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Sample records for marine gas-hydrate reservoirs

  1. Seepage from an arctic shallow marine gas hydrate reservoir is insensitive to momentary ocean warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Wei-Li; Torres, Marta E.; Carroll, Jolynn; Crémière, Antoine; Panieri, Giuliana; Yao, Haoyi; Serov, Pavel

    2017-06-01

    Arctic gas hydrate reservoirs located in shallow water and proximal to the sediment-water interface are thought to be sensitive to bottom water warming that may trigger gas hydrate dissociation and the release of methane. Here, we evaluate bottom water temperature as a potential driver for hydrate dissociation and methane release from a recently discovered, gas-hydrate-bearing system south of Spitsbergen (Storfjordrenna, ~380 m water depth). Modelling of the non-steady-state porewater profiles and observations of distinct layers of methane-derived authigenic carbonate nodules in the sediments indicate centurial to millennial methane emissions in the region. Results of temperature modelling suggest limited impact of short-term warming on gas hydrates deeper than a few metres in the sediments. We conclude that the ongoing and past methane emission episodes at the investigated sites are likely due to the episodic ventilation of deep reservoirs rather than warming-induced gas hydrate dissociation in this shallow water seep site.

  2. Reservoir controls on the occurrence and production of gas hydrates in nature

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    Collett, Timothy Scott

    2014-01-01

    Gas hydrates in both arctic permafrost regions and deep marine settings can occur at high concentrations in sand-dominated reservoirs, which have been the focus of gas hydrate exploration and production studies in

  3. SEISMIC STUDIES OF MARINE GAS HYDRATES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Haibin

    2003-01-01

    We give a brief introduction of developments of seismic methods in the studies of marine gas hydrates. Then we give an example of seismic data processing for BSRs in western Nankai accretionary prism, a typical gas hydrate distribution region. Seismic data processing is proved to be important to obtain better images of BSRs distribution. Studies of velocity structure of hydrated sediments are useful for better understanding the distribution of gas hydrates. Using full waveform inversion, we successfully derived high-resolution velocity model of a double BSR in eastern Nankai Trough area. Recent survey and research show that gas hydrates occur in the marine sediments of the South China Sea and East China Sea.But we would like to say seismic researches on gas hydrate in China are very preliminary.

  4. Exploitation of subsea gas hydrate reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicki, Georg; Schlüter, Stefan; Hennig, Torsten; Deerberg, Görge

    2016-04-01

    Natural gas hydrates are considered to be a potential energy resource in the future. They occur in permafrost areas as well as in subsea sediments and are stable at high pressure and low temperature conditions. According to estimations the amount of carbon bonded in natural gas hydrates worldwide is two times larger than in all known conventional fossil fuels. Besides technical challenges that have to be overcome climate and safety issues have to be considered before a commercial exploitation of such unconventional reservoirs. The potential of producing natural gas from subsea gas hydrate deposits by various means (e.g. depressurization and/or injection of carbon dioxide) is numerically studied in the frame of the German research project »SUGAR«. The basic mechanisms of gas hydrate formation/dissociation and heat and mass transport in porous media are considered and implemented into a numerical model. The physics of the process leads to strong non-linear couplings between hydraulic fluid flow, hydrate dissociation and formation, hydraulic properties of the sediment, partial pressures and seawater solution of components and the thermal budget of the system described by the heat equation. This paper is intended to provide an overview of the recent development regarding the production of natural gas from subsea gas hydrate reservoirs. It aims at giving a broad insight into natural gas hydrates and covering relevant aspects of the exploitation process. It is focused on the thermodynamic principles and technological approaches for the exploitation. The effects occurring during natural gas production within hydrate filled sediment layers are identified and discussed by means of numerical simulation results. The behaviour of relevant process parameters such as pressure, temperature and phase saturations is described and compared for different strategies. The simulations are complemented by calculations for different safety relevant problems.

  5. Numerical studies of depressurization-induced gas production from an interbedded marine turbidite gas hydrate reservoir model

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    Myshakin, Evgeniy; Lin, Jeen-Shang; Uchida, Shun; Seol, Yongkoo; Collett, Timothy S.; Boswell, Ray

    2017-01-01

    The numerical simulation of thin hydrate-bearing sand layers interbedded with mud layers is investigated. In this model, the lowest hydrate layer occurs at the base of gas hydrate stability and overlies a thinly-interbedded saline aquifer. The predicted gas rates reach 6.25 MMscf/day (1.77 x 105 m3 /day) after 90 days of continuous depressurization with manageable water production. Development of horizontal dissociating interfaces between hydrate-bearing sand and mud layers is a primary determinant of reservoir performance. A set of simulations has been executed to assess uncertainty in in situ permeability and to determine the impact of the saline aquifer on productivity.

  6. Preliminary discussion on gas hydrate reservoir system of Shenhu Area, North Slope of South China Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, N.; Yang, S.; Liang, J.; Wang, H.; Fu, S. [Guangzhou Marine Geological Survey, Guangzhou (China); Zhang, H. [China Geological Survey, Beijing (China); Su, X. [China Univ. of Geosciences, Beijing (China)

    2008-07-01

    Gas hydrate is a type of ice-like solid substance formed by the combination of certain low-molecular-weight gases such as methane, ethane, and carbon dioxide with water. Gas hydrate primarily occurs naturally in sediments beneath the permafrost and the sediments of the continental slope with the water depth greater than 300 m. Marine gas hydrate geological systems are important because they may be sufficiently concentrated in certain locations to be an economically viable fossil fuel resource. However, gas hydrates can cause geo-hazards through large-scale slope destabilization and can release methane, a potential greenhouse gas, into the environment. This paper discussed the hydrate drilling results from a geological and geophysical investigation of the gas hydrate reservoir system of the Shenhu Area, located in the north slope of South China Sea. The paper identified the basic formation conditions, and discussed the pore-water geochemical features of shallow sediments and their inflected gas sources, gas hydrate distribution and seismic characteristics. It was concluded that the gas hydrate was heterogeneously distributed in space, and mainly distributed in certain ranges above the bottom of the gas hydrate stability zone. It was also concluded that methane gas that formed hydrate was likely from in-situ micro-biogenic methane. Last, it was found that distributed and in-situ micro-biogenic methane resulted in low methane flux, and formed the distributed pattern of gas hydrate system with the features of differential distribution and saturation. 34 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs.

  7. Nuclear Well Log Properties of Natural Gas Hydrate Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchwell, A.; Cook, A.

    2015-12-01

    Characterizing gas hydrate in a reservoir typically involves a full suite of geophysical well logs. The most common method involves using resistivity measurements to quantify the decrease in electrically conductive water when replaced with gas hydrate. Compressional velocity measurements are also used because the gas hydrate significantly strengthens the moduli of the sediment. At many gas hydrate sites, nuclear well logs, which include the photoelectric effect, formation sigma, carbon/oxygen ratio and neutron porosity, are also collected but often not used. In fact, the nuclear response of a gas hydrate reservoir is not known. In this research we will focus on the nuclear log response in gas hydrate reservoirs at the Mallik Field at the Mackenzie Delta, Northwest Territories, Canada, and the Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg 2 sites in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Nuclear logs may add increased robustness to the investigation into the properties of gas hydrates and some types of logs may offer an opportunity to distinguish between gas hydrate and permafrost. For example, a true formation sigma log measures the thermal neutron capture cross section of a formation and pore constituents; it is especially sensitive to hydrogen and chlorine in the pore space. Chlorine has a high absorption potential, and is used to determine the amount of saline water within pore spaces. Gas hydrate offers a difference in elemental composition compared to water-saturated intervals. Thus, in permafrost areas, the carbon/oxygen ratio may vary between gas hydrate and permafrost, due to the increase of carbon in gas hydrate accumulations. At the Mallik site, we observe a hydrate-bearing sand (1085-1107 m) above a water-bearing sand (1107-1140 m), which was confirmed through core samples and mud gas analysis. We observe a decrease in the photoelectric absorption of ~0.5 barnes/e-, as well as an increase in the formation sigma readings of ~5 capture units in the water-bearing sand as

  8. Prospecting for marine gas hydrate resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell, Ray; Shipp, Craig; Reichel, Thomas; Shelander, Dianna; Saeki, Tetsuo; Frye, Matthew; Shedd, William; Collett, Timothy S.; McConnell, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    As gas hydrate energy assessment matures worldwide, emphasis has evolved away from confirmation of the mere presence of gas hydrate to the more complex issue of prospecting for those specific accumulations that are viable resource targets. Gas hydrate exploration now integrates the unique pressure and temperature preconditions for gas hydrate occurrence with those concepts and practices that are the basis for conventional oil and gas exploration. We have aimed to assimilate the lessons learned to date in global gas hydrate exploration to outline a generalized prospecting approach as follows: (1) use existing well and geophysical data to delineate the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ), (2) identify and evaluate potential direct indications of hydrate occurrence through evaluation of interval of elevated acoustic velocity and/or seismic events of prospective amplitude and polarity, (3) mitigate geologic risk via regional seismic and stratigraphic facies analysis as well as seismic mapping of amplitude distribution along prospective horizons, and (4) mitigate further prospect risk through assessment of the evidence of gas presence and migration into the GHSZ. Although a wide range of occurrence types might ultimately become viable energy supply options, this approach, which has been tested in only a small number of locations worldwide, has directed prospect evaluation toward those sand-hosted, high-saturation occurrences that were presently considered to have the greatest future commercial potential.

  9. Crystallite size distributions of marine gas hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klapp, S.A.; Bohrmann, G.; Abegg, F. [Bremen Univ., Bremen (Germany). Research Center of Ocean Margins; Hemes, S.; Klein, H.; Kuhs, W.F. [Gottingen Univ., Gottingen (Germany). Dept. of Crystallography

    2008-07-01

    Experimental studies were conducted to determine the crystallite size distributions of natural gas hydrate samples retrieved from the Gulf of Mexico, the Black Sea, and a hydrate ridge located near offshore Oregon. Synchrotron radiation technology was used to provide the high photon fluxes and high penetration depths needed to accurately analyze the bulk sediment samples. A new beam collimation diffraction technique was used to measure gas hydrate crystallite sizes. The analyses showed that gas hydrate crystals were globular in shape. Mean crystallite sizes ranged from 200 to 400 {mu}m for hydrate samples taken from the sea floor. Larger grain sizes in the hydrate ridge samples suggested differences in hydrate formation ages or processes. A comparison with laboratory-produced methane hydrate samples showed half a lognormal curve with a mean value of 40{mu}m. Results of the study showed that a cautious approach must be adopted when transposing crystallite-size sensitive physical data from laboratory-made gas hydrates to natural settings. It was concluded that crystallite size information may also be used to resolve the formation ages of gas hydrates when formation processes and conditions are constrained. 48 refs., 1 tab., 9 figs.

  10. Gas hydrate saturations estimated from fractured reservoir at Site NGHP-01-10, Krishna-Godavari Basin, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M.W.; Collett, T.S.

    2009-01-01

    During the Indian National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition 01 (NGHP-Ol), one of the richest marine gas hydrate accumulations was discovered at Site NGHP-01-10 in the Krishna-Godavari Basin. The occurrence of concentrated gas hydrate at this site is primarily controlled by the presence of fractures. Assuming the resistivity of gas hydratebearing sediments is isotropic, th?? conventional Archie analysis using the logging while drilling resistivity log yields gas hydrate saturations greater than 50% (as high as ???80%) of the pore space for the depth interval between ???25 and ???160 m below seafloor. On the other hand, gas hydrate saturations estimated from pressure cores from nearby wells were less than ???26% of the pore space. Although intrasite variability may contribute to the difference, the primary cause of the saturation difference is attributed to the anisotropic nature of the reservoir due to gas hydrate in high-angle fractures. Archie's law can be used to estimate gas hydrate saturations in anisotropic reservoir, with additional information such as elastic velocities to constrain Archie cementation parameters m and the saturation exponent n. Theory indicates that m and n depend on the direction of the measurement relative to fracture orientation, as well as depending on gas hydrate saturation. By using higher values of m and n in the resistivity analysis for fractured reservoirs, the difference between saturation estimates is significantly reduced, although a sizable difference remains. To better understand the nature of fractured reservoirs, wireline P and S wave velocities were also incorporated into the analysis.

  11. Comparison of the physical and geotechnical properties of gas-hydrate-bearing sediments from offshore India and other gas-hydrate-reservoir systems

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    Winters, William J.; Wilcox-Cline, R.W.; Long, P.; Dewri, S.K.; Kumar, P.; Stern, Laura A.; Kerr, Laura A.

    2014-01-01

    The sediment characteristics of hydrate-bearing reservoirs profoundly affect the formation, distribution, and morphology of gas hydrate. The presence and type of gas, porewater chemistry, fluid migration, and subbottom temperature may govern the hydrate formation process, but it is the host sediment that commonly dictates final hydrate habit, and whether hydrate may be economically developed.In this paper, the physical properties of hydrate-bearing regions offshore eastern India (Krishna-Godavari and Mahanadi Basins) and the Andaman Islands, determined from Expedition NGHP-01 cores, are compared to each other, well logs, and published results of other hydrate reservoirs. Properties from the hydrate-free Kerala-Konkan basin off the west coast of India are also presented. Coarser-grained reservoirs (permafrost-related and marine) may contain high gas-hydrate-pore saturations, while finer-grained reservoirs may contain low-saturation disseminated or more complex gas-hydrates, including nodules, layers, and high-angle planar and rotational veins. However, even in these fine-grained sediments, gas hydrate preferentially forms in coarser sediment or fractures, when present. The presence of hydrate in conjunction with other geologic processes may be responsible for sediment porosity being nearly uniform for almost 500 m off the Andaman Islands.Properties of individual NGHP-01 wells and regional trends are discussed in detail. However, comparison of marine and permafrost-related Arctic reservoirs provides insight into the inter-relationships and common traits between physical properties and the morphology of gas-hydrate reservoirs regardless of location. Extrapolation of properties from one location to another also enhances our understanding of gas-hydrate reservoir systems. Grain size and porosity effects on permeability are critical, both locally to trap gas and regionally to provide fluid flow to hydrate reservoirs. Index properties corroborate more advanced

  12. Formation of natural gas hydrates in marine sediments 1. Conceptual model of gas hydrate growth conditioned by host sediment properties

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    Clennell, M.B.; Hovland, M.; Booth, J.S.; Henry, P.; Winters, W.J.

    1999-01-01

    The stability of submarine gas hydrates is largely dictated by pressure and temperature, gas composition, and pore water salinity. However, the physical properties and surface chemistry of deep marine sediments may also affect the thermodynamic state, growth kinetics, spatial distributions, and growth forms of clathrates. Our conceptual model presumes that gas hydrate behaves in a way analogous to ice in a freezing soil. Hydrate growth is inhibited within fine-grained sediments by a combination of reduced pore water activity in the vicinity of hydrophilic mineral surfaces, and the excess internal energy of small crystals confined in pores. The excess energy can be thought of as a "capillary pressure" in the hydrate crystal, related to the pore size distribution and the state of stress in the sediment framework. The base of gas hydrate stability in a sequence of fine sediments is predicted by our model to occur at a lower temperature (nearer to the seabed) than would be calculated from bulk thermodynamic equilibrium. Capillary effects or a build up of salt in the system can expand the phase boundary between hydrate and free gas into a divariant field extending over a finite depth range dictated by total methane content and pore-size distribution. Hysteresis between the temperatures of crystallization and dissociation of the clathrate is also predicted. Growth forms commonly observed in hydrate samples recovered from marine sediments (nodules, and lenses in muds; cements in sands) can largely be explained by capillary effects, but kinetics of nucleation and growth are also important. The formation of concentrated gas hydrates in a partially closed system with respect to material transport, or where gas can flush through the system, may lead to water depletion in the host sediment. This "freeze-drying" may be detectable through physical changes to the sediment (low water content and overconsolidation) and/or chemical anomalies in the pore waters and metastable

  13. Formation of natural gas hydrates in marine sediments. Gas hydrate growth and stability conditioned by host sediment properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clennell, M.B.; Henry, P.; Hovland, M.; Booth, J.S.; Winters, W.J.; Thomas, M.

    2000-01-01

    The stability conditions of submarine gas hydrates (methane clathrates) are largely dictated by pressure, temperature, gas composition, and pore water salinity. However, the physical properties and surface chemistry of the host sediments also affect the thermodynamic state, growth kinetics, spatial distributions, and growth forms of clathrates. Our model presumes that gas hydrate behaves in a way analogous to ice in the pores of a freezing soil, where capillary forces influence the energy balance. Hydrate growth is inhibited within fine-grained sediments because of the excess internal phase pressure of small crystals with high surface curvature that coexist with liquid water in small pores. Therefore, the base of gas hydrate stability in a sequence of fine sediments is predicted by our model to occur at a lower temperature, and so nearer to the seabed than would be calculated from bulk thermodynamic equilibrium. The growth forms commonly observed in hydrate samples recovered from marine sediments (nodules, sheets, and lenses in muds; cements in sand and ash layers) can be explained by a requirement to minimize the excess of mechanical and surface energy in the system.

  14. Simulating the gas hydrate production test at Mallik using the pilot scale pressure reservoir LARS

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    Heeschen, Katja; Spangenberg, Erik; Schicks, Judith M.; Priegnitz, Mike; Giese, Ronny; Luzi-Helbing, Manja

    2014-05-01

    LARS, the LArge Reservoir Simulator, allows for one of the few pilot scale simulations of gas hydrate formation and dissociation under controlled conditions with a high resolution sensor network to enable the detection of spatial variations. It was designed and built within the German project SUGAR (submarine gas hydrate reservoirs) for sediment samples with a diameter of 0.45 m and a length of 1.3 m. During the project, LARS already served for a number of experiments simulating the production of gas from hydrate-bearing sediments using thermal stimulation and/or depressurization. The latest test simulated the methane production test from gas hydrate-bearing sediments at the Mallik test site, Canada, in 2008 (Uddin et al., 2011). Thus, the starting conditions of 11.5 MPa and 11°C and environmental parameters were set to fit the Mallik test site. The experimental gas hydrate saturation of 90% of the total pore volume (70 l) was slightly higher than volumes found in gas hydrate-bearing formations in the field (70 - 80%). However, the resulting permeability of a few millidarcy was comparable. The depressurization driven gas production at Mallik was conducted in three steps at 7.0 MPa - 5.0 MPa - 4.2 MPa all of which were used in the laboratory experiments. In the lab the pressure was controlled using a back pressure regulator while the confining pressure was stable. All but one of the 12 temperature sensors showed a rapid decrease in temperature throughout the sediment sample, which accompanied the pressure changes as a result of gas hydrate dissociation. During step 1 and 2 they continued up to the point where gas hydrate stability was regained. The pressure decreases and gas hydrate dissociation led to highly variable two phase fluid flow throughout the duration of the simulated production test. The flow rates were measured continuously (gas) and discontinuously (liquid), respectively. Next to being discussed here, both rates were used to verify a model of gas

  15. Investigation of gas hydrate-bearing sandstone reservoirs at the Mount Elbert stratigraphic test well, Milne Point, Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boswell, R. [United States Dept. of Energy, Morgantown, WV (United States). National Energy Technology Lab; Hunter, R. [ASRC Energy Services, Anchorage, AK (United States); Collett, T. [United States Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Digert, S.; Weeks, M. [BP Exploration Alaska Inc., Anchorage, AK (United States); Hancock, S. [RPS Energy Canada, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    Gas hydrates occur within the shallow sand reservoirs on the Alaska North Slope (ANS). The mean estimate for gas hydrate in-place resources on the ANS is 16.7 trillion cubic metres. In the past, they were viewed primarily as a drilling hazard to be managed during the development of deeper oil resources. In 2002, a cooperative research program was launched to help determine the potential for environmentally-sound and economically-viable production of methane from gas hydrates. Additional objectives were to refine ANS gas hydrate resource potential, improve the geologic and geophysical methods used to locate and asses gas hydrate resources, and develop numerical modeling capabilities that are essential in both planning and evaluating gas hydrate field programs. This paper reviewed the results of the an extensive data collection effort conducted at the Mount Elbert number 1 gas hydrates stratigraphic test well on the ANS. The 22-day field program acquired significant gas hydrate-bearing reservoir data, including a suite of open-hole well logs, over 500 feet of continuous core, and open-hole formation pressure response tests. The logging program confirmed the existence of approximately 30 m of gas hydrate saturated, fine-grained sand reservoir. Gas hydrate saturations were observed to range from 60 to 75 per cent. Continuous wire-line coring operations achieved 85 per cent recovery. The Mount Elbert field program also involved gas and water sample collection. It demonstrated the ability to safely and efficiently conduct a research-level open-hole data acquisition program in shallow, sub-permafrost sediments and increased confidence in gas hydrate resource assessment methodologies for the ANS. 10 refs., 9 figs.

  16. Sensitivity Analysis of Parameters Governing the Recovery of Methane from Natural Gas Hydrate Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Giraldo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Naturally occurring gas hydrates are regarded as an important future source of energy and considerable efforts are currently being invested to develop methods for an economically viable recovery of this resource. The recovery of natural gas from gas hydrate deposits has been studied by a number of researchers. Depressurization of the reservoir is seen as a favorable method because of its relatively low energy requirements. While lowering the pressure in the production well seems to be a straight forward approach to destabilize methane hydrates, the intrinsic kinetics of CH4-hydrate decomposition and fluid flow lead to complex processes of mass and heat transfer within the deposit. In order to develop a better understanding of the processes and conditions governing the production of methane from methane hydrates it is necessary to study the sensitivity of gas production to the effects of factors such as pressure, temperature, thermal conductivity, permeability, porosity on methane recovery from naturally occurring gas hydrates. A simplified model is the base for an ensemble of reservoir simulations to study which parameters govern productivity and how these factors might interact.

  17. Numerical simulation of gas hydrate exploitation from subsea reservoirs in the Black Sea

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    Janicki, Georg; Schlüter, Stefan; Hennig, Torsten; Deerberg, Görge

    2017-04-01

    Natural gas (methane) is the most environmental friendly source of fossil energy. When coal is replace by natural gas in power production the emission of carbon dioxide is reduced by 50 %. The vast amount of methane assumed in gas hydrate deposits can help to overcome a shortage of fossil energy resources in the future. To increase their potential for energy applications new technological approaches are being discussed and developed worldwide. Besides technical challenges that have to be overcome climate and safety issues have to be considered before a commercial exploitation of such unconventional reservoirs. The potential of producing natural gas from subsea gas hydrate deposits by various means (e. g. depressurization and/or carbon dioxide injection) is numerically studied in the frame of the German research project »SUGAR - Submarine Gas Hydrate Reservoirs«. In order to simulate the exploitation of hydrate-bearing sediments in the subsea, an in-house simulation model HyReS which is implemented in the general-purpose software COMSOL Multiphysics is used. This tool turned out to be especially suited for the flexible implementation of non-standard correlations concerning heat transfer, fluid flow, hydrate kinetics, and other relevant model data. Partially based on the simulation results, the development of a technical concept and its evaluation are the subject of ongoing investigations, whereby geological and ecological criteria are to be considered. The results illustrate the processes and effects occurring during the gas production from a subsea gas hydrate deposit by depressurization. The simulation results from a case study for a deposit located in the Black Sea reveal that the production of natural gas by simple depressurization is possible but with quite low rates. It can be shown that the hydrate decomposition and thus the gas production strongly depend on the geophysical properties of the reservoir, the mass and heat transport within the reservoir, and

  18. Scale-dependent gas hydrate saturation estimates in sand reservoirs in the Ulleung Basin, East Sea of Korea

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    Lee, Myung Woong; Collett, Timothy S.

    2013-01-01

    Through the use of 2-D and 3-D seismic data, several gas hydrate prospects were identified in the Ulleung Basin, East Sea of Korea and thirteen drill sites were established and logging-while-drilling (LWD) data were acquired from each site in 2010. Sites UBGH2–6 and UBGH2–10 were selected to test a series of high amplitude seismic reflections, possibly from sand reservoirs. LWD logs from the UBGH2–6 well indicate that there are three significant sand reservoirs with varying thickness. Two upper sand reservoirs are water saturated and the lower thinly bedded sand reservoir contains gas hydrate with an average saturation of 13%, as estimated from the P-wave velocity. The well logs at the UBGH2–6 well clearly demonstrated the effect of scale-dependency on gas hydrate saturation estimates. Gas hydrate saturations estimated from the high resolution LWD acquired ring resistivity (vertical resolution of about 5–8 cm) reaches about 90% with an average saturation of 28%, whereas gas hydrate saturations estimated from the low resolution A40L resistivity (vertical resolution of about 120 cm) reaches about 25% with an average saturation of 11%. However, in the UBGH2–10 well, gas hydrate occupies a 5-m thick sand reservoir near 135 mbsf with a maximum saturation of about 60%. In the UBGH2–10 well, the average and a maximum saturation estimated from various well logging tools are comparable, because the bed thickness is larger than the vertical resolution of the various logging tools. High resolution wireline log data further document the role of scale-dependency on gas hydrate calculations.

  19. Polyethylene Glycol Drilling Fluid for Drilling in Marine Gas Hydrates-Bearing Sediments: An Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lixin Kuang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Shale inhibition, low-temperature performance, the ability to prevent calcium and magnesium-ion pollution, and hydrate inhibition of polyethylene glycol drilling fluid were each tested with conventional drilling-fluid test equipment and an experimental gas-hydrate integrated simulation system developed by our laboratory. The results of these tests show that drilling fluid with a formulation of artificial seawater, 3% bentonite, 0.3% Na2CO3, 10% polyethylene glycol, 20% NaCl, 4% SMP-2, 1% LV-PAC, 0.5% NaOH and 1% PVP K-90 performs well in shale swelling and gas hydrate inhibition. It also shows satisfactory rheological properties and lubrication at temperature ranges from −8 °C to 15 °C. The PVP K-90, a kinetic hydrate inhibitor, can effectively inhibit gas hydrate aggregations at a dose of 1 wt%. This finding demonstrates that a drilling fluid with a high addition of NaCl and a low addition of PVP K-90 is suitable for drilling in natural marine gas-hydrate-bearing sediments.

  20. Reservoir microfacies and their logging response of gas hydrate in the Qilian Mountain permafrost in Northwest China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H.; Lu, Z.; Zhang, Y.; Sun, Z.

    2012-12-01

    The Qilian Mountain permafrost is located in the north margin of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau in northwest China. The permafrost area is about 10×104 Km2, and dominated by mountain permafrost. The mean annual ground temperature is 1.5 to 2.4 centigrade and the thickness of permafrost is generally 50 to 139 m. The gas hydrate was sampled successfully in the 133-396m interval from holes DK-1, DK-2 and DK-3 and tested by microRaman spectroscopy in the hydrate laboratory of the Qingdao Institute of Marine Geology during June to September in 2009. The exploratory drilling indicated that gas hydrate and its abnormal occurrence are mainly developed 130-400 m beneath permafrost. The strata belong to the Jiangcang Formation of middle Jurassic. Based on lithology, sedimentary structure and sequence and other facies markers, reservoir microfacies of gas hydrate are identified as underwater distributary channel and interdistributary bay in delta front of delta and deep lake mudstone facies in lacustrine. The underwater distributary channel in delta front of delta is dominated by fine sandstone. It has little mudstone. The grain size generally becomes finer, and scour-filling structure, parallel bedding, cross bedding and wavy bedding develop successively from bottom to top in one phase of channel. In vertical multi-period distributary channels superimpose, forming thick sandstone, and sometimes a thin mudstone develop between two channels. The interdistributaty bay is characterized by mudstone with little siltstone and fine sandstone. The lithology column shows mudstone interbedded with thin sandstone. Horizon bedding and lenticular bedding are the main structure. The gas hydrate usually presents visible white (smoky gray when mixing with mud) ice-like lamina in fissures or invisible micro disseminated occurrence in pores of sandstone. Honeycomb pores formed by the decomposition of gas hydrate are usually found in sandstone. The deep lake is dominated by thick dark grey mudstone

  1. 3D joint inversion using seismic data and marine controlled-source electromagnetic data for evaluating gas hydrate concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, B.; Byun, J.; Seol, S. J.; Jeong, S.; Chung, Y.; Kwon, T.

    2015-12-01

    For many decades, gas hydrates have been received great attention as a potential source of natural gas. Therefore, the detailed information of structures of buried gas hydrates and their concentrations are prerequisite for the production for the gas hydrate as a reliable source of alternate energy. Recently, for this reason, a lot of gas hydrate assessment methods have been proposed by many researchers. However, it is still necessary to establish as new method for the further improvement of the accuracy of the 3D gas hydrate distribution. In this study, we present a 3D joint inversion method that provides superior quantitative information of gas hydrate distributions using 3D seismic data obtained by ocean-bottom cable (OBC) and marine controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) data. To verify our inversion method, we first built the general 3D gas hydrate model containing vertical methane-flow pathways. With the described model, we generated synthetic 3D OBC data and marine CSEM data using finite element modeling algorithms, respectively. In the joint inversion process, to obtain the high-resolution volumetric P-wave velocity structure, we applied the 3D full waveform inversion algorithm to the acquired OBC data. After that, the obtained P-wave velocity model is used as the structure constraint to compute cross-gradients with the updated resistivity model in the EM inversion process. Finally, petrophysical relations were applied to estimate volumetric gas hydrate concentrations. The proposed joint inversion process makes possible to obtain more precise quantitative gas hydrate assessment than inversion processes using only seismic or EM data. This technique can be helpful for accurate decision-making in gas hydrate development as well as in their production monitoring.

  2. Linking basin-scale and pore-scale gas hydrate distribution patterns in diffusion-dominated marine hydrate systems

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    Nole, Michael; Daigle, Hugh; Cook, Ann E.; Hillman, Jess I. T.; Malinverno, Alberto

    2017-02-01

    The goal of this study is to computationally determine the potential distribution patterns of diffusion-driven methane hydrate accumulations in coarse-grained marine sediments. Diffusion of dissolved methane in marine gas hydrate systems has been proposed as a potential transport mechanism through which large concentrations of hydrate can preferentially accumulate in coarse-grained sediments over geologic time. Using one-dimensional compositional reservoir simulations, we examine hydrate distribution patterns at the scale of individual sand layers (1-20 m thick) that are deposited between microbially active fine-grained material buried through the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ). We then extrapolate to two-dimensional and basin-scale three-dimensional simulations, where we model dipping sands and multilayered systems. We find that properties of a sand layer including pore size distribution, layer thickness, dip, and proximity to other layers in multilayered systems all exert control on diffusive methane fluxes toward and within a sand, which in turn impact the distribution of hydrate throughout a sand unit. In all of these simulations, we incorporate data on physical properties and sand layer geometries from the Terrebonne Basin gas hydrate system in the Gulf of Mexico. We demonstrate that diffusion can generate high hydrate saturations (upward of 90%) at the edges of thin sands at shallow depths within the GHSZ, but that it is ineffective at producing high hydrate saturations throughout thick (greater than 10 m) sands buried deep within the GHSZ. Furthermore, we find that hydrate in fine-grained material can preserve high hydrate saturations in nearby thin sands with burial.Plain Language SummaryThis study combines one-, two-, and three-dimensional simulations to explore one potential process by which methane dissolved in water beneath the seafloor can be converted into solid methane hydrate. This work specifically examines one end-member methane transport

  3. Characterization of gas hydrate reservoirs by integration of core and log data in the Ulleung Basin, East Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahk, J.-J.; Kim, G.-Y.; Chun, J.-H.; Kim, J.-H.; Lee, J.Y.; Ryu, B.-J.; Lee, J.-H.; Son, B.-K.; Collett, Timothy S.

    2013-01-01

    Examinations of core and well-log data from the Second Ulleung Basin Gas Hydrate Drilling Expedition (UBGH2) drill sites suggest that Sites UBGH2-2_2 and UBGH2-6 have relatively good gas hydrate reservoir quality in terms of individual and total cumulative thicknesses of gas-hydrate-bearing sand (HYBS) beds. In both of the sites, core sediments are generally dominated by hemipelagic muds which are intercalated with turbidite sands. The turbidite sands are usually thin-to-medium bedded and mainly consist of well sorted coarse silt to fine sand. Anomalies in infrared core temperatures and porewater chlorinity data and pressure core measurements indicate that “gas hydrate occurrence zones” (GHOZ) are present about 68–155 mbsf at Site UBGH2-2_2 and 110–155 mbsf at Site UBGH2-6. In both the GHOZ, gas hydrates are preferentially associated with many of the turbidite sands as “pore-filling” type hydrates. The HYBS identified in the cores from Site UBGH2-6 are medium-to-thick bedded particularly in the lower part of the GHOZ and well coincident with significant high excursions in all of the resistivity, density, and velocity logs. Gas-hydrate saturations in the HYBS range from 12% to 79% with an average of 52% based on pore-water chlorinity. In contrast, the HYBS from Site UBGH2-2_2 are usually thin-bedded and show poor correlations with both of the resistivity and velocity logs owing to volume averaging effects of the logging tools on the thin HYBS beds. Gas-hydrate saturations in the HYBS range from 15% to 65% with an average of 37% based on pore-water chlorinity. In both of the sites, large fluctuations in biogenic opal contents have significant effects on the sediment physical properties, resulting in limited usage of gamma ray and density logs in discriminating sand reservoirs.

  4. Indian National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition 01 report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy S.; Riedel, M.; Boswell, R.; Presley, J.; Kumar, P.; Sathe, A.; Sethi, A.; Lall, M.; ,

    2015-01-01

    Gas hydrate is a naturally occurring “ice-like” combination of natural gas and water that has the potential to serve as an immense resource of natural gas from the world’s oceans and polar regions. However, gas-hydrate recovery is both a scientific and a technical challenge and much remains to be learned about the geologic, engineering, and economic factors controlling the ultimate energy resource potential of gas hydrate. The amount of natural gas contained in the world’s gas-hydrate accumulations is enormous, but these estimates are speculative and range over three orders of magnitude from about 2,800 to 8,000,000 trillion cubic meters of gas. By comparison, conventional natural gas accumulations (reserves and undiscovered, technically recoverable resources) for the world are estimated at approximately 440 trillion cubic meters. Gas recovery from gas hydrate is hindered because the gas is in a solid form and because gas hydrate commonly occurs in remote Arctic and deep marine environments. Proposed methods of gas recovery from gas hydrate generally deal with disassociating or “melting” in situ gas hydrate by heating the reservoir beyond the temperature of gas-hydrate formation, or decreasing the reservoir pressure below hydrate equilibrium. The pace of energy-related gas hydrate assessment projects has accelerated over the past several years.

  5. The deep-tow marine controlled-source electromagnetic transmitter system for gas hydrate exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meng; Deng, Ming; Wu, Zhongliang; Luo, Xianhu; Jing, Jianen; Chen, Kai

    2017-02-01

    The Marine Controlled-Source Electromagnetic (MCSEM) method has been recognized as an important and effective tool to detect electrically resistive structures, such as oil, gas, and gas hydrate. The MCSEM performance is strongly influenced by the transmitter system design. We have developed a deep-tow MCSEM transmitter system. In this paper, some new technical details will be present. A 10,000 m optical-electrical composite cable is used to support high power transmission and fast data transfer; a new clock unit is designed to keep the synchronization between transmitter and receivers, and mark the time stamp into the transmission current full waveform; a data link is established to monitor the real-time altitude of the tail unit; an online insulation measuring instrument is adopted to monitor current leakage from high voltage transformer; a neutrally buoyant dipole antenna of copper cable and flexible electrodes are created to transmit the large power current into seawater; a new design method for the transmitter, which is called "real-time control technology of hardware parallelism", is described to achieve inverting and recording high-power current waveform, controlling functions, and collecting auxiliary information. We use a gas hydrate exploration test to verify the performance of the transmitter system, focusing on more technical details, rather than applications. The test shows that the transmitter can be used for gas hydrate exploration as an effective source.

  6. Latest progress in numerical simulations on multiphase flow and thermodynamics in production of natural gas from gas hydrate reservoir

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin ZUO; Lixia SUN; Changfu YOU

    2009-01-01

    Natural gas hydrates are promising potential alternative energy resources. Some studies on the multiphase flow and thermodynamics have been conducted to investigate the feasibility of gas production from hydrate dissociation. The methods for natural gas production are analyzed and several models describing the dissociation process are listed and compared. Two prevailing models, one for depressurization and the other for thermal stimulation, are discussed in detail. A comprehensive numerical method considering the multiphase flow and thermodynamics of gas production from various hydrate-bearing reservoirs is required to better understand the dissociation process of natural gas hydrate, which would be of great benefit to its future exploration and exploitation.

  7. Investigation of gas hydrate-bearing sandstone reservoirs at the "Mount Elbert" stratigraphic test well, Milne Point, Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boswell, R.M.; Hunter, R. (ASRC Energy Services, Anchorage, AK); Collett, T. (USGS, Denver, CO); Digert, S. (BP Exploration (Alaska) Inc., Anchorage, AK); Hancock, S. (RPS Energy Canada, Calgary, Alberta, Canada); Weeks, M. (BP Exploration (Alaska) Inc., Anchorage, AK); Mt. Elbert Science Team

    2008-01-01

    In February 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy, BP Exploration (Alaska), Inc., and the U.S. Geological Survey conducted an extensive data collection effort at the "Mount Elbert #1" gas hydrates stratigraphic test well on the Alaska North Slope (ANS). The 22-day field program acquired significant gas hydrate-bearing reservoir data, including a full suite of open-hole well logs, over 500 feet of continuous core, and open-hole formation pressure response tests. Hole conditions, and therefore log data quality, were excellent due largely to the use of chilled oil-based drilling fluids. The logging program confirmed the existence of approximately 30 m of gashydrate saturated, fine-grained sand reservoir. Gas hydrate saturations were observed to range from 60% to 75% largely as a function of reservoir quality. Continuous wire-line coring operations (the first conducted on the ANS) achieved 85% recovery through 153 meters of section, providing more than 250 subsamples for analysis. The "Mount Elbert" data collection program culminated with open-hole tests of reservoir flow and pressure responses, as well as gas and water sample collection, using Schlumberger's Modular Formation Dynamics Tester (MDT) wireline tool. Four such tests, ranging from six to twelve hours duration, were conducted. This field program demonstrated the ability to safely and efficiently conduct a research-level openhole data acquisition program in shallow, sub-permafrost sediments. The program also demonstrated the soundness of the program's pre-drill gas hydrate characterization methods and increased confidence in gas hydrate resource assessment methodologies for the ANS.

  8. Electrical anisotropy of gas hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs in the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Anne E.; Anderson, Barbara I.; Rasmus, John; Sun, Keli; Li, Qiming; Collett, Timothy S.; Goldberg, David S.

    2012-01-01

    We present new results and interpretations of the electricalanisotropy and reservoir architecture in gashydrate-bearingsands using logging data collected during the Gulf of MexicoGasHydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II. We focus specifically on sandreservoirs in Hole Alaminos Canyon 21 A (AC21-A), Hole Green Canyon 955 H (GC955-H) and Hole Walker Ridge 313 H (WR313-H). Using a new logging-while-drilling directional resistivity tool and a one-dimensional inversion developed by Schlumberger, we resolve the resistivity of the current flowing parallel to the bedding, R| and the resistivity of the current flowing perpendicular to the bedding, R|. We find the sandreservoir in Hole AC21-A to be relatively isotropic, with R| and R| values close to 2 Ω m. In contrast, the gashydrate-bearingsandreservoirs in Holes GC955-H and WR313-H are highly anisotropic. In these reservoirs, R| is between 2 and 30 Ω m, and R| is generally an order of magnitude higher. Using Schlumberger's WebMI models, we were able to replicate multiple resistivity measurements and determine the formation resistivity the gashydrate-bearingsandreservoir in Hole WR313-H. The results showed that gashydrate saturations within a single reservoir unit are highly variable. For example, the sand units in Hole WR313-H contain thin layers (on the order of 10-100 cm) with varying gashydrate saturations between 15 and 95%. Our combined modeling results clearly indicate that the gashydrate-bearingsandreservoirs in Holes GC955-H and WR313-H are highly anisotropic due to varying saturations of gashydrate forming in thin layers within larger sand units.

  9. Gas Hydrate Characterization in the GoM using Marine EM Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constable, Steven [Univ. Of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2012-03-31

    In spite of the importance of gas hydrate as a low-carbon fuel, a possible contributor to rapid climate change, and a significant natural hazard, our current understanding about the amount and distribution of submarine gas hydrate is somewhat poor; estimates of total volume vary by at least an order of magnitude, and commercially useful concentrations of hydrate have remained an elusive target. This is largely because conventional geophysical tools have intrinsic limitations in their ability to quantitatively image hydrate. It has long been known from well logs that gas hydrate is resistive compared to the host sediments, and electrical and electromagnetic methods have been proposed and occasionally used to image hydrates. This project seeks to expand our capabilities to use electromagnetic methods to explore for gas hydrate in the marine environment. An important basic science aspect of our work was to quantify the resistivity of pure gas hydrate as a function of temperature at seafloor pressures. We designed, constructed, and tested a highpressure cell in which hydrate could be synthesized and then subjected to electrical conductivity measurements. Impedance spectroscopy at frequencies between 20 Hz and 2 MHz was used to separate the effect of the blocking electrodes from the intrinsic conductivity of the hydrate. We obtained very reproducible results that showed that pure methane hydrate was several times more resistive than the water ice that seeded the synthesis, 20,000 {Ohm}m at 0{degrees} C, and that the activation energy is 30.6 kJ/mol over the temperature range of -15 to 15{degrees} C. Adding silica sand to the hydrate, however, showed that the addition of the extra phase caused the conductivity of the assemblage to increase in a counterintuitive way. The fact that the increased conductivity collapsed after a percolation threshold was reached, and that the addition of glass beads does not produce a similar increase in conductivity, together suggest that

  10. A transfer function for the prediction of gas hydrate inventories in marine sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Marquardt

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A simple prognostic tool for gas hydrate (GH quantification in marine sediments is presented based on a diagenetic transport-reaction model approach. One of the most crucial factors for the application of diagenetic models is the accurate formulation of microbial degradation rates of particulate organic carbon (POC and the coupled formation of biogenic methane. Wallmann et al. (2006 suggested a kinetic formulation considering the ageing effects of POC and accumulation of reaction products (CH4, CO2 in the pore water. This model is applied to data sets of several ODP sites in order to test its general validity. Based on a thorough parameter analysis considering a wide range of environmental conditions, the POC accumulation rate (POCar in g/m2/yr and the thickness of the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ in m were identified as the most important and independent controls for biogenic GH formation. Hence, depth-integrated GH inventories in marine sediments (GHI in g of CH4 per cm2 seafloor area can be estimated as:

    GHI = a · POCar · GHSZb · exp (– GHSZc/POCar/d + e

    with a = 0.00214, b = 1.234, c = –3.339,

            d = 0.3148, e = –10.265.

    The transfer function gives a realistic first order approximation of the minimum GH inventory in low gas flux (LGF systems. The overall advantage of the presented function is its simplicity compared to the application of complex numerical models, because only two easily accessible parameters need to be determined.

  11. A transfer function for the prediction of gas hydrate inventories in marine sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Marquardt

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A simple prognostic tool for gas hydrate (GH quantification in marine sediments is presented based on a diagenetic transport-reaction model approach. One of the most crucial factors for the application of diagenetic models is the accurate formulation of microbial degradation rates of particulate organic carbon (POC and the coupled biogenic CH4 formation. Wallmann et al. (2006 suggested a kinetic formulation considering the ageing effects of POC and accumulation of reaction products (CH4, CO2 in the pore water. This model is applied to data sets of several ODP sites in order to test its general validity. Based on a thorough parameter analysis considering a wide range of environmental conditions, the POC accumulation rate (POCar in g/cm2/yr and the thickness of the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ in m were identified as the most important and independent controls for biogenic GH formation. Hence, depth-integrated GH inventories in marine sediments (GHI in g of CH4 per cm2 seafloor area can be estimated as:

    GHI = a · POCar · GHSZb · exp (−GHSZc/POCar/d + e

    with a = 0.00214, b = 1.234, c = −3.339, d = 0.3148, e = −10.265.

    Several tests indicate that the transfer function gives a realistic approximation of the minimum potential GH inventory of low gas flux (LGF systems. The overall advantage of the presented function is its simplicity compared to complex numerical models: only two easily accessible parameters are needed.

  12. Using Carbon Dioxide to Enhance Recovery of Methane from Gas Hydrate Reservoirs: Final Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGrail, B. Peter; Schaef, Herbert T.; White, Mark D.; Zhu, Tao; Kulkarni, Abhijeet S.; Hunter, Robert B.; Patil, Shirish L.; Owen, Antionette T.; Martin, P F.

    2007-09-01

    Carbon dioxide sequestration coupled with hydrocarbon resource recovery is often economically attractive. Use of CO2 for enhanced recovery of oil, conventional natural gas, and coal-bed methane are in various stages of common practice. In this report, we discuss a new technique utilizing CO2 for enhanced recovery of an unconventional but potentially very important source of natural gas, gas hydrate. We have focused our attention on the Alaska North Slope where approximately 640 Tcf of natural gas reserves in the form of gas hydrate have been identified. Alaska is also unique in that potential future CO2 sources are nearby, and petroleum infrastructure exists or is being planned that could bring the produced gas to market or for use locally. The EGHR (Enhanced Gas Hydrate Recovery) concept takes advantage of the physical and thermodynamic properties of mixtures in the H2O-CO2 system combined with controlled multiphase flow, heat, and mass transport processes in hydrate-bearing porous media. A chemical-free method is used to deliver a LCO2-Lw microemulsion into the gas hydrate bearing porous medium. The microemulsion is injected at a temperature higher than the stability point of methane hydrate, which upon contacting the methane hydrate decomposes its crystalline lattice and releases the enclathrated gas. Small scale column experiments show injection of the emulsion into a CH4 hydrate rich sand results in the release of CH4 gas and the formation of CO2 hydrate

  13. The influence of sedimentation rate variation on the occurrence of methane hydrate crystallized from dissolved methane in marine gas hydrate system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuncheng, C.; Chen, D.

    2015-12-01

    Methane is commonly delivered to the gas hydrate stability zone by advection of methane-bearing fluids, diffusion of dissolved methane, and in-situ biogenic methane production (Davie and Buffett, 2003), except at cold vent sites. Burial of pore water and sediment compaction can induce the fluid flux change (Bhatnagar et al., 2007). Sedimentation supply the organic material for methane production. In addition, Gas hydrate can move to below gas hydrate stability zone and decompose via sedimentation. Therefore, sedimentation significantly affect the gas hydrate accumulation. ODP site 997 located at the Blake Ridge. The sedimentation rate is estimated to 48 m/Ma, 245m/Ma, 17.2 m/Ma and 281m/Ma for 0-2.5Ma, 2.5-3.75Ma, 3.75-4.4Ma, and 4.4-5.9Ma, respectively, according to the age-depth profile of biostratigraphic marker of nonnofossils(Paull et al., 1996). We constructed a gas hydrate formation model and apply to ODP sites 997 to evaluate the influence of variation of sedimentation rate on gas hydrate accumulation. Our results show that the gas hydrate format rate varied from 0.013mol/m2-a to 0.017mol/m2-a and the gas hydrate burial to below gas hydrate stability zone varied from 0.001mol/m2-a to 0.018mol/m2-a during recently 5Ma. The gas hydrate formation rate by pore water advection and dissolved methane diffusion would be lower, and the top occurrence of gas hydrate would be shallower, when the sedimentation rate is higher. With higher sedimentation rate, the amount of gas hydrate burial to below stability zone would be larger. The relative high sedimentation rate before 2.5 Ma at ODP site 997 produced the gas hydrate saturation much lower than present value, and over 60% of present gas hydrates are formed during recent 2.5Ma. Reference: Bhatnagar,G., Chapman, W. G.,Dickens, G. R., et al. Generalization of gas hydrate distribution and saturation in marine sediments by scaling of thermodynamic and transport processes. American Journal of Science, 2007, 307, 861

  14. Non-equilibrium simulation of CH4 production through the depressurization method from gas hydrate reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qorbani, Khadijeh; Kvamme, Bjørn

    2016-04-01

    Natural gas hydrates (NGHs) in nature are formed from various hydrate formers (i.e. aqueous, gas, and adsorbed phases). As a result, due to Gibbs phase rule and the combined first and second laws of thermodynamics CH4-hydrate cannot reach thermodynamic equilibrium in real reservoir conditions. CH4 is the dominant component in NGH reservoirs. It is formed as a result of biogenic degradation of biological material in the upper few hundred meters of subsurface. It has been estimated that the amount of fuel-gas reserve in NGHs exceed the total amount of fossil fuel explored until today. Thus, these reservoirs have the potential to satisfy the energy requirements of the future. However, released CH4 from dissociated NGHs could find its way to the atmosphere and it is a far more aggressive greenhouse gas than CO2, even though its life-time is shorter. Lack of reliable field data makes it difficult to predict the production potential, as well as safety of CH4 production from NGHs. Computer simulations can be used as a tool to investigate CH4 production through different scenarios. Most hydrate simulators within academia and industry treat hydrate phase transitions as an equilibrium process and those which employ the kinetic approach utilize simple laboratory data in their models. Furthermore, it is typical to utilize a limited thermodynamic description where only temperature and pressure projections are considered. Another widely used simplification is to assume only a single route for the hydrate phase transitions. The non-equilibrium nature of hydrate indicates a need for proper kinetic models to describe hydrate dissociation and reformation in the reservoir with respect to thermodynamics variables, CH4 mole-fraction, pressure and temperature. The RetrasoCodeBright (RCB) hydrate simulator has previously been extended to model CH4-hydrate dissociation towards CH4 gas and water. CH4-hydrate is added to the RCB data-base as a pseudo mineral. Phase transitions are treated

  15. Gas hydrates

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramprasad, T.

    and the role it plays in the global climate and the future of fuels. Russia, Japan, Nigeria, Peru, Chile, Pakistan, Indonesia, Korea, etc are various countries who are perusing the gas hydrates studies as a future resource for fuel. Indian Initiative..., 1993, Free gas at the base of the gas hydrate zone in the vicinity of the Chile Triple junction: Geology, v. 21, pp. 905-908. Borowski, W.S., C.K. Paull, and U. William, III, 1999, Global and local variations of interstitial sulfate gradients...

  16. Sources of biogenic methane to form marine gas hydrates: In situ production or upward migration?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paull, C.K.; Ussler, W. III; Borowski, W.S.

    1993-09-01

    Potential sources of biogenic methane in the Carolina Continental Rise -- Blake Ridge sediments have been examined. Two models were used to estimate the potential for biogenic methane production: (1) construction of sedimentary organic carbon budgets, and (2) depth extrapolation of modern microbial production rates. While closed-system estimates predict some gas hydrate formation, it is unlikely that >3% of the sediment volume could be filled by hydrate from methane produced in situ. Formation of greater amounts requires migration of methane from the underlying continental rise sediment prism. Methane may be recycled from below the base of the gas hydrate stability zone by gas hydrate decomposition, upward migration of the methane gas, and recrystallization of gas hydrate within the overlying stability zone. Methane bubbles may also form in the sediment column below the depth of gas hydrate stability because the methane saturation concentration of the pore fluids decreases with increasing depth. Upward migration of methane bubbles from these deeper sediments can add methane to the hydrate stability zone. From these models it appears that recycling and upward migration of methane is essential in forming significant gas hydrate concentrations. In addition, the depth distribution profiles of methane hydrate will differ if the majority of the methane has migrated upward rather than having been produced in situ.

  17. Marine-controlled source electromagnetic study of methane seeps and gas hydrates at Opouawe Bank, Hikurangi Margin, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwalenberg, Katrin; Rippe, Dennis; Koch, Stephanie; Scholl, Carsten

    2017-05-01

    Marine controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) data have been collected to investigate methane seep sites and associated gas hydrate deposits at Opouawe Bank on the southern tip of the Hikurangi Margin, New Zealand. The bank is located in about 1000 m water depth within the gas hydrate stability field. The seep sites are characterized by active venting and typical methane seep fauna accompanied with patchy carbonate outcrops at the seafloor. Below the seeps, gas migration pathways reach from below the bottom-simulating reflector (at around 380 m sediment depth) toward the seafloor, indicating free gas transport into the shallow hydrate stability field. The CSEM data have been acquired with a seafloor-towed, electric multi-dipole system measuring the inline component of the electric field. CSEM data from three profiles have been analyzed by using 1-D and 2-D inversion techniques. High-resolution 2-D and 3-D multichannel seismic data have been collected in the same area. The electrical resistivity models show several zones of highly anomalous resistivities (>50 Ωm) which correlate with high amplitude reflections located on top of narrow vertical gas conduits, indicating the coexistence of free gas and gas hydrates within the hydrate stability zone. Away from the seeps the CSEM models show normal background resistivities between 1 and 2 Ωm. Archie's law has been applied to estimate gas/gas hydrate saturations below the seeps. At intermediate depths between 50 and 200 m below seafloor, saturations are between 40 and 80% and gas hydrate may be the dominating pore filling constituent. At shallow depths from 10 m to the seafloor, free gas dominates as seismic data and gas plumes suggest.

  18. Well log characterization of natural gas hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy S.; Lee, Myung W.

    2011-01-01

    In the last 25 years we have seen significant advancements in the use of downhole well logging tools to acquire detailed information on the occurrence of gas hydrate in nature: From an early start of using wireline electrical resistivity and acoustic logs to identify gas hydrate occurrences in wells drilled in Arctic permafrost environments to today where wireline and advanced logging-while-drilling tools are routinely used to examine the petrophysical nature of gas hydrate reservoirs and the distribution and concentration of gas hydrates within various complex reservoir systems. The most established and well known use of downhole log data in gas hydrate research is the use of electrical resistivity and acoustic velocity data (both compressional- and shear-wave data) to make estimates of gas hydrate content (i.e., reservoir saturations) in various sediment types and geologic settings. New downhole logging tools designed to make directionally oriented acoustic and propagation resistivity log measurements have provided the data needed to analyze the acoustic and electrical anisotropic properties of both highly inter-bedded and fracture dominated gas hydrate reservoirs. Advancements in nuclear-magnetic-resonance (NMR) logging and wireline formation testing have also allowed for the characterization of gas hydrate at the pore scale. Integrated NMR and formation testing studies from northern Canada and Alaska have yielded valuable insight into how gas hydrates are physically distributed in sediments and the occurrence and nature of pore fluids (i.e., free-water along with clay and capillary bound water) in gas-hydrate-bearing reservoirs. Information on the distribution of gas hydrate at the pore scale has provided invaluable insight on the mechanisms controlling the formation and occurrence of gas hydrate in nature along with data on gas hydrate reservoir properties (i.e., permeabilities) needed to accurately predict gas production rates for various gas hydrate

  19. Elastic-wave velocity in marine sediments with gas hydrates: Effective medium modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgerud, M.B.; Dvorkin, J.; Nur, A.; Sakai, A.; Collett, T.

    1999-01-01

    We offer a first-principle-based effective medium model for elastic-wave velocity in unconsolidated, high porosity, ocean bottom sediments containing gas hydrate. The dry sediment frame elastic constants depend on porosity, elastic moduli of the solid phase, and effective pressure. Elastic moduli of saturated sediment are calculated from those of the dry frame using Gassmann's equation. To model the effect of gas hydrate on sediment elastic moduli we use two separate assumptions: (a) hydrate modifies the pore fluid elastic properties without affecting the frame; (b) hydrate becomes a component of the solid phase, modifying the elasticity of the frame. The goal of the modeling is to predict the amount of hydrate in sediments from sonic or seismic velocity data. We apply the model to sonic and VSP data from ODP Hole 995 and obtain hydrate concentration estimates from assumption (b) consistent with estimates obtained from resistivity, chlorinity and evolved gas data. Copyright 1999 by the American Geophysical Union.

  20. Polyethylene Glycol Drilling Fluid for Drilling in Marine Gas Hydrates-Bearing Sediments: An Experimental Study

    OpenAIRE

    Lixin Kuang; Yibing Yu; Yunzhong Tu; Ling Zhang; Fulong Ning; Guosheng Jiang; Tianle Liu

    2011-01-01

    Shale inhibition, low-temperature performance, the ability to prevent calcium and magnesium-ion pollution, and hydrate inhibition of polyethylene glycol drilling fluid were each tested with conventional drilling-fluid test equipment and an experimental gas-hydrate integrated simulation system developed by our laboratory. The results of these tests show that drilling fluid with a formulation of artificial seawater, 3% bentonite, 0.3% Na 2 CO 3 , 10% polyethylene glycol, 20% NaCl, 4% SMP-2, 1% ...

  1. New global estimates of marine gas hydrate accumulations based on POC degradation and reaction-transport modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burwicz, Ewa; Ruepke, Lars; Wallmann, Klaus; Biastoch, Arne

    2010-05-01

    data from Seiter K. et al., 2004. We find that the global distribution of methane hydrates does not correlate in a simple way with the thickness of the hydrate stability zone but is a complex function of all input and model parameters. Prominent gas hydrate provinces are found offshore Central America where sediments are rich in organic carbon and in the Arctic Ocean where low bottom water temperatures stabilize methane hydrates. Our new total estimates of the world's marine hydrate inventory formed due to POC degradation give a number of ~3x1015m3 of CH4 (at STP conditions). These findings are in good agreement with previous studies based on direct observations (Milkov A. V., 2004) and show that numerical modeling is a valuable tool for studying the worldwide distribution of methane hydrates. Barnier B. et al., 2006. Impact of partial steps and momentum advection schemes in a global ocean circulation model at eddy-permitting resolution. Ocean Dynamics 56, 543-567. Milkov A. V., 2004. Global estimates of hydrate-bound gas in marine sediments: how much is really out there? Earth-Science Reviews 66, 183-197. Seiter K. et al., 2004. Organic carbon content in surface sediments-defining regional provinces. Deep-Sea Research I 51, 2001-2026. Wallmann K. et al., 2006. Kinetics of organic matter degradation, microbial methane generation, and gas hydrate formation in anoxic marine sediments. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 70, 3905-3927.

  2. The Iġnik Sikumi Field Experiment, Alaska North Slope: Design, operations, and implications for CO2−CH4 exchange in gas hydrate reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell, Ray; Schoderbek, David; Collett, Timothy S.; Ohtsuki, Satoshi; White, Mark; Anderson, Brian J.

    2017-01-01

    The Iġnik Sikumi Gas Hydrate Exchange Field Experiment was conducted by ConocoPhillips in partnership with the U.S. Department of Energy, the Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corporation, and the U.S. Geological Survey within the Prudhoe Bay Unit on the Alaska North Slope during 2011 and 2012. The primary goals of the program were to (1) determine the feasibility of gas injection into hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs and (2) observe reservoir response upon subsequent flowback in order to assess the potential for CO2 exchange for CH4 in naturally occurring gas hydrate reservoirs. Initial modeling determined that no feasible means of injection of pure CO2 was likely, given the presence of free water in the reservoir. Laboratory and numerical modeling studies indicated that the injection of a mixture of CO2 and N2 offered the best potential for gas injection and exchange. The test featured the following primary operational phases: (1) injection of a gaseous phase mixture of CO2, N2, and chemical tracers; (2) flowback conducted at downhole pressures above the stability threshold for native CH4 hydrate; and (3) an extended (30-days) flowback at pressures near, and then below, the stability threshold of native CH4 hydrate. The test findings indicate that the formation of a range of mixed-gas hydrates resulted in a net exchange of CO2 for CH4 in the reservoir, although the complexity of the subsurface environment renders the nature, extent, and efficiency of the exchange reaction uncertain. The next steps in the evaluation of exchange technology should feature multiple well applications; however, such field test programs will require extensive preparatory experimental and numerical modeling studies and will likely be a secondary priority to further field testing of production through depressurization. Additional insights gained from the field program include the following: (1) gas hydrate destabilization is self-limiting, dispelling any notion of the potential for

  3. Numerical simulations of depressurization-induced gas production from gas hydrate reservoirs at the Walker Ridge 312 site, northern Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myshakin, Evgeniy M.; Gaddipati, Manohar; Rose, Kelly; Anderson, Brian J.

    2012-06-01

    In 2009, the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) Gas Hydrates Joint-Industry-Project (JIP) Leg II drilling program confirmed that gas hydrate occurs at high saturations within reservoir-quality sands in the GOM. A comprehensive logging-while-drilling dataset was collected from seven wells at three sites, including two wells at the Walker Ridge 313 site. By constraining the saturations and thicknesses of hydrate-bearing sands using logging-while-drilling data, two-dimensional (2D), cylindrical, r-z and three-dimensional (3D) reservoir models were simulated. The gas hydrate occurrences inferred from seismic analysis are used to delineate the areal extent of the 3D reservoir models. Numerical simulations of gas production from the Walker Ridge reservoirs were conducted using the depressurization method at a constant bottomhole pressure. Results of these simulations indicate that these hydrate deposits are readily produced, owing to high intrinsic reservoir-quality and their proximity to the base of hydrate stability. The elevated in situ reservoir temperatures contribute to high (5–40 MMscf/day) predicted production rates. The production rates obtained from the 2D and 3D models are in close agreement. To evaluate the effect of spatial dimensions, the 2D reservoir domains were simulated at two outer radii. The results showed increased potential for formation of secondary hydrate and appearance of lag time for production rates as reservoir size increases. Similar phenomena were observed in the 3D reservoir models. The results also suggest that interbedded gas hydrate accumulations might be preferable targets for gas production in comparison with massive deposits. Hydrate in such accumulations can be readily dissociated due to heat supply from surrounding hydrate-free zones. Special cases were considered to evaluate the effect of overburden and underburden permeability on production. The obtained data show that production can be significantly degraded in comparison with a case using

  4. Gas Hydrate Research Site Selection and Operational Research Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, T. S.; Boswell, R. M.

    2009-12-01

    In recent years it has become generally accepted that gas hydrates represent a potential important future energy resource, a significant drilling and production hazard, a potential contributor to global climate change, and a controlling factor in seafloor stability and landslides. Research drilling and coring programs carried out by the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP), the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP), government agencies, and several consortia have contributed greatly to our understanding of the geologic controls on the occurrence of gas hydrates in marine and permafrost environments. For the most part, each of these field projects were built on the lessons learned from the projects that have gone before them. One of the most important factors contributing to the success of some of the more notable gas hydrate field projects has been the close alignment of project goals with the processes used to select the drill sites and to develop the project’s operational research plans. For example, IODP Expedition 311 used a transect approach to successfully constrain the overall occurrence of gas hydrate within the range of geologic environments within a marine accretionary complex. Earlier gas hydrate research drilling, including IODP Leg 164, were designed primarily to assess the occurrence and nature of marine gas hydrate systems, and relied largely on the presence of anomalous seismic features, including bottom-simulating reflectors and “blanking zones”. While these projects were extremely successful, expeditions today are being increasingly mounted with the primary goal of prospecting for potential gas hydrate production targets, and site selection processes designed to specifically seek out anomalously high-concentrations of gas hydrate are needed. This approach was best demonstrated in a recently completed energy resource focused project, the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II (GOM JIP Leg II), which featured the collection of a

  5. The simulation of gas production from oceanic gas hydrate reservoir by the combination of ocean surface warm water flooding with depressurization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Yang; Yu-Hu Bai; Qing-Ping Li

    2012-01-01

    A new method is proposed to produce gas from oceanic gas hydrate reservoir by combining the ocean surface warm water flooding with depressurization which can efficiently utilize the synthetic effects of thermal,salt and depressurization on gas hydrate dissociation.The method has the advantage of high efficiency,low cost and enhanced safety.Based on the proposed conceptual method,the physical and mathematical models are established,in which the effects of the flow of multiphase fluid,the kinetic process of hydrate dissociation,the endothermic process of hydrate dissociation,ice-water phase equilibrium,salt inhibition,dispersion,convection and conduction on the hydrate dissociation and gas and water production are considered.The gas and water rates,formation pressure for the combination method are compared with that of the single depressurization,which is referred to the method in which only depressurization is used.The results show that the combination method can remedy the deficiency of individual producing methods.It has the advantage of longer stable period of high gas rate than the single depressurization.It can also reduce the geologic hazard caused by the formation deformation due to the maintaining of the formation pressure by injected ocean warm water.

  6. Testing a coupled hydro-thermo-chemo-geomechanical model for gas hydrate bearing sediments using triaxial compression lab experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Shubhangi; Haeckel, Matthias; Helmig, Rainer; Wohlmuth, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    The presence of gas hydrates influences the stress-strain behavior and increases the load-bearing capacity of sub-marine sediments. This stability is reduced or completely lost when gas hydrates become unstable. Since natural gas hydrate reservoirs are considered as potential resources for gas production on industrial scales, there is a strong need for numerical production simulators with geomechanical capabilities. To reliably predict the mechanical behavior of gas hydrate-bearing sediments during gas production, numerical tools must be sufficiently calibrated against data from controlled experiments or field tests, and the models must consider thermo-hydro-chemo-mechanical process coupling in a suitable manner. In this study, we perform a controlled triaxial volumetric strain test on a sediment sample in which methane hydrate is first formed under controlled isotropic effective stress and then dissociated via depressurization under controlled total stress. Sample deformations were kept small, and under thes...

  7. Physical properties of gas hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kliner, J.T.R.; Grozic, J.L.H. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    Gas hydrates are naturally occurring, solid crystalline compounds (clathrates) that encapsulate gas molecules inside the lattices of hydrogen bonded water molecules within a specific temperature-pressure stability zone. Estimates of the total quantity of available methane gas in natural occurring hydrates are based on twice the energy content of known conventional fossil fuels reservoirs. Accurate and reliable in-situ quantification techniques are essential in determining the economic viability of this potential energy yield, which is dependent upon several factors such as sensitivity of the temperature-pressure stability zone, sediment type, porosity, permeability, concentration/abundance of free gas, spatial distribution in pore spaces, specific cage occupancy, and the influence of inhibitors. Various techniques like acoustic P and S waves, time domain reflectometry, and electrical resistance have been used to analyze the quantity and spatial distribution of the gas hydrate samples. These techniques were reviewed and the results obtained in the course of gas hydrate research were presented. 34 refs., 8 figs.

  8. Methane sources in gas hydrate-bearing cold seeps: Evidence from radiocarbon and stable isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlman, J.W.; Bauer, J.E.; Canuel, E.A.; Grabowski, K.S.; Knies, D.L.; Mitchell, C.S.; Whiticar, Michael J.; Coffin, R.B.

    2009-01-01

    Fossil methane from the large and dynamic marine gas hydrate reservoir has the potential to influence oceanic and atmospheric carbon pools. However, natural radiocarbon (14C) measurements of gas hydrate methane have been extremely limited, and their use as a source and process indicator has not yet been systematically established. In this study, gas hydrate-bound and dissolved methane recovered from six geologically and geographically distinct high-gas-flux cold seeps was found to be 98 to 100% fossil based on its 14C content. Given this prevalence of fossil methane and the small contribution of gas hydrate (??? 1%) to the present-day atmospheric methane flux, non-fossil contributions of gas hydrate methane to the atmosphere are not likely to be quantitatively significant. This conclusion is consistent with contemporary atmospheric methane budget calculations. In combination with ??13C- and ??D-methane measurements, we also determine the extent to which the low, but detectable, amounts of 14C (~ 1-2% modern carbon, pMC) in methane from two cold seeps might reflect in situ production from near-seafloor sediment organic carbon (SOC). A 14C mass balance approach using fossil methane and 14C-enriched SOC suggests that as much as 8 to 29% of hydrate-associated methane carbon may originate from SOC contained within the upper 6??m of sediment. These findings validate the assumption of a predominantly fossil carbon source for marine gas hydrate, but also indicate that structural gas hydrate from at least certain cold seeps contains a component of methane produced during decomposition of non-fossil organic matter in near-surface sediment.

  9. Well log characterization of natural gas-hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy S.; Lee, Myung W.

    2012-01-01

    In the last 25 years there have been significant advancements in the use of well-logging tools to acquire detailed information on the occurrence of gas hydrates in nature: whereas wireline electrical resistivity and acoustic logs were formerly used to identify gas-hydrate occurrences in wells drilled in Arctic permafrost environments, more advanced wireline and logging-while-drilling (LWD) tools are now routinely used to examine the petrophysical nature of gas-hydrate reservoirs and the distribution and concentration of gas hydrates within various complex reservoir systems. Resistivity- and acoustic-logging tools are the most widely used for estimating the gas-hydrate content (i.e., reservoir saturations) in various sediment types and geologic settings. Recent integrated sediment coring and well-log studies have confirmed that electrical-resistivity and acoustic-velocity data can yield accurate gas-hydrate saturations in sediment grain-supported (isotropic) systems such as sand reservoirs, but more advanced log-analysis models are required to characterize gas hydrate in fractured (anisotropic) reservoir systems. New well-logging tools designed to make directionally oriented acoustic and propagation-resistivity log measurements provide the data needed to analyze the acoustic and electrical anisotropic properties of both highly interbedded and fracture-dominated gas-hydrate reservoirs. Advancements in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) logging and wireline formation testing (WFT) also allow for the characterization of gas hydrate at the pore scale. Integrated NMR and formation testing studies from northern Canada and Alaska have yielded valuable insight into how gas hydrates are physically distributed in sediments and the occurrence and nature of pore fluids(i.e., free water along with clay- and capillary-bound water) in gas-hydrate-bearing reservoirs. Information on the distribution of gas hydrate at the pore scale has provided invaluable insight on the mechanisms

  10. HyFlux - Part II: Subsurface sequestration of methane-derived carbon in gas-hydrate- bearing marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naehr, T. H.; Asper, V. L.; Garcia, O.; Kastner, M.; Leifer, I.; MacDonald, I. R.; Solomon, E. A.; Yvon-Lewis, S.; Zimmer, B.

