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Sample records for mammary cancer cells

  1. Stem cells in normal mammary gland and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jie; Yin, Xin; Ma, Tao; Lu, Jun

    2010-04-01

    The mammary gland is a structurally dynamic organ that undergoes dramatic alterations with age, menstrual cycle, and reproductive status. Mammary gland stem cells, the minor cell population within the mature organ, are thought to have multiple functions in regulating mammary gland development, tissue maintenance, major growth, and structural remodeling. In addition, accumulative evidence suggests that breast cancers are initiated and maintained by a subpopulation of tumor cells with stem cell features (called cancer stem cells). A variety of methods have been developed to identify and characterize mammary stem cells, and several signal transduction pathways have been identified to be essential for the self-renewal and differentiation of mammary gland stem cells. Understanding the origin of breast cancer stem cells, their relationship to breast cancer development, and the differences between normal and cancer stem cells may lead to novel approaches to breast cancer diagnosis, prevention, and treatment.

  2. Mammary development and breast cancer: the role of stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercan, C; van Diest, P J; Vooijs, M

    2011-06-01

    The mammary gland is a highly regenerative organ that can undergo multiple cycles of proliferation, lactation and involution, a process controlled by stem cells. The last decade much progress has been made in the identification of signaling pathways that function in these stem cells to control self-renewal, lineage commitment and epithelial differentiation in the normal mammary gland. The same signaling pathways that control physiological mammary development and homeostasis are also often found deregulated in breast cancer. Here we provide an overview on the functional and molecular identification of mammary stem cells in the context of both normal breast development and breast cancer. We discuss the contribution of some key signaling pathways with an emphasis on Notch receptor signaling, a cell fate determination pathway often deregulated in breast cancer. A further understanding of the biological roles of the Notch pathway in mammary stem cell behavior and carcinogenesis might be relevant for the development of future therapies.

  3. Integrin Signaling in Mammary Epithelial Cells and Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Lambert, Arthur W.; Sait Ozturk; Sam Thiagalingam

    2012-01-01

    Cells sense and respond to the extracellular matrix (ECM) by way of integrin receptors, which facilitate cell adhesion and intracellular signaling. Advances in understanding the mammary epithelial cell hierarchy are converging with new developments that reveal how integrins regulate the normal mammary gland. But in breast cancer, integrin signaling contributes to the development and progression of tumors. This paper highlights recent studies which examine the role of integrin signaling in mam...

  4. Cadherin Cell Adhesion System in Canine Mammary Cancer: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelina Gama

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cadherin-catenin adhesion complexes play important roles by providing cell-cell adhesion and communication in different organ systems. Abnormal expression of cadherin adhesion molecules constitutes a common phenomenon in canine mammary cancer and has been frequently implicated in tumour progression. This paper summarizes the current knowledge on cadherin/catenin adhesion molecules (E-cadherin, β-catenin, and P-cadherin in canine mammary cancer, focusing on the putative biological functions and clinical significance of these molecules in this disease. This paper highlights the need for further research studies in this setting in order to elucidate the role of these adhesion molecules during tumour progression and metastasis.

  5. Culture and characterization of mammary cancer stem cells in mammospheres.

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    Piscitelli, Eleonora; Cocola, Cinzia; Thaden, Frank Rüdiger; Pelucchi, Paride; Gray, Brian; Bertalot, Giovanni; Albertini, Alberto; Reinbold, Rolland; Zucchi, Ileana

    2015-01-01

    Mammospheres (MMs) are a model for culturing and maintaining mammary gland stem cells (SCs) or cancer stem cells (CSCs) ex situ. As MMs recapitulate the micro-niche of the mammary gland or a tumor, MMs are a model for studying the properties of SCs or CSCs, and for mapping, isolating, and characterizing the SC/CSC generated lineages. Cancer stem cells share with normal SCs the properties of self-renewal and the capacity to generate all cell types and organ structures of the mammary gland. Analysis of human tumor samples suggests that CSCs are heterogeneous in terms of proliferation and differentiation potential. Mammospheres from CSCs likewise display heterogeneity. This heterogeneity makes analysis of CSC generated MMs challenging. To identify the unique and diverse properties of MM derived CSCs, comparative analysis with MMs obtained from normal SCs is required. Here we present protocols for identifying and enriching cells with SC features from a cancer cell line using the LA7CSCs as a model. A comprehensive and comparative approach for identifying, isolating, and characterizing MMs from SCs and CSCs from human breast is also introduced. In addition, we describe detailed procedures for identifying, isolating, and characterizing mammary gland specific cell types, generated during MM formation.

  6. Migrastatin analogues inhibit canine mammary cancer cell migration and invasion.

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    Kinga Majchrzak

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cancer spread to other organs is the main cause of death of oncological patients. Migration of cancer cells from a primary tumour is the crucial step in the complex process of metastasis, therefore blocking this process is currently the main treatment strategy. Metastasis inhibitors derived from natural products, such as, migrastatin, are very promising anticancer agents. Thus, the aim of our study was to investigate the effect of six migrastatin analogues (MGSTA-1 to 6 on migration and invasion of canine mammary adenocarcinoma cell lines isolated from primary tumours and their metastases to the lungs. Canine mammary tumours constitute a valuable tool for studying multiple aspect of human cancer. RESULTS: OUR RESULTS SHOWED THAT TWO OF SIX FULLY SYNTHETIC ANALOGUES OF MIGRASTATIN: MGSTA-5 and MGSTA-6 were potent inhibitors of canine mammary cancer cells migration and invasion. These data were obtained using the wound healing test, as well as trans-well migration and invasion assays. Furthermore, the treatment of cancer cells with the most effective compound (MGSTA-6 disturbed binding between filamentous F-actin and fascin1. Confocal microscopy analyses revealed that treatment with MGSTA-6 increased the presence of unbound fascin1 and reduced co-localization of F-actin and fascin1 in canine cancer cells. Most likely, actin filaments were not cross-linked by fascin1 and did not generate the typical filopodial architecture of actin filaments in response to the activity of MGSTA-6. Thus, administration of MGSTA-6 results in decreased formation of filopodia protrusions and stress fibres in canine mammary cancer cells, causing inhibition of cancer migration and invasion. CONCLUSION: Two synthetic migrastatin analogues (MGSTA-5 and MGSTA-6 were shown to be promising compounds for inhibition of cancer metastasis. They may have beneficial therapeutic effects in cancer therapy in dogs, especially in combination with other anticancer drugs

  7. Remodeling of endogenous mammary epithelium by breast cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parashurama, Natesh; Lobo, Neethan A; Ito, Ken; Mosley, Adriane R; Habte, Frezghi G; Zabala, Maider; Smith, Bryan R; Lam, Jessica; Weissman, Irving L; Clarke, Michael F; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2012-10-01

    Poorly regulated tissue remodeling results in increased breast cancer risk, yet how breast cancer stem cells (CSC) participate in remodeling is unknown. We performed in vivo imaging of changes in fluorescent, endogenous duct architecture as a metric for remodeling. First, we quantitatively imaged physiologic remodeling of primary branches of the developing and regenerating mammary tree. To assess CSC-specific remodeling events, we isolated CSC from MMTV-Wnt1 (mouse mammary tumor virus long-term repeat enhancer driving Wnt1 oncogene) breast tumors, a well studied model in which tissue remodeling affects tumorigenesis. We confirm that CSC drive tumorigenesis, suggesting a link between CSC and remodeling. We find that normal, regenerating, and developing gland maintain a specific branching pattern. In contrast, transplantation of CSC results in changes in the branching patterns of endogenous ducts while non-CSC do not. Specifically, in the presence of CSC, we identified an increased number of branches, branch points, ducts which have greater than 40 branches (5/33 for CSC and 0/39 for non-CSC), and histological evidence of increased branching. Moreover, we demonstrate that only CSC implants invade into surrounding stroma with structures similar to developing mammary ducts (nine for CSC and one for non-CSC). Overall, we demonstrate a novel approach for imaging physiologic and pathological remodeling. Furthermore, we identify unique, CSC-specific, remodeling events. Our data suggest that CSC interact with the microenvironment differently than non-CSC, and that this could eventually be a therapeutic approach for targeting CSC.

