WorldWideScience

Sample records for management drug study

  1. Drug use in business bathrooms: An exploratory study of manager encounters in New York City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfson-Stofko, Brett; Bennett, Alex S.; Elliott, Luther; Curtis, Ric

    2017-01-01

    Background Though public bathroom drug injection has been documented from the perspective of people who inject drugs, no research has explored the experiences of the business managers who oversee their business bathrooms and respond to drug use. These managers, by default, are first-responders in the event of a drug overdose and thus of intrinsic interest during the current epidemic of opioid-related overdoses in the United States. This exploratory study assists in elucidating the experiences that New York City business managers have with people who inject drugs, their paraphernalia, and their overdoses. Methods A survey instrument was designed to collect data on manager encounters with drug use occurring in their business bathrooms. Recruitment was guided by convenience and purposive approaches. Results More than half of managers interviewed (58%, n = 50/86) encountered drug use in their business bathrooms, more than a third (34%) of these managers also found syringes, and the vast majority (90%) of managers had received no overdose recognition or naloxone training. Seven managers encountered unresponsive individuals who required emergency assistance. Conclusion The results from this study underscore the need for additional research on the experiences that community stakeholders have with public injection as well as educational outreach efforts among business managers. This research also suggests that there is need for a national dialogue about potential interventions, including expanded overdose recognition and naloxone training and supervised injection facilities (SIF)/drug consumption rooms (DCR), that could reduce public injection and its associated health risks. PMID:27768996

  2. Study Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to quit, they may have withdrawal symptoms like depression, thoughts of suicide, intense drug cravings, sleep problems, and fatigue. The health risks aren't the only downside to study drugs. Students caught with illegal prescription drugs may get suspended ...

  3. Drug abuse identification and pain management in dental patients: a case study and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Fahmida; Frare, Robert W; Py Berrios, Karen L

    2012-01-01

    Properly identifying patients with a history of drug abuse is the first step in providing effective dental care. Dental professionals need to be fully aware of the challenges associated with treating this population. In the current study, the authors analyzed the physical and oral manifestations of illicit drug abuse to aid in the identification of patients who abuse drugs and the pain management strategies needed to treat them. The authors also present a clinical case of a patient with unique skin lesions and discuss the typical clinical findings of drug abuse based on a literature review.

  4. Drug procurement and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salhotra, V S

    2003-03-01

    A strong drug procurement and management system under the RNTCP is critical to programme success. Significant improvements in manufacturing, inspection, supply, storage and quality control practices and procedures have been achieved due to an intensive RNTCP network. Drugs used in RNTCP are rifampicin, isoniazid, ethambutol, pyrazinamide and streptomycin. Patients of TB are categorised into I, II and III and each category has a different standarised treatment. Procurement, distribution system and quality assurance of drugs are narrated in brief in this article.

  5. Collaborative Behavioral Management for Drug-Involved Parolees: Rationale and Design of the Step'n Out Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedmann, Peter D.; Katz, Elizabeth C.; Rhodes, Anne G.; Taxman, Faye S.; O'Connell, Daniel J.; Frisman, Linda K.; Burdon, William M.; Fletcher, Bennett W.; Litt, Mark D.; Clarke, Jennifer; Martin, Steven S.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the rationale, study design, and implementation for the Step'n Out study of the Criminal Justice Drug Abuse Treatment Studies. Step'n Out tests the relative effectiveness of collaborative behavioral management of drug-involved parolees. Collaborative behavioral management integrates the roles of parole officers and treatment…

  6. Study Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Lam, Stephanie Phuong; Roosta, Natalie; Nielsen, Mikkel Fuhr; Meyer, Maria Holmgaard; Friis, Katrine Birk

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, students around the world, started to use preparations as Ritalin and Modafinil,also known as study drugs, to improve their cognitive abilities1. It is a common use among thestudents in United States of America, but it is a new tendency in Denmark. Our main focus is tolocate whether study drugs needs to be legalized in Denmark or not. To investigate this ourstarting point is to understand central ethical arguments in the debate. We have chosen twoarguments from Nick Bostrom a...

  7. Drug Safety: Managing Multiple Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... This series is produced by Consumers Union and Consumer Reports Best Buy Drugs , a public information project sup- ported by grants from the Engelberg Foundation and the National Library of Medicine of ... Consumer and Prescriber Education Grant Program which is funded ...

  8. Learning to manage vasoactive drugs-A qualitative interview study with critical care nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häggström, Marie; Bergsman, Ann-Christin; Månsson, Ulrika; Holmström, Malin Rising

    2017-04-01

    Being a nurse in an intensive care unit entails caring for seriously ill patients. Vasoactive drugs are one of the tools that are used to restore adequate circulation. Critical care nurses often manage and administer these potent drugs after medical advice from physicians. To describe the experiences of critical care nurses learning to manage vasoactive drugs, and to highlight the competence required to manage vasoactive drugs. Twelve critical care nurses from three hospitals in Sweden were interviewed. Qualitative content analysis was applied. The theme "becoming proficient requires accuracy, practice and precaution" illustrated how critical care nurses learn to manage vasoactive drugs. Learning included developing cognitive, psychomotor, and effective skills. Sources for knowledge refers to specialist education combined with practical exercises, collegial support, and accessible routine documents. The competence required to manage vasoactive drugs encompassed well-developed safety thinking that included being careful, in control, and communicating failures. Specific skills were required such as titrating doses, being able to analyse and evaluate the technological assessments, adapting to the situation, and staying calm. Learning to manage vasoactive drugs requires a supportive introduction for novices, collegial support, lifelong learning, and a culture of safety. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Drug utilization research and risk management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mazzaglia, Giampiero; Mol, Peter G. M.; Elseviers, Monique; Wettermark, Björn; Almarsdóttir, Anna Birna; Andersen, Morten; Benko, Ria; Bennie, Marion; Eriksson, Irene; Godman, Brian; Krska, Janet; Poluzzi, Elisabetta; Taxis, Katja; Vlahovic-Palcevski, Vera; Stichele, Robert Vander

    2016-01-01

    Good risk management requires continuous evaluation and improvement of planned activities. The evaluation impact of risk management activities requires robust study designs and carefully selected outcome measures. Key learnings and caveats from drug utilization research should be applied to the

  10. Collegiate Drug Management Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janosik, Steven M.; Anderson, David S.

    A checklist to help colleges and universities reevaluate their policies and procedures regarding drug use among college students is presented. It is designed to supplement the "Collegiate Alcohol Risk Assessment Guide." In this guide drugs other than alcohol are of concern, although alcohol is viewed by many as the "drug of choice" among college…

  11. DRUG MANAGEMENT REVIEWS IN DISTRICT DRUG MANAGEMENT UNIT AND GENERAL HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Joseph Herman

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Drug is one of the essential elements in healthcare that should be effectively and efficiently managed. Following thedecentralization in 2001 in Indonesia, drug management has changed in district drug management units and also in District General Hospitals. Certainly this condition influences the sustainability of drug access in primary health care such as in Community Health Center and District General Hospital, especially in drug financing policy. A cross sectional descriptive study to obtain information on drug management in public healthcare in district had been carried out between July and December 2006 in 10 District Public Drug Management Units from 10 district health offices and 9 district general hospitals as samples. Data were collected by interviewing heads of Drug Section in District Health Offices and heads of Hospital Pharmacies using structured questionnaires and observing drug storage in District Drug Management Units, Community Health Centers, and Hospital Pharmacies. Results of the study show that drug planning in District Health Offices and General Hospitals did not meet the basic real need in some districts nor District Hospitals. The minimum health service standards had no been achieved yet. Furthermore, drug procurement, storage and recording as well as reporting was not good enough either, such as shown by the existence of expired drugs. Lead time for drug delivery to community health centers in some districts was longer than the average of lead time in the past 3 years.

  12. How Ghanaian, African-Surinamese and Dutch patients perceive and manage antihypertensive drug treatment: a qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Beune, E.J.A.J.; Haafkens, J.A.; Agyemang, C.; Schuster, J.S.; Willems, D.L.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To explore and compare how Ghanaian, African-Surinamese (Surinamese), and White-Dutch patients perceive and manage antihypertensive drug treatment in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. METHODS: Qualitative study was conducted using detailed interviews with a purposive sample of 46 hypertensive patients without comorbidity who were prescribed antihypertensives. RESULTS: Patients in all the ethnic groups actively decided how to manage their prescribed antihypertensive regimens. In all the ...

  13. How Ghanaian, African-Surinamese and Dutch patients perceive and manage antihypertensive drug treatment: a qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beune, Erik J. A. J.; Haafkens, Joke A.; Agyemang, Charles; Schuster, John S.; Willems, Dick L.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To explore and compare how Ghanaian, African-Surinamese (Surinamese), and White-Dutch patients perceive and manage antihypertensive drug treatment in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. METHODS: Qualitative study was conducted using detailed interviews with a purposive sample of 46 hypertensive

  14. How Ghanaian, African-Surinamese and Dutch patients percieve and manage antihypertensive drug treatment: A qualitive study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beune, E.J.; Haafkens, J.; Agyeman, Ch.; Schuster, J.; Willems, D.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To explore and compare how Ghanaian, African-Surinamese (Surinamese), and White-Dutch patients perceive and manage antihypertensive drug treatment in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. METHODS: Qualitative study was conducted using detailed interviews with a purposive sample of 46 hypertensive

  15. A randomized study of contingency management and spirometric lung age for motivating smoking cessation among injection drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Michael B; Astemborski, Jacquie; Lambert, Allison A; Goldberg, Scott; Stitzer, Maxine L; Merlo, Christian A; Rand, Cynthia S; Wise, Robert A; Kirk, Gregory D

    2014-07-28

    Even after quitting illicit drugs, tobacco abuse remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in former injection drug users. An important unmet need in this population is to have effective interventions that can be used in the context of community based care. Contingency management, where a patient receives a monetary incentive for healthy behavior choices, and incorporation of individual counseling regarding spirometric "lung age" (the age of an average healthy individual with similar spirometry) have been shown to improve cessation rates in some populations. The efficacy of these interventions on improving smoking cessation rates has not been studied among current and former injection drug users. In a randomized, factorial design study, we recruited 100 active smokers from an ongoing cohort study of current and former injection drug users to assess the impact of contingency management and spirometric lung age on smoking cessation. The primary outcome was 6-month biologically-confirmed smoking cessation comparing contingency management, spirometric lung age or both to usual care. Secondary outcomes included differences in self-reported and biologically-confirmed cessation at interim visits, number of visits attended and quit attempts, smoking rates at interim visits, and changes in Fagerstrom score and self-efficacy. Six-month biologically-confirmed smoking cessations rates were 4% usual care, 0% lung age, 14% contingency management and 0% for combined lung age and contingency management (p = 0.13). There were no differences in secondary endpoints comparing the four interventions or when pooling the lung age groups. Comparing contingency management to non-contingency management, 6-month cessation rates were not different (7% vs. 2%; p = 0.36), but total number of visits with exhaled carbon monoxide-confirmed abstinence were higher for contingency management than non-contingency management participants (0.38 vs. 0.06; p = 0.03), and more contingency management

  16. How participation in a Drug Company-Managed Clinical Trial Influenced GPs’ Guideline Adherence and Drug Preference: A Register-Based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Morten; Kragstrup, Jakob; Søndergaard, Jens

    2005-01-01

    21 st International Con ference on Pharmacoepidemiology and Therapeytic Risk Management, Nashville, Tennessee, USA, Abstract 187 i Pharmacoepidemiology and drug safety 2004;14:494......21 st International Con ference on Pharmacoepidemiology and Therapeytic Risk Management, Nashville, Tennessee, USA, Abstract 187 i Pharmacoepidemiology and drug safety 2004;14:494...

  17. Canadian Physicians' Use of Antiobesity Drugs and Their Referral Patterns to Weight Management Programs or Providers: The SOCCER Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. S. Padwal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Antiobesity pharmacotherapy and programs/providers that possess weight management expertise are not commonly used by physicians. The underlying reasons for this are not known. We performed a cross-sectional study in 33 Canadian medical practices (36 physicians examining 1788 overweight/obese adult patients. The frequency of pharmacotherapy use and referral for further diet, exercise, behavioral management and/or bariatric surgery was documented. If drug treatment or referral was not made, reasons were documented by choosing amongst preselected categories. Logistic regression models were used to identify predictors of antiobesity drug use. No single antiobesity management strategy was recommended by physicians in more than 50% of patients. Referral was most common for exercise (49% of cases followed by dietary advice (46%, and only 5% of eligible patients were referred for bariatric surgery. Significant predictors of initiating/continuing pharmacotherapy were male sex (OR 0.70; 95% CI 0.52–0.94, increasing BMI (1.02; 95% CI 1.01–1.03, and private drug coverage (1.78; 95% CI 1.39–2.29. “Not considered” and “patient refusal” were the main reasons for not initiating further weight management. We conclude that both physician and patient factors act as barriers to the use of weight management strategies and both need to be addressed to increase uptake of these interventions.

  18. To Drug or Not to Drug: A Qualitative Study of Patients' Decision-Making Processes for Managing Insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Janet M Y; Bartlett, Delwyn J; Armour, Carol L; Laba, Tracey-Lea; Saini, Bandana

    2018-01-01

    Treatment preferences play a key role in dictating sleep health outcomes. However, patients' treatment beliefs, attitudes, and experiences that inform preference conceptualization remain an unknown phenomenon. Therefore, this study aims to explore patient perceptions toward pharmacotherapy and the nonpharmacological management of insomnia. Fifty-one patients with insomnia were recruited from specialist clinics and general community settings. Participants completed a brief questionnaire followed by an in-depth semistructured interview that was digitally recorded, transcribed verbatim, and subjected to Framework Analysis to identify emergent themes. Three key themes were identified: Resolving Insomnia, Self-Imposed Treatment Boundaries, and Treatment Uptake. Patients' illness, treatment, and psychosocial beliefs and experiences are closely linked to treatment choice. Being attuned to these influences during the clinical encounter can facilitate treatment selection that is meaningful for the patient.

  19. Drug Safety Crises Management in Pharmacovigilance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Shalviri

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adverse drug events can cause serious consequences including death. A published report by Lazarou et al in 1998 showed that adverse drug events were the 4th to 6th leading cause of death in the United States. These events may lead to drug safety crises in some issues, which need to take crises management process for solving the problem and/or preventing similar events.Objectives: To evaluate nature of drug safety crises based on adverse events reported to Iranian Pharmacovigilance Center from 1999 through 2012. To mention success and failure outcomes of crises management process taken against detected crises.Methods: All adverse drug events received by Iranian Pharmacovigilance Center from 1999 through 2012 were evaluated for reports with fatal outcome. All alerting letters and manuscripts published by the Center during the same period were reviewed for detailed information on detected crises. World Health Organization definition was used for detecting drug safety crises.Results: Among 42036 registered cases in our database, 463 deaths were recorded. The most frequent suspected drug for adverse events with fatal outcome was ceftriaxone (100 cases. Ten different drug safety crises issues were detected during the study period and their successful or failure outcomes were evaluated. There were 112 issued alerting letters and 17 published manuscript during the same period which was monitored for detailed information.  Conclusion: It is necessary for national pharmacovigilance centers to have prepared programs for crises management. This could be useful for reducing drug related mortality.

  20. Clinical Management of HIV Drug Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortez, Karoll J.; Maldarelli, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Combination antiretroviral therapy for HIV-1 infection has resulted in profound reductions in viremia and is associated with marked improvements in morbidity and mortality. Therapy is not curative, however, and prolonged therapy is complicated by drug toxicity and the emergence of drug resistance. Management of clinical drug resistance requires in depth evaluation, and includes extensive history, physical examination and laboratory studies. Appropriate use of resistance testing provides valuable information useful in constructing regimens for treatment-experienced individuals with viremia during therapy. This review outlines the emergence of drug resistance in vivo, and describes clinical evaluation and therapeutic options of the individual with rebound viremia during therapy. PMID:21994737

  1. Clinical risk management in Dutch community pharmacies: the case of drug-drug interactions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buurma, H.; Smet, P.A.G.M. de; Egberts, A.C.G.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The prevention of drug-drug interactions requires a systematic approach for which the concept of clinical risk management can be used. The objective of our study was to measure the frequency, nature and management of drug-drug interaction alerts as these occur in daily practice of Dutch

  2. Drug shortage management in Alabama hospital pharmacies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver W. Holmes, III

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study is to identify effective strategies used by Alabama hospitals to manage drug shortages. Moreover, this study aims to determine if there are any relationships among hospital size, utilization of a standard policy for drug shortage management and perceived usefulness of standard procedures for drug shortages. Methods: A paper survey was mailed to 129 hospital pharmacies in Alabama (per the Alabama Hospital Association directory. The survey consisted of 5 demographic questions, questions involving perception of current medication shortages, sources of information about shorted drugs, and frequency of discussion at P&T committee meetings. Most importantly, the survey contained questions about the use of a standard policy for handling drug shortages, the effectiveness of the policy if one is used, and an open-ended question asking the recipient to describe the policy being used. Results: A response rate of 55% was achieved as 71 surveys were completed and returned. Approximately 70% of the survey respondents described the current drug shortage issue as a top priority in their pharmacy department. The pharmacy distributor served as the primary source of information regarding drug shortages for 45% of the facilities. There is a direct relationship between size of hospital and likelihood of utilization of a standard policy or procedure for drug shortage management among the sample. The smaller facilities of the sample perceived their management strategies as effective more frequently than the larger hospitals. Conclusion: Common components of effective management strategies included extensive communication of shortage details and the ability to locate alternative products. The use of portable technology (e.g., Smart phones and tablets along with mobile applications may emerge as popular means for communicating drug product shortage news and updates within a facility or healthcare system.   Type: Original Research

  3. Drug shortage management in Alabama hospital pharmacies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver W. Holmes III, Pharm.D. Candidate 2013

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study is to identify effective strategies used by Alabama hospitals to manage drug shortages. Moreover, this study aims to determine if there are any relationships among hospital size, utilization of a standard policy for drug shortage management and perceived usefulness of standard procedures for drug shortages.Methods: A paper survey was mailed to 129 hospital pharmacies in Alabama (per the Alabama Hospital Association directory. The survey consisted of 5 demographic questions, questions involving perception of current medication shortages, sources of information about shorted drugs, and frequency of discussion at P&T committee meetings. Most importantly, the survey contained questions about the use of a standard policy for handling drug shortages, the effectiveness of the policy if one is used, and an open-ended question asking the recipient to describe the policy being used.Results: A response rate of 55% was achieved as 71 surveys were completed and returned. Approximately 70% of the survey respondents described the current drug shortage issue as a top priority in their pharmacy department. The pharmacy distributor served as the primary source of information regarding drug shortages for 45% of the facilities. There is a direct relationship between size of hospital and likelihood of utilization of a standard policy or procedure for drug shortage management among the sample. The smaller facilities of the sample perceived their management strategies as effective more frequently than the larger hospitals.Conclusion: Common components of effective management strategies included extensive communication of shortage details and the ability to locate alternative products. The use of portable technology (e.g., Smart phones and tablets along with mobile applications may emerge as popular means for communicating drug product shortage news and updates within a facility or healthcare system.

  4. [Management of adverse drug effects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlienger, R G

    2000-09-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are still considered one of the main problems of drug therapy. ADRs are associated with considerable morbidity, mortality, decreased compliance and therapeutic success as well as high direct and indirect medical costs. Several considerations have to come into play when managing a potential ADR. It is critical to establish an accurate clinical diagnosis of the adverse event. Combining information about drug exposure together with considering other possible causes of the reaction is crucial to establish a causal relationship between the reaction and the suspected drug. Identification of the underlying pathogenesis of an ADR together with the severity of the reaction will have profound implications on continuation of drug therapy after an ADR. Since spontaneous reports about ADRs are a key stone of a functioning post-marketing surveillance system and therefore play a key role in improving drug safety, health care professionals are highly encouraged to report ADRs to a local or national organization. However, because the majority of ADRs is dose-dependent and therefore preventable, individualization of pharmacotherapy may have a major impact on reducing such events.

  5. Managing antiepileptic drugs during pregnancy and lactation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabers, Anne; Tomson, Torbjörn

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review discusses data on the pharmacokinetics of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in pregnancy and lactation, and the clinical consequences thereof, thus providing a basis for a rational management of AEDs during pregnancy and lactation. RECENT FINDINGS: Studies have confirmed...... of AEDs in pregnancy and during lactation is important to enable optimal treatment. Gestation induced alterations in pharmacokinetics vary with the AED but also between patients and are difficult to predict. Therapeutic drug monitoring is, therefore, advisable during pregnancy and the use...... of the individual patient's optimal prepregnancy drug level is recommended as reference. Breastfeeding is in general safe but needs appropriate observation of the nursing infant....

  6. A Prospective Study of Tuberculosis Drug Susceptibility in Sabah, Malaysia, and an Algorithm for Management of Isoniazid Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid Ali, Muhammad Redzwan S.; Parameswaran, Uma; William, Timothy; Bird, Elspeth; Wilkes, Christopher S.; Lee, Wai Khew; Yeo, Tsin Wen; Anstey, Nicholas M.; Ralph, Anna P.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The burden of tuberculosis is high in eastern Malaysia, and rates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis drug resistance are poorly defined. Our objectives were to determine M. tuberculosis susceptibility and document management after receipt of susceptibility results. Methods. Prospective study of adult outpatients with smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) in Sabah, Malaysia. Additionally, hospital clinicians accessed the reference laboratory for clinical purposes during the study. Results. 176 outpatients were enrolled; 173 provided sputum samples. Mycobacterial culture yielded M. tuberculosis in 159 (91.9%) and nontuberculous Mycobacterium (NTM) in three (1.7%). Among outpatients there were no instances of multidrug resistant M. tuberculosis (MDR-TB). Seven people (4.5%) had isoniazid resistance (INH-R); all were switched to an appropriate second-line regimen for varying durations (4.5–9 months). Median delay to commencement of the second-line regimen was 13 weeks. Among 15 inpatients with suspected TB, 2 had multidrug resistant TB (one extensively drug resistant), 2 had INH-R, and 4 had NTM. Conclusions. Current community rates of MDR-TB in Sabah are low. However, INH-resistance poses challenges, and NTM is an important differential diagnosis in this setting, where smear microscopy is the usual diagnostic modality. To address INH-R management issues in our setting, we propose an algorithm for the treatment of isoniazid-resistant PTB. PMID:25838829

  7. Does the Early Adopter of Drugs Exist? A Population Based Study of General Practitioners’ Prescribing of New Drugs.20 th International Conference on Pharmacoepiemiology and Risk Management. Bordeaux, France. Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety, 2004;13:Sl 1:158

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dybdahl, Torben; Andersen, Morten; Søndergaard, Jens

    2004-01-01

    20 th International Conference on Pharmacoepiemiology and Risk Management. Bordeaux, France. Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety, 2004;13:Sl 1:158......20 th International Conference on Pharmacoepiemiology and Risk Management. Bordeaux, France. Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety, 2004;13:Sl 1:158...

  8. Efficacy of local drug delivery of Achyranthes aspera gel in the management of chronic periodontitis: A clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramanarayana Boyapati

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease of microbial origin. Locally delivered antimicrobials reduce subgingival flora. Achyranthes aspera gel has antimicrobial, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and immunostimulant effects. Aims: To evaluate the efficacy of local drug delivery of A. aspera gel in the management of chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods: Thirty patients with chronic periodontitis were considered in the study and categorized into two equal groups (Group A: scaling and root planing (SRP with A. aspera gel, Group B: SRP with placebo gel. Patients were enlisted from the Department of Periodontics, Mamata Dental College and Hospital. The clinical parameters (gingival index, bleeding on probing, probing pocket depth, and clinical attachment level were recorded at baseline and 3 months. Statistical Analysis Used: All the obtained data were sent for statistical analyses using SPSS version 18. Results: The periodontitis and the Achyranthes were statistically analyzed. A comparison of clinical parameters for test group and control group from baseline to 3 months was done using paired t-test. Intergroup comparison for both the groups was done using independent sample t-test. Conclusions: A. aspera gel when delivered locally along with SRP showed a beneficial effect. A. aspera gel as a non-surgical local drug delivery system proved to be without any side effects in the management of periodontitis. A. aspera gel has strong anti-inflammatory effects in addition to its antioxidant activity.

  9. Efficacy of local drug delivery of Achyranthes aspera gel in the management of chronic periodontitis: A clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyapati, Ramanarayana; Gojja, Prathibha; Chintalapani, Srikanth; Nagubandi, Kirankumar; Ramisetti, Arpita; Salavadhi, Shyam Sunder

    2017-01-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease of microbial origin. Locally delivered antimicrobials reduce subgingival flora. Achyranthes aspera gel has antimicrobial, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and immunostimulant effects. To evaluate the efficacy of local drug delivery of A. aspera gel in the management of chronic periodontitis. Thirty patients with chronic periodontitis were considered in the study and categorized into two equal groups (Group A: scaling and root planing (SRP) with A. aspera gel, Group B: SRP with placebo gel). Patients were enlisted from the Department of Periodontics, Mamata Dental College and Hospital. The clinical parameters (gingival index, bleeding on probing, probing pocket depth, and clinical attachment level) were recorded at baseline and 3 months. All the obtained data were sent for statistical analyses using SPSS version 18. The periodontitis and the Achyranthes were statistically analyzed. A comparison of clinical parameters for test group and control group from baseline to 3 months was done using paired t -test. Intergroup comparison for both the groups was done using independent sample t -test. A. aspera gel when delivered locally along with SRP showed a beneficial effect. A. aspera gel as a non-surgical local drug delivery system proved to be without any side effects in the management of periodontitis. A. aspera gel has strong anti-inflammatory effects in addition to its antioxidant activity.

  10. How Ghanaian, African-Surinamese and Dutch patients perceive and manage antihypertensive drug treatment: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beune, Erik J A J; Haafkens, Joke A; Agyemang, Charles; Schuster, John S; Willems, Dick L

    2008-04-01

    To explore and compare how Ghanaian, African-Surinamese (Surinamese), and White-Dutch patients perceive and manage antihypertensive drug treatment in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Qualitative study was conducted using detailed interviews with a purposive sample of 46 hypertensive patients without comorbidity who were prescribed antihypertensives. Patients in all the ethnic groups actively decided how to manage their prescribed antihypertensive regimens. In all the groups, confidence in the doctor and beneficial effects of medication were reasons for taking prescribed antihypertensive dosage. Particularly, ethnic-minority patients reported lowering or leaving off the prescribed medication dosage. Explanations for altering prescribed dosage comprised disliking chemical medications, fear of side effects and preference for alternative treatment. Surinamese and Ghanaian men also worried about the negative effects of antihypertensives on their sexual performance. Some Ghanaians mentioned fear of addiction or lack of money as explanations for altering prescribed dosage. Surinamese and Ghanaians often discontinued medication when visiting their homeland. Some respondents from all ethnic groups preferred natural treatments although treatment type varied. Patients' explanations for their decisions regarding the use of antihypertensives are often influenced by sociocultural issues and in ethnic-minority groups also by migration-related issues. Self-alteration of prescribed medication among Surinamese and Ghanaians may contribute to the low blood pressure (BP) control rate and high rate of malignant hypertension reported among these populations in the Netherlands. This study provides new information, which can help clinicians to understand how patients of diverse ethnic populations think about managing antihypertensive drug treatment and to address ethnic disparities in medication adherence and BP control.

  11. Time course, outcome and management of adverse drug reactions associated with metformin from patient's perspective : a prospective, observational cohort study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Loek; Härmark, Linda; van Puijenbroek, Eugène

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to gather information about frequency, latency time, outcome and management of frequently occurring adverse drug reactions (ADRs) related to the use of metformin in daily practice. METHODS: A prospective, observational cohort study was performed. A total of 2490

  12. Time course, outcome and management of adverse drug reactions associated with metformin from patient's perspective: a prospective, observational cohort study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, L.A.W.; Harmark, L.; Puijenbroek, E. van

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to gather information about frequency, latency time, outcome and management of frequently occurring adverse drug reactions (ADRs) related to the use of metformin in daily practice. METHODS: A prospective, observational cohort study was performed. A total of 2490

  13. The anti-hepatitis drug use effect and inventory management optimization from the perspective of hospital drug supply chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhanyu

    2017-09-01

    By analyzing the current hospital anti hepatitis drug use, dosage, indications and drug resistance, this article studied the drug inventory management and cost optimization. The author used drug utilization evaluation method, analyzed the amount and kind distribution of anti hepatitis drugs and made dynamic monitoring of inventory. At the same time, the author puts forward an effective scheme of drug classification management, uses the ABC classification method to classify the drugs according to the average daily dose of drugs, and implements the automatic replenishment plan. The design of pharmaceutical services supply chain includes drug procurement platform, warehouse management system and connect to the hospital system through data exchange. Through the statistical analysis of drug inventory, we put forward the countermeasures of drug logistics optimization. The results showed that drug replenishment plan can effectively improve drugs inventory efficiency.

  14. Contemporary management of drug-packers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, J; Corrigan, M; Cahill, RA; Redmond, HP

    2007-01-01

    Experience with management of drug-packers (mules) is variable among different centres. However, despite a recorded increase in drug trafficking in general, as yet, no unified, clear guidelines exist to guide the medical management of those who only occasionally encounter these individuals. We describe our recent experience with this growing problem and discuss the most salient points concerning the contemporary management of body packers. Our recent experience demonstrates that type IV packages may now be managed conservatively for the most part. PMID:17448234

  15. Detection and Management of Adverse Drug Reactions Related to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study was to establish the detection, prevalence and management of various adverse drug reactions associated with antiretroviral drugs occurring in patients attending Comprehensive Care Centre (CCC) of Kiambu District Hospital. The study was a cross sectional survey where the patients included ...

  16. Iowa Case Management for Rural Drug Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, James A.; Vaughan Sarrazin, Mary S.; Huber, Diane L.; Vaughn, Thomas; Block, Robert I.; Reedy, Amanda R.; Jang, MiJin

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this research was to evaluate the effectiveness of a comprehensive, strengths-based model of case management for clients in drug abuse treatment. Method: 503 volunteers from residential or intensive outpatient treatment were randomly assigned to one of three conditions of Iowa Case Management (ICM) plus treatment as usual…

  17. Off-label drugs for weight management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendricks EJ

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Ed J Hendricks Center for Weight Management, Roseville and Sacramento, CA, USA Abstract: The global pandemic of obesity and overweight now affects between 2.8 and 3.5 ­billion of the world population and shows no signs of abatement. Treatment for what is now recognized as a chronic disease includes pharmacotherapy, considered an essential component of comprehensive therapy. New drug discovery is robust, but the pace of the US Food and Drug Administration approval for obesity drugs has been glacial, and only a handful of approved drugs are available for treating obesity. In the last 20 years, the US Food and Drug Administration has approved 208 drugs for cancer, 118 for cardiovascular diseases, 168 for neurological diseases, and 223 endocrinologic drugs, but only 6 for obesity, 2 of which have been taken off market. Currently, there are only 9 drugs approved by the FDA for obesity treatment. US physicians have turned to off-label drug use in their effort to care for increasing numbers of patients with excess adiposity. Phentermine is the most commonly used drug for treating obesity. Although approved only for short-term use, US physicians have used it successfully for long-term since its initial approval in 1959. This drug, used off-label for long-term, has proven to be safe and effective, far safer than the disease it is used to treat. Phentermine and diethylpropion, an equally safe but somewhat less effective drug, are both generic and therefore inexpensive. These drugs have been maligned inappropriately because their two-dimensional structure diagrams resemble amphetamine and also because of unproven presumptions about their potential adverse effects. In the face of an increasing epidemic, worldwide obese and overweight patients deserve effective treatment that prescribing these drugs could provide, if rehabilitated and used more frequently. US physicians will likely continue to use any drug proven useful off-label for this illness until

  18. An adverse drug event manager facilitates spontaneous reporting of adverse drug reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Siri; Klarskov, Pia; Borgeskov, Hanne

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Spontaneous reporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) is used for continuous risk-benefit evaluation of marketed pharmaceutical products and for signal detection. The Adverse Drug Event Manager (ADEM) is a service offered to clinicians employed at hospitals in the Capital Region......%). The drugs most frequently reported were lisdexamphetamine (n = 40), rivaroxaban (n = 16) and warfarin (n = 15) (vaccines excluded). In 13 out of 484 reports, the ADR was associated with a fatal outcome. CONCLUSION: The findings of this study indicate that an ADEM promotes and facilitates spontaneous ADR...

  19. [Terbinafine : Relevant drug interactions and their management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dürrbeck, A; Nenoff, P

    2016-09-01

    The allylamine terbinafine is the probably most frequently prescribed systemic antifungal agent in Germany for the treatment of dermatomycoses and onychomycoses. According to the German drug law, terbinafine is approved for patients who are 18 years and older; however, this antifungal agent is increasingly used off-label for treatment of onychomycoses and tinea capitis in children. Terbinafine is associated with only a few interactions with other drugs, which is why terbinafine can generally be used without problems in older and multimorbid patients. Nevertheless, some potential interactions of terbinafine with certain drug substances are known, including substances of the group of antidepressants/antipsychotics and some cardiovascular drugs. Decisive for the relevance of interactions is-along with the therapeutic index of the substrate and the possible alternative degradation pathways-the genetically determined type of metabolism. When combining terbinafine with tricyclic antidepressants or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and serotonin/noradrenalin reuptake inhibitors, the clinical response and potential side effects must be monitored. Problematic is the use of terbinafine with simultaneous treatment with tamoxifen. The administration of potent CYP2D6 inhibitors leads to a diminished efficacy of tamoxifen because one of its most important active metabolites-endoxifen-is not sufficiently available. Therefore, combination of tamoxifen and terbinafine should be avoided. In conclusion, the number of substances which are able to cause clinically relevant interactions in case of simultaneously administration with terbinafine is clear and should be manageable in the dermatological office with adequate monitoring.

  20. Compliance with national guidelines for the management of drug-drug interactions in Dutch community pharmacies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buurma, H.; Schalekamp, T.; Egberts, A.C.G.; Smet, P.A.G.M. de

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pharmacists contribute to the detection and prevention of drug therapy-related problems, including drug-drug interactions. Little is known about compliance with pharmacy practice guidelines for the management of drug-drug interaction alerts. OBJECTIVE: To measure the compliance of

  1. Knowledge and Practice of Drug Retailers in Malaria Management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of the study was to evaluate what drug sellers know about malaria and how they can manage their clients. ... All respondent knew that malaria was caused by the bite of an infected mosquito,but malaria was also attributed to various other causes such as:other infected people 7 (11.7%) eating too many mangoes ...

  2. Drug-induced parkinsonism: diagnosis and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanchet PJ

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Pierre J Blanchet,1–3 Veronika Kivenko1–3 1Department of Stomatology, Faculty of Dental Medicine, University of Montreal, 2Andre-Barbeau Movement Disorders Unit, University of Montreal Hospital Center (CHU Montreal, 3Montreal Mental Health University Institute, Montreal, QC, Canada Abstract: Drug-induced parkinsonism (DIP has been known for >60 years. It is the second leading cause of parkinsonism, but still underdiagnosis is likely to influence reported incidence figures. Since DIP is clinically undistinguishable from Lewy-body Parkinson’s disease, any new case of parkinsonism should prompt the search for an offending antipsychotic, hidden neuroleptic, or nonneuroleptic agent that may produce DIP. DIP is reversible upon drug withdrawal in most cases. There is no consensus regarding the duration of the recovery period to allow motor signs to fully remit in order to confirm the diagnosis of DIP following removal of the causative agent, but a drug-free interval of at least 6 months is generally recommended. Interestingly, up to 30% of DIP cases may show persisting or worsening motor signs beyond 6 months following drug withdrawal or adjustment, due to complex postsynaptic and presynaptic factors that may variably interact to negatively influence nigrostriatal dopamine transmission in a so-called “double-hit” hypothesis. The condition significantly impacts on quality of life and increases the risks of morbidity and mortality. Management is challenging in psychiatric patients and requires a team approach to achieve the best outcome. Keywords: neuroleptic drugs, extrapyramidal side effects, second generation antipsychotics, calcium channel blockers, valproic acid, tetrabenazine 

  3. Computational Studies of Drug Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    da Silva Martins, João Miguel

    Drug resistance has been an increasing problem in patient treatment and drug development. Starting in the last century and becoming a major worry in the medical and scienti c communities in the early part of the current millennium, major research must be performed to address the issues of viral...... is of the utmost importance in developing better and less resistance-inducing drugs. A drug's in uence can be characterized in many diff erent ways, however, and the approaches I take in this work re ect those same different in uences. This is what I try to achieve in this work, through seemingly unrelated...... approaches that come together in the study of drug's and their in uence on proteins and vice-versa. In part I, I aim to understand through combined theoretical ensemble analysis and free energy calculations the e ects mutations have over the binding anity and function of the M2 proton channel. This research...

  4. Deliberating Tarceva: A case study of how British NHS managers decide whether to purchase a high-cost drug in the shadow of NICE guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, David; Doheny, Shane

    2011-11-01

    This paper examines audio-recorded data from meetings in which NHS managers decide whether to fund high-cost drugs for individual patients. It investigates the work of a Welsh individual patient commissioning (IPC) panel responsible for sanctioning the purchase of 'un-commissioned' treatments for exceptional cases. The case study presented highlights the changing rationales used for approving or denying a cancer drug, Tarceva, during a period when NICE first suggested it was not cost effective, but then changed its position in a final technology appraisal recommending use when the cost did not exceed that of an alternative product. Our data show how decisions taken in the shadow of NICE guidance remain complex and subject to local discretion. Guidance that takes time to prepare, is released in stages, and relates to particular disease stages, must be interpreted in the context of particular cases. The case-based IPC panel discourse stands in tension with the standardised population-based recommendations in guidance. Panel members, who based their decisions on the central notions of 'efficacy' and 'exceptionality', often struggled to apply NICE information on cost-effectiveness to their deliberations on efficacy (clinical effectiveness). The case study suggests that the complex nature of decision making makes standardization of outcomes very difficult to achieve, so that local professional judgement is likely to remain central to health care rationing at this level. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. 3-12 Detection and Management of Adverse Drug React

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MINA SAN

    Detection and Management of Adverse Drug Reactions Related to Antiretroviral Drugs among. HIV/AIDS Patients in Kiambu ... of various adverse drug reactions associated with antiretroviral drugs occurring in patients attending Comprehensive Care .... educational level, perception of ADRs, knowledge of ADRs, detection ...

  6. Focused use of drug screening in overdose patients increases impact on management.

    OpenAIRE

    Erdmann, A.; Werner, D.; Hugli, O.; Yersin, B.

    2015-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Drug poisoning is a common cause for attendance in the emergency department. Several toxicology centres suggest performing urinary drug screens, even though they rarely influence patient management. STUDY OBJECTIVES: Measuring the impact on patient management, in a University Emergency Department with approximately 40 000 admissions annually, of a rapid urinary drug screening test using specifically focused indications. Drug screening was restricted to patients having a first p...

  7. Advanced and controlled drug delivery systems in clinical disease management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, JRBJ

    1996-01-01

    Advanced and controlled drug delivery systems are important for clinical disease management. In this review the most important new systems which have reached clinical application are highlighted. Microbiologically controlled drug delivery is important for gastrointestinal diseases like ulcerative

  8. 'Allowing the right' and its currency in managing drug stigma in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotopoulou, Maria; Munro, Alison; Taylor, Avril

    2015-08-01

    Evidence suggests that problem drug users are still subject to high levels of stigmatization. In countries, like Greece, where families occupy a central position and honour is collectively attained, secondary drug stigma is also highly prevalent. However, little is known about how drug users and their families manage drug stigma in the specific cultural milieu that makes up Greece. This article presents findings from a qualitative study exploring how drug stigma both manifests itself and is managed by drug users and parents in the context of Greek familial culture. The study was conducted in two state drug agencies in Thessaloniki - Greece and involved the participation of 40 problem drug users (PDU) (23 male/17 female) and 8 parents of PDU. Qualitative, in-depth, interviews were used to collect narrative accounts about experiences of managing addiction, drug stigma and secondary stigma in the Greek parental home. 'Allowing the right' - broadly understood as referring to passing to others information which might devalue a person and consequently that person's family - is discussed in terms of drug stigma management in Greece. We highlight how this culturally specific notion can be viewed as an active strategy adopted by both individual drug users and parents of PDU to manage stigmatization by illustrating the various way in which not 'allowing the right' was described by participants, including drug problem discovery or disclosure and subsequent management of drug using careers and drug stigma within the Greek family context. Given the significance of the cultural notion of 'allowing the right' in the trajectory of drug use amongst PDU and more particularly in stigma management and secondary stigma management, the paper highlights the need for further research into the field in Greece. The need for targeted culturally specific and culturally relevant interventions aimed at reducing drug stigma is also highlighted in relation to both policy and practice. Copyright

  9. Correlates and management of nonmalignant pain in the nursing home. SAGE Study Group. Systematic Assessment of Geriatric drug use via Epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, A; Lapane, K; Gambassi, G; Bernabei, R; Mor, V; Lipsitz, L A

    1999-08-01

    Nonmalignant pain is a common problem among older people. The prevalence of pain in the nursing home is not well studied. We looked at the association between nonmalignant pain, psychological and functional health, and the practice patterns for pain management in the nursing home. A cross-sectional study. Nursing Home in four US states. A total of 49,971 nursing home residents from 1992 to 1995. We used the SAGE database (Systematic Assessment of Geriatric drug use via Epidemiology), which linked information from the Minimum Data Set and nursing home drug utilization data. The MDS items measured included pain, activities of daily living (ADL) function, mood, and time involved in activities. The use of analgesics, anxiolytics, and antidepressants was also documented. Daily pain was reported in 26% of nursing home residents. The prevalence was lower among men, persons more than age 85, and racial minorities. Persons suffering pain daily were more likely to have severe ADL impairment, odds ratio (OR) (2.47 (95% CI, 2.34-2.60)), more depressive signs and symptoms (OR 1.66 (95% CI, 1.57-1.75)), and less frequent involvement in activities (OR 1.35 (95% CI, 1.29-1.40)). Approximately 25% of persons with daily pain received no analgesics. Residents who were more than 85 years old (OR 1.15 (95% CI 1.02-1.28)), cognitively impaired, (OR 1.44 (95% CI, 1.29-1.61)), of male gender (OR 1.17 (95% CI, 1.06-1.29)), or a racial minority (OR 1.69 (95% CI, 1.40-2.05) and OR 1.56 (95% CI, 0.70-1.04) for blacks and Hispanics, respectively) were at greater risk of not receiving analgesics. Approximately 50% of those in pain used physical and occupational therapies, which was more than two times higher (OR 2.44 (95% CI, 2.34-2.54)), than use for those not in pain. Daily nonmalignant pain is prevalent among nursing home residents and is often associated with impairments in ADL, mood, and decreased activity involvement. Even when pain was recognized, men, racial minorities, and cognitively

  10. Increased access to care and appropriateness of treatment at private sector drug shops with integrated management of malaria, pneumonia and diarrhoea: a quasi-experimental study in Uganda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phyllis Awor

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Drug shops are a major source of care for children in low income countries but they provide sub-standard care. We assessed the feasibility and effect on quality of care of introducing diagnostics and pre-packaged paediatric-dosage drugs for malaria, pneumonia and diarrhoea at drug shops in Uganda. METHODS: We adopted and implemented the integrated community case management (iCCM intervention within registered drug shops. Attendants were trained to perform malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs in each fever case and count respiratory rate in each case of cough with fast/difficult breathing, before dispensing recommended treatment. Using a quasi-experimental design in one intervention and one non-intervention district, we conducted before and after exit interviews for drug seller practices and household surveys for treatment-seeking practices in May-June 2011 and May-June 2012. Survey adjusted generalized linear models and difference-in-difference analysis was used. RESULTS: 3759 (1604 before/2155 after household interviews and 943 (163 before/780 after exit interviews were conducted with caretakers of children under-5. At baseline, no child at a drug shop received any diagnostic testing before treatment in both districts. After the intervention, while no child in the non-intervention district received a diagnostic test, 87.7% (95% CI 79.0-96.4 of children with fever at the intervention district drug shops had a parasitological diagnosis of malaria, prior to treatment. The prevalence ratios of the effect of the intervention on treatment of cough and fast breathing with amoxicillin and diarrhoea with ORS/zinc at the drug shop were 2.8 (2.0-3.9, and 12.8 (4.2-38.6 respectively. From the household survey, the prevalence ratio of the intervention effect on use of RDTs was 3.2 (1.9-5.4; Artemisinin Combination Therapy for malaria was 0.74 (0.65-0.84, and ORS/zinc for diarrhoea was 2.3 (1.2-4.7. CONCLUSION: iCCM can be utilized to improve

  11. Management of type 2 diabetes and its prescription drug cost before and during the economic crisis in Greece: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liatis, Stavros; Papaoikonomou, Stavroula; Ganotopoulou, Asimina; Papazafiropoulou, Athanasia; Dinos, Constantinos; Michail, Marios; Xilomenos, Apostolos; Melidonis, Andreas; Pappas, Stavros

    2014-03-05

    The aim of the present study is to examine the clinical indices related to cardiovascular risk management of Greek patients with type 2 diabetes, before and after the major economic crisis that emerged in the country. In this retrospective database study, the medical records of patients with type 2 diabetes treated at three diabetes outpatient centers of the national health system during 2006 and 2012 were examined. Only patients with at least six months of follow-up prior to the recorded examination were included. The prescription cost was calculated in Euros per patient-year (€PY). A total of 1953 medical records (938 from 2006 and 1015 from 2012) were included. There were no significant differences in adjusted HbA1c, systolic blood pressure and HDL-C, while significant reductions were observed in LDL-C and triglycerides. In 2012, a higher proportion of patients were prescribed glucose-lowering, lipid-lowering and antihypertensive medications. Almost 4 out of 10 patients were prescribed the new incretin-based medications, while the use of older drugs, except for metformin, decreased. A significant increase in the adjusted glucose-lowering prescription cost (612.4 [586.5-638.2] €PY vs 390.7 [363.5-418.0]; p crisis, the cardiovascular risk indices of Greek patients with type 2 diabetes being followed in public outpatient diabetes clinics did not deteriorate and in the case of lipid profile improved. However, the total prescription cost increased, mainly due to the higher cost of glucose-lowering prescriptions.

  12. 42 CFR 423.153 - Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... PRESCRIPTION DRUG BENEFIT Cost Control and Quality Improvement Requirements § 423.153 Drug utilization... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs). 423.153 Section 423.153 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE...

  13. [Management of cytostatic drugs by nurses: analysis of preliminary results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilski, Bartosz

    2004-01-01

    Cytostatic drugs pose a quite specific occupational risk to health care workers. There is a wide range of potential harmful effects, including remote effects, exerted by this group of drugs. In Polish and international regulations, standards of work safety and hygiene concerning these substances are clearly defined. Nevertheless working conditions in Polish health care institutions are now mostly influenced by economic and organizational problems, which may also be reflected in the compliance with the work safety rules. This paper presents a preliminary analysis of subjective assessment of practice with regard to the management of cytostatics reported by nurses, an occupational group mostly exposed to these substances. The study was carried out at hospital departments in the Warmińsko-Mazurskie Voivodship, where exposure of the staff to these drugs was observed. The study covered the whole nursing staff exposed. Completed questionnaires were obtained from 60 nurses, aged +/- 32 years (20-54 years) with job seniority +/- 8 years (2-18), including 58 nurses with secondary education and two university graduates. Undergraduate education did not develop in respondents skills to work with cytostatics. There is a need to increase the involvement of nursing schools, research institutes and teaching hospitals in the improvement of vocational training of nurses working with cytostatic drugs. To this end, all nurses should be covered with the obligatory training how to handle this group of drugs. The respondents reported that they had acquired their knowledge and experience of managing cytostatics in their work and during training organized at workplace. Despite the acquired knowledge and experience the interviewed nurses did not always comply with work safety and hygiene regulations. The problem of exposure to cytostatic drugs in the form of tablets was most frequently neglected. Some of the nurses were additionally exposed to ionizing radiation. Shortage of the nursing

  14. Antiretroviral adverse drug reactions and their management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-06-02

    Jun 2, 2011 ... Nevirapine and efavirenz (and etravirine) can cause a drug hypersensitivity ... HLA-B*5701 are at high risk of ABC hypersensitivity, while those with other variants .... creatinine and the patient's body weight using the modified ...

  15. Observational study of drug-drug interactions in oncological inpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Sacramento Díaz-Carrasco

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the prevalence of potential clinically relevant drug- drug interactions in adult oncological inpatients, as well as to describe the most frequent interactions. A standard database was used. Method: An observational, transversal, and descriptive study including patients admitted to the Oncology Service of a reference hospital. All prescriptions were collected twice a week during a month. They were analysed using Lexicomp® database, recording all interactions classified with a level of risk: C, D or X. Results: A total of 1 850 drug-drug interactions were detected in 218 treatments. The prevalence of treatments with at least one clinically relevant interaction was 95%, being 94.5% for those at level C and 26.1% for levels D and X. The drugs most commonly involved in the interactions detected were opioid analgesics, antipsychotics (butyrophenones, benzodiazepines, pyrazolones, glucocorticoids and heparins, whereas interactions with antineoplastics were minimal, highlighting those related to paclitaxel and between metamizole and various antineoplastics. Conclusions: The prevalence of clinically relevant drug-drug interactions rate was very high, highlighting the high risk percentage of them related to level of risk X. Due to the frequency of onset and potential severity, highlighted the concomitant use of central nervous system depressants drugs with risk of respiratory depression, the risk of onset of anticholinergic symptoms when combining morphine or haloperidol with butylscopolamine, ipratropium bromide or dexchlorpheniramine and the multiple interactions involving metamizole.

  16. Pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction and their implication in clinical management

    OpenAIRE

    Palleria, Caterina; DI PAOLO, Antonello; Giofrè, Chiara; Caglioti, Chiara; Leuzzi, Giacomo; Siniscalchi, Antonio; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Gallelli, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) are one of the commonest causes of medication error in developed countries, particularly in the elderly due to poly-therapy, with a prevalence of 20-40%. In particular, poly-therapy increases the complexity of therapeutic management and thereby the risk of clinically important DDIs, which can both induce the development of adverse drug reactions or reduce the clinical efficacy. DDIs can be classify into two main groups: pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic. In thi...

  17. Clinical management of drug-drug interactions in HCV therapy: Challenges and solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burger, D.M.; Back, D.; Buggisch, P.; Buti, M.; Craxi, A.; Foster, G.; Klinker, H.; Larrey, D.; Nikitin, I.; Pol, S. van der; Puoti, M.; Romero-Gomez, M.; Wedemeyer, H.; Zeuzem, S.

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infected patients often take multiple co-medications to treat adverse events related to HCV therapy, or to manage other co-morbidities. Drug-drug interactions associated with this polypharmacy are relatively new to the field of HCV pharmacotherapy. With the advent of the

  18. MANAGEMENT OF HAEMATOLOGICAL PATIENTS TREATED WITHCARDIOTOXIC DRUG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jure Dolenc

    2008-04-01

    Predisposing factors to cardiotoxicity should be taken into consideration when dealingwith such pacients. Careful history, clinical examination, electrocardiography, echocardiography and NT-proBNP measurement should be performed prior and at the end of thetreatment with cardiotoxic drugs. Pacients with slightest clinical, laboratory or echocardiographic parameters of developing heart failure should immediately be reffered to a cardiologist to start with appropriate treatment

  19. Planning for management information systems in drug treatment organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalkind, D; Zelon, H; Moore, M; Kaluzny, A

    1979-02-01

    An attempt to set up a management information system for individual drug abuse programs throughout a state is described. The principles upon which the system is based are discussed along with the problems encountered in its implementation. A series of guidelines for establishing management information systems in operating human services agencies is included.

  20. 75 FR 10490 - Joint Meeting of the Arthritis Drugs Advisory Committee and the Drug Safety and Risk Management...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2010-N-0001] Joint Meeting of the Arthritis Drugs Advisory Committee and the Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory... Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committees: To provide...

  1. Rabeto plus: a valuable drug for managing functional dyspepsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Asim; Halder, Susanta; Mandal, Sanjoy; Mandal, Arpan; Basu, Mitali; Dabholkar, Pareen

    2008-11-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate and document the efficacy and tolerability of rabeto plus (FDC of rabeprazole and itopride) in management of functional dyspepsia. It was an open, prospective, non-comparative, multidose study. The patients with functional dyspepsia (NERD or non-erosive reflux disease) attending OPD of a leading, tertiary care, teaching hospital in West Bengal (BS Medical College, Bankura) were inducted in the study. A total of 46 adult patients of either sex with functional dyspepsia and a clinical diagnosis of NERD were given 1 capsule of rabeto plus before breakfast, for up to 4 weeks. Primary efficacy variables were relief from symptoms of heartburn, nausea, vomiting, waterbrash and fullness. Secondary efficacy variables were global assessment of efficacy and toleration by patients and treating physicians. The tolerability was assessed on the basis of record of spontaneously reported adverse events with their nature, intensity and outcome. Out of 55 patients enrolled in the study, 46 completed the study as planned, while 9 patients were lost to follow-up (dropped). Most patients reported near total symptom relief by the end of study. Total symptom score showed remarkable and significant improvement from baseline to end of the study. Importantly, none of the patients reported any side-effect. All participants tolerated the drug well. Moreover, response to study drug was rated as excellent or good by over 93% patients and their treating physicians. This means that 9 out 10 patients receiving rabeto plus reported desired symptom relief from dyspepsia. Thus it was concluded that rabeto plus is a valuable drug for treatment of functional dyspepsia or NERD.

  2. Preferences of Patients and Pharmacists with Regard to the Management of Drug-Drug Interactions : A Choice-Based Conjoint Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heringa, Mette; Floor-Schreudering, Annemieke; Wouters, Hans; De Smet, Peter A G M; Bouvy, Marcel L

    INTRODUCTION: The management of drug-drug interactions (DDIs) is a complex process in which risk-benefit assessments should be combined with the patient's perspective. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine patients' and pharmacists' preferences regarding DDI management. METHODS: We

  3. Consensus-based evaluation of clinical significance and management of anticancer drug interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansman, F.G.A.; Reyners, A.K.L.; van Roon, E.N.; Smorenburg, C.H.; Helgason, H.H.; le Comte, M.; Wensveen, B.M.; van den Tweel, A.M.A.; de Blois, M.; Kwee, W.; Kerremans, A.L.; Brouwers, J.R.B.J.

    Background: Anticancer drug interactions can affect the efficacy and toxicity of anticancer treatment and that of the interacting drugs. However, information on the significance, prevention, and management of these interactions is currently lacking. Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess

  4. Phynx: an open source software solution supporting data management and web-based patient-level data review for drug safety studies in the general practice research database and other health care databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egbring, Marco; Kullak-Ublick, Gerd A; Russmann, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    To develop a software solution that supports management and clinical review of patient data from electronic medical records databases or claims databases for pharmacoepidemiological drug safety studies. We used open source software to build a data management system and an internet application with a Flex client on a Java application server with a MySQL database backend. The application is hosted on Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud. This solution named Phynx supports data management, Web-based display of electronic patient information, and interactive review of patient-level information in the individual clinical context. This system was applied to a dataset from the UK General Practice Research Database (GPRD). Our solution can be setup and customized with limited programming resources, and there is almost no extra cost for software. Access times are short, the displayed information is structured in chronological order and visually attractive, and selected information such as drug exposure can be blinded. External experts can review patient profiles and save evaluations and comments via a common Web browser. Phynx provides a flexible and economical solution for patient-level review of electronic medical information from databases considering the individual clinical context. It can therefore make an important contribution to an efficient validation of outcome assessment in drug safety database studies.

  5. Psychotropic drugs in Nepal: perceptions on use and supply chain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhaya, Nawaraj; Jordans, Mark J D; Gurung, Dristy; Pokhrel, Ruja; Adhikari, Ramesh P; Komproe, Ivan H

    2018-01-24

    Psychotropic drugs play an important role in the treatment of mental, neurological and substance use disorders. Despite the advancement of the use of psycho-pharmaceuticals in the developed countries, the psychotropic drug production and supply chain management in low- and middle- income countries are still poorly developed. This study aims to explore the perceptions of stakeholders involved in all stages of the psychotropic drug supply chain about the need, quality, availability and effectiveness of psychotropic drugs, as well as barriers to their supply chain management. The study was conducted among 65 respondents from the Kathmandu, Chitwan and Pyuthan districts, grouped into four categories: producers, promoters and distributors (N = 22), policy makers and government actors (N = 8), service providers (N = 21) and service users/family members (N = 14). The respondents reported that psychotropic drugs, despite having side effects, are 1) needed, 2) available in major regional centers and 3) are effective for treating mental health problems. The stigma associated with mental illness, however, forces patients and family members to hide their use of psychotropic drugs. The study found that the process of psychotropic drug supply chain management is similar to other general drugs, with the exceptions of strict pre-approval process, quantity restriction (for production and import), and mandatory record keeping. Despite these regulatory provisions, respondents believed that the misuse of psychotropic drugs is widespread and companies are providing incentives to prescribers and retailers to retain their brand in the market. The production and supply chain management of psychotropic drugs is influenced by the vested interests of pharmaceutical companies, prescribers and pharmacists. In the context of the government of Nepal's policy of integrating mental health into primary health care and increased consumption of psychotropic drugs in Nepal, there is a

  6. Project management case studies

    CERN Document Server

    Kerzner, Harold R

    2013-01-01

    A new edition of the most popular book of project management case studies, expanded to include more than 100 cases plus a ""super case"" on the Iridium Project Case studies are an important part of project management education and training. This Fourth Edition of Harold Kerzner''s Project Management Case Studies features a number of new cases covering value measurement in project management. Also included is the well-received ""super case,"" which covers all aspects of project management and may be used as a capstone for a course. This new edition:Contains 100-plus case studies drawn from re

  7. Microemulsion Drug Delivery Systems for Radiopharmacy Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emre Ozgenc

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Microemulsions have been used increasingly for last year’s because of ideal properties like favorable drug delivery, ease of preparation and physical stability. They have been improved the solubility and efficacy of the drug and reduce the side effects. Use of radiolabeled microemulsions plays an alternative role in drug delivery systems by investigating the formation, stability and application of microemulsions in radiopharmacy. Gama scintigraphic method is well recognized for developing and detecting the biodistribution of newly developed drugs or formulation. This review will focus on how radionuclides are able to play role with characterization studies of microemulsion drug delivery systems.

  8. Managing Drug Use in Danish Club Settings: A normalized enterprise?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Signe

    2012-01-01

    The article analyzes Danish clubbers’ strategies for taking drugs in night clubs. This exploration is framed within the discussion of a possible normalization of youth drug use. Thus, the article investigates how young drug-users experience the level of acceptability of drug use in clubs and how ...... are indicative of the level of acceptability of drugs in club settings. Through this focus on the micro-level, the article adds to the limited amount of literature on this dimension of the normalization thesis. Empirically, the article is based on a Danish mixed methods club study....

  9. Risk management and post-marketing surveillance of CNS drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henningfield, Jack E; Schuster, Charles R

    2009-12-01

    Drugs affecting the central nervous system span a broad range of chemical entities, dosage forms, indications, and risks. Unintended consequences include potential abuse and overdose in non-patient drug abusers, deliberate tampering of drug dosage forms, and criminal behavior associated with diversion. Regulators must consider diverse factors to find the appropriate conditions of approval to minimize unintended consequences while enabling a level of access desired by health care providers and patients. This commentary appears as part of a special issue of Drug and Alcohol Dependence that focuses on risk management and post-marketing surveillance and addresses key issues that pose real-world challenges to pharmaceutical sponsors and regulators in particular. For example, in the U.S., Controlled Substances Act drug scheduling can be considered a risk management strategy but its legal authorities and administrative processes are independent from those of risk management (including Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategies or REMS); better harmonization of these approaches is vital from drug development and regulatory perspectives. Risk management would ideally be implemented on a strong science foundation demonstrating that the tools employed to mitigate risks and ensure safe use are effective. In reality, research and evaluation of tools in this area is in its infancy and will necessarily be an evolutionary process; furthermore, there is little precedent for linking interventions and program evolution to unintended consequences such as regional outbreaks of abuse and diversion. How such issues are resolved has the potential to stimulate or stifle innovations in drug development and advance or imperil health care.

  10. Identification and management of prescription drug abuse in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worley, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Prescription drug abuse is a growing problem in the United States and many other countries. Estimates of prescription drug abuse rates during pregnancy range from 5% to 20%. The primary prescription drugs designated as controlled drugs with abuse potential in pregnancy are opiates prescribed for pain, benzodiazepines prescribed for anxiety, and stimulants prescribed for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Prescription drugs are obtained for abuse through diversion methods, such as purchasing them from others or by doctor shopping. The use of prescription drugs puts both the mother and the fetus at high risk during pregnancy. Identification of women who are abusing prescription drugs is important so that treatment can be ensured. It is crucial for healthcare professionals to use a multidisciplinary approach and be supportive and maintain a good rapport with pregnant women who abuse prescription drugs. Management includes inpatient hospitalization for detoxification and withdrawal symptoms, and in the case of opiate abuse, opiate maintenance is recommended for pregnant women for the duration of their pregnancy to reduce relapse rates and improve maternal and fetal outcomes. Other recommendations include referral for support groups and supportive housing.

  11. Atopic Dermatitis: Drug Delivery Approaches in Disease Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalan, Manisha; Baweja, Jitendra; Misra, Ambikanandan

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we describe the very basic of atopic dermatitis (AD), the established management strategies, and the advances in drug delivery approaches for successful therapeutic outcomes. The multifactorial pathophysiology of AD has given rise to the clinician's paradigm of topical and systemic therapy and potential combinations. However, incomplete remission of skin disorders like AD is a major challenge to be overcome. Recurrence is thought to be due to genetic and immunological etiologies and shortcomings in drug delivery. This difficulty has sparked research in nanocarrier-based delivery approaches as well as molecular biology-inspired stratagems to deal with the immunological imbalance and to address insufficiencies of delivery propositions. In this review, we assess various novel drug delivery strategies in terms of their success and utility. We present a brief compilation and assessment of management modalities to sensitize the readers to therapeutic scenario in AD.