    2008-12-01

    The recently funded DOE/NETL study "HyFlux: Remote sensing and sea-truth measurements of methane flux to the atmosphere" (see MacDonald et al.: HyFlux - Part I) will combine sea surface, water column and shallow subsurface observations to improve our estimates of methane flux from submarine seeps and associated gas hydrate deposits to the water column and atmosphere along the Gulf of Mexico continental margin and other selected areas world-wide. As methane-rich fluids rise towards the sediment-water interface, they will interact with sulfate-rich pore fluids derived from overlying bottom water, which results in the formation of an important biogeochemical redox boundary, the so-called sulfate-methane interface, or SMI. Both methane and sulfate are consumed within the SMI and dissolved inorganic carbon, mostly bicarbonate (HCO3-) and hydrogen sulfide are produced, stimulating authigenic carbonate precipitation at and immediately below the SMI. Accordingly, the formation of authigenic carbonates in methane- and gas-hydrate-rich sediments will sequester a portion of the methane-derived carbon. To date, however, little is known about the quantitative aspects of these reactions. Rates of DIC production are not well constrained, but recent biogeochemical models indicate that CaCO3 precipitation rates may be as high as 120 μmol cm-2a-1. Therefore, AOM-driven carbonate precipitation must be considered when assessing the impact of gas-hydrate-derived methane on the global carbon cycle. As part of HyFlux, we will conduct pore water analyses (DOC, DIC, CH4, δ13CDIC, δ13CDOC, δ13CCH4, δ18O, and δD isotope ratios) to evaluate the importance of authigenic carbonate precipitation as a sequestration mechanism for methane- derived carbon. In addition, sediment and seafloor carbonate samples will be analyzed for bulk sedimentary carbonate (δ13C and δ18O) and bulk sedimentary organic matter (δ13C and δ15N), as well as sulfur, bulk mineralogy, texture and morphological

  11. Gas-hydrate occurrence on the W-Svalbard margin at the gateway to the Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bünz, Stefan; Mienert, Jürgen

    2010-05-01

    Gas hydrates contain more carbon than does any other global reservoir and are abundant on continental margins worldwide. These two facts make gas hydrates important as a possible future energy resource, in submarine landsliding and in global climate change. With the ongoing global warming, there is a need for a better understanding of the distribution of gas hydrates and their sensitivity to environmental changes. Gas hydrate systems in polar latitudes may be of particular importance due to the fact that environmental changes will be felt here first and most likely are more extreme than elsewhere. The gas-hydrate systems offshore western Svalbard are far more extensive (~4000km^2) than previously assumed and include the whole Vestnesa Ridge, an elongated sediment drift north of the Molloy Transform and just east of the Molloy Ridge, one of the shortest segments of the slow spreading North-Atlantic Ridge system. However, in this peculiar setting gas hydrates also occur within few km of a mid-oceanic ridge and transform fault, which makes this gas hydrate system unique on Earth. The close proximity to the spreading centre and its hydrothermal circulation system affects the dynamics of the gas hydrate system. A strong cross-cutting BSR is visible, especially in areas of dipping seafloor. Other places show a weak almost subtle BSR. The base of gas-hydrate stability varies with distance from the ridge system, suggesting a strong temperature-controlled subsurface depth as the underlying young oceanic crust cools off eastward. High amplitude reflections over a depth range of up to 150m underneath the BSR indicate the presence of a considerable amount of free gas. The free gas is focused laterally upwards by the less-permeable hydrated sediments as the only fluid-escape features occur at the crest of the Vestnesa Ridge. The fluid migration system and its active plumbing system at the crest provide an efficient mechanism for gas escape from the base of the hydrate stability

  12. Putting the Deep Biosphere and Gas Hydrates on the Map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikorski, Janelle J.; Briggs, Brandon R.

    2016-01-01

    Microbial processes in the deep biosphere affect marine sediments, such as the formation of gas hydrate deposits. Gas hydrate deposits offer a large source of natural gas with the potential to augment energy reserves and affect climate and seafloor stability. Despite the significant interdependence between life and geology in the ocean, coverage…

  13. Fast parametric relationships for the large-scale reservoir simulation of mixed CH4-CO2 gas hydrate systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reagan, Matthew T.; Moridis, George J.; Seim, Katie S.

    2017-06-01

    A recent Department of Energy field test on the Alaska North Slope has increased interest in the ability to simulate systems of mixed CO2-CH4 hydrates. However, the physically realistic simulation of mixed-hydrate simulation is not yet a fully solved problem. Limited quantitative laboratory data leads to the use of various ab initio, statistical mechanical, or other mathematic representations of mixed-hydrate phase behavior. Few of these methods are suitable for inclusion in reservoir simulations, particularly for systems with large number of grid elements, 3D systems, or systems with complex geometric configurations. In this work, we present a set of fast parametric relationships describing the thermodynamic properties and phase behavior of a mixed methane-carbon dioxide hydrate system. We use well-known, off-the-shelf hydrate physical properties packages to generate a sufficiently large dataset, select the most convenient and efficient mathematical forms, and fit the data to those forms to create a physical properties package suitable for inclusion in the TOUGH+ family of codes. The mapping of the phase and thermodynamic space reveals the complexity of the mixed-hydrate system and allows understanding of the thermodynamics at a level beyond what much of the existing laboratory data and literature currently offer.

  14. Combining CO2 sequestration and CH4 production by means of guest exchange in a gas hydrate reservoir: two pilot scale experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeschen, Katja U.; Spangenberg, Erik; Schicks, Judith M.; Deusner, Christian; Priegnitz, Mike; Strauch, Bettina; Bigalke, Nikolaus; Luzi-Helbing, Manja; Kossel, Elke; Haeckel, Matthias; Wang, Yi

    2017-04-01

    Methane (CH4) hydrates are considered as a player in the field of energy supply and - if applied as such - as a possible sink for the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide (CO2). Next to the more conventional production methods depressurization and thermal stimulation, an extraction of CH4 by means of CO2 injection is investigated. The method is based on the chemical potential gradient between the CH4 hydrate phase and the injected CO2 phase. Results from small-scale laboratory experiments on the replacement method indicate recovery ratios of up to 66% CH4 but also encounter major discrepancies in conversion rates. So far it has not been demonstrated with certainty that the process rates are sufficient for an energy and cost effective production of CH4 with a concurrent sequestration of CO2. In a co-operation of GFZ and GEOMAR we used LARS (Large Scale Reservoir Simulator) to investigate the CO2-CH4-replacement method combined with thermal stimulation. LARS accommodates a sample volume of 210 l and allows for the simulation of in situ conditions typically found in gas hydrate reservoirs. Based on the sample size, diverse transport mechanisms could be simulated, which are assumed to significantly alter process yields. Temperature and pressure data complemented by a high resolution electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), gas chromatography, and flow measurements serve to interpret the experiments. In two experiments 50 kg heated CO2 was injected into sediments with CH4 hydrate saturations of 50%. While in the first experiment the CO2 was injected discontinuously in a so called "huff'n puff" manner, the second experiment saw a continuous injection. Conditions within LARS were set to 13 MPa and 8˚ C, which allow for stability of pure CO2 and CH4 hydrates as well as mixed hydrates. The CO2 was heated and entered the sediment sample with temperatures of approximately 30˚ C. In this presentation we will discuss the results from the large-scale experiments and compare them with

  15. Gas hydrates and magnetism : comparative geological settings for diagenetic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esteban, L.; Enkin, R.J. [Natural Resources Canada, Sidney, BC (Canada). Geological Survey of Canada; Hamilton, T. [Camosun College, Victoria, BC (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    Geophysical and geochemical methods assist in locating and quantifying natural gas hydrate deposits. They are also useful in understanding these resources, their climate impacts and their potential role in geohazards. In order to understand the mechanisms of gas hydrate formation and its natural distribution in sediments, magnetic studies were conducted on cores from three different geological settings. This paper presented the results of a detailed magnetic investigation, as well as petrological observations, that were conducted on cores from a permafrost setting in the Mackenzie Delta located in the Canadian Northwest Territories Mallik region, and two marine settings, from the Cascadia margin off Vancouver Island and the Indian National Gas Hydrate Program from the Bengal Fan. The paper provided background information on the permafrost setting in Mallik region of the Mackenzie Delta as well as the Cascadia margin. The magnetic properties of gas hydrate bearing sediments were found to be a combination of the original detrital content and the diagenetic transformations of iron minerals caused by the unique environment produced by gas hydrate formation. The availability of methane to provide food for bacteria coupled with the concentration of solutes outside gas hydrate accumulation zones led to the creation of iron sulphides. These new minerals were observable using magnetic techniques, which help in delineating the gas hydrate formation mechanism and may be developed into new geophysical methods of gas hydrate exploration. 7 refs., 7 figs.

  16. A study on gas hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Byoung Jae; Jung, Tae Jin; Sunwoo, Don [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-01

    Sufficient documents were reviewed to understand solid components of water and gaseous hydrocarbon known as gas hydrates, which represent an important potential energy resource of the future. The review provides us with valuable information on crystal structures, kinetics, origin and distribution of gas hydrates. In addition, the review increased our knowledge of exploration and development methods of gas hydrates. Large amounts of methane, the principal component of natural gas, in the form of solid gas hydrate are found mainly offshore in outer continental margin sediment and, to a lesser extent, in polar regions commonly associated with permafrost. Natural gas hydrates are stable in some environments where the hydrostatic pressure exerted by overlying water column is sufficient for hydrate formation and stability. The required high pressures generally restrict gas hydrate to sediments beneath water of approximately 400 m. Higher sediment temperatures at greater subbottom depths destabilize gas hydrates. Based on the pressure- temperature condition, the outer continental margin of East Sea where water depth is deep enough to form gas hydrate is considered to have high potential of gas hydrate accumulations. (author). 56 refs., tabs., figs.

  17. Geological & Geophysical findings from seismic, well log and core data for marine gas hydrate deposits at the 1st offshore methane hydrate production test site in the eastern Nankai Trough, offshore Japan: An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, T.; Noguchi, S.; Takayama, T.; Suzuki, K.; Yamamoto, K.

    2012-12-01

    In order to evaluate productivity of gas from marine gas hydrate by the depressurization method, Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corporation is planning to conduct a full-scale production test in early 2013 at the AT1 site in the north slope of Daini-Atsumi Knoll in the eastern Nankai Trough, Japan. The test location was determined using the combination of detailed 3D seismic reflection pattern analysis, high-density velocity analysis, and P-impedance inversion analysis, which were calibrated using well log data obtained in 2004. At the AT1 site, one production well (AT1-P) and two monitoring wells (AT1-MC and MT1) were drilled from February to March 2012, followed by 1 coring well (AT1-C) from June to July 2012. An extensive logging program with logging while drilling (LWD) and wireline-logging tools, such as GeoVISION (resistivity image), EcoScope (neutron/density porosity, mineral spectroscopy etc.), SonicScanner (Advanced Sonic tool), CMR/ProVISION (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Tools), XPT (formation pressure, fluid mobility), and IsolationScanner (ultrasonic cement evaluation tools) was conducted at AT1-MC well to evaluate physical reservoir properties of gas hydrate-bearing sediments, to determine production test interval in 2013, and to evaluate cement bonding. Methane hydrate concentrated zone (MHCZ) confirmed by the well logging at AT1-MC was thin turbidites (tens of centimeters to few meters) with 60 m of gross thickness, which is composed of lobe type sequences in the upper part of it and channel sand sequences in the lower part. The gross thickness of MHCZ in the well is thicker than previous wells in 2004 (A1, 45 m) located around 150 m northeast, indicating that the prediction given by seismic inversion analysis was reasonable. Well-to-well correlation between AT1-MC and MT1 wells within 40 m distance exhibited that lateral continuity of these sand layers (upper part of reservoir) are fairly good, which representing ideal reservoir for the production

  18. Controlled-source electromagnetic and seismic delineation of subseafloor fluid flow structures in a gas hydrate province, offshore Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attias, Eric; Weitemeyer, Karen; Minshull, Tim A.; Best, Angus I.; Sinha, Martin; Jegen-Kulcsar, Marion; Hölz, Sebastian; Berndt, Christian

    2016-08-01

    Deep sea pockmarks underlain by chimney-like or pipe structures that contain methane hydrate are abundant along the Norwegian continental margin. In such hydrate provinces the interaction between hydrate formation and fluid flow has significance for benthic ecosystems and possibly climate change. The Nyegga region, situated on the western Norwegian continental slope, is characterized by an extensive pockmark field known to accommodate substantial methane gas hydrate deposits. The aim of this study is to detect and delineate both the gas hydrate and free gas reservoirs at one of Nyegga's pockmarks. In 2012, a marine controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) survey was performed at a pockmark in this region, where high-resolution 3-D seismic data were previously collected in 2006. 2-D CSEM inversions were computed using the data acquired by ocean bottom electrical field receivers. Our results, derived from unconstrained and seismically constrained CSEM inversions, suggest the presence of two distinctive resistivity anomalies beneath the pockmark: a shallow vertical anomaly at the underlying pipe structure, likely due to gas hydrate accumulation, and a laterally extensive anomaly attributed to a free gas zone below the base of the gas hydrate stability zone. This work contributes to a robust characterization of gas hydrate deposits within subseafloor fluid flow pipe structures.

  19. Preliminary report on the commercial viability of gas production from natural gas hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, M.R.; Hancock, S.H.; Wilson, S.J.; Patil, S.L.; Moridis, G.J.; Boswell, R.; Collett, T.S.; Koh, C.A.; Sloan, E.D.

    2009-01-01

    Economic studies on simulated gas hydrate reservoirs have been compiled to estimate the price of natural gas that may lead to economically viable production from the most promising gas hydrate accumulations. As a first estimate, $CDN2005 12/Mscf is the lowest gas price that would allow economically viable production from gas hydrates in the absence of associated free gas, while an underlying gas deposit will reduce the viability price estimate to $CDN2005 7.50/Mscf. Results from a recent analysis of the simulated production of natural gas from marine hydrate deposits are also considered in this report; on an IROR basis, it is $US2008 3.50-4.00/Mscf more expensive to produce marine hydrates than conventional marine gas assuming the existence of sufficiently large marine hydrate accumulations. While these prices represent the best available estimates, the economic evaluation of a specific project is highly dependent on the producibility of the target zone, the amount of gas in place, the associated geologic and depositional environment, existing pipeline infrastructure, and local tariffs and taxes. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  20. Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope: Coring operations, core sedimentology, and lithostratigraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, K.; Boswell, R.; Collett, T.

    2011-01-01

    In February 2007, BP Exploration (Alaska), the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Geological Survey completed the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well (Mount Elbert well) in the Milne Point Unit on the Alaska North Slope. The program achieved its primary goals of validating the pre-drill estimates of gas hydrate occurrence and thickness based on 3-D seismic interpretations and wireline log correlations and collecting a comprehensive suite of logging, coring, and pressure testing data. The upper section of the Mount Elbert well was drilled through the base of ice-bearing permafrost to a casing point of 594??m (1950??ft), approximately 15??m (50??ft) above the top of the targeted reservoir interval. The lower portion of the well was continuously cored from 606??m (1987??ft) to 760??m (2494??ft) and drilled to a total depth of 914??m. Ice-bearing permafrost extends to a depth of roughly 536??m and the base of gas hydrate stability is interpreted to extend to a depth of 870??m. Coring through the targeted gas hydrate bearing reservoirs was completed using a wireline-retrievable system. The coring program achieved 85% recovery of 7.6??cm (3??in) diameter core through 154??m (504??ft) of the hole. An onsite team processed the cores, collecting and preserving approximately 250 sub-samples for analyses of pore water geochemistry, microbiology, gas chemistry, petrophysical analysis, and thermal and physical properties. Eleven samples were immediately transferred to either methane-charged pressure vessels or liquid nitrogen for future study of the preserved gas hydrate. Additional offsite sampling, analyses, and detailed description of the cores were also conducted. Based on this work, one lithostratigraphic unit with eight subunits was identified across the cored interval. Subunits II and Va comprise the majority of the reservoir facies and are dominantly very fine to fine, moderately sorted, quartz, feldspar, and lithic fragment-bearing to

  1. In-situ gas hydrate hydrate saturation estimated from various well logs at the Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M.W.; Collett, T.S.

    2011-01-01

    In 2006, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) completed detailed analysis and interpretation of available 2-D and 3-D seismic data and proposed a viable method for identifying sub-permafrost gas hydrate prospects within the gas hydrate stability zone in the Milne Point area of northern Alaska. To validate the predictions of the USGS and to acquire critical reservoir data needed to develop a long-term production testing program, a well was drilled at the Mount Elbert prospect in February, 2007. Numerous well log data and cores were acquired to estimate in-situ gas hydrate saturations and reservoir properties.Gas hydrate saturations were estimated from various well logs such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), P- and S-wave velocity, and electrical resistivity logs along with pore-water salinity. Gas hydrate saturations from the NMR log agree well with those estimated from P- and S-wave velocity data. Because of the low salinity of the connate water and the low formation temperature, the resistivity of connate water is comparable to that of shale. Therefore, the effect of clay should be accounted for to accurately estimate gas hydrate saturations from the resistivity data. Two highly gas hydrate-saturated intervals are identified - an upper ???43 ft zone with an average gas hydrate saturation of 54% and a lower ???53 ft zone with an average gas hydrate saturation of 50%; both zones reach a maximum of about 75% saturation. ?? 2009.

  2. Evaluation of Gas Hydrate at Alaminos Canyon 810, Northern Gulf of Mexico Slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, C.; Cook, A.; Sawyer, D.; Hillman, J. I. T.

    2016-12-01

    We characterize the gas hydrate reservoir in Alaminos Canyon Block 810 (AC810) on the northern Gulf of Mexico slope, approximately 400 km southeast of Houston, Texas, USA. Three-dimensional seismic data shows a bottom-simulating-reflection (BSR), over 30 km2, which suggests that a significant gas hydrate accumulation may occur at AC810. Furthermore, logging while drilling (LWD) data acquired from a Statoil well located that penetrated the BSR near the crest of the regional anticline indicates two possible gas hydrate units (Hydrate Unit A and Hydrate Unit B). LWD data in this interval are limited to gamma ray and resistivity only. Resistivity curve separations are observed in Hydrate Unit A (131 to 253 mbsf) suggesting hydrate-filled fractures in marine mud. A spiky high resistivity response in Hydrate Unit B (308 to 354 mbsf) could either be a marine mud or a sand-prone interval. The abrupt decrease (from 7 to 1 Ωm) in resistivity logs at 357 mbsf generally corresponds with the interpreted base of hydrate stability, as the BSR is observed near 350 mbsf on the seismic data. To further investigate the formation characteristics, we generate synthetic traces using general velocity and density trends for marine sediments to match the seismic trace extracted at the Statoil well. We consider models with 1) free gas and 2) water only below the base of hydrate stability. In our free gas-below models, we find the velocity of Hydrate Unit A and Hydrate Unit B is generally low and does not deviate significantly from the general velocity trends, suggesting that gas hydrate is present in a marine mud. In the water-below model, the compressional velocity of Hydrate Unit B ranges from 2450 m/s to 3150 m/s. This velocity is similar to the velocity of high hydrate saturation in sand; typically greater than 2500 m/s. This may indicate that Hydrate Unit B is sand with high hydrate saturation; however, to achieve a suitable match between the water-below synthetic seismogram and the

  3. The connection between natural gas hydrate and bottom-simulating reflectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Urmi; Cook, Ann E.; Shedd, William; Frye, Matthew

    2016-07-01

    Bottom-simulating reflectors (BSRs) on marine seismic data are commonly used to identify the presence of natural gas hydrate in marine sediments, although the exact relationship between gas hydrate and BSRs is undefined. To clarify this relationship we compile a data set of probable gas hydrate occurrence as appraised from well logs of 788 industry wells in the northern Gulf of Mexico. We combine the well log data set with a data set of BSR distribution in the same area identified from 3-D seismic data. We find that a BSR increases the chances of finding gas hydrate by 2.6 times as opposed to drilling outside a BSR and that the wells within a BSR also contain thicker and higher resistivity hydrate accumulations. Even so, over half of the wells drilled through BSRs have no detectable gas hydrate accumulations and gas hydrate occurrences and BSRs do not coincide in most cases.

  4. 油藏流体中H型水合物生成条件的计算%Prediction of Structure-H Gas Hydrate Formation Conditions for Reservoir Fluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马庆兰; 陈光进; 郭天民; 张坤; Julian Y.Zuo; Dan Zhang; Heng-Joo Ng

    2005-01-01

    In this work, a thermodynamic model is developed for prediction of structure H hydrate formation. The model combines the Peng-Robinson equation of state for the vapor, liquid and aqueous phases with the extended Ng-Robinson hydrate model for gas hydrate formation of all three structures. The parameters of 14 structureH hydrate formers are determined based on the experimental data of structure-H hydrates in the literature. The expression of fugacity of water in the empty hydrate phase is correlated for calculating structure-H hydrate formation conditions in the absence of free water. The model is tested by predicting hydrate formation conditions of a number of structure-H hydrate forming systems which are in good agreement with the experimental data. The proposed model is also applied to the prediction of hydrate formation conditions for various reservoir fluids such as natural gas and gas condensate.

  5. The characteristics of gas hydrates occurring in natural environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, H.; Moudrakovski, I.; Udachin, K.; Enright, G.; Ratcliffe, C.; Ripmeester, J.

    2009-12-01

    In the past few years, extensive analyses have been carried out for characterizing the natural gas hydrate samples from Cascadia, offshore Vancouver Island; Mallik, Mackenzie Delta; Mount Elbert, Alaska North Slope; Nankai Trough, offshore Japan; Japan Sea and offshore India. With the results obtained, it is possible to give a general picture of the characteristics of gas hydrates occurring in natural environment. Gas hydrate can occur in sediments of various types, from sands to clay, although it is preferentially enriched in sediments of certain types, for example coarse sands and fine volcanic ash. Most of the gas hydrates in sediments are invisible, occurring in the pores of the sediments, while some hydrates are visible, appearing as massive, nodular, planar, vein-like forms and occurring around the seafloor, in the fractures related to fault systems, or any other large spaces available in sediments. Although methane is the main component of most of the natural gas hydrates, C2 to C7 hydrocarbons have been recognized in hydrates, sometimes even in significant amounts. Shallow marine gas hydrates have been found generally to contain minor amounts of hydrogen sulfide. Gas hydrate samples with complex gas compositions have been found to have heterogeneous distributions in composition, which might reflect changes in the composition of the available gas in the surrounding environment. Depending on the gas compositions, the structure type of a natural gas hydrate can be structure I, II or H. For structure I methane hydrate, the large cages are almost fully occupied by methane molecules, while the small cages are only partly occupied. Methane hydrates occurring in different environments have been identified with almost the same crystallographic parameters.

  6. Study of Formation Mechanisms of Gas Hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jia-Sheng; Wu, Cheng-Yueh; Hsieh, Bieng-Zih

    2015-04-01

    Gas hydrates, which had been found in subsurface geological environments of deep-sea sediments and permafrost regions, are solid crystalline compounds of gas molecules and water. The estimated energy resources of hydrates are at least twice of that of the conventional fossil fuel in the world. Gas hydrates have a great opportunity to become a dominating future energy. In the past years, many laboratory experiments had been conducted to study chemical and thermodynamic characteristics of gas hydrates in order to investigate the formation and dissociation mechanisms of hydrates. However, it is difficult to observe the formation and dissociation of hydrates in a porous media from a physical experiment directly. The purpose of this study was to model the dynamic formation mechanisms of gas hydrate in porous media by reservoir simulation. Two models were designed for this study: 1) a closed-system static model with separated gas and water zones; this model was a hydrate equilibrium model to investigate the behavior of the formation of hydrates near the initial gas-water contact; and 2) an open-system dynamic model with a continuous bottom-up gas flow; this model simulated the behavior of gas migration and studied the formation of hydrates from flowed gas and static formation water in porous media. A phase behavior module was developed in this study for reservoir simulator to model the pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) behavior of hydrates. The thermodynamic equilibriums and chemical reactions were coupled with the phase behavior module to have functions modelling the formation and dissociation of hydrates from/to water and gas. The simulation models used in this study were validated from the code-comparison project proposed by the NETL. According to the modelling results of the closed-system static model, we found that predominated location for the formation of hydrates was below the gas-water contact (or at the top of water zone). The maximum hydrate saturation

  7. Energy from gas hydrates - assessing the opportunities and challenges for Canada: report of the expert panel on gas hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-09-15

    Gas hydrates form when water and natural gas combine at low temperatures and high pressures in regions of permafrost and in marine subseafloor sediments. Estimates suggest that the total amount of natural gas bound in hydrate form may exceed all conventional gas resources, or even the amount of all combined hydrocarbon energy. Gas from gas hydrate could provide a potentially vast new source of energy to offset declining supplies of conventional natural gas in North America and to provide greater energy security for countries such as Japan and India that have limited domestic sources. However, complex issues would need to be addressed if gas hydrate were to become a large part of the energy future of Canada. Natural Resources Canada asked the Council of Canadian Academies to assemble a panel of experts to examine the challenges for an acceptable operational extraction of gas hydrates in Canada. This report presented an overview of relevant contextual background, including some basic science; the medium-term outlook for supply and demand in markets for natural gas; broad environmental issues related to gas hydrate in its natural state and as a fuel; and an overview of Canada's contribution to knowledge about gas hydrate in the context of ongoing international research activity. The report also presented current information on the subject and what would be required to delineate and quantify the resource. Techniques for extracting gas from gas hydrate were also outlined. The report also addressed safety issues related to gas hydrate dissociation during drilling operations or release into the atmosphere; the environmental issues associated with potential leakage of methane into the atmosphere and with the large volumes of water produced during gas hydrate dissociation; and jurisdictional and local community issues that would need to be resolved in order to proceed with the commercial exploitation of gas hydrate. It was concluded that there does not appear to be

  8. Rapid gas hydrate formation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Thomas D.; Taylor, Charles E.; Unione, Alfred J.

    2013-01-15

    The disclosure provides a method and apparatus for forming gas hydrates from a two-phase mixture of water and a hydrate forming gas. The two-phase mixture is created in a mixing zone which may be wholly included within the body of a spray nozzle. The two-phase mixture is subsequently sprayed into a reaction zone, where the reaction zone is under pressure and temperature conditions suitable for formation of the gas hydrate. The reaction zone pressure is less than the mixing zone pressure so that expansion of the hydrate-forming gas in the mixture provides a degree of cooling by the Joule-Thompson effect and provides more intimate mixing between the water and the hydrate-forming gas. The result of the process is the formation of gas hydrates continuously and with a greatly reduced induction time. An apparatus for conduct of the method is further provided.

  9. Controls on evolution of gas-hydrate system in the Krishna-Godavari basin, offshore India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Badesab, F.K.; Dewangan, P.; Usapkar, A.; Kocherla, M.; Peketi, A.; Mohite, K.; Sangode, S.J.; Deenadayalan, K.

    magnetic minerals in the studied samples. 5.5. Can magnetic record be used as a potential tracer to identify the fossil gas hydrate zone in the K-G basin? In marine settings, the dissociation of gas hydrates takes place whenever P-T condition changes..., whenever the suitable P-T conditions prevail, hydrate nucleation takes place leaving the former boundary of gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) as a fossil gas hydrate horizon. In K-G basin, the present base of GHSZ calculated using hydrate stability...

  10. Simulation of gas hydrate dissociation caused by repeated tectonic uplift events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Shusaku; Matsubayashi, Osamu; Nagakubo, Sadao

    2016-05-01

    Gas hydrate dissociation by tectonic uplift is often used to explain geologic and geophysical phenomena, such as hydrate accumulation probably caused by hydrate recycling and the occurrence of double bottom-simulating reflectors in tectonically active areas. However, little is known of gas hydrate dissociation resulting from tectonic uplift. This study investigates gas hydrate dissociation in marine sediments caused by repeated tectonic uplift events using a numerical model incorporating the latent heat of gas hydrate dissociation. The simulations showed that tectonic uplift causes upward movement of some depth interval of hydrate-bearing sediment immediately above the base of gas hydrate stability (BGHS) to the gas hydrate instability zone because the sediment initially maintains its temperature: in that interval, gas hydrate dissociates while absorbing heat; consequently, the temperature of the interval decreases to that of the hydrate stability boundary at that depth. Until the next uplift event, endothermic gas hydrate dissociation proceeds at the BGHS using heat mainly supplied from the sediment around the BGHS, lowering the temperature of that sediment. The cumulative effects of these two endothermic gas hydrate dissociations caused by repeated uplift events lower the sediment temperature around the BGHS, suggesting that in a marine area in which sediment with a highly concentrated hydrate-bearing layer just above the BGHS has been frequently uplifted, the endothermic gas hydrate dissociation produces a gradual decrease in thermal gradient from the seafloor to the BGHS. Sensitivity analysis for model parameters showed that water depth, amount of uplift, gas hydrate saturation, and basal heat flow strongly influence the gas hydrate dissociation rate and sediment temperature around the BGHS.

  11. Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II logging-while-drilling data acquisition and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy S.; Lee, Wyung W.; Zyrianova, Margarita V.; Mrozewski, Stefan A.; Guerin, Gilles; Cook, Ann E.; Goldberg, Dave S.

    2012-01-01

    One of the objectives of the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II (GOM JIP Leg II) was the collection of a comprehensive suite of logging-while-drilling (LWD) data within gas-hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs in order to make accurate estimates of the concentration of gas hydrates under various geologic conditions and to understand the geologic controls on the occurrence of gas hydrate at each of the sites drilled during this expedition. The LWD sensors just above the drill bit provided important information on the nature of the sediments and the occurrence of gas hydrate. There has been significant advancements in the use of downhole well-logging tools to acquire detailed information on the occurrence of gas hydrate in nature: From using electrical resistivity and acoustic logs to identify gas hydrate occurrences in wells to where wireline and advanced logging-while-drilling tools are routinely used to examine the petrophysical nature of gas hydrate reservoirs and the distribution and concentration of gas hydrates within various complex reservoir systems. Recent integrated sediment coring and well-log studies have confirmed that electrical resistivity and acoustic velocity data can yield accurate gas hydrate saturations in sediment grain supported (isotropic) systems such as sand reservoirs, but more advanced log analysis models are required to characterize gas hydrate in fractured (anisotropic) reservoir systems. In support of the GOM JIP Leg II effort, well-log data montages have been compiled and presented in this report which includes downhole logs obtained from all seven wells drilled during this expedition with a focus on identifying and characterizing the potential gas-hydrate-bearing sedimentary section in each of the wells. Also presented and reviewed in this report are the gas-hydrate saturation and sediment porosity logs for each of the wells as calculated from available downhole well logs.

  12. Characterization of gas hydrates provinces off Norway-Svalbard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanneste, M.; Kvalstad, T.J.; Forsberg, C.F.; Pfaffhuber, A. [NGI, Oslo (Norway); ICG, Oslo (Norway); Bunz, S.; Mienert, J. [Tromso Univ., Tromso (Norway)

    2010-07-01

    The characterization of gas hydrates provinces off Norway-Svalbard were discussed in this presentation. Relevant research and development projects and activities were listed. Bottom simulating reflectors as a key seismic proxy were discussed. Seismic techniques such as p-waves and s-waves were identified. The quantification and saturation from velocity anomalies were illustrated along with the gas hydrate reservoir potential off Norway-Svalbard. Some interesting cases were presented, including the Nankai; Lake Baikal in Siberia; and the Black Sea. The presentation concluded with a discussion of lessons learned. The presentation noted that mapping and quantification requires integration of methods and techniques. figs.

  13. SCHEMES OF GAS PRODUCTION FROM NATURAL GAS HYDRATES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李淑霞; 陈月明; 杜庆军

    2003-01-01

    Natural gas hydrates are a kind of nonpolluting and high quality energy resources for future, the reserves of which are about twice of the carbon of the current fossil energy (petroleum, natural gas and coal) on the earth. And it will be the most important energy for the 21st century. The energy balance and numerical simulation are applied to study the schemes of the natural gas hydrates production in this paper,and it is considered that both depressurization and thermal stimulation are effective methods for exploiting natural gas hydrates, and that the gas production of the thermal stimulation is higher than that of the depressurization. But thermal stimulation is non-economic because it requires large amounts of energy.Therefore the combination of the two methods is a preferable method for the current development of the natural gas hydrates. The main factors which influence the production of natural gas hydrates are: the temperature of injected water, the injection rate, the initial saturation of the hydrates and the initial temperature of the reservoir which is the most important factor.

  14. Gas hydrate detection and mapping on the US east coast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlbrandt, T.S.; Dillon, W.P.

    1993-12-31

    Project objectives are to identify and map gas hydrate accumulations on the US eastern continental margin using remote sensing (seismic profiling) techniques and to relate these concentrations to the geological factors that-control them. In order to test the remote sensing methods, gas hydrate-cemented sediments will be tested in the laboratory and an effort will be made to perform similar physical tests on natural hydrate-cemented sediments from the study area. Gas hydrate potentially may represent a future major resource of energy. Furthermore, it may influence climate change because it forms a large reservoir for methane, which is a very effective greenhouse gas; its breakdown probably is a controlling factor for sea-floor landslides; and its presence has significant effect on the acoustic velocity of sea-floor sediments.

  15. Mass fractionation of noble gases in synthetic methane hydrate: Implications for naturally occurring gas hydrate dissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Andrew G.; Stern, Laura; Pohlman, John W.; Ruppel, Carolyn; Moscati, Richard J.; Landis, Gary P.

    2013-01-01

    As a consequence of contemporary or longer term (since 15 ka) climate warming, gas hydrates in some settings may presently be dissociating and releasing methane and other gases to the ocean-atmosphere system. A key challenge in assessing the impact of dissociating gas hydrates on global atmospheric methane is the lack of a technique able to distinguish between methane recently released from gas hydrates and methane emitted from leaky thermogenic reservoirs, shallow sediments (some newly thawed), coal beds, and other sources. Carbon and deuterium stable isotopic fractionation during methane formation provides a first-order constraint on the processes (microbial or thermogenic) of methane generation. However, because gas hydrate formation and dissociation do not cause significant isotopic fractionation, a stable isotope-based hydrate-source determination is not possible. Here, we investigate patterns of mass-dependent noble gas fractionation within the gas hydrate lattice to fingerprint methane released from gas hydrates. Starting with synthetic gas hydrate formed under laboratory conditions, we document complex noble gas fractionation patterns in the gases liberated during dissociation and explore the effects of aging and storage (e.g., in liquid nitrogen), as well as sampling and preservation procedures. The laboratory results confirm a unique noble gas fractionation pattern for gas hydrates, one that shows promise in evaluating modern natural gas seeps for a signature associated with gas hydrate dissociation.

  16. Hydro-geomechanical behaviour of gas-hydrate bearing soils during gas production through depressurization and CO2 injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deusner, C.; Gupta, S.; Kossel, E.; Bigalke, N.; Haeckel, M.

    2015-12-01

    Results from recent field trials suggest that natural gas could be produced from marine gas hydrate reservoirs at compatible yields and rates. It appears, from a current perspective, that gas production would essentially be based on depressurization and, when facing suitable conditions, be assisted by local thermal stimulation or gas hydrate conversion after injection of CO2-rich fluids. Both field trials, onshore in the Alaska permafrost and in the Nankai Trough offshore Japan, were accompanied by different technical issues, the most striking problems resulting from un-predicted geomechanical behaviour, sediment destabilization and catastrophic sand production. So far, there is a lack of experimental data which could help to understand relevant mechanisms and triggers for potential soil failure in gas hydrate production, to guide model development for simulation of soil behaviour in large-scale production, and to identify processes which drive or, further, mitigate sand production. We use high-pressure flow-through systems in combination with different online and in situ monitoring tools (e.g. Raman microscopy, MRI) to simulate relevant gas hydrate production scenarios. Key components for soil mechanical studies are triaxial systems with ERT (Electric resistivity tomography) and high-resolution local strain analysis. Sand production control and management is studied in a novel hollow-cylinder-type triaxial setup with a miniaturized borehole which allows fluid and particle transport at different fluid injection and flow conditions. Further, the development of a large-scale high-pressure flow-through triaxial test system equipped with μ-CT is ongoing. We will present results from high-pressure flow-through experiments on gas production through depressurization and injection of CO2-rich fluids. Experimental data are used to develop and parametrize numerical models which can simulate coupled process dynamics during gas-hydrate formation and gas production.

  17. Progress of Gas Hydrate Studies in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊栓狮; 汪集旸

    2006-01-01

    A brief overview is given on the gas hydrate-related research activities carried out by Chinese researchers in the past 15 years. The content involves: (1) Historical review. Introducing the gas hydrate research history in China; (2) Gas hydrate research groups in China. There are nearly 20 groups engaged in gas hydrate research now; (3) Present studies.Including fundamental studies, status of the exploration of natural gas hydrate resources in the South China Sea region, and development of hydrate-based new techniques; (4) Future development.

  18. Basin-Wide Temperature Constraints On Gas Hydrate Stability In The Gulf Of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, I. R.; Reagan, M. T.; Guinasso, N. L.; Garcia-Pineda, O. G.

    2012-12-01

    Gas hydrate deposits commonly occur at the seafloor-water interface on marine margins. They are especially prevalent in the Gulf of Mexico where they are associated with natural oil seeps. The stability of these deposits is potentially challenged by fluctuations in bottom water temperature, on an annual time-scale, and under the long-term influence of climate change. We mapped the locations of natural oil seeps where shallow gas hydrate deposits are known to occur across the entire Gulf of Mexico basin based on a comprehensive review of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data (~200 images). We prepared a bottom water temperature map based on the archive of CTD casts from the Gulf (~6000 records). Comparing the distribution of gas hydrate deposits with predicted bottom water temperature, we find that a broad area of the upper slope lies above the theoretical stability horizon for structure 1 gas hydrate, while all sites where gas hydrate deposits occur are within the stability horizon for structure 2 gas hydrate. This is consistent with analytical results that structure 2 gas hydrates predominate on the upper slope (Klapp et al., 2010), where bottom water temperatures fluctuate over a 7 to 10 C range (approx. 600 m depth), while pure structure 1 hydrates are found at greater depths (approx. 3000 m). Where higher hydrocarbon gases are available, formation of structure 2 gas hydrate should significantly increase the resistance of shallow gas hydrate deposits to destabilizing effects variable or increasing bottom water temperature. Klapp, S.A., Bohrmann, G., Kuhs, W.F., Murshed, M.M., Pape, T., Klein, H., Techmer, K.S., Heeschen, K.U., and Abegg, F., 2010, Microstructures of structure I and II gas hydrates from the Gulf of Mexico: Marine and Petroleum Geology, v. 27, p. 116-125.Bottom temperature and pressure for Gulf of Mexico gas hydrate outcrops and stability horizons for sI and sII hydrate.

  19. Formation of porous gas hydrates

    CERN Document Server

    Salamatin, Andrey N

    2015-01-01

    Gas hydrates grown at gas-ice interfaces are examined by electron microscopy and found to have a submicron porous texture. Permeability of the intervening hydrate layers provides the connection between the two counterparts (gas and water molecules) of the clathration reaction and makes further hydrate formation possible. The study is focused on phenomenological description of principal stages and rate-limiting processes that control the kinetics of the porous gas hydrate crystal growth from ice powders. Although the detailed physical mechanisms involved in the porous hydrate formation still are not fully understood, the initial stage of hydrate film spreading over the ice surface should be distinguished from the subsequent stage which is presumably limited by the clathration reaction at the ice-hydrate interface and develops after the ice grain coating is finished. The model reveals a time dependence of the reaction degree essentially different from that when the rate-limiting step of the hydrate formation at...

  20. Separation of water through gas hydrate formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boch Andersen, Torben; Thomsen, Kaj

    2009-01-01

    Gas hydrate is normally recognized as a troublemaker in the oil and gas industry. However, gas hydrate has some interesting possibilities when used in connection with separation of water. Nordic Sugar has investigated the possibility of using gas hydrates for concentration of sugar juice. The goa...... volumes and the needs for high pressure. The process could be interesting for concentration of heat sensitive, high value products......Gas hydrate is normally recognized as a troublemaker in the oil and gas industry. However, gas hydrate has some interesting possibilities when used in connection with separation of water. Nordic Sugar has investigated the possibility of using gas hydrates for concentration of sugar juice. The goal...... of the project was to formulate an alternative separation concept, which can replace the traditional water evaporation process in the sugar production. Work with the separation concept showed that gas hydrates can be used for water separation. The process is not suitable for sugar production because of large...

  1. HyFlux - Part I: Regional Modeling of Methane Flux From Near-Seafloor Gas Hydrate Deposits on Continental Margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, I. R.; Asper, V.; Garcia, O. P.; Kastner, M.; Leifer, I.; Naehr, T.; Solomon, E.; Yvon-Lewis, S.; Zimmer, B.

    2008-12-01

    HyFlux - Part I: Regional modeling of methane flux from near-seafloor gas hydrate deposits on continental margins MacDonald, I.R., Asper, V., Garcia, O., Kastner, M., Leifer, I., Naehr, T.H., Solomon, E., Yvon-Lewis, S., and Zimmer, B. The Dept. of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) has recently awarded a project entitled HyFlux: "Remote sensing and sea-truth measurements of methane flux to the atmosphere." The project will address this problem with a combined effort of satellite remote sensing and data collection at proven sites in the Gulf of Mexico where gas hydrate releases gas to the water column. Submarine gas hydrate is a large pool of greenhouse gas that may interact with the atmosphere over geologic time to affect climate cycles. In the near term, the magnitude of methane reaching the atmosphere from gas hydrate on continental margins is poorly known because 1) gas hydrate is exposed to metastable oceanic conditions in shallow, dispersed deposits that are poorly imaged by standard geophysical techniques and 2) the consumption of methane in marine sediments and in the water column is subject to uncertainty. The northern GOM is a prolific hydrocarbon province where rapid migration of oil, gases, and brines from deep subsurface petroleum reservoirs occurs through faults generated by salt tectonics. Focused expulsion of hydrocarbons is manifested at the seafloor by gas vents, gas hydrates, oil seeps, chemosynthetic biological communities, and mud volcanoes. Where hydrocarbon seeps occur in depths below the hydrate stability zone (~500m), rapid flux of gas will feed shallow deposits of gas hydrate that potentially interact with water column temperature changes; oil released from seeps forms sea-surface features that can be detected in remote-sensing images. The regional phase of the project will quantify verifiable sources of methane (and oil) the Gulf of Mexico continental margin and selected margins (e.g. Pakistan Margin, South China Sea

  2. Simulation of subsea gas hydrate exploitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicki, Georg; Schlüter, Stefan; Hennig, Torsten; Deerberg, Görge

    2014-05-01

    The recovery of methane from gas hydrate layers that have been detected in several subsea sediments and permafrost regions around the world is a promising perspective to overcome future shortages in natural gas supply. Being aware that conventional natural gas resources are limited, research is going on to develop technologies for the production of natural gas from such new sources. Thus various research programs have started since the early 1990s in Japan, USA, Canada, India, and Germany to investigate hydrate deposits and develop required technologies. In recent years, intensive research has focussed on the capture and storage of CO2 from combustion processes to reduce climate impact. While different natural or man-made reservoirs like deep aquifers, exhausted oil and gas deposits or other geological formations are considered to store gaseous or liquid CO2, the storage of CO2 as hydrate in former methane hydrate fields is another promising alternative. Due to beneficial stability conditions, methane recovery may be well combined with CO2 storage in the form of hydrates. Regarding technological implementation many problems have to be overcome. Especially mixing, heat and mass transfer in the reservoir are limiting factors causing very long process times. Within the scope of the German research project »SUGAR« different technological approaches for the optimized exploitation of gas hydrate deposits are evaluated and compared by means of dynamic system simulations and analysis. Detailed mathematical models for the most relevant chemical and physical processes are developed. The basic mechanisms of gas hydrate formation/dissociation and heat and mass transport in porous media are considered and implemented into simulation programs. Simulations based on geological field data have been carried out. The studies focus on the potential of gas production from turbidites and their fitness for CO2 storage. The effects occurring during gas production and CO2 storage within

  3. A new estimate of the volume and distribution of gas hydrate in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, U.; Cook, A.

    2016-12-01

    In spite of the wealth of information gained over the last several decades about gas hydrate in the northern Gulf of Mexico, there is still considerable uncertainty about the distribution and volume of gas hydrate. In our assessment we build a dataset of basin-wide gas hydrate distribution and thickness, as appraised from publicly available petroleum industry well logs within the gas hydrate stability zone (HSZ), and subsequently develop a Monte Carlo to determine the volumetric estimate of gas hydrate using the dataset. We evaluate the presence of gas hydrate from electrical resistivity well logs, and categorized possible reservoir type (either sand or clay) based on the gamma ray response and resistivity curve characteristics. Out of the 798 wells with resistivity well log data within the HSZ we analyzed, we found evidence of gas hydrate in 124 wells. In this research we present a new stochastic estimate of the gas hydrate volume in the northern Gulf of Mexico guided by our well log dataset. For our Monte Carlo simulation, we divided our assessment area of 200,000 km2 into 1 km2 grid cells. Our volume assessment model incorporates variables unique to our well log dataset such as the likelihood of gas hydrate occurrence, fraction of the HSZ occupied by gas hydrate, reservoir type, and gas hydrate saturation depending on the reservoir, in each grid cell, in addition to other basic variables such as HSZ thickness and porosity. Preliminary results from our model suggests that the total volume of gas at standard temperature and pressure in gas hydrate in the northern Gulf of Mexico is in the range of 430 trillion cubic feet (TCF) to 730 TCF, with a mean volume of 585 TCF. While the reservoir distribution from our well log dataset found gas hydrate in sand reservoirs in 30 wells out of the 124 wells with evidence of gas hydrate ( 24%), we find sand reservoirs contain over half of the total volume of gas hydrate in the Gulf of Mexico, as a result of the relatively high

  4. Pre- and post-drill comparison of the Mount Elbert gas hydrate prospect, Alaska North Slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M.W.; Agena, W.F.; Collett, T.S.; Inks, T.L.

    2011-01-01

    In 2006, the United States Geological Survey (USGS) completed a detailed analysis and interpretation of available 2-D and 3-D seismic data, along with seismic modeling and correlation with specially processed downhole well log data for identifying potential gas hydrate accumulations on the North Slope of Alaska. A methodology was developed for identifying sub-permafrost gas hydrate prospects within the gas hydrate stability zone in the Milne Point area. The study revealed a total of 14 gas hydrate prospects in this area.In order to validate the gas hydrate prospecting protocol of the USGS and to acquire critical reservoir data needed to develop a longer-term production testing program, a stratigraphic test well was drilled at the Mount Elbert prospect in the Milne Point area in early 2007. The drilling confirmed the presence of two prominent gas-hydrate-bearing units in the Mount Elbert prospect, and high quality well logs and core data were acquired. The post-drill results indicate pre-drill predictions of the reservoir thickness and the gas-hydrate saturations based on seismic and existing well data were 90% accurate for the upper unit (hydrate unit D) and 70% accurate for the lower unit (hydrate unit C), confirming the validity of the USGS approach to gas hydrate prospecting. The Mount Elbert prospect is the first gas hydrate accumulation on the North Slope of Alaska identified primarily on the basis of seismic attribute analysis and specially processed downhole log data. Post-drill well log data enabled a better constraint of the elastic model and the development of an improved approach to the gas hydrate prospecting using seismic attributes. ?? 2009.

  5. Site Selection for DOE/JIP Gas Hydrate Drilling in the Northern Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchinson, D.R. (USGS); Shelander, D. (Schlumberger, Houston, TX); Dai, J. (Schlumberger, Hoston, TX); McConnell, D. (AOA Geophysics, Inc., Houston, TX); Shedd, W. (Minerals Management Service); Frye, M. (Minerals Management Service); Ruppel, C. (USGS); Boswell, R.; Jones, E. (Chevron Energy Technology Corp., Houston, TX); Collett, T.S. (USGS); Rose, K.; Dugan, B. (Rice Univ., Houston, TX); Wood, W. (U.S. Naval Research Laboratory); Latham, T. (Chevron Energy Technology Corp., Houston, TX)

    2008-07-01

    In the late spring of 2008, the Chevron-led Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project (JIP) expects to conduct an exploratory drilling and logging campaign to better understand gas hydrate-bearing sands in the deepwater Gulf of Mexico. The JIP Site Selection team selected three areas to test alternative geological models and geophysical interpretations supporting the existence of potential high gas hydrate saturations in reservoir-quality sands. The three sites are near existing drill holes which provide geological and geophysical constraints in Alaminos Canyon (AC) lease block 818, Green Canyon (GC) 955, and Walker Ridge (WR) 313. At the AC818 site, gas hydrate is interpreted to occur within the Oligocene Frio volcaniclastic sand at the crest of a fold that is shallow enough to be in the hydrate stability zone. Drilling at GC955 will sample a faulted, buried Pleistocene channel-levee system in an area characterized by seafloor fluid expulsion features, structural closure associated with uplifted salt, and abundant seismic evidence for upward migration of fluids and gas into the sand-rich parts of the sedimentary section. Drilling at WR313 targets ponded sheet sands and associated channel/levee deposits within a minibasin, making this a non-structural play. The potential for gas hydrate occurrence at WR313 is supported by shingled phase reversals consistent with the transition from gas-charged sand to overlying gas-hydrate saturated sand. Drilling locations have been selected at each site to 1) test geological methods and models used to infer the occurrence of gas hydrate in sand reservoirs in different settings in the northern Gulf of Mexico; 2) calibrate geophysical models used to detect gas hydrate sands, map reservoir thicknesses, and estimate the degree of gas hydrate saturation; and 3) delineate potential locations for subsequent JIP drilling and coring operations that will collect samples for comprehensive physical property, geochemical and other

  6. Geologic controls on gas hydrate occurrence in the Mount Elbert prospect, Alaska North Slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell, R.; Rose, K.; Collett, T.S.; Lee, M.; Winters, W.; Lewis, K.A.; Agena, W.

    2011-01-01

    Data acquired at the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, drilled in the Milne Point area of the Alaska North Slope in February, 2007, indicates two zones of high gas hydrate saturation within the Eocene Sagavanirktok Formation. Gas hydrate is observed in two separate sand reservoirs (the D and C units), in the stratigraphically highest portions of those sands, and is not detected in non-sand lithologies. In the younger D unit, gas hydrate appears to fill much of the available reservoir space at the top of the unit. The degree of vertical fill with the D unit is closely related to the unit reservoir quality. A thick, low-permeability clay-dominated unit serves as an upper seal, whereas a subtle transition to more clay-rich, and interbedded sand, silt, and clay units is associated with the base of gas hydrate occurrence. In the underlying C unit, the reservoir is similarly capped by a clay-dominated section, with gas hydrate filling the relatively lower-quality sands at the top of the unit leaving an underlying thick section of high-reservoir quality sands devoid of gas hydrate. Evaluation of well log, core, and seismic data indicate that the gas hydrate occurs within complex combination stratigraphic/structural traps. Structural trapping is provided by a four-way fold closure augmented by a large western bounding fault. Lithologic variation is also a likely strong control on lateral extent of the reservoirs, particularly in the D unit accumulation, where gas hydrate appears to extend beyond the limits of the structural closure. Porous and permeable zones within the C unit sand are only partially charged due most likely to limited structural trapping in the reservoir lithofacies during the period of primary charging. The occurrence of the gas hydrate within the sands in the upper portions of both the C and D units and along the crest of the fold is consistent with an interpretation that these deposits are converted free gas accumulations

  7. Seismic reflections associated with submarine gas hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreassen, K.

    1995-12-31

    Gas hydrates are often suggested as a future energy resource. This doctoral thesis improves the understanding of the concentration and distribution of natural submarine gas hydrates. The presence of these hydrates are commonly inferred from strong bottom simulating reflection (BSR). To investigate the nature of BSR, this work uses seismic studies of hydrate-related BSRs at two different locations, one where gas hydrates are accepted to exist and interpreted to be very extensive (in the Beaufort Sea), the other with good velocity data and downhole logs available (offshore Oregon). To ascertain the presence of free gas under the BSR, prestack offset data must supplement near-vertical incidence seismic data. A tentative model for physical properties of sediments partially saturated with gas hydrate and free gas is presented. This model, together with drilling information and seismic data containing the BSR beneath the Oregon margin and the Beaufort Sea, made it possible to better understand when to apply the amplitude-versus-offset (AVO) method to constrain BSR gas hydrate and gas models. Distribution of natural gas hydrates offshore Norway and Svalbard is discussed and interpreted as reflections from the base of gas hydrate-bearing sediments, overlying sediments containing free gas. Gas hydrates inferred to exist at the Norwegian-Svalbard continental margin correlate well with Cenozoic depocenters, and the associated gas is assumed to be mainly biogenic. Parts of that margin have a high potential for natural gas hydrates of both biogenic and thermogenic origin. 235 refs., 86 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Occurrence of gas hydrate in Oligocene Frio sand: Alaminos Canyon Block 818: Northern Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boswell, R.D.; Shelander, D.; Lee, M.; Latham, T.; Collett, T.; Guerin, G.; Moridis, G.; Reagan, M.; Goldberg, D.

    2009-07-15

    A unique set of high-quality downhole shallow subsurface well log data combined with industry standard 3D seismic data from the Alaminos Canyon area has enabled the first detailed description of a concentrated gas hydrate accumulation within sand in the Gulf of Mexico. The gas hydrate occurs within very fine grained, immature volcaniclastic sands of the Oligocene Frio sand. Analysis of well data acquired from the Alaminos Canyon Block 818 No.1 ('Tigershark') well shows a total gas hydrate occurrence 13 m thick, with inferred gas hydrate saturation as high as 80% of sediment pore space. Average porosity in the reservoir is estimated from log data at approximately 42%. Permeability in the absence of gas hydrates, as revealed from the analysis of core samples retrieved from the well, ranges from 600 to 1500 millidarcies. The 3-D seismic data reveals a strong reflector consistent with significant increase in acoustic velocities that correlates with the top of the gas-hydrate-bearing sand. This reflector extends across an area of approximately 0.8 km{sup 2} and delineates the minimal probable extent of the gas hydrate accumulation. The base of the inferred gas-hydrate zone also correlates well with a very strong seismic reflector that indicates transition into units of significantly reduced acoustic velocity. Seismic inversion analyses indicate uniformly high gas-hydrate saturations throughout the region where the Frio sand exists within the gas hydrate stability zone. Numerical modeling of the potential production of natural gas from the interpreted accumulation indicates serious challenges for depressurization-based production in settings with strong potential pressure support from extensive underlying aquifers.

  9. Evaluation of long-term gas hydrate production testing locations on the Alaska North Slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy S.; Boswell, Ray; Lee, Myung W.; Anderson, Brian J.; Rose, Kelly K.; Lewis, Kristen A.

    2012-01-01

    The results of short-duration formation tests in northern Alaska and Canada have further documented the energy-resource potential of gas hydrates and have justified the need for long-term gas-hydrate-production testing. Additional data acquisition and long-term production testing could improve the understanding of the response of naturally occurring gas hydrate to depressurization-induced or thermal-, chemical-, or mechanical-stimulated dissociation of gas hydrate into producible gas. The Eileen gashydrate accumulation located in the Greater Prudhoe Bay area in northern Alaska has become a focal point for gas-hydrate geologic and production studies. BP Exploration (Alaska) Incorporated and ConocoPhillips have each established research partnerships with the US Department of Energy to assess the production potential of gas hydrates in northern Alaska. A critical goal of these efforts is to identify the most suitable site for production testing. A total of seven potential locations in the Prudhoe Bay, Kuparuk River, and Milne Point production units were identified and assessed relative to their suitability as a long-term gas-hydrate-production test sites. The test-site-assessment criteria included the analysis of the geologic risk associated with encountering reservoirs for gas-hydrate testing. The site-selection process also dealt with the assessment of the operational/logistical risk associated with each of the potential test sites. From this review, a site in the Prudhoe Bay production unit was determined to be the best location for extended gas-hydrate-production testing. The work presented in this report identifies the key features of the potential test site in the Greater Prudhoe Bay area and provides new information on the nature of gas-hydrate occurrence and the potential impact of production testing on existing infrastructure at the most favorable sites. These data were obtained from well-log analysis, geological correlation and mapping, and numerical

  10. Occurrence of gas hydrate in Oligocene Frio sand: Alaminos Canyon Block 818: Northern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell, R.; Shelander, D.; Lee, M.; Latham, T.; Collett, T.; Guerin, G.; Moridis, G.; Reagan, M.; Goldberg, D.

    2009-01-01

    A unique set of high-quality downhole shallow subsurface well log data combined with industry standard 3D seismic data from the Alaminos Canyon area has enabled the first detailed description of a concentrated gas hydrate accumulation within sand in the Gulf of Mexico. The gas hydrate occurs within very fine grained, immature volcaniclastic sands of the Oligocene Frio sand. Analysis of well data acquired from the Alaminos Canyon Block 818 #1 ("Tigershark") well shows a total gas hydrate occurrence 13??m thick, with inferred gas hydrate saturation as high as 80% of sediment pore space. Average porosity in the reservoir is estimated from log data at approximately 42%. Permeability in the absence of gas hydrates, as revealed from the analysis of core samples retrieved from the well, ranges from 600 to 1500 millidarcies. The 3-D seismic data reveals a strong reflector consistent with significant increase in acoustic velocities that correlates with the top of the gas-hydrate-bearing sand. This reflector extends across an area of approximately 0.8??km2 and delineates the minimal probable extent of the gas hydrate accumulation. The base of the inferred gas-hydrate zone also correlates well with a very strong seismic reflector that indicates transition into units of significantly reduced acoustic velocity. Seismic inversion analyses indicate uniformly high gas-hydrate saturations throughout the region where the Frio sand exists within the gas hydrate stability zone. Numerical modeling of the potential production of natural gas from the interpreted accumulation indicates serious challenges for depressurization-based production in settings with strong potential pressure support from extensive underlying aquifers.

  11. Gas Hydrates as a CH4 Source and a CO2 Sink: New Approaches Based on Fundamental Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schicks, J. M.; Spangenberg, E.; Erzinger, J.

    2007-12-01

    The huge amount of methane, stored in the gas hydrate reservoirs of the world suggests that natural gas hydrates may be used in the future as a source of energy. A first production test was performed during the Mallik 2002 Gas Hydrate Production Research Well Program, showing that the thermal stimulation of natural gas hydrates successfully results in methane production (Dallimore et al. 2005). However, regarding the energy balance, the most efficient method for methane production from hydrates still needs to be developed. From another point of view, the sequestration of CO2 in form of gas hydrates in (marine) sediments is an interesting idea. A combination of methane production from natural gas hydrates on the one hand and CO2 - sequestration on the other hand seems to be an obvious and ideal solution. Different studies on possible methods - e.g. the exchange of CH4 with CO2 in gas hydrates (Lee et al, 2003, Graue and Kvamme, 2006) - have been published recently and demonstrated that this could be a possible way, in principle. Our own investigations on the exchange of CH4 with gaseous CO2 showed that this reaction is much too slow and inefficient to be a reasonable approach. The exchange of only 20 percent CH4 with CO2 could be detected in stable structure I hydrate crystals after 120 hours. In addition, multicomponent hydrates containing higher hydrocarbons beside methane tend to be more stable than pure methane hydrates (Schicks et al, 2006). Therefore, the application of an additional and controlled method for CH4 -hydrate destabilization seems to be necessary and might lead to an efficient release of CH4 from and CO2 inclusion into hydrates. In any case, the question of process optimization still remains. In this contribution the chances and challenges of a combination of these two processes based on experimental data will be examined. Different kinds of experiments have been performed on natural marine and permafrost gas hydrates and synthesized clathrate

  12. Norwegian Research Strategies on gas Hydrates and Natural Seeps in the Nordic Seas Region (GANS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjelstuen, B. O.; Sejrup, H. P.; Andreassen, K.; Boe, R.; Eldholm, O.; Hovland, M.; Knies, J.; Kvalstad, T.; Kvamme, B.; Mienert, J.; Pedersen, R. B.

    2004-12-01

    Continuous leakage of methane to the oceans from hydrate reservoirs that partially are exposed towards the seafloor is an increasing international concern, as the greenhouse gas methane is significantly more (c. 20 times) aggressive than CO2. In Norway we have research groups with interest and experience on natural seeps and gas hydrates. These features, and processes related to them, are challenging research targets which demands inputs from different fields if important research breakthroughs shall be made. In February 2004 deep sea researchers from the University of Tromso, Geological Survey of Norway, Norwegian Geotechnical Institute, Statoil and University of Bergen met to obtain an overview of the research effort in the fields of natural seeps and gas hydrates in Norway and to discuss national coordination, research strategies, research infrastructure and international co-operation. The following research strategies were agreed upon: i) Strengthen multidisciplinary research on deep sea systems, ii) develop a strategy for research on natural seeps and gas hydrates, iii) contribute in national coordination of research on natural seeps and gas hydrates, iv) Coordinate the use and development of research infrastructures important for research on natural seeps and gas hydrates, and v) contribute in the international evaluations of strategies for hydrate reservoir exploitation. Proposed research tasks for GANS include: i) Gas and gas hydrate formation processes and conditions for transport, accumulation, preservation and dissociation in sediments, ii) Effect of gas hydrate on physical properties of sediment, iii) Detection and quantification of in situ gas hydrate content and distribution pattern, iv) Effect of dissociation on soil properties, v) Gas hydrates as an energy resource, vi) Rapid methane release and climate change, and vii) Geohazard and environmental impact.

  13. Raman Spectroscopic Studies of Methane Gas Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne Brunsgaard; Berg, Rolf W.

    2009-01-01

    A brief review of the Raman spectroscopic studies of methane gas hydrates is given, supported by some new measurements done in our laboratory.......A brief review of the Raman spectroscopic studies of methane gas hydrates is given, supported by some new measurements done in our laboratory....

  14. Tectonic Controls on Gas Hydrate Distribution off SW Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, C.; Chi, W. C.; Jegen, M. D.; Muff, S.; Hölz, S.; Lebas, E.; Sommer, M.; Lin, S.; Liu, C. S.; Lin, A. T.; Klaucke, I.; Klaeschen, D.; Chen, L.; Kunath, P.; McIntosh, K. D.; Feseker, T.

    2015-12-01

    The northern part of the South China Sea is characterized by wide-spread occurrence of bottom simulating reflectors (BSR), indicating the presence of marine gas hydrates. Because the area covers both the tectonically inactive passive margin and the northern termination of the Manila Trench subduction zone while sediment input is broadly similar, this area provides an excellent opportunity to study the influence of tectonic processes on the dynamics of gas hydrate systems. Long-offset multi-channel seismic data show that movement along thrust faults and blind thrust faults caused anticlinal ridges on the active margin, while faults are absent on the passive margin. This coincides with high-hydrate saturations derived from ocean bottom seismometer data and controlled source electromagnetic data, and conspicuous high-amplitude reflections in P-Cable 3D seismic data above the BSR in the anticlinal ridges of the active margin. On the contrary, all geophysical evidence for the passive margin points to normal- to low-hydrate saturations. Geochemical analysis of gas samples collected at seep sites on the active margin show methane with heavy δ13C isotope composition, while gas collected on the passive margin shows highly depleted (light) carbon isotope composition. Thus, we interpret the passive margin as a typical gas hydrate province fuelled by biogenic production of methane and the active margin gas hydrate system as a system that is fuelled not only by biogenic gas production but also by additional advection of thermogenic methane from the subduction system. The location of the highest gas hydrate saturations in the hanging wall next to the thrust faults suggests that the thrust faults represent pathways for the migration of methane. Our findings suggest that the most promising gas hydrate occurrences for exploitation of gas hydrate as an energy source may be found in the core of the active margin roll over anticlines immediately above the BSR and that high

  15. Three-dimensional distribution of gas hydrate beneath southern Hydrate Ridge: Constraints from ODP Leg 204

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trehu, A.M.; Long, P.E.; Torres, M.E.; Bohrmann, G.; Rack, F.R.; Collett, T.S.; Goldberg, D.S.; Milkov, A.V.; Riedel, M.; Schultheiss, P.; Bangs, N.L.; Barr, S.R.; Borowski, W.S.; Claypool, G.E.; Delwiche, M.E.; Dickens, G.R.; Gracia, E.; Guerin, G.; Holland, M.; Johnson, J.E.; Lee, Y.-J.; Liu, C.-S.; Su, X.; Teichert, B.; Tomaru, H.; Vanneste, M.; Watanabe, M. E.; Weinberger, J.L.

    2004-01-01

    Large uncertainties about the energy resource potential and role in global climate change of gas hydrates result from uncertainty about how much hydrate is contained in marine sediments. During Leg 204 of the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) to the accretionary complex of the Cascadia subduction zone, we sampled the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) from the seafloor to its base in contrasting geological settings defined by a 3D seismic survey. By integrating results from different methods, including several new techniques developed for Leg 204, we overcome the problem of spatial under-sampling inherent in robust methods traditionally used for estimating the hydrate content of cores and obtain a high-resolution, quantitative estimate of the total amount and spatial variability of gas hydrate in this structural system. We conclude that high gas hydrate content (30-40% of pore space or 20-26% of total volume) is restricted to the upper tens of meters below the seafloor near the summit of the structure, where vigorous fluid venting occurs. Elsewhere, the average gas hydrate content of the sediments in the gas hydrate stability zone is generally <2% of the pore space, although this estimate may increase by a factor of 2 when patchy zones of locally higher gas hydrate content are included in the calculation. These patchy zones are structurally and stratigraphically controlled, contain up to 20% hydrate in the pore space when averaged over zones ???10 m thick, and may occur in up to ???20% of the region imaged by 3D seismic data. This heterogeneous gas hydrate distribution is an important constraint on models of gas hydrate formation in marine sediments and the response of the sediments to tectonic and environmental change. ?? 2004 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. A new geotechnical gas hydrates research laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grozic, J.L.H. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    Gas hydrates encapsulate natural gas molecules in a very compact form, as ice-like compounds composed of water molecules. Permafrost environments and offshore areas contain vast quantities of gas hydrates within soil and rock. This paper describes the role played by gas hydrates in submarine slope instability, their potential as a sustainable energy source, and their effects on global climate change. A new state-of-the-art laboratory located at the University of Calgary, which was developed to study the geomechanical behaviour of gas hydrate-sediment mixtures, was also presented. A specialized high pressure low temperature triaxial apparatus capable of performing a suite of tests on gas hydrate-sediment mixtures is housed in this laboratory. Extensive renovations were required in order to enable the use of methane gas to simulate natural hydrate formation conditions. The laboratory is specifically designed to examine the properties and behaviour of reconstituted gas hydrate-sediment mixtures and natural gas hydrate core samples. 26 refs., 9 figs.

  17. Development of Alaskan gas hydrate resources: Annual report, October 1986--September 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, G.D.; Kamath, V.A.; Godbole, S.P.; Patil, S.L.; Paranjpe, S.G.; Mutalik, P.N.; Nadem, N.

    1987-10-01

    Solid ice-like mixtures of natural gas and water in the form of natural gas hydrated have been found immobilized in the rocks beneath the permafrost in Arctic basins and in muds under the deep water along the American continental margins, in the North Sea and several other locations around the world. It is estimated that the arctic areas of the United States may contain as much as 500 trillion SCF of natural gas in the form of gas hydrates (Lewin and Associates, 1983). While the US Arctic gas hydrate resources may have enormous potential and represent long term future source of natural gas, the recovery of this resource from reservoir frozen with gas hydrates has not been commercialized yet. Continuing study and research is essential to develop technologies which will enable a detailed characterization and assessment of this alternative natural gas resource, so that development of cost effective extraction technology.

  18. Detection of Occupancy Differences in Methane Gas Hydrates by Raman Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne Brunsgaard; Berg, Rolf W.; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2004-01-01

    Gas hydrates are solid crystalline compounds, which grow from micro crystals to bulk masses resembling ordinary slush, snow or ice. Since gas hydrates exist at elevated pressures at temperatures well above the ice point, they can cause severe problems under production and transportation of reserv......Gas hydrates are solid crystalline compounds, which grow from micro crystals to bulk masses resembling ordinary slush, snow or ice. Since gas hydrates exist at elevated pressures at temperatures well above the ice point, they can cause severe problems under production and transportation...... of reservoir fluids due to plugging. Methods to prevent hydrate formation are in use, e.g. by injection of inhibitors. From environmental and security points of view an easy way to detect hydrate formation is of interest. We have tried to detect methane hydrate formation by use of Raman spectroscopy....

  19. 3-D basin-scale reconstruction of natural gas hydrate system of the Green Canyon, Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burwicz, Ewa; Reichel, Thomas; Wallmann, Klaus; Rottke, Wolf; Haeckel, Matthias; Hensen, Christian

    2017-05-01

    Our study presents a basin-scale 3-D modeling solution, quantifying and exploring gas hydrate accumulations in the marine environment around the Green Canyon (GC955) area, Gulf of Mexico. It is the first modeling study that considers the full complexity of gas hydrate formation in a natural geological system. Overall, it comprises a comprehensive basin reconstruction, accounting for depositional and transient thermal history of the basin, source rock maturation, petroleum components generation, expulsion and migration, salt tectonics, and associated multistage fault development. The resulting 3-D gas hydrate distribution in the Green Canyon area is consistent with independent borehole observations. An important mechanism identified in this study and leading to high gas hydrate saturation (>80 vol %) at the base of the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) is the recycling of gas hydrate and free gas enhanced by high Neogene sedimentation rates in the region. Our model predicts the rapid development of secondary intrasalt minibasins situated on top of the allochthonous salt deposits which leads to significant sediment subsidence and an ensuing dislocation of the lower GHSZ boundary. Consequently, large amounts of gas hydrates located in the deepest parts of the basin dissociate and the released free methane gas migrates upward to recharge the GHSZ. In total, we have predicted the gas hydrate budget for the Green Canyon area that amounts to ˜3256 Mt of gas hydrate, which is equivalent to ˜340 Mt of carbon (˜7 × 1011 m3 of CH4 at STP conditions), and consists mostly of biogenic hydrates.

