WorldWideScience

Sample records for mapping land form

  1. Geodiversity and land form

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Murray

    2014-05-01

    The Earth's surface has a dynamic and topographically varied natural landscape. In some cases the resulting landforms are given generic names reflecting their form and/or origin, (e.g. sand dunes, eskers, ox-bow lakes) but in many cases the land surface has a more amorphous form and is less easily categorized other than at a landscape scale (e.g. dissected plateau, Chalk downland). Across much of Europe, while the natural vegetation has been removed or radically modified, the natural land form/topography remains in tact. In this context and in terms of geoconservation we ought to be: • allowing the dynamic natural processes that create, carve and modify landscapes to continue to operate; and • retaining natural topographic character and geomorphological authenticity in the face of human actions seeking to remodel the land surface. In this presentation examples of this approach to geoconservation of land form will be given from the UK and other parts of the world. This will include examples of both appropriate and inappropriate topographic modifications.

  2. MAPS Appraisal Report Form

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2005-01-01

    As announced in Weekly Bulletin 48/2004, from now onwards, the paper MAPS appraisal report form has been replaced by an electronic form, which is available via EDH (on the EDH desktop under Other Tasks / HR & Training) No changes have been made to the contents of the form. Practical information will be available on the web page http://cern.ch/ais/projs/forms/maps/info.htm, and information meetings will be held on the following dates: 18 January 2005: MAIN AUDITORIUM (500-1-001) from 14:00 to 15:30. 20 January 2005: AB AUDITORIUM II (864-1-D02) from14:00 to 15:30. 24 January 2005: AT AUDITORIUM (30-7-018) from 10:00 to 11:30. Human Resources Department Tel. 73566

  3. Photogrammetry, Digital mapping and Land Informations Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Poul

    1998-01-01

    Monitoring activities on photogrammetry, digital mapping and land information systems in State Land Service in Latvia in relation to the EU Phare Project Phase II, Technical Assistance to land Privatisation and registration in Latvia.......Monitoring activities on photogrammetry, digital mapping and land information systems in State Land Service in Latvia in relation to the EU Phare Project Phase II, Technical Assistance to land Privatisation and registration in Latvia....

  4. Classes of land-surface form in the United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital dataset describes classes of land-surface form in the conterminous United States. The source of the data is the map of land-surface form in the 1970...

  5. Mapped Landmark Algorithm for Precision Landing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Andrew; Ansar, Adnan; Matthies, Larry

    2007-01-01

    A report discusses a computer vision algorithm for position estimation to enable precision landing during planetary descent. The Descent Image Motion Estimation System for the Mars Exploration Rovers has been used as a starting point for creating code for precision, terrain-relative navigation during planetary landing. The algorithm is designed to be general because it handles images taken at different scales and resolutions relative to the map, and can produce mapped landmark matches for any planetary terrain of sufficient texture. These matches provide a measurement of horizontal position relative to a known landing site specified on the surface map. Multiple mapped landmarks generated per image allow for automatic detection and elimination of bad matches. Attitude and position can be generated from each image; this image-based attitude measurement can be used by the onboard navigation filter to improve the attitude estimate, which will improve the position estimates. The algorithm uses normalized correlation of grayscale images, producing precise, sub-pixel images. The algorithm has been broken into two sub-algorithms: (1) FFT Map Matching (see figure), which matches a single large template by correlation in the frequency domain, and (2) Mapped Landmark Refinement, which matches many small templates by correlation in the spatial domain. Each relies on feature selection, the homography transform, and 3D image correlation. The algorithm is implemented in C++ and is rated at Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 4.

  6. Alaska LandCarbon wetland distribution map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, Bruce K.; Pastick, Neal J.

    2017-01-01

    This product provides regional estimates of specific wetland types (bog and fen) in Alaska. Available wetland types mapped by the National Wetlands Inventory (NWI) program were re-classed into bog, fen, and other. NWI mapping of wetlands was only done for a portion of the area so a decision tree mapping algorithm was then developed to estimate bog, fen, and other across the state of Alaska using remote sensing and GIS spatial data sets as inputs. This data was used and presented in two chapters on the USGS Alaska LandCarbon Report.

  7. User's guide for Bristol Bay land cover maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this Users Guide is to explain how to use the land cover maps and field data generated by the Bristol Bay Land Cover Mapping Project. The complete...

  8. Closed forms and multi-moment maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Thomas Bruun; Swann, Andrew Francis

    2013-01-01

    We extend the notion of multi-moment map to geometries defined by closed forms of arbitrary degree. We give fundamental existence and uniqueness results and discuss a number of essential examples, including geometries related to special holonomy. For forms of degree four, multi-moment maps are gu...

  9. Sensitivity of land use change emission estimates to historical land use and land cover mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Shushi; Ciais, Philippe; Maignan, Fabienne; Li, Wei; Chang, Jinfeng; Wang, Tao; Yue, Chao

    2017-04-01

    The carbon emissions from land use and land cover change (ELUC) are an important anthropogenic component of the global carbon budget. Yet these emissions have a large uncertainty. Uncertainty in historical land use and land cover change (LULCC) maps and their implementation in global vegetation models is one of the key sources of the spread of ELUC calculated by global vegetation models. In this study, we used the Organizing Carbon and Hydrology in Dynamic Ecosystems terrestrial biosphere model to investigate how the different transition rules to define the priority of conversion from natural vegetation to agricultural land affect the historical reconstruction of plant functional types (PFTs) and ELUC. First, we reconstructed 10 sets of historical PFT maps using different transition rules and two methods. Then, we calculated ELUC from these 10 different historical PFT maps and an additional published PFT reconstruction, using the difference between two sets of simulations (with and without LULCC). The total area of forest loss is highly correlated with the total simulated ELUC (R2 = 0.83, P < 0.001) across the reconstructed PFT maps, which indicates that the choice of transition rules is a critical (and often overlooked) decision affecting the simulated ELUC. In addition to the choice of a transition rule, the initial land cover map and the reconstruction method for the reconstruction of historical PFT maps have an important impact on the resultant estimates of ELUC.

  10. Towards an Integrated Global Land Cover Monitoring and Mapping System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Herold

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Global land cover mapping has evolved in a number of ways over the past two decades including increased activity in the areas of map validation and inter-comparison, which is the main focus of this Special Issue in Remote Sensing. Here we describe the major trends in global land cover mapping that have occurred, followed by recent advances as exemplified by the papers in the Special Issue. Finally, we consider what the future holds for global land cover mapping.

  11. Terrestrial Ecosystems - Land Surface Forms of the Conterminous United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has generated land surface form classes for the contiguous United States. These land surface form classes were created as part of...

  12. Challenges and opportunities in mapping land use intensity globally

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuemmerle, Tobias; Erb, Karlheinz; Meyfroidt, Patrick;

    2013-01-01

    we lack appropriate datasets to assess land use intensity across broad geographic extents. Here, we review the state of the art regarding approaches for mapping land use intensity and provide a comprehensive overview of available global-scale datasets on land use intensity. We also outline major...... challenges and opportunities for mapping land use intensity for cropland, grazing, and forestry systems, and identify key issues for future research. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  13. Land cover in single-family housing areas and how it correlates with urban form

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Boye; Jensen, Marina Bergen

    2015-01-01

    Land cover composition is a valuable indicator of the ecological performance of a city. Single-family housing areas constitute a substantial part of most cities and may as such play an important role for sustainable urban development. From aerial photos we performed detailed GIS-based mapping...... of land cover in three detached single-family housing areas in Denmark of different urban form but comparable housing densities (ranging from 10.0 to 11.3 houses per hectare). The findings were subjected to statistical analysis and landscape metrics. Land cover varied with urban form: A traditional...... that the urban form of neighbourhoods to some degree predicts the long term land cover composition. We conclude that strategies for maximizing the ecological performance of single-family housing areas can be informed by knowledge on urban form, and that digital mapping of land cover based on aerial photography...

  14. Closed forms and multi-moment maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Thomas Bruun; Swann, Andrew Francis

    We extend the notion of multi-moment map to geometries defined by closed forms of arbitrary degree. We give fundamental existence and uniqueness results and discuss a number of essential examples, including geometries related to special holonomy. For forms of degree four, multi-moment maps...... are guaranteed to exist and are unique when the symmetry group is (3, 4)-trivial, meaning that the group is connected and the third and fourth Lie algebra Betti numbers vanish. We give a structural description of some classes of (3, 4)-trivial algebras and provide a number of examples....

  15. A technique on automatic land-use database reconstruction based on scanning land-use map

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiaojuan; GONG Huili; YIN Lianwang; SUN Yonghua; YANG Lingli; WANG Yanggang

    2006-01-01

    Although a land-cover database is very important to national land use including urban planning and land-use management, it is very laborious and time-consuming to build through digitization of paper land-use maps (1:10000) and data input by hand. Here we propose a new, high-level, automatic technique to build a land-use database, which has proved useful and practical in building a land-use database of Baotou City.

  16. Land use and land cover map of a semiarid region of Brazil for meteorological and climatic models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Marcia da Silva Pinto Vieira

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available An updated vegetation cover and land use map over a semiarid region of Brazil has been produced at a 1 km spatial resolution, using satellite data and remote sensing techniques, for application in climate modeling. The map presents the location and distribution of major vegetation types and non-vegetated land surface formations for the Northeast Brazil Region, which includes the semiarid region. In this study, Radambrasil and IBGE vegetation maps, a digital mosaic of ETM+ Landsat 7, and TM Landsat 5 images from the period 1999-2000 were used. To update the map, the techniques of segmentation and unsupervised classification (ISOSEG were applied. A total of 7 land cover and land use categories were mapped according to the "Simplified Simple Biosphere"(SSiB model legend. This map shows that there has been a considerable increase in agricultural activities and pasture area. The vegetation in this region is an intricate combination of different life forms (e.g., trees and shrubs forming a closed cover in this region. The semiarid region of Brazil is susceptible to desertification due to climatic and environmental conditions. This updated map should provide important input for regional stratification in climate studies.

  17. Land use mapping and modelling for the Phoenix Quadrangle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Place, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The mapping of generalized land use (level 1) from ERTS 1 images was shown to be feasible with better than 95% accuracy in the Phoenix quadrangle. The accuracy of level 2 mapping in urban areas is still a problem. Updating existing maps also proved to be feasible, especially in water categories and agricultural uses; however, expanding urban growth has presented with accuracy. ERTS 1 film images indicated where areas of change were occurring, thus aiding focusing-in for more detailed investigation. ERTS color composite transparencies provided a cost effective source of information for land use mapping of very large regions at small map scales.

  18. Digital Mapping and Land Information Systems - Volume 6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Poul

    1998-01-01

    Introduction of digital mapping techniques in the 28 counties of Latvia related to the offices of the national mapping agency (State Land Service). Major components are: Training of regional staff, procurement of hard- and software, training of technical staff from State Land Service, HQ. Develop....... Development of demo-GIS for Jurmala city. Detailed analysis of GIS infrastructure in State Land Service, HQ. Implementation of limited GIS facilities for data capture, conversion and editing. Development of first phase of a national standard for digital maps – object catalogue....

  19. Watershed Land Cover/Land Use Mapping Using Remote Sensing and Data Mining in Gorganrood, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Minaei

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The Gorganrood watershed (GW is experiencing considerable environmental change in the form of natural hazards and erosion, as well as deforestation, cultivation and development activities. As a result of this, different types of Land Cover/Land Use (LCLU change are taking place on an intensive level in the area. This research study investigates the LCLU conditions upstream of this watershed for the years 1972, 1986, 2000 and 2014, using Landsat MSS, TM, ETM+ and OLI/TIRS images. LCLU maps for 1972, 1986, and 2000 were produced using pixel-based classification methods. For the 2014 LCLU map, Geographic Object-Based Image Analysis (GEOBIA in combination with the data-mining capabilities of Gini and J48 machine-learning algorithms were used. The accuracy of the maps was assessed using overall accuracy, quantity disagreement and allocation disagreement indexes. The overall accuracy ranged from 89% to 95%, quantity disagreement from 2.1% to 6.6%, and allocation disagreement from 2.1% for 2014 to 2.7% for 2000. The results of this study indicate that a significant amount of change has occurred in the region, and that this has as a consequence affected ecosystem services and human activity. This knowledge of the LCLU status in the area will help managers and decision makers to develop plans and programs aimed at effectively managing the watershed into the future.

  20. Attwater Prairie Chicken National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map depicts lands owned and/or administered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service at Attwater Prairie Chicken National Wildlife Refuge.

  1. Savannah National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map: Sheet 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map depicts lands owned and/or administered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service at Savannah Coastal Office-wassaw And Tybee National Wildlife Refuges.

  2. Mark Twain National Wildlife Refuge (Calhoun Division) [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map depicts lands owned and/or administered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service at the Calhoun Division of Mark Twain National Wildlife Refuge.

  3. A Continuously Updated, Global Land Classification Map Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to demonstrate a fully automatic capability for generating a global, high resolution (30 m) land classification map, with continuous updates from...

  4. McGregor Administrative Site [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map depicts lands owned and/or administered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service at Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife And Fish Refuge-mcgregor District.

  5. Mapping land degradation and desertification using remote sensing data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, S. K.; Kumar, Munish; Lal, Bhajan; Barman, Alok Kumar; Das, Satyendra Nath

    2006-12-01

    Land degradation is the result of both natural and biotic forces operating on the earth. Natural calamities, over exploitation of land resources, unwise land use and the consequences of high inputs agriculture on soil and water resource are of great concern both at national and international level. It aggravated food insecurity in the world especially in the developing countries that calls for combating land degradation and desertification with scientific means. Development of degraded lands in India is one of the options to enhance food production and to restore the fragile ecosystem. The scientific information and spatial distribution of various kinds of degraded lands is thus essential for formulation of strategic plan to arrest the menace of land degradation. Remote sensing provides an opportunity for rapid inventorying of degraded lands to generate realistic database by virtue of multi-spectral and multi-temporal capabilities in the country. The satellite data provides subtle manifestations of degradation of land due to water and wind erosion, water-logging, salinity and alkalinity, shifting cultivation, etc., that facilitate mapping. All India Soil and Land Use Survey (AISLUS) has undertaken the task of land degradation mapping using remotely sensed data and developed a methodology accordingly. The mapping has been conceptualized as a four-tier approach comprising kind of degradation, severity of degradation, degradation under major landform and major land use. Visual mode of interpretation technique based on image characteristics followed by ground verification has been employed for mapping of degraded lands. Image interpretation key has been formulated based on the spectral signatures of various causative factors of different kinds of degraded lands. The mapping legend has been made systematic and connotative. The extent and spatial distribution of different kinds of degraded lands with degree of severity under major landform and major land use in a

  6. Mapping land cover through time with the Rapid Land Cover Mapper—Documentation and user manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotillon, Suzanne E.; Mathis, Melissa L.

    2017-02-15

    The Rapid Land Cover Mapper is an Esri ArcGIS® Desktop add-in, which was created as an alternative to automated or semiautomated mapping methods. Based on a manual photo interpretation technique, the tool facilitates mapping over large areas and through time, and produces time-series raster maps and associated statistics that characterize the changing landscapes. The Rapid Land Cover Mapper add-in can be used with any imagery source to map various themes (for instance, land cover, soils, or forest) at any chosen mapping resolution. The user manual contains all essential information for the user to make full use of the Rapid Land Cover Mapper add-in. This manual includes a description of the add-in functions and capabilities, and step-by-step procedures for using the add-in. The Rapid Land Cover Mapper add-in was successfully used by the U.S. Geological Survey West Africa Land Use Dynamics team to accurately map land use and land cover in 17 West African countries through time (1975, 2000, and 2013).

  7. Satellite Image Processing for Land Use and Land Cover Mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashoka Vanjare

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, urban growth of Bangalore region is analyzed and discussed by using multi-temporal and multi-spectral Landsat satellite images. Urban growth analysis helps in understanding the change detection of Bangalore region. The change detection is studied over a period of 39 years and the region of interest covers an area of 2182 km2. The main cause for urban growth is the increase in population. In India, rapid urbanization is witnessed due to an increase in the population, continuous development has affected the existence of natural resources. Therefore observing and monitoring the natural resources (land use plays an important role. To analyze changed detection, researcher’s use remote sensing data. Continuous use of remote sensing data helps researchers to analyze the change detection. The main objective of this study is to monitor land cover changes of Bangalore district which covers rural and urban regions using multi-temporal and multi-sensor Landsat - multi-spectral scanner (MSS, thematic mapper (TM, Enhanced Thematic mapper plus (ETM+ MSS, TM and ETM+ images captured in the years 1973, 1992, 1999, 2002, 2005, 2008 and 2011. Temporal changes were determined by using maximum likelihood classification method. The classification results contain four land cover classes namely, built-up, vegetation, water and barren land. The results indicate that the region is densely developed which has resulted in decrease of water and vegetation regions. The continuous transformation of barren land to built-up region has affected water and vegetation regions. Generally, from 1973 to 2011 the percentage of urban region has increased from 4.6% to 25.43%, mainly due to urbanization.

  8. Automatic land vehicle navigation using road map data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schindwolf, R.

    1984-06-01

    A land navigation system has been developed that provides accurate navigation data while it is traveling on mapped roads. The system is autonomous and consists of a simple dead-reckoning navigator that is updated with stored road map data. Simulation and preliminary test results indicate that accuracies on the order of 50 feet can be achieved. Accuracy is independent of time.

  9. Aerial Video Processing for Land Use and Land Cover Mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashoka Vanjare

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we have proposed an Automatic Aerial Video Processing System for analyzing land surface features. Analysis of aerial video is done in three steps a Image pre-processing b Image registration and c Image segmentation. Using the proposed system, we have identified Land features like Vegetation, Man-Made Structures and Barren Land. These features are identified and differentiated from each other to calculate their respective areas. Most important feature of this system is that it is an instantaneous video acquisition and processing system. In the first step, radial distortions of image are corrected using Fish-Eye correction algorithm. In the second step, the image features are matched and then images are stitched using Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT followed by Random Sample Consensus (RANSAC algorithm. In the third step, the stitched images are segmented using Mean Shift Segmentation and different structures are identified using RGB model. Here we have used a hybrid system to identify Man-Made Structures using Fuzzy Edge Extraction along with Mean Shift segmentation. The results obtained are compared with the ground truth data, thus evaluating the performance of the system. The proposed system is implemented using Intel's OpenCV.

  10. Tomahawk National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Tomahawk National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial photography,...

  11. Missisquoi National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Missisquoi National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial photography,...

  12. Nantucket National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Nantucket National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial photography,...

  13. Erwin National Fish Hatchery [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Erwin National Fish Hatchery. It was generated from rectified aerial photography,...

  14. Alaska LandCarbon Wetland Distribution Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This product provides regional estimates of specific wetland types (bog and fen) in Alaska. Available wetland types mapped by the National Wetlands Inventory (NWI)...

  15. Currituck National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Currituck National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial photography,...

  16. Sabine National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Sabine National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial photography,...

  17. Mandalay National Wildlife Refuge Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Mandalay National Wildlife Refuge in Atlanta. It was generated from rectified aerial...

  18. Mandalay National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Mandalay National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial photography,...

  19. Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial...

  20. Land-Cover Map for the Island of Maui, Hawaii, circa 2017

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset describes land cover and vegetation for the island of Maui, Hawaii, circa 2017, hereinafter the 2017 land-cover map. The 2017 land-cover map is a...

  1. Analysis of RapidEye imagery for agricultural land mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Huiyong; Zhang, Jixian; Zhai, Liang; Xie, Wenhan; Sun, Xiaoxia

    2015-12-01

    With the improvement of remote sensing technology, the spatial, structural and texture information of land covers are present clearly in high resolution imagery, which enhances the ability of crop mapping. Since the satellite RapidEye was launched in 2009, high resolution multispectral imagery together with wide red edge band has been utilized in vegetation monitoring. Broad red edge band related vegetation indices improved land use classification and vegetation studies. RapidEye high resolution imagery was used in this study to evaluate the potential of red edge band in agricultural land cover/use mapping using an objected-oriented classification approach. A new object-oriented decision tree classifier was introduced in this study to map agricultural lands in the study area. Besides the five bands of RapidEye image, the vegetation indexes derived from spectral bands and the structural and texture features are utilized as inputs for agricultural land cover/use mapping in the study. The optimization of input features for classification by reducing redundant information improves the mapping precision about 18% for AdaTree. WL decision tree, and 5% for SVM, the accuracy is over 90% for both classifiers.

  2. Land use, forest density, soil mapping, erosion, drainage, salinity limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassoglou, N. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The results of analyses show that it is possible to obtain information of practical significance as follows: (1) A quick and accurate estimate of the proper use of the valuable land can be made on the basis of temporal and spectral characteristics of the land features. (2) A rather accurate delineation of the major forest formations in the test areas was achieved on the basis of spatial and spectral characteristics of the studied areas. The forest stands were separated into two density classes; dense forest, and broken forest. On the basis of ERTS-1 data and the existing ground truth information a rather accurate mapping of the major vegetational forms of the mountain ranges can be made. (3) Major soil formations are mapable from ERTS-1 data: recent alluvial soils; soil on quarternary deposits; severely eroded soil and lithosol; and wet soils. (4) An estimation of cost benefits cannot be made accurately at this stage of the investigation. However, a rough estimate of the ratio of the cost for obtaining the same amount information from ERTS-1 data and from conventional operations would be approximately 1:6 to 1:10, in favor of the ERTS-1.

  3. Land User and Land Cover Maps of Europe: a Webgis Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brovelli, M. A.; Fahl, F. C.; Minghini, M.; Molinari, M. E.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the methods and implementation processes of a WebGIS platform designed to publish the available land use and land cover maps of Europe at continental scale. The system is built completely on open source infrastructure and open standards. The proposed architecture is based on a server-client model having GeoServer as the map server, Leaflet as the client-side mapping library and the Bootstrap framework at the core of the front-end user interface. The web user interface is designed to have typical features of a desktop GIS (e.g. activate/deactivate layers and order layers by drag and drop actions) and to show specific information on the activated layers (e.g. legend and simplified metadata). Users have the possibility to change the base map from a given list of map providers (e.g. OpenStreetMap and Microsoft Bing) and to control the opacity of each layer to facilitate the comparison with both other land cover layers and the underlying base map. In addition, users can add to the platform any custom layer available through a Web Map Service (WMS) and activate the visualization of photos from popular photo sharing services. This last functionality is provided in order to have a visual assessment of the available land coverages based on other user-generated contents available on the Internet. It is supposed to be a first step towards a calibration/validation service that will be made available in the future.

  4. Present and potential land use mapping in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garduno, H.; Lagos, R. G.; Simo, F. G.

    1975-01-01

    The Mexican Water Plan (MWP) conducted studies of present and potential land use in Mexico using LANDSAT-1 satellite imagery. Present land use studies were carried out all over the country (197 million hectares); nine soil uses were mapped according to the first classification level recommended by the U.S. Geological Survey. Also 6.3 million hectares of land with advanced erosion were detected. Work was executed at a rate of 8 million hectares per month; reliability was 90% and the cost of only 0.1 cents/hectare. The potential land use study was performed in 45 million hectares at a rate of 4 million hectares per month and at a cost of 0.33 cents/hectare. Soil units according to FAO classification were delineated scale 1:1 million; interpretative maps were also prepared dealing with potential agricultural productivity carrying capacity for cattle, water, erosion risk, and slope ranges.

  5. Effects of different scale land cover maps in watershed modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Antonio; Araújo, Antonio; Alexandridis, Thomas; Chambel, Pedro

    2013-04-01

    Water management is a rather complex process that usually involves multiple stakeholder, multiple data and sources, and complex mathematical modelling. One of the key data sets to understand a particular water system is the characterization of the land cover. Land cover maps are essential for the estimation of environmental variables (e.g. LAI, ETa) related to water quantity. Also, land cover maps are used for modelling the water quality. For instance, watersheds that have intensive agriculture can have poor water quality due to increase of nutrients loading; forest fires have a significant negative impact over the water quality by increasing the sediment loads; forest fires can increase flood risks. The land cover dynamics can as well severely affect the water quantity and quality in watersheds. In the MyWater project we are conducting a study to supply water quantity and quality information services for five study areas in five different countries (Brazil, Greece, Mozambique, Netherlands, and Portugal). In this project several land cover maps were produced both at regional and local scales, based on the exploitation of medium and high resolution satellite images (MERIS and SPOT 4). These maps were produced through semi-automatic supervised classification procedures, using an LCCS based nomenclature of 15 classes. Validation results pointed to global accuracy values greater than 80% for all maps. In this paper we focus on studying the effect of using different scale land cover maps in the watershed modelling and its impact in results. The work presented is part of the FP7-EU project "Merging hydrological models and Earth observation data for reliable information on water - MyWater".

  6. Mapping of land cover in Northern California with simulated HyspIRI images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, M. L.; Kilham, N. E.

    2014-12-01

    Land-cover maps are important science products needed for natural resource and ecosystem service management, biodiversity conservation planning, and assessing human-induced and natural drivers of land change. Most land-cover maps at regional to global scales are produced with remote sensing techniques applied to multispectral satellite imagery with 30-500 m pixel sizes (e.g., Landsat, MODIS). Hyperspectral, or imaging spectrometer, imagery measuring the visible to shortwave infrared regions (i.e., full range) of the spectrum have shown improved capacity to map plant species and coarser land-cover associations, yet techniques have not been widely tested at regional and greater spatial scales. The Hyperspectral Infrared Imager (HyspIRI) mission is a full-range hyperspectral and thermal satellite being considered for development by NASA (hyspiri.jpl.nasa.gov). A hyperspectral satellite, such as HyspIRI, will provide detailed spectral and temporal information at global scales that could greatly improve our ability to map land cover with greater class detail and spatial and temporal accuracy than possible with conventional multispectral satellites. The broad goal of our research is to assess multi-temporal, HyspIRI-like satellite imagery for improved land cover mapping across a range of environmental and anthropogenic gradients in California. In this study, we mapped FAO Land Cover Classification System (LCCS) classes over 30,000 km2 in Northern California using multi-temporal HyspIRI imagery simulated from the AVIRIS airborne sensor. The Random Forests classification was applied to predictor variables derived from the multi-temporal hyperspectral data and accuracies were compared to that from Landsat 8 OLI. Results indicate increased mapping accuracy using HyspIRI multi-temporal imagery, particularly in discriminating different forest life-form types, such as mixed conifer and broadleaf forests and open- and closed-canopy forests.

  7. Geological map of land and seaareas of northern Europe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    The Geological Survey of Norway, in cooperation with the Geological Surveys of 22 other countries and under the aegis of the Commission for the Geological Map of the World (CGMW), has compiled a geological map of northern Europe at the 1:4 million scale.For the first time the geology of both land and sea areas of this large region is displayed in a single document. The area covered extends

  8. Spatial resolution requirements for urban land cover mapping from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, William J.; Wrigley, Robert C.

    1986-01-01

    Very low resolution (VLR) satellite data (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer, DMSP Operational Linescan System), low resolution (LR) data (Landsat MSS), medium resolution (MR) data (Landsat TM), and high resolution (HR) satellite data (Spot HRV, Large Format Camera) were evaluated and compared for interpretability at differing spatial resolutions. VLR data (500 m - 1.0 km) is useful for Level 1 (urban/rural distinction) mapping at 1:1,000,000 scale. Feature tone/color is utilized to distinguish generalized urban land cover using LR data (80 m) for 1:250,000 scale mapping. Advancing to MR data (30 m) and 1:100,000 scale mapping, confidence in land cover mapping is greatly increased, owing to the element of texture/pattern which is now evident in the imagery. Shape and shadow contribute to detailed Level II/III urban land use mapping possible if the interpreter can use HR (10-15 m) satellite data; mapping scales can be 1:25,000 - 1:50,000.

  9. MAPPING SPATIAL ACCURACY AND ESTIMATING LANDSCAPE INDICATORS FROM THEMATIC LAND COVER MAPS USING FUZZY SET THEORY

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper presents a fuzzy set-based method of mapping spatial accuracy of thematic map and computing several ecological indicators while taking into account spatial variation of accuracy associated with different land cover types and other factors (e.g., slope, soil type, etc.)...

  10. Assessment of the thematic accuracy of land cover maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høhle, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Several land cover maps are generated from aerial imagery and assessed by different approaches. The test site is an urban area in Europe for which six classes (‘building’, ‘hedge and bush’, ‘grass’, ‘road and parking lot’, ‘tree’, ‘wall and car port’) had to be derived. Two classification methods...

  11. Map of Federal Lands Highway American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Projects -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The map depicts Federal Lands Highway (FLH) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) projects, which are administered through the Federal Lands Divisions (FLD)....

  12. Land cover mapping of Greater Mesoamerica using MODIS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Chandra; Jenkins, Clinton N.

    2005-01-01

    A new land cover database of Greater Mesoamerica has been prepared using moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS, 500 m resolution) satellite data. Daily surface reflectance MODIS data and a suite of ancillary data were used in preparing the database by employing a decision tree classification approach. The new land cover data are an improvement over traditional advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) based land cover data in terms of both spatial and thematic details. The dominant land cover type in Greater Mesoamerica is forest (39%), followed by shrubland (30%) and cropland (22%). Country analysis shows forest as the dominant land cover type in Belize (62%), Cost Rica (52%), Guatemala (53%), Honduras (56%), Nicaragua (53%), and Panama (48%), cropland as the dominant land cover type in El Salvador (60.5%), and shrubland as the dominant land cover type in Mexico (37%). A three-step approach was used to assess the quality of the classified land cover data: (i) qualitative assessment provided good insight in identifying and correcting gross errors; (ii) correlation analysis of MODIS- and Landsat-derived land cover data revealed strong positive association for forest (r2 = 0.88), shrubland (r2 = 0.75), and cropland (r2 = 0.97) but weak positive association for grassland (r2 = 0.26); and (iii) an error matrix generated using unseen training data provided an overall accuracy of 77.3% with a Kappa coefficient of 0.73608. Overall, MODIS 500 m data and the methodology used were found to be quite useful for broad-scale land cover mapping of Greater Mesoamerica.

  13. Generating Up-to-Date and Detailed Land Use and Land Cover Maps Using OpenStreetMap and GlobeLand30

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cidália Costa Fonte

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available With the opening up of the Landsat archive, global high resolution land cover maps have begun to appear. However, they often have only a small number of high level land cover classes and they are static products, corresponding to a particular period of time, e.g., the GlobeLand30 (GL30 map for 2010. The OpenStreetMap (OSM, in contrast, consists of a very detailed, dynamically updated, spatial database of mapped features from around the world, but it suffers from incomplete coverage, and layers of overlapping features that are tagged in a variety of ways. However, it clearly has potential for land use and land cover (LULC mapping. Thus the aim of this paper is to demonstrate how the OSM can be converted into a LULC map and how this OSM-derived LULC map can then be used to first update the GL30 with more recent information and secondly, enhance the information content of the classes. The technique is demonstrated on two study areas where there is availability of OSM data but in locations where authoritative data are lacking, i.e., Kathmandu, Nepal and Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. The GL30 and its updated and enhanced versions are independently validated using a stratified random sample so that the three maps can be compared. The results show that the updated version of GL30 improves in terms of overall accuracy since certain classes were not captured well in the original GL30 (e.g., water in Kathmandu and water/wetlands in Dar es Salaam. In contrast, the enhanced GL30, which contains more detailed urban classes, results in a drop in the overall accuracy, possibly due to the increased number of classes, but the advantages include the appearance of more detailed features, such as the road network, that becomes clearly visible.

  14. Automated Training Sample Extraction for Global Land Cover Mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Radoux

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Land cover is one of the essential climate variables of the ESA Climate Change Initiative (CCI. In this context, the Land Cover CCI (LC CCI project aims at building global land cover maps suitable for climate modeling based on Earth observation by satellite sensors.  The  challenge  is  to  generate  a  set  of  successive  maps  that  are  both  accurate and consistent over time. To do so, operational methods for the automated classification of optical images are investigated. The proposed approach consists of a locally trained classification using an automated selection of training samples from existing, but outdated land cover information. Combinations of local extraction (based on spatial criteria and self-cleaning of training samples (based on spectral criteria are quantitatively assessed. Two large study areas, one in Eurasia and the other in South America, are considered. The proposed morphological cleaning of the training samples leads to higher accuracies than the statistical outlier removal in the spectral domain. An optimal neighborhood has been identified for the local sample extraction. The results are coherent for the two test areas, showing an improvement of the overall accuracy compared with the original reference datasets and a significant reduction of macroscopic errors. More importantly, the proposed method partly controls the reliability of existing land cover maps as sources of training samples for supervised classification.

  15. Enhancing the performance of regional land cover mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Weicheng; Zucca, Claudio; Karam, Fadi; Liu, Guangping

    2016-10-01

    Different pixel-based, object-based and subpixel-based methods such as time-series analysis, decision-tree, and different supervised approaches have been proposed to conduct land use/cover classification. However, despite their proven advantages in small dataset tests, their performance is variable and less satisfactory while dealing with large datasets, particularly, for regional-scale mapping with high resolution data due to the complexity and diversity in landscapes and land cover patterns, and the unacceptably long processing time. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the comparatively highest performance of an operational approach based on integration of multisource information ensuring high mapping accuracy in large areas with acceptable processing time. The information used includes phenologically contrasted multiseasonal and multispectral bands, vegetation index, land surface temperature, and topographic features. The performance of different conventional and machine learning classifiers namely Malahanobis Distance (MD), Maximum Likelihood (ML), Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs), Support Vector Machines (SVMs) and Random Forests (RFs) was compared using the same datasets in the same IDL (Interactive Data Language) environment. An Eastern Mediterranean area with complex landscape and steep climate gradients was selected to test and develop the operational approach. The results showed that SVMs and RFs classifiers produced most accurate mapping at local-scale (up to 96.85% in Overall Accuracy), but were very time-consuming in whole-scene classification (more than five days per scene) whereas ML fulfilled the task rapidly (about 10 min per scene) with satisfying accuracy (94.2-96.4%). Thus, the approach composed of integration of seasonally contrasted multisource data and sampling at subclass level followed by a ML classification is a suitable candidate to become an operational and effective regional land cover mapping method.

  16. Mapping urban land cover from space: Some observations for future progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaydos, L.

    1982-01-01

    The multilevel classification system adopted by the USGS for operational mapping of land use and land cover at levels 1 and 2 is discussed and the successes and failures of mapping land cover from LANDSAT digital data are reviewed. Techniques used for image interpretation and their relationships to sensor parameters are examined. The requirements for mapping levels 2 and 3 classes are considered.

  17. UAS Mapping as an alternative for land surveying techniques?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Devriendt

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Can a UAS mapping technique compete with standard surveying techniques? Since the boom in different RPAS (remotely piloted air system, UAV (unmanned aerial vehicle, or UAS (unmanned aerial system, this is one of the crucial questions when it comes to UAS mappings. Not the looks and feels are important but the reliability, ease-to-use, and accuracy that you get with a system based on hardware and corresponding software. This was also one of the issues that the Dutch Land Registry asked a few months ago aimed at achieving an effective and usable system for updating property boundaries in new-build districts. Orbit GT gave them a ready-made answer: a definitive outcome based on years of research and development in UAS mapping technology and software.

  18. A map of radon flux at the Australian land surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Griffiths

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A time-dependent map of radon-222 flux density at the Australian land surface has been constructed with a spatial resolution of 0.05° and temporal resolution of one month. Radon flux density was calculated from a simple model utilising data from national gamma-ray aerial surveys, modelled soil moisture, and maps of soil properties. The model was calibrated against a large data set of accumulation-chamber measurements, thereby constraining it with experimental data. A notable application of the map is in atmospheric mixing and transport studies which use radon as a tracer, where it is a clear improvement on the common assumption of uniform radon flux density.

  19. A map of radon flux at the Australian land surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Griffiths

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A time-dependent map of radon-222 flux density at the Australian land surface has been constructed with a spatial resolution of 0.05° and temporal resolution of one month. Radon flux density was calculated from a simple model utilising data from national gamma-ray aerial surveys; modelled soil moisture, available from 1900 in near real-time; and maps of soil properties. The model was calibrated against a data set of accumulation chamber measurements, thereby constraining it with experimental data. A notable application of the map is in atmospheric mixing and transport studies which use radon as a tracer, where it is a clear improvement on the common assumption of uniform radon flux density.

  20. Land-Use and Land-Cover Mapping Using a Gradable Classification Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keigo Kitada

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Conventional spectral-based classification methods have significant limitations in the digital classification of urban land-use and land-cover classes from high-resolution remotely sensed data because of the lack of consideration given to the spatial properties of images. To recognize the complex distribution of urban features in high-resolution image data, texture information consisting of a group of pixels should be considered. Lacunarity is an index used to characterize different texture appearances. It is often reported that the land-use and land-cover in urban areas can be effectively classified using the lacunarity index with high-resolution images. However, the applicability of the maximum-likelihood approach for hybrid analysis has not been reported. A more effective approach that employs the original spectral data and lacunarity index can be expected to improve the accuracy of the classification. A new classification procedure referred to as “gradable classification method” is proposed in this study. This method improves the classification accuracy in incremental steps. The proposed classification approach integrates several classification maps created from original images and lacunarity maps, which consist of lacnarity values, to create a new classification map. The results of this study confirm the suitability of the gradable classification approach, which produced a higher overall accuracy (68% and kappa coefficient (0.64 than those (65% and 0.60, respectively obtained with the maximum-likelihood approach.

  1. Optimization of Map Compilation for County-level Land Consolidation Planning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Based on practice of the land consolidation planning in Changfeng County of Hefei City,taking full account of reality of land consolidation and its significance as livelihood project,we analyzed map compilation procedure.In combination with actual effect of land consolidation,we carried out consolidation assessment of same elements by overall planning method,and optimized the map compilation for county-level land consolidation planning.Results show that planning map of land consolidation potential is to be improved and legends should be merged.After consolidation of legends,it is convenient to apply in potential planning map and solve complicated problem of reading maps.

  2. Land Use and Land Cover, Heard County, Georgia Land Cover Map, Published in 2005, 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, Chattahoochee-Flint Regional Development.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Land Use and Land Cover dataset, published at 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Hardcopy Maps information as of 2005. It is described...

  3. Land Cover Mapping Using SENTINEL-1 SAR Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdikan, S.; Sanli, F. B.; Ustuner, M.; Calò, F.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the potential of using free-of-charge Sentinel-1 Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery for land cover mapping in urban areas is investigated. To this aim, we use dual-pol (VV+VH) Interferometric Wide swath mode (IW) data collected on September 16th 2015 along descending orbit over Istanbul megacity, Turkey. Data have been calibrated, terrain corrected, and filtered by a 5x5 kernel using gamma map approach. During terrain correction by using a 25m resolution SRTM DEM, SAR data has been resampled resulting into a pixel spacing of 20m. Support Vector Machines (SVM) method has been implemented as a supervised pixel based image classification to classify the dataset. During the classification, different scenarios have been applied to find out the performance of Sentinel-1 data. The training and test data have been collected from high resolution image of Google Earth. Different combinations of VV and VH polarizations have been analysed and the resulting classified images have been assessed using overall classification accuracy and Kappa coefficient. Results demonstrate that, combining opportunely dual polarization data, the overall accuracy increases up to 93.28% against 73.85% and 70.74% of using individual polarization VV and VH, respectively. Our preliminary analysis points out that dual polarimetric Sentinel-1SAR data can be effectively exploited for producing accurate land cover maps, with relevant advantages for urban planning and management of large cities.

  4. Mapping Urban Form: Morphology studies in the contemporary urban landscape

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pinzon Cortes, C.E.

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation discusses the importance to study the form of the contemporary urban landscape. It shows how mapping is the tool by which the formal logic of the contemporary city can be uncovered. Through mapping, the urban landscape can be understood as systems of overlapping layers. This observ

  5. Integrating Recent Land Cover Mapping Efforts to Update the National Gap Analysis Program's Species Habitat Map

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKerrow, A. J.; Davidson, A.; Earnhardt, T. S.; Benson, A. L.

    2014-11-01

    Over the past decade, great progress has been made to develop national extent land cover mapping products to address natural resource issues. One of the core products of the GAP Program is range-wide species distribution models for nearly 2000 terrestrial vertebrate species in the U.S. We rely on deductive modeling of habitat affinities using these products to create models of habitat availability. That approach requires that we have a thematically rich and ecologically meaningful map legend to support the modeling effort. In this work, we tested the integration of the Multi-Resolution Landscape Characterization Consortium's National Land Cover Database 2011 and LANDFIRE's Disturbance Products to update the 2001 National GAP Vegetation Dataset to reflect 2011 conditions. The revised product can then be used to update the species models. We tested the update approach in three geographic areas (Northeast, Southeast, and Interior Northwest). We used the NLCD product to identify areas where the cover type mapped in 2011 was different from what was in the 2001 land cover map. We used Google Earth and ArcGIS base maps as reference imagery in order to label areas identified as "changed" to the appropriate class from our map legend. Areas mapped as urban or water in the 2011 NLCD map that were mapped differently in the 2001 GAP map were accepted without further validation and recoded to the corresponding GAP class. We used LANDFIRE's Disturbance products to identify changes that are the result of recent disturbance and to inform the reassignment of areas to their updated thematic label. We ran species habitat models for three species including Lewis's Woodpecker (Melanerpes lewis) and the White-tailed Jack Rabbit (Lepus townsendii) and Brown Headed nuthatch (Sitta pusilla). For each of three vertebrate species we found important differences in the amount and location of suitable habitat between the 2001 and 2011 habitat maps. Specifically, Brown headed nuthatch habitat in

  6. Object-Based Land-Cover Mapping with High Resolution Aerial Photography at a County Scale in Midwestern USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxiao Li

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available There are growing demands for detailed and accurate land cover maps in land system research and planning. Macro-scale land cover maps normally cannot satisfy the studies that require detailed land cover maps at micro scales. In the meantime, applying conventional pixel-based classification methods in classifying high-resolution aerial imagery is ineffective to develop high accuracy land-cover maps, especially in spectrally heterogeneous and complicated urban areas. Here we present an object-based approach that identifies land-cover types from 1-meter resolution aerial orthophotography and a 5-foot DEM. Our study area is Tippecanoe County in the State of Indiana, USA, which covers about a 1300 km2 land area. We used a countywide aerial photo mosaic and normalized digital elevation model as input datasets in this study. We utilized simple algorithms to minimize computation time while maintaining relatively high accuracy in land cover mapping at a county scale. The aerial photograph was pre-processed using principal component transformation to reduce its spectral dimensionality. Vegetation and non-vegetation were separated via masks determined by the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index. A combination of segmentation algorithms with lower calculation intensity was used to generate image objects that fulfill the characteristics selection requirements. A hierarchical image object network was formed based on the segmentation results and used to assist the image object delineation at different spatial scales. Finally, expert knowledge regarding spectral, contextual, and geometrical aspects was employed in image object identification. The resultant land cover map developed with this object-based image analysis has more information classes and higher accuracy than that derived with pixel-based classification methods.

  7. 75 FR 61508 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Canadian Border Boat Landing Permit (CBP Form I-68)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-05

    ... Landing Permit (CBP Form I-68) AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), Department of Homeland... concerning the Canadian Border Boat Landing Permit (Form I- ] 68). This request for comment is being made... Form I-68. Abstract: The Canadian Border Boat Landing Permit (CBP Form I-68) allows...

  8. 78 FR 73875 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Canadian Border Boat Landing Permit (CBP Form I-68)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-09

    ... Landing Permit (CBP Form I-68) AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), Department of Homeland... requirement concerning the Canadian Border Boat Landing Permit (Form I-68). This request for comment is being... Form I-68. Abstract: The Canadian Border Boat Landing Permit (CBP Form I-68) allows...

  9. Some Weaker Forms of Fuzzy Faintly Open Mappings

    OpenAIRE

    Hakeem A. Othman

    2015-01-01

    This paper is devoted to introduce and investigate some weak forms of fuzzy open mappings, namely fuzzy faintly semi open (fuzzy faintly semi closed), fuzzy faintly preopen (fuzzy faintly preclosed), fuzzy faintly $\\alpha$-open (fuzzy faintly $\\alpha$-closed), fuzzy faintly semi preopen (fuzzy faintly semi preclosed) and fuzzy faintly $sp$- open (fuzzy faintly $sp$- closed) mappings and their fundamental properties are obtained. Moreover, their relationship with other types of fuzzy open (clo...

  10. Land use mapping in Erie County, Pennsylvania: A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcmurtry, G. J.; Petersen, G. W. (Principal Investigator); May, G. A.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A pilot study was conducted to determine the feasibility of mapping land use in the Great Lakes Basin area utilizing ERTS-1 data. Small streams were clearly defined by the presence of trees along their length in predominantly agricultural country. Field patterns were easily differentiated from forested areas; dairy and beef farms were differentiated from other farmlands, but no attempt was made to identify crops. Large railroad lines and major highway systems were identified. The city of Erie and several smaller towns were identified, as well as residential areas between these towns, and docks along the shoreline in Erie. Marshes, forests, and beaches within Presque Isle State Park were correctly identified, using the DCLUS program. Bay water was differentiated from lake water, with a small amount of misclassification.

  11. Modification to the MAPS interview process and electronic form

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2006-01-01

    Based on the first year of experience with e-MAPS and the feedback from departmental users, a number of modifications to the MAPS interview process and the form have been introduced for the 2006 exercise. Definition of signatories The top of the form now also shows the name of the group leader and department head. This is especially useful in cases of detachment. Corrections can be made via the MAPS Coordinator. 'Send back' facility The possibility to send the MAPS report one step backwards is only available to the MAPS coordinators, i.e., from group leader to supervisor, from staff member to group leader, and from group leader to staff member. The form should only be sent back to correct factual errors or oversights, and any send backs will be tracked. Link 'training' part to 'training' application When entering a training objective for 2006, a search menu allows selection from various CERN internal training courses or from conferences. It remains important however to first read the description of the...

  12. Modification to the MAPS interview process and electronic form

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2006-01-01

    Based on the first year of experience with e-MAPS and the feedback from departmental users, a number of modifications to the MAPS interview process and form have been introduced for the 2006 exercise. Definition of signatories The top of the form now also shows the name of the Group Leader and Department Head. This is especially useful in cases of detachment. Corrections can be made via the MAPS Coordinator. 'Send back' facility The possibility to send the MAPS report one step backwards, i.e. from Group Leader to supervisor, from Staff Member to Group Leader, and from Group Leader to Staff Member is only available to the MAPS coordinators. The form should only be sent back to correct factual errors or oversights, and any send- backs will be recorded. Link between 'training' part and 'training' application When entering a training objective for 2006, a search menu allows selection from various CERN internal training courses or from conferences. It is still important, however, to first read the descri...

  13. Integrating global land cover datasets for deriving user-specific maps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsendbazar, Nandika; Bruin, de Sytze; Herold, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Global scale land cover (LC) mapping has interested many researchers over the last two decades as it is an input data source for various applications. Current global land cover (GLC) maps often do not meet the accuracy and thematic requirements of specific users. This study aimed to create an improv

  14. Toward accountable land use mapping: Using geocomputation to improve classification accuracy and reveal uncertainty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beekhuizen, J.; Clarke, K.C.

    2010-01-01

    The classification of satellite imagery into land use/cover maps is a major challenge in the field of remote sensing. This research aimed at improving the classification accuracy while also revealing uncertain areas by employing a geocomputational approach. We computed numerous land use maps by cons

  15. Procedure for deriving qualitative contaminant attenuation maps from land type data

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sililo, OTN

    2001-01-15

    Full Text Available covered by each soil type is quantified. The approach adopted here was to use land type data to derive soil characteristic maps per land type. Using Geographic Information Systems (GIS), the soils characteristic maps were then combined with reported...

  16. Toward accountable land use mapping: Using geocomputation to improve classification accuracy and reveal uncertainty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beekhuizen, J.; Clarke, K.C.

    2010-01-01

    The classification of satellite imagery into land use/cover maps is a major challenge in the field of remote sensing. This research aimed at improving the classification accuracy while also revealing uncertain areas by employing a geocomputational approach. We computed numerous land use maps by

  17. Evaluation of hot forming effects mapping for CAE analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoerr, L.; Faath, T.; Dykeman, J.; Malcolm, S.

    2016-08-01

    Hot forming has grown significantly in the manufacturing of structural components within the vehicle Body-In-White construction. The superior strength of press hardened steels not only guarantee high resistance to deformation, it also brings a significant weight saving compared to conventional cold formed products. However, the benefit of achieving ultrahigh strength with hot stamping, comes with a reduction in ductility of the press hardened part. This will require advanced material modeling to capture the predicted performances accurately. A technique to optically measure and map the thinning distribution after hot stamping has shown to improve numerical analysis for fracture prediction. The proposed method to determine the forming effects and mapping to CAE models can be integrated into the Vehicle Development Process to shorten the time to production.

  18. A Biophysical Image Compositing Technique for the Global-Scale Extraction and Mapping of Barren Lands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram C. Sharma

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available As the barren lands play a key role in the interaction between land cover dynamics and climate system, an efficient methodology for the global-scale extraction and mapping of the barren lands is important. The discriminative potential of the existing soil/bareness indexes was assessed by collecting globally distributed reference data belonging to major land cover types. The existing soil/bareness indexes parameterized at the local scale did not work satisfactorily everywhere at the global level. A new technique called the Biophysical Image Composite (BIC is proposed in the research by exploiting time-series of the multi-spectral data to capture global-scale barren land attributes effectively. The BIC is a false color composite image made up of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI, short wave infrared reflectance, and green reflectance, which were specially selected from the highest vegetation activity period by avoiding signals from the seasonal snowfall. The drastic contrast between the barren lands and vegetation as exhibited by the BIC provides a robust extraction and mapping of the barren lands, and facilitates its visual interpretation. Random Forests based supervised classification approach was applied on the BIC for the mapping of global barren lands. A new global barren land cover map of year 2013 was produced with high accuracy. The comparison of the resulted map with an existing map of the same year showed a substantial discrepancy between two maps due to methodological variation. To cope with this problem, the BIC based mapping methodology, with a special account of the land surface phenological changes, is suggested to standardize the global-scale estimates and mapping of the barren lands.

  19. Mapping land cover from satellite images: A basic, low cost approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elifrits, C. D.; Barney, T. W.; Barr, D. J.; Johannsen, C. J.

    1978-01-01

    Simple, inexpensive methodologies developed for mapping general land cover and land use categories from LANDSAT images are reported. One methodology, a stepwise, interpretive, direct tracing technique was developed through working with university students from different disciplines with no previous experience in satellite image interpretation. The technique results in maps that are very accurate in relation to actual land cover and relative to the small investment in skill, time, and money needed to produce the products.

  20. 76 FR 2917 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Canadian Border Boat Landing Permit (CBP Form I-68)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-18

    ... Landing Permit (CBP Form I-68) AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security... (CBP Form I-68). This is a proposed extension of an information collection that was previously approved... Landing Permit. OMB Number: 1651-0108. Form Number: CBP Form I-68. Abstract: The Canadian Border...

  1. Land cover mapping for development planning in Eastern and Southern Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oduor, P.; Flores Cordova, A. I.; Wakhayanga, J. A.; Kiema, J.; Farah, H.; Mugo, R. M.; Wahome, A.; Limaye, A. S.; Irwin, D.

    2016-12-01

    Africa continues to experience intensification of land use, driven by competition for resources and a growing population. Land cover maps are some of the fundamental datasets required by numerous stakeholders to inform a number of development decisions. For instance, they can be integrated with other datasets to create value added products such as vulnerability impact assessment maps, and natural capital accounting products. In addition, land cover maps are used as inputs into Greenhouse Gas (GHG) inventories to inform the Agriculture, Forestry and other Land Use (AFOLU) sector. However, the processes and methodologies of creating land cover maps consistent with international and national land cover classification schemes can be challenging, especially in developing countries where skills, hardware and software resources can be limiting. To meet this need, SERVIR Eastern and Southern Africa developed methodologies and stakeholder engagement processes that led to a successful initiative in which land cover maps for 9 countries (Malawi, Rwanda, Namibia, Botswana, Lesotho, Ethiopia, Uganda, Zambia and Tanzania) were developed, using 2 major classification schemes. The first sets of maps were developed based on an internationally acceptable classification system, while the second sets of maps were based on a nationally defined classification system. The mapping process benefited from reviews from national experts and also from technical advisory groups. The maps have found diverse uses, among them the definition of the Forest Reference Levels in Zambia. In Ethiopia, the maps have been endorsed by the national mapping agency as part of national data. The data for Rwanda is being used to inform the Natural Capital Accounting process, through the WAVES program, a World Bank Initiative. This work illustrates the methodologies and stakeholder engagement processes that brought success to this land cover mapping initiative.