  8. Mammary epithelial cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kass, Laura; Erler, Janine Terra; Dembo, Micah

    2007-01-01

    a repertoire of transmembrane receptors, of which integrins are the best characterized. Integrins modulate cell fate by reciprocally transducing biochemical and biophysical cues between the cell and the extracellular matrix, facilitating processes such as embryonic branching morphogenesis and lactation...... in the mammary gland. During breast development and cancer progression, the extracellular matrix is dynamically altered such that its composition, turnover, processing and orientation change dramatically. These modifications influence mammary epithelial cell shape, and modulate growth factor and hormonal...

  9. Redirection of Human Cancer Cells upon the Interaction with the Regenerating Mouse Mammary Gland Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia M. Rosenfield

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumorigenesis is often described as a result of accumulated mutations that lead to growth advantage and clonal expansion of mutated cells. There is evidence in the literature that cancer cells are influenced by the microenvironment. Our previous studies demonstrated that the mouse mammary gland is capable of redirecting mouse cells of non-mammary origins as well as Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV-neu transformed cells toward normal mammary epithelial cell fate during gland regeneration. Interestingly, the malignant phenotype of MMTV-neu transformed cells was suppressed during serial transplantation experiments. Here, we discuss our studies that demonstrated the potential of the regenerating mouse mammary gland to redirect cancer cells of different species into a functional tumor-free mammary epithelial cell progeny. Immunochemistry for human specific CD133, mitochondria, cytokeratins as well as milk proteins and FISH for human specific probe identified human epithelial cell progeny in ducts, lobules, and secretory acini. Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization (FISH for human centromeric DNA and FACS analysis of propidium iodine staining excluded the possibility of mouse-human cell fusion. To our knowledge this is the first evidence that human cancer cells of embryonic or somatic origins respond to developmental signals generated by the mouse mammary gland microenvironment during gland regeneration in vivo.

  10. Use of a Novel Embryonic Mammary Stem Cell Gene Signature to Improve Human Breast Cancer Diagnostics and Therapeutic Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    SUBTITLE Use of a Novel Embryonic Mammary Stem Cell Gene Signature to Improve Human Breast Cancer Diagnostics and Therapeutic Decision Making Improve...to determine whether Fetal Mammary Stem Cell (fMaSC) signatures correlate with response to chemotherapy and metastasis in different breast cancer...positioned to achieve its aims. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Breast Cancer Prognosis, Mammary Stem Cells, Embryonic Development, Single Cell Transcriptomics 16

  11. Developmental signaling pathways regulating mammary stem cells and contributing to the etiology of triple-negative breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Rangel,Maria Cristina; Bertolette, Daniel; Castro, Nadia P.; Klauzinska, Malgorzata; Cuttitta, Frank; Salomon, David S

    2016-01-01

    Cancer has been considered as temporal and spatial aberrations of normal development in tissues. Similarities between mammary embryonic development and cell transformation suggest that the underlying processes required for mammary gland development are also those perturbed during various stages of mammary tumorigenesis and breast cancer (BC) development. The master regulators of embryonic development Cripto-1, Notch/CSL, and Wnt/β-catenin play key roles in modulating mammary gland morphogenes...

  12. Identification and characterization of cancer stem cells in canine mammary tumors.

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    Rybicka, Agata; Król, Magdalena

    2016-12-19

    Cancer stem cells (CSC) represent a small subpopulation of cells in malignant tumors that possess the unique ability to self-renew, differentiate and resist chemo- and radiotherapy. These cells have been postulated to be the basis for some of the difficulties in treating cancer, and therefore, numerous approaches have been developed to specifically target and eliminate CSC in diverse types of cancer, including breast cancer. Spontaneously occurring mammary tumors in canines share clinical and molecular similarities with the human counterpart, making the dog a potentially powerful model for the study of human breast cancer and clinical trials. Studies focused on canine mammary CSC might therefore enhance our understanding of the biology and possible treatment of the disease in both dogs and humans. In this review, we discuss various approaches currently in use to isolate and characterize canine mammary CSC.

  13. Mammary-Stem-Cell-Based Somatic Mouse Models Reveal Breast Cancer Drivers Causing Cell Fate Dysregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Zhang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cancer genomics has provided an unprecedented opportunity for understanding genetic causes of human cancer. However, distinguishing which mutations are functionally relevant to cancer pathogenesis remains a major challenge. We describe here a mammary stem cell (MaSC organoid-based approach for rapid generation of somatic genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs. By using RNAi and CRISPR-mediated genome engineering in MaSC-GEMMs, we have discovered that inactivation of Ptpn22 or Mll3, two genes mutated in human breast cancer, greatly accelerated PI3K-driven mammary tumorigenesis. Using these tumor models, we have also identified genetic alterations promoting tumor metastasis and causing resistance to PI3K-targeted therapy. Both Ptpn22 and Mll3 inactivation resulted in disruption of mammary gland differentiation and an increase in stem cell activity. Mechanistically, Mll3 deletion enhanced stem cell activity through activation of the HIF pathway. Thus, our study has established a robust in vivo platform for functional cancer genomics and has discovered functional breast cancer mutations.

  14. The mammary stem cell hierarchy: a looking glass into heterogeneous breast cancer landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreekumar, Amulya; Roarty, Kevin; Rosen, Jeffrey M

    2015-12-01

    The mammary gland is a dynamic organ that undergoes extensive morphogenesis during the different stages of embryonic development, puberty, estrus, pregnancy, lactation and involution. Systemic and local cues underlie this constant tissue remodeling and act by eliciting an intricate pattern of responses in the mammary epithelial and stromal cells. Decades of studies utilizing methods such as transplantation and lineage-tracing have identified a complex hierarchy of mammary stem cells, progenitors and differentiated epithelial cells that fuel mammary epithelial development. Importantly, these studies have extended our understanding of the molecular crosstalk between cell types and the signaling pathways maintaining normal homeostasis that often are deregulated during tumorigenesis. While several questions remain, this research has many implications for breast cancer. Fundamental among these are the identification of the cells of origin for the multiple subtypes of breast cancer and the understanding of tumor heterogeneity. A deeper understanding of these critical questions will unveil novel breast cancer drug targets and treatment paradigms. In this review, we provide a current overview of normal mammary development and tumorigenesis from a stem cell perspective.

  15. Antiproliferative effect of berberine on canine mammary gland cancer cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefidabi, Reyhaneh; Mortazavi, Pejman; Hosseini, Saeed

    2017-01-01

    Canine mammary gland tumors are the most frequent cause of cancer in female dogs. Numerous studies using cancer cell lines and clinical trials have indicated that various natural products and antioxidants reduce or possibly prevent the development of cancer. Berberine (BBR), the most important alkaloid in the Berberidaceae, which exerts a wide range of pharmacological and biochemical effects, has drawn much attention due to its particularly high antitumor activity in vitro and in animal studies. The aim of the present study was to investigate the antiproliferative effect of BBR against a canine mammary gland carcinoma cell line (CF41.Mg) in vitro. CF41.Mg cells were cultured in RPMI-1640 medium containing 10% heat inactived fetal bovine serum (FBS) and 100 mg/ml peniciline-streptomycin. Subsequently the cells were treated with different concentrations of BBR chloride (10, 25, 50, 100 and 200 µM) at a density of 12,000 cells/well in 96-well plates. Following treatment, the MTT assay was used to detect cell viability after 24-, 48- and 72-h incubations at 37°C with 5% CO2. The results indicated that BBR inhibited proliferation of canine mammary gland carcinoma cells, as treatment with 100 µM BBR for 24 h resulted in a significant decrease in cell viability (Pcancer cell death, it is proposed that BBR may serve as a candidate agent against canine mammary tumor cells via its antiproliferative activity.