  12. Default Drug Doses in Anesthesia Information Management Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriquez, Luis I; Smaka, Todd J; Mahla, Michael; Epstein, Richard H

    2017-07-01

    In the United States, anesthesia information management systems (AIMS) are well established, especially within academic practices. Many hospitals are replacing their stand-alone AIMS during migration to an enterprise-wide electronic health record. This presents an opportunity to review choices made during the original implementation, based on actual usage. One area amenable to this informatics approach is the configuration in the AIMS of quick buttons for typical drug doses. The use of such short cuts, as opposed to manual typing of doses, simplifies and may improve the accuracy of drug documentation within the AIMS. We analyzed administration data from 3 different institutions, 2 of which had empirically configured default doses, and one in which defaults had not been set up. Our first hypothesis was that most (ie, >50%) of drugs would need at least one change to the existing defaults. Our second hypothesis was that for most (>50%) drugs, the 4 most common doses at the site lacking defaults would be included among the most common doses at the 2 sites with defaults. If true, this would suggest that having default doses did not affect the typical administration behavior of providers. The frequency distribution of doses for all drugs was determined, and the 4 most common doses representing at least 5% of total administrations for each drug were identified. The appropriateness of the current defaults was determined by the number of changes (0-4) required to match actual usage at the 2 hospitals with defaults. At the institution without defaults, the most frequent doses for the 20 most commonly administered drugs were compared with the default doses at the other institutions. At the 2 institutions with defaults, 84.7% and 77.5% of drugs required at least 1 change in the default drug doses (P default drug doses, 100% of the 20 most commonly administered doses (representing ≥5% of use for that drug) were included in the most commonly administered doses at the other 2

  13. 77 FR 65000 - Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-24

    ...] Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug...: Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide... Use (ETASU) before CDER's Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee (DSaRM). The Agency plans...

  14. 78 FR 30929 - Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-23

    ...] Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug...: Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide... (REMS) with elements to assure safe use (ETASU) before its Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory...

  15. 77 FR 75176 - Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-19

    ...] Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug... being rescheduled due to the postponement of the October 29-30, 2012, Drug Safety and Risk Management... Committee: Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide...

  16. [Pain management with herbal antirheumatic drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrubasik, Sigrun; Pollak, S

    2002-01-01

    Herbal antirheumatics are indicated in painful inflammatory and degenerative rheumatic diseases. Their mechanism of action is broader than that of synthetic antirheumatics. Particular preparations from Devils's Claw with 50 to 100 mg of harpagoside in the daily dosage as well as a particular willow bark extract with 120 to 240 mg salicin in the daily dosage proved efficacy in a number of clinical studies including confirmatory ones. Exploratory studies indicate that these herbal antirheumatics were not inferior to the selective COX-2 inhibitor rofecoxib when treating acute exacerbations of chronic low back pain. For the proprietary nettle root extract IDS23 promising in vitro/in vivo results indicate an anti-inflammatory effect, however there are only 2 open uncontrolled clinical studies available and the proof of efficacy is still missing. Safety data in order to recommend use during pregnancy and lactation are only available for the herbal combination product Phytodolor prepared from aspen, ash and goldenrod. In principle, blackcurrent leaf with not less than 1.5% flavonoids may be an appropriate antirheumatic. Likewise, the seed oils of blackcurrent, evening primrose and borage offering at least 1 to 3 g gammalinolenic acid/day are recommendable. In case superiority versus placebo has been established, proprietary herbal antirheumatics should be administered before the conventional analgesics due to the lower incidence of adverse events.

  17. An Oral Contraceptive Drug Interaction Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradstreet, Thomas E.; Panebianco, Deborah L.

    2004-01-01

    This article focuses on a two treatment, two period, two treatment sequence crossover drug interaction study of a new drug and a standard oral contraceptive therapy. Both normal theory and distribution-free statistical analyses are provided along with a notable amount of graphical insight into the dataset. For one of the variables, the decision on…

  18. Managing Drug-Drug Interaction Between Ombitasvir, Paritaprevir/Ritonavir, Dasabuvir, and Mycophenolate Mofetil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaitre, Florian; Ben Ali, Zeineb; Tron, Camille; Jezequel, Caroline; Boglione-Kerrien, Christelle; Verdier, Marie-Clémence; Guyader, Dominique; Bellissant, Eric

    2017-08-01

    No drug-drug interaction study has been conducted to date for the combination of ombitasvir, paritaprevir/ritonavir, dasabuvir (3D), and mycophenolic acid (MPA). We here report the case of a hepatitis C virus-infected patient treated with 3D and MPA for vasculitis. In light of the threat of drug-drug interaction, the concentration of MPA was measured before, during, and 15 days after the end of the 3D treatment. Similar values were found at all 3 time points, thus indicating that there is probably no need to adapt MPA dosage to 3D.

  19. Managing Managerialism in Management Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lystbæk, Christian Tang

    The paper addresses the dominance of an instrumental or “managerialist” conception of rationality within management. Many critics have made clear that this conception of rationality is reductionist, but the critique often dismisses rationality altogether as the failed project of the Enlightenment...

  20. Prophylactic drug management for febrile seizures in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Offringa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Febrile seizures occurring in a child older than one month during an episode of fever affect 2% to 4% of children in Great Britain and the United States and recur in 30%. Rapid-acting antiepileptics and antipyretics given during subsequent fever episodes have been used to avoid the adverse effects of continuous antiepileptic drugs. OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of antiepileptic and antipyretic drugs used prophylactically to treat children with febrile seizures. METHODS Search methods: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2011. Issue 3; MEDLINE (1966 to May 2011; EMBASE (1966 to May 2011; Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effectiveness (DARE (May 2011. No language restrictions were imposed. We also contacted researchers in the field to identify continuing or unpublished studies. Selection criteria: Trials using randomized or quasi-randomized patient allocation that compared the use of antiepileptic or antipyretic agents with each other, placebo or no treatment. Data collection and analysis: Two review authors (RN and MO independently applied pre-defined criteria to select trials for inclusion and extracted the pre-defined relevant data, recording methods for randomization, blinding and exclusions. Outcomes assessed were seizure recurrence at 6, 12, 18, 24, 36 months and at age 5 to 6 years in the intervention and non-intervention groups, and adverse medication effects. The presence of publication bias was assessed using funnel plots. MAIN RESULTS Thirty-six articles describing 26 randomized trials with 2740 randomized participants were included. Thirteen interventions of continuous or intermittent prophylaxis and their control treatments were analyzed. Methodological quality was moderate to poor in most studies. We could not do a meta-analysis for 8 of the 13 comparisons due to insufficient numbers of trials. No significant benefit for valproate, pyridoxine

  1. Thermodynamic Studies for Drug Design and Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbett, Nichola C.; Chaires, Jonathan B.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction A key part of drug design and development is the optimization of molecular interactions between an engineered drug candidate and its binding target. Thermodynamic characterization provides information about the balance of energetic forces driving binding interactions and is essential for understanding and optimizing molecular interactions. Areas covered This review discusses the information that can be obtained from thermodynamic measurements and how this can be applied to the drug development process. Current approaches for the measurement and optimization of thermodynamic parameters are presented, specifically higher throughput and calorimetric methods. Relevant literature for this review was identified in part by bibliographic searches for the period 2004 – 2011 using the Science Citation Index and PUBMED and the keywords listed below. Expert opinion The most effective drug design and development platform comes from an integrated process utilizing all available information from structural, thermodynamic and biological studies. Continuing evolution in our understanding of the energetic basis of molecular interactions and advances in thermodynamic methods for widespread application are essential to realize the goal of thermodynamically-driven drug design. Comprehensive thermodynamic evaluation is vital early in the drug development process to speed drug development towards an optimal energetic interaction profile while retaining good pharmacological properties. Practical thermodynamic approaches, such as enthalpic optimization, thermodynamic optimization plots and the enthalpic efficiency index, have now matured to provide proven utility in design process. Improved throughput in calorimetric methods remains essential for even greater integration of thermodynamics into drug design. PMID:22458502

  2. Thermodynamic studies for drug design and screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbett, Nichola C; Chaires, Jonathan B

    2012-04-01

    A key part of drug design and development is the optimization of molecular interactions between an engineered drug candidate and its binding target. Thermodynamic characterization provides information about the balance of energetic forces driving binding interactions and is essential for understanding and optimizing molecular interactions. This review discusses the information that can be obtained from thermodynamic measurements and how this can be applied to the drug development process. Current approaches for the measurement and optimization of thermodynamic parameters are presented, specifically higher throughput and calorimetric methods. Relevant literature for this review was identified in part by bibliographic searches for the period 2004 - 2011 using the Science Citation Index and PUBMED and the keywords listed below. The most effective drug design and development platform comes from an integrated process utilizing all available information from structural, thermodynamic and biological studies. Continuing evolution in our understanding of the energetic basis of molecular interactions and advances in thermodynamic methods for widespread application are essential to realize the goal of thermodynamically driven drug design. Comprehensive thermodynamic evaluation is vital early in the drug development process to speed drug development toward an optimal energetic interaction profile while retaining good pharmacological properties. Practical thermodynamic approaches, such as enthalpic optimization, thermodynamic optimization plots and the enthalpic efficiency index, have now matured to provide proven utility in the design process. Improved throughput in calorimetric methods remains essential for even greater integration of thermodynamics into drug design. © 2012 Informa UK, Ltd.

  3. Remote controlled capsules in human drug absorption (HDA) studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilding, Ian R; Prior, David V

    2003-01-01

    The biopharmaceutical complexity of today's new drug candidates provides significant challenges for pharmaceutical scientists in terms of both candidate selection and optimizing subsequent development strategy. In addition, life cycle management of marketed drugs has become an important income stream for pharmaceutical companies, but the selection of least risk/highest benefit strategies is far from simple. The proactive adoption of human drug absorption (HDA) studies using remote controlled capsules offers the pharmaceutical scientist significant guidance for planning a route through the maze of product development. This review examines the position of HDA studies in drug development, using a variety of case histories and an insightful update on remote controlled capsules to achieve site-specific delivery.

  4. Perioperative drug management. Reduction of potential drug-related problems in patients undergoing orthopaedic surgery by perioperative participation of a hospital pharmacist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duyvendak, M.; Bosman, J.; Klopotowska, J.; Kuiper-Herder, A.J.; Van Roon, E.N.; Brouwers, J.R.B.J.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Drug management in the perioperative period is complex. Only little is known about the effects of clinical pharmaceutical care in this setting. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a clinical pharmacy-based intervention on the number of potential drug-related problems in

  5. RECENT DRUGS FOR THE MANAGEMENT AND TREATMENT OF FIBROMYALGIA

    OpenAIRE

    Abida*, Md. Tauqir Alam, Mohd. Imran, Said A.H. El-Feky, Mohamed A.M. Hagga

    2016-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a disorder, which is characterized by widespread musculoskeletal pain accompanied by fatigue, memory, mood, and sleep issues. Scientists believe that this condition may be due to injury, emotional distress, or viruses that change the way the brain perceives pain, but the exact cause is unclear. Generally, fibromyalgia is treated with antidepressants, pain relievers, and Anti-seizure drugs. There is not much specific treatment available for the treatment and management of fibro...

  6. Pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction and their implication in clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palleria, Caterina; Di Paolo, Antonello; Giofrè, Chiara; Caglioti, Chiara; Leuzzi, Giacomo; Siniscalchi, Antonio; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Gallelli, Luca

    2013-07-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) are one of the commonest causes of medication error in developed countries, particularly in the elderly due to poly-therapy, with a prevalence of 20-40%. In particular, poly-therapy increases the complexity of therapeutic management and thereby the risk of clinically important DDIs, which can both induce the development of adverse drug reactions or reduce the clinical efficacy. DDIs can be classify into two main groups: pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic. In this review, using Medline, PubMed, Embase, Cochrane library and Reference lists we searched articles published until June 30 2012, and we described the mechanism of pharmacokinetic DDIs focusing the interest on their clinical implications.

  7. Pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction and their implication in clinical management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palleria Caterina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug-drug interactions (DDIs are one of the commonest causes of medication error in developed countries, particularly in the elderly due to poly-therapy, with a prevalence of 20-40%. In particular, poly-therapy increases the complexity of therapeutic management and thereby the risk of clinically important DDIs, which can both induce the development of adverse drug reactions or reduce the clinical efficacy. DDIs can be classify into two main groups: pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic. In this review, using Medline, PubMed, Embase, Cochrane library and Reference lists we searched articles published until June 30 2012, and we described the mechanism of pharmacokinetic DDIs focusing the interest on their clinical implications.

  8. Vaccine and Drug Ontology Studies (VDOS 2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Cui; He, Yongqun; Arabandi, Sivaram

    2016-01-01

    The "Vaccine and Drug Ontology Studies" (VDOS) international workshop series focuses on vaccine- and drug-related ontology modeling and applications. Drugs and vaccines have been critical to prevent and treat human and animal diseases. Work in both (drugs and vaccines) areas is closely related - from preclinical research and development to manufacturing, clinical trials, government approval and regulation, and post-licensure usage surveillance and monitoring. Over the last decade, tremendous efforts have been made in the biomedical ontology community to ontologically represent various areas associated with vaccines and drugs - extending existing clinical terminology systems such as SNOMED, RxNorm, NDF-RT, and MedDRA, developing new models such as the Vaccine Ontology (VO) and Ontology of Adverse Events (OAE), vernacular medical terminologies such as the Consumer Health Vocabulary (CHV). The VDOS workshop series provides a platform for discussing innovative solutions as well as the challenges in the development and applications of biomedical ontologies for representing and analyzing drugs and vaccines, their administration, host immune responses, adverse events, and other related topics. The five full-length papers included in this 2014 thematic issue focus on two main themes: (i) General vaccine/drug-related ontology development and exploration, and (ii) Interaction and network-related ontology studies.

  9. Drug-Drug/Drug-Excipient Compatibility Studies on Curcumin using Non-Thermal Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moorthi Chidambaram

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Curcumin is a hydrophobic polyphenol isolated from dried rhizome of turmeric. Clinical usefulness of curcumin in the treatment of cancer is limited due to poor aqueous solubility, hydrolytic degradation, metabolism, and poor oral bioavailability. To overcome these limitations, we proposed to fabricate curcumin-piperine, curcumin-quercetin and curcumin-silibinin loaded polymeric nanoformulation. However, unfavourable combinations of drug-drug and drug-excipient may result in interaction and rises the safety concern. Hence, the present study was aimed to assess the interaction of curcumin with excipients used in nanoformulations. Methods: Isothermal stress testing method was used to assess the compatibility of drug-drug/drug-excipient. Results: The combination of curcumin-piperine, curcumin-quercetin, curcumin-silibinin and the combination of other excipients with curcumin, piperine, quercetin and silibinin have not shown any significant physical and chemical instability. Conclusion: The study concludes that the curcumin, piperine, quercetin and silibinin is compatible with each other and with other excipients.

  10. Non-drug Non-invasive Treatment in the Management of Low Back ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of functional independence and quality of life. Aim: The main purpose of this study was to assess the results of non-drug non-invasive treatment in the management of LBP. Subjects and Methods: This was prospective study conducted in the Department of Orthopedics in M. M. Medical College, Mullana, Ambala, Haryana, ...

  11. 75 FR 23782 - Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-04

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2010-N-0001] Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug...: Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide...

  12. How drug life-cycle management patent strategies may impact formulary management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Jan; Dunn, Jeffrey D; Johnson, Margaret M; Karst, Kurt R; Shear, W Chad

    2016-10-01

    Drug manufacturers may employ various life-cycle management patent strategies, which may impact managed care decision making regarding formulary planning and management strategies when single-source, branded oral pharmaceutical products move to generic status. Passage of the Hatch-Waxman Act enabled more rapid access to generic medications through the abbreviated new drug application process. Patent expirations of small-molecule medications and approvals of generic versions have led to substantial cost savings for health plans, government programs, insurers, pharmacy benefits managers, and their customers. However, considering that the cost of developing a single medication is estimated at $2.6 billion (2013 dollars), pharmaceutical patent protection enables companies to recoup investments, creating an incentive for innovation. Under current law, patent protection holds for 20 years from time of patent filing, although much of this time is spent in product development and regulatory review, leaving an effective remaining patent life of 7 to 10 years at the time of approval. To extend the product life cycle, drug manufacturers may develop variations of originator products and file for patents on isomers, metabolites, prodrugs, new drug formulations (eg, extended-release versions), and fixed-dose combinations. These additional patents and the complexities surrounding the timing of generic availability create challenges for managed care stakeholders attempting to gauge when generics may enter the market. An understanding of pharmaceutical patents and how intellectual property protection may be extended would benefit managed care stakeholders and help inform decisions regarding benefit management.

  13. Accuracy of manual entry of drug administration data into an anesthesia information management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avidan, Alexander; Dotan, Koren; Weissman, Charles; Cohen, Matan J; Levin, Phillip D

    2014-11-01

    Data on drug administration are entered manually into anesthesia information management systems (AIMS). This study examined whether these data are accurate regarding drug name, dose administered, and time of administration, and whether the stage of anesthesia influences data accuracy. Real-time observational data on drug administration during elective operations were compared with computerized information on drug administration entered by anesthesiologists. A trained observer (K.D.) performed the observations. Data were collected during 57 operations which included 596 separate occasions of drug administration by 22 anesthesiologists. No AIMS records were found for 90 (15.1%) occasions of drug administration (omissions), while there were 11 (1.8%) AIMS records where drug administration was not observed. The AIMS and observer data matched for drug name on 495 of 596 (83.1%) occasions, for dose on 439 of 495 (92.5%) occasions, and for time on 476 of 495 (96.2%) occasions. Amongst the 90 omitted records, 34 (37.8%) were for vasoactive drugs with 24 (27.7%) for small doses of hypnotics. Omissions occurred mostly during maintenance: 50 of 153 (24.6%), followed by induction: 30 of 325 (9.2%) and emergence: 10 of 57 (17.5%) (P < 0.001). Time and dose inaccuracies occurred mainly during induction, followed by maintenance and emergence; time inaccuracies were 7/325 (8.3%), 10/203 (4.9%), and 0/57 (0%), respectively (P = 0.07), and dose inaccuracies were 15/325 (4.6%), 3/203 (1.5%), and 1/57 (1.7%), respectively (P = 0.11). The range of accuracy varies when anesthesiologists manually enter drug administration data into an AIMS. Charting omissions represent the largest cause of inaccuracy, principally by omissions of records for vasopressors and small doses of hypnotic drugs. Manually entered drug administration data are not without errors. Accuracy of entering drug administration data remains the responsibility of the anesthesiologist.

  14. Addressing drug adherence using an operations management model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunlee, Martin; Bones, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To provide a model that enables health systems and pharmacy benefit managers to provide medications reliably and test for reliability and validity in the analysis of adherence to drug therapy of chronic disease. SUMMARY The quantifiable model described here can be used in conjunction with behavioral designs of drug adherence assessments. The model identifies variables that can be reproduced and expanded across the management of chronic diseases with drug therapy. By creating a reorder point system for reordering medications, the model uses a methodology commonly seen in operations research. The design includes a safety stock of medication and current supply of medication, which increases the likelihood that patients will have a continuous supply of medications, thereby positively affecting adherence by removing barriers. CONCLUSION This method identifies an adherence model that quantifies variables related to recommendations from health care providers; it can assist health care and service delivery systems in making decisions that influence adherence based on the expected order cycle days and the expected daily quantity of medication administered. This model addresses the possession of medication as a barrier to adherence.

  15. Focused use of drug screening in overdose patients increases impact on management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdmann, Andreas; Werner, Dominique; Hugli, Olivier; Yersin, Bertrand

    2015-01-01

    Drug poisoning is a common cause for attendance in the emergency department. Several toxicology centres suggest performing urinary drug screens, even though they rarely influence patient management. Measuring the impact on patient management, in a University Emergency Department with approximately 40 000 admissions annually, of a rapid urinary drug screening test using specifically focused indications. Drug screening was restricted to patients having a first psychotic episode or cases demonstrating respiratory failure, coma, seizures, a sympathomimetic toxidrome, severe opiate overdose necessitating naloxone, hypotension, ventricular arrhythmia, acquired long QT or QRS >100 ms, and high-degree heart block. Retrospective analysis of Triage® TOX drug screen tests performed between September 2009 and November 2011, and between January 2013 and March 2014. A total of 262 patients were included, mean age 35 ± 14.6 (standard deviation) years, 63% men; 29% poisoning with alcohol, and 2.3% deaths. Indications for testing were as follows: 34% were first psychotic episodes; 20% had acute respiratory failure; 16% coma; 8% seizures; 8% sympathomimetic toxidromes; 7% severe opioid toxidromes; 4% hypotension; 3% ventricular arrhythmias or acquired long QT intervals on electrocardiogram. A total of 78% of the tests were positive (median two substances, maximum five). The test resulted in drug-specific therapy in 6.1%, drug specific diagnostic tests in 13.3 %, prolonged monitoring in 10.7% of methadone-positive tests, and psychiatric admission in 4.2%. Overall, 34.3% tests influenced patient management. In contrast to previous studies showing modest effects of toxicological testing, restricted use of rapid urinary drug testing increases the impact on management of suspected overdose patients in the ED.

  16. Bureau of Land Management density management study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Cissel; Paul Anderson; Shanti Berryman; Sam Chan; Deanna Olson; Klaus. Puettman

    2004-01-01

    The Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Pacific Northwest Research Station (PNW), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and Oregon State University (OSU) established the Density Management Study (DMS) in 1994 to develop and test options for young stand management to meet Northwest Forest Plan objectives in western Oregon. The DMS demonstrates and evaluates alternative approaches...

  17. Critical Assessment of Implantable Drug Delivery Devices in Glaucoma Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dharani Manickavasagam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Glaucoma is a group of heterogeneous disorders involving progressive optic neuropathy that can culminate into visual impairment and irreversible blindness. Effective therapeutic interventions must address underlying vulnerability of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs to degeneration in conjunction with correcting other associated risk factors (such as elevated intraocular pressure. However, realization of therapeutic outcomes is heavily dependent on suitable delivery system that can overcome myriads of anatomical and physiological barriers to intraocular drug delivery. Development of clinically viable sustained release systems in glaucoma is a widely recognized unmet need. In this regard, implantable delivery systems may relieve the burden of chronic drug administration while potentially ensuring high intraocular drug bioavailability. Presently there are no FDA-approved implantable drug delivery devices for glaucoma even though there are several ongoing clinical studies. The paper critically assessed the prospects of polymeric implantable delivery systems in glaucoma while identifying factors that can dictate (a patient tolerability and acceptance, (b drug stability and drug release profiles, (c therapeutic efficacy, and (d toxicity and biocompatibility. The information gathered could be useful in future research and development efforts on implantable delivery systems in glaucoma.

  18. An Effectiveness Trial of Contingency Management in a Felony Preadjudication Drug Court

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlowe, Douglas B.; Festinger, David S.; Dugosh, Karen L.; Arabia, Patricia L.; Kirby, Kimberly C.

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated a contingency management (CM) program in a drug court. Gift certificates for compliance were delivered at 4- to 6-week intervals (total value = $390.00). Participants in one condition earned gift certificates that escalated by $5.00 increments. Participants in a second condition began earning higher magnitude gift…

  19. Management & Communication: Project Management Case Study

    CERN Multimedia

    Nathalie Dumeaux

    2004-01-01

    We are pleased to announce the recent launch of a new workshop on Project Management. This is designed for People with budgetary, scheduling and/or organizational responsibilities in a project or a sub-project. The objectives through a management case study specially suited to CERN are: to become familiar with modern management techniques in use for structuring, planning, scheduling, costing and progress monitoring of a project or a sub-project. to understand in-depth issues associated with Deliverable-oriented Project Management, Earned Value Management, Advanced Project Cost Engineering and Project Risk Management. The full description of this workshop can be found here. The next session will be held on 8 October 2004. If you are interested in this workshop, please contact Nathalie Dumeaux, email or 78144. Programme of Seminars October to December 2004 Situation : 21.09.2004 Séminaires bilingues Dates Jours Places disponibles Project Management Case study 8 October 1 oui Intr...

  20. African Journal of Drug and Alcohol Studies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The African Journal of Drug & Alcohol Studies is an international scientific journal published by the African Centre for Research and Information on Substance ... Anywhere, everywhere: alcohol industry promotion strategies in Nigeria and their influence on young people · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT

  1. DRUG-UTILIZATION STUDY ON CURACAO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VISSER, LE; OOSTERVELD, MH; DEJONGVANDENBERG, LTW

    1993-01-01

    The drug use on Curacao was evaluated with the help of the prescription forms of twelve community pharmacies at Curacao over a period of three months, The emphasis of the study was on three therapeutic groups: the systemic antibiotics, the psycholeptics and the anti-inflammatory and antirheumatic

  2. Safe procedure development to manage hazardous drugs in the workplace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa Gaspar Carreño

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To develop a safety working procedure for the employees in the Intermutual Hospital de Levante (HIL in those areas of activity that deal with the handling of hazardous drugs (MP. Methods: The procedure was developed in six phases: 1 hazard definition; 2 definition and identification of processes and development of general correct work practices about hazardous drugs’ selection and special handling; 3 detection, selection and set of specific recommendations to handle with hazardous drugs during the processes of preparation and administration included in the hospital GFT; 4 categorization of risk during the preparation/administration and development of an identification system; 5 information and training of professionals; 6 implementation of the identification measures and prevention guidelines. Results: Six processes were detected handling HD. During those processes, thirty HD were identified included in the hospital GFT and a safer alternative was found for 6 of them. The HD were classified into 4 risk categories based on those measures to be taken during the preparation and administration of each of them. Conclusions: The development and implementation of specific safety-work processes dealing with medication handling, allows hospital managers to accomplish effectively with their legal obligations about the area of prevention and provides healthcare professional staff with the adequate techniques and safety equipment to avoid possible dangers and risks of some drugs.

  3. Core management studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biele, B.; Dworak, Anton

    1974-03-15

    The aim of the here presented two studies is to investigate the possibilities of achieving an axial graduated power distribution, similar to the powershape present in a Pebbelbed-HTR with the OTTO-refueling-management. Two schemes were investigated, in Part 1, the results of the "Axial-Pushthrough" are quoted whereas in Part 2 the first results of the "Layer Loading System" (LLS) are given.

  4. Safe procedure development to manage hazardous drugs in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar Carreño, Marisa; Achau Muñoz, Rubén; Torrico Martín, Fátima; Agún Gonzalez, Juan José; Sanchez Santos, Jose Cristobal; Cercos Lletí, Ana Cristina; Ramos Orozco, Pedro

    2017-03-01

    To develop a safety working procedure for the employees in the Intermutual Hospital de Levante (HIL) in those areas of activity that deal with the handling of hazardous drugs (MP). The procedure was developed in six phases: 1) hazard definition; 2) definition and identification of processes and development of general correct work practices about hazardous drugs' selection and special handling; 3) detection, selection and set of specific recommendations to handle with hazardous drugs during the processes of preparation and administration included in the hospital GFT; 4) categorization of risk during the preparation/administration and development of an identification system; 5) information and training of professionals; 6) implementation of the identification measures and prevention guidelines. Six processes were detected handling HD. During those processes, thirty HD were identified included in the hospital GFT and a safer alternative was found for 6 of them. The HD were classified into 4 risk categories based on those measures to be taken during the preparation and administration of each of them. The development and implementation of specific safety-work processes dealing with medication handling, allows hospital managers to accomplish effectively with their legal obligations about the area of prevention and provides healthcare professional staff with the adequate techniques and safety equipment to avoid possible dangers and risks of some drugs. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  5. SODAS: Surveillance of Drugs of Abuse Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, David J; Torrance, Hazel J; Ireland, Alastair J; Bloeck, Felix; Stevenson, Richard

    2017-04-01

    Novel psychoactive substance (NPS) as a form of recreational drug use has become increasingly popular. There is a paucity of information with regard to the prevalence and clinical sequelae of these drugs. The aim of this study was to detect NPS in patients presenting to the emergency department with suspected toxicological ingestion. The prospective study was performed in a large emergency department in the UK. During a 3-month period 80 patients were identified by clinicians as having potentially ingested a toxicological agent. Urine samples were analysed using liquid chromatography high-resolution mass spectrometry, and basic clinical data was gathered. Eighty patients with a history of illicit or recreational drug consumption had urine screenings performed. Forty-nine per cent (39) of the patients undergoing a screen had more than one illicit substance detected. Twenty per cent (16) of the patients tested positive for at least one NPS. Almost half of the presented patients revealed ingestion of multiple substances, which correlated poorly with self-reporting of patients. Developing enhanced strategies to monitor evolving drug trends is crucial to the ability of clinicians to deliver care to this challenging group of patients.

  6. A drug utilisation study investigating prescribed daily doses of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and drug groups. Design. Retrospective drug utilisation study using data .... drugs that were prescribed 20 or fewer times during the period under ... occurs in women and men at different ages and with different severity. group. On average, men ...

  7. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDY OF DRUG INTOXICATION IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Cheraghali M. Taymori

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Unintentional drug intoxication is still a major cause of morbidity and mortality in young children. In order to study the epidemiological pattern of childhood drug poisoning in Golestan province, all cases diagnosed with poisoning from 1997 to 2002 in the only pediatric hospital in province were recruited. During this period 563 cases of poisoned children were hospitalized in Taleqani hospital, of these 305 cases were due to drug poisoning. Opium was responsible for more than half of the poisoning cases, and 91% of deaths, among drug intoxicated children. Metoclopramide, benzodiazepines, tricyclic antidepressants and anticonvulsants were among the other frequent causes of poisoning. Neurological symptoms were the most prominent symptoms of poisoning and more than 80% of cases showed some neurological symptoms. Mortality rate among the cases was 3.6% and of total of 11 deaths, 10 were poisoned with opium. About 61% of cases were hospitalized between 24-48 hrs. Most of the poisoning cases in young children were unintentional and in many cases, their parents played a critical role in their intoxication. This role specially is crucial in infants and children under one year of age. Parents in Golestan province use opium widely for symptomatic treatment of routine illnesses in their young children and overdose of opium may cause severe intoxication and even death of the child.

  8. Nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems for Alzheimer's disease management: Technical, industrial, and clinical challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Ming Ming; El-Salamouni, Noha S; El-Refaie, Wessam M; Hazzah, Heba A; Ali, Mai M; Tosi, Giovanni; Farid, Ragwa M; Blanco-Prieto, Maria J; Billa, Nashiru; Hanafy, Amira S

    2017-01-10

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease with high prevalence in the rapidly growing elderly population in the developing world. The currently FDA approved drugs for the management of symptomatology of AD are marketed mainly as conventional oral medications. Due to their gastrointestinal side effects and lack of brain targeting, these drugs and dosage regiments hinder patient compliance and lead to treatment discontinuation. Nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems (NTDDS) administered by different routes can be considered as promising tools to improve patient compliance and achieve better therapeutic outcomes. Despite extensive research, literature screening revealed that clinical activities involving NTDDS application in research for AD are lagging compared to NTDDS for other diseases such as cancers. The industrial perspectives, processability, and cost/benefit ratio of using NTDDS for AD treatment are usually overlooked. Moreover, active and passive immunization against AD are by far the mostly studied alternative AD therapies because conventional oral drug therapy is not yielding satisfactorily results. NTDDS of approved drugs appear promising to transform this research from 'paper to clinic' and raise hope for AD sufferers and their caretakers. This review summarizes the recent studies conducted on NTDDS for AD treatment, with a primary focus on the industrial perspectives and processability. Additionally, it highlights the ongoing clinical trials for AD management. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. 2013–2014 National Roadside Study of alcohol and drug use by drivers: drug results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    This was a nationally representative study to estimate the prevalence of alcohol and other drug use among drivers. : Drugs studied included 98 over-the-counter, prescription, and illegal substances. Drivers were randomly selected at : 60 sites (300 l...

  10. 78 FR 71036 - Pipeline Safety: Random Drug Testing Rate; Contractor Management Information System Reporting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-27

    ... PHMSA-2013-0248] Pipeline Safety: Random Drug Testing Rate; Contractor Management Information System Reporting; and Obtaining Drug and Alcohol Management Information System Sign-In Information AGENCY: Pipeline... Management Information System (MIS) Data; and New Method for Operators to Obtain User Name and Password for...

  11. PET IMAGING STUDIES IN DRUG ABUSE RESEARCH.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, J.S.; Volkow, N.D.; Ding, Y.S.; Logan, J.; Wang, G.J.

    2001-01-29

    . This will be followed by highlights of PET studies of the acute effects of the psychostimulant drugs cocaine and methylphenidate (ritalin) and studies of the chronic effects of cocaine and of tobacco smoke on the human brain. This chapter concludes with the description of a study which uses brain imaging coupled with a specific pharmacological challenge to address the age-old question of why some people who experiment with drugs become addicted while others do not.

  12. [Integrated management of patients with schizophrenia: beyond psychotropic drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taborda Zapata, Eliana; Montoya Gonzalez, Laura Elisa; Gómez Sierra, Natalia María; Arteaga Morales, Laura María; Correa Rico, Oscar Andrés

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a complex disease with severe functional repercussions; therefore it merits treatment which goes beyond drugs. It requires an approach that considers a diathesis-stress process that includes rehabilitation, psychotherapeutic strategies for persistent cognitive, negative and psychotic symptoms, psychoeducation of patient and communities, community adaptation strategies, such as the introduction to the work force, and the community model, such as a change in the asylum paradigm. It is necessary to establish private and public initiatives for the integrated care of schizophrenia in the country, advocating the well-being of those with the disease. The integrated management of schizophrenic patients requires a global view of the patient and his/her disease, and its development is essential. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  13. Online availability and safety of drugs in shortage: a descriptive study of internet vendor characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Bryan A; Mackey, Tim K

    2012-02-09

    Unprecedented drug shortages announced by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have severely affected therapeutic access, patient safety, and public health. With continued shortages, patients may seek drugs online. To assess the prevalence of online marketing for current FDA shortage drugs and potential patient safety risks. We performed a descriptive study of the prevalence of online marketing for shortage drugs-that is, offers for sale of each drug, including characteristics of online drug sellers and intermediary sites marketing these drugs. Of the 72 FDA shortage-listed drugs, 68 (94%) were offered for sale online. We found 291 offers for these drugs, the vast majority (n = 207, 71.1%) by online drug sellers selling direct to consumers. Intermediary sites included data aggregators (n = 22, 8%), forum links (n = 23, 8%), and personal page data links (n = 34, 12%), as well as Flickr social media links (n = 5, 2%), all advertising drugs without a prescription. Of the 91 online drug sellers identified, 31 (34%) had more than 1 shortage drug offered for sale, representing most (n = 148, 71%) of all online drug seller sales offers. The majority of these online drug sellers (n = 21, 68%) were on the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy (NABP) Not Recommended Sites list. Finally, for shortage drugs with an online drug seller (n = 58, 85%), 53 (91%) had at least one site on the Not Recommended list and 21 (36%) had only sites on the Not Recommended list. FDA shortage drugs are widely marketed over the Internet. Suspect online drug sellers and intermediaries dominate these sales offers. As a critical risk management issue, patients, providers, and policymakers should be extremely cautious in procuring shortage drugs through Internet sourcing.

  14. Indicators of club management practices and biological measurements of patrons' drug and alcohol use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, Hilary F; Miller, Brenda A; Johnson, Mark B; Voas, Robert B

    2014-12-01

    Electronic music and dance events in nightclubs attract patrons with heavy alcohol/drug use. Public health concerns are raised from risks related to these behaviors. Practices associated with increased risk in these club settings need to be identified. The relationship between club management practices and biological measures of patrons' alcohol/drug use is examined. Observational data from 25 events across six urban clubs were integrated with survey data (N = 738 patrons, 42.8% female) from patrons exiting these events, 2010-2012. Five indicators of club management practices were examined using mixed model regressions: club security, bar crowding, safety signs, serving intoxicated patrons, and isolation. Analyses revealed that serving intoxicated patrons and safety signs were related to substance use. Specifically, serving intoxicated patrons was related to heavy alcohol and drug use at exit, while safety signs were marginally related to less exit drug use. CONCLUSIONS/IMPORTANCE: Findings indicate observable measures in nightclubs provide important indicators for alcohol/drug use, suggesting practices to target. Study strengths include the use of biological measures of substance use on a relatively large scale. Limitations and future directions are discussed.

  15. Therapeutic drug management of linezolid: a missed opportunity for clinicians?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, Dario; Gervasoni, Cristina; Cozzi, Valeria; Castoldi, Simone; Baldelli, Sara; Clementi, Emilio

    2016-12-01

    Some studies have shown that adjustments to the linezolid dose guided by therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) can reduce interindividual variability in drug exposure and improve linezolid tolerability. In this study, 6 years of linezolid TDM, a diagnostic service for our hospital and others in the Milan (Italy) area, is described. Samples were collected immediately before the morning dose intake (trough concentrations) in steady-state conditions. Linezolid concentrations were quantified by a validated high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method. Four hundred linezolid trough concentrations from 220 patients were collected. A 20-fold variability in linezolid levels was observed. Positive and significant correlations between linezolid trough concentrations and patient age (r = 0.325, P linezolid concentrations with time was observed in a subgroup of patients with more than one TDM assessment. Elderly patients, especially those aged >80 years and with impaired renal function, are at a higher risk of overexposure to linezolid. Despite the observed progressive increase in linezolid concentrations over time, most physicians did not change the drug dose according to the TDM results, even in the presence of frank overexposure to linezolid. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  16. Baseline Antihypertensive Drug Count and Patient Response to Hypertension Medication Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Matthew J; Olsen, Maren K; Woolson, Sandra L; King, Heather A; Oddone, Eugene Z; Bosworth, Hayden B

    2016-04-01

    Telemedicine-based medication management improves hypertension control, but has been evaluated primarily in patients with low antihypertensive drug counts. Its impact on patients taking three or more antihypertensive agents is not well-established. To address this evidence gap, the authors conducted an exploratory analysis of an 18-month, 591-patient trial of telemedicine-based hypertension medication management. Using general linear models, the effect of medication management on blood pressure for patients taking two or fewer antihypertensive agents at study baseline vs those taking three or more was compared. While patients taking two or fewer antihypertensive agents had a significant reduction in systolic blood pressure with medication management, those taking three or more had no such response. The between-subgroup effect difference was statistically significant at 6 months (-6.4 mm Hg [95% confidence interval, -12.2 to -0.6]) and near significant at 18 months (-6.0 mm Hg [95% confidence interval, -12.2 to 0.2]). These findings suggest that baseline antihypertensive drug count may impact how patients respond to hypertension medication management and emphasize the need to study management strategies specifically in patients taking three or more antihypertensive medications. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  17. Emerging Trends in the Use of Drugs to Manage the Challenging Behaviour of People with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGillivray, Jane A.; McCabe, Marita P.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Concerns about the pharmacological management of the behaviour of individuals with intellectual disability have resulted in the development of legislative and procedural controls. Method: This Australian study provided a comparison of 873 reported cases where drugs were administered to manage behaviour in March 2000, with 762 cases…

  18. Is aspirin still the drug of choice for management of patients with peripheral arterial disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poredos, Pavel; Jezovnik, Mateja K

    2013-03-01

    Antiplatelet drugs represent one of the basic options for management of patients with different atherosclerotic diseases. Aspirin is the oldest and most often prescribed antiplatelet drug. The efficacy of aspirin depends on the clinical characteristics of the treated population and probably also on the type or location of atherosclerotic disease. It seems that it is most effective in coronary patients with clinically unstable disease, less effective in prevention of cerebrovascular incidents, and its efficacy is uncertain in peripheral artery disease (PAD) patients. One of the first meta-analyses (Antithrombotic Trialists' Collaboration - ATC) indicated that antiplatelet drugs also significantly reduce cardiovascular events in patients with PAD. However, only one third of the PAD patients included were treated with aspirin, while the rest received other anti-platelet drugs. The latest ATC meta-analysis of randomized control trials of aspirin therapy involving patients with diabetes and PAD demonstrated no benefit of aspirin in reducing cardiovascular events. Also in patients with preclinical PAD (pathological ankle brachial index) aspirin did not result in a significant reduction of vascular events. The new anti-platelet drugs prasugrel, ticagrelor and picotamide seem to be more effective than aspirin in PAD patients, particularly in diabetic patients with PAD. In conclusion, antiplatelet drugs are effective in prevention of cardiovascular events in different atherosclerotic diseases, including PAD. However, recent studies indicated that in PAD patients aspirin is less effective than in coronary artery disease. New anti-platelet drugs showed marginal superiority over aspirin without definite advantages. Aspirin thus remains the first line of antiplatelet drug for secondary prevention of cardiovascular events in PAD patients and clopidogrel as its effective alternative. Further, new studies on PAD patients are necessary to better define the role of anti

  19. Online Availability and Safety of Drugs in Shortage: A Descriptive Study of Internet Vendor Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Tim K

    2012-01-01

    Background Unprecedented drug shortages announced by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have severely affected therapeutic access, patient safety, and public health. With continued shortages, patients may seek drugs online. Objective To assess the prevalence of online marketing for current FDA shortage drugs and potential patient safety risks. Methods We performed a descriptive study of the prevalence of online marketing for shortage drugs—that is, offers for sale of each drug, including characteristics of online drug sellers and intermediary sites marketing these drugs. Results Of the 72 FDA shortage-listed drugs, 68 (94%) were offered for sale online. We found 291 offers for these drugs, the vast majority (n = 207, 71.1%) by online drug sellers selling direct to consumers. Intermediary sites included data aggregators (n = 22, 8%), forum links (n = 23, 8%), and personal page data links (n = 34, 12%), as well as Flickr social media links (n = 5, 2%), all advertising drugs without a prescription. Of the 91 online drug sellers identified, 31 (34%) had more than 1 shortage drug offered for sale, representing most (n = 148, 71%) of all online drug seller sales offers. The majority of these online drug sellers (n = 21, 68%) were on the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy (NABP) Not Recommended Sites list. Finally, for shortage drugs with an online drug seller (n = 58, 85%), 53 (91%) had at least one site on the Not Recommended list and 21 (36%) had only sites on the Not Recommended list. Conclusions FDA shortage drugs are widely marketed over the Internet. Suspect online drug sellers and intermediaries dominate these sales offers. As a critical risk management issue, patients, providers, and policymakers should be extremely cautious in procuring shortage drugs through Internet sourcing. PMID:22321731

  20. Management of noninfectious posterior uveitis with intravitreal drug therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan HY

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Hui Yi Tan,1 Aniruddha Agarwal,2 Cecilia S Lee,3 Jay Chhablani,4 Vishali Gupta,5 Manoj Khatri,6 Jayabalan Nirmal,7 Carlos Pavesio,8 Rupesh Agrawal1,7–9 1Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore; 2Department of Vitreoretina, Stanley M Truhlsen Eye Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 3Department of Ophthalmology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA; 4Department of Vitreoretina, L V Prasad Eye Institute, Hyderabad, Telangana, 5Department of Retina and Uvea, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, 6Department of Retina, Rajan Eye Care Hospital, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India; 7School of Material Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore; 8Department of Medical Retina, Moorfields Eye Hospital, NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK; 9Department of Ophthalmology, National Healthcare Group Eye Institute, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore Abstract: Uveitis is an important cause of vision loss worldwide due to its sight-threatening complications, especially cystoid macular edema, as well as choroidal neovascularization, macular ischemia, cataract, and glaucoma. Systemic corticosteroids are the mainstay of therapy for noninfectious posterior uveitis; however, various systemic side effects can occur. Intravitreal medication achieves a therapeutic level in the vitreous while minimizing systemic complications and is thus used as an exciting alternative. Corticosteroids, antivascular endothelial growth factors, immunomodulators such as methotrexate and sirolimus, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are currently available for intravitreal therapy. This article reviews the existing literature for efficacy and safety of these various options for intravitreal drug therapy for the management of noninfectious uveitis (mainly intermediate, posterior, and panuveitis. Keywords: intravitreal therapy, noninfectious uveitis, posterior uveitis

  1. An Effectiveness Trial of Contingency Management in a Felony Preadjudication Drug Court

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlowe, Douglas B; Festinger, David S; Dugosh, Karen L; Arabia, Patricia L; Kirby, Kimberly C

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated a contingency management (CM) program in a drug court. Gift certificates for compliance were delivered at 4- to 6-week intervals (total value  =  $390.00). Participants in one condition earned gift certificates that escalated by $5.00 increments. Participants in a second condition began earning higher magnitude gift certificates, and the density of reinforcement was gradually decreased. No main effects of CM were detected, which appears to be attributable to a ceiling effect from the intensive contingencies already delivered in the drug court and the low density of reinforcement. Preplanned interaction analyses suggested that participants with more serious criminal backgrounds might have performed better in the CM conditions. This suggests that CM programs may be best suited for more incorrigible drug offenders. PMID:19192860

  2. Outcome of everolimus eluting bioabsorbable vascular scaffold (BVS) compared to non BVS drug eluting stent in the management of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) — A comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, Rabin; Patra, Soumya, E-mail: dr_soumyapatra@rediffmail.com; Banerjee, Suvro; Pande, Arindam; Khan, Aftab; Mandol, Prakash Chandra; Ghosh, Debashish; De, Swapan Kumar; Das, Sankha Subhro; Nag, Raja

    2016-04-15

    Background: The safety and efficacy of everolimus eluting bioabsorbable vascular scaffold (BVS) in the management of “ST” segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) are yet to be established. Aims: To evaluate immediate and short term safety and efficacy of the everolimus-eluting ABSORB BVS compared with non BVS drug eluting stent (DES) in patients with STEMI. Methods: From December 2013 to December 2014, 220 patients with STEMI were included in this study. Among them, 35 patients treated with BVS were compared with a control group composed of 180 patients who underwent non BVS DES implantation in the same time period. The incidence of major adverse cardiac events (MACE: stent thrombosis: death, non-fatal myocardial infarction, or target vessel/lesion revascularization) before discharge and up to six months was evaluated. Results: 1 vessel disease was more frequent whereas, 2 and 3 vessel disease was less frequent in BVS group. Procedural characteristics were also similar between groups, except for the use of post dilation (p = 0.04). Procedural success, in-hospital, and up to six-month MACE rates were similar between both groups. Definite or probable stent thrombosis did not occur (according to the ARC criteria) in BVS patients, though two patients during the index admission and another two patients in the first month after DES implantation had stent thrombosis. Conclusion: The use of the ABSORB BVS for STEMI is feasible and associated with good procedural safety, and angiographic success rate.

  3. Outcome of everolimus eluting bioabsorbable vascular scaffold (BVS) compared to non BVS drug eluting stent in the management of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) — A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, Rabin; Patra, Soumya; Banerjee, Suvro; Pande, Arindam; Khan, Aftab; Mandol, Prakash Chandra; Ghosh, Debashish; De, Swapan Kumar; Das, Sankha Subhro; Nag, Raja

    2016-01-01

    Background: The safety and efficacy of everolimus eluting bioabsorbable vascular scaffold (BVS) in the management of “ST” segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) are yet to be established. Aims: To evaluate immediate and short term safety and efficacy of the everolimus-eluting ABSORB BVS compared with non BVS drug eluting stent (DES) in patients with STEMI. Methods: From December 2013 to December 2014, 220 patients with STEMI were included in this study. Among them, 35 patients treated with BVS were compared with a control group composed of 180 patients who underwent non BVS DES implantation in the same time period. The incidence of major adverse cardiac events (MACE: stent thrombosis: death, non-fatal myocardial infarction, or target vessel/lesion revascularization) before discharge and up to six months was evaluated. Results: 1 vessel disease was more frequent whereas, 2 and 3 vessel disease was less frequent in BVS group. Procedural characteristics were also similar between groups, except for the use of post dilation (p = 0.04). Procedural success, in-hospital, and up to six-month MACE rates were similar between both groups. Definite or probable stent thrombosis did not occur (according to the ARC criteria) in BVS patients, though two patients during the index admission and another two patients in the first month after DES implantation had stent thrombosis. Conclusion: The use of the ABSORB BVS for STEMI is feasible and associated with good procedural safety, and angiographic success rate.

  4. Routines and rituals: a grounded theory of the pain management of drug users in acute care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCreaddie, May; Lyons, Imogen; Watt, Debbie; Ewing, Elspeth; Croft, Jeanette; Smith, Marion; Tocher, Jennifer

    2010-10-01

    This study reviewed the perceptions and strategies of drug users and nurses with regard to pain management in acute care settings. Drug users present unique challenges in acute care settings with pain management noted to be at best suboptimal, at worst non-existent. Little is known about why and specifically how therapeutic effectiveness is compromised. Qualitative: constructivist grounded theory. A constructivist grounded theory approach incorporating a constant comparative method of data collection and analysis was applied. The data corpus comprised interviews with drug users (n = 11) and five focus groups (n = 22) of nurses and recovering drug users. Moral relativism as the core category both represents the phenomenon and explains the basic social process. Nurses and drug users struggle with moral relativism when addressing the issue of pain management in the acute care setting. Drug users lay claim to expectations of compassionate care and moralise via narration. Paradoxically, nurses report that the caring ideal and mutuality of caring are diminished. Drug users' individual sensitivities, anxieties and felt stigma in conjunction with opioid-induced hyperalgesia complicate the processes. Nurses' and hospitals' organisational routines challenge drug user rituals and vice versa leading both protagonists to become disaffected. Consequently, key clinical issues such as preventing withdrawal and managing pain are left unaddressed and therapeutic effectiveness is compromised. This study provides a robust account of nurses' and drug users' struggle with pain management in the acute care setting. Quick technological fixes such as urine screens, checklists or the transient effects of (cognitive-based) education (or training) are not the answer. This study highlights the need for nurses to engage meaningfully with this perceptibly 'difficult' group of patients. The key aspects likely to contribute to problematic interactions with this patient cohort are outlined so that

  5. A study on demographic characteristics of drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates in Belarus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Surkova

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: As Belarus is a high-burden MDR-TB country and treatment of drug-resistant TB is long and complicated, the findings of this study provided useful information to deliver effective community-based disease control measures and a proposed plane for the effective management of drug-resistant TB at the national level.

  6. Present studies on the radiosterilized drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marciniec, B.; Dettlaff, K.

    2007-01-01

    Lecture presents present status of radiosterilization of drugs and medical materials as compared to other sterilization methods. Literature review is shown on degradation of different kinds of drugs sterilized upon action of the sterilising doses of radiation

  7. The FDA Unapproved Drugs Initiative: An Observational Study of the Consequences for Drug Prices and Shortages in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ravi; Dhruva, Sanket S; Fox, Erin R; Ross, Joseph S

    2017-10-01

    Hundreds of drug products are currently marketed in the United States without approval from the FDA. The 2006 Unapproved Drugs Initiative (UDI) requires manufacturers to remove these drug products from the market or obtain FDA approval by demonstrating evidence of safety and efficacy. Once the FDA acts against an unapproved drug, fewer manufacturers remain in the market, potentially enabling drug price increases and greater susceptibility to drug shortages. There is a need for systematic study of the UDI's effect on prices and shortages of all targeted drugs. To examine the clinical evidence for approval and association with prices and shortages of previously unapproved prescription drugs after being addressed by the UDI. Previously unapproved prescription drugs that faced UDI regulatory action or with at least 1 product that received FDA approval through manufacturers' voluntary compliance with the UDI between 2006 and 2015 were identified. The clinical evidence was categorized as either newly conducted clinical trials or use of previously published literature and/or bioequivalence studies to demonstrate safety and efficacy. We determined the change in average wholesale price, presence of shortage, and duration of shortage for each drug during the 2 years before and after UDI regulatory action or approval through voluntary compliance. Between 2006 and 2015, 34 previously unapproved prescription drugs were addressed by the UDI. Nearly 90% of those with a drug product that received FDA approval were supported by literature reviews or bioequivalence studies, not new clinical trial evidence. Among the 26 drugs with available pricing data, average wholesale price during the 2 years before and after voluntary approval or UDI action increased by a median of 37% (interquartile range [IQR] = 23%-204%; P Innovation; from the Blue Cross Blue Shield Association to better understand medical technology evidence generation; from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services to

  8. Application of Model Animals in the Study of Drug Toxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yagang; Miao, Mingsan

    2018-01-01

    Drug safety is a key factor in drug research and development, Drug toxicology test is the main method to evaluate the safety of drugs, The body condition of an animal has important implications for the results of the study, Previous toxicological studies of drugs were carried out in normal animals in the past, There is a great deviation from the clinical practice.The purpose of this study is to investigate the necessity of model animals as a substitute for normal animals for toxicological studies, It is expected to provide exact guidance for future drug safety evaluation.

  9. Mechanism-based drug exposure classification in pharmacoepidemiological studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdel, B.M.

    2010-01-01

    Mechanism-based classification of drug exposure in pharmacoepidemiological studies In pharmacoepidemiology and pharmacovigilance, the relation between drug exposure and clinical outcomes is crucial. Exposure classification in pharmacoepidemiological studies is traditionally based on

  10. Drug-Drug/Drug-Excipient Compatibility Studies on Curcumin using Non-Thermal Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Moorthi Chidambaram; Kathiresan Krishnasamy

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Curcumin is a hydrophobic polyphenol isolated from dried rhizome of turmeric. Clinical usefulness of curcumin in the treatment of cancer is limited due to poor aqueous solubility, hydrolytic degradation, metabolism, and poor oral bioavailability. To overcome these limitations, we proposed to fabricate curcumin-piperine, curcumin-quercetin and curcumin-silibinin loaded polymeric nanoformulation. However, unfavourable combinations of drug-drug and drug-excipient may result in interacti...

  11. Identification and initial management of intoxication by alcohol and other drugs in the pediatric emergency room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Gatti Pianca

    2017-11-01

    Conclusion: The diagnosis and treatment of intoxication by alcohol and other drugs in adolescents and children in the emergency scenario requires a systematic evaluation of the use of these drugs. There are few specific treatments for intoxication, and the management comprehends support measures and management of related clinical complications.

  12. Doctoral Women: Managing Emotions, Managing Doctoral Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitchison, Claire; Mowbray, Susan

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the experiences of women doctoral students and the role of emotion during doctoral candidature. The paper draws on the concept of emotional labour to examine the two sites of emotional investment students experienced and managed during their studies: writing and family relationships. Emotion is perceived by many dominant…

  13. Data base management study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    Data base management techniques and applicable equipment are described. Recommendations which will assist potential NASA data users in selecting and using appropriate data base management tools and techniques are presented. Classes of currently available data processing equipment ranging from basic terminals to large minicomputer systems were surveyed as they apply to the needs of potential SEASAT data users. Cost and capabilities projections for this equipment through 1985 were presented. A test of a typical data base management system was described, as well as the results of this test and recommendations to assist potential users in determining when such a system is appropriate for their needs. The representative system tested was UNIVAC's DMS 1100.

  14. Evaluation of Probation Case Management (PCM) for Drug-Involved Women Offenders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Monica; Guydish, Joseph; Prem, Rosemary; Jessup, Martha A.; Cervantes, Armando; Bostrom, Alan

    2005-01-01

    Based on availability of case management services, drug-involved women offenders entered either a probation case management (PCM) intervention(n = 65) or standard probation(n = 44). Participants were placed in the case management condition until all slots were filled, then placed in standard probation until case management slots opened.…

  15. Standardization Study of Antifertility Drug - Pippalyadiyoga

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Shaila

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper deals with the standardization study of pippalyadiyoga powder. It is used as a long acting contraceptive. The standardization of compound drug has been achieved by physico-chemical analysis and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC fingerprint studies. Quantitative evaluation of borax in pippalyadiyoga showed 19.08% as sodium borate. RP-HPLC was performed using methanol and water as mobile phase. The detection and quantification was performed at a wavelength of 345 nm. Linearity of detector response for piperine was between the concentrations 0.005% to 0.1%. The correlation coefficient obtained for the linearity was 0.998. The recovery value of standard piperine was 99.4%. Low value of standard deviation and coefficient of variation are indicative of high precision of the method. Quantitative evaluation of piperine in pippalyadiyoga was found to be 0.339%.

  16. Possible roles for frequent salivary antiepileptic drug monitoring in the management of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herkes, G K; Eadie, M J

    1990-07-01

    Salivary levels of phenytoin, phenobarbitone, carbamazepine and carbamazepine-epoxide correlate with the simultaneous plasma water levels of these substances, after correcting for the effects of pH differences between saliva and plasma in the case of phenobarbitone. Saliva is easy and painless to collect, and salivary levels of the drugs are conveniently measured. Frequent (often daily) monitoring of pre-dose morning anticonvulsant drug concentrations in saliva over periods of weeks or months in 3 groups of epileptic subjects showed that (i) in some but not all poorly controlled epileptic patients seizures tended to occur on days when salivary anticonvulsant levels were lower than on non-seizure days, (ii) in such subjects it was possible to estimate an anticipated optimal drug concentration and dose to minimize seizure activity from the plot of seizure frequency against drug concentrations, (iii) in women with 'catamenial' epilepsy, salivary anticonvulsant levels were lower on perimenstrual days than at mid-cycle in half of the subjects studied, and (iv) in pregnant epileptic women the time course of the change in drug levels relative to dose could be followed more closely throughout pregnancy and the post-natal period than was practicable when using blood level measurements. Frequent measurement of salivary anticonvulsant concentrations appears a promising and inexpensive adjunct to the investigation and management of certain problem areas in epilepsy.

  17. 76 FR 11790 - Drugs for Human Use; Drug Efficacy Study Implementation; Oral Prescription Drugs Offered for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-03

    ... subject of an approved new drug application (NDA) or abbreviated new drug application (ANDA) (other than... 23, 1983, notice, the manufacturer had submitted supplemental applications proposing to reformulate... Laboratories, a subsidiary of Elan Corp., PLC, 800 Gateway Blvd., South San Francisco, CA 94080; Copley...

  18. The Long-term Outcomes of Sibutramine Effectiveness on Weight (LOSE Weight) study: evaluating the role of drug therapy within a weight management program in a group-model health maintenance organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Julie A; Raebel, Marsha A; Conner, Douglas A; Lanty, Frances A; Vogel, Erin A; Gay, Elizabeth C; Merenich, John A

    2004-06-01

    To assess the benefit of sibutramine hydrochloride monohydrate within a weight management program. Prospective randomized controlled trial in a health maintenance organization. Obese patients (n = 588) starting a weight management program were enrolled. Patients were randomly assigned to participate in the program alone or to participate in the program and receive sibutramine for 12 months. Outcome measures were change in weight, body mass index (BMI), percentage body fat, serum lipids, serum glucose, and blood pressure. At baseline, there was a younger age and higher weight, BMI, and waist circumference in the drug group. There was more degenerative joint disease in the nondrug group. The mean weight loss at 6 months was 6.8 kg (95% confidence interval [CI], -7.4 to -6.1 kg) in the drug group vs 3.1 kg (95% CI, -3.8 to -2.4 kg) (P managed care setting, the effectiveness and safety of sibutramine were similar to those observed in randomized, double-blind clinical efficacy trials.

  19. Stepped-wedge cluster randomised controlled trial to assess the effectiveness of an electronic medication management system to reduce medication errors, adverse drug events and average length of stay at two paediatric hospitals: a study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbrook, J I; Li, L; Raban, M Z; Baysari, M T; Mumford, V; Prgomet, M; Georgiou, A; Kim, T; Lake, R; McCullagh, C; Dalla-Pozza, L; Karnon, J; O'Brien, T A; Ambler, G; Day, R; Cowell, C T; Gazarian, M; Worthington, R; Lehmann, C U; White, L; Barbaric, D; Gardo, A; Kelly, M; Kennedy, P

    2016-10-21

    Medication errors are the most frequent cause of preventable harm in hospitals. Medication management in paediatric patients is particularly complex and consequently potential for harms are greater than in adults. Electronic medication management (eMM) systems are heralded as a highly effective intervention to reduce adverse drug events (ADEs), yet internationally evidence of their effectiveness in paediatric populations is limited. This study will assess the effectiveness of an eMM system to reduce medication errors, ADEs and length of stay (LOS). The study will also investigate system impact on clinical work processes. A stepped-wedge cluster randomised controlled trial (SWCRCT) will measure changes pre-eMM and post-eMM system implementation in prescribing and medication administration error (MAE) rates, potential and actual ADEs, and average LOS. In stage 1, 8 wards within the first paediatric hospital will be randomised to receive the eMM system 1 week apart. In stage 2, the second paediatric hospital will randomise implementation of a modified eMM and outcomes will be assessed. Prescribing errors will be identified through record reviews, and MAEs through direct observation of nurses and record reviews. Actual and potential severity will be assigned. Outcomes will be assessed at the patient-level using mixed models, taking into account correlation of admissions within wards and multiple admissions for the same patient, with adjustment for potential confounders. Interviews and direct observation of clinicians will investigate the effects of the system on workflow. Data from site 1 will be used to develop improvements in the eMM and implemented at site 2, where the SWCRCT design will be repeated (stage 2). The research has been approved by the Human Research Ethics Committee of the Sydney Children's Hospitals Network and Macquarie University. Results will be reported through academic journals and seminar and conference presentations. Australian New Zealand

  20. Safeguards for healthy volunteers in drug studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R N

    1975-09-06

    Safeguards for healthy volunteers in drug studies have not been as strict as those involving patients. The shortcomings include the lack of surveillance over the scientific validity of the protocol and its ethical review, and over the financial inducements to volunteers. Recruitment is open to abuse because the volunteers may have some allegiance to the investigators. There is an urgent need to institute checks on these aspects. Most important, however, is the lack of legal safeguards for volunteers taking part in research done outside the pharmaceutical industry. The suggested procedure for obtaining consent, for health checks, and for providing compensation can be equitable to all concerned, and yet not restrict initiative, nor curtail research aims.

