WorldWideScience

Sample records for marine model organism

  1. Implementing Marine Organic Aerosols Into the GEOS-Chem Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew S.

    2015-01-01

    Marine-sourced organic aerosols (MOA) have been shown to play an important role in tropospheric chemistry by impacting surface mass, cloud condensation nuclei, and ice nuclei concentrations over remote marine and coastal regions. In this work, an online marine primary organic aerosol emission parameterization, designed to be used for both global and regional models, was implemented into the GEOS-Chem model. The implemented emission scheme improved the large under-prediction of organic aerosol concentrations in clean marine regions (normalized mean bias decreases from -79% when using the default settings to -12% when marine organic aerosols are added). Model predictions were also in good agreement (correlation coefficient of 0.62 and normalized mean bias of -36%) with hourly surface concentrations of MOA observed during the summertime at an inland site near Paris, France. Our study shows that MOA have weaker coastal-to-inland concentration gradients than sea-salt aerosols, leading to several inland European cities having > 10% of their surface submicron organic aerosol mass concentration with a marine source. The addition of MOA tracers to GEOS-Chem enabled us to identify the regions with large contributions of freshly-emitted or aged aerosol having distinct physicochemical properties, potentially indicating optimal locations for future field studies.

  2. Model evaluation of marine primary organic aerosol emission schemes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Gantt

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, several marine primary organic aerosol (POA emission schemes have been evaluated using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model in order to provide guidance for their implementation in air quality and climate models. These emission schemes, based on varying dependencies of chlorophyll a concentration ([chl a] and 10 m wind speed (U10, have large differences in their magnitude, spatial distribution, and seasonality. Model comparison with weekly and monthly mean values of the organic aerosol mass concentration at two coastal sites shows that the source function exclusively related to [chl a] does a better job replicating surface observations. Sensitivity simulations in which the negative U10 and positive [chl a] dependence of the organic mass fraction of sea spray aerosol are enhanced show improved prediction of the seasonality of the marine POA concentrations. A top-down estimate of submicron marine POA emissions based on the parameterization that compares best to the observed weekly and monthly mean values of marine organic aerosol surface concentrations has a global average emission rate of 6.3 Tg yr−1. Evaluation of existing marine POA source functions against a case study during which marine POA contributed the major fraction of submicron aerosol mass shows that none of the existing parameterizations are able to reproduce the hourly-averaged observations. Our calculations suggest that in order to capture episodic events and short-term variability in submicron marine POA concentration over the ocean, new source functions need to be developed that are grounded in the physical processes unique to the organic fraction of sea spray aerosol.

  3. Model evaluation of marine primary organic aerosol emission schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, B.; Johnson, M. S.; Meskhidze, N.; Sciare, J.; Ovadnevaite, J.; Ceburnis, D.; O'Dowd, C. D.

    2012-09-01

    In this study, several marine primary organic aerosol (POA) emission schemes have been evaluated using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model in order to provide guidance for their implementation in air quality and climate models. These emission schemes, based on varying dependencies of chlorophyll a concentration ([chl a]) and 10 m wind speed (U10), have large differences in their magnitude, spatial distribution, and seasonality. Model comparison with weekly and monthly mean values of the organic aerosol mass concentration at two coastal sites shows that the source function exclusively related to [chl a] does a better job replicating surface observations. Sensitivity simulations in which the negative U10 and positive [chl a] dependence of the organic mass fraction of sea spray aerosol are enhanced show improved prediction of the seasonality of the marine POA concentrations. A top-down estimate of submicron marine POA emissions based on the parameterization that compares best to the observed weekly and monthly mean values of marine organic aerosol surface concentrations has a global average emission rate of 6.3 Tg yr-1. Evaluation of existing marine POA source functions against a case study during which marine POA contributed the major fraction of submicron aerosol mass shows that none of the existing parameterizations are able to reproduce the hourly-averaged observations. Our calculations suggest that in order to capture episodic events and short-term variability in submicron marine POA concentration over the ocean, new source functions need to be developed that are grounded in the physical processes unique to the organic fraction of sea spray aerosol.

  4. Biobanking of a Marine Invertebrate Model Organism: The Sea Urchin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estefania Paredes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The sea urchin has long been used as an invertebrate model organism in developmental biology, membrane transport and sperm oocyte interactions, and for the assessment of marine pollution. This review explores the effects of cryopreservation and biobanking in the biology and development of sea urchins, all the way from germaplasm through to juveniles. This review will provide an integral view of the process and all that is known so far about the biology of cryopreserved sea urchins, as well as provide an insight on the applications of the biobanking of these model organisms.

  5. Terrestrial and marine perspectives on modeling organic matter degradation pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burd, Adrian B; Frey, Serita; Cabre, Anna; Ito, Takamitsu; Levine, Naomi M; Lønborg, Christian; Long, Matthew; Mauritz, Marguerite; Thomas, R Quinn; Stephens, Brandon M; Vanwalleghem, Tom; Zeng, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Organic matter (OM) plays a major role in both terrestrial and oceanic biogeochemical cycles. The amount of carbon stored in these systems is far greater than that of carbon dioxide (CO2 ) in the atmosphere, and annual fluxes of CO2 from these pools to the atmosphere exceed those from fossil fuel combustion. Understanding the processes that determine the fate of detrital material is important for predicting the effects that climate change will have on feedbacks to the global carbon cycle. However, Earth System Models (ESMs) typically utilize very simple formulations of processes affecting the mineralization and storage of detrital OM. Recent changes in our view of the nature of this material and the factors controlling its transformation have yet to find their way into models. In this review, we highlight the current understanding of the role and cycling of detrital OM in terrestrial and marine systems and examine how this pool of material is represented in ESMs. We include a discussion of the different mineralization pathways available as organic matter moves from soils, through inland waters to coastal systems and ultimately into open ocean environments. We argue that there is strong commonality between aspects of OM transformation in both terrestrial and marine systems and that our respective scientific communities would benefit from closer collaboration.

  6. Global distribution and climate forcing of marine organic aerosol – Part 1: Model improvements and evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Meskhidze

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Marine organic aerosol emissions have been implemented and evaluated within the National Center of Atmospheric Research (NCAR's Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5 with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's 7-mode Modal Aerosol Module (MAM-7. Emissions of marine primary organic aerosols (POA, phytoplankton-produced isoprene- and monoterpenes-derived secondary organic aerosols (SOA and methane sulfonate (MS are shown to affect surface concentrations of organic aerosols in remote marine regions. Global emissions of submicron marine POA is estimated to be 7.9 and 9.4 Tg yr−1, for the Gantt et al. (2011 and Vignati et al. (2010 emission parameterizations, respectively. Marine sources of SOA and particulate MS (containing both sulfur and carbon atoms contribute an additional 0.2 and 5.1 Tg yr−1, respectively. Widespread areas over productive waters of the Northern Atlantic, Northern Pacific, and the Southern Ocean show marine-source submicron organic aerosol surface concentrations of 100 ng m−3, with values up to 400 ng m−3 over biologically productive areas. Comparison of long-term surface observations of water insoluble organic matter (WIOM with POA concentrations from the two emission parameterizations shows that both Gantt et al. (2011 and Vignati et al. (2010 formulations are able to capture the magnitude of marine organic aerosol concentrations, with the Gantt et al. (2011 parameterization attaining better seasonality. Model simulations show that the mixing state of the marine POA can impact the surface number concentration of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN. The largest increases (up to 20 % in CCN (at a supersaturation (S of 0.2 % number concentration are obtained over biologically productive ocean waters when marine organic aerosol is assumed to be externally mixed with sea-salt. Assuming marine organics are internally-mixed with sea-salt provides

  7. Global distribution and climate forcing of marine organic aerosol - Part 1: Model improvements and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meskhidze, N.; Xu, J.; Gantt, B.; Zhang, Y.; Nenes, A.; Ghan, S. J.; Liu, X.; Easter, R.; Zaveri, R.

    2011-07-01

    Marine organic aerosol emissions have been implemented and evaluated within the National Center of Atmospheric Research (NCAR)'s Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5) with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's 7-mode Modal Aerosol Module (MAM-7). Emissions of marine primary organic aerosols (POA), phytoplankton-produced isoprene- and monoterpenes-derived secondary organic aerosols (SOA) and methane sulfonate (MS-) are shown to affect surface concentrations of organic aerosols in remote marine regions. Global emissions of submicron marine POA is estimated to be 7.9 and 9.4 Tg yr-1, for the Gantt et al. (2011) and Vignati et al. (2010) emission parameterizations, respectively. Marine sources of SOA and particulate MS- (containing both sulfur and carbon atoms) contribute an additional 0.2 and 5.1 Tg yr-1, respectively. Widespread areas over productive waters of the Northern Atlantic, Northern Pacific, and the Southern Ocean show marine-source submicron organic aerosol surface concentrations of 100 ng m-3, with values up to 400 ng m-3 over biologically productive areas. Comparison of long-term surface observations of water insoluble organic matter (WIOM) with POA concentrations from the two emission parameterizations shows that both Gantt et al. (2011) and Vignati et al. (2010) formulations are able to capture the magnitude of marine organic aerosol concentrations, with the Gantt et al. (2011) parameterization attaining better seasonality. Model simulations show that the mixing state of the marine POA can impact the surface number concentration of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). The largest increases (up to 20 %) in CCN (at a supersaturation (S) of 0.2 %) number concentration are obtained over biologically productive ocean waters when marine organic aerosol is assumed to be externally mixed with sea-salt. Assuming marine organics are internally-mixed with sea-salt provides diverse results with increase and decrease in the concentration of CCN over different parts of

  8. Global distribution and climate forcing of marine organic aerosol: 1. Model improvements and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meskhidze, N.; Xu, J.; Gantt, B.; Zhang, Y.; Nenes, A.; Ghan, S. J.; Liu, X.; Easter, R.; Zaveri, R.

    2011-11-01

    Marine organic aerosol emissions have been implemented and evaluated within the National Center of Atmospheric Research (NCAR)'s Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5) with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's 7-mode Modal Aerosol Module (MAM-7). Emissions of marine primary organic aerosols (POA), phytoplankton-produced isoprene- and monoterpenes-derived secondary organic aerosols (SOA) and methane sulfonate (MS-) are shown to affect surface concentrations of organic aerosols in remote marine regions. Global emissions of submicron marine POA is estimated to be 7.9 and 9.4 Tg yr-1, for the Gantt et al. (2011) and Vignati et al. (2010) emission parameterizations, respectively. Marine sources of SOA and particulate MS- (containing both sulfur and carbon atoms) contribute an additional 0.2 and 5.1 Tg yr-1, respectively. Widespread areas over productive waters of the Northern Atlantic, Northern Pacific, and the Southern Ocean show marine-source submicron organic aerosol surface concentrations of 100 ng m-3, with values up to 400 ng m-3 over biologically productive areas. Comparison of long-term surface observations of water insoluble organic matter (WIOM) with POA concentrations from the two emission parameterizations shows that despite revealed discrepancies (often more than a factor of 2), both Gantt et al. (2011) and Vignati et al. (2010) formulations are able to capture the magnitude of marine organic aerosol concentrations, with the Gantt et al. (2011) parameterization attaining better seasonality. Model simulations show that the mixing state of the marine POA can impact the surface number concentration of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). The largest increases (up to 20%) in CCN (at a supersaturation (S) of 0.2%) number concentration are obtained over biologically productive ocean waters when marine organic aerosol is assumed to be externally mixed with sea-salt. Assuming marine organics are internally-mixed with sea-salt provides diverse results with increases

  9. Global distribution and climate forcing of marine organic aerosol: 1. Model improvements and evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Meskhidze

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Marine organic aerosol emissions have been implemented and evaluated within the National Center of Atmospheric Research (NCAR's Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5 with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's 7-mode Modal Aerosol Module (MAM-7. Emissions of marine primary organic aerosols (POA, phytoplankton-produced isoprene- and monoterpenes-derived secondary organic aerosols (SOA and methane sulfonate (MS are shown to affect surface concentrations of organic aerosols in remote marine regions. Global emissions of submicron marine POA is estimated to be 7.9 and 9.4 Tg yr−1, for the Gantt et al. (2011 and Vignati et al. (2010 emission parameterizations, respectively. Marine sources of SOA and particulate MS (containing both sulfur and carbon atoms contribute an additional 0.2 and 5.1 Tg yr−1, respectively. Widespread areas over productive waters of the Northern Atlantic, Northern Pacific, and the Southern Ocean show marine-source submicron organic aerosol surface concentrations of 100 ng m−3, with values up to 400 ng m−3 over biologically productive areas. Comparison of long-term surface observations of water insoluble organic matter (WIOM with POA concentrations from the two emission parameterizations shows that despite revealed discrepancies (often more than a factor of 2, both Gantt et al. (2011 and Vignati et al. (2010 formulations are able to capture the magnitude of marine organic aerosol concentrations, with the Gantt et al. (2011 parameterization attaining better seasonality. Model simulations show that the mixing state of the marine POA can impact the surface number concentration of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN. The largest increases (up to 20% in CCN (at a supersaturation (S of 0.2% number concentration are obtained over biologically productive ocean waters when marine organic aerosol is assumed to be externally mixed with sea-salt. Assuming

  10. The copepod Tigriopus: a promising marine model organism for ecotoxicology and environmental genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raisuddin, Sheikh; Kwok, Kevin W H; Leung, Kenneth M Y; Schlenk, Daniel; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2007-07-20

    There is an increasing body of evidence to support the significant role of invertebrates in assessing impacts of environmental contaminants on marine ecosystems. Therefore, in recent years massive efforts have been directed to identify viable and ecologically relevant invertebrate toxicity testing models. Tigriopus, a harpacticoid copepod has a number of promising characteristics which make it a candidate worth consideration in such efforts. Tigriopus and other copepods are widely distributed and ecologically important organisms. Their position in marine food chains is very prominent, especially with regard to the transfer of energy. Copepods also play an important role in the transportation of aquatic pollutants across the food chains. In recent years there has been a phenomenal increase in the knowledge base of Tigriopus spp., particularly in the areas of their ecology, geophylogeny, genomics and their behavioural, biochemical and molecular responses following exposure to environmental stressors and chemicals. Sequences of a number of important marker genes have been studied in various Tigriopus spp., notably T. californicus and T. japonicus. These genes belong to normal biophysiological functions (e.g. electron transport system enzymes) as well as stress and toxic chemical exposure responses (heat shock protein 20, glutathione reductase, glutathione S-transferase). Recently, 40,740 expressed sequenced tags (ESTs) from T. japonicus, have been sequenced and of them, 5,673 ESTs showed significant hits (E-value, >1.0E-05) to the red flour beetle Tribolium genome database. Metals and organic pollutants such as antifouling agents, pesticides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and polychrlorinated biphenyls (PCB) have shown reproducible biological responses when tested in Tigriopus spp. Promising results have been obtained when Tigriopus was used for assessment of risk associated with exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Application of environmental

  11. The copepod Tigriopus: A promising marine model organism for ecotoxicology and environmental genomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raisuddin, Sheikh [Department of Chemistry and the National Research Lab of Marine Molecular and Environmental Bioscience, College of Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kwok, Kevin W.H. [Swire Institute of Marine Science, Department of Ecology and Biodiversity, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong (China); Leung, Kenneth M.Y. [Swire Institute of Marine Science, Department of Ecology and Biodiversity, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong (China); Schlenk, Daniel [Department of Environmental Sciences, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Lee, Jae-Seong [Department of Chemistry and the National Research Lab of Marine Molecular and Environmental Bioscience, College of Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: jslee2@hanyang.ac.kr

    2007-07-20

    There is an increasing body of evidence to support the significant role of invertebrates in assessing impacts of environmental contaminants on marine ecosystems. Therefore, in recent years massive efforts have been directed to identify viable and ecologically relevant invertebrate toxicity testing models. Tigriopus, a harpacticoid copepod has a number of promising characteristics which make it a candidate worth consideration in such efforts. Tigriopus and other copepods are widely distributed and ecologically important organisms. Their position in marine food chains is very prominent, especially with regard to the transfer of energy. Copepods also play an important role in the transportation of aquatic pollutants across the food chains. In recent years there has been a phenomenal increase in the knowledge base of Tigriopus spp., particularly in the areas of their ecology, geophylogeny, genomics and their behavioural, biochemical and molecular responses following exposure to environmental stressors and chemicals. Sequences of a number of important marker genes have been studied in various Tigriopus spp., notably T. californicus and T. japonicus. These genes belong to normal biophysiological functions (e.g. electron transport system enzymes) as well as stress and toxic chemical exposure responses (heat shock protein 20, glutathione reductase, glutathione S-transferase). Recently, 40,740 expressed sequenced tags (ESTs) from T. japonicus, have been sequenced and of them, 5673 ESTs showed significant hits (E-value, >1.0E-05) to the red flour beetle Tribolium genome database. Metals and organic pollutants such as antifouling agents, pesticides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and polychrlorinated biphenyls (PCB) have shown reproducible biological responses when tested in Tigriopus spp. Promising results have been obtained when Tigriopus was used for assessment of risk associated with exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Application of environmental

  12. Integrated network modelling for identifying microbial mechanisms of particulate organic carbon accumulation in coastal marine systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Karlie; Turk, Valentina; Mozetič, Patricija; Tinta, Tinkara; Malfatti, Francesca; Hannah, David; Krause, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Accumulation of particulate organic carbon (POC) has the potential to change the structure and function of marine ecosystems. High abidance of POC can develop into aggregates, known as marine snow or mucus aggregates that can impair essential marine ecosystem functioning and services. Currently marine POC formation, accumulation and sedimentation processes are being explored as potential pathways to remove CO2 from the atmosphere by CO2 sequestration via fixation into biomass by phytoplankton. However, the current ability of scientists, environmental managers and regulators to analyse and predict high POC concentrations is restricted by the limited understanding of the dynamic nature of the microbial mechanisms regulating POC accumulation events in marine environments. We present a proof of concept study that applies a novel Bayesian Networks (BN) approach to integrate relevant biological and physical-chemical variables across spatial and temporal scales in order to identify the interactions of the main contributing microbial mechanisms regulating POC accumulation in the northern Adriatic Sea. Where previous models have characterised only the POC formed, the BN approach provides a probabilistic framework for predicting the occurrence of POC accumulation by linking biotic factors with prevailing environmental conditions. In this paper the BN was used to test three scenarios (diatom, nanoflagellate, and dinoflagellate blooms). The scenarios predicted diatom blooms to produce high chlorophyll a at the water surface while nanoflagellate blooms were predicted to occur at lower depths (> 6m) in the water column and produce lower chlorophyll a concentrations. A sensitivity analysis identified the variables with the greatest influence on POC accumulation being the enzymes protease and alkaline phosphatase, which highlights the importance of microbial community interactions. The developed proof of concept BN model allows for the first time to quantify the impacts of

  13. Modeling the role of microplastics in Bioaccumulation of organic chemicals to marine aquatic organisms. Critical Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koelmans, A.A.

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown that ingestion of microplastics may increase bioaccumulation of organic chemicals by aquatic organisms. This paper critically reviews the literature on the effects of plastic ingestion on the bioaccumulation of organic chemicals, emphasizing quantitative approaches and mechanistic

  14. Intellectual Organization in the New Model of the Russian Marine Industry Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.A. Kostrikova

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The role of intellectual organizations in the formation of professional competence, social adaptability and volitional qualities of workers of marine industry is actual in terms of growth of natural and man-made emergency situations, unstable socio-economic environment. In the marine industry, except for the education system and research, such organizations have prospects of development as the most competitive in the shipbuilding, fishing industry, port management, the logistics of fishing in the ocean and coastal fisheries, transport and storage prior to further processing. In this article is proposed a holistic resource approach to the formation of intellectual organization as a major maritime educational complex that integrates all stages of maritime specialist training, from a seaman to a master of a large ship including active research and intense maritime practice.

  15. Climatic Effects of Marine Organic Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, J.; Meskhidze, N.; Zhang, Y.; Gantt, B.; Ghan, S. J.; Nenes, A.; Liu, X.; Easter, R. C.; Zaveri, R. A.

    2009-12-01

    Recent studies suggest that the emissions of primary organic matter (POM) of marine biogenic origin and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from phytoplankton-produced volatile organic compounds can lead to changes of chemical composition and size distribution of marine aerosol, thus modifying the cloud droplet activation potential and affecting climate. In this study, the effects of marine organic aerosol emissions and the dissolved marine organic aerosol components as surfactant are explored using the National Center of Atmospheric Research’s Community Atmosphere Model, coupled with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s Modal Aerosol Model (CAM-MAM). Primary marine organic aerosol emissions are separated into sub- and super-micron modes, and calculated based on wind speed-dependent sea-spray mass flux and remotely-sensed surface chlorophyll-a concentration. Two distinct sea spray emission functions used in this study yield different amounts and spatial distributions of sub-micron marine POM mass flux. The super-micron sea-spray flux is determined based on simulated sea-spray number flux. Both sub and super-micron marine POM are assumed to be mostly water-insoluble and added in the accumulation mode and coarse sea-salt mode, respectively. A prescribed soluble mass fraction of 50% is assumed for marine SOA, formed from phytoplankton-emitted isoprene and allowed to be condensed on existing aerosols in different modes. Surfactant effects from the soluble part of sub-micron marine POM are included in the cloud droplet activation parameterization by some modifications based on the mass fraction of dissolved marine POM. 10 year model simulations are conducted to examine the effects of marine organic aerosols on cloud microphysical and optical properties. Analyses of model results show that different marine aerosol emissions and cloud droplet activation mechanisms can yield 9% to 16% increase in global maritime mean cloud droplet number concentration. Changes

  16. New pharmaceuticals from marine organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenical, W

    1997-09-01

    Definitions of 'marine biotechnology' often refer to the vast potential of the oceans to lead to new cures for human and animal disease; the exploitation of natural drugs has always been the most basic form of biotechnology. Although only initiated in the late 1970s, natural drug discovery from the world's oceans has been accelerated by the chemical uniqueness of marine organisms and by the need to develop drugs for contemporary, difficult to cure, diseases. Current research activities, while primarily within the academic laboratories, have generated convincing evidence that marine drug discovery has an exceedingly bright future.

  17. The mysid Siriella armata as a model organism in marine ecotoxicology: comparative acute toxicity sensitivity with Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Sara; Beiras, Ricardo

    2010-01-01

    Siriella armata (Crustacea, Mysidacea) is a component of the coastal zooplankton that lives in swarms in the shallow waters of the European neritic zone, from the North Sea to the Mediterranean. Juveniles of this species were examined as standard test organisms for use in marine acute toxicity tests. The effects of reference toxicants, three trace metals (Copper, Cadmium and Zinc), and one surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) were studied on S. armata neonates (\\24 h) reared in the laboratory. Acute toxicity tests were carried out with filtered sea water on individual chambers (microplate wells for metals or glass vials for SDS) incubated in an isothermal room at 20 degrees C, with 16 h light: 8 h dark photoperiod for 96 h. Each neonate was fed daily with 10-15 nauplii of Artemia salina. Acute (96 h) LC50 values, in increasing order, were 46.9 lg/L for Cu, 99.3 lg/L for Cd, 466.7 lg/L for Zn and 8.5 mg/L for SDS. The LC(10), NOEC and LOEC values were also calculated. Results were compared with Daphnia magna, a freshwater cladoceran widely used as a standard ecotoxicological test organism. Acute (48 h) LC(50) values were 56.2 lg/L for Cu, 571.5 lg/L for Cd, 1.3 mg/L for Zn and 27.3 mg/L for SDS. For all the reference toxicants studied, the marine mysid Siriella armata showed higher sensitivity than the freshwater model organism Daphnia magna, validating the use of Siriella mysids as model organisms in marine acute toxicity tests.

  18. Remote sensing and GIS for the modeling of persistent organic pollutant in the marine environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costanzini, S.; Teggi, S.; Bigi, A.; Ghermandi, G.

    2014-10-01

    The characterization of the marine environment plays an important role in the understanding of the dynamics affecting the transport, fate and persistence (TFP) of Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs). This work is part of a project funded by the Ministero dell'Istruzione, dell'Università e della Ricerca. The aim of the project is the assessment of the TFP of POPs in the Mediterranean sea. The analysis will be carried out at regionalmesoscale (central Mediterranean), and at local spatial scale considering different Italian test sites (the Delta of the Po River, the Venice Lagoon and the estuary of the Rio Nocella). The first step of this work involves the implementation of GIS geodatabases for the definition of the input dataset. The geodatabases were populated with MERIS and MODIS level 2 and level 3 products of Chlorophyll-a (CHL-a), Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter (CDOM), Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT), Diffuse Attenuation Coefficient (DAC), Particulate Inorganic Carbon (PIC), Particulate Organic Carbon (POC) and Sea Surface Temperature (SST). The spatial scale (central Mediterranean sea) and the reference system (Plate Carrée projection) have been imposed as a constraint for the geodatabases. Four geodatabases have been implemented, two for MODIS and two for MERIS products with a monthly, seasonal and climatological temporal scale (2002 -2013). Here, we present a first application of a methodology aimed to identify vulnerable areas to POPs accumulation and persistence. The methodology allowed to assess the spatial distribution of the CHL-a in the central Mediterranean sea. The chlorophyll concentration is related to the amount of nutrients in the water and therefore provides an indicator of the potential presence of POPs. A pilot area of 300 x 200 km located in the North Adriatic sea has been initially considered. The seasonal and climatological MODIS and MERIS CHL-a variability were retrieved and compared with in-situ forcing parameters, i.e. Po River

  19. Effect of Terrestrial and Marine Organic Aerosol on Regional and Global Climate: Model Development, Application, and Verification with Satellite Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meskhidze, Nicholas; Zhang, Yang; Kamykowski, Daniel

    2012-03-28

    In this DOE project the improvements to parameterization of marine primary organic matter (POM) emissions, hygroscopic properties of marine POM, marine isoprene derived secondary organic aerosol (SOA) emissions, surfactant effects, new cloud droplet activation parameterization have been implemented into Community Atmosphere Model (CAM 5.0), with a seven mode aerosol module from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)'s Modal Aerosol Model (MAM7). The effects of marine aerosols derived from sea spray and ocean emitted biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) on microphysical properties of clouds were explored by conducting 10 year CAM5.0-MAM7 model simulations at a grid resolution 1.9° by 2.5° with 30 vertical layers. Model-predicted relationship between ocean physical and biological systems and the abundance of CCN in remote marine atmosphere was compared to data from the A-Train satellites (MODIS, CALIPSO, AMSR-E). Model simulations show that on average, primary and secondary organic aerosol emissions from the ocean can yield up to 20% increase in Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) at 0.2% Supersaturation, and up to 5% increases in droplet number concentration of global maritime shallow clouds. Marine organics were treated as internally or externally mixed with sea salt. Changes associated with cloud properties reduced (absolute value) the model-predicted short wave cloud forcing from -1.35 Wm-2 to -0.25 Wm-2. By using different emission scenarios, and droplet activation parameterizations, this study suggests that addition of marine primary aerosols and biologically generated reactive gases makes an important difference in radiative forcing assessments. All baseline and sensitivity simulations for 2001 and 2050 using global-through-urban WRF/Chem (GU-WRF) were completed. The main objective of these simulations was to evaluate the capability of GU-WRF for an accurate representation of the global atmosphere by exploring the most accurate

  20. Spatial modelling of marine organisms in Forsmark and Oskarshamn. Including calculation of physical predictor variables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlen, Ida; Nikolopoulos, Anna; Isaeus, Martin (AquaBiota Water Research, Stockholm (SE))

    2007-06-15

    GIS grids (maps) of marine parameters were created using point data from previous site investigations in the Forsmark and Oskarshamn areas. The proportion of global radiation reaching the sea bottom in Forsmark and Oskarshamn was calculated in ArcView, using Secchi depth measurements and the digital elevation models for the respective area. The number of days per year when the incoming light exceeds 5 MJ/m2 at the bottom was then calculated using the result of the previous calculations together with measured global radiation. Existing modelled grid-point data on bottom and pelagic temperature for Forsmark were interpolated to create surface covering grids. Bottom and pelagic temperature grids for Oskarshamn were calculated using point measurements to achieve yearly averages for a few points and then using regressions with existing grids to create new maps. Phytoplankton primary production in Forsmark was calculated using point measurements of chlorophyll and irradiance, and a regression with a modelled grid of Secchi depth. Distribution of biomass of macrophyte communities in Forsmark and Oskarshamn was calculated using spatial modelling in GRASP, based on field data from previous surveys. Physical parameters such as those described above were used as predictor variables. Distribution of biomass of different functional groups of fish in Forsmark was calculated using spatial modelling based on previous surveys and with predictor variables such as physical parameters and results from macrophyte modelling. All results are presented as maps in the report. The quality of the modelled predictions varies as a consequence of the quality and amount of the input data, the ecology and knowledge of the predicted phenomena, and by the modelling technique used. A substantial part of the variation is not described by the models, which should be expected for biological modelling. Therefore, the resulting grids should be used with caution and with this uncertainty kept in mind. All

  1. New marine science organization formed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooster, Warren S.

    A new international organization, the North Pacific Marine Science Organization (PICES) will be established to promote and coordinate marine scientific research in the northern North Pacific Ocean and the Berlin Sea. This was decided in Ottawa on December 12, 1990, when a draft convention was approved by representatives of Canada, China, Japan, the United States, and the Soviet Union. PICES will focus on research on the ocean environment and its interactions with land and atmosphere, its role and response to global weather and climate change, its flora, fauna and ecosystems, its uses and resources, and impacts upon it from human activities. Such studies relate not only to the effects of fishing and environmental change on fish stocks but also to such issues as the impacts of oil spills and other forms of pollution and the eventual consequences of climate change for uses of the ocean and its resources.

  2. Effects of Surface-Engineered Nanoparticle-Based Dispersants for Marine Oil Spills on the Model Organism Artemia franciscana

    OpenAIRE

    Rodd, April L.; Creighton, Megan A.; Vaslet, Charles A.; Rangel-Mendez, J. Rene; Hurt, Robert H.; Kane, Agnes B.

    2014-01-01

    Fine particles are under active consideration as alternatives to chemical dispersants for large-scale petroleum spills. Fine carbon particles with engineered surface chemistry have been shown to stabilize oil-in-water emulsions, but the environmental impacts of large-scale particle introduction to the marine environment are unknown. Here we study the impact of surface-engineered carbon-black materials on brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana) as a model marine microcrustacean. Mortality was chara...

  3. Antitumor Peptides from Marine Organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Sun

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The biodiversity of the marine environment and the associated chemical diversity constitute a practically unlimited resource of new antitumor agents in the field of the development of marine bioactive substances. In this review, the progress on studies of antitumor peptides from marine sources is provided. The biological properties and mechanisms of action of different marine peptides are described; information about their molecular diversity is also presented. Novel peptides that induce apoptosis signal pathway, affect the tubulin-microtubule equilibrium and inhibit angiogenesis are presented in association with their pharmacological properties. It is intended to provide useful information for further research in the fields of marine antitumor peptides.

  4. A Marine Traffic Flow Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsz Leung Yip

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A model is developed for studying marine traffic flow through classical traffic flow theories, which can provide us with a better understanding of the phenomenon of traffic flow of ships. On one hand, marine traffic has its special features and is fundamentally different from highway, air and pedestrian traffic. The existing traffic models cannot be simply extended to marine traffic without addressing marine traffic features. On the other hand, existing literature on marine traffic focuses on one ship or two ships but does not address the issues in marine traffic flow.

  5. Role of marine algae in organic farming

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pereira, N.; Verlecar, X.N.

    As the efforts to unearth new sources for organic farming accelerate, one needs to evaluate the options available. Marine algae popularly known as seaweeds, have served mankind from times immemorial. form. Seaweed-based fertilizer is rich in growth...

  6. A model compound study: the ecotoxicological evaluation of five organic contaminants employing a battery of marine bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macken, Ailbhe; Giltrap, Michelle; Foley, Barry; McGovern, Evin; McHugh, Brendan; Davoren, Maria

    2008-06-01

    This paper describes the ecotoxicological evaluation of five organic contaminants frequently detected in marine sediments (tributyltin, triphenyltin, benzo[a]pyrene, fluoranthene, and PCB 153) using three marine species (Vibrio fischeri, Tetraselmis suecica, and Tisbe battagliai). The sensitivity of each species varied for all compounds. The triorganotins were consistently the most toxic to all species. The applicability of each test system to assess the acute toxicity of environmental contaminants and their use in Toxicity Identification Evaluation (TIE) is discussed. Suitability of the Microtox and T. battagliai tests for employment in TIE studies were further assessed through spiking experiments with tributyltin. Results demonstrated that the most effective treatment to remove organotin toxicity from the sample was the C18 resin. The results of this study have important implications for risk assessment in estuarine and coastal waters in Ireland, where, at present the monitoring of sediment and water quality is predominantly reliant on chemical analysis alone.

  7. Marine Organisms with Anti-Diabetes Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauritano, Chiara; Ianora, Adrianna

    2016-12-01

    Diabetes is a chronic degenerative metabolic disease with high morbidity and mortality rates caused by its complications. In recent years, there has been a growing interest in looking for new bioactive compounds to treat this disease, including metabolites of marine origin. Several aquatic organisms have been screened to evaluate their possible anti-diabetes activities, such as bacteria, microalgae, macroalgae, seagrasses, sponges, corals, sea anemones, fish, salmon skin, a shark fusion protein as well as fish and shellfish wastes. Both in vitro and in vivo screenings have been used to test anti-hyperglycemic and anti-diabetic activities of marine organisms. This review summarizes recent discoveries in anti-diabetes properties of several marine organisms as well as marine wastes, existing patents and possible future research directions in this field.

  8. Marine Organisms with Anti-Diabetes Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Lauritano

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is a chronic degenerative metabolic disease with high morbidity and mortality rates caused by its complications. In recent years, there has been a growing interest in looking for new bioactive compounds to treat this disease, including metabolites of marine origin. Several aquatic organisms have been screened to evaluate their possible anti-diabetes activities, such as bacteria, microalgae, macroalgae, seagrasses, sponges, corals, sea anemones, fish, salmon skin, a shark fusion protein as well as fish and shellfish wastes. Both in vitro and in vivo screenings have been used to test anti-hyperglycemic and anti-diabetic activities of marine organisms. This review summarizes recent discoveries in anti-diabetes properties of several marine organisms as well as marine wastes, existing patents and possible future research directions in this field.

  9. Organic matter mineralization in marine systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middelburg, J.J.; Vlug, T.; Van der Nat, F.J.

    1993-01-01

    Many of the reactions and biogeochemical processes that occur in the marine environment are related directly or indirectly to the mineralization of organic matter. Decomposition of organic matter is responsible for the recycling of essential nutrients, for the oxygen balance of the ocean and its sed

  10. Organic matter mineralization in marine systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middelburg, J.J.; Vlug, T.; Van der Nat, F.J.

    1993-01-01

    Many of the reactions and biogeochemical processes that occur in the marine environment are related directly or indirectly to the mineralization of organic matter. Decomposition of organic matter is responsible for the recycling of essential nutrients, for the oxygen balance of the ocean and its

  11. Ecotoxicity of pristine graphene to marine organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretti, Carlo; Oliva, Matteo; Pietro, Roberta Di; Monni, Gianfranca; Cevasco, Giorgio; Chiellini, Federica; Pomelli, Christian; Chiappe, Cinzia

    2014-03-01

    The ecotoxicity of pristine graphene nanoparticles (GNC1, PGMF) in model marine organisms was investigated. PGMF resulted more toxic than GNC1 to the bioluminescent bacterium Vibrio fischeri and the unicellular alga Dunaliella tertiolecta on the basis of EC50 values (end-points: inhibition of bioluminescence and growth, respectively). No acute toxicity was demonstrated with respect to the crustacean Artemia salina although light microscope images showed the presence of PGMF and GNC1 aggregates into the gut; a 48-h exposure experiment revealed an altered pattern of oxidative stress biomarkers, resulting in a significant increase of catalase activities in both PGMF and GNC1 1mg/L treated A. salina and a significant increase of glutathione peroxidase activities in PGMF (0.1 and 1mg/L) treated A. salina. Increased levels of lipid peroxidation of membranes was also observed in PGMF 1mg/L exposed A. salina.

  12. Characterization of elements in marine organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishii, Toshiaki [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Nakaminato, Ibaraki (Japan). Nakaminato Lab. Branch Office

    1994-03-01

    Characterization of elements was carried out to clarify the mechanisms of bioconcentration and the physiological roles of elements in marine organisms. The concentrations of {sup 238}U in fifty-five species of marine organisms were measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The concentrations of {sup 238}U in soft tissues of marine animals ranged from 0.076 to 500ng/g wet wt. Especially, the branchial heart of cephalopod molluscs showed the specific accumulation of {sup 238}U. The concentration factor of the branchial heart of Octopus vulgaris, which indicated the highest value, was calculated to be about 10{sup 3} by comparing it with the concentration of {sup 238}U (3.2 {+-} 0.2ng/ml) in coastal seawater of Japan. The concentrations of {sup 238}U of twenty species of algae ranged from 10 to 3700ng/g dry wt. (author).

  13. Quorum sensing antagonism from marine organisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skindersø, Mette Elena; Ettinger-Epstein, P.; Rasmussen, Thomas Bovbjerg

    2008-01-01

    target for the control of infectious bacteria. We present the results of screening of 284 extracts of marine organisms from the Great Barrier Reef, Australia, for their inhibition of QS. Of the 284 extracts, 64 (23%) were active in a general, LuxR-derived QS screen, and of these 36 (56%) were also active...

  14. Antifungal and antiviral products of marine organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Randy Chi Fai; Wong, Jack Ho; Pan, Wen Liang; Chan, Yau Sang; Yin, Cui Ming; Dan, Xiu Li; Wang, He Xiang; Fang, Evandro Fei; Lam, Sze Kwan; Ngai, Patrick Hung Kui; Xia, Li Xin; Liu, Fang; Ye, Xiu Yun; Zhang, Guo Qing; Liu, Qing Hong; Sha, Ou; Lin, Peng; Ki, Chan; Bekhit, Adnan A; Bekhit, Alaa El-Din; Wan, David Chi Cheong; Ye, Xiu Juan; Xia, Jiang; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2014-04-01

    Marine organisms including bacteria, fungi, algae, sponges, echinoderms, mollusks, and cephalochordates produce a variety of products with antifungal activity including bacterial chitinases, lipopeptides, and lactones; fungal (-)-sclerotiorin and peptaibols, purpurides B and C, berkedrimane B and purpuride; algal gambieric acids A and B, phlorotannins; 3,5-dibromo-2-(3,5-dibromo-2-methoxyphenoxy)phenol, spongistatin 1, eurysterols A and B, nortetillapyrone, bromotyrosine alkaloids, bis-indole alkaloid, ageloxime B and (-)-ageloxime D, haliscosamine, hamigeran G, hippolachnin A from sponges; echinoderm triterpene glycosides and alkene sulfates; molluscan kahalalide F and a 1485-Da peptide with a sequence SRSELIVHQR; and cepalochordate chitotriosidase and a 5026.9-Da antifungal peptide. The antiviral compounds from marine organisms include bacterial polysaccharide and furan-2-yl acetate; fungal macrolide, purpurester A, purpurquinone B, isoindolone derivatives, alterporriol Q, tetrahydroaltersolanol C and asperterrestide A, algal diterpenes, xylogalactofucan, alginic acid, glycolipid sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol, sulfated polysaccharide p-KG03, meroditerpenoids, methyl ester derivative of vatomaric acid, lectins, polysaccharides, tannins, cnidarian zoanthoxanthin alkaloids, norditerpenoid and capilloquinol; crustacean antilipopolysaccharide factors, molluscan hemocyanin; echinoderm triterpenoid glycosides; tunicate didemnin B, tamandarins A and B and; tilapia hepcidin 1-5 (TH 1-5), seabream SauMx1, SauMx2, and SauMx3, and orange-spotted grouper β-defensin. Although the mechanisms of antifungal and antiviral activities of only some of the aforementioned compounds have been elucidated, the possibility to use those known to have distinctly different mechanisms, good bioavailability, and minimal toxicity in combination therapy remains to be investigated. It is also worthwhile to test the marine antimicrobials for possible synergism with existing drugs. The prospects of

  15. Distribution and diversity of marine natural products from Indonesian marine organisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MasteriaYunovilsa Putra; Tutik Murniasih

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To study the distribution and diversity of species and isolated molecules, according to their structure classes, from Indonesian marine organisms. Methods: This study was performed by using the SciFinder® database, MarinLit and references from relevant articles from 1980 to 2014 which collected all the scientific publications dealing with the isolation of chemical compounds from Indonesian marine macroorganisms and microorganisms. Results: The discovery of novel compounds from Indonesian marine organisms gave us a result of a total of 78 papers. Alkaloids, terpenoids and peptides (84, 67 and 15 new compounds, respectively) represented the three main chemical classes of compounds discovered from Indonesian marine organisms, and together with the other chemical classes showed a range of biological activities. Conclusions: The new marine compounds are mainly from sponges and soft corals. Alkaloids, terpenoids and peptides are the most prolific compounds isolated from Indonesian marine organisms. Most marine natural products from Indonesian organisms have been screened for anticancer or cytotoxicity activities.

  16. Principles and application of transgenic technology in marine organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marine organisms into which a foreign gene or noncoding DNA fragment is artificially introduced and stably integrated in their genomes are termed transgenic marine organisms. Since the first report in 1985, a wide range of transgenic fish and marine bivalve mollusks have been produced by microinjec...

  17. Investigating organic aerosol loading in the remote marine environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Lapina

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol loading in the marine environment is investigated using aerosol composition measurements from several research ship campaigns (ICEALOT, MAP, RHaMBLe, VOCALS and OOMPH, observations of total AOD column from satellite (MODIS and ship-based instruments (Maritime Aerosol Network, MAN, and a global chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem. This work represents the most comprehensive evaluation of oceanic OM emission inventories to date, by employing aerosol composition measurements obtained from campaigns with wide spatial and temporal coverage. The model underestimates AOD over the remote ocean on average by 0.02 (21 %, compared to satellite observations, but provides an unbiased simulation of ground-based Maritime Aerosol Network (MAN observations. Comparison with cruise data demonstrates that the GEOS-Chem simulation of marine sulfate, with the mean observed values ranging between 0.22 μg m−3 and 1.34 μg m−3, is generally unbiased, however surface organic matter (OM concentrations, with the mean observed concentrations between 0.07 μg m−3 and 0.77 μg m−3, are underestimated by a factor of 2–5 for the standard model run. Addition of a sub-micron marine OM source of approximately 9 TgC yr−1 brings the model into agreement with the ship-based measurements, however this additional OM source does not explain the model underestimate of marine AOD. The model underestimate of marine AOD is therefore likely the result of a combination of satellite retrieval bias and a missing marine aerosol source (which exhibits a different spatial pattern than existing aerosol in the model.

  18. The concentrations of uranium in marine organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuba, Mitsue; Ishii, Toshiaki; Nakahara, Motokazu; Nakamura, Ryoichi; Watabe, Teruhisa; Hirano, Shigeki [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Hitachinaka, Ibaraki (Japan). Laboratory for Radioecology

    2000-07-01

    Determination of uranium in sixty-one species of marine organisms was carried out by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to obtain concentration factors and to estimate the internal radiation dose. The concentrations of uranium in soft tissues of marine animals were ranged from 0.077 to 5040 ng/g wet wt. Especially, the branchial heart of cephalopod molluscs showed the specific accumulation of uranium. The concentration factor of the branchial heart of Octopus vulgaris, which indicated the highest value, was calculated to be about 1.6 x 10{sup 3}, comparing with that (3.1 ng/ml) in coastal seawaters of Japan. The concentrations of uranium in hard tissues of marine invertebrates such as clam and sea urchin were similar to those in soft tissues. In contrast, hard tissues like bone, scale, fin, etc. of fishes showed much higher concentrations of uranium than soft tissues like muscle. The concentrations of uranium of twenty-two species of algae were ranged from 2 to 310 ng/g wet wt. Particularly, the brown alga Undaria pinnatifida showed the highest value of the uranium content in the algae and its concentration factor was calculated to be 10{sup 2}. (author)

  19. Latitudinal gradients in degradation of marine dissolved organic carbon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Arnosti

    Full Text Available Heterotrophic microbial communities cycle nearly half of net primary productivity in the ocean, and play a particularly important role in transformations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC. The specific means by which these communities mediate the transformations of organic carbon are largely unknown, since the vast majority of marine bacteria have not been isolated in culture, and most measurements of DOC degradation rates have focused on uptake and metabolism of either bulk DOC or of simple model compounds (e.g. specific amino acids or sugars. Genomic investigations provide information about the potential capabilities of organisms and communities but not the extent to which such potential is expressed. We tested directly the capabilities of heterotrophic microbial communities in surface ocean waters at 32 stations spanning latitudes from 76°S to 79°N to hydrolyze a range of high molecular weight organic substrates and thereby initiate organic matter degradation. These data demonstrate the existence of a latitudinal gradient in the range of complex substrates available to heterotrophic microbial communities, paralleling the global gradient in bacterial species richness. As changing climate increasingly affects the marine environment, changes in the spectrum of substrates accessible by microbial communities may lead to shifts in the location and rate at which marine DOC is respired. Since the inventory of DOC in the ocean is comparable in magnitude to the atmospheric CO(2 reservoir, such a change could profoundly affect the global carbon cycle.

  20. Noise in the Sea and Its Impacts on Marine Organisms

    OpenAIRE

    Chao Peng; Xinguo Zhao; Guangxu Liu

    2015-01-01

    With the growing utilization and exploration of the ocean, anthropogenic noise increases significantly and gives rise to a new kind of pollution: noise pollution. In this review, the source and the characteristics of noise in the sea, the significance of sound to marine organisms, and the impacts of noise on marine organisms are summarized. In general, the studies about the impact of noise on marine organisms are mainly on adult fish and mammals, which account for more than 50% and 20% of all...

  1. Dissolved organic carbon release by marine macrophytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Barrón

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Estimates of dissolved organic carbon (DOC release by marine macrophyte communities (seagrass meadows and macroalgal beds were obtained experimentally using in situ benthic chambers. The effect of light availability on DOC release by macrophyte communities was examined in two communities both by comparing net DOC release under light and dark, and by examining the response of net DOC release to longer-term (days experimental shading of the communities. All most 85% of the seagrass communities and almost all of macroalgal communities examined acted as net sources of DOC. There was a weak tendency for higher DOC fluxes under light than under dark conditions in seagrass meadow. There is no relationship between net DOC fluxes and gross primary production (GPP and net community production (NCP, however, this relationship is positive between net DOC fluxes and community respiration. Net DOC fluxes were not affected by shading of a T. testudinum community in Florida for 5 days, however, shading of a mixed seagrass meadow in the Philippines led to a significant reduction on the net DOC release when shading was maintained for 6 days compared to only 2 days of shading. Based on published and unpublished results we also estimate the global net DOC production by marine macrophytes. The estimated global net DOC flux, and hence export, from marine macrophyte is about 0.197 ± 0.015 Pg C yr−1 or 0.212 ± 0.016 Pg C yr−1 depending if net DOC flux by seagrass meadows was estimated by taking into account the low or high global seagrass area, respectively.

  2. Toxicity of Bioactive and Probiotic Marine Bacteria and Their Secondary Metabolites in Artemia sp. and Caenorhabditis elegans as Eukaryotic Model Organisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neu, Anna; Månsson, Maria; Gram, Lone

    2014-01-01

    We have previously reported that some strains belonging to the marine Actinobacteria class, the Pseudoalteromonas genus, the Roseobacter clade, and the Photobacteriaceae and Vibrionaceae families produce both antibacterial and antivirulence compounds, and these organisms are interesting from......-producing Roseobacter bacteria as a promising group to be used as probiotics in aquaculture, whereas Actinobacteria, Pseudoalteromonas, Photobacteriaceae, and Vibrionaceae should be used with caution....

  3. Microbial bioavailability regulates organic matter preservation in marine sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koho, K.A.; Nierop, K.G.J.; Moodley, L.; Middelburg, J.J.; Pozzato, L.; Soetaert, K.; van der Plicht, J.; Reichart, G.J.

    2013-01-01

    Burial of organic matter (OM) plays an important role in marine sediments, linking the short-term, biological carbon cycle with the long-term, geological subsurface cycle. It is well established that low-oxygen conditions promote organic carbon burial in marine sediments. However, the mechanism

  4. Korean Elementary School Students' Perceptions of Relationship with Marine Organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-Mun; Anderson, David; Scott, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    This exploratory study examined the perceptions of, and relationship with, marine organisms of 81 urban sixth grade Korean students using a specifically designed survey questionnaire. The study outcomes revealed that these Korean students have limited experience with and different levels of connectedness to marine organisms. Viewed through…

  5. Marine actinobacteria associated with marine organisms and their potentials in producing pharmaceutical natural products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valliappan, Karuppiah; Sun, Wei; Li, Zhiyong

    2014-09-01

    Actinobacteria are ubiquitous in the marine environment, playing an important ecological role in the recycling of refractory biomaterials and producing novel natural products with pharmic applications. Actinobacteria have been detected or isolated from the marine creatures such as sponges, corals, mollusks, ascidians, seaweeds, and seagrass. Marine organism-associated actinobacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences, i.e., 3,003 sequences, deposited in the NCBI database clearly revealed enormous numbers of actinobacteria associated with marine organisms. For example, RDP classification of these sequences showed that 112 and 62 actinobacterial genera were associated with the sponges and corals, respectively. In most cases, it is expected that these actinobacteria protect the host against pathogens by producing bioactive compounds. Natural products investigation and functional gene screening of the actinobacteria associated with the marine organisms revealed that they can synthesize numerous natural products including polyketides, isoprenoids, phenazines, peptides, indolocarbazoles, sterols, and others. These compounds showed anticancer, antimicrobial, antiparasitic, neurological, antioxidant, and anti-HIV activities. Therefore, marine organism-associated actinobacteria represent an important resource for marine drugs. It is an upcoming field of research to search for novel actinobacteria and pharmaceutical natural products from actinobacteria associated with the marine organisms. In this review, we attempt to summarize the present knowledge on the diversity and natural products production of actinobacteria associated with the marine organisms, based on the publications from 1991 to 2013.

  6. An overview on genome organization of marine organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, Maria

    2015-12-01

    In this review we will concentrate on some general genome features of marine organisms and their evolution, ranging from vertebrate to invertebrates until unicellular organisms. Before genome sequencing, the ultracentrifugation in CsCl led to high resolution of mammalian DNA (without seeing at the sequence). The analytical profile of human DNA showed that the vertebrate genome is a mosaic of isochores, typically megabase-size DNA segments that belong in a small number of families characterized by different GC levels. The recent availability of a number of fully sequenced genomes allowed mapping very precisely the isochores, based on DNA sequences. Since isochores are tightly linked to biological properties such as gene density, replication timing and recombination, the new level of detail provided by the isochore map helped the understanding of genome structure, function and evolution. This led the current level of knowledge and to further insights.

  7. Conserving endangered marine organisms: causes, trends and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambariyanto

    2017-02-01

    Increasing demand for marine resources in recent decades for human needs has led to intensified exploitation. This increase accelerates the process of extinction of various marine resources. In order to avoid extinction, it requires conservation measures of marine resources appropriately. This paper provides an overview of causes of extinction, trends and challenges in the conservation of endangered marine organisms. The success of conservation measures is highly dependent on various stakeholders such as governments, communities, the private sector and academics. Differences of the interest of these parties often lead to the failure of conservation programs. In general there is an increasing public awareness of the importance of protecting the diversity of marine resources and avoiding extinction of marine organisms, especially endangered organisms. The existence of comprehensive actions, legislation and improved coordination among government, community, private sector, and academics will significantly improve the success in overcoming all the challenges.

  8. The contribution of marine organics to the air quality of the western United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Gantt

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The contribution of marine organic emissions to the air quality in coastal areas of the western United States is studied using the latest version of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA regional-scale Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQv4.7 modeling system. Emissions of marine isoprene, monoterpenes, and primary organic matter (POM from the ocean are implemented into the model to provide a comprehensive view of the connection between ocean biology and atmospheric chemistry and air pollution. Model simulations show that marine organics can increase the concentration of PM2.5 by 0.1–0.3 μg m−3 (up to 5% in some coastal cities such as San Francisco, CA. This increase in the PM2.5 concentration is primarily attributed to the POM emissions, with small contributions from the marine isoprene and monoterpenes. When marine organic emissions are included, organic carbon (OC concentrations over the remote ocean are increased by up to 50% (25% in coastal areas, values consistent with recent observational findings. This study is the first to quantify the air quality impacts from marine POM and monoterpenes for the United States, and it highlights the need for inclusion of marine organic emissions in air quality models.

  9. Interactions Between Prokaryotes and Dissolved Organic Matter in Marine Waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Traving, Sachia Jo

    the key to understanding the mechanisms controlling the cycling of DOM within marine waters. In the thesis presented here, the aim was to investigate the activity and composition of prokaryotes to determine their functional role in DOM utilization. The thesis incorporates a range of study systems...... organic bound carbon equal in size to atmospheric carbon dioxide. Prokaryotes mediate the fate of a large part of marine DOM, which is their principal source of energy and substrate. However, a large fraction is also left behind in the water column persisting for millennia, and prokaryotes may hold...... – ranging from bacterioplankton communities in seasonally variable coastal ecosystems, a manipulated pelagic food web, to a mathematical model of free-living prokaryotes and extracellular enzyme strategies. The results characterize links between community dynamics and function in prokaryotes, and emphasize...

  10. W Photoprotection in Tropical Marine Organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Roy A.

    1997-01-01

    Increasing levels of ultraviolet (UV) radiation reaching the earth's surface which results from stratospheric ozone depletions could have serious implications for terrestrial plants and for aquatic organisms within the euphotic zone. A documented 9% decline in ozone at mid-latitudes is considered to produce a 12% increase in harmful UV radiation. The biologically damaging effects of higher UV levels, particularly W-B (280-320 rim), could manifest earlier in the tropics because of the relative thinness of the earth's equatorial ozone layer. Tropical marine organisms are also living close to their upper tolerance levels of water temperature, However, despite the large potential effects on plants and animals, little is known about UV effects on tropical ecosystems. Long-term ecological studies are needed to quantify the effects of increased UV radiation on terrestrial and marine ecosystems and to produce reliable data for prediction. Plants have developed several mechanisms to protect themselves from harmful UV radiation, one of which is the production of secondary leaf pigments that absorb W-B radiation (screening pigments). A higher concentration of screening pigments (e.g. flavonoids) in leaves may be interpreted as a natural response to increased W radiation. If higher concentrations of flavonoids filter out the excessive W radiation, no damage will occur, as suggested by Caldwell et al. (1989) and Tevini (1993). Failure to screen all W-B may result in deleterious effects on photosynthesis, plant genetic material, and plant and leaf morphology and growth. Eventually this will have an impact on ecosystem processes, structure, species composition, and productivity. This paper describes an ongoing project that is assessing the responses of mangroves, seagrasses and corals to W radiation by studying pigment concentrations, biophysical parameters, and variations in spectral reflectance in the field and in W-reduction experiments. Preliminary results on the distribution

  11. Distruption of retinoid and CYP systems and embryo development in marine organisms: a potential model for humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tairova, Zhanna; Strand, Jakob; Jørgensen, Eva Cecilie Bonefeld

    with embryo development and reproduction. At present, there is only limited knowledge of the potential effects of dioxin-like compounds and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the Danish environment. The Ph.D. project is expected to link exposure to POPs such as dioxin-like compounds and PAHs to effects...... in aquatic organisms and mammalian cell cultures by combining different in vivo and in vitro biomarkers in both laboratory and field studies. However, another perspective of this approach is exploring the potential of mammalian in vitro bioassays as screening tools for environmental samples and to contribute...

  12. Distribution and diversity of marine natural products from Indonesian marine organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masteria Yunovilsa Putra

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the distribution and diversity of species and isolated molecules, according to their structure classes, from Indonesian marine organisms. Methods: This study was performed by using the SciFinder® database, MarinLit and references from relevant articles from 1980 to 2014 which collected all the scientific publications dealing with the isolation of chemical compounds from Indonesian marine macroorganisms and microorganisms. Results: The discovery of novel compounds from Indonesian marine organisms gave us a result of a total of 78 papers. Alkaloids, terpenoids and peptides (84, 67 and 15 new compounds, respectively represented the three main chemical classes of compounds discovered from Indonesian marine organisms, and together with the other chemical classes showed a range of biological activities. Conclusions: The new marine compounds are mainly from sponges and soft corals. Alkaloids, terpenoids and peptides are the most prolific compounds isolated from Indonesian marine organisms. Most marine natural products from Indonesian organisms have been screened for anticancer or cytotoxicity activities.

  13. A new physically-based quantification of marine isoprene and primary organic aerosol emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Meskhidze

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The global marine sources of organic carbon (OC are estimated here using a physically-based parameterization for the emission of marine isoprene and primary organic matter. The marine isoprene emission model incorporates new physical parameters such as light sensitivity of phytoplankton isoprene production and dynamic euphotic depth to simulate hourly marine isoprene emissions totaling 0.92 Tg C yr−1. Sensitivity studies using different schemes for the euphotic zone depth and ocean phytoplankton speciation produce the upper and the lower range of marine-isoprene emissions of 0.31 to 1.09 Tg C yr−1, respectively. Established relationships between sea spray fractionation of water-insoluble organic carbon (WIOC and chlorophyll-a concentration are used to estimate the total primary sources of marine sub- and super-micron OC of 2.9 and 19.4 Tg C yr−1, respectively. The consistent spatial and temporal resolution of the two emission types allow us, for the first time, to explore the relative contributions of sub- and super-micron organic matter and marine isoprene-derived secondary organic aerosol (SOA to the total OC fraction of marine aerosol. Using a fixed 3% mass yield for the conversion of isoprene to SOA, our emission simulations show minor (<0.2% contribution of marine isoprene to the total marine source of OC on a global scale. However, our model calculations also indicate that over the tropical oceanic regions (30° S to 30° N, marine isoprene SOA may contribute over 30% of the total monthly-averaged sub-micron OC fraction of marine aerosol. The estimated contribution of marine isoprene SOA to hourly-averaged sub-micron marine OC emission is even higher, approaching 50% over the vast regions of the oceans during the midday hours when isoprene emissions are highest. As it is widely believed that sub-micron OC has the potential to influence the cloud droplet activation of marine aerosols, our

  14. Toxicity, Bioaccumulation and Biotransformation of Silver Nanoparticles in Marine Organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    The toxicity, bioaccumulation and biotransformation of citrate and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) capped silver nanoparticles (NPs) (AgNP-citrate and AgNP-PVP) and titanium dioxide (TiO2) NPs in marine organisms via marine sediment exposure were investigated. Results from 7-d sedimen...

  15. Large ancient organic matter contributions to Arctic marine sediments (Svalbard)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, J.-H.; Peterse, F.; Willmott, V.; Klitgaard Kristensen, D.; Baas, M.; Schouten, S.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.

    2011-01-01

    Soils, fine-grained ice-rafted detritus (IRD), coals, and marine surface sediments in the Arctic realm (Svalbard) were collected in 2007 and 2008 to characterize organic matter (OM) sources in Arctic marine sediments. Bulk geochemical (C : N ratio and stable carbon isotopic composition) parameters s

  16. Large ancient organic matter contributions to Arctic marine sediments (Svalbard)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, J.-H.; Peterse, F.; Willmott, V.; Klitgaard Kristensen, D.; Baas, M.; Schouten, S.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.

    2011-01-01

    Soils, fine-grained ice-rafted detritus (IRD), coals, and marine surface sediments in the Arctic realm (Svalbard)were collected in 2007 and 2008 to characterize organic matter (OM) sources in Arctic marine sediments. Bulkgeochemical (C : N ratio and stable carbon isotopic composition) parameters sug

  17. Toxicity, Bioaccumulation and Biotransformation of Silver Nanoparticles in Marine Organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    The toxicity, bioaccumulation and biotransformation of citrate and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) capped silver nanoparticles (NPs) (AgNP-citrate and AgNP-PVP) and titanium dioxide (TiO2) NPs in marine organisms via marine sediment exposure were investigated. Results from 7-d sedimen...

  18. Lagrangian Observations and Modeling of Marine Larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Claire B.; Irisson, Jean-Olivier

    2017-04-01

    Just within the past two decades, studies on the early-life history stages of marine organisms have led to new paradigms in population dynamics. Unlike passive plant seeds that are transported by the wind or by animals, marine larvae have motor and sensory capabilities. As a result, marine larvae have a tremendous capacity to actively influence their dispersal. This is continuously revealed as we develop new techniques to observe larvae in their natural environment and begin to understand their ability to detect cues throughout ontogeny, process the information, and use it to ride ocean currents and navigate their way back home, or to a place like home. We present innovative in situ and numerical modeling approaches developed to understand the underlying mechanisms of larval transport in the ocean. We describe a novel concept of a Lagrangian platform, the Drifting In Situ Chamber (DISC), designed to observe and quantify complex larval behaviors and their interactions with the pelagic environment. We give a brief history of larval ecology research with the DISC, showing that swimming is directional in most species, guided by cues as diverse as the position of the sun or the underwater soundscape, and even that (unlike humans!) larvae orient better and swim faster when moving as a group. The observed Lagrangian behavior of individual larvae are directly implemented in the Connectivity Modeling System (CMS), an open source Lagrangian tracking application. Simulations help demonstrate the impact that larval behavior has compared to passive Lagrangian trajectories. These methodologies are already the base of exciting findings and are promising tools for documenting and simulating the behavior of other small pelagic organisms, forecasting their migration in a changing ocean.

  19. Bioactivity of marine organisms. 4. Screening of some marine animals from the Indian coast

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naik, C.G.; Kamat, S.Y.; Parameswaran, P.S.; Das, B.; Battacharya, J.; Ramani, P.; Bhakuni, D.S.; Goel, A.K.; Jain, S.; Srimal, R.C.

    Of twenty eight alcoholic extracts of marine organisms screened for a wide range of pharmacological activities, 15 showed biological activity. Of these two were anti implantation, 3 CNS stimulant, 2 hypotensive, 4 diuretic, 4 hypoglycaemic, 2...

  20. [Application of chemical ecology in controlling marine fouling organisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Fang; Yan, Tao; Liu, Qing

    2005-10-01

    Many marine organisms can produce secondary metabolites beneficial to the protection of marine environments against fouling, and thus, applying chemo-ecological methods to extract the natural antifoulants from marine organisms to resolve the problems relevant to marine fouling is a new thinking in resent years. Its aim is to search for high efficient and non-toxic antifoulants to replace the existing chemically synthetic ones which are unfortunately found to have widespread toxic effects on marine environment. Although we know few about the antifouling mechanisms of secondary metabolites, many natural products have been proved to have antifouling activity. Therefore, basic and applied researches on the ecological roles of these natural compounds, their action mechanisms, coating compatibility, controlled release, and field test are required in the future.

  1. Marine Model Trout Farms: developments in marine RAS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Per Bovbjerg

    2011-01-01

    . This development and demonstration unit in commercial scale will during the next four years hopefully provide scientific and practical basis and support for further development in coming generations of Marine Model Trout Farms for large salmonids. The unit consist in the recirculation loop of one large fish tank...

  2. Application of Hydrocarbons Biomarkers in Marine Organic Geochemistry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴莹; 张经

    2001-01-01

    Biomarker is an important tool in the study of marine organic geochemistry. Its development and application makes it possible to elucidate the process and mechanism of the organic matter in the ocean. Hydrocarbons are the most useful molecular markers. They are used as tracers in many aspects, such as source indication; the degradation of organic matter; diagensis process; environmental pollution and paleooceanic study, etc. They are studied in the estuaries,coastal area and deep sea to give the knowledge of marine organic geochemistry. The paper deals with the characteristics, development and application ofbiomarkers as well as their advantages and disadvantages.

  3. Reburial of fossil organic carbon in marine sediments

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Marine sediments act as the ultimate sink for organic carbon, sequestering otherwise rapidly cycling carbon for geologic timescales. Sedimentary organic carbon burial appears to be controlled by oxygen exposure time in situ, and much research has focused on understanding the mechanisms of preservation of organic carbon. In this context, combustion-derived black carbon has received attention as a form of refractory organic carbon that may be preferentially preserved in soils and sediments. How...

  4. Reburial of fossil organic carbon in marine sediments

    OpenAIRE

    Dickens, Angela F.; Gélinas, Yves; Masiello, Caroline A.; Wakeham, Stuart; Hedges, John I.

    2004-01-01

    Marine sediments act as the ultimate sink for organic carbon, sequestering otherwise rapidly cycling carbon for geologic timescales. Sedimentary organic carbon burial appears to be controlled by oxygen exposure time in situ, and much research has focused on understanding the mechanisms of preservation of organic carbon. In this context, combustion-derived black carbon has received attention as a form of refractory organic carbon that may be preferentially preserved in soils and sediments. How...

  5. Atmosphere of Mars - Mariner IV models compared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshleman, V. R.; Fjeldbo, G.; Fjeldbo, W. C.

    1966-01-01

    Mariner IV models of three Mars atmospheric layers analogous to terrestrial E, F-1 and F-2 layers, considering relative mass densities, temperatures, carbon dioxide photodissociation and ionization profile

  6. Microbial bioavailability regulates organic matter preservation in marine sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Koho

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Burial of organic matter (OM plays an important role in marine sediments, linking the short-term, biological carbon cycle with the long-term, geological subsurface cycle. It is well established that low-oxygen conditions promote organic carbon burial in marine sediments. However, the mechanism remains enigmatic. Here we report biochemical quality, microbial degradability, OM preservation and accumulation along an oxygen gradient in the Indian Ocean. Our results show that more OM, and of biochemically higher quality, accumulates under low oxygen conditions. Nevertheless, microbial degradability does not correlate with the biochemical quality of OM. This decoupling of OM biochemical quality and microbial degradability, or bioavailability, violates the ruling paradigm that higher quality implies higher microbial processing. The inhibition of bacterial OM remineralisation may play an important role in the burial of organic matter in marine sediments and formation of oil source rocks.

