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Sample records for manganese peroxidase produced

  1. Decolorization applicability of sol–gel matrix immobilized manganese peroxidase produced from an indigenous white rot fungal strain Ganoderma lucidum

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Nasir Iqbal, Hafiz; Asgher, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    Background An eco-friendly treatment of industrial effluents is a major environmental concern of the modern world in the face of stringent environmental legislations. By keeping in mind the extensive industrial applications of ligninolytic enzymes, this study was performed to purify, and immobilize the manganese peroxidase (MnP) produced from an indigenous strain of Ganoderma lucidum. The present study was also focused on investigating the capability of immobilized MnP for decolorization of d...

  2. Manganese regulates expression of manganese peroxidase by Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, J A; Glenn, J K; Gold, M H

    1990-01-01

    The appearance of manganese peroxidase (MnP) activity in nitrogen-limited cultures of Phanerochaete chrysosporium is dependent on the presence of manganese. Cultures grown in the absence of Mn developed normally and produced normal levels of the secondary metabolite veratryl alcohol but produced no MnP activity. Immunoblot analysis indicated that appearance of MnP protein in the extracellular medium was also dependent on the presence of Mn. Intracellular MnP protein was detectable only in cel...

  3. Characterization and decolorization applicability of xerogel matrix immobilized manganese peroxidase produced from Trametes versicolor IBL-04.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Hafiz Muhammad Nasir; Asgher, Muhammad

    2013-05-01

    A novel manganese peroxidase (MnP) isolated from solid state culture of Trametes versicolor IBL-04 was immobilized using xerogel matrix composed of trimethoxysilane (TMOS) and propyltetramethoxysilane (PTMS). FTIR spectroscopy confirmed the successful entrapment of MnP into the xerogel matrix. An immobilization efficiency of 92.2% was achieved with a purified active fraction containing 2 mg/mL MnP. After 24 h incubation at varying pH and temperatures, the immobilized MnP retained 82 and 75% activity at pH 4 and 80°C, respectively. Xerogel matrix immobilization enhanced the catalytic efficiency of entrapped MnP. Metal ions including Cu2+, Mn2+ and Fe2+ stimulated enzyme activity while cysteine, EDTA and Ag+ inhibited the activity. MnP preserved 82% of its initial activity during oxidation of MnSO4 in 10 consecutive cycles, demonstrating the reusability of xerogel entrapped MnP. The immobilized MnP could be stored for up to 75 days at 4°C without significant activity loss. To explore the industrial applicability of MnP, the immobilized MnP was tested for decolorization of textile industry effluent in a Packed Bed Reactor System (PBRS). After five consecutive cycles, 98.8% decolorization of effluent was achieved within 5 h. The kinetic properties, storage stability and reusability of entrapped MnP from T. versicolor IBL-04 reflect its prospects as biocatalyst for bioremediation and other industrial applications.

  4. 木质层孔菌产锰过氧化物酶条件的优化及酶学性质研究%Study on condition optimization of manganese peroxidase produced by fomes lignosus and its enzymatic properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔艳红; 韩庆功; 常魁珍; 魏龙龙; 张贝贝; 胡志明

    2012-01-01

    试验选用白腐真菌中能产生较高锰过氧化物酶的菌株——木质层孔菌,采用单因子试验分析了木质层孔菌产锰过氧化物酶的最佳培养条件,并对其部分酶学作用特性进行了研究.试验结果表明,木质层孔菌产锰过氧化物酶的最佳培养条件是:最佳培养温度为35cC;最佳碳源是小麦秸粉,最佳氮源是胰蛋白胨;最佳培养时间是192h.锰过氧化物酶作用的最适反应温度是52℃;最适pH值是4.5;金属离子Zn2+和Ca2+对锰过氧化物酶的活性有促进作用;Mg2+对锰过氧化物酶的活性影响不是很大;Cu2+、Fe2+和Ag+对锰过氧化物酶活性具有抑制作用,其中Fe2+的抑制作用最强.%The test selected a bacterial strain that could produce higher manganese peroxidase among white-rot-fungi, or fomes lignosus, and analyzed the optimal conditions for fomes lignosus to produce manganese peroxidase using single-factor analysis and studied parts of function character of enzyme. The results showed that the optimal conditions for fomes lignosus to produce manganese peroxidase was as follows : the best culture temperature was 35 ℃, the best carbon source was wheat straw powder ,the optimal nitrogen source was tryptone, and the best culture time was 192 hours.The optimal temperature for reaction for manganese peroxidase was 52 ℃, the optimal pH was 4.5, Zn2+ and Ca2* had an effect of activation on the manganese peroxidase, Mg2+had little effect on the manganese peroxidase, Cu2+NFe2+and Ag+ had some inhibition effect on the manganese peroxidase and Fe2+ was the strongest among them.

  5. Screening of white-rot fungi manganese peroxidases: a comparison between the specific activities of the enzyme from different native producers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Järvinen, Juho; Taskila, Sanna; Isomäki, Ritva; Ojamo, Heikki

    2012-11-29

    In this study manganese peroxidase (MnP) enzymes from selected white-rot fungi were isolated and compared for potential future recombinant production. White-rot fungi were cultivated in small-scale in liquid media and a simplified process was established for the purification of extracellular enzymes.Five lignin degrading organisms were selected (Bjerkandera sp., Phanerochaete (P.) chrysosporium, Physisporinus (P.) rivulosus, Phlebia (P.) radiata and Phlebia sp. Nf b19) and studied for MnP production in small-scale. Extracellular MnP activity was followed and cultivations were harvested at proximity of the peak activity. The production of MnPs varied in different organisms but was clearly regulated by inducing liquid media components (Mn2+, veratryl alcohol and malonate). In total 8 different MnP isoforms were purified.Results of this study reinforce the conception that MnPs from distinct organisms differ substantially in their properties. Production of the extracellular enzyme in general did not reach a substantial level. This further suggests that these native producers are not suitable for industrial scale production of the enzyme. The highest specific activities were observed with MnPs from P. chrysosporium (200 U mg-1), Phlebia sp. Nf b19 (55 U mg-1) and P. rivulosus (89 U mg-1) and these MnPs are considered as the most potential candidates for further studies. The molecular weight of the purified MnPs was estimated to be between 45-50 kDa.

  6. Optimization of manganese peroxidase production by the white rot fungus Bjerkandera sp. strain BOS55.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mester, T.; Field, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    Manganese dependent peroxidase (MnP) is the most ubiquitous peroxidase produced by white rot fungi. MnP is known to be involved in lignin degradation, biobleaching and in the oxidation of hazardous organopollutants. Bjerkandera sp. strain BOS55 is a nitrogen-unregulated white rot fungus which produc

  7. Optimization of lignin peroxidase, manganese peroxidase, and Lac production from Ganoderma lucidum under solid state fermentation of pineapple leaf

    OpenAIRE

    Sudha Hariharan; Padma Nambisan

    2013-01-01

    This study was undertaken to isolate ligninase-producing white-rot fungi for use in the extraction of fibre from pineapple leaf agriwaste. Fifteen fungal strains were isolated from dead tree trunks and leaf litter. Ligninolytic enzymes (lignin peroxidase (LiP), manganese peroxidase (MnP), and laccase (Lac)), were produced by solid-state fermentation (SSF) using pineapple leaves as the substrate. Of the isolated strains, the one showing maximum production of ligninolytic enzymes was identified...

  8. Optimization of manganese peroxidase production by the white rot fungus Bjerkandera sp. strain BOS55.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mester, T.; Field, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    Manganese dependent peroxidase (MnP) is the most ubiquitous peroxidase produced by white rot fungi. MnP is known to be involved in lignin degradation, biobleaching and in the oxidation of hazardous organopollutants. Bjerkandera sp. strain BOS55 is a nitrogen-unregulated white rot fungus which

  9. High-yield production of manganese peroxidase, lignin peroxidase, and versatile peroxidase in Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coconi-Linares, Nancy; Magaña-Ortíz, Denis; Guzmán-Ortiz, Doralinda A; Fernández, Francisco; Loske, Achim M; Gómez-Lim, Miguel A

    2014-11-01

    The white-rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium secretes extracellular oxidative enzymes during secondary metabolism, but lacks versatile peroxidase, an enzyme important in ligninolysis and diverse biotechnology processes. In this study, we report the genetic modification of a P. chrysosporium strain capable of co-expressing two endogenous genes constitutively, manganese peroxidase (mnp1) and lignin peroxidase (lipH8), and the codon-optimized vpl2 gene from Pleurotus eryngii. For this purpose, we employed a highly efficient transformation method based on the use of shock waves developed by our group. The expression of recombinant genes was verified by PCR, Southern blot, quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), and assays of enzymatic activity. The production yield of ligninolytic enzymes was up to four times higher in comparison to previously published reports. These results may represent significant progress toward the stable production of ligninolytic enzymes and the development of an effective fungal strain with promising biotechnological applications.

  10. Redundancy among manganese peroxidases in Pleurotus ostreatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salame, Tomer M; Knop, Doriv; Levinson, Dana; Yarden, Oded; Hadar, Yitzhak

    2013-04-01

    Manganese peroxidases (MnPs) are key players in the ligninolytic system of white rot fungi. In Pleurotus ostreatus (the oyster mushroom) these enzymes are encoded by a gene family comprising nine members, mnp1 to -9 (mnp genes). Mn(2+) amendment to P. ostreatus cultures results in enhanced degradation of recalcitrant compounds (such as the azo dye orange II) and lignin. In Mn(2+)-amended glucose-peptone medium, mnp3, mnp4, and mnp9 were the most highly expressed mnp genes. After 7 days of incubation, the time point at which the greatest capacity for orange II decolorization was observed, mnp3 expression and the presence of MnP3 in the extracellular culture fluids were predominant. To determine the significance of MnP3 for ligninolytic functionality in Mn(2+)-sufficient cultures, mnp3 was inactivated via the Δku80 strain-based P. ostreatus gene-targeting system. In Mn(2+)-sufficient medium, inactivation of mnp3 did not significantly affect expression of nontargeted MnPs or their genes, nor did it considerably diminish the fungal Mn(2+)-mediated orange II decolorization capacity, despite the significant reduction in total MnP activity. Similarly, inactivation of either mnp4 or mnp9 did not affect orange II decolorization ability. These results indicate functional redundancy within the P. ostreatus MnP gene family, enabling compensation upon deficiency of one of its members.

  11. Calnexin overexpression increases manganese peroxidase production in Aspergillus niger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Conesa, A.; Jeenes, D.; Archer, D.B.; Hondel, C.A.M.J.J. van den; Punt, P.J.

    2002-01-01

    Heme-containing peroxidases from white rot basidiomycetes, in contrast to most proteins of fungal origin, are poorly produced in industrial filamentous fungal strains. Factors limiting peroxidase production are believed to operate at the posttranslational level. In particular, insufficient

  12. Calnexin overexpression increases manganese peroxidase production in Aspergillus niger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Conesa, A.; Jeenes, D.; Archer, D.B.; Hondel, C.A.M.J.J. van den; Punt, P.J.

    2002-01-01

    Heme-containing peroxidases from white rot basidiomycetes, in contrast to most proteins of fungal origin, are poorly produced in industrial filamentous fungal strains. Factors limiting peroxidase production are believed to operate at the posttranslational level. In particular, insufficient availabil

  13. Lignin degradation by a white-rot fungus lacking lignin peroxidase and manganese peroxidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eggert, C.B.; Eriksson, K.E.L. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Phanerochaete chrysosporium has been the organism of choice for studies of lignin degradation and much of this work has focused on two phenol oxidases, lignin peroxidase (LiP) and manganese peroxidase (MnP), secreted by the fungus under ligninolytic conditions. However, many white-rot fungi, including a number of aggressive lignin degraders, seem to operate without expressing LiP activity. Laccase is another phenol oxidase that white-rot fungi often produce. However, the role played by laccase in lignin degradation has remained obscured since its low redox potential appeared to make it incapable of oxidizing non-phenolic lignin constituents. We have identified, Pychnoporus cinnabarinus lacking both LiP and MnP, but a high producer of laccase, to degrade lignin as efficiently as UP producing fungi. We have found that P. cinnabarinus, to overcome the redox potential barrier for laccase, produces a mediator for oxidation of non-phenolic lignin structures. This is the first description of how laccase may be used in a biological system for the degradation of lignin.

  14. Aflatoxin detoxification by manganese peroxidase purified from Pleurotus ostreatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramy Sayed Yehia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Manganese peroxidase (MnP was produced from white rot edible mushroom Pleurotus ostreatus on the culture filtrate. The enzyme was purified to homogeneity using (NH42SO4 precipitation, DEAE-Sepharose and Sephadex G-100 column chromatography. The final enzyme activity achieved 81UmL-1, specific activity 78 U mg-1 with purification fold of 130 and recovery 1.2% of the crude enzyme. SDS-PAGE indicated that the pure enzyme have a molecular mass of approximately 42 kDa. The optimum pH was between 4-5 and the optimum temperature was 25 ºC. The pure MnP activity was enhanced by Mn2+,Cu2+,Ca2+ and K+ and inhibited by Hg+2 and Cd+2.H2O2 at 5 mM enhanced MnP activity while at 10 mM inhibited it significantly. The MnP-cDNA encoding gene was sequenced and determined (GenBank accession no. AB698450.1. The MnP-cDNA was found to consist of 497 bp in an Open Reading Frame (ORF encoding 165 amino acids. MnP from P. ostreatus could detoxify aflatoxin B1 (AFB1 depending on enzyme concentration and incubation period. The highest detoxification power (90% was observed after 48 h incubation at 1.5 U mL-1 enzyme activities.

  15. Aflatoxin detoxification by manganese peroxidase purified from Pleurotus ostreatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yehia, Ramy Sayed

    2014-01-01

    Manganese peroxidase (MnP) was produced from white rot edible mushroom Pleurotus ostreatus on the culture filtrate. The enzyme was purified to homogeneity using (NH4)2SO4 precipitation, DEAE-Sepharose and Sephadex G-100 column chromatography. The final enzyme activity achieved 81 U mL(-1), specific activity 78 U mg(-1) with purification fold of 130 and recovery 1.2% of the crude enzyme. SDS-PAGE indicated that the pure enzyme have a molecular mass of approximately 42 kDa. The optimum pH was between 4-5 and the optimum temperature was 25 °C. The pure MnP activity was enhanced by Mn(2+), Cu(2+), Ca(2+) and K(+) and inhibited by Hg(+2) and Cd(+2). H2O2 at 5 mM enhanced MnP activity while at 10 mM inhibited it significantly. The MnP-cDNA encoding gene was sequenced and determined (GenBank accession no. AB698450.1). The MnP-cDNA was found to consist of 497 bp in an Open Reading Frame (ORF) encoding 165 amino acids. MnP from P. ostreatus could detoxify aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) depending on enzyme concentration and incubation period. The highest detoxification power (90%) was observed after 48 h incubation at 1.5 U mL(-1) enzyme activities.

  16. Phenolic mediators enhance the manganese peroxidase catalyzed oxidation of recalcitrant lignin model compounds and synthetic lignin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nousiainen, Paula; Kontro, Jussi; Manner, Helmiina; Hatakka, Annele; Sipilä, Jussi

    2014-11-01

    Fungal oxidative enzymes, such as peroxidases and laccases, are the key catalysts in lignin biodegradation in vivo, and consequently provide an important source for industrial ligninolytic biocatalysts. Recently, it has been shown that some syringyl-type phenolics have potential as industrial co-oxidants or mediators, in laccase-catalyzed modification of lignocellulosic material. We have now studied the effect of such mediators with ligninolytic peroxidases on oxidation of the most recalcitrant lignin model compounds. We found that they are able to enhance the manganese peroxidase (MnP) catalyzed oxidation reactions of small non-phenolic compounds, veratryl alcohol and veratrylglycerol β-guaiacyl ether (adlerol), which are not usually oxidized by manganese peroxidases alone. In these experiments we compared two peroxidases from white-rot fungi, MnP from Phlebia sp. Nf b19 and versatile peroxidase (VP) from Bjerkandera adusta under two oxidation conditions: (i) the Mn(III) initiated mediated oxidation by syringyl compounds and (ii) the system involving MnP-dependent lipid peroxidation, both with production of (hydrogen) peroxides in situ to maintain the peroxidase catalytic cycle. It was found that both peroxidases produced α-carbonyl oxidation product of veratryl alcohol in clearly higher yields in reactions mediated by phenoxy radicals than in lipid-peroxyl radical system. The oxidation of adlerol, on the other hand, was more efficient in lipid-peroxidation-system. VP was more efficient than MnP in the oxidation of veratryl alcohol and showed its lignin peroxidase type activity in the reaction conditions indicated by some cleavage of Cα-Cβ-bond of adlerol. Finally, the mediator assisted oxidation conditions were applied in the oxidation of synthetic lignin (DHP) and the structural analysis of the oxidized polymers showed clear modifications in the polymer outcome, e.g. the oxidation resulted in reduced amount of aliphatic hydroxyls indicated by (31)P NMR

  17. 3D structure prediction of lignolytic enzymes lignin peroxidase and manganese peroxidase based on homology modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SWAPNIL K. KALE

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Lignolytic enzymes have great biotechnological value in biopulping, biobleaching, and bioremediation. Manganese peroxidase (EC 1:11:1:13 and lignin peroxidase (EC 1:11:1:14 are extracellular and hem-containing peroxidases that catalyze H2O2-dependent oxidation of lignin. Because of their ability to catalyse oxidation of a wide range of organic compounds and even some inorganic compounds, they got tremendous industrial importance. In this study, 3D structure of lignin and manganese peroxidase has been predicted on the basis of homology modeling using Swiss PDB workspace. The physicochemical properties like molecular weight, isoelectric point, Grand average of hydropathy, instability and aliphatic index of the target enzymes were performed using Protparam. The predicted secondary structure of MnP has 18 helices and 6 strands, while LiP has 20 helices and 4 strands. Generated 3D structure was visualized in Pymol. The generated model for MnP and LiP has Z-score Qmean of 0.01 and -0.71, respectively. The predicted models were validated through Ramachandran Plot, which indicated that 96.1 and 95.5% of the residues are in most favored regions for MnP and LiP respectively. The quality of predicted models were assessed and confirmed by VERIFY 3D, PROCHECK and ERRAT. The modeled structure of MnP and LiP were submitted to the Protein Model Database.

  18. Dye decolorization and detoxification potential of Ca-alginate beads immobilized manganese peroxidase

    OpenAIRE

    Bilal, Muhammad; Asgher, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Background In view of compliance with increasingly stringent environmental legislation, an eco-friendly treatment technology of industrial dyes and effluents is a major environmental challenge in the color industry. In present study, a promising and eco‐friendly entrapment approach was adopted to immobilize purified manganese peroxidase (MnP) produced from an indigenous strain of Ganoderma lucidum IBL-05 on Ca-alginate beads. The immobilized MnP was subsequently used for enhanced decolorizati...

  19. Enhanced production of manganese peroxidase by Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    OpenAIRE

    Raziye Ozturk Urek; Nurdan Kasikara Pazarlioglu

    2007-01-01

    Production of manganese-dependent peroxidase (MnP) by the white-rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium BKM-F-1767 (ATCC 24725) was monitored during growth in different media and growth conditions. The effect of some activators of MnP production, Mn2+, Tween 80, phenylmethylsulphonylfloride (PMSF), oxygen, temperature, pH, glycerol and nitrogen was studied. Supplementing the cultures with Tween 80 (0.05 %, v/v) and Mn2+ (174 µM) resulted a maximum MnP activity of 356 U/L which was approximatel...

  20. Fungal laccase, manganese peroxidase and lignin peroxidase: gene expression and regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janusz, Grzegorz; Kucharzyk, Katarzyna H; Pawlik, Anna; Staszczak, Magdalena; Paszczynski, Andrzej J

    2013-01-10

    Extensive research efforts have been dedicated to characterizing expression of laccases and peroxidases and their regulation in numerous fungal species. Much attention has been brought to these enzymes broad substrate specificity resulting in oxidation of a variety of organic compounds which brings about possibilities of their utilization in biotechnological and environmental applications. Research attempts have resulted in increased production of both laccases and peroxidases by the aid of heterologous and homologous expression. Through analysis of promoter regions, protein expression patterns and culture conditions manipulations it was possible to compare and identify common pathways of these enzymes' production and secretion. Although laccase and peroxidase proteins have been crystallized and thoroughly analyzed, there are still a lot of questions remaining about their evolutionary origin and the physiological functions. This review describes the present understanding of promoter sequences and correlation between the observed regulatory effects on laccase, manganese peroxidase and lignin peroxidase genes transcript levels and the presence of specific response elements. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Enhanced production of manganese peroxidase by Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raziye Ozturk Urek

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Production of manganese-dependent peroxidase (MnP by the white-rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium BKM-F-1767 (ATCC 24725 was monitored during growth in different media and growth conditions. The effect of some activators of MnP production, Mn2+, Tween 80, phenylmethylsulphonylfloride (PMSF, oxygen, temperature, pH, glycerol and nitrogen was studied. Supplementing the cultures with Tween 80 (0.05 %, v/v and Mn2+ (174 µM resulted a maximum MnP activity of 356 U/L which was approximately two times higher than that obtained in the control culture (without Tween 80. Decolourisation of Direct Blue 15 and Direct Green 6 (50 mg/L was also achieved with MnP.

  2. Effect of manganese on the secretion of manganese-peroxidase by the basidiomycete Ceriporiopsis subvermispora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancilla, Rodrigo A; Canessa, Paulo; Manubens, Augusto; Vicuña, Rafael

    2010-07-01

    The ligninolytic machinery of the widely used model fungus Ceriporiopsis subvermispora includes the enzymes manganese-peroxidase (MnP) and laccase (Lcs). In this work the effect of Mn(II) on the secretion of MnP was studied. Cultures grown in the absence of Mn(II) showed high levels of mnp transcripts. However, almost no MnP enzyme was detected in the extracellular medium, either by enzymatic activity assays or Western blot hybridizations. In the corresponding mycelia, immuno-electron microscopy experiments showed high levels of MnP enzyme within intracellular compartments. These results suggest that in addition to its well-known effect on transcription regulation of mnp genes, manganese influences secretion of MnP to the extracellular medium. Experiments carried out in the presence of cycloheximide confirmed that the metal is required to secrete MnP already synthesized and retained within the cell.

  3. The relationship between lignin peroxidase and manganese peroxidase production capacities and cultivation periods of mushrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian Z; Zhang, Jun L; Hu, Kai H; Zhang, Wei G

    2013-05-01

    Mushrooms are able to secrete lignin peroxidase (LiP) and manganese peroxidase (MnP), and able to use the cellulose as sources of carbon. This article focuses on the relation between peroxidase-secreting capacity and cultivation period of mushrooms with non-laccase activity. Methylene blue and methyl catechol qualitative assay and spectrophotometry quantitative assay show LiP secreting unvaryingly accompanies the MnP secreting in mushroom strains. The growth rates of hyphae are detected by detecting the dry hyphal mass. We link the peroxidase activities to growth rate of mushrooms and then probe into the relationship between them. The results show that there are close relationships between LiP- and/or MnP-secretory capacities and the cultivation periods of mushrooms. The strains with high LiP and MnP activities have short cultivation periods. However, those strains have long cultivation periods because of the low levels of secreted LiP and/or MnP, even no detectable LiP and/or MnP activity. This study provides the first evidence on the imitate relation between the level of secreted LiP and MnP activities and cultivation periods of mushrooms with non-laccase activity. Our study has significantly increased the understanding of the role of LiP and MnP in the growth and development of mushrooms with non-laccase activity. © 2012 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology © 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Contribution of manganese peroxidase and laccase to dye decoloration by Trametes versicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champagne, Paul-Philippe; Ramsay, Juliana Akit

    2005-12-01

    During dye decoloration by Trametes versicolor ATCC 20869 in modified Kirk's medium, manganese peroxidase (MnP) and laccase were produced, but not lignin peroxidase, cellobiose dehydrogenase or manganese-independent peroxidase. Purified MnP decolorized azo dyes [amaranth, reactive black 5 (RB5) and Cibacron brilliant yellow] in Mn(2+)-dependent reactions but did not decolorize an anthraquinone dye [Remazol brilliant blue R (RBBR)]. However, the purified laccase decolorized RBBR five to ten times faster than the azo dyes and the addition of a redox mediator, 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid), did not alter decoloration rates. Amaranth and RB5 were decolorized the most rapidly by MnP since they have a hydroxyl group in an ortho position and a sulfonate group in the meta position relative to the azo bond. During a typical batch decoloration with the fungal culture, the ratio of laccase:MnP was 10:1 to 20:1 (based on enzyme activity) and increased to greater than 30:1 after decoloration was complete. Since MnP decolorized amaranth about 30 times more rapidly than laccase per unit of enzyme activity, MnP should have contributed more to decoloration than laccase in batch cultures.

  5. Optimization of lignin peroxidase, manganese peroxidase, and Lac production from Ganoderma lucidum under solid state fermentation of pineapple leaf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudha Hariharan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to isolate ligninase-producing white-rot fungi for use in the extraction of fibre from pineapple leaf agriwaste. Fifteen fungal strains were isolated from dead tree trunks and leaf litter. Ligninolytic enzymes (lignin peroxidase (LiP, manganese peroxidase (MnP, and laccase (Lac, were produced by solid-state fermentation (SSF using pineapple leaves as the substrate. Of the isolated strains, the one showing maximum production of ligninolytic enzymes was identified to be Ganoderma lucidum by 18S ribotyping. Single parameter optimization and response surface methodology of different process variables were carried out for enzyme production. Incubation period, agitation, and Tween-80 were identified to be the most significant variables through Plackett-Burman design. These variables were further optimized by Box-Behnken design. The overall maximum yield of ligninolytic enzymes was achieved by experimental analysis under these optimal conditions. Quantitative lignin analysis of pineapple leaves by Klason lignin method showed significant degradation of lignin by Ganoderma lucidum under SSF.

  6. Oxidation of wheat straw lignin by fungal lignin peroxidase, manganese peroxidase and laccase: A comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Ingo, M.J.; Kurek, B. [Laboratorie de Chimie Biologique, Thiverval-Grignon (France)

    1996-10-01

    Lignin peroxidase (LiP), manganese peroxidase (MnP) from Phanerochaete chrysosporium and laccase from Pleurotus eryngii were separately used to degrade alkali wheat straw lignin (AL). In order to characterize the catalytic action of the different enzymes, the chemical structure and the hydrodynamic properties of the treated lignin were analyzed by thioacidolysis-gas chromatography and molecular size exclusion chromatography. The results confirmed that only LiP was able to degrade guiacyl (G) and syringyl (S) structures in non-phenolic methylated lignins. However, provided that some phenolic terminal structures are present, MnP and laccase were able to degrade the non-phenolic portion of the polymer linked by {beta}-O-4 alkyl aryl ether bonds. This suggested that the oxidative reactions catalyzed in alkali straw lignin could progress through bond cleavages generating phenoxy radicals. The molecular size distribution of both thioacidolysis products and the oxidized polymer showed that AL underwent condensation side-reactions regardless of the enzyme treatment, but only LiP oxidation led to the increase in the hydrodynamic volume of the recovered lignin. This indicated that modification of enzymes by bonding patterns in lignin is not always associated with alterations in the spatial network of the polymer.

  7. Modulation of Cerrena unicolor laccase and manganese peroxidase production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachlishvili, Eva; Metreveli, Eka; Elisashvili, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Among seven carbon sources tested, glycerol and glucose favored the Cerrena unicolor laccase production (18.8-20.3 U/mL); in addition, glycerol ensured the highest manganese peroxidase (MnP) activity (2 U/mL). Substitution of glycerol with the ethanol production residue (EPR) gave the highest laccase (90.1 U/mL) activity, while the walnut pericarp provided the highest MnP activity (7.4 U/mL). Supplementation of medium with 1 mM copper and 1 mM xylidine at appropriate time caused significant additive effect on laccase expression (333.2 U/mL) in shake-flask experiments. Overproduction of laccase activity (507 U/mL) and secretion of MnP activity was obtained when C. unicolor was cultivated in stirred-tank fermenter. C. unicolor showed several distinctive and attractive technological features: it is capable to synthesize high levels of oxidases under high carbon and high nitrogen conditions and it secretes high laccase activity during trophophase.

  8. Box-Behnken实验设计及响应面分析优化锰过氧化物酶培养基条件%Optimization of culture medium to produce manganese peroxidase by using Box-Behnken experimental design and response surface methodology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵玉萍; 陈晓旺; 沈鹏伟

    2013-01-01

    以白腐真菌为出发菌株,利用Design-Expert 8.05软件设计,采用三水平部分因子分析初始发酵产酶培养基中10个因子,确定麸皮、酵母膏和KH2PO4为产锰过氧化物酶(Mnp)的显著影响因子,根据Box-Benhnken的中心组合实验设计及三因素三水平的响应面分析,通过二次多项回归模型进行方差分析和回归拟合,预测了最佳产酶培养基条件为:麸皮、酵母膏和KH2PO4的添加量分别为10.75、3.37、0.095g/L,最大Mnp酶活预测值为4.06U/mL.验证实验Mnp酶活为4.15U/ml,与预测值十分接近.优化后的酶活与优化前相比,Mnp酶活提高了58.4%.%White rot fungi preserved in our laboratory was used to produce manganese peroxidase. Design-Expert 8.05 software was used to optimize the culture medium producing this peroxidase. 3-Level factorial analysis was used to analyze the main effect factors from 10 factors. The result showed that the wheat bran, yeast extract and KH2PO4 were the significant factors. According to Box-Behnken experimental design and response surface methodology, the second-order equation model was established by regression analysis of experimental data. The predicted optimal addition of wheat bran,yeast extract and KH2PO4 were 10.75、3.37 and 0.095g/L respectively,and the predicted maximum manganese peroxidase could reach 4.06U/mL The manganese peroxidase activity of verification experiment was 4.15U/mL,which was very close to the predicted value. The manganese peroxidase activity under the optimization condition increased by 58.4% compared with the original enzyme production medium.

  9. Production of laccase and manganese peroxidase by Fomes sclerodermeus grown on wheat bran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papinutti, V L; Diorio, L A; Forchiassin, F

    2003-03-01

    The aim of this work was to study the growth and production of ligninolytic enzymes by Fomes sclerodermeus using a natural medium based on wheat bran as the principal substrate in a solid-state fermentation. Growth was monitored by measuring the chitin content in the substrate. The maximum rate of growth was observed between days 7 and 18. A 38% total dry-weight loss of the substrate was measured after 28 days of cultivation. Differential hydrolysis of the substrate revealed that cellulose was more extensively degraded than lignin. In the 28-day incubation period, the losses of cellulose and lignin were 38 and 15%, respectively. No lignin peroxidase activity was found in any of the media tested. The maximum manganese-dependent peroxidase activity recorded was 6.3 U g(-1) at 14 days, while the maximum laccase activity was 270 U g(-1) at 28 days post-inoculation. Addition of commonly used inducers such as copper or manganese did not produce a further increase in the enzyme activities, nor did addition of glucose, asparagine, or malt extract.

  10. Effects of pH and temperature on recombinant manganese peroxidase production and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Fei; Kongsaeree, Puapong; Schilke, Karl; Lajoie, Curtis; Kelly, Christine

    2008-03-01

    The enzyme manganese peroxidase (MnP) is produced by numerous white-rot fungi to overcome biomass recalcitrance caused by lignin. MnP acts directly on lignin and increases access of the woody structure to synergistic wood-degrading enzymes such as cellulases and xylanases. Recombinant MnP (rMnP) can be produced in the yeast Pichia pastoris alphaMnP1-1 in fed-batch fermentations. The effects of pH and temperature on recombinant manganese peroxidase (rMnP) production by P. pastoris alphaMnP1-1 were investigated in shake flask and fed-batch fermentations. The optimum pH and temperature for a standardized fed-batch fermentation process for rMnP production in P. pastoris alphaMnP1-1 were determined to be pH 6 and 30 degrees C, respectively. P. pastoris alphaMnP1-1 constitutively expresses the manganese peroxidase (mnp1) complementary DNA from Phanerochaete chrysosporium, and the rMnP has similar kinetic characteristics and pH activity and stability ranges as the wild-type MnP (wtMnP). Cultivation of P. chrysosporium mycelia in stationary flasks for production of heme peroxidases is commonly conducted at low pH (pH 4.2). However, shake flask and fed-batch fermentation experiments with P. pastoris alphaMnP1-1 demonstrated that rMnP production is highest at pH 6, with rMnP concentrations in the medium declining rapidly at pH less than 5.5, although cell growth rates were similar from pH 4-7. Investigations of the cause of low rMnP production at low pH were consistent with the hypothesis that intracellular proteases are released from dead and lysed yeast cells during the fermentation that are active against rMnP at pH less than 5.5.

  11. Effects of pH and Temperature on Recombinant Manganese Peroxidase Production and Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Fei; Kongsaeree, Puapong; Schilke, Karl; Lajoie, Curtis; Kelly, Christine

    The enzyme manganese peroxidase (MnP) is produced by numerous white-rot fungi to overcome biomass recalcitrance caused by lignin. MnP acts directly on lignin and increases access of the woody structure to synergistic wood-degrading enzymes such as cellulases and xylanases. Recombinant MnP (rMnP) can be produced in the yeast Pichia pastoris αMnP1-1 in fed-batch fermentations. The effects of pH and temperature on recombinant manganese peroxidase (rMnP) production by P. pastoris αMnP1-1 were investigated in shake flask and fed-batch fermentations. The optimum pH and temperature for a standardized fed-batch fermentation process for rMnP production in P. pastoris ctMnP1-1 were determined to be pH 6 and 30 °C, respectively. P. pastoris αMnP1-1 constitutively expresses the manganese peroxidase (mnp1) complementary DNA from Phanerochaete chrysosporium, and the rMnP has similar kinetic characteristics and pH activity and stability ranges as the wild-type MnP (wtMnP). Cultivation of P. chrysosporium mycelia in stationary flasks for production of heme peroxidases is commonly conducted at low pH (pH 4.2). However, shake flask and fed-batch fermentation experiments with P. pastoris αMnP1-1 demonstrated that rMnP production is highest at pH 6, with rMnP concentrations in the medium declining rapidly at pH less than 5.5, although cell growth rates were similar from pH 4-7. Investigations of the cause of low rMnP production at low pH were consistent with the hypothesis that intracellular proteases are released from dead and lysed yeast cells during the fermentation that are active against rMnP at pH less than 5.5.

  12. Study on Impact Factors of Manganese-Dependent Peroxidase Produced by White Rot Fungi%白腐真菌产锰过氧化物酶的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余梅; 阮小文; 谭丽泉; 卢玉娟

    2014-01-01

    以锰过氧化物酶活性为评价指标,研究各种因子对白腐真菌生长及产锰过氧化物酶的影响。结果表明:藜芦醇、苯甲醇和吐温80的添加有利于促进白腐真菌的生长及产锰过氧化物酶活性,在浓度分别为150 mg·L-1、150 mg ·L-1、14 mg·L-1时对白腐真菌生长及产锰过氧化物酶促进作用最好;Ca2+、Fe2+对白腐真菌生长及产锰过氧化物酶活性的影响是一致的,均表现为“先促进,后抑制”的作用;Cu2+浓度小于0.4 mg·L-1时能略微促进白腐真菌的生长及产锰过氧化物酶活性,大于该浓度时具有较明显的抑制作用。%Taking enzyme activity of manganese-dependent peroxidase as the assessment index,the effects of several factors on the characterizations of growth and production of manganese-dependent peroxidase(MnP)by white rot fungi(Phanerochaete chrysosporium)were studied.Results indicated that,veratryl alcohol(150 mg· L-1 ),benzyl alcohol(150 mg·L-1 )and Tween 80(14 mg·L-1 )could stimulate the growth of white rot fungi and activity of MnP.Effects on the growth of white rot fungi and activity of MnP were the same with addition of Ca2+ and Fe2+ ,which was promoted at beginning and inhibited later.When Cu2+ concentration was lower than 0.4 mg·L-1 ,Cu2+ cound promote the growth of white rot fungi and activity of MnP,while it could inhibit the growth of white rot fungi and activity of MnP when the concentration was mare than 0.4 mg·L-1 .

  13. Screening of tetrachlorodibenzo- p-dioxin-degrading fungi capable of producing extracellular peroxidases under various conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manji, S; Ishihara, A

    2004-01-01

    Forty-six pulp-bleaching fungi were screened for production of key enzymes for conversion of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins--lignin peroxidase (LiP), manganese peroxidase (MnP), and manganese-independent peroxidase (MiP)--under various conditions that would allow their utilization in the environment. Of 38 MnP-producing strains with MiP activity, 22 produced LiP. Three of the new isolates, Bjerkandera sp. strains MS191, MS325, and MS1167, were the best producers of the three different peroxidases, and had reasonable growth rates. The most promising Bjerkandera sp. strain, MS325, exhibited significant levels of LiP and MnP activities under various conditions, e.g., nutrient nitrogen-sufficient or -limited conditions, conditions with or without Mn(II), and changes in temperature (15-37 degrees C). Furthermore, the ability of this strain to degrade 1,3,6,8-tetrachlorodibenzo- p-dioxin was confirmed. The results presented here indicate that utilization of Bjerkandera sp. strain MS325 on a practical scale in the environment has several advantages over many white rot fungi, which produce extracellular peroxidases only under specific conditions such as nutrient limitation.

  14. Direct oxidation of polymeric substrates by multifunctional manganese peroxidase isoenzyme from Pleurotus ostreatus without redox mediators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    VPs (versatile peroxidases) sharing the functions of LiP (lignin peroxidase) and MnP (manganese peroxidase) have been described in basidiomycetous fungi Pleurotus and Bjerkandera. Despite the importance of this enzyme in polymer degradation, its reactivity with polymeric substrates remains poorly understood. In the present study, we first report that, unlike LiP, VP from Pleurotus ostreatus directly oxidized two polymeric substrates, bovine pancreatic RNase and Poly R-478, through a long-range electron pathway without redox mediators. P. ostreatus produces several MnP isoenzymes, including the multifunctional enzyme MnP2 (VP) and a typical MnP isoenzyme MnP3. MnP2 (VP) depolymerized a polymeric azo dye, Poly R-478, to complete its catalytic cycle. Reduction of the oxidized intermediates of MnP2 (VP) to its resting state was also observed for RNase. RNase inhibited the oxidation of VA (veratryl alcohol) in a competitive manner. Blocking of the exposed tryptophan by N-bromosuccinimide inhibited the oxidation of RNase and VA by MnP2 (VP), but its Mn2+-oxidizing activity was retained, suggesting that Trp-170 exposed on an enzyme surface is a substrate-binding site both for VA and the polymeric substrates. The direct oxidation of RNase and Poly R by MnP2 (VP) is in sharp contrast with redox mediator-dependent oxidation of these polymers by LiP from Phanerochaete chrysosporium. Molecular modelling of MnP2 (VP) revealed that the differences in the dependence on redox mediators in polymer oxidation by MnP2 (VP) and LiP were explained by the anionic microenvironment surrounding the exposed tryptophan. PMID:15461584

  15. Laccase and manganese peroxidase activities of Phellinus robustus and Ganoderma adspersum grown on food industry wastes in submerged fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Songulashvili, G; Elisashvili, V; Wasser, S; Nevo, E; Hadar, Y

    2006-09-01

    Phellinus robustus produced both laccase (700-4,000 U l(-1)) and manganese peroxidase (MnP) (1,000-11,300 U l(-1)) in fermentation of nine food wastes, whereas Ganoderma adspersum produced only laccase (600-34,000 U l(-1)). Glucose provided high laccase and MnP activity of P. robustus but repressed enzyme production by G. adspersum. Ammonium sulphate and ammonium tartrate increased the P. robustus laccase yield (3-fold), whereas the accumulation of MnP was not enhanced by additional nitrogen.

  16. Increasing manganese peroxidase production and biodecolorization of triphenylmethane dyes by novel fungal consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiuqing; Wang, Jingren; Zhao, Xiaoxia; Wang, Qi; Xue, Rui

    2011-11-01

    A fungal consortium-SR consisting of Trametes sp. SQ01 and Chaetomium sp. R01 was developed for decolorizing three kinds of triphenylmethane dyes, which were decolorized by individual fungi with low efficiencies. The fungal consortium-SR produced 1.3 U ml(-1) of manganese peroxidase, 5.5 times higher than that produced by the monoculture of Trametes sp. SQ01, and decolorized Crystal Violet, Coomassie Brilliant Blue G250 (CBB G250) and Cresol Red. The fungal consortium-SR had a decolorization rate of 63-96%, much higher than that of the monoculture of strain SQ01 (38-72%). In consortium-SR, the higher efficiencies of decolorization of Crystal Violet and CBB G250 were obtained when they added to the culture after 4d of mixed cultivation rather than at the beginning of cultivation. Cresol Red was the exception. It is suggested that the consortium-SR has great potential for decolorizing triphenylmethane dyes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparative analysis of lignin peroxidase and manganese peroxidase activity on coniferous and deciduous wood using ToF-SIMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Jacqueline; Goacher, Robyn E; Abou-Zaid, Mamdouh; Master, Emma R

    2016-09-01

    White-rot fungi are distinguished by their ability to efficiently degrade lignin via lignin-modifying type II peroxidases, including manganese peroxidase (MnP) and lignin peroxidase (LiP). In the present study, time-of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) was used to evaluate lignin modification in three coniferous and three deciduous wood preparations following treatment with commercial preparations of LiP and MnP from two different white-rot fungi. Percent modification of lignin was calculated as a loss of intact methoxylated lignin over nonfunctionalized aromatic rings, which is consistent with oxidative cleavage of methoxy moieties within the lignin structure. Exposure to MnP resulted in greater modification of lignin in coniferous compared to deciduous wood (28 vs. 18 % modification of lignin); and greater modification of G-lignin compared to S-lignin within the deciduous wood samples (21 vs. 12 %). In contrast, exposure to LiP resulted in similar percent modification of lignin in all wood samples (21 vs 22 %), and of G- and S-lignin within the deciduous wood (22 vs. 23 %). These findings suggest that the selected MnP and LiP may particularly benefit delignification of coniferous and deciduous wood, respectively. Moreover, the current analysis further demonstrates the utility of ToF-SIMS for characterizing enzymatic modification of lignin in wood fibre along with potential advantages over UV and HPCL-MS detection of solubilized delignification products.

  18. Sandal reactive dyes decolorization and cytotoxicity reduction using manganese peroxidase immobilized onto polyvinyl alcohol-alginate beads

    OpenAIRE

    Bilal, Muhammad; Asgher, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Background Fungal manganese peroxidases (MnPs) have great potential as bio-remediating agents and can be used continuously in the immobilized form like many other enzymes. Results In the present study, purified manganese peroxidase (MnP) enzyme isolated from Ganoderma lucidum IBL-05 was immobilized onto polyvinyl alcohol-alginate beads and investigated its potential for the decolorization and detoxification of new class of reactive dyes and textile wastewater. The optimal conditions for MnP i...

  19. Novel promoter sequence required for manganese regulation of manganese peroxidase isozyme 1 gene expression in Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Biao; Mayfield, Mary B; Godfrey, Bruce J; Gold, Michael H

    2004-06-01

    Manganese peroxidase (MnP) is a major, extracellular component of the lignin-degrading system produced by the wood-rotting basidiomycetous fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium. The transcription of MnP-encoding genes (mnps) in P. chrysosporium occurs as a secondary metabolic event, triggered by nutrient-nitrogen limitation. In addition, mnp expression occurs only under Mn2+ supplementation. Using a reporter system based on the enhanced green fluorescent protein gene (egfp), we have characterized the P. chrysosporium mnp1 promoter by examining the effects of deletion, replacement, and translocation mutations on mnp1 promoter-directed egfp expression. The 1,528-bp mnp1 promoter fragment drives egfp expression only under Mn2+-sufficient, nitrogen-limiting conditions, as required for endogenous MnP production. However, deletion of a 48-bp fragment, residing 521 bp upstream of the translation start codon in the mnp1 promoter, or replacement of this fragment with an unrelated sequence resulted in egfp expression under nitrogen limitation, both in the absence and presence of exogenous Mn2+. Translocation of the 48-bp fragment to a site 120 bp downstream of its original location resulted in Mn2+-dependent egfp expression under conditions similar to those observed with the wild-type mnp1 promoter. These results suggest that the 48-bp fragment contains at least one Mn2+-responsive cis element. Additional promoter-deletion experiments suggested that the Mn2+ element(s) is located within the 33-bp sequence at the 3' end of the 48-bp fragment. This is the first promoter sequence containing a Mn2+-responsive element(s) to be characterized in any eukaryotic organism. Copyright 2004 American Society for Microbiology

  20. Purification and Partial characterization of manganese peroxidase from Bacillus pumilus AND Paenibacillus sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Lopes de Oliveira

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The production of manganese peroxidase (MnP from Bacillus pumilus and Paenibacillus sp. was studied under absence and presence of the inducers indulin AT, guayacol, veratryl alcohol, lignosulfonic acid and lignosulfonic acid desulfonated. Indulin AT increased the activity of B. pumilus MnP up to 31.66 U/L after 8 h, but no improve was observed for Paenibacillus sp., which reached maximum activity (12.22 U/L after 20 h. Both MnPs produced by these microorganisms were purified in phenyl sepharose resin and the proteins from crude extracts were eluted in two fractions. However, only the first fraction of each extract exhibited MnP activities. Tests in different pH and temperature values, from pH 5.0 to pH 10.0 and 30 ºC to 60 ºC, respectively, were carried out with the purified MnP. The maximum activity reached for B. pumilus and Paenibacillus sp. MnPs were 4.3 U/L at pH 8.0 and 25 ºC and 11.74 U/L at pH 9.0 and 35 ºC, respectively. The molar masses determined by SDS-PAGE gel eletrophoresis were 25 kDa and 40 kDa, respectively, for the purified enzyme from B. pumilus and Paenibacillus sp.

  1. Agaricus bisporus and related Agaricus species on lignocellulose: production of manganese peroxidase and multicopper oxidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildén, Kristiina; Mäkelä, Miia R; Lankinen, Pauliina; Lundell, Taina

    2013-06-01

    Biotechnological, microbiological, and genetic studies of Agaricus species other than A. bisporus, the white button mushroom, have been limited so far. To expand the knowledge in the genus Agaricus, six novel wild-type isolates of Agaricus spp. were studied on their nutritional demands for enzyme production and mycelial growth. All the selected Agaricus species produced extracellular manganese peroxidase (MnP) and laccase activities in semi-solid rye bran cultures. Moderate MnP activities were measured for A. bisporus, A. bernardii and A. campestris. The highest laccase activities were obtained for A. bisporus and A. campestris. On soy medium, the highest mycelial tyrosinase activity was determined for A. bernardii. For A. bisporus, addition of copper caused no increase in laccase or tyrosinase activities on soy or malt extract media. Hyphal growth rate of the isolates was studied on lignocellulose amended agar plates. Fastest growth was obtained for A. bisporus on wheat bran and birch leaf litter agar. Except for A. bernardii, hyphal growth rates correlated well with MnP and laccase production levels between Agaricus species. Molecular taxonomy of the novel Agaricus spp. positioned them to distinct phylogenetic clusters with species-level identity. In conclusion, our data point to the importance of both MnP and multicopper enzymes in Agaricus spp. while growing on lignocelluloses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Degradation of sulfide linkages between isoprenes by lipid peroxidation catalyzed by manganese peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Shin; Ohashi, Yasunori; Kojima, Masaaki; Watanabe, Takahito; Honda, Yoichi; Watanabe, Takashi

    2009-10-01

    Scission of sulfide linkages in vulcanized rubber has been a major concern since the early 20th century, because devulcanization is a key process for recycling waste rubber products as polymer materials that pose low environmental risks. We herein demonstrate that lipid peroxidation (LPO) of linoleic acid by manganese peroxidase (MnP), a proposed lignin-degradation system in the early stage of selective white rot fungi, cleaves sulfide bond in a model rubber compound, di(2-methylpent-2-enyl) sulfide, to 2,4-dimethylthiophene and 2-methyl-2-pentenal. The major intermediate of the LPO process, 2,4-decadienal was directly oxidized by MnP to cleave the sulfur-carbon bond. We propose that electrophilic radicals from 2,4-decadienal abstract one electron from a sulfur atom of the model compound to produce the sulfur radical cation intermediate, which in turn reacts with molecular oxygen to cleave the sulfur-carbon bond. The discovery of free radical-mediated scission of sulfide bond coupled with Mn oxidation provides a novel strategy for recycling vulcanized rubber wastes.

  3. Manganese-lignin peroxidase hybrid from Bjerkandera adusta oxidizes polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons more actively in the absence of manganese

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y.; Pickard, M. A. [University of Alberta, Dept. of Biological Sciences, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Vazquez-Duhalt, R. [Instituto de Biotecnologia, UNAM, Morelos (Mexico)

    2003-11-01

    Many polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are toxic. As such, they are considered priority pollutants and represent a public health risk. Manganese-lignin peroxidase (MnLiP) is a glycoprotein that normally requires manganese(II) for its activity. Enzymatic oxidation of PAHs has been reported with purified preparations of lignin peroxidase (LiP). In this study the oxidation of PAHs was examined in the presence and absence of manganese ions, using whole cells and a purified MnLiP hybrid isoenzyme derived from Bjerkandera adusta, a white rot fungi. The objective was to demonstrate the ability of the MnLiP hybrid enzyme to oxidize PAHs. Results showed a decrease in the rate of oxidation of PAHs in the presence of Mn. A clear correlation was found between the specific activity of MnLiP and the ionization potential (IP) of the PAH substrate. Aromatic substrates were oxidized by the purified enzyme with an IP lower than 7.43 eV; the lower the IP the faster the rate of oxidation. The PAH metabolites of the Mn-independent reaction were identified as the corresponding quinones. PAH oxidation with MnLiP showed a different pH profile according to the presence or absence of Mn: the Mn-dependent oxidation of PAHs showed a lower optimal pH profile than the Mn-independent oxidation. As reported in the case of other white rot fungi the metabolic degradation of PAHs by B. adusta appears to involve both intracellular enzymatic systems such as cytochrome P450, and extracellular oxidative enzymes. 48 refs., 4 tabs., 1 fig.

  4. Characterization of leaf apoplastic peroxidases and metabolites in Vigna unguiculata in response to toxic manganese supply and silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Führs, Hendrik; Götze, Stefanie; Specht, André; Erban, Alexander; Gallien, Sébastien; Heintz, Dimitri; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Kopka, Joachim; Braun, Hans-Peter; Horst, Walter J

    2009-01-01

    Previous work suggested that the apoplastic phenol composition and its interaction with apoplastic class III peroxidases (PODs) are decisive in the development or avoidance of manganese (Mn) toxicity in cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L.). This study characterizes apoplastic PODs with particular emphasis on the activities of specific isoenzymes and their modulation by phenols in the Mn-sensitive cowpea cultivar TVu 91 as affected by Mn and silicon (Si) supply. Si reduced Mn-induced toxicity symptoms without affecting the Mn uptake. Blue Native-PAGE combined with Nano-LC-MS/MS allowed identification of a range of POD isoenzymes in the apoplastic washing fluid (AWF). In Si-treated plants Mn-mediated induction of POD activity was delayed. Four POD isoenzymes eluted from the BN gels catalysed both H(2)O(2)-consuming and H(2)O(2)-producing activity with pH optima at 6.5 and 5.5, respectively. Four phenols enhanced NADH-peroxidase activity of these isoenzymes in the presence of Mn(2+) (p-coumaric=vanillic>benzoic>ferulic acid). p-Coumaric acid-enhanced NADH-peroxidase activity was inhibited by ferulic acid (50%) and five other phenols (50-90%). An independent component analysis (ICA) of the total and apoplastic GC-MS-based metabolome profile showed that Mn, Si supply, and the AWF fraction (AWF(H(2)O), AWF(NaCl)) significantly changed the metabolite composition. Extracting non-polar metabolites from the AWF allowed the identification of phenols. Predominantly NADH-peroxidase activity-inhibiting ferulic acid appeared to be down-regulated in Mn-sensitive (+Mn, -Si) and up-regulated in Mn-tolerant (+Si) leaf tissue. The results presented here support the previously hypothesized role of apoplastic NADH-peroxidase and its activity-modulating phenols in Mn toxicity and Si-enhanced Mn tolerance.

  5. Improving the pH-stability of Versatile Peroxidase by Comparative Structural Analysis with a Naturally-Stable Manganese Peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez-Jiménez, Verónica; Fernández-Fueyo, Elena; Medrano, Francisco Javier; Romero, Antonio; Martínez, Angel T; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J

    2015-01-01

    Versatile peroxidase (VP) from the white-rot fungus Pleurotus eryngii is a high redox potential peroxidase of biotechnological interest able to oxidize a wide range of recalcitrant substrates including lignin, phenolic and non-phenolic aromatic compounds and dyes. However, the relatively low stability towards pH of this and other fungal peroxidases is a drawback for their industrial application. A strategy based on the comparative analysis of the crystal structures of VP and the highly pH-stable manganese peroxidase (MnP4) from Pleurotus ostreatus was followed to improve the VP pH stability. Several interactions, including hydrogen bonds and salt bridges, and charged residues exposed to the solvent were identified as putatively contributing to the pH stability of MnP4. The eight amino acid residues responsible for these interactions and seven surface basic residues were introduced into VP by directed mutagenesis. Furthermore, two cysteines were also included to explore the effect of an extra disulfide bond stabilizing the distal Ca2+ region. Three of the four designed variants were crystallized and new interactions were confirmed, being correlated with the observed improvement in pH stability. The extra hydrogen bonds and salt bridges stabilized the heme pocket at acidic and neutral pH as revealed by UV-visible spectroscopy. They led to a VP variant that retained a significant percentage of the initial activity at both pH 3.5 (61% after 24 h) and pH 7 (55% after 120 h) compared with the native enzyme, which was almost completely inactivated. The introduction of extra solvent-exposed basic residues and an additional disulfide bond into the above variant further improved the stability at acidic pH (85% residual activity at pH 3.5 after 24 h when introduced separately, and 64% at pH 3 when introduced together). The analysis of the results provides a rational explanation to the pH stability improvement achieved.

  6. Improving the pH-stability of Versatile Peroxidase by Comparative Structural Analysis with a Naturally-Stable Manganese Peroxidase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Sáez-Jiménez

    Full Text Available Versatile peroxidase (VP from the white-rot fungus Pleurotus eryngii is a high redox potential peroxidase of biotechnological interest able to oxidize a wide range of recalcitrant substrates including lignin, phenolic and non-phenolic aromatic compounds and dyes. However, the relatively low stability towards pH of this and other fungal peroxidases is a drawback for their industrial application. A strategy based on the comparative analysis of the crystal structures of VP and the highly pH-stable manganese peroxidase (MnP4 from Pleurotus ostreatus was followed to improve the VP pH stability. Several interactions, including hydrogen bonds and salt bridges, and charged residues exposed to the solvent were identified as putatively contributing to the pH stability of MnP4. The eight amino acid residues responsible for these interactions and seven surface basic residues were introduced into VP by directed mutagenesis. Furthermore, two cysteines were also included to explore the effect of an extra disulfide bond stabilizing the distal Ca2+ region. Three of the four designed variants were crystallized and new interactions were confirmed, being correlated with the observed improvement in pH stability. The extra hydrogen bonds and salt bridges stabilized the heme pocket at acidic and neutral pH as revealed by UV-visible spectroscopy. They led to a VP variant that retained a significant percentage of the initial activity at both pH 3.5 (61% after 24 h and pH 7 (55% after 120 h compared with the native enzyme, which was almost completely inactivated. The introduction of extra solvent-exposed basic residues and an additional disulfide bond into the above variant further improved the stability at acidic pH (85% residual activity at pH 3.5 after 24 h when introduced separately, and 64% at pH 3 when introduced together. The analysis of the results provides a rational explanation to the pH stability improvement achieved.

  7. Reverse Transcription-PCR Analysis of the Regulation of the Manganese Peroxidase Gene Family

    OpenAIRE

    Gettemy, Jessica M.; Ma, Biao; Alic, Margaret; Gold, Michael H.

    1998-01-01

    Manganese peroxidase (MnP) gene expression in the lignin-degrading fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium is regulated by nutrient nitrogen levels and by Mn(II), the substrate for the enzyme, as well as by heat shock and other factors. Reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) of total RNA can distinguish the mRNAs of each of the three sequenced P. chrysosporium mnp genes, i.e., mnp1, mnp2, and mnp3. Quantitative RT-PCR demonstrates that each of the three transcripts is present at a similar low basal le...

  8. Heat Shock Induction of Manganese Peroxidase Gene Transcription in Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Julie A.; Li, Dan; Alic, Margaret; Gold, Michael H.

    1993-01-01

    The expression of manganese peroxidase (MnP) in nitrogen-limited cultures of Phanerochaete chrysosporium is regulated by heat shock at the level of gene transcription. Nitrogen limitation and manganous ion [Mn(II)] previously have been shown to regulate mnp gene transcription. Northern (RNA) blot analysis demonstrates that 45°C heat shock results in the accumulation of mnp mRNA, even in cells grown in the absence of Mn. Heat shock induces mnp gene transcription in 4- or 5-day-old cells, and m...

  9. Description of the first fungal dye-decolorizing peroxidase oxidizing manganese(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Fueyo, Elena; Linde, Dolores; Almendral, David; López-Lucendo, María F; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J; Martínez, Angel T

    2015-11-01

    Two phylogenetically divergent genes of the new family of dye-decolorizing peroxidases (DyPs) were found during comparison of the four DyP genes identified in the Pleurotus ostreatus genome with over 200 DyP genes from other basidiomycete genomes. The heterologously expressed enzymes (Pleos-DyP1 and Pleos-DyP4, following the genome nomenclature) efficiently oxidize anthraquinoid dyes (such as Reactive Blue 19), which are characteristic DyP substrates, as well as low redox-potential dyes (such as 2,2-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid)) and substituted phenols. However, only Pleos-DyP4 oxidizes the high redox-potential dye Reactive Black 5, at the same time that it displays high thermal and pH stability. Unexpectedly, both enzymes also oxidize Mn(2+) to Mn(3+), albeit with very different catalytic efficiencies. Pleos-DyP4 presents a Mn(2+) turnover (56 s(-1)) nearly in the same order of the two other Mn(2+)-oxidizing peroxidase families identified in the P. ostreatus genome: manganese peroxidases (100 s(-1) average turnover) and versatile peroxidases (145 s(-1) average turnover), whose genes were also heterologously expressed. Oxidation of Mn(2+) has been reported for an Amycolatopsis DyP (24 s(-1)) and claimed for other bacterial DyPs, albeit with lower activities, but this is the first time that Mn(2+) oxidation is reported for a fungal DyP. Interestingly, Pleos-DyP4 (together with ligninolytic peroxidases) is detected in the secretome of P. ostreatus grown on different lignocellulosic substrates. It is suggested that generation of Mn(3+) oxidizers plays a role in the P. ostreatus white-rot lifestyle since three different families of Mn(2+)-oxidizing peroxidase genes are present in its genome being expressed during lignocellulose degradation.

  10. Degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by free and nanoclay-immobilized manganese peroxidase from Anthracophyllum discolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, F; Pizzul, L; Castillo, M Dp; González, M E; Cea, M; Gianfreda, L; Diez, M C

    2010-06-01

    Manganese peroxidase (MnP) produced by Anthracophyllum discolor, a Chilean white rot fungus, was immobilized on nanoclay obtained from volcanic soil and its ability to degrade polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) compared with the free enzyme was evaluated. At the same time, nanoclay characterization was performed. Nanoclay characterization by transmission electronic microscopy showed a particle average size smaller than 100 nm. The isoelectric points (IEP) of nanoclay and MnP from A. discolor were 7.0 and 3.7, respectively, as determined by micro electrophoresis migration and preparative isoelectric focusing. Results indicated that 75% of the enzyme was immobilized on the nanoclay through physical adsorption. As compared to the free enzyme, immobilized MnP from A. discolor achieved an improved stability to temperature and pH. The activation energy (Ea) value for immobilized MnP (51.9 kJ mol(-1)) was higher than that of the free MnP (34.4 kJ mol(-1)). The immobilized enzyme was able to degrade pyrene (>86%), anthracene (>65%), alone or in mixture, and to a less extent fluoranthene (MnP from A. discolor, the enzyme immobilized on nanoclay enhanced the enzymatic transformation of anthracene in soil. Overall results indicate that nanoclay, a carrier of natural origin, is a suitable support material for MnP immobilization. In addition, immobilized MnP shows an increased stability to high temperature, pH and time storage, as well as an enhanced PAHs degradation efficiency in soil. All these characteristics may suggest the possible use of nanoclay-immobilized MnP from A. discolor as a valuable option for in situ bioremediation purposes.

  11. A manganese catalase from Thermomicrobium roseum with peroxidase and catecholase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baginski, Robin; Sommerhalter, Monika

    2017-01-01

    An enzyme with catechol oxidase activity was identified in Thermomicrobium roseum extracts via solution assays and activity-stained SDS-PAGE. Yet, the genome of T. roseum does not harbor a catecholase gene. The enzyme was purified with two anion exchange chromatography steps and ultimately identified to be a manganese catalase with additional peroxidase and catecholase activity. Catalase activity (6280 ± 430 IU/mg) clearly dominated over pyrogallol peroxidase (231 ± 53 IU/mg) and catecholase (3.07 ± 0.56 IU/mg) activity as determined at 70 °C. Most enzyme kinetic properties were comparable to previously characterized manganese catalase enzymes. Catalase activity was highest at alkaline pH values and showed inhibition by excess substrate and chloride. The apparent K m and k cat values were 20 mM and 2.02 × 10(4) s(-1) subunit(-1) at 25 °C and pH 7.0.

  12. Physiological regulation of laccase and manganese peroxidase production by white-rot Basidiomycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elisashvili, Vladimir; Kachlishvili, Eva

    2009-10-12

    This review integrates recent literature and our own data on the physiology of laccase and manganese peroxidase synthesis, focusing on the common characteristics and unique properties of individual fungi as well as on several approaches providing enhanced enzyme secretion. Firstly, the enzyme yield is species-dependent and strain-dependent and selection of new organisms with tremendous synthesis of these enzymes is possible. For example, in screening program the laccase activity of tested basidiomycetes varied from 0.5Uml(-1) to 75Uml(-1). Secondly, the carbon source and lignocellulosic substrate play a crucial role in enzyme production. Thus, laccase activity of Pseudotrametes gibbosa varied from 0.3Uml(-1) (Avicel) to 13.7Uml(-1) (lactose), while the substitution of wheat bran with walnut pericarp increased Cerrena unicolor manganese peroxidase yield from 0.7Uml(-1) to 8.3Uml(-1). Thirdly, aromatic compounds regulate the ligninolytic enzyme synthesis although their effect is very specific depending on fungi physiological peculiarities. 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) supplemented to the medium at appropriate concentration significantly accelerated C. unicolor laccase production and 4-fold increased laccase specific activity. Fourthly, co-cultivation of appropriate fungi shows considerable promise as a strategy to highly enhance the enzyme production. For example, pairing of C. unicolor and Phellinus robustus 2-fold increased the total laccase yield.

  13. Solid-state production of lignin peroxidase (LiP) and manganese peroxidase (MnP) by Phanerochaete chrysosporium using steam-exploded straw as substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujian, X; Hongzhang, C; Zuohu, L

    2001-11-01

    In the used media mainly consisting of steam-exploded wheat straw, the straw, which could replace expensive veratryl alcohol, might act not only as nutrient, but also as inducer of lignin enzymes. The activities of the enzymes lignin peroxidase (LiP) and manganese peroxidase (MnP) in solid-state fermentation (SSF) were far higher than in submerged fermentation (SmF). Under optimal conditions of SSF, the maximum activities of the enzymes Lip and MnP were 2600 and 1375 U/L, respectively. Thus, this would pave the way for production and application of lignin enzymes on a large scale.

  14. The effect of iron to manganese substitution on microperoxidase-8 catalysed peroxidase and cytochrome P450 type of catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Primus, J.L.; Boersma, M.G.; Mandon, D.; Boeren, S.; Veeger, C.; Weiss, R.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    1999-01-01

    This study describes the catalytic properties of manganese microperoxidase 8 [Mn(III)MP8] compared to iron microperoxidase 8 [Fe(III)MP8]. The mini-enzymes were tested for pH-dependent activity and operational stability in peroxidase-type conversions, using 2-methoxyphenol and 3,3'-dimethoxybenzidin

  15. Thermally stable and hydrogen peroxide tolerant manganese peroxidase (MnP) from Lenzites betulinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, Fumihiko; Kajino, Tsutomu; Sugiyama, Hidehiko; Asami, Osamu; Takahashi, Haruo

    2002-10-23

    A thermally stable and hydrogen peroxide tolerant manganese peroxidase (MnP) was purified from the culture medium of Lenzites betulinus by ion exchange chromatography, gel filtration and isoelectric focusing chromatography. The MnP purified from L. betulinus (L-MnP) has a molecular mass of 40 kDa and its isoelectric point was determined to be 6.2. The first 19 amino acids at the N-terminal end of the L-MnP sequence were found to exhibit 74% identity with those of a Phlebia radiata MnP. L-MnP was proved to have the highest hydrogen peroxide tolerance among MnPs reported so far. It retained more than 60% of the initial activity after thermal treatment at 60 degrees C for 60 min, and also retained more than 60% of the initial activity after exposure to 10 mM hydrogen peroxide for 5 min at 37 degrees C.

  16. Noncovalent immobilization of manganese peroxidases from P. chrysosporium on carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiaxi LI; Xianghua WEN

    2009-01-01

    Manganese peroxidases (MnP) from Phaner-ochaete chrysosporium were adsorbed onto multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT). Four different loadings of MnP on MWNTs were investigated, and the maximum enzyme loading of 47.5 μg/mg of MWNTs was obtained in 12 h. The adsorbed MnP showed a catalytic activity of up to 0.1 U/mg of the weight of the system of MnP/MWNTs,with 23% of its original activity retained. The AFM image of the adsorbed enzymes indicated that a layer of MnP covered the surface of the MWNTs and retained its original three-dimensional shape. Amino-based nonspecific inter-actions may play the dominant role in the adsorption of MnP on MWNTs.

  17. Effects of Pluronic F68 on Manganese peroxidase production by pelletized Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-Min; Liu, Yan; Chi, Zhan-You; Chen, Shu-lin

    2011-06-01

    In this study, a new process was developed for manganese peroxidase (MnP) production by Phanerochaete chrysosporium under an agitated and aerated cultivation condition. It was found that change of the inoculum from spore suspension to pellets resulted in enhanced MnP production of 200 U/L in rotated shake flasks. Several additives, including Pluronic F68, Tween 80, and PEG8000, significantly increased the enzyme production. With an optimal concentration in 125 mL flasks, Pluronic F68 increased MnP productivity by 180%. Moreover, successful enzyme production was achieved in a 5-L fermentor at an agitation speed of 300 rpm with the addition of 0.1% Pluronic F68.

  18. Synergistic effects of cellobiose dehydrogenase and manganese-dependent peroxidases during lignin degradation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The synergistic effects of cellobiose dehydrogenase (CDH) and manganese-dependent peroxidases (MnP) on the degradation of kraft pulp cellulolytic enzyme lignin (CEL) were investigated. Addition of CDH significantly increased the amount of water-soluble products reduced from CEL by MnP. CDH facilitated the reduction of the contents of methoxyl, carboxyl, phenolic hydroxyl and total hydroxyl groups of CEL by MnP. 1H-NMR analysis showed that addition of CDH also decreased further the amount of protons of CEL degraded by MnP. The results proved for the first time that CDH could promote degradation of lignin by MnP and suggest that CDH could not only promote degradation of cellulose but also is an important part of the lignin biodegradation system.

  19. Studies on Manganese Peroxidase Immobilized in Gelatin-containing Microemulsion-based Gels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Shao-fang; LUAN Yu-xia; SU Xiu-rong

    2005-01-01

    The immobilized technique of manganese peroxidase(MnP) in gelatin-containing microemulsion-based gels and the effects of storage time and reuse times on its catalytic activity were studied. The results show that the MnP immobilized together with Mn2+ and H2O2 could effectively oxidize syringaldazine in n-heptane. The immobilized MnP still had a high catalytic activity after one-month storage under a freezing condition. The reuse times have a relation to the amount of the immobilized H2O2. When the amount of the immobilized H2O2 is sufficient, the microemulsion-based gels containing MnP could be used many times.

  20. Expression of manganese peroxidase by Lentinula edodes and Lentinula boryana in solid state and submerged system fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KATIA L. HERMANN

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The production of ethanol from lignocellulosic biomass is referred as a second generation biofuel, whose processing is one of the most promising technologies under development. There are few available studies on the use of enzymes produced by fungi as active for the biodegradation of lignocellulosic biomass. However, the manganese peroxidase (MnP enzyme presents high potential to degrade lignin and the basidiomycetes are the major producers of this oxidase. Thus, this study aimed at evaluating the ability of fungi Lentinula edodes and Lentinula boryana to produce this enzyme when cultivated in submerged fermentation system (SS and also in solid-state fermentation system (SSF containing Eucalyptus benthamii sawdust with or without corn cob meal. In the SS the greatest MnP expression occurred on the 25th day, being of 70 UI.L–1 for L. boryana and of 20 UI.L–1 for L. edodes. In the SSF, the best results were obtained on the 10th day for L. edodes, while for L. boryana it happened between the 20th and the 25th days, despite both species presented values close to 110 UI.L–1. Therefore, the results indicated that the studied fungi express the enzyme of interest and that its production is enhanced when cultivated in solid system.

