cancer Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Li; Fong, Chi-Chun; Cheung, Pik-Yuan; Yang, Mengsu

    2017-01-01

    A novel biosensor based on piezoelectric ceramic resonator was developed for direct detection of cancer markers in the study. For the first time, a commercially available PZT ceramic resonator with high resonance frequency was utilized as transducer for a piezoelectric biosensor. A dual ceramic resonators scheme was designed wherein two ceramic resonators were connected in parallel: one resonator was used as the sensing unit and the other as the control unit. This arrangement minimizes environmental influences including temperature fluctuation, while achieving the required frequency stability for biosensing applications. The detection of the cancer markers Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) and α-Fetoprotein (AFP) was carried out through frequency change measurement. The device showed high sensitivity (0.25 ng/ml) and fast detection (within 30 min) with small samples (1 μl), which is compatible with the requirements of clinical measurements. The results also showed that the ceramic resonator-based piezoelectric biosensor platform could be utilized with different chemical interfaces, and had the potential to be further developed into biosensor arrays with different specificities for simultaneous detection of multiple analytes.

  14. SSR marker development and intraspecific genetic divergence exploration of Chrysanthemum indicum based on transcriptome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhengzhou; Ma, Xinye; Wei, Min; Zhao, Tong; Zhan, Ruoting; Chen, Weiwen

    2018-04-25

    Chrysanthemum indicum L., an important ancestral species of the flowering plant chrysanthemum, can be used as medicine and for functional food development. Due to the lack of hereditary information for this species and the difficulty of germplasm identification, we herein provide new genetic insight from the perspective of intraspecific transcriptome comparison and present single sequence repeat (SSR) molecular marker recognition technology. Through the study of a diploid germplasm (DIWNT) and a tetraploid germplasm (DIWT), the following outcome were obtained. (1) A significant difference in Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) annotations for specific homologous genes was observed using the OrthoMCL method for the identification of homologous gene families between the two cytotypes. Ka/Ks analysis of common, single-copy homologous family members also revealed a greater difference among genes that experienced positive selection than among those experiencing positive selection. (2) Of more practical value, 2575 SSR markers were predicted and partly verified. We used TaxonGap as a visual tool to inspect genotype uniqueness and screen for high-performance molecular loci; we recommend four primers of 65 randomly selected primers with a combined identification success rate of 88.6% as priorities for further development of DNA fingerprinting of C. indicum germplasm. The SSR technology based on next-generation sequencing was proved to be successful in the identification of C. indicum germplasms. And the information on the intraspecfic genetic divergence generated by transcriptome comparison deepened the understanding of this complex species' nature.

  15. Annual report 1992 on research and development work by the ITP, Institute for Technical Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-03-01

    The present annual report describes the activities undertaken by the ITP in the following areas: 1. Remote sensing by means of microwaves; 2. Nuclear fusion (studies for NET/ITER; superconducting magnets, poloidal field coil development; cryogenic systems; stellarator magnets, plasma heating technology; transmission components; component-related safety investigations); 3. Superconductivity (superconductivity physics, superconducting layers; massive superconductors; magnet developments; cryogenics for superconductivity). The appendix lists all publications or primary reports by the ITP in 1992. (orig./MM) [de

  16. Development and validation of new SSR markers from expressed regions in the garlic genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limited number of simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers is available for the genome of garlic (Allium sativum L.) although SSR markers have become one of the most preferred marker systems because they are typically co-dominant, reproducible, cross species transferable and highly polymorphic. In this ...

  17. Developing single nucleotide polymorphism markers for the identification of pineapple (Ananas comosus) germplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lin; Matsumoto, Tracie; Tan, Hua-Wei; Meinhardt, Lyndel W; Mischke, Sue; Wang, Boyi; Zhang, Dapeng

    2015-01-01

    Pineapple (Ananas comosus [L.] Merr.) is the third most important tropical fruit in the world after banana and mango. As a crop with vegetative propagation, genetic redundancy is a major challenge for efficient genebank management and in breeding. Using expressed sequence tag and nucleotide sequences from public databases, we developed 213 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers and validated 96 SNPs by genotyping the United States Department of Agriculture - Agricultural Research Service pineapple germplasm collection, maintained in Hilo, Hawaii. The validation resulted in designation of a set of 57 polymorphic SNP markers that revealed a high rate of duplicates in this pineapple collection. Twenty-four groups of duplicates were detected, encompassing 130 of the total 170 A cosmos accessions. The results show that somatic mutation has been the main source of intra-cultivar variations in pineapple. Multivariate clustering and a model-based population stratification suggest that the modern pineapple cultivars are comprised of progenies that are derived from different wild Ananas botanical varieties. Parentage analysis further revealed that both A. comosus var. bracteatus and A. comosus var. ananassoides are likely progenitors of pineapple cultivars. However, the traditional classification of cultivated pineapple into horticultural groups (e.g. 'Cayenne', 'Spanish', 'Queen') was not well supported by the present study. These SNP markers provide robust and universally comparable DNA fingerprints; thus, they can serve as an efficient genotyping tool to assist pineapple germplasm management, propagation of planting material, and pineapple cultivar protection. The high rate of genetic redundancy detected in this pineapple collection suggests the potential impact of applying this technology on other clonally propagated perennial crops.

  18. De novo transcriptome analysis and molecular marker development of two Hemarthria species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu eHuang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Hemarthria R. Br. is an important genus of perennial forage grasses that is widely used in subtropical and tropical regions. Hemarthria grasses have made remarkable contributions to the development of animal husbandry and agro-ecosystem maintenance; however, there is currently a lack of comprehensive genomic data available for these species. In this study, we used Illumina high-throughput deep sequencing to characterize of two agriculturally important Hemarthria materials, H. compressa ‘Yaan’ and H. altissima ‘1110.’ Sequencing runs that used each of four normalized RNA samples from the leaves or roots of the two materials yielded more than 24 million high-quality reads. After de novo assembly, 137,142 and 77,150 unigenes were obtained for ‘Yaan’ and ‘1110’, respectively. In addition, a total of 86,731 ‘Yaan’ and 48,645 ‘1110’ unigenes were successfully annotated. After consolidating the unigenes for both materials, 42,646 high-quality SNPs were identified in 10,880 unigenes and 10,888 SSRs were identified in 8,330 unigenes. To validate the identified markers, high quality PCR primers were designed for both SNPs and SSRs. We randomly tested 16 of the SNP primers and 54 of the SSR primers and found that the majority of these primers successfully amplified the desired PCR product. In addition, high cross-species transferability (61.11%-87.04% of SSR markers was achieved for four other Poaceae species. The amount of RNA sequencing data that was generated for these two Hemarthria species greatly increases the amount of genomic information available for Hemarthria and the SSR and SNP markers identified in this study will facilitate further advancements in genetic and molecular studies of the Hemarthria genus.

  19. The Effect of Different Types of Instruction and Feedback on the Development of Pragmatic Proficiency: The Case of Pragmatic Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeedeh Shafee Nahrkhalaji

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The necessity of conducting more studies addressing the development of pragmatic profciency and strong pragmatic awareness for English language learners has made the role of instruction and feedback in teaching pragmatic knowledge of utmost importance. The present study evaluates the relative effectiveness of four types of instruction for teaching some pragmatic markers including topic change markers, mitigation markers, interjections and hybrid basic markers to 75 advanced Iranian learners of English: explicit instruction only, explicit instruction with metalinguistic feedback, structured input instruction only, and structured in- put instruction with metalinguistic feedback. Treatment group performance was compared with control group performance on pre-tests, post-tests and follow-up tests that contained an open-ended discourse completion test and a multiple-choice pragmatic listening comprehension test. The results of the data analysis revealed that students› ability to comprehend and produce pragmatic markers improved significantly in treatment groups and that pragmatic interlanguage is permeable to instruction in EFL settings. However, there were statistically significant differences among the four treatment groups regarding awareness of different pragmatic markers and their appropriate use. These findings give us some useful insight on the teachability of pragmatic markers and the role of instruction and feedback in the classroom to develop pragmatic competence of EFL learners.

  20. Development and characterization of 79 nuclear markers amplifying in viviparous and oviparous clades of the European common lizard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horreo, J L; Peláez, M L; Suárez, T; Fitze, P S

    2018-02-01

    The European common lizard (Zootoca vivipara) is a widely distributed species across Europe and Asia exhibiting two reproductive modes (oviparity/viviparity), six major lineages and several sublineages. It has been used to tackle a large variety of research questions, nevertheless, few nuclear DNA sequence markers have been developed for this species. Here we developed 79 new nuclear DNA sequence markers using a clonation protocol. These markers were amplified in several oviparous and viviparous specimens including samples of all extant clades, to test the amplification success and their diversity. 49.4% of the markers were polymorphic and of those, 51.3% amplified in all and 94.9% amplified in 5-7 of the extant Z. vivipara clades. These new markers will be very useful for the study of the population structure, population dynamics, and micro/macro evolution of Z. vivipara. Cross-species amplification in four lizard species (Psammodromus edwardsianus, Podarcis muralis, Lacerta bilineata, and Takydromus sexlineatus) was positive in several of the markers, and six makers amplified in all five species. The large genetic distance between P. edwardsianus and Z. vivipara further suggests that these markers may as well be employed in many other species.

  1. Development of Polymorphic Microsatellite Markers for Indian Tobacco, Lobelia inflata (Campanulaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. William Hughes

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Nuclear microsatellite markers were developed for Lobelia inflata (Campanulaceae, an obligately self-fertilizing plant species, for use in the study of temporal fluctuation in allele frequency and of the genetic structure within and among populations. Methods and Results: We developed 28 primer pairs for L. inflata, all of which amplify CT dinucleotide repeats. We evaluated amplification of these loci in 53 L. inflata individuals at three sites in eastern North America and found that 24 loci showed microsatellite polymorphism. We also found that 16 loci amplified successfully in L. cardinalis, and 11 amplified successfully in L. siphilitica. Conclusions: These primers will be useful for assessing allelic diversity within and among populations of L. inflata, and show potential for use in congeneric species.

  2. Development of antibiotic marker-free creeping bentgrass resistance against herbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ki-Won; Kim, Ki-Yong; Kim, Kyung-Hee; Lee, Byung-Hyun; Kim, Jin-Seog; Lee, Sang-Hoon

    2011-01-01

    Herbicide-resistant creeping bentgrass plants (Agrostis stolonifera L.) without antibiotic-resistant markers were produced by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Embryogenic callus tissues were infected with Agrobacterium tumefaciens EHA105, harboring the bar and the CP4-EPSPS genes for bialaphos and glyphosate resistance. Phosphinothricin-resistant calli and plants were selected. Soil-grown plants were obtained at 14-16 weeks after transformation. Genetic transformation of the selected, regenerated plants was validated by PCR. Southern blot analysis revealed that at least one copy of the transgene was integrated into the genome of the transgenic plants. Transgene expression was confirmed by Northern blot. CP4-EPSPS protein was detected by ELISA. Transgenic plants remained green and healthy when sprayed with Basta, containing 0.5% glufosinate ammonium or glyphosate. The optimized Agrobacterium-mediated transformation method resulted in an average of 9.4% transgenic plants. The results of the present study suggest that the optimized marker-free technique could be used as an effective and reliable method for routine transformation, which may facilitate the development of varieties of new antibiotic-free grass species.

  3. Enriching Genomic Resources and Marker Development from Transcript Sequences of Jatropha curcas for Microgravity Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Wenlan; Paudel, Dev

    2017-01-01

    Jatropha (Jatropha curcas L.) is an economically important species with a great potential for biodiesel production. To enrich the jatropha genomic databases and resources for microgravity studies, we sequenced and annotated the transcriptome of jatropha and developed SSR and SNP markers from the transcriptome sequences. In total 1,714,433 raw reads with an average length of 441.2 nucleotides were generated. De novo assembling and clustering resulted in 115,611 uniquely assembled sequences (UASs) including 21,418 full-length cDNAs and 23,264 new jatropha transcript sequences. The whole set of UASs were fully annotated, out of which 59,903 (51.81%) were assigned with gene ontology (GO) term, 12,584 (10.88%) had orthologs in Eukaryotic Orthologous Groups (KOG), and 8,822 (7.63%) were mapped to 317 pathways in six different categories in Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genome (KEGG) database, and it contained 3,588 putative transcription factors. From the UASs, 9,798 SSRs were discovered with AG/CT as the most frequent (45.8%) SSR motif type. Further 38,693 SNPs were detected and 7,584 remained after filtering. This UAS set has enriched the current jatropha genomic databases and provided a large number of genetic markers, which can facilitate jatropha genetic improvement and many other genetic and biological studies. PMID:28154822

  4. Development of Raman spectral markers to assess metastatic bone in breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Hao; Nyman, Jeffry S.; Sterling, Julie A.; Perrien, Daniel S.; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita; Bi, Xiaohong

    2014-11-01

    Bone is the most common site for breast cancer metastases. One of the major complications of bone metastasis is pathological bone fracture caused by chronic bone loss and degeneration. Current guidelines for the prediction of pathological fracture mainly rely on radiographs or computed tomography, which are limited in their ability to predict fracture risk. The present study explored the feasibility of using Raman spectroscopy to estimate pathological fracture risk by characterizing the alterations in the compositional properties of metastatic bones. Tibiae with evident bone destruction were investigated using Raman spectroscopy. The carbonation level calculated by the ratio of carbonate/phosphate ν1 significantly increased in the tumor-bearing bone at all the sampling regions at the proximal metaphysis and diaphysis, while tumor-induced elevation in mineralization and crystallinity was more pronounced in the metaphysis. Furthermore, the increased carbonation level is positively correlated to bone lesion size, indicating that this parameter could serve as a unique spectral marker for tumor progression and bone loss. With the promising advances in the development of spatially offset Raman spectroscopy for deep tissue measurement, this spectral marker can potentially be used for future noninvasive evaluation of metastatic bone and prediction of pathological fracture risk.

  5. A massively parallel strategy for STR marker development, capture, and genotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistler, Logan; Johnson, Stephen M; Irwin, Mitchell T; Louis, Edward E; Ratan, Aakrosh; Perry, George H

    2017-09-06

    Short tandem repeat (STR) variants are highly polymorphic markers that facilitate powerful population genetic analyses. STRs are especially valuable in conservation and ecological genetic research, yielding detailed information on population structure and short-term demographic fluctuations. Massively parallel sequencing has not previously been leveraged for scalable, efficient STR recovery. Here, we present a pipeline for developing STR markers directly from high-throughput shotgun sequencing data without a reference genome, and an approach for highly parallel target STR recovery. We employed our approach to capture a panel of 5000 STRs from a test group of diademed sifakas (Propithecus diadema, n = 3), endangered Malagasy rainforest lemurs, and we report extremely efficient recovery of targeted loci-97.3-99.6% of STRs characterized with ≥10x non-redundant sequence coverage. We then tested our STR capture strategy on P. diadema fecal DNA, and report robust initial results and suggestions for future implementations. In addition to STR targets, this approach also generates large, genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) panels from flanking regions. Our method provides a cost-effective and scalable solution for rapid recovery of large STR and SNP datasets in any species without needing a reference genome, and can be used even with suboptimal DNA more easily acquired in conservation and ecological studies. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research 2017.

  6. Good Egg or Bad Egg: Developing markers of oocyte competence for Assisted Reproductive Interventions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trudee Fair

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The oocyte is the foundation of life. It develops from a single fertilized cell to a multicellular organism capable of an independent existence. Competence to achieve this maximum potential is acquired following the protracted, but, highly co-ordinated process of growth and subsequently, maturation. The environment in which all or part of these processes occur, can ultimately have long-term consequences for female fertility and the health of resulting offspring. The pressure to identify and select oocytes or embryos with the highest developmental potential has intensified as the number of patients and the range of options available to them have increased. In particular, as in vitro maturation and single embryo transfer become more routine in assisted reproductive technology, selection is critical to a successful outcome. Moreover, the identification of markers of oocyte health and quality is essential to monitor the impact of these technologies on gametes and embryos. Technologies, such as transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics, offer more sophisticated methods for oocyte and embryo selection, with the emphasis on the predictive value of non-invasive protocols which profile follicular fluid, follicle/ granulosa cells and cumulus cells, for assessment of oocyte quality. Using the bovine as a model, we have employed a range of approaches and identified many potential markers, such as oocyte and cumulus candidate proteins and transcripts and follicular fluid fatty acids and amino acids. The models, technologies, and future strategies will be discussed in detail.

  7. Development of a New Marker System for Identification of Spirodela polyrhiza and Landoltia punctata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Feng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lemnaceae (commonly called duckweed is an aquatic plant ideal for quantitative analysis in plant sciences. Several species of this family represent the smallest and fastest growing flowering plants. Different ecotypes of the same species vary in their biochemical and physiological properties. Thus, selecting of desirable ecotypes of a species is very important. Here, we developed a simple and rapid molecular identification system for Spirodela polyrhiza and Landoltia punctata based on the sequence polymorphism. First, several pairs of primers were designed and three markers were selected as good for identification. After PCR amplification, DNA fragments (the combination of three PCR products in different duckweeds were detected using capillary electrophoresis. The high-resolution capillary electrophoresis displayed high identity to the sequencing results. The combination of the PCR products containing several DNA fragments highly improved the identification frequency. These results indicate that this method is not only good for interspecies identification but also ideal for intraspecies distinguishing. Meanwhile, 11 haplotypes were found in both the S. polyrhiza and L. punctata ecotypes. The results suggest that this marker system is useful for large-scale identification of duckweed and for the screening of desirable ecotypes to improve the diverse usage in duckweed utilization.

  8. Development of DArT-based PCR markers for selecting drought-tolerant spring barley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiust, Anna; Rapacz, Marcin; Wójcik-Jagła, Magdalena; Tyrka, Mirosław

    2015-08-01

    The tolerance of spring barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) cultivars to spring drought is an important agronomic trait affecting crop yield and quality in Poland. Therefore, breeders require new molecular markers to select plants with lower spring drought susceptibility. With the advent of genomic selection technology, simple molecular tools may still be applicable to screen material for markers of the most important traits and in-depth genome scanning. In previous studies, diversity arrays technology (DArT)-based genetic maps were constructed for F2 populations of Polish fodder and malt barley elite breeding lines, and 15 and 18 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) related to spring drought tolerance were identified, respectively. In this paper, we show the results of a conversion of 30 DArT markers corresponding to 11 QTLs into simple sequence repeat (SSR) and sequence tagged site (STS) markers. Twenty-two polymorphic markers were obtained, including 13 DArT-based SSRs. Additionally, 31 SSR markers, located in close proximity to the DArT markers, were selected from the GrainGenes database and tested. Further analyses of 24 advanced breeding lines with different drought tolerances confirmed that five out of the 30 converted markers, as well as three out of the 31 additional SSR markers, were effective in marker-assisted selection for drought tolerance. The possible function of clones related to these markers in drought tolerance is discussed.

  9. Development of CACTA transposon derived SCAR markers and their use in population structure analysis in Zea mays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Neha Samir; Park, Kyong-Cheul; Lee, Sung-Il; Im, Min-Ji; Ramekar, Rahul Vasudeo; Kim, Nam-Soo

    2018-02-01

    Molecular marker technologies have proven to be an important breakthrough for genetic studies, construction of linkage maps and population genetics analysis. Transposable elements (TEs) constitute major fractions of repetitive sequences in plants and offer a wide range of possible areas to be explored as molecular markers. Sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR) marker development provides us with a simple and time saving alternative approach for marker development. We employed the CACTA-TD to develop SCARs and then integrated them into linkage map and used them for population structure and genetic diversity analysis of corn inbred population. A total of 108 dominant SCAR markers were designed out of which, 32 were successfully integrated in to the linkage map of maize RIL population and the remaining were added to a physical map for references to check the distribution throughout all chromosomes. Moreover, 76 polymorphic SCARs were used for diversity analysis of corn accessions being used in Korean corn breeding program. The overall average polymorphic information content (PIC) was 0.34, expected heterozygosity was 0.324 and Shannon's information index was 0.491 with a percentage of polymorphism of 98.67%. Further analysis by associating with desirable traits may also provide some accurate trait specific tagged SCAR markers. TE linked SCARs can provide an added level of polymorphism as well as improved discriminating ability and therefore can be useful in further breeding programs to develop high yielding germplasm.

  10. Work-family life courses and metabolic markers in mid-life: evidence from the British National Child Development Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMunn, Anne; Lacey, Rebecca E; Kumari, Meena; Worts, Diana; McDonough, Peggy; Sacker, Amanda

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies have found generally better health among those who combine employment and family responsibilities; however, most research excludes men, and relies on subjective measures of health and information on work and family activities from only 1 or 2 time points in the life course. This study investigated associations between work-family life course types (LCTs) and markers of metabolic risk in a British birth cohort study. Multichannel sequence analysis was used to generate work-family LCTs, combining annual information on work, partnership and parenthood between 16 and 42 years for men and women in the British National Child Development Study (NCDS, followed since their birth in 1958). Associations between work-family LCTs and metabolic risk factors in mid-life (age 44-45) were tested using multivariate linear regression in multiply imputed data. Life courses characterised by earlier transitions into parenthood were associated with significantly increased metabolic risk, regardless of attachment to paid work or marital stability over the life course. These associations were only partially attenuated by educational qualifications, early life circumstances and adult mediators. The positive association between weak labour markets ties and metabolic risk was weaker than might be expected from previous studies. Associations between work-family LCTs and metabolic risk factors did not differ significantly by gender. Earlier transitions to parenthood are linked to metabolic risk in mid-life. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  11. Development and characterization of microsatellite markers for Morus spp. and assessment of their transferability to other closely related species

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Adoption of genomics based breeding has emerged as a promising approach for achieving comprehensive crop improvement. Such an approach is more relevant in the case of perennial species like mulberry. However, unavailability of genomic resources of co-dominant marker systems has been the major constraint for adopting molecular breeding to achieve genetic enhancement of Mulberry. The goal of this study was to develop and characterize a large number of locus specific genic and genomic SSR markers which can be effectively used for molecular characterization of mulberry species/genotypes. Result We analyzed a total of 3485 DNA sequences including genomic and expressed sequences (ESTs) of mulberry (Morus alba L.) genome. We identified 358 sequences to develop appropriate microsatellite primer pairs representing 222 genomic and 136 EST regions. Primers amplifying locus specific regions of Dudia white (a genotype of Morus alba L), were identified and 137 genomic and 51 genic SSR markers were standardized. A two pronged strategy was adopted to assess the applicability of these SSR markers using mulberry species and genotypes along with a few closely related species belonging to the family Moraceae viz., Ficus, Fig and Jackfruit. While 100% of these markers amplified specific loci on the mulberry genome, 79% were transferable to other related species indicating the robustness of these markers and the potential they hold in analyzing the molecular and genetic diversity among mulberry germplasm as well as other related species. The inherent ability of these markers in detecting heterozygosity combined with a high average polymorphic information content (PIC) of 0.559 ranging between 0.076 and 0.943 clearly demonstrates their potential as genomic resources in diversity analysis. The dissimilarity coefficient determined based on Neighbor joining method, revealed that the markers were successful in segregating the mulberry species, genotypes and other related species

  12. Characterizing proton-activated materials to develop PET-mediated proton range verification markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jongmin; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Kerr, Matthew D.; Amos, Richard A.; Stingo, Francesco C.; Marom, Edith M.; Truong, Mylene T.; Palacio, Diana M.; Betancourt, Sonia L.; Erasmus, Jeremy J.; DeGroot, Patricia M.; Carter, Brett W.; Gladish, Gregory W.; Sabloff, Bradley S.; Benveniste, Marcelo F.; Godoy, Myrna C.; Patil, Shekhar; Sorensen, James; Mawlawi, Osama R.

    2016-06-01

    Conventional proton beam range verification using positron emission tomography (PET) relies on tissue activation alone and therefore requires particle therapy PET whose installation can represent a large financial burden for many centers. Previously, we showed the feasibility of developing patient implantable markers using high proton cross-section materials (18O, Cu, and 68Zn) for in vivo proton range verification using conventional PET scanners. In this technical note, we characterize those materials to test their usability in more clinically relevant conditions. Two phantoms made of low-density balsa wood (~0.1 g cm-3) and beef (~1.0 g cm-3) were embedded with Cu or 68Zn foils of several volumes (10-50 mm3). The metal foils were positioned at several depths in the dose fall-off region, which had been determined from our previous study. The phantoms were then irradiated with different proton doses (1-5 Gy). After irradiation, the phantoms with the embedded foils were moved to a diagnostic PET scanner and imaged. The acquired data were reconstructed with 20-40 min of scan time using various delay times (30-150 min) to determine the maximum contrast-to-noise ratio. The resultant PET/computed tomography (CT) fusion images of the activated foils were then examined and the foils’ PET signal strength/visibility was scored on a 5 point scale by 13 radiologists experienced in nuclear medicine. For both phantoms, the visibility of activated foils increased in proportion to the foil volume, dose, and PET scan time. A linear model was constructed with visibility scores as the response variable and all other factors (marker material, phantom material, dose, and PET scan time) as covariates. Using the linear model, volumes of foils that provided adequate visibility (score 3) were determined for each dose and PET scan time. The foil volumes that were determined will be used as a guideline in developing practical implantable markers.

  13. 6th Annual Homeland Security and Defense Education Summit, Developing an Adaptive Homeland Security Environment

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    6th Annual Homeland Security and Defense Education Summit Developing an Adaptive Homeland Security Environment, Burlington, MA, September 26-28, 2013 2013 Summit Agenda Naval Postgraduate School Center for Homeland Defense and Security In Partnership With Northeastern University, Department of Homeland Security, Federal Emergency Management Agency, National Guard Homeland Security Institute, National Homeland Defense Foundation Naval Postgraduate School Center for Homeland Defense and S...

  14. Marker for the pre-clinical development of bone substitute materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Wild Michael

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Thin mechanically stable Ti-cages have been developed for the in-vivo application as X-ray and histology markers for the optimized evaluation of pre-clinical performance of bone graft materials. A metallic frame defines the region of interest during histological investigations and supports the identification of the defect site. This standardization of the procedure enhances the quality of pre-clinical experiments. Different models of thin metallic frameworks were designed and produced out of titanium by additive manufacturing (Selective Laser Melting. The productibility, the mechanical stability, the handling and suitability of several frame geometries were tested during surgery in artificial and in ex-vivo bone before a series of cages was preclinically investigated in the female Göttingen minipigs model. With our novel approach, a flexible process was established that can be adapted to the requirements of any specific animal model and bone graft testing.

  15. Development and characterization of microsatellite markers in the critically endangered species Acer yangbiense (Aceraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Linlin; Sun, Weibang; Yang, Junbo

    2011-09-01

    Microsatellite primers were developed to assess genetic diversity and population structure in Acer yangbiense, a critically endangered endemic species that occurs in northwestern Yunnan Province, China. • Using the Fast Isolation by AFLP of Sequences Containing repeats (FIASCO) protocol, 34 microsatellite loci were isolated and characterized in A. yangbiense. Polymorphisms were evaluated in 39 individuals from two distinct populations, one of which was naturally occurring and the other an ex situ grouping. Nine of the markers showed polymorphisms with two to five alleles per locus; observed (H(o)) and expected (H(e)) heterozygosities ranged from 0.0000 to 0.8000 and from 0.0000 to 0.6889, respectively. • These microsatellite primers will prove useful in the further investigation of population genetics studies in A. yangbiense and, in addition, will assist related research of other congeneric species.

  16. Development of microsatellite markers to genetically differentiate populations of Octopus minor from Korea and China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jung-Ha; Kim, Yi-Kyung; Park, Jung-Youn; An, Chel-Min; Jun, Je-Chun

    2012-08-01

    Of the more than 300 octopus species, Octopus minor is one of the most popular and economically important species in Eastern Asia, including Korea, along with O. vulgaris, O. ocellatus, and O. aegina. We developed 19 microsatellite markers from Octopus minor and eight polymorphic markers were developed to analyze the genetic diversity and relationships among four octopus populations from Korea and three from China. The number of alleles per locus varied from 10 to 49, and allelic richness per locus ranged from 2 to 16.4 across all populations. The average allele number among the populations was 11.1, with a minimum of 8.3 and a maximum of 13.6. The mean allelic richness was 8.7 in all populations. The Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) test revealed significant deviation in 19 of the 56 single-locus sites, and null alleles were presumed in five of eight loci. The pairwise F ( ST ) values between populations from Korea and China differed significantly in all pairwise comparisons. The genetic distances between the China and Korea samples ranged from 0.161 to 0.454. The genetic distances among the populations from Korea ranged from 0.033 to 0.090, with an average of 0.062; those among populations from China ranged from 0.191 to 0.316, with an average of 0.254. The populations from Korea and China formed clearly separated into clusters via an unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean dendrogram. Furthermore, a population from muddy flats on the western coast of the Korean Peninsula and one from a rocky area on Jeju Island formed clearly separated subclusters. An assignment test based on the allele distribution discriminated between the Korean and Chinese origins with 96.9 % accuracy.

  17. LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ANNUAL REPORT TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY - DECEMBER 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FOX, K.J.

    2006-12-31

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, (BSA) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). BNL's total annual budget has averaged about $460 million. There are about 2,500 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 413.2B, ''Laboratory Directed Research and Development,'' April 19, 2006, and the Roles, Responsibilities, and Guidelines for Laboratory Directed Research and Development at the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories dated June 13, 2006. In accordance this is our Annual Report in which we describe the Purpose, Approach, Technical Progress and Results, and Specific Accomplishments of all LDRD projects that received funding during Fiscal Year 2006.

  18. Development of Insertion and Deletion Markers for Bottle Gourd Based on Restriction Site-associated DNA Sequencing Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyi WU

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Bottle gourd is an important cucurbit crop worldwide. To provide more available molecular markers for this crop, a bioinformatic approach was employed to develop insertion–deletions (InDels markers in bottle gourd based on restriction site-associated DNA sequencing (RAD-Seq data. A total of 892 Indels were predicted, with the length varying from 1 bp to 167 bp. Single-nucleotide InDels were the predominant types of InDels. To validate these InDels, PCR primers were designed from 162 loci where InDels longer than 2 bp were predicated. A total of 112 InDels were found to be polymorphic among 9 bottle gourd accessions under investigation. The rate of prediction accuracy was thus at a high level of 72.7%. DNA fingerprinting for 4 cultivars were performed using 8 selected Indels markers, demonstrating the usefulness of these markers.

  19. Development of novel low-copy nuclear markers for Hieraciinae (Asteraceae) and their perspective for other tribes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krak, Karol; Alvarez, Inés; Caklová, Petra; Costa, Andrea; Chrtek, Jindrich; Fehrer, Judith

    2012-02-01

    The development of three low-copy nuclear markers for low taxonomic level phylogenies in Asteraceae with emphasis on the subtribe Hieraciinae is reported. Marker candidates were selected by comparing a Lactuca complementary DNA (cDNA) library with public DNA sequence databases. Interspecific variation and phylogenetic signal of the selected genes were investigated for diploid taxa from the subtribe Hieraciinae and compared to a reference phylogeny. Their ability to cross-amplify was assessed for other Asteraceae tribes. All three markers had higher variation (2.1-4.5 times) than the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) in Hieraciinae. Cross-amplification was successful in at least seven other tribes of the Asteraceae. Only three cases indicating the presence of paralogs or pseudogenes were detected. The results demonstrate the potential of these markers for phylogeny reconstruction in the Hieraciinae as well as in other Asteraceae tribes, especially for very closely related species.

  20. Development of Simple Sequence Repeats (SSR) markers in Setaria italica (Poaceae) and cross-amplification in related species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Heng-Sheng; Chiang, Chih-Yun; Chang, Song-Bin; Kuoh, Chang-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Foxtail millet is one of the world's oldest cultivated crops. It has been adopted as a model organism for providing a deeper understanding of plant biology. In this study, 45 simple sequence repeats (SSR) markers of Setaria italica were developed. These markers showing polymorphism were screened in 223 samples from 12 foxtail millet populations around Taiwan. The most common dinucleotide and trinucleotide repeat motifs are AC/TG (84.21%) and CAT (46.15%). The average number of alleles (N(a)), the average heterozygosities observed (H(o)) and expected (H(e)) are 3.73, 0.714, 0.587, respectively. In addition, 24 SSR markers had shown transferability to six related Poaceae species. These new markers provide tools for examining genetic relatedness among foxtail millet populations and other related species. It is suitable for germplasm management and protection in Poaceae.

  1. Development of Simple Sequence Repeats (SSR Markers in Setaria italica (Poaceae and Cross-Amplification in Related Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Yun Chiang

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Foxtail millet is one of the world’s oldest cultivated crops. It has been adopted as a model organism for providing a deeper understanding of plant biology. In this study, 45 simple sequence repeats (SSR markers of Setaria italica were developed. These markers showing polymorphism were screened in 223 samples from 12 foxtail millet populations around Taiwan. The most common dinucleotide and trinucleotide repeat motifs are AC/TG (84.21% and CAT (46.15%. The average number of alleles (Na, the average heterozygosities observed (Ho and expected (He are 3.73, 0.714, 0.587, respectively. In addition, 24 SSR markers had shown transferability to six related Poaceae species. These new markers provide tools for examining genetic relatedness among foxtail millet populations and other related species. It is suitable for germplasm management and protection in Poaceae.

  2. Annual Proceedings of Selected Research and Development Papers Presented at the Annual Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (31st, Orlando, FL, 2008)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonson, Michael, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    For the thirty-first year, the Research and Theory Division of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) sponsored the publication of these Proceedings. Papers were presented at the annual AECT Convention in Orlando, Florida. This year's Proceedings has two sections--Section 1 includes research and development papers and…

  3. Marker-assisted selection: Policy considerations and options for developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dargie, J.D.

    2007-01-01

    Policy options for research, development and diffusion of the products of marker-assisted selection (MAS) depend on the development objectives and priorities of the agricultural sector, its various subsectors and cross-cutting activities dealing with science and technology (S and T), including biotechnology and the management of genetic resources. The policy agenda in each of these areas has shifted from the traditional focus of 'raising productivity' to a broader agenda of improving rural livelihoods in both economic and non-economic terms in support of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). Securing financial commitments from national governments and donors to invest in MAS and related molecular approaches requires more active engagement by national agricultural research and extension systems (NARES) in the processes of revising poverty reduction strategy papers (PRSPs), and in developing policies and strategies for agricultural development, S and T and genetic resources. Agriculture and agricultural S and T are undergoing rapid change but few developing countries have either agricultural S and T or biotechnology policies. They need to develop these to build coherence across the agricultural sector including delineating the roles of public and private sector entities, and as a means to strengthen accountability with respect to priority setting, monitoring and evaluating the outcomes and impacts of both research and practical applications of MAS. Options are provided for developing and implementing MAS programmes and projects, for setting priorities and evaluating outcomes and impacts. Given the uncertain nature of technical change and the long time frames that often characterize translation of the research and extension services provided by NARES into sustainable improvements in productivity and livelihoods through genetic enhancement, it is concluded that greater emphasis needs to be placed on research to analyse systematically the critical paths involved in

  4. Large-scale development of SSR markers in tobacco and construction of a linkage map in flue-cured tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Zhijun; Xiao, Bingguang; Jiao, Fangchan; Fang, Dunhuang; Zeng, Jianmin; Wu, Xingfu; Chen, Xuejun; Yang, Jiankang; Li, Yongping

    2016-06-01

    Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.), particularly flue-cured tobacco, is one of the most economically important nonfood crops and is also an important model system in plant biotechnology. Despite its importance, only limited molecular marker resources are available for genome analysis, genetic mapping, and breeding. Simple sequence repeats (SSR) are one of the most widely-used molecular markers, having significant advantages including that they are generally co-dominant, easy to use, abundant in eukaryotic organisms, and produce highly reproducible results. In this study, based on the genome sequence data of flue-cured tobacco (K326), we developed a total of 13,645 mostly novel SSR markers, which were working in a set of eighteen tobacco varieties of four different types. A mapping population of 213 backcross (BC1) individuals, which were derived from an intra-type cross between two flue-cured tobacco varieties, Y3 and K326, was selected for mapping. Based on the newly developed SSR markers as well as published SSR markers, we constructed a genetic map consisting of 626 SSR loci distributed across 24 linkage groups and covering a total length of 1120.45 cM with an average distance of 1.79 cM between adjacent markers, which is the highest density map of flue-cured tobacco till date.