  1. The importance of drug metabolites synthesis: the case-study of cardiotoxic anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrynchak, Ivanna; Sousa, Emília; Pinto, Madalena; Costa, Vera Marisa

    2017-05-01

    Anticancer drugs are presently guarantying more survivors as a result of more powerful drugs or combinations of drugs used in therapy. Thus, it has become more crucial to study and overcome the side effects of these therapies. Cardiotoxicity is one of the most relevant side effects on the long-term cancer survivors, because of its high social and economic impact. Drug metabolism can result in active metabolites or toxic metabolites that can lead to important side effects. The metabolites of anticancer drugs are possible culprits of cardiotoxicity; however, the cardiotoxicity of many of the metabolites in several drug classes was not yet suitably studied so far. On the other hand, the use of prodrugs that are bioactivated through metabolism can be a good alternative to obtain more cardio safe drugs. In this review, the methods to obtain and study metabolites are summarized and their application to the study of a group of anticancer drugs with acknowledged cardiotoxicity is highlighted. In this group of drugs, doxorubicin (DOX, 1), mitoxantrone (MTX, 2), cyclophosphamide (CTX, 3) and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU, 4) are included, as well as the tyrosine kinase inhibitors, such as imatinib (5), sunitinib (6) and sorafenib (7). Only with the synthesis and purification of considerable amounts of the metabolites can reliable studies be performed, either in vitro or in vivo that allow accurate conclusions regarding the cardiotoxicity of anticancer drug metabolites and then pharmacological prevention or treatment of the cardiac side effects can be done.

  2. The Expected Net Present Value of Developing Weight Management Drugs in the Context of Drug Safety Litigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Anita; Carls, Ginger; Deng, Edmund; Tuttle, Edward

    2015-07-01

    Following withdrawals, failures, and significant litigation settlements, drug product launches in the anti-obesity category slowed despite a large and growing unmet need. Litigation concerns, a more risk-averse regulatory policy, and the difficulty of developing a product with a compelling risk-benefit profile in this category may have limited innovators' expected return on investment and restricted investment in this therapeutic area. The objective of the study was to estimate perceived manufacturer risk associated with product safety litigation and increased development costs vs. revenue expectations on anticipated return on investment and to determine which scenarios might change a manufacturer's investment decision. Expected net present value of a weight-management drug entering pre-clinical trials was calculated for a range of scenarios representing evolving expectations of development costs, revenue, and litigation risk over the past 25 years. These three factors were based on published estimates, historical data, and analogs from other therapeutic areas. The main driver in expected net present value calculations is expected revenue, particularly if one assumes that litigation risk and demand are positively correlated. Changes in development costs associated with increased regulatory concern with potential safety issues for the past 25 years likely did not impact investment decisions. Regulatory policy and litigation risk both played a role in anti-obesity drug development; however, product revenue-reflecting efficacy at acceptable levels of safety-was by far the most important factor. To date, relatively modest sales associated with recent product introductions suggest that developing a product that is sufficiently efficacious with an acceptable level of safety continues to be the primary challenge in this market.

  3. Chimeric mice with humanized liver: Application in drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics studies for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naritomi, Yoichi; Sanoh, Seigo; Ohta, Shigeru

    2018-02-01

    Predicting human drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics (PK) is key to drug discovery. In particular, it is important to predict human PK, metabolite profiles and drug-drug interactions (DDIs). Various methods have been used for such predictions, including in vitro metabolic studies using human biological samples, such as hepatic microsomes and hepatocytes, and in vivo studies using experimental animals. However, prediction studies using these methods are often inconclusive due to discrepancies between in vitro and in vivo results, and interspecies differences in drug metabolism. Further, the prediction methods have changed from qualitative to quantitative to solve these issues. Chimeric mice with humanized liver have been developed, in which mouse liver cells are mostly replaced with human hepatocytes. Since human drug metabolizing enzymes are expressed in the liver of these mice, they are regarded as suitable models for mimicking the drug metabolism and PK observed in humans; therefore, these mice are useful for predicting human drug metabolism and PK. In this review, we discuss the current state, issues, and future directions of predicting human drug metabolism and PK using chimeric mice with humanized liver in drug discovery. Copyright © 2017 The Japanese Society for the Study of Xenobiotics. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. On-site management of investigational products and drug delivery systems in conformity with Good Clinical Practices (GCPs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méthot, Julie; Brisson, Diane; Gaudet, Daniel

    2012-04-01

    Investigators and research teams participating in clinical trials have to deal with complex investigational products, study designs, and research environments. The emergence of new drug delivery systems and investigational products combining more than one drug and the development of biodrugs such as monoclonal antibodies, peptides, siRNA, and gene therapy to treat orphan or common diseases constitute a new challenge for investigators and clinical sites. We describe the requirements and challenges of drug management in conformity with Good Clinical Practices (GCPs) for investigators and sites participating in clinical trials. Review At all sites participating in clinical trials, standard operating procedures (SOPs) covering the critical path of drug and drug delivery systems management are required. All steps should be auditable, including reception, validation, storage, access, preparation, distribution, techniques of administration, use, return, and destruction of research products. Biodrugs require traceability and specific SOPs on the management of potential immune reactions. Investigational products must be stored under standard auditable conditions. The traceability of storage conditions (including temperature) requires these conditions to be monitored on a continuous basis. A dedicated space with restricted access limited to authorized qualified personnel facilitates the monitoring. The development of standardized, auditable settings and the application of dedicated, site-specific SOPs for the management of investigational products and drug delivery systems contribute to guarantee the compliance to GCP requirements.

  5. Seniors' uncertainty management of direct-to-consumer prescription drug advertising usefulness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLorme, Denise E; Huh, Jisu

    2009-09-01

    This study provides insight into seniors' perceptions of and responses to direct-to-consumer prescription drug advertising (DTCA) usefulness, examines support for DTCA regulation as a type of uncertainty management, and extends and gives empirical voice to previous survey results through methodological triangulation. In-depth interview findings revealed that, for most informants, DTCA usefulness was uncertain and this uncertainty stemmed from 4 sources. The majority had negative responses to DTCA uncertainty and relied on 2 uncertainty-management strategies: information seeking from physicians, and inferences of and support for some government regulation of DTCA. Overall, the findings demonstrate the viability of uncertainty management theory (Brashers, 2001, 2007) for mass-mediated health communication, specifically DTCA. The article concludes with practical implications and research recommendations.

  6. A study on Prevalence of Drug Resistance in Drug Default ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ), and particularly multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB), has become a significant public health problem in a number of countries and an obstacle to effective global TB control. Method: This is a prospective randomized cross sectional study to ...

  7. Prescription for Drug Abuse Education: Managing the Mood Changers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yolles, Stanley F.

    1971-01-01

    This article emphasizes the need to prepare youth to make decisions about drug use. To do this it is essential to eliminate hypocrisy about the use of marihuana, to "infuse" the curriculum with drug information and to provide students with realistic learning experiences. (Author)

  8. Multi drug resistant tuberculosis: a challenge in the management of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Multi drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) will not usually respond to short course chemotherapy. Unless the individual infected with this bug is treated appropriately, they can continue spreading resistant strains in the community and further fuel the tuberculosis epidemic. Diagnosis requires drug sensitivity testing and the ...

  9. Comparative analysis of three drug-drug interaction screening systems against probable clinically relevant drug-drug interactions: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhič, Neža; Mrhar, Ales; Brvar, Miran

    2017-07-01

    Drug-drug interaction (DDI) screening systems report potential DDIs. This study aimed to find the prevalence of probable DDI-related adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and compare the clinical usefulness of different DDI screening systems to prevent or warn against these ADRs. A prospective cohort study was conducted in patients urgently admitted to medical departments. Potential DDIs were checked using Complete Drug Interaction®, Lexicomp® Online™, and Drug Interaction Checker®. The study team identified the patients with probable clinically relevant DDI-related ADRs on admission, the causality of which was assessed using the Drug Interaction Probability Scale (DIPS). Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of screening systems to prevent or warn against probable DDI-related ADRs were evaluated. Overall, 50 probable clinically relevant DDI-related ADRs were found in 37 out of 795 included patients taking at least two drugs, most common of them were bleeding, hyperkalemia, digitalis toxicity, and hypotension. Complete Drug Interaction showed the best sensitivity (0.76) for actual DDI-related ADRs, followed by Lexicomp Online (0.50), and Drug Interaction Checker (0.40). Complete Drug Interaction and Drug Interaction Checker had positive predictive values of 0.07; Lexicomp Online had 0.04. We found no difference in specificity and negative predictive values among these systems. DDI screening systems differ significantly in their ability to detect probable clinically relevant DDI-related ADRs in terms of sensitivity and positive predictive value.

  10. Fabrication of drug eluting implants: study of drug release mechanism from titanium dioxide nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamlekhan, Azhang; Shokuhfar, Tolou; Sinha-Ray, Suman; Yarin, Alexander L; Takoudis, Christos; Mathew, Mathew T; Sukotjo, Cortino

    2015-01-01

    Formation of titanium dioxide nanotubes (TNTs) on a titanium surface holds great potential for promoting desirable cellular response. However, prolongation of drug release from these nano-reservoirs remains to be a challenge. In our previous work TNTs were successfully loaded with a drug. In this study the effect of TNTs dimensions on prolongation of drug release is quantified aiming at the introduction of a simple novel technique which overcomes complications of previously introduced methods. Different groups of TNTs with different lengths and diameters are fabricated. Samples are loaded with a model drug and rate of drug release over time is monitored. The relation of the drug release rate to the TNT dimensions (diameter, length, aspect ratio and volume) is established. The results show that an increase in any of these parameters increases the duration of the release process. However, the strongest parameter affecting the drug release is the aspect ratio. In fact, TNTs with higher aspect ratios release drug slower. It is revealed that drug release from TNT is a diffusion-limited process. Assuming that diffusion of drug in (Phosphate-Buffered Saline) PBS follows one-dimensional Fick’s law, the theoretical predictions for drug release profile is compatible with our experimental data for release from a single TNT. (paper)

  11. Way for reducing drug supply chain cost for a hospital district: a case study

    OpenAIRE

    Postacchini, Leonardo; Ciarapica, Filippo Emanuele; Bevilacqua, Maurizio; Mazzuto, Giovanni; Paciarotti, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This work aims at providing insights to optimise healthcare logistic of the drug management, in order to deal with the healthcare expenditure cut. In this paper the effects of different drug supply chain configurations, on the resulting average stock, service level and Bullwhip effect, of the studied supply chain, is quantitatively assessed. Design/methodology/approach: A case study of an Italian district has been studied, taking into account three echelons: suppliers,...

  12. A way for reducing drug supply chain cost for a hospital district: A case study

    OpenAIRE

    Leonardo Postacchini; Filippo Emanuele Ciarapica; Maurizio Bevilacqua; Giovanni Mazzuto; Claudia Paciarotti

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This work aims at providing insights to optimise healthcare logistic of the drug management, in order to deal with the healthcare expenditure cut. In this paper the effects of different drug supply chain configurations, on the resulting average stock, service level and Bullwhip effect, of the studied supply chain, is quantitatively assessed. Design/methodology/approach: A case study of an Italian district has been studied, taking into account three echelons: suppliers, centra...

  13. MRI study of hydrophilic xanthan tablets with incorporated model drug

    OpenAIRE

    Mikac, Urša; Baumgartner, Saša; Sepe, Ana; Kristl, Julijana

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging was used to study swelling dynamics and hydrogel formation of xanthan tablets with or without Pentoxifylline drug in water and HCl pH 1.2 media at two different ionic strengths. Significant changes were observed only in the erosion front positions leading to different hydrogel thicknesses. The impact of the drug on the hydrogel thickness was found to be dependent on the medium conditions at high enough drug amount. The drug does not change the hydrogel thickness ...

  14. Early discontinuation of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder drug treatment: a danish nationwide drug utilization study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pottegård, Anton; Bjerregaard, B. K.; Kortegaard, L. S.

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of patterns of treatment discontinuation in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) drug treatment is of importance, for both the clinical practice and the study of long-term treatment outcomes. The purpose of this study was to describe early discontinuation of ADHD drug treatme...

  15. Drug-drug interactions in patients treated for cancer : a prospective study on clinical interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, R. W. F.; Jansman, F. G. A.; van den Bemt, P. M. L. A.; de Man, F.; Piran, F.; Vincenten, I.; Jager, A.; Rijneveld, A. W.; Brugma, J. D.; Mathijssen, R. H. J.; van Gelder, T.

    Background: Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) are of major concern in oncology, since cancer patients typically take many concomitant medications. Retrospective studies have been conducted to determine the prevalence of DDIs. However, prospective studies on DDIs needing interventions in cancer patients

  16. Clinical meanings of determination of serum β-HCG levels in the management of drug abortion for family planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xianping; Zou Huifeng; Jiang Juping

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical meanings of determination of serum β-HCG levels in the management of drug abortion for birth control. Methods: Serum β-HCG levels were determined with CLIA in 254 pregnant women asking for drug abortion and 102 women with ectopic gestation. Results: The serum β-HCG levels in women with normal pregnancy were significantly higher than those in women with ectopic gestation (P 0.05). Conclusion: For drug abortion in those pregnant women with amenorrhea over 45 days and serum β-HCG levels over 50000mlU/ml, a larger dose of misoprostol may be desirable. (authors)

  17. Improving Parolees' Participation in Drug Treatment and Other Services through Strengths Case Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prendergast, Michael; Cartier, Jerome J

    2008-01-01

    In an effort to increase participation in community aftercare treatment for substance-abusing parolees, an intervention based on a transitional case management (TCM) model that focuses mainly on offenders' strengths has been developed and is under testing. This model consists of completion, by the inmate, of a self-assessment of strengths that informs the development of the continuing care plan, a case conference call shortly before release, and strengths case management for three months post-release to promote retention in substance abuse treatment and support the participant's access to designated services in the community. The post-release component consists of a minimum of one weekly client/case manager meeting (in person or by telephone) for 12 weeks. The intervention is intended to improve the transition process from prison to community at both the individual and systems level. Specifically, the intervention is designed to improve outcomes in parolee admission to, and retention in, community-based substance-abuse treatment, parolee access to other needed services, and recidivism rates during the first year of parole. On the systems level, the intervention is intended to improve the communication and collaboration between criminal justice agencies, community-based treatment organizations, and other social and governmental service providers. The TCM model is being tested in a multisite study through the Criminal Justice Drug Abuse Treatment Studies (CJ-DATS) research cooperative funded by the National Institute of Drug Abuse.

  18. Emergency management of drug abuse in South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Drug abuse remains both a global scourge and a significant social and medical problem ... medicine at the Wits Emergency Medicine Department, ATLS Director, occasional media spokesman, .... Respiratory depression caused by morphine.

  19. 76 FR 63929 - Joint Meeting of the Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee and the Dermatologic and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-14

    ...] Joint Meeting of the Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee and the Dermatologic and... Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committees: Drug Safety and Risk Management... Safe Use (ETASU) before its Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee (DSaRM). On December 1...

  20. 75 FR 17417 - Joint Meeting of the Arthritis Advisory Committee and the Drug Safety and Risk Management...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-06

    ...] Joint Meeting of the Arthritis Advisory Committee and the Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory... Arthritis Advisory Committee and the Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee. This meeting was... Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee would be held on May 12, 2010. On page 10490, in the...

  1. Practical considerations and patient selection for intrathecal drug delivery in the management of chronic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saulino M

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Michael Saulino,1,2 Philip S Kim,3,4 Erik Shaw5 1MossRehab, Elkins Park, PA, USA; 2Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 3Helen F Graham Cancer Center, Christiana Care Health System, Newark, DE, USA; 4Center for Interventional Pain Spine, LLC., Bryn Mawr, PA, USA; 5Shepherd Pain Institute, Shepherd Center, Atlanta, GA, USA Abstract: Chronic pain continues to pose substantial and growing challenges for patients, caregivers, health care professionals, and health care systems. By the time a patient with severe refractory pain sees a pain specialist for evaluation and management, that patient has likely tried and failed several nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic approaches to pain treatment. Although relegated to one of the interventions of “last resort”, intrathecal drug delivery can be useful for improving pain control, optimizing patient functionality, and minimizing the use of systemic pain medications in appropriately selected patients. Due to its clinical and logistical requirements, however, intrathecal drug delivery may fit poorly into the classic pain clinic/interventional model and may be perceived as a "critical mass" intervention that is feasible only for large practices that have specialized staff and appropriate office resources. Potentially, intrathecal drug delivery may be more readily adopted into larger practices that can commit the necessary staff and resources to support patients' needs through the trialing, initiation, monitoring, maintenance, and troubleshooting phases of this therapy. Currently, two agents – morphine and ziconotide – are approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for long-term intrathecal delivery. The efficacy and safety profiles of morphine have been assessed in long-term, open-label, and retrospective studies of >400 patients with chronic cancer and noncancer pain types. The efficacy and safety profiles of ziconotide have been

  2. Optimal primary surgical management of infected pseudoaneurysm in intravenous drug abusers: ligation or reconstruction?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamil, M.; Usman, R.; Afzal, M.; Malik, N.I.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To find out the optimal primary surgical treatment options for infected pseudoaneurysm in intravenous drug abusers. Study Design: Cross sectional descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Vascular Surgery, Combined Military Hospital Lahore, from Jan 2010 to Jun 2015. Material and Methods: A total of 31 consecutive patients with a history of intravenous drug abuse and an infected pseudoaneurysm in the groin or elbow, presenting in emergency department; were included in this study. All patients were primarily treated with ligation of the artery, excision of infected pseudoaneurysm and debridement of necrotic tissues. Only one patient underwent additional revascularization procedure. Results: All patients who underwent ligation and excision procedures did well initially. One (3.2%) patient developed severe distal ischemia after ligation of femoral artery within first 24 hours, so extra anatomic revascularization procedure was performed. Five (16.1%) patients required revascularization procedure after 16 weeks due to disabling distal ischemia. No amputation was needed and mortality rate was zero. Conclusion: Primary ligation of the artery with excision of infected pseudoaneurysm and necrotic material was found the optimal initial management for infected pseudoaneurysm in intravenous drug addicts. Ischemic complications if develop should be treated with early or late revascularization.

  3. Pain management discussion forum: serious interaction among frequently used drugs for chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breivik, Harald

    2014-06-01

    A query and response regarding a patient who was taking high-dose tramadol and duloxetine is presented. The patient developed serotonin syndrome. Risks for this clinically important drug interaction and management of the syndrome are discussed.

  4. Ribonucleotide reductase as a drug target against drug resistance Mycobacterium leprae: A molecular docking study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Partha Sarathi; Bansal, Avi Kumar; Naaz, Farah; Gupta, Umesh Datta; Dwivedi, Vivek Dhar; Yadava, Umesh

    2018-06-01

    Leprosy is a chronic infection of skin and nerve caused by Mycobacterium leprae. The treatment is based on standard multi drug therapy consisting of dapsone, rifampicin and clofazamine. The use of rifampicin alone or with dapsone led to the emergence of rifampicin-resistant Mycobacterium leprae strains. The emergence of drug-resistant leprosy put a hurdle in the leprosy eradication programme. The present study aimed to predict the molecular model of ribonucleotide reductase (RNR), the enzyme responsible for biosynthesis of nucleotides, to screen new drugs for treatment of drug-resistant leprosy. The study was conducted by retrieving RNR of M. leprae from GenBank. A molecular 3D model of M. leprae was predicted using homology modelling and validated. A total of 325 characters were included in the analysis. The predicted 3D model of RNR showed that the ϕ and φ angles of 251 (96.9%) residues were positioned in the most favoured regions. It was also conferred that 18 α-helices, 6 β turns, 2 γ turns and 48 helix-helix interactions contributed to the predicted 3D structure. Virtual screening of Food and Drug Administration approved drug molecules recovered 1829 drugs of which three molecules, viz., lincomycin, novobiocin and telithromycin, were taken for the docking study. It was observed that the selected drug molecules had a strong affinity towards the modelled protein RNR. This was evident from the binding energy of the drug molecules towards the modelled protein RNR (-6.10, -6.25 and -7.10). Three FDA-approved drugs, viz., lincomycin, novobiocin and telithromycin, could be taken for further clinical studies to find their efficacy against drug resistant leprosy. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. [Post-marketing drug safety-risk management plan(RMP)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezaki, Asami; Hori, Akiko

    2013-03-01

    The Guidance for Risk Management Plan(RMP)was released by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare in April 2012. The RMP consists of safety specifications, pharmacovigilance plans and risk minimization action plans. In this paper, we outline post-marketing drug safety operations in PMDA and the RMP, with examples of some anticancer drugs.

  6. A Study on Drug Safety Monitoring Program in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, A.; Patel, Isha; Sanyal, Sudeepa; Balkrishnan, R.; Mohanta, G. P.

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacovigilance is useful in assuring the safety of medicines and protecting the consumers from their harmful effects. A number of single drugs as well as fixed dose combinations have been banned from manufacturing, marketing and distribution in India. An important issue about the availability of banned drugs over the counter in India is that sufficient adverse drug reactions data about these drugs have not been reported. The most common categories of drugs withdrawn in the last decade were nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (28%), antidiabetics (14.28%), antiobesity (14.28%), antihistamines (14.28%), gastroprokinetic drugs (7.14%), breast cancer and infertility drugs (7.14%), irritable bowel syndrome and constipation drugs (7.14%) and antibiotics (7.14%). Drug withdrawals from market were made mainly due to safety issues involving cardiovascular events (57.14%) and liver damage (14.28%). Majority of drugs have been banned since 3-5 years in other countries but are still available for sale in India. The present study compares the drug safety monitoring systems in the developed countries such as the USA and UK and provides implications for developing a system that can ensure the safety and efficacy of drugs in India. Absence of a gold standard for a drug safety surveillance system, variations in culture and clinical practice across countries makes it difficult for India to completely adopt another country's practices. There should be a multidisciplinary approach towards drug safety that should be implemented throughout the entire duration spanning from drug discovery to usage by consumers. PMID:25425751

  7. Pharmacogenomic study using bio- and nanobioelectrochemistry: Drug-DNA interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanzadeh, Mohammad; Shadjou, Nasrin

    2016-04-01

    Small molecules that bind genomic DNA have proven that they can be effective anticancer, antibiotic and antiviral therapeutic agents that affect the well-being of millions of people worldwide. Drug-DNA interaction affects DNA replication and division; causes strand breaks, and mutations. Therefore, the investigation of drug-DNA interaction is needed to understand the mechanism of drug action as well as in designing DNA-targeted drugs. On the other hand, the interaction between DNA and drugs can cause chemical and conformational modifications and, thus, variation of the electrochemical properties of nucleobases. For this purpose, electrochemical methods/biosensors can be used toward detection of drug-DNA interactions. The present paper reviews the drug-DNA interactions, their types and applications of electrochemical techniques used to study interactions between DNA and drugs or small ligand molecules that are potentially of pharmaceutical interest. The results are used to determine drug binding sites and sequence preference, as well as conformational changes due to drug-DNA interactions. Also, the intention of this review is to give an overview of the present state of the drug-DNA interaction cognition. The applications of electrochemical techniques for investigation of drug-DNA interaction were reviewed and we have discussed the type of qualitative or quantitative information that can be obtained from the use of each technique. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Challenges of drug resistance in the management of pancreatic cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sheikh, Rizwan

    2012-02-01

    The current treatment of choice for metastatic pancreatic cancer involves single-agent gemcitabine or a combination of gemcitabine with capecitabine or erlotinib (a tyrosine kinase inhibitor). Only 25–30% of patients respond to this treatment and patients who do respond initially ultimately exhibit disease progression. Median survival for pancreatic cancer patients has reached a plateau due to inherent and acquired resistance to these agents. Key molecular factors implicated in this resistance include: deficiencies in drug uptake, alteration of drug targets, activation of DNA repair pathways, resistance to apoptosis and the contribution of the tumor microenvironment. Moreover, for newer agents including tyrosine kinase inhibitors, overexpression of signaling proteins, mutations in kinase domains, activation of alternative pathways, mutations of genes downstream of the target and\\/or amplification of the target represent key challenges for treatment efficacy. Here we will review the contribution of known mechanisms and markers of resistance to key pancreatic cancer drug treatments.

  9. Evaluation Management of Drugs and Relations with Quality of Outpatient Pharmacy Services in One of Hospital Pontianak City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enggy Erwansani

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays government policy which embodies the National Social Security System (SJSN where the presence of this system that every Indonesian people entitled to social security to be able to meet the basic needs of living. This study aims to describe the pharmaceutical drug outpatient management Hospital X Pontianak City and analyze the relationship management with the quality of pharmaceutical care medicine outpatient Hospital X Pontianak. This medication management including planning, organizing, directing, and monitoring. This study uses a quantitative approach which is an observational analytic research using cross sectional study with a sample of outpatient pharmacy customer research in Hospital X Pontianak. Collecting data using questionnaires from 100 customers outpatient with consecutive sampling method. The results using Pearson Correlation analysis showed the drug management relationship with the quality of outpatient pharmacy services which means the value of aspects planning (r=0.626; p<0,001, organizing (r=0.409; p<0,001, directing (r=0.359; p<0,001, and controlling (r=0.426; p<0,001 with R2 multiple 66.80%. The description of pharmaceutical drug management in outpatient Hospital X produce an average value 96.90% so as to be in very good category, there by proving the existence of a strong relationship between the four functions of management of the quality of pharmaceutical care medicine outpatient Hospital X.

  10. Chamberino Floodplain Management Study

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The Dona Ana County Flood Commission requested the United States Department of Agriculture's Natural Resources Conservation Service to conduct a study of the...

  11. Antithyroid Drugs and Congenital Malformations: A Nationwide Korean Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Gi Hyeon; Kim, Tae Hyuk; Chung, Jae Hoon

    2018-03-20

    Untreated or insufficiently treated Graves disease in pregnancy may pose risks to both mother and fetus. Antithyroid drugs (ATDs) are the treatment mainstay, but the potential teratogenic effect of these drugs has prompted clinicians to question the safe management of this vulnerable population. To examine the association between maternal prescriptions for ATDs and congenital malformations in live births. Nationwide cohort study. Korean National Health Insurance database. A cohort of 2 886 970 completed pregnancies linked to live-born infants in 2 210 253 women between 2008 and 2014. Maternal prescriptions for ATDs in the first trimester. The risk for overall and organ-specific congenital malformations in offspring, with logistic regression models used to control for potential confounders. 12 891 pregnancies (0.45%) were exposed to ATDs during the first trimester. The prevalence of malformations in exposed offspring was 7.27%, compared with 5.94% in offspring of women who were not prescribed ATDs during pregnancy (P 495 mg) during the first trimester was associated with an increased risk for malformations compared with a low dose (1 to 126 mg) (adjusted odds ratio, 1.87 [CI, 1.06 to 3.30]). The study used a prescription claims database to assess ATD exposure. Exposure to ATDs during the first trimester was associated with increased risk for congenital malformations, particularly for pregnancies in which women received prescriptions for MMI or both ATDs. None.

  12. Predictive typing of drug-induced neurological sufferings from studies of the distribution of labelled drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takasu, T.

    1980-01-01

    A drug given to an animal becomes widely distributed throughout the body, acting on the living mechanisms or structures, and is gradually excreted. Some drugs can remain in some parts of the body for a long period. For example, 14 C-chloramphenical was found to remain preferentially in the salivary gland, liver and bone marrow of mice 24 hours after its oral administration. If such a drug is given repeatedly, it could possibly accumulate gradually in these organs. Thus, when its accumulation in a particular part of the body exceeds a certain level, the living mechanism or structure may possibly be injured. The harmful effects of a drug in repeated administration are called its chronic toxicity. The author discusses whether it is possible to predict the toxicity of a drug by studying its distribution in relation to time, and, if possible, the points in time. This problem is studied especially in relation to the nervous system. (Auth.)

  13. Considerations for Pharmacoepidemiological Studies of Drug-Cancer Associations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pottegård, Anton; Friis, Søren; Stürmer, Til

    2018-01-01

    and future perspectives. Aspects of data sources include assessment of complete history of drug use and data on dose and duration of drug use, allowing estimates of cumulative exposure. Outcome data from formal cancer registries are preferable, but cancer data from other sources, for example, patient......In this MiniReview, we provide general considerations for the planning and conduct of pharmacoepidemiological studies of associations between drug use and cancer development. We address data sources, study design, assessment of drug exposure, ascertainment of cancer outcomes, confounder adjustment...... or pathology registries, medical records or claims are also suitable. The two principal designs for observational studies evaluating drug-cancer associations are the cohort and case-control designs. A key challenge in studies of drug-cancer associations is the exposure assessment due to the typically long...

  14. Current Situation, Determinants, and Solutions to Drug Shortages in Shaanxi Province, China: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Caijun; Wu, Lina; Cai, Wenfang; Zhu, Wenwen; Shen, Qian; Li, Zongjie; Fang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Drug shortages were a complex global problem. The aim of this study was to analyze, characterize, and assess the drug shortages, and identify possible solutions in Shaanxi Province, western China. A qualitative methodological approach was conducted during May-June 2015 and December 2015-January 2016. Semi-structured interviews were performed to gather information from representatives of hospital pharmacists, wholesalers, pharmaceutical producers, and local health authorities. Thirty participants took part in the study. Eight traditional Chinese medicines and 87 types of biologicals and chemicals were reported to be in short supply. Most were essential medicines. Five main determinants of drug shortages were detected: too low prices, too low market demands, Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) issues, materials issues, and approval issues for imported drugs. Five different solutions were proposed by the participants: 1) let the market decide the drug price; 2) establish an information platform; 3) establish a reserve system; 4) enhance the communication among the three parties in the supply chain; and 5) improve hospital inventory management. Western China was currently experiencing a serious drug shortage. Numerous reasons for the shortage were identified. Most drug shortages in China were currently because of "too low prices." To solve this problem, all of the stakeholders, especially the government, needed to participate in managing the drug shortages.

  15. Drugs for Pain Management in Shock Wave Lithotripsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Bach

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. With this review, we provide a comprehensive overview of the main aspects and currently used drugs for analgesia in shockwave lithotripsy. Evidence Acquisition. We reviewed current literature, concentrating on newer articles and high-quality reviews in international journals. Results. No standardized protocols for pain control in SWL exist, although it is crucial for treatment outcome. General and spinal anaesthesia show excellent pain control but are only recommended for selected cases. The newer opioids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are able to deliver good analgesia. Interest in inhalation anaesthesia with nitrous oxide, local anaesthesia with deep infiltration of the tissue, and dermal anaesthesia with EMLA or DMSO has recently rekindled, showing good results in terms of pain control and a favourable side effect profile. Tamsulosin and paracetamol are further well-known drugs being currently investigated. Conclusion. Apart from classically used drugs like opioids and NSARs, medicaments like nitrous oxide, paracetamol, DMSA, or refined administration techniques for infiltration anaesthesia show a good effectiveness in pain control for SWL.

  16. Current and future drug targets in weight management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witkamp, R.F.

    2011-01-01

    Obesity will continue to be one of the leading causes of chronic disease unless the ongoing rise in the prevalence of this condition is reversed. Accumulating morbidity figures and a shortage of effective drugs have generated substantial research activity with several molecular targets being

  17. Business History and Management Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Álvaro-Moya, Adoración; Donzé, Pierre-Yves

    2016-01-01

    This article traces back the origins and nature of business history to stress its potential to dialogue with other social sciences and, in particular, with management studies. It also summarizes the main current trends in business history research to later propose the research lines that editors would like to promote from an interdisciplinary approach and in the direction of a fruitful exchange with scholars active in management and organization studies.

  18. Business History and Management Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adoración Álvaro-Moya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article traces back the origins and nature of business history to stress its potential to dialogue with other social sciences and, in particular, with management studies. It also summarizes the main current trends in business history research to later propose the research lines that editors would like to promote from an interdisciplinary approach and in the direction of a fruitful exchange with scholars active in management and organization studies.

  19. Oral adverse effects of gastrointestinal drugs and considerations for dental management in patients with gastrointestinal disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramya Karthik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal disease is associated with alterations in the mouth or influence the course of the dental diseases, and the dental health care workers are expected to recognize, diagnose, and treat oral conditions associated with gastrointestinal diseases and also provide safe and appropriate dental care for afflicted individuals. Drugs used in the management of these diseases result in oral adverse effects and also are known to interact with those prescribed during dental care. Hence, this article has reviewed the drug considerations and guidelines for drug use during dental management of patients with gastrointestinal diseases.

  20. Innovations in management of cardiac disease: drugs, treatment strategies and technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foëx, P

    2017-12-01

    Within the last generation, the management of patients with heart disease has been transformed by advances in drug treatments, interventions and diagnostic technologies. The management of arterial hypertension saw beta-blockers demoted from first- to third-line treatment. Recent studies suggest that the goal of treatment may have to change to lower systolic blood pressures to prevent long-term organ damage. Today less than 15% of coronary revascularizations are surgical and more than 85% are done by interventional cardiologists inserting coronary stents. Thus, managing patients on dual antiplatelet therapy has become an important issue. With new generations of coronary stents, recommendations are changing fast. In the past, decisions concerning non-cardiac surgery after acute myocardial infarction were based on the delay between infarction and non-cardiac surgery. Today, the main concern is the patient's status in respect of dual antiplatelet therapy after primary percutaneous intervention. There have been advances in the management of heart failure but new drugs (ivabradine, sacubitril/valsartan) and cardiac resynchronization are recommended only in patients with an ejection fraction below 35% on optimal medication. Heart failure remains a major perioperative risk factor. Prospective studies have shown that troponin elevations represent myocardial injury (not necessarily myocardial infarction), are mostly silent and are associated with increased 30-day mortality. Monitoring (troponin assays) for myocardial injury in non-cardiac surgery (MINS) seems increasingly justified. The treatment of MINS needs further research. Technological advances, such as intelligent, portable monitors benefit not only patients with cardiac disease but all patients who have undergone major surgery and are on the wards postoperatively. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please

  1. Hospital Waste Management - Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Edra

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The importance of waste management in hospitals is indisputable in preserving the environment and protecting public health, but management models are rarely discussed. This study presents the legal and conceptual frameworks of good waste management practices applicable to hospitals and associated indicators. As a case study, the overall performance of Hospital Centre of São João, in Porto, was analysed based on published reports. Data on the production of waste in their different typologies were collected from 2010 to 2016, enabling a correlation of the waste production with the kg/bed/day indicator. The aim of this study was to gather data and discuss trends in a real scenario of evolution over a six-year period in order to contribute to a future research proposal on indicators that can be used as reference for benchmarking the construction of methodological guides for hospital waste management.

  2. Using Nonexperts for Annotating Pharmacokinetic Drug-Drug Interaction Mentions in Product Labeling: A Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochheiser, Harry; Ning, Yifan; Hernandez, Andres; Horn, John R; Jacobson, Rebecca; Boyce, Richard D

    2016-04-11

    range of drug product labels. Preannotation of drug mentions may ease the annotation task. However, preannotation of PDDIs, as operationalized in this study, presented the participants with difficulties. Future work should test if these issues can be addressed by the use of better performing NLP and a different approach to presenting the PDDI preannotations to users during the annotation workflow.

  3. Drug and Alcohol Studies (Volume 5: Interventions)

    OpenAIRE

    MacGregor, S; Thom, B

    2014-01-01

    VOLUME FIVE: INTERVENTIONS Natural Recovery from Alcohol Problems Harald Klingemann School-Based Programmes to Prevent Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drug Use Gilbert Botvin and Kenneth Griffin Community Prevention of Alcohol Problems Harold Holder Can Screening and Brief Intervention Lead to Population-Level Reductions in Alcohol-Related Harm? Nick Heather Sharpening the Focus of Alcohol Policy from Aggregate Consumption to Harm and Risk Reduction Tim Stockwell et al A Review of the Efficacy and...

  4. Access to antiretroviral drugs and AIDS management in Senegal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desclaux, Alice; Ciss, Mounirou; Taverne, Bernard; Sow, Papa S; Egrot, Marc; Faye, Mame A; Lanièce, Isabelle; Sylla, Omar; Delaporte, Eric; Ndoye, Ibrahima

    2003-07-01

    Description and analysis of the Senegalese Antiretroviral Drug Access Initiative (ISAARV), the first governmental highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) treatment programme in Africa, launched in 1998. ISAARV was initially an experimental project designed to evaluate the feasibility, efficacy and acceptability of HAART in an African context. It was based on four principles: collective definition of the strategy, with involvement of the health professionals who would be called on to execute the programme; matching the objectives to available means (gradual enrollment according to drug availability); monitoring by several research programmes; and ongoing adaptation of treatment and follow-up according to the latest international recommendations. Persons qualifying for antiretroviral (ARV) therapy are selected on the basis of immunological and clinical criteria, regardless of economic and social considerations. A system of subsidies was created to favor access to ARV. Following the ARV price reductions that occurred in November 2000, 100% subsidies were created for the poorest participants. Optimal adherence was ensured by monthly follow-up by pharmacists and support groups held by social workers and patient associations. The chosen supply and distribution system allowed drug dispensing to be strictly controlled. The ISAARV programme demonstrates that HAART can be successfully prescribed in Africa. This experience has served as the basis for the creation of a national treatment programme in Senegal planned to treat 7000 patients by 2006.

  5. Management by Trajectory: Trajectory Management Study Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiden, Kenneth; Atkins, Stephen; Fernandes, Alicia D.; Kaler, Curt; Bell, Alan; Kilbourne, Todd; Evans, Mark

    2017-01-01

    In order to realize the full potential of the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen), improved management along planned trajectories between air navigation service providers (ANSPs) and system users (e.g., pilots and airline dispatchers) is needed. Future automation improvements and increased data communications between aircraft and ground automation would make the concept of Management by Trajectory (MBT) possible.

  6. 76 FR 76609 - Implementation of Office of Management and Budget Guidance on Drug-Free Workplace Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-08

    ... Implementation of Office of Management and Budget Guidance on Drug-Free Workplace Requirements AGENCY: Office of... Management and Budget (OMB) guidance implementing the portion of the Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988 (41 U.S... removing its regulation implementing the Governmentwide common rule on drug-free workplace requirements for...

  7. A pilot study of loss aversion for drug and non-drug commodities in cocaine users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Justin C; Beckmann, Joshua S; Rush, Craig R; Stoops, William W

    2017-11-01

    Numerous studies in behavioral economics have demonstrated that individuals are more sensitive to the prospect of a loss than a gain (i.e., loss aversion). Although loss aversion has been well described in "healthy" populations, little research exists in individuals with substance use disorders. This gap is notable considering the prominent role that choice and decision-making play in drug use. The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate loss aversion in active cocaine users. Current cocaine users (N=38; 42% female) participated in this within-subjects laboratory pilot study. Subjects completed a battery of tasks designed to assess loss aversion for drug and non-drug commodities under varying risk conditions. Standardized loss aversion coefficients (λ) were compared to theoretically and empirically relevant normative values (i.e., λ=2). Compared to normative loss aversion coefficient values, a precise and consistent decrease in loss aversion was observed in cocaine users (sample λ≈1). These values were observed across drug and non-drug commodities as well as under certain and risky conditions. These data represent the first systematic study of loss aversion in cocaine-using populations and provide evidence for equal sensitivity to losses and gains or loss equivalence. Futures studies should evaluate the specificity of these effects to a history of cocaine use as well as the impact of manipulations of loss aversion on drug use to determine how this phenomenon may contribute to intervention development efforts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Urine and oral fluid drug testing in support of pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, Tai C; Magnani, Barbarajean; Moore, Christine

    2017-09-01

    In recent years, the abuse of opioid drugs has resulted in greater prevalence of addiction, overdose, and deaths attributable to opioid abuse. The epidemic of opioid abuse has prompted professional and government agencies to issue practice guidelines for prescribing opioids to manage chronic pain. An important tool available to providers is the drug test for use in the initial assessment of patients for possible opioid therapy, subsequent monitoring of compliance, and documentation of suspected aberrant drug behaviors. This review discusses the issues that most affect the clinical utility of drug testing in chronic pain management with opioid therapy. It focuses on the two most commonly used specimen matrices in drug testing: urine and oral fluid. The advantages and disadvantages of urine and oral fluid in the entire testing process, from specimen collection and analytical methodologies to result interpretation are reviewed. The analytical sensitivity and specificity limitations of immunoassays used for testing are examined in detail to draw attention to how these shortcomings can affect result interpretation and influence clinical decision-making in pain management. The need for specific identification and quantitative measurement of the drugs and metabolites present to investigate suspected aberrant drug behavior or unexpected positive results is analyzed. Also presented are recent developments in optimization of test menus and testing strategies, such as the modification of the standard screen and reflexed-confirmation testing model by eliminating some of the initial immunoassay-based tests and proceeding directly to definitive testing by mass spectrometry assays.

  9. Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis: Principles of Resistance, Diagnosis, and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John W; Tsukayama, Dean T

    2016-04-01

    Extensively drug-resistant (XDR) tuberculosis (TB) is an unfortunate by-product of mankind's medical and pharmaceutical ingenuity during the past 60 years. Although new drug developments have enabled TB to be more readily curable, inappropriate TB management has led to the emergence of drug-resistant disease. Extensively drug-resistant TB describes Mycobacterium tuberculosis that is collectively resistant to isoniazid, rifampin, a fluoroquinolone, and an injectable agent. It proliferates when established case management and infection control procedures are not followed. Optimized treatment outcomes necessitate time-sensitive diagnoses, along with expanded combinations and prolonged durations of antimicrobial drug therapy. The challenges to public health institutions are immense and most noteworthy in underresourced communities and in patients coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus. A comprehensive and multidisciplinary case management approach is required to optimize outcomes. We review the principles of TB drug resistance and the risk factors, diagnosis, and managerial approaches for extensively drug-resistant TB. Treatment outcomes, cost, and unresolved medical issues are also discussed. Copyright © 2016 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Surgical management of cavernous malformations coursing with drug resistant epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Arturo Alonso-Vanegas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral cavernous malformations (CM are dynamic lesions characterized by continuous size changes and repeated bleeding. When involving cortical tissue, CM pose a significant risk for the development of drug-resistant epilepsy, which is thought to be result of an altered neuronal network caused by the lesion itself and its blood degradation products. Preoperative evaluation should comprise a complete seizure history, neurological examination, epilepsy-oriented MRI, EEG, video-EEG, completed with SPECT, PET, functional MRI and/or invasive monitoring as needed. Radiosurgery shows variable rates of seizure freedom and a high incidence of complications, thus microsurgical resection remains the optimal treatment for CM coursing with drug-resistant epilepsy.Two thirds of patients reach Engel I class at three-year follow-up, regardless of lobar location. Those with secondarily generalized seizures, a higher seizure frequency, and generalized abnormalities on preoperative or postoperative EEG, show poorer outcomes, while factors such as gender, duration of epilepsy, lesion size, age, bleeding at the time of surgery, do not correlate consistently with seizure outcome. Electrocorticography and a meticulous removal of all cortical hemosiderin –beyond pure lesionectomy– reduce the risk of symptomatic recurrences.

  11. Management of prescription and nonprescription drug use during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Maria A; Cragan, Janet D; Goldenberg, Robert L; Rasmussen, Sonja A; Schulkin, Jay

    2010-08-01

    To assess screening and treatment patterns of obstetrician-gynecologists regarding medication use during pregnancy. A questionnaire was mailed to 770 members of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists who participate in the Collaborative Ambulatory Research Network. The response rate was 58%. Most respondents reported always asking pregnant patients about use of over-the-counter (OTC) (86%) and prescription (98%) drugs; 24% reported not always asking about alternative medications. Far fewer reported always asking nonpregnant patients about use of alcohol (67%), illegal drugs (51%) and OTC medications (52%) than pregnant patients. Two-fifths (41%) reported prescribing a medication during pregnancy for which they had insufficient information about potential effects on the fetus; nearly half (47%) reported that there are medical conditions for which they would like to prescribe medications but do not due to insufficient safety information. Physician responses indicate that they are less likely to refer pregnant than nonpregnant patients to a specialist for treatment of certain conditions. These results indicate that obstetrician-gynecologists sometimes prescribe medications for pregnant patients under less than optimal conditions and emphasize the importance of generating up-to-date information on effects of medications during pregnancy and having it readily available to health care providers.

  12. Gastroretentive drug delivery systems for therapeutic management of peptic ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Tarun; Kumar, Animesh; Rath, Goutam; Goyal, Amit K

    2014-01-01

    A peptic ulcer, stomach ulcer, or gastric ulcer, also known as peptic ulcer disease (PUD), is a very common chronic disorder of the stomach which is mainly caused by damage or impairment of the stomach lining. Various factors such as pepsin, gastric acid, H. pylori, NSAIDs, prostaglandins, mucus, bicarbonate, and blood flow to mucosa play an important role in causing peptic ulcers. In this review article, our main focus is on some important gastroretentive drug delivery systems (GRDDS) (floating, bioadhesive, high density, swellable, raft forming, superporous hydrogel, and magnetic systems) which will be helpful in gastroretention of different dosage forms for treatment of peptic ulcer. GRDDS provides a mean for controlled release of compounds that are absorbed by active transport in the upper intestine. It also enables controlled delivery for paracellularly absorbed drugs without a decrease in bioavailability. The above approaches are specific for targeting and leading to a marked improvement in the quality of life for a large number of patients. In the future, it is expected that they will become of growing significance, finally leading to improved efficiencies of various types of pharmacotherapies.

  13. Case Studies: Profiles of Women Recovering from Drug Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Suzanne M.

    1995-01-01

    Profiles two women over an eight-month study who abused alcohol and other drugs while pregnant and describes their recovery from the addiction. Examines, from an ecological framework, the women's experiences with drug addiction, treatment, and recovery, and recounts their situation through each. (JPS)

  14. Nuclear materials management storage study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, G.W. Jr.

    1994-02-01

    The Office of Weapons and Materials Planning (DP-27) requested the Planning Support Group (PSG) at the Savannah River Site to help coordinate a Departmental complex-wide nuclear materials storage study. This study will support the development of management strategies and plans until Defense Programs' Complex 21 is operational by DOE organizations that have direct interest/concerns about or responsibilities for nuclear material storage. They include the Materials Planning Division (DP-273) of DP-27, the Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Facilities (DP-60), the Office of Weapons Complex Reconfiguration (DP-40), and other program areas, including Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM). To facilitate data collection, a questionnaire was developed and issued to nuclear materials custodian sites soliciting information on nuclear materials characteristics, storage plans, issues, etc. Sites were asked to functionally group materials identified in DOE Order 5660.1A (Management of Nuclear Materials) based on common physical and chemical characteristics and common material management strategies and to relate these groupings to Nuclear Materials Management Safeguards and Security (NMMSS) records. A database was constructed using 843 storage records from 70 responding sites. The database and an initial report summarizing storage issues were issued to participating Field Offices and DP-27 for comment. This report presents the background for the Storage Study and an initial, unclassified summary of storage issues and concerns identified by the sites

  15. Food and Drug Administration upscheduling of hydrocodone and the effects on nurse practitioner pain management practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Rachel

    2018-06-01

    In 2013, the Advisory Committee of the Food and Drug Administration determined hydrocodone combination medications (HCMs) needed tighter regulation due to high abuse potential; they recommended upscheduling HCMs from Schedule III to II. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of upscheduling of HCMs on pain management practices of advanced practiced registered nurses (APRNs) in Oklahoma. In this qualitative study, 25 participants described their primary care experiences after the upscheduling. A thematic analysis was used to understand the effects on APRN pain management practices. The upscheduling of HCMs has greatly affected the pain management practices of APRNs in a state where Schedule II narcotic prescribing is forbidden. Findings will assist APRNs with improving patient access to care, implementing practice regulations, and exploring options for alternative pain therapies in primary care. Upscheduling of HCMs has had a severe impact on APRNs, affecting their prescribing practices and leading to increased referrals. They noted limited treatment options, increased health care costs, and decreased access to care. The APRNs understand the problem of prescription opioid abuse, diversion, and misuse. A consensus model could standardize the regulatory process for APRNs, increase interstate mobility for practice, and increase access to APRN care nationwide.

  16. Antiviral Information Management System (AIMS): a prototype for operational innovation in drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadhav, Pravin R; Neal, Lauren; Florian, Jeff; Chen, Ying; Naeger, Lisa; Robertson, Sarah; Soon, Guoxing; Birnkrant, Debra

    2010-09-01

    This article presents a prototype for an operational innovation in knowledge management (KM). These operational innovations are geared toward managing knowledge efficiently and accessing all available information by embracing advances in bioinformatics and allied fields. The specific components of the proposed KM system are (1) a database to archive hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment data in a structured format and retrieve information in a query-capable manner and (2) an automated analysis tool to inform trial design elements for HCV drug development. The proposed framework is intended to benefit drug development by increasing efficiency of dose selection and improving the consistency of advice from US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). It is also hoped that the framework will encourage collaboration among FDA, industry, and academic scientists to guide the HCV drug development process using model-based quantitative analysis techniques.

  17. Consumption of antihypertensive drugs dispensed under the pharmacy benefit management program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Pereira Rocha

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacy benefit management (PBM programs provide attractive discounts for drug purchase, a relevant measure to address costs, mainly of drugs for the treatment of chronic diseases. This study investigated whether PBM may be used as a tool to provide information about the use of antihypertensive medications when they are purchased. The profile of medicines taken to treat high blood pressure by large IT company employees and their dependents was evaluated from January to December 2009. The mean rate of drug boxes purchased to control hypertension was 9.4 ± 10.0 in 2009. Men purchased more drugs than women. The number of drugs purchased for the treatment of hypertension was lower than expected in all age groups except for individuals aged 54-58 and >59 years. Among men, the purchase of drugs to treat hypertension was higher than expected in the 24-28, 34-38 and 54-58 age groups. Among women, results matched expectations, except for the age group 34-38 years, in which purchase was lower than expected. Individuals in the age group 0-18 years were found to consume antihypertensive drugs. Although the PBM system may be used to identify drugs purchased by users, it does not ensure patient adherence to recommended drug treatment to control hypertension.O objetivo do Programa de Benefícios em Medicamentos (PBM é proporcionar descontos atraentes para aquisição de medicamentos, um fator relevante para o custo, principalmente no tratamento de doenças crônicas. O objetivo deste estudo é comprovar se o PBM pode ser utilizado como ferramenta para o fornecimento de informações sobre o consumo de medicamentos antihipertensivos através da aquisição dos mesmos. Foi realizada análise do perfil de medicamentos adquiridos para o tratamento de hipertensão arterial sistêmica por funcionários e seus dependentes de uma empresa de grande porte na área de tecnologia de informação (TI no período compreendido entre janeiro a dezembro de 2009. A taxa de

  18. Glycemic control: a combination of lifestyle management and the use of drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standl, Eberhard; Erbach, Michael; Schnell, Oliver

    2013-06-01

    Some 30% of contemporary cardiology patients have coexisting known diabetes, and another 40% have either undiagnosed diabetes or prediabetes. There is still no final conclusive evidence of cardiovascular benefit by good glycemic control in type 2 diabetes, although studies like the United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) and the Prospective Pioglitazone Clinical Trial in Macrovascular Events, and meta-analyses based on these and other randomized controlled trials of blood glucose-lowering therapies have been encouraging. On the other hand, microvascular disease is clearly reduced by good glycemic control. Structured education has remained a mandatory prerequisite of any successful treatment. Not only is appropriate weight management by diet and exercise able to revert new onset diabetes to normal, but it is also the foundation of any successful pharmacotherapy of diabetes. Aiming at normal fasting plasma glucose concentrations of 5.3 mmol/L or 95 mg/dL appears to be safe since publication of the long-term outcome results of the Outcome Reduction with an Initial Glargine INtervention trial. Individualized target glycosylated hemoglobin levels as near to normal as safely possible (i.e., type 2 diabetes, also in terms of preventing cardiovascular complications. An alternate first-line option in some parts of the world, especially Asian countries, is the class of alpha-glucosidase inhibitors. In most patients, combination therapies with two or three classes of drugs are warranted. Early combination are the golden strategy as type 2 diabetes is a multi-causal disease; the various classes of drugs have distinct and synergistic modes of action, and the blood glucose-lowering efficacy of these drugs is more or less fully maintained in combination. The recent joint American Diabetes Association/European Association for the Study of Diabetes position statement mentions five options as step two of the treatment algorithm for combination with metformin

  19. Multi-Drug-Loaded Microcapsules with Controlled Release for Management of Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Jong-Suep; Choo, Chee Chong; Qian, Cheng; Tan, Nguan Soon; Shen, Zexiang; Loo, Say Chye Joachim

    2016-07-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive disease of the nervous system, and is currently managed through commercial tablets that do not sufficiently enable controlled, sustained release capabilities. It is hypothesized that a drug delivery system that provides controlled and sustained release of PD drugs would afford better management of PD. Hollow microcapsules composed of poly-l-lactide (PLLA) and poly (caprolactone) (PCL) are prepared through a modified double-emulsion technique. They are loaded with three PD drugs, i.e., levodopa (LD), carbidopa (CD), and entacapone (ENT), at a ratio of 4:1:8, similar to commercial PD tablets. LD and CD are localized in both the hollow cavity and PLLA/PCL shell, while ENT is localized in the PLLA/PCL shell. Release kinetics of hydrophobic ENT is observed to be relatively slow as compared to the other hydrophilic drugs. It is further hypothesized that encapsulating ENT into PCL as a surface coating onto these microcapsules can aid in accelerating its release. Now, these spray-coated hollow microcapsules exhibit similar release kinetics, according to Higuchi's rate, for all three drugs. The results suggest that multiple drug encapsulation of LD, CD, and ENT in gastric floating microcapsules could be further developed for in vivo evaluation for the management of PD. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Drug research methodology. Volume 5, Experimentation in drugs and highway safety : the study of drug effects on skills related to driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-01

    This report presents the findings of a workshop on experimental research in the area of drugs and highway safety. Complementing studies of drug use in different driving populations, experimentation here refers to studies performed under controlled co...

  1. [Drug information management through the intranet of a hospital center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juárez Giménez, J C; Mendarte Barrenechea, L; Gil Luján, G; Sala Piñol, F; Lalueza Broto, P; Girona Brumós, L; Monterde Junyent, J

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the methodology used for the implementation and validation of a network resource incorporated to the intranet of the Hospital, in order to retain and disseminate information from the Drug Information Center (DIC) of a pharmacy service in a hospital center. A working group designed the structure, contents, memory needs, priority of access for users and a quality assessment questionnaire. The resource developed by the working group had a capacity of 70 Gb and its structure was based on HTML documents, including files with different format and 12 theme areas. Two levels of priority of access were established depending on the user and two persons were in charge of the resource. The questionnaire was delivered after three months of use. Sixty nine per cent of the users regarded the resource as very useful and 31%, as useful. The final structure, according to the results of the survey, had 11 theme areas. The use of the hospital Intranet in order to include and organize DIC information can be very simple and economic. Furthermore, the involvement of all the users in its design and structure can facilitate the practical use of this tool and improve its quality.

  2. Adjunct therapy of Ayurvedic medicine with anti tubercular drugs on the therapeutic management of pulmonary tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, P K; Chattopadhyay, Jaydeb; Mitra, Achintya; Adhikari, Anjan; Alam, Mirza Samsur; Bandopadhyay, S K; Hazra, Jayram

    2012-07-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) is an age old disease described in Vedic Medicine as 'Yakshma'. Later on, in Ayurveda it earned a prefix and found way into mythology as 'Rajayakshma'. After the discovery of streptomycin, the therapeutic management of PTB received a major breakthrough. The treatment module changed remarkably with the formulation of newer anti-tubercular drugs (ATD) with appreciable success. Recent resurgence of PTB in developed countries like United States posed a threat to the medical community due to resistant strains. Consequently, WHO looked toward traditional medicine. Literature reveals that Ayurvedic treatment of PTB was in vogue in India before the introduction of ATD with limited success. Records show that 2766 patients of PTB were treated with Ayurvedic drugs in a tertiary care hospital in Kolkata in the year 1933-1947. To evaluate the toxicity reduction and early restoration by adjunct therapy of Ayurvedic drugs by increasing the bio-availability of ATDs. In the present study, treatment response of 99 patients treated with ATD as an adjunct with Aswagandha (Withania somnifera) and a multi-herbal formulation described in Chikitsa-sthana of Charaka samhita i.e. Chyawanprash were investigated. Hematological profile, sputum bacterial load count, immunoglobulin IgA and IgM, blood sugar, liver function test, serum creatinine were the assessed parameters besides blood isoniazid and pyrazinamide, repeated after 28 days of treatment. The symptoms abated, body weight showed improvement, ESR values were normal, there was appreciable change in IgA and IgM patterns and significantly increased bioavailability of isoniazid and pyrazinamide were recorded. This innovative clinical study coupled with empowered research may turn out to be promising in finding a solution for the treatment of PTB.

  3. Anti-diabetic drug utilization of pregnant diabetic women in us managed care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, Caitlin A; Delaney, Joseph A C; Winterstein, Almut G

    2014-01-17

    With the increasing prevalence of type 2 diabetes in young adulthood, treatment of diabetes in pregnancy faces new challenges. Anti-diabetic drug utilization patterns of pregnant women with pre-existing diabetes are poorly described. We aim to describe anti-diabetic (AD) agent utilization among diabetic pregnant women. We utilized IMS LifeLink, including administrative claims data of patients in US managed care plans, to establish a retrospective cohort of women, age 18-46 years (N = 96,740) with billed procedures for a live birth, and a 12 month eligibility period before and 3 month after delivery. Diabetes mellitus was identified from ≥2 in- or outpatient claims with diagnoses (ICD-9-CM 250.XX) before pregnancy. We estimated the prevalence of AD drugs before, during and after pregnancy, and secular trends across the study period (1999-2009), using linear regression. A sensitivity analysis was conducted to identify the extent of misclassification of trimesters. Almost six percent (n = 5,581) of the live birth cohort had diabetes mellitus. Throughout the study, 48% (1999) and 78% (2009) (p metformin, sulfonylureas, thiazolidinediones (TZD), and combination AD. The annual prevalence of insulin use increased by only 1% from 39% (1999) to 40% (2009) (p = 0.589) during pregnancy, while use of sulfonylureas and metformin increased from 2.5% and 4.2% (1999) to 17.3% and 15.3% (2009) (p use steadily increased in prevalence from the 1st to 3rd trimester (16.5% and 3.3% to 33.0% and 7.5%), while metformin and TZD use decreased (11.4% and 1.6% to 3.8% and 0.2%). AD use during pregnancy demonstrates the need for additional investigation regarding safety and efficacy of AD drugs on maternal outcomes.

  4. Alcohol and drug use in the workplace : managing the human factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKibbon, D. [Kelly Luttmer and Associates Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    1999-07-01

    The importance of implementing comprehensive drug and alcohol policies in the workplace was discussed with particular emphasis on the procedures which are needed to ensure that employers meet due diligence requirements regarding alcoholism and drug abuse. A study of workplace substance abuse issues in Alberta revealed that 80 per cent of the Alberta workforce uses alcohol, 27 per cent use cold medication, and 6.5 per cent use illicit drugs. The impact of drug and alcohol use in the workplace was also reviewed. Under the Canadian human rights legislation an employer cannot terminate an employee for having a medical illness including alcoholism or drug addiction. The issue of drug testing and when to drug screen was also discussed. It was suggested that addressing substance abuse in the workplace through policy procedures and practices can reduce costs related to lost productivity, absenteeism, workers` compensation claims, staff turnover, health benefit premiums and legal liabilities. 3 refs.

  5. Physician assessments of drug seeking behavior: A mixed methods study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A Fischer

    Full Text Available Pain complaints are common, but clinicians are increasingly concerned about overuse of opioid pain medications. This may lead patients with actual pain to be stigmatized as "drug-seeking," or attempting to obtain medications they do not require medically. We assessed whether patient requests for specific opioid pain medication would lead physicians to classify them as drug-seeking and change management decisions.Mixed-methods analysis of interviews with 192 office-based primary care physicians after viewing video vignettes depicting patients presenting with back pain. For each presentation physicians were randomly assigned to see either an active request for a specific medication or a more general request for help with pain. The main outcome was assignment by the physician of "drug-seeking" as a potential diagnosis among patients presenting with back pain. Additional outcomes included other actions the physician would take and whether the physician would prescribe the medication requested. A potential diagnosis of drug-seeking behavior was included by 21% of physicians seeing a specific request for oxycodone vs. 3% for a general request for help with back pain(p<0.001. In multivariable models an active request was most strongly associated with a physician-assigned diagnosis of drug-seeking behavior(OR 8.10; 95% CI 2.11-31.15;p = 0.002; other major patient and physician characteristics, including gender and race, did not have strong associations with drug-seeking diagnosis. Physicians described short courses of opioid medications as a strategy for managing patients with pain while avoiding opioid overuse.When patients make a specific request for opioid pain medication, physicians are far more likely to suspect that they are drug-seeking. Physician suspicion of drug-seeking behavior did not vary by patient characteristics, including gender and race. The strategies used to assess patients further varied widely. These findings indicate a need for

  6. Outage management: A case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haber, S.B.; Barriere, M.T.; Roberts, K.H.