  1. Manganese peroxidase production from cassava residue by Phanerochaete chrysosporium in solid state fermentation and its decolorization of indigo carmine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huixing Li; Ruijing Zhang; Lei Tang; Jianhua Zhang; Zhonggui Mao

    2015-01-01

    Bioconversion of lignocellulosic wastes to higher value products through fungal fermentation has economic and ecological benefits. In this study, to develop an effective strategy for production of manganese peroxidase (MnP) from cassava residue by Phanerochaete chrysosporium in solid state fermentation, the stimulators of MnP produc-tion were screened and their concentrations were optimized by one-at-a-time experiment and Box–Behnken design. The maximum MnP activity of 186.38 nkat·g−1 dry mass of the sample was achieved after 6 days of fer-mentation with the supplement of 79.5 mmol·L−1·kg−1 acetic acid, 3.21 ml·kg−1 soybean oil, and 28.5 g·kg−1 alkaline lignin, indicating that cassava residue is a promising substrate for MnP production in solid state fermen-tation. Meanwhile, in vitro decolorization of indigo carmine by the crude MnP was also carried out, attaining the ratio of 90.18%after 6 h of incubation. An oxidative mechanism of indigo carmine decolorization by MnP was pro-posed based on the analysis of intermediate metabolites with ultra-high performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Using the crude MnP produced from cassava residue for indigo carmine decolorization gives an effective approach to treat dyeing effluents.

  2. Expression of a fungal manganese peroxidase in Escherichia coli: a comparison between the soluble and refolded enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Nan; Ren, Kai; Jia, Rong; Chen, Wenting; Sun, Ruirui

    2016-01-01

    Background Manganese peroxidase (MnP) from Irpex lacteus F17 has been shown to have a strong ability to degrade recalcitrant aromatic pollutants. In this study, a recombinant MnP from I. lacteus F17 was expressed in Escherichia coli Rosetta (DE3) in the form of inclusion bodies, which were refolded to achieve an active enzyme. Further, we optimized the in vitro refolding conditions to increase the recovery yield of the recombinant protein production. Additionally, we attempted to express reco...

  3. Polyacrylamide Gel-Entrapped Fungal Manganese Peroxidase with Enhanced Catalytic, Stability and Reusability Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilal, Muhammad; Asgher, Muhammad; Iqbal, Hafiz M N

    2016-07-19

    In the present study, polyacrylamide gel (PAG) was utilized as bolster material for the immobilization of in-house extracted and partially purified manganese peroxidase (MnP) through entrapment technique. The entrapment technique impelled incredibly compelling MnP immobilization (87.3±3.3%) and conferred remarkable stability to the enzyme (37.2±2.4%) following two months of storage at 4°C. The PAG-assisted immobilization expanded the reaction time of MnP after 10 min of response when contrasted with a partially purified free MnP counterpart, which demonstrated the highest activity after 5.0 min. Following PAG-assisted immobilization, an improvement in the optimal temperature and a chemical (an alkaline) shift in the pH optima of MnP were recorded. Moreover, a significant enhancement in the thermo-stability was also observed after immobilization. After 72 h, PAG-entrapped-MnP exhibited 41.2% residual activity at 50°C, whereas the free counterpart lost its activity completely under the same conditions. Furthermore, the PAG-entrapped-MnP also showed an excellent recycling efficiency and retained more than 50% of its initial activity after five consecutive reaction cycles. In conclusion, owing to the economic feasibility, carrier-supported MnP may be a promising candidate for various applications in different sectors of the modern world.

  4. Molecular characterization of manganese peroxidases from white-rot fungus Polyporus brumalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Sun-Hwa; Kim, Boyeong; Kim, Myungkil; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2014-03-01

    The cDNAs of six manganese-dependent peroxidases (MnPs) were isolated from white-rot fungus Polyporus brumalis. The MnP proteins shared similar properties with each other in terms of size (approximately 360-365 amino acids) and primary structure, showing 62-96 % amino acid sequence identity. RT-PCR analysis indicated that these six genes were predominantly expressed in shallow stationary culture (SSC) in a liquid medium. Gene expression was induced by treatment with dibutyl phthalate (DBP) and wood chips. Expression of pbmnp4 was strongly induced by both treatments, whereas that of pbmnp5 was induced only by DBP, while pbmnp6 was induced by wood chips only. Then, we overexpressed pbmnp4 in P. brumalis under the control of the GPD promoter. Overexpression of pbmnp4 effectively increased MnP activity; the transformant that had the highest MnP activity also demonstrated the most effective decolorization of Remazol Brilliant Blue R dye. Identification of MnP cDNAs can contribute to the efficient production of lignin-degradation enzymes and may lead to utilization of basidiomycetous fungi for degradation of lignin and numerous recalcitrant xenobiotics.

  5. Manganese peroxidase production in submerged cultures by free and immobilized mycelia of Nematoloma frowardii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogalski, J; Szczodrak, J; Janusz, G

    2006-02-01

    The agaric basidiomycete Nematoloma frowardii has been suggested as a good alternative for production of the extracellular ligninolytic enzyme, manganese-dependent peroxidase (MnP). Some cultural and environmental factors influencing the enzymatic activity in shaken flasks and aerated fermenter cultures were evaluated to improve the yields of the process. A low nitrogen medium (1.36 mM N added as ammonium tartrate), containing 16 g/l glucose (C/N ratio=65.3), 2mM Mn2+ and inoculated with immobilized polyurethane foam mycelium, made it possible to obtain a MnP yield of 2304 nkat/l in 8 days. Under these operational conditions, the enzyme productivity in the immobilized cells of N. frowardii was 1.4 times higher than that obtained with the free fungus. In the procedure with the reusable immobilized mycelium (semi-continuous culture) as many as three subsequent 10 day batches could be fermented by using the same carrier with no loss of MnP activity.

  6. Differential regulation of genes encoding manganese peroxidase (MnP) in the basidiomycete Ceriporiopsis subvermispora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manubens, Augusto; Avila, Marcela; Canessa, Paulo; Vicuña, Rafael

    2003-09-01

    We previously identified and characterized three mnp genes coding for manganese peroxidase (MnP) in the white rot fungus Ceriporiopsis subvermispora. In this work, we assessed transcript levels of mnp genes in liquid cultures of this fungus grown under various conditions. In the absence of Mn(2+), mnp1 and mnp2 mRNA were detected by Northern hybridization, irrespective of the lack of extracellular MnP activity. Addition of Mn(2+) to the cultures led to a marked increase in both transcripts, the highest titers being observed at 10 micro M Mn(2+). mnp1 mRNA was not detected at Mn(2+ )concentrations above 80 micro M, whereas mnp2 mRNA was still observed at 320 micro M Mn(2+). Differential regulation of these genes was confirmed by the addition of Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Ag(+) and Cd(2+). These metal ions dramatically elevated both transcripts and also allowed the detection of the mnp3 transcript. In most cases, the increase in mRNA levels was partially abolished by the simultaneous presence of Mn(2+), although the latter was strictly required to detect extracellular MnP activity. However, the lignin-related compound syringic acid specifically increased the mnp1 transcript, although only in the absence of Mn(2+). These results indicate that there is no clear correlation between mnp mRNA levels and MnP activity. In addition, they strongly suggest that Mn(2+) plays a post-transcriptional role which is essential for the presence of active MnP in the extracellular fluid.

  7. Characteristic features and dye degrading capability of agar-agar gel immobilized manganese peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilal, Muhammad; Asgher, Muhammad; Shahid, Muhammad; Bhatti, Haq Nawaz

    2016-05-01

    Immobilization of enzymes has been regarded as an efficient approach to develop biocatalyst with improved activity and stability characteristics under reaction conditions. In the present study, purified manganese peroxidase (MnP) from Ganoderma lucidum IBL-05 was immobilized in agar-agar support using entrapment technique. Maximum immobilization yield was accomplished at 4.0% agar-agar gel. The immobilized MnP exhibited better resistance to changes in pH and temperature than the free enzyme, with optimal conditions being pH 6.0 and 50 °C. The kinetic parameters Km and Kcat/Km for free and entrapped MnP were calculated to be 65.6 mM and 6.99 M(-1) s(-1), and 82 mM and 8.15 M(-1) s(-1), respectively. Thermo-stability was significantly improved after immobilization. After 120 h, the insolubilized MnP retained its activity up to 71.9% and 60.3% at 30 °C and 40 °C, respectively. It showed activity until 10th cycle and retained 74.3% residual activity after 3th cycle. The effects of H2O2, ionic strength and potential inhibitors on activity of free and immobilized enzyme were investigated. Moreover, the decolorization of three structurally different dyes was monitored in order to assess the degrading capability of the entrapped MnP. The decolorization efficiencies for all the tested dyes were 78.6-84.7% after 12h. The studies concluded that the toxicity of dyes aqueous solutions was significantly reduced after treatment. The remarkable catalytic, thermo-stability and re-cycling features of the agar-agar immobilized MnP display a high potential for biotechnological applications.

  8. Solid State production of manganese peroxidases using arecanut husk as substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhila Rajan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The lignocellulosic biomass from arecanut husk (Areca catechu Linnaeus was evaluated as a new substrate for cultivation of Phanerochaete chrysosporium and Phanerochaete sp for solid state fermentation of manganese peroxidase (MnP. Arecanut had a moisture content of 79.84 % for ripe nut husk whereas green nut husk had 68.39 % moisture and a pH of 5.0, 3.0 and 7.0 for raw, ripe and dry husk. Reducing sugar content was 14.31, 19.21 and 1.77(mg/g of husk for raw, ripe and dry nut husk, respectively. Non reducing sugar was 1.04(mg/g of husk for raw and 0.68 (mg/g of husk for dry husk. Solid state fermentation carried out at different pH showed optimum enzyme production at pH 6.0 (52.60 IU/g for P.chrysosporium and pH 5.0 (44.08 IU/g for Phanerochaete sp. Optimum temperature was 30 ± 2º C for both the organisms. Lower concentration of MnSO4 (0.1 mM MnSO4 induced maximum enzyme production in P.chrysosporium whereas Phanerochaete sp. required 1 mM MnSO4 for induction. Absence of carbon and nitrogen stimulated enzyme production in P.chrysosporium while Phanerochaete sp. needed nitrogen. Enzyme was partially purified by ammonium sulphate precipitation followed by ion exchange chromatography.

  9. Pleurotus ostreatus manganese-dependent peroxidase silencing impairs decolourization of Orange II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salame, Tomer M; Yarden, Oded; Hadar, Yitzhak

    2010-01-01

    Decolourization of azo dyes by Pleurotus ostreatus, a white-rot fungus capable of lignin depolymerization and mineralization, is related to the ligninolytic activity of enzymes produced by this fungus. The capacity of P. ostreatus to decolourize the azo dye Orange II (OII) was dependent and positively co-linear to Mn(2+) concentration in the medium, and thus attributed to Mn(2+)-dependent peroxidase (MnP) activity. Based on the ongoing P. ostreatus genome deciphering project we identified at least nine genes encoding for MnP gene family members (mnp 1-9), of which only four (mnp 1-4) were previously known. Relative real-time PCR quantification analysis confirmed that all the nine genes are transcribed, and that Mn(2+) amendment results in a drastic increase in the transcript levels of the predominantly expressed MnP genes (mnp 3 and mnp 9), while decreasing versatile peroxidase gene transcription (mnp 4). A reverse genetics strategy based on silencing the P. ostreatus mnp 3 gene by RNAi was implemented. Knock-down of mnp 3 resulted in the reduction of fungal OII decolourization capacity, which was co-linear with marked silencing of the Mn(2+)-dependent peroxidase genes mnp 3 and mnp 9. This is the first direct genetic proof of an association between MnP gene expression levels and azo dye decolourization capacity in P. ostreatus, which may have significant implication on understanding the mechanisms governing lignin biodegradation. Moreover, this study has proven the applicability of RNAi as a tool for gene function studies in Pleurotus research.

  10. Structural Characterization of Biogenic Manganese Oxides Produced in Sea Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, S. M.; Bargar, J. R.; Tebo, B. M.

    2003-12-01

    Manganese oxides have been coined as the "scavengers of the sea" and play important roles in both marine and freshwater systems. Natural manganese oxide nanoparticles and grain coatings are ubiquitous in the environment and profoundly impact the quality of sediments via their ability to degrade and sequester contaminants. These oxides are believed to form dominantly via oxidation of Mn(II) by marine and freshwater bacteria and have extremely high sorptive capacities for heavy metals. We have used XANES, EXAFS, and synchrotron (SR)-XRD techniques to study biogenic manganese oxides produced by spores of the marine Bacillus sp., strain SG-1 in seawater as a function of reaction time under fully in-situ conditions. The primary biogenic solid-phase Mn oxide product is a hexagonal layered phyollomanganate with an oxidation state similar to that in delta-MnO2. XRD data show the biooxides to have a phyllomanganate 10 basal plane spacing, suggesting the interlayer is hydrated and contains calcium. As the experiment continues, the initial biooxide changes to show triclinic symmetry. Fits to these EXAFS spectra suggest the octahedral layers have low Mn octahedral site vacancies in the lattice and the latyers bend to accommodate Jahn-Teller distortions creating the change in symmetry. The oxides observed in this study as models of Mn(II) bio-oxidation may be representative of the most abundant manganese oxide phase suspended in the oxic and sub-oxic zones of the oceanic water column.

  11. Expression of a fungal manganese peroxidase in Escherichia coli: a comparison between the soluble and refolded enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Nan; Ren, Kai; Jia, Rong; Chen, Wenting; Sun, Ruirui

    2016-12-01

    Manganese peroxidase (MnP) from Irpex lacteus F17 has been shown to have a strong ability to degrade recalcitrant aromatic pollutants. In this study, a recombinant MnP from I. lacteus F17 was expressed in Escherichia coli Rosetta (DE3) in the form of inclusion bodies, which were refolded to achieve an active enzyme. Further, we optimized the in vitro refolding conditions to increase the recovery yield of the recombinant protein production. Additionally, we attempted to express recombinant MnP in soluble form in E. coli, and compared its activity with that of refolded MnP. Refolded MnP was obtained by optimizing the in vitro refolding conditions, and soluble MnP was produced in the presence of four additives, TritonX-100, Tween-80, ethanol, and glycerol, through incubation at 16 °C. Hemin and Ca(2+) supplementation was crucial for the activity of the recombinant protein. Compared with refolded MnP, soluble MnP showed low catalytic efficiencies for Mn(2+) and H2O2 substrates, but the two enzymes had an identical, broad range substrate specificity, and the ability to decolorize azo dyes. Furthermore, their enzymatic spectral characteristics were analysed by circular dichroism (CD), electronic absorption spectrum (UV-VIS), fluorescence and Raman spectra, indicating the differences in protein conformation between soluble and refolded MnP. Subsequently, size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) analyses demonstrated that refolded MnP was a good monomer in solution, while soluble MnP predominantly existed in the oligomeric status. Our results showed that two forms of recombinant MnP could be expressed in E. coli by varying the culture conditions during protein expression.

  12. Phanerochaete chrysosporium IBL-03 secretes high titers of manganese peroxidase during decolorization of Drimarine Blue K2RL textile dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noreen, Razia; Asgher, Muhammad; Bhatti, Haq Nawaz; Batool, Shaheera; Asad, Muhammad Javaid

    2011-01-01

    A novel indigenous strain, Phanerochaete chrysosporium IBL-03, with high manganese peroxidase (MnP) activities was used for decolorization of a reactive textile dye, Drimarine Blue K2R, which is used extensively in textile units of Pakistan. The initial experiment was run for seven days with 0.01% (w/v) dye solution prepared in Kirk's basal nutrient medium. Samples were removed after every 24 h and the extent of dye decolorization was determined at lambda(max) of the dye. The study revealed that P. chrysosporium caused 65% decolorization of Drimarine Blue K2RL in seven days. By process optimization, 97% colour removal could be achieved in three days using 0.005% (w/v) Drimarine Blue K2RL solution at pH 4.0 and 30 degrees C in defined Kirk's medium with 0.9% (w/v) molasses and 0.2% (w/v) ammonium dihydrogen phosphate added as carbon and nitrogen sources, respectively. Manganese peroxidase was found to be the major enzyme (560 IU/mL) involved in dye decolorization of Drimarine Blue K2RL by P. chrysosporium. The dye adsorption studies showed that the dye initially adsorbed on fungal mats disappeared later on, possibly by the action of MnP secreted by the fungus in secondary metabolism.

  13. Interactions of carbon nanotubes and/or graphene with manganese peroxidase during biodegradation of endocrine disruptors and triclosan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming; Zeng, Guangming; Lai, Cui; Zhang, Chang; Xu, Piao; Yan, Min; Xiong, Weiping

    2017-10-01

    Molecular-level biodegradation processes of bisphenol A (BPA), nonylphenol (NP) and triclosan (TCS) mediated by manganese peroxidase (MnP) were investigated with and without single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) and/or graphene (GRA). Although the incorporation of SWCNT, GRA or their combination (SWCNT+GRA) did not break up the complexes composed of manganese peroxidase (MnP) and these substrates, they had different effects on the native contacts between the substrates and MnP. GRA tended to decrease the overall stability of the binding between MnP and its substrates. SWCNT or SWCNT+GRA generally had a minor impact on the mean binding energy between MnP and its substrates. We detected some sensitive residues from MnP that were dramatically disturbed by the GRA, SWCNT or SWCNT+GRA. Nanomaterials changed the number and behavior of water molecules adjacent to both MnP and its substrates, which was not due to the destruction of H-bond network formed by sensitive regions and water molecules. The present results are useful for understanding the molecular basis of pollutant biodegradation affected by the nanomaterials in the environment, and are also helpful in assessing the risks of these materials to the environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Structural implications of the C-terminal tail in the catalytic and stability properties of manganese peroxidases from ligninolytic fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernández-Fueyo, Elena [CSIC, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Acebes, Sandra [Barcelona Supercomputing Center, Jordi Girona 29, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J.; Martínez, María Jesús; Romero, Antonio; Medrano, Francisco Javier, E-mail: fjmedrano@cib.csic.es [CSIC, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Guallar, Victor, E-mail: fjmedrano@cib.csic.es [Barcelona Supercomputing Center, Jordi Girona 29, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); ICREA, Passeig Lluís Companys 23, 08010 Barcelona (Spain); Martínez, Angel T., E-mail: fjmedrano@cib.csic.es [CSIC, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-12-01

    The variable C-terminal tail of manganese peroxidases, a group of enzymes involved in lignin degradation, is implicated in their catalytic and stability properties, as shown by new crystal structures, molecular-simulation and directed-mutagenesis data. Based on this structural–functional evaluation, short and long/extralong manganese peroxidase subfamilies have been accepted; the latter are characterized by exceptional stability, while it is shown for the first time that the former are able to oxidize other substrates at the same site where manganese(II) is oxidized. The genome of Ceriporiopsis subvermispora includes 13 manganese peroxidase (MnP) genes representative of the three subfamilies described in ligninolytic fungi, which share an Mn{sup 2+}-oxidation site and have varying lengths of the C-terminal tail. Short, long and extralong MnPs were heterologously expressed and biochemically characterized, and the first structure of an extralong MnP was solved. Its C-terminal tail surrounds the haem-propionate access channel, contributing to Mn{sup 2+} oxidation by the internal propionate, but prevents the oxidation of 2, 2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) (ABTS), which is only oxidized by short MnPs and by shortened-tail variants from site-directed mutagenesis. The tail, which is anchored by numerous contacts, not only affects the catalytic properties of long/extralong MnPs but is also associated with their high acidic stability. Cd{sup 2+} binds at the Mn{sup 2+}-oxidation site and competitively inhibits oxidation of both Mn{sup 2+} and ABTS. Moreover, mutations blocking the haem-propionate channel prevent substrate oxidation. This agrees with molecular simulations that position ABTS at an electron-transfer distance from the haem propionates of an in silico shortened-tail form, while it cannot reach this position in the extralong MnP crystal structure. Only small differences exist between the long and the extralong MnPs, which do not justify their

  15. Manganese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manganese is a mineral that is found in several foods including nuts, legumes, seeds, tea, whole grains, ... body requires it to function properly. People use manganese as medicine. Manganese is used for prevention and ...

  16. Differential regulation of manganese peroxidases and characterization of two variable MnP encoding genes in the white-rot fungus Physisporinus rivulosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakala, Terhi K; Hildén, Kristiina; Maijala, Pekka; Olsson, Cia; Hatakka, Annele

    2006-12-01

    Manganese peroxidase (MnP) production in the white-rot basidiomycete Physisporinus rivulosus T241i was studied. Separate MnP isoforms were produced in carbon-limited liquid media supplemented with Mn(2+), veratryl alcohol, or sawdust. The isoforms had different pH ranges for the oxidation of Mn(2+) and 2,6-dimethoxyphenol. Although lignin degradation by white-rot fungi is often triggered by nitrogen depletion, MnPs of P. rivulosus were efficiently produced also in the presence of high-nutrient nitrogen, especially in cultures supplemented with veratryl alcohol. Two MnP encoding genes, mnpA and mnpB, were identified, and their corresponding cDNAs were characterized. Structurally, the genes showed marked dissimilarity, and the expression of the two genes implicated quantitative variation and differential regulation in response to manganese, veratryl alcohol, or sawdust. The variability in regulation and properties of the isoforms may widen the operating range for efficient lignin degradation by P. rivulosus.

  17. Purification of a new manganese peroxidase of the white-rot fungus Irpex lacteus, and degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by the enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baborová, Petra; Möder, Monika; Baldrian, Petr; Cajthamlová, Kamila; Cajthaml, Tomás

    2006-04-01

    The white-rot fungus Irpex lacteus has been reported to be an efficient degrader of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls and pentachlorophenol. The fungus produces ligninolytic enzymes laccase, lignin peroxidase and manganese peroxidase (MnP), the latter being the major one produced. MnP was purified using anion exchange and size exclusion chromatography. SDS-PAGE showed the purified MnP to be a monomeric protein of 37 kDa (37.5 kDa using MALDI-TOF) with an isoelectric point at 3.55. The pH optimum was relatively broad, from 4.0 to 7.0 with a peak at pH 5.5. Kinetic constants K(m) were 8 microM for H(2)O(2) and 12 or 31 microM for Mn(2+) depending on the substrate. The enzyme did not perform oxidation in the absence of H(2)O(2) or Mn(2+). MnP was active at 5-70 degrees C with an optimum between 50-60 degrees C. At temperatures above 65 degrees C the enzyme rapidly lost activity. Degradation of four representatives of PAHs (phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene, and pyrene) was tested and the enzyme showed the ability to degrade them in vitro. Major degradation products of anthracene were identified. The results confirm the role of MnP in PAH degradation by I. lacteus, including cleavage of the aromatic ring.

  18. Induction, purification and characterization of a novel manganese peroxidase from Irpex lacteus CD2 and its application in the decolorization of different types of dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Xing; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Yang, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Manganese peroxidase (MnP) is the one of the important ligninolytic enzymes produced by lignin-degrading fungi which has the great application value in the field of environmental biotechnology. Searching for new MnP with stronger tolerance to metal ions and organic solvents is important for the maximization of potential of MnP in the biodegradation of recalcitrant xenobiotics. In this study, it was found that oxalic acid, veratryl alcohol and 2,6-Dimehoxyphenol could stimulate the synthesis of MnP in the white-rot fungus Irpex lacteus CD2. A novel manganese peroxidase named as CD2-MnP was purified and characterized from this fungus. CD2-MnP had a strong capability for tolerating different metal ions such as Ca2+, Cd2+, Co2+, Mg2+, Ni2+ and Zn2+ as well as organic solvents such as methanol, ethanol, DMSO, ethylene glycol, isopropyl alcohol, butanediol and glycerin. The different types of dyes including the azo dye (Remazol Brilliant Violet 5R, Direct Red 5B), anthraquinone dye (Remazol Brilliant Blue R), indigo dye (Indigo Carmine) and triphenylmethane dye (Methyl Green) as well as simulated textile wastewater could be efficiently decolorized by CD2-MnP. CD2-MnP also had a strong ability of decolorizing different dyes with the coexistence of metal ions and organic solvents. In summary, CD2-MnP from Irpex lacteus CD2 could effectively degrade a broad range of synthetic dyes and exhibit a great potential for environmental biotechnology.

  19. Induction, purification and characterization of a novel manganese peroxidase from Irpex lacteus CD2 and its application in the decolorization of different types of dye.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Qin

    Full Text Available Manganese peroxidase (MnP is the one of the important ligninolytic enzymes produced by lignin-degrading fungi which has the great application value in the field of environmental biotechnology. Searching for new MnP with stronger tolerance to metal ions and organic solvents is important for the maximization of potential of MnP in the biodegradation of recalcitrant xenobiotics. In this study, it was found that oxalic acid, veratryl alcohol and 2,6-Dimehoxyphenol could stimulate the synthesis of MnP in the white-rot fungus Irpex lacteus CD2. A novel manganese peroxidase named as CD2-MnP was purified and characterized from this fungus. CD2-MnP had a strong capability for tolerating different metal ions such as Ca2+, Cd2+, Co2+, Mg2+, Ni2+ and Zn2+ as well as organic solvents such as methanol, ethanol, DMSO, ethylene glycol, isopropyl alcohol, butanediol and glycerin. The different types of dyes including the azo dye (Remazol Brilliant Violet 5R, Direct Red 5B, anthraquinone dye (Remazol Brilliant Blue R, indigo dye (Indigo Carmine and triphenylmethane dye (Methyl Green as well as simulated textile wastewater could be efficiently decolorized by CD2-MnP. CD2-MnP also had a strong ability of decolorizing different dyes with the coexistence of metal ions and organic solvents. In summary, CD2-MnP from Irpex lacteus CD2 could effectively degrade a broad range of synthetic dyes and exhibit a great potential for environmental biotechnology.

  20. Kinetic and redox properties of MnP II, a major manganese peroxidase isoenzyme from Panus tigrinus CBS 577.79.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petruccioli, Maurizio; Frasconi, Marco; Quaratino, Daniele; Covino, Stefano; Favero, Gabriele; Mazzei, Franco; Federici, Federico; D'Annibale, Alessandro

    2009-11-01

    A manganese peroxidase (MnP) isoenzyme from Panus tigrinus CBS 577.79 was produced in a benchtop stirred-tank reactor and purified to apparent homogeneity. The purification scheme involving ultrafiltration, affinity chromatography on concanavalin-A Sepharose, and gel filtration led to a purified MnP, termed "MnP II," with a specific activity of 288 IU mg(-1) protein and a final yield of 22%. The enzyme turned out to be a monomeric protein with molecular mass of 50.5 kDa, pI of 4.07, and an extent of N-glycosylation of about 5.3% of the high-mannose type. The temperature and pH optima for the formation of malonate manganic chelates were 45 degrees C and 5.5, respectively. MnP II proved to be poorly thermostable at 50 and 60 degrees C, with half-lives of 11 min and 105 s, respectively. K (m) values for H(2)O(2) and Mn(2+) were 16 and 124 microM, respectively. Although MnP II was able to oxidize veratryl alcohol and to catalyze the Mn(2+)-independent oxidation of several phenols, it cannot be assigned to the versatile peroxidase family. As opposed to versatile peroxidase oxidation, veratryl alcohol oxidation required the simultaneous presence of H(2)O(2) and Mn(2+); in addition, low turnover numbers and K (m) values higher than 300 microM characterized the Mn(2+)-independent oxidation of substituted phenols. Kinetic properties and the substrate specificity of the enzyme markedly differed from those reported for MnP isoenzymes produced by the reference strain P. tigrinus 8/18. To our knowledge, this study reports for the first time a thorough electrochemical characterization of a MnP from this fungus.

  1. Oxidizability of unsaturated fatty acids and of a non-phenolic lignin structure in the manganese peroxidase-dependent lipid peroxidation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander N. Kapich; Tatyana V. Korneichik; Annele Hatakka; Kenneth E. Hammel

    2010-01-01

    Unsaturated fatty acids have been proposed to mediate the oxidation of recalcitrant, non-phenolic lignin structures by fungal manganese peroxidases (MnP), but their precise role remains unknown. We investigated the oxidizability of three fatty acids with varying degrees of polyunsaturation (linoleic, linolenic, and arachidonic acids) by measuring conjugated dienes...

  2. Generation of a transformant showing higher manganese peroxidase (Mnp) activity by overexpression of Mnp gene in Trametes versicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Sumin; Park, Nammee; Song, Hong-Gyu; Choi, Hyoung T

    2007-06-01

    Trametes versicolor has a lignin degrading enzyme system, which is also involved in the degradation of diverse recalcitrant compounds. Manganese-dependent peroxidase (MnP) is one of the lignin degrading enzymes in T. versicolor. In this study, a cDNA clone of a putative MnP-coding gene was cloned and transferred into an expression vector (pBARGPE1) carrying a phosphinothricin resistance gene (bar) as a selectable marker to yield the expression vector, pBARTvMnP2. Transformants were generated through genetic transformation using pBARTvMnP2. The genomic integration of the MnP clone was confirmed by PCR with bar-specific primers. One transformant showed higher enzyme activity than the recipient strain did, and was genetically stable even after 10 consecutive transfers on non-selective medium.

  3. Optimization of manganese peroxidase production from Schizophyllum sp. F17 in solid-state fermentation of agro-industrial residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yue; Yang, Bing; Yang, Yang; Jia, Rong

    2014-03-01

    Manganese peroxidase (MnP), a crucial enzyme in lignin degradation, has wide potential applications in environmental protection. However, large-scale industrial application of this enzyme is limited due to several factors primarily related to cost and availability. Special attention has been paid to the production of MnP from inexpensive sources, such as lignocellulosic residues, using solid-state fermentation (SSF) systems. In the present study, a suitable SSF medium for the production of MnP by Schizophyllum sp. F17 from agro-industrial residues has been optimized. The mixed solid medium, comprising pine sawdust, rice straw, and soybean powder at a ratio of 0.52:0.15:0.33, conferred a maximum enzyme activity of 11.18 U/g on the sixth day of SSF. The results show that the use of wastes such as pine sawdust and rice straw makes the enzyme production more economical as well as helps solve environmental problems.

  4. Advanced Recombinant Manganese Peroxidase for Biosynthesis of Lignin Bioproducts, Phase I Final Report, STTR Grant #: DE-SC0007503.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beatty, Christopher; Kitner, Joshua; Lajoie, Curtis; McClain, Sean; Potochnik, Steve

    2012-12-13

    The core purpose of this Phase I STTR was to evaluate the feasibility of a new method of producing a recombinant version of manganese peroxidase (MnP) enzyme. MnP is a potentially valuable enzyme for producing high value lignin products and also for industrial de-coloring operations such as biobleaching of pulp and color removal from textile dye effluents. This lignin-modifying enzyme is produced in small amounts by the native host, a white rot fungus. Previous work by Oregon State University developed a secreted recombinant version of the enzyme in the yeast Pichia pastoris. Unfortunately, the expression is barely moderate and the enzyme is heavily glycosylated, which inhibits purification. In this work, the gene for the enzyme is given a tag which targets production of the enzyme to the peroxisome. This is a promising approach since this location is also where heme and hydrogen peroxide are sequestered, which are both necessary cofactors for MnP. More than ten recombinant strains were constructed, verified, and expressed in the Pichia system. Constitutive (GAP) and methanol-induced promoters (AOX) were tried for peroxisomal targeted, cytosolic, and secreted versions of MnP. Only the secreted strains showed activity. The amount of expression was not significantly changed. The degree of glycosylation was lessened using the AOX (methanol) promotoer, but the resulting enzyme was still not able to be purified using immobilized metal affinity chromatography. Additional work beyond the scope of the defined Phase I project was undertaken to construct, verify, and express Pichia strains that mutated the MnP glycosylation sites to inhibit this process. These strains did not show significant activity. The cause is not known, but it is possible that these sites are important to the structure of the enzyme. Also beyond the scope proposed for our Phase I STTR, the team collaborated with AbSci, a startup with a new E. coli based expression system focused on the production of

  5. Transformation of the recalcitrant pharmaceutical compound carbamazepine by Pleurotus ostreatus: role of cytochrome P450 monooxygenase and manganese peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golan-Rozen, Naama; Chefetz, Benny; Ben-Ari, Julius; Geva, Joseph; Hadar, Yitzhak

    2011-08-15

    Carbamazepine (CBZ) is an environmentally recalcitrant compound highly stable in soil and during wastewater treatment. In this study, we examined the mechanisms by which the white-rot fungus Pleurotus ostreatus metabolizes CBZ in liquid culture using a physiological approach. P. ostreatus PC9 was grown in media known to support different levels of a multiplicity of enzyme systems such as cytochrome P450 (CYP450) and manganese peroxidase (MnP). When both CYP450 and MnP systems were active, 99% of the added CBZ was eliminated from the solution and transformed to 10,11-epoxycarbamazepine. High removal of CBZ was also obtained when either MnP or CYP450 was active. When both CYP450 and MnP were inactivated, only 10 to 30% of the added CBZ was removed. In this latter system, removal of CBZ might be partially attributed to the activity of versatile peroxidase. P. ostreatus was able to eliminate CBZ in liquid culture even when CBZ was added at an environmentally relevant concentration (1 μg L(-1)). On the basis of our study, we suggest that two families of enzymes are involved in the oxidation of CBZ in liquid culture: MnP in a Mn(2+)-dependent or independent manner and CYP450. Our study also highlights the potential of using P. ostreatus for bioremediation systems.

  6. Evaluation of manganese peroxidase (MnP) for its ability to resist the ozonization and thereafter decolorize methyl orange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhou; Xiang-hua, Wen; Xi, Zhao

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine whether ozone can be used to suppress bacterial growth in operating a white rot fungi reactor system. The effects of ozone dose on the activity of manganese peroxidase (MnP) and on the death rate of Escherichia coli were investigated. The results showed that at ozone dose of 0.98 mg/L the MnP activity was not affected after 40 min continuous treatment while the Escherichia coli inactivation rate can reach 99.9% after 30 min; In addition, the MnP that exposed to ozone dose of 1.56 mg/L for 40 min maintained their activity for decolorization of Methyl Orange. After 16 h, the decolorization rate of Methyl Orange was about 41%. These results showed that MnP have the ability to resist to some extent the attack of ozonization, which suggest that ozone might have its potential in suppressing the bacteria contamination in operating the white rot fungi reactor.

  7. Secretion of laccase and manganese peroxidase by Pleurotus strains cultivate in solid-state using Pinus spp. sawdust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marli Camassola

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pleurotus species secrete phenol oxidase enzymes: laccase (Lcc and manganese peroxidase (MnP. New genotypes of these species show potential to be used in processes aiming at the degradation of phenolic compounds, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and dyes. Hence, a screening of some strains of Pleurotus towards Lcc and MnP production was performed in this work. Ten strains were grown through solid-state fermentation on a medium based on Pinus spp. sawdust, wheat bran and calcium carbonate. High Lcc and MnP activities were found with these strains. Highest Lcc activity, 741 ± 245 U gdm-1 of solid state-cultivation medium, was detected on strain IB11 after 32 days, while the highest MnP activity occurred with strains IB05, IB09, and IB11 (5,333 ± 357; 4,701 ± 652; 5,999 ± 1,078 U gdm-1, respectively. The results obtained here highlight the importance of further experiments with lignocellulolytic enzymes present in different strains of Pleurotus species. Such results also indicate the possibility of selecting more valuable strains for future biotechnological applications, in soil bioremediation and biological biomass pre-treatment in biofuels production, for instance, as well as obtaining value-added products from mushrooms, like phenol oxidase enzymes.

  8. Detoxification of aflatoxin B1 by manganese peroxidase from the white-rot fungus Phanerochaete sordida YK-624.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianqiao; Ogata, Makoto; Hirai, Hirofumi; Kawagishi, Hirokazu

    2011-01-01

    Aflatoxin B(1) (AFB(1) ) is a potent mycotoxin with mutagenic, carcinogenic, teratogenic, hepatotoxic, and immunosuppressive properties. In order to develop a bioremediation system for AFB(1) -contaminated foods by white-rot fungi or ligninolytic enzymes, AFB(1) was treated with manganese peroxidase (MnP) from the white-rot fungus Phanerochaete sordida YK-624. AFB(1) was eliminated by MnP. The maximum elimination (86.0%) of AFB(1) was observed after 48 h in a reaction mixture containing 5 nkat of MnP. The addition of Tween 80 enhanced AFB(1) elimination. The elimination of AFB(1) by MnP considerably reduced its mutagenic activity in an umu test, and the treatment of AFB(1) by 20 nkat MnP reduced the mutagenic activity by 69.2%. (1) H-NMR and HR-ESI-MS analysis suggested that AFB(1) is first oxidized to AFB(1) -8,9-epoxide by MnP and then hydrolyzed to AFB(1) -8,9-dihydrodiol. This is the first report that MnP can effectively remove the mutagenic activity of AFB(1) by converting it into AFB(1) -8,9-dihydrodiol.

  9. Polyacrylamide Gel-Entrapped Fungal Manganese Peroxidase from Ganoderma lucidum IBL-05 with Enhanced Catalytic, Stability, and Reusability Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilal, Muhammad; Asgher, Muhammad; Iqbal, Hafiz M N

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, polyacrylamide gel (PAG) was utilized as bolster material for the immobilization of in-house extracted and partially purified manganese peroxidase (MnP) through an entrapment technique yielding significant MnP immobilization (87.3±3.3 %) and remarkable stability of the enzyme (37.2±2.4 %) after a storage period of two months at 4°C. The immobilization also increased the optimal temperature by 10 °C and provided an alkaline shift of the pH optimum. Moreover, a significant enhancement in the thermo-stability was observed. After an incubation period of 72 h at 50°C, the PAG-entrapped-MnP still exhibited 41.2 % of the initial activity, whereas the free enzyme was completely inactive. Furthermore, PAG-entrapped-MnP showed an excellent recycling efficiency and retained more than 50% of its initial activity after five consecutive reaction cycles. In conclusion, owing to the economic feasibility, carrier-supported MnP may be a promising candidate for various applications in different industrial sectors.

  10. Chitosan-mediated formation of biomimetic silica nanoparticles: an effective method for manganese peroxidase immobilization and stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Pan-Pan; Jiang, Yan-Jun; Zhang, Song-Ping; Gao, Jing; Su, Zhi-Guo; Ma, Guang-Hui; Zhang, Yu-Fei

    2014-11-01

    Our work here, for the first time, reported the use of chitosan-mediated biomimetic silica nanoparticles in enzyme immobilization. In order to make clear the relationship among silicification process, silica nanoparticle structure and immobilized enzyme activity, a mechanism of chitosan-mediated silicification using sodium silicate as the silica source was primarily evaluated. Chitosan was demonstrated effectively to promote the silicification not only in accelerating the aggregation rate of sodium silicate, but also in templating the formation of silica nanoparticles. Although the whole biomimetic silicification process contained polycondensation-aggregation-precipitation three stages, the elemental unit in precipitated silica was confirmed to be nanoparticles with 100 nm diameter regardless of the chitosan and silicate concentration used. Furthermore, the effect of enzyme on silicification process was also investigated. The introducing of manganese peroxidase (MnP) to silica precursor solution had no obvious effect on the silicification rate and nanoparticle morphology. The residual activity and embedding rate of immobilized MnP were 64.2% and 36.4% respectively under the optimum conditions. In addition, compared to native MnP, the MnP embedded in chitosan/silica nanoparticles exhibited improved stability against organic solvent and ultrasonic wave. After ultrasonic treatment for 20 min, 77% of the initial activity was remained due to the protective effect of chitosan/silica nanoparticles, while native MnP lost almost all of its original activity.

  11. Production of manganese peroxidase and laccase in a solid-state bioreactor and modeling of enzyme production kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moilanen, Ulla; Winquist, Erika; Mattila, Tuomas; Hatakka, Annele; Eerikäinen, Tero

    2015-01-01

    Lignin-modifying enzymes have various promising applications such as biobleaching, biopulping, the functionalization of lignocellulosic materials, the modification of wood fibers, the remediation of contaminated soil and effluents, as well as improvement of the enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic substrates. In this study, the production of laccase and manganese peroxidase (MnP) in solid-state cultivation was examined. Oat husks were used as an inexpensive substrate for the white-rot fungus Cerrena unicolor PM170798 (FBCC 387). The addition of a fines fraction (consisting of oat flour and finely ground husks) enhanced MnP production fivefold and laccase production almost threefold. The enzyme production was studied first on a 100 g scale, and the cultivation experiments were then repeated at a larger laboratory-scale (4 kg) in a solid-state bioreactor. High enzyme activity levels were obtained (MnP: 340 nkat g(-1) DM, laccase: 470 nkat g(-1) DM). In addition, the correlation between the CO2 evolution rate and enzyme production was mathematically modeled from the bioreactor experimental data. The model parameters could be used to predict enzyme production.

  12. Enzyme activity in soybean seeds produced under foliar application of manganese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everson Reis Carvalho

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Several factors affect the quality of soybean seeds, including the mineral nutrition of plants. Manganese (Mn is an important nutrient because it has as one of its functions the enzyme activation. The aim of this study was to evaluate enzyme activity in seeds of soybean cultivars produced with foliar application of different doses of Mn. The experiment was conducted at the Universidade Federal de Lavras (UFLA (Federal University of Lavras in randomized blocks with three replications and 4 x 4 x 2 factorial arrangement consisting of four soybean cultivars, two conventional and its genetically modified RR derived (BRS Celeste and BRS Baliza RR; BRSGO Jataí and BRS Silvânia RR, four doses of Mn via foliar application (0; 200; 400 and 600 g Mn ha-1 and two stages of application (R1 or R3. In the seeds, the expressions of the enzymes esterase (EST, malate dehydrogenase (MDH, alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH, superoxide dismutase (SOD, peroxidase (PRX and isocitratelyase (ICL were determined. For evaluation of physiological quality, the germination test and emergence speed index (ESI were performed. The Mn content in the seeds was also determined. The expression of the enzymes EST, SOD, PRX and ICL in soybean seeds are affected by foliar application of Mn, regardless of the stages of application. In the seeds of the cultivars that showed better physiological quality, Celeste and Baliza RR, greater expressions of the enzymes ADH and ICL and lower expressions of MDH and of PRX were observed.

  13. Fungal Growth and Manganese Peroxidase Production in a Deep Tray Solid-State Bioreactor, and In Vitro Decolorization of Poly R-478 by MnP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xinshan; Huang, Xianjun; Yao, Juntao; Zhou, Yue; Jia, Rong

    2015-06-01

    The growth of Irpex lacteus F17 and manganese peroxidase (MnP) production in a selfdesigned tray bioreactor, operating in solid-state conditions at a laboratory scale, were studied. The bioreactor was divided into three layers by three perforated trays. Agroindustrial residues were used both as the carrier of bound mycelia and as a nutrient medium for the growth of I. lacteus F17. The maximum biomass production in the bioreactor was detected at 60 h of fermentation, which was consistent with the CO2 releasing rate by the fungus. During the stationary phase of fungal growth, the maximum MnP activity was observed, reaching 950 U/l at 84 h. Scanning electron microscopy images clearly showed the growth situation of mycelia on the support matrix. Furthermore, the MnP produced by I. lacteus F17 in the bioreactor was isolated and purified, and the internal peptide sequences were also identified with mass spectrometry. The optimal activity of the enzyme was detected at pH 7 and 25 °C, with a long half-life time of 9 days. In addition, the MnP exhibited significant stability within a broad pH range of 4-7 and at temperature up to 55 °C. Besides this, the MnP showed the ability to decolorize the polymeric model dye Poly R-478 in vitro.

  14. Improving the pH-stability of Versatile Peroxidase by Comparative Structural Analysis with a Naturally-Stable Manganese Peroxidase (+ correction)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saez-Jimenez, V.; Fernandez Fueyo, E.; Madrano, F.J.; Romero, A.; Martinez, A.T.; Ruiz-Duenas, F.J.

    2015-01-01

    Versatile peroxidase (VP) from the white-rot fungus Pleurotus eryngii is a high redox potential peroxidase of biotechnological interest able to oxidize a wide range of recalcitrant substrates including lignin, phenolic and non-phenolic aromatic compounds and dyes. However, the relatively low stabili

  15. Lignin peroxidase-negative mutant of the white-rot basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    OpenAIRE

    Boominathan, K; Dass, S B; Randall, T A; Kelley, R.L.; Reddy, C A

    1990-01-01

    Phanerochaete chrysosporium produces two classes of extracellular heme proteins, designated lignin peroxidases and manganese peroxidases, that play a key role in lignin degradation. In this study we isolated and characterized a lignin peroxidase-negative mutant (lip mutant) that showed 16% of the ligninolytic activity (14C-labeled synthetic lignin----14CO2) exhibited by the wild type. The lip mutant did not produce detectable levels of lignin peroxidase, whereas the wild type, under identical...

  16. Manganese-dependent cleavage of nonphenolic lignin structures by Ceriporiopsis subvermispora in the absence of lignin peroxidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, K.A. Jr.; Bao, W.; Kawai, S. [USDA Forest Products Lab., Madison, WI (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    Many ligninolytic fungi appear to lack lignin peroxidase (LiP), the enzyme generally thought to cleave nonphenolic structures in lignin. However, the fungus, Ceriporiopsis subvermispora, is able to degrade these nonphenolic structures. Experiments showed wood block cultures and defined liquid medium cultures of C. subvermispora rapidly deploymerized and mineralized a {sup 14}C-labeled, polyethylene glycol-linked, high-molecular-weight {beta}-O-4 lignin model compound (model I) that represents the major nonphenolic structure of lignin. The fungus cleaved model I between C{sub {alpha}} and C{sub {beta}} to release benzylic fragments, which were shown in isotope trapping experiments to be major products of model I metabolism. The C{sub {alpha}}-C{sub {beta}} cleavage of {beta}-O-4 lignin structures to release benzylic fragments is characteristic of LiP catalysis, but no detectable LiP activity. Three results pointed, instead, to the participation of a different enzyme, manganese peroxidase (MnP), in the degradation of nonphenolic lignin structures by C. subvermispora. (1) The degradation of model I and of exhaustively methylated (nonphenolic), {sup 14}C-labeled, synthetic lignin by the fungus in liquid cultures was almost completely inhibited when the Mn concentration of the medium was decreased from 35 {mu}M to approximately 5 {mu}M. (2) The fungus degraded model I and methylated lignin significantly faster in the presence of Tween 80, a source of unsaturated fatty acids, than it did in the presence of Tween 20, which contains only saturated fatty acids. Previous work has shown that nonphenolic lignin structures are degraded during the MnP-mediated peroxidation of unsaturated lipids. (3) In experiments with MnP, Mn(II), and unsaturated lipid in vitro, this system mimicked intact C. subvermispora cultures in that it cleaved nonphenolic {beta}-O-4 lignin model compounds between C{sub {alpha}} and C{sub {beta}} to release a benzylic fragment. 41 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Production of manganese peroxidase (MnP) from Anthracophyllum discolor for limning degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubilar, O.; Tortella, G.; Acevedo, F.; Cuevas, R.; Bornhardt, C.; Diez, M. C.

    2009-07-01

    In Chile, millions of tons per year of pulp and paper are produced, generating large quantities of toxic and intensely colored wastewater, causing severe water pollution. The primary contributors to the color and toxicity are the lignin and its derivative compounds. The color is responsible for problems such as reduction in the light penetration depth of the receiving waters. (Author)

  18. Mimicking Peroxidase Activity by a Manganese(II Complex Involving a New Asymmetric Tetradentate Ligand Containing Both Amino and Imino Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Pérez-Otero

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric ligand (E-4-bromo-2-(((2-((5-bromo-2-hydroxybenzyl(methylaminoethyliminomethylphenol has been prepared by a novel seven-step route. All organic compounds isolated in each step have been characterised by elemental analysis, infrared and 1H NMR spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry. Interaction of this ligand with manganese has been investigated employing an electrochemical method. This method leads to the formation of a neutral manganese(II complex 7 in high yield and purity. The complex has been thoroughly characterised by elemental analysis, infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, magnetic susceptibility measurements, and cyclic voltammetry. Complex 7 behaves as peroxidase mimic in the presence of the water-soluble trap ABTS, probably due to its ease to coordinate the substrate molecule.

  19. Production of laccase and manganese peroxidase by Pleurotus pulmonarius in solid-state cultures and application in dye decolorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos Bazanella, Gisele Cristina; de Souza, Daniela Farani; Castoldi, Rafael; Oliveira, Roselene Ferreira; Bracht, Adelar; Peralta, Rosane Marina

    2013-11-01

    The production of ligninolytic enzymes (laccase and Mn-dependent peroxidase) by the white-rot fungus Pleurotus pulmonarius (FR.) Quélet was studied in solid-state cultures using agricultural and food wastes as substrate. The highest activities of laccase were found in wheat bran (2,860 ± 250 U/L), pineapple peel (2,450 ± 230 U/L), and orange bagasse (2,100 ± 270 U/L) cultures, all of them at an initial moisture level of 85 %. The highest activities of Mn peroxidase were obtained in pineapple peel cultures (2,200 ± 205 U/L) at an initial moisture level of 75 %. In general, the condition of high initial moisture level (80-90 %) was the best condition for laccase activity, while the best condition for Mn peroxidase activity was cultivation at low initial moisture (50-70 %). Cultures containing high Mn peroxidase activities were more efficient in the decolorization of the industrial dyes remazol brilliant blue R (RBBR), Congo red, methylene blue, and ethyl violet than those containing high laccase activity. Also, crude enzymatic extracts with high Mn peroxidase activity were more efficient in the in vitro decolorization of methylene blue, ethyl violet, and Congo red. The dye RBBR was efficiently decolorized by both crude extracts, rich in Mn peroxidase activity or rich in laccase activity.

  20. Production of manganese peroxidase and organic acids and mineralization of {sup 14}C-labelled lignin ({sup 14}C-DHP) during solid-state fermentation of wheat straw with the white rot fungus Nematoloma frowardii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofrichter, M.; Scheibner, K.; Fritsche, W. [Friedrich Schiller Univ., Jena (Germany). Inst. of Microbiology; Vares, T.; Kalsi, M.; Galkin, S.; Hatakka, A. [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland). Dept. of Applied Chemistry and Microbiology

    1999-05-01

    The basidiomycetous fungus Nematoloma frowardii produced manganese peroxidase (MnP) as the predominant ligninolytic enzyme during solid-state fermentation (SSF) of wheat straw. The purified enzyme had a molecular mass of 50 kDa and an isoelectric point of 3.2. In addition to MnP, low levels of laccase and lignin peroxidase were detected. Synthetic {sup 14}C-ring-labelled lignin ({sup 14}C-DHP) was efficiently degraded during SSF. Approximately 75% of the initial radioactivity was released as {sup 14}CO{sub 2}, while only 6% was associated with the residual straw material, including the well-developed fungal biomass. On the basis of this finding the authors concluded that at least partial extracellular mineralization of lignin may have occurred. This conclusion was supported by the fact that they detected high levels of organic acids in the fermented straw, which rendered MnP effective and therefore made partial direct mineralization of lignin possible. Experiments performed in a cell-free system, which simulated the conditions in the straw cultures, revealed that MnP in fact converted part of the {sup 14}C-DHP to {sup 14}CO{sub 2} and {sup 14}C-labelled water-soluble products in the presence of natural levels of organic acids.

  1. Improvement of manganese peroxidase production by the hyper lignin-degrading fungus Phanerochaete sordida YK-624 by recombinant expression of the 5-aminolevulinic acid synthase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Hirofumi; Misumi, Kenta; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Kawagishi, Hirokazu

    2013-12-01

    The manganese peroxidase (MnP) gene (mnp4) promoter of Phanerochaete sordida YK-624 was used to drive expression of 5-aminolevulinic acid synthase (als), which is a key heme biosynthesis enzyme. The expression plasmid pMnP4pro-als was transformed into P. sordida YK-624 uracil auxotrophic mutant UV-64, and 14 recombinant als expressing-transformants were generated. Average cumulative MnP activities in the transformants were 1.18-fold higher than that of control transformants. In particular, transformants A-14 and A-61 showed significantly higher MnP activity (approximately 2.8-fold) than wild type. RT-PCR analysis indicated that the increased MnP activity was caused by elevated recombinant als expression. These results suggest that the production of MnP is improved by high expression of als.

  2. Optimization of culture medium composition for manganese peroxidase and tyrosinase production during Reactive Black 5 decolourization by the yeast Trichosporon akiyoshidainum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martorell, María M; Pajot, Hipólito F; Rovati, José I; Figueroa, Lucía I C

    2012-03-01

    Decolourization and degradation of the diazo dye Reactive Black 5 was carried out by the yeast Trichosporon akiyoshidainum. A nine-factor Plackett-Burman design was employed for the study and optimization of the decolourization process and production of manganese peroxidase (MnP) and tyrosinase activities. In the present study, 26 individual experiments were conducted and three responses were evaluated. Raising yeast extract concentration significantly enhanced decolourization and MnP production. Carbon and nitrogen sources, glucose and (NH4)2 SO4, showed no significant effect on any response over the concentration range tested. Other culture medium components, such as CaCl2 or MgSO4, could be excluded from the medium formula, as they had no effect on the evaluated responses. Metal ions (Fe, Cu and Mn) showed different effects on decolourization and enzymatic activities. Addition of copper significantly enhanced MnP activity and decreased dye decolourization. On the contrary, iron had a positive effect on decolourization and no effect on enzyme production. Oddly, increasing manganese concentration had a positive effect on tyrosinase production without affecting decolourization or MnP activity. These results strongly suggest that dye decolourization should be regarded as a complex multi-enzymatic process, where optimal medium composition should arise as a compromise between those optimal for each implied enzyme production. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Expression and characteristics of manganese peroxidase from Ganoderma lucidum in Pichia pastoris and its application in the degradation of four dyes and phenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hui; Guo, Meng-Yuan; Gao, Yan-Hua; Bai, Xiao-Hui; Zhou, Xuan-Wei

    2017-02-23

    Manganese peroxidase (MnP) of white rot basidiomycetes, an extracellular heme enzyme, is part of a peroxidase superfamily that is capable of degrading the different phenolic compounds. Ganoderma, a white rot basidiomycete widely distributed worldwide, could secrete lignin-modifying enzymes (LME), including laccase (Lac), lignin peroxidases (LiP) and MnP. After the selection of a G. lucidum strain from five Ganoderma strains, the 1092 bp full-length cDNA of the MnP gene, designated as G. lucidum MnP (GluMnP1), was cloned from the selected strain. We subsequently constructed an eukaryotic expression vector, pAO815:: GlMnP, and transferred it into Pichia pastoris SMD116. Recombinant GluMnP1 (rGluMnP1) was with a yield of 126 mg/L and a molecular weight of approximately 37.72 kDa and a specific enzyme activity of 524.61 U/L. The rGluMnP1 could be capable of the decolorization of four types of dyes and the degradation of phenol. Phenol and its principal degradation products including hydroquinone, pyrocatechol, resorcinol, benzoquinone, were detected successfully in the experiments. The rGluMnP1 could be effectively expressed in Pichia pastoris and with a higher oxidation activity. We infer that, in the initial stages of the reaction, the catechol-mediated cycle should be the principal route of enzymatic degradation of phenol and its oxidation products. This study highlights the potential industrial applications associated with the production of MnP by genetic engineering methods, and the application of industrial wastewater treatment.

  4. PRODUCING OF ENZYME PREPARATION AND ANALYSIS OF ENZYME PREPARATION OF PEROXIDASE AND CATALASE OF SOME SPECIES OF BASIDIOMYCETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedotov O.V.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A method for obtaining of enzyme preparations of enzyme preparations (EP of peroxidases and catalases fungal extracellular and inracellular origin from cultures of Basidiomycetes was developed. The strains Flammulina velutipes F-vv, Agrocybe cylindracea167; Fistulina hepatica Fh-08 and Pleurotus ostreatus P-208 and P-01 were used as producers of oxidoreductases. Strains were grown on modified glucose-peptone media. Fractionation was carried out by salting out the enzymes with ammonium sulfate at 40-70% saturation of peroxidases and 80% of saturation - for catalase. These solutions protein fractions was further purified by dialysis and gel filtration on Molselekt granules G-50 and G-75. The enzyme solution was subjected to freeze-drying. The individual characteristics of the enzyme preparations were found. The individual characteristics of the enzyme preparations are the activity of enzymes, the protein content and amino-acid composition of enzyme preparations. It was established that strain F. velutipes F-vv was an active producer of intracellular and strain of A. cylindracea 167 was an active producer of extracellular peroxidase. The strains of P. ostreatus P-01 and P-208 were the active producers of extracellular catalase, and the strainsof F. hepatica Fh-08 were active producers of intracellular catalase. The developed methods for producing of enzymes catalase and peroxidase preparations of extra-and intracellular origin provided new antioxidant enzymes, which have their own properties and application prospects in various sectors of industry and science research.

  5. The kinetic properties producing the perfunctory pH profiles of catalase-peroxidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Robert L; Powell, Luke J; Goodwin, Douglas C

    2008-06-01

    Many structure-function relationship studies performed on the catalase-peroxidase enzymes are based on limited kinetic data. To provide a more substantive understanding of catalase-peroxidase function, we undertook a more exhaustive evaluation of catalase-peroxidase catalysis as a function of pH. Kinetic parameters across a broad pH range for the catalase and peroxidase activities of E. coli catalase peroxidase (KatG) were obtained, including the separate analysis of the oxidizing and reducing substrates of the peroxidase catalytic cycle. This investigation identified ABTS-dependent inhibition of peroxidase activity, particularly at low pH, unveiling that previously reported pH optima are clearly skewed. We show that turnover and efficiency of peroxidase activity increases with decreasing pH until the protein unfolds. The data also suggest that the catalase pH optimum is more complex than it is often assumed to be. The apparent optimum is in fact the intersection of the optimum for binding (7.00) and the optimum for activity (5.75). We also report the apparent pK(a)s for binding and catalysis of catalase activity as well as approximate values for certain peroxidatic and catalatic steps.

  6. Lignin peroxidase-negative mutant of the white-rot basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boominathan, K.; Dass, S.B.; Randall, T.A.; Kelley, R.L.; Reddy, C.A. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Phanerochaete chrysosporium produces two classes of extracellular heme proteins, designated lignin peroxidases and manganese peroxidases, that play a key role in lignin degradation. In this study the authors isolated and characterized a lignin peroxidase-negative mutant (lip mutant) that showed 16% of the ligninolytic activity ({sup 14}C-labeled synthetic lignin {yields}{sup 14}CO{sub 2}) exhibited by the wild type. The lip mutant did not produce detectable levels of lignin peroxidase, whereas the wild type, under identical conditions, produced 96 U of lignin peroxidase per liter. Both the wild type and the mutant produced comparable levels of manganese peroxidase and glucose oxidases, a key H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-generating secondary metabolic enzyme in P. chrysosporium. Fast protein liquid chromatographic analysis of the concentrated extracellular fluid of the lip mutant confirmed that it produced only heme proteins with manganese peroxidase activities were produced by the wild type. The lip mutant appears to be a regulatory mutant that is defective in the production of all the lignin peroxidases.

  7. Biodegradation of Chlorpyrifos by Manganese Peroxidase%锰过氧化物酶(MnP)对农药毒死蜱降解的初步研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    莫彩萍; 赵林果; 谢慧芳

    2012-01-01

    Biodegradation of chlorpyrifos by manganese peroxidase (MnP) which was prepared using whit rot fungi P. sordida YK-624 was studied. The systems of chlorpytifos biodegradation were tested. Results showed that the chlorpyrifos biodegradation by MnP should be done in organic acid buffer solution (malonic acid)containing Mn2+ and H2O2 which was produced by glucose oxidase oxidizing glucose. But surfactant Tween 80 was not necessary because of poor solubility of chlorpyrifos. Main influencing factors were determined. It proved that chlorpyrifos could be biodegraded by MnP at 30 ℃ in pH 4.5 malonic acid buffer system, which contained 7.5 mmmol/L MnSO4,2.5 mmol/L glucose and 40 U glucose oxidase. Under the conditions, 400 U/L MnP could degrade 77.51% 30 mg/L chlorpyrifos. GC-MS was used to analyze the product of chlorpyrifos biodegradation by MnP. It was found the possible enzymolysis product was O, O, O', O'-tetraethyl-dithiopyrophosphate, different from hydrolysis or bacterium degradation production of chlorpyrifos.%以广泛使用的有机磷杀虫剂毒死蜱为研究对象,利用白腐菌P.sordida YK-624.菌株所产锰过氧化物酶(MnP)对其进行生物降解的初步研究.首先比较确定了MnP降解毒死蜱所需要的降解体系,即对于毒死蜱的降解,需要在有机酸(丙二酸)存在的缓冲体系中进行,此体系不需要表面活性剂Tween 80,但必须含有Mn2+和葡萄糖氧化酶氧化葡萄糖产生的H2O2.随后对主要影响因素的试验结果表明,MnP降解毒死蜱较好的条件是在pH 4.5的丙二酸缓冲体系中含7.5 mmol/L MnSO4、2.5 mmol/L葡萄糖以及40 U葡萄糖氧化酶,温度30℃.此时,400 U/L的MnP可将30 mg/L的毒死蜱经3d时间降解77.51%.同时,利用GC-MS对毒死蜱酶降解后的产物进行了初步分析,得到1种可能的酶解产物O,O,O’,O’-四乙基二硫代焦磷酸酯,不同于水解和细菌降解途径,值得进行进一步研究.

  8. Peroxidases in nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria eCarmona-Ribeiro

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Peroxidases are enzymes catalyzing redox reactions that cleave peroxides. Their active redox centers have heme, cysteine thiols, selenium, manganese and other chemical moieties. Peroxidases and their mimetic systems have several technological and biomedical applications such as environment protection, energy production, bioremediation, sensors and immunoassays design and drug delivery devices. The combination of peroxidases or systems with peroxidase-like activity with nanostructures such as nanoparticles, nanotubes, thin films, liposomes, micelles, nanoflowers, nanorods and others is often an efficient strategy to improve catalytic activity, targeting and reusability.

  9. Heterologous expression of a new manganese-dependent peroxidase gene from Peniophora incarnata KUC8836 and its ability to remove anthracene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Aslan Hwanhwi; Kang, Chang-Min; Lee, Young Min; Lee, Hanbyul; Yun, Cheol-Won; Kim, Gyu-Hyeok; Kim, Jae-Jin

    2016-12-01

    The white rot fungus Peniophora incarnata KUC8836 has received an attention as the greatest degrader of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which are hazardous xenobiotics and recalcitrant pollutants. To characterize the mechanisms through which MnP degrades PAHs, heterologous expression of manganese-dependent peroxidase (MnP) gene pimp1 was performed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae BY4741 via the pGEM-T Easy vector, resulting in the recombinant plasmid pESC-URA/pimp1 containing the MnP signal peptide. MnP was significantly secreted into the culture medium with galactose as an active protein with higher efficiency (3.58 U mL(-1)) by transformants than by the wild-type S. cerevisiae. The recombinant MnP protein was shown to have a molecular weight of 44 kDa by western blotting analysis. With regard to enhancing the bioremediation of PAHs in the environment, anthracene was effectively degraded by the MnP encoded by pimp1, with a degradation rate of 6.5% when Tween 80 was added. In addition, the MnP activity of the transformant exhibited the highest efficiency (2.49 U mL(-1)) during the degradation. These results show that pimp1 might be useful for biodegradation and gene expression technologies at a transcriptional level, and genetic approaches can be improved by incorporating the highly ligninolytic gene pimp1 and the fungus P. incarnata KUC8836.

  10. Characterization of a manganese peroxidase from white-rot fungus Trametes sp.48424 with strong ability of degrading different types of dyes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Zhang, Shu; He, Feng; Qin, Xing; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Yang, Yang

    2016-12-15

    Manganese peroxidase, MnP-Tra-48424, was purified and characterized from the white-rot fungus Trametes sp.48424. MnP-Tra-48424 was strongly resistant to metal ions such as Ni(2+), Li(+), Ca(2+), K(+), Mn(2+). MnP-Tra-48424 was also resistant to organic solvents such as propanediol, glycerol, and glycol. MnP-Tra-48424 decolorized dyes (indigo, anthraquinone, azo and triphenylmethane) and degraded different polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Indigo Carmine, Remazol Brilliant Blue R, Remazol Brilliant Violet 5R and Methyl Green were efficiently decolorized by MnP-Tra-48424. MnP-Tra-48424 also decolorized Indigo Carmine and Methyl Green combined with metal ions and organic solvents. The decolorization capability of MnP-Tra-48424 was not inhibited by selected metal ions and organic solvents. A combination of MnP-Tra-48424 and Lac-Tra-48424 improved the decolorization rate. In addition to dyes, MnP-Tra-48424 was effective at degrading individual PAHs (fluorene, fluoranthene, pyrene, phenanthrene, anthracene) and also PAHs in mixtures.

  11. Saline-Dependent Regulation of Manganese Peroxidase Genes in the Hypersaline-Tolerant White Rot Fungus Phlebia sp. Strain MG-60▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamei, Ichiro; Daikoku, Chieko; Tsutsumi, Yuji; Kondo, Ryuichiro

    2008-01-01

    The expression pattern of manganese peroxidases (MnPs) in nitrogen-limited cultures of the saline-tolerant fungus Phlebia sp. strain MG-60 is differentially regulated under hypersaline conditions at the mRNA level. When MG-60 was cultured in nitrogen-limited medium (LNM) containing 3% (wt/vol) sea salts (LN-SSM), higher activity of MnPs was observed than that observed in normal medium (LNM). Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis demonstrated that two MnP isoenzymes were de novo synthesized in the culture of LN-SSM. Three MnP-encoding genes (MGmnp1, MGmnp2, and MGmnp3) were isolated by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR and rapid amplification of cDNA ends PCR techniques. The corresponding isozymes were identified by peptide mass fingerprinting analysis. MnP isozymes encoded by MGmnp2 and MGmnp3 were observed mainly in LN-SSM. Real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed high levels of MGmnp2 and MGmnp3 transcripts in LN-SSM 48 h after the addition of 2% NaCl. The induction of MnP production and the accumulation of gene transcripts by saline were well correlated in the presence of Mn2+. However, in the absence of Mn2+, there was no clear correlation between mnp transcripts levels and MnP activity, suggesting posttranscriptional regulation by Mn2+. PMID:18310430

  12. Saline-dependent regulation of manganese peroxidase genes in the hypersaline-tolerant white rot fungus Phlebia sp. strain MG-60.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamei, Ichiro; Daikoku, Chieko; Tsutsumi, Yuji; Kondo, Ryuichiro

    2008-05-01

    The expression pattern of manganese peroxidases (MnPs) in nitrogen-limited cultures of the saline-tolerant fungus Phlebia sp. strain MG-60 is differentially regulated under hypersaline conditions at the mRNA level. When MG-60 was cultured in nitrogen-limited medium (LNM) containing 3% (wt/vol) sea salts (LN-SSM), higher activity of MnPs was observed than that observed in normal medium (LNM). Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis demonstrated that two MnP isoenzymes were de novo synthesized in the culture of LN-SSM. Three MnP-encoding genes (MGmnp1, MGmnp2, and MGmnp3) were isolated by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR and rapid amplification of cDNA ends PCR techniques. The corresponding isozymes were identified by peptide mass fingerprinting analysis. MnP isozymes encoded by MGmnp2 and MGmnp3 were observed mainly in LN-SSM. Real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed high levels of MGmnp2 and MGmnp3 transcripts in LN-SSM 48 h after the addition of 2% NaCl. The induction of MnP production and the accumulation of gene transcripts by saline were well correlated in the presence of Mn(2+). However, in the absence of Mn(2+), there was no clear correlation between mnp transcripts levels and MnP activity, suggesting posttranscriptional regulation by Mn(2+).

  13. Optimized Production of Lignin Peroxidase, Manganese Peroxidase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mgina

    Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, College of Natural and Applied Sciences ... lignolytic enzymes production using Rhemazol Brilliant blue R (RBBR) dye, 2,2-azino-bis (3 .... profiles and ability to degrade dyes and .... fungal culture media during its preparation ... formation as a result of oxidation of colored.

  14. PRODUCING OF ENZYME PREPARATION AND ANALYSIS OF ENZYME PREPARATION OF PEROXIDASE AND CATALASE OF SOME SPECIES OF BASIDIOMYCETES

    OpenAIRE

    Fedotov O. V.; Voloshko T.E.

    2013-01-01

    A method for obtaining of enzyme preparations of enzyme preparations (EP) of peroxidases and catalases fungal extracellular and inracellular origin from cultures of Basidiomycetes was developed. The strains Flammulina velutipes F-vv, Agrocybe cylindracea167; Fistulina hepatica Fh-08 and Pleurotus ostreatus P-208 and P-01 were used as producers of oxidoreductases. Strains were grown on modified glucose-peptone media. Fractionation was carried out by salting out the enzymes with ammonium sulfat...

  15. Cost and energy demand of producing nickel manganese cobalt cathode material for lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Shabbir; Nelson, Paul A.; Gallagher, Kevin G.; Susarla, Naresh; Dees, Dennis W.

    2017-02-01

    The price of the cathode active materials in lithium ion batteries is a key cost driver and thus significantly impacts consumer adoption of devices that utilize large energy storage contents (e.g. electric vehicles). A process model has been developed and used to study the production process of a common lithium-ion cathode material, lithiated nickel manganese cobalt oxide, using the co-precipitation method. The process was simulated for a plant producing 6500 kg day-1. The results indicate that the process will consume approximately 4 kWh kgNMC-1 of energy, 15 L kgNMC-1 of process water, and cost 23 to produce a kg of Li-NMC333. The calculations were extended to compare the production cost using two co-precipitation reactions (with Na2CO3 and NaOH), and similar cathode active materials such as lithium manganese oxide and lithium nickel cobalt aluminum oxide. A combination of cost saving opportunities show the possibility to reduce the cost of the cathode material by 19%.