  5. Development of novel EST-SSR markers for ploidy identification based on de novo transcriptome assembly for Misgurnus anguillicaudatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Bing; Yi, Soojin V; Zhang, Manman; Zhou, Xiaoyun

    2018-01-01

    The co-existence of several ploidy types in natural populations makes the cyprinid loach Misgurnus anguillicaudatus an exciting model system to study the genetic and phenotypic consequences of ploidy variations. A first step in such effort is to identify the specific ploidy of an individual. Currently popular methods of karyotyping via cytological preparation or flow cytometry require a large amount of tissue (such as blood) samples, which can be damaging or fatal to the fishes. Here, we developed novel microsatellite markers (SSR markers) from M. anguillicaudatus and show that they can effectively discriminate ploidy using samples collected in a minimally invasive way. Specifically, we generated whole genome transcriptomes from multiple M. anguillicaudatus using the Illumina paired-end sequencing. Approximately 150 million raw reads were assembled into 76,544 non-redundant unigenes. A total of 8,194 potential SSR markers were identified. We selected 98 pairs with more than five tandem repeats for further assays. Out of 45 putative EST-SSR markers that successfully amplified and harbored polymorphism in diploids, 11 markers displayed high variability in tetraploids. We further demonstrate that a set of five EST-SSR markers selected from these are sufficient to distinguish ploidy levels, by first validating them on 69 reference specimens with known ploidy levels and then subsequently using fresh-collected 96 ploidy-unknown specimens. The results from EST-SSR markers are highly concordant with those from independent flow cytometry analysis. The novel EST-SSR markers developed here should facilitate genetic studies of polyploidy in the emerging model system M. anguillicaudatus.

  6. Isomyosin expression in developing chicken atria: a marker for the development of conductive tissue?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, I. J.; Sanders, E.; Visser, S. D.; Lamers, W. H.; de Jong, F.; Los, J. A.; Moorman, A. F.

    1987-01-01

    Isomyosin expression patterns in embryonic chicken atria during the first two weeks of development were analyzed immunohistochemically. In the 3-days embryonic chicken heart (HH19-20), strong coexpression of both isomyosins can be found as band-like zones at the lateral sides of the sinoatrial

  7. Analysis of genetic diversity of Brassica rapa var. chinensis using ISSR markers and development of SCAR marker specific for Fragrant Bok Choy, a product of geographic indication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, X L; Zhang, Y M; Xue, J Y; Li, M M; Lin, Y B; Sun, X Q; Hang, Y Y

    2016-04-25

    Non-heading Chinese cabbage [Brassica rapa var. chinensis (Linnaeus) Kitamura] is a popular vegetable and is also used as a medicinal plant in traditional Chinese medicine. Fragrant Bok Choy is a unique accession of non-heading Chinese cabbage and a product of geographic indication certified by the Ministry of Agriculture of China, which is noted for its rich aromatic flavor. However, transitional and overlapping morphological traits can make it difficult to distinguish this accession from other non-heading Chinese cabbages. This study aimed to develop a molecular method for efficient identification of Fragrant Bok Choy. Genetic diversity analysis, based on inter-simple sequence repeat molecular markers, was conducted for 11 non-heading Chinese cabbage accessions grown in the Yangtze River Delta region. Genetic similarity coefficients between the 11 accessions ranged from 0.5455 to 0.8961, and the genetic distance ranged from 0.0755 to 0.4475. Cluster analysis divided the 11 accessions into two major groups. The primer ISSR-840 amplified a fragment specific for Fragrant Bok Choy. A pair of specific sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) primers based on this fragment amplified a target band in Fragrant Bok Choy individuals, but no band was detected in individuals of other accessions. In conclusion, this study has developed an efficient strategy for authentication of Fragrant Bok Choy. The SCAR marker described here will facilitate the conservation and utilization of this unique non-heading Chinese cabbage germplasm resource.

  8. Pancreas developing markers expressed on human mononucleated umbilical cord blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pessina, A.; Eletti, B.; Croera, C.; Savalli, N.; Diodovich, C.; Gribaldo, L.

    2004-01-01

    Haematopoietic system represents the main source of haematopoietic stem cells and probably of multipotential adult progenitor cells and mesenchimal stem cells at first described as colony forming unit-fibroblast. Whereas there are many studies on the gene expression profile of the different precursors along their haematopoietic differentiation, few data (sometimes conflicting) have been reported about the phenotype of the cells (present in bone marrow and possibly in cord blood) able to differentiate into non-haematopoietic cells. As both postnatal bone marrow and umbilical cord blood contain nestin positive cells able to proliferate and differentiate into the main neural phenotype (neuron, astroglia and oligodendroglia) many authors considered nestin a neuroepithelial precursor marker that seems to be essential also in multipotential progenitor cells of pancreas present both in rat and in human pancreatic islets (called nestin positive islet derived progenitors). Although the importance of nestin in these cells appears to be evident, it remains yet to clarify the number and the sequential expression of the genes coding all the transcription factors essential for beta cells differentiation and therefore the conditions able to induce the expression of many important transcription factors genes such as isl-1, pax-4, pdx-1 and ngn-3. Among them pdx-1 is a gene essential for pancreas development which is able to control ngn-3 in activating the expression of other differentiation factors for endocrine cells. Here, we describe for the first time in human umbilical cord blood cells (UCB) the pattern of expression of a panel of markers (nestin, CK-8, CK-18) and transcription factors (Isl-1, Pdx-1, Pax-4, Ngn-3) considered important for beta cells differentiation. Our data demonstrate that UCB contains a cell population having a phenotype very similar to endocrine cell precursors in transition to beta cells

  9. Cytosolic labile zinc: a marker for apoptosis in the developing rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joo-Yong; Hwang, Jung Jin; Park, Mi-Ha; Koh, Jae-Young

    2006-01-01

    Cytosolic zinc accumulation was thought to occur specifically in neuronal death (necrosis) following acute injury. However, a recent study demonstrated that zinc accumulation also occurs in adult rat neurons undergoing apoptosis following target ablation, and in vitro experiments have shown that zinc accumulation may play a causal role in various forms of apoptosis. Here, we examined whether intraneuronal zinc accumulation occurs in central neurons undergoing apoptosis during development. Embryonic and newborn Sprague-Dawley rat brains were double-stained for terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labelling (TUNEL) detection of apoptosis and immunohistochemical detection of stage-specific neuronal markers, such as nestin, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), TuJ1 and neuronal nuclear specific protein (NeuN). The results revealed that apoptotic cell death occurred in neurons of diverse stages (neural stem cells, and dividing, young and adult neurons) throughout the brain during the embryonic and early postnatal periods. Further staining of brain sections with acid fuchsin or zinc-specific fluorescent dyes showed that all of the apoptotic neurons were acidophilic and contained labile zinc in their cell bodies. Cytosolic zinc accumulation was also observed in cultured cortical neurons undergoing staurosporine- or sodium nitroprusside (SNP)-induced apoptosis. In contrast, zinc chelation with CaEDTA or N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylenediamine (TPEN) reduced SNP-induced apoptosis but not staurosporine-induced apoptosis, indicating that cytosolic zinc accumulation does not play a causal role in all forms of apoptosis. Finally, the specific cytosolic zinc accumulation may have a practical application as a relatively simple marker for neurons undergoing developmental apoptosis.

  10. Development of a core set of SSR markers for the characterization of Gossypium germplasm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molecular markers such as simple sequence repeats (SSR) are a useful tool for characterizing genetic diversity of Gossypium germplasm collections. Genetic profiles by DNA fingerprinting of cotton accessions can only be compared among different collections if a common set of molecular markers are us...

  11. Development of simple sequence repeat markers and diversity analysis in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zan; Yan, Hongwei; Fu, Xinnian; Li, Xuehui; Gao, Hongwen

    2013-04-01

    Efficient and robust molecular markers are essential for molecular breeding in plant. Compared to dominant and bi-allelic markers, multiple alleles of simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers are particularly informative and superior in genetic linkage map and QTL mapping in autotetraploid species like alfalfa. The objective of this study was to enrich SSR markers directly from alfalfa expressed sequence tags (ESTs). A total of 12,371 alfalfa ESTs were retrieved from the National Center for Biotechnology Information. Total 774 SSR-containing ESTs were identified from 716 ESTs. On average, one SSR was found per 7.7 kb of EST sequences. Tri-nucleotide repeats (48.8 %) was the most abundant motif type, followed by di-(26.1 %), tetra-(11.5 %), penta-(9.7 %), and hexanucleotide (3.9 %). One hundred EST-SSR primer pairs were successfully designed and 29 exhibited polymorphism among 28 alfalfa accessions. The allele number per marker ranged from two to 21 with an average of 6.8. The PIC values ranged from 0.195 to 0.896 with an average of 0.608, indicating a high level of polymorphism of the EST-SSR markers. Based on the 29 EST-SSR markers, assessment of genetic diversity was conducted and found that Medicago sativa ssp. sativa was clearly different from the other subspecies. The high transferability of those EST-SSR markers was also found for relative species.

  12. Development and mapping of a public reference set of SSR markers in Lolium perenne L.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bach, J.L.; Muylle, H.; Arens, P.F.P.; Andersen, C.H.; Bach Holm, P.; Ghesquiere, M.; Julier, B.; Lubberstedt, T.; Nielsen, K.K.; Riek, de J.; Roldán-Ruiz, I.; Roulund, N.; Taylor, C.; Vosman, B.J.; Barre, P.

    2005-01-01

    We report on the characterization and mapping of 76 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers for Lolium perenne. These markers are publicly available or obtained either from genomic libraries enriched for SSR motifs or L. perenne expressed sequence tag (EST) clones. Four L. perenne mapping populations

  13. Development of Insertion and Deletion Markers based on Biparental Resequencing for Fine Mapping Seed Weight in Soybean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-hui Li

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available As a complement to single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and simple sequence repeats (SSRs, biallelic insertions and deletions (InDels represent powerful molecular markers with desirable features for filling the gap in current genetic linkage maps. In this study, 28,908 small InDel polymorphisms (1–5 base pair, bp distributed genome-wide were identified and annotated by comparison of a whole-genome resequencing data set from two soybean [ (L. Merr.] genotypes, cultivar Zhonghunag13 (ZH and line Zhongpin03-5373 (ZP. The physical distribution of InDel polymorphisms in soybean genome was uneven, and matched closely with the distribution of previously annotated genes. The average density of InDel in the arm region was significantly higher than that in the pericentromeric region. The genomic regions that were fixed between the two elites were elucidated. With this information, five InDel markers within a putative quantitative trait locus (QTL for seed weight (SW, , were developed and used to genotype 254 recombinant inbred lines (RILs derived from the cross of ZP × ZH. Adding these five InDel markers to previously used SNP and SSR markers facilitated the discovery of further recombination events allowing fine-mapping the QTL to a 0.5 Mbp region. Our study clearly underlines the high value of InDel markers for map-based cloning and marker-assisted selection in soybean.

  14. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY2016 Annual Summary of Completed Projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2017-03-30

    ORNL FY 2016 Annual Summary of Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program (LDRD) Completed Projects. The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program at ORNL operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2C, “Laboratory Directed Research and Development” (October 22, 2015), which establishes DOE’s requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. The LDRD program funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. ORNL reports its status to DOE in March of each year.

  15. Development of polymorphic genic-SSR markers by cDNA library sequencing in boxwood, Buxus spp. (Buxaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genic microsatellites or simple sequence repeat (genic-SSR) markers were developed in boxwood (Buxus taxa) for genetic diversity analysis, identification of taxa, and to facilitate breeding. cDNA libraries were developed from mRNA extracted from leaves of Buxus sempervirens ‘Vardar Valley’ and seque...

  16. Development of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers from the mango (Mangiferaindica) transcriptome for mapping and estimation of genetic diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    The development of resources for genomic studies in Mangifera indica (mango) will allow marker-assisted selection and identification of genetically diverse germplasm, greatly aiding mango breeding programs. We report here a first step in developing such resources, our identification of thousands una...

  17. Characterization and application of newly developed polymorphic microsatellite markers in the Ezo red fox (Vulpes vulpes schrencki).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, T; Seki, Y; Kameyama, Y; Kikkawa, Y; Wada, K

    2016-12-19

    The Ezo red fox (Vulpes vulpes schrencki), a subspecies endemic to Hokkaido island, Japan, is a known host species for the tapeworm Echinococcus multilocularis. To develop tools for molecular ecological studies, we isolated 28 microsatellite regions from the genome of Ezo red fox, and developed 18 polymorphic microsatellite markers. These markers were characterized using 7 individuals and 22 fecal samples of the Ezo red fox. The number of alleles for these markers ranged from 1 to 7, and the observed heterozygosity, estimated on the basis of the genotypes of 7 individuals, ranged from 0.29 to 1.00. All markers, except DvNok5, were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (P > 0.05), and no linkage disequilibrium was detected among these loci, except between DvNok14 and DvNok28 (P = 0.01). Moreover, six microsatellite loci were successfully genotyped using feces-derived DNA from the Ezo red fox. The markers developed in our study might serve as a useful tool for molecular ecological studies of the Ezo red fox.

  18. Development of a greenhouse-based inoculation protocol for the fungus Colletotrichum cereale pathogenic to annual bluegrass (Poa annua

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa A. Beirn

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The fungus Colletotrichum cereale incites anthracnose disease on Poa annua (annual bluegrass turfgrass. Anthracnose disease is geographically widespread throughout the world and highly destructive to cool-season turfgrasses, with infections by C. cereale resulting in extensive turf loss. Comprehensive research aimed at controlling turfgrass anthracnose has been performed in the field, but knowledge of the causal organism and its basic biology is still needed. In particular, the lack of a reliable greenhouse-based inoculation protocol performed under controlled environmental conditions is an obstacle to the study of C. cereale and anthracnose disease. Our objective was to develop a consistent and reproducible inoculation protocol for the two major genetic lineages of C. cereale. By adapting previously successful field-based protocols and combining with components of existing inoculation procedures, the method we developed consistently produced C. cereale infection on two susceptible P. annua biotypes. Approximately 7 to 10 days post-inoculation, plants exhibited chlorosis and thinning consistent with anthracnose disease symptomology. Morphological inspection of inoculated plants revealed visual signs of the fungus (appressoria and acervuli, although acervuli were not always present. After stringent surface sterilization of inoculated host tissue, C. cereale was consistently re-isolated from symptomatic tissue. Real-time PCR detection analysis based on the Apn2 marker confirmed the presence of the pathogen in host tissue, with both lineages of C. cereale detected from all inoculated plants. When a humidifier was not used, no infection developed for any biotypes or fungal isolates tested. The inoculation protocol described here marks significant progress for in planta studies of C. cereale, and will enable scientifically reproducible investigations of the biology, infectivity and lifestyle of this important grass pathogen.

  19. Oyster vasa-like gene as a marker of the germline cell development in Crassostrea gigas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabioux, C.; Huvet, A.; Lelong, C.; Robert, R.; Pouvreau, S.; Daniel, J.Y.; Minguant, C.; Le Pennec, M.

    2004-01-01

    The oyster vasa-like gene was previously demonstrated to be specifically expressed in germline cells of adult oysters Crassostrea gigas. In the present study, this gene was used as a molecular marker to establish the developmental pattern of germline cells during oyster ontogenesis, using whole-mount in situ hybridization and real-time PCR. The Oyvlg transcripts appeared to be localized to the vegetal pole of unfertilized oocytes and maternally transmitted to embryos. At early development, these maternal transcripts were observed to segregate into a single blastomere, from the CD macromere of 2-cell stage to the 4d mesentoblast of blastula. From late blastula stage, the mesentoblast divided into two cell clumps that migrated to both sides of the larvae body and that would correspond to primordial germ cells (PGCs). Based on these results, we postulate that the germline of C. gigas is specified at early development by maternal cytoplasmic determinants including Oyvlg mRNAs, in putative PGCs that would differentiate into germinal stem cells in juvenile oysters

  20. A Set of 20 New SSR Markers Developed and Evaluated in Mandevilla Lindl.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alev Oder

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Mandevilla is an ornamental crop with a bright future worldwide because of its high commercial acceptance and added value. However, as with most ornamental species, there are few molecular tools to support cultivar breeding and innovation. In this work, we report the development and analysis of 20 new Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR markers in Mandevilla. Microsatellites were isolated from two enriched small-insert genomic libraries of Mandevilla × amabilis. The diversity parameters estimated after their amplification in a group of 11 commercial genotypes illustrate the effect of two opposite drifts: the high relatedness of cultivars belonging to the same commercial group and the high divergence of other cultivars, especially M. × amabilis. Based on their different band patterns, six genotypes were uniquely distinguished, and two groups of sport mutations remained undistinguishable. The amplification of the SSRs in three wild species suggested the existence of unexploited diversity available to be introgressed into the commercial pool. This is the first report of available microsatellites in Mandevilla. The development process has provided some clues concerning the genome structure of the species, and the SSRs obtained will help to create new products and to protect existing and upcoming plant innovations.

  1. Development of Nested PCR-Based Specific Markers for Detection of Peach Rosette Mosaic Virus in Plant Quarantine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S; Kim, C S; Shin, Y G; Kim, J H; Kim, Y S; Jheong, W H

    2016-03-01

    The Peach rosette mosaic virus (PRMV) is a plant pathogen of the genus Nepovirus, and has been designated as a controlled quarantine virus in Korea. In this study, a specific reverse transcription (RT)-PCR marker set, nested PCR marker set, and modified-plasmid positive control were developed to promptly and accurately diagnose PRMV at plant-quarantine sites. The final selected PRMV-specific RT-PCR marker was PRMV-N10/C70 (967 bp), and the nested PCR product of 419 bp was finally amplified. The modified-plasmid positive control, in which the SalI restriction-enzyme region (GTCGAC) was inserted, verified PRMV contamination in a comparison with the control, enabling a more accurate diagnosis. It is expected that the developed method will continuously contribute to the plant-quarantine process in Korea.

  2. Development and characterization of novel microsatellite markers in Trillium govanianum: a threatened plant species from North-Western Himalaya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vikas; Wani, Mohammad Saleem; Singh, Vijay; Kaur, Kuljit; Gupta, Raghbir Chand

    2017-07-01

    Trillium govanianum is a temperate forest understory plant species of high value belonging to the family Melanthiaceae. It is endemic to Himalayan region and facing a bottleneck situation due to reckless extractions from its natural strands. In the present study, 21 microsatellite markers were developed and characterized in 20 accessions of T. govanianum. Collectively, the polymorphic markers amplified 31 alleles in a range of 2-4 with an average of 2.6 alleles per marker. The mean observed heterozygosity (H o ), expected heterozygosity (H e ), and Shannon information index (I) were 0.46, 0.48, and 0.73, respectively. Average polymorphism information content (PIC) was 0.385. The cross-transferability in a related species, namely, Polygonatum verticillatum, showed amplification of ten markers. The newly developed microsatellite markers efficiently distinguished the different accessions on the basis of their geographic origin. Thus, these microsatellites can be useful in exploring genetic diversity in various existing populations of T. govanianum in north-western Himalaya, which may be useful for their conservation, management, and improvement in future.

  3. Development of NMRI spectroscopy for improved petroleum recovery, Annex 6. Annual report, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrufet, M.A.; Flumerfelt, R.W.; Jennings, J.W.; Walsh, M.P.; Watson, A.T.

    1991-12-31

    The overall objectives are to develop and apply Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging (NMRI) and CT X-Ray Scanning methods for determining rock, fluid, and petrophysical properties and for fundamental studies of multiphase flow behavior in porous media. Specific objectives are to: (1) develop NMRI procedures for measuring porosity, permeability, pore size distribution, capillary pressure, and wetting characteristics, (2) apply imaging methods for improved methods of determining two- and three-phase relative permeability functions, (3) apply NMRI for development of a better understanding of dispersed phase displacement processes, and (4) apply imaging methods to develop a better understanding of saturation distribution and fingering during miscible displacements. The objectives have been organized into four subtasks. Annual progress reports for each subtask are provided.

  4. Divison of Environmental Education and Development Fiscal Year 1992 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    Primary design criterion for this division`s education activities is directly related to meeting the goal of environmental compliance on an accelerated basis and cleanup of the 1989 inventory of inactive sites and facilities by the year 2019. Therefore, the division`s efforts are directed toward stimulating knowledge and capability to achieve the goals while contributing to DOE`s overall goal of increasing scientific, mathematical, and technical literacy and competency. This annual report is divided into: overview, workforce development, academic partnerships, scholarships/fellowships, environmental restoration and waste management employment program, community colleges, outreach, evaluation, and principal DOE contacts.

  5. FY2009 Annual Progress Report for Advanced Combustion Engine Research and Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2009-12-01

    Fiscal Year 2009 Annual Progress Report for the Advanced Combustion Engine Research and Development (R&D) subprogram. The Advanced Combustion Engine R&D subprogram supports the mission of the VTP program by removing the critical technical barriers to commercialization of advanced internal combustion engines (ICEs) for passenger and commercial vehicles that meet future Federal emissions regulations. Dramatically improving the efficiency of ICEs and enabling their introduction in conventional as well as hybrid electric vehicles is the most promising and cost-effective approach to increasing vehicle fuel economy over the next 30 years.

  6. Transcriptome profiling reveals novel expression markers that predispose patients to develop post- photorefractive keratectomy corneal haze

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nimisha Nimisha

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Photorefractive keratectomy is an excimer laser [1] based ablation surgery of corneal surface used for correcting refractive errors. Corneal haze is the result of an aggressive wound healing response with an incidence rate [2] of 1.44% post PRK, making it an important health burden. Studies thus far have only focused on molecular alterations post haze development. Since the corneal epithelium is an important mediator of the stromal haze response, we studies its role in predisposing subjects to develop aberrant wound healing response. Corneal epithelium samples collected intra-operatively from clinically healthy patients during PRK. This epithelium from 6 eyes that developed haze postoperatively and 10 eyes of age matched controls without haze were compared. Gene expression microarrays were performed for the mRNA samples followed by ontological analysis of underlying molecular pathways. The identified targets were validated in an independent set of post haze epithelial samples from 3 subjects with PRK induced haze. In vitro studies were done on HCE cells for differential dose of TGFβ for inflammatory markers, corneal structure & fibrosis associated genes and regulators of signal transduction. In addition, loss and gain of function studies was performed using PREX1 as a novel, prototype target. Mean age of groups was 25-28 years. A total of 1100 up and 1700 down regulated genes were revealed by microarray. Alterations in Oxidative stress, ECM-Receptor interactions, Wnt signaling pathway and CXC motif containing chemokines contributes to cellular proliferation and wound healing, which is observed in in vitro model. In cornea novel target PREX1, an oxidative stress gene, when over expressed exhibits faster wound closure in HCE cells with and without TGFβ. Loss of function using PREX1 shRNA shows reduced wound closure. Our study shows that novel genes are involved in pathogenesis of post PRK haze. PREX1 over expression results in faster wound

  7. Altered Markers of Brain Development in Crohn's Disease with Extraintestinal Manifestations - A Pilot Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne K Thomann

    Full Text Available Alterations of brain morphology in Crohn's disease have been reported, but data is scarce and heterogenous and the possible impact of disease predisposition on brain development is unknown. Assuming a systemic course of the disease, brain involvement seems more probable in presence of extraintestinal manifestations, but this question has not yet been addressed. The present study examined the relationship between Crohn's disease and brain structure and focused on the connection with extraintestinal manifestations and markers of brain development.In a pilot study, brains of 15 patients with Crohn's disease (of which 9 had a history of extraintestinal manifestations, i.e. arthritis, erythema nodosum and primary sclerosing cholangitis were compared to matched healthy controls using high resolution magnetic resonance imaging. Patients and controls were tested for depression, fatigue and global cognitive function. Cortical thickness, surface area and folding were determined via cortical surface modeling.The overall group comparison (i.e. all patients vs. controls yielded no significant results. In the patient subgroup with extraintestinal manifestations, changes in cortical area and folding, but not thickness, were identified: Patients showed elevated cortical surface area in the left middle frontal lobe (p<0.05 and hypergyrification in the left lingual gyrus (p<0.001 compared to healthy controls. Hypogyrification of the right insular cortex (p<0.05 and hypergyrification of the right anterior cingulate cortex (p<0.001 were detected in the subgroup comparison of patients with against without extraintestinal manifestations. P-values are corrected for multiple comparisons.Our findings lend further support to the hypothesis that Crohn's disease is associated with aberrant brain structure and preliminary support for the hypothesis that these changes are associated with a systemic course of the disease as indicated by extraintestinal manifestations. Changes

  8. Transferability of Newly Developed Pear SSR Markers to Other Rosaceae Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, L; Zhang, M-Y; Liu, Q-Z; Li, L-T; Song, Y; Wang, L-F; Zhang, S-L; Wu, J

    2013-01-01

    A set of 120 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) was developed from the newly assembled pear sequence and evaluated for polymorphisms in seven genotypes of pear from different genetic backgrounds. Of these, 67 (55.8 %) primer pairs produced polymorphic amplifications. Together, the 67 SSRs detected 277 alleles with an average of 4.13 per locus. Sequencing of the amplification products from randomly picked loci NAUPy31a and NAUpy53a verified the presence of the SSR loci. When the 67 primer pairs were tested on 96 individual members of eight species in the Rosaceae family, 61.2 % (41/67) of the tested SSRs successfully amplified a PCR product in at least one of the Rosaceae genera. The transferability from pear to different species varied from 58.2 % (apple) to 11.9 % (cherry). The ratio of transferability also reflected the closer relationships within Maloideae over Prunoideae. Two pear SSR markers, NAUpy43c and NAUpy55k, could distinguish the 20 different apple genotypes thoroughly, and UPGMA cluster analysis grouped them into three groups at the similarity level of 0.56. The high level of polymorphism and good transferability of pear SSRs to Rosaceae species indicate their promise for application to future molecular screening, map construction, and comparative genomic studies among pears and other Rosaceae species.

  9. Novel polymorphic microsatellite markers developed for a common reef sponge, Stylissa carteri

    KAUST Repository

    Giles, E.C.; Saenz-Agudelo, P.; Berumen, Michael L.; Ravasi, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Despite the ubiquitous role sponges play in reef ecosystem dynamics, little is known about population-level connectivity in these organisms. The general field of population genetics in sponges remains in its infancy. To date, microsatellite markers have only been developed for few sponge species and no sponge population genetics studies using microsatellites have been conducted in the Red Sea. Here, with the use of next-generation sequencing, we characterize 12 novel polymorphic loci for the common reef sponge, Stylissa carteri. The number of alleles per loci ranged between three and eight. Observed heterozygosity frequencies (Ho) ranged from 0.125 to 0.870, whereas expected (He) heterozygosity frequencies ranged from 0.119 to 0.812. Only one locus showed consistent deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) in both populations and two loci consistently showed the possible presence of null alleles. No significant linkage disequilibrium was detected for any pairs of loci. These microsatellites will be of use for numerous ecological studies focused on this common and abundant sponge. 2013 The Author(s).

  10. Membrane-based oligonucleotide array developed from multiple markers for the detection of many Phytophthora species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen; Djama, Zeinab Robleh; Coffey, Michael D; Martin, Frank N; Bilodeau, Guillaume J; Radmer, Lorien; Denton, Geoff; Lévesque, C André

    2013-01-01

    Most Phytophthora spp. are destructive plant pathogens; therefore, effective monitoring and accurate early detection are important means of preventing potential epidemics and outbreaks of diseases. In the current study, a membrane-based oligonucleotide array was developed that can detect Phytophthora spp. reliably using three DNA regions; namely, the internal transcribed spacer (ITS), the 5' end of cytochrome c oxidase 1 gene (cox1), and the intergenic region between cytochrome c oxidase 2 gene (cox2) and cox1 (cox2-1 spacer). Each sequence data set contained ≈250 sequences representing 98 described and 15 undescribed species of Phytophthora. The array was validated with 143 pure cultures and 35 field samples. Together, nonrejected oligonucleotides from all three markers have the ability to reliably detect 82 described and 8 undescribed Phytophthora spp., including several quarantine or regulated pathogens such as Phytophthora ramorum. Our results showed that a DNA array containing signature oligonucleotides designed from multiple genomic regions provided robustness and redundancy for the detection and differentiation of closely related taxon groups. This array has the potential to be used as a routine diagnostic tool for Phytophthora spp. from complex environmental samples without the need for extensive growth of cultures.

  11. [Development of indel markers for molecular authentication of Panax ginseng and P. quinquefolius].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rong-Bo; Tian, Hui-Li; Wang, Hong-Tao; Li, Gui-Sheng

    2018-04-01

    Panax ginseng and P. quinquefolius are two kinds of important medicinal herbs. They are morphologically similar but have different pharmacological effects. Therefore, botanical origin authentication of these two ginsengs is of great importance for ensuring pharmaceutical efficacy and food safety. Based on the fact that intron position in orthologous genes is highly conserved across plant species, intron length polymorphisms were exploited from unigenes of ginseng. Specific primers were respectively designed for these two species based on their insertion/deletion sequences of cytochrome P450 and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and multiplex PCR was conducted for molecular authentication of P.ginseng and P. quinquefolius. The results showed that the developed multiplex PCR assay was effective for molecular authentication of P.ginseng and P. quinquefolius without strict PCR condition and the optimization of reaction system.This study provides a preferred ideal marker system for molecular authentication of ginseng,and the presented method can be employed in origin authentication of other herbal preparations. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  12. Development of Microsatellite Markers for Two Australian Persoonia (Proteaceae Species Using Two Different Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A. Stingemore

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Microsatellite markers were developed and cross-species transferability assessed for two Persoonia species to evaluate genetic diversity and population genetic structure of these broadly distributed southwest Australian tree species. Methods and Results: Microsatellite-enriched libraries and 454 GS-FLX shotgun sequencing were used to identity nine microsatellite loci for P. elliptica (one 454; eight cloning and six for P. longifolia (three 454; three cloning. These loci were screened for variation in individuals from populations in southwestern Australia. In P. elliptica, observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.46 to 0.93 and 0.42 to 0.88, respectively. For P. longifolia, observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.04 to 0.88 and 0.04 to 0.84, respectively. Conclusions: The microsatellites identified in this study will enable the examination of population and spatial structuring of genetic diversity in P. elliptica and P. longifolia, two priority species for mine site restoration in southwestern Australia.

  13. Novel polymorphic microsatellite markers developed for a common reef sponge, Stylissa carteri

    KAUST Repository

    Giles, E.C.

    2013-04-04

    Despite the ubiquitous role sponges play in reef ecosystem dynamics, little is known about population-level connectivity in these organisms. The general field of population genetics in sponges remains in its infancy. To date, microsatellite markers have only been developed for few sponge species and no sponge population genetics studies using microsatellites have been conducted in the Red Sea. Here, with the use of next-generation sequencing, we characterize 12 novel polymorphic loci for the common reef sponge, Stylissa carteri. The number of alleles per loci ranged between three and eight. Observed heterozygosity frequencies (Ho) ranged from 0.125 to 0.870, whereas expected (He) heterozygosity frequencies ranged from 0.119 to 0.812. Only one locus showed consistent deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) in both populations and two loci consistently showed the possible presence of null alleles. No significant linkage disequilibrium was detected for any pairs of loci. These microsatellites will be of use for numerous ecological studies focused on this common and abundant sponge. 2013 The Author(s).

  14. Development of aromatic giant-embryo rice by molecular marker-assisted selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHU Yingdong

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aromatic rice is loved for its distinctive aroma when cooking and eating.In this research,aromatic normal-embryo rice and non-aromatic giant-embryo rice,"Shangshida No.5",both bred by our laboratory,were selected as the parents for the hybridization.We used conventional breeding techniques as well as fragrance gene marker-assisted selection to derive new aromatic giant-embryo rice "Shangshida No.8".By comparing the agronomic and yield characters of "Shangshida No.5" and "Shangshida No.8",the average of filled grains per panicle of "Shangshida No.5" exceeds "Shangshida No.8" very significantly,while the average of effective panicles of "Shangshida No.8" is slightly more than "Shangshida No.5".Also,in the weight of thousand grains "Shangshida No.8" is slightly heavier than "Shangshida No.5".Thus,their grain weights per plant are close,29.10 g and 28.92 g respectively.By comparing the traits of rice embryo,there is no significant difference in embryo weight and volume.Also,there is no significant difference in weight ratio and volume ratio of embryo.This research has laid a solid foundation for further market development and application of aromatic giant-embryo rice.

  15. Verbal markers of epistemic modality and their role in the development of communicative competences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Pihler Ciglič

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Modality in language, one of the characteristic phenomena of the process of communication, has to do with, in the broad sense, the mindset that the speaker indicates in his words while describing, questioning, or wanting to draw attention to what he is saying. Traditionally there is a tendency to gather, under the broad label of linguistic modality, a variety of different forms: verbal mode, auxiliary verbs, certain adverbs and particles, intonation, etc. The aim of this study is to analyze the Spanish verbal markers and their possibilities to express epistemic modality, which is defined as the linguistic expression of the degree of commitment that the speaker assumes about the factuality of his statement (Lyons 1977, Palmer 1986. The study focuses, first, on modal verbal periphrases and some of the tenses which can indicate the epistemic modality and/or evidentiality in certain contexts through the so-called »quotative« or »polyphonic« uses. The second part of this study consists of an analysis of the systematization of these resources in six selected manuals of Spanish as a Second Language (SSL; levels B1, B2 and C1 according to CEFR, with special attention to its contribution to the development of communicative competences (linguistic, sociolinguistic and pragmatic competence, again according to CEFR. We believe that the explicit study of epistemic modality in the SSL classroom effectively contributes to a good command of Spanish, and therefore deserves more attention.

