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Sample records for manganese peroxidase produced

  1. Optimization of lignin peroxidase, manganese peroxidase, and Lac production from Ganoderma lucidum under solid state fermentation of pineapple leaf

    OpenAIRE

    Sudha Hariharan; Padma Nambisan

    2013-01-01

    This study was undertaken to isolate ligninase-producing white-rot fungi for use in the extraction of fibre from pineapple leaf agriwaste. Fifteen fungal strains were isolated from dead tree trunks and leaf litter. Ligninolytic enzymes (lignin peroxidase (LiP), manganese peroxidase (MnP), and laccase (Lac)), were produced by solid-state fermentation (SSF) using pineapple leaves as the substrate. Of the isolated strains, the one showing maximum production of ligninolytic enzymes was identified...

  2. Production of manganese peroxidase by white rot fungi from potato ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2010-01-18

    Jan 18, 2010 ... production rate of the MnP using the potato-processing wastewater-based medium were higher (ca. 2.5- ... Ligninolytic enzymes, such as manganese peroxidase ... not currently reached industrial levels except for the laccase.

  3. Induction of Laccase, Lignin Peroxidase and Manganese Peroxidase Activities in White-Rot Fungi Using Copper Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Vrsanska

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Ligninolytic enzymes, such as laccase, lignin peroxidase and manganese peroxidase, are biotechnologically-important enzymes. The ability of five white-rot fungal strains Daedaleopsis confragosa, Fomes fomentarius, Trametes gibbosa, Trametes suaveolens and Trametes versicolor to produce these enzymes has been studied. Three different copper(II complexes have been prepared ((Him[Cu(im4(H2O2](btc·3H2O, where im = imidazole, H3btc = 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylic acid, [Cu3(pmdien3(btc](ClO43·6H2O and [Cu3(mdpta3(btc](ClO43·4H2O, where pmdien = N,N,N′,N′′,N′′-pentamethyl-diethylenetriamine and mdpta = N,N-bis-(3-aminopropylmethyl- amine, and their potential application for laccase and peroxidases induction have been tested. The enzyme-inducing activities of the complexes were compared with that of copper sulfate, and it has been found that all of the complexes are suitable for the induction of laccase and peroxidase activities in white-rot fungi; however, the newly-synthesized complex M1 showed the greatest potential for the induction. With respect to the different copper inducers, this parameter seems to be important for enzyme activity, which depends also on the fungal strains.

  4. The relationship between lignin peroxidase and manganese peroxidase production capacities and cultivation periods of mushrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian Z; Zhang, Jun L; Hu, Kai H; Zhang, Wei G

    2013-05-01

    Mushrooms are able to secrete lignin peroxidase (LiP) and manganese peroxidase (MnP), and able to use the cellulose as sources of carbon. This article focuses on the relation between peroxidase-secreting capacity and cultivation period of mushrooms with non-laccase activity. Methylene blue and methyl catechol qualitative assay and spectrophotometry quantitative assay show LiP secreting unvaryingly accompanies the MnP secreting in mushroom strains. The growth rates of hyphae are detected by detecting the dry hyphal mass. We link the peroxidase activities to growth rate of mushrooms and then probe into the relationship between them. The results show that there are close relationships between LiP- and/or MnP-secretory capacities and the cultivation periods of mushrooms. The strains with high LiP and MnP activities have short cultivation periods. However, those strains have long cultivation periods because of the low levels of secreted LiP and/or MnP, even no detectable LiP and/or MnP activity. This study provides the first evidence on the imitate relation between the level of secreted LiP and MnP activities and cultivation periods of mushrooms with non-laccase activity. Our study has significantly increased the understanding of the role of LiP and MnP in the growth and development of mushrooms with non-laccase activity. © 2012 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology © 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Furfural and 5-hydroxymethyl-furfural degradation using recombinant manganese peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Kelsey L; Jansen, Lauren E; Lajoie, Curtis A; Penner, Michael H; Morse, Lettie; Kelly, Christine J

    2018-01-01

    Biomass pretreatment-derived degradation compounds, such as furfural and 5-hydroxymethyl-furfural (HMF), inhibit the growth of fermentation microorganisms that utilize biomass to produce fuels and chemicals. Here we report that recombinant manganese peroxidase (rMnP) produced from the yeast Pichia pastoris can degrade furfural and HMF making them less toxic to microorganisms. Treatment with rMnP or manganese(III) acetate reduced furfural and HMF concentrations in a dose-dependent manner. Furfural disappearance was accompanied by malonate disappearance and accumulation of four distinct degradation products. Furfural was more readily degraded by rMnP and manganese(III) acetate than HMF. Growth assays using Saccharomyces cerevisiae indicated that rMnP treatment reduced the toxicity of furfural and HMF. This work provides an avenue to use rMnP to increase the growth of fermentation microorganisms that are inhibited by toxic compounds derived from pretreatment of biomass. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of pH and Temperature on Recombinant Manganese Peroxidase Production and Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Fei; Kongsaeree, Puapong; Schilke, Karl; Lajoie, Curtis; Kelly, Christine

    The enzyme manganese peroxidase (MnP) is produced by numerous white-rot fungi to overcome biomass recalcitrance caused by lignin. MnP acts directly on lignin and increases access of the woody structure to synergistic wood-degrading enzymes such as cellulases and xylanases. Recombinant MnP (rMnP) can be produced in the yeast Pichia pastoris αMnP1-1 in fed-batch fermentations. The effects of pH and temperature on recombinant manganese peroxidase (rMnP) production by P. pastoris αMnP1-1 were investigated in shake flask and fed-batch fermentations. The optimum pH and temperature for a standardized fed-batch fermentation process for rMnP production in P. pastoris ctMnP1-1 were determined to be pH 6 and 30 °C, respectively. P. pastoris αMnP1-1 constitutively expresses the manganese peroxidase (mnp1) complementary DNA from Phanerochaete chrysosporium, and the rMnP has similar kinetic characteristics and pH activity and stability ranges as the wild-type MnP (wtMnP). Cultivation of P. chrysosporium mycelia in stationary flasks for production of heme peroxidases is commonly conducted at low pH (pH 4.2). However, shake flask and fed-batch fermentation experiments with P. pastoris αMnP1-1 demonstrated that rMnP production is highest at pH 6, with rMnP concentrations in the medium declining rapidly at pH less than 5.5, although cell growth rates were similar from pH 4-7. Investigations of the cause of low rMnP production at low pH were consistent with the hypothesis that intracellular proteases are released from dead and lysed yeast cells during the fermentation that are active against rMnP at pH less than 5.5.

  7. Oxidative cleavage of a phenolic diarylpropane lignin model dimer by manganese peroxidase from Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wariishi, Hiroyuki; Valli, K.; Gold, M.H.

    1989-01-01

    In the presence of Mn II and H 2 O 2 , homogeneous manganese peroxidase oxidized 1-(3,5-dimethoxy-4-hydroxyphenyl)-2-(4-methoxyphenyl)-1,3-dihydroxypropane (I) to yield 1-(3,5-dimethoxy-4-hydroxyphenyl)-2-(4-methoxyphenyl)-1-oxo-3-hydroxypropane (II), 2,6-dimethoxy-1,4-benzoquinone (III), 2,6-dimethoxy-1,4-dihydroxybenzene (IV), 1-(4-methoxyphenyl)-1-oxo-2-hydroxyethane (V), 1-(4-methoxyphenyl)-1,2-dihydroxyethane (VI), syringaldehyde (VIII), and 2-(4-methoxyphenyl)-3-hydroxypropanal (IX). Chemically prepared manganese(III) malonate catalyzed the same reactions. Oxidation of I in H 2 18 O under argon resulted in >80% incorporation of 18 O into the phenylglycol VI, the hydroquinone IV, and the quinone III. Oxidation of I in H 2 18 O under aerobic conditions resulted in 40% incorporation of 18 O into VI but no 18 O incorporation into V. Finally, oxidation of I under 18 O 2 resulted in 89% and 28% incorporation of 18 O into V and VI, respectively. These results are explained by mechanisms involving the one-electron oxidation of the substrate I by enzyme-generated Mn III to produce a phenoxy radical intermediate I'. Subsequent C α -C β bond cleavage of the radical intermediate yields syringaldehyde (VIII) and a C 6 -C 2 benzylic radical. Syringaldehyde is oxidized by Mn III in several steps to a cyclohexadiene cation intermediate I double-prime, which is attacked by water to yield the benzoquinone III. The C 6 -C 2 radical is scavenged by O 2 to form a peroxy radical that decomposes to V and VI. In these reactions, Mn III generated by manganese peroxidase catalyzes both formation of the substrate phenoxy radical and oxidation of carbon-centered radical intermediates, to yield reactive cations

  8. Mn(II) regulation of lignin peroxidases and manganese-dependent peroxidases from lignin-degrading white rot fungi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnarme, P.; Jeffries, T.W.

    1990-01-01

    Two families of peroxidases-lignin peroxidase (LiP) and manganese-dependent lignin peroxidase (MnP)-are formed by the lignin-degrading white rot basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium and other white rot fungi. Isoenzymes of these enzyme families carry out reactions important to the biodegradation of lignin. This research investigated the regulation of LiP and MnP production by Mn(II). In liquid culture, LiP titers varied as an inverse function of and MnP titers varied as a direct function of the Mn(II) concentration. The extracellular isoenzyme profiles differed radically at low and high Mn(II) levels, whereas other fermentation parameters, including extracellular protein concentrations, the glucose consumption rate, and the accumulation of cell dry weight, did not change significantly with the Mn(II) concentration. In the absence of Mn(II), extracellular LiP isoenzymes predominated, whereas in the presence of Mn(II), MnP isoenzymes were dominant. The release of 14 CO 2 from 14 C-labeled dehydrogenative polymerizate lignin was likewise affected by Mn(II). The rate of 14 CO 2 release increased at low Mn(II) and decreased at high Mn(II) concentrations. This regulatory effect of Mn(II) occurred with five strains of P. chrysosporium, two other species of Phanerochaete, three species of Phlebia, Lentinula edodes, and Phellinus pini

  9. Purification and Partial characterization of manganese peroxidase from Bacillus pumilus AND Paenibacillus sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Lopes de Oliveira

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The production of manganese peroxidase (MnP from Bacillus pumilus and Paenibacillus sp. was studied under absence and presence of the inducers indulin AT, guayacol, veratryl alcohol, lignosulfonic acid and lignosulfonic acid desulfonated. Indulin AT increased the activity of B. pumilus MnP up to 31.66 U/L after 8 h, but no improve was observed for Paenibacillus sp., which reached maximum activity (12.22 U/L after 20 h. Both MnPs produced by these microorganisms were purified in phenyl sepharose resin and the proteins from crude extracts were eluted in two fractions. However, only the first fraction of each extract exhibited MnP activities. Tests in different pH and temperature values, from pH 5.0 to pH 10.0 and 30 ºC to 60 ºC, respectively, were carried out with the purified MnP. The maximum activity reached for B. pumilus and Paenibacillus sp. MnPs were 4.3 U/L at pH 8.0 and 25 ºC and 11.74 U/L at pH 9.0 and 35 ºC, respectively. The molar masses determined by SDS-PAGE gel eletrophoresis were 25 kDa and 40 kDa, respectively, for the purified enzyme from B. pumilus and Paenibacillus sp.

  10. Methylene blue as a lignin surrogate in manganese peroxidase reaction systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goby, Jeffrey D; Penner, Michael H; Lajoie, Curtis A; Kelly, Christine J

    2017-11-15

    Manganese peroxidase (MnP) is associated with lignin degradation and is thus relevant to lignocellulosic-utilization technologies. Technological applications require reaction mixture optimization. A surrogate substrate can facilitate this if its susceptibility to degradation is easily monitored and mirrors that of lignin. The dye methylene blue (MB) was evaluated in these respects as a surrogate substrate by testing its reactivity in reaction mixtures containing relevant redox mediators (dicarboxylic acids, fatty acids). Relative rates of MB degradation were compared to available literature reports of lignin degradation under similar conditions, and suggest that MB can be a useful lignin surrogate in MnP systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A manganese catalase from Thermomicrobium roseum with peroxidase and catecholase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baginski, Robin; Sommerhalter, Monika

    2017-01-01

    An enzyme with catechol oxidase activity was identified in Thermomicrobium roseum extracts via solution assays and activity-stained SDS-PAGE. Yet, the genome of T. roseum does not harbor a catecholase gene. The enzyme was purified with two anion exchange chromatography steps and ultimately identified to be a manganese catalase with additional peroxidase and catecholase activity. Catalase activity (6280 ± 430 IU/mg) clearly dominated over pyrogallol peroxidase (231 ± 53 IU/mg) and catecholase (3.07 ± 0.56 IU/mg) activity as determined at 70 °C. Most enzyme kinetic properties were comparable to previously characterized manganese catalase enzymes. Catalase activity was highest at alkaline pH values and showed inhibition by excess substrate and chloride. The apparent K m and k cat values were 20 mM and 2.02 × 10 4  s -1 subunit -1 at 25 °C and pH 7.0.

  12. Biochemical and molecular characterization of an atypical manganese peroxidase of the litter-decomposing fungus Agrocybe praecox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildén, Kristiina; Mäkelä, Miia R; Steffen, Kari T; Hofrichter, Martin; Hatakka, Annele; Archer, David B; Lundell, Taina K

    2014-11-01

    Agrocybe praecox is a litter-decomposing Basidiomycota species of the order Agaricales, and is frequently found in forests and open woodlands. A. praecox grows in leaf-litter and the upper soil and is able to colonize bark mulch and wood chips. It produces extracellular manganese peroxidase (MnP) activities and mineralizes synthetic lignin. In this study, the A. praecox MnP1 isozyme was purified, cloned and enzymatically characterized. The enzyme catalysed the oxidation of Mn(2+) to Mn(3+), which is the specific reaction for manganese-dependent class II heme-peroxidases, in the presence of malonate as chelator with an activity maximum at pH 4.5; detectable activity was observed even at pH 7.0. The coding sequence of the mnp1 gene demonstrates a short-type of MnP protein with a slightly modified Mn(2+) binding site. Thus, A. praecox MnP1 may represent a novel group of atypical short-MnP enzymes. In lignocellulose-containing cultures composed of cereal bran or forest litter, transcription of mnp1 gene was followed by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. On spruce needle litter, mnp1 expression was more abundant than on leaf litter after three weeks cultivation. However, the expression was constitutive in wheat and rye bran cultures. Our data show that the atypical MnP of A. praecox is able to catalyse Mn(2+) oxidation, which suggests its involvement in lignocellulose decay by this litter-decomposer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Dye decolorization and detoxification potential of Ca-alginate beads immobilized manganese peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilal, Muhammad; Asgher, Muhammad

    2015-12-10

    In view of compliance with increasingly stringent environmental legislation, an eco-friendly treatment technology of industrial dyes and effluents is a major environmental challenge in the color industry. In present study, a promising and eco-friendly entrapment approach was adopted to immobilize purified manganese peroxidase (MnP) produced from an indigenous strain of Ganoderma lucidum IBL-05 on Ca-alginate beads. The immobilized MnP was subsequently used for enhanced decolorization and detoxification of textile reactive dyes). MnP isolated from solid-state culture of G. lucidum IBL-05, presented highest immobilization yield (83.9 %) using alginate beads prepared at optimized conditions of 4 % (w/v) sodium alginate, 2 % (w/v) Calcium chloride (CaCl2) and 0.5 mg/ml enzyme concentration. Immobilization of MnP enhanced optimum temperature but caused acidic shift in optimum pH of the enzyme. The immobilized MnP showed optimum activity at pH 4.0 and 60 °C as compared to pH 5.0 and 35 °C for free enzyme. The kinetic parameters K(m) and V(max) of MnP were significantly improved by immobilization. The enhanced catalytic potential of immobilized MnP led to 87.5 %, 82.1 %, 89.4 %, 95.7 % and 83 % decolorization of Sandal-fix Red C4BLN, Sandal-fix Turq Blue GWF, Sandal-fix Foron Blue E2BLN, Sandal-fix Black CKF and Sandal-fix Golden Yellow CRL dyes, respectively. The insolubilized MnP was reusable for 7 repeated cycles in dye color removal. Furthermore, immobilized MnP also caused a significant reduction in biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) (94.61-95.47 %), chemical oxygen demand (COD) (91.18-94.85 %), and total organic carbon (TOC) (89.58-95 %) of aqueous dye solutions. G. lucidum MnP was immobilized in Ca-alginate beads by entrapment method to improve its practical effectiveness. Ca-alginate bound MnP was catalytically more vigorous, thermo-stable, reusable and worked over wider ranges of pH and temperature as compared to its free counterpart. Results of cytotoxicity like

  14. Investigation on Possibility of Transferring OysterMushroom (Pleurotusostreatus Manganese Peroxidase Gene (mnp to the White Button Mushroom (Agaricusbisporus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojgan Parvandi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The white button mushroom does not produce remarkable yield in the third flash. Nutritional deficiency and the inability of this mushroom to efficient use of compost are mentioned as its reasons. Basically, compost includes two major food components, lignocellulose and microbial biomass. But this microbial biomass provides just 10% of button mushroom food needs. According to research studies, differentenzymes in both white button mushroom and oyster mushroom are responsible for decomposition of lignin compounds in compost media, from begin of mycelium grows to the end of fruiting. Lacasse, manganese peroxidase, lignin peroxidase, glyoxal oxidase enzymes contribute to degradation of lignin compounds in degradation mushroom has proven by researchers however itis dependent on mushroom types. Manganese peroxidase enzyme (EC. 1.11.1.13 is an extracellular parser lignin enzyme that has a central peroxidase core. Manganese peroxidase enzyme oxidizesMn2+ to Mn3+ and then Mn3+ oxidizes phenolic structure to fonoxile radical. Produced Mn3+ is very active and makes complex by chelating organic acids that is produced by mushrooms such as oxalate or malate. Mn3+ ions become stable by helping of these chelates and it can penetrate through materials such as wood. On the other hand, in recent years, plant biotechnology provides new solutions for old problems such as use of microorganisms, particularly using bacteria for gene transfer and improvement of superlatives. For a sample of this method, Agrobacterium-mediated transformation system can be noted. In addition, the use of suitable promoters for heterologous genes expression in suitable hosts is an important strategy in functional biotechnology that has been raised in edible mushroom genetic engineering. The lack of efficient and sufficient use of compost, low power of white button mushroom in competition with other rivals, lack of yield per area unit due to production costs, pests and diseases

  15. Expression of manganese peroxidase by Lentinula edodes and Lentinula boryana in solid state and submerged system fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KATIA L. HERMANN

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The production of ethanol from lignocellulosic biomass is referred as a second generation biofuel, whose processing is one of the most promising technologies under development. There are few available studies on the use of enzymes produced by fungi as active for the biodegradation of lignocellulosic biomass. However, the manganese peroxidase (MnP enzyme presents high potential to degrade lignin and the basidiomycetes are the major producers of this oxidase. Thus, this study aimed at evaluating the ability of fungi Lentinula edodes and Lentinula boryana to produce this enzyme when cultivated in submerged fermentation system (SS and also in solid-state fermentation system (SSF containing Eucalyptus benthamii sawdust with or without corn cob meal. In the SS the greatest MnP expression occurred on the 25th day, being of 70 UI.L–1 for L. boryana and of 20 UI.L–1 for L. edodes. In the SSF, the best results were obtained on the 10th day for L. edodes, while for L. boryana it happened between the 20th and the 25th days, despite both species presented values close to 110 UI.L–1. Therefore, the results indicated that the studied fungi express the enzyme of interest and that its production is enhanced when cultivated in solid system.

  16. Heterologous Expression of Phanerochaete chrysoporium Glyoxal Oxidase and its Application for the Coupled Reaction with Manganese Peroxidase to Decolorize Malachite Green

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Yu-Lim; Kim, Hyoun-Young; Thiyagarajan, Saravanakumar; Xu, Jing Jing

    2012-01-01

    cDNA of the glx1 gene encoding glyoxal oxidase (GLX) from Phanerochaete chrysosporium was isolated and expressed in Pichia pastoris. The recombinant GLX (rGLX) produces H2O2 over 7.0 nmol/min/mL using methyl glyoxal as a substrate. Use of rGLX as a generator of H2O2 improved the coupled reaction with recombinant manganese peroxidase resulting in decolorization of malachite green up to 150 µM within 90 min. PMID:23323052

  17. Effect of various synthetic dyes on the production of manganese-dependent peroxidase isoenzymes by immobilized Irpex lacteus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šušla, Martin; Svobodová, Kateřina

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 24, - (2008), s. 225-230 ISSN 0959-3993 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP526/06/P102 Grant - others:CZ(CZ) G4 359/2007 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : irpex lacteus * isoenzymes * manganese-dependent peroxidase Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 0.945, year: 2008

  18. Solid State production of manganese peroxidases using arecanut husk as substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhila Rajan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The lignocellulosic biomass from arecanut husk (Areca catechu Linnaeus was evaluated as a new substrate for cultivation of Phanerochaete chrysosporium and Phanerochaete sp for solid state fermentation of manganese peroxidase (MnP. Arecanut had a moisture content of 79.84 % for ripe nut husk whereas green nut husk had 68.39 % moisture and a pH of 5.0, 3.0 and 7.0 for raw, ripe and dry husk. Reducing sugar content was 14.31, 19.21 and 1.77(mg/g of husk for raw, ripe and dry nut husk, respectively. Non reducing sugar was 1.04(mg/g of husk for raw and 0.68 (mg/g of husk for dry husk. Solid state fermentation carried out at different pH showed optimum enzyme production at pH 6.0 (52.60 IU/g for P.chrysosporium and pH 5.0 (44.08 IU/g for Phanerochaete sp. Optimum temperature was 30 ± 2º C for both the organisms. Lower concentration of MnSO4 (0.1 mM MnSO4 induced maximum enzyme production in P.chrysosporium whereas Phanerochaete sp. required 1 mM MnSO4 for induction. Absence of carbon and nitrogen stimulated enzyme production in P.chrysosporium while Phanerochaete sp. needed nitrogen. Enzyme was partially purified by ammonium sulphate precipitation followed by ion exchange chromatography.

  19. Degradation and detoxification of the triphenylmethane dye malachite green catalyzed by crude manganese peroxidase from Irpex lacteus F17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xueting; Zheng, Jinzhao; Lu, Yongming; Jia, Rong

    2016-05-01

    Malachite green (MG), a recalcitrant, carcinogenic, and mutagenic triphenylmethane dye, was decolorized and detoxified using crude manganese peroxidase (MnP) prepared from the white rot fungus Irpex lacteus F17. In this study, the key factors (pH, temperature, MG, Mn(2+), H2O2, MnP) in these processes were investigated. Under optimal conditions, 96 % of 200 mg L(-1) of MG was decolorized when 66.32 U L(-1) of MnP was added for 1 h. The K m, V max, and k cat values were 109.9 μmol L(-1), 152.8 μmol L(-1) min(-1), and 44.5 s(-1), respectively. The decolorization of MG by MnP followed first-order reaction kinetics with a kinetic rate constant of 0.0129 h(-1). UV-vis and UPLC analysis revealed degradation of MG. Furthermore, seven different intermediates formed during the MnP treatment of 0.5 h were identified by LC-TOF-MS. These degradation products were generated via two different routes by either N-demethylation of MG or the oxidative cleavage of the C-C double bond in MG. Based on ecotoxicity analyses performed on bacteria and algae, it was confirmed that MG metabolites produced by the MnP-catalyzed system were appreciably less toxic than the parent compound. These studies indicate the potential use of this enzyme system in the clean-up of aquatic and terrestrial environments.

  20. Manganese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, William F.; Kimball, Bryn E.; Corathers, Lisa A.; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung,, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2017-12-19

    and about 25 percent of its reserves. South Africa, Brazil, and Ukraine together accounted for nearly 65 percent of reserves in 2013. The combination of total import reliance for manganese, the mineral commodity’s essential uses in our industrialized society, and the potential for supply disruptions because of the limited sources of the ore makes manganese among the most critical minerals for the United States.Manganese is the 12th most abundant element in Earth’s crust. Its concentration varies among common types of rocks, mostly in the range of from 0.1 to 0.2 percent. The highest quality manganese ores contain from 40 to 45 percent manganese. The formation of these ores requires specialized geologic conditions that concentrate manganese at several hundred times its average crustal abundance. The dominant processes in forming the world’s principal deposits take place in the oceans. As a result, most important manganese deposits occur in ancient marine sedimentary rocks that are now exposed on continents as a result of subsequent tectonic uplift and erosion. In many cases, other processes have further enriched these manganiferous sedimentary rocks to form some of today’s highest grade ores. Modern seabed resources of ferromanganese nodules cover vast areas of the present ocean floor and are still forming by complex interactions of marine microorganisms, manganese dissolved in seawater, and chemical processes on the seabed.Manganese is ubiquitous in soil, water, and air. It occurs most often in solid form but can become soluble under acidic conditions. Manganese mining, like any activity that disturbs large areas of Earth’s surface, has the potential to produce increases in manganese concentrations that could be harmful to humans or the environment if not properly controlled. Although manganese is an essential nutrient for humans and most other organisms, overexposure can lead to neurotoxicity in humans. Workers at manganese mining and processing facilities

  1. Interactions of carbon nanotubes and/or graphene with manganese peroxidase during biodegradation of endocrine disruptors and triclosan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming; Zeng, Guangming; Lai, Cui; Zhang, Chang; Xu, Piao; Yan, Min; Xiong, Weiping

    2017-10-01

    Molecular-level biodegradation processes of bisphenol A (BPA), nonylphenol (NP) and triclosan (TCS) mediated by manganese peroxidase (MnP) were investigated with and without single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) and/or graphene (GRA). Although the incorporation of SWCNT, GRA or their combination (SWCNT+GRA) did not break up the complexes composed of manganese peroxidase (MnP) and these substrates, they had different effects on the native contacts between the substrates and MnP. GRA tended to decrease the overall stability of the binding between MnP and its substrates. SWCNT or SWCNT+GRA generally had a minor impact on the mean binding energy between MnP and its substrates. We detected some sensitive residues from MnP that were dramatically disturbed by the GRA, SWCNT or SWCNT+GRA. Nanomaterials changed the number and behavior of water molecules adjacent to both MnP and its substrates, which was not due to the destruction of H-bond network formed by sensitive regions and water molecules. The present results are useful for understanding the molecular basis of pollutant biodegradation affected by the nanomaterials in the environment, and are also helpful in assessing the risks of these materials to the environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Structural implications of the C-terminal tail in the catalytic and stability properties of manganese peroxidases from ligninolytic fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernández-Fueyo, Elena [CSIC, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Acebes, Sandra [Barcelona Supercomputing Center, Jordi Girona 29, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J.; Martínez, María Jesús; Romero, Antonio; Medrano, Francisco Javier, E-mail: fjmedrano@cib.csic.es [CSIC, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Guallar, Victor, E-mail: fjmedrano@cib.csic.es [Barcelona Supercomputing Center, Jordi Girona 29, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); ICREA, Passeig Lluís Companys 23, 08010 Barcelona (Spain); Martínez, Angel T., E-mail: fjmedrano@cib.csic.es [CSIC, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-12-01

    The variable C-terminal tail of manganese peroxidases, a group of enzymes involved in lignin degradation, is implicated in their catalytic and stability properties, as shown by new crystal structures, molecular-simulation and directed-mutagenesis data. Based on this structural–functional evaluation, short and long/extralong manganese peroxidase subfamilies have been accepted; the latter are characterized by exceptional stability, while it is shown for the first time that the former are able to oxidize other substrates at the same site where manganese(II) is oxidized. The genome of Ceriporiopsis subvermispora includes 13 manganese peroxidase (MnP) genes representative of the three subfamilies described in ligninolytic fungi, which share an Mn{sup 2+}-oxidation site and have varying lengths of the C-terminal tail. Short, long and extralong MnPs were heterologously expressed and biochemically characterized, and the first structure of an extralong MnP was solved. Its C-terminal tail surrounds the haem-propionate access channel, contributing to Mn{sup 2+} oxidation by the internal propionate, but prevents the oxidation of 2, 2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) (ABTS), which is only oxidized by short MnPs and by shortened-tail variants from site-directed mutagenesis. The tail, which is anchored by numerous contacts, not only affects the catalytic properties of long/extralong MnPs but is also associated with their high acidic stability. Cd{sup 2+} binds at the Mn{sup 2+}-oxidation site and competitively inhibits oxidation of both Mn{sup 2+} and ABTS. Moreover, mutations blocking the haem-propionate channel prevent substrate oxidation. This agrees with molecular simulations that position ABTS at an electron-transfer distance from the haem propionates of an in silico shortened-tail form, while it cannot reach this position in the extralong MnP crystal structure. Only small differences exist between the long and the extralong MnPs, which do not justify their

  3. Induction, purification and characterization of a novel manganese peroxidase from Irpex lacteus CD2 and its application in the decolorization of different types of dye.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Qin

    Full Text Available Manganese peroxidase (MnP is the one of the important ligninolytic enzymes produced by lignin-degrading fungi which has the great application value in the field of environmental biotechnology. Searching for new MnP with stronger tolerance to metal ions and organic solvents is important for the maximization of potential of MnP in the biodegradation of recalcitrant xenobiotics. In this study, it was found that oxalic acid, veratryl alcohol and 2,6-Dimehoxyphenol could stimulate the synthesis of MnP in the white-rot fungus Irpex lacteus CD2. A novel manganese peroxidase named as CD2-MnP was purified and characterized from this fungus. CD2-MnP had a strong capability for tolerating different metal ions such as Ca2+, Cd2+, Co2+, Mg2+, Ni2+ and Zn2+ as well as organic solvents such as methanol, ethanol, DMSO, ethylene glycol, isopropyl alcohol, butanediol and glycerin. The different types of dyes including the azo dye (Remazol Brilliant Violet 5R, Direct Red 5B, anthraquinone dye (Remazol Brilliant Blue R, indigo dye (Indigo Carmine and triphenylmethane dye (Methyl Green as well as simulated textile wastewater could be efficiently decolorized by CD2-MnP. CD2-MnP also had a strong ability of decolorizing different dyes with the coexistence of metal ions and organic solvents. In summary, CD2-MnP from Irpex lacteus CD2 could effectively degrade a broad range of synthetic dyes and exhibit a great potential for environmental biotechnology.

  4. Oxidizability of unsaturated fatty acids and of a non-phenolic lignin structure in the manganese peroxidase-dependent lipid peroxidation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander N. Kapich; Tatyana V. Korneichik; Annele Hatakka; Kenneth E. Hammel

    2010-01-01

    Unsaturated fatty acids have been proposed to mediate the oxidation of recalcitrant, non-phenolic lignin structures by fungal manganese peroxidases (MnP), but their precise role remains unknown. We investigated the oxidizability of three fatty acids with varying degrees of polyunsaturation (linoleic, linolenic, and arachidonic acids) by measuring conjugated dienes...

  5. Advanced Recombinant Manganese Peroxidase for Biosynthesis of Lignin Bioproducts, Phase I Final Report, STTR Grant #: DE-SC0007503.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beatty, Christopher; Kitner, Joshua; Lajoie, Curtis; McClain, Sean; Potochnik, Steve

    2012-12-13

    The core purpose of this Phase I STTR was to evaluate the feasibility of a new method of producing a recombinant version of manganese peroxidase (MnP) enzyme. MnP is a potentially valuable enzyme for producing high value lignin products and also for industrial de-coloring operations such as biobleaching of pulp and color removal from textile dye effluents. This lignin-modifying enzyme is produced in small amounts by the native host, a white rot fungus. Previous work by Oregon State University developed a secreted recombinant version of the enzyme in the yeast Pichia pastoris. Unfortunately, the expression is barely moderate and the enzyme is heavily glycosylated, which inhibits purification. In this work, the gene for the enzyme is given a tag which targets production of the enzyme to the peroxisome. This is a promising approach since this location is also where heme and hydrogen peroxide are sequestered, which are both necessary cofactors for MnP. More than ten recombinant strains were constructed, verified, and expressed in the Pichia system. Constitutive (GAP) and methanol-induced promoters (AOX) were tried for peroxisomal targeted, cytosolic, and secreted versions of MnP. Only the secreted strains showed activity. The amount of expression was not significantly changed. The degree of glycosylation was lessened using the AOX (methanol) promotoer, but the resulting enzyme was still not able to be purified using immobilized metal affinity chromatography. Additional work beyond the scope of the defined Phase I project was undertaken to construct, verify, and express Pichia strains that mutated the MnP glycosylation sites to inhibit this process. These strains did not show significant activity. The cause is not known, but it is possible that these sites are important to the structure of the enzyme. Also beyond the scope proposed for our Phase I STTR, the team collaborated with AbSci, a startup with a new E. coli based expression system focused on the production of

  6. Manganese

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... research suggests that taking a specific product (7-Keto Naturalean) containing manganese, 7-oxo-DHEA, L-tyrosine, ... can absorb.Milk proteinAdding milk protein to the diet might increase the amount of manganese the body ...

  7. Secretion of laccase and manganese peroxidase by Pleurotus strains cultivate in solid-state using Pinus spp. sawdust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marli Camassola

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pleurotus species secrete phenol oxidase enzymes: laccase (Lcc and manganese peroxidase (MnP. New genotypes of these species show potential to be used in processes aiming at the degradation of phenolic compounds, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and dyes. Hence, a screening of some strains of Pleurotus towards Lcc and MnP production was performed in this work. Ten strains were grown through solid-state fermentation on a medium based on Pinus spp. sawdust, wheat bran and calcium carbonate. High Lcc and MnP activities were found with these strains. Highest Lcc activity, 741 ± 245 U gdm-1 of solid state-cultivation medium, was detected on strain IB11 after 32 days, while the highest MnP activity occurred with strains IB05, IB09, and IB11 (5,333 ± 357; 4,701 ± 652; 5,999 ± 1,078 U gdm-1, respectively. The results obtained here highlight the importance of further experiments with lignocellulolytic enzymes present in different strains of Pleurotus species. Such results also indicate the possibility of selecting more valuable strains for future biotechnological applications, in soil bioremediation and biological biomass pre-treatment in biofuels production, for instance, as well as obtaining value-added products from mushrooms, like phenol oxidase enzymes.

  8. Manganese

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayziev, A.R.

    2002-01-01

    Present article is devoted to manganese content in fluoride. The manganese content of some geologic deposits of Tajikistan was determined by means of chemical analysis. The mono mineral samples of fluorite of 5 geologic deposits of various mineralogical and genetic type was studied. The manganese content in fluorite of geologic deposits of various mineralogical and genetic type was defined.

  9. Peroxidases in nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria eCarmona-Ribeiro

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Peroxidases are enzymes catalyzing redox reactions that cleave peroxides. Their active redox centers have heme, cysteine thiols, selenium, manganese and other chemical moieties. Peroxidases and their mimetic systems have several technological and biomedical applications such as environment protection, energy production, bioremediation, sensors and immunoassays design and drug delivery devices. The combination of peroxidases or systems with peroxidase-like activity with nanostructures such as nanoparticles, nanotubes, thin films, liposomes, micelles, nanoflowers, nanorods and others is often an efficient strategy to improve catalytic activity, targeting and reusability.

  10. Optimized Production of Lignin Peroxidase, Manganese Peroxidase

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mgina

    submerged culture fermentations were investigated for maximum enzymes ... 0.18, 4.44 and 593 U/ml, respectively compared to 0.0011, 0.0054 and 2.3 U/ml .... (2004) studied some Tanzanian white rot ... were done in 500 ml Erlenmeyer flasks and ... rotary shaker at 125 rpm. ..... bioreactor cultures (Hess et al., 2002). From.

  11. Analysis of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD: Ala-9Val and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px: Pro 197 Leu gene polymorphisms in mood disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgül Elbozan Cumurcu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the etiopathogenetic role of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD (Ala-9Val and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px (Pro 197 Leu gene polymorphisms in patients diagnosed with major depressive disorder (MDD and bipolar I disorder (BD. Eighty patients with MDD, 82 patients with BD (total 162 patients and 96 healthy controls were enrolled in this study and genotyped using a Real Time-Quantitative Polymer Chain Reaction (RT-qPCR-based method. The patients with BD and MDD and the controls had a similar distribution of the genotypes and alleles in the Ala-9Val MnSOD gene polymorphism. Comparison of the MDD group and control group regarding the Pro197 Leu GSH-Px gene polymorphism revealed similar genotype distribution but different allele distribution. The BD group and control group were similar both for genotypes and for alleles when compared regarding the Pro 197 Leu GSH-Px gene polymorphism. The combined analysis (MDD plus BD also failed to find any association between the Ala-9Val MnSOD and Pro 197 Leu GSH-Px gene polymorphism. Although small statistical power of the current study the significant difference between patients with depression and the control group for the Pro 197 Leu GSH-Px polymorphism indicates that the distribution of these alleles may have a contribution in the physiopathogenesis of depression. One of the limitation of the current study is that the sample size is too small. Understanding of the exact role of Pro 197 LeuGSH-Px polymorphism in the development of depression needs to further studies with more sample size and high statistical power.

  12. Synthesis and characterization of monodispersed orthorhombic manganese oxide nanoparticles produced by Bacillus sp. cells simultaneous to its bioremediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, Arvind [Enzyme and Microbial Biochemistry Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi, Hauz Khas, New Delhi 110 016 (India); Singh, Vidya Nand; Mehta, Bodh Raj [Thin Film Laboratory, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi Hauz Khas, New Delhi 110016 (India); Khare, Sunil Kumar, E-mail: skhare@rocketmail.com [Enzyme and Microbial Biochemistry Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi, Hauz Khas, New Delhi 110 016 (India)

    2011-08-30

    Highlights: {yields} An efficient process wherein remediated manganese is synthesized into nanoparticles. {yields} A microbial process for manganese nanoparticle synthesis from metal waste streams. {yields} Nanoparticles characterized as monodispersed, spherical and 4.62 {+-} 0.14 nm sized MnO{sub 2}. -- Abstract: A heavy metal resistant strain of Bacillus sp. (MTCC10650) is reported. The strain exhibited the property of bioaccumulating manganese, simultaneous to its remediation. The nanoparticles thus formed were characterized and identified using energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). When the cells were challenged with manganese, the cells effectively synthesized nanoparticles of average size 4.62 {+-} 0.14 nm. These were mostly spherical and monodispersed. The ex situ enzymatically synthesized nanoparticles exhibited an absorbance maximum at 329 nm. These were more discrete, small and uniform, than the manganese oxide nanoparticles recovered after cell sonication. The use of Bacillus sp. cells seems promising and advantageous approach. Since, it serves dual purposes of (i) remediation and (ii) nanoparticle synthesis. Considering the increasing demand of developing environmental friendly and cost effective technologies for nanoparticle synthesis, these cells can be exploited for the remediation of manganese from the environment in conjunction with development of a greener process for the controlled synthesis of manganese oxide nanoparticles.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of monodispersed orthorhombic manganese oxide nanoparticles produced by Bacillus sp. cells simultaneous to its bioremediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, Arvind; Singh, Vidya Nand; Mehta, Bodh Raj; Khare, Sunil Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → An efficient process wherein remediated manganese is synthesized into nanoparticles. → A microbial process for manganese nanoparticle synthesis from metal waste streams. → Nanoparticles characterized as monodispersed, spherical and 4.62 ± 0.14 nm sized MnO 2 . -- Abstract: A heavy metal resistant strain of Bacillus sp. (MTCC10650) is reported. The strain exhibited the property of bioaccumulating manganese, simultaneous to its remediation. The nanoparticles thus formed were characterized and identified using energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). When the cells were challenged with manganese, the cells effectively synthesized nanoparticles of average size 4.62 ± 0.14 nm. These were mostly spherical and monodispersed. The ex situ enzymatically synthesized nanoparticles exhibited an absorbance maximum at 329 nm. These were more discrete, small and uniform, than the manganese oxide nanoparticles recovered after cell sonication. The use of Bacillus sp. cells seems promising and advantageous approach. Since, it serves dual purposes of (i) remediation and (ii) nanoparticle synthesis. Considering the increasing demand of developing environmental friendly and cost effective technologies for nanoparticle synthesis, these cells can be exploited for the remediation of manganese from the environment in conjunction with development of a greener process for the controlled synthesis of manganese oxide nanoparticles.

  14. High Performance of Manganese Porphyrin Sensitized p-Type CuFe2O4 Photocathode for Solar Water Splitting to Produce Hydrogen in a Tandem Photoelectrochemical Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Li

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A novel composite composed of (5, 10, 15, 20-tetraphenyl porphinato manganese sensitized p-type CuFe2O4 was developed for constructing the photocathode of a tandem photoelectrochemical (PEC cell. The prepared material was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS and UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS. Light-driven water splitting to produce hydrogen can be achieved through the PEC cell, and the results show that H2 and O2 can be collected separately at low applied bias. This work demonstrates that manganese porphyrin sensitized CuFe2O4 is an effective hybrid material for building the photocathode of a PEC cell for solar water splitting to produce H2.

  15. Characterisation of manganese peroxidase and laccase producing bacteria capable for degradation of sucrose glutamic acid-Maillard reaction products at different nutritional and environmental conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vineet; Chandra, Ram

    2018-02-02

    Maillard reactions products (MRPs) are a major colorant of distillery effluent. It is major source of environmental pollution due to its complex structure and recalcitrant nature. This study has revealed that sucrose glutamic acid-Maillard reaction products (SGA-MRPs) showed many absorption peaks between 200 and 450 nm. The absorption maximum peak was noted at 250 nm in spectrophotometric detection. This indicated the formation of variable molecular weight Maillard products during the SGA-MRPs formation at high temperature. The identified aerobic bacterial consortium consisting Klebsiella pneumoniae (KU726953), Salmonella enterica (KU726954), Enterobacter aerogenes (KU726955), Enterobacter cloaceae (KU726957) showed optimum production of MnP and laccase at 120 and 144 h of growth, respectively. The potential bacterial consortium showed decolourisation of Maillard product up to 70% in presence of glucose (1%), peptone (0.1%) at optimum pH (8.1), temperature (37 °C) and shaking speed (180 rpm) within 192 h of incubation. The reduction of colour of Maillard product correlated with shifting of absorption peaks in UV-Vis spectrophotometry analysis. Further, the changing of functional group in FT-IR data showed appearance of new peaks and GC-MS analysis of degraded sample revealed the depolymerisation of complex MRPs. The toxicity evaluation using seed of Phaseolus mungo L. showed reduction of toxicity of MRPs after bacterial treatment. Hence, this study concluded that developed bacterial consortium have capability for decolourisation of MRPs due to high content of MnP and laccase.

  16. Arabidopsis thaliana peroxidase N

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirza, Osman Asghar; Henriksen, A; Ostergaard, L

    2000-01-01

    The structure of the neutral peroxidase from Arabidopsis thaliana (ATP N) has been determined to a resolution of 1.9 A and a free R value of 20.5%. ATP N has the expected characteristic fold of the class III peroxidases, with a C(alpha) r.m.s.d. of 0.82 A when compared with horseradish peroxidase C...

  17. Long-term chemiluminescence signal is produced in the course of luminol oxidation catalyzed by enhancer-independent peroxidase purified from Jatropha curcas leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Peipei; Cai, Feng; Luo, Yongting; Chen, Yangxi; Zou, Shujuan

    2015-09-01

    Isoenzyme c of horseradish peroxidase (HRP-C) is widely used in enzyme immunoassay combined with chemiluminescence (CL) detection. For this application, HRP-C activity measurement is usually based on luminol oxidation in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). However, this catalysis reaction was enhancer dependent. In this study, we demonstrated that Jatropha curcas peroxidase (JcGP1) showed high efficiency in catalyzing luminol oxidation in the presence of H2O2. Compared with HRP-C, the JcGP1-induced reaction was enhancer independent, which made the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) simpler. In addition, the JcGP1 catalyzed reaction showed a long-term stable CL signal. We optimized the conditions for JcGP1 catalysis and determined the favorable conditions as follows: 50 mM Tris buffer (pH 8.2) containing 10 mM H2 O2, 14 mM luminol and 0.75 M NaCl. The optimum catalysis temperature was 30°C. The detection limit of JcGP1 under optimum condition was 0.2 pM. Long-term stable CL signal combined with enhancer-independent property indicated that JcGP1 might be a valuable candidate peroxidase for clinical diagnosis and enzyme immunoassay with CL detection. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Manganese availability is negatively associated with carbon storage in northern coniferous forest humus layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stendahl, Johan; Berg, Björn; Lindahl, Björn D

    2017-11-14

    Carbon sequestration below ground depends on organic matter input and decomposition, but regulatory bottlenecks remain unclear. The relative importance of plant production, climate and edaphic factors has to be elucidated to better predict carbon storage in forests. In Swedish forest soil inventory data from across the entire boreal latitudinal range (n = 2378), the concentration of exchangeable manganese was singled out as the strongest predictor (R 2  = 0.26) of carbon storage in the extensive organic horizon (mor layer), which accounts for one third of the total below ground carbon. In comparison, established ecosystem models applied on the same data have failed to predict carbon stocks (R 2  < 0.05), and in our study manganese availability overshadowed both litter production and climatic factors. We also identified exchangeable potassium as an additional strong predictor, however strongly correlated with manganese. The negative correlation between manganese and carbon highlights the importance of Mn-peroxidases in oxidative decomposition of recalcitrant organic matter. The results support the idea that the fungus-driven decomposition could be a critical factor regulating humus carbon accumulation in boreal forests, as Mn-peroxidases are specifically produced by basidiomycetes.

  19. Catalytic and peroxidase-like activity of carbon based-AuPd bimetallic nanocomposite produced using carbon dots as the reductant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Liuqing; Liu, Xiaoying; Lu, Qiujun; Huang, Na; Liu, Meiling; Zhang, Youyu; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2016-01-01

    In this report, carbon-based AuPd bimetallic nanocomposite (AuPd/C NC) was synthesized using carbon dots (C-dots) as the reducing agent and stabilizer by a simple green sequential reduction strategy, without adding other agents. The as synthesized AuPd/C NC showed good catalytic activity and peroxidase-like property. The structure and morphology of these nanoparticles were clearly characterized by UV–Vis spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The AuPd/C NC catalyst exhibits noticeably higher catalytic activity than Pd and Au nanoparticles in catalysis reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP). Moreover, based on the high peroxidase-like property of AuPd/C NC, a new colorimetric detection method for hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) has been designed using 3,3′,5,5′-tetramethyl-benzidine (TMB) as the substrate, which provides a simple and sensitive means to detect H 2 O 2 in wide linear range of 5 μM–500 μM and 500 μM–4 mM with low detection limit of 1.6 μM (S/N = 3). Therefore, the facile synthesis strategy for bimetallic nanoparticles by the mild reductant of carbon dot will provide some new thoughts for preparing of carbon-based metal nanomaterials and expand their application in catalysis and analytical chemistry areas. - Highlights: • Carbon-based AuPd bimetallic nanocomposite was synthesized using carbon dots. • The green sequential reduction strategy synthesis method is simple, green, convenient and effective. • The as synthesized AuPd/C NC showed good catalytic activity and peroxidase-like activity. • The AuPd/C NC exhibits noticeably higher catalytic activity in reduction of 4-nitrophenol. • A new colorimetric detection method for hydrogen peroxide based on AuPd/C NC was proposed.

  20. Catalytic and peroxidase-like activity of carbon based-AuPd bimetallic nanocomposite produced using carbon dots as the reductant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Liuqing [Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology & Traditional Chinese Medicine Research (Ministry of Education, China), College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan Normal University, Changsha 410081 (China); Liu, Xiaoying [College of Science, Science and Technological Innovation Platform, Hunan Agricultural University, Hunan, Changsha 410128 (China); Lu, Qiujun; Huang, Na [Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology & Traditional Chinese Medicine Research (Ministry of Education, China), College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan Normal University, Changsha 410081 (China); Liu, Meiling, E-mail: liumeilingww@126.com [Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology & Traditional Chinese Medicine Research (Ministry of Education, China), College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan Normal University, Changsha 410081 (China); Zhang, Youyu; Yao, Shouzhuo [Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology & Traditional Chinese Medicine Research (Ministry of Education, China), College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan Normal University, Changsha 410081 (China)

    2016-08-03

    In this report, carbon-based AuPd bimetallic nanocomposite (AuPd/C NC) was synthesized using carbon dots (C-dots) as the reducing agent and stabilizer by a simple green sequential reduction strategy, without adding other agents. The as synthesized AuPd/C NC showed good catalytic activity and peroxidase-like property. The structure and morphology of these nanoparticles were clearly characterized by UV–Vis spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The AuPd/C NC catalyst exhibits noticeably higher catalytic activity than Pd and Au nanoparticles in catalysis reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP). Moreover, based on the high peroxidase-like property of AuPd/C NC, a new colorimetric detection method for hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) has been designed using 3,3′,5,5′-tetramethyl-benzidine (TMB) as the substrate, which provides a simple and sensitive means to detect H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in wide linear range of 5 μM–500 μM and 500 μM–4 mM with low detection limit of 1.6 μM (S/N = 3). Therefore, the facile synthesis strategy for bimetallic nanoparticles by the mild reductant of carbon dot will provide some new thoughts for preparing of carbon-based metal nanomaterials and expand their application in catalysis and analytical chemistry areas. - Highlights: • Carbon-based AuPd bimetallic nanocomposite was synthesized using carbon dots. • The green sequential reduction strategy synthesis method is simple, green, convenient and effective. • The as synthesized AuPd/C NC showed good catalytic activity and peroxidase-like activity. • The AuPd/C NC exhibits noticeably higher catalytic activity in reduction of 4-nitrophenol. • A new colorimetric detection method for hydrogen peroxide based on AuPd/C NC was proposed.

  1. Enzyme Technology of Peroxidases: Immobilization, Chemical and Genetic Modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longoria, Adriana; Tinoco, Raunel; Torres, Eduardo

    An overview of enzyme technology applied to peroxidases is made. Immobilization on organic, inorganic, and hybrid supports; chemical modification of amino acids and heme group; and genetic modification by site-directed and random mutagenesis are included. Different strategies that were carried out to improve peroxidase performance in terms of stability, selectivity, and catalytic activity are analyzed. Immobilization of peroxidases on inorganic and organic materials enhances the tolerance of peroxidases toward the conditions normally found in many industrial processes, such as the presence of an organic solvent and high temperature. In addition, it is shown that immobilization helps to increase the Total Turnover Number at levels high enough to justify the use of a peroxidase-based biocatalyst in a synthesis process. Chemical modification of peroxidases produces modified enzymes with higher thermostability and wider substrate variability. Finally, through mutagenesis approaches, it is possible to produce modified peroxidases capable of oxidizing nonnatural substrates with high catalytic activity and affinity.

  2. Arabidopsis thaliana peroxidase N

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirza, Osman Asghar; Henriksen, A; Ostergaard, L

    2000-01-01

    The structure of the neutral peroxidase from Arabidopsis thaliana (ATP N) has been determined to a resolution of 1.9 A and a free R value of 20.5%. ATP N has the expected characteristic fold of the class III peroxidases, with a C(alpha) r.m.s.d. of 0.82 A when compared with horseradish peroxidase C...... (HRP C). HRP C is 54% identical to ATP N in sequence. When the structures of four class III plant peroxidases are superimposed, the regions with structural differences are non-randomly distributed; all are located in one half of the molecule. The architecture of the haem pocket of ATP N is very similar...... to that of HRP C, in agreement with the low small-molecule substrate specificity of all class III peroxidases. The structure of ATP N suggests that the pH dependence of the substrate turnover will differ from that of HRP C owing to differences in polarity of the residues in the substrate-access channel. Since...

  3. Characterization of purified and Xerogel immobilized Novel Lignin Peroxidase produced from Trametes versicolor IBL-04 using solid state medium of Corncobs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asgher Muhammad

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cost-effective production of industrially important enzymes is a key for their successful exploitation on industrial scale. Keeping in view the extensive industrial applications of lignin peroxidase (LiP, this study was performed to purify and characterize the LiP from an indigenous strain of Trametes versicolor IBL-04. Xerogel matrix enzyme immobilization technique was applied to improve the kinetic and thermo-stability characteristics of LiP to fulfil the requirements of the modern enzyme consumer sector of biotechnology. Results A novel LiP was isolated from an indigenous T. versicolor IBL-04 strain. T. versicolor IBL-04 was cultured in solid state fermentation (SSF medium of corn cobs and maximum LiP activity of 592 ± 6 U/mL was recorded after five days of incubation under optimum culture conditions. The crude LiP was 3.3-fold purified with specific activity of 553 U/mg after passing through the DEAE-cellulose and Sephadex-G-100 chromatography columns. The purified LiP exhibited a relatively low molecular weight (30 kDa homogenous single band on native and SDS-PAGE. The LiP was immobilized by entrapping in xerogel matrix of trimethoxysilane (TMOS and proplytetramethoxysilane (PTMS and maximum immobilization efficiency of 88.6% was achieved. The free and immobilized LiPs were characterized and the results showed that the free and immobilized LiPs had optimum pH 6 and 5 while optimum temperatures were 60°C and 80°C, respectively. Immobilization was found to enhance the activity and thermo-stability potential of LiP significantly and immobilized LiP remained stable over broad pH and temperature range as compare to free enzyme. Kinetic constants Km and Vmax were 70 and 56 μM and 588 and 417 U/mg for the free and immobilized LiPs, respectively. Activity of this novel extra thermo-stable LiP was stimulated to variable extents by Cu2+, Mn2+ and Fe2+ whereas, Cystein, EDTA and Ag+ showed inhibitory effects

  4. Optimization of laccase and manganese peroxidase production in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-09-05

    Sep 5, 2011 ... 100% oxidation of RBBR, ABTS and guaiacol was observed. ... acid and veratryl alcohol) (Arora and Gill, 2001; Prasad et al., 2005; Asgher et ...... Edible, Harmful and other Fungi, Finnish Museum of Natural History,. Helsinki ...

  5. Optimization of laccase and manganese peroxidase production in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of temperature, pH, carbon, nitrogen, Cu2+, 2,5- xylidine, ferulic acid, Mn2+ and immobilization using Luffa cylindrica sponges in submerged culture fermentations were investigated for maximum enzymes production. After 7 days of incubation, 83 to 100% oxidation of RBBR, ABTS and guaiacol was observed.

  6. Production of manganese peroxidase by white rot fungi from potato ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    phenylalanine and L-tyrosine blocked the MnP biosynthetic pathway. Ammonium ion released from the L-phenylalanine by the L-phenylalanine ammonia-lyase participated in the repression of the MnP biosynthetic pathway of the strain L-25.

  7. Anti-inflammatory effects of Lactobacillus casei BL23 producing or not a manganese-dependant catalase on DSS-induced colitis in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Rochat, Tatiana; Berm?dez-Humar?n, Luis; Gratadoux, Jean-Jacques; Fourage, Christel; Hoebler, Christine; Corthier, G?rard; Langella, Philippe

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Human immune cells generate large amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) throughout the respiratory burst that occurs during inflammation. In inflammatory bowel diseases, a sustained and abnormal activation of the immune system results in oxidative stress in the digestive tract and in a loss of intestinal homeostasis. We previously showed that the heterologous production of the Lactobacillus plantarum ATCC14431 manganese-dependant catalase (MnKat) in Lb. casei BL23 succe...

  8. Facile N...N coupling of manganese(V) imido species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiu, Shek-Man; Lam, William W Y; Ho, Chi-Ming; Lau, Tai-Chu

    2007-01-31

    (Salen)manganese(V) nitrido species are activated by electrophiles such as trifluoroacetic anhydride (TFAA) or trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) to produce N2. Mechanistic studies suggest that the manganese(V) nitrido species first react with TFAA or TFA to produce an imido species, which then undergoes N...N coupling. It is proposed that the resulting manganese(III) mu-diazene species decomposes via internal redox to give N2 and manganese(II). The manganese(II) species is then rapidly oxidized by manganese(V) imide to give manganese(III) and CF3CONH2 (for TFAA) or NH3 (for TFA).

  9. Immobilization of Peroxidase onto Magnetite Modified Polyaniline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Fernandes Barbosa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study describes the immobilization of horseradish peroxidase (HRP on magnetite-modified polyaniline (PANImG activated with glutaraldehyde. After the optimization of the methodology, the immobilization of HRP on PANImG produced the same yield (25% obtained for PANIG with an efficiency of 100% (active protein. The optimum pH for immobilization was displaced by the effect of the partition of protons produced in the microenvironment by the magnetite. The tests of repeated use have shown that PANImG-HRP can be used for 13 cycles with maintenance of 50% of the initial activity.

  10. Anti-inflammatory effects of Lactobacillus casei BL23 producing or not a manganese-dependant catalase on DSS-induced colitis in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corthier Gérard

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human immune cells generate large amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS throughout the respiratory burst that occurs during inflammation. In inflammatory bowel diseases, a sustained and abnormal activation of the immune system results in oxidative stress in the digestive tract and in a loss of intestinal homeostasis. We previously showed that the heterologous production of the Lactobacillus plantarum ATCC14431 manganese-dependant catalase (MnKat in Lb. casei BL23 successfully enhances its survival when exposed to oxidative stress. In this study, we evaluated the preventive effects of this antioxidative Lb. casei strain in a murine model of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS-induced moderate colitis. Results Either Lb. casei BL23 MnKat- or MnKat+ was administered daily to mice treated with DSS for 10 days. In contrast to control mice treated with PBS for which DSS induced bleeding diarrhea and mucosal lesions, mice treated with both Lb. casei strains presented a significant (p Conclusion No contribution of MnKat to the protective effect from epithelial damage has been observed in the tested conditions. In contrast, these results confirm the high interest of Lb. casei as an anti-inflammatory probiotic strain.

  11. Anti-inflammatory effects of Lactobacillus casei BL23 producing or not a manganese-dependant catalase on DSS-induced colitis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochat, Tatiana; Bermúdez-Humarán, Luis; Gratadoux, Jean-Jacques; Fourage, Christel; Hoebler, Christine; Corthier, Gérard; Langella, Philippe

    2007-07-20

    Human immune cells generate large amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) throughout the respiratory burst that occurs during inflammation. In inflammatory bowel diseases, a sustained and abnormal activation of the immune system results in oxidative stress in the digestive tract and in a loss of intestinal homeostasis. We previously showed that the heterologous production of the Lactobacillus plantarum ATCC14431 manganese-dependant catalase (MnKat) in Lb. casei BL23 successfully enhances its survival when exposed to oxidative stress. In this study, we evaluated the preventive effects of this antioxidative Lb. casei strain in a murine model of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced moderate colitis. Either Lb. casei BL23 MnKat- or MnKat+ was administered daily to mice treated with DSS for 10 days. In contrast to control mice treated with PBS for which DSS induced bleeding diarrhea and mucosal lesions, mice treated with both Lb. casei strains presented a significant (p casei as an anti-inflammatory probiotic strain.

  12. Structure of soybean seed coat peroxidase: a plant peroxidase with unusual stability and haem-apoprotein interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, A; Mirza, O; Indiani, C

    2001-01-01

    Soybean seed coat peroxidase (SBP) is a peroxidase with extraordinary stability and catalytic properties. It belongs to the family of class III plant peroxidases that can oxidize a wide variety of organic and inorganic substrates using hydrogen peroxide. Because the plant enzyme is a heterogeneous...... glycoprotein, SBP was produced recombinant in Escherichia coli for the present crystallographic study. The three-dimensional structure of SBP shows a bound tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane molecule (TRIS). This TRIS molecule has hydrogen bonds to active site residues corresponding to the residues that interact...... with the small phenolic substrate ferulic acid in the horseradish peroxidase C (HRPC):ferulic acid complex. TRIS is positioned in what has been described as a secondary substrate-binding site in HRPC, and the structure of the SBP:TRIS complex indicates that this secondary substrate-binding site could...

  13. Oxidation of NAD dimers by horseradish peroxidase.

    OpenAIRE

    Avigliano, L; Carelli, V; Casini, A; Finazzi-Agrò, A; Liberatore, F

    1985-01-01

    Horseradish peroxidase catalyses the oxidation of NAD dimers, (NAD)2, to NAD+ in accordance with a reaction that is pH-dependent and requires 1 mol of O2 per 2 mol of (NAD)2. Horseradish peroxidase also catalyses the peroxidation of (NAD)2 to NAD+. In contrast, bacterial NADH peroxidase does not catalyse the peroxidation or the oxidation of (NAD)2. A free-radical mechanism is proposed for both horseradish-peroxidase-catalysed oxidation and peroxidation of (NAD)2.

  14. Photogeochemical reactions of manganese under anoxic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W.; Yee, N.; Piotrowiak, P.; Falkowski, P. G.

    2017-12-01

    Photogeochemistry describes reactions involving light and naturally occurring chemical species. These reactions often involve a photo-induced electron transfer that does not occur in the absence of light. Although photogeochemical reactions have been known for decades, they are often ignored in geochemical models. In particular, reactions caused by UV radiation during an ozone free early Earth could have influenced the available oxidation states of manganese. Manganese is one of the most abundant transition metals in the crust and is important in both biology and geology. For example, the presence of manganese (VI) oxides in the geologic record has been used as a proxy for oxygenic photosynthesis; however, we suggest that the high oxidation state of Mn can be produced abiotically by photochemical reactions. Aqueous solutions of manganese (II) as well as suspensions of rhodochrosite (MnCO3) were irradiated under anoxic condition using a 450 W mercury lamp and custom built quartz reaction vessels. The photoreaction of the homogeneous solution of Mn(II) produced H2 gas and akhtenskite (ɛ-MnO2) as the solid product . This product is different than the previously identified birnessite. The irradiation of rhodochrosite suspensions also produced H2 gas and resulted in both a spectral shift as well as morphology changes of the mineral particles in the SEM images. These reactions offer alternative, abiotic pathways for the formation of manganese oxides.

  15. Use of an immuno-peroxidase staining method for the detection of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Immunopurified antigens of axenic E. histolytica were used to produce rabbit hyper-immune sera. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) was purified from hyper-immune sera and coupled to peroxidase using a two-step procedure. The IgG-peroxidase conjugate was then evaluated by detection of E. histolytica in 128 stool samples and ...

  16. Oxidative degradation of alkylphenols by horseradish peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuyama, Hisae; Endo, Yasushi; Fujimoto, Kenshiro; Hatana, Yasuhiko

    2003-01-01

    Alkylphenols such as bisphenol A (2,2-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)propane; BPA), p-nonylphenol (p-NP), and p-octylphenol (p-OP) that are known as endocrine disrupters were oxidized by horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) peroxidase (HRP) with H2O2. The optimal pHs for BPA, p-NP, and p-OP were 8.0, 7.0, and 5.0, respectively. The optimal temperature for BPA was 20 degrees C. Although BPA was rapidly degraded by HRP, its degradation depended on the concentration of HRP. Most of the oxidation products of BPA were polymers, although some 4-isopropenylphenol was produced. When male Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) were exposed to BPA, vitellogenin in the blood increased. However, no increased vitellogenin was observed in medaka exposed to HRP-oxidized BPA. The enzymatic oxidation of BPA using HRP was able to eliminate its estrogen-like activity.

  17. Unraveling the role of animal heme peroxidases in superoxide mediated Mn oxide formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learman, D. R.; Hansel, C. M.

    2013-12-01

    Manganese(III,IV) oxides are important in the environment as they can impact the fate of a broad range of nutrients (e.g. carbon and phosphate) and contaminates (e.g. lead and chromium). Bacteria play a valuable role in the production of Mn oxides, yet the mechanisms and physiological reasons remain unclear. Roseobacter sp. AzwK-3b, an organism within the abundant and ubiquitous Roseobacter clade, has recently been shown to oxidize Mn(II) via a novel pathway that involves enzymatic extracellular superoxide production. However, in reactions with only Mn(II) and abiotically generated superoxide, we find superoxide alone is not enough to produce Mn(III,IV) oxides. Scavenging of the byproduct hydrogen peroxide (via the addition of catalase) is required to generate Mn oxides via abiotic reaction of Mn(II) with superoxide. Thus, R. AzwK-3b must produce superoxide and also scavenge hydrogen peroxide to form Mn oxides. Further, in-gel Mn(II) oxidation assay revealed a protein band that could generate Mn oxides in the presence of soluble Mn(II). This Mn(II)-oxidizing protein band was excised from the gel and the peptides identified via mass spectrometry. An animal heme peroxidase (AHP) was the predominant protein found in this band. This protein is homologous to the AHPs previously implicated as a Mn(II)-oxidizing enzyme within the Alphaproteobacteria, Erythrobacter SD-21 and Aurantimonas manganoxydans strain SI85-9A1. Currently, protein expression of the AHPs in R. AzwK-3b is being examined to determine if expression is correlated with Mn(II) concentration or oxidative stress. Our data suggests that AHPs do not directly oxidize Mn(II) but rather plays a role in scavenging hydrogen peroxide and/or producing an organic Mn(III) ligand that complexes Mn(III) and likely aids in Mn oxide precipitation.