  16. Detoxification of azo dyes mediated by cell-free supernatant culture with manganese-dependent peroxidase activity: effect of Mn2+ concentration and H2O2 dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Elsa; Urra, Johana; Vásquez, Carlos; Palma, Carolyn

    2012-01-01

    White-rot fungi (WRF) are capable of degrading complex organic compounds such as lignin, and the enzymes that enable these processes can be used for the detoxification of recalcitrant organopollutants. The aim of this study is to evaluate a system based on the use of an in vitro ligninolytic enzyme for the detoxification of recalcitrant dye pollutants. The dyes selected for investigation were the anionic and cationic commercial azo dyes, basic blue 41 (BB41), acid black 1 (AB1), and reactive black 5 (RB5). A supernatant, cell-free culture of WRF with manganese peroxidase activity was used to investigate its degradative capacity under various conditions, and concentrations of cofactors, H(2)O(2) and Mn(2+). The assays were carried out using a 2(2) experimental designs whose variables were concentration of Mn(2+) (33 and 1,000 μM) and semicontinuous dosage of the H(2)O(2) (0.02 and 0.10 μmol) added at a frequency of 0.2 min(-1). The response variables analyzed were the efficiency and the initial rate of the decolorization process. The dye concentrations considered ranged from 10 to 200 mg L(-1). AB1 and RB5 were decolorized over the entire interval of concentrations studied; reaching efficiencies between 15 and 95%. Decolorization of up to 100 mg L(-1), BB41 had less than 30% efficiency. The decay of the concentration of AB1 was interpreted by two-stage kinetics model, with the exception of the condition of 33 μM Mn(2+)-0.02 μmol of H(2)O(2) in which only one stage was observed. For all assays performed with 33 μM Mn(2+), the initial rate of the decolorization process was found to be dependent on the dosage of H(2)O(2). The results of this study can be applied to the development bioreactors for the degradation of recalcitrant pollutants from the textile industry and may be used as a model for expanding the use of extracellular enzyme supernatants in bioremediation. Copyright © 2011 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

  17. 红平菇木质素降解酶系统漆酶、锰过氧化物酶及木质素过氧化物酶的检测%Detection on Laccase,Manganese Peroxidase and Lignin Peroxidase in Ligninolytic Enzymes of Pleurotus djamor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    池玉杰; 闫洪波

    2009-01-01

    @@ 木材白腐菌在分解木质素的过程中会产生非特异性的分解木质素结构的酶系统,这些酶系统主要包括细胞外过氧化物酶[锰过氧化物酶(manganese peroxidase,MnP)、木质素过氧化物酶(lignin peroxidase,LiP)]和细胞外酚氧化酶[漆酶(laccase)].因此,在生物修复方面,白腐菌能够有效地降解废水和土壤中难被降解的多氯联苯、多环芳烃、DDT、染料、炸药和其他氯化物、叠氮化合物等.

  18. Production of some extracellular enzymes by a lignin peroxidase-producing brown rot fungus, Polyporus ostreiformis, and its comparative abilities for lignin degradation and dye decolorization.

    OpenAIRE

    Dey, S; Maiti, T. K.; Bhattacharyya, B C

    1994-01-01

    Polyporus ostreiformis produced Mn peroxidase, acid protease, alpha-amylase, and lignin peroxidase, with maximum activities of 40, 8,300, and 4,200 U liter-1 and 50 nkat liter-1, respectively, in nitrogen-limited liquid media. The fungus removed only 18.6% lignin from rice straw in 3 weeks but effected 99% decolorization of Congo red dye in 9 days.

  19. Metal Transporter Zip14 (Slc39a14) Deletion in Mice Increases Manganese Deposition and Produces Neurotoxic Signatures and Diminished Motor Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydemir, Tolunay Beker; Kim, Min-Hyun; Kim, Jinhee; Colon-Perez, Luis M; Banan, Guita; Mareci, Thomas H; Febo, Marcelo; Cousins, Robert J

    2017-06-21

    results in manganese accumulation in critical tissues such as the brain, as measured by MRI, and produces signatures of brain injury and impaired motor function. Humans with altered ZIP14 function would lack this gatekeeper function of ZIP14 and therefore would be prone to manganese-related neurological diseases. Copyright © 2017 the authors 0270-6474/17/375996-11$15.00/0.

  20. Studies on the production of fungal peroxidases in Aspergillus niger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Conesa, A.; Hondel, C.A.M.J.J. van den; Punt, P.J.

    2000-01-01

    To get insight into the limiting factors existing for the efficient production of fungal peroxidase in filamentous fungi, the expression of the Phanerochaete chrysosporium lignin peroxidase H8 (lipA) and manganese peroxidase (MnP) H4 (mnp1) genes in Aspergillus niger has been studied. For this

  1. Studies on the production of fungal peroxidases in Aspergillus niger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Conesa, A.; Hondel, C.A.M.J.J. van den; Punt, P.J.

    2000-01-01

    To get insight into the limiting factors existing for the efficient production of fungal peroxidase in filamentous fungi, the expression of the Phanerochaete chrysosporium lignin peroxidase H8 (lipA) and manganese peroxidase (MnP) H4 (mnp1) genes in Aspergillus niger has been studied. For this purpo

  2. Studies on the production of fungal peroxidases in Aspergillus niger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Conesa, A.; Hondel, C.A.M.J.J. van den; Punt, P.J.

    2000-01-01

    To get insight into the limiting factors existing for the efficient production of fungal peroxidase in filamentous fungi, the expression of the Phanerochaete chrysosporium lignin peroxidase H8 (lipA) and manganese peroxidase (MnP) H4 (mnp1) genes in Aspergillus niger has been studied. For this purpo

  3. Characterization of different commercial soybean peroxidase preparations and the use of the enzyme for the N-demethylation of methyl-N-methylanthranilate to produce the food flavour methylanthranilate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haandel, van M.J.H.; Saraber, F.C.E.; Boersma, M.G.; Laane, C.; Fleming, Y.; Weenen, H.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    2000-01-01

    The potential of different peroxidase preparations for the N-demethylation of methyl N-methylanthranilate to produce the food flavor methylanthranilate (MA) was investigated. All tested peroxidase preparations were able to catalyze the N-dealkylation. The tested soybean preparations vary widely with

  4. Triphenylmethane dye decoloration using hydrogen peroxide-resistant manganese peroxidase%耐过氧化氢的锰过氧化物酶对三苯甲烷类染料的脱色

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨秀清; 李树仁; 沈翀; 王婧人

    2013-01-01

    [目的]从一株白腐菌Trametes sp.SQ01中获得一种新型的锰过氧化物酶,探讨该酶的底物特异性和对过氧化氢的耐性,以及其对三苯甲烷类染料的脱色能力.[方法]通过丙酮沉淀和DEAE-cellulose 52柱层析法纯化锰过氧化物酶.利用UV-2010紫外可见分光光度法研究锰过氧化物酶对过氧化氢的耐性,同时,用紫外可见分光光度计对三苯甲烷类染料脱色效果进行分析.[结果]通过两步纯化,获得了均一性的锰过氧化物酶.该酶的最适pH和温度分别是4.5和70℃,在pH 3.0-8.0时,酶活相对稳定.该酶在二价锰离子存在下能够氧化2,6-二甲氧基苯酚、愈创木酚、2,2'-连氮-双-(3-乙基苯并噻唑啉磺酸)和过氧化氢等化合物,同时也能作用二价锰离子.在与这些底物反应中,最适底物为过氧化氢(Km为3.7 tmmol/L).该酶具有抗过氧化氢漂白能力,锰过氧化物酶与高浓度的过氧化氢(2.5 mmol/L)作用60 min后仍能保持70%的活性.在所测试的染料中,锰过氧化物酶对结晶紫的脱色率最高达到65.8%.二价锰离子和过氧化氢对锰过氧化物酶脱色能力的影响进行研究,与孔雀绿相比,锰离子和过氧化氢对活性艳蓝脱色的影响很小.[结论]Trametes sp.SQ01锰过氧化物酶对过氧化氢的耐受性,以及对三苯甲烷类染料的高效脱色能力表明该酶在染料脱色降解方面有着广阔的应用前景.%[Objective] We produced a novel manganese-dependent peroxidase (MnP) by Trametes sp.SQ01 and studied its resistance of MnP to hydrogen peroxide,substrate specificity and ability of decolorizing triphenylmethane dyes.[Methods] MnP was purified through acetone precipitation and DEAE-celluose 52 anion-exchange chromatography.The resistance of MnP against H2O2 and dye decolorization were measured with a UV-visible spectrophotometer.[Results] The homogenous MnP has been obtained through two-step purification.The optimum pH and temperature for the

  5. Widespread occurrence of expressed fungal secretory peroxidases in forest soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellner, Harald; Luis, Patricia; Pecyna, Marek J; Barbi, Florian; Kapturska, Danuta; Krüger, Dirk; Zak, Donald R; Marmeisse, Roland; Vandenbol, Micheline; Hofrichter, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Fungal secretory peroxidases mediate fundamental ecological functions in the conversion and degradation of plant biomass. Many of these enzymes have strong oxidizing activities towards aromatic compounds and are involved in the degradation of plant cell wall (lignin) and humus. They comprise three major groups: class II peroxidases (including lignin peroxidase, manganese peroxidase, versatile peroxidase and generic peroxidase), dye-decolorizing peroxidases, and heme-thiolate peroxidases (e.g. unspecific/aromatic peroxygenase, chloroperoxidase). Here, we have repeatedly observed a widespread expression of all major peroxidase groups in leaf and needle litter across a range of forest ecosystems (e.g. Fagus, Picea, Acer, Quercus, and Populus spp.), which are widespread in Europe and North America. Manganese peroxidases and unspecific peroxygenases were found expressed in all nine investigated forest sites, and dye-decolorizing peroxidases were observed in five of the nine sites, thereby indicating biological significance of these enzymes for fungal physiology and ecosystem processes. Transcripts of selected secretory peroxidase genes were also analyzed in pure cultures of several litter-decomposing species and other fungi. Using this information, we were able to match, in environmental litter samples, two manganese peroxidase sequences to Mycena galopus and Mycena epipterygia and one unspecific peroxygenase transcript to Mycena galopus, suggesting an important role of this litter- and coarse woody debris-dwelling genus in the disintegration and transformation of litter aromatics and organic matter formation.

  6. Engineering a fungal peroxidase that degrades lignin at very acidic pH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandez-Fueyo, E.; Ruiz-Duenas, F.J.; Martinez, A.T.

    2014-01-01

    Background Ligninolytic peroxidases are divided into three families: manganese peroxidases (MnPs), lignin peroxidases (LiPs), and versatile peroxidases (VPs). The latter two are able to degrade intact lignins, as shown using nonphenolic lignin model compounds, with VP oxidizing the widest range of r

  7. Engineering a fungal peroxidase that degrades lignin at very acidic pH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandez-Fueyo, E.; Ruiz-Duenas, F.J.; Martinez, A.T.

    2014-01-01

    Background Ligninolytic peroxidases are divided into three families: manganese peroxidases (MnPs), lignin peroxidases (LiPs), and versatile peroxidases (VPs). The latter two are able to degrade intact lignins, as shown using nonphenolic lignin model compounds, with VP oxidizing the widest range of

  8. 粗毛栓菌胞外锰过氧化物酶的纯化及性质%Purification and Characterization of an Extracellular Manganese Peroxidase from Trametes gallica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙迅; 朱陶; 张义正

    2012-01-01

    When cultured on wheat straw powder,the white-rot basidiomycete Trametes gallica secreted extracellular lignocellulolytic enzymes including cellulase,xylanase,laccase,manganese-dependent peroxidase (MnP) and lignin peroxidase (LiP).By using membrane ultra-filtration,salting-out,ion-exchange chromatography,gel filtration and native-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE),a preliminarily purified MnP was obtained.SDS-PAGE and isoelectric focusing (IEF) were used to evaluate the molecular weight and isoelectric point (pI) of the enzyme,respectively.The purified MnP had a molecular weight of 35.7 ku and a pI of 2.8.The result showed that the MnP had a maximum absorbance at 407 nm,an optimal pH of 5.3 and an optimal reaction temperature of 35 ℃.%培养于麦草粉上的白腐担子菌粗毛栓菌分泌胞外木质纤维素降解酶(纤维素酶、木聚糖酶、漆酶、锰过氧化物酶和木质素过氧化物酶).经过超滤、盐析、离子交换层析、凝胶过滤和活性聚丙烯酰胺凝胶电泳等步骤,获得了初步纯化的锰过氧化物酶组分.利用变性聚丙烯酰胺凝胶电泳和等电点聚焦技术所测定的锰过氧化物酶的相对分子质量和等电点分别为35.7 ku和pI2.8.研究结果表明,所纯化的锰过氧化物酶在407nm处具有最大光吸收峰,该酶最适作用pH值和温度分别为pH 5.3和35℃.

  9. Purification and characterization of manganese peroxidases from native and mutant Trametes versicolor IBL-04%从野生与突变株云芝IBL-04提纯锰过氧化物酶及其表征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Muhammad Asgher; Muhammad Ramzan; Muhammad Bilal

    2016-01-01

    由野生及突变株云芝IBL-04制得细胞外锰过氧化物酶(MnPs),并经过硫酸铵沉淀、透析、离子交换和凝胶渗透层析法等步骤提纯.纯化的酶在十二烷基硫酸钠-聚丙烯酰胺凝胶电泳(SDS-PAGE)上于43 kDa区域呈现单一谱带,它适宜的pH值和温度分别为5.0和40°C.突变株MnPs表现出比野生株MnPs更宽的活性pH值范围和更高的热稳定性.从所选突变株所得纯化的MnPs表现出与野生株MnP几乎相同的电泳性质、稳态动力学、金属离子和EDCs降解效率.该生物酶与Mn2+一起催化的反应速率最快,但最高的亲和性对应于ABTS、甲氧基羟苯基乙二醇、4-氨基苯酚和活性染料. Mn2+和Cu2+可显著提高MnPs的活性,但Zn2+, Fe2+, EDTA和半胱氨酸则会不同程度地抑制其活性, Hg2+是最强的活性抑制剂.所有来源的MnPs均可有效催化EDCs、壬基苯酚和二氯苯氧氯酚降解,处理3 h可除去80%以上,在MnPs-介质体系中可进一步提高到90%.综上,云芝MnPs生物酶具有较高的pH适用性和热稳定性、独特的Michaelis-Menten动力学参数和高的EDCs去除效率等特点,因而有望工业化应用.%Extracellular manganese peroxidases (MnPs) produced by native and mutant strains of Trametes versicolor IBL‐04 (EB‐60, EMS‐90) were purified by ammonium sulphate precipitation and dialysis, followed by ion‐exchange and gel‐permeation chromatography. The purified enzymes elucidated a single band in the 43‐kDa region on sodium dodecyl sulphate‐polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The optimum pH and temperature of the purified enzymes were found to be 5.0 and 40 °C, respec‐tively. Mutant strain MnPs exhibited a broader active pH range and higher thermal stability than native MnP. Purified MnPs from selected mutants showed almost identical properties to native MnP in electrophoresis, steady‐state kinetics, and metal ion and endocrine‐disrupting compound (EDC) degradation

  10. Ultrafine grained high density manganese zinc ferrite produced using polyol process assisted by Spark Plasma Sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaudisson, T.; Beji, Z.; Herbst, F.; Nowak, S. [ITODYS, Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, CNRS UMR-7086, 75205 Paris (France); Ammar, S., E-mail: ammarmer@univ-paris-diderot.fr [ITODYS, Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, CNRS UMR-7086, 75205 Paris (France); Valenzuela, R. [D2MC, Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, 04510 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico)

    2015-08-01

    We report the synthesis of Mn–Zn ferrite (MZFO) nanoparticles (NPs) by the polyol process and their consolidation by Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) technique at relatively low temperature and short time, namely 500 °C for 10 min. NPs were obtained as perfectly epitaxied aggregated nanoclusters forming a kind of spherical pseudo-single-crystals of about 40 nm in size. The results on NPs consolidation by SPS underlined the importance of this clustering on the grain growth mechanism. Grain growth proceeds by coalescing nanocrystalline aggregates into single grain of almost the same average size, thus leading to a high density ceramic. Due to magnetic exchange interactions between grains, the produced ceramic does not exhibit thermal relaxation whereas their precursor polyol-made NPs are superparamagnetic. - Highlights: • Textured Mn–Zn ferrite nano-aggregates were produced in polyol. • Dense ceramic was obtained by SPS starting from these particles at 500 °C for 10 min. • The grain growth was driven by coalescence leading to nanometer-sized grains. • The 300 K-magnetic properties of the ceramic are typical of a soft magnet. • Its magnetization is very close to that of bulk despite its ultrafine grain size.

  11. Ontogenetic exposure of rats to pre- and post-natal manganese enhances behavioral impairments produced by perinatal 6-hydroxydopamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Przemysław; Bojanek, Kamila; Szkilnik, Ryszard; Jośko, Jadwiga; Boroń, Dariusz; Adwent, Marta; Gorczyca, Piotr; Kostrzewa, Richard M; Brus, Ryszard

    2011-05-01

    Rats lesioned shortly after birth with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA; 134 μg icv) represent a near-ideal model of severe Parkinson's disease because of the near-total destruction of nigrostriatal dopaminergic fibers. The element manganese, an essential cofactor for many enzymatic reactions, itself in toxic amount, replicates some clinical features similar to those of Parkinson's disease. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of neonatal manganese exposure on 6-OHDA modeling of Parkinson's disease in rats. Manganese (MnCl(2)·4H(2)O) 10,000 ppm was included in the drinking water of pregnant Wistar rats from the time of conception until the 21st day after delivery, the age when neonatal rats were weaned. Control rats consumed tap water. Other groups of neonatal rat pups, on the 3rd day after birth, were pretreated with desipramine (20 mg/kg ip 1 h) prior to bilateral icv administration of 6-OHDA (30, 60, or 137 μg) or its vehicle saline-ascorbic (0.1%) (control). At 2 months after birth, in rats lesioned with 30, 60, or 134 μg 6-OHDA, endogenous striatal dopamine (DA) content was reduced, respectively, by 66, 92, and 98% (HPLC/ED), while co-exposure of these groups to perinatal manganese did not magnify the DA depletion. However, there was prominent enhancement of DA D(1) agonist (i.e., SKF 38393)-induced oral activity in the group of rats exposed perinatally to manganese and also treated neonatally with the 30 mg/kg dose of 6-OHDA. The 30 mg/kg 6-OHDA group, demonstrating cataleptogenic responses to SCH 23390 (0.5 mg/kg) and haloperidol (0.5 mg/kg ip), developed resistance if co-exposed to perinatal manganese. In the group exposed to manganese and lesioned with the 60 mg/kg dose of 6-OHDA, there was a reduction in D(2) agonist (i.e., quinpirole, 0.1 mg/kg)-induced yawning. The series of findings demonstrate that ontogenetic exposure to manganese results in an enhancement of behavioral toxicity to a moderate dose of 6-OHDA, despite the fact that

  12. Stimulation of Ligninolytic Peroxidase Activity by Nitrogen Nutrients in the White Rot Fungus Bjerkandera sp. Strain BOS55

    OpenAIRE

    Kaal, Erwin E. J.; de Jong, Ed; Field, Jim A.

    1993-01-01

    Bjerkandera sp. strain BOS55, a newly isolated wild-type white rot fungus, produced lignin peroxidase (LiP) in nitrogen (N)-sufficient glucose-peptone medium, whereas no LiP was detectable in N-limited medium. The production of LiP was induced by the peptide-containing components of this medium and also by soy bean protein. Furthermore, the production of manganese-dependent peroxidase was stimulated by organic N sources, although lower production was also evident in N-limited medium. Further ...

  13. Polymorphic variations in manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), glutathione peroxidase-1 (GPX1), and catalase (CAT) contribute to elevated plasma triglyceride levels in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes or diabetic cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong; Yu, Ming; Li, Ming; Zhao, Ruie; Zhu, Qihan; Zhou, Wenrui; Lu, Ming; Lu, Yufeng; Zheng, Taishan; Jiang, Jiamei; Zhao, Weijing; Xiang, Kunsan; Jia, Weiping; Liu, Limei

    2012-04-01

    Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), glutathione peroxidase-1 (GPX1), and catalase (CAT) provide the primary antioxidant defense system. Impaired antioxidant defense increases oxidative stress and contributes to the development of type 2 diabetes and diabetic cardiovascular disease (CVD). We preformed a case-control study in Chinese type 2 diabetes patients, to determine if the MnSOD Val16Ala (T→C), GPX1 Pro198Leu (C→T), and CAT -262C/T (C→T) functional polymorphisms contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes or diabetic CVD. Patients with type 2 diabetes (n = 168) were divided into the non-CVD group (n = 83, >10 year since diagnosis) and CVD group (n = 85, history of ischemic CVD). Genotyping was performed using PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) or PCR-based direct sequencing. The genotypic distribution in the non-CVD- and CVD-group and the clinical parameters in genotypic groups were not significantly different in the three polymorphic sites, respectively. Among eight genotypic combinations, the most common TT+CC+CC genotype (59.5%) was associated with higher triglyceride levels than the TT+CT+CC genotype, the second frequent one (14.9%; 1.77 ± 0.12 vs. 1.21 ± 0.11 mmol/l, P = 0.001), and all non-TT+CC+CC genotypes (40.5%; 1.77 ± 0.12 vs. 1.43 ± 0.12 mmol/l, P = 0.048). In the CVD group, significantly elevated triglyceride levels were also observed in patients with TT+CC+CC compared to patients with TT+CT+CC (2.00 ± 0.18 vs. 1.37 ± 0.16 mmol/l, P = 0.018) or non-TT+CC+CC genotypes (2.00 ± 0.18 vs. 1.65 ± 0.19 mmol/l, P = 0.070). The common MnSOD, GPX1, and CAT TT+CC+CC genotype may contribute to hypertriglyceridemia in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes or diabetic CVD.

  14. A new versatile peroxidase from Pleurotus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Dueñas, F J; Camarero, S; Pérez-Boada, M; Martínez, M J; Martínez, A T

    2001-05-01

    Lignin peroxidase (LiP) and manganese peroxidase (MnP) have been investigated in Phanerochaete chrysosporium. A third ligninolytic peroxidase has been described in Pleurotus and Bjerkandera. Two of these versatile peroxidases (VPs) have been cloned, sequenced and characterized. They have high affinity for Mn(2+), hydroquinones and dyes, and also oxidize veratryl alcohol, dimethoxybenzene and lignin dimers. The deduced sequences show higher identity with Ph. chrysosporium LiP than MnP, but the molecular models obtained include a Mn(2+)-binding site. Concerning aromatic substrate oxidation, Pl. eryngii VP shows a putative long-range electron transfer pathway from an exposed trytophan to haem. Mutagenesis and chemical modification of this tryptophan and the acidic residues forming the Mn(2+)-binding site confirmed their role in catalysis. The existence of several substrate oxidation sites is supported further by biochemical evidence. Residue conservation in other fungal peroxidases is discussed.

  15. Substrate oxidation sites in versatile peroxidase and other basidiomycete peroxidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J; Morales, María; García, Eva; Miki, Yuta; Martínez, María Jesús; Martínez, Angel T

    2009-01-01

    Versatile peroxidase (VP) is defined by its capabilities to oxidize the typical substrates of other basidiomycete peroxidases: (i) Mn(2+), the manganese peroxidase (MnP) substrate (Mn(3+) being able to oxidize phenols and initiate lipid peroxidation reactions); (ii) veratryl alcohol (VA), the typical lignin peroxidase (LiP) substrate; and (iii) simple phenols, which are the substrates of Coprinopsis cinerea peroxidase (CIP). Crystallographic, spectroscopic, directed mutagenesis, and kinetic studies showed that these 'hybrid' properties are due to the coexistence in a single protein of different catalytic sites reminiscent of those present in the other basidiomycete peroxidase families. Crystal structures of wild and recombinant VP, and kinetics of mutated variants, revealed certain differences in its Mn-oxidation site compared with MnP. These result in efficient Mn(2+) oxidation in the presence of only two of the three acidic residues forming its binding site. On the other hand, a solvent-exposed tryptophan is the catalytically-active residue in VA oxidation, initiating an electron transfer pathway to haem (two other putative pathways were discarded by mutagenesis). Formation of a tryptophanyl radical after VP activation by peroxide was detected using electron paramagnetic resonance. This was the first time that a protein radical was directly demonstrated in a ligninolytic peroxidase. In contrast with LiP, the VP catalytic tryptophan is not beta-hydroxylated under hydrogen peroxide excess. It was also shown that the tryptophan environment affected catalysis, its modification introducing some LiP properties in VP. Moreover, some phenols and dyes are oxidized by VP at the edge of the main haem access channel, as found in CIP. Finally, the biotechnological interest of VP is discussed.

  16. Disulfide bonds and glycosylation in fungal peroxidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limongi, P; Kjalke, M; Vind, J; Tams, J W; Johansson, T; Welinder, K G

    1995-01-15

    Four conserved disulfide bonds and N-linked and O-linked glycans of extracellular fungal peroxidases have been identified from studies of a lignin and a manganese peroxidase from Trametes versicolor, and from Coprinus cinereus peroxidase (CIP) and recombinant C. cinereus peroxidase (rCIP) expressed in Aspergillus oryzae. The eight cysteine residues are linked 1-3, 2-7, 4-5 and 6-8, and are located differently from the four conserved disulfide bridges present in the homologous plant peroxidases. CIP and rCIP were identical in their glycosylation pattern, although the extent of glycan chain heterogeneity depended on the fermentation batch. CIP and rCIP have one N-linked glycan composed only of GlcNAc and Man at residue Asn142, and two O-linked glycans near the C-terminus. The major glycoform consists of single Man residues at Thr331 and at Ser338. T. versicolor lignin isoperoxidase TvLP10 contains a single N-linked glycan composed of (GlcNAc)2Man5 bound to Asn103, whereas (GlcNAc)2Man3 was found in T. versicolor manganese isoperoxidase TvMP2 at the same position. In addition, mass spectrometry of the C-terminal peptide of TvMP2 indicated the presence of five Man residues in O-linked glycans. No phosphate was found in these fungal peroxidases.

  17. Novel Applications of Peroxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rob, Abdul; Ball, Andrew S.; Tuncer, Munir; Wilson, Michael T.

    1997-02-01

    The article entitled "Novel Biocatalysts Will Work Even Better for Industry" published recently in this Journal (1) was informative and interesting. However it touched only briefly on the application of peroxidase as catalyst. Here, we would like to mention in more detail the novel applications of peroxidase in agricultural, paper pulp, water treatment, pharmaceutical, and medical situations. Firstly, the peroxidase isolated from Phanerochaete chyrosporium has been shown to detoxify herbicides such as atrazine to less toxic compounds and would certainly find potential application in agriculture (2). Secondly, the peroxidase produced by Streptomyces thermoviolaceus may find application in the paper pulp industry as a delignifying agent (3). Thirdly, it has been shown that extracellular peroxidase produced by Streptomyces avermitilis can remove the intense color from paper-mill effluent obtained after semichemical alkaline pulping of wheat straw (4), and thus this enzyme might find application as a catalyst in water treatment plants. Fourthly, the heme-containing horseradish peroxidase enzyme has been exploited in several diagnostic applications in pharmaceutics and medicine, such as the detection of human immunodeficiency virus and cystic fibrosis (5-10). Finally, recent work from our laboratory has suggested that thermophilic nonheme peroxidase produced by Thermomonospora fusca BD25 may find medical use in the diagnosis of myocardial infarction (11, 12). Literature Cited 1. Wiseman, A. J. Chem. Educ. 1996, 73, 55-58. 2. Mougin, C. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 1994, 60, 705-708. 3. McCarthy A. J.; Peace, W.; Broda, P. Appl. Microbiol. Technol. 1985, 23, 238-244. 4. Hernandez, M; Rodriguez J; Soliveri, J; Copa, J. L; Perez, M. I; Arias, M. E. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 1994, 60, 3909-3913. 5. Hopfer, S. M.; Aslanzadeh, J. Ann. Clin. Lab. Sci. 1995, 25, 475-480. 6. Suzuki, K; Iman, M. J. Virol. Methods 1995, 55, 347-356. 7. Nielsen, K. J. Immunoassay 1995, 16, 183-197. 8

  18. Lignin peroxidase functionalities and prospective applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falade, Ayodeji O; Nwodo, Uchechukwu U; Iweriebor, Benson C; Green, Ezekiel; Mabinya, Leonard V; Okoh, Anthony I

    2017-02-01

    Ligninolytic extracellular enzymes, including lignin peroxidase, are topical owing to their high redox potential and prospective industrial applications. The prospective applications of lignin peroxidase span through sectors such as biorefinery, textile, energy, bioremediation, cosmetology, and dermatology industries. The litany of potentials attributed to lignin peroxidase is occasioned by its versatility in the degradation of xenobiotics and compounds with both phenolic and non-phenolic constituents. Over the years, ligninolytic enzymes have been studied however; research on lignin peroxidase seems to have been lagging when compared to other ligninolytic enzymes which are extracellular in nature including laccase and manganese peroxidase. This assertion becomes more pronounced when the application of lignin peroxidase is put into perspective. Consequently, a succinct documentation of the contemporary functionalities of lignin peroxidase and, some prospective applications of futuristic relevance has been advanced in this review. Some articulated applications include delignification of feedstock for ethanol production, textile effluent treatment and dye decolourization, coal depolymerization, treatment of hyperpigmentation, and skin-lightening through melanin oxidation. Prospective application of lignin peroxidase in skin-lightening functions through novel mechanisms, hence, it holds high value for the cosmetics sector where it may serve as suitable alternative to hydroquinone; a potent skin-lightening agent whose safety has generated lots of controversy and concern. © 2016 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. The Study of Natural Isolates of Fusarium spp. Micromycetes – Ligninolytic Enzymes Producers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.V. Darmov

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available It is known that many basidiomycetes, white rot agents of wood in particular, produce ligninolytic complex enzymes, the most important of which are laccase, manganese peroxidase, and lignin peroxidase. Using these basidiomycete enzymes, promising methods have been developed for disposal of logging and plant farming wastes, paper stock delignification, cloth bio-bleaching, and production of wooden fibreboards; however, these techniques are not commonly applied on an industrial scale. It should be noted that wood lignin can be also destructed by various micromycetes, such as Fusarium, Trichoderma, Aspergillus, Penicillium, etc. Nevertheless, the range of ligninolytic complex enzymes produced by them, as well as the level of their activity and localization in a cell, have been studied insufficiently. Thus, it is not possible to fully appreciate the ligninolytic potential of micromycetes. The purpose of this research is to evaluate the ability of natural isolates of Fusarium spp. to produce laccase, manganese peroxidase, and lignin peroxidase. Furthermore, the level of activity of these enzymes in the culture liquid and cell mass of producers has been determined. The following natural isolates of micromycetes have been isolated and identified from natural envi-ronments of the Kirov region: F. culmorum, strain 3, F. sporotrichioides, strain 12, and F. solani, strain 52, all capable of degradation of wood lignin and carrying simultaneously genetic determinants of all the three major ligninolytic enzymes – laccase, manganese peroxidase, and lignin peroxidase. We have studied the dynamics of the activity of these enzymes in the culture liquid supernatants at deep micromycete cultivation. The enzyme activity has been determined by the spectrophotometric method. In terms of laccase and manganese peroxidase production, two micromycete strains – F. culmorum 3 and F. sporotrichioides 12 – have been almost as good as the basidiomycete T. versicolor

  20. Maize peroxidase Px5 has a highly conserved sequence in inbreds resistant to mycotoxin producing fungi which enhances fungal and insect resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowd, Patrick F; Johnson, Eric T

    2016-01-01

    Mycotoxin presence in maize causes health and economic issues for humans and animals. Although many studies have investigated expression differences of genes putatively governing resistance to producing fungi, few have confirmed a resistance role, or examined putative resistance gene structure in more than a couple of inbreds. The pericarp expression of maize Px5 has previously been associated with resistance to Aspergillus flavus growth and insects in a set of inbreds. Genes from 14 different inbreds that included ones with resistance and susceptibility to A. flavus, Fusarium proliferatum, F. verticillioides and F. graminearum and/or mycotoxin production were cloned using high fidelity enzymes, and sequenced. The sequence of Px5 from all resistant inbreds was identical, except for a single base change in two inbreds, only one of which affected the amino acid sequence. Conversely, the Px5 sequence from several susceptible inbreds had several base variations, some of which affected amino acid sequence that would potentially alter secondary structure, and thus enzyme function. The sequence of the maize peroxidase Px5 common to inbreds resistant to mycotoxigenic fungi was overexpressed in maize callus. Callus transformants overexpressing the gene caused significant reductions in growth for fall armyworms, corn earworms, and F. graminearum compared to transformant callus with a β-glucuronidase gene. This study demonstrates rarer transcripts of potential resistance genes overlooked by expression screens can be identified by sequence comparisons. A role in pest resistance can be verified by callus expression of the candidate genes, which can thereby justify larger scale transformation and regeneration of transgenic plants expressing the resistance gene for further evaluation.

  1. Pleurotus ostreatus heme peroxidases: an in silico analysis from the genome sequence to the enzyme molecular structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J; Fernández, Elena; Martínez, María Jesús; Martínez, Angel T

    2011-11-01

    An exhaustive screening of the Pleurotus ostreatus genome was performed to search for nucleotide sequences of heme peroxidases in this white-rot fungus, which could be useful for different biotechnological applications. After sequence identification and manual curation of the corresponding genes and cDNAs, the deduced amino acid sequences were converted into structural homology models. A comparative study of these sequences and their structural models with those of known fungal peroxidases revealed the complete inventory of heme peroxidases of this fungus. This consists of cytochrome c peroxidase and ligninolytic peroxidases, including manganese peroxidase and versatile peroxidase but not lignin peroxidase, as representative of the "classical" superfamily of plant, fungal, and bacterial peroxidases; and members of two relatively "new" peroxidase superfamilies, namely heme-thiolate peroxidases, here described for the first time in a fungus from the genus Pleurotus, and dye-decolorizing peroxidases, already known in P. ostreatus but still to be thoroughly explored and characterized.

  2. RECOMBINANT HORSERADISH PEROXIDASE FOR ANALYTICAL APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А.M. Egorov

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with prospects of using recombinant horseradish peroxidase in analytical biochemistry and biotechnology. Problems of recombinant horseradish peroxidase cloning in different expression systems, possible approaches to their solution, advantages of recombinant recombinant horseradish peroxidase and recombinant horseradish peroxidase-fusion proteins for immunoassays are considered. Possibility for development of mediatorless bienzyme biosensor for peroxide and metabolites, yielding hydrogen peroxide during their transformations, based on co-adsorption of recombinant horseradish peroxidase and the appropriate oxidase was demonstrated. The possibility to produce a fully active recombinant conjugate of recombinant horseradish peroxidase with human heart-type fatty acid binding protein, which may be used in competitive immunoassay for clinical diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction, and recombinant conjugates (N- and C-terminus of recombinant horseradish peroxidase with Fab-fragments of the antibody against atrazine, which may be applied for atrazine pesticides detection, are demonstra ted for the first time.

  3. Producer gas cleaning in a dual fluidized bed reformer - a comparative study of performance with ilmenite and a manganese oxide as catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berguerand, Nicolas; Lind, Fredrik; Seemann, Martin; Thunman, Henrik [Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Energy and Environment, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2012-09-15

    Secondary catalytic gas conditioning is one strategy to eliminate tars formed in a producer gas during biomass gasification. However, most catalysts tend to lose their tar reforming activity after a short period of operation due to carbon formation. A novel technique for catalytic gas cleaning based on two interconnected fluidized beds has been investigated; this technique can be applied to all types of gasifiers. The idea is to reform the tar components into useful molecules - even at high tar contents - by means of a circulating catalyst. More precisely, the producer gas is cleaned with catalyst in one of the reactors, referred to as the fuel reactor, while the catalyst is continuously regenerated in another reactor, the air reactor (AR). The system described here is coupled with the Chalmers 2-4 MW{sub th} biomass gasifier while the AR is fed with nitrogen-diluted air. The effect of different catalysts on both the tar content and the gas composition was investigated. Some of the tested materials do not only reform tars, they also influence the H{sub 2}/CO ratio in a beneficial manner; in particular, ratios closer to 3 in the reformed gas are favorable if subsequent methanation is implemented. In this paper, comparative results based on testing with manganese- and iron-based catalysts are presented. The former is a manufactured catalyst while the latter is a natural ore. Results suggest that both show satisfying ability for regeneration from carbon deposits. Higher temperature enhances tar decomposition during the experiment with both catalysts. Moreover, the iron-based catalyst enhances the water-gas shift activity, which in turn impacts the total amount of produced gas. On the other hand, the manganese-based catalyst seems to display a higher propensity for tar conversion. (orig.)

  4. DyP-type peroxidases comprise a novel heme peroxidase family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugano, Y

    2009-04-01

    Dye-decolorizing peroxidase (DyP) is produced by a basidiomycete (Thanatephorus cucumeris Dec 1) and is a member of a novel heme peroxidase family (DyP-type peroxidase family) that appears to be distinct from general peroxidases. Thus far, 80 putative members of this family have been registered in the PeroxiBase database (http://peroxibase.isbsib.ch/) and more than 400 homologous proteins have been detected via PSI-BLAST search. Although few studies have characterized the function and structure of these proteins, they appear to be bifunctional enzymes with hydrolase or oxygenase, as well as typical peroxidase activities. DyP-type peroxidase family suggests an ancient root compared with other general peroxidases because of their widespread distribution in the living world. In this review, firstly, an outline of the characteristics of DyP from T. cucumeris is presented and then interesting characteristics of the DyP-type peroxidase family are discussed.

  5. Biodistribution and acute toxicity of a nanofluid containing manganese iron oxide nanoparticles produced by a mechanochemical process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellusci, Mariangela; La Barbera, Aurelio; Padella, Franco; Mancuso, Mariateresa; Pasquo, Alessandra; Grollino, Maria Giuseppa; Leter, Giorgio; Nardi, Elisa; Cremisini, Carlo; Giardullo, Paola; Pacchierotti, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are candidate contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging and targeted drug delivery. Biodistribution and toxicity assessment are critical for the development of nanoparticle-based drugs, because of nanoparticle-enhanced biological reactivity. Here, we investigated the uptake, in vivo biodistribution, and in vitro and in vivo potential toxicity of manganese ferrite (MnFe2O4) nanoparticles, synthesized by an original high-yield, low-cost mechanochemical process. Cultures of murine Balb/3T3 fibroblasts were exposed for 24, 48, or 72 hours to increasing ferrofluid concentrations. Nanoparticle cellular uptake was assessed by flow-cytometry scatter-light measurements and microscopy imaging after Prussian blue staining; cytotoxicity was evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and colony-forming assays. After a single intravenous injection, in vivo nanoparticle biodistribution and clearance were evaluated in mice by Mn spectrophotometric determination and Prussian blue staining in the liver, kidneys, spleen, and brain at different posttreatment times up to 21 days. The same organs were analyzed for any possible histopathological change. The in vitro study demonstrated dose-dependent nanoparticle uptake and statistically significant cytotoxic effects from a concentration of 50 μg/mL for the MTT assay and 20 μg/mL for the colony-forming assay. Significant increases in Mn concentrations were detected in all analyzed organs, peaking at 6 hours after injection and then gradually declining. Clearance appeared complete at 7 days in the kidneys, spleen, and brain, whereas in the liver Mn levels remained statistically higher than in vehicle-treated mice up to 3 weeks postinjection. No evidence of irreversible histopathological damage to any of the tested organs was observed. A comparison of the lowest in vitro toxic concentration with the intravenously injected dose and the administered dose of

  6. Biodistribution and acute toxicity of a nanofluid containing manganese iron oxide nanoparticles produced by a mechanochemical process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bellusci M

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Mariangela Bellusci,1 Aurelio La Barbera,1 Franco Padella,1 Mariateresa Mancuso,2 Alessandra Pasquo,2 Maria Giuseppa Grollino,2 Giorgio Leter,2 Elisa Nardi,3 Carlo Cremisini,3 Paola Giardullo,4 Francesca Pacchierotti21Technical Unit for Material Technologies, 2Technical Unit for Radiation Biology and Human Health, 3Technical Unit for Environmental Characterization, Prevention and Recovery, Agenzia Nazionale per le Nuove Tecnologie, l'Energia e lo Sviluppo Economico Sostenibile (ENEA, Casaccia Research Centre, Rome, Italy; 4Department of Radiation Physics, Marconi University, Rome, ItalyAbstract: Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are candidate contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging and targeted drug delivery. Biodistribution and toxicity assessment are critical for the development of nanoparticle-based drugs, because of nanoparticle-enhanced biological reactivity. Here, we investigated the uptake, in vivo biodistribution, and in vitro and in vivo potential toxicity of manganese ferrite (MnFe2O4 nanoparticles, synthesized by an original high-yield, low-cost mechanochemical process. Cultures of murine Balb/3T3 fibroblasts were exposed for 24, 48, or 72 hours to increasing ferrofluid concentrations. Nanoparticle cellular uptake was assessed by flow-cytometry scatter-light measurements and microscopy imaging after Prussian blue staining; cytotoxicity was evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT and colony-forming assays. After a single intravenous injection, in vivo nanoparticle biodistribution and clearance were evaluated in mice by Mn spectrophotometric determination and Prussian blue staining in the liver, kidneys, spleen, and brain at different posttreatment times up to 21 days. The same organs were analyzed for any possible histopathological change. The in vitro study demonstrated dose-dependent nanoparticle uptake and statistically significant cytotoxic effects from a concentration of 50 µg

  7. Occupational exposure to manganese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarić, M; Markićević, A; Hrustić, O

    1977-05-01

    The relationship between the degree of exposure and biological effects of manganese was studied in a group of 369 workers employed in the production of ferroalloys. Two other groups of workers, from an electrode plant and from an aluminium rolling mill, served as controls. Mean manganese concentrations at work places where ferroalloys were produced varied from 0-301 to 20-442 mg/m3. The exposure level of the two control groups was from 2 to 30 microgram/m3 and from 0-05 to 0-07 microgram/m3, in the electrode plant and rolling mill respectively. Sixty-two (16-8%) manganese alloy workers showed some signs of neurological impairment. These signs were noticeably less in the two control groups (5-8% and 0%) than in the occupationally exposed group. Subjective symptoms, which are nonspecific but may be symptoms of subclinical manganism, were not markedly different in the three groups. However, in the manganese alloy workers some of the subjective symptoms occurred more frequently in heavier smokers than in light smokers or nonsmokers. Heavier smokers engaged in manganese alloy production showed some of the subjective symptoms more often than heavier smokers from the control groups.

  8. Catalytic and peroxidase-like activity of carbon based-AuPd bimetallic nanocomposite produced using carbon dots as the reductant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Liuqing [Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology & Traditional Chinese Medicine Research (Ministry of Education, China), College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan Normal University, Changsha 410081 (China); Liu, Xiaoying [College of Science, Science and Technological Innovation Platform, Hunan Agricultural University, Hunan, Changsha 410128 (China); Lu, Qiujun; Huang, Na [Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology & Traditional Chinese Medicine Research (Ministry of Education, China), College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan Normal University, Changsha 410081 (China); Liu, Meiling, E-mail: liumeilingww@126.com [Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology & Traditional Chinese Medicine Research (Ministry of Education, China), College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan Normal University, Changsha 410081 (China); Zhang, Youyu; Yao, Shouzhuo [Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology & Traditional Chinese Medicine Research (Ministry of Education, China), College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan Normal University, Changsha 410081 (China)

    2016-08-03

    In this report, carbon-based AuPd bimetallic nanocomposite (AuPd/C NC) was synthesized using carbon dots (C-dots) as the reducing agent and stabilizer by a simple green sequential reduction strategy, without adding other agents. The as synthesized AuPd/C NC showed good catalytic activity and peroxidase-like property. The structure and morphology of these nanoparticles were clearly characterized by UV–Vis spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The AuPd/C NC catalyst exhibits noticeably higher catalytic activity than Pd and Au nanoparticles in catalysis reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP). Moreover, based on the high peroxidase-like property of AuPd/C NC, a new colorimetric detection method for hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) has been designed using 3,3′,5,5′-tetramethyl-benzidine (TMB) as the substrate, which provides a simple and sensitive means to detect H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in wide linear range of 5 μM–500 μM and 500 μM–4 mM with low detection limit of 1.6 μM (S/N = 3). Therefore, the facile synthesis strategy for bimetallic nanoparticles by the mild reductant of carbon dot will provide some new thoughts for preparing of carbon-based metal nanomaterials and expand their application in catalysis and analytical chemistry areas. - Highlights: • Carbon-based AuPd bimetallic nanocomposite was synthesized using carbon dots. • The green sequential reduction strategy synthesis method is simple, green, convenient and effective. • The as synthesized AuPd/C NC showed good catalytic activity and peroxidase-like activity. • The AuPd/C NC exhibits noticeably higher catalytic activity in reduction of 4-nitrophenol. • A new colorimetric detection method for hydrogen peroxide based on AuPd/C NC was proposed.

  9. Extracellular haem peroxidases mediate Mn(II) oxidation in a marine Roseobacter bacterium via superoxide production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andeer, Peter F; Learman, Deric R; McIlvin, Matt; Dunn, James A; Hansel, Colleen M

    2015-10-01

    Manganese (Mn) oxides are among the strongest sorbents and oxidants in environmental systems. A number of biotic and abiotic pathways induce the oxidation of Mn(II) to Mn oxides. Here, we use a combination of proteomic analyses and activity assays, to identify the enzyme(s) responsible for extracellular superoxide-mediated Mn oxide formation by a bacterium within the ubiquitous Roseobacter clade. We show that animal haem peroxidases (AHPs) located on the outer membrane and within the secretome are responsible for Mn(II) oxidation. These novel peroxidases have previously been implicated in direct Mn(II) oxidation by phylogenetically diverse bacteria. Yet, we show that in this Roseobacter species, AHPs mediate Mn(II) oxidation not through a direct reaction but by producing superoxide and likely also by degrading hydrogen peroxide. These findings point to a eukaryotic-like oscillatory oxidative-peroxidative enzymatic cycle by these AHPs that leads to Mn oxide formation by this organism. AHP expression appears unaffected by Mn(II), yet the large energetic investment required to produce and secrete these enzymes points to an as yet unknown physiological function. These findings are further evidence that bacterial peroxidases and secreted enzymes, in general, are unappreciated controls on the cycling of metals and reactive oxygen species (ROS), and by extension carbon, in natural systems. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Independent evolution of four heme peroxidase superfamilies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zámocký, Marcel; Hofbauer, Stefan; Schaffner, Irene; Gasselhuber, Bernhard; Nicolussi, Andrea; Soudi, Monika; Pirker, Katharina F; Furtmüller, Paul G; Obinger, Christian

    2015-05-15

    Four heme peroxidase superfamilies (peroxidase-catalase, peroxidase-cyclooxygenase, peroxidase-chlorite dismutase and peroxidase-peroxygenase superfamily) arose independently during evolution, which differ in overall fold, active site architecture and enzymatic activities. The redox cofactor is heme b or posttranslationally modified heme that is ligated by either histidine or cysteine. Heme peroxidases are found in all kingdoms of life and typically catalyze the one- and two-electron oxidation of a myriad of organic and inorganic substrates. In addition to this peroxidatic activity distinct (sub)families show pronounced catalase, cyclooxygenase, chlorite dismutase or peroxygenase activities. Here we describe the phylogeny of these four superfamilies and present the most important sequence signatures and active site architectures. The classification of families is described as well as important turning points in evolution. We show that at least three heme peroxidase superfamilies have ancient prokaryotic roots with several alternative ways of divergent evolution. In later evolutionary steps, they almost always produced highly evolved and specialized clades of peroxidases in eukaryotic kingdoms with a significant portion of such genes involved in coding various fusion proteins with novel physiological functions.

  11. Barley peroxidase isozymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laugesen, Sabrina; Bak-Jensen, Kristian Sass; Hägglund, Per; Henriksen, Anette; Finnie, Christine; Svensson, Birte; Roepstorff, Peter

    2007-12-01

    Thirteen peroxidase spots on two-dimensional gels were identified by comprehensive proteome analysis of the barley seed. Mass spectrometry tracked multiple forms of three different peroxidase isozymes: barley seed peroxidase 1, barley seed-specific peroxidase BP1 and a not previously identified putative barley peroxidase. The presence of multiple spots for each of the isozymes reflected variations in post-translational glycosylation and protein truncation. Complete sequence coverage was achieved by using a series of proteases and chromatographic resins for sample preparation prior to mass spectrometric analysis. Distinct peroxidase spot patterns divided the 16 cultivars tested into two groups. The distribution of the three isozymes in different seed tissues (endosperm, embryo, and aleurone layer) suggested the peroxidases to play individual albeit partially overlapping roles during germination. In summary, a subset of three peroxidase isozymes was found to occur in the seed, whereas products of four other barley peroxidase genes were not detected. The present analysis documents the selective expression profiles and post-translational modifications of isozymes from a large plant gene family.

  12. Peroxidase(s) in Environment Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Neelam; Kanwar, Shamsher S.

    2013-01-01

    Industrial discharges of untreated effluents into water bodies and emissions into air have deteriorated the quality of water and air, respectively. The huge amount of pollutants derived from industrial activities represents a threat for the environment and ecologic equilibrium. Phenols and halogenated phenols, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), endocrine disruptive chemicals (EDC), pesticides, dioxins, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), industrial dyes, and other xenobiotics are among the most important pollutants. Peroxidases are enzymes that are able to transform a variety of compounds following a free radical mechanism, thereby yielding oxidized or polymerized products. The peroxidase transformation of these pollutants is accompanied by a reduction in their toxicity, due to loss of biological activity, reduction in the bioavailability, or the removal from aqueous phase, especially when the pollutant is found in water. The review describes the sources of peroxidases, the reactions catalyzed by them, and their applications in the management of pollutants in the environment. PMID:24453894

  13. Heterologous Transformation and Expression of Hericium erinaceum Manganese Peroxidase 1 Gene in Aspergillus nidulans%猴头菌锰过氧化物酶1基因在构巢曲霉的异源转化与表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹立伟; 池玉杰

    2013-01-01

    The recombinant plasmid pLB01/He-mnp1 which contains a gene encoding for manganese peroxidase (He-mnp1) from Hericium erinaceum CB1 was transformated into protoplasts of auxotrophic stain TN02A7 of Aspergillus nidulans by means of protoplast transformation method mediated by PEG/CaC12so as to enhance MnP production.A transformant stain TN02A7-He-mnp1 of A.nidulans was gained,the gene He-mnp1 was expressed under the control of alcohol dehydrogenase alcA (p) promoter.The transformant stain TN02A7-He-mnp1,auxotrophic stain TN02A7,wild stain of A.nidulans WJA01,and H.erinaceum CB1 were cultured under the same lignin condition and detected the MnP activity.The results showed that TN02A7-He-mnp1 could produce MnP activity in the absence and presence of heme,but the MnP activity was up to 38.31 U · L-1 on 96h with 0.05 g · L-1 heme which was 8.64 times higher than that without heme but less than that of H.erinaceum CB1,whereas TN02A7 and WJA01 could not produce MnP activity at any time,indicating that the gene He-mnp1 had been successfully transformed into TN02A7-He-mnp1 and expressed in lignin environment,and the heme was one of the restrictive factors for rescombinant mnp gene to express in A.nidulans.The study provides a new method to produce MnP and enhance MnP yield.%为提高猴头菌菌株CB1锰过氧化物酶(MnP)基因的表达产量,采用PEG/CaCl2介导的原生质体转化方法,将携带有He-mnp1的重组质粒pLB01/He-mnp1转入到构巢曲霉尿嘧啶尿苷营养缺陷菌株TN02A7的原生质体中,获得了转化子菌株TN02A 7-He-mnp1,并在乙醇脱氢酶启动子alcA(P)控制下实现了异源表达.将TN02A7-He-mnp1、TN02A7、构巢曲霉野生型菌株WJA01、猴头菌菌株CB1在相同的木质素环境下进行培养并检测MnP酶活性,结果表明:转化子菌株TN02A7-He-mnp1在0.05 g· L-1血红素的情况下、诱导96 h后酶活性最高为38.31 U·L-1,比不添加血红素的酶活力高8.64倍,但比猴头菌菌株CB1

  14. SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL ACCUMULATION OF MESSENGER-RNAS ENCODING 2 COMMON LIGNIN PEROXIDASES IN PHANEROCHAETE-CHRYSOSPORIUM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MOUKHA, SM; WOSTEN, HAB; MYLIUS, EJ; ASTHER, M; WESSELS, JGH

    Accumulation of peroxidases and their mRNAs was localized in colonies of Phanerochaete chrysosporium sandwiched between perforated polycarbonate membranes. Northern (RNA) blot analyses of colonial rings and in situ hybridizations with specific probes for manganese(II)-dependent peroxidase (MnP-1)

  15. Lignin-degrading peroxidases from genome of selective ligninolytic fungus Ceriporiopsis subvermispora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Fueyo, Elena; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J; Miki, Yuta; Martínez, María Jesús; Hammel, Kenneth E; Martínez, Angel T

    2012-05-11

    The white-rot fungus Ceriporiopsis subvermispora delignifies lignocellulose with high selectivity, but until now it has appeared to lack the specialized peroxidases, termed lignin peroxidases (LiPs) and versatile peroxidases (VPs), that are generally thought important for ligninolysis. We screened the recently sequenced C. subvermispora genome for genes that encode peroxidases with a potential ligninolytic role. A total of 26 peroxidase genes was apparent after a structural-functional classification based on homology modeling and a search for diagnostic catalytic amino acid residues. In addition to revealing the presence of nine heme-thiolate peroxidase superfamily members and the unexpected absence of the dye-decolorizing peroxidase superfamily, the search showed that the C. subvermispora genome encodes 16 class II enzymes in the plant-fungal-bacterial peroxidase superfamily, where LiPs and VPs are classified. The 16 encoded enzymes include 13 putative manganese peroxidases and one generic peroxidase but most notably two peroxidases containing the catalytic tryptophan characteristic of LiPs and VPs. We expressed these two enzymes in Escherichia coli and determined their substrate specificities on typical LiP/VP substrates, including nonphenolic lignin model monomers and dimers, as well as synthetic lignin. The results show that the two newly discovered C. subvermispora peroxidases are functionally competent LiPs and also suggest that they are phylogenetically and catalytically intermediate between classical LiPs and VPs. These results offer new insight into selective lignin degradation by C. subvermispora.

  16. Applications and Prospective of Peroxidase Biocatalysis in the Environmental Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Duarte, Cristina; Vazquez-Duhalt, Rafael

    Environmental protection is, doubtless, one of the most important challenges for the human kind. The huge amount of pollutants derived from industrial activities represents a threat for the environment and ecologic equilibrium. Phenols and halogenated phenols, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, endocrine disruptive chemicals, pesticides, dioxins, polychlorinated biphenyls, industrial dyes, and other xenobiotics are among the most important pollutants. A large variety of these xenobiotics are substrates for peroxidases and thus susceptible to enzymatic transformation. The literature reports mainly the use of horseradish peroxidase, manganese peroxidase, lignin peroxidase, and chloroperoxidase on the transformation of these pollutants. Peroxidases are enzymes able to transform a variety of compounds following a free radical mechanism, giving oxidized or polymerized products. The peroxidase transformation of these pollutants is accompanied by a reduction in their toxicity, due to a biological activity loss, a reduction in the bioavailability or due to the removal from aqueous phase, especially when the pollutant is found in water. In addition, when the pollutants are present in soil, peroxidases catalyze a covalent binding to soil organic matter. In most of cases, oxidized products are less toxic and easily biodegradable than the parent compounds. In spite of their versatility and potential use in environmental processes, peroxidases are not applied at large scale yet. Diverse challenges, such as stability, redox potential, and the production of large amounts, should be solved in order to apply peroxidases in the pollutant transformation. In this chapter, we critically review the transformation of different xenobiotics by peroxidases, with special attention on the identified transformation products, the probable reaction mechanisms, and the toxicity reports. Finally, the design and development of an environmental biocatalyst is discussed. The design challenges are

  17. Characterization of purified and Xerogel immobilized Novel Lignin Peroxidase produced from Trametes versicolor IBL-04 using solid state medium of Corncobs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Cost-effective production of industrially important enzymes is a key for their successful exploitation on industrial scale. Keeping in view the extensive industrial applications of lignin peroxidase (LiP), this study was performed to purify and characterize the LiP from an indigenous strain of Trametes versicolor IBL-04. Xerogel matrix enzyme immobilization technique was applied to improve the kinetic and thermo-stability characteristics of LiP to fulfil the requirements of the modern enzyme consumer sector of biotechnology. Results A novel LiP was isolated from an indigenous T. versicolor IBL-04 strain. T. versicolor IBL-04 was cultured in solid state fermentation (SSF) medium of corn cobs and maximum LiP activity of 592 ± 6 U/mL was recorded after five days of incubation under optimum culture conditions. The crude LiP was 3.3-fold purified with specific activity of 553 U/mg after passing through the DEAE-cellulose and Sephadex-G-100 chromatography columns. The purified LiP exhibited a relatively low molecular weight (30 kDa) homogenous single band on native and SDS-PAGE. The LiP was immobilized by entrapping in xerogel matrix of trimethoxysilane (TMOS) and proplytetramethoxysilane (PTMS) and maximum immobilization efficiency of 88.6% was achieved. The free and immobilized LiPs were characterized and the results showed that the free and immobilized LiPs had optimum pH 6 and 5 while optimum temperatures were 60°C and 80°C, respectively. Immobilization was found to enhance the activity and thermo-stability potential of LiP significantly and immobilized LiP remained stable over broad pH and temperature range as compare to free enzyme. Kinetic constants Km and Vmax were 70 and 56 μM and 588 and 417 U/mg for the free and immobilized LiPs, respectively. Activity of this novel extra thermo-stable LiP was stimulated to variable extents by Cu2+, Mn2+ and Fe2+ whereas, Cystein, EDTA and Ag+ showed inhibitory effects. Conclusions The indigenously

  18. Characterization of purified and Xerogel immobilized Novel Lignin Peroxidase produced from Trametes versicolor IBL-04 using solid state medium of Corncobs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asgher Muhammad

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cost-effective production of industrially important enzymes is a key for their successful exploitation on industrial scale. Keeping in view the extensive industrial applications of lignin peroxidase (LiP, this study was performed to purify and characterize the LiP from an indigenous strain of Trametes versicolor IBL-04. Xerogel matrix enzyme immobilization technique was applied to improve the kinetic and thermo-stability characteristics of LiP to fulfil the requirements of the modern enzyme consumer sector of biotechnology. Results A novel LiP was isolated from an indigenous T. versicolor IBL-04 strain. T. versicolor IBL-04 was cultured in solid state fermentation (SSF medium of corn cobs and maximum LiP activity of 592 ± 6 U/mL was recorded after five days of incubation under optimum culture conditions. The crude LiP was 3.3-fold purified with specific activity of 553 U/mg after passing through the DEAE-cellulose and Sephadex-G-100 chromatography columns. The purified LiP exhibited a relatively low molecular weight (30 kDa homogenous single band on native and SDS-PAGE. The LiP was immobilized by entrapping in xerogel matrix of trimethoxysilane (TMOS and proplytetramethoxysilane (PTMS and maximum immobilization efficiency of 88.6% was achieved. The free and immobilized LiPs were characterized and the results showed that the free and immobilized LiPs had optimum pH 6 and 5 while optimum temperatures were 60°C and 80°C, respectively. Immobilization was found to enhance the activity and thermo-stability potential of LiP significantly and immobilized LiP remained stable over broad pH and temperature range as compare to free enzyme. Kinetic constants Km and Vmax were 70 and 56 μM and 588 and 417 U/mg for the free and immobilized LiPs, respectively. Activity of this novel extra thermo-stable LiP was stimulated to variable extents by Cu2+, Mn2+ and Fe2+ whereas, Cystein, EDTA and Ag+ showed inhibitory effects

  19. Study of the manganese (II) manganese (III) complexes with quinaldic acid in aprotic medium, mononuclear and binuclear species produced under these conditions and possible formation of radical species upon oxidation or reduction of the ligand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodini, E.M.; Funes, M.M.; Valle, M.A. del; Arancibia, V. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica y Electroquimica, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad Catolica de Chile (Switzerland)

    1996-11-01

    The redox chemistry of the ligand Quinaldic acid (2-QA), its monoanion and its complexes with manganese (II) and manganese (III) has studied in dimethylsulphoxide using electrochemical, spectroscopic and magnetic measurements. The protonated ligand is reduce at -1.28 V vs SCE with the transfer of one equivalent of charge the resulting solution presents oxidation peaks at -0.02 V, +0.32 V and +1.14 V vs SCE which is indicative that both radical and dimeric species are involved in the oxidation processes. The combination of the monoanion of the ligand with Mn(II) in a 1:2 mole ratio forms a stable complex which presents a magnetic susceptibility of 5.90B.M. and conditional formation constant of 1.71 x 10``8 M``-2. Its oxidation at +0.76 V vs SCE yields a brown complex of Mn(III) with a magnetic susceptibility of 4.80 B.M. The voltammetric behaviour of the latter species indicates that is probably binuclear. This complex is reduced at +0.60 V vs SCE generating a Mn(II)-Mn(III) mixed-valance complex, and a second reduction at -0.40 V vs SCE regenerating the mononuclear Mn(II) complex. The mixed-valance complex decomposes quickly generating the corresponding Mn(II) and Mn(III) monomers. On the other hand, in the presence of this metal ion as counter-ion, both its +2 or +3 oxidation state, the monoanion of the ligand shows reduction processes that might lead to the stabilization of radical species. the voltammetric and spectroscopic characterization if these species is described. The results may be useful to the understanding of the charge transfer mechanism in biological systems. (Author) 26 refs.

  20. Manganese nodules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, James R.; Harff, Jan; Petersen, Sven; Thiede, Jorn

    2016-01-01

    The existence of manganese (Mn) nodules (Fig. 1) has been known since the late 1800s when they were collected during the Challenger expedition of 1873–1876. However, it was not until after WWII that nodules were further studied in detail for their ability to adsorb metals from seawater. Many of the early studies did not distinguish Mn nodules from Mn crusts. Economic interest in Mn nodules began in the late 1950s and early 1960s when John Mero finished his Ph.D. thesis on this subject, which was published...

  1. Maize peroxidase Px5 has a highly conserved sequence in inbreds resistant to mycotoxin producing fungi which enhances fungal and insect resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mycotoxin presence in maize causes health and economic issues for humans and animals. Although many studies have investigated expression differences of genes putatively governing resistance to producing fungi, few have confirmed a resistance role, or examined putative resistance gene structure in mo...

  2. Solid state fermentation of olive mill residues by wood- and dung-dwelling Agaricomycetes: effects on peroxidase production, biomass development and phenol phytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reina, Rocío; Liers, Christiane; Ocampo, Juan Antonio; García-Romera, Inmaculada; Aranda, Elisabet

    2013-10-01

    The in vivo conversion of dry olive mill residue (DOR) by wood- and dung-dwelling fungi - Auricularia auricula-judae, Bjerkandera adusta and Coprinellus radians - increases peroxidase secretion up to 3.2-3.5-fold (∼1.3, 3.5 and 7.0 Ug(-1) DOR for dye-decolorizing peroxidase, manganese peroxidase and aromatic peroxygenases, respectively). The incubation of DOR with these fungi produced a sharp decrease in total phenolic content (100% within 4 wk), a reduction in phytotoxicity as well as a certain degree of plant growth caused by the stimulating effect of fungal-treated DOR. These findings correlate with a characteristic shift in the fragmentation pattern of water-soluble aromatics (detected at 280 nm) from low (0.2, 1.5 and 2.2 kDa, respectively) to high molecular mass (35 to >200 kDa), which demonstrates the presence of a polymerization process. Phenol-rich agricultural residues are a useful tool for enzyme expression and production studies of peroxidase-producing Agaricomycetes which could make DOR a valuable organic fertilizer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Manganese Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Sousa Galito

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Cheickna Bounajim Cissé wrote an article in Mars 2013 in the Journal Les Afriques N. º 237, suggesting a new acronym, MANGANESE, for the nine African countries: Morocco, Angola, Namibia, Ghana, Algeria, Nigeria, Egypt, South Africa and Ethiopia. According to Cissé, this group of African nations will be the fastest growing states in the region over the next few years. The purpose of this article is to test the pertinence of the acronym, discuss the credibility and reliability of the future prospects of these countries by comparing selected socioeconomic and sociopolitical indicators based on the latest global rankings and trends. Likewise, the potential of Cissé's claim will be assessed, especially in relationship to drug trafficking and terrorism that may put their recent sustainability in danger now and in the future.

  4. Arabidopsis thaliana peroxidase N

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirza, Osman Asghar; Henriksen, A; Ostergaard, L

    2000-01-01

    The structure of the neutral peroxidase from Arabidopsis thaliana (ATP N) has been determined to a resolution of 1.9 A and a free R value of 20.5%. ATP N has the expected characteristic fold of the class III peroxidases, with a C(alpha) r.m.s.d. of 0.82 A when compared with horseradish peroxidase C...... (HRP C). HRP C is 54% identical to ATP N in sequence. When the structures of four class III plant peroxidases are superimposed, the regions with structural differences are non-randomly distributed; all are located in one half of the molecule. The architecture of the haem pocket of ATP N is very similar...... to that of HRP C, in agreement with the low small-molecule substrate specificity of all class III peroxidases. The structure of ATP N suggests that the pH dependence of the substrate turnover will differ from that of HRP C owing to differences in polarity of the residues in the substrate-access channel. Since...

  5. Construction of the Transformation System in Aspergillus nidulans for Manganese Peroxidases Gene of White-Rot Fungus Lenzites gibbosa%偏肿革裥菌 MnP基因在构巢曲霉中转化方法的建立1)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

      对已经构建好的携带有白腐菌偏肿革裥菌(Lenzites gibbosa)锰过氧化物酶完整编码序列基因的载体质粒pMDTM18-T/Lg-mnp、以及整合型表达载体质粒pLB01分别双酶切,然后进行连接构建了重组质粒pLB01/Lg-mnp。对构巢曲霉(Aspergillus nidulans)尿嘧啶尿苷营养缺陷体菌株TN02A7进行了制备分生孢子原生质体酶解方法的摸索。结果表明:将溶壁酶、纤维素酶和蜗牛酶3种酶以1∶1∶1的比例混合,能有效地使构巢曲霉的分生孢子形成原生质体。采用PEG/CaCl2介导的原生质体转化方法成功地将L.gibbosa的MnP基因转入到了构巢曲霉中,获得了携带有白腐菌基因的构巢曲霉转化子菌株。%We digested the integrated expression vectors pLB01 and pMDTM 18-T/Lg-mnp by restriction endonuclease XbaI and BamHI, respectively, and then connected them by T4 DNA ligase to construct the recombinant plasmid pLB01/Lg-mnp. We explored the methods how the conidiophores of auxotrophic stain TN02A7 of Aspergillus nidulans were transformed to protoplasts by different cell wall lyases.Lywallzyme, cellulase and snailase mixed together by 1 ∶1 ∶1 can effectively make the spores become protoplasts.By PEG/CaCl2 mediated protoplast transformation method, a manganese peroxidase gene of Lenzites gibbosa is successfully transferred to TN02A7.

  6. NMR studies of recombinant Coprinus peroxidase and three site-directed mutants. Implications for peroxidase substrate binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veitch, N C; Tams, J W; Vind, J; Dalbøge, H; Welinder, K G

    1994-06-15

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been used to characterise and compare wild-type fungal and recombinant Coprinus cinereus peroxidase (CIP) and three mutants in which Gly156 and/or Asn157 was replaced by Phe. Analysis of one- and two-dimensional NMR spectra of recombinant CIP was undertaken for comparison with the fungal enzyme and in order to establish a meaningful basis for solution studies of CIP mutants. Proton resonance assignments of haem and haem-linked residues obtained for the cyanide-ligated form of recombinant CIP revealed a high degree of spectral similarity with those of lignin and manganese-dependent peroxidases and extend previously reported NMR data for fungal CIP. The three mutants examined by NMR spectroscopy comprised site-specific substitutions made to a region of the structure believed to form part of the peroxidase haem group access channel for substrate and ligand molecules. Proton resonances of the aromatic side-chains of Phe156 and Phe157 were found to have similar spectral characteristics to those of two phenylalanine residues known to be involved in the binding of aromatic donor molecules to the plant peroxidase, horseradish peroxidase isoenzyme C. The results are discussed in the context of complementary reactivity studies on the mutants in order to develop a more detailed understanding of aromatic donor molecule binding to fungal and plant peroxidases.

  7. Inactivation of a Pleurotus ostreatus versatile peroxidase-encoding gene (mnp2) results in reduced lignin degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salame, Tomer M; Knop, Doriv; Levinson, Dana; Mabjeesh, Sameer J; Yarden, Oded; Hadar, Yitzhak

    2014-01-01

    Lignin biodegradation by white-rot fungi is pivotal to the earth's carbon cycle. Manganese peroxidases (MnPs), the most common extracellular ligninolytic peroxidases produced by white-rot fungi, are considered key in ligninolysis. Pleurotus ostreatus, the oyster mushroom, is a preferential lignin degrader occupying niches rich in lignocellulose such as decaying trees. Here, we provide direct, genetically based proof for the functional significance of MnP to P. ostreatus ligninolytic capacity under conditions mimicking its natural habitat. When grown on a natural lignocellulosic substrate of cotton stalks under solid-state culture conditions, gene and isoenzyme expression profiles of its short MnP and versatile peroxidase (VP)-encoding gene family revealed that mnp2 was predominately expressed. mnp2, encoding the versatile short MnP isoenzyme 2 was disrupted. Inactivation of mnp2 resulted in three interrelated phenotypes, relative to the wild-type strain: (i) reduction of 14% and 36% in lignin mineralization of stalks non-amended and amended with Mn(2+), respectively; (ii) marked reduction of the bioconverted lignocellulose sensitivity to subsequent bacterial hydrolyses; and (iii) decrease in fungal respiration rate. These results may serve as the basis to clarify the roles of the various types of fungal MnPs and VPs in their contribution to white-rot decay of wood and lignocellulose in various ecosystems. © 2013 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Manganese nodules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, James R.; Harff, Jan; Petersen, Sven; Thiede, Jorn

    2016-01-01

    The existence of manganese (Mn) nodules (Figure 1) has been known since the late 1800s when they were collected during the Challenger expedition of 1873–1876. However, it was not until after WWII that nodules were further studied in detail for their ability to adsorb metals from seawater. Many of the early studies did not distinguish Mn nodules from Mn crusts. Economic interest in Mn nodules began in the late 1950s and early 1960s when John Mero finished his Ph.D. thesis on this subject, which was published in the journal Economic Geology (Mero, 1962) and later as a book (Mero, 1965). By the mid-1970s, large consortia had formed to search for and mine Mn nodules that occur between the Clarion and Clipperton fracture zones (CCZ) in the NE Pacific (Figure 2). This is still the area considered of greatest economic potential in the global ocean because of high nickel (Ni), copper (Cu), and Mn contents and the dense distribution of nodules in the area. While the mining of nodules was fully expected to begin in the late 1970s or early 1980s, this never occurred due to a downturn in the price of metals on the global market. Since then, many research cruises have been undertaken to study the CCZ nodules, and now 15 contracts for exploration sites have been given or are pending by the International Seabed Authority (ISA). Many books and science journal articles have been published summarizing the early work (e.g., Baturin, 1988; Halbach et al., 1988), and research has continued to the present day (e.g., ISA, 1999; ISA, 2010). Although the initial attraction for nodules was their high Ni, Cu, and Mn contents, subsequent work has shown that nodules host large quantities of other critical metals needed for high-tech, green-tech, and energy applications (Hein et al., 2013; Hein and Koschinsky, 2014).