  16. Development of marker-free transgenic Jatropha plants with increased levels of seed oleic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qu Jing

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Jatropha curcas is recognized as a new energy crop due to the presence of the high amount of oil in its seeds that can be converted into biodiesel. The quality and performance of the biodiesel depends on the chemical composition of the fatty acids present in the oil. The fatty acids profile of the oil has a direct impact on ignition quality, heat of combustion and oxidative stability. An ideal biodiesel composition should have more monounsaturated fatty acids and less polyunsaturated acids. Jatropha seed oil contains 30% to 50% polyunsaturated fatty acids (mainly linoleic acid which negatively impacts the oxidative stability and causes high rate of nitrogen oxides emission. Results The enzyme 1-acyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine delta 12-desaturase (FAD2 is the key enzyme responsible for the production of linoleic acid in plants. We identified three putative delta 12 fatty acid desaturase genes in Jatropha (JcFAD2s through genome-wide analysis and downregulated the expression of one of these genes, JcFAD2-1, in a seed-specific manner by RNA interference technology. The resulting JcFAD2-1 RNA interference transgenic plants showed a dramatic increase of oleic acid (> 78% and a corresponding reduction in polyunsaturated fatty acids (Jatropha had around 37% oleic acid and 41% polyunsaturated fatty acids. This indicates that FAD2-1 is the major enzyme responsible for converting oleic acid to linoleic acid in Jatropha. Due to the changes in the fatty acids profile, the oil of the JcFAD2-1 RNA interference seed was estimated to yield a cetane number as high as 60.2, which is similar to the required cetane number for conventional premium diesel fuels (60 in Europe. The presence of high seed oleic acid did not have a negative impact on other Jatropha agronomic traits based on our preliminary data of the original plants under greenhouse conditions. Further, we developed a marker-free system to generate the transgenic Jatropha

  17. Development of optical marker for polyolefin processes; Desenvolvimento de marcador optico para processamento de poliolefinas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchini, Leonardo Guedes

    2013-08-01

    Research and publications about luminescent polymers have been developed in the last years for the academic innovation; however the industrial application has been very limited in this area. Processed Optical markers are few explored due the difficult to process luminescent polymeric materials with stable luminescence. The materials used to process luminescent polypropylene (PP) were polyamide 6 (PA6) doped with europium complex [Eu(tta){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}] obtained through the dilution and casting process. The polyolefins because they are inert, do not fit the common procedure of doping, in consequence, in this work luminescent polypropylene was indirectly prepared by polyamide 6 doped with europium complex through extrusion process. Product characterization was done using Thermal gravimetry analysis (TG), Differential Scanning Calorimetric (DSC), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and spectro fluorescence of emission and excitation. The blend PP/PA6:Eu(tta){sub 3} presented luminescent properties, after semi-industrial process, as observed in the narrow bands of intra configuration transitions- 4f{sup 6} relatives to energy levels {sup 7}F{sub 0} {yields} {sup 5}L{sub 6} (394nm), {sup 7}F{sub 0} {yields} {sup 5}D{sub 3} (415nm), {sup 7}F{sub 0} {yields} {sup 5}D{sub 2} (464nm), {sup 7}F{sub 0} {yields} {sup 5}D{sub 1} (525nm) e {sup 7}F{sub 0} {yields} {sup 5}D{sub 0} (578nm) of emission spectrum. Red light of the pellets or film is emitted when excited in UV lamp (365nm). TG results showed under O{sub 2} atmosphere that PP doped with PA6:Eu(tta){sub 3} was more stable than pure PP. In this work was processed luminescent PP/PA6:Eu(tta){sub 3} with properties of thermal and photo stability which can be used as optical marker in polymer processing. (author)

  18. Functional Analysis and Marker Development of TaCRT-D Gene in Common Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiping Wang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Calreticulin (CRT, an endoplasmic reticulum (ER-localized Ca2+-binding/buffering protein, is highly conserved and extensively expressed in animal and plant cells. To understand the function of CRTs in wheat (Triticum aestivum L., particularly their roles in stress tolerance, we cloned the full-length genomic sequence of the TaCRT-D isoform from D genome of common hexaploid wheat, and characterized its function by transgenic Arabidopsis system. TaCRT-D exhibited different expression patterns in wheat seedling under different abiotic stresses. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing ORF of TaCRT-D displayed more tolerance to drought, cold, salt, mannitol, and other abiotic stresses at both seed germination and seedling stages, compared with the wild-type controls. Furthermore, DNA polymorphism analysis and gene mapping were employed to develop the functional markers of this gene for marker-assistant selection in wheat breeding program. One SNP, S440 (T→C was detected at the TaCRT-D locus by genotyping a wheat recombinant inbred line (RIL population (114 lines developed from Opata 85 × W7984. The TaCRT-D was then fine mapped between markers Xgwm645 and Xgwm664 on chromosome 3DL, corresponding to genetic distances of 3.5 and 4.4 cM, respectively, using the RIL population and Chinese Spring nulli-tetrasomic lines. Finally, the genome-specific and allele-specific markers were developed for the TaCRT-D gene. These findings indicate that TaCRT-D function importantly in plant stress responses, providing a gene target for genetic engineering to increase plant stress tolerance and the functional markers of TaCRT-D for marker-assistant selection in wheat breeding.

  19. Functional Analysis and Marker Development of TaCRT-D Gene in Common Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiping; Li, Runzhi; Mao, Xinguo; Jing, Ruilian

    2017-01-01

    Calreticulin (CRT), an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-localized Ca 2+ -binding/buffering protein, is highly conserved and extensively expressed in animal and plant cells. To understand the function of CRTs in wheat ( Triticum aestivum L.), particularly their roles in stress tolerance, we cloned the full-length genomic sequence of the TaCRT-D isoform from D genome of common hexaploid wheat, and characterized its function by transgenic Arabidopsis system. TaCRT-D exhibited different expression patterns in wheat seedling under different abiotic stresses. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing ORF of TaCRT-D displayed more tolerance to drought, cold, salt, mannitol, and other abiotic stresses at both seed germination and seedling stages, compared with the wild-type controls. Furthermore, DNA polymorphism analysis and gene mapping were employed to develop the functional markers of this gene for marker-assistant selection in wheat breeding program. One SNP, S440 (T→C) was detected at the TaCRT-D locus by genotyping a wheat recombinant inbred line (RIL) population (114 lines) developed from Opata 85 × W7984. The TaCRT-D was then fine mapped between markers Xgwm645 and Xgwm664 on chromosome 3DL, corresponding to genetic distances of 3.5 and 4.4 cM, respectively, using the RIL population and Chinese Spring nulli-tetrasomic lines. Finally, the genome-specific and allele-specific markers were developed for the TaCRT-D gene. These findings indicate that TaCRT-D function importantly in plant stress responses, providing a gene target for genetic engineering to increase plant stress tolerance and the functional markers of TaCRT-D for marker-assistant selection in wheat breeding.

  20. The dual challenges of generality and specificity when developing environmental DNA markers for species and subspecies of Oncorhynchus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor M. Wilcox; Kellie J. Carim; Kevin S. McKelvey; Michael Young; Michael K. Schwartz

    2015-01-01

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) sampling is a powerful tool for detecting invasive and native aquatic species. Often, species of conservation interest co-occur with other, closely related taxa. Here, we developed qPCR (quantitative PCR) markers which distinguish westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii lewsi), Yellowstone cutthroat trout (O. clarkii bouvieri...

  1. Identifying Quantitative Trait Loci (QTLs) and Developing Diagnostic Markers Linked to Orange Rust Resistance in Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiping; Islam, Md S; Sood, Sushma; Maya, Stephanie; Hanson, Erik A; Comstock, Jack; Wang, Jianping

    2018-01-01

    Sugarcane ( Saccharum spp.) is an important economic crop, contributing up to 80% of table sugar used in the world and has become a promising feedstock for biofuel production. Sugarcane production has been threatened by many diseases, and fungicide applications for disease control have been opted out for sustainable agriculture. Orange rust is one of the major diseases impacting sugarcane production worldwide. Identifying quantitative trait loci (QTLs) and developing diagnostic markers are valuable for breeding programs to expedite release of superior sugarcane cultivars for disease control. In this study, an F 1 segregating population derived from a cross between two hybrid sugarcane clones, CP95-1039 and CP88-1762, was evaluated for orange rust resistance in replicated trails. Three QTLs controlling orange rust resistance in sugarcane (qORR109, qORR4 and qORR102) were identified for the first time ever, which can explain 58, 12 and 8% of the phenotypic variation, separately. We also characterized 1,574 sugarcane putative resistance ( R ) genes. These sugarcane putative R genes and simple sequence repeats in the QTL intervals were further used to develop diagnostic markers for marker-assisted selection of orange rust resistance. A PCR-based Resistance gene-derived maker, G1 was developed, which showed significant association with orange rust resistance. The putative QTLs and marker developed in this study can be effectively utilized in sugarcane breeding programs to facilitate the selection process, thus contributing to the sustainable agriculture for orange rust disease control.

  2. Development of an ELISA approach for the determination of flavodoxin and ferredoxin as markers of iron deficiency in phytoplankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inda, Luis A; Luisa Peleato, M

    2003-06-01

    Quantification of the iron-nutritional status of phytoplankton is of great interest not only for the study of oceans but also for fresh waters. Flavodoxin is a small flavoprotein proposed as a marker for iron deficiency, since it is induced as a consequence of iron deprivation, replacing the iron-sulphur protein ferredoxin. Flavodoxin and ferredoxin have been frequently used as markers for determination of iron deficiency in phytoplankton. Using purified flavodoxin and ferredoxin from Scenedesmus vacuolatus and polyclonal antibodies against both proteins, individual ELISA tests have been developed. The assays have a linear response in the range of 30-600 ng/ml of protein.

  3. Development and Validation of Marker-Aided Selection Methods for Wood Property Traits in Loblolly Pine and Hybrid Poplar; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuskan, G.A.

    2001-01-01

    Wood properties influence pulp and paper quality. Certainly, overall pulp yields are directly related to the cellulose content, changes in hemicellulose content are associated with changes in pulp cohesiveness, and pulping efficiency is related to lignin content. Despite the importance of wood properties on product quality, little progress has been made in improving such traits because current methods of assessing wood and fiber characteristics are time-consuming, expensive, and often imprecise. Genetic improvement of wood and fiber properties has been further hampered by the large size of trees, delayed reproductive maturity and long harvest cycles. Recent developments in molecular genetics will help overcome the physical, economic and biological constraints in assessing and improving wood properties. Genetic maps consisting of numerous molecular markers are now available for loblolly pine and hybrid poplar. Such markers/maps may be used as part of a marker-aided selection and breeding effort or to expedite the isolation and characterization of genes and/or promoters that directly control wood properties. The objectives of this project are: (1) to apply new and rapid analytical techniques for assessing component wood properties to segregating F(sub 2) progeny populations of loblolly pine and hybrid poplar, (2) to map quantitative trait loci and identify molecular markers associated with wood properties in each of the above species and (3) to validate marker-aided selection methods for wood properties in loblolly pine and hybrid poplar

  4. Development of EST Intron-Targeting SNP Markers for Panax ginseng and Their Application to Cultivar Authentication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongtao; Li, Guisheng; Kwon, Woo-Saeng; Yang, Deok-Chun

    2016-06-04

    Panax ginseng is one of the most valuable medicinal plants in the Orient. The low level of genetic variation has limited the application of molecular markers for cultivar authentication and marker-assisted selection in cultivated ginseng. To exploit DNA polymorphism within ginseng cultivars, ginseng expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were searched against the potential intron polymorphism (PIP) database to predict the positions of introns. Intron-flanking primers were then designed in conserved exon regions and used to amplify across the more variable introns. Sequencing results showed that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), as well as indels, were detected in four EST-derived introns, and SNP markers specific to "Gopoong" and "K-1" were first reported in this study. Based on cultivar-specific SNP sites, allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was conducted and proved to be effective for the authentication of ginseng cultivars. Additionally, the combination of a simple NaOH-Tris DNA isolation method and real-time allele-specific PCR assay enabled the high throughput selection of cultivars from ginseng fields. The established real-time allele-specific PCR assay should be applied to molecular authentication and marker assisted selection of P. ginseng cultivars, and the EST intron-targeting strategy will provide a potential approach for marker development in species without whole genomic DNA sequence information.

  5. Cre/lox system to develop selectable marker free transgenic tobacco plants conferring resistance against sap sucking homopteran insect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborti, Dipankar; Sarkar, Anindya; Mondal, Hossain A; Schuermann, David; Hohn, Barbara; Sarmah, Bidyut K; Das, Sampa

    2008-10-01

    A binary expression vector was constructed containing the insecticidal gene Allium sativum leaf agglutinin (ASAL), and a selectable nptII marker gene cassette, flanked by lox sites. Similarly, another binary vector was developed with the chimeric cre gene construct. Transformed tobacco plants were generated with these two independent vectors. Each of the T(0) lox plants was crossed with T(0) Cre plants. PCR analyses followed by the sequencing of the target T-DNA part of the hybrid T(1) plants demonstrated the excision of the nptII gene in highly precised manner in certain percentage of the T(1) hybrid lines. The frequency of such marker gene excision was calculated to be 19.2% in the hybrids. Marker free plants were able to express ASAL efficiently and reduce the survivability of Myzus persiceae, the deadly pest of tobacco significantly, compared to the control tobacco plants. Results of PCR and Southern blot analyses of some of the T(2) plants detected the absence of cre as well as nptII genes. Thus, the crossing strategy involving Cre/lox system for the excision of marker genes appears to be very effective and easy to execute. Documentation of such marker excision phenomenon in the transgenic plants expressing the important insecticidal protein for the first time has a great significance from agricultural and biotechnological points of view.

  6. Development and utilization of novel intron length polymorphic markers in foxtail millet (Setaria italica (L.) P. Beauv.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sarika; Kumari, Kajal; Das, Jyotirmoy; Lata, Charu; Puranik, Swati; Prasad, Manoj

    2011-07-01

    Introns are noncoding sequences in a gene that are transcribed to precursor mRNA but spliced out during mRNA maturation and are abundant in eukaryotic genomes. The availability of codominant molecular markers and saturated genetic linkage maps have been limited in foxtail millet (Setaria italica (L.) P. Beauv.). Here, we describe the development of 98 novel intron length polymorphic (ILP) markers in foxtail millet using sequence information of the model plant rice. A total of 575 nonredundant expressed sequence tag (EST) sequences were obtained, of which 327 and 248 unique sequences were from dehydration- and salinity-stressed suppression subtractive hybridization libraries, respectively. The BLAST analysis of 98 EST sequences suggests a nearly defined function for about 64% of them, and they were grouped into 11 different functional categories. All 98 ILP primer pairs showed a high level of cross-species amplification in two millets and two nonmillets species ranging from 90% to 100%, with a mean of ∼97%. The mean observed heterozygosity and Nei's average gene diversity 0.016 and 0.171, respectively, established the efficiency of the ILP markers for distinguishing the foxtail millet accessions. Based on 26 ILP markers, a reasonable dendrogram of 45 foxtail millet accessions was constructed, demonstrating the utility of ILP markers in germplasm characterizations and genomic relationships in millets and nonmillets species.

  7. Development and Validation of Marker-Aided Selection Methods for Wood Property Traits in Loblolly Pine and Hybrid Poplar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuskan, G.A.

    2001-06-20

    Wood properties influence pulp and paper quality. Certainly, overall pulp yields are directly related to the cellulose content, changes in hemicellulose content are associated with changes in pulp cohesiveness, and pulping efficiency is related to lignin content. Despite the importance of wood properties on product quality, little progress has been made in improving such traits because current methods of assessing wood and fiber characteristics are time-consuming, expensive, and often imprecise. Genetic improvement of wood and fiber properties has been further hampered by the large size of trees, delayed reproductive maturity and long harvest cycles. Recent developments in molecular genetics will help overcome the physical, economic and biological constraints in assessing and improving wood properties. Genetic maps consisting of numerous molecular markers are now available for loblolly pine and hybrid poplar. Such markers/maps may be used as part of a marker-aided selection and breeding effort or to expedite the isolation and characterization of genes and/or promoters that directly control wood properties. The objectives of this project are: (1) to apply new and rapid analytical techniques for assessing component wood properties to segregating F2 progeny populations of loblolly pine and hybrid poplar, (2) to map quantitative trait loci and identify molecular markers associated with wood properties in each of the above species and (3) to validate marker-aided selection methods for wood properties in loblolly pine and hybrid poplar.

  8. Development of a novel set of EST-SSR markers and cross-species amplification in Tamarix africana (Tamaricaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzoli, Serena; Beritognolo, Isacco; Sabatti, Maurizio; Kuzminsky, Elena

    2010-06-01

    Tamarix plants are resistant to abiotic stresses and have become invasive in North America. Their taxonomy is troublesome, and few molecular makers are available to enable species identification or to track the spread of specific invasive genotypes. Transcriptome sequencing projects offer a potential source for the development of new markers. • Thirteen polymorphic simple sequence repeats (SSRs) markers derived from Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) from Tamarix hispida, T. androssowii, T. ramosissima, and T. albiflonum were identified and screened on 24 samples of T. africana to detect polymorphism. The number of alleles per locus ranged from two to eight, with an average of 4.3 alleles per locus, and the mean expected heterozygosity was 0.453. • Amplification products of these 13 loci were also generated for T. gallica. These new EST-SSR markers will be useful in genetic characterization of Tamarix, as additional tools for taxonomic clarification, and for studying invasive populations where they are a threat.

  9. Annual report 1992 on research and development work by the IMF, Institute for Materials Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-03-01

    The present annual report describes the activities undertaken by the IMF in the following areas: 1. Low-pollutant and low-waste techniques (treatment and utilization of special wastes); 2. Nuclear fusion (studies for NET/ITER; structural materials for fusion devices; superconducting magnets; plasmas heating technique; blanket development; component-related safety investigations); 3. Nuclear safety research (safety and materials of fast breeders; transient behaviour of fast breeder fuel elements; LWR-oriented safety research; containment concepts for PWR-plants); 4. Nuclear waste management (materials studies of waste forms); 5. Superconductivity (superconductor developments); 6. Microsystems engineering (development and testing of compact and laminated materials of microsystems engineering); 7. Handling technique (remote handling components for invasive surgery); 8. Materials and interfaces (inter alia high-performance ceramics, failure behaviour, LCP, biomechanics). The appendix lists all publications or primary reports by the IMF in 1992. (orig./HP) [de

  10. ADVANCED FUSION TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT. ANNUAL REPORT TO THE US DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PROJECT STAFF

    2001-01-01

    OAK A271 ADVANCED FUSION TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ANNUAL REPORT TO THE US DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY. The General Atomics (GA) Advanced Fusion Technology Program seeks to advance the knowledge base needed for next-generation fusion experiments, and ultimately for an economical and environmentally attractive fusion energy source. To achieve this objective, they carry out fusion systems design studies to evaluate the technologies needed for next-step experiments and power plants, and they conduct research to develop basic and applied knowledge about these technologies. GA's Advanced Fusion Technology program derives from, and draws on, the physics and engineering expertise built up by many years of experience in designing, building, and operating plasma physics experiments. The technology development activities take full advantage of the GA DIII-D program, the DIII-D facility and the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program and the ICF Target Fabrication facility

  11. Proceedings of NUCLEAR 2008 annual international conference on sustainable development through nuclear research and education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantin, Marin; Turcu, Ilie

    2008-01-01

    The proceedings of the NUCLEAR 2008 annual international conference on sustainable development through nuclear research and education held at INR-Pitesti on May, 28 - 30 2008 contain 88 communications presented in 3 sections addressing the themes of Nuclear energy, Environmental protection, and Sustainable development. In turn these sections are addressing the following items: Section 1.1 - Nuclear safety and severe accidents (12 papers); Section 1.2 - Nuclear reactors (11 papers); Section 1.3 - Nuclear technologies and materials (20 papers); Section 2.1 - Radioprotection (5 papers); Section 2.2 - Radioactive waste management (20 papers); Section 2.3 - air, water and soil protection (5 papers); Section 3.1 - Strategies in energy (3 papers); Section 3.2 - Education, continuous formation and knowledge transfer (8 papers); Section 3.3 - International partnership for a sustainable development (4 papers). The conference proceedings where divided into two parts. This item refers particularly to the second part

  12. Proceedings of NUCLEAR 2008 annual international conference on sustainable development through nuclear research and education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantin, Marin; Turcu, Ilie

    2008-01-01

    The proceedings of the NUCLEAR 2008 annual international conference on sustainable development through nuclear research and education held at INR-Pitesti on May, 28 - 30 2008 contain 88 communications presented in 3 sections addressing the themes of Nuclear energy, Environmental protection, and Sustainable development. In turn these sections are addressing the following items: Section 1.1 - Nuclear safety and severe accidents (12 papers); Section 1.2 - Nuclear reactors (11 papers); Section 1.3 - Nuclear technologies and materials (20 papers); Section 2.1 - Radioprotection (5 papers); Section 2.2 - Radioactive waste management (20 papers); Section 2.3 - air, water and soil protection (5 papers); Section 3.1 - Strategies in energy (3 papers); Section 3.2 - Education, continuous formation and knowledge transfer (8 papers); Section 3.3 - International partnership for a sustainable development (4 papers)

  13. Development of Dietary Patterns Spanning Infancy and Toddlerhood: Relation to Body Size, Composition and Metabolic Risk Markers at Three Years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Louise B. B.; Mølgaard, Christian; Ejlerskov, Katrine Tschentscher

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the development of dietary patterns during toddlerhood and the relation to growth and health. The study objective was to characterise the development of dietary patterns from 9-36 mo of age and investigate the association to body size, body composition and metabolic risk...... total cholesterol and LDL. Hence, this could represent undesirable development of dietary patterns in toddlers. In conclusion, development of dietary patterns can be exploratory characterised by PCA and related to potential cardiovascular risk markers in toddlers even within a relatively homogeneous...... markers at 36 mo. Food records were filled out at 9, 18 and 36 mo of age (n = 229). Dietary patterns were identified by principal component analysis (PCA). Three dietary patterns were identified: Transition Food, Healthy Food and Traditional Food. The course of development in dietary patterns from 9-36 mo...

  14. Development of SSR Markers and Assessment of Genetic Diversity in Medicinal Chrysanthemum morifolium Cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shangguo; He, Renfeng; Lu, Jiangjie; Jiang, Mengying; Shen, Xiaoxia; Jiang, Yan; Wang, Zhi'an; Wang, Huizhong

    2016-01-01

    Chrysanthemum morifolium, is a well-known flowering plant worldwide, and has a high commercial, floricultural, and medicinal value. In this study, simple-sequence repeat (SSR) markers were generated from EST datasets and were applied to assess the genetic diversity among 32 cultivars. A total of 218 in silico SSR loci were identified from 7300 C. morifolium ESTs retrieved from GenBank. Of all SSR loci, 61.47% of them (134) were hexa-nucleotide repeats, followed by tri-nucleotide repeats (17.89%), di-nucleotide repeats (12.39%), tetra-nucleotide repeats (4.13%), and penta-nucleotide repeats (4.13%). In this study, 17 novel EST-SSR markers were verified. Along with 38 SSR markers reported previously, 55 C. morifolium SSR markers were selected for further genetic diversity analysis. PCR amplification of these EST-SSRs produced 1319 fragments, 1306 of which showed polymorphism. The average polymorphism information content of the SSR primer pairs was 0.972 (0.938-0.993), which showed high genetic diversity among C. morifolium cultivars. Based on SSR markers, 32 C. morifolium cultivars were separated into two main groups by partitioning of the clusters using the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean dendrogram, which was further supported by a principal coordinate analysis plot. Phylogenetic relationship among C. morifolium cultivars as revealed by SSR markers was highly consistent with the classification of medicinal C. morifolium populations according to their origin and ecological distribution. Our results demonstrated that SSR markers were highly reproducible and informative, and could be used to evaluate genetic diversity and relationships among medicinal C. morifolium cultivars.

  15. Development of RAPD-SCAR markers for different Ganoderma species authentication by improved RAPD amplification and molecular cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, J J; Mei, Z Q; Tania, M; Yang, L Q; Cheng, J L; Khan, M A

    2015-05-25

    The sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) is a valuable molecular technique for the genetic identification of any species. This method is mainly derived from the molecular cloning of the amplified DNA fragments achieved from the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD). In this study, we collected DNA from 10 species of Ganoderma mushroom and amplified the DNA using an improved RAPD technique. The amplified fragments were then cloned into a T-vector, and positive clones were screened, indentified, and sequenced for the development of SCAR markers. After designing PCR primers and optimizing PCR conditions, 4 SCAR markers, named LZ1-4, LZ2-2, LZ8-2, and LZ9-15, were developed, which were specific to Ganoderma gibbosum (LZ1-4 and LZ8-2), Ganoderma sinense (LZ2-2 and LZ8-2), Ganoderma tropicum (LZ8-2), and Ganoderma lucidum HG (LZ9-15). These 4 novel SCAR markers were deposited into GenBank with the accession Nos. KM391935, KM391936, KM391937, and KM391938, respectively. Thus, in this study we developed specific SCAR markers for the identification and authentication of different Ganoderma species.

  16. Development of Thinopyrum ponticum-specific molecular markers and FISH probes based on SLAF-seq technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liqin; Luo, Qiaoling; Teng, Wan; Li, Bin; Li, Hongwei; Li, Yiwen; Li, Zhensheng; Zheng, Qi

    2018-05-01

    Based on SLAF-seq, 67 Thinopyrum ponticum-specific markers and eight Th. ponticum-specific FISH probes were developed, and these markers and probes could be used for detection of alien chromatin in a wheat background. Decaploid Thinopyrum ponticum (2n = 10x = 70) is a valuable gene reservoir for wheat improvement. Identification of Th. ponticum introgression would facilitate its transfer into diverse wheat genetic backgrounds and its practical utilization in wheat improvement. Based on specific-locus-amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq) technology, 67 new Th. ponticum-specific molecular markers and eight Th. ponticum-specific fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) probes have been developed from a tiny wheat-Th. ponticum translocation line. These newly developed molecular markers allowed the detection of Th. ponticum DNA in a variety of materials specifically and steadily at high throughput. According to the hybridization signal pattern, the eight Th. ponticum-specific probes could be divided into two groups. The first group including five dispersed repetitive sequence probes could identify Th. ponticum chromatin more sensitively and accurately than genomic in situ hybridization (GISH). Whereas the second group having three tandem repetitive sequence probes enabled the discrimination of Th. ponticum chromosomes together with another clone pAs1 in wheat-Th. ponticum partial amphiploid Xiaoyan 68.

  17. Development and characterization of polymorphic genomic-SSR markers in Asian long-horned beetle (Anoplophora glabripennis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhaoyang; Tao, Jing; Luo, Youqing

    2017-12-01

    The Asian long-horned beetle (ALB), Anoplophora glabripennis (Motschulsky) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae: Lamiinae), is a wood-borer and polyphagous xylophage that is native to Asia. It infests and seriously harms healthy trees, and therefore is a cause for considerable environmental concern. The analysis of population genetic structure of ALB and sibling species Anoplophora nobilis (Ganglbauer) will not only help to clarify the relationship between environmental variables and mechanisms of speciation, but also will enhance our understanding of evolutionary processes. However, the known genetic markers, particularly microsatellites, are limited for this species. SSRLocator software was used to analyze the distribution and frequencies of genomic simple sequence repeat (SSR), to infer the basic characteristics of repeat motifs, and to design primers. We developed SSR loci of 2-6 repeated units, including 10,650 perfect SSRs, and found 140 types of repeat motifs. A total of 2621 SSR markers were discovered in ALB whole-genome shotgun sequences. 48 pairs of SSR primers were randomly chosen from 2621 SSR markers, and half of these 48 pairs were polymorphic containing 4 di-, 7 tri-, 2 tetra-, and 11-hexamer SSRs. Four populations test the effectiveness of the primers. These results suggest that our method for whole-genome SSR screening is feasible and efficient, and the SSR markers developed in this study are suitable for further population genetics studies of ALB. Moreover, they may also be useful for the development of SSRs for other Coleoptera.

  18. Development and application of sequence-tagged microsatellite site (STMS) markers in chickpea (Cicer arietinum), banana (Musa spp.) and their major pathogens, Ascochyta rabiei and Mycosphaerella fijiensis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winter, P.; Kaemmer, D.; Paff, T.; Geistlinger, J.; Neu, C.; Kahl, G.

    2001-01-01

    DNA markers of various kinds have found widespread application in many facets of plant breeding and plant pathogen control. Yet another marker type, sequence-tagged microsatellite (STMS) markers, provides the markers of choice for nearly every crop because of their co-dominant nature, reliability, ease of application and high polymorphic information content. We report here on the development of a whole set of STMS markers and the respective, selected primer sequences for two important crops, chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) and banana (Musa acuminata), and for their most devastating fungal pathogens, Ascochyta rabiei and Mycosphaerella fijiensis, respectively. These markers were generated either by direct screening of size-selected genomic libraries with microsatellite-complementary oligonucleotides, or by enrichment of DNA fragments containing microsatellite sequences. A total of 69 markers for chickpea, 15 markers for M. acuminata, 19 markers for A rabiei and 11 markers for M. fijiensis, selected on the basis of their high information content and ease of use are presented here. These can be applied for mapping of the respective genomes, for various population studies, and cultivar and isolate identification. We further demonstrate that several of these markers can potentially be applied across species boundaries and thus could increase the marker repertoire also for other species of the genus Cicer, Musa and for Ascochyta-type pathogens of bean, and potentially also of lentil and pea. (author)

  19. LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ANNUAL REPORT TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY - DECEMBER 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FOX,K.J.

    2004-12-31

    Brookhaven National (BNL) Laboratory is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy. BNL's total annual budget has averaged about $460 million. There are about 2,800 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 4 13.2A, ''Laboratory Directed Research and Development,'' January 8, 2001, and the LDRD Annual Report guidance, updated February 12, 1999. The LDRD Program obtains its funds through the Laboratory overhead pool and operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2A. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new ''fundable'' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research ''which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions'' for the Laboratory. As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community and foster new science and technology

  20. LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ANNUAL REPORT TO THE DOE - DECEMBER 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FOX, K.J.

    2001-01-01

    Brookhaven National (BNL) Laboratory is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy. BNL's total annual budget has averaged about$450 million. There are about 3,000 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 4 13.2, ''Laboratory Directed Research and Development,'' March 5, 1997, and the LDRD Annual Report guidance, updated February 12, 1999. The LDRD Program obtains its funds through the Laboratory overhead pool and operates under the authority of DOE Order 4 13.2. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new ''fundable'' R and D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research ''which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions'' for the Laboratory. As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community and foster new science and technology ideas, which becomes a major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence

  1. LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ANNUAL REPORT TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY - DECEMBER 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FOX,K.J.

    2003-12-31

    Brookhaven National (BNL) Laboratory is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy. BNL's total annual budget has averaged about $450 million. There are about 3,000 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 41 3.2A, ''Laboratory Directed Research and Development,'' January 8, 2001, and the LDRD Annual Report guidance, updated February 12, 1999. The LDRD Program obtains its funds through the Laboratory overhead pool and operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2A. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new ''fundable'' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research ''which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions'' for the Laboratory. As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community and foster new science and technology

  2. LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ANNUAL REPORT TO THE DOE - DECEMBER 2001.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FOX,K.J.

    2001-12-01

    Brookhaven National (BNL) Laboratory is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy. BNL's total annual budget has averaged about $450 million. There are about 3,000 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 4 13.2, ''Laboratory Directed Research and Development,'' March 5, 1997, and the LDRD Annual Report guidance, updated February 12, 1999. The LDRD Program obtains its funds through the Laboratory overhead pool and operates under the authority of DOE Order 4 13.2. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new ''fundable'' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research ''which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions'' for the Laboratory. As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community and foster new science and technology ideas

  3. Mining online genomic resources in Anolis carolinensis facilitates rapid and inexpensive development of cross-species microsatellite markers for the Anolis lizard genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wordley, Claire; Slate, Jon; Stapley, Jessica

    2011-01-01

    Online sequence databases can provide valuable resources for the development of cross-species genetic markers. In particular, mining expressed tag sequences (EST) for microsatellites and developing conserved cross-species microsatellite markers can provide a rapid and relatively inexpensive method to develop new markers for a range of species. Here, we adopt this approach to develop cross-species microsatellite markers in Anolis lizards, which is a model genus in evolutionary biology and ecology. Using EST sequences from Anolis carolinensis, we identified 127 microsatellites that satisfied our criteria, and tested 49 of these in five species of Anolis (carolinensis, distichus, apletophallus, porcatus and sagrei). We identified between 8 and 25 new variable genetic markers for five Anolis species. These markers will be a valuable resource for studies of population genetics, comparative mapping, mating systems, behavioural ecology and adaptive radiations in this diverse lineage. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Development and statistical assessment of a paper-based immunoassay for detection of tumor markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazzu-Nascimento, Thiago [Instituto de Química de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, 13566-590, São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia de Bioanalítica, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Morbioli, Giorgio Gianini [Instituto de Química de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, 13566-590, São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia de Bioanalítica, Campinas, SP (Brazil); School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States); Milan, Luis Aparecido [Departamento de Estatística, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Donofrio, Fabiana Cristina [Instituto de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso, 78557-267, Sinop, MT (Brazil); Mestriner, Carlos Alberto [Wama Produtos para Laboratório Ltda, 13560-971, São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Carrilho, Emanuel, E-mail: emanuel@iqsc.usp.br [Instituto de Química de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, 13566-590, São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia de Bioanalítica, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2017-01-15

    Paper-based assays are an attractive low-cost option for clinical chemistry testing, due to characteristics such as short time of analysis, low consumption of samples and reagents, and high portability of assays. However, little attention has been given to the evaluation of the performance of these simple tests, which should include the use of a statistical approach to define the choice of best cut-off value for the test. The choice of the cut-off value impacts on the sensitivity and specificity of the bioassay. Here, we developed a paper-based immunoassay for the detection of the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and performed a statistical assessment to establish the assay's cut-off value using the Youden's J index (68.28 A.U.), what allowed for a gain in sensibility (0.86) and specificity (1.0). We also discuss about the importance of defining a gray zone as a safety margin for test (±12% over the cut-off value), eliminating all false positives and false negatives outcomes and avoiding misleading results. The test accuracy was calculated as the area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, presenting a value of 0.97, what classifies this test as highly accurate. We propose here a low-cost method capable of detecting carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in human serum samples, highlighting the importance of statistical tools to evaluate a new low-cost diagnostic method. - Highlights: • A paper-based sandwich immunoassay protocol for detection of tumor markers. • A statistical approach to define cut-off values and measuring test's sensitivity, specificity and accuracy. • A simple way to create a gray zone, avoiding false positive and false negative outcomes.