  18. 10Be in manganese nodules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.; Parker, P.; Mangini, A.; Cochran, K.; Turekian, K.; Krishnaswami, S.; Sharma, P.

    1981-01-01

    10 Be (t/sub 1/2) = 1.5 MY) is(formed in the upper atmosphere by cosmic ray spallation on nitrogen and oxygen. It is transported to the earth's surface via precipitation. In the oceans it is eventually associated with solid phases depositing on the ocean floor such as manganese nodules and deep-sea sediments. One of the assumptions that is normally made in analysis of such processes is that 10 Be has been produced at a relatively uniform rate over the pat several million years. If we assume, in addition, that the initial specific concentration of 10 Be as it precipitates with a solid phase is invariant with time, then we would expect that the decrease of the 10 Be concentration as a function of depth in a deep-sea core or in a manganese nodule would provide a record of sediment accumulation rate in the former and of growth rate in the latter. The possibility of using cosmic-ray produced 10 Be for the dating of marine deposits had been proposed 25 years ago by Arnold and Goel et al. The method of analysis used by these investigators, and those subsequently pursuing the problem, was low-level β counting. Though the potential of using 10 Be for dating manganese nodules was explored more than a decade ago, only a few measurements of 10 Be in nodules exist in date. This is largely because of the 10 Be measurements in environmental samples have gained considerable momentum during the past 3 to 4 years, after the development of accelerator mass spectrometry for its determination

  19. Globally sustainable manganese metal production and use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagelstein, Karen

    2009-09-01

    The "cradle to grave" concept of managing chemicals and wastes has been a descriptive analogy of proper environmental stewardship since the 1970s. The concept incorporates environmentally sustainable product choices-such as metal alloys utilized steel products which civilization is dependent upon. Manganese consumption is related to the increasing production of raw steel and upgrading ferroalloys. Nonferrous applications of manganese include production of dry-cell batteries, plant fertilizer components, animal feed and colorant for bricks. The manganese ore (high grade 35% manganese) production world wide is about 6 million ton/year and electrolytic manganese metal demand is about 0.7 million ton/year. The total manganese demand is consumed globally by industries including construction (23%), machinery (14%), and transportation (11%). Manganese is recycled within scrap of iron and steel, a small amount is recycled within aluminum used beverage cans. Recycling rate is 37% and efficiency is estimated as 53% [Roskill Metals and Minerals Reports, January 13, 2005. Manganese Report: rapid rise in output caused by Chinese crude steel production. Available from: http://www.roskill.com/reports/manganese.]. Environmentally sustainable management choices include identifying raw material chemistry, utilizing clean production processes, minimizing waste generation, recycling materials, controlling occupational exposures, and collecting representative environmental data. This paper will discuss two electrolytically produced manganese metals, the metal production differences, and environmental impacts cited to date. The two electrolytic manganese processes differ due to the addition of sulfur dioxide or selenium dioxide. Adverse environmental impacts due to use of selenium dioxide methodology include increased water consumption and order of magnitude greater solid waste generation per ton of metal processed. The use of high grade manganese ores in the electrolytic process also

  20. Manganese in silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linnarsson, M.K., E-mail: marga@kth.se [Royal Institute of Technology, School of Information and Communication Technology, P.O. Box E229, SE-16440 Kista-Stockhom (Sweden); Hallen, A. [Royal Institute of Technology, School of Information and Communication Technology, P.O. Box E229, SE-16440 Kista-Stockhom (Sweden)

    2012-02-15

    Structural disorder and relocation of implanted Mn in semi-insulating 4H-SiC has been studied. Subsequent heat treatment of Mn implanted samples has been performed in the temperature range 1400-2000 Degree-Sign C. The depth distribution of manganese is recorded by secondary ion mass spectrometry. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry has been employed for characterization of crystal disorder. Ocular inspection of color changes of heat-treated samples indicates that a large portion of the damage has been annealed. However, Rutherford backscattering shows that after heat treatment, most disorder from the implantation remains. Less disorder is observed in the [0 0 0 1] channel direction compared to [112{sup Macron }3] channel direction. A substantial rearrangement of manganese is observed in the implanted region. No pronounced manganese diffusion deeper into the sample is recorded.

  1. Manganese in silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linnarsson, M.K.; Hallén, A.

    2012-01-01

    Structural disorder and relocation of implanted Mn in semi-insulating 4H–SiC has been studied. Subsequent heat treatment of Mn implanted samples has been performed in the temperature range 1400–2000 °C. The depth distribution of manganese is recorded by secondary ion mass spectrometry. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry has been employed for characterization of crystal disorder. Ocular inspection of color changes of heat-treated samples indicates that a large portion of the damage has been annealed. However, Rutherford backscattering shows that after heat treatment, most disorder from the implantation remains. Less disorder is observed in the [0 0 0 1] channel direction compared to [112 ¯ 3] channel direction. A substantial rearrangement of manganese is observed in the implanted region. No pronounced manganese diffusion deeper into the sample is recorded.

  2. Ultrasound-assisted extraction and characterization of hydrolytic and oxidative enzymes produced by solid state fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Orsolya Erzsebet; Csiszar, Emilia; Toth, Karolina; Szakacs, George; Koczka, Bela

    2015-01-01

    Ligninolytic and hydrolytic enzymes were produced with six selected fungi on flax substrate by solid state fermentation (SSF). The extracellular enzyme production of the organisms in two SSF media was evaluated by measuring the soluble protein concentration and the filter paper, endoxylanase, 1,4-β-d-glucosidase, 1,4-β-d-endoglucanase, polygalacturonase, lignin peroxidase, manganese peroxidase and laccase activities of the clear culture solutions produced by conventional extraction from the SSF materials. The SSF material of the best enzyme producer (Trichoderma virens TUB F-498) was further investigated to enhance the enzyme recovery by low frequency ultrasound treatment. Performance of both the original and ultrasound macerated crude enzyme mixtures was evaluated in degradation of the colored lignin-containing and waxy materials of raw linen fabric. Results proved that sonication (at 40%, 60% and 80% amplitudes, for 60min) did not result in reduction in the filter paper, lignin peroxidase and laccase activities of the crude enzyme solution, but has a significant positive effect on the efficiency of enzyme extraction from the SSF material. Depending on the parameters of sonication, the enzyme activities in the extracts obtained can be increased up to 129-413% of the original activities measured in the control extracts recovered by a common magnetic stirrer. Sonication also has an effect on both the enzymatic removal of the lignin-containing color materials and hydrophobic surface layer from the raw linen. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Statistical Optimization of Synthesis of Manganese Carbonates Nanoparticles by Precipitation Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javidan, A.; Rahimi-Nasrabadi, M.; Davoudi, A.A.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, an orthogonal array design (OAD), OA9, was employed as a statistical experimental method for the controllable, simple and fast synthesis of manganese carbonate nanoparticle. Ultrafine manganese carbonate nanoparticles were synthesized by a precipitation method involving the addition of manganese ion solution to the carbonate reagent. The effects of reaction conditions, for example, manganese and carbonate concentrations, flow rate of reagent addition and temperature, on the diameter of the synthesized manganese carbonate nanoparticle were investigated. The effects of these factors on the width of the manganese carbonate nanoparticle were quantitatively evaluated by the analysis of variance (ANOVA). The results showed that manganese carbonate nanoparticle can be synthesized by controlling the manganese concentration, flow rate and temperature. Finally, the optimum conditions for the synthesis of manganese carbonate nanoparticle by this simple and fast method were proposed. The results of ANOVA showed that 0.001 mol/ L manganese ion and carbonate reagents concentrations, 2.5 mL/ min flow rate for the addition of the manganese reagent to the carbonate solution and 0 degree Celsius temperature are the optimum conditions for producing manganese carbonate nanoparticle with 75 ± 25 nm width. (author)

  4. Fungal peroxidases : molecular aspects and applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Conesa, A.; Punt, P.J.; Hondel, C.A.M.J.J.

    2002-01-01

    Peroxidases are oxidoreductases that utilize hydrogen peroxide to catalyze oxidative reactions. A large number of peroxidases have been identified in fungal species and are being characterized at the molecular level. In this manuscript we review the current knowledge on the molecular aspects of this

  5. Peroxidase enzymes regulate collagen extracellular matrix biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeNichilo, Mark O; Panagopoulos, Vasilios; Rayner, Timothy E; Borowicz, Romana A; Greenwood, John E; Evdokiou, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    Myeloperoxidase and eosinophil peroxidase are heme-containing enzymes often physically associated with fibrotic tissue and cancer in various organs, without any direct involvement in promoting fibroblast recruitment and extracellular matrix (ECM) biosynthesis at these sites. We report herein novel findings that show peroxidase enzymes possess a well-conserved profibrogenic capacity to stimulate the migration of fibroblastic cells and promote their ability to secrete collagenous proteins to generate a functional ECM both in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistic studies conducted using cultured fibroblasts show that these cells are capable of rapidly binding and internalizing both myeloperoxidase and eosinophil peroxidase. Peroxidase enzymes stimulate collagen biosynthesis at a post-translational level in a prolyl 4-hydroxylase-dependent manner that does not require ascorbic acid. This response was blocked by the irreversible myeloperoxidase inhibitor 4-amino-benzoic acid hydrazide, indicating peroxidase catalytic activity is essential for collagen biosynthesis. These results suggest that peroxidase enzymes, such as myeloperoxidase and eosinophil peroxidase, may play a fundamental role in regulating the recruitment of fibroblast and the biosynthesis of collagen ECM at sites of normal tissue repair and fibrosis, with enormous implications for many disease states where infiltrating inflammatory cells deposit peroxidases. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Manganese dipyridoxyl diphosphate:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    H, Brurok; Ardenkjær-Larsen, Jan Henrik; G, Hansson

    1999-01-01

    Manganese dipyridoxyl diphosphate (MnDPDP) is a contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the liver. Aims of the study were to examine if MnDPDP possesses superoxide dismutase (SOD) mimetic activity in vitro, and if antioxidant protection can be demonstrated in an ex vivo rat heart...

  7. Manganese, Metallogenium, and Martian Microfossils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, L. Y.; Nealson, K. H.

    1999-01-01

    Manganese could easily be considered an abundant element in the Martian regolith, assuming that the composition of martian meteorites reflects the composition of the planet. Mineralogical analyses of 5 SNC meteorites have revealed an average manganese oxide concentration of 0.48%, relative to the 0.1% concentration of manganese found in the Earth's crust. On the Earth, the accumulation of manganese oxides in oceans, soils, rocks, sedimentary ores, fresh water systems, and hydrothermal vents can be largely attributed to microbial activity. Manganese is also a required trace nutrient for most life forms and participates in many critical enzymatic reactions such as photosynthesis. The wide-spread process of bacterial manganese cycling on Earth suggests that manganese is an important element to both geology and biology. Furthermore, there is evidence that bacteria can be fossilized within manganese ores, implying that manganese beds may be good repositories for preserved biomarkers. A particular genus of bacteria, known historically as Metallogenium, can form star-shaped manganese oxide minerals (called metallogenium) through the action of manganese oxide precipitation along its surface. Fossilized structures that resemble metallogenium have been found in Precambrian sedimentary formations and in Cretaceous-Paleogene cherts. The Cretaceous-Paleogene formations are highly enriched in manganese and have concentrations of trace elements (Fe, Zn, Cu, and Co) similar to modern-day manganese oxide deposits in marine environments. The appearance of metallogenium-like fossils associated with manganese deposits suggests that bacteria may be preserved within the minerals that they form. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  8. Degradation of textile dyes using immobilized lignin peroxidase-like metalloporphines under mild experimental conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zucca Paolo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Synthetic dyes represent a broad and heterogeneous class of durable pollutants, that are released in large amounts by the textile industry. The ability of two immobilized metalloporphines (structurally emulating the ligninolytic peroxidases to bleach six chosen dyes (alizarin red S, phenosafranine, xylenol orange, methylene blue, methyl green, and methyl orange was compared to enzymatic catalysts. To achieve a green and sustainable process, very mild conditions were chosen. Results IPS/MnTSPP was the most promising biomimetic catalyst as it was able to effectively and quickly bleach all tested dyes. Biomimetic catalysis was fully characterized: maximum activity was centered at neutral pH, in the absence of any organic solvent, using hydrogen peroxide as the oxidant. The immobilized metalloporphine kept a large part of its activity during multi-cycle use; however, well-known redox mediators were not able to increase its catalytic activity. IPS/MnTSPP was also more promising for use in industrial applications than its enzymatic counterparts (lignin peroxidase, laccase, manganese peroxidase, and horseradish peroxidase. Conclusions On the whole, the conditions were very mild (standard pressure, room temperature and neutral pH, using no organic solvents, and the most environmental-friendly oxidant and a significant bleaching and partial mineralization of the dyes was achieved in approximately 1 h. Therefore, the process was consistent with large-scale applications. The biomimetic catalyst also had more promising features than the enzymatic catalysts.

  9. Preparation of Baking-Free Brick from Manganese Residue and Its Mechanical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing amount of waste residue produced during the electrolytic preparation process of manganese has nowadays brought about serious environmental problems. The research on utilization of manganese slag has been a hot spot around the world. The utilization of manganese slag is not only environment friendly, but also economically feasible. In the current work, a summarization of the main methods to produced building materials from manganese slag materials was given. Baking-free brick, a promising building material, was produced from manganese slag with the addition of quicklime and cement. The physical properties, chemical composition, and mechanical performances of the obtained samples were measured by several analyses and characterization methods. Then the influence of adding materials and molding pressure during the preparation of baking-free brick samples on their compressive strength properties was researched. It is concluded that the baking-free brick prepared from manganese residue could have excellent compressive strength performance under certain formula.

  10. Inhibition of Heme Peroxidase During Phenol Derivatives Oxidation. Possible Molecular Cloaking of the Active Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juozas Kulys

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Ab initio quantum chemical calculations have been applied to the study of the molecular structure of phenol derivatives and oligomers produced during peroxidasecatalyzed oxidation. The interaction of substrates and oligomers with Arthromyces ramosus peroxidase was analyzed by docking methods. The most possible interaction site of oligomers is an active center of the peroxidase. The complexation energy increases with increasing oligomer length. However, the complexed oligomers do not form a precise (for the reaction hydrogen bonding network in the active center of the enzyme. It seems likely that strong but non productive docking of the oligomers determines peroxidase inhibition during the reaction.

  11. Wound-induced expression of horseradish peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaoka, A; Kawamoto, T; Ohta, H; Sekine, M; Takano, M; Shinmyo, A

    1994-01-01

    Peroxidases have been implicated in the responses of plants to physiological stress and to pathogens. Wound-induced peroxidase of horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) was studied. Total peroxidase activity was increased by wounding in cell wall fractions extracted from roots, stems and leaves of horseradish. On the other hand, wounding decreased the peroxidase activity in the soluble fraction from roots. The enzyme activities of the basic isozymes were induced by wounding in horseradish leaves based on data obtained by fractionation of crude enzyme in isoelectric focusing gel electrophoresis followed by activity staining. We have previously isolated genomic clones for four peroxidase genes, namely, prxC1a, prxC1b, prxC2 and prxC3. Northern blot analysis using gene-specific probes showed that mRNA of prxC2, which encodes a basic isozyme, accumulated by wounding, while the mRNAs for other peroxidase genes were not induced. Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants were transformed with four chimeric gene constructs, each consisting of a promoter from one of the peroxidase genes and the β-glucuronidase (GUS) structural gene. High level GUS activity induced in response to wounding was observed in tobacco plants containing the prxC2-GUS construct.

  12. Peroxidase activity as a marker for estrogenicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, J.; Liel, Y.; Glick, S.M.

    1981-01-01

    We examined the possibility that peroxidase activity might be a marker for estrogen activity in established estrogen-dependent tissues: dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced rat mammary tumours and human breast cancer. In DMBA-induced tumours undergoing regression after ovariectomy or tamoxifen treatment, tumour size decreased by 50%, estradiol receptors (ER) and progesterone receptors (PgR) decreased by 25 and 20%, respectively, but peroxidase activity paradoxically increased six- to sevenfold. In DMBA tumours stimulated by estradiol treatment or by the cessation of tamoxifen administration in intact rats, tumour size increased threefold. ER and PgR increased two- and threefold, respectively, while peroxidase activity decreased 50%. These data indicate an inverse relation between tumour growth, ER and PgR on the one hand, and peroxidase activity on the other. In the human breast cancers there was a singificant negative relation between the presence of ER and peroxidase activity. By using a calibrated Sephadex G-100 column it was shown that uterine peroxidase differs in molecular weight from the peroxidase of rat mammary tumours and that of human breast cancer. (author)

  13. Glycosylation and thermodynamic versus kinetic stability of horseradish peroxidase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tams, J.W.; Welinder, Karen G.

    1998-01-01

    Glycoprotein stability, glycoprotein unfolding, horseradish peroxidase, thermodynamic stability, kinetik stability......Glycoprotein stability, glycoprotein unfolding, horseradish peroxidase, thermodynamic stability, kinetik stability...

  14. A Biocatalytic One-Pot Approach for the Preparation of Lignin Oligomers Using an Oxidase/Peroxidase Cascade Enzyme System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habib, Mohamed H. M.; Deuss, Peter J.; Loncar, Nikola; Trajkovic, Milos; Fraaije, Marco W.

    2017-01-01

    Synthetic lignin was prepared biocatalytically in a one-pot, two-step reaction using an oxidase/peroxidase cascade enzyme system. Using eugenol in combination with eugenol oxidase and a peroxidase, lignin-like material was produced. The cascade reaction takes advantage of the ability of the oxidase

  15. Aquatic environmental risk assessment of manganese processing industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Becky; Peters, Adam; McGough, Doreen

    2017-01-01

    An environmental risk assessment (ERA) has been conducted for sites producing and processing manganese and its inorganic compounds, focussing on potential risks to freshwater. A site specific questionnaire was used to collect information. Sites fall into three broad categories: mining sites, refining sites, and sites producing chemicals and pigments. Waste disposal is principally carried out by the treatment of liquid wastes to separate solids for disposal off-site with a consented wastewater discharge, or disposal on-site using evaporation or settlement ponds in order to maintain the waste materials in a suitable manner following site closure. The main source of emissions from refining and alloying sites is from the treatment of emissions to air using wet scrubber air filters. There is also the potential for fugitive environmental emissions of manganese from stockpiles of raw material held on-site. Data provided from the questionnaires were both site-specific and also commercially sensitive. Therefore, this paper has undertaken the manganese exposure assessment, using a probabilistic approach to reflect the distribution of emissions of manganese and also to maintain the confidentiality of site specific data. An inverse correlation was observed between the total annual tonnage of manganese processed at the site and the emission factor, such that sites processing larger quantities resulted in lower emissions of manganese per tonne processed. The hazard assessment determined a Predicted No Effect Concentration (PNEC) for freshwater using a species sensitivity distribution approach, resulting in a freshwater PNEC of 0.075mgL -1 for soluble manganese. Based on the exposure data and the freshwater PNEC derived for this study, the distributions of risk characterisation ratios using the probabilistic approach indicates that two thirds of manganese processing sites would not be expected to pose a potential risk to the local aquatic environment due to wastewater emissions

  16. Halide peroxidase in tissues that interact with bacteria in the host squid Euprymna scolopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, A L; McFall-Ngai, M J

    1999-03-15

    An enzyme with similarities to myeloperoxidase, the antimicrobial halide peroxidase in mammalian neutrophils, occurs abundantly in the light organ tissue of Euprymna scolopes, a squid that maintains a beneficial association with the luminous bacterium Vibrio fischeri. Using three independent assays typically applied to the analysis of halide peroxidase enzymes, we directly compared the activity of the squid enzyme with that of human myeloperoxidase. One of these methods, the diethanolamine assay, confirmed that the squid peroxidase requires halide ions for its activity. The identification of a halide peroxidase in a cooperative bacterial association suggested that this type of enzyme can function not only to control pathogens, but also to modulate the interactions of host animals with their beneficial partners. To determine whether the squid peroxidase functions under both circumstances, we examined its distribution in a variety of host tissues, including those that typically interact with bacteria and those that do not. Tissues interacting with bacteria included those that have specific cooperative associations with bacteria (i.e., the light organ and accessory nidamental gland) and those that have transient nonspecific interactions with bacteria (i.e., the gills, which clear the cephalopod circulatory system of invading microorganisms). These bacteria-associated tissues were compared with the eye, digestive gland, white body, and ink-producing tissues, which do not typically interact directly with bacteria. Peroxidase enzyme assays, immunocytochemical localization, and DNA-RNA hybridizations showed that the halide-dependent peroxidase is consistently expressed in high concentration in tissues that interact bacteria. Elevated levels of the peroxidase were also found in the ink-producing tissues, which are known to have enzymatic pathways associated with antimicrobial activity. Taken together, these data suggest that the host uses a common biochemical response to

  17. Failure of manganese to protect from Shiga toxin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marsha A Gaston

    Full Text Available Shiga toxin (Stx, the main virulence factor of Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli, is a major public health threat, causing hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome. Currently, there are no approved therapeutics for these infections; however manganese has been reported to provide protection from the Stx1 variant isolated from Shigella dysenteriae (Stx1-S both in vitro and in vivo. We investigated the efficacy of manganese protection from Stx1-S and the more potent Stx2a isoform, using experimental systems well-established for studying Stx: in vitro responses of Vero monkey kidney cells, and in vivo toxicity to CD-1 outbred mice. Manganese treatment at the reported therapeutic concentration was toxic to Vero cells in culture and to CD-1 mice. At lower manganese concentrations that were better tolerated, we observed no protection from Stx1-S or Stx2a toxicity. The ability of manganese to prevent the effects of Stx may be particular to certain cell lines, mouse strains, or may only be manifested at high, potentially toxic manganese concentrations.

  18. The reactivity of phenolic and non-phenolic residual kraft lignin model compounds with Mn(II)-peroxidase from Lentinula edodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crestini, C; D'Annibale, A; Sermanni, G G; Saladino, R

    2000-02-01

    Three phenolic model compounds representing bonding patterns of residual kraft lignin were incubated with manganese peroxidase from Lentinula edodes. Extensive degradation of all the phenolic models, mainly occurring via side-chain benzylic oxidation, was observed. Among the tested model compounds the diphenylmethane alpha-5 phenolic model was found to be the most reactive, yielding several products showing oxidation and fragmentation at the bridging position. The non-phenolic 5-5' biphenyl and 5-5' diphenylmethane models were found unreactive.

  19. Structure of the Zymomonas mobilis respiratory chain: oxygen affinity of electron transport and the role of cytochrome c peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balodite, Elina; Strazdina, Inese; Galinina, Nina; McLean, Samantha; Rutkis, Reinis; Poole, Robert K; Kalnenieks, Uldis

    2014-09-01

    The genome of the ethanol-producing bacterium Zymomonas mobilis encodes a bd-type terminal oxidase, cytochrome bc1 complex and several c-type cytochromes, yet lacks sequences homologous to any of the known bacterial cytochrome c oxidase genes. Recently, it was suggested that a putative respiratory cytochrome c peroxidase, receiving electrons from the cytochrome bc1 complex via cytochrome c552, might function as a peroxidase and/or an alternative oxidase. The present study was designed to test this hypothesis, by construction of a cytochrome c peroxidase mutant (Zm6-perC), and comparison of its properties with those of a mutant defective in the cytochrome b subunit of the bc1 complex (Zm6-cytB). Disruption of the cytochrome c peroxidase gene (ZZ60192) caused a decrease of the membrane NADH peroxidase activity, impaired the resistance of growing culture to exogenous hydrogen peroxide and hampered aerobic growth. However, this mutation did not affect the activity or oxygen affinity of the respiratory chain, or the kinetics of cytochrome d reduction. Furthermore, the peroxide resistance and membrane NADH peroxidase activity of strain Zm6-cytB had not decreased, but both the oxygen affinity of electron transport and the kinetics of cytochrome d reduction were affected. It is therefore concluded that the cytochrome c peroxidase does not terminate the cytochrome bc1 branch of Z. mobilis, and that it is functioning as a quinol peroxidase. © 2014 The Authors.

  20. Exploiting a Simple Method for the Determination of Manganese in Polyethylene Lined Tubing for Petroleum and Natural Gas Industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao Xiaodong

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The polyethylene lined tubing is the key to enabling the industry to meet some of the energy security challenges that nations face today. It is well known that manganese is an important element in polyethylene lined tubing. In this paper, a simple spectrophotometric method was described for the determination of manganese in polyethylene lined tubing. The method was based on the oxidation-reduction reaction between ammonium persulfate and manganese(II producing manganese(VII in the presence of silver nitrate as a catalyst. The characteristic wavelength of maximum absorption of manganese(VII was obtained locating at 530 nm. Under the optimum reaction conditions the absorption value was proportional to the concentration of manganese in the range of 0.2%~1.9% (R2 = 0.9997, and the relative standard deviation was less than 3.0% (n=5. The proposed method was applied successfully to determine manganese in polyethylene lined tubing real samples.

  1. Microwave Production of Manganese from Manganese (IV) Oxide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael O. Mensah

    2015-12-02

    Dec 2, 2015 ... energy consumption occurs in the upper part of the ferromanganese furnace ... The pre-reduction of manganese ores by carbon has been investigated by Abdel ..... Awaso Bauxite Ore using Waste Pure Water. Sachets as ...

  2. Manganese deficiency in plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Sidsel Birkelund; Jensen, Poul Erik; Husted, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential plant micronutrient with an indispensable function as a catalyst in the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII). Even so, Mn deficiency frequently occurs without visual leaf symptoms, thereby masking the distribution and dimension of the problem...... restricting crop productivity in many places of the world. Hence, timely alleviation of latent Mn deficiency is a challenge in promoting plant growth and quality. We describe here the key mechanisms of Mn deficiency in plants by focusing on the impact of Mn on PSII stability and functionality. We also address...... the mechanisms underlying the differential tolerance towards Mn deficiency observed among plant genotypes, which enable Mn-efficient plants to grow on marginal land with poor Mn availability....

  3. Analysis of Manganese Superoxide Dismutase and Glutathione Peroxidase 1 Gene Polymorphisms in Vitiligo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seçkin, Havva Yıldız; Kalkan, Göknur; Bütün, İlknur; Akbaş, Ali; Baş, Yalçın; Karakuş, Nevin; Benli, İsmail

    2016-08-01

    Vitiligo is a hereditary/acquired progressive pigmentation disorder characterized by discoloration of skin as a result of melanocyte dysfunction. Recent studies have proposed that oxidant/antioxidant status plays an important role in vitiligo pathogenesis because of the toxic effects on melanocytes. In this study, we aimed to investigate possible associations of MnSOD Ala-9Val and GPx1 Pro198Leu polymorphisms with vitiligo with in Turkish population. The study group consists of 57 patients with vitiligo and 69 healthy controls. Genotyping is performed to identify MnSOD Ala-9Val and GPx1 Pro198Leu polymorphisms. The method used for genotyping was based on the PCR amplification and detection of polymorphisms by hybridization probes labeled with fluorescent dyes. Both the genotype and allele frequencies of MnSOD Ala-9Val (p = 0.817 and p = 0.553, respectively) and GPx1 Pro198Leu polymorphisms (p = 0.422 and p = 0.673, respectively) were not significantly different between vitiligo patients and the control group. Although no significant difference was found, this is the first report investigating the possible associations between the MnSOD Ala-9Val and GPx1 Pro198Leu polymorphisms in Turkish population. Further studies with large populations will be able to clarify the association better.

  4. Guaiacol Peroxidase Zymography for the Undergraduate Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkesman, Jeff; Castro, Diana; Contreras, Lellys M.; Kurz, Liliana

    2014-01-01

    This laboratory exercise presents a novel way to introduce undergraduate students to the specific detection of enzymatic activity by electrophoresis. First, students prepare a crude peroxidase extract and then analyze the homogenate via electrophoresis. Zymography, that is, a SDS-PAGE method to detect enzyme activity, is used to specifically…

  5. Heterologous Expression of Peroxidases : Chapter 12

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christien Lokman; S. de Weert

    2010-01-01

    This monograph describes many applications of peroxidase-based biocatalysis in the biotechnology industry. The need for such a book emerges from the considerable amount of new data regarding the phylogeny, reaction mechanisms, thermodynamic characterization and structural features of fungal and

  6. "Chitin-specific" peroxidases in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimov, I V; Cherepanova, E A; Khairullin, R M

    2003-01-01

    The activity of various plant peroxidases and the ability of their individual isoforms to bind chitin was studied. Some increase in peroxidase activity was observed in crude extracts in the presence of chitin. Activated peroxidases of some species fell in the fraction not sorbed on chitin and those of other species can bind chitin. Only anionic isoperoxidases from oat (Avena sativa), rice (Oryza sativa), horseradish (Armoracia rusticana), garden radish (Raphanus sativus var. radicula), peanut (Arachis hypogaea), and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum Link et Otto) were sorbed on chitin. Both anionic and cationic isoforms from pea (Pisum sativum), galega(Galega orientalis), cucumber (Cucumis sativus), and zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L.) were sorbed on chitin. Peroxidase activation under the influence of chitin was correlated to the processes that occur during hypersensitive reaction and lignification of sites, in which pathogenic fungus penetrates into a plant. The role of chitin-specific isoperoxidases in inhibition of fungal growth and connection of this phenomenon with structural characteristics of isoperoxidases are also discussed.

  7. Peroxidase-like activity of magnetoferritin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Melníková, V.; Pospíšková, K.; Mitróová, Z.; Kopčanský, P.; Šafařík, Ivo

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 181, 3-4 (2014), s. 295-301 ISSN 0026-3672 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD13021 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : magnetoferritin * magnetic nanoparticles * peroxidase-like activity * hydrogen peroxide * oxidative stress Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.741, year: 2014

  8. Occurrence and properties of Petunia peroxidase a

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, T.

    1989-01-01

    Peroxidases are probably the most extensively studied enzymes in higher plants. Various isoenzymes occur as soluble proteins in the apoplast and in the vacuole, or are bound to membranes and cell walls. Their occurrence is often organ-specific and developmentally controlled, and there is

  9. Thyroid peroxidase autoantibodies in euthyroid subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prummel, Mark F.; Wiersinga, Wilmar M.

    2005-01-01

    Thyroid peroxidase (TPO) is a key enzyme in the formation of thyroid hormones and a major autoantigen in autoimmune thyroid diseases. Titers of TPO antibodies also correlate with the degree of lymphocytic infiltration in euthyroid subjects, and they are frequently present in euthyroid subjects

  10. Quantification of manganese in human hand bones: a feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslam; Pejovic-Milic, A; Chettle, D R; McNeill, F E

    2008-01-01

    Manganese is both an essential element to human health and also toxic when humans are exposed to excessive levels, particularly by means of inhalation. Biological monitoring of manganese exposure is problematic. It is subject to homeostasis; levels in blood (or serum/plasma) reflect only the most recent exposure and rapidly return to within normal ranges, even when there has been a temporary excursion in response to exposure. In this context, we have been developing a non-invasive technique for measurement of manganese stored in bone, using in vivo neutron activation analysis. Following preliminary feasibility studies, the technique has been enhanced by two significant infrastructure advances. A specially designed irradiation facility serves to maximize the activation of manganese with respect to the dose of ionizing radiation. Secondly, an array of eight NaI(Tl) crystals provides a detection system with very close to 4π geometry. This feasibility study, using neutron activation analysis to measure manganese in the bones of the hand, takes two features into account. Firstly, there is considerable magnesium present in the bone and this produces a spectral interference with the manganese. The 26 Mg(n,γ) 27 Mg reaction produces γ-rays of 0.843 MeV from the decay of 27 Mg, which interfere with the 0.847 MeV γ-rays from the decay of 56 Mn, produced by the 55 Mn(n,γ) 56 Mn reaction. Secondly, this work provides estimates of the levels of manganese to be expected in referent subjects. A revised estimate has been made from the most recent literature to explore the potential of the technique as a suitable means of screening patients and people exposed to excessive amounts of Mn who could develop many-fold increased levels of Mn in bones as demonstrated through various animal studies. This report presents the enhancements to the neutron activation system, by which manganese can be measured, which resulted in a detection limit in the hand of human subjects of 1.6

  11. Quantification of manganese in human hand bones: a feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aslam; Pejovic-Milic, A; Chettle, D R; McNeill, F E [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, L8S 4K1 (Canada)], E-mail: aslamib@mcmaster.ca

    2008-08-07

    Manganese is both an essential element to human health and also toxic when humans are exposed to excessive levels, particularly by means of inhalation. Biological monitoring of manganese exposure is problematic. It is subject to homeostasis; levels in blood (or serum/plasma) reflect only the most recent exposure and rapidly return to within normal ranges, even when there has been a temporary excursion in response to exposure. In this context, we have been developing a non-invasive technique for measurement of manganese stored in bone, using in vivo neutron activation analysis. Following preliminary feasibility studies, the technique has been enhanced by two significant infrastructure advances. A specially designed irradiation facility serves to maximize the activation of manganese with respect to the dose of ionizing radiation. Secondly, an array of eight NaI(Tl) crystals provides a detection system with very close to 4{pi} geometry. This feasibility study, using neutron activation analysis to measure manganese in the bones of the hand, takes two features into account. Firstly, there is considerable magnesium present in the bone and this produces a spectral interference with the manganese. The {sup 26}Mg(n,{gamma}){sup 27}Mg reaction produces {gamma}-rays of 0.843 MeV from the decay of {sup 27}Mg, which interfere with the 0.847 MeV {gamma}-rays from the decay of {sup 56}Mn, produced by the {sup 55}Mn(n,{gamma}){sup 56}Mn reaction. Secondly, this work provides estimates of the levels of manganese to be expected in referent subjects. A revised estimate has been made from the most recent literature to explore the potential of the technique as a suitable means of screening patients and people exposed to excessive amounts of Mn who could develop many-fold increased levels of Mn in bones as demonstrated through various animal studies. This report presents the enhancements to the neutron activation system, by which manganese can be measured, which resulted in a detection

  12. Chronic organic manganese administration in the rat does not damage dopaminergic nigrostriatal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, V W; Perry, T L; Godolphin, W J; Jones, K A; Clavier, R M; Ito, M; Foulks, J G

    1986-01-01

    In an attempt to produce an animal model of Parkinson's disease, we injected rats repeatedly with high doses of methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl (MMT), a compound which has been reported to lower striatal dopamine content in mice. Chronic MMT administration for up to 5 months, even though it produced a substantial elevation in brain manganese content during the period of exposure, did not destroy dopaminergic nigrostriatal neurons. This was assessed by measurements of tyrosine hydroxylase activity and contents of dopamine and its metabolites in the striatum, and by histological examination of the substantia nigra. Our results differ from those of others who administered manganese chloride in drinking water to rats. This discrepancy is unlikely to be a consequence of differences in duration of exposure or route of administration. It could be due to our having used an organic rather than an inorganic manganese compound, or to a species difference in vulnerability to organic manganese between rats and mice.

  13. Peroxidase gene discovery from the horseradish transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Näätsaari, Laura; Krainer, Florian W; Schubert, Michael; Glieder, Anton; Thallinger, Gerhard G

    2014-03-24

    Horseradish peroxidases (HRPs) from Armoracia rusticana have long been utilized as reporters in various diagnostic assays and histochemical stainings. Regardless of their increasing importance in the field of life sciences and suggested uses in medical applications, chemical synthesis and other industrial applications, the HRP isoenzymes, their substrate specificities and enzymatic properties are poorly characterized. Due to lacking sequence information of natural isoenzymes and the low levels of HRP expression in heterologous hosts, commercially available HRP is still extracted as a mixture of isoenzymes from the roots of A. rusticana. In this study, a normalized, size-selected A. rusticana transcriptome library was sequenced using 454 Titanium technology. The resulting reads were assembled into 14871 isotigs with an average length of 1133 bp. Sequence databases, ORF finding and ORF characterization were utilized to identify peroxidase genes from the 14871 isotigs generated by de novo assembly. The sequences were manually reviewed and verified with Sanger sequencing of PCR amplified genomic fragments, resulting in the discovery of 28 secretory peroxidases, 23 of them previously unknown. A total of 22 isoenzymes including allelic variants were successfully expressed in Pichia pastoris and showed peroxidase activity with at least one of the substrates tested, thus enabling their development into commercial pure isoenzymes. This study demonstrates that transcriptome sequencing combined with sequence motif search is a powerful concept for the discovery and quick supply of new enzymes and isoenzymes from any plant or other eukaryotic organisms. Identification and manual verification of the sequences of 28 HRP isoenzymes do not only contribute a set of peroxidases for industrial, biological and biomedical applications, but also provide valuable information on the reliability of the approach in identifying and characterizing a large group of isoenzymes.

  14. Manganese Research Health Project (MHRP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    green nucleic acid staining further confirmed the neurotoxic effect of cadmium in this cell model (Fig 10C). Next, we examined the enzymatic activity...Quantification of Nissl bodies revealed a widespread reduction in SNpc cell numbers. Other areas of the basal ganglia were also altered by manganese as...the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) following manganese treatment. Quantification of Nissl bodies revealed a widespread reduction in SNpc

  15. Self-Assembled Complexes of Horseradish Peroxidase with Magnetic Nanoparticles Showing Enhanced Peroxidase Activity

    KAUST Repository

    Corgié , Sté phane C.; Kahawong, Patarawan; Duan, Xiaonan; Bowser, Daniel; Edward, Joseph B.; Walker, Larry P.; Giannelis, Emmanuel P.

    2012-01-01

    Bio-nanocatalysts (BNCs) consisting of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) self-assembled with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) enhance enzymatic activity due to the faster turnover and lower inhibition of the enzyme. The size and magnetization of the MNPs

  16. The study of ascorbate peroxidase, catalase and peroxidase during in vitro regeneration of Argyrolobium roseum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Darima; Chaudhary, Muhammad Fayyaz; Zia, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    Here, we demonstrate the micropropagation protocol of Argyrolobium roseum (Camb.), an endangered herb exhibiting anti-diabetic and immune-suppressant properties, and antioxidant enzymes pattern is evaluated. Maximum callogenic response (60 %) was observed from leaf explant at 1.0 mg L(-1) 1-nephthalene acetic acid (NAA) and 0.5 mg L(-1) 6-benzyl aminopurine (BA) in Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium using hypocotyl and root explants (48 % each). Addition of AgNO3 and PVP in the culture medium led to an increase in callogenic response up to 86 % from leaf explant and 72 % from hypocotyl and root explants. The best shooting response was observed in the presence of NAA, while maximum shoot length and number of shoots were achieved based on BA-supplemented MS medium. The regenerated shoots were rooted and successfully acclimatized under greenhouse conditions. Catalase and peroxidase enzymes showed ascending pattern during in vitro plant development from seed while ascorbate peroxidase showed descending pattern. Totally reverse response of these enzymes was observed during callus induction from three different explants. During shoot induction, catalase and peroxidase increased at high rate while there was a mild reduction in ascorbate peroxidase activity. Catalase and peroxidase continuously increased; on the other hand, ascorbate peroxidase activity decreased during root development and acclimatization states. The protocol described here can be employed for the mass propagation and genetic transformation of this rare herb. This study also highlights the importance and role of ascorbate peroxidase, catalase, and peroxidase in the establishment of A. roseum in vitro culture through callogenesis and organogenesis.

  17. Peroxidase isozyme profiles in some sweet cherry rootstocks and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PERS

    2012-01-10

    , 2005). Santamour (1980) defined role of peroxidase in graft compatibility as; 1) lignification is essential for a strong and permanent graft union; 2) peroxidase isoenzymes mediate the polymeri- zation of cinnamic alcohols to ...

  18. Luffa aegyptiaca (Gourd) Fruit Juice as a Source of Peroxidase

    OpenAIRE

    Yadav, R. S. S.; Yadav, K. S.; Yadav, H. S.

    2011-01-01

    Peroxidases have turned out to be potential biocatalyst for a variety of organic reactions. The research work reported in this communication was done with the objective of finding a convenient rich source of peroxidase which could be used as a biocatalyst for organic synthetic reactions. The studies made have shown that Luffa aegyptiaca (gourd) fruit juice contains peroxidase activity of the order of 180 enzyme unit/mL. The K m values of this peroxidase for the substrates guaiacol and hydroge...

  19. Screening of Coprinus species for the production of extracellular peroxidase and evaluation of its applicability to the treatment of aqueous phenol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikehata, K.; Buchanan, I.D.

    2002-01-01

    Twenty-nine strains of Coprinus species comprising 16 strains from 12 identified species and 13 unidentified strains as well as one Arthromyces ramosus strain were screened for the production of extracellular peroxidase. Among the fungi examined, three strains of C. cinereus, UAMH 4103, UAMH 7907 and IFO 30116, as well as one Coprinus sp., UAMH 10067, which was isolated from urea treated soil, were shown to produce large amounts of extracellular peroxidase. The performance of crude peroxidase, obtained from liquid culture of C. cinereus, (CIP) on phenol removal from synthetic wastewater was evaluated and compared with that of purified horseradish peroxidase and A. ramosus peroxidase. Although crude CIP performed better than both purified enzymes, its superiority vanished in the presence of poly(ethylene glycol), a known protective agent of peroxidase. This suggests that the residual soluble substances present in crude CIP have protective effects similar to those of poly(ethylene glycol). (author)

  20. Manganese oxidation state mediates toxicity in PC12 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reaney, S.H.; Smith, D.R.

    2005-01-01

    The role of the manganese (Mn) oxidation state on cellular Mn uptake and toxicity is not well understood. Therefore, undifferentiated PC12 cells were exposed to 0-200 μM Mn(II)-chloride or Mn(III)-pyrophosphate for 24 h, after which cellular manganese levels were measured along with measures of cell viability, function, and cytotoxicity (trypan blue exclusion, medium lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), 8-isoprostanes, cellular ATP, dopamine, serotonin, H-ferritin, transferrin receptor (TfR), Mn-superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), and copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) protein levels). Exposures to Mn(III) >10 μM produced 2- to 5-fold higher cellular manganese levels than equimolar exposures to Mn(II). Cell viability and ATP levels both decreased at the highest Mn(II) and Mn(III) exposures (150-200 μM), while Mn(III) exposures produced increases in LDH activity at lower exposures (≥50 μM) than did Mn(II) (200 μM only). Mn(II) reduced cellular dopamine levels more than Mn(III), especially at the highest exposures (50% reduced at 200 μM Mn(II)). In contrast, Mn(III) produced a >70% reduction in cellular serotonin at all exposures compared to Mn(II). Different cellular responses to Mn(II) exposures compared to Mn(III) were also observed for H-ferritin, TfR, and MnSOD protein levels. Notably, these differential effects of Mn(II) versus Mn(III) exposures on cellular toxicity could not simply be accounted for by the different cellular levels of manganese. These results suggest that the oxidation state of manganese exposures plays an important role in mediating manganese cytotoxicity

  1. Effect of Vitamin C on Glutathione Peroxidase Activities in Pregnant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Glutathione peroxidase is one of the most important antioxidant enzymes in humans. We studied the relationship between serum glutathione peroxidase activity and vitamin C ingestion during normal pregnancy in women attending antenatal clinic in the University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital, Ilorin. Glutathione peroxidase ...

  2. Comparative study of peroxidase purification from apple and orange ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reports the isolation and purification of peroxidase from low cost material; moreover, no significant work has been done on the isolation and purification of peroxidase from such cost effective sources (apple and orange seeds). Peroxidases had attracted considerable interest in recent years because of their ...

  3. Extraction of manganese from electrolytic manganese residue by bioleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Baoping; Chen, Bing; Duan, Ning; Zhou, Changbo

    2011-01-01

    Extraction of manganese from electrolytic manganese residues using bioleaching was investigated in this paper. The maximum extraction efficiency of Mn was 93% by sulfur-oxidizing bacteria at 4.0 g/l sulfur after bioleaching of 9days, while the maximum extraction efficiency of Mn was 81% by pyrite-leaching bacteria at 4.0 g/l pyrite. The series bioleaching first by sulfur-oxidizing bacteria and followed by pyrite-leaching bacteria evidently promoted the extraction of manganese, witnessing the maximum extraction efficiency of 98.1%. In the case of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria, the strong dissolution of bio-generated sulfuric acid resulted in extraction of soluble Mn2+, while both the Fe2+ catalyzed reduction of Mn4+ and weak acidic dissolution of Mn2+ accounted for the extraction of manganese with pyrite-leaching bacteria. The chemical simulation of bioleaching process further confirmed that the acid dissolution of Mn2+ and Fe2+ catalyzed reduction of Mn4+ were the bioleaching mechanisms involved for Mn extraction from electrolytic manganese residues. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Guaiacol peroxidase zymography for the undergraduate laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkesman, Jeff; Castro, Diana; Contreras, Lellys M; Kurz, Liliana

    2014-01-01

    This laboratory exercise presents a novel way to introduce undergraduate students to the specific detection of enzymatic activity by electrophoresis. First, students prepare a crude peroxidase extract and then analyze the homogenate via electrophoresis. Zymography, that is, a SDS-PAGE method to detect enzyme activity, is used to specifically detect peroxidase activity and furthermore, to analyze the total protein profile. After the assay, students may estimate the apparent molecular mass of the enzyme and discuss its structure. After the 4-h experiment, students gain knowledge concerning biological sample preparation, gel preparation, electrophoresis, and the importance of specific staining procedures for the detection of enzymatic activity. Copyright © 2014 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  5. Effect of Organic Binders on The Quality of Manganese Ore Sinter Fines Briquettes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, F. M.; Ahmed, Y.M.Z.; Shalabi, M. E. H.

    2004-01-01

    Sinai Manganese Company imports the manganese ore sinter from abroad for ferromanganese alloy production. Large quantities of manganese ore sinter fines are produced in this process. These fines must be agglomerated to a suitable size in order to be reused for charging the electric arc furnace. The aim of this work is studying the briquetting ability of these fines using organic binders such as starch and bitumen. The results showed that, the suitable briquettes were produced with the addition of 5 % of starch and 20% H 2 O under pressure 3 ton/cm 2 or 8 % bitumen under pressure 4 ton/cm 2 and 3 days curing time

  6. Lignin peroxidase mediated biotransformations useful in the biocatalytic production of vanillin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Have, ten R.

    2000-01-01

    This research concentrates on lignin peroxidase (LiP) mediated biotrans-formations that are useful in producing vanillin.

    In order to obtain this extracellular enzyme, the white-rot fungus Bjerkandera sp. strain BOS55 was cultivated on nitrogen rich

  7. Hierarchical hybrid peroxidase catalysts for remediation of phenol wastewater

    KAUST Repository

    Duan, Xiaonan

    2014-02-20

    We report a new family of hierarchical hybrid catalysts comprised of horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-magnetic nanoparticles for advanced oxidation processes and demonstrate their utility in the removal of phenol from water. The immobilized HRP catalyzes the oxidation of phenols in the presence of H2O2, producing free radicals. The phenoxy radicals react with each other in a non-enzymatic process to form polymers, which can be removed by precipitation with salts or condensation. The hybrid peroxidase catalysts exhibit three times higher activity than free HRP and are able to remove three times more phenol from water compared to free HRP under similar conditions. In addition, the hybrid catalysts reduce substrate inhibition and limit inactivation from reaction products, which are common problems with free or conventionally immobilized enzymes. Reusability is improved when the HRP-magnetic nanoparticle hybrids are supported on micron-scale magnetic particles, and can be retained with a specially designed magnetically driven reactor. The performance of the hybrid catalysts makes them attractive for several industrial and environmental applications and their development might pave the way for practical applications by eliminating most of the limitations that have prevented the use of free or conventionally immobilized enzymes. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Hierarchical hybrid peroxidase catalysts for remediation of phenol wastewater

    KAUST Repository

    Duan, Xiaonan; Corgié , Sté phane C.; Aneshansley, Daniel J.; Wang, Peng; Walker, Larry P.; Giannelis, Emmanuel P.

    2014-01-01

    We report a new family of hierarchical hybrid catalysts comprised of horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-magnetic nanoparticles for advanced oxidation processes and demonstrate their utility in the removal of phenol from water. The immobilized HRP catalyzes the oxidation of phenols in the presence of H2O2, producing free radicals. The phenoxy radicals react with each other in a non-enzymatic process to form polymers, which can be removed by precipitation with salts or condensation. The hybrid peroxidase catalysts exhibit three times higher activity than free HRP and are able to remove three times more phenol from water compared to free HRP under similar conditions. In addition, the hybrid catalysts reduce substrate inhibition and limit inactivation from reaction products, which are common problems with free or conventionally immobilized enzymes. Reusability is improved when the HRP-magnetic nanoparticle hybrids are supported on micron-scale magnetic particles, and can be retained with a specially designed magnetically driven reactor. The performance of the hybrid catalysts makes them attractive for several industrial and environmental applications and their development might pave the way for practical applications by eliminating most of the limitations that have prevented the use of free or conventionally immobilized enzymes. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Determination of manganese content in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeder, S.D.; Smith, J.R.

    1977-01-01

    The three analytical methods used in the hydrogen-to-manganese cross-section ratio measurement were: volumetric determination of manganese, gravimetric analysis of manganous sulfate; and densimetric determination of manganous sulfate

  10. Manganese activated phosphate glass for dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regulla, D.

    1975-01-01

    A measuring element comprises a metaphosphate glass doped with manganese as an activator. The manganese activated metaphosphate glass can detect and determine radiation doses in the range between milliroentgens and more than 10 megaroentgens. (auth)

  11. 21 CFR 184.1446 - Manganese chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Manganese chloride. 184.1446 Section 184.1446 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1446 Manganese chloride. (a) Manganese chloride (MnCl2·4H2O, CAS...

  12. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manganese chloride. 582.5446 Section 582.5446 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5446 Manganese chloride. (a) Product. Manganese chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  13. Graphene oxide vs. reduced graphene oxide as carbon support in porphyrin peroxidase biomimetic nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socaci, C; Pogacean, F; Biris, A R; Coros, M; Rosu, M C; Magerusan, L; Katona, G; Pruneanu, S

    2016-02-01

    The paper describes the preparation of supramolecular assemblies of tetrapyridylporphyrin (TPyP) and its metallic complexes with graphene oxide (GO) and thermally reduced graphene oxide (TRGO). The two carbon supports are introducing different characteristics in the absorption spectra of the investigated nanocomposites. Raman spectroscopy shows that the absorption of iron-tetrapyridylporphyrin is more efficient on GO than TRGO, suggesting that oxygen functionalities are involved in the non-covalent interaction between the iron-porphyrin and graphene. The biomimetic peroxidase activity is investigated and the two iron-containing composites exhibit a better catalytic activity than each component of the assembly, and their cobalt and manganese homologues, respectively. The main advantages of this work include the demonstration of graphene oxide as a very good support for graphene-based nanomaterials with peroxidase-like activity (K(M)=0.292 mM), the catalytic activity being observed even with very small amounts of porphyrins (the TPyP:graphene ratio=1:50). Its potential application in the detection of lipophilic antioxidants (vitamin E can be measured in the 10(-5)-10(-4) M range) is also shown. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of caffeine on peroxidase activity and gamma-ray-induced oxic and anoxic damage in Hordeum vulgare

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balachandran, R.; Kesavan, P.C.

    1978-01-01

    The influence of caffeine during and after gamma radiation of barley seeds was studied using seedling injury and peroxidase activity as parameters. The radiation-induced stimulation of peroxidase activity is evident in eight-day only seedlings but not in embryos (i.e. immediately after irradiation). Caffeine present during irradiation of seeds soaked in oxygenated water diminishes seedling injury and also reduces the peroxidase activity to the level observed in eight-day old seedlings of unirradiated seeds. Caffeine, however, produces just the opposite effect (i.e. enhances the seedling injury and peroxidase activity of eight-day old seedlings) when applied during irradiation of seeds soaked in oxygen-free water. There is no evidence that caffeine effects enzyme activity under in vitro conditions. (author)

  15. Selective Synthesis of Manganese/Silicon Complexes in Supercritical Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiancheng Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of manganese salts (Mn(NO32, MnCl2, MnSO4, and Mn(Ac2 and silicon materials (silica sand, silica sol, and tetraethyl orthosilicate were used to synthesize Mn/Si complexes in supercritical water using a tube reactor. X-ray diffraction (XRD, X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM were employed to characterize the structure and morphology of the solid products. It was found that MnO2, Mn2O3, and Mn2SiO4 could be obtained in supercritical water at 673 K in 5 minutes. The roles of both anions of manganese salts and silicon species in the formation of manganese silicon complexes were discussed. The inorganic manganese salt with the oxyacid radical could be easily decomposed to produce MnO2/SiO2 and Mn2O3/SiO2. It is interesting to found that Mn(Ac2 can react with various types of silicon to produce Mn2SiO4. The hydroxyl groups of the SiO2 surface from different silicon sources enhance the reactivity of SiO2.

  16. Dietary manganese in the Glasgow area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross, J.D.; Dale, I.M.; Raie, R.M.

    1979-01-01

    The manganese content of the diet and human tissue (adult and infant) in the Glasgow area is established. The total manganese intake by a breast fed infant (6 μg/day) is very much lower than that of an adult (5 mg/day). This does not appear to cause any upset in the infant's metabolism and the tissue levels of both groups are similar. This indicates that the human system can obtain its required manganese from both levels of intake. Tea is the major source of manganese in the diet: tobacco, which is rich in manganese, does not contribute a significant amount when smoked. (author)

  17. Noncollinear magnetism in manganese nanostructures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zelený, Martin; Šob, Mojmír; Hafner, J.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 80, č. 14 (2009), 144414/1-144414/19 ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100100920; GA MŠk OC09011 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : magnetism of nanostructures * nanowires * noncollinear magnetism * manganese Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.475, year: 2009

  18. Research on rejection performance of reverse osmosis to manganese in simulated radioactive wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong Jinsong; Wang Xiaowei

    2012-01-01

    In order to reveal the performance of reverse osmosis applied in the radioactive wastewater treatment, treatment experiments are carried out on a pilot RO equipment using wastewater containing manganese nuclide. Results show that the rejection ratio of RO to manganese is almost not influenced by the operation pressure and the ration of reclaiming, and has no direct relation with the salt rejection ratio. The ratio of manganese rejection is more than 95% and can meet the requirement on the disposal of radioactive wastewater produced by pressurized water reactors. (authors)

  19. Preparation of MnO nanofibers by novel hydrothermal treatment of manganese acetate/PVA electrospun nanofiber mats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barakat, Nasser A.M. [Chemical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, El-Minia University, El-Minia (Egypt); Center for Healthcare Technology Development, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: nasbarakat@yahoo.com; Park, Soo Jin [Center for Healthcare Technology Development, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Khil, Myung Seob [Department of Textile Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hak Yong [Center for Healthcare Technology Development, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Textile Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: khy@chonbuk.ac.kr

    2009-06-15

    In the present study, manganese monoxide (MnO) which is hard to prepare because of the chemical activity of the manganese metal has been synthesized in nanofibrous form. An electrospun manganese acetate/poly(vinyl alcohol) nanofiber mats have been hydrothermally treated by novel strategy. The treatment process was based on producing of water gas (Co and H{sub 2}) to eliminate the polymer and reduced the manganese acetate to manganese monoxide. The process was carried out by heating the dried nanofiber mates at 400 deg. C for 3 h in an especial designed reactor in which a stream of water vapor was passing through a bed of an activated carbon. The obtained physiochemical characterization results indicated that the proposed hydrothermal treatment process does have the ability to produce pure MnO nanofibers with good crystallinity.

  20. Preparation of MnO nanofibers by novel hydrothermal treatment of manganese acetate/PVA electrospun nanofiber mats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barakat, Nasser A.M.; Park, Soo Jin; Khil, Myung Seob; Kim, Hak Yong

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, manganese monoxide (MnO) which is hard to prepare because of the chemical activity of the manganese metal has been synthesized in nanofibrous form. An electrospun manganese acetate/poly(vinyl alcohol) nanofiber mats have been hydrothermally treated by novel strategy. The treatment process was based on producing of water gas (Co and H 2 ) to eliminate the polymer and reduced the manganese acetate to manganese monoxide. The process was carried out by heating the dried nanofiber mates at 400 deg. C for 3 h in an especial designed reactor in which a stream of water vapor was passing through a bed of an activated carbon. The obtained physiochemical characterization results indicated that the proposed hydrothermal treatment process does have the ability to produce pure MnO nanofibers with good crystallinity.

  1. The Roles of Glutathione Peroxidases during Embryo Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ufer, Christoph; Wang, Chi Chiu

    2011-01-01

    Embryo development relies on the complex interplay of the basic cellular processes including proliferation, differentiation, and apoptotic cell death. Precise regulation of these events is the basis for the establishment of embryonic structures and the organ development. Beginning with fertilization of the oocyte until delivery the developing embryo encounters changing environmental conditions such as varying levels of oxygen, which can give rise to reactive oxygen species (ROS). These challenges are met by the embryo with metabolic adaptations and by an array of anti-oxidative mechanisms. ROS can be deleterious by modifying biological molecules including lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids and may induce abnormal development or even embryonic lethality. On the other hand ROS are vital players of various signaling cascades that affect the balance between cell growth, differentiation, and death. An imbalance or dysregulation of these biological processes may generate cells with abnormal growth and is therefore potentially teratogenic and tumorigenic. Thus, a precise balance between processes generating ROS and those decomposing ROS is critical for normal embryo development. One tier of the cellular protective system against ROS constitutes the family of selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidases (GPx). These enzymes reduce hydroperoxides to the corresponding alcohols at the expense of reduced glutathione. Of special interest within this protein family is the moonlighting enzyme glutathione peroxidase 4 (Gpx4). This enzyme is a scavenger of lipophilic hydroperoxides on one hand, but on the other hand can be transformed into an enzymatically inactive cellular structural component. GPx4 deficiency - in contrast to all other GPx family members - leads to abnormal embryo development and finally produces a lethal phenotype in mice. This review is aimed at summarizing the current knowledge on GPx isoforms during embryo development and tumor development with an emphasis on

  2. Characteristics and treatment mechanism of mine water with high concentration of iron and manganese

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, F.; Yang, J.; He, X.; Yang, J.; Tian, T. [Hebei University of Engineering, Handan (China)

    2006-12-15

    The characteristics and treatment of mine water with high concentration or iron and manganese were studied with mine water produced in Jiukuang and Siwan belonging to Hebi Coal Industry Group Co., Ltd. Analysis shows that the mine water is abundant in dissolved oxygen and has high TDS and high turbidity so the mine water does not need aeration. The effect of removal of iron and manganese by coagulation-sedimentation and the influence of filter material and influent water flow rate on effluent quality were investigated. It is shown that the removal rate of iron can reach 90% while removal of manganese can only reach about 20%. The concentration of iron and manganese in the effluent is lower than 0.1 mg/L with filter material of manganese sand which was immersed in KMnO{sub 4} solution at a filtration rate of 7 - 9 m/h. The results show that the layer of activated compound substance membrane formed on the surface of the manganese sand plays an important role in the removal of manganese. 7 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. The effect of spices and manganese on meat starter culture activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coventry, M J; Hickey, M W

    1993-01-01

    Three species, two proprietary spice blends and six starter preparations used in commercial salami manufacture were analysed for manganese and magnesium content. A mettwurst spices blend showed the highest levels of manganese (0·77 ppm expressed as effective product level assuming a 1% spice content) while mild and hot paprika and milano blend contained levels of manganese 1 4 - 1 3 lower. Magnesium levels for spices ranged from 3·14 to 25·81 ppm. Only two of the six meat starter cultures showed high levels of manganese (7·77 and 16·12 ppm as effective product level based on inoculation rate) while magnesium levels for all starter cultures did not exceed 0·37 ppm. The pH of salami products made with starter cultures containing no added manganese lagged behind that of products made with added mangenese (5 ppm) by 0·2 pH units at 48 h. The effect of manganese ions on the fermentation rate of starter bacteria was studied further in a salami model system, in the absence and presence of added spices. The mettwurst blend produced greatest stimulation and the milano the least. A level of 1·2 ppm of added manganese was sufficient to achieve an optimal (spices tested in the salami model system. Copyright © 1993. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Radioimmunoassays for catalase and glutathion peroxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baret, A.; Courtiere, A.; Lorry, D.; Puget, K.; Michelson, A.M.

    1982-01-01

    Specific and sensitive radioimmunoassays for human, bovine and rat catalase (CAT) and glutathion Peroxidase (GPX) are described. The obtained values are expressed as enzymatic units per μg of immunoreactive protein. They appear to closely correspond to specific activities of the purified enzymes determined by colorimetric protein-assay. Indeed, the values of the specific activities of purified human CAT is 57.9 k/mg and that of purified rat GPX is 180 units/mg. This result validates the present RIAs and the association of the two techniques allows the determination of a further parameter. In conclusion, RIAs for CAT and GPX can be applied with great specificity and sensitivity to a wide variety of human, rat and bovine medias

  5. [Cell surface peroxidase--generator of superoxide anion in wheat root cells under wound stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasov, A V; Gordon, L Kh; Kolesnikov, O P; Minibaeva, F V

    2002-01-01

    Development of wound stress in excised wheat roots is known to be accompanied with an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, fall of membrane potential, release of K+ from cells, alkalization of extracellular solution, changes in respiration and metabolism of structural lipids. Dynamics of superoxide release correlates with changes in other physiological parameters, indicating the cross-reaction of these processes. Activity of peroxidase in extracellular solution after a 1 h incubation and removal of roots was shown to be stimulated by the range of organic acids, detergents, metals, and to be inhibited by cyanide. Superoxide production was sensitive to the addition of Mn2+ and H2O2. Increase in superoxide production correlates with the enhancement of peroxidase activity at the application of organic acids and detergents. The results obtained indicate that cell surface peroxidase is one of the main generators of superoxide in wounded wheat root cells. Different ways of stimulation of the ROS producing activity in root cells is supposed. By controlling superoxide and hydrogen peroxide formation, the cell surface peroxidase can control the adaptation processes in stressed plant cells.

  6. Strand displacement activated peroxidase activity of hemin for fluorescent DNA sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Quanbo; Xu, Nan; Gui, Zhen; Lei, Jianping; Ju, Huangxian; Yan, Feng

    2015-10-07

    To efficiently regulate the catalytic activity of the peroxidase mimic hemin, this work designs a double-stranded DNA probe containing an intermolecular dimer of hemin, whose peroxidase activity can be activated by a DNA strand displacement reaction. The double-stranded probe is prepared by annealing two strands of hemin labelled DNA oligonucleotides. Using the fluorescent oxidation product of tyramine by H2O2 as a tracing molecule, the low peroxidase activity of the hemin dimer ensures a low fluorescence background. The strand displacement reaction of the target DNA dissociates the hemin dimer and thus significantly increases the catalytic activity of hemin to produce a large amount of dityramine for fluorescence signal readout. Based on the strand displacement regulated peroxidase activity, a simple and sensitive homogeneous fluorescent DNA sensing method is proposed. The detection can conveniently be carried out in a 96-well plate within 20 min with a detection limit of 0.18 nM. This method shows high specificity, which can effectively distinguish single-base mismatched DNA from perfectly matched target DNA. The DNA strand displacement regulated catalytic activity of hemin has promising application in the determination of various DNA analytes.

  7. Spectroscopic characterization of manganese minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmi Reddy, S; Padma Suvarna, K; Udayabhaska Reddy, G; Endo, Tamio; Frost, R L

    2014-01-03

    Manganese minerals ardenite, alleghanyite and leucopoenicite originated from Madhya Pradesh, India, Nagano prefecture Japan, Sussex Country and Parker Shaft Franklin, Sussex Country, New Jersey respectively are used in the present work. In these minerals manganese is the major constituent and iron if present is in traces only. An EPR study of on all of the above samples confirms the presence of Mn(II) with g around 2.0. Optical absorption spectrum of the mineral alleghanyite indicates that Mn(II) is present in two different octahedral sites and in leucophoenicite Mn(II) is also in octahedral geometry. Ardenite mineral gives only a few Mn(II) bands. NIR results of the minerals ardenite, leucophoenicite and alleghanyite are due to hydroxyl and silicate anions which confirming the formulae of the minerals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Mineral resource of the month: manganese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corathers, Lisa A.

    2012-01-01

    Manganese is a silver-colored metal resembling iron and often found in conjunction with iron. The earliest-known human use of manganese compounds was in the Stone Age, when early humans used manganese dioxide as pigments in cave paintings. In ancient Rome and Egypt, people started using it to color or remove the color from glass - a practice that continued to modern times. Today, manganese is predominantly used in metallurgical applications as an alloying addition, particularly in steel and cast iron production. Steel and cast iron together provide the largest market for manganese (historically 85 to 90 percent), but it is also alloyed with nonferrous metals such as aluminum and copper. Its importance to steel cannot be overstated, as almost all types of steel contain manganese and could not exist without it.

  9. Expression, purification and characterization of a peroxidase from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Peroxidase is one of the key enzymes of the cellular antioxidant defense system, which is mostly involved in the reduction of hydrogen peroxide. Here, a peroxidase gene, named ThPOD1 was isolated from a cDNA library, which was generated from root tissue of Tamarix hispida that was exposed to 0.4 M NaCl. The cDNA ...