  20. Effect of Submarine Groundwater Discharge on Relict Arctic Submarine Permafrost and Gas Hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, J. M.; Buffett, B. A.

    2014-12-01

    Permafrost-associated gas hydrate deposits exist at shallow depths within the sediments of the circum-Arctic continental shelves. Degradation of this shallow water reservoir has the potential to release large quantities of methane gas directly to the atmosphere. Gas hydrate stability and the permeability of the shelf sediments to gas migration is closely linked with submarine permafrost. Submarine permafrost extent depends on several factors, such as the lithology, sea level variations, mean annual air temperature, ocean bottom water temperature, geothermal heat flux, and the salinity of the pore water. The salinity of the pore water is especially relevant because it partially controls the freezing point for both ice and gas hydrate. Measurements of deep pore water salinity are few and far between, but show that deep off-shore sediments are fresh. Deep freshening has been attributed to large-scale topographically-driven submarine groundwater discharge, which introduces fresh terrestrial groundwater into deep marine sediments. We investigate the role of submarine ground water discharge on the salinity field and its effects on the seaward extent of relict submarine permafrost and gas hydrate stability on the Arctic shelf with a 2D shelf-scale model based on the finite volume method. The model tracks the evolution of the temperature, salinity, and pressure fields given imposed boundary conditions, with latent heat of water ice and hydrate formation included. The permeability structure of the sediments is coupled to changes in permafrost. Results show that pore fluid is strongly influenced by the permeability variations imposed by the overlying permafrost layer. Groundwater discharge tends to travel horizontally off-shore beneath the permafrost layer and the freshwater-saltwater interface location displays long timescale transient behavior that is dependent on the groundwater discharge strength. The seaward permafrost extent is in turn strongly influenced by the

  1. ConocoPhillips Gas Hydrate Production Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoderbek, David; Farrell, Helen; Howard, James; Raterman, Kevin; Silpngarmlert, Suntichai; Martin, Kenneth; Smith, Bruce; Klein, Perry

    2013-06-30

    Work began on the ConocoPhillips Gas Hydrates Production Test (DOE award number DE-NT0006553) on October 1, 2008. This final report summarizes the entire project from January 1, 2011 to June 30, 2013.

  2. Indicators of δ13C and δ18O of gas hydrate-associated sediments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The analyses of δ13C and δ18O of gas hydrate-associated sediments from two cores on Hydrate Ridge in Cascadia convergent margin offshore Oregon, eastern North Pacific show the values of d 13C from -29.81‰ to -48.28‰ (PDB) and d 18O from 2.56‰ to 4.28‰ (PDB), which could be plotted into a group called typical carbonate minerals influenced by the methane in cold venting. Moreover, the values of d 13C and d 18O show a consistent trend in both cores from top to bottom with increasing of d 13C and decreasing of d 18O. This trend could be explained as an effect caused by the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) in depth and the oxygen fraction during the formation of gas hydrate in depth together. These characteristics of d 13C and d 18O indicate that the gas hydrate-associated sediments are significantly different from the normal marine carbonates, and they are deeply influenced by the formation and evolution of gas hydrate. So, the distinct characteristics of d 13C and d 18O of gas hydrate-associated sediments could be undoubtedly believed as one of parameters to determine the presence of gas hydrates in other unknown marine sediment cores.

  3. Scientific Objectives of the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate JIP Leg II Drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, E. (Chevron); Latham, T. (Chevron); McConnell, D. (AOA Geophysics); Frye, M. (Minerals Management Service); Hunt, J. (Minerals Management Service); Shedd, W. (Minerals Management Service); Shelander, D. (Schlumberger); Boswell, R.M. (NETL); Rose, K.K. (NETL); Ruppel, C. (USGS); Hutchinson, D. (USGS); Collett, T. (USGS); Dugan, B. (Rice University); Wood, W. (Naval Research Laboratory)

    2008-05-01

    The Gulf of Mexico Methane Hydrate Joint Industry Project (JIP) has been performing research on marine gas hydrates since 2001 and is sponsored by both the JIP members and the U.S. Department of Energy. In 2005, the JIP drilled the Atwater Valley and Keathley Canyon exploration blocks in the Gulf of Mexico to acquire downhole logs and recover cores in silt- and clay-dominated sediments interpreted to contain gas hydrate based on analysis of existing 3-D seismic data prior to drilling. The new 2007-2009 phase of logging and coring, which is described in this paper, will concentrate on gas hydrate-bearing sands in the Alaminos Canyon, Green Canyon, and Walker Ridge protraction areas. Locations were selected to target higher permeability, coarser-grained lithologies (e.g., sands) that have the potential for hosting high saturations of gas hydrate and to assist the U.S. Minerals Management Service with its assessment of gas hydrate resources in the Gulf of Mexico. This paper discusses the scientific objectives for drilling during the upcoming campaign and presents the results from analyzing existing seismic and well log data as part of the site selection process. Alaminos Canyon 818 has the most complete data set of the selected blocks, with both seismic data and comprehensive downhole log data consistent with the occurrence of gas hydrate-bearing sands. Preliminary analyses suggest that the Frio sandstone just above the base of the gas hydrate stability zone may have up to 80% of the available sediment pore space occupied by gas hydrate. The proposed sites in the Green Canyon and Walker Ridge areas are also interpreted to have gas hydrate-bearing sands near the base of the gas hydrate stability zone, but the choice of specific drill sites is not yet complete. The Green Canyon site coincides with a 4-way closure within a Pleistocene sand unit in an area of strong gas flux just south of the Sigsbee Escarpment. The Walker Ridge site is characterized by a sand

  4. Gas Hydrates Research Programs: An International Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorge Gabitto; Maria Barrufet

    2009-12-09

    Gas hydrates sediments have the potential of providing a huge amount of natural gas for human use. Hydrate sediments have been found in many different regions where the required temperature and pressure conditions have been satisfied. Resource exploitation is related to the safe dissociation of the gas hydrate sediments. Basic depressurization techniques and thermal stimulation processes have been tried in pilot efforts to exploit the resource. There is a growing interest in gas hydrates all over the world due to the inevitable decline of oil and gas reserves. Many different countries are interested in this valuable resource. Unsurprisingly, developed countries with limited energy resources have taken the lead in worldwide gas hydrates research and exploration. The goal of this research project is to collect information in order to record and evaluate the relative strengths and goals of the different gas hydrates programs throughout the world. A thorough literature search about gas hydrates research activities has been conducted. The main participants in the research effort have been identified and summaries of their past and present activities reported. An evaluation section discussing present and future research activities has also been included.

  5. Investigations into surfactant/gas hydrate relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, Rudy; Zhang, Guochang; Dearman, Jennifer; Woods, Charles [Swalm School of Chemical Engineering, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762 (United States)

    2007-03-15

    Gas hydrates have unique physical properties portending useful industrial applications of gas storage, gas separation, or water desalination. When gas hydrates were found in the early 1990s to occur naturally and abundantly in seafloors, three other primary interests and concerns emerged: potential new energy source, climate threat from their greenhouse gases, and seafloor instabilities. This paper presents research showing how anionic synthetic surfactants helped develop an industrial gas hydrate storage process for natural gas and how naturally-occurring in-situ anionic biosurfactants influence the formation and placement of gas hydrates in ocean sediments. The catalytic effects, mechanisms, and surface specificities imparted by synthetic surfactants in the gas storage process and imparted by biosurfactants in porous media are discussed. The Bacillus subtilis bacterium that is indigenous to gas hydrate mounds in the Gulf of Mexico was cultured in the laboratory. Its biosurfactant was separated and found to catalyze gas hydrates in porous media. The experiments indicate that seafloor-biosurfactants can be produced rapidly in-situ to achieve threshold concentrations whereby hydrates are promoted. The biosurfactants accumulate and promote hydrate formation on specific mineral surfaces such as sodium montmorillonite. (author)

  6. CHARACTER ANALYSIS OF THE MARINE GAS HYDRATE STABILITY ZONE%海底天然气水合物稳定带的特征分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方银霞; 黎明碧; 金翔龙; 申屠海港

    2001-01-01

    水合物稳定带(HSZ)控制着海底天然气水合物的成矿作用和分布规律,其厚度及分布范围决定了天然气水合物的蕴藏量,所以水合物稳定带的分析对天然气水合物的成矿与分布规律、成因与演化机制以及资源评价研究具有重要的指导意义。水合物稳定带本身受海底温度、压力和甲烷量等因素的影响,其变化会影响水合物稳定带的范围、稳定带底界的位置,并制约着天然气水合物的稳定性和甲烷气的释放。%Hydrate stability zone(HSZ)controls the deposition and the distribution of marine gas hydrate,and its thickness and distribution range determines the reserves of the marine gas hydrate.So the analysis of hydrate stability zone(HSZ) is useful to the study of the deposition,distribution,genesis,evolving mechanism and the resource evaluation of the marine gas hydrate.This paper systematically introduced the main characters of hydrate stability zone(HSZ),such as its formation,its temperature-pressure characters,and its geologic charactes.The paper also discussed the relationship between hydrate stability zone(HSZ) and hydrate deposition zone,the relationship between the base of hydrate stability zone and the top of free gas,the changes of hydrate stability zone and its influential factors.

  7. Effects of salinity on methane gas hydrate system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG; DingHui; XU; WenYue

    2007-01-01

    Using an approximately analytical formation,we extend the steady state model of the pure methane hydrate system to include the salinity based on the dynamic model of the methane hydrate system.The top and bottom boundaries of the methane hydrate stability zone (MHSZ) and the actual methane hydrate zone (MHZ),and the top of free gas occurrence are determined by using numerical methods and the new steady state model developed in this paper.Numerical results show that the MHZ thickness becomes thinner with increasing the salinity,and the stability is lowered and the base of the MHSZ is shifted toward the seafloor in the presence of salts.As a result,the thickness of actual hydrate occurrence becomes thinner compared with that of the pure water case.On the other hand,since lower solubility reduces the amount of gas needed to form methane hydrate,the existence of salts in seawater can actually promote methane gas hydrate formation in the hydrate stability zone.Numerical modeling also demonstrates that for the salt-water case the presence of methane within the field of methane hydrate stability is not sufficient to ensure the occurrence of gas hydrate,which can only form when the methane concentration dissolved in solution with salts exceeds the local methane solubility in salt water and if the methane flux exceeds a critical value corresponding to the rate of diffusive methane transport.In order to maintain gas hydrate or to form methane gas hydrate in marine sediments,a persistent supplied methane probably from biogenic or thermogenic processes,is required to overcome losses due to diffusion and advection.

  8. Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope: Overview of scientific and technical program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, R.B.; Collett, T.S.; Boswell, R.; Anderson, B.J.; Digert, S.A.; Pospisil, G.; Baker, R.; Weeks, M.

    2011-01-01

    The Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well was drilled within the Alaska North Slope (ANS) Milne Point Unit (MPU) from February 3 to 19, 2007. The well was conducted as part of a Cooperative Research Agreement (CRA) project co-sponsored since 2001 by BP Exploration (Alaska), Inc. (BPXA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to help determine whether ANS gas hydrate can become a technically and commercially viable gas resource. Early in the effort, regional reservoir characterization and reservoir simulation modeling studies indicated that up to 0.34 trillion cubic meters (tcm; 12 trillion cubic feet, tcf) gas may be technically recoverable from 0.92 tcm (33 tcf) gas-in-place within the Eileen gas hydrate accumulation near industry infrastructure within ANS MPU, Prudhoe Bay Unit (PBU), and Kuparuk River Unit (KRU) areas. To further constrain these estimates and to enable the selection of a test site for further data acquisition, the USGS reprocessed and interpreted MPU 3D seismic data provided by BPXA to delineate 14 prospects containing significant highly-saturated gas hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs. The "Mount Elbert" site was selected to drill a stratigraphic test well to acquire a full suite of wireline log, core, and formation pressure test data. Drilling results and data interpretation confirmed pre-drill predictions and thus increased confidence in both the prospect interpretation methods and in the wider ANS gas hydrate resource estimates. The interpreted data from the Mount Elbert well provide insight into and reduce uncertainty of key gas hydrate-bearing reservoir properties, enable further refinement and validation of the numerical simulation of the production potential of both MPU and broader ANS gas hydrate resources, and help determine viability of potential field sites for future extended term production testing. Drilling and data acquisition operations demonstrated that gas hydrate

  9. Pore fluid geochemistry from the Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, M.E.; Collett, T.S.; Rose, K.K.; Sample, J.C.; Agena, W.F.; Rosenbaum, E.J.

    2011-01-01

    The BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well was drilled and cored from 606.5 to 760.1. m on the North Slope of Alaska, to evaluate the occurrence, distribution and formation of gas hydrate in sediments below the base of the ice-bearing permafrost. Both the dissolved chloride and the isotopic composition of the water co-vary in the gas hydrate-bearing zones, consistent with gas hydrate dissociation during core recovery, and they provide independent indicators to constrain the zone of gas hydrate occurrence. Analyses of chloride and water isotope data indicate that an observed increase in salinity towards the top of the cored section reflects the presence of residual fluids from ion exclusion during ice formation at the base of the permafrost layer. These salinity changes are the main factor controlling major and minor ion distributions in the Mount Elbert Well. The resulting background chloride can be simulated with a one-dimensional diffusion model, and the results suggest that the ion exclusion at the top of the cored section reflects deepening of the permafrost layer following the last glaciation (???100 kyr), consistent with published thermal models. Gas hydrate saturation values estimated from dissolved chloride agree with estimates based on logging data when the gas hydrate occupies more than 20% of the pore space; the correlation is less robust at lower saturation values. The highest gas hydrate concentrations at the Mount Elbert Well are clearly associated with coarse-grained sedimentary sections, as expected from theoretical calculations and field observations in marine and other arctic sediment cores. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Site selection for DOE/JIP gas hydrates drilling in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchinson, D.R.; Ruppel, C. [United States Geological Survey, Woods Hole, MA (United States); Shelander, D.; Dai, J. [Schlumberger, Houston, TX (United States); McConnell, D. [AOA Geophysics Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Shedd, W. [Minerals Management Service, New Orleans, LA (United States); Frye, M. [Minerals Management Service, Herndon, VA (United States); Boswell, R.; Rose, K. [United States Dept. of Energy, Morgantown, WV (United States). National Energy Technology Lab; Jones, E.; Latham, T. [Chevron Energy Technology Corp., Houston, TX (United States); Collett, T. [United States Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Dugan, B. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Earth Science; Wood, W. [United States Naval Research Lab, Stennis Space Center, MS (United States)

    2008-07-01

    As drilling operations in the Gulf of Mexico shift from shallow water to deeper water targets, operators are encountering sediments with pressure-temperature regimes for gas hydrate stability. The Chevron-led Joint Industry Project (JIP) on methane hydrates was formed in 2001 to study the hazards associated with drilling these types of hydrate-bearing sediments and to assess the capacity of geological and geophysical tools to predict gas hydrate distributions and concentrations. Selected reservoirs units with high concentrations of gas hydrate were sampled to obtain physical data on hydrate bearing sediments. The JIP work validates methods devised to estimate gas hydrate distribution and concentrations in order to analyze the resource potential of these hydrate-bearing sediments. This paper described the geologic and geophysical setting of 3 sites in the northern Gulf of Mexico that contain hydrate-bearing reservoir sands. The three sites that will undergo exploratory drilling and a logging campaign in late spring 2008 include the Alaminos Canyon (AC) lease block 818, Green Canyon (GC) 955, and Walker Ridge (WR) 313. At the AC818 site, gas hydrate is interpreted to occur within the Oligocene Frio volcaniclastic sand at the crest of a fold that is shallow enough to be in the hydrate stability zone. Drilling at GC955 will sample a faulted, buried Pleistocene channel-levee system characterized with seafloor fluid expulsion features, structural closure associated with uplifted salt, and seismic evidence for upward migration of fluids and gas into the sand-rich parts of the sedimentary section. Drilling at WR313 targets sheet sands and associated channel deposits within a small basin. The potential for gas hydrate occurrence at WR313 is supported by shingled phase reversals consistent with the transition from gas-charged sand to overlying gas-hydrate saturated sand. 39 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  11. Apparatus investigates geological aspects of gas hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, J.S.; Winters, W.J.; Dillon, William P.

    1999-01-01

    The US Geological Survey has developed a laboratory research system which allows the study of the creation and dissociation of gas hydrates under deepwater conditions and with different sediment types and pore fluids. The system called GHASTLI (gas hydrate and sediment test laboratory instrument) comprises a pressure chamber which holds a sediment specimen, and which can simulate water depths to 2,500m and different sediment overburden. Seawater and gas flow through a sediment specimen can be precisely controlled and monitored. It can simulate a wide range of geology and processes and help to improve understanding of gas hydrate processes and aid prediction of geohazards, their control and potential use as an energy source. This article describes GHASTLI and how it is able to simulate natural conditions, focusing on fluid volume, acoustic velocity-compressional and shear wave, electric resistance, temperature, pore pressure, shear strength, and permeability.

  12. Authigenic gypsum found in gas hydrate-associated sediments from Hydrate Ridge, the eastern North Pacific

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Jiasheng; Erwin; Suess; Dirk; Rickert

    2004-01-01

    Characteristic gypsum micro-sphere and granular mass were discovered by binocular microscope in the gas hydrate-associated sediments at cores SO143-221 and SO143/TVG40-2A respectively on Hydrate Ridge of Cascadia margin, the eastern North Pacific. XRD patterns and EPA analyses show both micro-sphere and granular mass of the crystals have the typical peaks and the typical main chemical compositions of gypsum, although their weight percents are slightly less than the others in the non-gas hydrate-associated marine regions. SEM pictures show that the gypsum crystals have clear crystal boundaries, planes, edges and cleavages of gypsum in form either of single crystal or of twin crystals. In view of the fact that there are meanwhile gas hydrate-associated authigenic carbonates and SO42(-rich pore water in the same sediment cores, it could be inferred reasonably that the gypsums formed also authigenically in the gas hydrate-associated environment too, most probably at the interface between the downward advecting sulfate-rich seawater and the below gas hydrate, which spilled calcium during its formation on Hydrate Ridge. The two distinct forms of crystal intergrowth, which are the granular mass of series single gypsum crystals at core SO143/TVG40-2A and the microsphere of gypsum crystals accompanied with detrital components at core SO143-221 respectively, indicate that they precipitated most likely in different interstitial water dynamic environments. So, the distinct authigenic gypsums found in gas hydrate-associated sediments on Hydrate Ridge could also be believed as one of the parameters which could be used to indicate the presence of gas hydrate in an unknown marine sediment cores.

  13. Prediction of Refrigerant Gas Hydrates Formation Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deqing Liang; Ruzhu Wang; Kaihua Guo; Shuanshi Fan

    2001-01-01

    A fugacity model was developed for prediction of mixed refrigerant gas hydrates formation conditions based on the molecule congregation and solution theories. In this model, g as hydrates were regarded as non-ideal solid solution composed of water groups and guest molecules, and the expressions of fugacity of guest molecules in hydrate phase was proposed accordingly. It has been shown that the developed model can indicate successfully the effect of guest-guest molecule interaction. The results showed that the model can describe better the characteristics of phase equilibrium of mixed refrigerant gas hydrates and predictions are in good agreement with experimental data.

  14. Study on gas hydrate as a new energy resource in the 21th century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Byeong-Jae; Kwak Young-Hoon; Kim, Won-Sik [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (KR)] (and others)

    1999-12-01

    Natural gas hydrate, a special type of clathrate hydrates, is a metastable solid compound which mainly consists of methane and water, and generally called as gas hydrate. It is stable in the specific low-temperature/high-pressure conditions. Gas hydrates play an important role as major reservoir of methane on the earth. On the other hand, the formation and dissociation of gas hydrates could cause the plugging in pipeline, gas kick during production, atmospheric pollution and geohazard. To understand the formation and dissociation of the gas hydrate, the experimental equilibrium conditions of methane hydrate were measured in pure water, 3 wt.% NaCl and MgCl{sub 2} solutions. The equilibrium conditions of propane hydrates were also measured in pure water. The relationship between methane hydrate formation time and overpressure was also analyzed through the laboratory work. The geophysical surveys using air-gun system and multibeam echo sounder were implemented to develop exploration techniques and to evaluate the gas hydrate potential in the East Sea, Korea. General indicators of submarine gas hydrates on seismic data is commonly inferred from the BSR developed parallel to the see floor, amplitude blanking at the upper part of the BSR, and phase reversal and decrease of the interval velocity at BSR. The field data were processed using Geobit 2.9.5 developed by KIGAM to detect the gas hydrate indicators. The accurate velocity analysis was performed by XVA (X-window based Velocity Analysis). Processing results show that the strong reflector occurred parallel to the sea floor were shown at about 1800 ms two way travel time. The interval velocity decrease at this strong reflector and at the reflection phase reversal corresponding to the reflection at the sea floor. Gas hydrate stability field in the study area was determined using the data of measured hydrate equilibrium condition, hydrothermal gradient and geothermal gradient. The depth of BSR detected in the seismic

  15. Effect of permafrost properties on gas hydrate petroleum system in the Qilian Mountains, Qinghai, Northwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pingkang; Zhang, Xuhui; Zhu, Youhai; Li, Bing; Huang, Xia; Pang, Shouji; Zhang, Shuai; Lu, Cheng; Xiao, Rui

    2014-12-01

    The gas hydrate petroleum system in the permafrost of the Qilian Mountains, which exists as an epigenetic hydrocarbon reservoir above a deep-seated hydrocarbon reservoir, has been dynamic since the end of the Late Pleistocene because of climate change. The permafrost limits the occurrence of gas hydrate reservoirs by changing the pressure-temperature (P-T) conditions, and it affects the migration of the underlying hydrocarbon gas because of its strong sealing ability. In this study, we reconstructed the permafrost structure of the Qilian Mountains using a combination of methods and measured methane permeability in ice-bearing sediment permafrost. A relationship between the ice saturation of permafrost and methane permeability was established, which permitted the quantitative evaluation of the sealing ability of permafrost with regard to methane migration. The test results showed that when ice saturation is >80%, methane gas can be completely sealed within the permafrost. Based on the permafrost properties and genesis of shallow gas, we suggest that a shallow "gas pool" occurred in the gas hydrate petroleum system in the Qilian Mountains. Its formation was related to a metastable gas hydrate reservoir controlled by the P-T conditions, sealing ability of the permafrost, fault system, and climatic warming. From an energy perspective, the increasing volume of the gas pool means that it will likely become a shallow gas resource available for exploitation; however, for the environment, the gas pool is an underground "time bomb" that is a potential source of greenhouse gas.

  16. Natural gas hydrate formation and inhibition in gas/crude oil/aqueous systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daraboina, Nagu; Pachitsas, Stylianos; von Solms, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Gas hydrate formation in multi phase mixtures containing an aqueous phase (with dissolved salts), reservoir fluid (crude oil) and natural gas phase was investigated by using a standard rocking cell (RC-5) apparatus. The hydrate formation temperature was reduced in the presence of crude oils...... of the biodegradable commercial kinetic inhibitor (Luvicap-Bio) on natural gas hydrate formation with and without crude oil (30%) was investigated. The strength of kinetic inhibitor was not affected by salts, but decreased significantly in the presence of crude oil. Data for hydrate formation at practical conditions...... can contribute to the safe operation of sub sea pipelines in the oil and gas industry....

  17. Foam drilling in natural gas hydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Na

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The key problem of foam drilling in natural gas hydrate is prediction of characteristic parameters of bottom hole. The simulation shows that when the well depth increases, the foam mass number reduces and the pressure increases. At the same depth, pressure in drill string is always higher than annulus. The research findings provide theoretical basis for safety control.

  18. RESOURCE CHARACTERIZATION AND QUANTIFICATION OF NATURAL GAS-HYDRATE AND ASSOCIATED FREE-GAS ACCUMULATIONS IN THE PRUDHOE BAY - KUPARUK RIVER AREA ON THE NORTH SLOPE OF ALASKA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Hunter; Shirish Patil; Robert Casavant; Tim Collett

    2003-06-02

    Interim results are presented from the project designed to characterize, quantify, and determine the commercial feasibility of Alaska North Slope (ANS) gas-hydrate and associated free-gas resources in the Prudhoe Bay Unit (PBU), Kuparuk River Unit (KRU), and Milne Point Unit (MPU) areas. This collaborative research will provide practical input to reservoir and economic models, determine the technical feasibility of gas hydrate production, and influence future exploration and field extension of this potential ANS resource. The large magnitude of unconventional in-place gas (40-100 TCF) and conventional ANS gas commercialization evaluation creates industry-DOE alignment to assess this potential resource. This region uniquely combines known gas hydrate presence and existing production infrastructure. Many technical, economical, environmental, and safety issues require resolution before enabling gas hydrate commercial production. Gas hydrate energy resource potential has been studied for nearly three decades. However, this knowledge has not been applied to practical ANS gas hydrate resource development. ANS gas hydrate and associated free gas reservoirs are being studied to determine reservoir extent, stratigraphy, structure, continuity, quality, variability, and geophysical and petrophysical property distribution. Phase 1 will characterize reservoirs, lead to recoverable reserve and commercial potential estimates, and define procedures for gas hydrate drilling, data acquisition, completion, and production. Phases 2 and 3 will integrate well, core, log, and long-term production test data from additional wells, if justified by results from prior phases. The project could lead to future ANS gas hydrate pilot development. This project will help solve technical and economic issues to enable government and industry to make informed decisions regarding future commercialization of unconventional gas-hydrate resources.

  19. Characterization of gas hydrate distribution using conventional 3D seismic data in the Pearl River Mouth Basin, South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiujuan; Qiang, Jin; Collett, Timothy S.; Shi, Hesheng; Yang, Shengxiong; Yan, Chengzhi; Li, Yuanping; Wang, Zhenzhen; Chen, Duanxin

    2016-01-01

    A new 3D seismic reflection data volume acquired in 2012 has allowed for the detailed mapping and characterization of gas hydrate distribution in the Pearl River Mouth Basin in the South China Sea. Previous studies of core and logging data showed that gas hydrate occurrence at high concentrations is controlled by the presence of relatively coarse-grained sediment and the upward migration of thermogenic gas from the deeper sediment section into the overlying gas hydrate stability zone (BGHSZ); however, the spatial distribution of the gas hydrate remains poorly defined. We used a constrained sparse spike inversion technique to generate acoustic-impedance images of the hydrate-bearing sedimentary section from the newly acquired 3D seismic data volume. High-amplitude reflections just above the bottom-simulating reflectors (BSRs) were interpreted to be associated with the accumulation of gas hydrate with elevated saturations. Enhanced seismic reflections below the BSRs were interpreted to indicate the presence of free gas. The base of the BGHSZ was established using the occurrence of BSRs. In areas absent of well-developed BSRs, the BGHSZ was calculated from a model using the inverted P-wave velocity and subsurface temperature data. Seismic attributes were also extracted along the BGHSZ that indicate variations reservoir properties and inferred hydrocarbon accumulations at each site. Gas hydrate saturations estimated from the inversion of acoustic impedance of conventional 3D seismic data, along with well-log-derived rock-physics models were also used to estimate gas hydrate saturations. Our analysis determined that the gas hydrate petroleum system varies significantly across the Pearl River Mouth Basin and that variability in sedimentary properties as a product of depositional processes and the upward migration of gas from deeper thermogenic sources control the distribution of gas hydrates in this basin.

  20. Numerical Simulation of the Depressurization Process of a Natural Gas Hydrate Reservoir: An Attempt at Optimization of Field Operational Factors with Multiple Wells in a Real 3D Geological Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhixue Sun

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Natural gas hydrates, crystalline solids whose gas molecules are so compressed that they are denser than a typical fluid hydrocarbon, have extensive applications in the areas of climate change and the energy crisis. The hydrate deposit located in the Shenhu Area on the continental slope of the South China Sea is regarded as the most promising target for gas hydrate exploration in China. Samples taken at drilling site SH2 have indicated a high abundance of methane hydrate reserves in clay sediments. In the last few decades, with its relatively low energy cost, the depressurization gas recovery method has been generally regarded as technically feasible and the most promising one. For the purpose of a better acquaintance with the feasible field operational factors and processes which control the production behavior of a real 3D geological CH4-hydrate deposit, it is urgent to figure out the effects of the parameters such as well type, well spacing, bottom hole pressure, and perforation intervals on methane recovery. One years’ numerical simulation results show that under the condition of 3000 kPa constant bottom hole pressure, 1000 m well spacing, perforation in higher intervals and with one horizontal well, the daily peak gas rate can reach 4325.02 m3 and the cumulative gas volume is 1.291 × 106 m3. What’s more, some new knowledge and its explanation of the curve tendency and evolution for the production process are provided. Technically, one factor at a time design (OFAT and an orthogonal design were used in the simulation to investigate which factors dominate the productivity ability and which is the most sensitive one. The results indicated that the order of effects of the factors on gas yield was perforation interval > bottom hole pressure > well spacing.

  1. 墨西哥湾天然气水合物油气系统%The Natural Gas Hydrate Petroleum System in the Gulf of Mexico

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏明; 乔少华; 魏伟; 张金华; 杨睿; 吴能友; 丛晓荣

    2013-01-01

    Since 1980, natural gas hydrate research in the Gulf of Mexico underwent three stages, gas hydrate discovery, gas hydrate research in the shallow layers, and gas hydrate exploration. Especially the“Joint Industry Project”conducted from 2005, providing numerous geological, geophysical and geochemical data, which would make the Gulf of Mexico being the forefront area in marine gas hydrate research. Based on integrated investigation, summarizing and comparison of these data, this study preferred to use the concept and method of gas hydrate petroleum system to describe gas hydrate stability conditions, gas composition and source, favorable sedimentary units, and gas/fluid migration pathways. The results showed that, the temperature and pressure conditions in the continental slope of the Gulf of Mexico were suitable for the formation of gas hydrate. Both thermogenic and biogenic gas could be regarded as the source in this area. The deep-water sedimentary units, including channel, levee, mass transport complex, and so on, could be served as the potential reservoirs and accumulation spaces for gas hydrate. Besides, salt diapirism, fault, tilted strata and fracture network could afford the pathways for gas/fluid migration. Through the practical application in the Gulf of Mexico, the gas hydrate petroleum system was considered as a comprehensive and systematic idea not only because of the regard on physical conditions, but also due to the emphasize on actual geological setting, causing itself to be a rapid assessment method for marine gas hydrate. However, for the description of hydrate-bearing units and analyses on the heterogeneous distribution of gas hydrate, detailed dissection on deep-water sedimentary system and fluid migration would be the focuses. Therefore, combination with the identification marks of gas hydrate, distribution of favorable sedimentary units, and gas/fluid migration pathways, would be the objective of marine hydrate exploration in the future

  2. Geochemical Monitoring Of The Gas Hydrate Production By CO2/CH4 Exchange In The Ignik Sikumi Gas Hydrate Production Test Well, Alaska North Slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenson, T. D.; Collett, T. S.; Ignik Sikumi, S.

    2012-12-01

    Hydrocarbon gases, nitrogen, carbon dioxide and water were collected from production streams at the Ignik Sikumi gas hydrate production test well (TD, 791.6 m), drilled on the Alaska North Slope. The well was drilled to test the feasibility of producing methane by carbon dioxide injection that replaces methane in the solid gas hydrate. The Ignik Sikumi well penetrated a stratigraphically-bounded prospect within the Eileen gas hydrate accumulation. Regionally, the Eileen gas hydrate accumulation overlies the more deeply buried Prudhoe Bay, Milne Point, and Kuparuk River oil fields and is restricted to the up-dip portion of a series of nearshore deltaic sandstone reservoirs in the Sagavanirktok Formation. Hydrate-bearing sandstones penetrated by Ignik Sikumi well occur in three primary horizons; an upper zone, ("E" sand, 579.7 - 597.4 m) containing 17.7 meters of gas hydrate-bearing sands, a middle zone ("D" sand, 628.2 - 648.6 m) with 20.4 m of gas hydrate-bearing sands and a lower zone ("C" sand, 678.8 - 710.8 m), containing 32 m of gas hydrate-bearing sands with neutron porosity log-interpreted average gas hydrate saturations of 58, 76 and 81% respectively. A known volume mixture of 77% nitrogen and 23% carbon dioxide was injected into an isolated section of the upper part of the "C" sand to start the test. Production flow-back part of the test occurred in three stages each followed by a period of shut-in: (1) unassisted flowback; (2) pumping above native methane gas hydrate stability conditions; and (3) pumping below the native methane gas hydrate stability conditions. Methane production occurred immediately after commencing unassisted flowback. Methane concentration increased from 0 to 40% while nitrogen and carbon dioxide concentrations decreased to 48 and 12% respectively. Pumping above the hydrate stability phase boundary produced gas with a methane concentration climbing above 80% while the carbon dioxide and nitrogen concentrations fell to 2 and 18

  3. Development of Alaskan gas hydrate resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamath, V.A.; Sharma, G.D.; Patil, S.L.

    1991-06-01

    The research undertaken in this project pertains to study of various techniques for production of natural gas from Alaskan gas hydrates such as, depressurization, injection of hot water, steam, brine, methanol and ethylene glycol solutions through experimental investigation of decomposition characteristics of hydrate cores. An experimental study has been conducted to measure the effective gas permeability changes as hydrates form in the sandpack and the results have been used to determine the reduction in the effective gas permeability of the sandpack as a function of hydrate saturation. A user friendly, interactive, menu-driven, numerical difference simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of natural gas hydrates in porous media with variable thermal properties. A numerical, finite element simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of hydrates during hot water injection process.

  4. Formulating formation mechanism of natural gas hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palodkar, Avinash V; Jana, Amiya K

    2017-07-25

    A large amount of energy, perhaps twice the total amount of all other hydrocarbon reserves combined, is trapped within gas hydrate deposits. Despite emerging as a potential energy source for the world over the next several hundred years and one of the key factors in causing future climate change, gas hydrate is poorly known in terms of its formation mechanism. To address this issue, a mathematical formulation is proposed in the form of a model to represent the physical insight into the process of hydrate growth that occurs on the surface and in the irregular nanometer-sized pores of the distributed porous particles. To evaluate the versatility of this rigorous model, the experimental data is used for methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) hydrates grown in different porous media with a wide range of considerations.

  5. Controls on Gas Hydrate Formation and Dissociation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miriam Kastner; Ian MacDonald

    2006-03-03

    The main objectives of the project were to monitor, characterize, and quantify in situ the rates of formation and dissociation of methane hydrates at and near the seafloor in the northern Gulf of Mexico, with a focus on the Bush Hill seafloor hydrate mound; to record the linkages between physical and chemical parameters of the deposits over the course of one year, by emphasizing the response of the hydrate mound to temperature and chemical perturbations; and to document the seafloor and water column environmental impacts of hydrate formation and dissociation. For these, monitoring the dynamics of gas hydrate formation and dissociation was required. The objectives were achieved by an integrated field and laboratory scientific study, particularly by monitoring in situ formation and dissociation of the outcropping gas hydrate mound and of the associated gas-rich sediments. In addition to monitoring with the MOSQUITOs, fluid flow rates and temperature, continuously sampling in situ pore fluids for the chemistry, and imaging the hydrate mound, pore fluids from cores, peepers and gas hydrate samples from the mound were as well sampled and analyzed for chemical and isotopic compositions. In order to determine the impact of gas hydrate dissociation and/or methane venting across the seafloor on the ocean and atmosphere, the overlying seawater was sampled and thoroughly analyzed chemically and for methane C isotope ratios. At Bush hill the pore fluid chemistry varies significantly over short distances as well as within some of the specific sites monitored for 440 days, and gas venting is primarily focused. The pore fluid chemistry in the tub-warm and mussel shell fields clearly documented active gas hydrate and authigenic carbonate formation during the monitoring period. The advecting fluid is depleted in sulfate, Ca Mg, and Sr and is rich in methane; at the main vent sites the fluid is methane supersaturated, thus bubble plumes form. The subsurface hydrology exhibits both

  6. Gas hydrate of Lake Baikal: Discovery and varieties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khlystov, Oleg; De Batist, Marc; Shoji, Hitoshi; Hachikubo, Akihiro; Nishio, Shinya; Naudts, Lieven; Poort, Jeffrey; Khabuev, Andrey; Belousov, Oleg; Manakov, Andrey; Kalmychkov, Gennаdy

    2013-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of recent gas-hydrate studies in Lake Baikal, the only fresh-water lake in the world containing gas hydrates in its sedimentary infill. We provide a historical overview of the different investigations and discoveries and highlight some recent breakthroughs in our understanding of the Baikal hydrate system. So far, 21 sites of gas hydrate occurrence have been discovered. Gas hydrates are of structures I and II, which are of thermogenic, microbial, and mixed origin. At the 15 sites, gas hydrates were found in mud volcanoes, and the rest six - near gas discharges. Additionally, depending on type of discharge and gas hydrate structure, they were visually different. Investigations using MIR submersibles allowed finding of gas hydrates at the bottom surface of Lake Baikal at the three sites.

  7. Gas hydrates forming and decomposition conditions analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. М. Павленко

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The concept of gas hydrates has been defined; their brief description has been given; factors that affect the formation and decomposition of the hydrates have been reported; their distribution, structure and thermodynamic conditions determining the gas hydrates formation disposition in gas pipelines have been considered. Advantages and disadvantages of the known methods for removing gas hydrate plugs in the pipeline have been analyzed, the necessity of their further studies has been proved. In addition to the negative impact on the process of gas extraction, the hydrates properties make it possible to outline the following possible fields of their industrial use: obtaining ultrahigh pressures in confined spaces at the hydrate decomposition; separating hydrocarbon mixtures by successive transfer of individual components through the hydrate given the mode; obtaining cold due to heat absorption at the hydrate decomposition; elimination of the open gas fountain by means of hydrate plugs in the bore hole of the gushing gasser; seawater desalination, based on the hydrate ability to only bind water molecules into the solid state; wastewater purification; gas storage in the hydrate state; dispersion of high temperature fog and clouds by means of hydrates; water-hydrates emulsion injection into the productive strata to raise the oil recovery factor; obtaining cold in the gas processing to cool the gas, etc.

  8. Anomalous porosity preservation and preferential accumulation of gas hydrate in the Andaman accretionary wedge, NGHP-01 site 17A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, Kelly K.; Johnson, Joel E.; Torres, Marta E.; Hong, WeiLi; Giosan, Liviu; Solomon, E.; Kastner, Miriam; Cawthern, Thomas; Long, Philip E.; Schaef, Herbert T.

    2014-12-01

    In addition to well established properties that control the presence or absence of the hydrate stability zone, such as pressure, temperature, and salinity, additional parameters appear to influence the concentration of gas hydrate in host sediments. The stratigraphic record at Site 17A in the Andaman Sea, eastern Indian Ocean, illustrates the need to better understand the role pore-scale phenomena play in the distribution and presence of marine gas hydrates in a variety of subsurface settings. In this paper we integrate field-generated datasets with newly acquired sedimentology, physical property, imaging and geochemical data with mineral saturation and ion activity products of key mineral phases such as amorphous silica and calcite, to document the presence and nature of secondary precipitates that contributed to anomalous porosity preservation at Site 17A in the Andaman Sea. This study demonstrates the importance of grain-scale subsurface heterogeneities in controlling the occurrence and distribution of concentrated gas hydrate accumulations in marine sediments, and document the importance that increased permeability and enhanced porosity play in supporting gas concentrations sufficient to support gas hydrate formation. The grain scale relationships between porosity, permeability, and gas hydrate saturation documented at Site 17A likely offer insights into what may control the occurrence and distribution of gas hydrate in other sedimentary settings.

  9. Effect of microwave on formation/decomposition of natural gas hydrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG DeQing; HE Song; LI DongLiang

    2009-01-01

    Natural gas hydrate (NGH) reservoirs have been considered as a substantial future clean energy resource and how to recover gas from these reservoirs feasibly and economically is very important. Microwave heating will be taken as a promising method for gas production from gas hydrates for its advantages of fast heat transfer and flexible application. In this work, we investigate the formation /decomposition behavior of natural gas hydrate with different power of microwave (2450MHZ), preliminarily analyze the impact of microwave on phase equilibrium of gas hydrate, and make calculation based on van der Waals-Platteeuw model. It is found that microwave of a certain amount of power can reduce the induction time and sub-cooling degree of NGH formation, e.g., 20W microwave power can lead to a decrease of about 3℃ in sub-cooling degree and the shortening of induction time from 4.5hours to 1.3 hours. Microwave can make rapid NGH decomposition, and water from NGH decomposition accelerates the decomposition of NGH with the decomposition of NGH. Under the same pressure,microwave can increase NGH phase equilibrium temperature. Different dielectric properties of each composition of NGH may cause a distinct difference in temperature in the process of NGH decomposition. Therefore, NGH decomposition by microwave can be affected by many factors.

  10. A review and assessment of gas hydrate potential in Çınarcık Basin, Sea of Marmara

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sile, Hande; Akin, Cansu; Ucarkus, Gulsen; Namik Cagatay, M.

    2016-04-01

    The Sea of Marmara (NW Turkey), an intracontinental sea between the Mediterranean and Black Seas, is located in a tectonically active region with the formation of shallow gas hydrates and free gas. It is widely known that, Sea of Marmara sediments are organic-rich and conducive to production of methane, which is released on the sea floor through active fault segments of the North Anatolian Fault (Geli et al., 2008). Here we study the gas hydrate potential of the Çınarcık Basin using published data and our core analyses together with gas hydrate stability relations. The gas sampled in the Çınarcık Basin is composed mainly of biogenic methane and trace amounts of heavier hydrocarbons (Bourry et al., 2009). The seafloor at 1273 m depth on the Çınarcık Basin with temperature of 14.5oC and hydrostatic pressure of 127.3 atm corresponds to the physical limit for gas hydrate formation with respect to phase behavior of gas hydrates in marine sediments (Ménot and Bard, 2010). In order to calculate the base of the gas hydrate stability zone in Çınarcık Basin, we plotted T (oC) calculated considering the geothermal gradient versus P (atm) on the phase boundary diagram. Below the seafloor, in addition to hydrostatic pressure (10 Mpa/km), we calculated lithostatic pressure due to sediment thickness considering the MSCL gamma ray density values (~1.7 gr/cm3). Our estimations show that, gas hydrate could be stable in the upper ~20 m of sedimentary succession in Çınarcık Basin. The amount of gas hydrate in the Çınarcık Basin can be determined using the basinal area below 1220 m depth (483 km2) and average thickness of the gas hydrate stability zone (20 m) and the sediment gas hydrate saturation (1.2 % used as Milkov, 2004 suggested). The calculations indicate the potential volume of gas hydrate in Çınarcık Basin as ~11.6x107 m3. Such estimates are helpful for the consideration of gas hydrates as a new energy resource, for assessment of geohazards or their

  11. Geologic implications of gas hydrates in the offshore of India: results of the National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition 01

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy S.; Boswell, Ray; Cochran, J.R.; Kumar, Pushpendra; Lall, Malcolm; Mazumdar, Aninda; Ramana, Mangipudi Venkata; Ramprasad, Tammisetti; Riedel, Michael; Sain, Kalachand; Sathe, Arun Vasant; Vishwanath, Krishna

    2014-01-01

    The Indian National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition 01 (NGHP-01) is designed to study the occurrence of gas hydrate along the passive continental margin of the Indian Peninsula and in the Andaman convergent margin, with special emphasis on understanding the geologic and geochemical controls on the occurrence of gas hydrate in these two diverse settings. The NGHP-01 expedition established the presence of gas hydrates in the Krishna-Godavari and Mahanadi Basins, and the Andaman Sea. The expedition discovered in the Krishna-Godavari Basin one of the thickest gas hydrate accumulations ever documented, in the Andaman Sea one of the thickest and deepest gas hydrate stability zones in the world, and established the existence of a fully developed gas hydrate petroleum system in all three basins.

  12. Challenges, uncertainties and issues facing gas production from gas hydrate deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moridis, G.J.; Collett, T.S.; Pooladi-Darvish, M.; Hancock, S.; Santamarina, C.; Boswell, R.; Kneafsey, T.; Rutqvist, J.; Kowalsky, M.; Reagan, M.T.; Sloan, E.D.; Sum, A.K.; Koh, C.

    2010-11-01

    The current paper complements the Moridis et al. (2009) review of the status of the effort toward commercial gas production from hydrates. We aim to describe the concept of the gas hydrate petroleum system, to discuss advances, requirement and suggested practices in gas hydrate (GH) prospecting and GH deposit characterization, and to review the associated technical, economic and environmental challenges and uncertainties, including: the accurate assessment of producible fractions of the GH resource, the development of methodologies for identifying suitable production targets, the sampling of hydrate-bearing sediments and sample analysis, the analysis and interpretation of geophysical surveys of GH reservoirs, well testing methods and interpretation of the results, geomechanical and reservoir/well stability concerns, well design, operation and installation, field operations and extending production beyond sand-dominated GH reservoirs, monitoring production and geomechanical stability, laboratory investigations, fundamental knowledge of hydrate behavior, the economics of commercial gas production from hydrates, and the associated environmental concerns.

  13. Global Assessment of Methane Gas Hydrates: Outreach for the public and policy makers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudoin, Yannick

    2010-05-01

    The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), via its official collaborating center in Norway, GRID-Arendal, is in the process of implementing a Global Assessment of Methane Gas Hydrates. Global reservoirs of methane gas have long been the topic of scientific discussion both in the realm of environmental issues such as natural forces of climate change and as a potential energy resource for economic development. Of particular interest are the volumes of methane locked away in frozen molecules known as clathrates or hydrates. Our rapidly evolving scientific knowledge and technological development related to methane hydrates makes these formations increasingly prospective to economic development. In addition, global demand for energy continues, and will continue to outpace supply for the foreseeable future, resulting in pressure to expand development activities, with associated concerns about environmental and social impacts. Understanding the intricate links between methane hydrates and 1) natural and anthropogenic contributions to climate change, 2) their role in the carbon cycle (e.g. ocean chemistry) and 3) the environmental and socio-economic impacts of extraction, are key factors in making good decisions that promote sustainable development. As policy makers, environmental organizations and private sector interests seek to forward their respective agendas which tend to be weighted towards applied research, there is a clear and imminent need for a an authoritative source of accessible information on various topics related to methane gas hydrates. The 2008 United Nations Environment Programme Annual Report highlighted methane from the Arctic as an emerging challenge with respect to climate change and other environmental issues. Building upon this foundation, UNEP/GRID-Arendal, in conjunction with experts from national hydrates research groups from Canada, the US, Japan, Germany, Norway, India and Korea, aims to provide a multi-thematic overview of the key

  14. Mathematical Model and Simulation of Gas Hydrate Reservoir Decomposition by Depressurization Modèle mathématique et simulation de dépressurisation et de décompression d’un réservoir d’hydrates de méthane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao J.

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The numerical model for the depressurization of methane hydrates in a confined reservoir is presented based on mass conservation in porous media, incorporating multiphase flow theory and kinetics of gas hydrate dissociation. The universal implicit difference method is adopted, and the corresponding computer program is developed. During the production of the hydrate reservoir, distribution and the physical changes are analyzed and the gas hydrate dissociation and gas production law are studied from the computation. A numerical simulation shows that the reservoir pressure is descending slowly, which benefits the stabilization of the reservoir and inevitably decreases the efficiency in the production of gas hydrates in the depressurizing process. The gas production rate is controlled by the well pressure. The results are presented to show how this model may be used to estimate a lower downhole pressure of the well for hydrate recovery and how these results depend on reservoir and hydrate properties. Le modèle numérique présenté ici simule la dépressurisation d’hydrates de méthane dans un réservoir confiné; il se base sur le principe de conservation de la masse en milieu poreux, en intégrant la théorie de l’écoulement polyphasique et la cinétique de dissociation des hydrates de méthane. La méthode implicite et universelle des différences finies est utilisée et le programme informatique qui s’y rapporte est développé. Lors de l’exploitation du réservoir d’hydrates de méthane, la répartition et les changements physiques sont analysés et les lois sur la dissociation des hydrates de méthane et la production de gaz sont étudiées à partir des calculs. Une simulation numérique montre que la pression dans le réservoir diminue lentement, ce qui permet au réservoir de se stabiliser et diminue inévitablement le rendement de l’exploitation d’hydrates de méthane lors du processus de dépressurisation. Le rythme de

  15. Focus on the Development of Natural Gas Hydrate in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongfu Tan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Natural gas hydrate, also known as combustible ice, and mainly composed of methane, is identified as a potential clean energy for the 21st century. Due to its large reserves, gas hydrate can ease problems caused by energy resource shortage and has gained attention around the world. In this paper, we focus on the exploration and development of gas hydrate as well as discussing its status and future development trend in China and abroad. We then analyze its opportunities and challenges in China from four aspects, resource, technology, economy and policy, with five forces model and Politics Economics Society Technology method. The results show China has abundance gas hydrate resource; however, backward technologies and inadequate investment have seriously hindered the future development of gas hydrate; thus, China should establish relevant cooperation framework and intuitional arrangement to attract more investment as well as breaking through technical difficulties to commercialization gas hydrate as soon as possible.

  16. In-situ Micro-structural Studies of Gas Hydrate Formation in Sedimentary Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhs, Werner F.; Chaouachi, Marwen; Falenty, Andrzej; Sell, Kathleen; Schwarz, Jens-Oliver; Wolf, Martin; Enzmann, Frieder; Kersten, Michael; Haberthür, David

    2015-04-01

    The formation process of gas hydrates in sedimentary matrices is of crucial importance for the physical and transport properties of the resulting aggregates. This process has never been observed in-situ with sub-micron resolution. Here, we report on synchrotron-based micro-tomographic studies by which the nucleation and growth processes of gas hydrate were observed in different sedimentary matrices (natural quartz, glass beds with different surface properties, with and without admixtures of kaolinite and montmorillonite) at varying water saturation. The nucleation sites can be easily identified and the growth pattern is clearly established. In under-saturated sediments the nucleation starts at the water-gas interface and proceeds from there to form predominantly isometric single crystals of 10-20μm size. Using a newly developed synchrotron-based method we have determined the crystallite size distributions (CSD) of the gas hydrate in the sedimentary matrix confirming in a quantitative and statistically relevant manner the impressions from the tomographic reconstructions. It is noteworthy that the CSDs from synthetic hydrates are distinctly smaller than those of natural gas hydrates [1], which suggest that coarsening processes take place in the sedimentary matrix after the initial hydrate formation. Understanding the processes of formation and coarsening may eventually permit the determination of the age of gas hydrates in sedimentary matrices [2], which are largely unknown at present. Furthermore, the full micro-structural picture and its evolution will enable quantitative digital rock physics modeling to reveal poroelastic properties and in this way to support the exploration and exploitation of gas hydrate resources in the future. [1] Klapp S.A., Hemes S., Klein H., Bohrmann G., McDonald I., Kuhs W.F. Grain size measurements of natural gas hydrates. Marine Geology 2010; 274(1-4):85-94. [2] Klapp S.A., Klein H, Kuhs W.F. First determination of gas hydrate

  17. Gas Hydrate Storage of Natural Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudy Rogers; John Etheridge

    2006-03-31

    Environmental and economic benefits could accrue from a safe, above-ground, natural-gas storage process allowing electric power plants to utilize natural gas for peak load demands; numerous other applications of a gas storage process exist. A laboratory study conducted in 1999 to determine the feasibility of a gas-hydrates storage process looked promising. The subsequent scale-up of the process was designed to preserve important features of the laboratory apparatus: (1) symmetry of hydrate accumulation, (2) favorable surface area to volume ratio, (3) heat exchanger surfaces serving as hydrate adsorption surfaces, (4) refrigeration system to remove heat liberated from bulk hydrate formation, (5) rapid hydrate formation in a non-stirred system, (6) hydrate self-packing, and (7) heat-exchanger/adsorption plates serving dual purposes to add or extract energy for hydrate formation or decomposition. The hydrate formation/storage/decomposition Proof-of-Concept (POC) pressure vessel and supporting equipment were designed, constructed, and tested. This final report details the design of the scaled POC gas-hydrate storage process, some comments on its fabrication and installation, checkout of the equipment, procedures for conducting the experimental tests, and the test results. The design, construction, and installation of the equipment were on budget target, as was the tests that were subsequently conducted. The budget proposed was met. The primary goal of storing 5000-scf of natural gas in the gas hydrates was exceeded in the final test, as 5289-scf of gas storage was achieved in 54.33 hours. After this 54.33-hour period, as pressure in the formation vessel declined, additional gas went into the hydrates until equilibrium pressure/temperature was reached, so that ultimately more than the 5289-scf storage was achieved. The time required to store the 5000-scf (48.1 hours of operating time) was longer than designed. The lower gas hydrate formation rate is attributed to a

  18. 海底扩散体系含天然气水合物沉积物制样方法与装置%A method and apparatus for formation sample of gas hydrates bearing sediments in marine diffusion system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏厚振; 韦昌富; 颜荣涛; 吴二林; 陈盼

    2011-01-01

    Natural gas hydrate is one of the most important potential energy sources distributing in the seabed and continental permafrost; at the same time, the dissociation of hydrate in hydrates bearing layers is a triggering factor of global climate change and geologic hazards. The method and apparatus for formation sample is a basic issue for researching on hydrates-bearing sediments(HBS), which require homogeneity of the sample according with in-situ formation mode as soon as possible. Most marine hadrate formed in diffusion system, which means the gas transferred to the hydrate occur zone by diffusion in water and formed hydrate.Gas-bearing water is moved in cycles by constant-flow pump in this method and apparatus; and gas solubility in water is enlarged through stirred by magnetic stirring apparatus; soil sample could be saturated with gas-bearing water in short time; and then reduce the temperature of soil sample, Gas dissolved in water associates with water to form hydrate filling in the pore of soil sample equably. The experiments show that 1 day is spent to form the hydrates-bearing sediments used by silt and CO2 sample. Homogeneity is testified through observing and testing water-contents of different positions in formed sample. Thereby , heterogeneity caused by hydrate distribution in pore of sample and cost time too long is dissolved well; technological basis is provided for physico-mechanical experiments of hydrates bearing sediments.%天然气水合物是分布在海洋和大陆多年冻土中的一种具有巨大商业开发价值的新型战略性替代能源.同时,含天然气水合物地层中水合物的分解将带来严重的地质灾害和气候问题的关注.试验室内开展含天然气水合物沉积物物理力学性质研究需要首先解决的是制样问题,即在试验室内快速形成符合现场原位形成模式的试样,并且水合物均匀分布于土样孔隙中.海洋天然气水合物主要是在扩散体系中形成的,即溶

  19. Gas Hydrate Growth Kinetics: A Parametric Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remi-Erempagamo Tariyemienyo Meindinyo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Gas hydrate growth kinetics was studied at a pressure of 90 bars to investigate the effect of temperature, initial water content, stirring rate, and reactor size in stirred semi-batch autoclave reactors. The mixing energy during hydrate growth was estimated by logging the power consumed. The theoretical model by Garcia-Ochoa and Gomez for estimation of the mass transfer parameters in stirred tanks has been used to evaluate the dispersion parameters of the system. The mean bubble size, impeller power input per unit volume, and impeller Reynold’s number/tip velocity were used for analyzing observed trends from the gas hydrate growth data. The growth behavior was analyzed based on the gas consumption and the growth rate per unit initial water content. The results showed that the growth rate strongly depended on the flow pattern in the cell, the gas-liquid mass transfer characteristics, and the mixing efficiency from stirring. Scale-up effects indicate that maintaining the growth rate per unit volume of reactants upon scale-up with geometric similarity does not depend only on gas dispersion in the liquid phase but may rather be a function of the specific thermal conductance, and heat and mass transfer limitations created by the limit to the degree of the liquid phase dispersion is batched and semi-batched stirred tank reactors.

  20. Interfacial phenomena in gas hydrate systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aman, Zachary M; Koh, Carolyn A

    2016-03-21

    Gas hydrates are crystalline inclusion compounds, where molecular cages of water trap lighter species under specific thermodynamic conditions. Hydrates play an essential role in global energy systems, as both a hinderance when formed in traditional fuel production and a substantial resource when formed by nature. In both traditional and unconventional fuel production, hydrates share interfaces with a tremendous diversity of materials, including hydrocarbons, aqueous solutions, and inorganic solids. This article presents a state-of-the-art understanding of hydrate interfacial thermodynamics and growth kinetics, and the physiochemical controls that may be exerted on both. Specific attention is paid to the molecular structure and interactions of water, guest molecules, and hetero-molecules (e.g., surfactants) near the interface. Gas hydrate nucleation and growth mechanics are also presented, based on studies using a combination of molecular modeling, vibrational spectroscopy, and X-ray and neutron diffraction. The fundamental physical and chemical knowledge and methods presented in this review may be of value in probing parallel systems of crystal growth in solid inclusion compounds, crystal growth modifiers, emulsion stabilization, and reactive particle flow in solid slurries.

  1. Anaerobic oxidation of methane above gas hydrates at Hydrate Ridge, NE Pacific Ocean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Treude, T.; Boetius, A.; Knittel, K.;

    2003-01-01

    At Hydrate Ridge (HR), Cascadia convergent margin, surface sediments contain massive gas hydrates formed from methane that ascends together with fluids along faults from deeper reservoirs. Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), mediated by a microbial consortium of archaea and sulfate-reducing...... bacteria, generates high concentrations of hydrogen sulfide in the surface sediments. The production of sulfide supports chemosynthetic communities that gain energy from sulfide oxidation. Depending on fluid flow, the surface communities are dominated either by the filamentous sulfur bacteria Beggiatoa...

  2. Characterisation of gas hydrates formation and dissociation using high pressure DSC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Parlouer, P. [Thermal Consulting, Caluire (France); Etherington, G. [Setaram Inc., Pennsauken, NJ (United States)

    2008-07-01

    This paper provided details of an innovative methodology that used a high pressure micro-scale differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) method to characterize the thermodynamic properties and kinetics of gas hydrate formation. The calorimeter was based on a symmetrical heat flux design that used a Peltier cooling and heating principle. No refrigerating fluids were required. The method described phase transitions in relation to time, temperature and pressure. The DSC method was designed for use with gas hydrates trapped in marine sediments; hydrate formation in drilling muds and annulars during offshore oil and gas extraction; the storage and transportation of natural gas; and gas hydrate formation and dissociation for cold storage and transportation. Tests demonstrated that the DSC accurately predicted the formation of gas hydrates under high pressure conditions. Experimental studies were conducted to investigate salt solutions under methane pressure; and hydrate dissociation in a sodium chloride (NaC1) and ethyleneglycol solution. Data obtained comparing the method with classical PVT techniques showed that the MicroDSC technique was less time-consuming and required smaller sample volumes. It was concluded that the method is suitable for use with various types of fluids. 13 refs., 7 figs.

  3. Gas Hydrates Accumulations on the South Shetland Continental Margin: New Detection Possibilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. D. Solovyov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of investigations in 2006–2010 for hydrocarbon and gas hydrates on the Antarctic Peninsula continental margin are given. In 2004 and 2006, the marine geoelectric researches by methods of forming a short-pulsed electromagnetic field (FSPEF and vertical electric-resonance sounding (VERS had been conducted in this region. The “deposit” type anomaly was mapped by FSPEF survey, and anomalous polarized layers of “hydrocarbon deposit” type were chosen by VERS sounding within this anomaly on Antarctic margin in the region of UAS “Academician Vernadsky.” Anomalous zones of “gas hydrate deposit” type were detected on the South Shetland margin due to the special technology of satellite data processing and interpretation using. These results confirm the high gas hydrates potential of the West Antarctica region. Some practical results of the experimental approbation of these original technologies for the “direct” prospecting and exploration of hydrocarbon (HC and gas hydrates accumulations in different oil-and-gas bearing basins of Russia and Gulf of Mexico are proposed. The integration of satellite data processing and materials of FSPEF-VERS methods enable improving their efficiency for different geological and geophysical problems solving.

  4. INFLUENCE OF CHEMICAL ADDITIVES ON GAS HYDRATE FORMATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Cuiping; FAN Shuanshi

    2003-01-01

    One surfactant as sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and one synthesized sample as gas hydrate inhibitor are introduced in this paper. Through experiments we prove sodium dodecyl sulfate can accelerate the formation rate of gas hydrate and the synthesized sample can inhibit the formation and growth.

  5. High-resolution well-log derived dielectric properties of gas-hydrate-bearing sediments, Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Y.; Goldberg, D.; Collett, T.; Hunter, R.

    2011-01-01

    A dielectric logging tool, electromagnetic propagation tool (EPT), was deployed in 2007 in the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well (Mount Elbert Well), North Slope, Alaska. The measured dielectric properties in the Mount Elbert well, combined with density log measurements, result in a vertical high-resolution (cm-scale) estimate of gas hydrate saturation. Two hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs about 20 m thick were identified using the EPT log and exhibited gas-hydrate saturation estimates ranging from 45% to 85%. In hydrate-bearing zones where variation of hole size and oil-based mud invasion are minimal, EPT-based gas hydrate saturation estimates on average agree well with lower vertical resolution estimates from the nuclear magnetic resonance logs; however, saturation and porosity estimates based on EPT logs are not reliable in intervals with substantial variations in borehole diameter and oil-based invasion.EPT log interpretation reveals many thin-bedded layers at various depths, both above and below the thick continuous hydrate occurrences, which range from 30-cm to about 1-m thick. Such thin layers are not indicated in other well logs, or from the visual observation of core, with the exception of the image log recorded by the oil-base microimager. We also observe that EPT dielectric measurements can be used to accurately detect fine-scale changes in lithology and pore fluid properties of hydrate-bearing sediments where variation of hole size is minimal. EPT measurements may thus provide high-resolution in-situ hydrate saturation estimates for comparison and calibration with laboratory analysis. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Modeling Hydrates and the Gas Hydrate Markup Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weihua Wang

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Natural gas hydrates, as an important potential fuels, flow assurance hazards, and possible factors initiating the submarine geo-hazard and global climate change, have attracted the interest of scientists all over the world. After two centuries of hydrate research, a great amount of scientific data on gas hydrates has been accumulated. Therefore the means to manage, share, and exchange these data have become an urgent task. At present, metadata (Markup Language is recognized as one of the most efficient ways to facilitate data management, storage, integration, exchange, discovery and retrieval. Therefore the CODATA Gas Hydrate Data Task Group proposed and specified Gas Hydrate Markup Language (GHML as an extensible conceptual metadata model to characterize the features of data on gas hydrate. This article introduces the details of modeling portion of GHML.

  7. 海洋天然气水合物三维地震与海底地震勘探中的震源技术研究%Study of source in 3-D seismic and OBS exploration for marine gas hydrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    伍忠良

    2011-01-01

    三维地震与海底地震勘探技术愈来愈广泛应用于海洋天然气水合物调查中.为了获取高品质的纵波、转换横波等地震信息,揭示天然气水合物地层的速度结构异常,地震震源是决定调查成功与否的关键技术之一.本文对激发频宽、输出、气泡效应等震源特性及组合技术进行了综合研究,设计了一种新型的GI枪点震源系统,并于2006-2009年期间在南海北部某海域进行一系列试验.试验效果的综合对比表明:震源优化技术的应用明显提高了地震纵波的地层穿透深度,并改善了海底地震仪(OBS)纵波及转换横波的接收效果.%Application of 3-D seismic and OBS exploration has been ever-increasing in the marine survey on natural gas hydrate. The seismic source is one of determining factors in the acquisition, which is related to the quality of seismic data(P-wave and converted S-wave) acquired. The high quality data help to reveal the feature of velocity anomaly of strata bearing gas hydrate. By taking firing bandwidth, output and bubble effect into integrated consideration, a new type of GI gun point source was designed and then applied in the investigation on gas hydrate. Tests were conducted in northern of the South China Sea repeatedly over time from 2006 to 2009. The results indicated the application of new point source can enhance the penetrating capability of seismic P-wave and can improve the quality of P-wave and converted S-wave that OBS acquired.

  8. Gas and Gas Hydrate Potential Offshore Amasra,Bartin and Zonguldak and Possible Agent for Multiple BSR Occurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mert Küçük, Hilmi; Dondurur, Derman; Özel, Özkan; Sınayuç, Çağlar; Merey, Şükrü; Parlaktuna, Mahmut; Çifçi, Günay

    2015-04-01

    Gas hydrates, shallow gases and mud volcanoes have been studied intensively in the Black Sea in recent years. Researches have shown that the Black Sea region has an important potential about hydrocarbon. BSR reflections in the seismic sections and seabed sampling studies also have proven the formations of hydrates clearly. In this respect, total of 2400 km multichannel seismic reflection, chirp and multibeam bathymetry data were collected along shelf to abyssal plain in 2010 and 2012 offshore Amasra, Bartın, Zonguldak-Kozlu in the central Black Sea.. Collected data represent BSRs, bright spots and transparent zones. It has been clearly observed that possible gas chimneys cross the base of gas hydrate stability zones as a result of possible weak zones in the gas hydrate bearing sediments. Seabed samples were collected closely to possible gas chimneys due to shallow gas anomalies in the data. Head space gas cromatography was applied to seabed samples to observe gas composition and the gas cromatography results represented hydrocarbon gases such as Methane, Ethane, Propane, i-Butane, n-Butane, i-Pentane, n-Pentane and Hexane. Thermogenic gas production by Turkish Petroleum Corp. from Akçakoca-1 and Ayazlı-1 well is just located at the southwest of the study area and the observations of the study area point out there is also thermogenic gas potential at the eastern side of the Akçakoca. In addition, multiple-BSRs were observed in the study area and it is thought the key point of the multiple-BSRs are different gas compositions. This suggests that hydrate formations can be formed by gas mixtures. Changing of the thermobaric conditions can trigger dissociation of the gas hydrates in the marine sediments due to sedimentary load and changing of the water temperature around seabed. Our gas hydrate modelling study suggest that gas hydrates are behaving while their dissociation process if the gas hydrates are generated by gas mixture. Monitoring of our gas hydrate

  9. CHARACTERIZING NATURAL GAS HYDRATES IN THE DEEP WATER GULF OF MEXICO: APPLICATIONS FOR SAFE EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION ACTIVITIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steve Holditch; Emrys Jones

    2003-01-01

    In 2000, Chevron began a project to learn how to characterize the natural gas hydrate deposits in the deepwater portions of the Gulf of Mexico. A Joint Industry Participation (JIP) group was formed in 2001, and a project partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began in October 2001. The primary objective of this project is to develop technology and data to assist in the characterization of naturally occurring gas hydrates in the deep water Gulf of Mexico (GOM). These naturally occurring gas hydrates can cause problems relating to drilling and production of oil and gas, as well as building and operating pipelines. Other objectives of this project are to better understand how natural gas hydrates can affect seafloor stability, to gather data that can be used to study climate change, and to determine how the results of this project can be used to assess if and how gas hydrates act as a trapping mechanism for shallow oil or gas reservoirs. During the first six months of operation, the primary activities of the JIP were to conduct and plan Workshops, which were as follows: (1) Data Collection Workshop--March 2002 (2) Drilling, Coring and Core Analyses Workshop--May 2002 (3) Modeling, Measurement and Sensors Workshop--May 2002.

  10. CHARACTERIZING NATURAL GAS HYDRATES IN THE DEEP WATER GULF OF MEXICO: APPLICATIONS FOR SAFE EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION ACTIVITIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steve Holditch; Emrys Jones

    2003-01-01

    In 2000, Chevron began a project to learn how to characterize the natural gas hydrate deposits in the deepwater portions of the Gulf of Mexico. A Joint Industry Participation (JIP) group was formed in 2001, and a project partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began in October 2001. The primary objective of this project is to develop technology and data to assist in the characterization of naturally occurring gas hydrates in the deep water Gulf of Mexico (GOM). These naturally occurring gas hydrates can cause problems relating to drilling and production of oil and gas, as well as building and operating pipelines. Other objectives of this project are to better understand how natural gas hydrates can affect seafloor stability, to gather data that can be used to study climate change, and to determine how the results of this project can be used to assess if and how gas hydrates act as a trapping mechanism for shallow oil or gas reservoirs. During April-September 2002, the JIP concentrated on: Reviewing the tasks and subtasks on the basis of the information generated during the three workshops held in March and May 2002; Writing Requests for Proposals (RFPs) and Cost, Time and Resource (CTRs) estimates to accomplish the tasks and subtasks; Reviewing proposals sent in by prospective contractors; Selecting four contractors; Selecting six sites for detailed review; and Talking to drill ship owners and operators about potential work with the JIP.