  2. LAND-COVER DENSITY-BASED APPROACH TO URBAN LAND USE MAPPING USING HIGH-RESOLUTION IMAGERY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiu-ying; FENG Xue-zhi; DENG Hui

    2005-01-01

    Nowadays, remote sensing imagery, especially with its high spatial resolution, has become an indispensable tool to provide timely up-gradation of urban land use and land cover information, which is a prerequisite for proper urban planning and management. The possible method described in the present paper to obtain urban land use types is based on the principle that land use can be derived from the land cover existing in a neighborhood. Here, moving window is used to represent the spatial pattern of land cover within a neighborhood and seven window sizes (61m×61 m,68m×68m, 75m×75m, 87m×87m, 99m×99m, 110m×110m and 121m×121m) are applied to determining the most proper window size. Then, the unsupervised method of ISODATA is employed to classify the layered land cover density maps obtained by the moving window. The results of accuracy evaluation show that the window size of 99m×99m is proper to infer urban land use categories and the proposed method has produced a land use map with a total accuracy of 85%.

  3. A methodology to generate a synergetic land-cover map by fusion of different land-cover products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Hoyos, A.; García-Haro, F. J.; San-Miguel-Ayanz, J.

    2012-10-01

    The main goal of this study is to develop a general framework for building a hybrid land-cover map by the synergistic combination of a number of land-cover classifications with different legends and spatial resolutions. The proposed approach assesses class-specific accuracies of datasets and establishes affinity between thematic legends using a common land-cover language such as the UN Land-Cover Classification System (LCCS). The approach is illustrated over a large region in Europe using four land-cover datasets (CORINE, GLC2000, MODIS and GlobCover), but it can be applied to any set of existing products. The multi-classification map is expected to improve the performance of individual classifications by reconciling their best characteristics while avoiding their main weaknesses. The intermap comparison reveals improved agreement of the hybrid map with all other land-cover products and therefore indicates the successful exploration of synergies between the different products. The approach offers also estimates for the classification confidence associated with the pixel label and flexibility to shift the balance between commission and omission errors, which are critical in order to obtain a desired reliable map.

  4. Hamiltonian maps and normal forms for intense beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turchetti, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica Universita di Bologna and INFN, Bologna, Via Irnerio 46, 40126 (Italy)]. E-mail: turchetti@bo.infn.it

    2006-06-01

    The dynamics of a beam in a ring with a localized multipolar nonlinearity is described by a polynomial one turn map. The space charge forces act continuously along the ring, but their effect can be included by replacing the linear tune with the depressed tune which depends on the Courant Snyder invariant. This approximation allows to use the normal forms to compute the nonlinear invariants, the nonlinear tune and the islands geometric parameters when a low order resonance is approached.

  5. Application of Google Maps API service for creating web map of information retrieved from CORINE land cover databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kilibarda Milan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Today, Google Maps API application based on Ajax technology as standard web service; facilitate users with publication interactive web maps, thus opening new possibilities in relation to the classical analogue maps. CORINE land cover databases are recognized as the fundamental reference data sets for numerious spatial analysis. The theoretical and applicable aspects of Google Maps API cartographic service are considered on the case of creating web map of change in urban areas in Belgrade and surround from 2000. to 2006. year, obtained from CORINE databases.

  6. Interpretation of scenario results in terms of described and mapped land change trajectories and archetypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuemmerle, Tobias; Stürck, Julia; Levers, Christian

    . Within WP11, deliverable 11.2 documents three analyses carried out to interpret the scenario outcomes in light of the insights gained from studying recent and longterm land use change (module PROCESSES): (1) a delineation and mapping of high-level, typical land change trajectories; (2) an assessment...... of future developments of current land change archetypes; and (3) an interpretation of future land change in light of long-term land system trajectories. Synthesizing across these analyses, six key insights emerged. First, future land change was relatively similar across marker scenarios and different...... polarized with intensified production and abandonment of marginal areas continuing. Fifth, future land changes were projected to be well within the range of longterm historic land system changes. Finally, modelled scenarios generally suggest gradual, though not always linear future land system trends...

  7. MapSite - an Internet map service of the National Land Survey of Finland gets dressed up with modern technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jere Rajalin

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available MapSite of the National Land Survey of Finland was the first national Internet map service in Europe. It was launched in September 1996. Since then the service has been a huge success. Until now it has almost 300,000 users in all, the number of paying customers is over 2,000. In the spring of 2001 National Land Survey (NLS started a project to produce a new Internet map service to replace the old MapSite. The developing project is divided in three phases. In the first phase services of paying customers are renewed. Free of charge map browsing service is being modernised in the second phase. Totally new services may be produced in the third phase.

  8. Are floods in part a form of land use externality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorner, W.; Porter, M.; Metzka, R.

    2008-05-01

    Peak and volume of river flows are functions of the catchment surface characteristics. This means that any impacts to the run-off regime (for example surface sealing and river training) could affect people and land users in the lower system. The costs of flood defence or compensation of damages are usually not included in the economic calculation of the upstream land owner or land user. In economic terms these effects are referred to as unidirectional externalities. This paper presents a methodology to identify externalities related to land use and run-off and describes the relevant cause-effect relations and how they can be modelled. The Herzogbach is a small tributary of the Danube River in Lower Bavaria. It is located in a rural area, dominated by intensive farming practices. A combination of hydrological and hydraulic modelling provided the core of the project methodology to allow the interpretation of economic data. Comparisons of damage estimates resulting from different hydrological scenarios based on different land uses, and flood mitigation costs were used to show the economic significance of human impacts.

  9. Are floods in part a form of land use externality?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Dorner

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Peak and volume of river flows are functions of the catchment surface characteristics. This means that any impacts to the run-off regime (for example surface sealing and river training could affect people and land users in the lower system. The costs of flood defence or compensation of damages are usually not included in the economic calculation of the upstream land owner or land user. In economic terms these effects are referred to as unidirectional externalities. This paper presents a methodology to identify externalities related to land use and run-off and describes the relevant cause-effect relations and how they can be modelled. The Herzogbach is a small tributary of the Danube River in Lower Bavaria. It is located in a rural area, dominated by intensive farming practices. A combination of hydrological and hydraulic modelling provided the core of the project methodology to allow the interpretation of economic data. Comparisons of damage estimates resulting from different hydrological scenarios based on different land uses, and flood mitigation costs were used to show the economic significance of human impacts.

  10. Comparison of satellite imagery and infrared aerial photography as vegetation mapping methods in an arctic study area: Jameson Land, East Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Birger Ulf; Mosbech, Anders

    1994-01-01

    Remote Sensing, vegetation mapping, SPOT, Landsat TM, aerial photography, Jameson Land, East Greenland......Remote Sensing, vegetation mapping, SPOT, Landsat TM, aerial photography, Jameson Land, East Greenland...

  11. Columbian White-Tailed Deer National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map depicts lands owned and/or administered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service at Julia Butler Hansen Refuge For The Columbian White-tailed Deer.

  12. EnviroAtlas -Durham, NC- One Meter Resolution Urban Area Land Cover Map (2010)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The EnviroAtlas Durham, NC land cover map was generated from USDA NAIP (National Agricultural Imagery Program) four band (red, green, blue and near infrared) aerial...

  13. Land degradation mapping for modelling of ecosystem benefit flows in the Inkomati catchment using remote sensing.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ramoelo, Abel

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available , as well as nature conservation affect the natural ecosystems in different ways and magnitudes. The National Land Cover (NLC2000) project mapped degraded areas in the catchment, but the results lack a differentiation of magnitude of degradation...

  14. Parcels and Land Ownership, Digital mapping planned, but n, Published in 2008, Mille Lacs County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2008. It is described as 'Digital mapping planned, but n'. The extent of these data is generally Mille Lacs County, MN....

  15. Generation and Assessment of Urban Land Cover Maps Using High-Resolution Multispectral Aerial Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Höhle, Joachim; Höhle, Michael

    2013-01-01

    to a tree structured classifier, which automatically derives land cover maps in 2D or 3D. We investigate the thematic accuracy of the produced land cover map by a class-wise stratified design and provide a method for deriving necessary sample sizes. Corresponding survey adjusted accuracy measures...... and their associated confidence intervals are used to adequately reflect uncertainty in the assessment based on the chosen sample size. Proof of concept for the method is given for an urban area in Switzerland. Here, the produced land cover map with six classes (building, wall and carport, road and parking lot, hedge...... tree learning based on recursive partitioning is investigated. We conclude that the open source software “R” provides all the tools needed for performing statistical prudent classification and accuracy evaluations of urban land cover maps....

  16. Quantitative mapping of global land degradation using Earth observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de R.; Bruin, de S.; Schaepman, M.E.; Dent, D.

    2011-01-01

    Land degradation is a global issue on par with climate change and loss of biodiversity, but its extent and severity are only roughly known and there is little detail on the immediate processes – let alone the drivers. Earth-observation methods enable monitoring of land degradation in a consistent, p

  17. Rapid Land Cover Map Updates Using Change Detection and Robust Random Forest Classifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konrad J. Wessels

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper evaluated the Landsat Automated Land Cover Update Mapping (LALCUM system designed to rapidly update a land cover map to a desired nominal year using a pre-existing reference land cover map. The system uses the Iteratively Reweighted Multivariate Alteration Detection (IRMAD to identify areas of change and no change. The system then automatically generates large amounts of training samples (n > 1 million in the no-change areas as input to an optimized Random Forest classifier. Experiments were conducted in the KwaZulu-Natal Province of South Africa using a reference land cover map from 2008, a change mask between 2008 and 2011 and Landsat ETM+ data for 2011. The entire system took 9.5 h to process. We expected that the use of the change mask would improve classification accuracy by reducing the number of mislabeled training data caused by land cover change between 2008 and 2011. However, this was not the case due to exceptional robustness of Random Forest classifier to mislabeled training samples. The system achieved an overall accuracy of 65%–67% using 22 detailed classes and 72%–74% using 12 aggregated national classes. “Water”, “Plantations”, “Plantations—clearfelled”, “Orchards—trees”, “Sugarcane”, “Built-up/dense settlement”, “Cultivation—Irrigated” and “Forest (indigenous” had user’s accuracies above 70%. Other detailed classes (e.g., “Low density settlements”, “Mines and Quarries”, and “Cultivation, subsistence, drylands” which are required for operational, provincial-scale land use planning and are usually mapped using manual image interpretation, could not be mapped using Landsat spectral data alone. However, the system was able to map the 12 national classes, at a sufficiently high level of accuracy for national scale land cover monitoring. This update approach and the highly automated, scalable LALCUM system can improve the efficiency and update rate of regional land

  18. A probabilistic graphical model approach in 30 m land cover mapping with multiple data sources

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Jie; Ji, Luyan; Huang, Xiaomeng; Fu, Haohuan; Xu, Shiming; Li, Congcong

    2016-01-01

    There is a trend to acquire high accuracy land-cover maps using multi-source classification methods, most of which are based on data fusion, especially pixel- or feature-level fusions. A probabilistic graphical model (PGM) approach is proposed in this research for 30 m resolution land-cover mapping with multi-temporal Landsat and MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data. Independent classifiers were applied to two single-date Landsat 8 scenes and the MODIS time-series data, ...

  19. EVALUATION OF DECISION TREE CLASSIFICATION ACCURACY TO MAP LAND COVER IN CAPIXABA, ACRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Symone Maria de Melo Figueiredo

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the accuracy of mapping land cover in Capixaba, state of Acre, Brazil, using decision trees. Elevenattributes were used to build the decision trees: TM Landsat datafrom bands 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 7; fraction images derived from linearspectral unmixing; and the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI. The Kappa values were greater than 0,83, producingexcellent classification results and demonstrating that the technique is promising for mapping land cover in the study area.

  20. Global land cover mapping using Earth observation satellite data: Recent progresses and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Yifang; Gong, Peng; Giri, Chandra

    2015-05-01

    Land cover is an important variable for many studies involving the Earth surface, such as climate, food security, hydrology, soil erosion, atmospheric quality, conservation biology, and plant functioning. Land cover not only changes with human caused land use changes, but also changes with nature. Therefore, the state of land cover is highly dynamic. In winter snow shields underneath various other land cover types in higher latitudes. Floods may persist for a long period in a year over low land areas in the tropical and subtropical regions. Forest maybe burnt or clear cut in a few days and changes to bare land. Within several months, the coverage of crops may vary from bare land to nearly 100% crops and then back to bare land following harvest. The highly dynamic nature of land cover creates a challenge in mapping and monitoring which remains to be adequately addressed. As economic globalization continues to intensify, there is an increasing trend of land cover/land use change, environmental pollution, land degradation, biodiversity loss at the global scale, timely and reliable information on global land cover and its changes is urgently needed to mitigate the negative impact of global environment change.

  1. An assessment of a collaborative mapping approach for exploring land use patterns for several European metropolises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokar Arsanjani, Jamal; Vaz, Eric

    2015-03-01

    Until recently, land surveys and digital interpretation of remotely sensed imagery have been used to generate land use inventories. These techniques however, are often cumbersome and costly, allocating large amounts of technical and temporal costs. The technological advances of web 2.0 have brought a wide array of technological achievements, stimulating the participatory role in collaborative and crowd sourced mapping products. This has been fostered by GPS-enabled devices, and accessible tools that enable visual interpretation of high resolution satellite images/air photos provided in collaborative mapping projects. Such technologies offer an integrative approach to geography by means of promoting public participation and allowing accurate assessment and classification of land use as well as geographical features. OpenStreetMap (OSM) has supported the evolution of such techniques, contributing to the existence of a large inventory of spatial land use information. This paper explores the introduction of this novel participatory phenomenon for land use classification in Europe's metropolitan regions. We adopt a positivistic approach to assess comparatively the accuracy of these contributions of OSM for land use classifications in seven large European metropolitan regions. Thematic accuracy and degree of completeness of OSM data was compared to available Global Monitoring for Environment and Security Urban Atlas (GMESUA) datasets for the chosen metropolises. We further extend our findings of land use within a novel framework for geography, justifying that volunteered geographic information (VGI) sources are of great benefit for land use mapping depending on location and degree of VGI dynamism and offer a great alternative to traditional mapping techniques for metropolitan regions throughout Europe. Evaluation of several land use types at the local level suggests that a number of OSM classes (such as anthropogenic land use, agricultural and some natural environment

  2. Detailed forest formation mapping in the land cover map series for the Caribbean islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmer, E. H.; Schill, S.; Pedreros, D. H.; Tieszen, L. L.; Kennaway, T.; Cushing, M.; Ruzycki, T.

    2006-12-01

    Forest formation and land cover maps for several Caribbean islands were developed from Landsat ETM+ imagery as part of a multi-organizational project. The spatially explicit data on forest formation types will permit more refined estimates of some forest attributes. The woody vegetation classification scheme relates closely to that of Areces-Malea et al. (1), who classify Caribbean vegetation according to standards of the US Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC, 1997), with modifications similar to those in Helmer et al. (2). For several of the islands, we developed image mosaics that filled cloudy parts of scenes with data from other scene dates after using regression tree normalization (3). The regression tree procedure permitted us to develop mosaics for wet and drought seasons for a few of the islands. The resulting multiseason imagery facilitated separation between classes such as seasonal evergreen forest, semi-deciduous forest (including semi-evergreen forest), and drought deciduous forest or woodland formations. We used decision tree classification methods to classify the Landsat image mosaics to detailed forest formations and land cover for Puerto Rico (4), St. Kitts and Nevis, St. Lucia, St. Vincent and the Grenadines and Grenada. The decision trees classified a stack of raster layers for each mapping area that included the Landsat image bands and various ancillary raster data layers. For Puerto Rico, for example, the ancillary data included climate parameters (5). For some islands, the ancillary data included topographic derivatives such as aspect, slope and slope position, SRTM (6) or other topographic data. Mapping forest formations with decision tree classifiers, ancillary geospatial data, and cloud-free image mosaics, accurately distinguished spectrally similar forest formations, without the aid of ecological zone maps, on the islands where the approach was used. The approach resulted in maps of forest formations with comparable or better detail

  3. Time-Series analysis of MODIS NDVI data along with ancillary data for Land use/Land cover mapping of Uttarakhand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patakamuri, S. K.; Agrawal, S.; Krishnaveni, M.

    2014-12-01

    Land use and land cover plays an important role in biogeochemical cycles, global climate and seasonal changes. Mapping land use and land cover at various spatial and temporal scales is thus required. Reliable and up to date land use/land cover data is of prime importance for Uttarakhand, which houses twelve national parks and wildlife sanctuaries and also has a vast potential in tourism sector. The research is aimed at mapping the land use/land cover for Uttarakhand state of India using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data for the year 2010. The study also incorporated smoothening of time-series plots using filtering techniques, which helped in identifying phenological characteristics of various land cover types. Multi temporal Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data for the year 2010 was used for mapping the Land use/land cover at 250m coarse resolution. A total of 23 images covering a single year were layer stacked and 150 clusters were generated using unsupervised classification (ISODATA) on the yearly composite. To identify different types of land cover classes, the temporal pattern (or) phenological information observed from the MODIS (MOD13Q1) NDVI, elevation data from Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), MODIS water mask (MOD44W), Nighttime Lights Time Series data from Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) and Indian Remote Sensing (IRS) Advanced Wide Field Sensor (AWiFS) data were used. Final map product is generated by adopting hybrid classification approach, which resulted in detailed and accurate land use and land cover map.

  4. Land use and land cover (LULC) of the Republic of the Maldives: first national map and LULC change analysis using remote-sensing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallati, Luca; Savini, Alessandra; Sterlacchini, Simone; Galli, Paolo

    2017-08-01

    The Maldives islands in recent decades have experienced dramatic land-use change. Uninhabited islands were turned into new resort islands; evergreen tropical forests were cut, to be replaced by fields and new built-up areas. All these changes happened without a proper monitoring and urban planning strategy from the Maldivian government due to the lack of national land-use and land-cover (LULC) data. This study aimed to realize the first land-use map of the entire Maldives archipelago and to detect land-use and land-cover change (LULCC) using high-resolution satellite images and socioeconomic data. Due to the peculiar geographic and environmental features of the archipelago, the land-use map was obtained by visual interpretation and manual digitization of land-use patches. The images used, dated 2011, were obtained from Digital Globe's WorldView 1 and WorldView 2 satellites. Nine land-use classes and 18 subclasses were identified and mapped. During a field survey, ground control points were collected to test the geographic and thematic accuracy of the land-use map. The final product's overall accuracy was 85%. Once the accuracy of the map had been checked, LULCC maps were created using images from the early 2000s derived from Google Earth historical imagery. Post-classification comparison of the classified maps showed that growth of built-up and agricultural areas resulted in decreases in forest land and shrubland. The LULCC maps also revealed an increase in land reclamation inside lagoons near inhabited islands, resulting in environmental impacts on fragile reef habitat. The LULC map of the Republic of the Maldives produced in this study can be used by government authorities to make sustainable land-use planning decisions and to provide better management of land use and land cover.

  5. Global land cover map validation, comparison and integration for different user communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsendbazar, N.E.

    2016-01-01

    Global land cover map validation, comparison and integration for different user communities Abstract Observation of global-scale land cover is of importance to international initiatives, governments, and scientific communities that endeavour to understand and monito

  6. Analysis of multi-temporal SPOT NDVI images for small-scale land-use mapping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bie, de C.A.J.M.; Khan, M.R.; Smakhtin, V.U.; Venus, V.; Weir, M.J.C.; Smaling, E.M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Land-use information is required for a number of purposes such as to address food security issues, to ensure the sustainable use of natural resources and to support decisions regarding food trade and crop insurance. Suitable land-use maps often either do not exist or are not readily available. This

  7. Study of USGS/NASA land use classification system. [compatibility of land use classification system with computer processing techniques employed for land use mapping from ERTS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spann, G. W.; Faust, N. L.

    1974-01-01

    It is known from several previous investigations that many categories of land-use can be mapped via computer processing of Earth Resources Technology Satellite data. The results are presented of one such experiment using the USGS/NASA land-use classification system. Douglas County, Georgia, was chosen as the test site for this project. It was chosen primarily because of its recent rapid growth and future growth potential. Results of the investigation indicate an overall land-use mapping accuracy of 67% with higher accuracies in rural areas and lower accuracies in urban areas. It is estimated, however, that 95% of the State of Georgia could be mapped by these techniques with an accuracy of 80% to 90%.

  8. Land Cover Mapping in Northern High Latitude Permafrost Regions with Satellite Data: Achievements and Remaining Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annett Bartsch

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Most applications of land cover maps that have been derived from satellite data over the Arctic require higher thematic detail than available in current global maps. A range of application studies has been reviewed, including up-scaling of carbon fluxes and pools, permafrost feature mapping and transition monitoring. Early land cover mapping studies were driven by the demand to characterize wildlife habitats. Later, in the 1990s, up-scaling of in situ measurements became central to the discipline of land cover mapping on local to regional scales at several sites across the Arctic. This includes the Kuparuk basin in Alaska, the Usa basin and the Lena Delta in Russia. All of these multi-purpose land cover maps have been derived from Landsat data. High resolution maps (from optical satellite data serve frequently as input for the characterization of periglacial features and also flux tower footprints in recent studies. The most used map to address circumpolar issues is the CAVM (Circum Arctic Vegetation Map based on AVHRR (1 km and has been manually derived. It provides the required thematic detail for many applications, but is confined to areas north of the treeline, and it is limited in spatial detail. A higher spatial resolution circumpolar land cover map with sufficient thematic content would be beneficial for a range of applications. Such a land cover classification should be compatible with existing global maps and applicable for multiple purposes. The thematic content of existing global maps has been assessed by comparison to the CAVM and regional maps. None of the maps provides the required thematic detail. Spatial resolution has been compared to used classes for local to regional applications. The required thematic detail increases with spatial resolution since coarser datasets are usually applied over larger areas covering more relevant landscape units. This is especially of concern when the entire Arctic is addressed. A spatial

  9. Soil mapping and processes modelling for sustainable land management: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Paulo; Brevik, Eric; Muñoz-Rojas, Miriam; Miller, Bradley; Smetanova, Anna; Depellegrin, Daniel; Misiune, Ieva; Novara, Agata; Cerda, Artemi

    2017-04-01

    Soil maps and models are fundamental for a correct and sustainable land management (Pereira et al., 2017). They are an important in the assessment of the territory and implementation of sustainable measures in urban areas, agriculture, forests, ecosystem services, among others. Soil maps represent an important basis for the evaluation and restoration of degraded areas, an important issue for our society, as consequence of climate change and the increasing pressure of humans on the ecosystems (Brevik et al. 2016; Depellegrin et al., 2016). The understanding of soil spatial variability and the phenomena that influence this dynamic is crucial to the implementation of sustainable practices that prevent degradation, and decrease the economic costs of soil restoration. In this context, soil maps and models are important to identify areas affected by degradation and optimize the resources available to restore them. Overall, soil data alone or integrated with data from other sciences, is an important part of sustainable land management. This information is extremely important land managers and decision maker's implements sustainable land management policies. The objective of this work is to present a review about the advantages of soil mapping and process modeling for sustainable land management. References Brevik, E., Calzolari, C., Miller, B., Pereira, P., Kabala, C., Baumgarten, A., Jordán, A. (2016) Historical perspectives and future needs in soil mapping, classification and pedological modelling, Geoderma, 264, Part B, 256-274. Depellegrin, D.A., Pereira, P., Misiune, I., Egarter-Vigl, L. (2016) Mapping Ecosystem Services in Lithuania. International Journal of Sustainable Development and World Ecology, 23, 441-455. Pereira, P., Brevik, E., Munoz-Rojas, M., Miller, B., Smetanova, A., Depellegrin, D., Misiune, I., Novara, A., Cerda, A. (2017) Soil mapping and process modelling for sustainable land management. In: Pereira, P., Brevik, E., Munoz-Rojas, M., Miller, B

  10. South African National Land-Cover Change Map

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fritz Schoeman

    Various spatial modelling procedures were used to ensure compilation of comparable and .... 4.3 Temporal Land-Cover Change Modelling Issues ... The reasoning followed in developing these rules is based on logical principles associated ...

  11. GENERATION OF 2D LAND COVER MAPS FOR URBAN AREAS USING DECISION TREE CLASSIFICATION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Höhle, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    A 2D land cover map can automatically and efficiently be generated from high-resolution multispectral aerial images. First, a digital surface model is produced and each cell of the elevation model is then supplemented with attributes. A decision tree classification is applied to extract map objec...

  12. Mapping land cover gradients through analysis of hyper-temporal NDVI imagery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali, A.; de Bie, C.A.J.M.; Skidmore, A.K.; Scarrott, R.G.; Hamad, A.A.; Venus, V.; Lymberakis, P.

    2013-01-01

    The green cover of the earth exhibits various spatial gradients that represent gradual changes in space of vegetation density and/or in species composition. To date, land cover mapping methods differentiate at best, mapping units with different cover densities and/or species compositions, but typica

  13. Generation of Land Cover Maps Using High-Resolution Multispectral Aerial Cameras

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Höhle, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    . The classification had an overall accuracy of 79%. Suggestions for the improvements in the applied methodology are made. The potential of land cover maps lies in updating of topographic databases, quality control of maps, studies of town development, and other geo-spatial domain applications. The automatic...

  14. Mapping land cover gradients through analysis of hyper-temporal NDVI imagery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali, A.; Bie, de C.A.J.M.; Skidmore, A.K.; Scarrott, R.G.; Hamad, A.A.; Venus, V.; Lymberakis, P.

    2013-01-01

    The green cover of the earth exhibits various spatial gradients that represent gradual changes in space of vegetation density and/or in species composition. To date, land cover mapping methods differentiate at best, mapping units with different cover densities and/or species compositions, but typica

  15. Historical land-use induced evapotranspiration changes estimated from present-day observations and reconstructed land-cover maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Boisier

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent model intercomparison studies, within the framework of the LUCID project, have revealed large discrepancies in the evapotranspiration (ET changes simulated between the preindustrial period and the present in response to the historical change in land use. Distinct land-surface parameterizations are behind those discrepancies, but understanding those differences and attributing them to specific causes rely on evaluations using still very limited measurements. Model benchmarking studies with observed global-scale ET are required in order to reduce the current uncertainties in the impacts of land use in terrestrial water flows. Here we present a new estimate of historical land-use induced changes in ET based on three different state-of-the-art observation-based ET products. These products are used to derive regression models of ET as a function of land-cover partitioning, leaf area index and environmental variables. We then reconstruct past ET changes based on the set of land-cover maps of 1870 and 1992 used in LUCID. Our results show an average decrease in global terrestrial ET of 1260 ± 850 km3 yr−1 between the preindustrial period and the present-day. This estimate is of the same order but larger in magnitude than the model-mean change in ET simulated within LUCID, and substantially weaker in magnitude than other estimates based on observations. Although decreases in ET dominate in deforested regions, large summertime increases in ET are diagnosed over areas of large cropland expansion. The multiple ET reconstructions carried out here show a large spread that we attribute principally to the different land-cover maps adopted and to the crops' ET rates that are derived from the various products assessed. We therefore conclude that the current uncertainties of past ET changes could be reduced efficiently with improved historical land-cover reconstructions and better estimates of cropland ET.

  16. Mapping Ecosystem Services for Land Use Planning, the Case of Central Kalimantan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumarga, Elham; Hein, Lars

    2014-07-01

    Indonesia is subject to rapid land use change. One of the main causes for the conversion of land is the rapid expansion of the oil palm sector. Land use change involves a progressive loss of forest cover, with major impacts on biodiversity and global CO2 emissions. Ecosystem services have been proposed as a concept that would facilitate the identification of sustainable land management options, however, the scale of land conversion and its spatial diversity pose particular challenges in Indonesia. The objective of this paper is to analyze how ecosystem services can be mapped at the provincial scale, focusing on Central Kalimantan, and to examine how ecosystem services maps can be used for a land use planning. Central Kalimantan is subject to rapid deforestation including the loss of peatland forests and the provincial still lacks a comprehensive land use plan. We examine how seven key ecosystem services can be mapped and modeled at the provincial scale, using a variety of models, and how large scale ecosystem services maps can support the identification of options for sustainable expansion of palm oil production.

  17. Mapping ecosystem services for land use planning, the case of Central Kalimantan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumarga, Elham; Hein, Lars

    2014-07-01

    Indonesia is subject to rapid land use change. One of the main causes for the conversion of land is the rapid expansion of the oil palm sector. Land use change involves a progressive loss of forest cover, with major impacts on biodiversity and global CO2 emissions. Ecosystem services have been proposed as a concept that would facilitate the identification of sustainable land management options, however, the scale of land conversion and its spatial diversity pose particular challenges in Indonesia. The objective of this paper is to analyze how ecosystem services can be mapped at the provincial scale, focusing on Central Kalimantan, and to examine how ecosystem services maps can be used for a land use planning. Central Kalimantan is subject to rapid deforestation including the loss of peatland forests and the provincial still lacks a comprehensive land use plan. We examine how seven key ecosystem services can be mapped and modeled at the provincial scale, using a variety of models, and how large scale ecosystem services maps can support the identification of options for sustainable expansion of palm oil production.

  18. Land-cover mapping using multitemporal, dual-frequency polarimetric SAR data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Henning; Schou, Jesper; Dierking, Wolfgang

    2000-01-01

    The Danish Center for Remote Sensing (DCRS) is, in collaboration with the Danish mapping agency, conducting a study on topographic mapping using SAR data, and land cover mapping results are presented. The Danish EMISAR system (an L- and C-band, fully polarimetric, airborne SAR) have in 1994 to 19...... and coniferous forest types, wetlands, lakes, and urban areas. The data are used to study the classification potential of polarimetric SAR data using the Wishart distributed covariance matrix....

  19. Fast mapping of novel word forms traced neurophysiologically

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yury eShtyrov

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Human capacity to quickly learn new words, critical for our ability to communicate using language, is well-known from behavioural studies and observations, but its neural underpinnings remain unclear. In this study, we have used event-related potentials to record brain activity to novel spoken word forms as they are being learnt by the human nervous system through passive auditory exposure. We found that the brain response dynamics change dramatically within the short (20 min exposure session: as the subjects become familiarised with the novel word forms, the early (~100 ms fronto-central activity they elicit increases in magnitude and becomes similar to that of known real words. At the same time, acoustically similar real words used as control stimuli show a relatively stable response throughout the recording session; these differences between the stimulus groups are confirmed using both factorial and linear regression analyses. Furthermore, acoustically matched novel non-speech stimuli do not demonstrate similar response increase, suggesting neural specificity of this rapid learning phenomenon to linguistic stimuli. Left-lateralised perisylvian cortical networks appear to be underlying such fast mapping of novel word forms unto the brain’s mental lexicon.

  20. Mapping forest plantations in Mainland China: combining remotely sensed land cover and census land use data in a land transition model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Q.; Hurtt, G. C.; Chini, L. P.; Fisk, J.; Liang, S.; Hansen, M.; Dolan, K. A.

    2013-12-01

    Forest plantations have played an important role in shaping the coverage and compositions of China's forests. Maps characterizing the spatial and temporal patterns of forest plantations in china are essential to both identifying and quantifying how forest plantations are driving changes to the countries ecosystem structure and terrestrial carbon cycle. At this time there are no detailed spatial maps of plantations in China accessible to public. Land transition model that employs Metropolis simulated annealing optimization has been demonstrated effective in land use mapping when land cover observations and land use census data are available. This study aims to map forest plantations in Mainland China by linking remote sensing observations of land cover and census statistics on land use in land transition model. Two models, a national model and a regional model were developed in the study. National model depicted a universal relationship between land cover and land use across the whole country. One of the land use data sources came from the 7th National Forest Inventory (NFI) that depicted forest plantation area in the period of 2004-2008 in each provincial jurisdictions of China (Data from Taiwan, Hongkong and Macau is not available). In accordance with land use data, MODIS yearly IGBP land cover product that contains sixteen-land cover types has been averaged upon the same time period and summarized for each province. The pairwise correlation coefficient between modeled value and reported value is 0.9996. In addition, the 95% confidence interval of true population correlation of these two variables is [0.9994, 0.9998]. Because the targeted forest plantations cover much less area compared to the other land use type of non-plantation, model precision on forest plantations was isolated to eliminate the dominance in area of non-plantation and the correlation coefficient is 0.8058. National model tends to underestimate plantation area. Due to distinct geographic and

  1. Engineering Geological Mapping and Land-Capability Analysis in Tangshan City

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Geological environment in Tangshan City is under investigation with reference to the Tangshan Urban Earth Science, geo-hazards maps. The expected loss for urban land utilization is calculated by employing relevant economic mathematic models. Quantitative analysis and comprehensive evaluation are then exercised for the capability of land utilization and a series of charts for the analysis of land-use capability are worked out to provide the basis for the formulation of controlling measures for urban planning and to ensure the utmost conformity between land-use and geological environment in urban planning.

  2. Mapping cultivable land from satellite imagery with clustering algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arango, R. B.; Campos, A. M.; Combarro, E. F.; Canas, E. R.; Díaz, I.

    2016-07-01

    Open data satellite imagery provides valuable data for the planning and decision-making processes related with environmental domains. Specifically, agriculture uses remote sensing in a wide range of services, ranging from monitoring the health of the crops to forecasting the spread of crop diseases. In particular, this paper focuses on a methodology for the automatic delimitation of cultivable land by means of machine learning algorithms and satellite data. The method uses a partition clustering algorithm called Partitioning Around Medoids and considers the quality of the clusters obtained for each satellite band in order to evaluate which one better identifies cultivable land. The proposed method was tested with vineyards using as input the spectral and thermal bands of the Landsat 8 satellite. The experimental results show the great potential of this method for cultivable land monitoring from remote-sensed multispectral imagery.

  3. Malheur National Wildlife Refuge [1973: Land Status Map: Index Sheet

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Malheur National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial photography,...

  4. Butte Sink Wildlife Management Area [Land Status Map: Index Sheet

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Butte Sink Wildlife Management Area. It was generated from rectified aerial photography,...

  5. Panther Swamp National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Panther Swamp National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial...

  6. Malheur National Wildlife Refuge [1974: Land Status Map: Sheet 3

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Malheur National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial photography,...

  7. Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial photography,...

  8. Shell Lake National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Shell Lake National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial photography,...

  9. Lake Ilo National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Lake Ilo National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial photography,...

  10. Grand Cote National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Grand Cote National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial photography,...

  11. Eastern Shore of Virginia National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Eastern Shore Of Virginia National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified...

  12. Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial...

  13. Kelleys Slough National Wildilfe Refuge [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Kellys Slough National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial...

  14. Logan Cave National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Logan Cave National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial photography,...

  15. Rocky Mountain Front Conservation Area [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Rocky Mountain Front. It was generated from rectified aerial photography, cadastral...

  16. Bone Hill National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Bone Hill National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial photography,...

  17. John H. Chafee National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at John H. Chafee National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial...

  18. Wheeler National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map: Sheet 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Wheeler National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial photography,...

  19. Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map: Sheet 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial photography,...

  20. John W. & Louise Seier National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at John W. and Louise Seier National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial...

  1. Cameron Prairie National Wildlife Refuge Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Cameron Prairie National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial...

  2. Buenos Aires National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Buenos Aires National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial photography,...

  3. Lambs Lake National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Lambs Lake National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial photography,...

  4. Erie National Wildlife Refuge (Sugar Lake Division) [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Erie National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial photography,...

  5. Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial photography,...

  6. Erie National Wildlife Refuge (Seneca Division) [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Erie National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial photography,...

  7. Plum Tree Island National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Plum Tree Island National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial...

  8. Halfbreed Lake National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Halfbreed Lake National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial...

  9. Fern Cave National Wildlife Refuge Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge in Washington. It was generated from rectified aerial...

  10. Oyster Bay National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Oyster Bay National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial photography,...

  11. Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial...

  12. Upper Ouachita National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map: Sheet 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Upper Ouachita National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial...

  13. Laguna Cartagena National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Laguna Cartagena National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial...

  14. McLean National Wildilfe Refuge [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Mclean National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial photography,...

  15. Chickasaw National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map: Sheet 1 of ?

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Chickasaw National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial photography,...

  16. Lower Hatchie National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Lower Hatchie National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial...

  17. Rappahannock River Valley National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Rappahannock River Valley National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified...

  18. Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial photography,...

  19. Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (Sudbury Division) [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial...

  20. Wertheim National Wildlife Refuge (Sayville Division) [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Wertheim National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial photography,...

  1. Stoney Slough National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Stoney Slough National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial...

  2. Dakota Lake National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Dakota Lake National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial photography,...

  3. Whittlesey Creek National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Whittlesey Creek National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial...

  4. War Horse National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at War Horse National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial photography,...

  5. Lido Beach National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Lido Beach Wildlife Management Area. It was generated from rectified aerial photography,...

  6. Crocodile Lake National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Crocodile Lake National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial...

  7. Storm Lake National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Storm Lake National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial photography,...

  8. Integrating geographical data and phenological characteristics derived from MODIS data for improving land cover mapping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Hongyan; ZHANG Shuwen; BU Kun; YANG Jiuchun; CHANG Liping

    2011-01-01

    The study developed a feasible method for large-area land cover mapping with combination of geographical data and phenological characteristics,taking Northeast China (NEC) as the study area.First,with the monthly average of precipitation and temperature datasets,the spatial clustering method was used to divide the NEC into four ecoclimate regions.For each ecoclimate region,geographical variables (annual mean precipitation and temperature,elevation,slope and aspect) were combined with phenological variables derived from the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) data (enhanced vegetation index (EVI) and land surface water index (LSWI)),which were taken as input variables of land cover classification.Decision Tree (DT) classifiers were then performed to produce land cover maps for each region.Finally,four resultant land cover maps were mosaicked for the entire NEC (NEC_MODIS),and the land use and land cover data of NEC (NEC_LULC) interpreted from Landsat-TM images was used to evaluate the NEC_MODIS and MODIS land cover product (MODIS_IGBP) in terms of areal and spatial agreement.The results showed that the phenological information derived from EVl and LSWl time series well discriminated land cover classes in NEC,and the overall accuracy was significantly improved by 5.29% with addition of geographical variables.Compared with NEC_LULC for seven aggregation classes,the area errors of NEC_MODIS were much smaller and more stable than that of MODIS_IGBP for most of classes,and the wall-to-wall spatial comparisons at pixel level indicated that NEC_MODIS agreed with NEC_LULC for 71.26% of the NEC,whereas only 62.16% for MODIS_IGBP.The good performance of NEC_MODIS demonstrates that the methodology developed in the study has great potential for timely and detailed land cover mapping in temperate and boreal regions.

  9. Geospatial Mapping of Soil Nitrate-Nitrogen Distribution Under a Mixed-Land Use System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S.LAMSAL; C.M.BLISS; D.A.GRAETZ

    2009-01-01

    Mapping the spatial distribution of soil nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N) is important to guide nitrogen application as well as to assess environmental risk of NO3-N leaching into the groundwater.We employed univariate and hybrid geostatistical methods to map the spatial distribution of soil NO3-N across a landscape in northeast Florida.Soil samples were collected from four depth increments (0-30,30-60,60-120 and 120-180 era) from 147 sampling locations identified using a stratified random and nested sampling design based on soil,land use and elevation strata.Soil NOa-N distributions in the top two layers were spatially autocorrelated and mapped using lognormal kriging.Environmental correlation models for NO3-N prediction were derived using linear and non-linear regression methods,and employed to develop NO3-N trend maps.Land use and its related variables derived from satellite imagery were identified as important variables to predict NO3-N using environmental correlation models.While lognormal kriging produced smoothly varying maps,trend maps derived from environmental correlation models generated spatially heterogeneous maps.Trend maps were combined with ordinary kriging predictions of trend model residuals to develop regression kriging prediction maps,which gave the best NO3-N predictions.As land use and remotely sensed data are readily available and have much finer spatial resolution compared to field sampled soils,our findings suggested the efficacy of environmental correlation models based on land use and remotely sensed data for landscape scale mapping of soil NO3-N.The methodologies implemented are transferable for mapping of soil NO3-N in other landscapes.

  10. Aerosol mapping over land with imaging spectroscopy using spectral autocorrelation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bojinski, S.; Schlapfer, D.; Schaepman, M.E.; Keller, J.; Itten, K.I.

    2004-01-01

    A new method for aerosol retrieval over land is proposed that makes explicit use of the contiguous, high-resolution spectral coverage of imaging spectrometers. The method is labelled Aerosol Retrieval by Interrelated Abundances (ARIA) and is based on unmixing of the short-wave infrared sensor signal

  11. Well location and land-use mapping in the Columbia Plateau area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephan, J; Foote, H; Coburn, V

    1979-10-01

    Irrigation wells in a 41,000-square mile area located in Washington and northern Oregon were the subject of this study. Approximately 30,000 square miles of the area were mapped within the boundary of the Columbia Plateau, which covers some 48,200 square miles in the states of Washington, Oregon, and Idaho. Advanced state-of-the-art computer analysis techniques for processing Landsat digital multispectral data were used for mapping the area into ten land-use classes. Specially designed computer programs were used for mapping the locations of 1476 irrigation wells located in 13 counties. Six thematic color-encoded maps were prepared which show additional land-use types and relative areal distribution. Three maps depict the location of irrigation wells.

  12. Object-Based Analysis of Aerial Photogrammetric Point Cloud and Spectral Data for Land Cover Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debella-Gilo, M.; Bjørkelo, K.; Breidenbach, J.; Rahlf, J.

    2013-04-01

    The acquisition of 3D point data with the use of both aerial laser scanning (ALS) and matching of aerial stereo images coupled with advances in image processing algorithms in the past years provide opportunities to map land cover types with better precision than before. The present study applies Object-Based Image Analysis (OBIA) to 3D point cloud data obtained from matching of stereo aerial images together with spectral data to map land cover types of the Nord-Trøndelag county of Norway. The multi-resolution segmentation algorithm of the Definiens eCognition™ software is used to segment the scenes into homogenous objects. The objects are then classified into different land cover types using rules created based on the definitions given for each land cover type by the Norwegian Forest and Landscape Institute. The quality of the land cover map was evaluated using data collected in the field as part of the Norwegian National Forest Inventory. The results show that the classification has an overall accuracy of about 80% and a kappa index of about 0.65. OBIA is found to be a suitable method for utilizing 3D remote sensing data for land cover mapping in an effort to replace manual delineation methods.

  13. Mapping Evapotranspiration over Agricultural Land in the California Central Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melton, F. S.; Huntington, J. L.; Guzman, A.; Johnson, L.; Morton, C.; Nemani, R. R.; Post, K. M.; Rosevelt, C.; Shupe, J. W.; Spellenberg, R.; Vitale, A.

    2015-12-01

    Recent advances in satellite mapping of evapotranspiration (ET) have made it possible to largely automate the process of mapping ET over large areas at the field-scale. This development coincides with recent drought events across the western U.S. which have intensified interest in mapping of ET and consumptive use to address a range of water management challenges, including resolving disputes over water rights, improving irrigation management, and developing sustainable management plans for groundwater resources. We present a case study for California that leverages two automated ET mapping capabilities to estimate ET at the field scale over agricultural areas in the California Central Valley. We utilized the NASA Earth Exchange and applied a python-based implementation of the METRIC surface energy balance model and the Satellite Irrigation Management Support (SIMS) system, which uses a surface reflectance-based approach, to map ET over agricultural areas in the Central Valley. We present estimates from 2014 from both approaches and results from a comparison of the estimates. Though theoretically and computationally quite different from each other, initial results from both approaches show good agreement overall on seasonal ET totals for 2014. We also present results from comparisons against ET measurements collected on commercial farms in the Central Valley and discuss implications for accuracy of the two different approaches. The objective of this analysis is to provide data that can inform planning for the development of sustainable groundwater management plans, and assist water managers and growers in evaluating irrigation demand during drought events.

  14. Deriving a per-field land use and land cover map in an agricultural mosaic catchment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Seo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Detailed data on land use and land cover constitutes important information for Earth system models, environmental monitoring and ecosystem services research. Global land cover products are evolving rapidly, however, there is still a lack of information particularly for heterogeneous agricultural landscapes. We censused land use and land cover field by field in an agricultural mosaic catchment Haean, South Korea. We recorded the land cover types with additional information on agricultural practice and make this data available at the public repository Pangaea (doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.823677. In this paper we introduce the data, its collection and the post-processing protocol. During the studied period, a large portion of dry fields was converted to perennial crops. A comparison between our dataset and MODIS Land Cover Type (MCD12Q1 suggested that the MODIS product was restricted in this area since it does not distinguish irrigated fields from general croplands. In addition, linear landscape elements such as water bodies were not detected in the MODIS product due to its coarse spatial resolution. The data presented here can be useful for earth science and ecosystem services research.

  15. A new approach of mapping soils in the Alps - Challenges of deriving soil information and creating soil maps for sustainable land use. An example from South Tyrol (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baruck, Jasmin; Gruber, Fabian E.; Geitner, Clemens

    2015-04-01

    Nowadays sustainable land use management is gaining importance because intensive land use leads to increasing soil degradation. Especially in mountainous regions like the Alps sustainable land use management is important, as topography limits land use. Therefore, a database containing detailed information of soil characteristics is required. However, information of soil properties is far from being comprehensive. The project "ReBo - Terrain classification based on airborne laser scanning data to support soil mapping in the Alps", founded by the Autonomous Province of Bolzano, aims at developing a methodical framework of how to obtain soil data. The approach combines geomorphometric analysis and soil mapping to generate modern soil maps at medium-scale in a time and cost efficient way. In this study the open source GRASS GIS extension module r.geomorphon (Jasciewicz and Stepinski, 2013) is used to derive topographically homogeneous landform units out of high resolution DTMs on scale 1:5.000. Furthermore, for terrain segmentation and classification we additionally use medium-scale data sets (geology, parent material, land use etc.). As the Alps are characterized by a great variety of topography, parent material, wide range of moisture regimes etc. getting reliable soil data is difficult. Additionally, geomorphic activity (debris flow, landslide etc.) leads to natural disturbances. Thus, soil properties are highly diverse and largely scale dependent. Furthermore, getting soil information of anthropogenically influenced soils is an added challenge. Due to intensive cultivation techniques the natural link between the soil forming factors is often repealed. In South Tyrol we find the largest pome producing area in Europe. Normally, the annual precipitation is not enough for intensive orcharding. Thus, irrigation strategies are in use. However, as knowledge about the small scaled heterogeneous soil properties is mostly lacking, overwatering and modifications of the

  16. Development and applications of a comprehensive land use classification and map for the US.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theobald, David M

    2014-01-01

    Land cover maps reasonably depict areas that are strongly converted by human activities, but typically are unable to resolve low-density but widespread development patterns. Data products specifically designed to resolve land uses complement land cover datasets and likely improve our ability to understand the extent and complexity of human modification. Methods for developing a comprehensive land use classification system are described, and a map of land use for the conterminous United States is presented to reveal what we are doing on the land. The comprehensive, detailed and high-resolution dataset was developed through spatial analysis of nearly two-dozen publicly-available, national spatial datasets--predominantly based on census housing, employment, and infrastructure, as well as land cover from satellite imagery. This effort resulted in 79 land use classes that fit within five main land use groups: built-up, production, recreation, conservation, and water. Key findings from this study are that built-up areas occupy 13.6% of mainland US, but that the majority of this occurs as low-density exurban/rural residential (9.1% of the US), while more intensive built-up land uses occupy 4.5%. For every acre of urban and suburban residential land, there are 0.13 commercial, 0.07 industrial, 0.48 institutional, and 0.29 acres of interstates/highways. This database can be used to address a variety of natural resource applications, and I provide three examples here: an entropy index of the diversity of land uses for smart-growth planning, a power-law scaling of metropolitan area population to developed footprint, and identifying potential conflict areas by delineating the urban interface.

  17. Development and applications of a comprehensive land use classification and map for the US.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Theobald

    Full Text Available Land cover maps reasonably depict areas that are strongly converted by human activities, but typically are unable to resolve low-density but widespread development patterns. Data products specifically designed to resolve land uses complement land cover datasets and likely improve our ability to understand the extent and complexity of human modification. Methods for developing a comprehensive land use classification system are described, and a map of land use for the conterminous United States is presented to reveal what we are doing on the land. The comprehensive, detailed and high-resolution dataset was developed through spatial analysis of nearly two-dozen publicly-available, national spatial datasets--predominantly based on census housing, employment, and infrastructure, as well as land cover from satellite imagery. This effort resulted in 79 land use classes that fit within five main land use groups: built-up, production, recreation, conservation, and water. Key findings from this study are that built-up areas occupy 13.6% of mainland US, but that the majority of this occurs as low-density exurban/rural residential (9.1% of the US, while more intensive built-up land uses occupy 4.5%. For every acre of urban and suburban residential land, there are 0.13 commercial, 0.07 industrial, 0.48 institutional, and 0.29 acres of interstates/highways. This database can be used to address a variety of natural resource applications, and I provide three examples here: an entropy index of the diversity of land uses for smart-growth planning, a power-law scaling of metropolitan area population to developed footprint, and identifying potential conflict areas by delineating the urban interface.

  18. Digital soil mapping in assessment of land suitability for organic farming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghambashidze, Giorgi; Kentchiashvili, Naira; Tarkhnishvili, Maia; Jolokhava, Tamar; Meskhi, Tea

    2017-04-01

    Digital soil mapping (DSM) is a fast-developing sub discipline of soil science which gets more importance along with increased availability of spatial data. DSM is based on three main components: the input in the form of field and laboratory observational methods, the process used in terms of spatial and non-spatial soil inference systems, and the output in the form of spatial soil information systems, which includes outputs in the form of rasters of prediction along with the uncertainty of prediction. Georgia is one of the countries who are under the way of spatial data infrastructure development, which includes soil related spatial data also. Therefore, it is important to demonstrate the capacity of DSM technics for planning and decision making process, in which assessment of land suitability is a major interest for those willing to grow agricultural crops. In that term land suitability assessment for establishing organic farms is in high demand as market for organically produced commodities is still increasing. It is the first attempt in Georgia to use DSM to predict areas with potential for organic farming development. Current approach is based on risk assessment of soil pollution with toxic elements (As, Hg, Pb, Cd, Cr) and prediction of bio-availability of those elements to plants on example of the region of Western Georgia, where detailed soil survey was conducted and spatial database of soil was created. The results of the study show the advantages of DSM at early stage assessment and depending on availability and quality of the input data, it can achieve acceptable accuracy.

  19. Satellite-based land use mapping: comparative analysis of Landsat-8, Advanced Land Imager, and big data Hyperion imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervez, Wasim; Uddin, Vali; Khan, Shoab Ahmad; Khan, Junaid Aziz

    2016-04-01

    Until recently, Landsat technology has suffered from low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and comparatively poor radiometric resolution, which resulted in limited application for inland water and land use/cover mapping. The new generation of Landsat, the Landsat Data Continuity Mission carrying the Operational Land Imager (OLI), has improved SNR and high radiometric resolution. This study evaluated the utility of orthoimagery from OLI in comparison with the Advanced Land Imager (ALI) and hyperspectral Hyperion (after preprocessing) with respect to spectral profiling of classes, land use/cover classification, classification accuracy assessment, classifier selection, study area selection, and other applications. For each data source, the support vector machine (SVM) model outperformed the spectral angle mapper (SAM) classifier in terms of class discrimination accuracy (i.e., water, built-up area, mixed forest, shrub, and bare soil). Using the SVM classifier, Hyperion hyperspectral orthoimagery achieved higher overall accuracy than OLI and ALI. However, OLI outperformed both hyperspectral Hyperion and multispectral ALI using the SAM classifier, and with the SVM classifier outperformed ALI in terms of overall accuracy and individual classes. The results show that the new generation of Landsat achieved higher accuracies in mapping compared with the previous Landsat multispectral satellite series.

  20. Towards Innovative Geospatial Tools for Fit-For Land Rights Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeva, M.; Bennett, R.; Gerke, M.; Crommelinck, S.; Stöcker, C.; Crompvoets, J.; Ho, S.; Schwering, A.; Chipofya, M.; Schultz, C.; Zein, T.; Biraro, M.; Alemie, B.; Wayumba, R.; Kundert, K.