  10. Apple and quince peroxidase activity in response to essential oils ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enzymatic browning arises by peroxidase in fruits. However, essential oils are recognized as natural antioxidant agents. So in this study, the effect of thyme, coriander and rosemary essential oils were evaluated on the reduction of peroxidase activity in apples (Malus domestica Mill. cv Golden delicious), (M. domestica Mill.

  11. Cloning and analysis of the ascorbate peroxidase gene promoter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ascorbate peroxidase (APX) is known to catalyze the reduction of H2O2 to water and enhance plants' tolerance in stress environment. An ascorbate peroxidase protein (BnAPX) was previously isolated from Brassica napus in our laboratory and it was located in the chloroplast. In order to clarify the physiological function of ...

  12. Production of lignin peroxidase by Ganoderma leucidum using solid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The main objectives of this study were to optimize the culture conditions for the production of lignin peroxidase by Ganoderma leucidum, economic utilization of waste corn cobs as inducers substrate by pollution free fermentation technology and to optimize the solid state fermentation (SSF) process for lignin peroxidase ...

  13. Heat stable peroxidases from Vigna species (V) | Mbassi | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Shoots of three landraces of a Vigna species from two climatic areas of Cameroon were evaluated for their content of heat-resistant peroxidases. The peroxidase activity in the three landraces was detected with a greater catalytic efficiency for oxidation of O-dianisidine relative to ABTS (2, 2'-azino-bis-(3- ...

  14. Purification, characterization and stability of barley grain peroxidase BP1, a new type of plant peroxidase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Christine B; Henriksen, Anette; Abelskov, A. Katrine

    1997-01-01

    peroxidase isoenzyme C (HRP C). However, when measuring the specific activity of BP 1 at pH 4.0 in the presence of 1 mM CaCl2, the enzyme was as competent as HRP C at neutral pH towards a variety of substrates (mM mg(-1) min(-1)): coniferyl alcohol (930+/-48), caffeic acid (795+/-53), ABTS (2,2(1)-azino...

  15. Incorporation of carbohydrate residues into peroxidase isoenzymes in horseradish roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lew, J Y; Shannon, L M

    1973-11-01

    Sliced root tissue of the horseradish plant (Armoracia rusticana), when incubated with mannose-U-(14)C, incorporated radioactivity into peroxidase isoenzymes. Over 90% of the radioactivity in the highly purified peroxidase isoenzymes was present in the neutral sugar residues of the molecule, i.e. fucose, arabinose, xylose, mannose. When the root slices were incubated simultaneously with leucine-4,5-(3)H and mannose-U-(14)C, cycloheximide strongly inhibited leucine incorporation into the peptide portion of peroxidase isoenzymes but had little effect on the incorporation of (14)C into the neutral sugars. These results indicated that synthesis of the peptide portion of peroxidase was completed before the monosaccharide residues were attached to the molecule. This temporal relationship between the synthesis of protein and the attachment of carbohydrate residues in the plant glycoprotein, horseradish peroxidase, appears to be similar to that reported for glycoprotein biosynthesis in many mammalian systems.

  16. Luffa aegyptiaca (Gourd) Fruit Juice as a Source of Peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, R S S; Yadav, K S; Yadav, H S

    2011-01-01

    Peroxidases have turned out to be potential biocatalyst for a variety of organic reactions. The research work reported in this communication was done with the objective of finding a convenient rich source of peroxidase which could be used as a biocatalyst for organic synthetic reactions. The studies made have shown that Luffa aegyptiaca (gourd) fruit juice contains peroxidase activity of the order of 180 enzyme unit/mL. The K(m) values of this peroxidase for the substrates guaiacol and hydrogen peroxide were 2.0 and 0.2 mM, respectively. The pH and temperature optima were 6.5 and 60°C, respectively. Like other peroxidases, it followed double displacement type mechanism. Sodium azide inhibited the enzyme competitively with K(i) value of 3.35 mM.

  17. Luffa aegyptiaca (Gourd Fruit Juice as a Source of Peroxidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. S. S. Yadav

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Peroxidases have turned out to be potential biocatalyst for a variety of organic reactions. The research work reported in this communication was done with the objective of finding a convenient rich source of peroxidase which could be used as a biocatalyst for organic synthetic reactions. The studies made have shown that Luffa aegyptiaca (gourd fruit juice contains peroxidase activity of the order of 180 enzyme unit/mL. The Km values of this peroxidase for the substrates guaiacol and hydrogen peroxide were 2.0 and 0.2 mM, respectively. The pH and temperature optima were 6.5 and 60°C, respectively. Like other peroxidases, it followed double displacement type mechanism. Sodium azide inhibited the enzyme competitively with Ki value of 3.35 mM.

  18. Loss of hfe function reverses impaired recognition memory caused by olfactory manganese exposure in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Qi; Kim, Jonghan

    2015-03-01

    Excessive manganese (Mn) in the brain promotes a variety of abnormal behaviors, including memory deficits, decreased motor skills and psychotic behavior resembling Parkinson's disease. Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is a prevalent genetic iron overload disorder worldwide. Dysfunction in HFE gene is the major cause of HH. Our previous study has demonstrated that olfactory Mn uptake is altered by HFE deficiency, suggesting that loss of HFE function could alter manganese-associated neurotoxicity. To test this hypothesis, Hfe-knockout (Hfe (-/-)) and wild-type (Hfe (+/+)) mice mice were intranasally-instilled with manganese chloride (MnCl2 5 mg/kg) or water daily for 3 weeks and examined for memory function. Olfactory Mn diminished both short-term recognition and spatial memory in Hfe (+/+) mice, as examined by novel object recognition task and Barnes maze test, respectively. Interestingly, Hfe (-/-) mice did not show impaired recognition memory caused by Mn exposure, suggesting a potential protective effect of Hfe deficiency against Mn-induced memory deficits. Since many of the neurotoxic effects of manganese are thought to result from increased oxidative stress, we quantified activities of anti-oxidant enzymes in the prefrontal cortex (PFC). Mn instillation decreased superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) activity in Hfe (+/+) mice, but not in Hfe (-/-) mice. In addition, Hfe deficiency up-regulated SOD1 and glutathione peroxidase activities. These results suggest a beneficial role of Hfe deficiency in attenuating Mn-induced oxidative stress in the PFC. Furthermore, Mn exposure reduced nicotinic acetylcholine receptor levels in the PFC, indicating that blunted acetylcholine signaling could contribute to impaired memory associated with intranasal manganese. Together, our model suggests that disrupted cholinergic system in the brain is involved in airborne Mn-induced memory deficits and loss of HFE function could in part prevent memory loss via a potential up-regulation of

  19. Formation of a tyrosine adduct involved in lignin degradation by Trametopsis cervina lignin peroxidase: a novel peroxidase activation mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuta Miki; Rebecca Pogni; Sandra Acebes; Fatima Lucas; Elena Fernandez-Fueyo; Maria Camilla Baratto; Maria I. Fernandez; Vivian De Los Rios; Francisco J. Ruiz-duenas; Adalgisa Sinicropi; Riccardo Basosi; Kenneth E. Hammel; Victor Guallar; Angel T. Martinez

    2013-01-01

    LiP (lignin peroxidase) from Trametopsis cervina has an exposed catalytic tyrosine residue (Tyr181) instead of the tryptophan conserved in other lignin-degrading peroxidases. Pristine LiP showed a lag period in VA (veratryl alcohol) oxidation. However, VA-LiP (LiP after treatment with H2O2...

  20. Production and Purification of Peroxidase from Aspergillus niger.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed A. Jebor

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted in the laboratories of Biology Department, College of Science, which deals with isolation and purification of peroxidase and optimization of process parameters to achieve maximum yield of peroxidase by Aspergillus niger. Solid-state fermentation of Aspergillus niger was carried out for enhanced production of peroxidase using hydrogen peroxide as the substrate of enzyme maximum activity of the enzyme was achieved under optimum growth conditions. The optimum conditions were the isolated of Aspergillus niger from soil and growth in synthetic medium, it gave high titer of peroxidase activity, the fructose as carbon source, peptone as nitrogen source, after 12 days of incubation, incubation temperature 25 °C and pH = 6.5. Peroxidase purified in four purification steps; precipitation with 70% saturation of ammonium sulfate, step of dialysis, the third by ion exchange chromatography using DEAE-Cellulose and fourth by gel filtration throughout Sephadex G-100. The specific activity of the purified enzyme was 150U/mg with 7.75 folds. The peroxidase was shown to have molecular weight of 40kDa in SDS-PAGA and about 40kDa in gel filtration.The optimum pH and temperature for peroxidase activity 7 and 35 C0 respectively.

  1. Peroxidase gene expression during tomato fruit ripening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biggs, M.S.; Flurkey, W.H.; Handa, A.K.

    1987-01-01

    Auxin oxidation has been reported to play a critical role in the initiation of pear fruit ripening and a tomato fruit peroxidase (POD) has been shown to have IAA-oxidase activity. However, little is known about changes in the expression of POD mRNA in tomato fruit development. They are investigating the expression of POD mRNA during tomato fruit maturation. Fruit pericarp tissues from six stages of fruit development and ripening (immature green, mature green, breaker, turning, ripe, and red ripe fruits) were used to extract poly (A) + RNAs. These RNAs were translated in vitro in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate system using L- 35 S-methionine. The 35 S-labeled products were immunoprecipitated with POD antibodies to determine the relative proportions of POD mRNA. High levels of POD mRNA were present in immature green and mature green pericarp, but declined greatly by the turning stage of fruit ripening. In addition, the distribution of POD mRNA on free vs bound polyribosomes will be presented, as well as the presence or absence of POD mRNA in other tomato tissues

  2. Tetra(p-tolyl)borate-functionalized solvent polymeric membrane: a facile and sensitive sensing platform for peroxidase and peroxidase mimetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuewei; Qin, Wei

    2013-07-22

    The determination of peroxidase activities is the basis for enzyme-labeled bioaffinity assays, peroxidase-mimicking DNAzymes- and nanoparticles-based assays, and characterization of the catalytic functions of peroxidase mimetics. Here, a facile, sensitive, and cost-effective solvent polymeric membrane-based peroxidase detection platform is described that utilizes reaction intermediates with different pKa values from those of substrates and final products. Several key but long-debated intermediates in the peroxidative oxidation of o-phenylenediamine (o-PD) have been identified and their charge states have been estimated. By using a solvent polymeric membrane functionalized by an appropriate substituted tetraphenylborate as a receptor, those cationic intermediates could be transferred into the membrane from the aqueous phase to induce a large cationic potential response. Thus, the potentiometric indication of the o-PD oxidation catalyzed by peroxidase or its mimetics can be fulfilled. Horseradish peroxidase has been detected with a detection limit at least two orders of magnitude lower than those obtained by spectrophotometric techniques and traditional membrane-based methods. As an example of peroxidase mimetics, G-quadruplex DNAzymes were probed by the intermediate-sensitive membrane and a label-free thrombin detection protocol was developed based on the catalytic activity of the thrombin-binding G-quadruplex aptamer. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Study of Horseradish Peroxidase Fixed on Mesoporous Materials as a Chemical Reaction Catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Mengdan; Dai, Rongji

    2017-12-01

    Nanostructured mesoporous materials is a new type of porous materials, which has been widely used. It has excellent capability in enzymes immobilization, but modification on the chemical bonds of the enzyme reduce the enzymatic activity and rarely used in chemical reactions. The horseradish peroxidase was immobilized on the mesoporous materials with appropriate aperture and its activity and stability was evaluated when catalyzing the nitration reaction of amines and oxidation reaction of thiourea. The optimum mesoporous material to fix the horseradish peroxidase can be obtained by mixing polyoxyethylene - polyoxypropylene-pol, yoxyethylene(P123), 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene(TMB), and tetramethoxysilane (TMOS) at a ratio of 10:1:1, whose surface area and pore volume and pore diameter calculated by BET and BJH model were 402.903m2/g, 1.084cm2/g, 1.084cm2/g respectively. The horseradish peroxidase, immobilized on the mesoporous materials, was applied for catalyzing the nitration reaction of anilines and oxidation reaction of thiourea, produced a high product yield and can be recycled. Thus, it is a strong candidate as a catalysts for oxidation reactions, to be produced at industral scale, due to its high efficiency and low cost.

  4. Effect of Manganese Content on the Fabrication of Porous Anodic Alumina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. H. Voon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of manganese content on the formation of well-ordered porous anodic alumina was studied. Porous anodic alumina has been produced on aluminium substrate of different manganese content by single-step anodizing at 50 V in 0.3 M oxalic acid at 15°C for 60 minutes. The well-ordered pore and cell structure was revealed by subjecting the porous anodic alumina to oxide dissolution treatment in a mixture of chromic acid and phosphoric acid. It was found that the manganese content above 1 wt% impaired the regularity of the cell and pore structure significantly, which can be attributed to the presence of secondary phases in the starting material with manganese content above 1 wt%. The pore diameter and interpore distance decreased with the addition of manganese into the substrates. The time variation of current density and the thickness of porous anodic alumina also decreased as a function of the manganese content in the substrates.

  5. Manganese Deposits in the Artillery Mountains Region, Mohave County, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasky, S.G.; Webber, B.N.

    1944-01-01

    The manganese deposits of the Artillery Mountains region lie within an area of about 25 square miles between the Artillery and Rawhide Mountains, on the west side of the Bill Williams River in west-central Arizona. The richest croppings are on the northeast side of this area, among the foothills of the Artillery Mountains. They are 6 to 10 miles from Alamo. The nearest shipping points are Congress, about 50 miles to the east, and Aguila, about 50 miles to the southeast. The principal manganese deposits are part of a sequence of alluvial fan and playa material, probably of early Pliocene age, which were laid down in a fault basin. They are overlain by later Pliocene (?) basalt flows and sediments and by Quaternary basalt and alluvium. The Pliocene (?) rocks are folded into a shallow composite S1ncline ttat occupies the valley between the Artillery and Rawhide Mountains, and the folded rocks along either side of the valley, together with the overlying Quaternary basalt, are broken by faults that have produced a group of horsts, grabens, and step-fault blocks. The manganiferous beds, lie at two zones, 750 to 1,000 feet apart stratigraphically, each of which is locally as much as 300 to 400 feet thick. The main, or upper, zone contains three kinds of ore - sandstone ore, clay ore, and 'hard' ore. The sandstone and clay ores differ from the associated barren sandstone and clay, with which they are interlayered and into which they grade, primarily in containing a variable proportion of amorphous manganese oxides, besides iron oxides and clayey material such as are present in the barren beds. The 'hard' ore is sandstone that has been impregnated with opal and calcite and in which the original amorphous manganese oxides have been largely converted to psilomelane and manganite. The average manganese content of the sandstone and clay ores is between 3 and 4 percent and that of the 'hard' ore is between 6 and 7 percent. The ore contains an average of 3 percent of iron, 0

  6. Petunia peroxidase a: isolation, purification and characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, T; Wijsman, H J; van Loon, L C

    1991-07-01

    The fast-moving anionic peroxidase isoenzyme variant PRXa was purified from leaves of petunia (Petunia hybrida). Over 1300-fold purification was achieved by subjecting extracellular extracts to two sequential acetone precipitations and resuspending the pellets at pH 5.0 and pH 8.0, respectively, followed by gel filtration and chromatofocusing. The purified enzyme had an absorbance ratio (A405 nm/A280 nm) of 3.6, a molecular mass of about 37 kDa and a pI of 3.8. Three molecular forms with slightly different molecular masses were separated by concanavalin-A--Sepharose affinity chromatography, indicating that these three forms differ in their carbohydrate moieties. The absorption spectrum of PRXa had maxima at 496 and 636 nm and a Soret band at 405 nm. Spectra of compounds I and IV were obtained by titrating a batch of PRXa stored for several months at -20 degrees C with H2O2. The addition of 1 mol H2O2/mol freshly purified PRXa caused the formation of compound II, indicating that freshly isolated PRXa contains a bound hydrogen donor which is lost upon storage. Compound III was obtained from both preparations in the presence of excess H2O2. The pH optimum of PRXa for the reaction with H2O2 and guaiacol was 5.0 and its specific activity 61 mkat/g protein. Among various aromatic compounds, coniferyl alcohol was polymerized by PRXa to presumed lignin-like material. The extracellular localization and high affinity of PRXa for the cinnamic acid derivatives suggest that this isoenzyme functions in the polymerization or cross-linking of lignin in the plant cell wall.

  7. Apple and quince peroxidase activity in response to essential oils ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-09-28

    Sep 28, 2011 ... activities of edible coatings enriched with natural plant extracts such as rosemary ..... its oxidation by ascorbate peroxidase activity (Talano et al., 2008). ... delicious and quince improved the antioxidant protection of the fruits ...

  8. Evaluation of Crude Oil Biodegradation Efficiency and Peroxidase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    Increase in biomass enhanced degradation efficiency above 80 % after 10 days for all concentration of crude oil studied. Peroxidase ... compounds by various bacteria and fungi (Gianfreda et al, 1999) ... into a clean plastic container. Microbial.

  9. Studies of peroxidase isozyme profile in mungbean mutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auti, S.G.; Apparao, B.J.

    2007-01-01

    Peroxidase is an important oxygen-scavenging enzyme. The activity of peroxidase is often correlated with growth, development and hormonal activity. Traditional methods of cultivar identification usually involve observation and recording of morphological characters or description such as yield, height, weight, earliness etc. which vary with environmental conditions and often misleading. So molecular markers like protein and isozymes profiles, RFLP, RAPDs markers etc. are widely employed in varietal identification of cultivars. It plays important role in respiration and is an indicator of oxidative status of plants. Electrophoretic techniques have been used to group species and identify cultivars. Such identification has various advantages including the unique pattern of protein or isozymes bands for each pure cultivar under any set of environmental conditions. Peroxidase isozyme serves as very good marker for any mutational studies. In the present investigation, peroxidase isozyme profiles of various mutants of mungbean was studied employing the technique of electrophoresis

  10. Effect of heat treatment on polyphenol oxidase and peroxidase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGO

    2006-12-18

    Dec 18, 2006 ... enzymes in plant and its resistance to heat has been reported by a ... sintered glass funnel and washed with cold acetone under low vacuum ... Peroxidase activity was determined by measuring the colour deve- lopment at ...

  11. Cloning and characterization of an ascorbate peroxidase gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. NJ TONUKARI

    2012-05-29

    May 29, 2012 ... Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to explore expression patterns of. MaAPX1 in ... and the activity of a number of enzymatic systems, including ... peroxidase (APX), glutathione reductase and catalase.

  12. Cell wall bound anionic peroxidases from asparagus byproducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo-Carmona, Sara; López, Sergio; Vazquez-Castilla, Sara; Jimenez-Araujo, Ana; Rodriguez-Arcos, Rocio; Guillen-Bejarano, Rafael

    2014-10-08

    Asparagus byproducts are a good source of cationic soluble peroxidases (CAP) useful for the bioremediation of phenol-contaminated wastewaters. In this study, cell wall bound peroxidases (POD) from the same byproducts have been purified and characterized. The covalent forms of POD represent >90% of the total cell wall bound POD. Isoelectric focusing showed that whereas the covalent fraction is constituted primarily by anionic isoenzymes, the ionic fraction is a mixture of anionic, neutral, and cationic isoenzymes. Covalently bound peroxidases were purified by means of ion exchange chromatography and affinity chromatography. In vitro detoxification studies showed that although CAP are more effective for the removal of 4-CP and 2,4-DCP, anionic asparagus peroxidase (AAP) is a better option for the removal of hydroxytyrosol (HT), the main phenol present in olive mill wastewaters.

  13. Platelet crossmatch tests using radiolabelled staphylococcal protein A or peroxidase anti-peroxidase in alloimmunised patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yam, P.; Petz, L.D.; Scott, E.P.; Santos, S.

    1984-01-01

    Refractoriness to random-donor platelets as a result of alloimmunization remains a major problem in long-term platelet transfusion therapy despite the use of HLA-matched platelets. A study has been made of two methods for detection of platelet associated IgG as platelet crossmatch tests for the selection of platelet donors. These methods use radiolabelled staphylococcal protein A( 125 I-SPA) and peroxidase anti-peroxidase (PAP), respectively. One hundred and ten crossmatch tests using 125 I-SPA were performed retrospectively in 18 alloimmunized patients. The results indicated that the predictive value of a positive or a negative test was 87%; the sensitivity was 73% and the specificity was 95%. Results with the PAP test were similar. The HLA types were known for 48 donor-recipient pairs. With few exceptions, there was a correlation between the results of the platelet crossmatch tests and the effectiveness of platelet transfusion regardless of the degree of HLA match. These results indicate that platelet crossmatch tests may be valuable even when closely HLA matched donors are not available. A large-scale prospective study is warranted, particularly in highly immunized patients. (author)

  14. Activation of a water molecule coordinated to manganese: four study cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lassalle-Kaiser, B.

    2008-10-01

    The daunting energy consumption of western societies calls for the development of renewable energies. Among them, hydrogen stands as a major candidate. The cleanest way of producing hydrogen is water electro- or photolysis. This reaction is carried out in natural photosynthesis by a manganese-oxo cluster, the functioning of which remains unknown. Insight into this mechanism would greatly help the search for low-cost water splitting catalysts. Our contribution to this field is the understanding of the fundamental processes that govern the activation of water by manganese complexes. This manuscript describes our attempts to generate electrochemically mononuclear manganese(IV) complexes bearing a fully deprotonated water molecule (oxo ligand). We have studied four different cases, which reflect different possible coordination spheres capable of stabilizing such species. In the first chapter, we will give a brief overview of the present energetic challenges faced by western societies. In the second chapter, we will present general considerations about manganese chemistry and a description of the structure and functioning of the water oxidizing enzyme. We will also describe the basic requirements for the splitting of water and present the goals of our work. In the third chapter, we will present the synthesis of a new family of tetradentate ligands, together with the synthesis and full characterization of the corresponding nickel(II) complexes. The first results obtained with the manganese analogue will also be shown. Chapter four presents the formation and the full characterization of a mononuclear manganese(IV)-oxo complex, by electrochemical oxidation of a manganese(II)-aqua complex. We will present different pathways to generate this species and show which intermediates are involved in this 2 e - , 2 H + reaction. Chapter five describes the formation of a mononuclear manganese(IV) complex, by electrochemical oxidation of a manganese(III)-hydroxo complex. The

  15. HDM model magnet mechanical behavior with high manganese steel collars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyder, J.R.

    1994-01-01

    Westinghouse Electric Corporation (WEC) is presently under contract to the SSCL to design, develop, fabricate, and deliver superconducting dipole magnets for the High Energy Booster (HEB). As a first step toward these objectives SSCL supplied a design for short model magnets of 1.8 m in length (DSB). This design was used as a developmental tool for all phases of engineering and fabrication. Mechanical analysis of the HDM (High Energy Booster Dipole Magnets) model magnet design as specified by SSCL was performed with the following objectives: (1) to develop a thorough understanding of the design; (2) to review and verify through analytical and numerical analyses the SSCL model magnet design; (3) to identify any deficiencies that would violate design parameters specified in the HDM Design Requirements Document. A detailed analysis of the model magnet mechanical behavior was pursued by constructing a quarter section finite element model and solving with the ANSYS finite element code. Collar materials of Nitronic-40 and High-Manganese steel were both considered for the HEB model magnet program with the High-Manganese being the final selection. The primary mechanical difference in the two materials is the much lower thermal contraction of the High-Manganese steel. With this material the collars will contract less than the enclosing yoke producing an increased collar yoke interference during cooldown

  16. Peroxidase activity in root hairs of cress (lepidium sativum L.) Cytochemical localization and radioactive labelling of wall bound peroxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaar, K.

    1979-01-01

    The ultrastructural localization of peroxidase activity in young, growing root hairs of cress (Lepidium sativum L.) after assay with 3,3'-diaminobenzidine is reported. Prominent peroxidase activity has been found in the dictyosomes and the associated vesicles, in ribosomes on ER-cisternae, as well as in the cell wall. On the basis of both ultrastructural and cytochemical evidence it is proposed that peroxidase in root hairs is synthesized on the ER- and within dictyosome cisternae packaged and transported in secretory vesicles and extruded into the cell wall particularily at the tip region of a root hair. The kinetic of Golgi apparatus mediated peroxidasesecretion was monitored by measuring the 55 Fe protoheme content of primary cell walls. Peroxidase secretion seems to be enhanced during stress incubation in destilled water. Secretory activity in root hairs is 20 times higher than in cells of the root body. (author)

  17. Recovery of manganese from manganese oxide ores in the EDTA solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Wang, Shuai; Cao, Zhan-fang; Zhong, Hong

    2018-04-01

    A new process has been experimentally and theoretically established for the recovery of manganese from manganese oxide ores, mainly including the reductive leaching of manganese by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), EDTA recovery, and manganese electrolysis. The experimental conditions for this process were investigated. Moderate leaching environment by EDTA with the pH in the range of 5-6 is of benefit to leach manganese from some manganese oxide ores with high-content impurities, such as iron and aluminum. Most of EDTA can be recovered by acidification. A small amount of the residual EDTA in the electrolyte can prevent the generation of anode mud. In addition, trimanganese tetroxide (Mn3O4) can be obtained by the roasting of the EDTA-Mn crystallized product.

  18. Impedimetric aptasensor for nuclear factor kappa B with peroxidase-like mimic coupled DNA nanoladders as enhancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Kanfu; Zhao, Hongwen; Xie, Pan; Hu, Shuang; Yuan, Yali; Yuan, Ruo; Wu, Xiongfei

    2016-07-15

    In this work, we developed a sensitive and universal aptasensor for nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) detection based on peroxidase-like mimic coupled DNA nanoladders for signal amplification. The dsDNA formed by capture DNA S1 and NF-κB binding aptamer (NBA) was firstly assembled on electrode surface. The presence of target NF-κB then led to the leave of NBA from electrode surface and thus provided the binding sites for immobilizing initiator to trigger in situ formation of DNA nanoladders on electrode surface. Since the peroxidase-like mimic manganese (III) meso-tetrakis (4-Nmethylpyridyl)-porphyrin (MnTMPyP) interacts with DNA nanoladders via groove binding, the insoluble benzo-4-chlorohexadienone (4-CD) precipitation derived from the oxidation of 4-chloro-1-naphthol (4-CN) could be formed on electrode surface in the presence of H2O2, resulting in a significantly amplified EIS signal output for quantitative target analysis. As a result, the developed aptasensor showed a low detection limit of 7pM and a wide linear range of 0.01-20nM. Featured with high sensitivity and label-free capability, the proposed sensing scheme can thus offer new opportunities for achieving sensitive, selective and stable detection of different types of target proteins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Manganese oxide nanoparticles, methods and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abruna, Hector D.; Gao, Jie; Lowe, Michael A.

    2017-08-29

    Manganese oxide nanoparticles having a chemical composition that includes Mn.sub.3O.sub.4, a sponge like morphology and a particle size from about 65 to about 95 nanometers may be formed by calcining a manganese hydroxide material at a temperature from about 200 to about 400 degrees centigrade for a time period from about 1 to about 20 hours in an oxygen containing environment. The particular manganese oxide nanoparticles with the foregoing physical features may be used within a battery component, and in particular an anode within a lithium battery to provide enhanced performance.

  20. New fluorimetric assay of horseradish peroxidase using sesamol as substrate and its application to EIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidetoshi Arakawa

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Horseradish peroxidase (HRP is generally used as a label enzyme in enzyme immunoassay (EIA. The procedure used for HRP detection in EIA is critical for sensitivity and precision. This paper describes a novel fluorimetric assay for horseradish peroxidase (HRP using sesamol as substrate. The principle of the assay is as follow: sesamol (3,4-methylenedioxy phenol is reacted enzymatically in the presence of hydrogen peroxide to produce dimeric sesamol. The dimer is fluorescent and can be detected sensitively at ex. 347 nm, em. 427 nm.The measurable range of HRP was 1.0×10−18 to 1.0×10−15 mol/assay, with a detection limit of 1.0×10−18 mol/assay. The coefficient of variation (CV, n=8 was examined at each point on the standard curve, with a mean CV percentage of 3.8%. This assay system was applied to thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH EIA using HRP as the label enzyme. Keywords: Sesamol, Fluorescence, Enzyme immunoassay (EIA, Horseradish peroxidase (HRP, Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH

  1. Properties of catalase-peroxidase lacking its C-terminal domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, Ruletha D.; Cook, Carma O.; Goodwin, Douglas C.

    2004-01-01

    Catalase-peroxidases have a two-domain structure. The N-terminal domain contains the bifunctional active site, but the function of the C-terminal domain is unknown. We produced catalase-peroxidase containing only its N-terminal domain (KatG Nterm ). Removal of the C-terminal domain did not result in unexpected changes in secondary structure as evaluated by CD, but KatG Nterm had neither catalase nor peroxidase activity. Partial recovery of both activities was achieved by incubating KatG Nterm with the separately expressed and isolated KatG C-terminal domain. Spectroscopic measurements revealed a shift in heme environment from a mixture of high-spin species (wtKatG) to exclusively hexacoordinate, low-spin (KatG Nterm ). Moreover, a >1000-fold lower k on for CN - binding was observed for KatG Nterm . EPR spectra for KatG Nterm and the results of site-specific substitution of active site histidines suggested that the distal histidine was the sixth ligand. Thus, one important role for the C-terminal domain may be to support the architecture of the active site, preventing heme ligation by this catalytically essential residue

  2. Improving the oxidative stability of a high redox potential fungal peroxidase by rational design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez-Jiménez, Verónica; Acebes, Sandra; Guallar, Victor; Martínez, Angel T; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J

    2015-01-01

    Ligninolytic peroxidases are enzymes of biotechnological interest due to their ability to oxidize high redox potential aromatic compounds, including the recalcitrant lignin polymer. However, different obstacles prevent their use in industrial and environmental applications, including low stability towards their natural oxidizing-substrate H2O2. In this work, versatile peroxidase was taken as a model ligninolytic peroxidase, its oxidative inactivation by H2O2 was studied and different strategies were evaluated with the aim of improving H2O2 stability. Oxidation of the methionine residues was produced during enzyme inactivation by H2O2 excess. Substitution of these residues, located near the heme cofactor and the catalytic tryptophan, rendered a variant with a 7.8-fold decreased oxidative inactivation rate. A second strategy consisted in mutating two residues (Thr45 and Ile103) near the catalytic distal histidine with the aim of modifying the reactivity of the enzyme with H2O2. The T45A/I103T variant showed a 2.9-fold slower reaction rate with H2O2 and 2.8-fold enhanced oxidative stability. Finally, both strategies were combined in the T45A/I103T/M152F/M262F/M265L variant, whose stability in the presence of H2O2 was improved 11.7-fold. This variant showed an increased half-life, over 30 min compared with 3.4 min of the native enzyme, under an excess of 2000 equivalents of H2O2. Interestingly, the stability improvement achieved was related with slower formation, subsequent stabilization and slower bleaching of the enzyme Compound III, a peroxidase intermediate that is not part of the catalytic cycle and leads to the inactivation of the enzyme.

  3. Improving the oxidative stability of a high redox potential fungal peroxidase by rational design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Sáez-Jiménez

    Full Text Available Ligninolytic peroxidases are enzymes of biotechnological interest due to their ability to oxidize high redox potential aromatic compounds, including the recalcitrant lignin polymer. However, different obstacles prevent their use in industrial and environmental applications, including low stability towards their natural oxidizing-substrate H2O2. In this work, versatile peroxidase was taken as a model ligninolytic peroxidase, its oxidative inactivation by H2O2 was studied and different strategies were evaluated with the aim of improving H2O2 stability. Oxidation of the methionine residues was produced during enzyme inactivation by H2O2 excess. Substitution of these residues, located near the heme cofactor and the catalytic tryptophan, rendered a variant with a 7.8-fold decreased oxidative inactivation rate. A second strategy consisted in mutating two residues (Thr45 and Ile103 near the catalytic distal histidine with the aim of modifying the reactivity of the enzyme with H2O2. The T45A/I103T variant showed a 2.9-fold slower reaction rate with H2O2 and 2.8-fold enhanced oxidative stability. Finally, both strategies were combined in the T45A/I103T/M152F/M262F/M265L variant, whose stability in the presence of H2O2 was improved 11.7-fold. This variant showed an increased half-life, over 30 min compared with 3.4 min of the native enzyme, under an excess of 2000 equivalents of H2O2. Interestingly, the stability improvement achieved was related with slower formation, subsequent stabilization and slower bleaching of the enzyme Compound III, a peroxidase intermediate that is not part of the catalytic cycle and leads to the inactivation of the enzyme.

  4. A sensitive colorimetric aptasensor based on trivalent peroxidase-mimic DNAzyme and magnetic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuwen; Xu, Naihan; Tan, Chunyan; Fang, Wei; Tan, Ying; Jiang, Yuyang

    2018-08-14

    In this study, a novel colorimetric aptasensor was prepared by coupling trivalent peroxidase-mimic DNAzyme and magnetic nanoparticles for highly sensitive and selective detection of target proteins. A three G-quadruplex (G4) DNA-hemin complex was employed as the trivalent peroxidase-mimic DNAzyme, in which hemin assisted the G4-DNA to fold into a catalytic conformation and act as an enzyme. The design of the aptasensor includes magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), complementary DNA (cDNA) modified with biotin, and a label-free single strand DNA (ssDNA) including the aptamer and trivalent peroxidase-mimic DNAzyme. The trivalent DNAzyme, which has the highest catalytic activity among multivalent DNAzymes, catalyzed the H 2 O 2 -mediated oxidation of ABTS. The colorless ABTS was oxidized to produce a blue-green product that can be clearly distinguished by the naked eye. The aptamer and trivalent peroxidase-mimic DNAzyme promote the specificity and sensitivity of this detection method, which can be generalized for other targets by simply replacing the corresponding aptamers. To demonstrate the feasible use of the aptasensor for target detection, a well-known tumor biomarker MUC1 was evaluated as the model target. The limits of detection were determined to be 5.08 and 5.60 nM in a linear range of 50-1000 nM in a buffer solution and 10% serum system, respectively. This colorimetric and label-free aptasensor with excellent sensitivity and strong anti-interference ability has potential application in disease diagnoses, prognosis tracking, and therapeutic evaluation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Three manganese oxide-rich marine sediments harbor similar communities of acetate-oxidizing manganese-reducing bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Vandieken, Verona; Pester, Michael; Finke, Niko; Hyun, Jung-Ho; Friedrich, Michael W; Loy, Alexander; Thamdrup, Bo

    2012-01-01

    Dissimilatory manganese reduction dominates anaerobic carbon oxidation in marine sediments with high manganese oxide concentrations, but the microorganisms responsible for this process are largely unknown. In this study, the acetate-utilizing manganese-reducing microbiota in geographically well-separated, manganese oxide-rich sediments from Gullmar Fjord (Sweden), Skagerrak (Norway) and Ulleung Basin (Korea) were analyzed by 16S rRNA-stable isotope probing (SIP). Manganese reduction was the p...

  6. Manganese Oxidation by Bacteria: Biogeochemical Aspects

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sujith, P.P.; LokaBharathi, P.A.

    Manganese is an essential trace metal that is not as readily oxidizable like iron. Several bacterial groups posses the ability to oxidize Mn effectively competing with chemical oxidation. The oxides of Mn are the strongest of the oxidants, next...

  7. Manganese(II) chelate contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocklage, S.M.; Quay, S.C.

    1994-01-01

    New chelate forming compounds for use as contrast media in NMR imaging are described. Especially mentioned are manganese(II) ion chelates of N,N' dipyridoxaldiamine, N,N' diacetic acid, and salts and esters thereof. 1 fig

  8. 21 CFR 73.2775 - Manganese violet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .... Mercury (as Hg), not more than 1 part per million. Total color, based on Mn content in “as is” sample, not less than 93 percent. (c) Uses and restrictions. Manganese violet is safe for use in coloring cosmetics...

  9. Selective Method for the Determination of Manganese in End-fitting of Spoolable Reinforced Plastic Line Pipe for Petroleum Industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Xiaodong; Zhang, Dongna; Li, Houbu; Cai, Xuehua

    2017-10-01

    The fact that spoolable reinforced plastic line pipe is more flexible and spoolable than steel, and is also much lighter, means that it can becarried and deployedfrom smaller vessels and managed more easily. It was well known that manganese is an important element in end-fitting of spoolable reinforced plastic line pipe. In this paper, a simple spectrophotometric method was described for the determination of manganese in end-fitting of spoolable reinforced plastic line pipe. The method was based on the oxidation-reduction reaction between ammonium persulfate and manganese(II) producing manganese(VII) in the presence of silver nitrate as a catalyst. The characteristic wavelength of maximum absorption of manganese(VII) was obtained locating at 530 nm. Under the optimum reaction conditions the absorption value was proportional to the concentration of manganese in the range of 0.50%˜1.80% (R2 = 0.9997), and the relative standard deviation was less than 3.0% (n=5). The proposed method was applied successfully to determine manganese in end-fitting of spoolable reinforced plastic line pipe samples.

  10. Personality traits in persons with manganese poisoning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platonov, A A

    1976-10-01

    Results of studies with the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) in 3 groups of arc welders with various degrees of manganese poisoning (22 symptom-free, 23 with functional disturbances, 55 with organic symptoms) and 50 controls were discussed. There was a close relation between the severity of the poisoning and quantitative and qualitative personality changes. Personality tests are considered a useful addition to the clinical diagnosis of chronic manganese poisoning.

  11. Autonomic function in manganese alloy workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrington, W.W.; Angle, C.R.; Willcockson, N.K.; Padula, M.A. [Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States); Korn, T.

    1998-07-01

    The observation of orthostatic hypotension in an index case of manganese toxicity lead to this prospective attempt to evaluate cardiovascular autonomic function and cognitive and emotional neurotoxicity in eight manganese alloy welders and machinists. The subjects consisted of a convenience sample consisting of an index case of manganese dementia, his four co-workers in a frog shop for gouging, welding, and grinding repair of high manganese railway track and a convenience sample of three mild steel welders with lesser manganese exposure also referred because of cognitive or autonomic symptoms. Frog shop air manganese samples 9.6--10 years before and 1.2--3.4 years after the diagnosis of the index case exceeded 1.0 mg/m{sup 3} in 29% and 0.2 mg/m{sup 3} in 62%. Twenty-four-hour electrocardiographic (Holter) monitoring was used to determine the temporal variability of the heartrate (RR{prime} interval) and the rates of change at low frequency and high frequency. MMPI and MCMI personality assessment and short-term memory, figure copy, controlled oral word association, and symbol digit tests were used.

  12. Magnesium and manganese content of halophilic bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Medicis, E.; Paquette, J.; Gauthier, J.J.; Shapcott, D.

    1986-01-01

    Magnesium and manganese contents were measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry in bacteria of several halophilic levels, in Vibrio costicola, a moderately halophilic eubacterium growing in 1 M NaCl, Halobacterium volcanii, a halophilic archaebacterium growing in 2.5 NaCl, Halobacterium cutirubrum, an extremely halophilic archaebacterium growing in 4 M NaCl, and Escherichia coli, a nonhalophilic eubacterium growing in 0.17 M NaCl. Magnesium and manganese contents varied with the growth phase, being maximal at the early log phase. Magnesium and manganese molalities in cell water were shown to increase with the halophilic character of the logarithmically growing bacteria, from 30 mmol of Mg per kg of cell water and 0.37 mmol of Mn per kg of cell water for E. coli to 102 mmol of Mg per kg of cell water and 1.6 mmol of Mn per kg of cell water for H cutirubrum. The intracellular concentrations of manganese were determined independently by a radioactive tracer technique in V. costicola and H. volcanii. The values obtained by 54 Mn loading represented about 70% of the values obtained by atomic absorption. The increase of magnesium and manganese contents associated with the halophilic character of the bacteria suggests that manganese and magnesium play a role in haloadaptation

  13. Implication of Dichomitus squalens manganese-dependent peroxidase in dye decolorization and cooperation of the enzyme with laccase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šušla, Martin; Novotný, Čeněk; Erbanová, Pavla; Svobodová, Kateřina

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 6 (2008), s. 479-485 ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP526/06/P102; GA AV ČR IAA6020411 Grant - others:CZ(CZ) FRVŠ G4 359/2007 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : decolorization * white-rot fungi * dichotomitus squalens Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.172, year: 2008

  14. Oxidation of eugenol by purified human term placental peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, R; Kulkarni, K A; Kulkarni, A P

    2000-01-01

    The oxidation of eugenol by purified human term placental peroxidase (HTPP) was examined. Spectral analyses indicated that, similar to horseradish peroxidase, HTPP is capable of catalyzing the oxidation of eugenol. The accumulated stable product in the reaction medium due to eugenol oxidation by HTPP was tentatively identified as quinone methide of eugenol (EQM). The EQM formation exhibited a pH optimum of 8.0 and was dependent on incubation time, amount of HTPP and the concentration of both eugenol and hydrogen peroxide. The specific activity of approx 2.8 micromoles of EQM/min/mg protein was observed with different preparations of HTPP. The EQM formation was significantly suppressed by glutathione and ascorbic acid. The classical peroxidase inhibitors viz. potassium cyanide and sodium azide blocked the reaction in a concentration manner. Collectively, the results suggest that eugenol may undergo peroxidative metabolism in human placenta. Copyright 2000 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  15. The cDNA sequence of a neutral horseradish peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartonek-Roxå, E; Eriksson, H; Mattiasson, B

    1991-02-16

    A cDNA clone encoding a horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) peroxidase has been isolated and characterized. The cDNA contains 1378 nucleotides excluding the poly(A) tail and the deduced protein contains 327 amino acids which includes a 28 amino acid leader sequence. The predicted amino acid sequence is nine amino acids shorter than the major isoenzyme belonging to the horseradish peroxidase C group (HRP-C) and the sequence shows 53.7% identity with this isoenzyme. The described clone encodes nine cysteines of which eight correspond well with the cysteines found in HRP-C. Five potential N-glycosylation sites with the general sequence Asn-X-Thr/Ser are present in the deduced sequence. Compared to the earlier described HRP-C this is three glycosylation sites less. The shorter sequence and fewer N-glycosylation sites give the native isoenzyme a molecular weight of several thousands less than the horseradish peroxidase C isoenzymes. Comparison with the net charge value of HRP-C indicates that the described cDNA clone encodes a peroxidase which has either the same or a slightly less basic pI value, depending on whether the encoded protein is N-terminally blocked or not. This excludes the possibility that HRP-n could belong to either the HRP-A, -D or -E groups. The low sequence identity (53.7%) with HRP-C indicates that the described clone does not belong to the HRP-C isoenzyme group and comparison of the total amino acid composition with the HRP-B group does not place the described clone within this isoenzyme group. Our conclusion is that the described cDNA clone encodes a neutral horseradish peroxidase which belongs to a new, not earlier described, horseradish peroxidase group.

  16. Peroxidase activity in Spondias dulcis = Atividade da peroxidase em Spondias dulcis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lúcio Cardozo-Filho

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the best conditions to obtain crude extracts showingPeroxidase activity from Spondia dulcis (caja-mango were evaluated. Fresh fruits (25 g were blended in different sodium phosphate buffer (0.05 to 0.2 M with a pH varying from 3.0 to 9.0. The muddy material was centrifuged for 20 minutes. In order to improve POD activity, the crude extract was submitted to precipitation with ammonium sulfate at 90% saturation. This precipitated was re-suspended in sodium phosphate buffer 0.2 M pH 6.5 and then, optimum pH for activity assay (pH varying from 5.0 to 9.0 and thermal stability (exposure to different temperatures varying from 30 to 75ºC for periods between 0 to 15 minutes were determined. The best conditions for activity assay were in phosphate buffer 0.2 M at pH7.0. The results obtained for thermal inactivation study suggest that the heating at 75ºCfor 15 minutes inactivated 95% of initial POD activity.Foram avaliadas, neste trabalho, algumas condições para a obtenção de extratos brutos com atividade peroxidase de Spondias dulcis (cajá-manga. Frutas frescas (25 g foram trituradas com tampão fosfato de sódio (0,05 a 0,2 M em pHs diferentes (3,0 a 9,0. O material obtido foi centrifugado por 20 min. O extrato bruto foi submetido à precipitação com sulfato de amônio até 90% de saturação. Este precipitado foi ressuspenso em tampão fosfato de sódio 0,2 M pH 6,5 e, assim, o pH ótimo para o ensaio de atividade (pH que varia de 5,0 a 9,0 e a estabilidade térmica (exposição a temperaturas de 30, 60, 65, 70 e 75ºC por um período de 0 a 15 min. deste foram determinados. As melhores condições encontradas para o ensaio de atividade foram em tampão fosfato 0,2 M pH 7,0. Os resultados para a inativação térmica sugerem que o aquecimento a 75ºC por 15 mininativa 95% da atividade de POD inicial.

  17. Lignin peroxidase mediated biotransformations useful in the biocatalytic production of vanillin

    OpenAIRE

    Have, ten, R.

    2000-01-01

    This research concentrates on lignin peroxidase (LiP) mediated biotrans-formations that are useful in producing vanillin.

    In order to obtain this extracellular enzyme, the white-rot fungus Bjerkandera sp. strain BOS55 was cultivated on nitrogen rich medium. This procedure resulted in a successful LiP production of 600 U/L. Peptone in the culture medium was shown to interfere with the standard LiP assay in which the formation of veratraldehyde (V...

  18. Leaching of manganese from electrolytic manganese residue by electro-reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Jiancheng; Liu, Renlong; Liu, Zuohua; Chen, Hongliang; Tao, Changyuan

    2017-08-01

    In this study, an improved process for leaching manganese from electrolytic manganese residue (EMR) by electro-reduction was developed. The mechanisms of the electro-reduction leaching were investigated through X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray fluorescence, and Brunauer Emmett Teller. The results show that the electric field could change the surface charge distribution of EMR particles, and the high-valent manganese can be reduced by electric field. The leaching efficient of manganese reached 84.1% under the optimal leaching condition: 9.2 wt% H 2 SO 4 , current density of 25 mA/cm 2 , solid-to-liquid ratio of 1:5, and leaching time for 1 h. It is 37.9% higher than that attained without an electric field. Meanwhile, the manganese content in EMR decreased from 2.57% to 0.48%.

  19. Effect of manganese on neonatal rat: manganese concentration and enzymatic alterations in brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seth, P K; Husain, R; Mushtaq, M; Chandra, S V

    1977-01-01

    Suckling rats were exposed for 15 and 30 days to manganese through the milk of nursing dams receiving 15 mg MnCl/sub 2/.4H/sub 2/O/kg/day orally and after which the neurological manifestations of metal poisoning were studied. No significant differences in the growth rate, developmental landmarks and walking movements were observed between the control and manganese-exposed pups. The metal concentration was significantly increased in the brain of manganese-fed pups at 15 days and exhibited a further three-fold increase over the control, at 30 days. The accumulation of the metal in the brain of manganese-exposed nursing dams was comparatively much less. A significant decrease in succinic dehydrogenase, adenosine triphosphatase, adenosine deaminase, acetylcholine esterase and an increase in monoamine oxidase activity was observed in the brain of experimental pups and dams. The results suggest that the developing brain may also be susceptible to manganese.

  20. Catalase-like activity studies of the manganese(II) adsorbed zeolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ćiçek, Ekrem; Dede, Bülent

    2013-12-01

    Preparation of manganese(II) adsorbed on zeolite 3A, 4A, 5A. AW-300, ammonium Y zeolite, organophilic, molecular sieve and catalase-like enzyme activity of manganese(II) adsorbed zeolites are reported herein. Firstly zeolites are activated at 873 K for two hours before contact manganese(II) ions. In order to observe amount of adsorption, filtration process applied for the solution. The pure zeolites and manganese(II) adsorbed zeolites were analysed by FT-IR. As a result according to the FT-IR spectra, the incorporation of manganese(II) cation into the zeolite structure causes changes in the spectra. These changes are expected particularly in the pseudolattice bands connected with the presence of alumino and silicooxygen tetrahedral rings in the zeolite structure. Furthermore, the catalytic activities of the Mn(II) adsorbed zeolites for the disproportionation of hydrogen peroxide were investigated in the presence of imidazole. The Mn(II) adsorbed zeolites display efficiency in the disproportion reactions of hydrogen peroxide, producing water and dioxygen in catalase-like activity.

  1. Old age and gender influence the pharmacokinetics of inhaled manganese sulfate and manganese phosphate in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorman, David C.; McManus, Brian E.; Marshall, Marianne W.; James, R. Arden; Struve, Melanie F.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, we examined whether gender or age influences the pharmacokinetics of manganese sulfate (MnSO 4 ) or manganese phosphate (as the mineral form hureaulite). Young male and female rats and aged male rats (16 months old) were exposed 6 h day -1 for 5 days week -1 to air, MnSO 4 (at 0.01, 0.1, or 0.5 mg Mn m -3 ), or hureaulite (0.1 mg Mn m -3 ). Tissue manganese concentrations were determined in all groups at the end of the 90-day exposure and 45 days later. Tissue manganese concentrations were also determined in young male rats following 32 exposure days and 91 days after the 90-day exposure. Intravenous 54 Mn tracer studies were also performed in all groups immediately after the 90-day inhalation to assess whole-body manganese clearance rates. Gender and age did not affect manganese delivery to the striatum, a known target site for neurotoxicity in humans, but did influence manganese concentrations in other tissues. End-of-exposure olfactory bulb, lung, and blood manganese concentrations were higher in young male rats than in female or aged male rats and may reflect a portal-of-entry effect. Old male rats had higher testis but lower pancreas manganese concentrations when compared with young males. Young male and female rats exposed to MnSO 4 at 0.5 mg Mn m -3 had increased 54 Mn clearance rates when compared with air-exposed controls, while senescent males did not develop higher 54 Mn clearance rates. Data from this study should prove useful in developing dosimetry models for manganese that consider age or gender as potential sensitivity factors

  2. Arabidopsis ATP A2 peroxidase. Expression and high-resolution structure of a plant peroxidase with implications for lignification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, L; Teilum, K; Mirza, O

    2000-01-01

    Lignins are phenolic biopolymers synthesized by terrestrial, vascular plants for mechanical support and in response to pathogen attack. Peroxidases have been proposed to catalyse the dehydrogenative polymerization of monolignols into lignins, although no specific isoenzyme has been shown...... to be involved in lignin biosynthesis. Recently we isolated an extracellular anionic peroxidase, ATP A2, from rapidly lignifying Arabidopsis cell suspension culture and cloned its cDNA. Here we show that the Atp A2 promoter directs GUS reporter gene expression in lignified tissues of transgenic plants. Moreover......-coumaryl and coniferyl alcohols are preferred by ATP A2, while the oxidation of sinapyl alcohol will be sterically hindered in ATP A2 as well as in all other plant peroxidases due to an overlap with the conserved Pro-139. We suggest ATP A2 is involved in a complex regulation of the covalent cross-linking in the plant...

  3. Analysis of material flow in a utillzation technology of low grade manganese ore and sulphur coal complementary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo-Zhi; Deng, Biao; Su, Shi-Jun; Ding, Sang-Lan; Sun, Wei-Yi

    2018-03-01

    Electrolytic manganese is conventionally produced through low-grade manganese ore leaching in SO2, with the combustion of high sulfur coal. Subsequently the coal ash and manganese slag, produced by the combustion of high sulfur coal and preparation of electrolytic manganese, can be used as raw ingredients for the preparation of sulphoaluminate cement. In order to realize the `coal-electricity-sulfur-manganese-building material' system of complementary resource utilization, the conditions of material inflow and outflow in each process were determined using material flow analysis. The material flow models in each unit and process can be obtained by analyzed of material flow for new technology, and the input-output model could be obtained. Through the model, it is possible to obtain the quantity of all the input and output material in the condition of limiting the quantity of a substance. Taking one ton electrolytic manganese as a basis, the quantity of other input material and cements can be determined with the input-output model. The whole system had thusly achieved a cleaner production level. Therefore, the input-output model can be used for guidance in practical production.

  4. Peroxidase Biocathodes for a Biofuel Cell Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gomes, Celso; Shipovskov, Stepan; Ferapontova, Elena

    at 1.5 V for 6 days; the maximum power density of the cell was 98 W cm-2 at 0.6 V and pH 6. When coupled to the H2O2-producing glucose oxidizing enzymes (glucose oxidase or pyranose oxidase), the HRP-biocathode could function in the presence of glucose with no essential loss in I - V characteristics...

  5. Self-Assembled Complexes of Horseradish Peroxidase with Magnetic Nanoparticles Showing Enhanced Peroxidase Activity

    KAUST Repository

    Corgié, Stéphane C.

    2012-02-15

    Bio-nanocatalysts (BNCs) consisting of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) self-assembled with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) enhance enzymatic activity due to the faster turnover and lower inhibition of the enzyme. The size and magnetization of the MNPs affect the formation of the BNCs, and ultimately control the activity of the bound enzymes. Smaller MNPs form small clusters with a low affinity for the HRP. While the turnover for the bound fraction is drastically increased, there is no difference in the H 2O 2 inhibitory concentration. Larger MNPs with a higher magnetization aggregate in larger clusters and have a higher affinity for the enzyme and a lower substrate inhibition. All of the BNCs are more active than the free enzyme or the MNPs (BNCs > HRP ≤laquo; MNPs). Since the BNCs show surprising resilience in various reaction conditions, they may pave the way towards new hybrid biocatalysts with increased activities and unique catalytic properties for magnetosensitive enzymatic reactions. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Cross reactivities of rabbit anti-chicken horse radish peroxidase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The cross reactivities of rabbit anti chicken horse radish peroxidase (conjugate) was tested with sera of Chicken, Ducks, Geese, Guinea fowl, Hawks, Pigeons and Turkeys in indirect enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technique. Sera from mammalian species (Bat, Equine and swine) were used as negative ...

  7. The glucose oxidase-peroxidase assay for glucose

    Science.gov (United States)

    The glucose oxidase-peroxidase assay for glucose has served as a very specific, sensitive, and repeatable assay for detection of glucose in biological samples. It has been used successfully for analysis of glucose in samples from blood and urine, to analysis of glucose released from starch or glycog...

  8. Calorimetric studies of the thermal denaturation of cytochrome c peroxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kresheck, G.C.; Erman, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    Two endotherms are observed by differential scanning calorimetry during the thermal denaturation of cytochrome c peroxidase at pH 7.0. The transition midpoint temperatures (t/sub m/) were 43.9 +- 1.4 and 63.3 +- 1.6 0 C, independent of concentration. The two endotherms were observed at all pH values between 4 and 8, with the transition temperatures varying with pH. Precipitation was observed between pH 4 and 6, and only qualitative data are presented for this region. The thermal unfolding of cytochrome c peroxidase was sensitive to the presence and ligation state of the heme. Only a single endotherm was observed for the unfolding of the apoprotein, and this transition was similar to the high-temperature transition in the holoenzyme. Addition of KCN to the holoenzyme increases the midpoint of the high-temperature transition whereas the low-temperature transition was increased upon addition of KF. Binding of the natural substrate ferricytochrome c to the enzyme increases the low-temperature transition by 4.8 +- 1.3 0 C but has no effect on the high-temperature transition at pH 7. The presence of cytochrome c peroxidase decreases the stability of cytochrome c, and both proteins appear to unfold simultaneously. The results are discussed in terms of the two domains evident in the X-ray crystallographic structure of cytochrome c peroxidase

  9. Hepatic and erythrocytic glutathione peroxidase activity in liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero, R; Ortiz, A; Hernández, R; López, V; Gómez, M M; Mena, P

    1996-09-01

    Hepatic and erythrocytic glutathione peroxidase activity, together with malondialdehyde levels, were determined as indicators of peroxidation in 83 patients from whom liver biopsies had been taken for diagnostic purposes. On histological study, the patients were classified into groups as minimal changes (including normal liver), steatosis, alcoholic hepatitis, hepatic cirrhosis, light to moderately active chronic hepatitis, and severe chronic active hepatitis. The glutathione peroxidase activity in erythrocytes showed no significant changes in any liver disease group. In the hepatic study, an increased activity was observed in steatosis with respect to the minimal changes group, this increased activity induced by the toxic agent in the initial stages of the alcoholic hepatic disease declining as the hepatic damage progressed. There was a negative correlation between the levels of hepatic malondialdehyde and hepatic glutathione peroxidase in subjects with minimal changes. This suggested the existence of an oxidative equilibrium in this group. This equilibrium is broken in the liver disease groups as was manifest in a positive correlation between malondialdehyde and glutathione peroxidase activity.

  10. Polyamines, peroxidase and proteins involved in the senescence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Senescence is the natural aging process at the cellular level or range of phenomena associated with this process. The objective of this review was to show the involvement of substances that may be related to senescence in plants, such as polyamines, peroxidase and proteins. These substances were related with the ...

  11. Glutathione peroxidases of the potato cyst nematode Globodera Rostochiensis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jones, J.T.; Reavy, B.; Smant, G.; Prior, A.E.

    2004-01-01

    We report the cloning and characterisation of full-length DNAs complementary to RNA (cDNAs) encoding two glutathione peroxidases (GpXs) from a plant parasitic nematode, the potato cyst nematode (PCN) Globodera rostochiensis. One protein has a functional signal peptide that targets the protein for

  12. Expression, purification and characterization of a peroxidase from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-01-24

    Jan 24, 2012 ... from a cDNA library, which was generated from root tissue of Tamarix hispida that was exposed to ... enzymes, peroxidase (POD) plays an important role in .... ThPOD1 protein under various conditions, 3 month old T. hispida.

  13. Decolourization of Direct Blue 2 by peroxidases obtained from an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Also, an increase in toxicity, determined by Vibrio fisheri, was observed after the enzymatic oxidation of the dye. Results suggest that the oxidation of DB2 with peroxidases can be recommended as a pretreatment step before a conventional treatment process. Keywords: decolourization, Direct Blue 2, industrial waste, ...

  14. Molecular cloning and characterization of a new peroxidase gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    length cDNA of O.violaceus peroxidase gene (OvRCI, GenBank. Acc. No. AY428037) was 1220 bp and contained an 1128 bp open reading frame encoding a protein of 375 amino acids. Homology analysis and molecular modeling revealed that ...

  15. Towards uncovering the roles of switchgrass peroxidases in plant processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron eSaathoff

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Herbaceous perennial plants selected as potential biofuel feedstocks had been understudied at the genomic and functional genomic levels. Recent investments, primarily by the U.S. Department of Energy, have led to the development of a number of molecular resources for bioenergy grasses, such as the partially annotated genome for switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L., and some related diploid species. In its current version, the switchgrass genome contains 65,878 gene models arising from the A and B genomes of this tetraploid grass. The availability of these gene sequences provides a framework to exploit transcriptomic data obtained from next generation sequencing platforms to address questions of biological importance. One such question pertains to discovery of genes and proteins important for biotic and abiotic stress responses, and how these components might affect biomass quality and stress response in plants engineered for a specific end purpose. It can be expected that production of switchgrass on marginal lands will expose plants to diverse stresses, including herbivory by insects. Class III plant peroxidases have been implicated in many developmental responses such as lignification and in the adaptive responses of plants to insect feeding. Here, we have analyzed the class III peroxidases encoded by the switchgrass genome, and have mined available transcriptomic datasets to develop a first understanding of the expression profiles of the class III peroxidases in different plant tissues. Lastly, we have identified switchgrass peroxidases that appear to be orthologs of enzymes shown to play key roles in lignification and plant defense responses to hemipterans.

  16. Isolation of an ascorbate peroxidase in Brassica napus and analysis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-04-05

    Apr 5, 2010 ... domain; APX, ascorbate peroxidase; Bn-APX, Brassica napus ascorbate ... Brassica napus, which is widely grown as the oilseed crop of rape or canola, .... grew on the SD-Leu-Trp-His-Ade medium and were verified by PCR.

  17. Effect of heat treatment on polyphenol oxidase and peroxidase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of heat treatment (55°C/20 min) on polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and peroxidase (POD) activities and total phenolic compounds was investigated in Algerian dates (Deglet Nour variety) at Tamar (fully ripe) stage and in dates stored for 5 months at ambient temperature and in cold storage (10°C). Results obtained ...

  18. 21 CFR 864.7675 - Leukocyte peroxidase test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Leukocyte peroxidase test. 864.7675 Section 864.7675 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7675 Leukocyte...

  19. Effect of industrial wastewater ontotal protein and the peroxidase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of industrial wastewaters on protein and the peroxidase activity in Lycopersicon esculentum Mill., Capsicum annuum L., Phaseolus vulgaris L. and Vicia faba L. Industrial wastewaters were taken from Dardanel Fisheries Company, Tekel alcoholic drinks companies' ...

  20. Efficient production of Arthromyces ramosus peroxidase by Aspergillus awamori

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lokman, B.C.; Joosten, V.; Hovenkamp, J.; Gouka, R.J.; Verrips, C.T.; Hondel, C.A.M.J.J. van den

    2003-01-01

    The heterologous production of Arthromyces ramosus peroxidase (ARP) was analysed in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus awamori under control of the inducible endoxylanase promoter. Secretion of active ARP was achieved up to 800 mg l-1 in shake flask cultures. Western blot analysis showed that an

  1. Frequency of anti thyroid peroxidase antibody in patients of vitiligo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhokhar, A.; Shaikh, Z.I.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to compare the frequency of anti thyroid peroxidase antibody in patients suffering from vitiligo with healthy control group. Type of Study: Case control study. Settings: Dermatology Department, Military Hospital, Rawalpindi, from 20th March 2010 to 20th July 2011. Material and Methods: Fifty clinically diagnosed patients of vitiligo, age = 18 yrs and both genders with no history of thyroid disease, past or current use of drugs for thyroid disorder or thyroid surgery were included as cases (Group A). Fifty healthy individuals with no evidence of vitiligo or thyroid disorder on history and physical examination and with no family history of vitiligo, matched for age and gender with cases, were included as control (Group B). Serum anti thyroid peroxidase (anti TPO) antibodies were measured using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in both cases and control. Results: Eight (16%) patients in Group A were anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody positive and forty two (84%) patients were negative while one (2%) patient was anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody positive in Group B and forty nine (98%) patients were negative (p = 0.001). Conclusion: Anti TPO antibody is significantly more common in patients of vitiligo as compared to general population. (author)

  2. Thylakoid-bound ascorbate peroxidase increases resistance to salt ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are cellular indicators of stress. In plants, they function as secondary messengers in response to environmental stress. Ascorbate peroxidase (APX) is an important enzyme directly involved in the scavenging of ROS. In this study, we aimed at identifying the function of the Brassica napus ...

  3. Manganese and acute paranoid psychosis: a case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, W.M.A.; Egger, J.I.M.; Kuijpers, H.J.H.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Manganese regulates many enzymes and is essential for normal development and body function. Chronic manganese intoxication has an insidious and progressive course and usually starts with complaints of headache, fatigue, sleep disturbances, irritability and emotional instability. Later,

  4. Manganese and acute paranoid psychosis: A case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.M.A. Verhoeven (Wim); J.I.M. Egger (Jos); H.J. Kuijpers (Harold)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Manganese regulates many enzymes and is essential for normal development and body function. Chronic manganese intoxication has an insidious and progressive course and usually starts with complaints of headache, fatigue, sleep disturbances, irritability and emotional

  5. Biological Superoxide In Manganese Oxide Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansel, C.; Learman, D.; Zeiner, C.; Santelli, C. M.

    2011-12-01

    Manganese (Mn) oxides are among the strongest sorbents and oxidants within the environment, controlling the fate and transport of numerous elements and the degradation of recalcitrant carbon. Both bacteria and fungi mediate the oxidation of Mn(II) to Mn(III/IV) oxides but the genetic and biochemical mechanisms responsible remain poorly understood. Furthermore, the physiological basis for microbial Mn(II) oxidation remains an enigma. We have recently reported that a common marine bacterium (Roseobacter sp. AzwK-3b) oxidizes Mn(II) via reaction with extracellular superoxide (O2-) produced during exponential growth. Here we expand this superoxide-mediated Mn(II) oxidation pathway to fungi, introducing a surprising homology between prokaryotic and eukaryotic metal redox processes. For instance, Stibella aciculosa, a common soil Ascomycete filamentous fungus, precipitates Mn oxides at the base of asexual reproductive structures (synnemata) used to support conidia (Figure 1). This distribution is a consequence of localized production of superoxide (and it's dismutation product hydrogen peroxide, H2O2), leading to abiotic oxidation of Mn(II) by superoxide. Disruption of NADPH oxidase activity using the oxidoreductase inhibitor DPI leads to diminished cell differentiation and subsequent Mn(II) oxidation inhibition. Addition of Cu(II) (an effective superoxide scavenger) leads to a concentration dependent decrease in Mn oxide formation. We predict that due to the widespread production of extracellular superoxide within the fungal and likely bacterial kingdoms, biological superoxide may be an important contributor to the cycling of Mn, as well as other metals (e.g., Hg, Fe). Current and future explorations of the genes and proteins involved in superoxide production and Mn(II) oxidation will ideally lend insight into the physiological and biochemical basis for these processes.