  9. Screening and Decolorization of Malachite Green of a Manganses Peroxidase-Producing Bacteria%产锰过氧化物酶细菌的筛选及其对孔雀石绿脱色的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨晔; 李国辉; 高剑平; 丁重阳; 顾正华; 张梁; 石贵阳

    2012-01-01

    Six strains with manganses peroxidase-producing capability were screened from the soil samples which were collected in a Wood factory, Wuxi, China. The strain J09 which has the highest yield was identified as Sinorhizobium meliloti. The enzyme activity reached the peak of 607.7 U/L at the third day under the optimized conditions. For the crude enzyme liquid and fermentation medium with initial concentration of 15 mg/L malachite green,the decolorization rate could reach more than 75% and 85% by 3 hours respectively. Under aerobic condition the decolorization rate was higher than that under the anaerobic condition and malachite green has some toxicity to the bacteria.%从无锡某木材厂的腐木及腐殖土的表层土样中筛选分离得到6株产锰过氧化物酶的细菌,其中产酶最优的一株菌J09经鉴定为草木犀中华根瘤菌Sinorhizobium meliloti.在优化的条件下,该菌株发酵72 h锰过氧化物酶产量达到最高值,为607.7 U/L.利用粗酶液和发酵培养液对15 mg/L,的孔雀石绿进行脱色处理3h,脱色率分别达到78.5%和89.8%,好氧条件下的脱色率高于厌氧条件的脱色率,孔雀石绿对该菌具有一定的毒性.

  10. Anti-inflammatory effects of Lactobacillus casei BL23 producing or not a manganese-dependant catalase on DSS-induced colitis in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corthier Gérard

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human immune cells generate large amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS throughout the respiratory burst that occurs during inflammation. In inflammatory bowel diseases, a sustained and abnormal activation of the immune system results in oxidative stress in the digestive tract and in a loss of intestinal homeostasis. We previously showed that the heterologous production of the Lactobacillus plantarum ATCC14431 manganese-dependant catalase (MnKat in Lb. casei BL23 successfully enhances its survival when exposed to oxidative stress. In this study, we evaluated the preventive effects of this antioxidative Lb. casei strain in a murine model of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS-induced moderate colitis. Results Either Lb. casei BL23 MnKat- or MnKat+ was administered daily to mice treated with DSS for 10 days. In contrast to control mice treated with PBS for which DSS induced bleeding diarrhea and mucosal lesions, mice treated with both Lb. casei strains presented a significant (p Conclusion No contribution of MnKat to the protective effect from epithelial damage has been observed in the tested conditions. In contrast, these results confirm the high interest of Lb. casei as an anti-inflammatory probiotic strain.

  11. Manganese Oxidation State Assignment for Manganese Catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beal, Nathan J; O'Malley, Patrick J

    2016-04-06

    The oxidation state assignment of the manganese ions present in the superoxidized manganese (III/IV) catalase active site is determined by comparing experimental and broken symmetry density functional theory calculated (14)N, (17)O, and (1)H hyperfine couplings. Experimental results have been interpreted to indicate that the substrate water is coordinated to the Mn(III) ion. However, by calculating hyperfine couplings for both scenarios we show that water is coordinated to the Mn(IV) ion and that the assigned oxidation states of the two manganese ions present in the site are the opposite of that previously proposed based on experimental measurements alone.

  12. Manganese Research Health Project (MHRP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    of a GLP compliant micronucleus assay in mice according to the OECD Guideline for the Testing of Chemicals, OECD 474: Mammalian Erythrocyte... Micronucleus Test . Experimental Design The basic experimental design used at ILS and proposed for the definitive in vivo micronucleus assay in manganese...regimen, would be expected to produce lethality”. The limit dose for the in vivo micronucleus assay based on OECD 474 is 2000 mg/kg and testing in a

  13. In vitro degradation of natural insoluble lignin in aqueous media by the extracellular peroxidases of Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, D.N.; Reddy, C.A. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Hames, B.R. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States). Biomass Analysis Group; Grethlein, H.E. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)]|[Michigan Biotechnology Inst., Lansing, MI (United States)

    1998-03-20

    The lignin peroxidases (LIP) and manganese peroxidases (MNP) of Phanerochaete chrysosporium catalyze a wide range of lignin depolymerization reactions with lignin models and synthetic lignins in solution. However, their ability to degrade insoluble natural lignin in aqueous media has not been demonstrated. Insoluble isolated poplar lignin similar to natural lignin was treated in vitro in aqueous media for 12 h with LIP, MNP, and both. Treatment with MNP alone slightly increased the solid mass and produced measurable amounts of lignin-derived 2,6-dimethoxyhydroquinone and 2-methoxyhydroquinone but did not appreciably decrease the total lignin content. Treatment with LIP alone did not decrease the mass but produced measurable amounts of lignin-derived p-hydroxybenzoic acid and slightly decreased the lignin content. Finally, treatment with LIP and MNP together decreased the solid mass by 11%, decreased the lignin content by 5%, and released low-concentration compounds with mass spectra containing the typical lignin-derived electron-impact fragments of mass 107, 137, 151, 167, and 181. These results suggest that MNP increases the effectiveness of LIP-mediated lignin degradation.

  14. The molecular characterization of the lignin-forming peroxidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagrimini, L.M.

    1992-01-01

    This laboratory is committed to understanding the function of plant peroxidases via a multi-disciplinary approach. We have chosen the lignin-forming peroxidase from tobacco as the first isoenzyme to be subjected to this comprehensive approach. The goals which were set out upon the initiation of this project were as follows: (1) utilize a cDNA clone to the tobacco anionic peroxidase to generate transgenic plants which either over-produced this isoenzyme or specifically under-produced this isoenzyme via antisense RNA, (2) describe any phenotypic changes resulting from altered peroxidase expression, (3) perform morphological, physiological, and biochemical analysis of the above mentioned plants to help in determining the in planta function for this enzyme, and (4) clone and characterize the gene for the tobacco anionic peroxidase. A summary of progress thus far which includes both published and unpublished work will be presented in three sections: generation and characterization of transgenic plants, description of phenotypes, and biochemical and physiological analysis of peroxidase function, and cloning and characterization of the tobacco anionic peroxidase gene.

  15. Lignin-degrading peroxidases in white-rot fungus Trametes hirsuta 072. Absolute expression quantification of full multigene family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasina, Daria V; Moiseenko, Konstantin V; Fedorova, Tatiana V; Tyazhelova, Tatiana V

    2017-01-01

    Ligninolytic heme peroxidases comprise an extensive family of enzymes, which production is characteristic for white-rot Basidiomycota. The majority of fungal heme peroxidases are encoded by multigene families that differentially express closely related proteins. Currently, there were very few attempts to characterize the complete multigene family of heme peroxidases in a single fungus. Here we are focusing on identification and characterization of peroxidase genes, which are transcribed and secreted by basidiomycete Trametes hirsuta 072, an efficient lignin degrader. The T. hirsuta genome contains 18 ligninolytic peroxidase genes encoding 9 putative lignin peroxidases (LiP), 7 putative short manganese peroxidases (MnP) and 2 putative versatile peroxidases (VP). Using ddPCR method we have quantified the absolute expression of the 18 peroxidase genes under different culture conditions and on different growth stages of basidiomycete. It was shown that only two genes (one MnP and one VP) were prevalently expressed as well as secreted into cultural broth under all conditions investigated. However their transcriptome and protein profiles differed in time depending on the effector used. The expression of other peroxidase genes revealed a significant variability, so one can propose the specific roles of these enzymes in fungal development and lifestyle.

  16. Lignin-degrading peroxidases in white-rot fungus Trametes hirsuta 072. Absolute expression quantification of full multigene family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasina, Daria V.; Moiseenko, Konstantin V.; Fedorova, Tatiana V.; Tyazhelova, Tatiana V.

    2017-01-01

    Ligninolytic heme peroxidases comprise an extensive family of enzymes, which production is characteristic for white-rot Basidiomycota. The majority of fungal heme peroxidases are encoded by multigene families that differentially express closely related proteins. Currently, there were very few attempts to characterize the complete multigene family of heme peroxidases in a single fungus. Here we are focusing on identification and characterization of peroxidase genes, which are transcribed and secreted by basidiomycete Trametes hirsuta 072, an efficient lignin degrader. The T. hirsuta genome contains 18 ligninolytic peroxidase genes encoding 9 putative lignin peroxidases (LiP), 7 putative short manganese peroxidases (MnP) and 2 putative versatile peroxidases (VP). Using ddPCR method we have quantified the absolute expression of the 18 peroxidase genes under different culture conditions and on different growth stages of basidiomycete. It was shown that only two genes (one MnP and one VP) were prevalently expressed as well as secreted into cultural broth under all conditions investigated. However their transcriptome and protein profiles differed in time depending on the effector used. The expression of other peroxidase genes revealed a significant variability, so one can propose the specific roles of these enzymes in fungal development and lifestyle. PMID:28301519

  17. [Breeding and characterization of laccase-producing Phanerochaete chrysosporium mutant resistant to nutritional repression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Ailian; Li, Wenyan; Zheng, Yaotong; Fan, Xiaojing; Ye, Youxian; Meng, Yan

    2011-03-01

    To screen Phanerochaete chrysosporium mutants resisting nutritional repression and to characterize laccase produced by the mutants. We used repeated UV mutagenesis and screened the mutant strains by using the guaiacol nitrogen sufficient differential medium. We characterized enzymes production mechanism of the nutritional regulation through comparing the differences of cell growth and enzyme-production kinetics under different nutritional conditions; We validated production of laccase by Phanerochaete chrysosporium through measurements of the heat treatment, removal of manganese ion and addition of the catalase. Three different methods were validated that both strains of pcR5305 and pcR5324 can produce laccase under the nitrogen limitation (N-L) and nitrogen sufficient (N-S) conditions. Under the N-L conditions, pcR5305 can produce 203.5 U/L laccase and pcR5324 can produce 187.6 U/L laccase; Under the N-S conditions, pcR5305 can produce 220.6 U/L laccase and pcR5324 can produce 183.9 U/L laccase. The original strain pc530 only can produce very little laccase under either conditions. The laccase-production regulation mechanisms of the two strains are different: Production of laccase and the cell growth by pcR5305 are in synchronism. However production of the laccase by pcR5324 is repressed by nutrition. Both strains have the capacity of resisting nutritional repression and produce lignin peroxidase and manganese peroxidase with high yield. (LiP 1343.2, MnP 252.2 U/L and LiP 1169.5, MnP 172.4 U/L respectively). The mutants of Phanerochaete chrysosporium can produce laccase. At same time they showed the capacity of resisting nutritional repression and production of laccase, lignin peroxidase and manganese peroxidase. Our results possess high value for production, application and fundamental research. We provided new strains and established a very good foundation for the further research of metabolic regulation of ligninolytic enzymes production.

  18. Application of solid state fermentation on the cocoa bran (Theobroma Cacao L.: producing ligninases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamires Carvalho dos Santos

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyze and quantify the kinetic activity of enzymes ligninases laccase, lignin peroxidase and manganese peroxidase, produced by Solid State Fermentation. We used the fungus Aspergillus niger as inoculum and the waste from the processing of cocoa (Theobroma Cacao L. as raw material at different water concentrations. The agro-industrial residue, after generated, you need to target appropriate because, in addition to creating potential environmental problems, represents losses of raw materials and energy, requiring significant investments in treatments to control pollution. We evaluated the potential of kinetic activity of enzymes depending on weather conditions (24, 72, and 120 hours and water content (40%, 50% and 60%. The fermentation was conducted at 30 0C in a bacteriological incubator. The results indicate the maximization of enzyme activity occurred within 72 hours of fermentation and 50% water content, for all the enzymes.

  19. Immobilization of Peroxidase onto Magnetite Modified Polyaniline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Fernandes Barbosa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study describes the immobilization of horseradish peroxidase (HRP on magnetite-modified polyaniline (PANImG activated with glutaraldehyde. After the optimization of the methodology, the immobilization of HRP on PANImG produced the same yield (25% obtained for PANIG with an efficiency of 100% (active protein. The optimum pH for immobilization was displaced by the effect of the partition of protons produced in the microenvironment by the magnetite. The tests of repeated use have shown that PANImG-HRP can be used for 13 cycles with maintenance of 50% of the initial activity.

  20. Ligninolytic peroxidase gene expression by Pleurotus ostreatus: differential regulation in lignocellulose medium and effect of temperature and pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Fueyo, Elena; Castanera, Raul; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J; López-Lucendo, María F; Ramírez, Lucía; Pisabarro, Antonio G; Martínez, Angel T

    2014-11-01

    Pleurotus ostreatus is an important edible mushroom and a model lignin degrading organism, whose genome contains nine genes of ligninolytic peroxidases, characteristic of white-rot fungi. These genes encode six manganese peroxidase (MnP) and three versatile peroxidase (VP) isoenzymes. Using liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry, secretion of four of these peroxidase isoenzymes (VP1, VP2, MnP2 and MnP6) was confirmed when P. ostreatus grows in a lignocellulose medium at 25°C (three more isoenzymes were identified by only one unique peptide). Then, the effect of environmental parameters on the expression of the above nine genes was studied by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR by changing the incubation temperature and medium pH of P. ostreatus cultures pre-grown under the above conditions (using specific primers and two reference genes for result normalization). The cultures maintained at 25°C (without pH adjustment) provided the highest levels of peroxidase transcripts and the highest total activity on Mn(2+) (a substrate of both MnP and VP) and Reactive Black 5 (a VP specific substrate). The global analysis of the expression patterns divides peroxidase genes into three main groups according to the level of expression at optimal conditions (vp1/mnp3>vp2/vp3/mnp1/mnp2/mnp6>mnp4/mnp5). Decreasing or increasing the incubation temperature (to 10°C or 37°C) and adjusting the culture pH to acidic or alkaline conditions (pH 3 and 8) generally led to downregulation of most of the peroxidase genes (and decrease of the enzymatic activity), as shown when the transcription levels were referred to those found in the cultures maintained at the initial conditions. Temperature modification produced less dramatic effects than pH modification, with most genes being downregulated during the whole 10°C treatment, while many of them were alternatively upregulated (often 6h after the thermal shock) and downregulated (12h) at 37°C. Interestingly, mnp4 and

  1. Altered phenotypes in plants transformed with chimeric tobacco peroxidase genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagrimini, L.M.

    1990-12-31

    Peroxidases have been implicated in a variety of secondary metabolic reactions including lignification, cross-linking of cell wall polysaccharides, oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid, regulation of cell elongation, wound-healing, phenol oxidation, and pathogen defense. However, due to the many different isoenzymes and even more potential substrates, it has proven difficult to verify actual physiological roles for peroxidase. We are studying the molecular biology of the tobacco peroxidase genes, and have utilized genetic engineering techniques to produce transgenic plants which differ only in their expression of an individual peroxidase isoenzyme. Many of the in planta functions for any individual isoenzyme may be predicted through the morphological and physiological analysis of transformed plants.

  2. Altered phenotypes in plants transformed with chimeric tobacco peroxidase genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagrimini, L.M.

    1990-01-01

    Peroxidases have been implicated in a variety of secondary metabolic reactions including lignification, cross-linking of cell wall polysaccharides, oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid, regulation of cell elongation, wound-healing, phenol oxidation, and pathogen defense. However, due to the many different isoenzymes and even more potential substrates, it has proven difficult to verify actual physiological roles for peroxidase. We are studying the molecular biology of the tobacco peroxidase genes, and have utilized genetic engineering techniques to produce transgenic plants which differ only in their expression of an individual peroxidase isoenzyme. Many of the in planta functions for any individual isoenzyme may be predicted through the morphological and physiological analysis of transformed plants.

  3. Air Manganese Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    In November 2011 US EPA researchers conducted a health study of airborne manganese exposure in East Liverpool, Ohio. This Web site discusses preliminary results of the study and provides background and other related information.

  4. RECOMBINANT HORSERADISH PEROXIDASE FOR ANALYTICAL APPLICATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The article deals with prospects of using recombinant horseradish peroxidase in analytical biochemistry and biotechnology. Problems of recombinant horseradish peroxidase cloning in different expression systems, possible approaches to their solution, advantages of recombinant recombinant horseradish peroxidase and recombinant horseradish peroxidase-fusion proteins for immunoassays are considered. Possibility for development of mediatorless bienzyme biosensor for peroxide and metabolites, yield...

  5. Preparation of Manganese Oxide Nanobelts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jisen WANG; Jinquan SUN; Ying BAO; Xiufang BIAN

    2003-01-01

    Oriented nanobelts of manganese oxide have been firstly and successfully prepared by a microemulsion techniqueunder controlled circumstances. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electronmicroscope (TEM). Influences of sodium chloride and annealed temperature on the synthesis of Mn3O4 nanobeltswere investigated. It was found that NaCl is the key factor to synthesize oriented Mn3O4 nanobelts and 827 K isoptimum temperature to produce fine nanobelts. Oriented growth mechanism of Mn3O4 nanobelts was discussed.

  6. Predominance of a versatile-peroxidase-encoding gene, mnp4, as demonstrated by gene replacement via a gene targeting system for Pleurotus ostreatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salame, Tomer M; Knop, Doriv; Tal, Dana; Levinson, Dana; Yarden, Oded; Hadar, Yitzhak

    2012-08-01

    Pleurotus ostreatus (the oyster mushroom) and other white rot filamentous basidiomycetes are key players in the global carbon cycle. P. ostreatus is also a commercially important edible fungus with medicinal properties and is important for biotechnological and environmental applications. Efficient gene targeting via homologous recombination (HR) is a fundamental tool for facilitating comprehensive gene function studies. Since the natural HR frequency in Pleurotus transformations is low (2.3%), transformed DNA is predominantly integrated ectopically. To overcome this limitation, a general gene targeting system was developed by producing a P. ostreatus PC9 homokaryon Δku80 strain, using carboxin resistance complemented by the development of a protocol for hygromycin B resistance protoplast-based DNA transformation and homokaryon isolation. The Δku80 strain exhibited exclusive (100%) HR in the integration of transforming DNA, providing a high efficiency of gene targeting. Furthermore, the Δku80 strains produced showed a phenotype similar to that of the wild-type PC9 strain, with similar growth fitness, ligninolytic functionality, and capability of mating with the incompatible strain PC15 to produce a dikaryon which retained its resistance to the corresponding selection and was capable of producing typical fruiting bodies. The applicability of this system is demonstrated by inactivation of the versatile peroxidase (VP) encoded by mnp4. This enzyme is part of the ligninolytic system of P. ostreatus, being one of the nine members of the manganese-peroxidase (MnP) gene family, and is the predominantly expressed VP in Mn(2+)-deficient media. mnp4 inactivation provided a direct proof that mnp4 encodes a key VP responsible for the Mn(2+)-dependent and Mn(2+)-independent peroxidase activity under Mn(2+)-deficient culture conditions.

  7. Mn2+ alters peroxidase profiles and lignin degradation by the white-rot fungus Pleurotus ostreatus under different nutritional and growth conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Roni; Persky, Limor; Hazan-Eitan, Zahit; Yarden, Oded; Hadar, Yitzhak

    2002-01-01

    The white-rot fungus Pleurotus ostreatus produces two types of extracellular peroxidases: manganese-dependent peroxidase (MnP) and versatile peroxidase (VP). The effect of Mn2+ on fungal growth, peroxidase activity profiles, and lignin degradation by P. ostreatus was studied in liquid culture and under solid-state fermentation conditions on perlite, the latter resembling the natural growth conditions of this fungus. The fungus was grown in either a defined asparagine-containing basidiomycete selective medium (BSM) or in a rich peptone medium (PM). Biomass production, as determined by respiration experiments in solid-state fermentation and liquid cultures and fungal growth on Petri dishes, was higher in the PM than in the BSM. Mn2+ affected biomass production only in the PM on Petri dishes. In the nonamended PM, high levels of MnP and VP activity were detected relative to the nonamended BSM. Nevertheless, a higher rate of 14C-lignin mineralization was measured in the Mn2+-amended BSM, as determined during the course of 47 d of fermentation. Mn2+ amendment of the PM increased mineralization rate to that obtained in the Mn2+-amended BSM. The enzyme activity profiles of MnP and VP were studied in the BSM using anion-exchange chromatography. In the nonamended BSM, only minute levels of MnP and VP were detected. On Mn2+ amendment, two MnP isoenzymes (B1 and B2) appeared. Isoenzyme B2 was purified and showed 100% identity with the MnP isoenzyme purified in our previous study from PM-solid-state fermentation (P6). P6 was found to be the dominant isoenzyme in terms of activity level and gene expression compared with the VP isoenzymes. Based on these results, we concluded that Mn2+ plays a key role in lignin degradation under different nutritional and growth conditions, since it is required for the production of MnP in P. ostreatus.

  8. [Function and disease in manganese].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Mieko

    2016-07-01

    Manganese is a metal that has been known named a Greek word "Magnesia" meaning magnesia nigra from Roman Empire. Manganese provide the wide range of metablic function and the multiple abnomalities from its deficiency or toxicity. In 1931, the essentiality of manganese was demonstrated with the authoritative poor growth and declined reproduction in its deficiency. Manganese deficiency has been recognized in a number of species and its signs are impaired growth, impaired reproduction, ataxia, skeletal abnormalities and disorders in lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. Manganese toxicity is also acknowledged as health hazard for animals and humans. Here manganese nutrition, metabolism and metabolic function are summarized.

  9. Oxidation of chlorophenols catalyzed by Coprinus cinereus peroxidase with in situ production of hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzotti, Fabio; Okrasa, Krzysztof; Therisod, Michel

    2004-01-01

    Degradation of 2,6-dichlorophenol (2,6-DCP) was accomplished by oxidation catalyzed by Coprinus cinereus peroxidase. Immobilization of the enzyme in a polyacrylamide matrix enhanced DCP oxidation. Hydrogen peroxide, peroxidase's natural substrate, was produced enzymatically in situ to avoid peroxidase inactivation by its too high concentration. In the case of larger scale utilization, the method would also avoid direct handling of this hazardous reagent.

  10. Lignin-degrading peroxidases in Polyporales: an evolutionary survey based on 10 sequenced genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J; Lundell, Taina; Floudas, Dimitrios; Nagy, Laszlo G; Barrasa, José M; Hibbett, David S; Martínez, Angel T

    2013-01-01

    The genomes of three representative Polyporales (Bjerkandera adusta, Phlebia brevispora and a member of the Ganoderma lucidum complex) were sequenced to expand our knowledge on the diversity of ligninolytic and related peroxidase genes in this Basidiomycota order that includes most wood-rotting fungi. The survey was completed by analyzing the heme-peroxidase genes in the already available genomes of seven more Polyporales species representing the antrodia, gelatoporia, core polyporoid and phlebioid clades. The study confirms the absence of ligninolytic peroxidase genes from the manganese peroxidase (MnP), lignin peroxidase (LiP) and versatile peroxidase (VP) families, in the brown-rot fungal genomes (all of them from the antrodia clade), which include only a limited number of predicted low redox-potential generic peroxidase (GP) genes. When members of the heme-thiolate peroxidase (HTP) and dye-decolorizing peroxidase (DyP) superfamilies (up to a total of 64 genes) also are considered, the newly sequenced B. adusta appears as the Polyporales species with the highest number of peroxidase genes due to the high expansion of both the ligninolytic peroxidase and DyP (super)families. The evolutionary relationships of the 111 genes for class-II peroxidases (from the GP, MnP, VP, LiP families) in the 10 Polyporales genomes is discussed including the existence of different MnP subfamilies and of a large and homogeneous LiP cluster, while different VPs mainly cluster with short MnPs. Finally, ancestral state reconstructions showed that a putative MnP gene, derived from a primitive GP that incorporated the Mn(II)-oxidation site, is the precursor of all the class-II ligninolytic peroxidases. Incorporation of an exposed tryptophan residue involved in oxidative degradation of lignin in a short MnP apparently resulted in evolution of the first VP. One of these ancient VPs might have lost the Mn(II)-oxidation site being at the origin of all the LiP enzymes, which are found only in

  11. Fluorescent derivatization of aromatic carboxylic acids with horseradish peroxidase in the presence of excess hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odo, Junichi; Inoguchi, Masahiko; Aoki, Hiroyuki; Sogawa, Yuto; Nishimura, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    The fluorescent derivatization of aromatic carboxylic acids by the catalytic activity of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in the presence of excess H2O2 was investigated. Four monocarboxylic acids, nine dicarboxylic acids, and two tricarboxylic acids, all of which are non- or weakly fluorescent, were effectively converted into fluorescent compounds using this new method. This technique was further developed for the fluorometric determination of trace amounts of terephthalic acid (3c) and lutidinic acid (2b), and linear calibration curves for concentrations between 2.5 and 20.0 nmol of terephthalic acid (3c) and 1.0 and 10.0 nmol of lutidinic acid (2b) were demonstrated. Compound III, an intermediate of HRP, played an essential role in this process. Additionally, lactoperoxidase and manganese peroxidase, peroxidases similar to HRP, showed successful fluorescent derivatization of nicotinic acid (1b), lutidinic acid (2b), and hemimellitic acid (4a) in the presence of excess H2O2.

  12. Manganese As a Metal Accumulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manganese deposits in water distribution systems accumulate metals, radionuclides and oxyanions by a combination of surface complexation, adsorption and solid substitution, as well as a combination of oxidation followed by manganese reduction and sorption of the oxidized constitu...

  13. Manganese As a Metal Accumulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manganese deposits in water distribution systems accumulate metals, radionuclides and oxyanions by a combination of surface complexation, adsorption and solid substitution, as well as a combination of oxidation followed by manganese reduction and sorption of the oxidized constitu...

  14. Globally sustainable manganese metal production and use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagelstein, Karen

    2009-09-01

    The "cradle to grave" concept of managing chemicals and wastes has been a descriptive analogy of proper environmental stewardship since the 1970s. The concept incorporates environmentally sustainable product choices-such as metal alloys utilized steel products which civilization is dependent upon. Manganese consumption is related to the increasing production of raw steel and upgrading ferroalloys. Nonferrous applications of manganese include production of dry-cell batteries, plant fertilizer components, animal feed and colorant for bricks. The manganese ore (high grade 35% manganese) production world wide is about 6 million ton/year and electrolytic manganese metal demand is about 0.7 million ton/year. The total manganese demand is consumed globally by industries including construction (23%), machinery (14%), and transportation (11%). Manganese is recycled within scrap of iron and steel, a small amount is recycled within aluminum used beverage cans. Recycling rate is 37% and efficiency is estimated as 53% [Roskill Metals and Minerals Reports, January 13, 2005. Manganese Report: rapid rise in output caused by Chinese crude steel production. Available from: http://www.roskill.com/reports/manganese.]. Environmentally sustainable management choices include identifying raw material chemistry, utilizing clean production processes, minimizing waste generation, recycling materials, controlling occupational exposures, and collecting representative environmental data. This paper will discuss two electrolytically produced manganese metals, the metal production differences, and environmental impacts cited to date. The two electrolytic manganese processes differ due to the addition of sulfur dioxide or selenium dioxide. Adverse environmental impacts due to use of selenium dioxide methodology include increased water consumption and order of magnitude greater solid waste generation per ton of metal processed. The use of high grade manganese ores in the electrolytic process also

  15. Production of Manganese Oxide Nanoparticles by Shewanella Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqui, Saad M.; White, Alan R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Several species of the bacterial genus Shewanella are well-known dissimilatory reducers of manganese under anaerobic conditions. In fact, Shewanella oneidensis is one of the most well studied of all metal-reducing bacteria. In the current study, a number of Shewanella strains were tested for manganese-oxidizing capacity under aerobic conditions. All were able to oxidize Mn(II) and to produce solid dark brown manganese oxides. Shewanella loihica strain PV-4 was the strongest oxidizer, producing oxides at a rate of 20.3 mg/liter/day and oxidizing Mn(II) concentrations of up to 9 mM. In contrast, S. oneidensis MR-1 was the weakest oxidizer tested, producing oxides at 4.4 mg/liter/day and oxidizing up to 4 mM Mn(II). Analysis of products from the strongest oxidizers, i.e., S. loihica PV-4 and Shewanella putrefaciens CN-32, revealed finely grained, nanosize, poorly crystalline oxide particles with identical Mn oxidation states of 3.86. The biogenic manganese oxide products could be subsequently reduced within 2 days by all of the Shewanella strains when culture conditions were made anoxic and an appropriate nutrient (lactate) was added. While Shewanella species were detected previously as part of manganese-oxidizing consortia in natural environments, the current study has clearly shown manganese-reducing Shewanella species bacteria that are able to oxidize manganese in aerobic cultures. IMPORTANCE Members of the genus Shewanella are well known as dissimilatory manganese-reducing bacteria. This study shows that a number of species from Shewanella are also capable of manganese oxidation under aerobic conditions. Characterization of the products of the two most efficient oxidizers, S. loihica and S. putrefaciens, revealed finely grained, nanosize oxide particles. With a change in culture conditions, the manganese oxide products could be subsequently reduced by the same bacteria. The ability of Shewanella species both to oxidize and to reduce manganese indicates

  16. Characterization of three mnp genes of Fomitiporia mediterranea and report of additional class II peroxidases in the order hymenochaetales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenstern, Ingo; Robertson, Deborah L; Hibbett, David S

    2010-10-01

    We report the sequence-based characterization and expression patterns of three manganese peroxidase genes from the white rot fungus and grape vine pathogen Fomitiporia mediterranea (Agaricomycotina, Hymenochaetales), termed Fmmnp1, Fmmnp2, and Fmmnp3. The predicted open reading frames (ORFs) are 1,516-, 1,351-, and 1,345-bp long and are interrupted by seven, four, and four introns, respectively. The deduced amino acid sequences encode manganese peroxidases (EC 1.11.1.13) containing 371, 369, and 371 residues, respectively, and are similar to the manganese peroxidases of the model white rot organism Phanerochaete chrysosporium. The expression of the genes is most likely differentially regulated, as revealed by real-time PCR analysis. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that other members of the order Hymenochaetales harbor mnp genes encoding proteins that are related only distantly to those of F. mediterranea. Furthermore, multiple partial lip- and mnp-like sequences obtained for Pycnoporus cinnabarinus (Agaricomycotina, Polyporales) suggest that lignin degradation by white rot taxa relies heavily on ligninolytic peroxidases and is not efficiently achieved by laccases only.

  17. Ultrasound-assisted extraction and characterization of hydrolytic and oxidative enzymes produced by solid state fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Orsolya Erzsebet; Csiszar, Emilia; Toth, Karolina; Szakacs, George; Koczka, Bela

    2015-01-01

    Ligninolytic and hydrolytic enzymes were produced with six selected fungi on flax substrate by solid state fermentation (SSF). The extracellular enzyme production of the organisms in two SSF media was evaluated by measuring the soluble protein concentration and the filter paper, endoxylanase, 1,4-β-d-glucosidase, 1,4-β-d-endoglucanase, polygalacturonase, lignin peroxidase, manganese peroxidase and laccase activities of the clear culture solutions produced by conventional extraction from the SSF materials. The SSF material of the best enzyme producer (Trichoderma virens TUB F-498) was further investigated to enhance the enzyme recovery by low frequency ultrasound treatment. Performance of both the original and ultrasound macerated crude enzyme mixtures was evaluated in degradation of the colored lignin-containing and waxy materials of raw linen fabric. Results proved that sonication (at 40%, 60% and 80% amplitudes, for 60min) did not result in reduction in the filter paper, lignin peroxidase and laccase activities of the crude enzyme solution, but has a significant positive effect on the efficiency of enzyme extraction from the SSF material. Depending on the parameters of sonication, the enzyme activities in the extracts obtained can be increased up to 129-413% of the original activities measured in the control extracts recovered by a common magnetic stirrer. Sonication also has an effect on both the enzymatic removal of the lignin-containing color materials and hydrophobic surface layer from the raw linen.

  18. Manganese in silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnarsson, M. K.; Hallén, A.

    2012-02-01

    Structural disorder and relocation of implanted Mn in semi-insulating 4H-SiC has been studied. Subsequent heat treatment of Mn implanted samples has been performed in the temperature range 1400-2000 °C. The depth distribution of manganese is recorded by secondary ion mass spectrometry. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry has been employed for characterization of crystal disorder. Ocular inspection of color changes of heat-treated samples indicates that a large portion of the damage has been annealed. However, Rutherford backscattering shows that after heat treatment, most disorder from the implantation remains. Less disorder is observed in the [0 0 0 1] channel direction compared to [ 1 1 2¯ 3] channel direction. A substantial rearrangement of manganese is observed in the implanted region. No pronounced manganese diffusion deeper into the sample is recorded.

  19. Manganese in silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linnarsson, M.K., E-mail: marga@kth.se [Royal Institute of Technology, School of Information and Communication Technology, P.O. Box E229, SE-16440 Kista-Stockhom (Sweden); Hallen, A. [Royal Institute of Technology, School of Information and Communication Technology, P.O. Box E229, SE-16440 Kista-Stockhom (Sweden)

    2012-02-15

    Structural disorder and relocation of implanted Mn in semi-insulating 4H-SiC has been studied. Subsequent heat treatment of Mn implanted samples has been performed in the temperature range 1400-2000 Degree-Sign C. The depth distribution of manganese is recorded by secondary ion mass spectrometry. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry has been employed for characterization of crystal disorder. Ocular inspection of color changes of heat-treated samples indicates that a large portion of the damage has been annealed. However, Rutherford backscattering shows that after heat treatment, most disorder from the implantation remains. Less disorder is observed in the [0 0 0 1] channel direction compared to [112{sup Macron }3] channel direction. A substantial rearrangement of manganese is observed in the implanted region. No pronounced manganese diffusion deeper into the sample is recorded.

  20. Mineralogy, paragenesis and genesis of the braunite deposits of the Mary Valley Manganese Belt, Queensland, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostwald, J.

    1992-09-01

    The Mary Valley manganese deposits exhibit mineralogy and textures characteristic of at least four parageneses. The deposits consist mainly of isolated occurrences of braunite, together with a number of lower and higher valency manganese oxides, and manganese silicates, in bedded radiolarian cherts and jaspers of Permian age. The parageneses are: (a) Braunite — quartz (primary), (b) Braunite — hausmannite — spessartine — tephroite — quartz (metamorphic). (c) Hydrated manganese silicates — barite — braunite — hausmannite (hydrothermal veins), (d) Tetravalent manganese oxides (pyrolusite, cryptomelane, manjiroite, nsutite) (supergene). The primary mineralisation is interpreted as the result of the geochemical separation of Mn from Fe in a submarine exhalative system, and the precipitation of Mn as oxide within bedded radiolarian oozes and submarine lavas. During diagenesis this hydrothermal manganese oxide reacted with silica to produce primary braunite. The later geological of evolution of this volcanogenicsedimentary deposit involved metamorphism, hydrothermal veining by remobilised manganese, and supergene enrichment.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: eosinophil peroxidase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... invaders. EPX gene mutations reduce or prevent eosinophil peroxidase production or result in a protein that is unstable and nonfunctional. As a result, eosinophils have severely reduced amounts of eosinophil peroxidase or none at all. Other proteins within affected ...

  2. Inorganic chemistry of defensive peroxidases in the human oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashby, M T

    2008-10-01

    The innate host response system is comprised of various mechanisms for orchestrating host response to microbial infection of the oral cavity. The heterogeneity of the oral cavity and the associated microenvironments that are produced give rise to different chemistries that affect the innate defense system. One focus of this review is on how these spatial differences influence the two major defensive peroxidases of the oral cavity, salivary peroxidase (SPO) and myeloperoxidase (MPO). With hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) as an oxidant, the defensive peroxidases use inorganic ions to produce antimicrobials that are generally more effective than H(2)O(2) itself. The concentrations of the inorganic substrates are different in saliva vs. gingival crevicular fluid (GCF). Thus, in the supragingival regime, SPO and MPO work in unison for the exclusive production of hypothiocyanite (OSCN(-), a reactive inorganic species), which constantly bathes nascent plaques. In contrast, MPO is introduced to the GCF during inflammatory response, and in that environment it is capable of producing hypochlorite (OCl(-)), a chemically more powerful oxidant that is implicated in host tissue damage. A second focus of this review is on inter-person variation that may contribute to different peroxidase function. Many of these differences are attributed to dietary or smoking practices that alter the concentrations of relevant inorganic species in the oral cavity (e.g.: fluoride, F(-); cyanide, CN(-); cyanate, OCN(-); thiocyanate, SCN(-); and nitrate, NO(3)(-)). Because of the complexity of the host and microflora biology and the associated chemistry, it is difficult to establish the significance of the human peroxidase systems during the pathogenesis of oral diseases. The problem is particularly complex with respect to the gingival sulcus and periodontal pockets (where the very different defensive stratagems of GCF and saliva co-mingle). Despite this complexity, intriguing in vitro and in vivo

  3. Manganese dipyridoxyl diphosphate:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    H, Brurok; Ardenkjær-Larsen, Jan Henrik; G, Hansson

    1999-01-01

    Manganese dipyridoxyl diphosphate (MnDPDP) is a contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the liver. Aims of the study were to examine if MnDPDP possesses superoxide dismutase (SOD) mimetic activity in vitro, and if antioxidant protection can be demonstrated in an ex vivo rat heart...

  4. Manganese deficiency in plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Sidsel Birkelund; Jensen, Poul Erik; Husted, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential plant micronutrient with an indispensable function as a catalyst in the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII). Even so, Mn deficiency frequently occurs without visual leaf symptoms, thereby masking the distribution and dimension of the problem...

  5. Manganese, Metallogenium, and Martian Microfossils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, L. Y.; Nealson, K. H.

    1999-01-01

    Manganese could easily be considered an abundant element in the Martian regolith, assuming that the composition of martian meteorites reflects the composition of the planet. Mineralogical analyses of 5 SNC meteorites have revealed an average manganese oxide concentration of 0.48%, relative to the 0.1% concentration of manganese found in the Earth's crust. On the Earth, the accumulation of manganese oxides in oceans, soils, rocks, sedimentary ores, fresh water systems, and hydrothermal vents can be largely attributed to microbial activity. Manganese is also a required trace nutrient for most life forms and participates in many critical enzymatic reactions such as photosynthesis. The wide-spread process of bacterial manganese cycling on Earth suggests that manganese is an important element to both geology and biology. Furthermore, there is evidence that bacteria can be fossilized within manganese ores, implying that manganese beds may be good repositories for preserved biomarkers. A particular genus of bacteria, known historically as Metallogenium, can form star-shaped manganese oxide minerals (called metallogenium) through the action of manganese oxide precipitation along its surface. Fossilized structures that resemble metallogenium have been found in Precambrian sedimentary formations and in Cretaceous-Paleogene cherts. The Cretaceous-Paleogene formations are highly enriched in manganese and have concentrations of trace elements (Fe, Zn, Cu, and Co) similar to modern-day manganese oxide deposits in marine environments. The appearance of metallogenium-like fossils associated with manganese deposits suggests that bacteria may be preserved within the minerals that they form. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  6. Unraveling the role of animal heme peroxidases in superoxide mediated Mn oxide formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learman, D. R.; Hansel, C. M.

    2013-12-01

    Manganese(III,IV) oxides are important in the environment as they can impact the fate of a broad range of nutrients (e.g. carbon and phosphate) and contaminates (e.g. lead and chromium). Bacteria play a valuable role in the production of Mn oxides, yet the mechanisms and physiological reasons remain unclear. Roseobacter sp. AzwK-3b, an organism within the abundant and ubiquitous Roseobacter clade, has recently been shown to oxidize Mn(II) via a novel pathway that involves enzymatic extracellular superoxide production. However, in reactions with only Mn(II) and abiotically generated superoxide, we find superoxide alone is not enough to produce Mn(III,IV) oxides. Scavenging of the byproduct hydrogen peroxide (via the addition of catalase) is required to generate Mn oxides via abiotic reaction of Mn(II) with superoxide. Thus, R. AzwK-3b must produce superoxide and also scavenge hydrogen peroxide to form Mn oxides. Further, in-gel Mn(II) oxidation assay revealed a protein band that could generate Mn oxides in the presence of soluble Mn(II). This Mn(II)-oxidizing protein band was excised from the gel and the peptides identified via mass spectrometry. An animal heme peroxidase (AHP) was the predominant protein found in this band. This protein is homologous to the AHPs previously implicated as a Mn(II)-oxidizing enzyme within the Alphaproteobacteria, Erythrobacter SD-21 and Aurantimonas manganoxydans strain SI85-9A1. Currently, protein expression of the AHPs in R. AzwK-3b is being examined to determine if expression is correlated with Mn(II) concentration or oxidative stress. Our data suggests that AHPs do not directly oxidize Mn(II) but rather plays a role in scavenging hydrogen peroxide and/or producing an organic Mn(III) ligand that complexes Mn(III) and likely aids in Mn oxide precipitation.

  7. Root growth inhibition by aluminum is probably caused by cell death due to peroxidase-mediated hydrogen peroxide production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonovicová, M; Huttová, J; Mistrík, I; Siroká, B; Tamás, L

    2004-10-01

    The effect of aluminum on hydrogen peroxide production and peroxidase-catalyzed NADH oxidation was studied in barley roots germinated and grown between two layers of moistened filter paper. Guaiacol peroxidase activity significantly increased after 48 h and was approximately two times higher after 72 h in Al-treated roots. The oxidation of NADH was also significantly increased and, like guaiacol peroxidase activity, it was two times higher in A1-treated roots than in controls. Elevated H2O2 production was observed both 48 and 72 h after the onset of imbibition in the presence of A1. Separation on a cation exchange column allowed the detection of two peaks with NADH peroxidase and H2O2 production activity. However, a difference between control and Al-treated plants was found only in one fraction, in which four times higher guaiacol peroxidase activity and five times higher NADH peroxidase activity were expressed and about three times more H2O2 was produced. One anionic peroxidase and three cationic peroxidases were detected in this fraction by native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The anionic peroxidase was activated in the Al-treated root tips and also oxidized NADH but was detectable only after a long incubation time. Two of the cationic peroxidases were capable of oxidizing NADH and producing a significant amount of H2O2, but only one of these was activated by A1 stress. The role of these peroxidases during A1 stress in barley root tips is discussed.

  8. Peroxidase extraction from jicama skin peels for phenol removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiong, T.; Lau, S. Y.; Khor, E. H.; Danquah, M. K.

    2016-06-01

    Phenol and its derivatives exist in various types of industrial effluents, and are known to be harmful to aquatic lives even at low concentrations. Conventional treatment technologies for phenol removal are challenged with long retention time, high energy consumption and process cost. Enzymatic treatment has emerged as an alternative technology for phenol removal from wastewater. These enzymes interact with aromatic compounds including phenols in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, forming free radicals which polymerize spontaneously to produce insoluble phenolic polymers. This work aims to extract peroxidase from agricultural wastes materials and establish its application for phenol removal. Peroxidase was extracted from jicama skin peels under varying extraction conditions of pH, sample-to-buffer ratio (w/v %) and temperature. Experimental results showed that extraction process conducted at pH 10, 40% w/v and 25oC demonstrated a peroxidase activity of 0.79 U/mL. Elevated temperatures slightly enhanced the peroxidase activities. Jicama peroxidase extracted at optimum extraction conditions demonstrated a phenol removal efficiency of 87.5% at pH 7. Phenol removal efficiency was ∼ 97% in the range of 30 - 40oC, and H2O2 dosage has to be kept below 100 mM for maximum removal under phenol concentration tested.

  9. Polymerization of phenols catalyzed by peroxidase in nonaqueous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dordick, J.S.; Marletta, M.A.; Klibanov, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    Polymers produced by horseradish-peroxidase-catalyzed coupling of phenols have been explored as potential substitutes for phenol-formaldehyde resins. To overcome low substrate solubilities and product molecular weights in water, enzymatic polymerizations in aqueous-organic mixtures have been examined. Peroxidase vigorously polymerizes a number of phenols in mixtures of water with water-miscible solvents such as dioxane, acetone, dimethylformamide, and methyl formate with the solvent content up to 95%. As a result, various phenolic polymers with average molecular weights from 400 to 2.6 x 10/sup 4/ D were obtained depending on the reaction medium composition and the nature of the phenol. Peroxidase-catalyzed copolymerization of different phenols in 85% dioxane was demonstrated. Poly(p-phenylphenol) and poly(p-cresol) were enzymatically prepared on a gram scale. They had much higher melting points, and in addition, poly(p-phenylphenol) was found to have a much higher electrical conductivity than phenol-formaldehyde resins.

  10. Hot coal gas desulfurization with manganese-based sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynch, D.; Hepworth, M.T.

    1993-09-01

    The focus of work being performed on Hot Coal Gas Desulfurization is primarily in the use of zinc ferrite and zinc titanate sorbents; however, prior studies at the US Steel Fundamental Research Laboratories in Monroeville, PA, by E.T. Turkdogan indicated that an alternate sorbent, manganese dioxide-containing ore in mixture with alumina (75 wt % ore + 25 wt % Al{sub 2}/O{sub 3}) may be a viable alternative to zinc-based sorbents. Manganese, for example, has a lower vapor pressure in the elemental state than zinc hence it is not as likely to undergo depletion from the sorbent surface upon loading and regeneration cycles. Also manganese oxide is less readily reduced to the elemental state than iron hence the range of reduction potentials for oxygen is somewhat greater than for zinc ferrite. In addition, thermodynamic analysis of the manganese-oxygen-sulfur system shows it to be less amenable to sulfation than zinc ferrite. Potential also exists for utilization of manganese higher temperatures than zinc ferrite or zinc titanate. This presentation gives the thermodynamic background for consideration of manganese-based sorbents as an alternative to zinc ferrite. To date the work which has been in progress for nine months is limited at this stage to thermogravimetric testing of four formulations of manganese-alumina sorbents to determine the optimum conditions of pelletization and induration to produce reactive pellets.

  11. Selection and Use of Manganese Dioxide by Neanderthals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyes, Peter J.; Anastasakis, Konstantinos; de Jong, Wiebren; van Hoesel, Annelies; Roebroeks, Wil; Soressi, Marie

    2016-02-01

    Several Mousterian sites in France have yielded large numbers of small black blocs. The usual interpretation is that these ‘manganese oxides’ were collected for their colouring properties and used in body decoration, potentially for symbolic expression. Neanderthals habitually used fire and if they needed black material for decoration, soot and charcoal were readily available, whereas obtaining manganese oxides would have incurred considerably higher costs. Compositional analyses lead us to infer that late Neanderthals at Pech-de-l’Azé I were deliberately selecting manganese dioxide. Combustion experiments and thermo-gravimetric measurements demonstrate that manganese dioxide reduces wood’s auto-ignition temperature and substantially increases the rate of char combustion, leading us to conclude that the most beneficial use for manganese dioxide was in fire-making. With archaeological evidence for fire places and the conversion of the manganese dioxide to powder, we argue that Neanderthals at Pech-de-l’Azé I used manganese dioxide in fire-making and produced fire on demand.

  12. Systematic characterization of the peroxidase gene family provides new insights into fungal pathogenicity in Magnaporthe oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir, Albely Afifa; Park, Sook-Young; Abu Sadat, Md; Kim, Seongbeom; Choi, Jaeyoung; Jeon, Junhyun; Lee, Yong-Hwan

    2015-07-02

    Fungal pathogens have evolved antioxidant defense against reactive oxygen species produced as a part of host innate immunity. Recent studies proposed peroxidases as components of antioxidant defense system. However, the role of fungal peroxidases during interaction with host plants has not been explored at the genomic level. Here, we systematically identified peroxidase genes and analyzed their impact on fungal pathogenesis in a model plant pathogenic fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae. Phylogeny reconstruction placed 27 putative peroxidase genes into 15 clades. Expression profiles showed that majority of them are responsive to in planta condition and in vitro H2O2. Our analysis of individual deletion mutants for seven selected genes including MoPRX1 revealed that these genes contribute to fungal development and/or pathogenesis. We identified significant and positive correlations among sensitivity to H2O2, peroxidase activity and fungal pathogenicity. In-depth analysis of MoPRX1 demonstrated that it is a functional ortholog of thioredoxin peroxidase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and is required for detoxification of the oxidative burst within host cells. Transcriptional profiling of other peroxidases in ΔMoprx1 suggested interwoven nature of the peroxidase-mediated antioxidant defense system. The results from this study provide insight into the infection strategy built on evolutionarily conserved peroxidases in the rice blast fungus.

  13. 21 CFR 184.1449 - Manganese citrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Manganese citrate. 184.1449 Section 184.1449 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1449 Manganese citrate. (a) Manganese citrate (Mn3(C6H5O7)2, CAS... manganese carbonate from manganese sulfate and sodium carbonate solutions. The filtered and...

  14. Recombinant horseradish peroxidase: production and analytical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorenko, V G; Andreeva, I P; Rubtsova, M Yu; Egorov, A M

    2015-04-01

    Horseradish peroxidase is a key enzyme in bio- and immunochemical analysis. New approaches in functional expression of the peroxidase gene in E. coli cells and the subsequent refolding of the resulting protein yield a recombinant enzyme that is comparable in its spectral and catalytic characteristics to the native plant peroxidase. Genetic engineering approaches allow production of recombinant peroxidase conjugates with both protein antigens and Fab antibody fragments. The present article reviews the use of recombinant horseradish peroxidase as the marker enzyme in ELISA procedures as well as in amperometric sensors based on direct electron transfer.

  15. Manganese-based Permanent Magnets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Baker

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available There is a significant gap between the energy product, BH, where B is the magnetic flux density and H is the magnetic field strength, of both the traditional ferrite and AlNiCo permanent magnets of less than 10 MGOe and that of the rare earth magnets of greater than 30 MGOe. This is a gap that Mn-based magnets could potentially, inexpensively, fill. This Special Issue presents work on the development of both types of manganese permanent magnets. Some of the challenges involved in the development of these magnets include improving the compounds’ energy product, increasing the thermal stability of these metastable compounds, and producing them in quantity as a bulk material.[...

  16. The ligninolytic peroxidases in the genus Pleurotus: divergence in activities, expression, and potential applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knop, Doriv; Yarden, Oded; Hadar, Yitzhak

    2015-02-01

    Mushrooms of the genus Pleurotus are comprised of cultivated edible ligninolytic fungi with medicinal properties and a wide array of biotechnological and environmental applications. Like other white-rot fungi (WRF), they are able to grow on a variety of lignocellulosic biomass substrates and degrade both natural and anthropogenic aromatic compounds. This is due to the presence of the non-specific oxidative enzymatic systems, which are mainly consisted of lacasses, versatile peroxidases (VPs), and short manganese peroxidases (short-MnPs). Additional, less studied, peroxidase are dye-decolorizing peroxidases (DyPs) and heme-thiolate peroxidases (HTPs). During the past two decades, substantial information has accumulated concerning the biochemistry, structure and function of the Pleurotus ligninolytic peroxidases, which are considered to play a key role in many biodegradation processes. The production of these enzymes is dependent on growth media composition, pH, and temperature as well as the growth phase of the fungus. Mn(2+) concentration differentially affects the expression of the different genes. It also severs as a preferred substrate for these preoxidases. Recently, sequencing of the Pleurotus ostreatus genome was completed, and a comprehensive picture of the ligninolytic peroxidase gene family, consisting of three VPs and six short-MnPs, has been established. Similar enzymes were also discovered and studied in other Pleurotus species. In addition, progress has been made in the development of molecular tools for targeted gene replacement, RNAi-based gene silencing and overexpression of genes of interest. These advances increase the fundamental understanding of the ligninolytic system and provide the opportunity for harnessing the unique attributes of these WRF for applied purposes.

  17. Manganese in Madison's drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlenker, Thomas; Hausbeck, John; Sorsa, Kirsti

    2008-12-01

    Public concern over events of manganese-discolored drinking water and the potential for adverse health effects from exposure to excess manganese reached a high level in 2005. In response, Public Health Madison Dane County, together with the Madison Water Utility, conceived and implemented a public health/water utility strategy to quantify the extent of the manganese problem, determine the potential for adverse human health effects, and communicate these findings to the community. This strategy included five basic parts: taking an inventory of wells and their manganese levels, correlating manganese concentration with turbidity, determining the prevalence and distribution of excess manganese in Madison households, reviewing the available scientific literature, and effectively communicating our findings to the community. The year-long public health/water utility strategy successfully resolved the crisis of confidence in the safety of Madison's drinking water.

  18. Lignolytic enzymes produced by Trametes villosa ccb176 under different culture conditions Enzimas ligninóliticas produzidas por Trametes villosa ccb176 em diferentes condições de cultivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Yamanaka

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The expression of the enzymatic system produced by basidiomycetous fungi, which is involved in the degradation of xenobiotics, mainly depends on culture conditions, especially of the culture medium composition. Trametes villosa is a strain with a proven biotechnological potential for the degradation of organochlorine compounds and for the decolorization of textile dyes. The influence of glucose concentration, addition of a vegetable oil-surfactant emulsion, nature of the surfactant and the presence of manganese and copper on the growth, pH and production of laccase, total peroxidase and manganese-dependent peroxidase activities were evaluated. In general, acidification of the medium was observed, with the pH reaching a value close to 3.5 within the first days of growth. Laccase was the main activity detected under the different conditions and was produced throughout the culture period of the fungus, irrespective of the growth phase. Supplementation of the medium with vegetable oil emulsified with a surfactant induced manganese-dependent peroxidase activity in T. villosa. Higher specific yields of laccase activity were obtained with the addition of copper.A expressão do sistema enzimático produzido por fungos basidiomicetos envolvido na degradação de xenobióticos é bastante dependente das condições de cultivo, principalmente da composição do meio de cultivo. Trametes villosa CCB176 é uma linhagem com comprovado potencial biotecnológico para degradação de compostos organoclorados e descoloração de corantes têxteis. Foi avaliada a influência da concentração de glicose, adição de emulsão de óleo vegetal e surfactante, natureza do surfactante e os metais manganês e cobre no crescimento, pH e na produção das atividades de lacase, de peroxidases totais e de peroxidase dependente de manganês. No geral, ocorreu acidificação do meio com pH atingindo valor próximo a 3,5, nos primeiros dias de crescimento. Lacase foi a

  19. Purification of major lignin peroxidase isoenzymes from Phanerochaete chrysosporium by chromatofocusing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollikka, P; Leppänen, V M; Anttila, T; Suominen, I

    1995-06-01

    The basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium produces several isoforms of lignin peroxidase, which catalyzes the oxidative depolymerization of lignin To date, ion-exchange chromatography and preparative isoelectric focusing (IEF) have been commonly used for isolation of lignin peroxidase isoenzymes. In this work we have purified major lignin peroxidases to high purity by a one-step chromatographic method, chromatofocusing. The purified isoenzymes were identified by analytical IEF using isoenzymes purified by preparative IEF as standards. The specific activities and spectral properties of the isoenzymes were comparable with the previously published data. The predominant isoenzyme under the growth conditions used was LiP 4.65. Almost 50% of the lignin peroxidase activity applied into the column was recovered in the LiP 4.65 fraction. The total recovery of the lignin peroxidase activity was over 80%.

  20. Manganese abundances in Galactic bulge red giants

    CERN Document Server

    Barbuy, B; Zoccali, M; Minniti, D; Renzini, A; Ortolani, S; Gomez, A; Trevisan, M; Dutra, N

    2013-01-01

    Manganese is mainly produced in type II SNe during explosive silicon burning, in incomplete Si-burning regions, and depends on several nucleosynthesis environment conditions, such as mass cut beween the matter ejected and falling back onto the remnant, electron and neutron excesses, mixing fallback, and explosion energy. Manganese is also produced in type Ia SNe. The aim of this work is the study of abundances of the iron-peak element Mn in 56 bulge giants, among which 13 are red clump stars. Four bulge fields along the minor axis are inspected. The study of abundances of Mn-over-Fe as a function of metallicity in the Galactic bulge may shed light on its production mechanisms. High-resolution spectra were obtained using the FLAMES+UVES spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope. The spectra were obtained within a program to observe 800 stars using the GIRAFFE spectrograph, together with the present UVES spectra. We aim at identifying the chemical evolution of manganese, as a function of metallicity, in the Gala...

  1. Lignin peroxidase functionalities and prospective applications

    OpenAIRE

    Falade, Ayodeji O.; Nwodo, Uchechukwu U.; Iweriebor, Benson C.; Green, Ezekiel; Leonard V. Mabinya; Okoh, Anthony I.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Ligninolytic extracellular enzymes, including lignin peroxidase, are topical owing to their high redox potential and prospective industrial applications. The prospective applications of lignin peroxidase span through sectors such as biorefinery, textile, energy, bioremediation, cosmetology, and dermatology industries. The litany of potentials attributed to lignin peroxidase is occasioned by its versatility in the degradation of xenobiotics and compounds with both phenolic and non‐phe...

  2. Evidence for peroxidase activity in Caralluma umbellata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achar, Raghu Ram; Venkatesh, B K; Sharanappa, P; Priya, B S; Swamy, S Nanjunda

    2014-08-01

    Vast applications of peroxidases create an increasing demand to characterize peroxidases from new sources with more applicability potential. The aim of the present study was to check the presence of peroxidase activity from Caralluma umbellata. This is the first report on the C. umbellata peroxidase (CUP). The presence of peroxidase was revealed by the histochemical analysis of the stem sections, zymographic studies, and in vitro peroxidase activity assay using various reducing substrates viz., 2, 2'-azinobis (3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS), guaiacol, o-dianisidine, and ferulic acid. The band pattern in zymogram confirms that CUP has a molecular weight less than that of horseradish peroxidase (44 kDa). Comparative evaluation of peroxidase activity of CUP with respect to horseradish peroxidase (HRP) indicates that CUP catalyzes ABTS and ferulic acid in a similar pattern as HRP but with guaiacol, the extent of catalysis shown by CUP over HRP is high. The standard inhibitors sodium azide and sodium meta bisulphite inhibited CUP activity in a dose dependent manner.

  3. Failure of manganese to protect from Shiga toxin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marsha A Gaston

    Full Text Available Shiga toxin (Stx, the main virulence factor of Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli, is a major public health threat, causing hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome. Currently, there are no approved therapeutics for these infections; however manganese has been reported to provide protection from the Stx1 variant isolated from Shigella dysenteriae (Stx1-S both in vitro and in vivo. We investigated the efficacy of manganese protection from Stx1-S and the more potent Stx2a isoform, using experimental systems well-established for studying Stx: in vitro responses of Vero monkey kidney cells, and in vivo toxicity to CD-1 outbred mice. Manganese treatment at the reported therapeutic concentration was toxic to Vero cells in culture and to CD-1 mice. At lower manganese concentrations that were better tolerated, we observed no protection from Stx1-S or Stx2a toxicity. The ability of manganese to prevent the effects of Stx may be particular to certain cell lines, mouse strains, or may only be manifested at high, potentially toxic manganese concentrations.

  4. Failure of manganese to protect from Shiga toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaston, Marsha A; Pellino, Christine A; Weiss, Alison A

    2013-01-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx), the main virulence factor of Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli, is a major public health threat, causing hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome. Currently, there are no approved therapeutics for these infections; however manganese has been reported to provide protection from the Stx1 variant isolated from Shigella dysenteriae (Stx1-S) both in vitro and in vivo. We investigated the efficacy of manganese protection from Stx1-S and the more potent Stx2a isoform, using experimental systems well-established for studying Stx: in vitro responses of Vero monkey kidney cells, and in vivo toxicity to CD-1 outbred mice. Manganese treatment at the reported therapeutic concentration was toxic to Vero cells in culture and to CD-1 mice. At lower manganese concentrations that were better tolerated, we observed no protection from Stx1-S or Stx2a toxicity. The ability of manganese to prevent the effects of Stx may be particular to certain cell lines, mouse strains, or may only be manifested at high, potentially toxic manganese concentrations.

  5. Oxygen toxicity in Streptococcus mutans: manganese, iron and superoxide dismutase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, M.E.; Strachan, R.C.; Aranha, H.; Evans, S.L.; Salin, M.L.; Welch, B.; Arceneaux, J.E.L.; Byers, B.R.

    1984-07-01

    When cultured anaerobically in a chemically defined medium that was treated with Chelex-100 to lower its trace metal content, Streptococcus mutans OMZ176 had no apparent requirement for manganese or iron. Manganese or iron was necessary for aerobic cultivation in deep static cultures. During continuous aerobic cultivation in a stirred chemostat, iron did not support the growth rate achieved with manganese. Since the dissolved oxygen level in the chemostat cultures was higher than the final level in the static cultures, manganese may be required for growth at elevated levels. In medium supplemented with manganese, cells grown anaerobically contained a low level of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity; aerobic cultivation increased SOD activity at least threefold. In iron-supplemented medium, cells grown anaerobically also had low SOD activity; aerobic incubation resulted in little increase in SOD activity. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the cell extracts revealed a major band and a minor band of SOD activity in the cells grown with manganese; however, cells grown with iron contained a single band of SOD activity with an R/sub f/ value similar to that of the major band found in cells grown with manganese. None of the SOD activity bands were abolished by the inclusion of 2 mM hydrogen peroxide in the SOD activity strain. S. mutans may not produce a separate iron-containing SOD but may insert either iron or manganese into an apo-SOD protein. Alternatively, iron may function in another activity (not SOD) that augments the defense against oxygen toxicity at low SOD levels. 28 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  6. Recovery of lignin peroxidase from submerged liquid fermentation of Amauroderma rugosum (Blume & T. Nees) Torrend using polyethylene glycol/salt aqueous two-phase system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jong, Wan Yng Linda; Show, Pau Loke; Ling, Tau Chuan; Tan, Yee Shin

    2017-07-01

    Amauroderma rugosum is a wild mushroom species widely distributed in tropics and is classified under the class of Basidiomycetes. Basidiomycetes are well-known for their abilities of producing lignocellulolytic enzymes such as lignin peroxidase (LiP), laccase (Lac) and manganese peroxidase (MnP). Different factors such as nutrient sources, incubation period and agitation affect the production of lignocellulolytic enzymes. The A. rugosum produced LiP in the medium supplemented with potato dextrose broth (PDB), 0.5% yeast and 1.0% saw dust at 26.70±3.31 U/mL. However, the LiP activity was increased to 106.32±5.32 U/mL when supplemented with 150 μm of copper (CuSO4). The aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) is a simple, rapid and low cost method for primary extraction and recovery of LiP. A total of 25 systems made from five different molecular weights of polyethylene glycol (PEG)/dipotassium hydrogen phosphate (K2HPO4) were tested. PEG 600 produced the highest top phase purification factor (PFT) of 1.33±0.62 with yield of 72.18±8.50%. The optimization of the ATPS parameters, such as volume ratio VR, pH and crude enzyme loading are the factors controlling the phase partition. Our results showed that significant improvement (PFT of 6.26±2.87 with yield of 87.31±3.14%) of LiP recovery can be achieved by optimized the parameters. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Degradation of textile dyes using immobilized lignin peroxidase-like metalloporphines under mild experimental conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zucca Paolo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Synthetic dyes represent a broad and heterogeneous class of durable pollutants, that are released in large amounts by the textile industry. The ability of two immobilized metalloporphines (structurally emulating the ligninolytic peroxidases to bleach six chosen dyes (alizarin red S, phenosafranine, xylenol orange, methylene blue, methyl green, and methyl orange was compared to enzymatic catalysts. To achieve a green and sustainable process, very mild conditions were chosen. Results IPS/MnTSPP was the most promising biomimetic catalyst as it was able to effectively and quickly bleach all tested dyes. Biomimetic catalysis was fully characterized: maximum activity was centered at neutral pH, in the absence of any organic solvent, using hydrogen peroxide as the oxidant. The immobilized metalloporphine kept a large part of its activity during multi-cycle use; however, well-known redox mediators were not able to increase its catalytic activity. IPS/MnTSPP was also more promising for use in industrial applications than its enzymatic counterparts (lignin peroxidase, laccase, manganese peroxidase, and horseradish peroxidase. Conclusions On the whole, the conditions were very mild (standard pressure, room temperature and neutral pH, using no organic solvents, and the most environmental-friendly oxidant and a significant bleaching and partial mineralization of the dyes was achieved in approximately 1 h. Therefore, the process was consistent with large-scale applications. The biomimetic catalyst also had more promising features than the enzymatic catalysts.

  8. Turning points in the evolution of peroxidase-catalase superfamily: molecular phylogeny of hybrid heme peroxidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zámocký, Marcel; Gasselhuber, Bernhard; Furtmüller, Paul G; Obinger, Christian

    2014-12-01

    Heme peroxidases and catalases are key enzymes of hydrogen peroxide metabolism and signaling. Here, the reconstruction of the molecular evolution of the peroxidase-catalase superfamily (annotated in pfam as PF00141) based on experimentally verified as well as numerous newly available genomic sequences is presented. The robust phylogenetic tree of this large enzyme superfamily was obtained from 490 full-length protein sequences. Besides already well-known families of heme b peroxidases arranged in three main structural classes, completely new (hybrid type) peroxidase families are described being located at the border of these classes as well as forming (so far missing) links between them. Hybrid-type A peroxidases represent a minor eukaryotic subfamily from Excavates, Stramenopiles and Rhizaria sharing enzymatic and structural features of ascorbate and cytochrome c peroxidases. Hybrid-type B peroxidases are shown to be spread exclusively among various fungi and evolved in parallel with peroxidases in land plants. In some ascomycetous hybrid-type B peroxidases, the peroxidase domain is fused to a carbohydrate binding (WSC) domain. Both here described hybrid-type peroxidase families represent important turning points in the complex evolution of the whole peroxidase-catalase superfamily. We present and discuss their phylogeny, sequence signatures and putative biological function.

  9. 21 CFR 184.1452 - Manganese gluconate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Manganese gluconate. 184.1452 Section 184.1452 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1452 Manganese gluconate. (a) Manganese gluconate (C12H22MnO14... manganese carbonate with gluconic acid in aqueous medium and then crystallizing the product. (b)...

  10. 21 CFR 184.1461 - Manganese sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Manganese sulfate. 184.1461 Section 184.1461 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1461 Manganese sulfate. (a) Manganese sulfate (MnSO4·H2O, CAS... manganese compounds with sulfuric acid. It is also obtained as a byproduct in the manufacture...

  11. Inhibition of Heme Peroxidase During Phenol Derivatives Oxidation. Possible Molecular Cloaking of the Active Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juozas Kulys

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Ab initio quantum chemical calculations have been applied to the study of the molecular structure of phenol derivatives and oligomers produced during peroxidasecatalyzed oxidation. The interaction of substrates and oligomers with Arthromyces ramosus peroxidase was analyzed by docking methods. The most possible interaction site of oligomers is an active center of the peroxidase. The complexation energy increases with increasing oligomer length. However, the complexed oligomers do not form a precise (for the reaction hydrogen bonding network in the active center of the enzyme. It seems likely that strong but non productive docking of the oligomers determines peroxidase inhibition during the reaction.

  12. Actinobacterial peroxidases: an unexplored resource for biocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    le Roes-Hill, Marilize; Khan, Nuraan; Burton, Stephanie Gail

    2011-07-01

    Peroxidases are redox enzymes that can be found in all forms of life where they play diverse roles. It is therefore not surprising that they can also be applied in a wide range of industrial applications. Peroxidases have been extensively studied with particular emphasis on those isolated from fungi and plants. In general, peroxidases can be grouped into haem-containing and non-haem-containing peroxidases, each containing protein families that share sequence similarity. The order Actinomycetales comprises a large group of bacteria that are often exploited for their diverse metabolic capabilities, and with recent increases in the number of sequenced genomes, it has become clear that this metabolically diverse group of organisms also represents a large resource for redox enzymes. It is therefore surprising that, to date, no review article has been written on the wide range of peroxidases found within the actinobacteria. In this review article, we focus on the different types of peroxidases found in actinobacteria, their natural role in these organisms and how they compare with the more well-described peroxidases. Finally, we also focus on work remaining to be done in this research field in order for peroxidases from actinobacteria to be applied in industrial processes.

  13. 24-epibrassinolide mitigates the adverse effects of manganese induced toxicity through improved antioxidant system and photosynthetic attributes in Brassica juncea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fariduddin, Qazi; Ahmed, Mumtaz; Mir, Bilal A; Yusuf, Mohammad; Khan, Tanveer A

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to establish relationship between manganese-induced toxicity and antioxidant system response in Brassica juncea plants and also to investigate whether brassinosteroids activate antioxidant system to confer tolerance to the plants affected with manganese induced oxidative stress. Brassica juncea plants were administered with 3, 6, or 9 mM manganese at 10-day stage for 3 days. At 31-day stage, the seedlings were sprayed with deionized water (control) or 10(-8) M of 24-epibrassinolide, and plants were harvested at 45-day stage to assess growth, leaf gas-exchange traits, and biochemical parameters. The manganese treatments diminished growth along with photosynthetic attributes and carbonic anhydrase activity in the concentration-dependent manner, whereas it enhanced lipid peroxidation, electrolyte leakage, accumulation of H2O2 as well as proline, and various antioxidant enzymes in the leaves of Brassica juncea which were more pronounced at higher concentrations of manganese. However, the follow-up application of 24-epibrassinolide to the manganese stressed plants improved growth, water relations, and photosynthesis and further enhanced the various antioxidant enzymes viz. catalase, peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase and content of proline. The elevated level of antioxidant enzymes as well as proline could have conferred tolerance to the manganese-stressed plants resulting in improved growth and photosynthetic attributes.