    2017-09-01

    In large parts of sub Saharan Africa it remains an ongoing challenging to map millions of unrecognized land rights. Existing approaches for recognizing these rights have proven inappropriate in many cases. A new generation of tools needs to be developed to support faster, cheaper, easier, and more responsible land rights mapping. This is the main goal of its4land, an European Commission Horizon 2020 project that aims to develop innovative tools inspired by the continuum of land rights, fit-for-purpose land administration, and cadastral intelligence. its4land is using strategic collaboration between the EU and East Africa to deliver innovative, scalable, and transferrable ICT solutions. The innovation process incorporates a broad range of stakeholders and emergent geospatial technologies, including smart sketchmaps, UAVs, automated feature extraction, as well as geocloud services. The aim is to combine innovative technologies, capture the specific needs, market opportunities and readiness of end-users in the domain of land tenure information recording in Eastern Africa. The project consists of a four year work plan, € 3.9M funding, and eight consortium partners collaborating with stakeholders from six case study locations in Ethiopia, Kenya, and Rwanda. The major tasks include tool development, prototyping, and demonstration for local, national, regional, and international interest groups. The case locations cover different land uses such as: urban, peri-urban, rural smallholder, and (former) pastoralist. This paper describes the project's activities within the first 18 months and covers barriers discovered, lessons learned and results achieved.

  1. Land Cover of Northern Eurasia: Comparison and Assessment of Coarse Resolution Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krankina, O. N.; Pflugmacher, D.; Cohen, W.; Kennedy, R.; Nelson, P.; Loboda, T.

    2007-12-01

    Consistent measurements of land cover are critical for addressing a range of important science questions, from quantifying the effects of vegetation on the carbon, energy, and water cycles, to understanding the social and economic causes and consequences of land-use and land-cover change. While multiple moderate and coarse- resolution land-cover products have been developed, they disagree significantly. Resolving discrepancies among maps is particularly challenging for boreal and temperate Northern Eurasia, where validation sites are sparse and processes of ecosystem disturbance and land-cover change are widespread. To identify specific needs and possibilities for improved mapping of land cover across boreal and temperate Northern Eurasia, we compared the performance of three recent land-cover products based on different sensors: MODIS (Global Land Cover Collection 4), AVHRR (DISCover v. 2.0), and SPOT VEGETATION (GLC2000 for Northern Eurasia v. 4.0). First, we examined the level of agreement among these data sets across the entire region. On a qualitative level, the assessment of general patterns indicates the highest degree of disagreement in transitional zones at the northern and southern fringes of boreal forest, in mountainous regions, and in areas of extensive wetlands, agricultural development, and urban land use. The quantitative analysis measured the level of disagreement between land-cover classes aggregated according to dominant type of vegetation (trees, shrubs, herbaceous, bare land, permanent snow/ice). Secondly, validation of these products was performed at two test sites where Landsat-based classifications were developed based on FAO Land Cover Classification System. Fractional land cover was calculated for each 1x1 km pixel and used to construct fractional error matrices. Most errors were associated with "mixed" coarse-resolution pixels (i.e. those having nearly equal percentage of multiple class types), while errors in "pure" (single class) pixels

  2. MAPPING SPATIAL ACCURACY AND ESTIMATING LANDSCAPE INDICATORS FROM THEMATIC LAND COVER MAPS USING FUZZY SET THEORY

    Science.gov (United States)

    The accuracy of thematic map products is not spatially homogenous, but instead variable across most landscapes. Properly analyzing and representing the spatial distribution (pattern) of thematic map accuracy would provide valuable user information for assessing appropriate applic...

  3. Sensor Integration in a Low Cost Land Mobile Mapping System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Madeira

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Mobile mapping is a multidisciplinary technique which requires several dedicated equipment, calibration procedures that must be as rigorous as possible, time synchronization of all acquired data and software for data processing and extraction of additional information. To decrease the cost and complexity of Mobile Mapping Systems (MMS, the use of less expensive sensors and the simplification of procedures for calibration and data acquisition are mandatory features. This article refers to the use of MMS technology, focusing on the main aspects that need to be addressed to guarantee proper data acquisition and describing the way those aspects were handled in a terrestrial MMS developed at the University of Porto. In this case the main aim was to implement a low cost system while maintaining good quality standards of the acquired georeferenced information. The results discussed here show that this goal has been achieved.

  4. Web Mapping for Promoting Interaction and Collaboration in Community Land Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veenendaal, B.; Dhliwayo, M.

    2013-10-01

    There is an inherent advantage of geographic information Systems (GIS) and mapping in facilitating dialogue between experts and non-experts during land use plan development. Combining visual mapping information and effective user interaction can result in considerable benefits for developing countries like Botswana. Although the adoption of information and communication technologies has lagged behind that for developed countries, initiatives by the Botswana government in providing suitable information infrastructures, including internet and web based communications, are enabling multiple users to interact and collaborate in community land planning. A web mapping application was developed for the Maun Development Plan (MDP) in the Okavango Delta region in Botswana. It was designed according to requirements of land planners and managers and implemented using ArcGIS Viewer for Flex. Land planners and managers from two organisations in Maun involved in the development of the MDP were asked to evaluate the web mapping tools. This paper describes the results of implementation and some preliminary results of the web mapping evaluation.

  5. Operational High Resolution Land Cover Map Production at the Country Scale Using Satellite Image Time Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Inglada

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A detailed and accurate knowledge of land cover is crucial for many scientific and operational applications, and as such, it has been identified as an Essential Climate Variable. This accurate knowledge needs frequent updates. This paper presents a methodology for the fully automatic production of land cover maps at country scale using high resolution optical image time series which is based on supervised classification and uses existing databases as reference data for training and validation. The originality of the approach resides in the use of all available image data, a simple pre-processing step leading to a homogeneous set of acquisition dates over the whole area and the use of a supervised classifier which is robust to errors in the reference data. The produced maps have a kappa coefficient of 0.86 with 17 land cover classes. The processing is efficient, allowing a fast delivery of the maps after the acquisition of the image data, does not need expensive field surveys for model calibration and validation, nor human operators for decision making, and uses open and freely available imagery. The land cover maps are provided with a confidence map which gives information at the pixel level about the expected quality of the result.

  6. Land-based mobile mapping system with its applications for the Olympic Games

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI DeRen; HU QingWu; GUO Sheng; CHEN ZhiYong

    2009-01-01

    There is a trend for rapid spatial data capture supported by integration of multiple platforms and multiple sensors.This paper presents the principles and technologies of land-based mobile mapping systems based on an integration of remote sensing,GPS and GIS technologies.The innovations and advantages of the integrated system are described.The analytic model and error model of a mobile mapping system are proposed and the application interface of digital measurable images is also discussed.A Truemap Engine(R) with Plug-in and API is designed to manage a huge volume of stereo image series from a land-based mobile mapping system so that other geographic information systems (GIS) engines can freely use the sequence of stereo images.The applications of digital measurable images (DMI) as well as mobile mapping systems in the Olympic Games in Beijing,2008 are presented.

  7. Research on Integrated Mapping——A Case Study of Integrated Land Use with Swamp Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S.; Yan, F.; Chang, L.

    2015-12-01

    Unified real estate registration system shows the attention, determination and effort to of CPC Central Committee and State Council on real estate registration in China. However, under current situation, China's real estate registration work made less progress. One of the reasons is that it's hard to express the property right of real estate on one map under the multi-sector management system. Under current multi-sector management system in China, different departments usually just survey and mapping the land type under its jurisdiction. For example, wetland investigation only mapping all kinds of wetland resources but not mapping other resource types. As a result, it cause he problem of coincidence or leak in integration of different results from different departments. As resources of the earth's surface, the total area of forest, grassland, wetland and so on should be equal to the total area of the earth's surface area. However, under the current system, the area of all kinds of resources is not equal to the sum of the earth's surface. Therefore, it is of great importance to express all the resources on one map. On one hand, this is conducive to find out the real area and distribution of resources and avoid the problem of coincidence or leak in integration; On the other hand, it is helpful to study the dynamic change of different resources. Therefore, we first proposed the "integrated mapping" as a solution, and take integrated land use with swamp mapping in Northeast China as an example to investigate the feasibility and difficulty. Study showed that: integrated land use with swamp mapping can be achieved through combining land use survey standards with swamps survey standards and "second mapping" program. Based on the experience of integrated land use with swamp mapping, we point out its reference function on integrated mapping and unified real estate registration system. We concluded that: (1) Comprehending and integrating different survey standard of

  8. Land cover mapping in Latvia using hyperspectral airborne and simulated Sentinel-2 data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakovels, Dainis; Filipovs, Jevgenijs; Brauns, Agris; Taskovs, Juris; Erins, Gatis

    2016-08-01

    Land cover mapping in Latvia is performed as part of the Corine Land Cover (CLC) initiative every six years. The advantage of CLC is the creation of a standardized nomenclature and mapping protocol comparable across all European countries, thereby making it a valuable information source at the European level. However, low spatial resolution and accuracy, infrequent updates and expensive manual production has limited its use at the national level. As of now, there is no remote sensing based high resolution land cover and land use services designed specifically for Latvia which would account for the country's natural and land use specifics and end-user interests. The European Space Agency launched the Sentinel-2 satellite in 2015 aiming to provide continuity of free high resolution multispectral satellite data thereby presenting an opportunity to develop and adapted land cover and land use algorithm which accounts for national enduser needs. In this study, land cover mapping scheme according to national end-user needs was developed and tested in two pilot territories (Cesis and Burtnieki). Hyperspectral airborne data covering spectral range 400-2500 nm was acquired in summer 2015 using Airborne Surveillance and Environmental Monitoring System (ARSENAL). The gathered data was tested for land cover classification of seven general classes (urban/artificial, bare, forest, shrubland, agricultural/grassland, wetlands, water) and sub-classes specific for Latvia as well as simulation of Sentinel-2 satellite data. Hyperspectral data sets consist of 122 spectral bands in visible to near infrared spectral range (356-950 nm) and 100 bands in short wave infrared (950-2500 nm). Classification of land cover was tested separately for each sensor data and fused cross-sensor data. The best overall classification accuracy 84.2% and satisfactory classification accuracy (more than 80%) for 9 of 13 classes was obtained using Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier with 109 band

  9. Prediction maps of land subsidence caused by groundwater exploitation in Hanoi, Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thinh Hong Phi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents study results of the land subsidence caused by groundwater exploitation in Hanoi, Vietnam. The study includes collection and analysis of data on geology, hydrology, soil properties and settlements observed at 10 monitoring stations as well as models of the time-dependent settlement. The calculated settlements are relatively close to actual monitoring data. The models were done for prediction of the land subsidence at 92 selected points by the finite element method. Prediction maps are made for prediction of the land subsidence in 2020 and 2030. Recommendations are proposed for potential zones of groundwater exploitation in Hanoi.

  10. GENERATION OF 2D LAND COVER MAPS FOR URBAN AREAS USING DECISION TREE CLASSIFICATION

    OpenAIRE

    J. Höhle

    2014-01-01

    A 2D land cover map can automatically and efficiently be generated from high-resolution multispectral aerial images. First, a digital surface model is produced and each cell of the elevation model is then supplemented with attributes. A decision tree classification is applied to extract map objects like buildings, roads, grassland, trees, hedges, and walls from such an "intelligent" point cloud. The decision tree is derived from training areas which borders are digitized on top of a ...

  11. USFWS Land Interests Associated with Bull Mountain Game Range [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Bull Mountain Game Range. It was generated from rectified aerial photography, cadastral...

  12. Urbanization susceptibility maps: a dynamic spatial decision support system for sustainable land use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cerreta

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in land consumption assessment identify the need to implement integrated evaluative approaches, with particular attention to the identification of multidimensional tools for guiding and managing sustainable land use. Policy decisions defining land use are mostly implemented through spatial planning and related zoning, and this involves trade-offs between many sectoral interests and conflicting challenges aimed at win-win solutions. In order to identify a decision-making process for land use allocation, the paper proposes a methodological approach for a Dynamic Spatial Decision Support System (DSDSS, named Integrated Spatial Assessment (ISA, supported by Geographical Information Systems (GIS combined with Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP. Through the empirical investigation in an operative case study, an integrated evaluative approach implemented in a DSDSS helps to elaborate "urbanization susceptibility maps", where spatial analysis combined with a multi-criteria method proved to be useful for facing the main issues related to land consumption and minimizing environmental impacts of spatial planning.

  13. Uncertainty in Historical Land-Use Reconstructions with Topographic Maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaim Dominik

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the outcomes of the uncertainty investigation of a long-term forest cover change analysis in the Polish Carpathians (nearly 20,000 km2 and Swiss Alps (nearly 10,000 km2 based on topographic maps. Following Leyk et al. (2005 all possible uncertainties are grouped into three domains - production-oriented, transformation- oriented and application-oriented. We show typical examples for each uncertainty domain, encountered during the forest cover change analysis and discuss consequences for change detection. Finally, a proposal for reliability assessment is presented.

  14. Web mapping application of Roman Catholic Church administration in the Czech lands in the early modern period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Seemann

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Reconstruction of historical spatial relationships is still a topical issue in historical geography. In this respect, the Church history has not been well explored. The parish administration in the Czech lands is evolving since the advent of Christianity in 863, and a number of reforms have passed over the centuries. Significant changes in the administration also underwent during recatholisation of the Czech lands in the 17th and 18thcentury. From this Baroque era, there are written sources which have been preserved, so they can be utilized to reconstruct historical Church administration in the form of web mapping application. The paper briefly introduces methods which were used to build a spatial database filled with historical data. However, the main outcome of this paper is to describe the creation of the web mapping application that provides visualisation of this data. Discussed are topics like cartographic project, choice of map symbols, data generalization for different levels of detail and placement of annotations. Display of cartographic data were performed using the ArcGIS platform, through a combination of map tiles and feature services that are bundled into the application template created in Web AppBuilder.

  15. Spaceborne Radar for Mapping Forest and Land Use Changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joshi, Neha Pankaj

    of forest monitoring enable the development of policies and measures to alter current trends in global forest and biodiversity loss. This thesis investigates the use of long wavelength (~23 cm, L-band) spaceborne radar, which has all-weather and canopy-penetration capabilities, acquired by the Advanced Land...... Observing Satellite (ALOS) for forest monitoring. Using a combination of local expert knowledge, plot inventories, and data from lidar and optical sensors, it aims to understand (1) whether forest disturbance dynamics may be detected with radar, and (2) what physical and macroecological properties influence...... the radar backscatter and forest AGV/AGB relation. The papers in the thesis show that radar is able to pick up forest disturbances to larger extent than traditional optical-based detection approaches, the radar to AGV/AGB relation is strongly driven by spatial scale of assessments and age- and management...

  16. Locally optimized separability enhancement indices for urban land cover mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feyisa, Gudina L.; Meilby, Henrik; Darrel Jenerette, G.

    2016-01-01

    Landsat data were used to assess urbanization-induced dynamics in Land use/cover (LULC), surface thermal intensity, and its relationships with urban biophysical composition. The study was undertaken in Addis Ababa city, Ethiopia. Ground-based data and high resolution images were used as reference...... data in LULC classification. To more accurately quantify landscape patterns and their changes, we applied new locally optimized separability enhancement indices and decision rules (SEI–DR approach) to address commonly observed classification accuracy problems in urban environments. We tested the SEI...... classification method, use of hotspot analysis, and the investigations of the UHI for an African city fill important research gaps for studies of urban thermal variation....

  17. GlobeLand30 as an alternative fine-scale global land cover map: Challenges, possibilities, and implications for developing countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jokar Arsanjani, Jamal; Tayyebi, A.; Vaz, E.

    2016-01-01

    these regions, their coarse spatial resolution e.g., 500 m as well as their accuracy are very challenging. Recently, GlobeLand30 a global land cover with a relatively fine resolution at 30 m extracted from Landsat images has been released, which seems to be a potential dataset for mapping areas with limited......Global land cover maps are a vital source for mapping our globe into a set of thematic types. They have been extensively used as a basis layer for a large number of applications including ecosystem services, environmental planning, climate change, hydrological processes and policy making. While...

  18. Automatized system for realizing solar irradiation maps of lands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biasini, A.; Fanucci, O.; Visentin, R.

    In this work are explained in detail the methodological, operating and graphic proceedings for the realization of ''solar irradiation maps'' of the Italian territory. Starting from a topographic presentation of level curves, the graphic results are elaborated by means of acquisition, classification, digitalization and automatic superimposition processes of data concerning the orography of the place (classes of slope and exposition of slopes) and the following association to the areas located in this way of the corresponding classes of the relative solar irradiation. The method has been applied and tested successfully in an area of about 400 km/sup 2/ corresponding to the quadrant NE of the leaf I.G.M.I. nr. 221 scale 1:100,000 because it seems to represent almost all possible combinations between slopes and exposition. In this work is reported an example of the final result and the intermediate stage.

  19. Using MERIS fused images for land-cover mapping vegetation status assessment in heterogeneous landscapes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zurita Milla, R.; Clevers, J.G.P.W.; Gijsel, J.A.E.; Schaepman, M.E.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we evaluate the potential of ENVISAT–Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) fused images for land-cover mapping and vegetation status assessment in heterogeneous landscapes. A series of MERIS fused images (15 spectral bands; 25 m pixel size) is created using the linear mixing m

  20. Possibilities of MERIS for sub-pixel regional land cover mapping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zurita Milla, R.; Schaepman, M.E.; Clevers, J.G.P.W.

    2005-01-01

    The Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer, MERIS, on board of ENVISAT-1 fulfils the information gap between the current high and low spatial resolution sensors. In this respect, the use of MERIS full resolution data (300 m pixel size) has a great potential for regional and global land cover mapping

  1. Cadastre (forest maps) and spatial land uses planning, strategic tool for sustainable development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drosos, Vasileios C.

    2014-08-01

    The rise in the living standards of the Greeks created, especially since 1970, along with other needs and the need for second or holiday home since 1990 after finding the first house on the outskirts of large urban centers. Trying to find land for the creation of new resorts or new type of permanent residences (maisonettes with or without garden, depending on the financial position of each) had the painful consequence of wasteful and uncontrolled use of land, without a program, without the fundamental rules of land planning and the final creation was usually unsightly buildings. The costs were to pay as usually the forest rural lands. The national spatial planning of land use requires that we know the existing land uses in this country, and based on that we can design and decide their land uses on the future in a rational way. On final practical level, this planning leads to mark the boundaries of specific areas of land that are permitted and may change uses. For this reason, one of the most valuable "tools" of that final marking the boundaries is also the forest maps. The paper aims the investigation to determine the modern views on the issues of Cadastre and Land Management with an ulterior view to placing the bases for creating a building plan of an immediate completion of forest maps. Sustainable development as a term denoting a policy of continued economic and social development that does not involve the destruction of the environment and natural resources, but rather guarantees their rational viability.

  2. Mapping Biophysical Parameters for Land Surface Modeling over the Continental US Using MODIS and Landsat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lahouari Bounoua

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In terms of the space cities occupy, urbanization appears as a minor land transformation. However, it permanently modifies land’s ecological functions, altering its carbon, energy, and water fluxes. It is therefore necessary to develop a land cover characterization at fine spatial and temporal scales to capture urbanization’s effects on surface fluxes. We develop a series of biophysical vegetation parameters such as the fraction of photosynthetically active radiation, leaf area index, vegetation greenness fraction, and roughness length over the continental US using MODIS and Landsat products for 2001. A 13-class land cover map was developed at a climate modeling grid (CMG merging the 500 m MODIS land cover and the 30 m impervious surface area from the National Land Cover Database. The landscape subgrid heterogeneity was preserved using fractions of each class from the 500 m and 30 m into the CMG. Biophysical parameters were computed using the 8-day composite Normalized Difference Vegetation Index produced by the North American Carbon Program. In addition to urban impact assessments, this dataset is useful for the computation of surface fluxes in land, vegetation, and urban models and is expected to be widely used in different land cover and land use change applications.

  3. Assessment of Classification Accuracies of SENTINEL-2 and LANDSAT-8 Data for Land Cover / Use Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale Topaloğlu, Raziye; Sertel, Elif; Musaoğlu, Nebiye

    2016-06-01

    This study aims to compare classification accuracies of land cover/use maps created from Sentinel-2 and Landsat-8 data. Istanbul metropolitan city of Turkey, with a population of around 14 million, having different landscape characteristics was selected as study area. Water, forest, agricultural areas, grasslands, transport network, urban, airport- industrial units and barren land- mine land cover/use classes adapted from CORINE nomenclature were used as main land cover/use classes to identify. To fulfil the aims of this research, recently acquired dated 08/02/2016 Sentinel-2 and dated 22/02/2016 Landsat-8 images of Istanbul were obtained and image pre-processing steps like atmospheric and geometric correction were employed. Both Sentinel-2 and Landsat-8 images were resampled to 30m pixel size after geometric correction and similar spectral bands for both satellites were selected to create a similar base for these multi-sensor data. Maximum Likelihood (MLC) and Support Vector Machine (SVM) supervised classification methods were applied to both data sets to accurately identify eight different land cover/ use classes. Error matrix was created using same reference points for Sentinel-2 and Landsat-8 classifications. After the classification accuracy, results were compared to find out the best approach to create current land cover/use map of the region. The results of MLC and SVM classification methods were compared for both images.

  4. Energy crop mapping with enhanced TM/MODIS time series in the BCAP agricultural lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cuizhen; Fan, Qian; Li, Qingting; SooHoo, William M.; Lu, Linlin

    2017-02-01

    Since the mid-2000s, agricultural lands in the United States have been undergoing rapid change to meet the increasing bioenergy demand. In 2009 the USDA Biomass Crop Assistance Program (BCAP) was established. In its Project Area 1, land owners are financially supported to grow perennial prairie grasses (switchgrass) in their row-crop lands. To promote the program, this study tested the feasibility of biomass crop mapping based on unique timings of crop development. With a previously published data fusion algorithm - the Enhanced Spatial and Temporal Adaptive Reflectance Fusion Model (ESTARFM), a 10-day normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) time series in 2007 was established by fusing MODIS reflectance into TM image series. Two critical dates - peak growing (PG) and peak drying (PD) - were extracted and a unique "PG-0-PD" timing sequence was defined for each crop. With a knowledge-based decision tree approach, the classification of enhanced TM/MODIS time series reached an overall accuracy of 76% against the USDA Crop Data layer (CDL). Especially, our results showed that winter wheat single cropping and wheat-soybean double cropping were much better classified, which may provide additional information for the CDL product. More importantly, this study extracted the first spatial layer of warm-season prairie grasses that have not been published in any national land cover products, which could serve as a base map for decision making of bioenergy land use in BCAP land.

  5. Crop Frequency Mapping for Land Use Intensity Estimation During Three Decades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Michael; Tindall, Dan

    2016-08-01

    Crop extent and frequency maps are an important input to inform the debate around land value and competitive land uses, food security and sustainability of agricultural practices. Such spatial datasets are likely to support decisions on natural resource management, planning and policy. The complete Landsat Time Series (LTS) archive for 23 Landsat footprints in western Queensland from 1987 to 2015 was used in a multi-temporal mapping approach. Spatial, spectral and temporal information were combined in multiple crop-modelling steps, supported by on ground training data sampled across space and time for the classes Crop and No-Crop. Temporal information within summer and winter growing seasons for each year were summarised, and combined with various vegetation indices and band ratios computed from a mid-season spectral-composite image. All available temporal information was spatially aggregated to the scale of image segments in the mid- season composite for each growing season and used to train a random forest classifier for a Crop and No- Crop classification. Validation revealed that the predictive accuracy varied by growing season and region to be within k = 0.88 to 0.97 and are thus suitable for mapping current and historic cropping activity. Crop frequency maps were produced for all regions at different time intervals. The crop frequency maps were validated separately with a historic crop information time series. Different land use intensities and conversions e.g. from agricultural to pastures are apparent and potential drivers of these conversions are discussed.

  6. Impervious Surface Area Mapping using Landsat Imagery: Applications to Hydrology and Land Use Change Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A.; Goetz, S. J.; Mazzacato, M. E.; Jantz, C.; Wright, R.

    2002-12-01

    Impervious surfaces include rooftops, roads, parking lots and other areas that are impermeable to moisture. As the amount of built environment around urban areas has increased, it has been widely recognized that more impervious surface area (ISA) results in greater volume and intensity of stream flow, which can degrade stream health and require expensive modifications to flood control structures. Other effects include increased urban "heat island" influences and changes in local weather. If impervious areas could be accurately mapped using satellite imagery, it would provide valuable input to many applications, from hydrologic modeling to land use planning. We have developed a method to map subpixel ISA with Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) imagery and classification - regression tree algorithms. This approach provides highly accurate (90+ percent) maps of ISA, but also permits estimation of the proportion of each cell occupied by impervious materials (between 0-100 percent). We report on a recently completed a map of ISA for the entire 163,000 km2 Chesapeake Bay watershed, a region of highly altered land cover and rapid land use change. We also report on the mapping of change patterns, indicated by ISA changes between 1986 - 2001, in an 18,000 km2 area centered on Baltimore - Washington, D.C. We review the methods, issues, technical challenges, results, accuracy, and advantages of this approach, and provide an overview of various applications for which the products are currently being used.

  7. Land cover change mapping using MODIS time series to improve emissions inventories

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Saldaña, Gerardo; Quaife, Tristan; Clifford, Debbie

    2016-04-01

    MELODIES is an FP7 funded project to develop innovative and sustainable services, based upon Open Data, for users in research, government, industry and the general public in a broad range of societal and environmental benefit areas. Understanding and quantifying land surface changes is necessary for estimating greenhouse gas and ammonia emissions, and for meeting air quality limits and targets. More sophisticated inventories methodologies for at least key emission source are needed due to policy-driven air quality directives. Quantifying land cover changes on an annual basis requires greater spatial and temporal disaggregation of input data. The main aim of this study is to develop a methodology for using Earth Observations (EO) to identify annual land surface changes that will improve emissions inventories from agriculture and land use/land use change and forestry (LULUCF) in the UK. First goal is to find the best sets of input features that describe accurately the surface dynamics. In order to identify annual and inter-annual land surface changes, a times series of surface reflectance was used to capture seasonal variability. Daily surface reflectance images from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) at 500m resolution were used to invert a Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) model to create the seamless time series. Given the limited number of cloud-free observations, a BRDF climatology was used to constrain the model inversion and where no high-scientific quality observations were available at all, as a gap filler. The Land Cover Map 2007 (LC2007) produced by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH) was used for training and testing purposes. A land cover product was created for 2003 to 2015 and a bayesian approach was created to identified land cover changes. We will present the results of the time series development and the first exercises when creating the land cover and land cover changes products.

  8. Igneous Hydrothermal Alteration and Ore-Forming Processes in the Land's End Granite, Nanjizal

    OpenAIRE

    Eik, Marte

    2015-01-01

    This study addresses the hydrothermal alteration and mineralization related to a system of tourmaline-quartz veins intersecting biotite-granite in Nanjizal, in the Land s End granites of the cornubian batholith. Nanjizal is an important site as it is one of the few locations in the southern segment of the Land s End Granite where magmatic-hydrothermal tin mineralizations have been mined. The aim is to identify the alteration-patterns and their correlation with hydrothermal ore-forming events ...

  9. Use of various remote sensing land cover products for PFT mapping over Siberia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Ottlé

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available High-latitude ecosystems play an important role in the global carbon cycle and in regulating the climate system and are presently undergoing rapid environmental change. Accurate land cover datasets are required to both document these changes as well as to provide land-surface information for benchmarking and initializing earth system models. Earth system models also require specific land cover classification systems based on plant functional types, rather than species or ecosystems, and so post-processing of existing land cover data is often required. This study compares over Siberia, multiple land cover datasets against one another and with auxiliary data to identify key uncertainties that contribute to variability in Plant Functional Type (PFT classifications that would introduce errors in earth system modeling. Land cover classification systems from GLC 2000, GlobCover 2005 and 2009, and MODIS collections 5 and 5.1 are first aggregated to a common legend, and then compared to high-resolution land cover classification systems, continuous vegetation fields (MODIS-VCF and satellite-derived tree heights (to discriminate against sparse, shrub, and forest vegetation. The GlobCover dataset, with a lower threshold for tree cover and taller tree heights and a better spatial resolution, tends to have better distributions of tree cover compared to high-resolution data. It has therefore been chosen to build new PFTs maps for the ORCHIDEE land surface model at 1 km scale. Compared to the original PFT dataset, the new PFT maps based on GlobCover 2005 and an updated cross-walking approach mainly differ in the characterization of forests and degree of tree cover. The partition of grasslands and bare soils now appears more realistic compared with ground-truth data. This new vegetation map provides a framework for further development of new PFTs in the ORCHIDEE model like shrubs, lichens and mosses, to better represent the water and carbon cycles in northern

  10. Use of various remote sensing land cover products for PFT mapping over Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottlé, C.; Lescure, J.; Maignan, F.; Poulter, B.; Wang, T.; Delbart, N.

    2013-06-01

    High-latitude ecosystems play an important role in the global carbon cycle and in regulating the climate system and are presently undergoing rapid environmental change. Accurate land cover datasets are required to both document these changes as well as to provide land-surface information for benchmarking and initializing earth system models. Earth system models also require specific land cover classification systems based on plant functional types, rather than species or ecosystems, and so post-processing of existing land cover data is often required. This study compares over Siberia, multiple land cover datasets against one another and with auxiliary data to identify key uncertainties that contribute to variability in Plant Functional Type (PFT) classifications that would introduce errors in earth system modeling. Land cover classification systems from GLC 2000, GlobCover 2005 and 2009, and MODIS collections 5 and 5.1 are first aggregated to a common legend, and then compared to high-resolution land cover classification systems, continuous vegetation fields (MODIS-VCF) and satellite-derived tree heights (to discriminate against sparse, shrub, and forest vegetation). The GlobCover dataset, with a lower threshold for tree cover and taller tree heights and a better spatial resolution, tends to have better distributions of tree cover compared to high-resolution data. It has therefore been chosen to build new PFTs maps for the ORCHIDEE land surface model at 1 km scale. Compared to the original PFT dataset, the new PFT maps based on GlobCover 2005 and an updated cross-walking approach mainly differ in the characterization of forests and degree of tree cover. The partition of grasslands and bare soils now appears more realistic compared with ground-truth data. This new vegetation map provides a framework for further development of new PFTs in the ORCHIDEE model like shrubs, lichens and mosses, to better represent the water and carbon cycles in northern latitudes. Updated

  11. Use of various remote sensing land cover products for plant functional type mapping over Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottlé, C.; Lescure, J.; Maignan, F.; Poulter, B.; Wang, T.; Delbart, N.

    2013-11-01

    High-latitude ecosystems play an important role in the global carbon cycle and in regulating the climate system and are presently undergoing rapid environmental change. Accurate land cover data sets are required to both document these changes as well as to provide land-surface information for benchmarking and initializing Earth system models. Earth system models also require specific land cover classification systems based on plant functional types (PFTs), rather than species or ecosystems, and so post-processing of existing land cover data is often required. This study compares over Siberia, multiple land cover data sets against one another and with auxiliary data to identify key uncertainties that contribute to variability in PFT classifications that would introduce errors in Earth system modeling. Land cover classification systems from GLC 2000, GlobCover 2005 and 2009, and MODIS collections 5 and 5.1 are first aggregated to a common legend, and then compared to high-resolution land cover classification systems, vegetation continuous fields (MODIS VCFs) and satellite-derived tree heights (to discriminate against sparse, shrub, and forest vegetation). The GlobCover data set, with a lower threshold for tree cover and taller tree heights and a better spatial resolution, tends to have better distributions of tree cover compared to high-resolution data. It has therefore been chosen to build new PFT maps for the ORCHIDEE land surface model at 1 km scale. Compared to the original PFT data set, the new PFT maps based on GlobCover 2005 and an updated cross-walking approach mainly differ in the characterization of forests and degree of tree cover. The partition of grasslands and bare soils now appears more realistic compared with ground truth data. This new vegetation map provides a framework for further development of new PFTs in the ORCHIDEE model like shrubs, lichens and mosses, to represent the water and carbon cycles in northern latitudes better. Updated land cover

  12. Comparing Two Forms of Concept Map Critique Activities to Facilitate Knowledge Integration Processes in Evolution Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwendimann, Beat A.; Linn, Marcia C.

    2016-01-01

    Concept map activities often lack a subsequent revision step that facilitates knowledge integration. This study compares two collaborative critique activities using a Knowledge Integration Map (KIM), a form of concept map. Four classes of high school biology students (n?=?81) using an online inquiry-based learning unit on evolution were assigned…

  13. Mapping Irrigated Lands at 250-m Scale by Merging MODIS Data and National Agricultural Statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Shahriar Pervez

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Accurate geospatial information on the extent of irrigated land improves our understanding of agricultural water use, local land surface processes, conservation or depletion of water resources, and components of the hydrologic budget. We have developed a method in a geospatial modeling framework that assimilates irrigation statistics with remotely sensed parameters describing vegetation growth conditions in areas with agricultural land cover to spatially identify irrigated lands at 250-m cell size across the conterminous United States for 2002. The geospatial model result, known as the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS Irrigated Agriculture Dataset (MIrAD-US, identified irrigated lands with reasonable accuracy in California and semiarid Great Plains states with overall accuracies of 92% and 75% and kappa statistics of 0.75 and 0.51, respectively. A quantitative accuracy assessment of MIrAD-US for the eastern region has not yet been conducted, and qualitative assessment shows that model improvements are needed for the humid eastern regions where the distinction in annual peak NDVI between irrigated and non-irrigated crops is minimal and county sizes are relatively small. This modeling approach enables consistent mapping of irrigated lands based upon USDA irrigation statistics and should lead to better understanding of spatial trends in irrigated lands across the conterminous United States. An improved version of the model with revised datasets is planned and will employ 2007 USDA irrigation statistics.

  14. Algorithm for Automated Mapping of Land Surface Temperature Using LANDSAT 8 Satellite Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur Avdan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Land surface temperature is an important factor in many areas, such as global climate change, hydrological, geo-/biophysical, and urban land use/land cover. As the latest launched satellite from the LANDSAT family, LANDSAT 8 has opened new possibilities for understanding the events on the Earth with remote sensing. This study presents an algorithm for the automatic mapping of land surface temperature from LANDSAT 8 data. The tool was developed using the LANDSAT 8 thermal infrared sensor Band 10 data. Different methods and formulas were used in the algorithm that successfully retrieves the land surface temperature to help us study the thermal environment of the ground surface. To verify the algorithm, the land surface temperature and the near-air temperature were compared. The results showed that, for the first case, the standard deviation was 2.4°C, and for the second case, it was 2.7°C. For future studies, the tool should be refined with in situ measurements of land surface temperature.

  15. Land cover mapping based on random forest classification of multitemporal spectral and thermal images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisavi, Vahid; Homayouni, Saeid; Yazdi, Ahmad Maleknezhad; Alimohammadi, Abbas

    2015-05-01

    Thematic mapping of complex landscapes, with various phenological patterns from satellite imagery, is a particularly challenging task. However, supplementary information, such as multitemporal data and/or land surface temperature (LST), has the potential to improve the land cover classification accuracy and efficiency. In this paper, in order to map land covers, we evaluated the potential of multitemporal Landsat 8's spectral and thermal imageries using a random forest (RF) classifier. We used a grid search approach based on the out-of-bag (OOB) estimate of error to optimize the RF parameters. Four different scenarios were considered in this research: (1) RF classification of multitemporal spectral images, (2) RF classification of multitemporal LST images, (3) RF classification of all multitemporal LST and spectral images, and (4) RF classification of selected important or optimum features. The study area in this research was Naghadeh city and its surrounding region, located in West Azerbaijan Province, northwest of Iran. The overall accuracies of first, second, third, and fourth scenarios were equal to 86.48, 82.26, 90.63, and 91.82%, respectively. The quantitative assessments of the results demonstrated that the most important or optimum features increase the class separability, while the spectral and thermal features produced a more moderate increase in the land cover mapping accuracy. In addition, the contribution of the multitemporal thermal information led to a considerable increase in the user and producer accuracies of classes with a rapid temporal change behavior, such as crops and vegetation.

  16. Identification of land degradation evidences in an organic farm using probability maps (Croatia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Paulo; Bogunovic, Igor; Estebaranz, Ferran

    2017-04-01

    Land degradation is a biophysical process with important impacts on society, economy and policy. Areas affected by land degradation do not provide services in quality and with capacity to full-field the communities that depends on them (Amaya-Romero et al., 2015; Beyene, 2015; Lanckriet et al., 2015). Agricultural activities are one of the main causes of land degradation (Kraaijvanger and Veldkamp, 2015), especially when they decrease soil organic matter (SOM), a crucial element for soil fertility. In temperate areas, the critical level of SOM concentration in agricultural soils is 3.4%. Below this level there is a potential decrease of soil quality (Loveland and Weeb, 2003). However, no previous work was carried out in other environments, such as the Mediterranean. The spatial distribution of potential degraded land is important to be identified and mapped, in order to identify the areas that need restoration (Brevik et al., 2016; Pereira et al., 2017). The aim of this work is to assess the spatial distribution of areas with evidences of land degradation (SOM bellow 3.4%) using probability maps in an organic farm located in Croatia. In order to find the best method, we compared several probability methods, such as Ordinary Kriging (OK), Simple Kriging (SK), Universal Kriging (UK), Indicator Kriging (IK), Probability Kriging (PK) and Disjunctive Kriging (DK). The study area is located on the Istria peninsula (45°3' N; 14°2' E), with a total area of 182 ha. One hundred eighty-two soil samples (0-30 cm) were collected during July of 2015 and SOM was assessed using wet combustion procedure. The assessment of the best probability method was carried out using leave one out cross validation method. The probability method with the lowest Root Mean Squared Error (RMSE) was the most accurate. The results showed that the best method to predict the probability of potential land degradation was SK with an RMSE of 0.635, followed by DK (RMSE=0.636), UK (RMSE=0.660), OK (RMSE

  17. Land Cover Mapping in Southwestern China Using the HC-MMK Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangbin Lei

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Land cover mapping in mountainous areas is a notoriously challenging task due to the rugged terrain and high spatial heterogeneity of land surfaces as well as the frequent cloud contamination of satellite imagery. Taking Southwestern China (a typical mountainous region as an example, this paper established a new HC-MMK approach (Hierarchical Classification based on Multi-source and Multi-temporal data and geo-Knowledge, which was especially designed for land cover mapping in mountainous areas. This approach was taken in order to generate a 30 m-resolution land cover product in Southwestern China in 2010 (hereinafter referred to as CLC-SW2010. The multi-temporal native HJ (HuanJing, small satellite constellation for disaster and environmental monitoring CCD (Charge-Coupled Device images, Landsat TM (Thematic Mapper images and topographical data (including elevation, aspect, slope, etc. were taken as the main input data sources. Hierarchical classification tree construction and a five-step knowledge-based interactive quality control were the major components of this proposed approach. The CLC-SW2010 product contained six primary categories and 38 secondary categories, which covered about 2.33 million km2 (accounting for about a quarter of the land area of China. The accuracies of primary and secondary categories for CLC-SW2010 reached 95.09% and 87.14%, respectively, which were assessed independently by a third-party group. This product has so far been used to estimate the terrestrial carbon stocks and assess the quality of the ecological environments. The proposed HC-MMK approach could be used not only in mountainous areas, but also for plains, hills and other regions. Meanwhile, this study could also be used as a reference for other land cover mapping projects over large areas or even the entire globe.

  18. Mapping of land cover in northern California with simulated hyperspectral satellite imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Matthew L.; Kilham, Nina E.

    2016-09-01

    Land-cover maps are important science products needed for natural resource and ecosystem service management, biodiversity conservation planning, and assessing human-induced and natural drivers of land change. Analysis of hyperspectral, or imaging spectrometer, imagery has shown an impressive capacity to map a wide range of natural and anthropogenic land cover. Applications have been mostly with single-date imagery from relatively small spatial extents. Future hyperspectral satellites will provide imagery at greater spatial and temporal scales, and there is a need to assess techniques for mapping land cover with these data. Here we used simulated multi-temporal HyspIRI satellite imagery over a 30,000 km2 area in the San Francisco Bay Area, California to assess its capabilities for mapping classes defined by the international Land Cover Classification System (LCCS). We employed a mapping methodology and analysis framework that is applicable to regional and global scales. We used the Random Forests classifier with three sets of predictor variables (reflectance, MNF, hyperspectral metrics), two temporal resolutions (summer, spring-summer-fall), two sample scales (pixel, polygon) and two levels of classification complexity (12, 20 classes). Hyperspectral metrics provided a 16.4-21.8% and 3.1-6.7% increase in overall accuracy relative to MNF and reflectance bands, respectively, depending on pixel or polygon scales of analysis. Multi-temporal metrics improved overall accuracy by 0.9-3.1% over summer metrics, yet increases were only significant at the pixel scale of analysis. Overall accuracy at pixel scales was 72.2% (Kappa 0.70) with three seasons of metrics. Anthropogenic and homogenous natural vegetation classes had relatively high confidence and producer and user accuracies were over 70%; in comparison, woodland and forest classes had considerable confusion. We next focused on plant functional types with relatively pure spectra by removing open-canopy shrublands

  19. Land navigation Demonstration Vehicle with a color map display for tactical use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nava, E.J.; Creel, E.E.; Fellerhoff, J.R.; Martinez, S.D.

    1986-01-01

    A Land navigation Demonstration Vehicle (LDV) has been assembled which fully automates the navigation task and provides the operator with a color map display derived from Digital Terrain Elevation Data (DTED). The system relieves the operator of the burdens associated with the tactical use of paper maps by providing accurate 3-dimensional position information using a strapdown inertial navigation platform aided by the Sandia Inertial Terrain Aided Navigation algorithm (SITAN). The map display and navigation instruments consist of a multi-processor SANDia Aerospace Computer (SANDAC) and a commercial Image Processing System (IPS). These interactive devices allow real-time map annotation and corrections of vehicle position errors. 7 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Achieving a Sustainable Urban Form through Land Use Optimisation: Insights from Bekasi City’s Land-Use Plan (2010–2030

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmadya Trias Handayanto

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Cities worldwide have been trying to achieve a sustainable urban form to handle their rapid urban growth. Many sustainable urban forms have been studied and two of them, the compact city and the eco city, were chosen in this study as urban form foundations. Based on these forms, four sustainable city criteria (compactness, compatibility, dependency, and suitability were considered as necessary functions for land use optimisation. This study presents a land use optimisation as a method for achieving a sustainable urban form. Three optimisation methods (particle swarm optimisation, genetic algorithms, and a local search method were combined into a single hybrid optimisation method for land use in Bekasi city, Indonesia. It was also used for examining Bekasi city’s land-use-plan (2010–2030 after optimising current (2015 and future land use (2030. After current land use optimisation, the score of sustainable city criteria increased significantly. Three important centres of land use (commercial, industrial, and residential were also created through clustering the results. These centres were slightly different from centres of the city plan zones. Additional land uses in 2030 were predicted using a nonlinear autoregressive neural network with external input. Three scenarios were used for allocating these additional land uses including sustainable development, government policy, and business-as-usual. Future land use allocation in 2030 found that the sustainable development scenario showed better performance compared to government policy and business-as-usual scenarios.

  1. The land morphology approach to flood risk mapping: An application to Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, N S; Magalhães, M R; Domingos, T; Abreu, M M; Küpfer, C

    2017-02-16

    In the last decades, the increasing vulnerability of floodplains is linked to societal changes such as population density growth, land use changes, water use patterns, among other factors. Land morphology directly influences surface water flow, transport of sediments, soil genesis, local climate and vegetation distribution. Therefore, the land morphology, the land used and management directly influences flood risks genesis. However, attention is not always given to the underlying geomorphological and ecological processes that influence the dynamic of rivers and their floodplains. Floodplains are considered a part of a larger system called Wet System (WS). The WS includes permanent and temporary streams, water bodies, wetlands and valley bottoms. Valley bottom is a broad concept which comprehends not only floodplains but also flat and concave areas, contiguous to streams, in which slope is less than 5%. This will be addressed through a consistent method based on a land morphology approach that classifies landforms according to their hydrological position in the watershed. This method is based on flat areas (slopes less than 5%), surface curvature and hydrological features. The comparison between WS and flood risk data from the Portuguese Environmental Agency for the main rivers of mainland Portugal showed that in downstream areas of watersheds, valley bottoms are coincident with floodplains modelled by hydrological methods. Mapping WS has a particular interest in analysing river ecosystems position and function in the landscape, from upstream to downstream areas in the watershed. This morphological approach is less demanding data and time-consuming than hydrological methods and can be used as the preliminary delimitation of floodplains and potential flood risk areas in situations where there is no hydrological data available. The results were also compared with the land use/cover map at a national level and detailed in Trancão river basin, located in Lisbon

  2. Land cover change map comparisons using open source web mapping technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erik Lindblom; Ian Housman; Tony Guay; Mark Finco; Kevin. Megown

    2015-01-01

    The USDA Forest Service is evaluating the status of current landscape change maps and assessing gaps in their information content. These activities have been occurring under the auspices of the Landscape Change Monitoring System (LCMS) project, which is a joint effort between USFS Research, USFS Remote Sensing Applications Center (RSAC), USGS Earth Resources...

  3. High Precision Topographic Mapping at Chang'E-3 Landing Site with Multi-Source Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Liu, B.; Xu, B.; Liu, Z.; Di, K.; Zhou, J.

    2014-04-01

    Chang'e-3 (CE-3) is the first lander and rover of China following the success of Chang'e-1 and Chang'e-2 (CE-2) orbiters. High precision topographic mapping can provide detailed terrain information to ensure the safety of the rover as well as to support scientific investigations. In this research, multi-source data are co-registered into a uniform geographic framework for high precision topographic mapping at the CE-3 landing site. CE-2 CCD images with 7 m- and 1.5 m- resolutions are registered using selfcalibration bundle adjustment method with ground control points (GCPs) selected from LRO WAC mosaic map and LOLA DTM. The trajectory of CE-3 descent images are recovered using self-calibration free net bundle adjustment, and then the topographic data is rectified by absolute orientation with GCPs selected from the adjusted CE-2 DEM and DOM. Finally, these topographic data are integrated into the same geographic framework for unified, multi-scale, high precision mapping of the CE-3 landing site. Key technologies and the mapping products of this research have been used to support the surface operations of CE-3 mission.

  4. A new map of global ecological land units—An ecophysiographic stratification approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayre, Roger; Dangermond, Jack; Frye, Charlie; Vaughan, Randy; Aniello, Peter; Breyer, Sean; Cribbs, Douglas; Hopkins, Dabney; Nauman, Richard; Derrenbacher, William; Wright, Dawn; Brown, Clint; Convis, Charles; Smith, Jonathan H.; Benson, Laurence; Van Sistine, Darren; Warner, Harumi; Cress, Jill Janene; Danielson, Jeffrey J.; Hamann, Sharon L.; Cecere, Thomas; Reddy, Ashwan D.; Burton, Devon; Grosse, Andrea; True, Diane; Metzger, Marc; Hartmann, Jens; Moosdorf, Nils; Durr, Hans; Paganini, Marc; Defourny, Pierre; Arino, Olivier; Maynard, Simone; Anderson, Mark; Comer, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    In response to the need and an intergovernmental commission for a high resolution and data-derived global ecosystem map, land surface elements of global ecological pattern were characterized in an ecophysiographic stratification of the planet. The stratification produced 3,923 terrestrial ecological land units (ELUs) at a base resolution of 250 meters. The ELUs were derived from data on land surface features in a three step approach. The first step involved acquiring or developing four global raster datalayers representing the primary components of ecosystem structure: bioclimate, landform, lithology, and land cover. These datasets generally represent the most accurate, current, globally comprehensive, and finest spatial and thematic resolution data available for each of the four inputs. The second step involved a spatial combination of the four inputs into a single, new integrated raster dataset where every cell represents a combination of values from the bioclimate, landforms, lithology, and land cover datalayers. This foundational global raster datalayer, called ecological facets (EFs), contains 47,650 unique combinations of the four inputs. The third step involved an aggregation of the EFs into the 3,923 ELUs. This subdivision of the Earth’s surface into relatively fine, ecological land areas is designed to be useful for various types of ecosystem research and management applications, including assessments of climate change impacts to ecosystems, economic and non-economic valuation of ecosystem services, and conservation planning.

  5. Land use maps of the Tanana and Purcell Mountain areas, Alaska, based on Earth Resources Technology Satellite imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. ERTS imagery in photographic format was used to make land use maps of two areas of special interest to native corporations under terms of the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. Land selections are to be made in these areas, and the maps should facilitate decisions because of their comprehensive presentation of resource distribution information. The ERTS images enabled mapping broadly-defined land use classes in large areas in a comparatively short time. Some aerial photography was used to identify colors and shades of gray on the various images. The 14 mapped land use categories are identified according to the classification system under development by the U.S. Geological Survey. These maps exemplify a series of about a dozen diverse Alaskan areas. The principal resource depicted is vegetation, and clearly shown are vegetation units of special importance, including stands possibly containing trees of commercial grade and stands constituting wildlife habitat.

  6. Advancing Coastal Climate Adaptation in Denmark by Land Subsidence Mapping using Sentinel-1 Satellite Imagery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Carlo Sass; Broge, Niels H.; Mølgaard, Mads R.

    2016-01-01

    There are still large uncertainties in projections of climate change and sea level rise. Here, land subsidence is an additional factor that may adversely affect the vulnerability towards floods in low-lying coastal communities. The presented study performs an initial assessment of subsidence...... mapping using Sentinel-1 satellite imagery and leveling at two coastal locations in Denmark. Within both investigated areas current subsidence rates of 5-10 millimeters per year are found. This subsidence is related to the local geology, and challenges and potentials in bringing land subsidence mapping...... and geology into climate adaptation are discussed in relation to perspectives of a national subsidence monitoring system partly based on the findings from the two coastal locations. The current lack of subsidence data and a fragmentation of geotechnical information are considered as hindrances to optimal...

  7. A Large-Area, Spatially Continuous Assessment of Land Cover Map Error and Its Impact on Downstream Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, Lyndon; Chen, Peng; Debats, Stephanie; Evans, Tom; Ferreira, Stefanus; Kuemmerle, Tobias; Ragazzo, Gabrielle; Sheffield, Justin; Wolf, Adam; Wood, Eric; Caylor, Kelly

    2017-09-16

    Land cover maps increasingly underlie research into socioeconomic and environmental patterns and processes, including global change. It is known that map errors impact our understanding of these phenomena, but quantifying these impacts is difficult because many areas lack adequate reference data. We used a highly accurate, high-resolution map of South African cropland to assess 1) the magnitude of error in several current generation land cover maps, and 2) how these errors propagate in downstream studies. We first quantified pixel-wise errors in the cropland classes of four widely used land cover maps at resolutions ranging from 1 to 100 km, then calculated errors in several representative "downstream" (map-based) analyses, including assessments of vegetative carbon stocks, evapotranspiration, crop production, and household food security. We also evaluated maps' spatial accuracy based on how precisely they could be used to locate specific landscape features. We found that cropland maps can have substantial biases and poor accuracy at all resolutions (e.g. at 1 km resolution, up to ∼45% underestimates of cropland (bias) and nearly 50% mean absolute error (MAE, describing accuracy); at 100 km, up to 15% underestimates and nearly 20% MAE). National-scale maps derived from higher resolution imagery were most accurate, followed by multi-map fusion products. Constraining mapped values to match survey statistics may be effective at minimizing bias (provided the statistics are accurate). Errors in downstream analyses could be substantially amplified or muted, depending on the values ascribed to cropland-adjacent covers (e.g. with forest as adjacent cover, carbon map error was 200-500% greater than in input cropland maps, but ∼40% less for sparse cover types). The average locational error was 6 km (600%). These findings provide deeper insight into the causes and potential consequences of land cover map error, and suggest several recommendations for land cover map users

  8. Transforming cities: mapping opportunities to deliver sustainable urban form

    OpenAIRE

    Burgess, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Cities are dynamic settings that are constantly evolving. Physical changes, at varying scales, occur across time. These changes are often complex and slow-moving but all contribute to ongoing transformation of the urban form. The urban form of a city, town or settlement is important as it defines the size, shape and configuration of that urban area. It is within this structural framework that the functional qualities of the city are played out; the movement of people and information, the acti...

  9. Analysis and classification of hyperspectral data for mapping land degradation: An application in southern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, D. P.; Margate, D. E.; Meer, F. van der; Anh, H. V.