    1992-01-01

    Outage management issues identified from a field study conducted at a two-unit commercial pressurized water reactor (PWR), when one unit was in a refueling outage and the other unit was at full power operation, are the focus of this paper. The study was conduced as part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) organizational factors research program, and therefore the issues to be addressed are from an organizational perspective. Topics discussed refer to areas identified by the NRC as critical for safety during shutdown operations, including outage planning and control, personnel stress, and improvements in training and procedures. Specifically, issues in communication, management attention, involvement and oversight, administrative processes, organizational culture, and human resources relevant to each of the areas are highlighted by example from field data collection. Insights regarding future guidance in these areas are presented based upon additional data collection subsequent to the original study

  7. Adverse drug reactions monitoring of psychotropic drugs: a tertiary care centre study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemendra Singh

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Many new psychotropic drugs/ agents have been developed and found to be effective in the treatment of psychiatric disorders. However, these drugs also exhibit adverse drug reactions (ADRs which may affect compliance in psychiatric patients. Hence the present study was aimed at monitoring and assessing ADRs caused by psychotropic drugs. Methods: A hospital based prospective observational study was carried out in the psychiatry outpatient department of a tertiary care teaching hospital for the duration of six months. Two hundred and two patients were included in the study and ADRs were documented using a predesigned data collection form. The causality assessment was carried out as per the criteria of both the World Health Organization- Uppsala Monitoring Centre (WHO-UMC and Naranjo scale. Severity and predictability assessment of ADRs were also performed. Results: A total of 106 ADRs were observed during the study period with majority of them occurring in 25-35 years of age group (40.56%. Weight gain (18.86% followed by sedation (16.03% and insomnia (11.32% were found to be the commonest ADRs. Risperidone (19.8% and escitalopram (12.3% were the drugs responsible for majority of the ADRs. Causality assessment showed that most of ADRs were possible and probable. 94.33% of ADRs were found to be mild and 89% of them were predictable. Conclusion: A wide range of ADRs affecting central nervous and metabolic systems were reported with psychotropic drugs. The study findings necessitate the need for an active pharmacovigilance programme for the safe and effective use of psychotropics.

  8. An exploratory study of drug use in bar environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trocki, Karen; Michalak, Laurence; McDaniel, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the characteristics of bars where drug use was observed compared to those where no drug use was observed. The study was done through a combination of qualitative and quantitative techniques gleaned through observations and interviews. Among the most important of indicators were the type of activity (particularly dancing) and the level of rowdiness evident in the bars. In addition drug use bars had higher levels of other types of rule-breaking. Patron characteristics (more men) and behavioral patterns (more sexual risk-taking) also distinguished these bars. PMID:25221431

  9. Management of clandestine drug laboratories: need for evidence-based environmental health policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Obaidi, Tamara A; Fletcher, Stephanie M

    2014-01-01

    Clandestine drug laboratories (CDLs) have been emerging and increasing as a public health problem in Australia, with methamphetamine being the dominant illegally manufactured drug. However, management and remediation of contaminated properties are still limited in terms of regulation and direction, especially in relation to public and environmental health practice. Therefore, this review provides an update on the hazards and health effects associated with CDLs, with a specific look at the management of these labs from an Australian perspective. Particularly, the paper attempts to describe the policy landscape for management of CDLs, and identifies current gaps and how further research may be utilised to advance understanding and management of CDLs and inform public health policies. The paper highlights a significant lack of evidence-based policies and guidelines to guide regulatory authority including environmental health officers in Australia. Only recently, the national Clandestine Drug Laboratory Guidelines were developed to assist relevant authority and specialists manage and carry out investigations and remediation of contaminated sites. However, only three states have developed state-based guidelines, some of which are inadequate to meet environmental health requirements. The review recommends well-needed inter-sectoral collaborations and further research to provide an evidence base for the development of robust policies and standard operating procedures for safe and effective environmental health management and remediation of CDLs.

  10. [PHARMACOLOGICAL TREATMENT IN PALLIATIVE CARE. DRUG ADMINISTRATION ROUTE, CONTINUOUS SUBCUTANEOUS INFUSION, ADVERSE SIDE EFFECTS, SYMPTOM MANAGEMENT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez Álvarez, Rocío; Calderón Carrasco, Justo; García Colchero, Francisco; Postigo Mota, Salvador; Alburquerque Medina, Eulalia

    2015-01-01

    To achieve well-being in patients in Palliative Care is required to know which are the most common symptoms, which are the drugs used for relief, which are the routes of administration of drugs that are suitable, how effective the drugs are and what incompatibilities, interactions and adverse effects occur. The aim of this article is to review the relevant issues in the management of the drugs commonly used by nursing in Palliative Care and presenting recommendations to clinical practice. Management interventions drugs for nurses in Palliative Care recommended by the scientific literature after a search of Scopus, CINAHL, Medline, PubMed, UpToDate and Google Scholar are selected. The oral route is the choice for patients in palliative situation and subcutaneous route when the first is not available. The symptoms, complex, intense and moody, should be systematically reevaluated by the nurse, to predict when a possible decompensation of it needing extra dose of medication. Nurses must be able to recognize the imbalance of well-being and act quickly and effectively, to get relief to some unpleasant situations for the patient as the pain symptoms, dyspnea or delirium. For the proper administration of rescue medication, the nurse should know the methods of symptomatic evaluation, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of drugs, the time intervals to elapse between different rescues and nccocc rocnnnco t thocm

  11. Clinically relevant potential drug-drug interactions among outpatients: A nationwide database study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jazbar, Janja; Locatelli, Igor; Horvat, Nejc; Kos, Mitja

    2018-06-01

    Adverse drug events due to drug-drug interactions (DDIs) represent a considerable public health burden, also in Slovenia. A better understanding of the most frequently occurring potential DDIs may enable safer pharmacotherapy and minimize drug-related problems. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and predictors of potential DDIs among outpatients in Slovenia. An analysis of potential DDIs was performed using health claims data on prescription drugs from a nationwide database. The Lexi-Interact Module was used as the reference source of interactions. The influence of patient-specific predictors on the risk of potential clinically relevant DDIs was evaluated using logistic regression model. The study population included 1,179,803 outpatients who received 15,811,979 prescriptions. The total number of potential DDI cases identified was 3,974,994, of which 15.6% were potentially clinically relevant. Altogether, 9.3% (N = 191,213) of the total population in Slovenia is exposed to clinically relevant potential DDIs, and the proportion is higher among women and the elderly. After adjustment for cofactors, higher number of medications and older age are associated with higher odds of clinically relevant potential DDIs. The burden of DDIs is highest with drug combinations that increase risk of bleeding, enhance CNS depression or anticholinergic effects or cause cardiovascular complications. The current study revealed that 1 in 10 individuals in the total Slovenian population is exposed to clinically relevant potential DDIs yearly. Taking into account the literature based conservative estimate that approximately 1% of potential DDIs result in negative health outcomes, roughly 1800 individuals in Slovenia experience an adverse health outcome each year as a result of clinically relevant potential interactions alone. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Drug Release from ß-Cyclodextrin Complexes and Drug Transfer into Model Membranes Studied by Affinity Capillary Electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwish, Kinda A; Mrestani, Yahya; Rüttinger, Hans-Hermann; Neubert, Reinhard H H

    2016-05-01

    Is to characterize the drug release from the ß-cyclodextrin (ß-CD) cavity and the drug transfer into model membranes by affinity capillary electrophoresis. Phospholipid liposomes with and without cholesterol were used to mimic the natural biological membrane. The interaction of cationic and anionic drugs with ß-CD and the interaction of the drugs with liposomes were detected separately by measuring the drug mobility in ß-CD containing buffer and liposome containing buffer; respectively. Moreover, the kinetics of drug release from ß-CD and its transfer into liposomes with or without cholesterol was studied by investigation of changes in the migration behaviours of the drugs in samples, contained drug, ß-CD and liposome, at 1:1:1 molar ratio at different time intervals; zero time, 30 min, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 24 h. Lipophilic drugs such as propranolol and ibuprofen were chosen for this study, because they form complexes with ß-CD. The mobility of the both drug liposome mixtures changed with time to a final state. For samples of liposomal membranes with cholesterol the final state was faster reached than without cholesterol. The study confirmed that the drug release from the CD cavity and its transfer into the model membrane was more enhanced by the competitive displacement of the drug from the ß-CD cavity by cholesterol, the membrane component. The ACE method here developed can be used to optimize the drug release from CD complexes and the drug transfer into model membranes.

  13. Prevalence and management out comes of anti TB drugs induced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patients and Methods: All TB patients admitted in the Hospital during the study period are the source of population, the study groups were been selected by detecting the possible confounding factors for jaundice. Base line LFT before anti TB initiation was determined before developed jaundice. Those patients, whom the ...

  14. Dental management of patients using antithrombotic drugs: critical appraisal of existing guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Diermen, D.E.; Aartman, I.H.A.; Baart, J.A.; Hoogstraten, J.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives The aims were: 1) to identify the guidelines available for management of dental invasive procedures in patients on antithrombotic drugs; 2) to assess their quality with the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE) instrument; and 3) to summarize their conclusions and

  15. A Randomized Trial of Probation Case Management for Drug-Involved Women Offenders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guydish, Joseph; Chan, Monica; Bostrom, Alan; Jessup, Martha A.; Davis, Thomas B.; Marsh, Cheryl

    2011-01-01

    This article reports findings from a clinical trial of a probation case management (PCM) intervention for drug-involved women offenders. Participants were randomly assigned to PCM (n = 92) or standard probation (n = 91) and followed for 12 months using measures of substance abuse, psychiatric symptoms, social support, and service utilization.…

  16. General Practitioners' Management of Psychostimulant Drug Misuse: Implications for Education and Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhamis, Ahmed; Matheson, Catriona; Bond, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Aims: To provide baseline data regarding GPs' knowledge, experience, and attitudes toward the management of PsychoStimulant Drug Misuse (PSDM) patients to inform future education and training initiatives. Methods: A structured cross-sectional postal questionnaire was developed following initial content setting interviews, piloted then sent to a…

  17. Evaluating Environmental Management Approaches to Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Prevention. Prevention Updates

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJong, William; Langford, Linda M.

    2006-01-01

    Recent years have seen an upsurge in prevention work focused on changing the campus and community environments in which college students make decisions about alcohol and other drug (AOD) use. This approach, called "environmental management," is based on three fundamental premises: (1) Substance use problems are aggravated by a physical, social,…

  18. Does the placebo effect modulate drug bioavailability? Randomized cross-over studies of three drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammami, Muhammad M; Yusuf, Ahmed; Shire, Faduma S; Hussein, Rajaa; Al-Swayeh, Reem

    2017-05-23

    Medication effect is the sum of its drug, placebo, and drug*placebo interaction effects. It is conceivable that the interaction effect involves modulating drug bioavailability; it was previously observed that being aware of caffeine ingestion may prolong caffeine plasma half-life. This study was set to evaluate such concept using different drugs. Balanced single-dose, two-period, two-group, cross-over design was used to compare the pharmacokinetics of oral cephalexin, ibuprofen, and paracetamol, each described by its name (overt) or as placebo (covert). Volunteers and study coordinators were deceived as to study aim. Drug concentrations were determined blindly by in-house, high performance liquid chromatography assays. Terminal-elimination half-life (t ½ ) (primary outcome), maximum concentration (C max ), C max first time (T max ), terminal-elimination-rate constant (λ), area-under-the-concentration-time-curve, to last measured concentration (AUC T ), extrapolated to infinity (AUC I ), or to T max of overt drug (AUC Overttmax ), and C max /AUC I were calculated blindly using standard non-compartmental method. Covert-vs-overt effect on drug pharmacokinetics was evaluated by analysis-of-variance (ANOVA, primary analysis), 90% confidence interval (CI) using the 80.00-125.00% bioequivalence range, and percentage of individual pharmacokinetic covert/overt ratios that are outside the +25% range. Fifty, 30, and 50 healthy volunteers (18%, 10%, and 6% females, mean (SD) age 30.8 (6.2), 31.4 (6.6), and 31.2 (5.4) years) participated in 3 studies on cephalexin, ibuprofen, and paracetamol, respectively. Withdrawal rate was 4%, 0%, and 4%, respectively. Eighteen blood samples were obtained over 6, 10, and 14 h in each study period of the three drugs, respectively. ANOVA showed no significant difference in any pharmacokinetic parameter for any of the drugs. The 90% CIs for AUC T , AUC I , C max , AUC Overttmax , and C max /AUC I were within the bioequivalence range, except

  19. Pharmacogenetics of drug-induced arrhythmias : a feasibility study using spontaneous adverse drug reactions reporting data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Bruin, Marie L; van Puijenbroek, Eugene P; Bracke, Madelon; Hoes, Arno W; Leufkens, Hubert G M

    PURPOSE: The bottleneck in pharmacogenetic research on rare adverse drug reactions (ADR) is retrieval of patients. Spontaneous reports of ADRs may form a useful source of patients. We investigated the feasibility of a pharmacogenetic study, in which cases were selected from the database of a

  20. Management of rheumatic chorea: an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araújo Alexandra Prufer de Queiroz Campos

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rheumatic chorea (RC has recently been linked to an antibody-mediated immune mechanism. OBJECTIVE/METHOD: To verify if this knowledge reflected in management changes we conceived a descriptive study. RESULTS: The medical charts of 20 children (13 females aged 6 to 12 years (mean 8 years, diagnosed as RC from June 1996 to June 1999, were reviewed. All patients received some medical treatment. Haloperidol was the most prescribed medication (15 patients - 75 %. Sulpiride, diazepam and valproate were also used as symptomatic treatment. Imune-modulating therapy with prednisone was prescribed for seven children. The shortest course of chorea (16 days occurred in a patient treated with prednisone. CONCLUSION: Prednisone has been prescribed for rheumatic chorea besides the traditional symptomatic approach. A great variety of antichoreic drugs are being employed.

  1. MANAGEMENT OF ENDOCRINE DISEASE: Arguments for the prolonged use of antithyroid drugs in children with Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léger, Juliane; Carel, Jean-Claude

    2017-08-01

    Graves' disease is an autoimmune disorder. It is the leading cause of hyperthyroidism, but is rare in children. Patients are initially managed with antithyroid drugs (ATDs), such as methimazole/carbimazole. A major disadvantage of treatment with ATD is the high risk of relapse, exceeding 70% of children treated for duration of 2 years, and the potential major side effects of the drug reported in exceptional cases. The major advantage of ATD treatment is that normal homeostasis of the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis may be restored, with periods of drug treatment followed by freedom from medical intervention achieved in approximately 40-50% of cases after prolonged treatment with ATD, for several years, in recent studies. Alternative ablative treatments such as radioactive iodine and, less frequently and mostly in cases of very high volume goiters or in children under the age of 5 years, thyroidectomy, performed by pediatric surgeons with extensive experience should be proposed in cases of non-compliance, intolerance to medical treatment or relapse after prolonged medical treatment. Ablative treatments are effective against hyperthyroidism, but they require the subsequent administration of levothyroxine throughout the patient's life. This review considers data relating to the prognosis for Graves' disease remission in children and explores the limitations of study designs and results; and the emerging proposal for management through the prolonged use of ATD drugs. © 2017 European Society of Endocrinology.

  2. 75 FR 36427 - Joint Meeting of the Arthritis Advisory Committee and the Drug Safety and Risk Management...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2010-N-0001] Joint Meeting of the Arthritis Advisory Committee and the Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice...

  3. Financial risk relationships and adoption of management strategies in physician groups for self-administered injectable drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnew, Jonathan D; Stebbins, Marilyn R; Hickman, David E; Lipton, Helene Levins

    2003-01-01

    To consider the extent, nature, and range of risk arrangements between physician groups and health maintenance organizations (HMOs) for self-administered injectable (SAI) drugs; to examine types and frequencies of SAI drug-use management strategies adopted by physician groups; and to explore the relationship between locus and level of financial risk for SAIs and physician group strategy adoption. We used a multiple case-study design to select physician groups and their health maintenance organization (HMO) contractual partners in 4 markets in the United States (Northwest, Northeast, Midwest, Southwest). Physician groups in these markets were chosen based on size (e50 physicians) and experience with drug risk (e1 year). Physician groups were asked to identify their 3 major HMO contractual partners in each market. Telephone interviews were conducted from January 2000 to June 2001, with the resulting purposive sample of 37 individuals representing 20 physician groups. We found that the level and locus of SAI financial risk were related to the adoption of management strategies. Physician groups with higher financial risk for SAIs adopted more strategies than lower-risk groups. Groups with SAI financial risk in the medical services capitation (MSC) adopted 9.2 strategies per group. In contrast, groups with SAI financial risk in the pharmacy-risk budget (PRB) averaged 1.5 strategies per group. Groups with SAI financial risk in both the MSC and PRB fell in-between, averaging 4.5 strategies per group. The most frequently adopted strategy was designing evidenced-based therapeutic guidelines, i.e., protocols based on evidence from the peer-reviewed literature used to guide physicians in the treatment of typically chronic conditions (9 groups, 45% of sample). The second most common strategy involved adapting the existing utilization management system to process SAIs (7 groups, 35%) and the establishment of office procedures for internal authorization (5 groups, 25%). The

  4. Study of antimicrobial property of some hypoglycemic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Kumar Dash

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, a comparative antimicrobial study of different hypoglycemic drugs (Metformin, Phenformin, and Rosiglitazone was carried out. The main objective was to ascertain the antimicrobial activity by using "non-antibiotics" as the test substances. The antimicrobial activity was carried out against different bacteria and fungi namely Bacillus liceniformis, Escherichia coli, Proteus vulgaris, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Shigella flexneri, Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus subspp., and Staphylococcus epidermidis by using disc diffusion method and agar dilution method. Ciprofloxacin was taken as the standard antibiotic. The entire procedure was carried out in an aseptic area under the laminar flow by inoculating the bacterial strain to the agar media in which the drug solution was added. Different concentrations (300 and 400 μg/ml of the standard antibiotic and selected drugs were subjected for minimum inhibitory concentration, and zone of inhibition tests and the antimicrobial activity of the selected drugs were determined.

  5. The analysis of specialists’ opinion on the implementation of concept of risk management in clinical trials of drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Zupanets

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available At the modern stage of the pharmaceutical industry development quality risk management becomes an integral part of all the processes of drug development and clinical trials (CT. Aim of paper is to study the opinion of competent experts in the field of CT of drugs and formation of strategic ways of risk management at the clinical site as well as to identify possible complications in the practical implementation of these approaches. Materials and methods: the survey of the expert group (17 people to select the indicators and the parameters measuring the risks of CT at clinical site, as well as their acceptable levels. The assessment of survey results was done using non-parametric statistics methods. Results of research. There were established the differences of various stakeholders’ notion of conceptual content and practical importance of quality management and the application of risk-oriented approaches at the clinical site in relation to CT quality that can become an obstacle to their implementation. The introduction of risk-based monitoring into the system for CT management at the clinical site corresponds to the interests of all stakeholders involved in the study. General concernment of the customer’s representatives, regulatory authority and researchers should be an important basis for the implementation of the risk-based management at the clinical site. So, it is necessary to create a common understanding of the terminology, objectives and expected outcomes of risk management at the clinical site, as well as a clear allocation of the duties and responsibilities of each side. Conclusions. The expediency of the concept of risk management application at the clinical site, practical orientation, as well as the need to develop scientific and methodological approaches for its implementation, contributing to the formation of a common basis for action and coordinated interaction of stakeholders involved in the management of CT were proved.

  6. Newsmaking on drugs: a qualitative study with journalism professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastroianni, Fabio C; Noto, Ana Regina

    2008-09-01

    Drugs are a frequent subject in the news media. Despite the existence of an important dynamic interplay between the print media, public opinion, and public policies, studies on these relationships are still scarce regarding the drug issue. The objective of this study is to understand the newsmaking process regarding drugs from the vantage point of Brazilian journalism professionals. Using qualitative research, semistructured interviews were conducted among an intentional sample of 22 professionals who write news stories and articles about drugs in nationwide news media. Interviewees mentioned illegality and crime as the main factors leading to the production of stories and articles. They claimed that by instilling fear among readers, newspapers and magazines tend to increase their audiences and/or sales. Most interviewees considered the coverage of drugs in Brazil as weak. Main problems reported include lack of knowledge on the subject, and not enough time to prepare the stories. It was concluded that the newsmaking process regarding drugs undergoes a series of interferences that compromise the content of the stories, therefore social strategies are needed in order to improve the quality of the material published in Brazil.

  7. Characteristics studies of molecular structures in drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Gao

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In theoretical medicine, topological indices are defined to test the medicine and pharmacy characteristics, such as melting point, boiling point, toxicity and other biological activities. As basic molecular structures, hexagonal jagged-rectangle and distance-regular structure are widely appeared in medicine, pharmacy and biology engineering. In this paper, we study the chemical properties of hexagonal jagged-rectangle from the mathematical point of view. Several vertex distance-based indices are determined. Furthermore, the Wiener related indices of distance-regular structure are also considered.

  8. Application of drug selective electrode in the drug release study of pH-responsive microgels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jeremy P K; Tam, Kam C

    2007-03-12

    The colloidal phenomenon of soft particles is becoming an important field of research due to the growing interest in using polymeric system in drug delivery. Previous studies have focused on techniques that require intermediate process step such as dialysis or centrifugation, which introduces additional errors in obtaining the diffusion kinetic data. In this study, a drug selective electrode was used to directly measure the concentration of procaine hydrochloride (PrHy) released from methacrylic acid-ethyl acrylate (MAA-EA) microgel, thereby eliminating the intermediate process step. PrHy selective membrane constructed using a modified poly (vinyl chloride) (PVC) membrane and poly (ethylene-co-vinyl acetate-co-carbon monoxide) as plasticizer exhibited excellent reproducibility and stability. The response was reproducible at pH of between 3 to 8.5 and the selectivity coefficients against various organic and inorganic cations were evaluated. Drug release was conducted using the drug electrode under different pHs and the release rate increased with pH. The release behavior of the system under different pH exhibited obvious gradient release characteristics.

  9. From Addiction to Infection: Managing Drug Abuse in the Context of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    Keywords: Drug users, Drug addiction, Substance use, HIV infection, Africa. Résumé ... Recent efforts in the prevention of HIV ... have sex with men (MSM) and people who inject ..... generic health and social care services: a qualitative study of ...

  10. 49 CFR Appendix H to Part 40 - DOT Drug and Alcohol Testing Management Information System (MIS) Data Collection Form

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., App. H Appendix H to Part 40—DOT Drug and Alcohol Testing Management Information System (MIS) Data... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false DOT Drug and Alcohol Testing Management Information System (MIS) Data Collection Form H Appendix H to Part 40 Transportation Office of the Secretary...

  11. [Between scientific management and research-action: the problem of overconsumption of drugs in Kasongo (Zaire)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Brouwere, V; Van Lerberghe, W; Criel, B; Van Dormael, M

    1996-01-01

    A Primary Health Care (PHC) system may be effective and efficient to the extent that essential drugs are available in health services and financially accessible to the population. In developing countries, besides the difficulties related to supplying health services with adequate amounts of drugs, the control of drug consumption is one of the frequent problems encountered by health authorities. Literature is relatively abundant in the field of rationalization of the diagnosis and drug prescription processes, and also in the field of drug financing mechanisms; publications are however rather scarce when topics related to corruption or drug misappropriation are concerned. The case study submitted hereafter reports a drug overconsumption problem in the health centres (HC) of the Kasongo district (Zaire). Despite the existence of direct control mechanisms as well as indirect ones (monitoring of drug consumption by HC), the problem has been identified belatedly. The district staff then used a step-by-step analysis of the HC drug consumption profiles; this analysis allowed to demonstrate that misappropriation would be the most plausible hypothesis. In order to solve the misappropriation problem-the consequences of which jeopardized the functioning of the very health system-the district staff chose to involve the nurses, in charge of the HC, in the entire problem-solving process. This participative approach, involving different actors as partners, allowed to deepen the situation analysis and to elaborate solutions congruent with PHC principles and acceptable to all concerned.

  12. Critical Management Studies: Some Reflections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Alcadipani

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper seeks to challenge some assumptions associated with Critical Management Studies (CMS. This is done based on insights originating from the Actor-Network Theory (ANT, an approach that can be considered as an empirical form of post-structuralism and that has gained prominence in social sciences. Fundamentally, this paper broadly reviews some key CMS ideas associated with this perspective ontology to argue that what CMS usually tends to take as explanation is exactly what has to be explained. Moreover, it discusses CMS’ problematic view of objects and its tendency to neglect how existence is kept and maintained.

  13. A study of the web as DTC drug marketing agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorence, Daniel; Churchill, Rick

    2007-12-01

    The growth of direct-to-consumer (DTC) marketing of pharmaceuticals in the USA has spawned the generation of web sites for consumer information and discussion, related to specific medical conditions and the efficacy of specific drugs. In such an environment consumers often find and act upon health information of variable quality, with little input from health professionals. Some health policy analysts argue that the emergence of such consumer "drug networks" will lead to unnecessary expenditure of money on prescription drugs, as consumers see ads and then demand that their providers prescribe that drug. Others say that an intelligent consumer will be able to research the information and narrow down a drug that will likely work for them personally, rather than having the provider "experiment" with different medications. There exist few cross-disciplinary evaluative frameworks for assessing such health information, especially within commercial search engines. This study serves as an exploratory technology assessment that examines the prevalence of web-based DTC for a popular prescription drug and the impact on healthcare consumers.

  14. Do advertisements for antihypertensive drugs in Australia promote quality prescribing? A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spurling Geoffrey K

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antihypertensive medications are widely prescribed by doctors and heavily promoted by the pharmaceutical industry. Despite strong evidence of the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of thiazide diuretics, trends in both promotion and prescription of antihypertensive drugs favour newer, less cost-effective agents. Observational evidence shows correlations between exposure to pharmaceutical promotion and less ideal prescribing. Our study therefore aimed to determine whether print advertisements for antihypertensive medications promote quality prescribing in hypertension. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study of 113 advertisements for antihypertensive drugs from 4 general practice-oriented Australian medical publications in 2004. Advertisements were evaluated using a quality checklist based on a review of hypertension management guidelines. Main outcome measures included: frequency with which antihypertensive classes were advertised, promotion of thiazide class drugs as first line agents, use of statistical claims in advertisements, mention of harms and prices in the advertisements, promotion of assessment and treatment of cardiovascular risk, promotion of lifestyle modification, and targeting of particular patient subgroups. Results Thiazides were the most frequently advertised drug class (48.7% of advertisements, but were largely promoted in combination preparations. The only thiazide advertised as a single agent was the most expensive, indapamide. No advertisement specifically promoted any thiazide as a better first-line drug. Statistics in the advertisements tended to be expressed in relative rather than absolute terms. Drug costs were often reported, but without cost comparisons between drugs. Adverse effects were usually reported but largely confined to the advertisements' small print. Other than mentioning drug interactions with alcohol and salt, no advertisements promoted lifestyle modification. Few

  15. Do advertisements for antihypertensive drugs in Australia promote quality prescribing? A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Brett D; Mansfield, Peter R; Spurling, Geoffrey K; Ward, Alison M

    2008-05-20

    Antihypertensive medications are widely prescribed by doctors and heavily promoted by the pharmaceutical industry. Despite strong evidence of the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of thiazide diuretics, trends in both promotion and prescription of antihypertensive drugs favour newer, less cost-effective agents. Observational evidence shows correlations between exposure to pharmaceutical promotion and less ideal prescribing. Our study therefore aimed to determine whether print advertisements for antihypertensive medications promote quality prescribing in hypertension. We performed a cross-sectional study of 113 advertisements for antihypertensive drugs from 4 general practice-oriented Australian medical publications in 2004. Advertisements were evaluated using a quality checklist based on a review of hypertension management guidelines. Main outcome measures included: frequency with which antihypertensive classes were advertised, promotion of thiazide class drugs as first line agents, use of statistical claims in advertisements, mention of harms and prices in the advertisements, promotion of assessment and treatment of cardiovascular risk, promotion of lifestyle modification, and targeting of particular patient subgroups. Thiazides were the most frequently advertised drug class (48.7% of advertisements), but were largely promoted in combination preparations. The only thiazide advertised as a single agent was the most expensive, indapamide. No advertisement specifically promoted any thiazide as a better first-line drug. Statistics in the advertisements tended to be expressed in relative rather than absolute terms. Drug costs were often reported, but without cost comparisons between drugs. Adverse effects were usually reported but largely confined to the advertisements' small print. Other than mentioning drug interactions with alcohol and salt, no advertisements promoted lifestyle modification. Few advertisements (2.7%) promoted the assessment of cardiovascular risk

  16. Management of coccidioidomycosis in patients receiving biologic response modifiers or disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taroumian, Sara; Knowles, Susan L; Lisse, Jeffrey R; Yanes, James; Ampel, Neil M; Vaz, Austin; Galgiani, John N; Hoover, Susan E

    2012-12-01

    Coccidioidomycosis (valley fever) is an endemic fungal infection of the American Southwest, an area with a large population of patients with rheumatic diseases. There are currently no guidelines for management of patients who develop coccidioidomycosis while under treatment with biologic response modifiers (BRMs) or disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). We conducted a retrospective study of how both concurrent diseases were managed and the patient outcomes at 2 centers in Tucson, Arizona. A retrospective chart review identified patients who developed coccidioidomycosis during treatment with DMARDs or BRMs. Patients were seen at least once in a university-affiliated or Veterans Affairs outpatient rheumatology clinic in Tucson, Arizona, between 2007 and 2009. Forty-four patients were identified. Rheumatologic treatment included a BRM alone (n = 11), a DMARD alone (n = 8), or combination therapy (n = 25). Manifestations of coccidioidomycosis included pulmonary infection (n = 29), disseminated disease (n = 9), and asymptomatic positive coccidioidal serologies (n = 6). After the diagnosis of coccidioidomycosis, 26 patients had BRMs and DMARDs stopped, 8 patients had BRMs stopped but DMARD therapy continued, and 10 patients had no change in their immunosuppressive therapy. Forty-one patients had antifungal therapy initiated for 1 month or longer. Followup data were available for 38 patients. BRM and/or DMARD therapy was continued or resumed in 33 patients, only 16 of whom continued concurrent antifungal therapy. None of the patients have had subsequent dissemination or complications of coccidioidomycosis. Re-treating rheumatic disease patients with a BRM and/or a DMARD after coccidioidomycosis appears to be safe in some patients. We propose a management strategy based on coccidioidomycosis disease activity. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  17. A Proposal of Operational Risk Management Method Using FMEA for Drug Manufacturing Computerized System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Masakazu; Nanba, Reiji; Fukue, Yoshinori

    This paper proposes operational Risk Management (RM) method using Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) for drug manufacturing computerlized system (DMCS). The quality of drug must not be influenced by failures and operational mistakes of DMCS. To avoid such situation, DMCS has to be conducted enough risk assessment and taken precautions. We propose operational RM method using FMEA for DMCS. To propose the method, we gathered and compared the FMEA results of DMCS, and develop a list that contains failure modes, failures and countermeasures. To apply this list, we can conduct RM in design phase, find failures, and conduct countermeasures efficiently. Additionally, we can find some failures that have not been found yet.

  18. Diagnosis and Management of Gastroenteropathy Asssociated to Non-steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella Ilone

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs is a group of drugs used to treat pain, inflammation, and fever. High consumption of NSAIDs associated with high gastrointestinal side effects. Common complaint from patients, which ranging from mild heartburn to the onset of gastrointestinal bleeding, often complicates the adequate administration of NSAIDs. Various methods have been developed to reduce the likelihood of gastroenteropathy complication. Early diagnosis, appropriate prompt treatment, as well as adequate monitoring will reduce morbidity and mortality from complications due to NSAIDs. This paper will discuss the diagnosis and management of gastro-enteropathy NSAID through approaching the underlying pathophysiology.

  19. Drug use in the management of uncomplicated malaria in public health facilities in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntamabyaliro, Nsengi Y; Burri, Christian; Nzolo, Didier B; Engo, Aline B; Lula, Yves N; Mampunza, Samuel M; Nsibu, Célestin N; Mesia, Gauthier K; Kayembe, Jean-Marie N; Likwela, Joris L; Kintaudi, Leon M; Tona, Gaston L

    2018-05-03

    Malaria the first causes of death from parasitic infection worldwide. Interventions to reduce the burden of malaria have produced a tremendous drop in malaria morbidity and mortality. However, progress is slower in DRC, which shares with Nigeria 39% of deaths related to malaria globally. Inappropriate use of drugs may be one of the factors of this below-average performance. The aim of this study was to describe the use of drugs in the management of uncomplicated malaria in public health facilities in DRC. A drug use study was carried out in DRC from January to March 2014. In each of the former 11 provinces of DRC, one Rural Health Centre, one Urban Health Centre and one General Hospital were selected. In each of them, 100 patient's files containing prescription of anti-malarials from January to December 2013 were randomly selected. Among them, all of the files with diagnosis of uncomplicated malaria were included in this study. Prescribed anti-malarials, co-prescribed drugs and their indications were collected. Descriptive analyses were performed. A total of 2300 files out of 3300 (69.7%) concerned uncomplicated malaria and were included in analysis. Malaria treatment was initiated after a positive RDT or microscopy in 51.5% of cases, upon suspicion without requesting biological confirmation in 37% and despite negative results in 11%. Twenty-nine (29) different treatment regimens were used. The drugs recommended by the National Malaria Control Programme were used in 54.3% of cases (artesunate-amodiaquine 37.4% or artemether-lumefantrine 16.9%). The second most used anti-malarial was quinine (32.4%). Apart from anti-malarials, an average of 3.1 drugs per patient were prescribed, among which antibiotics (67.9%), analgesics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAIDs) (all abbreviations to be explicated on first use) (70.6%), vitamins (29.1%), anaemia drugs, including blood transfusion (9.1%) and corticosteroids (5.7%), In 51.4% of cases there was no indication for

  20. Rooting out institutional corruption to manage inappropriate off-label drug use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodwin, Marc A

    2013-01-01

    Prescribing drugs for uses that the FDA has not approved - off-label drug use - can sometimes be justified but is typically not supported by substantial evidence of effectiveness. At the root of inappropriate off-label drug use lie perverse incentives for pharmaceutical firms and flawed oversight of prescribing physicians. Typical reform proposals such as increased sanctions for manufacturers might reduce the incidence of unjustified off-label use, but they do not remove the source of the problem. Public policy should address the cause and control the practice. To manage inappropriate off-label drug use, off-label prescriptions must be tracked in order to monitor the risks and benefits and the manufacturers' conduct. Even more important, reimbursement rules should be changed so that manufacturers cannot profit from off-label sales. When off-label sales pass a critical threshold, manufacturers should also be required to pay for independent testing of the safety and effectiveness of off-label drug uses and for the FDA to review the evidence. Manufacturers should also finance, under FDA supervision, programs designed to warn physicians and the public about the risks of off-label drug use. © 2013 American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics, Inc.

  1. African Journal of Drug and Alcohol Studies: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Focus and Scope. The "African Journal of Drug & Alcohol Studies" is an international scientific journal published by the African Centre for Research and Information on Substance Abuse (CRISA). The Journal publishes original research, evaluation studies, case reports, review articles and book reviews of high scholarly ...

  2. Antiepileptic drugs and risk of suicide: a nationwide study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, J.B.; Hansen, Peter Riis; Erdal, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Patients with epilepsy or psychiatric diseases have increased risk of suicide, but whether the risk is influenced by antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment is unclear. Studies have suggested that AEDs in general increase the risk of suicidal behaviour shortly after initiation. This study inve...

  3. Drug and alcohol crash risk : a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    This study used a case-control design to estimate the risk of crashes involving drivers using drugs, alcohol or both. Data was collected in Virginia Beach, Virginia, for 20 months. The study obtained biological measures on more than 3,000 crash...

  4. ART drugs help reduce HIV transmission, Chinese study finds ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    International Development Research Centre Government of Canada ... ART drugs help reduce HIV transmission, Chinese study finds ... where only one person has HIV can reduce HIV transmission rates, at least in the short term, a Chinese study has found. ... Ecohealth Field-building Leadership Initiative in Southeast Asia.

  5. The EULAR Study Group for Registers and Observational Drug Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kearsley-Fleet, Lianne; Závada, Jakub; Hetland, Merete Lund

    2015-01-01

    and collate information on the availability of potential confounders within these registers. METHODS: Baseline characteristics of patients starting their first bDMARD in an arbitrary year (2008) for the treatment of RA, including demographic and disease characteristics, bDMARD drug details and co...

  6. Toxicity studies of drugs and chemicals in animals: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Saganuwan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Toxicity study is the investigation of either short or long-term toxic effects of a drug or chemical on animals. The toxicity is dose-dependent as asserted by Paracelsus over 500 years ago. However, short-term toxic effect is determined using median lethal dose (LD50 first introduced by Trevan in 1927 and revised many times. Presently there is a growing preponderance of rejection of scientific papers on acute toxicity study, simply because of the belief that in the current hazard and safety as-sessment of drugs and chemicals, LD50 values are no longer used. In view of this, literature search was carried out with a view to investigating the relevance of LD50 in development and assessment of drugs and chemicals. The findings revealed that in the past, many animals had been used for LD50 determination. OECD has reduced the number of test animals to 5–15 and presently it is further re-duced to 2–6. Acute toxicity study is being carried out in medicinal plants research and in the study of patent medicine. Although the application of LD50 has been drastically reduced, it is still applied and accepted in some parts of the world. Moreover, animals on which LD50 tests are conducted, should be allowed to die to see the end effect of the test drug or chemical because euthanisia of test animals may mask some toxicity signs of the test agents. Therefore, toxicity study of drugs and chemicals is a sci-entific process necessary for discovery and development of drugs as well as identification of potential toxicants.

  7. FTIR Drug-Polymer Interactions Studies of Perindopril Erbumine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modni, A.; Ahmad, S.; Din, I.; Hussain, Z.

    2014-01-01

    The present study was carried out to prepare different combinations of Perindopril Erbumine with different polymers like Hydroxy propyl methyl cellulose, Hydroxy propyl methyl cellulose K4M, Hydroxy propyl methyl cellulose K15M, Xanthan gum and Ethyl cellulose, thereby to determine any possible interactions between Perindopril erbumine and polymers. The analytical technique Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to take spectra of individual drug, polymers and combination of drug with polymers. The results were analyzed to find out any interactions of Perindopril erbumine and polymers. From this study it was concluded that there were no any significant changes in characteristic peaks of drug after combinations with polymers which indicated no interaction between Perindopril erbumine and polymers. (author)

  8. Drug-related celebrity deaths: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Just, Johannes M; Bleckwenn, Markus; Schnakenberg, Rieke; Skatulla, Philipp; Weckbecker, Klaus

    2016-12-09

    Celebrities are at risk for premature mortality as well as drug-related death. Despite being a vulnerable patient group, celebrities influence people's health behaviours through biological, psychological and social processes. Therefore, celebrity endorsement of the topic could be one way to challenge the current "opioid endemic". Our aim was to better understand the factors surrounding drug-related celebrity deaths by investigating the incidence as well as substances used between 1970 and 2015 using a cross-sectional study design. We searched public databases for drug-related celebrity deaths between 1970 and 2015. They were categorized for sex, profession, age at death, year of death and substances involved. The main outcome measures are descriptive values including number of drug deaths per year and substances involved. Secondary outcome measures are analytical questions to examine whether and which factors influence age at death and year of death (e.g. type of substance use disorder). We identified 220 celebrities who died a drug-related death with a clear indication of involved substances between 1970 and 2015. The average age at death was 38.6 years; 75% were male. Most celebrities died between the age of 25 and 40. The number of drug-related deaths increased in the 21st century, with a significant increase in the use of prescription opioids. Deaths involving prescription opioids and heroin were associated with a significantly lower mean age at death compared to deaths where these substances were not involved. Compared to the 20th century, the total number of celebrities who died from a drug-related death in the 21st century increased, possibly due to an increased involvement of prescription opioids. Negative effects on individual health decisions of celebrity's followers could be the result.

  9. Knowledge Management Analysis: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecha, Ezi I.; Desai, Mayur S.; Richards, Thomas C.

    2009-01-01

    It is imperative for businesses to manage knowledge and stay competitive in the marketplace. Knowledge management is critical and is a key to prevent organizations from duplicating their efforts with a subsequent improvement in their efficiency. This study focuses on overview of knowledge management, analyzes the current knowledge management in…

  10. Ethiopian Journal of Environmental Studies and Management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ethiopian Journal of Environmental Studies and Management: About this journal. Journal Home > Ethiopian Journal of Environmental Studies and Management: About this journal. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  11. Ontology-based knowledge management for personalized adverse drug events detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Feng; Sun, Xingzhi; Wang, Xiaoyuan; Li, Bo; Li, Jing; Pan, Yue

    2011-01-01

    Since Adverse Drug Event (ADE) has become a leading cause of death around the world, there arises high demand for helping clinicians or patients to identify possible hazards from drug effects. Motivated by this, we present a personalized ADE detection system, with the focus on applying ontology-based knowledge management techniques to enhance ADE detection services. The development of electronic health records makes it possible to automate the personalized ADE detection, i.e., to take patient clinical conditions into account during ADE detection. Specifically, we define the ADE ontology to uniformly manage the ADE knowledge from multiple sources. We take advantage of the rich semantics from the terminology SNOMED-CT and apply it to ADE detection via the semantic query and reasoning.

  12. Contingency Management interventions for non-prescribed drug use during treatment for opiate addiction: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainscough, Tom S; McNeill, Ann; Strang, John; Calder, Robert; Brose, Leonie S

    2017-09-01

    Use of non-prescribed drugs during treatment for opiate addiction reduces treatment success, creating a need for effective interventions. This review aimed to assess the efficacy of contingency management, a behavioural treatment that uses rewards to encourage desired behaviours, for treating non-prescribed drug use during opiate addiction treatment. A systematic search of the databases Embase, PsychInfo, PsychArticles and Medline from inception to March 2015 was performed. Random effects meta-analysis tested the use of contingency management to treat the use of drugs during opiate addiction treatment, using either longest duration of abstinence (LDA) or percentage of negative samples (PNS). Random effects moderator analyses were performed for six potential moderators: drug targeted for intervention, decade in which the study was carried out, study quality, intervention duration, type of reinforcer, and form of opiate treatment. The search returned 3860 papers; 22 studies met inclusion criteria and were meta-analysed. Follow-up data was only available for three studies, so all analyses used end of treatment data. Contingency management performed significantly better than control in reducing drug use measured using LDA (d=0.57, 95% CI: 0.42-0.72) or PNS (d=0.41) (95% CI: 0.28-0.54). This was true for all drugs other than opiates. The only significant moderator was drug targeted (LDA: Q=10.75, p=0.03). Contingency management appears to be efficacious for treating most drug use during treatment for opiate addiction. Further research is required to ascertain the full effects of moderating variables, and longer term effects. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Drug-drug interactions with sodium-glucose cotransporters type 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors, new oral glucose-lowering agents for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheen, André J

    2014-04-01

    Inhibitors of sodium-glucose cotransporters type 2 (SGLT2) reduce hyperglycaemia by decreasing renal glucose threshold and thereby increasing urinary glucose excretion. They are proposed as a novel approach for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus. They have proven their efficacy in reducing glycated haemoglobin, without inducing hypoglycaemia, as monotherapy or in combination with various other glucose-lowering agents, with the add-on value of promoting some weight loss and lowering arterial blood pressure. As they may be used concomitantly with many other drugs, we review the potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs) regarding the three leaders in the class (dapagliglozin, canagliflozin and empagliflozin). Most of the available studies were performed in healthy volunteers and have assessed the pharmacokinetic interferences with a single administration of the SGLT2 inhibitor. The exposure [assessed by peak plasma concentrations (Cmax) and area under the concentration-time curve (AUC)] to each SGLT2 inhibitor tested was not significantly influenced by the concomitant administration of other glucose-lowering agents or cardiovascular agents commonly used in patients with type 2 diabetes. Reciprocally, these medications did not influence the pharmacokinetic parameters of dapagliflozin, canagliflozin or empagliflozin. Some modest changes were not considered as clinically relevant. However, drugs that could specifically interfere with the metabolic pathways of SGLT2 inhibitors [rifampicin, inhibitors or inducers of uridine diphosphate-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT)] may result in significant changes in the exposure of SGLT2 inhibitors, as shown for dapagliflozin and canagliflozin. Potential DDIs in patients with type 2 diabetes receiving chronic treatment with an SGLT2 inhibitor deserve further attention, especially in individuals treated with several medications or in more fragile patients with hepatic and/or renal impairment.

  14. Drug Release Studies from Caesalpinia pulcherrima Seed Polysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeevanandham, Somasundaram; Dhachinamoorthi, Duraiswamy; Bannoth Chandra Sekhar, Kothapalli

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the controlled release behavior of both water-soluble (acetaminophen, caffeine, theophylline and salicylic acid) and water insoluble (indomethacin) drugs derived from Caesalpinia pulcherrima seed Gum isolated from Caesalpinia pulcherrima kernel powder. It further investigates the effect of incorporating diluents such as microcrystalline cellulose and lactose on caffeine release. In addition the effect the gum's (polysaccharide) partial cross-linking had on release of acetaminophen was examined. Applying the exponential equation, the soluble drugs mechanism of release was found to be anomalous. The insoluble drugs showed a near case II or zero order release mechanism. The rate of release in descending order was caffeine, acetaminophen, theophylline, salicylic acid and indomethacin. An increase in the release kinetics of the drug was observed on blending with diluents. However, the rate of release varied with the type and amount of blend within the matrix. The mechanism of release due to effect of diluents was found to be anomalous. The rate of drug release decreased upon partial cross-linking and the mechanism of release was found to be of super case II.

  15. Direct costs of managing adverse drug reactions during rifampicin-resistant tuberculosis treatment in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnippel, K; Firnhaber, C; Berhanu, R; Page-Shipp, L; Sinanovic, E

    2018-04-01

    To estimate the provider costs of managing adverse drug reactions (ADRs) to standard long-course treatment for multidrug- and rifampicin-resistant tuberculosis (MDR/RR-TB) according to South African guidelines. We parameterised a published Markov health state model for MDR/RR-TB with guidelines-based, bottom-up public-sector provider costing of ADR management. Frequency of ADR occurrence was extracted from the literature. Costs were estimated over 10 years, discounted 3% annually and tested using probabilistic sensitivity analysis. On average, guidelines-based costing of moderate ADRs weighted by the frequency of occurrence was US$135.76 (standard deviation [SD] US$17.18) and the cost of serious ADRs was US$521.29 (SD US$55.99). We estimated that the incremental costs of ADR management were US$380.17 annually per patient initiating MDR/RR-TB treatment. The incremental costs of ADR management for the public health sector in South Africa was US$4.76 million, 8.3% of the estimated cohort costs of MDR/RR-TB treatment ($57.55 million) for the 2015 cohort of 12 527 patients. Management of multiple ADRs and serious ADRs, which are common during the first 6 months of standard, long-course MDR/RR-TB treatment, substantially increases provider treatment costs. These results need to be taken into account when comparing regimen costs, and highlight the urgent need to identify drug regimens with improved safety profiles.

  16. Optimizing urine drug testing for monitoring medication compliance in pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melanson, Stacy E F; Ptolemy, Adam S; Wasan, Ajay D

    2013-12-01

    It can be challenging to successfully monitor medication compliance in pain management. Clinicians and laboratorians need to collaborate to optimize patient care and maximize operational efficiency. The test menu, assay cutoffs, and testing algorithms utilized in the urine drug testing panels should be periodically reviewed and tailored to the patient population to effectively assess compliance and avoid unnecessary testing and cost to the patient. Pain management and pathology collaborated on an important quality improvement initiative to optimize urine drug testing for monitoring medication compliance in pain management. We retrospectively reviewed 18 months of data from our pain management center. We gathered data on test volumes, positivity rates, and the frequency of false positive results. We also reviewed the clinical utility of our testing algorithms, assay cutoffs, and adulterant panel. In addition, the cost of each component was calculated. The positivity rate for ethanol and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine were us to optimize our testing panel for monitoring medication compliance in pain management and reduce cost. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Novel drugs in the management of acute mountain sickness and high altitude pulmonary edema

    OpenAIRE

    Gaurav Sikri, Gaurav; Bhattacharya,Anirban

    2015-01-01

    Gaurav Sikri, Anirban Bhattacharya Department of Physiology, Armed Forces Medical College, Wanowarie, Pune, IndiaWe read with great interest the review article titled “Wilderness medicine at high altitude: recent developments in the field” by Shah et al.1 The authors have comprehensively summarized the recent advances in the field of high altitude medicine relevant to sports and travel medicine. However, Shah et al have described potential drugs for management of high-alti...

  18. [Drug interactions and their management in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabarcos Ortíz de Barrón, A; Martínez Vázquez, J M; Lorenzo Zúñiga, V; Barrio Gómez, E

    1998-03-01

    In fact patients with human immune deficiency virus infection are in treatment with multidrugs regimen, also in antiretrovirical therapy as profilaxis and treatment opportunist infections and other problems, in other fact the high tase of intravenous drugs users in meta-done programming (one of the principal transmission cause). Consequently is necessary an rational approximation to this problem also in the deepth knowledgment of his mechanisms and his management in the daily clinical practice.

  19. Drug induced xerostomia in elderly individuals: An institutional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shishir Ram Shetty

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : With better health care facilities and nutritional levels the average life expectancy of Indian population has been on the rise over the years. Most of the geriatric population is under long-term medication. Aim : The aim of this study was to evaluate the synergistic effect of multiple xerostomia drugs. Materials and Methods : Unstimulated saliva was measured in 60 geriatric patients, and xerostomia questionnaire and quality-of-life scale were also administered. Results : There was a very highly significant reduction in the salivary flow rates of patients under multiple xerostomia-inducing drugs. Conclusion : The synergistic effect of the xerostomia inducing medication could be the possible factor responsible for reduced salivary flow in elderly individuals using such drugs

  20. Drug Taking Beliefs of Australian Adolescents: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrzypiec, Grace; Owens, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    In this study adolescents offered their insights and perspectives of factors associated with adolescent illicit drug taking intentions. The factors explored were identified using a cross-disciplinary approach involving the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) and criminological theories, and these formed the framework for data analysis. Interviews…

  1. Depoliticising the political: Market solutions and the retreat of Swedish institutional drug treatment from state management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edman, Johan

    2016-06-01

    This article examines developments in the Swedish drug treatment services in 1982-2000 and explores the ways in which political initiatives and the state administration's management have contributed to the major privatisations of institutional drug treatment during this period. The empirical basis for the textual analysis lies in official reports, parliamentary material and archived records from the Stockholm County Administrative Board's management of treatment facilities. The major privatisations of drug treatment services in the 1980s were both unintentional and unwanted and mainly arose from a lack of bureaucratic control and ideological anchorage. The privatisations were, however, reinforced by ideologically driven NPM-oriented political initiatives in the 1990s. The market-oriented treatment services have failed to fulfil the needs for diversity and availability within a publicly financed sector, which deals with unevenly informed and often socio-economically weak citizens. New management models in this field must ensure that ideological considerations are taken into account to meet politically decided goals and means. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Identification and initial management of intoxication by alcohol and other drugs in the pediatric emergency room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Gatti Pianca

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To review the screening, diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of intoxication by alcohol and other drugs in children and adolescents in the emergency scenario. Data source: This was a narrative literature review. Data summary: The detection of this problem in the emergency room can be a challenge, especially when its assessment is not standardized. The intentional and episodic use of large amounts of psychoactive substances by adolescents is a usual occurrence, and unintentional intoxication is more common in children younger than 12 years. The clinical picture in adolescents and children differs from that in adults and some particularities are important in the emergency scenario. After management of the acute condition, interventions targeting the adolescent at risk may be effective. Conclusion: The diagnosis and treatment of intoxication by alcohol and other drugs in adolescents and children in the emergency scenario requires a systematic evaluation of the use of these drugs. There are few specific treatments for intoxication, and the management comprehends support measures and management of related clinical complications.

  3. Identification and initial management of intoxication by alcohol and other drugs in the pediatric emergency room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pianca, Thiago Gatti; Sordi, Anne Orgle; Hartmann, Thiago Casarin; von Diemen, Lisia

    To review the screening, diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of intoxication by alcohol and other drugs in children and adolescents in the emergency scenario. This was a narrative literature review. The detection of this problem in the emergency room can be a challenge, especially when its assessment is not standardized. The intentional and episodic use of large amounts of psychoactive substances by adolescents is a usual occurrence, and unintentional intoxication is more common in children younger than 12 years. The clinical picture in adolescents and children differs from that in adults and some particularities are important in the emergency scenario. After management of the acute condition, interventions targeting the adolescent at risk may be effective. The diagnosis and treatment of intoxication by alcohol and other drugs in adolescents and children in the emergency scenario requires a systematic evaluation of the use of these drugs. There are few specific treatments for intoxication, and the management comprehends support measures and management of related clinical complications. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  4. Drug-resistant tuberculosis: Study of clinical practices of chest physicians, Maharashtra, India

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    Yatin Dholakia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients suffering from drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR TB avail of private care since Programmatic Management of DR TB (PMDT is not universally available in India. Management of DR TB is challenging and involves great expertise. Chest physicians (CPs play a major role in this area. The study was undertaken with the objective to see whether the practices of CPs comply with current guidelines and to identify areas where they could be involved to improve access to PMDT. Materials and Methods : For this cross-sectional study, CPs from Mumbai and Nagpur, Maharashtra, India, were given pretested questionnaires to be filled in and returned. Observations : Of 70 enlisted CPs, 29 (41% responded. Twenty-six (89% respondents used the drug susceptibility test (DST for diagnosis: private labs and hospitals were preferred; 9 (31% used standard treatment, 15 (51% switched to individual treatment after starting standard therapy and 12 (41% started empirical treatment later switched to individual treatment as per the WHO guidelines. Seven consultants (10% used in addition drugs from alternative systems of medicine for immune modulation and adverse drug effects. Eighty-six per cent CPs monitored treatment by smear examination, 51% by culture and 93% used X-rays. Reported case holding in the form of regular follow-up consultation visits was around 70%, treatment success estimated to be between 30% and 70%, and deaths around 30%. Adverse drug reactions were reported in around 30% cases. Conclusion : This study shows that most private CPs generally comply with current guidelines for management of DR TB. Accreditation of private labs for DST, involving CPs in diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of patients through public private partnerships can improve access to PMDT.

  5. Marketed drugs used for the management of hypercholesterolemia as anticancer armament

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    Papanagnou P

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Panagiota Papanagnou,1 Theodora Stivarou,2 Ioannis Papageorgiou,1 Georgios E Papadopoulos,3 Anastasios Pappas1 1Department of Urology, Agios Savvas Cancer Hospital, Athens, Greece; 2Immunology Laboratory, Immunology Department, Hellenic Pasteur Institute, Athens, Greece; 3Department of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, University of Thessaly, Larissa, Greece Abstract: The design of novel pharmacologic agents as well as their approval for sale in markets all over the world is a tedious and pricey process. Inevitably, oncologic patients commonly experience unwanted effects of new anticancer drugs, while the acquisition of clinical experience for these drugs is largely based on doctor–patient partnership which is not always effective. The repositioning of marketed non-antineoplastic drugs that hopefully exhibit anticancer properties into the field of oncology is a challenging option that gains ground and attracts preclinical and clinical research in an effort to override all these hindrances and minimize the risk for reduced efficacy and/or personalized toxicity. This review aims to present the anticancer properties of drugs used for the management of hypercholesterolemia. A global view of the antitumorigenicity of all marketed antihypercholesterolemic drugs is of major importance, given that atherosclerosis, which is etiologically linked to hypercholesterolemia, is a leading worldwide cause of morbidity and mortality, while hypercholesterolemia and tumorigenesis are known to be interrelated. In vitro, in vivo and clinical literature data accumulated so far outline the mechanistic basis of the antitumor function of these agents and how they could find application at the clinical setting. Keywords: antihypercholesterolemic agents, cancer, synergism, repurposing

  6. Procurement and Supply Management System for MDR-TB in Nigeria: Are the Early Warning Targets for Drug Stock Outs and Over Stock of Drugs Being Achieved?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jatau, Bolajoko; Avong, Yohanna; Ogundahunsi, Olumide; Shah, Safieh; Tayler Smith, Katherine; Van den Bergh, Rafael; Zachariah, Rony; van Griensven, Johan; Ekong, Ernest; Dakum, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The World Health Organisation (WHO) introduced the twelve early warning indicators for monitoring and evaluating drug Procurement and Supply management (PSM) systems, intended to prevent drug stock-outs and overstocking. Nigeria--one of the high Multi Drug Resistant Tuberculosis (MDR-TB) burden countries, scaled-up treatment in 2012 with the concurrent implementation of a PSM system. We evaluated how well this system functioned using the WHO indicators, including all seven MDR-TB treatment centres in the country that were functional throughout 2013. The quantity of MDR-TB drugs ordered for 2013 matched the annual forecast and all central orders placed during the year were delivered in full and on time. Drug consumption was 81%-106% of the quantity allocated for routine consumption. Timely submission of complete inventory reports ranged from 86-100%, late submissions being 5-15 days late. Forty to 71% of treatment centres placed a drug order when stock was below the minimum level of three months. The proportion of drug orders received at the treatment centres in full and on time ranged from 29-80%, late orders being 1-19 days late. The PSM was found to be performing well in terms of forecasting and procurement of MDR-TB drugs, but there were shortcomings in drug distribution, reporting at treatment centre level and in drug order placements. Despite these gaps, there were no stock outs. These findings indicate that where it matters most, namely ensuring that no drug stock outs affect patient management, the PSM system is effective. Addressing the observed shortcomings will help to strengthen the existing PSM system in anticipation of a growing MDR-TB case burden in the country.

  7. [Guidance of FDA risk evaluation and mitigation strategy and enlightenment to drug risk management of post-marketing Chinese medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanyuan; Xie, Yanming

    2011-10-01

    The FDA risk evaluation and mitigation strategy (REMS) aims to drugs or biological products known or potential serious risk management. Analysis with the example of the content of the Onsolis REMS named FOCOS. Our country can be reference for the analysis of relevant experience and establish a scientific evaluation mechanism, strengthen the drug risk consciousness, promote the rational drug use, organic combined with the before-marketing and post-marketing evaluation of traditional Chinese medicine, and promote the evaluation of risk management of the drug development and improvement.

  8. Biomembrane models and drug-biomembrane interaction studies: Involvement in drug design and development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Pignatello

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Contact with many different biological membranes goes along the destiny of a drug after its systemic administration. From the circulating macrophage cells to the vessel endothelium, to more complex absorption barriers, the interaction of a biomolecule with these membranes largely affects its rate and time of biodistribution in the body and at the target sites. Therefore, investigating the phenomena occurring on the cell membranes, as well as their different interaction with drugs in the physiological or pathological conditions, is important to exploit the molecular basis of many diseases and to identify new potential therapeutic strategies. Of course, the complexity of the structure and functions of biological and cell membranes, has pushed researchers toward the proposition and validation of simpler two- and three-dimensional membrane models, whose utility and drawbacks will be discussed. This review also describes the analytical methods used to look at the interactions among bioactive compounds with biological membrane models, with a particular accent on the calorimetric techniques. These studies can be considered as a powerful tool for medicinal chemistry and pharmaceutical technology, in the steps of designing new drugs and optimizing the activity and safety profile of compounds already used in the therapy.

  9. Role of reflexology and antiepileptic drugs in managing intractable epilepsy--a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalal, Krishna; Devarajan, Elanchezhiyan; Pandey, Ravindra Mohan; Subbiah, Vivekanandan; Tripathi, Manjari

    2013-01-01

    This report is based on the results of a randomized parallel controlled trial conducted to determine the efficacy of reflexology therapy in managing intractable epilepsy. Subjects who failed epilepsy surgery or were not candidates for epilepsy surgery or were non-responders of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) took part in this study. The trial was completed by 77 subjects randomly assigned to 2 arms: control (AEDs) and reflexology (AEDs + reflexology therapy). The hypothesis was that hand reflexology therapy could produce results similar to those of vagus nerve stimulation, and foot reflexology therapy could maintain homeostasis in the functional status of individual body parts. Reflexology therapy was applied by family members. The follow-up period was 1.5 years. Quality of life in epilepsy patients was assessed with the QOLIE-31 instrument. In the reflexology group, the median baseline seizure frequency decreased from 9.5 (range 2-120) to 2 (range 0-110) with statistical significance (p reflexology group were 41.05 ± 7 and 43.6 ± 8, respectively. Posttherapy data were 49.07 ± 6 and 65.4 ± 9, respectively (p reflexology method allowed detection of knee pain in 85% of the reflexology group patients (p reflexology group patients reported nausea/vomiting (n = 1), change in voice (n = 2), and hoarseness (n = 1). Reflexology therapy together with AEDs may help reducing seizure frequency and improving quality of life in individuals with epilepsy. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Interface management of pharmacotherapy. Joint hospital and primary care drug recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björkhem-Bergman, Linda; Andersén-Karlsson, Eva; Laing, Richard; Diogene, Eduardo; Melien, Oyvind; Jirlow, Malena; Malmström, Rickard E; Vogler, Sabine; Godman, Brian; Gustafsson, Lars L

    2013-05-01

    In September 2012 an interactive course on the "Interface Management of Pharmacotherapy" was organized by the Stockholm Drug and Therapeutics Committee in cooperation with Department of Clinical Pharmacology at Karolinska Institutet and at Karolinska University Hospital in Stockholm, Sweden, in collaboration with the WHO. The basis for the course was the "Stockholm model" for the rational use of medicines but also contained presentations about successful models in interface management of pharmacotherapy in other European countries. The "Stockholm model" consists of 8 components: 1) Independent Drug and Therapeutics Committee with key role for respected drug experts with policy for "interest of conflicts", 2) The "Wise List", recommendations of medicines jointly for primary and hospital care, 3) Communication strategy with continuous medical education, 4) Systematic introduction of new expensive medicines, 5) E-pharmacological support at "point of care", 6) Methods and tools for follow-up of medicines use, 7) Medicines policy strategy and 8) Operative resources. The course highlighted the importance of efficient and targeted communication of drug recommendations building on trust among prescribers and patients for the guidelines to achieve high adherence. Trust is achieved by independent Drug and Therapeutics Committees with a key role for respected experts and a strict policy for "conflicts of interest". Representations of GPs are also crucial for successful implementation, being the link between evidence based medicine and practice. The successful models in Scotland and in Stockholm as well as the ongoing work in Catalonia were considered as examples of multifaceted approaches to improve the quality of medicine use across primary and hospital care.