  11. The evolution of the marine phosphate reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planavsky, Noah J; Rouxel, Olivier J; Bekker, Andrey; Lalonde, Stefan V; Konhauser, Kurt O; Reinhard, Christopher T; Lyons, Timothy W

    2010-10-28

    Phosphorus is a biolimiting nutrient that has an important role in regulating the burial of organic matter and the redox state of the ocean-atmosphere system. The ratio of phosphorus to iron in iron-oxide-rich sedimentary rocks can be used to track dissolved phosphate concentrations if the dissolved silica concentration of sea water is estimated. Here we present iron and phosphorus concentration ratios from distal hydrothermal sediments and iron formations through time to study the evolution of the marine phosphate reservoir. The data suggest that phosphate concentrations have been relatively constant over the Phanerozoic eon, the past 542 million years (Myr) of Earth's history. In contrast, phosphate concentrations seem to have been elevated in Precambrian oceans. Specifically, there is a peak in phosphorus-to-iron ratios in Neoproterozoic iron formations dating from ∼750 to ∼635 Myr ago, indicating unusually high dissolved phosphate concentrations in the aftermath of widespread, low-latitude 'snowball Earth' glaciations. An enhanced postglacial phosphate flux would have caused high rates of primary productivity and organic carbon burial and a transition to more oxidizing conditions in the ocean and atmosphere. The snowball Earth glaciations and Neoproterozoic oxidation are both suggested as triggers for the evolution and radiation of metazoans. We propose that these two factors are intimately linked; a glacially induced nutrient surplus could have led to an increase in atmospheric oxygen, paving the way for the rise of metazoan life.

  12. 海洋天然气水合物的地球物理研究(Ⅰ):岩石物性%GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCHES ON MARINE GAS HYDRATES(I): PHYSICAL PROPERTIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋海斌; 郝天珧; 松林修; 吴能友

    2001-01-01

    本文综述含水合物沉积物的岩石物性模型,讨论水合物饱和度与岩石物性的关系.关于纵波速度与水合物饱和度的关系,有一些简单模型,如孔隙度降低模型、时间平均方程、时间平均—Wood加权方程,也有复杂模型,如根据弹性模量计算的模型、根据等效介质中地震波传播理论的模型.本文还介绍含水合物沉积物的电阻率、电导率模型与含游离气沉积物的岩石物性.%Physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments are reviewed and the relationships between physical properties and gas hydrate concentration are discussed. There are some simple models such as porosity-reduction, time-average equation and weighted time-average and Wood's equation and complex models such as elastic moduli model and those based on seismic wave propagation in effective medium. Resistivity and thermal conductivity models of hydrate-bearing sediments are also introduced, and physical properties of gas-bearing sediments are also presented.

  13. Relict gas hydrates as possible reason of gas emission from shallow permafrost at the northern part of West Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuvilin, Evgeny; Bukhanov, Boris; Tumskoy, Vladimir; Istomin, Vladimir; Tipenko, Gennady

    2017-04-01

    zone) permafrost horizons. The results show that all investigated frozen hydrate-bearing sandy and silty sand samples in the temperature range from -16 °C to -2 °C are characterized by not complete decomposition of pore hydrate at relieving pressure below the equilibrium. It was observed that at typical north Western Siberian permafrost temperature of -6 ° C the safety of pore hydrate in frozen samples can reach 60% at the pressure reducing below the equilibrium. In was found that with increasing temperature and particle size (dispersity) the efficiency of pore hydrate self-preservation is decreased, but even at the temperature of -2 °C there is residual pore methane hydrate content in non-saline sandy samples. All this suggests about high preservation of methane hydrates in frozen sediments at non-equilibrium thermobaric conditions, close to reservoir conditions. Based on the results of mathematical and experimental simulations about the possibility of relic gas hydrates existence on permafrost depth up to 200 m in the northern part of Western Siberia on the less than 200 m due to geological manifestation of the self-preservation effect of gas hydrates. References. 1.Chuvilin EM, Yakushev VS, Perlova EV. Gas and gas hydrates in the permafrost of Bovanenkovo gas field, Yamal Peninsula, West Siberia. // Polarforschung 68: 215-219, 1998. (erschienen 2000). 2.Yakushev V.S., Chuvilin E.M. 2000. Natural gas and hydrate accumulation within permafrost in Russia. Cold Regions Science and Technology. 31: 189-197. These researches are supported by grant RSF №16-17-00051.

  14. Gas hydrates and permafrost in continental northern West Siberia; Gashydrate und Permafrost im kontinentalen noerdlichen Westsibirien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cramer, B. [Bundesanstalt fuer Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe, Hannover (Germany); Braun, A.; Poelchau, H.S. [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). Inst. fuer Erdoel und Organische Geochemie; Littke, R. [RWTH Aachen (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Geologie, Geochemie und Lagerstaetten des Erdoels und der Kohle

    1997-12-31

    The largest natural gas pool in the world is located in northern part of the West Siberian Basin. During the Quaternary this reservoir became overlaid with several hundreds of metres of permafrost. The pressure and temperature conditions prevailing under this permafrost zone have led to the development of gas hydrates. As far as is known today there is no genetic relationship between the formation of the gas pool and the development of gas hydrates. The present contribution deals with these questions in detail. (MSK) [Deutsch] Im Nordteil des westsibirischen Beckens liegt die groesste Erdgaslagerstaette der Erde. Darueber hat sich im Quartaer ein mehrere hundert Meter maechtiger Permafrost gebildet. Die unter der Premafrostzone herrschenden Druck-und Temperaturbedingungen ermoeglichten die Bildung von Gashydraten. Nach heutigen Erkenntnisse besteht kein genetischer Zusammenhang zwischen Lagerstaettenbildung und Gashydraten. Im Folgenden werden Einzelheiten geschildert.

  15. A Method to Use Solar Energy for the Production of Gas from Marine Hydrate-Bearing Sediments: A Case Study on the Shenhu Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenglin Tang

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A method is proposed that uses renewable solar energy to supply energy for the exploitation of marine gas hydrates using thermal stimulation. The system includes solar cells, which are installed on the platform and a distributor with electric heaters. The solar module is connected with electric heaters via an insulated cable, and provides power to the heaters. Simplified equations are given for the calculation of the power of the electric heaters and the solar battery array. Also, a case study for the Shenhu area is provided to illustrate the calculation of the capacity of electric power and the solar cell system under ideal conditions. It is shown that the exploitation of marine gas hydrates by solar energy is technically and economically feasible in typical marine areas and hydrate reservoirs such as the Shenhu area. This method may also be used as a good assistance for depressurization exploitation of marine gas hydrates in the future.

  16. Spatial Coupling Relationships about Formation of Gas Hydrate in Tibetan Plateau%青藏高原天然气水合物形成的空间耦合关系探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周强; 李万伦; 陈伟涛; 王永江

    2011-01-01

    Gas hydrate at high latitude in continent has already been proved.However,the possibility of keeping gas hydrate in reserve in the sheet permafrost regions on the Tibetan Plateau at middle latitude also exists.Thus,further study is required to ascertain the potential gas hydrate.In this paper,literatures are collected about gas hydrate in the Tibetan Plateau,and both geological and geographical data are synthesized to reveal the relationships between formation of gas hydrate and petroleum geological evolution,plateau uplift,formation of permafrost and glaciers,and so on.Previous studies indicate that a lot of residual basins in the plateau have been formed by original sedimentary basins accompanied by rapid uplift of the plateau.Extensive marine Mesozoic hydrocarbon source rocks in these basins could provide rich sources of materials forming gas hydrate in permafrost regions.Primary hydrocarbon-generating period in the plateau was late Jurassic to early Cretaceous,while secondary hydrocarbon generation regionally or locally occurred mainly in Paleogene.Before rapid uplift of the plateau,oil-gas reservoir had continuously been destroyed and assembled to form new reservoir due to structural and thermal dynamics forcing hydrocarbon to move.Since 3.4 Ma BP,the plateau has been strongly uplifted and extensive glacial and periglacial processes prevailed,hydrocarbon gas has been removed again,free gas beneath ice sheet within sedimentary materials acted with water,generating gas hydrate and finally reserved under the cap formed by frozen layers through rapid cooling in the plateau.Taken as a whole,it can be safely concluded that there is great temporal and spatial coupling relationship between evolution of the Tibetan Plateau and generation of gas hydrate.%通过对青藏高原地质、地理资料的收集和综合归纳,分析了青藏高原油气地质演化、高原隆升、冻土生成、冰川推移与天然气水合物成生的关系,探讨了青藏高原油气地

  17. Characteristics of shallow gas hydrate in Okhotsk Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUAN XiWu; JIN YoungKeun; Anatoly OBZHIROV; YUE BaoJing

    2008-01-01

    Multidisciplinary field investigations were carried out in Okhotsk Sea by R/V Akademik M.A. Lavrentyev (LV) of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS) in May 2006, supported by funding agencies from Korea, Russia, Japan and China. Geophysical data including echo-sounder, bottom profile, side-scansonar, and gravity core sample were obtained aimed to understand the characteristics and formation mechanism of shallow gas hydrates. Based on the geophysical data, we found that the methane flare detected by echo-sounder was the evidence of free gas in the sediment, while the dome structure detected by side-scan sonar and bottom profile was the root of gas venting. Gas hydrate retrieved from core on top of the dome structure which was interbedded as thin lamination or lenses with thickness varying from a few millimeters to 3 cm. Gas hydrate content in hydrate-bearing intervals visually amounted to 5%-30% of the sediment volume. This paper argued that gases in the sediment core were not all from gas hydrate decomposition during the gravity core lifting process, free gases must existed in the gas hydrate stability zone, and tectonic structure like dome structure in this paper was free gas central, gas hydrate formed only when gases over-saturated in this gas central, away from these struc tures, gas hydrate could not form due to low gas concentration.

  18. Characteristics of shallow gas hydrate in Okhotsk Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anatoly; OBZHIROV

    2008-01-01

    Multidisciplinary field investigations were carried out in Okhotsk Sea by R/V Akademik M.A. Lavrentyev (LV) of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS) in May 2006, supported by funding agencies from Ko- rea, Russia, Japan and China. Geophysical data including echo-sounder, bottom profile, side-scan- sonar, and gravity core sample were obtained aimed to understand the characteristics and formation mechanism of shallow gas hydrates. Based on the geophysical data, we found that the methane flare detected by echo-sounder was the evidence of free gas in the sediment, while the dome structure de- tected by side-scan sonar and bottom profile was the root of gas venting. Gas hydrate retrieved from core on top of the dome structure which was interbedded as thin lamination or lenses with thickness varying from a few millimeters to 3 cm. Gas hydrate content in hydrate-bearing intervals visually amounted to 5%―30% of the sediment volume. This paper argued that gases in the sediment core were not all from gas hydrate decomposition during the gravity core lifting process, free gases must existed in the gas hydrate stability zone, and tectonic structure like dome structure in this paper was free gas central, gas hydrate formed only when gases over-saturated in this gas central, away from these struc- tures, gas hydrate could not form due to low gas concentration.

  19. Multicomponent seismic methods for characterizing gas hydrate occurrences and systems in deep-water Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Seth S.; Lee, Myung W.; Collett, Timothy S.; Hardage, Bob A.

    2011-01-01

    In-situ characterization and quantification of natural gas hydrate occurrences remain critical research directions, whether for energy resource, drilling hazard, or climate-related studies. Marine multicomponent seismic data provide the full seismic wavefield including partial redundancy, and provide a promising set of approaches for gas hydrate characterization. Numerous authors have demonstrated the possibilities of multicomponent data at study sites around the world. We expand on this work by investigating the utility of very densely spaced (10’s of meters) multicomponent receivers (ocean-bottom cables, OBC, or ocean-bottom seismometers, OBS) for gas hydrate studies in the Gulf of Mexico and elsewhere. Advanced processing techniques provide high-resolution compressional-wave (PP) and converted shearwave (PS) reflection images of shallow stratigraphy, as well as P-wave and S-wave velocity estimates at each receiver position. Reflection impedance estimates can help constrain velocity and density, and thus gas hydrate saturation. Further constraint on velocity can be determined through identification of the critical angle and associated phase reversal in both PP and PS wideangle data. We demonstrate these concepts with examples from OBC data from the northeast Green Canyon area and numerically simulated OBS data that are based on properties of known gas hydrate occurrences in the southeast (deeper water) Green Canyon area. These multicomponent data capabilities can provide a wealth of characterization and quantification information that is difficult to obtain with other geophysical methods.

  20. Formation rate of natural gas hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mork, Marit

    2002-07-01

    The rate of methane hydrate and natural gas hydrate formation was measured in a 9.5 litre stirred tank reactor of standard design. The experiments were performed to better understand the performance and scale-up of a reactor for continuous production of natural gas hydrates. The hydrate formation rate was measured at steady-state conditions at pressures between 70 and 90 bar and temperatures between 7 and 15 deg C. Between 44 and 56 % of the gas continuously supplied to the reactor was converted to hydrate. The experimental results show that the rate of hydrate formation is strongly influenced by gas injection rate and pressure. The effect of stirring rate is less significant and subcooling has no observable effect on the formation rate. Hydrate crystal concentration and gas composition do not influence the hydrate formation rate. Observations of produced hydrate crystals indicate that the crystals are elongated, about 5 micron in diameter and 10 micron long. Analysis of the results shows that the rate of hydrate formation is dominated by gas-liquid mass transfer. A mass transfer model, the bubble-to-crystal model, was developed for the hydrate formation rate in a continuous stirred tank reactor, given in terms of concentration driving force and an overall mass transfer coefficient. The driving force is the difference between the gas concentration at the gas-liquid interface and at the hydrate crystal surface. These concentrations correspond to the solubility of gas in water at experimental temperature and pressure and the solubility of gas at hydrate equilibrium temperature and experimental pressure, respectively. The overall mass transfer coefficient is expressed in terms of superficial gas velocity and impeller power consumption, parameters commonly used in study of stirred tank reactors. Experiments and modeling show that the stirred tank reactor has a considerable potential for increased production capacity. However, at higher hydrate production rates the

  1. Experimental Determination of Refractive Index of Gas Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bylov, Martin; Rasmussen, Peter

    1997-01-01

    The refractive indexes of methane hydrate and natural gas hydrate have been experimentally determined. The refractive indexes were determined in an indirect manner making use of the fact that two non-absorbing materials will have the same refractive index if they cannot be distinguished visually....... For methane hydrate (structure I) the refractive index was found to be 1.346 and for natural gas hydrate (structure II) it was found to be 1.350. The measurements further suggest that the gas hydrate growth rate increases if the water has formed hydrates before. The induction time, on the other hand, seems...

  2. Detection and Appraisal of Gas Hydrates: Indian Scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sain, K.

    2009-04-01

    Gas hydrates, found in shallow sediments of permafrost and outer continental margins, are crystalline form of methane and water. The carbon within global gas hydrates is estimated two times the carbon contained in world-wide fossil fuels. It is also predicted that 15% recovery of gas hydrates can meet the global energy requirement for the next 200 years. Several parameters like bathymetry, seafloor temperature, sediment thickness, rate of sedimentation and total organic carbon content indicate very good prospect of gas hydrates in the vast offshore regions of India. Methane stored in the form of gas hydrates within the Indian exclusive economic zone is estimated to be few hundred times the country's conventional gas reserve. India produces less than one-third of her oil requirement and gas hydrates provide great hopes as a viable source of energy in the 21st century. Thus identification and quantitative assessment of gas hydrates are very important. By scrutiny and reanalysis of available surface seismic data, signatures of gas hydrates have been found out in the Kerala-Konkan and Saurashtra basins in the western margin, and Krishna-Godavari, Mahanadi and Andaman regions in the eastern margin of India by mapping the bottom simulating reflector or BSR based on its characteristic features. In fact, the coring and drilling in 2006 by the Indian National Gas Hydrate Program have established the ground truth in the eastern margin. It has become all the more important now to identify further prospective regions with or without BSR; demarcate the lateral/areal extent of gas hydrate-bearing sediments and evaluate their resource potential in both margins of India. We have developed various approaches based on seismic traveltime tomography; waveform inversion; amplitude versus offset (AVO) modeling; AVO attributes; seismic attributes and rock physics modeling for the detection, delineation and quantification of gas-hydrates. The blanking, reflection strength, instantaneous

  3. Environmental impact studies for gas hydrate production test in the Ulleung Basin, East Sea of Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Byong-Jae

    2017-04-01

    To develop potential future energy resources, the Korean National Gas Hydrate Program has been carried out since 2005. The program has been supported by the Ministry of Trade, Industry and Energy (MOTIE), and carried out by the Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM), the Korea Gas Corporation (KOGAS) and the Korea National Oil Corporation (KNOC) under the management of Gas Hydrate R&D Organization (GHDO). As a part of this national program, geophysical surveys, geological studies on gas hydrates and two deep drilling expeditions were performed. Gas hydrate-bearing sand layers suitable for production using current technologies were found during the Second Ulleung Basin Gas Hydrate Drilling Expedition (UBGH2) in 2010. Environmental impact studies (EIS) also have been carried out since 2012 by KIGAM in cooperation with domestic and foreign universities and research organizations to ensure safe production test that will be performed in near future. The schedule of production test is being planned. The EIS includes assessment of environmental risks, examination on domestic environmental laws related with production test, collection of basic oceanographic information, and baseline and monitoring surveys. Oceanographic information and domestic environmental laws are already collected and analyzed. Baseline survey has been performed using the in-house developed system, KIGAM Seafloor Observation System (KISOS) since 2013. It will also be performed. R/V TAMHAE II of KIGAM used for KISOS operation. As a part of this EIS, pseudo-3D Chirp survey also was carried out in 2014 to determine the development of fault near the potential testing site. Using KIGAM Seafloor Monitoring System (KIMOS), monitoring survey is planned to be performed from three month before production test to three months after production test. The geophysical survey for determining the change of gas hydrate reservoirs and production-efficiency around the production well would also be

  4. Gas hydrate dissociation structures in submarine slopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gidley, I.; Grozic, J.L.H. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Studies have suggested that gas hydrates may play a role in submarine slope failures. However, the mechanics surrounding such failures are poorly understood. This paper discussed experimental tests conducted on a small-scale physical model of submarine soils with hydrate inclusions. The laboratory tests investigated the effects of slope angle and depth of burial of the hydrate on gas escape structures and slope stability. Laponite was used to model the soils due to its ability to swell and produce a clear, colorless thixotropic gel when dispersed in water. An R-11 refrigerant was used to form hydrate layers and nodules. The aim of the experiment was to investigate the path of the fluid escape structures and the development of a subsequent slip plane caused by the dissociation of the R-11 hydrates. Slope angles of 5, 10, and 15 degrees were examined. Slopes were examined using high-resolution, high-speed imaging techniques. Hydrate placement and slope inclinations were varied in order to obtain stability data. Results of the study showed that slope angle influenced the direction of travel of the escaping gas, and that the depth of burial affected sensitivity to slope angle. Theoretical models developed from the experimental data have accurately mapped deformations and stress states during testing. Further research is being conducted to investigate the influence of the size, shape, and placement of the hydrates. 30 refs., 15 figs.

  5. Gas hydrate inhibition of drilling fluid additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiaolan, L.; Baojiang, S.; Shaoran, R. [China Univ. of Petroleum, Dongying (China). Inst. of Petroleum Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Gas hydrates that form during offshore well drilling can have adverse impacts on well operational safety. The hydrates typically form in the risers and the annulus between the casing and the drillstring, and can stop the circulation of drilling fluids. In this study, experiments were conducted to measure the effect of drilling fluid additives on hydrate inhibition. Polyalcohols, well-stability control agents, lubricating agents, and polymeric materials were investigated in a stirred tank reactor at temperatures ranging from -10 degree C to 60 degrees C. Pressure, temperature, and torque were used to detect onset points of hydrate formation and dissociation. The inhibitive effect of the additives on hydrate formation was quantified. Phase boundary shifts were measured in terms of temperature difference or sub-cooling gained when chemicals were added to pure water. Results showed that the multiple hydroxyl groups in polyalcohol chemicals significantly inhibited hydrate formation. Polymeric and polyacrylamide materials had only a small impact on hydrate formation, while sulfonated methyl tannins were found to increase hydrate formation. 6 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  6. Geo-scientific investigations of gas-hydrates in India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sain, K.; Gupta, H.; Mazumdar, A.; Bhaumik, A.K.; Bhowmick, P.K.

    The best solution to meet India's overwhelming energy requirement is to tap the nuclear and solar power to the maximum extent possible. Another feasible major energy resource is gas-hydrates (crystalline substances of methane and water) that have...

  7. Methods of gas hydrate concentration estimation with field examples

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kumar, D.; Dash, R.; Dewangan, P.

    different methods of gas hydrate concentration estimation that make use of data from the measurements of the seismic properties, electrical resistivity, chlorinity, porosity, density, and temperature are summarized in this paper. We demonstrate the methods...

  8. Infrared spectroscopy for monitoring gas hydrates in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobbs, G.T.; Luzinova, Y.; Mizaikoff, B. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Chemistry and Biochemistry; Raichlin, Y.; Katzir, A. [Tel-Aviv Univ., Tel-Aviv (Israel). Shool of Physics and Astronomy

    2008-07-01

    This paper introduced the first principles for monitoring gas hydrate formation and dissociation in aqueous solution by evaluating state-responsive infrared (IR) absorption features of water with fiberoptic evanescent field spectroscopy. A first order linear functional relationship was also derived according to Lambert Beer's law in order to quantify the percentage gas hydrate within the volume of water probed via the evanescent field. In addition, spectroscopic studies evaluating seafloor sediments collected from a gas hydrate site in the Gulf of Mexico revealed minimal spectral interferences from sediment matrix components. As such, evanescent field sensing strategies were established as a promising perspective for monitoring the dynamics of gas hydrates in oceanic environments. 21 refs., 5 figs.

  9. Research Progress in Natural Gas Hydrate Accumulation System%天然气水合物成藏体系研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卜庆涛; 胡高伟; 业渝光; 刘昌岭; 李承峰; 王家生

    2015-01-01

    基于近年来国内外冻土区和海域天然气水合物勘探成果,从稳定条件、气源、气体运移、有利储层这几个方面概述了水合物成藏体系的新进展.研究结果表明,地温梯度、海底表层温度、气体组分、孔隙水盐度等多种因素影响并控制了水合物的相平衡条件.全球已发现的水合物气体来源以生物成因气、生物成因?热成因混合气为主,热成因气体对水合物成藏的贡献得到了越来越多的重视.烃类气体以扩散、溶解于水和独立气泡的形式在沉积物中发生迁移,断层、底辟、气烟囱构造等为含气流体运移提供了有效的通道.归纳出六种水合物的产出特征和四种水合物的储层类型.通过对水合物成藏模式的总结对比,认为以地质构造环境差异而进行的成藏模式分类具有更好的代表性.%On the basis of gas hydrate exploration achievements in permafrost regions and marine environment in recent years, new progress of gas hydrate accumulation system is summarized in aspects of gas hydrate stability conditions, gas source, gas migration and reservoir rocks. The results show that the geothermal gradient, seabed surface temperature, gas composition, pore water salinity and other factors affect and control hydrate equilibrium conditions. Biological and biological-thermogenic gas are the main sources in the global hydrate reservoir. Thermogenic gas becomes an important role in gas hydrate accumulation system. The hydrocarbon gas migrates in the sediments by diffusion, gas dissolved within migrating water, and as a separate bubble. Faults, diapirs, gas chimney and other similar structures provide effective channels for gas fluid migration. Six different types of hydrates and four hydrate reservoir rocks are introduced based on hydrate features occurrence around the world. According to analysis on different gas hydrate accumulation models, the classification of the accumulation model on the

  10. National Assessment of Oil and Gas Project: geologic assessment of undiscovered gas hydrate resources on the North Slope, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    USGS AK Gas Hydrate Assessment Team: Collett, Timothy S.; Agena, Warren F.; Lee, Myung Woong; Lewis, Kristen A.; Zyrianova, Margarita; Bird, Kenneth J.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Cook, Troy A.; Houseknecht, David W.; Klett, Timothy R.; Pollastro, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    Scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey have completed the first assessment of the undiscovered, technically recoverable gas hydrate resources beneath the North Slope of Alaska. This assessment indicates the existence of technically recoverable gas hydrate resources—that is, resources that can be discovered, developed, and produced using current technology. The approach used in this assessment followed standard geology-based USGS methodologies developed to assess conventional oil and gas resources. In order to use the USGS conventional assessment approach on gas hydrate resources, three-dimensional industry-acquired seismic data were analyzed. The analyses indicated that the gas hydrates on the North Slope occupy limited, discrete volumes of rock bounded by faults and downdip water contacts. This assessment approach also assumes that the resource can be produced by existing conventional technology, on the basis of limited field testing and numerical production models of gas hydrate-bearing reservoirs. The area assessed in northern Alaska extends from the National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska on the west through the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge on the east and from the Brooks Range northward to the State-Federal offshore boundary (located 3 miles north of the coastline). This area consists mostly of Federal, State, and Native lands covering 55,894 square miles. Using the standard geology-based assessment methodology, the USGS estimated that the total undiscovered technically recoverable natural-gas resources in gas hydrates in northern Alaska range between 25.2 and 157.8 trillion cubic feet, representing 95 percent and 5 percent probabilities of greater than these amounts, respectively, with a mean estimate of 85.4 trillion cubic feet.

  11. Predicting saturation of gas hydrates using pre-stack seismic data, Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelander, Dianna; Dai, Jianchun; Bunge, George

    2010-03-01

    A promising method for gas hydrates exploration incorporates pre-stack seismic inversion data, elastic properties modeling, and seismic interpretation to predict saturation of gas hydrates ( Sgh). The technology can be modified slightly and used for predicting hydrate concentrations in shallow arctic locations as well. Examples from Gulf of Mexico Walker Ridge (WR) and Green Canyon (GC) protraction areas illustrate how Sgh was derived and used to support the selection of well locations to be drilled for gas hydrates in sand reservoirs by the Chevron-led Joint Industry Project (JIP) Leg II cruise in 2009. Concentrations of hydrates were estimated through the integration of seismic inversion of carefully conditioned pre-stack data, seismic stratigraphic interpretation, and shallow rock property modeling. Rock property trends were established by applying principles of rock physics and shallow sediment compaction, constrained by regional geological knowledge. No nearby sonic or density logs were available to define the elastic property trends in the zone of interest. Sgh volumes were generated by inverting pre-stack data to acoustic and shear impedance (PI and SI) volumes, and then analyzing deviations from modeled impedance trends. In order to enhance the quality of the inversion, we stress the importance of maximizing the signal to noise ratio of the offset data by conditioning seismic angle gathers prior to inversion. Seismic interpretation further plays an important role by identifying false anomalies such as hard, compact strata, which can produce apparent high Sgh values, and by identifying the more promising strata and structures for containing the hydrates. This integrated workflow presents a highly promising methodology, appropriate for the exploration of gas hydrates.

  12. NIST Gas Hydrate Research Database and Web Dissemination Channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroenlein, K; Muzny, C D; Kazakov, A; Diky, V V; Chirico, R D; Frenkel, M; Sloan, E D

    2010-01-01

    To facilitate advances in application of technologies pertaining to gas hydrates, a freely available data resource containing experimentally derived information about those materials was developed. This work was performed by the Thermodynamic Research Center (TRC) paralleling a highly successful database of thermodynamic and transport properties of molecular pure compounds and their mixtures. Population of the gas-hydrates database required development of guided data capture (GDC) software designed to convert experimental data and metadata into a well organized electronic format, as well as a relational database schema to accommodate all types of numerical and metadata within the scope of the project. To guarantee utility for the broad gas hydrate research community, TRC worked closely with the Committee on Data for Science and Technology (CODATA) task group for Data on Natural Gas Hydrates, an international data sharing effort, in developing a gas hydrate markup language (GHML). The fruits of these efforts are disseminated through the NIST Sandard Reference Data Program [1] as the Clathrate Hydrate Physical Property Database (SRD #156). A web-based interface for this database, as well as scientific results from the Mallik 2002 Gas Hydrate Production Research Well Program [2], is deployed at http://gashydrates.nist.gov.

  13. Lithological controls on gas hydrate saturation: Insights from signal classification of NMR downhole data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Klaus; Kulenkampff, Johannes; Henninges, Jan; Spangenberg, Erik

    2016-04-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) downhole data are analyzed with a new strategy to study gas hydrate-bearing sediments in the Mackenzie Delta (NW Canada). NMR logging is a powerful tool to study geological reservoir formations. The measurements are based on interactions between the magnetic moments of protons in geological formation water and an external magnetic field. Inversion of the measured raw data provides so-called transverse relaxation time (T2) distribution curves or spectra. Different parts of the T2 curve are related with distinct pore radii and corresponding fluid components. A common practice in the analysis of T2 distribution curves is to extract single-valued parameters such as apparent total porosity. Moreover, the derived total NMR apparent porosity and the gamma-gamma density log apparent porosity can be combined to estimate gas hydrate saturation in hydrate-bearing sediments. To avoid potential loss of information, in our new approach we analyze the entire T2 distribution curves as quasi-continuous signals to characterize the rock formation. The approach is applied to NMR data measured in gas hydrate research well Mallik 5L-38. We use self-organizing maps, a neural network clustering technique, to subdivide the data set of NMR T2 distribution curves into classes with a similar and distinctive signal shape. The method includes (1) preparation of data vectors, (2) unsupervised learning, (3) cluster definition, and (4) classification and depth mapping of all NMR signals. Each signal class thus represents a specific pore size distribution which can be interpreted in terms of distinct lithologies and reservoir types. A key step in the interpretation strategy is to reconcile the NMR classes with other log data not considered in the clustering analysis, such as gamma ray, photo-electric factor, hydrate saturation, and other logs. Our results defined six main lithologies within the target zone. Gas hydrate layers were recognized by their low signal

  14. Surfactant process for promoting gas hydrate formation and application of the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Rudy E.; Zhong, Yu

    2002-01-01

    This invention relates to a method of storing gas using gas hydrates comprising forming gas hydrates in the presence of a water-surfactant solution that comprises water and surfactant. The addition of minor amounts of surfactant increases the gas hydrate formation rate, increases packing density of the solid hydrate mass and simplifies the formation-storage-decomposition process of gas hydrates. The minor amounts of surfactant also enhance the potential of gas hydrates for industrial storage applications.

  15. Is Submarine Groundwater Discharge a Gas Hydrate Formation Mechanism on the Circum-Arctic Shelf?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, J. M.; Buffett, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    Methane hydrate is an ice-like solid that can sequester large quantities of methane gas in marine sediments along most continental margins where thermodynamic conditions permit its formation. Along the circum-Arctic shelf, relict permafrost-associated methane hydrate deposits formed when non-glaciated portions of the shelf experienced subaerial exposure during ocean transgressions. Gas hydrate stability and the permeability of circum-Arctic shelf sediments to gas migration is closely linked with relict submarine permafrost. Heat flow observations on the Alaskan North Slope and Canadian Beaufort Shelf suggest the movement of groundwater offshore, but direct observations of groundwater flow do not exist. Submarine discharge, an offshore flow of fresh, terrestrial groundwater, can affect the temperature and salinity field in shelf sediments, and may be an important factor in submarine permafrost and gas hydrate evolution on the Arctic continental shelf. Submarine groundwater discharge may also enhance the transport of organic matter for methanogenesis within marine sediments. Because it is buoyancy-driven, the velocity field contains regions with a vertical (upward) component as groundwater flows offshore. This combination of factors makes submarine groundwater discharge a potential mechanism controlling permafrost-associated gas hydrate evolution on the Arctic continental shelf. In this study, we quantitatively investigate the feasibility of submarine groundwater discharge as a control on permafrost-associated gas hydrate formation on the Arctic continental shelf, using the Canadian Beaufort Shelf as an example. We have developed a shelf-scale, two-dimensional numerical model based on the finite volume method for two-phase flow of pore fluid and methane gas within Arctic shelf sediments. The model tracks the evolution of the pressure, temperature, salinity, methane gas, methane hydrate, and permafrost fields given imposed boundary conditions, with latent heat of

  16. Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II logging-while-drilling data acquisition and anaylsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy S.; Lee, Myung W.; Zyrianova, Margarita V.; Mrozewski, Stefan A.; Guerin, Gilles; Cook, Ann E.; Goldberg, Dave S.

    2012-01-01

    One of the objectives of the Gulf of MexicoGasHydrateJointIndustryProjectLegII (GOM JIP LegII) was the collection of a comprehensive suite of logging-while-drilling (LWD) data within gas-hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs in order to make accurate estimates of the concentration of gashydrates under various geologic conditions and to understand the geologic controls on the occurrence of gashydrate at each of the sites drilled during this expedition. The LWD sensors just above the drill bit provided important information on the nature of the sediments and the occurrence of gashydrate. There has been significant advancements in the use of downhole well-logging tools to acquire detailed information on the occurrence of gashydrate in nature: From using electrical resistivity and acoustic logs to identify gashydrate occurrences in wells to where wireline and advanced logging-while-drilling tools are routinely used to examine the petrophysical nature of gashydrate reservoirs and the distribution and concentration of gashydrates within various complex reservoir systems. Recent integrated sediment coring and well-log studies have confirmed that electrical resistivity and acoustic velocity data can yield accurate gashydrate saturations in sediment grain supported (isotropic) systems such as sand reservoirs, but more advanced log analysis models are required to characterize gashydrate in fractured (anisotropic) reservoir systems. In support of the GOM JIP LegII effort, well-log data montages have been compiled and presented in this report which includes downhole logs obtained from all seven wells drilled during this expedition with a focus on identifying and characterizing the potential gas-hydrate-bearing sedimentary section in each of the wells. Also presented and reviewed in this report are the gas-hydrate saturation and sediment porosity logs for each of the wells as calculated from available downhole well logs.

  17. Isotropic, anisotropic, and borehole washout analyses in Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II, Alaminos Canyon well 21-A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myung W.

    2012-01-01

    Through the use of three-dimensional seismic amplitude mapping, several gas hydrate prospects were identified in the Alaminos Canyon area of the Gulf of Mexico. Two of the prospects were drilled as part of the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Program Leg II in May 2009, and a suite of logging-while-drilling logs was acquired at each well site. Logging-while-drilling logs at the Alaminos Canyon 21–A site indicate that resistivities of approximately 2 ohm-meter and P-wave velocities of approximately 1.9 kilometers per second were measured in a possible gas-hydrate-bearing target sand interval between 540 and 632 feet below the sea floor. These values are slightly elevated relative to those measured in the hydrate-free sediment surrounding the sands. The initial well log analysis is inconclusive in determining the presence of gas hydrate in the logged sand interval, mainly because large washouts in the target interval degraded well log measurements. To assess gas-hydrate saturations, a method of compensating for the effect of washouts on the resistivity and acoustic velocities is required. To meet this need, a method is presented that models the washed-out portion of the borehole as a vertical layer filled with seawater (drilling fluid). Owing to the anisotropic nature of this geometry, the apparent anisotropic resistivities and velocities caused by the vertical layer are used to correct measured log values. By incorporating the conventional marine seismic data into the well log analysis of the washout-corrected well logs, the gas-hydrate saturation at well site AC21–A was estimated to be in the range of 13 percent. Because gas hydrates in the vertical fractures were observed, anisotropic rock physics models were also applied to estimate gas-hydrate saturations.

  18. Properties of samples containing natural gas hydrate from the JAPEX/JNOC/GSC Mallik 2L-38 gas hydrate research well, determined using Gas Hydrate And Sediment Test Laboratory Instrument (GHASTLI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, W.J.

    1999-01-01

    As part of an ongoing laboratory study, preliminary acoustic, strength, and hydraulic conductivity results are presented from a suite of tests conducted on four natural-gas-hydrate-containing samples from the Mackenzie Delta JAPEX/JNOC/GSC Mallik 2L-38 gas hydrate research well. The gas hydrate samples were preserved in pressure vessels during transport from the Northwest Territories to Woods Hole, Massachusetts, where multistep tests were performed using GHASTLI (Gas Hydrate And Sediment Test Laboratory Instrument), which recreates pressure and temperature conditions that are stable for gas hydrate. Properties and changes in sediment behaviour were measured before, during, and after controlled gas hydrate dissociation. Significant amounts of gas hydrate occupied the sample pores and substantially increased acoustic velocity and shear strength.

  19. Cryopegs as destabilization factor of intra-permafrost gas hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuvilin, Evgeny; Bukhanov, Boris; Istomin, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    A characteristic feature of permafrost soils in the Arctic is widespread intra-permafrost unfrozen brine lenses - cryopegs. They are often found in permafrost horizons in the north part of Western Siberia, in particular, on the Yamal Peninsula. Cryopegs depths in permafrost zone can be tens and hundreds of meters from the top of frozen strata. The chemical composition of natural cryopegs is close to sea waters, but is characterized by high mineralization. They have a sodium-chloride primary composition with a minor amount of sulphate. Mineralization of cryopegs brine is often hundreds of grams per liter, and the temperature is around -6…-8 °C. The formation of cryopegs in permafrost is associated with processes of long-term freezing of sediments and cryogenic concentration of salts and salt solutions in local areas. The cryopegs' formation can take place in the course of permafrost evolution at the sea transgressions and regressions during freezing of saline sea sediments. Very important feature of cryopegs in permafrost is their transformation in the process of changing temperature and pressure conditions. As a result, the salinity and chemical composition are changed and in addition the cryopegs' location can be changed during their migration. The cryopegs migration violates the thermodynamic conditions of existence intra-permafrost gas hydrate formations, especially the relic gas hydrates deposits, which are situated in the shallow permafrost up to 100 meters depth in a metastable state [1]. The interaction cryopegs with gas hydrates accumulations can cause decomposition of intra-permafrost hydrates. Moreover, the increasing of salt and unfrozen water content in sedimentary rocks sharply reduce the efficiency of gas hydrates self-preservation in frozen soils. It is confirmed by experimental investigations of interaction of frozen gas hydrate bearing sediments with salt solutions [2]. So, horizons with elevated pressure can appear, as a result of gas hydrate

  20. Distribution of long-lived radioactive iodine isotope (I-129) in pore waters from the gas hydrate fields on the continental margins: Indication for methane source of gas hydrate deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaru, H.; Lu, Z.; Fehn, U.

    2011-12-01

    Because iodine has a strong association with organic matters in marine environments, pore waters in high methane potential region, in particular gas hydrate occurrences on the continental margins, are enriched significantly in iodine compared with seawater. Natural iodine system is composed of stable and radioactive species, I-129 (half-life of 15.7 Myr) has been used for estimating the age of source formations both for methane and iodine, because iodine can be liberated into pore water during the degradation of organic matter to methane in deep sediments. Here we present I-129 age data in pore waters collected from variety of gas hydrate occurrences on the continental margins. The I-129 ages in pore waters from these locations are significantly older than those of host sediments, indicating long-term transport and accumulation from deep/old sediments. The I-129 ages in the Japan Sea and Okhotsk Sea along the plate boundary between the North American and Amurian Plates correspond to the ages of initial spreading of these marginal seas, pointing to the massive deposition of organic matter for methane generation in deep sediments within limited periods. On the Pacific side of these areas, organic matter-rich back stop is responsible for methane in deep-seated gas hydrate deposits along the Nankai Trough. Deep coaly sequences responsible for deep conventional natural gas deposits are also responsible for overlying gas hydrate deposits off Shimokita Peninsula, NE Japan. Those in the Gulf of Mexico are correlative to the ages of sediments where the top of salt diapirs intrude. Marine sediments on the Pacific Plate subducting beneath the Australian Plate are likely responsible for the methane and iodine in the Hikurangi Trough, New Zealand. These ages reflect well the regional geological settings responsible for generation, transport, and accumulation of methane, I-129 is a key to understand the geological history of gas hydrate deposition.

  1. Postglacial response of Arctic Ocean gas hydrates to climatic amelioration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serov, Pavel; Vadakkepuliyambatta, Sunil; Mienert, Jürgen; Patton, Henry; Portnov, Alexey; Silyakova, Anna; Panieri, Giuliana; Carroll, Michael L.; Carroll, JoLynn; Andreassen, Karin; Hubbard, Alun

    2017-06-01

    Seafloor methane release due to the thermal dissociation of gas hydrates is pervasive across the continental margins of the Arctic Ocean. Furthermore, there is increasing awareness that shallow hydrate-related methane seeps have appeared due to enhanced warming of Arctic Ocean bottom water during the last century. Although it has been argued that a gas hydrate gun could trigger abrupt climate change, the processes and rates of subsurface/atmospheric natural gas exchange remain uncertain. Here we investigate the dynamics between gas hydrate stability and environmental changes from the height of the last glaciation through to the present day. Using geophysical observations from offshore Svalbard to constrain a coupled ice sheet/gas hydrate model, we identify distinct phases of subglacial methane sequestration and subsequent release on ice sheet retreat that led to the formation of a suite of seafloor domes. Reconstructing the evolution of this dome field, we find that incursions of warm Atlantic bottom water forced rapid gas hydrate dissociation and enhanced methane emissions during the penultimate Heinrich event, the Bølling and Allerød interstadials, and the Holocene optimum. Our results highlight the complex interplay between the cryosphere, geosphere, and atmosphere over the last 30,000 y that led to extensive changes in subseafloor carbon storage that forced distinct episodes of methane release due to natural climate variability well before recent anthropogenic warming.

  2. Natural gas hydrates and the mystery of the Bermuda Triangle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruy, H.J.

    1998-03-01

    Natural gas hydrates occur on the ocean floor in such great volumes that they contain twice as much carbon as all known coal, oil and conventional natural gas deposits. Releases of this gas caused by sediment slides and other natural causes have resulted in huge slugs of gas saturated water with density too low to float a ship, and enough localized atmospheric contamination to choke air aspirated aircraft engines. The unexplained disappearances of ships and aircraft along with their crews and passengers in the Bermuda Triangle may be tied to the natural venting of gas hydrates. The paper describes what gas hydrates are, their formation and release, and their possible link to the mystery of the Bermuda Triangle.

  3. China's Research on Non-conventional Energy Resources- Gas Hydrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pu Ming; Ma Jianguo

    2002-01-01

    @@ Methane exists in ice-like formations called gas hydrate. Hydrate traps methane molecules inside a cage of frozen water. The magnitude of this previously unknown global storehouse of methane is truly staggering and has raised serious inquiry into the possibility of using methane hydrate as a substitute source of energy for oil and conventional natural gas. According to the estimation by PGC, gas hydrate deposits amount to 7.6 × 1018m3 and contain more than twice as much organic carbon as all the world's coal, oil and non-hydrate natural gas combined.

  4. Gas hydrate dissociation prolongs acidification of the Anthropocene oceans

    OpenAIRE

    Boudreau, B.P.; Luo, Yiming; Filip J R Meysman; J. J. Middelburg; G. R. Dickens

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic warming of the oceans can release methane (CH4) currently stored in sediments as gas hydrates. This CH4 will be oxidized to CO2, thus increasing the acidification of the oceans. We employ a biogeochemical model of the multimillennial carbon cycle to determine the evolution of the oceanic dissolved carbonate system over the next 13 kyr in response to CO2 from gas hydrates, combined with a reasonable scenario for long-term anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Hydrate-derived CO2 will appr...

  5. Frozen heat: Global outlook on methane gas hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaudoin, Yannick; Solgaard, Anne

    2010-09-15

    The United Nations Environment Programme via its collaborating center in Norway, UNEP/GRID-Arendal, is undertaking an assessment of the state of the knowledge of methane gas hydrates. The Global Outlook on Methane Gas Hydrates seeks to bridge the gap between the science, research and development activities related to this potential large scale unconventional source of natural gas and the needs of decision makers and the general public to understand the underlying societal and environmental drivers and impacts. The Outlook aims to provide credible and unbiased information sourced from stakeholders representing the environment, government, industry and society.

  6. Simulation of Methane Recovery from Gas Hydrates Combined with Storing Carbon Dioxide as Hydrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Janicki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the medium term, gas hydrate reservoirs in the subsea sediment are intended as deposits for carbon dioxide (CO2 from fossil fuel consumption. This idea is supported by the thermodynamics of CO2 and methane (CH4 hydrates and the fact that CO2 hydrates are more stable than CH4 hydrates in a certain P-T range. The potential of producing methane by depressurization and/or by injecting CO2 is numerically studied in the frame of the SUGAR project. Simulations are performed with the commercial code STARS from CMG and the newly developed code HyReS (hydrate reservoir simulator especially designed for hydrate processing in the subsea sediment. HyReS is a nonisothermal multiphase Darcy flow model combined with thermodynamics and rate kinetics suitable for gas hydrate calculations. Two scenarios are considered: the depressurization of an area 1,000 m in diameter and a one/two-well scenario with CO2 injection. Realistic rates for injection and production are estimated, and limitations of these processes are discussed.

  7. Synergistic kinetic inhibition of natural gas hydrate formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daraboina, Nagu; Malmos, Christine; von Solms, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Rocking cells were used to investigate the natural gas hydrate formation and decomposition in the presence of kinetic inhibitor, Luvicap. In addition, the influence of poly ethylene oxide (PEO) and NaCl on the performance of Luvicap was investigated using temperature ramping and isothermal...

  8. Gas hydrate dissociation prolongs acidification of the Anthropocene oceans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boudreau, B.P.; Luo, Y.; Meysman, F.J.R.; Middelburg, J

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic warming of the oceans can release methane (CH4) currently stored in sediments as gas hydrates. This CH4 will be oxidized to CO2, thus increasing the acidification of the oceans. We employ a biogeochemical model of the multimillennial carbon cycle to determine the evolution of the ocean

  9. Terahertz Time Domain Spectroscopy for Structure-II Gas Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takeya, Kei; Zhang, Caihong; Kawayama, Iwao

    2009-01-01

    For the nondestructive inspection of gas hydrates, terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy (TDS) was applied to tetrahydrofuran (THF) hydrate and propane hydrate. The absorption of propane hydrate monotonically increases with frequency, similar to the case of ice, while THF hydrate has a charact...

  10. Three-phase flow of submarine gas hydrate pipe transport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李立; 徐海良; 杨放琼

    2015-01-01

    In the hydraulic transporting process of cutter-suction mining natural gas hydrate, when the temperature−pressure equilibrium of gas hydrate is broken, gas hydrates dissociate into gas. As a result, solid−liquid two-phase flow (hydrate and water) transforms into gas−solid−liquid three-phase flow (methane, hydrate and water) inside the pipeline. The Euler model and CFD-PBM model were used to simulate gas−solid−liquid three-phase flow. Numerical simulation results show that the gas and solid phase gradually accumulate to the center of the pipe. Flow velocity decreases from center to boundary of the pipe along the radial direction. Comparison of numerical simulation results of two models reveals that the flow state simulated by CFD-PBM model is more uniform than that simulated by Euler model, and the main behavior of the bubble is small bubbles coalescence to large one. Comparison of numerical simulation and experimental investigation shows that the values of flow velocity and gas fraction in CFD-PBM model agree with experimental data better than those in Euler model. The proposed PBM model provides a more accurate and effective way to estimate three-phase flow state of transporting gas hydrate within the submarine pipeline.

  11. Site Selection for DOE/JIP Gas Hydrate Drilling in the Northern Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collett, T.S. (USGS); Riedel, M. (McGill Univ., Montreal, Quebec, Canada); Cochran, J.R. (Columbia Univ., Palisades, NY); Boswell, R.M.; Kumar, Pushpendra (Oil and Natural Gas Corporation Ltd., Navi Mumbai, India); Sathe, A.V. (Oil and Natural Gas Corporation Ltd., Uttaranchal, INDIA)

    2008-07-01

    Studies of geologic and geophysical data from the offshore of India have revealed two geologically distinct areas with inferred gas hydrate occurrences: the passive continental margins of the Indian Peninsula and along the Andaman convergent margin. The Indian National Gas Hydrate Program (NGHP) Expedition 01 was designed to study the occurrence of gas hydrate off the Indian Peninsula and along the Andaman convergent margin with special emphasis on understanding the geologic and geochemical controls on the occurrence of gas hydrate in these two diverse settings. NGHP Expedition 01 established the presence of gas hydrates in Krishna- Godavari, Mahanadi and Andaman basins. The expedition discovered one of the richest gas hydrate accumulations yet documented (Site 10 in the Krishna-Godavari Basin), documented the thickest and deepest gas hydrate stability zone yet known (Site 17 in Andaman Sea), and established the existence of a fully-developed gas hydrate system in the Mahanadi Basin (Site 19).

  12. Lithological control on gas hydrate saturation as revealed by signal classification of NMR logging data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Klaus; Kulenkampff, Johannes; Henninges, Jan; Spangenberg, Erik

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) downhole logging data are analyzed with a new strategy to study gas hydrate-bearing sediments in the Mackenzie Delta (NW Canada). In NMR logging, transverse relaxation time (T2) distribution curves are usually used to determine single-valued parameters such as apparent total porosity or hydrocarbon saturation. Our approach analyzes the entire T2 distribution curves as quasi-continuous signals to characterize the rock formation. We apply self-organizing maps, a neural network clustering technique, to subdivide the data set of NMR curves into classes with a similar and distinctive signal shape. The method includes (1) preparation of data vectors, (2) unsupervised learning, (3) cluster definition, and (4) classification and depth mapping of all NMR signals. Each signal class thus represents a specific pore size distribution which can be interpreted in terms of distinct lithologies and reservoir types. A key step in the interpretation strategy is to reconcile the NMR classes with other log data not considered in the clustering analysis, such as gamma ray, hydrate saturation, and other logs. Our results defined six main lithologies within the target zone. Gas hydrate layers were recognized by their low signal amplitudes for all relaxation times. Most importantly, two subtypes of hydrate-bearing shaly sands were identified. They show distinct NMR signals and differ in hydrate saturation and gamma ray values. An inverse linear relationship between hydrate saturation and clay content was concluded. Finally, we infer that the gas hydrate is not grain coating, but rather, pore filling with matrix support is the preferred growth habit model for the studied formation.

  13. Drilling Gas Hydrates on hydrate Ridge, Oregon continental margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trehu, A. M.; Bohrmann, G.; Leg 204 Science Party

    2002-12-01

    During Leg 204, we cored and logged 9 sites on the Oregon continental margin to determine the distribution and concentration of gas hydrates in an accretionary ridge and adjacent slope basin, investigate the mechanisms that transport methane and other gases into the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ), and obtain constraints on physical properties of hydrates in situ. A 3D seismic survey conducted in 2000 provided images of potential subsurface fluid conduits and indicated the position of the GHSZ throughout the survey region. After coring the first site, we acquired Logging-While-Drilling (LWD) data at all but one site to provide an overview of downhole physical properties. The LWD data confirmed the general position of key seismic stratigraphic horizons and yielded an initial estimate of hydrate concentration through the proxy of in situ electrical resistivity. These records proved to be of great value in planning subsequent coring. The second new hydrate proxy to be tested was infrared thermal imaging of cores on the catwalk as rapidly as possible after retrieval. The thermal images were used to identify hydrate samples and to estimate the distribution and texture of hydrate within the cores. Geochemical analyses of interstitial waters and of headspace and void gases provide additional information on the distribution and concentration of hydrate within the stability zone, the origin and pathway of fluids into and through the GHSZ, and the rates at which gas hydrate is forming. Bio- and lithostratigraphic description of cores, measurement of physical properties, and in situ pressure core sampling and thermal measurements complement the data set, providing ground-truth tests of inferred physical and sedimentological properties. Among the most interesting preliminary results are: 1) that gas hydrates are distributed through a broad depth range within the GHSZ and that different physical and chemical proxies for hydrate distribution and concentration give generally

  14. Evaluation of gas production potential from gas hydrate deposits in National Petroleum Reserve Alaska using numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandanwar, Manish S.; Anderson, Brian J.; Ajayi, Taiwo; Collett, Timothy S.; Zyrianova, Margarita V.

    2016-01-01

    An evaluation of the gas production potential of Sunlight Peak gas hydrate accumulation in the eastern portion of the National Petroleum Reserve Alaska (NPRA) of Alaska North Slope (ANS) is conducted using numerical simulations, as part of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) gas hydrate Life Cycle Assessment program. A field scale reservoir model for Sunlight Peak is developed using Advanced Processes & Thermal Reservoir Simulator (STARS) that approximates the production design and response of this gas hydrate field. The reservoir characterization is based on available structural maps and the seismic-derived hydrate saturation map of the study region. A 3D reservoir model, with heterogeneous distribution of the reservoir properties (such as porosity, permeability and vertical hydrate saturation), is developed by correlating the data from the Mount Elbert well logs. Production simulations showed that the Sunlight Peak prospect has the potential of producing 1.53 × 109 ST m3 of gas in 30 years by depressurization with a peak production rate of around 19.4 × 104 ST m3/day through a single horizontal well. To determine the effect of uncertainty in reservoir properties on the gas production, an uncertainty analysis is carried out. It is observed that for the range of data considered, the overall cumulative production from the Sunlight Peak will always be within the range of ±4.6% error from the overall mean value of 1.43 × 109 ST m3. A sensitivity analysis study showed that the proximity of the reservoir from the base of permafrost and the base of hydrate stability zone (BHSZ) has significant effect on gas production rates. The gas production rates decrease with the increase in the depth of the permafrost and the depth of BHSZ. From the overall analysis of the results it is concluded that Sunlight Peak gas hydrate accumulation behaves differently than other Class III reservoirs (Class III reservoirs are composed of a single layer of hydrate with no

  15. Field Data and the Gas Hydrate Markup Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf Löwner

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Data and information exchange are crucial for any kind of scientific research activities and are becoming more and more important. The comparison between different data sets and different disciplines creates new data, adds value, and finally accumulates knowledge. Also the distribution and accessibility of research results is an important factor for international work. The gas hydrate research community is dispersed across the globe and therefore, a common technical communication language or format is strongly demanded. The CODATA Gas Hydrate Data Task Group is creating the Gas Hydrate Markup Language (GHML, a standard based on the Extensible Markup Language (XML to enable the transport, modeling, and storage of all manner of objects related to gas hydrate research. GHML initially offers an easily deducible content because of the text-based encoding of information, which does not use binary data. The result of these investigations is a custom-designed application schema, which describes the features, elements, and their properties, defining all aspects of Gas Hydrates. One of the components of GHML is the "Field Data" module, which is used for all data and information coming from the field. It considers international standards, particularly the standards defined by the W3C (World Wide Web Consortium and the OGC (Open Geospatial Consortium. Various related standards were analyzed and compared with our requirements (in particular the Geographic Markup Language (ISO19136, GML and the whole ISO19000 series. However, the requirements demanded a quick solution and an XML application schema readable for any scientist without a background in information technology. Therefore, ideas, concepts and definitions have been used to build up the modules of GHML without importing any of these Markup languages. This enables a comprehensive schema and simple use.

  16. The history and future trends of ocean warming-induced gas hydrate dissociation in the SW Barents Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadakkepuliyambatta, Sunil; Chand, Shyam; Bünz, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    The Barents Sea is a major part of the Arctic where the Gulf Stream mixes with the cold Arctic waters. Late Cenozoic uplift and glacial erosion have resulted in hydrocarbon leakage from reservoirs, evolution of fluid flow systems, shallow gas accumulations, and hydrate formation throughout the Barents Sea. Here we integrate seismic data observations of gas hydrate accumulations along with gas hydrate stability modeling to analyze the impact of warming ocean waters in the recent past and future (1960-2060). Seismic observations of bottom-simulating reflectors (BSRs) indicate significant thermogenic gas input into the hydrate stability zone throughout the SW Barents Sea. The distribution of BSR is controlled primarily by fluid flow focusing features, such as gas chimneys and faults. Warming ocean bottom temperatures over the recent past and in future (1960-2060) can result in hydrate dissociation over an area covering 0.03-38% of the SW Barents Sea.

  17. The characteristics of gas hydrates recovered from the Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, H.; Lorenson, T.D.; Moudrakovski, I.L.; Ripmeester, J.A.; Collett, T.S.; Hunter, R.B.; Ratcliffe, C.I.

    2011-01-01

    Systematic analyses have been carried out on two gas hydrate-bearing sediment core samples, HYPV4, which was preserved by CH4 gas pressurization, and HYLN7, which was preserved in liquid-nitrogen, recovered from the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Stratigraphic Test Well. Gas hydrate in the studied core samples was found by observation to have developed in sediment pores, and the distribution of hydrate saturation in the cores imply that gas hydrate had experienced stepwise dissociation before it was stabilized by either liquid nitrogen or pressurizing gas. The gas hydrates were determined to be structure Type I hydrate with hydration numbers of approximately 6.1 by instrumentation methods such as powder X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and solid state 13C NMR. The hydrate gas composition was predominantly methane, and isotopic analysis showed that the methane was of thermogenic origin (mean ??13C=-48.6??? and ??D=-248??? for sample HYLN7). Isotopic analysis of methane from sample HYPV4 revealed secondary hydrate formation from the pressurizing methane gas during storage. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Geologic implications of gas hydrates in the offshore of India: Results of the National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition 01

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Collett, T.S.; Boswell, R.; Cochran, J.R.; Kumar, P.; Lall, M.; Mazumdar, A.; Ramana, M.V.; Ramprasad, T.; Riedel, M.; Sain, K.; Sathe, A.V.; Vishwanath, K.; NGHP Expedition 01 Scientific Party

    the continental margins of India. This was done in order to meet the long-term goal of exploiting gas hydrate as a potential energy resource in a cost effective and safe manner. During its 113.5-day voyage, the D/V JOIDES Resolution cored and/or drilled 39 holes...

  19. Evaluation of the gas production economics of the gas hydrate cyclic thermal injection model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuuskraa, V.A.; Hammersheimb, E.; Sawyer, W.

    1985-05-01

    The objective of the work performed under this directive is to assess whether gas hydrates could potentially be technically and economically recoverable. The technical potential and economics of recovering gas from a representative hydrate reservoir will be established using the cyclic thermal injection model, HYDMOD, appropriately modified for this effort, integrated with economics model for gas production on the North Slope of Alaska, and in the deep offshore Atlantic. The results from this effort are presented in this document. In Section 1, the engineering cost and financial analysis model used in performing the economic analysis of gas production from hydrates -- the Hydrates Gas Economics Model (HGEM) -- is described. Section 2 contains a users guide for HGEM. In Section 3, a preliminary economic assessment of the gas production economics of the gas hydrate cyclic thermal injection model is presented. Section 4 contains a summary critique of existing hydrate gas recovery models. Finally, Section 5 summarizes the model modification made to HYDMOD, the cyclic thermal injection model for hydrate gas recovery, in order to perform this analysis.

  20. GULF OF MEXICO SEAFLOOR STABILITY AND GAS HYDRATE MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Robert Woolsey; Thomas M. McGee; Robin C. Buchannon

    2004-11-01

    The gas hydrates research Consortium (HRC), established and administered at the University if Mississippi's Center for Marine Research and Environmental Technology (CMRET) has been active on many fronts in FY 03. Extension of the original contract through March 2004, has allowed completion of many projects that were incomplete at the end of the original project period due, primarily, to severe weather and difficulties in rescheduling test cruises. The primary objective of the Consortium, to design and emplace a remote sea floor station for the monitoring of gas hydrates in the Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005 remains intact. However, the possibility of levering HRC research off of the Joint Industries Program (JIP) became a possibility that has demanded reevaluation of some of the fundamental assumptions of the station format. These provisions are discussed in Appendix A. Landmark achievements of FY03 include: (1) Continuation of Consortium development with new researchers and additional areas of research contribution being incorporated into the project. During this period, NOAA's National Undersea Research Program's (NURP) National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology (NIUST) became a Consortium funding partner, joining DOE and Minerals Management Service (MMS); (2) Very successful annual and semiannual meetings in Oxford Mississippi in February and September, 2003; (3) Collection of piston cores from MC798 in support of the effort to evaluate the site for possible monitoring station installation; (4) Completion of the site evaluation effort including reports of all localities in the northern Gulf of Mexico where hydrates have been documented or are strongly suspected to exist on the sea floor or in the shallow subsurface; (5) Collection and preliminary evaluation of vent gases and core samples of hydrate from sites in Green Canyon and Mississippi Canyon, northern Gulf of Mexico; (6) Monitoring of gas activity on the sea floor, acoustically

  1. Main controlling factors of distribution and genetics of marine reservoirs in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Marine reservoirs are mainly made up of clastics and carbonate reservoirs, which are distributed widely in central Tarim, Sichuan, Ordos basins from the Pre-Cambrian to Cenozoic, mainly in Palaeozoic. Marine clastic reservoirs are developed in foreshore and nearshore, tidal flat and delta environment. The sedimentary facies are important controlling factors for reservoir quality. Compaction, pressolution and cementation are factors of decreasing porosity, and low palaeo-temperature gradient, early emplacement of oil and gas and dissolution are favorable for preservation of pore. Carbonate reservoirs are divided into reef and bank, karst, dolomite and fracture reservoirs. Dolomitization, dissolution, TSR and fracture are important factors of controlling carbonate reservoirs' quality.

  2. KIGAM Seafloor Observation System (KISOS) for the baseline study in monitoring of gas hydrate test production in the Ulleung Basin, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung-rock; Chun, Jong-hwa

    2013-04-01

    For the baseline study in the monitoring gas hydrate test production in the Ulleung Basin, Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM) has developed the KIGAM Seafloor Observation System (KISOS) for seafloor exploration using unmanned remotely operated vehicle connected with a ship by a cable. The KISOS consists of a transponder of an acoustic positioning system (USBL), a bottom finding pinger, still camera, video camera, water sampler, and measuring devices (methane, oxygen, CTD, and turbidity sensors) mounted on the unmanned ROV, and a sediment collecting device collecting sediment on the seafloor. It is very important to monitoring the environmental risks (gas leakage and production water/drilling mud discharge) which may be occurred during the gas hydrate test production drilling. The KISOS will be applied to solely conduct baseline study with the KIGAM seafloor monitoring system (KIMOS) of the Korean gas hydrate program in the future. The large scale of environmental monitoring program includes the environmental impact assessment such as seafloor disturbance and subsidence, detection of methane gas leakage around well and cold seep, methane bubbles and dissolved methane, change of marine environments, chemical factor variation of water column and seabed, diffusion of drilling mud and production water, and biological factors of biodiversity and marine habitats before and after drilling test well and nearby areas. The design of the baseline survey will be determined based on the result of SIMAP simulation in 2013. The baseline survey will be performed to provide the gas leakage and production water/drilling mud discharge before and after gas hydrate test production. The field data of the baseline study will be evaluated by the simulation and verification of SIMAP simulator in 2014. In the presentation, the authors would like introduce the configuration of KISOS and applicability to the seafloor observation for the gas hydrate test production in

  3. Fluid Flow Patterns During Production from Gas Hydrates in the Laboratory compared to Field Settings: LARS vs. Mallik

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauch, B.; Heeschen, K. U.; Priegnitz, M.; Abendroth, S.; Spangenberg, E.; Thaler, J.; Schicks, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    The GFZ's LArge Reservoir Simulator LARS allows for the simulation of the 2008 Mallik gas hydrate production test and the comparison of fluid flow patterns and their driving forces. Do we see the gas flow pattern described for Mallik [Uddin, M. et al., J. Can. Petrol Tech, 50, 70-89, 2011] in a pilot scale test? If so, what are the driving forces? LARS has a network of temperature sensors and an electric resistivity tomography (ERT) enabling a good spatial resolution of gas hydrate occurrences, water and gas distribution, and changes in temperature in the sample. A gas flow meter and a water trap record fluid flow patterns and a backpressure valve has controlled the depressurization equivalent to the three pressure stages (7.0 - 5.0 - 4.2 MPa) applied in the Mallik field test. The environmental temperature (284 K) and confining pressure (13 MPa) have been constant. The depressurization induced immediate endothermic gas hydrate dissociation until re-establishment of the stability conditions by a consequent temperature decrease. Slight gas hydrate dissociation continued at the top and upper lateral border due to the constant heat input from the environment. Here transport pathways were short and permeability higher due to lower gas hydrate saturation. At pressures of 7.0 and 5.0 MPa the LARS tests showed high water flow rates and short irregular spikes of gas production. The gas flow patterns at 4.2 MPa and 3.0MPa resembled those of the Mallik test. In LARS the initial gas surges overlap with times of hydrate instability while water content and lengths of pathways had increased. Water production was at a minimum. A rapidly formed continuous gas phase caused the initial gas surges and only after gas hydrate dissociation decreased to a minimum the single gas bubbles get trapped before slowly coalescing again. In LARS, where pathways were short and no additional water was added, a transport of microbubbles is unlikely to cause a gas surge as suggested for Mallik.

  4. Gas hydrates and fluid venting in ultradeep large scale pockmarks at the southwest african margin off Congo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiess, V.; Kasten, S.; Schneider, R.; Zuehlsdorff, L.; Bohrmann, G.; Sahling, H.; Breitzke, M.; Bialas, J.; Ivanov, M.; Meteor Shipboard Scientific Party, M56.

    2003-04-01

    near feeder channels, which originate from shallow gas reservoirs at some hundred meters sub-bottom depth. The pockmark structures are furthermore associated with anomalies in temperature gradient. Sea floor sampling revealed in most cases several indicators of an active vent system as shallow, layered gas hydrates, carbonate precipitates and typical life forms.

  5. Introduction of the 2007-2008 JOGMEC/NRCan/Aurora Mallik Gas Hydrate Production Research Program, NWT, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, K.; Dallimore, S. R.; Numasawa, M.; Yasuda, M.; Fujii, T.; Fujii, K.; Wright, J.; Nixon, F.

    2007-12-01

    Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corporation (JOGMEC) and Natural Resource Canada (NRCan) have embarked on a new research program to study the production potential of gas hydrates. The program is being carried out at the Mallik gas hydrate field in the Mackenzie Delta, a location where two previous scientific investigations have been carried in 1998 and 2002. In the 2002 program that was undertaken by seven partners from five countries, 468m3 of gas flow was measured during 124 hours of thermal stimulation using hot warm fluid. Small-scale pressure drawdown tests were also carried out using Schlumberger's Modular Dynamics Tester (MDT) wireline tool, gas flow was observed and the inferred formation permeabilities suggested the possible effectiveness of the simple depressurization method. While the testing undertaken in 2002 can be cited as the first well constrained gas production from a gas hydrate deposit, the results fell short of that required to fully calibrate reservoir simulation models or indeed establish the technical viability of long term production from gas hydrates. The objectives of the current JOGMEC/NRCan/Aurora Mallik production research program are to undertake longer term production testing to further constrain the scientific unknowns and to demonstrate the technical feasibility of sustained gas hydrate production using the depressurization method. A key priority is to accurately measure water and gas production using state-of-art production technologies. The primary production test well was established during the 2007 field season with the re-entry and deepening of JAPEX/JNOC/GSC Mallik 2L-38 well, originally drilled in 1998. Production testing was carried out in April of 2007 under a relatively low drawdown pressure condition. Flow of methane gas was measured from a 12m perforated interval of gas-hydrate-saturated sands from 1093 to 1105m. The results establish the potential of the depressurization method and provide a basis for future

  6. Calorimetric Determination of Enthalpy of Formation of Natural Gas Hydrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高军; KennethN.Marsh

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports the measurements of enthalpies of natural gas hydrates in typical natural gas mixture containing methane, ethane, propane and iso-butane at pressure in the vicinity of 2000 kPa (300 psi) and 6900 kPa(1000psi). The measurements were made in a multi-cell differential scanning calorimeter using modified high pressure cells. The enthalpy of water and the enthalpy of dissociation of the gas hydrate were determined from the calorimeter response during slow temperature scanning at constant pressure. The amount of gas released from the dissociation of hydrate was determined from the pumped volume of the high pressure pump. The occupation ratio (mole ratio) of the water to gas and the enthalpy of hydrate formation are subject to uncertainty of 1.5%.The results show that the enthalpy of hydrate formation and the occupation ratio are essentially independent of pressure.

  7. Fundamental challenges to methane recovery from gas hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servio, P.; Eaton, M.W.; Mahajan, D.; Winters, W.J.

    2005-01-01

    The fundamental challenges, the location, magnitude, and feasibility of recovery, which must be addressed to recover methane from dispersed hydrate sources, are presented. To induce dissociation of gas hydrate prior to methane recovery, two potential methods are typically considered. Because thermal stimulation requires a large energy input, it is less economically feasible than depressurization. The new data will allow the study of the effect of pressure, temperature, diffusion, porosity, tortuosity, composition of gas and water, and porous media on gas-hydrate production. These data also will allow one to improve existing models related to the stability and dissociation of sea floor hydrates. The reproducible kinetic data from the planned runs together with sediment properties will aid in developing a process to economically recover methane from a potential untapped hydrate source. The availability of plentiful methane will allow economical and large-scale production of methane-derived clean fuels to help avert future energy crises.

  8. Development of Alaskan gas hydrate resources. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamath, V.A.; Sharma, G.D.; Patil, S.L.

    1991-06-01

    The research undertaken in this project pertains to study of various techniques for production of natural gas from Alaskan gas hydrates such as, depressurization, injection of hot water, steam, brine, methanol and ethylene glycol solutions through experimental investigation of decomposition characteristics of hydrate cores. An experimental study has been conducted to measure the effective gas permeability changes as hydrates form in the sandpack and the results have been used to determine the reduction in the effective gas permeability of the sandpack as a function of hydrate saturation. A user friendly, interactive, menu-driven, numerical difference simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of natural gas hydrates in porous media with variable thermal properties. A numerical, finite element simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of hydrates during hot water injection process.