  7. Noise in the Sea and Its Impacts on Marine Organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Chao; Zhao, Xinguo; Liu, Guangxu

    2015-09-30

    With the growing utilization and exploration of the ocean, anthropogenic noise increases significantly and gives rise to a new kind of pollution: noise pollution. In this review, the source and the characteristics of noise in the sea, the significance of sound to marine organisms, and the impacts of noise on marine organisms are summarized. In general, the studies about the impact of noise on marine organisms are mainly on adult fish and mammals, which account for more than 50% and 20% of all the cases reported. Studies showed that anthropogenic noise can cause auditory masking, leading to cochlear damage, changes in individual and social behavior, altered metabolisms, hampered population recruitment, and can subsequently affect the health and service functions of marine ecosystems. However, since different sampling methodologies and unstandarized measurements were used and the effects of noise on marine organisms are dependent on the characteristics of the species and noise investigated, it is difficult to compare the reported results. Moreover, the scarcity of studies carried out with other species and with larval or juvenile individuals severely constrains the present understanding of noise pollution. In addition, further studies are needed to reveal in detail the causes for the detected impacts.

  8. Noise in the Sea and Its Impacts on Marine Organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Peng

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available With the growing utilization and exploration of the ocean, anthropogenic noise increases significantly and gives rise to a new kind of pollution: noise pollution. In this review, the source and the characteristics of noise in the sea, the significance of sound to marine organisms, and the impacts of noise on marine organisms are summarized. In general, the studies about the impact of noise on marine organisms are mainly on adult fish and mammals, which account for more than 50% and 20% of all the cases reported. Studies showed that anthropogenic noise can cause auditory masking, leading to cochlear damage, changes in individual and social behavior, altered metabolisms, hampered population recruitment, and can subsequently affect the health and service functions of marine ecosystems. However, since different sampling methodologies and unstandarized measurements were used and the effects of noise on marine organisms are dependent on the characteristics of the species and noise investigated, it is difficult to compare the reported results. Moreover, the scarcity of studies carried out with other species and with larval or juvenile individuals severely constrains the present understanding of noise pollution. In addition, further studies are needed to reveal in detail the causes for the detected impacts.

  9. A model for microbial phosphorus cycling in bioturbated marine sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dale, Andrew W.; Boyle, R. A.; Lenton, Timothy M.

    2016-01-01

    A diagenetic model is used to simulate the diagenesis and burial of particulate organic carbon (Corg) and phosphorus (P) in marine sediments underlying anoxic versus oxic bottom waters. The latter are physically mixed by animals moving through the surface sediment (bioturbation) and ventilated by...

  10. Effects of Pollution on Marine Organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mearns, Alan J; Reish, Donald J; Oshida, Philip S; Morrison, Ann Michelle; Rempel-Hester, Mary Ann; Arthur, Courtney; Rutherford, Nicolle; Pryor, Rachel

    2016-10-01

    This review covers selected 2015 articles on the biological effects of pollutants and human physical disturbances on marine and estuarine plants, animals, ecosystems and habitats. The review, based largely on journal articles, covers field and laboratory measurement activities (bioaccumulation of contaminants, field assessment surveys, toxicity testing and biomarkers) as well as pollution issues of current interest including endocrine disrupters, emerging contaminants, wastewater discharges, dredging and disposal, etc. Special emphasis is placed on effects of oil spills and marine debris due largely to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil blowout in the Gulf of Mexico. Several topical areas reviewed in the past (ballast water and ocean acidification) were dropped this year. The focus of this review is on effects, not pollutant fate and transport. There is considerable overlap across subject areas (e.g.some bioaccumulation papers may be cited in other topical categories). Please use keyword searching of the text to locate related but distributed papers. Use this review only as a guide and please consult the original papers before citing them.

  11. Application of acteylcholineesterase activity in marine organisms as a biomarker of coastal pollution

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarkar, A; Holkar, P.K.R.; Patil, S.S.

    compounds adversely affect the health of the marine ecosystem by inhibiting the acetylchoinesterase (AChE) activities of various species of marine organisms. This paper presents the effective use of acteylcholineesterase activities in marine gastropod...

  12. The physical and chemical characteristics of marine primary organic aerosol: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Gantt

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the physical characteristics and chemical composition of marine organic aerosols is needed for the quantification of their effects on solar radiation transfer and cloud processes. This review examines research pertinent to the chemical composition, size distribution, mixing state, emission mechanism, photochemical oxidation and climatic impact of marine primary organic aerosol (POA associated with sea-spray. Numerous measurements have shown that both the ambient mass concentration of marine POA and size-resolved organic mass fraction of sea-spray aerosol are related to surface ocean biological activity. Recent studies have also indicated that fine mode (smaller than 200 nm in diameter marine POA can have a size distribution independent from sea-salt, while coarse mode aerosols (larger than 1000 nm in diameter are more likely to be internally mixed with sea-salt. Modelling studies have estimated global submicron marine POA emission rates of ~10 ± 5 Tg yr−1, with a considerable fraction of these emissions occurring over regions most susceptible to aerosol perturbations. Climate studies have found that marine POA can cause large local increases in the cloud condensation nuclei concentration and have a non-negligible influence on model assessments of the anthropogenic aerosol forcing of climate. Despite these signs of climate-relevance, the source strength, chemical composition, mixing state, hygroscopicity, cloud droplet activation potential, atmospheric aging and removal of marine POA remain poorly quantified. Additional laboratory, field, and modelling studies focused on the chemistry, size distribution and mixing state of marine POA are needed to better understand and quantify their importance.

  13. Impacts of climate change on marine organisms and ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brierley, Andrew S; Kingsford, Michael J

    2009-07-28

    Human activities are releasing gigatonnes of carbon to the Earth's atmosphere annually. Direct consequences of cumulative post-industrial emissions include increasing global temperature, perturbed regional weather patterns, rising sea levels, acidifying oceans, changed nutrient loads and altered ocean circulation. These and other physical consequences are affecting marine biological processes from genes to ecosystems, over scales from rock pools to ocean basins, impacting ecosystem services and threatening human food security. The rates of physical change are unprecedented in some cases. Biological change is likely to be commensurately quick, although the resistance and resilience of organisms and ecosystems is highly variable. Biological changes founded in physiological response manifest as species range-changes, invasions and extinctions, and ecosystem regime shifts. Given the essential roles that oceans play in planetary function and provision of human sustenance, the grand challenge is to intervene before more tipping points are passed and marine ecosystems follow less-buffered terrestrial systems further down a spiral of decline. Although ocean bioengineering may alleviate change, this is not without risk. The principal brake to climate change remains reduced CO(2) emissions that marine scientists and custodians of the marine environment can lobby for and contribute to. This review describes present-day climate change, setting it in context with historical change, considers consequences of climate change for marine biological processes now and in to the future, and discusses contributions that marine systems could play in mitigating the impacts of global climate change.

  14. Biology, genome organization and evolution of parvoviruses in marine shrimp

    Science.gov (United States)

    A number of parvoviruses are now know to infect marine shrimp, and these viruses alone or in combination with other viruses have the potential to cause major losses in shrimp aquaculture globally. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the biology, genome organization, gene expression, and...

  15. Chemotaxis toward phytoplankton drives organic matter partitioning among marine bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smriga, Steven; Fernandez, Vicente I; Mitchell, James G; Stocker, Roman

    2016-02-09

    The microenvironment surrounding individual phytoplankton cells is often rich in dissolved organic matter (DOM), which can attract bacteria by chemotaxis. These "phycospheres" may be prominent sources of resource heterogeneity in the ocean, affecting the growth of bacterial populations and the fate of DOM. However, these effects remain poorly quantified due to a lack of quantitative ecological frameworks. Here, we used video microscopy to dissect with unprecedented resolution the chemotactic accumulation of marine bacteria around individual Chaetoceros affinis diatoms undergoing lysis. The observed spatiotemporal distribution of bacteria was used in a resource utilization model to map the conditions under which competition between different bacterial groups favors chemotaxis. The model predicts that chemotactic, copiotrophic populations outcompete nonmotile, oligotrophic populations during diatom blooms and bloom collapse conditions, resulting in an increase in the ratio of motile to nonmotile cells and in the succession of populations. Partitioning of DOM between the two populations is strongly dependent on the overall concentration of bacteria and the diffusivity of different DOM substances, and within each population, the growth benefit from phycospheres is experienced by only a small fraction of cells. By informing a DOM utilization model with highly resolved behavioral data, the hybrid approach used here represents a new path toward the elusive goal of predicting the consequences of microscale interactions in the ocean.

  16. A General Business Model for Marine Reserves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, Enric; Costello, Christopher; Dougherty, Dawn; Heal, Geoffrey; Kelleher, Kieran; Murray, Jason H.; Rosenberg, Andrew A.; Sumaila, Rashid

    2013-01-01

    Marine reserves are an effective tool for protecting biodiversity locally, with potential economic benefits including enhancement of local fisheries, increased tourism, and maintenance of ecosystem services. However, fishing communities often fear short-term income losses associated with closures, and thus may oppose marine reserves. Here we review empirical data and develop bioeconomic models to show that the value of marine reserves (enhanced adjacent fishing + tourism) may often exceed the pre-reserve value, and that economic benefits can offset the costs in as little as five years. These results suggest the need for a new business model for creating and managing reserves, which could pay for themselves and turn a profit for stakeholder groups. Our model could be expanded to include ecosystem services and other benefits, and it provides a general framework to estimate costs and benefits of reserves and to develop such business models. PMID:23573192

  17. A general business model for marine reserves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enric Sala

    Full Text Available Marine reserves are an effective tool for protecting biodiversity locally, with potential economic benefits including enhancement of local fisheries, increased tourism, and maintenance of ecosystem services. However, fishing communities often fear short-term income losses associated with closures, and thus may oppose marine reserves. Here we review empirical data and develop bioeconomic models to show that the value of marine reserves (enhanced adjacent fishing + tourism may often exceed the pre-reserve value, and that economic benefits can offset the costs in as little as five years. These results suggest the need for a new business model for creating and managing reserves, which could pay for themselves and turn a profit for stakeholder groups. Our model could be expanded to include ecosystem services and other benefits, and it provides a general framework to estimate costs and benefits of reserves and to develop such business models.

  18. A general business model for marine reserves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, Enric; Costello, Christopher; Dougherty, Dawn; Heal, Geoffrey; Kelleher, Kieran; Murray, Jason H; Rosenberg, Andrew A; Sumaila, Rashid

    2013-01-01

    Marine reserves are an effective tool for protecting biodiversity locally, with potential economic benefits including enhancement of local fisheries, increased tourism, and maintenance of ecosystem services. However, fishing communities often fear short-term income losses associated with closures, and thus may oppose marine reserves. Here we review empirical data and develop bioeconomic models to show that the value of marine reserves (enhanced adjacent fishing + tourism) may often exceed the pre-reserve value, and that economic benefits can offset the costs in as little as five years. These results suggest the need for a new business model for creating and managing reserves, which could pay for themselves and turn a profit for stakeholder groups. Our model could be expanded to include ecosystem services and other benefits, and it provides a general framework to estimate costs and benefits of reserves and to develop such business models.

  19. Bioavailability of sediment-bound contaminants to marine organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, B. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)]|[Colby Coll., Waterville, ME (United States); Neff, J. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)]|[Battelle Ocean Sciences, Duxbury, MA (United States)

    1993-09-01

    The bioavailability of sediment-bound contaminants to marine organisms indicates that there exists a potential for transfer of these contaminants through marine food webs to commercial fisheries products consumed by humans. However, there has been relatively little effort to combine and synthesize data on chemical/biological interactions between benthic animals and seagrasses and the sediments in which they reside on the one hand, and on the chemistry of bioaccumulation on the other. This report provides a conceptual basis for an approach to bioavailability and biomagnification of sediment-bound contaminants that reviews biological and chemical approaches.

  20. An Update on 2,5-Diketopiperazines from Marine Organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ri-Ming Huang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available 2,5-Diketopiperazines (2,5-DKPs are an important category of structurally diverse cyclic dipeptides with prominent biological properties. These 2,5-DKPs have been obtained from a variety of natural resources, including marine organisms. Because of the increasing numbers and biological importance of these compounds, this review covers 90 marine originated 2,5-DKPs that were reported from 2009 to the first half-year of 2014. The review will focus on the structure characterizations, biological properties and proposed biosynthetic processes of these compounds.

  1. Quantifying the degradation of organic matter in marine sediments: A review and synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Sandra; Jørgensen, B. B.; LaRowe, D. E.; Middelburg, J. J.; Pancost, R. D.; Regnier, P.

    2013-08-01

    Quantifying the rates of biogeochemical processes in marine sediments is essential for understanding global element cycles and climate change. Because organic matter degradation is the engine behind benthic dynamics, deciphering the impact that various forces have on this process is central to determining the evolution of the Earth system. Therefore, recent developments in the quantitative modeling of organic matter degradation in marine sediments are critically reviewed. The first part of the review synthesizes the main chemical, biological and physical factors that control organic matter degradation in sediments while the second part provides a general review of the mathematical formulations used to model these processes and the third part evaluates their application over different spatial and temporal scales. Key transport mechanisms in sedimentary environments are summarized and the mathematical formulation of the organic matter degradation rate law is described in detail. The roles of enzyme kinetics, bioenergetics, temperature and biomass growth in particular are highlighted. Alternative model approaches that quantify the degradation rate constant are also critically compared. In the third part of the review, the capability of different model approaches to extrapolate organic matter degradation rates over a broad range of temporal and spatial scales is assessed. In addition, the structure, functions and parameterization of more than 250 published models of organic matter degradation in marine sediments are analyzed. The large range of published model parameters illustrates the complex nature of organic matter dynamics, and, thus, the limited transferability of these parameters from one site to another. Compiled model parameters do not reveal a statistically significant correlation with single environmental characteristics such as water depth, deposition rate or organic matter flux. The lack of a generic framework that allows for model parameters to be

  2. Organic carbon burial in fjords: Terrestrial versus marine inputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xingqian; Bianchi, Thomas S.; Savage, Candida; Smith, Richard W.

    2016-10-01

    Fjords have been identified as sites of enhanced organic carbon (OC) burial and may play an important role in regulating climate change on glacial-interglacial timescales. Understanding sediment processes and sources of sedimentary OC are necessary to better constrain OC burial in fjords. In this study, we use Fiordland, New Zealand, as a case study and present data on surface sediments, sediment down-cores and terrestrial end-members to examine dynamics of sediments and the sources of OC in fjord sediments. Sediment cores showed evidence of multiple particle sources, frequent bioturbation and mass-wasting events. A multi-proxy approach (stable isotopes, lignin-phenols and fatty acids) allowed for separation of marine, soil and vascular plant OC in surface sediments. The relationship between mass accumulation rate (MAR) and OC contents in fjord surface sediments suggested that mineral dilution is important in controlling OC content on a global scale, but is less important for specific regions (e.g., New Zealand). The inconsistency of OC budgets calculated by using MAR weighted %OC and OC accumulation rates (AR; 6 vs 21-31 Tg OC yr-1) suggested that sediment flux in fjords was likely underestimated. By using end-member models, we propose that 55% to 62% of total OC buried in fjords is terrestrially derived, and accounts for 17 ± 12% of the OCterr buried in all marine sediments. The strong correlation between MAR and OC AR indicated that OC flux will likely decrease in fjords in the future with global warming due to decrease in sediment flux caused by glacier denudation.

  3. Indicator organisms for marine and terrestrial environmental radioactivity[Radioecology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raaum, A.; Christensen, G.C.; Ruud, A.M.B.; Straelberg, E. [Institute for Energy Technology, IFE, Kjeller (Norway)

    2006-04-15

    The aim of this work was to study different terrestrial and marine indicator organisms for environmental radioactivity. An area in central Norway, consisting of forests, mountain forests and high mountains without forests was subject to the study for terrestrial indicator organisms. This area received fairly high contamination of Chernobyl fallout. In 1990 samples of several species of biota were collected from the same area as a part of a NKS project. For marine indicator organisms, samples of the two species of brown algae Fucus vesiculosus and Ascophyllum nodosum were collected from Tromoeya in southern Norway. Seasonal variations in activity concentrations and indicator properties of Fucus vesiculosus and Ascophyllum nodosum were compared for several radionuclides, including some radionuclides that have not been focused on previously. (au)

  4. Reburial of fossil organic carbon in marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickens, Angela F; Gélinas, Yves; Masiello, Caroline A; Wakeham, Stuart; Hedges, John I

    2004-01-22

    Marine sediments act as the ultimate sink for organic carbon, sequestering otherwise rapidly cycling carbon for geologic timescales. Sedimentary organic carbon burial appears to be controlled by oxygen exposure time in situ, and much research has focused on understanding the mechanisms of preservation of organic carbon. In this context, combustion-derived black carbon has received attention as a form of refractory organic carbon that may be preferentially preserved in soils and sediments. However, little is understood about the environmental roles, transport and distribution of black carbon. Here we apply isotopic analyses to graphitic black carbon samples isolated from pre-industrial marine and terrestrial sediments. We find that this material is terrestrially derived and almost entirely depleted of radiocarbon, suggesting that it is graphite weathered from rocks, rather than a combustion product. The widespread presence of fossil graphitic black carbon in sediments has therefore probably led to significant overestimates of burial of combustion-derived black carbon in marine sediments. It could be responsible for biasing radiocarbon dating of sedimentary organic carbon, and also reveals a closed loop in the carbon cycle. Depending on its susceptibility to oxidation, this recycled carbon may be locked away from the biologically mediated carbon cycle for many geologic cycles.

  5. Reburial of fossil organic carbon in marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickens, Angela F.; Gélinas, Yves; Masiello, Caroline A.; Wakeham, Stuart; Hedges, John I.

    2004-01-01

    Marine sediments act as the ultimate sink for organic carbon, sequestering otherwise rapidly cycling carbon for geologic timescales. Sedimentary organic carbon burial appears to be controlled by oxygen exposure time in situ, and much research has focused on understanding the mechanisms of preservation of organic carbon. In this context, combustion-derived black carbon has received attention as a form of refractory organic carbon that may be preferentially preserved in soils and sediments. However, little is understood about the environmental roles, transport and distribution of black carbon. Here we apply isotopic analyses to graphitic black carbon samples isolated from pre-industrial marine and terrestrial sediments. We find that this material is terrestrially derived and almost entirely depleted of radiocarbon, suggesting that it is graphite weathered from rocks, rather than a combustion product. The widespread presence of fossil graphitic black carbon in sediments has therefore probably led to significant overestimates of burial of combustion-derived black carbon in marine sediments. It could be responsible for biasing radiocarbon dating of sedimentary organic carbon, and also reveals a closed loop in the carbon cycle. Depending on its susceptibility to oxidation, this recycled carbon may be locked away from the biologically mediated carbon cycle for many geologic cycles.

  6. The Elementary Marine Ice Sheet Model (EMISM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattyn, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Ice sheet models become more and more components of global climate system modelling instead of stand-alone features to study cryospheric processes. Full coupling of ice sheet models to atmospheric and ocean models requires a standard for ice sheet models, and more precisely for marine ice sheet models, where complex feedbacks between ice and ocean, such as marine ice sheet instability, and the atmosphere, such as the elevation-mass balance feedback, operate at different time scales. Recent model intercomparisons (e.g., SeaRISE, MISMIP) have shown that basic requirements for marine ice sheet models are still lacking and that the complexity of many ice sheet models is focused on processes that are either not well captured numerically (spatial resolution issue) or are of secondary importance compared to the essential features of marine ice sheet dynamics. Here, we propose a new and fast computing ice sheet model, devoid of most complexity, but capturing the essential feedbacks when coupled to ocean or atmospheric models. Its computational efficiency guarantees to easily tests its advantages as well as limits through ensemble modelling. EMISM (Elementary Marine Ice Sheet Model) is a vertically integrated ice sheet model based on the Shallow-Ice Approximation extended a Weertman sliding law. Although vertically integrated, thermomechanical coupling is ensured through a simplified representation of ice sheet thermodynamics based on an analytical solution of the vertical temperature profile, enhanced with strain heating. The marine boundary is represented by a parameterized flux condition similar to Pollard & Deconto (2012), based on Schoof (2007). A simplified ice shelf is added to account for buttressing of ice shelves in this parameterization. The ice sheet model is solved on a finite difference grid and special care is taken to its numerical efficiency and stability. While such model has a series of (known) deficiencies with respect to short time effects, its overall

  7. Leaching of Plastic Additives to Marine Organisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koelmans, A.A.; Besseling, E.; Foekema, E.M.

    2014-01-01

    It is often assumed that ingestion of microplastics by aquatic species leads to increased exposure to plastic additives. However, experimental data or model based evidence is lacking. Here we assess the potential of leaching of nonylphenol (NP) and bisphenol A (BPA) in the intestinal tracts of Areni

  8. Leaching of Plastic Additives to Marine Organisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koelmans, A.A.; Besseling, E.; Foekema, E.M.

    2014-01-01

    It is often assumed that ingestion of microplastics by aquatic species leads to increased exposure to plastic additives. However, experimental data or model based evidence is lacking. Here we assess the potential of leaching of nonylphenol (NP) and bisphenol A (BPA) in the intestinal tracts of Areni

  9. Modelling distribution of marine benthos from hydroacoustics and underwater video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, K. W.; Van Niel, K. P.; Radford, B.; Kendrick, G. A.; Grove, S. L.

    2008-08-01

    Broad-scale mapping of marine benthos is required for marine resource management and conservation. This study combines textural derivatives based on bathymetry from multibeam hydroacoustics with underwater video observations to model and map sessile biota between 10- and 60-m water depth over 35 km 2 in Point Addis Marine National Park (MNP), Vic., Australia. Classification tree models and maps were developed for macroalgae (all types, mixed red algae, Ecklonia, and rhodoliths) and sessile invertebrates (all types, sponges, and ascidians). Model accuracy was tested on 25% of the video observation dataset reserved from modelling. Models fit well for most macroalgae categories (correct classification rates of 67-84%), but are not as good for sessile invertebrate classes (correct classification rates of 57-62%). The poor fit of the sessile invertebrate models may be the combined result of grouping organisms with different environmental requirements and the effect of false absences recorded during video interpretation due to poor image quality. Probability maps, binary single-class maps, and multi-class maps supply spatially explicit, detailed information on the distribution of sessile benthic biota within the MNP and provide information at a landscape-scale for ecological investigations and marine management.

  10. Microlayer source of oxygenated volatile organic compounds in the summertime marine Arctic boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungall, Emma L.; Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.; Wentzell, Jeremy J. B.; Lee, Alex K. Y.; Thomas, Jennie L.; Blais, Marjolaine; Gosselin, Michel; Miller, Lisa A.; Papakyriakou, Tim; Willis, Megan D.; Liggio, John

    2017-06-01

    Summertime Arctic shipboard observations of oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) such as organic acids, key precursors of climatically active secondary organic aerosol (SOA), are consistent with a novel source of OVOCs to the marine boundary layer via chemistry at the sea surface microlayer. Although this source has been studied in a laboratory setting, organic acid emissions from the sea surface microlayer have not previously been observed in ambient marine environments. Correlations between measurements of OVOCs, including high levels of formic acid, in the atmosphere (measured by an online high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer) and dissolved organic matter in the ocean point to a marine source for the measured OVOCs. That this source is photomediated is indicated by correlations between the diurnal cycles of the OVOC measurements and solar radiation. In contrast, the OVOCs do not correlate with levels of isoprene, monoterpenes, or dimethyl sulfide. Results from box model calculations are consistent with heterogeneous chemistry as the source of the measured OVOCs. As sea ice retreats and dissolved organic carbon inputs to the Arctic increase, the impact of this source on the summer Arctic atmosphere is likely to increase. Globally, this source should be assessed in other marine environments to quantify its impact on OVOC and SOA burdens in the atmosphere, and ultimately on climate.

  11. The Identification of Two New Sterols from Marine Organism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Two new sterol have been isolated from the South China Sea marine organism. Compound 1 was isolated from the sponge Polymastia sobustia and compound 2 was obtained from the soft coral Sinularia inexplicata. Their structures were established as 3β -hydroxy- stigmast-5en-7-one and 24 - methylene cholestan -3β, 6β, 9α, 19 -tetrol by variety of spectral analysis such as IR, EIMS, 1DNMR, 1H-1H COSY, HMQC, HMBC, NOESY.

  12. Marine Vibrio Species Produce the Volatile Organic Compound Acetone

    OpenAIRE

    Nemecek-Marshall, M; Wojciechowski, C; Kuzma, J.; Silver, G. M.; Fall, R.

    1995-01-01

    While screening aerobic, heterotrophic marine bacteria for production of volatile organic compounds, we found that a group of isolates produced substantial amounts of acetone. Acetone production was confirmed by gas chromatography, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and high-performance liquid chromatography. The major acetone producers were identified as nonclinical Vibrio species. Acetone production was maximal in the stationary phase of growth and was stimulated by addition of l-leucine...

  13. Environmental sustainability of bioactive molecules from marine organisms

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez López, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Marine and freshwater ecosystems have been widely exploited throughout history as vast sources of food and valuable natural products. The diversity of aquatic organisms has led to the isolation of more than 24000 bioactive compounds with applications in strategic industries such as pharmaceutical, nutraceutical and cosmetic sectors. Moreover, the biochemical composition and growth characteristics of microalgae and seaweeds suggest their capability to overcome some bottleneck...

  14. Marine biogenic source of atmospheric organic nitrogen in the subtropical North Atlantic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altieri, Katye E; Fawcett, Sarah E; Peters, Andrew J; Sigman, Daniel M; Hastings, Meredith G

    2016-01-26

    Global models estimate that the anthropogenic component of atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition to the ocean accounts for up to a third of the ocean's external N supply and 10% of anthropogenic CO2 uptake. However, there are few observational constraints from the marine atmospheric environment to validate these findings. Due to the paucity of atmospheric organic N data, the largest uncertainties related to atmospheric N deposition are the sources and cycling of organic N, which is 20-80% of total N deposition. We studied the concentration and chemical composition of rainwater and aerosol organic N collected on the island of Bermuda in the western North Atlantic Ocean over 18 mo. Here, we show that the water-soluble organic N concentration ([WSON]) in marine aerosol is strongly correlated with surface ocean primary productivity and wind speed, suggesting a marine biogenic source for aerosol WSON. The chemical composition of high-[WSON] aerosols also indicates a primary marine source. We find that the WSON in marine rain is compositionally different from that in concurrently collected aerosols, suggesting that in-cloud scavenging (as opposed to below-cloud "washout") is the main contributor to rain WSON. We conclude that anthropogenic activity is not a significant source of organic N to the marine atmosphere over the North Atlantic, despite downwind transport from large pollution sources in North America. This, in conjunction with previous work on ammonium and nitrate, leads to the conclusion that only 27% of total N deposition to the global ocean is anthropogenic, in contrast to the 80% estimated previously.

  15. Screening for Anti-Cancer Compounds in Marine Organisms in Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Dobretsov

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Marine organisms are a rich source of bioactive molecules with potential applications in medicine, biotechnology and industry; however, few bioactive compounds have been isolated from organisms inhabiting the Arabian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman. This study aimed to isolate and screen the anti-cancer activity of compounds and extracts from 40 natural products of marine organisms collected from the Gulf of Oman. Methods: This study was carried out between January 2012 and December 2014 at the Sultan Qaboos University, Muscat, Oman. Fungi, bacteria, sponges, algae, soft corals, tunicates, bryozoans, mangrove tree samples and sea cucumbers were collected from seawater at Marina Bandar Al-Rowdha and Bandar Al-Khayran in Oman. Bacteria and fungi were isolated using a marine broth and organisms were extracted with methanol and ethyl acetate. Compounds were identified from spectroscopic data. The anti-cancer activity of the compounds and extracts was tested in a Michigan Cancer Foundation (MCF-7 cell line breast adenocarcinoma model. Results: Eight pure compounds and 32 extracts were investigated. Of these, 22.5% showed strong or medium anti-cancer activity, with malformin A, kuanoniamine D, hymenialdisine and gallic acid showing the greatest activity, as well as the soft coral Sarcophyton sp. extract. Treatment of MCF-7 cells at different concentrations of Sarcophyton sp. extracts indicated the induction of concentration-dependent cell death. Ultrastructural analysis highlighted the presence of nuclear fragmentation, membrane protrusion, blebbing and chromatic segregation at the nuclear membrane, which are typical characteristics of cell death by apoptosis induction. Conclusion: Some Omani marine organisms showed high anti-cancer potential. The efficacy, specificity and molecular mechanisms of anti-cancer compounds from Omani marine organisms on various cancer models should be investigated in future in vitro and in vivo studies.

  16. Microbial community structure affects marine dissolved organic matter composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth B Kujawinski

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Marine microbes are critical players in the global carbon cycle, affecting both the reduction of inorganic carbon and the remineralization of reduced organic compounds back to carbon dioxide. Members of microbial consortia all depend on marine dissolved organic matter (DOM and in turn, affect the molecules present in this heterogeneous pool. Our understanding of DOM produced by marine microbes is biased towards single species laboratory cultures or simplified field incubations, which exclude large phototrophs and protozoan grazers. Here we explore the interdependence of DOM composition and bacterial diversity in two mixed microbial consortia from coastal seawater: a whole water community and a <1.0-μm community dominated by heterotrophic bacteria. Each consortium was incubated with isotopically-labeled glucose for 9 days. Using stable-isotope probing techniques and electrospray ionization Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry, we show that the presence of organisms larger than 1.0-μm is the dominant factor affecting bacterial diversity and low-molecular-weight (<1000 Da DOM composition over this experiment. In the <1.0-μm community, DOM composition was dominated by compounds with lipid and peptide character at all time points, confirmed by fragmentation spectra with peptide-containing neutral losses. In contrast, DOM composition in the whole water community was nearly identical to that in the initial coastal seawater. These differences in DOM composition persisted throughout the experiment despite shifts in bacterial diversity, underscoring an unappreciated role for larger microorganisms in constraining DOM composition in the marine environment.

  17. Accurate Quantification of Laminarin in Marine Organic Matter with Enzymes from Marine Microbes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Stefan; Scheffel, André; Polz, Martin F; Hehemann, Jan-Hendrik

    2017-05-01

    Marine algae produce a variety of glycans, which fulfill diverse biological functions and fuel the carbon and energy demands of heterotrophic microbes. A common approach to analysis of marine organic matter uses acid to hydrolyze the glycans into measurable monosaccharides. The monosaccharides may be derived from different glycans that are built with the same monosaccharides, however, and this approach does not distinguish between glycans in natural samples. Here we use enzymes to digest selectively and thereby quantify laminarin in particulate organic matter. Environmental metaproteome data revealed carbohydrate-active enzymes from marine flavobacteria as tools for selective hydrolysis of the algal β-glucan laminarin. The enzymes digested laminarin into glucose and oligosaccharides, which we measured with standard methods to establish the amounts of laminarin in the samples. We cloned, expressed, purified, and characterized three new glycoside hydrolases (GHs) of Formosa bacteria: two are endo-β-1,3-glucanases, of the GH16 and GH17 families, and the other is a GH30 exo-β-1,6-glucanase. Formosa sp. nov strain Hel1_33_131 GH30 (FbGH30) removed the β-1,6-glucose side chains, and Formosa agariphila GH17A (FaGH17A) and FaGH16A hydrolyzed the β-1,3-glucose backbone of laminarin. Specificity profiling with a library of glucan oligosaccharides and polysaccharides revealed that FaGH17A and FbGH30 were highly specific enzymes, while FaGH16A also hydrolyzed mixed-linked glucans with β-1,4-glucose. Therefore, we chose the more specific FaGH17A and FbGH30 to quantify laminarin in two cultured diatoms, namely, Thalassiosira weissflogii and Thalassiosira pseudonana, and in seawater samples from the North Sea and the Arctic Ocean. Combined, these results demonstrate the potential of enzymes for faster, stereospecific, and sequence-specific analysis of select glycans in marine organic matter.IMPORTANCE Marine algae synthesize substantial amounts of the glucose polymer

  18. Reticulate Evolution and Marine Organisms: The Final Frontier?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael L. Arnold

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The role that reticulate evolution (i.e., via lateral transfer, viral recombination and/or introgressive hybridization has played in the origin and adaptation of individual taxa and even entire clades continues to be tested for all domains of life. Though falsified for some groups, the hypothesis of divergence in the face of gene flow is becoming accepted as a major facilitator of evolutionary change for many microorganisms, plants and animals. Yet, the effect of reticulate evolutionary change in certain assemblages has been doubted, either due to an actual dearth of genetic exchange among the lineages belonging to these clades or because of a lack of appropriate data to test alternative hypotheses. Marine organisms represent such an assemblage. In the past half-century, some evolutionary biologists interested in the origin and trajectory of marine organisms, particularly animals, have posited that horizontal transfer, introgression and hybrid speciation have been rare. In this review, we provide examples of such genetic exchange that have come to light largely as a result of analyses of molecular markers. Comparisons among these markers and between these loci and morphological characters have provided numerous examples of marine microorganisms, plants and animals that possess the signature of mosaic genomes.

  19. Zebrafish Embryo Toxicity Microscale Model for Ichthyotoxicity Evaluation of Marine Natural Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Hong; Kong, Wen-Wen; Shao, Chang-Lun; Li, Yun; Liu, Yun-Zhang; Liu, Min; Guan, Fei-Fei; Wang, Chang-Yun

    2016-04-01

    Marine organisms often protect themselves against their predators by chemical defensive strategy. The second metabolites isolated from marine organisms and their symbiotic microbes have been proven to play a vital role in marine chemical ecology, such as ichthyotoxicity, allelopathy, and antifouling. It is well known that the microscale models for marine chemoecology assessment are urgently needed for trace quantity of marine natural products. Zebrafish model has been widely used as a microscale model in the fields of environment ecological evaluation and drug safety evaluation, but seldom reported for marine chemoecology assessment. In this work, zebrafish embryo toxicity microscale model was established for ichthyotoxicity evaluation of marine natural products by using 24-well microplate based on zebrafish embryo. Ichthyotoxicity was evaluated by observation of multiple toxicological endpoints, including coagulation egg, death, abnormal heartbeat, no spontaneous movement, delayed hatch, and malformation of the different organs during zebrafish embryogenesis periods at 24, 48, and 72 h post-fertilization (hpf). 3,4-Dichloroaniline was used as the positive control for method validation. Subsequently, the established model was applied to test the ichthyotoxic activity of the compounds isolated from corals and their symbiotic microbes and to isolate the bioactive secondary metabolites from the gorgonian Subergorgia mollis under bioassay guidance. It was suggested that zebrafish embryo toxicity microscale model is suitable for bioassay-guided isolation and preliminary bioactivity screening of marine natural products.

  20. The comet assay in Environmental Risk Assessment of marine pollutants: applications, assets and handicaps of surveying genotoxicity in non-model organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Marta; Costa, Pedro M

    2015-01-01

    Determining the genotoxic effects of pollutants has long been a priority in Environmental Risk Assessment (ERA) for coastal ecosystems, especially of complex areas such as estuaries and other confined waterbodies. The acknowledged link between DNA damage, mutagenicity and carcinogenicity to the exposure to certain toxicants has been responsible to the growing interest in determining the genotoxic effects of xenobiotics to wildlife as a measure of environmental risk. The comet assay, although widely employed in in vivo and in vitro toxicology, still holds many constraints in ERA, in large part owing to difficulties in obtaining conclusive cause-effect relationships from complex environments. Nevertheless, these challenges do not hinder the attempts to apply the alkaline comet assay on sentinel organisms, wild or subjected to bioassays in or ex situ (from fish to molluscs) as well to standardise protocols and establish general guidelines to the interpretation of findings. Fish have been regarded as an appealing subject due to the ease of performing the comet assay in whole blood. However, the application of the comet assay is becoming increasingly common in invertebrates (e.g. in molluscan haemocytes and solid tissues such as gills). Virtually all sorts of results have been obtained from the application of the comet assay in ERA (null, positive and inconclusive). However, it has become clear that interpreting DNA damage data from wild organisms is particularly challenging due to their ability to adapt to continuous environmental stressors, including toxicants. Also, the comet assay in non-model organisms for the purpose of ERA implies different constraints, assumptions and interpretation of findings, compared with the in vitro procedures from which most guidelines have been derived. This paper critically reviews the application of the comet assay in ERA, focusing on target organisms and tissues; protocol developments, case studies plus data handling and

  1. Data Assimilation in Marine Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydendall, Jan

    a computational point of view, e.g. low storage cost, no linearizations of the numerical models, etc. However, this also gives rise to many unforeseen difficulties, e.g. the curse of dimensionality, huge computational costs, etc. The challenge faced in this thesis was finding filters that could handle...... assimilation concept into an atmospheric chemical transport model. This paper deals with the results and conclusions obtained through some of the first experiments with the Optimal Interpolation filter in a geophysical model. The second paper F, deals with the construction of a finite element solver......This thesis consists of six research papers published or submitted for publication in the period 2006-2009 together with a summary report. The main topics of this thesis are nonlinear data assimilation techniques and estimation in dynamical models. The focus has been on the nonlinear filtering...

  2. The physical impacts of microplastics on marine organisms: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Stephanie L; Thompson, Richard C; Galloway, Tamara S

    2013-07-01

    Plastic debris at the micro-, and potentially also the nano-scale, are widespread in the environment. Microplastics have accumulated in oceans and sediments worldwide in recent years, with maximum concentrations reaching 100 000 particles m(3). Due to their small size, microplastics may be ingested by low trophic fauna, with uncertain consequences for the health of the organism. This review focuses on marine invertebrates and their susceptibility to the physical impacts of microplastic uptake. Some of the main points discussed are (1) an evaluation of the factors contributing to the bioavailability of microplastics including size and density; (2) an assessment of the relative susceptibility of different feeding guilds; (3) an overview of the factors most likely to influence the physical impacts of microplastics such as accumulation and translocation; and (4) the trophic transfer of microplastics. These findings are important in guiding future marine litter research and management strategies.

  3. Latitudinal distributions of organic nitrogen and organic carbon in marine aerosols over the western North Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Miyazaki

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Marine aerosol samples were collected over the western North Pacific along the latitudinal transect from 44° N to 10° N in late summer 2008 for measurements of organic nitrogen (ON and organic carbon (OC as well as isotopic ratios of total nitrogen (TN and total carbon (TC. Increased concentrations of methanesulfonic acid (MSA and diethylammonium (DEA+ at 40–44° N and subtropical regions (10–20° N together with averaged satellite chlorophyll a data and 5-day back trajectories suggest a significant influence of marine biological activities on aerosols in these regions. ON exhibited increased concentrations up to 260 ngN m−3 in these marine biologically influenced aerosols. Water-insoluble organic nitrogen (WION was found to be the most abundant nitrogen in the aerosols, accounting for 55 ± 16% of total aerosol nitrogen. In particular, the average WION/ON ratio was as high as 0.93 ± 0.07 at 40–44° N. These results suggest that marine biological sources significantly contributed to ON, a majority of which is composed of water-insoluble fractions in the study region. Analysis of the stable carbon isotopic ratios (δ13C indicated that, on average, marine-derived carbon accounted for ~88 ± 12% of total carbon in the aerosols. In addition, the δ13C increased from −22 to −20‰ when ON/OC ratios increased from 0.15 to 0.35 in marine biologically influenced aerosols. These results clearly show that organic nitrogen is enriched in organic aerosols originated from an oceanic region with high biological productivity, indicating a preferential transfer of nitrogen-containing organic compounds from the sea surface to the marine atmosphere. Both WION concentrations and WION/water-insoluble organic carbon (WIOC ratios showed positive correlations with local wind speeds, suggesting that sea-to-air emissions of ON via sea spray significantly contributes to marine organic aerosols over the

  4. Latitudinal distributions of organic nitrogen and organic carbon in marine aerosols over the western North Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Miyazaki

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Marine aerosol samples were collected over the western North Pacific along the latitudinal transect from 44° N to 10° N in late summer 2008 for measurements of organic nitrogen (ON and organic carbon (OC as well as isotopic ratios of total nitrogen (TN and total carbon (TC. Increased concentrations of methanesulfonic acid (MSA and diethylammonium (DEA+ at 40–44° N and subtropical regions (10–20° N together with averaged satellite chlorophyll-a data and 5-day back trajectories suggest a significant influence of marine biological activities on aerosols in these regions. ON exhibited increased concentrations up to 260 ngN m−3 in these marine biologically influenced aerosols. Water-insoluble organic nitrogen (WION was found to be the most abundant nitrogen in the aerosols, accounting for 55 ± 16% of total aerosol nitrogen. In particular, the average WION/ON ratio was as high as 0.93 ± 0.07 at 40–44° N. These results suggest that marine biological sources significantly contributed to ON, a majority of which is composed of water-insoluble fractions in the study region. Analysis of the stable carbon isotopic ratios (δ13C indicated that, on average, marine-derived carbon accounted for ~88 ± 12% of total carbon in the aerosols. In addition, the δ13C showed higher values (from −22 to −20‰ when ON/OC ratios increased from 0.15 to 0.35 in marine biologically influenced aerosols. These results clearly show that organic nitrogen is enriched in organic aerosols originated from an oceanic region with high biological productivity, indicating a preferential transfer of nitrogen-containing organic compounds from the sea surface to the marine atmosphere. Both WION concentrations and WION/water-insoluble organic carbon (WIOC ratios tended to increase with increasing local wind speeds, indicating that sea-to-air emissions of ON via sea spray contribute significantly to the marine organic

  5. Antifouling potential of some marine organisms from India against species of Bacillus and Pseudomonas

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhosale, S.H.; Nagle, V.L.; Jagtap, T.G.

    Crude methanolic extracts of 37 marine organisms (16 species of flora, 21 species of fauna) were screened for antibacterial properties against 5 strains of bacteria isolated from marine environments. Of these, 10 plant and 9 animal extracts...

  6. Assessment of the impact of xenobiotic pollutants on the marine organisms: Molecular biomarker approach

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarkar, A.

    ) etc. through different pathways is indeed a global concern. Because of bioaccumulation of their residues into the tissues of marine organisms poses a serious threat to the health of the marine ecosystem. Once the xenobiotic contaminants get accumulated...

  7. Modelling marine protected areas: insights and hurdles

    OpenAIRE

    Elizabeth A Fulton; Bax, Nicholas J.; Bustamante, Rodrigo H.; Jeffrey M. Dambacher; Dichmont, Catherine; Dunstan, Piers K.; Hayes, Keith R.; Hobday, Alistair J.; Pitcher, Roland; Plagányi, Éva E.; Punt, André E; Savina-rolland, Marie; Anthony D M Smith; David C. Smith

    2015-01-01

    Models provide useful insights into conservation and resource management issues and solutions. Their use to date has highlighted conditions under which no-take marine protected areas (MPAs) may help us to achieve the goals of ecosystem-based management by reducing pressures, and where they might fail to achieve desired goals. For example, static reserve designs are unlikely to achieve desired objectives when applied to mobile species or when compromised by climate-related ecosystem restructur...

  8. Effects of triclosan on marine benthic and epibenthic organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perron, Monique M; Ho, Kay T; Cantwell, Mark G; Burgess, Robert M; Pelletier, Marguerite C

    2012-08-01

    Triclosan is an antimicrobial compound that has been widely used in consumer products such as toothpaste, deodorant, and shampoo. Because of its widespread use, triclosan has been detected in various environmental media, including wastewater, sewage sludge, surface waters, and sediments. Triclosan is acutely toxic to numerous aquatic organisms, but very few studies have been performed on estuarine and marine benthic organisms. For whole sediment toxicity tests, the sediment-dwelling estuarine amphipod, Ampelisca abdita, and the epibenthic mysid shrimp, Americamysis bahia, are commonly used organisms. In the present study, median lethal concentration values (LC50) were obtained for both of these organisms using water-only and whole sediment exposures. Acute 96-h water-only toxicity tests resulted in LC50 values of 73.4 and 74.3 µg/L for the amphipod and mysid, respectively. For the 7-d whole sediment toxicity test, LC50 values were 303 and 257 mg/kg (dry wt) for the amphipod and mysid, respectively. Using equilibrium partitioning theory, these whole sediment values are equivalent to interstitial water LC50 values of 230 and 190 µg/L for the amphipod and mysid, respectively, which are within a threefold difference of the observed 96-h LC50 water-only values. Triclosan was found to accumulate in polychaete tissue in a 28-d bioaccumulation study with a biota-sediment accumulation factor of 0.23 kg organic carbon/kg lipid. These data provide some of the first toxicity data for triclosan with marine benthic and epibenthic species while also indicating a need to better understand the effects of other forms of sediment carbon, triclosan ionization, and organism metabolism of triclosan on the chemical's behavior and toxicity in the aquatic environment.

  9. The Impacts of Marine Organic Emissions on Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meskhidze, N.; Gantt, B.

    2013-12-01

    Using laboratory studies and global/regional climate model results, this talk will contribute to two main research questions: 1) what can be learned about the carbon emission inducing stress factors for marine algae, and 2) what is a potential impact of marine biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions on global atmospheric chemistry and climate. Marine photosynthetic organisms emit VOCs which can form secondary organic aerosols (SOA). Currently large uncertainty exists in the magnitude of the marine biogenic sources, their spatiotemporal distribution, controlling factors, and contributions to natural background of organic aerosols. Here laboratory results for the production of isoprene and four monoterpene (α-pinene, β-pinene, camphene and d-limonene) compounds as a function of variable light and temperature regimes for 6 different phytoplankton species will be discussed. The experiment was designed to simulate the regions where phytoplankton is subjected to changeable light/temperature conditions. The samples were grown and maintained at a climate controlled room. VOCs accumulated in the water and headspace above the water were measured by passing the sample through a gas chromatography/mass system equipped with a sample pre-concentrator allowing detection of low ppt levels of hydrocarbons. The VOC production rates were distinctly different for light/temperature stressed (the first 12 hour cycle at light/temperature levels higher than what the cultures were acclimated to in a climate controlled room) and photo/temperature-acclimated (the second 12 hour light/temperature cycle) states. In general, all phytoplankton species showed a rapid increase in isoprene and monoterpene production at higher light levels (between 150 to 420 μE m-2 s-1) until a constant production rate was reached. Isoprene and α-pinene, production rates also increased with temperature until a certain level, after which the rates declined as temperature increased further. Two

  10. OCEANFILMS-2: Representing coadsorption of saccharides in marine films and potential impacts on modeled marine aerosol chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Susannah M.; Gobrogge, Eric; Fu, Li; Link, Katie; Elliott, Scott M.; Wang, Hongfei; Walker, Rob

    2016-08-01

    Here we show that the addition of chemical interactions between soluble monosaccharides and an insoluble lipid surfactant monolayer improves agreement of modeled sea spray chemistry with observed marine aerosol chemistry. In particular, the alkane:hydroxyl mass ratio in modeled sea spray organic matter is reduced from a median of 2.73 to a range of 0.41-0.69, reducing the discrepancy with previous Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) observations of clean marine aerosol (ratio: 0.24-0.38). The overall organic fraction of submicron sea spray also increases, allowing organic mass fractions in the range 0.5-0.7 for submicron sea spray particles over highly active phytoplankton blooms. Sum frequency generation experiments support the modeling approach by demonstrating that soluble monosaccharides can strongly adsorb to a lipid monolayer likely via Coulomb interactions under appropriate conditions. These laboratory findings motivate further research to determine the relevance of coadsorption mechanisms for real-world, sea spray aerosol production.

  11. OCEANFILMS-2: Representing coadsorption of saccharides in marine films and potential impacts on modeled marine aerosol chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrows, Susannah M. [Atmospheric Science and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Gobrogge, Eric [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Montana State University, Bozeman Montana USA; Fu, Li [Environmental and Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Link, Katie [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Montana State University, Bozeman Montana USA; Elliott, Scott M. [Climate, Ocean, and Sea Ice Modelling Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos New Mexico USA; Wang, Hongfei [Environmental and Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Walker, Rob [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Montana State University, Bozeman Montana USA

    2016-08-10

    Here we show that the addition of chemical interactions of soluble polysaccharides with a surfactant monolayer improves agreement of modeled sea spray chemistry with observed marine aerosol chemistry. In particular, the fraction of hydroxyl functional groups in modeled sea spray organic matter is increased, improving agreement with FTIR observations of marine aerosol composition. The overall organic fraction of submicron sea spray also increases, allowing organic mass fractions in the range 0.5 – 0.7 for submicron sea spray particles over highly active phytoplankton blooms. We show results from Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) experiments that support the modeling approach, by demonstrating that soluble polysaccharides can strongly adsorb to a lipid monolayer via columbic interactions under appropriate conditions.

  12. Modelling marine protected areas: insights and hurdles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, Elizabeth A; Bax, Nicholas J; Bustamante, Rodrigo H; Dambacher, Jeffrey M; Dichmont, Catherine; Dunstan, Piers K; Hayes, Keith R; Hobday, Alistair J; Pitcher, Roland; Plagányi, Éva E; Punt, André E; Savina-Rolland, Marie; Smith, Anthony D M; Smith, David C

    2015-11-05

    Models provide useful insights into conservation and resource management issues and solutions. Their use to date has highlighted conditions under which no-take marine protected areas (MPAs) may help us to achieve the goals of ecosystem-based management by reducing pressures, and where they might fail to achieve desired goals. For example, static reserve designs are unlikely to achieve desired objectives when applied to mobile species or when compromised by climate-related ecosystem restructuring and range shifts. Modelling tools allow planners to explore a range of options, such as basing MPAs on the presence of dynamic oceanic features, and to evaluate the potential future impacts of alternative interventions compared with 'no-action' counterfactuals, under a range of environmental and development scenarios. The modelling environment allows the analyst to test if indicators and management strategies are robust to uncertainties in how the ecosystem (and the broader human-ecosystem combination) operates, including the direct and indirect ecological effects of protection. Moreover, modelling results can be presented at multiple spatial and temporal scales, and relative to ecological, economic and social objectives. This helps to reveal potential 'surprises', such as regime shifts, trophic cascades and bottlenecks in human responses. Using illustrative examples, this paper briefly covers the history of the use of simulation models for evaluating MPA options, and discusses their utility and limitations for informing protected area management in the marine realm. © 2015 The Author(s).

  13. Global Modeling of the Oceanic Source of Organic Aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stelios Myriokefalitakis

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The global marine organic aerosol budget is investigated by a 3-dimensional chemistry-transport model considering recently proposed parameterisations of the primary marine organic aerosol (POA and secondary organic aerosol (SOA formation from the oxidation of marine volatile organic compounds. MODIS and SeaWiFS satellite data of Chlorophyll-a and ECMWF solar incoming radiation, wind speed, and temperature are driving the oceanic emissions in the model. Based on the adopted parameterisations, the SOA and the submicron POA marine sources are evaluated at about 5 Tg yr−1 (∼1.5 Tg C yr−1 and 7 to 8 Tg yr−1 (∼4 Tg C yr−1, respectively. The computed marine SOA originates from the dimethylsulfide oxidation (∼78%, the potentially formed dialkyl amine salts (∼21%, and marine hydrocarbon oxidation (∼0.1%. Comparison of calculations with observations indicates an additional marine source of soluble organic carbon that could be partially encountered by marine POA chemical ageing.

  14. Monitoring of PCDDs, PCDFs, DLPCBs and PAHs in marine organisms from the coastal areas of Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, H.B.; Choi, H.G.; Lee, S.J.; Kim, S.S.; Choi, M. [National Fisheries Research and Development Institute, Busan (Korea); Ok, G. [Pukyong National Univ., Busan (Korea)

    2004-09-15

    Monitoring of toxic organic contaminants is the fundamental work to study ecotoxicology. Bioaccumulative monitoring essentially can provide comprehensive information on the average variation in time and space of the concentrations of contaminants in the marine aquatic environments, assessing the extents and toxic effects of persistent organic chemicals for the coastal marine ecosystems. A large variety of organic chemicals, primarily anthropogenic pollutants, are transported into coastal marine ecosystems through various routes. Marine organisms may be exposed to toxic organic contaminants by contact with contaminated seawater and sediments, either on the seabed or through suspended sediments, or by ingestion of contaminated prey. Due to low water soulubility and high octanol/water partition coefficients (Kow) in seawater, these chemicals can retain and concentrate in fatty tissues of these marine organisms such as migrate into fish, shellfish and invertebrates. In aquatic systems, the highly lipophilic and hydrophobic organic pollutants tend to bioconcentrate from water to aquatic animal and then biomagnify up through the multistep food chain. Hence, these organisms reflect the pollution extent of persistent toxic organic pollutants and some species are used as bio-indicators at different environmental conditions and foodweb. Although several toxic microcontaminants have previously been determined in some locations for marine organisms from the Korean coastal environments, there are few reported data on levels of PCDDs/DFs, DLPCBs and PAHs in marine organisms, particularly shellfish, from the Korean coastal ecosystems. In this study, we planned to monitor the dioxins and dioxin-like contaminants pollution in marine environment of Korea.

  15. Antiviral Activity of Natural Products Extracted from Marine Organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sobia Tabassum

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Many epidemics have broken out over the centuries. Hundreds and thousands of humans have died over a disease. Available treatments for infectious diseases have always been limited. Some infections are more deadly than the others, especially viral pathogens. These pathogens have continuously resisted all kinds of medical treatment, due to a need for new treatments to be developed. Drugs are present in nature and are also synthesized in vitro and they help in combating diseases and restoring health. Synthesizing drugs is a hard and time consuming task, which requires a lot of man power and financial aid. However, the natural compounds are just lying around on the earth, may it be land or water. Over a thousand novel compounds isolated from marine organisms are used as antiviral agents. Others are being pharmacologically tested. Today, over forty antiviral compounds are present in the pharmacological market. Some of these compounds are undergoing clinical and pre-clinical stages. Marine compounds are paving the way for a new trend in modern medicine.

  16. Impacts of Ocean Acidification on Sensory Function in Marine Organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashur, Molly M; Johnston, Nicole K; Dixson, Danielle L

    2017-07-01

    Ocean acidification has been identified as a major contributor to ocean ecosystem decline, impacting the calcification, survival, and behavior of marine organisms. Numerous studies have observed altered sensory perception of chemical, auditory, and visual cues after exposure to elevated CO2. Sensory systems enable the observation of the external environment and therefore play a critical role in survival, communication, and behavior of marine organisms. This review seeks to (1) summarize the current knowledge of sensory impairment caused by ocean acidification, (2) discuss potential mechanisms behind this disruption, and (3) analyze the expected taxa differences in sensitivities to elevated CO2 conditions. Although a lack of standardized methodology makes cross-study comparisons challenging, trends and biases arise from this synthesis including a substantial focus on vertebrates, larvae or juveniles, the reef ecosystem, and chemosensory perception. Future studies must broaden the scope of the field by diversifying the taxa and ecosystems studied, incorporating ontogenetic comparisons, and focusing on cryptic sensory systems such as electroreception, magnetic sense, and the lateral line system. A discussion of possible mechanisms reveals GABAA receptor reversal as the conspicuous physiological mechanism. However, the potential remains for alternative disruption through structure or cue changes. Finally, a taxonomic comparison of physiological complexity reveals few trends in sensory sensitivities to lowered pH, but we hypothesize potential correlations relating to habitat, life history or relative use of sensory systems. Elevated CO2, in concordance with other global and local stressors, has the potential to drastically shift community composition and structure. Therefore research addressing the extent of sensory impairment, the underlying mechanisms, and the differences between taxa is vital for improved predictions of organismal response to ocean acidification.

  17. Marine organisms: an alternative source of potentially valuable natural products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alphonse Kelecom

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper recalls the outcoming of marine natural products research and reviews a selection of marirne bioactive metabolites in current use together with promising trends in marine pharmacology.

  18. Implicit assimilation for marine ecological models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, B.; Miller, R.; Spitz, Y. H.

    2012-12-01

    We use a new data assimilation method to estimate the parameters of a marine ecological model. At a given point in the ocean, the estimated values of the parameters determine the behaviors of the modeled planktonic groups, and thus indicate which species are dominant. To begin, we assimilate in situ observations, e.g., the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study, the Hawaii Ocean Time-series, and Ocean Weather Station Papa. From there, we estimate the parameters at surrounding points in space based on satellite observations of ocean color. Given the variation of the estimated parameters, we divide the ocean into regions meant to represent distinct ecosystems. An important feature of the data assimilation approach is that it refines the confidence limits of the optimal Gaussian approximation to the distribution of the parameters. This enables us to determine the ecological divisions with greater accuracy.

  19. Modeling and Analysis in Marine Big Data: Advances and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongmei Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It is aware that big data has gathered tremendous attentions from academic research institutes, governments, and enterprises in all aspects of information sciences. With the development of diversity of marine data acquisition techniques, marine data grow exponentially in last decade, which forms marine big data. As an innovation, marine big data is a double-edged sword. On the one hand, there are many potential and highly useful values hidden in the huge volume of marine data, which is widely used in marine-related fields, such as tsunami and red-tide warning, prevention, and forecasting, disaster inversion, and visualization modeling after disasters. There is no doubt that the future competitions in marine sciences and technologies will surely converge into the marine data explorations. On the other hand, marine big data also brings about many new challenges in data management, such as the difficulties in data capture, storage, analysis, and applications, as well as data quality control and data security. To highlight theoretical methodologies and practical applications of marine big data, this paper illustrates a broad view about marine big data and its management, makes a survey on key methods and models, introduces an engineering instance that demonstrates the management architecture, and discusses the existing challenges.

  20. Merging Marine Ecosystem Models and Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, V.; Hood, R. R.; Stukel, M. R.; Moran, M. A.; Paul, J. H.; Satinsky, B.; Zielinski, B.; Yager, P. L.

    2015-12-01

    oceanography. One of the grand challenges of oceanography is to develop model techniques to more effectively incorporate genomic information. As one approach, we developed an ecosystem model whose community is determined by randomly assigning functional genes to build each organism's "DNA". Microbes are assigned a size that sets their baseline environmental responses using allometric response cuves. These responses are modified by the costs and benefits conferred by each gene in an organism's genome. The microbes are embedded in a general circulation model where environmental conditions shape the emergent population. This model is used to explore whether organisms constructed from randomized combinations of metabolic capability alone can self-organize to create realistic oceanic biogeochemical gradients. Realistic community size spectra and chlorophyll-a concentrations emerge in the model. The model is run repeatedly with randomly-generated microbial communities and each time realistic gradients in community size spectra, chlorophyll-a, and forms of nitrogen develop. This supports the hypothesis that the metabolic potential of a community rather than the realized species composition is the primary factor setting vertical and horizontal environmental gradients. Vertical distributions of nitrogen and transcripts for genes involved in nitrification are broadly consistent with observations. Modeled gene and transcript abundance for nitrogen cycling and processing of land-derived organic material match observations along the extreme gradients in the Amazon River plume, and they help to explain the factors controlling observed variability.

  1. Isolation of microplastics in biota-rich seawater samples and marine organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Matthew; Webb, Hannah; Lindeque, Pennie K.; Fileman, Elaine S.; Halsband, Claudia; Galloway, Tamara S.

    2014-03-01

    Microplastic litter is a pervasive pollutant present in aquatic systems across the globe. A range of marine organisms have the capacity to ingest microplastics, resulting in adverse health effects. Developing methods to accurately quantify microplastics in productive marine waters, and those internalized by marine organisms, is of growing importance. Here we investigate the efficacy of using acid, alkaline and enzymatic digestion techniques in mineralizing biological material from marine surface trawls to reveal any microplastics present. Our optimized enzymatic protocol can digest >97% (by weight) of the material present in plankton-rich seawater samples without destroying any microplastic debris present. In applying the method to replicate marine samples from the western English Channel, we identified 0.27 microplastics m-3. The protocol was further used to extract microplastics ingested by marine zooplankton under laboratory conditions. Our findings illustrate that enzymatic digestion can aid the detection of microplastic debris within seawater samples and marine biota.

  2. Isolation of microplastics in biota-rich seawater samples and marine organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Matthew; Webb, Hannah; Lindeque, Pennie K.; Fileman, Elaine S.; Halsband, Claudia; Galloway, Tamara S.

    2014-01-01

    Microplastic litter is a pervasive pollutant present in aquatic systems across the globe. A range of marine organisms have the capacity to ingest microplastics, resulting in adverse health effects. Developing methods to accurately quantify microplastics in productive marine waters, and those internalized by marine organisms, is of growing importance. Here we investigate the efficacy of using acid, alkaline and enzymatic digestion techniques in mineralizing biological material from marine surface trawls to reveal any microplastics present. Our optimized enzymatic protocol can digest >97% (by weight) of the material present in plankton-rich seawater samples without destroying any microplastic debris present. In applying the method to replicate marine samples from the western English Channel, we identified 0.27 microplastics m−3. The protocol was further used to extract microplastics ingested by marine zooplankton under laboratory conditions. Our findings illustrate that enzymatic digestion can aid the detection of microplastic debris within seawater samples and marine biota. PMID:24681661

  3. The effect of marine isoprene emissions on secondary organic aerosol and ozone formation in the coastal United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, Brett; Meskhidze, Nicholas; Zhang, Yang; Xu, Jun

    2010-01-01

    The impact of marine isoprene emissions on summertime surface concentrations of isoprene, secondary organic aerosols (SOA), and ozone (O 3) in the coastal areas of the continental United States is studied using the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regional-scale Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system. Marine isoprene emission rates are based on the following five parameters: laboratory measurements of isoprene production from phytoplankton under a range of light conditions, remotely-sensed chlorophyll- a concentration ([Chl- a]), incoming solar radiation, surface wind speed, and sea-water optical properties. Model simulations show that marine isoprene emissions are sensitive to meteorology and ocean ecosystem productivity, with the highest rates simulated over the Gulf of Mexico. Simulated offshore surface layer marine isoprene concentration is less than 10 ppt and significantly dwarfed by terrestrial emissions over the continental United States. With the isoprene reactions included in this study, the average contribution of marine isoprene to SOA and O 3 concentrations is predicted to be small, up to 0.004 μg m -3 for SOA and 0.2 ppb for O 3 in coastal urban areas. The light-sensitivity of isoprene production from phytoplankton results in a midday maximum for marine isoprene emissions and a corresponding daytime increase in isoprene and O 3 concentrations in coastal locations. The potential impact of the daily variability in [Chl- a] on O 3 and SOA concentrations is simulated in a sensitivity study with [Chl- a] increased and decreased by a factor of five. Our results indicate that marine emissions of isoprene cause minor changes to coastal SOA and O 3 concentrations. Comparison of model simulations with few available measurements shows that the model underestimates marine boundary layer isoprene concentration. This underestimation is likely due to the limitations in current treatment of marine isoprene emission and a coarse spatial

  4. Screening for Anti-Cancer Compounds in Marine Organisms in Oman

    OpenAIRE

    Sergey Dobretsov; Yahya Tamimi; Al-Kindi, Mohamed A.; Ikram Burney

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Marine organisms are a rich source of bioactive molecules with potential applications in medicine, biotechnology and industry; however, few bioactive compounds have been isolated from organisms inhabiting the Arabian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman. This study aimed to isolate and screen the anti-cancer activity of compounds and extracts from 40 natural products of marine organisms collected from the Gulf of Oman. Methods: This study was carried out between January 2012 and December ...

  5. Contribution of feldspar and marine organic aerosols to global ice nucleating particle concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara-Temprado, Jesús; Murray, Benjamin J.; Wilson, Theodore W.; O'Sullivan, Daniel; Browse, Jo; Pringle, Kirsty J.; Ardon-Dryer, Karin; Bertram, Allan K.; Burrows, Susannah M.; Ceburnis, Darius; DeMott, Paul J.; Mason, Ryan H.; O'Dowd, Colin D.; Rinaldi, Matteo; Carslaw, Ken S.

    2017-03-01

    Ice-nucleating particles (INPs) are known to affect the amount of ice in mixed-phase clouds, thereby influencing many of their properties. The atmospheric INP concentration changes by orders of magnitude from terrestrial to marine environments, which typically contain much lower concentrations. Many modelling studies use parameterizations for heterogeneous ice nucleation and cloud ice processes that do not account for this difference because they were developed based on INP measurements made predominantly in terrestrial environments without considering the aerosol composition. Errors in the assumed INP concentration will influence the simulated amount of ice in mixed-phase clouds, leading to errors in top-of-atmosphere radiative flux and ultimately the climate sensitivity of the model. Here we develop a global model of INP concentrations relevant for mixed-phase clouds based on laboratory and field measurements of ice nucleation by K-feldspar (an ice-active component of desert dust) and marine organic aerosols (from sea spray). The simulated global distribution of INP concentrations based on these two species agrees much better with currently available ambient measurements than when INP concentrations are assumed to depend only on temperature or particle size. Underestimation of INP concentrations in some terrestrial locations may be due to the neglect of INPs from other terrestrial sources. Our model indicates that, on a monthly average basis, desert dusts dominate the contribution to the INP population over much of the world, but marine organics become increasingly important over remote oceans and they dominate over the Southern Ocean. However, day-to-day variability is important. Because desert dust aerosol tends to be sporadic, marine organic aerosols dominate the INP population on many days per month over much of the mid- and high-latitude Northern Hemisphere. This study advances our understanding of which aerosol species need to be included in order to

  6. Contribution of feldspar and marine organic aerosols to global ice nucleating particle concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vergara-Temprado, Jesús; Murray, Benjamin J.; Wilson, Theodore W.; O& amp; apos; Sullivan, Daniel; Browse, Jo; Pringle, Kirsty J.; Ardon-Dryer, Karin; Bertram, Allan K.; Burrows, Susannah M.; Ceburnis, Darius; DeMott, Paul J.; Mason, Ryan H.; O& amp; apos; Dowd, Colin D.; Rinaldi, Matteo; Carslaw, Ken S.