    2005-08-01

    Desertification is a severe stage of land degradation, manifested by "desert-like" conditions in dryland areas. Climatic conditions together with geomorphologic processes help to mould desert-like soil surface features in arid zones. The identification of these soil features serves as a useful input for understanding the desertification process and land degradation as a whole. In the present study, imaging spectrometer data were used to detect and map desert-like surface features. Absorption feature parameters in the spectral region between 0.4 and 2.5 μm wavelengths were analysed and correlated with soil properties, such as soil colour, soil salinity, gypsum content, etc. Soil groupings were made based on their similarities and their spectral reflectance curves were studied. Distinct differences in the reflectance curves throughout the spectrum were exhibited between groups. Although the samples belonging to the same group shared common properties, the curves still showed differences within the same group. Characteristic reflectance curves of soil surface features were derived from spectral measurements both in the field and in the laboratory, and mean reflectance values derived from image pixels representing known features. Linear unmixing and spectral angle matching techniques were applied to assess their suitability in mapping surface features for land degradation studies. The study showed that linear unmixing provided more realistic results for mapping "desert-like" surface features than the spectral angle matching technique.

  10. The potential of more accurate InSAR covariance matrix estimation for land cover mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Mi; Yong, Bin; Tian, Xin; Malhotra, Rakesh; Hu, Rui; Li, Zhiwei; Yu, Zhongbo; Zhang, Xinxin

    2017-04-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and Interferometric SAR (InSAR) provide both structural and electromagnetic information for the ground surface and therefore have been widely used for land cover classification. However, relatively few studies have developed analyses that investigate SAR datasets over richly textured areas where heterogeneous land covers exist and intermingle over short distances. One of main difficulties is that the shapes of the structures in a SAR image cannot be represented in detail as mixed pixels are likely to occur when conventional InSAR parameter estimation methods are used. To solve this problem and further extend previous research into remote monitoring of urban environments, we address the use of accurate InSAR covariance matrix estimation to improve the accuracy of land cover mapping. The standard and updated methods were tested using the HH-polarization TerraSAR-X dataset and compared with each other using the random forest classifier. A detailed accuracy assessment complied for six types of surfaces shows that the updated method outperforms the standard approach by around 9%, with an overall accuracy of 82.46% over areas with rich texture in Zhuhai, China. This paper demonstrates that the accuracy of land cover mapping can benefit from the 3 enhancement of the quality of the observations in addition to classifiers selection and multi-source data ingratiation reported in previous studies.

  11. Mapping Secondary Forest Succession on Abandoned Agricultural Land in the Polish Carpathians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolecka, N.; Kozak, J.; Kaim, D.; Dobosz, M.; Ginzler, Ch.; Psomas, A.

    2016-06-01

    Land abandonment and secondary forest succession have played a significant role in land cover changes and forest cover increase in mountain areas in Europe over the past several decades. Land abandonment can be easily observed in the field over small areas, but it is difficult to map over the large areas, e.g., with remote sensing, due to its subtle and spatially dispersed character. Our previous paper presented how the LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) and topographic data were used to detect secondary forest succession on abandoned land in one commune located in the Polish Carpathians by means of object-based image analysis (OBIA) and GIS (Kolecka et al., 2015). This paper proposes how the method can be applied to efficiently map secondary forest succession over the entire Polish Carpathians, incorporating spatial sampling strategy supported by various ancillary data. Here we discuss the methods of spatial sampling, its limitations and results in the context of future secondary forest succession modelling.

  12. Object-based approach to national land cover mapping using HJ satellite imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Li, Xiaosong; Yuan, Quanzhi; Liu, Yu

    2014-01-01

    To meet the carbon storage estimate in ecosystems for a national carbon strategy, we introduce a consistent database of China land cover. The Chinese Huan Jing (HJ) satellite is proven efficient in the cloud-free acquisition of seasonal image series in a monsoon region and in vegetation identification for mesoscale land cover mapping. Thirty-eight classes of level II land cover are generated based on the Land Cover Classification System of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization that follows a standard and quantitative definition. Twenty-four layers of derivative spectral, environmental, and spatial features compose the classification database. Object-based approach characterizing additional nonspectral features is conducted through mapping, and multiscale segmentations are applied on object boundary match to target real-world conditions. This method sufficiently employs spatial information, in addition to spectral characteristics, to improve classification accuracy. The algorithm of hierarchical classification is employed to follow step-by-step procedures that effectively control classification quality. This algorithm divides the dual structures of universal and local trees. Consistent universal trees suitable to most regions are performed first, followed by local trees that depend on specific features of nine climate stratifications. The independent validation indicates the overall accuracy reaches 86%.

  13. MAPPING SECONDARY FOREST SUCCESSION ON ABANDONED AGRICULTURAL LAND IN THE POLISH CARPATHIANS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Kolecka

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Land abandonment and secondary forest succession have played a significant role in land cover changes and forest cover increase in mountain areas in Europe over the past several decades. Land abandonment can be easily observed in the field over small areas, but it is difficult to map over the large areas, e.g., with remote sensing, due to its subtle and spatially dispersed character. Our previous paper presented how the LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging and topographic data were used to detect secondary forest succession on abandoned land in one commune located in the Polish Carpathians by means of object-based image analysis (OBIA and GIS (Kolecka et al., 2015. This paper proposes how the method can be applied to efficiently map secondary forest succession over the entire Polish Carpathians, incorporating spatial sampling strategy supported by various ancillary data. Here we discuss the methods of spatial sampling, its limitations and results in the context of future secondary forest succession modelling.

  14. Utilization of Historical Maps in the Land Use Change Impact Studies: A Case Study from Myjava River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valent, P.; Rončák, P.; Maliariková, M.; Behan, Š.

    2016-12-01

    The way land is used has a significant impact on many hydrological processes that determine the generation of flood runoff or soil erosion. Advancements in remote sensing which took place in the second half of the 20th century have led to the rise of a new research area focused on analyses of land use changes and their impact on hydrological processes. This study deals with an analysis of the changes in land use over a period of almost three centuries in the Myjava River catchment, which has an outlet at Šaštín-Stráže. In order to obtain information about the way the land was used in the past, three historical mappings representing various periods were used: the first (1st) military mapping (1764-1787), second (2nd) military mapping (1807-1869), and a military topographic mapping (1953-1957). The historical mappings have been manually vectorised in an ArcGIS environment to identify various land use categories. The historical evolution of land use was further compared with a concurrent land use mapping, which was undertaken in 2010 and exploited remote sensing techniques. The study also quantifies the impact of these changes on the long-term catchment runoff as well as their impact on flows induced by extreme precipitation events. This analysis was performed using the WetSpa distributed hydrological model, which enables the simulation of catchment runoff in a daily time step. The analysis showed that the selected catchment has undergone significant changes in land use, mainly characterized by massive deforestation at the end of the 18th century and land consolidation in the middle of the 20th century induced by communist collectivisation. The hydrological simulations demonstrated that the highest and lowest mean annual runoffs were simulated in the first (1st military mapping) and the last (concurrent land use monitoring) time intervals respectively with the smallest and largest percentages of forested areas.

  15. Land Cover Mapping for the Development of Green House Gas (GHG) Inventories in the Eastern and Southern Africa Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakhayanga, J. A.; Oduor, P.; Korme, T.; Farah, H.; Limaye, A. S.; Irwin, D.; Artis, G.

    2014-12-01

    Anthropogenic activities are responsible for the largest share of green house gas (GHG) emissions. Research has shown that greenhouse gases cause radioactive forcing in the stratosphere, leading to ozone depletion. Different land cover types act as sources or sinks of carbon dioxide (CO2), the most dominant GHG.Under the oversight of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) the Eastern and Southern Africa (ESA) region countries are developing Sustainable National GHG Inventory Management Systems. While the countries in the ESA region are making substantial progress in setting up GHG inventories, there remains significant constraints in the development of quality and sustainable National GHG Inventory Systems. For instance, there are fundamental challenges in capacity building and technology transfer, which can affect timely and consistent reporting on the land use, land-use change and forestry (LULUCF) component of the GHG inventory development. SERVIR Eastern and Southern Africa is a partnership project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Regional Center for Mapping of Resources for Development (RCMRD), an intergovernmental organization in Africa, with 21 member states in the ESA region. With support from the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), SERVIR ESA is implementing the GHG Project in 9 countries. The main deliverables of the project are land cover maps for the years 2000 and 2010 (also 1990 for Malawi and Rwanda), and related technical reports, as well as technical training in land cover mapping using replicable methodologies. Landsat imagery which is freely available forms the main component of earth observation input data, in addition to ancillary data collected from each country. Supervised classification using maximum likelihood algorithm is applied to the Landsat images. The work is completed for the initial 6 countries (Malawi, Zambia, Rwanda, Tanzania, Botswana, and

  16. Map Analysis and Spatial Statistic: Assessment of Spatial Variability of Agriculture Land Conversion at Urban Fringe Area of Yogyakarta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susilo, Bowo

    2016-11-01

    Urban development has brought various effects, one of which was the marginalization of the agricultural sector. Agricultural land is gradually converted to other type of land uses which considered more profitable. Conversion of agricultural land cannot be avoided but it should be controlled. Early identification on spatial distribution and intensity of agricultural land conversion as well as its related factor is necessary. Objective of the research were (1) to assess the spatial variability of agricultural land conversion, (2) to identify factors that affecting the spatial variability of agricultural land conversion. Research was conducted at urban fringe area of Yogyakarta. Spatial variability of agricultural land conversion was analysed using an index called Relative Conversion Index (RCI). Combined of map analysis and spatial statistical were used to determine the center of agricultural land conversion. Simple regression analysis was used to determine the factors associated with the conversion of agricultural land. The result shows that intensity of agricultural land conversion in the study area varies spatially as well as temporally. Intensity of agricultural land conversion in the period 1993-2000, involves three categories which are high, moderate and low. In the period of 2000-2007, the intensity of agricultural land conversion involves two categories which are high and low. Spatial variability of agricultural land conversion in the study area has a significant correlation with three factors: population growth, fragmentation of agricultural land and distance of agricultural land to the city

  17. Mapping 2000 2010 Impervious Surface Change in India Using Global Land Survey Landsat Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Panshi; Huang, Chengquan; Brown De Colstoun, Eric C.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding and monitoring the environmental impacts of global urbanization requires better urban datasets. Continuous field impervious surface change (ISC) mapping using Landsat data is an effective way to quantify spatiotemporal dynamics of urbanization. It is well acknowledged that Landsat-based estimation of impervious surface is subject to seasonal and phenological variations. The overall goal of this paper is to map 200-02010 ISC for India using Global Land Survey datasets and training data only available for 2010. To this end, a method was developed that could transfer the regression tree model developed for mapping 2010 impervious surface to 2000 using an iterative training and prediction (ITP) approach An independent validation dataset was also developed using Google Earth imagery. Based on the reference ISC from the validation dataset, the RMSE of predicted ISC was estimated to be 18.4%. At 95% confidence, the total estimated ISC for India between 2000 and 2010 is 2274.62 +/- 7.84 sq km.

  18. Multitemporal RADARSAT-2 polarimetric SAR data for urban land-cover mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Liang; Ban, Yifang

    2010-11-01

    The objective of this research is to evaluate the performance of multitemporal RADARSAT-2 polarimetric SAR data for urban land use/land-cover classification. Three dates of RADARSAT-2 polarimetric SAR data were acquired during the summer of 2008 over the rural-urban fringe of the Greater Toronto Area. The major land-cover types are residential areas, industry areas, bare land, golf courses, forest, and agricultural crops. The methodology used in this study follow the manner that first extracting the features and then carrying out the supervised classification taking the different feature combinations as an input. Support vectors machine is selected to be the classifier. SAR features including amplitude, intensity, long-term coherence, Freeman-Durden decomposition are extracted and compared by evaluating the classification abilities. Long-term coherence plays an important role in building discrimination in this study. The best classification results achieved by using the three dates HH, VH, HV amplitude layers and the coherence map. The overall accuracy is 82.3%. The results indicate that RADARSAT-2 polarimetric data has a potential to urban land-cover classification with the proper feature combinations.

  19. The Architecture of the Metacity: Land Use Change, Patch Dynamics and Urban Form in Chiang Mai, Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian McGrath

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This essay analyzes the spatial and temporal dynamics which have emerged from the rapid development of Chiang Mai, Thailand over the last four decades. Modern urbanization since the 1980s in the previously remote Chiang Mai-Lamphun Valley has coincided with digital and financial globalization, neo-liberal governance, and the articulation of a new geological era of the Anthropocene based on evidence of human induced climate change. This time frame serves as a lens to theorize the architecture of the “metacity”, a new urban form and new form of urban practice responding to the demands of global digital financial networks and neo-liberal trade policies, but grounded in the ecology and life worlds of particular localities. The metacity appears in Chiang Mai within the interstices of a particularly fragmented rural/urban mix within a self-organized rather than plan-controlled built environment. The entire valley has been the site of intensive inhabitation for centuries, and recently urbanized, yet is spatially heterogeneous, extensive and patchy rather than ordered, bounded and uniform. The resulting landscape is marked by a disjunction between a feudal wet-rice cultivation land tenure structure overlaid with a market-based typology of urban real estate products with little enforcement of land use controls. The essay begins with theorizing the form of the metacity, continues with a description of the Chiang Mai case study, and concludes with a general assessment of the need to create a new form of metacity urban practice. A metacity design practice would re-conceptualize urban theories and forms by inking architectural and ecological thinking with inclusive social practices, enhanced by new digitally-enhanced urban imaginaries and new representational tools of mapping, modeling and design.

  20. MAPPING OF THE LAND COVER SPATIOTEMPORAL CHARACTERISTICS IN NORTHERN RUSSIA CAUSED BY CLIMATE CHANGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Panidi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The study is devoted to the investigation of regional climate change in Northern Russia. Due to sparseness of the meteorological observation network in northern regions, we investigate the application capabilities of remotely sensed vegetation cover as indicator of climate change at the regional scale. In previous studies, we identified statistically significant relationship between the increase of surface air temperature and increase of the shrub vegetation productivity. We verified this relationship using ground observation data collected at the meteorological stations and Normalised Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI data produced from Terra/MODIS satellite imagery. Additionally, we designed the technique of growing seasons separation for detailed investigation of the land cover (shrub cover dynamics. Growing seasons are the periods when the temperature exceeds +5°C and +10°C. These periods determine the vegetation productivity conditions (i.e., conditions that allow growth of the phytomass. We have discovered that the trend signs for the surface air temperature and NDVI coincide on planes and river floodplains. On the current stage of the study, we are working on the automated mapping technique, which allows to estimate the direction and magnitude of the climate change in Northern Russia. This technique will make it possible to extrapolate identified relationship between land cover and climate onto territories with sparse network of meteorological stations. We have produced the gridded maps of NDVI and NDWI for the test area in European part of Northern Russia covered with the shrub vegetation. Basing on these maps, we may determine the frames of growing seasons for each grid cell. It will help us to obtain gridded maps of the NDVI linear trend for growing seasons on cell-by-cell basis. The trend maps can be used as indicative maps for estimation of the climate change on the studied areas.

  1. Global land cover mapping at 30 m resolution: A POK-based operational approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Chen, Jin; Liao, Anping; Cao, Xin; Chen, Lijun; Chen, Xuehong; He, Chaoying; Han, Gang; Peng, Shu; Lu, Miao; Zhang, Weiwei; Tong, Xiaohua; Mills, Jon

    2015-05-01

    Global Land Cover (GLC) information is fundamental for environmental change studies, land resource management, sustainable development, and many other societal benefits. Although GLC data exists at spatial resolutions of 300 m and 1000 m, a 30 m resolution mapping approach is now a feasible option for the next generation of GLC products. Since most significant human impacts on the land system can be captured at this scale, a number of researchers are focusing on such products. This paper reports the operational approach used in such a project, which aims to deliver reliable data products. Over 10,000 Landsat-like satellite images are required to cover the entire Earth at 30 m resolution. To derive a GLC map from such a large volume of data necessitates the development of effective, efficient, economic and operational approaches. Automated approaches usually provide higher efficiency and thus more economic solutions, yet existing automated classification has been deemed ineffective because of the low classification accuracy achievable (typically below 65%) at global scale at 30 m resolution. As a result, an approach based on the integration of pixel- and object-based methods with knowledge (POK-based) has been developed. To handle the classification process of 10 land cover types, a split-and-merge strategy was employed, i.e. firstly each class identified in a prioritized sequence and then results are merged together. For the identification of each class, a robust integration of pixel-and object-based classification was developed. To improve the quality of the classification results, a knowledge-based interactive verification procedure was developed with the support of web service technology. The performance of the POK-based approach was tested using eight selected areas with differing landscapes from five different continents. An overall classification accuracy of over 80% was achieved. This indicates that the developed POK-based approach is effective and feasible

  2. Parcels and Land Ownership, COGO and parcel map digitizing, primary attribute is APN, Published in 2000, Eureka County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2000. It is described as 'COGO and parcel map digitizing, primary...

  3. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex Refuge Lands Geographic Information System (RLGIS) habitat mapping project : 2008 season

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Mapping of all of the vegetation on the uplands present on the Waterfowl Production Areas (WP As) and Refuge lands managed by the Lake Andes NWR began in June of...

  4. Land Cover and Permafrost Change Mapping Using Dense Time Stacks of Landsat and Quickbird Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyland, K. E.; Streletskiy, D. A.; Shiklomanov, N. I.

    2014-12-01

    Climate change is especially pronounced in the Arctic, and regions on permafrost are at the frontier of these changes. Increasing air temperatures affect the extent, type, and characteristics of permafrost which is critical to many natural phenomena and northern infrastructure. In areas of discontinuous permafrost certain land cover types are indicative of permafrost conditions making satellite imagery an important tool for assessing environmental change in these remote areas. In arctic environments remote sensing can be particularly challenging due to consistently high cloud cover, data gaps, and landscape heterogeneity. However, there has been success at dealing with such challenges in lower latitude regions using the emerging dense time stack methodology. In place of using an anniversary date for land cover comparisons from different years, this methodology includes scenes from all seasons in addition to imagery normally rejected due to data gaps and high amounts of cloud cover. The incorporation of all available data creates a "dense time stack" which provides both a more complete dataset and more nuanced spectral signatures for classification. This work applied the dense time stack method to mapping five drainage basins in the close vicinity of the city of Igarka, Russia using both Landsat and Quickbird satellite imagery. The resulting map series proved this method to be effective within the Arctic for multiscalar mapping both temporally (annual and seasonal) and spatially (at the resolutions of Landsat and Quickbird). The time series of observed land cover changes produced allowed areas of permafrost degradation to be identified. These maps will be applied in the future to ongoing hydrological research in the region investigating the sources of increased run off and its relation to permafrost degradation.

  5. Connecting geomorphology to dust emission through high-resolution mapping of global land cover and sediment supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parajuli, Sagar Prasad; Zender, Charles S.

    2017-08-01

    A key challenge in modeling dust emissions is to represent the location and strength of dust sources. One critical aspect of dust sources that is not well understood and thus not represented in dust models is their geomorphology. In this work, we investigate the geomorphology of global dust sources by developing two high-resolution (∼500 m), seamless, global maps. First is a land surface map in which landforms are classified into different categories based on geomorphology using an image classification technique. The land surface map shows the distribution of landforms in dust source regions and is useful in defining the boundaries of different dust sources in dust models. Second is the sediment supply map developed by combining the upstream drainage area with the visible reflectance retrieved by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). This map, due to the inclusion of surface reflectance, highlights dust sources such as playa/sabkha and sand dunes and anthropogenic dust sources such as agricultural areas, that may not be captured by the commonly used elevation-based erodibility maps. We establish the connection between geomorphology and dust emission by comparing the sediment supply map with the land surface map and dust frequency map, qualitatively and quantitatively. We show that the sediment supply is linked to the land surface type and that playa/sabkha corresponds to the greatest inferred sediment supply. The sediment supply map is largely consistent with the land surface map and correlates well with the frequency of occurrence map derived from high-resolution MODIS level-2 aerosol optical depth (AOD) data.

  6. Mapping land cover gradients through analysis of hyper-temporal NDVI imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Amjad; de Bie, C. A. J. M.; Skidmore, A. K.; Scarrott, R. G.; Hamad, Amina; Venus, V.; Lymberakis, Petros

    2013-08-01

    The green cover of the earth exhibits various spatial gradients that represent gradual changes in space of vegetation density and/or in species composition. To date, land cover mapping methods differentiate at best, mapping units with different cover densities and/or species compositions, but typically fail to express such differences as gradients. Present interpretation techniques still make insufficient use of freely available spatial-temporal Earth Observation (EO) data that allow detection of existing land cover gradients. This study explores the use of hyper-temporal NDVI imagery to detect and delineate land cover gradients analyzing the temporal behavior of NDVI values. MODIS-Terra MVC-images (250 m, 16-day) of Crete, Greece, from February 2000 to July 2009 are used. The analysis approach uses an ISODATA unsupervised classification in combination with a Hierarchical Clustering Analysis (HCA). Clustering of class-specific temporal NDVI profiles through HCA resulted in the identification of gradients in landcover vegetation growth patterns. The detected gradients were arranged in a relational diagram, and mapped. Three groups of NDVI-classes were evaluated by correlating their class-specific annual average NDVI values with the field data (tree, shrub, grass, bare soil, stone, litter fraction covers). Multiple regression analysis showed that within each NDVI group, the fraction cover data were linearly related with the NDVI data, while NDVI groups were significantly different with respect to tree cover (adj. R2 = 0.96), shrub cover (adj. R2 = 0.83), grass cover (adj. R2 = 0.71), bare soil (adj. R2 = 0.88), stone cover (adj. R2 = 0.83) and litter cover (adj. R2 = 0.69) fractions. Similarly, the mean Sorenson dissimilarity values were found high and significant at confidence interval of 95% in all pairs of three NDVI groups. The study demonstrates that hyper-temporal NDVI imagery can successfully detect and map land cover gradients. The results may improve land

  7. Assessing Changes in Impervious Area Using Land Use Maps of Different Resolution in the Croton NY City Water Supply Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somerlot, C.; Duncan, J.; Endreny, T.

    2001-05-01

    With the advance of remote sensing, options arise for the hydrologic modeler to access both public domain and privately contracted watershed land cover maps. Land use classification processes using aerial photographs are highly variable depending on tools and training, but distinction between impervious and pervious land cover is relatively simple. Hydrologic models will estimate different runoff timing, volume, and water quality depending on the percent imperviousness of the watershed. This research will examine how percent imperviousness varies with changes in both radiometric and spatial land cover map resolution. WinHSPF was run with four distinct land cover maps derived from remote imagery: MRLC (30 m), LULC (1 km), contracted aerial photos (1 m), and processed digital (1 M) ortho quarter quads. Comparisons were made between map percent impervious cover and runoff timing and volume. A modified export coefficient model that tracks pollutant discharge through down gradient filters examined how estimated nutrient loading changed with differences in these land cover map products. Methods are suggested for updating estimates of percent impervious cover in coarser resolution maps using field data or other means.

  8. Multitemporal unmixing of medium-spatial-resolution satellite images: A case study using MERIS images for land-cover mapping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zurita Milla, R.; Gómez-Chova, L.; Guanter, L.; Clevers, J.G.P.W.; Champs-Valls, G.

    2011-01-01

    Data from current medium-spatial-resolution imaging spectroradiometers are used for land-cover mapping and land-cover change detection at regional to global scales. However, few landscapes are homogeneous at these scales, and this creates the so-called mixed-pixel problem. In this context, this

  9. Multitemporal unmixing of medium-spatial-resolution satellite images: a case study using MERIS images for land - cover mapping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zurita-Milla, R.; Gomez-Chova, L.; Guanter, L.; Clevers, J.G.P.W.; Camps-Valls, G.

    2011-01-01

    Data from current medium-spatial-resolution imaging spectroradiometers are used for land-cover mapping and land-cover change detection at regional to global scales. However, few landscapes are homogeneous at these scales, and this creates the so-called mixed-pixel problem. In this context, this

  10. Multitemporal unmixing of medium-spatial-resolution satellite images: A case study using MERIS images for land-cover mapping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zurita Milla, R.; Gómez-Chova, L.; Guanter, L.; Clevers, J.G.P.W.; Champs-Valls, G.

    2011-01-01

    Data from current medium-spatial-resolution imaging spectroradiometers are used for land-cover mapping and land-cover change detection at regional to global scales. However, few landscapes are homogeneous at these scales, and this creates the so-called mixed-pixel problem. In this context, this stud

  11. Visual interpretation of ASTER satellite data, Part II: Land use mapping in Mpumalanga,South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elna van Niekerk

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Since the initiation in 1960 of the era of satellite remote sensing to detect the different characteristics of the earth, a powerful tool was created to aid researchers. Many land-use studies were undertaken using Landsat MSS, Landsat TM and ETM, as well as SPOT satellite data. The application of these data to the mapping of land use and land cover at smaller scales was constrained by the limited spectral and/or spatial resolution of the data provided by these satellite sensors. In view of the relatively high cost of SPOT data, and uncertainty regarding the future continuation of the Landsat series, alternative data sources need to be investigated. In the absence of published previous research on this issue in South Africa, the purpose of this article is to investigate the value of visual interpretation of ASTER satellite images for the identification and mapping of land-use in an area in South Africa. The study area is situated in Mpumalanga, in the area of Witbank, around the Witbank and Doorndraai dams. This area is characterised by a variety of urban, rural and industrial land uses. Digital image processing of one Landsat 5 TM, one Landsat 7 ETM and one ASTER satellite image was undertaken, including atmospheric correction and georeferencing, natural colour composites, photo infrared colour composites (or false colour satellite images, band ratios, Normalised Difference Indices, as well as the Brightness, Greenness and Wetness Indices. The efficacy with which land use could be identified through the visual interpretation of the processed Landsat 5 TM, Landsat 7 TM and ASTER satellite images was compared. The published 1:50 000 topographical maps of the area were used for the purpose of initial verification. Findings of the visual interpretation process were verified by field visits to the study area. The study found that the ASTER satellite data produced clearer results and therefore have a higher mapping ability and capacity than the

  12. MAGIC-DML: Mapping/Measuring/Modeling Antarctic Geomorphology & Ice Change in Dronning Maud Land

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogozhina, Irina; Bernales, Jorge; Newall, Jennifer; Stroeven, Arjen; Harbor, Jonathan; Glasser, Neil; Fredin, Ola; Fabel, Derek; Hättestrand, Class; Lifton, Nat

    2016-04-01

    Reconstructing and predicting the response of the Antarctic Ice Sheet to climate change is one of the major challenges facing the Earth Science community. There are critical gaps in our knowledge of past changes in ice elevation and extent in many regions of East Antarctica, including a large area of Dronning Maud Land. An international Swedish-UK-US-Norwegian-German project MAGIC-DML aims to reconstruct the timing and pattern of ice surface elevation (thus ice sheet volume) fluctuations since the mid-Pliocene warm period on the Dronning Maud Land margin of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet. A combination of remotely sensed geomorphological mapping, field investigations, surface exposure dating and numerical modelling are being used in an iterative manner to produce a comprehensive reconstruction of the glacial history of Dronning Maud Land. Here we present the results from the first phase of this project, which involves high-resolution numerical simulations of the past glacial geometries and mapping of the field area using historic and recent aerial imagery together with a range of satellite acquired data.

  13. Mapeamento semidetalhado do uso da terra do Bioma Cerrado Semidetailed land use mapping in the Cerrado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson Eyji Sano

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi mapear o uso da terra do Bioma Cerrado na escala de 1:250.000. As seguintes classes de uso da terra foram consideradas: culturas agrícolas, pastagens cultivadas, reflorestamentos, áreas urbanas e áreas de mineração. A metodologia envolveu a segmentação de imagens do satélite Landsat, a classificação visual dos segmentos e a análise da exatidão global do mapa final. Aproximadamente 39,5% do Cerrado apresentaram algum tipo de uso de terra. Pastagens cultivadas e culturas agrícolas foram as classes predominantes, com 26,5 e 10,5%, respectivamente.The objective of this work was to map the land use in Cerrado at the 1:250,000 scale. The following classes of land use were considered: croplands, planted pasturelands, reforestations, urban settlements and mining areas. The methodological approach involved Landsat image segmentation, visual classification of the segments and analysis of the global accuracy of the final map. Approximately 39.5% of Cerrado presented some type of land use activity. Planted pasturelands and croplands were the dominant classes, with 26.5 and 10.5%, respectively.

  14. Estimation of agricultural pesticide use in drainage basins using land cover maps and county pesticide data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagaki, Naomi; Wolock, David M.

    2005-01-01

    A geographic information system (GIS) was used to estimate agricultural pesticide use in the drainage basins of streams that are studied as part of the U.S. Geological Survey?s National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. Drainage basin pesticide use estimates were computed by intersecting digital maps of drainage basin boundaries with an enhanced version of the National Land Cover Data 1992 combined with estimates of 1992 agricultural pesticide use in each United States county. This report presents the methods used to quantify agricultural pesticide use in drainage basins using a GIS and includes the estimates of atrazine use applied to row crops, small-grain crops, and fallow lands in 150 watersheds in the conterminous United States. Basin atrazine use estimates are presented to compare and analyze the results that were derived from 30-meter and 1-kilometer resolution land cover and county pesticide use data, and drainage basin boundaries at various grid cell resolutions. Comparisons of the basin atrazine use estimates derived from watershed boundaries, county pesticide use, and land cover data sets at different resolutions, indicated that overall differences were minor. The largest potential for differences in basin pesticide use estimates between those derived from the 30-meter and 1-kilometer resolution enhanced National Land Cover Data 1992 exists wherever there are abrupt agricultural land cover changes along the basin divide. Despite the limitations of the drainage basin pesticide use data described in this report, the basin estimates provide consistent and comparable indicators of agricultural pesticide application in surface-water drainage basins studied in the NAWQA Program.

  15. Mapping land slide occurrence zones using Remote Sensing and GIS techniques in Kelantan state, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, M.; Pour, A. B.; Misbari, S.

    2017-05-01

    Integration of satellite remote sensing data and Geographic Information System (GIS) techniques is one of the most applicable approach for landslide mapping and identification of high potential risk and susceptible zones in tropical environments. Yearly, several landslides occur during heavy monsoon rainfall in Kelantan river basin, Peninsular Malaysia. In this investigation, Landsat-8 and Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar-2 (PALSAR-2) remote sensing data sets were integrated with GIS analysis for detect, map and characterize landslide occurrences during December 2014 flooding period in the Kelantan river basin. Landslides were determined by tracking changes in vegetation pixel data using Landsat-8 images that acquired before and after December 2014 flooding for the study area. The PALSAR-2 data were used for mapping of major geological structures and detailed characterizations of lineaments in the state of Kelantan. Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) approach was used for landslide susceptibility mapping. Several factors such as slope, aspect, soil, lithology, Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), land cover, distance to drainage, precipitation, distance to fault, and distance to road were extracted from remote sensing satellite data and fieldwork to apply AHP approach. Two main outputs of this study were landslide inventory occurrences map during 2014 flooding episode and landslide susceptibility map for entire the Kelantan state. Modelled/predicted landslides with susceptible map generated prior and post flood episode, confirmed that intense rainfall in the Kelantan have contributed to weightage of numerous landslides with various sizes. It is concluded that precipitation is the most influential factor that bare to landslide event.

  16. A high-resolution land-use map; Nogales, Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Laura M.; Villarreal, Miguel L.; Wallace, Cynthia S.A.; Gil Anaya, Claudia Z.; Diaz Arcos, Israel; Gray, Floyd

    2010-01-01

    The cities of Nogales, Sonora, and Nogales, Arizona, are located in the Ambos Nogales Watershed, a topographically irregular bowl-shaped area with a northward gradient. Throughout history, residents in both cities have been affected by flooding. Currently, the primary method for regulating this runoff is to build a series of detention basins in Nogales, Sonora. Additionally, the municipality also is considering land-use planning to help mitigate flooding. This paper describes the production of a 10-meter resolution land-use map, derived from 2008 aerial photos of the Nogales, Sonora Watershed for modeling impacts of the detention basin construction and in support of an ?Early Warning Hazard System? for the region.

  17. Investigating the rank-size relationship of urban areas using land cover maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Tsuguki; Kato, Etsushi; Iwao, Koki; Yamagata, Yoshiki

    2008-09-01

    We investigated the possibility that the rank-size rule can be applied to the relationship between urban size and rank order. Accordingly, using a global land cover data set, we clustered contiguous urban grid cells, calculated the area in each cluster, and ranked urban areas in each of the countries studied. This research revealed that Zipf's law can be applied to the relationship between urban area and rank order as well as to city populations. Comparisons were made in some countries, and it was shown that the urban area rank-size rule was free from administrative boundaries. Finally, in Japan, using land-use maps for several times in recent history, changes in rank-size were investigated. As a result, it was found that the slopes for urban areas did not change vis-à-vis their rank in a double logarithmic graph and that only the x and y interception changed.

  18. Multiple support vector machines for land cover change detection: An application for mapping urban extensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemmour, Hassiba; Chibani, Youcef

    The reliability of support vector machines for classifying hyper-spectral images of remote sensing has been proven in various studies. In this paper, we investigate their applicability for land cover change detection. First, SVM-based change detection is presented and performed for mapping urban growth in the Algerian capital. Different performance indicators, as well as a comparison with artificial neural networks, are used to support our experimental analysis. In a second step, a combination framework is proposed to improve change detection accuracy. Two combination rules, namely, Fuzzy Integral and Attractor Dynamics, are implemented and evaluated with respect to individual SVMs. Recognition rates achieved by individual SVMs, compared to neural networks, confirm their efficiency for land cover change detection. Furthermore, the relevance of SVM combination is highlighted.

  19. Mapping the land surface for global atmosphere-biosphere models: Toward continuous distributions of vegetation's functional properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defries, Ruth S.; Field, Christopher B.; Fung, Inez; Justice, Christopher O.; Los, Sietse; Matson, Pamela A.; Matthews, Elaine; Mooney, Harold A.; Potter, Christopher S.; Prentice, Katharine; Sellers, Piers J.; Townshend, John R. G.; Tucker, Compton J.; Ustin, Susan L.; Vitousek, Peter M.

    1995-10-01

    Global land surface characteristics are important boundary conditions for global models that describe exchanges of water, energy, and carbon dioxide between the atmosphere and biosphere. Existing data sets of global land cover are based on classification schemes that characterize each grid cell as a discrete vegetation type. Consequently, parameter fields derived from these data sets are dependent on the particular scheme and the number of vegetation types it includes. The functional controls on exchanges of water, energy, and carbon dioxide between the atmosphere and biosphere are now well enough understood that it is increasingly feasible to model these exchanges using a small number of vegetation characteristics that either are related to or closely related to the functional controls. Ideally, these characteristics would be mapped as continuous distributions to capture mixtures and gradients in vegetation within the cell size of the model. While such an approach makes it more difficult to build models from detailed observations at a small number of sites, it increases the potential for capturing functionally important variation within, as well as between, vegetation types. Globally, the vegetation characteristics that appear to be most important in controlling fluxes of water, energy, and carbon dioxide include (1) growth form (tree, shrub, herb), (2) seasonality of woody vegetation (deciduous, evergreen), (3) leaf type (broadleaf, coniferous), (4) photosynthetic pathway of nonwoody vegetation (C3, C4), (5) longevity (annual, perennial), and (6) type and intensity of disturbance (e.g., cultivation, fire history). Many of these characteristics can be obtained through remote sensing, though some require ground-based information. The minimum number and the identity of the required land surface characteristics almost certainly vary with the intended objective, but the philosophy of driving models with continuous distributions of a small number of land surface

  20. Mapping Decadal Land Cover Changes in the Woodlands of North Eastern Namibia from 1975 to 2014 Using the Landsat Satellite Archived Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir R. Wingate

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Woodlands and savannahs provide essential ecosystem functions and services to communities. On the African continent, they are widely utilized and converted to subsistence and intensive agriculture or urbanized. This study investigates changes in land cover over four administrative regions of North Eastern Namibia within the Kalahari woodland savannah biome, covering a total of 107,994 km2. Land cover is mapped using multi-sensor Landsat imagery at decadal intervals from 1975 to 2014, with a post-classification change detection method. The dominant change observed was a reduction in the area of woodland savannah due to the expansion of agriculture, primarily in the form of small-scale cereal and pastoral production. More specifically, woodland savannah area decreased from 90% of the study area in 1975 to 83% in 2004, and then increased to 86% in 2014, while agricultural land increased from 6% to 12% between 1975 and 2014. We assess land cover changes in relation to towns, villages, rivers and roads and find most changes occurred in proximity to these. In addition, we find that most land cover changes occur within land designated as communally held, followed by state protected land. With widespread changes occurring across the African continent, this study provides important data for understanding drivers of change in the region and their impacts on the distribution of woodland savannahs.

  1. The effect of Thematic Mapper spectral properties on land cover mapping for hydrologic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervin, J. C.; Lu, Y. C.; Gauthier, R. L.; Miller, J. R.; Irish, R. R.

    1986-01-01

    The accuracy of unsupervised land-cover classification from all seven Landsat TM bands and from six combinations of three or four bands is evaluated using images of the Clinton River Basin, a suburban watershed near Detroit. Data from aerial TMS photography, USGS topographic maps, and ground surveys are employed to determine the classification accuracy. The mapping accuracy of all seven bands is found to be significantly better (6 percent overall, 12 percent for residential areas, and 13 percent for commercial districts) than that with bands 2, 3, and 4; but almost the same accuracy is obtained by including at least one band from each major spectral region (visible, NIR, and mid-IR).

  2. GEOBIA For Land Use Mapping Using Worldview2 Image In Bengkak Village Coastal, Banyuwangi Regency, East Java

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrassi, Fitzastri; Salim, Emil; Nina, Anastasia; Alwi, Luthfi; Danoedoro, Projo; Kamal, Muhammad

    2016-11-01

    The east coast of Banyuwangi regency has a diverse variety of land use such as ponds, mangroves, agricultural fields and settlements. WorldView-2 is a multispectral image with high spatial resolution that can display detailed information of land use. Geographic Object Based Image Analysis (GEOBIA) classification technique uses object segments as the smallest unit of analysis. The segmentation and classification process is not only based on spectral value of the image but also considering other elements of the image interpretation. This gives GEOBIA an opportunities and challenges in the mapping and monitoring of land use. This research aims to assess the GEOBIA classification method for generating the classification of land use in coastal areas of Banyuwangi. The result of this study is land use classification map produced by GEOBIA classification. We verified the accuracy of the resulted land use map by comparing the map with result from visual interpretation of the image that have been validated through field surveys. Variation of land use in most of the east coast of Banyuwangi regency is dominated by mangrove, agricultural fields, mixed farms, settlements and ponds.

  3. Agricultural land cover mapping in the context of a geographically referenced digital information system. [Carroll, Macon, and Gentry Counties, Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoner, E. R.

    1982-01-01

    The introduction of soil map information to the land cover mapping process can improve discrimination of land cover types and reduce confusion among crop types that may be caused by soil-specific management practices and background reflectance characteristics. Multiple dates of LANDSAT MSS digital were analyzed for three study areas in northern Missouri to produce cover types for major agricultural land cover classes. Digital data bases were then developed by adding ancillary data such as digitized soil and transportation network information to the LANDSAT-derived cover type map. Procedures were developed to manipulate the data base parameters to extract information applicable to user requirements. An agricultural information system combining such data can be used to determine the productive capacity of land to grow crops, fertilizer needs, chemical weed control rates, irrigation suitability, and trafficability of soil for planting.

  4. Mapping Impervious Surfaces Globally at 30m Resolution Using Global Land Survey Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeColstoun, Eric Brown; Huang, Chengquan; Tan, Bin; Smith, Sarah Elizabeth; Phillips, Jacqueline; Wang, Panshi; Ling, Pui-Yu; Zhan, James; Li, Sike; Taylor, Michael P.; Wolfe, Robert E.; Tilton, James C.

    2013-01-01

    Impervious surfaces, mainly artificial structures and roads, cover less than 1% of the world's land surface (1.3% over USA). Regardless of the relatively small coverage, impervious surfaces have a significant impact on the environment. They are the main source of the urban heat island effect, and affect not only the energy balance, but also hydrology and carbon cycling, and both land and aquatic ecosystem services. In the last several decades, the pace of converting natural land surface to impervious surfaces has increased. Quantitatively monitoring the growth of impervious surface expansion and associated urbanization has become a priority topic across both the physical and social sciences. The recent availability of consistent, global scale data sets at 30m resolution such as the Global Land Survey from the Landsat satellites provides an unprecedented opportunity to map global impervious cover and urbanization at this resolution for the first time, with unprecedented detail and accuracy. Moreover, the spatial resolution of Landsat is absolutely essential to accurately resolve urban targets such a buildings, roads and parking lots. With long term GLS data now available for the 1975, 1990, 2000, 2005 and 2010 time periods, the land cover/use changes due to urbanization can now be quantified at this spatial scale as well. In the Global Land Survey - Imperviousness Mapping Project (GLS-IMP), we are producing the first global 30 m spatial resolution impervious cover data set. We have processed the GLS 2010 data set to surface reflectance (8500+ TM and ETM+ scenes) and are using a supervised classification method using a regression tree to produce continental scale impervious cover data sets. A very large set of accurate training samples is the key to the supervised classifications and is being derived through the interpretation of high spatial resolution (approx. 2 m or less) commercial satellite data (Quickbird and Worldview2) available to us through the unclassified

  5. Mapping Impervious Surfaces Globally at 30m Resolution Using Landsat Global Land Survey Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown de Colstoun, E.; Huang, C.; Wolfe, R. E.; Tan, B.; Tilton, J.; Smith, S.; Phillips, J.; Wang, P.; Ling, P.; Zhan, J.; Xu, X.; Taylor, M. P.

    2013-12-01

    Impervious surfaces, mainly artificial structures and roads, cover less than 1% of the world's land surface (1.3% over USA). Regardless of the relatively small coverage, impervious surfaces have a significant impact on the environment. They are the main source of the urban heat island effect, and affect not only the energy balance, but also hydrology and carbon cycling, and both land and aquatic ecosystem services. In the last several decades, the pace of converting natural land surface to impervious surfaces has increased. Quantitatively monitoring the growth of impervious surface expansion and associated urbanization has become a priority topic across both the physical and social sciences. The recent availability of consistent, global scale data sets at 30m resolution such as the Global Land Survey from the Landsat satellites provides an unprecedented opportunity to map global impervious cover and urbanization at this resolution for the first time, with unprecedented detail and accuracy. Moreover, the spatial resolution of Landsat is absolutely essential to accurately resolve urban targets such a buildings, roads and parking lots. With long term GLS data now available for the 1975, 1990, 2000, 2005 and 2010 time periods, the land cover/use changes due to urbanization can now be quantified at this spatial scale as well. In the Global Land Survey - Imperviousness Mapping Project (GLS-IMP), we are producing the first global 30 m spatial resolution impervious cover data set. We have processed the GLS 2010 data set to surface reflectance (8500+ TM and ETM+ scenes) and are using a supervised classification method using a regression tree to produce continental scale impervious cover data sets. A very large set of accurate training samples is the key to the supervised classifications and is being derived through the interpretation of high spatial resolution (~2 m or less) commercial satellite data (Quickbird and Worldview2) available to us through the unclassified

  6. Mapping tsunami impacts on land cover and related ecosystem service supply in Phang Nga, Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, G.; Burkhard, B.; Römer, H.; Sangkaew, S.; Graterol, R.; Haitook, T.; Sterr, H.; Sakuna-Schwartz, D.

    2013-12-01

    The 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami caused damages to coastal ecosystems and thus affected the livelihoods of the coastal communities who depend on services provided by these ecosystems. The paper presents a case study on evaluating and mapping the spatial and temporal impacts of the tsunami on land use and land cover (LULC) and related ecosystem service supply in the Phang Nga province, Thailand. The method includes local stakeholder interviews, field investigations, remote-sensing techniques, and GIS. Results provide an ecosystem services matrix with capacity scores for 18 LULC classes and 17 ecosystem functions and services as well as pre-/post-tsunami and recovery maps indicating changes in the ecosystem service supply capacities in the study area. Local stakeholder interviews revealed that mangroves, casuarina forest, mixed beach forest, coral reefs, tidal inlets, as well as wetlands (peat swamp forest) have the highest capacity to supply ecosystem services, while e.g. plantations have a lower capacity. The remote-sensing based damage and recovery analysis showed a loss of the ecosystem service supply capacities in almost all LULC classes for most of the services due to the tsunami. A fast recovery of LULC and related ecosystem service supply capacities within one year could be observed for e.g. beaches, while mangroves or casuarina forest needed several years to recover. Applying multi-temporal mapping the spatial variations of recovery could be visualised. While some patches of coastal forest were fully recovered after 3 yr, other patches were still affected and thus had a reduced capacity to supply ecosystem services. The ecosystem services maps can be used to quantify ecological values and their spatial distribution in the framework of a tsunami risk assessment. Beyond that they are considered to be a useful tool for spatial analysis in coastal risk management in Phang Nga.

  7. Gaining Recognition Through Participatory Mapping? The Role of Adat Land in the Implementation of the Merauke Integrated Food and Energy Estate in Papua, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosita Dewi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Participatory mapping has recently become an instrument used by NGOs to advocate for adat (customary land in Indonesia. Maps produced from participatory mapping are expected to support legal recognition through land formalization or titling. In order to stop land grabbing through the Merauke Integrated Food and Energy Estate (MIFEE project, this strategy has also been applied in Merauke district, Papua. However, the pitfalls of communal participatory mapping have brought negative impacts to adat communities. This paper analyzes the land grabbing and mapping processes in three villages in the MIFEE area to show the unexpected consequences of participatory mapping. These mapping processes have caused fragmentation and conflict among adat communities. Furthermore, the legal recognition of communal adat land ownership is facilitating the buy-out of adat land by companies and/or the state.

  8. Mapping CORINE Land Cover from Sentinel-1A SAR and SRTM Digital Elevation Model Data using Random Forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heiko Balzter

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The European CORINE land cover mapping scheme is a standardized classification system with 44 land cover and land use classes. It is used by the European Environment Agency to report large-scale land cover change with a minimum mapping unit of 5 ha every six years and operationally mapped by its member states. The most commonly applied method to map CORINE land cover change is by visual interpretation of optical/near-infrared satellite imagery. The Sentinel-1A satellite carries a C-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR and was launched in 2014 by the European Space Agency as the first operational Copernicus mission. This study is the first investigation of Sentinel-1A for CORINE land cover mapping. Two of the first Sentinel-1A images acquired during its ramp-up phase in May and December 2014 over Thuringia in Germany are analysed. 27 hybrid level 2/3 CORINE classes are defined. 17 of these were present at the study site and classified based on a stratified random sample of training pixels from the polygon-eroded CORINE 2006 map. Sentinel-1A logarithmic radar backscatter at HH and HV polarisation (May acquisition, VV and VH polarisation (December acquisition, and the HH image texture are used as input bands to the classification. In addition, a Digital Terrain Model (DTM, a Canopy Height Model (CHM and slope and aspect maps from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM are used as input bands to account for geomorphological features of the landscape. In future, elevation data will be delivered for areas with sufficiently high coherence from the Sentinel-1A Interferometric Wide-Swath Mode itself. When augmented by elevation data from radar interferometry, Sentinel-1A is able to discriminate several CORINE land cover classes, making it useful for monitoring of cloud-covered regions. A bistatic Sentinel-1 Convoy mission would enable single-pass interferometric acquisitions without temporal decorrelation.

  9. Mapping of government land encroachment in Cameron Highlands using multiple remote sensing datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zin, M. H. M.; Ahmad, B.

    2014-02-01

    The cold and refreshing highland weather is one of the factors that give impact to socio-economic growth in Cameron Highlands. This unique weather of the highland surrounded by tropical rain forest can only be found in a few places in Malaysia. It makes this place a famous tourism attraction and also provides a very suitable temperature for agriculture activities. Thus it makes agriculture such as tea plantation, vegetable, fruits and flowers one of the biggest economic activities in Cameron Highlands. However unauthorized agriculture activities are rampant. The government land, mostly forest area have been encroached by farmers, in many cases indiscriminately cutting down trees and hill slopes. This study is meant to detect and assess this encroachment using multiple remote sensing datasets. The datasets were used together with cadastral parcel data where survey lines describe property boundary, pieces of land are subdivided into lots of government and private. The general maximum likelihood classification method was used on remote sensing image to classify the land-cover in the study area. Ground truth data from field observation were used to assess the accuracy of the classification. Cadastral parcel data was overlaid on the classification map in order to detect the encroachment area. The result of this study shows that there is a land cover change of 93.535 ha in the government land of the study area between years 2001 to 2010, nevertheless almost no encroachment took place in the studied forest reserve area. The result of this study will be useful for the authority in monitoring and managing the forest.

  10. The Application of Remote Sensing Data to GIS Studies of Land Use, Land Cover, and Vegetation Mapping in the State of Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Christine A.

    1996-01-01

    A land cover-vegetation map with a base classification system for remote sensing use in a tropical island environment was produced of the island of Hawaii for the State of Hawaii to evaluate whether or not useful land cover information can be derived from Landsat TM data. In addition, an island-wide change detection mosaic combining a previously created 1977 MSS land classification with the TM-based classification was produced. In order to reach the goal of transferring remote sensing technology to State of Hawaii personnel, a pilot project was conducted while training State of Hawaii personnel in remote sensing technology and classification systems. Spectral characteristics of young island land cover types were compared to determine if there are differences in vegetation types on lava, vegetation types on soils, and barren lava from soils, and if they can be detected remotely, based on differences in pigments detecting plant physiognomic type, health, stress at senescence, heat, moisture level, and biomass. Geographic information systems (GIS) and global positioning systems (GPS) were used to assist in image rectification and classification. GIS was also used to produce large-format color output maps. An interactive GIS program was written to provide on-line access to scanned photos taken at field sites. The pilot project found Landsat TM to be a credible source of land cover information for geologically young islands, and TM data bands are effective in detecting spectral characteristics of different land cover types through remote sensing. Large agriculture field patterns were resolved and mapped successfully from wildland vegetation, but small agriculture field patterns were not. Additional processing was required to work with the four TM scenes from two separate orbits which span three years, including El Nino and drought dates. Results of the project emphasized the need for further land cover and land use processing and research. Change in vegetation

  11. Mapping dominant annual land cover from 2009 to 2013 across Victoria, Australia using satellite imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffield, Kathryn; Morse-McNabb, Elizabeth; Clark, Rob; Robson, Susan; Lewis, Hayden

    2015-01-01

    There is a demand for regularly updated, broad-scale, accurate land cover information in Victoria from multiple stakeholders. This paper documents the methods used to generate an annual dominant land cover (DLC) map for Victoria, Australia from 2009 to 2013. Vegetation phenology parameters derived from an annual time series of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer Vegetation Indices 16-day 250 m (MOD13Q1) product were used to generate annual DLC maps, using a three-tiered hierarchical classification scheme. Classification accuracy at the broadest (primary) class level was over 91% for all years, while it ranged from 72 to 81% at the secondary class level. The most detailed class level (tertiary) had accuracy levels ranging from 61 to 68%. The approach used was able to accommodate variable climatic conditions, which had substantial impacts on vegetation growth patterns and agricultural production across the state between both regions and years. The production of an annual dataset with complete spatial coverage for Victoria provides a reliable base data set with an accuracy that is fit-for-purpose for many applications. PMID:26602009

  12. Geoinformatics for the Mapping of Nexus Between Poverty and Land Degradation in Drylands of Thar Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaur, Mahesh

    2012-07-01

    contributes to the relatively low Human Development Index (HDI) indicators. Besides the extreme deprivations in the normal course of life, the poor become particularly vulnerable at the time of recurrent drought induced crisis. (MPOWER, 2010) The present study demonstrates application of earth observations for the mapping of nexus between poverty and land degradation. The empirical study carried out by the investigator in the Pali district highlights that such technological inputs could be applied in support of the poor and marginal farming community in the different parts of State and the country at cadastral level.