  11. Multiple comparisons in drug efficacy studies: scientific or marketing principles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leo, Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    When researchers design an experiment to compare a given medication to another medication, a behavioral therapy, or a placebo, the experiment often involves numerous comparisons. For instance, there may be several different evaluation methods, raters, and time points. Although scientifically justified, such comparisons can be abused in the interests of drug marketing. This article provides two recent examples of such questionable practices. The first involves the case of the arthritis drug celecoxib (Celebrex), where the study lasted 12 months but the authors only presented 6 months of data. The second case involves the NIMH Multimodal Treatment Study (MTA) study evaluating the efficacy of stimulant medication for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder where ratings made by several groups are reported in contradictory fashion. The MTA authors have not clarified the confusion, at least in print, suggesting that the actual findings of the study may have played little role in the authors' reported conclusions.

  12. Pharmacists' advancing roles in drug and disease management: a review of states' legislation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKnight, Alicia G; Thomason, Angela R

    2009-01-01

    To determine which states in the United States have provisions in place for pharmacist participation in drug and disease management programs and/or collaborative practice agreements and to provide comparison and discussion regarding such provisions. A secondary endpoint was the requirements of certification, credentialing, and registration with the specific state's rules and regulations. Information was gathered from states' statutes, rules, and regulations. Acquisition of each state's laws was achieved through various forms of electronic media. Data were accessed from January to March 2008. 19 states (38%) had specific provisions for disease management, 33 (66%) had provisions for drug therapy management, and 37 (74%) had provisions for collaborative practice. A total of 11 states (22%) specified that pharmacists receive specialized training to participate in such endeavors. Board approval or notification for collaborative practice agreements was required in 16 states (32%). With varying degrees of autonomy and restriction, pharmacists in certain states have the ability to develop disease management and/or collaborative practice programs. For pharmacists to take advantage of these new direct patient care opportunities, knowing the rules and requirements of their state's legislation is essential.

  13. Severe idiosyncratic drug reactions with epidermal necrolysis: A 5-year study

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    I O Fadeyibi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Idiosyncratic drug reactions (IDRs are unexpected responses to a drug. The spectrums of severe cutaneous reactions include Stevens-Johnson Syndrome (SJS, SJS/Lyell Syndrome and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis (TEN. The conditions are associated with high mortality. This study was designed to determine the causal agents, patterns of presentations, review the management and make recommendations to reduce the incidence and mortality of this class of drug reactions. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study was made of patients seen with IDR in the Lagos State University Teaching Hospital, LASUTH, between January, 2004 and December, 2008. They were cases admitted with bullous skin eruptions with associated systemic symptoms. Results: Sixty-seven patients were seen, with 45 (67.2% satisfying the inclusion criteria. Fifteen males and 30 females were involved, giving a male to female (M:F ratio of 1:2. Their ages ranged from 7 to 79 years (mean, 40.02 ± 17.89 years. Peak incidences occurred among the 20-24 and 30-34 year age groups. The causal agents were antibiotics (48.89%, sulphonamides (24.44%, herbal preparations (17.78% and artemisinin drugs (8.89%. Conclusions: The age groups with the peak incidence are the most likely to indulge more in drug abuse in environments with poor drug control. Diagnosis of SJS, SJS/TEN and TEN were missed in many patients at first contact due to the progressive nature of the conditions. Patients needed reviews at regular intervals when IDR was suspected. Health education to prevent drug abuse is important and herbal preparations should be scientifically studied to determine the efficacy and side-effects.

  14. Pharmacokinetic equivalence study of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug etoricoxib

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    Tjandrawinata RR

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Raymond R Tjandrawinata,1 Arini Setiawati,2 Dwi Nofiarny,1 Liana W Susanto,1 Effi Setiawati3 1Dexa Laboratories of Biomolecular Sciences Unit, Dexa Medica Group, Cikarang, West Java, Indonesia; 2Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Medical Faculty, University of Indonesia, Jakarta, Indonesia; 3Bioavailability and Bioequivalence Laboratory Unit, PT Equilab International, Jakarta, Indonesia Purpose: The current study aimed to evaluate whether a generic product of etoricoxib 120 mg film-coated tablet (the test drug was bioequivalent to the reference product (Arcoxia® film-coated tablet 120 mg.Methods: This was a randomized, open-label, two-sequence, crossover study under fasting condition, with a 14-day washout period, involving 26 healthy adult male and female subjects. Blood samples were taken and analyzed for plasma concentrations of etoricoxib (Chemical Abstracts Service [CAS] 202409-33-4 using a high-pressure liquid chromatography–ultraviolet detector (HPLC-UV system capable of measuring etoricoxib concentrations ranging from 5.00 to 5002.90 ng/mL, with the lowest limit of quantitation of 5.00 ng/mL. A noncompartmental method was used to determine the pharmacokinetic parameters of a single-dose administration of the drug, including the area under plasma concentration–time curve from time zero to the time of last observed concentration (AUC0-t, the area under plasma concentration–time curve from time zero to infinity (AUC0-∞, the maximum plasma concentration (Cmax, the time to reach the maximum plasma concentration (tmax, and the terminal half-life (t½.Results: After a single-dose administration of etoricoxib 120 mg film-coated tablet, the mean (SD values for the AUC0-72h and Cmax of the test drug were 45913.42 (13142.19 ng·h/mL and 3155.93 (752.81 ng/mL, respectively; the values for the reference drug were 44577.20 (13541.85 ng⋅h/mL and 2915.13 (772.81 ng/mL, respectively. The geometric mean ratios (90% CIs of the test

  15. How might schools influence young people's drug use? Development of theory from qualitative case-study research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Adam; Bonell, Chris; Sorhaindo, Annik; Strange, Vicki

    2009-08-01

    To explore young people's experiences of school and drug use, generate hypotheses regarding the pathways through which schools may influence students' drug use, and examine how these may vary according to students' sociodemographic characteristics. Qualitative data were collected through semistructured interviews with 30 students (aged 14-15) and 10 teachers in two case-study schools. Students were purposively sampled to encompass variations in socioeconomic status, gender, ethnicity, and school engagement. Techniques associated with thematic content analysis and grounded theory were used to analyze the data and generate hypotheses. Three potential pathways via which school effects on drug use may occur were identified: (1) peer-group sorting and drug use as a source of identity and bonding among students who are disconnected from the main institutional markers of status; (2) students' desire to "fit in" at schools perceived to be unsafe and drug use facilitating this; and/or (3) drug use as a strategy to manage anxieties about school work and escape unhappiness at schools lacking effective social support systems. Various pathways may plausibly underlie school effects on drug use. These support the idea of "whole-school" interventions to reduce drug use through: recognizing students' varied achievements and promoting a sense of belonging, reducing bullying and aggression, and providing additional social support for students. Such interventions should be piloted and evaluated in a range of settings to examine effects on students' drug use. Broader policies relating to secondary school targets, curricula, assessment, and streaming may also influence rates of adolescent drug use.

  16. Integration of Biosensors and Drug Delivery Technologies for Early Detection and Chronic Management of Illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viness Pillay

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in biosensor design and sensing efficacy need to be amalgamated with research in responsive drug delivery systems for building superior health or illness regimes and ensuring good patient compliance. A variety of illnesses require continuous monitoring in order to have efficient illness intervention. Physicochemical changes in the body can signify the occurrence of an illness before it manifests. Even with the usage of sensors that allow diagnosis and prognosis of the illness, medical intervention still has its downfalls. Late detection of illness can reduce the efficacy of therapeutics. Furthermore, the conventional modes of treatment can cause side-effects such as tissue damage (chemotherapy and rhabdomyolysis and induce other forms of illness (hepatotoxicity. The use of drug delivery systems enables the lowering of side-effects with subsequent improvement in patient compliance. Chronic illnesses require continuous monitoring and medical intervention for efficient treatment to be achieved. Therefore, designing a responsive system that will reciprocate to the physicochemical changes may offer superior therapeutic activity. In this respect, integration of biosensors and drug delivery is a proficient approach and requires designing an implantable system that has a closed loop system. This offers regulation of the changes by means of releasing a therapeutic agent whenever illness biomarkers prevail. Proper selection of biomarkers is vital as this is key for diagnosis and a stimulation factor for responsive drug delivery. By detecting an illness before it manifests by means of biomarkers levels, therapeutic dosing would relate to the severity of such changes. In this review various biosensors and drug delivery systems are discussed in order to assess the challenges and future perspectives of integrating biosensors and drug delivery systems for detection and management of chronic illness.

  17. Bioresorbable polymer coated drug eluting stent: a model study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Filippo; Casalini, Tommaso; Raffa, Edoardo; Masi, Maurizio; Perale, Giuseppe

    2012-07-02

    In drug eluting stent technologies, an increased demand for better control, higher reliability, and enhanced performances of drug delivery systems emerged in the last years and thus offered the opportunity to introduce model-based approaches aimed to overcome the remarkable limits of trial-and-error methods. In this context a mathematical model was studied, based on detailed conservation equations and taking into account the main physical-chemical mechanisms involved in polymeric coating degradation, drug release, and restenosis inhibition. It allowed highlighting the interdependence between factors affecting each of these phenomena and, in particular, the influence of stent design parameters on drug antirestenotic efficacy. Therefore, the here-proposed model is aimed to simulate the diffusional release, for both in vitro and the in vivo conditions: results were verified against various literature data, confirming the reliability of the parameter estimation procedure. The hierarchical structure of this model also allows easily modifying the set of equations describing restenosis evolution to enhance model reliability and taking advantage of the deep understanding of physiological mechanisms governing the different stages of smooth muscle cell growth and proliferation. In addition, thanks to its simplicity and to the very low system requirements and central processing unit (CPU) time, our model allows obtaining immediate views of system behavior.

  18. Drug-induced acute interstitial nephritis: A clinicopathological study and comparative trial of steroid regimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Ramachandran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Steroids are used in the management of drug-induced acute interstitial nephritis (AIN. The present study was undertaken to compare the efficacy of pulse methyl prednisolone with oral prednisolone in the treatment of drug-induced AIN. Patients with biopsy-proven AIN with a history of drug intake were randomized to oral prednisolone (Group 1 1 mg/kg for 3 weeks or a pulse methyl prednisolone (Group II 30 mg/kg for 3 days followed by oral prednisolone 1 mg/kg for 2 weeks, tapered over 3 weeks. Kidney biopsy scoring was done for interstitial edema, infiltration and tubular damage. The response was reported as complete remission (CR (improvement in estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] to ≥60 ml/min/1.73 m 2 , partial remission (PR (improvement but eGFR <60 ml/min/1.73 m 2 or resistance (no CR/PR. A total of 29 patients, Group I: 16 and Group II: 13 were studied. Offending drugs included nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, herbal drugs, antibiotics, diuretic, rifampicin and omeprazole. There was no difference in the baseline parameters between the two groups. The biopsy score in Groups I and II was 5.9 ΁ 1.1 and 5.1 ΁ 1.2, respectively. At 3 months in Group I, eight patients each (50% achieved CR and PR. In Group II, 8 (61% achieved CR and 5 (39% PR. This was not significantly different. Percentage fall in serum creatinine at 1 week (56% was higher in CR as compared to (42% those with PR. ( P = 0.14. Patients with neutrophil infiltration had higher CR compared to patients with no neutrophil infiltration ( P = 0.01. Early steroid therapy, both oral and pulse steroid, is equally effective in achieving remission in drug-induced AIN.

  19. Information Management in Communication Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Alemany, Dolores

    2011-01-01

    An introduction to the concept of Information Management. Its close relation to other disciplines, the tasks it covers and its impact in Information Society. Digital citizens and Information Literacy.

  20. Non-medical use of prescription drugs among illicit drug users: A case study on an online drug forum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rönkä, Sanna; Katainen, Anu

    2017-01-01

    The non-medical use of prescription drugs is a growing phenomenon associated with increasing health-related harms. However, little is known about the drivers of this process among illicit drug users. Our aim is to show how the qualities of pharmaceutical drugs, pharmaceutical related knowledge, online communities sharing this knowledge and medical professionals mediate and transform the consumption behaviour related to pharmaceutical drugs. The data consist of discussion threads from an online drug use forum. Using actor network theory (ANT), we analysed translations that mediate the online user community's relationship with pharmaceutical drugs. Differences in experienced drug effects are explained both as a process of 'learning' and as differences in brain chemistry at the receptor level. Both science- and experience-based information are shared on best practices to optimise use, avoid adverse health effects and maximise the experience of intoxication. The expanded context of doctors' practices places stress on the medical framework for drug use. Our analysis shows how the non-medical use of psychoactive pharmaceuticals relates to joint, medicalised ideas of bodies as sites of medical experimentation, as well as to the collective process of constructing 'pharmaceutical competences' in user networks. Understandings of intoxication have increasingly been permeated with the pharmacological and scientific logic of knowledge. The forum works as a platform for harm reduction inspired exchange of knowledge. However, the user community's knowledge sharing practices can generate a shared perception of a sufficient or even superior drug use experience and knowledge. This may lead to overdoses and other risky behaviour, and thereby contribute to increased harms related to non-medical use of prescription drugs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Study of industry safety management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Pil Su

    1987-06-01

    This book deals with general remarks, industrial accidents, statistics of industrial accidents, unsafe actions, making machinery and facilities safe, safe activities, having working environment safe, survey of industrial accidents and analysis of causes, system of safety management and operations, safety management planning, safety education, human engineering such as human-machines system, system safety, and costs of disaster losses. It lastly adds individual protective equipment and working clothes including protect equipment for eyes, face, hands, arms and feet.

  2. Electrochemical studies of ropinirole, an anti-Parkinson's disease drug

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    trochemical techniques have application to drug-protein. ∗. For correspondence ... drug bioavailability and toxicity tests. ... analysis ranging from the assay of drugs in bulk form, ... stability-indicating assays.13,14 Separation and quantifi-.

  3. [Implementation of ontology-based clinical decision support system for management of interactions between antihypertensive drugs and diet].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeong Eun; Kim, Hwa Sun; Chang, Min Jung; Hong, Hae Sook

    2014-06-01

    The influence of dietary composition on blood pressure is an important subject in healthcare. Interactions between antihypertensive drugs and diet (IBADD) is the most important factor in the management of hypertension. It is therefore essential to support healthcare providers' decision making role in active and continuous interaction control in hypertension management. The aim of this study was to implement an ontology-based clinical decision support system (CDSS) for IBADD management (IBADDM). We considered the concepts of antihypertensive drugs and foods, and focused on the interchangeability between the database and the CDSS when providing tailored information. An ontology-based CDSS for IBADDM was implemented in eight phases: (1) determining the domain and scope of ontology, (2) reviewing existing ontology, (3) extracting and defining the concepts, (4) assigning relationships between concepts, (5) creating a conceptual map with CmapTools, (6) selecting upper ontology, (7) formally representing the ontology with Protégé (ver.4.3), (8) implementing an ontology-based CDSS as a JAVA prototype application. We extracted 5,926 concepts, 15 properties, and formally represented them using Protégé. An ontology-based CDSS for IBADDM was implemented and the evaluation score was 4.60 out of 5. We endeavored to map functions of a CDSS and implement an ontology-based CDSS for IBADDM.

  4. The management of cytotoxic drug wastes in Shiraz, Iran: an overview of all government and private chemotherapy settings, and comparison with national and international guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askarian, Mehrdad; Momeni, Mohsen; Danaei, Mina

    2013-06-01

    Excessive use of cytotoxic drugs owing to a dramatic increase in malignancy incidence leads to the production of high amounts of cytotoxic wastes. In Iran, management of hazardous wastes has been neglected in recent decades. The aim of this study was to determine the amount of intravenous cytotoxic drug wastes, their collection and disposal status in chemotherapy wards, and to compare the current status with standard guidelines in Shiraz, Iran. This cross-sectional study was performed using data collected during 2 consecutive months, from 22 June to 22 August 2011, in all 13 chemotherapy wards in Shiraz. The amount of prescribed drugs, drugs waste, collection and disposal status of cytotoxic drugs were recorded. We then compared the current status of waste collection and disposal in our samples with our national guideline. The prescription of cytotoxic drugs and the amount of total drugs waste reached approximately 6 and 0.2 kilograms respectively. Total vials volume was calculated to be approximately 1000 l in order to estimate the volume of containers required for the encapsulation method. The results demonstrated that the current status of cytotoxic waste collection and disposal is inappropriate, and none of the facilities under study followed our guidelines perfectly. The adherence to all recommendations and guidelines was poorer in private wards than in government-run ones. The management of cytotoxic wastes is inappropriate and our existing national guidelines are lacking. Suggestions for the best management of cytotoxic waste are revising the existing guidelines, allocating a sufficient budget, training healthcare workers, providing multiple administration options of cytotoxic drugs and accomplishing a surveillance system.

  5. Examining factors that influence the effectiveness of cleaning antineoplastic drugs from drug preparation surfaces: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hon, Chun-Yip; Chua, Prescillia Ps; Danyluk, Quinn; Astrakianakis, George

    2014-06-01

    Occupational exposure to antineoplastic drugs has been documented to result in various adverse health effects. Despite the implementation of control measures to minimize exposure, detectable levels of drug residual are still found on hospital work surfaces. Cleaning these surfaces is considered as one means to minimize the exposure potential. However, there are no consistent guiding principles related to cleaning of contaminated surfaces resulting in hospitals to adopt varying practices. As such, this pilot study sought to evaluate current cleaning protocols and identify those factors that were most effective in reducing contamination on drug preparation surfaces. Three cleaning variables were examined: (1) type of cleaning agent (CaviCide®, Phenokil II™, bleach and chlorhexidine), (2) application method of cleaning agent (directly onto surface or indirectly onto a wipe) and (3) use of isopropyl alcohol after cleaning agent application. Known concentrations of antineoplastic drugs (either methotrexate or cyclophosphamide) were placed on a stainless steel swatch and then, systematically, each of the three cleaning variables was tested. Surface wipes were collected and quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to determine the percent residual of drug remaining (with 100% being complete elimination of the drug). No one single cleaning agent proved to be effective in completely eliminating all drug contamination. The method of application had minimal effect on the amount of drug residual. In general, application of isopropyl alcohol after the use of cleaning agent further reduced the level of drug contamination although measureable levels of drug were still found in some cases.

  6. Studying illicit drug trafficking on Darknet markets: Structure and organisation from a Canadian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broséus, J; Rhumorbarbe, D; Mireault, C; Ouellette, V; Crispino, F; Décary-Hétu, D

    2016-07-01

    Cryptomarkets are online marketplaces that are part of the Dark Web and mainly devoted to the sale of illicit drugs. They combine tools to ensure anonymity of participants with the delivery of products by mail to enable the development of illicit drug trafficking. Using data collected on eight cryptomarkets, this study provides an overview of the Canadian illicit drug market. It seeks to inform about the most prevalent illicit drugs vendors offer for sale and preferred destination countries. Moreover, the research gives an insight into the structure and organisation of distribution networks existing online. In particular, we provide information about how vendors are diversifying and replicating across marketplaces. We inform on the number of listings each vendor manages, the number of cryptomarkets they are active on and the products they offer. This research demonstrates the importance of online marketplaces in the context of illicit drug trafficking. It shows how the analysis of data available online may elicit knowledge on criminal activities. Such knowledge is mandatory to design efficient policy for monitoring or repressive purposes against anonymous marketplaces. Nevertheless, trafficking on Dark Net markets is difficult to analyse based only on digital data. A more holistic approach for investigating this crime problem should be developed. This should rely on a combined use and interpretation of digital and physical data within a single collaborative intelligence model. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A way for reducing drug supply chain cost for a hospital district: A case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Postacchini, L.; Ciarapica, F.E.; Bevilacqua, M.; Mazzuto, G.; Paciarotti, C.

    2016-07-01

    This work aims at providing insights to optimise healthcare logistic of the drug management, in order to deal with the healthcare expenditure cut. In this paper the effects of different drug supply chain configurations, on the resulting average stock, service level and Bullwhip effect, of the studied supply chain, is quantitatively assessed. A case study of an Italian district has been studied, taking into account three echelons: suppliers, central stock, and hospitals. A model of the various supply chain configurations has been created with the use of the simulation. Specifically, 24 supply chain configurations have been examined, stemming from the combination of several supply chain design parameters, namely: transshipment policies (Emergency Lateral Transshipment or Total Inventory Equalization); re-order and inventory management policies (Economic Order Quantity or Economic Order Interval); required service levels (90% or 95%); the number of available vans (one or two). For each configuration, hospital average stock, service level and a “Bullwhip effect” analysis are computed. To know which input variables are statistically significant, a DoE (Design of Experiments) analysis has been executed. The output of this paper provides useful insights and suggestions to optimize the healthcare logistic and drug supply chain. According to the developed DoE analysis, it can be stated that the introduction of transshipment policies provides important improvement in terms of service and stock levels. To reduce the Bullwhip effect, which results in a service level decreasing, and in a managing stock costs increasing, it is worth to adopt an EOQ re-order policy. This research gives practical recommendations to the studied system, in order to reduce costs and maintain a very satisfactory service level. This paper fulfils an identified need to study which combination of transshipment policies, re-order/inventory management policies and required service levels, can be the

  8. Drug induced acute kidney injury: an experimental animal study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.W.A.; Khan, B.T.; Qazi, R.A.; Ashraf, M.; Waqar, M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To assess the extent of drug induced nephrotoxicity in laboratory animals for determining the role and extent of iatrogenic kidney damage in patients exposed to nephrotoxic drugs in various clinical setups. Study Design: Randomized control trail. Place and Duration of study: Pharmacology department and animal house of Army Medical College from Jan 2011 to Aug 2011. Material and Methods: Thirty six mixed breed rabbits were used in this study. Animals were randomly divided into six groups consisting of six rabbits in each. Groups were named A, B, C, D, E and F. Group A was control group. Group B was given 0.9% normal saline. Group C rabbits were given acute nephrotoxic single dose of amphotericin B deoxycholate. Group D received 0.9% normal saline 10ml/kg followed by amphotericin B infusion. Group E was injected acute nephrotoxic regimen of cyclosporine and amphotericin B infusion. Group F received saline loading along with acute nephrotoxic regimen of cyclosporine and amphotericin B infusion. Results: Biochemical and histopathological analysis showed significant kidney injury in rabbits exposed to acute nephrotoxic doses of amphotericin B and cyclosporine. Toxicity was additive when the two drugs were administered simultaneously. Group of rabbits with saline loading had significantly lesser kidney damage. Conclusion: Iatrogenic acute kidney damage is a major cause of morbidity in experimental animals exposed to such nephrotoxic drugs like amphotericin B and cyclosporine, used either alone or in combination. Clinical studies are recommended to assess the extent of iatrogenic renal damage in patients and its economic burden. Efficient and cost effective protective measure may be adopted in clinical setups against such adverse effects. (author)

  9. Drug Release Studies from Caesalpinia pulcherrima Seed Polysaccharide

    OpenAIRE

    Jeevanandham, Somasundaram; Dhachinamoorthi, Duraiswamy; Bannoth Chandra Sekhar, Kothapalli

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the controlled release behavior of both water-soluble (acetaminophen, caffeine, theophylline and salicylic acid) and water insoluble (indomethacin) drugs derived from Caesalpinia pulcherrima seed Gum isolated from Caesalpinia pulcherrima kernel powder. It further investigates the effect of incorporating diluents such as microcrystalline cellulose and lactose on caffeine release. In addition the effect the gum?s (polysaccharide) partial cross-linking had on release of aceta...

  10. Marine drugs: A hidden wealth and a new epoch for cancer management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakeel, Eram; Arora, Deepika; Jamal, Qazi Mohammad Sajid; Akhtar, Salman; Khan, Mohd Kalim Ahmad; Kamal, Mohammad A; Siddiqui, Mohd Haris; Lohani, Mohtashim; Arif, Jamal M

    2017-02-20

    Malignant tumors are the leading cause of death in humans. Due to tedious efforts and investigation made in the field of marine drug discovery, there is now a scientific bridge between marine and pharmaceutical sciences. However, at present only few marine drugs have been paved towards anticancer management, yet many more to be established. Marine organisms are profuse manufacturer of structurally inimitable bioactive metabolites that have unusual mechanisms of action and diverse biosynthetic pathways. Some of the compounds derived from marine organisms have antioxidant property and anticancer activities, but they are largely unexplored. The present review is summarising various source of marine chemicals and their exploration of anticancerous potential. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  11. Effect of quality chronic disease management for alcohol and drug dependence on addiction outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Theresa W; Saitz, Richard; Cheng, Debbie M; Winter, Michael R; Witas, Julie; Samet, Jeffrey H

    2012-12-01

    We examined the effect of the quality of primary care-based chronic disease management (CDM) for alcohol and/or other drug (AOD) dependence on addiction outcomes. We assessed quality using (1) a visit frequency based measure and (2) a self-reported assessment measuring alignment with the chronic care model. The visit frequency based measure had no significant association with addiction outcomes. The self-reported measure of care-when care was at a CDM clinic-was associated with lower drug addiction severity. The self-reported assessment of care from any healthcare source (CDM clinic or elsewhere) was associated with lower alcohol addiction severity and abstinence. These findings suggest that high quality CDM for AOD dependence may improve addiction outcomes. Quality measures based upon alignment with the chronic care model may better capture features of effective CDM care than a visit frequency measure. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Portfolio Manager Selection – A Case Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Within a delegated portfolio management setting, this paper presents a case study of how the manager selection process can be operationalized in practice. Investors have to pursue a thorough screening of potential portfolio managers in order to discover their quality, and this paper discusses how...

  13. Using anti-muscarinic drugs in the management of death rattle: evidence-based guidelines for palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Mike; Lucas, Viv; Brennan, Mary; Hughes, Andrew; O'Donnell, Valerie; Wee, Bee

    2002-09-01

    The management of 'death rattle' was reviewed by a task group on behalf of the Association for Palliative Medicine's Science Committee. Evidence was searched for the effectiveness of various anti-muscarinic drugs in drying oropharyngeal and bronchial secretions in dying patients. Clinical guidelines were constructed based on evidence from volunteer and clinical studies. Death rattle occurs in half of all dying patients and some response occurs in around 80% of treated patients. Clinical studies demonstrate that subcutaneous hyoscine hydrobromide 400 microg is more effective at improving symptoms at 30 min than glycopyrronium 200 microg by the same route. Volunteer studies demonstrate that intramuscular glycopyrronium 400 microg is as effective in drying secretions at 30 min as a dose of 200 microg given intravenously. Duration of response is shortest for hyoscine butylbromide (1 h) and longest for glycopyrronium (more than 6 h). There is insufficient evidence to support the use of one drug over another in a continuous infusion and prescribers should base decisions on different characteristics of each anti-muscarinic drug.

  14. Pharmacokinetic drug interactions with clopidogrel: updated review and risk management in combination therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang ZY

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Zhi-Yu Wang,1 Meng Chen,1 Ling-Ling Zhu,2 Lu-Shan Yu,3 Su Zeng,3 Mei-Xiang Xiang,4 Quan Zhou1 1Department of Pharmacy, 2VIP Care Ward, Division of Nursing, the Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, 3Department of Pharmaceutical Analysis and Drug Metabolism, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4Department of Cardiology, the Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province, People’s Republic of China Background: Coprescribing of clopidogrel and other drugs is common. Available reviews have addressed the drug–drug interactions (DDIs when clopidogrel is as an object drug, or focused on combination use of clopidogrel and a special class of drugs. Clinicians may still be ignorant of those DDIs when clopidogrel is a precipitant drug, the factors determining the degree of DDIs, and corresponding risk management.Methods: A literature search was performed using PubMed, MEDLINE, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library to analyze the pharmacokinetic DDIs of clopidogrel and new P2Y12 receptor inhibitors.Results: Clopidogrel affects the pharmacokinetics of cerivastatin, repaglinide, ferulic acid, sibutramine, efavirenz, and omeprazole. Low efficacy of clopidogrel is anticipated in the presence of omeprazole, esomeprazole, morphine, grapefruit juice, scutellarin, fluoxetine, azole antifungals, calcium channel blockers, sulfonylureas, and ritonavir. Augmented antiplatelet effects are anticipated when clopidogrel is coprescribed with aspirin, curcumin, cyclosporin, St John’s wort, rifampicin, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. The factors determining the degree of DDIs with clopidogrel include genetic status (eg, cytochrome P540 [CYP]2B6*6, CYP2C19 polymorphism, CYP3A5*3, CYP3A4*1G, and CYP1A2-163C>A, species differences, and dose strength. The DDI risk does not exhibit a class effect, eg, the effects of clopidogrel on cerivastatin versus other statins, the effects of proton pump

  15. Study of International Standards of Risk Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dykan Volodymyr L.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the article lies in the study of existing international standards of risk management, an important factor of improvement of risk management in domestic corporations and enterprises and development of recommendations on application of international standards in Ukraine, in particular, within the framework of building corporate systems of risk management. The conducted study shows that approaches on organisation of the process of risk management, used in standards of risk management, are of general character and differ with the degree of detailing. Their undoubted value in development of risk management in Ukraine is identification of a general direction of building corporate systems of risk management in practice. The said approaches at the national and corporate levels of standardisation in Ukraine within the framework of building corporate systems of risk management would allow improvement of risk management in corporations and enterprises. The prospect of further studies of domestic specialists in the field of risk management is development of the domestic standard of risk management with consideration of modern domestic specific features of development of risk management in Ukraine and leading foreign experience.

  16. Accidental drug deaths in Fulton County, Georgia, 2002: characteristics, case management and certification issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Jason K; Hanzlick, Randy

    2008-09-01

    Historically, the duty of the medical examiner in assigning cause and manner of death in drug-related death cases has been fraught with controversial challenges. The lack of standardization in certifying drug-related deaths may involve differences among practicing forensic pathologists in their approach to such cases. The central objectives of the present study include characterization of current drug death patterns and the variability among medical examiners with respect to autopsy performance and death certification practices in one county medical examiner's office. Death certificates, scene information/investigative reports, autopsy reports, and toxicological laboratory results for each of the 100 cases of drug-related death occurring in 2002 in Fulton County, Georgia were reviewed. Comparison of overall autopsy rates and autopsy rates in drug-related death cases for each medical examiner individually and for the group collectively was performed. In examining cocaine-related deaths (most common), statistical analysis was performed for comparison of drug concentrations (cocaine and benzoylecgonine) between deaths certified as cocaine toxicity (poisoning) versus cocaine-complicating disease or causing an adverse event such as cerebral hemorrhage. Causes of accidental drug deaths included cocaine 40%, mixed drug intoxication 37%, opioids 10%, ethanol 7%, and prescription medication (nonopioid) 5%. Overall total autopsy rates in 2002 for each of the 6 independent medical examiners ranged from 51% to 69% (mean 64%), whereas autopsy rates in drug-related death ranged from 55% to 91% (mean 81%). In review of the subset of 40 cocaine-related deaths, 25% were certified as cocaine toxicity (poisoning), with the remaining 75% certified as cocaine-complicating disease or causing and adverse event. Autopsy rates in cocaine-related deaths were as follows: cocaine toxicity 80%, cocaine-complicating disease 77.3%, and cocaine causing adverse event 62.5%. Thirty-eight percent of

  17. Individualized drug dosing using RBF-Galerkin method: Case of anemia management in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirinejad, Hossein; Gaweda, Adam E; Brier, Michael E; Zurada, Jacek M; Inanc, Tamer

    2017-09-01

    Anemia is a common comorbidity in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is frequently associated with decreased physical component of quality of life, as well as adverse cardiovascular events. Current treatment methods for renal anemia are mostly population-based approaches treating individual patients with a one-size-fits-all model. However, FDA recommendations stipulate individualized anemia treatment with precise control of the hemoglobin concentration and minimal drug utilization. In accordance with these recommendations, this work presents an individualized drug dosing approach to anemia management by leveraging the theory of optimal control. A Multiple Receding Horizon Control (MRHC) approach based on the RBF-Galerkin optimization method is proposed for individualized anemia management in CKD patients. Recently developed by the authors, the RBF-Galerkin method uses the radial basis function approximation along with the Galerkin error projection to solve constrained optimal control problems numerically. The proposed approach is applied to generate optimal dosing recommendations for individual patients. Performance of the proposed approach (MRHC) is compared in silico to that of a population-based anemia management protocol and an individualized multiple model predictive control method for two case scenarios: hemoglobin measurement with and without observational errors. In silico comparison indicates that hemoglobin concentration with MRHC method has less variation among the methods, especially in presence of measurement errors. In addition, the average achieved hemoglobin level from the MRHC is significantly closer to the target hemoglobin than that of the other two methods, according to the analysis of variance (ANOVA) statistical test. Furthermore, drug dosages recommended by the MRHC are more stable and accurate and reach the steady-state value notably faster than those generated by the other two methods. The proposed method is highly efficient for

  18. Development of a standardized, citywide process for managing smart-pump drug libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walroth, Todd A; Smallwood, Shannon; Arthur, Karen; Vance, Betsy; Washington, Alana; Staublin, Therese; Haslar, Tammy; Reddan, Jennifer G; Fuller, James

    2018-06-15

    Development and implementation of an interprofessional consensus-driven process for review and optimization of smart-pump drug libraries and dosing limits are described. The Indianapolis Coalition for Patient Safety (ICPS), which represents 6 Indianapolis-area health systems, identified an opportunity to reduce clinically insignificant alerts that smart infusion pumps present to end users. Through a consensus-driven process, ICPS aimed to identify best practices to implement at individual hospitals in order to establish specific action items for smart-pump drug library optimization. A work group of pharmacists, nurses, and industrial engineers met to evaluate variability within and lack of scrutiny of smart-pump drug libraries. The work group used Lean Six Sigma methodologies to generate a list of key needs and barriers to be addressed in process standardization. The group reviewed targets for smart-pump drug library optimization, including dosing limits, types of alerts reviewed, policies, and safety best practices. The work group also analyzed existing processes at each site to develop a final consensus statement outlining a model process for reviewing alerts and managing smart-pump data. Analysis of the total number of alerts per device across ICPS-affiliated health systems over a 4-year period indicated a 50% decrease (from 7.2 to 3.6 alerts per device per month) after implementation of the model by ICPS member organizations. Through implementation of a standardized, consensus-driven process for smart-pump drug library optimization, ICPS member health systems reduced clinically insignificant smart-pump alerts. Copyright © 2018 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Infection control, genetic assessment of drug resistance and drug susceptibility testing in the current management of multidrug/extensively-resistant tuberculosis (M/XDR-TB) in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bothamley, Graham H.; Lange, Christoph; Albrecht, Dirk

    2017-01-01

    AIM: Europe has the highest documented caseload and greatest increase in multidrug and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (M/XDR-TB) of all World Health Organization (WHO) regions. This survey examines how recommendations for M/XDR-TB management are being implemented. METHODS: TBNET is a pan...

  20. Kratom, an Emerging Drug of Abuse: A Case Report of Overdose and Management of Withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diep, Jack; Chin, David Tian; Gupta, Somdatta; Syed, Faraz; Xiong, Ming; Cheng, Jianguo

    2018-04-15

    Kratom is an herb indigenous to Southeast Asia with psychoactive opioid compounds, often used as a treatment for chronic pain or opiate withdrawal symptoms. It is legally and readily available via Internet sales and has been identified as an emerging drug of abuse in the United States. Kratom use has been associated with psychosis, seizures, and even death. At lower doses, kratom acts as a stimulant, while at higher doses, it produces analgesia and euphoria. Here, we describe the successful management of kratom overdose and withdrawal in a young man with negative toxicology screens.

  1. Management of a Complicated Ruptured Infected Pseudoaneurysm of the Femoral Artery in a Drug Addict

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanouil Psathas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Infected pseudoaneurysm of the femoral artery represents a devastating complication of intravenous drug abuse, especially in the event of rupture. Operative strategy depends upon the extent of arterial injury and the coexistence of infection or sepsis. Options range from simple common femoral artery (CFA ligation to complex arterial reconstruction with autologous grafts (arterial, venous, or homografts. We report herein the management of a 29-year-old male patient who was urgently admitted with a ruptured pseudoaneurysm of the right CFA, extending well above the inguinal ligament. Multidisciplinary approach with multiple arterial reconstructions and subsequent coverage of the tissue defect with a rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap transposition was performed.

  2. A study on the drug utilization trends in the cardiovascular emergencies in a tertiary care hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendhari, Shabbir Rafiq; Chaudhari, Devendra Ramesh; Burute, Shreyas Ramchandra; Bite, Bapurao Motiram

    2013-04-01

    To observe the cardiovascular emergencies which were most frequently treated and to quantify the drug utilization trends in the cardiovascular emergencies, in terms of the Defined Daily Doses [DDD] and the prescribing prevalence in the cardiovascular emergencies. This prescription based study was undertaken in the Medicine ICU of the government medical hospital. The age, sex, diagnosis (only cardiovascular) and the drugs which were prescribed, were recorded for each patient. Also, the brand names and the generic names of the prescribed drugs were noted. The collected data was analyzed to study the drug utilization trends. It was observed that the most commonly treated cardiovascular disease was IHD. The IHD was more in males than in females who were below 50 years of age and it was nearly equal in the age groups which were above 50 years. The use of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) inhibitors was higher than that of the beta blockers and the calcium channel blockers. The patients with cardiovascular emergencies also had preceding associated diseases like diabetes mellitus and hypertension. The protocol of the management which was followed by the college in the treatment of cardiovascular emergencies was competent enough, as the clinical outcomes of the patients were favourable. But there was a guideline incongruent prescribing behaviour which was statistically significant, for which there is a need to undertake large scale studies.

  3. Extravasations of Vesicant / Non- Vesicant Drugs and Evidence-Based Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nejla Aydinoğlu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The intravenous applications that have been used widely can lead to some complications such as extravasation,ecchymosis, hematoma and phlebitis. The extravasation is one of these complications. Extravasation leads tosome undesirable happenings such as prolonged times of hospitalization of the patients, unnecessary diagnosticprocedures and even unnecessary treatments, stress effects on the relatives of patients, extra workload for healthstaff and the economic loss as well as to threatening the lives of patients.It is important for the healthprofessionals, who are responsible for managing of intravenous applications, to know the drugs that cause tissueinjury and take the necessary measures to prevent extravasation. Therefore, this article defines the pathogenesisof extravasation, types, symptoms, and evidence-based management.

  4. Toxicity studies of drugs and chemicals in animals: An overview

    OpenAIRE

    S. Saganuwan

    2017-01-01

    Toxicity study is the investigation of either short or long-term toxic effects of a drug or chemical on animals. The toxicity is dose-dependent as asserted by Paracelsus over 500 years ago. However, short-term toxic effect is determined using median lethal dose (LD50) first introduced by Trevan in 1927 and revised many times. Presently there is a growing preponderance of rejection of scientific papers on acute toxicity study, simply because of the belief that in the current hazard and safety ...

  5. In silico studies in drug research against neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhouri, Farahnaz Rezaei; Ghasemi, Jahan B

    2017-08-22

    Neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), progressive neurodegenerative forms of Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease (PD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, spinal cerebellar ataxias, and spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy are described by slow and selective dysfunction and degeneration of neurons and axons in the central nervous system (CNS). Computer-aided or in silico design methods have matured into powerful tools for reducing the number of ligands that should be screened in experimental assays. In the present review, the authors provide a basic background about neurodegenerative diseases and in silico techniques in the drug research. Furthermore, they review the various in silico studies reported against various targets in neurodegenerative diseases, including homology modeling, molecular docking, virtual high-throughput screening, quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR), hologram quantitative structure activity relationship (HQSAR), 3D pharmacophore mapping, proteochemometrics modeling (PCM), fingerprints, fragment-based drug discovery, Monte Carlo simulation, molecular dynamic (MD) simulation, quantum-mechanical methods for drug design, support vector machines, and machine learning approaches. Neurodegenerative diseases have a multifactorial pathoetiological origin, so scientists have become persuaded that a multi-target therapeutic strategy aimed at the simultaneous targeting of multiple proteins (and therefore etiologies) involved in the development of a disease is recommended in future. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  6. Impact of online counseling on drug use: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemi, Farrokh; Haack, Mary; Nemes, Susie; Harge, Angela; Baghi, Heibatollah

    2010-01-01

    To examine the effect of online counseling abuse counseling on drug use among underserved patients. Subjects were recruited from an Indian Reservation in Eagle Butte, South Dakota; a family court in Newark, New Jersey; a probation office in Alexandria, Virginia; and a co-occurring disorders treatment clinic in Washington, District of Columbia. Subjects were predominantly poor, undereducated, unemployed, court involved, or diagnosed with co-occurring psychiatric disorders. A total of 79 subjects volunteered to participate in the project. Subjects were randomly assigned to either a control group or an experimental group. The control and experimental groups were both issued an Internet-ready computer and 1 year of Internet service. Only the experimental group had access to online counseling intervention. Drug use was measured using a combination of self-usage reporting and supervised urine tests. Urine tests were available for 37% of subjects. Exit surveys containing self-reported usage were obtained from 54% of the subjects. Self-usage reports or urine test results were available from 70% of subjects. The difference of the rates of drug use in the control and experimental groups (as calculated from urine tests or through self-report) was not significantly different from zero, suggesting that online counseling had not led to a reduction in substance use. It is possible that the study lacked sufficient power to detect small differences in the rate of drug use in the experimental and control groups. Additional research is needed to establish the efficacy of online counseling in hard-to-reach populations.

  7. Coal combustion waste management study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-02-01

    Coal-fired generation accounted for almost 55 percent of the production of electricity in the United States in 1990. Coal combustion generates high volumes of ash and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) wastes, estimated at almost 90 million tons. The amount of ash and flue gas desulfurization wastes generated by coal-fired power plants is expected to increase as a result of future demand growth, and as more plants comply with Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. Nationwide, on average, over 30 percent of coal combustion wastes is currently recycled for use in various applications; the remaining percentage is ultimately disposed in waste management units. There are a significant number of on-site and off-site waste management units that are utilized by the electric utility industry to store or dispose of coal combustion waste. Table ES-1 summarizes the number of disposal units and estimates of waste contained at these unites by disposal unit operating status (i.e, operating or retired). Further, ICF Resources estimates that up to 120 new or replacement units may need to be constructed to service existing and new coal capacity by the year 2000. The two primary types of waste management units used by the industry are landfills and surface impoundments. Utility wastes have been exempted by Congress from RCRA Subtitle C hazardous waste regulation since 1980. As a result of this exemption, coal combustion wastes are currently being regulated under Subtitle D of RCRA. As provided under Subtitle D, wastes not classified as hazardous under Subtitle C are subject to State regulation. At the same time Congress developed this exemption, also known as the ''Bevill Exclusion,'' it directed EPA to prepare a report on coal combustion wastes and make recommendations on how they should be managed

  8. Do Geriatric Conditions Increase Risk of Adverse Drug Reactions in Ambulatory Elders? Results From the VA GEM Drug Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanlon, Joseph T.; Sloane, Richard J.; Boscardin, W. John; Schmader, Kenneth E.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Many clinicians prescribe cautiously to older adults with common geriatric conditions for fear of causing adverse drug reactions (ADRs). However, little is known about the association between these conditions and risk of ADRs. Methods. Using data from the VA Geriatric Evaluation and Management Drug Study, we determined any, preventable, and serious ADRs in 808 elders for 12 months after hospital discharge using a validated process involving patient self-report and chart review adjudicated by two health care professionals. Eight common geriatric conditions (activities of daily living, dementia, incontinence, falls, difficulty ambulating, malnourishment, depression, and prolonged bed rest) were evaluated at study baseline through self-report and structured assessments. We used Poisson regression to model the relationship between these geriatric conditions and ADRs. Results. Participants had a mean of 2.9 ± 1.2 geriatric conditions. Over the 12-month follow-up period, 497 ADRs occurred in 269 participants, including 187 ADRs considered preventable and 127 considered severe. On multivariable analyses, participants with dependency in one or more activities of daily living were less likely to suffer ADRs than those who were fully independent (incidence rate ratio: 0.78, 95% confidence interval = 0.62–1.00). None of the other seven geriatric conditions assessed were associated with ADR risk. Results were similar for preventable and serious ADRs, although participants with a history of falls were more likely to develop serious ADRs (incidence rate ratio: 1.49, 95% confidence interval = 1.00–2.21). Conclusions. Many geriatric conditions were not associated with risk of ADRs. Although it is prudent to prescribe judiciously in patients with these conditions, excessive caution may not be warranted. PMID:21321003

  9. Medical databases in studies of drug teratogenicity: methodological issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Ehrenstein

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Vera Ehrenstein1, Henrik T Sørensen1, Leiv S Bakketeig1,2, Lars Pedersen11Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark; 2Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, NorwayAbstract: More than half of all pregnant women take prescription medications, raising concerns about fetal safety. Medical databases routinely collecting data from large populations are potentially valuable resources for cohort studies addressing teratogenicity of drugs. These include electronic medical records, administrative databases, population health registries, and teratogenicity information services. Medical databases allow estimation of prevalences of birth defects with enhanced precision, but systematic error remains a potentially serious problem. In this review, we first provide a brief description of types of North American and European medical databases suitable for studying teratogenicity of drugs and then discuss manifestation of systematic errors in teratogenicity studies based on such databases. Selection bias stems primarily from the inability to ascertain all reproductive outcomes. Information bias (misclassification may be caused by paucity of recorded clinical details or incomplete documentation of medication use. Confounding, particularly confounding by indication, can rarely be ruled out. Bias that either masks teratogenicity or creates false appearance thereof, may have adverse consequences for the health of the child and the mother. Biases should be quantified and their potential impact on the study results should be assessed. Both theory and software are available for such estimation. Provided that methodological problems are understood and effectively handled, computerized medical databases are a valuable source of data for studies of teratogenicity of drugs.Keywords: databases, birth defects, epidemiologic methods, pharmacoepidemiology

  10. Polymeric micelles for ocular drug delivery: From structural frameworks to recent preclinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Abhirup; Bisht, Rohit; Rupenthal, Ilva D; Mitra, Ashim K

    2017-02-28

    Effective intraocular drug delivery poses a major challenge due to the presence of various elimination mechanisms and physiological barriers that result in low ocular bioavailability after topical application. Over the past decades, polymeric micelles have emerged as one of the most promising drug delivery platforms for the management of ocular diseases affecting the anterior (dry eye syndrome) and posterior (age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma) segments of the eye. Promising preclinical efficacy results from both in-vitro and in-vivo animal studies have led to their steady progression through clinical trials. The mucoadhesive nature of these polymeric micelles results in enhanced contact with the ocular surface while their small size allows better tissue penetration. Most importantly, being highly water soluble, these polymeric micelles generate clear aqueous solutions which allows easy application in the form of eye drops without any vision interference. Enhanced stability, larger cargo capacity, non-toxicity, ease of surface modification and controlled drug release are additional advantages with polymeric micelles. Finally, simple and cost effective fabrication techniques render their industrial acceptance relatively high. This review summarizes structural frameworks, methods of preparation, physicochemical properties, patented inventions and recent advances of these micelles as effective carriers for ocular drug delivery highlighting their performance in preclinical studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Novel drugs in the management of acute mountain sickness and high altitude pulmonary edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sikri G

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Gaurav Sikri, Anirban Bhattacharya Department of Physiology, Armed Forces Medical College, Wanowarie, Pune, IndiaWe read with great interest the review article titled “Wilderness medicine at high altitude: recent developments in the field” by Shah et al.1 The authors have comprehensively summarized the recent advances in the field of high altitude medicine relevant to sports and travel medicine. However, Shah et al have described potential drugs for management of high-altitude illnesses, such as acute mountain sickness (AMS, high altitude cerebral edema, and high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE as one group under the section “Novel drug treatment for AMS”. The pathophysiologies of these two sets of diseases (AMS/high altitude cerebral edema as one and HAPE as another set are different2 and hence it would have been nice to have had the novel drugs described separately to elucidate the therapeutic approach for the two different classes of diseases.View original paper by Shah et al.

  12. Usual care and management of fall risk increasing drugs in older dizzy patients in Dutch general practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stam, Hanneke; Harting, Thomas; van der Sluijs, Marjolijn; van Marum, Rob; van der Horst, Henriëtte; van der Wouden, Johannes C.; Maarsingh, Otto R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective For general practitioners (GPs) dizziness is a challenging condition to deal with. Data on the management of dizziness in older patients are mostly lacking. Furthermore, it is unknown whether GPs attempt to decrease Fall Risk Increasing Drugs (FRIDs) use in the management of dizziness in older patients. The aim of this study is to gain more insight into GP’s management of dizziness in older patients, including FRID evaluation and adjustment. Design Data were derived from electronic medical records, obtained over a 12-month period in 2013. Setting Forty-six Dutch general practices. Patients The study sample comprised of 2812 older dizzy patients of 65 years and over. Patients were identified using International Classification of Primary Care codes and free text. Main outcome measures Usual care was categorized into wait-and-see strategy (no treatment initiated); education and advice; additional testing; medication adjustment; and referral. Results Frequently applied treatments included a wait-and-see strategy (28.4%) and education and advice (28.0%). Additional testing was performed in 26.8%; 19.0% of the patients were referred. Of the patients 87.2% had at least one FRID prescription. During the observation period, GPs adjusted the use of one or more FRIDs for 11.7% of the patients. Conclusion This study revealed a wide variety in management strategies for dizziness in older adults. The referral rate for dizziness was high compared to prior research. Although many older dizzy patients use at least one FRID, FRID evaluation and adjustment is scarce. We expect that more FRID adjustments may reduce dizziness and dizziness-related impairment. Key PointsIt is important to know how general practitioners manage dizziness in older patients in order to assess potential cues for improvement.This study revealed a wide variety in management strategies for dizziness in older patients.There was a scarcity in Fall Risk Increasing Drug (FRID) evaluation and adjustment

  13. Antithrombotic drugs in the primary medical management of intermittent claudication: a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Girolami, B.; Bernardi, E.; Prins, M. H.; ten Cate, J. W.; Prandoni, P.; Hettiarachchi, R.; Marras, E.; Stefani, P. M.; Girolami, A.; Büller, H. R.

    1999-01-01

    There is no consensus on the efficacy of the antithrombotic drugs available for patients with intermittent claudication. A Medline and manual search was used to identify relevant publications. Uncontrolled or retrospective studies, double reports or trials without clinical outcomes were excluded.

  14. Studying three management skills among midwifery managers of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: The results of this study showed that in the field of knowledge, managers prioritized the skills as follows: the human-communicational skills (MR =69.05), technical skills (MR =50.31) and theoretical-cognitive skills (MR =47.57). Also prioritization of skills from the perspective of the study population in the field of ...

  15. A Study of the Trend and Extent of Drug Abuse Among Drug ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The findings show that drug-abusers are predominantly males, single, unskilled workers, traders, unemployed and civil servants. Psychiatric hospitals and rehabilitation centres served as treatment centres for participants with previous admission records. Drug therapy, psychotherapy and occupational therapy were the ...

  16. A case study of polypharmacy management in nine European countries: Implications for change management and implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Jennifer; Alonso, Albert; MacLure, Katie; Stewart, Derek; Kempen, Thomas; Mair, Alpana; Castel-Branco, Margarida; Codina, Carles; Fernandez-Llimos, Fernando; Fleming, Glenda; Gennimata, Dimitra; Gillespie, Ulrika; Harrison, Cathy; Illario, Maddalena; Junius-Walker, Ulrike; Kampolis, Christos F; Kardas, Przemyslaw; Lewek, Pawel; Malva, João; Menditto, Enrica; Scullin, Claire; Wiese, Birgitt

    2018-01-01

    Multimorbidity and its associated polypharmacy contribute to an increase in adverse drug events, hospitalizations, and healthcare spending. This study aimed to address: what exists regarding polypharmacy management in the European Union (EU); why programs were, or were not, developed; and, how identified initiatives were developed, implemented, and sustained. Change management principles (Kotter) and normalization process theory (NPT) informed data collection and analysis. Nine case studies were conducted in eight EU countries: Germany (Lower Saxony), Greece, Italy (Campania), Poland, Portugal, Spain (Catalonia), Sweden (Uppsala), and the United Kingdom (Northern Ireland and Scotland). The workflow included a review of country/region specific polypharmacy policies, key informant interviews with stakeholders involved in policy development and implementation and, focus groups of clinicians and managers. Data were analyzed using thematic analysis of individual cases and framework analysis across cases. Polypharmacy initiatives were identified in five regions (Catalonia, Lower Saxony, Northern Ireland, Scotland, and Uppsala) and included all care settings. There was agreement, even in cases without initiatives, that polypharmacy is a significant issue to address. Common themes regarding the development and implementation of polypharmacy management initiatives were: locally adapted solutions, organizational culture supporting innovation and teamwork, adequate workforce training, multidisciplinary teams, changes in workflow, redefinition of roles and responsibilities of professionals, policies and legislation supporting the initiative, and data management and information and communication systems to assist development and implementation. Depending on the setting, these were considered either facilitators or barriers to implementation. Within the studied EU countries, polypharmacy management was not widely addressed. These results highlight the importance of change

  17. Factors influencing GPs’ choice between drugs in a therapeutic drug group. A qualitative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buusman, Allan; Andersen, Morten; Merrild, Camilla Hoffmann

    2007-01-01

    (GPs) were selected with reference to variation in organizational structure, age, and gender. Main outcome measures. GPs' description of drug choice in relation to specific patient encounters involving a prescription. Results. All informants appeared to consider drug price important...... as it was a recurring theme during all interviews. External factors outside the GP's control such as governmental regulation on prescribing and the pharmaceutical industry influenced most GPs. Internal factors related to the actual consultation included characteristics of the GP and the patient, drug characteristics......, and repeat prescriptions. These factors interact in a non-linear and unpredictable way similar to complex adaptive systems. Conclusion. GPs balance both internal and external factors when choosing between analogues. Drug choice is a regulated process in the realm of complex prescribing behaviour with drug...

  18. Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring for the Effective Management of Antihypertensive Drug Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Eoin; Dolan, Eamon

    2016-10-01

    This purpose of this article is to review the current recommendations for ambulatory blood pressure measurement (ABPM) and the use of ABPM in assessing treatment. We review current international guidelines and undertake a critical review of evidence supporting the clinical use of ABPM in effectively managing antihypertensive drug treatment. Current guidelines emphasize the diagnostic superiority of ABPM, mainly from the ability of the technique to identify sustained hypertension by allowing for the exclusion of white-coat hypertension and by demonstrating the presence of masked hypertension. ABPM also offers diagnostic insights into nocturnal patterns of blood pressure, such as dipping and nondipping, reverse dipping, and excessive dipping, and the presence of nocturnal hypertension; although less attention is given to the nocturnal behavior of blood pressure in clinical practice, the nocturnal patterns of blood pressure have particular relevance in assessing the response to blood pressure-lowering medication. Surprisingly, although the current guidelines give detailed recommendations on the diagnostic potential and use of ABPM, there are scant recommendations on the benefits and application of the technique for the initiation of blood pressure-lowering therapy in clinical practice and virtually no recommendations on how it might be used to assess the efficacy of drug treatment. In view of a deficiency in the literature on the role of ABPM in assess the efficacy of drug treatment, we put forward proposals to correct this deficiency and guide the prescribing physician on the most appropriate drug administration and dosage over time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Adverse event management in mass drug administration for neglected tropical diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, Arthur; Zink, Amanda

    2014-03-01

    The ethical challenges of reporting and managing adverse events (AEs) and serious AEs (SAEs) in the context of mass drug administration (MDA) for the treatment of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) require reassessment of domestic and international policies on a global scale. Although the World Health Organization has set forth AE/SAE guidelines specifically for NTD MDA that incorporate suspected causality, and recommends that only SAEs get reported in this setting, most regulatory agencies continue to require the reporting of all SAEs exhibiting even a merely temporal relationship to activities associated with an MDA program. This greatly increases the potential for excess "noise" and undue risk aversion and is not only impractical but arguably unethical where huge proportions of populations are being treated for devastating diseases, and no good baseline exists against which to compare possible AE/SAE reports. Other population-specific variables that might change the way drug safety ought to be assessed include differing efficacy rates of a drug, background morbidity/mortality rates of the target disease in question, the growth rate of the incidence of disease, the availability of rescue or salvage therapies, and the willingness of local populations to take risks that other populations might not. The fact that NTDs are controllable and potentially eradicable with well-tolerated, effective, existing drugs might further alter our assessment of MDA safety and AE/SAE tolerability. At the same time, diffuseness of population, communication barriers, lack of resources, and other difficult surveillance challenges may present in NTD-affected settings. These limitations could impair the ability to monitor an MDA program's success, as well as hinder efforts to obtain informed consent or provide rescue therapy. Denying beneficial research interventions and MDA programs intended to benefit millions requires sound ethical justification based on more than the identification of

  20. Study of the Dynamic Uptake of Free Drug and Nanostructures for Drug Delivery Based on Bioluminescence Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongjian Fang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The past two decades have witnessed the great growth of the development of novel drug carriers. However, the releasing dynamics of drug from drug carriers in vivo and the interactions between cells and drug carriers remain unclear. In this paper, liposomes were prepared to encapsulate D-luciferin, which was the substrate of luciferase and served as a model drug. Based on the theoretical calculation of active loading, methods of preparation for liposomes were optimized. Only when D-luciferin was released from liposomes or taken in by the cells could bioluminescence be produced under the catalysis of luciferase. Models of multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS were built with 4T1-luc cells that expressed luciferase stably. The kinetic processes of uptake and distribution of free drugs and liposomal drugs were determined with models of cell suspension, monolayer cells, MCTS, and tumor-bearing nude mice. The technology platform has been demonstrated to be effective for the study of the distribution and kinetic profiles of various liposomes as drug delivery systems.

  1. The Effect of Florida Medicaid's State-Mandated Formulary Provision on Prescription Drug Use and Health Plan Costs in a Medicaid Managed Care Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munshi, Kiraat D; Mager, Douglas; Ward, Krista M; Mischel, Brian; Henderson, Rochelle R

    2018-02-01

    Formulary or preferred drug list (PDL) management is an effective strategy to ensure clinically efficient prescription drug management by managed care organizations (MCOs). Medicaid MCOs participating in Florida's Medicaid program were required to use a state-mandated PDL between May and August 2014. To examine differences in prescription drug use and plan costs between a single Florida Medicaid managed care (MMC) health plan that implemented a state-mandated PDL policy on July 1, 2014, and a comparable MMC health plan in another state without a state-mandated PDL, controlling for sociodemographic confounders. A retrospective analysis with a pre-post design was conducted using deidentified administrative claims data from a large pharmacy benefit manager. The prepolicy evaluation period was January 1 through June 30, 2014, and the postpolicy period was January 1 through June 30, 2015. Continuously eligible Florida MMC plan members were matched on sociodemographic and health characteristics to their counterparts enrolled in a comparable MMC health plan in another state without a state-mandated formulary. Outcomes were drug use, measured as the number of 30-day adjusted nonspecialty drug prescriptions per member per period, and total drug plan costs per member per period for all drugs, with separate measures for generic and brand drugs. Bivariate comparisons were conducted using t-tests. Employing a difference-in-differences (DID) analytic approach, multivariate negative binomial regression and generalized estimating equation models were used to analyze prescription drug use and costs. The final analytical sample consisted of 18,372 enrollees, evenly divided between the 2 groups. In the postpolicy evaluation period, overall and generic use declined, while brand use increased for members in the Florida health plan. Drug costs, especially for brands, significantly increased for Florida health plan members. No significant changes were observed over the same time period

  2. Present studies on the radio-sterilized drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marciniec, B.; Dettlaff, K.

    2007-01-01

    Lecture presents present status of radiosterilization of drugs and medical materials as compared to other sterilization methods. Literature review is shown on degradation of different kinds of drugs sterilized upon action of the sterilising doses of radiation

  3. A long and winding road; evolution of antimicrobial drug development - crisis management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echols, Roger M

    2012-11-01

    The development of antimicrobial drugs has evolved from observational case reports to complex randomized prospective clinical trials in specific treatment indications. Beginning around the year 2000, the US FDA has evolved its approach on study design and other study characteristics, which has made the conduct of these studies more difficult and the outcomes for sponsors more risky. This has contributed to the decline in the discovery and development of new antimicrobials, which are needed to address the increasing problem of bacterial resistance to existing marketed products. This study reviews the historical basis for the current regulatory climate including the various crises that have led to considerable political pressures on the agency. Recent efforts to resolve development uncertainties and to provide economic incentives for future antimicrobial drug development are presented.

  4. Ethiopian Journal of Environmental Studies and Management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines; » Copyright Notice. Author Guidelines. Guide to Authors: The Ethiopian Journal of Environmental Studies and Management (EJESM) are based in Department of Geography and Environmental Studies, Bahir Dar University, ...

  5. Drug-drug cocrystals of antituberculous 4-aminosalicylic acid: Screening, crystal structures, thermochemical and solubility studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozd, Ksenia V; Manin, Alex N; Churakov, Andrei V; Perlovich, German L

    2017-03-01

    Experimental multistage cocrystal screening of the antituberculous drug 4-aminosalicylic acid (PASA) has been conducted with a number of coformers (pyrazinamide (PYR), nicotinamide (NAM), isonicotinamide (iNAM), isoniazid (INH), caffeine (CAF) and theophylline (TPH)). The crystal structures of 4-aminosalicylic acid cocrystals with isonicotinamide ([PASA+iNAM] (2:1)) and methanol solvate with caffeine ([PASA+CAF+MeOH] (1:1:1)) have been determined by single X-ray diffraction experiments. For the first time for PASA cocrystals it has been found that the structural unit of the [PASA+iNAM] cocrystal (2:1) is formed by 2 types of heterosynthons: acid-pyridine and acid-amide. The desolvation study of the [PASA+CAF+MeOH] cocrystal solvate (1:1:1) has been conducted. The correlation models linking the melting points of the cocrystals with the melting points of the coformers used in this paper have been developed. The thermochemical and solubility properties for all the obtained cocrystals have been studied. Cocrystallization has been shown to lead not only to PASA solubility improving but also to its higher stability against the chemical decomposition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Drug Education Based on a Knowledge, Attitude, and Experience Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, John A.