  9. Multicomponent seismic forward modeling of gas hydrates beneath the seafloor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Jia-Jia; He Bing-Shou; Zhang Jian-Zhong

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effect of microscopic distribution modes of hydrates in porous sediments, and the saturation of hydrates and free gas on the elastic properties of saturated sediments. We simulated the propagation of seismic waves in gas hydrate-bearing sediments beneath the seafloor, and obtained the common receiver gathers of compressional waves (P-waves) and shear waves (S-waves). The numerical results suggest that the interface between sediments containing gas hydrates and free gas produces a large-amplitude bottom-simulating reflector. The analysis of multicomponent common receiver data suggests that ocean-bottom seismometers receive the converted waves of upgoing P-and S-waves, which increases the complexity of the wavefield record.

  10. Geophysical Indicators of Gas Hydrate in the Northern Continental Margin, South China Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiujuan Wang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gas hydrate drilling results show that gas hydrate has a close relationship with strong bottom-simulating reflectors (BSRs identified from seismic data in the Baiyun sag, South China Sea. The BSRs observed on seismic profiles at the crests of submarine canyons indicate the likely existence of gas hydrate. We calculate the acoustic impedance using constrained sparse spike inversion (CSSI, the interval velocity, and the seismic reflection characteristics such as reflection strength, instantaneous frequency, blanking, and enhanced reflection to demonstrate the presence of gas hydrate. Higher acoustic impedance and P-wave velocity were identified above the BSR. A remarkable low impedance, low frequency, and acoustic blanking indicated the presence of gas below gas hydrate stability zone. The occurrence of gas hydrate at the crests of canyons suggests that the abundance of gas hydrate in Baiyun sag may be due to the migrating submarine canyons providing the structural reliefs and the topographic ridges.

  11. A constitutive mechanical model for gas hydrate bearing sediments incorporating inelastic mechanisms

    KAUST Repository

    Sánchez, Marcelo

    2016-11-30

    Gas hydrate bearing sediments (HBS) are natural soils formed in permafrost and sub-marine settings where the temperature and pressure conditions are such that gas hydrates are stable. If these conditions shift from the hydrate stability zone, hydrates dissociate and move from the solid to the gas phase. Hydrate dissociation is accompanied by significant changes in sediment structure and strongly affects its mechanical behavior (e.g., sediment stiffenss, strength and dilatancy). The mechanical behavior of HBS is very complex and its modeling poses great challenges. This paper presents a new geomechanical model for hydrate bearing sediments. The model incorporates the concept of partition stress, plus a number of inelastic mechanisms proposed to capture the complex behavior of this type of soil. This constitutive model is especially well suited to simulate the behavior of HBS upon dissociation. The model was applied and validated against experimental data from triaxial and oedometric tests conducted on manufactured and natural specimens involving different hydrate saturation, hydrate morphology, and confinement conditions. Particular attention was paid to model the HBS behavior during hydrate dissociation under loading. The model performance was highly satisfactory in all the cases studied. It managed to properly capture the main features of HBS mechanical behavior and it also assisted to interpret the behavior of this type of sediment under different loading and hydrate conditions.

  12. Gas Hydrate Research Database and Web Dissemination Channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Micheal Frenkel; Kenneth Kroenlein; V Diky; R.D. Chirico; A. Kazakow; C.D. Muzny; M. Frenkel

    2009-09-30

    To facilitate advances in application of technologies pertaining to gas hydrates, a United States database containing experimentally-derived information about those materials was developed. The Clathrate Hydrate Physical Property Database (NIST Standard Reference Database {number_sign} 156) was developed by the TRC Group at NIST in Boulder, Colorado paralleling a highly-successful database of thermodynamic properties of molecular pure compounds and their mixtures and in association with an international effort on the part of CODATA to aid in international data sharing. Development and population of this database relied on the development of three components of information-processing infrastructure: (1) guided data capture (GDC) software designed to convert data and metadata into a well-organized, electronic format, (2) a relational data storage facility to accommodate all types of numerical and metadata within the scope of the project, and (3) a gas hydrate markup language (GHML) developed to standardize data communications between 'data producers' and 'data users'. Having developed the appropriate data storage and communication technologies, a web-based interface for both the new Clathrate Hydrate Physical Property Database, as well as Scientific Results from the Mallik 2002 Gas Hydrate Production Research Well Program was developed and deployed at http://gashydrates.nist.gov.

  13. Gas hydrates in gas storage caverns; Gashydrate bei der Gaskavernenspeicherung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groenefeld, P. [Kavernen Bau- und Betriebs-GmbH, Hannover (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    Given appropriate pressure and temperature conditions the storage of natural gas in salt caverns can lead to the formation of gas hydrates in the producing well or aboveground operating facilities. This is attributable to the stored gas becoming more or less saturated with water vapour. The present contribution describes the humidity, pressure, and temperature conditions conducive to gas hydrate formation. It also deals with the reduction of the gas removal capacity resulting from gas hydrate formation, and possible measures for preventing hydrate formation such as injection of glycol, the reduction of water vapour absorption from the cavern sump, and dewatering of the cavern sump. (MSK) [Deutsch] Bei der Speicherung von Erdgas in Salzkavernen kann es unter entsprechenden Druck- und Temperaturverhaeltnissen zur Gashydratbildung in den Foerdersonden oder obertaegigen Betriebseinrichtungen kommen, weil sich das eingelagerte Gas mehr oder weniger mit Wasserdampf aufsaettigt. Im Folgenden werden die Feuchtigkeits-, Druck- und Temperaturbedingungen, die zur Hydratbildung fuehren erlaeutert. Ebenso werden die Verringerung der Auslagerungskapazitaet durch die Hydratbildung, Massnahmen zur Verhinderung der Hydratbildung wie die Injektion von Glykol, die Verringerung der Wasserdampfaufnahme aus dem Kavernensumpf und die Entwaesserung der Kavernensumpfs selbst beschrieben.

  14. Topographic features of gas hydrate mounds of shallow gas hydrate areas in Joetsu Basin , eastern margin of Japan Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiromatsu, M.; Machiyama, H.; Matsumoto, R.

    2010-12-01

    Mega pockmarks and mounds, both of which are 300m to 500m in diamater and 30m to 40 m deep or high, characterize the Umitaka Spur and Joetsu Knoll of the Joetsu Basin. A number of pockmarks and mounds develop in NNE to SSW direction parallel to the general trend of mobile belt along the eastern margin of Japan Sea, suggesting that the topography has been strongly controlled by regional tectonics. Seismic profiles have revealed well-developed chaotic to transparent zones (gas chimneys) in the area of pockmarks and mounds, from which a number of active methane plumes stand up to 700m above sea floor. Ultra-high resolution bathymetric data and reflection images were acquired by Multi Beam Echo Sounder (MBES) and Side Scan Sonar (SSS) of the AUV "URASHIMA” during the YK10-08 cruise of R/V Yokosuka (JAMSTEC), July 2010. Based on mosaic images of MBES and SSS, we could identify several types of the hydrate mounds over gas chimney zones. Some are represented as a smooth and low bulge without strong reflections of background level, but the others show rough and uneven topography, featured by a few meter scale depressions, crevasses and minor ridges with strong reflector images, indicating the development of hard ground. Such strong reflectors are due to carbonate crusts and concretions and gas hydrate exposures as observed by ROV . Micro-topographic features are likely to represent a growth stage of hydrate mounds, and perhaps the accumulation of shallow gas hydrates. MBES and SSS onboard AUV are powerful tools to identify gas hydrate accumulation and evolution of shallow gas hydrate system.

  15. NATURAL GAS HYDRATES STORAGE PROJECT PHASE II. CONCEPTUAL DESIGN AND ECONOMIC STUDY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.E. Rogers

    1999-09-27

    DOE Contract DE-AC26-97FT33203 studied feasibility of utilizing the natural-gas storage property of gas hydrates, so abundantly demonstrated in nature, as an economical industrial process to allow expanded use of the clean-burning fuel in power plants. The laboratory work achieved breakthroughs: (1) Gas hydrates were found to form orders of magnitude faster in an unstirred system with surfactant-water micellar solutions. (2) Hydrate particles were found to self-pack by adsorption on cold metal surfaces from the micellar solutions. (3) Interstitial micellar-water of the packed particles were found to continue forming hydrates. (4) Aluminum surfaces were found to most actively collect the hydrate particles. These laboratory developments were the bases of a conceptual design for a large-scale process where simplification enhances economy. In the design, hydrates form, store, and decompose in the same tank in which gas is pressurized to 550 psi above unstirred micellar solution, chilled by a brine circulating through a bank of aluminum tubing in the tank employing gas-fired refrigeration. Hydrates form on aluminum plates suspended in the chilled micellar solution. A low-grade heat source, such as 110 F water of a power plant, circulates through the tubing bank to release stored gas. The design allows a formation/storage/decomposition cycle in a 24-hour period of 2,254,000 scf of natural gas; the capability of multiple cycles is an advantage of the process. The development costs and the user costs of storing natural gas in a scaled hydrate process were estimated to be competitive with conventional storage means if multiple cycles of hydrate storage were used. If more than 54 cycles/year were used, hydrate development costs per Mscf would be better than development costs of depleted reservoir storage; above 125 cycles/year, hydrate user costs would be lower than user costs of depleted reservoir storage.

  16. Geochemical and geologic factors effecting the formulation of gas hydrate: Task No. 5, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kvenvolden, K.A.; Claypool, G.E.

    1988-01-01

    The main objective of our work has been to determine the primary geochemical and geological factors controlling gas hydrate information and occurrence and particularly in the factors responsible for the generation and accumulation of methane in oceanic gas hydrates. In order to understand the interrelation of geochemical/geological factors controlling gas hydrate occurrence, we have undertaken a multicomponent program which has included (1) comparison of available information at sites where gas hydrates have been observed through drilling by the Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) on the Blake Outer Ridge and Middle America Trench; (2) regional synthesis of information related to gas hydrate occurrences of the Middle America Trench; (3) development of a model for the occurrence of a massive gas hydrate as DSDP Site 570; (4) a global synthesis of gas hydrate occurrences; and (5) development of a predictive model for gas hydrate occurrence in oceanic sediment. The first three components of this program were treated as part of a 1985 Department of Energy Peer Review. The present report considers the last two components and presents information on the worldwide occurrence of gas hydrates with particular emphasis on the Circum-Pacific and Arctic basins. A model is developed to account for the occurrence of oceanic gas hydrates in which the source of the methane is from microbial processes. 101 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs.

  17. Methane Gas Hydrate Stability Models on Continental Shelves in Response to Glacio-Eustatic Sea Level Variations: Examples from Canadian Oceanic Margins

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    We model numerically regions of the Canadian continental shelves during successive glacio-eustatic cycles to illustrate past, current and future marine gas hydrate (GH) stability and instability. These models indicated that the marine GH resource has dynamic features and the formation age and resource volumes depend on the dynamics of the ocean-atmosphere system as it responds to both natural (glacial-interglacial) and anthropogenic (climate change) forcing. Our models focus on the interval b...

  18. New silica clathrate minerals that are isostructural with natural gas hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momma, Koichi; Ikeda, Takuji; Nishikubo, Katsumi; Takahashi, Naoki; Honma, Chibune; Takada, Masayuki; Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Nagase, Toshiro; Kudoh, Yasuhiro

    2011-02-15

    Silica clathrate compounds (clathrasils) and clathrate hydrates are structurally analogous because both materials have framework structures with cage-like voids occupied by guest species. The following three structural types of clathrate hydrates are recognized in nature: cubic structure I (sI); cubic structure II (sII); and hexagonal structure H (sH). In contrast, only one naturally occurring silica clathrate mineral, melanophlogite (sI-type framework), has been found to date. Here, we report the discovery of two new silica clathrate minerals that are isostructural with sII and sH hydrates and contain hydrocarbon gases. Geological and mineralogical observations show that these silica clathrate minerals are traces of low-temperature hydrothermal systems at convergent plate margins, which are the sources of thermogenic natural gas hydrates. Given the widespread occurrence of submarine hydrocarbon seeps, silica clathrate minerals are likely to be found in a wide range of marine sediments.

  19. Seismic investigation of gas hydrates in the Gulf of Mexico: 2013 multi-component and high-resolution 2D acquisition at GC955 and WR313

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Seth S.; Hart, Patrick E.; Shedd, William W.; Frye, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey led a seismic acquisition cruise at Green Canyon 955 (GC955) and Walker Ridge 313 (WR313) in the Gulf of Mexico from April 18 to May 3, 2013, acquiring multicomponent and high-resolution 2D seismic data. GC955 and WR313 are established, world-class study sites where high gas hydrate saturations exist within reservoir-grade sands in this long-established petroleum province. Logging-while-drilling (LWD) data acquired in 2009 by the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrates Joint Industry Project provide detailed characterization at the borehole locations, and industry seismic data provide regional- and local-scale structural and stratigraphic characterization. Significant remaining questions regarding lithology and hydrate saturation between and away from the boreholes spurred new geophysical data acquisition at these sites. The goals of our 2013 surveys were to (1) achieve improved imaging and characterization at these sites and (2) refine geophysical methods for gas hydrate characterization in other locations. In the area of GC955 we deployed 21 ocean-bottom seismometers (OBS) and acquired approximately 400 km of high-resolution 2D streamer seismic data in a grid with line spacing as small as 50 m and along radial lines that provide source offsets up to 10 km and diverse azimuths for the OBS. In the area of WR313 we deployed 25 OBS and acquired approximately 450 km of streamer seismic data in a grid pattern with line spacing as small as 250 m and along radial lines that provide source offsets up to 10 km for the OBS. These new data afford at least five times better resolution of the structural and stratigraphic features of interest at the sites and enable considerably improved characterization of lithology and the gas and gas hydrate systems. Our recent survey represents a unique application of dedicated geophysical data to the characterization of confirmed reservoir-grade gas hydrate accumulations.

  20. Geological and geochemical survey of gas hydrate deposits. Present status and future problems of R/D program; Gasuhaidoredo kosho no chishitsu {center_dot} chikagaku tansa. Genjo to kadai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, R. [The Unibersity of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-11-25

    Recent development of marine geological/geophysical investigations have revealed that (1) gas hydrates are widely distributed in deep shelf to slope sediments and (2) gas-hydrate-bearing sediments are underlain by a relatively thick free gas zone. This implies that [gas hydrate deposits] should be considered as a package of soild hydrate and free gas. An important parameter in resource evaluation is volume assessment of methane reserves, however, there are a number of issues to estimate even the total amount of methane trapped in gas hydrate deposits. There are a number of issues to be solved to estimate recoverable reserves of gas hydrate deposits. The issues include the discrepancy between BSR and BGHS and the nature and origin of double BSRs. Also another urgent and important theme is the generic link between gas hydrate formation and bacterial activity of deep biosphere. Stratigraphic Drilling of [Nankai Trough] by JNOC in 1999 and planned ODP drilling in the western Nankai Trough in 2000 are[expected to give clues to solve these problems. (author)

  1. New Methods for Gas Hydrate Energy and Climate Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppel, C. D.; Pohlman, J.; Waite, W. F.; Hunt, A. G.; Stern, L. A.; Casso, M.

    2015-12-01

    Over the past few years, the USGS Gas Hydrates Project has focused on advancements designed to enhance both energy resource and climate-hydrate interaction studies. On the energy side, the USGS now manages the Pressure Core Characterization Tools (PCCTs), which includes the Instrumented Pressure Testing Chamber (IPTC) that we have long maintained. These tools, originally built at Georgia Tech, are being used to analyze hydrate-bearing sediments recovered in pressure cores during gas hydrate drilling programs (e.g., Nankai 2012; India 2015). The USGS is now modifying the PCCTs for use on high-hydrate-saturation and sand-rich sediments and hopes to catalyze third-party tool development (e.g., visualization). The IPTC is also being used for experiments on sediments hosting synthetic methane hydrate, and our scanning electron microscope has recently been enhanced with a new cryo-stage for imaging hydrates. To support climate-hydrate interaction studies, the USGS has been re-assessing the amount of methane hydrate in permafrost-associated settings at high northern latitudes and examined the links between methane carbon emissions and gas hydrate dissociation. One approach relies on the noble gas signature of methane emissions. Hydrate dissociation uniquely releases noble gases partitioned by molecular weight, providing a potential fingerprint for hydrate-sourced methane emissions. In addition, we have linked a DOC analyzer with an IRMS at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, allowing rapid and precise measurement of DOC and DIC concentrations and carbon isotopic signatures. The USGS has also refined methods to measure real-time sea-air flux of methane and CO2 using cavity ring-down spectroscopy measurements coupled with other data. Acquiring ~8000 km of data on the Western Arctic, US Atlantic, and Svalbard margins, we have tested the Arctic methane catastrophe hypothesis and the link between seafloor methane emissions and sea-air methane flux.

  2. Methane Gas Hydrate Stability Models on Continental Shelves in Response to Glacio-Eustatic Sea Level Variations: Examples from Canadian Oceanic Margins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Safanda

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We model numerically regions of the Canadian continental shelves during successive glacio-eustatic cycles to illustrate past, current and future marine gas hydrate (GH stability and instability. These models indicated that the marine GH resource has dynamic features and the formation age and resource volumes depend on the dynamics of the ocean-atmosphere system as it responds to both natural (glacial-interglacial and anthropogenic (climate change forcing. Our models focus on the interval beginning three million years ago (i.e., Late Pliocene-Holocene. They continue through the current interglacial and they are projected to its anticipated natural end. During the current interglacial the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ thickness in each region responded uniquely as a function of changes in water depth and sea bottom temperature influenced by ocean currents. In general, the GHSZ in the deeper parts of the Pacific and Atlantic margins (≥1316 m thinned primarily due to increased water bottom temperatures. The GHSZ is highly variable in the shallower settings on the same margins (~400–500 m. On the Pacific Margin shallow GH dissociated completely prior to nine thousand years ago but the effects of subsequent sea level rise reestablished a persistent, thin GHSZ. On the Atlantic Margin Scotian Shelf the warm Gulf Stream caused GHSZ to disappear completely, whereas in shallow water depths offshore Labrador the combination of the cool Labrador Current and sea level rise increased the GHSZ. If future ocean bottom temperatures remain constant, these general characteristics will persist until the current interglacial ends. If the sea bottom warms, possibly in response to global climate change, there could be a significant reduction to complete loss of GH stability, especially on the shallow parts of the continental shelf. The interglacial GH thinning rates constrain rates at which carbon can be transferred between the GH reservoir and the atmosphere

  3. Alaska North Slope regional gas hydrate production modeling forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, S.J.; Hunter, R.B.; Collett, T.S.; Hancock, S.; Boswell, R.; Anderson, B.J.

    2011-01-01

    A series of gas hydrate development scenarios were created to assess the range of outcomes predicted for the possible development of the "Eileen" gas hydrate accumulation, North Slope, Alaska. Production forecasts for the "reference case" were built using the 2002 Mallik production tests, mechanistic simulation, and geologic studies conducted by the US Geological Survey. Three additional scenarios were considered: A "downside-scenario" which fails to identify viable production, an "upside-scenario" describes results that are better than expected. To capture the full range of possible outcomes and balance the downside case, an "extreme upside scenario" assumes each well is exceptionally productive.Starting with a representative type-well simulation forecasts, field development timing is applied and the sum of individual well forecasts creating the field-wide production forecast. This technique is commonly used to schedule large-scale resource plays where drilling schedules are complex and production forecasts must account for many changing parameters. The complementary forecasts of rig count, capital investment, and cash flow can be used in a pre-appraisal assessment of potential commercial viability.Since no significant gas sales are currently possible on the North Slope of Alaska, typical parameters were used to create downside, reference, and upside case forecasts that predict from 0 to 71??BM3 (2.5??tcf) of gas may be produced in 20 years and nearly 283??BM3 (10??tcf) ultimate recovery after 100 years.Outlining a range of possible outcomes enables decision makers to visualize the pace and milestones that will be required to evaluate gas hydrate resource development in the Eileen accumulation. Critical values of peak production rate, time to meaningful production volumes, and investments required to rule out a downside case are provided. Upside cases identify potential if both depressurization and thermal stimulation yield positive results. An "extreme upside

  4. Controls on methane expulsion during melting of natural gas hydrate systems. Topic area 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flemings, Peter [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2016-01-14

    1.1. Project Goal The project goal is to predict, given characteristic climate-induced temperature change scenarios, the conditions under which gas will be expelled from existing accumulations of gas hydrate into the shallow ocean or directly to the atmosphere. When those conditions are met, the fraction of the gas accumulation that escapes and the rate of escape shall be quantified. The predictions shall be applicable in Arctic regions and in gas hydrate systems at the up dip limit of the stability zone on continental margins. The behavior shall be explored in response to two warming scenarios: longer term change due to sea level rise (e.g. 20 thousand years) and shorter term due to atmospheric warming by anthropogenic forcing (decadal time scale). 1.2. Project Objectives During the first budget period, the objectives are to review and categorize the stability state of existing well-studied hydrate reservoirs, develop conceptual and numerical models of the melting process, and to design and conduct laboratory experiments that dissociate methane hydrate in a model sediment column by systematically controlling the temperature profile along the column. The final objective of the first budget period shall be to validate the models against the experiments. In the second budget period, the objectives are to develop a model of gas flow into sediment in which hydrate is thermodynamically stable, and conduct laboratory experiments of this process to validate the model. The developed models shall be used to quantify the rate and volume of gas that escapes from dissociating hydrate accumulations. In addition, specific scaled simulations characteristic of Arctic regions and regions near the stability limit at continental margins shall be performed. 1.3. Project Background and Rationale The central hypothesis proposed is that hydrate melting (dissociation) due to climate change generates free gas that can, under certain conditions, propagate through the gas hydrate stability

  5. Influences of different types of magnetic fields on HCFC-141b gas hydrate formation processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHU; Bifen; MA; Xiaolin; GUO; Kaihua; LI; Jianhong

    2004-01-01

    In this study, visualizations and experiments are carried out on the influence of static and rotating magnetic fields on the characteristics of HCFC-141b gas hydrate formation, such as crystallization form, formation temperature and induction time. It has been found that a proper rotating magnetic field can considerably improve the low-pressure gas hydrate formation process,especially in increasing the formation temperature and shortening the induction time. The morphology of the gas hydrate formation appears rather complex and compact. However, a proper static magnetic field can make the gas hydrate crystal more organized, which will be benefit to heat transfer.

  6. Gas hydrate fast nucleation from melting ice and quiescent growth along vertical heat transfer tube

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE; Yingming; GUO; Kaihua; LIANG; Deqing; FAN; Shuanshi

    2005-01-01

    During the observation of HCFC141b gas hydrate growth processes outside a vertical heat transfer tube, two exciting phenomena were found: fast nucleation of gas hydrate from melting ice, and the spontaneous permeation of water into the guest phases along the surface of heat transfer tube to form gas hydrate continuously. These two phenomena were explained with Zhou & Sloan's hypothesis and the theory of surface free energy respectively, and a novel method of gas hydrate formation was presented--gas hydrate fast nucleation from melting ice and quiescent growth along heat transfer tube. There is no mechanic stirring in this method, the formed gas hydrates are compact, the ratio of unreacted interstitial water is little, which overcome the drawback of high energy cost and high ratio of unreacted interstitial water among the formed gas hydrates in the system with mechanic stirring. This finding will benefit the gas hydrate application technologies such as natural gas storage technology or cool storage technology with gas hydrate.

  7. VISUAL OBSERBATION OF HCFC141b GAS HYDRATE FORMATION/DECOMPOSITION PROCESS OUTSIDE OF A TUBE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢应明; 郭开华; 樊栓狮; 梁德青; 顾建明

    2003-01-01

    In order to design a kind of heat exchanger suitable to the indirect-touched gas hydrate cool storage vessel, a visual observation of HCFC141b gas hydrate formation/decomposition process was presented through a self-designed small-scale visualization apparatus of gas hydrate cool storage. Based on the shooted photos and recorded temperatures, the formation/decomposition process of HCFC141b are described, some characteristics are concluded, and some suggestions of designing heat exchanger are indicated according to the specific characteristics of HCFC141b gas hydrate formation/decomposition process.

  8. Nucleation and growth constraints and outcome in the natural gas hydrate system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osegovic, J. P.; Max, M. D.

    2016-12-01

    Hydrate formation processes are functions of energy distribution constrained by physical and kinetic parameters. The generation of energy and energy derivative plots of a constrained growth crucible are used to demonstrate nucleation probability zones (phase origin(s)). Nucleation sets the stage for growth by further constraining the pathways through changes in heat capacity, heat flow coefficient, and enthalpy which in turn modify the mass and energy flow into the hydrate formation region. Nucleation events result from the accumulation of materials and energy relative to pressure, temperature, and composition. Nucleation induction is predictive (a frequency parameter) rather than directly dependent on time. Growth, as mass tranfer into a new phase, adds time as a direct parameter. Growth has direct feedback on phase transfer, energy dynamics, and mass export/import rates. Many studies have shown that hydrate growth is largely an equilibrium process controlled by either mass or energy flows. Subtle changes in the overall energy distribution shift the equilibrium in a predictable fashion. We will demonstrate the localization of hydrate nucleation in a reservoir followed by likely evolution of growth in a capped, sand filled environment. The gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) can be characterized as a semi-batch crystallizer in which nucleation and growth of natural gas hydrate (NGH) is a continuous process that may result in very large concentrations of NGH. Gas flux, or the relative concentration of hydrate-forming gas is the critical factor in a GHSZ. In an open groundwater system in which flow rate exceeds diffusion transport rate, dissolved natural gas is transported into and through the GHSZ. In a closed system, such as a geological trap, diffusion of hydrate-forming gas from a free gas zone below the GHSZ is the primary mechanism for movement of gas reactants. Because of the lower molecular weight of methane, where diffusion is the principal transport mechanism

  9. The role of water in gas hydrate dissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Circone, S.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.

    2004-01-01

    When raised to temperatures above the ice melting point, gas hydrates release their gas in well-defined, reproducible events that occur within self-maintained temperature ranges slightly below the ice point. This behavior is observed for structure I (carbon dioxide, methane) and structure II gas hydrates (methane-ethane, and propane), including those formed with either H2O- or D2O-host frameworks, and dissociated at either ambient or elevated pressure conditions. We hypothesize that at temperatures above the H2O (or D2O) melting point: (1) hydrate dissociation produces water + gas instead of ice + gas, (2) the endothermic dissociation reaction lowers the temperature of the sample, causing the water product to freeze, (3) this phase transition buffers the sample temperatures within a narrow temperature range just below the ice point until dissociation goes to completion, and (4) the temperature depression below the pure ice melting point correlates with the average rate of dissociation and arises from solution of the hydrate-forming gas, released by dissociation, in the water phase at elevated concentrations. In addition, for hydrate that is partially dissociated to ice + gas at lower temperatures and then heated to temperatures above the ice point, all remaining hydrate dissociates to gas + liquid water as existing barriers to dissociation disappear. The enhanced dissociation rates at warmer temperatures are probably associated with faster gas transport pathways arising from the formation of water product.

  10. Beaufort Sea deep-water gas hydrate recovery from a seafloor mound in a region of widespread BSR occurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Patrick E.; Pohlman, John W.; Lorenson, T.D.; Edwards, Brian D.

    2011-01-01

    Gas hydrate was recovered from the Alaskan Beaufort Sea slope north of Camden Bay in August 2010 during a U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy expedition (USCG cruise ID HLY1002) under the direction of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Interpretation of multichannel seismic (MCS) reflection data collected in 1977 by the USGS across the Beaufort Sea continental margin identified a regional bottom simulating reflection (BSR), indicating that a large segment of the Beaufort Sea slope is underlain by gas hydrate. During HLY1002, gas hydrate was sampled by serendipity with a piston core targeting a steep-sided bathymetric high originally thought to be an outcrop of older, exposed strata. The feature cored is an approximately 1100m diameter, 130 m high conical mound, referred to here as the Canning Seafloor Mound (CSM), which overlies the crest of a buried anticline in a region of sub-parallel compressional folds beneath the eastern Beaufort outer slope. An MCS profile shows a prominent BSR upslope and downslope from the mound. The absence of a BSR beneath the CSM and occurrence of gas hydrate near the summit indicates that free gas has migrated via deep-rooted thrust faults or by structural focusing up the flanks of the anticline to the seafloor. Gas hydrate recovered from near the CSM summit at a subbottom depth of about 5.7 meters in a water depth of 2538 m was of nodular and vein-filling morphology. Although the hydrate was not preserved, residual gas from the core liner contained >95% methane by volume when corrected for atmospheric contamination. The presence of trace C4+hydrocarbons (inflation of the seafloor caused by formation and accumulation of shallow hydrate lenses is also a likely factor in CSM growth. Pore water analysis shows the sulfate-methane transition to be very shallow (0-1 mbsf), also supporting an active high-flux interpretation. Pore water with chloride concentrations as low as 160 mM suggest fluid migration pathways may extend to the mound from buried

  11. Gas hydrate distribution and hydrocarbon maturation north of the Knipovich Ridge, western Svalbard margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumke, Ines; Burwicz, Ewa B.; Berndt, Christian; Klaeschen, Dirk; Feseker, Tomas; Geissler, Wolfram H.; Sarkar, Sudipta

    2016-03-01

    A bottom-simulating reflector (BSR) occurs west of Svalbard in water depths exceeding 600 m, indicating that gas hydrate occurrence in marine sediments is more widespread in this region than anywhere else on the eastern North Atlantic margin. Regional BSR mapping shows the presence of hydrate and free gas in several areas, with the largest area located north of the Knipovich Ridge, a slow spreading ridge segment of the Mid Atlantic Ridge system. Here heat flow is high (up to 330 mW m-2), increasing toward the ridge axis. The coinciding maxima in across-margin BSR width and heat flow suggest that the Knipovich Ridge influenced methane generation in this area. This is supported by recent finds of thermogenic methane at cold seeps north of the ridge termination. To evaluate the source rock potential on the western Svalbard margin, we applied 1-D petroleum system modeling at three sites. The modeling shows that temperature and burial conditions near the ridge were sufficient to produce hydrocarbons. The bulk petroleum mass produced since the Eocene is at least 5 kt and could be as high as ~0.2 Mt. Most likely, source rocks are Miocene organic-rich sediments and a potential Eocene source rock that may exist in the area if early rifting created sufficiently deep depocenters. Thermogenic methane production could thus explain the more widespread presence of gas hydrates north of the Knipovich Ridge. The presence of microbial methane on the upper continental slope and shelf indicates that the origin of methane on the Svalbard margin varies spatially.

  12. Black Sea mud volcanoes and their relation to the search for methane gas hydrates and environmental security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shnyukov, Evgeny; Yanko-Hombach, Valentina; Motnenko, Irena

    2016-04-01

    As of today, the number of known offshore mud volcanoes in the Black Sea is 68. The areas possessing the greatest abundance include the northern part of the Black Sea (Sorokin trough, Tuapsinskaya trough, Shatskiy arch) and the Kerch downfold (the area south of the Kerch peninsula). An intensive study of mud volcanoes has been performed in the course of on-shore and off-shore expeditions carried out by Ukrainian scientists since 1990. They brought to light new geological, geophysical, and geochemical data on the properties of mud volcanoes by (1) high resolution hydro-acoustic, seismic-acoustic, and gravity methods, (2) geothermal observations of the thermal regime of the water and uppermost sediments, (3) gravity core sampling of bottom deposits, (4) dredges and buckets, and (5) study of these samples by lithological, geochemical, paleontological, and biological methods. Methane gas hydrates have been recovered in about 28 localities largely associated with mud volcanoes below 600-700 m water depth, which suggests their close genetic relationships. Age of the sediments hosting methane gas hydrates as well as their lithological properties (e.g., grain-size) vary significantly. Relatively coarse-grained sediments make better hydrate reservoirs than fine-grained sediments. The area of the Black Sea suitable for gas hydrate formation is estimated at 288,100 km2, representing about 68% of the total Black Sea, or almost 91% of the deep-water basin; the volume of gas hydrates has been set at 4.8 km3 corresponding to 0.1-11012 m3 of free methane. A peculiar morphological structure of the sea bottom - conical hills (anticlinals) with low geostatic pressure and subsidence in their central part - provide a target in the search for underwater mud volcanoes. Our data show that such structures are formed by mud breccia and rock debris that are brought to the surface by methane flows, which escape along tectonic ruptures from the deep part of the lithosphere located beneath a

  13. Palynology, age, correlation, and paleoclimatology from JAPEX/JNOC/GSC Mallik 2L-38 gas hydrate research well and the significance for gas hydrate: a new approach

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    White, J M

    2009-01-01

    A quantitative palynological study of a 480 m section of mid-Cenozoic sediment from the Mallik 2L-38 gas hydrate research borehole, Mackenzie River delta, is based on core and high-quality cuttings...

  14. Marine echinoderms as reservoirs of antimicrobial resistant bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Marinho

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Echinoderms are benthic animals that play an important ecological role in marine communities occupying diverse trophic levels in the marine food chains. The majority of echinoderms feed on small particles of edible matter, although they can eat many kinds of food (Clark, 1968. Although, some echinoderms species has been facing an emerging demand for human consumption, particularly in Asian and Mediterranean cuisine, where these animals can be eaten raw (Kelly, 2005; Micael et al., 2009. Echinoderms own an innate immune mechanism that allows them to defend themselves from high concentrations of bacteria, viruses and fungus they are often exposed, on marine sediment (Janeway and Medzhitov, 1998, Cooper, 2003. The most frequent genera of gut bacteria in echinoderms are Vibrio, Pseudomonas, Flavobacterium, and Aeromonas; nevertheless Enterococcus spp. and Escherichia coli are also present (Harris, 1993; Marinho et al., 2013. Moreover, fecal resistant bacteria found in the aquatic environment might represent an index of marine pollution (Foti et al., 2009, Kummerer, 2009. Several studies had been lead in order to identify environmental reservoirs for antibiotic-resistant bacteria in populations of fish, echinoderms and marine mammals, and they all support the thesis that these animals may serve as reservoirs since they had acquired resistant microbial species (Johnson et al., 1998, Marinho et al., 2013, Miranda and Zemelman, 2001. However, to our knowledge, there are only available in bibliography one study of antimicrobial resistant bacteria isolated from marine echinoderms (Marinho et al., 2013, which stats that their provenience in this environment is still unclear. Antimicrobial resistance outcomes from the intensive use of antimicrobial drugs in human activities associated with various mechanisms for bacteria genetic transfer (Barbosa and Levy, 2000, Coque et al., 2008. Antibiotic-resistant bacteria enter into water environments where they are

  15. Formation process of structure 1 and 2 gas hydrates discovered in Kukuy, Lake Baikal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hachikubo, A.; Sakagami, H.; Minami, H.; Nunokawa, Y.; Yamashita, S.; Takahashi, N.; Shoji, H. [Kitami Inst. of Technology, Kitami (Japan); Kida, M. [Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Toyohira-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Krylov, A. [All-Russia Research Inst. for Geology and Mineral Resources of the Ocean, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Khlystov, O.; Zemskaya, T. [Limnological Inst., Irkutsk (Russian Federation); Manakov, A. [Nikolaev Inst. of Inorganic Chemistry, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Kalmychkov, G. [Vinogradov Inst. of Geochemistry, Irkutsk (Russian Federation); Poort, J. [Ghent Univ., Krijgslaan (Belgium). Renard Centre of Marine Geology

    2008-07-01

    This study investigated the formation process of different crystal structures of gas hydrates found in Kukuy K-2, Lake Baikal, Russia. Gas compositions and isotopic ratios were taken from hydrate-bound gas and from dissolved gas in sediments by a headspace gas method. Structure 1 and 2 gas hydrates were observed in the same sediment cores of a mud volcano in the Kukuy Canyon, Lake Baikal. This paper discussed the results of the observations. The structure 2 gas hydrate contained about 13-15 per cent ethane, whereas the structure 1 gas hydrate contained about 1-5 per cent ethane and was placed beneath the structure 2 gas hydrate. The paper discussed the measurement of isotopic composition of dissociation gas from both type gas hydrates and dissolved gas in pore water. The paper also reported on these results. It was concluded that the current gas dissolved in pore water was not the source of these gas hydrates of both crystal structures in Kukuy K-2 mud volcano in Lake Baikal. In addition, isotopic data also provided useful information on how the double structure gas hydrates formed. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Stages of Gas-Hydrate Evolution on the Northern Cascadia Margin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    the IODP Expedition 311 Scientists

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Natural gas hydrate occurs beneath many continental slopes and in arctic permafrost areas. Recent studies have indicated that the largest deposits of gas hydrate might lie in nearly horizontal layers several hundred meters beneath the seafloor of continental slopes, especially in the large, accretionary sedimentary prisms of subduction zones. Expedition 311 of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP investigated the formation of gas hydrate in the accretionary prism of the Cascadia subduction zone (Fig. 1. The primary objectives of Expedition 311 were to test and constraingeological models of gas hydrate formation by upward fluidand methane transport in accretionary prisms. We specifi -cally sought to (a determine the mechanisms that controlthe nature, magnitude, and distribution of the gas hydrate,(b find the pathways of the fluid migration required to formlarge concentrations of gas hydrate, (c examine the effectsof gas hydrate on the physical properties of the host sediment,and (d investigate the microbiology and geochemistryassociated with the occurrence of gas hydrate. Furthermore,we concentrated on the contrast between methane transportby focused fl ow in fault zones and by dispersed pervasiveupward flow at various scales of permeability.

  17. Models for Gas Hydrate-Bearing Sediments Inferred from Hydraulic Permeability and Elastic Velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myung W.

    2008-01-01

    Elastic velocities and hydraulic permeability of gas hydrate-bearing sediments strongly depend on how gas hydrate accumulates in pore spaces and various gas hydrate accumulation models are proposed to predict physical property changes due to gas hydrate concentrations. Elastic velocities and permeability predicted from a cementation model differ noticeably from those from a pore-filling model. A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) log provides in-situ water-filled porosity and hydraulic permeability of gas hydrate-bearing sediments. To test the two competing models, the NMR log along with conventional logs such as velocity and resistivity logs acquired at the Mallik 5L-38 well, Mackenzie Delta, Canada, were analyzed. When the clay content is less than about 12 percent, the NMR porosity is 'accurate' and the gas hydrate concentrations from the NMR log are comparable to those estimated from an electrical resistivity log. The variation of elastic velocities and relative permeability with respect to the gas hydrate concentration indicates that the dominant effect of gas hydrate in the pore space is the pore-filling characteristic.

  18. Thermally induced evolution of phase transformations in gas hydrate sediment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Thermally induced evolution of phase transformations is a basic physical-chemical process in the dissociation of gas hydrate in sediment (GHS). Heat transfer leads to the weakening of the bed soil and the simultaneous establishment of a time varying stress field accompanied by seepage of fluids and deformation of the soil. As a consequence, ground failure could occur causing engineering damage or/and environmental disaster. This paper presents a simplified analysis of the thermal process by assuming that thermal conduction can be decoupled from the flow and deformation process. It is further assumed that phase transformations take place instantaneously. Analytical and numerical results are given for several examples of simplified geometry. Experiments using Tetra-hydro-furan hydrate sediments were carried out in our laboratory to check the theory. By comparison, the theoretical, numerical and experimental results on the evolution of dissociation fronts and temperature in the sediment are found to be in good agreement.

  19. STUDY FOR NATURAL GAS HYDRATE CONVERSED FROM ICE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shengjie; SHEN Jiandong; HAO Miaoli; LIU Furong

    2003-01-01

    Natural gas hydrates are crystalline clathrate compounds composed of water and gases of small molecular diameters that can be used for storage and transport of natural gas as a novel method. In the paper a series of experiments of aspects and kinetics for hydrate formed from natural gas and ice were carried out on the industrial small scale production apparatus. The experimental results show that formation conditions of hydrate conversed from ice are independent of induction time, and bigger degrees of supersaturation and supercooling improved the driving force and advanced the hydrate formation.Superpressure is also favorable for ice particle conversion to hydrate. In addition, it was found there have an optimal reaction time during hydrate formation.

  20. Ocean Observatory Gas Hydrates Experiments on the Cascadia Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherwath, Martin; Heesemann, Martin; Mihaly, Steve; Kelley, Deborah; Moran, Kate; Philip, Brendan; Römer, Miriam; Riedel, Michael; Solomon, Evan; Thomsen, Laurenz; Purser, Autun

    2016-04-01

    Ocean Networks Canada's (ONC's) NEPTUNE observatory and the Ocean Observatories Initiative's (OOI's) Cabled Array installations enable long-term gas hydrate experiments on the Cascadia Margin offshore Vancouver Island and Washington and Oregon State. The great advantage of cabled ocean networks in providing power and high bandwidth internet access to the seafloor on a permanent basis is allowing constant monitoring and interacting with experiments hundreds of kilometres away from shore throughout the year. Many different gas hydrate related experiments are installed at three various hydrate nodes, Clayoquot Slope and Barkley Canyon offshore Vancouver Island and Southern Hydrate Ridge offshore Oregon. As an example, a seafloor crawler called Wally is operated from Bremen in Germany by Jacobs University, carrying out measurements by moving around the Barkley hydrate mounds on a daily basis, determining for instance the speed of dynamic changes of the benthic communities. In another example, several years of hourly sonar data show gas bubbles rising from the seafloor near the Bullseye Vent with varying intensities, allowing statistically sound correlations with other seafloor parameters such as ground shaking, temperature and pressure variations and currents, where tidal pressure appearing as the main driver. The Southern Hydrate Ridge is now equipped with the world's first long-term seafloor mass spectrometer, co-located with a camera and lights, hydrophone, current meters, pressure sensor, autonomous OSMO and fluid samplers, and is surrounded by a seismometer array for local seismicity. The data are freely available through open access data portals at: http://dmas.uvic.ca/home and https://ooinet.oceanobservatories.org/

  1. Depositional and Structural Controls on the Evolution of the Gas Hydrate Petroleum System in Green Canyon 955, Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, S. S.; Hart, P. E.; Collett, T. S.; Weimer, P.; Shedd, W. W.; Frye, M.; Boswell, R.

    2016-12-01

    The depositional, erosional, and deformational history at Green Canyon 955 (GC955), Gulf of Mexico, provides insight into the reservoir characteristics and the gas and gas hydrate petroleum system at this established research site. Using high-resolution 2D seismic data, industry 3D seismic data, and borehole logs, we have refined our knowledge of the area's geologic history. Following extended fine-grained deposition (while the primary sediment input was hundreds of km to the east), channel/levee activity shifted to the area of GC955 approximately 500 kya. The initial resulting deposits include sand-rich proximal levee packages, readily identifiable in high-resolution seismic images, and limited channel deposits. The levee deposits occur in discrete "pods", the result of intermingled deposition and erosion. Subsequently, salt diapirism initiated a period of uplift and caused channel activity to shift a few kilometers eastward. Pelagic deposition was followed by a mix of fine-grained sediments and limited sandy strata deposited in a distal levee and/or fan environment. Channel features from this time period are evident east of GC955, but the available data suggest that these were mainly erosional, with minimal sand deposition. Salt-driven structural deformation created a multi-kilometer-scale east-west graben and normal faults. These extensional faults facilitated upward migration of gas from deeper in the system, ultimately leading to creation of several gas chimneys. The presence of free gas at the location of well GC955-Q indicates that the fine-grained unit overlying the main reservoir provides a good seal, consistent with pelagic deposition. The absence of free gas at well GC955-H, coupled with the presence of ongoing chimney-related gas flow nearby, indicates that this seal can be broken where the pelagic unit is cut by the large-throw graben faults. Reservoir connectivity within the levee deposit "pods" is likely, based on established characteristics of levee

  2. Invasion of drilling mud into gas-hydrate-bearing sediments. Part I: effect of drilling mud properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Fulong; Zhang, Keni; Wu, Nengyou; Zhang, Ling; Li, Gang; Jiang, Guosheng; Yu, Yibing; Liu, Li; Qin, Yinghong

    2013-06-01

    To our knowledge, this study is the first to perform a numerical simulation and analysis of the dynamic behaviour of drilling mud invasion into oceanic gas-hydrate-bearing sediment (GHBS) and to consider the effects of such an invasion on borehole stability and the reliability of well logging. As a case study, the simulation background sets up the conditions of mud temperature over hydrate equilibrium temperature and overbalanced drilling, considering the first Chinese expedition to drill gas hydrate (GMGS-1). The results show that dissociating gas may form secondary hydrates in the sediment around borehole by the combined effects of increased pore pressure (caused by mud invasion and flow resistance), endothermic cooling that accompanies hydrate dissociation compounded by the Joule-Thompson effect and the lagged effect of heat transfer in sediments. The secondary hydrate ring around the borehole may be more highly saturated than the in situ sediment. Mud invasion in GHBS is a dynamic process of thermal, fluid (mud invasion), chemical (hydrate dissociation and reformation) and mechanical couplings. All of these factors interact and influence the pore pressure, flow ability, saturation of fluid and hydrates, mechanical parameters and electrical properties of sediments around the borehole, thereby having a strong effect on borehole stability and the results of well logging. The effect is particularly clear in the borehole SH7 of GMGS-1 project. The borehole collapse and resistivity distortion were observed during practical drilling and wireline logging operations in borehole SH7 of the GMGS-1.mud density (i.e. the corresponding borehole pressure), temperature and salinity have a marked influence on the dynamics of mud invasion and on hydrate stability. Therefore, perhaps well-logging distortion caused by mud invasion, hydrate dissociation and reformation should be considered for identifying and evaluating gas hydrate reservoirs. And some suitable drilling

  3. Evidence of oil and gas hydrates within planet Mars: early biogenic or thermogenic sources from the Martian soils and deeper sediments near the deltas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Prasanta K.

    2012-10-01

    The presence of water (in liquid form) within the gullies of the Newton Crater from Mars (near the equator), oil-like hydrocarbons on the surface, gas hydrates in the deeper zones on Mars, and a list of publications on the geochemistry and astrobiology of carbonaceous chondrites have indicated that these petroleum hydrocarbons are closely related to the complex biological species similar to our terrestrial environment. Recent evidence of the possible presence of bacterial globule associated with carbonate minerals in the geological history of Mars may have indicated the link between possible bacterial growth and generation of petroleum hydrocarbons on Mars. Recent evidence of the possible presence of bacterially derived source rocks (organic rich black carbonaceous rocks) and heat flow distribution within Eberswalde and Holden areas of Mars during the earlier Martian geological time (possibly within the first 2 Ga) may have been originated from both biogeneic and thermogenic oil and gas hydrates. The thermal evolution of this biological geopolymer (source rock) could be observed in our earlier findings within the carbonaceous chondrites which show three distinct thermal events. Based on the current knowledge gained from carbonaceous chondrites, deltas, and hydrocarbons present within Mars, the methane on Mars may have been derived from the following sources: (1) deeper gas hydrates; (b) from the cracking of oil to gas within deeper oil or gas bearing reservoirs from a higher reservoir temperature; and (c) the high temperature conversion of current bacterial bodies within the upper surface of Mars.

  4. Pressurized laboratory experiments show no stable carbon isotope fractionation of methane during gas hydrate dissolution and dissociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapham, Laura L; Wilson, Rachel M; Chanton, Jeffrey P

    2012-01-15

    The stable carbon isotopic ratio of methane (δ(13)C-CH(4)) recovered from marine sediments containing gas hydrate is often used to infer the gas source and associated microbial processes. This is a powerful approach because of distinct isotopic fractionation patterns associated with methane production by biogenic and thermogenic pathways and microbial oxidation. However, isotope fractionations due to physical processes, such as hydrate dissolution, have not been fully evaluated. We have conducted experiments to determine if hydrate dissolution or dissociation (two distinct physical processes) results in isotopic fractionation. In a pressure chamber, hydrate was formed from a methane gas source at 2.5 MPa and 4 °C, well within the hydrate stability field. Following formation, the methane source was removed while maintaining the hydrate at the same pressure and temperature which stimulated hydrate dissolution. Over the duration of two dissolution experiments (each ~20-30 days), water and headspace samples were periodically collected and measured for methane concentrations and δ(13)C-CH(4) while the hydrate dissolved. For both experiments, the methane concentrations in the pressure chamber water and headspace increased over time, indicating that the hydrate was dissolving, but the δ(13)C-CH(4) values showed no significant trend and remained constant, within 0.5‰. This lack of isotope change over time indicates that there is no fractionation during hydrate dissolution. We also investigated previous findings that little isotopic fractionation occurs when the gas hydrate dissociates into gas bubbles and water due to the release of pressure. Over a 2.5 MPa pressure drop, the difference in the δ(13)C-CH(4) was dissociates and demonstrated that there is no fractionation when the hydrate dissolves. Therefore, measured δ(13)C-CH(4) values near gas hydrates are not affected by physical processes, and can thus be interpreted to result from either the gas source or

  5. RESULTS FROM THE (1) DATA COLLECTION WORKSHOP, (2) MODELING WORKSHOP AND (3) DRILLING AND CORING METHODS WORKSHOP AS PART OF THE JOINT INDUSTRY PARTICIPATION (JIP) PROJECT TO CHARACTERIZE NATURAL GAS HYDRATES IN THE DEEPWATER GULF OF MEXICO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen A. Holditch; Emrys Jones

    2002-09-01

    In 2000, Chevron began a project to learn how to characterize the natural gas hydrate deposits in the deepwater portions of the Gulf of Mexico. A Joint Industry Participation (JIP) group was formed in 2001, and a project partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began in October 2001. The primary objective of this project is to develop technology and data to assist in the characterization of naturally occurring gas hydrates in the deepwater Gulf of Mexico. These naturally occurring gas hydrates can cause problems relating to drilling and production of oil and gas, as well as building and operating pipelines. Other objectives of this project are to better understand how natural gas hydrates can affect seafloor stability, to gather data that can be used to study climate change, and to determine how the results of this project can be used to assess if and how gas hydrates act as a trapping mechanism for shallow oil or gas reservoirs. As part of the project, three workshops were held. The first was a data collection workshop, held in Houston during March 14-15, 2002. The purpose of this workshop was to find out what data exist on gas hydrates and to begin making that data available to the JIP. The second and third workshop, on Geoscience and Reservoir Modeling, and Drilling and Coring Methods, respectively, were held simultaneously in Houston during May 9-10, 2002. The Modeling Workshop was conducted to find out what data the various engineers, scientists and geoscientists want the JIP to collect in both the field and the laboratory. The Drilling and Coring workshop was to begin making plans on how we can collect the data required by the project's principal investigators.

  6. AVO Character Research of Natural Gas Hydrates in the East China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Huaishan; HUANG Guangnan; HE Yi; TONG Siyou; CUI Shuguo; ZHANG Jin

    2009-01-01

    Natural gas hydrates are considered as strategic resources with commercial potential in the 21st century. Obvious BSR characteristics will be shown on seismic profiles, if there exist natural gas hydrates. The AVO method is one of the methods which can be used to identify and forecast lithologic characteristics and fluid properties by using the relationship between Amplitude and Offset. AVO anomaly is one of the significant signs to check out whether or not there is free gas below the BSR, so it can be used to detect natural gas hydrates from the seismic profile. Considering the geological and geophysical characteristics of the Okinawa Trough and making use of the techniques mentioned above, we can conclude that the conditions there are favorable for the formation and concentration of natural gas hydrates. By analyzing the data collected from the study area, one can discover many different anomalous phenomena on the seismic profile which are related to the existence of natural gas hydrates. Preliminary estimation of the natural gas hydrates in the Okinawa Trough shows that the trough is rich in natural gas hydrates and may become a potential important resources exploration area.

  7. Exploration Potential of Marine Source Rocks Oil-Gas Reservoirs in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    So far, more than 150 marine oil-gas fields have been found onshore and offshore about 350.The marine source rocks are mainly Paleozoic and Mesozoic onshore whereas Tertiary offshore. Three genetic categories of oil-gas reservoirs have been defined for the marine reservoirs in China: primary reservoirs, secondary reservoirs and hydrocarbon-regeneration reservoirs. And three exploration prospects have also been suggested: (1) Primary reservoirs prospects, which are chiefly distributed in many Tertiary basins of the South China Sea (SCS), the Tertiary shelf basins of the East China Sea (ECS) and the Paleozoic of Tarim basin, Sichuan basin and Ordos basin. To explore large-middle-scale even giant oil-gas fields should chiefly be considered in this category reservoirs. These basins are the most hopeful areas to explore marine oil-gas fields in China, among which especially many Tertiary basins of the SCS should be strengthened to explore. (2) Secondary reservoirs prospects, which are mainly distributed in the Paleozoic and Mesozoic of the Tarim basin, Sichuan basin, Qiangtang basin and Chuxiong basin in western China, of which exploration potential is less than that of the primary reservoirs. (3) Hydrocarbon-regeneration reservoirs prospects, which are chiefly distributed in the Bohai Bay basin, North Jiangsu-South Yellow Sea basin, southern North China basin, Jianghan basin,South Poyang basin in eastern China and the Tarim basin in western China, of which source rocks are generally the Paleozoic. And the reservoirs formed by late-stage (always Cenozoic) secondary hydrocarbon generation of the Paleozoic source rocks should mainly be considered to explore, among which middle-small and small oil-gas fields are the chief exploration targets. As a result of higher thermal evolution of Paleozoic and Mesozoic source rocks, the marine reservoirs onshore are mainly gas fields, and so far marine oil fields have only been found in the Tarim basin. No other than establishing

  8. Seismic imaging of a fractured gas hydrate system in the Krishna-Godavari Basin offshore India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, M.; Collett, T.S.; Kumar, P.; Sathe, A.V.; Cook, A.

    2010-01-01

    Gas hydrate was discovered in the Krishna-Godavari (KG) Basin during the India National Gas Hydrate Program (NGHP) Expedition 1 at Site NGHP-01-10 within a fractured clay-dominated sedimentary system. Logging-while-drilling (LWD), coring, and wire-line logging confirmed gas hydrate dominantly in fractures at four borehole sites spanning a 500m transect. Three-dimensional (3D) seismic data were subsequently used to image the fractured system and explain the occurrence of gas hydrate associated with the fractures. A system of two fault-sets was identified, part of a typical passive margin tectonic setting. The LWD-derived fracture network at Hole NGHP-01-10A is to some extent seen in the seismic data and was mapped using seismic coherency attributes. The fractured system around Site NGHP-01-10 extends over a triangular-shaped area of ~2.5 km2 defined using seismic attributes of the seafloor reflection, as well as " seismic sweetness" at the base of the gas hydrate occurrence zone. The triangular shaped area is also showing a polygonal (nearly hexagonal) fault pattern, distinct from other more rectangular fault patterns observed in the study area. The occurrence of gas hydrate at Site NGHP-01-10 is the result of a specific combination of tectonic fault orientations and the abundance of free gas migration from a deeper gas source. The triangular-shaped area of enriched gas hydrate occurrence is bound by two faults acting as migration conduits. Additionally, the fault-associated sediment deformation provides a possible migration pathway for the free gas from the deeper gas source into the gas hydrate stability zone. It is proposed that there are additional locations in the KG Basin with possible gas hydrate accumulation of similar tectonic conditions, and one such location was identified from the 3D seismic data ~6 km NW of Site NGHP-01-10. ?? 2010.

  9. Evaluation of the gas production economics of the gas hydrate cyclic thermal injection model. [Cyclic thermal injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuuskraa, V.A.; Hammersheimb, E.; Sawyer, W.

    1985-05-01

    The objective of the work performed under this directive is to assess whether gas hydrates could potentially be technically and economically recoverable. The technical potential and economics of recovering gas from a representative hydrate reservoir will be established using the cyclic thermal injection model, HYDMOD, appropriately modified for this effort, integrated with economics model for gas production on the North Slope of Alaska, and in the deep offshore Atlantic. The results from this effort are presented in this document. In Section 1, the engineering cost and financial analysis model used in performing the economic analysis of gas production from hydrates -- the Hydrates Gas Economics Model (HGEM) -- is described. Section 2 contains a users guide for HGEM. In Section 3, a preliminary economic assessment of the gas production economics of the gas hydrate cyclic thermal injection model is presented. Section 4 contains a summary critique of existing hydrate gas recovery models. Finally, Section 5 summarizes the model modification made to HYDMOD, the cyclic thermal injection model for hydrate gas recovery, in order to perform this analysis.

  10. Chemical and physical properties of gas hydrates; Chemische und physikalische Eigenschaften von Gashydraten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyn, V. [Inst. fuer Erdoel- und Erdgasforschung, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    Numerous properties of gas hydrates can be inferred directly from their phase behaviour. The present contribution gives a short overview of the properties of gas hydrates using pressure-temperature curves to depict their phase behaviour. It also describes the growth kinetics and inhibition of gas hydrates. (MSK) [Deutsch] Eine Vielzahl der Eigenschaften von Gashydraten lassen sich direkt aus ihrem Phasenverhalten herleiten. In kurzer Form wird ein Ueberblick ueber die Eigenschaften der Gashydrate gegeben. Druck-Temperatur-Diagramme erlaeutern des Phasenverhalten. Ebenso wird die Wachstumskinetik und die Inhibierung der Gashydrate beschrieben.

  11. Experimental and Modeling Studies on the Prediction of Gas Hydrate Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Yi Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available On the base of some kinetics model analysis and kinetic observation of hydrate formation process, a new prediction model of gas hydrate formation is proposed. The analysis of the present model shows that the formation of gas hydrate not only relevant with gas composition and free water content but also relevant with temperature and pressure. Through contrast experiment, the predicted result of the new prediction method of gas hydrate crystallization kinetics is close to measured result, it means that the prediction method can reflect the hydrate crystallization accurately.

  12. Evidence for Freshwater Discharge at a Gas Hydrate-Bearing Seafloor Mound on the Beaufort Sea Continental Slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlman, J.; Lorenson, T. D.; Hart, P. E.; Ruppel, C. D.; Joseph, C.; Torres, M. E.; Edwards, B. D.

    2011-12-01

    A deep-water (~2.5 km water depth) seafloor mound located ~150 km offshore of the North Slope Alaska, informally named the Canning Seafloor Mound (CSM), contains a documented occurrence of gas hydrate; the first from the Beaufort Sea. Gases and porewater extracted from cores taken at the CSM summit several months after core recovery provided surprisingly consistent and outstanding results. Gases migrating into the structure are likely a mixture of primary microbial gas formed by carbonate reduction and secondary microbial gas formed from degraded thermogenic gases, linking the system to deep oil and gas generation (see companion abstract by Lorenson et al.). Pore fluids extracted from the base of the 572 cm-long hydrate-bearing core had chloride values as low as 160 mM, which equates to an ~80% freshwater contribution. Low chloride values, often interpreted as a product of gas hydrate dissociation in hydrate-bearing cores, were coincident with sulfate values in excess of 1 mM and as high as 22 mM (seawater is ~28mM). High sulfate concentrations generally indicate an absence of methane, and, thus, gas hydrate; therefore, an allochthonous source of freshwater is required. Potential sources are clay mineral dehydration, clay membrane filtration and/or a meteoric water influx. Several lines of evidence indicate the Canning Seafloor Mound is connected to either a deep, landward freshwater aquifer or to an unusually fresh oil field brine. First, Na/Cl ratios decrease from marine (~0.86) near the seafloor to distinctly higher values of 1.20 at the bottom of the core. Second, clay dehydration and ion filtration processes have not, to our knowledge, yielded fluids as fresh as measured in these near-seafloor sediments. Third, and most importantly, δ18O-δD systematics of fluid end members are entirely consistent with a meteoric water source and inconsistent with trends expected for either gas hydrate dissociation, smectite to illite clay dewatering or ion filtration

  13. Study on gas hydrate as a new energy resource in the twenty first century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Byung Jae; Kim, Won Sik; Oh, Jae Ho [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea)] [and others

    1998-12-01

    Methane hydrate, a special type of clathrate hydrates, is a metastable solid compound mainly consisted of methane and water and generally called as gas hydrate. It is stable in the specific low- temperature/high-pressure conditions. Very large amount of methane that is the main component of natural gas, is accumulated in the form of methane hydrate subaquatic areas. Methane hydrate are the major reservoir of methane on the earth. On the other hand, the development and transmission through pipeline of oil and natural gas in the permafrost and deep subaquatic regions are significantly complicated by formation and dissociation of methane hydrate. The dissociation of natural methane hydrates caused by increasing temperature and decreasing pressure could cause the atmospheric pollution and geohazard. The formation, stable existence and dissociation of natural methane hydrates depend on the temperature, pressure, and composition of gas and characteristics of the interstitial waters. For the study on geophysical and geological conditions for the methane hydrate accumulation and to find BSR in the East Sea, Korea, the geophysical surveys using air-gun system, multibeam echo sounder, SBP were implemented in last September. The water temperature data vs. depth were obtained to determine the methane hydrate stability zone in the study area. The experimental equilibrium condition of methane hydrate was also measured in 3 wt.% sodium chloride solution. The relationship between Methane hydrate formation time and overpressure was analyzed through the laboratory work. (author). 49 refs., 6 tabs., 26 figs.

  14. Mechanisms Leading to Co-Existence of Gas Hydrate in Ocean Sediments [Part 2 of 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, Steven; Juanes, Ruben

    2011-12-31

    In this project we have sought to explain the co-existence of gas and hydrate phases in sediments within the gas hydrate stability zone. We have focused on the gas/brine interface at the scale of individual grains in the sediment. The capillary forces associated with a gas/brine interface play a dominant role in many processes that occur in the pores of sediments and sedimentary rocks. The mechanical forces associated with the same interface can lead to fracture initiation and propagation in hydrate-bearing sediments. Thus the unifying theme of the research reported here is that pore scale phenomena are key to understanding large scale phenomena in hydrate-bearing sediments whenever a free gas phase is present. Our analysis of pore-scale phenomena in this project has delineated three regimes that govern processes in which the gas phase pressure is increasing: fracturing, capillary fingering and viscous fingering. These regimes are characterized by different morphology of the region invaded by the gas. On the other hand when the gas phase pressure is decreasing, the corresponding regimes are capillary fingering and compaction. In this project, we studied all these regimes except compaction. Many processes of interest in hydrate-bearing sediments can be better understood when placed in the context of the appropriate regime. For example, hydrate formation in sub-permafrost sediments falls in the capillary fingering regime, whereas gas invasion into ocean sediments is likely to fall into the fracturing regime. Our research provides insight into the mechanisms by which gas reservoirs are converted to hydrate as the base of the gas hydrate stability zone descends through the reservoir. If the reservoir was no longer being charged, then variation in grain size distribution within the reservoir explain hydrate saturation profiles such as that at Mt. Elbert, where sand-rich intervals containing little hydrate are interspersed between intervals containing large hydrate

  15. Mechanisms Leading to Co-Existence of Gas Hydrate in Ocean Sediments [Part 2 of 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, Steven; Juanes, Ruben

    2011-12-31

    In this project we have sought to explain the co-existence of gas and hydrate phases in sediments within the gas hydrate stability zone. We have focused on the gas/brine interface at the scale of individual grains in the sediment. The capillary forces associated with a gas/brine interface play a dominant role in many processes that occur in the pores of sediments and sedimentary rocks. The mechanical forces associated with the same interface can lead to fracture initiation and propagation in hydrate-bearing sediments. Thus the unifying theme of the research reported here is that pore scale phenomena are key to understanding large scale phenomena in hydrate-bearing sediments whenever a free gas phase is present. Our analysis of pore-scale phenomena in this project has delineated three regimes that govern processes in which the gas phase pressure is increasing: fracturing, capillary fingering and viscous fingering. These regimes are characterized by different morphology of the region invaded by the gas. On the other hand when the gas phase pressure is decreasing, the corresponding regimes are capillary fingering and compaction. In this project, we studied all these regimes except compaction. Many processes of interest in hydrate-bearing sediments can be better understood when placed in the context of the appropriate regime. For example, hydrate formation in sub-permafrost sediments falls in the capillary fingering regime, whereas gas invasion into ocean sediments is likely to fall into the fracturing regime. Our research provides insight into the mechanisms by which gas reservoirs are converted to hydrate as the base of the gas hydrate stability zone descends through the reservoir. If the reservoir was no longer being charged, then variation in grain size distribution within the reservoir explain hydrate saturation profiles such as that at Mt. Elbert, where sand-rich intervals containing little hydrate are interspersed between intervals containing large hydrate

  16. Mechanisms Leading to Co-Existence of Gas Hydrate in Ocean Sediments [Part 1 of 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, Steven; Juanes, Ruben

    2011-12-31

    In this project we have sought to explain the co-existence of gas and hydrate phases in sediments within the gas hydrate stability zone. We have focused on the gas/brine interface at the scale of individual grains in the sediment. The capillary forces associated with a gas/brine interface play a dominant role in many processes that occur in the pores of sediments and sedimentary rocks. The mechanical forces associated with the same interface can lead to fracture initiation and propagation in hydrate-bearing sediments. Thus the unifying theme of the research reported here is that pore scale phenomena are key to understanding large scale phenomena in hydrate-bearing sediments whenever a free gas phase is present. Our analysis of pore-scale phenomena in this project has delineated three regimes that govern processes in which the gas phase pressure is increasing: fracturing, capillary fingering and viscous fingering. These regimes are characterized by different morphology of the region invaded by the gas. On the other hand when the gas phase pressure is decreasing, the corresponding regimes are capillary fingering and compaction. In this project, we studied all these regimes except compaction. Many processes of interest in hydrate-bearing sediments can be better understood when placed in the context of the appropriate regime. For example, hydrate formation in sub-permafrost sediments falls in the capillary fingering regime, whereas gas invasion into ocean sediments is likely to fall into the fracturing regime. Our research provides insight into the mechanisms by which gas reservoirs are converted to hydrate as the base of the gas hydrate stability zone descends through the reservoir. If the reservoir was no longer being charged, then variation in grain size distribution within the reservoir explain hydrate saturation profiles such as that at Mt. Elbert, where sand-rich intervals containing little hydrate are interspersed between intervals containing large hydrate

  17. Simulation of natural gas production from submarine gas hydrate deposits combined with carbon dioxide storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicki, Georg; Schlüter, Stefan; Hennig, Torsten; Deerberg, Görge

    2013-04-01

    The recovery of methane from gas hydrate layers that have been detected in several submarine sediments and permafrost regions around the world so far is considered to be a promising measure to overcome future shortages in natural gas as fuel or raw material for chemical syntheses. Being aware that natural gas resources that can be exploited with conventional technologies are limited, research is going on to open up new sources and develop technologies to produce methane and other energy carriers. Thus various research programs have started since the early 1990s in Japan, USA, Canada, South Korea, India, China and Germany to investigate hydrate deposits and develop technologies to destabilize the hydrates and obtain the pure gas. In recent years, intensive research has focussed on the capture and storage of carbon dioxide from combustion processes to reduce climate change. While different natural or manmade reservoirs like deep aquifers, exhausted oil and gas deposits or other geological formations are considered to store gaseous or liquid carbon dioxide, the storage of carbon dioxide as hydrate in former methane hydrate fields is another promising alternative. Due to beneficial stability conditions, methane recovery may be well combined with CO2 storage in form of hydrates. This has been shown in several laboratory tests and simulations - technical field tests are still in preparation. Within the scope of the German research project »SUGAR«, different technological approaches are evaluated and compared by means of dynamic system simulations and analysis. Detailed mathematical models for the most relevant chemical and physical effects are developed. The basic mechanisms of gas hydrate formation/dissociation and heat and mass transport in porous media are considered and implemented into simulation programs like CMG STARS and COMSOL Multiphysics. New simulations based on field data have been carried out. The studies focus on the evaluation of the gas production

  18. A quantum chemistry study of natural gas hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atilhan, Mert; Pala, Nezih; Aparicio, Santiago

    2014-04-01

    The structure and properties of natural gas hydrates containing hydrocarbons, CO₂, and N₂ molecules were studied by using computational quantum chemistry methods via the density functional theory approach. All host cages involved in I, II, and H types structures where filled with hydrocarbons up to pentanes, CO₂ and N₂ molecules, depending on their size, and the structures of these host-guest systems optimized. Structural properties, vibrational spectra, and density of states were analyzed together with results from atoms-in-a-molecule and natural bond orbitals methods. The inclusion of dispersion terms in the used functional plays a vital role for obtaining reliable information, and thus, B97D functional was shown to be useful for these systems. Results showed remarkable interaction energies, not strongly affected by the type of host cage, with molecules tending to be placed at the center of the cavities when host cages and guest molecules cavities are of similar size, but with molecules approaching hexagonal faces for larger cages. Vibrational properties show remarkable features in certain regions, with shiftings rising from host-guest interactions, and useful patterns in the terahertz region rising from water surface vibrations strongly coupled with guest molecules. Likewise, calculations on crystal systems for the I and H types were carried out using a pseudopotential approach combined with Grimme's method to take account of dispersion.

  19. LOW TEMPERATURE X-RAY DIFFRACTION STUDIES OF NATURAL GAS HYDRATE SAMPLES FROM THE GULF OF MEXICO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rawn, Claudia J [ORNL; Sassen, Roger [Texas A& M University; Ulrich, Shannon M [ORNL; Phelps, Tommy Joe [ORNL; Chakoumakos, Bryan C [ORNL; Payzant, E Andrew [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    Clathrate hydrates of methane and other small alkanes occur widespread terrestrially in marine sediments of the continental margins and in permafrost sediments of the arctic. Quantitative study of natural clathrate hydrates is hampered by the difficulty in obtaining pristine samples, particularly from submarine environments. Bringing samples of clathrate hydrate from the seafloor at depths without compromising their integrity is not trivial. Most physical property measurements are based on studies of laboratory-synthesized samples. Here we report X-ray powder diffraction measurements of a natural gas hydrate sample from the Green Canyon, Gulf of Mexico. The first data were collected in 2002 and revealed ice and structure II gas hydrate. In the subsequent time the sample has been stored in liquid nitrogen. More recent X-ray powder diffraction data have been collected as functions of temperature and time. This new data indicates that the larger sample is heterogeneous in ice content and shows that the amount of sII hydrate decreases with increasing temperature and time as expected. However, the dissociation rate is higher at lower temperatures and earlier in the experiment.