  13. Gemas: Geochemical mapping of the agricultural and grasing land soils of Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimann, Clemens; Fabian, Karl; Birke, Manfred; Demetriades, Alecos; Matschullat, Jörg; Gemas Project Team

    2017-04-01

    Geochemical Mapping of Agricultural and grazing land Soil (GEMAS) is a cooperative project between the Geochemistry Expert Group of EuroGeoSurveys and Eurometaux. During 2008 and until early 2009, a total of 2108 samples of agricultural (ploughed land, 0-20 cm, Ap-samples) and 2023 samples of grazing land (0-10 cm, Gr samples)) soil were collected at a density of 1 site/2500 km2 each from 33 European countries, covering an area of 5,600,000 km2. All samples were analysed for 52 chemical elements following an aqua regia extraction, 42 elements by XRF (total), and soil properties, like CEC, TOC, pH (CaCl2), following tight external quality control procedures. In addition, the Ap soil samples were analysed for 57 elements in a mobile metal ion (MMI®) extraction, Pb isotopes, magnetic susceptibility and total C, N and S. The results demonstrate that robust geochemical maps of Europe can be constructed based on low density sampling, the two independent sample materials, Ap and Gr, show very comparable distribution patterns across Europe. At the European scale, element distribution patterns are governed by natural processes, most often a combination of geology and climate. The geochemical maps reflect most of the known metal mining districts in Europe. In addition, a number of new anomalies emerge that may indicate mineral potential. The size of some anomalies is such that they can only be detected when mapping at the continental scale. For some elements completely new geological settings are detected. An anthropogenic impact at a much more local scale is discernible in the immediate vicinity of some major European cities (e.g., London, Paris) and some metal smelters. The impact of agriculture is visible for Cu (vineyard soils) and for some further elements only in the mobile metal ion (MMI) extraction. For several trace elements deficiency issues are a larger threat to plant, animal and finally human health at the European scale than toxicity. Taking the famous step

  14. Covariance of biophysical data with digital topographic and land use maps over the FIFE site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, F. W.; Schimel, D. S.; Friedl, M. A.; Michaelsen, J. C.; Kittel, T. G. F.; Dubayah, R.; Dozier, J.

    1992-11-01

    Sampling design is critical in locating ground sampling stations for large-scale climatological field experiments. In the stratified sampling design adopted for the First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Field Experiment (FIFE), the study region was stratified into 14 different terrain units based on land use/land cover and topographic variables that were hypothesized to have a strong influence on surface biophysical properties. Digital terrain maps were produced to facilitate ground data integration and extrapolation. This paper describes the biophysical stratification of the FIFE site, implementation of the stratification using geographic information system (GIS) techniques, and validation of the stratification with respect to field measurements of biomass, soil moisture, Bowen ratio (β), and the greenness vegetation index (GVI) derived from thematic mapper satellite data. Maps of burning and topographic position were significantly associated with variation in biomass, GVI, and β. The effects of burning and topography were stronger for the Konza Prairie Long-Term Ecological Research (KPLTER) site than for the rest of the FIFE site, where cattle grazing was a major confounding effect. The stratified design did not appreciably change the estimated site-wide means for surface climate parameters but accounted for between 25 and 45% of the sample variance depending on the variable. The design was weakened by undersampling of several strata, by high within-station variance in soil and vegetation data, and by failure to account for diverse land management practices on private lands surrounding KPLTER. We recommend that future large-scale climatological studies include the development of a digital terrain data base well in advance of field campaigns and that multitemporal imagery be used to obtain preliminary estimates of spatial and temporal variance in surface biophysical properties. We also recommend that sampling for the most

  15. Land use mapping from CBERS-2 images with open source tools by applying different classification algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanhouse-García, Antonio J.; Rangel-Peraza, Jesús Gabriel; Bustos-Terrones, Yaneth; García-Ferrer, Alfonso; Mesas-Carrascosa, Francisco J.

    2016-02-01

    Land cover classification is often based on different characteristics between their classes, but with great homogeneity within each one of them. This cover is obtained through field work or by mean of processing satellite images. Field work involves high costs; therefore, digital image processing techniques have become an important alternative to perform this task. However, in some developing countries and particularly in Casacoima municipality in Venezuela, there is a lack of geographic information systems due to the lack of updated information and high costs in software license acquisition. This research proposes a low cost methodology to develop thematic mapping of local land use and types of coverage in areas with scarce resources. Thematic mapping was developed from CBERS-2 images and spatial information available on the network using open source tools. The supervised classification method per pixel and per region was applied using different classification algorithms and comparing them among themselves. Classification method per pixel was based on Maxver algorithms (maximum likelihood) and Euclidean distance (minimum distance), while per region classification was based on the Bhattacharya algorithm. Satisfactory results were obtained from per region classification, where overall reliability of 83.93% and kappa index of 0.81% were observed. Maxver algorithm showed a reliability value of 73.36% and kappa index 0.69%, while Euclidean distance obtained values of 67.17% and 0.61% for reliability and kappa index, respectively. It was demonstrated that the proposed methodology was very useful in cartographic processing and updating, which in turn serve as a support to develop management plans and land management. Hence, open source tools showed to be an economically viable alternative not only for forestry organizations, but for the general public, allowing them to develop projects in economically depressed and/or environmentally threatened areas.

  16. Application of satellite and GIS technologies for land-cover and land-use mapping at the rural-urban fringe - A case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Treitz, P.M.; Howarth, P.J.; Gong, Peng (Waterloo, University (Canada))

    1992-04-01

    SPOT HRV multispectral and panchromatic data were recorded and coregistered for a portion of the rural-urban fringe of Toronto, Canada. A two-stage digital analysis algorithm incorporating a spectral-class frequency-based contextual classification of eight land-cover and land-use classes resulted in an overall Kappa coefficient of 82.2 percent for training-area data and a Kappa coefficient of 70.3 percent for test-area data. A matrix-overlay analysis was then performed within the geographic information system (GIS) to combine the land-cover and land-use classes generated from the SPOT digital classification with zoning information for the area. The map that was produced has an estimated interpretation accuracy of 78 percent. Global Positioning System (GPS) data provided a positional reference for new road networks. These networks, in addition to the new land-cover and land-use map derived from the SPOT HRV data, provide an up-to-date synthesis of change conditions in the area. 51 refs.

  17. Effect of land-use on the P forms of an Andisol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Henríquez

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The effect of agricultural land use on the forms of P in a Typic Hapludand was evaluated. An area of 8.4 ha composed of 3 adjacent lots, dedicated for over 20 years to secondary forest and plantings of sugarcane and coffee, was chosen at Juan Viñas, Costa Rica. Soil samples were taken using an 8x6 grid layout of sampling points, spaced at 40 m. Soil samples were analyzed with the P fractionation methodology proposed by Hedley et ál. (1982. Total P varied between 936 and 2516 mg.kg-1. Both coffee and sugar cane lots (1934 y 1754 mg.kg-1 respectively, showed the highest values of total-P compared with the forest (1419 mg.kg- 1, suggesting a positive overall balance of P due to its accumulation through the years. The coffee area showed the highest values of P-labile and P-sesquioxides-Fe/Al, which was related to usual higher fertilization compared with areas of sugarcane and forest. The greatest value of P-residual was found in sugarcane with almost 48% of total P. The P-organic varied 27 to 29% of the total suggesting its importance as valuable sink of P. We conclude that the type of land use had a significant effect on the forms of P which was observed in both the quantity and distributionof different forms of P in soil.

  18. Land cover mapping of the National Park Service northwest Alaska management area using Landsat multispectral and thematic mapper satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markon, C.J.; Wesser, Sara

    1998-01-01

    A land cover map of the National Park Service northwest Alaska management area was produced using digitally processed Landsat data. These and other environmental data were incorporated into a geographic information system to provide baseline information about the nature and extent of resources present in this northwest Alaskan environment.This report details the methodology, depicts vegetation profiles of the surrounding landscape, and describes the different vegetation types mapped. Portions of nine Landsat satellite (multispectral scanner and thematic mapper) scenes were used to produce a land cover map of the Cape Krusenstern National Monument and Noatak National Preserve and to update an existing land cover map of Kobuk Valley National Park Valley National Park. A Bayesian multivariate classifier was applied to the multispectral data sets, followed by the application of ancillary data (elevation, slope, aspect, soils, watersheds, and geology) to enhance the spectral separation of classes into more meaningful vegetation types. The resulting land cover map contains six major land cover categories (forest, shrub, herbaceous, sparse/barren, water, other) and 19 subclasses encompassing 7 million hectares. General narratives of the distribution of the subclasses throughout the project area are given along with vegetation profiles showing common relationships between topographic gradients and vegetation communities.

  19. AVIRIS Land-Surface Mapping in Support of the Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Dar A.; Gamon, John; Keightley, Keir; Prentiss, Dylan; Reith, Ernest; Green, Robert

    2001-01-01

    A key scientific objective of the original Boreal Ecosystem-Atmospheric Study (BOREAS) field campaign (1993-1996) was to obtain the baseline data required for modeling and predicting fluxes of energy, mass, and trace gases in the boreal forest biome. These data sets are necessary to determine the sensitivity of the boreal forest biome to potential climatic changes and potential biophysical feedbacks on climate. A considerable volume of remotely-sensed and supporting field data were acquired by numerous researchers to meet this objective. By design, remote sensing and modeling were considered critical components for scaling efforts, extending point measurements from flux towers and field sites over larger spatial and longer temporal scales. A major focus of the BOREAS follow-on program is concerned with integrating the diverse remotely sensed and ground-based data sets to address specific questions such as carbon dynamics at local to regional scales. The Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) has the potential of contributing to BOREAS through: (1) accurate retrieved apparent surface reflectance; (2) improved landcover classification; and (3) direct assessment of biochemical/biophysical information such as canopy liquid water and chlorophyll concentration through pigment fits. In this paper, we present initial products for major flux tower sites including: (1) surface reflectance of dominant cover types; (2) a land-cover classification developed using spectral mixture analysis (SMA) and Multiple Endmember Spectral Mixture Analysis (MESMA); and (3) liquid water maps. Our goal is to compare these land-cover maps to existing maps and to incorporate AVIRIS image products into models of photosynthetic flux.

  20. USE OF LANDSAT TM FOR MAPPING LAND USE IN THE ENDORHEIC AREA - CASE OF GADAINE PLAIN (EASTERN ALGERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabah BOUHATA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Information on land use is essential in environmental projects and ecosystem management, these data allow to approach the reality of lands and understand the challenges of development. The emergence of geospatial technology has provided an easy way to detect the use of land. This article presents the results of mapping land use based on remote sensing data (Landsat TM 2009 for the Gadaine plain region. The analysis of satellite image has identified six main types of land use (sebkha, chotts, bare soil, forest, agriculture, and cereal. The results allow the identification of each type of occupancy (spatial and area across the plain where interventions are needed for better management of this endorheic space and also to limit the processes of land degradation.

  1. Enhanced Built-Up and Bareness Index (EBBI for Mapping Built-Up and Bare Land in an Urban Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Wayan Arthana

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Remotely sensed imagery is a type of data that is compatible with the monitoring and mapping of changes in built-up and bare land within urban areas as the impacts of population growth and urbanisation increase. The application of currently available remote sensing indices, however, has some limitations with respect to distinguishing built-up and bare land in urban areas. In this study, a new index for transforming remote sensing data for mapping built-up and bare land areas is proposed. The Enhanced Built-Up and Bareness Index (EBBI is able to map built-up and bare land areas using a single calculation. The EBBI is the first built-up and bare land index that applies near infrared (NIR, short wave infrared (SWIR, and thermal infrared (TIR channels simultaneously. This new index was applied to distinguish built-up and bare land areas in Denpasar (Bali, Indonesia and had a high accuracy level when compared to existing indices. The EBBI was more effective at discriminating built-up and bare land areas and at increasing the accuracy of the built-up density percentage than five other indices.

  2. Assessing the Application of a Geographic Presence-Only Model for Land Suitability Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heumann, Benjamin W; Walsh, Stephen J; McDaniel, Phillip M

    2011-09-01

    Recent advances in ecological modeling have focused on novel methods for characterizing the environment that use presence-only data and machine-learning algorithms to predict the likelihood of species occurrence. These novel methods may have great potential for land suitability applications in the developing world where detailed land cover information is often unavailable or incomplete. This paper assesses the adaptation and application of the presence-only geographic species distribution model, MaxEnt, for agricultural crop suitability mapping in a rural Thailand where lowland paddy rice and upland field crops predominant. To assess this modeling approach, three independent crop presence datasets were used including a social-demographic survey of farm households, a remote sensing classification of land use/land cover, and ground control points, used for geodetic and thematic reference that vary in their geographic distribution and sample size. Disparate environmental data were integrated to characterize environmental settings across Nang Rong District, a region of approximately 1,300 sq. km in size. Results indicate that the MaxEnt model is capable of modeling crop suitability for upland and lowland crops, including rice varieties, although model results varied between datasets due to the high sensitivity of the model to the distribution of observed crop locations in geographic and environmental space. Accuracy assessments indicate that model outcomes were influenced by the sample size and the distribution of sample points in geographic and environmental space. The need for further research into accuracy assessments of presence-only models lacking true absence data is discussed. We conclude that the Maxent model can provide good estimates of crop suitability, but many areas need to be carefully scrutinized including geographic distribution of input data and assessment methods to ensure realistic modeling results.

  3. Airborne geoid mapping of land and sea areas of East Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamil, H.; Kadir, M.; Forsberg, R.; Olesen, A.; Isa, M. N.; Rasidi, S.; Mohamed, A.; Chihat, Z.; Nielsen, E.; Majid, F.; Talib, K.; Aman, S.

    2017-02-01

    This paper describes the development of a new geoid-based vertical datum from airborne gravity data, by the Department of Survey and Mapping Malaysia, on land and in the South China Sea out of the coast of East Malaysia region, covering an area of about 610,000 square kilometres. More than 107,000 km flight line of airborne gravity data over land and marine areas of East Malaysia has been combined to provide a seamless land-to-sea gravity field coverage; with an estimated accuracy of better than 2.0 mGal. The iMAR-IMU processed gravity anomaly data has been used during a 2014-2016 airborne survey to extend a composite gravity solution across a number of minor gaps on selected lines, using a draping technique. The geoid computations were all done with the GRAVSOFT suite of programs from DTU-Space. EGM2008 augmented with GOCE spherical harmonic model has been used to spherical harmonic degree N = 720. The gravimetric geoid first was tied at one tide-gauge (in Kota Kinabalu, KK2019) to produce a fitted geoid, my_geoid2017_fit_kk. The fitted geoid was offset from the gravimetric geoid by +0.852 m, based on the comparison at the tide-gauge benchmark KK2019. Consequently, orthometric height at the six other tide gauge stations was computed from HGPS Lev = hGPS - Nmy_geoid2017_.t_kk. Comparison of the conventional (HLev) and GPS-levelling heights (HGPS Lev) at the six tide gauge locations indicate RMS height difference of 2.6 cm. The final gravimetric geoidwas fitted to the seven tide gauge stations and is known as my_geoid2017_fit_east. The accuracy of the gravimetric geoid is estimated to be better than 5 cm across most of East Malaysia land and marine areas

  4. GIS based mapping of land cover changes utilizing multi-temporal remotely sensed image data in Lake Hawassa Watershed, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigatu Wondrade; Dick, Øystein B; Tveite, Havard

    2014-03-01

    Classifying multi-temporal image data to produce thematic maps and quantify land cover changes is one of the most common applications of remote sensing. Mapping land cover changes at the regional level is essential for a wide range of applications including land use planning, decision making, land cover database generation, and as a source of information for sustainable management of natural resources. Land cover changes in Lake Hawassa Watershed, Southern Ethiopia, were investigated using Landsat MSS image data of 1973, and Landsat TM images of 1985, 1995, and 2011, covering a period of nearly four decades. Each image was partitioned in a GIS environment, and classified using an unsupervised algorithm followed by a supervised classification method. A hybrid approach was employed in order to reduce spectral confusion due to high variability of land cover. Classification of satellite image data was performed integrating field data, aerial photographs, topographical maps, medium resolution satellite image (SPOT 20 m), and visual image interpretation. The image data were classified into nine land cover types: water, built-up, cropland, woody vegetation, forest, grassland, swamp, bare land, and scrub. The overall accuracy of the LULC maps ranged from 82.5 to 85.0 %. The achieved accuracies were reasonable, and the observed classification errors were attributable to coarse spatial resolution and pixels containing a mixture of cover types. Land cover change statistics were extracted and tabulated using the ERDAS Imagine software. The results indicated an increase in built-up area, cropland, and bare land areas, and a reduction in the six other land cover classes. Predominant land cover is cropland changing from 43.6 % in 1973 to 56.4 % in 2011. A significant portion of land cover was converted into cropland. Woody vegetation and forest cover which occupied 21.0 and 10.3 % in 1973, respectively, diminished to 13.6 and 5.6 % in 2011. The change in water body was very

  5. A methodology for small scale rural land use mapping in semi-arid developing countries using orbital imagery. Part 6: A low-cost method for land use mapping using simple visual techniques of interpretation. [Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangenderen, J. L. (Principal Investigator); Lock, B. F.

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. It was found that color composite transparencies and monocular magnification provided the best base for land use interpretation. New methods for determining optimum sample sizes and analyzing interpretation accuracy levels were developed. All stages of the methodology were assessed, in the operational sense, during the production of a 1:250,000 rural land use map of Murcia Province, Southeast Spain.

  6. Mapping soil salinity in irrigated land using optical remote sensing data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachid Lhissoui

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Soil salinity caused by natural or human-induced processes is certainly a severe environmental problem that already affects 400 million hectares and seriously threatens an equivalent surface. Salinization causes negative effects on the ground; it affects agricultural production, infrastructure, water resources and biodiversity. In semi-arid and arid areas, 21% of irrigated lands suffer from waterlogging, salinity and/or sodicity that reduce their yields. 77 million hectares are saline soils induced by human activity, including 58% in the irrigated areas. In the irrigated perimeter of Tadla plain (central Morocco, the increased use of saline groundwater and surface water, coupled with agricultural intensification leads to the deterioration of soil quality. Experimental methods for monitoring soil salinity by direct measurements in situ are very demanding of time and resources, and also very limited in terms of spatial coverage. Several studies have described the usefulness of remote sensing for mapping salinity by its synoptic coverage and the sensitivity of the electromagnetic signal to surface soil parameters. In this study, we used an image of the TM Landsat sensor and field measurements of electrical conductivity (EC, the correlation between the image data and field measurements allowed us to develop a semi-empirical model allowing the mapping of soil salinity in the irrigated perimeter of Tadla plain. The validation of this model by the ground truth provides a correlation coefficient r² = 0.90. Map obtained from this model allows the identification of different salinization classes in the study area.

  7. Agriculture pest and disease risk maps considering MSG satellite data and land surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques da Silva, J. R.; Damásio, C. V.; Sousa, A. M. O.; Bugalho, L.; Pessanha, L.; Quaresma, P.

    2015-06-01

    Pest risk maps for agricultural use are usually constructed from data obtained from in-situ meteorological weather stations, which are relatively sparsely distributed and are often quite expensive to install and difficult to maintain. This leads to the creation of maps with relatively low spatial resolution, which are very much dependent on interpolation methodologies. Considering that agricultural applications typically require a more detailed scale analysis than has traditionally been available, remote sensing technology can offer better monitoring at increasing spatial and temporal resolutions, thereby, improving pest management results and reducing costs. This article uses ground temperature, or land surface temperature (LST), data distributed by EUMETSAT/LSASAF (with a spatial resolution of 3 × 3 km (nadir resolution) and a revisiting time of 15 min) to generate one of the most commonly used parameters in pest modeling and monitoring: "thermal integral over air temperature (accumulated degree-days)". The results show a clear association between the accumulated LST values over a threshold and the accumulated values computed from meteorological stations over the same threshold (specific to a particular tomato pest). The results are very promising and enable the production of risk maps for agricultural pests with a degree of spatial and temporal detail that is difficult to achieve using in-situ meteorological stations.

  8. Synergy of airborne LiDAR and Worldview-2 satellite imagery for land cover and habitat mapping: A BIO_SOS-EODHaM case study for the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mücher, C. A.; Roupioz, L.; Kramer, H.; Bogers, M. M. B.; Jongman, R. H. G.; Lucas, R. M.; Kosmidou, V. E.; Petrou, Z.; Manakos, I.; Padoa-Schioppa, E.; Adamo, M.; Blonda, P.

    2015-05-01

    A major challenge is to develop a biodiversity observation system that is cost effective and applicable in any geographic region. Measuring and reliable reporting of trends and changes in biodiversity requires amongst others detailed and accurate land cover and habitat maps in a standard and comparable way. The objective of this paper is to assess the EODHaM (EO Data for Habitat Mapping) classification results for a Dutch case study. The EODHaM system was developed within the BIO_SOS (The BIOdiversity multi-SOurce monitoring System: from Space TO Species) project and contains the decision rules for each land cover and habitat class based on spectral and height information. One of the main findings is that canopy height models, as derived from LiDAR, in combination with very high resolution satellite imagery provides a powerful input for the EODHaM system for the purpose of generic land cover and habitat mapping for any location across the globe. The assessment of the EODHaM classification results based on field data showed an overall accuracy of 74% for the land cover classes as described according to the Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) Land Cover Classification System (LCCS) taxonomy at level 3, while the overall accuracy was lower (69.0%) for the habitat map based on the General Habitat Category (GHC) system for habitat surveillance and monitoring. A GHC habitat class is determined for each mapping unit on the basis of the composition of the individual life forms and height measurements. The classification showed very good results for forest phanerophytes (FPH) when individual life forms were analyzed in terms of their percentage coverage estimates per mapping unit from the LCCS classification and validated with field surveys. Analysis for shrubby chamaephytes (SCH) showed less accurate results, but might also be due to less accurate field estimates of percentage coverage. Overall, the EODHaM classification results encouraged us to derive the heights of

  9. Mapping land water and energy balance relations through conditional sampling of remote sensing estimates of atmospheric forcing and surface states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhadi, Leila; Entekhabi, Dara; Salvucci, Guido

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we develop and apply a mapping estimation capability for key unknown parameters that link the surface water and energy balance equations. The method is applied to the Gourma region in West Africa. The accuracy of the estimation method at point scale was previously examined using flux tower data. In this study, the capability is scaled to be applicable with remotely sensed data products and hence allow mapping. Parameters of the system are estimated through a process that links atmospheric forcing (precipitation and incident radiation), surface states, and unknown parameters. Based on conditional averaging of land surface temperature and moisture states, respectively, a single objective function is posed that measures moisture and temperature-dependent errors solely in terms of observed forcings and surface states. This objective function is minimized with respect to parameters to identify evapotranspiration and drainage models and estimate water and energy balance flux components. The uncertainty of the estimated parameters (and associated statistical confidence limits) is obtained through the inverse of Hessian of the objective function, which is an approximation of the covariance matrix. This calibration-free method is applied to the mesoscale region of Gourma in West Africa using multiplatform remote sensing data. The retrievals are verified against tower-flux field site data and physiographic characteristics of the region. The focus is to find the functional form of the evaporative fraction dependence on soil moisture, a key closure function for surface and subsurface heat and moisture dynamics, using remote sensing data.

  10. Regional adaptation of a dynamic global vegetation model using a remote sensing data derived land cover map of Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khvostikov, S.; Venevsky, S.; Bartalev, S.

    2015-12-01

    The dynamic global vegetation model (DGVM) SEVER has been regionally adapted using a remote sensing data-derived land cover map in order to improve the reconstruction conformity of the distribution of vegetation functional types over Russia. The SEVER model was modified to address noticeable divergences between modelling results and the land cover map. The model modification included a light competition method elaboration and the introduction of a tundra class into the model. The rigorous optimisation of key model parameters was performed using a two-step procedure. First, an approximate global optimum was found using the efficient global optimisation (EGO) algorithm, and afterwards a local search in the vicinity of the approximate optimum was performed using the quasi-Newton algorithm BFGS. The regionally adapted model shows a significant improvement of the vegetation distribution reconstruction over Russia with better matching with the satellite-derived land cover map, which was confirmed by both a visual comparison and a formal conformity criterion.

  11. Discovering Land Cover Web Map Services from the Deep Web with JavaScript Invocation Rules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongyang Hou

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Automatic discovery of isolated land cover web map services (LCWMSs can potentially help in sharing land cover data. Currently, various search engine-based and crawler-based approaches have been developed for finding services dispersed throughout the surface web. In fact, with the prevalence of geospatial web applications, a considerable number of LCWMSs are hidden in JavaScript code, which belongs to the deep web. However, discovering LCWMSs from JavaScript code remains an open challenge. This paper aims to solve this challenge by proposing a focused deep web crawler for finding more LCWMSs from deep web JavaScript code and the surface web. First, the names of a group of JavaScript links are abstracted as initial judgements. Through name matching, these judgements are utilized to judge whether or not the fetched webpages contain predefined JavaScript links that may prompt JavaScript code to invoke WMSs. Secondly, some JavaScript invocation functions and URL formats for WMS are summarized as JavaScript invocation rules from prior knowledge of how WMSs are employed and coded in JavaScript. These invocation rules are used to identify the JavaScript code for extracting candidate WMSs through rule matching. The above two operations are incorporated into a traditional focused crawling strategy situated between the tasks of fetching webpages and parsing webpages. Thirdly, LCWMSs are selected by matching services with a set of land cover keywords. Moreover, a search engine for LCWMSs is implemented that uses the focused deep web crawler to retrieve and integrate the LCWMSs it discovers. In the first experiment, eight online geospatial web applications serve as seed URLs (Uniform Resource Locators and crawling scopes; the proposed crawler addresses only the JavaScript code in these eight applications. All 32 available WMSs hidden in JavaScript code were found using the proposed crawler, while not one WMS was discovered through the focused crawler

  12. Mapping Land Surface Temperature and Land Cover to Detect Urban Heat Island Effect: A Case Study of Tarkwa, South West Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Soakodan Aduah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Urban Heat Island (UHI effect controls internal climates of buildings and affects energy use and comfort of urban dwellers. The objective of this study was to detect UHI from Land Surface Temperature (LST and to investigate whether land cover has any influence on UHI in Tarkwa, South West Ghana using satellite remote sensing techniques. A Landsat 7 ETM+ image, DEM and meteorological data were used to generate a land cover map with the maximum likelihood classification algorithm whiles LST was modeled with the Landsat Plank’s curve. Validation of the LST map was achieved by comparing it with air temperature measured at the UMaT meteorological station. The mean modeled LST of 298.60 Kelvin compared well with the mean observed air temperature of 298.30 Kelvin. Furthermore, LST ranged between 289 and 305 Kelvin while urban areas and bare soils had higher LSTs than vegetated areas implying that higher NDVI areas are associated with lower temperatures. Hence, LST maps produced indicated the existence of UHI effect in the Tarkwa area. From the study it is evident that impervious and non-evaporative surfaces have high LSTs due to absence of vegetation. Therefore, uncontrolled land cover changes may intensify the UHI effect. The study has proven that remote sensing can be used in operational mapping of LST for climate studies, vegetation monitoring and detecting UHIs in the humid regions of Ghana. This confirms the important role Earth observation and geoinformation technology can play in environmental monitoring and management as global climate and land cover changes.

  13. Mapping Land Cover and Land Use Changes in the Congo Basin Forests with Optical Satellite Remote Sensing: a Pilot Project Exploring Methodologies that Improve Spatial Resolution and Map Accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinario, G.; Baraldi, A.; Altstatt, A. L.; Nackoney, J.

    2011-12-01

    The University of Maryland has been a USAID Central Africa Rregional Program for the Environment (CARPE) cross-cutting partner for many years, providing remote sensing derived information on forest cover and forest cover changes in support of CARPE's objectives of diminishing forest degradation, loss and biodiversity loss as a result of poor or inexistent land use planning strategies. Together with South Dakota State University, Congo Basin-wide maps have been provided that map forest cover loss at a maximum of 60m resolution, using Landsat imagery and higher resolution imagery for algorithm training and validation. However, to better meet the needs within the CARPE Landscapes, which call for higher resolution, more accurate land cover change maps, UMD has been exploring the use of the SIAM automatic spectral -rule classifier together with pan-sharpened Landsat data (15m resolution) and Very High Resolution imagery from various sources. The pilot project is being developed in collaboration with the African Wildlife Foundation in the Maringa Lopori Wamba CARPE Landscape. If successful in the future this methodology will make the creation of high resolution change maps faster and easier, making it accessible to other entities in the Congo Basin that need accurate land cover and land use change maps in order, for example, to create sustainable land use plans, conserve biodiversity and resources and prepare Reducing Emissions from forest Degradation and Deforestation (REDD) Measurement, Reporting and Verification (MRV) projects. The paper describes the need for higher resolution land cover change maps that focus on forest change dynamics such as the cycling between primary forests, secondary forest, agriculture and other expanding and intensifying land uses in the Maringa Lopori Wamba CARPE Landscape in the Equateur Province of the Democratic Republic of Congo. The Methodology uses the SIAM remote sensing imagery automatic spectral rule classifier, together with pan

  14. Compilation of functional soil maps for the support of spatial planning and land management in Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pásztor, László; Laborczi, Annamária; Takács, Katalin; Szatmári, Gábor; Fodor, Nándor; Illés, Gábor; Bakacsi, Zsófia; Szabó, József

    2015-04-01

    The main objective of the DOSoReMI.hu (Digital, Optimized, Soil Related Maps and Information in Hungary) project is to significantly extend the potential, how demands on spatial soil related information could be satisfied in Hungary. Although a great amount of soil information is available due to former mappings and surveys, there are more and more frequently emerging discrepancies between the available and the expected data. The gaps are planned to be filled with optimized DSM products heavily based on legacy soil data. Delineation of Areas with Excellent Productivity in the framework of the National Regional Development Plan or delimitation of Areas with Natural Constraints in Hungary according to the common European biophysical criteria are primary issues in national level spatial planning. Impact assessment of the forecasted climate change and the analysis of the possibilities of the adaptation in the agriculture and forestry can be supported by scenario based land management modelling, whose results can be also incorporated in spatial planning. All these challenges require adequate, preferably timely and spatially detailed knowledge of the soil cover. For the satisfaction of these demands the soil conditions of Hungary have been digitally mapped based on the most detailed, available recent and legacy soil data, applying proper DSM techniques. Various soil related information were mapped in three distinct approaches: (i) basic soil properties determining agri-environmental conditions (e.g.: soil type according to the Hungarian genetic classification, rootable depth, sand, silt and clay content by soil layers, pH, OM and carbonate content for the plough layer); (ii) biophysical criteria of natural handicaps (e.g.: poor drainage, unfavourable texture and stoniness, shallow rooting depth, poor chemical properties and soil moisture balance) defined by common European system and (iii) agro-meteorologically modelled yield values for different crops, meteorological

  15. Developing Land Surface Type Map with Biome Classification Scheme Using Suomi NPP/JPSS VIIRS Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Huang, Chengquan; Zhan, Xiwu; Jin, Huiran

    2016-08-01

    Accurate representation of actual terrestrial surface types at regional to global scales is an important element for a wide range of applications, such as land surface parameterization, modeling of biogeochemical cycles, and carbon cycle studies. In this study, in order to meet the requirement of the retrieval of global leaf area index (LAI) and fraction of photosynthetically active radiation absorbed by the vegetation (fPAR) and other studies, a global map generated from Suomi National Polar- orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) surface reflectance data in six major biome classes based on their canopy structures, which include: Grass/Cereal Crops, Shrubs, Broadleaf Crops, Savannas, Broadleaf Forests, and Needleleaf Forests, was created. The primary biome classes were converted from an International Geosphere-Biosphere Program (IGBP) legend global surface type data that was created in previous study, and the separation of two crop types are based on a secondary classification.

  16. Multitemporal Sentinel-1A Data for Urban Land Cover Mapping Using Deep Learning: Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCutchan, Marvin; Ban, Yifang; Niu, Xin

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this research is to evaluate multitemporal Sentinel-1A SAR data for urban land cover mapping using a pixel-based Deep Belief Network (DBN) and an object-based post-processing. Multitemporal Sentinel-1A SAR in both ascending and descending orbits were acquired in Stockholm during the 2015 vegetation season. The images were first terrain corrected, co-registered, speckle filtered and scaled to 8 bit. Then the images were segmented using KTH-SEG, an edge- aware region growing and merging algorithm. For classification, a pixel-based deep belief network (DBN) was used. Then classification result was post-processed using object-based majority voting. For comparison, the same dataset was classified using an object-based support vector machine (SVM). The preliminary results show that the hybrid deep learning classification scheme produced comparable results as object-based SVM while yielded higher accuracies for builtup classes.

  17. Soil Moisture Mapping in an Arid Area Using a Land Unit Area (LUA Sampling Approach and Geostatistical Interpolation Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Gharechelou

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Soil moisture (SM plays a key role in many environmental processes and has a high spatial and temporal variability. Collecting sample SM data through field surveys (e.g., for validation of remote sensing-derived products can be very expensive and time consuming if a study area is large, and producing accurate SM maps from the sample point data is a difficult task as well. In this study, geospatial processing techniques are used to combine several geo-environmental layers relevant to SM (soil, geology, rainfall, land cover, etc. into a land unit area (LUA map, which delineates regions with relatively homogeneous geological/geomorphological, land use/land cover, and climate characteristics. This LUA map is used to guide the collection of sample SM data in the field, and the field data is finally spatially interpolated to create a wall-to-wall map of SM in the study area (Garmsar, Iran. The main goal of this research is to create a SM map in an arid area, using a land unit area (LUA approach to obtain the most appropriate sample locations for collecting SM field data. Several environmental GIS layers, which have an impact on SM, were combined to generate a LUA map, and then field surveying was done in each class of the LUA map. A SM map was produced based on LUA, remote sensing data indexes, and spatial interpolation of the field survey sample data. The several interpolation methods (inverse distance weighting, kriging, and co-kriging were evaluated for generating SM maps from the sample data. The produced maps were compared to each other and validated using ground truth data. The results show that the LUA approach is a reasonable method to create the homogenous field to introduce a representative sample for field soil surveying. The geostatistical SM map achieved adequate accuracy; however, trend analysis and distribution of the soil sample point locations within the LUA types should be further investigated to achieve even better results. Co

  18. Mapping Temperate Vegetation Climate Adaptation Variability Using Normalized Land Surface Phenology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Liang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Climate influences geographic differences of vegetation phenology through both contemporary and historical variability. The latter effect is embodied in vegetation heterogeneity underlain by spatially varied genotype and species compositions tied to climatic adaptation. Such long-term climatic effects are difficult to map and therefore often neglected in evaluating spatially explicit phenological responses to climate change. In this study we demonstrate a way to indirectly infer the portion of land surface phenology variation that is potentially contributed by underlying genotypic differences across space. The method undertaken normalized remotely sensed vegetation start-of-season (or greenup onset with a cloned plants-based phenological model. As the geography of phenological model prediction (first leaf represents the instantaneous effect of contemporary climate, the normalized land surface phenology potentially reveals vegetation heterogeneity that is related to climatic adaptation. The study was done at the continental scale for the conterminous U.S., with a focus on the eastern humid temperate domain. Our findings suggest that, in an analogous scenario, if a uniform contemporary climate existed everywhere, spring vegetation greenup would occur earlier in the north than in the south. This is in accordance with known species-level clinal variations—for many temperate plant species, populations adapted to colder climates require less thermal forcing to initiate growth than those in warmer climates. This study, for the first time, shows that such geographic adaption relationships are supported at the ecosystem level. Mapping large-scale vegetation climate adaptation patterns contributes to our ability to better track geographically varied phenological responses to climate change.

  19. Land Use and Land Cover, Comprehensive Planning Maps, Published in 2007, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Lafayette County Land Records.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Land Use and Land Cover dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2007. It is...

  20. Exploration of very high spatial resolution data for vegetation mapping using cartographic ontologies: Identifying life forms to mapping formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Gallegos, Hugo Benigno

    Vegetation mapping is often considered the process of identifying landscape patterns of individuals or clusters of species or life forms (LF). At the landscape scale, the larger pattern represented by individuals or clusters represents the conceptualization of "vegetation mapping" and can be used as a building block to describe an ecosystem. To represent these building blocks or LF a "common entity (CE)" concept is introduced to represent the components of Formations as described by the National Vegetation Classification (NVC) system. The NVC has established protocols to consistently represent plant communities and promote coordinated management, particularly across jurisdictional boundaries. However, it is not a universal standard and the methods of producing detailed maps of vegetation CE from very high spatial resolution (VHR) remote sensing data are important research questions. This research addressed how best to understand and represent plant cover in arid regions, the most effective methods of mapping vegetation cover using high spatial resolution data, how to assess the accuracy of these maps, and their value in establishing more standardized mapping protocols across ecosystems. Utilizing VHR products from the IKONOS and QuickBird sensors the study focused on the Coronado National Memorial and Chiricahua National Monument in Arizona and Los Ajos and Pinacate - Grand Desierto Biosphere Reserves in Mexico. Individual CE were semi-automatically mapped incorporating spectral, textural and geostatistical variables. The results were evaluated across sensors, study sites, and input variables. In addition, multiple methods of acquiring field data for accuracy assessment were evaluated and then an evaluation was made of a semi-automatic determination of Formation based on CE. The results of the study suggest consistency across study sites using the IKONOS data. A comparison between VHR products from the same place is feasible but sensor spectral differences may

  1. Mapping the land cover in coastal Gabes oases using the EO-1 HYPERION hyperspectral sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Arfa, Jouda; Bergès, Jean Claude; Beltrando, Gérard; Rim, Katlane; Zargouni, Fouad

    2015-04-01

    Gabes region is characterized by unique maritime oases in Mediterranean basin. Unfortunately these oases are sensitive areas due to a harsh competition for land and water between different user groups (urban, industry, agriculture). An industrial complex is now located in center of this region, cultivation practices have shifted from a traditional multi-layer plant association system and moreover the Gabes city itself is expanding in the very core of oases. The oases of Gabes are transformed into city oases; they undergo multiform interactions whose amplify their environmental dynamic. A proper management of this environment should be based on a fine cartography of land use and remote sensing plays a major role in this issue. However the use of legacy natural resource remote sensing data is disappointing. The crop production strategies rely on a fine scale ground split among various uses and the ground resolution of these satellites is not adequate. Our study relies on hyperspectral images in order to cartography oases boundaries and land use. We tested the potential of Hyperion hyperspectral satellite imagery for mapping dynamics oases covered. We have the opportunity to access EO1/Hyperion data on seven different dates on 2009 and 2010. This dataset allows us to compare various hyperspectral based processing both on the basis on information pertinence and time stability. In this frame some index appear as significantly efficient: cellulose index, vegetation mask, water presence index. On another side spectral unmixing looks as more sensitive to slight ground changes. These results raise the issue of compared interest of enhancing spatial resolution versus spectral resolution. Whereas high resolution ground observation satellites are obviously more appropriate for visual recognition process, reliable information could be extracted from hyperspectral information through a fully automatic process.

  2. A Review of the Application of Optical and Radar Remote Sensing Data Fusion to Land Use Mapping and Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha Joshi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The wealth of complementary data available from remote sensing missions can hugely aid efforts towards accurately determining land use and quantifying subtle changes in land use management or intensity. This study reviewed 112 studies on fusing optical and radar data, which offer unique spectral and structural information, for land cover and use assessments. Contrary to our expectations, only 50 studies specifically addressed land use, and five assessed land use changes, while the majority addressed land cover. The advantages of fusion for land use analysis were assessed in 32 studies, and a large majority (28 studies concluded that fusion improved results compared to using single data sources. Study sites were small, frequently 300–3000 km 2 or individual plots, with a lack of comparison of results and accuracies across sites. Although a variety of fusion techniques were used, pre-classification fusion followed by pixel-level inputs in traditional classification algorithms (e.g., Gaussian maximum likelihood classification was common, but often without a concrete rationale on the applicability of the method to the land use theme being studied. Progress in this field of research requires the development of robust techniques of fusion to map the intricacies of land uses and changes therein and systematic procedures to assess the benefits of fusion over larger spatial scales.

  3. A probabilistic approach for mapping free-text queries to complex web forms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjin-Kam-Jet, Kien; Trieschnigg, Rudolf Berend; Hiemstra, Djoerd

    Web applications with complex interfaces consisting of multiple input fields should understand free-text queries. We propose a probabilistic approach to map parts of a free-text query to the fields of a complex web form. Our method uses token models rather than only static dictionaries to create

  4. Assessment of Irrigation Land Suitability and Development of Map for the Fogera Catchment Using GIS, South Gondar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagnenet Sultan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Irrigation land suitability assessment and mapping play an imperative role for sustainable utilization of scarce physical land resources. The objectives of this study were to prepare spatial data base of physical land resources for irrigated agriculture and to assess land suitability for irrigation and developing suitable area map for the study area. The study was conducted at Fogera catchment, South Gondar. Soil and water sampling spots were selected based on free and grid survey techniques and their locations were taken using Global Positioning System (GPS. Geographical Information System (GIS techniques were used to develop irrigation land suitability map of the study area. Attributes of parameters were collected and used for suitability assessment. Attributes used as criteria for irrigation suitability analysis were ECe, ESP, soil depth, texture, pH, top and sub soil stoniness, water table depth, flood hazard, ground water quality (SAR and EC and slope. Point data with their attribute were arranged and proximity analysis of Arc-GIS was made this resulted into twelve mapping units. The final irrigation suitability map of the project area was derived after overlay analysis. On the basis of stoniness, soil salinity, soil alkalinity, soil depth and groundwater quality it was concluded that 72 percent of the study area is potentially suitable for irrigation and 28 percent was classified as unsuitable (N due to drainage limitation, flood hazard, texture and slope factors. Of the potentially suitable land, 1 percent was highly suitable (S1, 28 percent was moderately suitable (S2, and 43 percent is marginally suitable (S3.

  5. Land cover mapping with emphasis to burnt area delineation using co-orbital ALI and Landsat TM imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petropoulos, George P.; Kontoes, Charalambos C.; Keramitsoglou, Iphigenia

    2012-08-01

    In this study, the potential of EO-1 Advanced Land Imager (ALI) radiometer for land cover and especially burnt area mapping from a single image analysis is investigated. Co-orbital imagery from the Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) was also utilised for comparison purposes. Both images were acquired shortly after the suppression of a fire occurred during the summer of 2009 North-East of Athens, the capital of Greece. The Maximum Likelihood (ML), Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) and Support Vector Machines (SVMs) classifiers were parameterised and subsequently applied to the acquired satellite datasets. Evaluation of the land use/cover mapping accuracy was based on the error matrix statistics. Also, the McNemar test was used to evaluate the statistical significance of the differences between the approaches tested. Derived burnt area estimates were validated against the operationally deployed Services and Applications For Emergency Response (SAFER) Burnt Scar Mapping service. All classifiers applied to either ALI or TM imagery proved flexible enough to map land cover and also to extract the burnt area from other land surface types. The highest total classification accuracy and burnt area detection capability was returned from the application of SVMs to ALI data. This was due to the SVMs ability to identify an optimal separating hyperplane for best classes' separation that was able to better utilise ALI's advanced technological characteristics in comparison to those of TM sensor. This study is to our knowledge the first of its kind, effectively demonstrating the benefits of the combined application of SVMs to ALI data further implying that ALI technology may prove highly valuable in mapping burnt areas and land use/cover if it is incorporated into the development of Landsat 8 mission, planned to be launched in the coming years.

  6. Meter-scale Urban Land Cover Mapping for EPA EnviroAtlas Using Machine Learning and OBIA Remote Sensing Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilant, A. N.; Baynes, J.; Dannenberg, M.; Riegel, J.; Rudder, C.; Endres, K.

    2013-12-01

    US EPA EnviroAtlas is an online collection of tools and resources that provides geospatial data, maps, research, and analysis on the relationships between nature, people, health, and the economy (http://www.epa.gov/research/enviroatlas/index.htm). Using EnviroAtlas, you can see and explore information related to the benefits (e.g., ecosystem services) that humans receive from nature, including clean air, clean and plentiful water, natural hazard mitigation, biodiversity conservation, food, fuel, and materials, recreational opportunities, and cultural and aesthetic value. EPA developed several urban land cover maps at very high spatial resolution (one-meter pixel size) for a portion of EnviroAtlas devoted to urban studies. This urban mapping effort supported analysis of relations among land cover, human health and demographics at the US Census Block Group level. Supervised classification of 2010 USDA NAIP (National Agricultural Imagery Program) digital aerial photos produced eight-class land cover maps for several cities, including Durham, NC, Portland, ME, Tampa, FL, New Bedford, MA, Pittsburgh, PA, Portland, OR, and Milwaukee, WI. Semi-automated feature extraction methods were used to classify the NAIP imagery: genetic algorithms/machine learning, random forest, and object-based image analysis (OBIA). In this presentation we describe the image processing and fuzzy accuracy assessment methods used, and report on some sustainability and ecosystem service metrics computed using this land cover as input (e.g., carbon sequestration from USFS iTREE model; health and demographics in relation to road buffer forest width). We also discuss the land cover classification schema (a modified Anderson Level 1 after the National Land Cover Data (NLCD)), and offer some observations on lessons learned. Meter-scale urban land cover in Portland, OR overlaid on NAIP aerial photo. Streets, buildings and individual trees are identifiable.

  7. Land Use Cover Mapping of Water Melon and Cereals in Southern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costanza Fiorentino

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The new high-resolution images from the satellites as IKONOS, SPOT5, Quickbird2 give us the opportunity to map ground features, which were not detectable in the past, by using medium resolution remote sensed data (LANDSAT. More accurate and reliable maps of land cover can then be produced. However, classification procedure with these images is more complex than with the medium resolution remote sensing data for two main reasons: firstly, because of their exiguous number of spectral bands, secondly, owing to high spatial resolution, the assumption of pixel independence does not generally hold. It is then necessary to have a multi-temporal series of images or to use classifiers taking into account also proximal information. The data in this study were (i a remote sensing image taken by SPOT5 satellite in July 2007 and used to discriminate the water melon cover class and, (ii three multi-temporal remote sensing images taken by SPOT5 satellite in May, June and July 2008 used to discriminate water melon and cereal crop cover classes. For water melon recognition, providing a single image in 2007, an object-oriented technique was applied instead of a traditional, per pixel technique obtaining an increase of overall accuracy of 15%. In 2008, since it was available a multi-temporal data set, a traditional ‘Maximum Likelihood’ technique was applied for both water melon and cereal crop cover class. The overall accuracy is greater than 95%.

  8. Landing Site Selection and Surface Traverse Planning using the Lunar Mapping & Modeling Portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, E.; Chang, G.; Bui, B.; Sadaqathullah, S.; Kim, R.; Dodge, K.; Malhotra, S.

    2013-12-01

    Introduction: The Lunar Mapping and Modeling Portal (LMMP), is a web-based Portal and a suite of interactive visualization and analysis tools for users to access mapped lunar data products (including image mosaics, digital elevation models, etc.) from past and current lunar missions (e.g., Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, Apollo, etc.), and to perform in-depth analyses to support lunar surface mission planning and system design for future lunar exploration and science missions. It has been widely used by many scientists mission planners, as well as educators and public outreach (e.g., Google Lunar XPRICE teams, RESOLVE project, museums etc.) This year, LMMP was used by the Lunar and Planetary Institute (LPI)'s Lunar Exploration internship program to perform lighting analysis and local hazard assessments, such as, slope, surface roughness and crater/boulder distribution to research landing sites and surface pathfinding and traversal. Our talk will include an overview of LMMP, a demonstration of the tools as well as a summary of the LPI Lunar Exploration summer interns' experience in using those tools.

  9. Evaluate ERTS imagery for mapping and detection of changes of snowcover on land and on glaciers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, M. F. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The area of snow cover on land was determined from ERTS-1 imagery. Snow cover in specific drainage basins was measured with the Stanford Research Institute console by electronically superimposing basin outlines on imagery, with video density slicing to measure areas. Snow covered area and snowline altitudes were also determined by enlarging ERTS-1 imagery 1:250,000 and using a transparent map overlay. Under very favorable conditions, snowline altitude was determined to an accuracy of about 60 m. Ability to map snow cover or to determine snowline altitude depends primarily on cloud cover and vegetation and secondarily on slope, terrain roughness, sun angle, radiometric fidelity, and amount of spectral information available. Glacier accumulation area ratios were determined from ERTS-1 imagery. Also, subtle flow structures, undetected on aerial photographs, were visible. Surging glaciers were identified, and the changes resulting from the surge of a large glacier were measured as were changes in tidal glacier termini.

  10. Mapping of the Lunokhod-1 Landing Site: A Case Study for Future Lunar Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karachevtseva, I.; Oberst, J.; Konopikhin, A.; Shingareva, K.; Gusakova, E.; Kokhanov, A.; Baskakova, M.; Peters, O.; Scholten, F.; Wählisch, M.; Robinson, M.

    2012-04-01

    Introduction. Luna-17 landed on November 17, 1970 and deployed Lunokhod-1, the first remotely operated roving vehicle ever to explore a planetary surface. Within 332 days, the vehicle conquered a traverse of approx. 10 km. The rover was equipped with a navigation camera system as well as a scanner camera with which panoramic images were obtained. From separated stations, stereoscopic views were obtained. The history of the Lunokhods came back into focus recently, when the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter [1] obtained images from orbit at highest resolutions of 0.5-0.25 m/pixel. The Luna-17 landing platform as well as the roving vehicles at their final resting positions can clearly be identified. In addition, the rover tracks are clearly visible in most areas. From LRO stereo images, digital elevation model (DEM) of the Lunokhod-1 landing site areas have been derived [2]. These are useful to study the topographic profile and slopes of the traverse. The data are also useful to study the 3-D morphology of craters in the surroundings. Methodology. Lunokhod-1 area mapping have been done using GIS techniques. With CraterTools [3] we digitized craters in the Lunokhod-1 traverse area and created a geodatabase, which consists at this moment of about 45,000 craters including their diameters and depths, obtained from the DEM [4]. The LRO DEM also was used to measure traverse. We used automatic GIS functions for calculating various surface parameters of the Lunokhod-1 area surface including slopes, roughness, crater cumulative and spatial densities, and prepared respective thematic maps. We also measured relative depth (ratio D/H) and inner slopes of craters and classified craters by their morphological type using automatic and visual methods. Vertical profiles through several craters using the high resolution DEM have been done, and the results show good agreement with the topographic models with contours in 10cm that have been obtained from the Lunokhod-1 stereo images [5]. The

  11. Far Infrared Mapping of Three Galactic Star Forming Regions: W3(OH), S209 & S187

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S. K. Ghosh; B. Mookerjea; T. N. Rengarajan; S. N. Tandon; R. P. Verma

    2001-06-01

    Three Galactic star forming regions associated with W3(OH), S209 and S187 have been simultaneously mapped in two trans-IRAS far infrared (FIR) bands centered at ∼ 140 and 200m using the TIFR 100 cm balloon borne FIR telescope. These maps showextended FIR emission with structures. The HIRES processed IRAS maps of these regions at 12, 25, 60 & 100 m have also been presented for comparison. Point-like sources have been extracted from the longest waveband TIFR maps and searched for associations in the other five bands. The diffuse emission from these regions have been quantified, which turns out to be a significant fraction of the total emission. The spatial distribution of cold dust (T < 30 K) for two of these sources (W3(OH) & S209), has been determined reliably from the maps in TIFR bands. The dust temperature and optical depth maps show complex morphology. In general the dust around S209 has been found to be warmer than that in W3(OH) region.

  12. Remote sensing and GIS for land use/cover mapping and integrated land management: case from the middle Ganga plain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R B SINGH; Dilip KUMAR

    2012-01-01

    In India,land resources have reached a critical stage due to the rapidly growing population.This challenge requires an integrated approach toward hamessing land resources,while taking into account the vulnerable environmental conditions.Remote sensing and Geographical Information System (GIS) based technologies may be applied to an area in order to generate a sustainable development plan that is optimally suited to the terrain and to the productive potential of the local resources.The present study area is a part of the middle Ganga plain,known as Son-Karamnasa interfluve,in India.Alternative land use systems and the integration of livestock enterprises with the agricultural system have been suggested for land resources management.The objective of this paper is to prepare a land resource development plan in order to increase the productivity of land for sustainable development.The present study will contribute necessary input for policy makers to improve the socio-economic and environmental conditions of the region.

  13. USGS Land Cover (NLCD) Overlay Map Service from The National Map - National Geospatial Data Asset (NGDA) National Land Cover Database (NLCD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — NLCD 1992, NLCD 2001, NLCD 2006, and NLCD 2011 are National Land Cover Database classification schemes based primarily on Landsat data along with ancillary data...

  14. Land-Use Mapping in a Mixed Urban-Agricultural Arid Landscape Using Object-Based Image Analysis: A Case Study from Maricopa, Arizona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher S. Galletti

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Land-use mapping is critical for global change research. In Central Arizona, U.S.A., the spatial distribution of land use is important for sustainable land management decisions. The objective of this study was to create a land-use map that serves as a model for the city of Maricopa, an expanding urban region in the Sun Corridor of Arizona. We use object-based image analysis to map six land-use types from ASTER imagery, and then compare this with two per-pixel classifications. Our results show that a single segmentation, combined with intermediary classifications and merging, morphing, and growing image-objects, can lead to an accurate land-use map that is capable of utilizing both spatial and spectral information. We also employ a moving-window diversity assessment to help with analysis and improve post-classification modifications.