    2017-01-01

    Ice-nucleating particles (INPs) are known to affect the amount of ice in mixed-phase clouds, thereby influencing many of their properties. The atmospheric INP concentration changes by orders of magnitude from terrestrial to marine environments, which typically contain much lower concentrations. Many modelling studies use parameterizations for heterogeneous ice nucleation and cloud ice processes that do not account for this difference because they were developed based on INP measurements made predominantly in terrestrial environments without considering the aerosol composition. Errors in the assumed INP concentration will influence the simulated amount of ice in mixed-phase clouds, leading to errors in top-of-atmosphere radiative flux and ultimately the climate sensitivity of the model. Here we develop a global model of INP concentrations relevant for mixed-phase clouds based on laboratory and field measurements of ice nucleation by K-feldspar (an ice-active component of desert dust) and marine organic aerosols (from sea spray). The simulated global distribution of INP concentrations based on these two species agrees much better with currently available ambient measurements than when INP concentrations are assumed to depend only on temperature or particle size. Underestimation of INP concentrations in some terrestrial locations may be due to the neglect of INPs from other terrestrial sources. Our model indicates that, on a monthly average basis, desert dusts dominate the contribution to the INP population over much of the world, but marine organics become increasingly important over remote oceans and they dominate over the Southern Ocean. However, day-to-day variability is important. Because desert dust aerosol tends to be sporadic, marine organic aerosols dominate the INP population on many days per month over much of the mid- and high-latitude Northern Hemisphere. This study advances our understanding of which aerosol species need to be included in order to

  7. Recent Researches of Bioactive Metabolites in Marine Organisms-associated Microor-ganisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GU Qianqun; LU Jia; CUI Chengbin; ZHU Tianjiao; FANG Yuchun; LIU Hongbing; ZHU Weiming

    2004-01-01

    Recent researches have shown that some compounds isolated from marine organisms have striking structural similarities with the metabolites from known microorganisms. It is inferred from the researches that the symbiotic or associated marine microorganisms may be the true sources of those compounds or at least involved in the biosynthesizing process. This view has been further evidenced by the researches for many sponges and sponge-associated microorganisms. Importantly, growing evidence has highlighted that the symbiotic or associated marine microorganisms live in the microenvironment within the hosts, and they also produce secondary metabolites which are new and original in structure and unique in activity. All these suggest that the microorganisms associated with marine organisms are the sources with very high potential to be new natural bioactive agents. This article reviews briefly the research advances in the study of new bioactive metabolites from marine organisms-associated microorganisms since 2000.

  8. Polonium ({sup 210}Po) and lead ({sup 210}Pb) in marine organisms and their transfer in marine food chains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Fernando P., E-mail: carvalho@itn.p [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Departamento de Proteccao Radiologica e Seguranca Nuclear, E.N. 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal)

    2011-05-15

    The determination of {sup 210}Po and {sup 210}Pb was performed in marine organisms from the seashore to abyssal depths, encompassing a plethora of species from the microscopic plankton to the sperm whale. Concentrations of those radionuclides ranged from low values of about 5 x 10{sup -1} Bq kg{sup -1} (wet wt.) in jellyfish, to very high values of about of 3 x 10{sup 4} Bq kg{sup -1} (wet wt.) in the gut walls of sardines, with a common pattern of {sup 210}Po > {sup 210}Pb.These radionuclides are primarily absorbed from water and concentrated by phyto- and microzooplankton, and then are transferred to the next trophic level along marine food chains. Investigation in epipelagic, mesopelagic, bathypelagic and abyssobenthic organisms revealed that {sup 210}Po is transferred in the marine food webs with transfer factors ranging from 0.1 to 0.7, and numerically similar to those of the energy transfer in the marine food chains. As {sup 210}Po preferentially binds to amino acids and proteins, its transfer in food chains likely traces protein transfer and, thus, {sup 210}Po transfer factors are similar to ecotrophic coefficients. {sup 210}Pb is transferred less efficiently in marine food chains and this contributes to increased {sup 210}Po:{sup 210}Pb activity ratios in some trophic levels.

  9. Polonium (210Po) and lead (210Pb) in marine organisms and their transfer in marine food chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Fernando P

    2011-05-01

    The determination of (210)Po and (210)Pb was performed in marine organisms from the seashore to abyssal depths, encompassing a plethora of species from the microscopic plankton to the sperm whale. Concentrations of those radionuclides ranged from low values of about 5 × 10(-1) Bq kg(-1) (wet wt.) in jellyfish, to very high values of about of 3 × 10(4) Bq kg(-1) (wet wt.) in the gut walls of sardines, with a common pattern of (210)Po > (210)Pb.These radionuclides are primarily absorbed from water and concentrated by phyto- and microzooplankton, and then are transferred to the next trophic level along marine food chains. Investigation in epipelagic, mesopelagic, bathypelagic and abyssobenthic organisms revealed that (210)Po is transferred in the marine food webs with transfer factors ranging from 0.1 to 0.7, and numerically similar to those of the energy transfer in the marine food chains. As (210)Po preferentially binds to amino acids and proteins, its transfer in food chains likely traces protein transfer and, thus, (210)Po transfer factors are similar to ecotrophic coefficients. (210)Pb is transferred less efficiently in marine food chains and this contributes to increased (210)Po:(210)Pb activity ratios in some trophic levels. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of Marine Corps Manpower Computer Simulation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    MARINE CORPS MANPOWER COMPUTER SIMULATION MODEL by Eric S. Anderson December 2016 Thesis Advisor: Arnold Buss Second Reader: Neil Rowe...Master’s thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE EVALUATION OF MARINE CORPS MANPOWER COMPUTER SIMULATION MODEL 5. FUNDING NUMBERS ACCT: 622716 JON...overall end strength are maintained. To assist their mission, an agent-based computer simulation model was developed in the Java computer language

  11. Development of gas chromatography analysis of fatty acids in marine organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Baokun; Row, Kyung Ho

    2013-08-01

    The gas chromatographic analysis of fatty acids has attracted considerable interest. In this analysis, the common derivatives of fatty acids, such as fatty acid methyl esters, can be detected using a flame ionization detector and the mass spectra can indicate the true structure of fatty acids. This paper reviews gas chromatographic methods for obtaining fatty acids from marine organisms. The stationary phase and detector for applications in gas chromatography are discussed. This article also reviews the components of fatty acids in marine animals, marine plants and marine microorganisms.

  12. Screening marine organisms for antimicrobial activity against clinical pathogens

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    PrabhaDevi; Wahidullah, S.; Tonima, K.; DeSouza, L.

    ) and Hospital. Antimicrobial assay Antibacterial activity of different extracts was assessed using standard disc-diffusion assay on marine agar as described earlier5. Extracts and fractions, each, were dissolved in the respective solvents and loaded...

  13. Bioactivity of marine organisms. Part 3. Screening of marine algae of Indian coast for biological activity

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kamat, S.Y.; Wahidullah, S.; Naik, C.G.; DeSouza, L.; Jayasree, V.; Ambiye, V.; Bhakuni, D.S.; Goel, A.K.; Garg, H.S.; Srimal, R.C.

    Ethanolic extracts from Indian marine algae have been tested for anti-viral, anti-bacterial, anti-fungal, anti-fertility, hypoglycaemic and a wide range of pharmacological activities. Of 34 species investigated 17 appeared biologically active. Six...

  14. Bioactivity of marine organisms. Part 3. Screening of marine algae of Indian coast for biological activity

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kamat, S.Y.; Wahidullah, S.; Naik, C.G.; DeSouza, L.; Jayasree, V.; Ambiye, V.; Bhakuni, D.S.; Goel, A.K.; Garg, H.S.; Srimal, R.C.

    Ethanolic extracts from Indian marine algae have been tested for anti-viral, anti-bacterial, anti-fungal, anti-fertility, hypoglycaemic and a wide range of pharmacological activities. Of 34 species investigated 17 appeared biologically active. Six...

  15. Bioactivity of marine organisms. 6. Antiviral evaluation of marine algal extracts from the Indian coast

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kamat, S.Y.; Wahidullah, S.; DeSouza, L.; Naik, C.G.; Ambiye, V.; Bhakuni, D.S.; Goel, A.K.; Garg, H.S.; Srimal, R.C.

    Ethanolic extracts of Indian marine algae belonging to the Rhodophyceae, Phaeophyceae and Chlorophyceae were tested for anti-semiliki Forest (SFV), Ranikhet Disease (RDV) and Vaccinia (VV) viruses. In the primary screening of 31 seaweeds, 17...

  16. Stratigraphic modeling of organic matter distribution and preservation in deep marine environment. Case of a margin with pelagic sedimentation: the coastal upwelling system of Benguela (Namibia, Western South Africa); Modelisation stratigraphique de la distribution et de la preservation de la matiere organique en milieu marin profond. Cas d'une marge a sedimentation pelagique: systeme d'upwelling cotier du Benguela (Namibie, Afrique du Sud Ouest)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tranier, J.

    2006-06-15

    In order to develop stratigraphic modelling of organic matter distribution and preservation in marine environment, the methodology established, uses three modelling softwares. We make use of a 3D stratigraphic model, DIONISOS, which allows to build margin thanks to sediment input and transport and thanks to basin deformation. Biogenic sediments are introduced in DIONISOS after their production modelling by two coupled models, ROMS and NPZD. ROMS is a physical model which allows to simulate upwelling dynamics thanks to wind strength exerted on ocean surface and to margin morphology. NPZD models relationships (photosynthesis, grazing, excretion, mortality, re-mineralization, etc.) between four boxes: nutrients, phytoplankton, zooplankton and detritus. Nutrients availability (model inputs) and flux intensity between boxes are controlled by upwelling dynamics, i-e ROMS. Thanks to these three softwares, organic matter can be modelled from its production to its fossilization considering the influence of various factors as upwelling intensity, nutrients availability, chemical compounds of water mass and oxygenation of water column, species competition (diatoms and coccolithophoridae), margin morphology and eustatism. After testing sensibility of the various parameters of the three models, we study their capacity for reproduce biogenic sedimentation and simulate climatic cycle effect on organic matter distribution on a passive continental margin: the Namibian margin (Southwest Africa). They are validated comparing results with core data from this margin. (author)

  17. Antimicrobial activity of marine organisms collected off the coast of South East India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rodrigues, E.; Tilvi, S.; Naik, C.G.

    the marine organisms demonstrated activity against one or more of microbes tested. Sigmadocia carnosa was the most active exhibiting a broad spectrum antimicrobial activity against each of the microbe tested with the exception of Fusarium species. Contrary...

  18. Antifungal activity of some marine organisms from India, against food spoilage Aspergillus strains

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhosale, S.H.; Jagtap, T.G.; Naik, C.G.

    Crude aqueous methanol extracts obtained from 31 species of various marine organisms (including floral and faunal), were screened for their antifungal activity against food poisoning strains of Aspergillus. Seventeen species exhibited mild (+ = zone...

  19. The levels of certain heavy metals in marine organisms from Aguada Bay (Goa)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Singbal, S.Y.S.; George, M.D.; Topgi, R.S.; Noronha, R.J.

    The levels of manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, copper, zinc and mercury have been measured in marine organisms from Aguada Bay which is one of the major fishing zones in Goa, India. The concentration of metals varied from species to species...

  20. Sensitivity Analysis in a Complex Marine Ecological Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos D. Mateus

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Sensitivity analysis (SA has long been recognized as part of best practices to assess if any particular model can be suitable to inform decisions, despite its uncertainties. SA is a commonly used approach for identifying important parameters that dominate model behavior. As such, SA address two elementary questions in the modeling exercise, namely, how sensitive is the model to changes in individual parameter values, and which parameters or associated processes have more influence on the results. In this paper we report on a local SA performed on a complex marine biogeochemical model that simulates oxygen, organic matter and nutrient cycles (N, P and Si in the water column, and well as the dynamics of biological groups such as producers, consumers and decomposers. SA was performed using a “one at a time” parameter perturbation method, and a color-code matrix was developed for result visualization. The outcome of this study was the identification of key parameters influencing model performance, a particularly helpful insight for the subsequent calibration exercise. Also, the color-code matrix methodology proved to be effective for a clear identification of the parameters with most impact on selected variables of the model.

  1. Physiological and ecological implications of ocean deoxygenation for vision in marine organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Lillian R; Levin, Lisa A

    2017-09-13

    Climate change has induced ocean deoxygenation and exacerbated eutrophication-driven hypoxia in recent decades, affecting the physiology, behaviour and ecology of marine organisms. The high oxygen demand of visual tissues and the known inhibitory effects of hypoxia on human vision raise the questions if and how ocean deoxygenation alters vision in marine organisms. This is particularly important given the rapid loss of oxygen and strong vertical gradients in oxygen concentration in many areas of the ocean. This review evaluates the potential effects of low oxygen (hypoxia) on visual function in marine animals and their implications for marine biota under current and future ocean deoxygenation based on evidence from terrestrial and a few marine organisms. Evolutionary history shows radiation of eye designs during a period of increasing ocean oxygenation. Physiological effects of hypoxia on photoreceptor function and light sensitivity, in combination with morphological changes that may occur throughout ontogeny, have the potential to alter visual behaviour and, subsequently, the ecology of marine organisms, particularly for fish, cephalopods and arthropods with 'fast' vision. Visual responses to hypoxia, including greater light requirements, offer an alternative hypothesis for observed habitat compression and shoaling vertical distributions in visual marine species subject to ocean deoxygenation, which merits further investigation.This article is part of the themed issue 'Ocean ventilation and deoxygenation in a warming world'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  2. YIP: Generic Environment Models (GEMs) for Agile Marine Autonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. YIP : Generic Environment Models (GEMs) for Agile Marine...2013 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2013 to 00-00-2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE YIP : Generic Environment Models (GEMs) for Agile Marine...2010 ONR YIP Award Sponsor: Office of Naval Research Recipient: Fumin Zhang Institution: Georgia Institute of Technology Award: 2010 Lockheed

  3. Mathematical modelling and research of passenger flows in marine passenger port

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir A. Fetisov

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Modern passenger terminals are characterized by dynamic processes variability, diverse options consideration, taking into account the criteria of safety, reliability analysis and the continuous research of passenger processing. For any modern marine passenger terminal it is necessary to use the tool to simulate passenger flows. In this way it is possible to obtain the analytical information and use it for decision-making when solving the problem of the amount of personnel required for passenger services.in line with the original ship arrival schedule, to solve problems of forecasting groups at the terminal. Of particular relevance is the choice of the mathematical transport model and the practical conditions for the implementation of the model in the real terminal operation. In this article the analysis technique of simulation-based terminal services, provides a mathematical model of passenger movement inside the terminal. Also, the conditions of implementation of the transportation model during the operation of marine passenger terminal are examined. The object of the research is the marine Passenger Port of St. Petersburg "Marine Facade". The paper discusses advantages of using such systems and their introduction in the early stages of operation of the terminal. In addition, the conclusion about the effectiveness of such systems for the analysis of the correctness of internal space of the marine terminal. The study represents an example of analytical information used for the forecast of the terminal operations, the analysis of the workload and efficiency of the organization of the marine terminal.

  4. Marine genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveira Ribeiro, Ângela Maria; Foote, Andrew D.; Kupczok, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Marine ecosystems occupy 71% of the surface of our planet, yet we know little about their diversity. Although the inventory of species is continually increasing, as registered by the Census of Marine Life program, only about 10% of the estimated two million marine species are known. This lag......-throughput sequencing approaches have been helping to improve our knowledge of marine biodiversity, from the rich microbial biota that forms the base of the tree of life to a wealth of plant and animal species. In this review, we present an overview of the applications of genomics to the study of marine life, from...... evolutionary biology of non-model organisms to species of commercial relevance for fishing, aquaculture and biomedicine. Instead of providing an exhaustive list of available genomic data, we rather set to present contextualized examples that best represent the current status of the field of marine genomics....

  5. Correlation Between Ecospace and Metabolic Rate of Marine Organisms Through Geologic Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, C.; Tenorio, A.; Heim, N. A.; Payne, J.

    2015-12-01

    Marine organisms are the most abundant fossils scientists have discovered in the fossil record. Various factors affect the survival rate of individual organisms and entire genera including metabolic rate, genetic diversity, environmental availability, and ecology. We however chose to focus our attention on studying mean metabolic rates in correlation to life modes. A marine organism's life mode is determined by three criteria: tiering, motility, and feeding mechanism. We believe an organism's life mode has an effect on its survivorship, especially since ecospace is the "primary determinant of routine metabolic rate for marine organisms" (Seibel & Drazen 2007). Using the metabolic equation, we were able to plot metabolic rate changes for various life modes over time. Seibel and Drazen (2007) explain that "metabolic variation in the ocean results from interspecific differences in ecological energy demand," thus allowing us to hypothesize that with different combinations of life modes, different marine organisms will have varying metabolic rates. To further compare our data, we created a heatmap to show the change in metabolic rates over the last 540 million years. Based on the collection of data, metabolic rates of marine organisms have shown an increasing trend. When analyzing ecospaces, pelagic (living in the water column), free moving organisms have relatively high metabolic rates in comparison to other modes of tiering. In other life modes, there's a general trend of genera maintaining a stabilized and moderate metabolic rate that is neither extremely high nor low.

  6. OCEANOGRAPHY & MARINE GEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    20150652 Jiang Yuxuan(Key Laboratory of Marine Chemistry Theory and Technology,Ministry of Education,Ocean University of China,Qingdao 266100,China);Xing Lei Study on the Degradation of Marine Sedimentary Organic Matter and Model Development(Marine Geology&Quaternary; Geology,ISSN0256-1492,CN37-1117/P,34(4),

  7. Specimen banking of marine organisms in the United States: current status and long-term prospective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, P R; Wise, S A; Thorsteinson, L; Koster, B J; Rowles, T

    1997-05-01

    A major part of the activities conducted over the last decade by the National Biomonitoring Specimen Bank (NBSB) has involved the archival of marine specimens collected by ongoing environmental monitoring programs. These archived specimens include bivalves, marine sediments, and fish tissues collected by the National Status and Trends and the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill Damage Assessment programs, and marine mammal tissues collected by the Marine Mammal Health and Stranding, Response Program and the Alaska Marine Mammal Tissue Archival Project. In addition to supporting these programs, the specimens have been used to investigate circumpolar patterns of chlorinated hydrocarbon concentrations, genetic separation of marine animal stocks, baseline levels of essential and nonessential elements in marine mammals, and the potential risk to human consumers in the Arctic from anthropogenic contaminants found in local subsistence foods. The NBSB specimens represent a resource that has the potential for addressing future issues of marine environmental quality and ecosystem changes through retrospective analysis; however, an ecosystem-based food web approach would maximize this potential. The current status of the NBSB activities related to the banking of marine organisms is presented and discussed, the long-term prospective of these activities is presented, and the importance of an ecosystem-based food web monitoring approach to the value of specimen banking is discussed.

  8. Specimen banking of marine organisms in the United States: Current status and long-term prospective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, P.R.; Wise, S.A.; Thorsteinson, L.; Koster, B.J.; Rowles, T.

    1997-01-01

    A major part of the activities conducted over the last decade by the National Biomonitoring Specimen Bank (NBSB) has involved the archival of marine specimens collected by ongoing environmental monitoring programs. These archived specimens include bivalves, marine sediments, and fish tissues collected by the National Status and Trends and the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill Damage Assessment programs, and marine mammal tissues collected by the Marine Mammal Health and Stranding Response Program and the Alaska Marine Mammal Tissue Archival Project. In addition to supporting these programs, the specimens have been used to investigate circumpolar patterns of chlorinated hydrocarbon concentrations, genetic separation of marine animal stocks, baseline levels of essential and nonessential elements in marine mammals, and the potential risk to human consumers in the Arctic from anthropogenic contaminants found in local subsistence foods. The NBSB specimens represent a resource that has the potential for addressing future issues of marine environmental quality and ecosystem changes through retrospective analysis; however, an ecosystem-based food web approach would maximize this potential. The current status of the NBSB activities related to the banking of marine organisms is presented and discussed, the long-term prospective of these activities is presented, and the importance of an ecosystem-based food web monitoring approach to the value of specimen banking is discussed.

  9. Organization of marine phenology data in support of planning and conservation in ocean and coastal ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kathryn A.; Fornwall, Mark D.; Weltzin, Jake F.; Griffis, R.B.

    2014-01-01

    Among the many effects of climate change is its influence on the phenology of biota. In marine and coastal ecosystems, phenological shifts have been documented for multiple life forms; however, biological data related to marine species' phenology remain difficult to access and is under-used. We conducted an assessment of potential sources of biological data for marine species and their availability for use in phenological analyses and assessments. Our evaluations showed that data potentially related to understanding marine species' phenology are available through online resources of governmental, academic, and non-governmental organizations, but appropriate datasets are often difficult to discover and access, presenting opportunities for scientific infrastructure improvement. The developing Federal Marine Data Architecture when fully implemented will improve data flow and standardization for marine data within major federal repositories and provide an archival repository for collaborating academic and public data contributors. Another opportunity, largely untapped, is the engagement of citizen scientists in standardized collection of marine phenology data and contribution of these data to established data flows. Use of metadata with marine phenology related keywords could improve discovery and access to appropriate datasets. When data originators choose to self-publish, publication of research datasets with a digital object identifier, linked to metadata, will also improve subsequent discovery and access. Phenological changes in the marine environment will affect human economics, food systems, and recreation. No one source of data will be sufficient to understand these changes. The collective attention of marine data collectors is needed—whether with an agency, an educational institution, or a citizen scientist group—toward adopting the data management processes and standards needed to ensure availability of sufficient and useable marine data to understand

  10. Bioactive Natural Products From Chinese Tropical Marine Organisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO,Yue-Wei

    2004-01-01

    @@ The oceans contain a vast biological diversity of species that have so far been utilized by mankind mainly as a source of protein. In the last few decades, however, natural products chemists have started to discover the wealth of bioactive secondary metabolites that are produced by marine invertebrates such as sponges, soft corals, molluscs and others.

  11. Primary and Secondary Organic Marine Aerosol and Oceanic Biological Activity: Recent Results and New Perspectives for Future Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Matteo Rinaldi; Stefano Decesari; Emanuela Finessi; Lara Giulianelli; Claudio Carbone; Sandro Fuzzi; Colin D. O'Dowd; Darius Ceburnis; Maria Cristina Facchini

    2010-01-01

    One of the most important natural aerosol systems at the global level is marine aerosol that comprises both organic and inorganic components of primary and secondary origin. The present paper reviews some new results on primary and secondary organic marine aerosol, achieved during the EU project MAP (Marine Aerosol Production), comparing them with those reported in the recent literature. Marine aerosol samples collected at the coastal site of Mace Head, Ireland, show a chemical composition tr...

  12. Passive drift or active swimming in marine organisms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putman, Nathan F; Lumpkin, Rick; Sacco, Alexander E; Mansfield, Katherine L

    2016-12-14

    Predictions of organismal movements in a fluid require knowing the fluid's velocity and potential contributions of the organism's behaviour (e.g. swimming or flying). While theoretical aspects of this work are reasonably well-developed, field-based validation is challenging. A much-needed study recently published by Briscoe and colleagues in Proceedings of the Royal Society B compared movements and distribution of satellite-tracked juvenile sea turtles to virtual particles released in a data-assimilating hindcast ocean circulation model. Substantial differences observed between turtles and particles were considered evidence for an important role of active swimming by turtles. However, the experimental design implicitly assumed that transport predictions were insensitive to (i) start location, (ii) tracking duration, (iii) depth, and (iv) physical processes not depicted in the model. Here, we show that the magnitude of variation in physical parameters between turtles and virtual particles can profoundly alter transport predictions, potentially sufficient to explain the reported differences without evoking swimming behaviour. We present a more robust method to derive the environmental contributions to individual movements, but caution that resolving the ocean velocities experienced by individual organisms remains a problem for assessing the role of behaviour in organismal movements and population distributions. © 2016 The Authors.

  13. Environmental Characteristics of Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers in Marine System, with Emphasis on Marine Organisms and Sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs, due to their widespread usage as flame retardants and their lipophilicity and persistence, have become ubiquitous in the environment. It is urgent to understand the environmental characteristics of PBDEs in marine system, but they have attracted little attention. We summarize the available data and analyze the regional distributions, controlling factors, and congener patterns of PBDEs in marine and associated environmental matrixes worldwide. Based on meta-analysis, after separating the estuarial sites from the marine sites, ignoring the extraordinary sample sites such as those located just near the point source, the PBDE concentration levels are still in the same order of magnitude from global scale. Despite Principal Component Analysis, the congener patterns of sediments are predominant with the heavy brominated congeners (BDE-209 contributing over 75% to the total load while the biota abound with the light ones (BDE-47, BDE-99, and BDE-100 taking about 80%. The ratio between BDE-99 and BDE-100 for the lower trophic-level species often turns to be greater than 1, while for those higher species the ratio may be below 1, and some species feed mainly on the crustaceans and zooplankton seems to have a higher ratio value. The data of the PBDEs in marine system are currently limited; thus, data gaps are identified as well.

  14. [Analysis on sustainable development of marine economy in Jiangsu Province based on marine ecological footprint correction model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shan; Wang, Yu-ting

    2011-03-01

    Based on the theories and methods of ecological footprint, the concept of marine ecological footprint was proposed. According to the characteristics of marine environment in Jiangsu Province, five sub-models of marine ecological footprints, including fishery, transporation, marine engineering construction, marine energy, and tidal flat, were constructed. The equilibrium factors of the five marine types were determined by using improved entropy method, and the marine footprints and capacities in Jiangsu Province from 2000 to 2008 were calculated and analyzed. In 2000-2008, the marine ecology footprint per capita in Jiangsu Province increased nearly seven times, from 36.90 hm2 to 252.94 hm2, and the ecological capacity per capita grew steadily, from 105.01 hm2 to 185.49 hm2. In 2000, the marine environment in the Province was in a state of ecological surplus, and the marine economy was in a weak sustainable development state. Since 2004, the marine ecological environment deteriorated sharply, with ecological deficit up to 109660.5 hm2, and the sustainability of marine economy declined. The high ecological footprint of fishery was the main reason for the ecological deficit. Tidal flat was the important reserve resource for the sustainable development of marine economy in Jiangsu Province.

  15. [Dynamics of 95Zr in simulated marine water-sediment-organisms system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunlin; Shi, Jianjun; Sun, Pingyue; Li, Mingyun

    2003-06-01

    To provide scientific evidence to evaluate the behavior of 95Zr in ocean ecosystem, the dynamic model of the transference, accumulation and disappearance of 95Zr among the simulated marine water, sediment and organisms was investigated using Nassarius semiplicatus and Boleophthalums pectinirostris as experimental stuffs. The result showed that 95Zr(Bq.g-1 or Bq.ml-1) in the marine water was decreased more than 90% in the first 4 h, and then descended gradually. 95Zr in sediment was increased in the peak in 48 h and then declined. The radioactivity percent of 95Zr in the shell and muslce of Nassarius semiplicatus was 68.7% and 31.30% respectively, while the radioactivity percent was 22.80%, 12.64%, 34.82%, 10.31%, 4.48%, 11.55% and 3.71%, respectively in the fill, fin, viscera, skull, skin, vertebra and muscle of Boleophthalmus pectinirostris. Nassarius semiplicatus had a greater concentrating capability of 95Zr than Boleophthalmus pectinirostris. The order of the 95Zr concentration was found to be sediment > Nassarius semiplicatus > water > Boleophthalmus pectinirostris. A dynamic model of closed four-compartment was constructed with exponent function.

  16. Marine Vessel Models in Changing Operational Conditions - A Tutorial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perez, Tristan; Sørensen, Asgeir; Blanke, Mogens

    2006-01-01

    conditions (VOC). However, since marine systems operate in changing VOCs, there is a need to adapt the models. To date, there is no theory available to describe a general model valid across different VOCs due to the complexity of the hydrodynamic involved. It is believed that system identification could......This tutorial paper provides an introduction, from a systems perspective, to the topic of ship motion dynamics of surface ships. It presents a classification of parametric models currently used for monitoring and control of marine vessels. These models are valid for certain vessel operational...

  17. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart II of... - Volatile Organic HAP (VOHAP) Limits for Marine Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (Surface Coating) Pt. 63, Subpt. II, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart II of Part 63—Volatile Organic HAP (VOHAP... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Volatile Organic HAP (VOHAP) Limits for Marine Coatings 2 Table 2 to Subpart II of Part 63 Protection of Environment...

  18. Transfer of radionuclides from high polluted bottom sediments to marine organisms through benthic food chain in post Fukushima period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezhenar, Roman; Jung, Kyung Tae; Maderich, Vladimir; Willemsen, Stefan; de With, Govert; Qiao, Fangli

    2015-04-01

    A catastrophic earthquake and tsunami occurred on March 11, 2011 and severely damaged the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) that resulted in an uncontrolled release of radioactivity into air and ocean. Around 80% of the radioactivity released due to the FDNPP accident in March-April 2011 was either directly discharged into the ocean or deposited onto the ocean surface from the atmosphere. A large amount of long-lived radionuclides (mainly Cs-137) were released into the environment. The concentration of radionuclides in the ocean reached a maximum in mid-April of 2011, and then gradually decreased. From 2011 the concentration of Cs-137 in water essentially fell except the area around the FDNPP where leaks of contaminated water are continued. However, in the bottom sediment high concentrations of Cs-137 were found in the first months after the accident and slowly decreased with time. Therefore, it should be expected that a time delay is found of sediment-bound radionuclides in marine organisms. For the modeling of radionuclide transfer from highly polluted bottom sediments to marine organisms the dynamical food chain model BURN-POSEIDON (Heling et al, 2002; Maderich et al., 2014) was extended. In this model marine organisms are grouped into a limited number of classes based on their trophic level and type of species. These include: phytoplankton, zooplankton, fishes (two types: piscivorous and non-piscivorous), crustaceans, and molluscs for pelagic food chain and bottom sediment invertebrates, demersal fishes and bottom predators for benthic food chain and whole water column predators feeding by pelagial and benthic fishes. Bottom invertebrates consume organic parts of bottom sediments with adsorbed radionuclides which then migrate through the food chain. All organisms take radionuclides directly from water as well as via food. In fishes where radioactivity is not homogeneously distributed over all tissues of the organism, it is assumed that radionuclide

  19. Model study on the dependence of primary marine aerosol emission on the sea surface temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Barthel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary marine aerosol composed of sea salt and organic material is an important contributor to the global aerosol load. By comparing measurements from two EMEP (co-operative programme for monitoring and evaluation of the long-range transmissions of air-pollutants in Europe intensive campaigns in June 2006 and January 2007 with results from an atmospheric transport model this work shows that accounting for the influence of the sea surface temperature on the emission of primary marine aerosol improves the model results towards the measurements in both months. Different sea surface temperature dependencies were evaluated. Using correction functions based on Sofiev et al. (2011 and Jaeglé et al. (2011 improves the model results for coarse mode particles. In contrast, for the fine mode aerosols no best correction function could be found. The model captures the low sodium concentrations at the marine station Virolahti II (Finland, which is influenced by air masses from the low salinity Baltic Sea, as well as the higher concentrations at Cabauw (Netherlands and Auchencorth Moss (Scotland. These results indicate a shift towards smaller sizes with lower salinity for the emission of dry sea salt aerosols. Organic material was simulated as part of primary marine aerosol assuming an internal mixture with sea salt. A comparison of the model results for primary organic carbon with measurements by a Berner-impactor at Sao Vincente (Cape Verde indicated that the model underpredicted the observed organic carbon concentration. This leads to the conclusion that the formation of secondary organic material needs to be included in the model to improve the agreement with the measurements.

  20. Marine methane paradox explained by bacterial degradation of dissolved organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repeta, Daniel J.; Ferrón, Sara; Sosa, Oscar A.; Johnson, Carl G.; Repeta, Lucas D.; Acker, Marianne; Delong, Edward F.; Karl, David M.

    2016-12-01

    Biogenic methane is widely thought to be a product of archaeal methanogenesis, an anaerobic process that is inhibited or outcompeted by the presence of oxygen and sulfate. Yet a large fraction of marine methane delivered to the atmosphere is produced in high-sulfate, fully oxygenated surface waters that have methane concentrations above atmospheric equilibrium values, an unexplained phenomenon referred to as the marine methane paradox. Here we use nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to show that polysaccharide esters of three phosphonic acids are important constituents of dissolved organic matter in seawater from the North Pacific. In seawater and pure culture incubations, bacterial degradation of these dissolved organic matter phosphonates in the presence of oxygen releases methane, ethylene and propylene gas. Moreover, we found that in mutants of a methane-producing marine bacterium, Pseudomonas stutzeri, disrupted in the C-P lyase phosphonate degradation pathway, methanogenesis was also disabled, indicating that the C-P lyase pathway can catalyse methane production from marine dissolved organic matter. Finally, the carbon stable isotope ratio of methane emitted during our incubations agrees well with anomalous isotopic characteristics of seawater methane. We estimate that daily cycling of only about 0.25% of the organic matter phosphonate inventory would support the entire atmospheric methane flux at our study site. We conclude that aerobic bacterial degradation of phosphonate esters in dissolved organic matter may explain the marine methane paradox.

  1. Flash flood modeling with the MARINE hydrological distributed model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Estupina-Borrell

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Flash floods are characterized by their violence and the rapidity of their occurrence. Because these events are rare and unpredictable, but also fast and intense, their anticipation with sufficient lead time for warning and broadcasting is a primary subject of research. Because of the heterogeneities of the rain and of the behavior of the surface, spatially distributed hydrological models can lead to a better understanding of the processes and so on they can contribute to a better forecasting of flash flood. Our main goal here is to develop an operational and robust methodology for flash flood forecasting. This methodology should provide relevant data (information about flood evolution on short time scales, and should be applicable even in locations where direct observations are sparse (e.g. absence of historical and modern rainfalls and streamflows in small mountainous watersheds. The flash flood forecast is obtained by the physically based, space-time distributed hydrological model "MARINE'' (Model of Anticipation of Runoff and INondations for Extreme events. This model is presented and tested in this paper for a real flash flood event. The model consists in two steps, or two components: the first component is a "basin'' flood module which generates flood runoff in the upstream part of the watershed, and the second component is the "stream network'' module, which propagates the flood in the main river and its subsidiaries. The basin flash flood generation model is a rainfall-runoff model that can integrate remotely sensed data. Surface hydraulics equations are solved with enough simplifying hypotheses to allow real time exploitation. The minimum data required by the model are: (i the Digital Elevation Model, used to calculate slopes that generate runoff, it can be issued from satellite imagery (SPOT or from French Geographical Institute (IGN; (ii the rainfall data from meteorological radar, observed or

  2. On the impacts of phytoplankton-derived organic matter on the properties of the primary marine aerosol – Part 2: Composition, hygroscopicity and cloud condensation activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Fuentes

    2011-03-01

    indicative that discrepancies on the composition of the primary aerosol between different studies could partly be explained by the difference in the nature and concentration of the organic matter in the source seawater employed.

    Consistently across the experiments, theoretical analysis based on the Köhler model predicted a reduction in the primary marine aerosol CCN activity upon the incorporation of marine organics into the particle composition. This effect is consequence of the replacement of small inorganic sea salt molecules by large molar mass organic molecules, together with a moderate suppression of the surface tension at the point of activation of 5–0.5%, which leads to a dominance of the reduction in the dissolved solute in the Raoult term.

  3. Marine snow, organic solute plumes, and optimal chemosensory behavior of bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiørboe, Thomas; Jackson, G.A.

    2001-01-01

    Leaking organic solutes form an elongated plume in the wake of a sinking aggregate. These solutes may both be assimilated by suspended bacteria and guide bacteria with chemokinetic swimming behavior toward the aggregate. We used modifications of previously published models of the flow...... and concentration fields around sinking aggregates and of chemokinetic behavior of bacteria to identify the behavior that optimizes aggregate colonization and plume utilization. The optimal solution is governed by physical constraints and is a trade off between a high sensitivity to chemical signals and a long...... signal integration time. For a run-and-tumble swimming behavior, the predicted tumbling frequency is between 1 and 10 s(-1), similar to that reported for marine bacteria. The predicted optimal sensitivity to chemical signals is similar to or greater than that known for Escherichia coli. The optimal...

  4. From nitrogen enrichment to oxygen depletion: a mechanistic model of coastal marine ecosystems response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cosme, Nuno Miguel Dias; Koski, Marja; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    Nitrogen (N) emissions from anthropogenic sources may enrich coastal waters and lead to marine eutrophication impacts. Processes describing N-limited primary production (PP), zooplankton grazing, and bacterial respiration of sinking organic carbon, were modelled to quantify the potential dissolved...... oxygen (DO) consumption as a function of N input. Such indicator is the basis for an eXposure Factor (XF) applied in Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA) to estimate impacts from N enrichment. The Large Marine Ecosystems (LME) biogeographical classification system was adopted to address the spatial...... model and the uncertainty of the driving parameters is considered low. The presented XF estimation method contributes with a central component for site-dependent characterization factors (CFs) for marine eutrophication, to be coupled with environmental fate of N emissions and effects of oxygen depletion...

  5. Mumbai harbour, India: Gateway for introduction of marine organisms

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gaonkar, C.; Sawant, S.S.; Anil, A.C.; Venkat, K.; Harkantra, S.N.

    2009 / Published online: 9 April 2009 © Springer Science + Business Media B.V. 2009 Abstract Ships have been identified as one of the important vectors in the translocation of or- ganisms from one bioregion to another leading to bioinvasion...., & Venkat, K. (2007). Eutrophication status of marine environment of Mumbai and Jawaharlal Nehru ports. Environ- mental Monitoring and Assessment, 127, 283–291. doi:10.1007/s10661-006-9279-5. Subba Rao, D. V. (2005). Comprehensive review of the rec- ords...

  6. Ecotoxicological response of marine organisms to inorganic and organic sediment amendments in laboratory exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Gunther; Leather, James; Kan, Jinjun; Arias-Thode, Yolanda Meriah

    2011-10-01

    Experimental materials currently being investigated for use as amendments for the in situ remediation of contaminated sediments were assessed for their potential impacts on marine benthos. Laboratory toxicity tests involving lethal and sublethal endpoints were conducted on sediments amended with apatite, organoclay, chitin, or acetate, with the polychaete Neanthes arenaceodentata, the amphipod Eohaustorius estuarius, and the larval sheepshead minnow Cyprinodon variegatus. Amendments were mixed loosely into uncontaminated or metal-contaminated sediments, and also added inside experimental geotextile mats, at sediment dry weight (dw) concentrations ranging from 0.5% to 10%. The geotextile mats, containing apatite (5 or 10% dw), and/or organoclay (5%) did not result in adverse effects on any of the test organisms. Chitin and acetate, however, repetitively resulted in adverse effects on survival and/or adverse or positive effects on organism growth at concentrations of ≤ 2.5% dw. The adverse effects were attributed to water quality degradation in the exposure vessels (notably ammonia and dissolved oxygen concentration, for chitin and acetate, respectively) as a result of the microbial breakdown of the amendments. For N. arenaceodentata, growth was enhanced in the presence of chitin at concentrations as low as 0.5% sediment dw, which stimulated bacterial growth that may have provided an additional food source for the polychaete. Sediment chitin concentrations of 0.5% resulted in a statistically significant reduction in N. arenaceodentata body burdens of 61%, 29%, and 54%, relative to unamended contaminated sediment, for Cu, Zn, and Cd, respectively. The studies suggest a lack of inherent toxicity of these materials on the experimental organisms, as the adverse or positive responses observed are likely related to artifacts associated with laboratory exposure. Assessments in field settings are needed to verify this conclusion.

  7. Teaching biology with model organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, Dolores A.

    The purpose of this study is to identify and use model organisms that represent each of the kingdoms biologists use to classify organisms, while experiencing the process of science through guided inquiry. The model organisms will be the basis for studying the four high school life science core ideas as identified by the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS): LS1-From molecules to organisms, LS2-Ecosystems, LS3- Heredity, and LS4- Biological Evolution. NGSS also have identified four categories of science and engineering practices which include developing and using models and planning and carrying out investigations. The living organisms will be utilized to increase student interest and knowledge within the discipline of Biology. Pre-test and posttest analysis utilizing student t-test analysis supported the hypothesis. This study shows increased student learning as a result of using living organisms as models for classification and working in an inquiry-based learning environment.

  8. DNA Extraction Protocols for Whole-Genome Sequencing in Marine Organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panova, Marina; Aronsson, Henrik; Cameron, R Andrew; Dahl, Peter; Godhe, Anna; Lind, Ulrika; Ortega-Martinez, Olga; Pereyra, Ricardo; Tesson, Sylvie V M; Wrange, Anna-Lisa; Blomberg, Anders; Johannesson, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    The marine environment harbors a large proportion of the total biodiversity on this planet, including the majority of the earths' different phyla and classes. Studying the genomes of marine organisms can bring interesting insights into genome evolution. Today, almost all marine organismal groups are understudied with respect to their genomes. One potential reason is that extraction of high-quality DNA in sufficient amounts is challenging for many marine species. This is due to high polysaccharide content, polyphenols and other secondary metabolites that will inhibit downstream DNA library preparations. Consequently, protocols developed for vertebrates and plants do not always perform well for invertebrates and algae. In addition, many marine species have large population sizes and, as a consequence, highly variable genomes. Thus, to facilitate the sequence read assembly process during genome sequencing, it is desirable to obtain enough DNA from a single individual, which is a challenge in many species of invertebrates and algae. Here, we present DNA extraction protocols for seven marine species (four invertebrates, two algae, and a marine yeast), optimized to provide sufficient DNA quality and yield for de novo genome sequencing projects.

  9. Latitudinal gradients in degradation of marine dissolved organic carbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnosti, Carol; Steen, Andrew; Ziervogel, Kai

    2011-01-01

    Heterotrophic microbial communities cycle nearly half of net primary productivity in the ocean, and play a particularly important role in transformations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The specific means by which these communities mediate the transformations of organic carbon are largely...... molecular weight organic substrates and thereby initiate organic matter degradation. These data demonstrate the existence of a latitudinal gradient in the range of complex substrates available to heterotrophic microbial communities, paralleling the global gradient in bacterial species richness. As changing......, such a change could profoundly affect the global carbon cycle....

  10. Marine Biogeochemistry Under The Influence of Fish And Fisheries: An Ecosystem Modeling Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disa, Deniz; Akoglu, Ekin; Salihoglu, Baris

    2017-04-01

    The ocean and the marine ecosystems are important controllers of the global carbon cycle. They play a pivotal role in capturing atmospheric carbon into the ocean body, transforming it into organic carbon through photosynthesis and transporting it to the depths of the ocean. Fish, which has a significant role in the marine food webs, is thought to have a considerable impact on carbon export. More specifically, fish has a control on plankton dynamics as a predator, it provides nutrient to the ecosystem by its metabolic activities and it has the ability of moving actively and transporting materials. Fishing is also expected to impact carbon cycle because it directly changes the fish biomasses. However, how fish impacts the biogeochemistry of marine ecosystems is not studied extensively. The aim of this study is to analyze the impact of fish and fisheries on marine biogeochemical processes by setting up an end-to-end model, which simulates lower and higher tropic levels of marine ecosystems simultaneously. For this purpose, a one dimensional biogeochemical model simulating lower tropic level dynamics (e.g. carbon export, nutrient cycles) and an food web model simulating fisheries exploitation and higher tropic level dynamics were online and two-way coupled. Representing the marine ecosystem from one end to the other, the coupled model served as a tool for the analysis of fishing impacts on marine biogeochemical dynamics. Results obtained after incorporation of higher trophic level model changed the plankton compositions and enhanced detritus pools and increased carbon export. Additionally, our model showed that active movement of fish contributed to transport of carbon from surface to the deeper parts of the ocean. Moreover, results after applying different fishing intensities indicated that changes in fisheries exploitation levels directly influence the marine nutrient cycles and hence, the carbon export. Depending on the target and the intensity of fisheries

  11. Economic perspective of marine reserves in fisheries: a bioeconomic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Kunal; Kar, T K

    2012-12-01

    The present paper describes a prey-predator type fishery model with prey dispersal in a two-patch environment, one of which is a free fishing zone and other is protected zone. The objective of the paper is to maximize the net economic revenue earn from the fishery through implementing the sustainable properties of the fishery to keep the ecological balance. Biological measures are introduced to increase the understanding of the mechanisms in the bioeconomic system. The importance of marine reserve is analyzed through the obtained results of the numerical simulations of proposed model system. The results depict that reserves will be most effective when coupled with harvesting controls in adjacent fisheries. The paper also incorporates the induced cost and premium from establishing a marine protected area in a fishery. It is found that premium of marine protected area (MPA) increases with the increasing size of the reserve. Results are analyzed with the help of graphical illustrations.

  12. Latitudinal gradients in degradation of marine dissolved organic carbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnosti, Carol; Steen, Andrew; Ziervogel, Kai

    2011-01-01

    Heterotrophic microbial communities cycle nearly half of net primary productivity in the ocean, and play a particularly important role in transformations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The specific means by which these communities mediate the transformations of organic carbon are largely unkn...

  13. New Drugs from Marine Organisms in Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizia Russo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is a multifactorial neurodegenerative disorder. Current approved drugs may only ameliorate symptoms in a restricted number of patients and for a restricted period of time. Currently, there is a translational research challenge into identifying the new effective drugs and their respective new therapeutic targets in AD and other neurodegenerative disorders. In this review, selected examples of marine-derived compounds in neurodegeneration, specifically in AD field are reported. The emphasis has been done on compounds and their possible relevant biological activities. The proposed drug development paradigm and current hypotheses should be accurately investigated in the future of AD therapy directions although taking into account successful examples of such approach represented by Cytarabine, Trabectedin, Eribulin and Ziconotide. We review a complexity of the translational research for such a development of new therapies for AD. Bryostatin is a prominent candidate for the therapy of AD and other types of dementia in humans.

  14. New Drugs from Marine Organisms in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Patrizia; Kisialiou, Aliaksei; Lamonaca, Palma; Moroni, Rossana; Prinzi, Giulia; Fini, Massimo

    2015-12-25

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a multifactorial neurodegenerative disorder. Current approved drugs may only ameliorate symptoms in a restricted number of patients and for a restricted period of time. Currently, there is a translational research challenge into identifying the new effective drugs and their respective new therapeutic targets in AD and other neurodegenerative disorders. In this review, selected examples of marine-derived compounds in neurodegeneration, specifically in AD field are reported. The emphasis has been done on compounds and their possible relevant biological activities. The proposed drug development paradigm and current hypotheses should be accurately investigated in the future of AD therapy directions although taking into account successful examples of such approach represented by Cytarabine, Trabectedin, Eribulin and Ziconotide. We review a complexity of the translational research for such a development of new therapies for AD. Bryostatin is a prominent candidate for the therapy of AD and other types of dementia in humans.

  15. Thallium isotope evidence for a permanent increase in marine organic carbon export in the early Eocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, S.G.; Mar-Gerrison, S.; Gannoun, A.; LaRowe, D.; Klemm, V.; Halliday, A.N.; Burton, K.W.; Hein, J.R.

    2009-01-01

    The first high resolution thallium (Tl) isotope records in two ferromanganese crusts (Fe-Mn crusts), CD29 and D11 from the Pacific Ocean are presented. The crusts record pronounced but systematic changes in 205Tl/203Tl that are unlikely to reflect diagenetic overprinting or changes in isotope fractionation between seawater and Fe-Mn crusts. It appears more likely that the Fe-Mn crusts track the Tl isotope composition of seawater over time. The present-day oceanic residence time of Tl is estimated to be about 20,000??yr, such that the isotopic composition should reflect ocean-wide events. New and published Os isotope data are used to construct age models for these crusts that are consistent with each other and significantly different from previous age models. Application of these age models reveals that the Tl isotope composition of seawater changed systematically between ~ 55??Ma and ~ 45??Ma. Using a simple box model it is shown that the present day Tl isotope composition of seawater depends almost exclusively on the ratio between the two principal output fluxes of marine Tl. These fluxes are the rate of removal of Tl from seawater via scavenging by authigenic Fe-Mn oxyhydroxide precipitation and the uptake rate of Tl during low temperature alteration of oceanic crust. It is highly unlikely that the latter has changed greatly. Therefore, assuming that the marine Tl budget has also not changed significantly during the Cenozoic, the low 205Tl/203Tl during the Paleocene is best explained by a more than four-fold higher sequestration of Tl by Fe-Mn oxyhydroxides compared with at the present day. The calculated Cenozoic Tl isotopic seawater curve displays a striking similarity to that of S, providing evidence that both systems may have responded to the same change in the marine environment. A plausible explanation is a marked and permanent increase in organic carbon export from ~ 55??Ma to ~ 45??Ma, which led to higher pyrite burial rates and a significantly reduced

  16. Habitat segregation of sessile marine organisms; Kaiyo fuchaku seibutsu no sumiwake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isoai, A. [Asahi Glass Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Kawahara, H.; Shizuri, Y.

    1996-08-01

    In order to develop the safe control agent of sessile marine organisms, the mechanism of habitat segregation of them has been investigated. Among various marine organisms, around 120 species of Porifera and Coelenterata accompanied with less the other sessile organisms were collected, to examine the adhesion prevention activity of their extracts against barnacles and Mytilus edulis. As a result, this activity was found out for 33% of Porifera and 27% of Coelenterata specimens. This means these organisms contain the adhesion prevention substances, and it is considered these chemical substances are practically used for the habitat segregation. Isolation structures of the chemical substances used for the habitat segregation were determined from these organisms. It was made clear that two acceptor genes successfully cloned from Balanus amphitrate are new G-protein coupling type acceptors having similar homology to the adrenaline and serotonin acceptors. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  17. On the impacts of phytoplankton-derived organic matter on the properties of the primary marine aerosol – Part 2: Composition, hygroscopicity and cloud condensation activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Fuentes

    2010-11-01

    , discrepancies between different studies in the behaviour of the organics-enriched primary seaspray could partly be explained by the difference in the nature and concentration of the organic material in the source seawater employed.

    Consistently across the experiments, theoretical analysis based on the Köhler model predicted a reduction in the primary seaspray CCN activity upon the incorporation of marine organics into the particle composition. This effect is consequence of the replacement of small inorganic sea salt molecules by large molar mass organic molecules, together with a moderate suppression of the surface tension at the point of activation of 5–0.5%, which leads to a dominance of the reduction in the dissolved solute in the Raoult term.

  18. Habitat modelling predictions highlight seasonal relevance of Marine Protected Areas for marine megafauna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, C.; Virgili, A.; Pettex, E.; Delavenne, J.; Toison, V.; Blanck, A.; Ridoux, V.

    2017-07-01

    According to the European Union Habitats and Birds Directives, EU Member States must extend the Natura 2000 network to marine ecosystems, through the designation of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs). However, the initial status of cetacean and seabird communities across European waters is often poorly understood. It is assumed that an MPA is justified where at least 1% of the ;national population; of a species is present during at least part of its biological cycle. The aim of the present work was to use model-based cetacean and seabird distribution to assess the networks of existing Natura 2000 sites and offshore proposed areas of biological interest. The habitat models used here were Generalised Additive Models computed from aerial surveys observational data collected during the winter 2011-2012 and the summer 2012 across the English Channel, Bay of Biscay and north-western Mediterranean Sea. Based on these models, a ratio between species relative abundance predicted within each MPA and the total relative abundance predicted over the French Atlantic or Mediterranean marine regions was computed and compared to the 1% threshold. This assessment was conducted for winter and summer independently, providing information for assessing the relevance of individual MPAs and MPA networks at a seasonal scale. Our results showed that the existing network designed for coastal seabird species was relevant in both marine regions. In contrast, a clear shortfall was identified for offshore seabird species in the Atlantic region and for cetaceans in both regions. Moreover, the size of MPAs appeared to be a crucial feature, with larger MPAs being relevant for more species. Finally, we showed that the proposed large offshore areas of interest would constitute a highly relevant network for all offshore species, with e.g. up to 61% of the Globicephalinae population in the Atlantic French waters being present within these areas.

  19. Contrasting Responses of Marine and Freshwater Photosynthetic Organisms to UVB Radiation: A Meta-Analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Jin, Peng

    2017-03-14

    Ultraviolet-B (UVB) radiation is a global stressor that has profound impacts on freshwater and marine ecosystems. However, an analysis of the patterns of sensitivity to UVB radiation across aquatic photosynthetic organisms has not yet been published. Here, we performed a meta-analysis on results reported in 214 studies compiled from the published literature to quantify and compare the magnitude of responses of aquatic photosynthetic organisms to changes in UVB radiation. The meta-analysis was conducted on observations of marine (n = 893) and freshwater macroalgae (n = 126) and of marine (n = 1,087) and freshwater (n = 2,889) microalgae (total n = 4,995). Most of these studies (85%) analyzed the performance of organisms exposed to natural solar radiation when UVB was partially or totally reduced compared with the organismal performance under the full solar radiation spectrum, whereas the remaining 15% of the studies examined the responses of organisms to elevated UVB radiation mostly using artificial lamps. We found that marine photosynthetic organisms tend to be more sensitive than freshwater photosynthetic organisms to UVB radiation; responses to either decreased or increased UVB radiation vary among taxa; the mortality rate is the most sensitive of the trait responses to elevated UVB radiation, followed by changes in cellular and molecular traits; the sensitivity of microalgae to UVB radiation is dependent on size, with small-celled microalgae more sensitive than large-celled microalgae to UVB radiation. Thick macroalgae morphotypes were the less sensitive to UVB, but this effect could not be separated from phylogenetic differences. The high sensitivity of marine species, particularly the smallest photosynthetic organisms, to increased UVB radiation suggests that the oligotrophic ocean, a habitat comprising 70% of the world\\'s oceans with high UVB penetration and dominated by picoautotrophs, is extremely vulnerable to changes in UVB radiation.

  20. Modeling marine surface microplastic transport to assess optimal removal locations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sherman, Peter; Van Sebille, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Marine plastic pollution is an ever-increasing problem that demands immediate mitigation and reduction plans. Here, a model based on satellite-tracked buoy observations and scaled to a large data set of observations on microplastic from surface trawls was used to simulate the transport of plastics f

  1. Modeling marine surface microplastic transport to assess optimal removal locations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sherman, Peter; Van Sebille, Erik|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304831921

    2016-01-01

    Marine plastic pollution is an ever-increasing problem that demands immediate mitigation and reduction plans. Here, a model based on satellite-tracked buoy observations and scaled to a large data set of observations on microplastic from surface trawls was used to simulate the transport of plastics

  2. Ambient radioactivity monitoring V: Marine environment, fish and marine organisms; Ueberwachung der Umweltradioaktivitaet V: Meer, Fische und Meeresorganismen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wedekind, C. [Bundesamt fuer Seeschiffahrt und Hydrographie, Hamburg (Germany); Kanisch, G. [Bundesforschungsanstalt fuer Fischerei, Hamburg (Germany). Lab. fuer Radiooekologie der Gewaesser

    1996-12-31

    The sea, originally thought to have an almost unlimited capacity of uptake of pollutants due to its water volumes available for dilution, was shown by growing insight into the physical, chemical and ecologic interdependencies to be a sensitive ecosystem. Its limits to cope with growing pollution are increasingly becoming clear, and this is a particular reason to perform radioactivity monitoring of the sea water, as radioactivity is transferred to the marine organisms. Organisms selected for monitoring are fish and crustaceans. (orig.) [Deutsch] Das Meer, urspruenglich wegen seiner Groesse und Verduennungskapazitaet fuer Schadstoffe als fast unbegrenzt aufnahmefaehig angesehen, erwies sich mit wachsender Einsicht in die physikalischen, chemischen und oekologischen Zusammenhaenge zunehmend als empfindliches System. Die Grenzen seiner Belastbarkeit werden immer deutlicher, ein besonderer Grund fuer die Ueberwachung auch der Radioaktivitaetskonzentration im Meerwasser, die sich ja auch auf die Meeresbewohner uebertraegt. Zu den zu ueberwachenden Organismen zaehlen Fische sowie Krusten- und Schalentiere. (orig.)

  3. Analysis of the Organic Content of Marine Aerosols with X-ray Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, D.; OBrien, R. E.; Fraund, M.; Laskina, O.; Alpert, P. A.; Prather, K. A.; Knopf, D. A.; Grassian, V. H.; Moffet, R.

    2014-12-01

    The ocean is a major global source of aerosols and the seawater from which they are derived is a complex mixture of organic molecules from organisms including phytoplankton, bacteria, and viruses. Marine aerosols consist of any combination of these components and in different mixing states. The mixing state affects absorption and scattering efficiency as well as their ability to uptake water and form ice. Therefore, there is a need to spatially resolve the chemical composition of individual marine aerosols in order to study their potential effects on the climate. Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy coupled with Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy (SXTM-NEXAFS) gives both spatial resolution as well as the sensitivity to molecular transitions that is necessary to correlate a position on an aerosol with a functional group or inorganic constituent. The morphology, mixing state, and chemical composition from STXM-NEXAFS can be used in conjunction with collocated measurements (light scattering, ice nucleation, etc.) to correlate the spatially resolved chemical composition of aerosols with their physical properties. The goal of this project is to determine if there is a difference in the organic fraction between particles with clearly different morphology and mixing states. Three major classes of marine aerosols have been classified as sea salt, marine gels, and cell fragments. Sea salt is classified by having an inorganic core consisting of NaCl and a thin layer of organic coating on the outside. Marine gels consist of organic material in the form of lipids, polysaccharides, and proteins distributed throughout the aerosol alongside inorganic compounds, such as Ca2+, Mg2+, and K+, that help to stabilize the negative charge of the organic material. Cell fragments include fragments from phytoplankton and bacteria. Efforts are currently underway to quantitatively evaluate differences in NEXAFS spectra for these particle types using nonlinear least

  4. Bridging Organizations Drive Effective Governance Outcomes for Conservation of Indonesia's Marine Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdej, Samantha M; Armitage, Derek R

    2016-01-01

    This study empirically investigates the influence of bridging organizations on governance outcomes for marine conservation in Indonesia. Conservation challenges require ways of governing that are collaborative and adaptive across boundaries, and where conservation actions are better coordinated, information flows improved, and knowledge better integrated and mobilized. We combine quantitative social network analysis and qualitative data to analyze bridging organizations and their networks, and to understand their contributions and constraints in two case studies in Bali, Indonesia. The analysis shows 1) bridging organizations help to navigate the 'messiness' inherent in conservation settings by compensating for sparse linkages, 2) the particular structure and function of bridging organizations influence governing processes (i.e., collaboration, knowledge sharing) and subsequent conservation outcomes, 3) 'bridging' is accomplished using different strategies and platforms for collaboration and social learning, and 4) bridging organizations enhance flexibility to adjust to changing marine conservation contexts and needs. Understanding the organizations that occupy bridging positions, and how they utilize their positionality in a governance network is emerging as an important determinant of successful conservation outcomes. Our findings contribute to a relatively new body of literature on bridging organizations in marine conservation contexts, and add needed empirical investigation into their value to governance and conservation in Coral Triangle nations and beyond.

  5. Marine Heat Waves Hazard 3D Maps and the Risk for Low Motility Organisms in a Warming Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Galli

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Frequency and severity of heat waves is expected to increase as a consequence of climate change with important impacts on human and ecosystems health. However, while many studies explored the projected occurrence of hot extremes on terrestrial systems, few studies dealt with marine systems, so that both the expected change in marine heat waves occurrence and the effects on marine organisms and ecosystems remain less understood and surprisingly poorly quantified. Here we: (i assess how much more frequent, severe, and depth-penetrating marine heat waves will be in the Mediterranean area in the next decades by post-processing the output of an ocean general circulation model; and (ii show that heat waves increase will impact on many species that live in shallow waters and have reduced motility, and related economic activities. This information is made available also as a dataset of temperature threshold exceedance indexes that can be used in combination with biological information to produce risk assessment maps for target species or biomes across the whole Mediterranean Sea. As case studies we compared projected heat waves occurrence with thermotolerance thresholds of low motility organisms. Results suggest a deepening of the survival horizon for red coral (Corallium rubrum, a commercially exploited benthic species already subjected to heat-related mass mortality events and coralligenous reefs as well as a reduction of suitable farming sites for the mussel Mythilus galloprovincialis. In recent years Mediterranean circalittoral ecosystems (coralligenous have been severely and repeatedly impacted by marine heat waves. Our results support that equally deleterious events are expected in the near future also for other ecologically important habitats (e.g., seagrass meadows and aquaculture activities (bivalvae, and point at the need for mitigation strategies.

  6. Demonstrating the Effects of Ocean Acidification on Marine Organisms to Support Climate Change Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Amanda L.; Hanson, Paul R.; Kelley, Stephanie A.

    2015-01-01

    Ocean acidification, a product of CO[subscript 2] absorption by the world's oceans, is largely driven by the anthropogenic combustion of fossil fuels and has already lowered the pH of marine ecosystems. Organisms with calcium carbonate shells and skeletons are especially susceptible to increasing environmental acidity due to reduction in the…

  7. A supercritical oxidation system for the determination of carbon isotope ratios in marine dissolved organic carbon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Clercq, Martijn; Van der Plicht, Johannes; Meijer, Harro A.J.

    1998-01-01

    An analytical oxidation system employing supercritical oxidation has been developed. It is designed to measure concentration and the natural carbon isotope ratios (C-13, C-14) Of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and is especially suited for marine samples. The oxidation takes place in a ceramic tube a

  8. Demonstrating the Effects of Ocean Acidification on Marine Organisms to Support Climate Change Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Amanda L.; Hanson, Paul R.; Kelley, Stephanie A.

    2015-01-01

    Ocean acidification, a product of CO[subscript 2] absorption by the world's oceans, is largely driven by the anthropogenic combustion of fossil fuels and has already lowered the pH of marine ecosystems. Organisms with calcium carbonate shells and skeletons are especially susceptible to increasing environmental acidity due to reduction in the…

  9. A Comparison of Coastal and Inland Residents' Knowledge of Marine Organisms and Their Feeding Relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Robert B.; Bethel, Lowell J.

    The purpose of this investigation was to compare the knowledge regarding marine organisms and their feeding relationships of fourth grade residents of one coastal and one inland community in south Texas and to generate grounded theory concerning the participants' construction of such knowledge. Four male and four female students were randomly…

  10. Quantifying the degradation of organic matter in marine sediments: A review and synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arndt, S.; Jørgensen, B.B.; LaRowe, D.E.; Middelburg, J.J.; Pancost, R.D.; Regnier, P.

    2013-01-01

    Quantifying the rates of biogeochemical processes in marine sediments is essential for understanding global element cycles and climate change. Because organic matter degradation is the engine behind benthic dynamics, deciphering the impact that various forces have on this process is central to deter

  11. Drivers and uncertainties of future global marine primary production in marine ecosystem models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Laufkötter

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Past model studies have projected a global decrease in marine net primary production (NPP over the 21st century, but these studies focused on the multi-model mean and mostly ignored the large inter-model differences. Here, we analyze model simulated changes of NPP for the 21st century under IPCC's high emission scenario RCP8.5 using a suite of nine coupled carbon–climate Earth System Models with embedded marine ecosystem models with a focus on the spread between the different models and the underlying reasons. Globally, five out of the nine models show a decrease in NPP over the course of the 21st century, while three show no significant trend and one even simulates an increase. The largest model spread occurs in the low latitudes (between 30° S and 30° N, with individual models simulating relative changes between −25 and +40%. In this region, the inter-quartile range of the differences between the 2012–2031 average and the 2081–2100 average is up to 3 mol C m-2 yr-1. These large differences in future change mirror large differences in present day NPP. Of the seven models diagnosing a net decrease in NPP in the low latitudes, only three simulate this to be a consequence of the classical interpretation, i.e., a stronger nutrient limitation due to increased stratification and reduced upwelling. In the other four, warming-induced increases in phytoplankton growth outbalance the stronger nutrient limitation. However, temperature-driven increases in grazing and other loss processes cause a net decrease in phytoplankton biomass and reduces NPP despite higher growth rates. One model projects a strong increase in NPP in the low latitudes, caused by an intensification of the microbial loop, while the remaining model simulates changes of less than 0.5%. While there is more consistency in the modeled increase in NPP in the Southern Ocean, the regional inter-model range is also very substantial. In most models, this increase in NPP is driven by

  12. Interactions Between Prokaryotes and Dissolved Organic Matter in Marine Waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Traving, Sachia Jo

    Microscopic unicellular organisms display a wealth of diversity, and occupy many different roles on Earth. Due to their ubiquitous distribution and high numbers, what they do and when they do it are of vital importance for the biogeochemical cycles on Earth. A large and important group of microbes...... are the heterotrophic bacteria and archaea, from here on collectively referred to as prokaryotes. They are specialized in consuming and re-mineralize organic material converting it into biomass and inorganic nutrients and carbon. The oceans function as a vast reservoir of dissolved organic matter (DOM), which contain...... extracellular enzymes as a key trait of the prokaryote-DOM interface. Understanding the chemical ecology of extracellular enzymes may reveal new insights to DOM cycling in the oceans....

  13. Computational models for synthetic marine infrared clutter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantikes, Kim T.; Zysnarski, Adam H.

    1996-06-01

    The next generation of ship defense missiles will need to engage stealthy, passive, sea-skimming missiles. Detection and guidance will occur against a background of sea surface and horizon which can present significant clutter problems for infrared seekers, particularly when targets are comparatively dim. We need a variety of sea clutter models: statistical image models for signal processing algorithm design, clutter occurrence models for systems effectiveness assessment, and constructive image models for synthesizing very large field-of-view (FOV) images with high spatial and temporal resolution. We have implemented and tested such a constructive model. First principle models of water waves and light transport provide a computationally intensive clutter model implemented as a raytracer. Our models include sea, sky, and solar radiance; reflectance; attenuating atmospheres; constructive solid geometry targets; target and water wave dynamics; and simple sensor image formation.