  14. Horseradish peroxidase catalyzed free radical cannot free move in reaction solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai Xialing

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Mechanism of Horseradish Peroxidase -catalyzed phenol compound oxidizing reaction is a radical polymerization. Many polymer preparation are also carry on through the radical polymerization mechanism We deduce if free radical produced by peroxidasecatalyzed phenol polymerization could apply on polymer preparation? Could the phenol–oxygen free radical leave off the peroxidase and catalyze other compounds polymerization? The free radical in phenol oxidation process was investigated in homogeneous reaction and in immobilized HRP catalyzed reaction. The results showed the free radical produced by peroxidase only move on the surface of enzyme, can’t free move in solution in both experiment. Evidence showed the phenol polymerization is enzyme reaction process, different from general chemistry free radical chain reaction.Keywords: Horseradish Peroxidase, free radical polymerization, mechanismReceived: 17 March 2008 / Received in revised form: 5 February 2009, Accepted: 31 April 2009 Published online: 14 May 2009

  15. Biodistribution and PET Imaging of pharmacokinetics of manganese in mice using Manganese-52.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooten, A Lake; Aweda, Tolulope A; Lewis, Benjamin C; Gross, Rebecca B; Lapi, Suzanne E

    2017-01-01

    Manganese is essential to life, and humans typically absorb sufficient quantities of this element from a normal healthy diet; however, chronic, elevated ingestion or inhalation of manganese can be neurotoxic, potentially leading to manganism. Although imaging of large amounts of accumulated Mn(II) is possible by MRI, quantitative measurement of the biodistribution of manganese, particularly at the trace level, can be challenging. In this study, we produced the positron-emitting radionuclide 52Mn (t1/2 = 5.6 d) by proton bombardment (EpManganese is known to cross the blood-brain barrier, as confirmed in our studies following IV injection (0.86%ID/g, 1 d p.i.) and following inhalation of aerosol, (0.31%ID/g, 1 d p.i.). Uptake in salivary gland and pancreas were observed at 1 d p.i. (0.5 and 0.8%ID/g), but to a much greater degree from IV injection (6.8 and 10%ID/g). In a separate study, mice received IV injection of an imaging dose of [52Mn]MnCl2, followed by in vivo imaging by positron emission tomography (PET) and ex vivo biodistribution. The results from this study supported many of the results from the biodistribution-only studies. In this work, we have confirmed results in the literature and contributed new results for the biodistribution of inhaled radiomanganese for several organs. Our results could serve as supporting information for environmental and occupational regulations, for designing PET studies utilizing 52Mn, and/or for predicting the biodistribution of manganese-based MR contrast agents.

  16. Horseradish peroxidase catalyzed free radical cannot free move in reaction solution

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Mechanism of Horseradish Peroxidase -catalyzed phenol compound oxidizing reaction is a radical polymerization. Many polymer preparation are also carry on through the radical polymerization mechanism We deduce if free radical produced by peroxidasecatalyzed phenol polymerization could apply on polymer preparation? Could the phenol–oxygen free radical leave off the peroxidase and catalyze other compounds polymerization? The free radical in phenol oxidation process was investigated in homo...

  17. Glycosylation and thermodynamic versus kinetic stability of horseradish peroxidase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tams, J.W.; Welinder, Karen G.

    1998-01-01

    Glycoprotein stability, glycoprotein unfolding, horseradish peroxidase, thermodynamic stability, kinetik stability......Glycoprotein stability, glycoprotein unfolding, horseradish peroxidase, thermodynamic stability, kinetik stability...

  18. Selenium, glutathione peroxidase and other selenoproteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilhelmsen, E.C.

    1983-01-01

    Selenium, as essential trace element, has long been associated with protein. The essentiality of selenium is partially understood as glutathione peroxidase contains an essential selenocysteine. Glutathione peroxidase has been purified from many tissues including rat liver. An estimated molecular weight of 105,000 was obtained for glutathione peroxidase by comparison to standards. A subunit size of 26,000 was obtained by SDS-gel electrophoresis. Glutathione peroxidase is not the only selenoprotein in the rat. In seven rat tissues examined, there were many different subunit sizes and change groups representing between 9 and 23 selenoproteins. Selenocysteine in glutathione peroxidase accounts for ca. 36% of the selenium in the rat. The mode of synthesis of glutathione peroxidase and the other selenoproteins is not understood. Glutathione peroxidase is strongly and reversibly inhibited by mercaptocarboxylic acids and other mercaptans, including some used as slow-acting drugs for the symtomatic treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. The mechanism and chemistry of this inhibition is discussed. This inhibition may provide a link between selenium and arthritis.

  19. Enzymatic exploration of catalase from a nanoparticle producing and biodecolorizing algae Shewanella xiamenensis BC01.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, I-Son; Xu, Fangxin; Zhang, Xia; Ye, Chiming

    2015-05-01

    Shewanella xiamenensis (SXM) was found to produce nanoparticles (NPs) under aerobic condition. The oxidoreductase enzymatic activities including of catalase, manganese peroxidase, laccase, NADH dehydrogenase, flavin reductase, azoreductase and Fe reductase are first investigated. Catalase showed the greatest enzymatic activity among all oxidoreductases in SXM, which with strong activities in multiple substrates of ABTS, guaiacol and 2,6-DMP. The optimum temperature, pH, concentrations of H2O2 and 2,6-DMP for this enzyme were found to be 65 °C, pH 4.0, 128.7 mM and 10 mM, respectively. Finally, from the kinetic parameters and structure simulation of catalase, implied that SXM would potentially apply in bioremediation, microbe fuel cells (MFCs) and nano-biotechnology based on its distinguished enzymatic system.

  20. Thiol-Based Peroxidases and Ascorbate Peroxidases: Why Plants Rely on Multiple Peroxidase Systems in the Photosynthesizing Chloroplast?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Karl-Josef

    2016-01-01

    Photosynthesis is a highly robust process allowing for rapid adjustment to changing environmental conditions. The efficient acclimation depends on balanced redox metabolism and control of reactive oxygen species release which triggers signaling cascades and potentially detrimental oxidation reactions. Thiol peroxidases of the peroxiredoxin and glutathione peroxidase type, and ascorbate peroxidases are the main peroxide detoxifying enzymes of the chloroplast. They use different electron donors and are linked to distinct redox networks. In addition, the peroxiredoxins serve functions in redox regulation and retrograde signaling. The complexity of plastid peroxidases is discussed in context of suborganellar localization, substrate preference, metabolic coupling, protein abundance, activity regulation, interactions, signaling functions, and the conditional requirement for high antioxidant capacity. Thus the review provides an opinion on the advantage of linking detoxification of peroxides to different enzymatic systems and implementing mechanisms for their inactivation to enforce signal propagation within and from the chloroplast.

  1. Nitration of Phenol Catalyzed by Horseradish Peroxidase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Rong-ji; HUANG Hui; TONG Bin; XIAO Sheng-yuan

    2007-01-01

    Horseradish peroxidase, an acidic peroxidase from the horseradish, is one of the most important enzymes as analytical reagent.The enzymatic nitration of phenol by oxidation of nitrite was studied using horseradish peroxidase in the presence of H2O2.The results showed that nitration occur at 2- and 4- positions of phenol.There were also minor products of hydroquinone and catechol.The influence of various reaction parameters, including pH, organic solvent, and concentration of H2O2, on nitration products were discussed.The best nitration pH was 7.0, and H2O2 should be added to the reaction mixture slowly.

  2. Soybean nitrate reductase activity influenced by manganese nutrition

    OpenAIRE

    Damien P., Heenan; Lindsay C., Campbell; Department of Agronomy and Horticultural Science, University of Sydney

    1980-01-01

    Nitrate assimilation by soybeans [Glycine max (L.) Merrill cvv. Lee and Bragg] was investigated in plants grown in solution culture at manganese concentrations of 0, 1.8 and 275 μM and at day-night temperatures of 33-28℃ and 22-17℃. Manganese deficiency occurred in plants of both cultivars grown at 0 μM Mn; under these conditions, leaf nitrate concentration increased in both cultivars and nitrate reductase activity in vivo but not in vitro was reduced. High solution Mn (275 μM) produced sympt...

  3. Suspension cell culture as a tool for the characterization of class III peroxidases in sugarcane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesarino, Igor; Araújo, Pedro; Paes Leme, Adriana Franco; Creste, Silvana; Mazzafera, Paulo

    2013-01-01

    Secreted class III peroxidases (EC 1.11.1.7) are implicated in a broad range of physiological processes throughout the plant life cycle. However, the unambiguous determination of the precise biological role of an individual class III peroxidase isoenzyme is still a difficult task due to genetic redundancy and broad substrate specificity in vitro. In addition, many difficulties are encountered during extraction and analysis of cell wall proteins. Since class III peroxidases are also secreted into the apoplast, the use of suspension cell cultures can facilitate isolation and functional characterization of individual isoforms. Here, we report on the characterization of class III peroxidases secreted in the spent medium of sugarcane suspension cell cultures. After treatment with specific inducers of cell wall lignification, peroxidases were isolated and activities assayed with guaiacol, syringaldazine and coniferyl alcohol. Enzymatic activity was not significantly different after treatments, regardless of the substrate, with the exception of methyl-jasmonate treatment, which led to a decreased guaiacol peroxidase activity. Remarkably, peroxidases isolated from the medium were capable of oxidizing syringaldazine, an analog to sinapyl alcohol, suggesting that sugarcane cultures can produce peroxidases putatively correlated to lignification. A proteomic approach using activity staining of 2-DE gels revealed a complex isoperoxidase profile, composed predominantly of cationic isoforms. Individual spots were excised and analyzed by LC-ESI-Q-TOF and homology-based search against the Sugarcane EST Database resulted in the identification of several proteins. Spatio-temporal expression pattern of selected genes was determined for validation of identified class III peroxidases that were preferentially expressed during sugarcane stem development.

  4. The production of class III plant peroxidases in transgenic callus cultures transformed with the rolB gene of Agrobacterium rhizogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkryl, Y N; Veremeichik, G N; Bulgakov, V P; Avramenko, T V; Günter, E A; Ovodov, Y S; Muzarok, T I; Zhuravlev, Y N

    2013-10-10

    The production of plant peroxidases by plant cell cultures is of great interest because of the potential for industrial applications. We used plant cell cultures overexpressing the rolB gene to produce increased amounts of plant class III peroxidases. The rolB gene ensured the stable and permanent activation of peroxidase activity in the transformed callus cultures of different plants. In particular, the total peroxidase activity in transformed Rubia cordifolia cells was increased 23-86-fold, and the abundance of the major peroxidase gene transcripts was increased 17-125-fold (depending on the level of rolB expression) compared with non-transformed control calli. The peroxidase-activating effect of rolB was greater than that of other peroxidase inducers, such as external stresses and methyl jasmonate. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. 从锰银矿湿法提银的尾矿中回收银的研究%Recovery of Silver from the Tailings Produced by Treating Silver-manganese Ore

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于元进

    2015-01-01

    某锰银矿矿山生产中采用氰化浸出回收银,多年生产得到的尾矿中银品位68 g/t,锰品位4.6%。用重选—常温酸浸工艺对该尾矿中银的回收进行了研究,考查了重选、浸出过程中酸的用量、浸出时间和搅拌速度等因素对银浸出率的影响。结果表明,重选得到锰银粗精矿后,在质量浓度为15%的氯化钠溶液中,硫酸用量为40 kg/t,常温下搅拌浸出48 h,银的浸出率为72.5%,尾矿中的银得到了较好的回收。%In a silver-manganese ore,cyanide leaching is used to recover silver.In the tailings,the grades of Ag and Mn are 68 g/t and 4.6%,respectively.Gravity separation and room temperature acid leaching are used to recover Ag from the tailing,some influencing factors such as dosage of acid,leaching time and agitation intensity are investigated.Results show that rough concentrate containing Ag and Mn can be obtained by gravity separation, and under the condition of 15% NaCl solution,dosage of H2 SO4 40 kg/t,leaching time 48 h at room temperature, the leaching efficiency of Ag in the rough concentrate is 72.5%.

  6. Identification and properties of insect resistance-associated maize anionic peroxidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowd, Patrick F; Johnson, Eric T; Pinkerton, T Scott

    2010-08-01

    Previous studies with transgenic plants have indicated a tobacco anionic peroxidase can confer enhanced resistance to a variety of insects when expressed in different plant species. Tissue that expresses high levels of this enzyme often browns rapidly when damaged. Maize roots damaged under sterile conditions browned and had an anionic peroxidase induced. When introduced biolistically, maize callus transformants expressing a maize peroxidase gene with a predicted isoelectric point of ca. 5.1 produced browner callus compared to a corresponding beta-glucuronidase (GUS) transformant as callus aged. Higher production of only one isozyme of ca. pI 4.5 was noted. When the callus was fed to two maize pest caterpillar species, growth rates were slower (as reflected by weights) relative to the GUS callus. Based on examination of published information and electrophoretic properties, this gene appears to code for Px11, a peroxidase isozyme that is primarily produced in root tissue and callus. When sequence of the gene in several inbreds was examined, coding variations were noted, and abilities to utilize ferulic and p-coumaric acids differed. These coding differences may influence the ability of corresponding forms of the peroxidase to promote resistance. In addition to potential use in marker assisted breeding, enhanced expression of this anionic peroxidase through breeding or genetic engineering may lead to enhanced insect or disease resistance. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Release of Pleurotus ostreatus versatile-peroxidase from Mn2+ repression enhances anthropogenic and natural substrate degradation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomer M Salame

    Full Text Available The versatile-peroxidase (VP encoded by mnp4 is one of the nine members of the manganese-peroxidase (MnP gene family that constitutes part of the ligninolytic system of the white-rot basidiomycete Pleurotus ostreatus (oyster mushroom. VP enzymes exhibit dual activity on a wide range of substrates. As Mn(2+ supplement to P. ostreatus cultures results in enhanced degradation of recalcitrant compounds and lignin, we examined the effect of Mn(2+ on the expression profile of the MnP gene family. In P. ostreatus (monokaryon PC9, mnp4 was found to be the predominantly expressed mnp in Mn(2+-deficient media, whereas strongly repressed (to approximately 1% in Mn(2+-supplemented media. Accordingly, in-vitro Mn(2+-independent activity was found to be negligible. We tested whether release of mnp4 from Mn(2+ repression alters the activity of the ligninolytic system. A transformant over-expressing mnp4 (designated OEmnp4 under the control of the β-tubulin promoter was produced. Now, despite the presence of Mn(2+ in the medium, OEmnp4 produced mnp4 transcript as well as VP activity as early as 4 days after inoculation. The level of expression was constant throughout 10 days of incubation (about 0.4-fold relative to β-tubulin and the activity was comparable to the typical activity of PC9 in Mn(2+-deficient media. In-vivo decolorization of the azo dyes Orange II, Reactive Black 5, and Amaranth by OEmnp4 preceded that of PC9. OEmnp4 and PC9 were grown for 2 weeks under solid-state fermentation conditions on cotton stalks as a lignocellulosic substrate. [(14C]-lignin mineralization, in-vitro dry matter digestibility, and neutral detergent fiber digestibility were found to be significantly higher (about 25% in OEmnp4-fermented substrate, relative to PC9. We conclude that releasing Mn(2+ suppression of VP4 by over-expression of the mnp4 gene in P. ostreatus improved its ligninolytic functionality.

  8. Release of Pleurotus ostreatus versatile-peroxidase from Mn2+ repression enhances anthropogenic and natural substrate degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salame, Tomer M; Knop, Doriv; Levinson, Dana; Mabjeesh, Sameer J; Yarden, Oded; Hadar, Yitzhak

    2012-01-01

    The versatile-peroxidase (VP) encoded by mnp4 is one of the nine members of the manganese-peroxidase (MnP) gene family that constitutes part of the ligninolytic system of the white-rot basidiomycete Pleurotus ostreatus (oyster mushroom). VP enzymes exhibit dual activity on a wide range of substrates. As Mn(2+) supplement to P. ostreatus cultures results in enhanced degradation of recalcitrant compounds and lignin, we examined the effect of Mn(2+) on the expression profile of the MnP gene family. In P. ostreatus (monokaryon PC9), mnp4 was found to be the predominantly expressed mnp in Mn(2+)-deficient media, whereas strongly repressed (to approximately 1%) in Mn(2+)-supplemented media. Accordingly, in-vitro Mn(2+)-independent activity was found to be negligible. We tested whether release of mnp4 from Mn(2+) repression alters the activity of the ligninolytic system. A transformant over-expressing mnp4 (designated OEmnp4) under the control of the β-tubulin promoter was produced. Now, despite the presence of Mn(2+) in the medium, OEmnp4 produced mnp4 transcript as well as VP activity as early as 4 days after inoculation. The level of expression was constant throughout 10 days of incubation (about 0.4-fold relative to β-tubulin) and the activity was comparable to the typical activity of PC9 in Mn(2+)-deficient media. In-vivo decolorization of the azo dyes Orange II, Reactive Black 5, and Amaranth by OEmnp4 preceded that of PC9. OEmnp4 and PC9 were grown for 2 weeks under solid-state fermentation conditions on cotton stalks as a lignocellulosic substrate. [(14)C]-lignin mineralization, in-vitro dry matter digestibility, and neutral detergent fiber digestibility were found to be significantly higher (about 25%) in OEmnp4-fermented substrate, relative to PC9. We conclude that releasing Mn(2+) suppression of VP4 by over-expression of the mnp4 gene in P. ostreatus improved its ligninolytic functionality.

  9. 21 CFR 864.7675 - Leukocyte peroxidase test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Leukocyte peroxidase test. 864.7675 Section 864... peroxidase test. (a) Identification. A leukocyte peroxidase test is a device used to distinguish certain... peroxidase activity as evidenced by staining. The results of this test are used in the differential...

  10. Nonequilibrium Thermodynamic Model of Manganese Carbonate Oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝瑞霞; 彭省临

    1999-01-01

    Manganese carbonate can be converted to many kinds of manganese oxides when it is aerated in air and oxygen.Pure manganese carbonate can be changed into Mn3O4 and γ-MnOOH,and manganese carbonate ore can be converted to MnO2 under the air-aerating and oxygen-aerating circumstances.The oxidation process of manganese carbonate is a changing process of mineral association,and is also a converting process of valence of manganese itself.Not only equilibrium stat,but also nonequilibrium state are involved in this whole process,This process is an irreversible heterogeneous complex reaction,and oberys the nonequilibrium thermodynamic model,The oxidation rate of manganese cabonate is controlled by many factors,especially nonmanganese metallic ions which play an important role in the oxidation process of manganese carbonate.

  11. A robust and extracellular heme-containing peroxidase from Thermobifida fusca as prototype of a bacterial peroxidase superfamily

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bloois, Edwin; Torres Pazmino, Daniel; Winter, Remko T.; Fraaije, Marco W.

    2010-01-01

    DyP-type peroxidases comprise a novel superfamily of heme-containing peroxidases which is unrelated to the superfamilies of known peroxidases and of which only a few members have been characterized in some detail. Here, we report the identification and characterization of a DyP-type peroxidase (TfuD

  12. Manganese depresses rat heart muscle respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    It has previously been reported that moderately high dietary manganese (Mn) in combination with marginal magnesium (Mg) resulted in ultrastructural damage to heart mitochondria. Manganese may replace Mg in biological functions, including the role of enzyme cofactor. Manganese may accumulate and subs...

  13. 21 CFR 582.5458 - Manganese hypophosphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manganese hypophosphite. 582.5458 Section 582.5458 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5458 Manganese hypophosphite. (a) Product. Manganese hypophosphite. (b) Conditions of...

  14. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manganese chloride. 582.5446 Section 582.5446 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5446 Manganese chloride. (a) Product. Manganese chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  15. 21 CFR 582.5452 - Manganese gluconate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manganese gluconate. 582.5452 Section 582.5452 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5452 Manganese gluconate. (a) Product. Manganese gluconate. (b) Conditions of use....

  16. 21 CFR 582.5461 - Manganese sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manganese sulfate. 582.5461 Section 582.5461 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5461 Manganese sulfate. (a) Product. Manganese sulfate. (b) Conditions of use....

  17. 21 CFR 73.2775 - Manganese violet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manganese violet. 73.2775 Section 73.2775 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2775 Manganese violet. (a) Identity. The color additive manganese violet is a violet pigment obtained by reacting phosphoric acid, ammonium...

  18. 21 CFR 582.5455 - Manganese glycerophosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manganese glycerophosphate. 582.5455 Section 582.5455 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5455 Manganese glycerophosphate. (a) Product. Manganese glycerophosphate....

  19. 21 CFR 582.5449 - Manganese citrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manganese citrate. 582.5449 Section 582.5449 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5449 Manganese citrate. (a) Product. Manganese citrate. (b) Conditions of use....

  20. The sensitized luminescence of manganese-activated calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulman, J.H.; Evans, L.W.; Ginther, R.J.; Murata, K.J.

    1947-01-01

    Synthetic manganese-activated calcites are shown to be practically inert to ultraviolet excitation in the range 2000-3500A, while they are luminescent under cathode-ray excitation. The incorporation of small amounts of an auxiliary impurity along with the manganese produces the strong response to ultraviolet radiation hitherto ascribed to CaCO3:Mn itself. Three such impurities have been studied: lead, thallium, and cerium. The first two induce excitation in the neighborhood of the mercury resonance line, while the cerium introduces a response principally to longer wave ultraviolet. The strong response to 2537A excitation shown by some natural calcites is likewise found to be due to the presence of lead along with the manganese, rather than to the manganese alone. The data do not warrant ascribing the longer wave-length ultraviolet-excited luminescence of all natural calcites to the action of an auxiliary impurity. The essential identity of the cathode-ray excited luminescence spectra of CaCO 3:Mn, CaCO3: (Pb+Mn), CaCO3:(Tl+Mn), and CaCO3:(Ce+Mn) with the 2537A-excited spectra of the latter three is evidence that the luminescent center in all cases is the manganese ion or the MnO6 group. It is shown that a "cascade" mechanism for the action of the auxiliary impurities, lead, thallium, and cerium, is incorrect; and that the phenomenon must be considered as a case of sensitized luminescence. Owing to the nature of cathode-ray excitation, the manganese activator can be excited by this agent even in the absence of a second impurity. For optical excitation, however, an absorption band for the ultraviolet must be established by building into the CaCO3:Mn a second impurity or "sensitizer.".

  1. Enhanced performance of the aerobic landfill reactor by augmentation of manganese peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholameuz, E M; Hettiaratchi, J P A; Kumar, S

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the work discussed in this article was to determine the ability of an MnP augmented aerobic waste cell to reach stable conditions rapidly in terms of gas production, nutrient content and cellulose and hemicellulose to lignin ratio (C+H/L). Two types of experiments were conducted; small batch and laboratory scale lysimeter experiments. Results from batch experiments showed that enzyme added treatments have the capability to reach a stable C+H/L and lower gas production rates, faster than the treatments without enzyme addition. Enzyme enhancement of the lysimeter increased the rate of biodegradability of the waste; gas production increased more than two times and there was clear evidence of increase in nutrients (nitrogen, dissolved carbon, biological oxygen demand) in the lysimeter ​leachate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Analysis of Manganese Superoxide Dismutase and Glutathione Peroxidase 1 Gene Polymorphisms in Vitiligo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seçkin, Havva Yıldız; Kalkan, Göknur; Bütün, İlknur; Akbaş, Ali; Baş, Yalçın; Karakuş, Nevin; Benli, İsmail

    2016-08-01

    Vitiligo is a hereditary/acquired progressive pigmentation disorder characterized by discoloration of skin as a result of melanocyte dysfunction. Recent studies have proposed that oxidant/antioxidant status plays an important role in vitiligo pathogenesis because of the toxic effects on melanocytes. In this study, we aimed to investigate possible associations of MnSOD Ala-9Val and GPx1 Pro198Leu polymorphisms with vitiligo with in Turkish population. The study group consists of 57 patients with vitiligo and 69 healthy controls. Genotyping is performed to identify MnSOD Ala-9Val and GPx1 Pro198Leu polymorphisms. The method used for genotyping was based on the PCR amplification and detection of polymorphisms by hybridization probes labeled with fluorescent dyes. Both the genotype and allele frequencies of MnSOD Ala-9Val (p = 0.817 and p = 0.553, respectively) and GPx1 Pro198Leu polymorphisms (p = 0.422 and p = 0.673, respectively) were not significantly different between vitiligo patients and the control group. Although no significant difference was found, this is the first report investigating the possible associations between the MnSOD Ala-9Val and GPx1 Pro198Leu polymorphisms in Turkish population. Further studies with large populations will be able to clarify the association better.

  3. A practical culture technique for enhanced production of manganese peroxidase by Anthracophyllum discolor Sp4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisca Acevedo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, different growth conditions of Anthracophyllum discolor Sp4 including the effect of agitation, additions of lignocellulosic support, inducer and surfactant were evaluated on the MnP production in Kirk medium using a culture system made up of the tubes containing the glass bead . The highest MnP production (1,354 U/L on day 13 was obtained when the medium was supplemented with wheat grain and 0.25 mM MnSO4 as inducer, under static conditions at 30°C. Two isoenzymes were purified (35 and 38 kDa respectively. MnP presented a maximal activity in the pH range between 4.5 and 5.5, a relatively high temperature tolerance (50ºC and a high catalytic activity for 2,6-dimethoxyphenol and hydrogen peroxide.

  4. Selective Synthesis of Manganese/Silicon Complexes in Supercritical Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiancheng Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of manganese salts (Mn(NO32, MnCl2, MnSO4, and Mn(Ac2 and silicon materials (silica sand, silica sol, and tetraethyl orthosilicate were used to synthesize Mn/Si complexes in supercritical water using a tube reactor. X-ray diffraction (XRD, X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM were employed to characterize the structure and morphology of the solid products. It was found that MnO2, Mn2O3, and Mn2SiO4 could be obtained in supercritical water at 673 K in 5 minutes. The roles of both anions of manganese salts and silicon species in the formation of manganese silicon complexes were discussed. The inorganic manganese salt with the oxyacid radical could be easily decomposed to produce MnO2/SiO2 and Mn2O3/SiO2. It is interesting to found that Mn(Ac2 can react with various types of silicon to produce Mn2SiO4. The hydroxyl groups of the SiO2 surface from different silicon sources enhance the reactivity of SiO2.

  5. The SKPO-1 peroxidase functions in the hypodermis to protect Caenorhabditis elegans from bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiller, George R; Garsin, Danielle A

    2014-06-01

    In recent years, the synergistic relationship between NADPH oxidase (NOX)/dual oxidase (DUOX) enzymes and peroxidases has received increased attention. Peroxidases utilize NOX/DUOX-generated H2O2 for a myriad of functions including, but not limited to, thyroid hormone biosynthesis, cross-linking extracellular matrices (ECM), and immune defense. We postulated that one or more peroxidases produced by Caenorhabditis elegans would act in host defense, possibly in conjunction with BLI-3, the only NOX/DUOX enzyme encoded by the genome that is expressed. Animals exposed to RNA interference (RNAi) of the putative peroxidase genes were screened for susceptibility to the human pathogen Enterococcus faecalis. One of three genes identified, skpo-1 (ShkT-containing peroxidase), was studied in depth. Animals mutant for this gene were significantly more susceptible to E. faecalis, but not Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A slight decrease in longevity was also observed. The skpo-1 mutant animals had a dumpy phenotype of incomplete penetrance; half the animals displayed a dumpy phenotype ranging from slight to severe, and half were morphologically wild type. The SKPO-1 protein contains the critical catalytic residues necessary for peroxidase activity, and in a whole animal assay, more H2O2 was detected from the mutant compared to the wild type, consistent with the loss of an H2O2 sink. By using tissue-specific skpo-1 RNAi and immunohistochemical localization with an anti-SKPO-1 antibody, it was determined that the peroxidase is functionally and physically present in the hypodermis. In conclusion, these results characterize a peroxidase that functions protectively in the hypodermis during exposure to E. faecalis.

  6. Anionic peroxidase production by Arnebia euchroma callus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhadi, Sahar; Haghbeen, Kamahldin; Marefatjo, Mohammad-Javad; Hoor, Marjan Ghiyami; Zahiri, Hossein Shahbani; Rahimi, Karim

    2011-01-01

    Arnebia euchroma callus, obtained from the root cell culture of an Iranian native specimen, has gained a doubling time of 63 H after regular subculturing on Linsmaier-Skoog (LS) medium containing sugar (50 g/L), 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (10(-6) M), and kinetin (10(-5) M) under darkness at 25°C. Despite the observed somaclonal variations, peroxidase production by the A. euchroma calli has been stable over 4 years under the aforementioned conditions. Isoelectric focusing experiments revealed that the partially purified A. euchroma peroxidases (AePoxs) are mainly anionic with pI values of about 5.5 and 6.6. AePox reaches its optimal activity at 55°C and pH 7.5. Results of the various kinetic studies suggest that AePox belongs to the type III plant peroxidases with no activity for the oxidation of 3-indoleacetic acid, but seems to play a role in the lignin biosynthesis and H(2) O(2) regulation during the proliferation of the A. euchroma cells on LS medium. Comparing the biochemical properties of AePox with horseradish peroxidase and in view of the ease of solid cell culture, the A. euchroma callus could be considered as a source of plant peroxidase for some biotechnological applications. Copyright © 2011 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Production of phenol-oxidases and peroxidases by fungi isolated from irrigated rice Produção de fenol-oxidases e peroxidases por fungos isolados da cultura de arroz irrigado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Célia Maria Maganhotto de Souza Silva

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the potential of fungus strains considered as prospective degraders for the herbicides quinclorac and propanil, for ligninolytic enzyme production. Eight fungal strains were grown in King's B liquid culture medium supplemented with 0.05% Remazol Brilliant Blue R (RBBR and in liquid culture medium containing wheat bran as substrate. The enzymatic system assessment were: lignin peroxidase, manganese peroxidase and laccases. Results indicated differential patterns of ligninolytic enzyme production; the highest enzymatic activities were related to the production of lignin peroxidase. Among the strains, two (P3SA1F and P11SA2F showed RBBR discoloration, suggesting the possibility of their application in bioremediation studies.A proposta deste trabalho foi estudar o potencial das linhagens fúngicas, consideradas potenciais degradadoras dos herbicidas quinclorac e propanil, para produção de enzimas ligninolíticas. Oito linhagens fúngicas foram cultivadas em meio de cultura líquido King's B suplementado com 0,05% de Remazol Brilliant Blue R (RBBR e em meio de cultura líquido contendo farelo de trigo como substrato. Os sistemas enzimáticos avaliados foram: lignina peroxidase, manganês peroxidase e lacases. Os resultados demonstraram padrões diferenciados quanto à produção de enzimas ligninolíticas entre as linhagens, sendo que as maiores atividades enzimáticas estiveram relacionadas à produção de lignina peroxidase. Das oito linhagens, duas (P3SA1F e P11SA2F apresentaram descoloração do RBBR, sugerindo a possibilidade de sua aplicabilicação em estudos de biorremediação

  8. Lignin degradation mechanisms of ligninolytic enzyme system,manganese peroxidase,laccase and lignin peroxidase,produced by wood white rot fungi%木材白腐菌分解木质素的酶系统-锰过氧化物酶、漆酶和木质素过氧化物酶催化分解木质素的机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    池玉杰; 伊洪伟

    2007-01-01

    近年来许多研究者进行了木材白腐菌分解木质素的酶系统对木质素的催化分解机制的研究.木材白腐菌在分解木质素的过程中会产生分解木质素的酶系统,氧化与分解木质素,这些酶系统主要包括细胞外过氧化物酶(锰过氧化物酶-MnP、木质素过氧化物酶-LiP)和细胞外酚氧化酶-漆酶(laccase).

  9. Intrinsic Peroxidase-like Activity of Ficin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yufang; Shen, Dongjun; Long, Yijuan; Xie, Zhixiong; Zheng, Huzhi

    2017-02-01

    Ficin is classified as a sulfhydryl protease isolated from the latex of fig trees. In most cases, a particular enzyme fits a few types of substrate and catalyzes one type of reaction. In this investigation, we found sufficient proofs for the intrinsic peroxidase-like activity of ficin and designed experiments to examine its effectiveness in a variety of scenarios. Ficin can transform peroxidase substrates to colored products in the existence of H2O2. Our results also indicate that the active sites of peroxidase-like activity of ficin are different from that of protease, which reveals that one enzyme may catalyze more than one kind of substrate to perform different types of reactions. On the basis of these findings, H2O2 releasing from MCF-7 cells was detected successfully. Our findings support a wider application of ficin in biochemistry and open up the possibility of utilizing ficin as enzymatic mimics in biotechnology and environmental monitoring.

  10. Catalytic electron-transfer oxygenation of substrates with water as an oxygen source using manganese porphyrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Mizuno, Takuya; Ojiri, Tetsuya

    2012-12-03

    Manganese(V)-oxo-porphyrins are produced by the electron-transfer oxidation of manganese-porphyrins with tris(2,2'-bipyridine)ruthenium(III) ([Ru(bpy)(3)](3+); 2 equiv) in acetonitrile (CH(3)CN) containing water. The rate constants of the electron-transfer oxidation of manganese-porphyrins have been determined and evaluated in light of the Marcus theory of electron transfer. Addition of [Ru(bpy)(3)](3+) to a solution of olefins (styrene and cyclohexene) in CH(3)CN containing water in the presence of a catalytic amount of manganese-porphyrins afforded epoxides, diols, and aldehydes efficiently. Epoxides were converted to the corresponding diols by hydrolysis, and were further oxidized to the corresponding aldehydes. The turnover numbers vary significantly depending on the type of manganese-porphyrin used owing to the difference in their oxidation potentials and the steric bulkiness of the ligand. Ethylbenzene was also oxidized to 1-phenylethanol using manganese-porphyrins as electron-transfer catalysts. The oxygen source in the substrate oxygenation was confirmed to be water by using (18)O-labeled water. The rate constant of the reaction of the manganese(V)-oxo species with cyclohexene was determined directly under single-turnover conditions by monitoring the increase in absorbance attributable to the manganese(III) species produced in the reaction with cyclohexene. It has been shown that the rate-determining step in the catalytic electron-transfer oxygenation of cyclohexene is electron transfer from [Ru(bpy)(3)](3+) to the manganese-porphyrins.

  11. Manganese in dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    North, P.; Cescutti, G.; Jablonka, P.; Hill, V.; Shetrone, M.; Letarte, B.; Lemasle, B.; Venn, K. A.; Battaglia, G.; Tolstoy, E.; Irwin, M. J.; Primas, F.; Francois, P.

    We provide manganese abundances (corrected for the effect of the hyperfine structure) for a large number of stars in the dwarf spheroidal galaxies Sculptor and Fornax, and for a smaller number in the Carina and Sextans dSph galaxies. Abundances had already been determined for a number of other

  12. The molecular characterization of the lignin-forming peroxidase. Progress summary report, April 1, 1989--March 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagrimini, L.M.

    1992-04-01

    This laboratory is committed to understanding the function of plant peroxidases via a multi-disciplinary approach. We have chosen the lignin-forming peroxidase from tobacco as the first isoenzyme to be subjected to this comprehensive approach. The goals which were set out upon the initiation of this project were as follows: (1) utilize a cDNA clone to the tobacco anionic peroxidase to generate transgenic plants which either over-produced this isoenzyme or specifically under-produced this isoenzyme via antisense RNA, (2) describe any phenotypic changes resulting from altered peroxidase expression, (3) perform morphological, physiological, and biochemical analysis of the above mentioned plants to help in determining the in planta function for this enzyme, and (4) clone and characterize the gene for the tobacco anionic peroxidase. A summary of progress thus far which includes both published and unpublished work will be presented in three sections: generation and characterization of transgenic plants, description of phenotypes, and biochemical and physiological analysis of peroxidase function, and cloning and characterization of the tobacco anionic peroxidase gene.

  13. Plastic deformation wear in modified medium manganese steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YUAN Hai-lun

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available A medium manganese steel with high wear-resistance, strength and toughness has been produced with addition of a complex modifier (or refining agent containing Nb, N, RE and Si-Ca. The results showed that the wear resistance, strength and toughness of the modified medium manganese steel are respectively 1.92 times, 1.45 times and 3.63 times as high as that of the referenced unmodified medium manganese steel. The plastic deformation characteristic involved in the wear mechanism of the modified medium manganese steel was investigated by means of plastic-elasticity calculation and TEM electro-microscopy. The relationship between wear resistance and yield strength of the steel was established. Since the wear volume W is proportional to the square of the loading and to the numbers of the abrasives, and inversely proportional to the square of the yield strength of the materials, the wear resistance can be substantially improved by the enhancement of yield strength of the materials. The calculation results generally agreed with the experimental results.

  14. Plastic deformation wear in modified medium manganese steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A medium manganese steel with high wear-resistance, strength and toughness has been produced with addition of a complex modifier (or refining agent) containing Nb, N, RE and Si-Ca. The results showed that the wear resistance, strength and toughness of the modified medium manganese steel are respectively 1.92 times, 1.45times and 3.63 times as high as that of the referenced unmodified medium manganese steel. The plastic deformation characteristic involved in the wear mechanism of the modified medium manganese steel was investigated by means of plastic-elasticity calculation and TEM electro-microscopy. The relationship between wear resistance and yield strength of the steel was established. Since the wear volume W is proportional to the square of the loading and to the numbers of the abrasives, and inversely proportional to the square of the yield strength of the materials, the wear resistance can be substantially improved by the enhancement of yield strength of the materials. The calculation results generally agreed with the experimental results.

  15. Hydrogen peroxide-independent generation of superoxide by plant peroxidase: hypotheses and supportive data employing ferrous ion as a model stimulus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Makoto; Umemoto, Yosuke; Kawano, Tomonori

    2014-01-01

    When plants are threaten by microbial attacks or treated with elicitors, alkalization of extracellular space is often induced and thus pH-dependent extracellular peroxidase-mediated oxidative burst reportedly takes place, especially at the site of microbial challenge. However, direct stimulus involved in activation of peroxidase-catalyzed oxidative burst has not been identified to date. Here, we would like to propose a likely role for free ferrous ion in reduction of ferric native peroxidase into ferrous enzyme intermediate which readily produces superoxide anion via mechanism involving Compound III, especially under alkaline condition, thus, possibly contributing to the plant defense mechanism. Through spectroscopic and chemiluminescence (CL) analyses of reactions catalyzed by horseradish peroxidase (HRP), the present study proposed that plant peroxidase-catalyzed production of superoxide anion can be stimulated in the absence of conventional peroxidase substrates but in the presence of free ferrous ion. PMID:25071789

  16. Synthesis, characterization, optical and sensing property of manganese oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manigandan, R.; Suresh, R.; Giribabu, K.; Vijayalakshmi, L.; Stephen, A.; Narayanan, V.

    2014-01-01

    Manganese oxide nanoparticles were prepared by thermal decomposition of manganese oxalate. Manganese oxalate was synthesized by reacting 1:1 mole ratio of manganese acetate and ammonium oxalate along with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). The structural characterization of manganese oxalate and manganese oxide nanoparticles was analyzed by XRD. The XRD spectrum confirms the crystal structure of the manganese oxide and manganese oxalate. In addition, the average grain size, lattice parameter values were also calculated using XRD spectrum. Moreover, the diffraction peaks were broadened due to the smaller size of the particle. The band gap of manganese oxide was calculated from optical absorption, which was carried out by DRS UV-Visible spectroscopy. The morphology of manganese oxide nanoparticles was analyzed by SEM images. The FT-IR analysis confirms the formation of the manganese oxide from manganese oxalate nanoparticles. The electrochemical sensing behavior of manganese oxide nanoparticles were investigated using hydrogen peroxide by cyclic voltammetry.

  17. Ligninolytic peroxidase genes in the oyster mushroom genome: heterologous expression, molecular structure, catalytic and stability properties, and lignin-degrading ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The genome of Pleurotus ostreatus, an important edible mushroom and a model ligninolytic organism of interest in lignocellulose biorefineries due to its ability to delignify agricultural wastes, was sequenced with the purpose of identifying and characterizing the enzymes responsible for lignin degradation. Results Heterologous expression of the class II peroxidase genes, followed by kinetic studies, enabled their functional classification. The resulting inventory revealed the absence of lignin peroxidases (LiPs) and the presence of three versatile peroxidases (VPs) and six manganese peroxidases (MnPs), the crystal structures of two of them (VP1 and MnP4) were solved at 1.0 to 1.1 Å showing significant structural differences. Gene expansion supports the importance of both peroxidase types in the white-rot lifestyle of this fungus. Using a lignin model dimer and synthetic lignin, we showed that VP is able to degrade lignin. Moreover, the dual Mn-mediated and Mn-independent activity of P. ostreatus MnPs justifies their inclusion in a new peroxidase subfamily. The availability of the whole POD repertoire enabled investigation, at a biochemical level, of the existence of duplicated genes. Differences between isoenzymes are not limited to their kinetic constants. Surprising differences in their activity T50 and residual activity at both acidic and alkaline pH were observed. Directed mutagenesis and spectroscopic/structural information were combined to explain the catalytic and stability properties of the most interesting isoenzymes, and their evolutionary history was analyzed in the context of over 200 basidiomycete peroxidase sequences. Conclusions The analysis of the P. ostreatus genome shows a lignin-degrading system where the role generally played by LiP has been assumed by VP. Moreover, it enabled the first characterization of the complete set of peroxidase isoenzymes in a basidiomycete, revealing strong differences in stability properties and providing

  18. Occurrence and properties of petunia peroxidase a.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, Th.

    1989-01-01

    Peroxidases are probably the most extensively studied enzymes in higher plants. Various isoenzymes occur as soluble proteins in the apoplast and in the vacuole, or are bound to membranes and cell walls. Their occurrence is often organ-specific and developmentally controlled, and there is circumstant

  19. Occurrence and properties of Petunia peroxidase a

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, T.

    1989-01-01

    Peroxidases are probably the most extensively studied enzymes in higher plants. Various isoenzymes occur as soluble proteins in the apoplast and in the vacuole, or are bound to membranes and cell walls. Their occurrence is often organ-specific and developmentally controlled, and there is

  20. Inhibition of Heme Peroxidases by Melamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pattaraporn Vanachayangkul

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2008 melamine-contaminated infant formula and dairy products in China led to over 50,000 hospitalizations of children due to renal injuries. In North America during 2007 and in Asia during 2004, melamine-contaminated pet food products resulted in numerous pet deaths due to renal failure. Animal studies have confirmed the potent renal toxicity of melamine combined with cyanuric acid. We showed previously that the solubility of melamine cyanurate is low at physiologic pH and ionic strength, provoking us to speculate how toxic levels of these compounds could be transported through the circulation without crystallizing until passing into the renal filtrate. We hypothesized that melamine might be sequestered by heme proteins, which could interfere with heme enzyme activity. Four heme peroxidase enzymes were selected for study: horseradish peroxidase (HRP, lactoperoxidase (LPO, and cyclooxygenase-1 and -2 (COX-1 and -2. Melamine exhibited noncompetitive inhibition of HRP (9.5±0.7mM, and LPO showed a mixed model of inhibition (14.5±4.7mM. The inhibition of HRP and LPO was confirmed using a chemiluminescent peroxidase assay. Melamine also exhibited COX-1 inhibition, but inhibition of COX-2 was not detected. Thus, our results demonstrate that melamine inhibits the activity of three heme peroxidases.

  1. Occurrence and properties of Petunia peroxidase a

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, T.

    1989-01-01

    Peroxidases are probably the most extensively studied enzymes in higher plants. Various isoenzymes occur as soluble proteins in the apoplast and in the vacuole, or are bound to membranes and cell walls. Their occurrence is often organ-specific and developmentally controlled, and there is ci

  2. Guaiacol Peroxidase Zymography for the Undergraduate Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkesman, Jeff; Castro, Diana; Contreras, Lellys M.; Kurz, Liliana

    2014-01-01

    This laboratory exercise presents a novel way to introduce undergraduate students to the specific detection of enzymatic activity by electrophoresis. First, students prepare a crude peroxidase extract and then analyze the homogenate via electrophoresis. Zymography, that is, a SDS-PAGE method to detect enzyme activity, is used to specifically…

  3. Bioconjugation of antibodies to horseradish peroxidase (hrp)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The bioconjugation of an antibody to an enzymatic reporter such as horseradish peroxidase (HRP) affords an effective mechanism by which immunoassay detection of a target antigen can be achieved. The use of heterobifunctional cross—linkers to covalently link antibodies to HRP provides a simple and c...

  4. Heterologous Expression of Peroxidases : Chapter 12

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lokman, Christien; Weert, S. de

    2010-01-01

    This monograph describes many applications of peroxidase-based biocatalysis in the biotechnology industry. The need for such a book emerges from the considerable amount of new data regarding the phylogeny, reaction mechanisms, thermodynamic characterization and structural features of fungal and plan

  5. Manganese abundances in Galactic bulge red giants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbuy, B.; Hill, V.; Zoccali, M.; Minniti, D.; Renzini, A.; Ortolani, S.; Gómez, A.; Trevisan, M.; Dutra, N.

    2013-11-01

    Context. Manganese is mainly produced in type II SNe during explosive silicon burning, in incomplete Si-burning regions, and depends on several nucleosynthesis environment conditions, such as mass cut between the matter ejected and falling back onto the remnant, electron and neutron excesses, mixing fallback, and explosion energy. Manganese is also produced in type Ia SNe. Aims: The aim of this work is the study of abundances of the iron-peak element Mn in 56 bulge giants, among which 13 are red clump stars. Four bulge fields along the minor axis are inspected. The study of abundances of Mn-over-Fe as a function of metallicity in the Galactic bulge may shed light on its production mechanisms. Methods: High-resolution spectra were obtained using the FLAMES+UVES spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope. The spectra were obtained within a program to observe 800 stars using the GIRAFFE spectrograph, together with the present UVES spectra. Results: We aim at identifying the chemical evolution of manganese, as a function of metallicity, in the Galactic bulge. We find [Mn/Fe] ~ -0.7 at [Fe/H] ~ -1.3, increasing to a solar value at metallicities close to solar, and showing a spread around - 0.7 ≲ [Fe/H] ≲ -0.2, in good agreement with other work on Mn in bulge stars. There is also good agreement with chemical evolution models. We find no clear difference in the behaviour of the four bulge fields. Whereas [Mn/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] could be identified with the behaviour of the thick disc stars, [Mn/O] vs. [O/H] has a behaviour running parallel, at higher metallicities, compared to thick disc stars, indicating that the bulge enrichment might have proceeded differently from that of the thick disc. Observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile (ESO programmes 71.B-0617A, 73.B0074A, and GTO 71.B-0196).Tables 1-6 and Figs. 1-6 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  6. Method of producing imines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sithambaram, Shanthakumar; Son, Young-Chan; Suib, Steven L.

    2008-04-08

    A method for forming an imine comprises reacting a first reactant comprising a hydroxyl functionality, a carbonyl functionality, or both a hydroxyl functionality and a carbonyl functionality with a second reactant having an amine functionality in the presence of ordered porous manganese-based octahedral molecular sieves and an oxygen containing gas at a temperature and for a time sufficient for the imine to be produced.

  7. Azo dye oxidation with hydrogen peroxide catalysed by manganese 1,4,7-triazacyclononane complexes in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Bruce C; Smith, John R Lindsay; Newton, Maurice S; Oakes, John; Pons i Prats, Roger

    2003-05-07

    A kinetic and mechanistic study is reported of the oxidation of a number of azonaphthol dyes with hydrogen peroxide in aqueous solution, catalysed by some mono and dinuclear manganese(IV) complexes of 1,4,7-trimethyl-1,4,7-triazacyclononane (Me3TACN). The results of UV-Vis investigations, augmented by EPR and ESI-MS studies, are described for a series of experiments in which concentrations, pH and ionic strength have been varied. The reactions are characterised by an induction period followed by a relatively rapid oxidation. For the dinuclear manganese complex 2, these are consistent with an initial perhydrolysis of the manganese complex involving both the dye anion and HO2-, to give mononuclear manganese species and the operation of a catalytic cycle incorporating MnIIIL(OH)3, O = MnVL(OH)2 and MnIVL(OH)3 (L = Me3TACN) (cf. the reactions of peroxidase enzymes). ESI-MS results provide evidence for the formation and reaction (with the dye) of MnIVL(OH)3. With the mononuclear manganese complex MnIVL(OMe)3, there is a short lag-phase attributed to perhydrolysis by HO2- followed by the same catalytic cycle.

  8. Deficiency in the manganese efflux transporter SLC30A10 induces severe hypothyroidism in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchens, Steven; Liu, Chunyi; Jursa, Thomas; Shawlot, William; Chaffee, Beth K; Yin, Weiling; Gore, Andrea C; Aschner, Michael; Smith, Donald R; Mukhopadhyay, Somshuvra

    2017-06-09

    Manganese is an essential metal that becomes toxic at elevated levels. Loss-of-function mutations in SLC30A10, a cell-surface-localized manganese efflux transporter, cause a heritable manganese metabolism disorder resulting in elevated manganese levels and parkinsonian-like movement deficits. The underlying disease mechanisms are unclear; therefore, treatment is challenging. To understand the consequences of loss of SLC30A10 function at the organism level, we generated Slc30a10 knock-out mice. During early development, knock-outs were indistinguishable from controls. Surprisingly, however, after weaning and compared with controls, knock-out mice failed to gain weight, were smaller, and died prematurely (by ∼6-8 weeks of age). At 6 weeks, manganese levels in the brain, blood, and liver of the knock-outs were ∼20-60-fold higher than controls. Unexpectedly, histological analyses revealed that the brain and liver of the knock-outs were largely unaffected, but their thyroid exhibited extensive alterations. Because hypothyroidism leads to growth defects and premature death in mice, we assayed for changes in thyroid and pituitary hormones. At 6 weeks and compared with controls, the knock-outs had markedly reduced thyroxine levels (∼50-80%) and profoundly increased thyroid-stimulating hormone levels (∼800-1000-fold), indicating that Slc30a10 knock-out mice develop hypothyroidism. Importantly, a low-manganese diet produced lower tissue manganese levels in the knock-outs and rescued the phenotype, suggesting that manganese toxicity was the underlying cause. Our unanticipated discovery highlights the importance of determining the role of thyroid dysfunction in the onset and progression of manganese-induced disease and identifies Slc30a10 knock-out mice as a new model for studying thyroid biology. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Catalytic profile of Arabidopsis peroxidases, AtPrx-2, 25 and 71, contributing to stem lignification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Shigeto

    Full Text Available Lignins are aromatic heteropolymers that arise from oxidative coupling of lignin precursors, including lignin monomers (p-coumaryl, coniferyl, and sinapyl alcohols, oligomers, and polymers. Whereas plant peroxidases have been shown to catalyze oxidative coupling of monolignols, the oxidation activity of well-studied plant peroxidases, such as horseradish peroxidase C (HRP-C and AtPrx53, are quite low for sinapyl alcohol. This characteristic difference has led to controversy regarding the oxidation mechanism of sinapyl alcohol and lignin oligomers and polymers by plant peroxidases. The present study explored the oxidation activities of three plant peroxidases, AtPrx2, AtPrx25, and AtPrx71, which have been already shown to be involved in lignification in the Arabidopsis stem. Recombinant proteins of these peroxidases (rAtPrxs were produced in Escherichia coli as inclusion bodies and successfully refolded to yield their active forms. rAtPrx2, rAtPrx25, and rAtPrx71 were found to oxidize two syringyl compounds (2,6-dimethoxyphenol and syringaldazine, which were employed here as model monolignol compounds, with higher specific activities than HRP-C and rAtPrx53. Interestingly, rAtPrx2 and rAtPrx71 oxidized syringyl compounds more efficiently than guaiacol. Moreover, assays with ferrocytochrome c as a substrate showed that AtPrx2, AtPrx25, and AtPrx71 possessed the ability to oxidize large molecules. This characteristic may originate in a protein radical. These results suggest that the plant peroxidases responsible for lignin polymerization are able to directly oxidize all lignin precursors.

  10. Catalytic profile of Arabidopsis peroxidases, AtPrx-2, 25 and 71, contributing to stem lignification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigeto, Jun; Nagano, Mariko; Fujita, Koki; Tsutsumi, Yuji

    2014-01-01

    Lignins are aromatic heteropolymers that arise from oxidative coupling of lignin precursors, including lignin monomers (p-coumaryl, coniferyl, and sinapyl alcohols), oligomers, and polymers. Whereas plant peroxidases have been shown to catalyze oxidative coupling of monolignols, the oxidation activity of well-studied plant peroxidases, such as horseradish peroxidase C (HRP-C) and AtPrx53, are quite low for sinapyl alcohol. This characteristic difference has led to controversy regarding the oxidation mechanism of sinapyl alcohol and lignin oligomers and polymers by plant peroxidases. The present study explored the oxidation activities of three plant peroxidases, AtPrx2, AtPrx25, and AtPrx71, which have been already shown to be involved in lignification in the Arabidopsis stem. Recombinant proteins of these peroxidases (rAtPrxs) were produced in Escherichia coli as inclusion bodies and successfully refolded to yield their active forms. rAtPrx2, rAtPrx25, and rAtPrx71 were found to oxidize two syringyl compounds (2,6-dimethoxyphenol and syringaldazine), which were employed here as model monolignol compounds, with higher specific activities than HRP-C and rAtPrx53. Interestingly, rAtPrx2 and rAtPrx71 oxidized syringyl compounds more efficiently than guaiacol. Moreover, assays with ferrocytochrome c as a substrate showed that AtPrx2, AtPrx25, and AtPrx71 possessed the ability to oxidize large molecules. This characteristic may originate in a protein radical. These results suggest that the plant peroxidases responsible for lignin polymerization are able to directly oxidize all lignin precursors.

  11. Feruloylated arabinoxylans are oxidatively cross-linked by extracellular maize peroxidase but not by horseradish peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burr, Sally J; Fry, Stephen C

    2009-09-01

    Covalent cross-linking of soluble extracellular arabinoxylans in living maize cultures, which models the cross-linking of wall-bound arabinoxylans, is due to oxidation of feruloyl esters to oligoferuloyl esters and ethers. The oxidizing system responsible could be H2O2/peroxidase, O2/laccase, or reactive oxygen species acting non-enzymically. To distinguish these possibilities, we studied arabinoxylan cross-linking in vivo and in vitro. In living cultures, exogenous, soluble, extracellular, feruloylated [pentosyl-3H]arabinoxylans underwent cross-linking, beginning abruptly 8 d after sub-culture. Cross-linking was suppressed by iodide, an H2O2 scavenger, indicating dependence on endogenous H2O2. However, exogenous H2O2 did not cause precocious cross-linking, despite the constant presence of endogenous peroxidases, suggesting that younger cultures contained natural cross-linking inhibitors. Dialysed culture-filtrates cross-linked [3H]arabinoxylans in vitro only if H2O2 was also added, indicating a peroxidase requirement. This cross-linking was highly ionic-strength-dependent. The peroxidases responsible were heat-labile, although relatively heat-stable peroxidases (assayed on o-dianisidine) were also present. Surprisingly, added horseradish peroxidase, even after heat-denaturation, blocked the arabinoxylan-cross-linking action of maize peroxidases, suggesting that the horseradish protein was a competing substrate for [3H]arabinoxylan coupling. In conclusion, we show for the first time that cross-linking of extracellular arabinoxylan in living maize cultures is an action of apoplastic peroxidases, some of whose unusual properties we report.

  12. Evidence for thiocyanate-sensitive peroxidase activity in human saliva.

    OpenAIRE

    Cowman, R A; Baron, S S; Obenauf, S D; Byrnes, J J

    1983-01-01

    A procedure was developed for determining the relative levels of lactoperoxidase, leukocyte myeloperoxidase, and thiocyanate-sensitive peroxidase in human saliva. With this procedure, most of the peroxidase activity in whole saliva from normal (those without cancer) subjects was found to be associated with lactoperoxidase and thiocyanate-sensitive peroxidase, with only a minor contribution from leukocyte myeloperoxidase. In contrast, thiocyanate-sensitive peroxidase and leukocyte myeloperoxid...

  13. Purification and some properties of peroxidase isozymes from pineapple stem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, H Y; Yu, R H; Chang, C T

    1993-01-01

    The enzyme peroxidase is widely distributed among the higher plants. Isozymes of peroxidase are known to occur in a variety of tissues in a large number of plant species. In this study, peroxidase isozymes were purified from the extract of pineapple stem through successive steps of ammonium sulfate fractionation, CM-Sepharose CL-6B chromatographies and DEAE-Sepharose CL-6B chromatographies. By these steps, twelve isozymes of peroxidase were obtained. Some properties of the isozymes were studied and compared.

  14. Lignin peroxidase mediated biotransformations useful in the biocatalytic production of vanillin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Have, ten R.

    2000-01-01

    This research concentrates on lignin peroxidase (LiP) mediated biotrans-formations that are useful in producing vanillin.In order to obtain this extracellular enzyme, the white-rot fungus Bjerkandera sp. strain BOS55 was cultivated on nitrogen rich medium. This procedure resulted in a successful LiP

  15. Lignin peroxidase mediated biotransformations useful in the biocatalytic production of vanillin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Have, ten R.

    2000-01-01

    This research concentrates on lignin peroxidase (LiP) mediated biotrans-formations that are useful in producing vanillin.

    In order to obtain this extracellular enzyme, the white-rot fungus Bjerkandera sp. strain BOS55 was cultivated on nitrogen rich me

  16. Lignin peroxidase mediated biotransformations useful in the biocatalytic production of vanillin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Have, ten R.

    2000-01-01

    This research concentrates on lignin peroxidase (LiP) mediated biotrans-formations that are useful in producing vanillin.

    In order to obtain this extracellular enzyme, the white-rot fungus Bjerkandera sp. strain BOS55 was cultivated on nitrogen rich

  17. Spectroscopic characterization of manganese minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmi Reddy, S.; Padma Suvarna, K.; Udayabhaska Reddy, G.; Endo, Tamio; Frost, R. L.

    2014-01-01

    Manganese minerals ardenite, alleghanyite and leucopoenicite originated from Madhya Pradesh, India, Nagano prefecture Japan, Sussex Country and Parker Shaft Franklin, Sussex Country, New Jersey respectively are used in the present work. In these minerals manganese is the major constituent and iron if present is in traces only. An EPR study of on all of the above samples confirms the presence of Mn(II) with g around 2.0. Optical absorption spectrum of the mineral alleghanyite indicates that Mn(II) is present in two different octahedral sites and in leucophoenicite Mn(II) is also in octahedral geometry. Ardenite mineral gives only a few Mn(II) bands. NIR results of the minerals ardenite, leucophoenicite and alleghanyite are due to hydroxyl and silicate anions which confirming the formulae of the minerals.

  18. Spectroscopic characterization of manganese minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmi Reddy, S; Padma Suvarna, K; Udayabhaska Reddy, G; Endo, Tamio; Frost, R L

    2014-01-03

    Manganese minerals ardenite, alleghanyite and leucopoenicite originated from Madhya Pradesh, India, Nagano prefecture Japan, Sussex Country and Parker Shaft Franklin, Sussex Country, New Jersey respectively are used in the present work. In these minerals manganese is the major constituent and iron if present is in traces only. An EPR study of on all of the above samples confirms the presence of Mn(II) with g around 2.0. Optical absorption spectrum of the mineral alleghanyite indicates that Mn(II) is present in two different octahedral sites and in leucophoenicite Mn(II) is also in octahedral geometry. Ardenite mineral gives only a few Mn(II) bands. NIR results of the minerals ardenite, leucophoenicite and alleghanyite are due to hydroxyl and silicate anions which confirming the formulae of the minerals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Mineral resource of the month: manganese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corathers, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Manganese is a silver-colored metal resembling iron and often found in conjunction with iron. The earliest-known human use of manganese compounds was in the Stone Age, when early humans used manganese dioxide as pigments in cave paintings. In ancient Rome and Egypt, people started using it to color or remove the color from glass - a practice that continued to modern times. Today, manganese is predominantly used in metallurgical applications as an alloying addition, particularly in steel and cast iron production. Steel and cast iron together provide the largest market for manganese (historically 85 to 90 percent), but it is also alloyed with nonferrous metals such as aluminum and copper. Its importance to steel cannot be overstated, as almost all types of steel contain manganese and could not exist without it.

  20. [Characterization of lignin and Mn peroxidases from Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    Lignin peroxidases were investigated with respect to enzyme kinetics and NMR spectroscopy of the heme domain. MN peroxidases were studied with respect to the role of oxalate in enzyme activity, the NMR spectroscopy of the heme domain. Gene expression of both lignin and MN peroxidases were examined as well as expression of site-directed mutants aimed at scale up production of these enzymes.

  1. The effects of manganese phosphate coating wear resistance of chilled ductile iron camshafts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarık Gün

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The ductile iron camshafts are preferred due to high toughness and strength features in the automobile industry. Through the coolants used in the camshaft production high surface hardness is achieved. In this study, the wear resistance effects of ductile iron chill produced camshafts coated with manganese phosphate are researched. The camshaft surfaces produced as ductile iron chill are coated with manganese phosphate. The coating surfaces are observed with scanning electron microscope (SEM. The changes occurring on the cam profiles are measured with running the wear resistance of the manganese phosphate coating on the camshafts on the engine test rig with 30 minutes interval in 1000rpm. In order to compare the results of uncoated camshafts run on engines are checked against simultaneously. As result, the manganese phosphate coated cams were 2,8 times less worn up than the uncoated cams. The manganese phosphate coated ductile iron chill camshafts are less worn up according to uncoated camshafts because of the oil holding feature of manganese phosphate coating.

  2. Internal standardization for the determination of cadmium, cobalt, chromium and manganese in saline produced water from petroleum industry by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry after cloud point extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida Bezerra, Marcos [Departamento de Geoquimica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Outeiro Sao Joao Batista s/n, Centro, Niteroi/RJ, 24020-150 (Brazil); Universidade Estadual do Sudoeste da Bahia, Departamento de Quimica e Exatas, Rua Jose Moreira Sobrinho s/n, Jequiezinho, Jequie/BA, 45206-190 (Brazil)], E-mail: mbezerra@uesb.br; Mitihiro do Nascimento Maeda, Sergio; Padua Oliveira, Eliane [Departamento de Geoquimica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Outeiro Sao Joao Batista s/n, Centro, Niteroi/RJ, 24020-150 (Brazil); Fatima Batista de Carvalho, Maria de [Centro de Pesquisas e Desenvolvimento da PETROBRAS, Avaliacao e Monitoramento Ambiental, Av. Jequitiba, 950, Cidade Universitaria, Rio de Janeiro/RJ, 21941-598 (Brazil); Erthal Santelli, Ricardo [Departamento de Geoquimica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Outeiro Sao Joao Batista s/n, Centro, Niteroi/RJ, 24020-150 (Brazil)

    2007-09-15

    In the present paper a procedure is proposed for the determination of traces of Cd, Co, Mn and Cr in petroleum industry produced water by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. The procedure is based on cloud point extraction of these metals, as their dithizonate complexes, into the surfactant-rich phase of octylphenoxypolyethoxyethanol surfactant (Triton X-114). Extractions were carried out in solutions with salinities between 10 per mille and 70 per mille. Since residual salinity in the surfactant-rich phase caused differences in its transport to the plasma, yttrium was used as an internal standard to correct for this effect. The simultaneous metal extraction procedure was optimized by response surface methodology using a Doehlert design and desirability function. Enhancement factors of 21, 21, 9 and 19, along with limits of quantification of 0.093, 0.20, 0.73 and 1.2 {mu}g L{sup -1}, and precision expressed as relative standard deviation (n = 8, 20.0 {mu}g L{sup -1}) of 5.8, 1.2, 1.7 and 5.7% were obtained for Cd, Co, Mn and Cr, respectively. The accuracy was evaluated by spike recovery tests on the high salinity water samples with salinity of 40 and 63 per mille.

  3. Internal standardization for the determination of cadmium, cobalt, chromium and manganese in saline produced water from petroleum industry by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry after cloud point extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezerra, Marcos Almeida; Mitihiro do Nascimento Maêda, Sérgio; Oliveira, Eliane Padua; de Fátima Batista de Carvalho, Maria; Santelli, Ricardo Erthal

    2007-09-01

    In the present paper a procedure is proposed for the determination of traces of Cd, Co, Mn and Cr in petroleum industry produced water by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. The procedure is based on cloud point extraction of these metals, as their dithizonate complexes, into the surfactant-rich phase of octylphenoxypolyethoxyethanol surfactant (Triton X-114). Extractions were carried out in solutions with salinities between 10‰ and 70‰. Since residual salinity in the surfactant-rich phase caused differences in its transport to the plasma, yttrium was used as an internal standard to correct for this effect. The simultaneous metal extraction procedure was optimized by response surface methodology using a Doehlert design and desirability function. Enhancement factors of 21, 21, 9 and 19, along with limits of quantification of 0.093, 0.20, 0.73 and 1.2 μg L - 1 , and precision expressed as relative standard deviation ( n = 8, 20.0 μg L - 1 ) of 5.8, 1.2, 1.7 and 5.7% were obtained for Cd, Co, Mn and Cr, respectively. The accuracy was evaluated by spike recovery tests on the high salinity water samples with salinity of 40 and 63‰.

  4. Peroxidase catalyzed nitration of tryptophan derivatives. Mechanism, products and comparison with chemical nitrating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, Alberto; Nicolis, Stefania; Roncone, Raffaella; Casella, Luigi; Monzani, Enrico

    2004-07-01

    The enzymatic nitration of tryptophan derivatives by oxidation of nitrite has been studied using lactoperoxidase and horseradish peroxidase, and compared with the chemical nitration produced by nitrogen dioxide and peroxynitrite. HPLC, mass spectra and NMR analysis of the mixture of products clearly show that nitration occurs at position 4-, 6-, 7-, and N1 of the indole ring, and nitrosation at position N1. Kinetic studies performed on peroxidase/NO2-/H2O2 systems showed substrate saturation behavior with all the tryptophan derivatives employed. The rate dependence on nitrite concentration was found to be linear with horseradish peroxidase while it exhibited saturation behavior with lactoperoxidase. The composition of the product mixture depends on the nitrating agent. While the production of 4-nitro, 6-nitro, 7-nitro and N1-nitro derivatives follows a similar trend, indicating that they are formed according to a similar mechanism, the ratio between the N1-nitroso derivative and other derivatives depends markedly on the nitrite concentration when tryptophan modification is performed by the peroxidase/H2O2/nitrite systems. Analysis of the data indicates that at low nitrite concentration the enzymatic reaction occurs through the classical peroxidase cycle. At high nitrite concentration the reaction proceeds through a different intermediate that we assume to be a protein bound peroxynitrite species.

  5. Role of manganese and veratryl alcohol in the ligninolytic system of bjerkandera sp. strain BOS55.

    OpenAIRE

    Mester, T.

    1998-01-01

    IntroductionLignin is a three dimensional hydrophobic plant polymer derived from the random coupling of phenylpropanoid precursors. The chemical and physical characteristics of lignin require a nonspecific, extracellular oxidative process for biodegradation. White rot basidiomycetes are the only group of organisms having an efficient extracellular ligninolytic system. These fungi produce peroxidases and laccases that are involved in the initial attack of lignin. The peroxidases work with H 2 ...

  6. Characterization of Helicobacter pylori adhesin thiol peroxidase (HP0390) purified from Escherichia coli

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Huyen Thi Minh Nguyen; Kwang-Ho Nam; Yasar Saleem; Key-Sun Kim

    2010-06-01

    The antioxidant protein, adhesin thiol peroxidase (HpTpx or HP0390), plays an important role in enabling Helicobacter pylori to survive gastric oxidative stress. The bacterium colonizes the host stomach and produces gastric cancer. However, little information is available about the biochemical characteristics of HpTpx. We expressed recombinant HpTpx in Escherichia coli, purified to homogeneity, and characterized it. The results showed that HpTpx existed in a monomeric hydrodynamic form and the enzyme fully retained its peroxidase and antioxidant activities. The catalytic reaction of the enzyme was similar to an atypical 2-cysteine peroxiredoxin (Prx). The conformation of the enzyme was observed in the presence and absence of dithiothreitol (DTT); similar to other known thiol peroxidases, conformational change was observed in HpTpx by the addition of DTT.

  7. DETERMINATION OF STABILITY CONSTANTS OF MANGANESE (II ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    Keywords: Amino acids, dissociation constant, potentiometry, stability constant. INTRODUCTION ... constants of manganese (II) amino acid complexes using potentiometer. .... Principles of Biochemistry Third Edition,. Worth publishers, 41 ...

  8. Amino acid sequence of Coprinus macrorhizus peroxidase and cDNA sequence encoding Coprinus cinereus peroxidase. A new family of fungal peroxidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baunsgaard, L; Dalbøge, H; Houen, G; Rasmussen, E M; Welinder, K G

    1993-04-01

    Sequence analysis and cDNA cloning of Coprinus peroxidase (CIP) were undertaken to expand the understanding of the relationships of structure, function and molecular genetics of the secretory heme peroxidases from fungi and plants. Amino acid sequencing of Coprinus macrorhizus peroxidase, and cDNA sequencing of Coprinus cinereus peroxidase showed that the mature proteins are identical in amino acid sequence, 343 residues in size and preceded by a 20-residue signal peptide. Their likely identity to peroxidase from Arthromyces ramosus is discussed. CIP has an 8-residue, glycine-rich N-terminal extension blocked with a pyroglutamate residue which is absent in other fungal peroxidases. The presence of pyroglutamate, formed by cyclization of glutamine, and the finding of a minor fraction of a variant form lacking the N-terminal residue, indicate that signal peptidase cleavage is followed by further enzymic processing. CIP is 40-45% identical in amino-acid sequence to 11 lignin peroxidases from four fungal species, and 42-43% identical to the two known Mn-peroxidases. Like these white-rot fungal peroxidases, CIP has an additional segment of approximately 40 residues at the C-terminus which is absent in plant peroxidases. Although CIP is much more similar to horseradish peroxidase (HRP C) in substrate specificity, specific activity and pH optimum than to white-rot fungal peroxidases, the sequences of CIP and HRP C showed only 18% identity. Hence, CIP qualifies as the first member of a new family of fungal peroxidases. The nine invariant residues present in all plant, fungal and bacterial heme peroxidases are also found in CIP. The present data support the hypothesis that only one chromosomal CIP gene exists. In contrast, a large number of secretory plant and fungal peroxidases are expressed from several peroxidase gene clusters. Analyses of three batches of CIP protein and of 49 CIP clones revealed the existence of only two highly similar alleles indicating less

  9. Structure of soybean seed coat peroxidase: a plant peroxidase with unusual stability and haem-apoprotein interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, A; Mirza, O; Indiani, C

    2001-01-01

    Soybean seed coat peroxidase (SBP) is a peroxidase with extraordinary stability and catalytic properties. It belongs to the family of class III plant peroxidases that can oxidize a wide variety of organic and inorganic substrates using hydrogen peroxide. Because the plant enzyme is a heterogeneous...