  16. Mammary gland stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fridriksdottir, Agla J R; Petersen, Ole W; Rønnov-Jessen, Lone

    2011-01-01

    Distinct subsets of cells, including cells with stem cell-like properties, have been proposed to exist in normal human breast epithelium and breast carcinomas. The cellular origins of epithelial cells contributing to gland development, tissue homeostasis and cancer are, however, still poorly...... understood. The mouse is a widely used model of mammary gland development, both directly by studying the mouse mammary epithelial cells themselves and indirectly, by studying development, morphogenesis, differentiation and carcinogenesis of xenotransplanted human breast epithelium in vivo. While in early...... studies, human or mouse epithelium was implanted as fragments into the mouse gland, more recent technical progress has allowed the self-renewal capacity and differentiation potential of distinct cell populations or even individual cells to be interrogated. Here, we review and discuss similarities...

  17. Establishment and Characterization of a New Cell Line of Canine Inflammatory Mammary Cancer: IPC-366

    OpenAIRE

    Sara Caceres; Laura Peña; de Andres, Paloma J.; Maria J Illera; Mirtha S Lopez; Woodward, Wendy A; Reuben, James M.; Illera, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    Canine inflammatory mammary cancer (IMC) shares epidemiologic, histopathological and clinical characteristics with the disease in humans and has been proposed as a natural model for human inflammatory breast cancer (IBC). The aim of this study was to characterize a new cell line from IMC (IPC-366) for the comparative study of both IMC and IBC. Tumors cells from a female dog with clinical IMC were collected. The cells were grown under adherent conditions. The growth, cytological, ultrastructur...

  18. Human breast cancer cells are redirected to mammary epithelial cells upon interaction with the regenerating mammary gland microenvironment in-vivo.

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    Bussard, Karen M; Smith, Gilbert H

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. At present, the etiology of breast cancer is unknown; however the possibility of a distinct cell of origin, i.e. a cancer stem cell, is a heavily investigated area of research. Influencing signals from the tissue niche are known to affect stem cells. Literature has shown that cancer cells lose their tumorigenic potential and display 'normal' behavior when placed into 'normal' ontogenic environments. Therefore, it may be the case that the tissue microenvironment is able to generate signals to redirect cancer cell fate. Previously, we showed that pluripotent human embryonal carcinoma cells could be redirected by the regenerating mammary gland microenvironment to contribute epithelial progeny for 'normal' gland development in-vivo. Here, we show that that human metastatic, non-metastatic, and metastasis-suppressed breast cancer cells proliferate and contribute to normal mammary gland development in-vivo without tumor formation. Immunochemistry for human-specific mitochondria, keratin 8 and 14, as well as human-specific milk proteins (alpha-lactalbumin, impregnated transplant hosts) confirmed the presence of human cell progeny. Features consistent with normal mammary gland development as seen in intact hosts (duct, lumen formation, development of secretory acini) were recapitulated in both primary and secondary outgrowths from chimeric implants. These results suggest the dominance of the tissue microenvironment over cancer cell fate. This work demonstrates that cultured human breast cancer cells (metastatic and non-metastatic) respond developmentally to signals generated by the mouse mammary gland microenvironment during gland regeneration in-vivo.

  19. Human breast cancer cells are redirected to mammary epithelial cells upon interaction with the regenerating mammary gland microenvironment in-vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen M Bussard

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. At present, the etiology of breast cancer is unknown; however the possibility of a distinct cell of origin, i.e. a cancer stem cell, is a heavily investigated area of research. Influencing signals from the tissue niche are known to affect stem cells. Literature has shown that cancer cells lose their tumorigenic potential and display 'normal' behavior when placed into 'normal' ontogenic environments. Therefore, it may be the case that the tissue microenvironment is able to generate signals to redirect cancer cell fate. Previously, we showed that pluripotent human embryonal carcinoma cells could be redirected by the regenerating mammary gland microenvironment to contribute epithelial progeny for 'normal' gland development in-vivo. Here, we show that that human metastatic, non-metastatic, and metastasis-suppressed breast cancer cells proliferate and contribute to normal mammary gland development in-vivo without tumor formation. Immunochemistry for human-specific mitochondria, keratin 8 and 14, as well as human-specific milk proteins (alpha-lactalbumin, impregnated transplant hosts confirmed the presence of human cell progeny. Features consistent with normal mammary gland development as seen in intact hosts (duct, lumen formation, development of secretory acini were recapitulated in both primary and secondary outgrowths from chimeric implants. These results suggest the dominance of the tissue microenvironment over cancer cell fate. This work demonstrates that cultured human breast cancer cells (metastatic and non-metastatic respond developmentally to signals generated by the mouse mammary gland microenvironment during gland regeneration in-vivo.

  20. JS-K, a nitric oxide-releasing prodrug, induces breast cancer cell death while sparing normal mammary epithelial cells.

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    McMurtry, Vanity; Saavedra, Joseph E; Nieves-Alicea, René; Simeone, Ann-Marie; Keefer, Larry K; Tari, Ana M

    2011-04-01

    Targeted therapy with reduced side effects is a major goal in cancer research. We investigated the effects of JS-K, a nitric oxide (NO) prodrug designed to release high levels of NO when suitably activated, on human breast cancer cell lines, on non-transformed human MCF-10A mammary cells, and on normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMECs). Cell viability assay, flow cytometry, electron microscopy, and Western blot analysis were used to study the effects of JS-K on breast cancer and on mammary epithelial cells. After a 3-day incubation, the IC50s of JS-K against the breast cancer cells ranged from 0.8 to 3 µM. However, JS-K decreased the viability of the MCF-10A cells by only 20% at 10-µM concentration, and HMECs were unaffected by 10 µM JS-K. Flow cytometry indicated that JS-K increased the percentages of breast cancer cells under-going apoptosis. Interestingly, flow cytometry indicated that JS-K increased acidic vesicle organelle formation in breast cancer cells, suggesting that JS-K induced autophagy in breast cancer cells. Electron microscopy confirmed that JS-K-treated breast cancer cells underwent autophagic cell death. Western blot analysis showed that JS-K induced the expression of microtubule light chain 3-II, another autophagy marker, in breast cancer cells. However, JS-K did not induce apoptosis or autophagy in normal human mammary epithelial cells. These data indicate that JS-K selectively induces programmed cell death in breast cancer cells while sparing normal mammary epithelial cells under the same conditions. The selective anti-tumor activity of JS-K warrants its further investigation in breast tumors.

  1. Elimination of progressive mammary cancer by repeated administrations of chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cells.