  14. Size-resolved particulate water-soluble organic compounds in the urban, mountain and marine atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Wang

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Primary (i.e., sugars and sugar alcohols and secondary water-soluble organic compounds (WSOCs (i.e., dicarboxylic acids and aromatic acids were characterised on a molecular level in size-segregated aerosols from the urban and mountain atmosphere of China and from the marine atmosphere in the outflow region of East Asia. Levoglucosan is the most abundant WSOCs in the urban and mountain atmosphere, whose accumulated concentrations in all stages are 1–3 orders of magnitude higher than those of marine aerosols. In contrast, malic, succinic and phthalic acids are dominant in the marine aerosols, which are 3–6 times more abundant than levoglucosan. This suggests that a continuous formation of secondary organic aerosols is occurring in the marine atmosphere during the long-range transport of air mass from inland China to the North Pacific. Sugars and sugar-alcohols, except for levoglucosan, gave a bimodal size distribution in the urban and mountain areas, peaking at 0.7–1.1 μm and >3.3 μm, and a unimodal distribution in the marine region, peaking at >3.3 μm. In contrast, levoglucosan and all the secondary WSOCs, except for benzoic and azelaic acids, showed a unimodal size distribution with a peak at 0.7–1.1 μm. Geometric mean diameters (GMDs of the WSOCs in fine particles (<2.1 μm at the urban site are larger in winter than in spring, due to an enhanced coagulation effect under the development of an inversion layer. However, GMDs of levoglucosan and most of the secondary WSOCs in the coarse mode are larger in the mountain and marine air and smaller in the urban air. This is most likely caused by an enhanced hygroscopic growth due to the high humidity of the mountain and marine atmosphere.

  15. Modeling Marine Electromagnetic Survey with Radial Basis Function Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Arif

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A marine electromagnetic survey is an engineering endeavour to discover the location and dimension of a hydrocarbon layer under an ocean floor. In this kind of survey, an array of electric and magnetic receivers are located on the sea floor and record the scattered, refracted and reflected electromagnetic wave, which has been transmitted by an electric dipole antenna towed by a vessel. The data recorded in receivers must be processed and further analysed to estimate the hydrocarbon location and dimension. To conduct those analyses successfuly, a radial basis function (RBF network could be employed to become a forward model of the input-output relationship of the data from a marine electromagnetic survey. This type of neural networks is working based on distances between its inputs and predetermined centres of some basis functions. A previous research had been conducted to model the same marine electromagnetic survey using another type of neural networks, which is a multi layer perceptron (MLP network. By comparing their validation and training performances (mean-squared errors and correlation coefficients, it is concluded that, in this case, the MLP network is comparatively better than the RBF network[1].[1] This manuscript is an extended version of our previous paper, entitled Radial Basis Function Networks for Modeling Marine Electromagnetic Survey, which had been presented on 2011 International Conference on Electrical Engineering and Informatics, 17-19 July 2011, Bandung, Indonesia.

  16. JEDI Marine and Hydrokinetic Model: User Reference Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldberg, M.; Previsic, M.

    2011-04-01

    The Jobs and Economic Development Impact Model (JEDI) for Marine and Hydrokinetics (MHK) is a user-friendly spreadsheet-based tool designed to demonstrate the economic impacts associated with developing and operating MHK power systems in the United States. The JEDI MHK User Reference Guide was developed to assist users in using and understanding the model. This guide provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the sources and parameters used to develop the cost data utilized in the model. This guide also provides basic instruction on model add-in features, operation of the model, and a discussion of how the results should be interpreted.

  17. Evaluation of the toxicity of organic matter in marine sediments

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarkar, A.

    The inhibitory effects of the organics from the sediment along the east coast of India on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in-vitro were evaluated. Sediment samples collected from the surface layers at various depths were extracted. Each of the extracts...

  18. Inventory of organisms interfering with transmission of a marine trematode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welsh, J.E.; van der Meer, J.; Brussaard, C.P.D.; Thieltges, D.W.

    2014-01-01

    It has increasingly been recognized that organisms can interfere with parasitic free-living stages, preventing them from infecting their specified host and thus reducing infection levels. This common phenomenon in freshwater and terrestrial systems has been termed the ‘dilution effect’ and, so far,

  19. Inventory of organisms interfering with transmission of a marine trematode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welsh, J.E.; van der Meer, J.; Brussaard, C.P.D.; Thieltges, D.W.

    2014-01-01

    It has increasingly been recognized that organisms can interfere with parasitic free-living stages, preventing them from infecting their specified host and thus reducing infection levels. This common phenomenon in freshwater and terrestrial systems has been termed the ‘dilution effect’ and, so far,

  20. One-Dimensional Modelling of Marine Current Turbine Runaway Behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staffan Lundin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available If a turbine loses its electrical load, it will rotate freely and increase speed, eventually achieving that rotational speed which produces zero net torque. This is known as a runaway situation. Unlike many other types of turbine, a marine current turbine will typically overshoot the final runaway speed before slowing down and settling at the runaway speed. Since the hydrodynamic forces acting on the turbine are dependent on rotational speed and acceleration, turbine behaviour during runaway becomes important for load analyses during turbine design. In this article, we consider analytical and numerical models of marine current turbine runaway behaviour in one dimension. The analytical model is found not to capture the overshoot phenomenon, while still providing useful estimates of acceleration at the onset of runaway. The numerical model incorporates turbine wake build-up and predicts a rotational speed overshoot. The predictions of the models are compared against measurements of runaway of a marine current turbine. The models are also used to recreate previously-published results for a tidal turbine and applied to a wind turbine. It is found that both models provide reasonable estimates of maximum accelerations. The numerical model is found to capture the speed overshoot well.

  1. Distribution and sources of organic matter in surface marine sediments across the North American Arctic margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goñi, Miguel A.; O'Connor, Alison E.; Kuzyk, Zou Zou; Yunker, Mark B.; Gobeil, Charles; Macdonald, Robie W.

    2013-09-01

    As part of the International Polar Year research program, we conducted a survey of surface marine sediments from box cores along a section extending from the Bering Sea to Davis Strait via the Canadian Archipelago. We used bulk elemental and isotopic compositions, together with biomarkers and principal components analysis, to elucidate the distribution of marine and terrestrial organic matter in different regions of the North American Arctic margin. Marked regional contrasts were observed in organic carbon loadings, with the highest values (≥1 mg C m-2 sediment) found in sites along Barrow Canyon and the Chukchi and Bering shelves, all of which were characterized by sediments with low oxygen exposure, as inferred from thin layers (cutin acids) all indicate marked regional differences in the proportions of marine and terrigenous organic matter present in surface sediments. Regions such as Barrow Canyon and the Mackenzie River shelf were characterized by the highest contributions of land-derived organic matter, with compositional characteristics that suggested distinct sources and provenance. In contrast, sediments from the Canadian Archipelago and Davis Strait had the smallest contributions of terrigenous organic matter and the lowest organic carbon loadings indicative of a high degree of post-depositional oxidation.

  2. Marine Aerosol Precursor Emissions for Earth System Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maltrud, Mathew Einar [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-07-25

    Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) is generated by marine ecosystems and plays a major role in cloud formation over the ocean. Currently, Earth System Models use imposed flux of DMS from the ocean to the atmosphere that is independent of the climate state. We have added DMS as a prognostic variable to the Community Earth System Model (CESM) that depends on the distribution of phytoplankton species, and thus changes with climate.

  3. Partitioning of organic production in marine plankton communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conan, P.; Søndergaard, Morten; Kragh, T.

    2007-01-01

    and a constant low net production of dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) across the nutrient gradient. The production of DOP was low in the P-limited (-Si) bags; however, with a surplus of inorganic P, most of the assimilated P (74% to 85%) was recovered as new DOP. The consequence was a huge range...... limitation as the initial conditions. The experiment lasted 21 days in August. Addition of silicate (+Si) resulted in diatom dominance, while a more diverse community was present in treatments with no added Si (-Si). Addition of inorganic nutrients in a N:P gradient from 64 to 4 either conserved the initial...... N limitation or forced the plankton communities to P limitation. Per added limiting nutrient, the diatom-dominated bags produced more particulate (POC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) than the other bags. However, the relative partitioning of net production to POC and DOC did not differ...

  4. Partitioning of organic production in marine plankton communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conan, P.; Søndergaard, Morten; Kragh, T.;

    2007-01-01

    N limitation or forced the plankton communities to P limitation. Per added limiting nutrient, the diatom-dominated bags produced more particulate (POC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) than the other bags. However, the relative partitioning of net production to POC and DOC did not differ...... and a constant low net production of dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) across the nutrient gradient. The production of DOP was low in the P-limited (-Si) bags; however, with a surplus of inorganic P, most of the assimilated P (74% to 85%) was recovered as new DOP. The consequence was a huge range...... diagenetic "maturation" process but can be produced almost immediately. Both the nutrient regime and phytoplankton community composition affected the production and composition of new DOM in this experiment...

  5. Burrowing and avoidance behaviour in marine organisms exposed to pesticide-contaminated sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møhlenberg, Flemming; Kiørboe, Thomas

    1983-01-01

    Behavioural effects of marine sediment contaminated with pesticides (6000 ppm parathion, 200 ppm methyl parathion, 200 ppm malathion) were studied in a number of marine organisms in laboratory tests and in situ. The burrowing behaviour in Macoma baltica, Cerastoderma edule, Abra alba, Nereis...... for Crangon crangon and Solea solea, but not for Carcinus meanas and Pomatoschistus minutus. The validity of both behavioural tests was supported by in situ observations and investigations on the distribution of the species. It is concluded that both tests are useful tools in the assessment of the impact...

  6. Source rock evaluation and organic geochemistry of Belayim Marine Oil Field, Gulf of Suez, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Abu Al-Atta

    2014-09-01

    In general, TOC analyses showed that the Nubia-A and B formation sediments are fairly immature compared to good source rocks with very high Hydrogen Index indicative of kerogen type II. The geochemical investigations of two oil samples indicate that the Upper Rudeis oil of Belayim Marine was derived from a marine carbonate rich source, which is relatively rich in algal organic matter and has moderate sulfur content. The maturity of the analyzed oils (about 0.75% R0 falls short from the stage of peak hydrocarbon generation which is known to be reached at about 0.85% R0.

  7. Optimisation of Marine Boilers using Model-based Multivariable Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solberg, Brian

    Traditionally, marine boilers have been controlled using classical single loop controllers. To optimise marine boiler performance, reduce new installation time and minimise the physical dimensions of these large steel constructions, a more comprehensive and coherent control strategy is needed. Th......). In the thesis the pressure control is based on this new method when on/off burner switching is required while the water level control is handled by a model predictive controller........ This research deals with the application of advanced control to a specific class of marine boilers combining well-known design methods for multivariable systems. This thesis presents contributions for modelling and control of the one-pass smoke tube marine boilers as well as for hybrid systems control. Much...... of the focus has been directed towards water level control which is complicated by the nature of the disturbances acting on the system as well as by low frequency sensor noise. This focus was motivated by an estimated large potential to minimise the boiler geometry by reducing water level fluctuations...

  8. Efficient bioremediation of total organic carbon (TOC) in integrated aquaculture system by marine sponge Hymeniacidon perleve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Wantao; Wu, Yichun; Sun, Liming; Zhang, Wei

    2007-08-15

    The aim of this study is to investigate the potential of using marine sponge Hymeniacidon perleve to remove total organic carbon (TOC) in integrated aquaculture ecosystems. In sterilized natural seawater (SNSW) with different concentrations of TOC, H. perleve removed approximately 44-61% TOC during 24 h, with retention rates of ca. 0.19-1.06 mg/h .g-fresh sponge, however no particulate selectivity was observed. The highest initial TOC concentration, in which about 2.7 g fresh sponges could remove TOC effectively in 0.5-L SNSW, is 214.3-256.9 mg/L. The highest capacity of TOC removal and clearance rate (CR) by H. perleve is ca. 25.50 mg-TOC/g-fresh sponge and 7.64 mL/h . g-fresh sponge within 24 h, respectively. Until reaching the highest TOC removal capacity, the TOC removal capacity and clearance rate of H. perleve increased with initial TOC concentration, and dropped dramatically thereafter. After reaching the highest removal capacity, H. perleve could only remove relatively lower TOC concentration in seawater in subsequent run. The TOC removal kinetics in SNSW by H. perleve fitted very well with a S-shaped curve and a Logistic model equation (R(2) = 0.999). In different volumes of SNSW with a fixed initial TOC concentration, the weight/volume ratio of sponge biomass and SFNSW was optimized at 1.46 g-fresh sponge/1-L SNSW to achieve the maximum TOC removal. When co-cultured with marine fish Fugu rubripes for 15 days, H. perleve removed TOC excreted by F. rubripes with similar retention rates of ca. 0.15 mg/h . g-fresh sponge, and the sponge biomass increased by 22.8%.

  9. Using seabird habitat modeling to inform marine spatial planning in central California's National Marine Sanctuaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Jennifer; Hines, Ellen; Elliott, Meredith; Howar, Julie; Dransfield, Andrea; Nur, Nadav; Jahncke, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    Understanding seabird habitat preferences is critical to future wildlife conservation and threat mitigation in California. The objective of this study was to investigate drivers of seabird habitat selection within the Gulf of the Farallones and Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuaries to identify areas for targeted conservation planning. We used seabird abundance data collected by the Applied California Current Ecosystem Studies Program (ACCESS) from 2004-2011. We used zero-inflated negative binomial regression to model species abundance and distribution as a function of near surface ocean water properties, distances to geographic features and oceanographic climate indices to identify patterns in foraging habitat selection. We evaluated seasonal, inter-annual and species-specific variability of at-sea distributions for the five most abundant seabirds nesting on the Farallon Islands: western gull (Larus occidentalis), common murre (Uria aalge), Cassin's auklet (Ptychorampus aleuticus), rhinoceros auklet (Cerorhinca monocerata) and Brandt's cormorant (Phalacrocorax penicillatus). The waters in the vicinity of Cordell Bank and the continental shelf east of the Farallon Islands emerged as persistent and highly selected foraging areas across all species. Further, we conducted a spatial prioritization exercise to optimize seabird conservation areas with and without considering impacts of current human activities. We explored three conservation scenarios where 10, 30 and 50 percent of highly selected, species-specific foraging areas would be conserved. We compared and contrasted results in relation to existing marine protected areas (MPAs) and the future alternative energy footprint identified by the California Ocean Uses Atlas. Our results show that the majority of highly selected seabird habitat lies outside of state MPAs where threats from shipping, oil spills, and offshore energy development remain. This analysis accentuates the need for innovative marine spatial

  10. Using seabird habitat modeling to inform marine spatial planning in central California's National Marine Sanctuaries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer McGowan

    Full Text Available Understanding seabird habitat preferences is critical to future wildlife conservation and threat mitigation in California. The objective of this study was to investigate drivers of seabird habitat selection within the Gulf of the Farallones and Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuaries to identify areas for targeted conservation planning. We used seabird abundance data collected by the Applied California Current Ecosystem Studies Program (ACCESS from 2004-2011. We used zero-inflated negative binomial regression to model species abundance and distribution as a function of near surface ocean water properties, distances to geographic features and oceanographic climate indices to identify patterns in foraging habitat selection. We evaluated seasonal, inter-annual and species-specific variability of at-sea distributions for the five most abundant seabirds nesting on the Farallon Islands: western gull (Larus occidentalis, common murre (Uria aalge, Cassin's auklet (Ptychorampus aleuticus, rhinoceros auklet (Cerorhinca monocerata and Brandt's cormorant (Phalacrocorax penicillatus. The waters in the vicinity of Cordell Bank and the continental shelf east of the Farallon Islands emerged as persistent and highly selected foraging areas across all species. Further, we conducted a spatial prioritization exercise to optimize seabird conservation areas with and without considering impacts of current human activities. We explored three conservation scenarios where 10, 30 and 50 percent of highly selected, species-specific foraging areas would be conserved. We compared and contrasted results in relation to existing marine protected areas (MPAs and the future alternative energy footprint identified by the California Ocean Uses Atlas. Our results show that the majority of highly selected seabird habitat lies outside of state MPAs where threats from shipping, oil spills, and offshore energy development remain. This analysis accentuates the need for innovative marine

  11. Chemical characterization of high molecular weight dissolved organic matter in fresh and marine waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repeta, Daniel J.; Quan, Tracy M.; Aluwihare, Lihini I.; Accardi, AmyMarie

    2002-03-01

    The high molecular weight fraction of dissolved organic matter in a suite of lakes, rivers, seawater, and marine sediment interstitial water samples was collected by ultrafiltration and characterized by molecular level and spectroscopic techniques. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of all samples show a high degree of similarity, with major contributions from carbohydrates, bound acetate, and lipids. Molecular level analyses of neutral sugars show seven monosaccharides, rhamnose, fucose, arabinose, xylose, mannose, glucose, and galactose, to be abundant, and to occur in comparable relative amounts in each sample. Previous studies have emphasized the distinctive composition of dissolved humic substances in fresh and marine waters, and have attributed these differences to sources and transformations of organic matter unique to each environment. In contrast we find a large fraction of freshwater high molecular weight dissolved organic matter (HMWDOM; > 1kD) to be indistinguishable from marine HMWDOM in bulk and molecular-level chemical properties. Aquatic HMWDOM is similar in chemical composition to biologically derived acylated heteropolysaccharides isolated from marine algal cultures, suggesting a biological source for some fraction of persistent HMWDOM. High molecular weight DOC contributes 51 ± 26% of the total DOC, and monosaccharides 18 ± 8% of the total HMWDOC in our freshwater samples. These contributions are on average higher and more variable, but not significantly different than for surface seawater (30% and 16% respectively). Biogeochemical processes that produce, accumulate, and recycle DOM may therefore share important similarities and be broadly comparable across a range of environmental settings.

  12. Modeling and Simulation of Marine Hydrokinetic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoele, K.; Previsic, M.

    2012-12-01

    To accurately design a wave energy conversion system, the time domain numerical model is necessary. This is due to nonlinearities in the system from different sources such as hydrodynamic forces, device dynamics, control mechanisms, and mooring lines. Combining model accuracy with efficient and fast calculation of hydrodynamic forces in time domain is challenging and time-consuming. This article describes an easy to use and unified computational framework that handles those challenges efficiently for different types of wave energy converters. The framework has been generated as a Matlab toolbox that contains the key components of a wave to wire model. It can be used for initial performance evaluation of wave energy converters as well as detailed nonlinear analysis in the time domain. The preprocessing, post-processing, and standard modeling procedure are among the unique capabilities of the toolbox that enable users to check different device concepts and optimize device performance without dealing with modeling troubles. The hydrodynamic parameters are initially computed using the three-dimensional panel method and transformed to time domain by systematic identification techniques to accelerate computation of the hydrodynamic radiation forces. The dynamics of the whole system including nonlinear viscous forces, multi-body dynamics, mooring lines, and power takeoff units is then modeled in Matlab Simulink interface. Validation of the model with experimental studies is described and the responses of different wave energy conversion systems, especially their converted power, are presented.

  13. Bioavailability of autochthonous dissolved organic nitrogen in marine plankton communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Helle; Markager, Svend Stiig; Søndergaard, Morten

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the bioavailability of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) produced during a phytoplankton bloom. The experiments were conducted with natural plankton communities as batch growth experiments over approximately 30 days with nitrogen limitation. Five to six...... times during the exponential and stationary phases of each experimental bloom the bioavailability of DON was measured over 60 days together with DOC and oxygen consumption. The overall aim was to quantify remineralization of the added nitrate. The results showed that maximum 33 % of the added nitrate...

  14. Microbial diversity associated with tetrodotoxin production in marine organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratheepa, V; Vasconcelos, Vitor

    2013-11-01

    Tetrodotoxin (TTX), is a potent neurotoxin found in genetically diversed organisms. Many TTX producing microorganism have also been isolated from TTX bearing animals. The TTX producing microbes found in four different phylum (Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes), the Proteobacteria are the dominating one. In most of the cases, TTX producing microbes are found in the intestine of the TTX producing vector indicating the origin of TTX through food chain. This paper reviews the TTX and its analogs and the geographic distribution of TTX in symbiotic microorganism and its production.

  15. Toxicity of chlorine dioxide to early life stages of marine organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hose, J.E.; Di Fiore, D.; Parker, H.S.; Sciarrotta, T.

    1989-03-01

    With increasing interest in minimizing exposure to chlorine, many electric generating and water treatment plants are exploring the use of alternative biocides such as chlorine dioxide. Unlike chlorine, chlorine dioxide does not react with ambient organic compounds to form potentially carcinogenic trihalomethanes such as chloroform. However, the toxicity of chlorine dioxide to aquatic organisms has received little study. No information exists on chlorine toxicity to marine organisms. Furthermore, West Coast electric power stations usually discharge chlorine intermittently once or twice daily and substantial mixing of receiving water occurs between treatments. Therefore, this study sought to obtain information on chlorine dioxide toxicity using an exposure schedule typical of generating stations which discharge into the marine environment. Early life history stages of a plant, invertebrate and fish were tested since these stages are generally acknowledged to be most sensitive to toxicants and are the stages that are most likely to be exposed to the effluent.

  16. Models of marine molluscan diseases: Trends and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Eric N; Hofmann, Eileen E

    2015-10-01

    Disease effects on host population dynamics and the transmission of pathogens between hosts are two important challenges for understanding how epizootics wax and wane and how disease influences host population dynamics. For the management of marine shellfish resources, marine diseases pose additional challenges in early intervention after the appearance of disease, management of the diseased population to limit a decline in host abundance, and application of measures to restrain that decline once it occurs. Mathematical models provide one approach for quantifying these effects and addressing the competing goals of managing the diseased population versus managing the disease. The majority of models for molluscan diseases fall into three categories distinguished by these competing goals. (1) Models that consider disease effects on the host population tend to focus on pathogen proliferation within the host. Many of the well-known molluscan diseases are pandemic, in that they routinely reach high prevalence rapidly over large geographic expanses, are characterized by transmission that does not depend upon a local source, and exert a significant influence on host population dynamics. Models focused on disease proliferation examine the influence of environmental change on host population metrics and provide a basis to better manage diseased stocks. Such models are readily adapted to questions of fishery management and habitat restoration. (2) Transmission models are designed to understand the mechanisms triggering epizootics, identify factors impeding epizootic development, and evaluate controls on the rate of disease spread over the host's range. Transmission models have been used extensively to study terrestrial diseases, yet little attention has been given to their potential for understanding the epidemiology of marine molluscan diseases. For management of diseases of wild stocks, transmission models open up a range of options, including the application of area

  17. Can we predict temperature-dependent chemical toxicity to marine organisms and set appropriate water quality guidelines for protecting marine ecosystems under different thermal scenarios?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Guang-Jie; Wang, Zhen; Lau, Edward Tak Chuen; Xu, Xiang-Rong; Leung, Kenneth Mei Yee

    2014-10-15

    Temperature changes due to climate change and seasonal fluctuation can have profound implications on chemical toxicity to marine organisms. Through a comprehensive meta-analysis by comparing median lethal or effect concentration data of six chemicals for various saltwater species obtained at different temperatures, we reveal that the chemical toxicity generally follows two different models: (1) it increases with increasing temperature and (2) it is the lowest at an optimal temperature and increases with increasing or decreasing temperature from the optimal temperature. Such observations are further supported by temperature-dependent hazardous concentration 10% (HC10) values derived from species sensitivity distributions which are constructed using the acute toxicity data generated at different temperatures. Considering these two models and natural variations of seawater temperature, we can scientifically assess whether applying an assessment factor (e.g. 10) to modify water quality guidelines of the chemicals can adequately protect marine ecosystems in tropics, subtropics and temperate regions, respectively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Metal–organic complexation in the marine environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witter Amy

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the voltammetric methods that are used to assess metal–organic complexation in seawater. These consist of titration methods using anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV and cathodic stripping voltammetry competitive ligand experiments (CSV-CLE. These approaches and a kinetic approach using CSV-CLE give similar information on the amount of excess ligand to metal in a sample and the conditional metal ligand stability constant for the excess ligand bound to the metal. CSV-CLE data using different ligands to measure Fe(III organic complexes are similar. All these methods give conditional stability constants for which the side reaction coefficient for the metal can be corrected but not that for the ligand. Another approach, pseudovoltammetry, provides information on the actual metal–ligand complex(es in a sample by doing ASV experiments where the deposition potential is varied more negatively in order to destroy the metal–ligand complex. This latter approach gives concentration information on each actual ligand bound to the metal as well as the thermodynamic stability constant of each complex in solution when compared to known metal–ligand complexes. In this case the side reaction coefficients for the metal and ligand are corrected. Thus, this method may not give identical information to the titration methods because the excess ligand in the sample may not be identical to some of the actual ligands binding the metal in the sample.

  19. The chemical composition of organic nitrogen in marine rainwater and aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altieri, K. E.; Hastings, M. G.; Peters, A.; Sigman, D. M.

    2010-12-01

    The current state of knowledge on organic nitrogen in the atmosphere is very limited. Atmospheric water soluble organic nitrogen (WSON) is a subset of the complex water soluble organic matter measured in atmospheric aerosols and rainwater; as such, it impacts cloud condensation processes and aerosol chemical and optical properties. In marine and continental atmospheric deposition, the organic N fraction can be 20-80% of total N potentially influencing receiving ecosystems. Therefore, atmospheric WSON plays an important role in both atmospheric chemistry and the global biogeochemical N cycle. However, the sources (i.e., anthropogenic vs. terrestrial vs. marine), composition (e.g., reduced or oxidized N), potential connections to inorganic N (NO3- and NH4+), and spatio-temporal variability of atmospheric WSON are largely unknown. Samples were collected on or near the island of Bermuda (32.27°N, 64.87°W), which is located in the western North Atlantic and experiences seasonal changes in transport that allow for study of both anthropogenically and primarily marine influenced air masses. Rainwater samples (n=7) and aqueous extracted aerosol samples (n=4) were analyzed by positive ion ultra-high resolution electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI FT-ICR MS) to characterize the chemical composition of the water soluble organic N on a per compound level. We found ~ 800 N containing compounds in 8 compound classes. The CHON+ compound class contained the largest number of N compounds (~ 460). Compared to continental rainwater [Altieri et al., ES&T, 2009], the CHON+ compounds in the marine samples are as dominant in number, yet have less regular patterns and lower O:C ratios for comparable N:C ratios. In fact, average O:C ratios of all N containing compound classes were lower in the marine samples than in continental rainwater samples. No organosulfates or nitrooxy-organosulfates were detected in the marine samples, both of

  20. The chronic toxicity of molybdate to marine organisms. I. Generating reliable effects data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijerick, D G; Regoli, L; Stubblefield, W

    2012-07-15

    A scientific research program was initiated by the International Molybdenum Association (IMOA) which addressed identified gaps in the environmental toxicity data for the molybdate ion (MoO(4)(2-)). These gaps were previously identified during the preparation of EU-REACH-dossiers for different molybdenum compounds (European Union regulation on Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemical substances; EC, 2006). Evaluation of the open literature identified few reliable marine ecotoxicological data that could be used for deriving a Predicted No-Effect Concentration (PNEC) for the marine environment. Rather than calculating a PNEC(marine) using the assessment factor methodology on a combined freshwater/marine dataset, IMOA decided to generate sufficient reliable marine chronic data to permit derivation of a PNEC by means of the more scientifically robust species sensitivity distribution (SSD) approach (also called the statistical extrapolation approach). Nine test species were chronically exposed to molybdate (added as sodium molybdate dihydrate, Na(2)MoO(4)·2H(2)O) according to published standard testing guidelines that are acceptable for a broad range of regulatory purposes. The selected test organisms were representative for typical marine trophic levels: micro-algae/diatom (Phaeodactylum tricornutum, Dunaliella tertiolecta), macro-alga (Ceramium tenuicorne), mysids (Americamysis bahia), copepod (Acartia tonsa), fish (Cyprinodon variegatus), echinoderms (Dendraster exentricus, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) and molluscs (Mytilus edulis, Crassostrea gigas). Available NOEC/EC(10) levels ranged between 4.4 mg Mo/L (blue mussel M. edulis) and 1174 mg Mo/L (oyster C. gigas). Using all available reliable marine chronic effects data that are currently available, a HC(5,50%) (median hazardous concentration affecting 5% of the species) of 5.74(mg Mo)/L was derived with the statistical extrapolation approach, a value that can be used for national and

  1. Mumbai harbour, India: gateway for introduction of marine organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaonkar, C A; Sawant, S S; Anil, A C; Venkat, K; Harkantra, S N

    2010-04-01

    Ships have been identified as one of the important vectors in the translocation of organisms from one bioregion to another leading to bioinvasion. In this context, harbours serve as a gateway for the introduction of alien species. Surveys were carried out in the vicinity of ports of Mumbai for macrobenthic fauna, zooplankton and hard substratum community on three different occasions during 2001-2002. The study shows that 14 polychaete species are recently introduced to this area. Mytilopsis sallei, a bivalve, which is an invasive species in the Indian context continued to be present but was restricted to enclosed docks, indicating preference for embayed water bodies. The polychaete Protula tubularia was abundant in the hard substratum community and is being reported as a possible ship-mediated introduction.

  2. Comparative analysis of marine ecosystems: international production modelling workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, Jason S; Megrey, Bernard A; Miller, Thomas J; Essington, Tim; Boldt, Jennifer; Bundy, Alida; Moksness, Erlend; Drinkwater, Ken F; Perry, R Ian

    2010-12-23

    Understanding the drivers that dictate the productivity of marine ecosystems continues to be a globally important issue. A vast literature identifies three main processes that regulate the production dynamics of such ecosystems: biophysical, exploitative and trophodynamic. Exploring the prominence among this 'triad' of drivers, through a synthetic analysis, is critical for understanding how marine ecosystems function and subsequently produce fisheries resources of interest to humans. To explore this topic further, an international workshop was held on 10-14 May 2010, at the National Academy of Science's Jonsson Center in Woods Hole, MA, USA. The workshop compiled the data required to develop production models at different hierarchical levels (e.g. species, guild, ecosystem) for many of the major Northern Hemisphere marine ecosystems that have supported notable fisheries. Analyses focused on comparable total system biomass production, functionally equivalent species production, or simulation studies for 11 different marine fishery ecosystems. Workshop activities also led to new analytical tools. Preliminary results suggested common patterns driving overall fisheries production in these ecosystems, but also highlighted variation in the relative importance of each among ecosystems.

  3. Managing the Marine Environment, Conceptual Models and Assessment Considerations for the European Marine Strategy Framework Directive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher John Smith

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Conceptual models summarize, visualize and explain actual or predicted situations and how they might be tackled. In recent years, Pressure-State-Response (P-S-R frameworks have been central to conceptualizing marine ecosystem issues and then translating those to stakeholders, environmental managers and researchers. Society is concerned about the risks to the natural and human system posed by those Pressures (thus needing risk assessment and then needs to act to minimize or compensate those risks (as risk management. This research relates this to the DPSIR (Drivers-Pressure-State(change-Impact-Response hierarchical framework using standardized terminology/definitions and lists of impacting Activities and Pressures affecting ecosystem components, incorporating the European Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD legal decision components. This uses the example of fishing activity and the pressure of trawling from abrasion on the seabed and its effects on particular components. The mechanisms of Pressure acting on State changes are highlighted here as an additional refinement to DPSIR. The approach moves from conceptual models to actual assessments including: assessment methodologies (interactive matrices, ecosystem modeling, Bayesian Belief Networks, Bow-tie approach, some assessment tools data availability, confidence, scaling, cumulative effects and multiple simultaneous Pressures, which more often occur in multi-use and multi-user areas. In defining and describing the DPSIR Conceptual Framework we consider its use in re-world ecosystems affected by multiple pressures or multiple mechanisms of single pressures, and show how it facilitates management and assessment issues with particular relevance to the MSFD.

  4. Results of the Marine Ice Sheet Model Intercomparison Project, MISMIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Pattyn

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Predictions of marine ice-sheet behaviour require models that are able to robustly simulate grounding line migration. We present results of an intercomparison exercise for marine ice-sheet models. Verification is effected by comparison with approximate analytical solutions for flux across the grounding line using simplified geometrical configurations (no lateral variations, no effects of lateral buttressing. Unique steady state grounding line positions exist for ice sheets on a downward sloping bed, while hysteresis occurs across an overdeepened bed, and stable steady state grounding line positions only occur on the downward-sloping sections. Models based on the shallow ice approximation, which does not resolve extensional stresses, do not reproduce the approximate analytical results unless appropriate parameterizations for ice flux are imposed at the grounding line. For extensional-stress resolving "shelfy stream" models, differences between model results were mainly due to the choice of spatial discretization. Moving grid methods were found to be the most accurate at capturing grounding line evolution, since they track the grounding line explicitly. Adaptive mesh refinement can further improve accuracy, including fixed grid models that generally perform poorly at coarse resolution. Fixed grid models, with nested grid representations of the grounding line, are able to generate accurate steady state positions, but can be inaccurate over transients. Only one full-Stokes model was included in the intercomparison, and consequently the accuracy of shelfy stream models as approximations of full-Stokes models remains to be determined in detail, especially during transients.

  5. Modelling of Marine Icing with Close Range Photogrammetry

    OpenAIRE

    Haukebø, Asbjørn Risholm

    2015-01-01

    Installations and vessels operating in the high North in the winter season are likely to be subjected to marine Icing. To date there are no sensor technology available to accurately measure the total weight or volume of the ice. Photogrammetry is a universal 3-D measuring technique applied in a wide range of interdisciplinary fields. Agisoft PhotoScan is a photogrammetry software utilizing Structure From Motion(SFM) algorithm to create accurate 3-D mesh models. Scenes involving objects that a...

  6. Biology, genome organization, and evolution of parvoviruses in marine shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Arun K; Robles-Sikisaka, Refugio; Saksmerprome, Vanvimon; Lakshman, Dilip K

    2014-01-01

    As shrimp aquaculture has evolved from a subsistent farming activity to an economically important global industry, viral diseases have also become a serious threat to the sustainable growth and productivity of this industry. Parvoviruses represent an economically important group of viruses that has greatly affected shrimp aquaculture. In the early 1980s, an outbreak of a shrimp parvovirus, infectious hypodermal and hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHHNV), led to the collapse of penaeid shrimp farming in the Americas. Since then, considerable progress has been made in characterizing the parvoviruses of shrimp and developing diagnostic methods aimed to preventing the spread of diseases caused by these viruses. To date, four parvoviruses are known that infect shrimp; these include IHHNV, hepatopancreatic parvovirus (HPV), spawner-isolated mortality virus (SMV), and lymphoid organ parvo-like virus. Due to the economic repercussions that IHHNV and HPV outbreaks have caused to shrimp farming over the years, studies have been focused mostly on these two pathogens, while information on SMV and LPV remains limited. IHHNV was the first shrimp virus to be sequenced and the first for which highly sensitive diagnostic methods were developed. IHHNV-resistant lines of shrimp were also developed to mitigate the losses caused by this virus. While the losses due to IHHNV have been largely contained in recent years, reports of HPV-induced mortalities in larval stages in hatchery and losses due to reduced growth have increased. This review presents a comprehensive account of the history and current knowledge on the biology, diagnostics methods, genomic features, mechanisms of evolution, and management strategies of shrimp parvoviruses. We also highlighted areas where research efforts should be focused in order to gain further insight on the mechanisms of parvoviral pathogenicity in shrimp that will help to prevent future losses caused by these viruses.

  7. Ecotoxicological Response of Marine Organisms to Inorganic and Organic Sediment Amendments in Laboratory Exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-15

    adsorption, and transformation. In marine sediments, transition metals form relatively stable insoluble complexes with hydrogen sulfide (HS-) and carbonate...2008). While some experimental amendments have been added to sediments to sorb, degrade, transform or immobilize toxins and metals, others are added...reducing bacteria, promoting the precipitation of metals as sulfides , rendering the metals non-bioavailable. Regardless of the amendment composition

  8. The chronic toxicity of molybdate to marine organisms. I. Generating reliable effects data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heijerick, D.G., E-mail: Dagobert.heijerick@arche-consulting.be [ARCHE - Assessing Risks of Chemicals, Stapelplein 70 Bus 104, Gent (Belgium); Regoli, L. [International Molybdenum Association, 4 Heathfield Terrace, London, W4 4JE (United Kingdom); Stubblefield, W. [Oregon State University, Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, 421 Weniger Hall, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States)

    2012-07-15

    A scientific research program was initiated by the International Molybdenum Association (IMOA) which addressed identified gaps in the environmental toxicity data for the molybdate ion (MoO{sub 4}{sup 2-}). These gaps were previously identified during the preparation of EU-REACH-dossiers for different molybdenum compounds (European Union regulation on Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemical substances; EC, 2006). Evaluation of the open literature identified few reliable marine ecotoxicological data that could be used for deriving a Predicted No-Effect Concentration (PNEC) for the marine environment. Rather than calculating a PNEC{sub marine} using the assessment factor methodology on a combined freshwater/marine dataset, IMOA decided to generate sufficient reliable marine chronic data to permit derivation of a PNEC by means of the more scientifically robust species sensitivity distribution (SSD) approach (also called the statistical extrapolation approach). Nine test species were chronically exposed to molybdate (added as sodium molybdate dihydrate, Na{sub 2}MoO{sub 4}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O) according to published standard testing guidelines that are acceptable for a broad range of regulatory purposes. The selected test organisms were representative for typical marine trophic levels: micro-algae/diatom (Phaeodactylum tricornutum, Dunaliella tertiolecta), macro-alga (Ceramium tenuicorne), mysids (Americamysis bahia), copepod (Acartia tonsa), fish (Cyprinodon variegatus), echinoderms (Dendraster exentricus, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) and molluscs (Mytilus edulis, Crassostrea gigas). Available NOEC/EC{sub 10} levels ranged between 4.4 mg Mo/L (blue mussel M. edulis) and 1174 mg Mo/L (oyster C. gigas). Using all available reliable marine chronic effects data that are currently available, a HC{sub 5,50%} (median hazardous concentration affecting 5% of the species) of 5.74 (mg Mo)/L was derived with the statistical extrapolation approach, a

  9. A Structural Modelling Study on Marine Sediments Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorana D. Bolboacă

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative structure-activity relationship models were obtained by applying the Molecular Descriptor Family approach to eight ordnance compounds with different toxicity on five marine species (arbacia punctulata, dinophilus gyrociliatus, sciaenops ocellatus, opossum shrimp, and ulva fasciata. The selection of the best among molecular descriptors generated and calculated from the ordnance compounds structures lead to accurate monovariate models. The resulting models obtained for six endpoints proved to be accurate in estimation (the squared correlation coefficient varied from 0.8186 to 0.9997 and prediction (the correlation coefficient obtained in leave-one-out analysis varied from 0.7263 to 0.9984.

  10. Exposure factors for marine eutrophication impacts assessment based on a mechanistic biological model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cosme, Nuno Miguel Dias; Koski, Marja; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    2015-01-01

    Emissions of nitrogen (N) from anthropogenic sources enrich marine waters and promote planktonic growth. This newly synthesised organic carbon is eventually exported to benthic waters where aerobic respiration by heterotrophic bacteria results in the consumption of dissolved oxygen (DO...... routes from primary (cell aggregates) and secondary producers (faecal pellets, carcasses, and active vertical transport). Carbon export production (PE) and ecosystems eXposure Factors (XF), which represents a nitrogen-to-oxygen 'conversion' potential, were estimated at a spatial resolution of 66 large...... is essential to estimate a marine eutrophication impacts indicator in Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA) of anthropogenic-N emissions. Every relevant process was modelled and the uncertainty of the driving parameters considered low suggesting valid applicability in characterisation modelling in LCIA....

  11. Projected 21st century decrease in marine productivity: a multi-model analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Steinacher

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Changes in marine net primary productivity and export of particulate organic carbon are projected over the 21st century with three global coupled carbon cycle-climate models. These include representations of marine ecosystems and the carbon cycle of different structure and complexity. All three models show a decrease in global mean marine productivity and export production between 7 and 20% by 2100 relative to preindustrial conditions, for the SRES A2 emission scenario. Two different regimes for productivity changes are consistently identified in all three models. The first chain of mechanisms is dominant in the low- and mid-latitude ocean and in the North Atlantic: reduced input of macro-nutrients into the euphotic zone related to enhanced stratification, reduced mixed layer depth, and slowed circulation causes a decrease in macro-nutrient concentrations and in productivity and export of particulate organic carbon. The second regime is projected for parts of the Southern Ocean: an alleviation of light and/or temperature limitation leads to an increase in primary and export production as productivity is fueled by a sustained nutrient input. A region of disagreement among the models is the Arctic, where two models project an increase in productivity while one model projects a decrease. Projected changes in seasonal and interannual variability are modest in most regions. Regional model skill metrics are proposed to generate multi-model mean fields that show an improved skill in representing observations compared to a simple multi-model average. Model results are compared to recent productivity projections with three different algorithms, usually applied to infer primary production from satellite observations.

  12. Modeling Marine Stratocumulus with a Detailed Microphysical Scheme

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Chunsheng(赵春生); Yutaka ISHIZAKA

    2004-01-01

    A one-dimensional 3rd-order turbulence closure model with size-resolved microphysics and radiative transfer has been developed for investigating aerosol and cloud interactions of the stratocumulus-topped marine boundary layer.A new method is presented for coupling between the dynamical model and the microphysical model.This scheme allows the liquid water related correlations to be directly calculated rather than parameterized.On 21 April 2001,a marine stratocumulus was observed by the Caesar aircraft over the west Pacific Rim south of Japan during the 2001 APEX/ACE-Asia field measurements.This cloud is simulated by the model we present here.The model results show that the general features of the stratocumulus-topped marine boundary layer predicted by the model are in agreement with the measurements.A new onboard cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) counter provides not only total CC Nnumber concentration (as the traditional CCN counters do at a certain supersaturation) but also the CCN size distribution information.Using these CCN data,model responses to different CCN initial concentrations are examined.The model results are consistent with both observations and expectations.The numerical results show that the cloud microphysical properties are changed fundamentally by differentinitial CCN concentrations but the cloud liquid water content does not differ significantly.Different initial CCN loadings have large impacts on the evolution of cloud microstructure and radiation transfer while they have a modest effect on thermodynamics.Increased CCN concentration leads to significant decrease of cloud effective radius.

  13. Differential response of marine organisms to certain metal and agrichemical pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, H.H.; Xu, C.H.

    1984-10-01

    Oocyte maturation of the starfish, fertilization and embryogenesis of sea urchins, and the development of amphioxus and brine shrimps were used to assay the effects of several common metals and agrichemicals frequently found in marine environments. While brine shrimp embryos were tolerant to metals and agrichemicals used here, sea urchins and amphioxus showed a differential response to the common metal pollutants. Starfish oocyte maturation process was affected by agrichemicals. The results show that no one single organism, or its embryonic form, or a particular stage of development, can be used as the indicator for a particular pollutant. However, the use of lower forms of marine organisms can be useful collectively for environmental investigations and the management of waste disposal.

  14. Effect of Organic Acids and Marination Ingredients on the Survival of Campylobacter jejuni on Meat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birk, Tina; Grønlund, Anne Christine Jørgensen; Christensen, Bjarke Bak

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether marination of chicken meat in different food ingredients call be used to reduce populations of Campylobacter jejuni strains, were exposed to different organic acids (tartaric, acetic. lactic, malic, and citric acids) and food marinating ingredients...... at 4 degrees C in broth and on chicken meat. The organic acids (0.5%) reduced populations of C. jejuni broth (chicken juice and brain heart infusion broth) by 4 to 6 1011 units (after 24 h): tartaric acid was the most efficient treatment. Large strain variation was observed among 14 C. jejuni isolates...... inoculated in brain heart infusion broth containing 0.3% tartaric acid. On chicken meat medallions, reductions of C. jejuni were 0.5 to 2 log units when tartaric acid solutions (2, 4, 6, and 10%) were spread onto the meal. Analysis of acidic food ingredient (e.g., vinegar. lemon juice, pomegranate syrup...

  15. Skill Assessment for Coupled Biological/Physical Models of Marine Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Journal of Marine Systems 76 (2009) 4-15 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Journal of Marine Systems journal...doi:10.1016/j.jmarsys.2008.03.0ll 20090401086 CA. Stow ei al / Journal of Marine Systems 76 12009) 4-15 Given a choice of models to evaluate future...uncertainty. CA. Slow et al. / Journal of Marine Systems 76 {2009) 4-/5 form of model validation. A possible reason for the relatively

  16. Organism activity levels predict marine invertebrate survival during ancient global change extinctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapham, Matthew E

    2017-04-01

    Multistressor global change, the combined influence of ocean warming, acidification, and deoxygenation, poses a serious threat to marine organisms. Experimental studies imply that organisms with higher levels of activity should be more resilient, but testing this prediction and understanding organism vulnerability at a global scale, over evolutionary timescales, and in natural ecosystems remain challenging. The fossil record, which contains multiple extinctions triggered by multistressor global change, is ideally suited for testing hypotheses at broad geographic, taxonomic, and temporal scales. Here, I assess the importance of activity level for survival of well-skeletonized benthic marine invertebrates over a 100-million-year-long interval (Permian to Jurassic periods) containing four global change extinctions, including the end-Permian and end-Triassic mass extinctions. More active organisms, based on a semiquantitative score incorporating feeding and motility, were significantly more likely to survive during three of the four extinction events (Guadalupian, end-Permian, and end-Triassic). In contrast, activity was not an important control on survival during nonextinction intervals. Both the end-Permian and end-Triassic mass extinctions also triggered abrupt shifts to increased dominance by more active organisms. Although mean activity gradually returned toward pre-extinction values, the net result was a permanent ratcheting of ecosystem-wide activity to higher levels. Selectivity patterns during ancient global change extinctions confirm the hypothesis that higher activity, a proxy for respiratory physiology, is a fundamental control on survival, although the roles of specific physiological traits (such as extracellular pCO2 or aerobic scope) cannot be distinguished. Modern marine ecosystems are dominated by more active organisms, in part because of selectivity ratcheting during these ancient extinctions, so on average may be less vulnerable to global change

  17. Primary and Secondary Organic Marine Aerosol and Oceanic Biological Activity: Recent Results and New Perspectives for Future Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Rinaldi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important natural aerosol systems at the global level is marine aerosol that comprises both organic and inorganic components of primary and secondary origin. The present paper reviews some new results on primary and secondary organic marine aerosol, achieved during the EU project MAP (Marine Aerosol Production, comparing them with those reported in the recent literature. Marine aerosol samples collected at the coastal site of Mace Head, Ireland, show a chemical composition trend that is influenced by the oceanic biological activity cycle, in agreement with other observations. Laboratory experiments show that sea-spray aerosol from biologically active sea water can be highly enriched in organics, and the authors highlight the need for further studies on the atmospheric fate of such primary organics. With regard to the secondary fraction of organic aerosol, the average chemical composition and molecular tracer (methanesulfonic-acid, amines distribution could be successfully characterized by adopting a multitechnique analytical approach.

  18. Marine chemistry, fish / shell-fish surveys, benthic organisms, and marine toxic substances and pollutants data from current meter and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico from 26 January 1993 to 13 June 1994 (NODC Accession 9500088)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine chemistry, fish / shell-fish surveys, benthic organisms, and marine toxic substances and pollutants data were collected using current meter and other...

  19. Order reduction for a model of marine bacteriophage evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagliarini, Silvia; Korobeinikov, Andrei

    2017-02-01

    A typical mechanistic model of viral evolution necessary includes several time scales which can differ by orders of magnitude. Such a diversity of time scales makes analysis of these models difficult. Reducing the order of a model is highly desirable when handling such a model. A typical approach applied to such slow-fast (or singularly perturbed) systems is the time scales separation technique. Constructing the so-called quasi-steady-state approximation is the usual first step in applying the technique. While this technique is commonly applied, in some cases its straightforward application can lead to unsatisfactory results. In this paper we construct the quasi-steady-state approximation for a model of evolution of marine bacteriophages based on the Beretta-Kuang model. We show that for this particular model the quasi-steady-state approximation is able to produce only qualitative but not quantitative fit.

  20. Modeling marine surface microplastic transport to assess optimal removal locations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Peter; van Sebille, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Marine plastic pollution is an ever-increasing problem that demands immediate mitigation and reduction plans. Here, a model based on satellite-tracked buoy observations and scaled to a large data set of observations on microplastic from surface trawls was used to simulate the transport of plastics floating on the ocean surface from 2015 to 2025, with the goal to assess the optimal marine microplastic removal locations for two scenarios: removing the most surface microplastic and reducing the impact on ecosystems, using plankton growth as a proxy. The simulations show that the optimal removal locations are primarily located off the coast of China and in the Indonesian Archipelago for both scenarios. Our estimates show that 31% of the modeled microplastic mass can be removed by 2025 using 29 plastic collectors operating at a 45% capture efficiency from these locations, compared to only 17% when the 29 plastic collectors are moored in the North Pacific garbage patch, between Hawaii and California. The overlap of ocean surface microplastics and phytoplankton growth can be reduced by 46% at our proposed locations, while sinks in the North Pacific can only reduce the overlap by 14%. These results are an indication that oceanic plastic removal might be more effective in removing a greater microplastic mass and in reducing potential harm to marine life when closer to shore than inside the plastic accumulation zones in the centers of the gyres.

  1. Modeling Marine Electromagnetic Survey with Radial Basis Function Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Arif

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A marine electromagnetic survey is an engineering endeavour to discover the location and dimension of a hydrocarbon layer under an ocean floor. In this kind of survey, an array of electric and magnetic receivers are located on the sea floor and record the scattered, refracted and reflected electromagnetic wave, which has been transmitted by an electric dipole antenna towed by a vessel. The data recorded in receivers must be processed and further analysed to estimate the hydrocarbon location and dimension. To conduct those analyses successfuly, a radial basis function (RBF network could be employed to become a forward model of the input-output relationship of the data from a marine electromagnetic survey. This type of neural networks is working based on distances between its inputs and predetermined centres of some basis functions. A previous research had been conducted to model the same marine electromagnetic survey using another type of neural networks, which is a multi layer perceptron (MLP network. By comparing their validation and training performances (mean-squared errors and correlation coefficients, it is concluded that, in this case, the MLP network is comparatively better than the RBF network

  2. he Impact of Primary Marine Aerosol on Atmospheric Chemistry, Radiation and Climate: A CCSM Model Development Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keene, William C. [University of Virginia; Long, Michael S. [University of Virginia

    2013-05-20

    This project examined the potential large-scale influence of marine aerosol cycling on atmospheric chemistry, physics and radiative transfer. Measurements indicate that the size-dependent generation of marine aerosols by wind waves at the ocean surface and the subsequent production and cycling of halogen-radicals are important but poorly constrained processes that influence climate regionally and globally. A reliable capacity to examine the role of marine aerosol in the global-scale atmospheric system requires that the important size-resolved chemical processes be treated explicitly. But the treatment of multiphase chemistry across the breadth of chemical scenarios encountered throughout the atmosphere is sensitive to the initial conditions and the precision of the solution method. This study examined this sensitivity, constrained it using high-resolution laboratory and field measurements, and deployed it in a coupled chemical-microphysical 3-D atmosphere model. First, laboratory measurements of fresh, unreacted marine aerosol were used to formulate a sea-state based marine aerosol source parameterization that captured the initial organic, inorganic, and physical conditions of the aerosol population. Second, a multiphase chemical mechanism, solved using the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry's MECCA (Module Efficiently Calculating the Chemistry of the Atmosphere) system, was benchmarked across a broad set of observed chemical and physical conditions in the marine atmosphere. Using these results, the mechanism was systematically reduced to maximize computational speed. Finally, the mechanism was coupled to the 3-mode modal aerosol version of the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM v3.6.33). Decadal-scale simulations with CAM v.3.6.33, were run both with and without reactive-halogen chemistry and with and without explicit treatment of particulate organic carbon in the marine aerosol source function. Simulated results were interpreted (1) to evaluate influences

  3. Effect of Industrial By-Products on Unconfined Compressive Strength of Solidified Organic Marine Clayey Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan-Gi Park

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The use of industrial by-products as admixture to ASTM Type I cement (ordinary Portland cement (OPC was investigated with the objective of improving the solidification of organic marine clayey soils. The industrial by-products considered in this paper were oyster-shell powder (OSP, steelmaking slag dust (SMS and fuel-gas-desulfurized (FGD gypsum. The industrial by-products were added to OPC at a ratio of 5% based on dry weight to produce a mixture used to solidify organic marine clayey soils. The dosage ratios of mixtures to organic marine clayey soils were 5, 10 and 15% on a dry weight basis. Unconfined compressive strength (UCS test after 28 days revealed that the highest strength was obtained with the OPC + SMS 15% mixing ratio. The UCS of specimens treated with this mixture was >500 kPa, compared with 300 kPa for specimens treated with a 15% OPC + OSP mixture and 200 kPa when 15% of OPC was used alone. These results were attributed to the more active hydration and pozzolanic reaction of the OPC + SMS mixture. This hypothesis was verified through X-ray diffraction (XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM analyses, and was confirmed by variations in the calcium carbonate (CaCO3 content of the materials during curing.

  4. Hydrographic controls on marine organic matter fate and microbial diversity in the western Irish Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Shane; Szpak, Michal; Monteys, Xavier; Flanagan, Paul; Allen, Christopher; Kelleher, Brian

    2014-05-01

    Cycling of organic matter (OM) is the key biological process in the marine environment1 and knowledge of the sources and the reactivity of OM, in addition to factors controlling its distribution in estuarine, coastal and shelf sediments are of key importance for understanding global biogeochemical cycles2. With recent advances in cultivation-independent molecular approaches to microbial ecology, the key role of prokaryotes in global biogeochemical cycling in marine ecosystems has been emphasised3,4. However, spatial studies combining the distribution and fate of OM with microbial community abundance and diversity remain rare. Here, a combined spatial lipid biomarker and 16S rRNA tagged pyrosequencing study was conducted in surface sediments and particulate matter across hydrographically distinct zones associated with the seasonal western Irish Sea gyre. The aim was to assess the spatial variation of, and factors controlling, marine organic cycling and sedimentary microbial communities across these distinct zones. The distribution of phospholipid fatty acids, source-specific sterols, wax esters and C25 highly branched isoprenoids indicate that diatoms, dinoflagellates and green algae were the major contributors of marine organic matter, while the distribution of cholesterol, wax esters and C20 and C22 polyunsaturated fatty acids have highlighted the importance of copepod grazing for mineralizing organic matter in the water column5. This marine OM production and mineralisation was greatest in well-mixed waters compared to offshore stratified waters. Lipid analysis and 16S rRNA PCR-DGGE profiling also suggests that sedimentary bacterial abundance increases while community diversity decreases in offshore stratified waters. The major bacterial classes are the Deltaproteobacteria, Clostridia, Flavobacteriia, Gammaproteobactera and Bacteroiidia. At the family/genus level most groups appear to be associated with organoheterotrophic processing of sedimentary OM, ranging

  5. Validation of an Eulerian population model for the marine copepod Calanus finmarchicus in the Norwegian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alver, Morten Omholt; Broch, Ole Jacob; Melle, Webjørn; Bagøien, Espen; Slagstad, Dag

    2016-08-01

    Calanus finmarchicus is an important zooplankton species in the Norwegian Sea, as a dominant food organism for pelagic fish larvae, and a potentially large source of marine lipids and proteins. Its position in the marine food web also makes it an important model species in assessing the risk posed by oil spills in the Norwegian and Arctic Seas. In this study, an Eulerian population model for C.finmarchicus, coupled to the physical and ecological model SINMOD, is presented. The model includes the full life cycle of C. finmarchicus with a representation of all developmental stages. The model has been validated against field measurements made in different areas of the Norwegian Sea in 1997 and 1998. The model displays geographical and temporal distributions of development stages that is in line with observed patterns. When comparing time series for selected regions, we see a high degree of variability both in the field samples and model output. On average, the model deviations are near half of the summed variability of the field data and model estimates. The model has applications within assessment of ecological production, and the potential for harvesting in the Norwegian and Arctic Seas, but in combination with other models, also for the assessment of ecological effects of oil spills and other types of pollution.

  6. Tracking small mountainous river derived terrestrial organic carbon across the active margin marine environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childress, L. B.; Blair, N. E.; Orpin, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    Active margins are particularly efficient in the burial of organic carbon due to the close proximity of highland sources to marine sediment sinks and high sediment transport rates. Compared with passive margins, active margins are dominated by small mountainous river systems, and play a unique role in marine and global carbon cycles. Small mountainous rivers drain only approximately 20% of land, but deliver approximately 40% of the fluvial sediment to the global ocean. Unlike large passive margin systems where riverine organic carbon is efficiently incinerated on continental shelves, small mountainous river dominated systems are highly effective in the burial and preservation of organic carbon due to the rapid and episodic delivery of organic carbon sourced from vegetation, soil, and rock. To investigate the erosion, transport, and burial of organic carbon in active margin small mountainous river systems we use the Waipaoa River, New Zealand. The Waipaoa River, and adjacent marine depositional environment, is a system of interest due to a large sediment yield (6800 tons km-2 yr-1) and extensive characterization. Previous studies have considered the biogeochemistry of the watershed and tracked the transport of terrestrially derived sediment and organics to the continental shelf and slope by biogeochemical proxies including stable carbon isotopes, lignin phenols, n-alkanes, and n-fatty acids. In this work we expand the spatial extent of investigation to include deep sea sediments of the Hikurangi Trough. Located in approximately 3000 m water depth 120 km from the mouth of the Waipaoa River, the Hikurangi Trough is the southern extension of the Tonga-Kermadec-Hikurangi subduction system. Piston core sediments collected by the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA, NZ) in the Hikurangi Trough indicate the presence of terrestrially derived material (lignin phenols), and suggest a continuum of deposition, resuspension, and transport across the margin

  7. A model marine-science curriculum for fourth-grade pupils in Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Philip James

    This dissertation focused on the development of a model marine-science curriculum for fourth-grade pupils in the State of Florida. The curriculum was developed using grounded theory research method, including a component of data collected from an on-line survey administered to 106 professional educators and marine biologists. The results of the data collection and analysis showed a definitive necessity for teacher preparedness, multidisciplinary content, and inquiry-based science instruction. Further, three important factors emerged: (a) collaborative grouping increases achievement; (b) field excursions significantly impact student motivation; (c) standardized testing influences curriculum development. The curriculum is organized as an 11-day unit, with detailed lesson plans presented in standard curricular format and with all components correlated to the Florida State Educational Standards. The curriculum incorporates teacher preparation, multimedia presentations, computer-assisted instruction, scientific art appreciation, and replication as well as assessment factors. The curriculum addresses topics of ichthyology, marine animal identification, environmental conservation and protection, marine animal anatomy, water safety, environmental stewardship, and responsible angling techniques. The components of the curriculum were discussed with reference to the literature on which it was based and recommendations for future research were addressed.

  8. Damped trophic cascades driven by fishing in model marine ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ken Haste; Pedersen, Martin

    2010-01-01

    that fishing does not change the overall slope of the size spectrum, but depletes the largest individuals and induces trophic cascades. A trophic cascade can propagate both up and down in trophic levels driven by a combination of changes in predation mortality and food limitation. The cascade is damped...... cascade triggered by the removal of top predators. Here we use a novel size- and trait-based model to explore how marine ecosystems might react to perturbations from different types of fishing pressure. The model explicitly resolves the whole life history of fish, from larvae to adults. The results show...

  9. Application of oil spill model to marine pollution and risk control problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aseev, Nikita; Agoshkov, Valery; Sheloput, Tatyana

    2017-04-01

    Oil transportation by sea induces challenging problems of environmental control. Millions of tonnes of oil are yearly released during routine ship operations, not to mention vast spills due to different accidents (e.g. tanker collisions, grounding, etc.). Oil pollution is dangerous to marine organisms such as plants, fish and mammals, leading to widespread damage to our planet. In turn, fishery and travel agencies can lose money and clients, and ship operators are obliged to pay huge penalties for environmental pollution. In this work we present the method of accessing oil pollution of marine environment using recently developed oil spill model. The model describes basic processes of the oil slick evolution: oil transport due to currents, drift under the action of wind, spreading on the surface, evaporation, emulsification and dispersion. Such parameters as slick location, mass, density of oil, water content, viscosity and density of "water-in-oil" emulsion can be calculated. We demonstrate how to apply the model to damage calculation problems using a concept of average damage to particular marine area. We also formulate the problem of oil spill risk control, when some accident parameters are not known, but their probability distribution is given. We propose a new algorithm to solve such problems and show results of our model simulations. The work can be interesting to broad environmental, physics and mathematics community. The work is supported by Russian Foundation for Basic Research grant 16-31-00510.

  10. Nutrient supply and mercury dynamics in marine ecosystems: a conceptual model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Charles T; Chen, Celia Y; Hammerschmidt, Chad R; Mason, Robert P; Gilmour, Cynthia C; Sunderland, Elsie M; Greenfield, Ben K; Buckman, Kate L; Lamborg, Carl H

    2012-11-01

    There is increasing interest and concern over the impacts of mercury (Hg) inputs to marine ecosystems. One of the challenges in assessing these effects is that the cycling and trophic transfer of Hg are strongly linked to other contaminants and disturbances. In addition to Hg, a major problem facing coastal waters is the impacts of elevated nutrient, particularly nitrogen (N), inputs. Increases in nutrient loading alter coastal ecosystems in ways that should change the transport, transformations and fate of Hg, including increases in fixation of organic carbon and deposition to sediments, decreases in the redox status of sediments and changes in fish habitat. In this paper we present a conceptual model which suggests that increases in loading of reactive N to marine ecosystems might alter Hg dynamics, decreasing bioavailabilty and trophic transfer. This conceptual model is most applicable to coastal waters, but may also be relevant to the pelagic ocean. We present information from case studies that both support and challenge this conceptual model, including marine observations across a nutrient gradient; results of a nutrient-trophic transfer Hg model for pelagic and coastal ecosystems; observations of Hg species, and nutrients from coastal sediments in the northeastern U.S.; and an analysis of fish Hg concentrations in estuaries under different nutrient loadings. These case studies suggest that changes in nutrient loading can impact Hg dynamics in coastal and open ocean ecosystems. Unfortunately none of the case studies is comprehensive; each only addresses a portion of the conceptual model and has limitations. Nevertheless, our conceptual model has important management implications. Many estuaries near developed areas are impaired due to elevated nutrient inputs. Widespread efforts are underway to control N loading and restore coastal ecosystem function. An unintended consequence of nutrient control measures could be to exacerbate problems associated with Hg

  11. Behavioral and chemical ecology of marine organisms with respect to tetrodotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Becky L

    2010-02-26

    The behavioral and chemical ecology of marine organisms that possess tetrodotoxin (TTX) has not been comprehensively reviewed in one work to date. The evidence for TTX as an antipredator defense, as venom, as a sex pheromone, and as an attractant for TTX-sequestering organisms is discussed. Little is known about the adaptive value of TTX in microbial producers; thus, I focus on what is known about metazoans that are purported to accumulate TTX through diet or symbioses. Much of what has been proposed is inferred based on the anatomical distribution of TTX. Direct empirical tests of these hypotheses are absent in most cases.

  12. Ceramic membrane as a pretreatment for reverse osmosis: Interaction between marine organic matter and metal oxides

    KAUST Repository

    Dramas, Laure

    2013-02-01

    Scaling and (bio)fouling phenomena can severely alter the performance of the reverse osmosis process during desalination of seawater. Pretreatments must be applied to efficiently remove particles, colloids, and also precursors of the organic fouling and biofouling. Ceramic membranes offer a lot of advantages for micro and ultrafiltration pretreatments because their initial properties can be recovered using more severe cleaning procedure. The study focuses on the interaction between metal oxides and marine organic matter. Experiments were performed at laboratory scale. The first series of experiments focus on the filtration of different fractions of natural organic matter and model compounds solutions on flat disk ceramic membranes (47 mm of diameter) characterized with different pore size and composition. Direct filtration experiments were conducted at 0.7 bar or 2 bars and at room temperature (20 ± 0.5 °C). The efficiency of backflush and alkaline cleaning were eval, and titanium oxides. Each metal oxide corresponds to a specific pore size for the disk ceramic membranes: 80, 60, and 30 nm. Different sizes of metal oxide particles are used to measure the impact of the surface area on the adsorption of the organic matter. Seawaters from the Arabian Gulf and from the Red Sea were collected during algal blooms. Cultures of algae were also performed in the laboratory and in cooperation with woods hole oceanographic institute. Solutions of algal exudates were obtained after a couple of weeks of cultivation followed by sonication. Solutions were successively filtered through GFF (0.7 lm) and 0.45 lm membrane filters before use. The dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration of final solution was between 1 and 4 mg/L and showed strong hydrophilic character. These various solutions were prepared with the objective to mimic the dissolved organic matter composition of seawater subjected to algal bloom. Characterization of the solutions of filtration experiments (feed

  13. The use of potassium hydroxide (KOH) solution as a suitable approach to isolate plastics ingested by marine organisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kühn, Susanne; Werven, Van Bernike; Oyen, Van Albert; Meijboom, André; Bravo Rebolledo, Elisa L.; Franeker, Van Jan A.

    2017-01-01

    In studies of plastic ingestion by marine wildlife, visual separation of plastic particles from gastrointestinal tracts or their dietary content can be challenging. Earlier studies have used solutions to dissolve organic materials leaving synthetic particles unaffected. However, insufficient tests h

  14. The use of potassium hydroxide (KOH) solution as a suitable approach to isolate plastics ingested by marine organisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kühn, Susanne; Werven, Van Bernike; Oyen, Van Albert; Meijboom, André; Bravo Rebolledo, Elisa L.; Franeker, Van Jan A.