  10. Hierarchical hybrid peroxidase catalysts for remediation of phenol wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xiaonan; Corgié, Stéphane C; Aneshansley, Daniel J; Wang, Peng; Walker, Larry P; Giannelis, Emmanuel P

    2014-04-04

    We report a new family of hierarchical hybrid catalysts comprised of horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-magnetic nanoparticles for advanced oxidation processes and demonstrate their utility in the removal of phenol from water. The immobilized HRP catalyzes the oxidation of phenols in the presence of H2 O2 , producing free radicals. The phenoxy radicals react with each other in a non-enzymatic process to form polymers, which can be removed by precipitation with salts or condensation. The hybrid peroxidase catalysts exhibit three times higher activity than free HRP and are able to remove three times more phenol from water compared to free HRP under similar conditions. In addition, the hybrid catalysts reduce substrate inhibition and limit inactivation from reaction products, which are common problems with free or conventionally immobilized enzymes. Reusability is improved when the HRP-magnetic nanoparticle hybrids are supported on micron-scale magnetic particles, and can be retained with a specially designed magnetically driven reactor. The performance of the hybrid catalysts makes them attractive for several industrial and environmental applications and their development might pave the way for practical applications by eliminating most of the limitations that have prevented the use of free or conventionally immobilized enzymes.

  11. Hierarchical hybrid peroxidase catalysts for remediation of phenol wastewater

    KAUST Repository

    Duan, Xiaonan

    2014-02-20

    We report a new family of hierarchical hybrid catalysts comprised of horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-magnetic nanoparticles for advanced oxidation processes and demonstrate their utility in the removal of phenol from water. The immobilized HRP catalyzes the oxidation of phenols in the presence of H2O2, producing free radicals. The phenoxy radicals react with each other in a non-enzymatic process to form polymers, which can be removed by precipitation with salts or condensation. The hybrid peroxidase catalysts exhibit three times higher activity than free HRP and are able to remove three times more phenol from water compared to free HRP under similar conditions. In addition, the hybrid catalysts reduce substrate inhibition and limit inactivation from reaction products, which are common problems with free or conventionally immobilized enzymes. Reusability is improved when the HRP-magnetic nanoparticle hybrids are supported on micron-scale magnetic particles, and can be retained with a specially designed magnetically driven reactor. The performance of the hybrid catalysts makes them attractive for several industrial and environmental applications and their development might pave the way for practical applications by eliminating most of the limitations that have prevented the use of free or conventionally immobilized enzymes. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Feruloylated Arabinoxylans Are Oxidatively Cross-Linked by Extracellular Maize Peroxidase but Not by Horseradish Peroxidase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sally J. Burr; Stephen C. Fry

    2009-01-01

    Covalent cross-linking of soluble extraceUular arabinoxylans in living maize cultures, which models the cross-linking of wall-bound arabinoxylans, is due to oxidation of feruloyl esters to oligoferuloyl esters and ethers. The oxidizing system responsible could be H_2O_2/peroxidase, O_2/laccase, or reactive oxygen species acting non-enzymically. To distinguish these possibilities, we studied arabinoxylan cross-linking in vivo and in vitro. In living cultures, exogenous, soluble, extra-cellular, feruloylated [pentosyl-~3H]arabinoxylans underwent cross-linking, beginning abruptly 8 d after sub-culture. Cross-linking was suppressed by iodide, an H_2O_2 scavenger, indicating dependence on endogenous H2O2. However, exogenous H_2O_2 did not cause precocious cross-linking, despite the constant presence of endogenous peroxidases, suggesting that younger cultures contained natural cross-linking inhibitors. Dialysed culture-filtrates cross-linked [~3H]arabinoxylans in vitro only if H_20_2 was also added, indicating a peroxiclase requirement. This cross-linking was highly ionic-strength-dependent. The peroxidases responsible were heat-labile, although relatively heat-stable peroxidases (assayed on o-dianisidine) were also present, Surprisingly, added horseradish peroxidase, even after heat-denaturation, blocked the arabinoxylan-cross-linking action of maize peroxidases, suggesting that the horseradish protein was a competing substrate for [~3H]arabino-xylan coupling. In conclusion, we show for the first time that cross-linking of extracellular arabinoxylan in living maize cultures is an action of apoplastic peroxidases, some of whose unusual properties we report.

  13. Battles with Iron: Manganese in Oxidative Stress Protection*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, J. Dafhne; Culotta, Valeria C.

    2012-01-01

    The redox-active metal manganese plays a key role in cellular adaptation to oxidative stress. As a cofactor for manganese superoxide dismutase or through formation of non-proteinaceous manganese antioxidants, this metal can combat oxidative damage without deleterious side effects of Fenton chemistry. In either case, the antioxidant properties of manganese are vulnerable to iron. Cellular pools of iron can outcompete manganese for binding to manganese superoxide dismutase, and through Fenton chemistry, iron may counteract the benefits of non-proteinaceous manganese antioxidants. In this minireview, we highlight ways in which cells maximize the efficacy of manganese as an antioxidant in the midst of pro-oxidant iron. PMID:22247543

  14. Graphene oxide vs. reduced graphene oxide as carbon support in porphyrin peroxidase biomimetic nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socaci, C; Pogacean, F; Biris, A R; Coros, M; Rosu, M C; Magerusan, L; Katona, G; Pruneanu, S

    2016-02-01

    The paper describes the preparation of supramolecular assemblies of tetrapyridylporphyrin (TPyP) and its metallic complexes with graphene oxide (GO) and thermally reduced graphene oxide (TRGO). The two carbon supports are introducing different characteristics in the absorption spectra of the investigated nanocomposites. Raman spectroscopy shows that the absorption of iron-tetrapyridylporphyrin is more efficient on GO than TRGO, suggesting that oxygen functionalities are involved in the non-covalent interaction between the iron-porphyrin and graphene. The biomimetic peroxidase activity is investigated and the two iron-containing composites exhibit a better catalytic activity than each component of the assembly, and their cobalt and manganese homologues, respectively. The main advantages of this work include the demonstration of graphene oxide as a very good support for graphene-based nanomaterials with peroxidase-like activity (K(M)=0.292 mM), the catalytic activity being observed even with very small amounts of porphyrins (the TPyP:graphene ratio=1:50). Its potential application in the detection of lipophilic antioxidants (vitamin E can be measured in the 10(-5)-10(-4) M range) is also shown.

  15. Role of heme-protein covalent bonds in mammalian peroxidases. Protection of the heme by a single engineered heme-protein link in horseradish peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Liusheng; Wojciechowski, Grzegorz; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R

    2006-07-14

    Oxidation of SCN-, Br-, and Cl- (X-) by horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and other plant and fungal peroxidases results in the addition of HOX to the heme vinyl group. This reaction is not observed with lactoperoxidase (LPO), in which the heme is covalently bound to the protein via two ester bonds between carboxylic side chains and heme methyl groups. To test the hypothesis that the heme of LPO and other mammalian peroxidases is protected from vinyl group modification by the hemeprotein covalent bonds, we prepared the F41E mutant of HRP in which the heme is attached to the protein via a covalent bond between Glu41 and the heme 3-methyl. We also examined the E375D mutant of LPO in which only one of the two normal covalent heme links is retained. The prosthetic heme groups of F41E HRP and E375D LPO are essentially not modified by the HOBr produced by these enzymes. The double E375D/D225E mutant of LPO that can form no covalent bonds is inactive and could not be examined. These results unambiguously demonstrate that a single heme-protein link is sufficient to protect the heme from vinyl group modification even in a protein (HRP) that is normally highly susceptible to this reaction. The results directly establish that one function of the covalent heme-protein bonds in mammalian peroxidases is to protect their prosthetic group from their highly reactive metabolic products.

  16. Ostensible enzyme promiscuity: alkene cleavage by peroxidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutti, Francesco G; Lara, Miguel; Kroutil, Markus; Kroutil, Wolfgang

    2010-12-17

    Enzyme promiscuity is generally accepted as the ability of an enzyme to catalyse alternate chemical reactions besides the 'natural' one. In this paper peroxidases were shown to catalyse the cleavage of a C=C double bond adjacent to an aromatic moiety for selected substrates at the expense of molecular oxygen at an acidic pH. It was clearly shown that the reaction occurs due to the presence of the enzyme; furthermore, the reactivity was clearly linked to the hemin moiety of the peroxidase. Comparison of the transformations catalysed by peroxidase and by hemin chloride revealed that these two reactions proceed equally fast; additional experiments confirmed that the peptide backbone was not obligatory for the reaction and only a single functional group of the enzyme was required, namely in this case the prosthetic group (hemin). Consequently, we propose to define such a promiscuous activity as 'ostensible enzyme promiscuity'. Thus, we call an activity that is catalysed by an enzyme 'ostensible enzyme promiscuity' if the reactivity can be tracked back to a single catalytic site, which on its own can already perform the reaction equally well in the absence of the peptide backbone.

  17. Redox thermodynamics of lactoperoxidase and eosinophil peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battistuzzi, Gianantonio; Bellei, Marzia; Vlasits, Jutta; Banerjee, Srijib; Furtmüller, Paul G; Sola, Marco; Obinger, Christian

    2010-02-01

    Eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) and lactoperoxidase (LPO) are important constituents of the innate immune system of mammals. These heme enzymes belong to the peroxidase-cyclooxygenase superfamily and catalyze the oxidation of thiocyanate, bromide and nitrite to hypothiocyanate, hypobromous acid and nitrogen dioxide that are toxic for invading pathogens. In order to gain a better understanding of the observed differences in substrate specificity and oxidation capacity in relation to heme and protein structure, a comprehensive spectro-electrochemical investigation was performed. The reduction potential (E degrees ') of the Fe(III)/Fe(II) couple of EPO and LPO was determined to be -126mV and -176mV, respectively (25 degrees C, pH 7.0). Variable temperature experiments show that EPO and LPO feature different reduction thermodynamics. In particular, reduction of ferric EPO is enthalpically and entropically disfavored, whereas in LPO the entropic term, which selectively stabilizes the oxidized form, prevails on the enthalpic term that favors reduction of Fe(III). The data are discussed with respect to the architecture of the heme cavity and the substrate channel. Comparison with published data for myeloperoxidase demonstrates the effect of heme to protein linkages and heme distortion on the redox chemistry of mammalian peroxidases and in consequence on the enzymatic properties of these physiologically important oxidoreductases.

  18. Wound-induced apoplastic peroxidase activities: their roles in the production and detoxification of reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minibayeva, F; Kolesnikov, O; Chasov, A; Beckett, R P; Lüthje, S; Vylegzhanina, N; Buck, F; Böttger, M

    2009-05-01

    Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a widely reported response of plants to wounding. However, the nature of enzymes responsible for ROS production and metabolism in the apoplast is still an open question. We identified and characterized the proteins responsible for the wound-induced production and detoxification of ROS in the apoplast of wheat roots (Triticum aestivum L.). Compared to intact roots, excised roots and leachates derived from them produced twice the amount of superoxide (O2(*-)). Wounding also induced extracellular peroxidase (ECPOX) activity mainly caused by the release of soluble peroxidases with molecular masses of 37, 40 and 136 kD. Peptide mass analysis by electrospray ionization-quadrupole time-of-flight-tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-QTOF-MS/MS) following lectin affinity chromatography of leachates showed the presence of peroxidases in unbound (37 kD) and bound (40 kD) fractions. High sensitivity of O2(*-)-producing activity to peroxidase inhibitors and production of O2(*-) by purified peroxidases in vitro provided evidence for the involvement of ECPOXs in O2(*-) production in the apoplast. Our results present new insights into the rapid response of roots to wounding. An important component of this response is mediated by peroxidases that are released from the cell surface into the apoplast where they can display both oxidative and peroxidative activities.

  19. Control of bacterial iron homeostasis by manganese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Sumant; Hohle, Thomas H.; O'Brian, Mark R.

    2010-01-01

    Perception and response to nutritional iron availability by bacteria are essential to control cellular iron homeostasis. The Irr protein from Bradyrhizobium japonicum senses iron through the status of heme biosynthesis to globally regulate iron-dependent gene expression. Heme binds directly to Irr to trigger its degradation. Here, we show that severe manganese limitation created by growth of a Mn2+ transport mutant in manganese-limited media resulted in a cellular iron deficiency. In wild-type cells, Irr levels were attenuated under manganese limitation, resulting in reduced promoter occupancy of target genes and altered iron-dependent gene expression. Irr levels were high regardless of manganese availability in a heme-deficient mutant, indicating that manganese normally affects heme-dependent degradation of Irr. Manganese altered the secondary structure of Irr in vitro and inhibited binding of heme to the protein. We propose that manganese limitation destabilizes Irr under low-iron conditions by lowering the threshold of heme that can trigger Irr degradation. The findings implicate a mechanism for the control of iron homeostasis by manganese in a bacterium. PMID:20498065

  20. Effect of Manganese Content on the Fabrication of Porous Anodic Alumina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. H. Voon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of manganese content on the formation of well-ordered porous anodic alumina was studied. Porous anodic alumina has been produced on aluminium substrate of different manganese content by single-step anodizing at 50 V in 0.3 M oxalic acid at 15°C for 60 minutes. The well-ordered pore and cell structure was revealed by subjecting the porous anodic alumina to oxide dissolution treatment in a mixture of chromic acid and phosphoric acid. It was found that the manganese content above 1 wt% impaired the regularity of the cell and pore structure significantly, which can be attributed to the presence of secondary phases in the starting material with manganese content above 1 wt%. The pore diameter and interpore distance decreased with the addition of manganese into the substrates. The time variation of current density and the thickness of porous anodic alumina also decreased as a function of the manganese content in the substrates.

  1. The Mechanism on Biomass Reduction of Low-Grade Manganese Dioxide Ore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Honglei; Zhu, Guocai; Yan, Hong; Li, Tiancheng; Zhao, Yuna

    2013-08-01

    The mechanism on biomass reduction of low-grade manganese dioxide ore was studied by investigating influence factors on manganese recovery degree, such as the reaction temperature, time, biomass/ore ratio, compositions of biomass, nitrogen flow rate, and particle size of raw materials, and it was further identified through analysis of gas composition in the outlet gas, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) for the reduced sample. The results show that the reduction process involved mainly two steps: (1) The biomass was first pyrolyzed to release reductive volatiles and (2) manganese oxide ore was reacted with the reductive volatiles. By an analysis of gas composition in the outlet gas, it was also found that the ratio of biomass/ore had an important effect on the reduction mechanism. With a low biomass/ore ratio of 0.5:10, the reducing reaction of the reductive volatiles with manganese dioxide ore proceeded mainly in two stages: (1) The condensable volatiles (tar) released from biomass pyrolysis reacted with manganese oxide ore to produce reductive noncondensable gases such as hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and some light hydrocarbons; and (2) the small molecule gases further participated in the reduction. XRD pattern analysis on the reduced manganese dioxide ore revealed that the process of biomass reduction of manganese ore underwent in phases (MnO2 → Mn3O4 → MnO). The kinetics study showed the reduction process was controlled by a gas-solid reaction between biomass volatiles and manganese oxide ore with activation energy E of 53.64 kJ mol-1 and frequency factor A of 5.45 × 103 minutes-1.

  2. Nutrient media optimization for simultaneous enhancement of the laccase and peroxidases production by coculture of Dichomitus squalens and Ceriporiopsis subvermispora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannaiyan, Ranjani; Mahinpey, Nader; Kostenko, Victoria; Martinuzzi, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    Coculturing of two white-rot fungi, Dichomitus squalens and Ceriporiopsis subvermispora, was explored for the optimization of cultivation media for simultaneous augmentation of laccase and peroxidase activities by response surface methodology (RSM). Nutrient parameters chosen from our previous studies with the monocultures of D. squalens and C. subvermispora were used to design the experiments for the cocultivation study. Glucose, arabinose, sodium nitrate, casein, copper sulfate (CuSO4 ), and manganese sulfate (MnSO4 ) were combined according to central composite design and used as the incubation medium for the cocultivation. The interaction of glucose and sodium nitrate resulted in laccase and peroxidase activities of approximately 800 U/g protein. The addition of either glucose or sodium nitrate to the medium also modifies the impact of other nutrients on the ligninolytic activity. Both enzyme activities were cross-regulated by arabinose, casein, CuSO4 , and MnSO4 as a function of concentrations. Based on RSM, the optimum nutrient levels are 1% glucose, 0.1% arabinose, 20 mM sodium nitrate, 0.27% casein, 0.31 mM CuSO4 , and 0.07 mM MnSO4 . Cocultivation resulted in the production of laccase of 1,378 U/g protein and peroxidase of 1,372 U/g protein. Lignin (16.9%) in wheat straw was degraded by the optimized enzyme mixture. © 2014 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Reagent removal of manganese from ground water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brayalovsky, G.; Migalaty, E.; Naschetnikova, O.

    2017-06-01

    The study is aimed at the technology development of treating drinking water from ground waters with high manganese content and oxidizability. Current technologies, physical/chemical mechanisms and factors affecting in ground treatment efficiency are reviewed. Research has been conducted on manganese compound removal from ground waters with high manganese content (5 ppm) and oxidizability. The studies were carried out on granular sorbent industrial ODM-2F filters (0.7-1.5 mm fraction). It was determined that conventional reagent oxidization technologies followed by filtration do not allow us to obtain the manganese content below 0.1 ppm when treating ground waters with high oxidizability. The innovative oxidation-based manganese removal technology with continuous introduction of reaction catalytic agent is suggested. This technology is effective in alkalization up to pH 8.8-9. Potassium permanganate was used as a catalytic agent, sodium hypochlorite was an oxidizer and cauistic soda served an alkalifying agent.

  4. RNASeq in C. elegans Following Manganese Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmalee, Nancy L; Maqbool, Shahina B; Ye, Bin; Calder, Brent; Bowman, Aaron B; Aschner, Michael

    2015-08-06

    Manganese is a metal that is required for optimal biological functioning of organisms. Absorption, cellular import and export, and excretion of manganese are all tightly regulated. While some genes involved in regulation, such as DMT-1 and ferroportin, are known, it is presumed that many more are involved and as yet unknown. Excessive exposure to manganese, usually in industrial settings such as mining or welding, can lead to neurotoxicity and a condition known as manganism that closely resembles Parkinson's disease. Elucidating transcriptional changes following manganese exposure could lead to the development of biomarkers for exposure. This unit presents a protocol for RNA sequencing in the worm Caenorhabditis elegans to assay for transcriptional changes following exposure to manganese. This protocol is adaptable to any environmental exposure in C. elegans. The protocol results in counts of gene transcripts in control versus exposed conditions and a ranked list of differentially expressed genes for further study.

  5. DyP, a unique dye-decolorizing peroxidase, represents a novel heme peroxidase family: ASP171 replaces the distal histidine of classical peroxidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugano, Yasushi; Muramatsu, Riichi; Ichiyanagi, Atsushi; Sato, Takao; Shoda, Makoto

    2007-12-14

    DyP, a unique dye-decolorizing enzyme from the fungus Thanatephorus cucumeris Dec 1, has been classified as a peroxidase but lacks homology to almost all other known plant peroxidases. The primary structure of DyP shows moderate sequence homology to only two known proteins: the peroxide-dependent phenol oxidase, TAP, and the hypothetical peroxidase, cpop21. Here, we show the first crystal structure of DyP and reveal that this protein has a unique tertiary structure with a distal heme region that differs from that of most other peroxidases. DyP lacks an important histidine residue known to assist in the formation of a Fe4+ oxoferryl center and a porphyrin-based cation radical intermediate (compound I) during the action of ubiquitous peroxidases. Instead, our tertiary structural and spectrophotometric analyses of DyP suggest that an aspartic acid and an arginine are involved in the formation of compound I. Sequence analysis reveals that the important aspartic acid and arginine mentioned above and histidine of the heme ligand are conserved among DyP, TAP, and cpop21, and structural and phylogenetic analyses confirmed that these three enzymes do not belong to any other families of peroxidase. These findings, which strongly suggest that DyP is a representative heme peroxidase from a novel family, should facilitate the identification of additional new family members and accelerate the classification of this novel peroxidase family.

  6. Iron and manganese removal by using manganese ore constructed wetlands in the reclamation of steel wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jing-Cheng; Chen, Gu; Huang, Xiang-Feng; Li, Guang-Ming; Liu, Jia; Yang, Na; Gao, Sai-Nan

    2009-09-30

    To reclaim treated steel wastewater as cooling water, manganese ore constructed wetland was proposed in this study for the removal of iron and manganese. In lab-scale wetlands, the performance of manganese ore wetland was found to be more stable and excellent than that of conventional gravel constructed wetland. The iron and manganese concentration in the former was below 0.05 mg/L at hydraulic retention time of 2-5 days when their influent concentrations were in the range of 0.16-2.24 mg/L and 0.11-2.23 mg/L, respectively. Moreover, its removals for COD, turbidity, ammonia nitrogen and total phosphorus were 55%, 90%, 67% and 93%, respectively, superior to the corresponding removals in the gravel wetland (31%, 86%, 58% and 78%, respectively). The good performance of manganese ore was ascribed to the enhanced biological manganese removal with the aid of manganese oxide surface and the smaller size of the medium. The presence of biological manganese oxidation was proven by the facts of good manganese removal in wetlands at chemical unfavorable conditions (such as ORP and pH) and the isolation of manganese oxidizing strains from the wetlands. Similar iron and manganese removal was later observed in a pilot-scale gravel-manganese-ore constructed wetland, even though the manganese ore portion in total volume was reduced from 100% (in the lab-scale) to only 4% (in the pilot-scale) for the sake of cost-saving. The quality of the polished wastewater not only satisfied the requirement for cooling water but also suitable as make-up water for other purposes.

  7. Revision of the Export Tax Rebate Policy for Manganese

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    <正>According to a newly released circular by the Finance Ministry and the State Administration of Taxation, the export tax rebate policy for the manganese products under the tax code No. 811100100 is eliminated as from August 1, 2005. These products mainly include un-wrought manganese, manganese scrap and manganese powder.

  8. Magnetosomes extracted from Magnetospirillum magneticum strain AMB-1 showed enhanced peroxidase-like activity under visible-light irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kefeng; Chen, Chuanfang; Chen, Changyou; Wang, Yuzhan; Wei, Zhao; Pan, Weidong; Song, Tao

    2015-05-01

    Magnetosomes are intracellular structures produced by magnetotactic bacteria and are magnetic nanoparticles surrounded by a lipid bilayer membrane. Magnetosomes reportedly possess intrinsic enzyme mimetic activity similar to that found in horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and can scavenge reactive oxygen species depending on peroxidase activity. Our previous study has demonstrated the phototaxis characteristics of Magnetospirillum magneticum strain AMB-1 cells, but the mechanism is not well understood. Therefore, we studied the relationship between visible-light irradiation and peroxidase-like activity of magnetosomes extracted from M. magneticum strain AMB-1. We then compared this characteristic with that of HRP, iron ions, and naked magnetosomes using 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine as a peroxidase substrate in the presence of H2O2. Results showed that HRP and iron ions had different activities from those of magnetosomes and naked magnetosomes when exposed to visible-light irradiation. Magnetosomes and naked magnetosomes had enhanced peroxidase-like activities under visible-light irradiation, but magnetosomes showed less affinity toward substrates than naked magnetosomes under visible-light irradiation. These results suggested that the peroxidase-like activity of magnetosomes may follow an ordered ternary mechanism rather than a ping-pong mechanism. This finding may provide new insight into the function of magnetosomes in the phototaxis in magnetotactic bacteria.

  9. Geochemical Characteristics of Sinian Manganese Deposits in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Sinian is one of the main periods of the formation of manganese deposits in China. Sinian manganese deposits are mainly hosted in carbon-rich black shale and siliceous shale formed during the Sinian interglacial period. The composition of manganese ore is simple. The main ore mineral is manganiferous carbonates. The grade of manganese ore is about 16- 25%, with Mn/Fe>5 and P/Mn=0.006- 0.14. Based on the tectonic setting and geological and geochemical characteristics of manganese deposits, this paper discusses the process of migration and concentration of manganese and ore-forming conditions of Sinian manganese deposits in China.

  10. Purification, characterization and stability of barley grain peroxidase BP1, a new type of plant peroxidase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Christine B; Henriksen, Anette; Abelskov, A. Katrine

    1997-01-01

    The major peroxidase of barley grain (BP 1) has enzymatic and spectroscopic properties that are very differeant from those of other known plant peroxidases (EC 1.11.1.7) and can therefore contribute to the understanding of the many physiological functions ascribed to these enzymes. To study...... the structure-function relationships of this unique model peroxidase, large-scale and laboratory-scale purifications have been developed. The two batches of pure BP 1 obtained were identical in their enzymatic and spectral properties, and confirmed that BP 1 is different from the prototypical horseradish...... peroxidase isoenzyme C (HRP C). However, when measuring the specific activity of BP 1 at pH 4.0 in the presence of 1 mM CaCl2, the enzyme was as competent as HRP C at neutral pH towards a variety of substrates (mM mg(-1) min(-1)): coniferyl alcohol (930+/-48), caffeic acid (795+/-53), ABTS (2,2(1)-azino...

  11. A PRELIMINARY STUDY OF CERVICOVAGINAL PEROXIDASES AS INDICATORS FOR OVULATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIANGHong-Fa; HANZi-Yan; LIANGZang-Guang; XIESu-Xiang

    1989-01-01

    There were many studies using cervicovaginal peroxidases to predict ovulation. Some resuits suggested that cervieovaginal peroxidases are reliable indicators for ovulation; but others did not. The present study was designed to determine whether the change patterns of ccrvicovaginal guaiacul peroxidase activity in fertile period of Chinese women can also be served as a basis for development of a technique to predict ovulation time in natural family planning.

  12. [Tongue play and manganese deficiency in dairy cattle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatzias, H; Roubies, N; Polizopoulou, Z; Papasteriades, A

    1995-09-01

    The present paper discusses "tongue rolling" observed in dairy cattle farms of a region in northern Greece associated with manganese deficiency. In these animals total body manganese status was evaluated by determining hair, as well as feed manganese content. Cows exhibiting tongue rolling had significantly lower hair manganese content, compared to non-tongue rolling control animals from other farms; in addition, feedstuff analysis demonstrated that manganese and inorganic phosphorus intake of affected cows was also significantly lower.

  13. EFFECTS OF MANGANESE ON THYROID HORMONE HOMEOSTASIS: POTENTIAL LINKS

    OpenAIRE

    Soldin, OP; Aschner, M.

    2007-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential trace nutrient that is potentially toxic at high levels of exposure. As a constituent of numerous enzymes and a cofactor, manganese plays an important role in a number of physiologic processes in mammals. The manganese-containing enzyme, manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD), is the principal antioxidant enzyme which neutralizes the toxic effects of reactive oxygen species. Other manganese-containing enzymes include oxidoreductases, transferases, hydrolases, l...

  14. Roles of apoplastic peroxidases in plant response to wounding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minibayeva, Farida; Beckett, Richard Peter; Kranner, Ilse

    2015-04-01

    Apoplastic class III peroxidases (EC 1.11.1.7) play key roles in the response of plants to pathogen infection and abiotic stresses, including wounding. Wounding is a common stress for plants that can be caused by insect or animal grazing or trampling, or result from agricultural practices. Typically, mechanical damage to a plant immediately induces a rapid release and activation of apoplastic peroxidases, and an oxidative burst of reactive oxygen species (ROS), followed by the upregulation of peroxidase genes. We discuss how plants control the expression of peroxidases genes upon wounding, and also the sparse information on peroxidase-mediated signal transduction pathways. Evidence reviewed here suggests that in many plants production of the ROS that comprise the initial oxidative burst results from a complex interplay of peroxidases with other apoplastic enzymes. Later responses following wounding include various forms of tissue healing, for example through peroxidase-dependent suberinization, or cell death. Limited data suggest that ROS-mediated death signalling during the wound response may involve the peroxidase network, together with other redox molecules. In conclusion, the ability of peroxidases to both generate and scavenge ROS plays a key role in the involvement of these enigmatic enzymes in plant stress tolerance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Manganese oxide nanoparticles, methods and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abruna, Hector D.; Gao, Jie; Lowe, Michael A.

    2017-08-29

    Manganese oxide nanoparticles having a chemical composition that includes Mn.sub.3O.sub.4, a sponge like morphology and a particle size from about 65 to about 95 nanometers may be formed by calcining a manganese hydroxide material at a temperature from about 200 to about 400 degrees centigrade for a time period from about 1 to about 20 hours in an oxygen containing environment. The particular manganese oxide nanoparticles with the foregoing physical features may be used within a battery component, and in particular an anode within a lithium battery to provide enhanced performance.

  16. Assessment of physicochemical quality of sachet water produced in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assessment of physicochemical quality of sachet water produced in selected local ... Heavy metals tested (using AAS) include; Manganese (Mn), Arsenic (As), Zinc ... were within the permissible limits stipulated by the drinking water standards, ...

  17. Versatile peroxidase degradation of humic substances: use of isothermal titration calorimetry to assess kinetics, and applications to industrial wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Khawar Sohail; Ertan, Haluk; Charlton, Timothy; Poljak, Anne; Daud Khaled, A K; Yang, Xuexia; Marshall, Gavin; Cavicchioli, Ricardo

    2014-05-20

    The kinetic constants of a hybrid versatile-peroxidase (VP) which oxidizes complex polymeric humic substances (HS) derived from lignin (humic and fulvic acids) and industrial wastes were determined for the first time using isothermal titration calorimetry (iTC). The reaction conditions were manipulated to enable manganese-peroxidase (MnP) and/or lignin-peroxidase (LiP) activities to be evaluated. The peroxidase reactions exhibited varying degrees of product inhibition or activation; properties which have not previously been reported for VP enzymes. In contrast to previous work (Ertan et al., 2012) on small non-polymeric substrates (MnSO4, veratryl alcohol and dyes), all kinetic plots for polymeric HS were sigmoidal, lacked Michaelis-Menten characteristics, and were indicative of positive cooperativity. Under conditions when both LiP and MnP were active, the kinetic data fitted to a novel biphasic Hill Equation, and the rate of enzymatic reaction was significantly greater than the sum of individual LiP plus MnP activities implying synergistic activation. By employing size-exclusion chromatography and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, the characteristics of the oxidative degradation products of the HS were also monitored. Our study showed that the allosteric behaviour of the VP enzyme promotes a high level of regulation of activity during the breakdown of model and industrial ligninolytic substrates. The work was extended to examine the kinetics of breakdown of industrial wastes (effluent from a pulp and paper plant, and fouled membrane solids extracted from a ground water treatment membrane) revealing unique, VP-mediated, kinetic responses. This work demonstrates that iTC can be successfully employed to study the kinetic properties of VP enzymes in order to devise reaction conditions optimized for oxidative degradation of HS present in materials used in a wide range of industries. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The Roles of Glutathione Peroxidases during Embryo Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ufer, Christoph; Wang, Chi Chiu

    2011-01-01

    Embryo development relies on the complex interplay of the basic cellular processes including proliferation, differentiation, and apoptotic cell death. Precise regulation of these events is the basis for the establishment of embryonic structures and the organ development. Beginning with fertilization of the oocyte until delivery the developing embryo encounters changing environmental conditions such as varying levels of oxygen, which can give rise to reactive oxygen species (ROS). These challenges are met by the embryo with metabolic adaptations and by an array of anti-oxidative mechanisms. ROS can be deleterious by modifying biological molecules including lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids and may induce abnormal development or even embryonic lethality. On the other hand ROS are vital players of various signaling cascades that affect the balance between cell growth, differentiation, and death. An imbalance or dysregulation of these biological processes may generate cells with abnormal growth and is therefore potentially teratogenic and tumorigenic. Thus, a precise balance between processes generating ROS and those decomposing ROS is critical for normal embryo development. One tier of the cellular protective system against ROS constitutes the family of selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidases (GPx). These enzymes reduce hydroperoxides to the corresponding alcohols at the expense of reduced glutathione. Of special interest within this protein family is the moonlighting enzyme glutathione peroxidase 4 (Gpx4). This enzyme is a scavenger of lipophilic hydroperoxides on one hand, but on the other hand can be transformed into an enzymatically inactive cellular structural component. GPx4 deficiency - in contrast to all other GPx family members - leads to abnormal embryo development and finally produces a lethal phenotype in mice. This review is aimed at summarizing the current knowledge on GPx isoforms during embryo development and tumor development with an emphasis on

  19. Mn²⁺-deficiency reveals a key role for the Pleurotus ostreatus versatile peroxidase (VP4) in oxidation of aromatic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knop, Doriv; Ben-Ari, Julius; Salame, Tomer M; Levinson, Dana; Yarden, Oded; Hadar, Yitzhak

    2014-08-01

    The manganese peroxidase gene family (mnps) is a part of the ligninolytic system of Pleurotus ostreatus. This gene family is comprised of nine members, mnp1-9, encoding short manganese peroxidases (short-MnPs) or versatile peroxidases (VPs). We show that unlike in Mn(2+)-amended glucose-peptone (GP) medium, where redundancy among mnps was reported, in Mn(2+)-deficient GP medium mnp4 [encoding versatile peroxidase isoenzyme 4 (VP4)] has a key and nonredundant function. The abundance of mnps transcripts at time points corresponding to the tropophase (active growth), early idiophase, and idiophase indicates that mnp4 is the predominantly expressed mnp gene and that its relative predominance is dependent on the age of the culture. In this medium, azo dye, Orange II (OII) decolorization occurs only during the idiophase and a Δmnp4 strain showed a drastic reduction in this decolorization. Three degradation metabolites were identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy (LC-MS), indicating both asymmetric and symmetric enzymatic cleavage of the azo-bond. In addition, the culture filtrate of Δmnp4 showed negligible values of oxidation capability of four typical VP substrates: Mn(2+), 2,6-dimethoxyphenol, phenol red, and Reactive Black 5 (RB5), compared to the wild-type strain PC9. We concluded that under Mn(2+)-deficient GP culture, VP4 (encoded by mnp4) is the main active ligninolytic enzyme able to oxidize Mn(2+) as well as high and low redox potential aromatic substrate, including dyes. Furthermore, other VPs/MnPs do not compensate for the lack of VP4 activity.

  20. Neurotoxicity of manganese oxide nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanescu, Diana M.; Khoshnan, Ali; Patterson, Paul H.; Hering, Janet G.

    2009-11-01

    Manganese (Mn) toxicity in humans has been observed as manganism, a disease that resembles Parkinson's disease. The mechanism of Mn toxicity and the chemical forms that may be responsible for its neurotoxicity are not well understood. We examined the toxicity of Mn oxide nanomaterials in a neuronal precursor cell model, using the MTS assay to evaluate mitochondrial function in living cells and the LDH assay to quantify the release of the enzyme lactate dehydrogenase as a result of damage to the cell membrane. Both assays show that the toxicity of Mn is dependent on the type of Mn oxide nanomaterial and its concentration as well as on the state of cell differentiation. Following exposure to Mn oxide nanomaterials, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated, and flow cytometry experiments suggest that cell death occurred through apoptosis. During exposure to Mn oxide nanomaterials, increased levels of the transcription factor NF-κB (which mediates the cellular inflammatory response) were observed.

  1. A comparative study of the peroxidase-antiperoxidase method and an avidin-biotin complex method for studying polypeptide hormones with radioimmunoassay antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, S M; Raine, L; Fanger, H

    1981-05-01

    A highly sensitive immunoenzymatic technic is presented. The method involves three sequential steps: (1) primary antibody, (2) biotin-labeled secondary antibody, and (3) avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex. Avidin, an egg white protein, has four binding sites for the low-molecular-weight vitamin biotin. Many moieties of biotin can be coupled to the peroxidase molecule. Thus, since a relatively large amount of avidin is incubated with biotin-labeled peroxidase, avidin serves as a link between biotin-peroxidase molecules; in turn, biotin-peroxidase serves as a link between avidin molecules. Consequently, this large lattice-like complex with biotin-binding capability can be attracted to the sites of biotin-labeled antibody, producing a superior staining sensitivity. Several commercially available radioimmunoassay antibodies (e.g., antiglucagon, prolactin, gastrin, growth hormone, and thyroid-stimulating hormone antibodies) were tested for immunohistochemical staining. The unlabeled antibody peroxidase-antiperoxidase method fails to stain gastrin or thyroid-stimulating secretory cells when using these antibodies, and a relatively high antibody concentration is required to produce a positive reaction for glucagon, prolactin, and growth hormone. In contrast, the avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex method successfully demonstrates polypeptide hormones even when antibodies are diluted 20 to 40 times.

  2. Manganese ferrite thin films Part II: Properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulscher, W.S.

    1972-01-01

    Some properties of evaporated manganese ferrite thin films are investigated, e.g. resistivity, magnetization reversal, Curie temperature, Faraday rotation and optical absorption. The properties are partly related to the partial oxygen pressure present during a preceding annealing process.

  3. Manganese Oxidation by Bacteria: Biogeochemical Aspects

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sujith, P.P.; LokaBharathi, P.A.

    Manganese is an essential trace metal that is not as readily oxidizable like iron. Several bacterial groups posses the ability to oxidize Mn effectively competing with chemical oxidation. The oxides of Mn are the strongest of the oxidants, next...

  4. MANGANESE DIOXIDE METHOD FOR PREPARATION OF PROTACTINIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzin, L.I.

    1958-08-12

    A method of obtaining U/sup 233/ is described. An aqueous solution of neutriln irradiated thoriunn is treated by forming tberein a precipitate of manganese dioxide which carries and thus separates the Pa/sup 233/ from the solution. The carrier precipitate so formed is then dissolved in an acidic solution containing a reducing agent sufficiently electronegative to reduce the tetravalent manganese to the divalent state. Further purification of the Pa/sup 233/ may be obtained by forming another manganese dioxide carrier precipitate and subsequently dissolving it. Ater a sufficient number of such cycles have brought the Pa/sup 233/ to the desired purity, the solution is aged, allowing the formation ot U/sup 233/ by radioaetive decay. A manganese dioxide precipitate is then formed in the U/sup 233/ containing solution. This precipitate carries down any remaining Pa/sup 233/ thus leaving the separated U/sup 233/solution, from whieh it may be easily recovered.

  5. Manganese: Its Speciation, Pollution and Microbial Mitigation

    OpenAIRE

    Arvind Sinha; Sunil Kumar Khare

    2013-01-01

    Manganese is known to be one of the essential trace elements and has plenty of applications. Inspite of its essential nature, concerns are arising due to its toxic nature at higher concentration. Several methods of removing manganese from environment have been proposed during the last few decades. However, the most favourable option based on cost-effectiveness, performance, and simplicity is still under investigation. The current review summarizes updated information on various technical aspe...

  6. Composition and recovery method for electrolytic manganese residue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶长元; 李明艳; 刘作华; 杜军

    2009-01-01

    According to the statistic analysis,the reserve of manganese in electrolytic manganese residue deposit is over 780 kt. The average contents of available manganese and ammonium reach 3.90% and 1.68% (mass fraction),respectively. Large amount of manganese compounds and ammonium sulfate are detruded without any treatment or recovery. The compositions of the main elements in electrolytic manganese residue were analyzed comprehensively based on the extensive research data. According to the new development of electrolytic manganese residue comprehensively used in recent years,a water washing residue-twice precipitation process was also proposed. The experimental results indicate that manganese dioxide silicon dioxide and calcium sulfate are presented as amorphous state in the manganese residues. The recovery rates of manganese and nitrogen reach up to 99.5% and 94.5 %,respectively. The recovery process can be easily implemented,environment-friendly and fitting for industrial production.

  7. Barley coleoptile peroxidases. Purification, molecular cloning, and induction by pathogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, B.K.; Bloch, H.; Rasmussen, Søren Kjærsgård

    1999-01-01

    A cDNA clone encoding the Prx7 peroxidase from barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) predicted a 341-amino acid protein with a molecular weight of 36,515. N- and C-terminal putative signal peptides were present, suggesting a vacuolar location of the peroxidase. Immunoblotting and reverse-transcriptase poly...

  8. Cytochrome c as a peroxidase : tuning of heme reactivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diederix, Rutger Ernest Michiel

    2003-01-01

    This thesis describes the peroxidase activity of the electron-transfer protein cytochrome c, and how it is controlled by the protein matrix. It is shown that unfolding cytochrome c has the effect to significantly enhance its peroxidase activity of (up to several thousand-fold). This can be achieved

  9. ATP-enhanced peroxidase-like activity of gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Juhi; Purohit, Rahul; Singh, Ragini; Karakoti, Ajay Singh; Singh, Sanjay

    2015-10-15

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are known to possess intrinsic biological peroxidase-like activity that has applications in development of numerous biosensors. The reactivity of the Au atoms at the surface of AuNPs is critical to the performance of such biosensors, yet little is known about the effect of biomolecules and ions on the peroxidase-like activity. In this work, the effect of ATP and other biologically relevant molecules and ions over peroxidase-like activity of AuNPs are described. Contrary to the expectation that nanoparticles exposed to biomolecules may lose the catalytic property, ATP and ADP addition enhanced the peroxidase-like activity of AuNPs. The catalytic activity was unaltered by the addition of free phosphate, sulphate and carbonate anions however, addition of ascorbic acid to the reaction mixture diminished the intrinsic peroxidase-like activity of AuNPs, even in the presence of ATP and ADP. In contrast to AuNPs, ATP did not synergize and improve the peroxidase activity of the natural peroxidase enzyme, horseradish peroxidase.

  10. Autonomic function in manganese alloy workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrington, W.W.; Angle, C.R.; Willcockson, N.K.; Padula, M.A. [Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States); Korn, T.

    1998-07-01

    The observation of orthostatic hypotension in an index case of manganese toxicity lead to this prospective attempt to evaluate cardiovascular autonomic function and cognitive and emotional neurotoxicity in eight manganese alloy welders and machinists. The subjects consisted of a convenience sample consisting of an index case of manganese dementia, his four co-workers in a frog shop for gouging, welding, and grinding repair of high manganese railway track and a convenience sample of three mild steel welders with lesser manganese exposure also referred because of cognitive or autonomic symptoms. Frog shop air manganese samples 9.6--10 years before and 1.2--3.4 years after the diagnosis of the index case exceeded 1.0 mg/m{sup 3} in 29% and 0.2 mg/m{sup 3} in 62%. Twenty-four-hour electrocardiographic (Holter) monitoring was used to determine the temporal variability of the heartrate (RR{prime} interval) and the rates of change at low frequency and high frequency. MMPI and MCMI personality assessment and short-term memory, figure copy, controlled oral word association, and symbol digit tests were used.

  11. Hydrogen peroxide-mediated inactivation of two chloroplastic peroxidases, ascorbate peroxidase and 2-cys peroxiredoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitajima, Sakihito

    2008-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as the superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide, are generated by the photosystems because photoexcited electrons are often generated in excess of requirements for CO2 fixation and used for reducing molecular oxygen, even under normal environmental conditions. Moreover, ROS generation is increased in chloroplasts if plants are subjected to stresses, such as drought, high salinity and chilling. Chloroplast-localized isoforms of ascorbate peroxidase and possibly peroxiredoxins assume the principal role of scavenging hydrogen peroxide. However, in vitro studies revealed that both types of peroxidases are easily damaged by hydrogen peroxide and lose their catalytic activities. This is one contributing factor for cellular damage that occurs under severe oxidative stress. In this review, I describe mechanisms of hydrogen peroxide-mediated inactivation of these two enzymes and discuss a reason why they became susceptible to damage by hydrogen peroxide.

  12. Dissociative excitation of the manganese atom quartet levels by collisions e-MnBr2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Yu M.

    2017-04-01

    Dissociative excitation of quartet levels of the manganese atom was studied in collisions of electrons with manganese dibromide molecules. Eighty-two cross-sections for transitions originating at odd levels and eleven cross-sections for transitions originating at even levels have been measured at an incident electron energy of 100 eV. An optical excitation function has been recorded in the electron energy range of 0–100 eV for transitions originating from 3d 64p z 4 F° levels. For the majority of transitions, a comparison of the resulting cross-section values to cross-sections produced by direct excitation is provided.

  13. Bacterial disproportionation of elemental sulfur coupled to chemical reduction of iron or manganese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thamdrup, Bo; Finster, Kai; Hansen, Jens Würgler

    1993-01-01

    the formed sulfide and the added FeOOH led to the observed precipitation of iron sulfides. Sulfate and iron sulfides were also produced when FeOOH was replaced by FeCO(3). Further enrichment with manganese oxide, MnO(2), instead of FeOOH yielded stable cultures which formed sulfate during concomitant...... significantly in the presence of sulfide-scavenging agents such as iron and manganese compounds. The population density of bacteria capable of S disproportionation in the presence of FeOOH or MnO(2) was high, > 10 cm in coastal sediments. The metabolism offers an explanation for recent observations of anaerobic...

  14. Toxoplasma gondii: demonstration of intrinsic peroxidase activity during lacto-peroxidase mediated radioiodination of tachyzoites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallois, Y.; Tricaud, A.; Foussard, F.; Hodbert, J.; Girault, A.; Mauras, G.; Dubremetz, J.F.

    1986-01-01

    Tachyzoites of Toxoplasma gondii have been radioiodinated under various conditions with or without lactoperoxidase, with glucose oxidase being used to generate hydrogen peroxide. Erythrocytes were iodinated simultaneously as a control. In our conditions, tachyzoites were more intensely labelled in the absence of lactoperoxidase. This result can be explained by the existence of an intrinsic peroxidase activity which interfere with the exogenously added enzyme during surface radioiodination.

  15. The Quantum Mixed-Spin Heme State of Barley Peroxidase: A Paradigm for Class III Peroxidases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howes, B.D.; Ma, J.; Marzocchi, M.P.; Schiodt, C.B.; Shelnutt, J.A.; Smulevich, G.; Welinder, K.G.; Zhang, J.

    1999-03-23

    Electronic absorption and resonance Raman (RR) spectra of the ferric form of barley grain peroxidase (BP 1) at various pH values both at room temperature and 20 K are . reported, together with EPR spectra at 10 K. The ferrous forms and the ferric complex with fluoride have also been studied. A quantum mechanically mixed-spin (QS) state has been identified. The QS heme species co-exists with 6- and 5-cHS heroes; the relative populations of these three spin states are found to be dependent on pH and temperature. However, the QS species remains in all cases the dominant heme spin species. Barley peroxidase appears to be further characterized by a splitting of the two vinyl stretching modes, indicating that the vinyl groups are differently conjugated with the porphyrin. An analysis of the presently available spectroscopic data for proteins from all three peroxidase classes suggests that the simultaneous occurrence of the QS heme state as well as the splitting of the two vinyl stretching modes is confined to class III enzymes. The former point is discussed in terms of the possible influences of heme deformations on heme spin state. It is found that moderate saddling alone is probably not enough to cause the QS state, although some saddling maybe necessary for the QS state.

  16. Thermogravimetric Analysis and Kinetics on Reducing Low-Grade Manganese Dioxide Ore by Biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Honglei; Zhu, Guocai; Yan, Hong; Li, Tiancheng; Feng, Xiujuan

    2013-08-01

    Nonisothermal thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was applied to evaluate rice straw, sawdust, wheat stalk, maize straw, and bamboo to explore their potential for reduction of manganese dioxide ore. Results from the biomass pyrolysis experiments showed that wood-based biomass materials, such as sawdust and bamboo, could produce more reductive agents, while herb-based biomass materials, such as rice straw, wheat stalk, and maize straw, had lower reaction temperatures. The peak temperatures for biomass reduction tests were 20 K to 50 K (20 °C to 50 °C) higher compared with the pyrolysis tests, and a clear shoulder at around 523 K (250 °C) could be observed. The effects of heating rate, biomass/manganese dioxide ore ratio, and different components of biomass were also investigated. An independent parallel first-order reaction kinetic model was used to calculate the values of activation energy and frequency factor for biomass pyrolysis and reduction of manganese dioxide ore. For better understanding the reduction process, kinetic parameters of independent behavior of manganese dioxide ore were also calculated by simple mathematical treatment. Finally, the isokinetic temperature T i and the rate constant k 0 for reduction of manganese oxide ore by reductive volatiles of biomass were derived according to the Arrhenius equation, which were determined to be 603 K (330 °C) and 108.99 min-1, respectively.

  17. Effect of basicity on ferromanganese production from beneficiated low-grade manganese ore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suharno, Bambang; Noegroho, Adi; Ferdian, Deni; Nurjaman, Fajar

    2017-01-01

    Indonesia is known to have a large low-grade manganese ore reserve. Nevertheless, it could not be used optimally in producing ferromanganese due to their low Mn/Fe ratio. In this present study, the beneficiation process had been applied to the low-grade manganese ore. Reduction roasting was conducted to this manganese ore at 700°C for an hour and then continued with low-intensity magnetic separation. This process had improved the Mn/Fe ratio from 1.39 to 6.11. The effect of basicity on ferromanganese production from this beneficiated low-grade manganese ore had been investigated clearly in this experiment by using mini submerged arc furnace (SAF). Several basicities for 0.7 and 1.0, was used and it was controlled by the addition of limestone in this smelting process. From this experiment, the ferromanganese containing 60% Mn was obtained from smelting the beneficiated low-grade manganese ore with the optimum basicity 0.7.

  18. [Function of nitric oxide in initiating production of lignin degrading peroxidases by Phanerochaete chrysosporium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yaotong; Qiu, Ailian; Li, Wenyan; Zheng, Feng; Zhang, Li; Shi, Yaqing; Zheng, Gang; Zou, Yanqiong

    2013-03-04

    By analyzing the function and mechanism of nitric oxide in initiating producing lignin peroxidases by phanerochaete chrysosporium, we studied the regulation mechanism triggering the secondary metabolism of white-rot fungi. Mutant (pcR5305) and wild-type (pc530) strains of phanerochaete chrysosporium were respectively cultured under both the conditions of nitrogen limitation and nitrogen sufficiency. To compare their lignin peroxidases (LiP)-production and nitric oxide(NO)-production kinetics and their different influences on producing LiP after the NO donor Sodium Nitroprusside (SNP) and scavenger cPTIO were respectively added to the nitrogen limitation or sufficiency culture medium to show the function and mechanism of nitric oxide in initiating production of lignin peroxidases by white-rot fungi. Both strains produced nitric oxide (NO) under the two opposite nutritional conditions, but the levels of NO produced were related with the type of strain and the nutritional conditions. Strain pc530 produced NO requiring nutrition depletion and producing of NO was strongly delayed and reduced when it was cultured under nitrogen sufficiency condition. On the contrary, pcR5305 did not require nitrogen depletion to trigger and the levels of NO were higher than that of pc530. The results indicate that LiP content had positive correlation with NO value except the occurrence time of LiP peak value was later than that of NO. The ability of producing LiP was promoted after the NO donor SNP added, but SNP affected more on pc530 than pcR5305 in promoting producing LiP. 15mM cPTIO would greatly repress producing LiP, but could not completely restrain the synthesis of LiP for both strains. By producing NO, Phanerochaete chrysosporium triggers LiP synthesis. However, the evidences do not indicate that NO participates or effect directly in LiP synthesis. It is more likely that NO is reacting as an upstream signal molecule. Besides NO, there are other signal molecules that have a

  19. Reactions of the class II peroxidases, lignin peroxidase and Arthromyces ramosus peroxidase, with hydrogen peroxide. Catalase-like activity, compound III formation, and enzyme inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiner, Alexander N P; Hernández-Ruiz, Josefa; Rodríguez-López, José Neptuno; García-Cánovas, Francisco; Brisset, Nigel C; Smith, Andrew T; Arnao, Marino B; Acosta, Manuel

    2002-07-26

    The reactions of the fungal enzymes Arthromyces ramosus peroxidase (ARP) and Phanerochaete chrysosporium lignin peroxidase (LiP) with hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) have been studied. Both enzymes exhibited catalase activity with hyperbolic H(2)O(2) concentration dependence (K(m) approximately 8-10 mm, k(cat) approximately 1-3 s(-1)). The catalase and peroxidase activities of LiP were inhibited within 10 min and those of ARP in 1 h. The inactivation constants were calculated using two independent methods; LiP, k(i) approximately 19 x 10(-3) s(-1); ARP, k(i) approximately 1.6 x 10(-3) s(-1). Compound III (oxyperoxidase) was detected as the majority species after the addition of H(2)O(2) to LiP or ARP, and its formation was accompanied by loss of enzyme activity. A reaction scheme is presented which rationalizes the turnover and inactivation of LiP and ARP with H(2)O(2). A similar model is applicable to horseradish peroxidase. The scheme links catalase and compound III forming catalytic pathways and inactivation at the level of the [compound I.H(2)O(2)] complex. Inactivation does not occur from compound III. All peroxidases studied to date are sensitive to inactivation by H(2)O(2), and it is suggested that the model will be generally applicable to peroxidases of the plant, fungal, and prokaryotic superfamily.

  20. Biogeochemical cycling of manganese in Oneida Lake, New York: whole lake studies of manganese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, C.; Nealson, K. H.

    1998-01-01

    Oneida Lake, New York is a eutrophic freshwater lake known for its abundant manganese nodules and a dynamic manganese cycle. Temporal and spatial distribution of soluble and particulate manganese in the water column of the lake were analyzed over a 3-year period and correlated with other variables such as oxygen, pH, and temperature. Only data from 1988 are shown. Manganese is removed from the water column in the spring via conversion to particulate form and deposited in the bottom sediments. This removal is due to biological factors, as the lake Eh/pH conditions alone can not account for the oxidation of the soluble manganese Mn(II). During the summer months the manganese from microbial reduction moves from the sediments to the water column. In periods of stratification the soluble Mn(II) builds up to concentrations of 20 micromoles or more in the bottom waters. When mixing occurs, the soluble Mn(II) is rapidly removed via oxidation. This cycle occurs more than once during the summer, with each manganese atom probably being used several times for the oxidation of organic carbon. At the end of the fall, whole lake concentrations of manganese stabilize, and remain at about 1 micromole until the following summer, when the cycle begins again. Inputs and outflows from the lake indicate that the active Mn cycle is primarily internal, with a small accumulation each year into ferromanganese nodules located in the oxic zones of the lake.

  1. Electrokinetic remediation of manganese and ammonia nitrogen from electrolytic manganese residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Jiancheng; Liu, Renlong; Liu, Zuohua; Du, Jun; Tao, Changyuan

    2015-10-01

    Electrolytic manganese residue (EMR) is a solid waste found in filters after sulphuric acid leaching of manganese carbonate ore, which mainly contains manganese and ammonia nitrogen and seriously damages the ecological environment. This work demonstrated the use of electrokinetic (EK) remediation to remove ammonia nitrogen and manganese from EMR. The transport behavior of manganese and ammonia nitrogen from EMR during electrokinetics, Mn fractionation before and after EK treatment, the relationship between Mn fractionation and transport behavior, as well as the effects of electrolyte and pretreatment solutions on removal efficiency and energy consumption were investigated. The results indicated that the use of H2SO4 and Na2SO4 as electrolytes and pretreatment of EMR with citric acid and KCl can reduce energy consumption, and the removal efficiencies of manganese and ammonia nitrogen were 27.5 and 94.1 %, respectively. In these systems, electromigration and electroosmosis were the main mechanisms of manganese and ammonia nitrogen transport. Moreover, ammonia nitrogen in EMR reached the regulated level, and the concentration of manganese in EMR could be reduced from 455 to 37 mg/L. In general, the electrokinetic remediation of EMR is a promising technology in the future.

  2. Manganese exposure in foundry furnacemen and scrap recycling workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lander, F; Kristiansen, J; Lauritsen, Jens

    1999-01-01

    Cast iron products are alloyed with small quantities of manganese, and foundry furnacemen are potentially exposed to manganese during tapping and handling of smelts. Manganese is a neurotoxic substance that accumulates in the central nervous system, where it may cause a neurological disorder...... that bears many similarities to Parkinson's disease. The aim of the study was to investigate the sources and levels of manganese exposure in foundry furnacemen by a combined measuring of blood-manganese (B-Mn) and manganese in ambient air (air-Mn)....

  3. Autonomic function in manganese alloy workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrington, W W; Angle, C R; Willcockson, N K; Padula, M A; Korn, T

    1998-07-01

    The observation of orthostatic hypotension in an index case of manganese toxicity lead to this prospective attempt to evaluate cardiovascular autonomic function and cognitive and emotional neurotoxicity in eight manganese alloy welders and machinists. The subjects consisted of a convenience sample consisting of an index case of manganese dementia, his four co-workers in a "frog shop" for gouging, welding, and grinding repair of high manganese railway track and a convenience sample of three mild steel welders with lesser manganese exposure also referred because of cognitive or autonomic symptoms. Frog shop air manganese samples 9.6-10 years before and 1.2-3.4 years after the diagnosis of the index case exceeded 1.0 mg/m3 in 29% and 0.2 mg/m3 in 62%. Twenty-four-hour electrocardiographic (Holter) monitoring was used to determine the temporal variability of the heartrate (RR' interval) and the rates of change at low frequency (0.04-0.15 Hz) and high frequency (0.15-0.40 Hz). MMPI and MCMI personality assessment and short-term memory, figure copy, controlled oral word association, and symbol digit tests were used. The five frog shop workers had abnormal sympathovagal balance with decreased high frequency variability (increased ln LF/ln HF). Seven of the eight workers had symptoms of autonomic dysfunction and significantly decreased heart rate variability (rMSSD) but these did not distinguish the relative exposure. Mood or affect was disturbed in all with associated changes in short-term memory and attention in four of the subjects. There were no significant correlations with serum or urine manganese. Power spectrum analysis of 24-h ambulatory ECG indicating a decrease in parasympathetic high frequency activation of heart rate variability may provide a sensitive index of central autonomic dysfunction reflecting increased exposure to manganese, although the contribution of exposures to solvents and other metals cannot be excluded. Neurotoxicity due to the gouging

  4. Leaching of manganese from electrolytic manganese residue by electro-reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Jiancheng; Liu, Renlong; Liu, Zuohua; Chen, Hongliang; Tao, Changyuan

    2017-08-01

    In this study, an improved process for leaching manganese from electrolytic manganese residue (EMR) by electro-reduction was developed. The mechanisms of the electro-reduction leaching were investigated through X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray fluorescence, and Brunauer Emmett Teller. The results show that the electric field could change the surface charge distribution of EMR particles, and the high-valent manganese can be reduced by electric field. The leaching efficient of manganese reached 84.1% under the optimal leaching condition: 9.2 wt% H2SO4, current density of 25 mA/cm(2), solid-to-liquid ratio of 1:5, and leaching time for 1 h. It is 37.9% higher than that attained without an electric field. Meanwhile, the manganese content in EMR decreased from 2.57% to 0.48%.

  5. The role of enzymes produced by white-rot fungus Irpex lacteus in the decolorization of the textile industry effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Kwang-Soo

    2004-03-01

    The textile industry wastewater has been decolorized efficiently by the white rot fungus, Irpex lacteus, without adding any chemicals. The degree of the decolorization of the dye effluent by shaking or stationary cultures is 59 and 93%, respectively, on the 8th day. The higher level of manganese-dependent peroxidase (MnP) and non-specific peroxidase (NsP) was detected in stationary cultures than in the cultures shaken. Laccase activities were equivalent in both cultures and its level was not affected significantly by the culture duration. Neither lignin peroxidase (LiP) nor Remazol Brilliant Blue R oxidase (RBBR ox) was detected in both cultures. The absorbance of the dye effluent was significantly decreased by the stationary culture filtrate of 7 days in the absence of Mn (II) and veratryl alcohol. In the stationary culture filtrate, three or more additional peroxidase bands were detected by the zymogram analysis.

  6. Development of a hydrometallurgical route for the recovery of zinc and manganese from spent alkaline batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veloso, Leonardo Roger Silva; Rodrigues, Luiz Eduardo Oliveira Carmo; Ferreira, Daniel Alvarenga; Magalhães, Fernando Silva; Mansur, Marcelo Borges

    A hydrometallurgical route is proposed in this paper for the selective separation of zinc and manganese from spent alkaline batteries. The recycling route comprises the following steps: (1) batteries dismantling to separate the spent batteries dust from other components (iron scraps, plastic and paper), (2) grinding of the batteries dust to produce a black homogeneous powder, (3) leaching of the powder in two sequential steps, "neutral leaching with water" to separate potassium and produce a KOH solution, followed by an "acidic leaching with sulphuric acid" to remove zinc and manganese from the powder, and (4) selective precipitation of zinc and manganese using the KOH solution (pH around 11) produced in the neutral leaching step. For the acidic leaching step, two alternative routes have been investigated (selective leaching of zinc and total leaching) with regard to the following operational variables: temperature, time, sulphuric acid concentration, hydrogen peroxide concentration and solid/liquid ratio. The results obtained in this study have shown that the proposed route is technically simple, versatile and provides efficient separation of zinc and manganese.

  7. Manganese in dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    North, P; Jablonka, P; Hill, V; Shetrone, M; Letarte, B; Lemasle, B; Venn, K A; Battaglia, G; Tolstoy, E; Irwin, M J; Primas, F; Francois, P

    2012-01-01

    We provide manganese abundances (corrected for the effect of the hyperfine structure) for a large number of stars in the dwarf spheroidal galaxies Sculptor and Fornax, and for a smaller number in the Carina and Sextans dSph galaxies. Abundances had already been determined for a number of other elements in these galaxies, including alpha and iron-peak ones, which allowed us to build [Mn/Fe] and [Mn/alpha] versus [Fe/H] diagrams. The Mn abundances imply sub-solar [Mn/Fe] ratios for the stars in all four galaxies examined. In Sculptor, [Mn/Fe] stays roughly constant between [Fe/H]\\sim -1.8 and -1.4 and decreases at higher iron abundance. In Fornax, [Mn/Fe] does not vary in any significant way with [Fe/H]. The relation between [Mn/alpha] and [Fe/H] for the dSph galaxies is clearly systematically offset from that for the Milky Way, which reflects the different star formation histories of the respective galaxies. The [Mn/alpha] behavior can be interpreted as a result of the metal-dependent Mn yields of type II and ...

  8. 2.0 Angstrom Structure of Prostaglandin H2 Synthase-1 Reconstituted with a Manganese Porphyrin Cofactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta,K.; Selinsky, B.; Loll, P.

    2006-01-01

    Prostaglandin H{sub 2} synthase (EC 1.14.99.1) is a clinically important drug target that catalyzes two key steps in the biosynthesis of the eicosanoid hormones. The enzyme contains spatially distinct cyclooxygenase and peroxidase active sites, both of which require a heme cofactor. Substitution of ferric heme by Mn{sup III} protoporphyrin IX greatly diminishes the peroxidase activity, but has little effect on the cyclooxygenase activity. Here, the 2.0 Angstrom resolution crystal structure of the Mn{sup III} form of ovine prostaglandin H{sub 2} synthase-1 is described (R = 21.8%, R{sub free} = 23.7%). Substitution of Mn{sup III} for Fe{sup III} causes no structural perturbations in the protein. However, the out-of-plane displacement of the manganese ion with respect to the porphyrin is greater than that of the iron by approximately 0.2 Angstroms. This perturbation may help to explain the altered catalytic properties of the manganese enzyme.

  9. Prognostic significance of glutathione peroxidase 2 in gastric carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dongzhe; Sun, Liang; Tong, Jinxue; Chen, Xiuhui; Li, Hui; Zhang, Qifan

    2017-06-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that the glutathione peroxidase 2 may actually play important roles in tumorigenesis and progression in various human cancers such as colorectal carcinomas and lung adenocarcinomas. However, the role of glutathione peroxidase 2 in gastric carcinoma remains to be determined. In this study, the expression and prognostic significance of glutathione peroxidase 2 in gastric carcinoma were investigated and the well-known prognostic factor Ki-67 labeling index was also assessed as positive control. Glutathione peroxidase 2 expression levels in the tumor tissue specimens, the matched adjacent normal tissue specimens, and the lymph node metastases of 176 patients with gastric carcinoma were evaluated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, western blotting, and immunohistochemical staining. The associations between glutathione peroxidase 2 expression levels, as determined by immunohistochemical staining, and multiple clinicopathological characteristics were determined by Pearson's chi-square test and Spearman's correlation analysis. The relationships between glutathione peroxidase 2 expression and other clinicopathological variables and patient prognoses were analyzed further by the Kaplan-Meier method, the log-rank test, and Cox multivariate regression. The quantitative polymerase chain reaction, western blotting, and immunohistochemical staining results showed that glutathione peroxidase 2 expression levels were upregulated in both the primary tumor foci and the lymph node metastases of patients with gastric carcinoma (all p values gastric carcinoma (all p values gastric carcinoma that may be used to devise personalized therapeutic regimens and precision treatments for this disease.

  10. Purification and characterization of peroxidase from papaya (Carica papaya) fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Veda P; Singh, Swati; Singh, Rupinder; Dwivedi, Upendra N

    2012-05-01

    Ripening of papaya fruit was found to be characterized with a decrease in peroxidase activity and its transcript. This peroxidase was purified to homogeneity through successive steps of ammonium sulfate fractionation, ion exchange and molecular exclusion chromatography. The peroxidase was purified 30.22-folds with overall recovery of 44.37% and specific activity of 68.59. Purified peroxidase was found to be a heterotrimer of ~240 kDa, containing two subunits each of 85 and one of 70 kDa. Purified enzyme exhibited pH and temperature optima of 7.0 and 40 °C, respectively. K(m) values for substrates o-dianicidin, guaiacol and ascorbic acid were found to be 0.125, 0.8 and 5.2 mM, respectively. K(m) for H(2)O(2) was found to be 0.25 mM. Salicylic acid was found to activate peroxidase up to 50 μM concentration, beyond which it acted as inhibitor. Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) activated peroxidase while sodium azide, SDS, and Triton X-100 were found to inhibit peroxidase.

  11. Limits of Versatility of Versatile Peroxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knop, Doriv; Levinson, Dana; Makovitzki, Arik; Agami, Avi; Lerer, Elad; Mimran, Avishai; Yarden, Oded

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although Mn2+ is the most abundant substrate of versatile peroxidases (VPs), repression of Pleurotus ostreatus vp1 expression occurred in Mn2+-sufficient medium. This seems to be a biological contradiction. The aim of this study was to explore the mechanism of direct oxidation by VP1 under Mn2+-deficient conditions, as it was found to be the predominant enzyme during fungal growth in the presence of synthetic and natural substrates. The native VP1 was purified and characterized using three substrates, Mn2+, Orange II (OII), and Reactive Black 5 (RB5), each oxidized by a different active site in the enzyme. While the pH optimum for Mn2+ oxidation is 5, the optimum pH for direct oxidation of both dyes was found to be 3. Indeed, effective in vivo decolorization occurred in media without addition of Mn2+ only under acidic conditions. We have determined that Mn2+ inhibits in vitro the direct oxidation of both OII and RB5 while RB5 stabilizes both Mn2+ and OII oxidation. Furthermore, OII was found to inhibit the oxidation of both Mn2+ and RB5. In addition, we could demonstrate that VP1 can cleave OII in two different modes. Under Mn2+-mediated oxidation conditions, VP1 was able to cleave the azo bond only in asymmetric mode, while under the optimum conditions for direct oxidation (absence of Mn2+ at pH 3) both symmetric and asymmetric cleavages occurred. We concluded that the oxidation mechanism of aromatic compounds by VP1 is controlled by Mn2+ and pH levels both in the growth medium and in the reaction mixture. IMPORTANCE VP1 is a member of the ligninolytic heme peroxidase gene family of the white rot fungus Pleurotus ostreatus and plays a fundamental role in biodegradation. This enzyme exhibits a versatile nature, as it can oxidize different substrates under altered environmental conditions. VPs are highly interesting enzymes due to the fact that they contain unique active sites that are responsible for direct oxidation of various aromatic compounds

  12. Purification and partial characterization of a peroxidase from plant cell cultures of Cassia didymobotrya and biotransformation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitali, A; Botta, B; Delle Monache, G; Zappitelli, S; Ricciardi, P; Melino, S; Petruzzelli, R; Giardina, B

    1998-04-15

    An acidic peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7) produced by cell suspension cultures of Cassia didymobotrya (wild senna) was purified from culture medium collected on the 29th day. The enzyme was shown to be a glycoprotein with a pI of 3.5, a molecular mass of approx. 43 kDa by SDS/PAGE and 50 kDa by gel filtration. The N-terminal sequence was very similar to those of other plant peroxidases. The peroxidase was characterized by a high specificity towards coniferyl alcohol and other natural phenolics such as guaiacol and ferulic and caffeic acids. These findings suggest that the enzyme is involved in lignification processes of the cell wall. Moreover, the enzyme was able to catalyse the oxidation of 4,3',4'-trihydroxychalcone and 4, 3',4'-trihydroxy-3-methoxychalcone to the corresponding 3, 3'-biflavanones, as mixtures of racemic and meso forms.

  13. Intraspecific diversity within Ganoderma lucidum in the production of laccase and Mn-oxidizing peroxidases during plant residues fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonić, Jasmina; Vukojević, Jelena; Stajić, Mirjana; Glamoclija, Jasmina

    2010-09-01

    Comparison of the potential for laccase and Mn-oxidizing peroxidases synthesis by ten strains of Ganoderma lucidum, originating from different worldwide areas, during solid-state fermentation of selected plant raw materials was the aim of this study. The great intraspecific variability in the production of analyzed enzymes as well as the dependence of the enzyme activity on plant raw materials were reported. The strain HAI 957 was the best laccase producer in the presence of corn stem, as a unique carbon source (129.46 U/L). The highest level of Mn-dependent peroxidase activity was noted after wheat straw fermentation by G. lucidum HAI 246 (78.64 U/L), while the maximal versatile peroxidase production (59.72 U/L) was observed in strain HAI 957 in the medium with oak sawdust.