  20. Reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mokhtar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Scarab field is an analog for the deep marine slope channels in Nile Delta of Egypt. It is one of the Pliocene reservoirs in West delta deep marine concession. Channel-1 and channel-2 are considered as main channels of Scarab field. FMI log is used for facies classification and description of the channel subsequences. Core data analysis is integrated with FMI to confirm the lithologic response and used as well for describing the reservoir with high resolution. A detailed description of four wells penetrated through both channels lead to define channel sequences. Some of these sequences are widely extended within the field under study exhibiting a good correlation between the wells. Other sequences were of local distribution. Lithologic sequences are characterized mainly by fining upward in Vshale logs. The repetition of these sequences reflects the stacking pattern and high heterogeneity of the sandstone reservoir. It also refers to the sea level fluctuation which has a direct influence to the facies change. In terms of integration of the previously described sequences with a high resolution seismic data a depositional model has been established. The model defines different stages of the channel using Scarab-2 well as an ideal analog.

  1. Gas Hydrate Stability at Low Temperatures and High Pressures with Applications to Mars and Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, G. M.; Kargel, J. S.; Catling, D. C.

    2004-01-01

    Gas hydrates are implicated in the geochemical evolution of both Mars and Europa [1- 3]. Most models developed for gas hydrate chemistry are based on the statistical thermodynamic model of van der Waals and Platteeuw [4] with subsequent modifications [5-8]. None of these models are, however, state-of-the-art with respect to gas hydrate/electrolyte interactions, which is particularly important for planetary applications where solution chemistry may be very different from terrestrial seawater. The objectives of this work were to add gas (carbon dioxide and methane) hydrate chemistries into an electrolyte model parameterized for low temperatures and high pressures (the FREZCHEM model) and use the model to examine controls on gas hydrate chemistries for Mars and Europa.

  2. Gas hydrate occurrence in the Krishna-Godavari offshore basin off the east coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramana, M.V.; Ramprasad, T.

    in 1996 with an ambitious plan of exploring gas hydrate deposits within the Indian continental margins to meet partly the projected demand-supply gap of fossil fuels. Continuous efforts of Indian scientific community and oil industry culminated...

  3. Fluid Migration Patterns in Gas Hydrate System of Four-Way-Closure Ridge Offshore Southwestern Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liwen; Chi, Wu-Cheng; Lin, Yu-Hsieh; Berndt, Christian; Lin, Saulwood

    2016-04-01

    Four-Way-Closure (4WC) Ridge shows great potential as a hydrate prospect from collected multitude of marine geophysical datasets offshore southwestern Taiwan. The aim of my study is to better understand the fluid migration patterns and the possible source locations of the methane at this site. It is a cold seep site with an elongated NW-SE trending anticlinal ridge, which is formed by fault-related folds in the frontal segment of the lower slope domain of the Taiwan accretionary prism along its convergent boundary. So I detail recognized the regional feature structures of the 4WC Ridge, including the thrust faulting and a seismic chimney beneath the seepage sites. I plan to study the temperature perturbation at the 4WC Ridge to better understand gas hydrate system there. To quantify the amount of temperature perturbation near the fault zone, we need to correct the temperature field data for other geological processes. One important correction we want to make concerns the topographic effects on the shallow crust temperature field. So we used 3D finite element method to quantify how much temperature perturbation can be attributed to the local bathymetry at the 4WC Ridge. This model will give us a temperature field based on pure thermal conduction. Then, we can compare the model temperature field with the temperature field derived from thousands of BSRs from the seismic cube, and interpret any resulting temperature discrepancy. As our previous study, we known several geological processes can cause such a discrepancy, including advective fluid migration. If the fault zone fluid migration hypothesis is correct and gas hydrate system reacts to the deep warm fluids from below it, we expect that the BSR will become shallower near the fluid pathways, and the BSR-based temperature field might be a few degrees Celsius higher than in the 3D thermal conductive temperature field. Otherwise, the two temperature fields should be similar. This study is important for hydrate

  4. Numerical study on the deformation of soil stratum and vertical wells with gas hydrate dissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xudong; Zhang, Xuhui; Lu, Xiaobing; Wei, Wei; Shi, Yaohong

    2016-07-01

    Gas hydrate (GH) dissociates owing to thermal injection or pressure reduction from the well in gas/oil or GH exploitation. GH dissociation leads to, for example, decreases in soil strength, engineering failures such as wellbore instabilities, and marine landslides. The FLAC3D software was used to analyze the deformation of the soil stratum and vertical wells with GH dissociation. The effects of Young's modulus, internal friction angle, cohesion of the GH layer after dissociation, and the thickness of the GH layer on the deformation of soils were studied. It is shown that the maximum displacement in the whole soil stratum occurs at the interface between the GH layer and the overlayer. The deformation of the soil stratum and wells increases with decreases in the modulus, internal friction angle, and cohesion after GH dissociation. The increase in thickness of the GH layer enlarges the deformation of the soil stratum and wells with GH dissociation. The hydrostatic pressure increases the settlement of the soil stratum, while constraining horizontal displacement. The interaction between two wells becomes significant when the affected zone around each well exceeds half the length of the GH dissociation zone.

  5. Numerical study on the deformation of soil stratum and vertical wells with gas hydrate dissociation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xudong Chen; Xuhui Zhang; Xiaobing Lu; Wei Wei; Yaohong Shi

    2016-01-01

    Gas hydrate (GH) dissociates owing to thermal injection or pressure reduction from the well in gas/oil or GH exploitation. GH dissociation leads to, for exam-ple, decreases in soil strength, engineering failures such as wellbore instabilities, and marine landslides. The FLAC3D software was used to analyze the deformation of the soil stratum and vertical wells with GH dissociation. The effects of Young’s modulus, internal friction angle, cohesion of the GH layer after dissociation, and the thickness of the GH layer on the deformation of soils were studied. It is shown that the maximum displacement in the whole soil stratum occurs at the interface between the GH layer and the over-layer. The deformation of the soil stratum and wells increases with decreases in the modulus, internal friction angle, and cohesion after GH dissociation. The increase in thickness of the GH layer enlarges the deformation of the soil stratum and wells with GH dissociation. The hydrostatic pressure increases the settlement of the soil stratum, while constrain-ing horizontal displacement. The interaction between two wells becomes significant when the affected zone around each well exceeds half the length of the GH dissociation zone.

  6. HFC-134a refrigerant gas hydrate formation process and RIN model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, the macroscopic visualization experiments of HFC-134a refrigerant gas hydrate formation are investigated. According to the macroscopic photos and Mori's microscopic photos of HFC-134a hydrate formation process, the mechanism of gas hydrate formation is analyzed.A random inducement nucleation model is presented to describe the hydrate formation process. The factors affecting the fractal growth dimension in the model, such as step,branch increment and angle, are discussed.``

  7. Investigation of shallow gas hydrate occurrence and gas seep activity on the Sakhalin continental slope, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Young Keun; Baranov, Boris; Obzhirov, Anatoly; Salomatin, Alexander; Derkachev, Alexander; Hachikubo, Akihiro; Minami, Hrotsugu; Kuk Hong, Jong

    2016-04-01

    The Sakhalin continental slope has been a well-known gas hydrate area since the first finding of gas hydrate in 1980's. This area belongs to the southernmost glacial sea in the northern hemisphere where most of the area sea is covered by sea ice the winter season. Very high organic carbon content in the sediment, cold sea environment, and active tectonic regime in the Sakhalin slope provide a very favorable condition for occurring shallow gas hydrate accumulation and gas emission phenomena. Research expeditions under the framework of a Korean-Russian-Japanese long-term international collaboration projects (CHAOS, SSGH-I, SSGH-II projects) have been conducted to investigate gas hydrate occurrence and gas seepage activities on the Sakhalin continental slope, Russia from 2003 to 2015. During the expeditions, near-surface gas hydrate samples at more than 30 sites have been retrieved and hundreds of active gas seepage structures on the seafloor were newly registered by multidisciplinary surveys. The gas hydrates occurrence at the various water depths from about 300 m to 1000 m in the study area were accompanied by active gas seepage-related phenomena in the sub-bottom, on the seafloor, and in the water column: well-defined upward gas migration structures (gas chimney) imaged by high-resolution seismic, hydroacoustic anomalies of gas emissions (gas flares) detected by echosounders, seafloor high backscatter intensities (seepage structures) imaged by side-scan sonar and bathymetric structures (pockmarks and mounds) mapped by single/multi-beam surveys, and very shallow SMTZ (sulphate-methane transition zone) depths, strong microbial activities and high methane concentrations measured in sediment/seawater samples. The highlights of the expeditions are shallow gas hydrate occurrences around 300 m in the water depth which is nearly closed to the upper boundary of gas hydrate stability zone in the area and a 2,000 m-high gas flare emitted from the deep seafloor.

  8. Regional long-term production modeling from a single well test, Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, B.J.; Kurihara, M.; White, M.D.; Moridis, G.J.; Wilson, S.J.; Pooladi-Darvish, M.; Gaddipati, M.; Masuda, Y.; Collett, T.S.; Hunter, R.B.; Narita, H.; Rose, K.; Boswell, R.

    2011-01-01

    Following the results from the open-hole formation pressure response test in the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well (Mount Elbert well) using Schlumberger's Modular Dynamics Formation Tester (MDT) wireline tool, the International Methane Hydrate Reservoir Simulator Code Comparison project performed long-term reservoir simulations on three different model reservoirs. These descriptions were based on 1) the Mount Elbert gas hydrate accumulation as delineated by an extensive history-matching exercise, 2) an estimation of the hydrate accumulation near the Prudhoe Bay L-pad, and 3) a reservoir that would be down-dip of the Prudhoe Bay L-pad and therefore warmer and deeper. All of these simulations were based, in part, on the results of the MDT results from the Mount Elbert Well. The comparison group's consensus value for the initial permeability of the hydrate-filled reservoir (k = 0.12 mD) and the permeability model based on the MDT history match were used as the basis for subsequent simulations on the three regional scenarios. The simulation results of the five different simulation codes, CMG STARS, HydrateResSim, MH-21 HYDRES, STOMP-HYD, and TOUGH+HYDRATE exhibit good qualitative agreement and the variability of potential methane production rates from gas hydrate reservoirs is illustrated. As expected, the predicted methane production rate increased with increasing in situ reservoir temperature; however, a significant delay in the onset of rapid hydrate dissociation is observed for a cold, homogeneous reservoir and it is found to be repeatable. The inclusion of reservoir heterogeneity in the description of this cold reservoir is shown to eliminate this delayed production. Overall, simulations utilized detailed information collected across the Mount Elbert reservoir either obtained or determined from geophysical well logs, including thickness (37 ft), porosity (35%), hydrate saturation (65%), intrinsic permeability (1000 mD), pore water

  9. Permafrost-associated gas hydrate: is it really approximately 1% of the global system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppel, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    Permafrost-associated gas hydrates are often assumed to contain ∼1 % of the global gas-in-place in gas hydrates based on a study26 published over three decades ago. As knowledge of permafrost-associated gas hydrates has grown, it has become clear that many permafrost-associated gas hydrates are inextricably linked to an associated conventional petroleum system, and that their formation history (trapping of migrated gas in situ during Pleistocene cooling) is consistent with having been sourced at least partially in nearby thermogenic gas deposits. Using modern data sets that constrain the distribution of continuous permafrost onshore5 and subsea permafrost on circum-Arctic Ocean continental shelves offshore and that estimate undiscovered conventional gas within arctic assessment units,16 the done here reveals where permafrost-associated gas hydrates are most likely to occur, concluding that Arctic Alaska and the West Siberian Basin are the best prospects. A conservative estimate is that 20 Gt C (2.7·1013 kg CH4) may be sequestered in permafrost-associated gas hydrates if methane were the only hydrate-former. This value is slightly more than 1 % of modern estimates (corresponding to 1600 Gt C to 1800 Gt C2,22) for global gas-in-place in methane hydrates and about double the absolute estimate (11.2 Gt C) made in 1981.26

  10. Dissociation and specific heats of gas hydrates under submarine and sublacustrine environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagawa, R.; Hachikubo, A.; Shoji, H. [Kitami Inst. of Technology, Kitami (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    Studies have shown that natural gas hydrates located near a mud volcano in Lake Baikal contain high concentrations of ethane. Gas hydrates absorb and release large amounts of latent heat during their formation and dissociation processes. In this study, the specific heat of synthetic methane and ethane hydrates were measured under high pressure using a heat-flow calorimeter. The aim of the study was to develop an improved understanding of the thermal environment of gas hydrate-bearing sediments in submarine and sublacustrine environments. Ice was placed in 2 sampling cells and pressurized with methane and ethane at 5 MPa and 2 MPa. After the gas hydrates formed, the samples were then heated from 263 K to 288 K. An analysis of data obtained from the experiment showed that large negative heat flow peaks corresponding with methane gas hydrate dissociation occurred in temperature ranges of 279 to 282 K at a pressure of 5 MPa, and at temperatures of 283-286 K at 2 MPa for the ethane gas hydrate. Future experiments with the calorimeter will be conducted at higher pressure ranges. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Evaluation of the geological relationships to gas hydrate formation and stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krason, J.; Finley, P.

    1988-01-01

    The summaries of regional basin analyses document that potentially economic accumulations of gas hydrates can be formed in both active and passive margin settings. The principal requirement for gas hydrate formation in either setting is abundant methane. Passive margin sediments with high sedimentation rates and sufficient sedimentary organic carbon can generate large quantities of biogenic methane for hydrate formation. Similarly, active margin locations near a terrigenous sediment source can also have high methane generation potential due to rapid burial of adequate amounts of sedimentary organic matter. Many active margins with evidence of gas hydrate presence correspond to areas subject to upwelling. Upwelling currents can enhance methane generation by increasing primary productivity and thus sedimentary organic carbon. Structural deformation of the marginal sediments at both active and passive sites can enhance gas hydrate formation by providing pathways for migration of both biogenic and thermogenic gas to the shallow gas hydrate stability zone. Additionally, conventional hydrocarbon traps may initially concentrate sufficient amounts of hydrocarbons for subsequent gas hydrate formation.

  12. Recognition of Gas Hydrate Using AVO-Attribute Crossplots Based on the Porous Medium Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhangYuwen; LiuXuewei; YaoChangli

    2005-01-01

    Gas hydrate is gradually considered as a potential energy resource. The presence of gas hydrate is commonly inferred from the appearance of “bottom simulating reflector”(BSR) on seismic section. Understanding the properties of hydrate-bearing sediments and studying the AVO characteristics of BSR are of great significance. Although more and more domestic and international studies have been conducted on the subjects mentioned above, they are still in the primary stage and need a long way to go to be appled in practice, especially in the field of gas hydrate. Aiming at the identification of gas hydrate, we studied the characteristics of the AVO attributes based on the Biot's theory when the sediments were bearing gas hydrate or free gas. The AVO attribute crossplots obtained from seismic sections with the forward simulation by means of staggered-grid finite-difference were compared with that of theoretic models. The coincidence shows that utilization of AVO attribute crossplots is an effective way to recognize gas hydrate and free gas.

  13. Geologic implications of gas hydrates in the offshore of India: Krishna-Godavari Basin, Mahanadi Basin, Andaman Sea, Kerala-Konkan Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pushpendra; Collett, Timothy S.; Boswell, Ray; Cochran, James R.; Lall, Malcolm; Mazumdar, Aninda; Ramana, Mangipudi Venkata; Ramprasad, Tammisetti; Riedel, Michael; Sain, Kalachand; Sathe, Arun Vasant; Vishwanath, Krishna; Yadav, U.S.

    2014-01-01

    Gas hydrate resource assessments that indicate enormous global volumes of gas present within hydrate accumulations have been one of the primary driving forces behind the growing interest in gas hydrates. Gas hydrate volumetric estimates in recent years have focused on documenting the geologic parameters in the “gas hydrate petroleum system” that control the occurrence of gas hydrates in nature. The primary goals of this report are to review our present understanding of the geologic controls on the occurrence of gas hydrate in the offshore of India and to document the application of the petroleum system approach to the study of gas hydrates.

  14. Gas hydrate formation in deep-sea sediments - on the role of sediment-mechanical process determination; Gashydratbildung in Tiefseesedimenten - zur Rolle der sedimentmechanischen Prozesssteuerung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feeser, V. [Kiel Univ. (Germany). Geologisch-Palaeontologisches Inst.

    1997-12-31

    Slope failures in gas hydrate regions are encountered throughout the oceans. The stability of seafloor slopes can be assessed and predicted by means of calculation methods based on mechanical laws and parameters which describe the deformation behaviour and/or mechanical strength of the slope-forming sediments. Thermodynamic conditions conducive to the formation of gas hydrates in marine sediments differ from conditions prevailing in exclusively water-filled systems. The present contribution describes the relevant energetic conditions on the basis of a simple spherical model giving due consideration to petrographic parameters. Depending on pore size distribution, lithological stress conditions, pore water pressure, and sediment strength gas hydrates will either develop as a cementing phase or as segregated lenses. (MSK) [Deutsch] In den Weltmeeren ereignen sich immer wieder Hangrutschungen in Gashydratgebieten. Die zur Beurteilung und Prognonse von Hangstabilitaeten zu verwendenden Berechnungsverfahren erfordern Stoffgesetze und Parameter, welche das Deformations-und/oder Festigkeitsverhalten der hangbildenden Sedimente beschreiben. Die thermodynamischen Bildungsbedingungen von Gashydraten in marinen Sedimenten unterscheiden sich von den Bedingungen in ausschliesslich wassergefuellten Systemen. Unter Einbeziehung petrographischer Eigenschaften werden die energetischen Bedingungen beschrieben. Dazu dient ein einfaches Kugelmodell. Je nach vorhandenem Porenraumspektrum, lithostatischen Spannungsverhaeltnissen, Porenwasserdruck und Sedimentfestigkeit wachsen Gashydrate als Porenraumzement oder als segregierte Linsen.

  15. Gas hydrates distribution in the Shenhu area, northern South China Sea: comparisons between the eight drilling sites with gashydrate petroleum system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, M.; Yang, R.; Wang, H.; Sha, Z.; Liang, J.; Wu, N.; Qiao, S.; Cong, X.

    2016-07-01

    The results of the first marine gas hydrate drilling expedition of Guangzhou Marine Geological Survey (GMGS-1) in northern continental slope of the South China Sea revealed a variable distribution of gas hydrates in the Shenhu area. In this study, comparisons between the eight sites with gas-hydrate petroleum system were used to analyze and re-examine hydrate potential. In the Shenhu gas hydrate drilling area, all the sites were located in a suitable low-temperature, high-pressure environment. Biogenic and thermogenic gases contributed to the formation of hydrates. Gas chimneys and some small-scale faults (or micro-scale fractures) compose the migration pathways for gas-bearing fluids. Between these sites, there are three key differences: the seafloor temperatures and pressures; geothermal gradient and sedimentary conditions. Variations of seafloor temperatures and pressures related to water depths and geothermal gradient would lead to changes in the thickness of gas hydrate stability zones. Although the lithology and grain size of the sediments were similar, two distinct sedimentary units were identified for the first time through seismic interpretation, analysis of deep-water sedimentary processes, and the Cm pattern (plotted one-percentile and median values from grain-size analyses), implying the heterogeneous sedimentary conditions above Bottom Simulating Reflectors (BSRs). Based on the analyses of forming mechanisms and sedimentary processes, these two fine-grained sedimentary units have different physical properties. Fine-grained turbidites (Unit I) with thin-bedded chaotic reflectors at the bottom acted as the host rocks for hydrates; whereas, finegrained sediments related to soft-sediment deformation (Unit II) characterized by thick continuous reflectors at the top would serve as regional homogeneous caprocks. Low-flux methane that migrated upwards along chimneys could be enriched preferentially in fine-grained turbidites, resulting in the formation of

  16. Seismic detection and quantification of gas hydrates in Alaminos Canyon, Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jianchun, D.; Banik, N.; Shelander, D.; Bunge, G.; Dutta, N. [Schlumberger Data Consulting Services, Houston, TX (United States). Reservoir Seismic Services

    2008-07-01

    Due to the potential of gas hydrates as an alternative energy resource, and as possible sources of shallow hazards for drilling and production of oil and gas, and as an agent of long-term, global climate change, naturally occurring gas hydrates have drawn significant attention from the scientific community and industry around the world. Gas hydrates exist in shallow sediments in Arctic permafrost regions and in the world's deepwater oceans. A large portion of naturally occurring hydrates offer potential for an energy resource. Because the world demand for fossil fuel is ever-increasing and the supply is dwindling, it is crucial to have a methodology for reliable assessment of gas hydrates accumulation in worldwide deepwater basins. Three-dimensional seismic reflection is a possible technology for such efforts. This paper presented the results of a study on the quantitative estimation of gas hydrates in Alaminos Canyon block 818, Gulf of Mexico. A five-step workflow was used for the study, which included high resolution seismic re-processing; prestack full waveform inversion (PSWI) at selected locations; three-dimensional simultaneous inversion; rock physics modeling; and hydrate quantification. The final estimation of gas hydrates saturation was done using both a direct deterministic regression-based transformation method and using Bayesian statistical inversion. Based on these inversion results, a series of prospects were generated within the study area. The study identified a large area, approximately 1 square kilometre in the middle east of the AC818, containing high concentration gas hydrates bearing sediments. 8 refs., 9 figs.

  17. Observed correlation between the depth to base and top of gas hydrate occurrence from review of global drilling data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Michael; Collett, Timothy S.

    2017-01-01

    A global inventory of data from gas hydrate drilling expeditions is used to develop relationships between the base of structure I gas hydrate stability, top of gas hydrate occurrence, sulfate-methane transition depth, pressure (water depth), and geothermal gradients. The motivation of this study is to provide first-order estimates of the top of gas hydrate occurrence and associated thickness of the gas hydrate occurrence zone for climate-change scenarios, global carbon budget analyses, or gas hydrate resource assessments. Results from publically available drilling campaigns (21 expeditions and 52 drill sites) off Cascadia, Blake Ridge, India, Korea, South China Sea, Japan, Chile, Peru, Costa Rica, Gulf of Mexico, and Borneo reveal a first-order linear relationship between the depth to the top and base of gas hydrate occurrence. The reason for these nearly linear relationships is believed to be the strong pressure and temperature dependence of methane solubility in the absence of large difference in thermal gradients between the various sites assessed. In addition, a statistically robust relationship was defined between the thickness of the gas hydrate occurrence zone and the base of gas hydrate stability (in meters below seafloor). The relationship developed is able to predict the depth of the top of gas hydrate occurrence zone using observed depths of the base of gas hydrate stability within less than 50 m at most locations examined in this study. No clear correlation of the depth to the top and base of gas hydrate occurrences with geothermal gradient and sulfate-methane transition depth was identified.

  18. Using open hole and cased-hole resistivity logs to monitor gas hydrate dissociation during a thermal test in the mallik 5L-38 research well, Mackenzie Delta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, B.I.; Collett, T.S.; Lewis, R.E.; Dubourg, I.

    2008-01-01

    Gas hydrates, which are naturally occurring ice-like combinations of gas and water, have the potential to provide vast amounts of natural gas from the world's oceans and polar regions. However, producing gas economically from hydrates entails major technical challenges. Proposed recovery methods such as dissociating or melting gas hydrates by heating or depressurization are currently being tested. One such test was conducted in northern Canada by the partners in the Mallik 2002 Gas Hydrate Production Research Well Program. This paper describes how resistivity logs were used to determine the size of the annular region of gas hydrate dissociation that occurred around the wellbore during the thermal test in the Mallik 5L-38 well. An open-hole logging suite, run prior to the thermal test, included array induction, array laterolog, nuclear magnetic resonance and 1.1-GHz electromagnetic propagation logs. The reservoir saturation tool was run both before and after the thermal test to monitor formation changes. A cased-hole formation resistivity log was run after the test.Baseline resistivity values in each formation layer (Rt) were established from the deep laterolog data. The resistivity in the region of gas hydrate dissociation near the wellbore (Rxo) was determined from electromagnetic propagation and reservoir saturation tool measurements. The radius of hydrate dissociation as a function of depth was then determined by means of iterative forward modeling of cased-hole formation resistivity tool response. The solution was obtained by varying the modeled dissociation radius until the modeled log overlaid the field log. Pretest gas hydrate production computer simulations had predicted that dissociation would take place at a uniform radius over the 13-ft test interval. However, the post-test resistivity modeling showed that this was not the case. The resistivity-derived dissociation radius was greatest near the outlet of the pipe that circulated hot water in the wellbore

  19. Controls on gas hydrate stability in methane depleted sediments: Laboratory and field measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapham, L.; Chanton, J.; Martens, C. S.

    2009-12-01

    Gas hydrate deposits are the Earth’s largest reservoir of the powerful greenhouse gas methane and thus a key future energy resource. However, hydrate stability in sedimentary environments featuring highly variable methane concentrations needs to be understood to allow resource estimation and recovery. Hydrates are at chemical equilibrium and therefore stable where high pressures, low temperatures, and moderate salinities coexist with methane-saturated pore waters. When all of these conditions are not met, hydrates should dissociate or dissolve, releasing methane to the overlying water and possibly the atmosphere. In addition, other natural factors may control the kinetics of their degradation complicating models for hydrate stability and occurrence. Our measurements indicate that the pore-waters surrounding some shallow buried hydrates are not methane-saturated suggesting that dissolution should occur relatively rapidly. Yet, these hydrate deposits are known to persist relatively unchanged for years. We hypothesize that, once formed, hydrate deposits may be stabilized by natural factors inhibiting dissolution, including oil or microbial biofilm coatings. While most studies have focused on pressure and temperature changes where hydrates occur, relatively few have included measurements of in situ methane concentration gradients because of the difficulties inherent to making such measurements. Here we present recent measurements of methane concentration and stable carbon isotope gradients immediately adjacent to undisturbed hydrate surfaces obtained through deployments of novel seafloor instruments. Our results suggest that the hydrates studied are relatively stable when exposed to overlying and pore-waters that are undersaturated with methane. Concurrent laboratory measurements of methane concentration gradients next to artificial hydrate surfaces were utilized to test our protective coating hypothesis. After a stable dissolution rate for hydrate samples was

  20. Basin scale assessment of gas hydrate dissociation in response to climate change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reagan, M.; Moridis, G.; Elliott, S.; Maltrud, M.; Cameron-Smith, P.

    2011-07-01

    Paleooceanographic evidence has been used to postulate that methane from oceanic hydrates may have had a significant role in regulating climate. However, the behavior of contemporary oceanic methane hydrate deposits subjected to rapid temperature changes, like those now occurring in the arctic and those predicted under future climate change scenarios, has only recently been investigated. Field investigations have discovered substantial methane gas plumes exiting the seafloor along the Arctic Ocean margin, and the plumes appear at depths corresponding to the upper limit of a receding gas hydrate stability zone. It has been suggested that these plumes may be the first visible signs of the dissociation of shallow hydrate deposits due to ongoing climate change in the arctic. We simulate the release of methane from oceanic deposits, including the effects of fully-coupled heat transfer, fluid flow, hydrate dissociation, and other thermodynamic processes, for systems representative of segments of the Arctic Ocean margins. The modeling encompasses a range of shallow hydrate deposits from the landward limit of the hydrate stability zone down to water depths beyond the expected range of century-scale temperature changes. We impose temperature changes corresponding to predicted rates of climate change-related ocean warming and examine the possibility of hydrate dissociation and the release of methane. The assessment is performed at local-, regional-, and basin-scales. The simulation results are consistent with the hypothesis that dissociating shallow hydrates alone can result in significant methane fluxes at the seafloor. However, the methane release is likely to be confined to a narrow region of high dissociation susceptibility, defined by depth and temperature, and that any release will be continuous and controlled, rather than explosive. This modeling also establishes the first realistic bounds for methane release along the arctic continental shelf for potential hydrate

  1. Atomistic modeling of structure II gas hydrate mechanics: Compressibility and equations of state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas M. Vlasic

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This work uses density functional theory (DFT to investigate the poorly characterized structure II gas hydrates, for various guests (empty, propane, butane, ethane-methane, propane-methane, at the atomistic scale to determine key structure and mechanical properties such as equilibrium lattice volume and bulk modulus. Several equations of state (EOS for solids (Murnaghan, Birch-Murnaghan, Vinet, Liu were fitted to energy-volume curves resulting from structure optimization simulations. These EOS, which can be used to characterize the compressional behaviour of gas hydrates, were evaluated in terms of their robustness. The three-parameter Vinet EOS was found to perform just as well if not better than the four-parameter Liu EOS, over the pressure range in this study. As expected, the Murnaghan EOS proved to be the least robust. Furthermore, the equilibrium lattice volumes were found to increase with guest size, with double-guest hydrates showing a larger increase than single-guest hydrates, which has significant implications for the widely used van der Waals and Platteeuw thermodynamic model for gas hydrates. Also, hydrogen bonds prove to be the most likely factor contributing to the resistance of gas hydrates to compression; bulk modulus was found to increase linearly with hydrogen bond density, resulting in a relationship that could be used predictively to determine the bulk modulus of various structure II gas hydrates. Taken together, these results fill a long existing gap in the material chemical physics of these important clathrates.

  2. Problems of ecological and technical safety by exploration and production of natural gas hydrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    V.K. Chistyakov; Youhong SUN; Chen CHEN; Zupei ZHANG

    2006-01-01

    Gas hydrates-the firm crystal connections formed water (water, ice, water vapor) and low-molecular waterproof natural gases (mainly methane) whose crystal structure effectively compresses gas: each cubic meter of hydrate can yield over 160 m3 of methane.In present time exploitation of the Messoyahsk (Russia) and Mallik (Canada) deposits of gas hydrates in is conducted actively. The further perfection of prospecting methods in the field of studying gas hydrates containing sediments in round extent depends on improvement of geophysical and well test research, among which native-state core drilling is one of the major. Sampling native-state core from gas hydrates sediments keeping not only original composition, but structural-textural features of their construction.Despite of appeal of use gas hydrates as the perspective and ecologically pure fuel possessing huge resources, investigation and development of their deposits can lead to a number of the negative consequences connected with arising hazards for maintenance of their technical and ecological safety of carrying out. Scales of arising problems can change from local up to regional and even global.

  3. Amplitude versus offset modeling of the bottom simulating reflection associated with submarine gas hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreassen, K.; Hart, P.E.; MacKay, M.

    1997-01-01

    A bottom simulating seismic reflection (BSR) that parallels the sea floor occurs worldwide on seismic profiles from outer continental margins. The BSR coincides with the base of the gas hydrate stability field and is commonly used as indicator of natural submarine gas hydrates. Despite the widespread assumption that the BSR marks the base of gas hydrate-bearing sediments, the occurrence and importance of low-velocity free gas in the sediments beneath the BSR has long been a subject of debate. This paper investigates the relative abundance of hydrate and free gas associated with the BSR by modeling the reflection coefficient or amplitude variation with offset (AVO) of the BSR at two separate sites, offshore Oregon and the Beaufort Sea. The models are based on multichannel seismic profiles, seismic velocity data from both sites and downhole log data from Oregon ODP Site 892. AVO studies of the BSR can determine whether free gas exists beneath the BSR if the saturation of gas hydrate above the BSR is less than approximately 30% of the pore volume. Gas hydrate saturation above the BSR can be roughly estimated from AVO studies, but the saturation of free gas beneath the BSR cannot be constrained from the seismic data alone. The AVO analyses at the two study locations indicate that the high amplitude BSR results primarily from free gas beneath the BSR. Hydrate concentrations above the BSR are calculated to be less than 10% of the pore volume for both locations studied.

  4. Production behaviour of gas hydrate under hot sea water injection : laboratory case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nengkoda, A. [Schlumberger, Calgary, AB (Canada); Budhijanto, B.; Supranto, S.; Prasetyo, I.; Purwono, S.; Sutijan, S. [Gadjah Mada Univ., Yogyakarta (Indonesia)

    2010-07-01

    The gas hydrate potential in Indonesia was discussed, with particular reference to offshore production of gas from deep-water gas-hydrates by injection of hot seawater. In 2004, the Indonesian National Agency for Assessment and Application Technology estimated the gas hydrate resource potential to be 850 trillion cubic feet (tcf). To date, the 3 most reliable scenarios for gas hydrate production are thermal stimulation which involves increasing the temperature until the hydrates break into water and gas; depressurization which involves lowering the pressure by pumping out gas at the base of the hydrate to cause dissociation of hydrates into gas; and injection of a chemical inhibitor such as methanol into the hydrated sediments to cause destabilization, thus releasing gas from hydrates. This study investigated the effect of hot seawater injection on the gas hydrate production under laboratory conditions. The temperature profile distribution was examined along with operational parameters and flow characteristics of the dissociated gas and water from hydrates in porous systems under a synthetic hydrate setup. The study showed that gas production increases with time until a maximum is reached, at which time it begins to decrease. The energy ratio of thermal stimulation production was found to be influenced by the injection water temperature and rate as well as the hydrate content in the synthetic sediment. Scale problems were found to be associated with high temperature seawater injection. 8 refs., 3 tabs., 7 figs.

  5. Atomistic modeling of structure II gas hydrate mechanics: Compressibility and equations of state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasic, Thomas M.; Servio, Phillip; Rey, Alejandro D.

    2016-08-01

    This work uses density functional theory (DFT) to investigate the poorly characterized structure II gas hydrates, for various guests (empty, propane, butane, ethane-methane, propane-methane), at the atomistic scale to determine key structure and mechanical properties such as equilibrium lattice volume and bulk modulus. Several equations of state (EOS) for solids (Murnaghan, Birch-Murnaghan, Vinet, Liu) were fitted to energy-volume curves resulting from structure optimization simulations. These EOS, which can be used to characterize the compressional behaviour of gas hydrates, were evaluated in terms of their robustness. The three-parameter Vinet EOS was found to perform just as well if not better than the four-parameter Liu EOS, over the pressure range in this study. As expected, the Murnaghan EOS proved to be the least robust. Furthermore, the equilibrium lattice volumes were found to increase with guest size, with double-guest hydrates showing a larger increase than single-guest hydrates, which has significant implications for the widely used van der Waals and Platteeuw thermodynamic model for gas hydrates. Also, hydrogen bonds prove to be the most likely factor contributing to the resistance of gas hydrates to compression; bulk modulus was found to increase linearly with hydrogen bond density, resulting in a relationship that could be used predictively to determine the bulk modulus of various structure II gas hydrates. Taken together, these results fill a long existing gap in the material chemical physics of these important clathrates.

  6. Sediment composition and texture of Pleistocene deep-sea turbidites in the eastern Nankai Trough gas hydrate field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egawa, K.; Nishimura, O.; Izumi, S.; Ito, T.; Konno, Y.; Yoneda, J.; Jin, Y.; Kida, M.; Suzuki, K.; Nakatsuka, Y.; Nagao, J.

    2013-12-01

    In the 2012 JOGMEC/JAPEX pressure coring operation, we collected a totally 60-m-long core sample from the interval of gas hydrate concentration zone at the planned site of the world's first offshore production test of natural gas hydrates in the eastern Nankai Trough area. In this contribution, the cored sediments were sedimentologically, mineralogically, and paleontologically analyzed to know sediment composition and texture of reservoir formation, which are known to provide useful geological information to discuss sedimentation, diagenesis, and permeability. The targeted interval belongs to a Middle Pleistocene deep-sea turbidite sequence distributed around the Daini Atsumi Knoll, east of the Kumano forearc basin, and consists of the lower (thick sand-dominant), middle (thin-bedded sand-and-mud alteration), and upper (mud-dominant) formations in ascending order. X-ray powder diffraction analysis and scanning electron microscopic observation revealed that pore space in turbidite sands is commonly filled with clay fractions (mostly phyllosilicates) in the lower formation. Such a pore filling of clay fractions is reflected in particle size distribution showing high standard deviation and clay content, and thus is expected to have an impact on permeability. There is the older Pliocene to Early Pleistocene fossil coccolith record in the middle formation, indicating sediment reworking probably induced by submarine landslide. The coexistence of authigenic siderite and framboidal pyrite in the middle formation strongly suggests anoxic microbial activity under methane oxidation and sulfide reduction conditions at least before the hydrate cementation. This contribution was financially supported by the Research Consortium for Methane Hydrate Resources in Japan (MH21 Research Consortium) planned by the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI).

  7. The Potential Socio-economic Impacts of Gas Hydrate Exploitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, David; Schaafsma, Marije; Marin-Moreno, Héctor; Minshull, Tim A.

    2017-04-01

    Gas hydrate has garnered significant interest as a possible clean fossil fuel resource, especially in countries with limited energy supplies. Whilst the sector is still in its infancy, there has been escalating development towards commercial production. To the best of our knowledge it appears that, despite its potential, existing analyses of the social and economic impacts of hydrate exploitation have been very limited. Before any viable commercial production commences, the potential impacts across society must be considered. It is likely that such impact assessments will become a legislative requirement for hydrate exploitation, similar to their requirement in conventional oil and gas projects. Social impact analysis should guide hydrate development to have the highest possible net benefits to the human and natural environment. Without active commercial hydrate operations, potential socio-economic impacts can only be inferred from other fossil fuel resource focused communities, including those directly or indirectly affected by the oil and gas industry either in the vicinity of the well or further afield. This review attempts to highlight potential impacts by synthesising current literature, focusing on social impacts at the extraction stage of operation, over time. Using a DPSIR (Driving forces; Pressures; States; Impacts; Responses) framework, we focus on impacts upon: health and wellbeing, land use and access, services and infrastructure, population, employment opportunities, income and lifestyles. Human populations directly or indirectly related with fossil fuel extraction activities often show boom and bust dynamics, and so any impacts may be finite or change temporally. Therefore potential impacts have to be reassessed throughout the lifetime of the exploitation. Our review shows there are a wide range of possible positive and negative socio-economic impacts from hydrate development. Exploitation can bring jobs and infrastructure to remote areas, although

  8. Effects of magnetic fields on HCFC-141b refrigerant gas hydrate formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘勇; 郭开华; 梁德青; 樊栓狮

    2003-01-01

    Low-pressure refrigerant gas hydrates have brilliant prospects as a cool storage medium for air-conditioning systems. Intensive effects of some specific magnetic fields on the formation process of HCFC-141b refrigerant gas hydrate are depicted experimentally. Under influence of these specific magnetic fields, the orientation and growth region of gas hydrate are altered; induction time of hydrate crystallization can be shortened extremely, and it can be shortened to 40 min from 9 h; hydrate formation mass can be enhanced considerably, and hydration rate can arrive at 100% in some instances. Meanwhile, the relations of induction time and hydration rate changed with magnetic field intensity are depicted, and some elementary regulations are found.

  9. Calculation of the eroei coefficient for natural gas hydrates in laboratory conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siažik, Ján; Malcho, Milan; Čaja, Alexander

    2017-09-01

    In the 1960s, scientists discovered that methane hydrate existed in the gas field in Siberia. Gas hydrates are known to be stable under conditions of high pressure and low temperature that have been recognized in polar regions and in the uppermost part of deep -water sediments below the sea floor. The article deals with the determination of the EROEI coefficient to generate the natural gas hydrate in the device under specific temperature and pressure conditions. Energy returned on energy invested expresses ratio of the amount of usable energy delivered from a particular energy resource to the amount of exergy used to obtain that energy resource. Gas hydrates have been also discussed before decades like potential source mainly for regions with restricted access to conventional hydrocarbons also tactic interest in establishing alternative gas reserves.

  10. Gas hydrate saturation and distribution in the Kumano Forearc Basin of the Nankai Trough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Jihui; Tsuji, Takeshi; Matsuoka, Toshifumi

    2017-02-01

    The Kumano Forearc Basin is located to the south-east of the Kii Peninsula, Japan, overlying the accretionary prism in the Nankai Trough. The presence of gas hydrate in submarine sediments of the forearc basin has resulted in the widespread occurrence of bottom simulating reflectors (BSRs) on seismic profiles, and has caused distinct anomalies in logging data in the region. We estimated the in situ gas hydrate saturation from logging data by using three methods: effective rock physics models, Archie's equation, and empirical relationships between acoustic impedance (AI) and water-filled porosity. The results derived from rock physics models demonstrate that gas hydrates are attached to the grain surfaces of the rock matrix and are not floating in pore space. By applying the empirical relationships to the AI distribution derived from model-based AI inversion of the three-dimensional (3D) seismic data, we mapped the spatial distribution of hydrate saturation within the Kumano Basin and characterised locally concentrated gas hydrates. Based on the results, we propose two different mechanisms of free gas supply to explain the process of gas hydrate formation in the basin: (1) migration along inclined strata that dip landwards, and (2) migration through the faults or cracks generated by intensive tectonic movements of the accretionary prism. The dipping strata with relatively low AI in the forearc basin could indicate the presence of hydrate formation due to gas migration along the dipping strata. However, high hydrate concentration is observed at fault zones with high pore pressures, thus the second mechanism likely plays an important role in the genesis of gas hydrates in the Kumano Basin. Therefore, the tectonic activities in the accretionary wedge significantly influence the hydrate saturation and distribution in the Kumano Forearc Basin.

  11. Control of the geomorphology and gas hydrate extent on widespread gas emissions offshore Romania (Black Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riboulot, V.; Cattaneo, A.; Sultan, N.; Ker, S.; Scalabrin, C.; Gaillot, A.; Jouet, G.; Marsset, B.; Thomas, Y.; Ballas, G.; Marsset, T.; Garziglia, S.; Ruffine, L.; Boulart, C.

    2016-12-01

    The Romanian sector of the Black Sea deserves attention because the Danube deep-sea fan is one of the largest sediment depositional systems worldwide and is considered the world's most isolated sea, the largest anoxic water body on the planet and a unique energy-rich sea. Due to the high sediment accumulation rate, presence of organic matter and anoxic conditions, the Black sea sediment offshore the Danube delta is rich in gas and thus show BSR. The cartography of the BSR over the last 20 years, exhibits its widespread occurrence, indicative of extensive development of hydrate accumulations and a huge gas hydrate potential. By combining old and new datasets acquired in 2015 during the GHASS expedition, we performed a geomorphological analysis of the continental slope north-east of the Danube canyon that reveals the presence of several landslides inside and outside several canyons incising the seafloor. It is a complex study area presenting sedimentary processes such as seafloor erosion and instability, mass wasting, formation of gas hydrates, fluid migration, gas escape, where the imprint of geomorphology seems to dictate the location where gas seep occurs. . Some 1409 gas seeps within the water column acoustic records are observed between 200 m and 800 m water depth. No gas flares were detected in deeper areas where gas hydrates are stable. Overall, 93% of the all gas seeps observed are above geomorphological structures. 78% are right above escarpment induced by sedimentary destabilizations inside or outside canyons. The results suggest a geomorphological control of degassing at the seafloor and gas seeps are thus constrained by the gas hydrates stability zone. The stability of the gas hydrates is dependent on the salinity gradient through the sedimentary column and thus on the Black Sea recent geological history. The extent and the dynamics of gas hydrates have a probable impact on the sedimentary destabilization observed at the seafloor.

  12. Gas Hydrate Deposits in the Cauvery-Mannar Offshore Basin, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewangan, P.

    2015-12-01

    The analysis of geophysical and coring data from Mahanadi and Krishna-Godavari offshore basins, eastern continental margin of India, has established the presence of gas hydrate deposits; however, other promising petroliferous basins are relatively unexplored for gas hydrates. A collaborative program between GSI/MoM and CSIR-NIO was formulated to explore the Cauvery-Mannar offshore basin for gas hydrate deposits (Fig. 1a). High quality multi-channel reflection seismics (MCS) data were acquired with 3,000 cu. in airgun source array and 3 km long hydrophone streamer (240 channels) onboard R/V Samudra Ratnakar for gas hydrate studies. Other geophysical data such as gravity, magnetic and multibeam data were also acquired along with seismic data.After routine processing of seismic data, the bottom simulating reflectors (BSRs) are observed in the central and north-eastern part of the survey area. The BSRs are identified based on its characteristic features such as mimicking the seafloor, opposite polarity with respect to the seafloor and crosscutting the existing geological layers (Fig. 1b). At several locations, seismic signatures associated with free gas such as drop in interval velocity, pull-down structures, amplitude variation with offset (AVO) and attenuation are observed below the BSRs which confirm the presence of free gas in the study area. Acoustic chimneys are observed at some locations indicating vertical migration of the free gas. The observed seismic signatures established the presence of gas hydrates/free gas deposits in Cauvery-Mannar basin. Interestingly, BSRs appear to be distributed along the flanks of submarine canyon indicating the influence of geomorphology on the formation and distribution of gas hydrates.

  13. Grain-scale imaging and compositional characterization of cryo-preserved India NGHP 01 gas-hydrate-bearing cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Laura A.; Lorenson, T.D.

    2014-01-01

    We report on grain-scale characteristics and gas analyses of gas-hydrate-bearing samples retrieved by NGHP Expedition 01 as part of a large-scale effort to study gas hydrate occurrences off the eastern-Indian Peninsula and along the Andaman convergent margin. Using cryogenic scanning electron microscopy, X-ray spectroscopy, and gas chromatography, we investigated gas hydrate grain morphology and distribution within sediments, gas hydrate composition, and methane isotopic composition of samples from Krishna–Godavari (KG) basin and Andaman back-arc basin borehole sites from depths ranging 26 to 525 mbsf. Gas hydrate in KG-basin samples commonly occurs as nodules or coarse veins with typical hydrate grain size of 30–80 μm, as small pods or thin veins 50 to several hundred microns in width, or disseminated in sediment. Nodules contain abundant and commonly isolated macropores, in some places suggesting the original presence of a free gas phase. Gas hydrate also occurs as faceted crystals lining the interiors of cavities. While these vug-like structures constitute a relatively minor mode of gas hydrate occurrence, they were observed in near-seafloor KG-basin samples as well as in those of deeper origin (>100 mbsf) and may be original formation features. Other samples exhibit gas hydrate grains rimmed by NaCl-bearing material, presumably produced by salt exclusion during original hydrate formation. Well-preserved microfossil and other biogenic detritus are also found within several samples, most abundantly in Andaman core material where gas hydrate fills microfossil crevices. The range of gas hydrate modes of occurrence observed in the full suite of samples suggests a range of formation processes were involved, as influenced by local in situconditions. The hydrate-forming gas is predominantly methane with trace quantities of higher molecular weight hydrocarbons of primarily microbial origin. The composition indicates the gas hydrate is Structure I.

  14. Anisotropic amplitude variation of the bottom-simulating reflector beneath fracture-filled gas hydrate deposit

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sriram, G.; Dewangan, P.; Ramprasad, T.; RamaRao, P.

    stream_size 75666 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name J_Geophys_Res_B_Solid_Earth_118_2258a.pdf.txt stream_source_info J_Geophys_Res_B_Solid_Earth_118_2258a.pdf.txt Content-Encoding UTF-8 Content-Type text/plain; charset... below the base of gas hydrate stability zone is interpreted in the vicinity of fault system (F1). 1. Introduction Gas hydrate represents a solid crystalline form of lighter hydrocarbon gases trapped within the cages of water molecules...

  15. Pre-bomb marine reservoir ages in the western north Pacific : Preliminary result on Kyoto University collection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yoneda, M; Kitagawa, H; van der Plicht, J; Uchida, M; Tanaka, A; Uehiro, T; Shibata, Y; Morita, M; Ohno, T

    2000-01-01

    The calibration of radiocarbon dates on marine materials involves a global marine calibration with regional corrections. The marine reservoir ages in the Western North Pacific have not been discussed, while it is quite important to determine the timing of palaeo-environmental changes as well as arch

  16. Pre-bomb marine reservoir ages in the western north Pacific : Preliminary result on Kyoto University collection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yoneda, M; Kitagawa, H; van der Plicht, J; Uchida, M; Tanaka, A; Uehiro, T; Shibata, Y; Morita, M; Ohno, T

    2000-01-01

    The calibration of radiocarbon dates on marine materials involves a global marine calibration with regional corrections. The marine reservoir ages in the Western North Pacific have not been discussed, while it is quite important to determine the timing of palaeo-environmental changes as well as

  17. Pre-bomb marine reservoir ages in the western north Pacific : Preliminary result on Kyoto University collection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yoneda, M; Kitagawa, H; van der Plicht, J; Uchida, M; Tanaka, A; Uehiro, T; Shibata, Y; Morita, M; Ohno, T

    2000-01-01

    The calibration of radiocarbon dates on marine materials involves a global marine calibration with regional corrections. The marine reservoir ages in the Western North Pacific have not been discussed, while it is quite important to determine the timing of palaeo-environmental changes as well as arch

  18. Modeling variations of marine reservoir ages during the last 45 000 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Franke

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available When dating marine samples with 14C, the reservoir-age effect is usually assumed to be constant, although atmospheric 14C production rate and ocean circulation changes cause temporal and spatial reservoir-age variations. These lead to dating errors, which can limit the interpretation of cause and effect in paleoclimate data. We used a global ocean circulation model forced by transient atmospheric Δ14C variations to calculate reservoir ages for the last 45 000 years for a present day-like and a last glacial maximum-like ocean circulation. A ~30% reduced Atlantic meridonal overturning circulation leads to increased reservoir ages by up to ~500 years in high latitudes. Temporal variations are proportional to the absolute value of the reservoir age; regions with large reservoir age also show large variation. Temporal variations range between ~300 years in parts of the subtropics and ~1000 years in the Southern Ocean. For tropical regions, which are generally assumed to have nearly stable reservoir ages, the model suggests variations of several hundred years.

  19. Numerical investigations of the fluid flows at deep oceanic and arctic permafrost-associated gas hydrate deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, Jennifer Mary

    , allows us a unique opportunity to study the response of methane hydrate deposits to warming. Gas hydrate stability in the Arctic and the permeability of the shelf sediments to gas migration is thought to be closely linked with relict submarine permafrost. Submarine permafrost extent depends on several environmental factors, such as the shelf lithology, sea level variations, mean annual air temperature, ocean bottom water temperature, geothermal heat flux, groundwater hydrology, and the salinity of the pore water. Effects of submarine groundwater discharge, which introduces fresh terrestrial groundwater off-shore, can freshen deep marine sediments and is an important control on the freezing point depression of ice and methane hydrate. While several thermal modeling studies suggest the permafrost layer should still be largely intact near-shore, many recent field studies have reported elevated methane levels in Arctic coastal waters. The permafrost layer is thought to create an impermeable barrier to fluid and gas flow, however, talik formation (unfrozen regions within otherwise continuous permafrost) below paleo-river channels can create permeable pathways for gas migration from depth. This is the first study of its kind to make predictions of the methane gas flux to the water column from the Arctic shelf sediments using a 2D multi-phase fluid flow model. Model results show that the dissociation of methane hydrate deposits through taliks can supersaturate the overlying water column at present-day relative to equilibrium with the atmosphere when taliks are large (> 1 km width) or hydrate saturation is high within hydrate layers (> 50% pore volume). Supersaturated waters likely drive a net flux of methane into the atmosphere, a potent greenhouse gas. Effects of anthropogenic global warming will certainly increase gas venting rates if ocean bottom water temperatures increase, but likely won't have immediately observable impacts due to the long response times.

  20. Thermodynamic and Process Modelling of Gas Hydrate Systems in CO2 Capture Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herslund, Peter Jørgensen

    A novel gas separation technique based on gas hydrate formation (solid precipitation) is investigated by means of thermodynamic modeling and experimental investigations. This process has previously been proposed for application in post-combustion carbon dioxide capture from power station flue gas...

  1. Establishing Long-term Observations of Gas Hydrate Systems: Results from Ocean Networks Canada's NEPTUNE Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherwath, M.; Riedel, M.; Roemer, M.; Heesemann, M.; Chun, J. H.; Moran, K.; Spence, G.; Thomsen, L.

    2016-12-01

    The key for a scientific understanding of natural environments and the determination of baselines is the long-term monitoring of environmental factors. For seafloor environments including gas hydrate systems, cabled ocean observatories are important platforms for the remote acquisition of a comprehensive suite of datasets. This is particularly critical for those datasets that are difficult to acquire with autonomous, battery-powered systems, such as cameras or high-bandwidth sonar because cable connections provide continuous power and communication from shore to the seafloor. Ocean Networks Canada is operating the NEPTUNE cabled undersea observatory in the Northeast Pacific with two nodes at gas hydrate sites, Barkley Canyon and Clayoquot Slope. With up to seven years of continuous data from these locations we are now beginning to understand the dynamics of the natural systems and are able to classify the variations within the gas hydrate system. For example, the long-term monitoring of gas vent activity has allowed us to classify phases of low, intermittent and high activity that seem to reoccur periodically. Or, by recording the speeds of bacterial mat growth or detecting periods of increased productivity of flora and fauna at hydrates sites we can start to classify benthic activity and relate that to outside environmental parameters. This will eventually allow us to do enhanced environmental monitoring, establish baselines, and potentially detect anthropogenic variations or events for example during gas hydrate production.

  2. High pressure rheology of gas hydrate formed from multiphase systems using modified Couette rheometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Gaurav; Linga, Praveen; Sangwai, Jitendra S.

    2017-02-01

    Conventional rheometers with concentric cylinder geometries do not enhance mixing in situ and thus are not suitable for rheological studies of multiphase systems under high pressure such as gas hydrates. In this study, we demonstrate the use of modified Couette concentric cylinder geometries for high pressure rheological studies during the formation and dissociation of methane hydrate formed from pure water and water-decane systems. Conventional concentric cylinder Couette geometry did not produce any hydrates in situ and thus failed to measure rheological properties during hydrate formation. The modified Couette geometries proposed in this work observed to provide enhanced mixing in situ, thus forming gas hydrate from the gas-water-decane system. This study also nullifies the use of separate external high pressure cell for such measurements. The modified geometry was observed to measure gas hydrate viscosity from an initial condition of 0.001 Pa s to about 25 Pa s. The proposed geometries also possess the capability to measure dynamic viscoelastic properties of hydrate slurries at the end of experiments. The modified geometries could also capture and mimic the viscosity profile during the hydrate dissociation as reported in the literature. The present study acts as a precursor for enhancing our understanding on the rheology of gas hydrate formed from various systems containing promoters and inhibitors in the context of flow assurance.

  3. Active downhole thermal property measurement system for characterization of gas hydrate-bearing formations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuhara, Masafumi; Fujii, Kasumi; Tertychnyi, Vladimir; Shandrygin, Alexander; Popov, Yuri; Matsubayashi, Osamu; Kusaka, Koji; Yasuda, Masato

    2005-07-01

    Gas hydrates dissociate or form when temperature and/or pressure conditions cross the equilibrium border. When we consider gas hydrates as an energy resource, understanding those parameters is very important for developing efficient production schemes. Therefore, thermal measurement is one of the key components of the characterization of the gas hydrate-bearing formation, not only statically but also dynamically. To estimate thermal properties such as thermal conductivity and diffusivity of subsurface formations, the conventional method has been to monitor temperature passively at several underground locations and interpret collected information with assumptions such as steady heat flow or relaxation from thermal disturbance by fluid flow, etc. Because the thermal properties are estimated based on several assumptions, these passive measurement methods sometimes leave a lot of uncertainties. On the other hand, active thermal property measurement, which could minimize those uncertainties, is commonly used in a laboratory and many types of equipment exist commercially for the purpose. The concept of measurement is very simple: creating a known thermal disturbance with a thermal source and then monitoring the response of the specimen. However, simply applying this method to subsurface formation measurement has many technical and logistical difficulties. In this paper, newly developed thermal property measurement equipment and its measurement methodology are described. Also discussed are the theoretical background for the application of the methodology to a gas hydrate-bearing formation through numerical simulation and the experimental results of laboratory mockup in a controlled environment. (Author)

  4. Catalysis of gas hydrates by biosurfactants in seawater-saturated sand/clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, R. E.; Kothapalli, C.; Lee, M.S. [Mississippi State University, Swalm School of Chemical Engineering, MS (United States); Woolsey, J. R. [University of Mississippi, Centre of Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, MS (United States)

    2003-10-01

    Large gas hydrate mounds have been photographed in the seabed of the Gulf of Mexico and elsewhere. According to industry experts, the carbon trapped within gas hydrates is two or three times greater than all known crude oil, natural gas and coal reserves in the world. Gas hydrates, which are ice-like solids formed from the hydrogen bonding of water as water temperature is lowered under pressure to entrap a suitable molecular-size gas in cavities of the developing crystal structure, are found below the ocean floor to depths exhibiting temperature and pressure combinations within the appropriate limits. The experiments described in this study attempt to ascertain whether biosurfactant byproducts of microbial activity in seabeds could catalyze gas hydrate formation. Samples of five possible biosurfactants classifications were used in the experiments. Results showed that biosurfactants enhanced hydrate formation rate between 96 per cent and 288 percent, and reduced hydrate induction time 20 per cent to 71 per cent relative to the control. The critical micellar concentration of rhamnolipid/seawater solution was found to be 13 ppm at hydrate-forming conditions. On the basis of these results it was concluded that minimal microbial activity in sea floor sands could achieve the threshold concentration of biosurfactant that would greatly promote hydrate formation. 28 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs.

  5. High-pressure gas hydrates of argon: compositions and equations of state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manakov, Andrey Yu; Ogienko, Andrey G; Tkacz, Marek; Lipkowski, Janusz; Stoporev, Andrey S; Kutaev, Nikolay V

    2011-08-11

    Volume changes corresponding to transitions between different phases of high-pressure argon gas hydrates were studied with a piston-cylinder apparatus at room temperature. Combination of these data with the data taken from the literature allowed us to obtain self-consistent set of data concerning the equations of state and compositions of the high-pressure hydrates of argon.

  6. Integrated analysis of well logs and seismic data to estimate gas hydrate concentrations at Keathley Canyon, Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M.W.; Collett, T.S.

    2008-01-01

    Accurately detecting and quantifying gas hydrate or free gas in sediments from seismic data require downhole well-log data to calibrate the physical properties of the gas hydrate-/free gas-bearing sediments. As part of the Gulf of Mexico Joint Industry Program, a series of wells were either cored or drilled in the Gulf of Mexico to characterize the physical properties of gas hydrate-bearing sediments, to calibrate geophysical estimates, and to evaluate source and transport mechanisms for gas within the gas hydrates. Downhole acoustic logs were used sparingly in this study because of degraded log quality due to adverse wellbore conditions. However, reliable logging while drilling (LWD) electrical resistivity and porosity logs were obtained. To tie the well-log information to the available 3-D seismic data in this area, a velocity log was calculated from the available resistivity log at the Keathley Canyon 151-2 well, because the acoustic log or vertical seismic data acquired at the nearby Keathley Canyon 151-3 well were either of poor quality or had limited depth coverage. Based on the gas hydrate saturations estimated from the LWD resistivity log, the modified Biot-Gassmann theory was used to generate synthetic acoustic log and a synthetic seismogram was generated with a fairly good agreement with a seismic profile crossing the well site. Based on the well-log information, a faintly defined bottom-simulating reflection (BSR) in this area is interpreted as a reflection representing gas hydrate-bearing sediments with about 15% saturation overlying partially gas-saturated sediments with 3% saturation. Gas hydrate saturations over 30-40% are estimated from the resistivity log in two distinct intervals at 220-230 and 264-300 m below the sea floor, but gas hydrate was not physically recovered in cores. It is speculated that the poor recovery of cores and gas hydrate morphology are responsible for the lack of physical gas hydrate recovery.

  7. Gas hydrate, fluid flow and free gas: Formation of the bottom-simulating reflector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haacke, R. Ross; Westbrook, Graham K.; Hyndman, Roy D.

    2007-09-01

    Gas hydrate in continental margins is commonly indicated by a prominent bottom-simulating seismic reflector (BSR) that occurs a few hundred metres below the seabed. The BSR marks the boundary between sediments containing gas hydrate above and free gas below. Most of the reflection amplitude is caused by the underlying free gas. Gas hydrate can occur without a BSR, however, and the controls on its formation are not well understood. Here we describe two complementary mechanisms for free gas accumulation beneath the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ). The first is the well-recognised hydrate recycling mechanism that generates gas from dissociating hydrate when the base of the GHSZ moves upward relative to hydrate-bearing sediment. The second is a recently identified mechanism in which the relationship between the advection and diffusion of dissolved gas with the local solubility curve allows the liquid phase to become saturated in a thick layer beneath the GHSZ when hydrate is present near its base. This mechanism for gas production (called the solubility-curvature mechanism) is possible in systems where the influence of diffusion becomes important relative to the influence of advection and where the gas-water solubility decreases to a minimum several hundred metres below the GHSZ. We investigate a number of areas in which gas hydrate occurs to determine where gas formation is dominated by the solubility-curvature mechanism and where it is dominated by hydrate recycling. We show that the former is dominant in areas with low rates of upward fluid flow (such as old, rifted continental margins), low rates of seafloor uplift, and high geothermal gradient and/or pressure. Conversely, free-gas formation is dominated by hydrate recycling where there are rapid rates of upward fluid flow and seabed uplift (such as in subduction zone accretionary wedges). Using these two mechanisms to investigate the formation of free gas beneath gas hydrate in continental margins, we are able

  8. The fate of gas hydrates in the Barents Sea and Kara Sea region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klitzke, Peter; Scheck-Wenderoth, Magdalena; Schicks, Judith; Luzi-Helbing, Manja; Cacace, Mauro; Jacquey, Antoine; Sippel, Judith; Faleide, Jan Inge

    2016-04-01

    The Barents Sea and Kara Sea are located in the European Arctic. Recent seismic lines indicate the presence of gas hydrates in the Barents Sea and Kara Sea region. Natural gas hydrates contain huge amounts of methane. Their stability is mainly sensitive to pressure and temperature conditions which make them susceptible for climate change. When not stable, large volumes of methane will be released in the water column and - depending on the water depth - may also be released into the atmosphere. Therefore, studying the evolution in time and space of the gas hydrates stability zone in the Barents Sea region is of interest for both environmental impact and energy production. In this study, we assess the gas hydrate inventory of the Barents Sea and Kara Sea under the light of increasing ocean bottom temperatures in the next 200 years. Thereby, we make use of an existing 3D structural and thermal model which resolves five sedimentary units, the crystalline crust and the lithospheric mantle. The sedimentary units are characterised by the prevailing lithology and porosity including effects of post-depositional erosion which strongly affect the local geothermal gradient. Governing equations for the conductive 3D thermal field and momentum balance have been integrated in a massively parallel finite-element-method based framework (MOOSE). The MOOSE framework provides a powerful and flexible platform to solve multiphysics problems implicitly on unstructured meshes. First we calculate the present-day steady-state 3D thermal field. Subsequently, we use the latter as initial condition to calculate the transient 3D thermal field for the next 200 years considering an ocean temperature model as upper boundary. Temperature and load distributions are then used to calculate the thickness of the gas hydrate stability zone for each time step. The results show that the gas hydrate stability zone strongly varies in the region due to the local geothermal gradient changes. The latter

  9. Documenting channel features associated with gas hydrates in the Krishna-Godavari Basin, offshore India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, M.; Collett, T.S.; Shankar, U.

    2011-01-01

    During the India National Gas Hydrate Program (NGHP) Expedition 01 in 2006 significant sand and gas hydrate were recovered at Site NGHP-01-15 within the Krishna-Godavari Basin, East Coast off India. At the drill site NGHP-01-15, a 5-8m thick interval was found that is characterized by higher sand content than anywhere else at the site and within the KG Basin. Gas hydrate concentrations were determined to be 20-40% of the pore volume using wire-line electrical resistivity data as well as core-derived pore-fluid freshening trends. The gas hydrate-bearing interval was linked to a prominent seismic reflection observed in the 3D seismic data. This reflection event, mapped for about 1km2 south of the drill site, is bound by a fault at its northern limit that may act as migration conduit for free gas to enter the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) and subsequently charge the sand-rich layer. On 3D and additional regional 2D seismic data a prominent channel system was imaged mainly by using the seismic instantaneous amplitude attribute. The channel can be clearly identified by changes in the seismic character of the channel fill (sand-rich) and pronounced levees (less sand content than in the fill, but higher than in surrounding mud-dominated sediments). The entire channel sequence (channel fill and levees) has been subsequently covered and back-filled with a more mud-prone sediment sequence. Where the levees intersect the base of the GHSZ, their reflection strengths are significantly increased to 5- to 6-times the surrounding reflection amplitudes. Using the 3D seismic data these high-amplitude reflection edges where linked to the gas hydrate-bearing layer at Site NGHP-01-15. Further south along the channel the same reflection elements representing the levees do not show similarly large reflection amplitudes. However, the channel system is still characterized by several high-amplitude reflection events (a few hundred meters wide and up to ~1km in extent) interpreted as gas

  10. Observation of ice sheet formation on methane and ethane gas hydrates using a scanning confocal microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagao, J.; Shimomura, N.; Ebinuma, T.; Narita, H. [National Inst. of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Toyohira, Sapporo (Japan). Methane Hydrate Research Lab.

    2008-07-01

    Interest in gas hydrates has increased in recent years due to the discovery of large deposits under the ocean floor and in permafrost regions. Natural gas hydrates, including methane, is expected to become a new energy source and a medium for energy storage and transportation. Gas hydrates consist of an open network of water molecules that are hydrogen-bonded in a similar manner to ice. Gas molecules are interstitially engaged under high pressures and low temperatures. Although the dissociation temperature of methane hydrate under atmospheric pressure is about 193 K, studies have shown that methane hydrate can be stored at atmospheric pressure and 267 K for 2 years. Because of this phenomenon, known as self-preservation, transportation and storage of methane hydrate can occur at temperature conditions milder than those for liquefied methane gas at atmospheric pressure. This study examined the surface changes of methane and ethane hydrates during dissociation using an optical microscope and confocal scanning microscope (CSM). This paper reported on the results when the atmospheric gas pressure was decreased. Ice sheets formed on the surfaces of methane and ethane gas hydrates due to depressurizing dissociation of methane and ethane hydrates when the methane and ethane gas pressures were decreased at designated temperatures. The dissociation of methane gas hydrate below below 237 K resulted in the generation of small ice particles on the hydrate surface. A transparent ice sheet formed on the hydrate surface above 242 K. The thickness of the ice sheet on the methane hydrate surface showed the maximum of ca. 30 {mu}m at 253 K. In the case of ethane hydrates, ice particles and ice sheets formed below 262 and 267 respectively. Since the ice particles and ice sheets were formed by water molecules generated during the gas hydrate dissociation, the mechanism of ice sheet formation depends on the dissociation rate of hydrate, ice particle sintering rate, and water molecule

  11. Marine reservoir effect on the Southeastern coast of Brazil: results from the Tarioba shellmound paired samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macario, K D; Souza, R C C L; Aguilera, O A; Carvalho, C; Oliveira, F M; Alves, E Q; Chanca, I S; Silva, E P; Douka, K; Decco, J; Trindade, D C; Marques, A N; Anjos, R M; Pamplona, F C

    2015-05-01

    On the Southeastern coast of Brazil the presence of many archaeological shellmounds offers a great potential for studying the radiocarbon marine reservoir effect (MRE). However, very few such studies are available for this region. These archaeological settlements, mostly dating from 5 to 2 kyr cal BP, include both terrestrial and marine remains in good stratigraphic context and secure association, enabling the comparison of different carbon reservoirs. In a previous study the chronology of the Sambaqui da Tarioba, located in Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil, was established based on marine mollusc shells and charcoal samples from hearths, from several layers in two excavated sectors. We now compare the different materials with the aim of studying the MRE in this region. Calibration was performed with Oxford software OxCal v4.2.3 using the marine curve Marine13 with an undetermined offset to account for local corrections for shell samples, and the atmospheric curve SHCal13 for charcoal samples. The distribution of results considering a phase model indicates a ΔR value of -127 ± 67 (14)C yr in the 1 sigma range and the multi-paired approach leads to a mean value of -110 ± 94 (14)C yr.

  12. Laboratory measurement of longitudinal wave velocity of artificial gas hydrate under different temperatures and pressures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The longitudinal wave velocity and attenuation measurements of artificial gas hy- drate samples at a low temperature are reported. And the temperature and pressure dependence of longitudinal wave velocity is also investigated. In order to under- stand the acoustic properties of gas hydrate, the pure ice, the pure tetrahydrofuran (THF), the pure gas hydrate samples and sand sediment containing gas hydrate are measured at a low temperature between 0℃ and –15℃. For the pure ice, the pure THF and the pure gas hydrate samples, whose density is 898 kg/m3, 895 kg/m3 and 475 kg/m3, the velocity of longitudinal wave is respectively 3574 m/s, 3428 m/s and 2439 m/s. For synthesized and compacted samples, the velocity of synthesized samples is lower than that of compacted samples. The velocities increase when the densities of the samples increase, while the attenuation decreases. Under the con- dition of low temperature, the results show that the velocity is slightly affected by the temperature. The results also show that wave velocities increase with the in- crease of piston pressures. For example, the velocity of one sample increases from 3049 up to 3337 m/s and the other increases from 2315 up to 2995 m/s. But wave velocity decreases from 3800 to 3546 m/s when the temperature increases from –15℃ to 5℃ and changes significantly close to the melting point. Formation con- ditions of the two samples are the same but with different conversion ratios of wa- ter. The results of the experiment are important for exploration of the gas hydrate resources and development of acoustic techniques.