    1971-01-01

    Results of a questionnaire concerning factual knowledge of attitudes toward, and experience with a variety of drugs are reported. It was concluded that marihuana and other drugs are readily available to secondary school students, and widespread experimentation exists; however, a strict dichotomy exists between marihuana and other drugs. (Author/BY)

  7. NIR spectrometry for counterfeit drug detection - A feasibility study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodionova, O.Y.; Houmøller, Lars P.; Pomerantsev, A.L.

    2005-01-01

    for mathematical data processing for false drugs detection is demonstrated. Also, multivariate hyperspectral image analysis is applied providing additional diagnostic information. Hyperspectral imaging is becoming a useful diagnostic tool for identifying non-homogeneous spatial regions of drug formulation. Two...... types of drugs are used to demonstrate the applicability of these approaches....

  8. From Abstinence to Relapse: A Preliminary Qualitative Study of Drug Users in a Compulsory Drug Rehabilitation Center in Changsha, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Yang

    Full Text Available Relapse among abstinent drug users is normal. Several factors are related to relapse, but it remains unclear what individuals' actual life circumstances are during periods of abstinence, and how these circumstances facilitate or prevent relapse.To illuminate drug users' experiences during abstinence periods and explore the real-life catalysts and inhibitors contributing to drug use relapse.Qualitative in-depth interviews were conducted with 20 drug users recruited from a compulsory isolated drug rehabilitation center in Changsha. The interviews were guided by open-ended questions on individuals' experiences in drug use initiation, getting addicted, treatment history, social environment, abstinence, and relapse. Participants were also encouraged to share their own stories. Interviews were digitally recorded and fully transcribed. The data of 18 participants who reported abstinence experiences before admission were included in the analyses. The data were analyzed using a thematic analysis with inductive hand coding to derive themes.Most drug users were able to successfully abstain from drugs. During abstinence, their lives were congested with challenges, such as adverse socioeconomic conditions, poor family/social support, interpersonal conflicts, and stigma and discrimination, all of which kept them excluded from mainstream society. Furthermore, the police's system of ID card registration, which identifies individuals as drug users, worsened already grave situations. Relapse triggers reported by the participants focused mainly on negative feelings, interpersonal conflicts, and stressful events. Craving was experienced but not perceived as a relapse trigger by most participants.This study of in-depth interview with drug users found evidence of situations and environments they live during abstinence appear rather disadvantaged, making it extremely difficult for them to remain abstinent. Comprehensive programs on relapse prevention that acknowledge

  9. Analysis of the importance of drug packaging quality for end users and pharmaceutical industry as a part of the quality management system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lončar Irma M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we collected and analyzed information on the importance of drug packaging quality to end users and pharmaceutical industry, as an indicator of the process of traceability and originality of drugs. Two surveys were conducted: one among the end users of drugs (252 patients and the other among professionals working in seven pharmaceutical companies in Serbia. For most end users (82.5% quality on the packaging of drugs was important, but only 41.8% of them thought that the appearance of the packaging could be an indicator of genuinity of drugs. The existence of the control marks (KM on drug packaging was not of great importance, since most of them (86.9% know, its function, but majority (60.2% would nevertheless decide to buy the drug without KM. Regarding the experts from the pharmaceutical industry, more then two-thirds of them (68.4% believed that the existence of KM did not contribute to efficient operations. Although a great number of pharmaceutical industry professionals (84.2% answered that the introduction of GS1 DataMatrix system would allow for complete traceability of the drug from the manufacturer to the end user, only 22.2% of them introduced this system to their products. This study also showed that domestic producers did not have a great interest for additional protection (special inks, holograms, special graphics, smart multicolor design, watermark, chemically labeled paper and cardboard etc.. on their products, given that only 15.8 % of them had some kind of additional protection against counterfeiting. Monitoring drug traceability from a manufacturer to end user is achieved by many complex activities regulated by law. A high percentage of responders said they were satisfied with the functionality of traceability systems used in their companies. As a way to increase the quality of drug packaging and business performance most responders saw in the continuous improvement of the system of traceability within the company

  10. Spectroscopic, structural and drug docking studies of carbocysteine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manivannan, M.; Rajeshwaran, K.; Govindhan, R.; Karthikeyan, B.

    2017-09-01

    Carbocysteine or carbocisteine having the empirical formula C5H9NO4S,is one of the most therapeutically prescribed expectorant, sold under the brand name viz., Mucodyne (UK and India), Rhinathiol and Mucolite. In pediatric respiratory pathology, it can relieve the symptoms of obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and bronchiectasis. On the consideration of its extensive pharmaceutical usage and medicinal value, we have investigated its chemical structure and composition by employing various spectral techniques like 1H, 13C NMR, FT-IR,Raman, UV-Visible spectroscopy and powder X-ray diffraction method. Density Functional Theoretical (DFT) studies on its electronic structure is also carried out. Drug docking studies were carried out to ascertain the nature of molecular interaction with the biological protein system. Furthermore theoretical Raman spectrum of this molecule has been computed and compared with the experimental Raman spectrum. The forbidden energy gap between its frontier molecular orbitals, viz., HOMO-LUMO is calculated and correlated with its observed λmax value. Atomic orbitals which are mainly contributes to the frontier molecular orbitals were identified. Molecular electrostatic potential diagram has been mapped to explain its chemical activity. Based on the results, a suitable mechanism of its protein binding mode and drug action has been discussed.

  11. Open source drug discovery in practice: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Årdal, Christine; Røttingen, John-Arne

    2012-01-01

    Open source drug discovery offers potential for developing new and inexpensive drugs to combat diseases that disproportionally affect the poor. The concept borrows two principle aspects from open source computing (i.e., collaboration and open access) and applies them to pharmaceutical innovation. By opening a project to external contributors, its research capacity may increase significantly. To date there are only a handful of open source R&D projects focusing on neglected diseases. We wanted to learn from these first movers, their successes and failures, in order to generate a better understanding of how a much-discussed theoretical concept works in practice and may be implemented. A descriptive case study was performed, evaluating two specific R&D projects focused on neglected diseases. CSIR Team India Consortium's Open Source Drug Discovery project (CSIR OSDD) and The Synaptic Leap's Schistosomiasis project (TSLS). Data were gathered from four sources: interviews of participating members (n = 14), a survey of potential members (n = 61), an analysis of the websites and a literature review. Both cases have made significant achievements; however, they have done so in very different ways. CSIR OSDD encourages international collaboration, but its process facilitates contributions from mostly Indian researchers and students. Its processes are formal with each task being reviewed by a mentor (almost always offline) before a result is made public. TSLS, on the other hand, has attracted contributors internationally, albeit significantly fewer than CSIR OSDD. Both have obtained funding used to pay for access to facilities, physical resources and, at times, labor costs. TSLS releases its results into the public domain, whereas CSIR OSDD asserts ownership over its results. Technically TSLS is an open source project, whereas CSIR OSDD is a crowdsourced project. However, both have enabled high quality research at low cost. The critical success factors appear to be clearly

  12. Open Source Drug Discovery in Practice: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Årdal, Christine; Røttingen, John-Arne

    2012-01-01

    Background Open source drug discovery offers potential for developing new and inexpensive drugs to combat diseases that disproportionally affect the poor. The concept borrows two principle aspects from open source computing (i.e., collaboration and open access) and applies them to pharmaceutical innovation. By opening a project to external contributors, its research capacity may increase significantly. To date there are only a handful of open source R&D projects focusing on neglected diseases. We wanted to learn from these first movers, their successes and failures, in order to generate a better understanding of how a much-discussed theoretical concept works in practice and may be implemented. Methodology/Principal Findings A descriptive case study was performed, evaluating two specific R&D projects focused on neglected diseases. CSIR Team India Consortium's Open Source Drug Discovery project (CSIR OSDD) and The Synaptic Leap's Schistosomiasis project (TSLS). Data were gathered from four sources: interviews of participating members (n = 14), a survey of potential members (n = 61), an analysis of the websites and a literature review. Both cases have made significant achievements; however, they have done so in very different ways. CSIR OSDD encourages international collaboration, but its process facilitates contributions from mostly Indian researchers and students. Its processes are formal with each task being reviewed by a mentor (almost always offline) before a result is made public. TSLS, on the other hand, has attracted contributors internationally, albeit significantly fewer than CSIR OSDD. Both have obtained funding used to pay for access to facilities, physical resources and, at times, labor costs. TSLS releases its results into the public domain, whereas CSIR OSDD asserts ownership over its results. Conclusions/Significance Technically TSLS is an open source project, whereas CSIR OSDD is a crowdsourced project. However, both have enabled high quality

  13. Studies in youth, drug and alcohol consumption at the Centre for Alcohol and Drug Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolind, Torsten; Demant, Jakob Johan; Hunt, Geoffrey

    2013-01-01

    or providing genuine contribution to the sociological analysis and understanding of youth cultures. From the mid-00 s and forward however, a range of analytical tools were developed at Centre for Alcohol and Drug Research (CRF) in order to understand the relationship between youth, drug and alcohol use......Background: During the 90 s and especially in the beginning of the 00 s research in youth, drug and alcohol consumption increased markedly in Denmark. Much of this research was applied and placed in a dilemma between reproducing existing social problem characterizations of youthful behaviors...... and to move beyond the applied perspective into a more social science analytical approach. Aim: The article investigates the relationship developments between drug and alcohol research and youth research in Denmark in general, with a special focus on research conducted at CRF. Specifically, we will focus...

  14. [Quetiapine and anticholinergic drugs induced ischaemic colitis: A case study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuny, P; Houot, M; Ginisty, S; Horowicz, S; Plassart, F; Mentec, H; Eftekhari, P

    2017-02-01

    operating room. At laparotomy, both colonic necrosis with perforation and necrosis of the small bowel were seen. The patient underwent total colectomy with small bowel resection, distal ileostomy and closure of the rectal stump. The onset of septic and hemorrhagic state required further surgery on June 26th. The evolution was characterized by multi-organ failure with acute anuric renal failure, multiple cardiac arrests, and systemic bacterial and fungal infection. On July 24th, this unfavorable outcome lead to death. In summary, the patient had an occlusive syndrome due to neuroleptics and complications, including mesenteric ischemia with necrotizing colitis. Quetiapine, like all antipsychotics, has anticholinergic effects, including cardiac, psychiatric and digestive disorders. The combination of anticholinergic drugs decreases intestinal peristalsis. Without any prompt management, this decrease can result in a colonic ischemia or necrosis. In patients treated with neuroleptics, the onset of constipation must alert medical staff. Systematic monitoring of bowel movements should be performed in any patient receiving anticholinergic drugs. Copyright © 2016 L'Encéphale, Paris. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. A review on the study of bioreductive drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xiaojing; Jin Yizun

    2003-01-01

    Hypoxia is a feature that exists in most solid tumors. Bio-reductive drugs are pro-drugs that can selectively target the hypoxia cells in tumors. In reductive environment, they are reductively metabolized to generate toxic species. There are 3 main classes of bio-reductive drugs: the nitro-aromatics, N-oxides and quinones. Recently, bio-reductive drugs were combined with GDEPT for the treatment of cancer, in addition to radiation and the chemotherapeutic agents. Bio-reductive drugs will play a significant role in future cancer therapy

  16. Drug pricing and reimbursement information management: processes and decision making in the global economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsourougiannis, Dimitrios

    2017-01-01

    Background : Cost-containment initiatives are re-shaping the pharmaceutical business environment and affecting market access as well as pricing and reimbursement decisions. Effective price management procedures are too complex to accomplish manually. Prior to February 2013, price management within Astellas Pharma Europe Ltd was done manually using an Excel database. The system was labour intensive, slow to update, and prone to error. An innovative web-based pricing information management system was developed to address the shortcomings of the previous system. Development : A secure web-based system for submitting, reviewing and approving pricing requests was designed to: track all pricing applications and approval status; update approved pricing information automatically; provide fixed and customizable reports of pricing information; collect pricing and reimbursement rules from each country; validate pricing and reimbursement rules monthly. Several sequential phases of development emphasized planning, time schedules, target dates, budgets and implementation of the entire system. A test system was used to pilot the electronic (e)-pricing system with three affiliates (four users) in February 2013. Outcomes : The web-based system was introduced in March 2013, currently has about 227 active users globally and comprises more than 1000 presentations of 150 products. The overall benefits of switching from a manual to an e-pricing system were immediate and highly visible in terms of efficiency, transparency, reliability and compliance. Conclusions : The e-pricing system has improved the efficiency, reliability, compliance, transparency and ease of access to multinational drug pricing and approval information.

  17. Study on Case Teaching of Financial Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Zhenghong; Che, Zhengmei

    2011-01-01

    Case teaching is an efficient teaching method of management. It plays an important role to enhance the students' ability to practice the theory. However, case teaching of financial management has not achieved the expected results. The paper aims to study the importance, characteristics and corresponding methods of case teaching method of financial…

  18. Increasing compliance with mass drug administration programs for lymphatic filariasis in India through education and lymphedema management programs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul T Cantey

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Nearly 45% of people living at risk for lymphatic filariasis (LF worldwide live in India. India has faced challenges obtaining the needed levels of compliance with its mass drug administration (MDA program to interrupt LF transmission, which utilizes diethylcarbamazine (DEC or DEC plus albendazole. Previously identified predictors of and barriers to compliance with the MDA program were used to refine a pre-MDA educational campaign. The objectives of this study were to assess the impact of these refinements and of a lymphedema morbidity management program on MDA compliance.A randomized, 30-cluster survey was performed in each of 3 areas: the community-based pre-MDA education plus community-based lymphedema management education (Com-MDA+LM area, the community-based pre-MDA education (Com-MDA area, and the Indian standard pre-MDA education (MDA-only area. Compliance with the MDA program was 90.2% in Com-MDA+LM, 75.0% in Com-MDA, and 52.9% in the MDA-only areas (p<0.0001. Identified barriers to adherence included: 1 fear of side effects and 2 lack of recognition of one's personal benefit from adherence. Multivariable predictors of adherence amenable to educational intervention were: 1 knowing about the MDA in advance of its occurrence, 2 knowing everyone is at risk for LF, 3 knowing that the MDA was for LF, and 4 knowing at least one component of the lymphedema management techniques taught in the lymphedema management program.This study confirmed previously identified predictors of and barriers to compliance with India's MDA program for LF. More importantly, it showed that targeting these predictors and barriers in a timely and clear pre-MDA educational campaign can increase compliance with MDA programs, and it demonstrated, for the first time, that lymphedema management programs may also increase compliance with MDA programs.

  19. Role for therapeutic drug monitoring during induction therapy with TNF antagonists in IBD: evolution in the definition and management of primary nonresponse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papamichael, Konstantinos; Gils, Ann; Rutgeerts, Paul; Levesque, Barrett G; Vermeire, Séverine; Sandborn, William J; Vande Casteele, Niels

    2015-01-01

    : Primary nonresponse and primary nonremission are important limitations of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antagonists, occurring in 10% to 40% and 50% to 80% of patients with inflammatory bowel disease, respectively. The magnitude of primary nonresponse differs between phase III clinical trials and cohort studies, indicating differences, e.g., in definition, patient population or blinding. The causes of nonresponse can be attributed to the drug (pharmacokinetics, immunogenicity), the patient (genetics, disease activity), the disease (type, location, severity), and/or the treatment strategy (dosing regimen, combination therapy). Primary nonresponse has been attributed to "non-TNF-driven disease" which is an overly simplified and potentially misleading approach to the problem. Many patients with primary nonresponse could successfully be treated with dose optimization during the induction phase or switching to another TNF antagonist. Therefore, primary nonresponse is frequently not a non-TNF-driven disease. Recent studies from rheumatoid arthritis and preliminary data from inflammatory bowel disease evaluating therapeutic drug monitoring have suggested that early measurement of drug and anti-drug antibody concentrations could help to define primary nonresponse and rationalize patient management of this problem. Moreover, a modeling approach including pharmacological parameters and patient-related covariants could potentially be predictive for response to the treatment. We describe an overview of this evolution in thinking, underpinned by previous findings, and assess the potential role of early measurement of drug and antidrug antibody concentrations in the definition and management of primary nonresponse.

  20. [Study on liver targeted drug delivery system of the effective anticancer component from Bolbstemma paniculatum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yi-Yi; Ll, Tong-Hui; Tang, Chen-Kang; Zhu, Zi-Ping; Chi, Qun; Hou, Shi-Xiang

    2005-06-01

    To study the liver targeted drug delivery system of TBMS--the effective anticancer component from Bolbstemma paniculatum, and to discuss the system's function of decreasing toxicity. BCA was used as carrier material. The preparation through overall feedback dynamic techniques. The properties of preparation and toxicology were also technology of nanoparticles was optimized studied. Thenanoparticles' targeting in mice vivo was observed with transmission electron microscopy. The function of decreasing toxicity was researched by the XXTX-2000 automatic quantitative analysis management system. D50 was 0.68 microm. Drug-loading rate and entrapment rate were 37.3% and 88.6% respectively. The release in vitro accorded with Weibull equation. The reaching release balance time and the t 1/2 extended 26 times and 19 times respectively comparing with injection. Nanoparticles mainly distributed in liver tissue. Their toxicity to lung and liver was evidently lower than injection. Nanoparticles' LD50 exceeded injection's by 13.5% and their stimulus was much lower than injection. The TBMS can be targeted to liver by liver targeted drug delivery system. At the same time, the problem about the toxicity hindering clinical application could be solved, which lays the foundation for the further studies on TBMS.

  1. Managing a case of extensively drug-resistant (XDR) pulmonary tuberculosis in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phua, Chee Kiang; Chee, Cynthia B E; Chua, Angeline P G; Gan, Suay Hong; Ahmed, Aneez D B; Wang, Yee Tang

    2011-03-01

    Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) is an emerging global health risk. We present the first case report of XDR-TB in Singapore. A 41-year-old Indonesian lady with previously treated pulmonary tuberculosis presented with chronic cough. Her sputum was strongly acid-fast bacilli positive and grew Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex resistant to first and second-line TB medications. She received 5 months of intensive multidrug treatment without sputum smear conversion. She then underwent resection of the diseased lung. The total cost incurred amounted to over S$100,000. She achieved sputum smear/culture conversion post-surgery, but will require further medical therapy for at least 18 months. XDRTB is poorly responsive to therapy and extremely expensive to manage. Its prevention by strict compliance to therapy is paramount.

  2. Topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for management of osteoarthritis in long-term care patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Argoff CE

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Charles E Argoff1, F Michael Gloth2 1Albany Medical College and Comprehensive Pain Center, Albany Medical Center, Albany, NY, USA; 2Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: Osteoarthritis is common in patients ≥65 years of age. Although nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs are often prescribed for osteoarthritis pain, they pose age-related cardiovascular, renal, and gastrointestinal risks. Two topical NSAIDs, diclofenac sodium 1% gel (DSG and diclofenac sodium 1.5% in 45.5% dimethylsulfoxide solution (D-DMSO, are approved in the US for the treatment of osteoarthritis pain. Topical NSAIDs have shown efficacy and safety in knee (DSG, D-DMSO and hand (DSG osteoarthritis. Analyses of data from randomized controlled trials of DSG in hand and knee osteoarthritis demonstrate significant improvement of pain and function in both younger patients (<65 years and older patients (≥65 years and suggest good safety and tolerability. However, long-term safety data in older patients are limited. Topical NSAIDs can ease medication administration and help address barriers to pain management in older patients, such as taking multiple medications and inability to swallow, and are a valuable option for long-term care providers. Keywords: nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, long-term care, nursing homes, chronic pain, topical analgesics

  3. [Drug management of prisoners: Role of the pharmaceutical staff to ensure patient safety].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalande, L; Bertin, C; Rioufol, C; Boleor, P; Cabelguenne, D

    2016-03-01

    In the prisons of Lyon, drug management of inmates implies cooperation between general practitioners, psychiatrists and pharmacists. All the medical prescriptions are reviewed by the pharmacists of the medical unit. The aim of this work was to synthesize the pharmaceutical interventions performed and show the implication of the pharmaceutical staff in detecting and handling prescribing errors. Pharmaceutical interventions performed between the 1st of June 2012 and the 31st December 2014 and entered in the Act-IP(®) database (SFPC) were retrospectively analyzed. Among the 18,205 prescriptions reviewed, 4064 (22.3%) had a prescription error. The main problems encountered were by decreasing order of frequency: missing monitoring (15% of the interventions), lack of compliance (13%), over dosage (10%), lack of conformity with recommendations or consensus (8%). Interventions were accepted in 78% cases. Most prescribing errors implied medications of the central nervous system. Among the interventions, 8% were initiated by pharmacy technicians, mainly lack of compliance. The pharmaceutical interventions reported reflected actions of securisation initiated by the pharmacists in cooperation with physicians: monitoring of patients taking antipsychotic medications or benzodiazepines maximal dosages. Besides, in this population with a high prevalence of psychiatric comorbidities and important suicide rate, detection of patients with default of compliance is one of the keys for drug optimization among these patients as it is an explanation for therapeutic failure. Copyright © 2015 Académie Nationale de Pharmacie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Cannabis as a substitute for prescription drugs – a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corroon Jr JM

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available James M Corroon Jr,1 Laurie K Mischley,2 Michelle Sexton3 1Center for Medical Cannabis Education, Del Mar, CA, 2Bastyr University Research Institute, Kenmore, WA, 3Department of Medical Research, Center for the Study of Cannabis and Social Policy, Seattle, WA, USA Background: The use of medical cannabis is increasing, most commonly for pain, anxiety and depression. Emerging data suggest that use and abuse of prescription drugs may be decreasing in states where medical cannabis is legal. The aim of this study was to survey cannabis users to determine whether they had intentionally substituted cannabis for prescription drugs.Methods: A total of 2,774 individuals were a self-selected convenience sample who reported having used cannabis at least once in the previous 90 days. Subjects were surveyed via an online anonymous questionnaire on cannabis substitution effects. Participants were recruited through social media and cannabis dispensaries in Washington State.Results: A total of 1,248 (46% respondents reported using cannabis as a substitute for prescription drugs. The most common classes of drugs substituted were narcotics/opioids (35.8%, anxiolytics/benzodiazepines (13.6% and antidepressants (12.7%. A total of 2,473 substitutions were reported or approximately two drug substitutions per affirmative respondent. The odds of reporting substituting were 4.59 (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.87–5.43 greater among medical cannabis users compared with non-medical users and 1.66 (95% CI, 1.27–2.16 greater among those reporting use for managing the comorbidities of pain, anxiety and depression. A slightly higher percentage of those who reported substituting resided in states where medical cannabis was legal at the time of the survey (47% vs. 45%, p=0.58, but this difference was not statistically significant.Discussion: These patient-reported outcomes support prior research that individuals are using cannabis as a substitute for prescription drugs

  5. [Six-month follow-up study of drug treatment for cannabis addiction: comparison study of four drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoenfeld, Netta; Bodnik, Dana; Rosenberg, Oded; Kotler, Moshe; Dannon, Pinhas

    2011-12-01

    Marijuana addiction is one of the most common forms of addiction worldwide. A variety of reasons for use exist, however, there are only a few tested treatments with frequent relapses. In this study, we examined the efficacy of four pharmacotherapy agents for the treatment of marijuana addiction: naltrexone, bupropion, escitalopram and bromazepam. A total of 59 patients were randomly assigned into four groups. Each group received one of the pharmacological agents for 120 days. Four types of questionnaires were employed: The Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression--21 items, the Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety, the Global Assessment of Functioning and a Visual Analogue Scale for perceived need of the drug. In addition, random urine tests were performed to detect tetrahydrocannabinol [THC). Naltrexone proved to be the most efficacious of the four agents, with only four dropouts. Other agents proved less efficacious with six, seven and eights dropouts for bupropion, bromazepam and escitalopram, respectively. In addition, naltrexone was most efficacious in reducing anxiety and depression rates, and increasing functioning and perceived need for drug use. Out of four pharmacological agents, naltrexone proved to be most efficacious in treating marijuana addiction and related disorders. Further studies are needed to confirm our results.

  6. Rio Chama Floodplain Management Study

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The Village of Chama requested the Soil Conservation Service, through the Upper Chama Soil and Water Conservation District, to conduct a study of the Rio Chama and...

  7. Electronic Document Management: A Human Resource Management Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Groenewald

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available This case study serve as exemplar regarding what can go wrong with the implementation of an electronic document management system. Knowledge agility and knowledge as capital, is outlined against the backdrop of the information society and knowledge economy. The importance of electronic document management and control is sketched thereafter. The literature review is concluded with the impact of human resource management on knowledge agility, which includes references to the learning organisation and complexity theory. The intervention methodology, comprising three phases, follows next. The results of the three phases are presented thereafter. Partial success has been achieved with improving the human efficacy of electronic document management, however the client opted to discontinue the system in use. Opsomming Die gevalle studie dien as voorbeeld van wat kan verkeerd loop met die implementering van ’n elektroniese dokumentbestuur sisteem. Teen die agtergrond van die inligtingsgemeenskap en kennishuishouding word kennissoepelheid en kennis as kapitaal bespreek. Die literatuurstudie word afgesluit met die inpak van menslikehulpbronbestuur op kennissoepelheid, wat ook die verwysings na die leerorganisasie en kompleksietydsteorie insluit. Die metodologie van die intervensie, wat uit drie fases bestaan, volg daarna. Die resultate van die drie fases word vervolgens aangebied. Slegs gedeelte welslae is behaal met die verbetering van die menslike doeltreffendheid ten opsigte van elektroniese dokumentbestuur. Die klient besluit egter om nie voort te gaan om die huidige sisteem te gebruik nie.

  8. Ethiopian Journal of Environmental Studies and Management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Ethiopian Journal of Environmental Studies and Management (EJESM) is based in ... Remote sensing and gis applications in determining shoreline and surface ... Assessment Of Labile Metals In Effluents From Lubricating Oil Company In ...

  9. Bureau of Land Management Wilderness Study Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This dataset is meant to depict Wilderness Study Areas (WSA's), within the state of New Mexico, identified by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM) as having...

  10. Drugs related to motor vehicle crashes in northern European countries: A study of fatally injured drivers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørland, Jørg; Steentoft, Anni; Simonsen, Kirsten Wiese

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to find which drugs and drug combinations were most common in drivers who died, in particular, in single vehicle crashes where the responsibility for the crash would be referred to the driver killed. The study included all available blood samples from drivers, who died......% respectively of the drivers under 30 with drugs present). Similar findings were obtained for drivers 30–49 years of age (63% with alcohol and/or drugs). In drivers aged 50 years and above, killed in single vehicle crashes (48% with alcohol and/or drugs) illicit drugs were found in only one case...

  11. How do pharmaceutical companies handle consumer adverse drug reaction reports? An overview based on a survey of French drug safety managers and officers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleuranceau-Morel, P

    2002-01-01

    It is surprising to see how consumer Adverse Drug Reaction (ADR) reports have been continuously increasing for the last few years in Europe. This probably results from the influence of United States (US) market where the patients feels justified in telephoning the pharmaceutical companies directly with queries regarding their treatment. The growing number of alternative sources of information (e.g. health and popular magazines, spots on radio and TV etc.) to which a consumer is exposed has added to this growth too. The changing relationship between patients and doctors may also contribute to this phenomenon. It is then interesting to evaluate the way pharmaceutical companies currently deal with consumer ADR reports. The management of consumer ADR reporting was investigated by means of a questionnaire sent to 46 French drug safety managers and drug safety officers (DSOs) of multinational pharmaceutical companies. The analysis of the survey stressed the fact that pharmaceutical companies should be prepared to face up to an increase in the number of consumer ADR reports. It clearly appears that the consumers who telephone to register side-effects should be forwarded to a trained DSO with medical or pharmaceutical background and the communication skills acquired through specific training. This person should also be able to release adequate product information validated by his/her own company. The influence of the US market seems to be changing the way pharmaceutical companies deal with consumer ADR reports. Nowadays, these reports are entered into a drug safety database by most of the companies without previously having contacted the patient's general practitioner (GP) or specialist for medical confirmation. Lastly, the drug safety managers and DSOs consulted have divided opinions about the usefulness of call centres and e-mails as tools for ADR reporting. But both tools are globally rejected by the pharmaceutical companies as a reliable means of reporting. As stated

  12. 131I metabolism in the study of antithyroid drug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagliardi, R.P.; Santalla de Pirovano, M. del C.; Kramar de Valmaggia, E.P.; Valsecchi, R.; Pisarev, Mario; Altschuler, Noe

    1977-11-01

    The main purpose of the present report was to study the action of antithyroid drugs on different parameters of thyroid activity utilizing 131 I, in the offsprings of rats treated during pregnancy and the perinatal period. Both PTU and MMI caused alterations in growth and thyroid activity, but they were more dramatic with the former. A significative increase in 131 I thyroid uptake and in circulating radioactivity was observed. When % uptake was expressed as a function of thyroidal and body weights, a significative decrease was noticed. The ratio T/S and the percentage of labelled iodothyronines in pancreatin digests were also decreased. Neuromuscular maturation was evaluated, by means of the test of Schapiro. A group of animals treated with PTU plus T 4 had a significant delay, reaching normal developement later than the controls or those treated with MMI. (author) [es

  13. 21 CFR 201.200 - Disclosure of drug efficacy study evaluations in labeling and advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... labeling and advertising. 201.200 Section 201.200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... Efficacy Study § 201.200 Disclosure of drug efficacy study evaluations in labeling and advertising. (a)(1... bringing to the attention of the prescribers of prescription items the conclusions of the expert panels...

  14. An Intercompany Perspective on Biopharmaceutical Drug Product Robustness Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morar-Mitrica, Sorina; Adams, Monica L; Crotts, George; Wurth, Christine; Ihnat, Peter M; Tabish, Tanvir; Antochshuk, Valentyn; DiLuzio, Willow; Dix, Daniel B; Fernandez, Jason E; Gupta, Kapil; Fleming, Michael S; He, Bing; Kranz, James K; Liu, Dingjiang; Narasimhan, Chakravarthy; Routhier, Eric; Taylor, Katherine D; Truong, Nobel; Stokes, Elaine S E

    2018-02-01

    The Biophorum Development Group (BPDG) is an industry-wide consortium enabling networking and sharing of best practices for the development of biopharmaceuticals. To gain a better understanding of current industry approaches for establishing biopharmaceutical drug product (DP) robustness, the BPDG-Formulation Point Share group conducted an intercompany collaboration exercise, which included a bench-marking survey and extensive group discussions around the scope, design, and execution of robustness studies. The results of this industry collaboration revealed several key common themes: (1) overall DP robustness is defined by both the formulation and the manufacturing process robustness; (2) robustness integrates the principles of quality by design (QbD); (3) DP robustness is an important factor in setting critical quality attribute control strategies and commercial specifications; (4) most companies employ robustness studies, along with prior knowledge, risk assessments, and statistics, to develop the DP design space; (5) studies are tailored to commercial development needs and the practices of each company. Three case studies further illustrate how a robustness study design for a biopharmaceutical DP balances experimental complexity, statistical power, scientific understanding, and risk assessment to provide the desired product and process knowledge. The BPDG-Formulation Point Share discusses identified industry challenges with regard to biopharmaceutical DP robustness and presents some recommendations for best practices. Copyright © 2018 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Physician adherence to hypertension treatment guidelines and drug acquisition costs of antihypertensive drugs at the cardiac clinic: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulameer SA

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Shaymaa Abdalwahed Abdulameer1, Mohanad Naji Sahib1, Noorizan Abd Aziz1,2, Yahaya Hassan1,2, Hadeer Akram Abdul AlRazzaq1, Omar Ismail31School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Minden, Penang, Malaysia; 2Faculty of Pharmacy, Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM, 42300 Puncak Alam, Selangor, Malaysia; 3Hospital Pulau Pinang, 10900, Penang, MalaysiaAbstract: Prescribing pattern surveys are one of the pharmacoepidemiological techniques that provide an unbiased picture of prescribing habits. Prescription surveys permit the identification of suboptimal prescribing patterns for further evaluation. The aims of this study were to determine the prescribing trend, adherence of the prescribers to the guideline, and the impact of drug expenditure on drug utilization at the cardiac clinic of Penang Hospital, Malaysia. This was a cross-sectional study. Demographic data of the patients, diagnoses and the drugs prescribed were recorded. The average drug acquisition costs (ADAC were calculated for each antihypertensive drug class on a daily and annual basis. Adherence to the guideline was calculated as a percentage of the total number of patients. A total of 313 individuals fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The average age of the study population was 59.30 ± 10.35 years. The mean number of drugs per prescription in the study was 2.09 ± 0.78. There were no significant differences in the demographic data. Antihypertensive drugs were used in monotherapy and polytherapy in 20.8% and 79.2% of the patients, respectively. Adherence to the guideline regarding prescription occurred in 85.30% of the patients. The lowest priced drug class was diuretics and the highest was angiotensin-receptor blockers. In conclusion, the total adherence to the guideline was good; the adherence percentage only slightly decreased with a co-existing comorbidity (such as diabetes mellitus. The use of thiazide diuretics was encouraged because they are well tolerated and

  16. A way for reducing drug supply chain cost for a hospital district: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Postacchini

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This work aims at providing insights to optimise healthcare logistic of the drug management, in order to deal with the healthcare expenditure cut. In this paper the effects of different drug supply chain configurations, on the resulting average stock, service level and Bullwhip effect, of the studied supply chain, is quantitatively assessed. Design/methodology/approach: A case study of an Italian district has been studied, taking into account three echelons: suppliers, central stock, and hospitals. A model of the various supply chain configurations has been created with the use of the simulation. Specifically, 24 supply chain configurations have been examined, stemming from the combination of several supply chain design parameters, namely: transshipment policies (Emergency Lateral Transshipment or Total Inventory Equalization; re-order and inventory management policies (Economic Order Quantity or Economic Order Interval; required service levels (90% or 95%; the number of available vans (one or two. For each configuration, hospital average stock, service level and a “Bullwhip effect” analysis are computed. To know which input variables are statistically significant, a DoE (Design of Experiments analysis has been executed. Findings: The output of this paper provides useful insights and suggestions to optimize the healthcare logistic and drug supply chain. According to the developed DoE analysis, it can be stated that the introduction of transshipment policies provides important improvement in terms of service and stock levels. To reduce the Bullwhip effect, which results in a service level decreasing, and in a managing stock costs increasing, it is worth to adopt an EOQ re-order policy. Practical implications: This research gives practical recommendations to the studied system, in order to reduce costs and maintain a very satisfactory service level. Originality/value: This paper fulfils an identified need to study which combination of

  17. Reduction of costs for anemia-management drugs associated with the use of ferric citrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Anila Thomas,1 Leif E Peterson2 1Clinical Pharmacy Services, Houston Methodist Hospital, Houston, TX, USA; 2Center for Biostatistics, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX, USA Background: Ferric citrate is a novel phosphate binder which has the potential to reduce usage of erythropoietin-stimulating agents (ESAs and intravenous (IV iron used for anemia management during hemodialysis (HD among patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD. Currently, the potential health care cost savings on a national scale due to the use of ferric citrate in ESRD are undetermined. Methods: Per-patient-per-year costs of ESAs (Epogen® and Aranesp® [Amgen Inc., CA, USA] and IV iron (Venofer® [American Regent, Inc., NY, USA] and Ferrlecit® [Sanofi US, Bridgewater, NJ, USA] were based on RED BOOK™ (Truven Health Analytics New York, NY, USA costs combined with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS base rate and actual usage in 2011 for the four drugs. The annual number of outpatients undergoing HD in the US was based on frequencies reported by the USRDS (United States Renal Data System. Monte Carlo uncertainty analysis was performed to determine total annual costs and cost reduction based on ferric citrate usage. Results: Total annual cost of ESAs and IV iron for anemia management in ESRD determined by Monte Carlo analysis assuming CMS base rate value was 5.127 (3.664–6.260 billion USD. For actual utilization in 2011, total annual cost of ESAs and IV iron was 3.981 (2.780–4.930 billion USD. If ferric citrate usage reduced ESA utilization by 20% and IV iron by 40%, then total cost would be reduced by 21.2% to 4.038 (2.868–4.914 billion USD for the CMS base rate, and by 21.8% to 3.111 (2.148–3.845 billion USD, based on 2011 actual utilization. Conclusion: It is likely that US health care costs for anemia-management drugs associated with ESRD among HD patients can be reduced by using ferric citrate as a phosphate binder. Keywords

  18. NMR spectroscopy applied to the eye: Drugs and metabolic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saether, Oddbjoern

    2005-07-01

    NMR spectroscopy has been extensively applied in biomedical research during the last decades. It has proved to be an analytical tool of great value. From being mainly used in chemistry, technological developments have expanded the application of NMR spectroscopy to a great wealth of disciplines. With this method, biochemical information can be obtained by analysing tissue extracts. Moreover, NMR spectroscopy is increasingly employed for pharmacokinetic studies and analysis of biofluids. Technological progress has provided increased sensitivity and resolution in the spectra, which enable even more of the complexity of biological samples to be elucidated. With the implementation of high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) NMR spectroscopy in biomedicine, intact tissue samples or biopsies can be investigated. Thus, NMR spectroscopy has an ever-increasing impact in metabolic screening of human samples and in animal models, and methods are also increasingly realised in vivo. The present work, NMR spectroscopy applied to eye research, consists of two main parts. Firstly, the feasibility to monitor fluorinated ophthalmic drugs directly in the eye was assessed. Secondly, HR-MAS H1 NMR spectroscopy was applied for metabolic profiling of the anterior eye segment, specifically to analyse metabolic changes in intact corneal and lenticular samples after cataractogenic insults. This work included metabonomics with the application of pattern recognition methods to analyse HR-MAS spectra of eye tissues. Optimisation strategies were explored for F19 NMR detection of fluorinated drugs in a phantom eye. S/N gains in F19 NMR spectroscopy were achieved by implementing time-share H1 decoupling at 2.35 T. The method is advantageous for compounds displaying broad spectral coupling patterns, though detection of drugs at concentrations encountered in the anterior eye segment after topical application was not feasible. Higher magnetic fields and technological improvements could enable

  19. NMR spectroscopy applied to the eye: Drugs and metabolic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saether, Oddbjoern

    2005-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy has been extensively applied in biomedical research during the last decades. It has proved to be an analytical tool of great value. From being mainly used in chemistry, technological developments have expanded the application of NMR spectroscopy to a great wealth of disciplines. With this method, biochemical information can be obtained by analysing tissue extracts. Moreover, NMR spectroscopy is increasingly employed for pharmacokinetic studies and analysis of biofluids. Technological progress has provided increased sensitivity and resolution in the spectra, which enable even more of the complexity of biological samples to be elucidated. With the implementation of high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) NMR spectroscopy in biomedicine, intact tissue samples or biopsies can be investigated. Thus, NMR spectroscopy has an ever-increasing impact in metabolic screening of human samples and in animal models, and methods are also increasingly realised in vivo. The present work, NMR spectroscopy applied to eye research, consists of two main parts. Firstly, the feasibility to monitor fluorinated ophthalmic drugs directly in the eye was assessed. Secondly, HR-MAS H1 NMR spectroscopy was applied for metabolic profiling of the anterior eye segment, specifically to analyse metabolic changes in intact corneal and lenticular samples after cataractogenic insults. This work included metabonomics with the application of pattern recognition methods to analyse HR-MAS spectra of eye tissues. Optimisation strategies were explored for F19 NMR detection of fluorinated drugs in a phantom eye. S/N gains in F19 NMR spectroscopy were achieved by implementing time-share H1 decoupling at 2.35 T. The method is advantageous for compounds displaying broad spectral coupling patterns, though detection of drugs at concentrations encountered in the anterior eye segment after topical application was not feasible. Higher magnetic fields and technological improvements could enable

  20. Adverse drug reaction reports for cardiometabolic drugs from sub-Saharan Africa: a study in VigiBase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berhe, Derbew Fikadu; Juhlin, Kristina; Star, Kristina; Beyene, Kidanemariam G M; Dheda, Mukesh; Haaijer-Ruskamp, Flora M; Taxis, Katja; Mol, Peter G M

    2015-06-01

    Identifying key features in individual case safety reports (ICSR) of suspected adverse drug reactions (ADRs) with cardiometabolic drugs from sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) compared with reports from the rest of the world (RoW). Reports on suspected ADRs of cardiometabolic drugs (ATC: A10[antidiabetic], B01[antithrombotics] and C[cardiovascular]) were extracted from WHO Global database, VigiBase(®) (1992-2013). We used vigiPoint, a logarithmic odds ratios (log2 OR)-based method to study disproportional reporting between SSA and RoW. Case-defining features were considered relevant if the lower limit of the 99% CI > 0.5. In SSA, 3773 (9%) of reported ADRs were for cardiometabolic drugs, in RoW for 18%. Of these, 79% originated from South Africa and 81% were received after 2007. Most reports were for drugs acting on the renin-angiotensin system (36% SSA & 14% RoW). Compared with RoW, reports were more often sent for patients 18-44 years old (log2 OR 0.95 [99 CI 0.80; 1.09]) or with non-fatal outcome (log2 OR 1.16 [99 CI 1.10; 1.22]). Eight ADRs (cough, angioedema, lip swelling, face oedema, swollen tongue, throat irritation, drug ineffective and blood glucose abnormal) and seven drugs (enalapril, rosuvastatin, perindopril, vildagliptin, insulin glulisine, nifedipine and insulin lispro) were disproportionally more reported in SSA than in the RoW. 'In recent years, the number of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) reported in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) has sharply increased. The data showed the well-known population-based differential ADR profile of ACE inhibitors in the SSA population.' © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Thermoanalytical study of polymorphic transformation in Fluconazole drug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desai, S.R.; Shaikh, M.M.; Dharwadkar, S.R.

    2003-01-01

    Polymorphic transformation in Fluconazole (I) drug has been studied employing differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction and FT-IR techniques. Fluconazole (I) exhibited the sharp melting point at 138.4 deg. C. Considerable under cooling was, however, observed for the drug during cooling. No indication of freezing of molten Fluconazole (I) was evident in the DSC curve recorded up to a temperature of 25 deg. C in the cooling cycle. Reheating of the sample obtained after cooling, produced the DSC pattern much different compared to that obtained in the first heating and consisted of a sharp exothermic peak beginning at 81 deg. C preceding the twin endothermic peak with an onset temperature of 135.3 deg. C. In addition to these two peaks, a small endothermic peak was also observed around 31 deg. C, which could be attributed to a glass transition with an associated relaxation. The precise glass transition temperature derived from the data collected from six different independent experiments was found to be (31.67±0.13) deg. C. X-ray diffraction pattern of the Fluconazole (I) indicated that the as received sample was crystalline. The molten Fluconazole on cooling, however, produced a glassy amorphous mass. The amorphous product on heating to temperature >81 deg. C transformed to Fluconazole (II) which subsequently changed to Fluconazole (I) prior to melting. The split endothermic peak beginning at 135.3 deg. C recorded for the solidified Fluconazole sample is consistent with the observations made by X-ray diffraction. The observations made by employing DSC and X-ray diffraction were corroborated by FT-IR data on the samples isolated at different stages in the experiments

  2. Thermoanalytical study of polymorphic transformation in Fluconazole drug

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desai, S.R.; Shaikh, M.M.; Dharwadkar, S.R

    2003-03-24

    Polymorphic transformation in Fluconazole (I) drug has been studied employing differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction and FT-IR techniques. Fluconazole (I) exhibited the sharp melting point at 138.4 deg. C. Considerable under cooling was, however, observed for the drug during cooling. No indication of freezing of molten Fluconazole (I) was evident in the DSC curve recorded up to a temperature of 25 deg. C in the cooling cycle. Reheating of the sample obtained after cooling, produced the DSC pattern much different compared to that obtained in the first heating and consisted of a sharp exothermic peak beginning at 81 deg. C preceding the twin endothermic peak with an onset temperature of 135.3 deg. C. In addition to these two peaks, a small endothermic peak was also observed around 31 deg. C, which could be attributed to a glass transition with an associated relaxation. The precise glass transition temperature derived from the data collected from six different independent experiments was found to be (31.67{+-}0.13) deg. C. X-ray diffraction pattern of the Fluconazole (I) indicated that the as received sample was crystalline. The molten Fluconazole on cooling, however, produced a glassy amorphous mass. The amorphous product on heating to temperature >81 deg. C transformed to Fluconazole (II) which subsequently changed to Fluconazole (I) prior to melting. The split endothermic peak beginning at 135.3 deg. C recorded for the solidified Fluconazole sample is consistent with the observations made by X-ray diffraction. The observations made by employing DSC and X-ray diffraction were corroborated by FT-IR data on the samples isolated at different stages in the experiments.

  3. Critical appraisal of the guidelines for the management of ankylosing spondylitis: disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano, Enrique R; Clegg, Daniel O; Lisse, Jeffrey R

    2012-05-01

    Surprisingly, little data are available for the use of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in ankylosing spondylitis. Sulfasalazine has been the best studied. Efficacy data for individual agents (including pamidronate) and combinations of agents are detailed in this review. Intriguingly, these agents continue to be used with some frequency, even in the absence of efficacy data. To answer these questions, additional systematic studies of these agents in ankylosing spondylitis are needed and will likely need to be done by interested collaborative groups such as SPARTAN.

  4. Study of interaction between antiobesity and hypolipidemic drugs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PURPOSE: To explore the interaction between antiobesity drug, topiramate, and hypolipidemic drug, atorvastatin, in rats. METHODS: Obesity was induced in Wistar albino rats by administering cafeteria diet (CD) for 40 days and divided into 5 groups. While one group served as control, each other group received either ...

  5. A study on programmed drug release from tablets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, Jacoba van der

    1993-01-01

    This thesis shows the extension of the applicability of the megaloporous system for drugs with different physico-chemical properties, like solubility and pK.. Procaine HC1, a highly soluble drug, can successfully be formulated in the programmed release megaloporous system, by using Carnauba wax,

  6. Electrochemical studies of ropinirole, an anti-Parkinson's disease drug

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The oxidation behaviour of a potent anti-Parkinson's disease drug ropinirole hydrochloride was investigated over a wide pH range in aqueous solution at glassy carbon electrode using cyclic and square-wave voltammetry. The oxidation of drug is a pH dependent irreversible process and occurs in two steps.

  7. Ethiopian Journal of Environmental Studies and Management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... Ethiopian Journal of Environmental Studies and Management (EJESM) is based in the Department of Geography and Environmental Studies, Bahir Dar University, Ethiopia. Its aim is to publish original research output in the area of Geography, Ecology, Botany, Conservation studies, Food and Nutrition, Water Resources, ...

  8. Hybrid Risk Management Methodology: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacky Siu-Lun Ting

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Risk management is a decision-making process involving considerations of political, social, economic and engineering factors with relevant risk assessments relating to a potential hazard. In the last decade, a number of risk management tools are introduced and employed to manage and minimize the uncertainty and threats realization to the organizations. However, the focus of these methodologies are different; in which companies need to adopt various risk management principles to visualize a full picture of the organizational risk level. Regarding to this, this paper presents a new approach of risk management that integrates Hierarchical Holographic Modeling (HHM, Enterprise Risk Management (ERM and Business Recovery Planning (BCP for identifying and assessing risks as well as managing the consequences of realized residual risks. To illustrate the procedures of the proposed methodology, a logistic company ABC Limited is chosen to serve as a case study Through applying HHM and ERM to investigate and assess the risk, ABC Limited can be better evaluated the potential risks and then took the responsive actions (e.g. BCP to handle the risks and crisis in near future.

  9. Consensus statement: Management of drug-induced liver injury in HIV-positive patients treated for TB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Jong

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Drug-induced liver injury (DILI in HIV/tuberculosis (TB co-infected patients is a common problem in the South African setting, and re-introduction of anti-TB drugs can be challenging for the healthcare worker. Although international guidelines on the re-introduction of TB treatment are available, the definition of DILI is not uniform, management of antiretroviral therapy (ART in HIV co-infection is not mentioned, and the guidance on management is not uniform and lacks a practical approach. In this consensus statement, we summarise important aspects of DILI and provide practical guidance for healthcare workers for different patient groups and healthcare settings on the re-introduction of anti-TB drugs and ART in HIV/TB co-infected individuals presenting with DILI.

  10. A study on nanodiamond-based drug delivery system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jing; Zhang Xiaoyong; Zhu Ying; Li Wenxin; Huang Qing

    2010-01-01

    A multifunctional drug delivery system based on nanodiamonds (NDs) has been developed. FITC, HCPT and TF were absorbed on NDs successively to form the multifunctional complex. The NDs and ND complex samples were characterized by TEM, FR-IR and UV-V. The results indicated that this drug delivery system is a high loading system. Efficacy of the drug delivery system on Hela cell was evaluated with MTT assays and fluorescence microscopy. The results show that multifunction of the NDs complex include fluorescence, targeting and high efficacy. (authors)

  11. A study of drug use pattern among inmates of Jos prison, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study of drug use pattern among inmates of Jos prison, Nigeria. ... A total of 3134 inmates who were admitted for drug use treatment in the ... children have been identified to abuse drugs should be co-opted into the rehabilitation process.

  12. 75 FR 36425 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; In Vitro Diagnostic Studies...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2007-D-0076] (formerly Docket No. 2007D-0387) Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; In Vitro Diagnostic Studies--Frequently Asked Questions; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS...

  13. Detection and management of drug-resistant tuberculosis in HIV-infected patients in lower-income countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ballif, M; Nhandu, V; Wood, R

    2014-01-01

    SETTING: Drug resistance threatens tuberculosis (TB) control, particularly among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected persons. OBJECTIVE: To describe practices in the prevention and management of drug-resistant TB under antiretroviral therapy (ART) programs in lower-income countries. DESIGN...... patients seen at 40 of the participating ART programs. RESULTS: Phenotypic drug susceptibility testing (DST) was available in 36 (77%) ART programs, but was only used for 22% of all TB patients. Molecular DST was available in 33 (70%) programs and was used in 23% of all TB patients. Twenty ART programs (43......%) provided directly observed therapy (DOT) during the entire course of treatment, 16 (34%) during the intensive phase only, and 11 (23%) did not follow DOT. Fourteen (30%) ART programs reported no access to second-line anti-tuberculosis regimens; 18 (38%) reported TB drug shortages. CONCLUSIONS: Capacity...

  14. Drug education in victorian schools (DEVS: the study protocol for a harm reduction focused school drug education trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Midford Richard

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study seeks to extend earlier Australian school drug education research by developing and measuring the effectiveness of a comprehensive, evidence-based, harm reduction focused school drug education program for junior secondary students aged 13 to 15 years. The intervention draws on the recent literature as to the common elements in effective school curriculum. It seeks to incorporate the social influence of parents through home activities. It also emphasises the use of appropriate pedagogy in the delivery of classroom lessons. Methods/Design A cluster randomised school drug education trial will be conducted with 1746 junior high school students in 21 Victorian secondary schools over a period of three years. Both the schools and students have actively consented to participate in the study. The education program comprises ten lessons in year eight (13-14 year olds and eight in year nine (14-15 year olds that address issues around the use of alcohol, tobacco, cannabis and other illicit drugs. Control students will receive the drug education normally provided in their schools. Students will be tested at baseline, at the end of each intervention year and also at the end of year ten. A self completion questionnaire will be used to collect information on knowledge, patterns and context of use, attitudes and harms experienced in relation to alcohol, tobacco, cannabis and other illicit drug use. Multi-level modelling will be the method of analysis because it can best accommodate hierarchically structured data. All analyses will be conducted on an Intent-to-Treat basis. In addition, focus groups will be conducted with teachers and students in five of the 14 intervention schools, subsequent to delivery of the year eight and nine programs. This will provide qualitative data about the effectiveness of the lessons and the relevance of the materials. Discussion The benefits of this drug education study derive both from the knowledge

  15. Cannabis as a substitute for prescription drugs – a cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corroon, James M; Mischley, Laurie K; Sexton, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    Background The use of medical cannabis is increasing, most commonly for pain, anxiety and depression. Emerging data suggest that use and abuse of prescription drugs may be decreasing in states where medical cannabis is legal. The aim of this study was to survey cannabis users to determine whether they had intentionally substituted cannabis for prescription drugs. Methods A total of 2,774 individuals were a self-selected convenience sample who reported having used cannabis at least once in the previous 90 days. Subjects were surveyed via an online anonymous questionnaire on cannabis substitution effects. Participants were recruited through social media and cannabis dispensaries in Washington State. Results A total of 1,248 (46%) respondents reported using cannabis as a substitute for prescription drugs. The most common classes of drugs substituted were narcotics/opioids (35.8%), anxiolytics/benzodiazepines (13.6%) and antidepressants (12.7%). A total of 2,473 substitutions were reported or approximately two drug substitutions per affirmative respondent. The odds of reporting substituting were 4.59 (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.87–5.43) greater among medical cannabis users compared with non-medical users and 1.66 (95% CI, 1.27–2.16) greater among those reporting use for managing the comorbidities of pain, anxiety and depression. A slightly higher percentage of those who reported substituting resided in states where medical cannabis was legal at the time of the survey (47% vs. 45%, p=0.58), but this difference was not statistically significant. Discussion These patient-reported outcomes support prior research that individuals are using cannabis as a substitute for prescription drugs, particularly, narcotics/opioids, and independent of whether they identify themselves as medical or non-medical users. This is especially true if they suffer from pain, anxiety and depression. Additionally, this study suggests that state laws allowing access to, and use of, medical

  16. [Discussion about traditional Chinese medicine pharmacokinetics study based on first botanical drug approved by FDA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Fanghua

    2010-04-01

    Pharmacokinetics study is one of main components of pharmaceuticals development. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Veregen as the first botanical drug in 2006. This article introduced FDA's requirement on pharmacokinetics study of botanical drug and pharmacokinetics studies of Veregen, summarized current requirement and status quo of pharmacokinetics study on traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and natural medicine in China, and discussed about pharmacokinetics study strategy for TCM and natural medicine.

  17. A case study of hospital operations management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, T C

    1987-12-01

    This paper discusses a study to investigate various operations management problems in a newly opened, modern regional hospital in Hong Kong. The findings of the study reveal that there exist in the hospital a number of current and potential problem areas. Recommendations for solving these problems are suggested with a view to improving the overall operational efficiency and effectiveness of the hospital.

  18. Drug management in the elderly adult with chronic kidney disease: a review for the primary care physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponticelli, Claudio; Sala, Gabriele; Glassock, Richard J

    2015-05-01

    With advancing age, the functional reserve of many organs tends to decrease. In particular, the lean body mass, the levels of serum albumin, the blood flow to the liver, and the glomerular filtration rate are reduced in elderly individuals and can be further impaired by the concomitant presence of acute or chronic kidney disease. Moreover, patients with kidney disease are often affected by comorbid processes and are prescribed multiple medications. The aging process also modifies some drug interactions, including the affinity of some drugs for their receptor, the number of receptors, and the cell responses upon receptor activation. Therefore, older patients with kidney disease are particularly susceptible to the risks of adverse drug reactions. Planning a pharmacological regimen in such patients is confounded by the paucity of information available on the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles of a large number of drugs commonly used in this group of patients. Finally, many aged patients suffer from unintentional poor compliance. In this review, the problems physicians face in designing safe and effective medication management in elderly individuals are discussed, paying attention to those more frequently used, which may be potentially harmful in patients with kidney disease. The risks of overdosing and underdosing are outlined, and some recommendations to reduce the risk of adverse drug reactions are provided. A review of the literature covering the field of drug management in older patients with kidney disease was performed by selecting those articles published between January 1, 1990, and December 1, 2014, using PubMed as a search engine with the keywords elderly, kidney disease, drugs, drug interaction, and renal function. Copyright © 2015 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A System for Anesthesia Drug Administration Using Barcode Technology: The Codonics Safe Label System and Smart Anesthesia Manager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelacic, Srdjan; Bowdle, Andrew; Nair, Bala G; Kusulos, Dolly; Bower, Lynnette; Togashi, Kei

    2015-08-01

    Many anesthetic drug errors result from vial or syringe swaps. Scanning the barcodes on vials before drug preparation, creating syringe labels that include barcodes, and scanning the syringe label barcodes before drug administration may help to prevent errors. In contrast, making syringe labels by hand that comply with the recommendations of regulatory agencies and standards-setting bodies is tedious and time consuming. A computerized system that uses vial barcodes and generates barcoded syringe labels could address both safety issues and labeling recommendations. We measured compliance of syringe labels in multiple operating rooms (ORs) with the recommendations of regulatory agencies and standards-setting bodies before and after the introduction of the Codonics Safe Label System (SLS). The Codonics SLS was then combined with Smart Anesthesia Manager software to create an anesthesia barcode drug administration system, which allowed us to measure the rate of scanning syringe label barcodes at the time of drug administration in 2 cardiothoracic ORs before and after introducing a coffee card incentive. Twelve attending cardiothoracic anesthesiologists and the OR satellite pharmacy participated. The use of the Codonics SLS drug labeling system resulted in >75% compliant syringe labels (95% confidence interval, 75%-98%). All syringe labels made using the Codonics SLS system were compliant. The average rate of scanning barcodes on syringe labels using Smart Anesthesia Manager was 25% (730 of 2976) over 13 weeks but increased to 58% (956 of 1645) over 8 weeks after introduction of a simple (coffee card) incentive (P < 0.001). An anesthesia barcode drug administration system resulted in a moderate rate of scanning syringe label barcodes at the time of drug administration. Further, adaptation of the system will be required to achieve a higher utilization rate.

  20. Unique characteristics of regulatory approval and pivotal studies of orphan anticancer drugs in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Hiroki; Tsukamoto, Katsura

    2018-04-17

    The approval of orphan anticancer drugs has increased, with the number exceeding that of non-orphan drugs in Japan in recent years. Although orphan anticancer drugs may have unique characteristics due to their rarity, these have not been fully characterized. We investigated anticancer drugs approved in Japan between April 2004 and November 2017 to reveal the characteristics of regulatory approval and pivotal studies on orphan anticancer drugs compared to non-orphan drugs. The median regulatory review time and number of patients in pivotal studies on orphan anticancer drugs (281.0 days [interquartile range, 263.3-336.0]; 222.5 patients [66.0-454.3]) were significantly lower than those on non-orphan drugs (353.0 days [277.0-535.5]; 521.0 patients [303.5-814.5], respectively) (P < 0.001). Phase II, non-randomized and non-controlled designs were more frequently used in pivotal studies on orphan anticancer drugs (45.9%, 41.9% and 43.2%) than non-orphan drugs (17.2%, 14.1% and 14.1%, respectively). Response rate was more commonly used as a primary endpoint in pivotal studies on orphan anticancer drugs (48.6%) than non-orphan drugs (17.2%). Indications limited by molecular features, second or later treatment line, and accelerated approval in the United States were associated with the use of response rate in orphan anticancer drug studies. In conclusion, we demonstrated that orphan anticancer drugs in Japan have unique characteristics compared to non-orphan drugs: shorter regulatory review and pivotal studies frequently using phase II, non-randomized, or non-controlled designs and response rate as a primary endpoint, with fewer patients.

  1. Biological studies of matrix metalloproteinase sensitive drug delivery systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Pia Thermann

    due to severe side effects as a result of drug distribution to healthy tissues. To enhance ecacy of treatment and improve life quality of patients, tumor specific drug delivery strategies, such as liposome encapsulated drugs, which accumulate in tumor tissue, has gained increased attention. Several....... The system exploits the increased MMP-2 activity present in tumor tissue as a site-specific trigger of liposomal activation and controlled drug release after accumulation due to the enhanced permeability and retention effect. Enzymatic activity of MMP-2 results in shedding of a novel PEG coating, consisting...... of a negatively charged lipopeptide-PEG conjugates containing a MMP-2 cleavable peptide, which leads to cationic liposomes with enhanced ability to interact with negatively charged cell membranes. Activation of the liposomal formulation developed here resulted in enhanced association of liposomes with cancer...

  2. Systems biology approaches to the study of cardiovascular drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nikolsky, Y.; Kleemann, R.

    2010-01-01

    Atherogenic lipids and chronic inflammation drive the development of cardiovascular disorders such as atherosclerosis. Many cardiovascular drugs target the liver which is involved in the formation of lipid and inflammatory risk factors. With robust systems biology tools and comprehensive

  3. Pharmacokinetic Study of a Capsule-based Chronomodulated Drug ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cross-linked gelatin capsule shells containing salbutamol pellets, and sealed with a suitable mixture of ... delivered at a constant rate, since the drug effect decreases with time at .... parameters were analyzed by Wilcoxon Signed. Rank test for ...