  6. Candida albicans biofilm on titanium: effect of peroxidase precoating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Ahariz

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Mohamed Ahariz1, Philippe Courtois1,21Laboratory of Experimental Hormonology, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, 2UER de Biologie Médicale, Haute Ecole Francisco Ferrer, Brussels, BelgiumAbstract: The present study aimed to document Candida albicans biofilm development on titanium and its modulation by a peroxidase-precoated material which can generate antimicrobials, such as hypoiodite or hypothiocyanite, from hydrogen peroxide, iodide, or thiocyanate. For this purpose, titanium (powder or foil was suspended in Sabouraud liquid medium inoculated with C. albicans ATCC10231. After continuous stirring for 2–21 days at room temperature, the supernatant was monitored by turbidimetry at 600 nm and titanium washed three times in sterile Sabouraud broth. Using the tetrazolium salt MTT-formazan assay, the titanium-adherent fungal biomass was measured as 7.50 ± 0.60 × 106 blastoconidia per gram of titanium powder (n = 30 and 0.50 ± 0.04 × 106 blastoconidia per cm² of titanium foil (n = 12. The presence of yeast on the surface of titanium was confirmed by microscopy both on fresh preparations and after calcofluor white staining. However, in the presence of peroxidase systems (lactoperoxidase with substrates such as hydrogen peroxide donor, iodide, or thiocyanate, Candida growth in both planktonic and attached phases appeared to be inhibited. Moreover, this study demonstrates the possible partition of peroxidase systems between titanium material (peroxidase-precoated and liquid environment (containing peroxidase substrates to limit C. albicans biofilm formation.Keywords: adhesion, material, oral, yeast

  7. Silver manganese oxide electrodes for lithium batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Vaughey, John T.; Dees, Dennis W.

    2006-05-09

    This invention relates to electrodes for non-aqueous lithium cells and batteries with silver manganese oxide positive electrodes, denoted AgxMnOy, in which x and y are such that the manganese ions in the charged or partially charged electrodes cells have an average oxidation state greater than 3.5. The silver manganese oxide electrodes optionally contain silver powder and/or silver foil to assist in current collection at the electrodes and to improve the power capability of the cells or batteries. The invention relates also to a method for preparing AgxMnOy electrodes by decomposition of a permanganate salt, such as AgMnO4, or by the decomposition of KMnO4 or LiMnO4 in the presence of a silver salt.

  8. The effect of EGb 761 on retinal lipid peroxidation and glutathione peroxidase level in experimental lens induced uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgihan, A; Aricioğlu, A; Bilgihan, K; Onol, M; Hasanreisoğlu, B; Türközkan, N

    1994-01-01

    An acute lens-induced necrotizing intraocular inflammation was produced in pigmented guinea pigs. Treatment of these animals by 100 mg/kg/day EGb 761 a free oxygen radical scavenger for 10 days, reduced retinal lipid peroxidation (p > 0.05) and increased the retinal glutathione peroxidase level (p > 0.05). Although not significantly, these findings suggest that EGb 761 could be combined with other antiinflammatory drugs and may be beneficial in the treatment of uveitis.

  9. Manganese (II) induces chemical hypoxia by inhibiting HIF-prolyl hydroxylase: Implication in manganese-induced pulmonary inflammation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Jeongoh; Lee, Jong-Suk; Choi, Daekyu; Lee, Youna; Hong, Sungchae; Choi, Jungyun; Han, Songyi; Ko, Yujin; Kim, Jung-Ae; Mi Kim, Young; Jung, Yunjin

    2009-01-01

    Manganese (II), a transition metal, causes pulmonary inflammation upon environmental or occupational inhalation in excess. We investigated a potential molecular mechanism underlying manganese-induced pulmonary inflammation. Manganese (II) delayed HIF-1α protein disappearance, which occurred by inhibiting HIF-prolyl hydroxylase (HPH), the key enzyme for HIF-1α hydroxylation and subsequent von Hippel-Lindau(VHL)-dependent HIF-1α degradation. HPH inhibition by manganese (II) was neutralized significantly by elevated dose of iron. Consistent with this, the induction of cellular HIF-1α protein by manganese (II) was abolished by pretreatment with iron. Manganese (II) induced the HIF-1 target gene involved in pulmonary inflammation, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), in lung carcinoma cell lines. The induction of VEGF was dependent on HIF-1. Manganese-induced VEGF promoted tube formation of HUVEC. Taken together, these data suggest that HIF-1 may be a potential mediator of manganese-induced pulmonary inflammation

  10. Manganese exposure in foundry furnacemen and scrap recycling workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lander, F; Kristiansen, J; Lauritsen, Jens

    1999-01-01

    Cast iron products are alloyed with small quantities of manganese, and foundry furnacemen are potentially exposed to manganese during tapping and handling of smelts. Manganese is a neurotoxic substance that accumulates in the central nervous system, where it may cause a neurological disorder...

  11. Colorimetric detection of glucose based on ficin with peroxidase-like activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Yanjiao; Huang, Zili; Yang, Yufang; Long, Yijuan; Zheng, Huzhi

    2018-01-01

    In this work, we developed a colorimetric biosensing system for glucose detection by coupling the peroxidase-like of ficin and the glucose oxidase (GOx). GOx can catalyze the oxidation of glucose to produce H2O2, then, ficin catalyzes the oxidation of peroxidase substrate 3,3‧,5,5‧-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) by H2O2 to produce a blue color reaction. The present sensing system showed a linear response toward glucose detection over range of 2.0-100 μM with a detection limit of 0.5 μM. This system is simple, low cost, highly sensitive and selective for glucose detection, and was also applied to measuring glucose in human serum. Furthermore, in order to expand the application of ficin in biological sensing, we immobilized ficin onto the SiO2@Fe3O4 NPs, which exhibited the merits of recycling as well as allowing the repeated detection of glucose. Thus it may provide great potential applications in biomedicine, biotechnology and environmental chemistry.

  12. Ligninolytic enzymes of the fungus Irpex lacteus (Polyporus tulipiferae): isolation and characterization of lignin peroxidase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rothschild, N.; Novotný, Čeněk; Šašek, Václav; Dosoretz, C. G.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 31, - (2002), s. 627-633 ISSN 0141-0229 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : lignin * peroxidase * heme peroxidase Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.773, year: 2002

  13. Dissection of the mechanism of manganese porphyrin-catalyzed chlorine dioxide generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umile, Thomas P; Wang, Dong; Groves, John T

    2011-10-17

    Chlorine dioxide, an industrially important biocide and bleach, is produced rapidly and efficiently from chlorite ion in the presence of water-soluble, manganese porphyrins and porphyrazines at neutral pH under mild conditions. The electron-deficient manganese(III) tetra-(N,N-dimethyl)imidazolium porphyrin (MnTDMImP), tetra-(N,N-dimethyl)benzimidazolium (MnTDMBImP) porphyrin, and manganese(III) tetra-N-methyl-2,3-pyridinoporphyrazine (MnTM23PyPz) were found to be the most efficient catalysts for this process. The more typical manganese tetra-4-N-methylpyridiumporphyrin (Mn-4-TMPyP) was much less effective. Rates for the best catalysts were in the range of 0.24-32 TO/s with MnTM23PyPz being the fastest. The kinetics of reactions of the various ClO(x) species (e.g., chlorite ion, hypochlorous acid, and chlorine dioxide) with authentic oxomanganese(IV) and dioxomanganese(V)MnTDMImP intermediates were studied by stopped-flow spectroscopy. Rate-limiting oxidation of the manganese(III) catalyst by chlorite ion via oxygen atom transfer is proposed to afford a trans-dioxomanganese(V) intermediate. Both trans-dioxomanganese(V)TDMImP and oxoaqua-manganese(IV)TDMImP oxidize chlorite ion by 1-electron, generating the product chlorine dioxide with bimolecular rate constants of 6.30 × 10(3) M(-1) s(-1) and 3.13 × 10(3) M(-1) s(-1), respectively, at pH 6.8. Chlorine dioxide was able to oxidize manganese(III)TDMImP to oxomanganese(IV) at a similar rate, establishing a redox steady-state equilibrium under turnover conditions. Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) produced during turnover was found to rapidly and reversibly react with manganese(III)TDMImP to give dioxoMn(V)TDMImP and chloride ion. The measured equilibrium constant for this reaction (K(eq) = 2.2 at pH 5.1) afforded a value for the oxoMn(V)/Mn(III) redox couple under catalytic conditions (E' = 1.35 V vs NHE). In subsequent processes, chlorine dioxide reacts with both oxomanganese(V) and oxomanganese(IV)TDMImP to afford chlorate

  14. Manganese phospate physical chemistry and surface properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najera R, N.; Romero G, E. T.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the methodology for the manganese phosphate (III) synthesis (MnP0 4 H 2 0) from manganese chloride. The physicochemical characterization was carried out by: X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, infrared analysis and thermal gravimetric analysis. The surface characterization is obtained through the determination of surface area, point of zero charge and kinetics of moisture. As a phosphate compound of a metal with low oxidation state is a promising compound for removal pollutants from water and soil, can be used for the potential construction of containment barriers for radioactive wastes. (Author)

  15. Green tea and its major polyphenol EGCG increase the activity of oral peroxidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narotzki, Baruch; Levy, Yishai; Aizenbud, Dror; Reznick, Abraham Z

    2013-01-01

    Oral peroxidases (OPO) consist mainly of salivary peroxidase and myeloperoxidase and are involved in oral defense mechanisms. Salivary peroxidase is synthesized and secreted by salivary glands, whereas myeloperoxidase is found in polymorphonuclear leukocytes, which migrate into the oral cavity at gingival crevices. Green tea is the world's second most popular drink after water. Polyphenols are the most biologically active group of tea components. The purpose of our study was to elucidate the interaction between green tea & EGCG (Epigallocatechin 3-gallate), its main polyphenol and OPO. In previous studies we have shown that elderly trained people who drink green tea for 3 months, have a higher level of OPO activity compared to non-drinkers. Thus, we decided to extend our project in order to understand the above observations by studying the interaction of green tea and OPO both in vitro and in vivo. Addition of green tea and black tea infusions (50 μl/ml) and EGCG (50 μM) to saliva, resulted in a sharp rise of OPO activity +280% (p = 0.009), 54% (p = 0.04) and 42% (p = 0.009), respectively. The elevation of OPO activity due to addition of green tea and EGCG was in a dose dependent manner: r = 0.91 (p = 0.001) and r = 0.637 (p = 0.019), respectively. Also, following green tea infusion mouth rinsing, a rise of OPO activity was observed: +268% (p = 0.159). These results may be of great clinical importance, as tea consumer's oral epithelium may have better protection against the deleterious effects of hydroxyl radicals, produced by not removed hydrogen peroxides in the presence of metal ions. Higher OPO activity upon green tea drinking may provide an extra protection against oxidative stress in the oral cavity.

  16. Effect of manganese on neonatal rat: manganese distribution in vital organs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Husain, R; Mushtaq, M; Seth, P K; Chandra, S V

    1976-01-01

    At present very little is known about the effect of manganese on the early stage of life, though the metal poisoning in adult humans and experimental animals has been known for quite some time. The possibility of the exposure of the general public to the deleterious effects of the metal through the environmental contamination resulting from its increasing industrial applications, and the use of Methyl Cyclopentadienyl Manganese Tricarbonyl (MMT) in gasoline and motor fuel, points to the need for such an information. Our recent studies in this direction have shown that manganese exposed nursing dams can transfer significant amounts of the metal via maternal milk of their sucklings and the brain of the latter exhibited marked enzymatic alterations. The present communication deals with the distribution of manganese in the vital organs of rat pups nursing on mothers receiving the metal orally.

  17. Thermodynamic Properties of Manganese and Molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desai, P.D.

    1987-01-01

    This work reviews and discusses the data on the various thermodynamic properties of manganese and molybdenum available through March 1985. These include heat capacity, enthalpy, enthalpy of transitions and melting, vapor pressure, and enthalpy of vaporization. The existing data have been critically evaluated and analyzed. The recommended values for the heat capacity, enthalpy, entropy, and Gibbs energy function from 0.5 to 2400 K for manganese and from 0.4 to 5000 K for molybdenum have been generated, as have heat capacity values for supercooled β-Mn and for γ-Mn below 298.15 K. The recommended values for vapor pressure cover the temperature range from 298.15 to 2400 K for manganese and from 298.15 to 5000 K for molybdenum. These values are referred to temperatures based on IPTS-1968. The uncertainties in the recommended values of the heat capacity range from +-3% to +-5% for manganese and from +-1.5% to +-3% for molybdenum

  18. Iron and manganese deposits in Uruguay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarado, B.

    1959-01-01

    This report is the results of the study carried out for the United Nations expert which the main object was: the study of the information available about iron and manganese formation in Uruguay, as well as the main researching deposit to determinate economical possibilities in the exportation.

  19. Crystallization and spectroscopic studies of manganese malonate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    ... and its esters are important intermediates in syntheses of vitamins B1 and B6, barbitu- ... been a subject of interest because of the importance of such interactions in a ... The d-values of the Bragg peaks in the XRD. Figure 1. (a) Manganese ...

  20. Treating electrolytic manganese residue with alkaline additives for stabilizing manganese and removing ammonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Changbo; Wang, Jiwei [Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing (China); Wang, Nanfang [Hunan Institute of Engineering, Xiangtan (China)

    2013-11-15

    Electrolytic manganese residue (EMR) from the electrolytic manganese industry is a solid waste containing mainly calcium sulfate dihydrate and quartzite. It is impossible to directly use the EMR as a building material due to some contaminants such as soluble manganese, ammonia nitrogen and other toxic substances. To immobilize the contaminants and reduce their release into the environment, treating EMR using alkaline additives for stabilizing manganese and removing ammonia was investigated. The physical and chemical characteristics of the original EMR were characterized by XRFS, XRD, and SEM. Leaching test of the original EMR shows that the risks to the environment are the high content of soluble manganese and ammonia nitrogen. The influence of various alkaline additives, solidifying reaction time, and other solidifying reaction conditions such as outdoor ventilation and sunlight, and rain flow on the efficiencies of Mn{sup 2+} solidification and ammonia nitrogen removal was investigated. The results show that with mass ratio of CaO to residue 1 : 8, when the solidifying reaction was carried out indoors for 4 h with no rain flow, the highest efficiencies of Mn{sup 2+} solidification and ammonia nitrogen removal (99.98% and 99.21%) are obtained. Leaching test shows that the concentration and emission of manganese and ammonia nitrogen of the treated EMR meets the requirements of the Chinese government legislation (GB8978-1996)

  1. Treating electrolytic manganese residue with alkaline additives for stabilizing manganese and removing ammonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Changbo; Wang, Jiwei; Wang, Nanfang

    2013-01-01

    Electrolytic manganese residue (EMR) from the electrolytic manganese industry is a solid waste containing mainly calcium sulfate dihydrate and quartzite. It is impossible to directly use the EMR as a building material due to some contaminants such as soluble manganese, ammonia nitrogen and other toxic substances. To immobilize the contaminants and reduce their release into the environment, treating EMR using alkaline additives for stabilizing manganese and removing ammonia was investigated. The physical and chemical characteristics of the original EMR were characterized by XRFS, XRD, and SEM. Leaching test of the original EMR shows that the risks to the environment are the high content of soluble manganese and ammonia nitrogen. The influence of various alkaline additives, solidifying reaction time, and other solidifying reaction conditions such as outdoor ventilation and sunlight, and rain flow on the efficiencies of Mn"2"+ solidification and ammonia nitrogen removal was investigated. The results show that with mass ratio of CaO to residue 1 : 8, when the solidifying reaction was carried out indoors for 4 h with no rain flow, the highest efficiencies of Mn"2"+ solidification and ammonia nitrogen removal (99.98% and 99.21%) are obtained. Leaching test shows that the concentration and emission of manganese and ammonia nitrogen of the treated EMR meets the requirements of the Chinese government legislation (GB8978-1996)

  2. Purification and characterization of an intracellular peroxidase from Streptomyces cyaneus.

    OpenAIRE

    Mliki, A; Zimmermann, W

    1992-01-01

    An intracellular peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7) from Streptomyces cyaneus was purified to homogeneity. The enzyme had a molecular weight of 185,000 and was composed of two subunits of equal size. It had an isoelectric point of 6.1. The enzyme had a peroxidase activity toward o-dianisidine with a Km of 17.8 microM and a pH optimum of 5.0. It also showed catalase activity with a Km of 2.07 mM H2O2 and a pH optimum of 8.0. The purified enzyme did not catalyze C alpha-C beta bond cleavage of 1,3-dihydr...

  3. Potential Applications of Peroxidases in the Fine Chemical Industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casella, Luigi; Monzani, Enrico; Nicolis, Stefania

    A description of selected types of reactions catalyzed by heme peroxidases is given. In particular, the discussion is focused mainly on those of potential interest for fine chemical synthesis. The division into subsections has been done fromthe point of view of the enzyme action, i.e., giving emphasis to themechanismof the enzymatic reaction, and from that of the substrate, i.e., analyzing the type of transformation promoted by the enzyme. These two approaches have several points in common.

  4. Kinetic mechanism and nucleotide specificity of NADH peroxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoll, V.S.; Blanchard, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    NADH peroxidase is a flavoprotein isolated from Streptococcus faecalis which catalyzes the pyridine nucleotide-dependent reduction of hydrogen peroxide to water. Initial velocity, product, and dead-end inhibition studies have been performed at pH 7.5 and support a ping-pong kinetic mechanism. In the absence of hydrogen peroxide, both transhydrogenation between NADH and thioNAD, and isotope exchange between [ 14 C]NADH and NAD, have been demonstrated, although in both these experiments, the maximal velocity of nucleotide exchange was less than 1.5% the maximal velocity of the peroxidatic reaction. We propose that NADH binds tightly to both oxidized and two-electron reduced enzyme. NADH oxidation proceeds stereospecifically with the transfer of the 4S hydrogen to enzyme, and then, via exchange, to water. No primary tritium kinetic isotope effect was observed, and no statistically significant primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects on V/K were determined, although primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects on V were observed in the presence and absence of sodium acetate. NADH peroxidase thus shares with other flavoprotein reductases striking kinetic, spectroscopic, and stereochemical similarities. On this basis, we propose a chemical mechanism for the peroxide cleaving reaction catalyzed by NADH peroxidase which involves the obligate formation of a flavinperoxide, and peroxo bond cleavage by nucleophilic attack by enzymatic dithiols

  5. DYNAMICS OF LEAF PEROXIDASE ACTIVITY DURING ONTOGENY OF HEMP PLANTS, IN RELATION TO SEXUAL PHENOTYPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Truta

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available During vegetation of female and male hemp plants (Cannabis sativa L., five quantitative determinations of peroxidase activities were made (40 days, 55 days, 70 days, 85 days, 105 days. Peroxidase activity presented some differences in hemp plants, between females and males, during their vegetation cycle. In female plants, before anthesis were registered peaks of peroxidase activities. The blossoming of male plants was coincident with the increase of catalitic action of peroxidase. Generally, the male plants displayed greater levels of peroxidasic activity.

  6. Soil manganese enrichment from industrial inputs: a gastropod perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Despina-Maria Bordean

    Full Text Available Manganese is one of the most abundant metal in natural environments and serves as an essential microelement for all living systems. However, the enrichment of soil with manganese resulting from industrial inputs may threaten terrestrial ecosystems. Several studies have demonstrated harmful effects of manganese exposure by cutaneous contact and/or by soil ingestion to a wide range of soil invertebrates. The link between soil manganese and land snails has never been made although these invertebrates routinely come in contact with the upper soil horizons through cutaneous contact, egg-laying, and feeding activities in soil. Therefore, we have investigated the direct transfer of manganese from soils to snails and assessed its toxicity at background concentrations in the soil. Juvenile Cantareus aspersus snails were caged under semi-field conditions and exposed first, for a period of 30 days, to a series of soil manganese concentrations, and then, for a second period of 30 days, to soils with higher manganese concentrations. Manganese levels were measured in the snail hepatopancreas, foot, and shell. The snail survival and shell growth were used to assess the lethal and sublethal effects of manganese exposure. The transfer of manganese from soil to snails occurred independently of food ingestion, but had no consistent effect on either the snail survival or shell growth. The hepatopancreas was the best biomarker of manganese exposure, whereas the shell did not serve as a long-term sink for this metal. The kinetics of manganese retention in the hepatopancreas of snails previously exposed to manganese-spiked soils was significantly influenced by a new exposure event. The results of this study reveal the importance of land snails for manganese cycling in terrestrial biotopes and suggest that the direct transfer from soils to snails should be considered when precisely assessing the impact of anthropogenic Mn releases on soil ecosystems.

  7. New fluorimetric assay of horseradish peroxidase using sesamol as substrate and its application to EIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, Hidetoshi; Nakabayashi, Shigeo; Ohno, Ken-Ichi; Maeda, Masako

    2012-04-01

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) is generally used as a label enzyme in enzyme immunoassay (EIA). The procedure used for HRP detection in EIA is critical for sensitivity and precision. This paper describes a novel fluorimetric assay for horseradish peroxidase (HRP) using sesamol as substrate. The principle of the assay is as follow: sesamol (3,4-methylenedioxy phenol) is reacted enzymatically in the presence of hydrogen peroxide to produce dimeric sesamol. The dimer is fluorescent and can be detected sensitively at ex. 347 nm, em. 427 nm. The measurable range of HRP was 1.0×10 -18 to 1.0×10 -15  mol/assay, with a detection limit of 1.0×10 -18  mol/assay. The coefficient of variation (CV, n =8) was examined at each point on the standard curve, with a mean CV percentage of 3.8%. This assay system was applied to thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) EIA using HRP as the label enzyme.

  8. Hemin-Graphene Derivatives with Increased Peroxidase Activities Restrain Protein Tyrosine Nitration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Huan; Yang, Zhen; Li, Hailing; Gao, Zhonghong

    2017-12-14

    Protein tyrosine nitration is implicated in the occurrence and progression of pathological conditions involving free radical reactions. It is well recognized that hemin can catalyze protein tyrosine nitration in the presence of nitrite and hydrogen peroxide. Generally, the catalytic efficiency is positively correlated to its peroxidase activity. In this study, however, it is found that the efficiency of hemin in catalyzing protein tyrosine nitration is largely suppressed after functionalization with graphene derivatives, even though its peroxidase-like activity is more than quadrupled. Further studies show that the oxidation of tyrosine is still observed for these composites; dityrosine formation, however, is greatly inhibited. Furthermore, these composites also exhibit strong effects on the oxidation of nitrite into nitrate. Therefore, we propose a mechanism in which hemin-graphene derivatives facilitate the oxidation of tyrosine and nitrite to produce tyrosyl radicals and nitrogen dioxide radicals in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, but graphene interlayers serve as barriers that hinder radical-radical coupling reactions; consequently, protein tyrosine nitration is restrained. This property of hemin-graphene derivatives, by which they catalyze substrate oxidation but suppress radical-radical coupling reactions, shows their great potential in selective oxidation procedures for byproduct removal. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Two oxidation sites for low redox potential substrates: a directed mutagenesis, kinetic, and crystallographic study on Pleurotus eryngii versatile peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, María; Mate, María J; Romero, Antonio; Martínez, María Jesús; Martínez, Ángel T; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J

    2012-11-30

    Versatile peroxidase shares with manganese peroxidase and lignin peroxidase the ability to oxidize Mn(2+) and high redox potential aromatic compounds, respectively. Moreover, it is also able to oxidize phenols (and low redox potential dyes) at two catalytic sites, as shown by biphasic kinetics. A high efficiency site (with 2,6-dimethoxyphenol and p-hydroquinone catalytic efficiencies of ∼70 and ∼700 s(-1) mM(-1), respectively) was localized at the same exposed Trp-164 responsible for high redox potential substrate oxidation (as shown by activity loss in the W164S variant). The second site, characterized by low catalytic efficiency (∼3 and ∼50 s(-1) mM(-1) for 2,6-dimethoxyphenol and p-hydroquinone, respectively) was localized at the main heme access channel. Steady-state and transient-state kinetics for oxidation of phenols and dyes at the latter site were improved when side chains of residues forming the heme channel edge were removed in single and multiple variants. Among them, the E140G/K176G, E140G/P141G/K176G, and E140G/W164S/K176G variants attained catalytic efficiencies for oxidation of 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) at the heme channel similar to those of the exposed tryptophan site. The heme channel enlargement shown by x-ray diffraction of the E140G, P141G, K176G, and E140G/K176G variants would allow a better substrate accommodation near the heme, as revealed by the up to 26-fold lower K(m) values (compared with native VP). The resulting interactions were shown by the x-ray structure of the E140G-guaiacol complex, which includes two H-bonds of the substrate with Arg-43 and Pro-139 in the distal heme pocket (at the end of the heme channel) and several hydrophobic interactions with other residues and the heme cofactor.

  10. Stress response to cadmium and manganese in Paracentrotus lividus developing embryos is mediated by nitric oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Migliaccio, Oriana; Castellano, Immacolata; Romano, Giovanna; Palumbo, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • NO is produced in sea urchin embryos in response to cadmium and manganese. • Cadmium and manganese affect the expression of specific genes. • NO levels regulate directly or indirectly the expression of some metal-induced genes. • NO is proposed as a sensor of different stress agents in sea urchin embryos. - Abstract: Increasing concentrations of contaminants, often resulting from anthropogenic activities, have been reported to occur in the marine environment and affect marine organisms. Among these, the metal ions cadmium and manganese have been shown to induce developmental delay and abnormalities, mainly reflecting skeleton elongation perturbation, in the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus, an established model for toxicological studies. Here, we provide evidence that the physiological messenger nitric oxide (NO), formed by L-arginine oxidation by NO synthase (NOS), mediates the stress response induced by cadmium and manganese in sea urchins. When NO levels were lowered by inhibiting NOS, the proportion of abnormal plutei increased. Quantitative expression of a panel of 19 genes involved in stress response, skeletogenesis, detoxification and multidrug efflux processes was followed at different developmental stages and under different conditions: metals alone, metals in the presence of NOS inhibitor, NO donor and NOS inhibitor alone. These data allowed the identification of different classes of genes whose metal-induced transcriptional expression was directly or indirectly mediated by NO. These results open new perspectives on the role of NO as a sensor of different stress agents in sea urchin developing embryos

  11. Stress response to cadmium and manganese in Paracentrotus lividus developing embryos is mediated by nitric oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Migliaccio, Oriana; Castellano, Immacolata [Laboratory of Cellular and Developmental Biology, Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn, Villa Comunale, 80121 Naples (Italy); Romano, Giovanna [Laboratory of Functional and Evolutionary Ecology, Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn, Villa Comunale, 80121 Naples (Italy); Palumbo, Anna, E-mail: anna.palumbo@szn.it [Laboratory of Cellular and Developmental Biology, Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn, Villa Comunale, 80121 Naples (Italy)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • NO is produced in sea urchin embryos in response to cadmium and manganese. • Cadmium and manganese affect the expression of specific genes. • NO levels regulate directly or indirectly the expression of some metal-induced genes. • NO is proposed as a sensor of different stress agents in sea urchin embryos. - Abstract: Increasing concentrations of contaminants, often resulting from anthropogenic activities, have been reported to occur in the marine environment and affect marine organisms. Among these, the metal ions cadmium and manganese have been shown to induce developmental delay and abnormalities, mainly reflecting skeleton elongation perturbation, in the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus, an established model for toxicological studies. Here, we provide evidence that the physiological messenger nitric oxide (NO), formed by L-arginine oxidation by NO synthase (NOS), mediates the stress response induced by cadmium and manganese in sea urchins. When NO levels were lowered by inhibiting NOS, the proportion of abnormal plutei increased. Quantitative expression of a panel of 19 genes involved in stress response, skeletogenesis, detoxification and multidrug efflux processes was followed at different developmental stages and under different conditions: metals alone, metals in the presence of NOS inhibitor, NO donor and NOS inhibitor alone. These data allowed the identification of different classes of genes whose metal-induced transcriptional expression was directly or indirectly mediated by NO. These results open new perspectives on the role of NO as a sensor of different stress agents in sea urchin developing embryos.

  12. A simple route to synthesize manganese germanate nanorods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pei, L.Z.; Yang, Y.; Yuan, C.Z.; Duan Taike; Zhang Qianfeng

    2011-01-01

    Manganese germanate nanorods have been synthesized by a simple route using germanium dioxide and manganese acetate as the source materials. X-ray diffraction observation shows that the nanorods are composed of orthorhombic and monoclinic manganese germanate phases. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy observations display that the manganese germanate nanorods have flat tips with the length of longer than 10 micrometers and diameter of 60-350 nm, respectively. The role of the growth conditions on the formation of the manganese germanate nanorods shows that the proper selection and combination of the growth conditions are the key factor for controlling the formation of the manganese germanate nanorods. The photoluminescence spectrum of the manganese germanate nanorods exhibits four fluorescence emission peaks centered at 422 nm, 472 nm, 487 nm and 530 nm showing the application potential for the optical devices. - Research Highlights: → Manganese germanate nanorods have been synthesized by simple hydrothermal process. → The formation of manganese germanate nanorods can be controlled by growth conditions. → Manganese germanate nanorods exhibit good PL emission ability for optical device.

  13. Manganese binding proteins in human and cow's milk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loennerdal, B.; Keen, C.L.; Hurley, L.S.

    1985-01-01

    Manganese nutrition in the neonatal period is poorly understood, due in part to a lack of information on the amount of manganese in infant foods and its bioavailability. Since the molecular localization of an element in foods is one determinant of its subsequent bioavailability, a study was made of the binding of manganese in human and cow's milk. An extrinsic label of 54 Mn was shown to equilibrate isotopically with native manganese in milks and formulas. Milk samples were separated into fat, casein and whey by ultracentrifugation. In human milk, the major part (71%) of manganese was found in whey, 11% in casein and 18% in the lipid fraction. In contrast, in cow's milk, 32% of total manganese was in whey, 67% in casein and 1% in lipid. Within the human whey fraction, most of the manganese was bound to lactoferrin, while in cow's whey, manganese was mostly complexed to ligands with molecular weights less than 200. The distribution of manganese in formulas was closer to that of human milk than of cow's milk. The bioavailability of manganese associated with lactoferrin, casein and low molecular weight complexes needs to be assessed

  14. Synthesis of Manganese Tetroxide Nanoparticles Using Precipitation and Study of Its Structure and Optical Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Shokoohi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Considering extensive applications of manganese tetroxide nanoparticles in various industries due to its special properties, conducting studies on how to achieve more suitable ways to produce smaller nanoparticles is of great importance. In this study, nanoparticles of manganese tetroxide (Mn3O4 were synthesized by a co-precipitation method. In order to determine the characteristics of the structure, size, and specific surface of the resulting nanoparticles, techniques such as XRD, BET, BJH, FESEM, and FTIR were employed. Also, the nanoparticles were quantified with EDS and their colony size was examined using DLS experiments. The findings revealed a production of crystalline manganese tetroxide nanoparticles with a space group of 141/amd (S.G. (141 and a molecular weight of 228.81 with the international code of ICSD Card # 89 - 4837. The specific surface area was 32.147 m2/g with a pore volume of 0.1041 cm3/g. The XRD and EDX analyses verify the production of the Mn3O4 nanoparticles. The size of the nanostructures is approximately 19 nm. The method used in this study could produce the Mn3O4 nanoparticles in a much easier way without the need for surfactants. Compared to the nanoparticles produced in other studies, the size of the nanoparticles produced in the present study is remarkably smaller. Moreover, less amount of the metal salt was used.

  15. Cell-free one-pot conversion of (+)-valencene to (+)-nootkatone by a unique dye-decolorizing peroxidase combined with a laccase from Funalia trogii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolwek, Julia; Behrens, Christoph; Linke, Diana; Krings, Ulrich; Berger, Ralf G

    2018-02-01

    A combined system of a unique dye-decolorizing peroxidase (Ftr-DyP) and a laccase obtained from the basidiomycete Funalia trogii converted the precursor (+)-valencene completely to the high-value grapefruit flavour constituent (+)-nootkatone, reaching a concentration maximum of 1100 mg/L. In the presence of 1 mM Mn 2+ and 2.5 mM p-coumaric acid, (+)-nootkatone was the predominating volatile product, and only traces of substrate and the nootkatols were detectable after 24 h. Hence, the two-enzyme-system reproduced the oxidizing activity observed before for the crude culture supernatant. The newly discovered Ftr-DyP was purified, sequenced and further characterized as a thermostable, non-glycosylated protein with a pH-optimum in the acidic range and a calculated mass of 52.3 kDa. Besides the typical activity of DyPs towards anthraquinone dyes, Ftr-DyP also oxidized Mn 2+ and showed activity in the absence of hydrogen peroxide. Neither the DyP from Mycetinis scorodonius nor the manganese peroxidase from Nematoloma frowardii were able to replace Ftr-DyP in this reaction. A hypothetical reaction mechanism is presented.

  16. Characterization of Sumbawa manganese ore and recovery of manganese sulfate as leaching products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusumaningrum, Retno; Rahmani, Siti Astari; Widayatno, Wahyu Bambang; Wismogroho, Agus Sukarto; Nugroho, Dwi Wahyu; Maulana, Syahrizal; Rochman, Nurul Taufiqu; Amal, M. Ikhlasul

    2018-05-01

    The aims of this research were to study the leaching process of manganese ore which originated from Sumbawa, Indonesia and its characterization. A high grade Indonesian manganese ore from Sumbawa, West of Nusa Tenggara was characterized by X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF). The result showed composition of 78.8 % Mn, 17.77% Fe and the rest were trace elements such as Si, Co, Ti, Zn, V and Zr contents. X-Ray Diffraction analysis showed that the manganese ore was consisted of pyrolusite (MnO2), rhodonite (MnSiO3), rhodochrosite (MnCO3) and hematite (Fe2O3). Manganese ore was also analyzed by thermal analysis to observe their thermal decomposition character. In this study, sulphuric acid (H2SO4, 6 M) was deployed as leaching agent. The leaching process was performed at 90 °C for two hours with the addition of NH4OH to control pH. Recovery percentage of leaching process yielded of 87 % Mn extracted. The crystallization process result at heating temperature of 200 °C was confirmed by XRD as manganese sulfate.

  17. Hydrometallurgical Process and Kinetics of Leaching Manganese from Semi-Oxidized Manganese Ores with Sucrose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhong Wang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The extraction of manganese from a semi-oxidized manganese ore was investigated with sucrose as the reducing agent in dilute sulfuric acid medium. The kinetics of leaching manganese from the complex ore containing MnCO3 and MnO2 was also investigated. The effects of sucrose and sulfuric acid concentrations, leaching temperature and reaction time on the total Mn (TMn, MnO2 and MnCO3 leaching were investigated. Results showed that MnCO3 could more easily react with hydrogen ions than MnO2 in ores, and MnO2 decomposition could be advantageous for MnCO3 leaching. The leaching efficiencies of 91.8% for total Mn, 91.4% for MnO2 and 96.9% for MnCO3 were obtained under the following optimized conditions: 0.035 mol/L sucrose concentration, 5 mol/L sulfuric acid concentration, 60 min of reaction time and 363.2 K of leaching temperature. In addition, it was found that the leaching process of semi-oxidized manganese ore follows the shrinking core model and the leaching rate was controlled by chemical reaction and diffusion. The apparent activation energy of the total manganese, MnO2, and MnCO3 leaching were 40.83, 40.59, and 53.33 kJ·mol−1, respectively.

  18. Bioleaching of a manganese and silver Ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porro, S.; Tedesco, P.H.; La Plata

    1990-01-01

    The bioleaching with a strain of Thiobacillus thiooxidans of the ore of Farallon Negro (Catamarca, Argentina) was studied in order to estimate its application to the solution and recovery of the manganese, and to improve the silver extraction. The State company which works the mine has not yet found an economical process to extract the manganese and has only reached a 30% efficiency in the recovery of silver by cianuration. The effects of pulp density variations and the addition of different quantities of FeS were analysed looking for the best working conditions. 74 μm (mesh Tyler 200) of ore particles were used because that is the size used in this plant for the cianuration process. (Author)

  19. Arsenic removal by manganese greensand filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phommavong, T. [Saskatchewan Environment, Regina (Canada); Viraraghavan, T. [Univ. of Regina, Saskatchewan (Canada). Faculty of Engineering

    1994-12-31

    Some of the small communities in Saskatchewan are expected to have difficulty complying with the new maximum acceptable concentration (MAC) of 25 {micro}g/L for arsenic. A test column was set up in the laboratory to study the removal of arsenic from the potable water using oxidation with KMnO{sub 4}, followed by manganese greensand filtration. Tests were run using water from the tap having a background arsenic concentration of <0.5 {micro}g/L and iron concentration in the range of 0.02 to 0.77 mg/L. The test water was spiked with arsenic and iron. Results showed that 61 % to 98% of arsenic can be removed from the potable water by oxidation with KMnO{sub 4} followed by manganese greensand filtration.

  20. Peroxidase synthesis and activity in the interaction of soybean with Phytophthora megasperma f. sp. glycinea (Pmg)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chibbar, R.N.; Esnault, R.; Lee, D.; van Huystee, R.B.; Ward, E.W.B.

    1986-01-01

    Changes, in peroxidase (EC1.11.1.7) have been reported following infection. However, determinations of biosynthesis of quantities of the peroxidase protein molecule have not been made! In this study hypocotyl of soybean seedlings (Glycine max; cv Harosoy, susceptible; cv Harosoy 63, resistant) were inoculated with zoospores of Pmg. Incorporation of 35 S-methionine (supplied with inoculum) in TCA precipitates was measured. Peroxidase synthesis was measured by immuno precipitation using antibodies against a cationic and an anionic peroxidase derived from peanut cells. Specific peroxidase activity increased rapidly from 5 to 9 h following infection in the resistant reaction but not in the susceptible reaction or the water controls. There was increased synthesis of the anionic peroxidase but not of the cationic peroxidase in the resistant reaction. The anionic peroxidase did not increase in the susceptible until 15 h. The ratio of peroxidase synthesis to total protein synthesis decreased in inoculated tissues compared to control. Peroxidase synthesis is, therefore, a relative minor host response to infection

  1. Iron and manganese removal from drinking water

    OpenAIRE

    Pascu, Daniela-Elena; Neagu (Pascu), Mihaela; Alina Traistaru, Gina; Nechifor, Aurelia Cristina; Raluca Miron, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to find a suitable method for removal of iron and manganese from ground water, considering both local economical and environmental aspects. Ground water is a highly important source of drinking water in Romania. Ground water is naturally pure from bacteria at a 25 m depth or more. However, solved metals may occur and if the levels are too high, the water is not drinkable. Different processes, such as electrochemical and combined electrochemical-adsorption m...

  2. Manganese concentration in human saliva using NAA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewgoy, Hugo R., E-mail: hugorl@usp.br [Universidade Bandeirante Anhanguera (UNIBAN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Zamboni, Cibele B.; Medeiros, Ilca M.M.A.; Medeiros, Jose A.G. de [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    In this investigation the Manganese levels in human whole saliva were determined using Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) technique for the proposition of an indicative interval. The measurements were performed considering gender and lifestyle factors of Brazilian inhabitants (non-smokers, non-drinkers and no history of toxicological exposure). The results emphasize that the indicative interval is statistically different by gender. These data are useful for identifying or preventing some diseases in the Brazilian population. (author)

  3. Manganese concentration in human saliva using NAA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewgoy, Hugo R.; Zamboni, Cibele B.; Medeiros, Ilca M.M.A.; Medeiros, Jose A.G. de

    2013-01-01

    In this investigation the Manganese levels in human whole saliva were determined using Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) technique for the proposition of an indicative interval. The measurements were performed considering gender and lifestyle factors of Brazilian inhabitants (non-smokers, non-drinkers and no history of toxicological exposure). The results emphasize that the indicative interval is statistically different by gender. These data are useful for identifying or preventing some diseases in the Brazilian population. (author)

  4. Colorimetric assay of copper ions based on the inhibition of peroxidase-like activity of MoS2 nanosheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huan; Li, Zhihong; Liu, Xueting; Zhong, Jianhai; Lin, Tianran; Guo, Liangqia; Fu, Fengfu

    2017-10-01

    The peroxidase-like catalytic activity of MoS2 nanomaterials has been utilized for colorimetric bioassays and medical diagnostics. However, the application of peroxidase-like catalytic activity of MoS2 nanomaterials in environmental analysis was seldom explored. Herein, copper ions were found to inhibit the peroxidase-like catalytic activity of MoS2 nanosheets, which can catalyze the oxidation of 3, 3‧, 5, 5‧-tetramethylbenzidine by H2O2 to produce a colorimetric product. Based on this finding, a simple sensitive colorimetric method for the detection of copper ions was developed. In the presence of copper ions, the absorbance and color of the solution decreased with the increasing concentration of copper ions. The color of the solution can be used to semi-quantitative on-site assay of copper ions by naked eyes. A linear relationship between the absorbance and the concentration of copper ions was observed in the range of 0.4-4.0 μmol L- 1 with a detection limit of 92 nmol L- 1, which was much lower than the maximum contaminant level of copper in drinking water legislated by the Environmental Protection Agency of USA and the World Health Organization. The method was applied to detect copper ions in environmental water samples with satisfactory results.

  5. Demonstration of Lignin-to-Peroxidase Direct Electron Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez-Jiménez, Verónica; Baratto, Maria Camilla; Pogni, Rebecca; Rencoret, Jorge; Gutiérrez, Ana; Santos, José Ignacio; Martínez, Angel T.; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    Versatile peroxidase (VP) is a high redox-potential peroxidase of biotechnological interest that is able to oxidize phenolic and non-phenolic aromatics, Mn2+, and different dyes. The ability of VP from Pleurotus eryngii to oxidize water-soluble lignins (softwood and hardwood lignosulfonates) is demonstrated here by a combination of directed mutagenesis and spectroscopic techniques, among others. In addition, direct electron transfer between the peroxidase and the lignin macromolecule was kinetically characterized using stopped-flow spectrophotometry. VP variants were used to show that this reaction strongly depends on the presence of a solvent-exposed tryptophan residue (Trp-164). Moreover, the tryptophanyl radical detected by EPR spectroscopy of H2O2-activated VP (being absent from the W164S variant) was identified as catalytically active because it was reduced during lignosulfonate oxidation, resulting in the appearance of a lignin radical. The decrease of lignin fluorescence (excitation at 355 nm/emission at 400 nm) during VP treatment under steady-state conditions was accompanied by a decrease of the lignin (aromatic nuclei and side chains) signals in one-dimensional and two-dimensional NMR spectra, confirming the ligninolytic capabilities of the enzyme. Simultaneously, size-exclusion chromatography showed an increase of the molecular mass of the modified residual lignin, especially for the (low molecular mass) hardwood lignosulfonate, revealing that the oxidation products tend to recondense during the VP treatment. Finally, mutagenesis of selected residues neighboring Trp-164 resulted in improved apparent second-order rate constants for lignosulfonate reactions, revealing that changes in its protein environment (modifying the net negative charge and/or substrate accessibility/binding) can modulate the reactivity of the catalytic tryptophan. PMID:26240145

  6. Manganese contents of soils as determined by activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Kholi, A.F.; Hamdy, A.A.; Al Metwally, A.I.; El-Damaty, A.H.

    1976-01-01

    The object of this investigation is to determine total manganese by means of neutron activation analysis and evaluate this technique in comparison with the corresponding data obtained by conventional chemical analysis. Data obtained revealed that the values of total manganese in calcareous soils obtained by both chemical analysis and that by neutron activation analysis were similar. Therefore, activation analysis could be recommended as a quick laboratory, less tedious, and time consuming method for the determination of Mn content in both soils and plants than the conventional chemical techniques due to its great specificity, sensitivity and simplicity. Statistical analysis showed that there is a significant correlation at 5% probability level between manganese content in Soybean plant and total manganese determined by activation and chemical analysis giving the evidence that in the case of those highly calcareous soils of low total manganese content this fraction has to be considered as far as available soil manganese is concerned

  7. Manganese deposition in drinking water distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerke, Tammie L; Little, Brenda J; Barry Maynard, J

    2016-01-15

    This study provides a physicochemical assessment of manganese deposits on brass and lead components from two fully operational drinking water distributions systems. One of the systems was maintained with chlorine; the other, with secondary chloramine disinfection. Synchrotron-based in-situ micro X-ray adsorption near edge structure was used to assess the mineralogy. In-situ micro X-ray fluorescence mapping was used to demonstrate the spatial relationships between manganese and potentially toxic adsorbed metal ions. The Mn deposits ranged in thickness from 0.01 to 400 μm. They were composed primarily of Mn oxides/oxhydroxides, birnessite (Mn(3+) and Mn(4+)) and hollandite (Mn(2+) and Mn(4+)), and a Mn silicate, braunite (Mn(2+) and Mn(4+)), in varying proportions. Iron, chromium, and strontium, in addition to the alloying elements lead and copper, were co-located within manganese deposits. With the exception of iron, all are related to specific health issues and are of concern to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA). The specific properties of Mn deposits, i.e., adsorption of metals ions, oxidation of metal ions and resuspension are discussed with respect to their influence on drinking water quality. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koretsky, Alan P; Silva, Afonso C

    2004-12-01

    Manganese ion (Mn2+) is an essential metal that participates as a cofactor in a number of critical biological functions, such as electron transport, detoxification of free radicals and synthesis of neurotransmitters. Mn2+ can enter excitable cells using some of the same transport systems as Ca2+ and it can bind to a number of intracellular sites because it has high affinity for Ca2+ and Mg2+ binding sites on proteins and nucleic acids. Paramagnetic forms of manganese ions are potent MRI relaxation agents. Indeed, Mn2+ was the first contrast agent proposed for use in MRI. Recently, there has been renewed interest in combining the strong MRI relaxation effects of Mn2+ with its unique biology, in order to further expand the already broad assortment of useful information that can be measured by MRI. Such an approach has been continuously developed in the past several years to provide unique tissue contrast, to assess tissue viability, to act as a surrogate marker of calcium influx into cells and to trace neuronal connections. This special issue of NMR in Biomedicine on manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) is aimed at providing the readers of this journal with an extensive review of some of the most prominent applications of MEMRI in biological systems. Written by several of the leaders in the field, the reviews and original research articles featured in this special issue are likely to offer an exciting and inspiring view of the broad range of applications of MEMRI. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Manganese and the II system in photosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joyard, Jacques

    1971-01-01

    The evolution during greening of some components of system II of photosynthesis has been followed in plastids extracted from Zea mays grown in the dark. Manganese studies were done by means of neutron activation, electron spin resonance (ESR) was also used in some experiments. Oxygen evolution of isolated plastids was followed by polarography (with a membrane electrode). The evolution of manganese/carotenoids ratio can be divided in three parts. During the first hour of greening, the increase shows an input of Mn in the plastids; then, whereas carotenoids content of those plastids presents no changes, Mn is released in the medium; at last, carotenoids synthesis is parallel to Mn fixation in the plastids, the ratio being constant after 24 hours of greening. From various measurements on chloroplastic manganese, it is shown that the development of system II can be divided in two main phases: during the first one (that is during the first day of light) the components are not yet bound together but the relations become more and more strong. Then, during the last period of the development, the organisation of system II is complete and the transformations of the plastids are parallel to the raise of their activity. (author) [fr

  10. The rapid determination of manganese, vanadium, and aluminium by instrumental neutron-activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watterson, J.I.W.; Eddy, B.T.; Pearton, D.C.G.

    1976-01-01

    Aluminium, manganese, and vanadium were determined in chromuim, ferrochromium, and slags. Because of the short-lived isotopes produced, the technique is rapid, and the total analysis time per sample is 15 minutes. The reproducibility is 3 to 4 per cent, and this value can be improved by certain modifications, particularly to the irradiation facilities. A similar method could be applied to on-line or in-plant analysis if an isotopic source of neutrons were used [af

  11. Retrograde and transganglionic transport of horseradish peroxidase-conjugated cholera toxin B subunit, wheatgerm agglutinin and isolectin B4 from Griffonia simplicifolia I in primary afferent neurons innervating the rat urinary bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H F; Shortland, P; Park, M J; Grant, G

    1998-11-01

    In the present study, we investigated and compared the ability of the cholera toxin B subunit, wheat germ agglutinin and isolectin B4 from Griffonia simplicifolia I conjugated to horseradish peroxidase, to retrogradely and transganglionically label visceral primary afferents after unilateral injections into the rat urinary bladder wall. Horseradish peroxidase histochemical or lectin-immunofluorescence histochemical labelling of bladder afferents was seen in the L6-S1 spinal cord segments and in the T13-L2 and L6-S1 dorsal root ganglia. In the lumbosacral spinal cord, the most intense and extensive labelling of bladder afferents was seen when cholera toxin B subunit-horseradish peroxidase was injected. Cholera toxin B subunit-horseradish peroxidase-labelled fibres were found in Lissauer's tract, its lateral and medial collateral projections, and laminae I and IV-VI of the spinal gray matter. Labelled fibres were numerous in the lateral collateral projection and extended into the spinal parasympathetic nucleus. Labelling from both the lateral and medial projections extended into the dorsal grey commissural region. Wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase labelling produced a similar pattern but was not as dense and extensive as that of cholera toxin B subunit-horseradish peroxidase. The isolectin B4 from Griffonia simplicifolia I-horseradish peroxidase-labelled fibres, on the other hand, were fewer and only observed in the lateral collateral projection and occasionally in lamina I. Cell profile counts showed that a larger number of dorsal root ganglion cells were labelled with cholera toxin B subunit-horseradish peroxidase than with wheat germ agglutinin- or isolectin B4-horseradish peroxidase. In the L6-S1 dorsal root ganglia, the majority (81%) of the cholera toxin B subunit-, and almost all of the wheat germ agglutinin- and isolectin B4-immunoreactive cells were RT97-negative (an anti-neurofilament antibody that labels dorsal root ganglion neurons with

  12. Enzymatic extract containing lignin peroxidase immobilized on carbon nanotubes: Potential biocatalyst in dye decolourization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Sabrina Feliciano; da Luz, José Maria Rodrigues; Kasuya, Maria Catarina Megumi; Ladeira, Luiz Orlando; Correa Junior, Ary

    2018-05-01

    The majority of the textile dyes are harmful to the environment and potentially carcinogenic. Among strategies for their exclusion, the treatment of dye contaminated wastewater with fungal extract, containing lignin peroxidase (LiP), may be useful. Two fungi isolates, Pleurotus ostreatus (PLO9) and Ganoderma lucidum (GRM117), produced the enzymatic extract by fermentation in the lignocellulosic residue, Jatropha curcas seed cake. The extracts from PLO9 and GRM117 were immobilized on carbon nanotubes and showed an increase of 18 and 27-fold of LiP specific activity compared to the free enzyme. Also, LiP from both fungi extracts showed higher Vmax and lower Km values. Only the immobilized extracts could be efficiently reused in the dye decolourization, contrary, the carbon nanotubes became saturated and they should be discarded over time. This device may offer a final biocatalyst with higher catalytic efficiency and capability to be reused in the dye decolourization process.

  13. Polyphenol oxidase and peroxidase expression in four pineapple varieties (Ananas comosus L.) after a chilling injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimbault, Astrid-Kim; Marie-Alphonsine, Paul-Alex; Horry, Jean-Pierre; Francois-Haugrin, Madlyn; Romuald, Karell; Soler, Alain

    2011-01-12

    Pineapple internal browning (IB) is a chilling injury that produces enzymatic browning associated with flesh translucency. Pineapple biodiversity allowed the investigation of how polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and peroxidase (POD) activities with their different isoforms are involved in the IB mechanism. Fruits of four varieties that expressed IB symptoms differently, Smooth Cayenne (SCay) and the hybrids MD2, Flhoran 41 (Flh 41), and Flhoran 53 (Flh 53), were stressed by cold. The susceptible varieties showed classical brown spots but different patterns of IB, whereas MD2 and controls showed no IB. Enzymatic activities were measured on fruit protein extracts and PPO and POD isoforms separated on mini-gels (PhastSystem). Only PPO activity was significantly enhanced in the presence of IB. Up to six PPO isoforms were identified in the susceptible varieties. PPO was barely detectable in the nonsusceptible variety MD2 and in controls. The number of PPO isoforms and the total PPO activity after chilling are varietal characteristics.

  14. Development of an accelerator based system for in vivo neutron activation analysis measurements of manganese in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Michelle Lynn

    2001-11-01

    Manganese is required by the human body, but as with many heavy elements, in large amounts it can be toxic, producing a neurological disorder similar to that of Parkinson's Disease. The primary industrial uses of the element are for the manufacturing of steel and alkali batteries. Environmental exposure may occur via drinking water or exhaust emissions from vehicles using gasoline with the manganese containing compound MMT as an antiknock agent (MMT has been approved for use in both Canada and the United States). Preclinical symptoms of toxicity have recently been detected in individuals occupationally exposed to airborne manganese at levels below the present threshold limit value set by the EPA. Evidence also suggests that early detection of manganese toxicity is crucial since once the symptoms have developed past a certain point, the syndrome will continue to progress even if manganese exposure ceases. The development of a system for in vivo neutron activation analysis (IVNAA) measurement of manganese levels was investigated, with the goal being to have a means of monitoring both over exposed and manganese deficient populations. The McMaster KN-accelerator was used to provide low-energy neutrons, activation within an irradiation site occurred via the 55Mn(n,gamma) 56Mn capture reaction, and the 847 keV gamma-rays emitted when 56Mn decayed were measured using one or more Nal(TI) detectors. The present data regarding manganese metabolism and storage within the body are limited, and it is unclear what the optimal measurement site would be to provide a suitable biomarker of past exposure. Therefore the feasibility of IVNAA measurements in three sites was examined---the liver, brain and hand bones. Calibration curves were derived, minimum detectable limits determined and resulting doses calculated for each site (experimentally in the case of the liver and hand bones, and through computer simulations for the brain). Detailed analytical calculations of the 7Li(p,n) 7Be

  15. Metabolism of manganese, iron, copper, and selenium in calves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, S.Y.

    1981-01-01

    Sixteen male Holstein calves were used to study manganese and iron metabolism. The calves were fed one of the following diets for 18 days: control, control + iron, control + manganese, and control + iron and manganese. All calves were dosed orally with manganese-54. Tissue concentrations of manganese, iron and manganese-54 were determined. Small intestinal iron was lower in calves fed the high manganese diet than in controls. Tissue manganese-54 was lower in calves fed a high manganese diet. Fecal manganese content increased in calves fed both high manganese and high manganese-high iron diets. Serum total iron was not affected by the dietary treatments. To study the effects of high dietary levels of copper and selenium on the intracellular distributions of these two elements in liver and kidney cytosol, calves were fed one of four diets for 15 days. These were 0 and 100 ppM supplemental copper and 0 and 1 ppM added selenium. The control diet containing 0.1 ppM of selenium and 15 ppM of copper. All calves were orally dosed 48 hrs prior to sacrifice with selenium-75. A high copper diet increased copper concentrations in all intracellular liver fractions and most kidney fractions. Only the effects in the liver were significant. Less copper was found in the mitochondria fractions in liver and kidney of calves fed a high selenium diet. Three major copper-binding protein peaks were separated from the soluble fractions of calf liver and kidney. Peak 1 appeared to be the major copper-binding protein in liver and kidney cytosol of copper-loaded animals. Added selenium alone or in combination with copper accentuated the copper accumulation in this peak. Most of selenium-75 was recovered in the same peak as the copper. The results of this experiment indicated that the large molecular proteins in liver and kidney cytosol of calves play an important role in copper and selenium-75 metabolism

  16. Modeling Manganese Sorption and Surface Oxidation During Filtration

    OpenAIRE

    Bierlein, Kevin Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Soluble manganese (Mn) is a common contaminant in drinking water sources. High levels of Mn can lead to aesthetic water quality problems, necessitating removal of Mn during treatment to minimize consumer complaints. Mn may be removed during granular media filtration by the â natural greensand effect,â in which soluble Mn adsorbs to manganese oxide-coated (MnOx(s)) media and is then oxidized by chlorine, forming more manganese oxide. This research builds on a previous model developed by Mer...

  17. Microstructural aspects of manganese metal during its electrodeposition from sulphate solutions in the presence of quaternary amines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padhy, Subrat Kumar; Patnaik, P.; Tripathy, B.C.; Bhattacharya, I.N.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Quaternary amines produced smooth and bright manganese electrodeposits. • TEABr produced smooth and bright deposits with euhedral shaped crystals. • TBABr produced dendritic deposits with elongated poly-nodular crystals. • All the quaternary amines behaved as cathode polarisers. • TEABr was found to be the most efficient organic additive. - Abstract: In the present study investigation was made on the electrodeposition of manganese from sulphate solutions in the presence of quaternary amines TEABr, TPABr and TBABr. The concentrations of these additives were varied over a relatively broad range to evaluate their effect on the deposit morphology and preferred crystal orientations of the electrodeposited metal. TEABr resulted in bright and smooth manganese electrodeposits giving euhedral shape to the crystals with distinct triple junction points. TPABr also showed similar results at lower concentrations. However, TBABr resulted in the formation of dendritic growths with elongated poly-nodular crystals similar to that of Paragorgia corals having uniform multistep growths. The presence of these quaternary amines in the electrolyte causes polarisation of the cathode. TBABr being the strongest cathode polariser adsorbs strongly on the cathode resulting in poor deposit quality. TEABr was found to be the most efficient additive producing the desired quality manganese electrodeposit

  18. MacA is a second cytochrome c peroxidase of Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Julian; Hoffmann, Maren; Ellis, Katie E; Seidel, Antonia; Spatzal, Thomas; Gerhardt, Stefan; Elliott, Sean J; Einsle, Oliver

    2012-04-03

    The metal-reducing δ-proteobacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens produces a large number of c-type cytochromes, many of which have been implicated in the transfer of electrons to insoluble metal oxides. Among these, the dihemic MacA was assigned a central role. Here we have produced G. sulfurreducens MacA by recombinant expression in Escherichia coli and have solved its three-dimensional structure in three different oxidation states. Sequence comparisons group MacA into the family of diheme cytochrome c peroxidases, and the protein indeed showed hydrogen peroxide reductase activity with ABTS(-2) as an electron donor. The observed K(M) was 38.5 ± 3.7 μM H(2)O(2) and v(max) was 0.78 ± 0.03 μmol of H(2)O(2)·min(-1)·mg(-1), resulting in a turnover number k(cat) = 0.46 · s(-1). In contrast, no Fe(III) reductase activity was observed. MacA was found to display electrochemical properties similar to other bacterial diheme peroxidases, in addition to the ability to electrochemically mediate electron transfer to the soluble cytochrome PpcA. Differences in activity between CcpA and MacA can be rationalized with structural variations in one of the three loop regions, loop 2, that undergoes conformational changes during reductive activation of the enzyme. This loop is adjacent to the active site heme and forms an open loop structure rather than a more rigid helix as in CcpA. For the activation of the protein, the loop has to displace the distal ligand to the active site heme, H93, in loop 1. A H93G variant showed an unexpected formation of a helix in loop 2 and disorder in loop 1, while a M297H variant that altered the properties of the electron transfer heme abolished reductive activation.

  19. Nanostructured manganese oxides as highly active water oxidation catalysts: a boost from manganese precursor chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Prashanth W; Indra, Arindam; Littlewood, Patrick; Schwarze, Michael; Göbel, Caren; Schomäcker, Reinhard; Driess, Matthias

    2014-08-01

    We present a facile synthesis of bioinspired manganese oxides for chemical and photocatalytic water oxidation, starting from a reliable and versatile manganese(II) oxalate single-source precursor (SSP) accessible through an inverse micellar molecular approach. Strikingly, thermal decomposition of the latter precursor in various environments (air, nitrogen, and vacuum) led to the three different mineral phases of bixbyite (Mn2 O3 ), hausmannite (Mn3 O4 ), and manganosite (MnO). Initial chemical water oxidation experiments using ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN) gave the maximum catalytic activity for Mn2 O3 and MnO whereas Mn3 O4 had a limited activity. The substantial increase in the catalytic activity of MnO in chemical water oxidation was demonstrated by the fact that a phase transformation occurs at the surface from nanocrystalline MnO into an amorphous MnOx (1manganese oxides including the newly formed amorphous MnOx . Both Mn2 O3 and the amorphous MnOx exhibit tremendous enhancement in oxygen evolution during photocatalysis and are much higher in comparison to so far known bioinspired manganese oxides and calcium-manganese oxides. Also, for the first time, a new approach for the representation of activities of water oxidation catalysts has been proposed by determining the amount of accessible manganese centers. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Nanostructured manganese oxide thin films as electrode material for supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Hui; Lai, Man On; Lu, Li

    2011-01-01

    Electrochemical capacitors, also called supercapacitors, are alternative energy storage devices, particularly for applications requiring high power densities. Recently, manganese oxides have been extensively evaluated as electrode materials for supercapacitors due to their low cost, environmental benignity, and promising supercapacitive performance. In order to maximize the utilization of manganese oxides as the electrode material for the supercapacitors and improve their supercapacitive performance, the nanostructured manganese oxides have therefore been developed. This paper reviews the synthesis of the nanostructured manganese oxide thin films by different methods and the supercapacitive performance of different nanostructures.

  1. Manganese Catalyzed C–H Halogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Wei; Groves, John T.

    2015-06-16

    The remarkable aliphatic C–H hydroxylations catalyzed by the heme-containing enzyme, cytochrome P450, have attracted sustained attention for more than four decades. The effectiveness of P450 enzymes as highly selective biocatalysts for a wide range of oxygenation reactions of complex substrates has driven chemists to develop synthetic metalloporphyrin model compounds that mimic P450 reactivity. Among various known metalloporphyrins, manganese derivatives have received considerable attention since they have been shown to be versatile and powerful mediators for alkane hydroxylation and olefin epoxidation. Mechanistic studies have shown that the key intermediates of the manganese porphyrin-catalyzed oxygenation reactions include oxo- and dioxomanganese(V) species that transfer an oxygen atom to the substrate through a hydrogen abstraction/oxygen recombination pathway known as the oxygen rebound mechanism. Application of manganese porphyrins has been largely restricted to catalysis of oxygenation reactions until recently, however, due to ultrafast oxygen transfer rates. In this Account, we discuss recently developed carbon–halogen bond formation, including fluorination reactions catalyzed by manganese porphyrins and related salen species. We found that biphasic sodium hypochlorite/manganese porphyrin systems can efficiently and selectively convert even unactivated aliphatic C–H bonds to C–Cl bonds. An understanding of this novel reactivity derived from results obtained for the oxidation of the mechanistically diagnostic substrate and radical clock, norcarane. Significantly, the oxygen rebound rate in Mn-mediated hydroxylation is highly correlated with the nature of the trans-axial ligands bound to the manganese center (L–MnV$=$O). Based on the ability of fluoride ion to decelerate the oxygen rebound step, we envisaged that a relatively long-lived substrate radical could be trapped by a Mn–F fluorine source, effecting carbon–fluorine bond

  2. Cu–hemin metal-organic frameworks with peroxidase-like activity as peroxidase mimics for colorimetric sensing of glucose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Fenfen; He, Juan; Zeng, Mulang; Hao, Juan; Guo, Qiaohui; Song, Yonghai; Wang, Li, E-mail: lwanggroup@aliyun.com [Jiangxi Normal University, Key Laboratory of Functional Small Organic Molecule, Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering (China)

    2016-05-15

    In this work, a facile strategy to synthesize Cu–hemin metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with peroxidase-like activity was reported. The prepared Cu–hemin MOFs were characterized by various techniques such as scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, UV–visible absorbance spectra, and so on. The results showed that the prepared Cu–hemin MOFs looked like a ball-flower with an average diameter of 10 μm and provided a large specific surface area. The Cu–hemin MOFs possessing peroxidase-like activity could be used to catalyze the peroxidase substrate of 3,3,5,5-tetramethylbenzidine in the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, which was employed to detect H{sub 2}O{sub 2} quantitatively with the linear range from 1.0 μM to 1.0 mM and the detection limit was 0.42 μM. Furthermore, with the additional help of glucose oxidase, a sensitive and selective method to detect glucose was developed by using the Cu–hemin MOFs as catalyst and the linear range was from 10.0 μM to 3.0 mM and the detection limit was 6.9 μM. This work informs researchers of the advantages of MOFs for preparing biomimetic catalysts and extends the functionality of MOFs for biosensor application.Graphical Abstract.

  3. Becoming a Peroxidase: Cardiolipin-Induced Unfolding of Cytochrome c

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muenzner, Julia; Toffey, Jason R.; Hong, Yuning; Pletneva, Ekaterina V.