  15. Water quality and small-scale land use mapping in the South-Chinese megacity Guangzhou

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohschoen, R.; Azzam, R.; Baier, K.

    2011-12-01

    Since China adopted its "open-door" policy in 1978/ 79, the Pearl River Delta became one of the most rapid and dynamic urbanizing areas in East Asia due to migration, industrialization and globalization processes. The study area Guangzhou grew from a small town to a megacity with some 15 million inhabitants within less than 30 years. The rapid population growth and the urban and industrial expansion led to a remarkably increasing demand for freshwater, a high water consume and a rising sewage production. While economy and house constructions developed very fast, the expansion of water infrastructures could not keep pace with the urban growth. The consequences arising out of these situations are a serious deterioration of the surface and groundwater resources but also a degradation of living conditions and a threat to human health, particularly of the urban poor. In contrast to other studies that often consider the surface water quality outside Guangzhou, our focus was put on the urban Pearl River and its tributaries as well as urban groundwater and tap water. The study was conducted to spatially investigate the present status of the water quality in view of the concurrent formal and informal anthropogenic influences. Additional land use mapping was undertaken to analyze the interrelations between different land use types and water quality and to determine local pollution hotspots which should be taken into particular consideration of future city planning. Supplementing interviews were hold to find out usage patterns of groundwater and strategies to cope with both insufficient tap water quality and water infrastructures. A total of 74 surface water samples and 16 groundwater samples of privately and publicly accessible wells were taken at the beginning of the rainy season in May 2010. Those samples were partly compared to measurements carried out from 2007-2009, where adequate. Further, 15 tap water samples were taken in 2007/ 08 to draw conclusions about possible

  16. Deviations of the lepton mapping matrix from the Harrison-Perkins-Scott form

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R.Friedberg; T.D.Lee

    2010-01-01

    We propose a simple set of hypotheses governing the deviations of the leptonic mapping matrix from the Harrison-Perkins-Scott(HPS)form.These deviations are supposed to arise entirely from a perturbation of the mass matrix in the charged lepton sector.The perturbing matrix is assumed to be purely imaginary(thus maximally T-violating)and to have a strength in energy scale no greater(but perhaps smaller)than the muon mass.As we shall show,it then follows that the absolute value of the mapping matrix elements pertaining to the tan lepton deviate by no more than O((mμ/mτ)2)≈3.5 × 10-3 from their HPS values.Assuming that(mμ/mτ)2 can be neglected,we derive two simple constraints on the four parameters θ12,θ23,θ31,and δ of the mapping matrix.These constraints are independent of the details of the imaginary T-violating perturbation of the charged lepton mass matrix.We also show that the e and μ parts of the mapping matrix have a definite form governed by two parameters a and β; any deviation of order mμ/mτ can be accommodated by adjusting these two parameters.

  17. Landslide inventory map as a tool for landscape planning and management in Buzau Land Geopark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatu, Mihai; Niculae, Lucica; Popa, Răzvan-Gabriel

    2015-04-01

    Buzău Land is an aspiring Geopark in Romania, located in the mountainous region of the southern part of the Carpathian Bend Area. From a geologic point of view, the East Carpathians represent a segment of the Alpine - Carpathian orogene, and they are composed of numerous tectonic units put up throughout the Mesozoic and Cenozoic orogenesis. They represent a result of two compressional phases, (1) during Late Cretaceous and (2) during Early and Middle Miocene that were responsible for thrusting of internal units onto external units. The latter cover tectonically the Foredeep folded deposits. Landslides are one of the most widespread and dangerous natural hazards in this region, disrupting access routes and damaging property and habitats at least twice per year, in the rainy seasons. This hazard induces deep changes in the landscape and has serious economic consequences related to the damaging of infrastructure and isolation of localities. The proximity to the Vrancea seismogenic zone increases the risk of landslide triggering. A first step in observing the space and time tendency and amplitude of landslides, in order to distinguish the main vulnerabilities and estimate the risk, is to produce an inventory map. We shall present a landslide inventory map for the Buzău Land territory (~1036 km2), which is the primary base of information for further discussions regarding this phenomenon and an essential tool in observing the development of mass-wasting processes and in landscape planning. The inventory map is in accordance with the recommendations of the IAEG Commission on Landslides and other Mass-Movement, applied across the EU. Based on this work, we can already draw some remarks: - The Geopark territory mostly covers two major tectonic units of the East Carpathians: the external nappes and the folded foredeep; areas with landslide potential are common, but by far the highest landslide frequency is observed in the foredeep. This is related to the soft, argillaceous

  18. Evaluation of a LIDAR Land-Based Mobile Mapping System for Monitoring Sandy Coasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pieter Van Waarden

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The Dutch coast is characterized by sandy beaches flanked by dunes. Understanding the morphology of the coast is essential for defense against flooding of the hinterland. Because most dramatic changes of the beach and the first dune row happen during storms, it is important to assess the state of the coast immediately after a storm. This is expensive and difficult to organize with Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS. Therefore, the performance of a Land-based Mobile Mapping System (LMMS in mapping a stretch of sandy Dutch coast of 6 km near the municipality of Egmond is evaluated in this research. A test data set was obtained by provider Geomaat using the StreetMapper LMMS system. Both the relative quality of laser point heights and of a derived Digital Terrain model (DTM are assessed. First, the height precision of laser points is assessed a priori by random error propagation, and a posteriori by calculating the height differences between close-by points. In the a priori case, the result is a theoretical laser point precision of around 5 cm. In the a posteriori approach it is shown that on a flat beach a relative precision of 3 mm is achieved, and that almost no internal biases exist. In the second analysis, a DTM with a grid size of 1 m is obtained using moving least squares. Each grid point height includes a quality description, which incorporates both measurement precision and terrain roughness. Although some problems remain with the scanning height of 2 m, which causes shadow-effect behind low dunes, it is concluded that a laser LMMS enables the acquisition of a high quality DTM product, which is available within two days.

  19. Mapping of the CO2 and anthropogenic heat emission under spatially explicit urban land use scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamichi, K.; Yamagata, Y.; Seya, H.

    2010-12-01

    possible range of future land use change. The first one is a compact city scenario and the second one is a dispersion scenario. In the compact city scenario, we assumed that commuting to work by cars would be prohibited. In the dispersion scenario, we assumed that all workers would work in their own houses and the time of commuting to work would be zero. The spatially explicit emissions are mapped by using Geographical Information System (GIS). As for the CO2 emission, this study focuses on the analysis of the tendency from the viewpoint of both direct and indirect emission. As a result, people would live in suburbs in the second scenario, and the emissions would increase. It is concluded that the results shows the importance of low-carbon city as compact city. Moreover, the anthropogenic heat emission estimated in this study can used as the input parameters for the climate models. The developed system can be used for analyzing the implications of urban planning and carbon management scenarios.

  20. Converting Topographic Maps into Digital Form to Aid in Archeological Research in the Peten, Guatemala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldrich, Serena R.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of my project was to convert a topographical map into digital form so that the data can be manipulated and easily accessed in the field. With the data in this particular format, Dr. Sever and his colleagues can highlight the specific features of the landscape that they require for their research of the ancient Mayan civilization. Digital elevation models (DEMs) can also be created from the digitized contour features adding another dimension to their research.

  1. Analysis of Double Meridian Distance for a Closed Traverse Area towards Developing a Contour Map and Land Title

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. U. Ganiron Jr

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed to analyze double meridian distance for a closed traverse area in developing a land title for a propose gymnasium in Qassim University. Theodolite, leveling rod and steel tape plays an important role in measuring elevations, bearings and distances of the boundaries of a lot. Contour map is necessary to determine the traces of level surfaces of successive elevation. This will enable to identify the type of contour map and type of contour lines necessary for this project. Corel draw software is used to draw contour map and guide to interpret the significance of the variables. It is essential to check the error of closure for interior angles and for both latitude and departure before applying the Double Meridian Distance (DMD method to obtain the total area of the lot. Technical descriptions of the land such as distance, bearing, boundaries and area are necessary to visualize the shape & exact location of the land. Developing a land title will be obtained using the technical descriptions of the lot in preparation for the type of gymnasium necessary for Qassim University.

  2. Direct Sensor Orientation of a Land-Based Mobile Mapping System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hua Li

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available A land-based mobile mapping system (MMS is flexible and useful for the acquisition of road environment geospatial information. It integrates a set of imaging sensors and a position and orientation system (POS. The positioning quality of such systems is highly dependent on the accuracy of the utilized POS. This limitation is the major drawback due to the elevated cost associated with high-end GPS/INS units, particularly the inertial system. The potential accuracy of the direct sensor orientation depends on the architecture and quality of the GPS/INS integration process as well as the validity of the system calibration (i.e., calibration of the individual sensors as well as the system mounting parameters. In this paper, a novel single-step procedure using integrated sensor orientation with relative orientation constraint for the estimation of the mounting parameters is introduced. A comparative analysis between the proposed single-step and the traditional two-step procedure is carried out. Moreover, the estimated mounting parameters using the different methods are used in a direct geo-referencing procedure to evaluate their performance and the feasibility of the implemented system. Experimental results show that the proposed system using single-step system calibration method can achieve high 3D positioning accuracy.

  3. AN ASSESSMENT OF CITIZEN CONTRIBUTED GROUND REFERENCE DATA FOR LAND COVER MAP ACCURACY ASSESSMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Foody

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available It is now widely accepted that an accuracy assessment should be part of a thematic mapping programme. Authoritative good or best practices for accuracy assessment have been defined but are often impractical to implement. Key reasons for this situation are linked to the ground reference data used in the accuracy assessment. Typically, it is a challenge to acquire a large sample of high quality reference cases in accordance to desired sampling designs specified as conforming to good practice and the data collected are normally to some degree imperfect limiting their value to an accuracy assessment which implicitly assumes the use of a gold standard reference. Citizen sensors have great potential to aid aspects of accuracy assessment. In particular, they may be able to act as a source of ground reference data that may, for example, reduce sample size problems but concerns with data quality remain. The relative strengths and limitations of citizen contributed data for accuracy assessment are reviewed in the context of the authoritative good practices defined for studies of land cover by remote sensing. The article will highlight some of the ways that citizen contributed data have been used in accuracy assessment as well as some of the problems that require further attention, and indicate some of the potential ways forward in the future.

  4. Land use, macroalgae, and a tumor-forming disease in marine turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Houtan, Kyle S; Hargrove, Stacy K; Balazs, George H

    2010-09-29

    Wildlife diseases are an increasing concern for endangered species conservation, but their occurrence, causes, and human influences are often unknown. We analyzed 3,939 records of stranded Hawaiian green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas) over 28 years to understand fibropapillomatosis, a tumor-forming disease linked to a herpesvirus. Turtle size is a consistent risk factor and size-standardized models revealed considerable spatial and temporal variability. The disease peaked in some areas in the 1990s, in some regions rates remained constant, and elsewhere rates increased. Land use, onshore of where the turtles feed, may play a role. Elevated disease rates were clustered in watersheds with high nitrogen-footprints; an index of natural and anthropogenic factors that affect coastal eutrophication. Further analysis shows strong epidemiological links between disease rates, nitrogen-footprints, and invasive macroalgae and points to foraging ecology. These turtles now forage on invasive macroalgae, which can dominate nutrient rich waters and sequester environmental N in the amino acid arginine. Arginine is known to regulate immune activity, promote herpesviruses, and contribute to tumor formation. Our results have implications for understanding diseases in aquatic organisms, eutrophication, herpesviruses, and tumor formation.

  5. Land use, macroalgae, and a tumor-forming disease in marine turtles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle S Van Houtan

    Full Text Available Wildlife diseases are an increasing concern for endangered species conservation, but their occurrence, causes, and human influences are often unknown. We analyzed 3,939 records of stranded Hawaiian green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas over 28 years to understand fibropapillomatosis, a tumor-forming disease linked to a herpesvirus. Turtle size is a consistent risk factor and size-standardized models revealed considerable spatial and temporal variability. The disease peaked in some areas in the 1990s, in some regions rates remained constant, and elsewhere rates increased. Land use, onshore of where the turtles feed, may play a role. Elevated disease rates were clustered in watersheds with high nitrogen-footprints; an index of natural and anthropogenic factors that affect coastal eutrophication. Further analysis shows strong epidemiological links between disease rates, nitrogen-footprints, and invasive macroalgae and points to foraging ecology. These turtles now forage on invasive macroalgae, which can dominate nutrient rich waters and sequester environmental N in the amino acid arginine. Arginine is known to regulate immune activity, promote herpesviruses, and contribute to tumor formation. Our results have implications for understanding diseases in aquatic organisms, eutrophication, herpesviruses, and tumor formation.

  6. Students' perception of a modified form of PBL using concept mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addae, Jonas Innies; Wilson, Jacqueline I; Carrington, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) and concept mapping have been shown to promote active and meaningful learning. To design a method of PBL that includes concept mapping and examine students' perceptions of this form of PBL. We designed a 5-phase method of PBL which produced three clearly identifiable mapping phases that reflected the learning activities during the tutorial: (1) the initial understanding of the clinical problem, (2) students' prior knowledge of the problem, (3) the final understanding of the problem following self-directed study. The process of developing the second and third phases of the map involved the students answering questions that they generated on two occasions to give the entire process a 5-phase approach. Each student was exposed to both methods of PBL: a conventional 7-step method (Maastricht type) and the modified PBL (5-phase) method. We used a questionnaire to evaluate the students' perceptions of the two methods in four learning domains. The students' ratings for the 5-phase method were significantly higher than for the 7-step method (paired t-test) on all items on the questionnaire. The students perceived the 5-phase method as promoting their passion for learning, and developing their cognitive, metacognitive and interpersonal skills.

  7. Deviations of the Lepton Mapping Matrix from the Harrison-Perkins-Scott Form

    CERN Document Server

    Friedberg, R

    2010-01-01

    We propose a simple set of hypotheses governing the deviations of the leptonic mapping matrix from the Harrison-Perkins-Scott (HPS) form. These deviations are supposed to arise entirely from a perturbation of the mass matrix in the charged lepton sector. The perturbing matrix is assumed to be purely imaginary (thus maximally $T$-violating) and to have a strength in energy scale no greater (but perhaps smaller) than the muon mass. As we shall show, it then follows that the absolute value of the mapping matrix elements pertaining to the tau lepton deviate by no more than $O((m_\\mu/m_\\tau)^2) \\simeq 3.5 \\times 10^{-3}$ from their HPS values. Assuming that $(m_\\mu/m_\\tau)^2 $ can be neglected, we derive two simple constraints on the four parameters $\\theta_{12}$, $\\theta_{23}$, $\\theta_{31}$, and $\\delta$ of the mapping matrix. These constraints are independent of the details of the imaginary $T$-violating perturbation of the charged lepton mass matrix. We also show that the $e$ and $\\mu$ parts of the mapping mat...

  8. Land subsidence in major cities of Central Mexico: Interpreting InSAR-derived land subsidence mapping with hydrogeological data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellazzi, Pascal; Arroyo-Domínguez, Norma; Martel, Richard; Calderhead, Angus I.; Normand, Jonathan C. L.; Gárfias, Jaime; Rivera, Alfonso

    2016-05-01

    Significant structural damages to urban infrastructures caused by compaction of over-exploited aquifers are an important problem in Central Mexico. While the case of Mexico City has been well-documented, insight into land subsidence problems in other cities of Central Mexico is still limited. Among the cities concerned, we present and discuss the cases of five of them, located within the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB): Toluca, Celaya, Aguascalientes, Morelia, and Queretaro. Applying the SBAS-InSAR method to C-Band RADARSAT-2 data, five high resolution ground motion time-series were produced to monitor the spatio-temporal variations of displacements and fracturing from 2012 to 2014. The study presents recent changes of land subsidence rates along with concordant geological and water data. It aims to provide suggestions to mitigate future damages to infrastructure and to assist in groundwater resources management. Aguascalientes, Celaya, Morelia and Queretaro (respectively in order of decreasing subsidence rates) are typical cases of fault-limited land subsidence of Central Mexico. It occurs as a result of groundwater over-exploitation in lacustrine and alluvial deposits covering highly variable bedrock topography, typical of horst-graben geological settings. Aguascalientes and Toluca show high rates of land subsidence (up to 10 cm/yr), while Celaya and Morelia show lower rates (from 2 to 5 cm/yr). Comparing these results with previous studies, it is inferred that the spatial patterns of land subsidence have changed in the city of Toluca. This change appears to be mainly controlled by the spatial heterogeneity of compressible sediments since no noticeable change occurred in groundwater extraction and related drawdown rates. While land subsidence of up to 8 cm/yr has been reported in the Queretaro Valley before 2011, rates inferior to 1 cm/yr are measured in 2013-2014. The subsidence has been almost entirely mitigated by major changes in the water management

  9. Development of an expert analysis tool based on an interactive subsidence hazard map for urban land use in the city of Celaya, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alloy, A.; Gonzalez Dominguez, F.; Nila Fonseca, A. L.; Ruangsirikulchai, A.; Gentle, J. N., Jr.; Cabral, E.; Pierce, S. A.

    2016-12-01

    Land Subsidence as a result of groundwater extraction in central Mexico's larger urban centers initiated in the 80's as a result of population and economic growth. The city of Celaya has undergone subsidence for a few decades and a consequence is the development of an active normal fault system that affects its urban infrastructure and residential areas. To facilitate its analysis and a land use decision-making process we created an online interactive map enabling users to easily obtain information associated with land subsidence. Geological and socioeconomic data of the city was collected, including fault location, population data, and other important infrastructure and structural data has been obtained from fieldwork as part of a study abroad interchange undergraduate course. The subsidence and associated faulting hazard map was created using an InSAR derived subsidence velocity map and population data from INEGI to identify hazard zones using a subsidence gradient spatial analysis approach based on a subsidence gradient and population risk matrix. This interactive map provides a simple perspective of different vulnerable urban elements. As an accessible visualization tool, it will enhance communication between scientific and socio-economic disciplines. Our project also lays the groundwork for a future expert analysis system with an open source and easily accessible Python coded, SQLite database driven website which archives fault and subsidence data along with visual damage documentation to civil structures. This database takes field notes and provides an entry form for uniform datasets, which are used to generate a JSON. Such a database is useful because it allows geoscientists to have a centralized repository and access to their observations over time. Because of the widespread presence of the subsidence phenomena throughout cities in central Mexico, the spatial analysis has been automated using the open source software R. Raster, rgeos, shapefiles, and rgdal

  10. Use of multispectral satellite imagery and hyperspectral endmember libraries for urban land cover mapping at the metropolitan scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priem, Frederik; Okujeni, Akpona; van der Linden, Sebastian; Canters, Frank

    2016-10-01

    The value of characteristic reflectance features for mapping urban materials has been demonstrated in many experiments with airborne imaging spectrometry. Analysis of larger areas requires satellite-based multispectral imagery, which typically lacks the spatial and spectral detail of airborne data. Consequently the need arises to develop mapping methods that exploit the complementary strengths of both data sources. In this paper a workflow for sub-pixel quantification of Vegetation-Impervious-Soil urban land cover is presented, using medium resolution multispectral satellite imagery, hyperspectral endmember libraries and Support Vector Regression. A Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager surface reflectance image covering the greater metropolitan area of Brussels is selected for mapping. Two spectral libraries developed for the cities of Brussels and Berlin based on airborne hyperspectral APEX and HyMap data are used. First the combined endmember library is resampled to match the spectral response of the Landsat sensor. The library is then optimized to avoid spectral redundancy and confusion. Subsequently the spectra of the endmember library are synthetically mixed to produce training data for unmixing. Mapping is carried out using Support Vector Regression models trained with spectra selected through stratified sampling of the mixed library. Validation on building block level (mean size = 46.8 Landsat pixels) yields an overall good fit between reference data and estimation with Mean Absolute Errors of 0.06, 0.06 and 0.08 for vegetation, impervious and soil respectively. Findings of this work may contribute to the use of universal spectral libraries for regional scale land cover fraction mapping using regression approaches.

  11. Object-based analysis of multispectral airborne laser scanner data for land cover classification and map updating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matikainen, Leena; Karila, Kirsi; Hyyppä, Juha; Litkey, Paula; Puttonen, Eetu; Ahokas, Eero

    2017-06-01

    During the last 20 years, airborne laser scanning (ALS), often combined with passive multispectral information from aerial images, has shown its high feasibility for automated mapping processes. The main benefits have been achieved in the mapping of elevated objects such as buildings and trees. Recently, the first multispectral airborne laser scanners have been launched, and active multispectral information is for the first time available for 3D ALS point clouds from a single sensor. This article discusses the potential of this new technology in map updating, especially in automated object-based land cover classification and change detection in a suburban area. For our study, Optech Titan multispectral ALS data over a suburban area in Finland were acquired. Results from an object-based random forests analysis suggest that the multispectral ALS data are very useful for land cover classification, considering both elevated classes and ground-level classes. The overall accuracy of the land cover classification results with six classes was 96% compared with validation points. The classes under study included building, tree, asphalt, gravel, rocky area and low vegetation. Compared to classification of single-channel data, the main improvements were achieved for ground-level classes. According to feature importance analyses, multispectral intensity features based on several channels were more useful than those based on one channel. Automatic change detection for buildings and roads was also demonstrated by utilising the new multispectral ALS data in combination with old map vectors. In change detection of buildings, an old digital surface model (DSM) based on single-channel ALS data was also used. Overall, our analyses suggest that the new data have high potential for further increasing the automation level in mapping. Unlike passive aerial imaging commonly used in mapping, the multispectral ALS technology is independent of external illumination conditions, and there are

  12. Land

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Audouin, M

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Unsustainable agricultural practices have had a role to play in the degradation of land on which agriculture depends. South Africa has an international obligation to develop a National Action Programme (NAP), the purpose of which is to identify...

  13. Mapping Ecosystem Services for Land Use Planning, the Case of Central Kalimantan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sumarga, E.; Hein, L.G.

    2014-01-01

    Indonesia is subject to rapid land use change. One of the main causes for the conversion of land is the rapid expansion of the oil palm sector. Land use change involves a progressive loss of forest cover, with major impacts on biodiversity and global CO2 emissions. Ecosystem services have been propo

  14. From soil map to digital database: land resources inventories, SOTER and its applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkshoorn, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    Readily accessible information of up-to-data geo-referenced land resources is being requested with increasing frequency. This demand comes not only from the traditional group of researchers on land resources, but also from others such as the environmentalists using land resource data for their model

  15. Interpretation of scenario results in terms of described and mapped land change trajectories and archetypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuemmerle, Tobias; Stürck, Julia; Levers, Christian

    polarized with intensified production and abandonment of marginal areas continuing. Fifth, future land changes were projected to be well within the range of longterm historic land system changes. Finally, modelled scenarios generally suggest gradual, though not always linear future land system trends...

  16. Per pixel uncertainty modelling and its spatial representation on land cover maps obtained by hybrid classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pons, Xavier; Sevillano, Eva; Moré, Gerard; Serra, Pere; Cornford, Dan; Ninyerola, Miquel

    2013-04-01

    The usage of remote sensing imagery combined with statistical classifiers to obtain categorical cartography is now common practice. As in many other areas of geographic information quality assessment, knowing the accuracy of these maps is crucial, and the spatialization of quality information is becoming ever more important for a large range of applications. Whereas some classifiers (e.g., maximum likelihood, linear discriminant analysis, naive Bayes, etc) permit the estimation and spatial representation of the uncertainty through a pixel level probabilistic estimator (and, from that, to compute a global accuracy estimator for the whole map), for other methods such a direct estimator does not exist. Regardless of the classification method applied, ground truth data is almost always available (to train the classifier and/or to compute the global accuracy and, usually, a confusion matrix). Our research is devoted to the development of a protocol to spatialize the error on a general framework based on the classifier parameters, and some ground truth reference data. In the methodological experiment presented here we provide an insight into uncertainty modelling for a hybrid classifier that combines unsupervised and supervised stages (implemented in the MiraMon GIS). In this work we describe what we believe is the first attempt to characterise pixel level uncertainty in a two stage classification process. We describe the model setup, show the preliminary results and identify future work that will be undertaken. The study area is a Landsat full frame located at the North-eastern region of the Iberian Peninsula. The six non-thermal bands + NDVI of a multi-temporal set of six geometrically and radiometrically corrected Landsat-5 images (between 2005 and 2007) were submitted to a hybrid classification process, together with some ancillary data (climate, slopes, etc). Training areas were extracted from the Land Cover Map of Catalonia (MCSC), a 0.5 m resolution map created by

  17. The Glacier and Land Ice Surface Topography Interferometer: An Airborne Proof-of-concept Mapping Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moller, D.; Hensley, S.; Chuang, C.; Fisher, C.; Muellerschoen, R.; Milligan, L.; Sadowy, G.; Rignot, E. J.

    2009-12-01

    In May 2009 a new radar technique for mapping ice surface topography was demonstrated in a Greenland campaign as part of the NASA International Polar Year activities. This was achieved by integrating a Ka-band single-pass interferometric synthetic radar on the NASA Dryden Gulfstream III for a coordinated deployment. Although the technique of using radar interferometry for mapping terrain has been demonstrated before, this is the first such application at millimeter-wave frequencies. This proof-of-concept demonstration was motivated by the Glacier and Land Ice Surface Topography Interferometer (GLISTIN) Instrument Incubator Program and furthermore, highly leveraged existing ESTO hardware and software assets (the Unmanned Airborne Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) and processor and the PR2 (precipitation radar 2) RF assembly and power amplifier). Initial Ka-band test flights occurred in March and April of 2009 followed by the Greenland deployment. Instrument performance indicates swath widths over the ice between 5-7km, with height precisions ranging from 30cm-3m at a posting of 3m x 3m. However, for this application the electromagnetic wave will penetrate an unknown amount into the snow cover thus producing an effective bias that must be calibrated. This penetration will be characterized as part of this program and is expected to vary as a function of snow wetness and radar incidence angle. To evaluate this, we flew a coordinated collection with the NASA Wallops Airborne Topographic Mapper on a transect from Greenland’s Summit its West coast. This flight included two field calibration sites at Colorado Institute for Research in Environmental Science’s Swiss Camp and the National Science Foundation’s Summit station. Additional collections entailed flying a grid over Jakobshavn glacier which were repeated after 6 days to reveal surface dynamics. In this time frame we were able to observe horizontal motion of over 1km on the glacier. While developed for

  18. Soft supervised self-organizing mapping (3SOM) for improving land cover classification with MODIS time-series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawawirojwong, Siam

    Classification of remote sensing data has long been a fundamental technique for studying vegetation and land cover. Furthermore, land use and land cover maps are a basic need for environmental science. These maps are important for crop system monitoring and are also valuable resources for decision makers. Therefore, an up-to-date and highly accurate land cover map with detailed and timely information is required for the global environmental change research community to support natural resource management, environmental protection, and policy making. However, there appears to be a number of limitations associated with data utilization such as weather conditions, data availability, cost, and the time needed for acquiring and processing large numbers of images. Additionally, improving the classification accuracy and reducing the classification time have long been the goals of remote sensing research and they still require the further study. To manage these challenges, the primary goal of this research is to improve classification algorithms that utilize MODIS-EVI time-series images. A supervised self-organizing map (SSOM) and a soft supervised self-organizing map (3SOM) are modified and improved to increase classification efficiency and accuracy. To accomplish the main goal, the performance of the proposed methods is investigated using synthetic and real landscape data derived from MODIS-EVI time-series images. Two study areas are selected based on a difference of land cover characteristics: one in Thailand and one in the Midwestern U.S. The results indicate that time-series imagery is a potentially useful input dataset for land cover classification. Moreover, the SSOM with time-series data significantly outperforms the conventional classification techniques of the Gaussian maximum likelihood classifier (GMLC) and backpropagation neural network (BPNN). In addition, the 3SOM employed as a soft classifier delivers a more accurate classification than the SSOM applied as

  19. Uniform gold nanoarray formed by controlled IP6 micelles for chemical mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiyao; Wen, Ying; Wang, Na; Gu, Kai; Yang, Haifeng

    2011-05-01

    A uniform Au nanoarray is successfully formed at an indium tin oxide (ITO) glass surface modified with well-distributed inositol hexakisphosphoric (IP6) micelle layers by controlling the pH of the medium at 10. When Rhodamine 6G (R6G) and 2-mercaptopyridine (2-MPy) are used as the Raman probes, the uniform Au nanoarray presents a sound surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) efficiency and a reproducible Raman signal in two dimensions. The relative standard deviation (RSD) of Raman intensities of R6G or 2-MPy on the uniform Au nanoarray recorded by point to point is less than 12%, which is beneficial to its application for chemical mapping or imaging. A case of Raman point-mapping for onion epidermis is demonstrated in the present work. A uniform IP6-Au nanoarray might be mass-produced by this protocol.

  20. Analysis of resonances by action map comparing tracking and normal forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazzani, A.; Bongini, L.; Turchetti, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Via Irnerio 46, 40126 Bologna (Italy) INFN, Sezione di Bologna

    1997-02-01

    The network of resonances for a 4D map is obtained by two different methods and displayed in the plane of invariant actions. Starting from tracking data the tunes are determined for every initial point in a plane and the actions are computed whenever the tunes are non-resonant. In the action plane a resonance appears as an empty channel, whose width is the true resonance width. The normal forms locate the single resonance lines in the action plane and provide their width. The tracking method matches the normal form results close to the origin and allows to explore the neighborhood of the dynamic aperture, where the normal forms are inaccurate. The proposed procedure applies to any real lattice and is suitable to analyze the diffusion due to a slow modulation of the linear frequency since the actions are adiabatic invariants. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. Mapping and quantifying geodiversity in land-water transition zones using MBES and topobathymetric LiDAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernstsen, Verner Brandbyge; Andersen, Mikkel Skovgaard; Gergely, Aron;

    coastal areas and the river floodplain areas, potentially enables full-coverage and high-resolution mapping in these challenging environments. We have carried out MBES and topobathymetric LiDAR surveys in the Knudedyb tidal inlet system, a coastal environment in the Danish Wadden Sea which is part......Land-water transition zones, like e.g. coastal and fluvial environments, are valuable ecosystems which are often characterised by high biodiversity and geodiversity. However, often these land-water transition zones are difficult or even impossible to map and investigate in high spatial resolution...... of the Wadden Sea National Park and UNESCO World Heritage, and in the Ribe Vesterå, a fluvial environment in the Ribe Å river catchment discharging into the Knudedyb tidal basin. Detailed digital elevation models (DEMs) with a grid cell size of 0.5 m x 0.5 m were generated from the MBES and the LiDAR point...

  2. Mapping and quantifying geodiversity in land-water transition zones using MBES and topobathymetric LiDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandbyge Ernstsen, Verner; Skovgaard Andersen, Mikkel; Gergely, Aron; Schulze Tenberge, Yvonne; Al-Hamdani, Zyad; Steinbacher, Frank; Rolighed Larsen, Laurids; Winter, Christian; Bartholomä, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Land-water transition zones, like e.g. coastal and fluvial environments, are valuable ecosystems which are often characterised by high biodiversity and geodiversity. However, often these land-water transition zones are difficult or even impossible to map and investigate in high spatial resolution due to the challenging environmental conditions. Combining vessel borne shallow water multibeam echosounder (MBES) surveys ,to cover the subtidal coastal areas and the river channel areas, with airborne topobathymetric light detection and ranging (LiDAR) surveys, to cover the intertidal and supratidal coastal areas and the river floodplain areas, potentially enables full-coverage and high-resolution mapping in these challenging environments. We have carried out MBES and topobathymetric LiDAR surveys in the Knudedyb tidal inlet system, a coastal environment in the Danish Wadden Sea which is part of the Wadden Sea National Park and UNESCO World Heritage, and in the Ribe Vesterå, a fluvial environment in the Ribe Å river catchment discharging into the Knudedyb tidal basin. Detailed digital elevation models (DEMs) with a grid cell size of 0.5 m x 0.5 m were generated from the MBES and the LiDAR point clouds, which both have point densities in the order of 20 points/m2. Morphometric analyses of the DEMs enabled the identification and mapping of the different landforms within the coastal and fluvial environments. Hereby, we demonstrate that vessel borne MBES and airborne topobathymetric LiDAR, here in combination, are promising tools for seamless mapping across land-water transition zones as well as for the quantification of a range of landforms at landscape scale in different land-water transition zone environments. Hence, we demonstrate the potential for mapping and quantifying geomorphological diversity, which is one of the main components of geodiversity and a prerequisite for assessing geoheritage. Acknowledgements This work was funded by the Danish Council for

  3. Mapping human and social dimensions of conservation opportunity for the scheduling of conservation action on private land.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Andrew T; Cowling, Richard M; Difford, Mark; Campbell, Bruce M

    2010-10-01

    Abstract  Spatial prioritization techniques are applied in conservation-planning initiatives to allocate conservation resources. Although typically they are based on ecological data (e.g., species, habitats, ecological processes), increasingly they also include nonecological data, mostly on the vulnerability of valued features and economic costs of implementation. Nevertheless, the effectiveness of conservation actions implemented through conservation-planning initiatives is a function of the human and social dimensions of social-ecological systems, such as stakeholders' willingness and capacity to participate. We assessed human and social factors hypothesized to define opportunities for implementing effective conservation action by individual land managers (those responsible for making day-to-day decisions on land use) and mapped these to schedule implementation of a private land conservation program. We surveyed 48 land managers who owned 301 land parcels in the Makana Municipality of the Eastern Cape province in South Africa. Psychometric statistical and cluster analyses were applied to the interview data so as to map human and social factors of conservation opportunity across a landscape of regional conservation importance. Four groups of landowners were identified, in rank order, for a phased implementation process. Furthermore, using psychometric statistical techniques, we reduced the number of interview questions from 165 to 45, which is a preliminary step toward developing surrogates for human and social factors that can be developed rapidly and complemented with measures of conservation value, vulnerability, and economic cost to more-effectively schedule conservation actions. This work provides conservation and land management professionals direction on where and how implementation of local-scale conservation should be undertaken to ensure it is feasible.

  4. A Comparison of Land Surface Water Mapping Using the Normalized Difference Water Index from TM, ETM+ and ALI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingyu Sun

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Remote sensing has more advantages than the traditional methods of land surface water (LSW mapping because it is a low-cost, reliable information source that is capable of making high-frequency and repeatable observations. The normalized difference water indexes (NDWIs, calculated from various band combinations (green, near-infrared (NIR, or shortwave-infrared (SWIR, have been successfully applied to LSW mapping. In fact, new NDWIs will become available when Advanced Land Imager (ALI data are used as the ALI sensor provides one green band (Band 4, two NIR bands (Bands 6 and 7, and three SWIR bands (Bands 8, 9, and 10. Thus, selecting the optimal band or combination of bands is critical when ALI data are employed to map LSW using NDWI. The purpose of this paper is to find the best performing NDWI model of the ALI data in LSW map. In this study, eleven NDWI models based on ALI, Thematic Mapper (TM, and Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+ data were compared to assess the performance of ALI data in LSW mapping, at three different study sites in the Yangtze River Basin, China. The contrast method, Otsu method, and confusion matrix were calculated to evaluate the accuracies of the LSW maps. The accuracies of LSW maps derived from eleven NDWI models showed that five NDWI models of the ALI sensor have more than an overall accuracy of 91% with a Kappa coefficient of 0.78 of LSW maps at three test sites. In addition, the NDWI model, calculated from the green (Band 4: 0.525–0.605 μm and SWIR (Band 9: 1.550–1.750 μm bands of the ALI sensor, namely NDWIA4,9, was shown to have the highest LSW mapping accuracy, more than the other NDWI models. Therefore, the NDWIA4,9 is the best indicator for LSW mapping of the ALI sensor. It can be used for mapping LSW with high accuracy.

  5. A triangular prism solid and shell interactive mapping element for electromagnetic sheet metal forming process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiangyang; Li, She; Feng, Hui; Li, Guangyao

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, a novel triangular prism solid and shell interactive mapping element is proposed to solve the coupled magnetic-mechanical formulation in electromagnetic sheet metal forming process. A linear six-node ;Triprism; element is firstly proposed for transient eddy current analysis in electromagnetic field. In present ;Triprism; element, shape functions are given explicitly, and a cell-wise gradient smoothing operation is used to obtain the gradient matrices without evaluating derivatives of shape functions. In mechanical field analysis, a shear locking free triangular shell element is employed in internal force computation, and a data mapping method is developed to transfer the Lorentz force on solid into the external forces suffered by shell structure for dynamic elasto-plasticity deformation analysis. Based on the deformed triangular shell structure, a ;Triprism; element generation rule is established for updated electromagnetic analysis, which means inter-transformation of meshes between the coupled fields can be performed automatically. In addition, the dynamic moving mesh is adopted for air mesh updating based on the deformation of sheet metal. A benchmark problem is carried out for confirming the accuracy of the proposed ;Triprism; element in predicting flux density in electromagnetic field. Solutions of several EMF problems obtained by present work are compared with experiment results and those of traditional method, which are showing excellent performances of present interactive mapping element.

  6. The locus for a novel syndromic form of neuronal intestinal pseudoobstruction maps to Xq28.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auricchio, A; Brancolini, V; Casari, G; Milla, P J; Smith, V V; Devoto, M; Ballabio, A

    1996-04-01

    The neuronal type of primary chronic idiopathic intestinal pseudoobstruction (CIIP) results from the developmental failure of enteric neurons to migrate or differentiate correctly. This leads to intestinal motility disorders, which are characterized by symptoms and signs of bowel obstruction in the absence of a mechanical obstacle. Most of these conditions are congenital, and among them some are inherited. One syndromic condition characterized by intestinal pseudoobstruction with morphological abnormalities of the argyrophil neurons in the myenteric plexus, associated with short small bowel, malrotation, and pyloric hypertrophy, has been previously described. We have studied a family affected by this disorder, in which the disease appeared to segregate as an X-linked recessive trait. In order to map the CIIP locus in this family, we performed linkage analysis in 26 family members by use of highly polymorphic microsatellite markers from the X chromosome. One of these markers, DXYS154, located in the distal part of Xq28, shows no recombination with a maximum lod score of 2.32. Multipoint analysis excluded linkage with markers spanning other regions of the X chromosome. Our results, integrated with the current genetic and physical map of Xq28, determine the order of loci as cen-DXS15-(CIIPX)-DXS1108/DXYS154-tel. This study establishes, for the first time, the mapping assignment of a neuropathic form of CIIP other than Hirschsprung disease.

  7. The locus for a novel syndromic form of neuronal intestinal pseudoobstruction maps of Xq28

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auricchio, A.; Casari, G.; Ballabio, A. [Telethon Inst. of Genetics and Medicine, Milan (Italy); Brancolini, V.; Devoto, M. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    The neuronal type of primary chronic idiopathic intestinal pseudoobstruction (CIIP) results from the developmental failure of enteric neurons to migrate or differentiate correctly. This leads to intestinal motility disorders, which are characterized by symptoms and signs of bowel obstruction in the absence of a mechanical obstacle. Most of these conditions are congenital, and among them some are inherited. One syndromic condition characterized by intestinal pseudoobstruction with morphological abnormalities of the argyrophil neurons in the myenteric plexus, associated with short small bowel, malrotation, and pyloric hypertrophy, has been previously described. We have studied a family affected by this disorder, in which the disease appeared to segregate as an X-linked recessive trait. In order to map the CIIP locus in this family, we performed linkage analysis in 26 family members by use of highly polymorphic microsatellite markers from the X chromosome. One of these markers, DXYS154, located in the distal part of Xq28, shows no recombination with a maximum lod score of 2.32. Multipoint analysis excluded linkage with markers spanning other regions of the X chromosome. Our results, integrated with the current genetic and physical map of Xq28, determine the order of loci as cen-DXS15-(CIIPX)-DXS1108/DXYS154-tel. This study establishes, for the first time, the mapping assignment of a neuropathic form of CIIP other than Hirschsprung disease. 31 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Land Surface Water Mapping Using Multi-Scale Level Sets and a Visual Saliency Model from SAR Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Xu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Land surface water mapping is one of the most basic classification tasks to distinguish water bodies from dry land surfaces. In this paper, a water mapping method was proposed based on multi-scale level sets and a visual saliency model (MLSVS, to overcome the lack of an operational solution for automatically, rapidly and reliably extracting water from large-area and fine spatial resolution Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR images. This paper has two main contributions, as follows: (1 The method integrated the advantages of both level sets and the visual saliency model. First, the visual saliency map was applied to detect the suspected water regions (SWR, and then the level set method only needed to be applied to the SWR regions to accurately extract the water bodies, thereby yielding a simultaneous reduction in time cost and increase in accuracy; (2 In order to make the classical Itti model more suitable for extracting water in SAR imagery, an improved texture weighted with the Itti model (TW-Itti is employed to detect those suspected water regions, which take into account texture features generated by the Gray Level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM algorithm, Furthermore, a novel calculation method for center-surround differences was merged into this model. The proposed method was tested on both Radarsat-2 and TerraSAR-X images, and experiments demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed method, the overall accuracy of water mapping is 98.48% and the Kappa coefficient is 0.856.

  9. Cusp form motives in the cohomology of the space of stable maps to BG

    CERN Document Server

    Petersen, Dan

    2010-01-01

    The moduli space of twisted stable maps into the stack $B(\\Z/m\\Z)^2$ carries a natural $S_n$-action and so its cohomology may be decomposed into irreducible $S_n$-representations. Working over $\\Spec \\Z[1/m]$ we show that the alternating part of the cohomology of one of its connected components is exactly the cohomology associated to cusp forms for $\\Gamma(m)$. In particular this offers an alternative to Scholl's construction of the Chow motive associated to such cusp forms. This answers in the affirmative a question of Manin on whether one can replace the Kuga-Sato varieties used by Scholl with some moduli space of pointed stable curves.

  10. Application of remote sensing and GIS in land use/land cover mapping and change detection in Shasha forest reserve, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olokeogun, O. S.; Iyiola, K.; Iyiola, O. F.

    2014-11-01

    Mapping of LULC and change detection using remote sensing and GIS techniques is a cost effective method of obtaining a clear understanding of the land cover alteration processes due to land use change and their consequences. This research focused on assessing landscape transformation in Shasha Forest Reserve, over an 18 year period. LANDSAT Satellite imageries (of 30 m resolution) covering the area at two epochs were characterized into five classes (Water Body, Forest Reserve, Built up Area, Vegetation, and Farmland) and classification performs with maximum likelihood algorithm, which resulted in the classes of each land use. The result of the comparison of the two classified images showed that vegetation (degraded forest) has increased by 30.96 %, farmland cover increased by 22.82 % and built up area by 3.09 %. Forest reserve however, has decreased significantly by 46.12 % during the period. This research highlights the increasing rate of modification of forest ecosystem by anthropogebic activities and the need to apprehend the situation to ensure sustainable forest management.

  11. Mapping the Influence of Land Use/Land Cover Changes on the Urban Heat Island Effect—A Case Study of Changchun, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaobin Yang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The spatio-temporal patterns of land use/land cover changes (LUCC can significantly affect the distribution and intensity of the urban heat island (UHI effect. However, few studies have mapped a clear picture of the influence of LUCC on UHI. In this study, both qualitative and quantitative models are employed to explore the effect of LUCC on UHI. UHI and LUCC maps were retrieved from Landsat data acquired from 1984, 1992, 2000, 2007, and 2014 to show their spatiotemporal patterns. The results showed that: (1 both the patterns of LUCC and UHI have had dramatic changes in the past 30 years. The urban area of Changchun increased more than four times, from 143.15 km2 in 1984 to 577.45 km2 in 2014, and the proportion of UHI regions has increased from 15.27% in 1984 to 29.62% in 2014; (2 the spatiotemporal changes in thermal environment were consistent with the process of urbanization. The average LST of the study area has been continuously increasing as many other land use types have been transformed to urban regions. The mean temperatures were higher in urban regions than rural areas over all of the periods, but the UHI intensity varied based on different measurements; and (3 the thermal environment inside the city varied widely even within a small area. The LST possesses a very strong positive relationship with impervious surface area (ISA, and the relationship has become stronger in recent years. The UHI we employ, specifically in this study, is SUHI (surface urban heat island.

  12. Parcels and Land Ownership, Hogansville, Georgia Zoning map, Published in 2002, 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, Chattahoochee-Flint Regional Development.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Hardcopy Maps information as of 2002. It is described...

  13. ANWR progress report FY87: Accuracy assessment of Landsat land cover maps of the coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska, 1987

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Accuracy assessments of two versions of Landsat-assisted land cover maps were conducted on the coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. Ground...

  14. Mapping Land Cover in the Taita Hills, se Kenya, Using Airborne Laser Scanning and Imaging Spectroscopy Data Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piiroinen, R.; Heiskanen, J.; Maeda, E.; Hurskainen, P.; Hietanen, J.; Pellikka, P.

    2015-04-01

    The Taita Hills, located in south-eastern Kenya, is one of the world's biodiversity hotspots. Despite the recognized ecological importance of this region, the landscape has been heavily fragmented due to hundreds of years of human activity. Most of the natural vegetation has been converted for agroforestry, croplands and exotic forest plantations, resulting in a very heterogeneous landscape. Given this complex agro-ecological context, characterizing land cover using traditional remote sensing methods is extremely challenging. The objective of this study was to map land cover in a selected area of the Taita Hills using data fusion of airborne laser scanning (ALS) and imaging spectroscopy (IS) data. Land Cover Classification System (LCCS) was used to derive land cover nomenclature, while the height and percentage cover classifiers were used to create objective definitions for the classes. Simultaneous ALS and IS data were acquired over a 10 km x 10 km area in February 2013 of which 1 km x 8 km test site was selected. The ALS data had mean pulse density of 9.6 pulses/m2, while the IS data had spatial resolution of 1 m and spectral resolution of 4.5-5 nm in the 400-1000 nm spectral range. Both IS and ALS data were geometrically co-registered and IS data processed to at-surface reflectance. While IS data is suitable for determining land cover types based on their spectral properties, the advantage of ALS data is the derivation of vegetation structural parameters, such as tree height and crown cover, which are crucial in the LCCS nomenclature. Geographic object-based image analysis (GEOBIA) was used for segmentation and classification at two scales. The benefits of GEOBIA and ALS/IS data fusion for characterizing heterogeneous landscape were assessed, and ALS and IS data were considered complementary. GEOBIA was found useful in implementing the LCCS based classification, which would be difficult to map using pixel-based methods.

  15. Mapping land cover in urban residential landscapes using fine resolution imagery and object-oriented classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    A knowledge of different types of land cover in urban residential landscapes is important for building social and economic city-wide policies including landscape ordinances and water conservation programs. Urban landscapes are typically heterogeneous, so classification of land cover in these areas ...

  16. Different "routes" to a cognitive map: dissociable forms of spatial knowledge derived from route and cartographic map learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Zherdeva, Ksenia; Ekstrom, Arne D

    2014-10-01

    An important, but as yet incompletely resolved, issue is whether spatial knowledge acquired during navigation differs significantly from that acquired by studying a cartographic map. This, in turn, is relevant to understanding the generalizability of the concept of a "cognitive map," which is often likened to a cartographic map. On the basis of previous theoretical proposals, we hypothesized that route and cartographic map learning would produce differences in the dynamics of acquisition of landmark-referenced (allocentric) knowledge, relative to view-referenced (egocentric) knowledge. We compared this model with competing predictions from two other models linked to route versus map learning. To test these ideas, participants repeatedly performed a judgment of relative direction (JRD) and a scene- and orientation-dependent pointing (SOP) task while undergoing route and cartographic map learning of virtual spatial environments. In Experiment 1, we found that map learning led to significantly faster improvements in JRD pointing accuracy than did route learning. In Experiment 2, in contrast, we found that route learning led to more immediate and greater improvements overall in SOP accuracy, as compared to map learning. Comparing Experiments 1 and 2, we found a significant three-way interaction effect, indicating that improvements in performance differed for the JRD versus the SOP task as a function of route versus map learning. We interpreted these findings as suggesting that the learning modality differentially affects the dynamics of how we utilize primarily landmark-referenced versus view-referenced knowledge, suggesting potential differences in how we utilize spatial representations acquired from routes versus cartographic maps.

  17. Use of Land Use Land Cover Change Mapping Products in Aiding Coastal Habitat Conservation and Restoration Efforts of the Mobile Bay NEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spruce, Joseph P.; Swann, Roberta; Smooth, James

    2010-01-01

    The Mobile Bay region has undergone significant land use land cover change (LULC) over the last 35 years, much of which is associated with urbanization. These changes have impacted the region s water quality and wildlife habitat availability. In addition, much of the region is low-lying and close to the Gulf, which makes the region vulnerable to hurricanes, climate change (e.g., sea level rise), and sometimes man-made disasters such as the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill. Land use land cover change information is needed to help coastal zone managers and planners to understand and mitigate the impacts of environmental change on the region. This presentation discusses selective results of a current NASA-funded project in which Landsat data over a 34-year period (1974-2008) is used to produce, validate, refine, and apply land use land cover change products to aid coastal habitat conservation and restoration needs of the Mobile Bay National Estuary Program (MB NEP). The project employed a user defined classification scheme to compute LULC change mapping products for the entire region, which includes the majority of Mobile and Baldwin counties. Additional LULC change products have been computed for select coastal HUC-12 sub-watersheds adjacent to either Mobile Bay or the Gulf of Mexico, as part of the MB NEP watershed profile assessments. This presentation will include results of additional analyses of LULC change for sub-watersheds that are currently high priority areas, as defined by MB NEP. Such priority sub-watersheds include those that are vulnerable to impacts from the DWH oil spill, as well as sub-watersheds undergoing urbanization. Results demonstrating the nature and permanence of LULC change trends for these higher priority sub-watersheds and results characterizing change for the entire 34-year period and at approximate 10-year intervals across this period will also be presented. Future work will include development of value-added coastal habitat quality

  18. The South Florida Ecosystem Portfolio Model - A Map-Based Multicriteria Ecological, Economic, and Community Land-Use Planning Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labiosa, William B.; Bernknopf, Richard; Hearn, Paul; Hogan, Dianna; Strong, David; Pearlstine, Leonard; Mathie, Amy M.; Wein, Anne M.; Gillen, Kevin; Wachter, Susan

    2009-01-01

    The South Florida Ecosystem Portfolio Model (EPM) prototype is a regional land-use planning Web tool that integrates ecological, economic, and social information and values of relevance to decision-makers and stakeholders. The EPM uses a multicriteria evaluation framework that builds on geographic information system-based (GIS) analysis and spatially-explicit models that characterize important ecological, economic, and societal endpoints and consequences that are sensitive to regional land-use/land-cover (LULC) change. The EPM uses both economics (monetized) and multiattribute utility (nonmonetized) approaches to valuing these endpoints and consequences. This hybrid approach represents a methodological middle ground between rigorous economic and ecological/ environmental scientific approaches. The EPM sacrifices some degree of economic- and ecological-forecasting precision to gain methodological transparency, spatial explicitness, and transferability, while maintaining credibility. After all, even small steps in the direction of including ecosystem services evaluation are an improvement over current land-use planning practice (Boyd and Wainger, 2003). There are many participants involved in land-use decision-making in South Florida, including local, regional, State, and Federal agencies, developers, environmental groups, agricultural groups, and other stakeholders (South Florida Regional Planning Council, 2003, 2004). The EPM's multicriteria evaluation framework is designed to cut across the objectives and knowledge bases of all of these participants. This approach places fundamental importance on social equity and stakeholder participation in land-use decision-making, but makes no attempt to determine normative socially 'optimal' land-use plans. The EPM is thus a map-based set of evaluation tools for planners and stakeholders to use in their deliberations of what is 'best', considering a balancing of disparate interests within a regional perspective. Although

  19. Change in land use in the Phoenix (1:250,000) Quadrangle, Arizona between 1970 and 1973: ERTS as an aid in a nationwide program for mapping general land use. [Phoenix Quadrangle, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Place, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    Changes in land use between 1970 and 1973 in the Phoenix (1:250,000 scale) Quadrangle in Arizona have been mapped using only the images from ERTS-1, tending to verify the utility of a standard land use classification system proposed for use with ERTS images. Types of changes detected have been: (1) new residential development of former cropland and rangeland; (2) new cropland from the desert; and (3) new reservoir fill-up. The seasonal changing of vegetation patterns in ERTS has complemented air photos in delimiting the boundaries of some land use types. ERTS images, in combination with other sources of information, can assist in mapping the generalized land use of the fifty states by the standard 1:250,000 quadrangles. Several states are already working cooperatively in this type of mapping.