  5. Automatic fuzzy inference system development for marker-based watershed segmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, M A; Meschino, G J; Ballarin, V L

    2007-01-01

    Texture image segmentation is a constant challenge in digital image processing. The partition of an image into regions that allow the experienced observer to obtain the necessary information can be done using a Mathematical Morphology tool called the Watershed Transform. This transform is able to distinguish extremely complex objects and is easily adaptable to various kinds of images. The success of the Watershed Transform depends essentially on the existence of unequivocal markers for each of the objects of interest. The standard methods for marker detection are highly specific and complex when objects presenting great variability of shape, size and texture are processed. This paper proposes the automatic generation of a fuzzy inference system for marker detection using object selection done by the expert. This method allows applying the Watershed Transform to biomedical images with diferent kinds of texture. The results allow concluding that the method proposed is an effective tool for the application of the Watershed Transform

  6. Exploiting EST databases for the development and characterization of EST-SSR markers in castor bean (Ricinus communis L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Jun-Bo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The castor bean (Ricinus communis L., a monotypic species in the spurge family (Euphorbiaceae, 2n = 20, is an important non-edible oilseed crop widely cultivated in tropical, sub-tropical and temperate countries for its high economic value. Because of the high level of ricinoleic acid (over 85% in its seed oil, the castor bean seed derivatives are often used in aviation oil, lubricants, nylon, dyes, inks, soaps, adhesive and biodiesel. Due to lack of efficient molecular markers, little is known about the population genetic diversity and the genetic relationships among castor bean germplasm. Efficient and robust molecular markers are increasingly needed for breeding and improving varieties in castor bean. The advent of modern genomics has produced large amounts of publicly available DNA sequence data. In particular, expressed sequence tags (ESTs provide valuable resources to develop gene-associated SSR markers. Results In total, 18,928 publicly available non-redundant castor bean EST sequences, representing approximately 17.03 Mb, were evaluated and 7732 SSR sites in 5,122 ESTs were identified by data mining. Castor bean exhibited considerably high frequency of EST-SSRs. We developed and characterized 118 polymorphic EST-SSR markers from 379 primer pairs flanking repeats by screening 24 castor bean samples collected from different countries. A total of 350 alleles were identified from 118 polymorphic SSR loci, ranging from 2-6 per locus (A with an average of 2.97. The EST-SSR markers developed displayed moderate gene diversity (He with an average of 0.41. Genetic relationships among 24 germplasms were investigated using the genotypes of 350 alleles, showing geographic pattern of genotypes across genetic diversity centers of castor bean. Conclusion Castor bean EST sequences exhibited considerably high frequency of SSR sites, and were rich resources for developing EST-SSR markers. These EST-SSR markers would be particularly

  7. Presentation for the first research co-ordination meeting on development of kits for radioimmunometric assays for tumour markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yibing

    1997-01-01

    Radioimmunoassay and Labeled Compound Lab. is the earliest and biggest center which supply RIA reagents in China. It started the research on RIA reagents in the middle of 1970's. Now it can produce more than 80 kinds of RIA kits including thyroid function and newborn screening, tumor markers, kidney function, diabetes-related, fertility and pregnancy monitoring and diagnosis of hepatitis B and C. There are over 1000 hospitals and research organizations using the reagents. Cancer is a disease which endanger human life. There are about 1.6 million new cancer patient and 800 thousand persons died of cancer every year in our country. The laboratory has been paying attention to development of tumor markers RIA reagents since we started the research on RIA reagents. The first kit produced was Rocket Electrophoresis Radioautograph of AFP. In 1980's it developed AFP, CEA, HCG and Ferritin RIA kits. Now RIA reagents for tumor markers have become important part of our products . Besides the products above mentioned it also can produce calcitonin RIA, thyroidglobulin RIA and CA125 IRMA. In early 1990's it established a monoclonal antibody Lab. and this Lab. have been working for the preparation of the monoclonal antibody to tumor markers

  8. Development and validation of 89 novel expressed sequence tag-derived microsatellite markers in blood clam, Tegillarca granosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Shuangshuang; Fang, Jun; Cai, Yilong; Chai, Xueliang; Xiao, Guoqiang

    2017-06-01

    Blood clam, Tegillarca granosa, is an important shellfish in Chinese mariculture industry. Investigative research in this species, such as genetic linkage mapping, requires a large panel of molecular markers. In present study, a total of 89 polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed in T. granosa using the sequence database of Life Sciences Technology 454 next generation sequencing technology. All 89 loci were characterized in 20 individual clams from a natural population inhabiting Yueqing Gulf, Zhejiang Province, China. The number of alleles per polymorphic locus varied between 2 and 15, while the observed heterozygosity, expected heterozygosity and polymorphic information content varied between 0.000 and 1.000, 0.102 and 0.921, and 0.048 and 0.886, respectively. Of the 89 loci identified, 32 loci deviated significantly from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium following Bonferroni correction. Thirty nine markers, which were shown to be polymorphic in a full-sibling family, were tested in Mendelian segregations. As expected, 32 loci were co-dominantly segregated in a Mendelian fashion. These novel developed microsatellite markers represent useful research tools for investigation of population genetic structure and genetic diversity in this species.

  9. A comprehensive characterization of simple sequence repeats in pepper genomes provides valuable resources for marker development in Capsicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jiaowen; Zhao, Zicheng; Li, Bo; Qin, Cheng; Wu, Zhiming; Trejo-Saavedra, Diana L; Luo, Xirong; Cui, Junjie; Rivera-Bustamante, Rafael F; Li, Shuaicheng; Hu, Kailin

    2016-01-07

    The sequences of the full set of pepper genomes including nuclear, mitochondrial and chloroplast are now available for use. However, the overall of simple sequence repeats (SSR) distribution in these genomes and their practical implications for molecular marker development in Capsicum have not yet been described. Here, an average of 868,047.50, 45.50 and 30.00 SSR loci were identified in the nuclear, mitochondrial and chloroplast genomes of pepper, respectively. Subsequently, systematic comparisons of various species, genome types, motif lengths, repeat numbers and classified types were executed and discussed. In addition, a local database composed of 113,500 in silico unique SSR primer pairs was built using a homemade bioinformatics workflow. As a pilot study, 65 polymorphic markers were validated among a wide collection of 21 Capsicum genotypes with allele number and polymorphic information content value per marker raging from 2 to 6 and 0.05 to 0.64, respectively. Finally, a comparison of the clustering results with those of a previous study indicated the usability of the newly developed SSR markers. In summary, this first report on the comprehensive characterization of SSR motifs in pepper genomes and the very large set of SSR primer pairs will benefit various genetic studies in Capsicum.

  10. Web Application Development by Applying the MVC and Table Data Gateway in the Annual Program Budget Management System

    OpenAIRE

    A. Medina-Santiago; A. Cisneros-Gómez; E. M. Melgar-Paniagua; G. B. Nango-Sólis; E. A. Moreno-López; M. E. Castellanos-Morales; D. B. Cantoral-Díaz; L. M. Blanco-Gonzalez

    2017-01-01

    This paper is the result of the development of the Web application to register the Annual Work Program, in which goals and actions are assigned the financial resources to manage the annual work program identified. In this paper, we have identified five types of users: the first is the Administrator, in charge of monitoring the goals programmed in the period, as well as the resource assigned to reach those goals; the second corresponds to the purchasing department who is in charge of contactin...

  11. Development of 23 novel polymorphic EST-SSR markers for the endangered relict conifer Metasequoia glyptostroboides1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yuqing; Bi, Quanxin; Guan, Wenbin; Mao, Jian-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: Metasequoia glyptostroboides is an endangered relict conifer species endemic to China. In this study, expressed sequence tag–simple sequence repeat (EST-SSR) markers were developed using transcriptome mining for future genetic and functional studies. Methods and Results: We collected 97,565 unigene sequences generated by 454 pyrosequencing. A bioinformatics analysis identified 2087 unique and putative microsatellites, from which 96 novel microsatellite markers were developed. Fifty-three of the 96 primer sets successfully amplified clear fragments of the expected sizes; 23 of those loci were polymorphic. The number of alleles per locus ranged from two to eight, with an average of three, and the observed and expected heterozygosity values ranged from 0 to 1.0 and 0.117 to 0.813, respectively. Conclusions: These microsatellite loci will enrich the genetic resources to develop functional studies and conservation strategies for this endangered relict species. PMID:26421250

  12. Annual report of Nuclear Human Resource Development Center. April 1, 2014 - March 31, 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-06-01

    This annual report summarizes the activities of Nuclear Human Resource Development Center (NuHRDeC) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) in the fiscal year (FY) 2014. In FY 2014, we flexibly designed special training courses corresponding with the outside training needs, while organizing the annually scheduled regular training programs. We also actively addressed the challenging issues on human resource development, such as to enhance the collaboration with academia and to organize international training for Asian countries. Besides these regular courses, we also organized the special training courses based on the outside needs, e.g. Nuclear Regulatory Authority or the people in Naraha town in Fukushima Prefecture. JAEA continued its cooperative activities with universities. In respect of the cooperation with graduate school of The University of Tokyo, we accepted nuclear major students and cooperatively conducted lectures and practical exercises for one year. In terms of the collaboration network with universities, the joint course was successfully held with six universities through utilizing the remote education system. Besides, the intensive summer course and practical exercise at Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories were also conducted. Furthermore, JAEA had re-signed the agreement “Japan Nuclear Education Network” with 7 Universities in Feb. 2015 for the new participation of Nagoya University from FY 2015. Concerning International training, we continuously implemented the Instructor Training Program (ITP) by receiving the annual sponsorship from Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology. In FY 2014, eight countries (i.e. Bangladesh, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Malaysia, Mongolia, Philippines, Thailand and Vietnam) joined this Instructor training courses such as “Reactor Engineering Course”. Furthermore, we organized nuclear technology seminar courses, e.g. “Basic Radiation Knowledge for School Education”. In respect of

  13. Annual and monthly range fidelity of female boreal woodland caribou in respons to petroleum development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyan V. Tracz

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Petroleum-sector development in northern Alberta, Canada has been implicated as one factor influencing the decline of boreal woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou. Previous research showed that caribou are farther from petroleum-sector disturbances within their home range than expected. As petroleum development increases, the distance caribou can selectively place themselves relative to industrial disturbance must decrease, because distances between disturbances decrease. Conceptually, the number of local disturbances becomes so large that caribou either abandon their local avoidance behaviour or leave their traditional home range. We evaluated whether an intense petroleum- development event in northern Alberta was sufficient to result in home range abandonment by female woodland caribou. Using well locations as an index of petroleum development, we found that caribou studied from 1992 to 2000 did not change their annual or monthly range fidelity as a function of development intensity. Caribou remained in peatland complexes containing a large number of petroleum-sector disturbances rather than move to new areas, presumably because the risks of dispersing across upland habitat to reach other suitable habitat are high. Such range fidelity may have fitness consequences for woodland caribou if they suffer greater predation in areas where petroleum development is occurring.

  14. Association analysis and marker development for grain quality traits using USDA diverse rice germplasm collections

    Science.gov (United States)

    New molecular markers are being designed and validated for grain quality improvement based on computationally assisted analysis of genome wide association study (GWAS) findings across multiple panels and multiple grain quality traits. The traits include grain dimensions, apparent amylose content (A...

  15. Development of tools and strategies towards marker assisted selection and gene cloning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brugmans, B.W.

    2005-01-01

    In this thesis research is described aiming at alleviation of the perceived limitations in the standard protocol which encompasses: mapping a trait, followed by marker saturation, genetic resolution, and finally BAC landing and walking to span the physical distance between the

  16. Development of a Prognostic Marker for Lung Cancer Using Analysis of Tumor Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Bambanker cell freezing medium (Lymphotec Inc., Tokyo, Japan ). Prior to FACS, isolated tumor cells were stained with mouse anti-human CD45RA PE/Cy7... clone L48, BD Biosciences, San Jose, CA) and Aqua Vital Dye (Invitrogen, Carlsbad, CA). CD45 is a blood cell marker used to separate blood cells from

  17. Endothelial cell marker PAL-E reactivity in brain tumor, developing brain, and brain disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenstra, S.; Troost, D.; Das, P. K.; Claessen, N.; Becker, A. E.; Bosch, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    The endothelial cell marker PAL-E is not reactive to vessels in the normal brain. The present study concerns the PAL-E reactivity in brain tumors in contrast to normal brain and nonneoplastic brain disease. A total of 122 specimens were examined: brain tumors (n = 94), nonneoplastic brain disease (n

  18. SNP discovery and marker development for disease resistance candidate genes in common carp (Cyprinus carpio)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in immune response genes have been reported as markers of susceptibility to infectious diseases in human and livestock. A disease caused by cyprinid herpes virus 3 (CyHV-3) is highly contagious and virulent in common carp. With the aim to investigate the gene...

  19. Development of SSR markers for the short arm of rye chromosome 1

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kofler, R.; Stift, G.; Gong, L.; Suchánková, Pavla; Šimková, Hana; Doležel, Jaroslav; Lelley, T.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 71, - (2007), s. 279-281 ISSN 0723-7812 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA521/04/0607 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Source of funding: V - iné verejné zdroje Keywords : SSR markers * rye chromosome 1 Subject RIV: GE - Plant Breeding

  20. Marker-Assisted Backcrossing to Develop an Elite Cytoplasmic Male Sterility Line in Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asadollah Ahmadikhah

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS is a cornerstone of hybrid production in many crops. In three-line hybrid systems, use of CMS, maintainer, and fertility restorer lines is necessary for production of hybrid seeds. Limited resources of CMS and low variation of CMS lines cause genetic vulnerability to pathogens. Therefore, diversifying the CMS sources is indispensible for a sustainable production system of hybrid seed. In this study, we attempted for the first time to transfer CMS into maintainer line Yosen B in restricted generations using the marker-assisted backcrossing (MABC method. The resultant F hybrid of IR68897 A/Yosen B cross was backcrossed to Yosen B, and CMS plants in each backcross generation (from BCF to BCF were selected based on phenotyping test and MABC. Molecular assessment of backcross progenies was conducted using a mitochondrial CMS-specific marker and 34 polymorphic nuclear simple-sequence repeat (SSR markers in early generations (from BCF to BCF and was continued using 9 additional SSRs and 82 inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR markers in BCF. A MABC strategy could successfully recover the recurrent parent genome (RPG in BCF generation, and decreased heterozygosity of final CMS plants. Restorability test with known wild-abortive restorer lines (viz. IR36 and IR24 showed that combination of Yosen A × IR24 could produce highly fertile F hybrid. Evaluation of some important agronomic traits of the final CMS line (BCF at field condition showed that it was comparable to the original maintainer fertile counterpart. Phenotypic and marker-assisted selections could considerably decrease the time needed for full recovery of RPG so that final CMS line could show a high similarity to original fertile counterpart.

  1. Development and Characterization of 1,906 EST-SSR Markers from Unigenes in Jute (Corchorus spp..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liwu Zhang

    Full Text Available Jute, comprising white and dark jute, is the second important natural fiber crop after cotton worldwide. However, the lack of expressed sequence tag-derived simple sequence repeat (EST-SSR markers has resulted in a large gap in the improvement of jute. Previously, de novo 48,914 unigenes from white jute were assembled. In this study, 1,906 EST-SSRs were identified from these assembled uingenes. Among these markers, di-, tri- and tetra-nucleotide repeat types were the abundant types (12.0%, 56.9% and 21.6% respectively. The AG-rich or GA-rich nucleotide repeats were the predominant. Subsequently, a sample of 116 SSRs, located in genes encoding transcription factors and cellulose synthases, were selected to survey polymorphisms among12 diverse jute accessions. Of these, 83.6% successfully amplified at least one fragment and detected polymorphism among the 12diverse genotypes, indicating that the newly developed SSRs are of good quality. Furthermore, the genetic similarity coefficients of all the 12 accessions were evaluated using 97 polymorphic SSRs. The cluster analysis divided the jute accessions into two main groups with genetic similarity coefficient of 0.61. These EST-SSR markers not only enrich molecular markers of jute genome, but also facilitate genetic and genomic researches in jute.

  2. Development of polysomic microsatellite markers for characterization of population structuring and phylogeography in the shortnose sturgeon (Acipenser brevirostrum)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Anne P.; King, Tim L.

    2012-01-01

    Shortnose sturgeon Acipenser brevirostrum is an endangered polyploid fish species for which no nuclear DNA markers previously existed. To address this need, 86 polysomic loci were developed and characterized in 20 A. brevirostrum from five river systems and eight members (parents and six progeny) of a captive-bred family. All markers proved to be polymorphic, polysomic, and demonstrated direct inheritance when tested in a captive family. Eleven loci were included in a range-wide survey of 561 fish sampled from 17 geographic collections. Allelic diversity at these markers ranged from 7 to 24 alleles/locus and averaged 16.5 alleles/locus; sufficient diversity to produce unique multilocus genotypes. In the range-wide survey, a Mantel comparison of an ecological (1-Jaccard’s) and genetic (ΦPT; an analog to FST) distance metrics, identified a strong positive correlation (r = 0.98, P PT represents a viable metric for assessing genetic relatedness using this class of marker.

  3. Development of novel microsatellite markers for the Northern Goshawk (Accipiter gentilis) and their utility in cross-species amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haughey, Christy; Sage, George K.; Degange, Gabriel; Sonsthagen, Sarah A.; Talbot, Sandra L.

    2016-01-01

    The Northern Goshawk (Accipiter gentilis) is a large forest raptor with a Holarctic distribution and, in some portions of its range, a species of conservation concern. To augment previously reported genetic markers, 13 novel polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed to establish individual identification and familial relationships, to assess levels of genetic diversity, and to identify diagnostic markers. Of the 22 loci tested, 13 were polymorphic, seven were monomorphic, and two failed to amplify. This suite of microsatellite loci yielded a combined probability of parental exclusion of 98%; a single individual sampled from a North American population can be reliably identified using a combination of seven of the 13 polymorphic loci. Cross-species screening in Cooper's Hawks (A. cooperii) and Sharp-shinned Hawks (A. striatus) of the 20 loci that successfully amplified in Northern Goshawks identified 13 loci as polymorphic in each species. Six of these loci (Age1303, Age1308, Age1309, Age1312, and Age1314) appeared to be useful in distinguishing between Accipiter species. These markers will be useful to researchers investigating populations of North American accipiters.

  4. Annual report of Nuclear Human Resource Development Center. April 1, 2011 - March 31, 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-11-01

    This annual report summarizes the activities of Nuclear Human Resource Development Center (NuHRDeC) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) in the fiscal year 2011. In this fiscal year, we flexibly designed and conducted training courses corresponding with the needs from outside, while conducting the annually scheduled training programs, and also actively addressed the challenge of human resource development, such as to enhance the collaboration with academia and to organize international training for Asian countries. The number of trainees who completed the domestic training courses in 2011 was increased to 387, which is 14 percent more than the previous year. And also, in order to respond to the Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO)'s Fukushima No.1 nuclear power plant accident, we also newly designed and organized the special training courses on radiation survey for the subcontracting companies working with TEPCO, and the training courses on decontamination work for the construction companies in Fukushima prefecture. The total number of attendees in these special courses was 3,800 persons. JAEA continued its cooperative activities with universities. In respect of the cooperation with graduate school of University of Tokyo, we accepted 17 students and cooperatively conducted practical exercises for nuclear major. Furthermore, we also actively continued cooperation on practical exercises for students of universities which were signed in Nuclear HRD Program. In terms of the collaboration network with universities, the joint course was held with six universities through utilizing the remote education system. Furthermore, the intensive course at Okayama University and practical exercise at Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories of JAEA were also conducted. In respect of International training, NuHRDeC continuously implemented the Instructor Training Program (ITP) by receiving the annual sponsorship from MEXT. In fiscal year 2011, seven countries (i.e. Bangladesh

  5. Annual report of Nuclear Human Resource Development Center. April 1, 2013 - March 31, 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-07-01

    This annual report summarizes the activities of Nuclear Human Resource Development Center (NuHRDeC) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) in the FY2013. In FY2013, we flexibly designed special training courses corresponding with the outside training needs, while organizing the annually scheduled regular training programs. We also actively addressed the challenging issues on human resource development, such as to enhance the collaboration with academia and to organize international training for Asian countries. The number of trainees who participated in the domestic regular training courses in 2013 was more than 300 persons. Besides these regular courses, we also organized the special training courses based on the outside needs, e.g. the training courses on radiation survey and decontamination work in Fukushima prefecture for the subcontracting companies of the Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) working to respond to the TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station accident. JAEA continued its cooperative activities with universities. In respect of the cooperation with graduate school of University of Tokyo, we accepted nuclear major students and cooperatively conducted lectures and practical exercises for one year. In terms of the collaboration network with universities, the joint course was successfully held with six universities through utilizing the remote education system. Furthermore, the intensive course at Okayama University, University of Fukui, and practical exercise at Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories of JAEA were also conducted. In respect of International training, we continuously implemented the Instructor Training Program (ITP) by receiving the annual sponsorship from Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology. In fiscal year 2013, eight countries (i.e. Bangladesh, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Malaysia, Mongolia, Philippines, Thailand, Vietnam) joined this Instructor training courses. Furthermore, we organized nuclear

  6. Annual report of Nuclear Human Resource Development Center. April 1, 2010 - March 31, 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-03-01

    This annual report summarizes the activities of Nuclear Human Resource Development Center (NuHRDeC) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) in the fiscal year 2010. In this fiscal year, NuHRDeC flexibly designed and conducted as need training courses upon requests while conducting the annually scheduled training programs, and actively addressed the challenge of human resource development, such as to enhance the collaboration with academia and to expand the number of participating countries for international training. The number of trainees who completed the domestic training courses in 2010 was slightly increased to 340, which is 6 percent more than the previous year. The number of those who completed the staff technical training courses was 879 in 2010, which is 12 percent more than the previous year. As a result, the total number of trainees during this period is about 10 percent more than the previous year. In order to correspond with the needs from outside of JAEA, four temporary courses were held upon the request from Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency (NISA), Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI). JAEA continued its cooperative activities with universities; cooperation with graduate school of University of Tokyo, and the cooperative graduate school program was enlarged to cooperate with totally 19 graduate schools, one faculty of undergraduate school, and one technical college, including the newly joined 1 graduate school in 2010. JAEA also continued cooperative activities with Nuclear HRD Program initiated by MEXT and METI in 2007. The joint course has continued networking with six universities through utilizing the remote education system, Japan Nuclear Education Network (JNEN), and special lectures, summer and winter practice were also conducted. In respect of International training, NuHRDeC continuously implemented the Instructor Training Program (ITP) by receiving the annual sponsorship from MEXT. In fiscal year 2010, four countries (Bangladesh

  7. Annual report of Nuclear Human Resource Development Center. April 1, 2012 - March 31, 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-03-01

    This annual report summarizes the activities of Nuclear Human Resource Development Center (NuHRDeC) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) in the fiscal year 2012. In this fiscal year, we flexibly designed training courses corresponding with the needs from outside, while organizing the annually scheduled training programs, and also actively addressed the challenging issues on human resource development, such as to enhance the collaboration with academia and to organize international training for Asian countries. The number of trainees who completed the domestic training courses in 2012 was increased to 525, which is 30 percent more than the previous year. And also, in order to respond to the Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO)'s Fukushima No.1 nuclear power plant accident, we also organized the special training courses on radiation survey for the subcontracting companies working with TEPCO, and the training courses on decontamination work for the construction companies in Fukushima prefecture. The total number of attendees in these special courses was more than 4,000 persons. JAEA continued its cooperative activities with universities. In respect of the cooperation with graduate school of University of Tokyo, we accepted 14 students and cooperatively conducted practical exercises for nuclear major. Furthermore, we also actively continued cooperation on practical exercises for students of universities which were signed in Nuclear HRD Program. In terms of the collaboration network with universities, the joint course was held with six universities through utilizing the remote education system. Furthermore, the intensive course at Okayama University, Fukui University, and practical exercise at Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories of JAEA were also conducted. In respect of International training, NuHRDeC continuously implemented the Instructor Training Program (ITP) by receiving the annual sponsorship from MEXT. In fiscal year 2012, eight countries (i

  8. Development and application of the electrochemical etching technique. Annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-08-01

    This annual progress report documents further advances in the development and application of electrochemical etching of polycarbonate foils (ECEPF) for fast, intermediate, and thermal neutron dosimetry as well as alpha particle dosimetry. The fast (> 1.1 MeV) and thermal neutron dosimetry techniques were applied to a thorough investigation of the neutron contamination inherent in and about the primary x-ray beam of several medical therapy electron accelerators. Because of the small size of ECEPF dosimeters in comparison to other neutron meters, they have an unusually low perturbation of the radiation field under measurement. Due to this small size and the increased sensitivity of the ECEPF dosimeter over current techniques of measuring neutrons in a high photon field, the fast neutron contamination in the primary x-ray beam of all the investigated accelerators was measured with precision and found to be greater than that suggested by the other, more common, neutron dosimetry methods

  9. Development and application of the electrochemical etching technique. Annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-08-01

    This annual progress report documents further advances in the development and application of electrochemical etching of polycarbonate foils (ECEPF) for fast, intermediate, and thermal neutron dosimetry as well as alpha particle dosimetry. The fast (> 1.1 MeV) and thermal neutron dosimetry techniques were applied to a thorough investigation of the neutron contamination inherent in and about the primary x-ray beam of several medical therapy electron accelerators. Because of the small size of ECEPF dosimeters in comparison to other neutron meters, they have an unusually low perturbation of the radiation field under measurement. Due to this small size and the increased sensitivity of the ECEPF dosimeter over current techniques of measuring neutrons in a high photon field, the fast neutron contamination in the primary x-ray beam of all the investigated accelerators was measured with precision and found to be greater than that suggested by the other, more common, neutron dosimetry methods.

  10. ES12; The 24th Annual Workshop on Recent Developments in Electronic Structure Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzwarth, Natalie [Wake Forest Univ., Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Thonhauser, Timo [Wake Forest Univ., Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Salam, Akbar [Wake Forest Univ., Winston-Salem, NC (United States)

    2012-06-29

    ES12: The 24th Annual Workshop on Recent Developments in Electronic Structure Theory was held June 5-8, 2012 at Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, NC 27109. The program consisted of 24 oral presentations, 70 posters, and 2 panel discussions. The attendance of the Workshop was comparable to or larger than previous workshops and participation was impressively diverse. The 136 participants came from all over the world and included undergraduate students, graduate students, postdoctoral researchers, and senior scientists. The general assessment of the Workshop was extremely positive in terms of the high level of scientific presentations and discussions, and in terms of the schedule, accommodations, and affordability of the meeting.

  11. Update On The Development Of DArT Markers And 454-Sequencing In Festuca/Lolium And Phleum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandve, Simen R; Bartos, Jan; Kopecky, David

    Development of genomic resources in perennial grasses for high-throughput applications in genomic research and plant breeding has lagged behind most other crops. The predicted climate changes create novel patterns of biotic and abiotic stresses. Efficient characterization and utilization of genetic...... resources for developing improved cultivars adapted to the future climates depend on modern genomic resources. We will describe our recent activity in developing genomic resources for Festuca/Lolium and Phleum. These resources include the development and mapping of DArT-markers in Festuca pratensis...

  12. In silico polymorphism analysis for the development of simple sequence repeat and transposon markers and construction of linkage map in cultivated peanut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirasawa Kenta

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peanut (Arachis hypogaea is an autogamous allotetraploid legume (2n = 4x = 40 that is widely cultivated as a food and oil crop. More than 6,000 DNA markers have been developed in Arachis spp., but high-density linkage maps useful for genetics, genomics, and breeding have not been constructed due to extremely low genetic diversity. Polymorphic marker loci are useful for the construction of such high-density linkage maps. The present study used in silico analysis to develop simple sequence repeat-based and transposon-based markers. Results The use of in silico analysis increased the efficiency of polymorphic marker development by more than 3-fold. In total, 926 (34.2% of 2,702 markers showed polymorphisms between parental lines of the mapping population. Linkage analysis of the 926 markers along with 253 polymorphic markers selected from 4,449 published markers generated 21 linkage groups covering 2,166.4 cM with 1,114 loci. Based on the map thus produced, 23 quantitative trait loci (QTLs for 15 agronomical traits were detected. Another linkage map with 326 loci was also constructed and revealed a relationship between the genotypes of the FAD2 genes and the ratio of oleic/linoleic acid in peanut seed. Conclusions In silico analysis of polymorphisms increased the efficiency of polymorphic marker development, and contributed to the construction of high-density linkage maps in cultivated peanut. The resultant maps were applicable to QTL analysis. Marker subsets and linkage maps developed in this study should be useful for genetics, genomics, and breeding in Arachis. The data are available at the Kazusa DNA Marker Database (http://marker.kazusa.or.jp.

  13. Annual report of Nuclear Human Resource Development Center. April 1, 2015 - March 31, 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-07-01

    This annual report summarizes the activities of Nuclear Human Resource Development Center (NuHRDeC) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) in the fiscal year (FY) 2015. In FY 2015, we were actively engaged in organizing special training courses in response to external training needs, cooperating with universities, and offering international training courses for Asian countries in addition to the regular training programs at NuHRDeC. In accordance to the annual plan for national training, we conducted training courses for radioisotopes and radiation engineers, nuclear energy engineers, and national qualification examinations, as well as for officials in Nuclear Regulatory Authority and prefectural and municipal officials in Fukushima as outreach activities in order to meet the training needs from the external organizations. We continued to enhance cooperative activities with universities, such as the acceptance of postdoctoral researchers, the cooperation according to the cooperative graduate school system, including the acceptance of students from Nuclear Professional School of University of Tokyo. Furthermore, through utilizing the remote education system, the joint course was successfully held with seven universities, and the intensive summer course and the practical exercise at Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories were also conducted as part of the collaboration network with universities. The Instructor Training Program (ITP) was continually offered to the ITP participating countries (Bangladesh, China, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Malaysia, Mongolia, Philippines, Saudi Arabia, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Turkey and Viet Nam) in FY2015 under contact with Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology. As part of the ITP, the Instructor Training Course and the Nuclear Technology Seminar were organized at NuHRDeC such as “Reactor Engineering Course” and “Basic Radiation Knowledge for School Education Seminar”. Eight and eleven countries

  14. Developing and testing a global-scale regression model to quantify mean annual streamflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbarossa, Valerio; Huijbregts, Mark A. J.; Hendriks, A. Jan; Beusen, Arthur H. W.; Clavreul, Julie; King, Henry; Schipper, Aafke M.

    2017-01-01

    Quantifying mean annual flow of rivers (MAF) at ungauged sites is essential for assessments of global water supply, ecosystem integrity and water footprints. MAF can be quantified with spatially explicit process-based models, which might be overly time-consuming and data-intensive for this purpose, or with empirical regression models that predict MAF based on climate and catchment characteristics. Yet, regression models have mostly been developed at a regional scale and the extent to which they can be extrapolated to other regions is not known. In this study, we developed a global-scale regression model for MAF based on a dataset unprecedented in size, using observations of discharge and catchment characteristics from 1885 catchments worldwide, measuring between 2 and 106 km2. In addition, we compared the performance of the regression model with the predictive ability of the spatially explicit global hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB by comparing results from both models to independent measurements. We obtained a regression model explaining 89% of the variance in MAF based on catchment area and catchment averaged mean annual precipitation and air temperature, slope and elevation. The regression model performed better than PCR-GLOBWB for the prediction of MAF, as root-mean-square error (RMSE) values were lower (0.29-0.38 compared to 0.49-0.57) and the modified index of agreement (d) was higher (0.80-0.83 compared to 0.72-0.75). Our regression model can be applied globally to estimate MAF at any point of the river network, thus providing a feasible alternative to spatially explicit process-based global hydrological models.

  15. Identification of mitochondrial DNA sequence variation and development of single nucleotide polymorphic markers for CMS-D8 in cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Hideaki; Yu, Jiwen; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Jinfa

    2013-06-01

    Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS), which is a maternally inherited trait and controlled by novel chimeric genes in the mitochondrial genome, plays a pivotal role in the production of hybrid seed. In cotton, no PCR-based marker has been developed to discriminate CMS-D8 (from Gossypium trilobum) from its normal Upland cotton (AD1, Gossypium hirsutum) cytoplasm. The objective of the current study was to develop PCR-based single nucleotide polymorphic (SNP) markers from mitochondrial genes for the CMS-D8 cytoplasm. DNA sequence variation in mitochondrial genes involved in the oxidative phosphorylation chain including ATP synthase subunit 1, 4, 6, 8 and 9, and cytochrome c oxidase 1, 2 and 3 subunits were identified by comparing CMS-D8, its isogenic maintainer and restorer lines on the same nuclear genetic background. An allelic specific PCR (AS-PCR) was utilized for SNP typing by incorporating artificial mismatched nucleotides into the third or fourth base from the 3' terminus in both the specific and nonspecific primers. The result indicated that the method modifying allele-specific primers was successful in obtaining eight SNP markers out of eight SNPs using eight primer pairs to discriminate two alleles between AD1 and CMS-D8 cytoplasms. Two of the SNPs for atp1 and cox1 could also be used in combination to discriminate between CMS-D8 and CMS-D2 cytoplasms. Additionally, a PCR-based marker from a nine nucleotide insertion-deletion (InDel) sequence (AATTGTTTT) at the 59-67 bp positions from the start codon of atp6, which is present in the CMS and restorer lines with the D8 cytoplasm but absent in the maintainer line with the AD1 cytoplasm, was also developed. A SNP marker for two nucleotide substitutions (AA in AD1 cytoplasm to CT in CMS-D8 cytoplasm) in the intron (1,506 bp) of cox2 gene was also developed. These PCR-based SNP markers should be useful in discriminating CMS-D8 and AD1 cytoplasms, or those with CMS-D2 cytoplasm as a rapid, simple, inexpensive, and

  16. Development of EST-SSR markers for Elaeocarpus photiniifolia (Elaeocarpaceae), an endemic taxon of the Bonin Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugai, Kyoko; Setsuko, Suzuki; Uchiyama, Kentaro; Murakami, Noriaki; Kato, Hidetoshi; Yoshimaru, Hiroshi

    2012-02-01

    Expressed sequence tag (EST)-derived microsatellite markers were developed for Elaeocarpus photiniifolia, an endemic taxon of the Bonin Islands. Initially, a complementary DNA (cDNA) library was constructed by de novo pyrosequencing of total RNA extracted from a seedling. A total of 267 primer pairs were designed from the library. Of the 48 tested loci, 25 loci were polymorphic among 41 individuals representing the entire geographical range of the species, with the number of alleles per locus and expected heterozygosity ranging from two to 14 and 0.09 to 0.86, respectively. Most loci were transferable to a related species, E. sylvestris. The developed markers will be useful for evaluating the genetic structure of E. photiniifolia.

  17. Development, characterization and cross species amplification of polymorphic microsatellite markers from expressed sequence tags of turmeric (Curcuma longa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siju, S; Dhanya, K; Syamkumar, S; Sasikumar, B; Sheeja, T E; Bhat, A I; Parthasarathy, V A

    2010-02-01

    Expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from turmeric (Curcuma longa L.) were used for the screening of type and frequency of Class I (hypervariable) simple sequence repeats (SSRs). A total of 231 microsatellite repeats were detected from 12,593 EST sequences of turmeric after redundancy elimination. The average density of Class I SSRs accounts to one SSR per 17.96 kb of EST. Mononucleotides were the most abundant class of microsatellite repeat in turmeric ESTs followed by trinucleotides. A robust set of 17 polymorphic EST-SSRs were developed and used for evaluating 20 turmeric accessions. The number of alleles detected ranged from 3 to 8 per loci. The developed markers were also evaluated in 13 related species of C. longa confirming high rate (100%) of cross species transferability. The polymorphic microsatellite markers generated from this study could be used for genetic diversity analysis and resolving the taxonomic confusion prevailing in the genus.