    2014-01-01

    Interactions of cytochrome c (cyt c) with a unique mitochondrial glycerophospholipid cardiolipin (CL) are relevant for the protein’s function in oxidative phosphorylation and apoptosis. Binding to CL-containing membranes promotes cyt c unfolding and dramatically enhances the protein’s peroxidase activity, which is critical in early stages of apoptosis. We have employed a collection of seven dansyl variants of horse heart cyt c to probe the sequence of steps in this functional transformation. Kinetic measurements have unraveled four distinct processes during CL-induced cyt c unfolding: rapid protein binding to CL liposomes; rearrangements of protein substructures with small unfolding energies; partial insertion of the protein into the lipid bilayer; and extensive protein restructuring leading to “open” extended structures. While early rearrangements depend on a hierarchy of foldons in the native structure, the later process of large-scale unfolding is influenced by protein interactions with the membrane surface. The opening of the cyt c structure exposes the heme group, which enhances the protein’s peroxidase activity and also frees the C-terminal helix to aid in the translocation of the protein through CL membranes. PMID:23713573

  4. Horseradish peroxidase-modified porous silicon for phenol monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kermad, A., E-mail: amina_energetique@yahoo.fr [Unité de Recherche Matériaux et Energies Renouvelables (URMER), Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences, Université Abou Baker Belkaid, B.P. 119, Tlemcen 13000 (Algeria); Sam, S., E-mail: Sabrina.sam@polytechnique.edu [Centre de Recherche en Technologie des Semi-conducteurs pour l’Energétique (CRTSE), 02 Bd. Frantz-Fanon, B.P. 140, Alger-7 merveilles, Algiers (Algeria); Ghellai, N., E-mail: na_ghellai@yahoo.fr [Unité de Recherche Matériaux et Energies Renouvelables (URMER), Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences, Université Abou Baker Belkaid, B.P. 119, Tlemcen 13000 (Algeria); Khaldi, K., E-mail: Khadidjaphy@yahoo.fr [Unité de Recherche Matériaux et Energies Renouvelables (URMER), Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences, Université Abou Baker Belkaid, B.P. 119, Tlemcen 13000 (Algeria); Gabouze, N., E-mail: ngabouze@yahoo.fr [Centre de Recherche en Technologie des Semi-conducteurs pour l’Energétique (CRTSE), 02 Bd. Frantz-Fanon, B.P. 140, Alger-7 merveilles, Algiers (Algeria)

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: • Horseradish peroxidase enzyme (HRP) was covalently immobilized on porous silicon (PSi) surface. • Multistep strategy was used allowing the maintaining of the enzymatic activity of the immobilized enzyme. • Direct electron transfer has occurred between the immobilized enzyme and the surface. • Electrochemical measurements showed a response of HRP-modified PSi toward phenol in the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. -- Abstract: In this study, horseradish peroxidase enzyme (HRP) was covalently immobilized on porous silicon (PSi) surface using multistep strategy. First, acid terminations were generated on hydrogenated PSi surface by thermal hydrosilylation of undecylenic acid. Then, the carboxyl-terminated monolayer was transformed to active ester (succinimidyl ester) using N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) in the presence of the coupling agent N-ethyl-N′-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC). Subsequently, the enzyme was anchored on the surface via an amidation reaction. The structure of the PSi layers was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and contact angle measurements confirmed the efficiency of the modification at each step of the functionalization. Cyclic voltammetry was recorded using the HRP-modified PSi as working electrode. The results show that the enzymatic activity of the immobilized HRP is preserved and in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, the enzyme oxidizes phenolic molecules which were subsequently reduced at the modified-PSi electrode.

  5. Horseradish peroxidase-modified porous silicon for phenol monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kermad, A.; Sam, S.; Ghellai, N.; Khaldi, K.; Gabouze, N.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Horseradish peroxidase enzyme (HRP) was covalently immobilized on porous silicon (PSi) surface. • Multistep strategy was used allowing the maintaining of the enzymatic activity of the immobilized enzyme. • Direct electron transfer has occurred between the immobilized enzyme and the surface. • Electrochemical measurements showed a response of HRP-modified PSi toward phenol in the presence of H 2 O 2 . -- Abstract: In this study, horseradish peroxidase enzyme (HRP) was covalently immobilized on porous silicon (PSi) surface using multistep strategy. First, acid terminations were generated on hydrogenated PSi surface by thermal hydrosilylation of undecylenic acid. Then, the carboxyl-terminated monolayer was transformed to active ester (succinimidyl ester) using N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) in the presence of the coupling agent N-ethyl-N′-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC). Subsequently, the enzyme was anchored on the surface via an amidation reaction. The structure of the PSi layers was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and contact angle measurements confirmed the efficiency of the modification at each step of the functionalization. Cyclic voltammetry was recorded using the HRP-modified PSi as working electrode. The results show that the enzymatic activity of the immobilized HRP is preserved and in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, the enzyme oxidizes phenolic molecules which were subsequently reduced at the modified-PSi electrode

  6. The effects of xylitol and sorbitol on lysozyme- and peroxidase-related enzymatic and candidacidal activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bum-Soo; Chang, Ji-Youn; Kim, Yoon-Young; Kho, Hong-Seop

    2015-07-01

    To investigate whether xylitol and sorbitol affect enzymatic and candidacidal activities of lysozyme, the peroxidase system, and the glucose oxidase-mediated peroxidase system. Xylitol and sorbitol were added to hen egg-white lysozyme, bovine lactoperoxidase, glucose oxidase-mediated peroxidase, and whole saliva in solution and on hydroxyapatite surfaces. The enzymatic activities of lysozyme, peroxidase, and glucose oxidase-mediated peroxidase were determined by the turbidimetric method, the NbsSCN assay, and production of oxidized o-dianisidine, respectively. Candidacidal activities were determined by comparing colony forming units using Candida albicans ATCC strains 10231, 11006, and 18804. While xylitol and sorbitol did not affect the enzymatic activity of hen egg-white lysozyme both in solution and on hydroxyapatite surfaces, they did inhibit the enzymatic activity of salivary lysozyme significantly in solution, but not on the surfaces. Xylitol and sorbitol enhanced the enzymatic activities of both bovine lactoperoxidase and salivary peroxidase significantly in a dose-dependent manner in solution, but not on the surfaces. Sorbitol, but not xylitol, inhibited the enzymatic activity of glucose oxidase-mediated peroxidase significantly. Both xylitol and sorbitol did not affect candidacidal activities of hen egg-white lysozyme, the bovine lactoperoxidase system, or the glucose oxidase-mediated bovine lactoperoxidase system. Xylitol and sorbitol inhibited salivary lysozyme activity, but enhanced both bovine lactoperoxidase and salivary peroxidase activities significantly in solution. Xylitol and sorbitol did not augment lysozyme- and peroxidase-related candidacidal activities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Battery recycling: recovery of manganese in the form of electrolytic manganese dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roriz, Elizabeth Rodrigues Rangel; Von Krüge, Paulo; Espinosa, Denise Crocce Romano; Tenorio, Jorge Alberto Soares

    2010-01-01

    This work seeks to verify the possibility of using depleted batteries as a source of manganese applying the electrolytic process, considering the growing demand for products containing manganese in their composition. It was used an electrolyte solution containing the metal ions: Ca (270mg / L), Ni (3000 mg / L), Co (630 mg / L), Mn (115.300 mg / L) , Ti (400 mg / L) and Pb (20 mg / L) in concentrated sulfuric acid. The production of electrolytic manganese dioxide (EMD) was performed through galvanization using a stabilized source that monitored the potential of the working electrode. It was used an electrode of lead and two counter electrodes of graphite at a temperature of 98 deg C (± 2 deg C) and current density of 1.69A.dm"-"2. The material obtained was analyzed through the process of X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and X-ray diffraction. The results indicated that it is possible to obtain electrolytic manganese dioxide with a purity of about 94% and that the main allotropic variety obtained under the conditions of the experiment was the ε-MnO_2. (author)

  8. Synthesis and catalytic activity of Birnessite-Type Manganese Oxide synthesized by solvent-free method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siregar, S. S.; Awaluddin, A.

    2018-04-01

    Redox reaction between KMnO4 and glucose usingsolvent-free method produces the octahedral layer birnessite-type manganese oxide. The effects of mole ratios, temperatures, and calcinations time on the structures and crystallinity of the oxides were studied throughthe X-ray powder diffraction analysis. The mole ratio of KMnO4/glucose (1:3) produces the purebirnessite with low crystallinity, whereas the mole ratio of KMnO4/glucose (3:1) yields high crystalline birnessite with minor components of hausmannite-type manganese oxide.The increasing of the temperature and calcinations times (300-700 °C and 3-7 h, respectively) willimprove the crystallinity and the purity of the as-synthesized oxide. Further experiments also showed that the as-syntesized octahedral layer birnessite-type manganese oxides have catalytic activity on the degradation of methylene blue (MB) dye with H2O2 as oxidant. The results revealed that the effective degradation could be achieved only in the presence of both the birnessite and H2O2, whereas without the addition of catalyst (H2O2only) or addition of H2O2 (catalyst only), the 3.5% and 15.5% of MB removal were obtained, respectively.

  9. Three manganese oxide-rich marine sediments harbor similar communities of acetate-oxidizing manganese-reducing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandieken, Verona; Pester, Michael; Finke, Niko; Hyun, Jung-Ho; Friedrich, Michael W; Loy, Alexander; Thamdrup, Bo

    2012-11-01

    Dissimilatory manganese reduction dominates anaerobic carbon oxidation in marine sediments with high manganese oxide concentrations, but the microorganisms responsible for this process are largely unknown. In this study, the acetate-utilizing manganese-reducing microbiota in geographically well-separated, manganese oxide-rich sediments from Gullmar Fjord (Sweden), Skagerrak (Norway) and Ulleung Basin (Korea) were analyzed by 16S rRNA-stable isotope probing (SIP). Manganese reduction was the prevailing terminal electron-accepting process in anoxic incubations of surface sediments, and even the addition of acetate stimulated neither iron nor sulfate reduction. The three geographically distinct sediments harbored surprisingly similar communities of acetate-utilizing manganese-reducing bacteria: 16S rRNA of members of the genera Colwellia and Arcobacter and of novel genera within the Oceanospirillaceae and Alteromonadales were detected in heavy RNA-SIP fractions from these three sediments. Most probable number (MPN) analysis yielded up to 10(6) acetate-utilizing manganese-reducing cells cm(-3) in Gullmar Fjord sediment. A 16S rRNA gene clone library that was established from the highest MPN dilutions was dominated by sequences of Colwellia and Arcobacter species and members of the Oceanospirillaceae, supporting the obtained RNA-SIP results. In conclusion, these findings strongly suggest that (i) acetate-dependent manganese reduction in manganese oxide-rich sediments is catalyzed by members of taxa (Arcobacter, Colwellia and Oceanospirillaceae) previously not known to possess this physiological function, (ii) similar acetate-utilizing manganese reducers thrive in geographically distinct regions and (iii) the identified manganese reducers differ greatly from the extensively explored iron reducers in marine sediments.

  10. Synthesis and characterization of monomeric manganese(II) and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The geometry at the manganese center is seven-coordinate, and is best described as a capped trigonal pyramid with the water molecule forming the cap and the six nitrogen atoms of the tpen ligand occupying the pyramidal sites. The manganese atom and the water molecule lie on a crystallographic twofold axis.

  11. Adsorptive removal of manganese, arsenic and iron from groundwater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buamah, R.

    2009-01-01

    Arsenic, manganese and iron in drinking water at concentrations exceeding recommended guideline values pose health risks and aesthetic defects. Batch and pilot experiments on manganese adsorption equilibrium and kinetics using iron-oxide coated sand (IOCS), Aquamandix and other media have been

  12. Gastroprotective Properties of Manganese Chloride on Acetic Acid

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    Drugs with multiple mechanisms of protective action may be effective in minimizing ... that Manganese had dose and treatment duration dependent effect on healing of ulcerated stomach. .... The stomach was bathed with normal saline ..... Arnaud, J., and Favier, A. (1995): "Copper, iron, manganese ... Experimental Toxic.

  13. Behavior of manganese ion in basic medium: consequence for the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr. J. T. Ekanem

    2006-01-25

    Jan 25, 2006 ... adding manganese chloride or manganese sulfate to sodium hydroxyde or sodium carbonate in aqueous ... carbonate (1 M). The release of p- nitrophenoxide anion (pNP) was quantified at. 420 nm using a spectrophotometer (Spectronic. Genesis 5). .... These curves were bell-type with an ascending.

  14. Bioconcentration of manganese and iron in Panaeoloideae Sing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stijve, T.; Blake, C.

    1994-01-01

    According to literature, the manganese content of most basidiomycetes fluctuates between 10 and 60 mg/kg, whereas the iron levels range from 100-500 mg/kg (both expressed on dry weight). The present authors report that bioconcentration of manganese is a distinguishing feature of the Panaeoloideae,

  15. 40 CFR 721.10011 - Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Barium calcium manganese strontium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10011 Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium calcium...

  16. Characterization and concentration of manganese ore waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, Rosa Malena Fernandes; Pereira, Eder Esper; Reis, Erica Linhares; Silva, Glaucia Regina da

    2010-01-01

    In this work is presented the tests results of characterization and concentration by gravity and flotation methods carried out with a manganese sample waste. By optical microscopy, SEM/EDS and X-ray diffractometry were identified the Mn minerals spessartite (20%), tephroite (15%), rhodonite (5%), rhodochrosite and carbonates minerals (29%), opaque minerals and others (16%), micaceus minerals (6%) and quartz (4%). It was obtained Mn metallurgical recovery of 58% with Mn concentrate contents varying from 30 to 32.5%. The concentrates SiO_2 contents of flotation were until 1.5% smaller than those contents of gravity method concentrates. (author)

  17. Manganese accumulation in the brain: MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchino, A.; Nomiyama, K.; Takase, Y.; Nakazono, T.; Nojiri, J.; Kudo, S. [Saga Medical School, Department of Radiology, Saga (Japan); Noguchi, T. [Kyushu University, Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2007-09-15

    Manganese (Mn) accumulation in the brain is detected as symmetrical high signal intensity in the globus pallidi on T1-weighted MR images without an abnormal signal on T2-weighted images. In this review, we present several cases of Mn accumulation in the brain due to acquired or congenital diseases of the abdomen including hepatic cirrhosis with a portosystemic shunt, congenital biliary atresia, primary biliary cirrhosis, congenital intrahepatic portosystemic shunt without liver dysfunction, Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome with a diffuse intrahepatic portosystemic shunt, and patent ductus venosus. Other causes of Mn accumulation in the brain are Mn overload from total parenteral nutrition and welding-related Mn intoxication. (orig.)

  18. Asparagus byproducts as a new source of peroxidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo-Carmona, Sara; Lopez, Sergio; Vazquez-Castilla, Sara; Rodriguez-Arcos, Rocio; Jimenez-Araujo, Ana; Guillen-Bejarano, Rafael

    2013-07-03

    Soluble peroxidase (POD) from asparagus byproducts was purified by ion exchange chromatographies, and its kinetic and catalytic properties were studied. The isoelectric point of the purified isoperoxidases was 9.1, and the optimum pH and temperature values were 4.0 and 25 °C, respectively. The cationic asparagus POD (CAP) midpoint inactivation temperature was 57 °C, which favors its use in industrial processes. The Km values of cationic asparagus POD for H₂O₂ and ABTS were 0.318 and 0.634 mM, respectively. The purified CAP is economically obtained from raw materials using a simple protocol and possesses features that make it advantageous for the potential use of this enzyme in a large number of processes with demonstrated requirements of thermostable POD. The results indicate that CAP can be used as a potential candidate for removing phenolic contaminants.

  19. Erythrocytic glutathione peroxidase: Its relationship to plasma selenium in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perona, G.; Cellerino, R.; Guidi, G.C.; Moschini, G.; Stievano, B.M.; Tregnaghi, C.

    1977-01-01

    Erythrocytic glutathione-peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity and plasma selenium concentrations were measured in 14 patients: 7 with iron deficiency and 7 with raised serum iron levels. The decreased enzymatic activity in iron deficiency was confirmed. Plasma selenium was significantly lower in patients with lower serum iron; furthermore there is a significant correlation between serum iron and plasma selenium concentrations. Another correlation even more significant was found between plasma selenium and enzyme activity in all the cases we studied. These data suggests that the importance of iron for GSH-Px activity may be merely due to its relationship with selenium and that plasma selenium concentration may be of critical importance for enzyme activity. (author)

  20. Double Antibody EIA of Cortisol Using Peroxidase As Label

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karim, F.M.; Hamad, A.W.R.; Hashim, A.M.

    1998-01-01

    An enzyme immunoassay (EIA) technique for plasma cortisol was established by using cortisol-3 (carboxymethyl) oxime covalently linked to the horseradish peroxidase as the label. An antibody raised in the rabbits against cortisol-3-(carboxy-methyl) oxime-bovline serum albumin was used as the first anti-body. Sheep anti-rabbit gamma-globulin serum with 8 percent poly-ethyleneglycol were used to separate antibody-bound and free cortisol. The enzyme activity of the bound fraction was measured with ortho-phenylene diamine as substrate. The procedure performed at room temperature was evaluated by sensitivity (50 pg/ tube). The correlation coefficient between our enzyme immunoassay technique and radioimmunoassay technique for determination of plasma cortisol was 97 percent

  1. Polymerization reactivity of sulfomethylated alkali lignin modified with horseradish peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dongjie; Wu, Xiaolei; Qiu, Xueqing; Chang, Yaqi; Lou, Hongming

    2014-03-01

    Alkali lignin (AL) was employed as raw materials in the present study. Sulfomethylation was conducted to improve the solubility of AL, while sulfomethylated alkali lignin (SAL) was further polymerized by horseradish peroxidase (HRP). HRP modification caused a significant increase in molecular weight of SAL which was over 20 times. It was also found to increase the amount of sulfonic and carboxyl groups while decrease the amount of phenolic and methoxyl groups in SAL. The adsorption quantity of self-assembled SAL film was improved after HRP modification. Sulfonation and HRP modification were mutually promoted. The polymerization reactivity of SAL in HRP modification was increased with its sulfonation degree. Meanwhile, HRP modification facilitated SAL's radical-sulfonation reaction. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Alternative irradiation system for efficiency manganese bath determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passos Leite, Sandro, E-mail: sandro@ird.gov.b [Programa de Engenharia Nuclear/COPPE, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Ilha do Fundao, Caixa Postal 68509, 21945-970, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Wagner Pereira, Walsan, E-mail: walsan@ird.gov.b [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria LNMRI/IRD/CNEN, Av. Salvador Allende, s/no, Recreio dos Bandeirantes, CEP: 22780-160, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Xavier da Silva, Ademir, E-mail: ademir@con.ufrj.b [Programa de Engenharia Nuclear/COPPE, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Ilha do Fundao, Caixa Postal 68509, 21945-970, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Simoes da Fonseca, Evaldo, E-mail: evaldo@ird.gov.b [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria LNMRI/IRD/CNEN, Av. Salvador Allende, s/no, Recreio dos Bandeirantes, CEP: 22780-160, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Souza Patrao, Karla Cristina de, E-mail: karla@ird.gov.b [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria LNMRI/IRD/CNEN, Av. Salvador Allende, s/no, Recreio dos Bandeirantes, CEP: 22780-160, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2010-12-15

    An alternative irradiation system, which works with a radionuclide neutron source and manganese sulphate solution volume have been proposed for efficiency determination of a Manganese Bath System (MBS). This irradiation system was designed by simulation with MCNP5 code, considering a californium neutron source in several manganese sulphate volumes and different neutron reflectors. Although its solution specific activity are less than those in nuclear reactors, the simulation results have showed that the irradiation system proposed takes a manganese neutron capture increase up to 200 times when it compared to manganese neutron capture from a MBS whose diameter is about 100 cm. That becomes possible to use those samples for some of the absolute specific activity measuring methods.

  3. Purification of peroxidase from Horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavery, Christopher B; Macinnis, Morgan C; Macdonald, M Jason; Williams, Joanna Bassey; Spencer, Colin A; Burke, Alicia A; Irwin, David J G; D'Cunha, Godwin B

    2010-08-11

    Peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7) from horseradish ( Armoracia rusticana ) roots was purified using a simple, rapid, three-step procedure: ultrasonication, ammonium sulfate salt precipitation, and hydrophobic interaction chromatography on phenyl Sepharose CL-4B. The preparation gave an overall yield of 71%, 291-fold purification, and a high specific activity of 772 U mg(-1) protein. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that the purified enzyme was homogeneous and had a molecular weight of approximately 40 kDa. The isolated enzyme had an isoelectric point of 8.8 and a Reinheitszahl value of 3.39 and was stable when stored in the presence of glycerol at -20 degrees C, with >95% retention of original enzyme activity for at least 6 months. Maximal activity of purified horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was obtained under different optimized conditions: substrate (guaiacol and H(2)O(2)) concentrations (0.5 and 0.3 mM, respectively), type of buffer (50 mM phosphate buffer), pH (7.0), time (1.0 min), and temperature of incubation (30 degrees C). In addition, the effect of HRP and H(2)O(2) in a neutral-buffered aqueous solution for the oxidation of phenol and 2-chlorophenol substrates was also studied. Different conditions including concentrations of phenol/2-chlorophenol, H(2)O(2), and enzyme, time, pH, and temperature were standardized for the maximal activity of HRP with these substrates; under these optimal conditions 89.6 and 91.4% oxidations of phenol and 2-chlorophenol were obtained, respectively. The data generated from this work could have direct implications in studies on the commercial production of this biotechnologically important enzyme and its stability in different media.

  4. Thyroid peroxidase: evidence for disease gene exclusion in Pendred's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gausden, E; Armour, J A; Coyle, B; Coffey, R; Hochberg, Z; Pembrey, M; Britton, K E; Grossman, A; Reardon, W; Trembath, R

    1996-04-01

    Pendred's syndrome is an association between congenital neurosensory deafness and goitre with abnormal discharge of iodide following perchlorate challenge, indicating a defect of iodide organification. Although Pendred's syndrome may cause up to 7.5% of all cases of congenital deafness, the molecular basis of the association between the hearing loss and the thyroid organification defect remains unknown. We chose to investigate the role of the thyroid peroxidase (TPO) gene as the genetic defect in Pendred's syndrome. A highly informative variable number tandem repeat (VNTR), located 1.5 kb downstream of exon 10 of the TPO gene, was used to search for genetic linkage in multiple sibships affected by Pendred's syndrome. Seven kindreds were recruited from the UK, each with at least two affected members. We have also examined a large inbred Israeli family with two affected offspring and five unaffected children. Individuals were assigned affected status based on the characteristic clinical features of Pendred's syndrome, namely the presence of congenital sensorineural hearing loss and the appearance in early life of a goitre. Additionally, at least one affected member from each sibship had a characteristic positive perchlorate discharge test (Morgans & Trotter, 1958). PCR amplification of genomic DNA at the TPO VNTR allowed assignment of genotypes to each individual and the calculation of a two-point LOD score. In six of the nine sibships analysed we found obligatory recombination between TPO and Pendred's syndrome. Non-complementation observed in affected parents with an affected offspring excluded TPO in an affected sibship with genotype sharing and supports a hypothesis of genetic homogeneity for Pendred's syndrome. In two sibships, mutation of the TPO gene as the cause of Pendred's syndrome could not be excluded. These data suggest that defects at the thyroid peroxidase locus on chromosome 2 are not the major cause of Pendred's syndrome.

  5. Computational Modeling of the Catalytic Cycle of Glutathione Peroxidase Nanomimic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheirabadi, Ramesh; Izadyar, Mohammad

    2016-12-29

    To elucidate the role of a derivative of ebselen as a mimic of the antioxidant selenoenzyme glutathione peroxidase, density functional theory and solvent-assisted proton exchange (SAPE) were applied to model the reaction mechanism in a catalytic cycle. This mimic plays the role of glutathione peroxidase through a four-step catalytic cycle. The first step is described as the oxidation of 1 in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, while selenoxide is reduced by methanthiol at the second step. In the third step of the reaction, the reduction of selenenylsulfide occurs by methanthiol, and the selenenic acid is dehydrated at the final step. Based on the kinetic parameters, step 4 is the rate-determining step (RDS) of the reaction. The bond strength of the atoms involved in the RDS is discussed with the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM). Low value of electron density, ρ(r), and positive Laplacian values are the evidence for the covalent nature of the hydrogen bonds rupture (O 30 -H 31 , O 33 -H 34 ). A change in the sign of the Laplacian, L(r), from the positive value in the reactant to a negative character at the transition state indicates the depletion of the charge density, confirming the N 5 -H 10 and O 11 -Se 1 bond breaking. The analysis of electron location function (ELF) and localized orbital locator (LOL) of the Se 1 -N 5 and Se 1 -O 11 bonds have been done by multi-WFN program. High values of ELF and LOL at the transition state regions between the Se, N, and O atoms display the bond formation. Finally, the main donor-acceptor interaction energies were analyzed using the natural bond orbital analysis for investigation of their stabilization effects on the critical bonds at the RDS.

  6. Diffusion abnormalities of the globi pallidi in manganese neurotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKinney, Alexander M.; Filice, Ross W.; Teksam, Mehmet; Casey, Sean; Truwit, Charles; Clark, H. Brent; Woon, Carolyn; Liu, Hai Ying [Department of Radiology, Medical School, Box 292, 420 Delaware Street S.E., 55455, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2004-04-01

    Manganese is an essential trace metal required for normal central nervous system function, which is toxic when in excess amounts in serum. Manganese neurotoxicity has been demonstrated in patients with chronic liver/biliary failure where an inability to excrete manganese via the biliary system causes increased serum levels, and in patients on total parenteral nutrition (TPN), occupational/inhalational exposure, or other source of excess exogenous manganese. Manganese has been well described in the literature to deposit selectively in the globi pallidi and to induce focal neurotoxicity. We present a case of a 53-year-old woman who presented for a brain MR 3 weeks after liver transplant due to progressively decreasing level of consciousness. The patient had severe liver failure by liver function tests and bilirubin levels, and had also been receiving TPN since the transplant. The MR demonstrated symmetric hyperintensity on T1-weighted images in the globi pallidi. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) map indicated restricted diffusion in the globi pallidi bilaterally. The patient eventually succumbed to systemic aspergillosis 3 days after the MR. The serum manganese level was 195 mcg/l (micrograms per liter) on postmortem exam (over 20 times the upper limits of normal). The patient was presumed to have suffered from manganese neurotoxicity since elevated serum manganese levels have been shown in the literature to correlate with hyperintensity on T1-weighted images, neurotoxicity symptoms, and focal concentration of manganese in the globi pallidi. Neuropathologic sectioning of the globi pallidi at autopsy was also consistent with manganese neurotoxicity. (orig.)

  7. Reduction of ripening time of full-scale manganese removal filters with manganese oxide-coated media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruins, J.H.; Petrusevski, B.; Slokar, Y.M.; Huysman, K.; Joris, K.; Kruithof, J.C.; Kennedy, M.D.

    2015-01-01

    Effective manganese removal by conventional aeration-filtration with virgin filter media requires a long ripening time. The aim of this study was to assess the potential of manganese oxide-coated media to shorten the ripening time of filters with virgin media, under practical conditions. A full

  8. Sony Co., Ltd.: An outlook is made for merchandising of the manganese acid lithium ion battery; Mangansan richiumuion denchi no shohinka ni medo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    Sony Co., Ltd. sells the manganese acid lithium ion battery that a battery is 1 by 2 as to the next generation lithium ion during 99 years. It is characteristics that a price is restrained because manganese is used for the proper pole material instead of cobalt of the rare metal. It becomes mass production by Koriyama factory where a lithium ion battery is being manufactured improving an existent production line. It is seen when some percents of manufacture cost goes down more than cobalt acid battery of news file before. A manganese acid lithium ion battery uses manganese acid lithium for the proper pole of the battery. The efficiency of the charge of the usual lithium ion battery is good, and composition is easy, and uses cobalt acid lithium, which is easy to produce. One side where a material fee is cheap, the stability at the high temperature of manganese acid is low, and composition is difficult. Only NEC Moli Energy corporation who is the subsidiary company of NEC succeeds in the mass production. NEC Moli Energy corporation is extending market share by the price competition power. It seems to have the possibility that manganese acid becomes the main force with a battery by two by new entering of Sony Co., Ltd. of the lithium ion battery extreme big enterprises. (translated by NEDO)

  9. Magnetic resonance spectral characterization of the heme active site of Coprinus cinereus peroxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukat, G.S.; Rodgers, K.R.; Jabro, M.N.; Goff, H.M.

    1989-01-01

    Examination of the peroxidase isolated from the inkcap Basidiomycete Coprinus cinereus shows that the 42,000-dalton enzyme contains a protoheme IX prosthetic group. Reactivity assays and the electronic absorption spectra of native Coprinus peroxidase and several of its ligand complexes indicate that this enzyme has characteristics similar to those reported for horseradish peroxidase. In this paper, the authors characterize the H 2 O 2 -oxidized forms of Coprinus peroxidase compounds I, II, and III by electronic absorption and magnetic resonance spectroscopies. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of this Coprinus peroxidase indicate the presence of high-spin Fe(III) in the native protein and a number of differences between the heme site of Coprinus peroxidase and horseradish peroxidase. Carbon-13 (of the ferrous CO adduct) and nitrogen-15 (of the cyanide complex) NMR studies together with proton NMR studies of the native and cyanide-complexed Caprinus peroxidase are consistent with coordination of a proximal histidine ligand. The EPR spectrum of the ferrous NO complex is also reported. Protein reconstitution with deuterated hemin has facilitated the assignment of the heme methyl resonances in the proton NMR spectrum

  10. Purification and characterization of an intracellular catalase-peroxidase from Penicillium simplicissimum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fraaije, Marco W.; Roubroeks, Hanno P.; Hagen, Wilfred R.; Berkel, Willem J.H. van

    1996-01-01

    The first dimeric catalase-peroxidase of eucaryotic origin, an intracellular hydroperoxidase from Penicillium simplicissimum which exhibited both catalase and peroxidase activities, has been isolated. The enzyme has an apparent molecular mass of about 170 kDa and is composed of two identical

  11. Constraints on superoxide mediated formation of manganese oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deric R. Learman

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Manganese (Mn oxides are among the most reactive sorbents and oxidants within the environment, where they play a central role in the cycling of nutrients, metals, and carbon. Recent discoveries have identified superoxide (O2- (both of biogenic and abiogenic origin as an effective oxidant of Mn(II leading to the formation of Mn oxides. Here we examined the conditions under which abiotically produced superoxide led to oxidative precipitation of Mn and the solid-phases produced. Oxidized Mn, as both aqueous Mn(III and Mn(III/IV oxides, was only observed in the presence of active catalase, indicating that hydrogen peroxide, a product of the reaction of O2- with Mn(II, inhibits the oxidation process presumably through the reduction of Mn(III. Citrate and pyrophosphate increased the yield of oxidized Mn but decreased the amount of Mn oxide produced via formation of Mn(III-ligand complexes. While complexing ligands played a role in stabilizing Mn(III, they did not eliminate the inhibition of net Mn(III formation by H2O2. The Mn oxides precipitated were highly disordered colloidal hexagonal birnessite, similar to those produced by biotically generated superoxide. Yet, in contrast to the large particulate Mn oxides formed by biogenic superoxide, abiotic Mn oxides did not ripen to larger, more crystalline phases. This suggests that the deposition of crystalline Mn oxides within the environment requires a biological, or at least organic, influence. This work provides the first direct evidence that, under conditions relevant to natural waters, oxidation of Mn(II by superoxide can occur and lead to formation of Mn oxides. For organisms that oxidize Mn(II by producing superoxide, these findings may also point to other microbially mediated processes, in particular enzymatic hydrogen peroxide degradation and/or production of organic ligand metabolites, that allow for Mn oxide formation.

  12. Ferromagnetic properties of manganese doped iron silicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Reyes, Angel; Fonseca, Luis F.; Sabirianov, Renat

    We report the synthesis of high quality Iron silicide (FeSi) nanowires via Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD). The materials exhibits excellent magnetic response at room temperature, especially when doped with manganese showing values of 2.0 X 10-04 emu for the FexMnySi nanowires. SEM and TEM characterization indicates that the synthesized nanowires have a diameter of approximately 80nm. MFM measurements present a clear description of the magnetic domains when the nanowires are doped with manganese. Electron Diffraction and XRD measurements confirms that the nanowires are single crystal forming a simple cubic structure with space group P213. First-principle calculations were performed on (111) FeSi surface using the Vienna ab initio simulation package (VASP). The exchange correlations were treated under the Ceperley-Alder (CA) local density approximation (LDA). The Brillouin Zone was sampled with 8x8x1 k-point grid. A total magnetic moment of about 10 μB was obtained for three different surface configuration in which the Iron atom nearest to the surface present the higher magnetization. To study the effect of Mn doping, Fe atom was replaced for a Mn. Stronger magnetization is presented when the Mn atom is close to the surface. The exchange coupling constant have been evaluated calculating the energy difference between the ferromagnetic and anti-ferromagnetic configurations.

  13. Iron and manganese removal from drinking water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela-Elena Pascu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study is to find a suitable method for removal of iron and manganese from ground water, considering bothlocal economical and environmental aspects. Ground water is a highly important source of drinking water in Romania. Ground water is naturally pure from bacteria at a 25 m depth or more. However, solved metals may occur and if the levels are too high, the water is not drinkable. Different processes, such as electrochemical and combined electrochemical-adsorption methods have been applied to determine metals content in accordance to reports of National Water Agency from Romania (ANAR. Every water source contains dissolved or particulate compounds. The concentrations of these compounds can affect health, productivity, compliance requirements, or serviceability and cannot be economically removed by conventional filtration means. In this study, we made a comparison between the electrochemical and adsorption methods (using membranes. Both methods have been used to evaluate the efficiency of iron and manganese removal at various times and temperatures. We used two membrane types: composite and cellulose, respectively. Different approaches, including lowering the initial current density and increasing the initial pH were applied. Reaction kinetics was achieved using mathematical models: Jura and Temkin.

  14. Biological removal of iron and manganese in rapid sand filters - Process understanding of iron and manganese removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Katie

    to precipitation and corrosion. Manganese and iron can either be removed physico-chemically or biologically or combined. The physico-chemical oxidation and precipitation of manganese can theoretically be achieved by aeration, but this process is slow unless pH is raised far above neutral, making the removal...... of manganese by simple aeration and precipitation under normal drinking water treatment conditions insignificant. Manganese may also be oxidized autocatalytically. Iron is usually easier to remove. First, iron is rapidly chemically oxidized by oxygen at neutral pH followed by precipitation and filtration......-filter, where iron is removed. Step 2: Filtration in an after-filter where e.g. ammonium and manganese is removed. The treatment relies on microbial processes and may present an alternative, greener and more sustainable approach for drinking water production spending less chemicals and energy than chemical (e...

  15. Aging promotes todorokite formation from layered manganese oxide at near-surface conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Haojie [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen (China). Key Lab. of Urban Environment and Health; Huazhong Agricultural Univ., Ministry of Agriculture, Wuhan (China). Key Lab. of Subtropical Agricultural Resources and Environment; Liu, Fan; Feng, Xionghan; Tan, Wenfeng [Huazhong Agricultural Univ., Ministry of Agriculture, Wuhan (China). Key Lab. of Subtropical Agricultural Resources and Environment; Wang, Ming Kuang [National Taiwan Univ., Taipei (China). Dept. of Agricultural Chemistry

    2010-12-15

    Todorokite is one common manganese oxide in soils and sediments and is commonly formed from layered Na-buserite. Aging processes can alter the physicochemical properties of freshly formed Na-buserite in natural environments. However, it is not clear whether and how aging affects the formation of todorokites. In the present paper, Na-buserite with aging treatment was employed to prepare todorokite at atmospheric pressure to investigate the effects of aging treatment of Na-buserite on the formation of todorokite. Four aged Na-buserite samples, which are produced through oxidation of Mn{sup 2+} in concentrated NaOH medium by O{sub 2} with aging for 3, 6, 9, and 12 months, were employed to investigate the effects of aging processes on the transformation from Na-buserite to todorokite by Mg{sup 2+}-templating reaction at atmospheric pressure. The manganese oxides were examined using X-ray diffraction (XRD), elemental analysis, determinations of the average manganese oxidation number, infrared spectroscopy (IR), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The XRD, IR, and elemental analyses indicate that aging treatment can alter the substructure of the freshly synthesized Na-buserite. During the aging process, some of the Mn(III) may migrate into the interlayer region or disproportionate to form Mn{sup 2+} and Mn{sup 4+} from the layer of Na-buserite and the concomitant formation of layer vacancies. The interlayer Mn{sup 3+} or Mn{sup 2+} occupied above or below the layer vacancy sites and become corner-sharing octahedral. XRD analyses and TEM clearly show that the transformation from Na-buserite to todorokite was promoted by aging treatments. The alterations of substructure of aged Na-buserites can promote the rearrangement of manganese to construct a tunnel structure during the transformation from layered manganese oxides to tunnel-structure todorokite at atmospheric pressure. The transformation from Na-buserite to todorokite was promoted by aging treatments at

  16. Phosphates nanoparticles doped with zinc and manganese for sunscreens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, T.S. de, E-mail: tatiana.araujo@ifs.edu.br [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Sergipe (Brazil); Instituto Federal de Ciencias e Tecnologia de Sergipe, Sergipe (Brazil); Souza, S.O. de [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Sergipe (Brazil); Miyakawa, W. [Divisao de Fotonica - Instituto de Estudos Avancados, Sao Jose dos Campos (Brazil); Sousa, E.M.B. de [Centro de Desenvolvimento de Tecnologia Nuclear - CDTN/CNEN, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2010-12-01

    The crescent number of skin cancer worldwide gives impulse to the development of sunscreen that can both prevent skin cancer and also permit gradual tanning. In this work, the synthesis of hydroxyapatite and tricalcium phosphate nanocrystalline powders was investigated in order to obtain materials with optical properties and appropriate size for sunscreen. Pure, Zn{sup 2+}-doped and Mn{sup 2+}-doped hydroxyapatite (HAP) and tricalcium phosphate ({beta}-TCP) were produced by the wet precipitation process using diammonium phosphate, calcium nitrate, ammonium hydroxide, zinc nitrate and manganese nitrate as reagents. The pure and doped HAP precipitates were calcined at 500 deg. C for 1 h, while the {beta}-TCP (pure and doped) were calcined at 800 deg. C for 2 h. The powder samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDX), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and ultraviolet (UV)-vis spectroscopy. XRD and EDX showed the formation of the expected materials (HAP and {beta}-TCP) without toxic components. AFM micrographs showed aggregated ellipsoidal particles with dimensions smaller than 120 nm. Optical absorption spectra showed that the calcium phosphate produced in this work absorbs in the UV region. The obtained materials presented structural, morphological and optical properties that allow their use as the active centers in sunscreens.

  17. Phosphates nanoparticles doped with zinc and manganese for sunscreens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, T.S. de; Souza, S.O. de; Miyakawa, W.; Sousa, E.M.B. de

    2010-01-01

    The crescent number of skin cancer worldwide gives impulse to the development of sunscreen that can both prevent skin cancer and also permit gradual tanning. In this work, the synthesis of hydroxyapatite and tricalcium phosphate nanocrystalline powders was investigated in order to obtain materials with optical properties and appropriate size for sunscreen. Pure, Zn 2+ -doped and Mn 2+ -doped hydroxyapatite (HAP) and tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) were produced by the wet precipitation process using diammonium phosphate, calcium nitrate, ammonium hydroxide, zinc nitrate and manganese nitrate as reagents. The pure and doped HAP precipitates were calcined at 500 deg. C for 1 h, while the β-TCP (pure and doped) were calcined at 800 deg. C for 2 h. The powder samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDX), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and ultraviolet (UV)-vis spectroscopy. XRD and EDX showed the formation of the expected materials (HAP and β-TCP) without toxic components. AFM micrographs showed aggregated ellipsoidal particles with dimensions smaller than 120 nm. Optical absorption spectra showed that the calcium phosphate produced in this work absorbs in the UV region. The obtained materials presented structural, morphological and optical properties that allow their use as the active centers in sunscreens.

  18. Determination of semi-empirical relationship between the manganese and hydrogen atoms ratio, physical density and concentration in an aqueous solution of manganese sulphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues Bittencourt, Guilherme, E-mail: bittencourt@ird.gov.b [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria LNMRI/IRD/CNEN, Av. Salvador Allende, s/n Recreio dos Bandeirantes, CEP 22780-160, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Souza Patrao, Karla Cristina de, E-mail: karla@ird.gov.b [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria LNMRI/IRD/CNEN, Av. Salvador Allende, s/n Recreio dos Bandeirantes, CEP 22780-160, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Passos Leite, Sandro, E-mail: sandro@ird.gov.b [Programa de Engenharia Nuclear/COPPE, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Ilha do Fundao, Caixa Postal 68509, 21945-970, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Wagner Pereira, Walsan, E-mail: walsan@ird.gov.b [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria LNMRI/IRD/CNEN, Av. Salvador Allende, s/n Recreio dos Bandeirantes, CEP 22780-160, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Simoes da Fonseca, Evaldo, E-mail: evaldo@ird.gov.b [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria LNMRI/IRD/CNEN, Av. Salvador Allende, s/n Recreio dos Bandeirantes, CEP 22780-160, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2010-12-15

    The Manganese sulphate solution has been used for neutron metrology through the method of Manganese Bath. This method uses physical parameters of manganese sulphate solution to obtain its corrections. This work established a functional relationship, using the gravimetric method, between those physical parameters: density, concentration and hydrogen to manganese ratio. Comparisons were done between manganese sulphate solution concentration from the Manganese Bath system of Laboratory of Metrology of Ionising Radiation and estimated values from the functional relationship obtained, showing percentage difference of less than 0.1%. This result demonstrates the usefulness in the correlation of the physical values of the solution to the MB.

  19. Removal of Iron and Manganese in Groundwater using Natural Biosorbent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baharudin, F.; Tadza, M. Y. Mohd; Imran, S. N. Mohd; Jani, J.

    2018-04-01

    This study was conducted to measure and compare the concentration of iron, manganese and hardness of the river and groundwater and to determine the effectiveness of iron and manganese removal by using natural biosorbent which is banana peels. The samples of river and groundwater were collected at riverbank filtration site at Jenderam Hilir, Dengkil. Based on the water quality investigation, the concentration of iron and manganese in the samples of groundwater have exceeded the drinking water quality standard which are 0.3 mg/L for iron and 0.1 mg/L for manganese. The removal process of the iron and manganese in the groundwater was done by using 2, 4 and 8 grams of banana peels activated carbon. It is found that with higher amount of activated banana peels, the removal of iron and manganese is more effective. The ranges of percentage of iron and manganese removal are between 82.25% to 90.84% and 98.79% to 99.43% respectively. From the result, banana peels activated carbon can be concluded as a one of the most effective low-cost adsorbent for groundwater treatment.

  20. Spectroscopic Characteristics of Highly Selective Manganese Catalysis in Acqueous Polyurethane Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroljub Barac

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The latest investigations on producing more efficient catalytic aqueouspolyurethane systems are in the domain of metal complexes with mixed ligands. In ourprevious research works, the high selectivity for the isocyanate-hydroxyl reaction inaqueous polyurethane systems has been shown by the manganese(III mixed-ligandcomplexes. The two new complexes have been prepared with two acetylacetonate (acacligands and one maleate ligand and its hydroxylamine derivative of the general formula[Mn(C5H7O22L]. Their structures have been established by using the fundamental analyses,the FTIR and UV/VIS spectroscopic methods, as well as the magnetic measurements. Inorder to explain the different selectivity of the manganese(III mixed-ligand complexes, theUV and ESR spectroscopy have been employed to determine the kinetics of the complexes’decomposition. The thermal stability of the complexes has been determined by way of thedynamic TG method at the heating rate of 5°C⋅min-1 and at the temperature ranged 20-550°C. It suggests the decomposition of the complexes by loss of acid ligand. The main factor in the selective catalysis control in theaqueous polyurethane systems is the nature of the acid ligands and their impact on themanganese(II/manganese(III equilibrium.

  1. Indirect Manganese Removal by Stenotrophomonas sp. and Lysinibacillus sp. Isolated from Brazilian Mine Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Rocha Barboza

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Manganese is a contaminant in the wastewaters produced by Brazilian mining operations, and the removal of the metal is notoriously difficult because of the high stability of the Mn(II ion in aqueous solutions. To explore a biological approach for removing excessive amounts of aqueous Mn(II, we investigated the potential of Mn(II oxidation by both consortium and bacterial isolates from a Brazilian manganese mine. A bacterial consortium was able to remove 99.7% of the Mn(II. A phylogenetic analysis of isolates demonstrated that the predominant microorganisms were members of Stenotrophomonas, Bacillus, and Lysinibacillus genera. Mn(II removal rates between 58.5% and 70.9% were observed for Bacillus sp. and Stenotrophomonas sp. while the Lysinibacillus isolate 13P removes 82.7%. The catalytic oxidation of Mn(II mediated by multicopper oxidase was not properly detected; however, in all of the experiments, a significant increase in the pH of the culture medium was detected. No aggregates inside the cells grown for a week were found by electronic microscopy. Nevertheless, an energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy of the isolates revealed the presence of manganese in Stenotrophomonas sp. and Lysinibacillus sp. grown in K medium. These results suggest that members of Stenotrophomonas and Lysinibacillus genera were able to remove Mn(II by a nonenzymatic pathway.

  2. Microstructure and properties of TiC-high manganese steel cermet prepared by different sintering processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhi; Lin, Tao, E-mail: lintao@ustb.edu.cn; He, Xinbo; Shao, Huiping; Zheng, Jianshu; Qu, Xuanhui

    2015-11-25

    In the paper, the TiC −50 wt.% high manganese steel cermet was made with different sintering processes including vacuum sintering, hot pressing, microwave sintering and spark plasma sintering (SPS). The microstructure, porosity and fracture morphology of the samples were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Phase analysis was carried out using X-ray diffraction (XRD). The density, hardness, transverse rupture strength (TRS) and wear resistance were investigated for the effect of the sintering processes. The results showed that the core–shell structure was not clearly observed for the TiC particles in microstructures and the high manganese steel matrix is BCC structure. Hot pressing, microwave sintering and SPS are useful processes for densification of the cermet. Nearly full density and higher hardness can be reached by these three processes at a lower sintering temperature and in a shorter sintering time. However, higher TRS can be reached by means of alloying completely in a longer sintering time, for example vacuum sintering. Pre-sintering in a long sintering time at a lower sintering temperature is also useful for improving the TRS. Finally, vacuum sintering is an effective process for producing this composite with the lowest cost in the mass production. - Highlights: • TiC-high manganese steel cermets were prepared by four sintering processes. • The core–shell structure was not clearly observed for the TiC particles in microstructures. • Th high manganese steel matrix is BCC structure instead of FCC structure. • Pre-sintering before microwave sintering is also useful for improving the TRS. • Vacuum sintering can be effective way for prepare this cermet in mass production.

  3. Brain manganese, catecholamine turnover, and the development of startle in rats prenatally exposed to manganese

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kontur, P.J.; Fechter, L.D.

    1985-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) can be neurotoxic when present in high concentrations. Neonatal animals show differential absorption, accumulation, and excretion of Mn relative to adults. If similar kinetic differences exist during gestation, then fetal animals may be susceptible to Mn neurotoxicity. The objective of this study was to examine maternal-fetal Mn transfer and the susceptibility of prenatal animals to Mn neurotoxicity. This was approached by studying the ability of Mn to cross the placenta and reach the fetal central nervous system using radiotracer and atomic absorption spectroscopy techniques. Manganese is thought to disrupt catecholamine neurotransmission in the central nervous system. This was examined in newborn rats by alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine induced catecholamine turnover and the development of the acoustic startle response. The results suggest that there are limits on fetal Mn accumulation under conditions of both normal and excessive dietary Mn levels. Manganese accumulation in the fetal brain after exposure to increased dietary Mn does not alter either dopamine or norepinephrine turnover or the development of the acoustic startle response. Excess Mn does not appear to be neurotoxic to fetal rats in spite of its limited accumulation in nervous tissue after gestational exposure

  4. Manganese superoxide dismutase and breast cancer recurrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cronin-Fenton, Deirdre P; Christensen, Mariann; Lash, Timothy L

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) inhibits oxidative damage and cancer therapy effectiveness. A polymorphism in its encoding gene (SOD2: Val16Ala rs4880) may confer poorer breast cancer survival, but data are inconsistent. We examined the association of SOD2 genotype and breast......-metastatic breast cancer from 1990-2001, received adjuvant Cyclo, and were registered in the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group. We identified 118 patients with BCR and 213 matched breast cancer controls. We genotyped SOD2 and used conditional logistic regression to compute the odds ratio (OR) and associated 95...... cancer recurrence (BCR) among patients treated with cyclophosphamide-based chemotherapy (Cyclo). We compared our findings with published studies using meta-analyses. METHODS: We conducted a population-based case-control study of BCR among women in Jutland, Denmark. Subjects were diagnosed with non...

  5. Phase transformations in Higher Manganese Silicides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allam, A. [MADIREL, UMR 7246 CNRS - Universite Aix-Marseille, av Normandie-Niemen, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France); IM2NP, UMR 7334 CNRS - Universite Aix-Marseille, av Normandie-Niemen, Case 142, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France); Boulet, P. [MADIREL, UMR 7246 CNRS - Universite Aix-Marseille, av Normandie-Niemen, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France); Nunes, C.A. [Departamento de Engenharia de Materiais (DEMAR), Escola de Engenharia de Lorena (EEL), Universidade de Sao Paulo - USP, Caixa Postal 116, 12600-970 Lorena, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Sopousek, J.; Broz, P. [Masaryk University, Faculty of Science, Department of Chemistry, Kolarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Masaryk University, Central European Institute of Technology, CEITEC, Kamenice 753/5, 625 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Record, M.-C., E-mail: m-c.record@univ-cezanne.fr [IM2NP, UMR 7334 CNRS - Universite Aix-Marseille, av Normandie-Niemen, Case 142, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France)

    2013-02-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The phase transitions of the Higher Manganese Silicides were investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The samples were characterised by XRD, DTA and DSC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mn{sub 27}Si{sub 47} is the stable phase at room temperature and under atmospheric pressure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At around 800 Degree-Sign C, Mn{sub 27}Si{sub 47} is transformed into Mn{sub 15}Si{sub 26}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The phase transition is of a second order. - Abstract: This work is an investigation of the phase transformations of the Higher Manganese Silicides in the temperature range [100-1200 Degree-Sign C]. Several complementary experimental techniques were used, namely in situ X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA) and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). The evolution of both the lattice parameters and the thermal expansion coefficients was determined from in situ XRD measurements. The stability of the samples was investigated by thermal analysis (DTA) and Cp measurements (DSC). This study shows that Mn{sub 27}Si{sub 47} which is the stable phase at room temperature and under atmospheric pressure undergoes a phase transformation at around 800 Degree-Sign C. Mn{sub 27}Si{sub 47} is transformed into Mn{sub 15}Si{sub 26}. This phase transformation seems to be of a second order one. Indeed it was not evidenced by DTA and by contrast it appears on the Cp curve.

  6. A putative peroxidase cDNA from turnip and analysis of the encoded protein sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Gómez, S; Duarte-Vázquez, M A; García-Almendárez, B E; Mayorga-Martínez, L; Cervantes-Avilés, O; Regalado, C

    2008-12-01

    A putative peroxidase cDNA was isolated from turnip roots (Brassica napus L. var. purple top white globe) by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). Total RNA extracted from mature turnip roots was used as a template for RT-PCR, using a degenerated primer designed to amplify the highly conserved distal motif of plant peroxidases. The resulting partial sequence was used to design the rest of the specific primers for 5' and 3' RACE. Two cDNA fragments were purified, sequenced, and aligned with the partial sequence from RT-PCR, and a complete overlapping sequence was obtained and labeled as BbPA (Genbank Accession No. AY423440, named as podC). The full length cDNA is 1167bp long and contains a 1077bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding a 358 deduced amino acid peroxidase polypeptide. The putative peroxidase (BnPA) showed a calculated Mr of 34kDa, and isoelectric point (pI) of 4.5, with no significant identity with other reported turnip peroxidases. Sequence alignment showed that only three peroxidases have a significant identity with BnPA namely AtP29a (84%), and AtPA2 (81%) from Arabidopsis thaliana, and HRPA2 (82%) from horseradish (Armoracia rusticana). Work is in progress to clone this gene into an adequate host to study the specific role and possible biotechnological applications of this alternative peroxidase source.

  7. Correlation between airborne manganese concentration at the workstations in the iron foundry and manganese concentration in workers’ blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyedtaghi Mirmohammadi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Manganese (Mn used as raw material for melting process in the ferrous foundry is considered as hazardous neurotoxic substance because it accumulates in the central nervous system and may cause neurological disorders. The furnace-men and melting department workers are potentially exposed to manganese particles or fume in the workplace. The objective of the research has been to investigate the sources and levels of manganese exposure in the foundry by correlation of blood-manganese (B-Mn and air-manganese (air-Mn measurement. Material and Methods: Air-Mn and Mn of blood serum were measured involving workers who worked in a big-sized foundry during 1 year. The standard method of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA ID-121 was used for air and blood assessment and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS was carried out for air and blood sample analysis. Results: The air sampling results have revealed that there is a high exposure to manganese (4.5 mg/m3 in the workplace as compared to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health’s (NIOSH time weighted average (the reference time-weighted average (TWA = 1 mg/m3. The average blood serum Mn concentration was 2.745 μg/l for subjects working for shorter than 3 months and 274.85 μg/l for subjects working 3–12 months. Conclusions: Against the research hypothesis there was no correlation between the air-Mn concentration and the B-Mn (serum level of manganese in the serum of the exposed subjects. It may be due to short time of air sampling of manganese airborne particles, and a real-time monitoring of airborne manganese particles is suggested for any future study. Med Pr 2017;68(4:449–458

  8. Manganese-oxide minerals in fractures of the Crater Flat Tuff in drill core USW G-4, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlos, B.A.; Bish, D.L.; Chipera, S.J.

    1990-07-01

    The Crater Flat Tuff is almost entirely below the water table in drill hole USW G-4 at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Manganese-oxide minerals from the Crater Flat Tuff in USW G-4 were studied using optical, scanning electron microscopic, electron microprobe, and x-ray powder diffraction methods to determine their distribution, mineralogy, and chemistry. Manganese-oxide minerals coat fractures in all three members of the Crater Flat Tuff (Prow Pass, Bullfrog, and Tram), but they are most abundant in fractures in the densely welded devitrified intervals of these members. The coatings are mostly of the cryptomelane/hollandite mineral group, but the chemistry of these coatings varies considerably. Some of the chemical variations, particularly the presence of calcium, sodium, and strontium, can be explained by admixture with todorokite, seen in some x-ray powder diffraction patterns. Other chemical variations, particularly between Ba and Pb, demonstrate that considerable substitution of Pb for Ba occurs in hollandite. Manganese-oxide coatings are common in the 10-m interval that produced 75% of the water pumped from USW G-4 in a flow survey in 1983. Their presence in water-producing zones suggests that manganese oxides may exert a significant chemical effect on groundwater beneath Yucca Mountain. In particular, the ability of the manganese oxides found at Yucca Mountain to be easily reduced suggests that they may affect the redox conditions of the groundwater and may oxidize dissolved or suspended species. Although the Mn oxides at Yucca Mountain have low exchange capacities, these minerals may retard the migration of some radionuclides, particularly the actinides, through scavenging and coprecipitation. 23 refs., 21 figs., 2 tabs

  9. Glutathione peroxidases of the potato cyst nematode Globodera Rostochiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J T; Reavy, B; Smant, G; Prior, A E

    2004-01-07

    We report the cloning and characterisation of full-length DNAs complementary to RNA (cDNAs) encoding two glutathione peroxidases (GpXs) from a plant parasitic nematode, the potato cyst nematode (PCN) Globodera rostochiensis. One protein has a functional signal peptide that targets the protein for secretion from animal cells while the other is predicted to be intracellular. Both genes are expressed in all parasite stages tested. The mRNA encoding the intracellular GpX is present throughout the nematode second stage juvenile and is particularly abundant in metabolically active tissues including the genital primordia. The mRNA encoding the secreted GpX is restricted to the hypodermis, the outermost cellular layer of the nematode, a location from which it is likely to be secreted to the parasite surface. Biochemical studies confirmed the secreted protein as a functional GpX and showed that, like secreted GpXs of other parasitic nematodes, it does not metabolise hydrogen peroxide but has a preference for larger hydroperoxide substrates. The intracellular protein is likely to have a role in metabolism of active oxygen species derived from internal body metabolism while the secreted protein may protect the parasite from host defences. Other functional roles for this protein are discussed.

  10. Thyroid Peroxidase Antibody and Screening for Postpartum Thyroid Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A. Adlan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Postpartum thyroid dysfunction (PPTD is a common disorder which causes considerable morbidity in affected women. The availability of effective treatment for hypothyroid PPTD, the occurrence of the disease in subsequent pregnancies and the need to identify subjects who develop long term hypothyroidism, has prompted discussion about screening for this disorder. There is currently no consensus about screening as investigations hitherto have been variable in their design, definitions and assay frequency and methodology. There is also a lack of consensus about a suitable screening tool although thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPOAb is a leading contender. We present data about the use of TPOAb in early pregnancy and its value as a screening tool. Although its positive predictive value is moderate, its sensitivity and specificity when used in early pregnancy are comparable or better compared to other times during pregnancy and the postpartum period. Recent studies have also confirmed this strategy to be cost effective and to compare favourably with other screening strategies. We also explore the advantages of universal screening.

  11. Colorimetric peroxidase mimetic assay for uranyl detection in sea water

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Dingyuan

    2015-03-04

    Uranyl (UO2 2+) is a form of uranium in aqueous solution that represents the greatest risk to human health because of its bioavailability. Different sensing techniques have been used with very sensitive detection limits especially the recently reported uranyl-specific DNAzymes systems. However, to the best of our knowledge, few efficient detection methods have been reported for uranyl sensing in seawater. Herein, gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) are employed in an efficient spectroscopic method to detect uranyl ion (UO2 2+) with a detection limit of 1.86 ÎM. In the absence of UO2 2+, the BSA-stabilized AuNCs (BSA-AuNCs) showed an intrinsic peroxidase-like activity. In the presence of UO2 2+, this activity can be efficiently restrained. The preliminary quenching mechanism and selectivity of UO2 2+ was also investigated and compared with other ions. This design strategy could be useful in understanding the binding affinity of protein-stabilized AuNCs to UO2 2+ and consequently prompt the recycling of UO2 2+ from seawater.

  12. Silica Sol-Gel Entrapment of the Enzyme Chloro peroxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le, T.; Chan, S.; Ebaid, B.; Sommerhalter, M.

    2015-01-01

    The enzyme chloro peroxidase (CPO) was immobilized in silica sol-gel beads prepared from tetramethoxysilane. The average pore diameter of the silica host structure (∼3 nm) was smaller than the globular CPO diameter (∼6 nm) and the enzyme remained entrapped after sol-gel maturation. The catalytic performance of the entrapped enzyme was assessed via the pyrogallol peroxidation reaction. Sol-gel beads loaded with 4 μg CPO per mL sol solution reached 9-12% relative activity compared to free CPO in solution. Enzyme kinetic analysis revealed a decrease in K_cat but no changes in K_M or K_I . Product release or enzyme damage might thus limit catalytic performance. Yet circular dichroism and visible absorption spectra of transparent CPO sol-gel sheets did not indicate enzyme damage. Activity decline due to methanol exposure was shown to be reversible in solution. To improve catalytic performance the sol-gel protocol was modified. The incorporation of 5, 20, or 40% methyltrimethoxysilane resulted in more brittle sol-gel beads but the catalytic performance increased to 14% relative to free CPO in solution. The use of more acidic casting buffers (ph 4.5 or 5.5 instead of 6.5) resulted in a more porous silica host reaching up to 18% relative activity

  13. Biotechnological advances towards an enhanced peroxidase production in Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krainer, Florian W; Gerstmann, Michaela A; Darnhofer, Barbara; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth; Glieder, Anton

    2016-09-10

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) is a high-demand enzyme for applications in diagnostics, bioremediation, biocatalysis and medicine. Current HRP preparations are isolated from horseradish roots as mixtures of biochemically diverse isoenzymes. Thus, there is a strong need for a recombinant production process enabling a steady supply with enzyme preparations of consistent high quality. However, most current recombinant production systems are limited at titers in the low mg/L range. In this study, we used the well-known yeast Pichia pastoris as host for recombinant HRP production. To enhance recombinant enzyme titers we systematically evaluated engineering approaches on the secretion process, coproduction of helper proteins, and compared expression from the strong methanol-inducible PAOX1 promoter, the strong constitutive PGAP promoter, and a novel bidirectional promoter PHTX1. Ultimately, coproduction of HRP and active Hac1 under PHTX1 control yielded a recombinant HRP titer of 132mg/L after 56h of cultivation in a methanol-independent and easy-to-do bioreactor cultivation process. With regard to the many versatile applications for HRP, the establishment of a microbial host system suitable for efficient recombinant HRP production was highly overdue. The novel HRP production platform in P. pastoris presented in this study sets a new benchmark for this medically relevant enzyme. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Direct Electrochemistry of Horseradish Peroxidase-Gold Nanoparticles Conjugate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanchal K. Mitra

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the direct electrochemistry of horseradish peroxidase (HRP coupled to gold nanoparticles (AuNP using electrochemical techniques, which provide some insight in the application of biosensors as tools for diagnostics because HRP is widely used in clinical diagnostics kits. AuNP capped with (i glutathione and (ii lipoic acid was covalently linked to HRP. The immobilized HRP/AuNP conjugate showed characteristic redox peaks at a gold electrode. It displayed good electrocatalytic response to the reduction of H2O2, with good sensitivity and without any electron mediator. The covalent linking of HRP and AuNP did not affect the activity of the enzyme significantly. The response of the electrode towards the different concentrations of H2O2 showed the characteristics of Michaelis Menten enzyme kinetics with an optimum pH between 7.0 to 8.0. The preparation of the sensor involves single layer of enzyme, which can be carried out efficiently and is also highly reproducible when compared to other systems involving the layer-by-layer assembly, adsorption or encapsulation of the enzyme. The immobilized AuNP-HRP can be used for immunosensor applications

  15. Thermal and high pressure inactivation kinetics of blueberry peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terefe, Netsanet Shiferaw; Delon, Antoine; Versteeg, Cornelis

    2017-10-01

    This study for the first time investigated the stability and inactivation kinetics of blueberry peroxidase in model systems (McIlvaine buffer, pH=3.6, the typical pH of blueberry juice) during thermal (40-80°C) and combined high pressure-thermal processing (0.1-690MPa, 30-90°C). At 70-80°C, the thermal inactivation kinetics was best described by a biphasic model with ∼61% labile and ∼39% stable fractions at temperature between 70 and 75°C. High pressure inhibited the inactivation of the enzyme with no inactivation at pressures as high as 690MPa and temperatures less than 50°C. The inactivation kinetics of the enzyme at 60-70°C, and pressures higher than 500MPa was best described by a first order biphasic model with ∼25% labile fraction and 75% stable fraction. The activation energy values at atmospheric pressure were 548.6kJ/mol and 324.5kJ/mol respectively for the stable and the labile fractions. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Correlation among physical and electrochemical behaviour of nanostructured electrolytic manganese dioxide from leach liquor and synthetic for aqueous asymmetric capacitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minakshi Sundaram, Manickam; Biswal, Avijit; Mitchell, David; Jones, Rob; Fernandez, Carlos

    2016-02-14

    An attempt has been made to correlate the differences in structural parameters, surface areas, morphology etc. with the electrochemical capacitive behaviour of the EMDs. The nanostructured electrolytic manganese dioxides (EMD) have been synthesized through electrodepositing MnO2 from two different leach liquors and a synthetic analogue thereof. The structural and chemical state was determined using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) respectively. Multiplet structure determination led to estimates of the manganese valence states present in the EMD. The EMDs have been tested in an asymmetric capacitor which we have developed. This used activated carbon as the negative electrode and the various EMDs as the positive electrode. Aqueous 2 M NaOH solution was used as the electrolyte. The capacitor achieved 1.6 V corresponding to a capacitance of ∼50 F g(-1) of the EMDs from leach liquors. The EMD derived from the synthetic solution showed an inferior capacitance of 25 F g(-1). Extended cycling (2000 cycles), showed 100% capacity retention was achieved for one EMD produced from the leach liquor derived from low-grade manganese ore/residue. This outstanding capacitor performance was correlated with the presence of a nanofibrous morphology. These findings open up the possibility of extracting a high performance EMD product from a low cost, low-grade source of manganese.