    2017-01-01

    In studies of plastic ingestion by marine wildlife, visual separation of plastic particles from gastrointestinal tracts or their dietary content can be challenging. Earlier studies have used solutions to dissolve organic materials leaving synthetic particles unaffected. However, insufficient tests h

  15. Modelling light and photosynthesis in the marine environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Woźniak

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The overriding and far-reaching aim of our work has been to achieve a good understanding of the processes of light interaction with phytoplankton in the sea and to develop an innovative physical model of photosynthesis in the marine environment, suitable for the remote sensin gof marine primary production. Unlike previous models, the present one takesgreater account of the complexity of the physiological processes in phytoplankton. We have focused in particular on photophysiological processes, which are governed directly or indirectly by light energy, or in which light, besides the nutrient content in and the temperature of seawater, is one of the principal limiting factors.    To achieve this aim we have carried out comprehensive statistical analyses of the natural variability of the main photophysiological properties of phytoplankton and their links with the principal abiotic factors in the sea. These analyses have made use of extensive empirical data gathered in a wide diversity of seas and oceans by Polish and Russian teams as well as by joint Polish-Russian expeditions. Data sets available on the Internet have also been applied. As a result, a set of more or less complex, semi-empirical models of light-stimulated processes occurring in marine phytoplankton cells has been developed. The trophic type of sea, photo-acclimation and the production of photoprotecting carotenoids, chromatic acclimation and the production of various forms of chlorophyll-antennas and photosynthetic carotenoids, cell adaptation by the package effect, light absorption, photosynthesis, photoinhibition, the fluorescence effect, and the activation of PS2 centres are all considered in the models. These take into account not only the influence of light, but also, indirectly, that of the vertical mixing of water; in the case of photosynthesis, the quantum yield has been also formulated as being dependent on the nutrient concentrations and the temperature of seawater

  16. Effects of organic matter addition on methylmercury formation in capped and uncapped marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndungu, Kuria; Schaanning, Morten; Braaten, Hans Fredrik Veiteberg

    2016-10-15

    In situ subaqueous capping (ISC) of contaminated marine sediments is frequently proposed as a feasible and effective mitigation option. However, though effective in isolating mercury species migration into overlying water, capping can also alter the location and extent of biogeochemical zones and potentially enhance methylmercury (MeHg) formation in Hg-contaminated marine sediments. We carried out a boxcosm study to investigate whether the addition of organic carbon (OC) to Hg-contaminated marine sediments beneath an in situ cap would initiate and/or enhance MeHg formation of the inorganic Hg present. The study was motivated by ongoing efforts to remediate ca. 30,000 m(2) of Hg-contaminated seabed sediments from a Hg spill from the U864 WWII submarine wreck. By the time of sinking, the submarine is assumed to have been holding a cargo of ca. 65 tons of liquid Hg. Natural organic matter and petroleum hydrocarbons from fuels and lubricants in the wreck are potential sources of organic carbon that could potentially fuel MeHg formation beneath a future cap. The results of our study clearly demonstrated that introduction of algae OC to Hg-contaminated sediments, triggered high rates of MeHg production as long a there was sufficient OC. Thus, MeHg production was limited by the amount of organic carbon available. The study results also confirmed that, within the six-month duration of the study and in the absence of bioturbating fauna, a 3-cm sediment clay cap could effectively reduce fluxes of Hg species to the overlying water and isolate the Hg-contaminated sediments from direct surficial deposition of organic matter that could potentially fuel methylation.

  17. The Marine Virtual Laboratory: enabling efficient ocean model configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. R. Oke

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The technical steps involved in configuring a regional ocean model are analogous for all community models. All require the generation of a model grid, preparation and interpolation of topography, initial conditions, and forcing fields. Each task in configuring a regional ocean model is straight-forward – but the process of downloading and reformatting data can be time-consuming. For an experienced modeller, the configuration of a new model domain can take as little as a few hours – but for an inexperienced modeller, it can take much longer. In pursuit of technical efficiency, the Australian ocean modelling community has developed the Web-based MARine Virtual Laboratory (WebMARVL. WebMARVL allows a user to quickly and easily configure an ocean general circulation or wave model through a simple interface, reducing the time to configure a regional model to a few minutes. Through WebMARVL, a user is prompted to define the basic options needed for a model configuration, including the: model, run duration, spatial extent, and input data. Once all aspects of the configuration are selected, a series of data extraction, reprocessing, and repackaging services are run, and a "take-away bundle" is prepared for download. Building on the capabilities developed under Australia's Integrated Marine Observing System, WebMARVL also extracts all of the available observations for the chosen time-space domain. The user is able to download the take-away bundle, and use it to run the model of their choice. Models supported by WebMARVL include three community ocean general circulation models, and two community wave models. The model configuration from the take-away bundle is intended to be a starting point for scientific research. The user may subsequently refine the details of the model set-up to improve the model performance for the given application. In this study, WebMARVL is described along with a series of results from test cases comparing Web

  18. Biochemical features and kinetic properties of α-amylases from marine organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homaei, Ahmad; Ghanbarzadeh, Mehri; Monsef, Ferial

    2016-02-01

    Marine organisms have the ability of producing enzymes with unique properties compared to those of the same enzymes from terrestrial organisms. α-Amylases are among the most important extracellular enzymes found in various groups of organisms such as plants, animals and microorganisms. They play important roles in their carbohydrates metabolism of each organism. Microbial production of α-amylases is more effective than other sources of the enzyme. Many microorganisms are known to produce α-amylase including bacteria, yeasts, fungi and actinomycetes. However, enzymes from fungal and bacterial sources have dominated applications in industrial sectors. This review deals with what is known about the kinetics, biochemical properties and applications of these enzymes that have only been found in them and not in other α-amylases, and discussing their mechanistic and regulatory implications.

  19. Macromolecular composition of terrestrial and marine organic matter in sediments across the East Siberian Arctic Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparkes, Robert B.; Doğrul Selver, Ayça; Gustafsson, Örjan; Semiletov, Igor P.; Haghipour, Negar; Wacker, Lukas; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Talbot, Helen M.; van Dongen, Bart E.

    2016-10-01

    Mobilisation of terrestrial organic carbon (terrOC) from permafrost environments in eastern Siberia has the potential to deliver significant amounts of carbon to the Arctic Ocean, via both fluvial and coastal erosion. Eroded terrOC can be degraded during offshore transport or deposited across the wide East Siberian Arctic Shelf (ESAS). Most studies of terrOC on the ESAS have concentrated on solvent-extractable organic matter, but this represents only a small proportion of the total terrOC load. In this study we have used pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (py-GCMS) to study all major groups of macromolecular components of the terrOC; this is the first time that this technique has been applied to the ESAS. This has shown that there is a strong offshore trend from terrestrial phenols, aromatics and cyclopentenones to marine pyridines. There is good agreement between proportion phenols measured using py-GCMS and independent quantification of lignin phenol concentrations (r2 = 0.67, p < 0.01, n = 24). Furfurals, thought to represent carbohydrates, show no offshore trend and are likely found in both marine and terrestrial organic matter. We have also collected new radiocarbon data for bulk OC (14COC) which, when coupled with previous measurements, allows us to produce the most comprehensive 14COC map of the ESAS to date. Combining the 14COC and py-GCMS data suggests that the aromatics group of compounds is likely sourced from old, aged terrOC, in contrast to the phenols group, which is likely sourced from modern woody material. We propose that an index of the relative proportions of phenols and pyridines can be used as a novel terrestrial vs. marine proxy measurement for macromolecular organic matter. Principal component analysis found that various terrestrial vs. marine proxies show different patterns across the ESAS, and it shows that multiple river-ocean transects of surface sediments transition from river-dominated to coastal-erosion-dominated to marine

  20. Utilization of isolated marine mussel cells as an in vitro model to assess xenobiotics induced genotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y F; Chen, S Y; Qu, M J; Adeleye, A O; Di, Y N

    2017-10-01

    Freshly isolated cells are used as an ideal experimental model in in vitro toxicology analysis, especially the detection of diverse xenobiotics induced genotoxic effects. In present study, heavy metals (Zn, Cu, Cd, Pb) and PCBs were selected as representative xenobiotics to verify the ability of in vitro model in assessing genotoxic effects in cells of marine mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis). DNA damage and chromosome aberration were assessed in freshly isolated cells from haemolymph, gill and digestive gland by single cell gel electrophoresis and micronucleus assay respectively. Gill cells showed more sensitive to Zn exposure among three types of cells, indicating tissue-specific genotoxicity. Significantly higher DNA aberrations were induced by Cu in haemocytes compared to Cd and Pb, indicating chemical-specific genotoxicity. An additive effect was detected after combined heavy metals and PCBs exposure, suggesting the interaction of selected xenobiotics. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt to study the complex effects of organic and/or inorganic contaminants using freshly isolated cells from marine mussels. Genetic responses are proved to occur and maintained in vitro in relation to short-term xenobiotics induced stresses. The utilization of the in vitro model could provide a rapid tool to investigate the comprehensive toxic effects in marine invertebrates and monitor environmental health. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Complete modeling for systems of a marine diesel engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahim, Hassan Moussa; Younes, Rafic; Nohra, Chadi; Ouladsine, Mustapha

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a simulator model of a marine diesel engine based on physical, semi-physical, mathematical and thermodynamic equations, which allows fast predictive simulations. The whole engine system is divided into several functional blocks: cooling, lubrication, air, injection, combustion and emissions. The sub-models and dynamic characteristics of individual blocks are established according to engine working principles equations and experimental data collected from a marine diesel engine test bench for SIMB Company under the reference 6M26SRP1. The overall engine system dynamics is expressed as a set of simultaneous algebraic and differential equations using sub-blocks and S-Functions of Matlab/Simulink. The simulation of this model, implemented on Matlab/Simulink has been validated and can be used to obtain engine performance, pressure, temperature, efficiency, heat release, crank angle, fuel rate, emissions at different sub-blocks. The simulator will be used, in future work, to study the engine performance in faulty conditions, and can be used to assist marine engineers in fault diagnosis and estimation (FDI) as well as designers to predict the behavior of the cooling system, lubrication system, injection system, combustion, emissions, in order to optimize the dimensions of different components. This program is a platform for fault simulator, to investigate the impact on sub-blocks engine's output of changing values for faults parameters such as: faulty fuel injector, leaky cylinder, worn fuel pump, broken piston rings, a dirty turbocharger, dirty air filter, dirty air cooler, air leakage, water leakage, oil leakage and contamination, fouling of heat exchanger, pumps wear, failure of injectors (and many others).

  2. Complete Modeling for Systems of a Marine Diesel Engine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hassan Moussa Nahim; Rafic Younes; Chadi Nohra; Mustapha Ouladsine

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a simulator model of a marine diesel engine based on physical, semi-physical, mathematical and thermodynamic equations, which allows fast predictive simulations. The whole engine system is divided into several functional blocks: cooling, lubrication, air, injection, combustion and emissions. The sub-models and dynamic characteristics of individual blocks are established according to engine working principles equations and experimental data collected from a marine diesel engine test bench for SIMB Company under the reference 6M26SRP1. The overall engine system dynamics is expressed as a set of simultaneous algebraic and differential equations using sub-blocks and S-Functions of Matlab/Simulink. The simulation of this model, implemented on Matlab/Simulink has been validated and can be used to obtain engine performance, pressure, temperature, efficiency, heat release, crank angle, fuel rate, emissions at different sub-blocks. The simulator will be used, in future work, to study the engine performance in faulty conditions, and can be used to assist marine engineers in fault diagnosis and estimation (FDI) as well as designers to predict the behavior of the cooling system, lubrication system, injection system, combustion, emissions, in order to optimize the dimensions of different components. This program is a platform for fault simulator, to investigate the impact on sub-blocks engine’s output of changing values for faults parameters such as: faulty fuel injector, leaky cylinder, worn fuel pump, broken piston rings, a dirty turbocharger, dirty air filter, dirty air cooler, air leakage, water leakage, oil leakage and contamination, fouling of heat exchanger, pumps wear, failure of injectors (and many others).

  3. Comparison of Bioavailability and Biotransformation of Inorganic and Organic Arsenic to Two Marine Fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Wang, Wen-Xiong; Zhang, Li

    2016-03-01

    Dietary uptake could be the primary route of arsenic (As) bioaccumulation in marine fish, but the bioavailability of inorganic and organic As remains elusive. In this study, we investigated the trophic transfer and bioavailability of As in herbivorous rabbitfish Siganus fuscescens and carnivorous seabass Lateolabrax japonicus. Rabbitfish were fed with one artificial diet or three macroalgae, whereas seabass were fed with one artificial diet, one polychaete, or two bivalves for 28 days. The six spiked fresh prey diets contained different proportions of inorganic As [As(III) and As(V)] and organic As compounds [methylarsenate (MMA), dimethylarsenate (DMA), and arsenobetaine (AsB)], and the spiked artificial diet mainly contained As(III) or As(V). We demonstrated that the trophic transfer factors (TTF) of As in both fish were negatively correlated with the concentrations of inorganic As in the diets, while there was no relationship between TTF and the AsB concentrations in the diets. Positive correlation was observed between the accumulated As concentrations and the AsB concentrations in both fish, suggesting that organic As compounds (AsB) were more trophically available than inorganic As. Furthermore, the biotransformation ability of seabass was higher than that in rabbitfish, which resulted in higher As accumulation in seabass than in rabbitfish. Our study demonstrated that different prey with different inorganic/organic As proportions resulted in diverse bioaccumulation of total As in different marine fish.

  4. Kinematic Models for Manoeuvring and Seakeeping of Marine Vessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tristan Perez

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The motion of marine vessels has traditionally been studied using two different approaches: manoeuvring and seakeeping. These two approaches use different reference frames and coordinate systems to describe the motion. This paper derives the kinematic models that characterize the transformation of motion variables (position, velocity, accelerations and forces between the different coordinate systems used in these theories. The derivations hereby presented are done in terms of the formalism adopted in robotics. The advantage of this formulation is the use of matrix notation and operations. As an application, the transformation of linear equations of motion used in seakeeping into body-fixed coordinates is considered for both zero and forward speed.

  5. Effects of pharmaceuticals and personal care products on marine organisms: from single-species studies to an ecosystem-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prichard, Emma; Granek, Elise F

    2016-11-01

    Pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) are contaminants of emerging concern that are increasing in use and have demonstrated negative effects on aquatic organisms. There is a growing body of literature reporting the effects of PPCPs on freshwater organisms, but studies on the effects of PPCPs to marine and estuarine organisms are limited. Among effect studies, the vast majority examines subcellular or cellular effects, with far fewer studies examining organismal- and community-level effects. We reviewed the current published literature on marine and estuarine algae, invertebrates, fish, and mammals exposed to PPCPs, in order to expand upon current reviews. This paper builds on previous reviews of PPCP contamination in marine environments, filling prior literature gaps and adding consideration of ecosystem function and level of knowledge across marine habitat types. Finally, we reviewed and compiled data gaps suggested by current researchers and reviewers and propose a multi-level model to expand the focus of current PPCP research beyond laboratory studies. This model includes examination of direct ecological effects including food web and disease dynamics, biodiversity, community composition, and other ecosystem-level indicators of contaminant-driven change.

  6. A new laboratory radio frequency identification (RFID) system for behavioural tracking of marine organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguzzi, Jacopo; Sbragaglia, Valerio; Sarriá, David; García, José Antonio; Costa, Corrado; del Río, Joaquín; Mànuel, Antoni; Menesatti, Paolo; Sardà, Francesc

    2011-01-01

    Radio frequency identification (RFID) devices are currently used to quantify several traits of animal behaviour with potential applications for the study of marine organisms. To date, behavioural studies with marine organisms are rare because of the technical difficulty of propagating radio waves within the saltwater medium. We present a novel RFID tracking system to study the burrowing behaviour of a valuable fishery resource, the Norway lobster (Nephrops norvegicus L.). The system consists of a network of six controllers, each handling a group of seven antennas. That network was placed below a microcosm tank that recreated important features typical of Nephrops' grounds, such as the presence of multiple burrows. The animals carried a passive transponder attached to their telson, operating at 13.56 MHz. The tracking system was implemented to concurrently report the behaviour of up to three individuals, in terms of their travelled distances in a specified unit of time and their preferential positioning within the antenna network. To do so, the controllers worked in parallel to send the antenna data to a computer via a USB connection. The tracking accuracy of the system was evaluated by concurrently recording the animals' behaviour with automated video imaging. During the two experiments, each lasting approximately one week, two different groups of three animals each showed a variable burrow occupancy and a nocturnal displacement under a standard photoperiod regime (12 h light:12 h dark), measured using the RFID method. Similar results were obtained with the video imaging. Our implemented RFID system was therefore capable of efficiently tracking the tested organisms and has a good potential for use on a wide variety of other marine organisms of commercial, aquaculture, and ecological interest.

  7. Redox effects on the microbial degradation of refractory organic matter in marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimers, Clare E.; Alleau, Yvan; Bauer, James E.; Delaney, Jennifer; Girguis, Peter R.; Schrader, Paul S.; Stecher, Hilmar A.

    2013-11-01

    Microbially mediated reduction-oxidation (redox) reactions are often invoked as being the mechanisms by which redox state influences the degradation of sedimentary organic matter (OM) in the marine environment. To evaluate the effects of elevated, oscillating and reduced redox potentials on the fate of primarily aged, mineral-adsorbed OM contained in continental shelf sediments, we used microbial fuel cells to control redox state within and around marine sediments, without amending the sediments with reducing or oxidizing substances. We subsequently followed electron fluxes in the redox elevated and redox oscillating treatments, and related sediment chemical, isotopic and bacterial community changes to redox conditions over a 748-day experimental period. The electron fluxes of the elevated and oscillating redox cells were consistent with models of organic carbon (OC) oxidation with time-dependent first-order rate constants declining from 0.023 to 0.005 y-1, in agreement with rate constants derived from typical OC profiles and down core ages of offshore sediments, or from sulfate reduction rate measurements in similar sediments. Moreover, although cumulative electron fluxes were higher in the continuously elevated redox treatment, incremental rates of electron harvesting in the two treatments converged over the 2 year experiment. These similar rates were reflected in chemical indicators of OM metabolism such as dissolved OC and ammonia, and particulate OC concentrations, which were not significantly different among all treatments and controls over the experimental time-scale. In contrast, products of carbonate and opal dissolution and metal mobilization showed greater enrichments in sediments with elevated and oscillating redox states. Microbial community composition in anode biofilms and surrounding sediments was assessed via high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and these analyses revealed that the elevated and oscillatory redox treatments led to the

  8. Reconstruction of late Quaternary marine and terrestrial environmental conditions of Northwest Africa and Southeast Australia : a multiple organic proxy study using marine sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alfama Lopes dos Santos, R.

    2012-01-01

    NW Africa and SE Australia are regions which are particularly vulnerable to climate change. In this thesis, organic proxies are used from marine sediment cores to reconstruct past environmental conditions from these areas. In sediments from NW Africa, the UK'37 showed an efficient proxy for sea sur

  9. Middle Atlantic Bight Marine Ecosystem: A Regional Forecast Model Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H.; Coles, V. J.; Garraffo, Z. D.

    2011-12-01

    Changes in basin scale climate patterns can drive changes in mesoscale physical oceanographic processes and subsequent alterations of ecosystem states. Climatic variability can be induced in the northeastern shelfbreak large marine ecosystem by climate oscillations, such as North Atlantic Oscillation, Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation; and long-term trends, such as a warming pattern. Short term variability can be induced by changes in the water masses in the northern and southern boundaries, by Gulf Stream path and transport variations, and by local mesoscale and submesoscale features. A coupled bio-physical model (HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model) is being used to forecast the evolution of the frontal and current systems of the shelf and Gulf Stream, and subsequent changes in thermal conditions and ecosystem structure over the Middle Atlantic Bight (MAB). This study aims to forecast the ocean state and nutrients in the MAB, and to investigate how cross-shelf exchanges of different water masses could affect nutrient budgets, primary and secondary production, and fish populations in coastal and shelf marine ecosystems. Preliminary results are shown for a regional MAB model nested to the global 1/12o HYCOM run at NOAA/NCEP/EMC using Naval Oceanographic Office (NAVO) daily initialization. Elements of this simulation are nutrient influx condition at the northern and southern boundaries through regression to ocean thermodynamic variables, and nutrient input at the river mouths.

  10. Marine Mammal Brucella Reference Strains Are Attenuated in a BALB/c Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nymo, Ingebjørg H; Arias, Maykel A; Pardo, Julián; Álvarez, María Pilar; Alcaraz, Ana; Godfroid, Jacques; Jiménez de Bagüés, María Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonosis of worldwide distribution with numerous animal host species. Since the novel isolation of Brucella spp. from marine mammals in 1994 the bacteria have been isolated from various marine mammal hosts. The marine mammal reference strains Brucella pinnipedialis 12890 (harbour seal, Phoca vitulina) and Brucella ceti 12891 (harbour porpoise, Phocoena phocoena) were included in genus Brucella in 2007, however, their pathogenicity in the mouse model is pending. Herein this is evaluated in BALB/c mice with Brucella suis 1330 as a control. Both marine mammal strains were attenuated, however, B. ceti was present at higher levels than B. pinnipedialis in blood, spleen and liver throughout the infection, in addition B. suis and B. ceti were isolated from brains and faeces at times with high levels of bacteraemia. In B. suis-infected mice serum cytokines peaked at day 7. In B. pinnipedialis-infected mice, levels were similar, but peaked predominantly at day 3 and an earlier peak in spleen weight likewise implied an earlier response. The inflammatory response induced pathology in the spleen and liver. In B. ceti-infected mice, most serum cytokine levels were comparable to those in uninfected mice, consistent with a limited inflammatory response, which also was indicated by restricted spleen and liver pathology. Specific immune responses against all three strains were detected in vitro after stimulation of splenocytes from infected mice with the homologous heat-killed brucellae. Antibody responses in vivo were also induced by the three brucellae. The immunological pattern of B. ceti in combination with persistence in organs and limited pathology has heretofore not been described for other brucellae. These two marine mammal wildtype strains show an attenuated pattern in BALB/c mice only previously described for Brucella neotomea.

  11. Marine Mammal Brucella Reference Strains Are Attenuated in a BALB/c Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nymo, Ingebjørg H.; Arias, Maykel A.; Pardo, Julián; Álvarez, María Pilar; Alcaraz, Ana; Godfroid, Jacques; Jiménez de Bagüés, María Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonosis of worldwide distribution with numerous animal host species. Since the novel isolation of Brucella spp. from marine mammals in 1994 the bacteria have been isolated from various marine mammal hosts. The marine mammal reference strains Brucella pinnipedialis 12890 (harbour seal, Phoca vitulina) and Brucella ceti 12891 (harbour porpoise, Phocoena phocoena) were included in genus Brucella in 2007, however, their pathogenicity in the mouse model is pending. Herein this is evaluated in BALB/c mice with Brucella suis 1330 as a control. Both marine mammal strains were attenuated, however, B. ceti was present at higher levels than B. pinnipedialis in blood, spleen and liver throughout the infection, in addition B. suis and B. ceti were isolated from brains and faeces at times with high levels of bacteraemia. In B. suis-infected mice serum cytokines peaked at day 7. In B. pinnipedialis-infected mice, levels were similar, but peaked predominantly at day 3 and an earlier peak in spleen weight likewise implied an earlier response. The inflammatory response induced pathology in the spleen and liver. In B. ceti-infected mice, most serum cytokine levels were comparable to those in uninfected mice, consistent with a limited inflammatory response, which also was indicated by restricted spleen and liver pathology. Specific immune responses against all three strains were detected in vitro after stimulation of splenocytes from infected mice with the homologous heat-killed brucellae. Antibody responses in vivo were also induced by the three brucellae. The immunological pattern of B. ceti in combination with persistence in organs and limited pathology has heretofore not been described for other brucellae. These two marine mammal wildtype strains show an attenuated pattern in BALB/c mice only previously described for Brucella neotomea. PMID:26959235

  12. Boundary layer models for calving marine outlet glaciers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Schoof

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We consider the flow of marine-terminating outlet glaciers that are laterally confined in a channel of prescribed width. In that case, the drag exerted by the channel side walls on a floating ice shelf can reduce extensional stress at the grounding line. If ice flux through the grounding line increases with both ice thickness and extensional stress, then a longer shelf can reduce ice flux by decreasing extensional stress. Consequently, calving has an effect on flux through the grounding line by regulating the length of the shelf. In the absence of a shelf, it plays a similar role by controlling the above-flotation height of the calving cliff. Using two calving laws, one due to Nick et al. (2010 based on a model for crevasse propagation due to hydrofracture and the other simply asserting that calving occurs where the glacier ice becomes afloat, we pose and analyse a flowline model for a marine-terminating glacier by two methods: direct numerical solution and matched asymptotic expansions. The latter leads to a boundary layer formulation that predicts flux through the grounding line as a function of depth to bedrock, channel width, basal drag coefficient, and a calving parameter. By contrast with unbuttressed marine ice sheets, we find that flux can decrease with increasing depth to bedrock at the grounding line, reversing the usual stability criterion for steady grounding line location. Stable steady states can then have grounding lines located on retrograde slopes. We show how this anomalous behaviour relates to the strength of lateral versus basal drag on the grounded portion of the glacier and to the specifics of the calving law used.

  13. Perspective on the Use of Sulfated Polysaccharides from Marine Organisms as a Source of New Antithrombotic Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo A. S. Mourão

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Thromboembolic diseases are increasing worldwide and always require anticoagulant therapy. We still need safer and more secure antithrombotic drugs than those presently available. Sulfated polysaccharides from marine organisms may constitute a new source for the development of such drugs. Investigation of these compounds usually attempts to reproduce the therapeutic effects of heparin. However, we may need to follow different routes, focusing particularly in the following aspects: (1 defining precisely the specific structures required for interaction of these sulfated polysaccharides with proteins of the coagulation system; (2 looking for alternative mechanisms of action, distinct from those of heparin; (3 identifying side effects (mostly pro-coagulant action and hypotension rather than bleeding and preparing derivatives that retain the desired antithrombotic action but are devoid of side effects; (4 considering that sulfated polysaccharides with low anticoagulant action on in vitro assays may display potent effects on animal models of experimental thrombosis; and finally (5 investigating the antithrombotic effect of these sulfated polysaccharides after oral administration or preparing derivatives that may achieve this effect. If these aspects are successfully addressed, sulfated polysaccharides from marine organisms may conquer the frontier of antithrombotic therapy and open new avenues for treatment or prevention of thromboembolic diseases.

  14. Perspective on the Use of Sulfated Polysaccharides from Marine Organisms as a Source of New Antithrombotic Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourão, Paulo A. S.

    2015-01-01

    Thromboembolic diseases are increasing worldwide and always require anticoagulant therapy. We still need safer and more secure antithrombotic drugs than those presently available. Sulfated polysaccharides from marine organisms may constitute a new source for the development of such drugs. Investigation of these compounds usually attempts to reproduce the therapeutic effects of heparin. However, we may need to follow different routes, focusing particularly in the following aspects: (1) defining precisely the specific structures required for interaction of these sulfated polysaccharides with proteins of the coagulation system; (2) looking for alternative mechanisms of action, distinct from those of heparin; (3) identifying side effects (mostly pro-coagulant action and hypotension rather than bleeding) and preparing derivatives that retain the desired antithrombotic action but are devoid of side effects; (4) considering that sulfated polysaccharides with low anticoagulant action on in vitro assays may display potent effects on animal models of experimental thrombosis; and finally (5) investigating the antithrombotic effect of these sulfated polysaccharides after oral administration or preparing derivatives that may achieve this effect. If these aspects are successfully addressed, sulfated polysaccharides from marine organisms may conquer the frontier of antithrombotic therapy and open new avenues for treatment or prevention of thromboembolic diseases. PMID:25955754

  15. A dichotomy in primary marine organic aerosol-cloud-climate system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceburnis, D.; Ovadnevaite, J.; Martucci, G.; Bialek, J.; Monahan, C.; Rinaldi, M.; Facchini, C.; Berresheim, H.; Worsnop, D. R.; O'Dowd, C.

    2011-12-01

    D. Ceburnis1, J. Ovadnevaite1, G. Martucci1, J. Bialek1, C. Monahan1, M. Rinaldi2, M. C. Facchini2, H. Berresheim1, D. R. Worsnop3,4 and C. D. O'Dowd1 1School of Physics & Centre for Climate and Air Pollution Studies, National University of Ireland Galway, University Road, Galway, Ireland 2Institute of Atmospheric Sciences and Climate, National Research Council, Bologna, 20129, Italy. 3 Aerodyne Research, Inc., 45 Manning Road, Billerica, MA 01821-3976, USA 4 Physics Department, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 64, 00014, Helsinki, Finland Organic matter has been observed to significantly contribute to particulate matter in every environment including pristine remote oceans. A significant if not dominant contribution of insoluble organic matter to marine aerosol has been proved to be of biogenic origin1,2. High time resolution measurements of marine organic matter have demonstrated a dynamic system with regular organic matter plume events occurring during summer3 as well as frequent open ocean particle formation events4. High-time resolution measurements of primary marine organic sea-spray physico-chemical properties reveal an apparent dichotomous behavior in terms of water uptake: specifically sea-spray aerosol enriched in organic matter possesses a low hygroscopic Growth Factor (GF~1.25) while simultaneously having a cloud condensation nucleus/condensation nuclei (CCN/CN) activation efficiency of between 83% at 0.25% supersaturation and 100% at 0.75%5. Simultaneous retrieval of Cloud Droplet Number Concentration (CDNC) during primary organic aerosol plumes reveal CDNC concentrations of 350 cm-3 in newly formed marine stratocumulus cloud for boundary layer organic mass concentrations of 3-4 ug m-36. It is suggested that marine hydrogels are responsible for this dichotomous behavior which has profound impacts to aerosol-cloud-climate system along with a better understood process analysis of aerosol formation by sea-spray7. A hydrophobic character of organic matter

  16. Modeling of Unsteady Sheet Cavitation on Marine Propeller Blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spyros A. Kinnas

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Unsteady sheet cavitation is very common on marine propulsor blades. The authors summarize a lifting-surface and a surface-panel model to solve for the unsteady cavitating flow around a propeller that is subject to nonaxisymmetric inflow. The time-dependent extent and thickness of the cavity were determined by using an iterative method. The cavity detachment was determined by applying the smooth detachment criterion in an iterative manner. A nonzeroradius developed vortex cavity model was utilized at the tip of the blade, and the trailing wake geometry was determined using a fully unsteady wake-alignment process. Comparisons of predictions by the two models and measurements from several experiments are given.

  17. Quantitative analysis of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) in marine sediments: A modeling perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regnier, P.; Dale, A. W.; Arndt, S.; LaRowe, D. E.; Mogollón, J.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2011-05-01

    Recent developments in the quantitative modeling of methane dynamics and anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) in marine sediments are critically reviewed. The first part of the review begins with a comparison of alternative kinetic models for AOM. The roles of bioenergetic limitations, intermediate compounds and biomass growth are highlighted. Next, the key transport mechanisms in multi-phase sedimentary environments affecting AOM and methane fluxes are briefly treated, while attention is also given to additional controls on methane and sulfate turnover, including organic matter mineralization, sulfur cycling and methane phase transitions. In the second part of the review, the structure, forcing functions and parameterization of published models of AOM in sediments are analyzed. The six-orders-of-magnitude range in rate constants reported for the widely used bimolecular rate law for AOM emphasizes the limited transferability of this simple kinetic model and, hence, the need for more comprehensive descriptions of the AOM reaction system. The derivation and implementation of more complete reaction models, however, are limited by the availability of observational data. In this context, we attempt to rank the relative benefits of potential experimental measurements that should help to better constrain AOM models. The last part of the review presents a compilation of reported depth-integrated AOM rates (ΣAOM). These rates reveal the extreme variability of ΣAOM in marine sediments. The model results are further used to derive quantitative relationships between ΣAOM and the magnitude of externally impressed fluid flow, as well as between ΣAOM and the depth of the sulfate-methane transition zone (SMTZ). This review contributes to an improved understanding of the global significance of the AOM process, and helps identify outstanding questions and future directions in the modeling of methane cycling and AOM in marine sediments.

  18. Black Carbon in Marine Dissolved Organic Carbon: Abundance and Radiocarbon Measurements in the Global Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppola, A. I.; Walker, B. D.; Druffel, E. R. M.

    2014-12-01

    Compound specific radiocarbon analysis is a powerful tool for understanding the cycling of individual components, such as black carbon (BC) produced from biomass burning and fossil fuel combustion, within bulk pools, like the marine dissolved organic carbon pool. Here, we use a solid phase extraction method and a wide range of solvent polarities to concentrate dissolved organic carbon from seawater. Then we isolate BC in sufficient quantities for radiocarbon analysis. We report the radiocarbon age of BC, concentrations and its relative structure, from coastal and open ocean surface samples. We will discuss our progress towards measuring these quantities in dissolved organic carbon collected from the Pacific and Atlantic oceans to understand the fate, transformation and cycling of BC in the world ocean. These measurements are paired with bulk DOC Δ14C profiles, providing insight into the role of BC as a missing sink in the ultra-refractory DOC pool.

  19. Marines in the Boxer Rebellion as a Model for Current Marine Corps Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-10

    Security Group ....................................................................... 45 Marine Corps Operations during the Cold War ...47 vii Post- Cold War Operations...naval gun crews in most of the major naval battles of the war .17 After the Civil War , the Marine Corps returned to Asia in support of national

  20. Dissolved organic matter in sea spray: a transfer study from marine surface water to aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt-Kopplin, P.; Liger-Belair, G.; Koch, B. P.; Flerus, R.; Kattner, G.; Harir, M.; Kanawati, B.; Lucio, M.; Tziotis, D.; Hertkorn, N.; Gebefügi, I.

    2012-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosols impose direct and indirect effects on the climate system, for example, by absorption of radiation in relation to cloud droplets size, on chemical and organic composition and cloud dynamics. The first step in the formation of Organic primary aerosols, i.e. the transfer of dissolved organic matter from the marine surface into the atmosphere, was studied. We present a molecular level description of this phenomenon using the high resolution analytical tools of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). Our experiments confirm the chemoselective transfer of natural organic molecules, especially of aliphatic compounds from the surface water into the atmosphere via bubble bursting processes. Transfer from marine surface water to the atmosphere involves a chemical gradient governed by the physicochemical properties of the involved molecules when comparing elemental compositions and differentiating CHO, CHNO, CHOS and CHNOS bearing compounds. Typical chemical fingerprints of compounds enriched in the aerosol phase were CHO and CHOS molecular series, smaller molecules of higher aliphaticity and lower oxygen content, and typical surfactants. A non-targeted metabolomics analysis demonstrated that many of these molecules corresponded to homologous series of oxo-, hydroxy-, methoxy-, branched fatty acids and mono-, di- and tricarboxylic acids as well as monoterpenes and sugars. These surface active biomolecules were preferentially transferred from surface water into the atmosphere via bubble bursting processes to form a significant fraction of primary organic aerosols. This way of sea spray production leaves a selective biological signature of the surface water in the corresponding aerosol that may be transported into higher altitudes up to the lower atmosphere, thus contributing to the formation of secondary organic aerosol on a global scale or transported laterally with

  1. Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter across a Marine Distributed Biological Observatory in the Pacific Arctic Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, S. L.; Frey, K. E.; Shake, K. L.; Cooper, L. W.; Grebmeier, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) plays an important role in marine ecosystems as both a carbon source for the microbial food web (and thus a source of CO2 to the atmosphere) and as a light inhibitor in marine environments. The presence of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM; the optically active portion of total DOM) can have significant controlling effects on transmittance of sunlight through the water column and therefore on primary production as well as the heat balance of the upper ocean. However, CDOM is also susceptible to photochemical degradation, which decreases the flux of solar radiation that is absorbed. Knowledge of the current spatial and temporal distribution of CDOM in marine environments is thus critical for understanding how ongoing and future changes in climate may impact these biological, biogeochemical, and physical processes. We describe the quantity and quality of CDOM along five key productive transects across a developing Distributed Biological Observatory (DBO) in the Pacific Arctic region. The samples were collected onboard the CCGS Sir Wilfred Laurier in July 2013 and 2014. Monitoring of the variability of CDOM along transects of high productivity can provide important insights into biological and biogeochemical cycling across the region. Our analyses include overall concentrations of CDOM, as well as proxy information such as molecular weight, lability, and source (i.e., autochthonous vs. allochthonous) of organic matter. We utilize these field observations to compare with satellite-derived CDOM concentrations determined from the Aqua MODIS satellite platform, which ultimately provides a spatially and temporally continuous synoptic view of CDOM concentrations throughout the region. Examining the current relationships among CDOM, sea ice variability, biological productivity, and biogeochemical cycling in the Pacific Arctic region will likely provide key insights for how ecosystems throughout the region will respond in future

  2. Study on the restitution coefficient of original total organic carbon for high mature marine source rocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN Jianzhong; ZHENG Longju; Tenger

    2007-01-01

    On the basis of the results of hydropyrolysis simulations for about 90 different types of immature to mature source rocks selected from about 5 000 marine source rocks in China,along with the natural thermal evolution profiles,the following conclusions were obtained.(1) Total organic carbon (TOC) content of excellent marine source rocks does not change obviously when Ro<0.8% or Ro > 1.3%,and the residual TOC content is decreasing gradually with the maturity increase at 0.8% <Ro< 1.3%.(2) At the high-post mature stage (Ro > 1.3%),the decreased maximums of residual TOC content for the kerogen of sapropel (Ⅰ),Ⅱ1,and Ⅱ are usually 40%,32% and 24%,respectively,and their TOC restitution coefficient is,respectively,1.68,1.48 and 1.32.(3)Both the TOC decreasing amplitude and the restitution coefficient decrease gradually with the decrease of TOC content for the source rocks with low organic matter abundance (usually 0.3% < TOC < 1.0%).The TOC restitution coefficients are,respectively,1.20 and 1.0,when 0.3%<TOC<0.5% and TOC < 0.3%.(4) TOCres.of solid bitumen and shale with high organic matter abundance (TOC > 30%) also require no restitution at the high mature stage.Such kind of TOC restitution is further supported by the coincidence of the decrease of residual TOC with the decreasing of S1 + S2 and the increasing of hydrocarbon quantity during the experimental simulation of hydrocarbon generation and expulsion for marine source rocks (0.3%<TOC&<30%) in natural thermal evolution profiles.

  3. Impacts of ocean acidification on marine organisms: quantifying sensitivities and interaction with warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeker, Kristy J; Kordas, Rebecca L; Crim, Ryan; Hendriks, Iris E; Ramajo, Laura; Singh, Gerald S; Duarte, Carlos M; Gattuso, Jean-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Ocean acidification represents a threat to marine species worldwide, and forecasting the ecological impacts of acidification is a high priority for science, management, and policy. As research on the topic expands at an exponential rate, a comprehensive understanding of the variability in organisms' responses and corresponding levels of certainty is necessary to forecast the ecological effects. Here, we perform the most comprehensive meta-analysis to date by synthesizing the results of 228 studies examining biological responses to ocean acidification. The results reveal decreased survival, calcification, growth, development and abundance in response to acidification when the broad range of marine organisms is pooled together. However, the magnitude of these responses varies among taxonomic groups, suggesting there is some predictable trait-based variation in sensitivity, despite the investigation of approximately 100 new species in recent research. The results also reveal an enhanced sensitivity of mollusk larvae, but suggest that an enhanced sensitivity of early life history stages is not universal across all taxonomic groups. In addition, the variability in species' responses is enhanced when they are exposed to acidification in multi-species assemblages, suggesting that it is important to consider indirect effects and exercise caution when forecasting abundance patterns from single-species laboratory experiments. Furthermore, the results suggest that other factors, such as nutritional status or source population, could cause substantial variation in organisms' responses. Last, the results highlight a trend towards enhanced sensitivity to acidification when taxa are concurrently exposed to elevated seawater temperature. PMID:23505245

  4. Impacts of ocean acidification on marine organisms: quantifying sensitivities and interaction with warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeker, Kristy J; Kordas, Rebecca L; Crim, Ryan; Hendriks, Iris E; Ramajo, Laura; Singh, Gerald S; Duarte, Carlos M; Gattuso, Jean-Pierre

    2013-06-01

    Ocean acidification represents a threat to marine species worldwide, and forecasting the ecological impacts of acidification is a high priority for science, management, and policy. As research on the topic expands at an exponential rate, a comprehensive understanding of the variability in organisms' responses and corresponding levels of certainty is necessary to forecast the ecological effects. Here, we perform the most comprehensive meta-analysis to date by synthesizing the results of 228 studies examining biological responses to ocean acidification. The results reveal decreased survival, calcification, growth, development and abundance in response to acidification when the broad range of marine organisms is pooled together. However, the magnitude of these responses varies among taxonomic groups, suggesting there is some predictable trait-based variation in sensitivity, despite the investigation of approximately 100 new species in recent research. The results also reveal an enhanced sensitivity of mollusk larvae, but suggest that an enhanced sensitivity of early life history stages is not universal across all taxonomic groups. In addition, the variability in species' responses is enhanced when they are exposed to acidification in multi-species assemblages, suggesting that it is important to consider indirect effects and exercise caution when forecasting abundance patterns from single-species laboratory experiments. Furthermore, the results suggest that other factors, such as nutritional status or source population, could cause substantial variation in organisms' responses. Last, the results highlight a trend towards enhanced sensitivity to acidification when taxa are concurrently exposed to elevated seawater temperature.

  5. Butenolide inhibits marine fouling by altering the primary metabolism of three target organisms

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yifan

    2012-06-15

    Butenolide is a very promising antifouling compound that inhibits ship hull fouling by a variety of marine organisms, but its antifouling mechanism was previously unknown. Here we report the first study of butenolides molecular targets in three representative fouling organisms. In the barnacle Balanus (=Amphibalanus) amphitrite, butenolide bound to acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase 1 (ACAT1), which is involved in ketone body metabolism. Both the substrate and the product of ACAT1 increased larval settlement under butenolide treatment, suggesting its functional involvement. In the bryozoan Bugula neritina, butenolide bound to very long chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACADVL), actin, and glutathione S-transferases (GSTs). ACADVL is the first enzyme in the very long chain fatty acid β-oxidation pathway. The inhibition of this primary pathway for energy production in larvae by butenolide was supported by the finding that alternative energy sources (acetoacetate and pyruvate) increased larval attachment under butenolide treatment. In marine bacterium Vibrio sp. UST020129-010, butenolide bound to succinyl-CoA synthetase β subunit (SCSβ) and inhibited bacterial growth. ACAT1, ACADVL, and SCSβ are all involved in primary metabolism for energy production. These findings suggest that butenolide inhibits fouling by influencing the primary metabolism of target organisms. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  6. Toxicity of nano-zero valent iron to freshwater and marine organisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo A Keller

    Full Text Available We tested whether three commercial forms (uncoated, organic coating, and iron oxide coating of nano zero-valent iron (nZVI are toxic to freshwater and marine organisms, specifically three species of marine phytoplankton, one species of freshwater phytoplankton, and a freshwater zooplankton species (Daphnia magna, because these organisms may be exposed downstream of where nZVI is applied to remediate polluted soil. The aggregation and reactivity of the three types of nZVI varied considerably, which was reflected in their toxicity. Since levels of Fe(2+ and Fe(3+ increase as the nZVI react, we also evaluated their toxicity independently. All four phytoplankton species displayed decreasing population growth rates, and Daphnia magna showed increasing mortality, in response to increasing levels of nZVI, and to a lesser degree with increasing Fe(2+ and Fe(3+. All forms of nZVI aggregated in soil and water, especially in the presence of a high concentration of calcium ions in groundwater, thus reducing their transports through the environment. However, uncoated nZVI aggregated extremely rapidly, thus vastly reducing the probability of environmental transport and potential for toxicity. This information can be used to design a risk management strategy to arrest the transport of injected nZVI beyond the intended remediation area, by injecting inert calcium salts as a barrier to transport.

  7. Application of Neomysis awatschensis as a standard marine toxicity test organism in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Tian; ZHOU Ming-jiang; TAN Zhi-jun; LI Zheng-yan; LI Jun; YU Ren-cheng; WANG Li-ping

    2003-01-01

    The small mysid crustacean Neomysis awatschensis was collected in the west coast of Jiaozhou Bay, Qingdao, China in 1992 and acclimated and cultured in laboratory conditions since then. Standard acute toxicity tests using 4-6 d juvenile mysids of this species were conducted and the results were compared with Mysidopsis bahia, a standard toxicity test organism used in the US in terms of their sensitivities to reference toxins, as well as their taxonomy, morphology and geographic distributions. Because of its wide distribution along the Chinese coast, similar sensitivity to pollutants as M. bahia, short life history, small size and the ease of handling, this study intended to use N.awatschensis as one of the standard marine organisms for toxicity testing in China. The species were applied to acute toxicity evaluations of drilling fluid and its additives, organotin TPT and toxic algae, and to chronic ( life cycle) toxicity assays of organotin TPT and a toxic dinofalgellate Alexandrium tamarense, respectively. Using N. awatschensis as a standard toxicity testing organism in marine pollution assessment in China is suggested.

  8. Recreational Diver Behavior and Contacts with Benthic Organisms in the Abrolhos National Marine Park, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giglio, Vinicius J.; Luiz, Osmar J.; Schiavetti, Alexandre

    2016-03-01

    In the last two decades, coral reefs have become popular among recreational divers, especially inside marine protected areas. However, the impact caused by divers on benthic organisms may be contributing to the degradation of coral reefs. We analyzed the behavior of 142 scuba divers in the Abrolhos National Marine Park, Brazil. We tested the effect of diver profile, reef type, use of additional equipment, timing, and group size on diver behavior and their contacts with benthic organisms. Eighty-eight percent of divers contacted benthic organism at least once, with an average of eight touches and one damage per dive. No significant differences in contacts were verified among gender, group size, or experience level. Artificial reef received a higher rate of contact than pinnacle and fringe reefs. Specialist photographers and sidemount users had the highest rates, while non-users of additional equipment and mini camera users had the lowest contact rates. The majority of contacts were incidental and the highest rates occurred in the beginning of a dive. Our findings highlight the need of management actions, such as the provision of pre-dive briefing including ecological aspects of corals and beginning dives over sand bottoms or places with low coral abundance. Gathering data on diver behavior provides managers with information that can be used for tourism management.

  9. Measurements and Modelling of Glyoxal in the Tropical Marine Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, D. J.; Walker, H.; Ingham, T.; Whalley, L. K.; Hackenberg, S.; Read, K.; Lee, J. D.; Carpenter, L.; Spracklen, D. V.; Heard, D. E.; Arnold, S.

    2015-12-01

    Glyoxal (CHOCHO) is a reactive volatile organic compound (VOC) produced during the atmospheric oxidation of both anthropogenic VOCs, such as acetylene and benzene, and biogenic VOCs, such as isoprene and monoterpenes. The photo-oxidation of glyoxal leads to the rapid production of peroxy radicals and condensable products, which are expected to result in formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). We report new measurements of glyoxal in the tropical marine boundary layer, which were made using laser-induced phosphorescence (LIP) spectroscopy at the Cape Verde Atmospheric Observatory in June and August-September 2014 during the Ocean Reactive Carbon: Chemistry-Climate impacts (ORC3) campaign. The measurement site is marked by an absence of coastal features such as extensive shallows or large seaweed beds, and receives clean, well-processed marine air more than 95 % of the time, with minimal influence from local effects. Maximum glyoxal mixing ratios of ~15 ppt were observed during the ORC3 campaigns, with typical daytime maxima of ~ 5-6 ppt during June and ~ 6-8 ppt during August-September, and nighttime minima of ~ 4 ppt and ~4-5 ptt during June and August-September, respectively. This presentation will summarise these new measurements of glyoxal, in conjunction with box model simulations using the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM). Simulations are constrained to observations of glyoxal precursors, and are used to investigate the sources and sinks of glyoxal in the tropical marine boundary layer. Model calculations significantly underestimate the observed abundances of glyoxal, indicating the need for additional sources in the model. A number of possible scenarios will be discussed to explain the discrepancy between the measurements and the model.

  10. Fundamental study on magnetic separation of aquatic organisms for preservation of marine ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, F.; Akiyama, Y.; Izumi, Y.; Nishijima, S.

    2009-10-01

    Recently, destruction and disturbance of marine ecosystem have been caused by changes in global environment and transplants of farmed fishes and shellfishes. To solve the problems, water treatment techniques to kill or to remove aquatic organisms are necessary. In this study, application of magnetic separation for removal of the aquatic organisms was examined in order to establish the process with high-speed, compact device and low environmental load. Techniques of magnetic seeding and magnetic separation using superconducting magnet are important for high-speed processing of aquatic organisms. Magnetic seeding is to adhere separating object to the surface of ferromagnetic particles, and magnetic separation is to remove aquatic organisms with magnetic force. First, we confirmed the possibility of magnetic seeding of aquatic organisms, and then interaction between aquatic organisms and ferromagnetic particles was examined. Next, for practical application of magnetic separation system using superconducting magnet for removal of aquatic organisms, particle trajectories were simulated and magnetic separation experiment using superconducting magnet was performed in order to design magnetic separation system to achieve high separation efficiency.

  11. Microplastics as vectors for bioaccumulation of hydrophobic organic chemicals in the marine environment: A state-of-the-science review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziccardi, Linda M; Edgington, Aaron; Hentz, Karyn; Kulacki, Konrad J; Kane Driscoll, Susan

    2016-07-01

    A state-of-the-science review was conducted to examine the potential for microplastics to sorb hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOCs) from the marine environment, for aquatic organisms to take up these HOCs from the microplastics, and for this exposure to result in adverse effects to ecological and human health. Despite concentrations of HOCs associated with microplastics that can be orders of magnitude greater than surrounding seawater, the relative importance of microplastics as a route of exposure is difficult to quantify because aquatic organisms are typically exposed to HOCs from various compartments, including water, sediment, and food. Results of laboratory experiments and modeling studies indicate that HOCs can partition from microplastics to organisms or from organisms to microplastics, depending on experimental conditions. Very little information is available to evaluate ecological or human health effects from this exposure. Most of the available studies measured biomarkers that are more indicative of exposure than effects, and no studies showed effects to ecologically relevant endpoints. Therefore, evidence is weak to support the occurrence of ecologically significant adverse effects on aquatic life as a result of exposure to HOCs sorbed to microplastics or to wildlife populations and humans from secondary exposure via the food chain. More data are needed to fully understand the relative importance of exposure to HOCs from microplastics compared with other exposure pathways. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1667-1676. © 2016 SETAC.

  12. Archaeal remains dominate marine organic matter from the early Albian oceanic anoxic event 1b

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuypers, M.M.M.; Blokker, P.; Hopmans, E.C.;

    2002-01-01

    tetraethers) indicates an important contribution of representatives of marine planktonic archaea. The large difference (up to 12 ‰) in C/C ratios between algal biomarkers and the much more abundant planktonic archaea-derived biomarkers indicates that the latter were living chemoautotrophically. This offset......, distinct lamination, C-enrichment of OC) between the black shales of OAE1b and the Cenomanian/Turonian (∼94 Myr) OAE, the origin of the organic matter (archaeal versus phytoplanktonic) and causes for C-enrichment of OC are completely different. © 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved....

  13. A Study of Coupling Coordination between Marine Economy and Land Economy Based on Gear Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin ZHAO; Xu NAN; Shun YUAN

    2016-01-01

    Based on the construction of evaluation index system of marine-land economy system,this paper analyzes the coupling coordination between marine economy and land economy. The coupling coordinative model is used to analyze the coupling coordinative degree of the marine economy and land economy. The results show that from 2002 to 2012,the marine economy and land economy coupling degree was high and it achieved coordination from disorder gradually,resulting in mutual promotion and common development of marine economy and land economy.

  14. A fish-feeding laboratory bioassay to assess the antipredatory activity of secondary metabolites from the tissues of marine organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marty, Micah J; Pawlik, Joseph R

    2015-01-11

    Marine chemical ecology is a young discipline, having emerged from the collaboration of natural products chemists and marine ecologists in the 1980s with the goal of examining the ecological functions of secondary metabolites from the tissues of marine organisms. The result has been a progression of protocols that have increasingly refined the ecological relevance of the experimental approach. Here we present the most up-to-date version of a fish-feeding laboratory bioassay that enables investigators to assess the antipredatory activity of secondary metabolites from the tissues of marine organisms. Organic metabolites of all polarities are exhaustively extracted from the tissue of the target organism and reconstituted at natural concentrations in a nutritionally appropriate food matrix. Experimental food pellets are presented to a generalist predator in laboratory feeding assays to assess the antipredatory activity of the extract. The procedure described herein uses the bluehead, Thalassoma bifasciatum, to test the palatability of Caribbean marine invertebrates; however, the design may be readily adapted to other systems. Results obtained using this laboratory assay are an important prelude to field experiments that rely on the feeding responses of a full complement of potential predators. Additionally, this bioassay can be used to direct the isolation of feeding-deterrent metabolites through bioassay-guided fractionation. This feeding bioassay has advanced our understanding of the factors that control the distribution and abundance of marine invertebrates on Caribbean coral reefs and may inform investigations in diverse fields of inquiry, including pharmacology, biotechnology, and evolutionary ecology.

  15. Marine Natural Products as Models to Circumvent Multidrug Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Solida; Sousa, Emília; Kijjoa, Anake; Pinto, Madalena M M

    2016-07-08

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) to anticancer drugs is a serious health problem that in many cases leads to cancer treatment failure. The ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp), which leads to premature efflux of drugs from cancer cells, is often responsible for MDR. On the other hand, a strategy to search for modulators from natural products to overcome MDR had been in place during the last decades. However, Nature limits the amount of some natural products, which has led to the development of synthetic strategies to increase their availability. This review summarizes the research findings on marine natural products and derivatives, mainly alkaloids, polyoxygenated sterols, polyketides, terpenoids, diketopiperazines, and peptides, with P-gp inhibitory activity highlighting the established structure-activity relationships. The synthetic pathways for the total synthesis of the most promising members and analogs are also presented. It is expected that the data gathered during the last decades concerning their synthesis and MDR-inhibiting activities will help medicinal chemists develop potential drug candidates using marine natural products as models which can deliver new ABC transporter inhibitor scaffolds.

  16. Constructing a raster-based spatio-temporal hierarchical data model for marine fisheries application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Marine information has been increasing quickly. The traditional database technologies have disadvantages in manipulating large amounts of marine information which relates to the position in 3-D with the time. Recently, greater emphasis has been placed on GIS (geographical information system)to deal with the marine information. The GIS has shown great success for terrestrial applications in the last decades, but its use in marine fields has been far more restricted. One of the main reasons is that most of the GIS systems or their data models are designed for land applications. They cannot do well with the nature of the marine environment and for the marine information. And this becomes a fundamental challenge to the traditional GIS and its data structure. This work designed a data model,the raster-based spatio-temporal hierarchical data model (RSHDM), for the marine information system, or for the knowledge discovery from spatio-temporal data, which bases itself on the nature of the marine data and overcomes the shortages of the current spatio-temporal models when they are used in the field. As an experiment, the marine fishery data warehouse (FDW) for marine fishery management was set up, which was based on the RSHDM. The experiment proved that the RSHDM can do well with the data and can extract easily the aggregations that the management needs at different levels.

  17. Dynamic model for the assessment of radiological exposure to marine biota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vives i Batlle, J. [Westlakes Scientific Consulting Ltd, The Princess Royal Building, Westlakes Science and Technology Park, Moor Row, Cumbria CA24 3LN (United Kingdom)], E-mail: jordi.vives@westlakes.ac.uk; Wilson, R.C.; Watts, S.J.; Jones, S.R.; McDonald, P.; Vives-Lynch, S. [Westlakes Scientific Consulting Ltd, The Princess Royal Building, Westlakes Science and Technology Park, Moor Row, Cumbria CA24 3LN (United Kingdom)

    2008-11-15

    A generic approach has been developed to simulate dynamically the uptake and turnover of radionuclides by marine biota. The approach incorporates a three-compartment biokinetic model based on first order linear kinetics, with interchange rates between the organism and its surrounding environment. Model rate constants are deduced as a function of known parameters: biological half-lives of elimination, concentration factors and a sample point of the retention curve, allowing for the representation of multi-component release. The new methodology has been tested and validated in respect of non-dynamic assessment models developed for regulatory purposes. The approach has also been successfully tested against research dynamic models developed to represent the uptake of technetium and radioiodine by lobsters and winkles. Assessments conducted on two realistic test scenarios demonstrated the importance of simulating time-dependency for ecosystems in which environmental levels of radionuclides are not in equilibrium.

  18. Organization of ESOMM-2014: 5th International Meeting on the Effects of Sound in the Ocean on Marine Mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    on the Effects of Sound in the Ocean on Marine Mammals 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...Organization of ESOMM-2014: 5th international meeting on the Effects of Sound in the Ocean on Marine Mammals Dr. Frans-Peter A. Lam Acoustics & Sonar...together with namelist. After the conference posters and presentations have been distributed. A special ESOMM-issue for Aquatic Mammals Journal has

  19. Effect of phytoplankton-released organic matter on the production and properties of the primary marine aerosol (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, E.; Coe, H.; Green, D.; de Leeuw, G.; McFiggans, G.

    2010-12-01

    This study investigates the effect of the biogenic matter exuded by marine biota on the production and properties of the submicron primary sea-spray, based on the laboratory simulation of marine aerosol formation from seawater enriched with organic matter released by laboratory-grown algal cultures. Primary aerosol formation by bubble bursting was reproduced by using a plunging water jet generation system. Particle production experiments with seawater enriched in marine exudate marine organics. An increase in the production of particles production experiments. Estimations of the relationship between Chl-a biomass and seawater OC concentration indicated that effects on particle fluxes due to biological activity are likely to occur in diatom blooms with Chl-a diatom biomass >0.35-2 mg/m3 (OC>175 µM), depending on the primary organic production conditions in the algal bloom. Analysis of the hygroscopicity and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity of the organics-enriched primary aerosol indicated both a suppression of the water uptake and the CCN activity with increasing amount of organic exudate in the source seawater. The increase in the CCN number likely to occur in algal bloom areas due to the potential increase in particle production would therefore be counteracted by the reduction of the particle CCN activity induced by the incorporation of organic matter. Calculations of the primary particle composition using a mixing rule yielded organic mass fractions in the range 5-37%, with the organic particle enrichment proportional to the seawater organic content. This level of organic mass fraction is in contrast with values up to 80% reported from atmospheric measurements, suggesting the presence of organics of secondary origin in the atmospheric marine aerosol.

  20. Element fingerprinting of marine organisms by dynamic reaction cell inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubadda, Francesco; Raggi, Andrea; Coni, Ettore

    2006-02-01

    A method for the determination of sixteen elements (Al, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Se, Sn, V, Zn) in seafood by dynamic reaction cell inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-DRC-MS) is presented. A preliminary study of polyatomic interferences was carried out in relation to the chemical composition of marine organisms belonging to different taxa. Acid effects and other matrix effects in marine organisms submitted to closed-vessel microwave digestion were investigated as well. Ammonia was the reactive gas used in the DRC to remove polyatomic ions interfering with 27Al, 52Cr, 56Fe and 51V. Optimal conditions for the simultaneous determination of analytes were identified in order to develop a fast multielement method. A suite of real samples (mussels and various fish species) were used during method development along with three certified reference materials: BCR CRM 278R (mussel tissue), BCR CRM 422 (cod muscle) and DORM-2 (dogfish muscle). The proposed analytical approach can be used in conjunction with suitable chemometric procedures to address quality and safety issues in aquaculture and fisheries. As an example, a case study is described in which mussels from three farming sites in the Venice Lagoon were distinguished by multivariate analysis of element fingerprints.

  1. /sup 210/Po in marine organisms: a wide range of natural radiation dose domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, F.P.

    1988-01-01

    Marine biota is able to concentrate /sup 210/Po to high levels, as 10/sup 3/-10/sup 5/ relative to sea water concentration. /sup 210/Po concentrations in mixed zooplankton reaches 34-51 Bq.kg/sup -1/ (fresh wt), special groups such as copepods reaching even higher concentrations /similar to/ 90 Bq.kg/sup -1/, whereas gelatinous zooplankton display /similar to/ 1 Bq.kg/sup -1/. Epipelagic teleosts feeding on plankton displayed the highest concentrations found in fish muscle, 2-21 Bq.kg/sup -1/. Contrasting with this, demersal teleosts and elasmobranchs display lower /sup 210/Po concentrations, in the ranges 0.5-7 Bq.kg/sup -1/ and 0.2-1.7 Bq.kg/sup -1/, respectively. Much higher concentrations can, however, be measured in fish liver, gonad, bone and piloric caecca, and small mesopelagic fish can reach /similar to/ 800 Bq.kg/sup -1/ on a whole-body basis. Due to these /sup 210/Po activity concentrations, dose equivalent rates delivered to biological tissues in marine organisms can vary widely, from 0.4 mSv.y/sup -1/ in gelatinous plankton up to 5.6 x 10/sup 3/ mSv.y/sup -1/ in the gut wall of sardines. It is concluded that in organisms living in the same ocean layer a wide range of internal radiation doses exists and it is essentially sustained by /sup 210/Po food-chain transfer. (author).

  2. Occurrence and fate of organic and inorganic contaminants in marine animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittle, K J; Hardy, R; Holden, A V; Johnston, R; Pentreath, R J

    1978-09-29

    Most chemical contaminants occur in highest concentrations in coastal waters, often maximized in very localized areas. In general, this situation represents the exposure pattern for marine animals. However, the availability of contaminant to an organism depends not only on its concentration but also on its chemical nature, its physical state, and whether the source of exposure is the surrounding seawater or the diet. Depending on the type of exposure, uptake occurs across absorptive surfaces, such as those of the respiratory apparatus or gastrointestinal tract, where selectivity may occur, even among neighboring homologs. Deposition in tissues, accumulation, degradation, or depuration depends on tissue type, metabolic processes, detoxification mechanisms, and the adaptive status of a particular animal. This hypothesis is examined briefly for hydrocarbons, pesticides, other miscellaneous organic contaminants, heavy metals, and radionuclides. It is concluded that most data relate to occurrence and distribution. Considerably less information is available on the underlying biochemical processes.

  3. Organic micropollutants in marine plastics debris from the open ocean and remote and urban beaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Hisashi; Takada, Hideshige; Ogata, Yuko; Yamashita, Rei; Mizukawa, Kaoruko; Saha, Mahua; Kwan, Charita; Moore, Charles; Gray, Holly; Laursen, Duane; Zettler, Erik R; Farrington, John W; Reddy, Christopher M; Peacock, Emily E; Ward, Marc W

    2011-08-01

    To understand the spatial variation in concentrations and compositions of organic micropollutants in marine plastic debris and their sources, we analyzed plastic fragments (∼10 mm) from the open ocean and from remote and urban beaches. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane and its metabolites (DDTs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), alkylphenols and bisphenol A were detected in the fragments at concentrations from 1 to 10,000 ng/g. Concentrations showed large piece-to-piece variability. Hydrophobic organic compounds such as PCBs and PAHs were sorbed from seawater to the plastic fragments. PCBs are most probably derived from legacy pollution. PAHs showed a petrogenic signature, suggesting the sorption of PAHs from oil slicks. Nonylphenol, bisphenol A, and PBDEs came mainly from additives and were detected at high concentrations in some fragments both from remote and urban beaches and the open ocean. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Phylogenetic Characterization of Marine Benthic Archaea in Organic-Poor Sediments of the Eastern Equatorial Pacific Ocean (ODP Site 1225).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, Antje; Sørensen, Ketil Bernt; Teske, Andreas

    2016-09-06

    Sequencing surveys of microbial communities in marine subsurface sediments have focused on organic-rich, continental margins; the database for organic-lean deep-sea sediments from mid-ocean regions is underdeveloped. The archaeal community in subsurface sediments of ODP Site 1225 in the eastern equatorial Pacific (3760 m water depth; 1.1 and 7.8 m sediment depth) was analyzed by PCR, cloning and sequencing, and by denaturant gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of 16S rRNA genes. Three uncultured archaeal lineages with different depth distributions were found: Marine Group I (MG-I) within the Thaumarchaeota, its sister lineage Marine Benthic Group A (MBG-A), the phylum-level archaeal lineage Marine Benthic Group B (also known as Deep-Sea Archaeal Group or Lokiarchaeota), and the Deep-Sea Euryarchaeotal Group 3. The MG-I phylotypes included representatives of sediment clusters that are distinct from the pelagic members of this phylum. On the scale from fully oxidized, extremely organic carbon-depleted sediments (for example, those the South Pacific Gyre) to fully reduced, organic carbon-rich marine subsurface sediments (such as those of the Peru Margin), Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 1225 falls into the non-extreme organic carbon-lean category, and harbors archaeal communities from both ends of the spectrum.

  5. Glaciers as a source of ancient and labile organic matter to the marine environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Eran; Fellman, Jason; Spencer, Robert G M; Hernes, Peter J; Edwards, Rick; D'Amore, David; Scott, Durelle

    2009-12-24

    Riverine organic matter supports of the order of one-fifth of estuarine metabolism. Coastal ecosystems are therefore sensitive to alteration of both the quantity and lability of terrigenous dissolved organic matter (DOM) delivered by rivers. The lability of DOM is thought to vary with age, with younger, relatively unaltered organic matter being more easily metabolized by aquatic heterotrophs than older, heavily modified material. This view is developed exclusively from work in watersheds where terrestrial plant and soil sources dominate streamwater DOM. Here we characterize streamwater DOM from 11 coastal watersheds on the Gulf of Alaska that vary widely in glacier coverage (0-64 per cent). In contrast to non-glacial rivers, we find that the bioavailability of DOM to marine microorganisms is significantly correlated with increasing (14)C age. Moreover, the most heavily glaciated watersheds are the source of the oldest ( approximately 4 kyr (14)C age) and most labile (66 per cent bioavailable) DOM. These glacial watersheds have extreme runoff rates, in part because they are subject to some of the highest rates of glacier volume loss on Earth. We estimate the cumulative flux of dissolved organic carbon derived from glaciers contributing runoff to the Gulf of Alaska at 0.13 +/- 0.01 Tg yr(-1) (1 Tg = 10(12) g), of which approximately 0.10 Tg is highly labile. This indicates that glacial runoff is a quantitatively important source of labile reduced carbon to marine ecosystems. Moreover, because glaciers and ice sheets represent the second largest reservoir of water in the global hydrologic system, our findings indicate that climatically driven changes in glacier volume could alter the age, quantity and reactivity of DOM entering coastal oceans.