  18. Application of next-generation sequencing for rapid marker development in molecular plant breeding: a case study on anthracnose disease resistance in Lupinus angustifolius L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Huaan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the last 30 years, a number of DNA fingerprinting methods such as RFLP, RAPD, AFLP, SSR, DArT, have been extensively used in marker development for molecular plant breeding. However, it remains a daunting task to identify highly polymorphic and closely linked molecular markers for a target trait for molecular marker-assisted selection. The next-generation sequencing (NGS technology is far more powerful than any existing generic DNA fingerprinting methods in generating DNA markers. In this study, we employed a grain legume crop Lupinus angustifolius (lupin as a test case, and examined the utility of an NGS-based method of RAD (restriction-site associated DNA sequencing as DNA fingerprinting for rapid, cost-effective marker development tagging a disease resistance gene for molecular breeding. Results Twenty informative plants from a cross of RxS (disease resistant x susceptible in lupin were subjected to RAD single-end sequencing by multiplex identifiers. The entire RAD sequencing products were resolved in two lanes of the 16-lanes per run sequencing platform Solexa HiSeq2000. A total of 185 million raw reads, approximately 17 Gb of sequencing data, were collected. Sequence comparison among the 20 test plants discovered 8207 SNP markers. Filtration of DNA sequencing data with marker identification parameters resulted in the discovery of 38 molecular markers linked to the disease resistance gene Lanr1. Five randomly selected markers were converted into cost-effective, simple PCR-based markers. Linkage analysis using marker genotyping data and disease resistance phenotyping data on a F8 population consisting of 186 individual plants confirmed that all these five markers were linked to the R gene. Two of these newly developed sequence-specific PCR markers, AnSeq3 and AnSeq4, flanked the target R gene at a genetic distance of 0.9 centiMorgan (cM, and are now replacing the markers previously developed by a traditional DNA

  19. Development of a swine-specific fecal pollution marker based on host differences in methanogen mcrA genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ufnar, Jennifer A; Ufnar, David F; Wang, Shiao Y; Ellender, R D

    2007-08-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate methanogen diversity in animal hosts to develop a swine-specific archaeal molecular marker for fecal source tracking in surface waters. Phylogenetic analysis of swine mcrA sequences compared to mcrA sequences from the feces of five animals (cow, deer, sheep, horse, and chicken) and sewage showed four distinct swine clusters, with three swine-specific clades. From this analysis, six sequences were chosen for molecular marker development and initial testing. Only one mcrA sequence (P23-2) showed specificity for swine and therefore was used for environmental testing. PCR primers for the P23-2 clone mcrA sequence were developed and evaluated for swine specificity. The P23-2 primers amplified products in P23-2 plasmid DNA (100%), pig feces (84%), and swine waste lagoon surface water samples (100%) but did not amplify a product in 47 bacterial and archaeal stock cultures and 477 environmental bacterial isolates and sewage and water samples from a bovine waste lagoon and a polluted creek. Amplification was observed in only one sheep sample out of 260 human and nonswine animal fecal samples. Sequencing of PCR products from pig feces demonstrated 100% similarity to pig mcrA sequence from clone P23-2. The minimal amount of DNA required for the detection was 1 pg for P23-2 plasmid, 1 ng for pig feces, 50 ng for swine waste lagoon surface water, 1 ng for sow waste influent, and 10 ng for lagoon sludge samples. Lower detection limits of 10(-6) g of wet pig feces in 500 ml of phosphate-buffered saline and 10(-4) g of lagoon waste in estuarine water were established for the P23-2 marker. This study was the first to utilize methanogens for the development of a swine-specific fecal contamination marker.

  20. Development of 14 microsatellite markers in the Queensland koala (Phascolarctos cinereus adustus) using next generation sequencing technology

    OpenAIRE

    Ruiz-Rodriguez, Christina T.; Ishida, Yasuko; Greenwood, Alex D.; Roca, Alfred L.

    2014-01-01

    We report the development of 14 new microsatellite markers in the Queensland koala (Phascolarctos cinereus adustus). Ten unrelated Queensland koala individuals from the San Diego Zoo, USA, were genotyped. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 2 to 7, with an average of 5.14 alleles per locus. Across all loci, the average observed and expected heterozygosity values were both 0.69. These polymorphic microsatellite loci will be useful for genetic studies relevant to the conservation of the...

  1. Post-translational modifications of the extracellular matrix are key events in cancer progression: opportunities for biochemical marker development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leeming, D J; Bay-Jensen, A C; Vassiliadis, E

    2011-01-01

    -associated extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Furthermore, severe cellular stress and inflammation, caused by cancer, results in generation of PTMs, which will be distributed throughout the ECM. This gives rise to release of protein-specific fragments to the circulation. Here we highlight the importance of remodeling...... of the ECM in cancer and the generation of PTMs, which may be cancer specific and reflect disease progression; thus having potential for biochemical marker development....

  2. Bone turnover markers during pubertal development: relationships with growth factors and adipocytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jürimäe, Jaak; Mäestu, Jarek; Jürimäe, Toivo

    2010-01-01

    The rapid increase in skeletal mass that occurs during puberty is caused by increases in longitudinal growth as well as cortical thickness. The measurement of growth changes during puberty using two-dimensional (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry) and/or three-dimensional (computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging) measurement devices provides only a static representation of bone tissue parameters. The measurement of bone turnover markers provides a more dynamic picture of the nature of bone tissue that can be repeated at much shorter intervals during puberty. The bone turnover markers are products of osteoblasts and osteoclasts which can be measured in urine or blood. The increase in different markers of bone turnover coincides with the pubertal growth spurt and thereafter markers decline until they converge into adult values. The initiation of puberty is accompanied by increases in androgens and estrogens. The effects of sex hormones on bone mineral accrual are mediated mainly by growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-1, but they also exert a direct effect on bone metabolism. Important determinants of bone mineral accrual during puberty include optimal nutritional status, body composition parameters and physical activity pattern. All of these determinants are related to the state of energy balance, while peripheral indicators of energy balance, such as different growth factors and adipocytokines, may also have a positive influence of the growing skeleton. Taken together, bone mineral accrual during puberty is a complex interaction between physical activity pattern, various body composition parameters, specific growth factors and adipocytokines, and also sex hormones. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ANNUAL REPORT TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY - DECEMBER 2000.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FOX,K.J.

    2000-12-31

    The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and I exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new ''fundable'' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research ''which could lead to new programs, ,projects, and directions'' for the Laboratory. As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community, fostering new science and technology ideas, which is a major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence and a means to address national needs within the overall mission of the DOE and BNL. The LDRD Annual Report contains summaries of all research activities funded during Fiscal Year 2000. The Project Summaries with their accomplishments described in this report reflect the above. Aside from leading to new fundable or promising programs and producing especially noteworthy research, they have resulted in numerous publications in various professional and scientific journals and presentations at meetings and forums. All FY 2000 projects are listed and tabulated in the Project Funding Table. Also included in this Annual Report in Appendix A is a summary of the proposed projects for FY 2001. The BNL LDRD budget authority by DOE in FY 2000 was $6 million. The.actual allocation totaled $5.5 million. The following sections in this report contain the management processes, peer

  4. Genome-Wide Development of MicroRNA-Based SSR Markers in Medicago truncatula with Their Transferability Analysis and Utilization in Related Legume Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Xueyang; Zhang, Zhengshe; Liu, Yisong; Wei, Xingyi; Liu, Zhipeng; Wang, Yanrong; Liu, Wenxian

    2017-11-18

    Microsatellite (simple sequence repeats, SSRs) marker is one of the most widely used markers in marker-assisted breeding. As one type of functional markers, MicroRNA-based SSR (miRNA-SSR) markers have been exploited mainly in animals, but the development and characterization of miRNA-SSR markers in plants are still limited. In the present study, miRNA-SSR markers for Medicago truncatula ( M. truncatula ) were developed and their cross-species transferability in six leguminous species was evaluated. A total of 169 primer pairs were successfully designed from 130 M. truncatula miRNA genes, the majority of which were mononucleotide repeats (70.41%), followed by dinucleotide repeats (14.20%), compound repeats (11.24%) and trinucleotide repeats (4.14%). Functional classification of SSR-containing miRNA genes showed that all targets could be grouped into three Gene Ontology (GO) categories: 17 in biological process, 11 in molecular function, and 14 in cellular component. The miRNA-SSR markers showed high transferability in other six leguminous species, ranged from 74.56% to 90.53%. Furthermore, 25 Mt - miRNA-SSR markers were used to evaluate polymorphisms in 20 alfalfa accessions, and the polymorphism information content (PIC) values ranged from 0.39 to 0.89 with an average of 0.71, the allele number per marker varied from 3 to 18 with an average of 7.88, indicating a high level of informativeness. The present study is the first time developed and characterized of M. truncatula miRNA-SSRs and demonstrated their utility in transferability, these novel markers will be valuable for genetic diversity analysis, marker-assisted selection and genotyping in leguminous species.

  5. Association of incidental emphysema with annual lung function decline and future development of airflow limitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koo HK

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyeon-Kyoung Koo,1 Kwang Nam Jin,2 Deog Kyeom Kim,3 Hee Soon Chung,3 Chang-Hoon Lee3,4 1Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, College of Medicine, Ilsan Paik Hospital, Inje University, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-Do, 2Department of Radiology, Seoul Metropolitan Government – Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, 3Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Seoul Metropolitan Government-Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, 4Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea Objectives: Emphysema is one of the prognostic factors for rapid lung function decline in patients with COPD, but the impact of incidentally detected emphysema on population without spirometric abnormalities has not been evaluated. This study aimed to determine whether emphysema detected upon computed tomography (CT screening would accelerate the rate of lung function decline and influence the possibility of future development of airflow limitation in a population without spirometric abnormalities.Materials and methods: Subjects who participated in a routine screening for health checkup and follow-up pulmonary function tests for at least 3 years between 2004 and 2010 were retrospectively enrolled. The percentage of low-attenuation area below −950 Hounsfield units (%LAA−950 was calculated automatically. A calculated value of %LAA−950 that exceeded 10% was defined as emphysema. Adjusted annual lung function decline was analyzed using random-slope, random-intercept mixed linear regression models.Results: A total of 628 healthy subjects within the normal range of spriometric values were included. Multivariable analysis showed that the emphysema group exhibited a faster decline in forced vital capacity (−33.9 versus −18.8

  6. De novo assembly, gene annotation and marker development using Illumina paired-end transcriptome sequences in celery (Apium graveolens L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Fu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Celery is an increasing popular vegetable species, but limited transcriptome and genomic data hinder the research to it. In addition, a lack of celery molecular markers limits the process of molecular genetic breeding. High-throughput transcriptome sequencing is an efficient method to generate a large transcriptome sequence dataset for gene discovery, molecular marker development and marker-assisted selection breeding. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Celery transcriptomes from four tissues were sequenced using Illumina paired-end sequencing technology. De novo assembling was performed to generate a collection of 42,280 unigenes (average length of 502.6 bp that represent the first transcriptome of the species. 78.43% and 48.93% of the unigenes had significant similarity with proteins in the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI non-redundant protein database (Nr and Swiss-Prot database respectively, and 10,473 (24.77% unigenes were assigned to Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COG. 21,126 (49.97% unigenes harboring Interpro domains were annotated, in which 15,409 (36.45% were assigned to Gene Ontology(GO categories. Additionally, 7,478 unigenes were mapped onto 228 pathways using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Pathway database (KEGG. Large numbers of simple sequence repeats (SSRs were indentified, and then the rate of successful amplication and polymorphism were investigated among 31 celery accessions. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates the feasibility of generating a large scale of sequence information by Illumina paired-end sequencing and efficient assembling. Our results provide a valuable resource for celery research. The developed molecular markers are the foundation of further genetic linkage analysis and gene localization, and they will be essential to accelerate the process of breeding.

  7. Rapid development of microsatellite markers for Callosobruchus chinensis using Illumina paired-end sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can-Xing Duan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The adzuki bean weevil, Callosobruchus chinensis L., is one of the most destructive pests of stored legume seeds such as mungbean, cowpea, and adzuki bean, which usually cause considerable loss in the quantity and quality of stored seeds during transportation and storage. However, a lack of genetic information of this pest results in a series of genetic questions remain largely unknown, including population genetic structure, kinship, biotype abundance, and so on. Co-dominant microsatellite markers offer a great resolving power to determine these events. Here, we report rapid microsatellite isolation from C. chinensis via high-throughput sequencing. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, 94,560,852 quality-filtered and trimmed reads were obtained for the assembly of genome using Illumina paired-end sequencing technology. In total, the genome with total length of 497,124,785 bp, comprising 403,113 high quality contigs was generated with de novo assembly. More than 6800 SSR loci were detected and a suit of 6303 primer pair sequences were designed and 500 of them were randomly selected for validation. Of these, 196 pair of primers, i.e. 39.2%, produced reproducible amplicons that were polymorphic among 8 C. chinensis genotypes collected from different geographical regions. Twenty out of 196 polymorphic SSR markers were used to analyze the genetic diversity of 18 C. chinensis populations. The results showed the twenty SSR loci were highly polymorphic among these populations. CONCLUSIONS: This study presents a first report of genome sequencing and de novo assembly for C. chinensis and demonstrates the feasibility of generating a large scale of sequence information and SSR loci isolation by Illumina paired-end sequencing. Our results provide a valuable resource for C. chinensis research. These novel markers are valuable for future genetic mapping, trait association, genetic structure and kinship among C. chinensis.

  8. Development of STS and CAPS markers for variety identification and genetic diversity analysis of tea germplasm in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chih-Yi; Tsai, You-Zen; Lin, Shun-Fu

    2014-12-01

    Tea (Camellia sinensis) is an important economic crop in Taiwan. Particularly, two major commercial types of tea (Paochong tea and Oolong tea) which are produced in Taiwan are famous around the world, and they must be manufactured with specific cultivars. Nevertheless, many elite cultivars have been illegally introduced to foreign countries. Because of the lower cost, large amount of "Taiwan-type tea" are produced and imported to Taiwan, causing a dramatic damage in the tea industry. It is very urgent to develop the stable, fast and reliable DNA markers for fingerprinting tea cultivars in Taiwan and protecting intellectual property rights for breeders. Furthermore, genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationship evaluations of tea germplasm in Taiwan are imperative for parental selection in the cross-breeding program and avoidance of genetic vulnerability. Two STS and 37 CAPS markers derived from cytoplasmic genome and ESTs of tea have been developed in this study providing a useful tool for distinguishing all investigated germplasm. For identifying 12 prevailing tea cultivars in Taiwan, five core markers, including each one of mitochondria and chloroplast, and three nuclear markers, were developed. Based on principal coordinate analysis and cluster analysis, 55 tea germplasm in Taiwan were divided into three groups: sinensis type (C. sinensis var. sinensis), assamica type (C. sinensis var. assamica) and Taiwan wild species (C. formosensis). The result of genetic diversity analysis revealed that both sinensis (0.44) and assamica (0.41) types had higher genetic diversity than wild species (0.25). The close genetic distance between the first (Chin-Shin-Oolong) and the third (Shy-Jih-Chuen) prevailing cultivars was found, and many recently released varieties are the descents of Chin-Shin-Oolong. This implies the potential risk of genetic vulnerability for tea cultivation in Taiwan. We have successfully developed a tool for tea germplasm discrimination and genetic

  9. Nevada National Security Site: Site-Directed Research and Development (SDRD) Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, Howard A. [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States). Site-Directed Research and Development Program

    2016-04-01

    This report presents results of multiple research projects, new and ongoing, funded under the Site-Directed Research and Development Program for the Nevada National Security Site during federal fiscal year 2015. The Site's legacy capabilities in remote sensing combined with new paradigms for emergency response and consequence management help drive the need to develop advanced aerial sensor platforms. Likewise, dynamic materials science is a critical area of scientific research for which basic physics issues are still unresolved. New methods of characterizing materials in extreme states are vitally needed, and these efforts are paving the way with new knowledge. Projects selected in FY 2015 for the Exploratory Research portfolio exhibit a strong balance of NNSS mission relevance. Geoscience, seismology, and techniques for detecting underground nuclear events are still essential focus areas. Many of the project reports in the second major section of this annual report are ongoing continuations in multi-year lifecycles. Diagnostic techniques for stockpile and nuclear security science figured prominently as well, with a few key efforts coming to fruition, such as phase transition detection. In other areas, modeling efforts toward better understanding plasma focus physics has also started to pay dividends for major program needs.

  10. Nevada Test Site-Directed Research and Development FY 2010 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard Bender, comp.

    2011-04-04

    This annual report of the Site-Directed Research and Development (SDRD) program represents the highly significant R&D accomplishments conducted during fiscal year 2010. This year was noteworthy historically, as the Nevada Test Site was renamed to the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). This change not only recognizes how the site's mission has evolved, but also heralds a future of new challenges and opportunities for the NNSS. In many ways, since its inception in 2002, the SDRD program has helped shape that evolving mission. As we approach 2012, SDRD will also mark a milestone, having completed its first full decade of innovative R&D in support of the site and national security. The program continues to fund advanced science and technology development across traditional Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear security areas such as stockpile stewardship and non-proliferation while also supporting Department of Homeland Security (DHS) needs, and specialized work for government agencies like the Department of Defense (DoD) and others. The NNSS will also contribute technologies in the areas of treaty verification and monitoring, two areas of increasing importance to national security. Keyed to the NNSS's broadened scope, the SDRD program will continue to anticipate and advance R&D projects that will help the NNSS meet forthcoming challenges.

  11. Mapping mean annual and monthly river discharges: geostatistical developments for incorporating river network dependencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauquet, Eric

    2004-01-01

    Regional hydrology is one topic that shows real improvement in partly due to new statistical development and computation facilities. Nevertheless theoretical difficulties for mapping river regime characteristics or recover these features at un gauged location remain because of the nature of the variable under study: river flows are related to a specific area that is defined by the drainage basin, are spatially organised by the river network with upstream-downstream dependencies. Estimations of hydrological descriptors are required for studying links with ecological processes at different spatial scale, from local site where biological or/and water quality data are available to large scale for sustainable development purposes. This presentation aims at describing a method for runoff pattern along the main river network. The approach dedicated to mean annual runoff is based on geostatistical interpolation procedures to which a constraint of water budget has been added. Expansion in Empirical Orthogonal Function has been considered in combination with kriging for interpolating mean monthly discharges. The methodologies are implemented within a Geographical Information System and illustrated by two study cases (two large basins in France). River flow regime descriptors are estimated for basins of more than 50km 2 . Opportunities of collaboration with a partition of France into hydro-eco regions derived from geology and climate considerations is discussed. (Author)

  12. Nevada Natonal Security Site-Directed Research and Development FY 2010 Annual Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, Howard

    2011-01-01

    This annual report of the Site-Directed Research and Development (SDRD) program represents the highly significant R and D accomplishments conducted during fiscal year 2010. This year was noteworthy historically, as the Nevada Test Site was renamed to the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). This change not only recognizes how the site's mission has evolved, but also heralds a future of new challenges and opportunities for the NNSS. In many ways, since its inception in 2002, the SDRD program has helped shape that evolving mission. As we approach 2012, SDRD will also mark a milestone, having completed its first full decade of innovative R and D in support of the site and national security. The program continues to fund advanced science and technology development across traditional Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear security areas such as stockpile stewardship and non-proliferation while also supporting Department of Homeland Security (DHS) needs, and specialized work for government agencies like the Department of Defense (DoD) and others. The NNSS will also contribute technologies in the areas of treaty verification and monitoring, two areas of increasing importance to national security. Keyed to the NNSS's broadened scope, the SDRD program will continue to anticipate and advance R and D projects that will help the NNSS meet forthcoming challenges.

  13. Development of wind turbines for safe operation in alpine environments - Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barber, S.; Abhari, R.

    2009-08-15

    Many favourable sites for wind farms, particularly in the Swiss Alps, are located in cold, wet regions where the build-up of ice is a risk and therefore limits the installation of wind turbines. The aim of this work is to quantify and understand in detail the effects of blade icing on wind turbine performance and to propose mitigation strategies. The project is unique in that it is carried out using a multi-disciplinary approach that combines (1) analysis of field data, (2) controlled experiments on a sub-scale wind turbine model and (3) 3D Computational Fluid Dynamics. In part (1) the wind data and full-scale wind turbine power and icing measurements from the Alpine Test Site Guetsch over one year are analysed. Icing on the blades is estimated to cause approximately a 2% loss in Annual Energy Production (AEP). Other losses due to the particular location of the turbine in complex terrain are found to reduce the expected AEP by up to 23%. These major losses must be further investigated in controlled experiments. The analysis of photographs of ice on the blades, alongside numerical simulations, enables five ice geometries to be defined for Guetsch atmospheric conditions (altitude: 2331 m above sea level). One further 'extreme' ice shape is also defined, which is representative of ice formed on wind turbines installed at lower altitude sites such as the Berne Jura (altitude: 800 to 1500 m). In part (2), experiments are undertaken in the new sub-scale wind turbine test facility at ETH Zuerich using a novel method to quantify performance. The defined ice shapes are attached to the blades and the performance compared. The five shapes representative of the ice formed at Guetsch are found to reduce the Annual Energy Production by up to 2%. However, the 'extreme' ice shape could result in a loss in Annual Energy Production of up to 17%. Furthermore, the presence of ice on the most outboard 5% of the blade is found to be key to performance. Ice removal or

  14. Application of in silico bulked segregant analysis for rapid development of markers linked to Bean common mosaic virus resistance in common bean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Common bean was one of the first crops that benefited from the development and utilization of molecular markers in tagging major disease resistance genes for marker-assisted selection (MAS). Efficiency of MAS breeding in common bean is still hampered; however, due to the dominance, linkage phase, an...

  15. Identification of degenerate nuclei and development of a SCAR marker for Flammulina velutipes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Young Kim

    Full Text Available Flammulina velutipes is one of the major edible mushrooms in the world. Recently, abnormalities that have a negative impact on crop production have been reported in this mushroom. These symptoms include slow vegetative growth, a compact mycelial mat, and few or even no fruiting bodies. The morphologies and fruiting capabilities of monokaryons of wild-type and degenerate strains that arose through arthrospore formation were investigated through test crossing. Only one monokaryotic group of the degenerate strains and its hybrid strains showed abnormal phenotypes. Because the monokaryotic arthrospore has the same nucleus as the parent strain, these results indicated that only one aberrant nucleus of the two nuclei in the degenerate strain was responsible for the degeneracy. A sequence-characterized amplified region marker that is linked to the degenerate monokaryon was identified based on a polymorphic sequence that was generated using random primers. Comparative analyses revealed the presence of a degenerate-specific genomic region in a telomere, which arose via the transfer of a genomic fragment harboring a putative helicase gene. Our findings have narrowed down the potential molecular targets responsible for this phenotype for future studies and have provided a marker for the detection of degenerate strains.

  16. The Development of Three Long Universal Nuclear Protein-Coding Locus Markers and Their Application to Osteichthyan Phylogenetics with Nested PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng

    2012-01-01

    Background Universal nuclear protein-coding locus (NPCL) markers that are applicable across diverse taxa and show good phylogenetic discrimination have broad applications in molecular phylogenetic studies. For example, RAG1, a representative NPCL marker, has been successfully used to make phylogenetic inferences within all major osteichthyan groups. However, such markers with broad working range and high phylogenetic performance are still scarce. It is necessary to develop more universal NPCL markers comparable to RAG1 for osteichthyan phylogenetics. Methodology/Principal Findings We developed three long universal NPCL markers (>1.6 kb each) based on single-copy nuclear genes (KIAA1239, SACS and TTN) that possess large exons and exhibit the appropriate evolutionary rates. We then compared their phylogenetic utilities with that of the reference marker RAG1 in 47 jawed vertebrate species. In comparison with RAG1, each of the three long universal markers yielded similar topologies and branch supports, all in congruence with the currently accepted osteichthyan phylogeny. To compare their phylogenetic performance visually, we also estimated the phylogenetic informativeness (PI) profile for each of the four long universal NPCL markers. The PI curves indicated that SACS performed best over the whole timescale, while RAG1, KIAA1239 and TTN exhibited similar phylogenetic performances. In addition, we compared the success of nested PCR and standard PCR when amplifying NPCL marker fragments. The amplification success rate and efficiency of the nested PCR were overwhelmingly higher than those of standard PCR. Conclusions/Significance Our work clearly demonstrates the superiority of nested PCR over the conventional PCR in phylogenetic studies and develops three long universal NPCL markers (KIAA1239, SACS and TTN) with the nested PCR strategy. The three markers exhibit high phylogenetic utilities in osteichthyan phylogenetics and can be widely used as pilot genes for

  17. De novo characterization of Larimichthys crocea transcriptome for growth-/immune-related gene identification and massive microsatellite (SSR) marker development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhaofang; Xiao, Shijun; Liu, Xiande; Liu, Yang; Li, Jiakai; Xie, Yangjie; Wang, Zhiyong

    2017-03-01

    The large yellow croaker, Larimichthys crocea is an important marine fish in China with a high economic value. In the last decade, the stock conservation and aquaculture industry of this species have been facing severe challenges because of wild population collapse and degeneration of important economic traits. However, genes contributing to growth and immunity in L. crocea have not been thoroughly analyzed, and available molecular markers are still not sufficient for genetic resource management and molecular selection. In this work, we sequenced the transcriptome in L. crocea liver tissue with a Roche 454 sequencing platform and assembled the transcriptome into 93 801 transcripts. Of them, 38 856 transcripts were successfully annotated in nt, nr, Swiss-Prot, InterPro, COG, GO and KEGG databases. Based on the annotation information, 3 165 unigenes related to growth and immunity were identified. Additionally, a total of 6 391 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were identified from the transcriptome, among which 4 498 SSRs had enough flanking regions to design primers for polymerase chain reactions (PCR). To access the polymorphism of these markers, 30 primer pairs were randomly selected for PCR amplification and validation in 30 individuals, and 12 primer pairs (40.0%) exhibited obvious length polymorphisms. This work applied RNA-Seq to assemble and analyze a live transcriptome in L. crocea. With gene annotation and sequence information, genes related to growth and immunity were identified and massive SSR markers were developed, providing valuable genetic resources for future gene functional analysis and selective breeding of L. crocea.

  18. Development of Molecular Markers for Determining Continental Origin of Wood from White Oaks (Quercus L. sect. Quercus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilke Schroeder

    Full Text Available To detect and avoid illegal logging of valuable tree species, identification methods for the origin of timber are necessary. We used next-generation sequencing to identify chloroplast genome regions that differentiate the origin of white oaks from the three continents; Asia, Europe, and North America. By using the chloroplast genome of Asian Q. mongolica as a reference, we identified 861 variant sites (672 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; 189 insertion/deletion (indel polymorphism from representative species of three continents (Q. mongolica from Asia; Q. petraea and Q. robur from Europe; Q. alba from North America, and we identified additional chloroplast polymorphisms in pools of 20 individuals each from Q. mongolica (789 variant sites and Q. robur (346 variant sites. Genome sequences were screened for indels to develop markers that identify continental origin of oak species, and that can be easily evaluated using a variety of detection methods. We identified five indels and one SNP that reliably identify continent-of-origin, based on evaluations of up to 1078 individuals representing 13 white oak species and three continents. Due to the size of length polymorphisms revealed, this marker set can be visualized using capillary electrophoresis or high resolution gel (acrylamide or agarose electrophoresis. With these markers, we provide the wood trading market with an instrument to comply with the U.S. and European laws that require timber companies to avoid the trade of illegally harvested timber.

  19. Development of SSR Markers Based on Transcriptome Sequencing and Association Analysis with Drought Tolerance in Perennial Grass Miscanthus from China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Nie

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Drought has become a critical environmental stress affecting on plant in temperate area. As one of the promising bio-energy crops to sustainable biomass production, the genus Miscanthus has been widely studied around the world. However, the most widely used hybrid cultivar among this genus, Miscanthus × giganteus is proved poor drought tolerance compared to some parental species. Here we mainly focused on Miscanthus sinensis, which is one of the progenitors of M. × giganteus providing a comparable yield and well abiotic stress tolerance in some places. The main objectives were to characterize the physiological and photosynthetic respond to drought stress and to develop simple sequence repeats (SSRs markers associated with drought tolerance by transcriptome sequencing within an originally collection of 44 Miscanthus genotypes from southwest China. Significant phenotypic differences were observed among genotypes, and the average of leaf relative water content (RWC were severely affected by drought stress decreasing from 88.27 to 43.21%, which could well contribute to separating the drought resistant and drought sensitive genotype of Miscanthus. Furthermore, a total of 16,566 gene-associated SSRs markers were identified based on Illumina RNA sequencing under drought conditions, and 93 of them were randomly selected to validate. In total, 70 (75.3% SSRs were successfully amplified and the generated loci from 30 polymorphic SSRs were used to estimate the genetic differentiation and population structure. Finally, two optimum subgroups of the population were determined by structure analysis and based on association analysis, seven significant associations were identified including two markers with leaf RWC and five markers with photosynthetic traits. With the rich sequencing resources annotation, such associations would serve an efficient tool for Miscanthus drought response mechanism study and facilitate genetic improvement of drought resistant for

  20. Impacts of intellectual property rights on marker-assisted selection research and application for agriculture in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henson-Apollonio, V.

    2007-01-01

    Although the impact of marker-assisted selection (MAS) in commercial and public sector breeding programmes in developing countries is to date limited to a few crops and traits, the potential benefits of using markers linked to genes of interest in breeding programmes for improving the productivity of crops, livestock, forest trees and farmed fish is substantial. While more recent methods associated with the use of MAS are technically demanding and often expensive, most applications of basic MAS were initially described in the literature, and thus will likely have very few intellectual property (IP) restrictions associated with their use, irrespective of the agricultural sector involved. For example, isolating DNA, amplifying specific gene sequences from that DNA (with most available primers), separating fragments using gel/polyacrylamide electrophoresis and imaging of fragments with standard techniques are likely to be available without restriction to scientists and breeders in the developing world, even as part of a commercial service. Problems arise when there is a need to use or develop high-throughput modes, which require more sophisticated technologies. For high-throughput use, a breeder will want to use the most efficient techniques that are currently available. This means that the more advanced processes/methods, reagents, software applications/simulations and equipment, which provide the most effective means to exploit MAS fully, are most likely covered by intellectual property rights (IPRs) such as patent rights, confidential information (trade secrets) and copyrights, both in industrialized countries and also in many developing countries such as Brazil, China and India. In situations where breeders wish to use cutting edge technologies and the most efficient markers, care must be taken to avoid activities that may infringe IPRs when using MAS methodologies. (author)

  1. Research, development and demonstration of nickel-zinc batteries for electric vehicle propulsion. Annual report, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-10-01

    This is the first annual report of progress achieved under ANL Contract 31-109-38-4248. It covers the report period from 15 March 1978 to 15 August 1978. The nickel electrode development program is directed at the optimization of the electrical performance, specifically, in terms of increased cycle life. The work concentrated upon both the development of pilot plant facilities to produce nickel hydroxide and upon optimizing the manufacturing processes to produce nickel hydroxide which has high electrochemical utilization. The primary goal of the zinc electrode studies is to increase the cycle life of this electrode. This effort is primarily concentrating on the effect of additives upon shape change and cycle performance and on the mechanistic processes involved in the shape change. The separator effort has as its major goal the development of a low-cost separator which exhibits stability in the electrolyte, has uniform pores which are of a sufficiently small size to impede the growth of zinc dendrites, and exhibits low electrical resistance and good flexibility. The process itself is now optimized for pilot plant manufacture; hundreds of formulations have been produced and subsequently screened in both the laboratory and in actual cells. Promising formulations are presently being subjected to additional characterization tests and life cycles. The goal of the sealed cell studies is to determine the feasibility of sealed-cell operation. Large numbers of 20-Ah cells have been subjected to accelerated testing. These cells incorporated separator variations, active material additives, and internal design variations. Cycle lives up to 150 deep cycles were achieved. Cell failure modes are analyzed. 51 figures, 20 tables.

  2. Development of novel InDel markers and genetic diversity in Chenopodium quinoa through whole-genome re-sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tifu; Gu, Minfeng; Liu, Yuhe; Lv, Yuanda; Zhou, Ling; Lu, Haiyan; Liang, Shuaiqiang; Bao, Huabin; Zhao, Han

    2017-09-05

    Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) is a balanced nutritional crop, but its breeding improvement has been limited by the lack of information on its genetics and genomics. Therefore, it is necessary to obtain knowledge on genomic variation, population structure, and genetic diversity and to develop novel Insertion/Deletion (InDel) markers for quinoa by whole-genome re-sequencing. We re-sequenced 11 quinoa accessions and obtained a coverage depth between approximately 7× to 23× the quinoa genome. Based on the 1453-megabase (Mb) assembly from the reference accession Riobamba, 8,441,022 filtered bi-allelic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 842,783 filtered InDels were identified, with an estimated SNP and InDel density of 5.81 and 0.58 per kilobase (kb). From the genomic InDel variations, 85 dimorphic InDel markers were newly developed and validated. Together with the 62 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers reported, a total of 147 markers were used for genotyping the 129 quinoa accessions. Molecular grouping analysis showed classification into two major groups, the Andean highland (composed of the northern and southern highland subgroups) and Chilean coastal, based on combined STRUCTURE, phylogenetic tree and PCA (Principle Component Analysis) analyses. Further analysis of the genetic diversity exhibited a decreasing tendency from the Chilean coast group to the Andean highland group, and the gene flow between subgroups was more frequent than that between the two subgroups and the Chilean coastal group. The majority of the variations (approximately 70%) were found through an analysis of molecular variation (AMOVA) due to the diversity between the groups. This was congruent with the observation of a highly significant F ST value (0.705) between the groups, demonstrating significant genetic differentiation between the Andean highland type of quinoa and the Chilean coastal type. Moreover, a core set of 16 quinoa germplasms that capture all 362 alleles was

  3. Nevada National Security Site. Site-Directed Research and Development FY 2011 Annual Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, Howard

    2012-01-01

    This fiscal year 2011 annual report of the Site-Directed Research and Development program, the 10th anniversary edition, recognizes a full decade of innovative R and D accomplishments in support of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Last year the NNSS itself was renamed to reflect a diversifying mission, and our R and D program has contributed significantly to shape emerging missions that will continue to evolve. New initiatives in stockpile stewardship science, nonproliferation, and treaty verification and monitoring have had substantial successes in FY 2011, and many more accomplishments are expected. SDRD is the cornerstone on which many of these initiatives rest. Historically supporting our main focus areas, SDRD is also building a solid foundation for new, and non-traditional, emerging national security missions. The program continues its charter to advance science and technology for a broad base of agencies including the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), and many others.

  4. Production of ethanol from refinery waste gases. Phase 2, technology development, annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arora, D.; Basu, R.; Phillips, J.R.; Wikstrom, C.V.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L.