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    Globerson-Levin, Anat; Waks, Tova; Eshhar, Zelig

    2014-05-01

    Continuous oncogenic processes that generate cancer require an on-going treatment approach to eliminate the transformed cells, and prevent their further development. Here, we studied the ability of T cells expressing a chimeric antibody-based receptor (CAR) to offer a therapeutic benefit for breast cancer induced by erbB-2. We tested CAR-modified T cells (T-bodies) specific to erbB-2 for their antitumor potential in a mouse model overexpressing a human erbB-2 transgene that develops mammary tumors. Comparing the antitumor reactivity of CAR-modified T cells under various therapeutic settings, either prophylactic, prior to tumor development, or therapeutically. We found that repeated administration of CAR-modified T cells is required to eliminate spontaneously developing mammary cancer. Systemic, as well as intratumoral administered CAR-modified T cells accumulated at tumor sites and eventually eliminated the malignant cells. Interestingly, within a few weeks after a single CAR T cells' administration, and rejection of primary lesion, tumors usually relapsed both in treated mammary gland and at remote sites; however, repeated injections of CAR-modified T cells were able to control the secondary tumors. Since spontaneous tumors can arise repeatedly, especially in the case of syndromes characterized by specific susceptibility to cancer, multiple administrations of CAR-modified T cells can serve to control relapsing disease.

  2. Sesamin synergistically potentiates the anticancer effects of γ-tocotrienol in mammary cancer cell lines.

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    Akl, Mohamed R; Ayoub, Nehad M; Abuasal, Bilal S; Kaddoumi, Amal; Sylvester, Paul W

    2013-01-01

    γ-Tocotrienol and sesamin are phytochemicals that display potent anticancer activity. Since sesamin inhibits the metabolic degradation of tocotrienols, studies were conducted to determine if combined treatment with sesamin potentiates the antiproliferative effects of γ-tocotrienol on neoplastic mouse (+SA) and human (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231) mammary cancer cells. Results showed that treatment with γ-tocotrienol or sesamin alone induced a significant dose-responsive growth inhibition, whereas combination treatment with these agents synergistically inhibited the growth of +SA, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 mammary cancer cells, while similar treatment doses were found to have little or no effect on normal (mouse CL-S1 and human MCF-10A) mammary epithelial cell growth or viability. However, sesamin synergistic enhancement of γ-tocotrienol-induced anticancer effects was not found to be mediated from a reduction in γ-tocotrienol metabolism. Rather, combined treatment with subeffective doses of γ-tocotrienol and sesamin was found to induce G1 cell cycle arrest, and a corresponding decrease in cyclin D1, CDK2, CDK4, CDK6, phospho-Rb, and E2F1 levels, and increase in p27 and p16 levels. Additional studies showed that the antiproliferative effect of combination treatment did not initiate apoptosis or result in a decrease in mammary cancer cell viability. Taken together, these findings indicate that the synergistic antiproliferative action of combined γ-tocotrienol and sesamin treatment in mouse and human mammary cancer cells is cytostatic, not cytotoxic, and results from G1 cell cycle arrest.

  3. MicroRNA-regulated gene networks during mammary cell differentiation are associated with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydoğdu, Eylem; Katchy, Anne; Tsouko, Efrosini; Lin, Chin-Yo; Haldosén, Lars-Arne; Helguero, Luisa; Williams, Cecilia

    2012-08-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play pivotal roles in stem cell biology, differentiation and oncogenesis and are of high interest as potential breast cancer therapeutics. However, their expression and function during normal mammary differentiation and in breast cancer remain to be elucidated. In order to identify which miRNAs are involved in mammary differentiation, we thoroughly investigated miRNA expression during functional differentiation of undifferentiated, stem cell-like, murine mammary cells using two different large-scale approaches followed by qPCR. Significant changes in expression of 21 miRNAs were observed in repeated rounds of mammary cell differentiation. The majority, including the miR-200 family and known tumor suppressor miRNAs, was upregulated during differentiation. Only four miRNAs, including oncomiR miR-17, were downregulated. Pathway analysis indicated complex interactions between regulated miRNA clusters and major pathways involved in differentiation, proliferation and stem cell maintenance. Comparisons with human breast cancer tumors showed the gene profile from the undifferentiated, stem-like stage clustered with that of poor-prognosis breast cancer. A common nominator in these groups was the E2F pathway, which was overrepresented among genes targeted by the differentiation-induced miRNAs. A subset of miRNAs could further discriminate between human non-cancer and breast cancer cell lines, and miR-200a/miR-200b, miR-146b and miR-148a were specifically downregulated in triple-negative breast cancer cells. We show that miR-200a/miR-200b can inhibit epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-characteristic morphological changes in undifferentiated, non-tumorigenic mammary cells. Our studies propose EphA2 as a novel and important target gene for miR-200a. In conclusion, we present evidentiary data on how miRNAs are involved in mammary cell differentiation and indicate their related roles in breast cancer.

  4. Antiproliferative effect of berberine on canine mammary gland cancer cell culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefidabi, Reyhaneh; Mortazavi, Pejman; Hosseini, Saeed

    2017-01-01

    Canine mammary gland tumors are the most frequent cause of cancer in female dogs. Numerous studies using cancer cell lines and clinical trials have indicated that various natural products and antioxidants reduce or possibly prevent the development of cancer. Berberine (BBR), the most important alkaloid in the Berberidaceae, which exerts a wide range of pharmacological and biochemical effects, has drawn much attention due to its particularly high antitumor activity in vitro and in animal studies. The aim of the present study was to investigate the antiproliferative effect of BBR against a canine mammary gland carcinoma cell line (CF41.Mg) in vitro. CF41.Mg cells were cultured in RPMI-1640 medium containing 10% heat inactived fetal bovine serum (FBS) and 100 mg/ml peniciline-streptomycin. Subsequently the cells were treated with different concentrations of BBR chloride (10, 25, 50, 100 and 200 µM) at a density of 12,000 cells/well in 96-well plates. Following treatment, the MTT assay was used to detect cell viability after 24-, 48- and 72-h incubations at 37°C with 5% CO2. The results indicated that BBR inhibited proliferation of canine mammary gland carcinoma cells, as treatment with 100 µM BBR for 24 h resulted in a significant decrease in cell viability (P<0.005). As the present study demonstrated that BBR (10–200 µM) induced cancer cell death, it is proposed that BBR may serve as a candidate agent against canine mammary tumor cells via its antiproliferative activity.

  5. PKCδ Inhibition Impairs Mammary Cancer Proliferative Capacity But Selects Cancer Stem Cells, Involving Autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berardi, Damián E; Flumian, Carolina; Rodriguez, Cristina E; Bessone, María I Díaz; Cirigliano, Stefano M; Joffé, Elisa D Bal de Kier; Fiszman, Gabriel L; Urtreger, Alejandro J; Todaro, Laura B

    2016-03-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) is a family of serine/threonine kinases that regulate diverse cellular functions including cell death, proliferation, and survival. Recent studies have reported that PKCδ, are involved in apoptosis or autophagy induction. In the present study we focused on how PKCδ regulates proliferation and cancer stem cell (CSC) properties of the hormone-independent mammary cancer cell line LM38-LP, using pharmacological and genetic approaches. We found that pharmacological inhibition of PKCδ, by Rottlerin treatment, impairs in vitro LM38-LP proliferation through cell cycle arrest, inducing the formation of cytoplasmic-vacuoles. Using immunofluorescence we confirmed that Rottlerin treatment induced the apparition of LC3 dots in cell cytoplasm, and increased autophagy flux. On the other side, the same treatment increased CSC growth rate and self-renewal. Furthermore, Rottlerin pre-treatment induced in CSC the development of a "grape-like" morphology when they are growing in 3D cultures (Matrigel), usually associated with a malignant phenotype, as well as an increase in the number of experimental lung metastasis when these cells were inoculated in vivo. The PKCδ knockdown, by RNA interference, induced autophagy and increased CSC number, indicating that these effects are indeed exerted through a PKCδ dependent pathway. Finally, the increase in the number of mammospheres could be reversed by a 3MA treatment, suggesting that autophagy mechanism is necessary for the increased of CSC self-renewal induced by PKCδ inhibition. Here we demonstrated that PKCδ activity exerts a dual role through the autophagy mechanism, decreasing proliferative capacity of mammary tumor cells but also regulating tumor stem cell self-renewal. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. microRNAs and EMT in mammary cells and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Josephine A; Richer, Jennifer K; Goodall, Gregory J

    2010-06-01

    MicroRNAs are master regulators of gene expression in many biological and pathological processes, including mammary gland development and breast cancer. The differentiation program termed the epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) involves changes in a number of microRNAs. Some of these microRNAs have been shown to control cellular plasticity through the suppression of EMT-inducers or to influence cellular phenotype through the suppression of genes involved in defining the epithelial and mesenchymal cell states. This has led to the suggestion that microRNAs maybe a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of breast cancer. In this review, we will discuss microRNAs that are involved in EMT in mammary cells and breast cancer.