  20. Fuzzy Nonnative Phonolexical Representations Lead to Fuzzy Form-to-Meaning Mappings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Svetlana V; Pandža, Nick B; Lancaster, Alia K; Gor, Kira

    2016-01-01

    The present paper explores nonnative (L2) phonological encoding of lexical entries and dissociates the difficulties associated with L2 phonological and phonolexical encoding by focusing on similarly sounding L2 words that are not differentiated by difficult phonological contrasts. We test two main claims of the fuzzy lexicon hypothesis: (1) L2 fuzzy phonolexical representations are not fully specified and lack details at both phonological and phonolexical levels of representation (Experiment 1); and (2) fuzzy phonolexical representations can lead to establishing incorrect form-to-meaning mappings (Experiment 2). The Russian-English Translation Judgment Task (Experiment 1, TJT) explores how the degree of phonolexical similarity between a word and its lexical competitor affects lexical access of Russian words. Words with smaller phonolexical distance (e.g., parent-parrot) show longer reaction times and lower accuracy compared to words with a larger phonolexical distance (e.g., parent-parchment) in lower-proficiency nonnative speakers, and, to a lesser degree, higher-proficiency speakers. This points to a lack of detail in nonnative phonolexical representations necessary for efficient lexical access. The Russian Pseudo-Semantic Priming task (Experiment 2, PSP) addresses the vulnerability of form-to-meaning mappings as a consequence of fuzzy phonolexical representations in L2. We primed the target with a word semantically related to its phonological competitor, or a potentially confusable word. The findings of Experiment 2 extend the results of Experiment 1 that, unlike native speakers, nonnative speakers do not properly encode phonolexical information. As a result, they are prone to access an incorrect lexical representation of a competitor word, as indicated by a slowdown in the judgments to confusable words. The study provides evidence that fuzzy phonolexical representations result in unfaithful form-to-meaning mappings, which lead to retrieval of incorrect semantic

  1. Fuzzy Nonnative Phonolexical Representations Lead to Fuzzy Form-to-Meaning Mappings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana V Cook

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The present paper explores nonnative (L2 phonological encoding of lexical entries and dissociates the difficulties associated with L2 phonological and phonolexical encoding by focusing on similarly sounding L2 words that are not differentiated by difficult phonological contrasts. We test two main claims of the fuzzy lexicon hypothesis: (1 L2 fuzzy phonolexical representations are not fully specified and lack details at both phonological and phonolexical levels of representation (Experiment 1; and (2 fuzzy phonolexical representations can lead to establishing incorrect form-to-meaning mappings (Experiment 2.The Russian-English Translation Priming task (Experiment 1, TJT explores how the degree of phonolexical similarity between a word and its lexical competitor affects lexical access of Russian words. Words with smaller phonolexical distance (e.g., parent - parrot show longer reaction times and lower accuracy compared to words with a larger phonolexical distance (e.g., parent – parchment in lower-proficiency nonnative speakers, and, to a lesser degree, higher-proficiency speakers. This points to a lack of detail in nonnative phonolexical representations necessary for efficient lexical access. The Russian Pseudo-Semantic Priming task (Experiment 2, PSP addresses the vulnerability of form-to-meaning mappings as a consequence of fuzzy phonolexical representations in L2. We primed the target with a word semantically related to its phonological competitor, or a potentially confusable word. The findings of Experiment 2 extend the results of Experiment 1 that, unlike native speakers, nonnative speakers do not properly encode phonolexical information. As a result, they are prone to access an incorrect lexical representation of a competitor word, as indicated by a slowdown in the judgments to confusable words.The study provides evidence that fuzzy phonolexical representations result in unfaithful form-to-meaning mappings, which lead to retrieval of

  2. Fuzzy Nonnative Phonolexical Representations Lead to Fuzzy Form-to-Meaning Mappings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Svetlana V.; Pandža, Nick B.; Lancaster, Alia K.; Gor, Kira

    2016-01-01

    The present paper explores nonnative (L2) phonological encoding of lexical entries and dissociates the difficulties associated with L2 phonological and phonolexical encoding by focusing on similarly sounding L2 words that are not differentiated by difficult phonological contrasts. We test two main claims of the fuzzy lexicon hypothesis: (1) L2 fuzzy phonolexical representations are not fully specified and lack details at both phonological and phonolexical levels of representation (Experiment 1); and (2) fuzzy phonolexical representations can lead to establishing incorrect form-to-meaning mappings (Experiment 2). The Russian-English Translation Judgment Task (Experiment 1, TJT) explores how the degree of phonolexical similarity between a word and its lexical competitor affects lexical access of Russian words. Words with smaller phonolexical distance (e.g., parent–parrot) show longer reaction times and lower accuracy compared to words with a larger phonolexical distance (e.g., parent–parchment) in lower-proficiency nonnative speakers, and, to a lesser degree, higher-proficiency speakers. This points to a lack of detail in nonnative phonolexical representations necessary for efficient lexical access. The Russian Pseudo-Semantic Priming task (Experiment 2, PSP) addresses the vulnerability of form-to-meaning mappings as a consequence of fuzzy phonolexical representations in L2. We primed the target with a word semantically related to its phonological competitor, or a potentially confusable word. The findings of Experiment 2 extend the results of Experiment 1 that, unlike native speakers, nonnative speakers do not properly encode phonolexical information. As a result, they are prone to access an incorrect lexical representation of a competitor word, as indicated by a slowdown in the judgments to confusable words. The study provides evidence that fuzzy phonolexical representations result in unfaithful form-to-meaning mappings, which lead to retrieval of incorrect

  3. The MST and the EZLN Struggle for Land : New Forms of Peasant Rebellions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vergara-camus, Leandro

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author reviews some of the conclusions of the literature on peasant rebellions in the light of current land struggles of the Landless Rural Workers' Movement (MST) in Brazil and the Zapatista Army of National Liberation (EZLN) in Chiapas, Mexico. The author argues that conventio

  4. The MST and the EZLN Struggle for Land : New Forms of Peasant Rebellions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vergara-camus, Leandro

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author reviews some of the conclusions of the literature on peasant rebellions in the light of current land struggles of the Landless Rural Workers' Movement (MST) in Brazil and the Zapatista Army of National Liberation (EZLN) in Chiapas, Mexico. The author argues that conventio

  5. Forest and land use mapping using Remote Sensing and Geographical Information System: A case study on model system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhat Kumar Rai

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Remote sensing and geospatial technologies find tremendous application in rapid spatial and temporal monitoring as well as assessment of tropical forest resources and hence in formulation of concrete policy frameworks for their sustainable management. Present paper provides an overview on application of remote sensing in forestry and ecology with a case study which may be further extrapolated in other Indian Himalayan regions of North-East India. The case study used an IKONOS (2001 image, Arc View ver. 3.2, and ERDAS IMAGINE ver. 9.1 in order to investigate the forest/vegetation types/land cover mapping of Forest Research Institute campus (FRI, Dehradun, India (as model system through visual image interpretation. In the present case study, Chir pine was the dominant vegetation type covering major area of plantation inside FRI campus followed by Sal, Teak, Cassia, Cupressus and mixed vegetation with intermittent built up areas. Since FRI consists of huge plantations, separated in a segmented way, the site was feasible for learners of vegetation or forest mapping in an effective and systematic way. In nutshell, vegetation type/land use mapping through visual interpretation may be a valuable tool in monitoring, assessment and conservation planning of forests.

  6. Hot deformation of spray formed nickel-base superalloy using processing maps

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KANG Fu-wei; ZHANG Guo-qing; LI Zhou; SUN Jian-fei

    2008-01-01

    The hot compression testing of hot isostatically pressed (HIPed) spray formed (SF) nickel-base superalloy was carried out by thermal mechanical simulator in the temperature range of 1050-1140℃ at strain rates of 0.01-10 S-1 and engineering strain of 50%. A processing map was developed on the basis of these data by using the principles of dynamic materials modeling. The microstructural evolution of deformed samples was also examined on the basis of optical and electron microscopic observations. The map exhibits two domains: the instability domain at the temperatures of 1050℃-1110℃ and strain rate of 0.01 S-1, the stability domain at the temperatures of 1110℃-1140℃ and strain rates of 1s-1-10 S-1, with a peak efficiency of about 40%. The dynamic recrystallization(DRX) is observed in the stability domain and the deformed specimens are no cracking or instabilities. However, there is no DRX in the instability domain and the alloy exhibits flow instability with cracks due to poor workability. The optimum hot working condition Was determined in the stability domain.

  7. Mapping Local Climate Zones for a Worldwide Database of the Form and Function of Cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Bechtel

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Progress in urban climate science is severely restricted by the lack of useful information that describes aspects of the form and function of cities at a detailed spatial resolution. To overcome this shortcoming we are initiating an international effort to develop the World Urban Database and Access Portal Tools (WUDAPT to gather and disseminate this information in a consistent manner for urban areas worldwide. The first step in developing WUDAPT is a description of cities based on the Local Climate Zone (LCZ scheme, which classifies natural and urban landscapes into categories based on climate-relevant surface properties. This methodology provides a culturally-neutral framework for collecting information about the internal physical structure of cities. Moreover, studies have shown that remote sensing data can be used for supervised LCZ mapping. Mapping of LCZs is complicated because similar LCZs in different regions have dissimilar spectral properties due to differences in vegetation, building materials and other variations in cultural and physical environmental factors. The WUDAPT protocol developed here provides an easy to understand workflow; uses freely available data and software; and can be applied by someone without specialist knowledge in spatial analysis or urban climate science. The paper also provides an example use of the WUDAPT project results.

  8. Design of Dispersive Delay Structures (DDSs) Formed by Coupled C-Sections Using Predistortion with Space Mapping

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Qingfeng; Caloz, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    The concept of space mapping is applied, for the first time, to the design of microwave dispersive delay structures (DDSs). DDSs are components providing specified group delay versus frequency responses for real-time radio systems. The DDSs considered in this paper are formed by cascaded coupled C-sections. It is first shown that aggressive space mapping suffers from accuracy issue in the synthesis of DDSs. To address this issue, we propose a predistortion space mapping technique. Compared to aggressive space mapping, this technique provides enhanced accuracy, while compared to output space mapping, it provides greater implementation simplicity. Two full-wave and one experimental examples are provided to illustrate the proposed predistortion space mapping technique.

  9. Parcels and Land Ownership, Tax Parcels, Published in unknown, Wilson County GIS/Mapping.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of unknown. It is described as 'Tax Parcels'. This...

  10. Three very high resolution optical images for land use mapping of a suburban catchment: input to distributed hydrological models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacqueminet, Christine; Kermadi, Saïda; Michel, Kristell; Jankowfsky, Sonja; Braud, Isabelle; Branger, Flora; Beal, David; Gagnage, Matthieu

    2010-05-01

    Keywords : land cover mapping, very high resolution, remote sensing processing techniques, object oriented approach, distributed hydrological model, peri-urban area Urbanization and other modifications of land use affect the hydrological cycle of suburban catchments. In order to quantify these impacts, the AVuPUR project (Assessing the Vulnerability of Peri-Urban Rivers) is currently developing a distributed hydrological model that includes anthropogenic features. The case study is the Yzeron catchment (150 km²), located close to Lyon city, France. This catchment experiences a growing of urbanization and a modification of traditional land use since the middle of the 20th century, resulting in an increase of flooding, water pollution and river banks erosion. This contribution discusses the potentials of automated data processing techniques on three different VHR images, in order to produce appropriate and detailed land cover data for the models. Of particular interest is the identification of impermeable surfaces (buildings, roads, and parking places) and permeable surfaces (forest areas, agricultural fields, gardens, trees…) within the catchment, because their infiltration capacity and their impact on runoff generation are different. Three aerial and spatial images were acquired: (1) BD Ortho IGN aerial images, 0.50 m resolution, visible bands, may 5th 2008; (2) QuickBird satellite image, 2.44 m resolution, visible and near-infrared bands, august 29th 2008; (3) Spot satellite image, 2.50 m resolution, visible and near-infrared bands, September 22nd 2008. From these images, we developed three image processing methods: (1) a pixel-based method associated to a segmentation using Matlab®, (2) a pixel-based method using ENVI®, (3) an object-based classification using Definiens®. We extracted six land cover types from the BD Ortho IGN (visible bands) and height classes from the satellite images (visible and near infrared bands). The three classified images are

  11. Theory and praxis pf map analsys in CHEF part 1: Linear normal form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelotti, Leo; /Fermilab

    2008-10-01

    This memo begins a series which, put together, could comprise the 'CHEF Documentation Project' if there were such a thing. The first--and perhaps only--three will telegraphically describe theory, algorithms, implementation and usage of the normal form map analysis procedures encoded in CHEF's collection of libraries. [1] This one will begin the sequence by explaining the linear manipulations that connect the Jacobian matrix of a symplectic mapping to its normal form. It is a 'Reader's Digest' version of material I wrote in Intermediate Classical Dynamics (ICD) [2] and randomly scattered across technical memos, seminar viewgraphs, and lecture notes for the past quarter century. Much of its content is old, well known, and in some places borders on the trivial.1 Nevertheless, completeness requires their inclusion. The primary objective is the 'fundamental theorem' on normalization written on page 8. I plan to describe the nonlinear procedures in a subsequent memo and devote a third to laying out algorithms and lines of code, connecting them with equations written in the first two. Originally this was to be done in one short paper, but I jettisoned that approach after its first section exceeded a dozen pages. The organization of this document is as follows. A brief description of notation is followed by a section containing a general treatment of the linear problem. After the 'fundamental theorem' is proved, two further subsections discuss the generation of equilibrium distributions and issue of 'phase'. The final major section reviews parameterizations--that is, lattice functions--in two and four dimensions with a passing glance at the six-dimensional version. Appearances to the contrary, for the most part I have tried to restrict consideration to matters needed to understand the code in CHEF's libraries.

  12. Effect of Training Class Label Noise on Classification Performances for Land Cover Mapping with Satellite Image Time Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Pelletier

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Supervised classification systems used for land cover mapping require accurate reference databases. These reference data come generally from different sources such as field measurements, thematic maps, or aerial photographs. Due to misregistration, update delay, or land cover complexity, they may contain class label noise, i.e., a wrong label assignment. This study aims at evaluating the impact of mislabeled training data on classification performances for land cover mapping. Particularly, it addresses the random and systematic label noise problem for the classification of high resolution satellite image time series. Experiments are carried out on synthetic and real datasets with two traditional classifiers: Support Vector Machines (SVM and Random Forests (RF. A synthetic dataset has been designed for this study, simulating vegetation profiles over one year. The real dataset is composed of Landsat-8 and SPOT-4 images acquired during one year in the south of France. The results show that both classifiers are little influenced for low random noise levels up to 25%–30%, but their performances drop down for higher noise levels. Different classification configurations are tested by increasing the number of classes, using different input feature vectors, and changing the number of training instances. Algorithm complexities are also analyzed. The RF classifier achieves high robustness to random and systematic label noise for all the tested configurations; whereas the SVM classifier is more sensitive to the kernel choice and to the input feature vectors. Finally, this work reveals that the cross-validation procedure is impacted by the presence of class label noise.

  13. Theory and praxis of map analsys in CHEF part 2: Nonlinear normal form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelotti, Leo; /FERMILAB

    2009-04-01

    This is the second of three memos describing how normal form map analysis is implemented in CHEF. The first [1] explained the manipulations required to assure that initial, linear transformations preserved Poincare invariants, thereby confirming correct normalization of action-angle coordinates. In this one, the transformation will be extended to nonlinear terms. The third, describing how the algorithms were implemented within the software of CHEF's libraries, most likely will never be written. The first section, Section 2, quickly lays out preliminary concepts and relationships. In Section 3, we shall review the perturbation theory - an iterative sequence of transformations that converts a nonlinear mapping into its normal form - and examine the equation which moves calculations from one step to the next. Following that is a section titled 'Interpretation', which identifies connections between the normalized mappings and idealized, integrable, fictitious Hamiltonian models. A final section contains closing comments, some of which may - but probably will not - preview work to be done later. My reasons for writing this memo and its predecessor have already been expressed. [1] To them can be added this: 'black box code' encourages users to proceed with little or no understanding of what it does or how it operates. So far, CHEF has avoided this trap admirably by failing to attract potential users. However, we reached a watershed last year: even I now have difficulty following the software through its maze of operations. Extensions to CHEF's physics functionalities, software upgrades, and even simple maintenance are becoming more difficult than they should. I hope these memos will mark parts of the maze for easier navigation in the future. Despite appearances to the contrary, I tried to include no (or very little) more than the minimum needed to understand what CHEF's nonlinear analysis modules do.1 As with the first memo, material

  14. A spatial-temporal Hopfield neural network approach for super-resolution land cover mapping with multi-temporal different resolution remotely sensed images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaodong; Ling, Feng; Du, Yun; Feng, Qi; Zhang, Yihang

    2014-07-01

    The mixed pixel problem affects the extraction of land cover information from remotely sensed images. Super-resolution mapping (SRM) can produce land cover maps with a finer spatial resolution than the remotely sensed images, and reduce the mixed pixel problem to some extent. Traditional SRMs solely adopt a single coarse-resolution image as input. Uncertainty always exists in resultant fine-resolution land cover maps, due to the lack of information about detailed land cover spatial patterns. The development of remote sensing technology has enabled the storage of a great amount of fine spatial resolution remotely sensed images. These data can provide fine-resolution land cover spatial information and are promising in reducing the SRM uncertainty. This paper presents a spatial-temporal Hopfield neural network (STHNN) based SRM, by employing both a current coarse-resolution image and a previous fine-resolution land cover map as input. STHNN considers the spatial information, as well as the temporal information of sub-pixel pairs by distinguishing the unchanged, decreased and increased land cover fractions in each coarse-resolution pixel, and uses different rules in labeling these sub-pixels. The proposed STHNN method was tested using synthetic images with different class fraction errors and real Landsat images, by comparing with pixel-based classification method and several popular SRM methods including pixel-swapping algorithm, Hopfield neural network based method and sub-pixel land cover change mapping method. Results show that STHNN outperforms pixel-based classification method, pixel-swapping algorithm and Hopfield neural network based model in most cases. The weight parameters of different STHNN spatial constraints, temporal constraints and fraction constraint have important functions in the STHNN performance. The heterogeneity degree of the previous map and the fraction images errors affect the STHNN accuracy, and can be served as guidances of selecting the

  15. Land Use and Land Cover - Montana Land Cover Framework 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This statewide land cover theme is a baseline digital map of Montana's natural and human land cover. The baseline map is adapted from the Northwest ReGAP project...

  16. Boreal Forest Land Cover Mapping in Iceland and Finland Using Sentinel-1A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haarpaintner, J.; Davids, C.; Storvold, R.; Johansen, K. S.; Arnason, K.; Rauste, Y.; Mutanen, T.

    2016-08-01

    The complete Sentinel-1A (S1A) data set since autumn 2014 until September 2015 over two test sites of the EU FP7 project NorthState has been collected: Hallormsstaður in the north-east of Iceland of 50x50 km2 and Hyytiälä in southern Finland of 200x200 km2. The dense 20m-resolution dual-polarization S1A time series allow for a new level of forest land cover monitoring capabilities compared to ESA's former Envisat A(dvanced)SAR sensor. Temporal filtered dual- polarized mosaics clearly show different land covers that can be classified into forest land cover (FLC) products. Even single agricultural fields can be distinguished from these mosaics. The S1A data set also allowed the construction of a precise water mask for these sites. Results of S1A-based FLC based on two different approaches are compared to 2010 ALOS PALSAR derived FLC results and very high resolution (VHR) NDVI aerial photos. The forest land cover classes extracted are forest, disturbed forest, peatland, grassland, bare land, and settlements.

  17. Lexical form class information guides word-to-object mapping in preschoolers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, D G; Graham, S A

    1999-01-01

    We demonstrate that lexical form class information can play a powerful role in directing the establishment of word-to-object mappings in referentially ambiguous situations. A total of 144 3- and 4-year-olds heard a novel label, modeled syntactically as either a proper name or an adjective, for a stuffed animal of a familiar kind. We then added a second object of the same kind and asked children (1) to choose one of the two objects as the referent of a second novel label, also presented syntactically as either a proper name or an adjective, and (2) to decide whether this second label could also apply to the object they did not choose. In each of three experiments, preschoolers were most likely to reject two words for the same object if both words were proper names (as if one dog could not be both "Fido" and "Rover"). They were significantly less likely to do so if both were adjectives (as if one dog could be both "spotted" and "furry") or if one was a proper name and the other was an adjective (as if one dog could be both "Fido" and "furry"). Information about lexical form class thus contributed significantly to the formation of linkages between words and objects.

  18. Fire and Parasites: An Under-Recognized Form of Anthropogenic Land Use Change and Mechanism of Disease Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scasta, John Derek

    2015-09-01

    Anthropogenic land use changes have altered ecosystems and exacerbated the spread of infectious diseases. Recent reviews, however, have revealed that fire suppression in fire-prone natural areas has not been recognized as a form of anthropogenic land use change. Furthermore, fire suppression has been an under-recognized mechanism altering the risk and transmission of infectious disease pathogens and host-parasite dynamics. However, as settlement patterns changed, especially due to colonial expansion in North America, Africa, and Australia, fire suppression became a major form of land use change which has led to broad-scale ecosystem changes. Because parasites of humans and animals can vector viral, bacterial, prion, fungal, or protozoan pathogens, concomitant changes associated with anthropogenic-induced changes to fire frequencies and intensities are of concern. I provide reference to 24 studies that indicate that restoring fire in natural areas has the potential to reduce ectoparasites without wings such as ticks, chiggers, fleas, and lice; ectoparasites with wings such as mosquitos, horn flies, face flies, and stable flies; and endoparasites affecting livestock and wildlife. This suggests that fire ecology and parasitology be considered as a priority area for future research that has implications for both humans and animals.

  19. Preliminary results of mapping urban land cover with Seasat SAR imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, F. M.; Wharton, S. W.; Toll, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    The detectability of urban land cover types is explored using digitally processed Seasat SAR imagery of the Denver, Colorado area. Test sites within the metropolitan area were selected to include a cross section of Anderson, et. al. Level II land cover classes and cover types representative of the urban area growth stages. Using the Image 100 interactive processing system each test site was level sliced in an attempt to define specific reflectance boundaries for each cover type and to determine the spectral and spatial characteristics of homogeneous response regions. The rural-urban fringe boundary was readily definable, but a precise Level I and Level II land cover classification was not possible. High density housing could be separated from low density housing and from parks, but reflectance values were often look angle dependent. Confusion between some water and vegetation responses also posed problems.

  20. Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge (Barnegat Division) [Land Status Map: Sheet 2-4

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial...

  1. Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge [1997: Land Status Map: Sheet 2 of 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial photography,...

  2. Ace Basin National Wildlife Refuge (Combahee Unit) [Land Status Map: Sheet 1 of 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Ernest F. Hollings Ace Basin National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified...

  3. Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map: Sheet 4 of 6

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial...

  4. Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge (Reedy Creek Division) [Land Status Map: Sheet 6 of 8

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial...

  5. Erie National Wildlife Refuge (Seneca Division) [Land Status Map: Sheet 2 of 3

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Erie National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial photography,...

  6. Patoka River National Wildlife Refuge: Cannelton Locks & Dams [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Patoka River National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial photography,...

  7. Erie National Wildlife Refuge (Seneca Division) [Land Status Map: Sheet 1 of 3

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Erie National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial photography,...

  8. Erie National Wildlife Refuge (Seneca Division) [Land Status Map: Sheet 3 of 3

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Erie National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial photography,...

  9. Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map: Sheet 5 of 6

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial...

  10. Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map: Sheet 1 of 6

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial...

  11. Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map: Sheet 2 of 6

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial...

  12. Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map: Sheet 3 of 6

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial...

  13. Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map: Sheet 6 of 6

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial...

  14. Great Bay National Wildlife Refuge (Karner Blue Butterfly Division) [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Great Bay National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial photography,...

  15. National Key Deer Refuge [Land Status Map: Sheet 7 of 20

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at National Key Deer Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial photography, cadastral...

  16. Mark Twain National Wildlife Refuge Iowa River Corridor Project [Land Status Map: Sheet 3 of 3

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Mark Twain National Wildlife Refuge Iowa River Corridor Project. It was generated from...

  17. Mark Twain National Wildlife Refuge Iowa River Corridor Project [Land Status Map: Sheet 2 of 3

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Mark Twain National Wildlife Refuge Iowa River Corridor Project. It was generated from...

  18. Mark Twain National Wildlife Refuge Iowa River Corridor Project [Land Status Map: Sheet 1 of 3

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Mark Twain National Wildlife Refuge Iowa River Corridor Project. It was generated from...

  19. Mark Twain National Wildlife Refuge (Horseshoe Bend Division) [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Mark Twain National Wildlife Refuge Complex. It was generated from rectified aerial...

  20. EnviroAtlas - Durham, NC - One Meter Resolution Urban Area Land Cover Map (2010) Web Service

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas web service supports research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas ). The EnviroAtlas Durham, NC...

  1. Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map: Sheet 4 of 4

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial photography,...

  2. Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map: Sheet 1 of 4

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial photography,...

  3. Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map: Sheet 2 of 4

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial photography,...

  4. Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map: Sheet 3 of 4

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial photography,...

  5. Santee National Wildlife Refuge (Detail "A") [Land Status Map: Sheet 1 of 3

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Santee National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial photography,...

  6. Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge (Goose Rocks Division) [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial...

  7. Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge (Brigantine Division) [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial...

  8. Hillside National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map: Sheet 1 of 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Hillside National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial photography,...

  9. Big Branch Marsh National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map: Sheet 3 of 3

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Big Branch Marsh National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial...

  10. Butte Sink Wildlife Management Area [1989:Land Status Map: Sheet 1 of 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Butte Sink Wildlife Management Area. It was generated from rectified aerial photography,...

  11. Malheur National Wildlife Refuge [1988: Land Status Map: Sheet 1B

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Malheur National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial photography,...

  12. Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge (Barnegat Division) [Land Status Map: Sheet 1-7

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial...

  13. Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge (Reedy Creek Division) [Land Status Map: Sheet 2 of 8

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial...

  14. Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge (Barnegat Division) [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial...

  15. Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge (Little River Division) [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial...

  16. Colorado River Wildlife Management Area (Green River Easements) [Land Status Map: Sheet 1 of 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Colorado River Wildlife Management Area. It was generated from rectified aerial...

  17. Charles M Russell National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map: Sheet 2 of 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Charles M. Russell National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial...

  18. Charles M Russell National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map: Sheet 1 of 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Charles M. Russell National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial...

  19. Big Branch Marsh National Wildlife Refuge Land Status Map: Sheet 1 of 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Big Branch Marsh National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial...

  20. Lower Suwannee National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map: Sheet 4 of 4

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Lower Suwannee National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial...

  1. Moosehorn National Wildlife Refuge (Edmunds Division) [Land Status Map: Sheet 4 of 5

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Moosehorn National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial photography,...

  2. Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge (Barnegat Division) [Land Status Map: Sheet 2-2

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial...

  3. National Key Deer Refuge [Land Status Map: Sheet 3 of 20

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at National Key Deer Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial photography, cadastral...

  4. Cache River National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map: Sheet 5 of 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Cache River National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial photography,...

  5. Missisquoi National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map: Sheet 1 of 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Missisquoi National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial photography,...

  6. Stewart B. McKinney National Wildlife Refuge (Milford Point Division) [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Stewart B. Mckinney National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial...

  7. Millimetre spectral line mapping observations towards four massive star-forming H II regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shanghuo; Wang, Junzhi; Zhang, Zhi-Yu; Fang, Min; Li, Juan; Zhang, Jiangshui; Fan, Junhui; Zhu, Qingfeng; Li, Fei

    2017-04-01

    We present spectral line mapping observations towards four massive star-forming regions - Cepheus A, DR21S, S76E and G34.26+0.15 - with the IRAM 30-m telescope at the 2 and 3 mm bands. In total, 396 spectral lines from 51 molecules, one helium recombination line, 10 hydrogen recombination lines and 16 unidentified lines were detected in these four sources. An emission line of nitrosyl cyanide (ONCN, 140, 14-130, 13) was detected in G34.26+0.15, as the first detection in massive star-forming regions. We found that c-C3H2 and NH2D show enhancement in shocked regions, as suggested by the evidence of SiO and/or SO emission. The column density and rotational temperature of CH3CN were estimated with the rotational diagram method for all four sources. Isotope abundance ratios of 12C/13C were derived using HC3N and its 13C isotopologue, which were around 40 in all four massive star-forming regions and slightly lower than the local interstellar value (∼65). The 14N/15N and 16O/18O abundance ratios in these sources were also derived using the double isotopic method, which were slightly lower than in the local interstellar medium. Except for Cep A, the 33S/34S ratios in the other three targets were derived, which were similar to that in the local interstellar medium. The column density ratios of N(DCN)/N(HCN) and N(DCO+)/N(HCO+) in these sources were more than two orders of magnitude higher than the elemental [D]/[H] ratio, which is 1.5 × 10-5. Our results show that the later stage sources, G34.26+0.15 in particular, present more molecular species than earlier stage sources. Evidence of shock activity is seen in all stages studied.

  8. Mapping socio-economic scenarios of land cover change: a GIS method to enable ecosystem service modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swetnam, R D; Fisher, B; Mbilinyi, B P; Munishi, P K T; Willcock, S; Ricketts, T; Mwakalila, S; Balmford, A; Burgess, N D; Marshall, A R; Lewis, S L

    2011-03-01

    We present a GIS method to interpret qualitatively expressed socio-economic scenarios in quantitative map-based terms. (i) We built scenarios using local stakeholders and experts to define how major land cover classes may change under different sets of drivers; (ii) we formalized these as spatially explicit rules, for example agriculture can only occur on certain soil types; (iii) we created a future land cover map which can then be used to model ecosystem services. We illustrate this for carbon storage in the Eastern Arc Mountains of Tanzania using two scenarios: the first based on sustainable development, the second based on 'business as usual' with continued forest-woodland degradation and poor protection of existing forest reserves. Between 2000 and 2025 4% of carbon stocks were lost under the first scenario compared to a loss of 41% of carbon stocks under the second scenario. Quantifying the impacts of differing future scenarios using the method we document here will be important if payments for ecosystem services are to be used to change policy in order to maintain critical ecosystem services.

  9. A new surface accumulation map for western Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica, from interpolation of point measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rotschky, G.; Oerter, H.; Holmlund, P.; Winther, J.G.; Mulvaney, R.; van den Broeke, M.R.

    2007-01-01

    As a result of intensive field activities carried out by several nations over the past 15 years, a set of accumulation measurements for western Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica, was collected, based on firn-core drilling and snow-pit sampling. This new information was supplemented by earlier data take

  10. A study of the utilization of ERTS-1 data from the Wabash River Basin. [crop identification, water resources, urban land use, soil mapping, and atmospheric modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landgrebe, D. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The most significant results were obtained in the water resources research, urban land use mapping, and soil association mapping projects. ERTS-1 data was used to classify water bodies to determine acreages and high agreement was obtained with USGS figures. Quantitative evaluation was achieved of urban land use classifications from ERTS-1 data and an overall test accuracy of 90.3% was observed. ERTS-1 data classifications of soil test sites were compared with soil association maps scaled to match the computer produced map and good agreement was observed. In some cases the ERTS-1 results proved to be more accurate than the soil association map.

  11. High Resolution Urban Land Cover Mapping Using NAIP Aerial Photography and Image Processing for the USEPA National Atlas of Sustainability and Ecosystem Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilant, A. N.; Baynes, J.; Dannenberg, M.

    2012-12-01

    The US EPA National Atlas for Sustainability is a web-based, easy-to-use, mapping application that allows users to view and analyze multiple ecosystem services in a specific region. The Atlas provides users with a visual method for interpreting ecosystem services and understanding how they can be conserved and enhanced for a sustainable future. The Urban Atlas component of the National Atlas will provide fine-scale information linking human health and well-being to environmental conditions such as urban heat islands, near-road pollution, resource use, access to recreation, drinking water quality and other quality of life indicators. The National Land Cover Data (NLCD) derived from 30 m scale 2006 Landsat imagery provides the land cover base for the Atlas. However, urban features and phenomena occur at finer spatial scales, so higher spatial resolution and more current LC maps are required. We used 4 band USDA NAIP imagery (1 m pixel size) and various classification approaches to produce urban land cover maps with these classes: impervious surface, grass and herbaceous, trees and forest, soil and barren, and water. Here we present the remote sensing methods used and results from four pilot cities in this effort, highlighting the pros and cons of the approach, and the benefits to sustainability and ecosystem services analysis. Example of high resolution land cover map derived from USDA NAIP aerial photo. Compare 30 m and 1 m resolution land cover maps of downtown Durham, NC.

  12. Land cover/use mapping using multi-band imageries captured by Cropcam Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Autopilot (UAV) over Penang Island, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuyi, Tan; Boon Chun, Beh; Mat Jafri, Mohd Zubir; Hwee San, Lim; Abdullah, Khiruddin; Mohammad Tahrin, Norhaslinda

    2012-11-01

    The problem of difficulty in obtaining cloud-free scene at the Equatorial region from satellite platforms can be overcome by using airborne imagery. Airborne digital imagery has proved to be an effective tool for land cover studies. Airborne digital camera imageries were selected in this present study because of the airborne digital image provides higher spatial resolution data for mapping a small study area. The main objective of this study is to classify the RGB bands imageries taken from a low-altitude Cropcam UAV for land cover/use mapping over USM campus, penang Island, Malaysia. A conventional digital camera was used to capture images from an elevation of 320 meter on board on an UAV autopilot. This technique was cheaper and economical compared with other airborne studies. The artificial neural network (NN) and maximum likelihood classifier (MLC) were used to classify the digital imageries captured by using Cropcam UAV over USM campus, Penang Islands, Malaysia. The supervised classifier was chosen based on the highest overall accuracy (statistic (<0.8). The classified land cover map was geometrically corrected to provide a geocoded map. The results produced by this study indicated that land cover features could be clearly identified and classified into a land cover map. This study indicates the use of a conventional digital camera as a sensor on board on an UAV autopilot can provide useful information for planning and development of a small area of coverage.

  13. The use of geo-technologies for land use mapping on reclaimed areas. (Polish Title: Zastosowanie technik geomatycznych w opracowywaniu map pokrycia i użytkowania terenu dla obszarów zrekultywowanych)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szostak, M.; Nowicka, M.

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible use of geotechniques and generally available geodata for mapping land cover on reclaimed areas . The choice of subject was dictated by the growing number of such areas and the related problem of restoring their value. The validity of the use of modern technology, including GIS, photogrammetry and remote sensing, was determined, especially for the land cover classes mapping that are relevant in assessing the effects of reclamation and analyzes of the changes taking place on such sites. The study was performed for dump site of the Sulphur Mine "Machów", which is an example of the reclaimed area, located in the Tarnobrzeski district. The research materials consisted of aerial orthophotos, which were the basis of on-screen vectorization of land cover classes; Landsat satellite images, which were used in the pixel based classification; and the CORINE Land Cover database as a general reference to the global maps of land cover and land use. The site was characterized by relatively large mosaic of landscape which is typical for reclaimed areas. Due to this fact, high resolution aerial photos were most suitable for the land cover mapping, allowing distinguishing highest number of land cover classes. The process was also successfully automated with the means of pixel-based image classification on the satellite images. This resulted also in the subjectivity of the operator and time costs. The effort made to develop land cover classes, supported with thorough knowledge of the operator, is important for the proper evaluation of the reclamation process.

  14. GEOMORPHOLOGICAL MAPPING OF A SAHARAN REGION, THE STILL LANDS NORTH EAST SAHARA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belkacem BOUMARAF

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study is a first in a Saharan region. Following a collaboration between soil scientists and geomorphologists a geomorphological mapping was realized. This work aims to understand the evolution of Saharan soils .The result we obtained demonstrated the presence of five geomorphological soil level. Each level and defined as soil with special chemical, physical and genetic characteristic.

  15. Geomorphic/Geologic Mapping, Localization, and Traverse Planning at the Opportunity Landing Site, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, T. J.; Golombek, M. P.; Powell, M. W.

    2010-03-01

    Mapping of the Opportunity traverse, using the project’s planning tool, “maestro”, and GIS software. Experience gained by the science and engineering teams will be invaluable for planning and conducting future mobile explorer missions to Mars and other planetary bodies.

  16. Testing the use of a land cover map for habitat ranking in boreal forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilli, Milla; Kuitunen, Markku T

    2005-04-01

    Habitat loss and modification is one of the major threats to biodiversity and the preservation of conservation values. We use the term ''conservation value'' to mean the benefit of nature or habitats for species. The importance of identifying and preserving conservation values has increased with the decline in biodiversity and the adoption of more stringent environmental legislation. In this study, conservation values were considered in the context of land-use planning and the rapidly increasing demand for more accurate methods of predicting and identifying these values. We used a k-nearest neighbor interpreted satellite (Landsat TM) image classified in 61 classes to assess sites with potential conservation values at the regional and landscape planning scale. Classification was made at the National Land Survey of Finland for main tree species, timber volume, land-use type, and soil on the basis of spectral reflectance in satellite image together with broad numerical reference data. We used the number and rarity of vascular plant species observed in the field as indicators for potential conservation values. We assumed that significant differences in the species richness, rarity, or composition of flora among the classes interpreted in the satellite image would also mean a difference in conservation values among these classes. We found significant differences in species richness among the original satellite image classes. Many of the classes examined could be distinguished by the number of plant species. Species composition also differed correspondingly. Rare species were most abundant in old spruce forests (>200 m3/ha), raising the position of such forests in the ranking of categories according to conservation values. The original satellite image classification was correct for 70% of the sites studied. We concluded that interpreted satellite data can serve as a useful source for evaluating habitat categories on the basis of plant species richness and rarity

  17. A matrix clustering method to explore patterns of land-cover transitions in satellite-derived maps of the Brazilian Amazon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Hansen, Finn; Cardoso, Manoel F.; Dalla-Nora, Eloi L.; Donges, Jonathan F.; Heitzig, Jobst; Kurths, Jürgen; Thonicke, Kirsten

    2017-02-01

    Changes in land-use systems in tropical regions, including deforestation, are a key challenge for global sustainability because of their huge impacts on green-house gas emissions, local climate and biodiversity. However, the dynamics of land-use and land-cover change in regions of frontier expansion such as the Brazilian Amazon are not yet well understood because of the complex interplay of ecological and socioeconomic drivers. In this paper, we combine Markov chain analysis and complex network methods to identify regimes of land-cover dynamics from land-cover maps (TerraClass) derived from high-resolution (30 m) satellite imagery. We estimate regional transition probabilities between different land-cover types and use clustering analysis and community detection algorithms on similarity networks to explore patterns of dominant land-cover transitions. We find that land-cover transition probabilities in the Brazilian Amazon are heterogeneous in space, and adjacent subregions tend to be assigned to the same clusters. When focusing on transitions from single land-cover types, we uncover patterns that reflect major regional differences in land-cover dynamics. Our method is able to summarize regional patterns and thus complements studies performed at the local scale.

  18. Maps4Science - National Roadmap for Large-Scale Research Facilities 2011 (NWO Application form)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Oosterom, P.J.M.; Van der Wal, T.; De By, R.A.

    2011-01-01

    The Netherlands is historically known as one of worlds' best-measured countries. It is continuing this tradition today with unequalled new datasets, such as the nationwide large-scale topographic map, our unique digital height map (nationwide coverage; ten very accurate 3D points for every Dutch m2)

  19. Mapping large-area landscape suitability for honey bees to assess the influence of land-use change on sustainability of national pollination services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallant, Alisa L.; Euliss, Ned H.; Browning, Zac

    2014-01-01

    Pollination is a critical ecosystem service affected by various drivers of land-use change, such as policies and programs aimed at land resources, market values for crop commodities, local land-management decisions, and shifts in climate. The United States is the world's most active market for pollination services by honey bees, and the Northern Great Plains provide the majority of bee colonies used to meet the Nation's annual pollination needs. Legislation requiring increased production of biofuel crops, increasing commodity prices for crops of little nutritional value for bees in the Northern Great Plains, and reductions in government programs aimed at promoting land conservation are converging to alter the regional landscape in ways that challenge beekeepers to provide adequate numbers of hives for national pollination services. We developed a spatially explicit model that identifies sites with the potential to support large apiaries based on local-scale land-cover requirements for honey bees. We produced maps of potential apiary locations for North Dakota, a leading producer of honey, based on land-cover maps representing (1) an annual time series compiled from existing operational products and (2) a realistic scenario of land change. We found that existing land-cover products lack sufficient local accuracy to monitor actual changes in landscape suitability for honey bees, but our model proved informative for evaluating effects on suitability under scenarios of land change. The scenario we implemented was aligned with current drivers of land-use change in the Northern Great Plains and highlighted the importance of conservation lands in landscapes intensively and extensively managed for crops.

  20. Mapping large-area landscape suitability for honey bees to assess the influence of land-use change on sustainability of national pollination services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallant, Alisa L; Euliss, Ned H; Browning, Zac

    2014-01-01

    Pollination is a critical ecosystem service affected by various drivers of land-use change, such as policies and programs aimed at land resources, market values for crop commodities, local land-management decisions, and shifts in climate. The United States is the world's most active market for pollination services by honey bees, and the Northern Great Plains provide the majority of bee colonies used to meet the Nation's annual pollination needs. Legislation requiring increased production of biofuel crops, increasing commodity prices for crops of little nutritional value for bees in the Northern Great Plains, and reductions in government programs aimed at promoting land conservation are converging to alter the regional landscape in ways that challenge beekeepers to provide adequate numbers of hives for national pollination services. We developed a spatially explicit model that identifies sites with the potential to support large apiaries based on local-scale land-cover requirements for honey bees. We produced maps of potential apiary locations for North Dakota, a leading producer of honey, based on land-cover maps representing (1) an annual time series compiled from existing operational products and (2) a realistic scenario of land change. We found that existing land-cover products lack sufficient local accuracy to monitor actual changes in landscape suitability for honey bees, but our model proved informative for evaluating effects on suitability under scenarios of land change. The scenario we implemented was aligned with current drivers of land-use change in the Northern Great Plains and highlighted the importance of conservation lands in landscapes intensively and extensively managed for crops.

  1. Mapping large-area landscape suitability for honey bees to assess the influence of land-use change on sustainability of national pollination services.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alisa L Gallant

    Full Text Available Pollination is a critical ecosystem service affected by various drivers of land-use change, such as policies and programs aimed at land resources, market values for crop commodities, local land-management decisions, and shifts in climate. The United States is the world's most active market for pollination services by honey bees, and the Northern Great Plains provide the majority of bee colonies used to meet the Nation's annual pollination needs. Legislation requiring increased production of biofuel crops, increasing commodity prices for crops of little nutritional value for bees in the Northern Great Plains, and reductions in government programs aimed at promoting land conservation are converging to alter the regional landscape in ways that challenge beekeepers to provide adequate numbers of hives for national pollination services. We developed a spatially explicit model that identifies sites with the potential to support large apiaries based on local-scale land-cover requirements for honey bees. We produced maps of potential apiary locations for North Dakota, a leading producer of honey, based on land-cover maps representing (1 an annual time series compiled from existing operational products and (2 a realistic scenario of land change. We found that existing land-cover products lack sufficient local accuracy to monitor actual changes in landscape suitability for honey bees, but our model proved informative for evaluating effects on suitability under scenarios of land change. The scenario we implemented was aligned with current drivers of land-use change in the Northern Great Plains and highlighted the importance of conservation lands in landscapes intensively and extensively managed for crops.

  2. Urban land use/land cover mapping with high-resolution SAR imagery by integrating support vector machines into object-based analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hongtao; Ban, Yifang

    2008-10-01

    This paper investigates the capability of high-resolution SAR data for urban landuse/land-cover mapping by integrating support vector machines (SVMs) into object-based analysis. Five-date RADARSAT fine-beam C-HH SAR images with a pixel spacing of 6.25 meter were acquired over the rural-urban fringe of the Great Toronto Area (GTA) during May to August in 2002. First, the SAR images were segmented using multi-resolution segmentation algorithm and two segmentation levels were created. Next, a range of spectral, shape and texture features were selected and calculated for all image objects on both levels. The objects on the lower level then inherited features of their super objects. In this way, the objects on the lower level received detailed descriptions about their neighbours and contexts. Finally, SVM classifiers were used to classify the image objects on the lower level based on the selected features. For training the SVM, sample image objects on the lower level were used. One-against-one approach was chosen to apply SVM to multiclass classification of SAR images in this research. The results show that the proposed method can achieve a high accuracy for the classification of high-resolution SAR images over urban areas.

  3. On the dualization of scalars into (d-2)-forms in supergravity. Momentum maps, R-symmetry and gauged supergravity

    CERN Document Server

    Bandos, Igor A

    2016-01-01

    We review and investigate different aspects of scalar fields in supergravity theories both when they parametrize symmetric spaces and when they parametrize spaces of special holonomy which are not necessarily symmetric (Kahler and Quaternionic-Kahler spaces): their role in the definition of derivatives of the fermions covariant under the R-symmetry group and (in gauged supergravities) under some gauge group, their dualization into (d-2)-forms, their role in the supersymmetry transformation rules (via fermion shifts, for instance) etc. We find a general definition of momentum map that applies to any manifold admitting a Killing vector and coincides with those of the holomorphic and tri-holomorphic momentum maps in Kahler and Quaternionic-Kahler spaces and with an independent definition that can be given in symmetric spaces. We show how the momentum map occurs ubiquitously: in gauge-covariant derivatives of fermions, in fermion shifts, in the supersymmetry transformation rules of (d-2)-forms etc. We also give t...

  4. Effective roughness calculated from satellite-derived land cover maps and hedge-information used in a weather forecasting model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasager, C.B.; Nielsen, N.,W.; Jensen, N.O.

    2003-01-01

    In numerical weather prediction, climate and hydrological modelling, the grid cell size is typically larger than the horizontal length scales of variations in aerodynamic roughness, surface temperature and surface humidity. These local land cover variations give rise to sub-grid scale surface flux...... to be well-described in any large-scale model. A method of aggregating the roughness step changes in arbitrary real terrain has been applied in flat terrain (Denmark) where sub-grid scale vegetation-driven roughness variations are a dominant characteristic of the landscape. The aggregation model...... is a physical two-dimensional atmospheric flow model in the horizontal domain based on a linearized version of the Navier Stoke equation. The equations are solved by the Fast Fourier Transformation technique, hence the code is very fast. The new effective roughness maps have been used in the HIgh Resolution...

  5. Near-surface mapping using SH-wave and P-wave seismic land-streamer data acquisition in Illinois, U.S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugin, Andre J.M.; Larson, T.H.; Sargent, S.L.; McBride, J.H.; Bexfield, C.E.

    2004-01-01

    SH-wave and P-wave high-resolution seismic reflection combined with land-streamer technology provide 3D regional maps of geologic formations that can be associated with aquifers and aquitards. Examples for three study areas are considered to demonstrate this. In these areas, reflection profiling detected near-surface faulting and mapped a buried glacial valley and its aquifers in two settings. The resulting seismic data can be used directly to constrain hydrogeologic modeling of shallow aquifers.

  6. OBJECT BASED AGRICULTURAL LAND COVER CLASSIFICATION MAP OF SHADOWED AREAS FROM AERIAL IMAGE AND LIDAR DATA USING SUPPORT VECTOR MACHINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. T. Alberto

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aerial image and LiDAR data offers a great possibility for agricultural land cover mapping. Unfortunately, these images leads to shadowy pixels. Management of shadowed areas for classification without image enhancement were investigated. Image segmentation approach using three different segmentation scales were used and tested to segment the image for ground features since only the ground features are affected by shadow caused by tall features. The RGB band and intensity were the layers used for the segmentation having an equal weights. A segmentation scale of 25 was found to be the optimal scale that will best fit for the shadowed and non-shadowed area classification. The SVM using Radial Basis Function kernel was then applied to extract classes based on properties extracted from the Lidar data and orthophoto. Training points for different classes including shadowed areas were selected homogeneously from the orthophoto. Separate training points for shadowed areas were made to create additional classes to reduced misclassification. Texture classification and object-oriented classifiers have been examined to reduced heterogeneity problem. The accuracy of the land cover classification using 25 scale segmentation after accounting for the shadow detection and classification was significantly higher compared to higher scale of segmentation.

  7. Optical and SAR sensor synergies for forest and land cover mapping in a tropical site in West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaglio Laurin, Gaia; Liesenberg, Veraldo; Chen, Qi; Guerriero, Leila; Del Frate, Fabio; Bartolini, Antonio; Coomes, David; Wilebore, Beccy; Lindsell, Jeremy; Valentini, Riccardo

    2013-04-01

    The classification of tropical fragmented landscapes and moist forested areas is a challenge due to the presence of a continuum of vegetation successional stages, persistent cloud cover and the presence of small patches of different land cover types. To classify one such study area in West Africa we integrated the optical sensors Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) and the Advanced Visible and Near Infrared Radiometer type 2 (AVNIR-2) with the Phased Arrayed L-band SAR (PALSAR) sensor, the latter two on-board the Advanced Land Observation Satellite (ALOS), using traditional Maximum Likelihood (MLC) and Neural Networks (NN) classifiers. The impact of texture variables and the use of SAR to cope with optical data unavailability were also investigated. SAR and optical integrated data produced the best classification overall accuracies using both MLC and NN, respectively equal to 91.1% and 92.7% for TM and 95.6% and 97.5% for AVNIR-2. Texture information derived from optical images was critical, improving results between 10.1% and 13.2%. In our study area, PALSAR alone was able to provide valuable information over the entire area: when the three forest classes were aggregated, it achieved 75.7% (with MCL) and 78.1% (with NN) overall classification accuracies. The selected classification and processing methods resulted in fine and accurate vegetation mapping in a previously untested region, exploiting all available sensors synergies and highlighting the advantages of each dataset.

  8. Segmentation and classification models validation area mapping of peat lands as initial value of Fuzzy Kohonen Clustering Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin; Saparudin; Fachrurrozi, Muhammad

    2017-04-01

    Ogan Komering Ilir (OKI) is located at the eastern of South Sumatra Province, 2030‧-4015‧ latitude and 104020‧-106000‧ longitude. Digital image of land was captured from Landsat 8 satellite path 124/row 062. Landsat 8 is new generation satellite which has two sensors, Operation Land Manager (OLI) and Thermal Infra-Red Sensor (TIRS). In pre-processing step, there are a geometric correction, radiometric correction, and cropping of the digital images which resulting coordinated geography. Classification uses maximum likelihood estimator algorithm. In segmentation process and classification, grey value spread is into evenly after applying histogram technique. The results of entropy value are7.42 which is the highest of result image classification, then the smallest entropy value in the result of correction mapping are 6.39. The three of them prove that they have enough high entropy value. Then the result of peatlands classification is given overall accuracy value = = 94.0012% and overall kappa value = 0.9230 so the result of classification can be considered to be right.

  9. Role of Remote Sensing and Geographyc Information System Mapping for Protected Areas Land Rice Field Subak, Buffer Zones, and Area Conversion (Case Studies In Gianyar Regency, Bali Province)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanya, Indayati; Netera Subadiyasa, N.

    2016-11-01

    Conversion of rice fields in Bali 2579 ha/year, Law Number 41 of 2009 [1] and five of Government Regulation (GR), mandates the Local Government (LG) has a Regional Regulation (RR) or Rule Regent/Mayor, on the protection of agricultural land sustainable food (PALSF). Yet none provincial government of Bali has PALSF; although Subak as world cultural heritage. Similarly, Gianyar regency development strategy directed to integrate agriculture with tourism. Landsat 8 images, Word View Coverage 2015 Gianyar district and ArcGIS 10.3 software used for of rice field mapping and zoning of land protection Subak. Ten thematic maps (watersheds, land use, irrigation, relief/slope, rainfall, spatial planning, land suitability, productivity, the distance from downtown) as a variable parameter, weighted and balanced numerically. Numerical classification agricultura land using for the overlay menu and reselek. The total value of >125 as rice need to be protected, 100-125 value for buffer zone, and the value of 100, 50-100 and sustainable of rice field protection, buffer and can be converted in a row for the next 20 years is 10973 ha, 3855 ha and 311 ha. For the next 40 years Subak conserved of rice field (8019 ha), buffer (5855 ha), and can be converted (3124 ha). Subak land pattern of spread can be converted to an supply of land for non-agricultural development of the region downstream to the access road Ida Bagus Matera (Jln. Province / national) in the coastal areas of Gianyar.