    1995-07-01

    Oil refineries discharge large volumes of H{sub 2}, CO, and CO{sub 2} from cracking, coking, and hydrotreating operations. This program seeks to develop a biological process for converting these waste gases into ethanol, which can be blended with gasoline to reduce emissions. Production of ethanol from all 194 US refineries would save 450 billion BTU annually, would reduce crude oil imports by 110 million barrels/year and emissions by 19 million tons/year. Phase II efforts has yielded at least 3 cultures (Clostridium ljungdahlii, Isolate O-52, Isolate C-01) which are able to produce commercially viable concentrations of ethanol from CO, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2} in petroleum waste gas. Single continuous stirred tank reactor studies have shown that 15-20 g/L of ethanol can be produced, with less than 5 g/L acetic acid byproduct. Culture and reactor optimization in Phase III should yield even higher ethanol concentrations and minimal acetic acid. Product recovery studies showed that ethanol is best recovered in a multi-step process involving solvent extraction/distillation to azeotrope/azeotropic distillation or pervaporation, or direct distillation to the azeotrope/azeotropic distillation or pervaporation. Projections show that the ethanol facility for a typical refinery would require an investment of about $30 million, which would be returned in less than 2 years.

  5. Nevada National Security Site-Directed Research and Development FY 2011 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard Bender, comp.

    2012-04-25

    This fiscal year 2011 annual report of the Site-Directed Research and Development program, the 10th anniversary edition, recognizes a full decade of innovative R&D accomplishments in support of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Last year the NNSS itself was renamed to reflect a diversifying mission, and our R&D program has contributed significantly to shape emerging missions that will continue to evolve. New initiatives in stockpile stewardship science, nonproliferation, and treaty verification and monitoring have had substantial successes in FY 2011, and many more accomplishments are expected. SDRD is the cornerstone on which many of these initiatives rest. Historically supporting our main focus areas, SDRD is also building a solid foundation for new, and non-traditional, emerging national security missions. The program continues its charter to advance science and technology for a broad base of agencies including the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), and many others.

  6. 78 FR 64153 - Policy Statement on the Principles for Development and Distribution of Annual Stress Test Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-28

    .... OCC-2012-0016] Policy Statement on the Principles for Development and Distribution of Annual Stress... the stress test horizon. The variables specified for each scenario generally address economic activity... institutions by November 15th of each year. This document articulates the principles that the OCC will apply to...

  7. Development of 35 novel microsatellite markers for the two-band anemonefish Amphiprion bicinctus

    KAUST Repository

    Nanninga, Gerrit B.; Mughal, Mehreen; Saenz Agudelo, Pablo; Bayer, Till; Berumen, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    To investigate population genetic patterns of the anemonefish Amphiprion bicinctus in the Red Sea, we isolated and characterized 35 microsatellite loci using 454-sequencing. Microsatellite sequences were identified using the Tandem Repeats Finder program. The 35 loci were tested on 80 individuals sampled from two spatially separated populations along the Saudi Arabian Red Sea coast. We found a mean of 10. 9 alleles per locus and observed levels of heterozygosity ranged from 0. 4 to 0. 98. All loci were polymorphic, none deviated significantly from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, no linkage disequilibrium was observed and there was no evidence for -alleles in both populations. The markers reported here constitute the first specific set for this species, and they are expected to contribute to future studies of connectivity in the Red Sea region. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

  8. Development of 35 novel microsatellite markers for the two-band anemonefish Amphiprion bicinctus

    KAUST Repository

    Nanninga, Gerrit B.

    2012-12-18

    To investigate population genetic patterns of the anemonefish Amphiprion bicinctus in the Red Sea, we isolated and characterized 35 microsatellite loci using 454-sequencing. Microsatellite sequences were identified using the Tandem Repeats Finder program. The 35 loci were tested on 80 individuals sampled from two spatially separated populations along the Saudi Arabian Red Sea coast. We found a mean of 10. 9 alleles per locus and observed levels of heterozygosity ranged from 0. 4 to 0. 98. All loci were polymorphic, none deviated significantly from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, no linkage disequilibrium was observed and there was no evidence for -alleles in both populations. The markers reported here constitute the first specific set for this species, and they are expected to contribute to future studies of connectivity in the Red Sea region. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

  9. Development of identification process for insect group using radiation marker DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muraji, M.; Tamura, T.

    2004-01-01

    Detection of a band pattern for insect groups was tried by using radiation marked DNA clone. A rapid segregation process for poly-type DNA segment was investigated. A band pattern of silkworm was detected by analysis using DNA type transposon, K1.4. The exon regions on genes of hemiptera insect were segregated by in vitro cloning. Band patterns of the silkworm and the other insects were detected by identification process of DNA clone and radiation marker. Family singularity mutation existed in the inserted position of transposon. The family of insect was identified easily by the difference of the detection band patterns. Effective band pattern for family discrimination were obtained by analysis for a part of mitochondria DNA and ribosomal DNA. DNA segregation process was investigated by using the enriched library, also. (M. Suetake)

  10. Development and validation of cross-transferable and polymorphic DNA markers for detecting alien genome introgression in Oryza sativa from Oryza brachyantha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Soham; Bose, Lotan K; Ray, Joshitha; Ngangkham, Umakanta; Katara, Jawahar L; Samantaray, Sanghamitra; Behera, Lambodar; Anumalla, Mahender; Singh, Onkar N; Chen, Meingsheng; Wing, Rod A; Mohapatra, Trilochan

    2016-08-01

    African wild rice Oryza brachyantha (FF), a distant relative of cultivated rice Oryza sativa (AA), carries genes for pests and disease resistance. Molecular marker assisted alien gene introgression from this wild species to its domesticated counterpart is largely impeded due to the scarce availability of cross-transferable and polymorphic molecular markers that can clearly distinguish these two species. Availability of the whole genome sequence (WGS) of both the species provides a unique opportunity to develop markers, which are cross-transferable. We observed poor cross-transferability (~0.75 %) of O. sativa specific sequence tagged microsatellite (STMS) markers to O. brachyantha. By utilizing the genome sequence information, we developed a set of 45 low cost PCR based co-dominant polymorphic markers (STS and CAPS). These markers were found cross-transferrable (84.78 %) between the two species and could distinguish them from each other and thus allowed tracing alien genome introgression. Finally, we validated a Monosomic Alien Addition Line (MAAL) carrying chromosome 1 of O. brachyantha in O. sativa background using these markers, as a proof of concept. Hence, in this study, we have identified a set molecular marker (comprising of STMS, STS and CAPS) that are capable of detecting alien genome introgression from O. brachyantha to O. sativa.

  11. Development of molecular markers for zebrafish (Danio rerio) ovarian follicle growth assessment following in-vitro culture in cryopreservation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anil, Siji; Rawson, David; Zhang, Tiantian

    2018-05-29

    Development of in vitro culture protocol for early stage ovarian follicles of zebrafish is important since cryopreserved early stage ovarian follicles would need to be matured in vitro following cryopreservation before they can be fertilised. Development of molecular markers for zebrafish (Danio rerio) ovarian follicle growth assessment following in vitro culture of early stage zebrafish ovarian follicles in ovarian tissue fragments is reported here for the first time although some work has been reported for in vitro culture of isolated early stage zebrafish ovarian follicles. The main aim of the present study was to develop molecular markers in an optimised in vitro culture protocol for stage I and stage II zebrafish ovarian follicles in ovarian tissue fragments. The effect of concentration of the hormones human chorionic gonadotropin and follicle stimulating hormones, and additives such as Foetal Bovine Serum and Bovine Serum Albumin were studied. The results showed that early stage zebrafish ovarian fragments containing stage I and stage II follicles which are cultured in vitro for 24 h in 20% FBS and 100mIU/ml FSH in 90% L-15 medium at 28 °C can grow to the size of stage II and stage III ovarian follicles respectively. More importantly the follicle growth from stage I to stage II and from stage II to stage III were confirmed using molecular markers such as cyp19a1a (also known as P450aromA) and vtg1 genes respectively. However, no follicle growth was observed following cryopreservation and in vitro culture. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Hydrothermal processing of Hanford tank waste. Organic destruction technology development task annual report -- FY 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orth, R.J.; Schmidt, A.J.; Zacher, A.H.

    1993-09-01

    Low-temperature hydrothermal processing (HTP) is a thermal-chemical autogenous processing method that can be used to destroy organics and ferrocyanide in Hanford tank waste at temperatures from 250 C to 400 C. With HTP, organics react with oxidants, such as nitrite and nitrate, already present in the waste. Ferrocyanides and free cyanide will hydrolyze at similar temperatures and may also react with nitrates or other oxidants in the waste. No air or oxygen or additional chemicals need to be added to the autogenous HTP system. However, enhanced kinetics may be realized by air addition, and, if desired, chemical reductants can be added to the system to facilitate complete nitrate/nitrate destruction. Tank waste can be processed in a plug-flow, tubular reactor, or a continuous-stirred tank reactor system designed to accommodate the temperature, pressure, gas generation, and heat release associated with decomposition of the reactive species. The work described in this annual report was conducted in FY 1993 for the Organic Destruction Technology Development Task of Hanford's Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS). This task is part of an overall program to develop organic destruction technologies originally funded by TWRS to meet tank safety and waste form disposal criteria and condition the feed for further pretreatment. During FY 1993 the project completed seven experimental test plans, a 30-hr pilot-scale continuous run, over 200 hr of continuous bench-scale HTP testing, and 20 batch HTP tests; two contracts were established with commercial vendors, and a commercial laboratory reactor was procured and installed in a glovebox for HTP testing with actual Hanford tank waste

  13. Development of 14 microsatellite markers in the Queensland koala (Phascolarctos cinereus adustus) using next generation sequencing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Rodriguez, Christina T; Ishida, Yasuko; Greenwood, Alex D; Roca, Alfred L

    2014-06-01

    We report the development of 14 new microsatellite markers in the Queensland koala ( Phascolarctos cinereus adustus ). Ten unrelated Queensland koala individuals from the San Diego Zoo, USA, were genotyped. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 2 to 7, with an average of 5.14 alleles per locus. Across all loci, the average observed and expected heterozygosity values were both 0.69. These polymorphic microsatellite loci will be useful for genetic studies relevant to the conservation of the koala, a species listed as vulnerable.

  14. Characterization of the global transcriptome for Pyropia haitanensis (Bangiales, Rhodophyta) and development of cSSR markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Chaotian; Li, Bing; Xu, Yan; Ji, Dehua; Chen, Changsheng

    2013-02-16

    Pyropia haitanensis is an economically important mariculture crop in China and is also valuable in life science research. However, the lack of genetic information of this organism hinders the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of specific traits. Thus, high-throughput sequencing is needed to generate a number of transcriptome sequences to be used for gene discovery and molecular marker development. In this study, high-throughput sequencing was used to analyze the global transcriptome of P. haitanensis. Approximately 103 million 90 bp paired-end reads were generated using an Illumina HiSeq 2000. De novo assembly with paired-end information yielded 24,575 unigenes with an average length of 645 bp. Based on sequence similarity searches with known proteins, a total of 16,377 (66.64%) genes were identified. Of these annotated unigenes, 5,471 and 9,168 unigenes were assigned to gene ontology and clusters of orthologous groups, respectively. Searching against the KEGG database indicated that 12,167 (49.51%) unigenes mapped to 124 KEGG pathways. Among the carbon fixation pathways, almost all the essential genes related to the C3- and C4-pathways for P. haitanensis were discovered. Significantly different expression levels of three key genes (Rubisco, PEPC and PEPCK) in different lifecycle stages of P. haitanensis indicated that the carbon fixation pathway in the conchocelis and thallus were different, and the C4-like pathway might play important roles in the conchocelis stage. In addition, 2,727 cSSRs loci were identified in the unigenes. Among them, trinucleotide SSRs were the dominant repeat motif (87.17%, 2,377) and GCC/CCG motifs were the most common repeats (60.07%, 1,638). High quality primers to 824 loci were designed and 100 primer pairs were randomly evaluated in six strains of P. haitanensis. Eighty-seven primer pairs successfully yielded amplicons. This study generated a large number of putative P. haitanensis transcript sequences, which can be used for

  15. Development of Selectable Marker-Free Transgenic Rice Plants with Enhanced Seed Tocopherol Content through FLP/FRT-Mediated Spontaneous Auto-Excision.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee-Jong Woo

    Full Text Available Development of marker-free transgenic plants is a technical alternative for avoiding concerns about the safety of selectable marker genes used in genetically modified (GM crops. Here, we describe the construction of a spontaneous self-excision binary vector using an oxidative stress-inducible modified FLP/FRT system and its successful application to produce marker-free transgenic rice plants with enhanced seed tocopherol content. To generate selectable marker-free transgenic rice plants, we constructed a binary vector using the hpt selectable marker gene and the rice codon-optimized FLP (mFLP gene under the control of an oxidative stress-inducible promoter between two FRT sites, along with multiple cloning sites for convenient cloning of genes of interest. Using this pCMF binary vector with the NtTC gene, marker-free T1 transgenic rice plants expressing NtTC were produced by Agrobacterium-mediated stable transformation using hygromycin as a selective agent, followed by segregation of selectable marker genes. Furthermore, α-, γ-, and total tocopherol levels were significantly increased in seeds of the marker-free transgenic TC line compared with those of wild-type plants. Thus, this spontaneous auto-excision system, incorporating an oxidative stress-inducible mFLP/FRT system to eliminate the selectable marker gene, can be easily adopted and used to efficiently generate marker-free transgenic rice plants. Moreover, nutritional enhancement of rice seeds through elevation of tocopherol content coupled with this marker-free strategy may improve human health and public acceptance of GM rice.

  16. Development of Selectable Marker-Free Transgenic Rice Plants with Enhanced Seed Tocopherol Content through FLP/FRT-Mediated Spontaneous Auto-Excision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Hee-Jong; Qin, Yang; Park, Soo-Yun; Park, Soon Ki; Cho, Yong-Gu; Shin, Kong-Sik; Lim, Myung-Ho; Cho, Hyun-Suk

    2015-01-01

    Development of marker-free transgenic plants is a technical alternative for avoiding concerns about the safety of selectable marker genes used in genetically modified (GM) crops. Here, we describe the construction of a spontaneous self-excision binary vector using an oxidative stress-inducible modified FLP/FRT system and its successful application to produce marker-free transgenic rice plants with enhanced seed tocopherol content. To generate selectable marker-free transgenic rice plants, we constructed a binary vector using the hpt selectable marker gene and the rice codon-optimized FLP (mFLP) gene under the control of an oxidative stress-inducible promoter between two FRT sites, along with multiple cloning sites for convenient cloning of genes of interest. Using this pCMF binary vector with the NtTC gene, marker-free T1 transgenic rice plants expressing NtTC were produced by Agrobacterium-mediated stable transformation using hygromycin as a selective agent, followed by segregation of selectable marker genes. Furthermore, α-, γ-, and total tocopherol levels were significantly increased in seeds of the marker-free transgenic TC line compared with those of wild-type plants. Thus, this spontaneous auto-excision system, incorporating an oxidative stress-inducible mFLP/FRT system to eliminate the selectable marker gene, can be easily adopted and used to efficiently generate marker-free transgenic rice plants. Moreover, nutritional enhancement of rice seeds through elevation of tocopherol content coupled with this marker-free strategy may improve human health and public acceptance of GM rice.

  17. Development of novel SSR markers for evaluation of genetic diversity and population structure in Tribulus terrestris L. (Zygophyllaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Kuljit; Sharma, Vikas; Singh, Vijay; Wani, Mohammad Saleem; Gupta, Raghbir Chand

    2016-12-01

    Tribulus terrestris L., commonly called puncture vine and gokhru, is an important member of Zygophyllaceae. The species is highly important in context to therapeutic uses and provides important active principles responsible for treatment of various diseases and also used as tonic. It is widely distributed in tropical regions of India and the world. However, status of its genetic diversity remained concealed due to lack of research work in this species. In present study, genetic diversity and structure of different populations of T. terrestris from north India was examined at molecular level using newly developed Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) markers. In total, 20 primers produced 48 alleles in a size range of 100-500 bp with maximum (4) fragments amplified by TTMS-1, TTMS-25 and TTMS-33. Mean Polymorphism Information Content (PIC) and Marker Index (MI) were 0.368 and 1.01, respectively. Dendrogram showed three groups, one of which was purely containing accessions from Rajasthan while other two groups corresponded to Punjab and Haryana regions with intermixing of few other accessions. Analysis of molecular variance partitioned 76 % genetic variance within populations and 24 % among populations. Bayesian model based STRUCTURE analysis detected two genetic stocks for analyzed germplasm and also detected some admixed individuals. Different geographical populations of this species showed high level of genetic diversity. Results of present study can be useful in identifying diverse accessions and management of this plant resource. Moreover, the novel SSR markers developed can be utilized for various genetic analyses in this species in future.

  18. Diversity analysis in Cannabis sativa based on large-scale development of expressed sequence tag-derived simple sequence repeat markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chunsheng; Xin, Pengfei; Cheng, Chaohua; Tang, Qing; Chen, Ping; Wang, Changbiao; Zang, Gonggu; Zhao, Lining

    2014-01-01

    Cannabis sativa L. is an important economic plant for the production of food, fiber, oils, and intoxicants. However, lack of sufficient simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers has limited the development of cannabis genetic research. Here, large-scale development of expressed sequence tag simple sequence repeat (EST-SSR) markers was performed to obtain more informative genetic markers, and to assess genetic diversity in cannabis (Cannabis sativa L.). Based on the cannabis transcriptome, 4,577 SSRs were identified from 3,624 ESTs. From there, a total of 3,442 complementary primer pairs were designed as SSR markers. Among these markers, trinucleotide repeat motifs (50.99%) were the most abundant, followed by hexanucleotide (25.13%), dinucleotide (16.34%), tetranucloetide (3.8%), and pentanucleotide (3.74%) repeat motifs, respectively. The AAG/CTT trinucleotide repeat (17.96%) was the most abundant motif detected in the SSRs. One hundred and seventeen EST-SSR markers were randomly selected to evaluate primer quality in 24 cannabis varieties. Among these 117 markers, 108 (92.31%) were successfully amplified and 87 (74.36%) were polymorphic. Forty-five polymorphic primer pairs were selected to evaluate genetic diversity and relatedness among the 115 cannabis genotypes. The results showed that 115 varieties could be divided into 4 groups primarily based on geography: Northern China, Europe, Central China, and Southern China. Moreover, the coefficient of similarity when comparing cannabis from Northern China with the European group cannabis was higher than that when comparing with cannabis from the other two groups, owing to a similar climate. This study outlines the first large-scale development of SSR markers for cannabis. These data may serve as a foundation for the development of genetic linkage, quantitative trait loci mapping, and marker-assisted breeding of cannabis.

  19. Development and management of the knowledge base for the geological disposal technology. Annual report 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umeda, Koji; Oyama, Takuya; Kurosawa, Hideki; Semba, Takeshi; Takeuchi, Shinji; Tajikara, Masayoshi; Tsuruta, Tadahiko; Yasue, Ken-ichi; Ohi, Takao; Oda, Chie; Kamei, Gento; Kobayashi, Yasushi; Sasaki, Yasuo; Sawada, Atsushi; Taniguchi, Naoki; Tanai, Kenji; Naito, Morimasa; Nakayama, Masashi; Kuno, Yoshio; Fujita, Tomoo; Honda, Akira; Mihara, Morihiro; Miyahara, Kaname; Osawa, Hideaki; Fujishima, Atsushi; Kuji, Masayoshi; Saito, Haruo; Sanada, Hiroyuki; Niizato, Tadafumi; Funaki, Hironori; Maekawa, Keisuke; Fujiwara, Kenso

    2007-12-01

    To increase technical reliability in geological disposal technology of high-level radioactive waste, JAEA have been conducting R and D activities in the fields in the repository engineering, performance assessment (PA) of the geological disposal system, and geoscientific study. In the field of R and D on the repository engineering, laboratory experimental studies at Tokai Research Center are carried out by engineering-scale and non-radiogenic experiments. The studies on performance assessment include more realistic model development with extensive computer analyses and acquisition of basic data concerning the chemical properties and migration behavior of radionuclides under geological disposal conditions. The information obtained from the Underground Research Laboratories (URLs) is used to provide a realistic condition of geological environments for these studies. The R and D studies are also carried out for TRU waste. A particular JAEA R and D activity is to promote the projects of two Underground Research Laboratories (URLs): one at Mizunami city, in crystalline rock and the other at Horonobe town, in sedimentary rock. In the present stage (2nd R and D phase) of the URL projects, the investigation are being carried out during the excavation of shafts and drifts. Data obtained from the investigations will serve to verify and refine the results from the surface-based investigations and characterize the evolution of the geological environment during drift excavation. The research on natural processes, such as fault and volcanic activities, is also conducted to provide better understanding of long-term stability on the geological environment. JAEA has initiated a project to develop the next generation of novel knowledge management system (KMS) to develop and manage the technical knowledge base for supporting implementers and regulators. This knowledge base includes all technical achievements by the JAEA as well as know-how and experience which have been accumulated

  20. A fast and cost-effective approach to develop and map EST-SSR markers: oak as a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherubini Marcello

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs are a source of simple sequence repeats (SSRs that can be used to develop molecular markers for genetic studies. The availability of ESTs for Quercus robur and Quercus petraea provided a unique opportunity to develop microsatellite markers to accelerate research aimed at studying adaptation of these long-lived species to their environment. As a first step toward the construction of a SSR-based linkage map of oak for quantitative trait locus (QTL mapping, we describe the mining and survey of EST-SSRs as well as a fast and cost-effective approach (bin mapping to assign these markers to an approximate map position. We also compared the level of polymorphism between genomic and EST-derived SSRs and address the transferability of EST-SSRs in Castanea sativa (chestnut. Results A catalogue of 103,000 Sanger ESTs was assembled into 28,024 unigenes from which 18.6% presented one or more SSR motifs. More than 42% of these SSRs corresponded to trinucleotides. Primer pairs were designed for 748 putative unigenes. Overall 37.7% (283 were found to amplify a single polymorphic locus in a reference full-sib pedigree of Quercus robur. The usefulness of these loci for establishing a genetic map was assessed using a bin mapping approach. Bin maps were constructed for the male and female parental tree for which framework linkage maps based on AFLP markers were available. The bin set consisting of 14 highly informative offspring selected based on the number and position of crossover sites. The female and male maps comprised 44 and 37 bins, with an average bin length of 16.5 cM and 20.99 cM, respectively. A total of 256 EST-SSRs were assigned to bins and their map position was further validated by linkage mapping. EST-SSRs were found to be less polymorphic than genomic SSRs, but their transferability rate to chestnut, a phylogenetically related species to oak, was higher. Conclusion We have generated a bin map for oak

  1. The first set of EST resource for gene discovery and marker development in pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byregowda Munishamappa

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan (L. Millsp is one of the major grain legume crops of the tropics and subtropics, but biotic stresses [Fusarium wilt (FW, sterility mosaic disease (SMD, etc.] are serious challenges for sustainable crop production. Modern genomic tools such as molecular markers and candidate genes associated with resistance to these stresses offer the possibility of facilitating pigeonpea breeding for improving biotic stress resistance. Availability of limited genomic resources, however, is a serious bottleneck to undertake molecular breeding in pigeonpea to develop superior genotypes with enhanced resistance to above mentioned biotic stresses. With an objective of enhancing genomic resources in pigeonpea, this study reports generation and analysis of comprehensive resource of FW- and SMD- responsive expressed sequence tags (ESTs. Results A total of 16 cDNA libraries were constructed from four pigeonpea genotypes that are resistant and susceptible to FW ('ICPL 20102' and 'ICP 2376' and SMD ('ICP 7035' and 'TTB 7' and a total of 9,888 (9,468 high quality ESTs were generated and deposited in dbEST of GenBank under accession numbers GR463974 to GR473857 and GR958228 to GR958231. Clustering and assembly analyses of these ESTs resulted into 4,557 unique sequences (unigenes including 697 contigs and 3,860 singletons. BLASTN analysis of 4,557 unigenes showed a significant identity with ESTs of different legumes (23.2-60.3%, rice (28.3%, Arabidopsis (33.7% and poplar (35.4%. As expected, pigeonpea ESTs are more closely related to soybean (60.3% and cowpea ESTs (43.6% than other plant ESTs. Similarly, BLASTX similarity results showed that only 1,603 (35.1% out of 4,557 total unigenes correspond to known proteins in the UniProt database (≤ 1E-08. Functional categorization of the annotated unigenes sequences showed that 153 (3.3% genes were assigned to cellular component category, 132 (2.8% to biological process, and 132 (2

  2. Development, genetic mapping and QTL association of cotton PHYA, PHYB, and HY5-specific CAPS and dCAPS markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Among SNP markers that become increasingly valuable in molecular breeding of crop plants are the CAP and dCAP markers derived from the genes of interest. To date, the number of such gene-based markers is small in polyploid crop plants such as tetraploid cotton that has A and D subgenomes. The obje...

  3. First Microsatellite Markers Developed from Cupuassu ESTs: Application in Diversity Analysis and Cross-Species Transferability to Cacao.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraz Dos Santos, Lucas; Moreira Fregapani, Roberta; Falcão, Loeni Ludke; Togawa, Roberto Coiti; Costa, Marcos Mota do Carmo; Lopes, Uilson Vanderlei; Peres Gramacho, Karina; Alves, Rafael Moyses; Micheli, Fabienne; Marcellino, Lucilia Helena

    2016-01-01

    The cupuassu tree (Theobroma grandiflorum) (Willd. ex Spreng.) Schum. is a fruitful species from the Amazon with great economical potential, due to the multiple uses of its fruit´s pulp and seeds in the food and cosmetic industries, including the production of cupulate, an alternative to chocolate. In order to support the cupuassu breeding program and to select plants presenting both pulp/seed quality and fungal disease resistance, SSRs from Next Generation Sequencing ESTs were obtained and used in diversity analysis. From 8,330 ESTs, 1,517 contained one or more SSRs (1,899 SSRs identified). The most abundant motifs identified in the EST-SSRs were hepta- and trinucleotides, and they were found with a minimum and maximum of 2 and 19 repeats, respectively. From the 1,517 ESTs containing SSRs, 70 ESTs were selected based on their functional annotation, focusing on pulp and seed quality, as well as resistance to pathogens. The 70 ESTs selected contained 77 SSRs, and among which, 11 were polymorphic in cupuassu genotypes. These EST-SSRs were able to discriminate the cupuassu genotype in relation to resistance/susceptibility to witches' broom disease, as well as to pulp quality (SST/ATT values). Finally, we showed that these markers were transferable to cacao genotypes, and that genome availability might be used as a predictive tool for polymorphism detection and primer design useful for both Theobroma species. To our knowledge, this is the first report involving EST-SSRs from cupuassu and is also a pioneer in the analysis of marker transferability from cupuassu to cacao. Moreover, these markers might contribute to develop or saturate the cupuassu and cacao genetic maps, respectively.

  4. Survey and analysis of simple sequence repeats in the Laccaria bicolor genome, with development of microsatellite markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labbe, Jessy L [ORNL; Murat, Claude [INRA, Nancy, France; Morin, Emmanuelle [INRA, Nancy, France; Le Tacon, F [UMR, France; Martin, Francis [INRA, Nancy, France

    2011-01-01

    It is becoming clear that simple sequence repeats (SSRs) play a significant role in fungal genome organization, and they are a large source of genetic markers for population genetics and meiotic maps. We identified SSRs in the Laccaria bicolor genome by in silico survey and analyzed their distribution in the different genomic regions. We also compared the abundance and distribution of SSRs in L. bicolor with those of the following fungal genomes: Phanerochaete chrysosporium, Coprinopsis cinerea, Ustilago maydis, Cryptococcus neoformans, Aspergillus nidulans, Magnaporthe grisea, Neurospora crassa and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using the MISA computer program, we detected 277,062 SSRs in the L. bicolor genome representing 8% of the assembled genomic sequence. Among the analyzed basidiomycetes, L. bicolor exhibited the highest SSR density although no correlation between relative abundance and the genome sizes was observed. In most genomes the short motifs (mono- to trinucleotides) were more abundant than the longer repeated SSRs. Generally, in each organism, the occurrence, relative abundance, and relative density of SSRs decreased as the repeat unit increased. Furthermore, each organism had its own common and longest SSRs. In the L. bicolor genome, most of the SSRs were located in intergenic regions (73.3%) and the highest SSR density was observed in transposable elements (TEs; 6,706 SSRs/Mb). However, 81% of the protein-coding genes contained SSRs in their exons, suggesting that SSR polymorphism may alter gene phenotypes. Within a L. bicolor offspring, sequence polymorphism of 78 SSRs was mainly detected in non-TE intergenic regions. Unlike previously developed microsatellite markers, these new ones are spread throughout the genome; these markers could have immediate applications in population genetics.

  5. First Microsatellite Markers Developed from Cupuassu ESTs: Application in Diversity Analysis and Cross-Species Transferability to Cacao.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Ferraz Dos Santos

    Full Text Available The cupuassu tree (Theobroma grandiflorum (Willd. ex Spreng. Schum. is a fruitful species from the Amazon with great economical potential, due to the multiple uses of its fruit´s pulp and seeds in the food and cosmetic industries, including the production of cupulate, an alternative to chocolate. In order to support the cupuassu breeding program and to select plants presenting both pulp/seed quality and fungal disease resistance, SSRs from Next Generation Sequencing ESTs were obtained and used in diversity analysis. From 8,330 ESTs, 1,517 contained one or more SSRs (1,899 SSRs identified. The most abundant motifs identified in the EST-SSRs were hepta- and trinucleotides, and they were found with a minimum and maximum of 2 and 19 repeats, respectively. From the 1,517 ESTs containing SSRs, 70 ESTs were selected based on their functional annotation, focusing on pulp and seed quality, as well as resistance to pathogens. The 70 ESTs selected contained 77 SSRs, and among which, 11 were polymorphic in cupuassu genotypes. These EST-SSRs were able to discriminate the cupuassu genotype in relation to resistance/susceptibility to witches' broom disease, as well as to pulp quality (SST/ATT values. Finally, we showed that these markers were transferable to cacao genotypes, and that genome availability might be used as a predictive tool for polymorphism detection and primer design useful for both Theobroma species. To our knowledge, this is the first report involving EST-SSRs from cupuassu and is also a pioneer in the analysis of marker transferability from cupuassu to cacao. Moreover, these markers might contribute to develop or saturate the cupuassu and cacao genetic maps, respectively.

  6. First Microsatellite Markers Developed from Cupuassu ESTs: Application in Diversity Analysis and Cross-Species Transferability to Cacao

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraz dos Santos, Lucas; Moreira Fregapani, Roberta; Falcão, Loeni Ludke; Togawa, Roberto Coiti; Costa, Marcos Mota do Carmo; Lopes, Uilson Vanderlei; Peres Gramacho, Karina; Alves, Rafael Moyses

    2016-01-01

    The cupuassu tree (Theobroma grandiflorum) (Willd. ex Spreng.) Schum. is a fruitful species from the Amazon with great economical potential, due to the multiple uses of its fruit´s pulp and seeds in the food and cosmetic industries, including the production of cupulate, an alternative to chocolate. In order to support the cupuassu breeding program and to select plants presenting both pulp/seed quality and fungal disease resistance, SSRs from Next Generation Sequencing ESTs were obtained and used in diversity analysis. From 8,330 ESTs, 1,517 contained one or more SSRs (1,899 SSRs identified). The most abundant motifs identified in the EST-SSRs were hepta- and trinucleotides, and they were found with a minimum and maximum of 2 and 19 repeats, respectively. From the 1,517 ESTs containing SSRs, 70 ESTs were selected based on their functional annotation, focusing on pulp and seed quality, as well as resistance to pathogens. The 70 ESTs selected contained 77 SSRs, and among which, 11 were polymorphic in cupuassu genotypes. These EST-SSRs were able to discriminate the cupuassu genotype in relation to resistance/susceptibility to witches’ broom disease, as well as to pulp quality (SST/ATT values). Finally, we showed that these markers were transferable to cacao genotypes, and that genome availability might be used as a predictive tool for polymorphism detection and primer design useful for both Theobroma species. To our knowledge, this is the first report involving EST-SSRs from cupuassu and is also a pioneer in the analysis of marker transferability from cupuassu to cacao. Moreover, these markers might contribute to develop or saturate the cupuassu and cacao genetic maps, respectively. PMID:26949967

  7. Marker-assisted selection as a potential tool for genetic improvement in developing countries: debating the issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, J.; Ruane, J.

    2007-01-01

    Marker-assisted selection (MAS) is a complementary technology, for use in conjunction with more established conventional methods of genetic selection, for plant and animal improvement. It has generated a good deal of expectations, many of which have yet to be realized. Although documentation is limited, the current impact of MAS on products delivered to farmers seems small. While the future possibilities and potential impacts of MAS are considerable, there are also obstacles to its use, particularly in developing countries. Principal among these are issues relating to current high costs of the technology and its appropriateness, given that publicly funded agricultural research in many developing countries is suboptimal and development priorities do not necessarily include genetic improvement programmes. Other potential obstacles to the uptake of MAS in developing countries include limited infrastructure, the absence of conventional selection and breeding programmes, poor private sector involvement and lack of research on specific crops of importance in developing countries. Intellectual property rights may also be an important constraint to development and uptake of MAS in the developing world. It is hoped that through partnerships between developing and developed country institutions and individuals, including public-private sector collaboration, MAS costs can be reduced, resources pooled and shared and capacity developed. With the assistance of the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR) and international organizations such as FAO, developing countries can benefit more from MAS. These were some of the outcomes of a moderated e-mail conference, entitled 'Molecular Marker- Assisted Selection as a Potential Tool for Genetic Improvement of Crops, Forest Trees, Livestock and Fish in Developing Countries', that FAO hosted at the end of 2003. During the four-week conference, 627 people subscribed and 85 messages were posted, about 60 percent

  8. Development of SSR Markers in Hickory (Carya cathayensis Sarg.) and Their Transferability to Other Species of Carya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juan; Zeng, Yanru; Shen, Dengfeng; Xia, Guohua; Huang, Yinzhi; Huang, Youjun; Chang, Jun; Huang, Jianqin; Wang, Zhengjia

    2014-10-01

    Hickory (Carya cathayensis Sarg.), an important nut-producing species in Southeastern China, has high economic value, but so far there has been no cultivar bred under species although it is mostly propagated by seeding and some elite individuals have been found. It has been found recently that this species has a certain rate of apomixis and poor knowledge of its genetic background has influenced development of a feasible breeding strategy. Here in this paper we first release SSR (Simple sequence repeat) markers developed in this species and their transferability to other three species of the same genus, Carya. A total of 311 pairs of SSR primers in hickory were developed based on sequenced cDNAs of a fruit development-associated cDNA library and RNA-seq data of developing female floral buds and could be used to distinguish hickory, C. hunanensis Cheng et R. H. Chang ex R. H. Chang et Lu, C. illinoensis K. Koch (pecan) and C. dabieshanensis M. C. Liu et Z. J. Li, but they were monomorphic in both hickory and C. hunanensis although multi-alleles have been identified in all the four species. There is a transferability rate of 63.02% observed between hickory and pecan and the markers can be applied to study genetic diversity of accessions in pecan. When used in C. dabieshanensis, it was revealed that C. dabieshanensis had the number of alleles per locus ranging from 2 to 4, observed heterozygosity from 0 to 0.6667 and expected heterozygosity from 0.333 to 0.8667, respectively, which supports the existence of C. dabieshanensis as a separate species different from hickory and indicates that there is potential for selection and breeding in this species.