  7. The myoepithelial cell: its role in normal mammary glands and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopel, M

    2010-02-01

    Mammary gland epithelium is composed of an inner layer of secretory cells (luminal) and an outer layer of myoepithelial cells (MEC) bordering the basal lamina which separates the epithelial layer from the extracellular matrix. Mature MECs morphologically resemble smooth muscle cells; however, they exhibit features typical for epithelial cells, such as the presence of specific cytokeratin filaments. During lactation, secretory cells synthesize milk components, which are collected in alveoli and duct lumen, and transported to the nipple as a result of MEC contraction. Although the induction of MEC contraction results from oxytocin action, also other, still unknown auto/paracrine mechanisms participate in the regulation of this process. As well as milk ejection, MECs are involved in mammary gland morphogenesis in all developmental stages, modulating proliferation and differentiation of luminal cells. They take part in the formation of extracellular matrix, synthesizing its components and secreting proteinases and their inhibitors. In addition, MECs are regarded as natural cancer suppressors, stabilizing the normal structure of the mammary gland, they secrete suppressor proteins (e.g. maspin) limiting cancer growth, invasiveness, and neoangiogenesis. The majority of malignant breast cancers are derived from luminal cells, whereas neoplasms of MEC origin are the most seldom and usually benign form of breast tumours. MECs are markedly resistant to malignant transformation and they are able to suppress the transformation of neighboring luminal cells. Therefore, a deeper insight into the role of MECs in the physiology and pathology of mammary glands would allow a better understanding of cancerogenesis mechanisms and possible application of specific MEC markers in the diagnosis and therapy of breast cancer.

  8. Antiproliferative and apoptotic effect of Pleurotus ostreatus on human mammary carcinoma cell line (michigan cancer foundation-7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnamoorthy Deepalakshmi

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: The study demonstrates a potent anticancer property of P. ostreatus against human mammary carcinoma cells which might be of value in nutraceutical industry. Further investigations are essential to establish it as a treatment against breast cancer.

  9. Exogenous normal mammary epithelial mitochondria suppress glycolytic metabolism and glucose uptake of human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xian-Peng; Elliott, Robert L; Head, Jonathan F

    2015-10-01

    We hypothesized that normal mitochondria inhibited cancer cell proliferation and increased drug sensitivity by the mechanism of suppression of cancer aerobic glycolysis. To demonstrate the mechanism, we used real-time PCR and glycolysis cell-based assay to measure gene expression of glycolytic enzymes and glucose transporters, and extracellular lactate production of human breast cancer cells. We found that isolated fluorescent probe-stained mitochondria of MCF-12A (human mammary epithelia) could enter into human breast cancer cell lines MCF-7, T47D, and MDA-MB-231, confirmed by fluorescent and confocal microscopy. Mitochondria from the untransformed human mammary epithelia increased drug sensitivity of MCF-7 cells to paclitaxel. Real-time PCR showed that exogenous normal mitochondria of MCF-12A suppressed gene expression of glycolytic enzymes, lactate dehydrogenase A, and glucose transporter 1 and 3 of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. Glycolysis cell-based assay revealed that normal mitochondria significantly suppressed lactate production in culture media of MCF-7, T47D, and MDA-MB-231 cells. In conclusion, normal mitochondria suppress cancer proliferation and increase drug sensitivity by the mechanism of inhibition of cancer cell glycolysis and glucose uptake.

  10. Differential subcellular localization renders HAI-2 a matriptase inhibitor in breast cancer cells but not in mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hsiang-Hua D; Xu, Yuan; Lai, Hongyu; Yang, Xiaoyu; Tseng, Chun-Che; Lai, Ying-Jung J; Pan, Yu; Zhou, Emily; Johnson, Michael D; Wang, Jehng-Kang; Lin, Chen-Yong

    2015-01-01

    The type 2 transmembrane serine protease matriptase is under tight control primarily by the actions of the integral membrane Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor HAI-1. Growing evidence indicates that HAI-2 might also be involved in matriptase inhibition in some contexts. Here we showed that matriptase inhibition by HAI-2 depends on the subcellular localizations of HAI-2, and is observed in breast cancer cells but not in mammary epithelial cells. HAI-2 is co-expressed with matriptase in 21 out of 26 human epithelial and carcinoma cells examined. HAI-2 is also a potent matriptase inhibitor in solution, but in spite of this, HAI-2 inhibition of matriptase is not observed in all contexts where HAI-2 is expressed, unlike what is seen for HAI-1. Induction of matriptase zymogen activation in mammary epithelial cells results in the formation of matriptase-HAI-1 complexes, but matriptase-HAI-2 complexes are not observed. In breast cancer cells, however, in addition to the appearance of matriptase-HAI-1 complex, three different matriptase-HAI-2 complexes, are formed following the induction of matriptase activation. Immunofluorescent staining reveals that activated matriptase is focused at the cell-cell junctions upon the induction of matriptase zymogen activation in both mammary epithelial cells and breast cancer cells. HAI-2, in contrast, remains localized in vesicle/granule-like structures during matriptase zymogen activation in human mammary epithelial cells. In breast cancer cells, however, a proportion of the HAI-2 reaches the cell surface where it can gain access to and inhibit active matriptase. Collectively, these data suggest that matriptase inhibition by HAI-2 requires the translocation of HAI-2 to the cell surface, a process which is observed in some breast cancer cells but not in mammary epithelial cells.

  11. Canine Mammary Cancer Stem Cells are Radio- and Chemo- Resistant and Exhibit an Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Lisa Y; Cervantes-Arias, Alejandro; Else, Rod W; Argyle, David J

    2011-03-30

    Canine mammary carcinoma is the most common cancer among female dogs and is often fatal due to the development of distant metastases. In humans, solid tumors are made up of heterogeneous cell populations, which perform different roles in the tumor economy. A small subset of tumor cells can hold or acquire stem cell characteristics, enabling them to drive tumor growth, recurrence and metastasis. In veterinary medicine, the molecular drivers of canine mammary carcinoma are as yet undefined. Here we report that putative cancer stem cells (CSCs) can be isolated form a canine mammary carcinoma cell line, REM134. We show that these cells have an increased ability to form tumorspheres, a characteristic of stem cells, and that they express embryonic stem cell markers associated with pluripotency. Moreover, canine CSCs are relatively resistant to the cytotoxic effects of common chemotherapeutic drugs and ionizing radiation, indicating that failure of clinical therapy to eradicate canine mammary cancer may be due to the survival of CSCs. The epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) has been associated with cancer invasion, metastasis, and the acquisition of stem cell characteristics. Our results show that canine CSCs predominantly express mesenchymal markers and are more invasive than parental cells, indicating that these cells have a mesenchymal phenotype. Furthermore, we show that canine mammary cancer cells can be induced to undergo EMT by TGFβ and that these cells have an increased ability to form tumorspheres. Our findings indicate that EMT induction can enrich for cells with CSC properties, and provide further insight into canine CSC biology.