  14. Peroxidase-like catalytic activity of Ag3PO4 nanocrystals prepared by a colloidal route.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanjun Liu

    Full Text Available Nearly monodispersed Ag3PO4 nanocrystals with size of 10 nm were prepared through a colloidal chemical route. It was proven that the synthesized Ag3PO4 nanoparticles have intrinsic peroxidase-like catalytic activity. They can quickly catalyze oxidation of the peroxidase substrate 3, 3, 5, 5-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB in the presence of H2O2, producing a blue color. The catalysis reaction follows Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The calculated kinetic parameters indicate a high catalytic activity and the strong affinity of Ag3PO4 nanocrystals to the substrate (TMB. These results suggest the potential applications of Ag3PO4 nanocrystals in fields such as biotechnology, environmental chemistry, and medicine.

  15. Characterization of lignin and Mn peroxidases from Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-01

    Long-term objectives are to elucidate the role and mechanism of the various isozymes in lignin biodegradation. Work is described on electrochemical studies on lignin and Mn peroxidases. This study was performed to investigate the structural aspects which confer the lignin and Mn peroxidases with their high reactivity. The experimentally determined redox potential of the Fe{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 2+} couple for the lignin peroxidase isozymes H1, H2, H8 and H10 are very similar, near-130 mV. The redox potential for the Mn peroxidase isozymes H3 and H4 are similar to each other ({minus}88 mV and {minus}95 mV, respectively) and are more positive than the lignin peroxidases. The higher redox potential for the Fe{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 2+} couple is consistent with the heme active site of these fungal peroxidases being more electron deficient. To investigate the accessibility of the heme active site to the substrate which is oxidized (veratryl alcohol and Mn (II)), we investigated whether these substrates had any affect on the redox potential of the heme. The E{sub m7} value for lignin and Mn peroxidases are not affected by their respective substrates, veratryl alcohol and Mn (II). These results suggest that substrates do not directly interact with the ferric heme-iron as axial ligands. This is consistent with the present model for peroxidase catalysis. Suicide inhibitor (1) and nmr studies (2) indicate that the heme-iron of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) is not fully accessible to bulky substrates occur at the periphery of the heme.

  16. Manganese and acute paranoid psychosis: A case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.M.A. Verhoeven (Wim); J.I.M. Egger (Jos); H.J. Kuijpers (Harold)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Manganese regulates many enzymes and is essential for normal development and body function. Chronic manganese intoxication has an insidious and progressive course and usually starts with complaints of headache, fatigue, sleep disturbances, irritability and emotional instabi

  17. Manganese and acute paranoid psychosis: a case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, W.M.A.; Egger, J.I.M.; Kuijpers, H.J.H.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Manganese regulates many enzymes and is essential for normal development and body function. Chronic manganese intoxication has an insidious and progressive course and usually starts with complaints of headache, fatigue, sleep disturbances, irritability and emotional instability. Later,

  18. Peroxidase gene expression during tomato fruit ripening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biggs, M.S.; Flurkey, W.H.; Handa, A.K.

    1987-04-01

    Auxin oxidation has been reported to play a critical role in the initiation of pear fruit ripening and a tomato fruit peroxidase (POD) has been shown to have IAA-oxidase activity. However, little is known about changes in the expression of POD mRNA in tomato fruit development. They are investigating the expression of POD mRNA during tomato fruit maturation. Fruit pericarp tissues from six stages of fruit development and ripening (immature green, mature green, breaker, turning, ripe, and red ripe fruits) were used to extract poly (A)/sup +/ RNAs. These RNAs were translated in vitro in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate system using L-/sup 35/S-methionine. The /sup 35/S-labeled products were immunoprecipitated with POD antibodies to determine the relative proportions of POD mRNA. High levels of POD mRNA were present in immature green and mature green pericarp, but declined greatly by the turning stage of fruit ripening. In addition, the distribution of POD mRNA on free vs bound polyribosomes will be presented, as well as the presence or absence of POD mRNA in other tomato tissues.

  19. Immobilization of horseradish peroxidase onto kaolin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šekuljica, Nataša Ž; Prlainović, Nevena Ž; Jovanović, Jelena R; Stefanović, Andrea B; Djokić, Veljko R; Mijin, Dušan Ž; Knežević-Jugović, Zorica D

    2016-03-01

    Kaolin showed as a very perspective carrier for the enzyme immobilization and it was used for the adsorption of horseradish peroxidase (HRP). The effects of the enzyme concentration and pH on the immobilization efficiency were studied in the reaction with pyrogallol and anthraquinone dye C.I. Acid Violet 109 (AV 109). In addition, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and analysis by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller were performed for kaolin, thermally activated kaolin and the immobilized enzyme. It has been shown that 0.1 IU of HRP-kaolin decolorized 87 % of dye solution, under the optimal conditions (pH 5.0, temperature 24 °C, dye concentration 40 mg/L and 0.2 mM of H2O2) within 40 min. The immobilized HRP decolorization follows the Ping Pong Bi-Bi mechanism with dead-end inhibition by the dye. The biocatalyst retained 35 ± 0.9 % of the initial activity after seven cycles of reuse in the decolorization reaction of AV 109 under optimal conditions in a batch reactor. The obtained kinetic parameters and reusability study confirmed improvement in performances of k-HRP compared to free, indicating that k-HRP has a great potential for environmental purposes.

  20. Class III peroxidases in plant defence reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almagro, L; Gómez Ros, L V; Belchi-Navarro, S; Bru, R; Ros Barceló, A; Pedreño, M A

    2009-01-01

    When plants are attacked by pathogens, they defend themselves with an arsenal of defence mechanisms, both passive and active. The active defence responses, which require de novo protein synthesis, are regulated through a complex and interconnected network of signalling pathways that mainly involve three molecules, salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA), and ethylene (ET), and which results in the synthesis of pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins. Microbe or elicitor-induced signal transduction pathways lead to (i) the reinforcement of cell walls and lignification, (ii) the production of antimicrobial metabolites (phytoalexins), and (iii) the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). Among the proteins induced during the host plant defence, class III plant peroxidases (EC 1.11.1.7; hydrogen donor: H(2)O(2) oxidoreductase, Prxs) are well known. They belong to a large multigene family, and participate in a broad range of physiological processes, such as lignin and suberin formation, cross-linking of cell wall components, and synthesis of phytoalexins, or participate in the metabolism of ROS and RNS, both switching on the hypersensitive response (HR), a form of programmed host cell death at the infection site associated with limited pathogen development. The present review focuses on these plant defence reactions in which Prxs are directly or indirectly involved, and ends with the signalling pathways, which regulate Prx gene expression during plant defence. How they are integrated within the complex network of defence responses of any host plant cell will be the cornerstone of future research.

  1. Carbon Nanodots as Peroxidase Nanozymes for Biosensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhaskar Garg

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available ‘Nanozymes’, a term coined by Scrimin, Pasquato, and co-workers to describe nanomaterials with enzyme-like characteristics, represent an exciting and emerging research area in the field of artificial enzymes. Indubitably, the last decade has witnessed substantial advancements in the design of a variety of functional nanoscale materials, including metal oxides and carbon-based nanomaterials, which mimic the structures and functions of naturally occurring enzymes. Among these, carbon nanodots (C-dots or carbon quantum dots (CQDs offer huge potential due to their unique properties as compared to natural enzymes and/or classical artificial enzymes. In this mini review, we discuss the peroxidase-like catalytic activities of C-dots and their applications in biosensing. The scope intends to cover not only the C-dots but also graphene quantum dots (GQDs, doped C-dots/GQDs, carbon nitride dots, and C-dots/GQDs nanocomposites. Nevertheless, this mini review is designed to be illustrative, not comprehensive.

  2. Biological Superoxide In Manganese Oxide Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansel, C.; Learman, D.; Zeiner, C.; Santelli, C. M.

    2011-12-01

    Manganese (Mn) oxides are among the strongest sorbents and oxidants within the environment, controlling the fate and transport of numerous elements and the degradation of recalcitrant carbon. Both bacteria and fungi mediate the oxidation of Mn(II) to Mn(III/IV) oxides but the genetic and biochemical mechanisms responsible remain poorly understood. Furthermore, the physiological basis for microbial Mn(II) oxidation remains an enigma. We have recently reported that a common marine bacterium (Roseobacter sp. AzwK-3b) oxidizes Mn(II) via reaction with extracellular superoxide (O2-) produced during exponential growth. Here we expand this superoxide-mediated Mn(II) oxidation pathway to fungi, introducing a surprising homology between prokaryotic and eukaryotic metal redox processes. For instance, Stibella aciculosa, a common soil Ascomycete filamentous fungus, precipitates Mn oxides at the base of asexual reproductive structures (synnemata) used to support conidia (Figure 1). This distribution is a consequence of localized production of superoxide (and it's dismutation product hydrogen peroxide, H2O2), leading to abiotic oxidation of Mn(II) by superoxide. Disruption of NADPH oxidase activity using the oxidoreductase inhibitor DPI leads to diminished cell differentiation and subsequent Mn(II) oxidation inhibition. Addition of Cu(II) (an effective superoxide scavenger) leads to a concentration dependent decrease in Mn oxide formation. We predict that due to the widespread production of extracellular superoxide within the fungal and likely bacterial kingdoms, biological superoxide may be an important contributor to the cycling of Mn, as well as other metals (e.g., Hg, Fe). Current and future explorations of the genes and proteins involved in superoxide production and Mn(II) oxidation will ideally lend insight into the physiological and biochemical basis for these processes.

  3. Dissection of the mechanism of manganese porphyrin-catalyzed chlorine dioxide generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umile, Thomas P; Wang, Dong; Groves, John T

    2011-10-17

    Chlorine dioxide, an industrially important biocide and bleach, is produced rapidly and efficiently from chlorite ion in the presence of water-soluble, manganese porphyrins and porphyrazines at neutral pH under mild conditions. The electron-deficient manganese(III) tetra-(N,N-dimethyl)imidazolium porphyrin (MnTDMImP), tetra-(N,N-dimethyl)benzimidazolium (MnTDMBImP) porphyrin, and manganese(III) tetra-N-methyl-2,3-pyridinoporphyrazine (MnTM23PyPz) were found to be the most efficient catalysts for this process. The more typical manganese tetra-4-N-methylpyridiumporphyrin (Mn-4-TMPyP) was much less effective. Rates for the best catalysts were in the range of 0.24-32 TO/s with MnTM23PyPz being the fastest. The kinetics of reactions of the various ClO(x) species (e.g., chlorite ion, hypochlorous acid, and chlorine dioxide) with authentic oxomanganese(IV) and dioxomanganese(V)MnTDMImP intermediates were studied by stopped-flow spectroscopy. Rate-limiting oxidation of the manganese(III) catalyst by chlorite ion via oxygen atom transfer is proposed to afford a trans-dioxomanganese(V) intermediate. Both trans-dioxomanganese(V)TDMImP and oxoaqua-manganese(IV)TDMImP oxidize chlorite ion by 1-electron, generating the product chlorine dioxide with bimolecular rate constants of 6.30 × 10(3) M(-1) s(-1) and 3.13 × 10(3) M(-1) s(-1), respectively, at pH 6.8. Chlorine dioxide was able to oxidize manganese(III)TDMImP to oxomanganese(IV) at a similar rate, establishing a redox steady-state equilibrium under turnover conditions. Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) produced during turnover was found to rapidly and reversibly react with manganese(III)TDMImP to give dioxoMn(V)TDMImP and chloride ion. The measured equilibrium constant for this reaction (K(eq) = 2.2 at pH 5.1) afforded a value for the oxoMn(V)/Mn(III) redox couple under catalytic conditions (E' = 1.35 V vs NHE). In subsequent processes, chlorine dioxide reacts with both oxomanganese(V) and oxomanganese(IV)TDMImP to afford chlorate

  4. Phenol removal from refinery wastewater by mutant recombinant horseradish peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asad, Sedigheh; Dabirmanesh, Bahareh; Khajeh, Khosro

    2014-01-01

    Application of mutated recombinant horseradish peroxidase (HRP) for phenol removal from refinery effluents is reported. Recombinant HRP produced in Escherichia coli suffers from the disadvantage of lacking glycosylation, which affects its catalytic efficiency and stability toward inactivating parameters such as increased temperature and enhanced amounts of hydrogen peroxide. In the present study, the previously reported variant (in which Asn268 was substituted with Asp, N268D) with improved stability characteristics and catalytic efficiency was used to remove phenol from a petroleum refinery effluent. The presence and removal of phenol was studied by high-performance liquid chromatography; the precipitated oxidized phenol was also observed and removed from the sample by centrifugation. Results showed that the N268D variant can remove 61%, 67%, and 81% of phenol from effluent in 1, 2, and 16 H, respectively. By exploiting the N268D mutant, removal of 50% phenol could be achieved in 42 Min, which was more than 22 times less than the treatment time required by native recombinant enzyme.

  5. Thyroid peroxidase activity is inhibited by amino acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.P. Carvalho

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Normal in vitro thyroid peroxidase (TPO iodide oxidation activity was completely inhibited by a hydrolyzed TPO preparation (0.15 mg/ml or hydrolyzed bovine serum albumin (BSA, 0.2 mg/ml. A pancreatic hydrolysate of casein (trypticase peptone, 0.1 mg/ml and some amino acids (cysteine, tryptophan and methionine, 50 µM each also inhibited the TPO iodide oxidation reaction completely, whereas casamino acids (0.1 mg/ml, and tyrosine, phenylalanine and histidine (50 µM each inhibited the TPO reaction by 54% or less. A pancreatic digest of gelatin (0.1 mg/ml or any other amino acid (50 µM tested did not significantly decrease TPO activity. The amino acids that impair iodide oxidation also inhibit the TPO albumin iodination activity. The inhibitory amino acids contain side chains with either sulfur atoms (cysteine and methionine or aromatic rings (tyrosine, tryptophan, histidine and phenylalanine. Among the amino acids tested, only cysteine affected the TPO guaiacol oxidation reaction, producing a transient inhibition at 25 or 50 µM. The iodide oxidation inhibitory activity of cysteine, methionine and tryptophan was reversed by increasing iodide concentrations from 12 to 18 mM, while no such effect was observed when the cofactor (H2O2 concentration was increased. The inhibitory substances might interfere with the enzyme activity by competing with its normal substrates for their binding sites, binding to the free substrates or reducing their oxidized form.

  6. 40 CFR 721.10003 - Manganese heterocyclic tetraamine complex (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Manganese heterocyclic tetraamine... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10003 Manganese heterocyclic tetraamine complex (generic). (a) Chemical... as manganese heterocyclic tetraamine complex (PMNs P-98-625/626/627/628/629 and P-00-614/617)...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10011 - Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Barium calcium manganese strontium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10011 Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide. (a) Chemical substance... manganese strontium oxide (PMN P-00-1124; CAS No. 359427-90-0) is subject to reporting under this...

  8. Essentiality, Toxicity and Uncertainty in the Risk Assessment of Manganese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risk assessments of manganese by inhalation or oral routes of exposure typically acknowledge the duality of manganese as an essential element at low doses and a toxic metal at high doses. Previously, however, risk assessors were unable to describe manganese pharmacokinetics quant...

  9. Changes in specific activity of ascorbate peroxidase during seed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-08-16

    Aug 16, 2010 ... modes of application of SA, it was observed that maximum specific activity of .... One gram seeds were homogenized at 4°C with pestle and mortar .... properties and distribution of ascorbate peroxidase in legume root nodules.

  10. Optimization of extracellular fungal peroxidase production by 2 Coprinus species

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Keisuke Ikehata; Michael A. Pickard; Ian D. Buchanan; Daniel W. Smith

    2004-01-01

    .... Of the 7 factors examined in the screening study, the concentrations of carbon (glucose) and nitrogen (peptone or casitone) sources showed significant effects on the peroxidase production by Coprinus sp...

  11. Biomimetic Synthesis of Resveratrol Trimers Catalyzed by Horseradish Peroxidase

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jian-Qiao Zhang; Gan-Peng Li; Yu-Long Kang; Bin-Hao Teng; Chun-Suo Yao

    2017-01-01

    Biotransformation of trans-resveratrol and synthetic (±)-ε-viniferin in aqueous acetone using horseradish peroxidase and hydrogen peroxide as oxidants resulted in the isolation of two new resveratrol trimers (3 and 4...

  12. Heme electron transfer in peroxidases: the propionate e-pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guallar, Victor

    2008-10-23

    Computational modeling offers a new insight about the electron transfer pathway in heme peroxidases. Available crystal structures have revealed an intriguing arrangement of the heme propionate side chains in heme-heme and heme-substrate complexes. By means of mixed quantum mechanical/molecular mechanics calculations, we study the involvement of these propionate groups into the substrate oxidation in ascorbate peroxidase and into the heme to heme electron transfer in bacterial cytochrome c peroxidase. By selectively turning on/off different quantum regions, we obtain the electron transfer pathway which directly involves the porphyrin ring and the heme propionates. Furthermore, in ascorbate peroxidase the presence of the substrate appears to be crucial for the activation of the electron transfer channel. The results might represent a general motif for electron transfer from/to the heme group and change our view for the propionate side chains as simple electrostatic binding anchors. We name the new mechanism "the propionate e-pathway".

  13. Cell wall bound anionic peroxidases from asparagus byproducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo-Carmona, Sara; López, Sergio; Vazquez-Castilla, Sara; Jimenez-Araujo, Ana; Rodriguez-Arcos, Rocio; Guillen-Bejarano, Rafael

    2014-10-08

    Asparagus byproducts are a good source of cationic soluble peroxidases (CAP) useful for the bioremediation of phenol-contaminated wastewaters. In this study, cell wall bound peroxidases (POD) from the same byproducts have been purified and characterized. The covalent forms of POD represent >90% of the total cell wall bound POD. Isoelectric focusing showed that whereas the covalent fraction is constituted primarily by anionic isoenzymes, the ionic fraction is a mixture of anionic, neutral, and cationic isoenzymes. Covalently bound peroxidases were purified by means of ion exchange chromatography and affinity chromatography. In vitro detoxification studies showed that although CAP are more effective for the removal of 4-CP and 2,4-DCP, anionic asparagus peroxidase (AAP) is a better option for the removal of hydroxytyrosol (HT), the main phenol present in olive mill wastewaters.

  14. Kinetic Study on Horseradish Peroxidase Interacting with Cyclodextrin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The catalyst reactivity of Horseradish peroxidase was enhanced in the presence of β- cyclodextrin. During this course, β- cyclodextrin played a role of stabilizing the intermediates of HRP. The results have been investigated using spectra and calculation.

  15. The effect of heavy metals on peroxidase from Jerusalem artichoke ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-07-04

    Jul 4, 2008 ... African Journal of Biotechnology Vol. ... EU/mg. The substrate specificity of peroxidase was investigated ... compounds, removal of phenolics from waste waters and ... Heavy metal pollution occurs in many industrial waste-.

  16. Kinetics of Nitrogen Diffusion in Granular Manganese

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jin-zhu; XU Chu-shao; ZHAO Yue-ping

    2008-01-01

    The kinetics and the influence of time on granular manganese nitriding were studied by means of a vacuum resistance furnace, X-ray diffraction technique, and LECO TC-436 oxygen/nitrogen determinator. The longer the nitriding time, the more the nitrogen pickup. Except for a trace of oxide MnO that developed, the metal manganese could thoroughly be nitrided to form Mn4N and a little ζ-phase (the stoichiometric components as Mn2N) with the nitriding time lasting. A kinetic model is developed to reveal the nitriding situation and agrees well with the experimental results.

  17. Ionically Bound Peroxidase from Peach Fruit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neves Valdir Augusto

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Soluble, ionically bound peroxidase (POD and polyphenoloxidase (PPO were extracted from the pulp of peach fruit during ripening at 20°C. Ionically bound form was purified 6.1-fold by DEAE-cellulose and Sephadex G-100 chromatography. The purified enzyme showed only one peak of activity on Sephadex G-100 and PAGE revealed that the enzyme was purified by the procedures adopted. The purified enzyme showed a molecular weight of 29000 Da, maximum activity at pH 5.0 and at 40ºC. The calculated apparent activation energy (Ea for the reaction was10.04 kcal/mol. The enzyme was heat-labile in the temperature range of 60 to 75ºC with a fast inactivation at 75ºC. Measurement of residual activity showed a stabilizing effect of sucrose at various temperature/sugar concentrations (0, 10, 20 %, w/w, with an activation energy (Ea for inactivation increasing with sucrose concentration from 0 to 20% (w/w. The Km and Vmax values were 9.35 and 15.38 mM for 0-dianisidine and H2O2, respectively. The bound enzyme was inhibited competitively by ferulic, caffeic and protocatechuic acids with different values of Ki,. L-cysteine, p-coumaric and indolacetic acid and Fe++ also inhibited the enzyme but at a lower grade. N-ethylmaleimide and p-CMB were not effective to inhibit the enzyme demonstrating the non-essentiality of SH groups.

  18. Comparison of lignin peroxidase and horseradish peroxidase for catalyzing the removal of nonylphenol from water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shipeng; Mao, Liang; Luo, Siqiang; Zhou, Lei; Feng, Yiping; Gao, Shixiang

    2014-02-01

    Concentrations of aqueous-phase nonylphenol (NP), a well-known endocrine-disrupting chemical, are shown to be reduced effectively via reaction with lignin peroxidase (LiP) or horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and hydrogen peroxide. We systematically assessed their reaction efficiencies at varying conditions, and the results have confirmed that the catalytic performance of LiP toward NP was more efficient than that of HRP under experimental conditions. Mass spectrum analysis demonstrated that polymerization through radical-radical coupling mechanism was the pathway leading to NP transformation. Our molecular modeling with the assistance of ab initio suggested the coupling of NP likely proceeded via covalent bonding between two NP radicals at their unsubstituted carbons in phenolic rings. Data from acute immobilization tests with Daphnia confirm that NP toxicity is effectively eliminated by LiP/HRP-catalyzed NP removal. The findings in this study provide useful information for understanding LiP/HRP-mediated NP reactions, and comparison of enzymatic performance can present their advantages for up-scale applications in water/wastewater treatment.

  19. Roles of horseradish peroxidase in response to terbium stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuanbo; Wang, Lihong; Zhou, Qing

    2014-10-01

    The pollution of the environment by rare earth elements (REEs) causes deleterious effects on plants. Peroxidase plays important roles in plant response to various environmental stresses. Here, to further understand the overall roles of peroxidase in response to REE stress, the effects of the REE terbium ion (Tb(3+)) on the peroxidase activity and H2O2 and lignin contents in the leaves and roots of horseradish during different growth stages were simultaneously investigated. The results showed that after 24 and 48 h of Tb(3+) treatment, the peroxidase activity in horseradish leaves decreased, while the H2O2 and lignin contents increased. After a long-term (8 and 16 days) treatment with Tb(3+), these effects were also observed in the roots. The analysis of the changes in peroxidase activity and H2O2 and lignin contents revealed that peroxidase plays important roles in not only reactive oxygen species scavenging but also cell wall lignification in horseradish under Tb(3+) stress. These roles were closely related to the dose of Tb(3+), duration of stress, and growth stages of horseradish.

  20. The impact of thiol peroxidases on redox regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flohé, Leopold

    2016-01-01

    The biology of glutathione peroxidases and peroxiredoxins is reviewed with emphasis on their role in metabolic regulation. Apart from their obvious function in balancing oxidative challenge, these thiol peroxidases are not only implicated in orchestrating the adaptive response to oxidative stress, but also in regulating signaling triggered by hormones, growth factors and cytokines. The mechanisms presently discussed comprise dampening of redox-sensitive regulatory processes by elimination of hydroperoxides, suppression of lipoxygenase activity, committing suicide to save H2O2 for signaling, direct binding to receptors or regulatory proteins in a peroxidase activity-independent manner, or acting as sensors for hydroperoxides and as transducers of oxidant signals. The various mechanistic proposals are discussed in the light of kinetic data, which unfortunately are scarce. Taking into account pivotal criteria of a meaningful regulatory circuit, kinetic plausibility and specificity, the mechanistic concepts implying a direct sensor/transducer function of the thiol peroxidases appear most appealing. With rate constants for the reaction with hydroperoxide of 10(5)-10(8) M(-1) s(-1), thiol peroxidases are qualified as kinetically preferred hydroperoxide sensors, and the ability of the oxidized enzymes to react with defined protein thiols lends specificity to the transduction process. The versatility of thiol peroxidases, however, allows multiple ways of interaction with regulatory pathways.

  1. Enantioselective epoxidation and carbon-carbon bond cleavage catalyzed by Coprinus cinereus peroxidase and myeloperoxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuynman, A; Spelberg, J L; Kooter, I M; Schoemaker, H E; Wever, R

    2000-02-01

    We demonstrate that myeloperoxidase (MPO) and Coprinus cinereus peroxidase (CiP) catalyze the enantioselective epoxidation of styrene and a number of substituted derivatives with a reasonable enantiomeric excess (up to 80%) and in a moderate yield. Three major differences with respect to the chloroperoxidase from Caldariomyces fumago (CPO) are observed in the reactivity of MPO and CiP toward styrene derivatives. First, in contrast to CPO, MPO and CiP produced the (S)-isomers of the epoxides in enantiomeric excess. Second, for MPO and CiP the H(2)O(2) had to be added very slowly (10 eq in 16 h) to prevent accumulation of catalytically inactive enzyme intermediates. Under these conditions, CPO hardly showed any epoxidizing activity; only with a high influx of H(2)O(2) (300 eq in 1.6 h) was epoxidation observed. Third, both MPO and CiP formed significant amounts of (substituted) benzaldehydes as side products as a consequence of C-alpha-C-beta bond cleavage of the styrene derivatives, whereas for CPO and cytochrome c peroxidase this activity is not observed. C-alpha-C-beta cleavage was the most prominent reaction catalyzed by CiP, whereas with MPO the relative amount of epoxide formed was higher. This is the first report of peroxidases catalyzing both epoxidation reactions and carbon-carbon bond cleavage. The results are discussed in terms of mechanisms involving ferryl oxygen transfer and electron transfer, respectively.

  2. Somatic embryogenesis and peroxidase activity of desiccation toler-ant mature somatic embryos of loblolly pine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    White, translucent, glossy mucilaginous callus was initiated from the mature zygotic embryos explants on callus induction medium with 2,4-D, BA, and kinetin in the 3-9th week of culture. This type of callus induction occurred at a lower frequency with either a-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) or IBA (both 8 mg/L). White, translucent, glossy mucilaginous callus was embryogenic and mainly developed from the cotyledons of the mature zygotic embryo. Somatic embryos were formed on differentiation medium. Desiccation tolerance can be induced by culturing somatic embryos of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) on medium supplemented with 50 mm abscisic acid (ABA) and/or 8.5% polyethylene glycol (PEG6000). Scanning electron microscopy of desiccated somatic embryos showed that the size and external morphology of the desiccation tolerant somatic embryos recov-ered to the pre-desiccation state within 24-36 h, whereas the sensitive somatic embryos did not recover and remained shriveled, after the desiccated somatic embryos had been rehydrated. Peroxidase activity of desiccated somatic embryos increased shar-ply after 3 days of desiccation treatment, and desiccation tolerant somatic embryos had higher peroxidase activity compared to sensitive somatic embryos. Higher peroxidase activity of desiccation tolerant somatic embryos was possibly advantage of cata-lyzing the reduction of H2O2 which was produced by drought stress, and protecting somatic embryos from oxidative damage.

  3. Characterization of a purified decolorizing detergent-stable peroxidase from Streptomyces griseosporeus SN9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekik, Hatem; Nadia, Zaraî Jaouadi; Bejar, Wacim; Kourdali, Sidali; Belhoul, Mouna; Hmidi, Maher; Benkiar, Amina; Badis, Abdelmalek; Sallem, Naim; Bejar, Samir; Jaouadi, Bassem

    2015-02-01

    A novel extracellular lignin peroxidase (called LiP-SN) was produced and purified from a newly isolated Streptomyces griseosporeus strain SN9. The findings revealed that the pure enzyme was a monomeric protein with an estimated molecular mass of 43 kDa and a Reinheitzahl value of 1.63. The 19 N-terminal residue sequence of LiP-SN showed high homology with those of Streptomyces peroxidases. Its optimum pH and temperature were pH 8.5 and 65 °C, respectively. The enzyme was inhibited by sodium azide and potassium cyanide, suggesting the presence of heme components in its tertiary structure. Its catalytic efficiency was higher than that of the peroxidase from Streptomyces albidoflavus strain TN644. Interestingly, LiP-SN showed marked dye-decolorization efficiency and stability toward denaturing, oxidizing, and bleaching agents, and compatibility with EcoVax and Dipex as laundry detergents for 48 h at 40 °C. These properties make LiP-SN a potential candidate for future applications in distaining synthetic dyes and detergent formulations.

  4. Microbial Manganese Oxidation in Saltmarsh Surface Sediments Using a Leuco Crystal Violet Manganese Oxide Detection Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spratt, Henry G.; Siekmann, Ellen C.; Hodson, Robert E.

    1994-01-01

    Microbial manganese (Mn) oxide production in surface sediments of a Georgia saltmarsh was directly measured using an assay involving the oxidation of 4,4',4″-methylidynetris (N,N-dimethylaniline), leuco crystal violet (LCV), by Mn oxides to produce crystal violet. The assay exhibits high specificity for Mn oxides without interference by Mn(II) and is sufficiently sensitive to determine rates of Mn oxidation in surface sediment or saltmarsh creek water suspensions. Sample salinity affects crystal violet absorbance in the 0-25 salinity range and must be corrected for in Mn oxide determinations for estuarine samples of variable salinity. Other oxidants found to oxidize LCV slowly included Cl(I), Cr(III), I(V), Fe(III), and Mn(III), although the sensitivity of the assay for Mn(IV) oxides was found to be seven times greater than for Mn(III), and at least 100 times greater than for any of the other oxidants. Rates of abiotic Mn oxide production in sediment suspensions treated with either sodium azide or formalin, or autoclaved, were much slower than rates determined for untreated sediments. Sodium azide (7·7 mM) inhibited Mn oxide production in these sediment suspensions to rates between 5 and 10% of the rates of Mn oxidation determined for unamended suspensions. Manganese oxidation was highly temperature dependent, with maximal rates on a dry weight basis (8·9 nmol mg dwt -1 h -1), occurring at 60°C, and negligible activity at 100 and 0°C. Rates were also dependent on sample pH, with maximal rates at pH 6·7, decreasing to near 0 as the pH was lowered to approximately 3·0. For Mn(II) concentrations ranging from 9 to 91 μM, rates of Mn oxide production were independent of Mn(II) concentration, while Mn oxide production was inhibited at concentrations greater than 91 μM (e.g. by 25-40% at 450 μM). Rates of microbial Mn oxide production in surface sediment/saltmarsh creek water suspensions incubated under natural conditions of temperature, pH, and Mn

  5. Glyco-variant library of the versatile enzyme horseradish peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capone, Simona; Pletzenauer, Robert; Maresch, Daniel; Metzger, Karl; Altmann, Friedrich; Herwig, Christoph; Spadiut, Oliver

    2014-09-01

    When the glycosylated plant enzyme horseradish peroxidase (HRP) is conjugated to specific antibodies, it presents a powerful tool for medical applications. The isolation and purification of this enzyme from plant is difficult and only gives low yields. However, HRP recombinantly produced in the yeast Pichia pastoris experiences hyperglycosylation, which impedes the use of this enzyme in medicine. Enzymatic and chemical deglycosylation are cost intensive and cumbersome and hitherto existing P. pastoris strain engineering approaches with the goal to avoid hyperglycosylation only resulted in physiologically impaired yeast strains not useful for protein production processes. Thus, the last resort to obtain less glycosylated recombinant HRP from P. pastoris is to engineer the enzyme itself. In the present study, we mutated all the eight N-glycosylation sites of HRP C1A. After determination of the most suitable mutation at each N-glycosylation site, we physiologically characterized the respective P. pastoris strains in the bioreactor and purified the produced HRP C1A glyco-variants. The biochemical characterization of the enzyme variants revealed great differences in catalytic activity and stability and allowed the combination of the most promising mutations to potentially give an unglycosylated, active HRP C1A variant useful for medical applications. Interestingly, site-directed mutagenesis proved to be a valuable strategy not only to reduce the overall glycan content of the recombinant enzyme but also to improve catalytic activity and stability. In the present study, we performed an integrated bioprocess covering strain generation, bioreactor cultivations, downstream processing and product characterization and present the biochemical data of the HRP glyco-library.

  6. Ferroportin is a manganese-responsive protein that decreases manganese cytotoxicity and accumulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yin, Zhaobao; Jiang, Haiyan; Lee, Eun-Sook Y; Ni, Mingwei; Erikson, Keith M; Milatovic, Dejan; Bowman, Aaron B; Aschner, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Although manganese (Mn) is an essential trace element for human development and growth, chronic exposure to excessive Mn levels can result in psychiatric and motor disturbances, referred to as manganism...

  7. Cell wall peroxidases in the liverwort Dumortiera hirsuta are responsible for extracellular superoxide production, and can display tyrosinase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jackson L Y; Sulaiman, Mariam; Beckett, Richard P; Minibayeva, Farida V

    2010-04-01

    In our earlier work, we showed that the liverwort Dumortiera hirsuta produces an extracellular oxidative burst of superoxide radicals during rehydration following desiccation stress. The oxidative burst is a common early response of organisms to biotic and abiotic stresses, with suggested roles in signal transduction, formation of protective substances such as suberin, melanin and lignin and defense against pathogens. To discover which enzymes are responsible for the extracellular superoxide production, we isolated apoplastic fractions from D. hirsuta, surveyed for the presence of potential redox enzymes, and performed non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis activity stains. Various isoforms of peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7) and tyrosinase (o-diphenolase) (EC 1.10.3.1) were present at significant levels in the apoplast. In-gel activity staining revealed that some peroxidases isoforms could produce superoxide, while tryosinases could readily metabolize 3,4-dihydroxy phenyl l-alanine (l-dopa) into melanins. Interestingly, some peroxidase isoforms could oxidize the native tyrosinase substrate l-dopa at significant levels, even in the absence of hydrogen peroxide, while others could do so only in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. In D. hirsuta, peroxidases may play an important role in melanin formation. Possible functions for these diverse oxidases in liverwort biology are discussed.

  8. Improving the oxidative stability of a high redox potential fungal peroxidase by rational design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Sáez-Jiménez

    Full Text Available Ligninolytic peroxidases are enzymes of biotechnological interest due to their ability to oxidize high redox potential aromatic compounds, including the recalcitrant lignin polymer. However, different obstacles prevent their use in industrial and environmental applications, including low stability towards their natural oxidizing-substrate H2O2. In this work, versatile peroxidase was taken as a model ligninolytic peroxidase, its oxidative inactivation by H2O2 was studied and different strategies were evaluated with the aim of improving H2O2 stability. Oxidation of the methionine residues was produced during enzyme inactivation by H2O2 excess. Substitution of these residues, located near the heme cofactor and the catalytic tryptophan, rendered a variant with a 7.8-fold decreased oxidative inactivation rate. A second strategy consisted in mutating two residues (Thr45 and Ile103 near the catalytic distal histidine with the aim of modifying the reactivity of the enzyme with H2O2. The T45A/I103T variant showed a 2.9-fold slower reaction rate with H2O2 and 2.8-fold enhanced oxidative stability. Finally, both strategies were combined in the T45A/I103T/M152F/M262F/M265L variant, whose stability in the presence of H2O2 was improved 11.7-fold. This variant showed an increased half-life, over 30 min compared with 3.4 min of the native enzyme, under an excess of 2000 equivalents of H2O2. Interestingly, the stability improvement achieved was related with slower formation, subsequent stabilization and slower bleaching of the enzyme Compound III, a peroxidase intermediate that is not part of the catalytic cycle and leads to the inactivation of the enzyme.

  9. Improving the Oxidative Stability of a High Redox Potential Fungal Peroxidase by Rational Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez-Jiménez, Verónica; Acebes, Sandra; Guallar, Victor; Martínez, Angel T.; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J.

    2015-01-01

    Ligninolytic peroxidases are enzymes of biotechnological interest due to their ability to oxidize high redox potential aromatic compounds, including the recalcitrant lignin polymer. However, different obstacles prevent their use in industrial and environmental applications, including low stability towards their natural oxidizing-substrate H2O2. In this work, versatile peroxidase was taken as a model ligninolytic peroxidase, its oxidative inactivation by H2O2 was studied and different strategies were evaluated with the aim of improving H2O2 stability. Oxidation of the methionine residues was produced during enzyme inactivation by H2O2 excess. Substitution of these residues, located near the heme cofactor and the catalytic tryptophan, rendered a variant with a 7.8-fold decreased oxidative inactivation rate. A second strategy consisted in mutating two residues (Thr45 and Ile103) near the catalytic distal histidine with the aim of modifying the reactivity of the enzyme with H2O2. The T45A/I103T variant showed a 2.9-fold slower reaction rate with H2O2 and 2.8-fold enhanced oxidative stability. Finally, both strategies were combined in the T45A/I103T/M152F/M262F/M265L variant, whose stability in the presence of H2O2 was improved 11.7-fold. This variant showed an increased half-life, over 30 min compared with 3.4 min of the native enzyme, under an excess of 2000 equivalents of H2O2. Interestingly, the stability improvement achieved was related with slower formation, subsequent stabilization and slower bleaching of the enzyme Compound III, a peroxidase intermediate that is not part of the catalytic cycle and leads to the inactivation of the enzyme. PMID:25923713

  10. Biosynthesis of N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) in a melanoma cell line and its metabolization by peroxidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Melissa M; Coimbra, Janine B; Clara, Renan O; Dörr, Felipe A; Moreno, Ana Carolina R; Chagas, Jair R; Tufik, Sérgio; Pinto, Ernani; Catalani, Luiz H; Campa, Ana

    2014-04-01

    Tryptophan (TRP) is essential for many physiological processes, and its metabolism changes in some diseases such as infection and cancer. The most studied aspects of TRP metabolism are the kynurenine and serotonin pathways. A minor metabolic route, tryptamine and N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) biosynthesis, has received far less attention, probably because of the very low amounts of these compounds detected only in some tissues, which has led them to be collectively considered as trace amines. In a previous study, we showed a metabolic interrelationship for TRP in melanoma cell lines. Here, we identified DMT and N,N-dimethyl-N-formyl-kynuramine (DMFK) in the supernatant of cultured SK-Mel-147 cells. Furthermore, when we added DMT to the cell culture, we found hydroxy-DMT (OH-DMT) and indole acetic acid (IAA) in the cell supernatant at 24 h. We found that SK-Mel-147 cells expressed mRNA for myeloperoxidase (MPO) and also had peroxidase activity. We further found that DMT oxidation was catalyzed by peroxidases. DMT oxidation by horseradish peroxidase, H2O2 and MPO from PMA-activated neutrophils produced DMFK, N,N-dimethyl-kynuramine (DMK) and OH-DMT. Oxidation of DMT by peroxidases apparently uses the common peroxidase cycle involving the native enzyme, compound I and compound II. In conclusion, this study describes a possible alternative metabolic pathway for DMT involving peroxidases that has not previously been described in humans and identifies DMT and metabolites in a melanoma cell line. The extension of these findings to other cell types and the biological effects of DMT and its metabolites on cell proliferation and function are key questions for future studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Role of peroxidases in the compensation of cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase knockdown in rice plants under abiotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifacio, Aurenivia; Martins, Marcio O; Ribeiro, Carolina W; Fontenele, Adilton V; Carvalho, Fabricio E L; Margis-Pinheiro, Márcia; Silveira, Joaquim A G

    2011-10-01

    Current studies, particularly in Arabidopsis, have demonstrated that mutants deficient in cytosolic ascorbate peroxidases (APXs) are susceptible to the oxidative damage induced by abiotic stress. In contrast, we demonstrate here that rice mutants double silenced for cytosolic APXs (APx1/2s) up-regulated other peroxidases, making the mutants able to cope with abiotic stress, such as salt, heat, high light and methyl viologen, similar to non-transformed (NT) plants. The APx1/2s mutants exhibited an altered redox homeostasis, as indicated by increased levels of H₂O₂ and ascorbate and glutathione redox states. Both mutant and NT plants exhibited similar photosynthesis (CO₂) assimilation and photochemical efficiency) under both normal and stress conditions. Overall, the antioxidative compensatory mechanism displayed by the mutants was associated with increased expression of OsGpx genes, which resulted in higher glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activity in the cytosolic and chloroplastic fractions. The transcript levels of OsCatA and OsCatB and the activities of catalase (CAT) and guaiacol peroxidase (GPOD; type III peroxidases) were also up-regulated. None of the six studied isoforms of OsApx were up-regulated under normal growth conditions. Therefore, the deficiency in cytosolic APXs was effectively compensated for by up-regulation of other peroxidases. We propose that signalling mechanisms triggered in rice mutants could be distinct from those proposed for Arabidopsis.

  12. Manganese ore tailing: optimization of acid leaching conditions and recovery of soluble manganese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Olívia de Souza Heleno; Carvalho, Cornélio de Freitas; Silva, Gilmare Antônia da; Santos, Cláudio Gouvêa Dos

    2015-01-01

    Manganese recovery from industrial ore processing waste by means of leaching with sulfuric acid was the objective of this study. Experimental conditions were optimized by multivariate experimental design approaches. In order to study the factors affecting leaching, a screening step was used involving a full factorial design with central point for three variables in two levels (2(3)). The three variables studied were leaching time, concentration of sulfuric acid and sample amount. The three factors screened were shown to be relevant and therefore a Doehlert design was applied to determine the best working conditions for leaching and to build the response surface. By applying the best leaching conditions, the concentrations of 12.80 and 13.64 %w/w of manganese for the global sample and for the fraction -44 + 37 μm, respectively, were found. Microbeads of chitosan were tested for removal of leachate acidity and recovering of soluble manganese. Manganese recovery from the leachate was 95.4%. Upon drying the leachate, a solid containing mostly manganese sulfate was obtained, showing that the proposed optimized method is efficient for manganese recovery from ore tailings.

  13. Crystallization and spectroscopic studies of manganese malonate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Varghese Mathew; Jochan Joseph; Sabu Jacob; K E Abraham

    2010-08-01

    The preparation of manganese malonate crystals by gel method and its spectroscopic studies are reported. X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern reveals the crystalline nature. The FTIR and FT Raman spectra of the crystals are recorded and the vibrational assignments are given with possible explanations. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) is used to measure the bandgap (g) of the material.

  14. Mixed iron-manganese oxide nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lai, Jriuan; Shafi, Kurikka V.P.M.; Ulman, Abraham; Loos, Katja; Yang, Nan-Loh; Cui, Min-Hui; Vogt, Thomas; Estournès, Claude; Locke, Dave C.

    2004-01-01

    Designing nanoparticles for practical applications requires knowledge and control of how their desired properties relate to their composition and structure. Here, we present a detailed systematic study of mixed iron-manganese oxide nanoparticles, showing that ultrasonication provides the high-energy

  15. Manganese superoxide dismutase and breast cancer recurrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cronin-Fenton, Deirdre P; Christensen, Mariann; Lash, Timothy L

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) inhibits oxidative damage and cancer therapy effectiveness. A polymorphism in its encoding gene (SOD2: Val16Ala rs4880) may confer poorer breast cancer survival, but data are inconsistent. We examined the association of SOD2 genotype and breast...

  16. Manganese homeostasis in the nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pan; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Mukhopadhyay, Somshuvra; Lee, Eunsook; Paoliello, Monica M B; Bowman, Aaron B; Aschner, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential heavy metal that is naturally found in the environment. Daily intake through dietary sources provides the necessary amount required for several key physiological processes, including antioxidant defense, energy metabolism, immune function and others. However, overexposure from environmental sources can result in a condition known as manganism that features symptomatology similar to Parkinson's disease (PD). This disorder presents with debilitating motor and cognitive deficits that arise from a neurodegenerative process. In order to maintain a balance between its essentiality and neurotoxicity, several mechanisms exist to properly buffer cellular Mn levels. These include transporters involved in Mn uptake, and newly discovered Mn efflux mechanisms. This review will focus on current studies related to mechanisms underlying Mn import and export, primarily the Mn transporters, and their function and roles in Mn-induced neurotoxicity. Though and essential metal, overexposure to manganese may result in neurodegenerative disease analogous to Parkinson's disease. Manganese homeostasis is tightly regulated by transporters, including transmembrane importers (divalent metal transporter 1, transferrin and its receptor, zinc transporters ZIP8 and Zip14, dopamine transporter, calcium channels, choline transporters and citrate transporters) and exporters (ferroportin and SLC30A10), as well as the intracellular trafficking proteins (SPCA1 and ATP12A2). A manganese-specific sensor, GPP130, has been identified, which affords means for monitoring intracellular levels of this metal.

  17. ADVERSE HEALTH EFFECTS FROM ENVIRONMENTAL MANGANESE EXPOSURE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ubiquitous element, manganese (Mn), is an essential nutrient, but toxic at excessive exposure levels. Therefore, the US EPA set guideline levels for Mn exposure through inhalation (reference concentration-RfC=0.05 ?g/m3) and ingestion (reference dose-RfD=0.14 mg/kg/day (10 mg...

  18. Soil manganese enrichment from industrial inputs: a gastropod perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Despina-Maria Bordean

    Full Text Available Manganese is one of the most abundant metal in natural environments and serves as an essential microelement for all living systems. However, the enrichment of soil with manganese resulting from industrial inputs may threaten terrestrial ecosystems. Several studies have demonstrated harmful effects of manganese exposure by cutaneous contact and/or by soil ingestion to a wide range of soil invertebrates. The link between soil manganese and land snails has never been made although these invertebrates routinely come in contact with the upper soil horizons through cutaneous contact, egg-laying, and feeding activities in soil. Therefore, we have investigated the direct transfer of manganese from soils to snails and assessed its toxicity at background concentrations in the soil. Juvenile Cantareus aspersus snails were caged under semi-field conditions and exposed first, for a period of 30 days, to a series of soil manganese concentrations, and then, for a second period of 30 days, to soils with higher manganese concentrations. Manganese levels were measured in the snail hepatopancreas, foot, and shell. The snail survival and shell growth were used to assess the lethal and sublethal effects of manganese exposure. The transfer of manganese from soil to snails occurred independently of food ingestion, but had no consistent effect on either the snail survival or shell growth. The hepatopancreas was the best biomarker of manganese exposure, whereas the shell did not serve as a long-term sink for this metal. The kinetics of manganese retention in the hepatopancreas of snails previously exposed to manganese-spiked soils was significantly influenced by a new exposure event. The results of this study reveal the importance of land snails for manganese cycling in terrestrial biotopes and suggest that the direct transfer from soils to snails should be considered when precisely assessing the impact of anthropogenic Mn releases on soil ecosystems.

  19. Soil Manganese Enrichment from Industrial Inputs: A Gastropod Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordean, Despina-Maria; Nica, Dragos V.; Harmanescu, Monica; Banatean-Dunea, Ionut; Gergen, Iosif I.

    2014-01-01

    Manganese is one of the most abundant metal in natural environments and serves as an essential microelement for all living systems. However, the enrichment of soil with manganese resulting from industrial inputs may threaten terrestrial ecosystems. Several studies have demonstrated harmful effects of manganese exposure by cutaneous contact and/or by soil ingestion to a wide range of soil invertebrates. The link between soil manganese and land snails has never been made although these invertebrates routinely come in contact with the upper soil horizons through cutaneous contact, egg-laying, and feeding activities in soil. Therefore, we have investigated the direct transfer of manganese from soils to snails and assessed its toxicity at background concentrations in the soil. Juvenile Cantareus aspersus snails were caged under semi-field conditions and exposed first, for a period of 30 days, to a series of soil manganese concentrations, and then, for a second period of 30 days, to soils with higher manganese concentrations. Manganese levels were measured in the snail hepatopancreas, foot, and shell. The snail survival and shell growth were used to assess the lethal and sublethal effects of manganese exposure. The transfer of manganese from soil to snails occurred independently of food ingestion, but had no consistent effect on either the snail survival or shell growth. The hepatopancreas was the best biomarker of manganese exposure, whereas the shell did not serve as a long-term sink for this metal. The kinetics of manganese retention in the hepatopancreas of snails previously exposed to manganese-spiked soils was significantly influenced by a new exposure event. The results of this study reveal the importance of land snails for manganese cycling in terrestrial biotopes and suggest that the direct transfer from soils to snails should be considered when precisely assessing the impact of anthropogenic Mn releases on soil ecosystems. PMID:24454856

  20. Peroxynitrite mediates active site tyrosine nitration in manganese superoxide dismutase. Evidence of a role for the carbonate radical anion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surmeli, N Basak; Litterman, Nadia K; Miller, Anne-Frances; Groves, John T

    2010-12-08

    Protein tyrosine nitration has been observed in a variety of human diseases associated with oxidative stress, such as inflammatory, neurodegenerative, and cardiovascular conditions. However, the pathways leading to nitration of tyrosine residues are still unclear. Recent studies have shown that peroxynitrite (PN), produced by the reaction of superoxide and nitric oxide, can lead to protein nitration and inactivation. Tyrosine nitration may also be mediated by nitrogen dioxide produced by the oxidation of nitrite by peroxidases. Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), which plays a critical role in cellular defense against oxidative stress by decomposing superoxide within mitochondria, is nitrated and inactivated under pathological conditions. In this study, MnSOD is shown to catalyze PN-mediated self-nitration. Direct, spectroscopic observation of the kinetics of PN decay and nitrotyrosine formation (k(cat) = 9.3 × 10(2) M(-1) s(-1)) indicates that the mechanism involves redox cycling between Mn(2+) and Mn(3+), similar to that observed with superoxide. Distinctive patterns of tyrosine nitration within MnSOD by various reagents were revealed and quantified by MS/MS analysis of MnSOD trypsin digest peptides. These analyses showed that three of the seven tyrosine residues of MnSOD (Tyr34, Tyr9, and Tyr11) were the most susceptible to nitration and that the relative amounts of nitration of these residues varied widely depending upon the nature of the nitrating agent. Notably, nitration mediated by PN, in both the presence and absence of CO2, resulted in nitration of the active site tyrosine, Tyr34, while nitration by freely diffusing nitrogen dioxide led to surface nitration at Tyr9 and Tyr11. Flux analysis of the nitration of Tyr34 by PN-CO2 showed that the nitration rate coincided with the kinetics of the reaction of PN with CO2. These kinetics and the 20-fold increase in the efficiency of tyrosine nitration in the presence of CO2 suggest a specific role for the

  1. The Influence of Manganese and Glutamine Intake on Antioxidants and Neurotransmitter Amino Acids Levels in Rats' Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szpetnar, Maria; Luchowska-Kocot, Dorota; Boguszewska-Czubara, Anna; Kurzepa, Jacek

    2016-08-01

    Depending on the concentration, Mn can exert protective or toxic effect. Potential mechanism for manganese neurotoxicity is manganese-induced oxidative stress. Glutamine supplementation could reduce manganese-induced neurotoxicity and is able to influence the neurotransmission processes. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the long term administration of manganese (alone or in combination with glutamine) in dose and time dependent manner could affect the selected parameters of oxidative-antioxidative status (superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities, concentrations of vitamin C and malonic dialdehyde) and concentrations of excitatory (Asp, Glu) and inhibitory amino acids (GABA, Gly) in the brain of rats. The experiments were carried out on 2-months-old albino male rats randomly divided into 6 group: Mn300 and Mn500-received solution of MnCl2 to drink (dose 300 and 500 mg/L, respectively), Gln group-solution of glutamine (4 g/L), Mn300-Gln and Mn500-Gln groups-solution of Mn at 300 and 500 mg/L and Gln at 4 g/L dose. The control group (C) received deionized water. Half of the animals were euthanized after three and the other half-after 6 weeks of experiment. The exposure of rats to Mn in drinking water contributes to diminishing of the antioxidant enzymes activity and the increase in level of lipid peroxidation. Glutamine in the diet admittedly increases SOD and GPx activity, but it is unable to restore the intracellular redox balance. The most significant differences in the examined amino acids levels in comparison to both control and Gln group were observed in the group of rats receiving Mn at 500 mg/L dose alone or with Gln. It seems that Gln is amino acid which could improve antioxidant status and affect the concentrations of the neurotransmitters.

  2. Ethics position towards the exploitation of manganese material in Oenbit Village, East Nusa Tenggara, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fios, Frederikus

    2017-04-01

    Oenbit village is an area that is located in the district of Timor Tengah Utara (TTU), Timor Island, East Nusa Tenggara Province, Indonesia. In Oenbit ongoing a conflict between the economic interests of some parties namely the government, corporation and the local indigenous community. Government of Timor Tengah Utara give legal permission to the Elgari Resources Indonesia (ERI) Company to exploit the mining of Manganese in Oenbit Village which informally is the ancestral land of indigenous peoples Oenbit hereditary called pusuf kelef and Kot-tau niap-tau (king land). Oenbit society has an ethical belief that the ancestral land Oenbit should not be produced by outside parties besides the local community on the orders of the king. Manganese exploitation in Oenbit Village cause problems contradictorily interesting to reflect on the ethical-philosophical. This paper aims to reflect the ethical position against cases of exploitation of manganese in the Oenbit Village with focuses on the local government’s decision to issue a permit exploitation and ERI Company exploit Mangan assumed unethical traditional indigenous tribe Oenbit. The study found that the district government and ERI Company has violated the public ethics and society traditional law, especially the rights of local indigenous communities by exploiting manganese material. The method used is the reflection of philosophy with ethical approaches and relevant ethical theories.

  3. Water exchange in manganese-based water-oxidizing catalysts in photosynthetic systems: from the water-oxidizing complex in photosystem II to nano-sized manganese oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Isaloo, Mohsen Abbasi; Eaton-Rye, Julian J; Tomo, Tatsuya; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Satoh, Kimiyuki; Carpentier, Robert; Shen, Jian-Ren; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I

    2014-09-01

    The water-oxidizing complex (WOC), also known as the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC), of photosystem II in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms efficiently catalyzes water oxidation. It is, therefore, responsible for the presence of oxygen in the Earth's atmosphere. The WOC is a manganese-calcium (Mn₄CaO₅(H₂O)₄) cluster housed in a protein complex. In this review, we focus on water exchange chemistry of metal hydrates and discuss the mechanisms and factors affecting this chemical process. Further, water exchange rates for both the biological cofactor and synthetic manganese water splitting are discussed. The importance of fully unveiling the water exchange mechanism to understand the chemistry of water oxidation is also emphasized here. This article is part of a special issue entitled: photosynthesis research for sustainability: keys to produce clean energy.

  4. Peroxidase activation of cytoglobin by anionic phospholipids: Mechanisms and consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejero, Jesús; Kapralov, Alexandr A; Baumgartner, Matthew P; Sparacino-Watkins, Courtney E; Anthonymutu, Tamil S; Vlasova, Irina I; Camacho, Carlos J; Gladwin, Mark T; Bayir, Hülya; Kagan, Valerian E

    2016-05-01

    Cytoglobin (Cygb) is a hexa-coordinated hemoprotein with yet to be defined physiological functions. The iron coordination and spin state of the Cygb heme group are sensitive to oxidation of two cysteine residues (Cys38/Cys83) and/or the binding of free fatty acids. However, the roles of redox vs lipid regulators of Cygb's structural rearrangements in the context of the protein peroxidase competence are not known. Searching for physiologically relevant lipid regulators of Cygb, here we report that anionic phospholipids, particularly phosphatidylinositolphosphates, affect structural organization of the protein and modulate its iron state and peroxidase activity both conjointly and/or independently of cysteine oxidation. Thus, different anionic lipids can operate in cysteine-dependent and cysteine-independent ways as inducers of the peroxidase activity. We establish that Cygb's peroxidase activity can be utilized for the catalysis of peroxidation of anionic phospholipids (including phosphatidylinositolphosphates) yielding mono-oxygenated molecular species. Combined with the computational simulations we propose a bipartite lipid binding model that rationalizes the modes of interactions with phospholipids, the effects on structural re-arrangements and the peroxidase activity of the hemoprotein.

  5. Recombinant horseradish peroxidase variants for targeted cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifert, Günther; Folkes, Lisa; Gmeiner, Christoph; Dachs, Gabi; Spadiut, Oliver

    2016-06-01

    Cancer is a major cause of death. Common chemo- and radiation-therapies damage healthy tissue and cause painful side effects. The enzyme horseradish peroxidase (HRP) has been shown to activate the plant hormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) to a powerful anticancer agent in in vitro studies, but gene directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT) studies showed ambivalent results. Thus, HRP/IAA in antibody directed enzyme prodrug therapy (ADEPT) was investigated as an alternative. However, this approach has not been intensively studied, since the enzyme preparation from plant describes an undefined mixture of isoenzymes with a heterogenic glycosylation pattern incompatible with the human system. Here, we describe the recombinant production of the two HRP isoenzymes C1A and A2A in a Pichia pastoris benchmark strain and a glyco-engineered strain with a knockout of the α-1,6-mannosyltransferase (OCH1) responsible for hypermannosylation. We biochemically characterized the enzyme variants, tested them with IAA and applied them on cancer cells. In the absence of H2 O2 , HRP C1A turned out to be highly active with IAA, independent of its surface glycosylation. Subsequent in vitro cytotoxicity studies with human T24 bladder carcinoma and MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cells underlined the applicability of recombinant HRP C1A with reduced surface glycoslyation for targeted cancer treatment. Summarizing, this is the first study describing the successful use of recombinantly produced HRP for targeted cancer treatment. Our findings might pave the way for an increased use of the powerful isoenzyme HRP C1A in cancer research in the future.

  6. Borrelia burgdorferi, a Pathogen That Lacks Iron, Encodes Manganese-dependent Superoxide Dismutase Essential for Resistance to Streptonigrin*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troxell, Bryan; Xu, Haijun; Yang, X. Frank

    2012-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, exists in nature through a complex life cycle involving ticks of the Ixodes genus and mammalian hosts. During its life cycle, B. burgdorferi experiences fluctuations in oxygen tension and may encounter reactive oxygen species (ROS). The key metalloenzyme to degrade ROS in B. burgdorferi is SodA. Although previous work suggests that B. burgdorferi SodA is an iron-dependent superoxide dismutase (SOD), later work demonstrates that B. burgdorferi is unable to transport iron and contains an extremely low intracellular concentration of iron. Consequently, the metal cofactor for SodA has been postulated to be manganese. However, experimental evidence to support this hypothesis remains lacking. In this study, we provide biochemical and genetic data showing that SodA is a manganese-dependent enzyme. First, B. burgdorferi contained SOD activity that is resistant to H2O2 and NaCN, characteristics associated with Mn-SODs. Second, the addition of manganese to the Chelex-treated BSK-II enhanced SodA expression. Third, disruption of the manganese transporter gene bmtA, which significantly lowers the intracellular manganese, greatly reduced SOD activity and SodA expression, suggesting that manganese regulates the level of SodA. In addition, we show that B. burgdorferi is resistant to streptonigrin, a metal-dependent redox cycling compound that produces ROS, and that SodA plays a protective role against the streptonigrin. Taken together, our data demonstrate the Lyme disease spirochete encodes a manganese-dependent SOD that contributes to B. burgdorferi defense against intracellular superoxide. PMID:22500025

  7. Borrelia burgdorferi, a pathogen that lacks iron, encodes manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase essential for resistance to streptonigrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troxell, Bryan; Xu, Haijun; Yang, X Frank

    2012-06-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, exists in nature through a complex life cycle involving ticks of the Ixodes genus and mammalian hosts. During its life cycle, B. burgdorferi experiences fluctuations in oxygen tension and may encounter reactive oxygen species (ROS). The key metalloenzyme to degrade ROS in B. burgdorferi is SodA. Although previous work suggests that B. burgdorferi SodA is an iron-dependent superoxide dismutase (SOD), later work demonstrates that B. burgdorferi is unable to transport iron and contains an extremely low intracellular concentration of iron. Consequently, the metal cofactor for SodA has been postulated to be manganese. However, experimental evidence to support this hypothesis remains lacking. In this study, we provide biochemical and genetic data showing that SodA is a manganese-dependent enzyme. First, B. burgdorferi contained SOD activity that is resistant to H(2)O(2) and NaCN, characteristics associated with Mn-SODs. Second, the addition of manganese to the Chelex-treated BSK-II enhanced SodA expression. Third, disruption of the manganese transporter gene bmtA, which significantly lowers the intracellular manganese, greatly reduced SOD activity and SodA expression, suggesting that manganese regulates the level of SodA. In addition, we show that B. burgdorferi is resistant to streptonigrin, a metal-dependent redox cycling compound that produces ROS, and that SodA plays a protective role against the streptonigrin. Taken together, our data demonstrate the Lyme disease spirochete encodes a manganese-dependent SOD that contributes to B. burgdorferi defense against intracellular superoxide.

  8. Role of peroxidase activity and Ca(2+) in axis growth during seed germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Khangembam L; Chaudhuri, Abira; Kar, Rup K

    2015-10-01

    Axis growth during seed germination is mediated by reactive oxygen species and apoplastic peroxidase plays a role by producing OH(·) from H2O2. Ca (2+) activates both apoplastic peroxidase and NADPH oxidase. Role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in seed germination and axis growth has been demonstrated in our earlier works with Vigna radiata seeds by studying superoxide generation and its metabolism in axes (Singh et al. in Plant Signal Behav doi: 10.4161/psb.29278 , 2014). In the present study, the participation of apoplastic peroxidase along with the involvement of Ca(2+) in axis growth during germination and post-germination stage has been investigated. Pharmacological studies using peroxidase (POX) inhibitors (salicylhydroxamic acid, SHAM; sodium azide, NaN3) and OH(·) scavenger (sodium benzoate, NaBz) indicated that seed germination and early axis growth (phase I) depend much on POX activity. Subapical region of axes corresponding to radicle that elongated much particularly in phase II suggested high POX activity as well as high NADPH oxidase (Respiratory burst oxidase homologue, Rboh, in plants) activity as indicated from localization by staining with TMB (3,3',5,5'-tetramethyl benzidine dihydrochloride hydrate) and NBT (nitroblue tetrazolium chloride), respectively. Apoplastic class III peroxidase (Prx) and also cellular POX activity reached maximum at the time of radicle emergence as revealed by TMB staining, spectrophotometric and in-gel assay for POX activity. Treatment with Ca(2+) antagonists (La(3+), plasma membrane-located Ca(2+) channel blocker and EGTA, Ca(2+) chelator in apoplast) retarded seed germination and strongly inhibited axis growth, while Li(+) (blocks endosomal Ca(2+) release) was effective only in retarding phase II axis growth suggesting an involvement of Ca(2+) influx during early axis growth. From the effect of Ca(2+) antagonists on the localization of activities of POX and Rboh using stains, it appears that Ca(2+) plays a dual role

  9. Direct determination of lignin peroxidase released from Phanerochaete chrysosporium by in-capillary enzyme assay using micellar electrokinetic chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Airi; Sasaki, Keiko; Kaneta, Takashi

    2016-04-01

    Here we describe the application of an in-capillary enzyme assay using micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) in the determination of enzyme activity in a crude culture medium containing lignin peroxidase released from Phanerochaete chrysosporium (P. chrysosporium). The method consists of a plug-plug reaction between lignin peroxidase and its substrate, veratryl alcohol, the separation of the product, veratraldehyde, from the other components including the enzyme and the culture medium, and the determination of the enzyme activity from the peak area of veratraldehyde produced by the plug-plug reaction. This method is more sensitive than conventional spectrophotometry since the background originates from the enzyme and the culture medium can be removed via MEKC separation. Veratraldehyde was separated at -10kV in a background electrolyte containing 50mM tartrate buffer (pH 2.5) and 50mM sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) after a plug-plug reaction in the capillary for 5min. The calibration curve of veratraldehyde was linear up to 4pmol (500μM) with a limit to quantification of 0.026pmol (3.2μM) (SN=10). The activity of lignin peroxidase was directly measured from the peak area of veratraldehyde. The activity of lignin peroxidase released from P. chrysosporium into the medium for 7 days was successfully determined to be 3.40UL(-1).

  10. Assay of methylglyoxal and glyoxal and control of peroxidase interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornalley, Paul J; Rabbani, Naila

    2014-04-01

    Methylglyoxal and glyoxal are endogenous α-oxoaldehyde metabolites and substrates of the glyoxalase system. These and related α-oxoaldehydes are often determined in cell, tissue and body fluid samples by derivatization with 1,2-diaminobenzene and similar compounds. Peroxidase activity in physiological tissues is a potential interference in estimation of methylglyoxal and glyoxal as it catalyses the conversion of 1,2-diaminobenzene into trace amounts of these dicarbonyl metabolites. Residual peroxidase activity in deproteinized extracts is found to cause significant interference in methylglyoxal and glyoxal estimations. This interference is blocked by the addition of sodium azide in the derivatizing buffer. Estimates of methylglyoxal concentration thereby obtained are in keeping with those predicted by systems modelling of methylglyoxal glycation kinetics in situ. Blocking sample peroxidase activity is important to avoid overestimation in the measurement of glyoxal and methylglyoxal. A dicarbonyl assay protocol resistant to interferences is described in the present article.

  11. Horseradish and soybean peroxidases: comparable tools for alternative niches?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Barry J; Carolan, Neil; O'Fágáin, Ciarán

    2006-08-01

    Horseradish and soybean peroxidases (HRP and SBP, respectively) are useful biotechnological tools. HRP is often termed the classical plant heme peroxidase and although it has been studied for decades, our understanding has deepened since its cloning and subsequent expression, enabling numerous mutational and protein engineering studies. SBP, however, has been neglected until recently, despite offering a real alternative to HRP: SBP actually outperforms HRP in terms of stability and is now used in numerous biotechnological applications, including biosensors. Review of both is timely. This article summarizes and discusses the main insights into the structure and mechanism of HRP, with special emphasis on HRP mutagenesis, and outlines its use in a variety of applications. It also reviews the current knowledge and applications to date of SBP, particularly biosensors. The final paragraphs speculate on the future of plant heme-based peroxidases, with probable trends outlined and explored.

  12. Optimization of extracellular fungal peroxidase production by 2 Coprinus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikehata, Keisuke; Pickard, Michael A; Buchanan, Ian D; Smith, Daniel W

    2004-12-01

    Optimum culture conditions for the batch production of extracellular peroxidase by Coprinus cinereus UAMH 4103 and Coprinus sp. UAMH 10067 were explored using 2 statistical experimental designs, including 2-level, 7-factor fractional factorial design and 2-factor central composite design. Of the 7 factors examined in the screening study, the concentrations of carbon (glucose) and nitrogen (peptone or casitone) sources showed significant effects on the peroxidase production by Coprinus sp. UAMH 10067. The optimum glucose and peptone concentrations were determined as 2.7% and 0.8% for Coprinus sp. UAMH 10067, and 2.9% and 1.4% for C. cinereus UAMH 4103, respectively. Under the optimized culture condition the maximum peroxidase activity achieved in this study was 34.5 U x mL(-1) for Coprinus sp. UAMH 10067 and 68.0 U x mL(-1) for C. cinereus UAMH 4103, more than 2-fold higher than the results of previous studies.

  13. Fluorescence Spectra and Enzymatic Property of Hemoglobin as Mimetic Peroxidase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li De-jia; Li Hai-cheng; Zou Guo-lin

    2003-01-01

    Intrinsic fluorescence emission maxima of hemoglobin(Hb) was investigated in relation to peroxidase property of Hb. The peroxidase activity of Hb was based on its catalytic activity for oxidation of o-phenylenediamine by hydrogen peroxide. Hb was treated in the condition (temperature,ethanol and salt) that tetramer-dimer equilibrium of Hb is shifted to the dimer state and its fluorescence spectrum was measured. When Hb treated in temperature (60-70 ℃ ), ethanol concentration (60 %-70 % ) and NaCl concentration (2.5-3.0 mol/L), the fluorescence emission maxima of Hb shifted towards red wavelength and its activity decreased quickly.Experimental results revealed that the activity and stability of Hb as mimetic peroxidase was closely relative to the hydrophobic environment of active center of Hb, and when Hb (FeⅡ) converted into met Hb (FeⅢ ), its activity was 1. 6times as much as that of Hb.

  14. Fluorescence Spectra and Enzymatic Property of Hemoglobin as Mimetic Peroxidase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiDe-jia; LiHai-cheng; ZouGuo-lin

    2003-01-01

    Intrinsic fluorescence emission maxima of hemo-lobin(Hb) was investigated in relation to peroxidase property of Hb. The peroxidase activity of Hb was based on its catalytic activity for oxidation of o-phenylenediamine by hydrogen peroxide. Hb was treated in the condition (temperature,ethanol and salt) that tetramer-dimer equilibrium of Hb is shifted to the dimer state and its fluorescence spectrum was measured. When Hb treated in temperature (60-70 ℃), ethanol concentration (60%-70%) and NaCl concentration (2. 5-3.0 mol/L), the fluorescence emission maxima of Hb shifted towards red wavelength and its activity decreased quickly.Experimental results revealed that the activity and stability of Hb as mimetic peroxidase was closely relative to the hydrophobic environment of active center of Hb, and when Hb (FeⅡ) converted into met Hb (FeⅢ ), its activity was 1. 6 times as much as that of Hb.

  15. Microstructural aspects of manganese metal during its electrodeposition from sulphate solutions in the presence of quaternary amines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padhy, Subrat Kumar [CSIR – Institute of Minerals and Materials Technology, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Bhubaneswar 751013 (India); Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research, CSIR Campus, CSIR Road, Taramani, Chennai 600 113 (India); Patnaik, P. [CSIR – Institute of Minerals and Materials Technology, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Bhubaneswar 751013 (India); Tripathy, B.C., E-mail: bankim@immt.res.in [CSIR – Institute of Minerals and Materials Technology, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Bhubaneswar 751013 (India); Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research, CSIR Campus, CSIR Road, Taramani, Chennai 600 113 (India); Bhattacharya, I.N. [CSIR – Institute of Minerals and Materials Technology, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Bhubaneswar 751013 (India)

    2015-03-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Quaternary amines produced smooth and bright manganese electrodeposits. • TEABr produced smooth and bright deposits with euhedral shaped crystals. • TBABr produced dendritic deposits with elongated poly-nodular crystals. • All the quaternary amines behaved as cathode polarisers. • TEABr was found to be the most efficient organic additive. - Abstract: In the present study investigation was made on the electrodeposition of manganese from sulphate solutions in the presence of quaternary amines TEABr, TPABr and TBABr. The concentrations of these additives were varied over a relatively broad range to evaluate their effect on the deposit morphology and preferred crystal orientations of the electrodeposited metal. TEABr resulted in bright and smooth manganese electrodeposits giving euhedral shape to the crystals with distinct triple junction points. TPABr also showed similar results at lower concentrations. However, TBABr resulted in the formation of dendritic growths with elongated poly-nodular crystals similar to that of Paragorgia corals having uniform multistep growths. The presence of these quaternary amines in the electrolyte causes polarisation of the cathode. TBABr being the strongest cathode polariser adsorbs strongly on the cathode resulting in poor deposit quality. TEABr was found to be the most efficient additive producing the desired quality manganese electrodeposit.