  17. Long-term litter decomposition controlled by manganese redox cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiluweit, Marco; Nico, Peter; Harmon, Mark E; Mao, Jingdong; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Kleber, Markus

    2015-09-22

    Litter decomposition is a keystone ecosystem process impacting nutrient cycling and productivity, soil properties, and the terrestrial carbon (C) balance, but the factors regulating decomposition rate are still poorly understood. Traditional models assume that the rate is controlled by litter quality, relying on parameters such as lignin content as predictors. However, a strong correlation has been observed between the manganese (Mn) content of litter and decomposition rates across a variety of forest ecosystems. Here, we show that long-term litter decomposition in forest ecosystems is tightly coupled to Mn redox cycling. Over 7 years of litter decomposition, microbial transformation of litter was paralleled by variations in Mn oxidation state and concentration. A detailed chemical imaging analysis of the litter revealed that fungi recruit and redistribute unreactive Mn(2+) provided by fresh plant litter to produce oxidative Mn(3+) species at sites of active decay, with Mn eventually accumulating as insoluble Mn(3+/4+) oxides. Formation of reactive Mn(3+) species coincided with the generation of aromatic oxidation products, providing direct proof of the previously posited role of Mn(3+)-based oxidizers in the breakdown of litter. Our results suggest that the litter-decomposing machinery at our coniferous forest site depends on the ability of plants and microbes to supply, accumulate, and regenerate short-lived Mn(3+) species in the litter layer. This observation indicates that biogeochemical constraints on bioavailability, mobility, and reactivity of Mn in the plant-soil system may have a profound impact on litter decomposition rates.

  18. Structure and Heme-Independent Peroxidase Activity of a Fully-Coordinated Mononuclear Mn(II) Complex with a Schiff-Base Tripodal Ligand Containing Three Imidazole Groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, Shuranjan; Lee, Hong In [Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Do Hyun [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Lah, Myoung Soo [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    New complex [Mn(II)H{sub 1.5}L]{sub 2}[Mn(II)H{sub 3}L]{sub 2}(ClO{sub 4}){sub 5}·3H{sub 2}O, where H{sub 3}L is tris{2-(4-imidazolyl)methyliminoethyl} amine (imtren), has been prepared by reacting manganese(II) perchlorate hexahydrate with the imtren ligand in methanol. X-ray crystallographic study revealed that the imtren ligand hexadentately binds to Mn(II) ion through the three Schiff-base imine N atoms and three imidazole N atoms with a distorted octahedral geometry, and the apical tertiary amine N atom of the ligand pseudo-coordinates to Mn(II), forming overall a pseudo-seven coordination environment. The hydrogen-bonds between imidazole and imidazolate of [Mn(II)H{sub 1.5}L]{sup 0.5+} complex ions are extended to build a 2D puckered network with trigonal voids. [Mn(II)H{sub 3}L]{sup 2+} complex ions constitutes another extended 2D puckered layer without hydrogen bonds. Two layers are wedged each other to constitute overall stack of the crystal. Peroxidase activity of complex 1 was examined by observing the oxidation of 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline)- 6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of complex 1. Generation of ABTS{sup +·} was observed by UV-vis and EPR spectroscopies, indicating that the complex 1, a fully-coordinated mononuclear Mn(II) complex with nitrogen-only ligand, has a heme-independent peroxidase activity.

  19. Manganese Exposure in the General Population in a Mining District ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Manganese Exposure in the General Population in a Mining District (Mexico) ... in a population living close to a mine and mineral processing plant in Mexico ... Call for proposals: Innovations for the economic inclusion of marginalized youth.

  20. Beneficiation studies of Bajaur manganese ore by different processing techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riaz, M.; Khan, F.U.; Yamin, A.; Bilquees, R.; Muhammad, N.

    2010-01-01

    The manganese ore of Bajaur Agency of Pakistan was subjected to flotation, heavy medium separation, gravity concentration and magnetic separation techniques for beneficiation. The original composition of the manganese ore was 45.56% Mn , 4% Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/, 40% SiO/sub 2/. The Mn content was raised to a maximum 48.76 % in the concentrate with the recovery of 67.78 % through flotation technique. Other techniques rendered marginal increase in Mn concentration against the theoretical possibility of substantial enrichment by rejecting the 20 % gangue minerals. The separation of manganese minerals from associated gangue was difficult, due to mineralogical complexity of the ore, extreme fineness of the particle size, texture and minerals intergrowth. High Mn/Fe ratio, phosphorus, and silica contents were within tolerable limits for utilisation of the ore in ferro-manganese production. (author)

  1. By lithology Zbruch deposits (Lower Sarmatian Nikopol manganese ore Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdanovich V.V.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on lithologic-paleogeographic study Zbruch layers of Nikopol manganese ore Basin sediments described lithological and genetic types of rocks and facies conditions of formation of deposits.

  2. Manganese nodules in the Exclusive Economic Zone of Mauritius

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nath, B.N.; ShyamPrasad, M.

    The distribution of manganese nodules in the Exclusive Economic Zone of the island nation Mauritius was delineated during cruise SK-35 of ORV Sagar Kanya in 1987. The areas surveyed included Saya de Malha and Nazareth Banks, the Cargados Carajos...

  3. Manganese oxidation by bacterial isolates from the Indian Ridge System

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, S.O.; Krishnan, K.P.; Khedekar, V.D.; LokaBharathi, P.A.

    The abundance and activity of culturable manganese-oxidizing bacteria were assessed from near-bottom water samples of the tectonically active Carlsberg Ridge. Retrievable counts as colony forming units (CFU) on dilute nutrient agar medium (dilNA = 2...

  4. Investigation of Wear Coefficient of Manganese Phosphate Coated Tool Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ilaiyavel

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years the properties of the coating in terms of wear resistance is of paramount importance in order to prevent the formation of severe damages. In this study, Wear coefficient of uncoated, Manganese Phosphate coated, Manganese Phosphate coated with oil lubricant, Heat treated Manganese Phosphate coated with oil lubricant on AISI D2 steels was investigated using Archard’s equation. The wear tests were performed in a pin on disk apparatus as per ASTM G-99 Standard. The volumetric wear loss and wear coefficient were evaluated through pin on disc test using a sliding velocity of 3.0 m/s under normal load of 40 N and controlled condition of temperature and humidity. Based on the results of the wear test, the Heat treated Manganese Phosphate with oil lubricant exhibited the lowest average wear coefficient and the lowest wear loss under 40 N load.

  5. Spectroscopic characterization of manganese-doped alkaline earth ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The shapes of spectra are also changed with varying alkaline earth ions content. ... of manganese ion and electrical properties of glass contain- ing mobile ions like .... octahedral crystal field are located above the ground 6S state. Figure 2.

  6. Arsenic, chromium, copper, iron, manganese, lead, selenium and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arsenic, chromium, copper, iron, manganese, lead, selenium and zinc in the tissues of the largemouth yellowfish, Labeobarbus kimberleyensis (Gilchrist and Thompson, 1913), from the Vaal Dam, South Africa, and associated consumption risks.

  7. Relation between grade and abundance of manganese nodules

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sudhakar, M.

    Data from more than 1000 locations in the Central Indian Ocean Basin (CIOB) where both bulk nodule chemistry and abundance were determined and utilized to study the relationship between grade and abundance of manganese nodule deposits. Grade...

  8. India's manganese nodule mine site in the Central Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Banakar, V.K.

    This commentary highlights the activities of massive exploration programme for manganese nodule deposits in the Central Indian Basin located 5 km below the ocean surface and India's claim for mine site development and registration with UNCLOS...

  9. Preparation of manganese-based perovskite nanoparticles using a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Preparation of manganese-based perovskite nanoparticles using a reverse microemulsion method: ... ted much attention in various fields of medicine and pharma- cology such as .... In addition, the SAR value of sample was calculated through ...

  10. Anodically generated manganese(III) sulphate for the oxidation of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    oxidation of dipeptides in aqueous sulphuric acid medium: A kinetic study ... acetic acid (TFA) and N-methylmorpholine (NMM) were purchased ... and chloroform–methanol– acetic acid .... tion), manganese(II) sulphate and water (to keep the.

  11. Status and Role of Manganese in the Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RK Kamble

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Manganese is the second most abundant heavy metal, and in frequency list of elements it occupies 12th place. The Earth’s core contains about 1.5% manganese. According to Indian Standards for Drinking water (IS 10500:2012 manganese concentration in drinking water is 0.1 ppm (acceptable limit and 0.3 ppm as permissible limit. An attempt has been made to record the presence of manganese in different environmental matrices such as air, water, soil, food, its effects on plants, animals including human beings. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/ije.v3i3.11081 International Journal of Environment Vol.3(3 2014: 222-234

  12. Investigation of manganese homeostasis in dogs with anaemia and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Investigation of manganese homeostasis in dogs with anaemia and chronic enteropathy. Marisa da Fonseca Ferreira, Arielle Elizabeth Ann Aylor, Richard John Mellanby, Susan Mary Campbell, Adam George Gow ...

  13. Occupational neurotoxicology due to heavy metals-especially manganese poisoning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Naohide

    2007-01-01

    The most hazardous manganese exposures occur in mining and smelting of ore. Recently, the poisoning has been frequently reported to be associated with welding. In occupational exposure, manganese is absorbed mainly by inhalation. Manganese preferentially accumulates in tissues rich in mitochondria. It also penetrates the blood brain barrior and accumulate in the basal ganglia, especially the globus pallidus, but also the striatum. Manganese poisoning is clinically characterized by the central nervous system involvement including psychiatric symptomes, extrapyramidal signs, and less frequently other neurological manifestations. Psychiatric symptomes are well described in the manganese miners and incrude sleep disturbance, disorientation, emotional lability, compulsive acts, hallucinations, illusions, and delusions. The main characteristic manifestations usually begin shortly after the appearance of these psychiatric symptomes. The latter neurological signs are progressive bradykinesia, dystonia, and disturbance of gait. Bradykinesia is one of the most important findings. There is a remarkable slowing of both active and passive movements of the extremities. Micrographia is frequently observed and a characteristic finding. The patients may show some symmetrical tremor, which usually not so marked. The dystonic posture of the limbs is often accompanied by painfull cramps. This attitudal hypertonia has a tendency to decrease or disappear in the supine position and to increase in orthostation. Cog-wheel rigidity is also elisited on the passive movement of all extremities. Gait disturbance is also characteristic in this poisoning. In the severe cases, cook gait has been reported. The patient uses small steps, but has a tendency to elevate the heels and to rotate them outward. He progress without pressing on the flat of his feet, but only upon the metatarsophalangeal articulations, mainly of the fourth and fifth toes. Increased signal in T1-weighted image in the basal

  14. Polyphenol oxidase and peroxidase in different sugarcane cultivars, in Presidente Prudente region; Polifenoloxidases e peroxidase em diferentes variedades de cana-de-acucar na regiao de Presidente Prudente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques, Tadeu A.; Gomes, Danilo B.; Marques, Patricia A.A.; Alves, Vagner C. [Universidade do Oeste Paulista (UNOESTE), Presidente Prudente, SP (Brazil). Curso de Agronomia], Emails: tmarques@unoeste.br, pmarques@unoeste.br, vagner@unoeste.br

    2009-07-01

    The objective in present work was compare three sugarcane cultivars (RB 72-454, RB 86-7515, IAC 86-2480), evaluating the content of polyphenoloxidase and peroxidase. These determinations had aimed at to detect possible differences between varieties thus and being to differentiate them with regard to the products most interesting to be elaborated, ethanol production or sugar production. The varieties had presented differences of behavior for studied enzymes. The activity of polyphenoloxidase was superior the activity of peroxidase. The enzyme peroxidase was presented in bigger indices in the dry and cold periods. The enzyme polyphenoloxidase was presented well changeable, but with strong trend of bigger values in the rainy periods. It can be said that distinct periods for the best use of the varieties in the sugar production or alcohol exist. (author)

  15. Iron and manganese oxide mineralization in the Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, J. R.; Koschinsky, A.; Halbach, P.; Manheim, F. T.; Bau, M.; Jung-Keuk, Kang; Lubick, N.

    1997-01-01

    Iron, manganese, and iron-manganese deposits occur in nearly all geomorphologic and tectonic environments in the ocean basins and form by one or more of four processes: (1) hydrogenetic precipitation from cold ambient seawater, (2) precipitation from hydrothermal fluids, (3) precipitation from sediment pore waters that have been modified from bottom water compositions by diagenetic reactions in the sediment column and (4) replacement of rocks and sediment. These processes are discussed.

  16. Bioconcentration of manganese and iron in Panaeoloideae Sing

    OpenAIRE

    Stijve, T.; Blake, C.

    1994-01-01

    According to literature, the manganese content of most basidiomycetes fluctuates between 10 and 60 mg/kg, whereas the iron levels range from 100-500 mg/kg (both expressed on dry weight). The present authors report that bioconcentration of manganese is a distinguishing feature of the Panaeoloideae, as demonstrated by the analysis of 44 collections representing 15 taxons. Carpophores generally contain between 250 and 2500 mg/kg on dry weight, and, with the notable exception of Panaeolus semiova...

  17. A study on the long term effect of biofilm produced by biosurfactant producing microbe on medical implant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabhawathi, Veluchamy; Thirunavukarasu, Kathirvel; Doble, Mukesh

    2014-01-01

    Low density polyethylene (LDPE) is used as a long term medical implant. Biofilm forming ability of two pathogenic microorganisms, namely, Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) on this polymer and the differences in the properties of these matrices are studied for a year. There are very few long term studies on biofilms formed on medical implants. After three months, colonies of B. subtilis were two times higher when compared to those of P. aeruginosa. And at the end of one year, they were two orders of magnitude higher than the later. The exopolysaccharide (EPS) and biosurfactant recovered from the polymer surface after three months were 21 and 10.4 μg/cm 2 for B. subtilis and 13 and 8.6 μg/cm 2 for P. aeruginosa. After one year, these were higher in B. subtilis (50 and 37.1 μg/cm 2 , respectively) than in P. aeruginosa (34.1 and 31.8 μg/cm 2 , respectively). B. subtilis consisted of protein controlling the community and sporulation development, while P. aeruginosa had either housekeeping or metabolic proteins. The EPS in the respective biofilm consisted of biosurfactants produced by B. subtilis (surfactins, m/z = 1029 to 1134) and P. aeruginosa (rhamnolipids, m/z = 568 to 705). Thermogravimetric analysis indicated that LDPE incubated with these organisms underwent a weight loss of 4 and 3% after three months and 11.1 and 9.2% after one year, respectively at 435 °C. Laccase and manganese peroxidase were detected in the biofilm which could be involved in the degradation. The biosurfactant of these microorganisms altered the hydrophobicity of the surface, favoring their attachment and proliferation. - Highlights: • Early P.aeru biofilm had genes needed for motility but later for housekeeping. • Early B. sub biofilm had genes needed for its formation but later for maturity. • Cells and matrix components in B. sub biofilm are higher than in P.aeru. • Compositions of these two biofilms are different. • So they need

  18. A study on the long term effect of biofilm produced by biosurfactant producing microbe on medical implant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhawathi, Veluchamy; Thirunavukarasu, Kathirvel; Doble, Mukesh, E-mail: mukeshd@iitm.ac.in

    2014-07-01

    Low density polyethylene (LDPE) is used as a long term medical implant. Biofilm forming ability of two pathogenic microorganisms, namely, Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) on this polymer and the differences in the properties of these matrices are studied for a year. There are very few long term studies on biofilms formed on medical implants. After three months, colonies of B. subtilis were two times higher when compared to those of P. aeruginosa. And at the end of one year, they were two orders of magnitude higher than the later. The exopolysaccharide (EPS) and biosurfactant recovered from the polymer surface after three months were 21 and 10.4 μg/cm{sup 2} for B. subtilis and 13 and 8.6 μg/cm{sup 2} for P. aeruginosa. After one year, these were higher in B. subtilis (50 and 37.1 μg/cm{sup 2}, respectively) than in P. aeruginosa (34.1 and 31.8 μg/cm{sup 2}, respectively). B. subtilis consisted of protein controlling the community and sporulation development, while P. aeruginosa had either housekeeping or metabolic proteins. The EPS in the respective biofilm consisted of biosurfactants produced by B. subtilis (surfactins, m/z = 1029 to 1134) and P. aeruginosa (rhamnolipids, m/z = 568 to 705). Thermogravimetric analysis indicated that LDPE incubated with these organisms underwent a weight loss of 4 and 3% after three months and 11.1 and 9.2% after one year, respectively at 435 °C. Laccase and manganese peroxidase were detected in the biofilm which could be involved in the degradation. The biosurfactant of these microorganisms altered the hydrophobicity of the surface, favoring their attachment and proliferation. - Highlights: • Early P.aeru biofilm had genes needed for motility but later for housekeeping. • Early B. sub biofilm had genes needed for its formation but later for maturity. • Cells and matrix components in B. sub biofilm are higher than in P.aeru. • Compositions of these two biofilms are different.

  19. Low copper and high manganese levels in prion protein plaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christopher J.; Gilbert, P.U.P.A.; Abrecth, Mike; Baldwin, Katherine L.; Russell, Robin E.; Pedersen, Joel A.; McKenzie, Debbie

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation of aggregates rich in an abnormally folded form of the prion protein characterize the neurodegeneration caused by transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). The molecular triggers of plaque formation and neurodegeneration remain unknown, but analyses of TSE-infected brain homogenates and preparations enriched for abnormal prion protein suggest that reduced levels of copper and increased levels of manganese are associated with disease. The objectives of this study were to: (1) assess copper and manganese levels in healthy and TSE-infected Syrian hamster brain homogenates; (2) determine if the distribution of these metals can be mapped in TSE-infected brain tissue using X-ray photoelectron emission microscopy (X-PEEM) with synchrotron radiation; and (3) use X-PEEM to assess the relative amounts of copper and manganese in prion plaques in situ. In agreement with studies of other TSEs and species, we found reduced brain levels of copper and increased levels of manganese associated with disease in our hamster model. We also found that the in situ levels of these metals in brainstem were sufficient to image by X-PEEM. Using immunolabeled prion plaques in directly adjacent tissue sections to identify regions to image by X-PEEM, we found a statistically significant relationship of copper-manganese dysregulation in prion plaques: copper was depleted whereas manganese was enriched. These data provide evidence for prion plaques altering local transition metal distribution in the TSE-infected central nervous system.

  20. Permanganate-based synthesis of manganese oxide nanoparticles in ferritin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Cameron R.; Smith, Trevor J.; Embley, Jacob S.; Maxfield, Jake H.; Hansen, Kameron R.; Peterson, J. Ryan; Henrichsen, Andrew M.; Erickson, Stephen D.; Buck, David C.; Colton, John S.; Watt, Richard K.

    2017-05-01

    This paper investigates the comproportionation reaction of MnII with {{{{MnO}}}4}- as a route for manganese oxide nanoparticle synthesis in the protein ferritin. We report that {{{{MnO}}}4}- serves as the electron acceptor and reacts with MnII in the presence of apoferritin to form manganese oxide cores inside the protein shell. Manganese loading into ferritin was studied under acidic, neutral, and basic conditions and the ratios of MnII and permanganate were varied at each pH. The manganese-containing ferritin samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, UV/Vis absorption, and by measuring the band gap energies for each sample. Manganese cores were deposited inside ferritin under both the acidic and basic conditions. All resulting manganese ferritin samples were found to be indirect band gap materials with band gap energies ranging from 1.01 to 1.34 eV. An increased UV/Vis absorption around 370 nm was observed for samples formed under acidic conditions, suggestive of MnO2 formation inside ferritin.

  1. Spatial and temporal variations of manganese concentrations in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbeau, Benoit; Carrière, Annie; Bouchard, Maryse F

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the variability of manganese concentrations in drinking water (daily, seasonal, spatial) for eight communities who participated in an epidemiological study on neurotoxic effects associated with exposure to manganese in drinking water. We also assessed the performance of residential point-of-use and point-of-entry devices (POE) for reducing manganese concentrations in water. While the total Mn concentrations measured during this study were highly variable depending on the location (manganese concentration for 4 out of 5 sampling locations. The efficiency of reverse osmosis and ion exchange for total Mn removal was consistently high while activated carbon provided variable results. The four POE greensand filters investigated all increased (29 to 199%) manganese concentration, indicating deficient operation and/or maintenance practices. Manganese concentrations in the distribution system were equal or lower than at the inlet, indicating that sampling at the inlet of the distribution system is conservative. The decline in total Mn concentration was linked to higher water residence time in the distribution system.

  2. Metastable α-AgVO3 microrods as peroxidase mimetics for colorimetric determination of H2O2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Zhang, Dun; Wang, Jin

    2017-12-01

    Single phase metastable α-AgVO 3 microrods with high crystallinity, tetragonal rod-like microstructure, uniform particle size distribution, and good dispersion were synthesized by direct coprecipitation at room temperature. They are shown to be viable peroxidase mimics that catalyze the oxidation of 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine in the presence of H 2 O 2 . Kinetic analysis indicated typical Michaelis-Menten catalytic behavior. The findings were used to design a colorimetric assay for H 2 O 2 , best measured at 652 nm. The method has a linear response in the 60 to 200 μM H 2 O 2 concentration range, with a 2 μM detection limit. Benefitting from the chemical stability of the microrods, the method is well reproducible. It also is easily performed and highly specific. Graphic abstract Single phase metastable α-AgVO 3 microrods with high crystallinity, tetragonal rod-like microstructure, uniform particle size distribution, and good dispersion can efficiently catalyze the oxidation reaction of peroxidase substrate 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) in the presence of H 2 O 2 to produce a blue color change.

  3. Ascorbate Peroxidase and Catalase Activities and Their Genetic Regulation in Plants Subjected to Drought and Salinity Stresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Sofo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, an important relatively stable non-radical reactive oxygen species (ROS is produced by normal aerobic metabolism in plants. At low concentrations, H2O2 acts as a signal molecule involved in the regulation of specific biological/physiological processes (photosynthetic functions, cell cycle, growth and development, plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. Oxidative stress and eventual cell death in plants can be caused by excess H2O2 accumulation. Since stress factors provoke enhanced production of H2O2 in plants, severe damage to biomolecules can be possible due to elevated and non-metabolized cellular H2O2. Plants are endowed with H2O2-metabolizing enzymes such as catalases (CAT, ascorbate peroxidases (APX, some peroxiredoxins, glutathione/thioredoxin peroxidases, and glutathione sulfo-transferases. However, the most notably distinguished enzymes are CAT and APX since the former mainly occurs in peroxisomes and does not require a reductant for catalyzing a dismutation reaction. In particular, APX has a higher affinity for H2O2 and reduces it to H2O in chloroplasts, cytosol, mitochondria and peroxisomes, as well as in the apoplastic space, utilizing ascorbate as specific electron donor. Based on recent reports, this review highlights the role of H2O2 in plants experiencing water deficit and salinity and synthesizes major outcomes of studies on CAT and APX activity and genetic regulation in drought- and salt-stressed plants.

  4. Reactivity of biogenic manganese oxide for metal sequestration and photochemistry: Computational solid state physics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, K.D.; Sposito, G.

    2010-02-01

    Many microbes, including both bacteria and fungi, produce manganese (Mn) oxides by oxidizing soluble Mn(II) to form insoluble Mn(IV) oxide minerals, a kinetically much faster process than abiotic oxidation. These biogenic Mn oxides drive the Mn cycle, coupling it with diverse biogeochemical cycles and determining the bioavailability of environmental contaminants, mainly through strong adsorption and redox reactions. This mini review introduces recent findings based on quantum mechanical density functional theory that reveal the detailed mechanisms of toxic metal adsorption at Mn oxide surfaces and the remarkable role of Mn vacancies in the photochemistry of these minerals.

  5. Luminol, horseradish peroxidase, and glucose oxidase ternary functionalized graphene oxide for ultrasensitive glucose sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fang; Ma, Wenjing; Liu, Jiachang; Wu, Xiang; Wang, Yan; He, Jianbo

    2018-01-01

    Luminol, horseradish peroxidase (HRP), and glucose oxidase (GOx) ternary functionalized graphene oxide (HRP/GOx-luminol-GO) with excellent chemiluminescence (CL) activity and specific enzymatic property was prepared via a simple and general strategy for the first time. In this approach, luminol functionalized GO (luminol-GO) was prepared by gently stirring GO with luminol. Then HRP and GOx were further co-immobilized onto the surface of luminol-GO by storing HRP and GOx with luminol-GO at 4 °C overnight, to form HRP/GOx-luminol-GO bionanocomposites. The synthesized HRP/GOx-luminol-GO could react with H 2 O 2 generated from GOx catalyzed glucose oxidization reaction, to produce strong CL emission in the presence of co-immobilized HRP. Thus, we developed an ultrasensitive, homogeneous, reagentless, selective, and simple CL sensing system for glucose detection. The resulting biosensors exhibited ultra-wide linear range from 5.0 nM to 5.0 mM, and an ultra-low detection limit of 1.2 nM, which was more than 3 orders of magnitude lower than previously reported methods. Furthermore, the sensing system was successfully applied for the detection of glucose in human blood samples.

  6. Enzymatic extract containing lignin peroxidase immobilized on carbon nanotubes: Potential biocatalyst in dye decolourization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Feliciano Oliveira

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The majority of the textile dyes are harmful to the environment and potentially carcinogenic. Among strategies for their exclusion, the treatment of dye contaminated wastewater with fungal extract, containing lignin peroxidase (LiP, may be useful. Two fungi isolates, Pleurotus ostreatus (PLO9 and Ganoderma lucidum (GRM117, produced the enzymatic extract by fermentation in the lignocellulosic residue, Jatropha curcas seed cake. The extracts from PLO9 and GRM117 were immobilized on carbon nanotubes and showed an increase of 18 and 27-fold of LiP specific activity compared to the free enzyme. Also, LiP from both fungi extracts showed higher Vmax and lower Km values. Only the immobilized extracts could be efficiently reused in the dye decolourization, contrary, the carbon nanotubes became saturated and they should be discarded over time. This device may offer a final biocatalyst with higher catalytic efficiency and capability to be reused in the dye decolourization process. Keywords: Lignocellulosic residue, Solid state fermentation, Immobilization, Fungi

  7. Effect of ozone and histamine on airway permeability to horseradish peroxidase in guinea pigs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, P.D.; Gordon, T.; Warnick, M.; Amdur, M.O.

    1986-01-01

    Airway permeability was studied in groups of male guinea pigs at 2, 8, and 24 h after a 1-h exposure to 1 ppm ozone or at 2 h after a 1-h exposure to filtered air (control). Intratracheal administration of 2 mg horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was followed by blood sampling at 5-min intervals up to 30 min. The rate of appearance of HRP in plasma was significantly higher at 2 and 8 h after ozone exposure than that found in animals examined 2 h after air exposure or 24 h after ozone exposure. A dose of 0.12 mg/kg of subcutaneous histamine given after the 15 min blood sample significantly increased the already elevated permeability seen at 2 h post ozone, but had no effect on animals exposed to filtered air 2 h earlier or to ozone 24 h earlier. No difference was seen in the amount of subcutaneous radiolabeled histamine in the lungs of animals exposed 2 h earlier either to air or to ozone. These data indicate that a short-term exposure to ozone produced a reversible increase in respiratory epithelial permeability to HRP in guinea pigs. The potentiation of this increased permeability by histamine may be another manifestation of ozone-induced hyperreactivity

  8. Construction of a horseradish peroxidase resistant toward hydrogen peroxide by saturation mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asad, Sedigheh; Dastgheib, Seyed Mohammad Mehdi; Khajeh, Khosro

    2016-11-01

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) with a variety of potential biotechnological applications is still isolated from the horseradish root as a mixture of different isoenzymes with different biochemical properties. There is an increasing demand for preparations of high amounts of pure enzyme but its recombinant production is limited because of the lack of glycosylation in Escherichia coli and different glycosylation patterns in yeasts which affects its stability parameters. The goal of this study was to increase the stability of non-glycosylated enzyme, which is produced in E. coli, toward hydrogen peroxide via mutagenesis. Asparagine 268, one of the N-glycosylation sites of the enzyme, has been mutated via saturation mutagenesis using the megaprimer method. Modification and miniaturization of previously described protocols enabled screening of a library propagated in E. coli XJb (DE3). The library of mutants was screened for stability toward hydrogen peroxide with azinobis (ethylbenzthiazoline sulfonate) as a reducing substrate. Asn268Gly mutant, the top variant from the screening, exhibited 18-fold increased stability toward hydrogen peroxide and twice improved thermal stability compared with the recombinant HRP. Moreover, the substitution led to 2.5-fold improvement in the catalytic efficiency with phenol/4-aminoantipyrine. Constructed mutant represents a stable biocatalyst, which may find use in medical diagnostics, biosensing, and bioprocesses. © 2015 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. EVALUATION OF ENDOGLUCANASE, EXOGLUCANASE, LACCASE, AND LIGNIN PEROXIDASE ACTIVITIES ON TEN WHITE-ROT FUNGI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Montoya B

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a way of tracking the production of lignocellulolytic enzymes in ten species of white rot fungi: Lentinula edodes, Schizophyllum commune, Trametes trogii, Coriolus versicolor, Pycnoporus sanguineus, Ganoderma applanatum, Ganoderma lucidum, Grifola frondosa, Pleurotus ostreatus and Auricularia delicata. These species were first screened on solid culture media containing carboxymethyl cellulose, crystalline cellulose, ABTS (2,2´-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonate and azure B, which showed the production of endoglucanase, exoglucanase, laccase and lignin peroxidase (LiP enzymes. Cellulolytic activities were detected after five days of incubation with congo red indicator, forming a clear-white halo in areas where cellulose was degraded. For ligninases, the tracking consisted of the monitoring in the formation of green halos due to ABTS oxidation for laccase, and decolorization halos on azure B for LiP during 14 days of incubation. From this qualitative screening, four strains were selected (G. lucidum, L. edodes, C. versicolor and T. trogii as the best producers of cellulolytic and ligninolytic enzymes. These four species were inoculated on a substrate of sawdust oak, yielding 51,8% of lignin degraded by L. edodes and 22% of cellulose degraded by C. versicolor.

  10. Nanodiamond-Gold Nanocomposites with the Peroxidase-Like Oxidative Catalytic Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Chul; Lee, Dukhee; Jeong, Seong Hoon; Lee, Sang-Yup; Kang, Eunah

    2016-12-21

    Novel nanodiamond-gold nanocomposites (NDAus) are prepared, and their oxidative catalytic activity is examined. Gold nanoparticles are deposited on carboxylated nanodiamonds (NDs) by in situ chemical reduction of gold precursor ions to produce NDAus, which exhibit catalytic activity for the oxidation of o-phenylenediamine in the presence of hydrogen peroxide similarly to a peroxidase. This remarkable catalytic activity is exhibited only by the gold nanoparticle-decorated NDs and is not observed for either Au nanoparticles or NDs separately. Kinetic oxidative catalysis studies show that NDAus exhibit a ping-pong mechanism with an activation energy of 93.3 kJ mol -1 , with the oxidation reaction rate being proportional to the substrate concentration. NDAus retain considerable activity even after several instances of reuse and are compatible with a natural enzyme, allowing the detection of xanthine using cascade catalysis. Association with gold nanoparticles makes NDs a good carbonic catalyst due to charge transfer at the metal-carbon interface and facilitated substrate adsorption. The results of this study suggest that diverse carbonic catalysts can be obtained by interfacial incorporation of various metal/inorganic substances.

  11. Structure of the horseradish peroxidase isozyme C genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiyama, K; Takemura, H; Shibayama, S; Kobayashi, K; Choi, J K; Shinmyo, A; Takano, M; Yamada, Y; Okada, H

    1988-05-02

    We have isolated, cloned and characterized three cDNAs and two genomic DNAs corresponding to the mRNAs and genes for the horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) peroxidase isoenzyme C (HPR C). The amino acid sequence of HRP C1, deduced from the nucleotide sequence of one of the cDNA clone, pSK1, contained the same primary sequence as that of the purified enzyme established by Welinder [FEBS Lett. 72, 19-23 (1976)] with additional sequences at the N and C terminal. All three inserts in the cDNA clones, pSK1, pSK2 and pSK3, coded the same size of peptide (308 amino acid residues) if these are processed in the same way, and the amino acid sequence were homologous to each other by 91-94%. Functional amino acids, including His40, His170, Tyr185 and Arg183 and S-S-bond-forming Cys, were conserved in the three isozymes, but a few N-glycosylation sites were not the same. Two HRP C isoenzyme genomic genes, prxC1 and prxC2, were tandem on the chromosomal DNA and each gene consisted of four exons and three introns. The positions in the exons interrupted by introns were the same in two genes. We observed a putative promoter sequence 5' upstream and a poly(A) signal 3' downstream in both genes. The gene product of prxC1 might be processed with a signal sequence of 30 amino acid residues at the N terminus and a peptide consisting of 15 amino acid residues at the C terminus.

  12. Prostaglandin endoperoxide H synthases: peroxidase hydroperoxide specificity and cyclooxygenase activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiayan; Seibold, Steve A; Rieke, Caroline J; Song, Inseok; Cukier, Robert I; Smith, William L

    2007-06-22

    The cyclooxygenase (COX) activity of prostaglandin endoperoxide H synthases (PGHSs) converts arachidonic acid and O2 to prostaglandin G2 (PGG2). PGHS peroxidase (POX) activity reduces PGG2 to PGH2. The first step in POX catalysis is formation of an oxyferryl heme radical cation (Compound I), which undergoes intramolecular electron transfer forming Intermediate II having an oxyferryl heme and a Tyr-385 radical required for COX catalysis. PGHS POX catalyzes heterolytic cleavage of primary and secondary hydroperoxides much more readily than H2O2, but the basis for this specificity has been unresolved. Several large amino acids form a hydrophobic "dome" over part of the heme, but when these residues were mutated to alanines there was little effect on Compound I formation from H2O2 or 15-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid, a surrogate substrate for PGG2. Ab initio calculations of heterolytic bond dissociation energies of the peroxyl groups of small peroxides indicated that they are almost the same. Molecular Dynamics simulations suggest that PGG2 binds the POX site through a peroxyl-iron bond, a hydrogen bond with His-207 and van der Waals interactions involving methylene groups adjoining the carbon bearing the peroxyl group and the protoporphyrin IX. We speculate that these latter interactions, which are not possible with H2O2, are major contributors to PGHS POX specificity. The distal Gln-203 four residues removed from His-207 have been thought to be essential for Compound I formation. However, Q203V PGHS-1 and PGHS-2 mutants catalyzed heterolytic cleavage of peroxides and exhibited native COX activity. PGHSs are homodimers with each monomer having a POX site and COX site. Cross-talk occurs between the COX sites of adjoining monomers. However, no cross-talk between the POX and COX sites of monomers was detected in a PGHS-2 heterodimer comprised of a Q203R monomer having an inactive POX site and a G533A monomer with an inactive COX site.

  13. Association of antithyroid peroxidase antibody with fibromyalgia in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Jowairiyya; Blumen, Helena; Tagoe, Clement E

    2015-08-01

    To investigate how autoimmune thyroiditis (ATD) affects the clinical presentation of established rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with particular reference to fibromyalgia and chronic widespread pain (CWP). A cohort of 204 patients with RA for whom the presence or absence of autoimmune thyroid antibodies was documented was examined for the relationships between thyroid autoantibodies and fibromyalgia or CWP. We identified 29 % who tested positive for antithyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAb). The anti-thyroglobulin antibody (TgAb) was found in 24 %. Among the thyroid autoantibody-positive patients, 40 % had a diagnosis of fibromyalgia or CWP versus 17 % for antibody negative patients. Logistic regression analyses (adjusted by age, sex, diabetes and BMI) indicated that TPOAb-positive patients were more likely to have fibromyalgia or CWP, with an odds ratio (OR) of 4.641, 95 % confidence interval (CI) (2.110-10.207) P fibromyalgia, OR 4.458, 95 % CI (1.950-10.191), P fibromyalgia was not significant (P > .05). Additional logistic regression analyses (adjusted by age, sex and BMI) indicated a significant relationship between TPOAb and fibromyalgia or CWP in patients without diabetes and those without hypothyroidism (OR of 4.873, 95 % CI (1.877-12.653), P = .001 and OR of 4.615 95 % CI (1.810-11.770), P = .001, respectively). There may be a positive association between the ATD antibody TPOAb, and fibromyalgia syndrome and CWP in patients with established RA.

  14. Changes in peroxidases associated with radiation-induced sprout inhibition in garlic (Allium sativum L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croci, C.A.; Curvetto, N.R.; Orioli, G.A.; Arguello, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of an acute dose of γ-rays (10 Gy) to post-dormant garlic cloves on inner sprout growth and changes in peroxidases and soluble proteins were evaluated up to 100 days of storage in darkness at 19±1 0 C and 42±2% relative humidity. Radiation-induced inhibition of sprout growth became evident after 25 days of treatment and was synchronous with a marked increase in peroxidase activity. Thin-layer isoelectric focusing revealed that radiation induced an increase in the number of anodic peroxidase isoenzymes at 100 days, suggesting modifications in the vascularization process. Neither the soluble protein content nor the protein pattern were affected by irradiation. These results are discussed in terms of a possible mediating effect of peroxidase on radiation-induced sprout inhibition in garlic. (author)

  15. Degradation of disperse dye from textile effluent by free and immobilized Cucurbita pepo peroxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucherit, N.; Abouseoud, M.; Adour, L.

    2012-06-01

    Disperse dyes constitute the largest group of dyes used in local textile industry. This work evaluates the potential of the Cucurbita peroxidase(C-peroxidase) extracted from courgette in the decolourization of disperse dye in free and immobilized form. The optimal conditions for immobilization of C-peroxidase in Ca-alginate were identified. The immobilization was optimized at 2%(w/v) of sodium alginate and 0.2 M of calcium chloride. After optimization of treatment parameters, the results indicate that at pH 2, dye concentration: 80 mg/L(for FCP) and 180 mg/L(for ICP), H2O2 dose: 0,02M (for FCP) and 0,12M(for ICP), the decolourization by free and immobilized C-peroxidase were 72.02% and 69.71 % respectively. The degradation pathway and the metabolic products formed after the degradation were also predicted using UV-vis spectroscopy analysis.

  16. A catalytic approach to estimate the redox potential of heme-peroxidases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayala, Marcela; Roman, Rosa; Vazquez-Duhalt, Rafael

    2007-01-01

    The redox potential of heme-peroxidases varies according to a combination of structural components within the active site and its vicinities. For each peroxidase, this redox potential imposes a thermodynamic threshold to the range of oxidizable substrates. However, the instability of enzymatic intermediates during the catalytic cycle precludes the use of direct voltammetry to measure the redox potential of most peroxidases. Here we describe a novel approach to estimate the redox potential of peroxidases, which directly depends on the catalytic performance of the activated enzyme. Selected p-substituted phenols are used as substrates for the estimations. The results obtained with this catalytic approach correlate well with the oxidative capacity predicted by the redox potential of the Fe(III)/Fe(II) couple

  17. Changes in peroxidases associated with radiation-induced sprout inhibition in garlic (Allium sativum L. )

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croci, C.A.; Curvetto, N.R.; Orioli, G.A. (Universidad Nacional del Sur, Bahia Blanca (Argentina)); Arguello, J.A. (Universidad Nacional de Cordoba (Argentina). Dept. de Biologia Aplicada)

    1991-02-01

    The effects of an acute dose of {gamma}-rays (10 Gy) to post-dormant garlic cloves on inner sprout growth and changes in peroxidases and soluble proteins were evaluated up to 100 days of storage in darkness at 19+-1{sup 0}C and 42+-2% relative humidity. Radiation-induced inhibition of sprout growth became evident after 25 days of treatment and was synchronous with a marked increase in peroxidase activity. Thin-layer isoelectric focusing revealed that radiation induced an increase in the number of anodic peroxidase isoenzymes at 100 days, suggesting modifications in the vascularization process. Neither the soluble protein content nor the protein pattern were affected by irradiation. These results are discussed in terms of a possible mediating effect of peroxidase on radiation-induced sprout inhibition in garlic. (author).

  18. Identification of novel genetic Loci associated with thyroid peroxidase antibodies and clinical thyroid disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medici, M.; Porcu, E.; Pistis, G.; Teumer, A.; Brown, S.J.; Jensen, R.A.; Rawal, R.; Roef, G.L.; Plantinga, T.S.; Vermeulen, S.; Lahti, J.; Simmonds, M.J.; Husemoen, L.L.; Freathy, R.M.; Shields, B.M.; Pietzner, D.; Nagy, R.; Broer, L.; Chaker, L.; Korevaar, T.I.; Plia, M.G.; Sala, C.; Volker, U.; Richards, J.B.; Sweep, F.C.; Gieger, C.; Corre, T.; Kajantie, E.; Thuesen, B.; Taes, Y.E.; Visser, W.E.; Hattersley, A.T.; Kratzsch, J.; Hamilton, A.; Li, W.; Homuth, G.; Lobina, M.; Mariotti, S.; Soranzo, N.; Cocca, M.; Nauck, M.; Spielhagen, C.; Ross, A.; Arnold, A.; Bunt, M. van de; Liyanarachchi, S.; Heier, M.; Grabe, H.J.; Masciullo, C.; Galesloot, T.E.; Lim, E.M.; Reischl, E.; Leedman, P.J.; Lai, S.; Delitala, A.; Bremner, A.P.; Philips, D.I.; Beilby, J.P.; Mulas, A.; Vocale, M.; Abecasis, G.; Forsen, T.; James, A.; Widen, E.; Hui, J.; Prokisch, H.; Rietzschel, E.E.; Palotie, A.; Feddema, P.; Fletcher, S.J.; Schramm, K.; Rotter, J.I.; Kluttig, A.; Radke, D.; Traglia, M.; Surdulescu, G.L.; He, H.; Franklyn, J.A.; Tiller, D.; Vaidya, B.; Meyer, T.; Jorgensen, T.; Eriksson, J.G.; O'Leary, P.C.; Wichmann, E.; Hermus, A.R.M.M.; Psaty, B.M.; Ittermann, T.; Hofman, A.; Bosi, E.; Schlessinger, D.; Wallaschofski, H.; Pirastu, N.; Aulchenko, Y.S.; Chapelle, A. dela; Netea-Maier, R.T.; Gough, S.C.; Meyer Zu Schwabedissen, H.; Frayling, T.M.; Kaufman, J.M.; Smit, J.W.; Kiemeney, B.; et al.,

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) are common, affecting 2-5% of the general population. Individuals with positive thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAbs) have an increased risk of autoimmune hypothyroidism (Hashimoto's thyroiditis), as well as autoimmune hyperthyroidism (Graves' disease). As the

  19. Identification of Novel Genetic Loci Associated with Thyroid Peroxidase Antibodies and Clinical Thyroid Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Medici (Marco); E. Porcu (Eleonora); G. Pistis (Giorgio); A. Teumer (Alexander); S.J. Brown (Stephen); R.A. Jensen (Richard); R. Rawal (R.); G.L. Roef (Greet); T.S. Plantinga (Theo S.); S.H.H.M. Vermeulen (Sita); J. Lahti (Jari); M.C. Simmonds (Mark); L.L.N. Husemoen (Lise Lotte); R.M. Freathy (Rachel); B.M. Shields (Beverley); D. Pietzner (Diana); R. Nagy (Rebecca); L. Broer (Linda); L. Chaker (Layal); T.I.M. Korevaar (Tim); M.G. Plia (Maria Grazia); C. Sala (Cinzia); U. Völker (Uwe); J.B. Richards (Brent); F.C. Sweep (Fred); C. Gieger (Christian); T. Corre (Tanguy); E. Kajantie (Eero); L. Thuesen (Leif); Y.E. Taes (Youri); W.E. Visser (Wil Edward); A.T. Hattersley (Andrew); J. Kratzsch (Jürgen); A. Hamilton (Amy); W. Li (Wei); G. Homuth (Georg); M. Lobina (Monia); S. Mariotti (Stefano); N. Soranzo (Nicole); M. Cocca (Massimiliano); M. Nauck (Matthias); C. Spielhagen (Christin); H.A. Ross (Alec); A.M. Arnold (Alice); M. van de Bunt (Martijn); S. Liyanarachchi (Sandya); M. Heier (Margit); H.J. Grabe (Hans Jörgen); C. Masciullo (Corrado); T.E. Galesloot (Tessel); E.M. Lim (Ee Mun); G. Reischl (Gunilla); P.J. Leedman (Peter); S. Lai (Sandra); A. Delitala (Alessandro); A. Bremner (Alexandra); D.I.W. Philips (David I.); J.P. Beilby (John); A. Mulas (Antonella); M. Vocale (Matteo); G.R. Abecasis (Gonçalo); T. Forsen (Tom); A. James (Alan); E. Widen (Elisabeth); J. Hui (Jennie); H. Prokisch (Holger); E.E. Rietzschel (Ernst); A. Palotie (Aarno); W. Feddema (Wouter); S.J. Fletcher (Stephen); K. Schramm (Katharina); J.I. Rotter (Jerome); A. Kluttig (Alexander); D. Radke (Dörte); M. Traglia (Michela); G. Surdulescu (Gabriela); H. He (Hao); J.A. Franklyn (Jayne); D. Tiller (Daniel); B. Vaidya (Bijay); T. Meyer (Thorsten); T. Jorgensen (Torben); K. Hagen (Knut); P.C. O'Leary (Peter); E. Wichmann (Eric); A.R.M.M. Hermus (Ad); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); T. Ittermann (Till); A. Hofman (Albert); E. Bosi (Emanuele); D. Schlessinger (David); H. Wallaschofski (Henri); N. Pirastu (Nicola); Y.S. Aulchenko (Yurii); A. de la Chapelle (Albert); R.T. Netea-Maier (Romana ); J.E. Gough (Julie); H. Meyer zu Schwabedissen (Henriette); T.M. Frayling (Timothy); J.-M. Kaufman (Jean-Marc); A. Linneberg (Allan); K. Räikkönen (Katri); J.W.A. Smit (Jan); L.A.L.M. Kiemeney (Bart); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); J.P. Walsh (John); C. Meisinger (Christa); M. den Heijer (Martin); T.J. Visser (Theo); T.D. Spector (Timothy); S.G. Wilson (Scott); H. Völzke (Henry); A.R. Cappola (Anne); D. Toniolo (Daniela); S. Sanna (Serena); S. Naitza (Silvia); R.P. Peeters (Robin)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractAutoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) are common, affecting 2-5% of the general population. Individuals with positive thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAbs) have an increased risk of autoimmune hypothyroidism (Hashimoto's thyroiditis), as well as autoimmune hyperthyroidism (Graves'

  20. Epitope recognition patterns of thyroid peroxidase autoantibodies in healthy individuals and patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis*

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus H; Brix, Thomas H; Gardas, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    Thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAb) are markers of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), including Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT), but naturally occurring TPOAb are also detectable in healthy, euthyroid individuals. In AITD, circulating TPOAb react mainly with two immunodominant regions (IDR), IDR...

  1. Identification of Novel Genetic Loci Associated with Thyroid Peroxidase Antibodies and Clinical Thyroid Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medici, M.; Porcu, E.; Pistis, G.; Teumer, A.; Brown, S.J.; Jensen, R.A.; Rawal, R.; Roef, G.L.; Plantinga, T.S.; Vermeulen, S.H.; Lahti, J.; Simmonds, M.J.; Husemoen, L.L.N.; Freathy, R.M.; Shields, B.M.; Pietzner, D.; Nagy, R.; Broer, L.; Chaker, L.; Korevaar, T.I.M.; Plia, M.G.; Sala, C.; Volker, U.; Richards, J.B.; Sweep, F.C.; Gieger, C.; Corre, T.; Kajantie, E.; Thuesen, B.; Taes, Y.E.; Visser, W.E.; Hattersley, A.T.; Kratzsch, J.; Hamilton, A.; Li, W.; Homuth, G.; Lobina, M.; Mariotti, S.; Soranzo, N.; Cocca, M.; Nauck, M.; Spielhagen, C.; Ross, A.; Arnold, A.; van de Bunt, M.; Liyanarachchi, S.; Heier, M.; Grabe, H.J.; Masciullo, C.; Galesloot, T.E.; Lim, E.M.; Reischl, E.; Leedman, P.J.; Lai, S.; Delitala, A.; Bremner, A.P.; Philips, D.I.W.; Beilby, J.P.; Mulas, A.; Vocale, M.; Abecasis, G.; Forsen, T.; James, A.; Widen, E.; Hui, J.; Prokisch, H.; Rietzschel, E.E.; Palotie, A.; Feddema, P.; Fletcher, S.J.; Schramm, K.; Rotter, J.I.; Kluttig, A.; Radke, D.; Traglia, M.; Surdulescu, G.L.; He, H.L.; Franklyn, J.A.; Tiller, D.; Vaidya, B.; Meyer, T.; Jorgensen, T.; Eriksson, J.G.; O'Leary, P.C.; Wichmann, E.; Hermus, A.R.; Psaty, B.M.; Ittermann, T.; Hofman, A.; Bosi, E.; Schlessinger, D.; Wallaschofski, H.; Pirastu, N.; Aulchenko, Y.S.; de la Chapelle, A.; Netea-Maier, R.T.; Gough, S.C.L.; Meyer zu Schwabedissen, H.; Frayling, T.M.; den Heijer, M.; Naitza, S.; Peeters, R.P.

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) are common, affecting 2-5% of the general population. Individuals with positive thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAbs) have an increased risk of autoimmune hypothyroidism (Hashimoto's thyroiditis), as well as autoimmune hyperthyroidism (Graves' disease). As the

  2. The effect of acid rain stress on chlorophyll, peroxidase of the conservation of rare earth elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chongling, Y.; Yetang, H.; Xianke, Y.; Shunzhen, F.; Shanql, W.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Based on pot experiment, the effect of acid rain stress on chlorophyll, peroxidase of wheat, the relationship of them and the conservation of rare earth elements has been studied. The result showed: stress of acid rain resulted in decrease of chlorophyll content and a/b values, chlorophyll a/b value and chlorophyll content is positive correlation with pH value of acid rain: peroxidase activity was gradually rise with pH value decrease, which indirectly increased decomposition intensity of chlorophyll. Decreased content and a/b value of chlorophyll further speeded blade decay affected the transport and transformation of light energy and metabolism of carbohydrates. After being treated by rare earth elements content and pH value of chlorophyll and peroxidase activity could be relatively stable. Therefore, under lower acidity condition, rare earth elements can influence the effect of acid rain on chlorophyll and peroxidase activity of wheat

  3. Imaging, photophysical properties and DFT calculations of manganese blue (barium manganate(VI) sulphate)--a modern pigment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accorsi, Gianluca; Verri, Giovanni; Acocella, Angela; Zerbetto, Francesco; Lerario, Giovanni; Gigli, Giuseppe; Saunders, David; Billinge, Rachel

    2014-12-18

    Manganese blue is a synthetic barium manganate(VI) sulphate compound that was produced from 1935 to the 1990s and was used both as a blue pigment in works of art and by conservators in the restoration of paintings. The photophysical properties of the compound are described as well as the setup needed to record the spatial distribution of the pigment in works of art.

  4. CDNA cloning, characterization and expression of an endosperm-specific barley peroxidase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Søren Kjærsgård; Welinder, K.G.; Hejgaard, J.

    1991-01-01

    A barley peroxidase (BP 1) of pI ca. 8.5 and M(r) 37000 has been purified from mature barley grains. Using antibodies towards peroxidase BP 1, a cDNA clone (pcR7) was isolated from cDNA expression library. The nucleotide sequence of pcR7 gave a derived amino acid sequence identical to the 158 C...

  5. Thiol peroxidases mediate specific genome-wide regulation of gene expression in response to hydrogen peroxide

    OpenAIRE

    Fomenko, Dmitri E.; Koc, Ahmet; Agisheva, Natalia; Jacobsen, Michael; Kaya, Alaattin; Malinouski, Mikalai; Rutherford, Julian C.; Siu, Kam-Leung; Jin, Dong-Yan; Winge, Dennis R.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is thought to regulate cellular processes by direct oxidation of numerous cellular proteins, whereas antioxidants, most notably thiol peroxidases, are thought to reduce peroxides and inhibit H2O2 response. However, thiol peroxidases have also been implicated in activation of transcription factors and signaling. It remains unclear if these enzymes stimulate or inhibit redox regulation and whether this regulation is widespread or limited to a few cellular components. Herein, w...

  6. Airway Peroxidases Catalyze Nitration of the β2-Agonist Salbutamol and Decrease Its Pharmacological Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Reszka, Krzysztof J.; Sallans, Larry; Macha, Stephen; Brown, Kari; McGraw, Dennis W.; Kovacic, Melinda Butsch; Britigan, Bradley E.

    2011-01-01

    β2-Agonists are the most effective bronchodilators for the rapid relief of asthma symptoms, but for unclear reasons, their effectiveness may be decreased during severe exacerbations. Because peroxidase activity and nitrogen oxides are increased in the asthmatic airway, we examined whether salbutamol, a clinically important β2-agonist, is subject to potentially inactivating nitration. When salbutamol was exposed to myeloperoxidase, eosinophil peroxidase or lactoperoxidase in the presence of hy...

  7. The Effect of Citrus Aurantium, Foeniculum Vulgare and Rosmarinus Officinalis Essential Oils on Peroxidase Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Maryam Mohajerani (PhD); Afsaneh Aghae i ( MSc )

    2016-01-01

    Background and objective: Peroxidases catalyze protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation. The activity of these enzymes in nerve cells is involved in causing disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. This study investigated the effect of Citrus aurantium, Foeniculum vulgare and Rosmarinus officinalis essential oils on activity of peroxidase enzyme. Methods: All three medicinal plants were dried at room temperature. Their essential oil was extracted by steam distillation ...

  8. The Ustilago maydis effector Pep1 suppresses plant immunity by inhibition of host peroxidase activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Hemetsberger

    Full Text Available The corn smut Ustilago maydis establishes a biotrophic interaction with its host plant maize. This interaction requires efficient suppression of plant immune responses, which is attributed to secreted effector proteins. Previously we identified Pep1 (Protein essential during penetration-1 as a secreted effector with an essential role for U. maydis virulence. pep1 deletion mutants induce strong defense responses leading to an early block in pathogenic development of the fungus. Using cytological and functional assays we show that Pep1 functions as an inhibitor of plant peroxidases. At sites of Δpep1 mutant penetrations, H₂O₂ strongly accumulated in the cell walls, coinciding with a transcriptional induction of the secreted maize peroxidase POX12. Pep1 protein effectively inhibited the peroxidase driven oxidative burst and thereby suppresses the early immune responses of maize. Moreover, Pep1 directly inhibits peroxidases in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner. Using fluorescence complementation assays, we observed a direct interaction of Pep1 and the maize peroxidase POX12 in vivo. Functional relevance of this interaction was demonstrated by partial complementation of the Δpep1 mutant defect by virus induced gene silencing of maize POX12. We conclude that Pep1 acts as a potent suppressor of early plant defenses by inhibition of peroxidase activity. Thus, it represents a novel strategy for establishing a biotrophic interaction.

  9. Eosinophil peroxidase signals via epidermal growth factor-2 to induce cell proliferation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, Marie-Therese

    2011-11-01

    Eosinophils exert many of their inflammatory effects in allergic disorders through the degranulation and release of intracellular mediators, including a set of cationic granule proteins that include eosinophil peroxidase. Studies suggest that eosinophils are involved in remodeling. In previous studies, we showed that eosinophil granule proteins activate mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling. In this study, we investigated the receptor mediating eosinophil peroxidase-induced signaling and downstream effects. Human cholinergic neuroblastoma IMR32 and murine melanoma B16.F10 cultures, real-time polymerase chain reaction, immunoprecipitations, and Western blotting were used in the study. We showed that eosinophil peroxidase caused a sustained increase in both the expression of epidermal growth factor-2 (HER2) and its phosphorylation at tyrosine 1248, with the consequent activation of extracellular-regulated kinase 1\\/2. This, in turn, promoted a focal adhesion kinase-dependent egress of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27(kip) from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Eosinophil peroxidase induced a HER2-dependent up-regulation of cell proliferation, indicated by an up-regulation of the nuclear proliferation marker Ki67. This study identifies HER2 as a novel mediator of eosinophil peroxidase signaling. The results show that eosinophil peroxidase, at noncytotoxic levels, can drive cell-cycle progression and proliferation, and contribute to tissue remodeling and cell turnover in airway disease. Because eosinophils are a feature of many cancers, these findings also suggest a role for eosinophils in tumorigenesis.

  10. Structure-activity relationships and molecular docking of thirteen synthesized flavonoids as horseradish peroxidase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfoudi, Reguia; Djeridane, Amar; Benarous, Khedidja; Gaydou, Emile M; Yousfi, Mohamed

    2017-10-01

    For the first time, the structure-activity relationships of thirteen synthesized flavonoids have been investigated by evaluating their ability to modulate horseradish peroxidase (HRP) catalytic activity. Indeed, a modified spectrophotometrically method was carried out and optimized using 4-methylcatechol (4-MC) as peroxidase co-substrate. The results show that these flavonoids exhibit a great capacity to inhibit peroxidase with Ki values ranged from 0.14±0.01 to 65±0.04mM. Molecular docking has been achieved using Auto Dock Vina program to discuss the nature of interactions and the mechanism of inhibition. According to the docking results, all the flavonoids have shown great binding affinity to peroxidase. These molecular modeling studies suggested that pyran-4-one cycle acts as an inhibition key for peroxidase. Therefore, potent peroxidase inhibitors are flavonoids with these structural requirements: the presence of the hydroxyl (OH) group in 7, 5 and 4' positions and the absence of the methoxy (O-CH 3 ) group. Apigenin contributed better in HRP inhibitory activity. The present study has shown that the studied flavonoids could be promising HRP inhibitors, which can help in developing new molecules to control thyroid diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Purification and characterization of lignin peroxidases from Penicillium decumbens P6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, J.S.; Yuan, H.L.; Wang, H.X.; Chen, W.X. [China Agricultural University, Beijing (China). College of Biological Science

    2005-06-01

    Peroxidases are essential enzymes in biodegradation of lignin and lignite which have been investigated intensively in the white-rot fungi. This is the first report of purification and characterization of lignin peroxidase from Penicillium sp. P6 as lignite degradation fungus. The results indicated that the lignin peroxidase of Penicillium decumbens P6 had physical and chemical properties and a N-terminal amino acid sequence different from the lignin peroxidases of white-rot fungi. The lignin peroxidase was isolated from a liquid culture of P. decumbens P6. This enzyme had a molecular weight of 46.3 KDa in SDS-PAGE and exhibited greater activity, temperature stability and wider pH range than those previously reported. The isolation procedure involved (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} precipitation, ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and CM-cellulose, gel filtration on Sephadex G-100, and non-denaturing, discontinuous polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The K{sub m} and V{sub max} values of this enzyme using veratryl alcohol as substrate were 0.565 mmol L{sup -1} and 0.088 mmol (mg protein){sup -1} min{sup -1} respectively. The optimum pH of P6 lignin peroxidase was 4.0, and 70.6% of the relative activity was remained at pH 9.0. The optimum temperature of the enzyme was 45{sup o}C.

  12. Recovery of manganese oxides from spent alkaline and zinc–carbon batteries. An application as catalysts for VOCs elimination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallegos, María V., E-mail: plapimu@yahoo.com.ar [Pla.Pi.Mu-Planta Piloto Multipropósito, (CICPBA-UNLP) Cno. Centenario y 505, M.B. Gonnet, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Falco, Lorena R., E-mail: mlfalco@quimica.unlp.edu.ar [Pla.Pi.Mu-Planta Piloto Multipropósito, (CICPBA-UNLP) Cno. Centenario y 505, M.B. Gonnet, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Peluso, Miguel A., E-mail: apelu@quimica.unlp.edu.ar [Centro de Investigación y Desarrollo en Ciencias Aplicadas, “Dr. J. Ronco” CINDECA (CONICET CCT La Plata), 47 N°257, La Plata, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Sambeth, Jorge E., E-mail: sambeth@quimica.unlp.edu.ar [Centro de Investigación y Desarrollo en Ciencias Aplicadas, “Dr. J. Ronco” CINDECA (CONICET CCT La Plata), 47 N°257, La Plata, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Thomas, Horacio J. [Pla.Pi.Mu-Planta Piloto Multipropósito, (CICPBA-UNLP) Cno. Centenario y 505, M.B. Gonnet, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2013-06-15

    Highlights: • Manganese oxides were synthesized using spent batteries as raw materials. • Spent alkaline and zinc–carbon size AA batteries were used. • A biohydrometallurgical process was employed to bio-lixiviate batteries. • Manganese oxides were active in the oxidation of VOCs (ethanol and heptane). - Abstract: Manganese, in the form of oxide, was recovered from spent alkaline and zinc–carbon batteries employing a biohydrometallurgy process, using a pilot plant consisting in: an air-lift bioreactor (containing an acid-reducing medium produced by an Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans bacteria immobilized on elemental sulfur); a leaching reactor (were battery powder is mixed with the acid-reducing medium) and a recovery reactor. Two different manganese oxides were recovered from the leachate liquor: one of them by electrolysis (EMO) and the other by a chemical precipitation with KMnO{sub 4} solution (CMO). The non-leached solid residue was also studied (RMO). The solids were compared with a MnO{sub x} synthesized in our laboratory. The characterization by XRD, FTIR and XPS reveal the presence of Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the EMO and the CMO samples, together with some Mn{sup 4+} cations. In the solid not extracted by acidic leaching (RMO) the main phase detected was Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}. The catalytic performance of the oxides was studied in the complete oxidation of ethanol and heptane. Complete conversion of ethanol occurs at 200 °C, while heptane requires more than 400 °C. The CMO has the highest oxide selectivity to CO{sub 2}. The results show that manganese oxides obtained using spent alkaline and zinc–carbon batteries as raw materials, have an interesting performance as catalysts for elimination of VOCs.

  13. Restoration of growth by manganese in a mutant strain of Escherichia coli lacking most known iron and manganese uptake systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taudte, Nadine; German, Nadezhda; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2016-01-01

    The interplay of manganese and iron homeostasis and oxidative stress in Escherichia coli can give important insights into survival of bacteria in the phagosome and under differing iron or manganese bioavailabilities. Here, we characterized a mutant strain devoid of all know iron/manganese-uptake ......The interplay of manganese and iron homeostasis and oxidative stress in Escherichia coli can give important insights into survival of bacteria in the phagosome and under differing iron or manganese bioavailabilities. Here, we characterized a mutant strain devoid of all know iron...

  14. Elemental abundance analyses with coadded DAO spectrograms. VI - The mercury-manganese stars Nu Cancri, Iota Coronae Borealis and HR 8349

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelman, Saul J.

    1989-01-01

    The elemental abundances of three mercury-manganese stars, Nu Cancri, Iota Coronae Borealis, and HR 8349, were found to be consistent with previous analyses of this series. As Iota CrB is a double-lined spectroscopic binary with a small velocity amplitude for most of its period, its study required determining whether the observed lines were produced in the primary or secondary or both. The derived abundances and effective termperatures were used along with those of mercury-manganese stars previously analyzed in order to extend the study of probable correlations between abundances, with the effective temperature and surface gravity in accordance with radiative diffusion explanations.

  15. Role of manganese oxides in peptide synthesis: implication in chemical evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhushan, Brij; Nayak, Arunima; Kamaluddin

    2017-10-01

    During the course of chemical evolution the role of metal oxides may have been very significant in catalysing the polymerization of biomonomers. The peptide bond formation of alanine (ala) and glycine (gly) in the presence of various oxides of manganese were performed for a period of 35 days at three different temperatures 50, 90 and 120°C without applying drying/wetting cycling. The reaction was monitored every week. The products formed were characterized by high-performance liquid chromatography and electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry techniques. Trace amount of oligomers was observed at 50°C. Maximum yield of peptides was found after 35 days at 90°C. It is important to note that very high temperatures of 120°C favoured the formation of diketopiperazine derivatives. Different types of manganese oxides [manganosite (MnO), bixbyite (Mn2O3), hausmannite (Mn3O4) and pyrolusite (MnO2)] were used as catalyst. The MnO catalysed glycine to cyclic (Gly)2, (Gly)2 and (Gly)3, and alanine, to cyclic (Ala)2 and (Ala)2. Mn3O4 also produced the same products but in lesser yield, while Mn2O3 and MnO2 produced cyclic anhydride of glycine and alanine with a trace amount of dimers and trimmers. Manganese of lower oxidation state is much more efficient in propagating the reaction than higher oxidation states. The possible mechanism of these reactions and the relevance of the results for the prebiotic chemistry are discussed.

  16. Effect of Manganese on the Mechanical Properties of Welded As-Cast Aluminium Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isiaka Oluwole OLADELE

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The effects of manganese on the mechanical properties of welded and un-weld as-cast 6063 aluminium alloy has been studied. Alloys of varying percentage of manganese from 0.019 to 0.24 were sand cast. A wooden pattern of dimensions 200×100×100mm was used, the aluminium (500g was charged into an induction furnace and heated to 750°C for 15 minutes, this was followed by the addition of weighed powdered manganese, stirred and heated at the same temperature for another 5 minutes and thereafter poured into the already prepared sand mould at a temperature of 690°C. The as-cast aluminium samples, were sectioned into two equal parts of 45mm each using power hack saw; a weld groove was created between the sides of the samples using an electric hand grinding machine, the groove served as the path along which the filler metal was deposited on the aluminium, a single v butt joint was produced from each sample and Metal Inert Gas Welding process was carried out to produce the required joint design. The different cast samples were machined to the different test pieces after which they were assessed to determine their mechanical properties (impact, hardness (welded joint and heat affected zone and tensile tests. The microstructures of the welded samples were also studied. From the results, it was observed that Sample F, which has 0.172% Mn, has the best hardness and impact strength while sample C with 0.160% Mn has the highest ultimate tensile strength.