  6. Biological Activities of Aqueous and Organic Extracts from Tropical Marine Sponges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Turk

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available We report on screening tests of 66 extracts obtained from 35 marine sponge species from the Caribbean Sea (Curaçao and from eight species from the Great Barrier Reef (Lizard Island. Extracts were prepared in aqueous and organic solvents and were tested for hemolytic, hemagglutinating, antibacterial and anti-acetylcholinesterase (AChE activities, as well as their ability to inhibit or activate cell protein phosphatase 1 (PP1. The most interesting activities were obtained from extracts of Ircinia felix, Pandaros acanthifolium, Topsentia ophiraphidites, Verongula rigida and Neofibularia nolitangere. Aqueous and organic extracts of I. felix and V. rigida showed strong antibacterial activity. Topsentia aqueous and some organic extracts were strongly hemolytic, as were all organic extracts from I. felix. The strongest hemolytic activity was observed in aqueous extracts from P. acanthifolium. Organic extracts of N. nolitangere and I. felix inhibited PP1. The aqueous extract from Myrmekioderma styx possessed the strongest hemagglutinating activity, whilst AChE inhibiting activity was found only in a few sponges and was generally weak, except in the methanolic extract of T. ophiraphidites.

  7. Conservation physiology of marine fishes: advancing the predictive capacity of models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jorgensen, C.; Peck, M.A.; Antognarelli, F.; Teal, L.R.

    2012-01-01

    At the end of May, 17 scientists involved in an EU COST Action on Conservation Physiology of Marine Fishes met in Oristano, Sardinia, to discuss how physiology can be better used in modelling tools to aid in management of marine ecosystems. Current modelling approaches incorporate physiology to diff

  8. Projected 21st century decrease in marine productivity: a multi-model analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Steinacher

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Changes in marine net primary productivity (PP and export of particulate organic carbon (EP are projected over the 21st century with four global coupled carbon cycle-climate models. These include representations of marine ecosystems and the carbon cycle of different structure and complexity. All four models show a decrease in global mean PP and EP between 2 and 20% by 2100 relative to preindustrial conditions, for the SRES A2 emission scenario. Two different regimes for productivity changes are consistently identified in all models. The first chain of mechanisms is dominant in the low- and mid-latitude ocean and in the North Atlantic: reduced input of macro-nutrients into the euphotic zone related to enhanced stratification, reduced mixed layer depth, and slowed circulation causes a decrease in macro-nutrient concentrations and in PP and EP. The second regime is projected for parts of the Southern Ocean: an alleviation of light and/or temperature limitation leads to an increase in PP and EP as productivity is fueled by a sustained nutrient input. A region of disagreement among the models is the Arctic, where three models project an increase in PP while one model projects a decrease. Projected changes in seasonal and interannual variability are modest in most regions. Regional model skill metrics are proposed to generate multi-model mean fields that show an improved skill in representing observation-based estimates compared to a simple multi-model average. Model results are compared to recent productivity projections with three different algorithms, usually applied to infer net primary production from satellite observations.

  9. Molecular alteration of marine dissolved organic matter under experimental hydrothermal conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkes, Jeffrey A.; Hansen, Christian T.; Goldhammer, Tobias; Bach, Wolfgang; Dittmar, Thorsten

    2016-02-01

    Marine dissolved organic matter (DOM) is a large (660 Pg) pool of reduced carbon that is subject to thermal alteration in hydrothermal systems and sedimentary basins. In natural high-temperature hydrothermal systems, DOM is almost completely removed, but the mechanism and temperature dependence of this removal have not been studied to date. We investigated molecular-level changes to DOM that was solid-phase extracted (SPE-DOM) from the deep ocean of the North Pacific Ocean. This complex molecular mixture was experimentally exposed to temperatures between 100 and 380 °C over the course of two weeks in artificial seawater, and was then characterised on a molecular level via ultrahigh-resolution Fourier-transform ion cyclotron mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS). Almost 93% of SPE-DOM was removed by the treatment at 380 °C, and this removal was accompanied by a consistent pattern of SPE-DOM alteration across the temperatures studied. Higher molecular weight and more oxygen rich compounds were preferentially removed, suggesting that decarboxylation and dehydration of carboxylic acid and alcohol groups are the most rapid degradation mechanisms. Nitrogen containing compounds followed the same overall trends as those containing just C, H and O up to 300 °C. Above this temperature, the most highly altered samples contained very little of the original character of marine DOM, instead being mainly composed of very low intensity N- and S- containing molecules with a high H/C ratio (>1.5). Our results suggest that abiotic hydrothermal alteration of SPE-DOM may already occur at temperatures above 68 °C. Our experiments were conducted without a sedimentary or mineral phase, and demonstrate that profound molecular alteration and almost complete removal of marine SPE-DOM requires nothing more than heating in a seawater matrix.

  10. Production of volatile organic compounds in the culture of marine α-proteobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, M.; Abe, M.; Hashimoto, S.

    2014-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) release halogens in the troposphere and in the stratosphere by photolysis and released halogens catalyze ozone depletion . In the ocean, macroalgae, phytoplankton, and bacteria are considered to be the main producers of VOCs. Recent investigations have shown that marine bacteria produce halomethanes such as chloromethane, bromomethane, and iodomethane. However, knowledge of aquatic VOC production, particularly through bacteria, is lacking. We studied the production of VOCs, including halomethanes, through the bacterium HKF-1. HKF-1 was isolated from brackish water in Sanaru Lake, Shizuoka prefecture, Japan. The bacterium belongs to the α-proteobacteria. Bacteria were incubated in marine broth 2216 (Difco) added with KI and KIO3 (each at 0.02 μmol/L) at 25°C. VOCs in the gas phase above the cultured samples was determined using a dynamic headspace (GESTEL DHS)—gas chromatograph (Agilent 6890N)—mass spectrometer (Agilent 5975C) at 0, 4, 7, 10 and 12 incubation days. In addition, the optical density at 600 nm (OD600) was measured during the culture period. Measurement of VOCs showed that chloromethane, bromomethane, iodomethane, isoprene, methanethiol, dimethyl sulfide, and dimethyl disulfide were produced in the culture of HKF-1. Dihalomethanes and trihalomethanes, such as dibromomethane, chloroiodomethane, bromoiodomethane, and tribromomethane, were not detected. Given that monohalomethanes and sulfur-containing VOCs were abundant in the culture, HKF-1 is one of the possible candidates as a producer of monohalomethane and sulfur-containing VOCs in marine environment, but not of di- or trihalomethanes.

  11. Assessment of potential radiation dose rates to marine organisms around the Korean Peninsula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong Myung [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jun Ho [University of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    It is very difficult to set a regulatory guidance or criteria for the protection of non-human species from the ionizing radiation, because there are no generally or internationally accepted methods for demonstrating the compliance with such criteria. It is needed that Korea develop the primary dose rate standards for the protection of both aquatic and terrestrial biota in the near future. The potential dose rates due to both external and internal radiation exposures to marine organisms such as plaice/flounder, gray mullet, and brown seaweed collected within territorial seas around the Korean Peninsula were estimated. The total dose rates to plaice/flounder, gray mullet and brown seaweed due to {sup 40}K, a primordial radionuclide in marine environment, were found to be 0.2%, 0.08% and 0.3% of approximately the values of the Derived Consideration Reference Levels (DCRLs, i.e. 1-10 mGy d{sup -1}), respectively, as suggested by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) publication 124. The total dose rates to marine fishes and brown seaweed due to anthropogenic radionuclides such as {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs and {sup 239+240}Pu were considered to be negligible compared to the total dose rate due to {sup 40}K. The external exposure to benthic fish due to all radionuclides was much higher than that of pelagic fish. From this study, it is recommended that the further study is required to develop a national regulatory guidance for the evaluation of doses to non-human species.

  12. Interactions between volatile organic compounds and reactive halogen in the tropical marine atmosphere using WRF-Chem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badia, Alba; Reeves, Claire E.; Baker, Alex; Volkamer, Rainer; von Glasow, Roland

    2016-04-01

    Halogen species (chlorine, bromine and iodine) are known to play an important role in the chemistry and oxidizing capacity of the troposphere, particularly in the marine boundary layer (MBL). Reactive halogens cause ozone (O3) destruction, change the HOx and NOX partitioning, affect the oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and mercury, reduce the lifetime of methane, and take part in new particle formation. Numerical models predicted that reactive halogen compounds account for 30% of O3 destruction in the MBL and 5-20% globally. There are indications that the chemistry of reactive halogens and oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs) in the tropics are inter-related. Moreover, the presence of aldehydes, such as glyoxal (CHOCHO), has a potential impact on radical cycling and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation in the MBL and free troposphere (FT). Model calculations suggest aldehydes to be an important sink for bromine atoms and hence competition for their reaction with O3 forming BrO and so illustrating a link between the cycles of halogens and OVOCs in the marine atmosphere. The main objective of this contribution is to investigate the atmospheric chemistry in the tropical East Pacific with a focus on reactive halogens and OVOCs and their links using the latest version of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model coupled with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) and field data from the TORERO campaign. WRF-Chem is a highly flexible community model for atmospheric research where aerosol-radiation-cloud feedback processes are taken into account. Our current reaction mechanism in WRF-Chem is based on the MOZART mechanism and has been extended to include bromine, chlorine and iodine chemistry. The MOZART mechanism includes detailed gas-phase chemistry of CHOCHO formation as well as state-of-the-science pathways to form SOA. Oceanic emissions of aldehydes, including CHOCHO, and of organic halogens based on measurements from the TORERO campaign have been added into the model. Sea

  13. Model Organisms Fact Sheet: Using Model Organisms to Study Health and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Model Organisms to Study Health and Disease Using Model Organisms to Study Health and Disease Tagline (Optional) ... and treating disease in humans. What is a model? The word model has many meanings, but in ...

  14. Assessing the trophic position and ecological role of squids in marine ecosystems by means of food-web models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coll, Marta; Navarro, Joan; Olson, Robert J.; Christensen, Villy

    2013-10-01

    We synthesized available information from ecological models at local and regional scales to obtain a global picture of the trophic position and ecological role of squids in marine ecosystems. First, static food-web models were used to analyze basic ecological parameters and indicators of squids: biomass, production, consumption, trophic level, omnivory index, predation mortality diet, and the ecological role. In addition, we developed various dynamic temporal simulations using two food-web models that included squids in their parameterization, and we investigated potential impacts of fishing pressure and environmental conditions for squid populations and, consequently, for marine food webs. Our results showed that squids occupy a large range of trophic levels in marine food webs and show a large trophic width, reflecting the versatility in their feeding behaviors and dietary habits. Models illustrated that squids are abundant organisms in marine ecosystems, and have high growth and consumption rates, but these parameters are highly variable because squids are adapted to a large variety of environmental conditions. Results also show that squids can have a large trophic impact on other elements of the food web, and top-down control from squids to their prey can be high. In addition, some squid species are important prey of apical predators and may be keystone species in marine food webs. In fact, we found strong interrelationships between neritic squids and the populations of their prey and predators in coastal and shelf areas, while the role of squids in open ocean and upwelling ecosystems appeared more constrained to a bottom-up impact on their predators. Therefore, large removals of squids will likely have large-scale effects on marine ecosystems. In addition, simulations confirm that squids are able to benefit from a general increase in fishing pressure, mainly due to predation release, and quickly respond to changes triggered by the environment. Squids may thus

  15. A relational database model and data migration plan for the student services department at the Marine Corps Institute

    OpenAIRE

    Slaughter, Aaron Tory

    1997-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited includes APPENDIX H. MCI ENTERPRISE LEVEL DATA MODEL on PDF. Today's business environment in the Depattment of Defense (DoD) demands that managers possess a clear understanding of the design, implementation, and maintenance of the databases used to store, organize, manipulate and return data. In response to shoncomings identified in their current legacy information system, the Marine Corps Institute (MCI) initiated a project to migr...

  16. Estimation of dietary intake for PCDDs, PCDFs and DLPCBs in various marine organisms from the coastal areas of Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, H.B.; Choi, H.G.; Lee, S.J.; Park, J.S. [National Fisheries Research and Development Inst., Busan (Korea); Ok, G. [Pukyong National Univ., Busan (Korea)

    2004-09-15

    A large variety of organic chemicals, primarily anthropogenic pollutants, are transported into coastal marine ecosystems through various routes. Marine organisms may be exposed to toxic organic contaminants by contact with contaminated seawater and sediments, either on the seabed or through suspended sediments, or by ingestion of contaminated prey. Due to low water solubility and high octanol/water partition coefficients (K{sub ow}) in seawater, these chemicals can retain and concentrate in fatty tissues of these marine organisms such as migrate into fish, shellfish and invertebrates. The different chemical characterisation of toxic contaminants has been observed in organisms of different trophic levels. These differences were attributed to a partial biotransformation of the contaminants in the organisms of higher trophic levels. In aquatic systems, the highly lipophilic and hydrophobic organic pollutants tend to bioconcentrate from water to aquatic animal and then biomagnify up through the multistep food chain. Hence, these organisms reflect the pollution extent of persistent toxic organic pollutants and some species are used as bio-indicators at different environmental conditions and foodweb7. Exposure of humans to dioxins and dioxin-like contaminants occurs mainly (>95%) through contamination of food and the inhalatory route contributes only a neglible extent. The present risk assessment will briefly outline the major exposures of PCDDs/DFs and dioxin-like PCBs (DLPCBs) and their toxicity, and finally characterize the health risk for humans associated with dietary uptake of contaminated seafood.

  17. The second skin: Ecological role of epibiotic biofilms on marine organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin eWahl

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In the aquatic environment, biofilms on solid surfaces are omnipresent. The outer body surface of marine organisms often represents a highly active interface between host and biofilm. Since biofilms on living surfaces have the capacity to affect the fluxes of information, energy and matter across the host’s body surface, they have an important ecological potential to modulate the abiotic and biotic interactions of the host. Here we review existing evidence how marine epibiotic biofilms affect their hosts’ ecology by altering the properties of and processes across its outer surfaces. Biofilms have a huge potential to reduce its host’s access to light, gases and/or nutrients and modulate the host’s interaction with further foulers, consumers or pathogens. These effects of epibiotic biofilms may be intensely interact with environmental conditions. The quality of a biofilm’s impact on the host may vary from detrimental to beneficial according to the identity of the epibiotic partners, the type of interaction considered and prevailing environmental conditions. The review concludes with some unresolved but important questions and future perspectives.

  18. Salmon-Eating Grizzly Bears Exposed to Elevated Levels of Marine Derived Persistent Organic Pollutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, J. R.; Ross, P. S.; Whiticar, M. J.

    2004-12-01

    The coastal grizzly bears of British Columbia (BC, Canada) rely heavily on salmon returning from the Pacific Ocean, whereas interior bears do not have access to or readily utilize this marine-derived food source. Since salmon have been shown to accumulate persistent organic pollutants (POPs) from the North Pacific Ocean, we hypothesized that salmon consumption by grizzly bears would be reflected by an increase in the POP burden. To test this hypothesis we collected hair and fat tissue from grizzlies at various locations around BC to compare salmon-eating (coastal) grizzlies to non-salmon-eating (interior) grizzlies. We characterized the feeding habits for each bear sampled by measuring the stable carbon and nitrogen isotope signature of their hair. The positive relationship between 13C/12C and 15N/14N isotopic ratios suggests that the majority of the meat portion of the diet of coastal grizzlies is coming from salmon, rather than from terrestrial or freshwater sources. By contrast, stable isotope ratios revealed that interior bears have an almost exclusive vegetarian diet with no marine influence. As hypothesized, the coastal grizzly bears have significantly greater OC pesticide and lower-brominated PBDE congener body burden than the interior grizzlies. We also found a positive relationship between C and N isotope ratios and these same POP contaminants in bear tissue. Overall, these results demonstrate that Pacific salmon represents a significant vector delivering both OC pesticides and PBDEs to BC coastal grizzly bears.

  19. Novel and potential physiological roles of vacuolar-type H+-ATPase in marine organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tresguerres, Martin

    2016-07-15

    The vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPase (VHA) is a multi-subunit enzyme that uses the energy from ATP hydrolysis to transport H(+) across biological membranes. VHA plays a universal role in essential cellular functions, such as the acidification of lysosomes and endosomes. In addition, the VHA-generated H(+)-motive force can drive the transport of diverse molecules across cell membranes and epithelia for specialized physiological functions. Here, I discuss diverse physiological functions of VHA in marine animals, focusing on recent discoveries about base secretion in shark gills, potential bone dissolution by Osedax bone-eating worms and its participation in a carbon-concentrating mechanism that promotes coral photosynthesis. Because VHA is evolutionarily conserved among eukaryotes, it is likely to play many other essential physiological roles in diverse marine organisms. Elucidating and characterizing basic VHA-dependent mechanisms could help to determine species responses to environmental stress, including (but not limited to) that resulting from climate change. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  20. Production, Organic Characterization, and Phase Transformations of Marine Particles Aerosolized from a Laboratory Mesocosm Phytoplankton Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpert, P. A.; Knopf, D. A.; Aller, J. Y.; Radway, J.; Kilthau, W.

    2012-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that particles emitted from bubble bursting and wave breaking of ocean waters with high biological activity can contain sea salts associated with organic material, with smaller particles containing a larger mass fraction of organics than larger particles. This likely indicates a link between phytoplankton productivity in oceans and particulate organic material in marine air. Once aerosolized, particles with significant amount of organic material can affect cloud activation and formation of ice crystals, among other atmospheric processes, thus influencing climate. This is significant for clouds and climate particularly over nutrient rich polar seas, in which concentrations of biological organisms can reach up to 109 cells per ml during spring phytoplankton blooms. Here we present results of bubble bursting aerosol production from a seawater mesocosm containing artificial seawater, natural seawater and unialgal cultures of three representative phytoplankton species. These phytoplankton (Thalassiosira pseudonana, Emilianaia huxleyi, and Nannochloris atomus), possessed siliceous frustules, calcareous frustules and no frustules, respectively. Bubbles were generated employing recirculating impinging water jets or glass frits. Dry and humidified aerosol size distributions and bulk aerosol organic composition were measured as a function of phytoplankton growth, and chlorophyll composition and particulate and dissolved organic carbon in the water were determined. Finally, particles were collected on substrates for ice nucleation and water uptake experiments, their elemental compositions were determined using computer controlled scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEMEDAX), and their carbon speciation was determined using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). Particle size distributions exposed to dry and humidified air employing

  1. The use of potassium hydroxide (KOH) solution as a suitable approach to isolate plastics ingested by marine organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühn, Susanne; van Werven, Bernike; van Oyen, Albert; Meijboom, André; Bravo Rebolledo, Elisa L; van Franeker, Jan A

    2017-02-15

    In studies of plastic ingestion by marine wildlife, visual separation of plastic particles from gastrointestinal tracts or their dietary content can be challenging. Earlier studies have used solutions to dissolve organic materials leaving synthetic particles unaffected. However, insufficient tests have been conducted to ensure that different categories of consumer products partly degraded in the environment and/or in gastrointestinal tracts were not affected. In this study 63 synthetic materials and 11 other dietary items and non-plastic marine debris were tested. Irrespective of shape or preceding environmental history, most polymers resisted potassium hydroxide (KOH) solution, with the exceptions of cellulose acetate from cigarette filters, some biodegradable plastics and a single polyethylene sheet. Exposure of hard diet components and other marine debris showed variable results. In conclusion, the results confirm that usage of KOH solutions can be a useful approach in general quantitative studies of plastic ingestion by marine wildlife. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Model of optical response of marine aerosols to Forbush decreases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Bondo

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to elucidate the effect of galactic cosmic rays on cloud formation, we investigate the optical response of marine aerosols to Forbush decreases – abrupt decreases in galactic cosmic rays – by means of modeling. We vary the nucleation rate of new aerosols, in a sectional coagulation and condensation model, according to changes in ionization by the Forbush decrease. From the resulting size distribution we then calculate the aerosol optical thickness and Angstrom exponent, for the wavelength pairs 350, 450 nm and 550, 900 nm. In the cases where the output parameters from the model seem to compare best with atmospheric observations we observe, for the shorter wavelength pair, a change in Angstrom exponent, following the Forbush Decrease, of −6 to +3%. In some cases we also observe a delay in the change of Angstrom exponent, compared to the maximum of the Forbush decrease, which is caused by different sensitivities of the probing wavelengths to changes in aerosol number concentration and size. For the long wavelengths these changes are generally smaller. The types and magnitude of change is investigated for a suite of nucleation rates, condensable gas production rates, and aerosol loss rates. Furthermore we compare the model output with observations of 5 of the largest Forbush decreases after year 2000. For the 350, 450 nm pair we use AERONET data and find a comparable change in signal while the Angstrom Exponent is lower in the model than in the data, due to AERONET being mainly sampled over land. For 550, 900 nm we compare with both AERONET and MODIS and find little to no response in both model and observations. In summary our study shows that the optical properties of aerosols show a distinct response to Forbush Decreases, assuming that the nucleation of fresh aerosols is driven by ions. Shorter wavelengths seem more favorable for observing these effects and great care should be taken when analyzing observations, in order to avoid

  3. Rapid transcriptome and proteome profiling of a non-model marine invertebrate, Bugula neritina

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hao

    2010-06-10

    Non-model organisms represent the majority of life forms in our planet. However, the lack of genetic information hinders us to understand the unique biological phenomena in non-model organisms at the molecular level. In this study, we applied a tandem transcriptome and proteome profiling on a non-model marine fouling organism, Bugula neritina. Using a 454 pyrosequencing platform with the updated titanium reagents, we generated a total of 48M bp transcriptome data consisting of 131 450 high-quality reads. Of these, 122 650 reads (93%) were assembled to produce 6392 contigs with an average length of 538 bases and the remaining 8800 reads were singletons. Of the total 15 192 unigenes, 13 863 ORFs were predicated, of which 6917 were functionally annotated based on gene ontology and eukaryotic orthologous groups. Subsequent proteome analysis identified and quantified 882 proteins from B. neritina. These results would provide fundamental and important information for the subsequent studies of molecular mechanism in larval biology, development, antifouling research. Furthermore, we demonstrated, for the first time, the combined use of two high-throughput technologies as a powerful approach for accelerating the studies of non-model but otherwise important species. © 2010 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  4. Benthos distribution modelling and its relevance for marine ecoysystem management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reiss, H.; Birchenough, S.N.R.; Borja, A.; Buhl-Mortensen, L.; Craeymeersch, J.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Marine benthic ecosystems are difficult to monitor and assess, which is in contrast to modern ecosystem-based management requiring detailed information at all important ecological and anthropogenic impact levels. Ecosystem management needs to ensure a sustainable exploitation of marine resources as

  5. Application of the Sea-Level Affecting Marshes Model (SLAMM 6) to Marin Islands NWR

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Sea-Level Affecting Marshes Model (SLAMM) report presents a model for projecting the effects of sea-level rise on coastal marshes and related habitats on Marin...

  6. Distribution and bioaccumulation of heavy metals in marine organisms in east and west Guangdong coastal regions, South China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling; Shi, Zhen; Jiang, Zhijian; Zhang, Jingping; Wang, Fei; Huang, Xiaoping

    2015-12-30

    Heavy metal (Cu, Pb, Zn, Cr, Cd, As) concentrations, distribution and bioaccumulation were studied in marine organisms in Guangdong coastal regions. Heavy metal concentrations and distribution in organisms showed characteristics according to areas and species. Heavy metal concentrations in most organisms were higher in west than in east, tightly related to the local industry structure and the disequilibrium of metal discharge. Generally, high heavy metal concentrations were detected in molluscs and low concentrations were detected in fish. Bioaccumulation factor was used to assess the accumulation level of marine organisms to heavy metals, of which Cd, Cu and As were the most accumulated elements. Accumulation abilities to heavy metals varied among organism species, such as Distorsio reticulate accumulating Cu, Zn, Cd, As, Loligo beka Sasaki accumulating Pb, Cu, Cr, and Turritella bacillum Kiener accumulating Zn, Cd, As. By comparison, Johnius belengeri, Argyrosomus argentatus, Cynoglossus sinicus Wu had relatively low accumulation abilities.

  7. Matching Forces Applied in Underwater Hull Cleaning with Adhesion Strength of Marine Organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinis Oliveira

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Biofouling is detrimental to the hydrodynamic performance of ships. In spite of advances in hull coating technology, a ship must usually undergo underwater hull cleaning to remove biofouling during her in-service time. However, some cleaning practices may also lead to decreased lifetime of the fouling-control coating. Therefore, cleaning forces should be minimized, according to the adhesion strength of marine organisms present on the hull. In this article, values of adhesion strength found in available literature are discussed in the light of current knowledge on hull cleaning technology. Finally, the following knowledge gaps are identified: (1 data on adhesion strength of naturally-occurring biofouling communities are practically absent; (2 shear forces imparted by current cleaning devices on low-form fouling (microfouling and corresponding effects on hull coatings are largely unknown. This knowledge would be valuable for both developers and users of cleaning technology.

  8. Anthropogenic Forcing of Carbonate and Organic Carbon Preservation in Marine Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Carbon preservation in marine sediments, supplemented by that in large lakes, is the primary mechanism that moves carbon from the active surficial carbon cycle to the slower geologic carbon cycle. Preservation rates are low relative to the rates at which carbon moves between surface pools, which has led to the preservation term largely being ignored when evaluating anthropogenic forcing of the global carbon cycle. However, a variety of anthropogenic drivers—including ocean warming, deoxygenation, and acidification, as well as human-induced changes in sediment delivery to the ocean and mixing and irrigation of continental margin sediments—all work to decrease the already small carbon preservation term. These drivers affect the cycling of both carbonate and organic carbon in the ocean. The overall effect of anthropogenic forcing in the modern ocean is to decrease delivery of carbon to sediments, increase sedimentary dissolution and remineralization, and subsequently decrease overall carbon preservation.

  9. Paleocene-Eocene δ13C of marine and terrestrial organic matter: implications for the magnitude of total organic carbon hyperthermal isotope excursions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sluijs, A.; Dickens, G. R.

    2011-12-01

    A series of "hyperthermals" occurred during the Late Paleocene and Early Eocene (~58-50 Ma). These transient global warming events were characterized by prominent negative excursions in the stable carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) of carbon-bearing phases, and widespread dissolution of deep-sea carbonate; they were almost certainly geologically brief intervals of rapid and massive injection of 13C-depleted carbon into the combined ocean-atmosphere-biosphere system. However, the carbon masses involved remain the source of considerable debate, in part because the carbon isotope excursions (CIEs) are expressed differently, depending on the substrate analyzed and the location. For example, the CIE across the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM; ~56 Ma), now measured in numerous phases at over 100 locations, ranges between 2 - 8 %, even after discounting sections with truncated records. Three factors might cause individual carbon isotope records to differ in shape and magnitude from changes in the global exogenic carbon cycle during hyperthermal events: (i) Changes in the isotope composition of the proximal carbon source (e.g., DIC); (ii) Changes in isotope fractionation through physiological response to ecological change; and (iii) Changes in the relative abundance of components with different δ13C. All three factors likely influence the magnitude of the CIE in many records across hyperthermal events. Here, we discuss how the third factor impacts the δ13C of total organic carbon (TOC) in a shallow marine sequence. Over the past years, bulk organic δ13C, BIT index and palynomorph records have been published for the late Paleocene-early Eocene interval at IODP Hole 4A on Lomonosov Ridge, Arctic Ocean. These records show a long-term -3 % decrease in TOC and a long-term increase in the proportion of marine organic carbon; they also show a rapid -5.5 % CIE in TOC and the proportion of marine organic carbon across the PETM. After correcting for long-term variations in

  10. Dynamic Energy Budgets and Bioaccumulation: A Model for Marine Mammals and Marine Mammal Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    Orcinus orca : Effects of age, sex and dietary preference. Marine Pollution Bulletin 40:504 74 515. Schwacke, L. H., E. 0. Voit, L. J. Hansen, R. S...requirements for maintenance and growth of captive harbour seals, Phoca Goenlandica. Canadian Journal of Zoology 68:423-426. McCauley, E., Roger, R.M., de

  11. Model of optical response of marine aerosols to Forbush decreases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Bondo

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to elucidate the effect of galactic cosmic rays on cloud formation, we investigate the optical response of marine aerosols to Forbush decreases – abrupt decreases in galactic cosmic rays – by means of modeling. We vary the nucleation rate of new aerosols, in a sectional coagulation and condensation model, according to changes in ionization by the Forbush decrease. From the resulting size distribution we then calculate the aerosol optical thickness and Angstrom exponent, for the wavelength pairs 350, 450 nm and 550, 900 nm. For the shorter wavelength pair we observe a change in Angstrom exponent, following the Forbush Decrease, of −6 to +3% in the cases with atmospherically realistic output parameters. For some parameters we also observe a delay in the change of Angstrom exponent, compared to the maximum of the Forbush decrease, which is caused by different sensitivities of the probing wavelengths to changes in aerosol number concentration and size. For the long wavelengths these changes are generally smaller. The types and magnitude of change is investigated for a suite of nucleation rates, condensable gas production rates, and aerosol loss rates. Furthermore we compare the model output with observations of 5 of the largest Forbush decreases after year 2000. For the 350, 450 nm pair we use AERONET data and find a comparable change in signal while the Angstrom Exponent is lower in the model than in the data, due to AERONET being mainly sampled over land. For 550, 900 nm we compare with both AERONET and MODIS and find little to no response in both model and observations. In summary our study shows that the optical properties of aerosols show a distinct response to Forbush Decreases, assuming that the nucleation of fresh aerosols is driven by ions. Shorter wavelengths seem more favorable for observing these effects and great care should be taken when analyzing observations, in order to avoid the signal being drowned out by noise.

  12. Influence of Sea Ice on Arctic Marine Sulfur Biogeochemistry in the Community Climate System Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deal, Clara [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AL (United States); Jin, Meibing [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AL (United States)

    2013-06-30

    Global climate models (GCMs) have not effectively considered how responses of arctic marine ecosystems to a warming climate will influence the global climate system. A key response of arctic marine ecosystems that may substantially influence energy exchange in the Arctic is a change in dimethylsulfide (DMS) emissions, because DMS emissions influence cloud albedo. This response is closely tied to sea ice through its impacts on marine ecosystem carbon and sulfur cycling, and the ice-albedo feedback implicated in accelerated arctic warming. To reduce the uncertainty in predictions from coupled climate simulations, important model components of the climate system, such as feedbacks between arctic marine biogeochemistry and climate, need to be reasonably and realistically modeled. This research first involved model development to improve the representation of marine sulfur biogeochemistry simulations to understand/diagnose the control of sea-ice-related processes on the variability of DMS dynamics. This study will help build GCM predictions that quantify the relative current and possible future influences of arctic marine ecosystems on the global climate system. Our overall research objective was to improve arctic marine biogeochemistry in the Community Climate System Model (CCSM, now CESM). Working closely with the Climate Ocean Sea Ice Model (COSIM) team at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), we added 1 sea-ice algae and arctic DMS production and related biogeochemistry to the global Parallel Ocean Program model (POP) coupled to the LANL sea ice model (CICE). Both CICE and POP are core components of CESM. Our specific research objectives were: 1) Develop a state-of-the-art ice-ocean DMS model for application in climate models, using observations to constrain the most crucial parameters; 2) Improve the global marine sulfur model used in CESM by including DMS biogeochemistry in the Arctic; and 3) Assess how sea ice influences DMS dynamics in the arctic marine

  13. Continental background in oceanic air masses and marine emission of Volatile Organic Compounds in Drake Passage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colomb, Aurélie; Paris, Rodolphe; Losno, Rémi; Desboeufs, Karine; Provost, Christine

    2010-05-01

    In Drake Passage, continental air masses are mixed with pure oceanic air masses, and are evolving through the circumpolar atmospheric circulation. The most probable origin of continental air is Australia and Patagonia. Atmospheric dust content and deposition rate is quite unknown in Austral region. Long term evolution of continental air over the ocean is only poorly known, even if the oceanic surface is more than 80% of the Southern Hemisphere. Recent field experiments have shown large differences between estimated and measured dust or deposition. Dust particles can be carried up from the sources into the atmosphere for long range transport. Then, dust is deposited into the ocean surface. Dust deposition can bring micro-nutrients to the marine biota as trace metals and metalloids. During transport, some trace gases are oxidized depending on their lifetimes. It is therefore possible to calculate the photochemical age of the air masses, with some tracers of the long range transport and some tracers of sources origin. The Southern Ocean is poorly characterized in term of organic compounds and trace gases. Numerous experiments have shown that marine biology, such as phytoplankton can emit volatile organic compounds (VOC) but few shipborne measurements have been performed to determine potential source or sink of selected species. Especially in austral region, recent campaigns (MANCHOT in Indian Austral Ocean in December 2004 (Colomb et al, 2009); OOMPH between Cape Town and Punta Arenas in January 2007) have shown the impact of oceanic emission on the local and global atmospheric chemistry. During the ANT XXV-4 cruise on board the Polarstern in 2009, from Punta Arenas through Drake passage to Antarctic Peninsula, 165 air samples and 25 aerosol samples were collected, distributed all along the track. Additionally we took 4 rain samples to estimate the wet deposition. All the samples were taken at the front of the crow deck. Particles size and distribution and ozone

  14. Validation of the marine vegetation model in Forsmark. SFR-Site Forsmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aquilonius, Karin (Studsvik Nuclear AB (Sweden)); Qvarfordt, Susanne; Borgiel, Micke (Sveriges Vattenekologer AB (Sweden))

    2011-04-15

    A regression model implemented in GIS of the marine vegetation in Forsmark were developed by SKB /Aquilonius 2010/ based on field investigations and video surveys /Fredriksson 2005/ and from correlations of field data and physical properties /Carlen et al. 2007/. The marine vegetation model describes distribution and biomasses of the marine vegetation and is used as input data in the dose modeling within the safety assessments performed by the SKB. In this study the predictive performance of the vegetation model in the less examined parts of the marine area in Forsmark is evaluated. In general, the vegetation model works very well in predicting absence of biomass, except for Red algae. In total and for Fucus sp., the model also predicts the observed biomass fairly well. However, for phanerogams, Chara sp., filamentous algae and red algae the vegetation model works less well in predicting biomass

  15. Forecasting the Marine Corps’ Enlisted Classification Plan: Assessment of An Alternative Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Figure 8. Example GAR Requirements Over the FYDP.................................................24 Figure 9. Models’ MAPE Distribution...Marine Air-Ground Task Force MAPE Mean Absolute Percent Error MCT Marine Combat Training MOE Measure of Effectiveness MOS Military Occupational...Figure 9. Models’ MAPE Distribution However, an analysis of the steady-state model reveals that produced a forecast error mean of 40 percentage

  16. Molecular insights into the microbial formation of marine dissolved organic matter: recalcitrant or labile?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, B. P.; Kattner, G.; Witt, M.; Passow, U.

    2014-08-01

    The degradation of marine dissolved organic matter (DOM) is an important control variable in the global carbon cycle. For our understanding of the kinetics of organic matter cycling in the ocean, it is crucial to achieve a mechanistic and molecular understanding of its transformation processes. A long-term microbial experiment was performed to follow the production of non-labile DOM by marine bacteria. Two different glucose concentrations and dissolved algal exudates were used as substrates. We monitored the bacterial abundance, concentrations of dissolved and particulate organic carbon (DOC, POC), nutrients, amino acids and transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) for 2 years. The molecular characterization of extracted DOM was performed by ultrahigh resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) after 70 days and after ∼2 years of incubation. Although glucose quickly degraded, a non-labile DOC background (5-9% of the initial DOC) was generated in the glucose incubations. Only 20% of the organic carbon from the algal exudate degraded within the 2 years of incubation. The degradation rates for the non-labile DOC background in the different treatments varied between 1 and 11 μmol DOC L-1 year-1. Transparent exopolymer particles, which are released by microorganisms, were produced during glucose degradation but decreased back to half of the maximum concentration within less than 3 weeks (degradation rate: 25 μg xanthan gum equivalents L-1 d-1) and were below detection in all treatments after 2 years. Additional glucose was added after 2 years to test whether labile substrate can promote the degradation of background DOC (co-metabolism; priming effect). A priming effect was not observed but the glucose addition led to a slight increase of background DOC. The molecular analysis demonstrated that DOM generated during glucose degradation differed appreciably from DOM transformed during the degradation of the algal exudates. Our

  17. An improved method for quantitatively measuring the sequences of total organic carbon and black carbon in marine sediment cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoming; Zhu, Qing; Zhou, Qianzhi; Liu, Jinzhong; Yuan, Jianping; Wang, Jianghai

    2017-04-01

    Understanding global carbon cycle is critical to uncover the mechanisms of global warming and remediate its adverse effects on human activities. Organic carbon in marine sediments is an indispensable part of the global carbon reservoir in global carbon cycling. Evaluating such a reservoir calls for quantitative studies of marine carbon burial, which closely depend on quantifying total organic carbon and black carbon in marine sediment cores and subsequently on obtaining their high-resolution temporal sequences. However, the conventional methods for detecting the contents of total organic carbon or black carbon cannot resolve the following specific difficulties, i.e., (1) a very limited amount of each subsample versus the diverse analytical items, (2) a low and fluctuating recovery rate of total organic carbon or black carbon versus the reproducibility of carbon data, and (3) a large number of subsamples versus the rapid batch measurements. In this work, (i) adopting the customized disposable ceramic crucibles with the micropore-controlled ability, (ii) developing self-made or customized facilities for the procedures of acidification and chemothermal oxidization, and (iii) optimizing procedures and carbon-sulfur analyzer, we have built a novel Wang-Xu-Yuan method (the WXY method) for measuring the contents of total organic carbon or black carbon in marine sediment cores, which includes the procedures of pretreatment, weighing, acidification, chemothermal oxidation and quantification; and can fully meet the requirements of establishing their highresolution temporal sequences, whatever in the recovery, experimental efficiency, accuracy and reliability of the measurements, and homogeneity of samples. In particular, the usage of disposable ceramic crucibles leads to evidently simplify the experimental scenario, which further results in the very high recovery rates for total organic carbon and black carbon. This new technique may provide a significant support for

  18. Parasites and marine invasions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torchin, M.E.; Lafferty, K.D.; Kuris, A.M.

    2002-01-01

    Introduced marine species are a major environmental and economic problem. The rate of these biological invasions has substantially increased in recent years due to the globalization of the world's economies. The damage caused by invasive species is often a result of the higher densities and larger sizes they attain compared to where they are native. A prominent hypothesis explaining the success of introduced species is that they are relatively free of the effects of natural enemies. Most notably, they may encounter fewer parasites in their introduced range compared to their native range. Parasites are ubiquitous and pervasive in marine systems, yet their role in marine invasions is relatively unexplored. Although data on parasites of marine organisms exist, the extent to which parasites can mediate marine invasions, or the extent to which invasive parasites and pathogens are responsible for infecting or potentially decimating native marine species have not been examined. In this review, we present a theoretical framework to model invasion success and examine the evidence for a relationship between parasite presence and the success of introduced marine species. For this, we compare the prevalence and species richness of parasites in several introduced populations of marine species with populations where they are native. We also discuss the potential impacts of introduced marine parasites on native ecosystems.

  19. Dynamic modeling of environmental risk associated with drilling discharges to marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durgut, İsmail; Rye, Henrik; Reed, Mark; Smit, Mathijs G D; Ditlevsen, May Kristin

    2015-10-15

    Drilling discharges are complex mixtures of base-fluids, chemicals and particulates, and may, after discharge to the marine environment, result in adverse effects on benthic communities. A numerical model was developed to estimate the fate of drilling discharges in the marine environment, and associated environmental risks. Environmental risk from deposited drilling waste in marine sediments is generally caused by four types of stressors: oxygen depletion, toxicity, burial and change of grain size. In order to properly model these stressors, natural burial, biodegradation and bioturbation processes were also included. Diagenetic equations provide the basis for quantifying environmental risk. These equations are solved numerically by an implicit-central differencing scheme. The sediment model described here is, together with a fate and risk model focusing on the water column, implemented in the DREAM and OSCAR models, both available within the Marine Environmental Modeling Workbench (MEMW) at SINTEF in Trondheim, Norway.

  20. Relating biomarkers to whole-organism effects using species sensitivity distributions : A pilot study for marine species exposed to oil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, M.G.D.; Bechmann, R.K.; Hendriks, A.J.; Skadsheim, A.; Larsen, B.K.; Baussant, T.; Bamber, S.; Sannei, S.

    2009-01-01

    Biomarkers are widely used to measure environmental impacts on marine species. For many biomarkers, it is not clear how the signal levels relate to effects on the whole organism. This paper shows how species sensitivity distributions (SSDs) can be applied to evaluate multiple biomarker responses in

  1. Relating biomarkers to whole-organism effects using species sensitivity distributions : A pilot study for marine species exposed to oil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, M.G.D.; Bechmann, R.K.; Hendriks, A.J.; Skadsheim, A.; Larsen, B.K.; Baussant, T.; Bamber, S.; Sannei, S.

    2009-01-01

    Biomarkers are widely used to measure environmental impacts on marine species. For many biomarkers, it is not clear how the signal levels relate to effects on the whole organism. This paper shows how species sensitivity distributions (SSDs) can be applied to evaluate multiple biomarker responses in

  2. Relating biomarkers to whole-organism effects using species sensitivity distributions: a pilot study for marine species exposed to oil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, M.G.D.; Bechmann, R.K.; Hendriks, A.J.; Skadsheim, A.; Larsen, B.K.

    2009-01-01

    Biomarkers are widely used to measure environmental impacts on marine species. For many biomarkers, it is not clear how the signal levels relate to effects on the whole organism. This paper shows how species sensitivity distributions (SSDs) can be applied to evaluate multiple biomarker responses in

  3. Concepts, Models and Implementation of the Marine Spatial Data Infrastructure in Germany Mdi-De

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüh, C.; Bill, R.

    2012-07-01

    In Germany currently the development of a marine data infrastructure takes place with the aim of merging information concerning the fields coastal engineering, hydrography and surveying, protection of the marine environment, maritime conservation, regional planning and coastal research. This undertaking is embedded in a series of regulations and developments on many administrative levels from which specifications and courses of action derive. To set up a conceptual framework for the marine data infrastructure (MDI-DE) scientists at the Professorship for Geodesy and Geoinformatics at Rostock University are building a reference model, evaluating meta-information systems and developing models to support common workflows in marine applications. The reference model for the marine spatial data infrastructure of Germany (MDI-DE) is the guideline for all developments inside this infrastructure. Because the undertaking is embedded in a series of regulations and developments this paper illustrates an approach on modelling a scenario for the Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD) using the Unified Modelling Language (UML). Evaluating how other countries built their marine spatial infrastructures is of main importance, to learn where obstacles are and errors are likely to occur. To be able to look at other initiatives from a neutral point of view it is necessary to construct a framework for evaluation of marine spatial data infrastructures. Spatial data infrastructure assessment approaches were used as bases and were expanded to meet the requirements of the marine domain. As an international case-study this paper will look at Canada's Marine Geospatial Data Infrastructure (MGDI), COINAtlantic and GeoPortal.

  4. CONCEPTS, MODELS AND IMPLEMENTATION OF THE MARINE SPATIAL DATA INFRASTRUCTURE IN GERMANY (MDI-DE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Rüh

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In Germany currently the development of a marine data infrastructure takes place with the aim of merging information concerning the fields coastal engineering, hydrography and surveying, protection of the marine environment, maritime conservation, regional planning and coastal research. This undertaking is embedded in a series of regulations and developments on many administrative levels from which specifications and courses of action derive. To set up a conceptual framework for the marine data infrastructure (MDI-DE scientists at the Professorship for Geodesy and Geoinformatics at Rostock University are building a reference model, evaluating meta-information systems and developing models to support common workflows in marine applications. The reference model for the marine spatial data infrastructure of Germany (MDI-DE is the guideline for all developments inside this infrastructure. Because the undertaking is embedded in a series of regulations and developments this paper illustrates an approach on modelling a scenario for the Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD using the Unified Modelling Language (UML. Evaluating how other countries built their marine spatial infrastructures is of main importance, to learn where obstacles are and errors are likely to occur. To be able to look at other initiatives from a neutral point of view it is necessary to construct a framework for evaluation of marine spatial data infrastructures. Spatial data infrastructure assessment approaches were used as bases and were expanded to meet the requirements of the marine domain. As an international case-study this paper will look at Canada's Marine Geospatial Data Infrastructure (MGDI, COINAtlantic and GeoPortal.

  5. Organic molecular composition of marine aerosols over the Arctic Ocean in summer: contributions of primary emission and secondary aerosol formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Q. Fu

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Organic molecular composition of marine aerosol samples collected during the MALINA cruise in the Arctic Ocean was investigated by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. More than 110 individual organic compounds were determined in the samples and were grouped into different compound classes based on the functionality and sources. The concentrations of total quantified organics ranged from 7.3 to 185 ng m−3 (mean 47.6 ng m−3, accounting for 1.8–11.0% (4.8% of organic carbon in the marine aerosols. Primary saccharides were found to be dominant organic compound class, followed by secondary organic aerosol (SOA tracers formed from the oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs such as isoprene, α-pinene and β-caryophyllene. Mannitol, the specific tracer for airborne fungal spores, was detected as the most abundant organic species in the samples with a concentration range of 0.052–53.3 ng m−3 (9.2 ng m−3, followed by glucose, arabitol, and the isoprene oxidation products of 2-methyltetrols. Biomass burning tracers such as levoglucosan are evident in all samples with trace levels. On the basis of the tracer-based method for the estimation of fungal-spore OC and biogenic secondary organic carbon (SOC, we estimate that an average of 10.7% (up to 26.2% of the OC in the marine aerosols was due to the contribution of fungal spores, followed by the contribution of isoprene SOC (mean 3.8% and α-pinene SOC (2.9%. In contrast, only 0.19% of the OC was due to the photooxidation of β-caryophyllene. This study indicates that primary organic aerosols from biogenic emissions, both from long-range transport of mid-latitude aerosols and from sea-to-air emission of marine organics, as well as secondary organic aerosols formed from the photooxidation of biogenic VOCs are important factors controlling the organic chemical composition of marine aerosols in the Arctic Ocean.

  6. Organic molecular composition of marine aerosols over the Arctic Ocean in summer: contributions of primary emission and secondary aerosol formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Q. Fu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Organic molecular composition of marine aerosol samples collected during the MALINA cruise in the Arctic Ocean was investigated by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. More than 110 individual organic compounds were determined in the samples and were grouped into different compound classes based on the functionality and sources. The concentrations of total quantified organics ranged from 7.3 to 185 ng m−3 (mean 47.6 ng m−3, accounting for 1.8–11.0% (4.8% of organic carbon in the marine aerosols. Primary saccharides were found to be dominant organic compound class, followed by secondary organic aerosol (SOA tracers formed from the oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs such as isoprene, α-pinene and β-caryophyllene. Mannitol, the specific tracer for airborne fungal spores, was detected as the most abundant organic species in the samples with a concentration range of 0.052–53.3 ng m−3 (9.2 ng m−3, followed by glucose, arabitol, and the isoprene oxidation products of 2-methyltetrols. Biomass burning tracers such as levoglucosan are evident in all samples with trace levels. On the basis of the tracer-based method for the estimation of fungal-spore OC and biogenic secondary organic carbon (SOC, we estimate that an average of 10.7% (up to 26.2% of the OC in the marine aerosols was due to the contribution of fungal spores, followed by the contribution of isoprene SOC (mean 3.8% and α-pinene SOC (2.9%. In contrast, only 0.19% of the OC was due to the photooxidation of β-caryophyllene. This study indicates that primary organic aerosols from biogenic emissions, both from long-range transport of mid-latitude aerosols and from sea-to-air emission of marine organics, as well as secondary organic aerosols formed from the photooxidation of biogenic VOCs are important factors controlling the organic chemical composition of marine aerosols in the Arctic Ocean.

  7. A model for Bioinformatics training: the marine biological laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Grant; Miller, Holly; Goddard, Anthony; Norton, Cathy

    2010-11-01

    Many areas of science such as biology, medicine and oceanography are becoming increasingly data-rich and most programs that train scientists do not address informatics techniques or technologies that are necessary for managing and analysing large amounts of data. Educational resources for scientists in informatics are scarce, yet scientists need the skills and knowledge to work with informaticians and manage graduate students and post-docs in informatics projects. The Marine Biological Laboratory houses a world-renowned library and is involved in a number of informatics projects in the sciences. The MBL has been home to the National Library of Medicine's BioMedical Informatics Course for nearly two decades and is committed to educating scientists and other scholars in informatics. In an innovative, immersive learning experience, G.Y., a biologist and post-doc at Arizona State University, visited the Science Informatics Group at the MBL to learn first hand how informatics is done and how informatics teams work. Hands-on work with developers, systems administrators, librarians and other scientists provided an invaluable education in informatics and is a model for future science informatics training.

  8. Quantitative Transcriptomics Reveals the Growth- and Nutrient-Dependent Response of a Streamlined Marine Methylotroph to Methanol and Naturally Occurring Dissolved Organic Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifford, Scott M; Becker, Jamie W; Sosa, Oscar A; Repeta, Daniel J; DeLong, Edward F

    2016-11-22

    The members of the OM43 clade of Betaproteobacteria are abundant coastal methylotrophs with a range of carbon-utilizing capabilities. However, their underlying transcriptional and metabolic responses to shifting conditions or different carbon substrates remain poorly understood. We examined the transcriptional dynamics of OM43 isolate NB0046 subjected to various inorganic nutrient, vitamin, and carbon substrate regimes over different growth phases to (i) develop a quantitative model of its mRNA content; (ii) identify transcriptional markers of physiological activity, nutritional state, and carbon and energy utilization; and (iii) identify pathways involved in methanol or naturally occurring dissolved organic matter (DOM) metabolism. Quantitative transcriptomics, achieved through addition of internal RNA standards, allowed for analyses on a transcripts-per-cell scale. This streamlined bacterium exhibited substantial shifts in total mRNA content (ranging from 1,800 to 17 transcripts cell(-1) in the exponential and deep stationary phases, respectively) and gene-specific transcript abundances (>1,000-fold increases in some cases), depending on the growth phase and nutrient conditions. Carbon metabolism genes exhibited substantial dynamics, including those for ribulose monophosphate, tricarboxylic acid (TCA), and proteorhodopsin, as well as methanol dehydrogenase (xoxF), which, while always the most abundant transcript, increased from 5 to 120 transcripts cell(-1) when cultures were nutrient and vitamin amended. In the DOM treatment, upregulation of TCA cycle, methylcitrate cycle, vitamin, and organic phosphorus genes suggested a metabolic route for this complex mixture of carbon substrates. The genome-wide inventory of transcript abundances produced here provides insight into a streamlined marine bacterium's regulation of carbon metabolism and energy flow, providing benchmarks for evaluating the activity of OM43 populations in situ IMPORTANCE: Bacteria exert a

  9. Organization customer behavior: Elected models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maričić Branko

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Paper is dealing with business-to-business marketing issues with particular attention to some of models oriented to explain differences relative to FMCG marketing. Author describe the core principles of selected models including their basic features. In this paper some of models are in focus - Window and Webster-Window model as well as Sheets model, Nielsen model and Multivariation tools.

  10. The role of rivers in transporting organic contaminants in the marine environment of Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzianestis, Ioannis

    2013-04-01

    The study of trace organic contaminants in coastal marine environments and especially in estuarine systems is of great importance, since these areas, being biologically productive and receiving considerable pollutant inputs from land-based sources via river runoff, act as a transit zone in which contaminants are transported to the sea. The aim of this work is to identify the significance of estuarine export of organic pollution in the marine environment of Greece. For this reason, the distribution, composition and sources of hydrocarbon mixtures were investigated in sediments collected from eight major Greek estuarine systems, by using a molecular marker approach and several diagnostic criteria and indices. Surface sediment samples were collected from the estuaries of five rivers in Northern Greece flowing into Aegean sea (Axios, Aliakmonas, Strymon, Nestos, Evros), one river in Central Greece (Asopos) also flowing into Aegean Sea and two rivers in Western Greece flowing into Ionian sea (Acheloos, Acherontas). The highest aliphatic hydrocarbon concentrations (>100 μg/g), indicative of petroleum pollution, were recorded in Asopos estruaries, followed by Aliakmonas, Axios, Strymon and Evros estuaries (50-100 μg/g). On the contrary, in Nestos delta, as well as in Acheloos and Acherontas estuaries, hydrocarbon values were found low and similar to those measured in open sea (molecular weight n-alkanes (>C23) predominated in most cases, showing an important odd/even carbon number preference (mean CPI values above 5) which is characteristic of terrestrial higher plant origin. Low CPI values (1.6-3.4) were recorded only in Acheloos river, where very low n-alkane concentrations were also found, suggesting transport of limited amounts of terrigenous organic material in this case. The highest PAH concentrations were again measured in Asopos and Evros estuary (800-1200 ng/g), followed by Axios, Aliakmons, Strymon, Acheloos and Acherontas (220 - 650 ng/g), whereas very low

  11. A proteinaceous organic matrix regulates carbonate mineral production in the marine teleost intestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauer, Kevin L.; LeMoine, Christophe M. R.; Pelin, Adrian; Corradi, Nicolas; Warren, Wesley C.; Grosell, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Marine teleost fish produce CaCO3 in their intestine as part of their osmoregulatory strategy. This precipitation is critical for rehydration and survival of the largest vertebrate group on earth, yet the molecular mechanisms that regulate this reaction are unknown. Here, we isolate and characterize an organic matrix associated with the intestinal precipitates produced by Gulf toadfish (Opsanus beta). Toadfish precipitates were purified using two different methods, and the associated organic matrix was extracted. Greater than 150 proteins were identified in the isolated matrix by mass spectrometry and subsequent database searching using an O. beta transcriptomic sequence library produced here. Many of the identified proteins were enriched in the matrix compared to the intestinal fluid, and three showed no substantial homology to any previously characterized protein in the NCBI database. To test the functionality of the isolated matrix, a micro-modified in vitro calcification assay was designed, which revealed that low concentrations of isolated matrix substantially promoted CaCO3 production, where high concentrations showed an inhibitory effect. High concentrations of matrix also decreased the incorporation of magnesium into the forming mineral, potentially providing an explanation for the variability in magnesium content observed in precipitates produced by different fish species. PMID:27694946

  12. Advanced characterization of dissolved organic matter released by bloom-forming marine algae

    KAUST Repository

    Rehman, Zahid Ur

    2017-06-01

    Algal organic matter (AOM), produced by marine phytoplankton during bloom periods, may adversely affect the performance of membrane processes in seawater desalination. The polysaccharide fraction of AOM has been related to (bio)fouling in micro-filtration and ultrafiltration, and reverse osmosis membranes. However, so far, the chemical structure of the polysaccharides released by bloom-forming algae is not well understood. In this study, dissolved fraction of AOM produced by three algal species (Chaetoceros affinis, Nitzschia epithemoides and Hymenomonas spp.) was characterized using liquid chromatography–organic carbon detection (LC-OCD) and fluorescence spectroscopy. Chemical structure of polysaccharides isolated from the AOM solutions at stationary phase was analyzed using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (H-NMR). The results showed that production and composition of dissolved AOM varied depending on algal species and their growth stage. AOM was mainly composed of biopolymers (BP; i.e., polysaccharides and proteins [PN]), but some refractory substances were also present.H-NMR spectra confirmed the predominance of carbohydrates in all samples. Furthermore, similar fingerprints were observed for polysaccharides of two diatom species, which differed considerably from that of coccolithophores. Based on the findings of this study,H-NMR could be used as a method for analyzing chemical profiles of algal polysaccharides to enhance the understanding of their impact on membrane fouling.

  13. Enhanced availability of mercury bound to dissolved organic matter for methylation in marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazrui, Nashaat M.; Jonsson, Sofi; Thota, Sravan; Zhao, Jing; Mason, Robert P.

    2016-12-01

    The forms of inorganic mercury (HgII) taken up and methylated by bacteria in sediments still remain largely unknown. From pure cultures studies, it has been suggested that dissolved organic matter (DOM) may facilitate the uptake either by acting as a shuttle molecule, transporting the HgII atom to divalent metal transporters, or by binding HgII and then being transported into the cell as a carbon source. Enhanced availability of Hg complexed to DOM has however not yet been demonstrated in natural systems. Here, we show that HgII complexed with DOM of marine origin was up to 2.7 times more available for methylation in sediments than HgII added as a dissolved inorganic complex (HgII(aq)). We argue that the DOM used to complex HgII directly facilitated the bacterial uptake of HgII whereas the inorganic dissolved HgII complex adsorbed to the sediment matrix before forming bioavailable dissolved HgII complexes. We further demonstrate that differences in net methylation in sediments with high and low organic carbon content may be explained by differences in the availability of carbon to stimulate the activity of Hg methylating bacteria rather than, as previously proposed, be due to differences in HgII binding capacities between sediments.

  14. Microscale characterization of dissolved organic matter production and uptake in marine microbial mat communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paerl, H. W.; Bebout, B. M.; Joye, S. B.; Des Marais, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    Intertidal marine microbial mats exhibited biologically mediated uptake of low molecular weight dissolved organic matter (DOM), including D-glucose, acetate, and an L-amino acid mixture at trace concentrations. Uptake of all compounds occurred in darkness, but was frequently enhanced under natural illumination. The photosystem 2 inhibitor, 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethyl urea (DCMU) generally failed to inhibit light-stimulated DOM uptake. Occasionally, light plus DCMU-amended treatments led to uptake rates higher than light-incubated samples, possibly due to phototrophic bacteria present in subsurface anoxic layers. Uptake was similar with either 3H- or 14C-labeled substrates, indicating that recycling of labeled CO2 via photosynthetic fixation was not interfering with measurements of light-stimulated DOM uptake. Microautoradiographs showed a variety of pigmented and nonpigmented bacteria and, to a lesser extent, cyanobacteria and eucaryotic microalgae involved in light-mediated DOM uptake. Light-stimulated DOM uptake was often observed in bacteria associated with sheaths and mucilage surrounding filamentous cyanobacteria, revealing a close association of organisms taking up DOM with photoautotrophic members of the mat community. The capacity for dark- and light-mediated heterotrophy, coupled to efficient retention of fixed carbon in the mat community, may help optimize net production and accretion of mats, even in oligotrophic waters.

  15. A proteinaceous organic matrix regulates carbonate mineral production in the marine teleost intestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauer, Kevin L.; Lemoine, Christophe M. R.; Pelin, Adrian; Corradi, Nicolas; Warren, Wesley C.; Grosell, Martin

    2016-10-01

    Marine teleost fish produce CaCO3 in their intestine as part of their osmoregulatory strategy. This precipitation is critical for rehydration and survival of the largest vertebrate group on earth, yet the molecular mechanisms that regulate this reaction are unknown. Here, we isolate and characterize an organic matrix associated with the intestinal precipitates produced by Gulf toadfish (Opsanus beta). Toadfish precipitates were purified using two different methods, and the associated organic matrix was extracted. Greater than 150 proteins were identified in the isolated matrix by mass spectrometry and subsequent database searching using an O. beta transcriptomic sequence library produced here. Many of the identified proteins were enriched in the matrix compared to the intestinal fluid, and three showed no substantial homology to any previously characterized protein in the NCBI database. To test the functionality of the isolated matrix, a micro-modified in vitro calcification assay was designed, which revealed that low concentrations of isolated matrix substantially promoted CaCO3 production, where high concentrations showed an inhibitory effect. High concentrations of matrix also decreased the incorporation of magnesium into the forming mineral, potentially providing an explanation for the variability in magnesium content observed in precipitates produced by different fish species.

  16. Toxic effect of a marine bacterium on aquatic organisms and its algicidal substances against Phaeocystis globosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiuchan Yang

    Full Text Available Harmful algal blooms have caused enormous damage to the marine ecosystem and the coastal economy in China. In this paper, a bacterial strain B1, which had strong algicidal activity against Phaeocystis globosa, was isolated from the coastal waters of Zhuhai in China. The strain B1 was identified as Bacillus sp. on the basis of 16S rDNA gene sequence and morphological characteristics. To evaluate the ecological safety of the algicidal substances produced by strain B1, their toxic effects on marine organisms were tested. Results showed that there were no adverse effects observed in the growth of Chlorella vulgaris, Chaetoceros muelleri, and Isochrystis galbana after exposure to the algicidal substances at a concentration of 1.0% (v/v for 96 h. The 48h LC50 values for Brachionus plicatilis, Moina mongolica Daday and Paralichthys olivaceus were 5.7, 9.0 and 12.1% (v/v, respectively. Subsequently, the algicidal substances from strain B1 culture were isolated and purified by silica gel column, Sephadex G-15 column and high-performance liquid chromatography. Based on quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry and PeakView Software, the purified substances were identified as prolyl-methionine and hypoxanthine. Algicidal mechanism indicated that prolyl-methionine and hypoxanthine inhibited the growth of P. globosa by disrupting the antioxidant systems. In the acute toxicity assessment using M. mongolica, 24h LC50 values of prolyl-methionine and hypoxanthine were 7.0 and 13.8 g/L, respectively. The active substances produced by strain B1 can be considered as ecologically and environmentally biological agents for controlling harmful algal blooms.

  17. Organic pollution and its effects in the marine mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis in Eastern Mediterranean coasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasiotis, Konstantinos M; Emmanouil, Christina; Anastasiadou, Pelagia; Papadi-Psyllou, Asimina; Papadopoulos, Antonis; Okay, Oya; Machera, Kyriaki

    2015-01-01

    Persistent chemicals and emerging pollutants are continuously detected in marine waters and biota. Out of these, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and organochlorine pesticides (OCs) are significant contaminants with decades of presence in the marine environment. The Mediterranean Sea is an ecosystem directly affected by a variety of anthropogenic activities including industry, municipal, touristic, commercial and agricultural. The Mediterranean mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis) is a filter feeder, which presents wide distribution. In this regard, the specific organism was used as a biological indicator for the monitoring and evaluation of pollution in the studied areas with focus on the mentioned chemical groups. Pristine Turkish sites with minimum effect from anthropogenic activities, in contrast with Greek sites which were subjected to heavy industrial and shipping activity, were selected. A gas chromatographic tandem mass spectrometric method (GC-MS/MS) was developed and validated to monitor 34 compounds (16 EPA priority PAHs and 18 OCs). Analyses of mussel samples in 2011 from sites with the limited anthropogenic pollution shores have shown the occurrence of 11 pollutants (6 PAHs, 5 OCs), while in the samples from sites with intensive activity and expected pollution, 12 PAHs and 6 OCs were detected. Biochemical and biological responses studied only in mussels samples from the sites with the highest contamination showed a situation that was under strong seasonal influence. The intensity of the response was also influenced by deployment duration. Noteworthy correlations were detected among biochemical/biological effects and between mussel body burden and these effects. Continuous monitoring of priority pollutants of East Mediterranean Sea is vital both for ecological and human risk assessment purposes.

  18. A multitrophic model to quantify the effects of marine viruses on microbial food webs and ecosystem processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitz, Joshua S; Stock, Charles A; Wilhelm, Steven W; Bourouiba, Lydia; Coleman, Maureen L; Buchan, Alison; Follows, Michael J; Fuhrman, Jed A; Jover, Luis F; Lennon, Jay T; Middelboe, Mathias; Sonderegger, Derek L; Suttle, Curtis A; Taylor, Bradford P; Frede Thingstad, T; Wilson, William H; Eric Wommack, K

    2015-06-01

    Viral lysis of microbial hosts releases organic matter that can then be assimilated by nontargeted microorganisms. Quantitative estimates of virus-mediated recycling of carbon in marine waters, first established in the late 1990s, were originally extrapolated from marine host and virus densities, host carbon content and inferred viral lysis rates. Yet, these estimates did not explicitly incorporate the cascade of complex feedbacks associated with virus-mediated lysis. To evaluate the role of viruses in shaping community structure and ecosystem functioning, we extend dynamic multitrophic ecosystem models to include a virus component, specifically parameterized for processes taking place in the ocean euphotic zone. Crucially, we are able to solve this model analytically, facilitating evaluation of model behavior under many alternative parameterizations. Analyses reveal that the addition of a virus component promotes the emergence of complex communities. In addition, biomass partitioning of the emergent multitrophic community is consistent with well-established empirical norms in the surface oceans. At steady state, ecosystem fluxes can be probed to characterize the effects that viruses have when compared with putative marine surface ecosystems without viruses. The model suggests that ecosystems with viruses will have (1) increased organic matter recycling, (2) reduced transfer to higher trophic levels and (3) increased net primary productivity. These model findings support hypotheses that viruses can have significant stimulatory effects across whole-ecosystem scales. We suggest that existing efforts to predict carbon and nutrient cycling without considering virus effects are likely to miss essential features of marine food webs that regulate global biogeochemical cycles.