  12. Canine Mammary Cancer Stem Cells are Radio- and Chemo-Resistant and Exhibit an Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition Phenotype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pang, Lisa Y., E-mail: lisa.pang@ed.ac.uk; Cervantes-Arias, Alejandro; Else, Rod W.; Argyle, David J. [Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies and Roslin Institute, The University of Edinburgh, Easter Bush, Midlothian, EH25 9RG (United Kingdom)

    2011-03-30

    Canine mammary carcinoma is the most common cancer among female dogs and is often fatal due to the development of distant metastases. In humans, solid tumors are made up of heterogeneous cell populations, which perform different roles in the tumor economy. A small subset of tumor cells can hold or acquire stem cell characteristics, enabling them to drive tumor growth, recurrence and metastasis. In veterinary medicine, the molecular drivers of canine mammary carcinoma are as yet undefined. Here we report that putative cancer stem cells (CSCs) can be isolated form a canine mammary carcinoma cell line, REM134. We show that these cells have an increased ability to form tumorspheres, a characteristic of stem cells, and that they express embryonic stem cell markers associated with pluripotency. Moreover, canine CSCs are relatively resistant to the cytotoxic effects of common chemotherapeutic drugs and ionizing radiation, indicating that failure of clinical therapy to eradicate canine mammary cancer may be due to the survival of CSCs. The epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) has been associated with cancer invasion, metastasis, and the acquisition of stem cell characteristics. Our results show that canine CSCs predominantly express mesenchymal markers and are more invasive than parental cells, indicating that these cells have a mesenchymal phenotype. Furthermore, we show that canine mammary cancer cells can be induced to undergo EMT by TGFβ and that these cells have an increased ability to form tumorspheres. Our findings indicate that EMT induction can enrich for cells with CSC properties, and provide further insight into canine CSC biology.

  13. Developmental signaling pathways regulating mammary stem cells and contributing to the etiology of triple-negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel, Maria Cristina; Bertolette, Daniel; Castro, Nadia P; Klauzinska, Malgorzata; Cuttitta, Frank; Salomon, David S

    2016-04-01

    Cancer has been considered as temporal and spatial aberrations of normal development in tissues. Similarities between mammary embryonic development and cell transformation suggest that the underlying processes required for mammary gland development are also those perturbed during various stages of mammary tumorigenesis and breast cancer (BC) development. The master regulators of embryonic development Cripto-1, Notch/CSL, and Wnt/β-catenin play key roles in modulating mammary gland morphogenesis and cell fate specification in the embryo through fetal mammary stem cells (fMaSC) and in the adult organism particularly within the adult mammary stem cells (aMaSC), which determine mammary progenitor cell lineages that generate the basal/myoepithelial and luminal compartments of the adult mammary gland. Together with recognized transcription factors and embryonic stem cell markers, these embryonic regulatory molecules can be inappropriately augmented during tumorigenesis to support the tumor-initiating cell (TIC)/cancer stem cell (CSC) compartment, and the effects of their deregulation may contribute for the etiology of BC, in particular the most aggressive subtype of BC, triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). This in depth review will present evidence of the involvement of Cripto-1, Notch/CSL, and Wnt/β-catenin in the normal mammary gland morphogenesis and tumorigenesis, from fMaSC/aMaSC regulation to TIC generation and maintenance in TNBC. Specific therapies for treating TNBC by targeting these embryonic pathways in TICs will be further discussed, providing new opportunities to destroy not only the bulk tumor, but also TICs that initiate and promote the metastatic spread and recurrence of this aggressive subtype of BC.

  14. Establishment and characterization of a new feline mammary cancer cell line, FkMTp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Ana; Adega, Filomena; Chaves, Raquel

    2016-08-01

    Studies on tumours in domestic animals are believed to greatly contribute to a better understanding of similar diseases in humans. Comparative studies have shown that feline mammary carcinomas share important features with human breast cancers, including a similar biological behaviour and histological appearance. In the present study we have established and characterized at different cellular levels one feline mammary cancer cell line, FkMTp, derived from a cat mammary carcinoma. The FkMTp cell line revealed to be a promising resource and tool to study tumour microevolution and all the mechanisms and processes involved in carcinogenesis from the tumour (primary culture) to the immortalized cell line. Several assays were conducted to assess the growth behaviour, differentiated morphology, anchorage independent growth in soft agar, wound-healing invasion and migration of the cell line across time (from the primary culture until the 160th passage). FkMTp revealed increased levels of anchorage independence, migration and invasion according to the course of time as well as different numbers of ploidy. These results demonstrate and validate the in vitro tumorigenicity of the FkMTp cell line. During the cell line establishment, it was cryopreserved approximately every six passages, including the tumour primary culture, allowing now the possibility to access almost any specific momento of the tumour progression.

  15. Fingerprinting Breast Cancer vs. Normal Mammary Cells by Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Volatiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jingjing; Sinues, Pablo Martinez-Lozano; Hollmén, Maija; Li, Xue; Detmar, Michael; Zenobi, Renato

    2014-06-01

    There is increasing interest in the development of noninvasive diagnostic methods for early cancer detection, to improve the survival rate and quality of life of cancer patients. Identification of volatile metabolic compounds may provide an approach for noninvasive early diagnosis of malignant diseases. Here we analyzed the volatile metabolic signature of human breast cancer cell lines versus normal human mammary cells. Volatile compounds in the headspace of conditioned culture medium were directly fingerprinted by secondary electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry. The mass spectra were subsequently treated statistically to identify discriminating features between normal vs. cancerous cell types. We were able to classify different samples by using feature selection followed by principal component analysis (PCA). Additionally, high-resolution mass spectrometry allowed us to propose their chemical structures for some of the most discriminating molecules. We conclude that cancerous cells can release a characteristic odor whose constituents may be used as disease markers.

  16. Vitamin D receptor regulates autophagy in the normal mammary gland and in luminal breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavera-Mendoza, Luz E; Westerling, Thomas; Libby, Eric; Marusyk, Andriy; Cato, Laura; Cassani, Raymundo; Cameron, Lisa A; Ficarro, Scott B; Marto, Jarrod A; Klawitter, Jelena; Brown, Myles

    2017-03-14

    Women in North America have a one in eight lifetime risk of developing breast cancer (BC), and a significant proportion of these individuals will develop recurrent BC and will eventually succumb to the disease. Metastatic, therapy-resistant BC cells are refractory to cell death induced by multiple stresses. Here, we document that the vitamin D receptor (VDR) acts as a master transcriptional regulator of autophagy. Activation of the VDR by vitamin D induces autophagy and an autophagic transcriptional signature in BC cells that correlates with increased survival in patients; strikingly, this signature is present in the normal mammary gland and is progressively lost in patients with metastatic BC. A number of epidemiological studies have shown that sufficient vitamin D serum levels might be protective against BC. We observed that dietary vitamin D supplementation in mice increases basal levels of autophagy in the normal mammary gland, highlighting the potential of vitamin D as a cancer-preventive agent. These findings point to a role of vitamin D and the VDR in modulating autophagy and cell death in both the normal mammary gland and BC cells.

  17. Canine Mammary Cancer Stem Cells are Radio- and Chemo- Resistant and Exhibit an Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition Phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Argyle, David J.; Else, Rod W.; Alejandro Cervantes-Arias; Pang, Lisa Y

    2011-01-01

    Canine mammary carcinoma is the most common cancer among female dogs and is often fatal due to the development of distant metastases. In humans, solid tumors are made up of heterogeneous cell populations, which perform different roles in the tumor economy. A small subset of tumor cells can hold or acquire stem cell characteristics, enabling them to drive tumor growth, recurrence and metastasis. In veterinary medicine, the molecular drivers of canine mammary carcinoma are as yet undefined. Her...