  13. Microbial community in the potential gas hydrate area Kaoping Canyon bearing sediment at offshore SW Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S. Y.; Hung, C. C.; Lai, S. J.; Ding, J. Y.; Lai, M. C.

    2015-12-01

    The deep sub-seafloor biosphere is among the least-understood habitats on Earth, even though the huge microbial biomass plays a potentially important role in long-term controls of global biogeochemical cycles. The research team from Taiwan, supported by the Central Geological Survey (CGS), has been demonstrated at SW offshore Taiwan that indicated this area is potential gas hydrate region. Therefore, the Gas Hydrate Master Program (GHMP) was brought in the National Energy Program-Phase II (NEP-II) to continue research and development. In this study, the microbial community structure of potential gas hydrate bearing sediments of giant piston core MD-178-10-3291 (KP12N) from the Kaoping Canyon offshore SW of Taiwan were investigated. This core was found many empty spaces and filling huge methane gas (>99.9 %) that might dissociate from solid gas hydrate. 16S rRNA gene clone libraries and phylogenetic analysis showed that the dominant members of Archaea were ANME (13 %), SAGMEG (31 %) and DSAG (20 %), and those of Bacteria were Chloroflexi (13 %), Candidate division JS1 (40 %) and Planctomycetes (15 %). Among them, ANME-3 is only distributed at the sulfate-methane interface (SMI) of 750 cmbsf, and sharing similarity with the Hydrate Ridge clone HydBeg92. ANME-1 and SAGMEG distributed below 750 cmbsf. In addition, DSAG and Candidate division JS1 are most dominant and distributed vertically at all tested depths from 150-3600 cmbsf. Combine the geochemical data and microbial phylotype distribution suggests the potential of gas hydrate bearing sediments at core MD-178-10-3291 (KP12N) from the Kaoping Canyon offshore SW of Taiwan.

  14. Environmental changes of the last 30,000 years in the gas hydrate area of Joetsu Basin, eastern margin of Japan Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freire, A.F.M.; Sugai, T. [Tokyo Univ., Kashiwanoha Campus, Chiba (Japan). Dept. of Natural Environmental Studies; Takeuchi, E.; Nagasaka, A.; Hiruta, A.; Ishizaki, O.; Matsumoto, R. [Tokyo Univ., Hongo Campus, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Earth and Planetary Science

    2008-07-01

    The Japan Sea is a semi-isolated marginal sea with an average depth of 1350 metres and a maximum water depth of approximately 3700 metres in the northern basin. This paper presented a study that inferred the age and the nature of the environmental events of the last 30 thousand years using geochemical and sedimentary records from piston cores collected on the gas hydrates bearing-sediments of Joetsu Basin, eastern margin of Japan Sea, south of Sado Islands. Interbedded dark gray thinly laminates and dark brown to gray bioturbated units are common throughout the quaternary sediments of the Japan Sea. They have been explained in terms of glacio-eustatic sea-level change. Active methane venting and gas hydrates have also been recognized, which are widely distributed just beneath the sea floor in the Joetsu Basin, in the eastern margin of the Japan Sea. In order to identify the nature of the organic matter present in the study area and to make a correlation with samples collected in the Pacific Ocean, the study utilized total organic carbon contents and carbon isotopic composition of the gas hydrates bearing-sediments. Using X-ray diffraction analysis, these data were used to apply sequence stratigraphy concepts to locate the holocene/pleistocene boundary and to identify key stratigraphic surfaces, and also to recognize methane flux variations and sulfate-methane interfaces. The paper discussed total organic carbon in the Holocene/Pleistocene boundaries; nature of the organic matter and terrestrial versus marine phytoplankton production; and terrigenous material input. Sulfate oxidation of methane was also discussed. It was concluded that the correlation between the Japan Sea and Pacific Ocean was possible using piston cores. 13 refs., 13 figs.

  15. Prediction of calcite Cement Distribution in Shallow Marine Sandstone Reservoirs using Seismic Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakke, N.E.

    1996-12-31

    This doctoral thesis investigates how calcite cemented layers can be detected by reflection seismic data and how seismic data combined with other methods can be used to predict lateral variation in calcite cementation in shallow marine sandstone reservoirs. Focus is on the geophysical aspects. Sequence stratigraphy and stochastic modelling aspects are only covered superficially. Possible sources of calcite in shallow marine sandstone are grouped into internal and external sources depending on their location relative to the presently cemented rock. Well data and seismic data from the Troll Field in the Norwegian North Sea have been analysed. Tuning amplitudes from stacks of thin calcite cemented layers are analysed. Tuning effects are constructive or destructive interference of pulses resulting from two or more closely spaced reflectors. The zero-offset tuning amplitude is shown to depend on calcite content in the stack and vertical stack size. The relationship is found by regression analysis based on extensive seismic modelling. The results are used to predict calcite distribution in a synthetic and a real data example. It is found that describing calcite cemented beds in shallow marine sandstone reservoirs is not a deterministic problem. Hence seismic inversion and sequence stratigraphy interpretation of well data have been combined in a probabilistic approach to produce models of calcite cemented barriers constrained by a maximum amount of information. It is concluded that seismic data can provide valuable information on distribution of calcite cemented beds in reservoirs where the background sandstones are relatively homogeneous. 63 refs., 78 figs., 10 tabs.

  16. CO2 + N2O mixture gas hydrate formation kinetics and effect of soil minerals on mixture-gas hydrate formation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enkh-Amgalan, T.; Kyung, D.; Lee, W.

    2012-12-01

    CO2 mitigation is one of the most pressing global scientific topics in last 30 years. Nitrous oxide (N2O) is one of the main greenhouse gases (GHGs) defined by the Kyoto Protocol and its global warming potential (GWP) of one metric ton is equivalent to 310 metric tons of CO2. They have similar physical and chemical properties and therefore, mixture-gas (50% CO2 + 50% N2O) hydrate formation process was studied experimentally and computationally. There were no significant research to reduce N20 gas and we tried to make hydrate to mitigate N20 and CO2 in same time. Mixture gas hydrate formation periods were approximately two times faster than pure N2O hydrate formation kinetic in general. The fastest induction time of mixture-gas hydrate formation observed in Illite and Quartz among various soil mineral suspensions. It was also observed that hydrate formation kinetic was faster with clay mineral suspensions such as Nontronite, Sphalerite and Montmorillonite. Temperature and pressure change were not significant on hydrate formation kinetic; however, induction time can be significantly affected by various chemical species forming under the different suspension pHs. The distribution of chemical species in each mineral suspension was estimated by a chemical equilibrium model, PHREEQC, and used for the identification of hydrate formation characteristics in the suspensions. With the experimental limitations, a study on the molecular scale modeling has a great importance for the prediction of phase behavior of the gas hydrates. We have also performed molecular dynamics computer simulations on N2O and CO2 hydrate structures to estimate the residual free energy of two-phase (hydrate cage and guest molecule) at three different temperature ranges of 260K, 273K, and 280K. The calculation result implies that N2O hydrates are thermodynamically stable at real-world gas hydrate existing condition within given temperature and pressure. This phenomenon proves that mixture-gas could be

  17. Significance and occurrence of gas hydrates in offshore areas; Bedeutung und Vorkommen von Gashydraten im Offshore-Bereich

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wehner, H.; Faber, E. [Bundesanstalt fuer Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe, Hannover (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    The present contribution describes the boundary and stability conditions under which gas hydrates are able to exist. It also discusses the occurrence and genesis of gas hydrates and their role as an energy raw material of the future. Furthermore, it deals with the possibility of gas hydrates being the cause of submarine slumps and with their influence on the climate. (MSK) [Deutsch] Die Rand-und Stabilitaetsbedingungen unter denen die Gashydrate existent sein koennen werden beschrieben. Ebenso wird das Vorkommen von Gashydraten, ihre Genese und ihre Rolle als Energierohstoff der Zukunft diskutiert. Darueberhinaus werden die Gashydrate als moegliche Ursache fuer untermeerische Rutschungen und ihr Einfluss auf Klimaaenderungen erlaeutert.

  18. Relation of Gas Hydrates and Global Climate Changes%天然气水合物与全球气候变化的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙美琴; 王通其; 付萍

    2012-01-01

    Gas hydrate, a mineral that exists in marine and terrestrial environments, accounts for a large quantity of organic carbon, exceeding the total organic carbon from all other sources. However, gas hydrates is instable in nature, a slight variation of temperature/pressure would cause the decomposition of gas hydrates. Under steady - state conditions, much of the methane released into water column would be dissociated to carbon dioxide before reaching the sea surface. The amount of methane released into atmosphere is too little to impact global climate. Only catastrophic events such as large - scale sediment slumping would lead to considerable turbulence in the overlying water mass. Under these conditions, it is probable that a much higher proportion of the methane would be brought up to the sea surface and released to the atmosphere. Such events would have an immediate impact on global climate and global environment. Therefore, conscious and technological measures must be taken to prevent or decrease vari- ous environment hazards triggered by gas hydrate exploitation.%天然气水合物是一种广泛地存在于海底沉积物和陆地高纬度永久冻土带中的矿物,含碳量超过全球所有其他来源有机碳的总和。然而天然气水合物在自然界极不稳定,温压条件的微小变化都会引起其分解而释放出甲烷气体。一般情况下,释放出的甲烷大部分可能会被氧化成CO,而溶解在海水中,进入大气中的量不足以对气候产生影响。只有在发生巨变事件的情况下,如海底大规模的沉积物滑塌,才会将大量的甲烷带到海面并释放到大气中,从而对全球气候和环境产生严重的影响。因此,在开发利用天然气水合物之前,必须有超前的防范措施,以防止或尽可能减少天然气水合物对环境造成的不良影响。

  19. The influence of SO2 and NO2 impurities on CO2 gas hydrate formation and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeskow-Strauch, Bettina; Schicks, Judith M; Spangenberg, Erik; Erzinger, Jörg

    2011-04-11

    The sequestration of industrially emitted CO(2) in gas hydrate reservoirs has been recently discussed as an option to reduce atmospheric greenhouse gas. This CO(2) contains, despite much effort to clean it, traces of impurities such as SO(2) and NO(2) . Here, we present results of a pilot study on CO(2) hydrates contaminated with 1% SO(2) or 1% NO(2) and show the impact on hydrate formation and stability. Microscopic observations show similar hydrate formation rates, but an increase in hydrate stability in the presence of SO(2). Laser Raman spectroscopy indicates a strong enrichment of SO(2) in the liquid and hydrate phase and its incorporation in both large and small cages of the hydrate lattice. NO(2) is not verifiable by laser Raman spectroscopy, only the presence of nitrate ions could be confirmed. Differential scanning calorimetry analyses show that hydrate stability and dissociation enthalpy of mixed CO(2)-SO(2) hydrates increase, but that only negligible changes arise in the presence of NO(2) impurities. X-ray diffraction data reveal the formation of sI hydrate in all experiments. The conversion rates of ice+gas to hydrate increase in the presence of SO(2), but decrease in the presence of NO(2). After hydrate dissociation, SO(2) and NO(2) dissolved in water and form strong acids.

  20. National Assessment of Oil and Gas Project, Northern Alaska Province (001). Petroleum Systems and Geologic Assessment of Gas Hydrates in Northern Alaska – 2008. Limits of the Gas Hydrate stability zone contour lines

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The limits of Gas Hydrate (GH) stability zone contour lines (GH stability thickness zero) shown here is a geographic boundary defined and mapped on basis of U.S....

  1. A non-steady-state condition in sediments at the gas hydrate stability boundary off West Spitsbergen: Evidence for gas hydrate dissociation or just dynamic methane transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treude, Tina; Krause, Stefan; Bertics, Victoria; Steinle, Lea; Niemann, Helge; Liebetrau, Volker; Feseker, Tomas; Burwicz, Ewa; Krastel, Sebastian; Berndt, Christian

    2015-04-01

    In 2008, a large area with several hundred methane plumes was discovered along the West Spitsbergen continental margin at water depths between 150 and 400 m (Westbrook et al. 2009). Many of the observed plumes were located at the boundary of gas hydrate stability (~400 m water depth). It was speculated that the methane escape at this depth was correlated with gas hydrate destabilization caused by recent increases in water temperatures recorded in this region. In a later study, geochemical analyses of authigenic carbonates and modeling of heat flow data combined with seasonal changes in water temperature demonstrated that the methane seeps were active already prior to industrial warming but that the gas hydrate system nevertheless reacts very sensitive to even seasonal temperature changes (Berndt et al. 2014). Here, we report about a methane seep site at the gas hydrate stability boundary (394 m water depth) that features unusual geochemical profiles indicative for non-steady state conditions. Sediment was recovered with a gravity corer (core length 210 cm) and samples were analyzed to study porewater geochemistry, methane concentration, authigenic carbonates, and microbial activity. Porewater profiles revealed two zones of sulfate-methane transition at 50 and 200 cm sediment depth. The twin zones were confirmed by a double peaking in sulfide, total alkalinity, anaerobic oxidation of methane, and sulfate reduction. d18O values sharply increased from around -2.8 ‰ between 0 and 126 cm to -1.2 ‰ below 126 cm sediment depth. While U/Th isotope measurements of authigenic seep carbonates that were collected from different depths of the core illustrated that methane seepage must be occurring at this site since at least 3000 years, the biogeochemical profiles suggest that methane flux must have been altered recently. By applying a multi-phase reaction-transport model using known initial parameters from the study site (e.g. water depth, temperature profile, salinity

  2. Prediction of Gas Hydrate Formation Conditions in Aqueous Solutions of Single and Mixed Electrolytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zuo, You-Xiang; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, the extended Patel-Teja equation of state was modified to describe non-ideality of the liquid phase containing water and electrolytes accurately. The modified Patel-Teja equation of state (MPT EOS) was utilized to develop a predictive method for gas hydrate equilibria. The new method...... employs the Barkan and Sheinin hydrate model for the description of the hydrate phase, the original Patel-Teja equation of state for the vapor phase fugacities, and the MPT EOS (instead of the activity coefficient model) for the activity of water in the aqueous phase. The new method has succesfully...... predicted the gas hydrate formation conditions in aqueous solutions of single and mixed electrolytes. The agreement between experimental data and predictions was found to be excellent....

  3. Prediction of Gas Hydrate Formation Conditions in Aqueous Solutions of Single and Mixed Electrolytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zuo, You-Xiang; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, the extended Patel-Teja equation of state was modified to describe non-ideality of the liquid phase containing water and electrolytes accurately. The modified Patel-Teja equation of state (MPT EOS) was utilized to develop a predictive method for gas hydrate equilibria. The new method...... employs the Barkan and Sheinin hydrate model for the description of the hydrate phase, the original Patel-Teja equation of state for the vapor phase fugacities, and the MPT EOS (instead of the activity coefficient model) for the activity of water in the aqueous phase. The new method has succesfully...... predicted the gas hydrate formation conditions in aqueous solutions of single and mixed electrolytes. The agreement between experimental data and predictions was found to be excellent....

  4. Structure II gas hydrates found below the bottom-simulating reflector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganoni, M.; Cartwright, J. A.; Foschi, M.; Shipp, R. C.; Van Rensbergen, P.

    2016-06-01

    Gas hydrates are a major component in the organic carbon cycle. Their stability is controlled by temperature, pressure, water chemistry, and gas composition. The bottom-simulating reflector (BSR) is the primary seismic indicator of the base of hydrate stability in continental margins. Here we use seismic, well log, and core data from the convergent margin offshore NW Borneo to demonstrate that the BSR does not always represent the base of hydrate stability and can instead approximate the boundary between structure I hydrates above and structure II hydrates below. At this location, gas hydrate saturation below the BSR is higher than above and a process of chemical fractionation of the migrating free gas is responsible for the structure I-II transition. This research shows that in geological settings dominated by thermogenic gas migration, the hydrate stability zone may extend much deeper than suggested by the BSR.

  5. Geological evolution and analysis of confirmed or suspected gas hydrate localities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finley, P.D.; Krason, J.

    1988-10-01

    Geological factors controlling the formation, stability, and distribution of gas hydrates of the Beaufort Sea region were investigated by basin analysis. Geological, geophysical, and geochemical data from the region were assembled and evaluated to determine the relationships of geological environments and gas hydrates. The Beaufort Sea is the southern part of the Arctic Ocean offshore of the North Slope of Alaska and the Yukon and Mackenzie districts of Canada. The Beaufort Sea study region extends northward from the Arctic coasts of Alaska and Canada between Point Barrow on the west to Cape Beaufort on the east. The northern boundary of the Beaufort Sea study region is 72.5{degrees}N. The study region comprises broad continental shelves, slopes, rises, and the Arctic abyssal plain. 84 refs., 76 figs., 9 tabs.

  6. Oil & Natural Gas Technology A new approach to understanding the occurrence and volume of natural gas hydrate in the northern Gulf of Mexico using petroleum industry well logs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, Ann [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Majumdar, Urmi [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2016-03-31

    The northern Gulf of Mexico has been the target for the petroleum industry for exploration of conventional energy resource for decades. We have used the rich existing petroleum industry well logs to find the occurrences of natural gas hydrate in the northern Gulf of Mexico. We have identified 798 wells with well log data within the gas hydrate stability zone. Out of those 798 wells, we have found evidence of gas hydrate in well logs in 124 wells (15% of wells). We have built a dataset of gas hydrate providing information such as location, interval of hydrate occurrence (if any) and the overall quality of probable gas hydrate. Our dataset provides a wide, new perspective on the overall distribution of gas hydrate in the northern Gulf of Mexico and will be the key to future gas hydrate research and prospecting in the area.

  7. Geochemical Indications of Possible Gas Hydrates in the Northeastern South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Zhengquan; WU Bihao; ZHU Youhai; QIANG Zuji; WANG Zaimin; ZHANG Fuyuan

    2006-01-01

    Gas hydrate, mainly composed of hydrocarbon gas and water, is considered to be a clean energy in the 21st century. Many indicators such as BSRs (Bottom-Simulating Reflections), which are thought to be related to gas hydrate, are found in the South China Sea (SCS) in recent years. The northeastern part of the SCS is taken as one of the most potentials in the area by many scientists. It is situated in the conjunction of the northern divergent continental margin and the eastern convergent island margin, whose geological settings are much preferable for gas hydrate to occur. Through this study, brightness temperature anomalies recorded by satellite-based thermal infrared remotely sensed images before or within the imminent earthquake, the high content of hydrocarbon gas acid-degassed from subsurface sediment and the high radioactive thermoluminescence value of subsurface sediment were found in the region. Sometimes brightness temperature anomalies alone exist in the surrounding of the Dongsha Islands. The highest content of hydrocarbon gas amounts to 393 μL methane per kilogram sediment and the highest radioactive thermoluminescence value is 31752 unit; their geometric averages are 60.5 μL/kg and 2688.9 unit respectively. What is more inspiring is that there are three sites where the methane contents are up to 243, 268 and 359 μL/kg and their radioactive thermoluminescence values are 8430, 9537 and 20826 unit respectively. These three locations are just in the vicinity of one of the highest confident BSRs identified by predecessors. Meanwhile, the anomalies are generally coincident with other results such as headspace gas anomaly in the sediment and chloride anomaly in the interstitial water in the site 1146 of Leg 184. The above-mentioned anomalies are most possibly to indicate the occurrence of gas hydrate in the northeastern SCS.

  8. Report: Proceedings of the Hedberg Research Conference 'Gas Hydrates : Energy resource potential and associated geologic hazards'

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Veerayya, M.

    computable through simulations on the GIS for different rates and volumes of precipitation. We are systematically under prepared in the war against natural hazards. System needs a psychological adjustment to become receptive to scientists and scientific... and discussed the state-of-the-art concepts, methodologies, case histories, and the future direction of gas hydrates as an energy resource. The primary goals of the conference were to critically examine the geologic parameters that control the occurrence...

  9. High-resolution seafloor features related to potential gas-hydrate formation off SW Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, S.; Tsai, C.; Chen, S.; Shih, T.

    2010-12-01

    The area off SW Taiwan is considered as a high potential area for gas-hydrate formation. The gas-hydrate signature is indicated by the abundant presence of BSR (Bottom-Simulating-Reflector). High methane concentration is also shown in the bottom water near the seafloor. To have a better understanding, we have conducted deep-towed survey of side-scan sonar and sub-bottom profiler in several potential areas. Pockmarks are found in several places. Some are related to gas seeping. The gas seeps are especially obvious in high-resolution sub-bottom profilers. The high pore-pressure due to the charging of the gas has clearly uplifted a top layer of sediments. The pockmarks area usually accompany the presence of authigenic carbonate. In the image of side-scan sonar data, the irregular patterns of strong backscatter signal are associated with the gas seeping or pockmark sites. The presence of pockmarks or gas seeps could be related to structural faults. Because the NW convergence of the Philippine Sea plate relative to the Eurasian plate, the area off SW Taiwan in fact is under compression and has caused folds and faults. These structural faults provide efficient conduits for fluid to migrate upward. Thus, the pockmarks frequently appear near faults. In the water depth of about 450m, the upward gas even goes into water column and creates clear gas plume image in EK 500 data. The gas is inferred to be dissociated from gas-hydrate and can get into the atmosphere. The dissociation of gas-hydrate has probably also induced the instability of the seafloor off SW Taiwan and cuased submarine landslides.

  10. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION ON GAS HYDRATE FORMATION IN PRESENCE OF ADDITIVE COMPONENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Zhigao; FAN Shuanshi; GUO Kaihua

    2003-01-01

    Additives were used to increase gas hydrate formation rate and storage capacity. Experimental tests of methane hydrate formation were carried out in surfactant water solutions in a high-pressure cell.Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and alkyl polysaccharide glycoside (APG) were used to increase hydrate formation. The effect of SDS on hydrate formation is more pronounced compared APG. Cyclopentane (CP) also improves hydrate formation rates while it cannot increase methane gas storage capacity.

  11. Marine and fluvial facies modelling at petroleum reservoir scale; Modelisation des heterogeneites lithologiques a l'echelle du reservoir petrolier en milieu marin et fluviatile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leflon, B.

    2005-10-15

    When modelling a petroleum reservoir, well data are very useful to model properties at a sub-seismic scale. Petrophysical properties like porosity or permeability are linked to the rock-type. Two methods based on well data have been developed to model facies. The first one is used to model marine carbonates deposits. The geometry of sedimentary layers is modelled through a special parameterization of the reservoir similar to Wheeler space. The time parameter is defined along the well paths thanks to correlations. The layer thickness is then extrapolated between wells. A given relationship between facies and bathymetry of sedimentation makes it possible to compute bathymetry along the well paths. Bathymetry is then extrapolated from wells and a reference map using the concept of accommodation. The model created this way is stratigraphically consistent. Facies simulation can then be constrained by the computed bathymetry. The second method describes a novel approach to fluvial reservoirs modelling. The core of the method lies in the association of a fairway with the channels to be simulated. Fairways are positioned so that all data are taken in account; they can be stochastic if unknown or explicitly entered if identified on seismic data. A potential field is defined within the fairway. Specifying a transfer function to map this potential field to thickness results in generating a channel inside the fairway. A residual component is stochastically simulated and added to the potential field creating realistic channel geometries. Conditioning to well data is obtained by applying the inverse transfer function at the data location to derive thickness values that will constrain the simulation of residuals. (author)

  12. Separation of SF6 from gas mixtures using gas hydrate formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Inuk; Lee, Seungmin; Lee, Ju Dong; Lee, Gang-woo; Seo, Yongwon

    2010-08-15

    This study aims to examine the thermodynamic feasibility of separating sulfur hexafluoride (SF(6)), which is widely used in various industrial fields and is one of the most potent greenhouse gases, from gas mixtures using gas hydrate formation. The key process variables of hydrate phase equilibria, pressure-composition diagram, formation kinetics, and structure identification of the mixed gas hydrates, were closely investigated to verify the overall concept of this hydrate-based SF(6) separation process. The three-phase equilibria of hydrate (H), liquid water (L(W)), and vapor (V) for the binary SF(6) + water mixture and for the ternary N(2) + SF(6) + water mixtures with various SF(6) vapor compositions (10, 30, 50, and 70%) were experimentally measured to determine the stability regions and formation conditions of pure and mixed hydrates. The pressure-composition diagram at two different temperatures of 276.15 and 281.15 K was obtained to investigate the actual SF(6) separation efficiency. The vapor phase composition change was monitored during gas hydrate formation to confirm the formation pattern and time needed to reach a state of equilibrium. Furthermore, the structure of the mixed N(2) + SF(6) hydrate was confirmed to be structure II via Raman spectroscopy. Through close examination of the overall experimental results, it was clearly verified that highly concentrated SF(6) can be separated from gas mixtures at mild temperatures and low pressure conditions.

  13. Dissociation behavior of methane--ethane mixed gas hydrate coexisting structures I and II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kida, Masato; Jin, Yusuke; Takahashi, Nobuo; Nagao, Jiro; Narita, Hideo

    2010-09-09

    Dissociation behavior of methane-ethane mixed gas hydrate coexisting structures I and II at constant temperatures less than 223 K was studied with use of powder X-ray diffraction and solid-state (13)C NMR techniques. The diffraction patterns at temperatures less than 203 K showed both structures I and II simultaneously convert to Ih during the dissociation, but the diffraction pattern at temperatures greater than 208 K showed different dissociation behavior between structures I and II. Although the diffraction peaks from structure II decreased during measurement at constant temperatures greater than 208 K, those from structure I increased at the initial step of dissociation and then disappeared. This anomalous behavior of the methane-ethane mixed gas hydrate coexisting structures I and II was examined by using the (13)C NMR technique. The (13)C NMR spectra revealed that the anomalous behavior results from the formation of ethane-rich structure I. The structure I hydrate formation was associated with the dissociation rate of the initial methane-ethane mixed gas hydrate.

  14. The influence of porosity and structural parameters on different kinds of gas hydrate dissociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misyura, S Y

    2016-07-22

    Methane hydrate dissociation at negative temperatures was studied experimentally for different artificial and natural samples, differing by macro- and micro-structural parameters. Four characteristic dissociation types are discussed in the paper. The internal kinetics of artificial granule gas hydrates and clathrate hydrates in coal is dependent on the porosity, defectiveness and gas filtration rate. The density of pores distribution in the crust of formed ice decreases by the several orders of magnitude and this change significantly the rate of decay. Existing models for describing dissociation at negative temperatures do not take into account the structural parameters of samples. The dissociation is regulated by internal physical processes that must be considered in the simulation. Non-isothermal dissociation with constant external heat flux was simulated numerically. The dissociation is simulated with consideration of heat and mass transfer, kinetics of phase transformation and gas filtering through a porous medium of granules for the negative temperatures. It is shown that the gas hydrate dissociation in the presence of mainly microporous structures is fundamentally different from the disintegration of gas hydrates containing meso and macropores.

  15. Characterizing Natural Gas Hydrates in the Deep Water Gulf of Mexico: Applications for Safe Exploration and Production Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bent, Jimmy

    2014-05-31

    In 2000 Chevron began a project to learn how to characterize the natural gas hydrate deposits in the deep water portion of the Gulf of Mexico (GOM). Chevron is an active explorer and operator in the Gulf of Mexico and is aware that natural gas hydrates need to be understood to operate safely in deep water. In August 2000 Chevron worked closely with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and held a workshop in Houston, Texas to define issues concerning the characterization of natural gas hydrate deposits. Specifically, the workshop was meant to clearly show where research, the development of new technologies, and new information sources would be of benefit to the DOE and to the oil and gas industry in defining issues and solving gas hydrate problems in deep water.

  16. Regional Mapping and Resource Assessment of Shallow Gas Hydrates of Japan Sea - METI Launched 3 Years Project in 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, R.

    2014-12-01

    Agency of Natural Resources and Energy of METI launched a 3 years shallow gas hydrate exploration project in 2013 to make a precise resource assessment of shallow gas hydrates in the eastern margin of Japan Sea and around Hokkaido. Shallow gas hydrates of Japan Sea occur in fine-grained muddy sediments of shallow subsurface of mounds and gas chimneys in the form of massive nodular to platy accumulation. Gas hydrate bearing mounds are often associated with active methane seeps, bacterial mats and carbonate concretions and pavements. Gases of gas hydrates are derived either from deep thermogenic, shallow microbial or from the mixed gases, contrasting with totally microbial deep-seated stratigraphically controlled hydrates. Shallow gas hydrates in Japan Sea have not been considered as energy resource due to its limited distribution in narrow Joetsu basin. However recently academic research surveys have demonstrated regional distribution of gas chimney and hydrate mound in a number of sedimentary basins along the eastern margin of Japan Sea. Regional mapping of gas chimney and hydrate mound by means of MBES and SBP surveys have confirmed that more than 200 gas chimneys exist in 100 km x 100 km area. ROV dives have identified dense accumulation of hydrates on the wall of half collapsed hydrate mound down to 30 mbsf. Sequential LWD and shallow coring campaign in the Summer of 2014, R/V Hakurei, which is equipped with Fugro Seacore R140 drilling rig, drilled through hydrate mounds and gas chimneys down to the BGHS (base of gas hydrate stability) level and successfully recovered massive gas hydrates bearing sediments from several horizons.

  17. Geomechanical, Hydraulic and Thermal Characteristics of Deep Oceanic Sandy Sediments Recovered during the Second Ulleung Basin Gas Hydrate Expedition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohan Cha

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the geomechanical, hydraulic and thermal characteristics of natural sandy sediments collected during the Ulleung Basin gas hydrate expedition 2, East Sea, offshore Korea. The studied sediment formation is considered as a potential target reservoir for natural gas production. The sediments contained silt, clay and sand fractions of 21%, 1.3% and 77.7%, respectively, as well as diatomaceous minerals with internal pores. The peak friction angle and critical state (or residual state friction angle under drained conditions were ~26° and ~22°, respectively. There was minimal or no apparent cohesion intercept. Stress- and strain-dependent elastic moduli, such as tangential modulus and secant modulus, were identified. The sediment stiffness increased with increasing confining stress, but degraded with increasing strain regime. Variations in water permeability with water saturation were obtained by fitting experimental matric suction-water saturation data to the Maulem-van Genuchen model. A significant reduction in thermal conductivity (from ~1.4–1.6 to ~0.5–0.7 W·m−1·K−1 was observed when water saturation decreased from 100% to ~10%–20%. In addition, the electrical resistance increased quasi-linearly with decreasing water saturation. The geomechanical, hydraulic and thermal properties of the hydrate-free sediments reported herein can be used as the baseline when predicting properties and behavior of the sediments containing hydrates, and when the hydrates dissociate during gas production. The variations in thermal and hydraulic properties with changing water and gas saturation can be used to assess gas production rates from hydrate-bearing deposits. In addition, while depressurization of hydrate-bearing sediments inevitably causes deformation of sediments under drained conditions, the obtained strength and stiffness properties and stress-strain responses of the sedimentary formation under drained loading conditions

  18. Evaluation of the geological relationships to gas hydrate formation and stability. Progress report, June 16--September 30, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krason, J.; Finley, P.

    1988-12-31

    The summaries of regional basin analyses document that potentially economic accumulations of gas hydrates can be formed in both active and passive margin settings. The principal requirement for gas hydrate formation in either setting is abundant methane. Passive margin sediments with high sedimentation rates and sufficient sedimentary organic carbon can generate large quantities of biogenic methane for hydrate formation. Similarly, active margin locations near a terrigenous sediment source can also have high methane generation potential due to rapid burial of adequate amounts of sedimentary organic matter. Many active margins with evidence of gas hydrate presence correspond to areas subject to upwelling. Upwelling currents can enhance methane generation by increasing primary productivity and thus sedimentary organic carbon. Structural deformation of the marginal sediments at both active and passive sites can enhance gas hydrate formation by providing pathways for migration of both biogenic and thermogenic gas to the shallow gas hydrate stability zone. Additionally, conventional hydrocarbon traps may initially concentrate sufficient amounts of hydrocarbons for subsequent gas hydrate formation.

  19. Scientific results from JAPEX/JNOC/GSC Mallik 2L-38 gas hydrate research well, Mackenzie Delta, Northwest Territories, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dallimore, S.R. [ed.] [Geological Survey of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Uchida, T. [ed.] [JAPEX Research Center, Chiba (Japan); Collett, T.S. [ed.] [United States Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)

    1999-10-01

    A general overview was presented of a joint research project involving Canada, the United States and Japan. The project involved the drilling of the JAPEX/JNOC/GSC Mallik 2L-38 gas hydrate research well to examine the occurrence of natural gas hydrate beneath permafrost. The 1150 m deep gas hydrate well, which is located on the northeastern edge of the Mackenzie Delta, Northwest Territories was completed in March 1998. This book presents the scientific results from the well program. It is meant to assess regional issues related to gas hydrate occurrences in the Mackenzie Delta area. An operations overview of the project was presented along with the regional geology, gas hydrate setting, and the ground-thermal conditions of the Mackenzie Delta region. 19 papers were also included which provided a comprehensive review of the core data collected in the well. The studies were grouped into the following subjects: (1) geology and biostratigraphy, (2) geophysical properties, (3) geochemistry, (4) gas hydrate characterization, and (5) downhole geophysics. One well log and three maps were included with this bulletin. refs., tabs., figs.

  20. Evidence of mud volcanism rooted in gas hydrate-rich cryosphere linking surface and subsurface for the search for life on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Toffoli, Barbara; Pozzobon, Riccardo; Mazzarini, Francesco; Massironi, Matteo; Cremonese, Gabriele

    2017-04-01

    We mapped around 6000 mounds in three different portions of the Martian surface on an average area of about 90.000 Km2 for each region. The study areas are located in Hellas basin, Utopia basin and a portion of the Northern Plains lying north of Arabia Terra, between Acidalia and Utopia Planitia. The aim of the study was to understand the nature of the observed features, particularly if they could be interpreted as mud volcanoes or not, and improve our knowledge about the Martian mound fields origin. The analysis of Context Camera (onboard Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter) images showed circular, elliptical and coalescent mounds with central and/or distal pits and flow features such as concentric annular lobes around the source pits and apron-like extensions. We produced DTMs and then high-to-diameter morphometric analysis on two groups of mounds located in Utopia and Hellas basins to enhance the geomorphological observations. We inferred, by means of cluster and fractal analyses, the thickness of the medium cracked by connected fractures and, consequently, the depths of reservoirs that fed the mounds. We found that the fields, which are seated at different latitudes, has been fed, at least partially, by reservoirs located at the base of the gas hydrate stability zone according to Clifford et al., 2010. This evidence produces a meaningful relationship between the clathrates distribution underneath the Martian surface and the occurrence of mound fields on the surface leading to the assumption that the involvement of water, ostensibly as a result of gas hydrate dissociation, plays a key role in the subsurface processes that potentially worked as triggers. These outcomes corroborate the hypothesis that the mapped mounds are actually mud volcanoes and make these structures outstanding targets for astrobiology and habitability studies. In fact, mud volcanoes, extruding material from depths that are still not affordable by our present-day instrumentations, could have sampled

  1. Estimation of gas hydrate saturation with temperature calculated from hydrate threshold at C0002 during IODP NanTroSEIZE Stage 1 expeditions in the Nankai Trough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyakawa, A.; Yamada, Y.; Saito, S.; Bourlange, S.; Chang, C.; Conin, M.; Tomaru, H.; Kinoshita, M.; Tobin, H.; 314/315/316Scientists, E.

    2008-12-01

    During the IODP Expedition 314, conducted at Nankai trough accretionary prism, gas hydrate was observed at Site C0002. Gas hydrate beneath seafloor is promising energy source and potentially hazardous material during drilling. The precise estimation of gas hydrate saturation is important, but previous works have not considered the effect" of the in-situ temperature. In this study, we propose an estimation method of gas hydrate saturation with temperature calculated from threshold of gas hydrate. Gas hydrate saturation was determined based on the Logging While Drilling (LWD) Expedition 314 data. The gas hydrate bearing zone was located between 218.1 to 400.4 m below seafloor. Archie's relation was used to estimate gas hydrate saturation. This relation requires the porosity, the sea water resistivity and formation resistivity. We determined porosity to be between ~70 to ~30% based on density log. Since the resistivity of sea water is temperature dependent, temperature profile (calculated temperature model) was determined from the thermal conductivity and the temperature at the base of the gas hydrate. In our calculated temperature model, the saturation increases from ~10% at ~220m to ~30% at 400 m below sea floor. Spikes that have a maximum value at 80% at sand layers were observed. We also estimated the gas hydrate saturation from the constant temperature profile in 12°C (temperature constant model). This resulted in almost constant saturation (~15%) with the high saturation spikes. We compared these saturations with the hydrate occupation ratio within sand layers derived from RAB image. The hydrate occupation ratio shows increasing trend with increasing depth, and this trend is similar to the gas hydrate saturation with the calculated temperature model. This result suggests that the temperature profile should be considered to obtain precise gas hydrate saturation. Since the high sedimentation rate can affect thermal condition, we are planning to estimate the

  2. Direct Reservoir Parameter Estimation Using Joint Inversion ofMarine Seismic AVA&CSEM Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoversten, G. Michael; Cassassuce, Florence; Gasperikova, Erika; Newman,Gregory A.; Rubin, Yoram; Zhangshuan, Hou; Vasco, Don

    2005-01-12

    A new joint inversion algorithm to directly estimate reservoir parameters is described. This algorithm combines seismic amplitude versus angle (AVA) and marine controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) data. The rock-properties model needed to link the geophysical parameters to the reservoir parameters is described. Errors in the rock-properties model parameters, measured in percent, introduce errors of comparable size in the joint inversion reservoir parameter estimates. Tests of the concept on synthetic one-dimensional models demonstrate improved fluid saturation and porosity estimates for joint AVA-CSEM data inversion (compared to AVA or CSEM inversion alone). Comparing inversions of AVA, CSEM, and joint AVA-CSEM data over the North Sea Troll field, at a location with well control, shows that the joint inversion produces estimated gas saturation, oil saturation and porosity that is closest (as measured by the RMS difference, L1 norm of the difference, and net over the interval) to the logged values whereas CSEM inversion provides the closest estimates of water saturation.

  3. Geochemistry of drill core headspace gases and its significance in gas hydrate drilling in Qilian Mountain permafrost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhengquan; Rao, Zhu; He, Jiaxiong; Zhu, Youhai; Zhang, Yongqin; Liu, Hui; Wang, Ting; Xue, Xiaohua

    2015-02-01

    Headspace gases from cores are sampled in the gas hydrate drilling well DK-8 in the Qilian Mountain permafrost. Gas components and carbon isotopes of methane from headspace gas samples are analyzed. The geochemical features of the headspace gases along the well profile are compared with occurrences of gas hydrate, and with the distribution of faults or fractures. Their geochemical significance is finally pointed out in gas hydrate occurrences and hydrocarbon migration. Results show high levels of hydrocarbon concentrations in the headspace gases at depths of 149-167 m, 228-299 m, 321-337 m and 360-380 m. Visible gas hydrate and its associated anomalies occur at 149-167 m and 228-299 m; the occurrence of high gas concentrations in core headspace gases was correlated to gas hydrate occurrences and their associated anomalies, especially in the shallow layers. Gas compositions, gas ratios of C1/ΣC1-5, C1/(C2 + C3), iC4/nC4, and iC5/nC5, and carbon isotopic compositions of methane (δ13C1, PDB‰) indicate that the headspace gases are mainly thermogenic, partly mixed with biodegraded thermogenic sources with small amounts derived from microbial sources. Faults or fracture zones are identified at intervals of 149-167 m, 228-299 m, 321-337 m, and near 360-380 m; significantly higher gas concentrations and lower dryness ratio were found in the headspace gases within the fault or fracture zones compared with areas above these zones. In the shallow zones, low dryness ratios were observed in headspace gases in zones where gas hydrate and faults or fracture zones were found, suggesting that faults or fracture zones serve as migration paths for gases in the deep layers and provide accumulation space for gas hydrate in the shallow layers of the Qilian Mountain permafrost.

  4. Final Report for the September 2001 Workshop on Physical Property Measurements for the Gas Hydrate R&D Community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, N D; Durham, W B; Kirby, S; Brewer, P

    2001-10-01

    A 2-day workshop ''Physical and Chemical Property Measurements for the Gas Hydrate R&D Community'' was held on 17-18 September 2001. Putting together this workshop was a joint effort by LLNL, MBARI and the USGS, Menlo Park. Twenty-two people from a wide variety of institutions and backgrounds participated. An additional eighteen people were forced to cancel at the last minute due to the events of 11 September 2001. The premise of the workshop was that progress in nearly every aspect of gas hydrate research depends fundamentally on the availability of high-quality property data and the development of laboratory insights into the physics and chemistry that govern gas hydrates in nature. One objective of the workshop was to develop a dialogue between laboratory scientists who make property measurements of gas hydrates and scientists who use these data for quantitative modeling. A second objective was to help facilitate research among experimentalists and the acquisition of reliable gas hydrate properties. The latter focused mainly, but not exclusively, on researchers from institutions in the San Francisco Bay Area to energize a community that has a geographic advantage in collaborative relationships. The workshop was successful at meeting both of these objectives, although the unique perspectives of the invitees who weren't able to attend were missed. After reviewing the current state of gas hydrate R&D with respect to property measurements, there was general agreement that it is time to move forward with new approaches (e.g., seafloor experiments, lab experiments with hydrate-sediment aggregates) and new applications of techniques (e.g., improved seismics, in situ x-ray and neutron diffraction and tomography, and NMR scanning). The workshop consensus is summarized at the end of this document in a table of fundamental questions pertaining to natural gas hydrates and possible experimental lab and seafloor approaches to answering them.

  5. Elastic velocity models for gas-hydrate-bearing sediments-a comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chand, Shyam; Minshull, Tim A.; Gei, Davide; Carcione, José M.

    2004-11-01

    The presence of gas hydrate in oceanic sediments is mostly identified by bottom-simulating reflectors (BSRs), reflection events with reversed polarity following the trend of the seafloor. Attempts to quantify the amount of gas hydrate present in oceanic sediments have been based mainly on the presence or absence of a BSR and its relative amplitude. Recent studies have shown that a BSR is not a necessary criterion for the presence of gas hydrates, but rather its presence depends on the type of sediments and the in situ conditions. The influence of hydrate on the physical properties of sediments overlying the BSR is determined by the elastic properties of their constituents and on sediment microstructure. In this context several approaches have been developed to predict the physical properties of sediments, and thereby quantify the amount of gas/gas hydrate present from observed deviations of these properties from those predicted for sediments without gas hydrate. We tested four models: the empirical weighted equation (WE); the three-phase effective-medium theory (TPEM); the three-phase Biot theory (TPB) and the differential effective-medium theory (DEM). We compared these models for a range of variables (porosity and clay content) using standard values for physical parameters. The comparison shows that all the models predict sediment properties comparable to field values except for the WE model at lower porosities and the TPB model at higher porosities. The models differ in the variation of velocity with porosity and clay content. The variation of velocity with hydrate saturation is also different, although the range is similar. We have used these models to predict velocities for field data sets from sediment sections with and without gas hydrates. The first is from the Mallik 2L-38 well, Mackenzie Delta, Canada, and the second is from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 164 on Blake Ridge. Both data sets have Vp and Vs information along with the composition and

  6. Appraisal of gas hydrate resources based on a P- and S-impedance reflectivity template: case study from the deep sea sediments in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoar, Behnam Hosseini; Javaherian, Abdolrahim; Keshavarz Farajkhah, Nasser; Seddigh Arabani, Mojtaba

    2013-12-01

    The occurrence of a bottom simulating reflector (BSR) in the 2D seismic data from Makran's accretionary prism reveals the presence of gas hydrate and free gas several hundred meters below the seafloor of Iran's deep sea. According to the global distribution of marine hydrates, they are widely present in deep sea sediments, where high operational costs and hazards cause a lack of well log information. Therefore, developing a method to quantify the hydrate resources with seismic data is an ultimate goal for unexplored regions. In this study, the so-called reflectivity templates (RTs) are introduced for quantification of the hydrate and free gas near the BSR. These RTs are intuitive crossplots of P-impedance and S-impedance contrasts across the BSR. They are calculated theoretically based on the effective medium theory for different hydrate distribution modes with some assumptions on porosity and mineralogical composition of unconsolidated sediments. This technique suggests the possibility of using the amplitude variation versus offset (AVO) analysis of the BSR for a quantitative interpretation when well log data are not available. By superimposing the AVO-derived P-impedance and S-impedance contrasts across the BSR on these RTs, the saturations of the hydrate and free gas near the BSR could be estimated. Validation of this approach by synthetic data showed that a reliable quantification could be achieved if the model parameters were rearranged to a form in which the AVO inversion was independent of the S-wave to P-wave velocity-ratio assumption. Based on this approach applied on the 2D marine pre-stack time migrated seismic line in offshore Iran, 4% to 28% of the gas hydrate and 1% to 2% of the free gas are expected to be accumulated near the thrusted-ridge and thrusted-footwall types of BSRs.

  7. Evidence for large methane releases to the atmosphere from deep-sea gas-hydrate dissociation during the last glacial episode

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Garidel-Thoron, Thibault; Beaufort, Luc; Bassinot, Franck; Henry, Pierre

    2004-01-01

    Past atmospheric methane-concentration oscillations recorded in polar ice cores vary together with rapid global climatic changes during the last glacial episode. In the “clathrate gun hypothesis,” massive releases of deep-sea methane from marine gas-hydrate dissociation led to these well known, global, abrupt warmings in the past. If evidence for such releases in the water column exists, however, the mechanism and eventual transfer to the atmosphere has not yet been documented clearly. Here we describe a high-resolution marine-sediment record of stable carbon isotopic changes from the Papua Gulf, off Papua New Guinea, which exhibits two extremely depleted excursions (down to -9‰) at ≈39,000 and ≈55,000 years. Morphological, isotopic, and trace metal evidence dismisses authigenic calcite as the main source of depleted carbon. Massive methane release associated with deep-sea gas-hydrate dissociation is the most likely cause for such large depletions of δ13C. The absence of a δ13C gradient in the water column during these events implies that the methane rose through the entire water column, reaching the sea–air interface and thus the atmosphere. Foraminiferal δ18O composition suggests that the rise of the methane in the water column created an upwelling flow. These inferred emission events suggest that during the last glacial episode, this process was likely widespread, including tropical regions. Thus, the release of methane from the ocean floor into the atmosphere cannot be dismissed as a strong positive feedback in climate dynamics processes. PMID:15197255

  8. Tracking Dissolved Methane Concentrations near Active Seeps and Gas Hydrates: Sea of Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, G. T.; Aoki, S.; Matsumoto, R.; Tomaru, H.; Owari, S.; Nakajima, R.; Doolittle, D. F.; Brant, B.

    2015-12-01

    A number of regions in the Sea of Japan are known for active gas venting and for gas hydrate exposures on the sea floor. In this investigation we employed several gas sensors mounted on a ROV in order to determine the concentrations of dissolved methane in the water near these sites. Methane concentrations were determined during two-second intervals throughout each ROV deployment during the cruise. The methane sensor deployments were coupled with seawater sampling using Niskin bottles. Dissolved gas concentrations were later measured using gas chromatography in order to compare with the sensor results taken at the same time. The observed maximum dissolved methane concentrations were much lower than saturation values, even when the ROV manipulators were in contact with gas hydrate. Nonetheless, dissolved concentrations did reach several thousands of nmol/L near gas hydrate exposures and gas bubbles, more than two orders of magnitude over the instrumental detection limits. Most of the sensors tested were able to detect dissolved methane concentrations as low as 10 nmol/L which permitted detection when the ROV approached methane plume sites, even from several tens of meters above the sea floor. Despite the low detection limits, the methane sensors showed variable response times when returning to low-background seawater (~5nM). For some of the sensors, the response time necessary to return to background values occurred in a matter of minutes, while for others it took several hours. Response time, as well as detection limit, should be an important consideration when selecting methane sensors for ROV or AUV investigations. This research was made possible, in part, through funding provided by the Japanese Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI).

  9. Modeling of Oceanic Gas Hydrate Instability and Methane Release in Response to Climate Change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reagan, Matthew; Reagan, Matthew T.; Moridis, George J.

    2008-04-15

    Paleooceanographic evidence has been used to postulate that methane from oceanic hydrates may have had a significant role in regulating global climate, implicating global oceanic deposits of methane gas hydrate as the main culprit in instances of rapid climate change that have occurred in the past. However, the behavior of contemporary oceanic methane hydrate deposits subjected to rapid temperature changes, like those predicted under future climate change scenarios, is poorly understood. To determine the fate of the carbon stored in these hydrates, we performed simulations of oceanic gas hydrate accumulations subjected to temperature changes at the seafloor and assessed the potential for methane release into the ocean. Our modeling analysis considered the properties of benthic sediments, the saturation and distribution of the hydrates, the ocean depth, the initial seafloor temperature, and for the first time, estimated the effect of benthic biogeochemical activity. The results show that shallow deposits--such as those found in arctic regions or in the Gulf of Mexico--can undergo rapid dissociation and produce significant methane fluxes of 2 to 13 mol/yr/m{sup 2} over a period of decades, and release up to 1,100 mol of methane per m{sup 2} of seafloor in a century. These fluxes may exceed the ability of the seafloor environment (via anaerobic oxidation of methane) to consume the released methane or sequester the carbon. These results will provide a source term to regional or global climate models in order to assess the coupling of gas hydrate deposits to changes in the global climate.

  10. Gas hydrate-related proxies inferred from multidisciplinary investigations in the India offshoe areas

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramana, M.V.; Ramprasad, T.; Desa, M.; Sathe, A.V.; Sethi, A.K.

    . Gornitz, V. and Fung, I., Potential distribution of methane h y drates in the world?s oceans. Global Biogeochem. Cycles , 1994, 8 , 335 ? 347 . 27. Whiticar, M. J., Carbon and hydrogen isotope systematics o f ba c- terial form a tion and oxidation... Simulating R e- flection (BSR) on the multichannel seismic refle c tion records and computed gas hydrate st a bility zone thickness map. The BSR alone is inadequate to infe r gas h y drates as suggested by drilling results els e where. Therefore...

  11. Joint Electrical and Seismic Interpretation of Gas Hydrate Bearing Sediments From the Cascadia Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, M.; Minshull, T.; Sinha, M.; Best, A.

    2008-12-01

    Gas hydrates are found in continental margin sediments worldwide. Their global importance as future energy reserves and their potential impact on slope stability and abrupt climate change all require better knowledge of where they occur and how much hydrate is present. However, current estimates of the distribution and volume of gas hydrate beneath the seabed range widely. Improved geophysical methods could provide much better constraints on hydrate concentrations. Geophysical measurements of seismic velocity and electrical resistivity using seabed or borehole techniques are often used to determine the hydrate saturation of sediments. Gas hydrates are well known to affect these physical properties; hydrate increases sediment p-wave velocity and electrical resistivity by replacing the conductive pore fluids, by cementing grains together and by blocking pores. A range of effective medium theoretical models have been developed to interpret these measurements in terms of hydrate content, but uncertainties about the pore-scale distribution of hydrate can lead to large uncertainties in the results. This study developed effective medium models to determine the seismic and electrical properties of hydrate bearing sediments in terms of their porosity, micro-structure and hydrate saturation. The seismic approach combines a Self Consistent Approximation (SCA) and Differential Effective Medium (DEM), which can model a bi-connected effective medium and allows the shape and alignment of the grains to be taken into account. The electrical effective medium method was developed to complement the seismic models and is based on the application of a geometric correction to the Hashin-Shrikman conductive bound. The electrical and seismic models are non-unique and hence it was necessary to develop a joint electrical and seismic interpretation method to investigate hydrate bearing sediments. The joint method allows two variables (taken from porosity, aspect ratio or hydrate saturation

  12. Gas-hydrates in Krishna-Godavari and Mahanadi basins: New data

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sain, K.; Ojha, M.; Satyavani, N.; Ramadass, G.A.; Ramprasad, T.; Das, S.K.; Gupta, H.

    -7622/2012-79-6-553/$ 1.00 © GEOL. SOC. INDIA JOURNAL GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF INDIA Vol.79, June 2012, pp.553-556 Gas-hydrates in Krishna-Godavari and Mahanadi Basins: New Data KALACHAND SAIN 1 , MAHESWAR OJHA 1 , NITTALA SATYAVANI 1 , G.A. RAMADASS 2 , T. RAMPRASAD 3 , S... Paula, Goa - 403 004 4 Ministry of Earth Sciences, Prithvi Bhavan, Lodhi Road, New Delhi - 110 003 Email: kalachandsain@yahoo.com than 1500 times of India’s present natural gas reserve, and it is envisaged that 10% recovery from this huge cache of energy...

  13. Entropic Description of Gas Hydrate Ice-Liquid Equilibrium via Enhanced Sampling of Coexisting Phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Małolepsza, Edyta; Kim, Jaegil; Keyes, Tom

    2015-05-01

    Metastable β ice holds small guest molecules in stable gas hydrates, so its solid-liquid equilibrium is of interest. However, aqueous crystal-liquid transitions are very difficult to simulate. A new molecular dynamics algorithm generates trajectories in a generalized NPT ensemble and equilibrates states of coexisting phases with a selectable enthalpy. With replicas spanning the range between β ice and liquid water, we find the statistical temperature from the enthalpy histograms and characterize the transition by the entropy, introducing a general computational procedure for first-order transitions.

  14. Thessaloniki Mud Volcano, the Shallowest Gas Hydrate-Bearing Mud Volcano in the Anaximander Mountains, Eastern Mediterranean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Perissoratis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A detailed multibeam survey and the subsequent gravity coring carried out in the Anaximander Mountains, Eastern Mediterranean, detected a new active gas hydrate-bearing mud volcano (MV that was named Thessaloniki. It is outlined by the 1315 m bathymetric contour, is 1.67 km2 in area, and has a summit depth of 1260 m. The sea bottom water temperature is 13.7∘C. The gas hydrate crystals generally have the form of flakes or rice, some larger aggregates of them are up to 2 cm across. A pressure core taken at the site contained 3.1 lt. of hydrocarbon gases composed of methane, nearly devoid of propane and butane. The sediment had a gas hydrate occupancy of 0.7% of the core volume. These characteristics place the gas hydrate field at Thessaloniki MV at the upper boundary of the gas hydrate stability zone, prone to dissociation with the slightest increase in sea water temperature, decrease in hydrostatic pressure, or change in the temperature of the advecting fluids.

  15. Toward Production From Gas Hydrates: Current Status, Assessment of Resources, and Simulation-Based Evaluationof Technology and Potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reagan, Matthew; Moridis, George J.; Collett, Timothy; Boswell, Ray; Kurihara, M.; Reagan, Matthew T.; Koh, Carolyn; Sloan, E. Dendy

    2008-02-12

    Gas hydrates are a vast energy resource with global distribution in the permafrost and in the oceans. Even if conservative estimates are considered and only a small fraction is recoverable, the sheer size of the resource is so large that it demands evaluation as a potential energy source. In this review paper, we discuss the distribution of natural gas hydrate accumulations, the status of the primary international R&D programs, and the remaining science and technological challenges facing commercialization of production. After a brief examination of gas hydrate accumulations that are well characterized and appear to be models for future development and gas production, we analyze the role of numerical simulation in the assessment of the hydrate production potential, identify the data needs for reliable predictions, evaluate the status of knowledge with regard to these needs, discuss knowledge gaps and their impact, and reach the conclusion that the numerical simulation capabilities are quite advanced and that the related gaps are either not significant or are being addressed. We review the current body of literature relevant to potential productivity from different types of gas hydrate deposits, and determine that there are consistent indications of a large production potential at high rates over long periods from a wide variety of hydrate deposits. Finally, we identify (a) features, conditions, geology and techniques that are desirable in potential production targets, (b) methods to maximize production, and (c) some of the conditions and characteristics that render certain gas hydrate deposits undesirable for production.

  16. Anisotropic models to account for large borehole washouts to estimate gas hydrate saturations in the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II Alaminos 21 B well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M.W.; Collett, T.S.; Lewis, K.A.

    2012-01-01

    Through the use of 3-D seismic amplitude mapping, several gashydrate prospects were identified in the Alaminos Canyon (AC) area of the Gulf of Mexico. Two locations were drilled as part of the Gulf of MexicoGasHydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II (JIP Leg II) in May of 2009 and a comprehensive set of logging-while-drilling (LWD) logs were acquired at each well site. LWD logs indicated that resistivity in the range of ~2 ohm-m and P-wave velocity in the range of ~1.9 km/s were measured in the target sand interval between 515 and 645 feet below sea floor. These values were slightly elevated relative to those measured in the sediment above and below the target sand. However, the initial well log analysis was inconclusive regarding the presence of gashydrate in the logged sand interval, mainly because largewashouts caused by drilling in the target interval degraded confidence in the well log measurements. To assess gashydratesaturations in the sedimentary section drilled in the Alaminos Canyon 21B (AC21-B) well, a method of compensating for the effect of washouts on the resistivity and acoustic velocities was developed. The proposed method models the washed-out portion of the borehole as a vertical layer filled with sea water (drilling fluid) and the apparent anisotropic resistivity and velocities caused by a vertical layer are used to correct the measured log values. By incorporating the conventional marine seismic data into the well log analysis, the average gashydratesaturation in the target sand section in the AC21-Bwell can be constrained to the range of 8–28%, with 20% being our best estimate.

  17. Chemical and isotopic characteristics of gas hydrate- and pore-water samples obtained from gas hydrate-bearing sediment cores retrieved from a mud volcano in the Kukuy Canyon, Lake Baikal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minami, H.; Hachikubo, A.; Krylov, A.; Sakagami, H.; Ohashi, M.; Bai, J.; Kataoka, S.; Yamashita, S.; Takahashi, N.; Shoji, H. [Kitami Inst. of Technology, Kitami (Japan); Khlystov, O.; Zemskaya, T.; Grachev, M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Irkutsk (Russian Federation). Limnological Inst.

    2008-07-01

    This paper provided details of a method developed to obtain gas hydrate water samples from a mud volcano in Lake Baikal, Russia. Chemical and isotopic analyses were conducted to examine the hydrate and pore water samples as well as to evaluate the original water involved in shallow gas hydrate accumulations in the region. Lake sediment core samples were retrieved from the bottom of the lake with gravity corers. A squeezer was used to take pore water samples from the sediments. Hydrate samples were taken from a gas hydrate placed on a polyethylene funnel. Dissolved hydrate water was filtered through a membrane into bottles. Both samples were kept under chilled or liquid nitrogen temperatures. Ion chromatography was used to determine concentrations of anions and hydrogen carbonate ions. Sodium and magnesium concentrations were determined using an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer. An absorption spectrometer was used to determine potassium and calcium concentrations, and a mass spectrometer was used to analyze stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen. Results of the study suggested that the gas dissolved in pore water and adsorbed on the surfaces of sediment particles was not the original gas from the hydrates retrieved at the mud volcano. Original gas hydrate-forming fluids were chemically different from the pore- and lake-water samples. The oxygen isotopic composition of the gas hydrate water samples correlated well with hydrogen values. It was concluded that ascending fluid and water delivered the gas into the gas stability zone, and is the main gas hydrate-forming fluid in the area of study. 12 refs., 1 fig.

  18. Structural features of a potential gas hydrate area in the Pointer Ridge off southwest Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsueh-Fen; Hsu, Shu-Kun; Tsai, Ching-Hui; Chen, Song-Chuen; Liu, Char-Shine; Lin, Hsiao-Shan

    2015-04-01

    The offshore area of the southwest Taiwan is located in the oblique convergence zone between the northern continental margin of South China Sea and the Manila accretionary wedge. To the west of the deformation front offshore southwestern Taiwan, the Pointer Ridge is located in the passive South China Sea continental margin. The continental margin is compose of extensional horst-and-graben structures. There are numerous submarine channels and linear ridge, formed due to the submarine erosion across the continental slope region. According to geophysical research off SW Taiwan, abundant gas hydrate may exist. In this study, our purpose is to understand the relationship between the near-seafloor structures of the Pointer Ridge and the gas hydrate formation off SW Taiwan. The data we used include multi-beam echo sounder (MBES), side-scan sonar (SSS), sub-bottom profiler (SBP) and the multi-channel reflection seismic (MCS) data. Our results show the pockmark and gas seepage structures mainly appear in the place where the gradient of the BSR thickness is maximum. Those sites contain authigenic carbonate signature shown in the sub-bottom profiler. We also observe several folds and faults structures in this extensional background; however, these compressional features need further studies.

  19. HYFLUX: Satellite Inventory and Sea-Truth for Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate System

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, I. R.; Garcia-Pineda, O. G.; Chanton, J.; Kastner, M.; Solomon, E. A.; Leifer, I.; Naehr, T. H.; Yvon-Lewis, S. A.; Kessler, J. D.

    2009-12-01

    Repeated detection of floating oil over discrete locations in the ocean provides robust evidence for active oil and gas release. At depths deeper than ~500 m, seeps host shallow deposits of gas hydrate. A set of 686 Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images was analyzed to inventory oil and gas seeps in the Gulf of Mexico. Results show that seep formations comprise seafloor areas <2.5km in width that may contain from 1 to 5 active vents. Some vents are continuous, others are intermittent. We found 531 seep formations below the hydrate stability depth, which comprised between 930 and 1567 individual vents. This is an order of magnitude fewer hydrate sites than would be predicted from geophysical evidence. However, gas hydrates associated with active seep are most susceptible to destabilizing effects of increased water temperature. A recently completed cruise investigated Gulf of Mexico seeps in 540, 900, and 1200 m depths. All three produced significant CH4 flux to the water column. Elevated concentrations of CH4 were detected in surface waters at all three sites, but CH4 flux to the atmosphere appears to be locally variable and site and depth specific.

  20. Geophysical Evidence for the Occurrence of Gas Hydrate in the Ulleung Basin, East Sea off Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, D.-G.; Kim, G.-Y.; Kang, D.-H.; Ryu, B.-J.

    2009-04-01

    Analysis of multi-channel seismic reflection data collected from the Ulleung Basin, East Sea reveals five types of seismic indicators that imply the existence of gas hydrate including the bottom simulating reflector (BSR), seismic chimney/column, acoustic blanking, enhanced reflections, and gas seepage. The BSR, the most common seismic indicator in the Ulleung Basin, is of high amplitude and good continuity in the southern slope, whereas it is of low amplitude and poor continuity in the northern basin. Seismic chimney/column of reduced reflectivity and velocity pull-up is commonly seen in the central basin and northeastern part of the study area and suggests that imply the probability of gas hydrate or gas fluids. Acoustic blanking of reduced reflectivity partly occurs on the central basin consisting of turbidite/pelagic sediment. Acoustic blanking related to column structures is common in the southeastern slope of the study area. Enhanced reflection below the BSR is seen in the western slope of the area and suggests the existence of free gas due to strong negative amplitude. Gas seepages combined with dome structures and pockmark are widely distributed on the southern slope, consisting of debris flow deposits.

  1. Kinetic and Phase Behaviors of Catalytic Cracking Dry Gas Hydrate in Water-in-Oil Emulsion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Qinglan; HUANG Qiang; CHEN Guangjin; WANG Xiulin; SUN Changyu; YANG Lanying

    2013-01-01

    The systematic experimental studies were performed on the hydrate formation kinetics and gas-hydrate equilibrium for a simulated catalytic cracking gas in the water-in-oil emulsion.The effect of temperature,pressure and initial gas-liquid ratio on the hydrate formation was studied,respectively.The data were obtained at pressures ranging from 3.5 to 5 MPa and temperatures from 274.15 to 277.15 K.The results showed that hydrogen and methane can be separated from the C2+ fraction by forming hydrate at around 273.15 K which is much higher temperature than that of the cryogenic separation method,and the hydrate formation rate can be enhanced in the water-in-oil emulsion compared to pure water.The experiments provided the basic data for designing the industrial process,and setting the suitable operational conditions.The measured data of gas-hydrate equilibria were compared with the predictions by using the Chen-Guo hydrate thermodynamic model.

  2. Kinetic studies of gas hydrate formation with low-dosage hydrate inhibitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Pipeline blockage by gas hydrates is a serious problem in the petroleum industry.Low-dosage inhibitors have been developed for its cost-effective and environmentally acceptable characteristics.In a 1.072-L reactor with methane,ethane and propane gas mixture under the pressure of about 8.5 MPa at 4 °C,hydrate formation was investigated with low-dosage hydrate inhibitors PVP and GHI1,the change of the compressibility factor and gas composition in the gas phase was analyzed,the gas contents in hydrates were compared with PVP and GHI1 added,and the inhibition mechanism of GHI1 was discussed.The results show that PVP and GHI1 could effectively inhibit the growth of gas hydrates but not nucleation.Under the experimental condition with PVP added,methane and ethane occupied the small cavities of the hydrate crystal unit and the ability of ethane entering into hydrate cavities was weaker than that of methane.GHI1 could effectively inhibit molecules which could more readily form hydrates.The ether and hydroxy group of diethylene glycol monobutyl ether have the responsibility for stronger inhibition ability of GHI1 than PVP.

  3. Gas production from a cold, stratigraphically-bounded gas hydrate deposit at the Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope: Implications of uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moridis, G.J.; Silpngarmlert, S.; Reagan, M.T.; Collett, T.; Zhang, K.

    2011-01-01

    As part of an effort to identify suitable targets for a planned long-term field test, we investigate by means of numerical simulation the gas production potential from unit D, a stratigraphically bounded (Class 3) permafrost-associated hydrate occurrence penetrated in the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well on North Slope, Alaska. This shallow, low-pressure deposit has high porosities (?? = 0.4), high intrinsic permeabilities (k = 10-12 m2) and high hydrate saturations (SH = 0.65). It has a low temperature (T = 2.3-2.6 ??C) because of its proximity to the overlying permafrost. The simulation results indicate that vertical wells operating at a constant bottomhole pressure would produce at very low rates for a very long period. Horizontal wells increase gas production by almost two orders of magnitude, but production remains low. Sensitivity analysis indicates that the initial deposit temperature is by the far the most important factor determining production performance (and the most effective criterion for target selection) because it controls the sensible heat available to fuel dissociation. Thus, a 1 ??C increase in temperature is sufficient to increase the production rate by a factor of almost 8. Production also increases with a decreasing hydrate saturation (because of a larger effective permeability for a given k), and is favored (to a lesser extent) by anisotropy. ?? 2010.

  4. Natural Gas Hydrates as CH4 Source and CO2 Sink - What do SO2 Impurities do?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeskow-Strauch, B.; Schicks, J. M.; Spangenberg, E.; Erzinger, J.

    2009-04-01

    The large amounts of gas hydrates stored in natural reservoirs are thought to be a promising future energy source. The recently discussed idea of methane extraction from these formations, together with the subsequent storage of CO2 in form of gas hydrates is an elegant approach to bring forward. A number of experiments have been performed on lab scale showing the replacement of CH4 by CO2 and vice versa. For instance, Graue and Kvamme (2006) demonstrated with Magnetic Resonance Images of core plug experiments the possibility of CH4 extraction by using liquid CO2. Laser Raman investigations of Schicks et al. (2007) showed, on the other hand, the ineffectiveness and slowness of the CH4 exchange reaction with gaseous CO2. After 120 hours, only 20% CH4 were exchanged for CO2. Natural methane hydrates which include often higher hydrocarbons tend to be even more stable than pure methane hydrates (Schicks et al., 2006). Contrary to lab conditions, industrial emitted CO2 contains - despite much effort to clean it - traces of impurities. For instance, CO2 emitted from the state-of-the-art Vattenfall Oxyfuel pilot plant in Schwarze Pumpe should reach a quality of >99.7% CO2 but still contains small amounts of N2, Ar, O2, SOx and NOx (pers. comm. Dr. Rolland). Here we present a microscopic and laser Raman study in a p-T range of 1 to 4 MPa and 271 to 280K focussing on CO2 hydrate formation and CH4-exchange reaction in the presence of 1% SO2. The experiments have been performed in a small-scale cryocell. The Raman spectra show that CO2 and SO2 occupy both large and small cages of the hydrate lattice. SO2 occurs strongly enriched in the hydrate clathrate, compared to its concentration in the feed gas which causes a strong acidification of the liquid phase after hydrate dissociation. Our study reveals that the hydrate formation rate from impure CO2 is similar to that of pure CO2 hydrate but that the stability of the CO2-SO2-hydrate exceeds that of pure CO2 hydrate. The improved

  5. Experimental Investigation of Gas Hydrate Production at Injection of Liquid Nitrogen into Water with Bubbles of Freon 134A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meleshkin Anton V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The hydrodynamic processes during the injection of the cryogenic liquid into the volume of water with bubbles of gas freon 134a are studding experimentally. A processes during the explosive boiling of liquid nitrogen in the volume of water are registered. Video recording of identified gas hydrate flakes formed during this process is carried out by high speed camera. These results may be useful for the study of the new method of producing gas hydrates, based on the shock-wave method.

  6. Velocity and AVO analysis for the investigation of gas hydrate along a profile in the western continental margin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Dewangan, P.; Ramprasad, T.

    velocity picking errors mainly depend on the width of the maximum semblance at a reflector. The semblance can be calculated in terms of the sum-of-cross correlations approach of Neidell and Taner (1971). The unnormalized cross correlation measure (UC) for a.... Keywords Gas hydrates C1 BSRs C1 Velocity analysis C1 AVO analysis C1 Wave-equation datuming C1 Error analysis C1 Tomographic velocity analysis Introduction Gas hydrate is an ice-like non-stoichiometric crystalline solid formed under high pressure and low...