  17. Submicron Features in Higher Manganese Silicide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yatir Sadia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The world energy crisis had increased the demand for alternative energy sources and as such is one of the topics at the forefront of research. One way for reducing energy consumption is by thermoelectricity. Thermoelectric effects enable direct conversion of thermal into electrical energy. Higher manganese silicide (HMS, MnSi1.75 is one of the promising materials for applications in the field of thermoelectricity. The abundance and low cost of the elements, combined with good thermoelectric properties and high mechanical and chemical stability at high temperatures, make it very attractive for thermoelectric applications. Recent studies have shown that Si-rich HMS has improved thermoelectric properties. The most interesting of which is the unusual reduction in thermal conductivity. In the current research, transmission (TEM and scanning (SEM electron microscopy as well as X-ray diffraction methods were applied for investigation of the govern mechanisms resulting in very low thermal conductivity values of an Si-rich HMS composition, following arc melting and hot-pressing procedures. In this paper, it is shown that there is a presence of sub-micron dislocations walls, stacking faults, and silicon and HMS precipitates inside each other apparent in the matrix, following a high temperature (0.9 Tm hot pressing for an hour. These are not just responsible for the low thermal conductivity values observed but also indicate the ability to create complicate nano-structures that will last during the production process and possibly during the application.

  18. Low carbon manganese-nickel-niobium steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heisterkamp, F.; Hulka, K.

    1983-11-01

    Experimental heats of a low carbon-manganese-0.5% nickel-0.15% niobium steel have been rolled to plates between 13.5 and 50 mm thickness and to a 16 mm hot strip. Various combinations of soaking temperatures form 1100 0 C to 1300 0 C and of finish rolling temperatures between 710 0 C and 930 0 C have been investigated. From mechanical properties obtained, one can conclude that the investigated steel composition provides very good properties e.g. for pipe steels X65 to X75. In particular, the toughness at low temperature is outstanding despite relaxed rolling conditions. Metalographic and special investigations such as electron microscopy, texture evaluation and chemical extraction, correlated with applied rolling schedules and the mechanical properties obtained resulted in a comprehensive understanding about the benefits of high niobium metallurgy combined with nickel addition. All practically applied welding processes generated mechanical properties, in particular toughness of the weldment, that meet arctic specifications.(Author) [pt

  19. Manganese Superoxide Dismutase: Guardian of the Powerhouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daret K. St. Clair

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrion is vital for many metabolic pathways in the cell, contributing all or important constituent enzymes for diverse functions such as β-oxidation of fatty acids, the urea cycle, the citric acid cycle, and ATP synthesis. The mitochondrion is also a major site of reactive oxygen species (ROS production in the cell. Aberrant production of mitochondrial ROS can have dramatic effects on cellular function, in part, due to oxidative modification of key metabolic proteins localized in the mitochondrion. The cell is equipped with myriad antioxidant enzyme systems to combat deleterious ROS production in mitochondria, with the mitochondrial antioxidant enzyme manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD acting as the chief ROS scavenging enzyme in the cell. Factors that affect the expression and/or the activity of MnSOD, resulting in diminished antioxidant capacity of the cell, can have extraordinary consequences on the overall health of the cell by altering mitochondrial metabolic function, leading to the development and progression of numerous diseases. A better understanding of the mechanisms by which MnSOD protects cells from the harmful effects of overproduction of ROS, in particular, the effects of ROS on mitochondrial metabolic enzymes, may contribute to the development of novel treatments for various diseases in which ROS are an important component.

  20. Environmental Exposure to Manganese in Air: Associations ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manganese (Mn), an essential element, can be neurotoxic in high doses. This cross-sectional study explored the oognitive function of adults residing in two towns (Marietta and East Liverpool, Ohio, USA) identified as having high levels of environmental airborne Mn from industrial sources. Air-Mn site surface emissions method modeling for total suspended particulate (TSP) ranged from 0.03 to 1.61 µg/m(3) in Marietta and 0.01-6.32 µg/m(3) in East Liverpool. A comprehensive screening test battery of cognitive function, including the domains of abstract thinking, attention/concentration, executive function and memory was administered. The mean age of the participants was 56 years (±10.8 years). Participants were mostly female (59.1) and primarily white (94.6%). Significant relationships (pworking and visuospatial memory (e.g., Rey-0 Immediate B3=0.19, Rey-0 Delayed B3=0.16) and verbal skills (e.g., Similarities B3=0.19). Using extensive cognitive testing and computer modeling of 10-plus years of measured air monitoring data, this study suggests that long-term environmental exposure to high levels of air-Mn, the exposure metric of this paper, may result in mild deficits of cognitive function in adult populations. This study addresses research questions under Sustainable and Healthy Communities (2.2.1.6 lessons learned, best practices and stakeholder feedback from community and tribal participa

  1. Manganese Dioxide As Rechargeable Magnesium Battery Cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling, Chen; Zhang, Ruigang

    2017-01-01

    Rechargeable magnesium battery (rMB) has received increased attention as a promising alternative to current Li-ion technology. However, the lack of appropriate cathode that provides high-energy density and good sustainability greatly hinders the development of practical rMBs. To date, the successful Mg 2+ -intercalation was only achieved in only a few cathode hosts, one of which is manganese dioxide. This review summarizes the research activity of studying MnO 2 in magnesium cells. In recent years, the cathodic performance of MnO 2 was impressively improved to the capacity of >150–200 mAh g −1 at voltage of 2.6–2.8 V with cyclability to hundreds or more cycles. In addition to reviewing electrochemical performance, we sketch a mechanistic picture to show how the fundamental understanding about MnO 2 cathode has been changed and how it paved the road to the improvement of cathode performance.

  2. Manganese Dioxide As Rechargeable Magnesium Battery Cathode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ling, Chen, E-mail: chen.ling@toyota.com; Zhang, Ruigang [Toyota Research Institute of North America, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2017-11-03

    Rechargeable magnesium battery (rMB) has received increased attention as a promising alternative to current Li-ion technology. However, the lack of appropriate cathode that provides high-energy density and good sustainability greatly hinders the development of practical rMBs. To date, the successful Mg{sup 2+}-intercalation was only achieved in only a few cathode hosts, one of which is manganese dioxide. This review summarizes the research activity of studying MnO{sub 2} in magnesium cells. In recent years, the cathodic performance of MnO{sub 2} was impressively improved to the capacity of >150–200 mAh g{sup −1} at voltage of 2.6–2.8 V with cyclability to hundreds or more cycles. In addition to reviewing electrochemical performance, we sketch a mechanistic picture to show how the fundamental understanding about MnO{sub 2} cathode has been changed and how it paved the road to the improvement of cathode performance.

  3. Trace elements profile is associated with insulin resistance syndrome and oxidative damage in thyroid disorders: Manganese and selenium interest in Algerian participants with dysthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maouche, Naima; Meskine, Djamila; Alamir, Barkahoum; Koceir, Elhadj-Ahmed

    2015-10-01

    The relationship between dysthyroidism and antioxidant trace elements (ATE) status is very subtle during oxidative stress (OS). This relationship is mediated by thyroid hormone (TH) disorder, insulin resistance syndrome (IRS) and inflammation. The aim of this study was to investigate ATE such as selenium (Se), manganese (Mn), zinc (Zn) and copper (Cu) status on thyroid dysfunction, and their interaction with antioxidant enzyme activities, mainly, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx), TH profile (TSH, T(3), T(4)) and IRS clusters. The study was undertaken on 220 Algerian adults (30-50 years), including 157 women and 63 men who were divided to 4 groups: subclinical hypothyroidism (n = 50), overt hypothyroidism (n = 60), Graves's disease hyperthyroidism (n = 60) and euthyroid controls (n = 50). The IRS was confirmed according to NCEP (National Cholesterol Education Program). Insulin resistance was evaluated by HOMA-IR model. Trace elements were determined by the Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (Flame-AAS) technique. The antioxidant enzymes activity and metabolic parameters were determined by biochemical methods. The TH profile and anti-Thyroperoxidase Antibodies (anti-TPO-Ab) were evaluated by radioimmunoassay. Results showed that the plasma manganese levels were significantly increased in all dysthyroidism groups (p ≤ 0.01). However, the plasma copper and zinc concentrations were maintained normal or not very disturbed vs control group. In contrast, the plasma selenium levels were highly decreased (p ≤ 0.001) and positively correlated with depletion of glutathione peroxidase activity; and associated both with anti-TPO-Ab overexpression and fulminant HS-CRP levels. This study confirms the oxidative stress-inflammation relationship in the dysthyroidism. The thyroid follicles antioxidant protection appears preserved in the cytosol (Cu/Zn-SOD), while it is altered in the mitochondria (Mn-SOD), which gives this cell organelle, a status of

  4. Secretome-based Manganese(II) Oxidation by Filamentous Ascomycete Fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiner, C. A.; Purvine, S.; Zink, E.; Paša-Tolić, L.; Chaput, D.; Wu, S.; Santelli, C. M.; Hansel, C. M.

    2017-12-01

    Manganese (Mn) oxides are among the strongest oxidants in the environment, and Mn(II) oxidation to Mn(III/IV) (hydr)oxides includes both abiotic and microbially-mediated processes. While white-rot Basidiomycete fungi oxidize Mn(II) using laccases and Mn peroxidases in association with lignocellulose degradation, the mechanisms by which filamentous Ascomycete fungi oxidize Mn(II) and a physiological role for Mn(II) oxidation in these organisms remain poorly understood. Through a combination of chemical and in-gel assays, bulk mass spectrometry, and iTRAQ proteomics, we demonstrate enzymatic Mn(II) oxidation in the secretomes of three phylogenetically diverse Ascomycetes that were isolated from Mn-laden sediments. Candidate Mn(II)-oxidizing enzymes were species-specific and included bilirubin oxidase and tyrosinase in Stagonospora sp. SRC1lsM3a, GMC oxidoreductase in Paraconiothyrium sporulosum AP3s5-JAC2a, and FAD-binding oxidoreductases in Pyrenochaeta sp. DS3sAY3a. These findings were supported by full proteomic characterization of the secretomes, which revealed a lack of Mn, lignin, and versatile peroxidases in these Ascomycetes but a substantially higher proportion of LMCOs and GMC oxidoreductases compared to wood-rot Basidiomycetes. We also identified the potential for indirect enzymatic Mn(II) oxidation by hydroxyl radical, as the secretomes were rich in diverse lignocellulose-degrading enzymes that could participate in Fenton chemistry. A link between Mn(II) oxidation and carbon oxidation analogous to white-rot Basidiomycetes remains unknown in these Ascomycetes. Interestingly, growth rates on rich medium were unaffected by the presence of Mn(II), and the production of Mn(II)-oxidizing proteins in the secretome was constitutive and not inducible by Mn(II). Thus, no physiological benefit of Mn(II) oxidation in these Ascomycetes has yet been identified, and Mn(II) oxidation appears to be a side reaction. Future work will explore the lignin-degrading capacity of

  5. Anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody and vitiligo: a controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhyani Maryam

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vitiligo is an acquired depigmenting disorder due to destruction of melanocytes. Although many theories have been suggested for its pathogenesis, the role of autoimmunity is the most popular one. The association of vitiligo with autoimmune thyroid diseases and the increased prevalence of autoantibodies including thyroid autoantibodies in vitiligo favor this role. Our objective was to compare the frequency of thyroid peroxidase antibody (anti-TPO in vitiligo patients with healthy subjects in Iran. Methods Ninety-four cases of vitiligo (46 female and 48 male and 96 control subjects (49 female and 47 male were enrolled in this controlled study. Patients with known thyroid disease, history of thyroid surgery and those receiving thyroid medications were not included. The two groups were matched regarding gender and age. The demographic data, symptoms related to thyroid diseases and results of skin and thyroid examinations were recorded in a questionnaire for each subject. Thyroid function tests including free T3, free T4 and TSH-IRMA were performed. Anti-TPO levels were assessed as well. The collected data were analyzed by SPSS version-11 in vitiligo patients and subgroups according to gender, age, extent, and duration of the disease compared with the control group. Results Anti-TPO was detected in 17 (18.1% of patients affected by vitiligo, while this figure was 7 (7.3% in the control group; the difference was significant with p-value The difference of the frequency of anti-TPO was not significant regarding the duration and extent of vitiligo. In addition, there was no significant difference in the levels of free T3, free T4, and TSH in vitiligo patients compared with the control group. Conclusion According to our study, anti-TPO was shown to be significantly more common in vitiligo patients especially in young women, compared with control group. As this antibody is a relatively sensitive and specific marker of autoimmune thyroid

  6. AhpA is a peroxidase expressed during biofilm formation in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwick, Joelie V; Noble, Sarah; Ellaicy, Yasser K; Coe, Gabrielle Dierker; Hakey, Dylan J; King, Alyssa N; Sadauskas, Alex J; Faulkner, Melinda J

    2017-02-01

    Organisms growing aerobically generate reactive oxygen species such as hydrogen peroxide. These reactive oxygen molecules damage enzymes and DNA, potentially causing cell death. In response, Bacillus subtilis produces at least nine potential peroxide-scavenging enzymes; two belong to the alkylhydroperoxide reductase (Ahp) class of peroxidases. Here, we explore the role of one of these Ahp homologs, AhpA. While previous studies demonstrated that AhpA can scavenge peroxides and thus defend cells against peroxides, they did not clarify when during growth the cell produces AhpA. The results presented here show that the expression of ahpA is regulated in a manner distinct from that of the other peroxide-scavenging enzymes in B. subtilis. While the primary Ahp, AhpC, is expressed during exponential growth and stationary phase, these studies demonstrate that the expression of ahpA is dependent on the transition-state regulator AbrB and the sporulation and biofilm formation transcription factor Spo0A. Furthermore, these results show that ahpA is specifically expressed during biofilm formation, and not during sporulation or stationary phase, suggesting that derepression of ahpA by AbrB requires a signal other than those present upon entry into stationary phase. Despite this expression pattern, ahpA mutant strains still form and maintain robust biofilms, even in the presence of peroxides. Thus, the role of AhpA with regard to protecting cells within biofilms from environmental stresses is still uncertain. These studies highlight the need to further study the Ahp homologs to better understand how they differ from one another and the unique roles they may play in oxidative stress resistance. © 2016 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. An oxidative burst and its attenuation by bacterial peroxidase activity is required for optimal establishment of the Arachis hypogaea-Bradyrhizobium sp. symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, V; Ibáñez, F; Figueredo, M S; Fabra, A

    2016-07-01

    The main purpose of this study was to determine whether the Arachis hypogaea L. root oxidative burst, produced at early stages of its symbiotic interaction with Bradyrhizobium sp. SEMIA 6144, and the bacterial antioxidant system are required for the successful development of this interaction. Pharmacological approaches were used to reduce both plant oxidative burst and bacterial peroxidase enzyme activity. In plants whose H2 O2 levels were decreased, a low nodule number, a reduction in the proportion of red nodules (%) and an increase in the bacteroid density were found. The symbiotic phenotype of plants inoculated with a Bradyrhizobium sp. SEMIA 6144 culture showing decreased peroxidase activity was also affected, since the biomass production, nodule number and percentage of red nodules in these plants were lower than in plants inoculated with Bradyrhizobium sp. control cultures. We demonstrated for the first time that the oxidative burst triggered at the early events of the symbiotic interaction in peanut, is a prerequisite for the efficient development of root nodules, and that the antioxidant system of bradyrhizobial peanut symbionts, particularly the activity of peroxidases, is counteracting this oxidative burst for the successful establishment of the symbiosis. Our results provide new insights into the mechanisms involved in the development of the symbiotic interaction established in A. hypogaea L. a legume infected in an intercellular way. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  8. Mercury distribution characteristics in primary manganese smelting plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Back, Seung-Ki; Sung, Jin-Ho; Moon, Young-Hoon; Kim, Young-Hee; Seok, Kwang-Seol; Song, Geum-Ju; Seo, Yong-Chil

    2017-01-01

    The mercury (Hg) distribution characteristics were investigated in three primary manganese smelting plants in Korea for the assessment of anthropogenic Hg released. Input and output materials were sampled from each process, and Hg concentrations in the samples were analyzed. Among the input materials, the most mercury was found in the manganese ore (83.1–99.7%) and mercury was mainly released through fly ash or off gas, depending on the condition of off gas cleaning system. As off gas temperature decreases, proportion and concentration of emitted gaseous elemental mercury (Hg 0 ) in off gas decreases. Based on mass balance study from these three plants and national manganese production data, the total amount of mercury released from those Korean plants was estimated to 644 kg/yr. About half of it was emitted into the air while the rest was released to waste as fly ash. With the results of this investigation, national inventory for Hg emission and release could be updated for the response to Minamata Convention on Mercury. - Graphical abstract: 1. Lack of data on mercury (Hg) distribution in manganese smelters. 2. Mass distribution of Hg released from 3 plants (as normalized values) were made as follows by measurements. 3. Information of distribution of Hg in Manganese smelters would be used for emission in to air and releases to other streams for the nation and globe in UNEP mercury report. - Highlights: • The mass balance study by on-site measurement from primary manganese smelting plants was made at first time in the world. • Hg distribution and main input and release pathways of Hg from primary manganese smelting plants could be found as the first time. • Gas temperature in bag filter affects Hg behavior and speciation changes in APCDs. • National inventory of Hg emssion has been updated with new data. - Mercury distribution in manganese smelting plant was investigated as the first measurements at commercial plants in the world. National Hg release

  9. Manganese and acute paranoid psychosis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egger Jos I

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Manganese regulates many enzymes and is essential for normal development and body function. Chronic manganese intoxication has an insidious and progressive course and usually starts with complaints of headache, fatigue, sleep disturbances, irritability and emotional instability. Later, several organ systems may be affected and, due to neurotoxicity, an atypical parkinsonian syndrome may emerge. With regard to neuropsychiatry, an array of symptoms may develop up to 30 years after intoxication, of which gait and speech abnormalities, cognitive and motor slowing, mood changes and hallucinations are the most common. Psychotic phenomena are rarely reported. Case presentation We describe the case of a 49-year-old Caucasian man working as a welder who was referred to our facility for evaluation of acute paranoid psychotic behavior. Our patient's medical history made no mention of any somatic complaints or psychiatric symptoms, and he had been involved in a professional career as a metalworker. On magnetic resonance imaging scanning of his brain, a bilateral hyperdensity of the globus pallidus, suggestive for manganese intoxication, was found. His manganese serum level was 52 to 97 nmol/L (range: 7 to 20 nmol/L. A diagnosis of organic psychotic disorder due to manganese overexposure was made. His psychotic symptoms disappeared within two weeks of treatment with low-dose risperidone. At three months later, serum manganese was decreased to slightly elevated levels and the magnetic resonance imaging T1 signal intensity was reduced. No signs of Parkinsonism were found and a definite diagnosis of manganese-induced apathy syndrome was made. Conclusion Although neuropsychiatric and neurological symptoms caused by (chronic manganese exposure have been reported frequently in the past, in the present day the disorder is rarely diagnosed. In this report we stress that manganese intoxication can still occur, in our case in a confined

  10. Fixation and localisation of manganese in some soft water organisms: I - Distribution of 54Mn in an ecologic system in fresh water; II - study by biochemical fractionation of manganese contained by isolated plant cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnaval, Robert; Lachet, Bernard; Gagnaire, Janine; Fourcy, Andre; Neuburger, Michel; Fer, Andre

    1968-12-01

    After having recalled that Manganese 54, an irradiation product of 54 Fe, has a sufficiently long radioactive period to be detected in atmospheric fallouts of nuclear explosions, but also in radioactive wastes produced by research centres, and is generally produced by corrosion of any enclosure submitted to neutron irradiation, the authors report the experimental study of a radioactive pollution of fresh water when this radio-element is a component of this pollution. Different containers are considered. They contain either water and sediments, or water and organic compounds and aquatic plants, or water and sediments and aquatic plants. A solution of 54 MnCl 2 of radioactive pollution is introduced in these containers and the authors study the decrease of radioactivity in water with respect to the considered ecosystem, the 54 Mn concentration in aquatic living species, and the distribution of 54 Mn after 43 days. In a second part, they report the study of the distribution of cellular manganese in isolated biochemical fractions by using the Schmidt and Thannhauser method. Due to the low content, the detection of this mineral nutrient requires a highly sensitive method: dosing of natural manganese by radio-activation

  11. Manganese and iron oxidation by fungi isolated from building stone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Torre, M A; Gomez-Alarcon, G

    1994-01-01

    Acid and nonacid generating fungal strains isolated from weathered sandstone, limestone, and granite of Spanish cathedrals were assayed for their ability to oxidize iron and manganese. In general, the concentration of the different cations present in the mineral salt media directly affected Mn(IV) oxide formation, although in some cases, the addition of glucose and nitrate to the culture media was necessary. Mn(II) oxidation in acidogenic strains was greater in a medium containing the highest concentrations of glucose, nitrate, and manganese. High concentrations of Fe(II), glucose, and mineral salts were optimal for iron oxidation. Mn(IV) precipitated as oxides or hydroxides adhered to the mycelium. Most of the Fe(III) remained in solution by chelation with organic acids excreted by acidogenic strains. Other metabolites acted as Fe(III) chelators in nonacidogenic strains, although Fe(III) deposits around the mycelium were also detected. Both iron and manganese oxidation were shown to involve extracellular, hydrosoluble enzymes, with maximum specific activities during exponential growth. Strains able to oxidize manganese were also able to oxidize iron. It is concluded that iron and manganese oxidation reported in this work were biologically induced by filamentous fungi mainly by direct (enzymatic) mechanisms.

  12. [Factors affecting biological removal of iron and manganese in groundwater].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Gang; He, Sheng-Bing; Wang, Xin-Ze

    2006-01-01

    Factors affecting biological process for removing iron and manganese in groundwater were analyzed. When DO and pH in groundwater after aeration were 7.0 - 7.5 mg/L and 6.8 - 7.0 respectively, not only can the activation of Mn2+ oxidizing bacteria be maintained, but also the demand of iron and manganese removal can be satisfied. A novel inoculating approach of grafting mature filter material into filter bed, which is easier to handle than selective culture media, was employed in this research. However, this approach was only suitable to the filter material of high-quality manganese sand with strong Mn2+ adsorption capacity. For the filter material of quartz sand with weak adsorption capacity, only culturing and domesticating Mn2+ oxidizing bacteria by selective culture media can be adopted as inoculation in filter bed. The optimal backwashing rate of biological filter bed filled with manganese sand and quartz sand should be kept at a relatively low level of 6 - 9 L/(m2 x s) and 7 -11 L/( m2 x s), respectively. Then the stability of microbial phase in filter bed was not disturbed, and iron and manganese removal efficiency recovered in less than 5h. Moreover, by using filter material with uniform particle size of 1.0 - 1.2 mm in filter bed, the filtration cycle reached as long as 35 - 38h.

  13. The sorption of silver by poorly crystallized manganese oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, B.J.; Jenne, E.A.; Chao, T.T.

    1973-01-01

    The sorption of silver by poorly crystallized manganese oxides was studied using synthesized samples of three members of the manganous manganite (birnessite) group, of different chemical composition and crystallinity, and a poorly organized ??-MnO2. All four oxides sorbed significant quantities of silver. The manganous manganites showed the greatest sorption (up to 0.5 moles silver/mole MnOx at pH 7) while the ??-MnO2 showed the least (0.3 moles silver/ mole MnOx at pH 7). Sorption of silver was adequately described by the Langmuir equation over a considerable concentration range. The relationship failed at low pH values and high equilibrium silver concentrations. The sorption capacity showed a direct relationship with pH. However, the rate of increase of sorption capacity decreased at the higher pH values. Silver sorption maxima. were not directly related to surface area but appeared to vary with the amount of occluded sodium and potassium present in the manganese oxide. The important processes involved in the uptake of silver by the four poorly crystallized manganese oxides ara considered to be surface exchange for manganese, potassium and sodium as well as exchange for structural manganese, potassium and sodium. ?? 1973.

  14. Manganese oxide-based materials as electrochemical supercapacitor electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Weifeng; Cui, Xinwei; Chen, Weixing; Ivey, Douglas G

    2011-03-01

    Electrochemical supercapacitors (ECs), characteristic of high power and reasonably high energy densities, have become a versatile solution to various emerging energy applications. This critical review describes some materials science aspects on manganese oxide-based materials for these applications, primarily including the strategic design and fabrication of these electrode materials. Nanostructurization, chemical modification and incorporation with high surface area, conductive nanoarchitectures are the three major strategies in the development of high-performance manganese oxide-based electrodes for EC applications. Numerous works reviewed herein have shown enhanced electrochemical performance in the manganese oxide-based electrode materials. However, many fundamental questions remain unanswered, particularly with respect to characterization and understanding of electron transfer and atomic transport of the electrochemical interface processes within the manganese oxide-based electrodes. In order to fully exploit the potential of manganese oxide-based electrode materials, an unambiguous appreciation of these basic questions and optimization of synthesis parameters and material properties are critical for the further development of EC devices (233 references).

  15. Copper-Based Metal-Organic Framework Nanoparticles with Peroxidase-Like Activity for Sensitive Colorimetric Detection of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuqin; Deng, Wenfang; Yang, Lu; Tan, Yueming; Xie, Qingji; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2017-07-26

    Cu-MOF nanoparticles with an average diameter of 550 nm were synthesized from 2-aminoterephthalic acid and Cu(NO 3 ) 2 by a mixed solvothermal method. The Cu-MOF nanoparticles can show peroxidase-like activity that can catalyze 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine to produce a yellow chromogenic reaction in the presence of H 2 O 2 . The presence of abundant amine groups on the surfaces of Cu-MOF nanoparticles enables facile modification of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) aptamer on Cu-MOF nanoparticles. By combining Cu-MOF-catalyzed chromogenic reaction with aptamer recognition and magnetic separation, a simple, sensitive, and selective colorimetric method for the detection of S. aureus was developed.

  16. Multimicronutrient Slow-Release Fertilizer of Zinc, Iron, Manganese, and Copper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siladitya Bandyopadhyay

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The process for the production of a slow-release micronutrient fertilizer is described. The compound contains zinc, iron, manganese, and copper as micronutrients and is produced by polymerizing a system containing phosphoric acid, zinc oxide, hematite, pyrolusite, copper sulfate, and magnesium oxide followed by neutralization of the polyphosphate chain with ammonium hydroxide. Changes in temperature, density, and viscosity of the reaction system during polymerization were studied. Reaction kinetics was studied at three different temperatures. Rate curves revealed a multistage process with essentially linear rates at each stage. Thus, each stage displayed zero order kinetics. The product was crystalline and revealed ordering of P-O-P chains. It had low solubility in water but high solubility in 0.33 M citric acid and 0.005 M DTPA. Three different field trials showed significant yield increments using the slow-release micronutrient fertilizer compared to the conventional micronutrients. Yield increments in rice were in the range of 10–55% over control (with no micronutrient and up to 17% over the conventional micronutrient fertilizers. There were significant increases in total uptake of zinc, iron, and manganese in the grain. Slow-release fertilizers also produced significant yield increases in potato as well as significant increase in vitamin C content of the tuber.

  17. Solvent extractions applications to hydrometallurgy. Pt.III: Nickel, cobalt, manganese and ocean nodules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amer, S.

    1981-01-01

    The main applications of solvent extraction to the hydrometallurgy of nickel, cobalt, manganese and manganese rich ocean nodules, which also contain nickel, cooper and cobalt, are exposed. A short description of the processes with commercial applications is made. (author)

  18. Effects of dietary manganese contents on 54Mn metabolism in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, I.; Matsusaka, N.; Kobayashi, H.; Nishimura, Y.

    1996-01-01

    Several parameters of 54 Mn metabolism were noted in mice maintained on diets with manganese contents of 80 to 8000 mg/kg. Excretion of 54 Mn was promoted as the dietary manganese contents increased. Clearance of 54 Mn from the liver, kidneys, pancreas, and spleen was markedly accelerated by feeding mice a high-manganese diet, but clearance from the muscles, femurs, and brain was relatively insensitive to the dietary manganese. Manganese concentrations in the tissue were regulated homoestatically upto the dietary manganese content of 2400 mg/kg, but marked accumulations of manganese occurred when mice were given 8000 mg/kg diet. No toxic symptoms were found up to the 2400 mg/kg diet, but consumption of the 8000 mg/kg diet was less than for other diets. These results suggest that an oral intake of excess manganese is effective for promoting the excretion of 54 Mn from a body contaminated with this isotope. (author)

  19. The complex compounds of manganese (II) with poly dental ligands and polyhedron borane anions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buranova, S.A.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of the present work is synthesis of complex compounds of manganese with organic ligands. Their studying by spectroscopic methods purposely to determinate the influence of borane anions on composition and structure of coordinating sphere of manganese

  20. Manganese and the Evolution of Photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Woodward W.; Hemp, James; Johnson, Jena E.

    2015-09-01

    Oxygenic photosynthesis is the most important bioenergetic event in the history of our planet—it evolved once within the Cyanobacteria, and remained largely unchanged as it was transferred to algae and plants via endosymbiosis. Manganese plays a fundamental role in this history because it lends the critical redox behavior of the water-oxidizing complex of photosystem II. Constraints from the photoassembly of the Mn-bearing water-oxidizing complex fuel the hypothesis that Mn(II) once played a key role as an electron donor for anoxygenic photosynthesis prior to the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis. Here we review the growing body of geological and geochemical evidence from the Archean and Paleoproterozoic sedimentary records that supports this idea and demonstrates that the oxidative branch of the Mn cycle switched on prior to the rise of oxygen. This Mn-oxidizing phototrophy hypothesis also receives support from the biological record of extant phototrophs, and can be made more explicit by leveraging constraints from structural biology and biochemistry of photosystem II in Cyanobacteria. These observations highlight that water-splitting in photosystem II evolved independently from a homodimeric ancestral type II reaction center capable of high potential photosynthesis and Mn(II) oxidation, which is required by the presence of homologous redox-active tyrosines in the modern heterodimer. The ancestral homodimer reaction center also evolved a C-terminal extension that sterically precluded standard phototrophic electron donors like cytochrome c, cupredoxins, or high-potential iron-sulfur proteins, and could only complete direct oxidation of small molecules like Mn2+, and ultimately water.

  1. Unprecedented access of phenolic substrates to the heme active site of a catalase: substrate binding and peroxidase-like reactivity of Bacillus pumilus catalase monitored by X-ray crystallography and EPR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewen, Peter C; Villanueva, Jacylyn; Switala, Jacek; Donald, Lynda J; Ivancich, Anabella

    2015-05-01

    Heme-containing catalases and catalase-peroxidases catalyze the dismutation of hydrogen peroxide as their predominant catalytic activity, but in addition, individual enzymes support low levels of peroxidase and oxidase activities, produce superoxide, and activate isoniazid as an antitubercular drug. The recent report of a heme enzyme with catalase, peroxidase and penicillin oxidase activities in Bacillus pumilus and its categorization as an unusual catalase-peroxidase led us to investigate the enzyme for comparison with other catalase-peroxidases, catalases, and peroxidases. Characterization revealed a typical homotetrameric catalase with one pentacoordinated heme b per subunit (Tyr340 being the axial ligand), albeit in two orientations, and a very fast catalatic turnover rate (kcat  = 339,000 s(-1) ). In addition, the enzyme supported a much slower (kcat  = 20 s(-1) ) peroxidatic activity utilizing substrates as diverse as ABTS and polyphenols, but no oxidase activity. Two binding sites, one in the main access channel and the other on the protein surface, accommodating pyrogallol, catechol, resorcinol, guaiacol, hydroquinone, and 2-chlorophenol were identified in crystal structures at 1.65-1.95 Å. A third site, in the heme distal side, accommodating only pyrogallol and catechol, interacting with the heme iron and the catalytic His and Arg residues, was also identified. This site was confirmed in solution by EPR spectroscopy characterization, which also showed that the phenolic oxygen was not directly coordinated to the heme iron (no low-spin conversion of the Fe(III) high-spin EPR signal upon substrate binding). This is the first demonstration of phenolic substrates directly accessing the heme distal side of a catalase. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Methylphenidate alleviates manganese-induced impulsivity but not distractibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudin, Stephane A.; Strupp, Barbara J.; Uribe, Walter; Ysais, Lauren; Strawderman, Myla; Smith, Donald R.

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies from our lab have demonstrated that postnatal manganese (Mn) exposure in a rodent model can cause lasting impairments in fine motor control and attention, and that oral methylphenidate (MPH) treatment can effectively treat the dysfunction in fine motor control. However, it is unknown whether MPH treatment can alleviate the impairments in attention produced by Mn exposure. Here we used a rodent model of postnatal Mn exposure to determine whether (1) oral MPH alleviates attention and impulse control deficits caused by postnatal Mn exposure, using attention tasks that are variants of the 5-choice serial reaction time task, and (2) whether these treatments affected neuronal dendritic spine density in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and dorsal striatum. Male Long-Evans rats were exposed orally to 0 or 50 mg Mn/kg/d throughout life starting on PND 1, and tested as young adults (PND 107 – 115) on an attention task that specifically tapped selective attention and impulse control. Animals were treated with oral MPH (2.5 mg/kg/d) throughout testing on the attention task. Our findings show that lifelong postnatal Mn exposure impaired impulse control and selective attention in young adulthood, and that a therapeutically relevant oral MPH regimen alleviated the Mn-induced dysfunction in impulse control, but not selective attention, and actually impaired focused attention in the Mn group. In addition, the effect of MPH was qualitatively different for the Mn-exposed versus control animals across a range of behavioral measures of inhibitory control and attention, as well as dendritic spine density in the mPFC, suggesting that postnatal Mn exposure alters catecholaminergic systems modulating these behaviors. Collectively these findings suggest that MPH may hold promise for treating the behavioral dysfunction caused by developmental Mn exposure, although further research is needed with multiple MPH doses to determine whether a dose can be identified that

  3. Sequence and RT-PCR expression analysis of two peroxidases from Arabidopsis thaliana belonging to a novel evolutionary branch of plant peroxidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjaersgård, I V; Jespersen, H M; Rasmussen, S K; Welinder, K G

    1997-03-01

    cDNA clones encoding two new Arabidopsis thaliana peroxidases, ATP 1a and ATP 2a, have been identified by searching the Arabidopsis database of expressed sequence tags (dbEST). They represent a novel branch of hitherto uncharacterized plant peroxidases which is only 35% identical in amino acid sequence to the well characterized group of basic plant peroxidases represented by the horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) isoperoxidases HRP C, HRP E5 and the similar Arabidopsis isoperoxidases ATP Ca, ATP Cb, and ATP Ea. However ATP 1a is 87% identical in amino acid sequence to a peroxidase encoded by an mRNA isolated from cotton (Gossypium hirsutum). As cotton and Arabidopsis belong to rather diverse families (Malvaceae and Crucifereae, respectively), in contrast with Arabidopsis and horseradish (both Crucifereae), the high degree of sequence identity indicates that this novel type of peroxidase, albeit of unknown function, is likely to be widespread in plant species. The atp 1 and atp 2 types of cDNA sequences were the most redundant among the 28 different isoperoxidases identified among about 200 peroxidase encoding ESTs. Interestingly, 8 out of totally 38 EST sequences coding for ATP 1 showed three identical nucleotide substitutions. This variant form is designated ATP 1b. Similarly, six out of totally 16 EST sequences coding for ATP 2 showed a number of deletions and nucleotide changes. This variant form is designated ATP 2b. The selected EST clones are full-length and contain coding regions of 993 nucleotides for atp 1a, and 984 nucleotides for atp 2a. These regions show 61% DNA sequence identity. The predicted mature proteins ATP 1a, and ATP 2a are 57% identical in sequence and contain the structurally and functionally important residues, characteristic of the plant peroxidase superfamily. However, they do show two differences of importance to peroxidase catalysis: (1) the asparagine residue linked with the active site distal histidine via hydrogen bonding is absent

  4. Efficacies of manganese chloride and Ca-DTPA for the elimination of incorporated manganese-54 in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Itaru; Matsusaka, Naonori; Shinagawa, Kunihiro; Kobayashi, Haruo; Nishimura, Yoshikazu.

    1993-01-01

    Efficacies of manganese chloride and Ca-DTPA (calcium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid) for the elimination of incorporated 54 Mn were investigated in mice. Each mouse was given an intraperitoneal injection of 54 Mn and initial whole-body radioactivity was measured immediately. Manganese chloride (10 mg-Mn/kg) or Ca-DTPA (10 or 100 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally once or repeatedly at various times after 54 Mn injection. Efficacies for elimination were estimated by measuring the whole body retention of 54 Mn for 14 or 21 days. A single injection of manganese chloride eliminated more than 80% of the incorporated 54 Mn when it was injected within 24 h after the injection of 54 Mn. Although the efficacy was decreased with the passage of time after the injection of 54 Mn, about 50% was still eliminated after 14 days. Repeated injection of this agent raised the efficacy, but the second or later injection was less effective than the first injection. Ca-DTPA eliminated the incorporated 54 Mn by 57% for 100 mg/kg and by 19% for 10 mg/kg when it was injected after 3 h. But after 6 h or later, Ca-DTPA had little efficacy. These results indicate that manganese chloride is very effective to eliminate the 54 Mn from accidentally contaminated persons and the efficacy of Ca-DTPA is less than that of manganese chloride. (author)

  5. Contribution of arginase to manganese metabolism of Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keni, Sarita; Punekar, Narayan S

    2016-02-01

    Aspects of manganese metabolism during normal and acidogenic growth of Aspergillus niger were explored. Arginase from this fungus was a Mn[II]-enzyme. The contribution of the arginase protein towards A. niger manganese metabolism was investigated using arginase knockout (D-42) and arginase over-expressing (ΔXCA-29) strains of A. niger NCIM 565. The Mn[II] contents of various mycelial fractions were found in the order: D-42 strain niger mycelia harvested from acidogenic growth media contain substantially less Mn[II] as compared to those from normal growth media. Nevertheless, acidogenic mycelia harbor considerable Mn[II] levels and a functional arginase. Altered levels of mycelial arginase protein did not significantly influence citric acid production. The relevance of arginase to cellular Mn[II] pool and homeostasis was evaluated and the results suggest that arginase regulation could occur via manganese availability.

  6. Manganese and Iron Catalysts in Alkyd Paints and Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Hage

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Many paint, ink and coating formulations contain alkyd-based resins which cure via autoxidation mechanisms. Whilst cobalt-soaps have been used for many decades, there is a continuing and accelerating desire by paint companies to develop alternatives for the cobalt soaps, due to likely classification as carcinogens under the REACH (Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals legislation. Alternative driers, for example manganese and iron soaps, have been applied for this purpose. However, relatively poor curing capabilities make it necessary to increase the level of metal salts to such a level that often coloring of the paint formulation occurs. More recent developments include the application of manganese and iron complexes with a variety of organic ligands. This review will discuss the chemistry of alkyd resin curing, the applications and reactions of cobalt-soaps as curing agents, and, subsequently, the paint drying aspects and mechanisms of (model alkyd curing using manganese and iron catalysts.

  7. Factors affecting radium removal using mixed iron-manganese oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mott, H.V. Singh, S.; Kondapally, V.R.

    1993-01-01

    Batch experiments confirmed that sorption of radium by a mixed iron-manganese oxide solid phase shows promise for treating radium-contaminated water. The capacities of these mixed oxides for sorption of radium depend on the composition of the solid phase, the pH of the aqueous solution, and the presence of competing cations. The removal of the oxide-radium complexes from aqueous suspension by manganese greensand filtration was also investigated. It was found that influent radium concentrations of 100 pCi/L were reduced to 2--9 pCi/L by this process. Additional study of the fate of radium in manganese greensand filters is recommended before this procedure is used for drinking water treatment

  8. A redox-assisted supramolecular assembly of manganese oxide nanotube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao Li; Sun Chenggao; Fan Meilian; Huang Caijuan; Wu Hailong; Chao Zisheng; Zhai Hesheng

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we report the hydrothermal synthesis of manganese oxide nanotube from an aqueous medium of pH 7, using KMnO 4 and MnCl 2 as inorganic precursors, polyoxyethylene (10) nonyl phenyl ether (TX-10) a surfactant and acetaldehyde an additive. The characterization of X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and N 2 adsorption at 77 K (BET) reveals that the synthesized manganese oxide nanotube has a mesopore size of ca. 3.65 nm and a wall thickness of ca. 12 nm, with the wall being composed of microporous crystals of monoclinic manganite. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) result demonstrates a decrease of the binding energy of the Mn 3+ in the manganese oxide nanotube, which may be related to both the nanotubular morphology and the crystalline pore wall. A mechanism of a redox-assisted supramolecular assembly, regulated by acetaldehyde, is postulated

  9. Factors affecting radium removal using mixed iron-manganese oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mott, H.V. Singh, S.; Kondapally, V.R. (South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Rapid City, SD (United States))

    1993-10-01

    Batch experiments confirmed that sorption of radium by a mixed iron-manganese oxide solid phase shows promise for treating radium-contaminated water. The capacities of these mixed oxides for sorption of radium depend on the composition of the solid phase, the pH of the aqueous solution, and the presence of competing cations. The removal of the oxide-radium complexes from aqueous suspension by manganese greensand filtration was also investigated. It was found that influent radium concentrations of 100 pCi/L were reduced to 2--9 pCi/L by this process. Additional study of the fate of radium in manganese greensand filters is recommended before this procedure is used for drinking water treatment.

  10. Thiol peroxidases mediate specific genome-wide regulation of gene expression in response to hydrogen peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomenko, Dmitri E.; Koc, Ahmet; Agisheva, Natalia; Jacobsen, Michael; Kaya, Alaattin; Malinouski, Mikalai; Rutherford, Julian C.; Siu, Kam-Leung; Jin, Dong-Yan; Winge, Dennis R.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is thought to regulate cellular processes by direct oxidation of numerous cellular proteins, whereas antioxidants, most notably thiol peroxidases, are thought to reduce peroxides and inhibit H2O2 response. However, thiol peroxidases have also been implicated in activation of transcription factors and signaling. It remains unclear if these enzymes stimulate or inhibit redox regulation and whether this regulation is widespread or limited to a few cellular components. Herein, we found that Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells lacking all eight thiol peroxidases were viable and withstood redox stresses. They transcriptionally responded to various redox treatments, but were unable to activate and repress gene expression in response to H2O2. Further studies involving redox transcription factors suggested that thiol peroxidases are major regulators of global gene expression in response to H2O2. The data suggest that thiol peroxidases sense and transfer oxidative signals to the signaling proteins and regulate transcription, whereas a direct interaction between H2O2 and other cellular proteins plays a secondary role. PMID:21282621

  11. Peroxidase-Mimicking Nanozyme with Enhanced Activity and High Stability Based on Metal-Support Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhihao; Yang, Xiangdong; Yang, Yanbing; Tan, Yaning; He, Yue; Liu, Meng; Liu, Xinwen; Yuan, Quan

    2018-01-09

    Peroxidase-mimicking nanozymes offer unique advantages in terms of high stability and low cost over natural peroxidase for applications in bioanalysis, biomedicine, and the treatment of pollution. However, the design of high-efficiency peroxidase-mimicking nanozymes remains a great challenge. In this study, we adopted a structural-design approach through hybridization of cube-CeO 2 and Pt nanoparticles to create a new peroxidase-mimicking nanozyme with high efficiency and excellent stability. Relative to pure cube-CeO 2 and Pt nanoparticles, the as-hybridized Pt/cube-CeO 2 nanocomposites display much improved activities because of the strong metal-support interaction. Meanwhile, the nanocomposites also maintain high catalytic activity after long-term storage and multiple recycling. Based on their excellent properties, Pt/cube-CeO 2 nanocomposites were used to construct high-performance colorimetric biosensors for the sensitive detection of metabolites, including H 2 O 2 and glucose. Our findings highlight opportunities for the development of high-efficiency peroxidase-mimicking nanozymes with potential applications such as diagnostics, biomedicine, and the treatment of pollution. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. COMPARISON OF METHODS FOR ALKALINE PHOSPHATASE AND PEROXIDASE DETECTION IN MILK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    felipe Nael Seixas

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the performance of strips for colorimetric detection of alkaline phosphatase and peroxidase in milk, comparing them with a kit of reagents for alkaline phosphatase and the official methodology for peroxidase. The samples were analyzed at the Laboratory Inspection of Products of Animal Origin, State University of Londrina. For the comparison tests for the detection of alkaline phosphatase four treatments were made by adding different percentages of raw milk (1%, 2%, 5% and 10% in the pasteurized milk, plus two control treatments. Thirty-eight samples triplicate for each treatment were analyzed. To compare the performance of tests for peroxidase 80 pasteurized milk samples were evaluated simultaneously by official methodology and by colorimetric strips. The performance of the alkaline phosphatase were different for the treatments with 1% and 2% of raw milk which had all the strips change color as the reagent kit showed the presence of phosphatase in just 2.63% and 5.26% the cases, respectively for each treatment. The colorimetric strips for alkaline phosphatase are more sensitive for the identification of small quantities compared to the reagent kit. The performance of tests for peroxidase showed no difference. The strips for the detection of peroxidase or alkaline phosphatase were effective and can replace traditional methods.

  13. Purification and characterization of peroxidase from avocado (Persea americana Mill, cv. Hass).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Reyes, José O; Robles-Olvera, Victor; Carvajal-Zarrabal, Octavio; Castro Matinez, Claudia; Waliszewski, Krzysztof N; Aguilar-Uscanga, María Guadalupe

    2014-07-01

    Avocado (Persea americana Mill, cv. Hass) fruit ranks tenth in terms of the most important products for Mexico. Avocado products are quite unstable due to the presence of oxidative enzymes such as polyphenol oxidase and peroxidase. The present study is to characterize the activity of purified avocado peroxidase from avocado in order to ascertain the biochemical and kinetic properties and their inhibition conditions. Purification was performed by Sephacryl S 200 HR gel filtration chromatography and its estimated molecular weight was 40 kDa. The zymogram showed an isoelectric point of 4.7. Six substrates were tested in order to ascertain the affinity of the enzyme for these substrates. The purified peroxidase was found to have low Km (0.296 mM) and high catalytic efficiency (2688 mM(-1) s(-1)) using 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid), optimum activity being reached at 51°C, pH 3.8. The addition of dithiothreitol, β-mercaptoethanol, ascorbic acid, sodium azide, L-cysteine and Tween-20 had high inhibitory effects, while metals ions such as Cu(+), Fe(2+) and Mn(2+) had weak inhibitory activity on purified avocado peroxidase. The purified avocado peroxidase exhibits high inhibition (Ki = 0.37 µM) with 1.97 µM n-propyl gallate using ABTS as substrate at 51°C, pH 3.8 for 10 min. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. An updated view on horseradish peroxidases: recombinant production and biotechnological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krainer, Florian W; Glieder, Anton

    2015-02-01

    Horseradish peroxidase has been the subject of scientific research for centuries. It has been used exhaustively as reporter enzyme in diagnostics and histochemistry and still plays a major role in these applications. Numerous studies have been conducted on the role of horseradish peroxidase in the plant and its catalytic mechanism. However, little progress has been made in its recombinant production. Until now, commercial preparations of horseradish peroxidase are still isolated from plant roots. These preparations are commonly mixtures of various isoenzymes of which only a small fraction has been described so far. The composition of isoenzymes in these mixed isolates is subjected to uncontrollable environmental conditions. Nowadays, horseradish peroxidase regains interest due to its broad applicability in the fields of medicine, life sciences, and biotechnology in cancer therapy, biosensor systems, bioremediation, and biocatalysis. These medically and commercially relevant applications, the recent discovery of new natural isoenzymes with different biochemical properties, as well as the challenges in recombinant production render this enzyme particularly interesting for future biotechnological solutions. Therefore, we reviewed previous studies as well as current developments with biotechnological emphasis on new applications and the major remaining biotechnological challenge-the efficient recombinant production of horseradish peroxidase enzymes.

  15. A peroxidase related to the mammalian antimicrobial protein myeloperoxidase in the Euprymna-Vibrio mutualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, V M; Small, A L; McFall-Ngai, M J

    1996-11-26

    Many animal-bacteria cooperative associations occur in highly modified host organs that create a unique environment for housing and maintaining the symbionts. It has been assumed that these specialized organs develop through a program of symbiosis-specific or -enhanced gene expression in one or both partners, but a clear example of this process has been lacking. In this study, we provide evidence for the enhanced production of an enzyme in the symbiotic organ of the squid Euprymna scolopes, which harbors a culture of the luminous bacterium Vibrio fischeri. Our data show that this enzyme has a striking biochemical similarity to mammalian myeloperoxidase (MPO; EC 1.11.17), an antimicrobial dianisidine peroxidase that occurs in neutrophils. MPO and the squid peroxidase catalyze the same reaction, have similar apparent subunit molecular masses, and a polyclonal antibody to native human MPO specifically localized a peroxidase-like protein to the bacteria-containing regions of the symbiotic organ. We also provide evidence that a previously described squid cDNA encodes the protein (LO4) that is responsible for the observed dianisidine peroxidase activity. An antibody made against a fragment of LO4 immunoprecipiated dianisidine peroxidase activity from extracts of the symbiotic organ, and reacted against these extracts and human MPO in Western blot analysis. These data suggest that related biochemical mechanisms for the control of bacterial number and growth operate in associations that are as functionally diverse as pathogenesis and mutualism, and as phylogenetically distant as molluscs and mammals.

  16. Characteristics of estrogen-induced peroxidase in mouse uterine luminal fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jellinck, P.H.; Newbold, R.R.; McLachlan, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    Peroxidase activity in the uterine luminal fluid of mice treated with diethylstilbestrol was measured by the guaiacol assay and also by the formation of 3H2O from [2-3H]estradiol. In the radiometric assay, the generation of 3H2O and 3H-labeled water-soluble products was dependent on H2O2 (25 to 100 microM), with higher concentrations being inhibitory. Tyrosine or 2,4-dichlorophenol strongly enhanced the reaction catalyzed either by the luminal fluid peroxidase or the enzyme in the CaCl2 extract of the uterus, but decreased the formation of 3H2O from [2-3H]estradiol by lactoperoxidase in the presence of H2O2 (80 microM). NADPH, ascorbate, and cytochrome c inhibited both luminal fluid and uterine tissue peroxidase activity to the same extent, while superoxide dismutase showed a marginal activating effect. Lactoferrin, a major protein component of uterine luminal fluid, was shown not to contribute to its peroxidative activity, and such an effect by prostaglandin synthase was also ruled out. However, it was not possible to exclude eosinophil peroxidase, brought to the uterus after estrogen stimulation, as being the source of peroxidase activity in uterine luminal fluid

  17. Peroxidase activity in Raphanus sativus and its relationship with soil heavy metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alipour, H.; Zare Myvan, H.; Sharifi, M.

    2009-01-01

    Today heavy metals are important environmental pollutants which generated from human activities and are one of the most important environmental stresses that cause molecular damages to plants through reactive oxygen species formation such as H2O2. Heavy metals are absorbed and accumulated by plants thus are absorbed by human bodies through the food chain. Raphanus sativus is a herbaceous plant within the Brassicaceae family that has different varieties and is used as a food plant in different parts of Iran. Peroxidase is one of the most important enzyme in oxidoreductase super family that can metabolize H2O2. In this research we studied some growth parameters, peroxidase activity and their relationships with heavy metal content and other soil factors in three different populations of radish collected from Sari, Semnan and south of Tehran. After harvesting the plants shoots and roots Peroxidase activity was assayed spectrophotometrically at 470 nm. Our results showed total heavy metal content of shomal 3 station soil and radish plants was higher than other stations, so plants collected from this station had lowest root and shoot lengths, fresh weights, dry weights, protein content and leaf collrophyll content. The peroxidase activity in both leaves and roots of these plants was higher than plants of other stations Therefore our results showed that with increasing heavy metal concentrations in soils peroxidase activity increased.

  18. Preparation of the electrochemically formed spinel-lithium manganese oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katakura, Katsumi; Wada, Kohei; Kajiki, Yoshiyuki; Yamamoto, Akiko [Department of Chemical Engineering, Nara National College of Technology, 22 Yata-cho Yamotokoriyama, Nara 639-1080 (Japan); Ogumi, Zempachi [Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan)

    2009-04-01

    Electrochemically formed spinel-lithium manganese oxides were synthesized from manganese hydroxides prepared by a cathodic electrochemical precipitation from various concentrations of manganese nitrate solutions. Two types of manganese hydroxides were formed from diluted and concentrated Mn(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} aqueous solutions. Uniform and equi-sized disk shaped Mn(OH){sub 2} crystals of 0.2-5 {mu}m in diameter were obtained on a Pt substrate after the electrochemical precipitation from lower concentration of ranging from 2 mmol dm{sup -3} to 2 mol dm{sup -3} Mn(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} aq., while the grass blade-like precipitate which is ascribed to manganese hydroxide with 20-80 {mu}m long and 1-5 {mu}m wide were formed from concentrated Mn(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} aq. Both manganese hydroxides gave the electrochemically formed spinel-LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} onto a Pt sheet, which is ready for electrochemical measurement, after calcination of the Li incorporated precipitate at 750 C without any additives. While the shape and size of the secondary particle frameworks (aggregates) of the electrochemically formed spinel-LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} can be controlled by the electrolysis conditions, the nanostructured primary crystals of 200 nm in diameter were obtained in all cases except that the fiber-like nanostructured spinel-LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} crystals with 200 nm in diameter were obtained from concentrated Mn(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} aq. Though these two types of electrochemically formed spinel-LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} showed well-shaped CVs even in higher scan rates, it would be suitable for high power density battery applications. These behaviors are assumed to be ascribed to the crystal size and shape of the processed spinel-LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}. (author)

  19. 40 CFR 721.10010 - Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). 721... Substances § 721.10010 Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3) (PMN P-00...

  20. Manganese Loading and Photosystem II Stability are Key Components of Manganese Efficiency in Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Sidsel Birkelund

    Manganese (Mn) deficiency constitutes a major plant nutritional problem in commercial crop production of winter cereals. In plants, Mn has an indispensable role in the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII). Hence, the consequences of Mn deficiency are reduced plant growth......, and eventually substantial yield losses. It is well known, that genotypes within plant species differ considerably in tolerance to growth under Mn limiting conditions, a phenomenon designated as Mn efficiency. However, the physiological responses reflecting the underlying mechanisms of Mn efficiency are still...... not fully understood. In this PhD study, a new method for determination and characterization of metal binding in size-fractionated photosynthetic protein complexes from barley thylakoids was established. The applicability of the method was shown by quantification of Mn binding in PSII from thylakoids of two...

  1. Determination of the oxidizing capacity of manganese ores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, R

    1974-09-01

    An accurate method is described for determining the amount of active oxygen in manganese ores, based on the oxidation-reduction reaction between the ore and arsenic(III) in presence of ammonium molybdate, followed by the back-titration of excess of arsenic(III) with cerium(IV), using osmium tetroxide as catalyst and Disulphine Blue V as indicator. A survey has been made of the applicability of this method to various pyrolusite ores containing less than 0.2% phosphorus. Aluminium(III), copper(II), iron(III), manganese(II), and molybdenum(VI) do not interfere. Up to 30% phosphorus(V) causes no interference.

  2. Biostimulation strategies to enhance manganese removal in drinking water biofilters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breda, Inês Lousinha Ribeiro; Ramsay, Loren; Søborg, Ditte

    to national drinking water criteria. The period during which virgin filter media matures into a fully functional biofilter is designated as the start-up period. The duration of a start-up for efficient manganese removal varies from weeks to more than a year. The aim of this study was to investigate...... growth and activity of specific bacteria. Biostimulation of virgin media to enhance initial manganese removal using different amendments strategies is possible especially in the early stages of filter development whereas autocatalytic processes appear to become dominant with time. The complex...

  3. Manganese removal from mine waters - investigating the occurrence and importance of manganese carbonates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bamforth, Selina M.; Manning, David A.C.; Singleton, Ian; Younger, Paul L.; Johnson, Karen L.

    2006-01-01

    Manganese is a common contaminant of mine water and other waste waters. Due to its high solubility over a wide pH range, it is notoriously difficult to remove from contaminated waters. Previous systems that effectively remove Mn from mine waters have involved oxidising the soluble Mn(II) species at an elevated pH using substrates such as limestone and dolomites. However it is currently unclear what effect the substrate type has upon abiotic Mn removal compared to biotic removal by in situ micro-organisms (biofilms). In order to investigate the relationship between substrate type, Mn precipitation and the biofilm community, net-alkaline Mn-contaminated mine water was treated in reactors containing one of the pure materials: dolomite, limestone, magnesite and quartzite. Mine water chemistry and Mn removal rates were monitored over a 3-month period in continuous-flow reactors. For all substrates except quartzite, Mn was removed from the mine water during this period, and Mn minerals precipitated in all cases. In addition, the plastic from which the reactor was made played a role in Mn removal. Manganese oxyhydroxides were formed in all the reactors; however, Mn carbonates (specifically kutnahorite) were only identified in the reactors containing quartzite and on the reactor plastic. Magnesium-rich calcites were identified in the dolomite and magnesite reactors, suggesting that the Mg from the substrate minerals may have inhibited Mn carbonate formation. Biofilm community development and composition on all the substrates was also monitored over the 3-month period using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The DGGE profiles in all reactors showed no change with time and no difference between substrate types, suggesting that any microbiological effects are independent of mineral substrate. The identification of Mn carbonates in these systems has important implications for the design of Mn treatment systems in that the provision of a carbonate-rich substrate

  4. Environmental contamination and human exposure to manganese--contribution of methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl in unleaded gasoline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayed, J; Vyskocil, A; Kennedy, G

    1999-01-01

    The organomanganese compound MMT (methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl), an antiknock additive in unleaded gasoline, has been used in Canada since 1976. Indeed, Canada is the only country where MMT is almost exclusively used. In October 1995, by court decision the Environmental protection Agency (EPA) granted Ethyl's waiver for the use of MMT in the United States. Paradoxically, in 1997 the federal government of Canada adopted a law (C-29) that banned both the interprovincial trade and the importation for commercial purposes of manganese-based substances, including MMT. However, MMT is currently widely used in Canada because of substantial stockpiling, and six Canadian provinces are challenging the law in the courts. Moreover, MMT has been approved for use in Argentina, Australia, Bulgaria, Russia, and conditionally, in New Zealand. It has been suggested by some scientists that combustion of MMT may be a significant source of exposure to inorganic Mn in urban areas. The crucial question is whether Mn contamination from industrial sources combined with the additional contamination that would result from the widespread use of MMT would lead to toxic effects. Our research efforts have attempted to assess the environmental/ecosystem Mn contamination arising from the combustion of MMT in abiotic and biotic systems as well as human exposure. The experimental evidence acquired so far provides useful information on certain environmental consequences of the use of MMT as well as raising a number of questions. Our results gave evidence indicating that roadside air, soils, plants, and animals may be contaminated by Mn. As well, some specific groups of the population could have a higher level of exposure to Mn. Nevertheless, the levels of exposure remain below international guide values. Further studies and further characterization of dose-response relationships are thus needed to provide successful implementation of evidence-based risk-assessment approaches.

  5. Prokaryotic Expression and Serodiagnostic Potential of Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase and Thioredoxin Peroxidase from Baylisascaris schroederi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Li

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Baylisascaris schroederi, a roundworm parasite of giant pandas, badly affects the health of its hosts. Diagnosis of this disease currently depends mainly on sedimentation floatation and Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR methods to detect the eggs. However, neither of these methods is suitable for diagnosis of early-stage panda baylisascariasis and no information on early diagnosis of this disease is available so far. Therefore, to develop an effective serologic diagnostic method, this study produced recombinant glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH and thioredoxin peroxidase (Tpx proteins from B. schroederi using a prokaryotic expression system. We determined the immunological characteristics of these proteins and their location in the parasite. Indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs were established to detect B. schroederi infection in giant pandas based on GAPDH and Tpx respectively. The open reading frame of the GAPDH gene (1083 bp encoded a 39 kDa protein, while the predicted molecular weight of Tpx (588 bp was 21.6 kDa. Western-blotting analysis revealed that both recombinant proteins could be recognized with positive serum of pandas infected with B. schroederi. Immunohistochemical staining showed that the endogenous GAPDH of B. schroederi was widely distributed in the worm while Tpx was mainly localized in the muscle, eggs, gut wall, uterus wall and hypodermis. Serological tests showed that the GAPDH-based indirect ELISA had a sensitivity of 95.83% and specificity of 100%, while the test using Tpx as the antigen had sensitivity of 75% and specificity of 91.7%. Thus, B. schroederi Tpx is unsuitable as a diagnostic antigen for baylisascariasis, but B. schroederi GAPDH is a good candidate diagnostic antigen for B. schroederi in pandas.

  6. Continuous manganese delivery via osmotic pumps for manganese-enhanced mouse MRI does not impair spatial learning but leads to skin ulceration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vousden, Dulcie A; Cox, Elizabeth; Allemang-Grand, Rylan; Laliberté, Christine; Qiu, Lily R; Lindenmaier, Zsuzsa; Nieman, Brian J; Lerch, Jason P

    2018-06-01

    Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI) is a widely used technique in rodent neuroimaging studies. Traditionally, Mn 2+ is delivered to animals via a systemic injection; however, this can lead to toxic effects at high doses. Recent studies have shown that subcutaneously implanted mini-osmotic pumps can be used to continuously deliver manganese chloride (MnCl 2 ), and that they produce satisfactory contrast while circumventing many of the toxic side effects. However, neither the time-course of signal enhancement nor the effect of continuous Mn 2+ delivery on behaviour, particularly learning and memory, have been well-characterized. Here, we investigated the effect of MnCl 2 dose and route of administration on a) spatial learning in the Morris Water Maze and b) tissue signal enhancement in the mouse brain. Even as early as 3 days after pump implantation, infusion of 25-50 mg/kg/day MnCl 2 via osmotic pump produced signal enhancement as good as or better than that achieved 24 h after a single 50 mg/kg intraperitoneal injection. Neither route of delivery nor MnCl 2 dose adversely affected spatial learning and memory on the water maze. However, especially at higher doses, mice receiving MnCl 2 via osmotic pumps developed skin ulceration which limited the imaging window. With these findings, we provide recommendations for route and dose of MnCl 2 to use for different study designs. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A novel membrane-based process to isolate peroxidase from horseradish roots: optimization of operating parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianguo; Yang, Bo; Chen, Changzhen

    2013-02-01

    The optimization of operating parameters for the isolation of peroxidase from horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) roots with ultrafiltration (UF) technology was systemically studied. The effects of UF operating conditions on the transmission of proteins were quantified using the parameter scanning UF. These conditions included solution pH, ionic strength, stirring speed and permeate flux. Under optimized conditions, the purity of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) obtained was greater than 84 % after a two-stage UF process and the recovery of HRP from the feedstock was close to 90 %. The resulting peroxidase product was then analysed by isoelectric focusing, SDS-PAGE and circular dichroism, to confirm its isoelectric point, molecular weight and molecular secondary structure. The effects of calcium ion on HRP specific activities were also experimentally determined.

  8. Musa paradisiaca stem juice as a source of peroxidase and ligninperoxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernwal, S K; Yadav, R S; Yadav, K D

    2000-10-01

    Musa paradisiaca stem juice has been shown to contain peroxidase activity of the order of 0.1 enzyme unit/ml. The Km values of this peroxidase for the substrates guaiacol and hydrogen peroxide are 2.4 and 0.28 mM respectively. The pH and temperature optima are 4.5 and 62.5 degrees C respectively. Like other peroxidases, it follows double displacement type mechanism. At low pH, Musa paradisiaca stem juice exhibits ligninperoxidase type activity. The pH optimum for ligninperoxidase type activity is 2.0 and the temperature optimum is 24 degrees C. The Km values for veratryl alcohol and n-propanol are 66 and 78 microM respectively.