  10. Covariance of biophysical data with digital topograpic and land use maps over the FIFE site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, F.W.; Schimel, D.S.; Friedl, M.A.; Michaelsen, J.C.; Kittel, T.G.F.; Dubayah, R.; Dozier, J. (California Univ., Santa Barbara (United States) Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins (United States) Cooperative Inst. for Research in the Atmosphere, Fort Collins, CO (United States) Maryland Univ., College Park (United States) NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States))

    1992-11-01

    This paper discusses the biophysical stratification of the FIFE site, implementation of the stratification utilizing geographic information system methods, and validation of the stratification with respect to field measurements of biomass, Bowen ratio, soil moisture, and the greenness vegetation index (GVI) derived from TM satellite data. Maps of burning and topographic position were significantly associated with variation in GVI, biomass, and Bowen ratio. The stratified design did not significantly alter the estimated site-wide means for surface climate parameters but accounted for between 25 and 45 percent of the sample variance depending on the variable. 30 refs.

  11. Development of a Bi-National Great Lakes Coastal Wetland and Land Use Map Using Three-Season PALSAR and Landsat Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Bourgeau-Chavez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Methods using extensive field data and three-season Landsat TM and PALSAR imagery were developed to map wetland type and identify potential wetland stressors (i.e., adjacent land use for the United States and Canadian Laurentian coastal Great Lakes. The mapped area included the coastline to 10 km inland to capture the region hydrologically connected to the Great Lakes. Maps were developed in cooperation with the overarching Great Lakes Consortium plan to provide a comprehensive regional baseline map suitable for coastal wetland assessment and management by agencies at the local, tribal, state, and federal levels. The goal was to provide not only land use and land cover (LULC baseline data at moderate spatial resolution (20–30 m, but a repeatable methodology to monitor change into the future. The prime focus was on mapping wetland ecosystem types, such as emergent wetland and forested wetland, as well as to delineate wetland monocultures (Typha, Phragmites, Schoenoplectus and differentiate peatlands (fens and bogs from other wetland types. The overall accuracy for the coastal Great Lakes map of all five lake basins was 94%, with a range of 86% to 96% by individual lake basin (Huron, Ontario, Michigan, Erie and Superior.

  12. 农村土地调查基本农田上图方法%Basic Farmland Mapping Methodology in Rural Land Survey

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱小龙

    2014-01-01

    土地是人类赖以生存和社会发展的物质基础,耕地是农业生产最基本、不可替代的生产资料。基本农田调查是农村土地调查最为重要的一个部分,基本农田上图工作对于政府部门制定土地政策、优化土地结构、保护耕地、提高耕地质量具有十分重要的意义。本文从基本农田概念的引入、基本农田上图技术流程、基本农田保护块上图以及图件编制、数据汇总几个方面阐述了农村土地调查基本农田的上图方法。%The Material Basis of human existence and social development is Land ;Cultivated Land is the fundamental and irreplacea-ble production is in Agricultural Production .Basic Farmland survey is the most important part of the rural land survey , Basic Farmland Mapping has great significance on developing land policy , optimizing land structure , protecting farmland and improving quality of ara-ble land.This paper elaborates method of Basic Farmland Mapping in rural land survey from several aspects , such as the concept of basic farmland , the technical processes of basic farmland mapping , basic farmland protection block diagram , and map edit and data aggregation .

  13. Global land surface albedo maps from MODIS using the Google Earth Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitraka, Zina; Benas, Nikolaos; Gorelick, Noel; Chrysoulakis, Nektarios

    2016-04-01

    The land surface albedo (LSA) is a critical physical variable, which influences the Earth's climate by affecting the energy budget and distribution in the Earth-atmosphere system. Its role is highly significant in both global and local scales; hence, LSA measurements provide a quantitative means for better constraining global and regional scale climate modelling efforts. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor, on board NASA's Terra and Aqua platforms, provides the parameters needed for the computation of LSA on an 8-day temporal scale and a variety of spatial scales (ranging between 0.5 - 5 km). This dataset was used here for the LSA estimation and its changes over the study area at 0.5 km spatial resolution. More specifically, the MODIS albedo product was used, which includes both the directional-hemispherical surface reflectance (black-sky albedo) and the bi-hemispherical surface reflectance (white-sky albedo). The LSA was estimated for the whole globe on an 8-day basis for the whole time period covered by MODIS acquisitions (i.e. 2000 until today). To estimate LSA from black-sky and white-sky albedos, the fraction of the diffused radiation is needed, a function of the Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT). Required AOT information was acquired from the MODIS AOT product at 1̊ × 1̊ spatial resolution. Since LSA also depends on solar zenith angle (SZA), 8-day mean LSA values were computed as averages of corresponding LSA values for representative SZAs covering the 24-hour day. The estimated LSA was analysed in terms of both spatial and seasonal characteristics, while LSA changes during the period examined were assessed. All computation were performed using the Google Earth Engine (GEE). The GEE provided access to all the MODIS products needed for the analysis without the need of searching or downloading. Moreover, the combination of MODIS products in both temporal and spatial terms was fast and effecting using the GEE API (Application

  14. Wildfire Risk Mapping over the State of Mississippi: Land Surface Modeling Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooke, William H. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Mostovoy, Georgy [Mississippi State University (MSU); Anantharaj, Valentine G [ORNL; Jolly, W. Matt [USDA Forest Service

    2012-01-01

    Three fire risk indexes based on soil moisture estimates were applied to simulate wildfire probability over the southern part of Mississippi using the logistic regression approach. The fire indexes were retrieved from: (1) accumulated difference between daily precipitation and potential evapotranspiration (P-E); (2) top 10 cm soil moisture content simulated by the Mosaic land surface model; and (3) the Keetch-Byram drought index (KBDI). The P-E, KBDI, and soil moisture based indexes were estimated from gridded atmospheric and Mosaic-simulated soil moisture data available from the North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS-2). Normalized deviations of these indexes from the 31-year mean (1980-2010) were fitted into the logistic regression model describing probability of wildfires occurrence as a function of the fire index. It was assumed that such normalization provides more robust and adequate description of temporal dynamics of soil moisture anomalies than the original (not normalized) set of indexes. The logistic model parameters were evaluated for 0.25 x0.25 latitude/longitude cells and for probability representing at least one fire event occurred during 5 consecutive days. A 23-year (1986-2008) forest fires record was used. Two periods were selected and examined (January mid June and mid September December). The application of the logistic model provides an overall good agreement between empirical/observed and model-fitted fire probabilities over the study area during both seasons. The fire risk indexes based on the top 10 cm soil moisture and KBDI have the largest impact on the wildfire odds (increasing it by almost 2 times in response to each unit change of the corresponding fire risk index during January mid June period and by nearly 1.5 times during mid September-December) observed over 0.25 x0.25 cells located along the state of Mississippi Coast line. This result suggests a rather strong control of fire risk indexes on fire occurrence probability

  15. Chromosome landing at the ¤Mla¤ locus in barley (¤Hordeum vulgare¤ L.) by means of high-resolution mapping with AFLP markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwarz, G.; Michalek, W.; Mohler, V.

    1999-01-01

    to construct a high-resolution map of the Mla region. A fluorescence-based AFLP technique and bulked segregant analysis were applied to screen for polymorphic, tightly linked AFLP markers, Three AFLP markers were selected as suitable for a chromosome-landing strategy. One of these AFLP markers and a closely...

  16. Accuracy assessment for the U.S. Geological Survey Regional Land-Cover Mapping Program: New York and New Jersey Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhiliang Zhu; Limin Yang; Stephen V. Stehman; Raymond L. Czaplewski

    2000-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with other government and private organizations, is producing a conterminous U.S. land-cover map using Landsat Thematic Mapper 30-meter data for the Federal regions designated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Accuracy assessment is to be conducted for each Federal region to estimate overall and class-specific...

  17. Augmented Kalman Filter and Map Matching for 3D RISS/GPS Integration for Land Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Cossaboom

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Owing to their complimentary characteristics, global positioning system (GPS and inertial navigation system (INS are integrated, traditionally through Kalman filter (KF, to obtain improved navigational solution. To reduce the overall cost of the system, microelectromechanical system- (MEMS- based INS is utilized. One of the approaches is to reduce the number of low-cost inertial sensors, decreasing their error contribution which leads to a reduced inertial sensor system (RISS. This paper uses KF to integrate GPS and 3D RISS in a loosely coupled fashion to enhance navigational solution while further improvement is achieved by augmenting it with map matching (MM. The 3D RISS consists of only one gyroscope and two accelerometers along with the vehicle’s built-in odometer. MM limits the error growth during GPS outages by restricting the predicted positions to the road networks. The performance of proposed method is compared with KF-only 3D RISS/GPS integration to demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed technique.

  18. Using a Combined Platform of Swarm Intelligence Algorithms and GIS to Provide Land Suitability Maps for Locating Cardiac Rehabilitation Defibrillators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neda KAFFASH-CHARANDABI

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cardiac arrest is a condition in which the heart is completely stopped and is not pumping any blood. Although most cardiac arrest cases are reported from homes or hospitals, about 20% occur in public areas. Therefore, these areas need to be investigated in terms of cardiac arrest incidence so that places of high incidence can be identi-fied and cardiac rehabilitation defibrillators installed there.Methods: In order to investigate a study area in Petersburg, Pennsylvania State, and to determine appropriate places for installing defibrillators with 5-year period data, swarm intelligence algorithms were used. Moreover, the location of the defibrillators was determined based on the following five evaluation criteria: land use, altitude of the area, econom-ic conditions, distance from hospitals and approximate areas of reported cases of cardiac arrest for public places that were created in geospatial information system (GIS.Results: The A-P HADEL algorithm results were more precise about 27.36%. The validation results indicated a wider coverage of real values and the verification results confirmed the faster and more exact optimization of the cost func-tion in the PSO method.Conclusion: The study findings emphasize the necessity of applying optimal optimization methods along with GIS and precise selection of criteria in the selection of optimal locations for installing medical facilities because the selected algorithm and criteria dramatically affect the final responses. Meanwhile, providing land suitability maps for installing facilities across hot and risky spots has the potential to save many lives.

  19. The Research of Chinese Land Tenancy Form%中国地租形式研究——以近代江苏地租为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘冬梅; 周应堂

    2011-01-01

    对土地租税的征收形式,以及3种土地制度模式即雇工经营、分成制和定额制进行了比较研究,并得出结论,中国土地制度的形成与地主、农民对利益的获取与风险的偏好直接相关,形成了中国传统社会的独具特点的土地制度.%Land system is the result of the play between the level of productive development 、landlord class and the renter using land. At analytical domestic relevant land leasing relation research progress of foundation up. Forms of land tenancy and three kinds of land system model including hired management, rent-sharing system and rating system were studied comparatively in this thesis. The thesis hold the view that the formation of Chinese land system has directly relationship with attitudes that the landlords and the farmers hold to interests and risks. As a result,Chinese land system has been a traditional social land system.

  20. Federal Lands

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This map layer consists of federally owned or administered lands of theUnited States, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Only areas of 640 acres or more are...

  1. Coastal-Change and Glaciological Map of the Palmer Land Area, Antarctica: 1947-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrigno, Jane G.; Cook, Alison J.; Mathie, Amy M.; Williams, Richard S.; Swithinbank, Charles; Foley, Kevin M.; Fox, Adrian J.; Thomson, Janet W.; Sievers, Jorn

    2009-01-01

    out a comprehensive analysis of the glaciological features of the coastal regions and changes in ice fronts of Antarctica (Swithinbank, 1988; Williams and Ferrigno, 1988). The project was later modified to include Landsat 4 and 5 MSS and Thematic Mapper (TM) images (and in some areas Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) images), RADARSAT images, aerial photography, and other data where available, to compare changes that occurred during a 20- to 25- or 30-year time interval (or longer where data were available, as in the Antarctic Peninsula). The results of the analysis are being used to produce a digital database and a series of USGS Geologic Investigations Series Maps (I-2600) (Williams and others, 1995; Swithinbank and others, 2003a,b, 2004; Ferrigno and others, 2002, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, and in press; and Williams and Ferrigno, 2005) (available online at http://www.glaciers.er.usgs.gov).

  2. Continuous assessment of land mapping accuracy at High Resolution from global networks of atmospheric and field observatories -concept and demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicard, Pierre; Martin-lauzer, François-regis

    2017-04-01

    In the context of global climate change and adjustment/resilience policies' design and implementation, there is a need not only i. for environmental monitoring, e.g. through a range of Earth Observations (EO) land "products" but ii. for a precise assessment of uncertainties of the aforesaid information that feed environmental decision-making (to be introduced in the EO metadata) and also iii. for a perfect handing of the thresholds which help translate "environment tolerance limits" to match detected EO changes through ecosystem modelling. Uncertainties' insight means precision and accuracy's knowledge and subsequent ability of setting thresholds for change detection systems. Traditionally, the validation of satellite-derived products has taken the form of intensive field campaigns to sanction the introduction of data processors in Payload Data Ground Segments chains. It is marred by logistical challenges and cost issues, reason why it is complemented by specific surveys at ground-based monitoring sites which can provide near-continuous observations at a high temporal resolution (e.g. RadCalNet). Unfortunately, most of the ground-level monitoring sites, in the number of 100th or 1000th, which are part of wider observation networks (e.g. FLUXNET, NEON, IMAGINES) mainly monitor the state of the atmosphere and the radiation exchange at the surface, which are different to the products derived from EO data. In addition they are "point-based" compared to the EO cover to be obtained from Sentinel-2 or Sentinel-3. Yet, data from these networks, processed by spatial extrapolation models, are well-suited to the bottom-up approach and relevant to the validation of vegetation parameters' consistency (e.g. leaf area index, fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation). Consistency means minimal errors on spatial and temporal gradients of EO products. Test of the procedure for land-cover products' consistency assessment with field measurements delivered by worldwide

  3. Mapping soil erosion hotspots and assessing the potential impacts of land management practices in the highlands of Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamene, Lulseged; Adimassu, Zenebe; Ellison, James; Yaekob, Tesfaye; Woldearegay, Kifle; Mekonnen, Kindu; Thorne, Peter; Le, Quang Bao

    2017-09-01

    An enormous effort is underway in Ethiopia to address soil erosion and restore overall land productivity. Modelling and participatory approaches can be used to delineate erosion hotspots, plan site- and context-specific interventions and assess their impacts. In this study, we employed a modelling interface developed based on the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation adjusted by the sediment delivery ratio to map the spatial distribution of net soil loss and identify priority areas of intervention. Using the modelling interface, we also simulated the potential impacts of different soil and water conservation measures in reducing net soil loss. Model predictions showed that net soil loss in the study area ranges between 0.4 and 88 t ha- 1 yr- 1 with an average of 12 t ha- 1 yr- 1. The dominant soil erosion hotspots were associated with steep slopes, gullies, communal grazing and cultivated areas. The average soil loss observed in this study is higher than the tolerable soil loss rate estimated for the highland of Ethiopia. The scenario analysis results showed that targeting hotspot areas where soil loss exceeds 10 t ha- 1 yr- 1 could reduce net soil loss to the tolerable limit (erosion problem and the potential of management interventions. Future work should include cost-benefit and tradeoff analyses of the various management options for achieving a given level of erosion reduction.

  4. Evaluation of karst water quality as an early reference of land suitability mapping for vaname shrimp (Litopenaeusvannamei) culture media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildan, D. M.; Affandi, R.; Pratiwi, N. T. M.; Krisanti, M.; Ayu, I. P.; Iswantari, A.

    2017-01-01

    Vaname shrimp (Litopenaeusvannamei) is one of the excellent fishery commodities in Indonesia. Vaname shrimp farming can be conducted in low salinity water. Low salinity water sources which could be used as culture media is karst water because it has a high mineral. The research was aimedto evaluate land suitability mapping for pond as the vaname shrimpculture mediaseen from the water quality. Research was conducted in May and August 2016. Water sampling was conducted in several locations; Ancol-Jakarta (seawater), Ciseeng-Bogor (karst water salinity), Ciampea-Bogor (karst freshwater), and Situ Gede Bogor (freshwater). Evaluating the suitability of karst water quality for vaname shrimp culture media, done by the results of karst water quality analysis compared with seawater and SNI 01-7246-2006 on shrimp vaname culture media. The results showed that Karst water of Ciseeng and Ciampea could not directly use as vaname shrimp culture media. It is needed water quality treatment of ozonation and aeration of karst water to improve water quality. Ozonation and aeration treatments were able to improve the quality of karst water up to approach the living quality standard of vaname shrimp media.

  5. Comparison of multi-temporal NOAA-AVHRR and SPOT-XS satellite data for mapping land-cover dynamics in the West African Sahel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, S. E.; Walsh, J. L.; Lee, C. T.; Beck, L. R.; Hutchinson, C. F.

    1992-01-01

    Multi-resolution and multi-temporal remote sensing data (SPOT-XS and AVHRR) were evaluated for mapping local land-cover dynamics in the Sahel of West Africa. The aim of this research was to evaluate the agricultural information that could be derived from both high and low spatial resolution data in areas where there is very often limited ground information. A combination of raster-based image processing and vector-based geographical information system mapping was found to be effective for understanding both spatial and spectral land-cover dynamics. The SPOT data proved useful for mapping local land-cover classes in a dominantly recessive agricultural region. The AVHRR-LAC data could be used to map the dynamics of riparian vegetation, but not the changes associated with recession agriculture. In areas where there was a complex mixture of recession and irrigated agriculture, as well as riparian vegetation, the AVHRR data did not provide an accurate temporal assessment of vegetation dynamics.

  6. Spectral mixture analysis (SMA and change vector analysis (CVA methods for monitoring and mapping land degradation/desertification in arid and semiarid areas (Sudan, using Landsat imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelrahim A.M. Salih

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The severe Sahel catastrophe in 1968–1974 as well as repeated famines and food shortage that have hit many African countries during the 1970s have highlighted the need for further research concerning land degradation and environmental monitoring in arid and semi-arid areas. Land degradation, and desertification processes in arid and semi-arid environment were increased in the last four decades, especially in the developing countries like Sudan. To test to what extent remote sensing and geographical information science (GIS methodologies and techniques could be used for monitoring changes in arid and semi-arid regions and environment, these methodologies have long been suggested as a time and cost-efficient method. In this frame, spectral Mixture Analysis (SMA, Object-based oriented classification (Segmentation, and Change Vector Analysis are recently much recommended as a most suitable method for monitoring and mapping land cover changes in arid and semi-arid environment. Therefor the aim of this study is to use these methods and techniques for environmental monitoring with emphasis on desertification and to find model that can describe and map the status and rate of desertification processes and land cover changes in semi-arid areas in White Nile State (Sudan by using multi-temporal imagery of the Landsat satellite TM (1987, TM (2000, and ETM+ (2014 respectively. The paper also discusses and evaluates the efficiency of the adapted methodologies in monitoring the land degradation processes and changes in the arid and semi-arid regions.

  7. Detecting, mapping and monitoring of land subsidence in Jharia Coalfield, Jharkhand, India by spaceborne differential interferometric SAR, GPS and precision levelling techniques

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R S Chatterjee; Shailaja Thapa; K B Singh; G Varunakumar; E V R Raju

    2015-08-01

    The study aims at detection, mapping and monitoring of land subsidence in Jharia Coalfield, Jharkhand, India by spaceborne DInSAR, GPS and precision levelling techniques. Using multi-frequency C- and L-band DInSAR, both slowly and rapidly subsiding areas were identified and DInSAR-based subsidence maps were prepared. C-band DInSAR was found useful for detection of slowly subsiding areas whereas L-band DInSAR for rapidly subsiding and/or adverse land cover areas. Due to dynamic nature of mining and adverse land cover, temporal decorrelation poses a serious problem particularly in C-band DInSAR. Specially designed InSAR coherence guided adaptive filtering was found useful to highlight the deformation fringes. Collateral GPS and levelling observations were conducted in three test sites to validate DInSAR measurements and to determine the net displacement vectors. We observed an appreciable horizontal displacement component of land subsidence in all the test sites. For comparison of results, we calculated InSAR coherence weighted LOS displacement rates from the unwrapped differential interferograms of smaller spatial subsets and LOS projected ground-based displacement rates in three test sites. We found good agreement between DInSAR and ground-based measurements except for C-band observation in Dobari test site primarily due to large difference in observation periods and temporally inconsistent land subsidence. Collateral spaceborne and ground-based observations were also found useful for characterization of subsidence phenomena to determine net displacement vector and horizontal displacement component. In coal mining areas with spatially scattered and temporally irregular land subsidence phenomena, the adopted methodology can be used successfully for detection, mapping and monitoring of the subsiding areas vulnerable to future collapse. This will facilitate efficient planning and designing of surface infrastructures and other developmental structures in the mining

  8. A Framework for Mapping User-Designed Forms to Relational Databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, Ritu

    2011-01-01

    In the quest for database usability, several applications enable users to design custom forms using a graphical interface, and forward engineer the forms into new databases. The path-breaking aspect of such applications is that users are completely shielded from the technicalities of database creation. Despite this innovation, the process of…

  9. A Framework for Mapping User-Designed Forms to Relational Databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, Ritu

    2011-01-01

    In the quest for database usability, several applications enable users to design custom forms using a graphical interface, and forward engineer the forms into new databases. The path-breaking aspect of such applications is that users are completely shielded from the technicalities of database creation. Despite this innovation, the process of…

  10. On the dualization of scalars into ( d - 2)-forms in supergravity. Momentum maps, R-symmetry and gauged supergravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandos, Igor A.; Ortín, Tomás

    2016-08-01

    We review and investigate different aspects of scalar fields in supergravity theories both when they parametrize symmetric spaces and when they parametrize spaces of special holonomy which are not necessarily symmetric (Kähler and Quaternionic-Kähler spaces): their rôle in the definition of derivatives of the fermions covariant under the R-symmetry group and (in gauged supergravities) under some gauge group, their dualization into ( d - 2)-forms, their role in the supersymmetry transformation rules (via fermion shifts, for instance) etc. We find a general definition of momentum map that applies to any manifold admitting a Killing vector and coincides with those of the holomorphic and tri-holomorphic momentum maps in Kähler and quaternionic-Kähler spaces and with an independent definition that can be given in symmetric spaces. We show how the momen-tum map occurs ubiquitously: in gauge-covariant derivatives of fermions, in fermion shifts, in the supersymmetry transformation rules of ( d - 2)-forms etc. We also give the general structure of the Noether-Gaillard-Zumino conserved currents in theories with fields of different ranks in any dimension.

  11. Land cover mapping, fire regeneration, and scaling studies in the Canadian boreal forest with 1 km AVHRR and Landsat TM data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steyaert, L.T.; Hall, F.G.; Loveland, T.R.

    1997-01-01

    A multitemporal 1 km advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) land cover analysis approach was used as the basis for regional land cover mapping, fire disturbance-regeneration, and multiresolution land cover scaling studies in the boreal forest ecosystem of central Canada. The land cover classification was developed by using regional field observations from ground and low-level aircraft transits to analyze spectral-temporal clusters that were derived from an unsupervised cluster analysis of monthly normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) image composites (April-September 1992). Quantitative areal proportions of the major boreal forest components were determined for a 821 km ?? 619 km region, ranging from the southern grasslands-boreal forest ecotone to the northern boreal transitional forest. The boreal wetlands (mostly lowland black spruce, tamarack, mosses, fens, and bogs) occupied approximately 33% of the region, while lakes accounted for another 13%. Upland mixed coniferous-deciduous forests represented 23% of the ecosystem. A SW-NE productivity gradient across the region is manifested by three levels of tree stand density for both the boreal wetland conifer and the mixed forest classes, which are generally aligned with isopleths of regional growing degree days. Approximately 30% of the region was directly affected by fire disturbance within the preceding 30-35 years, especially in the Canadian Shield Zone where large fire-regeneration patterns contribute to the heterogeneous boreal landscape. Intercomparisons with land cover classifications derived from 30-m Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) data provided important insights into the relative accuracy of the 1 km AVHRR land cover classification. Primarily due to the multitemporal NDVI image compositing process, the 1 km AVHRR land cover classes have an effective spatial resolution in the 3-4 km range; therefore fens, bogs, small water bodies, and small patches of dry jack pine cannot be resolved within

  12. Parcels and Land Ownership, Tax Parcel Map Index, Published in unknown, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Columbia County Wisconsin Land Information Department.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of unknown....

  13. Parcels and Land Ownership, Lafayette County Parcel Map with attached tax roll data, Published in 1997, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Lafayette County Land Records.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 1997. It...

  14. Historical Topographic Map Collection bookmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishburn, Kristin A.; Allord, Gregory J.

    2017-06-29

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Geospatial Program is scanning published USGS 1:250,000-scale and larger topographic maps printed between 1884, the inception of the topographic mapping program, and 2006. The goal of this project, which began publishing the historical scanned maps in 2011, is to provide a digital repository of USGS topographic maps, available to the public at no cost. For more than 125 years, USGS topographic maps have accurately portrayed the complex geography of the Nation. The USGS is the Nation’s largest producer of printed topographic maps, and prior to 2006, USGS topographic maps were created using traditional cartographic methods and printed using a lithographic printing process. As the USGS continues the release of a new generation of topographic maps (US Topo) in electronic form, the topographic map remains an indispensable tool for government, science, industry, land management planning, and leisure.

  15. Geologic Mapping and Characterization of Gale Crater and Implications for its Potential as a Mars Science Laboratory Landing Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R. B.; Bell, J. F.

    2009-12-01

    We have conducted a study of the geomorphology, stratigraphy, and composition of Gale crater and its central mound of layered deposits, a region that is being considered as a landing site for the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission. We surveyed the crater for fluvial features and evaluated hypotheses for the origin of the central mound, including aeolian, lacustrine, spring mound, and volcanic processes. The rim of Gale crater is extensively dissected by fluvial channels, and the observed channels on the crater rim appear to flow into the crater with no obvious outlet. Many of the channels are dendritic, some showing third or fourth-order tributaries. Inverted fluvial features occur on the floor and mound, including several meandering channels and channel networks within the proposed MSL landing ellipse. Fractures on the mound are common and are often erosion-resistant, possibly suggesting alteration and/or cementation by fluid. The key geomorphic units of the landing site and mound include: a fan-shaped deposit in the landing site (divided into low and high thermal inertia portions), hummocky plains, a widespread mound-skirting unit, a basal unit that underlies the mound and floor units, a light toned ridge, a phyllosilicate-bearing trough that parallels the ridge, dark-toned layered yardangs, light-toned yardangs, an upper mound unit, a thin mantle unit, and several lobate features on the northern flanks of the mound. Erosional unconformities suggest that the dark-toned layered yardang unit was significantly eroded prior to the deposition of the light-toned yardang-forming unit and the upper mound unit. Fan-shaped deposits of material from the dark-toned layered yardang unit extend onto the mound-skirting unit in some locations, suggesting that the skirting unit was emplaced prior to or during a period of significant erosion of the mound. A fan-shaped unit on the mound near the landing site appears to be an isolated patch of the mound-skirting unit, rather than

  16. THREE-DIMENSIONAL DUST MAPPING REVEALS THAT ORION FORMS PART OF A LARGE RING OF DUST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlafly, E. F.; Rix, H.-W.; Martin, N. F. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Green, G.; Finkbeiner, D. P. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Kaiser, N.; Morgan, J. S.; Tonry, J. L.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Waters, C. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu HI 96822 (United States); Draper, P. W.; Metcalfe, N. [Department of Physics, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Price, P. A. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    The Orion Molecular Complex is the nearest site of ongoing high-mass star formation, making it one of the most extensively studied molecular complexes in the Galaxy. We have developed a new technique for mapping the three-dimensional distribution of dust in the Galaxy using Pan-STARRS1 photometry. We isolate the dust at the distance to Orion using this technique, revealing a large (100 pc, 14° diameter), previously unrecognized ring of dust, which we term the ''Orion dust ring''. The ring includes Orion A and B, and is not coincident with current Hα features. The circular morphology suggests formation as an ancient bubble in the interstellar medium, though we have not been able to conclusively identify the source of the bubble. This hint at the history of Orion may have important consequences for models of high-mass star formation and triggered star formation.

  17. Fine mapping of the barley chromosome 6H net form net blotch susceptibility locus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Net form net blotch (NFNB) caused by the necrotrophic fungal pathogen Pyrenophora teres f. teres (Ptt) is a destructive foliar disease of barley with the potential to cause significant yield loss in major production regions throughout the world. Characterization of diverse genetic resistances to thi...

  18. Utilizing NASA Earth Observations to Assess Estuary Health and Enhance Management of Water Resources in Coastal Texas through Land Cover and Precipitation Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crepps, G.; Gonsoroski, E.; Lynn, T.; Schick, R.; Pereira da Silva, R.

    2015-12-01

    This project partnered with the National Park Service (NPS) to help analyze the correlation between mesquite trees and the salinity of the Laguna Madre of Padre Island National Seashore. The lagoon is a hypersaline estuary; however, there is historical evidence that this was not always the case. It is hypothesized that the increase in the number of honey mesquite trees (Prosopis grandulosa var. glandulosa) in the area has contributed to the Laguna Madre's increased salinity by decreasing the groundwater inflow to the lagoon. These mesquite trees have long taproots capable of extracting significant amounts of groundwater. This project utilized Earth observation data in ERDAS IMAGINE and ArcGIS software to create map time series and analyze the data. Landsat 5, 7, and 8 data were used to create land use/land cover (LULC) maps in order to analyze the change in the occurrence of mesquite trees over time. Thermal maps of the lagoon were generated using Landsat 5, 7, and 8 data to understand changes in groundwater inflow. In addition, TRMM and GRACE derived changes in root zone soil moisture content data were compared over the study period. By investigating the suspected positive correlation between the mesquite trees and the salinity of the Laguna Madre, the NPS can improve future land management practices.

  19. Towards an improved Land Surface Phenology mapping using a new MODIS product: A case study of Bavarian Forest National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Gourav; Buras, Allan; Asam, Sarah; Menzel, Annette

    2017-04-01

    Past work in remote sensing of land surface phenology have mapped vegetation cycles at multiple scales. Much has been discussed and debated about the uncertainties associated with the selection of data, data processing and the eventual conclusions drawn. Several studies do however provide evidence of strong links between different land surface phenology (LSP) metrics with specific ground phenology (GP) (Fisher and Mustard, 2007; Misra et al., 2016). Most importantly the use of high temporal and spatial resolution remote sensing data and ground truth information is critical for such studies. In this study, we use a higher temporal resolution 4 day MODIS NDVI product developed by EURAC (Asam et al., in prep) for the Bavarian Forest National Park during 2002-2015 period and extract various phenological metrics covering different phenophases of vegetation (start of season / sos and end of season / eos). We found the LSP-sos to be more strongly linked to the elevation of the area than LSP-eos which has been cited to be harder to detect (Stöckli et al., 2008). The LSP metrics were also correlated to GP information at 4 different stations covering elevations ranging from approx. 500 to 1500 metres. Results show that among the five dominant species in the area i.e. European ash, Norway spruce, European beech, Norway maple and orchard grass, only particular GP observations for some species show stronger correlations with LSP than others. Spatial variations in the LSP-GP correlations were also observed, with certain areas of the National Park showing positive correlations and others negative. An analysis of temporal trends of LSP also indicates the possibility to detect those areas in the National Park that were affected by extreme events. Further investigations are planned to explain the heterogeneity in the derived LSP metrics using high resolution ground truth data and multivariate statistical analyses. Acknowledgement: This research received funding from the Bavarian

  20. Land Cover Mapping using GEOBIA to Estimate Loss of Salacca zalacca Trees in Landslide Area of Clapar, Madukara District of Banjarnegara

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permata, Anggi; Juniansah, Anwar; Nurcahyati, Eka; Dimas Afrizal, Mousafi; Adnan Shafry Untoro, Muhammad; Arifatha, Na'ima; Ramadhani Yudha Adiwijaya, Raden; Farda, Nur Mohammad

    2016-11-01

    Landslide is an unpredictable natural disaster which commonly happens in highslope area. Aerial photography in small format is one of acquisition method that can reach and obtain high resolution spatial data faster than other methods, and provide data such as orthomosaic and Digital Surface Model (DSM). The study area contained landslide area in Clapar, Madukara District of Banjarnegara. Aerial photographs of landslide area provided advantage in objects visibility. Object's characters such as shape, size, and texture were clearly seen, therefore GEOBIA (Geography Object Based Image Analysis) was compatible as method for classifying land cover in study area. Dissimilar with PPA (PerPixel Analyst) method that used spectral information as base object detection, GEOBIA could use spatial elements as classification basis to establish a land cover map with better accuracy. GEOBIA method used classification hierarchy to divide post disaster land cover into three main objects: vegetation, landslide/soil, and building. Those three were required to obtain more detailed information that can be used in estimating loss caused by landslide and establishing land cover map in landslide area. Estimating loss in landslide area related to damage in Salak (Salacca zalacca) plantations. This estimation towards quantity of Salak tree that were drifted away by landslide was calculated in assumption that every tree damaged by landslide had same age and production class with other tree that weren't damaged. Loss calculation was done by approximating quantity of damaged trees in landslide area with data of trees around area that were acquired from GEOBIA classification method.

  1. Land Use and Land Cover, Rhode Island 1962 Land-Cover Maps; Set of 37 scanned maps of land cover for the State of Rhode Island originally prepared by John J. Kupa and William R. Whitman based on 1962 aerial photographs., Published in 2011, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Land Use and Land Cover dataset, published at 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Orthoimagery information as of 2011. It is described as...

  2. Neuroticism and self-evaluation measures are related to the ability to form cognitive maps critical for spatial orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burles, Ford; Guadagni, Veronica; Hoey, Felecia; Arnold, Aiden E G F; Levy, Richard M; O'Neill, Thomas; Iaria, Giuseppe

    2014-09-01

    Trait neuroticism is suggested to be related to measures of volume and function of the hippocampus, a brain structure located in the medial temporal lobe that is critical for human navigation and orientation. In this study, we assessed whether measures of trait neuroticism and self-concept are correlated with the human ability to orient by means of cognitive maps (i.e. mental representations of an environment that include landmarks and their spatial relationships). After controlling for gender differences, which are well-known in spatial orientation abilities, we found that measures of neuroticism (i.e. negative affect, emotional stability) and self-concept (i.e. self-esteem) were correlated with individual differences in the rate at which cognitive maps were formed; the same measures were generally unrelated to the ability to make use of cognitive maps, as well as the ability to orient using visual path integration. The relationships (and lack thereof) between personality traits and the spatial orientation skills, as reported in the present study, are consistent with specific neural correlates underlying these factors, and may have important implications for treatment of disorders related to them.

  3. Meso(topoclimatic maps and mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislav Plánka

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The atmospheric characteristics can be studied from many points of view, most often we talk about time and spatial standpoint. Application of time standpoint leads either to different kinds of the synoptic and prognostic maps production, which presents actual state of atmosphere in short time section in the past or in the near future or to the climatic maps production which presents longterm weather regime. Spatial standpoint then differs map works according to natural phenomenon proportions, whereas the scale of their graphic presentation can be different. It depends on production purpose of each work.In the paper there are analysed methods of mapping and climatic maps production, which display longterm regime of chosen atmospheric features. These athmosphere features are formed in interaction with land surface and also have direct influence on people and their activities throughout the country. At the same time they’re influenced by anthropogenic intervention to the landscape.

  4. Interferometric Mapping of Magnetic Fields in Star-forming Regions II. NGC2024 FIR5

    CERN Document Server

    Lai, S P; Girart, J M; Rao, R; Lai, Shih-Ping; Crutcher, Richard M.; Girart, Jose M.; Rao, Ramprasad

    2001-01-01

    We present the first interferometric polarization maps of the NGC2024 FIR5 molecular core obtained with the BIMA array at approximately 2 arcsec resolution. We measure an average position angle of -60+-6 degrees in the main core of FIR5 and 54+-9 degrees in the eastern wing of FIR5. The morphology of the polarization angles in the main core of FIR5 suggests that the field lines are parabolic with a symmetry axis approximately parallel to the major axis of the putative disk in FIR5, which is consistent with the theoretical scenario that the gravitational collapse pulled the field lines into an hour-glass shape. The polarization percentage decreases toward regions with high intensity and close to the center of the core, suggesting that the dust alignment efficiency may decrease at high density. The plane-of-sky field strength can be estimated with the modified Chandrasekhar-Fermi formula, and the small dispersion of the polarization angles in FIR5 suggests that the magnetic field is strong ($\\gtrsim$ 2mG) and p...

  5. Nominal KAŊ form in Basse Mandinka: Its cognitive mapping and taxonomical status (Part 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrason Alexander

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: T he present study, divided into a series of two papers, provides a detailed empirical description and cognitive-grammaticalization analysis of the meaning of a Mandinka verbal expression compounded of the non-verbal predicator be ‘be’, a verbal noun expressing a given action and the postposition kaŋ ‘on, at’ (so-called the Nominal KAŊ form.

  6. ALMA maps the Star-Forming Regions in a Dense Gas Disk at z~3

    CERN Document Server

    Swinbank, Mark; Nightgale, James; Furlanetto, Christina; Smail, Ian; Cooray, Asantha; Dannerbauer, Helmut; Dunne, Loretta; Eales, Steve; Gavazzi, Raphael; Hunter, Todd; Ivison, Rob; Negrello, Mattia; Oteo, Ivan; Smit, Renske; van der Werf, Paul; Vlahakis, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    We exploit long-baseline ALMA sub-mm observations of the lensed star-forming galaxy SDP 81 at z=3.042 to investigate the properties of inter-stellar medium on scales of 50-100pc. The kinematics of the CO gas within this system are well described by a rotationally-supported disk with an inclination-corrected rotation speed, v=320+/-20km/s and a dynamical mass of M=(3.5+/-1.0)x10^10Mo within a radius of 1.5 kpc. The disk is gas rich and unstable, with a Toomre parameter, Q=0.30+/-0.10 and so should collapse in to star-forming regions with Jeans length L_J~130pc. We identify five star-forming regions within the ISM on these scales and show that their scaling relations between luminosity, line-widths and sizes are significantly offset from those typical of molecular clouds in local Galaxies (Larson's relations). These offsets are likely to be caused by the high external hydrostatic pressure for the interstellar medium (ISM), P/kB=(40+/-20)x10^7K/cm3, which is ~10,000x higher than the typical ISM pressure in the M...

  7. ECOLOGICAL CLASSIFICATION OF LAND AND ECOSYSTEM MAPPING. TOWARDS THE IMPLEMENTATION OF ACTION 5 OF THE EUROPEAN BIODIVERSITY STRATEGY TO 2020 IN ITALY.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Capotorti

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present paper is to illustrate the basic data and the methodological approach proposed for the implementation of Action 5 of the European Biodiversity Strategy in Italy. In particular, it focuses on a model for ecosystem mapping and characterisation at the country level that has been built with the interdisciplinary involvement of geobotanists, functional ecologists, forest scientists and zoologists. The first operational steps of the model are based on the cartographic integration between potential natural vegetation, biogeographic regions, and land cover maps. The final step entails characterising the mapped ecosystems in terms of Habitats Directive, local occurrence of threatened plant species and faunal components. The model is going to be tested in Italy, but should also be applied elsewhere in Mediterranean Europe, especially in those countries that have a comparable ecological complexity.

  8. 海河流域土地利用变化图谱分析%Mapping Analysis of Land-use Changes in Haihe River Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱占永; 郭伟志; 张海力

    2012-01-01

    [目的]定量探求海河流域土地利用类型转换、变化强度与空间分布规律,以期为该地区土地利用的科学管理提供依据.[方法]在遥感技术与地理信息技术支持下,解译并绘制了研究区40年(1970 ~2010年)5期(1970年、1980年、1990年、2000年和2010年)的土地利用图,并以此为基础进行空间叠加构建了土地利用变化图谱、过程图谱、涨势图谱和演变模式4种图谱,分析了土地利用格局变化规律.[结果]整体上看,耕地转化为建设用地是40年来海河流域最主要的土地利用变化特征;非稳定区域面积占到35%,海河流域土地利用变化剧烈,加强土地科学管理十分必要;1980~1990年期间各土地利用类型新增转化均最小,形成了增量波动低谷,表明在此时期土地利用类型之间转化最为平缓.[结论]该研究结果表明与常规转移矩阵法相比,地学信息图谱方法在土地利用变化分析方面有着明显优势,能够展示兴趣区的空间位置分布,表现出多维空间信息.%[ Objective] This study was to provide basis for the scientific management of land use in Haihe River Basin ( HRB) through the quantitative exploration of the land-use conversion,changes of intensity and spatial distribution in this region. [ Method ] With the support of remote sensing technology and geographic information technology, the land use maps of the study area in 40 years (1970-2010) were interpreted and drawn. Four kinds of Tupu,namely,land-use change Tupu,process Tupu,arising Tupu and evolution model Tupu were built through the spatial o-verlay of the land-use maps to analyze the change rules of land-use patterns. [ Result] The conversion of arable land to construction land was the main characteristics of land-use changes in HRB for the 40 years:the area of non-stable region accounted for 35% of the total,indicating that the land use changed remarltahly,thus,it was necessary to strengthen the scientific

  9. Mapping decadal land cover changes in the woodlands of north eastern Namibia using the Landsat satellite archive (1975-2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingate, Vladimir; Phinn, Stuart; Kuhn, Nikolaus

    2016-04-01

    Woodland savannahs provide essential ecosystem functions and services to communities. On the African continent, they are widely utilized and converted to intensive land uses. This study investigates the land cover changes over 108,038 km2 in NE Namibia using multi-sensor Landsat imagery, at decadal intervals from 1975 to 2014, with a post-classification change detection method and supervised Regression Tree classifiers. We discuss likely impacts of land tenure and reforms over the past four decades on changes in land use and land cover. These included losses, gains and exchanges between predominant land cover classes. Exchanges comprised logical conversions between woodland and agricultural classes, implying woodland clearing for arable farming, cropland abandonment and vegetation succession. The dominant change was a reduction in the area of the woodland class due to the expansion of the agricultural class, specifically, small-scale cereal and pastoral production. Woodland area decreased from 90% of the study area in 1975 to 83% in 2014, while cleared land increased from 9% to 14%. We found that the main land cover changes are conversion from woodland to agricultural and urban land uses, driven by urban expansion and woodland clearing for subsistence-based agriculture and pastoralism.

  10. Optimization of accelerator parameters using normal form methods on high-order transfer maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snopok, Pavel [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2007-05-01

    Methods of analysis of the dynamics of ensembles of charged particles in collider rings are developed. The following problems are posed and solved using normal form transformations and other methods of perturbative nonlinear dynamics: (1) Optimization of the Tevatron dynamics: (a) Skew quadrupole correction of the dynamics of particles in the Tevatron in the presence of the systematic skew quadrupole errors in dipoles; (b) Calculation of the nonlinear tune shift with amplitude based on the results of measurements and the linear lattice information; (2) Optimization of the Muon Collider storage ring: (a) Computation and optimization of the dynamic aperture of the Muon Collider 50 x 50 GeV storage ring using higher order correctors; (b) 750 x 750 GeV Muon Collider storage ring lattice design matching the Tevatron footprint. The normal form coordinates have a very important advantage over the particle optical coordinates: if the transformation can be carried out successfully (general restrictions for that are not much stronger than the typical restrictions imposed on the behavior of the particles in the accelerator) then the motion in the new coordinates has a very clean representation allowing to extract more information about the dynamics of particles, and they are very convenient for the purposes of visualization. All the problem formulations include the derivation of the objective functions, which are later used in the optimization process using various optimization algorithms. Algorithms used to solve the problems are specific to collider rings, and applicable to similar problems arising on other machines of the same type. The details of the long-term behavior of the systems are studied to ensure the their stability for the desired number of turns. The algorithm of the normal form transformation is of great value for such problems as it gives much extra information about the disturbing factors. In addition to the fact that the dynamics of particles is represented

  11. Expression of MAP1B protein and its phosphorylated form MAP1B-P in the CNS of a continuously growing fish, the rainbow trout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfei, Laura; Soares, Sylvia; Alunni, Alessandro; Ravaille-Veron, Michèle; Von Boxberg, Ysander; Nothias, Fatiha

    2004-05-29

    Microtubule-associated protein-1B (MAP1B), and particularly its phosphorylated isoform MAP1B-P, play an important role in axonal outgrowth during development of the mammalian nervous system and have also been shown to be associated with axonal plasticity in the adult. Here, we used antibodies and mRNA probes directed against mammalian MAP1B to extend our analysis to fish species, trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), at different stages of development. The specificity of the cross-reaction of our anti-total-MAP1B/MAP1B-P antibodies was confirmed by Western blotting. Trout MAP1B-like proteins exhibited about the same apparent molecular weight (320 kDa) as rat-MAP1B. Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization analysis performed on hindbrain and spinal cord revealed the presence of MAP1B in neurons and some glial subpopulations. Primary sensory neurons and motoneurons maintain high levels of MAP1B expression from early stages throughout adulthood, as has been shown for mammals. Unlike mammals, however, MAP1B and axon-specific MAP1B-P continue to be strongly expressed by hindbrain neurons projecting into spinal cord, with the important exception of Mauthner cells. MAP1B/MAP1B-P immunostaining were also detected elsewhere within the brain, including axons of the retino-tectal projection. This obvious difference between adult fish and mammals is likely to reflect the capacity of fish for continued growth and regeneration. Our results suggest that MAP1B/MAP1B-P expression is generally maintained in neurons known to regenerate after axotomy. The regenerative potential of the adult nervous system may in fact depend on continued expression of neuron-intrinsic growth related proteins, a feature of MAP1B that appears phylogenetically conserved.

  12. A comparison of supervised, unsupervised and synthetic land use classification methods in the north of Iran

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohammady, M.; Moradi, H.R.; Zeinivand, H.; Temme, A.J.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Land use classification is often the first step in land use studies and thus forms the basis for many earth science studies. In this paper, we focus on low-cost techniques for combining Landsat images with geographic information system approaches to create a land use map. In the Golestan region of I

  13. Information System of Land Utilization Based on Google Maps%一种基于Google Maps的土地利用信息发布平台

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晓煜; 李向

    2012-01-01

    Typical Web map services of current only supports functions of browsing and querying,and does not support the distribute of the vector data. A WebGIS construction method based on the Google Maps was proposed in this paper. It supports vector data processing in variety of client browser, which has good interoperability and ability of spatial analysis. Aiming at the requirement for land usage information distribution of Zhengzhou City,a systematic and standardized platform which based on B/S architecture has been developed adopting the technology of Google Maps API and AJAX. The platform responses fast and supports for mass data sharing, which provided friendly interface face to variety of users. It also can provide information services for land use change research and land consolidation planning.%目前常见的Web地图服务仅支持浏览和查询,不支持矢量数据的发布.文章提出一种基于Google Maps的WebGIS构建方法,支持多种浏览器的矢量数据互操作及空间分析.针对郑州市土地利用信息发布需求,采用B/S架构,借助Google Maps API和AJAX技术,实现了土地利用信息系统化,标准化发布平台.该平台响应速度快,面向多种用户,支持数据共享,能更好的为土地利用变化研究及土地整理决策提供服务.

  14. A review of the application of optical and radar remote sensing data fusion to land use mapping and monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joshi, Neha; Baumann, Matthias; Ehammer, Andrea; Reiche, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    The wealth of complementary data available from remote sensing missions can hugely aid efforts towards accurately determining land use and quantifying subtle changes in land use management or intensity. This study reviewed 112 studies on fusing optical and radar data, which offer unique spectral

  15. The role of GIS and remote sensing in land degradation assessment and conservation mapping: some user experiences and expectations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lynden, van G.W.J.; Mantel, S.

    2001-01-01

    Planning strategies for sustainable land management require solid base line data on natural resources (soils, physiography, climate, vegetation, land use, etc.) and on socio-economic aspects. GIS and remote sensing have an important role in linkage and analysis of such data, in particular for detect

  16. On the spatial and temporal resolution of land cover products for applied use in wind resource mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasager, Charlotte Bay; Badger, Merete; Dellwik, Ebba

    The suitability of Copernicus Global Land Service products for wind assessment is investigated using two approaches. In the first approach the CORINE land cover database and the pan-European highresolution products were considered as input to atmospheric flow models. The CORINE data were used...

  17. Accuracy assessment of global land cover maps: lessons learnt from the GlobCover and GlobCorine experiences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Defourny, P.; Bontemps, S.; Obsomer, V.; Schouten, L.; Bartalev, S.; Herold, M.; Bicheron, P.; Bogaert, van E.; Leroy, M.; Arino, O.

    2010-01-01

    The validation of global land cover products becomes a critical and challenging issue as more global products are made available more regularly to the international community. The GlobCover 2005 product delivered in 2008 was the first global land cover product at 300 m resolution. Later on, the

  18. Mapping transiently formed and sparsely populated conformations on a complex energy landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Papaleo, Elena; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten

    2016-01-01

    Determining the structures, kinetics, thermodynamics and mechanisms that underlie conformational exchange processes in proteins remains extremely difficult. Only in favourable cases is it possible to provide atomic-level descriptions of sparsely populated and transiently formed alternative conformations. Here we benchmark the ability of enhanced-sampling molecular dynamics simulations to determine the free energy landscape of the L99A cavity mutant of T4 lysozyme. We find that the simulations capture key properties previously measured by NMR relaxation dispersion methods including the structure of a minor conformation, the kinetics and thermodynamics of conformational exchange, and the effect of mutations. We discover a new tunnel that involves the transient exposure towards the solvent of an internal cavity, and show it to be relevant for ligand escape. Together, our results provide a comprehensive view of the structural landscape of a protein, and point forward to studies of conformational exchange in systems that are less characterized experimentally. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17505.001 PMID:27552057

  19. Area-averaged evapotranspiration over a heterogeneous land surface: aggregation of multi-point EC flux measurements with a high-resolution land-cover map and footprint analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Feinan; Wang, Weizhen; Wang, Jiemin; Xu, Ziwei; Qi, Yuan; Wu, Yueru

    2017-08-01

    The determination of area-averaged evapotranspiration (ET) at the satellite pixel scale/model grid scale over a heterogeneous land surface plays a significant role in developing and improving the parameterization schemes of the remote sensing based ET estimation models and general hydro-meteorological models. The Heihe Watershed Allied Telemetry Experimental Research (HiWATER) flux matrix provided a unique opportunity to build an aggregation scheme for area-averaged fluxes. On the basis of the HiWATER flux matrix dataset and high-resolution land-cover map, this study focused on estimating the area-averaged ET over a heterogeneous landscape with footprint analysis and multivariate regression. The procedure is as follows. Firstly, quality control and uncertainty estimation for the data of the flux matrix, including 17 eddy-covariance (EC) sites and four groups of large-aperture scintillometers (LASs), were carefully done. Secondly, the representativeness of each EC site was quantitatively evaluated; footprint analysis was also performed for each LAS path. Thirdly, based on the high-resolution land-cover map derived from aircraft remote sensing, a flux aggregation method was established combining footprint analysis and multiple-linear regression. Then, the area-averaged sensible heat fluxes obtained from the EC flux matrix were validated by the LAS measurements. Finally, the area-averaged ET of the kernel experimental area of HiWATER was estimated. Compared with the formerly used and rather simple approaches, such as the arithmetic average and area-weighted methods, the present scheme is not only with a much better database, but also has a solid grounding in physics and mathematics in the integration of area-averaged fluxes over a heterogeneous surface. Results from this study, both instantaneous and daily ET at the satellite pixel scale, can be used for the validation of relevant remote sensing models and land surface process models. Furthermore, this work will be

  20. Support Vector Data Description Model to Map Specific Land Cover with Optimal Parameters Determined from a Window-Based Validation Set

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinshui Zhang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper developed an approach, the window-based validation set for support vector data description (WVS-SVDD, to determine optimal parameters for support vector data description (SVDD model to map specific land cover by integrating training and window-based validation sets. Compared to the conventional approach where the validation set included target and outlier pixels selected visually and randomly, the validation set derived from WVS-SVDD constructed a tightened hypersphere because of the compact constraint by the outlier pixels which were located neighboring to the target class in the spectral feature space. The overall accuracies for wheat and bare land achieved were as high as 89.25% and 83.65%, respectively. However, target class was underestimated because the validation set covers only a small fraction of the heterogeneous spectra of the target class. The different window sizes were then tested to acquire more wheat pixels for validation set. The results showed that classification accuracy increased with the increasing window size and the overall accuracies were higher than 88% at all window size scales. Moreover, WVS-SVDD showed much less sensitivity to the untrained classes than the multi-class support vector machine (SVM method. Therefore, the developed method showed its merits using the optimal parameters, tradeoff coefficient (C and kernel width (s, in mapping homogeneous specific land cover.