  19. Transfer of radiocaesium from contaminated bottom sediments to marine organisms through benthic food chains in post-Fukushima and post-Chernobyl periods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezhenar, Roman; Maderich, Vladimir [Institute of Mathematical Machine and System Problems, Kiev (Ukraine); Jung, Kyung Tae [Korea Institute of Ocean Science and Technology, Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Willemsen, Stefan; With, Govert de [NRG, Arnhem (Netherlands); Qiao, Fangli [First Institute of Oceanography, Qingdao (China)

    2016-07-01

    After the earthquake and tsunami on 11 March 2011 damaged the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP), an accidental release of a large amount of radioactive isotopes into both the air and the ocean occurred. Measurements provided by the Japanese agencies over the past 5 years show that elevated concentrations of {sup 137}Cs still remain in sediments, benthic organisms, and demersal fishes in the coastal zone around the FDNPP. These observations indicate that there are {sup 137}Cs transfer pathways from bottom sediments to the marine organisms. To describe the transfer quantitatively, the dynamic food chain biological uptake model of radionuclides (BURN) has been extended to include benthic marine organisms. The extended model takes into account both pelagic and benthic marine organisms grouped into several classes based on their trophic level and type of species: phytoplankton, zooplankton, and fishes (two types: piscivorous and non-piscivorous) for the pelagic food chain; deposit-feeding invertebrates, demersal fishes fed by benthic invertebrates, and bottom omnivorous predators for the benthic food chain; crustaceans, mollusks, and coastal predators feeding on both pelagic and benthic organisms. Bottom invertebrates ingest organic parts of bottom sediments with adsorbed radionuclides which then migrate up through the food chain. All organisms take radionuclides directly from water as well as food. The model was implemented into the compartment model POSEIDON-R and applied to the north-western Pacific for the period of 1945-2010, and then for the period of 2011-2020 to assess the radiological consequences of {sup 137}Cs released due to the FDNPP accident. The model simulations for activity concentrations of {sup 137}Cs in both pelagic and benthic organisms in the coastal area around the FDNPP agree well with measurements for the period of 2011-2015. The decrease constant in the fitted exponential function of simulated concentration for the deposit

  20. Transfer of radiocaesium from contaminated bottom sediments to marine organisms through benthic food chains in post-Fukushima and post-Chernobyl periods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezhenar, Roman; Jung, Kyung Tae; Maderich, Vladimir; Willemsen, Stefan; de With, Govert; Qiao, Fangli

    2016-05-01

    After the earthquake and tsunami on 11 March 2011 damaged the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP), an accidental release of a large amount of radioactive isotopes into both the air and the ocean occurred. Measurements provided by the Japanese agencies over the past 5 years show that elevated concentrations of 137Cs still remain in sediments, benthic organisms, and demersal fishes in the coastal zone around the FDNPP. These observations indicate that there are 137Cs transfer pathways from bottom sediments to the marine organisms. To describe the transfer quantitatively, the dynamic food chain biological uptake model of radionuclides (BURN) has been extended to include benthic marine organisms. The extended model takes into account both pelagic and benthic marine organisms grouped into several classes based on their trophic level and type of species: phytoplankton, zooplankton, and fishes (two types: piscivorous and non-piscivorous) for the pelagic food chain; deposit-feeding invertebrates, demersal fishes fed by benthic invertebrates, and bottom omnivorous predators for the benthic food chain; crustaceans, mollusks, and coastal predators feeding on both pelagic and benthic organisms. Bottom invertebrates ingest organic parts of bottom sediments with adsorbed radionuclides which then migrate up through the food chain. All organisms take radionuclides directly from water as well as food. The model was implemented into the compartment model POSEIDON-R and applied to the north-western Pacific for the period of 1945-2010, and then for the period of 2011-2020 to assess the radiological consequences of 137Cs released due to the FDNPP accident. The model simulations for activity concentrations of 137Cs in both pelagic and benthic organisms in the coastal area around the FDNPP agree well with measurements for the period of 2011-2015. The decrease constant in the fitted exponential function of simulated concentration for the deposit-feeding invertebrates (0.45 yr-1

  1. Primary marine aerosol emissions: size resolved eddy covariance measurements with estimates of the sea salt and organic carbon fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. D. Nilsson

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Primary marine aerosol fluxes were measured using eddy covariance (EC, a condensation particle counter (CPC and an optical particle counter (OPC with a heated inlet. The later was used to discriminate between sea salt and total aerosol. Measurements were made from the 25 m tower at the research station Mace Head at the Irish west coast, May to September 2002. The aerosol fluxes were dominated by upward fluxes, sea spray from bubble bursting at the ocean surface. The sea salt aerosol number emissions increased two orders of magnitude with declining diameter from 1 to 0.1 μm where it peaked at values of 105 to 107 particles m−2s−1. The sea salt emissions increased at all sizes in the wind range 4 to 22 ms−1, in consistency with a power function of the wind speed. The sea salt emission data were compared to three recent sub micrometer sea salt source parameterisations. The best agreement was with Mårtensson et al. (2003, which appear to apply from 0.1 to 1.1 μm diameters in temperate water (12°C as well as tropical water (25°C. The total aerosol emissions were independent of the wind speed below 10 ms−1, but increased with the wind above 10 ms−1. The aerosol volume emissions were larger for the total aerosol than for the sea salt at all wind speeds, while the sea salt number emissions approached the total number emissions at 15 ms−1. It is speculated that this is caused by organic carbon in the surface water that is depleted at high wind speeds. The data are consistent with an internal aerosol mixture of sea salt, organic carbon and water. Using the aerosol model by Ellison et al. (1999 (a mono-layer of organic carbon surrounding a water-sea-salt brine we show that the total and sea salt aerosol emissions are consistent. This predict that the organic carbon fraction increase with decreasing diameter from a few % at 1 μm over 50% at about 0.5

  2. Vitamin B12 Production by Marine Bacteria in Organic Substrate Limited, Slow Growth Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villegas-Mendoza, J.; Cajal-Medrano, R.; Maske, H.

    2016-02-01

    The conditions and processes governing the B12 vitamin dissemination through planktonic organisms are little understood. It is generally assumed that bacteria produce B12 vitamin and the whole auxotrophic plankton community consumes it. We used natural marine bacteria communities and marine bacteria Dinoroseobacter shibae cultures, growing in substrate-limited continuous cultures at low specific growth rates [0.1 to 1 d-1] to measure intracellular and dissolved B12 production, bacterial and viral abundance, particulate organic carbon, and nitrogen, bacterial production, oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, ETS activity, and taxonomic composition. We find dissolved B12 vitamin at concentrations between 0 to 1.4 pM with no relation to growth or respiration rates. The intracellular B12 vitamin normalized to cell volume ranged between 1x10-2 to 4.6x10-2 pmol μm3 showing a significant relationship with growth rate [y=0.02(m)1.07; r2=0.78; p≤0.05; y=intracellular B12 production, pmol μm3 day-1; m=specific growth rate, day-1], and respiration rates [y=2.4ln(x)-2.66; r2=0.87; p≤0.05; x=CO2 production, μM day-1]. The vitamin B12 producing bacteria D. shibae, showed a dissolved B12 concentration between 0 and 1.8 pM, whereas intracellular B12 normalized to cell volume varied between 1.1x10-2 to 1.8x10-2 pmol μm-3, responding significantly to growth rate [y=0.01(m)0.56; r2=0.85; p≤0.05], and to respiration rates [y=3.01ln(x)-7.56, r2=0.97, p≤0.05; x=CO2 production, μM day-1]. The lack of correlation of dissolved B12 vitamin with the metabolic activity suggests that the dissolved B12 concentration depends on the interactions among vitamin B12 producers and consumers while the bacterial metabolism is regulating the intracellular production of B12 vitamin.

  3. Heavy metal distribution in organic and siliceous marine sponge tissues measured by square wave anodic stripping voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illuminati, S; Annibaldi, A; Truzzi, C; Scarponi, G

    2016-10-15

    May sponge spicules represent a "tank" to accumulate heavy metals? In this study we test this hypothesis determining the distribution of Cd, Pb and Cu concentrations between organic and siliceous tissues in Antarctic Demospongia (Sphaerotylus antarcticus, Kirkpatrikia coulmani and Haliclona sp.) and in the Mediterranean species Petrosia ficiformis. Results show that although, in these sponges, spicules represent about 80% of the mass content, the accumulation of pollutant is lower in the spicules than in the corresponding organic fraction. The contribution of tissues to the total sponge content of Cd, Pb and Cu is respectively 99%, 82% and 97% for Antarctic sponges and 96%, 95% and 96% for P. ficiformis, similar in polar and temperate organisms. These results pave the way to a better understanding of the role of marine sponges in uptaking heavy metals and to their possible use as monitor of marine ecosystems, recommend by the Water Framework Directive. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Environmental Proteomics: Changes in the Proteome of Marine Organisms in Response to Environmental Stress, Pollutants, Infection, Symbiosis, and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomanek, Lars

    2011-01-01

    Environmental proteomics, the study of changes in the abundance of proteins and their post-translational modifications, has become a powerful tool for generating hypotheses regarding how the environment affects the biology of marine organisms. Proteomics discovers hitherto unknown cellular effects of environmental stressors such as changes in thermal, osmotic, and anaerobic conditions. Proteomic analyses have advanced the characterization of the biological effects of pollutants and identified comprehensive and pollutant-specific sets of biomarkers, especially those highlighting post-translational modifications. Proteomic analyses of infected organisms have highlighted the broader changes occurring during immune responses and how the same pathways are attenuated during the maintenance of symbiotic relationships. Finally, proteomic changes occurring during the early life stages of marine organisms emphasize the importance of signaling events during development in a rapidly changing environment. Changes in proteins functioning in energy metabolism, cytoskeleton, protein stabilization and turnover, oxidative stress, and signaling are common responses to environmental change.

  5. Generalized Ocean Color Inversion Model for Retrieving Marine Inherent Optical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werdell, P. Jeremy; Franz, Bryan A.; Bailey, Sean W.; Feldman, Gene C.; Boss, Emmanuel; Brando, Vittorio E.; Dowell, Mark; Hirata, Takafumi; Lavender, Samantha J.; Lee, ZhongPing; Loisel, Hubert; Maritorena, Stephane; Melin, Frederic; Moore, Timothy S.; Smyth, TImothy J.; Antoine, David; Devred, Emmanuel; Fantond'Andon, Odile Hembise; Mangin, Antoine

    2013-01-01

    Ocean color measured from satellites provides daily, global estimates of marine inherent optical properties (IOPs). Semi-analytical algorithms (SAAs) provide one mechanism for inverting the color of the water observed by the satellite into IOPs. While numerous SAAs exist, most are similarly constructed and few are appropriately parameterized for all water masses for all seasons. To initiate community-wide discussion of these limitations, NASA organized two workshops that deconstructed SAAs to identify similarities and uniqueness and to progress toward consensus on a unified SAA. This effort resulted in the development of the generalized IOP (GIOP) model software that allows for the construction of different SAAs at runtime by selection from an assortment of model parameterizations. As such, GIOP permits isolation and evaluation of specific modeling assumptions, construction of SAAs, development of regionally tuned SAAs, and execution of ensemble inversion modeling. Working groups associated with the workshops proposed a preliminary default configuration for GIOP (GIOP-DC), with alternative model parameterizations and features defined for subsequent evaluation. In this paper, we: (1) describe the theoretical basis of GIOP; (2) present GIOP-DC and verify its comparable performance to other popular SAAs using both in situ and synthetic data sets; and, (3) quantify the sensitivities of their output to their parameterization. We use the latter to develop a hierarchical sensitivity of SAAs to various model parameterizations, to identify components of SAAs that merit focus in future research, and to provide material for discussion on algorithm uncertainties and future ensemble applications.

  6. Butyltin compounds in biofilm and marine organisms from the Dona Paula Bay, west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhosle, N.B.

    and Salazar 1991) and microalgae (Beaumont and Newman 1986). Because of these environmental effects, many countries have formulated laws to control the usage of TBT. The first regulatory and legislative risk management actions for the usage of TBT were... Organotin compounds in Mediterranean: a continuing cause for concern Marine Environmental Research 32: 261-270 Beaumont A R and Newman P B. 1986 Low levels of tributyltin reduce growth of marine micro-algae Marine Pollution Bulletin 17: 457-461 Bennett...

  7. MOSAIC: An organic geochemical and sedimentological database for marine surface sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavagna, Maria Luisa; Usman, Muhammed; De Avelar, Silvania; Eglinton, Timothy

    2015-04-01

    Modern ocean sediments serve as the interface between the biosphere and the geosphere, play a key role in biogeochemical cycles and provide a window on how contemporary processes are written into the sedimentary record. Research over past decades has resulted in a wealth of information on the content and composition of organic matter in marine sediments, with ever-more sophisticated techniques continuing to yield information of greater detail and as an accelerating pace. However, there has been no attempt to synthesize this wealth of information. We are establishing a new database that incorporates information relevant to local, regional and global-scale assessment of the content, source and fate of organic materials accumulating in contemporary marine sediments. In the MOSAIC (Modern Ocean Sediment Archive and Inventory of Carbon) database, particular emphasis is placed on molecular and isotopic information, coupled with relevant contextual information (e.g., sedimentological properties) relevant to elucidating factors that influence the efficiency and nature of organic matter burial. The main features of MOSAIC include: (i) Emphasis on continental margin sediments as major loci of carbon burial, and as the interface between terrestrial and oceanic realms; (ii) Bulk to molecular-level organic geochemical properties and parameters, including concentration and isotopic compositions; (iii) Inclusion of extensive contextual data regarding the depositional setting, in particular with respect to sedimentological and redox characteristics. The ultimate goal is to create an open-access instrument, available on the web, to be utilized for research and education by the international community who can both contribute to, and interrogate the database. The submission will be accomplished by means of a pre-configured table available on the MOSAIC webpage. The information on the filled tables will be checked and eventually imported, via the Structural Query Language (SQL), into

  8. Soil organic carbon stocks in estuarine and marine mangrove ecosystems are driven by nutrient colimitation of P and N.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Christian; Weiss, Joanna; Boy, Jens; Iskandar, Issi; Mikutta, Robert; Guggenberger, Georg

    2016-07-01

    Mangroves play an important role in carbon sequestration, but soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks differ between marine and estuarine mangroves, suggesting differing processes and drivers of SOC accumulation. Here, we compared undegraded and degraded marine and estuarine mangroves in a regional approach across the Indonesian archipelago for their SOC stocks and evaluated possible drivers imposed by nutrient limitations along the land-to-sea gradients. SOC stocks in natural marine mangroves (271-572 Mg ha(-1) m(-1)) were much higher than under estuarine mangroves (100-315 Mg ha(-1) m(-1)) with a further decrease caused by degradation to 80-132 Mg ha(-1) m(-1). Soils differed in C/N ratio (marine: 29-64; estuarine: 9-28), δ (15)N (marine: -0.6 to 0.7‰; estuarine: 2.5 to 7.2‰), and plant-available P (marine: 2.3-6.3 mg kg(-1); estuarine: 0.16-1.8 mg kg(-1)). We found N and P supply of sea-oriented mangroves primarily met by dominating symbiotic N2 fixation from air and P import from sea, while mangroves on the landward gradient increasingly covered their demand in N and P from allochthonous sources and SOM recycling. Pioneer plants favored by degradation further increased nutrient recycling from soil resulting in smaller SOC stocks in the topsoil. These processes explained the differences in SOC stocks along the land-to-sea gradient in each mangrove type as well as the SOC stock differences observed between estuarine and marine mangrove ecosystems. This first large-scale evaluation of drivers of SOC stocks under mangroves thus suggests a continuum in mangrove functioning across scales and ecotypes and additionally provides viable proxies for carbon stock estimations in PES or REDD schemes.

  9. Organic geochemical characterisation of shallow marine Cretaceous formations from Yola Sub-basin, Northern Benue Trough, NE Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarki Yandoka, Babangida M.; Abdullah, Wan Hasiah; Abubakar, M. B.; Hakimi, Mohammed Hail; Jauro, Aliyu; Adegoke, Adebanji Kayode

    2016-05-01

    The shallow marine shales of the Cretaceous formations namely Yolde, Dukul, Jessu, Sekuliye and Numanha ranging in age from Cenomanian to Coniacian within the Yola Sub-basin in the Northern Benue Trough, northeastern Nigeria were analysed to provide an overview on their hydrocarbon generation potential. This study is based on pyrolysis analysis, total organic carbon content (TOC), extractable organic matter (EOM), biomarker distributions and measured vitrinite reflectance. The present-day TOC contents range between 0.24 and 0.71 wt. % and Hydrogen Index (HI) values between 8.7 and 113 mg HC/g TOC with Type III/IV kerogens. Based on the present-day kerogen typing, the shale sediments are expected to generate mainly gas. Biomarker compositions indicates deposition in a marine environment under suboxic conditions with prevalent contribution of aquatic organic matter and a significant amount of terrigenous organic matter input. Organic matter that is dominated by marine components contains kerogens of Type II and Type II-III. This study shows that the organic matter has been affected by volcanic intrusion and consequently, have reached post-mature stage of oil generation. These higher thermal maturities levels are consistent with the vitrinite reflectance ranging from 0.85 to 2.35 Ro % and high Tmax (440-508 °C) values as supported by biomarker maturity ratios. Based on this study, a high prospect for major gas and minor oil generation potential is anticipated from the shallow marine Cretaceous formations from Yola Sub-basin.

  10. Dynamics models of soil organic carbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANGLi-xia; PANJian-jun

    2003-01-01

    As the largest pool of terrestrial organic carbon, soils interact strongly with atmosphere composition, climate, and land change. Soil organic carbon dynamics in ecosystem plays a great role in global carbon cycle and global change. With development of mathematical models that simulate changes in soil organic carbon, there have been considerable advances in understanding soil organic carbon dynamics. This paper mainly reviewed the composition of soil organic matter and its influenced factors, and recommended some soil organic matter models worldwide. Based on the analyses of the developed results at home and abroad, it is suggested that future soil organic matter models should be developed toward based-process models, and not always empirical ones. The models are able to reveal their interaction between soil carbon systems, climate and land cover by technique and methods of GIS (Geographical Information System) and RS (Remote Sensing). These models should be developed at a global scale, in dynamically describing the spatial and temporal changes of soil organic matter cycle. Meanwhile, the further researches on models should be strengthen for providing theory basis and foundation in making policy of green house gas emission in China.

  11. Molecular evidence for abiotic sulfurization of dissolved organic matter in marine shallow hydrothermal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Saez, Gonzalo V.; Niggemann, Jutta; Dittmar, Thorsten; Pohlabeln, Anika M.; Lang, Susan Q.; Noowong, Ann; Pichler, Thomas; Wörmer, Lars; Bühring, Solveig I.

    2016-10-01

    recirculation in Milos seafloor. The four most effective potential sulfurization reactions were those exchanging an O atom by one S atom in the formula or the equivalent + H2S reaction, correspondingly exchanging H2O, H2 and/or O2 by a H2S molecule. Our study reveals novel insights into DOS dynamics in marine hydrothermal environments and provides a conceptual framework for molecular-scale mechanisms in organic sulfur geochemistry.

  12. Marine biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurman, H.V.; Webber, H.H.

    1984-01-01

    This book discusses both taxonomic and ecological topics on marine biology. Full coverage of marine organisms of all five kingdoms is provided, along with interesting and thorough discussion of all major marine habitats. Organization into six major parts allows flexibility. It also provides insight into important topics such as disposal of nuclear waste at sea, the idea that life began on the ocean floor, and how whales, krill, and people interact. A full-color photo chapter reviews questions, and exercises. The contents are: an overview marine biology: fundamental concepts/investigating life in the ocean; the physical ocean, the ocean floor, the nature of water, the nature and motion of ocean water; general ecology, conditions for life in the sea, biological productivity and energy transfer; marine organisms; monera, protista, mycota and metaphyta; the smaller marine animals, the large animals marine habitats, the intertidal zone/benthos of the continental shelf, the photic zone, the deep ocean, the ocean under stress, marine pollution, appendix a: the metric system and conversion factors/ appendix b: prefixes and suffixes/ appendix c: taxonomic classification of common marine organisms, and glossary, and index.

  13. Amino acids, fatty acids and sterols profile of some marine organisms from Portuguese waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, David M; Valentão, Patrícia; Teixeira, Natércia; Andrade, Paula B

    2013-12-01

    Marine organisms have been increasingly regarded as good sources of new drugs for human therapeutics and also as nutrients for human diet. The amino acids, fatty acids and sterols profiles of the widely consumed echinoderms Paracentrotus lividus Lamarck (sea urchin), Holothuria forskali Chiaje (sea cucumber), the gastropod molluscs Aplysia fasciata Poiret and Aplysia punctata Cuvier (sea hares), from Portuguese waters, were established by GC-MS analysis. Overall, 10 amino acids, 14 fatty acids and 4 sterols were determined. In general, all species presented the 10 amino acids identified, with the exceptions of H. forskali, in which no glycine, proline, trans-4-hydroxy-proline or phenylalanine were found, and of A. fasciata which did not contain proline. Unsaturated fatty acids were predominant compounds, with those from the ω-6 series, being in higher amounts than their ω-3 homologues, and cholesterol being the main sterol. The amino acids, fatty acids and sterols qualitative and quantitative composition of A. fasciata, A. punctata and H. forskali is reported here for the first time. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Quick, portable toxicity testing of marine or terrigenous fluids, sediments, or chemicals with bioluminescent organism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabate, R.W.; Stiffey, A.V.; Dewailly, E.L. [Lumitox Gulf L.C., New Orleans, LA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    A hand-held, battery-operated instrument, which measures bioluminescence inhibition of the microscopic marine dinoflagellate Pyrocystis lunula, is capable of field-testing substances for toxicity. The organism is sensitive to ppb of strong toxicants. It tolerates some solvents in concentrations necessary for testing lipophylic samples. A test consumes only micrograms of sample. This method requires no adjustments for salinity, pH, color, or turbidity. It has been used successfully to test oil-well drilling fluids, brines produced with oil, waters and sediments from streams and lakes and petroleum-plant effluents containing contaminants such as benzene. The test is non-specific; however, if the substance is known, the end-point effects a direct measurement of its concentration. One-hour toxicity screening tests in the field produce results comparable to the standard four-hour laboratory test. Keeping the sample in the dark during incubation and testing, together with shortness of the overall procedure, eliminates anomalies from light-sensitive substances. Day-to-day variation, as well as among test replicates, is less than 10%. This quick method yields results comparable with a quick test that uses Photobacterium phosphoria, and with 96-hour tests that use Mysidopsis bahia, Artemia salina, Gonyaulax polyedra, Pimephales promelas, Ceriodaphnia dubia, and Cyprinodon variegatus.

  15. Early life developmental effects of marine persistent organic pollutants on the sea urchin Psammechinus miliaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmo, Henrique M R; Koerting, Lina; Devito, Sarah; van den Berg, Johannes H J; Dubbeldam, Marco; Kwadijk, Christiaan; Murk, Albertinka J

    2011-11-01

    A new 16-day echinoid early life stage (ELS) bioassay was developed to allow for prolonged observation of possible adverse effects during embryogenesis and larval development of the sea urchin Psammechinus miliaris. Subsequently, the newly developed bioassay was applied to study the effects of key marine persistent organic pollutants (POPs). Mortality, morphological abnormalities and larval development stages were quantified at specific time points during the 16-day experimental period. In contrast to amphibians and fish, P. miliaris early life development was not sensitive to dioxin-like toxicity in the prolonged early life stage test. Triclosan (TCS) levels higher than 500 nM were acutely toxic during embryo development. Morphological abnormalities were induced at concentrations higher than 50 nM hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) and 1000 nM tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA). Larval development was delayed above 25 nM HBCD and 500 nM TBBPA. Heptadecafluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) exposure slightly accelerated larval development at 9 days post-fertilization (dpf). However, the accelerated development was no longer observed at the end of the test period (16 dpf). The newly developed 16-day echinoid ELS bioassay proved to be sensitive to toxic effects of POPs that can be monitored for individual echinoid larvae. The most sensitive and dose related endpoint was the number of developmental penalty points. By manipulation of the housing conditions, the reproductive season could be extended from 3 to 9 months per year and the ELS experiments could be performed in artificial sea water as well.

  16. The Impact of Ocean Acidification on Reproduction, Early Development and Settlement of Marine Organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A. Bailey

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Predicting the impact of warming and acidifying on oceans on the early development life history stages of invertebrates although difficult, is essential in order to anticipate the severity and consequences of future climate change. This review summarises the current literature and meta-analyses on the early life-history stages of invertebrates including fertilisation, larval development and the implications for dispersal and settlement of populations. Although fertilisation appears robust to near future predictions of ocean acidification, larval development is much more vulnerable and across invertebrate groups, evidence indicates that the impacts may be severe. This is especially for those many marine organisms which start to calcify in their larval and/or juvenile stages. Species-specificity and variability in responses and current gaps in the literature are highlighted, including the need for studies to investigate the total effects of climate change including the synergistic impact of temperature, and the need for long-term multigenerational experiments to determine whether vulnerable invertebrate species have the capacity to adapt to elevations in atmospheric CO2 over the next century.

  17. Kernel density surface modelling as a means to identify significant concentrations of vulnerable marine ecosystem indicators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Kenchington

    Full Text Available The United Nations General Assembly Resolution 61/105, concerning sustainable fisheries in the marine ecosystem, calls for the protection of vulnerable marine ecosystems (VME from destructive fishing practices. Subsequently, the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO produced guidelines for identification of VME indicator species/taxa to assist in the implementation of the resolution, but recommended the development of case-specific operational definitions for their application. We applied kernel density estimation (KDE to research vessel trawl survey data from inside the fishing footprint of the Northwest Atlantic Fisheries Organization (NAFO Regulatory Area in the high seas of the northwest Atlantic to create biomass density surfaces for four VME indicator taxa: large-sized sponges, sea pens, small and large gorgonian corals. These VME indicator taxa were identified previously by NAFO using the fragility, life history characteristics and structural complexity criteria presented by FAO, along with an evaluation of their recovery trajectories. KDE, a non-parametric neighbour-based smoothing function, has been used previously in ecology to identify hotspots, that is, areas of relatively high biomass/abundance. We present a novel approach of examining relative changes in area under polygons created from encircling successive biomass categories on the KDE surface to identify "significant concentrations" of biomass, which we equate to VMEs. This allows identification of the VMEs from the broader distribution of the species in the study area. We provide independent assessments of the VMEs so identified using underwater images, benthic sampling with other gear types (dredges, cores, and/or published species distribution models of probability of occurrence, as available. For each VME indicator taxon we provide a brief review of their ecological function which will be important in future assessments of significant adverse impact on these habitats here

  18. Feasibility study for application of the marine coral powder as a novel adsorbent for Volatile Organic Hydrocarbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Mashkoori

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The marine coral has a porous outer surface and it has served in the processes such as water treatment systems, removal of carbon dioxide and adsorption of arsenic. Based on the need for cheap and efficient adsorbents, in sampling, the aim of this study, comparison of the efficiency of marine coral powder and activated charcoal in adsorption of volatile organic hydrocarbons was considered. In this experimental research, a certain concentrations of 8 volatile organic hydrocarbons: (para-Xylene, Chloroform, Carbon tetrachloride, tert-Butanol, Pyridine, Acetone, Ethyl acetate and Diethyl ether was injected into dynamic atmospheric chamber in the NTP (Normal Temperature and Pressure conditions. Air sampling was performed with the tube containing marine coral powder as well as the tube of activated charcoal, based on the standard method of NIOSH (National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health and in the same laboratory conditions. Then samples were injected into the gas Chromatograph apparatus and analytical comparison has been done between the amount of adsorption of hydrocarbons by activated charcoal and coral powder-test and Mann-Whitney were done with SPSS V.20.Findings showed that there was a significant difference between the amount of adsorption of Para-Xylene, carbon tetrachloride, tert-Butanol, Pyridine, acetone and Ethyl acetate hydrocarbons by activated charcoal and coral powder (P<0.05(. The amount of hydrocarbons adsorption by activated charcoal was, more than coral powder significantly (P<0.001. Based on the present research, in sampling of used hydrocarbons, the marine coral powder was less efficient than the activated charcoal, and it is recommended that more works be designed about other techniques such as coating of the marine coral powder in order to the improvement of adsorption capacity for volatile organic hydrocarbons.

  19. Persistent organic pollutants in marine fish from Yongxing Island, South China Sea: levels, composition profiles and human dietary exposure assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yu-Xin; Hao, Qing; Xu, Xiang-Rong; Luo, Xiao-Jun; Wang, Shuai-Long; Zhang, Zai-Wang; Mai, Bi-Xian

    2014-03-01

    Little data is available on the bioaccumulation of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in marine organisms from South China Sea (SCS). Five marine fish species were collected from Yongxing Island, SCS to investigate the presence of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and its metabolites (DDTs). PBDEs, PCBs, and DDTs concentrations ranged from 2.0-117, 6.3-199, and 9.7-5831 ng g(-1) lw, respectively. In general, contaminants measured in this study were at the lower end of the global range. Concentrations of PBDEs and PCBs were significantly correlated in fish samples, implying that PBDEs are as prevalent as PCBs in Yongxing Island. Among the five fish species studied, yellow striped goatfish had the highest concentrations of PBDEs, PCBs, and DDTs, probably attributed to its different living and feeding habits. The contaminant distribution pattern indicated that agrochemical source is more important than industrial source in Yongxing Island, SCS. The average estimated daily intakes of PBDEs, PCBs, and DDTs via fish consumption by local residents in the coastal areas of South China ranged from 1.42-5.91, 3.20-13.3, and 8.08-33.6 ng d(-1), which were lower than those in previous studies, suggesting that consumption of marine fish in Yongxing Island, SCS, might not subject local residents to significant health risk as far as POPs are concerned. This is the first study to report the occurrence of POPs in marine biota from SCS.

  20. Bioaccumulation of metallic trace elements and organic pollutants in marine sponges from the South Brittany Coast, France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentric, Charline; Rehel, Karine; Dufour, Alain; Sauleau, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the accumulation of metallic and organic pollutants in marine sponges with the oyster Crassostrea gigas used as sentinel species. The concentrations of 12 Metallic Trace Elements (MTEs), 16 Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs), 7 PolyChlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs), and 3 organotin derivatives were measured in 7 marine sponges collected in the Etel River (South Brittany, France). Results indicated Al, Co, Cr, Fe, Pb, and Ti particularly accumulated in marine sponges such as Hymeniacidon perlevis and Raspailia ramosa at higher levels compared to oysters. At the opposite, Cu and Zn accumulated significantly at higher concentrations in oysters. Among PAHs analyzed, benzo(a)pyrene bioaccumulated in H. perlevis at levels up to 17-fold higher than in oysters. In contrast, PCBs bioaccumulated preferentially in oysters. Significant differences exist in the abilities of marine phyla and sponge species to accumulate organic and metallic pollutants however, among the few sponge species studied, H. perlevis showed impressive bioaccumulation properties. The use of this species as bioindicator and/or bioremediator near shellfish farming areas is also discussed.

  1. Seasonal variation in accumulation of persistent organic pollutants in an Arctic marine benthic food web

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evenset, A., E-mail: anita.evenset@akvaplan.niva.no [Akvaplan-niva. Fram Centre, Tromsø (Norway); University of Tromsø, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø (Norway); Hallanger, I.G. [University of Tromsø, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø (Norway); Tessmann, M. [Akvaplan-niva. Fram Centre, Tromsø (Norway); Institute for Hydrobiology and Fisheries Research, University of Hamburg (Germany); Warner, N. [Norwegian Institute for Air Research, Fram Centre, Tromsø (Norway); Ruus, A. [Norwegian Institute for Water Research, Oslo (Norway); Borgå, K. [Norwegian Institute for Water Research, Oslo (Norway); Department of Biosciences, P.O. Box 1066, Blindern 0316, Oslo (Norway); Gabrielsen, G.W. [Norwegian Polar Institute, Fram Centre, Tromsø (Norway); Christensen, G. [Akvaplan-niva. Fram Centre, Tromsø (Norway); Renaud, P.E. [Akvaplan-niva. Fram Centre, Tromsø (Norway); University Centre in Svalbard, Longyearbyen (Norway)

    2016-01-15

    The aim of the present study was to investigate seasonal variation in persistent organic pollutant (POP) concentrations, as well as food-web biomagnification, in an Arctic, benthic marine community. Macrozoobenthos, demersal fish and common eiders were collected both inside and outside of Kongsfjorden, Svalbard, during May, July and October 2007. The samples were analysed for a selection of legacy chlorinated POPs. Overall, low levels of POPs were measured in all samples. Although POP levels and accumulation patterns showed some seasonal variation, the magnitude and direction of change was not consistent among species. Overall, seasonality in bioaccumulation in benthic biota was less pronounced than in the pelagic system in Kongsfjorden. In addition, the results indicate that δ{sup 15}N is not a good predictor for POP-levels in benthic food chains. Other factors, such as feeding strategy (omnivory, necrophagy versus herbivory), degree of contact with the sediment, and a high dependence on particulate organic matter (POM), with low POP-levels and high δ{sup 15}N-values (due to bacterial isotope enrichment), seem to govern the uptake of the different POPs and result in loads deviating from what would be expected consulting the trophic position alone. - Highlights: • Seasonal variation in POP biomagnification was investigated in a benthic food web. • Levels of POPs are generally low in benthic species from Kongsfjorden, Svalbard. • POP-concentrations varied with season, but direction of change varied among taxa. • No POP-biomagnification, except for cis-nonachlor, was detected in this study. • δ{sup 15}N-values does not seem to be a good proxy for trophic level in macrozoobenthos.

  2. The Effectivity of Marine Bio-activator and Surimi Liquid Waste Addition of Characteristics Liquid Organic Fertilizer from Sargassum sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Putri Wening Ratrinia

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Organic fertilizer is highly recommended for soil and plant because it can improve the productivity and repair physical, chemical, and biological of soil. Sargassum sp. and surimi liquid wastes contain organic matter and nutrient needed by plants and soils. The addition of marine bio-activator which contains bacterial isolates from litter mangrove serves to accelerate the composting time and increases the activity of microorganisms in the decomposition process. The purpose of this study was to determine optimum time and the best formulation of decomposition process organic fertilizer. Raw materials used a waste of seaweed Sargassum sp., marine bio-activator and surimi liquid waste from catfish (Clarias sp.. The research was conducted six treatments control, Sargassum sp. + marine bio-activator, surimi liquid waste , Sargassum sp. + marine bio-activator + surimi liquid waste 80%, 90%, 100%. All treatments were fermented for 9 days and analysed the C-organic, total N, C/N ratio, P2 O5 , K2 O on days 0, 3, 6 and 9. The results showed the optimum fermentation period was on the 6th day. The most optimum concentration of surimi liquid waste added was at a concentration of 90%, with characteristics of the products was C-organic 0.803 ± 0.0115 %, total N 740.063 ± 0.0862 ppm, C/N ratio 10.855 ± 0.1562, P2 O5 425.603 ± 0.2329 ppm, K2 O 2738.627 ± 0.2836 ppm.

  3. The Effectivity of Marine Bio-activator and Surimi Liquid Waste Addition of Characteristics Liquid Organic Fertilizer from Sargassum sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Putri Wening Ratrinia

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available AbstractOrganic fertilizer is highly recommended for soil and plant because it can improve the productivity and repair physical, chemical, and biological of soil. Sargassum sp. and surimi liquid wastes contain organic matter and nutrient needed by plants and soils. The addition of marine bio-activator which contains bacterial isolates from litter mangrove serves to accelerate the composting time and increases the activity of microorganisms in the decomposition process. The purpose of this study was to determine optimum time and the best formulation of decomposition process organic fertilizer. Raw materials used a waste of seaweed Sargassum sp., marine bio-activator and surimi liquid waste from catfish (Clarias sp.. The research was conducted six treatments control, Sargassum sp. + marine bio-activator, surimi liquid waste , Sargassum sp. + marine bio-activator + surimi liquid waste 80%, 90%, 100%. All treatments were fermented for 9 days and analysed the C-organic, total N, C/N ratio, P2O5, K2O on days 0, 3, 6 and 9. The results showed the optimum fermentation period was on the 6th day. The most optimum concentration of surimi liquid waste added was at a concentration of 90%, with characteristics of the products was C-organic 0.803±0.0115%, total N 740.063±0.0862 ppm, C/N ratio 10.855±0.1562, P2O5 425.603±0.2329 ppm, K2O 2738.627±0.2836 ppm.

  4. Converted waves in shallow marine environments: modelling and field experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El Allouche, N.

    2011-01-01

    The shallow marine subsurface is explored for various engineering purposes e.g. constructing installations and platforms, laying pipelines and dredging for sand. Knowledge of the soil properties is essential to minimize the risks involved with these offshore activities. Energy resources in the form

  5. Sorption of hydrophobic organic compounds to plastics in marine environments: Equilibrium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Endo, S.; Koelmans, A.A.

    2016-01-01

    Marine plastics have shown to contain various environmental chemicals. For evaluating the potential of plastics to influence regional and global dynamics of these chemicals and to serve as a vector to marine biota, understanding of sorption and desorption of chemicals by plastics is important. In

  6. Sorption of hydrophobic organic compounds to plastics in marine environments: Equilibrium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Endo, S.; Koelmans, A.A.

    2016-01-01

    Marine plastics have shown to contain various environmental chemicals. For evaluating the potential of plastics to influence regional and global dynamics of these chemicals and to serve as a vector to marine biota, understanding of sorption and desorption of chemicals by plastics is important. In th

  7. Production and Reutilization of Fluorescent Dissolved Organic Matter by a Marine Bacterial Strain, Alteromonas macleodii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Shuji; Tada, Yuya; Suzuki, Koji; Yamashita, Youhei

    2017-01-01

    The recalcitrant fraction of marine dissolved organic matter (DOM) plays an important role in carbon storage on the earth’s surface. Bacterial production of recalcitrant DOM (RDOM) has been proposed as a carbon sequestration process. It is still unclear whether bacterial physiology can affect RDOM production. In this study, we conducted a batch culture using the marine bacterial isolate Alteromonas macleodii, a ubiquitous gammaproteobacterium, to evaluate the linkage between bacterial growth and DOM production. Glucose (1 mmol C L-1) was used as the sole carbon source, and the bacterial number, the DOM concentration in terms of carbon, and the excitation–emission matrices (EEMs) of DOM were monitored during the 168-h incubation. The incubation period was partitioned into the exponential growth (0–24 h) and stationary phases (24–168 h) based on the growth curve. Although the DOM concentration decreased during the exponential growth phase due to glucose consumption, it remained stable during the stationary phase, corresponding to approximately 4% of the initial glucose in terms of carbon. Distinct fluorophores were not evident in the EEMs at the beginning of the incubation, but DOM produced by the strain exhibited five fluorescent peaks during exponential growth. Two fluorescent peaks were similar to protein-like fluorophores, while the others could be categorized as humic-like fluorophores. All fluorophores increased during the exponential growth phase. The tryptophan-like fluorophore decreased during the stationary phase, suggesting that the strain reused the large exopolymer. The tyrosine-like fluorophore seemed to be stable during the stationary phase, implying that the production of tyrosine-containing small peptides through the degradation of exopolymers was correlated with the reutilization of the tyrosine-like fluorophore. Two humic-like fluorophores that showed emission maxima at the longer wavelength (525 nm) increased during the stationary phase

  8. Adjoint Assimilation in Marine Ecosystem Models and an Example of Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Qing; LIU Yuguang; L(U) Xianqing

    2005-01-01

    This paper aims at a review of the work carried out to date on the adjoint assimilation of data in marine ecosystem models since 1995. The structure and feature of the adjoint assimilation in marine ecosystem models are also introduced.To illustrate the application of the adjoint technique and its merits, a 4-variable ecosystem model coupled with a 3-D physical model is established for the Bohai Sea and the Yellow Sea. The chlorophyll concentration data derived from the SeaWiFS ocean colour data are assimilated in the model with the technique. Some results are briefly presented.

  9. Marine geophysics. New global marine gravity model from CryoSat-2 and Jason-1 reveals buried tectonic structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandwell, David T; Müller, R Dietmar; Smith, Walter H F; Garcia, Emmanuel; Francis, Richard

    2014-10-03

    Gravity models are powerful tools for mapping tectonic structures, especially in the deep ocean basins where the topography remains unmapped by ships or is buried by thick sediment. We combined new radar altimeter measurements from satellites CryoSat-2 and Jason-1 with existing data to construct a global marine gravity model that is two times more accurate than previous models. We found an extinct spreading ridge in the Gulf of Mexico, a major propagating rift in the South Atlantic Ocean, abyssal hill fabric on slow-spreading ridges, and thousands of previously uncharted seamounts. These discoveries allow us to understand regional tectonic processes and highlight the importance of satellite-derived gravity models as one of the primary tools for the investigation of remote ocean basins.

  10. Molecular characterization of water soluble organic nitrogen in marine rainwater by ultra-high resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altieri, K. E.; Hastings, M. G.; Peters, A. J.; Sigman, D. M.

    2012-04-01

    Atmospheric water soluble organic nitrogen (WSON) is a subset of the complex organic matter in aerosols and rainwater, which impacts cloud condensation processes and aerosol chemical and optical properties and may play a significant role in the biogeochemical cycle of N. However, its sources, composition, connections to inorganic N, and variability are largely unknown. Rainwater samples were collected on the island of Bermuda (32.27° N, 64.87° W), which experiences both anthropogenic and marine influenced air masses. Samples were analyzed by ultra-high resolution electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry to chemically characterize the WSON. Elemental compositions of 2281 N containing compounds were determined over the mass range m/z+ 50 to 500. The five compound classes with the largest number of elemental formulas identified, in order from the highest number of formulas to the lowest, contained carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen (CHON+), CHON compounds that contained sulfur (CHONS+), CHON compounds that contained phosphorus (CHONP+), CHON compounds that contained both sulfur and phosphorus (CHONSP+), and compounds that contained only carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen (CHN+). Compared to rainwater collected in the continental USA, average O:C ratios of all N containing compound classes were lower in the marine samples whereas double bond equivalent values were higher, suggesting a reduced role of secondary formation mechanisms. Despite their prevalence in continental rainwater, no organonitrates or nitrooxy-organosulfates were detected, but there was an increased presence of organic S and organic P containing compounds in the marine rainwater. Cluster analysis showed a clear chemical distinction between samples collected during the cold season (October to March) which have anthropogenic air mass origins and samples collected during the warm season (April to September) with remote marine air mass origins. This, in

  11. Molecular characterization of water soluble organic nitrogen in marine rainwater by ultra-high resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. E. Altieri

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric water soluble organic nitrogen (WSON is a subset of the complex organic matter in aerosols and rainwater, which impacts cloud condensation processes and aerosol chemical and optical properties, and may play a significant role in the biogeochemical cycle of N. However, its sources, composition, connections to inorganic N, and variability are largely unknown. Rainwater samples were collected on the island of Bermuda (32.27° N, 64.87° W, which experiences both anthropogenic and marine influenced air masses. Samples were analyzed by ultra-high resolution electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry to chemically characterize the WSON. Elemental compositions of 2455 N containing compounds were determined over the mass range m/z+ 50 to 500. The five compound classes with the largest number of elemental formulas identified, in order from the highest number of formulas to the lowest, contained carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen (CHON+, CHON compounds that contained sulfur (CHONS+, CHON compounds that contained phosphorous (CHONP+, CHON compounds that contained both sulfur and phosphorous (CHONSP+, and compounds that contained only carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen (CHN+. No organonitrates or nitrooxy-organosulfates were detected, but there was an increased presence of organic S and organic P containing compounds in the marine rainwater. Compared to rainwater collected in the continental USA, average O:C ratios of all N containing compound classes were lower in the marine samples whereas double bond equivalent values were higher, suggesting a reduced role of secondary formation mechanisms. Cluster analysis showed a clear chemical distinction between samples collected during the cold season (October to March which have anthropogenic air mass origins and samples collected during the warm season (April to September with remote marine air mass origins. This, in conjunction with patterns

  12. Mathematical model of marine diesel engine simulator for a new methodology of self propulsion tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzuddin, Nur; Sunarsih, Priyanto, Agoes

    2015-05-01

    As a vessel operates in the open seas, a marine diesel engine simulator whose engine rotation is controlled to transmit through propeller shaft is a new methodology for the self propulsion tests to track the fuel saving in a real time. Considering the circumstance, this paper presents the real time of marine diesel engine simulator system to track the real performance of a ship through a computer-simulated model. A mathematical model of marine diesel engine and the propeller are used in the simulation to estimate fuel rate, engine rotating speed, thrust and torque of the propeller thus achieve the target vessel's speed. The input and output are a real time control system of fuel saving rate and propeller rotating speed representing the marine diesel engine characteristics. The self-propulsion tests in calm waters were conducted using a vessel model to validate the marine diesel engine simulator. The simulator then was used to evaluate the fuel saving by employing a new mathematical model of turbochargers for the marine diesel engine simulator. The control system developed will be beneficial for users as to analyze different condition of vessel's speed to obtain better characteristics and hence optimize the fuel saving rate.

  13. Mathematical model of marine diesel engine simulator for a new methodology of self propulsion tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izzuddin, Nur; Sunarsih,; Priyanto, Agoes [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia)

    2015-05-15

    As a vessel operates in the open seas, a marine diesel engine simulator whose engine rotation is controlled to transmit through propeller shaft is a new methodology for the self propulsion tests to track the fuel saving in a real time. Considering the circumstance, this paper presents the real time of marine diesel engine simulator system to track the real performance of a ship through a computer-simulated model. A mathematical model of marine diesel engine and the propeller are used in the simulation to estimate fuel rate, engine rotating speed, thrust and torque of the propeller thus achieve the target vessel’s speed. The input and output are a real time control system of fuel saving rate and propeller rotating speed representing the marine diesel engine characteristics. The self-propulsion tests in calm waters were conducted using a vessel model to validate the marine diesel engine simulator. The simulator then was used to evaluate the fuel saving by employing a new mathematical model of turbochargers for the marine diesel engine simulator. The control system developed will be beneficial for users as to analyze different condition of vessel’s speed to obtain better characteristics and hence optimize the fuel saving rate.

  14. Improving the Gap between Model Predictions and Observations of Formaldehyde over the Remote Marine Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trueblood, J.; Meskhidze, N.

    2013-05-01

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is a ubiquitous oxidation product that exists in polluted rural and urban areas, as well as remote background sites where it is an important photochemical intermediate. HCHO levels of up to six times above what is typically predicted by photochemical models have been reported over the Marine Boundary Layer (MBL). As proposed mechanisms for HCHO production remain to be insufficient to explain such large discrepancies between model predictions and measured values, the role of marine regions in the creation of HCHO continues to be one of the largest sources of uncertainty in current global chemistry-transport models. Here we examine the viability of a proposed mechanism for the photochemical production of formaldehyde involving aerosols enriched with biologically produced organic matter. In this study, the phytoplankton Emiliania Huxleyi was incubated in autoclaved seawater contained within a 9 liter Pyrex glass bottle. Quantitative analysis of the enrichment of transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) and other biologically produced organic matter (dissolved and particulate) in the surface microlayer was carried out by employing Alldredge's alcian blue staining technique. To produce organic aerosols, enriched seawater was bubbled with hydrocarbon free air using a sintered glass filter placed 5 cm below the surface. Utilizing a mixed flow reaction scheme, produced aerosols were then pushed through stainless steel flow tubes into a separate 9-liter Pyrex glass container acting as a residence chamber. The container was surrounded with six Ushio 9W Midrange UVB lights to allow for the irradiation of aerosols at 306 nm. A flow rate of approximately 0.1 l/min allowed for an average aerosol residence time of 90 minutes inside the residence chamber. All air from the chamber was then passed through a 5" long Pyrex desorber tube packed with 60/80 Tenax that had been soaked in the derivatizing agent pentafluorophenyl hydrazine (PFPH). Subsequent thermal

  15. Levelized Cost of Energy Analysis of Marine and Hydrokinetic Reference Models: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenne, D. S.; Yu, Y. H.; Neary, V.

    2015-04-24

    In 2010 the U.S. Department of Energy initiated the development of six marine energy converter reference models. The reference models are point designs of well-known marine energy converters. Each device was designed to operate in a specific marine resource, instead of a generic device that can be deployed at any location. This method allows each device to be used as a benchmark for future reference model to benchmark future devices. The six designs consist of three current energy converters and three wave energy converters. The reference model project has generated both technical and economic data sets that are available in the public domain. The methodology to calculate the levelized cost of energy for the reference model project and an overall comparison of the cost of energy from these six reference-model designs are presented in this paper.

  16. Marine organic geochemistry in industrially affected coastal areas in Greece: Hydrocarbons in surface sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzianestis, Ioannis

    2015-04-01

    Hydrocarbons are abundant components of the organic material in coastal zones. Their sources are mainly anthropogenic, but several natural ones have also been recognized. Among hydrocarbons, the polycyclic aromatic ones (PAHs) have received special attention since they considered as hazardous environmental chemicals and are included in priority pollutant lists. The purpose of this study was to investigate the distribution, sources and transport pathways of hydrocarbons in marine areas in Greece directly influenced from the operation of major industrial units in the coastal zone by using a molecular marker approach, characteristic compositional patterns and related indices and also to evaluate their potential toxicity. Thirty two surface sediment samples were collected from three marine areas: a) Antikyra bay in Korinthiakos gulf, affected from the operation of an alumina and production plant b) Larymna bay in Noth Evoikos, affected from the operation of a nickel production plant and c) Aliveri bay in South Evoikos Gulf, affected from a cement production plant. In all the studied areas aquaculture and fishing activities have been also developed in the coastal zone. High aliphatic hydrocarbon (AHC) concentrations (~500 μg/g), indicating significant petroleum related inputs, were measured only in Antikyra bay. In all the other samples, AHC values were below 100 μg/g. N-alkanes were the most prominent resolved components (R) with an elevated odd to even carbon number preference, revealing the high importance of terrestrial inputs in the study areas. The unresolved complex mixture (UCM) was the major component of the aliphatic fraction (UCM/R > 4), indicating a chronic oil pollution. A series of hopanes were also identified, with patterns characteristic of oil-derived hydrocarbons, further confirming the presence of pollutant inputs from fossil fuel products. Extremely high PAH concentrations (> 100,000 ng/g) were found in the close vicinity of the alumina production

  17. Environmental variables and definitive host distribution: a habitat suitability modelling for endohelminth parasites in the marine realm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Thomas; Cunze, Sarah; Kochmann, Judith; Klimpel, Sven

    2016-08-01

    Marine nematodes of the genus Anisakis are common parasites of a wide range of aquatic organisms. Public interest is primarily based on their importance as zoonotic agents of the human Anisakiasis, a severe infection of the gastro-intestinal tract as result of consuming live larvae in insufficiently cooked fish dishes. The diverse nature of external impacts unequally influencing larval and adult stages of marine endohelminth parasites requires the consideration of both abiotic and biotic factors. Whereas abiotic factors are generally more relevant for early life stages and might also be linked to intermediate hosts, definitive hosts are indispensable for a parasite’s reproduction. In order to better understand the uneven occurrence of parasites in fish species, we here use the maximum entropy approach (Maxent) to model the habitat suitability for nine Anisakis species accounting for abiotic parameters as well as biotic data (definitive hosts). The modelled habitat suitability reflects the observed distribution quite well for all Anisakis species, however, in some cases, habitat suitability exceeded the known geographical distribution, suggesting a wider distribution than presently recorded. We suggest that integrative modelling combining abiotic and biotic parameters is a valid approach for habitat suitability assessments of Anisakis, and potentially other marine parasite species.

  18. Project-matrix models of marketing organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gutić Dragutin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Unlike theory and practice of corporation organization, in marketing organization numerous forms and contents at its disposal are not reached until this day. It can be well estimated that marketing organization today in most of our companies and in almost all its parts, noticeably gets behind corporation organization. Marketing managers have always been occupied by basic, narrow marketing activities as: sales growth, market analysis, market growth and market share, marketing research, introduction of new products, modification of products, promotion, distribution etc. They rarely found it necessary to focus a bit more to different aspects of marketing management, for example: marketing planning and marketing control, marketing organization and leading. This paper deals with aspects of project - matrix marketing organization management. Two-dimensional and more-dimensional models are presented. Among two-dimensional, these models are analyzed: Market management/products management model; Products management/management of product lifecycle phases on market model; Customers management/marketing functions management model; Demand management/marketing functions management model; Market positions management/marketing functions management model. .

  19. Cardiac Electromechanical Models: From Cell to Organ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia A Trayanova

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The heart is a multiphysics and multiscale system that has driven the development of the most sophisticated mathematical models at the frontiers of computation physiology and medicine. This review focuses on electromechanical (EM models of the heart from the molecular level of myofilaments to anatomical models of the organ. Because of the coupling in terms of function and emergent behaviors at each level of biological hierarchy, separation of behaviors at a given scale is difficult. Here, a separation is drawn at the cell level so that the first half addresses subcellular/single cell models and the second half addresses organ models. At the subcelluar level, myofilament models represent actin-myosin interaction and Ca-based activation. Myofilament models and their refinements represent an overview of the development in the field. The discussion of specific models emphasizes the roles of cooperative mechanisms and sarcomere length dependence of contraction force, considered the cellular basis of the Frank-Starling law. A model of electrophysiology and Ca handling can be coupled to a myofilament model to produce an EM cell model, and representative examples are summarized to provide an overview of the progression of field. The second half of the review covers organ-level models that require solution of the electrical component as a reaction-diffusion system and the mechanical component, in which active tension generated by the myocytes produces deformation of the organ as described by the equations of continuum mechanics. As outlined in the review, different organ-level models have chosen to use different ionic and myofilament models depending on the specific application; this choice has been largely dictated by compromises between model complexity and computational tractability. The review also addresses application areas of EM models such as cardiac resynchronization therapy and the role of mechano-electric coupling in arrhythmias and

  20. Lethal effects on different marine organisms, associated with sediment-seawater acidification deriving from CO2 leakage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basallote, M D; Rodríguez-Romero, A; Blasco, J; DelValls, A; Riba, I

    2011-08-01

    CO(2) leakages during carbon capture and storage in sub-seabed geological structures could produce potential impacts on the marine environment. To study lethal effects on marine organisms attributable to CO(2) seawater acidification, a bubbling CO(2) system was designed enabling a battery of different tests to be conducted, under laboratory conditions, employing various pH treatments (8.0, 7.5, 7.0, 6.5, 6.0, and 5.5). Assays were performed of three exposure routes (seawater, whole sediment, and sediment elutriate). Individuals of the clam (Ruditapes philippinarum) and early-life stages of the gilthead seabream, Sparus aurata, were exposed for 10 days and 72 h, respectively, to acidified clean seawater. S. aurata larvae were also exposed to acidified elutriate samples, and polychaete organisms of the specie Hediste diversicolor and clams R. philippinarum were also exposed for 10 days to estuarine whole sediment. In the fish larvae elutriate test, 100 % mortality was recorded at pH 6.0, after 48 h of exposure. Similar results were obtained in the clam sediment exposure test. In the other organisms, significant mortality (p < 0.05) was observed at pH values lower than 6.0. Very high lethal effects (calculating L[H(+)]50, defined as the H(+) concentration that causes lethal effects in 50 % of the population exposed) were detected in association with the lowest pH treatment for all the species. The implication of these results is that a severe decrease of seawater pH would cause high mortality in marine organisms of several different kinds and life stages. The study addresses the potential risks incurred due to CO(2) leakages in marine environments.

  1. The Zebrafish Model Organism Database (ZFIN)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — ZFIN serves as the zebrafish model organism database. It aims to: a) be the community database resource for the laboratory use of zebrafish, b) develop and support...

  2. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musial, W. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Lawson, M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Rooney, S. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2013-02-01

    The Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop was hosted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Broomfield, Colorado, July 9–10, 2012. The workshop brought together over 60 experts in marine energy technologies to disseminate technical information to the marine energy community, and to collect information to help identify ways in which the development of a commercially viable marine energy industry can be accelerated. The workshop was comprised of plenary sessions that reviewed the state of the marine energy industry and technical sessions that covered specific topics of relevance. Each session consisted of presentations, followed by facilitated discussions. During the facilitated discussions, the session chairs posed several prepared questions to the presenters and audience to encourage communication and the exchange of ideas between technical experts. Following the workshop, attendees were asked to provide written feedback on their takeaways from the workshop and their best ideas on how to accelerate the pace of marine energy technology development. The first four sections of this document give a general overview of the workshop format, provide presentation abstracts, supply discussion session notes, and list responses to the post-workshop questions. The final section presents key findings and conclusions from the workshop that suggest what the most pressing MHK technology needs are and how the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and national laboratory resources can be utilized to assist the marine energy industry in the most effective manner.

  3. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musial, W.; Lawson, M.; Rooney, S.

    2013-02-01

    The Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop was hosted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Broomfield, Colorado, July 9-10, 2012. The workshop brought together over 60 experts in marine energy technologies to disseminate technical information to the marine energy community and collect information to help identify ways in which the development of a commercially viable marine energy industry can be accelerated. The workshop was comprised of plenary sessions that reviewed the state of the marine energy industry and technical sessions that covered specific topics of relevance. Each session consisted of presentations, followed by facilitated discussions. During the facilitated discussions, the session chairs posed several prepared questions to the presenters and audience to encourage communication and the exchange of ideas between technical experts. Following the workshop, attendees were asked to provide written feedback on their takeaways and their best ideas on how to accelerate the pace of marine energy technology development. The first four sections of this document give a general overview of the workshop format, provide presentation abstracts and discussion session notes, and list responses to the post-workshop questions. The final section presents key findings and conclusions from the workshop that suggest how the U.S. Department of Energy and national laboratory resources can be utilized to most effectively assist the marine energy industry.

  4. Modeling Virtual Organization Architecture with the Virtual Organization Breeding Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paszkiewicz, Zbigniew; Picard, Willy

    While Enterprise Architecture Modeling (EAM) methodologies become more and more popular, an EAM methodology tailored to the needs of virtual organizations (VO) is still to be developed. Among the most popular EAM methodologies, TOGAF has been chosen as the basis for a new EAM methodology taking into account characteristics of VOs presented in this paper. In this new methodology, referred as Virtual Organization Breeding Methodology (VOBM), concepts developed within the ECOLEAD project, e.g. the concept of Virtual Breeding Environment (VBE) or the VO creation schema, serve as fundamental elements for development of VOBM. VOBM is a generic methodology that should be adapted to a given VBE. VOBM defines the structure of VBE and VO architectures in a service-oriented environment, as well as an architecture development method for virtual organizations (ADM4VO). Finally, a preliminary set of tools and methods for VOBM is given in this paper.

  5. Modeling Virtual Organization Architecture with the Virtual Organization Breeding Methodology

    CERN Document Server

    Paszkiewicz, Zbigniew

    2011-01-01

    While Enterprise Architecture Modeling (EAM) methodologies become more and more popular, an EAM methodology tailored to the needs of virtual organizations (VO) is still to be developed. Among the most popular EAM methodologies, TOGAF has been chosen as the basis for a new EAM methodology taking into account characteristics of VOs presented in this paper. In this new methodology, referred as Virtual Organization Breeding Methodology (VOBM), concepts developed within the ECOLEAD project, e.g. the concept of Virtual Breeding Environment (VBE) or the VO creation schema, serve as fundamental elements for development of VOBM. VOBM is a generic methodology that should be adapted to a given VBE. VOBM defines the structure of VBE and VO architectures in a service-oriented environment, as well as an architecture development method for virtual organizations (ADM4VO). Finally, a preliminary set of tools and methods for VOBM is given in this paper.

  6. Modeling personnel turnover in the parametric organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Edwin B.

    1991-01-01

    A model is developed for simulating the dynamics of a newly formed organization, credible during all phases of organizational development. The model development process is broken down into the activities of determining the tasks required for parametric cost analysis (PCA), determining the skills required for each PCA task, determining the skills available in the applicant marketplace, determining the structure of the model, implementing the model, and testing it. The model, parameterized by the likelihood of job function transition, has demonstrated by the capability to represent the transition of personnel across functional boundaries within a parametric organization using a linear dynamical system, and the ability to predict required staffing profiles to meet functional needs at the desired time. The model can be extended by revisions of the state and transition structure to provide refinements in functional definition for the parametric and extended organization.

  7. Integration of Biogeochemistry and Marine Ecosystem Model in Mercator-Ocean Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Moussaoui, Abdelali; Dombrowsky, Eric; Moulin, Cyril; Bopp, Laurent; Aumont, Olivier

    2010-05-01

    Accounting for ocean biogeochemistry and marine ecosystem dynamic is of strong interest in the context of Earth System modelling to better represent the marine component to the global atmospheric cycle of greenhouse gazes that influence climate as CO2. Furthermore, treating the ocean as a whole is also the way to address large anthropogenic impacts on marine systems as climate change, nutrients loading, acidification, and eventually overfishing and habitat destructuring. To forecast how interactions between marine biogeochemical cycles and ecosystems respond to and force global change, several efforts have been promoted on biogeochemical integration into operational Mercator Ocean systems. The aim of this work is to implement a marine biogeochemical and ecosystem component at global scale into the MERCATOR operational system, using first PSY3 analysis at 1/4° then PSY4 at 1/12°. Previous works have conducted successfully the integration of a multi-nutrient and multi-plankton biogeochemical model (PISCES, N5P2Z2D2 type) into MERCATOR system. This allowed the use of MERCATOR operational analyses to drive near real time forecast of marine primary production. Results will be shown and advances on biogeochemical model integration within Mercator Systems will be discussed.

  8. Modeled and Measured Underwater Sound Isopleths and Implications for Marine Mammal Mitigation in Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aerts, Lisanne A M; Streever, Bill

    2016-01-01

    Before operating air guns in Alaska, industry is usually required to model underwater sound isopleths, some of which have implications for the mitigation and monitoring of potential marine mammal impacts. Field measurements are often required to confirm or revise model predictions. We compared modeled and measured air gun sound isopleths from 2006 to 2012 and found poor agreement. Natural variability in the marine environment, application of precautionary correction factors, and data interpretation in the generation of circular isopleths all contributed to the observed poor agreement. A broader understanding of the realities of modeled and measured underwater sound isopleths will contribute to improved mitigation practices.

  9. Complex Systems and Self-organization Modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Bertelle, Cyrille; Kadri-Dahmani, Hakima

    2009-01-01

    The concern of this book is the use of emergent computing and self-organization modelling within various applications of complex systems. The authors focus their attention both on the innovative concepts and implementations in order to model self-organizations, but also on the relevant applicative domains in which they can be used efficiently. This book is the outcome of a workshop meeting within ESM 2006 (Eurosis), held in Toulouse, France in October 2006.

  10. Global Bathymetric Prediction For Ocean Modeling and Marine Geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandwell, David T.; Smith, Walter H. F.; Sichoix, Lydie; Frey, Herbert V. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We proposed to construct a complete bathymetric map of the oceans at a 3-10 km resolution by combining all of the available depth soundings collected over the past 30 years with high resolution marine gravity information provided by the Geosat, ERS-1/2, and Topex/Poseidon altimeters. Detailed bathymetry is essential for understanding physical oceanography and marine geophysics. Currents and tides are controlled by the overall shapes of the ocean basins as well as the smaller sharp ocean ridges and seamounts. Because erosion rates are low in the deep oceans, detailed bathymetry reveals the mantle convection patterns, the plate boundaries, the cooling/subsidence of the oceanic lithosphere, the oceanic plateaus, and the distribution of off-ridge volcanoes. We proposed to: (1) Accumulate all available depth soundings collected over the past 30 years; (2) Use the short wavelength (< 160 km) satellite gravity information to interpolate between sparse ship soundings; (3) Improve the resolution of the marine gravity field using enhanced estimates along repeat altimeter profiles together with the dense altimeter measurements; (4) Refine/improve bathymetric predictions using the improved resolution gravity field and also by investigating computer-intensive methods for bathymetric prediction such as inverse theory; and (5) Produce a 'Globe of the Earth' similar to the globe of Venus prepared by the NASA Magellan investigation. This will also include the best available digital land data.

  11. Physiological effects of five different marine natural organic matters (NOMs and three different metals (Cu, Pb, Zn on early life stages of the blue mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lygia Sega Nogueira

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Metals are present in aquatic environments as a result of natural and anthropogenic inputs, and may induce toxicity to organisms. One of the main factors that influence this toxicity in fresh water is natural organic matter (NOM but all NOMs are not the same in this regard. In sea water, possible protection by marine NOMs is not well understood. Thus, our study isolated marine NOMs by solid-phase extraction from five different sites and characterized them by excitation-emission fluorescence analysis—one inshore (terrigenous origin, two offshore (autochthonous origin, and two intermediate in composition (indicative of a mixed origin. The physiological effects of these five NOMS alone (at 8 mg/L, of three metals alone (copper, lead and zinc at 6 µg Cu/L, 20 µg Pb/L, and 25 µg Zn/L respectively, and of each metal in combination with each NOM, were evaluated in 48-h exposures of mussel larvae. Endpoints were whole body Ca2++Mg2+-ATPase activity, carbonic anhydrase activity and lipid peroxidation. By themselves, NOMs increased lipid peroxidation, Ca2++Mg2+-ATPase, and/or carbonic anhydrase activities (significant in seven of 15 NOM-endpoint combinations, whereas metals by themselves did not affect the first two endpoints, but Cu and Pb increased carbonic anhydrase activities. In combination, the effects of NOMs predominated, with the metal exerting no additional effect in 33 out of 45 combinations. While NOM effects varied amongst different isolates, there was no clear pattern with respect to optical or chemical properties. When NOMs were treated as a single source by data averaging, NOM had no effect on Ca2++Mg2+-ATPase activity but markedly stimulated carbonic anhydrase activity and lipid peroxidation, and there were no additional effects of any metal. Our results indicate that marine NOMs may have direct effects on this model marine organism, as well as protective effects against metal toxicity, and the quality of marine NOMs may be an

  12. The UK Earth System Models Marine Biogeochemical Evaluation Toolkit, BGC-val

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mora, Lee

    2017-04-01

    The Biogeochemical Validation toolkit, BGC-val, is a model and grid independent python-based marine model evaluation framework that automates much of the validation of the marine component of an Earth System Model. BGC-val was initially developed to be a flexible and extensible system to evaluate the spin up of the marine UK Earth System Model (UKESM). However, the grid-independence and flexibility means that it is straightforward to adapt the BGC-val framework to evaluate other marine models. In addition to the marine component of the UKESM, this toolkit has been adapted to compare multiple models, including models from the CMIP5 and iMarNet inter-comparison projects. The BGC-val toolkit produces multiple levels of analysis which are presented in a simple to use interactive html5 document. Level 1 contains time series analyses, showing the development over time of many important biogeochemical and physical ocean metrics, such as the Global primary production or the Drake passage current. The second level of BGC-val is an in-depth spatial analyses of a single point in time. This is a series of point to point comparison of model and data in various regions, such as a comparison of Surface Nitrate in the model vs data from the world ocean atlas. The third level analyses are specialised ad-hoc packages to go in-depth on a specific question, such as the development of Oxygen minimum zones in the Equatorial Pacific. In additional to the three levels, the html5 document opens with a Level 0 table showing a summary of the status of the model run. The beta version of this toolkit is available via the Plymouth Marine Laboratory Gitlab server and uses the BSD 3 clause license.