  9. Horseradish peroxidase-nanoclay hybrid particles of high functional and colloidal stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlovic, Marko; Rouster, Paul; Somosi, Zoltan; Szilagyi, Istvan

    2018-08-15

    Highly stable dispersions of enzyme-clay nanohybrids of excellent horseradish peroxidase activity were developed. Layered double hydroxide nanoclay was synthesized and functionalized with heparin polyelectrolyte to immobilize the horseradish peroxidase enzyme. The formation of a saturated heparin layer on the platelets led to charge inversion of the positively charged bare nanoclay and to highly stable aqueous dispersions. Great affinity of the enzyme to the surface modified platelets resulted in strong horseradish peroxidase adsorption through electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions as well as hydrogen bonding network and prevented enzyme leakage from the obtained material. The enzyme kept its functional integrity upon immobilization and showed excellent activity in decomposition of hydrogen peroxide and oxidation of an aromatic compound in the test reactions. In addition, remarkable long term functional stability of the enzyme-nanoclay hybrid was observed making the developed colloidal system a promising antioxidant candidate in biomedical treatments and industrial processes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Pathophysiology of Manganese-Associated Neurotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racette, Brad A.; Aschner, Michael; Guilarte, Tomas R.; Dydak, Ulrike; Criswell, Susan R.; Zheng, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Conference Summary Manganese (Mn) is a well established neurotoxin associated with specific damage to the basal ganglia in humans. The phenotype associated with Mn neurotoxicity was first described in two workers with occupational exposure to Mn oxide.(Couper, 1837) Although the description did not use modern clinical terminology, a parkinsonian illness characterized by slowness of movement (bradykinesia), masked facies, and gait impairment (postural instability) appears to have predominated. Nearly 100 years later an outbreak of an atypical parkinsonian illness in a Chilean Mn mine provided a phenotypic description of a fulminant neurologic disorder with parkinsonism, dystonia, and neuropsychiatric symptoms.(Rodier J, 1955) Exposures associated with this syndrome were massive and an order of magnitude greater than modern exposures.(Rodier J, 1955; Hobson et al., 2011) The clinical syndrome associated with Mn neurotoxicity has been called manganism. Modern exposures to Mn occur primarily through occupations in the steel industry and welding. These exposures are often chronic and varied, occurring over decades in the healthy workforce. Although the severe neurologic disorder described by Rodier and Couper are no longer seen, several reports have suggested a possible increased risk of neurotoxicity in these workers.(Racette et al., 2005b; Bowler et al., 2007; Harris et al., 2011) Based upon limited prior imaging and pathologic investigations into the pathophysiology of neurotoxicity in Mn exposed workers,(Huang et al., 2003) many investigators have concluded that the syndrome spares the dopamine system distinguishing manganism from Parkinson disease (PD), the most common cause of parkinsonism in the general population, and a disease with characteristic degenerative changes in the dopaminergic system.(Jankovic, 2005) The purpose of this symposium was to highlight recent advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of Mn associated neurotoxicity from C. elegans

  11. Screening of postharvest agricultural wastes as alternative sources of peroxidases: characterization and kinetics of a novel peroxidase from lentil ( Lens culinaris L.) stubble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo-Cuadrado, Nazaret; Pérez-Galende, Patricia; Manzano, Teresa; De Maria, Cándido Garcia; Shnyrov, Valery L; Roig, Manuel G

    2012-05-16

    Aqueous crude extracts of a series of plant wastes (agricultural, wild plants, residues from sports activities (grass), ornamental residues (gardens)) from 17 different plant species representative of the typical biodiversity of the Iberian peninsula were investigated as new sources of peroxidases (EC 1.11.1.7). Of these, lentil (Lens culinaris L.) stubble crude extract was seen to provide one of the highest specific peroxidase activities, catalyzing the oxidation of guaiacol in the presence of hydrogen peroxide to tetraguaiacol, and was used for further studies. For the optimum extraction conditions found, the peroxidase activity in this crude extract (110 U mL(-1)) did not vary for at least 15 months when stored at 4 °C (k(inact) = 0.146 year(-1), t(1/2 inact) = 4.75 year), whereas, for comparative purposes, the peroxidase activity (60 U mL(-1)) of horseradish (Armoracia rusticana L.) root crude extract, obtained and stored under the same conditions, showed much faster inactivation kinetics (k(inact) = 2.2 × 10(-3) day(-1), t(1/2 inact) = 315 days). Using guaiacol as an H donor and a universal buffer (see above), all crude extract samples exhibited the highest peroxidase activity in the pH range between 4 and 7. Once semipurified by passing the crude extract through hydrophobic chromatography on phenyl-Sepharose CL-4B, the novel peroxidase (LSP) was characterized as having a purity number (RZ) of 2.5 and three SDS-PAGE electrophoretic bands corresponding to molecular masses of 52, 35, and 18 kDa. The steady-state kinetic study carried out on the H(2)O(2)-mediated oxidation of guaiacol by the catalytic action of this partially purified peroxidase pointed to apparent Michaelian kinetic behavior (K(m)(appH(2)O(2)) = 1.87 mM; V(max)(appH(2)O(2)) = 6.4 mM min(-1); K(m)(app guaicol) = 32 mM; V(max)(app guaicol) = 9.1 mM min(-1)), compatible with the two-substrate ping-pong mechanism generally accepted for peroxidases. Finally, after the effectiveness of the crude

  12. Engineering a horseradish peroxidase C stable to radical attacks by mutating multiple radical coupling sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Su Jin; Joo, Jeong Chan; Song, Bong Keun; Yoo, Young Je; Kim, Yong Hwan

    2015-04-01

    Peroxidases have great potential as industrial biocatalysts. In particular, the oxidative polymerization of phenolic compounds catalyzed by peroxidases has been extensively examined because of the advantage of this method over other conventional chemical methods. However, the industrial application of peroxidases is often limited because of their rapid inactivation by phenoxyl radicals during oxidative polymerization. In this work, we report a novel protein engineering approach to improve the radical stability of horseradish peroxidase isozyme C (HRPC). Phenylalanine residues that are vulnerable to modification by the phenoxyl radicals were identified using mass spectrometry analysis. UV-Vis and CD spectra showed that radical coupling did not change the secondary structure or the active site of HRPC. Four phenylalanine (Phe) residues (F68, F142, F143, and F179) were each mutated to alanine residues to generate single mutants to examine the role of these sites in radical coupling. Despite marginal improvement of radical stability, each single mutant still exhibited rapid radical inactivation. To further reduce inactivation by radical coupling, the four substitution mutations were combined in F68A/F142A/F143A/F179A. This mutant demonstrated dramatic enhancement of radical stability by retaining 41% of its initial activity compared to the wild-type, which was completely inactivated. Structure and sequence alignment revealed that radical-vulnerable Phe residues of HPRC are conserved in homologous peroxidases, which showed the same rapid inactivation tendency as HRPC. Based on our site-directed mutagenesis and biochemical characterization, we have shown that engineering radical-vulnerable residues to eliminate multiple radical coupling can be a good strategy to improve the stability of peroxidases against radical attack. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Pollution characteristics of surface runoff under different restoration types in manganese tailing wasteland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Cheng, Qingyu; Xue, Shengguo; Rajendran, Manikandan; Wu, Chuan; Liao, Jiaxin

    2018-04-01

    A great deal of manganese and associated heavy metals (such as Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb, etc.) was produced in manganese mining, smelting, and other processes and weathering and leaching of waste slag, which entered rainwater runoff by different means under the action of rainfall runoff. It caused heavy metal pollution in water environment to surrounding areas, and then environmental and human health risks were becoming increasingly serious. In the Xiangtan manganese mine, we studied the characteristics of nutritional pollutants and heavy metals by using the method of bounded runoff plots on the manganese tailing wasteland after carrying out some site treatments using three different approaches, such as (1) exposed tailings, the control treatment (ET), (2) external-soil amelioration and colonization of Cynodon dactylon (Linn.) Pers. turf (EC), and (3) external-soil amelioration and seedling seeding propagation of Cynodon dactylon (Linn.) Pers. (ES). The research showed that the maximum runoff occurred in 20,140,712 rainfall events, and the basic law of runoff was EC area > ET area > ES area in the same rainfall event. The concentration of total suspended solids (TSS) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) of three ecological restoration areas adopted the following rule: ET area > EC area > ES area. Nitrogen (N) existed mainly in the form of water soluble while phosphorus (P) was particulate. The highest concentrations of total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) were 11.57 ± 2.99 mg/L in the EC area and 1.42 ± 0.56 mg/L in the ET area, respectively. Cr, Ni, Pb, Zn, Mn, and Cu in surface runoff from three restoration types all exceeded the class V level of the environmental quality standard for surface water except Cu in EC and ES areas. Pollution levels of heavy metals in surface runoff from three restoration areas are shown as follows: ET area > EC area > ES area. There was a significant positive correlation between TSS and runoff, COD, and TP. And this

  14. A polymeric liquid membrane electrode responsive to 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine oxidation for sensitive peroxidase/peroxidase mimetic-based potentiometric biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuewei; Yang, Yangang; Li, Long; Sun, Mingshuang; Yin, Haogen; Qin, Wei

    2014-05-06

    The oxidation of 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) has great utility in bioanalysis such as peroxidase/peroxidase mimetic-based biosensing. In this paper, the behaviors of TMB oxidation intermediates/products in liquid/liquid biphasic systems have been investigated for the first time. The free radical, charge transfer complex, and diimine species generated by TMB oxidation are all positively charged under acidic and near-neutral conditions. Electron paramagnetic resonance and visible absorbance spectroscopy data demonstrate that these cationic species can be effectively transferred from an aqueous phase into a water-immiscible liquid phase functionalized by an appropriate cation exchanger. Accordingly, sensitive potential responses of TMB oxidation have been obtained on a cation exchanger-doped polymeric liquid membrane electrode under mildly acidic and near-neutral conditions. By using the membrane electrode responsive to TMB oxidations, two sensitive potentiometric biosensing schemes including the peroxidase-labeled sandwich immunoassay and G-quadruplex DNAzyme-based DNA hybridization assay have been developed. The obtained detection limits for the target antigen and DNA are 0.02 ng/mL and 0.1 nM, respectively. Coupled with other advantages such as low cost, high reliability, and ease of miniaturization and integration, the proposed polymeric liquid membrane electrode holds great promise as a facile and efficient transducer for TMB oxidation and related biosensing applications.

  15. Peroxidase activity of the rat blood at prolonged intake of 137Cs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. P. Grynevych

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Investigated peroxidase activity of blood white nonlinear rats-males by daily oral administration of 15 kBq 137Cs by chemiluminescence. Discovered oscillatory nature of the changes chemiluminescent indicators peroxi-dase oxidation of blood, the maximum deviation of the control are registered during the 4th and 60th days, and the minimum at the 1st, 7th and 135th days. Recovering kinetic parameters CL does not occur within 135 days of ob-servation (the 90th day of the completion of the introduction of radioactive cesium.

  16. [Isolation and purification of Mn-peroxidase from Azospirillum brasilense Sp245].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupriashina, M A; Selivanov, N Iu; Nikitina, V E

    2012-01-01

    Homogenous Mn-peroxidase of a 26-fold purity grade was isolated from a culture of Azospirillum brasilense Sp245 cultivated on a medium containing 0.1 mM pyrocatechol. The molecular weight of the enzyme is 43 kD as revealed by electrophoresis in SDS-PAAG. It was shown that the use of pyrocatechol and 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzotiazoline-6-sulfonate) at concentrations of 0.1 and I mM as inductors increased the Mn-peroxidase activity by a factor of 3.

  17. The peroxidase and oxidase-like activity of NiCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} mesoporous spheres: Mechanistic understanding and colorimetric biosensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Li, E-mail: suli@htu.edu.cn [Collaborative Innovation Center of Henan Province for Green Manufacturing of Fine Chemicals, Key Laboratory of Green Chemical Media and Reactions, Ministry of Education, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang, Henan 453007 (China); Henan Key Laboratory of Green Chemical Media and Reactions, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang, Henan 453007 (China); Dong, Wenpei; Wu, Chengke; Gong, Yijun; Zhang, Yan; Li, Ling; Mao, Guojiang; Feng, Suling [Collaborative Innovation Center of Henan Province for Green Manufacturing of Fine Chemicals, Key Laboratory of Green Chemical Media and Reactions, Ministry of Education, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang, Henan 453007 (China); Henan Key Laboratory of Green Chemical Media and Reactions, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang, Henan 453007 (China)

    2017-01-25

    The synthesized NiCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} mesoporous spheres (MS) displayed intrinsic peroxidase and oxidase-like activity were firstly reported. The catalytic mechanism of the oxidase-like activity of NiCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} MS was analyzed in detail using the electron spin resonance (ESR) method. It is found that NiCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} MS could directly oxidize 3,3′,5,5′-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) but did not produce {sup 1}O{sub 2} and ·OH. And the mechanism of the peroxidase-like activity of NiCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} MS was also verified that the oxidation of TMB stemmed from not only ·OH but also {sup 1}O{sub 2}. Based on the NiCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} MS showed excellent peroxidase-like activity over a broad temperature range, especially at normal body temperature, a detection tool was designed for glucose determination in diabetics' serum samples. And this detection method based on NiCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} MS gave a lower limit of detection than the method using Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs and NiO NPs, as the single-component oxides of NiCo{sub 2}O{sub 4}. Our study may open up the possibility to make a great influence on the next generation of enzyme mimetics system. - Highlights: • NiCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} MS were found to possess the peroxidase and oxidase-like activity. • The peroxidase-like activity of NiCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} MS was stemmed from not only ·OH but also {sup 1}O{sub 2}. • The oxidase-like activity may stem from NiCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} MS′ oxidation rather than ·OH and {sup 1}O{sub 2}. • A colorimetric detection tool is designed for glucose determination in serum samples.

  18. A novel colorimetric method based on copper nanoclusters with intrinsic peroxidase-like for detecting xanthine in serum samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhengyu; Niu, Qianqian; Mou, Mingyao; Wu, Yi; Liu, Xiaoxuan; Liao, Shenghua

    2017-07-01

    A facile strategy for detecting xanthine in serum samples by copper nanocluster (CuNCs) with high intrinsic peroxidase-like activity was reported. Firstly, a simple, mild and time-saving method for preparing CuNCs was developed, in which dithiothreitol (DTT) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were used as reductant and stabilizer, respectively. The as-prepared CuNCs exhibited a fluorescence emission at 590 nm with a quantum yield (QY) of approximately 5.29%, the fluorescence intensity of the as-prepared CuNCs exhibited no considerable change when stored under ambient condition with the lifetime is 1.75 μs. Moreover, the as-prepared CuNCs exhibited high intrinsic peroxidase-like activity with lower K m ( K m = 8.90 × 10-6 mol L-1) for H2O2, which indicated that CuNCs have a higher affinity for H2O2. Compared with natural enzyme, the as-synthesized CuNCs are more catalytic stable over a wide range of pH (4.0 13.0) and temperature (4 80 °C). Finally, an indirect method for sensing xanthine was established because xanthine oxidase can catalyse the oxidation of xanthine to produce H2O2. Xanthine could be detected as low as 3.8 × 10-7 mol L-1 with a linear range from 5.0 × 10-7 to 1.0 × 10-4 mol L-1. These results proved that the proposed method is sensitive and accurate and could be successfully applied to the determination of xanthine in the serum sample with satisfaction.

  19. Ultra-high-throughput screening of an in vitro-synthesized horseradish peroxidase displayed on microbeads using cell sorter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhu

    Full Text Available The C1a isoenzyme of horseradish peroxidase (HRP is an industrially important heme-containing enzyme that utilizes hydrogen peroxide to oxidize a wide variety of inorganic and organic compounds for practical applications, including synthesis of fine chemicals, medical diagnostics, and bioremediation. To develop a ultra-high-throughput screening system for HRP, we successfully produced active HRP in an Escherichia coli cell-free protein synthesis system, by adding disulfide bond isomerase DsbC and optimizing the concentrations of hemin and calcium ions and the temperature. The biosynthesized HRP was fused with a single-chain Cro (scCro DNA-binding tag at its N-terminal and C-terminal sites. The addition of the scCro-tag at both ends increased the solubility of the protein. Next, HRP and its fusion proteins were successfully synthesized in a water droplet emulsion by using hexadecane as the oil phase and SunSoft No. 818SK as the surfactant. HRP fusion proteins were displayed on microbeads attached with double-stranded DNA (containing the scCro binding sequence via scCro-DNA interactions. The activities of the immobilized HRP fusion proteins were detected with a tyramide-based fluorogenic assay using flow cytometry. Moreover, a model microbead library containing wild type hrp (WT and inactive mutant (MUT genes was screened using fluorescence-activated cell-sorting, thus efficiently enriching the WT gene from the 1:100 (WT:MUT library. The technique described here could serve as a novel platform for the ultra-high-throughput discovery of more useful HRP mutants and other heme-containing peroxidases.

  20. Methods for the shipboard determination of dissolved iron and manganese in samples of sediment interstitial water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydes, D.J.; Chapman, E.

    1986-01-01

    Iron is extremely unstable in the presence of oxygen. A working atmosphere containing less than 0.2% oxygen is required if iron losses are not to be significant. Iron can be determined with a single addition of reagent, either manually or by a continuous flow procedure using ferrozine. Using a continuous flow procedure with a 5 cm colorimeter cell the method is linear up to 40 μM Fe and the precision is 2%. Manganese can similarly be determined with a single reagent addition using formaldoxime. For the continuous flow procedure with a 5 cm colorimeter cell the method is linear up to 60 μM Mn and the precision is 1%; however, under these conditions a solution containing 100 μm of iron produces an interference equivalent to 4.7 μM of manganese. A two-reagent procedure was developed using EDTA to suppress the iron interference. Using a 5% EDTA solution interference from a solution containing 100 μM of iron was undetectable. (author)

  1. Electrochemically-induced reversible transition from the tunneled to layered polymorphs of manganese dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Boeun; Yoon, Chong Seung; Lee, Hae Ri; Chung, Kyung Yoon; Cho, Byung Won; Oh, Si Hyoung

    2014-08-01

    Zn-ion batteries are emerging energy storage systems eligible for large-scale applications, such as electric vehicles. These batteries consist of totally environmentally-benign electrode materials and potentially manufactured very economically. Although Zn/α-MnO2 systems produce high energy densities of 225 Wh kg-1, larger than those of conventional Mg-ion batteries, they show significant capacity fading during long-term cycling and suffer from poor performance at high current rates. To solve these problems, the concrete reaction mechanism between α-MnO2 and zinc ions that occur on the cathode must be elucidated. Here, we report the intercalation mechanism of zinc ions into α-MnO2 during discharge, which involves a reversible phase transition of MnO2 from tunneled to layered polymorphs by electrochemical reactions. This transition is initiated by the dissolution of manganese from α-MnO2 during discharge process to form layered Zn-birnessite. The original tunneled structure is recovered by the incorporation of manganese ions back into the layers of Zn-birnessite during charge process.

  2. An evaluation of a manganese bath system having a new geometry through MCNP modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khabaz, Rahim

    2012-12-01

    In this study, an approximate symmetric cylindrical manganese bath system with equal diameter and height was appraised using a Monte Carlo simulation. For nine sizes of the tank filled with MnSO(4).H(2)O solution of three different concentrations, the necessary correction factors involved in the absolute measurement of neutron emission rate were determined by a detailed modelling of the MCNP4C code with the ENDF/B-VII.0 neutron cross section data library. The results obtained were also used to determine the optimum dimensions of the bath for each concentration of solution in the calibration of (241)Am-Be and (252)Cf sources. Also, the amount of gamma radiation produced as a result of (n,γ) the reaction with the nuclei of the manganese sulphate solution that escaped from the boundary of each tank was evaluated. This gamma can be important for the background in NaI(Tl) detectors and issues concerned with radiation protection.

  3. Investigation of physicochemical and pigment properties of solid solutions of cadmium, manganese, zinc sulfides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigor'eva, L.I.; Ignat'eva, I.V.; Kalinskaya, T.V.

    1985-01-01

    Mixed sulfides (Cd, Mn)S and (Cd, Mn, Zn)S with manganese sulfide content upto 50 mol% are synthesized. The possibility of preparing solid solutions both on the basis of silfides (Cd, Mn)S and in the ternary system (Cd, Mn, Zn)S with the temperature of polymorphic transformation of a cubic structure into a hexagonal one, being lower (500 deg C) than in the absence of MnS, is shown by the X-ray diffraction method. The colour analysis of the pigment specimens obtained has shown that the quantity of oxidized manganese compounds, producing no effect of the system colour, should not exceed 0.05 mol% on conversion to MnS. Among the mixed specimens (Cd, Mn)S the brightest colour background is obtained for specimens calcinated at 500-550 deg C. The mixed sulfide of the composition 0.77CdSx0.15MnSx0.08ZnS, calcinated at 500 deg C, gives a pigment corresponding to a commercial one by colour

  4. Environmental Exposure to Manganese in Air: Associations with Cognitive Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manganese (Mn), an essential element, can be neurotoxic in high doses. This cross-sectional study explored the oognitive function of adults residing in two towns (Marietta and East Liverpool, Ohio, USA) identified as having high levels of environmental airborne Mn from indu...

  5. Effect of increased manganese addition and mould type on the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Effect of increased manganese addition and mould type on the slurry erosion characteristics of .... slurry erosion data in the form of bar diagrams for 5M24 and 10M24 ... being bigger in size with higher austenite retention and the attendant ...

  6. Adsorptive removal of manganese, arsenic and iron from groundwater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buamah, R.

    2009-01-01

    To determine the scale of the problem of arsenic, iron and manganese contamination of groundwater in Ghana a survey was performed in the first phase of the research to provide in depth information with respect to these contaminants. Presence of these mentioned contaminants in groundwater is not

  7. Effect of increased manganese addition and mould type on the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The wear resistance of high chromium iron is well recorded. However, the same is not the case as regards the use of manganese at higher percentages in high chromium irons and its influence on wear behaviour. Hence, this work highlights the slurry wear characteristics of chromium (□ ◻ 16–19%) iron following the ...

  8. Arsenic, chromium, copper, iron, manganese, lead, selenium and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-05-20

    May 20, 2014 ... Arsenic, chromium, copper, iron, manganese, lead, selenium and zinc in the ... and sediment were collected and trace element concentrations were measured with an ICP-MS. ..... Clay minerals are known to have high sorption affinities ..... sediment/water quality interaction with particular reference to the.

  9. Manganese, iron and copper contents in leaves of maize plants ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Micronutrients such as boron (B), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn) and zinc (Zn) play important physiological roles in humans and animals. Zn and B are the micronutrients most often deficient in maize, in Iran. A completely randomized factorial block design experiment was carried out at Fars province of Iran during ...

  10. Assessment of Serum Levels of Magnesium and Manganese among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pregnant women in developing countries have been reported to consume diets with low density of minerals and essential trace elements. Therefore, this study aims to assess the serum levels of magnesium and manganese and its trimester correlates among pregnant women in Ika community of Delta state, Nigeria.

  11. Bioleaching of copper, aluminum, magnesium and manganese from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study was done to check the bioleaching feasibility of brown shale for the recovery of copper (Cu), aluminum (Al), magnesium (Mg) and manganese (Mn) ions using Ganoderma lucidum. Different experimental parameters were optimized for the enhanced recovery of metals ions. Effect of different substrates like ...

  12. Bentonite Modification with Manganese Oxides and Its Characterization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dolinská, S.; Schütz, T.; Znamenáčková, I.; Lovás, M.; Vaculíková, Lenka

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 1 (2015), s. 213-218 ISSN 1640-4920 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : bentonite * natrification * manganese oxide Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation http://www.potopk.com.pl/ Full _text/2015_full/IM%202-2015-a35.pdf

  13. Uranium in Pacific Deep-Sea Sediments and Manganese Nodules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kunzendorf, Helmar; Pluger, W. L.; Friedrich, G. H.

    1983-01-01

    A total of 1344 manganese nodules and 187 pelagic sediments from 9 areas in the North and the South Pacific were analyzed for U by the delayed-neutron counting technique. A strong positive correlation between U and Fe in nodules and sediments suggests a co-precipitative removal from sea water int...

  14. Covalent Functionalization of Carbon Nanotube by Tetrasubtituted Amino Manganese Phthalocyanine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Long YANG; Hong Zheng CHEN; Lei CAO; Han Yin LI; Mang WANG

    2004-01-01

    The multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) bonded to 2, 9, 16, 23-tetraamino manganese phthalocyanine (TAMnPc) was obtained by covalent functionalization, and its chemical structure was characterized by TEM. The photoconductivity of single-layered photoreceptors, where MWCNT bonded by TAMnPc (MWCNT-b-TAMnPc) served as the charge generation material (CGM), was also studied.

  15. Cognitive Function Related to Environmental Exposure to Manganese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: The towns of Marietta and East Liverpool (EL), Ohio, have been identified as having elevated manganese (Mn) in air due to industrial pollution. Objectives: To evaluate relationships between environmental Mn (Mn-air) exposure and distance from the source and cognitive...

  16. Experimental and numerical simulation of carbon manganese steel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Experimental and numerical simulation of carbon manganese steel for cyclic plastic behaviour. J Shit, S Dhar, S Acharyya. Abstract. The paper deals with finite element modeling of saturated low cycle fatigue and the cyclic hardening phenomena of the materials Sa333 grade 6 carbon steel and SS316 stainless steel.

  17. Pilot study points way to iron/manganese removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qureshi, N.; Barnes, A. [Progressive Consulting Engineers Inc., Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The use of coal, greensand and sand in filters for removing iron and manganese from the Brooklyn Park, Minnesota, water supply was investigated. The most effective and economic treatment involved using a dual media filtration and potassium permanganate as the oxidant.

  18. 40 CFR 721.10003 - Manganese heterocyclic tetraamine complex (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Manganese heterocyclic tetraamine complex (generic). 721.10003 Section 721.10003 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... section. (2) The significant new uses are: (i) Industrial, commercial, and consumer activities...

  19. Manganese Catalyzed Regioselective C–H Alkylation: Experiment and Computation

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Chengming

    2018-05-08

    A new efficient manganese-catalyzed selective C2-alkylation of indoles via carbenoid insertion has been achieved. The newly developed C-H functionalization protocol provides access to diverse products and shows good functional group tolerance. Mechanistic and computational studies support the formation of a Mn(CO)3 acetate complex as the catalytically active species.

  20. Manganese Catalyzed α-Olefination of Nitriles by Primary Alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Subrata; Das, Uttam Kumar; Ben-David, Yehoshoa; Milstein, David

    2017-08-30

    Catalytic α-olefination of nitriles using primary alcohols, via dehydrogenative coupling of alcohols with nitriles, is presented. The reaction is catalyzed by a pincer complex of an earth-abundant metal (manganese), in the absence of any additives, base, or hydrogen acceptor, liberating dihydrogen and water as the only byproducts.

  1. Cognitive dysfunction, MRI findings and manganese levels in alcoholics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Tsutomu; Nakane, Yoshibumi [Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Takahashi, Katsurou; Shimanaga, Masaki [National Nagasaki Medical Center, Omura (Japan)

    2002-12-01

    Alcoholic patients have been known to have brain atrophy and cognitive dysfunction. However, recent studies have reported bilateral signal hyperintensities of the globus pallidus on T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in liver failure, findings that are typically associated with manganese intoxication. The present study compared brain atrophy on T1-weighted MRI, signal intensity ratios of the globus pallidus on T1-weighted MRI, whole blood manganese levels, and Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R) IQ parameters between alcoholics with and without liver cirrhosis, to investigate cognitive dysfunction, MRI findings and manganese levels in alcoholics. Pallidal hyperintensity was visually identified in 80% of alcoholic patients with liver cirrhosis. In addition, a significant correlation was seen between pallidal signal intensity (P.S.I.) ratio and blood manganese level. However, no significant correlations were found between pallidal signal intensity ratio and any of the WAIS-R parameters. These findings suggest that no direct connection exists between cognitive dysfunction and pallidal hyperintensity in alcoholic patients with liver cirrhosis. We confirmed that brain MRI in alcoholics could detect pallidal signal hyperintensity, suggesting severe liver dysfunction. In addition to diagnosis, brain MRI is useful for therapeutic psychoeducation to alcoholic patients with liver cirrhosis, visualizing the severe liver dysfunction. (author)

  2. Manganese Biogeochemistry in a Central Czech Republic Catchment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Navrátil, Tomáš; Shanley, J. B.; Krám, P.; Mihaljevič, M.; Drahota, Petr

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 186, 1-4 (2007), s. 149-165 ISSN 0049-6979 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/04/0060 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : manganese * catchment * weathering * biogeochemistry * biotite weathering * forest ecosystem * mass balance Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry Impact factor: 1.224, year: 2007

  3. Cognitive dysfunction, MRI findings and manganese levels in alcoholics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Tsutomu; Nakane, Yoshibumi

    2002-01-01

    Alcoholic patients have been known to have brain atrophy and cognitive dysfunction. However, recent studies have reported bilateral signal hyperintensities of the globus pallidus on T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in liver failure, findings that are typically associated with manganese intoxication. The present study compared brain atrophy on T1-weighted MRI, signal intensity ratios of the globus pallidus on T1-weighted MRI, whole blood manganese levels, and Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R) IQ parameters between alcoholics with and without liver cirrhosis, to investigate cognitive dysfunction, MRI findings and manganese levels in alcoholics. Pallidal hyperintensity was visually identified in 80% of alcoholic patients with liver cirrhosis. In addition, a significant correlation was seen between pallidal signal intensity (P.S.I.) ratio and blood manganese level. However, no significant correlations were found between pallidal signal intensity ratio and any of the WAIS-R parameters. These findings suggest that no direct connection exists between cognitive dysfunction and pallidal hyperintensity in alcoholic patients with liver cirrhosis. We confirmed that brain MRI in alcoholics could detect pallidal signal hyperintensity, suggesting severe liver dysfunction. In addition to diagnosis, brain MRI is useful for therapeutic psychoeducation to alcoholic patients with liver cirrhosis, visualizing the severe liver dysfunction. (author)

  4. Investigation of paramagnetic saturation in lanthanum manganese nitrate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flokstra, Jakob; Meijer, H.C.; Bots, G.J.C.; Verheij, W.A.; van der Marel, L.C.

    1973-01-01

    Paramagnetic saturation of lanthanum manganese nitrate, La2Mn3(NO3)12·24H2O, has been investigated at liquid He temperatures in a static as well as a dynamical way. With the aid of the molecular-field theory the Casimir and Du Pré dispersion and absorption curves are adapted explicitly to the

  5. Manganese Catalyzed Regioselective C–H Alkylation: Experiment and Computation

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Chengming; Maity, Bholanath; Cavallo, Luigi; Rueping, Magnus

    2018-01-01

    A new efficient manganese-catalyzed selective C2-alkylation of indoles via carbenoid insertion has been achieved. The newly developed C-H functionalization protocol provides access to diverse products and shows good functional group tolerance. Mechanistic and computational studies support the formation of a Mn(CO)3 acetate complex as the catalytically active species.

  6. from Tailings Material of Ghana Manganese Company (GMC)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    arrive at large scale secondary manganese sourcing by recycling from steel, beverage ... rpm, and the tangential flow of water through jets was at the rate of 210.10 ... the limitation of the machine‟s discharge pipes, frac- tions coarser than 20 ...

  7. THE STATE OF MANGANESE IN THE PHOTOSYNTHETIC APPARATUS. I. EXAFS STUDIES ON CHLOROPLASTS AND di-u-oxo BRIDGED di-MANGANESE MODEL COMPOUNDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirby, J. A.; Robertson, A. S.; Smith, J. P.; Thompson, A. C.; Thompson, A. C.; Klein, M. P.

    1980-11-01

    Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) studies on the manganese contained in spinach chloroplasts and on certain di-u-oxo bridged manganese dimers of the form (X{sub 2}Mn)O{sub 2}(MnX{sub 2} (X=2,2'-bypyridine and 1,10-phenanthroline) are reported. From these studies, the manganese associated with photosynthetic oxygen evolution is suggested to occur as a bridged transition metal dimer with most likely another manganese. Extensive details on the analysis are included.

  8. Sorbents based on xerogels of zirconium, aluminum and manganese oxyhydroxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.V. Smotraiev

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The actual problem of water supply in the world and in Ukraine, in particular, is a high level of pollution in water resources and an insufficient level of drinking water purification. With industrial wastewater, a significant amount of pollutants falls into water bodies, including suspended particles, sulfates, iron compounds, heavy metals, etc. Aim: The aim of this work is to determine the impact of aluminum and manganese ions additives on surface and sorption properties of zirconium oxyhydroxide based sorbents during their production process. Materials and Methods: The sorbents based on xerogels of zirconium, aluminum and manganese oxyhydroxides were prepared by sol-gel method during the hydrolysis of metal chlorides (zirconium oxychloride ZrOCl2, aluminum chloride AlCl3 and manganese chloride MnCl2 with carbamide. Results: The surface and sorption properties of sorbents based on xerogels of zirconium, aluminum and manganese oxyhydroxides were investigated. X-ray amorphous structure and evolved hydroxyl-hydrate cover mainly characterize the obtained xerogels. The composite sorbents based on xerogels of zirconium oxyhydroxide doped with aluminum oxyhydroxide (aS = 537 m2/g and manganese oxyhydroxide (aS = 356 m2/g have more developed specific surface area than single-component xerogels of zirconium oxyhydroxide (aS = 236 m2/g and aluminum oxyhydroxide (aS = 327 m2/g. The sorbent based on the xerogel of zirconium and manganese oxyhydroxides have the maximum SO42--ions sorption capacity. It absorbs 1.5 times more SO42–-ions than the industrial anion exchanger AN-221. The sorbents based on xerogels of zirconium oxyhydroxide has the sorption capacity of Fe3+-ions that is 1.5…2 times greater than the capacity of the industrial cation exchanger KU-2-8. The Na+-ions absorption capacity is 1.47…1.56 mmol/g for each sorbent. Conclusions: Based on these data it can be concluded that the proposed method is effective for sorbents production based on

  9. Fluxes of dissolved aluminum and manganese to the Weddell Sea and indications for manganese co-limitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middag, R.; de Baar, H.J.W.; Klunder, M.B.; Laan, P.

    2013-01-01

    The trace metals aluminum (Al) and manganese (Mn) were studied in the Weddell Sea in March 2008. Concentrations of dissolved Al ([Al]) were slightly elevated (0.23-0.35 nmol L-1) in the surface layer compared to the subsurface minimum (0.07-0.21 nmol L-1) observed in the winter water. Atmospheric

  10. Thyroid peroxidase antibodies in pregnant women with type 1 diabetes: impact on thyroid function, metabolic control and pregnancy outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestgaard, Marianne; Nielsen, Lene Ringholm; Rasmussen, Åse Krogh

    2008-01-01

    In pregnant women with type 1 diabetes, we evaluated whether the presence of thyroid peroxidase autoantibodies (anti-TPO) was associated with changes in thyroid function, metabolic control and pregnancy outcome.......In pregnant women with type 1 diabetes, we evaluated whether the presence of thyroid peroxidase autoantibodies (anti-TPO) was associated with changes in thyroid function, metabolic control and pregnancy outcome....

  11. Peroxidase catalyzed conjugation of peptides, proteins and polysaccharides via endogenous and exogenous phenols.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudgenoeg, G.

    2004-01-01

    The research was directed towards peroxidase mediated cross-linking of proteins and polysaccharides. Two approaches were explored, cross-linking by use of ferulic acid (FA)oand cross-linking by use

  12. Activity of Mn-Oxidizing Peroxidases of Ganoderma lucidum Depending on Cultivation Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmina Ćilerdžić

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Trunks and stumps of various deciduous species act as natural habitats for Ganoderma lucidum. The chemical composition of their cell wall affects the development of fungal ligninolytic enzyme system as well as its ability to degrade lignin from the plant cell wall. Additionally, numerous compounds structurally similar to lignin can be degraded by the G. lucidum enzyme system which could take important roles in various biotechnological processes. The laccases, which are the dominant enzymes synthesized by G. lucidum, have been studied more extensively than the Mn-oxidizing peroxidases. Therefore, this study aimed to create the dynamics profile of Mn-oxidizing peroxidases activities in four G. lucidum strains, classifying and determining their properties depending on the cultivation type and plant residue as a carbon source in the medium, as well as to establish whether intraspecific variety exists. The findings suggest that submerged cultivation appeared to be a more appropriate cultivation type for enzyme activities compared with solid-state cultivation, and oak sawdust was a better carbon source than wheat straw. Under the optimum conditions, on day 14, G. lucidum BEOFB 431 was characterized by the highest levels of both Mn-dependent and Mn-independent peroxidase activities (4795.5 and 5170.5 U/L, respectively. Strain, cultivation type, and carbon source were factors that affected the profiles of Mn-oxidizing peroxidases isoenzymes.

  13. Effects of commercial selenium products on glutathione peroxidase activity and semen quality in stud boars

    Science.gov (United States)

    The aim of this study was to determine how dietary supplementation of inorganic and organic selenium affects selenium concentration and glutathione peroxidase activity in blood and sperm of sexually mature stud boars. Twenty-four boars of the Large White, Landrace, Pietrain, and Duroc breeds of opt...

  14. Calculated ionisation potentials to determine the oxidation of vanillin precursors by lignin peroxidase.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Have, ten R.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Hartmans, S.; Swarts, H.J.; Field, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    In view of the biocatalytic production of vanillin, this research focused on the lignin peroxidase (LiP) catalysed oxidation of naturally occurring phenolic derivatives: O-methyl ethers, O-acetyl esters, and O-glucosyl ethers. The ionisation potential (IP) of a series of model compounds was

  15. Molecular Modeling of Peroxidase and Polyphenol Oxidase: Substrate Specificity and Active Site Comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalida Shank

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Peroxidases (POD and polyphenol oxidase (PPO are enzymes that are well known to be involved in the enzymatic browning reaction of fruits and vegetables with different catalytic mechanisms. Both enzymes have some common substrates, but each also has its specific substrates. In our computational study, the amino acid sequence of grape peroxidase (ABX was used for the construction of models employing homology modeling method based on the X-ray structure of cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase from pea (PDB ID:1APX, whereas the model of grape polyphenol oxidase was obtained directly from the available X-ray structure (PDB ID:2P3X. Molecular docking of common substrates of these two enzymes was subsequently studied. It was found that epicatechin and catechin exhibited high affinity with both enzymes, even though POD and PPO have different binding pockets regarding the size and the key amino acids involved in binding. Predicted binding modes of substrates with both enzymes were also compared. The calculated docking interaction energy of trihydroxybenzoic acid related compounds shows high affinity, suggesting specificity and potential use as common inhibitor to grape ascorbate peroxidase and polyphenol oxidase.

  16. Xylem occlusion in Bouvardia flowers : evidence for a role of peroxidase and catechol oxidase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaslier, N.; Doorn, van W.G.

    2003-01-01

    During vase life, Bouvardia flowers show rapid leaf wilting, especially if they are stored dry prior to placement in water. Wilting is due to a blockage in the basal stem end. We investigated the possible role of peroxidase and catechol oxidase in the blockage in cv. van Zijverden flowers, which

  17. Lignin peroxidase isoenzyme: a novel approach to biodegrade the toxic synthetic polymer waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatoon, Nazia; Jamal, Asif; Ali, Muhammad Ishtiaq

    2018-01-05

    Fungal metabolites are playing an immense role in developing various sustainable waste treatment processes. The present study aimed at production and characterization of fungal lignin peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.14) with a potential to degrade Polyvinyl Chloride. Optimization studies revealed that the maximum enzyme production occurred at a temperature 25°C, pH 5 in the 4th week of the incubation period with fungal strain. Enzyme assay was performed to find out the dominating enzyme in the culture broth. The molecular weight of the enzyme was found to be 46 kDa. Partially purified lignin peroxidase from Phanerocheate chrysosporium was used for the degradation of PVC films. A significant reduction in the weight of PVC film was observed (31%) in shake flask experiment. FTIR spectra of the enzyme-treated plastic film revealed structural changes in the chemical composition, indicating a specific peak at 2943 cm -1 that corresponded to alkenyl C-H stretch. Moreover, deterioration on the surface of PVC films was confirmed by Scanning Electron Microscopy tracked through activity assay for the lignin peroxidase. Extracellular lignin peroxidases from P. chrysosporium play a significant role in the degradation of complex polymeric compounds like PVC.

  18. Glutathione peroxidase activity in the selenium-treated alga Scenedesmus quadricauda

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vítová, Milada; Bišová, Kateřina; Hlavová, Monika; Zachleder, Vilém; Rucki, M.; Čížková, Mária

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 102, 1-2 (2011), s. 87-94 ISSN 0166-445X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA525/09/0102 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : Cell cycle * Enzyme activity * Glutathione peroxidase Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.761, year: 2011

  19. Horseradish peroxidase-catalyzed cross-linking of feruloylated arabinoxylans with β-casein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeriu, C.G.; Oudgenoeg, G.; Spekking, W.T.J.; Berendsen, L.B.J.M.; Vancon, L.; Boumans, H.; Gruppen, H.; Berkel, W.J.H. van; Laane, C.; Voragen, A.G.J.

    2004-01-01

    Heterologous conjugates of wheat arabinoxylan and β-casein were prepared via enzymatic cross-linking, using sequential addition of the arabinoxylan to a mixture of β-casein, peroxidase, and hydrogen peroxide. The maximal formation of adducts between the β-casein and the feruloylated arabinoxylan was

  20. Nucleotide sequences of two genomic DNAs encoding peroxidase of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intapruk, C; Higashimura, N; Yamamoto, K; Okada, N; Shinmyo, A; Takano, M

    1991-02-15

    The peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7)-encoding gene of Arabidopsis thaliana was screened from a genomic library using a cDNA encoding a neutral isozyme of horseradish, Armoracia rusticana, peroxidase (HRP) as a probe, and two positive clones were isolated. From the comparison with the sequences of the HRP-encoding genes, we concluded that two clones contained peroxidase-encoding genes, and they were named prxCa and prxEa. Both genes consisted of four exons and three introns; the introns had consensus nucleotides, GT and AG, at the 5' and 3' ends, respectively. The lengths of each putative exon of the prxEa gene were the same as those of the HRP-basic-isozyme-encoding gene, prxC3, and coded for 349 amino acids (aa) with a sequence homology of 89% to that encoded by prxC3. The prxCa gene was very close to the HRP-neutral-isozyme-encoding gene, prxC1b, and coded for 354 aa with 91% homology to that encoded by prxC1b. The aa sequence homology was 64% between the two peroxidases encoded by prxCa and prxEa.

  1. Preferential hydroxylation over epoxidation catalysis by a horseradish peroxidase mutant: a cytochrome P450 mimic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Visser, Sam P

    2007-10-25

    Density functional theory calculations are presented on the catalytic properties of a horseradish peroxidase mutant whereby the axial nitrogen atom is replaced by phosphorus. This mutant has never been studied experimentally and only one theoretical report on this system is known (de Visser, S. P. J. Phys. Chem. B 2006, 110, 20759-20761). Thus, a one-atom substitution in horseradish peroxidase changes the properties of the catalytic center of the enzyme to more cytochrome P450-type qualities. In particular, the phosphorus-substituted horseradish peroxidase mutant reacts with substrates via a unique reactivity pattern, whereby alkanes are regioselectively hydroxylated even in the presence of a double bond. Reaction barriers of propene epoxidation and hydroxylation are almost identical to ones observed for a cytochrome P450 catalyst and significantly higher than those obtained for a horseradish peroxidase catalyst. It is shown that the regioselectivity difference is entropy and thermally driven and that the electron-transfer processes that occur during the reaction mechanism follow cytochrome P450-type patterns in the hydroxylation reaction.

  2. Electrochemical determination of hydrogen peroxide using Rhodobacter capsulatus cytochrome c peroxidase at a gold electrode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Wael, K.; Buschop, H.; Heering, H.A.; De Smet, L.; Van Beeumen, J.; Devreese, B.; Adriaens, A.

    2007-01-01

    We describe the redox behaviour of horse heart cytochrome c (HHC) and Rhodobacter capsulatus cytochrome c peroxidase (RcCCP) at a gold electrode modified with 4,4?-bipyridyl. RcCCP shows no additional oxidation or reduction peaks compared to the electrochemistry of only HHC, which indicates that it

  3. Tissue Printing to Visualize Polyphenol Oxidase and Peroxidase in Vegetables, Fruits, and Mushrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melberg, Amanda R.; Flurkey, William H.; Inlow, Jennifer K.

    2009-01-01

    A simple tissue-printing procedure to determine the tissue location of the endogenous enzymes polyphenol oxidase and peroxidase in a variety of vegetables, fruits, and mushrooms is described. In tissue printing, cell contents from the surface of a cut section of the tissue are transferred to an adsorptive surface, commonly a nitrocellulose…

  4. In silico molecular modeling and docking studies on the leishmanial tryparedoxin peroxidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozal Mutlu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis is one of the most common form of neglected parasitic disease that affects about 350 million people worldwide. Leishmanias have a trypanothione mediated hydroperoxide metabolism to eliminate endogenous or exogenous oxidative agents. Both of 2-Cys peroxiredoxin (Prx and glutathione peroxidase type tryparedoxin peroxidase (Px are the terminal enzymes in the trypanothione dependent detoxification system. Therefore absence of trypanothione redox system in mammals and the sensitivity of trypanosomatids against oxidative stress, enzymes of this pathway are drug targets candidates. In this study, 3D structure of tryparedoxin peroxidase (2-Cys peroxiredoxin type from Leishmania donovani (LdTXNPx was described by homology modeling method based on the template of tryparedoxin peroxidase from Crithidia fasciculata and selected compounds were docked to the active site pocket. The quality of the 3D structure of the model was confirmed by various web based validation programs. When compared secondary and tertiary structure of the model, it showed a typical thioredoxin fold containing a central beta-sheet and three alpha-helices. Docking study showed that the selected compound 2 (CID 16073813 interacted with the active site amino acids and binding energy was -118.675 kcal/mol.

  5. Peroxidase-mediated polymerization of 1-naphthol: impact of solution pH and ionic strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Alok; Xu, Fangxiang; Koch, David E; Hunter, Robert P

    2009-01-01

    Peroxidase-mediated oxidation has been proposed as a treatment method for naphthol-contaminated water. However, the impact of solution chemistry on naphthol polymerization and removal has not been documented. This research investigated the impact of pH and ionic strength on peroxidase-mediated removal of 1-naphthol in completely mixed batch reactors. The impact of hydrogen peroxide to 1-naphthol ratio and activity of horseradish peroxidase was also studied. Size exclusion chromatography was used to estimate the molecular weight distribution of oligomeric products, and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry was used to estimate product structure. Naphthol transformation decreased with ionic strength, and substrate removal was lowest at neutral pHs. Solution pH influenced the size and the composition of the oligomeric products. An equimolar ratio of H(2)O(2):naphthol was sufficient for optimal naphthol removal. Polymerization products included naphthoquinones and oligomers derived from two, three, and four naphthol molecules. Our results illustrate the importance of water chemistry when considering a peroxidase-based approach for treatment of naphthol-contaminated waters.

  6. Characterization of glutathione peroxidase diversity in the symbiotic sea anemone Anemonia viridis

    OpenAIRE

    Pey , Alexis; Zamoum , Thamilla; Christen , Richard; Merle , Pierre-Laurent; Furla , Paola

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Cnidarians living in symbiosis with photosynthetic dinoflagellates (commonly named zooxanthellae) are exposed to high concentrations of reactive oxygen species (ROS) upon illumination. To quench ROS production, both the cnidarian host and zooxanthellae express a full suite of antioxidant enzymes. Studying antioxidative balance is therefore crucial to understanding how symbiotic cnidarians cope with ROS production. We characterized glutathione peroxidases (GPx) in the s...

  7. Assessing two different peroxidases´ potential for application in recalcitrant organic compound bioremediation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Caicedo

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available This work shows the promising future presented by the following enzymes: Chloroperoxidase (CPO from Caldariomyces fumago and royal palm peroxidase (Roystonea regia, PPR. These peroxidases were obtained from different sources (microbial and vegetable and used as biocatalysts for applicating them in bioremediation of recalcitrant organic compounds. Each one of the enzymes' peroxidase catalytic activity was evaluated in organic phase systems, using different model compounds such as: PAHs (pyrene and anthracene, organic-nitrogenated compounds (diphenylamine, monoaromatic phenolic molecules (guayacol and dyes (methyl orange and ABTS. The reaction systems were composed of mono-phase water mixtures and organic miscible solvent (methanol, ethanol, isopropanol, acetonitrile, tetrahydrofuran, dimethyl sulfoxide and dimethyl formamide, on which both peroxidases' catalytic activity was evaluated. The two enzymes' catalytic activity was observed on the evaluated substrates in most of these assays. However, PPR did not show biocatalytic oxidation for methyl orange dye and some PAHs. This enzyme did show the best tolerance to the evaluated solvents. Its catalytic activity was appreciably enhanced when low hydrophobic solvents were used. The kcat was calculated from this experimental data (as kinetic parameter leading to each enzyme's biocatalytic performance on substrates being compared.

  8. Decolorization of direct dyes using peroxidase from raphanus sativus (F04 SL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatti, H.N.; Kalsoom, U.; Habib, A.

    2012-01-01

    An acidic peroxidase was isolated and partially purified from Raphanus sativus. The purified enzyme was characterized in terms of kinetics and thermodynamic aspects. Finally the enzyme was assessed to see its potential for decolorization of direct dyes. The specific activity of Raphanus sativus peroxidase increased from 44.77 to 65.20 U/mg of protein using 80 % ammonium sulphate precipitation. The optimum pH and temperature of the enzyme was 4 and 55 deg. C respectively. The activation energy of Raphanus sativus peroxidase was 25.44 kJ/mol and average value of Km was 0.25 mM. The activation energy of thermal denaturation of Raphanus sativus peroxidase was 17.79 kJ/mol. It was observed that with an increase in temperature, there was decrease in a half life and enthalpy, which showed that the enzyme was unstable at higher temperature. A maximum decolorization of 97 and 77 % was observed for Solar Blue A and Solar Flavine 5G at pH 4 and temperature 50 deg. C respectively. It was observed that % decolorization of both the dyes increased with an increase in enzyme units and incubation time. H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ dose of 0.8 mM for Solar Blue A and 0.7 mM for Solar Flavine 5G was sufficient for the maximum dye degradation. (author)

  9. A peroxidase gene expressed during early developmental stages of the parasitic plant Orobanche ramosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Verdejo, Clara Isabel; Barandiaran, Xabier; Moreno, Maria Teresa; Cubero, José Ignacio; Di Pietro, Antonio

    2006-01-01

    Broomrapes (Orobanche spp.) are holoparasitic weeds that cause devastating losses in many economically important crops. The molecular mechanisms that control the early stages of host infection in Orobanche are poorly understood. In the present study, the role of peroxidase has been examined during pre-infection growth and development of O. ramosa, using an in vitro model system. Peroxidase activity was histochemically localized at the tips of actively growing radicles and nascent attachment organs. Addition of exogenous catalase resulted in a significant reduction in the apical growth rate of the radicle. The prx1 gene encoding a putative class III peroxidase was cloned from a cDNA library of O. ramosa and was found to be expressed specifically during the early stages of the parasitic life cycle. The exogenous addition of sucrose resulted in significantly reduced prx1 transcript levels and in a dramatic change in radicle development from polarized apical growth to isotropic growth and the formation of tubercle-like structures. The results indicate an important role of peroxidases during the early parasitic stages of Orobanche.

  10. Chemical Composition and Rheological Properties of Set Yoghurt Prepared from Skimmed Milk Treated with Horseradish Peroxidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to determine the impact of an enzymatic treatment on the fermentation and rheological properties of set yoghurt prepared from skimmed milk. Skimmed bovine milk was treated with horseradish peroxidase added at the level of 645 U per g of proteins in the presence (addition level of 7.8 mmol per L of milk or absence of ferulic acid as a cross-linking agent, and used to prepare set yoghurt with commercial direct vat set starter culture. The evaluation showed that the treatment of skimmed milk with horseradish peroxidase enhanced its apparent viscosity, and storage and loss moduli. The prepared yoghurt contained protein, fat and total solids at 3.49–3.59, 0.46–0.52 and 15.23–15.43 %, respectively, had titratable acidity of 0.83–0.88 %, and no significant difference in the composition was found among the yoghurt samples (p>0.05. Compared to the control yoghurt, the yoghurt prepared from the milk treated with horseradish peroxidase had a higher apparent viscosity, storage and loss moduli and flow behavior indices, especially when ferulic acid was added. Yoghurt samples from the skimmed milk treated either with horseradish peroxidase only or with the additional ferulic acid treatment had better structural reversibility, because their hysteresis loop area during rheological analysis was larger (p<0.05.

  11. Structure and organ specificity of an anionic peroxidase from Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, L; Abelskov, A K; Mattsson, O

    1996-01-01

    The predominant peroxidase (pI 3.5) (E.C. 1.11.1.7) of an Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension culture was purified and partially sequenced. Oligonucleotides were designed and a specific probe was obtained. A cDNA clone was isolated from an Arabidopsis cell suspension cDNA library and completely ...

  12. Aqueous synthesis of porous platinum nanotubes at room temperature and their intrinsic peroxidase-like activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Kai; Lv, Zhicheng; Chen, Kun; Huang, Liang; Wang, Jing; Shao, Feng; Wang, Yanjun; Han, Heyou

    2013-07-11

    Platinum nanotubes (PtNTs) exhibiting high porosity were constructed by sacrificing the exterior of tellurium nanowires (TeNWs) and disintegrating the inner part spontaneously in aqueous solution at room temperature, in which the Kirkendall effect may play an important role. The present PtNTs exhibited intrinsic peroxidase-like activity in the presence of H2O2.

  13. Assessment of Behavior of Rice Root Peroxidase in the Presence of Silver Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadzade

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Silver Nanoparticles (AgNPs can change proteins function and structure. The increased production and high surface reactivity of silver nanoparticles, has interested researchers to study the interactions of these particles with biomolecules. Objectives The present study aimed to show the effects of AgNPs on rice plant root peroxidase enzyme and the interaction quality between silver nanoparticles and the enzyme. Materials and Methods Extracted peroxidase enzyme of rice plant root was treated by AgNPs at concentrations of 0, 20, 40, 80, 100mg/L for 2, 7 and 24 hours. The experiment was done with 15 treatments for measuring the peroxidase enzyme activity using the spectrophotometry method at a wavelength of 470. Results Low concentrations of AgNPs and short incubation times can have the maximum positive impact on the peroxidase activity, and in the present study the highest activity was seen at a concentration of 40 mg/L and two hours of incubation time. Conclusions This study suggests that changes of enzyme activity can occur as a result of the effect of silver nanoparticles on enzyme conformation, increase of reactive environment pH, and amount of substrate and enzyme stability.

  14. Quantitative analysis of manganese concentration in manganese-doped glasses by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy using a nanosecond ultraviolet Nd:YAG laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unnikrishnan, V.K.; Nayak, Rajesh; Kartha, V.B.; Santhosh, C.; Sonavane, M.S.; Yeotikar, R.G.; Gupta, G.P.; Suri, B.M.

    2012-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been well recognized as a simple, fast and direct analytical technique for the analysis of elemental analysis of multi-element materials by a number of research groups all over the world. It is based on the focusing of a high-power pulsed laser beam with a power density > 100 MW/cm 2 onto a sample surface followed by optical emission spectroscopy of the plasma produced over the surface. During the last two decades, LIBS has attracted a lot of attention, leading to an ever increasing list of applications, both in laboratory and in industry. In this work, the quantitative analysis of manganese in manganese-doped glass samples in air at atmospheric pressure has been carried out by the LIBS system assembled and optimized in the laboratory. The plasma is generated using a nanosecond ultraviolet Nd:YAG laser with an irradiance of 1x10 9 W/cm 2 on the sample surface. The spatially integrated plasma light emission was collected and imaged on to the spectrograph slit using an optical-fibre-based collection system. An Echelle spectrograph-ICCD system (Andor Mechelle ME5000-DH734-18U-03PS150) was used to record the emission spectrum. The spectrograph with an Echelle grating covers 200-975 nm spectral range in a single shot with a good wavelength resolution (0.05 nm). The detector was gated in synchronization with the laser pulse to get maximum signal-to-background (S/B) ratio. The detector gate width of 2 μs and the detector gate delay of 2 μs were chosen for recording the plasma emission signals, discriminating the continuum radiation which is intense at initial delay time less than 300 ns and decreases at later time

  15. Preparation and performance of manganese-oxide-coated zeolite for the removal of manganese-contamination in groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Cong; Yang, Xuejiao; Zhang, Shengyu; Zhang, Qihui; Su, Xiaosi

    2017-12-29

    A promising and easily prepared catalytic filler media, manganese-oxide-coated zeolite (MOCZ), for the removal of Mn (II) contamination in groundwater was studied. The optimal condition for MOCZ preparation was given as follows: acid activation of zeolite with 5% HCl mass percent for 12 h, then soaking of acid-activated zeolite with 7% KMnO 4 mass percent for 8 h, and finally calcination at 300°C for 5 h. Acid activation significantly enlarged the specific surface area of the zeolite (>79 m 2  g -1 ), subsequently enhancing the coating of manganese oxides onto the surface of the zeolite. This was further supported by the manganese-to-zeolite ratio (γ Mn ) and Energy dispersive analysis-mapping. The γ Mn was over 12.26 mg Mn g -1 zeolite, representing more active sites for the adsorption and catalytic-oxidation of Mn (II). As such, great performance of Mn (II) removal by MOCZ was obtained in the filter experiment. An estimated 98-100% removal efficiency of Mn (II) was achieved in a greatly short startup time (only 2 h). During the filtration process, newborn flocculent manganese oxides with a mixed-valence of manganese (Mn (II) and Mn (IV)) were generated on the MOCZ surface, further facilitating the adsorption and catalytic-oxidation of Mn (II). The filter with MOCZ as adsorbent had a great performance on the Mn (II) removal in a wide range of hydraulic retention time (HRT) (4-40 min), particularly in a short HRT. Besides, the filter prolonged the filtration period (60 days), which would significantly reduce the frequency of backwash. Thus, it could be concluded that MOCZ prepared in this study showed a good performance in terms of Mn (II) removal in waterworks, especially small waterworks in the villages/towns.

  16. Methylphenidate alleviates manganese-induced impulsivity but not distractibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudin, Stephane A; Strupp, Barbara J; Uribe, Walter; Ysais, Lauren; Strawderman, Myla; Smith, Donald R

    2017-05-01

    Recent studies from our lab have demonstrated that postnatal manganese (Mn) exposure in a rodent model can cause lasting impairments in fine motor control and attention, and that oral methylphenidate (MPH) treatment can effectively treat the dysfunction in fine motor control. However, it is unknown whether MPH treatment can alleviate the impairments in attention produced by Mn exposure. Here we used a rodent model of postnatal Mn exposure to determine whether (1) oral MPH alleviates attention and impulse control deficits caused by postnatal Mn exposure, using attention tasks that are variants of the 5-choice serial reaction time task, and (2) whether these treatments affected neuronal dendritic spine density in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and dorsal striatum. Male Long-Evans rats were exposed orally to 0 or 50Mn/kg/d throughout life starting on PND 1, and tested as young adults (PND 107-115) on an attention task that specifically tapped selective attention and impulse control. Animals were treated with oral MPH (2.5mg/kg/d) throughout testing on the attention task. Our findings show that lifelong postnatal Mn exposure impaired impulse control and selective attention in young adulthood, and that a therapeutically relevant oral MPH regimen alleviated the Mn-induced dysfunction in impulse control, but not selective attention, and actually impaired focused attention in the Mn group. In addition, the effect of MPH was qualitatively different for the Mn-exposed versus control animals across a range of behavioral measures of inhibitory control and attention, as well as dendritic spine density in the mPFC, suggesting that postnatal Mn exposure alters catecholaminergic systems modulating these behaviors. Collectively these findings suggest that MPH may hold promise for treating the behavioral dysfunction caused by developmental Mn exposure, although further research is needed with multiple MPH doses to determine whether a dose can be identified that ameliorates the

  17. Relationships Between Essential Manganese Biology and Manganese Toxicity in Neurological Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfalzer, Anna C; Bowman, Aaron B

    2017-06-01

    Manganese (Mn) is critical for neurodevelopment but also has been implicated in the pathophysiology of several neurological diseases. We discuss how Mn requirements intersect with Mn biology and toxicity, and how these requirements may be altered in neurological disease. Furthermore, we discuss the emerging evidence that the level of Mn associated with optimal overall efficiency for Mn biology does not necessarily coincide with optimal cognitive outcomes. Studies have linked Mn exposures with urea cycle metabolism and autophagy, with evidence that exposures typically neurotoxic may be able to correct deficiencies in these processes at least short term. The line between Mn-dependent biology and toxicity is thus blurred. Further, new work suggests that Mn exposures correlating to optimal cognitive scores in children are associated with cognitive decline in adults. This review explores relationships between Mn-dependent neurobiology and Mn-dependent neurotoxicity. We propose the hypothesis that Mn levels/exposures that are toxic to some biological processes are beneficial for other biological processes and influenced by developmental stage and disease state.

  18. Evaluation of peroxidases from roots of Cyperus hermaphroditus as enzymatic mechanisms in phenanthrene oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerrero Zuniga, A. [Inst. Mexicano del Petroleo, Mexico City (Mexico). Environmental Protection Management Office; Rodriguez Dorantes, A.M. [Lab. Fisiologia Vegetal, Escuela Nacional de Ciencias Biologicas, Mexico City (Mexico). Depto Botanica

    2006-07-01

    Although phenanthrene is not mutagenic or carcinogenic, it has been shown to be toxic to aquatic organisms. This study evaluated in-vitro phenanthrene oxidation by peroxidases from radical extracts of Cyperus hermaphroditus plants. The characterization of oxidation products of phenanthrene related to the induction of root peroxidases was also examined. Concentrated ethanol stock of phenanthrene solution was added to the mineral solution of each plant container. The total radical biomass was placed in 4.5 ml of an ionic solution to analyze the enzymatic activity of the extracellular peroxidases. The total protein for each experiment was quantified by the Bradford method. Extracellular peroxidases activity was measured using the spectrophotometric method. The amount of radical biomass was quantified as high in the 80 and 120 ppm phenanthrene treatments relative to the control plants. It was suggested that the nature of the Cyperaceae roots combined with the high-octanol water coefficient and a low water solubility for phenanthrene may have facilitated the stabilization of the contaminant towards the roots. The ability of Cyperus hermaphroditus to immobilize phenanthrene through its adhesion was encouraged by the conditions of the hydroponic culture system. The adsorption of phenanthrene was increased with the time of exposure to the contaminant due to the greater total root mass. The study also showed the transformation of phenanthrene by radical extracts of Cyperus hermaphroditus containing guaiacol peroxidases with 12 per cent residual phenanthrene in the in vitro assays. The spectrophotometric analysis confirmed that the enzymatic systems are responsible for the phytotransformation of the pollutant. 9 refs., 2 tabs., 5 figs.

  19. Adaptive aneuploidy protects against thiol peroxidase deficiency by increasing respiration via key mitochondrial proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Alaattin; Gerashchenko, Maxim V; Seim, Inge; Labarre, Jean; Toledano, Michel B; Gladyshev, Vadim N

    2015-08-25

    Aerobic respiration is a fundamental energy-generating process; however, there is cost associated with living in an oxygen-rich environment, because partially reduced oxygen species can damage cellular components. Organisms evolved enzymes that alleviate this damage and protect the intracellular milieu, most notably thiol peroxidases, which are abundant and conserved enzymes that mediate hydrogen peroxide signaling and act as the first line of defense against oxidants in nearly all living organisms. Deletion of all eight thiol peroxidase genes in yeast (∆8 strain) is not lethal, but results in slow growth and a high mutation rate. Here we characterized mechanisms that allow yeast cells to survive under conditions of thiol peroxidase deficiency. Two independent ∆8 strains increased mitochondrial content, altered mitochondrial distribution, and became dependent on respiration for growth but they were not hypersensitive to H2O2. In addition, both strains independently acquired a second copy of chromosome XI and increased expression of genes encoded by it. Survival of ∆8 cells was dependent on mitochondrial cytochrome-c peroxidase (CCP1) and UTH1, present on chromosome XI. Coexpression of these genes in ∆8 cells led to the elimination of the extra copy of chromosome XI and improved cell growth, whereas deletion of either gene was lethal. Thus, thiol peroxidase deficiency requires dosage compensation of CCP1 and UTH1 via chromosome XI aneuploidy, wherein these proteins support hydroperoxide removal with the reducing equivalents generated by the electron transport chain. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence of adaptive aneuploidy counteracting oxidative stress.

  20. Vinylene carbonate and tris(trimethylsilyl) phosphite hybrid additives to improve the electrochemical performance of spinel lithium manganese oxide/graphite cells at 60 °C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Bonjae; Lee, Jeongmin; Lee, Yongwon; Kim, Jun Ki; Choi, Nam-Soon

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: •The combination of tris(trimethylsilyl) phosphite and vinylene carbonate improves the electrochemical performance of lithium manganese oxide/graphite cells at 60 °C. •Removal of hydrogen fluoride and water by tris(trimethylsilyl) phosphite suppresses manganese dissolution from lithium manganese oxide. -- Abstract: The organophosphorus compounds tris(trimethylsilyl) phosphite (TMSP) and vinylene carbonate (VC) have been considered for use as functional additives to improve the electrochemical performance of Li 1.1 Mn 1.86 Mg 0.04 O 4 (LMO)/graphite full cells. Our investigation reveals that the combination of VC and TMSP as additives enhances the cycling properties and storage performance of full cells at 60 °C. The unique functions of the TMSP additive in the VC electrolyte are investigated via ex situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and 19 F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements. The TMSP additive effectively eliminates trace water and hydrogen fluoride (HF) and produces a protective film on the LMO cathode that alleviates manganese dissolution at 60 °C