  16. Suppressing Manganese Dissolution from Lithium Manganese Oxide Spinel Cathodes with Single-Layer Graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaber-Ansari, Laila; Puntambekar, Kanan P.; Kim, Soo; Aykol, Muratahan; Luo, Langli; Wu, Jinsong; Myers, Benjamin D.; Iddir, Hakim; Russell, John T.; Saldana, Spencer J.; Kumar, Rajan; Thackeray, Michael M.; Curtiss, Larry A.; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Wolverton, Christopher M.; Hersam, Mark C.

    2015-06-24

    Spinel-structured LiMn 2 O 4 (LMO) is a desirable cathode material for Li-ion batteries due to its low cost, abundance, and high power capability. However, LMO suffers from limited cycle life that is triggered by manganese dissolution into the electrolyte during electrochemical cycling. Here, it is shown that single-layer graphene coatings suppress manganese dissolution, thus enhancing the performance and lifetime of LMO cathodes. Relative to lithium cells with uncoated LMO cathodes, cells with graphene-coated LMO cathodes provide improved capacity retention with enhanced cycling stability. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that graphene coatings inhibit manganese depletion from the LMO surface. Additionally, transmission electron microscopy demonstrates that a stable solid electrolyte interphase is formed on graphene, which screens the LMO from direct contact with the electrolyte. Density functional theory calculations provide two mechanisms for the role of graphene in the suppression of manganese dissolution. First, common defects in single-layer graphene are found to allow the transport of lithium while concurrently acting as barriers for manganese diffusion. Second, graphene can chemically interact with Mn 3+ at the LMO electrode surface, promoting an oxidation state change to Mn 4+ , which suppresses dissolution.

  17. Preparation of manganese sulfate from low-grade manganese carbonate ores by sulfuric acid leaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-quan Lin; Guo-hua Gu; Hui Wang; Ren-feng Zhu; You-cai Liu; and Jian-gang Fu

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a method for preparing pure manganese sulfate from low-grade ores with a granule mean size of 0.47 mm by direct acid leaching was developed. The effects of the types of leaching agents, sulfuric acid concentration, reaction temperature, and agitation rate on the leaching efficiency of manganese were investigated. We observed that sulfuric acid used as a leaching agent provides a similar leach-ing efficiency of manganese and superior selectivity against calcium compared to hydrochloric acid. The optimal leaching conditions in sul-furic acid media were determined; under the optimal conditions, the leaching efficiencies of Mn and Ca were 92.42% and 9.61%, respec-tively. Moreover, the kinetics of manganese leaching indicated that the leaching follows the diffusion-controlled model with an apparent ac-tivation energy of 12.28 kJ·mol−1. The purification conditions of the leaching solution were also discussed. The results show that manganese dioxide is a suitable oxidant of ferrous ions and sodium dimethyldithiocarbamate is an effective precipitant of heavy metals. Finally, through chemical analysis and X-ray diffraction analysis, the obtained product was determined to contain 98% of MnSO4·H2O.

  18. Improved avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex (ABC) staining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattoretti, G; Berti, E; Schiró, R; D'Amato, L; Valeggio, C; Rilke, F

    1988-02-01

    A considerable intensification of the avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex staining system (ABC) was obtained by sequentially overlaying the sections to be immunostained with an avidin-rich and a biotin-rich complex. Each sequential addition contributed to the deposition of horseradish peroxidase on the immunostained site and allowed the subsequent binding of a complementary complex. With this technique a higher dilution of the antisera could be used and minute amounts of antigen masked by the fixative could be demonstrated on paraffin sections.

  19. Laccase- and peroxidase-free tyrosinase production by isolated microbial strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambasiva Rao, K R S; Tripathy, N K; Mahalaxmi, Y; Prakasham, R S

    2012-02-01

    Laccase- and peroxidase-free tyrosinase has commercial importance in the production of L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA), which is mainly used in the treatment of Parkinson's disease. In the present study, isolation of an actinomycetes microbial strain capable of producing only tyrosinase is reported. Among all soil isolates, three individual colonies revealed black color around the colony in the presence of tyrosine. Further screening for laccase and peroxidase activities using syringaldazine denoted that one of the isolates, designated as RSP-T1, is laccase and peroxidase negative and produces only tyrosinase. The microbe was authenticated as Streptomyces antibioticus based on 16S ribotyping. Effective growth of this isolate was noticed with the use of medium (pH 5.5) containing casein acid hydrolysate (10.0 g/l), K(2)HPO(4) (5.0 g/l), MgSO(4) (0.25 g/l), L-tyrosine (1.0 g/l), and agar (15 g/l). The scanning electron micrograph depicted that the microbe is highly branched and filamentous in nature. The enzyme production was positively regulated in the presence of copper sulfate. The impact of different fermentation parameters on tyrosinase production depicted that the maximized enzyme titer values were observed when this isolate was grown at 6.5 pH and at 30 degrees C temperature under agitated conditions (220 rpm). Among all the studied physiological parameters, agitation played a significant role on tyrosinase production. Upon optimization of the parameters, the yield of tyrosinase was improved more than 100% compared with the initial yield.

  20. Lack of the DNA repair enzyme OGG1 sensitizes dopamine neurons to manganese toxicity during development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardozo-Pelaez, Fernando; Cox, David P; Bolin, Celeste

    2005-01-01

    Onset of Parkinson's disease (PD) and Parkinson-like syndromes has been associated with exposure to diverse environmental stimuli. Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that exposure to elevated levels of manganese produces neuropathological changes localized to the basal ganglia, including neuronal loss and depletions in striatal dopamine content. However, understanding the mechanisms associated with manganese neurotoxicity has been hampered by the lack of a good rodent model. Elevated levels of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (oxo8dG) have been found in brain areas affected in PD. Whether increased DNA damage is responsible for neuronal degeneration or is a mere epiphenomena of neuronal loss remains to be elucidated. Thus, by using mice deficient in the ability to remove oxo8dG we aimed to determine if dysregulation of DNA repair coupled to manganese exposure would be detrimental to dopaminergic neurons. Wild-type and OGG1 knockout mice were exposed to manganese from conception to postnatal day 30; in both groups, exposure to manganese led to alterations in the neurochemistry of the nigrostriatal system. After exposure, dopamine levels were elevated in the caudate of wild-type mice. Dopamine was reduced in the caudate of OGG1 knockout mice, a loss that was paralleled by an increase in the dopamine index of turnover. In addition, the reduction of dopamine in caudate putamen correlated with the accumulation of oxo8dG in midbrain. We conclude that OGG1 function is essential in maintaining neuronal stability during development and identify DNA damage as a common pathway in neuronal loss after a toxicological challenge.

  1. Manganese Abnormity in Holocene Sediments of the Bohai Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Manganese abnormity has been observed in the Holocene sediments of the mud area of Bohai Sea. On the basis of grain size, chemical composition, heavy mineral content and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) 14C dating of foraminifer, relationships between manganese abnormity and sedimentation rates, material source, hydrodynamic conditions are probed. Manganese abnormity occurred during the Middle Holocene when sea level and sedimentation rates were higher than those at present. Sedimentary hiatus was not observed when material sources and hydrodynamic conditions were quite similar. Compared with the former period, the latter period showed a decrease in reduction environment and an inclination toward oxidation environment with high manganese content, whereas provenance and hydrodynamic conditions showed only a slight change. From the above observations, it can be concluded that correlation among manganese abnormity, material source, and hydrodynamic conditions is not obvious. Redox environment seems to be the key factor for manganese enrichment, which is mainly related to marine authigenic process.

  2. Peroxidase activity in Spondias dulcis = Atividade da peroxidase em Spondias dulcis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lúcio Cardozo-Filho

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the best conditions to obtain crude extracts showingPeroxidase activity from Spondia dulcis (caja-mango were evaluated. Fresh fruits (25 g were blended in different sodium phosphate buffer (0.05 to 0.2 M with a pH varying from 3.0 to 9.0. The muddy material was centrifuged for 20 minutes. In order to improve POD activity, the crude extract was submitted to precipitation with ammonium sulfate at 90% saturation. This precipitated was re-suspended in sodium phosphate buffer 0.2 M pH 6.5 and then, optimum pH for activity assay (pH varying from 5.0 to 9.0 and thermal stability (exposure to different temperatures varying from 30 to 75ºC for periods between 0 to 15 minutes were determined. The best conditions for activity assay were in phosphate buffer 0.2 M at pH7.0. The results obtained for thermal inactivation study suggest that the heating at 75ºCfor 15 minutes inactivated 95% of initial POD activity.Foram avaliadas, neste trabalho, algumas condições para a obtenção de extratos brutos com atividade peroxidase de Spondias dulcis (cajá-manga. Frutas frescas (25 g foram trituradas com tampão fosfato de sódio (0,05 a 0,2 M em pHs diferentes (3,0 a 9,0. O material obtido foi centrifugado por 20 min. O extrato bruto foi submetido à precipitação com sulfato de amônio até 90% de saturação. Este precipitado foi ressuspenso em tampão fosfato de sódio 0,2 M pH 6,5 e, assim, o pH ótimo para o ensaio de atividade (pH que varia de 5,0 a 9,0 e a estabilidade térmica (exposição a temperaturas de 30, 60, 65, 70 e 75ºC por um período de 0 a 15 min. deste foram determinados. As melhores condições encontradas para o ensaio de atividade foram em tampão fosfato 0,2 M pH 7,0. Os resultados para a inativação térmica sugerem que o aquecimento a 75ºC por 15 mininativa 95% da atividade de POD inicial.

  3. Spin dependent calculation of calcium manganese oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathod, Ruchi; Kansara, Shivam; Gupta, Sanjeev K.; Sonvane, Yogesh

    2017-05-01

    Particularly interesting as candidates for technological applications are the manganese perovskites with AMnO3 formula. In this paper, we investigated the ground states properties of the CaMnO3 perovskite oxide. Our structural properties are given using GGA in the aim to introduce the exchange correlation potential using density functional calculation. Generally, the perovskites materials of ABO3-type are well known with their anti/ferroelectric, piezoelectric and anti/ferromagnetism properties applied in remarkable technological studies.

  4. Manganese concentration in human saliva using NAA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewgoy, Hugo R., E-mail: hugorl@usp.br [Universidade Bandeirante Anhanguera (UNIBAN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Zamboni, Cibele B.; Medeiros, Ilca M.M.A.; Medeiros, Jose A.G. de [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    In this investigation the Manganese levels in human whole saliva were determined using Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) technique for the proposition of an indicative interval. The measurements were performed considering gender and lifestyle factors of Brazilian inhabitants (non-smokers, non-drinkers and no history of toxicological exposure). The results emphasize that the indicative interval is statistically different by gender. These data are useful for identifying or preventing some diseases in the Brazilian population. (author)

  5. Arabidopsis ATP A2 peroxidase. Expression and high-resolution structure of a plant peroxidase with implications for lignification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, L; Teilum, K; Mirza, O;

    2000-01-01

    to be involved in lignin biosynthesis. Recently we isolated an extracellular anionic peroxidase, ATP A2, from rapidly lignifying Arabidopsis cell suspension culture and cloned its cDNA. Here we show that the Atp A2 promoter directs GUS reporter gene expression in lignified tissues of transgenic plants. Moreover......Lignins are phenolic biopolymers synthesized by terrestrial, vascular plants for mechanical support and in response to pathogen attack. Peroxidases have been proposed to catalyse the dehydrogenative polymerization of monolignols into lignins, although no specific isoenzyme has been shown......-coumaryl and coniferyl alcohols are preferred by ATP A2, while the oxidation of sinapyl alcohol will be sterically hindered in ATP A2 as well as in all other plant peroxidases due to an overlap with the conserved Pro-139. We suggest ATP A2 is involved in a complex regulation of the covalent cross-linking in the plant...

  6. 40 CFR 424.60 - Applicability; description of the electrolytic manganese products subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... electrolytic manganese products subcategory. 424.60 Section 424.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Electrolytic Manganese Products Subcategory § 424.60 Applicability; description of the electrolytic manganese products subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  7. MANGANESE SPECIATION IN SELECTED AGRICULTURAL SOILS OF PENINSULAR MALAYSIA

    OpenAIRE

    J. Habibah; J. Khairiah; Ismail, B.S.; M.D. Kadderi

    2014-01-01

    Manganese speciation in selected agricultural soils of Peninsular Malaysia is discussed in this study. Manganese concentration in the Easily Leacheable and Ion Exchangeable (ELFE), Acid Reducible (AR), Organic Oxidizable (OO) and Resistant (RR) fractions of soils developed on weathered rocks, soils of mixed nature, alluvium and peat deposits are described. The total manganese concentration in soils developed on weathered rocks was found to be higher than that in soils of mixed nature, alluviu...

  8. Manganese oxide nanowires, films, and membranes and methods of making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suib, Steven Lawrence [Storrs, CT; Yuan, Jikang [Storrs, CT

    2011-02-15

    Nanowires, films, and membranes comprising ordered porous manganese oxide-based octahedral molecular sieves and methods of making the same are disclosed. A method for forming nanowires includes hydrothermally treating a chemical precursor composition in a hydrothermal treating solvent to form the nanowires, wherein the chemical precursor composition comprises a source of manganese cations and a source of counter cations, and wherein the nanowires comprise ordered porous manganese oxide-based octahedral molecular sieves.

  9. Solution Layer Deposition: A Technique for the Growth of Ultra-Pure Manganese Oxides on Silica at Room Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cure, Jérémy; Piettre, Kilian; Coppel, Yannick; Beche, Eric; Esvan, Jérôme; Collière, Vincent; Chaudret, Bruno; Fau, Pierre

    2016-02-24

    With the ever increasing miniaturization in microelectronic devices, new deposition techniques are required to form high-purity metal oxide layers. Herein, we report a liquid route to specifically produce thin and conformal amorphous manganese oxide layers on silicon substrate, which can be transformed into a manganese silicate layer. The undesired insertion of carbon into the functional layers is avoided through a solution metal-organic chemistry approach named Solution Layer Deposition (SLD). The growth of a pure manganese oxide film by SLD takes place through the decoordination of ligands from a metal-organic complex in mild conditions, and coordination of the resulting metal atoms on a silica surface. The mechanism of this chemical liquid route has been elucidated by solid-state (29) Si MAS NMR, XPS, SIMS, and HRTEM.

  10. Manganese-induced turnover of TMEM165.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potelle, Sven; Dulary, Eudoxie; Climer, Leslie; Duvet, Sandrine; Morelle, Willy; Vicogne, Dorothée; Lebredonchel, Elodie; Houdou, Marine; Spriet, Corentin; Krzewinski-Recchi, Marie-Ange; Peanne, Romain; Klein, André; de Bettignies, Geoffroy; Morsomme, Pierre; Matthijs, Gert; Marquardt, Thorsten; Lupashin, Vladimir; Foulquier, François

    2017-04-19

    TMEM165 deficiencies lead to one of the congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG), a group of inherited diseases where the glycosylation process is altered. We recently demonstrated that the Golgi glycosylation defect due to TMEM165 deficiency resulted from a Golgi manganese homeostasis defect and that Mn(2+) supplementation was sufficient to rescue normal glycosylation. In the present paper, we highlight TMEM165 as a novel Golgi protein sensitive to manganese. When cells were exposed to high Mn(2+) concentrations, TMEM165 was degraded in lysosomes. Remarkably, while the variant R126H was sensitive upon manganese exposure, the variant E108G, recently identified in a novel TMEM165-CDG patient, was found to be insensitive. We also showed that the E108G mutation did not abolish the function of TMEM165 in Golgi glycosylation. Altogether, the present study identified the Golgi protein TMEM165 as a novel Mn(2+)-sensitive protein in mammalian cells and pointed to the crucial importance of the glutamic acid (E108) in the cytosolic ELGDK motif in Mn(2+)-induced degradation of TMEM165. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  11. Manganese deposition in drinking water distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerke, Tammie L; Little, Brenda J; Barry Maynard, J

    2016-01-15

    This study provides a physicochemical assessment of manganese deposits on brass and lead components from two fully operational drinking water distributions systems. One of the systems was maintained with chlorine; the other, with secondary chloramine disinfection. Synchrotron-based in-situ micro X-ray adsorption near edge structure was used to assess the mineralogy. In-situ micro X-ray fluorescence mapping was used to demonstrate the spatial relationships between manganese and potentially toxic adsorbed metal ions. The Mn deposits ranged in thickness from 0.01 to 400 μm. They were composed primarily of Mn oxides/oxhydroxides, birnessite (Mn(3+) and Mn(4+)) and hollandite (Mn(2+) and Mn(4+)), and a Mn silicate, braunite (Mn(2+) and Mn(4+)), in varying proportions. Iron, chromium, and strontium, in addition to the alloying elements lead and copper, were co-located within manganese deposits. With the exception of iron, all are related to specific health issues and are of concern to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA). The specific properties of Mn deposits, i.e., adsorption of metals ions, oxidation of metal ions and resuspension are discussed with respect to their influence on drinking water quality.

  12. Manganese deposition in drinking water distribution systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerke, Tammie L., E-mail: Tammie.Gerke@miamioh.edu [Department of Geology, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221-0013 (United States); Little, Brenda J., E-mail: brenda.little@nrlssc.navy.mil [Naval Research Laboratory, Stennis Space Center, MS 39529 (United States); Barry Maynard, J., E-mail: maynarjb@ucmail.uc.edu [Department of Geology, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221-0013 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    This study provides a physicochemical assessment of manganese deposits on brass and lead components from two fully operational drinking water distributions systems. One of the systems was maintained with chlorine; the other, with secondary chloramine disinfection. Synchrotron-based in-situ micro X-ray adsorption near edge structure was used to assess the mineralogy. In-situ micro X-ray fluorescence mapping was used to demonstrate the spatial relationships between manganese and potentially toxic adsorbed metal ions. The Mn deposits ranged in thickness from 0.01 to 400 μm. They were composed primarily of Mn oxides/oxhydroxides, birnessite (Mn{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 4+}) and hollandite (Mn{sup 2+} and Mn{sup 4+}), and a Mn silicate, braunite (Mn{sup 2+} and Mn{sup 4+}), in varying proportions. Iron, chromium, and strontium, in addition to the alloying elements lead and copper, were co-located within manganese deposits. With the exception of iron, all are related to specific health issues and are of concern to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA). The specific properties of Mn deposits, i.e., adsorption of metals ions, oxidation of metal ions and resuspension are discussed with respect to their influence on drinking water quality. - Highlights: • Oxidation and deposition of Mn deposits in drinking water distribution pipes • In-situ synchrotron-based μ-XANES and μ-XRF mapping • Toxic metal sorption in Mn deposits.

  13. Sulfuric acid leaching of mechanically activated manganese carbonate ore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenan Yıldız

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Acidic leaching of mechanically activated manganese ore from Denizli – Tavas was investigated. The ore was activated mechanically in a planetary mill and the amorphisation in manganese structure was analyzed with X-ray diffraction. The parameters in acidic leaching of the ore were milling time, acid concentration and time. All experiments were performed at 25°C with solid to liquid ratio: 1/10. The activation procedure led to amorphization and structural disordering in manganese ore and accelerated the dissolution of manganese in acidic media.

  14. A survey of neurobehavioral symptoms of welders exposed to manganese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Hassani

    2013-05-01

    Conclusion: Welders’ exposure to manganese and its potential health effects should be evaluated periodically and effective control measures should be applied in order to to prevent neurobehavioral symptoms.

  15. Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance microscopy of mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnick, I.E.; Todorov, T.I.; Centeno, J.A.; Newbury, D.E.; Small, J.A.; Potter, K.

    2007-01-01

    Paramagnetic manganese (II) can be employed as a calcium surrogate to sensitize magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) to the processing of calcium during bone formation. At high doses, osteoblasts can take up sufficient quantities of manganese, resulting in marked changes in water proton T1, T2 and magnetization transfer ratio values compared to those for untreated cells. Accordingly, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) results confirm that the manganese content of treated cell pellets was 10-fold higher than that for untreated cell pellets. To establish that manganese is processed like calcium and deposited as bone, calvaria from the skull of embryonic chicks were grown in culture medium supplemented with 1 mM MnCl2 and 3 mM CaCl2. A banding pattern of high and low T2 values, consistent with mineral deposits with high and low levels of manganese, was observed radiating from the calvarial ridge. The results of ICP-MS studies confirm that manganese-treated calvaria take up increasing amounts of manganese with time in culture. Finally, elemental mapping studies with electron probe microanalysis confirmed local variations in the manganese content of bone newly deposited on the calvarial surface. This is the first reported use of manganese-enhanced MRM to study the process whereby calcium is taken up by osteoblasts cells and deposited as bone. ?? 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Synthesis and Crystal Structure of a New Manganese Complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jian; LIU Ping; CHEN Yun

    2003-01-01

    @@ In order to study the relationship between the manganese ion and the biological coordination agent, the role ofmanganese ion in the active sites and the structure of the active sites in the manganese enzymes, small molecule complexes are often applied to modeling the structure and the properties of reaction in the active centers. In this pa per, we will report the synthesis and crystal structure of a new manganese(Ⅱ) complex, catena[ aqua-(p-methoxybenzoato- O, O′ ) - (p-methoxybenzoato- O )- (2,2′-bipyridine)-manganese (Ⅱ) ] (p-methoxybenzoic acid). The crystal structure was confirmeded by X-ray crystallography analysis.

  17. Restoration of growth by manganese in a mutant strain of Escherichia coli lacking most known iron and manganese uptake systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taudte, Nadine; German, Nadezhda; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2016-01-01

    The interplay of manganese and iron homeostasis and oxidative stress in Escherichia coli can give important insights into survival of bacteria in the phagosome and under differing iron or manganese bioavailabilities. Here, we characterized a mutant strain devoid of all know iron/manganese......-uptake systems relevant for growth in defined medium. Based on these results an exit strategy enabling the cell to cope with iron depletion and use of manganese as an alternative for iron could be shown. Such a strategy would also explain why E. coli harbors some iron- or manganese-dependent iso......-enzymes such as superoxide dismutases or ribonucleotide reductases. The benefits for gaining a means for survival would be bought with the cost of less efficient metabolism as indicated in our experiments by lower cell densities with manganese than with iron. In addition, this strain was extremely sensitive to the metalloid...

  18. Self-Assembled Complexes of Horseradish Peroxidase with Magnetic Nanoparticles Showing Enhanced Peroxidase Activity

    KAUST Repository

    Corgié, Stéphane C.

    2012-02-15

    Bio-nanocatalysts (BNCs) consisting of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) self-assembled with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) enhance enzymatic activity due to the faster turnover and lower inhibition of the enzyme. The size and magnetization of the MNPs affect the formation of the BNCs, and ultimately control the activity of the bound enzymes. Smaller MNPs form small clusters with a low affinity for the HRP. While the turnover for the bound fraction is drastically increased, there is no difference in the H 2O 2 inhibitory concentration. Larger MNPs with a higher magnetization aggregate in larger clusters and have a higher affinity for the enzyme and a lower substrate inhibition. All of the BNCs are more active than the free enzyme or the MNPs (BNCs > HRP ≤laquo; MNPs). Since the BNCs show surprising resilience in various reaction conditions, they may pave the way towards new hybrid biocatalysts with increased activities and unique catalytic properties for magnetosensitive enzymatic reactions. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Nanostructured manganese oxides as highly active water oxidation catalysts: a boost from manganese precursor chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Prashanth W; Indra, Arindam; Littlewood, Patrick; Schwarze, Michael; Göbel, Caren; Schomäcker, Reinhard; Driess, Matthias

    2014-08-01

    We present a facile synthesis of bioinspired manganese oxides for chemical and photocatalytic water oxidation, starting from a reliable and versatile manganese(II) oxalate single-source precursor (SSP) accessible through an inverse micellar molecular approach. Strikingly, thermal decomposition of the latter precursor in various environments (air, nitrogen, and vacuum) led to the three different mineral phases of bixbyite (Mn2 O3 ), hausmannite (Mn3 O4 ), and manganosite (MnO). Initial chemical water oxidation experiments using ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN) gave the maximum catalytic activity for Mn2 O3 and MnO whereas Mn3 O4 had a limited activity. The substantial increase in the catalytic activity of MnO in chemical water oxidation was demonstrated by the fact that a phase transformation occurs at the surface from nanocrystalline MnO into an amorphous MnOx (1water oxidation in the presence of [Ru(bpy)3 ](2+) (bpy=2,2'-bipyridine) as a sensitizer and peroxodisulfate as an electron acceptor was carried out for all three manganese oxides including the newly formed amorphous MnOx . Both Mn2 O3 and the amorphous MnOx exhibit tremendous enhancement in oxygen evolution during photocatalysis and are much higher in comparison to so far known bioinspired manganese oxides and calcium-manganese oxides. Also, for the first time, a new approach for the representation of activities of water oxidation catalysts has been proposed by determining the amount of accessible manganese centers. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. [Early Detection of Manganese Intoxication Based on Occupational History and T1-weighted MRI].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukutake, Toshio; Yano, Hajime; Kushida, Ryutaro; Sunada, Yoshihide

    2016-02-01

    Manganese regulates many enzymes and is essential for normal cell function. Chronic manganese intoxication has an insidious and progressive course terminating to atypical parkinsonism with little therapeutic efficacy. For subjects with chronic manganese exposure such as welders, manganese intoxication can be detected early based on the presence of hyperintensity in the globus pallidus on T(1)-weighted MRI and abnormally high urinary excretion of manganese with a chelating agent even in cases of normal serum/urine level of manganese.

  1. VERTEX: manganese transport through oxygen minima

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, John H.; Knauer, George A.

    1984-01-01

    Manganese transport through a well-developed oxygen minimum was studied off central Mexico (18°N, 108°W) in October-November 1981 as part of the VERTEX (Vertical Transport and Exchange) research program. Refractory, leachable and dissolved Mn fractions associated with particulates caught in traps set at eight depths (120-1950 m) were analyzed. Particles entering the oxygen minimum had relatively large Mn loads; however, as the particulates sank further into the minimum, total Mn fluxes steadily decreased from 190 nmol m -2 day -1 at 120 m to 36 nmol m -2 day -1 at 400 m. Manganese fluxes then steadily increased in the remaining 800-1950 m, reaching rates of up to 230 nmol m -2 day -1 at 1950 m. Manganese concentrations were also measured in the water column. Dissolved Mn levels Rate-of-change estimates based on trap flux data yield regeneration rates of up to 0.44 nmol kg -1 yr -1 in the upper oxygen minimum (120-200 m). However, only 30% of the dissolved Mn in the oxygen minimum appears to be from sinking particulate regeneration; the other 70% probably results from continental-slope-release-horizontal-transport processes. Dissolved Mn scavenges back onto particles as oxygen levels begin to increase with depth. Scavenging rates ranging from -0.03 to -0.09 nmol kg -1 yr -1 were observed at depths from 700 to 1950 m. These scavenging rates result in Mn residence times of 16-19 years, and scavenging rate constants on the order of 0.057 yr -1. Manganese removal via scavenging on sinking particles below the oxygen minimum is balanced by Mn released along continental boundaries and transported horizontally via advective-diffusive processes. Manganese appears to be very weakly associated with particulates. Nevertheless, the amounts of Mn involved with sinking biogenic particles are large, and the resulting fluxes are on the same order of magnitude as those necessary to explain the excess Mn accumulating on the sea floor. The overall behavior of Mn observed in this, and

  2. Biosynthesis of ascaridole: iodide peroxidase-catalyzed synthesis of a monoterpene endoperoxide in soluble extracts of Chenopodium ambrosioides fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M A; Croteau, R

    1984-11-15

    Ascaridole, an asymmetric monoterpene endoperoxide with anthelmintic properties, occurs as a major constituent (60-80%) in the volatile oil of American wormseed fruit (Chenopodium ambrosioides: Chenopodiaceae), and as a lesser component in the leaf pocket oil of the boldo tree (Peumus boldus: Monimiaceae). Determination of optical activity and chromatographic resolution of naturally occurring ascaridole, and several synthetic derivatives, showed that both wormseed and boldo produce ascaridole in racemic form. The biosynthesis of ascaridole from the conjugated, symmetrical diene alpha-terpinene (a major component of the oil from wormseed) was shown to be catalyzed by a soluble iodide peroxidase isolated from homogenates of C. ambrosioides fruit and leaves. The enzymatic synthesis of ascaridole was confirmed by capillary gas-liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry of the product, which was also shown to be racemic. Optimal enzymatic activity occurred at pH 4.0 in the presence of 2.5 mM H2O2 and 1 mM NaI. Soluble enzyme extracts were fractionated by gel filtration on both Sephacryl S-300 and Sephadex G-100, and were shown to consist of a high-molecular-weight peroxidase component (Mr greater than 1,000,000, 30% of total activity) and two other peroxidase species having apparent molecular weights of 62,000 and 45,000 (major component). Peroxidase activity was susceptible to proteolytic destruction only after periodate treatment, suggesting an association of the enzyme(s) with polysaccharide material. Ascaridole biosynthesis from alpha-terpinene was inhibited by cyanide, catalase, and reducing agents, but not by compounds that trap superoxide or quench singlet oxygen. A peroxide transfer reaction initiated by peroxidase-generated I+ is proposed for the conversion of alpha-terpinene to ascaridole.

  3. Peroxidase-coupled method for kinetic colorimetry of total creatine kinase activity in serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimmer, M C; Artiss, J D; Zak, B

    1985-10-01

    We describe a peroxidase-coupled method involving a colorimetric indicator reaction for determining the total activity of creatine kinase (EC 2.7.3.2) in serum. The kinetically favorable reverse reaction is exploited to generate adenosine 5'-triphosphate, which is used in the glycerol kinase-catalyzed phosphorylation of glycerol. The glycerol 3-phosphate so generated is oxidized in the presence of alpha-glycerophosphate oxidase to produce hydrogen peroxide, which is reduced in the presence of peroxidase with the simultaneous oxidation and coupling of 4-aminoantipyrene and 2-hydroxy-3,5-dichlorobenzenesulfonate to produce an intensely colored red chromogen. Results of the proposed method (y) correlate well with those of the Boehringer-Mannheim "CK-NAC UV" method as applied to the Hitachi 705 chemistry analyzer (y = 1.025 chi - 18.1, r = 0.9985, n = 100, range = 19-4531 U/L). The sensitivity of the method, based on molar absorptivities, is nearly fourfold that of procedures involving the reduction of NADP+.

  4. GPx8 peroxidase prevents leakage of H2O2 from the endoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramming, Thomas; Hansen, Henning G; Nagata, Kazuhiro; Ellgaard, Lars; Appenzeller-Herzog, Christian

    2014-05-01

    Unbalanced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis (ER stress) leads to increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Disulfide-bond formation in the ER by Ero1 family oxidases produces hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and thereby constitutes one potential source of ER-stress-induced ROS. However, we demonstrate that Ero1α-derived H2O2 is rapidly cleared by glutathione peroxidase (GPx) 8. In 293 cells, GPx8 and reduced/activated forms of Ero1α co-reside in the rough ER subdomain. Loss of GPx8 causes ER stress, leakage of Ero1α-derived H2O2 to the cytosol, and cell death. In contrast, peroxiredoxin (Prx) IV, another H2O2-detoxifying rough ER enzyme, does not protect from Ero1α-mediated toxicity, as is currently proposed. Only when Ero1α-catalyzed H2O2 production is artificially maximized can PrxIV participate in its reduction. We conclude that the peroxidase activity of the described Ero1α-GPx8 complex prevents diffusion of Ero1α-derived H2O2 within and out of the rough ER. Along with the induction of GPX8 in ER-stressed cells, these findings question a ubiquitous role of Ero1α as a producer of cytoplasmic ROS under ER stress. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Efficient production of Arthromyces ramosus peroxidase by Aspergillus awamori

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lokman, B.C.; Joosten, V.; Hovenkamp, J.; Gouka, R.J.; Verrips, C.T.; Hondel, C.A.M.J.J. van den

    2003-01-01

    The heterologous production of Arthromyces ramosus peroxidase (ARP) was analysed in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus awamori under control of the inducible endoxylanase promoter. Secretion of active ARP was achieved up to 800 mg l-1 in shake flask cultures. Western blot analysis showed that an rAR

  6. KINETICS OF QUERCETIN NITRATIO N BY HORSERADISH PEROXIDASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrija Šmelcerović

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study we investigated the kinetics of the nitration of quercetin by horseradish peroxidase. Quercetin nitration reaction was followed by recording the spectral changes over the time at 380 nm. The reaction rate increases with increasing of the quercetin concentration and follows the Michaelis-Menten type kinetics. Kinetic parameters of the studied enzymatic reaction were determined.

  7. An insight into the lignin peroxidase of Macrophomina phaseolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbar, Mohammed Touaha; Habib, Abdul Musaweer; Chowdhury, Dil Umme Salma; Bhuiyan, Md Iqbal Kaiser; Mostafa, Kazi Md Golam; Mondol, Sobuj; Mosleh, Ivan Mhai

    2013-01-01

    Macrophomina phaseolina is one of the deadliest necrotrophic fungal pathogens that infect more than 500 plant species including major food, fiber, and oil crops all throughout the globe. It secretes a cocktail of ligninolytic enzymes along with other hydrolytic enzymes for degrading the woody lignocellulosic plant cell wall and penetrating into the host tissue. Among them, lignin peroxidase has been reported only in Phanerochaete chrysosporium so far. But interestingly, a recent study has revealed a second occurrence of lignin peroxidase in M. phaseolina. However, lignin peroxidases are of much significance biotechnologically because of their potential applications in bio-remedial waste treatment and in catalyzing difficult chemical transformations. Besides, this enzyme also possesses agricultural and environmental importance on account of their role in lignin biodegradation. In the present work, different properties of the lignin peroxidase of M. phaseolina along with predicting the 3-D structure and its active sites were investigated by the use of various computational tools. The data from this study will pave the way for more detailed exploration of this enzyme in wet lab and thereby facilitating the strategies to be designed against such deadly weapons of Macrophomina phaseolina. Furthermore, the insight of such a ligninolytic enzyme will contribute to the assessment of its potentiality as a bioremediation tool.

  8. Efficient production of Arthromyces ramosus peroxidase by Aspergillus awamori

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lokman, B.C.; Joosten, V.; Hovenkamp, J.; Gouka, R.J.; Verrips, C.T.; Hondel, C.A.M.J.J. van den

    2003-01-01

    The heterologous production of Arthromyces ramosus peroxidase (ARP) was analysed in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus awamori under control of the inducible endoxylanase promoter. Secretion of active ARP was achieved up to 800 mg l-1 in shake flask cultures. Western blot analysis showed that an

  9. Mammalian heme peroxidases: from molecular mechanisms to health implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Michael J; Hawkins, Clare L; Pattison, David I; Rees, Martin D

    2008-07-01

    A marked increase in interest has occurred over the last few years in the role that mammalian heme peroxidase enzymes, primarily myeloperoxidase, eosinophil peroxidase, and lactoperoxidase, may play in both disease prevention and human pathologies. This increased interest has been sparked by developments in our understanding of polymorphisms that control the levels of these enzymes, a greater understanding of the basic chemistry and biochemistry of the oxidants formed by these species, the development of specific biomarkers that can be used in vivo to detect damage induced by these oxidants, the detection of active forms of these peroxidases at most, if not all, sites of inflammation, and a correlation between the levels of these enzymes and a number of major human pathologies. This article reviews recent developments in our understanding of the enzymology, chemistry, biochemistry and biologic roles of mammalian peroxidases and the oxidants that they generate, the potential role of these oxidants in human disease, and the use of the levels of these enzymes in disease prognosis.

  10. The glucose oxidase-peroxidase assay for glucose

    Science.gov (United States)

    The glucose oxidase-peroxidase assay for glucose has served as a very specific, sensitive, and repeatable assay for detection of glucose in biological samples. It has been used successfully for analysis of glucose in samples from blood and urine, to analysis of glucose released from starch or glycog...

  11. Mechanism of reaction of chlorite with mammalian heme peroxidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakopitsch, Christa; Pirker, Katharina F; Flemmig, Jörg; Hofbauer, Stefan; Schlorke, Denise; Furtmüller, Paul G; Arnhold, Jürgen; Obinger, Christian

    2014-06-01

    This study demonstrates that heme peroxidases from different superfamilies react differently with chlorite. In contrast to plant peroxidases, like horseradish peroxidase (HRP), the mammalian counterparts myeloperoxidase (MPO) and lactoperoxidase (LPO) are rapidly and irreversibly inactivated by chlorite in the micromolar concentration range. Chlorite acts as efficient one-electron donor for Compound I and Compound II of MPO and LPO and reacts with the corresponding ferric resting states in a biphasic manner. The first (rapid) phase is shown to correspond to the formation of a MPO-chlorite high-spin complex, whereas during the second (slower) phase degradation of the prosthetic group was observed. Cyanide, chloride and hydrogen peroxide can block or delay heme bleaching. In contrast to HRP, the MPO/chlorite system does not mediate chlorination of target molecules. Irreversible inactivation is shown to include heme degradation, iron release and decrease in thermal stability. Differences between mammalian peroxidases and HRP are discussed with respect to differences in active site architecture and heme modification.

  12. Structural and spectroscopic characterisation of a heme peroxidase from sorghum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nnamchi, Chukwudi I; Parkin, Gary; Efimov, Igor; Basran, Jaswir; Kwon, Hanna; Svistunenko, Dimitri A; Agirre, Jon; Okolo, Bartholomew N; Moneke, Anene; Nwanguma, Bennett C; Moody, Peter C E; Raven, Emma L

    2016-03-01

    A cationic class III peroxidase from Sorghum bicolor was purified to homogeneity. The enzyme contains a high-spin heme, as evidenced by UV-visible spectroscopy and EPR. Steady state oxidation of guaiacol was demonstrated and the enzyme was shown to have higher activity in the presence of calcium ions. A Fe(III)/Fe(II) reduction potential of -266 mV vs NHE was determined. Stopped-flow experiments with H2O2 showed formation of a typical peroxidase Compound I species, which converts to Compound II in the presence of calcium. A crystal structure of the enzyme is reported, the first for a sorghum peroxidase. The structure reveals an active site that is analogous to those for other class I heme peroxidase, and a substrate binding site (assigned as arising from binding of indole-3-acetic acid) at the γ-heme edge. Metal binding sites are observed in the structure on the distal (assigned as a Na(+) ion) and proximal (assigned as a Ca(2+)) sides of the heme, which is consistent with the Ca(2+)-dependence of the steady state and pre-steady state kinetics. It is probably the case that the structural integrity (and, thus, the catalytic activity) of the sorghum enzyme is dependent on metal ion incorporation at these positions.

  13. Electrochemical Detection of Horseradish Peroxidase at Zeptomole Level

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    An electrochemical method for determination of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was developed using a capillary catalytic system. HRP can be measured in several minutes with a detection limit of 4.8×10-12 mol/L or 47 zmol (S/N=3).

  14. Manganese Catalyzed C-H Halogenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Groves, John T

    2015-06-16

    The remarkable aliphatic C-H hydroxylations catalyzed by the heme-containing enzyme, cytochrome P450, have attracted sustained attention for more than four decades. The effectiveness of P450 enzymes as highly selective biocatalysts for a wide range of oxygenation reactions of complex substrates has driven chemists to develop synthetic metalloporphyrin model compounds that mimic P450 reactivity. Among various known metalloporphyrins, manganese derivatives have received considerable attention since they have been shown to be versatile and powerful mediators for alkane hydroxylation and olefin epoxidation. Mechanistic studies have shown that the key intermediates of the manganese porphyrin-catalyzed oxygenation reactions include oxo- and dioxomanganese(V) species that transfer an oxygen atom to the substrate through a hydrogen abstraction/oxygen recombination pathway known as the oxygen rebound mechanism. Application of manganese porphyrins has been largely restricted to catalysis of oxygenation reactions until recently, however, due to ultrafast oxygen transfer rates. In this Account, we discuss recently developed carbon-halogen bond formation, including fluorination reactions catalyzed by manganese porphyrins and related salen species. We found that biphasic sodium hypochlorite/manganese porphyrin systems can efficiently and selectively convert even unactivated aliphatic C-H bonds to C-Cl bonds. An understanding of this novel reactivity derived from results obtained for the oxidation of the mechanistically diagnostic substrate and radical clock, norcarane. Significantly, the oxygen rebound rate in Mn-mediated hydroxylation is highly correlated with the nature of the trans-axial ligands bound to the manganese center (L-Mn(V)═O). Based on the ability of fluoride ion to decelerate the oxygen rebound step, we envisaged that a relatively long-lived substrate radical could be trapped by a Mn-F fluorine source, effecting carbon-fluorine bond formation. Indeed, this idea

  15. Autogenous electrolyte, non-pyrolytically produced solid capacitor structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, D.J.; Armstrong, P.S.; Panitz, J.K.G.

    1998-03-17

    A solid electrolytic capacitor is described having a solid electrolyte comprising manganese dioxide dispersed in an aromatic polyamide capable of further cure to form polyimide linkages, the solid electrolyte being disposed between a first electrode made of valve metal covered by an anodic oxide film and a second electrode opposite the first electrode. The electrolyte autogenously produces water, oxygen, and hydroxyl groups which act as healing substances and is not itself produced pyrolytically. Reduction of the manganese dioxide and the water molecules released by formation of imide linkages result in substantially improved self-healing of anodic dielectric layer defects. 2 figs.

  16. Degradation of textile dyes mediated by plant peroxidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffiqu, T S; Roy, J Jegan; Nair, R Aswathi; Abraham, T Emilia

    2002-01-01

    The peroxidase enzyme from the plants Ipomea palmata (1.003 IU/g of leaf) and Saccharum spontaneum (3.6 IU/g of leaf) can be used as an alternative to the commercial source of horseradish and soybean peroxidase enzyme for the decolorization of textile dyes, mainly azo dyes. Eight textiles dyes currently used by the industry and seven other dyes were selected for decolorization studies at 25-200 mg/L levels using these plant enzymes. The enzymes were purified prior to use by ammonium sulfate precipitation, and ion exchange and gel permeation chromatographic techniques. Peroxidase of S. spontaneum leaf (specific activity of 0.23 IU/mg) could completely degrade Supranol Green and Procion Green HE-4BD (100%) dyes within 1 h, whereas Direct Blue, Procion Brilliant Blue H-7G and Chrysoidine were degraded >70% in 1 h. Peroxidase of Ipomea (I. palmata leaf; specific activity of 0.827 U/mg) degraded 50 mg/L of the dyes Methyl Orange (26%), Crystal Violet (36%), and Supranol Green (68%) in 2-4 h and Brilliant Green (54%), Direct Blue (15%), and Chrysoidine (44%) at the 25 mg/L level in 1 to 2 h of treatment. The Saccharum peroxidase was immobilized on a hydrophobic matrix. Four textile dyes, Procion Navy Blue HER, Procion Brilliant Blue H-7G, Procion Green HE-4BD, and Supranol Green, at an initial concentration of 50 mg/L were completely degraded within 8 h by the enzyme immobilized on the modified polyethylene matrix. The immobilized enzyme was used in a batch reactor for the degradation of Procion Green HE-4BD and the reusability was studied for 15 cycles, and the half-life was found to be 60 h.

  17. Ethylene production and peroxidase activity in aphid-infested barley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argandoña, V H; Chaman, M; Cardemil, L; Muñoz, O; Zúñiga, G E; Corcuera, L J

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate whether ethylene is involved in the oxidative and defensive responses of barley to the aphids Schizaphis graminum (biotype C) and Rhopalophum padi. The effect of aphid infestation on ethylene production was measured in two barley cultivars (Frontera and Aramir) that differ in their susceptibility to aphids. Ethylene evolution was higher in plants infested for 16 hr than in plants infested for 4 hr in both cultivars. Under aphid infestation, the production of ethylene was higher in cv. Frontera than in Aramir, the more aphid susceptible cultivar. Ethylene production also increases with the degree of infestation. Maximum ethylene evolution was detected after 16 hr when plants were infested with 10 or more aphids. Comparing the two species of aphids, Schizaphis graminum induced more ethylene evolution than Rhopalosiphum padi. Infestation with S. graminum increased hydrogen peroxide content and total soluble peroxidase activity in cv. Frontera, with a maximum level of H2O2 observed after 20 min of infestation and the maximum in soluble peroxidase activity after 30 min of infestation. When noninfested barley seedlings from cv. Frontera were exposed to ethylene, an increase in hydrogen peroxide and in total peroxidase activity was detected at levels similar to those of infested plants from cv. Frontera. When noninfested plants were treated with 40 ppm of ethylene, the maximum levels of H2O2 and soluble peroxidase activity were at 10 and 40 min, respectively. Ethylene also increased the activity of both cell-wall-bound peroxidases types (ionically and covalently bound), comparable with infestation. These results suggest that ethylene is involved in the oxidative responses of barley plants induced by infestation.

  18. Candida albicans biofilm on titanium: effect of peroxidase precoating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Ahariz

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Mohamed Ahariz1, Philippe Courtois1,21Laboratory of Experimental Hormonology, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, 2UER de Biologie Médicale, Haute Ecole Francisco Ferrer, Brussels, BelgiumAbstract: The present study aimed to document Candida albicans biofilm development on titanium and its modulation by a peroxidase-precoated material which can generate antimicrobials, such as hypoiodite or hypothiocyanite, from hydrogen peroxide, iodide, or thiocyanate. For this purpose, titanium (powder or foil was suspended in Sabouraud liquid medium inoculated with C. albicans ATCC10231. After continuous stirring for 2–21 days at room temperature, the supernatant was monitored by turbidimetry at 600 nm and titanium washed three times in sterile Sabouraud broth. Using the tetrazolium salt MTT-formazan assay, the titanium-adherent fungal biomass was measured as 7.50 ± 0.60 × 106 blastoconidia per gram of titanium powder (n = 30 and 0.50 ± 0.04 × 106 blastoconidia per cm² of titanium foil (n = 12. The presence of yeast on the surface of titanium was confirmed by microscopy both on fresh preparations and after calcofluor white staining. However, in the presence of peroxidase systems (lactoperoxidase with substrates such as hydrogen peroxide donor, iodide, or thiocyanate, Candida growth in both planktonic and attached phases appeared to be inhibited. Moreover, this study demonstrates the possible partition of peroxidase systems between titanium material (peroxidase-precoated and liquid environment (containing peroxidase substrates to limit C. albicans biofilm formation.Keywords: adhesion, material, oral, yeast

  19. Comparison of two Agricultural Wastes for Phenol Removal Via Peroxidase-Catalyzed Enzymatic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiong Tung

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural wastes of jicama and luffa skin peels were used as the source for peroxidase extraction. The extracted crude enzymes showed similar activities, 1.34U/mL and 1.22U/mL for jicama and luffa peroxidase respectively. These peroxidases were used to treat phenol under varying operating conditions of buffer pH, hydrogen peroxide concentration, enzyme volume and temperature. Jicama peroxidase demonstrated a phenol removal efficiency of approximately 90% at buffer pH 7, 1mM hydrogen peroxide using 1.5mL enzyme at 25°C. Luffa peroxidase required a higher dosage of hydrogen peroxide, and exhibited a removal efficiency of 84% at 8mM with other operating conditions same as jicama peroxidase. Jicama peroxidase is sensitive to pH change and more susceptible to thermal denaturation. Luffa peroxidase showed a better stability in terms of temperature.

  20. Role of Amorphous Manganese Oxide in Nitrogen Loss

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LILIANG-MO; WUQI-TU

    1991-01-01

    Studies have been made,by 15N-tracer technique on nitrogen loss resulting from adding amorphous manganese oxide to NH4+-N medium under anaerobic conditions.The fact that the total nitrogen recovery was decreased and that 15NO2,15N2O,15N14NO,15NO,15N2 and 15N14N were emitted has proved that,like amorphous iron oxide,amorphous manganese oxide can also act as an electron acceptor in the oxidation of NH4+-N under anaerobic conditions and give rise to nitrogen loss.This once again illustrates another mechanism by which the loss of ammonium nitrogen in paddy soils is brought about by amorphous iron and manganese oxides.The quantity of nitrogen loss by amorphous manganese oxide increased with an increase in the amount of amorphous manganese oxide added and lessened with time of its aging.The nitrogen loss resulting from amorphous manganese oxide was less than that from amorphous iron oxide.And the nitrogen loss resulting from amorphous manganese oxide was less than that from amorphous iron oxide.And the nitrogen loss by cooperation of amorphous manganese oxide and microorganisms (soil suspension) was larger than that by amorphous manganese oxide alone.In the system,nitrogen loss was associated with the specific surface ares and oxidation-reduction of amorphous manganese oxide.However,their quantitative relationship and the exact reaction processes of nitrogen loss induced by amorphous manganese oxide remain to be further studied.

  1. Oxidative aliphatic C-H fluorination with manganese catalysts and fluoride ion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Huang, Xiongyi; Groves, John T

    2013-12-01

    Fluorination is a reaction that is useful in improving the chemical stability and changing the binding affinity of biologically active compounds. The protocol described here can be used to replace aliphatic, C(sp(3))-H hydrogen in small molecules with fluorine. Notably, isolated methylene groups and unactivated benzylic sites are accessible. The method uses readily available manganese porphyrin and manganese salen catalysts and various fluoride ion reagents, including silver fluoride (AgF), tetrabutylammonium fluoride and triethylamine trihydrofluoride (TREAT·HF), as the source of fluorine. Typically, the reactions afford 50-70% yield of mono-fluorinated products in one step. Two representative examples, the fragrance component celestolide and the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen, are described; they produced useful isolated quantities (250-300 mg, ~50% yield) of fluorinated material over periods of 1-8 h. The procedures are performed in a typical fume hood using ordinary laboratory glassware. No special precautions to rigorously exclude water are required.

  2. Controllable cyanation of carbon-hydrogen bonds by zeolite crystals over manganese oxide catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang; Wang, Guoxiong; Zhang, Jian; Bian, Chaoqun; Meng, Xiangju; Xiao, Feng-Shou

    2017-05-01

    The synthesis of organic nitriles without using toxic cyanides is in great demand but challenging to make. Here we report an environmentally benign and cost-efficient synthesis of nitriles from the direct oxidative cyanation of primary carbon-hydrogen bonds with easily available molecular oxygen and urea. The key to this success is to design and synthesize manganese oxide catalysts fixed inside zeolite crystals, forming a manganese oxide catalyst with zeolite sheath (MnOx@S-1), which exhibits high selectivity for producing nitriles by efficiently facilitating the oxidative cyanation reaction and hindering the side hydration reaction. The work delineates a sustainable strategy for synthesizing nitriles while avoiding conventional toxic cyanide, which might open a new avenue for selective transformation of carbon-hydrogen bonds.

  3. Microstructures and Properties of Medium Manganese Sheet Steels - Strategies and Opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rana, Radhakanta [CSM/ASPPRC; De Moor, Emmanuel [CSM/ASPPRC; Speer, John G [CSM/ASPPRC; Matlock, David K [CSM/ASPPRC

    2015-10-06

    Medium manganese steels, with 3 to 10 wt pct Mn, have been shown to be capable of being thermally-processed to produce sheet products with a variety of strength-ductility combinations and thus are receiving considerable attention as candidates for 3rd generation advanced high strength steels (3GAHSS). The steels typically contain refined microstructures with characteristic microstructural dimensions of 1 to 2 µm and consist of significant amounts of retained austenite in a fine grained ferritic matrix. Strategies for development of medium manganese steels are reviewed and results of recent property predictions based on composite modeling are presented. The importance of controlling austenite stability is illustrated with data on medium Mn (7 and 10 wt pct.), low carbon (0.1 and 0.15 wt pct) steels. Important forming variables (strain, strain rate, and temperature) are discussed, along with a consideration of yield point elongation, present in many medium Mn steels.

  4. Pleurotus ostreatus manganese‐dependent peroxidase silencing impairs decolourization of Orange II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salame, Tomer M.; Yarden, Oded; Hadar, Yitzhak

    2010-01-01

    Summary Decolourization of azo dyes by Pleurotus ostreatus, a white‐rot fungus capable of lignin depolymerization and mineralization, is related to the ligninolytic activity of enzymes produced by this fungus. The capacity of P. ostreatus to decolourize the azo dye Orange II (OII) was dependent and positively co‐linear to Mn2+ concentration in the medium, and thus attributed to Mn2+‐dependent peroxidase (MnP) activity. Based on the ongoing P. ostreatus genome deciphering project we identified at least nine genes encoding for MnP gene family members (mnp1–9), of which only four (mnp1–4) were previously known. Relative real‐time PCR quantification analysis confirmed that all the nine genes are transcribed, and that Mn2+ amendment results in a drastic increase in the transcript levels of the predominantly expressed MnP genes (mnp3 and mnp9), while decreasing versatile peroxidase gene transcription (mnp4). A reverse genetics strategy based on silencing the P. ostreatus mnp3 gene by RNAi was implemented. Knock‐down of mnp3 resulted in the reduction of fungal OII decolourization capacity, which was co‐linear with marked silencing of the Mn2+‐dependent peroxidase genes mnp3 and mnp9. This is the first direct genetic proof of an association between MnP gene expression levels and azo dye decolourization capacity in P. ostreatus, which may have significant implication on understanding the mechanisms governing lignin biodegradation. Moreover, this study has proven the applicability of RNAi as a tool for gene function studies in Pleurotus research. PMID:21255310

  5. Vascular defense responses in rice: peroxidase accumulation in xylem parenchyma cells and xylem wall thickening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilaire, E.; Young, S. A.; Willard, L. H.; McGee, J. D.; Sweat, T.; Chittoor, J. M.; Guikema, J. A.; Leach, J. E.

    2001-01-01

    The rice bacterial blight pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae is a vascular pathogen that elicits a defensive response through interaction with metabolically active rice cells. In leaves of 12-day-old rice seedlings, the exposed pit membrane separating the xylem lumen from the associated parenchyma cells allows contact with bacterial cells. During resistant responses, the xylem secondary walls thicken within 48 h and the pit diameter decreases, effectively reducing the area of pit membrane exposed for access by bacteria. In susceptible interactions and mock-inoculated controls, the xylem walls do not thicken within 48 h. Xylem secondary wall thickening is developmental and, in untreated 65-day-old rice plants, the size of the pit also is reduced. Activity and accumulation of a secreted cationic peroxidase, PO-C1, were previously shown to increase in xylem vessel walls and lumen. Peptide-specific antibodies and immunogold-labeling were used to demonstrate that PO-C1 is produced in the xylem parenchyma and secreted to the xylem lumen and walls. The timing of the accumulation is consistent with vessel secondary wall thickening. The PO-C1 gene is distinct but shares a high level of similarity with previously cloned pathogen-induced peroxidases in rice. PO-C1 gene expression was induced as early as 12 h during resistant interactions and peaked between 18 and 24 h after inoculation. Expression during susceptible interactions was lower than that observed in resistant interactions and was undetectable after infiltration with water, after mechanical wounding, or in mature leaves. These data are consistent with a role for vessel secondary wall thickening and peroxidase PO-C1 accumulation in the defense response in rice to X. oryzae pv. oryzae.

  6. Molecular identification of indigenous manganese solubilising bacterial biodiversity from manganese mining deposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Shreya; Mohanty, Sansuta; Nayak, Sanghamitra; Sukla, Lala B; Das, Alok P

    2016-03-01

    Manganese (Mn) ranks twelfth among the most exuberant metal present in the earth's crust and finds its imperative application in the manufacturing steel, chemical, tannery, glass, and battery industries. Solubilisation of Mn can be performed by several bacterial strains which are useful in developing environmental friendly solutions for mining activities. The present investigation aims to isolate and characterize Mn solubilising bacteria from low grade ores from Sanindipur Manganese mine of Sundargh district in Odisha state of India. Four morphologically distinct bacterial strains showing visible growth on Mn supplemented plates were isolated. Mn solubilising ability of the bacterial strains was assessed by visualizing the lightening of the medium appearing around the growing colonies. Three isolates were gram negative and rod shaped while the remaining one was gram positive, coccobacilli. Molecular identification of the isolates was carried out by 16S rRNA sequencing and the bacterial isolates were taxonomically classified as Bacillus anthrasis MSB 2, Acinetobacter sp. MSB 5, Lysinibacillus sp. MSB 11, and Bacillus sp. MMR-1 using BLAST algorithm. The sequences were deposited in NCBI GenBank with the accession number KP635223, KP635224, KP635225 and JQ936966, respectively. Manganese solubilisation efficiency of 40, 96, 97.5 and 48.5% were achieved by MMR-1, MSB 2, MSB 5 and MSB 11 respectively. The efficiency of Mn solubilisation is suggested with the help of a pH variation study. The results are discussed in relation to the possible mechanisms involved in Manganese solubilisation efficiency of bacterial isolates.

  7. Manganese Loading and Photosystem II Stability are Key Components of Manganese Efficiency in Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Sidsel Birkelund

    Manganese (Mn) deficiency constitutes a major plant nutritional problem in commercial crop production of winter cereals. In plants, Mn has an indispensable role in the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII). Hence, the consequences of Mn deficiency are reduced plant growth...

  8. Chlorpromazine as permeabilizer and reagent for detection of microbial peroxidase and peroxidaselike activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeazzi, L; Turchetti, G; Grilli, G; Groppa, G; Giunta, S

    1986-01-01

    Chlorpromazine was used to perform a test for the detection of microbial peroxidase activities. The compound acts as both a cell permeabilizer and a reagent in the procedure developed which allows the detection of peroxidase and peroxidase like reactions both semiquantitatively in whole cell determinations and quantitatively in cell-free supernatants. PMID:3539020

  9. DyP‑type peroxidases : a promising and versatile class of enzymes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colpa, Dana I.; Fraaije, Marco W.; Bloois, Edwin van

    2014-01-01

    DyP peroxidases comprise a novel superfamily of heme-containing peroxidases, which is unrelated to the superfamilies of plant and animal peroxidases. These enzymes have so far been identified in the genomes of fungi, bacteria, as well as archaea, although their physiological function is still unclea

  10. [Characterization of lignin and Mn peroxidases from Phanerochaete chrysosporium]. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    Lignin peroxidases were investigated with respect to enzyme kinetics and NMR spectroscopy of the heme domain. MN peroxidases were studied with respect to the role of oxalate in enzyme activity, the NMR spectroscopy of the heme domain. Gene expression of both lignin and MN peroxidases were examined as well as expression of site-directed mutants aimed at scale up production of these enzymes.

  11. Adsorptive removal of manganese, arsenic and iron from groundwater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buamah, R.

    2009-01-01

    Arsenic, manganese and iron in drinking water at concentrations exceeding recommended guideline values pose health risks and aesthetic defects. Batch and pilot experiments on manganese adsorption equilibrium and kinetics using iron-oxide coated sand (IOCS), Aquamandix and other media have been

  12. Adsorptive removal of manganese, arsenic and iron from groundwater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buamah, R.

    2009-01-01

    Arsenic, manganese and iron in drinking water at concentrations exceeding recommended guideline values pose health risks and aesthetic defects. Batch and pilot experiments on manganese adsorption equilibrium and kinetics using iron-oxide coated sand (IOCS), Aquamandix and other media have been inve

  13. Sony Co., Ltd.: An outlook is made for merchandising of the manganese acid lithium ion battery; Mangansan richiumuion denchi no shohinka ni medo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    Sony Co., Ltd. sells the manganese acid lithium ion battery that a battery is 1 by 2 as to the next generation lithium ion during 99 years. It is characteristics that a price is restrained because manganese is used for the proper pole material instead of cobalt of the rare metal. It becomes mass production by Koriyama factory where a lithium ion battery is being manufactured improving an existent production line. It is seen when some percents of manufacture cost goes down more than cobalt acid battery of news file before. A manganese acid lithium ion battery uses manganese acid lithium for the proper pole of the battery. The efficiency of the charge of the usual lithium ion battery is good, and composition is easy, and uses cobalt acid lithium, which is easy to produce. One side where a material fee is cheap, the stability at the high temperature of manganese acid is low, and composition is difficult. Only NEC Moli Energy corporation who is the subsidiary company of NEC succeeds in the mass production. NEC Moli Energy corporation is extending market share by the price competition power. It seems to have the possibility that manganese acid becomes the main force with a battery by two by new entering of Sony Co., Ltd. of the lithium ion battery extreme big enterprises. (translated by NEDO)

  14. Identification and Characterization of a Putative Manganese Export Protein in Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Carolyn R; Wyckoff, Elizabeth E; Peng, Eric D; Payne, Shelley M

    2016-10-15

    Manganese plays an important role in the cellular physiology and metabolism of bacterial species, including the human pathogen Vibrio cholerae The intracellular level of manganese ions is controlled through coordinated regulation of the import and export of this element. We have identified a putative manganese exporter (VC0022), named mneA (manganese exporter A), which is highly conserved among Vibrio spp. An mneA mutant exhibited sensitivity to manganese but not to other cations. Under high-manganese conditions, the mneA mutant showed an almost 50-fold increase in intracellular manganese levels and reduced intracellular iron relative to those of its wild-type parent, suggesting that the mutant's manganese sensitivity is due to the accumulation of toxic levels of manganese and reduced iron. Expression of mneA suppressed the manganese-sensitive phenotype of an Escherichia coli strain carrying a mutation in the nonhomologous manganese export gene, mntP, further supporting a manganese export function for V. cholerae MneA. The level of mneA mRNA was induced approximately 2.5-fold after addition of manganese to the medium, indicating regulation of this gene by manganese. This study offers the first insights into understanding manganese homeostasis in this important pathogen. Bacterial cells control intracellular metal concentrations by coordinating acquisition in metal-limited environments with export in metal-excess environments. We identified a putative manganese export protein, MneA, in Vibrio cholerae An mneA mutant was sensitive to manganese, and this effect was specific to manganese. The mneA mutant accumulated high levels of intracellular manganese with a concomitant decrease in intracellular iron levels when grown in manganese-supplemented medium. Expression of mneA in trans suppressed the manganese sensitivity of an E. coli mntP mutant. This study is the first to investigate manganese export in V. cholerae. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology

  15. Differential activity and structure of highly similar peroxidases. Spectroscopic, crystallographic, and enzymatic analyses of lignifying Arabidopsis thaliana peroxidase A2 and horseradish peroxidase A2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, K L; Indiani, C; Henriksen, A; Feis, A; Becucci, M; Gajhede, M; Smulevich, G; Welinder, K G

    2001-09-18

    Anionic Arabidopsis thaliana peroxidase ATP A2 was expressed in Escherichia coli and used as a model for the 95% identical commercially available horseradish peroxidase HRP A2. The crystal structure of ATP A2 at 1.45 A resolution at 100 K showed a water molecule only 2.1 A from heme iron [Ostergaard, L., et al. (2000) Plant Mol. Biol. 44, 231-243], whereas spectroscopic studies of HRP A2 in solution at room temperature [Feis, A., et al. (1998) J. Raman Spectrosc. 29, 933-938] showed five-coordinated heme iron, which is common in peroxidases. Presented here, the X-ray crystallographic, single-crystal, and solution resonance Raman studies at room temperature confirmed that the sixth coordination position of heme iron of ATP A2 is essentially vacant. Furthermore, electronic absorption and resonance Raman spectroscopy showed that the heme environments of recombinant ATP A2 and glycosylated plant HRP A2 are indistinguishable at neutral and alkaline pH, from room temperature to 12 K, and are highly flexible compared with other plant peroxidases. Ostergaard et al. (2000) also demonstrated that ATP A2 expression and lignin formation coincide in Arabidopsis tissues, and docking of lignin precursors into the substrate binding site of ATP A2 predicted that coniferyl and p-coumaryl alcohols were good substrates. In contrast, the additional methoxy group of the sinapyl moiety gave rise to steric hindrance, not only in A2 type peroxidases but also in all peroxidases. We confirm these predictions for ATP A2, HRP A2, and HRP C. The specific activity of ATP A2 was lower than that of HRP A2 (pH 4-8), although a steady-state study at pH 5 demonstrated very little difference in their rate constants for reaction with H2O2 (k1 = 1.0 microM(-1) x s(-1). The oxidation of coniferyl alcohol, ferulic, p-coumaric, and sinapic acids by HRP A2, and ATP A2, however, gave modest but significantly different k3 rate constants of 8.7 +/- 0.3, 4.0 +/- 0.2, 0.70 +/- 0.03, and 0.04 +/- 0.2 microM(-1) x

  16. A novel colorimetric method for the detection of Escherichia coli using cytochrome c peroxidase-encoding bacteriophage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Hoang A; Abe, Michiharu; Nakasaki, Kiyohiko

    2014-03-01

    A new rapid and simple method was developed for the detection of Escherichia coli by constructing a recombinant T4 phage carrying the cytochrome c peroxidase gene derived from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (T4ccp) using which, the colorimetric detection of E. coli K12 was examined. The oxidation activity toward the chromogenic substrate cytochrome c was demonstrated by the cytochrome c peroxidase (CCP) produced from the T4ccp genome. The color change caused by the oxidation of the substrate could be visually perceived. The possibility of interference in the detection by the coexistence of other bacteria was assessed using Pseudomonas aeruginosa as a nontarget bacterium, and it was confirmed that the coexistence of P. aeruginosa caused no interference in the detection of E. coli K12.

  17. Mobilization of manganese by basalt associated Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria from the Indian Ridge System

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sujith, P.P.; Mourya, B.S.; Krishnamurthi, S.; Meena, R.M.; LokaBharathi, P.A.

    %) after growth for detecting amylase activity. The hydrolysis of starch and tributyrin was observed as clear halos surrounding the colony. Similarly, screening for cellulase producers was on carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) agar (0.2% NaNO3, 0.1% K2HPO4, 0.... Solubilization of manganese from ores by heterotrophic micro-organisms. Hydrometallurgy 29,131-144. Bairagi, A., Ghosh, K., Sen, S.K., Ray, A.K., 2002. Enzyme producing bacterial flora isolated from fish digestive tracts. Aquacult. Int. 10, 109-121. Boone, D...

  18. Manganese accumulation in the brain: MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchino, A.; Nomiyama, K.; Takase, Y.; Nakazono, T.; Nojiri, J.; Kudo, S. [Saga Medical School, Department of Radiology, Saga (Japan); Noguchi, T. [Kyushu University, Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2007-09-15

    Manganese (Mn) accumulation in the brain is detected as symmetrical high signal intensity in the globus pallidi on T1-weighted MR images without an abnormal signal on T2-weighted images. In this review, we present several cases of Mn accumulation in the brain due to acquired or congenital diseases of the abdomen including hepatic cirrhosis with a portosystemic shunt, congenital biliary atresia, primary biliary cirrhosis, congenital intrahepatic portosystemic shunt without liver dysfunction, Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome with a diffuse intrahepatic portosystemic shunt, and patent ductus venosus. Other causes of Mn accumulation in the brain are Mn overload from total parenteral nutrition and welding-related Mn intoxication. (orig.)

  19. Preparation of highly efficient manganese catalase mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triller, Michael U; Hsieh, Wen-Yuan; Pecoraro, Vincent L; Rompel, Annette; Krebs, Bernt

    2002-10-21

    The series of compounds [Mn(bpia)(mu-OAc)](2)(ClO(4))(2) (1), [Mn(2)(bpia)(2)(muO)(mu-OAc)](ClO(4))(3).CH(3)CN (2), [Mn(bpia)(mu-O)](2)(ClO(4))(2)(PF(6)).2CH(3)CN (3), [Mn(bpia)(Cl)(2)](ClO)(4) (4), and [(Mn(bpia)(Cl))(2)(mu-O)](ClO(4))(2).2CH(3)CN (5) (bpia = bis(picolyl)(N-methylimidazol-2-yl)amine) represents a structural, spectroscopic, and functional model system for manganese catalases. Compounds 3 and 5 have been synthesized from 2 via bulk electrolysis and ligand exchange, respectively. All complexes have been structurally characterized by X-ray crystallography and by UV-vis and EPR spectroscopies. The different bridging ligands including the rare mono-mu-oxo and mono-mu-oxo-mono-mu-carboxylato motifs lead to a variation of the Mn-Mn separation across the four binuclear compounds of 1.50 A (Mn(2)(II,II) = 4.128 A, Mn(2)(III,III) = 3.5326 and 3.2533 A, Mn(2)(III,IV) = 2.624 A). Complexes 1, 2, and 3 are mimics for the Mn(2)(II,II), the Mn(2)(III,III), and the Mn(2)(III,IV) oxidation states of the native enzyme. UV-vis spectra of these compounds show similarities to those of the corresponding oxidation states of manganese catalase from Thermus thermophilus and Lactobacillus plantarum. Compound 2 exhibits a rare example of a Jahn-Teller compression. While complexes 1 and 3 are efficient catalysts for the disproportionation of hydrogen peroxide and contain an N(4)O(2) donor set, 4 and 5 show no catalase activity. These complexes have an N(4)Cl(2) and N(4)OCl donor set, respectively, and serve as mimics for halide inhibited manganese catalases. Cyclovoltammetric data show that the substitution of oxygen donor atoms with chloride causes a shift of redox potentials to more positive values. To our knowledge, complex 1 is the most efficient binuclear functional manganese catalase mimic exhibiting saturation kinetics to date.

  20. Toxicity of manganese metallodrugs toward Danio rerio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Anderson; Borella, Maria Inês; Espósito, Breno Pannia

    2014-02-01

    Manganese is an essential metal which can be neurotoxic in some instances. As Mn-based metallodrugs are ever more prevalent in clinical practice, concern regarding the toxic effects of Mn discharges to water bodies on the biota prompted us to study the physicochemical parameters of these complexes and to assess their acute toxicity toward adult Danio rerio individuals, particularly in terms of brain tissue damage. Our results show that the Mn(III)-salen acetate complex EUK108 is toxic, which can be rationalized in terms of its lipophilicity, stability and redox activity.