  7. Comparison of intelligent systems, artificial neural networks and neural fuzzy model for prediction of gas hydrate formation rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Javad Jalalnezhad

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study was to present a novel approach for predication of gas hydrate formation rate based on the Intelligent Systems. Using a data set including about 470 data obtained from flow tests in a mini-loop apparatus, different predictive models were developed. From the results predicted by these models, it can be pointed out that the developed models can be used as powerful tools for prediction of gas hydrate formation rate with total errors of less than 4%.

  8. Kinetic inhibition of natural gas hydrates in offshore drilling, production, and processing. Annual report, January 1--December 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    Natural gas hydrates are crystalline materials formed of natural gas and water at elevated pressures and reduced temperatures. Because natural gas hydrates can plug drill strings, pipelines, and process equipment, there is much effort expended to prevent their formation. The goal of this project was to provide industry with more economical hydrate inhibitors. The specific goals for the past year were to: define a rational approach for inhibitor design, using the most probable molecular mechanism; improve the performance of inhibitors; test inhibitors on Colorado School of Mines apparatuses and the Exxon flow loop; and promote sharing field and flow loop results. This report presents the results of the progress on these four goals.

  9. Geochemical and sedimentological evidence for the massive dissociation and formation of subsurface gas hydrates on the Umitaka Spur, eastern margin of Japan Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiruta, A.; Matsumoto, R.; Snyder, G.; Tomaru, H.; Aoyama, C.; Machiyama, H.; Hiromatsu, M.; Hiruta, T.

    2006-12-01

    The Umitaka (UT) spur in Japan Sea is characterized by subsurface gas chimneys, seafloor gas hydrate, methane-induced carbonate nodules, BSRs, methane plumes, pockmarks and mounds[1]. These indicate strong methane flux and active seepages on the UT spur. Thick pile of organic-rich Neogene strata in the UT spur area are considered as hydrocarbon source rocks for oil and natural gas reservoirs of Niigata gas and oil fields[2]. Methane plumes, approximately 600 m high, are concentrated in central and north part of the UT spur[3]. Gas hydrates (G.H.) have been recovered from the plume sites. Sediment cores (3.5~9m) recovered on and around the UT spur are grey to olive black silt and clay with occasional thin ash layers. C-14 age of planktonic foraminifera indicates that the deepest sediment in 9m piston core is at most 30ky.BP.. Sulfate concentration in pore water decreases linearly with depth toward zero (SMI: sulfate methane interface) at 1.5 to 3.5 mbsf at every coring site. Alkalinity increases rapidly downward to SMI, showing mirror image of sulfate pattern. Delta 13C values of DIC becomes ~-20 permil VPDB around SMI depth. These data strongly indicate coupled anoxic oxidation of methane and sulfate reduction in shallow sediments. The methane flux calculated from the depth profile of sulfate is about 4 times stronger than that of the Blake Ridge. Chloride concentrations in pore water linearly increase or linearly decrease with depth in some cores. Linearly- increasing and decreasing patterns of chloride concentration likely reflect diffusion of chloride between bottom sea water and subsurface brine and less saline water pools at depths, respectively. Formation of brine pools is explained as the results of rapid gas hydrate formation while the buildup of freshwater pools is caused by a massive gas hydrate dissociation, which was probably triggered by a sea-level fall and shoaling of BGHS during the LGM. Carbonate geochemistry: Methane derived, calcite nodules (-28

  10. Marine caves of the Mediterranean Sea: a sponge biodiversity reservoir within a biodiversity hotspot.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilis Gerovasileiou

    Full Text Available Marine caves are widely acknowledged for their unique biodiversity and constitute a typical feature of the Mediterranean coastline. Herein an attempt was made to evaluate the ecological significance of this particular ecosystem in the Mediterranean Sea, which is considered a biodiversity hotspot. This was accomplished by using Porifera, which dominate the rocky sublittoral substrata, as a reference group in a meta-analytical approach, combining primary research data from the Aegean Sea (eastern Mediterranean with data derived from the literature. In total 311 species from all poriferan classes were recorded, representing 45.7% of the Mediterranean Porifera. Demospongiae and Homoscleromorpha are highly represented in marine caves at the family (88%, generic (70%, and species level (47.5%, the latter being the most favored group along with Dictyoceratida and Lithistida. Several rare and cave-exclusive species were reported from only one or few caves, indicating the fragmentation and peculiarity of this unique ecosystem. Species richness and phylogenetic diversity varied among Mediterranean areas; the former was positively correlated with research effort, being higher in the northern Mediterranean, while the latter was generally higher in caves than in the overall sponge assemblages of each area. Resemblance analysis among areas revealed that cavernicolous sponge assemblages followed a pattern quite similar to that of the overall Mediterranean assemblages. The same pattern was exhibited by the zoogeographic affinities of cave sponges: species with Atlanto-Mediterranean distribution and Mediterranean endemics prevailed (more than 40% each, 70% of them having warm-water affinities, since most caves were studied in shallow waters. According to our findings, Mediterranean marine caves appear to be important sponge biodiversity reservoirs of high representativeness and great scientific interest, deserving further detailed study and protection.

  11. Modeling of stability of gas hydrates under permafrost in an environment of surface climatic change – terrestrial case, Beaufort-Mackenzie basin, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Majorowicz

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Modeling of the onset of permafrost formation and succeeding gas hydrate formation in the changing surface temperature environment has been done for the Beaufort-Mackenzie Basin (BMB. Numerical 1-D modeling is constrained by deep heat flow from deep well bottom hole temperatures, deep conductivity, present permafrost thickness and thickness of Type I gas hydrates. Latent heat effects were applied to the model for the entire ice bearing permafrost and Type I hydrate intervals. Modeling for a set of surface temperature forcing during the glacial-interglacial history including the last 14 Myr was performed. Two scenarios of gas formation were considered; case 1: formation of gas hydrate from gas entrapped under deep geological seals and case 2: formation of gas hydrate from gas in a free pore space simultaneously with permafrost formation. In case 1, gas hydrates could have formed at a depth of about 0.9 km only some 1 Myr ago. In case 2, the first gas hydrate formed in the depth range of 290–300 m shortly after 6 Myr ago when the GST dropped from −4.5 °C to −5.5. °C. The gas hydrate layer started to expand both downward and upward subsequently. These models show that the gas hydrate zone, while thinning persists under the thick body of BMB permafrost through the current interglacial warming periods.

  12. 天然气水合物储集类型的测井响应特征%Well Logging Response Characteristics of Various Natural Gas Hydrate Accumulation Types

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田贵发; 栾安辉; 赵平; 弓佩章

    2013-01-01

    通过木里煤田聚乎更煤矿区四井田、哆嗦公马、雪霍立三个矿区(井田)大量测井资料的分析和研究,并结合祁连山冻土区天然气水合物DK-1科学试验孔测井资料的综合对比和解释,对煤田常规测井参数在天然气水合物储集层上的响应特征进行了分析。根据该区常年冻土(岩)的勘探成果及测井曲线响应特征,将陆源天然气水合物储集层分为生气层与储集层的相对位置、纵向位置、空间位置、储集介质等四大类,上生下储、下生上储、自生自储、冻土(岩)带内、增温带内等11个亚类。在此基础上建立了与富冰型、煤层自储型、孔隙型、裂隙型等多种储集模式对应的典型测井曲线响应特征。利用测井方法识别天然气水合物储集层的方法,可为青藏高原研究、评价、勘查、开发天然气水合物提供可靠的解释依据。%Based on analyses and studies of large amount well logging data from 3 mine areas (minefields) in the Muri coalfield, com-bined with correlation and interpretation of well logging data from natural gas hydrate DK-1 scientific test hole in the Qilian Mts. per-mafrost region, carried out analysis of natural gas hydrate reservoir response characteristics on coalfield conventional well logging pa-rameters. According to exploration results and logging traces response characteristics of perennial frozen soil (rock) in the area, based on four classification bases of relative position of generation layer and reservoir, vertical position, spatial position and medium of accu-mulation, divided the natural gas hydrate accumulation into eleven types of generation layer upper reservoir lower, generation layer low-er reservoir upper, identical generation layer and reservoir, within zone of frozen soil (rock), within zone of constructive temperature and so on. On this basis established typical logging trace response characteristics corresponding to

  13. Modelling of tetrahydrofuran promoted gas hydrate systems for carbon dioxide capture processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herslund, Peter Jørgensen; Thomsen, Kaj; Abildskov, Jens

    2014-01-01

    accurate descriptions of both fluid- and hydrate phase equilibria in the studied system and its subsystems. The developed model is applied to simulate two simplified, gas hydrate-based processes for post-combustion carbon dioxide capture from power station flue gases. The first process, an unpromoted...... hydrate process, operates isothermally at a temperature of 280. K. Applying three consecutive hydrate formation/dissociation stages (three-stage capture process), a carbon dioxide-rich product (97. mol%) is finally delivered at a temperature of 280. K and a pressure of 3.65. MPa. The minimum pressure...... requirement of the first stage is estimated to be 24.9. MPa, corresponding to the incipient hydrate dissociation pressure at 280. K for the considered flue gas. A second simulated carbon dioxide capture process uses tetrahydrofuran as a thermodynamic promoter to reduce the pressure requirements. By doing so...

  14. Reaction mechanism between "memory effect" and induction time of gas hydrate formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Deng-lin; WU Qiang; ZHANG Bao-yong

    2008-01-01

    Using visual experimental apparatus,one system(T40,1×10-3 mol/L,nonadded with coal)and another system(T40,2×10-3 mol/L,added with coal)were experimented with for three times and two times.respectively.Five groups of P-T experimental parameters were obtained using the data logger system and analyzed combined with the video information of the experiments.Maior conclustions show that the induction time is shortened by 10-20 times in the experimental system containing residual pentahedral ring structures;"memory effect"can accelerate the dynamic progress and improve the thermodynamic conditions of gas hydrate formation.

  15. A prediction method of natural gas hydrate formation in deepwater gas well and its application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanli Guo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available To prevent the deposition of natural gas hydrate in deepwater gas well, the hydrate formation area in wellbore must be predicted. Herein, by comparing four prediction methods of temperature in pipe with field data and comparing five prediction methods of hydrate formation with experiment data, a method based on OLGA & PVTsim for predicting the hydrate formation area in wellbore was proposed. Meanwhile, The hydrate formation under the conditions of steady production, throttling and shut-in was predicted by using this method based on a well data in the South China Sea. The results indicate that the hydrate formation area decreases with the increase of gas production, inhibitor concentrations and the thickness of insulation materials and increases with the increase of thermal conductivity of insulation materials and shutdown time. Throttling effect causes a plunge in temperature and pressure in wellbore, thus leading to an increase of hydrate formation area.

  16. Increasing the storage capacity and selectivity in the formation of natural gas hydrates using porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gholipour Zanjani, N.; Zarringhalam Moghaddam, A.; Mohammad-Taheri, M. [Tarbiat Modares University, Chemical Engineering Department, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nazari, K. [Research Institute of Petroleum Industry, Chemistry and Petrochemical Research Division, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    Formation of a gas hydrate with two different gas compositions (natural gas and a mixture of methane-ethane-propane) was investigated using a special method of producing the hydrate from ice. Gas uptake, splitting the fraction of each component between the gas phase and hydrate phase, and purification of methane were studied in the presence of silica-based porous media. Addition of a small amount of colloidal silica media increased considerably the gas storage capacity of the hydrate phase. In the presence of silica-based porous media, the purification factor of CH{sub 4} became significantly higher. The results can provide the basis for the storage of natural gas in hydrate form and application of the hydrate-based gas separation technology to achieve methane with high purity from natural gas. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  17. A Numerical Approach for Multicomponent Vapor Solid Equilibrium Calculations in Gas Hydrate Formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A new numerical approach has been developed for vapor solid equilibrium calculations and for predicting vapor solid equilibrium constant and composition of vapor and solid phases in gas hydrate formation. Equation of state methods generally do a good job of determining vapor phase properties,but for solid phase it is much more difficult and inaccurate. This proposed new model calculates vapor solid equilibrium constant and vapor and solid phase composition as a function of temperature and partial pressure. The results of this proposed numerical approach, for vapor solid equilibrium, have a good agreement with the available reported data. This new numerical model also has an advantage to tune coefficients, to cover different sets of experimental data accurately.

  18. Experimental validation of kinetic inhibitor strength on natural gas hydrate nucleation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daraboina, Nagu; Pachitsas, Stylianos; von Solms, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The kinetics of natural gas hydrate formation in the presence of dissolved salts (NaCl) and crude oil ( a middle east crude with density 851.5 kg/m3 were investigated by using a standard rocking cell (RC-5) apparatus. The hydrate nucleation temperature was reduced in the presence of NaCl and oil...... was not affected by NaCl but decreased significantly in the presence of crude oil. The hydrate decomposition temperatures were not influenced by the presence of NaCl, however, they decreased slightly in the presence of liquid hydrocarbon. The data presented here can contribute to appropriate hydrate risk...... in comparison with that in pure distilled water. The kinetic inhibition strength of various inhibitors (Luvicap Bio; Inhibex 505; Inhibex 501; Luvicap 55w; BIO inhibex-800; and Inhibex 301) was experimentally evaluated at complex conditions (in the presence of salts and crude oil) using the constant cooling...

  19. Geological evolution and analysis of confirmed or suspected gas hydrate localities: Volume 10, Basin analysis, formation and stability of gas hydrates of the Aleutian Trench and the Bering Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krason, J.; Ciesnik, M.

    1987-01-01

    Four major areas with inferred gas hydrates are the subject of this study. Two of these areas, the Navarin and the Norton Basins, are located within the Bering Sea shelf, whereas the remaining areas of the Atka Basin in the central Aleutian Trench system and the eastern Aleutian Trench represent a huge region of the Aleutian Trench-Arc system. All four areas are geologically diverse and complex. Particularly the structural features of the accretionary wedge north of the Aleutian Trench still remain the subjects of scientific debates. Prior to this study, suggested presence of the gas hydrates in the four areas was based on seismic evidence, i.e., presence of bottom simulating reflectors (BSRs). Although the disclosure of the BSRs is often difficult, particularly under the structural conditions of the Navarin and Norton basins, it can be concluded that the identified BSRs are mostly represented by relatively weak and discontinuous reflectors. Under thermal and pressure conditions favorable for gas hydrate formation, the relative scarcity of the BSRs can be attributed to insufficient gas supply to the potential gas hydrate zone. Hydrocarbon gas in sediment may have biogenic, thermogenic or mixed origin. In the four studied areas, basin analysis revealed limited biogenic hydrocarbon generation. The migration of the thermogenically derived gases is probably diminished considerably due to the widespread diagenetic processes in diatomaceous strata. The latter processes resulted in the formation of the diagenetic horizons. The identified gas hydrate-related BSRs seem to be located in the areas of increased biogenic methanogenesis and faults acting as the pathways for thermogenic hydrocarbons.

  20. Prediction of natural gas hydrate formation region in wellbore during deep- water gas well testing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhi-yuan; SUN Bao-jiang; WANG Xue-rui; ZHANG Zhen-nan

    2014-01-01

    Wellbore temperature field equations are established with considerations of the enthalpy changes of the natural gas during the deep-water gas well testing. A prediction method for the natural gas hydrate formation region during the deep-water gas well testing is proposed, which combines the wellbore temperature field equations, the phase equilibrium conditions of the natural gas hydrate formation and the calculation methods for the pressure field. Through the sensitivity analysis of the parameters that affect the hydrate formation region, it can be concluded that during the deep-water gas well testing, with the reduction of the gas production rate and the decrease of the geothermal gradient, along with the increase of the depth of water, the hydrate formation region in the wellbore enlarges, the hydrate formation regions differ with different component contents of natural gases, as compared with the pure methane gas, with the increase of ethane and propane, the hydrate formation region expands, the admixture of inhibitors, the type and the concentrations of which can be optimized through the method proposed in the paper, will reduce the hydrate formation region, the throttling effect will lead to the abrupt changes of temperature and pressure, which results in a variation of the hydrate formation region, if the throttling occurs in the shallow part of the wellbore, the temperature will drop too much, which enlarges the hydrate formation region, otherwise, if the throttling occurs in the deep part of the wellbore, the hydrate formation region will be reduced due to the decrease of the pressure.

  1. Why Gas Hydrate Occurrenced Over Topographic Highs in Shenhu Area Northern South China Sea?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, J.

    2015-12-01

    Methane gas hydrate has been drilled by China Geological Survey in shenhu area northern south china sea in 2007 .Shenhu area is located in the middle-lower continental slope and 17 submarine canyons are incised into the shelf,gas hydrtae was observed in boreholes over topographic highs,but origin of the hydrate is controversial.Accumulation of gas hydrate is depending on temperature-pressure field and supply quantities of methane and some other factors,in the same depth of the shallow sediments there is the same press,so temperature field and supply quantities of methane become the most important factors.Lachenbruch(1968) calculated the topographic disturbance to geothermal gradients,in shenhu area consistent local variations were observed, notably low heat flow values over prominent topographic highs and high heat flow values over the flanks of the topographic highs. At some localities over a horizontal distance of 2.5 km, heat flow increased by as much as 50%, from typical values of 65 to 100 mW/m2 .Some vertical fractures were observed beneath topographic highs in previous studies.Based on the profile across borehole SH7,we designed four experiments:A,uniform distribution of heat flux with no vertical fractures;B,Uniform distribution of heat flux with vertical fractures beneath geographic highs;C,uneven distribution of heat flux with no vertical fractures;D,uneven distribution of heat flux with vertical fractures beneath geographic highs.According to previous studies,we restored Palaeobathymetry,abundance of organic matters, sandstone-madstone ratio ,porosity and permeability of each,and parameters of vertical fractures.The result of experiment D shows the similar distribution characteristic with the drilling result,so We believe that low heat flux and Vertical fractures are the most important factors . This work was supported by the National Science Foundation of China(grant no. 41406080).

  2. Fluid-solid coupling model for studying wellbore instability in drilling of gas hydrate bearing sediments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程远方; 李令东; 崔青

    2013-01-01

    As the oil or gas exploration and development activities in deep and ultra-deep waters become more and more, encountering gas hydrate bearing sediments (HBS) is almost inevitable. The variation in temperature and pressure can destabilize gas hydrate in nearby formation around the borehole, which may reduce the strength of the formation and result in wellbore instability. A non-isothermal, transient, two-phase, and fluid-solid coupling mathematical model is proposed to simulate the complex stability performance of a wellbore drilled in HBS. In the model, the phase transition of hydrate dissociation, the heat exchange between drilling fluid and formation, the change of mechanical and petrophysical properties, the gas-water two-phase seepage, and its interaction with rock deformation are considered. A finite element simulator is developed, and the impact of drilling mud on wellbore instability in HBS is simulated. Results indicate that the re-duction in pressure and the increase in temperature of the drilling fluid can accelerate hydrate decomposition and lead to mechanical properties getting worse tremendously. The cohesion decreases by 25% when the hydrate totally dissociates in HBS. This easily causes the wellbore instability accordingly. In the first two hours after the formation is drilled, the regions of hydrate dissociation and wellbore instability extend quickly. Then, with the soaking time of drilling fluid increasing, the regions enlarge little. Choosing the low temperature drilling fluid and increasing the drilling mud pressure appropriately can benefit the wellbore stability of HBS. The established model turns out to be an efficient tool in numerical studies of the hydrate dissociation behavior and wellbore stability of HBS.

  3. Gas hydrate as a proxy for contemporary climate change and shallow heat flow on the US east coast and north slope of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phrampus, Benjamin J.

    Methane hydrates, ice-like solids that sequester large quantities of methane in their crystal structure, are stable at moderate pressures and low temperature. The methane contained within these naturally occurring deposits is typically derived from organic matter that is broken down by thermogenic or biogenic activity. Methane hydrate is found world-wide on nearly every continental margin on Earth where the thermodynamic conditions and methane gas permit the formation of hydrate. Hydrate potentially represents the largest reservoir of hydrocarbon on the planet, yet their response to evolving thermodynamic conditions are poorly understood. This dissertation is a summary of several projects that investigate the unique properties of gas hydrate, and the information we can gain from detailed analysis of these natural deposits. Gas hydrate response to contemporary warming is currently poorly understood. Determining if current or past warming trends are having direct effects on the hydrate stability regime is a region of active interest. The observed zone of hydrate stability is deduced from the current distribution of hydrate. Using current geologic and hydrologic conditions, we can compare the model-predicted zone of hydrate stability and directly compare the data with the observed stability regime. Due to the low thermal diffusivity of sediments, heat conduction is slow, thus if the thermodynamic conditions changed recently, the observed zone of stability will not have time to reach equilibrium and will appear anomalous compared with the predicted stability zone. Using this technique, combined with observations of recent changes in ocean temperatures, I identify two regions currently experiencing ocean warming induced hydrate dissociation: The U.S. East Coast (N. Atlantic) and the North Slope of Alaska (Beaufort Sea). These regions are currently experiencing hydrate dissociation due to contemporary climate forcing. Hydrates also offer unique insights into the

  4. Modelling of Gas Hydrate Dissociation During The Glacial-Inter-glacial Cycles, Case Study The Chatham Rise, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oluwunmi, P.; Pecher, I. A.; Archer, R.; Moridis, G. J.; Reagan, M. T.

    2015-12-01

    Seafloor depressions covering an area of >20,000 km2 on the Chatham Rise, south east of New Zealand, have been interpreted as pockmarks which are related to past fluid releases. It is proposed that the seafloor depressions were caused by sudden escape of overpressured gas generated by gas hydrate dissociation during glacial sea-level lowering. We are attempting to simulate the evolution of the gas hydrate system through glacial-interglacial cycles in the study area using TOUGH-Hydrate. The Chatham Rise offers a unique opportunity for studying the effect of depressurization from sealevel lowering to gas hydrate systems because it is a bathymetric barrier preventing the Subtropical Front separating subtropical and subantarctic waters from migrating during glacial-interglacial cycles. Hence, bottom-water temperatures can be assumed to remain constant. Recent results from paleoceanographic studies however, indicate that bottom-temperature may have varied locally. These temperature changes may have a more significant effect on the shallow gas hydrate system in the study area than the relatively gradual decrease of pressure associated with sealevel lowering.

  5. Methane in shallow subsurface sediments at the landward limit of the gas hydrate stability zone offshore western Svalbard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Carolyn A.; James, Rachael H.; Sapart, Célia Julia; Stott, Andrew W.; Wright, Ian C.; Berndt, Christian; Westbrook, Graham K.; Connelly, Douglas P.

    2017-02-01

    Offshore western Svalbard plumes of gas bubbles rise from the seafloor at the landward limit of the gas hydrate stability zone (LLGHSZ; ∼400 m water depth). It is hypothesized that this methane may, in part, come from dissociation of gas hydrate in the underlying sediments in response to recent warming of ocean bottom waters. To evaluate the potential role of gas hydrate in the supply of methane to the shallow subsurface sediments, and the role of anaerobic oxidation in regulating methane fluxes across the sediment-seawater interface, we have characterised the chemical and isotopic compositions of the gases and sediment pore waters. The molecular and isotopic signatures of gas in the bubble plumes (C1/C2+ = 1 × 104; δ13C-CH4 = -55 to -51‰; δD-CH4 = -187 to -184‰) are similar to gas hydrate recovered from within sediments ∼30 km away from the LLGHSZ. Modelling of pore water sulphate profiles indicates that subsurface methane fluxes are largely at steady state in the vicinity of the LLGHSZ, providing no evidence for any recent change in methane supply due to gas hydrate dissociation. However, at greater water depths, within the GHSZ, there is some evidence that the supply of methane to the shallow sediments has recently increased, which is consistent with downslope retreat of the GHSZ due to bottom water warming although other explanations are possible. We estimate that the upward diffusive methane flux into shallow subsurface sediments close to the LLGHSZ is 30,550 mmol m-2 yr-1, but it is <20 mmol m-2 yr-1 in sediments further away from the seafloor bubble plumes. While anaerobic oxidation within the sediments prevents significant transport of dissolved methane into ocean bottom waters this amounts to less than 10% of the total methane flux (dissolved + gas) into the shallow subsurface sediments, most of which escapes AOM as it is transported in the gas phase.

  6. Petroleum exploration of shallow marine deposit Carboniferous volcanic tuff reservoir in the western margin of Junggar Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jianyong; Wang Xuezhong; Ma Liqun

    2013-01-01

    In 2011,petroleum exploration of shallow marine deposits Carboniferous and volcanic tuff reservoir re-alized breakthroughs at Chepaizi slope in the western margin of Junggar Basin. Pai 61 well ,with 855.7 ~949.6 m section,in the conventional test oil obtained 6 t/d industrial oil flow. The surface viscosity is 390 mPa· s (50℃). The marine deposit of Carboniferous are deep oil source rocks and high-quality reservoir. Magma volcanic activity provides the basis for volcanic reservoir development and distribution. The weathering crust and secondary cracks developed volcanic tuff by strong rock weathering and dissolution of organic acids which has become top quality reservoir. Deep Permian oil-gas migrated and accumulated to high parts along Hong-Che fault belt and stratigraphic unconformity stripping. Permian and Triassic volcanic rocks or dense mudstone sedimentary cover as a regional seal for the late Carboniferous oil-gas to save critically. The seismic pre-stack time migration processing technologies for the problem of poor inner structures of Carboniferous were developed. Response of volcanic rock seismic and logging are obvious. The application imaging logging and nuclear magnetic technology achieved the qualitative identification and quantification of fracture description.

  7. {sup 14}C age determination for human bones during the Yayoi period - the calibration ambiguity around 2400 BP and the marine reservoir effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihara, S. E-mail: cs200027@scs.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Miyamoto, K.; Nakamura, T.; Koike, H

    2004-08-01

    {sup 14}C ages for Japanese prehistoric samples from the Latest Jomon period to the early Yayoi period have a calibration ambiguity for dates around 2400 BP. It is also necessary to correct for the marine reservoir effect on {sup 14}C ages of human bone samples from people who consumed marine food as a protein source. The Ohtomo site in western Japan, is a cemetery site used from the end of the Latest Jomon period to the Kofun period, provide a useful archaeological chronology. Human bones found in dolmen burials, jar burials and cist burials. In this study, we determined the {sup 14}C ages of human bone samples and calculated the marine reservoir effect, using diet analysis based on carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes. Diet analysis showed that these people obtained from 40% to 60% of their protein from marine sources. Their {sup 14}C ages with calibration and marine reservoir correction were serially matched with the archaeological chronology.

  8. Stability of permafrost and gas hydrates in Arctic coastal lowlands and on the Eurasian shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubberten, H. W.; Lantuit, H.; Overduin, P. P.; Romanovskii, N.; Wetterich, S.

    2011-12-01

    During the last Glacial period thick continuous permafrost developed on the Siberian coastal lowlands and large shelf areas due to the up to 120 m lower sea level and the exposure of these areas to cold temperatures. With the beginning of the Holocene transgression, complex interaction processes of sea water with the permafrost landscape occurred. The occurrence of gas hydrates captured in permafrost is a characteristic feature of the the Eurasian Arctic shelf areas, especially on the shelf of the Kara, Laptev and East Siberia seas. In some of the shelf areas oceanic rift zones stretch to the continent, as for example in the Laptev Sea area where the Gakkel Ridge continues into the land. Great differences in geothermal heat flow values and in the properties of the sediments and rocks have to be assumed in undisturbed lithosphere block and in fault zones like as in continental rifts (such as Momskii and Baikalskii rifts, etc.). As a result differences in the thickness of permafrost and the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) within these structures are expected. The thickness of permafrost and the GHSZ change essentially and irregularly in the stages of regressions and transgressions of the sea. Models show that the thickness of offshore (subsea) permafrost in the stages of climatic warming and transgressions essentially decrease however, rather irregular. The possibilities and the boundary conditions for the occurrence of open taliks, which may result in an emission of greenhouse gases from sub-permafrost gases and hydrates, have been estimated. Ice-bearing and ice-bonded permafrost in the northern regions of Arctic lowlands and in the inner shelf zone, have been preserved during at least four Pleistocene climatic and glacial-eustatic cycles. Presently, they are subjected to degradation from the bottom under the impact of geothermal heat flux as well as from interaction with warmer sea water at the top. Subsea permafrost formed on the arctic continental shelves that

  9. Methane sources and production in the northern Cascadia margin gas hydrate system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlman, John; Kaneko, Masanori; Heuer, Verena B.; Coffin, Richard B.; Whiticar, Michael

    2009-01-01

    -enrichment. The magnitude of the 13C-enrichment of CO2 correlates with decreasing sedimentation rates and a diminishing occurrence of stratigraphic gas hydrate. We suggest the decreasing sedimentation rates increase the exposure time of sedimentary organic matter to aerobic and anaerobic degradation, during burial, thereby reducing the availability of metabolizable organic matter available for methane production. This process is reflected in the occurrence and distribution of gas hydrate within the northern Cascadia margin accretionary prism. Our observations are relevant for evaluating methane production and the occurrence of stratigraphic gas hydrate within other convergent margins.

  10. 天然气水合物开采技术进展%New Developments in Gas Hydrate Recovery Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴西顺; 张百忍; 张炜; 王燕东; 孙张涛; 邵明娟

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyzed the drilling technology and the latest developments of gas hydrate recovery and classified six kinds of recovery methods and three kinds of key technologies of gas hydrate. In view of environmental risk factors, the latest research results at home and abroad were took into account to analyze the risk mechanism and integrated risk model of gas hydrate drilling. The economic and social value of gas hydrate as a new kind of energy for challenges and opportunities were described. The authors argued that the social value still depends on the capacity and level of the industry in communicating new knowledge with the public, including to comprehensively learn the features of gas hydrate and relationship with energy resources, ecosystem and environment, geohazards, and global climate changing. This paper finally concluded with“safely utilization”and“effective utilization”as two core issues of gas hydrate.%本文对天然气水合物开采技术现状和进展进行分析,归纳出6类天然气水合物开采方法和3种关键技术。鉴于天然气水合物开采的环境风险因素,本文综合了国内外最新研究成果,深入分析风险机理和综合风险模式。从经济和社会角度阐述了天然气水合物成为一种可供人类使用的新能源所面临的挑战与机遇,指出天然气水合物的社会价值仍有赖于业界与公众交流新知的能力和水平,提倡通过科学钻采试验深刻理解水合物的特性以及与能源资源、生态环境、地质灾害和全球气候变化的关系,提出“安全开采”和“有效开采”是围绕水合物的两个核心问题。

  11. Verification and recovery of thick deposits of massive gas hydrate from chimney structures, eastern margin of Japan Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, R.; Kakuwa, Y.; Snyder, G. T.; Tanahashi, M.; Yanagimoto, Y.; Morita, S.

    2016-12-01

    The initial scientific research that was carried out between 2004 and 2013 has provided us with invaluable evidence that gas hydrates occur widely on and below the sea floor down to approximately 30 mbsf within gas chimney structures in Japan Sea (Matsumoto, 2005; 2009). In 2013, METI (Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry) launched a 3-year exploration project to assess the resource potential of shallow gas hydrates in Japan Sea. During the course of the project, Meiji University and AIST conducted: sea-going geophysical surveys with AUV, and high resolution 3D seismic and CSEM. These were followed by LWD and coring down to BSR depths, and coupled with a number of analyses and experiments. Regional mapping by MBES and SBP has confirmed 1742 gas chimneys in an area of 64,000km2 along the eastern margin of Japan Sea and around Hokkaido. Multiple LWD operations have revealed anomalous profiles such as extremely low natural gamma ray, high velocity Vp, and high resistivity Ro down to BSR depths, providing a strong indication that thick and massive gas hydrates exist throughout gas chimneys above the BSR. In several cases, conventional coring using 6-m long core liners recovered nearly 6 m long massive gas hydrates in several horizons adjacent to the anomalous LWD sites.The PCTB pressure coring system (Geotek Ltd) successfully cored 2-m long intervals of undisturbed, pressurized hydrate-bearing cores, providing valuable information about the in-situ occurrence and textural relations of hydrate and surrounding sediments. Full dissociation and slow degassing experiments of pressurized cores were conducted using onboard PCATS (Pressure core analysis and transfer system) to measure the amount of gases from hydrates. The mean volume fraction of gas hydrates in well-developed gas chimney structures is estimated to be 30 to 86 vol.% based on coupled PCATS and chloride anomaly profiles. Such an unusually high accumulation of gas hydrates in gas chimneys is assumed to have

  12. Scientific results from Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrates Joint Industry Project Leg 1 drilling: introduction and overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppel, C.; Boswell, R.; Jones, E.

    2008-01-01

    The Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrates Joint Industry Project (JIP) is a consortium of production and service companies and some government agencies formed to address the challenges that gas hydrates pose for deepwater exploration and production. In partnership with the U.S. Department of Energy and with scientific assistance from the U.S. Geological Survey and academic partners, the JIP has focused on studies to assess hazards associated with drilling the fine-grained, hydrate-bearing sediments that dominate much of the shallow subseafloor in the deepwater (>500 m) Gulf of Mexico. In preparation for an initial drilling, logging, and coring program, the JIP sponsored a multi-year research effort that included: (a) the development of borehole stability models for hydrate-bearing sediments; (b) exhaustive laboratory measurements of the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments; (c) refinement of new techniques for processing industry-standard 3-D seismic data to constrain gas hydrate saturations; and (d) construction of instrumentation to measure the physical properties of sediment cores that had never been removed from in situ hydrostatic pressure conditions. Following review of potential drilling sites, the JIP launched a 35-day expedition in Spring 2005 to acquire well logs and sediment cores at sites in Atwater Valley lease blocks 13/14 and Keathley Canyon lease block 151 in the northern Gulf of Mexico minibasin province. The Keathley Canyon site has a bottom simulating reflection at ???392 m below the seafloor, while the Atwater Valley location is characterized by seafloor mounds with an underlying upwarped seismic reflection consistent with upward fluid migration and possible shoaling of the base of the gas hydrate stability (BGHS). No gas hydrate was recovered at the drill sites, but logging data, and to some extent cores, suggest the occurrence of gas hydrate in inferred coarser-grained beds and fractures, particularly between 220 and 330 m below the seafloor

  13. Investigating a dynamic gas hydrate system in disequilibrium in the Danube Delta, Black Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillman, Jess; Bialas, Joerg; Klaucke, Ingo; Feldman, Howard; Drexler, Tina

    2017-04-01

    Gas hydrates are known to be extensive across the Danube Delta, as indicated by the presence of bottom simulating reflections (BSRs). The shelf break in this region is characterised by several incised submarine canyons, the largest of which is the Viteaz Canyon, and numerous slope failures. BSRs often coincide with submarine landslides, and it has been proposed that hydrates may play a role in triggering, or facilitating such events. This study focuses on a seafloor canyon (the S2 Canyon) to the north-east of the main Viteaz Canyon, where geophysical survey data and sediment cores were acquired in 2014. Active venting from the seafloor is known to be occurring at this site as multiple flares were been imaged in the water column. The location of these flares coincides with a significant slope failure adjacent to the canyon, and some can be correlated to subsurface gas chimneys, indicating a complex 'plumbing system' of gas migration pathways. This site is of particular interest as the 'present-day' BSR imaged in seismic data is not at equilibrium with the present-day seafloor conditions. Using high resolution 2D seismic data, a P-cable 3D seismic volume and ocean bottom seismometer data we investigate potential gas migration pathways and the complex gas hydrate system in the vicinity of the S2 Canyon. In addition, we use stratigraphic interpretation based on regional 2D seismic lines to constrain the relative ages of the channel levee systems. Through detailed mapping of the BSR, possible paleo-seafloor surfaces and gas migration features we are able to provide estimates of equilibrium conditions for the hydrate system, and examine the controlling factors affecting gas migration pathways and hydrate formation. The results of this study provide new insight into a geologically complex setting with a dynamic hydrate system. Characterising the hydrate system here may help to explain why it is in disequilibrium with the present day seafloor, and provide a better

  14. Gas hydrate decomposition recorded by authigenic barite at pockmark sites of the northern Congo Fan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasten, Sabine; Nöthen, Kerstin; Hensen, Christian; Spieß, Volkhard; Blumenberg, Martin; Schneider, Ralph R.

    2012-12-01

    The geochemical cycling of barium was investigated in sediments of pockmarks of the northern Congo Fan, characterized by surface and subsurface gas hydrates, chemosynthetic fauna, and authigenic carbonates. Two gravity cores retrieved from the so-called Hydrate Hole and Worm Hole pockmarks were examined using high-resolution pore-water and solid-phase analyses. The results indicate that, although gas hydrates in the study area are stable with respect to pressure and temperature, they are and have been subject to dissolution due to methane-undersaturated pore waters. The process significantly driving dissolution is the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) above the shallowest hydrate-bearing sediment layer. It is suggested that episodic seep events temporarily increase the upward flux of methane, and induce hydrate formation close to the sediment surface. AOM establishes at a sediment depth where the upward flux of methane from the uppermost hydrate layer counterbalances the downward flux of seawater sulfate. After seepage ceases, AOM continues to consume methane at the sulfate/methane transition (SMT) above the hydrates, thereby driving the progressive dissolution of the hydrates "from above". As a result the SMT migrates downward, leaving behind enrichments of authigenic barite and carbonates that typically precipitate at this biogeochemical reaction front. Calculation of the time needed to produce the observed solid-phase barium enrichments above the present-day depths of the SMT served to track the net downward migration of the SMT and to estimate the total time of hydrate dissolution in the recovered sediments. Methane fluxes were higher, and the SMT was located closer to the sediment surface in the past at both sites. Active seepage and hydrate formation are inferred to have occurred only a few thousands of years ago at the Hydrate Hole site. By contrast, AOM-driven hydrate dissolution as a consequence of an overall net decrease in upward methane flux seems to

  15. Overview of the 2006-2008 JOGMEC/NRCan/Aurora Mallik Gas Hydrate Production Test Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, K.; Dallimore, S. R.

    2008-12-01

    During the winters of 2007 and 2008 the Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corporation (JOGMEC) and Natural Resources Canada (NRCan), with Aurora Research Institute as the operator, carried out an on-shore gas hydrate production test program at the Mallik site, Mackenzie Delta, Northwest Territories, Canada. The prime objective of the program was to verify the feasibility of depressurization technique by drawing down the formation pressure across a 12m perforated gas hydrate bearing section. This project was the second full scale production test at this site following the 2002 Japex/JNOC/GSC et al Mallik research program in which seven participants organizatinos from five countries undertook a thermal test using hot water circulation Field work in 2007 was devoted to establishing a production test well, installing monitoring devices outside of casing, conducting base line geophysical studies and undertaking a short test to gain practical experience prior to longer term testing planned for 2008 . Hydrate-dissociated gas was produced to surface by depressurization achieved by lowering the fluid level with a dowhole pump. However, the operation was terminated 60 hours after the start of the pumping mainly due to sand production problems. In spite of the short period (12.5 hours of ellapsed pumping time), at least 830m3 of the gas was produced and accumulated in the borehole. Sand screens were installed across the perforated interval at the bottom hole for the 2008 program to overcome operational problems encountered in 2007 and achieve sustainable gas production. Stable bottom hole flowing pressures were successfully achieved during a 6 day test with continuous pump operation. Sustained gas production was achieved with rates between 2000- 4000m3/day and cummulative gas volume in the surface of approximately 13,000m3. Temperature and pressure data measured at the bottom hole and gas and water production rates gave positive evidence for the high efficiency of gas

  16. In Situ Raman Analyses of Natural Gas and Gas Hydrates at Hydrate Ridge, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltzer, E. T.; White, S. N.; Dunk, R. M.; Brewer, P. G.; Sherman, A. D.; Schmidt, K.; Hester, K. C.; Sloan, E. D.

    2004-12-01

    During a July 2004 cruise to Hydrate Ridge, Oregon, MBARI's sea-going laser Raman spectrometer was used to obtain in situ Raman spectra of natural gas hydrates and natural gas venting from the seafloor. This was the first in situ analysis of gas hydrates on the seafloor. The hydrate spectra were compared to laboratory analyses performed at the Center for Hydrate Research, Colorado School of Mines. The natural gas spectra were compared to MBARI gas chromatography (GC) analyses of gas samples collected at the same site. DORISS (Deep Ocean Raman In Situ Spectrometer) is a laboratory model laser Raman spectrometer from Kaiser Optical Systems, Inc modified at MBARI for deployment in the deep ocean. It has been successfully deployed to depths as great as 3600 m. Different sampling optics provide flexibility in adapting the instrument to a particular target of interest. An immersion optic was used to analyze natural gas venting from the seafloor at South Hydrate Ridge ( ˜780 m depth). An open-bottomed cube was placed over the vent to collect the gas. The immersion optic penetrated the side of the cube as did a small heater used to dissociate any hydrate formed during sample collection. To analyze solid hydrates at both South and North Hydrate Ridge ( ˜590 m depth), chunks of hydrate were excavated from the seafloor and collected in a glass cylinder with a mesh top. A stand-off optic was used to analyze the hydrate inside the cylinder. Due to the partial opacity of the hydrate and the small focal volume of the sampling optic, a precision underwater positioner (PUP) was used to focus the laser spot onto the hydrate. PUP is a stand-alone system with three degrees-of-freedom, capable of moving the DORISS probe head with a precision of 0.1 mm. In situ Raman analyses of the gas indicate that it is primarily methane. This is verified by GC analyses of samples collected from the same site. Other minor constituents (such as CO2 and higher hydrocarbons) are present but may be in

  17. Natural Gas Evolution in a Gas Hydrate Melt: Effect of Thermodynamic Hydrate Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sujith, K S; Ramachandran, C N

    2017-01-12

    Natural gas extraction from gas hydrate sediments by injection of hydrate inhibitors involves the decomposition of hydrates. The evolution of dissolved gas from the hydrate melt is an important step in the extraction process. Using classical molecular dynamics simulations, we study the evolution of dissolved methane from its hydrate melt in the presence of two thermodynamic hydrate inhibitors, NaCl and CH3OH. An increase in the concentration of hydrate inhibitors is found to promote the nucleation of methane nanobubbles in the hydrate melt. Whereas NaCl promotes bubble formation by enhancing the hydrophobic interaction between aqueous CH4 molecules, CH3OH molecules assist bubble formation by stabilizing CH4 bubble nuclei formed in the solution. The CH3OH molecules accumulate around the nuclei leading to a decrease in the surface tension at their interface with water. The nanobubbles formed are found to be highly dynamic with frequent exchange of CH4 molecules between the bubble and the surrounding liquid. A quantitative analysis of the dynamic behavior of the bubble is performed by introducing a unit step function whose value depends on the location of CH4 molecules with respect to the bubble. It is observed that an increase in the concentration of thermodynamic hydrate inhibitors reduces the exchange process, making the bubble less dynamic. It is also found that for a given concentration of the inhibitor, larger bubbles are less dynamic compared to smaller ones. The dependence of the dynamic nature of nanobubbles on bubble size and inhibitor concentration is correlated with the solubility of CH4 and the Laplace pressure within the bubble. The effect of CO2 on the formation of nanobubble in the CH4-CO2 mixed gas hydrate melt in the presence of inhibitors is also examined. The simulations show that the presence of CO2 molecules significantly reduces the induction time for methane nanobubble nucleation. The role of CO2 in the early nucleation of bubble is explained

  18. Compound Natural Gas Hydrate: A Natural System for Separation of Hydrate-Forming Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Max, M. D.; Osegovic, J. P.

    2007-12-01

    Natural processes that separate materials from a mixture may exert a major influence on the development of the atmospheres and surfaces of planets, moons, and other planetary bodies. Natural distillation and gravity separation, amongst others, are well known means of differentiating materials through liquid-gas partitioning. One of the least known attributes of clathrate (gas) hydrates is their potential effect on the evolution of planetary system oceans and atmospheres. Gas hydrates separate gases from mixtures of gases by concentrating preferred hydrate-forming materials (HFM) guests within the water-molecule cage structure of crystalline hydrate. Different HFMs have very different fields of stability. When multiple hydrate formers are present, a preference series based on their selective uptake exists. Compound hydrate, which is formed from two or more species of HFM, extract preferred HFM from a mixture in very different proportions to their relative percentages of the original mixture. These compound hydrates can have different formation and dissociation conditions depending on the evolution of the environment. That is, the phase boundary of the compound hydrate that is required for dissociation lies along a lower pressure - higher temperature course. Compound hydrates respond to variations in temperature, pressure, and HFM composition. On Earth, the primary naturally occurring hydrate of interest to global climate modeling is methane hydrate. Oceanic hydrate on Earth is the largest store of carbon in the biosphere that is immediately reactive to environmental change, and is capable of releasing large amounts of methane into the atmosphere over a short geological time span. Hydrate formation is essentially metastable and is very sensitive to environmental change and to gas flux. Where natural variations in temperature and pressure varies so that hydrate will form and dissociate in some cyclical manner, such as in oceans where sea level is capable of rising and

  19. Submerged oceanic shoals of north Western Australia are a major reservoir of marine biodiversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Cordelia; Cappo, Mike; Radford, Ben; Heyward, Andrew

    2017-09-01

    This paper provides a first assessment of fish communities associated with the submerged oceanic banks and shoals in north-west Australia. Until recently, little was known about these deeper and more inaccessible reefs. The mesophotic coral-reef habitats (20-80 m) were a major reservoir of marine biodiversity, with unique and exceptionally high fish diversity and abundance. Species richness in the study region was 1.4 times, and abundance almost twice, that recorded for similar mesophotic habitats on the Great Barrier Reef in north-east Australia. A review of the published literature revealed that Australia's NW oceanic shoals support the highest fish species richness reported for mesophotic reefs to date. We made regional comparisons of fish community structure (species composition, richness and abundance) and assessed the influence of depth, substrate and location. The presence of consolidated calcareous reef, depth and aspect (a surrogate for exposure) had the greatest influence on species richness. In contrast, aspect and the presence of benthic biota had the greatest influence on fish abundance. Sites most exposed to the prevailing currents (facing north-east) had lowest fish abundance, while highest abundances were recorded on moderately exposed sites (along the north-west and south-east edges). The most abundant species were small ( Pomacentrus coelestis) and large ( Naso hexacanthus) planktivorous fish. Currently, 29.3% of NE Australia mesophotic reefs are within no-take management zones of the Great Barrier Reef. In contrast, just 1.3% of the NW oceanic shoals are designated as no-take areas. The location and extent of mesophotic reefs remain poorly quantified globally. Because these habitats support significant biodiversity and have the potential to act as important refugia, understanding their extent is critical to maintaining coral-reef biodiversity and resilience and supporting sustainable management.

  20. Pure SF6 and SF6-N2 mixture gas hydrates equilibrium and kinetic characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun Kyung; Lee, Ju Dong; Lee, Hyun Ju; Lee, Bo Ram; Lee, Yoon Seok; Kim, Soo Min; Park, Hye Ok; Kim, Young Seok; Park, Yeong-Do; Kim, Yang Do

    2009-10-15

    Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), whether pure or mixed with inexpensive inert gas, has been widely used in a variety of industrial processes, but it is one of the most potent greenhouse gases. For this reason, it is necessary to separate and/or collect it from waste gas streams. In this study, we investigated the pure SF6 and SF6-N2 mixture gas hydrates formation equilibrium aswell asthe gas separation efficiency in the hydrate process. The equilibrium pressure of SF6-N2 mixture gas was higher than that of pure SF6 gas. Phase equilibrium data of SF6-N2 mixture gas was similar to SF6 rather than N2. The kinetics of SF6-N2 mixture gas was controlled by the amount of SF6 at the initial gas composition as well as N2 gas incorporation into the S-cage of structure-II hydrate preformed by the SF6 gas. Raman analysis confirmed the N2 gas incorporation into the S-cage of structure-II hydrate. The compositions in the hydrate phase were found to be 71, 79, 80, and 81% of SF6 when the feed gas compositions were 40, 65, 70, and 73% of SF6, respectively. The present study provides basic information for the separation and purification of SF6 from mixed SF6 gas containing inert gases.

  1. Contribution of oceanic gas hydrate dissociation to the formation of Arctic Ocean methane plumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reagan, M.; Moridis, G.; Elliott, S.; Maltrud, M.

    2011-06-01

    Vast quantities of methane are trapped in oceanic hydrate deposits, and there is concern that a rise in the ocean temperature will induce dissociation of these hydrate accumulations, potentially releasing large amounts of carbon into the atmosphere. Because methane is a powerful greenhouse gas, such a release could have dramatic climatic consequences. The recent discovery of active methane gas venting along the landward limit of the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) on the shallow continental slope (150 m - 400 m) west of Svalbard suggests that this process may already have begun, but the source of the methane has not yet been determined. This study performs 2-D simulations of hydrate dissociation in conditions representative of the Arctic Ocean margin to assess whether such hydrates could contribute to the observed gas release. The results show that shallow, low-saturation hydrate deposits, if subjected to recently observed or future predicted temperature changes at the seafloor, can release quantities of methane at the magnitudes similar to what has been observed, and that the releases will be localized near the landward limit of the GHSZ. Both gradual and rapid warming is simulated, along with a parametric sensitivity analysis, and localized gas release is observed for most of the cases. These results resemble the recently published observations and strongly suggest that hydrate dissociation and methane release as a result of climate change may be a real phenomenon, that it could occur on decadal timescales, and that it already may be occurring.

  2. EFFECT OF MAGNETIZATION OF WATER ON INDUCTION TIME AND GROWTH PERIOD OF NATURAL GAS HYDRATE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KUANG Li; FAN Shuanshi

    2003-01-01

    The effect of diluted solution's magnetization on induction time and growth period of natural gas hydrate (NGH) has been investigated in quiescent reaction system at pressure of 4. 5 MPa and temperature of 274 K with SDS as surfactant, by using volume fixed and pressure falling method. Experimental results show that magnetization will have effect on the induction time of NGH. After magnetization with magnetic field intensity of 0.33 T, the induction time of NGH has been reduced to 47 min (average) from 99 min (average) in which there is no magnetization. On the other hand, the induction time has been prolonged after magnetization of the diluted solution with magnetic field intensity of 0.05 T, 0. 11 T, 0.22 T, 0.44T. Especially with magnetic field intensity of 0.11 T, the induction time had even been prolonged to 431min (average). The effect of magnetization on the growth period of NGH has not been found at the experimental condition.

  3. Development of a Neural Fuzzy System for Advanced Prediction of Gas Hydrate Formation Rate in Pipeline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Javad JALALNEZHAD

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available With the development of the natural gas industry in the 20th century, the production, processing and distribution of natural gas under high-pressure conditions has become necessary. Under these conditions, it was found that the production and transmission pipelines were becoming blocked with what looked like to be ice. Hammerschmidt determined that hydrates were the cause of plugged natural gas pipelines. Gas hydrates and difficulties related to their formation in production and transmission pipelines and equipment, are the major concerns of the gas industry. The main objective of this study was to present a novel approach to access more accurate hydrate formation rate predicting models based on a combination of flow loop experimental data with learning power of adaptive neural-fuzzy inference systems and more than 900 data points of the , , , and i-  hydrate formation rate. Using this data set different predictive models were developed. It was found that such models can be used as powerful tools, with total errors less than 6 % for the developed models, in predicting hydrate formation rate in these cases.

  4. Combining Novel Simulation Methods and Nucleation Theory to Uncover the Secrets of Gas Hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keyes, Thomas [Boston Univ., MA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2016-04-14

    Conventional computer simulation methods fail for some of the most important problems. With the design and application of innovative algorithms, this project achieved a breakthrough for the case of systems undergoing first-order phase transitions. We gave a complete simulation protocol based upon a well optimized version of our "generalized replica exchange method". The transition of primary interest was gas hydrate formation, a process of significance for climate science and natural gas retrieval. Since hydrates consist of guest molecules in the cages of a water matrix, β ice, the freezing and melting of water was also studied. New information was uncovered about the transition pathways and thermodynamics. Some highlights are 1. the finding that in a very dilute solution without deep supercooling, representative of real-world conditions and very challenging to conventional algorithms, methane can act as a catalyst to drive the formation of large amounts of β ice with empty cages as metastable intermediates, which might be filled by additional methane in a mechanism for hydrate formation, and 2. illumination of the role of metastable cubic ice in water freezing, with determination of the surface tensions of the cubic, hexagonal, and β ices, and the free energy difference of cubic vs hexagonal ice. Work was begun on lipid systems, bilayers and nanoreactors promising for energy-related photoreductions, and targets for future research. Our methods yielded what is arguably the most complete description of the composite lipid/water phases and the transition pathways among them.

  5. Acoustic Investigations of Gas and Gas Hydrate Formations, Offshore Southwestern Black Sea*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucuk, H. M.; Dondurur, D.; Ozel, O.; Atgin, O.; Sinayuc, C.; Merey, S.; Parlaktuna, M.; Cifci, G.

    2015-12-01

    The Black Sea is a large intercontinental back-arc basin with relatively high sedimentation rate. The basin was formed as two different sub-basins divided by Mid-Black Sea Ridge. The ridge is completely buried today and the Black Sea became a single basin in the early Miocene that is currently anoxic. Recent acoustic investigations in the Black Sea indicate potential for gas hydrate formation and gas venting. A total of 2500 km multichannel seismic, Chirp sub-bottom profiler and multibeam bathymetry data were collected during three different expeditions in 2010 and 2012 along the southwestern margin of the Black Sea. Box core sediment samples were collected for gas cromatography analysis. Wide spread BSRs and multiple BSRs are observed in the seismic profiles and may be categorized into two different types: cross-cutting BSRs (transecting sedimentary strata) and amplitude BSRs (enhanced reflections). Both types mimic the seabed reflection with polarity reversal. Some undulations of the BSR are observed along seismic profiles probably caused by local pressure and/or temperature changes. Shallow gas sources and chimney vents are clearly indicated by bright reflection anomalies in the seismic data. Gas cromatography results indicate the presence of methane and various components of heavy hydrocarbons, including Hexane. These observations suggest that the gas forming hydrate in the southwestern Black Sea may originate from deeper thermogenic hydrocarbon sources. * This study is supported by 2214-A programme of The Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey (TÜBITAK).

  6. Compressive Strength Properties of Natural Gas Hydrate Pellet by Continuous Extrusion from a Twin-Roll System

    OpenAIRE

    Yun-Hoo Lee; Bong-Hwan Koh; Heung Soo Kim; Myung Ho Song

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the compressive strength of natural gas hydrate (NGH) pellet strip extruded from die holes of a twin-roll press for continuous pelletizing (TPCP). The lab-scale TPCP was newly developed, where NGH powder was continuously fed and extruded into strip-type pellet between twin rolls. The system was specifically designed for future expansion towards mass production of solid form NGH. It is shown that the compressive strength of NGH pellet strip heavily depends on parameters...

  7. Submarine creeping landslide deformation controlled by the presence of gas hydrates: The Tuaheni Landslide Complex, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Felix; Mountjoy, Joshu; Crutchle, Garethy; Koch, Stephanie; Bialas, Jörg; Pecher, Ingo; Woelz, Susi; Dannowski, Anke; Carey, Jon; Micallef, Aaron; Böttner, Christoph; Huhn, Katrin; Krastel, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    Methane hydrate occurrence is bound to a finite pressure/temperature window on continental slopes, known as the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ). Hydrates within sediment pore spaces and fractures are recognized to act like a cement, increasing shear strength and stabilizing slopes. However, recent studies show that over longer strain periods methane hydrates can undergo ductile deformation. This combination of short term strengthening and longer term ductile behavior is implicated in the development of slow creeping submarine landforms within the GHSZ. In order to study this phenomenon, a new high-resolution seismic 3D volume was acquired at the Tuaheni Landslide Complex (TLC) at the Hikurangi margin offshore the North Island of New Zealand. Parts of TLC have been interpreted as a slow moving landslide controlled by the gas hydrate system. Two hypotheses for its slow deformation related to the presence of methane hydrates have been proposed: i) Hydrofracturing, driven by gas pressure at the base of the GHSZ, allows pressurized fluids to ascend toward the seafloor, thereby weakening the shallow debris and promoting failure. ii) The mixture of methane hydrates and sediment results in a rheology that behaves in a ductile way under sustained loading, resulting in slow deformation comparable to that of terrestrial and extra-terrestrial rock glaciers. The 3D dataset reveals the distribution of gas and the extend of gas hydrate stability within the deformed debris, as well as deformation fabrics like tectonic-style faulting and a prominent basal décollement, known to be a critical element of terrestrial earth-flows and rock glaciers. Observations from 3D data indicate that the TLC represents the type example of a new submarine landform - an active creeping submarine landslide - which is influenced by the presence of gas hydrates. The morphology, internal structure and deformation of the landslide are comparable with terrestrial- and extra-terrestrial earth flows and

  8. An Analysis on Stability and Deposition Zones of Natural Gas Hydrate in Dongsha Region, North of South China Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuan Chen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose several physical/chemical causes to support the seismic results which find presence of Bottom Simulating Reflector (BSR at site 1144 and site 1148 in Dongsha Region, North of South China Sea. At site 1144, according to geothermal gradient, the bottom of stability zone of conduction mode is in agreement with BSR. At site 1148, however, the stability zone of conduction mode is smaller than the natural gas presence zone predicted by the BSR. We propose three causes, that is, mixed convection and conduction thermal flow mode, multiple composition of natural gas and overpressure in deep sediment to explain the BSR presence or gas hydrate presence. Further, our numerical simulation results suggest yet another reason for the presence of BSR at site 1144 and site 1148. Because the temperatures in deep sediment calculated from the mixed convection and conduction thermal flow mode are lower than that from the single conduction mode, the bottom of gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ is deeper than the bottom of gas hydrate deposition zone (GHDZ or BSR. The result indicates that occurrence zone of natural is decided by the condition that natural gas concentrate in the zone is greater than its solubility.

  9. Inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by altering the structure of water with amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa, Jeong-Hoon; Kwak, Gye-Hoon; Han, Kunwoo; Ahn, Docheon; Cho, Seong Jun; Lee, Ju Dong; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2016-08-16

    Natural gas hydrates are solid hydrogen-bonded water crystals containing small molecular gases. The amount of natural gas stored as hydrates in permafrost and ocean sediments is twice that of all other fossil fuels combined. However, hydrate blockages also hinder oil/gas pipeline transportation, and, despite their huge potential as energy sources, our insufficient understanding of hydrates has limited their extraction. Here, we report how the presence of amino acids in water induces changes in its structure and thus interrupts the formation of methane and natural gas hydrates. The perturbation of the structure of water by amino acids and the resulting selective inhibition of hydrate cage formation were observed directly. A strong correlation was found between the inhibition efficiencies of amino acids and their physicochemical properties, which demonstrates the importance of their direct interactions with water and the resulting dissolution environment. The inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by amino acids has the potential to be highly beneficial in practical applications such as hydrate exploitation, oil/gas transportation, and flow assurance. Further, the interactions between amino acids and water are essential to the equilibria and dynamics of many physical, chemical, biological, and environmental processes.

  10. Inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by altering the structure of water with amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa, Jeong-Hoon; Kwak, Gye-Hoon; Han, Kunwoo; Ahn, Docheon; Cho, Seong Jun; Lee, Ju Dong; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2016-08-01

    Natural gas hydrates are solid hydrogen-bonded water crystals containing small molecular gases. The amount of natural gas stored as hydrates in permafrost and ocean sediments is twice that of all other fossil fuels combined. However, hydrate blockages also hinder oil/gas pipeline transportation, and, despite their huge potential as energy sources, our insufficient understanding of hydrates has limited their extraction. Here, we report how the presence of amino acids in water induces changes in its structure and thus interrupts the formation of methane and natural gas hydrates. The perturbation of the structure of water by amino acids and the resulting selective inhibition of hydrate cage formation were observed directly. A strong correlation was found between the inhibition efficiencies of amino acids and their physicochemical properties, which demonstrates the importance of their direct interactions with water and the resulting dissolution environment. The inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by amino acids has the potential to be highly beneficial in practical applications such as hydrate exploitation, oil/gas transportation, and flow assurance. Further, the interactions between amino acids and water are essential to the equilibria and dynamics of many physical, chemical, biological, and environmental processes.

  11. Massive Dissociation of Subsurface Gas Hydrates and Collapse of Gas Hydrate Mounds during the LGM in the Eastern Margin of Japan Sea: Evidence from Benthic Forams and U/Th ages of Authigenic Carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, R.; Takeuchi, E.; Sanno, R.

    2008-12-01

    A number of gigantic methane plumes, ca. 600 m high, and massive blocks of gas hydrate, ca. 0.5 m x 1.0 m, have been observed on the Umitaka spur and Joetsu knoll, eastern margin of Japan Sea. Large pockmarks and mounds, ca. 0.5 km in diameter, develop on the spur and knoll. The mounds exhibit rough morphological features characterized by small valleys of 5m wide, steep cliffs, crater-like depressions of 10 m in diameter, and scattered carbonate nodules and crusts of various size and shape with occasional gas hydrate blocks and veins and gas venting. To the contrary, pockmarks are inactive, partly filled by well-stratified mud without any indication of gas venting. 2D and 3D seismic surveys have recognized widely distributed BSRs at around 150 mbsf over the spur and knoll. Seismic profiles delineated deep gas chimney structures below the pockmarks and mounds. Unusual pull-up structures within gas chimneys indicate massive accumulation of gas hydrate. All these findings are likely to suggest that massive hydrate deposits both in gas chimneys at depths and hydrate mounds on the spur and knoll were collapsed and floated up to the sea surface, leaving big holes (= pockmarks) on the seafloor. Quantitative analysis of foraminiferal assemblage has revealed that the well laminated, burrow-free 17 to 22 ka sediments are substantially barren for benthic forams but for unusual species which has been believed to survive under high methane environments. Shells of such a few benthic formas from around 20 ka sediments are anomalously depleted in C-13. U-Th ages of authigenic carbonates of CH4-induced carbonate nodules and crusts are likely to center around 20 ka. Above line of evidences all suggest that gas hydrate system was collapsed and methane fluxes were enhanced during the last glacial maximum (LGM), presumably due to low stand of sea level and pressure release. Broken gas hydrate blocks are expected to float up to the sea surface to supply significant amount of methane to

  12. Methane Production from Gas Hydrate Deposits through Injection of Supercritical CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Haeckel

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The recovery of natural gas from CH4-hydrate deposits in sub-marine and sub-permafrost environments through injection of CO2 is considered a suitable strategy towards emission-neutral energy production. This study shows that the injection of hot, supercritical CO2 is particularly promising. The addition of heat triggers the dissociation of CH4-hydrate while the CO2, once thermally equilibrated, reacts with the pore water and is retained in the reservoir as immobile CO2-hydrate. Furthermore, optimal reservoir conditions of pressure and temperature are constrained. Experiments were conducted in a high-pressure flow-through reactor at different sediment temperatures (2 °C, 8 °C, 10 °C and hydrostatic pressures (8 MPa, 13 MPa. The efficiency of both, CH4 production and CO2 retention is best at 8 °C, 13 MPa. Here, both CO2- and CH4-hydrate as well as mixed hydrates can form. At 2 °C, the production process was less effective due to congestion of transport pathways through the sediment by rapidly forming CO2-hydrate. In contrast, at 10 °C CH4 production suffered from local increases in permeability and fast breakthrough of the injection fluid, thereby confining the accessibility to the CH4 pool to only the most prominent fluid channels. Mass and volume balancing of the collected gas and fluid stream identified gas mobilization as equally important process parameter in addition to the rates of methane hydrate dissociation and hydrate conversion. Thus, the combination of heat supply and CO2 injection in one supercritical phase helps to overcome the mass transfer limitations usually observed in experiments with cold liquid or gaseous CO2.

  13. Unexpected inhibition of CO2 gas hydrate formation in dilute TBAB solutions and the critical role of interfacial water structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ngoc N.; Nguyen, Anh V.; Nguyen, Khoi T.; Rintoul, Llew; Dang, Liem X.

    2016-12-01

    Gas hydrates formed under moderated conditions open up novel approaches to tackling issues related to energy supply, gas separation, and CO2 sequestration. Several additives like tetra-n-butylammonium bromide (TBAB) have been empirically developed and used to promote gas hydrate formation. Here we report unexpected experimental results which show that TBAB inhibits CO2 gas hydrate formation when used at minuscule concentration. We also used spectroscopic techniques and molecular dynamics simulation to gain further insights and explain the experimental results. They have revealed the critical role of water alignment at the gas-water interface induced by surface adsorption of tetra-n-butylammonium cation (TBA+) which gives rise to the unexpected inhibition of dilute TBAB solution. The water perturbation by TBA+ in the bulk is attributed to the promotion effect of high TBAB concentration on gas hydrate formation. We explain our finding using the concept of activation energy of gas hydrate formation. Our results provide a step toward to mastering the control of gas hydrate formation.

  14. Applications of seismic techniques to gas hydrates prediction%地球物理技术在天然气水合物预测中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘彦君; 刘喜武; 刘大锰; 王燕津; 赵迎新

    2008-01-01

    Based on the sensitivity of geophysical response to gas hydrates contained in sediments, we studied the prediction of gas hydrates with seismic techniques, including seismic attributes analysis, AVO, inverted velocity field construction for dipping formations, and pseudo-well constrained impedance inversion. We used an optimal integration of geophysical techniques results in a set of reliable and effective workflows to predict gas hydrates. The results show that the integrated analysis of the combination of reflectivity amplitude, instantaneous phase, interval velocity, relative impedance, absolute impedance, and AVO intercept is a valid combination of techniques for identifying the BSR (Bottom Simulated Reflector) from the lower boundary of the gas hydrates. Integration of seismic sections, relative and absolute impedance sections, and interval velocity sections can improve the validity of gas hydrates determination. The combination of instantaneous frequency, energy half attenuation time, interval velocity, AVO intercept, AVO product, and AVO fluid factor accurately locates the escaped gas beneath the BSR. With these conclusions, the combined techniques have been used to successfully predict the gas hydrates in the Dongsha Sea area.

  15. Are seafloor pockmarks on the Chatham Rise, New Zealand, linked to CO2 hydrates? Gas hydrate stability considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecher, I. A.; Davy, B. W.; Rose, P. S.; Coffin, R. B.

    2015-12-01

    Vast areas of the Chatham Rise east of New Zealand are covered by seafloor pockmarks. Pockmark occurrence appears to be bathymetrically controlled with a band of smaller pockmarks covering areas between 500 and 700 m and large seafloor depressions beneath 800 m water depth. The current depth of the top of methane gas hydrate stability in the ocean is about 500 m and thus, we had proposed that pockmark formation may be linked to methane gas hydrate dissociation during sealevel lowering. However, while seismic profiles show strong indications of fluid flow, geochemical analyses of piston cores do not show any evidence for current or past methane flux. The discovery of Dawsonite, indicative of significant CO2 flux, in a recent petroleum exploration well, together with other circumstantial evidence, has led us to propose that instead of methane hydrate, CO2 hydrate may be linked to pockmark formation. We here present results from CO2 hydrate stability calculations. Assuming water temperature profiles remain unchanged, we predict the upper limit of pockmark occurrence to coincide with the top of CO2 gas hydrate stability during glacial-stage sealevel lowstands. CO2 hydrates may therefore have dissociated during sealevel lowering leading to gas escape and pockmark formation. In contrast to our previous model linking methane hydrate dissociation to pockmark formation, gas hydrates would dissociate beneath a shallow base of CO2 hydrate stability, rather than on the seafloor following upward "grazing" of the top of methane hydrate stability. Intriguingly, at the water depths of the larger seafloor depressions, the base of gas hydrate stability delineates the phase boundary between CO2 hydrates and super-saturated CO2. We caution that because of the high solubility of CO2, dissociation from hydrate to free gas or super-saturated CO2 would imply high concentrations of CO2 and speculate that pockmark formation may be linked to CO2 hydrate dissolution rather than dissociation

  16. Coalbed Methane Procduced Water Treatment Using Gas Hydrate Formation at the Wellhead

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BC Technologies

    2009-12-30

    Water associated with coalbed methane (CBM) production is a significant and costly process waste stream, and economic treatment and/or disposal of this water is often the key to successful and profitable CBM development. In the past decade, advances have been made in the treatment of CBM produced water. However, produced water generally must be transported in some fashion to a centralized treatment and/or disposal facility. The cost of transporting this water, whether through the development of a water distribution system or by truck, is often greater than the cost of treatment or disposal. To address this economic issue, BC Technologies (BCT), in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and International Petroleum Environmental Consortium (IPEC), proposed developing a mechanical unit that could be used to treat CBM produced water by forming gas hydrates at the wellhead. This process involves creating a gas hydrate, washing it and then disassociating hydrate into water and gas molecules. The application of this technology results in three process streams: purified water, brine, and gas. The purified water can be discharged or reused for a variety of beneficial purposes and the smaller brine can be disposed of using conventional strategies. The overall objectives of this research are to develop a new treatment method for produced water where it could be purified directly at the wellhead, to determine the effectiveness of hydrate formation for the treatment of produced water with proof of concept laboratory experiments, to design a prototype-scale injector and test it in the laboratory under realistic wellhead conditions, and to demonstrate the technology under field conditions. By treating the water on-site, producers could substantially reduce their surface handling costs and economically remove impurities to a quality that would support beneficial use. Batch bench-scale experiments of the hydrate formation process and research conducted at ORNL

  17. Testing of pressurised cores containing gas hydrate from deep ocean sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clayton, C.; Kingston, E.; Priest, J. [Southampton Univ., Highfield, Southampton (United Kingdom). School of Civil Engineering and the Environment; Schultheiss, P. [Geotek Ltd., Daventry, Northamptonshire (United Kingdom)]|[Indian National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition 01, New Delhi (India)

    2008-07-01

    The geotechnical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments were investigated given their importance in predicting the stability of wellbores drilled in hydrate bearing sediments. The properties c