  18. Stage-specific embryonic antigen: determining expression in canine glioblastoma, melanoma, and mammary cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Daisuke

    2017-01-01

    The expression of stage-specific embryonic antigens (SSEAs) was determined in several types of canine cancer cells. Flow cytometry showed SSEA-1 expression in glioblastoma, melanoma, and mammary cancer cells, although none expressed SSEA-3 or SSEA-4. Expression of SSEA-1 was not detected in lymphoma, osteosarcoma, or hemangiosarcoma cell lines. Relatively stable SSEA-1 expression was observed between 24 and 72 h of culture. After 8 days in culture, sorted SSEA-1− and SSEA-1+ cells re-established SSEA-1 expression to levels comparable to those observed in unsorted cells. Our results document, for the first time, the expression of SSEA-1 in several canine cancer cell lines. PMID:27456773

  19. Canine mammary tumors contain cancer stem-like cells and form spheroids with an embryonic stem cell signature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferletta, Maria; Grawé, Jan; Hellmén, Eva

    2011-01-01

    We have investigated the presence of tentative stem-like cells in the canine mammary tumor cell line CMT-U229. This cell line is established from an atypical benign mixed mammary tumor, which has the property of forming duct-like structures in collagen gels. Stem cells in mammary glands are located in the epithelium; therefore we thought that the CMT-U229 cell line would be suitable for detection of tentative cancer stem-like cells. Side population (SP) analyses by flow cytometry were performed with cells that formed spheroids and with cells that did not. Flow cytometric, single sorted cells were expanded and re-cultured as spheroids. The spheroids were paraffin embedded and characterized by immunohistochemistry. SP analyses showed that spheroid forming cells (retenate) as well as single cells (filtrate) contained SP cells. Sca1 positive cells were single cell sorted and thereafter the SP population increased with repeated SP analyses. The SP cells were positively labeled with the cell surface-markers CD44 and CD49f (integrin alpha6); however the expression of CD24 was low or negative. The spheroids expressed the transcription factor and stem cell marker Sox2, as well as Oct4. Interestingly, only peripheral cells of the spheroids and single cells were positive for Oct4 expression. SP cells are suggested to correspond to stem cells and in this study, we have enriched for tentative tumor stem-like cells derived from a canine mammary tumor. All the used markers indicate that the studied CMT-U229 cell line contains SP cells, which in particular have cancer stem-like cell characteristics.

  20. A mammary stem cell population identified and characterized in late embryogenesis reveals similarities to human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spike, Benjamin T; Engle, Dannielle D; Lin, Jennifer C; Cheung, Samantha K; La, Justin; Wahl, Geoffrey M

    2012-02-03

    Gene expression signatures relating mammary stem cell populations to breast cancers have focused on adult tissue. Here, we identify, isolate, and characterize the fetal mammary stem cell (fMaSC) state since the invasive and proliferative processes of mammogenesis resemble phases of cancer progression. fMaSC frequency peaks late in embryogenesis, enabling more extensive stem cell purification than achieved with adult tissue. fMaSCs are self-renewing, multipotent, and coexpress multiple mammary lineage markers. Gene expression, transplantation, and in vitro analyses reveal putative autocrine and paracrine regulatory mechanisms, including ErbB and FGF signaling pathways impinging on fMaSC growth. Expression profiles from fMaSCs and associated stroma exhibit significant similarities to basal-like and Her2+ intrinsic breast cancer subtypes. Our results reveal links between development and cancer and provide resources to identify new candidates for diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy.

  1. The potential role of COX-2 in cancer stem cell-mediated canine mammary tumor initiation: an immunohistochemical study

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Jian; Zhang, Di; Xie, Fuqiang; LIN, Degui

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that cancer stem cells (CSCs) are responsible for tumor initiation and maintenance. Additionally, it is becoming apparent that cyclooxygenase (COX) signaling is associated with canine mammary tumor development. The goals of the present study were to investigate COX-2 expression patterns and their effect on CSC-mediated tumor initiation in primary canine mammary tissues and tumorsphere models using immunohistochemistry. Patterns of COX-2, CD44, octamer-binding tran...

  2. From milk to malignancy: the role of mammary stem cells in development, pregnancy and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiede, Benjamin; Kang, Yibin

    2011-02-01

    Adult stem cells of the mammary gland (MaSCs) are a highly dynamic population of cells that are responsible for the generation of the gland during puberty and its expansion during pregnancy. In recent years significant advances have been made in understanding how these cells are regulated during these developmentally important processes both in humans and in mice. Understanding how MaSCs are regulated is becoming a particularly important area of research, given that they may be particularly susceptible targets for transformation in breast cancer. Here, we summarize the identification of MaSCs, how they are regulated and the evidence for their serving as the origins of breast cancer. In particular, we focus on how changes in MaSC populations may explain both the increased risk of developing aggressive ER/PR(-) breast cancer shortly after pregnancy and the long-term decreased risk of developing ER/PR(+) tumors.

  3. From milk to malignancy: the role of mammary stem cells in development, pregnancy and breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Benjamin Tiede; Yibin Kang

    2011-01-01

    Adult stem cells of the mammary gland (MaSCs) are a highly dynamic population of cells that are responsible for the generation of the gland during puberty and its expansion during pregnancy, in recent years significant advances have been made in understanding how these cells are regulated during these developmentally important processes both in humans and in mice. Understanding how MaSCs are regulated is becoming a particularly important area of research, given that they may be particularly susceptible targets for transformation in breast cancer. Here, we summarize the identification of MaSCs, how they are regulated and the evidence for their serving as the origins of breast cancer, in particular, we focus on how changes in MaSC populations may explain both the increased risk of developing aggressive ERJPR(-) breast cancer shortly after pregnancy and the long-term decreased risk of developing ER/ PR(+) tumors.

  4. Tracing anti-cancer and cancer-promoting actions of all-trans retinoic acid in breast cancer to a RARα epigenetic mechanism of mammary epithelial cell fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, Stefano; Ren, MingQiang; Visconti, Nicolo; Corlazzoli, Francesca; Gagliostro, Vincenzo; Somenzi, Giulia; Yao, Jin; Sun, Yijun; Sacchi, Nicoletta

    2016-12-27

    A hallmark of cancer cells is the ability to evade the growth inhibitory/pro-apoptotic action of physiological all-trans retinoic acid (RA) signal, the bioactive derivative of Vitamin A. However, as we and others reported, RA can also promote cancer cell growth and invasion. Here we show that anticancer and cancer-promoting RA actions in breast cancer have roots in a mechanism of mammary epithelial cell morphogenesis that involves both transcriptional (epigenetic) and non-transcriptional RARα (RARA) functions. We found that the mammary epithelial cell-context specific degree of functionality of the RARA transcriptional (epigenetic) component of this mechanism, by tuning the effects of the non-transcriptional RARA component, determines different cell fate decisions during mammary morphogenesis. Indeed, factors that hamper the RARA epigenetic function make physiological RA drive aberrant morphogenesis via non-transcriptional RARA, thus leading to cell transformation. Remarkably, also the cell context-specific degree of functionality of the RARA epigenetic component retained by breast cancer cells is critical to determine cell fate decisions in response to physiological as well as supraphysiological RA variation. Overall this study supports the proof of principle that the epigenetic functional plasticity of the mammary epithelial cell RARA mechanism, which is essential for normal morphogenetic processes, is necessary to deter breast cancer onset/progression consequent to the insidious action of physiological RA.