  9. Annual report of Fusion Research and Development Directorate of JAEA for FY2008 and FY2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isei, Nobuaki

    2011-03-01

    This annual report provides an overview of major results and progress on research and development (R and D) activities at Fusion Research and Development Directorate of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) for FY2008 (from April 1, 2008 to March 31, 2009) and FY2009 (from April 1, 2009 to March 31, 2010), including those performed in collaboration with other research establishments of JAEA, research institutes, and universities. Concerning the ITER project, JAEA was nominated as the domestic agency by the Japanese government after the ITER Agreement took effect, and has fulfilled the obligations. In the development of superconducting conductors, JAEA constructed a technical platform for the fabrication of superconducting conductors for toroidal field (TF) coils ahead of other countries. JAEA immediately started and completed the construction of a plant to fabricate superconducting conductors, and started their fabrication ahead of other countries. In the development of gyrotron high-frequency heating equipment, since only the JAEA satisfies the ITER's procurement specifications among supplier countries, the ITER Organization requested JAEA to conduct confidence tests, and achieved results such as data acquisition that could contribute to the development of the ITER's operational scenario. For the development of neutral beam injectors, advantages of the multi-stage acceleration system developed by JAEA was recognized as a result of comparative experiments with single-stage acceleration systems developed in Europe for the particle acceleration system, and was adopted in the ITER's technical specifications. For the Broader Approach (BA) activities, JAEA was designated as the implementing agency by the Japanese government after the BA Agreement took effect, and has fulfilled the obligations and promoted three projects in the BA activities steadily through domestic cooperation and coordination with Europe. Concerning activities related to the International Fusion Energy

  10. Argonne National Laboratory annual report of Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities FY 2009.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Office of the Director

    2010-04-09

    I am pleased to submit Argonne National Laboratory's Annual Report on its Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) activities for fiscal year 2009. Fiscal year 2009 saw a heightened focus by DOE and the nation on the need to develop new sources of energy. Argonne scientists are investigating many different sources of energy, including nuclear, solar, and biofuels, as well as ways to store, use, and transmit energy more safely, cleanly, and efficiently. DOE selected Argonne as the site for two new Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) - the Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations and the Center for Electrical Energy Storage - and funded two other EFRCs to which Argonne is a major partner. The award of at least two of the EFRCs can be directly linked to early LDRD-funded efforts. LDRD has historically seeded important programs and facilities at the lab. Two of these facilities, the Advanced Photon Source and the Center for Nanoscale Materials, are now vital contributors to today's LDRD Program. New and enhanced capabilities, many of which relied on LDRD in their early stages, now help the laboratory pursue its evolving strategic goals. LDRD has, since its inception, been an invaluable resource for positioning the Laboratory to anticipate, and thus be prepared to contribute to, the future science and technology needs of DOE and the nation. During times of change, LDRD becomes all the more vital for facilitating the necessary adjustments while maintaining and enhancing the capabilities of our staff and facilities. Although I am new to the role of Laboratory Director, my immediate prior service as Deputy Laboratory Director for Programs afforded me continuous involvement in the LDRD program and its management. Therefore, I can attest that Argonne's program adhered closely to the requirements of DOE Order 413.2b and associated guidelines governing LDRD. Our LDRD program management continually strives to be more efficient. In

  11. Argonne National Laboratory annual report of Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities FY 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    I am pleased to submit Argonne National Laboratory's Annual Report on its Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) activities for fiscal year 2009. Fiscal year 2009 saw a heightened focus by DOE and the nation on the need to develop new sources of energy. Argonne scientists are investigating many different sources of energy, including nuclear, solar, and biofuels, as well as ways to store, use, and transmit energy more safely, cleanly, and efficiently. DOE selected Argonne as the site for two new Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) - the Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations and the Center for Electrical Energy Storage - and funded two other EFRCs to which Argonne is a major partner. The award of at least two of the EFRCs can be directly linked to early LDRD-funded efforts. LDRD has historically seeded important programs and facilities at the lab. Two of these facilities, the Advanced Photon Source and the Center for Nanoscale Materials, are now vital contributors to today's LDRD Program. New and enhanced capabilities, many of which relied on LDRD in their early stages, now help the laboratory pursue its evolving strategic goals. LDRD has, since its inception, been an invaluable resource for positioning the Laboratory to anticipate, and thus be prepared to contribute to, the future science and technology needs of DOE and the nation. During times of change, LDRD becomes all the more vital for facilitating the necessary adjustments while maintaining and enhancing the capabilities of our staff and facilities. Although I am new to the role of Laboratory Director, my immediate prior service as Deputy Laboratory Director for Programs afforded me continuous involvement in the LDRD program and its management. Therefore, I can attest that Argonne's program adhered closely to the requirements of DOE Order 413.2b and associated guidelines governing LDRD. Our LDRD program management continually strives to be more efficient. In addition to

  12. Independent Research and Independent Exploratory Development Programs: FY92 Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-04-01

    others (e.g., Myers- Briggs Type inventory and Paper Formboard) will be obtained from publishers. The primary analytical technique will be structural...Reports TRIlED FY92 Annual Report 77 Biodata and Personality: Are They Related? Stephanie Booth-Kewley and Marie D. Thomas Abstract Despite the demonstrated

  13. Construction of a normalized full-length cDNA library of cephalopod Amphioctopus fangsiao and development of microsatellite markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yanwei; Liu, Wenfen; Xu, Xin; Yang, Jianmin; Wang, Weijun; Wei, Xiumei; Liu, Xiangquan; Sun, Guohua

    2017-10-01

    Amphioctopus fangsiao is one of the most economically important species and has been considered to be a candidate for aquaculture. In order to facilitate its fine-scale genetic analyses, we constructed a normalized full-length library successfully and developed a set of microsatellite markers in this study. The normalized full-length library had a storage capacity of 6.9×105 independent clones. The recombination efficiency was 95% and the average size of inserted fragments was longer than 1000 bp. A total of 3440 high quality ESTs were obtained, which were assembled into 1803 unigenes. Of these unigenes, 450 (25%) were assigned into 33 Gene Ontology terms, 576 (31.9%) into 153 Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways, and 275 (15.3%) into 22 Clusters of Orthologous Groups. Seventy-six polymorphic microsatellite markers were identified. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 4 to 17, and the observed and expected heterozygosities varied between 0.167 and 0.967 and between 0.326 and 0.944, respectively. Twelve loci were significantly deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium after Bonferroni correction and no linkage disequilibrium was found between different loci. This study provided not only a useful resource for the isolation of the functional genes, but also a set of informative microsatellites for the assessment of population structure and conservation genetics of A. fangsiao.

  14. Functional Marker Development and Effect Analysis of Grain Size Gene GW2 in Extreme Grain Size Germplasm in Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Ya-dong

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available GW2 is an important gene that regulates grain width and weight. We used cDNA clone to obtain the sequences of GW2 from large- and small-grained rice varieties, TD70 and Kasalath, respectively. Then, we developed a dCAPS (derived cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence marker on the basis of the sequence difference between functional and nonfunctional GW2 genes to analyze the genotypes and phenotypes of recombinant inbred lines. Results showed that the sequence of GW2TD70 had a single nucleotide deletion at site 316 that generates a termination codon. This codon terminated the GW2 protein in advance. By contrast, the sequence of GW2Kasalath encoded an intact protein. A novel dCAPS marker was designed in accordance with a base A deletion at site 316 of the sequence. After the PCR product was digested by ApoI, TD70 showed 21 and 30 bp fragments, and Kasalath showed a 51 bp fragment. Up to 82 lines contained GW2TD70, and 158 lines contained GW2Kasalath. The lines that contained TD70 alleles displayed substantial increases in width and 1000-grain weight. This result suggested that GW2 played a critical role in rice breeding.

  15. The development and mapping of functional markers in Fragaria and their transferability and potential for mapping in other genera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, D J; Rys, A; Nier, S; Simpson, D W; Tobutt, K R

    2007-01-01

    We have developed 46 primer pairs from exon sequences flanking polymorphic introns of 23 Fragaria gene sequences and one Malus sequence deposited in the EMBL database. Sequencing of a set of the PCR products amplified with the novel primer pairs in diploid Fragaria showed the products to be homologous to the sequences from which the primers were originally designed. By scoring the segregation of the 24 genes in two diploid Fragaria progenies FV x FN (F. vesca x F. nubicola F(2)) and 815 x 903BC (F. vesca x F. viridis BC(1)) 29 genetic loci at discrete positions on the seven linkage groups previously characterised could be mapped, bringing to 35 the total number of known function genes mapped in Fragaria. Twenty primer pairs, representing 14 genes, amplified a product of the expected size in both Malus and Prunus. To demonstrate the applicability of these gene-specific loci to comparative mapping in Rosaceae, five markers that displayed clear polymorphism between the parents of a Malus and a Prunus mapping population were selected. The markers were then scored and mapped in at least one of the two additional progenies.

  16. Colour and surface fluorescence development and their relationship with Maillard reaction markers as influenced by structural changes during cornflakes production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farroni, Abel; Buera, María Del Pilar

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this work was to study colour and surface fluorescence development in relation to the chemical markers for the Maillard reaction at the cooking, flaking and toasting stages of cornflake production process. Colour was measured by a calibrated computer vision system. Surface fluorescence was measured on compressed samples. Aqueous extracted Maillard reaction markers (hydroxymethylfurfural, carboxymethyl-lysine, absorbance at 420nm and total fluorescence) were measured on protease hydrolyzed samples. Sample microstructure was observed by scanning electron microscopy. During cooking the colour coordinates L(∗) and b(∗) decreased and a(∗) increased. After flaking, the samples appeared lighter, while the pigment concentration, fluorescence and hydroxymethylfurfural did not change. Toasting generated bubbles in the matrix and L(∗) apparently increased, although brown pigment concentration increased. Pigment concentration did not correlate with surface colour due to the destruction or generation of interfaces. Surface and microstructure effects can be avoided by milling and compressing the samples. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Rapid Development of Microsatellite Markers with 454 Pyrosequencing in a Vulnerable Fish, the Mottled Skate, Raja pulchra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jung-Ha; Park, Jung-Youn; Jo, Hyun-Su

    2012-01-01

    The mottled skate, Raja pulchra, is an economically valuable fish. However, due to a severe population decline, it is listed as a vulnerable species by the International Union for Conservation of Nature. To analyze its genetic structure and diversity, microsatellite markers were developed using 454 pyrosequencing. A total of 17,033 reads containing dinucleotide microsatellite repeat units (mean, 487 base pairs) were identified from 453,549 reads. Among 32 loci containing more than nine repeat units, 20 primer sets (62%) produced strong PCR products, of which 14 were polymorphic. In an analysis of 60 individuals from two R. pulchra populations, the number of alleles per locus ranged from 1–10, and the mean allelic richness was 4.7. No linkage disequilibrium was found between any pair of loci, indicating that the markers were independent. The Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium test showed significant deviation in two of the 28 single-loci after sequential Bonferroni’s correction. Using 11 primer sets, cross-species amplification was demonstrated in nine related species from four families within two classes. Among the 11 loci amplified from three other Rajidae family species; three loci were polymorphic. A monomorphic locus was amplified in all three Rajidae family species and the Dasyatidae family. Two Rajidae polymorphic loci amplified monomorphic target DNAs in four species belonging to the Carcharhiniformes class, and another was polymorphic in two Carcharhiniformes species. PMID:22837688

  18. Rapid development of microsatellite markers with 454 pyrosequencing in a vulnerable fish, the mottled skate, Raja pulchra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jung-Ha; Park, Jung-Youn; Jo, Hyun-Su

    2012-01-01

    The mottled skate, Raja pulchra, is an economically valuable fish. However, due to a severe population decline, it is listed as a vulnerable species by the International Union for Conservation of Nature. To analyze its genetic structure and diversity, microsatellite markers were developed using 454 pyrosequencing. A total of 17,033 reads containing dinucleotide microsatellite repeat units (mean, 487 base pairs) were identified from 453,549 reads. Among 32 loci containing more than nine repeat units, 20 primer sets (62%) produced strong PCR products, of which 14 were polymorphic. In an analysis of 60 individuals from two R. pulchra populations, the number of alleles per locus ranged from 1-10, and the mean allelic richness was 4.7. No linkage disequilibrium was found between any pair of loci, indicating that the markers were independent. The Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium test showed significant deviation in two of the 28 single-loci after sequential Bonferroni's correction. Using 11 primer sets, cross-species amplification was demonstrated in nine related species from four families within two classes. Among the 11 loci amplified from three other Rajidae family species; three loci were polymorphic. A monomorphic locus was amplified in all three Rajidae family species and the Dasyatidae family. Two Rajidae polymorphic loci amplified monomorphic target DNAs in four species belonging to the Carcharhiniformes class, and another was polymorphic in two Carcharhiniformes species.

  19. The MMN as a viable and objective marker of auditory development in CI users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Näätänen, Risto; Petersen, Bjørn; Torppa, Ritva

    2017-01-01

    procedures. Therefore, the MMN can also be used as a tool in developing and testing different novel rehabilitation procedures. Importantly, the recently developed multi-feature MMN paradigms permit the objective assessment of discrimination accuracy for all the different auditory dimensions (such...... as frequency, intensity, and duration) in a short recording time of about 30 min. Most recently, such stimulus paradigms have been successfully developed for an objective assessment of music perception, too....

  20. Development and detection efficiency of sequence characterized amplified region markers for authentication of medicinal plant Ruta graveolens and its adulterant Euphorbia dracunculoides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irum Gul

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: With the increase in demand of herbal medicines, adulteration in these drugs is also gaining momentum and remains an indispensable problem in domestic and export markets. Correct identification is the first step toward assuring quality, safety, and efficacy of indigenous herbal medicines. Materials and Methods: In this study, sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR markers were developed to discriminate Ruta graveolens from its adulterant Euphorbia dracunculoides. Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD was performed and subsequently converted into SCAR markers. Results: After performing RAPD, SCAR primers were designed from the selected unique RAPD amplicons of the genuine drug as well as its adulterant. These primers produced 670 bp and 750 bp SCAR markers with genomic DNA sample of R. graveolens and E. dracunculoides, respectively. Conclusion: Development of these markers will help in the quality control of herbal drugs and monitoring widespread adulteration of these drugs by pharmaceutical industries and government agencies.

  1. Alteration in molecular markers of oocyte development and intersex condition in mullets impacted by wastewater treatment plant effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, Ainara; Rojo-Bartolomé, Iratxe; Bizarro, Cristina; Cancio, Ibon; Ortiz-Zarragoitia, Maren

    2017-05-01

    Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) discharges are an important source of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) into the aquatic environment. Fish populations inhabiting downstream of WWTP effluents show alterations in gonad and gamete development such as intersex condition, together with xenoestrogenic effects such as vitellogenin up-regulation. However, the molecular mechanisms participating in the development of intersex condition in fish are not elucidated. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of two WWTPs effluents (Gernika and Bilbao-Galindo situated in the South East Bay of Biscay) with different contaminant loads, in thicklip grey mullet (Chelon labrosus) populations inhabiting downstream, examining the presence and severity of intersex condition, during two seasons. Molecular markers of xenoestrogenicity and oocyte differentiation and development (vtgAa, cyp19a1a, cyp19a1b, cyp11b, foxl2, dmrt1 and gtf3a) were also studied. Intersex mullets were identified downstream of both WWTPs and vtgAa was upregulated in intersex and non intersex males. Sex dependent differential transcription levels of target genes were detected in mullets from Galindo. However, no such pattern was observed in mullets from Gernika, suggesting an attenuating effect over studied genes caused by a higher presence of EDCs in this site, as indicated by the elevated prevalence of intersex mullets in this population. In conclusion, no direct association between xenoestrogenic responses and intersex condition was established. Mullets from Gernika showed signs of severe EDC exposure compared to those from Galindo, as demonstrated by the higher prevalence of intersex males and the reduction in transcription profile differences between sexes of gametogenic gene markers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Genome-wide development and deployment of informative intron-spanning and intron-length polymorphism markers for genomics-assisted breeding applications in chickpea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Rishi; Bajaj, Deepak; Sayal, Yogesh K; Meher, Prabina K; Upadhyaya, Hari D; Kumar, Rajendra; Tripathi, Shailesh; Bharadwaj, Chellapilla; Rao, Atmakuri R; Parida, Swarup K

    2016-11-01

    The discovery and large-scale genotyping of informative gene-based markers is essential for rapid delineation of genes/QTLs governing stress tolerance and yield component traits in order to drive genetic enhancement in chickpea. A genome-wide 119169 and 110491 ISM (intron-spanning markers) from 23129 desi and 20386 kabuli protein-coding genes and 7454 in silico InDel (insertion-deletion) (1-45-bp)-based ILP (intron-length polymorphism) markers from 3283 genes were developed that were structurally and functionally annotated on eight chromosomes and unanchored scaffolds of chickpea. A much higher amplification efficiency (83%) and intra-specific polymorphic potential (86%) detected by these markers than that of other sequence-based genetic markers among desi and kabuli chickpea accessions was apparent even by a cost-effective agarose gel-based assay. The genome-wide physically mapped 1718 ILP markers assayed a wider level of functional genetic diversity (19-81%) and well-defined phylogenetics among domesticated chickpea accessions. The gene-derived 1424 ILP markers were anchored on a high-density (inter-marker distance: 0.65cM) desi intra-specific genetic linkage map/functional transcript map (ICC 4958×ICC 2263) of chickpea. This reference genetic map identified six major genomic regions harbouring six robust QTLs mapped on five chromosomes, which explained 11-23% seed weight trait variation (7.6-10.5 LOD) in chickpea. The integration of high-resolution QTL mapping with differential expression profiling detected six including one potential serine carboxypeptidase gene with ILP markers (linked tightly to the major seed weight QTLs) exhibiting seed-specific expression as well as pronounced up-regulation especially in seeds of high (ICC 4958) as compared to low (ICC 2263) seed weight mapping parental accessions. The marker information generated in the present study was made publicly accessible through a user-friendly web-resource, "Chickpea ISM-ILP Marker Database

  3. Development of genomic SSR and potential EST-SSR markers in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-11-16

    Nov 16, 2009 ... Institute of Medicinal Plant Development (IMPLAD), Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences (CAMS) and Peking .... from three sources of B. fatcatum in Taiwan (Liu et al., ..... Ministry of Finance People's Republic of China (No.

  4. Annual Report Nucelar Energy Research and Development Program Nuclear Energy Research Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hively, LM

    2003-02-13

    NERI Project No.2000-0109 began in August 2000 and has three tasks. The first project year addressed Task 1, namely development of nonlinear prognostication for critical equipment in nuclear power facilities. That work is described in the first year's annual report (ORNLTM-2001/195). The current (second) project year (FY02) addresses Task 2, while the third project year will address Tasks 2-3. This report describes the work for the second project year, spanning August 2001 through August 2002, including status of the tasks, issues and concerns, cost performance, and status summary of tasks. The objective of the second project year's work is a compelling demonstration of the nonlinear prognostication algorithm using much more data. The guidance from Dr. Madeline Feltus (DOE/NE-20) is that it would be preferable to show forewarning of failure for different kinds of nuclear-grade equipment, as opposed to many different failure modes from one piece of equipment. Long-term monitoring of operational utility equipment is possible in principle, but is not practically feasible for the following reason. Time and funding constraints for this project do not allow us to monitor the many machines (thousands) that will be necessary to obtain even a few failure sequences, due to low failure rates (<10{sup -3}/year) in the operational environment. Moreover, the ONLY way to guarantee a controlled failure sequence is to seed progressively larger faults in the equipment or to overload the equipment for accelerated tests. Both of these approaches are infeasible for operational utility machinery, but are straight-forward in a test environment. Our subcontractor has provided such test sequences. Thus, we have revised Tasks 2.1-2.4 to analyze archival test data from such tests. The second phase of our work involves validation of the nonlinear prognostication over the second and third years of the proposed work. Recognizing the inherent limitations outlined in the previous

  5. Characterization of the Kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus) Global Transcriptome Using Illumina Paired-End Sequencing and Development of EST-SSR Markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Li, Defang; Chen, Anguo; Tang, Huijuan; Li, Jianjun; Huang, Siqi

    2016-01-01

    Kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) is an economically important natural fiber crop grown worldwide. However, only 20 expressed tag sequences (ESTs) for kenaf are available in public databases. The aim of this study was to develop large-scale simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers to lay a solid foundation for the construction of genetic linkage maps and marker-assisted breeding in kenaf. We used Illumina paired-end sequencing technology to generate new EST-simple sequences and MISA software to mine SSR markers. We identified 71,318 unigenes with an average length of 1143 nt and annotated these unigenes using four different protein databases. Overall, 9324 complementary pairs were designated as EST-SSR markers, and their quality was validated using 100 randomly selected SSR markers. In total, 72 primer pairs reproducibly amplified target amplicons, and 61 of these primer pairs detected significant polymorphism among 28 kenaf accessions. Thus, in this study, we have developed large-scale SSR markers for kenaf, and this new resource will facilitate construction of genetic linkage maps, investigation of fiber growth and development in kenaf, and also be of value to novel gene discovery and functional genomic studies. PMID:26960153

  6. Characterization of the Kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus) Global Transcriptome Using Illumina Paired-End Sequencing and Development of EST-SSR Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Li, Defang; Chen, Anguo; Tang, Huijuan; Li, Jianjun; Huang, Siqi

    2016-01-01

    Kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) is an economically important natural fiber crop grown worldwide. However, only 20 expressed tag sequences (ESTs) for kenaf are available in public databases. The aim of this study was to develop large-scale simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers to lay a solid foundation for the construction of genetic linkage maps and marker-assisted breeding in kenaf. We used Illumina paired-end sequencing technology to generate new EST-simple sequences and MISA software to mine SSR markers. We identified 71,318 unigenes with an average length of 1143 nt and annotated these unigenes using four different protein databases. Overall, 9324 complementary pairs were designated as EST-SSR markers, and their quality was validated using 100 randomly selected SSR markers. In total, 72 primer pairs reproducibly amplified target amplicons, and 61 of these primer pairs detected significant polymorphism among 28 kenaf accessions. Thus, in this study, we have developed large-scale SSR markers for kenaf, and this new resource will facilitate construction of genetic linkage maps, investigation of fiber growth and development in kenaf, and also be of value to novel gene discovery and functional genomic studies.

  7. The Community's research and development programme on decommissioning of nuclear installations. Third annual progress report 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This is the third annual progress report of the European Community's programme (1984-88) of research on the decommissioning of nuclear installations. It shows the status of the programme on 31 December 1987. The third progress report describes the objectives, scope and work programme of the 69 research contracts concluded, as well as the progress of work achieved and the results obtained in 1987

  8. The community's research and development programme on decommissioning of nuclear installations. Fourth annual progress report 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    This is the fourth annual progress report on the European Community's programme (1984-88) of research on the decommissioning of nuclear installations. It shows the status of the programme at 31 December 1988. The fourth progress report describes the objectives, scope and work programme of the 72 research contracts concluded, as well as the progress of work achieved and the results obtained in 1988

  9. Primary cortical folding in the human newborn: an early marker of later functional development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benders, M.; Borradori-Tolsa, C.; Cachia, A.; Lazeyras, F.; Ha-Vinh Leuchter, R.; Sizonenko, S. V.; Warfield, S. K.; Mangin, J. F.; Hüppi, P. S.

    2008-01-01

    In the human brain, the morphology of cortical gyri and sulci is complex and variable among individuals, and it may reflect pathological functioning with specific abnormalities observed in certain developmental and neuropsychiatric disorders. Since cortical folding occurs early during brain development, these structural abnormalities might be present long before the appearance of functional symptoms. So far, the precise mechanisms responsible for such alteration in the convolution pattern during intra-uterine or post-natal development are still poorly understood. Here we compared anatomical and functional brain development in vivo among 45 premature newborns who experienced different intra-uterine environments: 22 normal singletons, 12 twins and 11 newborns with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and dedicated post-processing tools, we investigated early disturbances in cortical formation at birth, over the developmental period critical for the emergence of convolutions (26–36 weeks of gestational age), and defined early ‘endophenotypes’ of sulcal development. We demonstrated that twins have a delayed but harmonious maturation, with reduced surface and sulcation index compared to singletons, whereas the gyrification of IUGR newborns is discordant to the normal developmental trajectory, with a more pronounced reduction of surface in relation to the sulcation index compared to normal newborns. Furthermore, we showed that these structural measurements of the brain at birth are predictors of infants’ outcome at term equivalent age, for MRI-based cerebral volumes and neurobehavioural development evaluated with the assessment of preterm infant's behaviour (APIB). PMID:18587151

  10. Development and characterization of 38 polymorphic microsatellite markers from an economically important fruit tree, the Indian jujube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, Chu-Ying; Chiang, Yu-Chung; Chen, Chih-Hsiung; Yen, Chung-Ruey; Lee, Sheue-Ru; Lin, Yu-Shium; Tsai, Chi-Chu

    2012-05-01

    A total of 38 polymorphic microsatellite loci of the Indian jujube (Ziziphus mauritiana), an economically important fruit tree, were developed to evaluate genetic diversity and aid in the identification of cultivars. The 38 microsatellite markers were isolated from the Indian jujube using a magnetic bead enrichment method, and polymorphisms were identified in 24 Indian jujube cultivars. The number of alleles ranged from two to 13, with expected heterozygosity ranging from 0.261 to 0.898. The polymorphism information content ranged from 0.248 to 0.889, with a mean of 0.616. Of these 38 simple sequence repeat loci, 20 loci from Z. jujuba (Chinese jujube) were successfully amplified using the simple sequence repeat primer sets. These polymorphic loci should be useful in further studies of the genetic diversity and the identification of cultivars of both the Indian jujube and the Chinese jujube.

  11. Proteomic profiling of pretreatment serum from HIV-infected patients identifies candidate markers predictive of lymphoma development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vase, Maja Ølholm; Ludvigsen, Maja; Bendix, Knud

    2016-01-01

    . Differentially expressed proteins were identified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. A tissue microarray, containing diagnostic HIV-lymphoma tissue samples (N = 40), was used to investigate immunohistochemical expression of markers in tumoural lesions. RESULTS: Fourteen differentially expressed...... protein spots were detected. Using principal components analysis, spots containing immunoglobulin J chain, apolipoprotein A-I, procollagen C-endopeptidase enhancer-1 and complement C4-A were associated with lymphoma development (P ... with subsequent lymphoma compared with patients without subsequent lymphoma. In the tissue microarray, amyloid A was widely expressed, and high expression showed a tendency towards inferior outcome (log-rank 0.073). CONCLUSION: We identified several differentially expressed protein spots present already...

  12. Chloroplast microsatellite markers for Pseudotaxus chienii developed from the whole chloroplast genome of Taxus chinensis var. mairei (Taxaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Qi; Zhang, Hanrui; He, Yipeng; Wang, Ting; Su, Yingjuan

    2017-03-01

    Pseudotaxus chienii (Taxaceae) is an old rare species endemic to China that has adapted well to ecological heterogeneity with high genetic diversity in its nuclear genome. However, the genetic variation in its chloroplast genome is unknown. Eighteen chloroplast microsatellite markers (cpSSRs) were developed from the whole chloroplast genome of Taxus chinensis var. mairei and successfully amplified in four P. chienii populations and one T. chinensis var. mairei population. Of these loci, 10 were polymorphic in P. chienii , whereas six were polymorphic in T. chinensis var. mairei . The unbiased haploid diversity per locus ranged from 0.000 to 0.641 and 0.000 to 0.545 for P. chienii and T. chinensis var. mairei , respectively. The 18 cpSSRs will be used to further investigate the chloroplast genetic structure and adaptive evolution in P. chienii populations.

  13. Co-ordinated research program on development of kits for radioimmunometric assays of tumor markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acevedo Castro, B.E.; Perera Negrin, Y.; Pichardo Diaz, D.; Murugiah, R.; Ayala Avila, M.; Gavilondo Cowley, J.; Ruiz Pena, M.; Caso Pena, R.; Hernandez Pagarizabal, M.

    1999-01-01

    Mice were immunized with semen and natural PSA, following three different schemes. Splenocytes from two hyper immune animals were fused with the P3/x63.Ag8.653 myeloma under conventional hybridoma procedures. Stable hybrid cell cultures secreting antibodies specific to natural PSA were obtained by cloning dilutions procedures. With a group of stable hybridoma cultures we developed epitope characterization assays to determine whether the antibodies were capable of recognizing PSA. According to the recognition level in ELISA, the hybridomas were classified in different groups,. We select the best pairs of Mabs for developing a total and free PSA assays based on ELISA or IRMA format. Our total-PSA based on IRMA format presented a good correlation in comparison with CIS bio total PSA assay. We recommend our anti-PSA monoclonal antibodies to develop an IRMA assay for total PSA. Cuban free-PSA assay is under evaluation at present. (author)

  14. Transcriptional markers of sub-optimal nutrition in developing Apis mellifera nurse workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Honey bees (Apis mellifera) contribute substantially to the worldwide economy and ecosystem health as pollinators. Pollen is essential to the bee’s diet, providing protein, lipids, and micronutrients. The dramatic shifts in physiology, anatomy, and behavior that accompany normal worker development are highly plastic and recent work demonstrates that development, particularly the transition from nurse to foraging roles, is greatly impacted by diet. However, the role that diet plays in the developmental transition of newly eclosed bees to nurse workers is poorly understood. To further understand honey bee nutrition and the role of diet in nurse development, we used a high-throughput screen of the transcriptome of 3 day and 8 day old worker bees fed either honey and stored pollen (rich diet) or honey alone (poor diet) within the hive. We employed a three factor (age, diet, age x diet) analysis of the transcriptome to determine whether diet affected nurse worker physiology and whether poor diet altered the developmental processes normally associated with aging. Results Substantial changes in gene expression occurred due to starvation. Diet-induced changes in gene transcription occurring in younger bees were largely a subset of those occurring in older bees, but certain signatures of starvation were only evident 8 day old workers. Of the 18,542 annotated transcripts in the A. mellifera genome, 150 transcripts exhibited differential expression due to poor diet at 3d of age compared with 17,226 transcripts that differed due to poor diet at 8d of age, and poor diet caused more frequent down-regulation of gene expression in younger bees compared to older bees. In addition, the age-related physiological changes that accompanied early adult development differed due to the diet these young adult bees were fed. More frequent down-regulation of gene expression was observed in developing bees fed a poor diet compared to those fed an adequate diet. Functional

  15. Development of Agrobacterium-mediated virus-induced gene silencing and performance evaluation of four marker genes in Gossypium barbadense.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhuan Pang

    Full Text Available Gossypiumbarbadense is a cultivated cotton species and possesses many desirable traits, including high fiber quality and resistance to pathogens, especially Verticilliumdahliae (a devastating pathogen of Gossypium hirsutum, the main cultivated species. These elite traits are difficult to be introduced into G. hirsutum through classical breeding methods. In addition, genetic transformation of G. barbadense has not been successfully performed. It is therefore important to develop methods for evaluating the function and molecular mechanism of genes in G. barbadense. In this study, we had successfully introduced a virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS system into three cultivars of G. barbadense by inserting marker genes into the tobacco rattle virus (TRV vector. After we optimized the VIGS conditions, including light intensity, photoperiod, seedling age and Agrobacterium strain, 100% of plants agroinfiltrated with the GaPDS silencing vector showed white colored leaves. Three other marker genes, GaCLA1, GaANS and GaANR, were employed to further test this VIGS system in G. barbadense. The transcript levels of the endogenous genes in the silenced plants were reduced by more than 99% compared to control plants; these plants presented phenotypic symptoms 2 weeks after inoculation. We introduced a fusing sequence fragment of GaPDS and GaANR gene silencing vectors into a single plant, which resulted in both photobleaching and brownish coloration. The extent of silencing in plants agroinfiltrated with fusing two-gene-silencing vector was consistent with plants harboring a single gene silencing vector. The development of this VIGS system should promote analysis of gene function in G. barbadense, and help to contribute desirable traits for breeding of G. barbadense and G. hirsutum.

  16. Research Note Development and characterization of microsatellite ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srirama R

    2School of Biosciences and Technology, VIT University, Vellore 632014, India. 7. 8 ... microsatellite markers developed can be used for studying the population ... characterized by diverse growth forms, including shrubs, trees, and annual or ...

  17. Aberrant crypt foci in the colo-rectal mucosa as reliable markers of tumor development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorup, Inger

    connection exists between occurrence of ACF (neither qualitatively nor quantita- tively) and later development of tumors. However, the literature has shown that part of the ACF show morphologic and genetic features characteristic for the tumorigenic process and a recent investigation indicate that all ACF...

  18. Integrated Development of Serum Molecular Markers for Early Diagnosis of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    development of breast cancer screening test. Increasing our understanding of the role of biomarkers in the etiology and progression of breast cancer...granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor in normal pregnancy and preeclampsia . Hypertens Pregnancy 1999;18:95 – 106. 50. Bux J, Hofmann C, Welte K. Serum G-CSF

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF MARKERS OF EXPOSURE TO COPPER, NONYLPHENOL AND ATRAZINE USING SUTRACTIVE HYBRIDIZATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daphnia have been among the most commonly used test organisms for aquatic toxicity studies due to their sensitivity to contaminants. This sensitivity makes them excellent candidates for development as sentinels to monitor the occurrence of chemicals in the environment. The sequen...

  20. Developments in the use of Y-chromosome markers in forensic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sexual assault is a significant problem facing South African society. The South African Police service indicates that between April 2003 and March 2004 over 52 733 rapes were reported. Our research focuses on the development and implementation of genetic identity testing systems for use in sexual assault cases. Genetic ...

  1. Developing new microsatellite markers in walnut (Juglans regia L.) from Juglans nigra genomic GA enriched library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayat Topcu; Nergiz Coban; Keith Woeste; Mehmet Sutyemez; Salih. Kafkas

    2015-01-01

    We attempted to develop new polymorphic SSR primer pairs in walnut using sequences derived from Juglans nigra L. genomic enriched library with GA repeat. The designed 94 SSR primer pairs were subjected to gradient PCR in 12 walnut cultivars to determine their optimum annealing temperatures and to determine whether they produce bands. Then, the...

  2. Development and characterization of microsatellite markers for the Cape gooseberry Physalis peruviana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simbaqueba, Jaime; Sánchez, Pilar; Sanchez, Erika; Núñez Zarantes, Victor Manuel; Chacon, Maria Isabel; Barrero, Luz Stella; Mariño-Ramírez, Leonardo

    2011-01-01

    Physalis peruviana, commonly known as Cape gooseberry, is an Andean Solanaceae fruit with high nutritional value and interesting medicinal properties. In the present study we report the development and characterization of microsatellite loci from a P. peruviana commercial Colombian genotype. We identified 932 imperfect and 201 perfect Simple Sequence Repeats (SSR) loci in untranslated regions (UTRs) and 304 imperfect and 83 perfect SSR loci in coding regions from the assembled Physalis peruviana leaf transcriptome. The UTR SSR loci were used for the development of 162 primers for amplification. The efficiency of these primers was tested via PCR in a panel of seven P. peruviana accessions including Colombia, Kenya and Ecuador ecotypes and one closely related species Physalis floridana. We obtained an amplification rate of 83% and a polymorphic rate of 22%. Here we report the first P. peruviana specific microsatellite set, a valuable tool for a wide variety of applications, including functional diversity, conservation and improvement of the species.