  4. A PROSPECTIVE, OBSERVATIONAL STUDY OF ADVERSE REACTIONS TO DRUG REGIME FOR MULTI-DRUG RESISTANT PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS IN CENTRAL INDIA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Rohan C. Hire

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: 1 To assess the adverse drug reactions of second line anti-tubercular drugs used to treat Multi-drug resistant Tuberculosis (MDR TB in central India on the basis of causality, severity and avoidability scales. 2 To study the relationship of type of MDR TB (primary or secondary and presence of diabetes mellitus (DM with mean smear conversion time. Material and Methods: A prospective, observational study was carried out on diagnosed multidrug resistant tuberculosis patients enrolled for DOTS‑Plus regimen at TB and Chest Disease Department from January to December 2012. They were followed for 9 months thereafter and encountered adverse drug reactions (ADRs were noted along with the time of sputum conversion. The data were analysed by Chi-square or Fisher’s exact test and unpaired student’s‘t’ test. Results: Total 64 ADRs were reported in 55 patients out of total 110 patients (n = 110. As per the Naranjo causality assessment of ADRs, 7 patients had “definite” causal relation, 45 had “probable” causal relation and 3 had “possible” causal relation with drugs of DOTS Plus regime. As per the Hartwig’s severity assessment scale, there were total 7 ADRs in Level 1, 6 in Level 2, 33 in Level 3 and 9 in Level 4. Hallas avoidability assessment scale divided the ADRs as 3 being “Definitely avoidable”, 26 “Possibly avoidable”, 23 “Not avoidable” and 3 “unevaluable”. . Mean sputum smear conversion time is significantly higher in patients with secondary type than that of primary type of MDR TB (p = 0.0001 and in patients with DM than those without DM (p <0.0001. Conclusion: ADRs were common in patients of MDR TB on DOTs-Plus drug regime. It was due to lack of availability of safer and equally potent drugs in DOTs-Plus drug regime compared to DOTS regime in non-resistant TB. The frequency and severity of ADRs can be reduced by strict vigilance about known and unknown ADRs, monitoring their laboratory and

  5. Identification and management of physical health problems among an injecting drug using population

    OpenAIRE

    Patton, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Injecting drug use is highly prevalent in London and is associated with specific physical health problems. These problems are related to the toxicity of the substances, their mode of consumption and as a consequence of the drug taking lifestyle. Hepatitis B and C viral infections are common among drug users due to sharing of both needles and other drug taking paraphernalia. Hepatitis B infection can be prevented by immunisation. Hepatitis C infection can interact with alcohol consumption to a...

  6. Extent and quality of drug use in community-dwelling people aged ≥75 years: A Swedish nationwide register-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagerin, Annica; Törnkvist, Lena; Nilsson, Gunnar; Johnell, Kristina; Fastbom, Johan

    2017-12-01

    It is important for district nurses and other health professionals in primary care to gain more insight into the patterns and quality of drug use in community-dwelling older people, particularly in 75-year-olds, who have been the target of preventive home visits. This study aimed to examine the extent and quality of drug use in community-dwelling older people and to compare drug use in 75-year-olds with that of older age groups. Data from 2013 on people aged ≥75 years were obtained from the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register. Those living in the community (671,940/739,734 people aged ≥75 years) were included in the study. Quality of drug use was assessed by using a selection of indicators issued by the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare. The prevalence of polypharmacy and of many drug groups increased with age, as did several indicators of inappropriate drug use. However some drug groups, as well as inappropriate drugs, were prevalent in 75-year-olds and declined with age, for example diabetes drugs, drugs with major anticholinergic effects and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The substantial use of some drugs as early as 75 years of age confirms the value of including drug use as a topic in preventive home visits to 75-year-olds. The finding that polypharmacy and many measures of inappropriate drug use increased with age in community-dwelling older people also underscores the importance of district nurses' role in continuing to promote safe medication management at higher ages.

  7. Drug-polymer interaction studies of cytarabine loaded chitosan nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madni, A.; Kashif, P.M.; Nazir, I.; Rehman, M.

    2017-01-01

    Assessment of possible incompatibilities between drug and excipients is an important parameter of preformulation stage during the pharmaceutical product development of active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). The potential physical and chemical interaction among the components of a delivery system can affect the chemical nature, bioavailability, stability, and subsequently therapeutic efficacy of drugs. In this study, ATR-FTIR spectroscopy was employed to investigate the possible intermolecular interaction of Cytarabine with deacetylated chitosan and tripolyphosphate in the resulting physical blends and crosslinked nanoparticulate system. Two different strategies, physical blending and ionotropic gelation, were adopted to prepare binary or tertiary mixtures and nanoparticulate formulation, respectively. The IR spectra of CB showed characteristic peaks at 3438.27 cm-1 (primary amine), 3264.74 cm-1 (hydroxyl group) and 1654.98 cm-1 (C=O stretch in cyclic ring); CS at 3361.47 cm-1 (N-H stretching), 1646.18 cm-1 (C=O of Amide I), 1582.36 cm-1 (C=O of Amide II), and sTPP at 1135.77 cm-1 (P=O). CS-sTPP chemical interaction was confirmed from the shift in the absorption band of carbonyl groups (amide I, II) to 1634.66 cm-1 and 1541.17 cm-1 in blank chitosan nanoparticles, and 1636.87 cm-1, 1543.33 cm-1 in CSNP1 (2:6:1), and at 1646.15 cm-1 and 1557.04 cm-1 in CSNP2 (1:3:1). The characteristic peaks of CB were also present in chitosan formulation with a slight shift in the amino group at 3429.43 cm-1 and 3423.21 cm-1, in the hydroxyl group at 3274.54 cm-1 and 3270.73 cm-1, CSNP1 and CSNP2, respectively. The findings counseled no significant interaction in IR absorption pattern of cytarabine functional groups after encapsulation in CS-sTPP complex, which projected the potential of chitosan nanoparticulate system to entrap cytarabine. (author)

  8. ETHICAL PRACTICES IN DRUG PRESCRIBING. A COMPARATIVE STUDY BETWEEN DOCTORS’ AND PHARMACISTS’ OPINION ABOUT DRUG PRESCRIBING IN ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LASZLO-ZOLTAN SZTANKOVSZKY

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The prescription of drugs is influenced by a number of factors with a great impact upon the health of the main beneficiaries of health services. The purpose of the study is to identify the perception of doctors and pharmacists on drug prescription practices adopted by doctors. Material and Methods: a number of 349 subjects (149 pharmacists and 200 doctors answered a survey about the perception of drug dispensing in Romania. Variables like age, work environment (urban, rural, length of employment were taken into account. Results: When prescribing a treatment, 93% of doctors follow the standard treatment protocol for the given diagnosis and 93,5% of them are declaring that personal resources are the main source for training while the percent appreciated by pharmacists is evaluated to 65,78%. A total of 50% of doctors are considering other criteria than the treatment when prescribing a drug (financial contribution for the patient or National Health Insurance House. A total of 59% of doctors are recommending overthe-counter products while pharmacists consider that is happening in more than 70% of the cases. Conclusions: There are differences of opinion between doctors and pharmacists regarding doctor’s practices of prescribing drugs to their patients, like: kinds of sponsorship for the continuing education, the relationship with the pharmaceutical representative or the frequency of prescribing over-the-counter products or supplements when they are recommending a certain treatment.

  9. Financial incentives for generic drugs: case study on a reimbursement program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Inocencio

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To discuss the use of financial incentives in choice of medication and to assess the economic results concerning the use of financial incentives to promote the use of genetic medication in lieu of reference drugs in a company with a reimbursement program. Methods: A case study was carried out in a large supermarket. The data was obtained in the company responsible for managing medication. The study reached 83,625 users between August 2005 and July 2007. The data was submitted to regressions in order to analyze trends and hypothesis tests to assess differences in medication consumption. The results were compared with general data regarding medication consumption of five other organizations and also with data about the national consumption of generic medication in Brazil. Results: The use of financial incentives to replace brand medications for generics, in the company studied, increased the consumption of generic drugs without reducing the company expenses with the reimbursement programs. Conclusions: This study show the occurrence of unplanned results (increase in the consumption of medications and the positive consequences of the reimbursement program concerning access to medication.

  10. From Addiction to Infection: Managing Drug Abuse in the Context of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    Pretoria, South Africa. *For Correspondence: E-mail: taiwo.akindipe@gmail.com; Phone: +234 803 388 1391 ... 18[3]: 47-54). Keywords: Drug users, Drug addiction, Substance use, HIV infection, Africa. Résumé ... potentially weak social support systems, ..... electronic media need to highlight the relationship between drug ...

  11. From Addiction to Infection: Managing Drug Abuse in the Context of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    People who use drugs are at higher risk of HIV: directly through the sharing of injecting equipment, indirectly through associated risk behavior, and physiologically through the substances' impact on the immune system. Drug users, especially people who inject drugs (PWID) are a bridge to the general population.

  12. School of Management, Marketing and Commerce Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. B. Nozdryova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Governance and regulation at the national and international level, the management system of the leading companies in the world, forms and methods of management, and marketing, commercial and advertising work form a relatively new subject field in domestic science. These issues have been introduced into the educational process in Russian universities in the second half of the 1980s. At the MGIMO these research areas have been developed for more than 60 years. Scientific School of the Department of Management and Marketing and the Department of Management Foreign Economic Activity is oriented at the international level and focuses on the development of organizational forms and methods of management, marketing strategy, marketing, and commerce in the context of foreign trade and international activities of domestic firms and organizations on the basis of a comprehensive study of advanced management experience of leading foreign countries. In the early stages of its existence, the school was focused on methodological and practical aspects of international commerce and advertising. But gradually its research encompassed the field of management and marketing, and the scientific school in the field of international management and marketing was established on the basis of examination of relevant theories and experiences of leading foreign countries, and especially multinational companies. Originally these studies were conducted by the Department International Economic Relations of the Faculty of International Economic Relations at MGIMO. The disciplines included studies of the foreign trade operations in global markets, management of foreign economic activities in foreign countries, world commodity markets, and others. The textbook "Organization and technology of foreign trade in the capitalist market" by I.N. Gerchikova, Honored Scientist of the Russian Federation, Doctor of Economic Science, Professor, published in 1977 already contained sections on

  13. Reevaluation of Meta-analysis on prophylactic drug management for recurrence of febrile seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan LIAO

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the efficiency and safety of drugs to prevent the recurrence of febrile seizures (FS.  Methods Relevant literatures were searched via PubMed, EMBASE/SCOPUS, EBSCO-CINAHL, Web of Science, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews from December 1997 to November 2014 using the following keywords: febrile seizure OR febrile convulsion, recurrence, prevention OR prophylaxis, medicine OR medication. Publication type was limited to Meta-analysis. Extract the relevant information of Meta-analysis, such as characteristics of objects, types of study design, number of clinical trials, number of cases, search strategies, databases, information of methodology (methods of randomization, concealment, blinding, withdrawal and exit, follow-up time, heterogeneity analysis, subgroup analysis and outcome assessment, etc. Quality of Reporting of Meta-analyses (QUOROM and Oxman-Guyatt Overview Quality Assessment Questionnaire (OQAQ were used to assess the quality of included Meta-analyses. Jadad decision was used to assess inclusion and exclusion criteria, search strategies, effectiveness evaluation, data extraction and data analysis, to explore reliable evidence of evidence-based medicine.  Results Eventually, four Meta-analyses were included after screening of all the literatures that can be searched out. Among those Meta-analyses, the Meta-analysis of Offringa and Newton (2012 was relatively more reliable. The results suggesed that no clinically important benefits were found in administering intermittent oral or rectal diazepam, oral phenobarbitone, phenytoin, valproate, pyridoxine, buprofen, diclofenac and acetominophen to children with FE. Only one clinical trial reported that intermittent oral clobazam could reduce the recurrence of FE in comparing with placebo at 6-month follow-up (RR = 0.360, 95% CI: 0.200-0.640; P = 0.000, but it should be verified by more randomized controlled trials (RCTs. Among 4 Meta-analyses included in this study

  14. Ageing management studies of RAPS-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohra, A.K.; Jain, L.K.; Joshi, K.M.

    2006-01-01

    Unit-l of Rajasthan Atomic Power Station (RAPS-1) is the first nuclear power plant of India with pressurized heavy water reactor. The construction of Unit-l of Rajasthan Atomic Power Station (RAPS-1) was started in the year 1966 in collaboration with Canada. The Unit-1 achieved first criticality on August 1972 and was first synchronized to Grid on November 1972. During initial operation of the Unit, several problems were faced in its various systems and these were addressed by incorporating various engineering changes and procedures. In this unit various major innovative repairs were done like end shield leak repair, OPRD leak repair. Considering the operation of various systems of Unit-1, since year 1971 it was imperative to study ageing degradation mechanisms and mitigating measures were to be taken. Although the ageing management is a continuous process the opportunity of Unit-1 shutdown for upgradations from 30-04-2002 to 08-02-2004 was utilized for inspection and assessment of health of various SSC, which otherwise could not have been done with unit in operational state. This paper contains the following in detail. (1) Ageing management programme, its objectives and scope (2) Methodology of ageing management studies - Replacement and upgradation -Additional inspection programme based on ageing management review - Statistical analysis of ageing degradation occurrence - Estimation of residual life span of cables and relays (3) Criteria for selection of components for ageing management programme (4) Findings of ageing management studies-case studies. The ageing study done for RAPS-1 indicated that appropriate ageing monitoring methods and procedures exist in the station for taking timely mitigating measures. The technological obsoleteness has been overcome by installing new components of latest technology. On overall assessment, the Unit-1 was considered fit for further service. (author)

  15. Drug treatment at the end of life: an epidemiologic study in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Kristian; Schaufel, Margrethe Aase; Ruths, Sabine

    2014-12-01

    To examine drug treatment in nursing home patients at the end of life, and identify predictors of palliative drug therapy. A historical cohort study. Three urban nursing homes in Norway. All patients admitted from January 2008 and deceased before February 2013. Drug prescriptions, diagnoses, and demographic data were collected from electronic patient records. Palliative end-of-life drug treatment was defined on the basis of indication, drug, and formulation. 524 patients were included, median (range) age at death 86 (19-104) years, 59% women. On the day of death, 99.4% of the study population had active prescriptions; 74.2% had palliative drugs either alone (26.9%) or concomitantly with curative/preventive drugs (47.3%). Palliative drugs were associated with nursing home, length of stay > 16 months (AOR 2.10, 95% CI 1.12-3.94), age (1.03, 1.005-1.05), and a diagnosis of cancer (2.12, 1.19-3.76). Most initiations of palliative drugs and withdrawals of curative/preventive drugs took place on the day of death. Palliative drug therapy and drug therapy changes are common for nursing home patients on the last day of life. Improvements in end-of-life care in nursing homes imply addressing prognostication and earlier response to palliative needs.

  16. Preparation, characterization, drug release and computational modelling studies of antibiotics loaded amorphous chitin nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayathri, N K; Aparna, V; Maya, S; Biswas, Raja; Jayakumar, R; Mohan, C Gopi

    2017-12-01

    We present a computational investigation of binding affinity of different types of drugs with chitin nanocarriers. Understanding the chitn polymer-drug interaction is important to design and optimize the chitin based drug delivery systems. The binding affinity of three different types of anti-bacterial drugs Ethionamide (ETA) Methacycline (MET) and Rifampicin (RIF) with amorphous chitin nanoparticles (AC-NPs) were studied by integrating computational and experimental techniques. The binding energies (BE) of hydrophobic ETA, hydrophilic MET and hydrophobic RIF were -7.3kcal/mol, -5.1kcal/mol and -8.1kcal/mol respectively, with respect to AC-NPs, using molecular docking studies. This theoretical result was in good correlation with the experimental studies of AC-drug loading and drug entrapment efficiencies of MET (3.5±0.1 and 25± 2%), ETA (5.6±0.02 and 45±4%) and RIF (8.9±0.20 and 53±5%) drugs respectively. Stability studies of the drug encapsulated nanoparticles showed stable values of size, zeta and polydispersity index at 6°C temperature. The correlation between computational BE and experimental drug entrapment efficiencies of RIF, ETA and MET drugs with four AC-NPs strands were 0.999 respectively, while that of the drug loading efficiencies were 0.854 respectively. Further, the molecular docking results predict the atomic level details derived from the electrostatic, hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions of the drug and nanoparticle for its encapsulation and loading in the chitin-based host-guest nanosystems. The present results thus revealed the drug loading and drug delivery insights and has the potential of reducing the time and cost of processing new antibiotic drug delivery nanosystem optimization, development and discovery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Drug distribution in man: a positron emission tomography study after oral administration of the labelled neuroprotective drug vinpocetine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulyas, Balazs; Halldin, Christer; Sandell, Johan; Farde, Lars; Sovago, Judit; Cselenyi, Zsolt; Vas, Adam; Kiss, Bela; Karpati, Egon

    2002-01-01

    Direct information on the distribution of a drug requires measurements in various tissues. Such data have until now been obtained in animals, or have indirectly been calculated from plasma measurements in humans using mathematical models. Here we suggest the use of positron emission tomography (PET) as a method to obtain direct measurements of drug distribution in the human body. The distribution in body and brain of vinpocetine, a neuroprotective drug widely used in the prevention and treatment of cerebrovascular diseases, was followed after oral administration. Vinpocetine was labelled with carbon-11 and radioactivity was measured by PET in stomach, liver, brain and kidney in six healthy volunteers. The radioactivity in blood and urine as well as the fractions of [ 11 C]vinpocetine and labelled metabolites in plasma were also determined. After oral administration, [ 11 C]vinpocetine appeared immediately in the stomach and within minutes in the liver and the blood. In the blood the level of radioactivity continuously increased until the end of the measurement period, whereas the fraction of the unchanged mother compound decreased. Radioactivity uptake and distribution in the brain were demonstrable from the tenth minute after the administration of the labelled drug. Brain distribution was heterogeneous, similar to the distribution previously reported after intravenous administration. These findings indicate that vinpocetine, administered orally in humans, readily enters the bloodstream from the stomach and gastrointestinal tract and, consequently, passes the blood-brain barrier and enters the brain. Radioactivity from [ 11 C]vinpocetine was also demonstrated in the kidneys and in urine, indicating that at least a part of the radioactive drug and labelled metabolites is eliminated from the body through the kidneys. This study is the first to demonstrate that PET might be a useful, direct and non-invasive tool to study the distribution and pharmacokinetics of orally

  18. Drug distribution in man: a positron emission tomography study after oral administration of the labelled neuroprotective drug vinpocetine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulyás, Balázs; Halldin, Christer; Sóvágó, Judit; Sandell, Johan; Cselényi, Zsolt; Vas, Adám; Kiss, Béla; Kárpáti, Egon; Farde, Lars

    2002-08-01

    Direct information on the distribution of a drug requires measurements in various tissues. Such data have until now been obtained in animals, or have indirectly been calculated from plasma measurements in humans using mathematical models. Here we suggest the use of positron emission tomography (PET) as a method to obtain direct measurements of drug distribution in the human body. The distribution in body and brain of vinpocetine, a neuroprotective drug widely used in the prevention and treatment of cerebrovascular diseases, was followed after oral administration. Vinpocetine was labelled with carbon-11 and radioactivity was measured by PET in stomach, liver, brain and kidney in six healthy volunteers. The radioactivity in blood and urine as well as the fractions of [(11)C]vinpocetine and labelled metabolites in plasma were also determined. After oral administration, [(11)C]vinpocetine appeared immediately in the stomach and within minutes in the liver and the blood. In the blood the level of radioactivity continuously increased until the end of the measurement period, whereas the fraction of the unchanged mother compound decreased. Radioactivity uptake and distribution in the brain were demonstrable from the tenth minute after the administration of the labelled drug. Brain distribution was heterogeneous, similar to the distribution previously reported after intravenous administration. These findings indicate that vinpocetine, administered orally in humans, readily enters the bloodstream from the stomach and gastrointestinal tract and, consequently, passes the blood-brain barrier and enters the brain. Radioactivity from [(11)C]vinpocetine was also demonstrated in the kidneys and in urine, indicating that at least a part of the radioactive drug and labelled metabolites is eliminated from the body through the kidneys. This study is the first to demonstrate that PET might be a useful, direct and non-invasive tool to study the distribution and pharmacokinetics of orally

  19. Drug distribution in man: a positron emission tomography study after oral administration of the labelled neuroprotective drug vinpocetine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulyas, Balazs [Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Hospital, 171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, 171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Halldin, Christer; Sandell, Johan; Farde, Lars [Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Hospital, 171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Sovago, Judit; Cselenyi, Zsolt [Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Hospital, 171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Debrecen, Debrecen (Hungary); Vas, Adam; Kiss, Bela; Karpati, Egon [Chemical Works of Gedeon Richter Ltd., Budapest (Hungary)

    2002-08-01

    Direct information on the distribution of a drug requires measurements in various tissues. Such data have until now been obtained in animals, or have indirectly been calculated from plasma measurements in humans using mathematical models. Here we suggest the use of positron emission tomography (PET) as a method to obtain direct measurements of drug distribution in the human body. The distribution in body and brain of vinpocetine, a neuroprotective drug widely used in the prevention and treatment of cerebrovascular diseases, was followed after oral administration. Vinpocetine was labelled with carbon-11 and radioactivity was measured by PET in stomach, liver, brain and kidney in six healthy volunteers. The radioactivity in blood and urine as well as the fractions of [{sup 11}C]vinpocetine and labelled metabolites in plasma were also determined. After oral administration, [{sup 11}C]vinpocetine appeared immediately in the stomach and within minutes in the liver and the blood. In the blood the level of radioactivity continuously increased until the end of the measurement period, whereas the fraction of the unchanged mother compound decreased. Radioactivity uptake and distribution in the brain were demonstrable from the tenth minute after the administration of the labelled drug. Brain distribution was heterogeneous, similar to the distribution previously reported after intravenous administration. These findings indicate that vinpocetine, administered orally in humans, readily enters the bloodstream from the stomach and gastrointestinal tract and, consequently, passes the blood-brain barrier and enters the brain. Radioactivity from [{sup 11}C]vinpocetine was also demonstrated in the kidneys and in urine, indicating that at least a part of the radioactive drug and labelled metabolites is eliminated from the body through the kidneys. This study is the first to demonstrate that PET might be a useful, direct and non-invasive tool to study the distribution and

  20. Temporal differences in gamma-hydroxybutyrate overdoses involving injecting drug users versus recreational drug users in Helsinki: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyd James J

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB and gamma-butyrolactone (GBL have been profiled as 'party drugs' used mainly at dance parties and in nightclubs on weekend nights. The purpose of this study was to examine the frequency of injecting drug use among GHB/GBL overdose patients and whether there are temporal differences in the occurrence of GHB/GBL overdoses of injecting drug and recreational drug users. Methods In this retrospective study, the ambulance and hospital records of suspected GHB- and GBL overdose patients treated by the Helsinki Emergency Medical Service from January 1st 2006 to December 31st 2007 were reviewed. According to the temporal occurrence of the overdose, patients were divided in two groups. In group A, the overdose occurred on a Friday-Saturday or Saturday-Sunday night between 11 pm-6 am. Group B consisted of overdoses occurring on outside this time frame. Results Group A consisted of 39 patient contacts and the remaining 61 patient contacts were in group B. There were statistically significant differences between the two groups in (group A vs. B, respectively: history of injecting drug abuse (33% vs. 59%, p = 0.012, reported polydrug and ethanol use (80% vs. 62%, p = 0.028, the location where the patients were encountered (private or public indoors or outdoors, 10%, 41%, 41% vs. 25%, 18%, 53%, p = 0.019 and how the knowledge of GHB/GBL use was obtained (reported by patient/bystanders or clinical suspicion, 72%, 28% vs. 85%, 10%, p = 0.023. Practically all (99% patients were transported to emergency department after prehospital care. Conclusion There appears to be at least two distinct groups of GHB/GBL users. Injecting drug users represent the majority of GHB/GBL overdose patients outside weekend nights.

  1. Identifying and assessing highly hazardous drugs within quality risk management programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, Robert G; Schatz, Anthony R; Kimmel, Tracy A; Ader, Allan; Naumann, Bruce D; Weideman, Patricia A

    2016-08-01

    Historically, pharmaceutical industry regulatory guidelines have assigned certain active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) to various categories of concern, such as "cytotoxic", "hormones", and "steroids". These categories have been used to identify APIs requiring segregation or dedication in order to prevent cross-contamination and protect the quality and safety of drug products. Since these terms were never defined by regulatory authorities, and many novel pharmacological mechanisms challenge these categories, there is a recognized need to modify the historical use of these terms. The application of a risk-based approach using a health-based limit, such as an acceptable daily exposure (ADE), is more appropriate for the development of a Quality Risk Management Program (QRMP) than the use of categories of concern. The toxicological and pharmacological characteristics of these categories are discussed to help identify and prioritize compounds requiring special attention. Controlling airborne concentrations and the contamination of product contact surfaces in accordance with values derived from quantitative risk assessments can prevent adverse effects in workers and patients, regardless of specific categorical designations to which these APIs have been assigned. The authors acknowledge the movement away from placing compounds into categories and, while not yet universal, the importance of basing QRMPs on compound-specific ADEs and risk assessments. Based on the results of a risk assessment, segregation and dedication may also be required for some compounds to prevent cross contamination during manufacture of APIs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Oxcarbazepine: a new drug in the management of intractable trigeminal neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrzewska, J M; Patsalos, P N

    1989-01-01

    The efficacy and tolerability of oxcarbazepine, a keto derivative of carbamazepine, has been assessed in six patients (two males, four females; mean age 61 years, range 42-77), with trigeminal neuralgia refractory to carbamazepine therapy, over a period of 6 months. An excellent therapeutic response to oxcarbazepine was seen in all patients with pain control correlating well with serum drug concentrations of oxcarbazepine and its primary active metabolite 10-OH-carbazepine. Onset of the effect was observed within 24 hours in all cases. An overall serum therapeutic concentration range, in the six patients, of 50-110 mumol/l of 10-OH-carbazepine corresponding to a daily effective dose range of 1200-2400 mg (14.6-35.6 mg/kg body weight) oxcarbazepine, was observed. There was a significant correlation between oxcarbazepine dose and serum oxcarbazepine (r = 0.695, p less than 0.05) and 10-OH-carbazepine (r = 0.957, p less than 0.001) concentrations. Oxcarbazepine was well tolerated and no significant side effects were identified, though a mild hyponatraemia was observed during high doses (greater than 28 and greater than 35 mg/kg/day) in two patients. It is concluded that oxcarbazepine has potent antineuralgic properties in the absence of significant side effects and therefore may be useful in the management of intractable trigeminal neuralgia. Images PMID:2738589

  3. Drug residues in used syringes in Switzerland: A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefrançois, Elodie; Augsburger, Marc; Esseiva, Pierre

    2018-05-01

    Harm reduction services, including needle-exchange programmes, have been implemented in Switzerland for over 20 years. Their main aim is to lessen the negative social and/or physical consequences associated with illicit drug consumption and, therefore, improve prevention messages. To this end, knowledge of illicit drug consumption practices is necessary. Periodic self-report surveys are the primary source of data for monitoring drug users' behaviour. Analysis of residual content of used syringes can bring further and objective knowledge about consumed products through analytically confirmed data. Used syringes were sampled in 2 syringe-exchange facilities in Lausanne. These structures are a bus where the users bring back their syringes (ABS) and an automatic injecting kit dispenser (AIKD). Once syringes were collected, a validated gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method was implemented in order to detect drugs (licit or illicit) contained in the residual content of used syringes. Cocaine was the most common drug detected alone (39% in ABS and 31% in AIKD), followed by the simultaneous detection of heroin and cocaine (12% and 17%) and heroin and midazolam (12% and 17%). The differences between the illicit drugs distribution of used syringes collected in AIKD and ABS were not statistically significant. Analysis of residual content of used syringes as a monitoring tool is an original approach that has already led to a better understanding of the habits of drug-injection users. Over the long term, this approach is a powerful tool to track and detect new consumption practices in a quasi-real-time. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Photostability studies on the furosemide-triamterene drug association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiori, J; Ballardini, R; Andrisano, V; Cavrini, V

    2003-09-01

    The photostability of the diuretic drugs triamterene and furosemide, individually and combined, was evaluated. Spectrophotometric, spectrofluorimetric and chromatographic (HPLC) methods were applied to monitor the drug photodegradation. Furosemide was confirmed to be highly photolable in both pH 7.4 solution and methanol. Differently triamterene proved to be highly fluorescent (emission quantum yield: 0.9 in methanol and 0.8 in pH 7.4 solution), but essentially photostable (photochemical reaction quantum yield: congruent with 5 x 10(-4)) under exposure at 365 and 313 nm radiations. When the combined drugs in pH 7.4 solutions were exposed to 365 nm radiations a significant photoprotective effect of triamterene on furosemide was observed. The photoreactivity of the drugs was exploited to develop an HPLC method involving a post-column on-line photochemical derivatization useful to confirm the analyte identity in a commercial dosage form (tablets). The commercial product, containing the combined drugs, proved to be photostable also after long (65 h) light exposure.

  5. Drug-drug interaction and doping, part 1: an in vitro study on the effect of non-prohibited drugs on the phase I metabolic profile of toremifene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzarino, Monica; de la Torre, Xavier; Fiacco, Ilaria; Palermo, Amelia; Botrè, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    The present study was designed to provide preliminary information on the potential impact of metabolic drug-drug interaction on the effectiveness of doping control strategies currently followed by the anti-doping laboratories to detect the intake of banned agents. In vitro assays based on the use of human liver microsomes and recombinant CYP isoforms were designed and performed to characterize the phase I metabolic profile of the prohibited agent toremifene, selected as a prototype drug of the class of selective oestrogen receptor modulators, both in the absence and in the presence of medicaments (fluconazole, ketoconazole, itraconazole, miconazole, cimetidine, ranitidine, fluoxetine, paroxetine, nefazodone) not included in the World Anti-Doping Agency list of prohibited substances and methods and frequently administered to athletes. The results show that the in vitro model developed in this study was adequate to simulate the in vivo metabolism of toremifene, confirming the results obtained in previous studies. Furthermore, our data also show that ketoconazole, itraconazole, miconazole and nefazodone cause a marked modification in the production of the metabolic products (i.e. hydroxylated and carboxylated metabolites) normally selected by the anti-doping laboratories as target analytes to detect toremifene intake; moderate variations were registered in the presence of fluconazole, paroxetine and fluoxetine; while no significant modifications were measured in the presence of ranitidine and cimetidine. This evidence imposes that the potential effect of drug-drug interactions is duly taken into account in anti-doping analysis, also for a broader significance of the analytical results. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Drug-eluting stents studies in mice: Do we need atherosclerosis to study restenosis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pires, N.M.M.; Jukema, J.W.; Daemen, M.J.A.P.; Quax, P.H.A.

    2006-01-01

    In 2001, the first human study with drug-eluting stents (DES) was published showing a nearly complete abolition of restenosis by using a sirolimus-eluting stent. This success was very encouraging to test new compounds in combination with the DES platform. Nevertheless, several other anti-restenotic

  7. Japanese-Style Management: A Bibliometric Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Sachie

    1988-01-01

    Reports results of a bibliometric study of the literature on Japanese-style management published in western languages from 1971-84 in order to: (1) determine Japanese contributions to the literature; (2) determine whether there are nuclear journals for the subject; and (3) investigate how the flow of information from Japan to overseas countries…

  8. Ethiopian Journal of Environmental Studies and Management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ethiopian Journal of Environmental Studies and Management: Advanced Search ... AND is implied); Combine multiple words with OR to find articles containing either term; e.g., education OR research; Use parentheses to create more complex queries; e.g., archive ((journal OR conference) NOT theses); Search for an exact ...

  9. In vivo 7Li and 19F NMR studies of drugs in the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komoroski, Richard A.

    1999-01-01

    For various reasons, it is advantageous to measure the concentration of a psychoactive drug in the brain in vivo. Many drugs contain the element fluorine. Using 19 F NMR spectroscopy, we have studied the psychoactive drugs trifluoperazine and fluoxetine in the brain in vivo. Using 7 Li NMR, it is possible to detect lithium ion, used to treat manic depressive illness. We have measured the concentration and distribution of lithium in both human and rat brain in vivo. Measurement of drug levels in the human brain may provide a measure of therapeutic or toxic effects, as well as insight into drug metabolism and mechanism of action. (author)

  10. Study of homeopathic drugs on seed germination and fungal growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanif, A.; Dawar, S.

    2016-01-01

    In vitro, seeds of mungbean, sunflower, okra and mashbean were treated with homeopathic drugs namely Arnica montana and Thuja occidentalis (30C) were evaluated against root rot fungi. Different concentrations like 100, 75 and 50% v/v were tested to investigate seeds germination and inhibition of root rot fungi such as Fusarium oxysporum, Rhizoctonia solani and Macrophomina phaseolina. Results indicated that treated seeds of mungbean, sunflower, okra and mashbean with pure homeopathic drugs (100% v/v) by A. montana and T. occidentalis (30C) showed complete germination (100%), greater root length and excellent inhibition of root infecting pathogens. However, tested seeds treated with 75 and 50% v/v concentrations (prepared from 30C) by homeopathic drugs, respectively recorded significant increase in germination, root length and maximum zone of inhibition. (author)

  11. EV Portfolio Management and Grid Impact Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Qiuwei; Jensen, Jakob Munch; Hansen, Lars Henrik

    2009-01-01

    is to determine the day‐ahead charging schedules of a fleet of EVs in order to minimize the EV charging cost with EV energy constraints taken into account. In order to investigate the benefits of the spot price based EV charging scenario, two more charging scenarios have been studied as well, i.e. plug......The EV portfolio management is to develop an EV charging management algorithm in order to determine EV charging schedules with the goal of utilizing renewalbe energy production for EV charging as much as possible and ensuring that EV energy requirements for driving needs are met. According...

  12. Microstructural effects in drug release by solid and cellular polymeric dosage forms: A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaesi, Aron H; Saka, Nannaji

    2017-11-01

    In recent studies, we have introduced melt-processed polymeric cellular dosage forms to achieve both immediate drug release and predictable manufacture. Dosage forms ranging from minimally-porous solids to highly porous, open-cell and thin-walled structures were prepared, and the drug release characteristics investigated as the volume fraction of cells and the excipient molecular weight were varied. In the present study, both minimally-porous solid and cellular dosage forms consisting of various weight fractions of Acetaminophen drug and polyethylene glycol (PEG) excipient are prepared and analyzed. Microstructures of the solid forms and the cell walls range from single-phase solid solutions of the excipient and a small amount of drug molecules to two-phase composites of the excipient and tightly packed drug particles. Results of dissolution experiments show that the minimally-porous solid forms disintegrate and release drug by slow surface erosion. The erosion rate decreases as the drug weight fraction is increased. By contrast, the open-cell structures disintegrate rapidly by viscous exfoliation, and the disintegration time is independent of drug weight fraction. Drug release models suggest that the solid forms erode by convective mass transfer of the faster-eroding excipient if the drug volume fraction is small. At larger drug volume fractions, however, the slower-eroding drug particles hinder access of the free-flowing fluid to the excipient, thus slowing down erosion of the composite. Conversely, the disintegration rate of the cellular forms is limited by diffusion of the dissolution fluid into the excipient phase of the thin cell walls. Because the wall thickness is of the order of the drug particle size, and the particles are enveloped by the excipient during melt-processing, the drug particles cannot hinder diffusion through the excipient across the walls. Thus the disintegration time of the cellular forms is mostly unaffected by the volume fraction of drug

  13. Exercise treatment for drug abuse -a Danish pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roessler, Kirsten Kaya

    2010-01-01

    AIMS: The paper presents a recent Danish programme using exercise to alter the behaviour and body image of drug addicts. METHODS: 38 participants (23 male and 15 female) took part in groups three times per week for a minimum of two to a maximum of six months. Self-reported data combined with the ......AIMS: The paper presents a recent Danish programme using exercise to alter the behaviour and body image of drug addicts. METHODS: 38 participants (23 male and 15 female) took part in groups three times per week for a minimum of two to a maximum of six months. Self-reported data combined...

  14. Project safety studies - nuclear waste management (PSE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-10-01

    The project 'Safety Studies-Nuclear Waste Management' (PSE) is a research project performed by order of the Federal Minister for Research and Technology, the general purpose of which is to deepen and ensure the understanding of the safety aspects of the nuclear waste management and to prepare a risk analysis which will have to be established in the future. Owing to this the project is part of a series of projects which serve the further development of the concept of nuclear waste management and its safety, and which are set up in such a way as to accompany the realization of that concept. This report contains the results of the first stage of the project from 1978 to mid-1981. (orig./RW) [de

  15. A pilot study of a smartphone application supporting recovery from drug addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Di; Han, Hui; Du, Jiang; Zhao, Min; Hser, Yih-Ing

    2018-05-01

    Mobile health (mHealth) technologies have the potential to facilitate self-monitoring and self-management for individuals with substance use disorders (SUD). S-Health is a bilingual smartphone application based on cognitive behavioral principles and is designed to support recovery from drug addiction by trigger recognition so as to allow practice in-the-moment coping to prevent relapse. For this pilot randomized controlled study, 75 participants were recruited from methadone maintenance treatment clinics and the social worker consortium in Shanghai, China. Participants in the control group (N=25) received text messages from S-Health (e.g., HIV prevention and other educational materials). Participants in the intervention group (N=50) received both text messages and daily surveys on cravings, affects, triggers, responses to triggers, and social contexts. At the end of the 1-month study trial, 26.2% of the intervention group and 50% of the control group had positive urine test results (p=0.06). Also, the number of days using drug in the past week was significantly lower among participants in the intervention group (Mean=0.71, SD=1.87) relative to the control group (Mean=2.20, SD=3.06) (paddiction. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Identification and quantification of drug-albumin adducts in serum samples from a drug exposure study in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Switzar, L.; Kwast, L.M.; Lingeman, H.; Giera, M.; Pieters, R.H.H.; Niessen, W.M.A.

    2013-01-01

    The formation of drug-protein adducts following the bioactivation of drugs to reactive metabolites has been linked to adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and is a major complication in drug discovery and development. Identification and quantification of drug-protein adducts in vivo may lead to a better

  17. African Journal of Drug and Alcohol Studies: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Drug diplomacy in the twentieth century. London: Routledge. Website: Include the date of access. Submission of manuscripts. All manuscripts should be submitted by e-mail to the Editor-in-Chief at iobot@crisanet.org. You can also submit your manuscript to the deputy editor responsible for the region to which you belong.

  18. National anti-tuberculosis drug resistance study in Tanzania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chonde, T. M.; Basra, D.; Mfinanga, S. G. M.; Range, N.; Lwilla, F.; Shirima, R. P.; van Deun, A.; Zignol, M.; Cobelens, F. G.; Egwaga, S. M.; van Leth, F.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence of anti-tuberculosis drug resistance in a national representative sample of tuberculosis (TB) patients in Tanzania according to recommended methodology. DESIGN: Cluster survey, with 40 clusters sampled proportional to size, of notified TB patients from all

  19. e-Learning for the elderly on drug utilization: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Throfast, Victoria; Hellström, Lina; Hovstadius, Bo; Petersson, Göran; Ericson, Lisa

    2017-05-01

    This study explores the attitudes of elderly people to the use of electronic educational technology (e-learning) on drug utilization, with particular emphasis on the layout, usability, content, and level of knowledge in the tool. e-Learning modules were evaluated by a group of elderly people (aged ⩾65 years, n = 16) via a questionnaire comprising closed and open-ended questions. Both qualitative and quantitative analyses of the responses showed mostly positive reviews. The results indicate that the e-learning modules are a suitable tool for distributing information and education and that they can be managed by elderly individuals who are familiar with computers, allowing them to learn more about medication use.

  20. Prescription drugs in nursing homes: managing costs and quality in a complex environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelson, Dan; Ramchand, Rajeev; Abramson, Richard; Tumlinson, Anne

    2002-11-12

    This brief provides a description of prescription drug use in nursing homes and a summary of current policy issues in this area. The brief first profiles the nursing home pharmaceutical market, outlining the major trends in demographics and drug utilization, the supply chain by which drugs go from manufacturers to pharmacies to nursing home residents, and the alternative arrangements by which prescription drugs in nursing homes are financed. The brief then provides a synopsis of current policy issues, focusing in turn on cost containment and quality improvement initiatives.

  1. Impacts of generic competition and benefit management practices on spending for prescription drugs: evidence from Medicare's Part D benefit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheingold, Steven; Nguyen, Nguyen Xuan

    2014-01-01

    This study estimates the effects of generic competition, increased cost-sharing, and benefit practices on utilization and spending for prescription drugs. We examined changes in Medicare price and utilization from 2007 to 2009 of all drugs in 28 therapeutic classes. The classes accounted for 80% of Medicare Part D spending in 2009 and included the 6 protected classes and 6 classes with practically no generic competition. All variables were constructed to measure each drug relative to its class at a specific plan sponsor. We estimated that the shift toward generic utilization had cut in half the rate of increase in the price of a prescription during 2007-2009. Specifically, the results showed that (1) rapid generic penetration had significantly held down costs per prescription, (2) copayment and other benefit practices shifted utilization to generics and favored brands, and (3) price increases were generally greater in less competitive classes of drugs. In many ways, Part D was implemented at a fortuitous time; since 2006, there have been relatively few new blockbuster drugs introduced, and many existing high-volume drugs used by beneficiaries were in therapeutic classes with multiple brands and generic alternatives. Under these conditions, our paper showed that plan sponsors have been able to contain costs by encouraging use of generics or drugs offering greater value within therapeutic classes. It is less clear what will happen to future Part D costs if a number of new and effective drugs for beneficiaries enter the market with no real competitors.

  2. Benefit and risk information in prescription drug advertising: review of empirical studies and marketing implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, S W; Bang, H K

    2000-01-01

    As pharmaceutical companies began to advertise prescription drugs directly to consumers as well as to physicians, understanding the impact of benefit and risk information in drug advertising on physicians and consumers has become more critical. This paper reviews previous empirical studies that examined the content of benefit and risk information in drug advertising and its potential effects on physicians' subsequent prescribing behaviors. It also reviews studies that investigated how consumers process information on a drug's efficacy and side effects. Based on the findings of these studies, implications are discussed for effective marketing information development as well as for government regulation.

  3. Drug residues in urban water: A database for ecotoxicological risk management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Destrieux, Doriane; Laurent, François; Budzinski, Hélène; Pedelucq, Julie; Vervier, Philippe; Gerino, Magali

    2017-12-31

    Human-use drug residues (DR) are only partially eliminated by waste water treatment plants (WWTPs), so that residual amounts can reach natural waters and cause environmental hazards. In order to properly manage these hazards in the aquatic environment, a database is made available that integrates the concentration ranges for DR, which cause adverse effects for aquatic organisms, and the temporal variations of the ecotoxicological risks. To implement this database for the ecotoxicological risk assessment (ERA database), the required information for each DR is the predicted no effect concentrations (PNECs), along with the predicted environmental concentrations (PECs). The risk assessment is based on the ratio between the PNECs and the PECs. Adverse effect data or PNECs have been found in the publicly available literature for 45 substances. These ecotoxicity test data have been extracted from 125 different sources. This ERA database contains 1157 adverse effect data and 287 PNECs. The efficiency of this ERA database was tested with a data set coming from a simultaneous survey of WWTPs and the natural environment. In this data set, 26 DR were searched for in two WWTPs and in the river. On five sampling dates, concentrations measured in the river for 10 DR could pose environmental problems of which 7 were measured only downstream of WWTP outlets. From scientific literature and measurements, data implementation with unit homogenisation in a single database facilitates the actual ecotoxicological risk assessment, and may be useful for further risk coming from data arising from the future field survey. Moreover, the accumulation of a large ecotoxicity data set in a single database should not only improve knowledge of higher risk molecules but also supply an objective tool to help the rapid and efficient evaluation of the risk. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. PUREX source Aggregate Area management study report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-03-01

    This report presents the results of an aggregate area management study (AAMS) for the PUREX Plant Aggregate Area in the 200 Areas of the US Department of Energy (DOE)Hanford Site in Washington State. This scoping level study provides the basis for initiating Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) activities under the comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigations (RFI) and Corrective Measures Studies (CMS) under RCRA. This report also integrates select RCRA treatment, storage, or disposal (TSD) closure activities with CERCLA and RCRA past-practice investigations

  5. Values and beliefs of psychedelic drug users: a cross-cultural study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Michael; Lyvers, Michael

    2006-06-01

    Psychedelic drugs such as LSD and psilocybin are often claimed to be capable of inducing life-changing experiences described as mystical or transcendental, especially if high doses are taken. The present study examined possible enduring effects of such experiences by comparing users of psychedelic drugs (n = 88), users of nonpsychedelic illegal drugs (e.g., marijuana, amphetamines) (n = 29) and non illicit drug-using social drinkers (n = 66) on questionnaire measures of values, beliefs and emotional empathy. Samples were obtained from Israel (n = 110) and Australia (n = 73) in a cross-cultural comparison to see if values associated with psychedelic drug use transcended culture of origin. Psychedelic users scored significantly higher on mystical beliefs (e.g., oneness with God and the universe) and life values of spirituality and concern for others than the other groups, and lower on the value of financial prosperity, irrespective of culture of origin. Users of nonpsychedelic illegal drugs scored significantly lower on a measure of coping ability than both psychedelic users and non illicit drug users. Both groups of illegal drug users scored significantly higher on empathy than non illicit drug users. Results are discussed in the context of earlier findings from Pahnke (1966) and Doblin (1991) of the transformative effect of psychedelic experiences, although the possibility remains that present findings reflect predrug characteristics of those who chose to take psychedelic drugs rather than effects of the drugs themselves.

  6. Violent and Non-Violent Criminal Behavior among Young Chinese Drug Users: A Mixed Methods Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liu; Chui, Wing Hong; Chen, Ye

    2018-03-02

    Young drug users are found to be increasingly involved in criminal justice issues. This exploratory and descriptive study aims to analyze the criminal behaviors among young Chinese drug users through a mixed methods research design. Quantitative analysis indicates that young drug users with and without a history of criminality show significant differences in terms of several features. Male drug users, particularly, those who are older, with religious beliefs, and initiated into drug use at younger age were most likely to commit crimes. Among drug users with criminal experiences, those who committed crimes prior to drug initiation have a greater likelihood of committing violent crimes. Furthermore, young drug users with severe depression are more likely to commit crimes, especially violent ones. Qualitative analysis further illustrates that young male drug users often get involved in criminal conduct of the youth gang nature with propensity for engaging in violent crimes as compared to their female counterparts who are more likely to turn into drug dealers and traffickers, in addition to engaging in larceny. The research findings are consistent with developmental theories and "victim to offender cycle". Integrated mental health and substance use services are suggested for crime prevention among young Chinese drug users.

  7. [Rational and emotional appeals in prescription drug advertising: study of a weight loss drug].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertas, Melby Karina Zuniga; Campomar, Marcos Cortez

    2008-04-01

    The Direct-to-Consumer (DTC) advertising of medicines encourages people to ask doctors for certain medicines and treatments that require medical prescription. In order to enhance their persuasive power, advertising models recommend matching the appeals (rational and/or emotional) to the consumer's attitude (cognitive and/ or affective) towards the product. This recommendation leads to controversies in the context of DTC advertising. Emotional appeals, although frequently used, would always be inadequate in that kind of advertising. In absence of empiric evidence of the consumer's perspective, a descriptive research was undertaken with the objective of evaluating: i) the components of the attitude toward medicines; ii) attitude and behavioral intentions in response to DTC ads (one appealing to reason and the other appealing to emotion). A prescription weight loss drug was chosen for this purpose. The results revealed a predominantly cognitive attitude toward the product and an attitude and behavioral intention more favorable to the rational ad. Negative cognition about the product played an outstanding role canceling the persuasive power of emotional appeals.

  8. Comparisons of Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency risk management implementation for recent pharmaceutical approvals: report of the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and outcomes research risk benefit management working group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lis, Yvonne; Roberts, Melissa H; Kamble, Shital; J Guo, Jeff; Raisch, Dennis W

    2012-12-01

    1) To compare the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategies (REMS) and European Medicines Agency's (EMA's) Risk Management Plan (RMP) guidances and 2) to compare REMS and RMPs for specific chemical entities and biological products. FDA, EMA, and pharmaceutical company Web sites were consulted for details pertaining to REMS and RMPs. REMS requirements include medication guides, communication plans, elements to ensure safe use, implementation systems, and specified assessment intervals. RMP requirements are increased pharmacovigilance and risk minimization activities. We compared these requirements for drugs requiring both REMS and RMPs. We identified 95 drugs on FDA's REMS list as of March 2010. Of these, there were 29 drugs (11 biologics and 18 new chemical entities) with EMA RMPs. REMS and RMPs are similar in objectives, with comparable toolkits. Both allow flexibility in product-specific actions, recognizing adverse effects of potential concern. Of the 29 drugs reviewed, REMS requirements not included in RMPs were patient medication guides (100% of the drugs), provider communication plans (38%), and routine monitoring of REMS (66%). RMP requirements not included in REMS were specific adverse event reporting (45% of the drugs), prospective registry studies (34%), prospective epidemiology studies (24%), additional trial data (28%), and Summary of Product Characteristics contraindications (76%). Both REMS and RMPs provide positive guidance for identification, monitoring, and minimization of risk to patient safety. Currently, neither agency provides specific guidance on how risk should be related to benefit either qualitatively or quantitatively. Copyright © 2012 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. 77 FR 9946 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Drug Interaction Studies-Study Design, Data Analysis, Implications...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-21

    ... industry entitled ``Drug Interaction Studies--Study Design, Data Analysis, Implications for Dosing, and... data analysis in the context of identifying potential drug interactions. The guidance also addresses... Studies--Study Design, Data Analysis, and Implications for Dosing and Labeling.'' Comments were received...

  10. Development, implementation and management of a drug testing program in the workplace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burtis, C.A.

    1990-01-01

    To combat the rising use of drugs in the workplace many American companies have implemented drug testing programs and are testing employees and job applicants for use of illegal drugs. In addition, on September 15, 1986, Executive Order No.12564 was issued by President Reagan, which requires all federal agencies to develop programs and policies, one of the goals of which is to achieve a drug-free federal workplace. Included in this Executive Order is the requirement that federal agencies implement drug testing has become a prevalent practice as a means to detect and deter drug use in the workplace. Before a drug testing program is implemented, it is imperative that policies and procedures are developed that (1) ensure the accuracy of test results, (2) protect the validity and integrity of the specimen, (3) guarantee due process, and (4) maintain confidentiality. To make certain that these prerequisites were met in the government drug testing programs, the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) was directed to develop technical and scientific guidelines for conducting such programs. 15 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  11. Design Project on Controlled-Release Drug Delivery Devices: Implementation, Management, and Learning Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qingxing; Liang, Youyun; Tong, Yen Wah; Wang, Chi-Hwa

    2010-01-01

    A design project that focuses on the subject of controlled-release drug delivery devices is presented for use in an undergraduate course on mass transfer. The purpose of the project is to introduce students to the various technologies used in the fabrication of drug delivery systems and provide a practical design exercise for understanding the…

  12. Genotoxicity of antiobesity drug orlistat and effect of caffeine intervention: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Manoswini; Ghosh, Ilika; Jana, Aditi; Ghosh, Manosij; Mukherjee, Anita

    2017-07-01

    Obesity is a major global health problem associated with various adverse effects. Pharmacological interventions are often necessary for the management of obesity. Orlistat is an FDA-approved antiobesity drug which is a potent inhibitor of intestinal lipases. In the current study, orlistat was evaluated for its genotoxic potential in human lymphocyte cells in vitro and was compared with that of another antiobesity drug sibutramine, presently withdrawn from market due its undesirable health effects. Caffeine intake may be an additional burden in people using anorectic drugs, therefore, further work is needed to be carried out to evaluate the possible effects of caffeine on orlistat-induced DNA damage. Human lymphocytes were exposed to orlistat (250, 500 and 1000 μg/ml), sibutramine (250, 500 and 1000 μg/ml) and caffeine (25, 50, 75, 100, 125 and 150 μg/ml) to assess their genotoxicity by comet assay in vitro. In addition, lymphocytes were co-incubated with caffeine (50, 75 and 100 μg/ml) and a single concentration of orlistat (250 μg/ml). Orlistat and sibutramine were genotoxic at all concentrations tested, sibutramine being more genotoxic. Caffeine was found to be genotoxic at concentrations 125 μg/ml and above. Co-treatment of orlistat with non-genotoxic concentrations (50, 75 and 100 μg/ml) of caffeine lead to a decrease in DNA damage. Orlistat can induce DNA damage in human lymphocytes in vitro and caffeine was found to reduce orlistat-induced genotoxicity.

  13. Bioengineered Liver Models for Drug Testing and Cell Differentiation Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory H. Underhill

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In vitro models of the human liver are important for the following: (1 mitigating the risk of drug-induced liver injury to human beings, (2 modeling human liver diseases, (3 elucidating the role of single and combinatorial microenvironmental cues on liver cell function, and (4 enabling cell-based therapies in the clinic. Methods to isolate and culture primary human hepatocytes (PHHs, the gold standard for building human liver models, were developed several decades ago; however, PHHs show a precipitous decline in phenotypic functions in 2-dimensional extracellular matrix–coated conventional culture formats, which does not allow chronic treatment with drugs and other stimuli. The development of several engineering tools, such as cellular microarrays, protein micropatterning, microfluidics, biomaterial scaffolds, and bioprinting, now allow precise control over the cellular microenvironment for enhancing the function of both PHHs and induced pluripotent stem cell–derived human hepatocyte-like cells; long-term (4+ weeks stabilization of hepatocellular function typically requires co-cultivation with liver-derived or non–liver-derived nonparenchymal cell types. In addition, the recent development of liver organoid culture systems can provide a strategy for the enhanced expansion of therapeutically relevant cell types. Here, we discuss advances in engineering approaches for constructing in vitro human liver models that have utility in drug screening and for determining microenvironmental determinants of liver cell differentiation/function. Design features and validation data of representative models are presented to highlight major trends followed by the discussion of pending issues that need to be addressed. Overall, bioengineered liver models have significantly advanced our understanding of liver function and injury, which will prove useful for drug development and ultimately cell-based therapies.

  14. Alcohol and drug abuse in the workplace - managing the human factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKibbon, D.; Glass, H. [Kelly Luttmer and Associates Ltd., (Canada)

    1998-09-01

    The impact of drugs and alcohol in the workplace was reviewed. The policies and procedures which are required to ensure that employers meet due diligence requirements were discussed. Under the Canadian human rights legislation an employer cannot terminate an employee for having a medical illness including alcoholism or drug addiction. The implementation of a comprehensive drug and alcohol policy was said to be important to demonstrate to employees that the organization is ready to take a proactive and supportive role in addressing this health concern. The issue of drug testing and when to drug screen was also discussed. It was suggested that addressing substance abuse in the workplace through policies, procedures and practices can reduce costs related to lost productivity, absenteeism, workers` compensation claims, staff turnover, health benefit premiums and legal liabilities.

  15. Validation of an LC-MS/MS method for analysis of anti-diabetic drugs in botanical dietary supplements labeled for blood sugar management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jun; Pawar, Rahul S; Grundel, Erich

    2018-03-01

    We developed and validated a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method to detect and quantitate 14 anti-diabetic, 2 anti-obesity, and 3 cholesterol-lowering drugs in botanical dietary supplements marketed for blood sugar management. Many botanical dietary supplements which carry label statements related to blood sugar management are available over the Internet. Potential adulteration of such dietary supplements with anti-diabetic and other prescription drugs, some of which have been removed from the market due to adverse events, is of concern. No significant matrix effects were observed and mean recoveries of all 19 analytes from a single product matrix were 88 to 113% at spiking concentrations from 500 to 2000 μg/g. Mean recoveries of metformin, phenformin, and sibutramine from matrices prepared from multiple product composites ranged from 93 to 115% at a spiking concentration of 100 μg/g. The relative standard deviations (RSD) (%) of intra-day analyses ranged from 0.2 to 13 for all recovery studies. Eighty dietary supplements obtained in the USA and carrying label statements related to blood sugar management were analyzed using this method and none were found to be adulterated with the above 19 drugs. Two products obtained outside of the USA and known to be adulterated were also analyzed by this method and found to contain phenformin, glibenclamide, and sibutramine. This method provided satisfactory selectivity, linearity, accuracy, precision, and sensitivity for rapid determination of 19 drugs and has broad applicability for the analysis of dietary supplements for possible adulteration with these compounds. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  16. A study of drug use in five urban centres in Kenya | Ndetei | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Few studies have addressed the reasons for substance use in Kenya, with most focusing on prevalence rates in school-based and general population samples. None have been carried out among people already using drugs. This study, based on five samples of drug users, aimed to identify patterns of factors contributing to ...

  17. Take with Food: Study Tests Lowering Dose of Prostate Cancer Drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Currents Blog Cancer Currents Blog Take with Food: Study Tests Lowering Dose of Prostate Cancer Drug Subscribe April ... to this page included, e.g., “Take with Food: Study Tests Lowering Dose of Prostate Cancer Drug was originally ...

  18. Meta-analysis of recent studies on patients admitted to hospital due to adverse drug effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atiqi, R.; Cleophas, T. J.; van Bommel, E.; Zwinderman, A. H.

    2009-01-01

    The use of drugs has expanded during the previous decade. However, earlier studies oil patients admitted for adverse drugs effects (ADEs) have been heterogeneous. The objectives of this Study were to assess the number of recent admissions to hospital Clue to ADEs and to assess the degree of

  19. Young people's attitudes towards illicit drugs: A population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friis, Karina; Østergaard, Jeanette; Reese, Sidsel; Lasgaard, Mathias

    2017-12-01

    Previous studies indicate that young people who have positive attitudes towards illicit drugs are more inclined to experiment with them. The first aim of our study was to identify the sociodemographic and risk behaviour characteristics of young people (16-24 years) with positive attitudes towards illicit drug use. The second aim was to identify the characteristics of young people with positive attitudes towards illicit drugs among those who had never tried drugs, those who had tried cannabis but no other illicit drugs, and those who regularly used cannabis and/or had tried other illicit drugs. The analysis was based on a population-based survey from 2013 ( N = 3812). Multiple logistic regression was used to analyse the association between sociodemographic and risk behaviour characteristics and positive attitudes towards illicit drugs. Young men had twice the odds of having positive attitudes towards illicit drug use compared with young women (AOR = 2.1). Also, young age, being single, being employed, smoking tobacco, practising unprotected sex, and experimental cannabis use were associated with positive attitudes towards illicit drug use. Finally, use of cannabis at least 10 times during the previous year and/or use of other illicit drugs had the strongest association with positive attitudes to illicit drug use (AOR = 6.0). Young people who have positive attitudes towards illicit drug use are characterized by a broad range of risky behaviours. These findings may help to identify young people at risk of initiating illicit drug use and thereby support the development and implementation of prevention programmes.

  20. Studying the electronic customer relationship management and its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studying the electronic customer relationship management and its effect on bank quality outcomes. ... Journal of Fundamental and Applied Sciences ... Keywords: Electronic Banking, Service Quality, Customer Satisfaction, Management of

  1. SMS for Life: a pilot project to improve anti-malarial drug supply management in rural Tanzania using standard technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mwafongo Winfred

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maintaining adequate supplies of anti-malarial medicines at the health facility level in rural sub-Saharan Africa is a major barrier to effective management of the disease. Lack of visibility of anti-malarial stock levels at the health facility level is an important contributor to this problem. Methods A 21-week pilot study, 'SMS for Life', was undertaken during 2009-2010 in three districts of rural Tanzania, involving 129 health facilities. Undertaken through a collaborative partnership of public and private institutions, SMS for Life used mobile telephones, SMS messages and electronic mapping technology to facilitate provision of comprehensive and accurate stock counts from all health facilities to each district management team on a weekly basis. The system covered stocks of the four different dosage packs of artemether-lumefantrine (AL and quinine injectable. Results Stock count data was provided in 95% of cases, on average. A high response rate (≥ 93% was maintained throughout the pilot. The error rate for composition of SMS responses averaged 7.5% throughout the study; almost all errors were corrected and messages re-sent. Data accuracy, based on surveillance visits to health facilities, was 94%. District stock reports were accessed on average once a day. The proportion of health facilities with no stock of one or more anti-malarial medicine (i.e. any of the four dosages of AL or quinine injectable fell from 78% at week 1 to 26% at week 21. In Lindi Rural district, stock-outs were eliminated by week 8 with virtually no stock-outs thereafter. During the study, AL stocks increased by 64% and quinine stock increased 36% across the three districts. Conclusions The SMS for Life pilot provided visibility of anti-malarial stock levels to support more efficient stock management using simple and widely available SMS technology, via a public-private partnership model that worked highly effectively. The SMS for Life system has

  2. SMS for Life: a pilot project to improve anti-malarial drug supply management in rural Tanzania using standard technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Maintaining adequate supplies of anti-malarial medicines at the health facility level in rural sub-Saharan Africa is a major barrier to effective management of the disease. Lack of visibility of anti-malarial stock levels at the health facility level is an important contributor to this problem. Methods A 21-week pilot study, 'SMS for Life', was undertaken during 2009-2010 in three districts of rural Tanzania, involving 129 health facilities. Undertaken through a collaborative partnership of public and private institutions, SMS for Life used mobile telephones, SMS messages and electronic mapping technology to facilitate provision of comprehensive and accurate stock counts from all health facilities to each district management team on a weekly basis. The system covered stocks of the four different dosage packs of artemether-lumefantrine (AL) and quinine injectable. Results Stock count data was provided in 95% of cases, on average. A high response rate (≥ 93%) was maintained throughout the pilot. The error rate for composition of SMS responses averaged 7.5% throughout the study; almost all errors were corrected and messages re-sent. Data accuracy, based on surveillance visits to health facilities, was 94%. District stock reports were accessed on average once a day. The proportion of health facilities with no stock of one or more anti-malarial medicine (i.e. any of the four dosages of AL or quinine injectable) fell from 78% at week 1 to 26% at week 21. In Lindi Rural district, stock-outs were eliminated by week 8 with virtually no stock-outs thereafter. During the study, AL stocks increased by 64% and quinine stock increased 36% across the three districts. Conclusions The SMS for Life pilot provided visibility of anti-malarial stock levels to support more efficient stock management using simple and widely available SMS technology, via a public-private partnership model that worked highly effectively. The SMS for Life system has the potential to alleviate

  3. Radiometric studies on the oxidation of (I-14C) fatty acids by drug-susceptible and drug-resistant mycobacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camargo, E.E.; Kopajtic, T.M.; Hopkins, G.K.; Cannon, N.P.; Wagner Junior, H.N.