  13. Study on detection of terrestrial and marine fractions in marine organic molecules by spectrophoto- and spectrofluorometric methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozdowska, Violetta; Wróbel, Iwona; Piskozub, Jacek

    2017-04-01

    The sea surface is a highly productive and active interface between the sea and the atmosphere. Sea surface films are created by organic matter from sea and land sources and they dissipate due to loss of material at the sea surface, including microbial degradation, chemical and photo chemical processes, and loss due to absorption and adsorption onto particulates. However the surface microlayer is almost ubiquitous and cover most of the surface of the ocean, even under conditions of high turbulence. Surface active molecules (surfactants) present in the surface microlayer (SML) may modify the number of physical processes taking place there: among others they affect the depth of penetration of solar radiation and gas exchange. Therefore, research on the influence of surfactants on the sea surface properties become an important task, especially in coastal waters and in vicinity of the river mouths. Surfactants comprises a mixture of organic molecules rich in lipids, polymeric and humus whose proportions determine the various properties of the SML. A unique structure of the energy levels of the organic molecules results in a unique spectral distribution of the light intensity absorbed and emitted by the molecules. Hence, the absorption and fluorescence spectra of organic compounds may allow the identification of the sources of organic matter. Additionally, several absorption (E2:E3, S, SR) and fluorescence (fluorescence intensities at peaks: A, C, M, T, the ratio (M+T)/(A+C), HIX) indices help in describing the changes in molecular size and weight as well as composition of organic matter during the humification processes and caused by photobleaching and biodegradation. Investigations included the region of Gulf of Gdańsk, along a transect from the Vistula River outlet to open sea. The fluorescence and absorption measurements of the samples collected from a surface films and a subsurface layer (SS, a depth of 1 m) during three research cruises in Gulf of Gdańsk, the

  14. Detection of pollutants in marine organisms and in the environment as markers of environmental quality

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarkar, A.

    of analysis of chlorinated hydrocarbons using gas chromatography coupled with electron capture detector. The biogeochemistry of trace elements in the oceans is controlled by the competing processes of particle scavenging, uptake and releases by marine...

  15. Bioactivity of marine organisms: Part 7- Effect of seaweed extract on central nervous system

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kamat, S.Y.; Wahidullah, S.; DeSouza, L.; Naik, C.G.; Ambiye, V.; Bhakuni, D.S.; Jain, S.; Goel, A.K.; Srimal, R.C.

    Alcohol extracts of marine algae (Rhodophyceae, Phaeophyceae and Chlorophyceae) was screened for their effect on central nervous system. Of 69 species investigated 8 appeared biologically active, 6 being CNS stimulant, sites and dates of collection...

  16. Production, purification and characterization of halophilic organic solvent tolerant protease from marine crustacean shell wastes and its efficacy on deproteinization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruthiah, Thirumalai; Somanath, Beena; Jasmin, Jebamonydhas Vijila; Immanuel, Grasian; Palavesam, Arunachalam

    2016-12-01

    The quantum of marine fish wastes produced by fish processing industries has necessitated to search new methods for its disposal. Hence, this study is focused on production and purification of halophilic organic solvent tolerant protease (HOSP) from marine Alcaligenes faecalis APCMST-MKW6 using marine shell wastes as substrate. The candidate bacterium was isolated from the marine sediment of Manakudi coast and identified as A. faecalis APCMST-MKW6. The purified protease showed 16.39-fold purity, 70.34 U/mg specific activity with 21.67 % yield. The molecular weight of the purified alkaline protease was 49 kDa. This purified protease registered maximum activity at pH 9 and it was stable between pH 8-9 after 1.30 h of incubation. The optimum temperature registered was 60 °C and it was stable between 50 and 60 °C even after 1.30 h of incubation. This enzyme also showed maximum activity at 20 % NaCl concentration. Further, manganese chloride, magnesium chloride, calcium chloride and barium chloride influenced this enzyme activity remarkably and it was also found to be enhanced by many of the tested surfactants and solvents. The candidate bacterium effectively deproteinized the shrimp shell waste compared to the other tested crustaceans shell wastes and also attained maximum antioxidant activity.

  17. Marine mammal blubber reference and control materials for use in the determination of halogenated organic compounds and fatty acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kucklick, John R.; Pugh, Rebecca S.; Becker, Paul R. [Hollings Marine Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Charleston, SC (United States); Schantz, Michele M.; Porter, Barbara J.; Poster, Dianne L.; Leigh, Stefan; Wise, Stephen A. [NIST, Analytical Chemistry Division, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Rowles, Teri K. [National Marine Fisheries Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Silver Spring, MD (United States)

    2010-05-15

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has a diverse collection of control materials derived from marine mammal blubber, fat, and serum. Standard Reference Material (SRM) 1945 Organics in Whale Blubber was recertified for polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, organochlorine pesticides, and polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congeners. SRM 1945 has also been assigned mass fraction values for compounds not frequently determined in marine samples including toxaphene congeners, coplanar PCBs, and methoxylated PBDE congeners which are natural products. NIST also has assigned mass fraction values, as a result of interlaboratory comparison exercises, for PCB congeners, organochlorine pesticides, PBDE congeners, and fatty acids in six homogenate materials produced from marine mammal blubber or serum. The materials are available from NIST upon request; however, the supply is very limited for some of the materials. The materials include those obtained from pilot whale blubber (Homogenates III and IV), Blainville's beaked whale blubber (Homogenate VII), polar bear fat (Homogenate VI), and California sea lion serum (Marine Mammal Control Material-1 Serum) and blubber (Homogenate V). (orig.)

  18. Contribution to the study of radioactivity in marine organisms; dosage of /sup 210/Po in Perna perna, L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gouvea, R.C.; Santos, P.L; Gouvea, V.A.

    1987-03-01

    The bioaccumulation of natural radionuclides in marine organisms along the Rio de Janeiro Coast has been examined. Significant levels of /sup 210/Po were found in the edible bivalve Perna perna Linnaeus, 1758. The radionuclide was concentrated predominantly in the viceral mass (52.5%) and gills (43.8%) with minor accumulation also occurring in the byssus (3.8%) and shell (0.1%). The level of /sup 210/Po in the soft tissue of bivalves collected along Ponta Negra beach was three times higher than that of similar organisms collected near Boa Viagem beach. (Auth.). 12 refs.; 1 figure; 1 table.

  19. Broad-spectrum antimicrobial epiphytic and endophytic fungi from marine organisms: isolation, bioassay and taxonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Mu, Jun; Feng, Yan; Kang, Yue; Zhang, Jia; Gu, Peng-Juan; Wang, Yu; Ma, Li-Fang; Zhu, Yan-Hua

    2009-04-17

    In the search for new marine derived antibiotics, 43 epi- and endophytic fungal strains were isolated from the surface or the inner tissue of different marine plants and invertebrates. Through preliminary and secondary screening, 10 of them were found to be able to produce broad-spectrum antimicrobial metabolites. By morphological and molecular biological methods, three active strains were characterized to be Penicillium glabrum, Fusarium oxysporum, and Alternaria alternata.

  20. Broad-Spectrum Antimicrobial Epiphytic and Endophytic Fungi from Marine Organisms: Isolation, Bioassay and Taxonomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Hua Zhu

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available In the search for new marine derived antibiotics, 43 epi- and endophytic fungal strains were isolated from the surface or the inner tissue of different marine plants and invertebrates. Through preliminary and secondary screening, 10 of them were found to be able to produce broad-spectrum antimicrobial metabolites. By morphological and molecular biological methods, three active strains were characterized to be Penicillium glabrum, Fusarium oxysporum, and Alternaria alternata.

  1. Broad-Spectrum Antimicrobial Epiphytic and Endophytic Fungi from Marine Organisms: Isolation, Bioassay and Taxonomy

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    In the search for new marine derived antibiotics, 43 epi- and endophytic fungal strains were isolated from the surface or the inner tissue of different marine plants and invertebrates. Through preliminary and secondary screening, 10 of them were found to be able to produce broad-spectrum antimicrobial metabolites. By morphological and molecular biological methods, three active strains were characterized to be Penicillium glabrum, Fusarium oxysporum, and Alternaria alternata.

  2. Using Hybrid Model to Evaluate Performance of Innovation and Technology Professionals in Marine Logistics Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qunzhen Qu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development of marine logistics industry to grow, the government and corporate more and more attach importance to the performance evaluation of innovation and technology professionals. Combine the characteristics of marine logistics industry and innovative technology professionals to design a performance evaluation index of marine logistics industry in innovation and technology professionals, with the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP to determine the weights of the various performance indicatorsf and through the establishment of fuzzy comprehensive evaluation model to make the problems of complex performance evaluation quantification and then come to their performance evaluation results, and provide reference methods and recommendations for innovation and technology professionals in performance evaluation theory and practice of marine logistics industry.

  3. Determining the Main Gas-generation Phase of Marine Organic Matters in Different Occurrence States using the Kinetic Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yunpeng; ZHAO Changyi; WANG Zhaoyun; WANG Hongjun; ZOU Yanrong; LIU Jinzhong; ZHAO Wenzhi; LIU Dehan; LU Jialan

    2008-01-01

    This paper probes the determination of the main gas-generation phase of marine organic mattes using the kinetic method. The main gas-generation phase of marine organic matters was determined by coupling the gas generation yields and rates in geological history computed by the acquired kinetic parameters of typical marine organic matters (reservoir oil, residual bitumen, low-maturity kerogen and residual kerogen) in both China and abroad and maturity by the EasyRo(%) method. Here, the main gas-generation phase was determined as Ro%=1.4%-2.4% for type Ⅰ kerogen, Ro%=1.5-3.0% for low-maturity type Ⅱ kerogen, Ro%=1.4-2.8% for residual kerogen,Ro%=1.5-3.2% for residual bitumen and Ro%=1.6-3.2% for reservoir oil cracking. The influences on the main gas-generation phase from the openness of the simulated system and the "dead line" of natural gas generation are also discussed. The results indicate that the openness of simulation system has a definite influence on computing the main gas-generation phase. The main gas-generation phase of type Ⅱ kerogen is Ro%=1.4-3.1% in an open system, which is earlier than that in a closed system.According to our results, the "dead line" of natural gas generation is determined as Ro=3.5% for type Ⅰ kerogen, Ro=4.4-4.5% for type Ⅱ kerogen and Ro=4.6% for marine oil. Preliminary applications are presented taking the southwestern Tarim Basin as an example.

  4. Bio-prospecting of Plants and Marine Organisms in Saudi Arabia for New Potential Bioactivity

    KAUST Repository

    Hajjar, Dina A.

    2016-12-08

    demonstrates the efficiency of the newly developed pipeline using cell-based phenotypic screening. Anti-cancer potential activity was detected in Juniperus phoenicea. Bioactive potential against the reverse transcriptase enzyme of HIV virus was confirmed in Avicennia marina leaves. The organic extracts of Actinomycetes bacterial isolates were found active against West Nile Virus NS3 Protease. Here, promising starting point for the potential of drug discovery of plants and marine organism of Saudi Arabia.

  5. Modeling of Micromotion and Analysis of Properties of Rigid Marine Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xiao-long

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available As one of the most useful phenomena for separating sea clutter and marine targets, micro-Doppler (m-D describes the refined motion characteristics of a marine target and helps to improve the abilities of radar detection and recognition. In this study, based on maritime radar, the signal model of a target with micromotion in sea clutter is described. Initially, the definitions of micromotion and m-D are briefly reviewed with a description of their details, and a classification of rigid marine targets that exhibit micromotion is introduced. Then, according to the duration of the observation time, we establish two types of signal models, i.e., in one range unit and across range unit. According to the type of motion, we establish separate signal models for non-uniform translational motion and rotational motion. Finally, the properties of micromotion are analyzed using real radar data, and the effectiveness of the established models is verified.

  6. Rank-Defect Adjustment Model for Survey-Line Systematic Errors in Marine Survey Net

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In this paper,the structure of systematic and random errors in marine survey net are discussed in detail and the adjustment method for observations of marine survey net is studied,in which the rank-defect characteristic is discovered first up to now.On the basis of the survey-line systematic error model,the formulae of the rank-defect adjustment model are deduced according to modern adjustment theory.An example of calculations with really observed data is carried out to demonstrate the efficiency of this adjustment model.Moreover,it is proved that the semi-systematic error correction method used at present in marine gravimetry in China is a special case of the adjustment model presented in this paper.

  7. Marine geochemical data assimilation in an efficient Earth System Model of global biogeochemical cycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ridgwell

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We have extended the 3-D ocean based "Grid ENabled Integrated Earth system model" (GENIE-1 to help understand the role of ocean biogeochemistry and marine sediments in the long-term (~100 to 100 000 year regulation of atmospheric CO2, and the importance of feedbacks between CO2 and climate. Here we describe the ocean carbon cycle, which in its first incarnation is based around a simple single nutrient (phosphate control on biological productivity. The addition of calcium carbonate preservation in deep-sea sediments and its role in regulating atmospheric CO2 is presented elsewhere (Ridgwell and Hargreaves, 2007. We have calibrated the model parameters controlling ocean carbon cycling in GENIE-1 by assimilating 3-D observational datasets of phosphate and alkalinity using an ensemble Kalman filter method. The calibrated (mean model predicts a global export production of particulate organic carbon (POC of 8.9 PgC yr−1, and reproduces the main features of dissolved oxygen distributions in the ocean. For estimating biogenic calcium carbonate (CaCO3 production, we have devised a parameterization in which the CaCO3:POC export ratio is related directly to ambient saturation state. Calibrated global CaCO3 export production (1.2 PgC yr-1 is close to recent marine carbonate budget estimates. The GENIE-1 Earth system model is capable of simulating a wide variety of dissolved and isotopic species of relevance to the study of modern global biogeochemical cycles as well as past global environmental changes recorded in paleoceanographic proxies. Importantly, even with 12 active biogeochemical tracers in the ocean and including the calculation of feedbacks between atmospheric CO2 and climate, we achieve better than 1000 years per (2.4 GHz CPU hour on a desktop PC. The GENIE-1 model thus provides a viable alternative to box and zonally-averaged models for studying global biogeochemical cycling over all but the very longest (>1 000 000 year time-scales.

  8. Marine geochemical data assimilation in an efficient Earth System Model of global biogeochemical cycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ridgwell

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available We have extended the 3-D ocean based "Grid ENabled Integrated Earth system model'' (GENIE-1 to help understand the role of ocean biogeochemistry and marine sediments in the "long-term'' (~100 to 100 000 year regulation of atmospheric CO2, and the importance of feedbacks between CO2 and climate. Here we describe the ocean carbon cycle, which is based around a simple single nutrient (phosphate control on biological productivity. The addition of ocean-sediment interactions is presented elsewhere (Ridgwell and Hargreaves, 2006.

    We have calibrated the model parameters controlling ocean carbon cycling in GENIE-1 by assimilating 3-D observational datasets of phosphate and alkalinity using an ensemble Kalman filter method. The calibrated (mean model predicts a global export production of particulate organic carbon (POC of 8.9 PgC yr−1, and reproduces the main features of dissolved oxygen distributions in the ocean. For estimating biogenic calcium carbonate (CaCO3 production, we have devised a parameterization in which the CaCO3:POC export ratio is related directly to ambient saturation state. Calibrated global CaCO3 export production (1.2 PgC yr−1 is close to recent marine carbonate budget estimates.

    The GENIE-1 Earth system model is capable of simulating a wide variety of dissolved and isotopic species of relevance to the study of modern global biogeochemical cycles as well as past global environmental changes recorded in paleoceanographic proxies. Importantly, even with 12 active biogeochemical tracers in the ocean and including the calculation of feedbacks between atmospheric CO2 and climate, we achieve better than 1000 years per (2.4 GHz CPU hour on a desktop PC. The GENIE-1 model thus provides a viable alternative to box and zonally-averaged models for studying global biogeochemical cycling over all but the very longest

  9. Exposure factors for marine eutrophication impacts assessment based on a mechanistic biological model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cosme, Nuno Miguel Dias; Koski, Marja; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    2015-01-01

    Emissions of nitrogen (N) from anthropogenic sources enrich marine waters and promote planktonic growth. This newly synthesised organic carbon is eventually exported to benthic waters where aerobic respiration by heterotrophic bacteria results in the consumption of dissolved oxygen (DO...... marine ecosystem (LME), five climate zones, and site-generic. The XFs obtained range from 0.45 (Central Arctic Ocean) to 15.9kgO2kgN-1 (Baltic Sea). While LME resolution is recommended, aggregated PE or XF per climate zone can be adopted, but not global aggregation due to high variability. The XF...

  10. Calibrated Blade-Element/Momentum Theory Aerodynamic Model of the MARIN Stock Wind Turbine: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goupee, A.; Kimball, R.; de Ridder, E. J.; Helder, J.; Robertson, A.; Jonkman, J.

    2015-04-02

    In this paper, a calibrated blade-element/momentum theory aerodynamic model of the MARIN stock wind turbine is developed and documented. The model is created using open-source software and calibrated to closely emulate experimental data obtained by the DeepCwind Consortium using a genetic algorithm optimization routine. The provided model will be useful for those interested in validating interested in validating floating wind turbine numerical simulators that rely on experiments utilizing the MARIN stock wind turbine—for example, the International Energy Agency Wind Task 30’s Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration Continued, with Correlation project.

  11. Condensing Organic Aerosols in a Microphysical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Y.; Tsigaridis, K.; Bauer, S.

    2015-12-01

    The condensation of organic aerosols is represented in a newly developed box-model scheme, where its effect on the growth and composition of particles are examined. We implemented the volatility-basis set (VBS) framework into the aerosol mixing state resolving microphysical scheme Multiconfiguration Aerosol TRacker of mIXing state (MATRIX). This new scheme is unique and advances the representation of organic aerosols in models in that, contrary to the traditional treatment of organic aerosols as non-volatile in most climate models and in the original version of MATRIX, this new scheme treats them as semi-volatile. Such treatment is important because low-volatility organics contribute significantly to the growth of particles. The new scheme includes several classes of semi-volatile organic compounds from the VBS framework that can partition among aerosol populations in MATRIX, thus representing the growth of particles via condensation of low volatility organic vapors. Results from test cases representing Mexico City and a Finish forrest condistions show good representation of the time evolutions of concentration for VBS species in the gas phase and in the condensed particulate phase. Emitted semi-volatile primary organic aerosols evaporate almost completely in the high volatile range, and they condense more efficiently in the low volatility range.

  12. Organic carbon, phosphorus and nitrogen in surface sediments of the marine-coastal region north and south of the Paria Peninsula, Venezuela

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez-Soto, M. C.; Martínez, Gregorio

    2012-01-01

    The organic carbon, phosphorus and nitrogen content of silt and clay fractions of surface sediments from the marine-coastal region north and south of the Paria Peninsula (PP) were quantified. Organic carbon concentrations (Corg) were determined by dry combustion after decarbonation with 10% hydrochloric acid, and total phosphorus (TP) and total nitrogen (TN). This information was then used to produce maps of the iso-concentrations of the distribution of these elements in the sub-marine contin...

  13. Environmental and human health risk assessment of organic micro-pollutants occurring in a Spanish marine fish farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz, Ivan, E-mail: ivanmuno@ual.e [Departamento de Hidrogeologia y Quimica Analitica, Universidad de Almeria, 04120 Almeria (Spain); Martinez Bueno, Maria J., E-mail: mjbueno@ual.e [Departamento de Hidrogeologia y Quimica Analitica, Universidad de Almeria, 04120 Almeria (Spain); Agueera, Ana, E-mail: aaguera@ual.e [Departamento de Hidrogeologia y Quimica Analitica, Universidad de Almeria, 04120 Almeria (Spain); Fernandez-Alba, Amadeo R., E-mail: amadeo@ual.e [Departamento de Hidrogeologia y Quimica Analitica, Universidad de Almeria, 04120 Almeria (Spain)

    2010-05-15

    In this work the risk posed to seawater organisms, predators and humans is assessed, as a consequence of exposure to 12 organic micro-pollutants, namely metronidazole, trimethoprim, erythromycin, simazine, flumequine, carbaryl, atrazine, diuron, terbutryn, irgarol, diphenyl sulphone (DPS) and 2-thiocyanomethylthiobenzothiazole (TCMTB). The risk assessment study is based on a 1-year monitoring study at a Spanish marine fish farm, involving passive sampling techniques. The results showed that the risk threshold for irgarol concerning seawater organisms is exceeded. On the other hand, the risk to predators and especially humans through consumption of fish is very low, due to the low bioconcentration potential of the substances assessed. - Exposure and effects of twelve organic micro-pollutants are evaluated at a Spanish fish farm.

  14. Effects of ocean acidification on marine dissolved organic matter are not detectable over the succession of phytoplankton blooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zark, Maren; Riebesell, Ulf; Dittmar, Thorsten

    2015-10-01

    Marine dissolved organic matter (DOM) is one of the largest active organic carbon reservoirs on Earth, and changes in its pool size or composition could have a major impact on the global carbon cycle. Ocean acidification is a potential driver for these changes because it influences marine primary production and heterotrophic respiration. We simulated ocean acidification as expected for a "business-as-usual" emission scenario in the year 2100 in an unprecedented long-term mesocosm study. The large-scale experiments (50 m(3) each) covered a full seasonal cycle of marine production in a Swedish Fjord. Five mesocosms were artificially enriched in CO2 to the partial pressure expected in the year 2100 (900 μatm), and five more served as controls (400 μatm). We applied ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry to monitor the succession of 7360 distinct DOM formulae over the course of the experiment. Plankton blooms had a clear effect on DOM concentration and molecular composition. This succession was reproducible across all 10 mesocosms, independent of CO2 treatment. In contrast to the temporal trend, there were no significant differences in DOM concentration and composition between present-day and year 2100 CO2 levels at any time point of the experiment. On the basis of our results, ocean acidification alone is unlikely to affect the seasonal accumulation of DOM in productive coastal environments.

  15. Marine biogeochemical influence on primary sea spray aerosol composition in the Southern Ocean: predictions from a mechanistic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, D.; Burrows, S. M.; Elliott, S.; Frossard, A. A.; Russell, L. M.; Liu, X.; Ogunro, O. O.; Easter, R. C.; Rasch, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    Remote marine clouds, such as those over the Southern Ocean, are particularly sensitive to variations in the concentration and chemical composition of aerosols that serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Observational evidence indicates that the organic content of fine marine aerosol is greatly increased during the biologically active season near strong phytoplankton blooms in certain locations, while being nearly constant in other locations. We have recently developed a novel modeling framework that mechanistically links the organic fraction of submicron sea spray to ocean biogeochemistry (Burrows et al., in discussion, ACPD, 2014; Elliott et al., ERL, 2014). Because of its combination of large phytoplankton blooms and high wind speeds, the Southern Ocean is an ideal location for testing our understanding of the processes driving the enrichment of organics in sea spray aerosol. Comparison of the simulated OM fraction with satellite observations shows that OM fraction is a statistically significant predictor of cloud droplet number concentration over the Southern Ocean. This presentation will focus on predictions from our modeling framework for the Southern Ocean, specifically, the predicted geographic gradients and seasonal cycles in the aerosol organic matter and its functional group composition. The timing and location of a Southern Ocean field campaign will determine its utility in observing the effects of highly localized and seasonal phytoplankton blooms on aerosol composition and clouds. Reference cited: Burrows, S. M., Ogunro, O., Frossard, A. A., Russell, L. M., Rasch, P. J., and Elliott, S.: A physically-based framework for modelling the organic fractionation of sea spray aerosol from bubble film Langmuir equilibria, Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., 14, 5375-5443, doi:10.5194/acpd-14-5375-2014, 2014. Elliott, S., Burrows, S. M., Deal, C., Liu, X., Long, M., Ogunro, O., Russell, L. M., and Wingenter O.. "Prospects for simulating macromolecular surfactant

  16. Size exclusion and anion exchange high performance liquid chromatography for characterizing metals bound to marine dissolved organic matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Otero, Natalia; Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Nutrition and Bromatology, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Santiago de Compostela, Avenida das Ciencias, s/n, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Moreda-Pineiro, Antonio, E-mail: antonio.moreda@usc.es [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Nutrition and Bromatology, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Santiago de Compostela, Avenida das Ciencias, s/n, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2013-01-14

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fractionation methods for assessing metals bound to marine DOM were developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SEC and AEC with UV detection and hyphenated with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry were used. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SEC-UV showed marine DOM of molecular weights from 16 to 1 kDa. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cobalt, manganese, strontium and zinc are bound to marine DOM. - Abstract: Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) followed by anion exchange chromatography (AEC) hyphenated with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was applied for fractionating metals bound to marine dissolved organic matter (DOM). Surface seawater samples (100 L) were subjected to tangential flow ultrafiltration (10,000 Da cut off) for isolating and pre-concentrating dissolved large molecules. The isolated fraction (retentate) consisted of 1 L, which was further freeze-dried and re-dissolved to 250 mL with ultrapure water. After HI Trap desalting of the re-dissolved retentate, SEC with UV detection showed marine DOM ranging from 6.5 kDa (lower than the permeable volume of the SEC column) to 16 kDa. A further characterization of this fraction by AEC with UV detection revealed the existence of four groups of macromolecules exhibiting retention times of 2.3, 2.8, 4.5 and 14.0 min. AEC hyphenated with ICP-MS showed the presence of strontium and zinc in the first AE fraction isolated from the SEC fraction; while manganese was found to be bound to the second AE fraction. Cobalt was found to be bound to molecules comprising the third AE fraction.

  17. A dynamic marine iron cycle module coupled to the University of Victoria Earth System Model: the Kiel Marine Biogeochemical Model 2 (KMBM2) for UVic 2.9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickelsen, L.; Keller, D. P.; Oschlies, A.

    2014-12-01

    Marine biological production and the associated biotic uptake of carbon in many ocean regions depend on the availability of nutrients in the euphotic zone. While large areas are limited by nitrogen and/or phosphorus, the micronutrient iron is considered the main limiting nutrient in the North Pacific, equatorial Pacific and Southern Ocean. Changes in iron availability via changes in atmospheric dust input are discussed to play an important role in glacial/interglacial cycles via climate feedbacks caused by changes in biological ocean carbon sequestration. Although many aspects of the iron cycle remain unknown, its incorporation into marine biogeochemical models is needed to test our current understanding and better constrain its role in the Earth system. In the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model (UVic) iron limitation in the ocean was, until now, simulated pragmatically with an iron concentration masking scheme that did not allow a consistent interactive response to perturbations of ocean biogeochemistry or iron cycling sensitivity studies. Here, we replace the iron masking scheme with a dynamic iron cycle and compare the results to available observations and the previous marine biogeochemical model. Sensitivity studies are also conducted with the new model to test the importance of considering the variable solubility of iron in dust deposition, the importance of considering high resolution bathymetry for the sediment release of iron, the effect of scaling the sedimentary iron release with temperature and the sensitivity of the iron cycle to a climate change scenario.

  18. A dynamic marine iron cycle module coupled to the University of Victoria Earth System Model: the Kiel Marine Biogeochemical Model 2 (KMBM2 for UVic 2.9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Nickelsen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Marine biological production and the associated biotic uptake of carbon in many ocean regions depend on the availability of nutrients in the euphotic zone. While large areas are limited by nitrogen and/or phosphorus, the micronutrient iron is considered the main limiting nutrient in the North Pacific, equatorial Pacific and Southern Ocean. Changes in iron availability via changes in atmospheric dust input are discussed to play an important role in glacial/interglacial cycles via climate feedbacks caused by changes in biological ocean carbon sequestration. Although many aspects of the iron cycle remain unknown, its incorporation into marine biogeochemical models is needed to test our current understanding and better constrain its role in the Earth system. In the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model (UVic iron limitation in the ocean was, until now, simulated pragmatically with an iron concentration masking scheme that did not allow a consistent interactive response to perturbations of ocean biogeochemistry or iron cycling sensitivity studies. Here, we replace the iron masking scheme with a dynamic iron cycle and compare the results to available observations and the previous marine biogeochemical model. Sensitivity studies are also conducted with the new model to test the importance of considering the variable solubility of iron in dust deposition, the importance of considering high resolution bathymetry for the sediment release of iron, the effect of scaling the sedimentary iron release with temperature and the sensitivity of the iron cycle to a climate change scenario.

  19. Modelling marine ecosystem response to climate change and trawling in the North Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Molen, J.; Aldridge, J.N.; Coughlan, C.; Parker, E.R.; Stephens, D; Ruardij, P.

    2013-01-01

    The marine ecosystem response to climate change and demersal trawling was investigated using the coupled hydrodynamic-biogeochemical water column model GOTM-ERSEM-BFM for three contrasting sites in the North Sea. Climate change forcing was derived from the HadRM3-PPE-UK regional climate model for

  20. Modeling Complex Marine Ecosystems: An Investigation of Two Teaching Approaches with Fifth Graders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaevripidou, M.; Constantinou, C. P.; Zacharia, Z. C.

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated acquisition and transfer of the modeling ability of fifth graders in various domains. Teaching interventions concentrated on the topic of marine ecosystems either through a modeling-based approach or a worksheet-based approach. A quasi-experimental (pre-post comparison study) design was used. The control group (n = 17)…

  1. Microbial colonization and degradation of polyethylene and biodegradable plastic bags in temperate fine-grained organic-rich marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauendorf, Alice; Krause, Stefan; Bigalke, Nikolaus K; Gorb, Elena V; Gorb, Stanislav N; Haeckel, Matthias; Wahl, Martin; Treude, Tina

    2016-02-15

    To date, the longevity of plastic litter at the sea floor is poorly constrained. The present study compares colonization and biodegradation of plastic bags by aerobic and anaerobic benthic microbes in temperate fine-grained organic-rich marine sediments. Samples of polyethylene and biodegradable plastic carrier bags were incubated in natural oxic and anoxic sediments from Eckernförde Bay (Western Baltic Sea) for 98 days. Analyses included (1) microbial colonization rates on the bags, (2) examination of the surface structure, wettability, and chemistry, and (3) mass loss of the samples during incubation. On average, biodegradable plastic bags were colonized five times higher by aerobic and eight times higher by anaerobic microbes than polyethylene bags. Both types of bags showed no sign of biodegradation during this study. Therefore, marine sediment in temperate coastal zones may represent a long-term sink for plastic litter and also supposedly compostable material.

  2. A model for microbial phosphorus cycling in bioturbated marine sediments: Significance for phosphorus burial in the early Paleozoic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Andrew W.; Boyle, Richard A.; Lenton, Timothy M.; Ingall, Ellery D.; Wallmann, Klaus

    2016-09-01

    A diagenetic model is used to simulate the diagenesis and burial of particulate organic carbon (Corg) and phosphorus (P) in marine sediments underlying anoxic versus oxic bottom waters. The latter are physically mixed by animals moving through the surface sediment (bioturbation) and ventilated by burrowing, tube-dwelling organisms (bioirrigation). The model is constrained using an empirical database including burial ratios of Corg with respect to organic P (Corg:Porg) and total reactive P (Corg:Preac), burial efficiencies of Corg and Porg, and inorganic carbon-to-phosphorus regeneration ratios. If Porg is preferentially mineralized relative to Corg during aerobic respiration, as many previous studies suggest, then the simulated Porg pool is found to be completely depleted. A modified model that incorporates the redox-dependent microbial synthesis of polyphosphates and Porg (termed the microbial P pump) allows preferential mineralization of the bulk Porg pool relative to Corg during both aerobic and anaerobic respiration and is consistent with the database. Results with this model show that P burial is strongly enhanced in sediments hosting fauna. Animals mix highly labile Porg away from the aerobic sediment layers where mineralization rates are highest, thereby mitigating diffusive PO43- fluxes to the bottom water. They also expand the redox niche where microbial P uptake occurs. The model was applied to a hypothetical shelf setting in the early Paleozoic; a time of the first radiation of benthic fauna. Results show that even shallow bioturbation at that time may have had a significant impact on P burial. Our model provides support for a recent study that proposed that faunal radiation in ocean sediments led to enhanced P burial and, possibly, a stabilization of atmospheric O2 levels. The results also help to explain Corg:Porg ratios in the geological record and the persistence of Porg in ancient marine sediments.

  3. Putting "Organizations" into an Organization Theory Course: A Hybrid CAO Model for Teaching Organization Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannah, David R.; Venkatachary, Ranga

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the authors present a retrospective analysis of an instructor's multiyear redesign of a course on organization theory into what is called a hybrid Classroom-as-Organization model. It is suggested that this new course design served to apprentice students to function in quasi-real organizational structures. The authors further argue…

  4. Simulated coal spill causes mortality and growth inhibition in tropical marine organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Kathryn L. E.; Hoogenboom, Mia O.; Flores, Florita; Negri, Andrew P.

    2016-05-01

    Coal is a principal fossil fuel driving economic and social development, and increases in global coal shipments have paralleled expansion of the industry. To identify the potential harm associated with chronic marine coal contamination, three taxa abundant in tropical marine ecosystems (the coral Acropora tenuis, the reef fish Acanthochromis polyacanthus and the seagrass Halodule uninervis) were exposed to five concentrations (0–275 mg coal l‑1) of suspended coal dust (cause considerable lethal effects on corals, and reductions in seagrass and fish growth rates. Coral survivorship and seagrass growth rates were inversely related to increasing coal concentrations (≥38 mg coal l‑1) and effects increased between 14 and 28 d, whereas fish growth rates were similarly depressed at all coal concentrations tested. This investigation provides novel insights into direct coal impacts on key tropical taxa for application in the assessment of risks posed by increasing coal shipments in globally threatened marine ecosystems.

  5. Novel, resistant microalgal polyethers: An important sink of organic carbon in the marine environment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelin, F.; Boogers, I.; Noordeloos, A. A. M.; Damsté, J. S. Sinninghe; Hatcher, P. G.; Leeuw, J. W. de

    1996-04-01

    Five out of seven marine microalgal species investigated were found to biosynthesize nonhydrolysable, mainly aliphatic, biomacromolecules (algaenans). The molecular structure of the algaenan isolated from the microalga Nannochloropsis salina of the class Eustigmatophyceae was determined by solid state 13C NMR spectroscopy, Curie point pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and chemical degradations with HI and RuO 4. The structure is predominantly composed of C 28-C 34 linear chains linked by ether bridges. The algaenan isolated from a second eustigmatophyte ( Nannochloropsis sp.) was structurally similar. Algaenans isolated from two chlorophytes also possess a strongly aliphatic nature, as revealed by the dominance of alkenes/alkanes in their pyrolysates. Accordingly, we propose that the aliphatic character of numerous Recent and ancient marine kerogens reflects selectively preserved algaenans and that these algaenans may act as a source of n-alkanes in marine crude oils.

  6. Web Resources for Model Organism Studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bixia Tang; Yanqing Wang; Junwei Zhu; Wenming Zhao

    2015-01-01

    An ever-growing number of resources on model organisms have emerged with the continued development of sequencing technologies. In this paper, we review 13 databases of model organisms, most of which are reported by the National Institutes of Health of the United States (NIH; http://www.nih.gov/science/models/). We provide a brief description for each database, as well as detail its data source and types, functions, tools, and availability of access. In addition, we also provide a quality assessment about these databases. Significantly, the organism databases instituted in the early 1990s––such as the Mouse Genome Database (MGD), Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD), and FlyBase––have developed into what are now comprehensive, core authority resources. Furthermore, all of the databases mentioned here update continually according to user feedback and with advancing technologies.

  7. Copper binding by terrestrial versus marine organic ligands in the coastal plume of River Thurso, North Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, François L. L.; Batchelli, Silvia

    2013-11-01

    It is generally assumed that terrestrial humic matter contains a high density of metal complexing ligands spanning a wide range of stability constants. From equilibrium modelling it would be anticipated that carboxyl groups, which are known to be abundant in humic matter, should be capable of binding Cu quantitatively in humic-rich estuarine systems such as the river plume outflow of River Thurso, on Scotland's north coast, where concentrations along the full mixing gradient typically range for Cu: 1-25 nM and for DOC (Dissolved Organic Carbon): 150-1500 μM. Using a combination of reverse and forward titrations monitored by adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry (ACSV), we show that terrestrial humic substances were the likely source of high-affinity (class 1), low abundance ligands (1-4 nM) found throughout the coastal plume, but that weaker (class 2), more abundant ligands (90-170 nM) appeared to be produced largely in situ, probably as a biological response to Cu inputs into the estuary. Conditional stability constants for Cu-binding were respectively log K1‧ = 14.9-15.9 and log K2‧ = 11.8-12.6. Class 2 ligands were evenly distributed between the low and high molecular weight fractions of dissolved organic matter (DOM), both in March and May. Class 1 ligands were more abundant in the low molecular weight fraction in March, but not in May. The latter could be related to seasonal differences in the nature of peatland derived organic matter carried by River Thurso. Since class 1 ligands (terrestrial, humic) were saturated with Cu throughout the plume, it effectively fell upon class 2 ligands (marine, biological) to control Cu speciation in Thurso Bay, in particular keeping the free Cu concentration [Cu2+] within a relatively narrow range (10-13.6 M to 10-12.4 M). On the other hand, class 1 ligands were responsible for solubilising small amounts of Cu derived from this peatland catchment and effectively transporting Cu, in dissolved and colloidal forms, to

  8. Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saracino-Brown, Jocelyn [Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Washington, DC (United States); Smith, Courtney [Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Washington, DC (United States); Gilman, Patrick [Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Washington, DC (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The Wind Program hosted a two-day workshop on July 24-25, 2012 with scientists and regulators engaged in marine ecological survey, modeling, and database efforts pertaining to the waters of the Mid-Atlantic region. The workshop was planned by Federal agency, academic, and private partners to promote collaboration between ongoing offshore ecological survey efforts, and to promote the collaborative development of complementary predictive models and compatible databases. The meeting primarily focused on efforts to establish and predict marine mammal, seabird, and sea turtle abundance, density, and distributions extending from the shoreline to the edge of the Exclusive Economic Zone between Nantucket Sound, Massachusetts and Cape Hatteras, North Carolina.

  9. Mathematical Modeling Social Responsibility for Dynamic Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Chavoshbashi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic organizations as accountable organizations, for transparency and accountability to its stakeholders to stakeholders for their toward performance there should express their commitment to social responsibility are through their values and ensure that this commitment throughout the organization are now and thus will have a social responsibility for their mutual benefit, so there is more and more coherent in their ethical approach takes advantage and the community and stakeholders and the organization will have better performance and strengths. Because of interest in social responsibility, in this paper dynamic model is presented for Corporate Social Responsibility of Bionic organization. Model presented a new model is inspired by chaos theory and natural systems theory based on bifurcation in creation to be all natural systems, realizing the value of responsibility as one of the fundamental values of social and institutional development that the relationship between business and work environment in the global market economy and range will be specified. First Social Responsibility factors identified, then experts and scholars determine the weight of the components and technical coefficient for modeling and paired comparison has been done using MATLAB mathematical Software.

  10. Polymer models of chromosome (re)organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirny, Leonid

    Chromosome Conformation Capture technique (Hi-C) provides comprehensive information about frequencies of spatial interactions between genomic loci. Inferring 3D organization of chromosomes from these data is a challenging biophysical problem. We develop a top-down approach to biophysical modeling of chromosomes. Starting with a minimal set of biologically motivated interactions we build ensembles of polymer conformations that can reproduce major features observed in Hi-C experiments. I will present our work on modeling organization of human metaphase and interphase chromosomes. Our works suggests that active processes of loop extrusion can be a universal mechanism responsible for formation of domains in interphase and chromosome compaction in metaphase.

  11. CTD, marine invertebrate pathology, benthic organisms, and marine toxic substances and pollutants data collected using CTD casts and other instruments from SEA TRANSPORTER and other platforms in Gulf of Mexico from 20 May 1978 to 15 January 1979 (NODC Accession 8000022)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CTD, marine invertebrate pathology, benthic organisms, and marine toxic substances and pollutants data were collected using CTD, net casts, and other instruments...

  12. The marine atmospheric boundary layer under strong wind conditions: Organized turbulence structure and flux estimates by airborne measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brilouet, Pierre-Etienne; Durand, Pierre; Canut, Guylaine

    2017-02-01

    During winter, cold air outbreaks take place in the northwestern Mediterranean sea. They are characterized by local strong winds (Mistral and Tramontane) which transport cold and dry continental air across a warmer sea. In such conditions, high values of surface sensible and latent heat flux are observed, which favor deep oceanic convection. The HyMeX/ASICS-MED field campaign was devoted to the study of these processes. Airborne measurements, gathered in the Gulf of Lion during the winter of 2013, allowed for the exploration of the mean and turbulent structure of the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL). A spectral analysis based on an analytical model was conducted on 181 straight and level runs. Profiles of characteristic length scales and sharpness parameter of the vertical wind spectrum revealed larger eddies along the mean wind direction associated with an organization of the turbulence field into longitudinal rolls. These were highlighted by boundary layer cloud bands on high-resolution satellite images. A one-dimensional description of the vertical exchanges is then a tricky issue. Since the knowledge of the flux profile throughout the entire MABL is essential for the estimation of air-sea exchanges, a correction of eddy covariance turbulent fluxes was developed taking into account the systematic and random errors due to sampling and data processing. This allowed the improvement of surface fluxes estimates, computed from the extrapolation of the stacked levels. A comparison between those surface fluxes and bulk fluxes computed at a moored buoy revealed considerable differences, mainly regarding the latent heat flux under strong wind conditions.

  13. A Bayesian hierarchical modeling approach for analyzing observational data from marine ecological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Song S; Craig, J Kevin; Baustian, Melissa M; Rabalais, Nancy N

    2009-12-01

    We introduce the Bayesian hierarchical modeling approach for analyzing observational data from marine ecological studies using a data set intended for inference on the effects of bottom-water hypoxia on macrobenthic communities in the northern Gulf of Mexico off the coast of Louisiana, USA. We illustrate (1) the process of developing a model, (2) the use of the hierarchical model results for statistical inference through innovative graphical presentation, and (3) a comparison to the conventional linear modeling approach (ANOVA). Our results indicate that the Bayesian hierarchical approach is better able to detect a "treatment" effect than classical ANOVA while avoiding several arbitrary assumptions necessary for linear models, and is also more easily interpreted when presented graphically. These results suggest that the hierarchical modeling approach is a better alternative than conventional linear models and should be considered for the analysis of observational field data from marine systems.

  14. Microtechnology-Based Multi-Organ Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Hwan Lee

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Drugs affect the human body through absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination (ADME processes. Due to their importance, the ADME processes need to be studied to determine the efficacy and side effects of drugs. Various in vitro model systems have been developed and used to realize the ADME processes. However, conventional model systems have failed to simulate the ADME processes because they are different from in vivo, which has resulted in a high attrition rate of drugs and a decrease in the productivity of new drug development. Recently, a microtechnology-based in vitro system called “organ-on-a-chip” has been gaining attention, with more realistic cell behavior and physiological reactions, capable of better simulating the in vivo environment. Furthermore, multi-organ-on-a-chip models that can provide information on the interaction between the organs have been developed. The ultimate goal is the development of a “body-on-a-chip”, which can act as a whole body model. In this review, we introduce and summarize the current progress in the development of multi-organ models as a foundation for the development of body-on-a-chip.

  15. Microtechnology-Based Multi-Organ Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Hwan; Sung, Jong Hwan

    2017-05-21

    Drugs affect the human body through absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination (ADME) processes. Due to their importance, the ADME processes need to be studied to determine the efficacy and side effects of drugs. Various in vitro model systems have been developed and used to realize the ADME processes. However, conventional model systems have failed to simulate the ADME processes because they are different from in vivo, which has resulted in a high attrition rate of drugs and a decrease in the productivity of new drug development. Recently, a microtechnology-based in vitro system called "organ-on-a-chip" has been gaining attention, with more realistic cell behavior and physiological reactions, capable of better simulating the in vivo environment. Furthermore, multi-organ-on-a-chip models that can provide information on the interaction between the organs have been developed. The ultimate goal is the development of a "body-on-a-chip", which can act as a whole body model. In this review, we introduce and summarize the current progress in the development of multi-organ models as a foundation for the development of body-on-a-chip.

  16. New Federated Collaborative Networked Organization Model (FCNOM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morcous M. Yassa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Formation of Collaborative Networked Organization (CNO usually comes upon expected business opportunities and needs huge of negotiation during its lifecycle, especially to increase the Dynamic Virtual Organization (DVO configuration automation. Decision makers need more comprehensive information about CNO system to support their decisions. Unfortunately, there is no single formal modeling, tool, approach or any comprehensive methodology that covers all perspectives. In spite of there are some approaches to model CNO have been existed, these approaches model the CNO either with respect to the technology, or business without considering organizational behavior, federation modeling, and external environments. The aim of this paper is to propose an integrated framework that combines the existed modeling perspectives, as well as, proposes new ones. Also, it provides clear CNO boundaries. By using this approach the view of CNO environment becomes clear and unified. Also, it minimizes the negotiations within CNO components during its life cycle, supports DVO configuration automation, as well as, helps decision making for DVO, and achieves harmonization between CNO partners. The proposed FCNOM utilizes CommonKADS methodology organization model for describing CNO components. Insurance Collaborative Network has been used as an example to proof the proposed FCNOM model.

  17. The Transformation from Civilian to United States Marine: A Conscious, Organized and Systematic Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-24

    field, recruits continue to build discipline, a sense of teamwork, 12 and a warrior spirit through martial arts training, close order drill and...The seven graduation requirements are: earn a tan belt in the Marine Corps Martial Arts Program, complete combat water survival requirements, qualify

  18. Algal blooms and "Marine snow": Mechanisms that enhance preservation of organic carbon in ancient fine-grained sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macquaker, Joe H.S.; Keller, Margaret A.; Davies, Sarah J.

    2010-01-01

    Combined petrographic and geochemical methods are used to investigate the microfabrics present in thin sections prepared from representative organic carbon-rich mudstones collected from three successions (the Kimmeridge Clay Formation, the Jet Rock Member of the Whitby Mudstone Formation, and the pebble shale and Hue Shale). This study was initiated to determine how organic carbon-rich materials were being delivered to the sediment–water interface, and what happened to them after deposition, prior to deep burial.Analyses of the fabrics present shows that they exhibit many common attributes. In particular they are all: (1) highly heterogeneous on the scale of a thin section, (2) organized into thin beds (pellets. In addition, framboidal pyrite (range of sizes from pelleted laminasets contain small horizontal burrows.The organomineralic aggregates present in these mudstones are interpreted to be ancient examples of marine snow. This marine snow likely formed in the water column, particularly during phytoplankton blooms, and was then transported rapidly to the seafloor. The existence of the thin beds with homogenized tops and an in-situ infauna indicates that between blooms there was sufficient oxygen and time for a mixed layer to develop as a result of sediment colonization by diminutive organisms using either aerobic or dysaerobic metabolic pathways. These textures suggest that the constituents of these mudstones were delivered neither as a continuous rain of sediment nor were the bottom waters persistently anoxic. In addition, the presence of thin lags and sharp-based beds suggests that the seafloor was being episodically reworked during deposition. These fabrics indicate that conditions in the water columns and at the seafloors while these rocks were being deposited were very dynamic, and episodic fluxes of high concentrations of organic carbon to the seafloor, during phytoplankton blooms, likely enhanced preservation of organic carbon.

  19. Organic production in a dynamic CGE model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Lars Bo

    2004-01-01

    Concerns about the impact of modern agriculture on the environment have in recent years led to an interest in supporting the development of organic farming. In addition to environmental benefits, the aim is to encourage the provision of other “multifunctional” properties of organic farming...... such as rural amenities and rural development that are spillover benefit additional to the supply of food. In this paper we further develop an existing dynamic general equilibrium model of the Danish economy to specifically incorporate organic farming. In the model and input-output data each primary...... to illustrate the working of our theory by constructing a long term forecast for the development of the Danish economy. Moreover we simulate the effect of the recent agreed 2003 reform of the common agricultural policy....

  20. A new marine ecosystem model for the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. P. Keller

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Earth System Climate Models (ESCMs are valuable tools that can be used to gain a better understanding of the climate system, global biogeochemical cycles and how anthropogenically-driven changes may affect them. Here we describe improvements made to the marine biogeochemical ecosystem component of the University of Victoria's ESCM (version 2.9. Major changes include corrections to the code and equations describing phytoplankton light limitation and zooplankton grazing, the implementation of a more realistic zooplankton growth and grazing model, and the implementation of an iron limitation scheme to constrain phytoplankton growth. The new model is evaluated after a 10 000-yr spin-up and compared to both the previous version and observations. For the majority of biogeochemical tracers and ecosystem processes the new model shows significant improvements when compared to the previous version and evaluated against observations. Many of the improvements are due to better simulation of seasonal changes in higher latitude ecosystems and the effect that this has on ocean biogeochemistry. This improved model is intended to provide a basic new ESCM model component, which can be used as is or expanded upon (i.e., the addition of new tracers, for climate change and biogeochemical cycling research.

  1. Distribution and functions of TonB-dependent transporters in marine bacteria and environments: implications for dissolved organic matter utilization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Tang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacteria play critical roles in marine nutrient cycles by incorporating and redistributing dissolved organic matter (DOM and inorganic nutrients in the ocean. TonB-dependent transporter (TBDT proteins allow Gram-negative bacteria to take up scarce resources from nutrient-limiting environments as well as siderophores, heme, vitamin B12, and recently identified carbohydrates. Thus, the characterization of TBDT distribution and functions is essential to better understand the contribution TBDT to DOM assimilation and its consequences on nutrient cycling in the environment. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This study presents the distribution of encoded known and putative TBDT proteins in the genomes of microorganisms and from the Global Ocean Survey data. Using a Lek clustering algorithm and substrate specificities, the TBDT sequences were mainly classified into the following three groups: (1 DOM transporters; (2 Siderophores/Vitamins transporters; and (3 Heme/Hemophores/Iron(heme-binding protein transporters. Diverse TBDTs were found in the genomes of oligotroph Citromicrobium bathyomarinum JL354 and Citromicrobium sp JLT1363 and were highly expressed in the stationary phase of bacterial growth. The results show that the Gammaproteobacteria and the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides (CFB group bacteria accounted for the majority of the TBDT gene pool in marine surface waters. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results of this study confirm the ecological importance of TBDTs in DOM assimilation for bacteria in marine environments owing to a wide range of substrate utilization potential in the ubiquitous Gammaproteobacteria and CFB group bacteria.

  2. Safety Cultural Competency Modeling in Nuclear Organizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sa Kil; Oh, Yeon Ju; Luo, Meiling; Lee, Yong Hee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The nuclear safety cultural competency model should be supplemented through a bottom-up approach such as behavioral event interview. The developed model, however, is meaningful for determining what should be dealt for enhancing safety cultural competency of nuclear organizations. The more details of the developing process, results, and applications will be introduced later. Organizational culture include safety culture in terms of its organizational characteristics.

  3. The whole is more than the sum of its parts: Modeling community-level effects of UVR in marine ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momo, Fernando; Ferrero, Emma; Eöry, Matías; Esusy, Marisol; Iribarren, Julia; Ferreyra, Gustavo; Schloss, Irene; Mostajir, Behzad; Demers, Serge

    2006-01-01

    The effect of UVB radiation (UVBR, 290-320 nm) on the dynamics of the lower levels of the marine plankton community was modeled. The model was built using differential equations and shows a good fit to experimental data collected in mesocosms (defined as large enclosures of 1500 L filled with natural marine waters). Some unexpected results appear to be possible by indirect effects in prey (bacteria, phytoplankton and heterotrophic flagellates). In particular, apparent competition appears between small phytoplankton and bacteria. This effect is caused by a shared predator (ciliates). Another remarkable effect is an increase in bacteria and flagellates populations due to enhanced UVBR. This effect is similar to that observed under mesocosm experimental conditions and is related to the decrease of predation due to the direct damage to predators (ciliates) by UVBR. The effect of UVBR changing interaction coefficients may be dramatic on the community structure, producing big changes in equilibrium populations, as demonstrated by sensitivity analysis of the model. In order to generalize these results to field conditions it will be necessary to increase model complexity and include extra organic mater sources, mixing and sinking effects and predation by large zooplankton. This work shows that UVBR may produce community global responses that are consequence of both direct and indirect effects among populations.

  4. Expanding on Successful Concepts, Models, and Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    If the goal of the AEP framework was to replace existing exposure models or databases for organizing exposure data with a concept, we would share Dr. von Göetz concerns. Instead, the outcome we promote is broader use of an organizational framework for exposure science. The f...

  5. Stress physiology in marine mammals: how well do they fit the terrestrial model?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Shannon; Crocker, Daniel; Houser, Dorian; Mashburn, Kendall

    2015-07-01

    Stressors are commonly accepted as the causal factors, either internal or external, that evoke physiological responses to mediate the impact of the stressor. The majority of research on the physiological stress response, and costs incurred to an animal, has focused on terrestrial species. This review presents current knowledge on the physiology of the stress response in a lesser studied group of mammals, the marine mammals. Marine mammals are an artificial or pseudo grouping from a taxonomical perspective, as this group represents several distinct and diverse orders of mammals. However, they all are fully or semi-aquatic animals and have experienced selective pressures that have shaped their physiology in a manner that differs from terrestrial relatives. What these differences are and how they relate to the stress response is an efflorescent topic of study. The identification of the many facets of the stress response is critical to marine mammal management and conservation efforts. Anthropogenic stressors in marine ecosystems, including ocean noise, pollution, and fisheries interactions, are increasing and the dramatic responses of some marine mammals to these stressors have elevated concerns over the impact of human-related activities on a diverse group of animals that are difficult to monitor. This review covers the physiology of the stress response in marine mammals and places it in context of what is known from research on terrestrial mammals, particularly with respect to mediator activity that diverges from generalized terrestrial models. Challenges in conducting research on stress physiology in marine mammals are discussed and ways to overcome these challenges in the future are suggested.

  6. Informing Marine Spatial Planning (MSP) with numerical modelling: A case-study on shellfish aquaculture in Malpeque Bay (Eastern Canada).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filgueira, Ramón; Guyondet, Thomas; Bacher, Cédric; Comeau, Luc A

    2015-11-15

    A moratorium on further bivalve leasing was established in 1999-2000 in Prince Edward Island (Canada). Recently, a marine spatial planning process was initiated explore potential mussel culture expansion in Malpeque Bay. This study focuses on the effects of a projected expansion scenario on productivity of existing leases and available suspended food resources. The aim is to provide a robust scientific assessment using available datasets and three modelling approaches ranging in complexity: (1) a connectivity analysis among culture areas; (2) a scenario analysis of organic seston dynamics based on a simplified biogeochemical model; and (3) a scenario analysis of phytoplankton dynamics based on an ecosystem model. These complementary approaches suggest (1) new leases can affect existing culture both through direct connectivity and through bay-scale effects driven by the overall increase in mussel biomass, and (2) a net reduction of phytoplankton within the bounds of its natural variation in the area.

  7. Quantitative analysis of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) in marine sediments: a modeling perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Regnier, P.; Dale, A.W.; Arndt, S.; LaRowe, D.E.; Mogollon, J.M.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2011-01-01

    Recent developments in the quantitativemodeling of methane dynamics and anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) in marine sediments are critically reviewed. The first part of the review begins with a comparison of alternative kinetic models for AOM. The roles of bioenergetic limitations, intermediate c

  8. Model-based temperature measurement system development for marine methane hydrate-bearing sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuhara, Masafumi; Sugiyama, Hitoshi; Igarashi, Juei; Fujii, Kasumi; Shun' etsu, Onodera; Tertychnyi, Vladimir; Shandrygin, Alexander; Pimenov, Viacheslav; Shako, Valery; Matsubayashi, Osamu; Ochiai, Koji

    2005-07-01

    This paper describes the effect of the sensor installation on the temperature of the hydrate-bearing sediments through modeling, how the system was deployed in Nankai Trough area in Japan, and the features of the marine methane hydrate temperature measurement system. (Author)

  9. Coupling ecosystems exposure to nitrogen and species sensitivity to hypoxia: modelling marine eutrophication in LCIA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cosme, Nuno Miguel Dias; Koski, Marja; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    ecosystems and promote planktonic growth that may lead to marine eutrophication impacts. Excessive algal biomass and dissolved oxygen (DO) depletion typify the ecosystem response to the nutrient input. The present novel method couples a mechanistic model of coastal biological processes that determines...

  10. Permanence and Stability of a Kill the Winner Model in Marine Ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korytowski, Daniel A; Smith, Hal

    2017-05-01

    We focus on the long-term dynamics of "killing the winner" Lotka-Volterra models of marine communities consisting of bacteria, virus, and zooplankton. Under suitable conditions, it is shown that there is a unique equilibrium with all populations present which is stable, the system is permanent, and the limiting behavior of its solutions is strongly constrained.

  11. A dynamic marine iron cycle module coupled to the University of Victoria Earth System Model: the Kiel Marine Biogeochemical Model 2 for UVic 2.9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickelsen, L.; Keller, D. P.; Oschlies, A.

    2015-05-01

    Marine biological production as well as the associated biotic uptake of carbon in many ocean regions depends on the availability of nutrients in the euphotic zone. While large areas are limited by nitrogen and/or phosphorus, the micronutrient iron is considered the main limiting nutrient in the North Pacific, equatorial Pacific and Southern Ocean. Changes in iron availability via changes in atmospheric dust input are discussed to play an important role in glacial-interglacial cycles via climate feedbacks caused by changes in biological ocean carbon sequestration. Although many aspects of the iron cycle remain unknown, its incorporation into marine biogeochemical models is needed to test our current understanding and better constrain its role in the Earth system. In the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model (UVic) iron limitation in the ocean was, until now, simulated pragmatically with an iron concentration masking scheme that did not allow a consistent interactive response to perturbations of ocean biogeochemistry or iron cycling sensitivity studies. Here, we replace the iron masking scheme with a dynamic iron cycle and compare the results to available observations and the previous marine biogeochemical model. Sensitivity studies are also conducted with the new model to test the sensitivity of the model to parameterized iron ligand concentrations, the importance of considering the variable solubility of iron in dust deposition, the importance of considering high-resolution bathymetry for the sediment release of iron, the effect of scaling the sedimentary iron release with temperature and the sensitivity of the iron cycle to a climate change scenario.

  12. Spatial structure induced by marine reserves shapes population responses to catastrophes in mathematical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGilliard, Carey R; Punt, André E; Hilborn, Ray

    2011-06-01

    Catastrophic events such as oil spills, hypoxia, disease, and major predation events occur in marine ecosystems and affect fish populations. Previous evaluations of the performance of spatial management alternatives have not considered catastrophic events. We investigate the effects of local and global catastrophic events on populations managed with and without no-take marine reserves and with fishing mortality rates that are optimized accounting for reserves. A spatial population dynamics model is used to explore effects of large, catastrophic natural mortality events. The effects of the spatial spread, magnitude, probability of catastrophe, and persistence of a catastrophic event through time are explored. Catastrophic events affecting large spatial areas and those that persist through time have the greatest effects on population dynamics because they affect natural mortality nonlinearly, whereas the probability and magnitude of catastrophic events result in only linear increases in natural mortality. The probability of falling below 10% or 20% of unfished abundance was greatest when a no-take marine reserve was implemented with no additional fishing regulations and least when a no-take marine reserve was implemented in addition to the maintenance of optimal fishing mortality in fished areas. In the absence of implementation error, maintaining abundance across space using restrictions on fishing mortality rates, regardless of the existence of a no-take marine reserve, decreased the probability of falling below 10% or 20% of unfished abundance.

  13. Emergent organization in a model market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Avinash Chand; Manchanda, Kaustubh; Ramaswamy, Ramakrishna

    2017-09-01

    We study the collective behaviour of interacting agents in a simple model of market economics that was originally introduced by Nørrelykke and Bak. A general theoretical framework for interacting traders on an arbitrary network is presented, with the interaction consisting of buying (namely consumption) and selling (namely production) of commodities. Extremal dynamics is introduced by having the agent with least profit in the market readjust prices, causing the market to self-organize. In addition to examining this model market on regular lattices in two-dimensions, we also study the cases of random complex networks both with and without community structures. Fluctuations in an activity signal exhibit properties that are characteristic of avalanches observed in models of self-organized criticality, and these can be described by power-law distributions when the system is in the critical state.

  14. Emergent organization in a model market

    CERN Document Server

    Yadav, Avinash Chand; Ramaswamy, Ramakrishna

    2016-01-01

    We study the collective behavior of interacting agents in a simple model of market economics originally introduced by N{\\o}rrelykke and Bak. A general theoretical framework for interacting traders on an arbitrary network is presented, with the interaction consisting of buying (namely, consumption) and selling (namely, production) of commodities. Extremal dynamics is introduced by having the agent with least profit in the market readjust prices, causing the market to self--organize. We study this model market on regular lattices in two--dimension as well as on random complex networks; in the critical state fluctuations in an activity signal exhibit properties that are characteristic of avalanches observed in models of self-organized criticality, and these can be described by power--law distributions.

  15. Integrated bio-chemostratigraphy of Late Cretaceous organic-rich marine sediments in Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizrahi, Nitzan; Harlavan, Yehudit; Abramovich, Sigal; Ashckenazi-Polivoda, Sarit

    2017-04-01

    The Late Cretaceous was a time of great climatic and paleocanographic changes that had major impact on the global marine ecosystems. The timing of these events must be accurately determined based on a reliable chronostratigraphic framework that can be readily applied in various environmental settings. The Late Cretaceous planktic foraminiferal biostratigraphic zonation is mainly based on tropical-subtropical species that are typically found in normal pelagic settings. However, during this time, unique conditions of high water column productivity and oxygen deficiency prevailed throughout the Levant region, including Israel, causing a partial to total exclusion of some of these species. Consequently, establishing age framework based on biostratigraphic correlation of the Levant region is a challenging task, emphasizing the need to apply additional method to advance the regional chronostratigraphy. Among these, is chemostratigraphy based on the 87Sr/86Sr ratio in of the carbonate tests of foraminifera, which is now widely used for stratigraphic correlation. The main objective of the present research was to improve the chronostratigraphic resolution for the Upper Cretaceous organic-rich sequence in Israel. This was accomplished by integrating detailed correlation of planktic and benthic foraminiferal bioevents, with 87Sr/86Sr ratio, correlated to the global 87Sr/86Sr ratio curve. This integration provides a new and much improved chronostratigraphic framework of the Late Cretaceous strata of Israel and the entire Levant region. It allows to integrate sections with poorly preserved or lack of the common biomarkers, define for the biozone. In general this should yield the best age control for economically valuable stratigraphic units (e.g., oil shale) deposited during this time. The biozonation of the studied sections, RE-2 and RE-6 from the Negev basins (southern Israel), spans from the Late Santonian Dicarinella asymetrica Zone to the middle Maastrichtian Abathomphalus

  16. Open Source Software for Mapping Human Impacts on Marine Ecosystems with an Additive Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy Stock

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an easy-to-use open source software tool implementing a commonly used additive model (Halpern et al., 'Science', 2008 for mapping human impacts on marine ecosystems. The tool has been used to map the potential for cumulative human impacts in Arctic marine waters and can support future human impact mapping projects by 1 making the model easier to use; 2 making updates of model results straightforward when better input data become available; 3 storing input data and information about processing steps in a defined format and thus facilitating data sharing and reproduction of modeling results; 4 supporting basic visualization of model inputs and outputs without the need for advanced technical skills. The tool, called EcoImpactMapper, was implemented in Java and is thus platform-independent. A tutorial, example data, the tool and the source code are available online.

  17. Self-organized model of cascade spreading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualdi, S.; Medo, M.; Zhang, Y.-C.

    2011-01-01

    We study simultaneous price drops of real stocks and show that for high drop thresholds they follow a power-law distribution. To reproduce these collective downturns, we propose a minimal self-organized model of cascade spreading based on a probabilistic response of the system elements to stress conditions. This model is solvable using the theory of branching processes and the mean-field approximation. For a wide range of parameters, the system is in a critical state and displays a power-law cascade-size distribution similar to the empirically observed one. We further generalize the model to reproduce volatility clustering and other observed properties of real stocks.

  18. Recursive self-organizing network models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Barbara; Micheli, Alessio; Sperduti, Alessandro; Strickert, Marc

    2004-01-01

    Self-organizing models constitute valuable tools for data visualization, clustering, and data mining. Here, we focus on extensions of basic vector-based models by recursive computation in such a way that sequential and tree-structured data can be processed directly. The aim of this article is to give a unified review of important models recently proposed in literature, to investigate fundamental mathematical properties of these models, and to compare the approaches by experiments. We first review several models proposed in literature from a unifying perspective, thereby making use of an underlying general framework which also includes supervised recurrent and recursive models as special cases. We shortly discuss how the models can be related to different neuron lattices. Then, we investigate theoretical properties of the models in detail: we explicitly formalize how structures are internally stored in different context models and which similarity measures are induced by the recursive mapping onto the structures. We assess the representational capabilities of the models, and we shortly discuss the issues of topology preservation and noise tolerance. The models are compared in an experiment with time series data. Finally, we add an experiment for one context model for tree-structured data to demonstrate the capability to process complex structures.

  19. Capturing optically important constituents and properties in a marine biogeochemical and ecosystem model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutkiewicz, S.; Hickman, A. E.; Jahn, O.; Gregg, W. W.; Mouw, C. B.; Follows, M. J.

    2015-02-01

    We present a numerical model of the ocean that couples a three-stream radiative transfer component with a marine biogeochemical-ecosystem in a dynamic three-dimensional physical framework. The radiative transfer component resolves spectral irradiance as it is absorbed and scattered within the water column. We explicitly include the effect of several optically important water constituents (the phytoplankton community, detrital particles, and coloured dissolved organic matter, CDOM). The model is evaluated against in situ observed and satellite derived products. In particular we compare to concurrently measured biogeochemical, ecosystem and optical data along a north-south transect of the Atlantic Ocean. The simulation captures the patterns and magnitudes of these data, and estimates surface upwelling irradiance analogous to that observed by ocean colour satellite instruments. We conduct a series of sensitivity experiments to demonstrate, globally, the relative importance of each of the water constituents, and the crucial feedbacks between the light field and the relative fitness of phytoplankton types, and the biogeochemistry of the ocean. CDOM has proportionally more importance at short wavelengths and in more productive waters, phytoplankton absorption is especially important at the deep chlorophyll a (Chl a) maximum, and absorption by water molecules is relatively most important in the highly oligotrophic gyres. Sensitivity experiments in which absorption by any of the optical constituents was increased led to a decrease in the size of the oligotrophic regions of the subtropical gyres: lateral nutrient supplies were enhanced as a result of decreasing high latitude productivity. Scattering does not as strongly affect the ecosyste