  3. Development of a behavioural marker system for scrub practitioners' non-technical skills (SPLINTS system).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Lucy; Flin, Rhona; Yule, Steven; Mitchell, Janet; Coutts, Kathy; Youngson, George

    2013-04-01

    Adverse events still occur despite ongoing efforts to reduce harm to patients. Contributory factors to adverse events are often due to limitations in clinicians' non-technical skills (e.g. communication, situation awareness), rather than deficiencies in technical competence. We developed a behavioural rating system to provide a structured means for teaching and assessing scrub practitioners' (i.e. nurse, technician, operating department practitioner) non-technical skills. Psychologists facilitated focus groups (n = 4) with experienced scrub practitioners (n = 16; 4 in each group) to develop a preliminary taxonomy. Focus groups reviewed lists of non-technical-skill-related behaviours that were extracted from an interview study. The focus groups labelled skill categories and elements and also provided examples of good and poor behaviours for those skills. An expert panel (n = 2 psychologists; n = 1 expert nurse) then used an iterative process to individually and collaboratively review and refine those data to produce a prototype skills taxonomy. A preliminary taxonomy containing eight non-technical skill categories with 28 underlying elements was produced. The expert panel reduced this to three categories (situation awareness, communication and teamwork, task management), each with three underlying elements. The system was called the Scrub Practitioners' List of Intraoperative Non-Technical Skills system. A scoring system and a user handbook were also developed. A prototype behavioural rating system for scrub practitioners' non-technical skills was developed, to aid in teaching and providing formative assessment. This important aspect of performance is not currently explicitly addressed in any educational route to qualify as a scrub practitioner. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Use of stable isotopes in developing countries: safe markers for nutrition regime study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, P.D.; Klein, E.R.

    1987-01-01

    Possible use of stable radioisotopes in studies on nutrition and medicine problems that may be used in investigations of babies, children, pregnant women is shown. Attention is paid to behaviour of limited number of elements: hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen. The IAEA plans implementation of a new coordinated research program on use of stable isotopes for studying nutrition problems and related diseases. The program emphasis will be placed on protein metabolism measurements and estimation of energy consumption in control population groups in developing countries

  5. Development and Characterization of Microsatellite Markers for the Cape Gooseberry Physalis peruviana

    OpenAIRE

    Simbaqueba, Jaime; S?nchez, Pilar; Sanchez, Erika; N??ez Zarantes, Victor Manuel; Chacon, Maria Isabel; Barrero, Luz Stella; Mari?o-Ram?rez, Leonardo

    2011-01-01

    Physalis peruviana, commonly known as Cape gooseberry, is an Andean Solanaceae fruit with high nutritional value and interesting medicinal properties. In the present study we report the development and characterization of microsatellite loci from a P. peruviana commercial Colombian genotype. We identified 932 imperfect and 201 perfect Simple Sequence Repeats (SSR) loci in untranslated regions (UTRs) and 304 imperfect and 83 perfect SSR loci in coding regions from the assembled Physalis peruvi...

  6. F2-isoprostanes and F4-neuroprostanes as markers of intracranial aneurysm development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syta-Krzyżanowska, Anna; Jarocka-Karpowicz, Iwona; Kochanowicz, Jan; Turek, Grzegorz; Rutkowski, Robert; Gorbacz, Krzysztof; Mariak, Zenon; Skrzydlewska, Elżbieta

    2018-04-24

    Intracranial aneurysms are common, occurring in about 1-2% of the population. Saccular aneurysm is a pouch-like pathological dilatation of an intracranial artery that develops when the cerebral artery wall becomes too weak to resist hemodynamic pressure and distends. The aim of this study was to determine whether the development of intracranial aneurysms and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) affects neuronal phospholipid metabolism, and what influence different invasive treatments have on brain free radical phospholipid metabolism. The level of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) cyclization products - F2-isoprostanes and F4-neuroprostanes - was examined using liquid chromatography - mass spectrometry (LC-MS) in the plasma of patients with brain aneurysm and resulting subarachnoid hemorrhage. It was revealed that an aneurysm leads to the enhancement of lipid peroxidation with a significant increase in plasma F2-isoprostanes and F4-neuroprostanes (more than 3-fold and 11-fold, respectively) in comparison to healthy subjects. The rupture of an aneurysm results in hemorrhage and an additional increase in examined prostaglandin derivatives. The embolization and clipping of aneurysms contribute to a gradual restoration of metabolic homeostasis in brain cells, which is visible in the decrease in PUFA cyclization products. The results indicate that aneurysm development is associated with enhanced inflammation and oxidative stress, factors which favor lipid peroxidation, particularly in neurons, whose membranes are rich in docosahexaenoic acid, a precursor of F4-neuroprostanes.

  7. Presentation for the first research co-ordination meeting on development of kits for radioimmunometric assays for tumour markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavilondo, J.

    1997-01-01

    Regarding to PSA CIGB- IAEA project the center will be generating a panel of monoclonal antibodies against prostatic specific antigen (PSA) free and complexed to α1 antichymotrysin, and tissue polypeptide specific (TPS) antigen as potentially useful markers for the diagnosis of prostate and breast cancer using IRMA or RIA. The panel of monoclonal antibodies would be distributed in Cuba and another countries for the development of diagnostic Kits. The detailed objectives of the contract are: 1. To obtain a panel of monoclonal antibodies against prostatic specific antigen (PSA) complexed antichymotrysin. 2. To obtain a panel of monoclonal antibodies against free PSA. 3. To study the potential use for detect free or complexed PSA in the serum of patients with benign prostatic hypertrophy or prostatic neoplasia. 4. To obtain a panel of monoclonal antibodies against TPS. 5. To develop and validate IRMA or RIA assays using the panel of monoclonal antibodies. The objectives are designed according to the present knowledge on the field of monoclonal antibodies and diagnostic kits. Basic techniques for developing monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) have been used in our division for more than 10 years. The possibility to acquire commercial PSA antigen could reduced the overall time to obtain the Mabs, according with our experience. All these aspects support the idea that the proposing Cuban institutes are able to develop this research project and that its benefits will be applicable in the country and in the region

  8. Work-Family Life Courses and Metabolic Markers in the MRC National Survey of Health and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey, Rebecca E; Kumari, Meena; Sacker, Amanda; Stafford, Mai; Kuh, Diana; McMunn, Anne

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to investigate whether the combined work-family life courses of British men and women were associated with differences in metabolic markers-waist circumference, blood pressure, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, and glycated haemoglobin-in mid-life. We used data from the Medical Research Council's National Survey of Health and Development-the 1946 British birth cohort. Multi-channel sequence analysis was used to create a typology of eight work-family life course types combining information on work, partnerships and parenthood between ages 16-51. Linear regression tested associations between work-family types and metabolic outcomes at age 53 on multiply imputed data (20 imputations) of >2,400 participants. Compared with men with strong ties to employment and early transitions to family life, men who made later transitions to parenthood and maintained strong ties to paid work had smaller waist circumferences (-2.16cm, 95% CI: -3.73, -0.59), lower triglycerides (9.78% lower, 95% CI: 0.81, 17.94) and lower blood pressure (systolic: -4.03mmHg, 95% CI: -6.93, -1.13; diastolic: -2.34mmHg, 95% CI: -4.15, -0.53). Married men and women who didn't have children had increased high density lipoprotein cholesterol (7.23% higher, 95% CI: 0.68, 14.21) and lower waist circumferences (-4.67cm, 95% CI: -8.37, -0.97), respectively. For men later transitions to parenthood combined with strong ties to paid work were linked to reduced metabolic risk in mid-life. Fewer differences between work-family types and metabolic markers were seen for women.

  9. Development of a panel of genome-wide ancestry informative markers to study admixture throughout the Americas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Mark Galanter

    Full Text Available Most individuals throughout the Americas are admixed descendants of Native American, European, and African ancestors. Complex historical factors have resulted in varying proportions of ancestral contributions between individuals within and among ethnic groups. We developed a panel of 446 ancestry informative markers (AIMs optimized to estimate ancestral proportions in individuals and populations throughout Latin America. We used genome-wide data from 953 individuals from diverse African, European, and Native American populations to select AIMs optimized for each of the three main continental populations that form the basis of modern Latin American populations. We selected markers on the basis of locus-specific branch length to be informative, well distributed throughout the genome, capable of being genotyped on widely available commercial platforms, and applicable throughout the Americas by minimizing within-continent heterogeneity. We then validated the panel in samples from four admixed populations by comparing ancestry estimates based on the AIMs panel to estimates based on genome-wide association study (GWAS data. The panel provided balanced discriminatory power among the three ancestral populations and accurate estimates of individual ancestry proportions (R² > 0.9 for ancestral components with significant between-subject variance. Finally, we genotyped samples from 18 populations from Latin America using the AIMs panel and estimated variability in ancestry within and between these populations. This panel and its reference genotype information will be useful resources to explore population history of admixture in Latin America and to correct for the potential effects of population stratification in admixed samples in the region.

  10. Analysis of simple sequence repeats in the Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici genome and the development of microsatellite markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Feng, Yanxia; Sun, Haiyan; Deng, Yuanyu; Yu, Hanshou; Chen, Huaigu

    2014-11-01

    Understanding the genetic structure of Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici is essential for the establishment of efficient disease control strategies. It is becoming clear that microsatellites, or simple sequence repeats (SSRs), play an important role in genome organization and phenotypic diversity, and are a large source of genetic markers for population genetics and meiotic maps. In this study, we examined the G. graminis var. tritici genome (1) to analyze its pattern of SSRs, (2) to compare it with other plant pathogenic filamentous fungi, such as Magnaporthe oryzae and M. poae, and (3) to identify new polymorphic SSR markers for genetic diversity. The G. graminis var. tritici genome was rich in SSRs; a total 13,650 SSRs have been identified with mononucleotides being the most common motifs. In coding regions, the densities of tri- and hexanucleotides were significantly higher than in noncoding regions. The di-, tri-, tetra, penta, and hexanucleotide repeats in the G. graminis var. tritici genome were more abundant than the same repeats in M. oryzae and M. poae. From 115 devised primers, 39 SSRs are polymorphic with G. graminis var. tritici isolates, and 8 primers were randomly selected to analyze 116 isolates from China. The number of alleles varied from 2 to 7 and the expected heterozygosity (He) from 0.499 to 0.837. In conclusion, SSRs developed in this study were highly polymorphic, and our analysis indicated that G. graminis var. tritici is a species with high genetic diversity. The results provide a pioneering report for several applications, such as the assessment of population structure and genetic diversity of G. graminis var. tritici.

  11. Exploring the heat-responsive chaperones and microsatellite markers associated with terminal heat stress tolerance in developing wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ranjeet R; Goswami, Suneha; Shamim, Mohammad; Dubey, Kavita; Singh, Khushboo; Singh, Shweta; Kala, Yugal K; Niraj, Ravi R K; Sakhrey, Akshay; Singh, Gyanendra P; Grover, Monendra; Singh, Bhupinder; Rai, Gyanendra K; Rai, Anil K; Chinnusamy, Viswanathan; Praveen, Shelly

    2017-11-01

    Global warming is a major threat for agriculture and food security, and in many cases the negative impacts are already apparent. Wheat is one of the most important staple food crops and is highly sensitive to the heat stress (HS) during reproductive and grain-filling stages. Here, whole transcriptome analysis of thermotolerant wheat cv. HD2985 was carried out at the post-anthesis stage under control (22 ± 3 °C) and HS-treated (42 °C, 2 h) conditions using Illumina Hiseq and Roche GS-FLX 454 platforms. We assembled ~24 million (control) and ~23 million (HS-treated) high-quality trimmed reads using different assemblers with optimal parameters. De novo assembly yielded 52,567 (control) and 59,658 (HS-treated) unigenes. We observed 785 transcripts to be upregulated and 431 transcripts to be downregulated under HS; 78 transcripts showed >10-fold upregulation such as HSPs, metabolic pathway-related genes, etc. Maximum number of upregulated genes was observed to be associated with processes such as HS-response, protein-folding, oxidation-reduction and photosynthesis. We identified 2008 and 2483 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) markers from control and HS-treated samples; 243 SSRs were observed to be overlying on stress-associated genes. Polymorphic study validated four SSRs to be heat-responsive in nature. Expression analysis of identified differentially expressed transcripts (DETs) showed very high fold increase in the expression of catalytic chaperones (HSP26, HSP17, and Rca) in contrasting wheat cvs. HD2985 and HD2329 under HS. We observed positive correlation between RNA-seq and qRT-PCR expression data. The present study culminated in greater understanding of the heat-response of tolerant genotype and has provided good candidate genes for the marker development and screening of wheat germplasm for thermotolerance.

  12. Fractional-order Viscoelasticity (FOV): Constitutive Development Using the Fractional Calculus: First Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Alan; Diethelm, Kai; Luchko, Yury

    2002-01-01

    This is the first annual report to the U.S. Army Medical Research and Material Command for the three year project "Advanced Soft Tissue Modeling for Telemedicine and Surgical Simulation" supported by grant No. DAMD17-01-1-0673 to The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, to which the NASA Glenn Research Center is a subcontractor through Space Act Agreement SAA 3-445. The objective of this report is to extend popular one-dimensional (1D) fractional-order viscoelastic (FOV) materials models into their three-dimensional (3D) equivalents for finitely deforming continua, and to provide numerical algorithms for their solution.

  13. NERSC 2001 Annual Report; ANNUAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hules, John

    2001-01-01

    The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the primary computational resource for scientific research funded by the DOE Office of Science. The Annual Report for FY2001 includes a summary of recent computational science conducted on NERSC systems (with abstracts of significant and representative projects); information about NERSC's current systems and services; descriptions of Berkeley Lab's current research and development projects in applied mathematics, computer science, and computational science; and a brief summary of NERSC's Strategic Plan for 2002-2005

  14. Development, applications and distribution of DNA markers for genetic information for sorghum and maize improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, M.

    2001-01-01

    This final report summarizes the progress made towards the enhancement and distribution of genetic resources (e.g. genetic stocks, seed and DNA clones) used for basic and applied aspects of the genetic improvement of maize and sorghum. The genetic maps of maize and sorghum were improved through comparative mapping of RFLP loci detected by 124 maize cDNA clones and through the development of a new mapping population of maize. Comparative mapping between maize and sorghum and maize and rice, using the set of 124 maize cDNA clones (and other clones) in each study, substantiated previous observations of extensive conservation of locus order but it also provided strong evidence of numerous large-scale chromosomal rearrangements. The new mapping population for maize (intermated B73xMo17, 'IBM') was created by random intermating during the first segregating generation. Intermating for four generations prior to the derivation of recombinant inbred lines (RILs) increased the frequency of recombinants at many regions of the maize genome and provided better genetic resolution of locus order. Expansion of the maize genetic map was not uniform along the length of a linkage group and was less than the theoretical expectation. The 350 IBM RILs were genotyped at 512 loci detected by DNA clones, including 76 of the 124 supported by this contract. The production of the sorghum mapping population of RILs from the cross CK60xPI229828 has been delayed by weather conditions that were not conducive to plant growth and seed development. Seed of the IBM RILs have been distributed (approximately 5000 RILs in total) to 16 research organizations in the public and private sector. The DNA clones have been distributed (1,206 in total) to nine research labs. Further distribution of the seed and clones will be managed by curators at stock centers in the public domain. (author)

  15. Biochemical markers of bone turnover in the clinical development of drugs for osteoporosis and metastatic bone disease: potential uses and pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremers, Serge; Garnero, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    Biochemical markers of bone turnover are used increasingly during the clinical development of drugs for the treatment of metabolic bone diseases such as Paget's disease, osteoporosis and cancer that has metastasised to the bone. However, assessing the optimal value of these markers is often complicated, and such an assessment is an obvious prerequisite for rational use of the markers and, consequently, potential improvement of clinical drug development. Biochemical markers of bone turnover are substances in the blood or urine that are produced or released during bone remodelling. They provide semiquantitative information on bone remodelling, and are often the most adequate tool to describe the pharmacodynamics of the drug. Their use has increased considerably because of dose-effect relationships that have been seen with certain drugs, but also because they have proven relationships with clinical outcomes in several metabolic bone diseases. However, there is a lack of information on the kinetics of these markers, and the immunoassays that are frequently used in their monitoring often measure a mixture of fragments rather than a single molecular entity. For drug development it should also be realised that different markers, but also different assays for the same marker, may provide different results, considerably limiting the ability to compare results. In postmenopausal osteoporosis, relationships have been shown between several biochemical markers of bone turnover, and either fracture risk and/or the antifracture efficacy of drugs. Such relationships can be used for the development of drugs with similar mechanisms of action, but also for the development of these drugs for closely related indications, such as corticosteroid-induced osteoporosis. In both of these instances, data on effects on biochemical markers of bone turnover are usually employed in combination with information about effects on bone mineral density. However, the relationships of these parameters

  16. Nppa and Nppb act redundantly during zebrafish cardiac development to confine AVC marker expression and reduce cardiac jelly volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassini, Daniela R; Lagendijk, Anne K; De Angelis, Jessica E; Da Silva, Jason; Jeanes, Angela; Zettler, Nicole; Bower, Neil I; Hogan, Benjamin M; Smith, Kelly A

    2018-05-11

    Atrial natriuretic peptide ( nppa/anf ) and brain natriuretic peptide ( nppb/bnp ) form a gene cluster with expression in the chambers of the developing heart. Despite restricted expression, a function in cardiac development has not been demonstrated by mutant analysis. This is attributed to functional redundancy however their genomic location in cis has impeded formal analysis. Using genome-editing, we generated mutants for nppa and nppb and found single mutants indistinguishable from wildtype whereas nppa / nppb double mutants display heart morphogenesis defects and pericardial oedema. Analysis of atrioventricular canal (AVC) markers show expansion of bmp4 , tbx2b, has2 and versican expression into the atrium of double mutants. This expanded expression correlates with increased extracellular matrix in the atrium. Using a biosensor for Hyaluronic acid to measure the cardiac jelly (cardiac extracellular matrix), we confirm cardiac jelly expansion in nppa / nppb double mutants. Finally, bmp4 knockdown rescues the expansion of has2 expression and cardiac jelly in double mutants. This definitively shows that nppa and nppb function redundantly during cardiac development to restrict gene expression to the AVC, preventing excessive cardiac jelly synthesis in the atrial chamber. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  17. Morphological and behavioral markers of environmentally induced retardation of brain development: an animal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altman, J.

    1987-01-01

    In most neurotoxicological studies morphological assessment focuses on pathological effects, like degenerative changes in neuronal perikarya, axonopathy, demyelination, and glial and endothelial cell reactions. Similarly, the assessment of physiological and behavioral effects center on evident neurological symptoms, like EEG and EMG abnormalities, resting and intention tremor, abnormal gait, and abnormal reflexes. This paper reviews briefly another central nervous system target of harmful environmental agents, which results in behavioral abnormalities without any qualitatively evident neuropathology. This is called microneuronal hypoplasia, a retardation of brain development characterized by a quantitative reduction in the normal population of late-generated, short-axoned neurons in specific brain regions. Correlated descriptive and experimental neurogenetic studies in the rat have established that all the cerebellar granule cells and a very high proportion of hippocampal granule cells are produced postnatally, and that focal, low-dose X-irradiation either of the cerebellum or of the hippocampus after birth selectively interferes with the acquisition of the full complement of granule cells (microneuronal hypoplasia). Subsequent behavioral investigations showed that cerebellar microneuronal hypoplasia results in profound hyperactivity without motor abnormalities, while hippocampal microneuronal hypoplasia results in hyperactivity, as well as attentional and learning deficits. There is much indirect clinical evidence that various harmful environmental agents affecting the pregnant mother and/or the infant lead to such childhood disorders as hyperactivity and attentional and learning disorders. 109 references

  18. Development of New Submergence Tolerant Rice Variety for Bangladesh Using Marker-Assisted Backcrossing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khandakar Md Iftekharuddaula

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Submergence tolerant high yielding rice variety was developed using BR11 as a recipient parent applying foreground, phenotypic and background selection approaches. Recombinant selection was found essential to minimize linkage drag by BC2F2 generation. Without recombinant selection, the introgression size in the backcross recombinant lines (BRLs was approximately 15 Mb on the carrier chromosome. The BRLs were found submergence tolerance compared to the check varieties under complete submergence for two weeks at Bangladesh Rice Research Institute, and produced higher yield compared to the isogenic Sub1-line under controlled submerged condition. The BRL IR85260-66-654-Gaz2 was released as BRRI dhan52 in 2010, which was the first high yielding submergence tolerant variety in Bangladesh. BRRI dhan52 produced grain yield ranging from 4.2 to 5.2 t/hm2 under different flash flood prone areas of Bangladesh in three consecutive seasons. The study demonstrated the efficiency of recombinant selection and better adaptability of the newly released submergence tolerant high yielding variety in flash flood prone different areas of the country with respect to submergence tolerance and yield potential.

  19. Development of microsatellite markers for globally distributed populations of the threatened silky shark, Carcharhinus falciformis

    KAUST Repository

    O’Bryhim, J. R.

    2014-12-05

    Eighteen microsatellite loci were developed for the silky shark Carcharhinus falciformis and screened across a total of 53 individuals from the western Atlantic Ocean, Eastern Tropical Pacific Ocean, and Red Sea. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 3 to 19, observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.158 to 0.917, and the probability of identity values ranged from 0.010 to 0.460. Though believed to be one of the most abundant species of large sharks, C. falciformis were recently listed as “near threatened” globally and “vulnerable” in the Eastern Tropical Pacific by the IUCN, due to reductions in catch rates from both target and non-target fisheries (Dulvy et al. in Aquat Conserv 18:459–482, 2008). Very little information exists about the population structure and genetic diversity of C. falciformis around the world. These new loci will provide effective tools for examining the sustainability of this declining species. © 2014, Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

  20. Whole plastome sequences from five ginger species facilitate marker development and define limits to barcode methodology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin N Vaughn

    Full Text Available Plants from the Zingiberaceae family are a key source of spices and herbal medicines. Species identification within this group is critical in the search for known and possibly novel bioactive compounds. To facilitate precise characterization of this group, we have sequenced chloroplast genomes from species representing five major groups within Zingiberaceae. Generally, the structure of these genomes is similar to the basal angiosperm excepting an expansion of 3 kb associated with the inverted repeat A region. Portions of this expansion appear to be shared across the entire Zingiberales order, which includes gingers and bananas. We used whole plastome alignment information to develop DNA barcodes that would maximize the ability to differentiate species within the Zingiberaceae. Our computation pipeline identified regions of high variability that were flanked by highly conserved regions used for primer design. This approach yielded hitherto unexploited regions of variability. These theoretically optimal barcodes were tested on a range of species throughout the family and were found to amplify and differentiate genera and, in some cases, species. Still, though these barcodes were specifically optimized for the Zingiberaceae, our data support the emerging consensus that whole plastome sequences are needed for robust species identification and phylogenetics within this family.

  1. Development of cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS) and high-resolution melting (HRM) markers from the chloroplast genome of Glycyrrhiza species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Ick-Hyun; Sung, Jwakyung; Hong, Chi-Eun; Raveendar, Sebastin; Bang, Kyong-Hwan; Chung, Jong-Wook

    2018-05-01

    Licorice ( Glycyrrhiza glabra ) is an important medicinal crop often used as health foods or medicine worldwide. The molecular genetics of licorice is under scarce owing to lack of molecular markers. Here, we have developed cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS) and high-resolution melting (HRM) markers based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) by comparing the chloroplast genomes of two Glycyrrhiza species ( G. glabra and G. lepidota ). The CAPS and HRM markers were tested for diversity analysis with 24 Glycyrrhiza accessions. The restriction profiles generated with CAPS markers classified the accessions (2-4 genotypes) and melting curves (2-3) were obtained from the HRM markers. The number of alleles and major allele frequency were 2-6 and 0.31-0.92, respectively. The genetic distance and polymorphism information content values were 0.16-0.76 and 0.15-0.72, respectively. The phylogenetic relationships among the 24 accessions were estimated using a dendrogram, which classified them into four clades. Except clade III, the remaining three clades included the same species, confirming interspecies genetic correlation. These 18 CAPS and HRM markers might be helpful for genetic diversity assessment and rapid identification of licorice species.

  2. Development of COS-SNP and HRM markers for high-throughput and reliable haplotype-based detection of Lr14a in durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terracciano, Irma; Maccaferri, Marco; Bassi, Filippo; Mantovani, Paola; Sanguineti, Maria C; Salvi, Silvio; Simková, Hana; Doležel, Jaroslav; Massi, Andrea; Ammar, Karim; Kolmer, James; Tuberosa, Roberto

    2013-04-01

    Leaf rust (Puccinia triticina Eriks. & Henn.) is a major disease affecting durum wheat production. The Lr14a-resistant gene present in the durum wheat cv. Creso and its derivative cv. Colosseo is one of the best characterized leaf-rust resistance sources deployed in durum wheat breeding. Lr14a has been mapped close to the simple sequence repeat markers gwm146, gwm344 and wmc10 in the distal portion of the chromosome arm 7BL, a gene-dense region. The objectives of this study were: (1) to enrich the Lr14a region with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and high-resolution melting (HRM)-based markers developed from conserved ortholog set (COS) genes and from sequenced Diversity Array Technology (DArT(®)) markers; (2) to further investigate the gene content and colinearity of this region with the Brachypodium and rice genomes. Ten new COS-SNP and five HRM markers were mapped within an 8.0 cM interval spanning Lr14a. Two HRM markers pinpointed the locus in an interval of HRM designed for agarose gel electrophoresis/KASPar(®) assays and high-resolution melting analysis, respectively, as well as the double-marker combinations ubw14/ubw18, ubw14/ubw35 and wPt-4038-HRM-ubw35 will be useful for germplasm haplotyping and for molecular-assisted breeding.

  3. Introduction of an Electronic Forum for Annual Development Planning (A Case Study in Banyuasin Regency, South Sumatra, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irwanto Irwanto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Indonesian constitution was amended in 1999 and requested for local government to establish bottom up planning process that has been set as a standard approach to accommodate local aspiration in the making of annual development plan. The Musrenbang (Musyawarah Perencanaan Pembangunan/The Deliberation of development Plan was amended by Law No. 25/2004 as the stages of planning formulation process in which stakeholders and Public Administrator sit down for forum to communicate each other to find best means for local problem solution. Musrenbang need to modify since it tend to not work as become effective mechanism to accommodate aspirations of stakeholders (bottom level and hand them over to local government (upper level due to several barriers, such as; geographical distance, limited transportation system, irregular political intervention and bureaucratic red tape. Using Information Communication Technology (ICT that able to simplify the planning process by utilizing the people’s interactions expectedly can make simpler and faster procedure, including maximizing the role of Musrenbang. An Electronic forum for annual development planning will set to improve validity, effectiveness and efficiency. Banyuasin Regency, South Sumatera, Indonesia is now making preparation to introduce this system. PCM method was applied to analyze the problems for its introduction. Keywords: development plan, information communication technology, local government, musrenbang.

  4. Tumors markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi-Mizumoto, N.H.

    1989-01-01

    In order to study blood and cell components alterations (named tumor markers) that may indicate the presence of a tumor, several methods are presented. Aspects as diagnostic, prognostic, therapeutic value and clinical evaluation are discussed. (M.A.C.)

  5. Use of Moringa oleifera Flower Pod Extract as Natural Preservative and Development of SCAR Marker for Its DNA Based Identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gull, Iram; Javed, Attia; Aslam, Muhammad Shahbaz; Mushtaq, Roohi; Athar, Muhammad Amin

    2016-01-01

    The use of Moringa oleifera as natural food preservative has been evaluated in the present study. In addition, for quality assurance, the study has also been focused on the shelf life of product to authenticate the identification of plant by development of DNA based marker. Among the different extracts prepared from flower pods of Moringa oleifera, methanol and aqueous extract exhibited high antibacterial and antioxidant activity, respectively. The high phenolic contents (53.5 ± 0.169 mg GAE/g) and flavonoid contents (10.9 ± 0.094 mg QE/g) were also recorded in methanol and aqueous extract, respectively. Due to instability of bioactive compounds in aqueous extract, methanol extract is considered as potent natural preservative. The shelf life of methanol extract was observed for two months at 4°C under dark conditions. The developed SCAR primers (MOF217/317/MOR317) specifically amplified a fragment of 317 bp from DNA of Moringa oleifera samples collected from different regions of Punjab province of Pakistan. The methanol extract of Moringa oleifera flower pods has great potential to be used as natural preservative and nutraceutical in food industry.

  6. Development of Microsatellite Markers in the Branched Broomrape Phelipanche ramosa L. (Pomel and Evidence for Host-Associated Genetic Divergence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie Le Corre

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Phelipanche ramosa is a parasitic plant that infects numerous crops worldwide. In Western Europe it recently expanded to a new host crop, oilseed rape, in which it can cause severe yield losses. We developed 13 microsatellite markers for P. ramosa using next-generation 454 sequencing data. The polymorphism at each locus was assessed in a sample of 96 individuals collected in France within 6 fields cultivated with tobacco, hemp or oilseed rape. Two loci were monomorphic. At the other 11 loci, the number of alleles and the expected heterozygosity ranged from 3 to 6 and from 0.31 to 0.60, respectively. Genetic diversity within each cultivated field was very low. The host crop from which individuals were collected was the key factor structuring genetic variation. Individuals collected on oilseed rape were strongly differentiated from individuals collected on hemp or tobacco, which suggests that P. ramosa infecting oilseed rape forms a genetically diverged race. The microsatellites we developed will be useful for population genetics studies and for elucidating host-associated genetic divergence in P. ramosa.

  7. National Plan for Research - Development and Innovation, CERES Programme. Annual Scientific Session

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionescu-Bujor, Theodor; Dobrescu, Serban

    2002-01-01

    The CERES Programme is a research program organized in the frame of Institut of Atomic Physics, Bucharest, Romania. The annual scientific session held in Bucharest on December 2-3, 2002 covered the following 9 sections (projects): Mathematics (2); Physics (85); Chemistry (14); Engineering (2); Earth Sciences (13); Life Sciences (8); Economics and Social Studies (4); Culture (4); Works received after the deadline. The most numerous contributions within the INIS scope addressed subjects from the fields: theoretical and experimental nuclear physics, seismic survey and prognoses, high energy physics and quantum field theory, physical properties of materials, nuclear spectroscopic instrumentation, nuclear methods in isotopic analysis. The contributors presented their results obtained under research contracts supported by the Romanian Ministry of Education and Research in the period October 15, 2001 - October 15, 2002. Many of the reported research works were done in collaborations with international organizations or institutes from abroad

  8. IDA Gamma-Ray Laser Annual Summary Report (1990): Investigation of the Feasibility of Developing A Laser Using Nuclear Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-04-01

    Broadening in the Theory of Superradiant Emission," Acta Physica Polonica , Vol. A39, 1971, pp. 633-638. 8. B. Balko, I.W. Kay, and J. Neuberger, IDA...Cuopy 1 3 of 60 copies AD-A259 475 IDA PAPER P-2533 IDA GAMMA-RAY LASER ANNUAL SUMMARY REPORT (1990) Investigation of the Feasibility of Developing a ...embody results of major projects which ( a ) have a direct bearing on decisions affecting major programs, (b) address issues of significant concern to

  9. Developing market class specific InDel markers from next generation sequence data in Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira eMafi Moghaddam

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Next generation sequence data provides valuable information and tools for genetic and genomic research and offers new insights useful for marker development. This data is useful for the design of accurate and user-friendly molecular tools. Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. is a diverse crop in which separate domestication events happened in each gene pool followed by race and market class diversification that has resulted in different morphological characteristics in each commercial market class. This has led to essentially independent breeding programs within each market class which in turn has resulted in limited within market class sequence variation. Sequence data from selected genotypes of five bean market classes (pinto, black, navy, and light and dark red kidney were used to develop InDel-based markers specific to each market class. Design of the InDel markers was conducted through a combination of assembly, alignment and primer design software using 1.6x to 5.1x coverage of Illumina GAII sequence data for each of the selected genotypes. The procedure we developed for primer design is fast, accurate, less error prone, and higher throughput than when they are designed manually. All InDel markers are easy to run and score with no need for PCR optimization. A total of 2,687 InDel markers distributed across the genome were developed. To highlight their usefulness, they were employed to construct a phylogenetic tree and a genetic map, showing that InDel markers are reliable, simple, and accurate.

  10. A second generation framework for the analysis of microsatellites in expressed sequence tags and the development of EST-SSR markers for a conifer, Cryptomeria japonica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ueno Saneyoshi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSRs in expressed sequence tags (ESTs are useful resources for genome analysis because of their abundance, functionality and polymorphism. The advent of commercial second generation sequencing machines has lead to new strategies for developing EST-SSR markers, necessitating the development of bioinformatic framework that can keep pace with the increasing quality and quantity of sequence data produced. We describe an open scheme for analyzing ESTs and developing EST-SSR markers from reads collected by Sanger sequencing and pyrosequencing of sugi (Cryptomeria japonica. Results We collected 141,097 sequence reads by Sanger sequencing and 1,333,444 by pyrosequencing. After trimming contaminant and low quality sequences, 118,319 Sanger and 1,201,150 pyrosequencing reads were passed to the MIRA assembler, generating 81,284 contigs that were analysed for SSRs. 4,059 SSRs were found in 3,694 (4.54% contigs, giving an SSR frequency lower than that in seven other plant species with gene indices (5.4–21.9%. The average GC content of the SSR-containing contigs was 41.55%, compared to 40.23% for all contigs. Tri-SSRs were the most common SSRs; the most common motif was AT, which was found in 655 (46.3% di-SSRs, followed by the AAG motif, found in 342 (25.9% tri-SSRs. Most (72.8% tri-SSRs were in coding regions, but 55.6% of the di-SSRs were in non-coding regions; the AT motif was most abundant in 3′ untranslated regions. Gene ontology (GO annotations showed that six GO terms were significantly overrepresented within SSR-containing contigs. Forty–four EST-SSR markers were developed from 192 primer pairs using two pipelines: read2Marker and the newly-developed CMiB, which combines several open tools. Markers resulting from both pipelines showed no differences in PCR success rate and polymorphisms, but PCR success and polymorphism were significantly affected by the expected PCR product size

  11. A second generation framework for the analysis of microsatellites in expressed sequence tags and the development of EST-SSR markers for a conifer, Cryptomeria japonica

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSRs) in expressed sequence tags (ESTs) are useful resources for genome analysis because of their abundance, functionality and polymorphism. The advent of commercial second generation sequencing machines has lead to new strategies for developing EST-SSR markers, necessitating the development of bioinformatic framework that can keep pace with the increasing quality and quantity of sequence data produced. We describe an open scheme for analyzing ESTs and developing EST-SSR markers from reads collected by Sanger sequencing and pyrosequencing of sugi (Cryptomeria japonica). Results We collected 141,097 sequence reads by Sanger sequencing and 1,333,444 by pyrosequencing. After trimming contaminant and low quality sequences