    1987-01-01

    A radiometric assay system has been used to study oxidation patterns of (l - 14 C) fatty acids by drug-susceptible and drug-resistant organisms of the genus Mycobacterium (M. tuberculosis - H 37 Rv and Erdman, M. bovis, M. avium, M. intracellulare, M.Kansasii and M. chelonei). The organisms were inoculated in sterile reaction vials containing liquid 7H9 medium, 10% ADC enrichment and 1.0 uli of one of the (l- 14 C) fatty acids (butyric, hexanoic, octanoic, decanoic, lauric, myristic, palmitic, stearic, oleic, linoleic, linolenic). Vials were incubated at 37 0 C and the 14 CO 2 envolved was measured daily for 3 days with a Bactec R-301 instrument. (M.A.C.) [pt

  4. Strategies for the early detection of drug-induced hepatic steatosis in preclinical drug safety evaluation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amacher, David E.

    2011-01-01

    Hepatic steatosis is characterized by the accumulation of lipid droplets in the liver. Although relatively benign, simple steatosis can eventually lead to the development of steatohepatitis, a more serious condition characterized by fibrosis, cirrhosis, and eventual liver failure if the underlying cause is not eliminated. According to the 'two hit' theory of steatohepatitis, the initial hit involves fat accumulation in the liver, and a second hit leads to inflammation and subsequent tissue injury. Because some xenobiotics target liver fatty acid metabolism, especially mitochondrial β-oxidation, it is important to avoid potential drug candidates that can contribute to either the initiation of liver steatosis or progression to the more injurious steatohepatitis. The gold standard for the detection of these types of hepatic effects is histopathological examination of liver tissue. In animal studies, these examinations are slow, restricted to a single sampling time, and limited tissue sections. Recent literature suggests that rapid in vitro screening methods can be used early in the drug R and D process to identify compounds with steatotic potential. Further, progress in the identification of potential serum or plasma protein biomarkers for these liver changes may provide additional in vivo tools to the preclinical study toxicologist. This review summarizes recent developments for in vitro screening and in vivo biomarker detection for steatotic drug candidates.

  5. Market Exclusivity Time for Top Selling Originator Drugs in Canada: A Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lexchin, Joel

    2017-09-01

    This study looks at market exclusivity time for the top selling originator drugs in Canada. Total sales for drugs without competition were also calculated. A list of the top selling originator drugs by dollar sales from 2009 to 2015 inclusive, except for 2010, was compiled along with their annual sales. Health Canada databases were used to extract the following information: generic name, date of Notice of Compliance (NOC, date of marketing authorization), whether the product was a small molecule drug or a biologic, and date of NOC for a generic or biosimilar. Market exclusivity time was calculated in days for drugs. A total of 121 drugs were identified. There were 96 small molecule drugs (63 with a generic competitor and 33 with no generic competitor) and 25 biologics (none with a biosimilar competitor). The 63 drugs with a competitor had a mean market exclusivity time of 4478 days (12.3 years) (95% CI 4159-4798). The 58 drugs without competition had total annual sales of Can$8.59 billion and were on the market for a median of 5357 days (14.7 years) (interquartile range 3291-6679) as of January 31, 2017. Top selling originator drugs in Canada have a considerably longer period of market exclusivity than the 8 to 10 years that the research-based pharmaceutical industry claims. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Psychomotor developmental effects of prenatal exposure to psychotropic drugs: a study in EFEMERIS database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurault-Delarue, Caroline; Damase-Michel, Christine; Finotto, Laurent; Guitard, Claudine; Vayssière, Christophe; Montastruc, Jean-Louis; Montastruc, François; Lacroix, Isabelle

    2016-10-01

    Little is known about neurodevelopment of children exposed to psychotropic drugs during pregnancy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of prenatal exposure to psychotropic drugs on psychomotor development in children. This observational study used the EFEMERIS database. The database records the drugs prescribed and delivered during pregnancy and the resulting outcomes. Neurodevelopment at nine and 24 months of children born to women exposed to psychotropic drugs (anxiolytics, antidepressants, neuroleptics and anti-epileptics) during the second and/or third trimesters of pregnancy was compared to children who were not exposed to these drugs. Psychomotor development of 493 children (1.5%) exposed to psychotropic drugs during pregnancy was compared to 32 303 unexposed children. Exposure to psychotropic drugs during pregnancy was associated with an increased risk of abnormal motor development at 9 months (OR = 1.3 [1.1-2.2]) and abnormal motor and mental development at 24 months (OR = 4.8 [2.1-11.0] and OR = 2.3 [1.05-4.9]). Increased risk was observed in children born to women exposed to anti-epileptic drugs, neuroleptics or antidepressants during pregnancy. This study found a higher rate of deviation from the normal developmental milestones in children born to women exposed to psychotropic drugs during pregnancy and more particularly antidepressants, neuroleptics and anti-epileptics. © 2016 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  7. Polymeric nanoparticles containing diazepam: preparation, optimization, characterization, in-vitro drug release and release kinetic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohrey, Sarvesh; Chourasiya, Vibha; Pandey, Archna

    2016-03-01

    Nanoparticles formulated from biodegradable polymers like poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) are being extensively investigated as drug delivery systems due to their two important properties such as biocompatibility and controlled drug release characteristics. The aim of this work to formulated diazepam loaded PLGA nanoparticles by using emulsion solvent evaporation technique. Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) is used as stabilizing agent. Diazepam is a benzodiazepine derivative drug, and widely used as an anticonvulsant in the treatment of various types of epilepsy, insomnia and anxiety. This work investigates the effects of some preparation variables on the size and shape of nanoparticles prepared by emulsion solvent evaporation method. These nanoparticles were characterized by photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Zeta potential study was also performed to understand the surface charge of nanoparticles. The drug release from drug loaded nanoparticles was studied by dialysis bag method and the in vitro drug release data was also studied by various kinetic models. The results show that sonication time, polymer content, surfactant concentration, ratio of organic to aqueous phase volume, and the amount of drug have an important effect on the size of nanoparticles. Hopefully we produced spherical shape Diazepam loaded PLGA nanoparticles with a size range under 250 nm with zeta potential -23.3 mV. The in vitro drug release analysis shows sustained release of drug from nanoparticles and follow Korsmeyer-Peppas model.

  8. Achieving Drug and Alcohol Abstinence Among Recently Incarcerated Homeless Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Dialectical Behavioral Therapy-Case Management With a Health Promotion Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyamathi, Adeline M; Shin, Sanghyuk S; Smeltzer, Jolene; Salem, Benissa E; Yadav, Kartik; Ekstrand, Maria L; Turner, Susan F; Faucette, Mark

    Homeless female ex-offenders (homeless female offenders) exiting jail and prison are at a critical juncture during reentry and transitioning into the community setting. The purpose of the study was to compare the effect of a dialectical behavioral therapy-case management (DBT-CM) program with a health promotion (HP) program on achieving drug and alcohol abstinence among female parolees/probationers residing in the community. We conducted a multicenter parallel randomized controlled trial with 130 female parolees/probationers (aged 19-64 years) residing in the community randomly assigned to either DBT-CM (n = 65) or HP (n = 65). The trial was conducted in four community-based partner sites in Los Angeles and Pomona, California, from February 2015 to November 2016. Treatment assignment was carried out using a computer-based urn randomization program. The primary outcome was drug and alcohol use abstinence at 6-month follow up. Analysis was based on data from 116 participants with complete outcome data. Multivariable logistic regression revealed that the DBT-CM program remained an independent positive predictor of decrease in drug use among the DBT-CM participants at 6 months (p = .01) as compared with the HP program participants. Being non-White (p < .05) and having higher depressive symptom scores (p < .05) were associated with lower odds of drug use abstinence (i.e., increased the odds of drug use) at 6 months. DBT-CM increased drug and alcohol abstinence at 6-month follow-up, compared to an HP program.

  9. Automation impact study of Army Training Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanquist, T.F.; Schuller, C.R.; McCallum, M.C.; Underwood, J.A.; Bettin, P.J.; King, J.L.; Melber, B.D.; Hostick, C.J.; Seaver, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    The main objectives of this impact study were to identify the potential cost savings associated with automated Army Training Management (TM), and to perform a cost-benefit analysis for an Army-wide automated TM system. A subsidiary goal was to establish baseline data for an independent evaluation of a prototype Integrated Training Management System (ITMS), to be tested in the fall of 1988. A structured analysis of TM doctrine was performed for comparison with empirical data gathered in a job analysis survey of selected units of the 9ID (MTZ) at Ft. Lewis, Washington. These observations will be extended to other units in subsequent surveys. The survey data concerning staffing levels and amount of labor expended on eight distinct TM tasks were analyzed in a cost effectiveness model. The main results of the surveys and cost effectiveness modelling are summarized. 18 figs., 47 tabs.

  10. Automation impact study of Army Training Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanquist, T.F.; Schuller, C.R.; McCallum, M.C.; Underwood, J.A.; Bettin, P.J.; King, J.L.; Melber, B.D.; Hostick, C.J.; Seaver, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    The main objectives of this impact study were to identify the potential cost savings associated with automated Army Training Management (TM), and to perform a cost-benefit analysis for an Army-wide automated TM system. A subsidiary goal was to establish baseline data for an independent evaluation of a prototype Integrated Training Management System (ITMS), to be tested in the fall of 1988. A structured analysis of TM doctrine was performed for comparison with empirical data gathered in a job analysis survey of selected units of the 9ID (MTZ) at Ft. Lewis, Washington. These observations will be extended to other units in subsequent surveys. The survey data concerning staffing levels and amount of labor expended on eight distinct TM tasks were analyzed in a cost effectiveness model. The main results of the surveys and cost effectiveness modelling are summarized. 18 figs., 47 tabs

  11. Study on managing EPICS database using ORACLE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Shu; Wang Chunhong; Zhao Jijiu

    2007-01-01

    EPICS is used as a development toolkit of BEPCII control system. The core of EPICS is a distributed database residing in front-end machines. The distributed database is usually created by tools such as VDCT and text editor in the host, then loaded to front-end target IOCs through the network. In BEPCII control system there are about 20,000 signals, which are distributed in more than 20 IOCs. All the databases are developed by device control engineers using VDCT or text editor. There's no uniform tools providing transparent management. The paper firstly presents the current status on EPICS database management issues in many labs. Secondly, it studies EPICS database and the interface between ORACLE and EPICS database. finally, it introduces the software development and application is BEPCII control system. (authors)

  12. 'Silk Road', the virtual drug marketplace: a single case study of user experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hout, Marie Claire; Bingham, Tim

    2013-09-01

    The online promotion of 'drug shopping' and user information networks is of increasing public health and law enforcement concern. An online drug marketplace called 'Silk Road' has been operating on the 'Deep Web' since February 2011 and was designed to revolutionise contemporary drug consumerism. A single case study approach explored a 'Silk Road' user's motives for online drug purchasing, experiences of accessing and using the website, drug information sourcing, decision making and purchasing, outcomes and settings for use, and perspectives around security. The participant was recruited following a lengthy relationship building phase on the 'Silk Road' chat forum. The male participant described his motives, experiences of purchasing processes and drugs used from 'Silk Road'. Consumer experiences on 'Silk Road' were described as 'euphoric' due to the wide choice of drugs available, relatively easy once navigating the Tor Browser (encryption software) and using 'Bitcoins' for transactions, and perceived as safer than negotiating illicit drug markets. Online researching of drug outcomes, particularly for new psychoactive substances was reported. Relationships between vendors and consumers were described as based on cyber levels of trust and professionalism, and supported by 'stealth modes', user feedback and resolution modes. The reality of his drug use was described as covert and solitary with psychonautic characteristics, which contrasted with his membership, participation and feelings of safety within the 'Silk Road' community. 'Silk Road' as online drug marketplace presents an interesting displacement away from 'traditional' online and street sources of drug supply. Member support and harm reduction ethos within this virtual community maximises consumer decision-making and positive drug experiences, and minimises potential harms and consumer perceived risks. Future research is necessary to explore experiences and backgrounds of other users. Copyright © 2013

  13. The impact of medicinal drugs on traffic safety: a systematic review of epidemiological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orriols, Ludivine; Salmi, Louis-Rachid; Philip, Pierre; Moore, Nicholas; Delorme, Bernard; Castot, Anne; Lagarde, Emmanuel

    2009-08-01

    To evaluate the quality of epidemiological research into effects of medicinal drugs on traffic safety and the current knowledge in this area. The bibliographic search was done in Medline electronic database using the keywords: ((accident* or crash*) and traffic and drug*) leading to 1141 references. Additional references were retrieved from the Safetylit website and the reference lists of selected studies. Original articles published in English or French, between 1 April 1979 and 31 July 2008, were considered for inclusion. We excluded descriptive studies, studies limited to alcohol or illicit drug involvement and investigations of injuries other than from traffic crashes. Studies based on laboratory tests, driving simulators or on-the-road driving tests were also excluded. Eligible studies had to evaluate the causal relationship between the use of medicinal drugs and the risk of traffic crashes. Study quality was assessed by two independent experts, according to a grid adapted from the strengthening the reporting of observational studies in epidemiology (STROBE) statement. Twenty two studies of variable methodological quality were included. Definition of drug exposure varied across studies and depended on the data sources. Potential confounding due to the interaction between the effects of the medicinal drug and disease-related symptoms was often not controlled. The risk of motor-vehicle crashes related to benzodiazepines has been amply studied and demonstrated. Results for other medicinal drugs remain controversial. There is a need for large studies, investigating the role of individual substances in the risk of road traffic crashes. Copyright 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Use of density functional theory in drug metabolism studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rydberg, Patrik; Jørgensen, Flemming Steen; Olsen, Lars

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs) metabolize many drug compounds. They catalyze a wide variety of reactions, and potentially, a large number of different metabolites can be generated. Density functional theory (DFT) has, over the past decade, been shown to be a powerful tool...... isoforms. This is probably due to the fact that the binding of the substrates is not the major determinant. When binding of the substrate plays a significant role, the well-known issue of determining the free energy of binding is the challenge. How approaches taking the protein environment into account...

  15. Management of Hypercholesterolemia, Appropriateness of Therapeutic Approaches and New Drugs in Patients with High Cardiovascular Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agabiti Rosei, Enrico; Salvetti, Massimo

    2016-09-01

    Control of lipid levels is one of the most effective strategies for cardiovascular (CV) event prevention. In fact, many clinical trials have clearly demonstrated that low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) lowering, primarily with statins, reduces major CV events and mortality. The evidence from these trials has been useful in designing the cholesterol treatment guidelines, which are mainly aimed at preventing and managing cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, available data indicate that a large proportion of patients fail to achieve lipid goals, and this is particularly frequent in patients at high or very high CV risk. Furthermore, owing to side effects, a significant percentage of patients cannot tolerate statin treatment. Hence, researchers have focused their attention on novel LDL-C-lowering agents that act via mechanisms distinct from that of statins. Among the new compounds under investigation, the monoclonal antibodies to proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) seem particularly promising, having recently been shown to be well tolerated and highly effective at lowering LDL-C, with a possible effect on the occurrence of CV events. Currently, alirocumab is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as an adjunct to diet and maximally tolerated statin therapy for use in adults with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) or those with atherosclerotic CV disease who require additional LDL-C lowering; it has also been recently approved by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) for use in patients with heterozygous FH, non-familial hypercholesterolemia or mixed dyslipidemia in whom statins are ineffective or not tolerated. Evolocumab is approved by the FDA as an adjunct to diet and maximally tolerated statins for adults with hetero- and homozygous FH and those with atherosclerotic CV disease who require additional lowering of LDL-C, and by the EMA in adults with primary hypercholesterolemia or mixed dyslipidemia, as an adjunct

  16. Semantic Web Ontology and Data Integration: a Case Study in Aiding Psychiatric Drug Repurposing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chen; Sun, Jingchun; Tao, Cui

    2015-01-01

    There remain significant difficulties selecting probable candidate drugs from existing databases. We describe an ontology-oriented approach to represent the nexus between genes, drugs, phenotypes, symptoms, and diseases from multiple information sources. We also report a case study in which we attempted to explore candidate drugs effective for bipolar disorder and epilepsy. We constructed an ontology incorporating knowledge between the two diseases and performed semantic reasoning tasks with the ontology. The results suggested 48 candidate drugs that hold promise for further breakthrough. The evaluation demonstrated the validity our approach. Our approach prioritizes the candidate drugs that have potential associations among genes, phenotypes and symptoms, and thus facilitates the data integration and drug repurposing in psychiatric disorders.

  17. SOME ASPECTS OF THE MARKETING STUDIES FOR THE PHARMACEUTICAL MARKET OF ANTIVIRAL DRUGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Salnikova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Antiviral drugs are widely used in medicinal practice. They suppress the originator and stimulate the protection of an organism. The drugs are used for the treatment of flu and ARVI, herpetic infections, virus hepatitis, HIV-infection. Contemporary pharmaceutical market is represented by a wide range of antiviral drugs. Marketing studies are conducted to develop strategies, used for the enhancement of pharmacy organization activity efficiency. Conduction of the marketing researches of pharmaceutical market is the purpose of this study. We have used State Registry of Drugs, State Record of Drugs, List of vital drugs, questionnaires of pharmaceutical workers during our work. Historical, sociological, mathematical methods, and a method of expert evaluation were used in the paper. As the result of the study we have made the following conclusions. We have studied and generalized the literature data about classification and application of antiviral drugs, marketing, competition. The assortment of antiviral drugs on the pharmaceutical market of the Russian Federation was also studied. We have conducted an analysis for the obtainment of the information about antiviral drugs by pharmaceutical workers. We have determined the competitiveness of antiviral drugs, and on the basis of the research conducted we have submitted an offer for pharmaceutical organizations to form the range of antiviral drugs.

  18. Drug utilization in patients with OA: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Nicholas; Sanchez-Riera, Lidia; Morros, Rosa; Diez-Perez, Adolfo; Javaid, M Kassim; Cooper, Cyrus; Arden, Nigel K; Prieto-Alhambra, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    Patients with OA use different drugs in their search for relief. We aimed to study the prevalence of use and combinations of different medications for OA in a population-based cohort of OA patients in Catalonia, Spain, while characterizing users of each of the drugs available, with a particular focus on cardiovascular risk factors. Data were obtained from the Sistema d'Informació per al Desenvolupament de l'Investigació en Atenció Primària (SIDIAP) database, which includes electronic medical records and pharmacy invoice data for >5 million people from Catalonia. Study participants were those with a clinical diagnosis of OA in 2006-10. Drugs studied included oral and topical NSAIDs, analgesics (paracetamol, metamizole), opioids (tramadol, fentanyl), cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) inhibitors and symptomatic slow-acting drugs in OA. Drug utilization was described using medication possession ratios (MPRs), equivalent to the proportion of days covered with the drug of interest. The annual incidence of new users in the first year after OA diagnosis from 2006 to 2010 was estimated for all studied drugs among newly diagnosed OA patients using Poisson regression. We identified 238 536 study participants. The most common regimen of treatment consisted of at least three drugs (53.9% of patients). The drugs most frequently used regularly (MPR ≥50%) were chondroitin (21.2%), glucosamine (15.8%) and oral NSAIDs (14.4%). The incidence of the use of opioids, COX-2 inhibitors and chondroitin increased over the 5 year period, whereas all others decreased. Drug combinations are common in the treatment of OA patients, who are thus exposed to potential drug interactions, with unknown impacts on their health. The increasing use of opioids and COX-2 inhibitors is noteworthy because of the potential impact on safety and costs. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email

  19. Demand for a Medicare prescription drug benefit: exploring consumer preferences under a managed competition framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, Richard R; Mott, David A

    2003-01-01

    Several proposals for adding a prescription drug benefit to the Medicare program rely on consumer choice and market forces to promote efficiency. However, little information exists regarding: 1) the extent of price sensitivity for such plans among Medicare beneficiaries, or 2) the extent to which drug-only insurance plans using various cost-control mechanisms might experience adverse selection. Using data from a survey of elderly Wisconsin residents regarding their likely choices from a menu of hypothetical drug plans, we show that respondents are likely to be price sensitive with respect to both premiums and out-of-pocket costs but that selection problems may arise in these markets. Outside intervention may be necessary to ensure the feasibility of a market-based approach to a Medicare drug benefit.

  20. Mechanisms Underlying the Risk to Develop Drug Addiction, Insights From Studies in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryvkin, Julia; Bentzur, Assa; Zer-Krispil, Shir; Shohat-Ophir, Galit

    2018-01-01

    The ability to adapt to environmental changes is an essential feature of biological systems, achieved in animals by a coordinated crosstalk between neuronal and hormonal programs that allow rapid and integrated organismal responses. Reward systems play a key role in mediating this adaptation by reinforcing behaviors that enhance immediate survival, such as eating or drinking, or those that ensure long-term survival, such as sexual behavior or caring for offspring. Drugs of abuse co-opt neuronal and molecular pathways that mediate natural rewards, which under certain circumstances can lead to addiction. Many factors can contribute to the transition from drug use to drug addiction, highlighting the need to discover mechanisms underlying the progression from initial drug use to drug addiction. Since similar responses to natural and drug rewards are present in very different animals, it is likely that the central systems that process reward stimuli originated early in evolution, and that common ancient biological principles and genes are involved in these processes. Thus, the neurobiology of natural and drug rewards can be studied using simpler model organisms that have their systems stripped of some of the immense complexity that exists in mammalian brains. In this paper we review studies in Drosophila melanogaster that model different aspects of natural and drug rewards, with an emphasis on how motivational states shape the value of the rewarding experience, as an entry point to understanding the mechanisms that contribute to the vulnerability of drug addiction.

  1. Mechanisms Underlying the Risk to Develop Drug Addiction, Insights From Studies in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Ryvkin

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The ability to adapt to environmental changes is an essential feature of biological systems, achieved in animals by a coordinated crosstalk between neuronal and hormonal programs that allow rapid and integrated organismal responses. Reward systems play a key role in mediating this adaptation by reinforcing behaviors that enhance immediate survival, such as eating or drinking, or those that ensure long-term survival, such as sexual behavior or caring for offspring. Drugs of abuse co-opt neuronal and molecular pathways that mediate natural rewards, which under certain circumstances can lead to addiction. Many factors can contribute to the transition from drug use to drug addiction, highlighting the need to discover mechanisms underlying the progression from initial drug use to drug addiction. Since similar responses to natural and drug rewards are present in very different animals, it is likely that the central systems that process reward stimuli originated early in evolution, and that common ancient biological principles and genes are involved in these processes. Thus, the neurobiology of natural and drug rewards can be studied using simpler model organisms that have their systems stripped of some of the immense complexity that exists in mammalian brains. In this paper we review studies in Drosophila melanogaster that model different aspects of natural and drug rewards, with an emphasis on how motivational states shape the value of the rewarding experience, as an entry point to understanding the mechanisms that contribute to the vulnerability of drug addiction.

  2. Recent updates on drug abuse analyzed by neuroproteomics studies: Cocaine, Methamphetamine and MDMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firas Kobeissy

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Currently, drug abuse and addiction represent a global public health concern with about 13.6 million people using illicit drugs in the USA alone. Substance abuse intervenes in normal brain functioning, causing alterations in memory, behavior and neuronal physiology. Although many studies have been conducted to elucidate the mode of action of different drugs, the heterogeneous modes of drug intake led to a complicated profile of drug-induced brain changes involving neurotoxicity and addiction. Given the complex interplay of genes and proteins in mediating these effects, neuroproteomics analysis has been considered among the methods of choice to complement what has already been discovered and to create targeted therapies. In this review, we will focus on three drugs, namely cocaine, methamphetamine (METH and 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine (MDMA. In the context of neuroproteomics, these drugs have been extensively studied by utilizing different experimental models, including primate and non-primate animals along with postmortem human samples. Even though there are many variations in the results, these drugs were shown to employ common pathways in eliciting their effects. Neuroproteomics analysis of these drugs has led to the identification of differentially expressed proteins involved in metabolism, oxidative stress, cell signaling, cytoskeleton, cell death and synaptic plasticity. Finally, this work will discuss recent findings from our laboratory by looking at a model of chronic methamphetamine abuse and its effect on different brain regions.

  3. Homeless drug users and information technology: a qualitative study with potential implications for recovery from drug dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neale, Joanne; Stevenson, Caral

    2014-09-01

    Having access to information and communication technologies (ICTs) is a prerequisite to meaningful participation in society. This paper seeks to: i. explore the engagement of homeless drug users (HDUs) with ICTs and ii. discuss the findings with reference to recovery from drug dependence. The study design was qualitative and longitudinal, involving data collected in 2012-13 via 52 semi-structured interviews with 30 homeless drug users (25 men; five women). Participants were recruited from 17 hostels in two English cities. Interview data were analyzed using Framework. HDUs had access to ICTs, used ICTs, and wanted to engage with them more. Experiences of digital exclusion were a function of participants' inability to afford ICTs, the relatively cheap and poor quality technology available to them, limited knowledge about ICTs, and lack of support in using them. That HDUs were often unable to take full advantage of technology because they had nobody to explain what their devices could do or to show them how they worked was ironic given that using ICTs to (re)establish and maintain relationships were functions of technology that HDUs particularly liked. The physical, human, cultural, and social capital of HDUs influenced their access to, and use of, ICTs. Equally, ICTs were themselves an important recovery resource. Services and others should endeavor to provide HDUs with easy access to good quality technology, as well as offers of support and education so that all individuals have the knowledge and confidence to make optimum use of the technology that is available to them.

  4. The drug release study of ceftriaxone from porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sokanee, Zeki N; Toabi, Abedl Amer H; Al-Assadi, Mohammed J; Alassadi, Erfan A S

    2009-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAP) is an important biomedical material that is used for grafting osseous defects. It has an excellent bioactivity and biocompatibility properties. To isolate hydroxyapatite, pieces of cleaned cattle's bone were heated at different temperature range from 400 degrees C up to 1,200 degrees C. A reasonable yield of 60.32% w/w HAP was obtained at temperature range from 1,000 degrees C to 1,200 degrees C. Fourier transform infrared spectra and the thermogravimetric measurement showed a clear removal of organic at 600 degrees C as well as an excellent isolation of HAP from the bones which was achieved at 1,000-1,200 degrees C. This was also confirmed from X-ray diffraction of bone sample heated at 1,200 degrees C. The concentration ions were found to be sodium, potassium, lithium, zinc, copper, iron, calcium, magnesium, and phosphate present in bones within the acceptable limits for its role in the bioactivity property of HAP. Glucose powder was used as a porosifier. Glucose was novel and excellent as porogen where it was completely removed by heating, giving an efficient porosity in the used scaffolds. The results exhibited that the ceftriaxone drug release was increased with increasing the porosity. It was found that a faster, higher, and more regular drug release was obtained from the scaffold with a porosity of 10%.

  5. Study on radiosterilization of crude drug pill involving bezoar bovis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Syojiro; Sasaki, Masahiro; Kondo, Yuichi; Jo, Hisanobu; Kanbashi, Toshitaka.

    1981-01-01

    Radiolysis of bilirubin and cholic acids (cholic acid, desoxycholic acid and lithocholic acid) in hydrous pellet have been investigated with following parameters, which were hydrous content, radiation dose and the dose rate, to discuss the application of gamma -irradiation for sterilization of crude drug pill involving bezoar bovis. At 774 C/kg(3.0MR) irradiation for 5% and 10% hydrous contents pellets, the radiolysis percent of those components were less than 5%. However, the higher hydrous pellet, the radiolysis percents of those are more increase. At the same irradiated condition for 20% hydrous contents pellets, the radiolysis percents of those were 15--22%. The hydrous percent of commercial crude drug pill involving bezoar bovis are about 9%, so that the radiolysis of those components will be less than 5% on the sterilization. The radiolysis percent of bilirubin are constant to variation of radiation dose rate between 51.6--722.5C/kg.hr(0.2--2.8MR/hr). But, the values of cholic acids don't definite such as that of bilirubin, because of larger analitycal error. (author)

  6. CAREER ANALYSIS AND BANK MANAGER???S PERFORMANCES (A Gender Study in Macassar)

    OpenAIRE

    Idayanti

    2012-01-01

    The purposes of this study are to analyze career and bank manager???s performances in Macassar. The study implemented t test among two groups of respondents. The results indicated that those two variables contributed differently based on types of sex perspectives. The result shown that women manager faced more obstacles in career development compare than men, however women manager have better performances.

  7. Nuclear Power Plant Lifetime Management Study (I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Sung Yull; Jeong, Ill Seok; Jang, Chang Heui; Song, Taek Ho; Song, Woo Young [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Jin, Tae Eun [Korea Power Engineering Company Consulting and Architecture Engineers, (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Woo Chul [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    As the operation-year of nuclear power plant increases and finding sites for new nuclear power plant becomes harder, a comprehensive and systematic nuclear plant lifetime management(PLIM) program including life extension has to be established for stable and safe supply of electricity. A feasibility study was conducted to systematically evaluate technical, economic and regulatory aspect of plant lifetime managements and plant life extension for Kori-1 nuclear power plant. For technical evaluation of nuclear power plant, 13 major components were selected for lifetime evaluation by screening system. structure, and components(SSCs) of the plant. It was found that except reactor pressure vessel, which needs detailed integrity analysis, and low pressure turbine, which is scheduled to be replaced, 11 out of 13 major components have sufficient service life, for more than 40 years. Because domestic rules and regulations related to license renewal has not yet been written, review on the regulatory aspect of life extensions was conducted using US NRC rules and regulations. A cooperative effort with nuclear regulatory body is needed for early completion of license renewal rules and regulations. For economic evaluation of plant lifetime extension, a computer program was developed and used. It was found that 10 to 20 year of extension operation of Kori-1 nuclear power plant was proved. Based on the results, next phase of plant lifetime management program for detailed lifetime evaluation and presenting detailed implementation schedule for plant refurbishment for lifetime extension should be followed. (author). 74 refs., figs.

  8. Nuclear Power Plant Lifetime Management Study (I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Sung Yull; Jeong, Ill Seok; Jang, Chang Heui; Song, Taek Ho; Song, Woo Young [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Jin, Tae Eun [Korea Power Engineering Company Consulting and Architecture Engineers, (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Woo Chul [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-31

    As the operation-year of nuclear power plant increases and finding sites for new nuclear power plant becomes harder, a comprehensive and systematic nuclear plant lifetime management(PLIM) program including life extension has to be established for stable and safe supply of electricity. A feasibility study was conducted to systematically evaluate technical, economic and regulatory aspect of plant lifetime managements and plant life extension for Kori-1 nuclear power plant. For technical evaluation of nuclear power plant, 13 major components were selected for lifetime evaluation by screening system. structure, and components(SSCs) of the plant. It was found that except reactor pressure vessel, which needs detailed integrity analysis, and low pressure turbine, which is scheduled to be replaced, 11 out of 13 major components have sufficient service life, for more than 40 years. Because domestic rules and regulations related to license renewal has not yet been written, review on the regulatory aspect of life extensions was conducted using US NRC rules and regulations. A cooperative effort with nuclear regulatory body is needed for early completion of license renewal rules and regulations. For economic evaluation of plant lifetime extension, a computer program was developed and used. It was found that 10 to 20 year of extension operation of Kori-1 nuclear power plant was proved. Based on the results, next phase of plant lifetime management program for detailed lifetime evaluation and presenting detailed implementation schedule for plant refurbishment for lifetime extension should be followed. (author). 74 refs., figs.

  9. Food, Drugs, and TV: The Social Study of Corporate Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleifer, David; Penders, Bart

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the contributions in this special issue, which brings together contributions that explore the varied ways in which science is practiced, managed, contested, and abandoned in corporate settings. From these empirical contributions, the authors aim to provoke reflection on the usefulness of the demarcations between for-profit…

  10. Prescription drug use during pregnancy in France: a study from the national health insurance permanent sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demailly, Romain; Escolano, Sylvie; Quantin, Catherine; Tubert-Bitter, Pascale; Ahmed, Ismaïl

    2017-09-01

    To provide an up-to-date account of drug prescription during pregnancy in France from 2011 to 2014 using the permanent sample of the French national computerized healthcare database and with a focus on recommended supplementations, fetotoxic drugs and teratogenic drugs. All pregnancies identified by the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision codes list in the hospitalization database, lasting more than 9 weeks of amenorrhea and whose delivery occurred between 01/01/2011 and 12/31/2014, were included. Drugs delivered between the trimester before and until the end of the pregnancy were included. Drug exposure prevalence was calculated for each year and according to pregnancy trimesters. The study included 28,491 pregnancies with a median number of 9 [5-13] (median [IQ range]) drugs delivered. The most prescribed drug class was antianemia (in 72.5% of exposed). The prescription rate of recommended vitamins (B9 and D) increased over the study period (+10%). Influenza vaccination also increased but remained at a low rate (1%). Exposure to fetotoxic drugs decreased as pregnancy advanced. Exposure to the main teratogenic antiepileptics was stable over the study period. Low-income pregnant women had a higher average drug consumption except for recommended vitamins. Pregnant French women are among the largest consumers of prescription medications worldwide. Overall, the dispensation trends observed in this study are in line with the recommendations of the French National College of Gynecologists and Obstetricians. Nevertheless, while being low, exposure to fetotoxic drugs, teratogenic drugs or those under safety alerts still occurred. Supplementations and vaccines in low-income pregnant women should also be increased. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Evidence based herbal drug standardization approach in coping with challenges of holistic management of diabetes: a dreadful lifestyle disorder of 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Raman; Thakur, Pallavi; Chowdhry, Ayush; Jaiswal, Sarita; Sharma, Anamika; Goel, Rajeev; Sharma, Jyoti; Priyadarshi, Smruti Sagar; Kumar, Vinod; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar; Arora, Rajesh

    2013-07-04

    Plants by virtue of its composition of containing multiple constituents developed during its growth under various environmental stresses providing a plethora of chemical families with medicinal utility. Researchers are exploring this wealth and trying to decode its utility for enhancing health standards of human beings. Diabetes is dreadful lifestyle disorder of 21st century caused due to lack of insulin production or insulin physiological unresponsiveness. The chronic impact of untreated diabetes significantly affects vital organs. The allopathic medicines have five classes of drugs, or otherwise insulin in Type I diabetes, targeting insulin secretion, decreasing effect of glucagon, sensitization of receptors for enhanced glucose uptake etc. In addition, diet management, increased food fiber intake, Resistant Starch intake and routine exercise aid in managing such dangerous metabolic disorder. One of the key factors that limit commercial utility of herbal drugs is standardization. Standardization poses numerous challenges related to marker identification, active principle(s), lack of defined regulations, non-availability of universally acceptable technical standards for testing and implementation of quality control/safety standard (toxicological testing). The present study proposed an integrated herbal drug development & standardization model which is an amalgamation of Classical Approach of Ayurvedic Therapeutics, Reverse Pharmacological Approach based on Observational Therapeutics, Technical Standards for complete product cycle, Chemi-informatics, Herbal Qualitative Structure Activity Relationship and Pharmacophore modeling and, Post-Launch Market Analysis. Further studies are warranted to ensure that an effective herbal drug standardization methodology will be developed, backed by a regulatory standard guide the future research endeavors in more focused manner.

  12. In vitro drug interaction of levocetirizine and diclofenac: Theoretical and spectroscopic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abo Dena, Ahmed S.; Abdel Gaber, Sara A.

    2017-06-01

    Levocetirizine dihydrochloride is known to interact with some anti-inflammatory drugs. We report here a comprehensive integrated theoretical and experimental study for the in vitro drug interaction between levocetirizine dihydrochloride (LEV) and diclofenac sodium (DIC). The interaction of the two drugs was confirmed by the molecular ion peak obtained from the mass spectrum of the product. Moreover, FTIR and 1HNMR spectra of the individual drugs and their interaction product were inspected to allocate the possible sites of interaction. In addition, quantum mechanical DFT calculations were performed to search for the interaction sites and to verify the types of interactions deduced from the spectroscopic studies such as charge-transfer and non-bonding π-π interactions. It was found that the studied drugs interact with each other in aqueous solution via four types of interactions, namely, ion-pair formation, three weak hydrogen bonds, non-bonding π-π interactions and charge-transfer from DIC to LEV.

  13. 78 FR 73199 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Bioequivalence Studies With Pharmacokinetic Endpoints for Drugs...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-05

    ... exposure measures is suitable for documenting BE (e.g., transdermal delivery systems and certain rectal and... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2013-D-1464] Draft Guidance for Industry on Bioequivalence Studies With Pharmacokinetic Endpoints for Drugs Submitted...

  14. Maturing Out: An empirical study of personal histories and processes in hard-drug addiction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.H. Prins

    1995-01-01

    textabstractEver since the fiftieth, the sixtieth and the seventieth, the time I worked and studied in the United States, I developed an interest in the fate of the many drug addicts I met there. What struck me particularly was the fact that these drug addicts were almost always quite young. In

  15. Enantiomeric profiling of chiral illicit drugs in a pan-European study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castrignanò, E.; Yang, Z.; Bade, R.; Baz-Lomba, J.A.; Castiglioni, S.; Causanilles, A.; Covaci, A.; Gracia-Lor, E.; Hernández, F.; Kinyua, J.; McCall, A.-K.; van Nuijs, A.L.N.; Ort, C.; Plósz, B.G.; Ramin, P.; Rousis, N.I.; Ryu, Y.; Thomas, K.V.; de Voogt, P.; Zuccato, E.; Kasprzyk-Hordern, B.

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the first study on spatial and temporal variation in the enantiomeric profile of chiral drugs in eight European cities. Wastewater-based epidemiology (WBE) and enantioselective analysis were combined to evaluate trends in illicit drug use in the context of their

  16. Risk of falls after withdrawal of fall-risk-increasing drugs: a prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Velde, Nathalie; Stricker, Bruno H. Ch; Pols, Huib A. P.; van der Cammen, Tischa J. M.

    2007-01-01

    AIMS: Falling in older persons is a frequent and serious clinical problem. Several drugs have been associated with increased fall risk. The objective of this study was to identify differences in the incidence of falls after withdrawal (discontinuation or dose reduction) of fall-risk-increasing drugs

  17. A baseline study of drug prescribing practices in a Nigerian military ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Military facilities provide health care services to an important segment of both themilitary and civil population. Methods: The aim of this study was to evaluate drug prescribing practices at a Nigerian military hospital (MilitaryHospital, Ikoyi, Lagos) and tomake recommendations for its improvement.UsingWHOrational drug use ...

  18. Intensive monitoring of new drugs based on first prescription signals from pharmacists : a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Grootheest, AC; Groote, JK; de Jong-van den Berg, LTW

    Background Intensive monitoring can be a valuable tool in the early detection of adverse drug reactions, especially of new drugs. Aim of this pilot study was to investigate the practical possibilities of a system of intensive monitoring, using the pharmacy computer system to detect the first

  19. Bioanalysis and metabolite identification of anticancer drugs in mass balance studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubbelman, A.C.

    2012-01-01

    Anticancer drugs are valuable assets in the treatment of cancer. However, before a new drug is admitted to the market and available for patients, it has to survive a lengthy path of pre-clinical and clinical studies to demonstrate its efficacy and safety. Critical information required to understand

  20. Drug Utilization Study in Ophthalmology Out‑patient Department of a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROMOTING ACCESS TO AFRICAN RESEARCH. AFRICAN ... Abstract. Background: Drug utilization studies provide a pharmacoeconomic basis for making evidence‑based health‑care decisions. ... Results: A total of 640 prescriptions were analyzed with the average number of drugs per prescription being 2.4 (0.9).

  1. Microfluidics Enables Small-Scale Tissue-Based Drug Metabolism Studies With Scarce Human Tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Midwoud, Paul M.; Verpoorte, Elisabeth; Groothuis, Geny M. M.; Merema, M.T.

    2011-01-01

    Early information on the metabolism and toxicity properties of new drug candidates is crucial for selecting the right candidates for further development. Preclinical trials rely on cell-based in vitro tests and animal studies to characterize the in vivo behavior of drug candidates, although neither

  2. Investigating unlicensed retail drug vendors' preparedness and knowledge about malaria: An exploratory study in rural Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liow, Eric; Kassam, Rosemin; Sekiwunga, Richard

    2017-10-01

    Despite major efforts to increase the uptake of preventive measures and timely use of the first line antimalarial treatment artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACT), Uganda continues to fall short of meeting its national malaria control targets. One of the challenges has been scaling up effective measures in rural and remote areas where the unlicensed private retail sector remains the first point of contact and a common source of treatment. The current paper discusses unlicensed vendors' (1) training related to malaria case management for children aged five and under, and (2) knowledge related to the cause of malaria, preventive measures, common signs, and symptoms, diagnostic procedures, and best treatment options. A qualitative study using semi-structured interviews was conducted in the rural district of Butaleja, Uganda in 2011. All 88 unlicensed drug outlets enumerated in the study area were visited by six locally recruited research assistants, with one vendor from each outlet invited to participate. The transcripts were analyzed using acceptable qualitative research protocols. About half of the 75 vendors interviewed had received some sort of formal training on malaria at a post-secondary institution, although only 6.7% had qualifications which met licensure requirements. The study found widespread misconceptions relating to the cause, as well as prevention and treatment of malaria. A large majority of the vendors relied primarily on non-specific symptoms and limited physical exams for diagnoses, with less than one-tenth of the vendors recognizing that rapid or microscopic blood testing was necessary to confirm a clinical diagnosis of malaria. While most recognized mosquitoes as the primary vector for malaria, over two-fifths of the vendors held misconceptions about the factors that could increase the risk of malaria, and nearly a third believed that malaria could not be prevented. With respect to acute case management, three-quarters viewed as the best

  3. DRUG UTILISATION STUDY IN THE TREATMENT OF HYPERTENSION IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amol Chandrakant Deshmukh

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Hypertension, a common clinical problem is considered as an ‘iceberg disease’ because its unknown morbidity far exceeds the known morbidity. In terms of attributable deaths, it is one of the leading behavioural and physiological risk factors amounting to 13% of global deaths. Drug selection is based on efficacy in lowering BP (blood pressure and in reducing Cardiovascular (CV endpoints like stroke, myocardial infarction and heart failure. This study was carried out to evaluate the pattern, extent, rationality and frequency of the use of antihypertensive drugs in the treatment of hypertension. The aim of the study is to analyse drug utilisation in the treatment of hypertension in a tertiary care hospital. MATERIALS AND METHODS This study was conducted during January 2014 to December 2015 in Medicine OPD (Outpatient Department in a tertiary care hospital. The sample size was selected as per the WHO recommendations on conducting Drug Utilisation Studies (DUS. Statistical Analysis- The collected data was numerically coded and entered in Microsoft Excel 2007 and analysed by SPSS version 16. Settings and Design- Prospective, cross-sectional, observational study. RESULTS Out of 612 patients, 262 (42.81% were in the age group of 60 and above. Considering gender distribution, 328 (53.59% were males and 284 (46.41% were females. Of these, 274 (44.78% were prescribed monotherapy, 256 (41.83% were prescribed two-drug therapy, 72 (11.76% were prescribed three-drug therapy and 10 (1.63% were prescribed four-drug therapy. Among 274 (44.78% patients prescribed with monotherapy, 112 (40.87% were prescribed with CCB (calcium channel blocker, 76 (27.73% were given BB (B-blocker, 45 (16.42% were prescribed ACEI (angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, 35 (12.77% were prescribed with ARB (angiotensin receptor blocker and 6 (2.18% were prescribed with Diuretics (D. Of the total antihypertensive drugs prescribed, 68.30% were prescribed by generic name

  4. Drug Use among Street Children in Tehran, Iran: A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh eDejman

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: Globally, children who work and live on the streets are at higher risk of undesired behavioral health outcomes, including increased drug use and abuse. Considering the rapid growth of this population in Iran and the lack of program planning that is partly due to a scarcity of research-based information, this study was conducted in 2013 to investigate drug use among street children in Tehran. Method: With a qualitative design, we conducted a Rapid Assessment and Response (RAS Survey of street children in Tehran, 2012-2013. Data were also obtained from ten focus group discussions with street children using semi-structured questionnaires and 27 in-depth interviews with key informants in governmental, non-governmental, and international organizations. Results: The variation in age at first use, type of drugs, and pattern of drug use were found based on ethnicity. Gypsy boys and girls reported consuming more alcohol than other groups. Drug use problems were commonly described among families of street children. Children whose parents had drug-use problems described using drugs earlier than other children. Informants reported that families with drug-related problems used children for procurement of drugs. Children themselves described using drugs to cope with stress, reduce physical and psychological stressors and problems such as fatigue, sadness, and pressure resulting from frequent failures in life. Conclusion: These results suggest that intervention and prevention programs dealing with drug use of street children in Iran should include family and peers when addressing drug use by street children.

  5. Drug utilization study of gynecology OPD: In a tertiary care hospital.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baig MS, Bagle TR,Gadappa SN, Deshpande Sonali, Doifode SM

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The treatment of diseases by use of essential medicines, prescribed by generic names, has been emphasized by WHO and National Health Policy of India. Drugs used in gynaecology are one of the top selling drugs in India; however they are least studied with respect to drug utilization. Thus present study was undertaken to analyze drug utilization pattern of gynecology OPD in a tertiary care hospital. Materials and Methods: A retrospective, cross sectional, observational study of prescriptions in Gynecology OPD. Data was obtained from an electronic medical record database of patients that attended Gynecology OPD during the study period. Prescription records of patients were screened as per inclusion and exclusion criteria and 300 prescriptions were randomly selected by Openepi software. Patient related and drug related information was collected on a customized data collection sheet. Results: The mean age of patients was 30.19+9.83 years and common age of presentation was >18-30 years. In infective cases, vaginal discharge (10.33% was common, and in non-infective cases, menstrual disorders (24% were common. The average number of drugs per prescription was 3.47+1.53. In drug category, minerals (30.94% were most commonly prescribed, followed by antimicrobials (24.98%, and NSAIDs (13.37%. Polypharmacy was observed in 96.33% of the prescriptions. Conclusion: It is only by drug utilization studies that burden of diseases and corresponding utilization of drugs in gynecology can be measured. In our study majority of the drugs prescribed were generic which were from the essential medical list NLEM and WHO.

  6. Application for disability pension and change in use of prescribed drugs. A regional Danish cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Thomas T; Fonager, Kirsten; Bøggild, Henrik; Pedersen, Lars; Mortensen, Jens T

    2009-06-01

    To investigate if a pending application for disability pension had an influence on the applicant's purchase of medical drugs, with a particular focus on musculoskeletal disorders and the use of painkillers. We performed a registry-based follow-up study including 12,020 applicants for disability pension in a Danish county from 1995 to 2000 and linked this information to a database of drug prescriptions. Purchase of drug was calculated for the 6-month period just before the decision and for the 6-month period 2 years later. Changes in a 2-year time period were estimated by differences in purchase rates. Furthermore, the proportion of applicants with an increased purchase of drugs and the proportion of applicants who ceased buying drugs were estimated. The results were stratified by diagnosis and result of application (awarded/rejected). The analyses were furthermore restricted to musculoskeletal disorders and the use of painkillers. At baseline 81% had a purchase and after the 2-year time period 11% ceased buying prescribed drugs. Half of all applicants increased the purchase of drugs. For musculoskeletal disorders one third had an increased purchase rate of painkillers while one fourth ceased purchase of drugs with variations in different diagnostic subgroups. The major changes of drug purchase after a pending application for disability pension are probably ascribed to characteristics of the diseases underlying the disability.

  7. [DESCRIPTIVE STUDY OF DRUGS OF ABUSE IN THE COMPLEJO HOSPITALARIO DE JAEN].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcántara Carrillo, José; Martínez Cañamero, Antonio; Martín Alcaide, Martín Ángel; Caño Garrido, Rosa; Nieto Martos, Manuela; Díaz Barranco, Ángeles

    2014-12-01

    Drugs is, according to the World Health Organization (WHO), any substance introduced into a living organism by any route is capable of acting on the central nervous system. For decades, drug abuse has increased in the population of our country but not all drugs are an illegal drug. The overall objective is the description of testing for drugs of abuse, and their distribution, as they were made in the Hospital Médico-Quirúrgico (HMQ) and Neurotraumatológico (HNT) of the Hospital of Jaén, in 2012. Secondary objectives analyzed the differences in the tests as variables: sex, months of the year and age of the subject (patient). We carry a description of differences by type of drug and associations of two, three, four or five drugs at once and finally, we study differences detected by drug or therapeutic use is illegal (of abuse). The results indicate a positive per 300 inhabitants, mostly men, adults and Hospital Neurotraumatológico. The most commonly detected drugs are benzodiazepines, alone or in association with cannabis.

  8. Titration calorimetry of surfactant–drug interactions: Micelle formation and saturation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waters, Laura J.; Hussain, Talib; Parkes, Gareth M.B.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Isothermal titration calorimetry can be used to monitor the saturation of micelles with pharmaceutical compounds. ► The number of drug molecules per micelle varies depending on the drug used and the temperature of the calorimeter. ► The change in enthalpy for the saturation of micelles with drugs can be endothermic or exothermic. ► The critical micellar concentration of an anionic surfactant (SDS) does not appear to vary in the presence of drugs. - Abstract: Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) was employed to monitor the addition of five model drugs to anionic surfactant based micelles, composed of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), through to the point at which they were saturated with drug. Analysis of the resultant data using this newly developed method has confirmed the suitability of the technique to acquire such data with saturation limits established in all cases. Values for the point at which saturation occurred ranged from 17 molecules of theophylline per micelle at T = 298 K up to 63 molecules of caffeine per micelle at 310 K. Micellar systems can be disrupted by the presence of additional chemicals, such as the drugs used in this study, therefore a separate investigation was undertaken to determine the critical micellar concentration (CMC) for SDS in the presence of each drug at T = 298 K and 310 K using ITC. In the majority of cases, there was no appreciable alteration to the CMC of SDS with drug present.

  9. Molecular biological studies on the human radioresistance and drug resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chang Min; Hong, Weon Seon

    1992-04-01

    We irradiated the MKN45 and PC14 cell lines with 500 rads and also established the adriamycin-resistant and cis-platinum resistant cell line. The genomic DNA and total RNA were extracted and subjected to the Southern and Northern analysis using various probes including heat shock protein 70, MDR1, fos, TGFb etc. The mRNA transcript was increased 1 hour after the irradiation and sustained during the 48 hours and returned to the level of pre-irradiation. No significant change was observed with the drug resistant cell lines at the level of gene dosage. We suggest that the marked increase of the hsp70 transcript is very important finding and is believed to be a good candidate for the modulation of the cellular response to irradiation and the radioresistance. (Author)

  10. Analytical, Characterization, and Stability Studies of Organic Chemical, Drugs, and Drug Formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-21

    manufacturing process involves batch API sterilization with ethylene oxide , a procedure that does not lend itself to large-scale manufacturing, we studied...to its use of ethylene oxide for sterilization, which is done in small batches. The generally recognized method of choice to produce a parenteral...water in the lyophilizates continues to permit AS hydrolysis to DHA, which has limited solubility in the phosphate dissolution medium, and the

  11. Choosing the right laboratory: a review of clinical and forensic toxicology services for urine drug testing in pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisfield, Gary M; Goldberger, Bruce A; Bertholf, Roger L

    2015-01-01

    Urine drug testing (UDT) services are provided by a variety of clinical, forensic, and reference/specialty laboratories. These UDT services differ based on the principal activity of the laboratory. Clinical laboratories provide testing primarily focused on medical care (eg, emergency care, inpatients, and outpatient clinics), whereas forensic laboratories perform toxicology tests related to postmortem and criminal investigations, and drug-free workplace programs. Some laboratories now provide UDT specifically designed for monitoring patients on chronic opioid therapy. Accreditation programs for clinical laboratories have existed for nearly half a century, and a federal certification program for drug-testing laboratories was established in the 1980s. Standards of practice for forensic toxicology services other than workplace drug testing have been established in recent years. However, no accreditation program currently exists for UDT in pain management, and this review considers several aspects of laboratory accreditation and certification relevant to toxicology services, with the intention to provide guidance to clinicians in their selection of the appropriate laboratory for UDT surveillance of their patients on opioid therapy.

  12. Drug research methodology. Volume 4, Epidemiology in drugs and highway safety : the study of drug use among drivers and its role in traffic crashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-01

    This report presents the findings of a workshop on epidemiology in drugs and highway safety. A cross-disciplinary panel of experts (1) identified methodological issues and constraints present in research to define the nature and magnitude of the drug...

  13. Prophylaxis and management of antineoplastic drug induced nausea and vomiting in children with cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidharth Totadri

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Antineoplastic drug induced nausea and vomiting (AINV is a major adverse event which deeply impacts the quality of life of children with cancer. It additionally causes distress to parents and negatively impacts compliance to therapy. A robust AINV prophylaxis regimen is essential to achieve complete control; and prevent anticipatory, breakthrough and refractory AINV. With a wide array of available anti-emetics, standard guidelines for their use are crucial to ensure uniform and optimum prophylaxis. Chemotherapeutic agents are classified as having high, moderate, low or minimal emetic risk based on their potential to cause emesis in the absence of prophylaxis. Three drug regimen with aprepitant, ondansetron/granisetron and dexamethasone is recommended for protocols with high emetic risk. Although approved in children ≥12 years, there is mounting evidence for the use of aprepitant in younger children too. In protocols with moderate and low emetic risk, combination of ondansetron/granisetron and dexamethasone; and single agent ondansetron/granisetron are recommended, respectively. Metoclopramide is an alternative when steroids are contraindicated. Olanzapine and lorazepam are useful drugs for breakthrough AINV and anticipatory AINV. Knowledge of pediatric dosage, salient adverse events, drug interactions as well as cost of drugs is essential to prescribe anti-emetics accurately and safely in resource constrained settings. Non pharmacological interventions such as hypnosis, acupressure and psychological interventions can benefit a sub-group of patients without significant risk of adverse events.

  14. [Exploration and demonstration study on drug combination from clinical real world].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yan-ming; Wang, Lian-xin; Wang, Yong-yan

    2014-09-01

    Drug combination is extensive in the clinical real world,which is an important part and the inherent requirements of the post-marketing evaluation of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). The key issues and technology include multi-domain and multi-disciplinary such as the rationality, efficacy and safety evaluation of combination drug starting from clinical real world, study on component in vivo and mechanism of combination drug, the risk/benefit assessment and cost-benefit evaluation of combination drug and so on. The topic has been studied as clinical demonstration on combination therapy of variety of diseases such as coronary heart disease, stroke, insomnia, depression, hepatitis, herpes zoster, psoriasis and ectopic pregnancy. Meanwhile, multi-disciplinary dynamic innovation alliance of clinical drug combination has been presented, which can promote the academic development and improving service ability and level of TCM.

  15. Cochleo-vestibular clinical findings among drug resistant Tuberculosis Patients on therapy-a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramma Lebogang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstracts Background To investigate the Cochleo-vestibular clinical and audiometric findings in Multi and Extreme Drug Resistance(MDR and XDR tuberculosis(TB patients on treatment and make recommendations. Methods A cross-sectional study of adult MDR and XDR-TB patients was conducted in a general hospital in Cape-Town-South-Africa. Ethical approval was secured and all consenting patients administered with pretested and validated questionnaire under the guidance of International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health(ICF Checklist-version-2.1a. Audiometric evaluation included: Otoscopy, Diagnostic Audiometry and Tympanometry. The data analyses were done with SPSS version 16, Chi-square and StatCalc-7. Results Fifty-three adults, ages 18-60 (mean-33 years comprising 26 males and 27 females participated in the study. Hospital stay duration varied from 1-18 months (mean-6 months and all were on anti-Koch's second line drugs (regimen 2. MDR TB group were 45(85% and XDR 8(15%. Vertigo was the most common vestibular symptoms, 24(45% whereas, tinnitus 23(42% and hearing loss 13(25% were most frequent auditory complaints. Bilateral sensorineural hearing losses of varying degrees were confirmed in 23(47%. There was no association between gender and age with hearing loss [χ2 (P = 0.16, ά = 0.05 and (p = 0.13, ά = 0.05]. Furthermore, MDR and XTR TB groups [20/42 Vs 3/8; Z = 0.46 and P = 0.64], showed no difference in pattern of the hearing losses. Conclusions A multi-disciplinary close surveillance of MDR and XDR TB patients on therapy is imperative. Finally, researches into therapeutic trials on antidotes and potent safer substitutes for aminoglycosides in the management are recommended.

  16. Strategies for a risky business: How drug dealers manage customers, suppliers and competitors in Italy, Slovenia and Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzvetkova, Marina; Pardal, Mafalda; Disley, Emma; Rena, Alice; Talic, Sanela; Forberger, Sarah

    2016-05-01

    the day-to-day operational concerns and modes of relationship management. Interviewees' arrangements for securing supplies of drugs provide support to the notion that drug markets are resilient and flexible. Our findings correspond with other empirical research in relation to the centrality of trust in the practical operation of supply and sale of drugs. The research highlights some differences, but important similarities between dealers who were part of organised crime groups and those who were not; dealers all faced some common challenges and adopted some common responses to these. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Using standardized methods for research on HIV and injecting drug use in developing/transitional countries: case study from the WHO Drug Injection Study Phase II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stimson Gerry V

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Successful cross-national research requires methods that are both standardized across sites and adaptable to local conditions. We report on the development and implementation of the methodology underlying the survey component of the WHO Drug Injection Study Phase II – a multi-site study of risk behavior and HIV seroprevalence among Injecting Drug Users (IDUs. Methods Standardized operational guidelines were developed by the Survey Coordinating Center in collaboration with the WHO Project Officer and participating site Investigators. Throughout the duration of the study, survey implementation at the local level was monitored by the Coordinating Center. Surveys were conducted in 12 different cities. Prior rapid assessment conducted in 10 cities provided insight into local context and guided survey implementation. Where possible, subjects were recruited both from drug abuse treatment centers and via street outreach. While emphasis was on IDUs, non-injectors were also recruited in cities with substantial non-injecting use of injectable drugs. A structured interview and HIV counseling/testing were administered. Results Over 5,000 subjects were recruited. Subjects were recruited from both drug treatment and street outreach in 10 cities. Non-injectors were recruited in nine cities. Prior rapid assessment identified suitable recruitment areas, reduced drug users' distrust of survey staff, and revealed site-specific risk behaviors. Centralized survey coordination facilitated local questionnaire modification within a core structure, standardized data collection protocols, uniform database structure, and cross-site analyses. Major site-specific problems included: questionnaire translation difficulties; locating affordable HIV-testing facilities; recruitment from drug treatment due to limited/selective treatment infrastructure; access to specific sub-groups of drug users in the community, particularly females or higher income groups

  18. Utility of therapeutic drug monitoring in the management of HIV-infected pregnant women in receipt of lopinavir.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Caswell, R J

    2011-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of antiretroviral drugs in pregnancy is poorly understood. We reviewed the use of therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) in clinical settings to document plasma concentrations of lopinavir during pregnancy and investigated how clinicians acted upon TDM results. A retrospective review was carried out of all HIV-infected pregnant women taking boosted lopinavir-based highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) at five National Health Service (NHS) centres in the UK between May 2004 and March 2007. Seventy-three women in receipt of lopinavir were identified, of whom 89% had plasma lopinavir concentrations above the suggested minimum recommended for wild-type HIV. Initial TDM results prompted dosage change in 10% and assessment of adherence and\\/or pharmacist review in 11%. TDM was repeated in 29%. TDM can play an important role in the clinical management of HIV-positive pregnant women, allowing informed dose modification and an alternative measure of adherence.

  19. Methods in pharmacoepidemiology: a review of statistical analyses and data reporting in pediatric drug utilization studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sequi, Marco; Campi, Rita; Clavenna, Antonio; Bonati, Maurizio

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate the quality of data reporting and statistical methods performed in drug utilization studies in the pediatric population. Drug utilization studies evaluating all drug prescriptions to children and adolescents published between January 1994 and December 2011 were retrieved and analyzed. For each study, information on measures of exposure/consumption, the covariates considered, descriptive and inferential analyses, statistical tests, and methods of data reporting was extracted. An overall quality score was created for each study using a 12-item checklist that took into account the presence of outcome measures, covariates of measures, descriptive measures, statistical tests, and graphical representation. A total of 22 studies were reviewed and analyzed. Of these, 20 studies reported at least one descriptive measure. The mean was the most commonly used measure (18 studies), but only five of these also reported the standard deviation. Statistical analyses were performed in 12 studies, with the chi-square test being the most commonly performed test. Graphs were presented in 14 papers. Sixteen papers reported the number of drug prescriptions and/or packages, and ten reported the prevalence of the drug prescription. The mean quality score was 8 (median 9). Only seven of the 22 studies received a score of ≥10, while four studies received a score of statistical methods and reported data in a satisfactory manner. We therefore conclude that the methodology of drug utilization studies needs to be improved.

  20. Drug Use and Sex Work Among At-risk Women: A Qualitative Study of Initial Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshanfekr, Payam; Noori, Roya; Dejman, Masoumeh; Fathi Geshnigani, Zahra; Rafiey, Hassan

    2015-06-01

    In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in performing research on drug use and sex work among at-risk women. Although there is a well-documented literature of the initial reasons associated with drug use and sex work among women, there is, however, a paucity of information in this area in Iran. This study aimed to explore the initial reasons associated with drug use and sex work in a group of female treatment seekers, who presented health-related risk behaviors, in Tehran, Iran. This qualitative study enrolled a total of 65 at-risk women, from five women-specific drug clinics, who participated in the study in 2011. Individual in-depth interviews were conducted. Focus group interviews were conducted with 10 key informants. All interviews were audio-taped and thematically written. The recorded data were analyzed using ATLASti qualitative research software version 10. The median age of the sample was 34 years. In addition, 44.6% of subjects were opiate users, and 55.4% were users of opiates and methamphetamine. Sex work was the main source of income for almost half of the sample. The most frequently reported reasons, associated with initial drug use, were extrinsic motivations, including the drug-using family, friends or social networks. Intrinsic motivations, including curiosity and individual willingness to use drugs, were other initial reasons. The most frequently reported reasons, associated with initial sex work, included the need to purchase drugs and financial problems. The study findings demonstrated a number of reasons associated with initial drug use and sex work. The role of sex work in providing drugs necessitates education and prevention. Special treatment programs should be implemented to prevent sex work among at-risk women in Iran.