  5. Antiproliferative Effects of Oxytocin and Desmopressin on Canine Mammary Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavente, Micaela Andrea; Bianchi, Carolina Paula; Imperiale, Fernanda; Aba, Marcelo Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Neoplasms of the mammary gland represent the most frequent tumor type in the female dog, and according to the histologic criteria, approximately 50% of them are malignant. In the most aggressive cases of mammary cancer, surgery is not enough to warrant a favorable outcome, and adjuvant therapies are needed to improve the patient’s overall survival. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of two peptides on proliferation of a canine mammary cancer cell line derived from a simple carcinoma. The cell line CMT-U27 was grown in 96-well plates, at two cell densities (4 × 103 and 8 × 103 cells/well). Cultures were treated with oxytocin (OT) or desmopressin at five concentrations (10, 50, 100, 500, and 1000 nM). After 72 h of incubation, cell proliferation was determined by the MTT assay. Results showed that with 4 × 103 cells/well, OT at 50, 500, and 1000 nM was growth inhibitory for the cells, being statistically significant at 1000 nM. On the contrary, no antiproliferative effect was observed with 10 or 100 nM. At 8 × 103 cells/well, OT showed a significant antiproliferative effect only with the highest concentration (1000 nM). Desmopressin at 4 × 103 cells/well decreased cell viability at concentrations of 50, 100, 500, and 1000 nM (statistically significant with the highest concentration), while no effect was observed with 10 nM. With 8 × 103 cells/well, this peptide reduced cell growth at 100, 500, and 1000 nM. In conclusion, we suggest that these peptides may be potential and promising compounds for the treatment of dogs with simple carcinomas of the mammary gland. In vivo studies are required to confirm this hypothesis. PMID:28083539

  6. Mammary stem cells and breast cancer--role of Notch signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnie, Gillian; Clarke, Robert B

    2007-06-01

    Adult stem cells are found in numerous tissues of the body and play a role in tissue development, replacement and repair. Evidence shows that breast stem cells are multipotent and can self renew, which are key characteristics of stem cells, and a single cell enriched with cell surface markers has the ability to grow a fully functional mammary gland in vivo. Many groups have extrapolated the cancer stem cell hypothesis from the haematopoietic system to solid cancers, where using in vitro culture techniques and in vivo transplant models have established evidence of cancer stem cells in colon, pancreas, prostate, brain and breast cancers. In the report we describe the evidence for breast cancer stem cells; studies consistently show that stem cell like and breast cancer initiating populations can be enriched using cell surface makers CD44+/CD24- and have upregulated genes which include Notch. Notch signalling has been highlighted as a pathway involved in the development of the breast and is frequently dysregulated in invasive breast cancer. We have investigated the role of Notch in a pre-invasive breast lesion, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), and have found that aberrant activation of Notch signalling is an early event in breast cancer. High expression of Notch 1 intracellular domain (NICD) in DCIS also predicted a reduced time to recurrence 5 years after surgery. Using a non-adherent sphere culture technique we have grown DCIS mammospheres from primary DCIS tissue, where self-renewal capacity, measured by the number of mammosphere initiating cells, were increased from normal breast tissue. A gamma-secretase inhibitor, DAPT, which inhibits all four Notch receptors and a Notch 4 neutralising antibody were shown to reduce DCIS mammosphere formation, indicating that Notch signalling and other stem cell self-renewal pathways may represent novel therapeutic targets to prevent recurrence of pre-invasive and invasive breast cancer.

  7. STAT5A Regulates the Survival of Mammary Epithelial Cells and the Development of Mammary Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-07-01

    Western Blot Recycling Kit according to the manufacturer’s protocol (a AQ: J Pierce Chemical Co. (Rockford, IL). Diagnostic, San Antonio , TX). Blots...Peters G, Lu X and Barnes DM. (1999). Bonilla M, Ramirez M, Lopez- Cueto J and Gariglio P. J. Pathol., 187, 200-206. (1988). J. Nati. Cancer Inst., 80

  8. Establishment and characterization of a new cell line of canine inflammatory mammary cancer: IPC-366.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Caceres

    Full Text Available Canine inflammatory mammary cancer (IMC shares epidemiologic, histopathological and clinical characteristics with the disease in humans and has been proposed as a natural model for human inflammatory breast cancer (IBC. The aim of this study was to characterize a new cell line from IMC (IPC-366 for the comparative study of both IMC and IBC. Tumors cells from a female dog with clinical IMC were collected. The cells were grown under adherent conditions. The growth, cytological, ultrastructural and immunohistochemical (IHC characteristics of IPC-366 were evaluated. Ten female Balb/SCID mice were inoculated with IPC-366 cells to assess their tumorigenicity and metastatic potential. Chromosome aberration test and Karyotype revealed the presence of structural aberration, numerical and neutral rearrangements, demonstrating a chromosomal instability. Microscopic examination of tumor revealed an epithelial morphology with marked anysocytosis. Cytological and histological examination of smears and ultrathin sections by electron microscopy revealed that IPC-366 is formed by highly malignant large round or polygonal cells characterized by marked atypia and prominent nucleoli and frequent multinucleated cells. Some cells had cytoplasmic empty spaces covered by cytoplasmic membrane resembling capillary endothelial cells, a phenomenon that has been related to s vasculogenic mimicry. IHC characterization of IPC-366 was basal-like: epithelial cells (AE1/AE3+, CK14+, vimentin+, actin-, p63-, ER-, PR-, HER-2, E-cadherin, overexpressed COX-2 and high Ki-67 proliferation index (87.15 %. At 2 weeks after inoculating the IPC-366 cells, a tumor mass was found in 100 % of mice. At 4 weeks metastases in lung and lymph nodes were found. Xenograph tumors maintained the original IHC characteristics of the female dog tumor. In summary, the cell line IPC-366 is a fast growing malignant triple negative cell line model of inflammatory mammary carcinoma that can be used for the

  9. Establishment and characterization of a new cell line of canine inflammatory mammary cancer: IPC-366.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caceres, Sara; Peña, Laura; de Andres, Paloma J; Illera, Maria J; Lopez, Mirtha S; Woodward, Wendy A; Reuben, James M; Illera, Juan C

    2015-01-01

    Canine inflammatory mammary cancer (IMC) shares epidemiologic, histopathological and clinical characteristics with the disease in humans and has been proposed as a natural model for human inflammatory breast cancer (IBC). The aim of this study was to characterize a new cell line from IMC (IPC-366) for the comparative study of both IMC and IBC. Tumors cells from a female dog with clinical IMC were collected. The cells were grown under adherent conditions. The growth, cytological, ultrastructural and immunohistochemical (IHC) characteristics of IPC-366 were evaluated. Ten female Balb/SCID mice were inoculated with IPC-366 cells to assess their tumorigenicity and metastatic potential. Chromosome aberration test and Karyotype revealed the presence of structural aberration, numerical and neutral rearrangements, demonstrating a chromosomal instability. Microscopic examination of tumor revealed an epithelial morphology with marked anysocytosis. Cytological and histological examination of smears and ultrathin sections by electron microscopy revealed that IPC-366 is formed by highly malignant large round or polygonal cells characterized by marked atypia and prominent nucleoli and frequent multinucleated cells. Some cells had cytoplasmic empty spaces covered by cytoplasmic membrane resembling capillary endothelial cells, a phenomenon that has been related to s vasculogenic mimicry. IHC characterization of IPC-366 was basal-like: epithelial cells (AE1/AE3+, CK14+, vimentin+, actin-, p63-, ER-, PR-, HER-2, E-cadherin, overexpressed COX-2 and high Ki-67 proliferation index (87.15 %). At 2 weeks after inoculating the IPC-366 cells, a tumor mass was found in 100 % of mice. At 4 weeks metastases in lung and lymph nodes were found. Xenograph tumors maintained the original IHC characteristics of the female dog tumor. In summary, the cell line IPC-366 is a fast growing malignant triple negative cell line model of inflammatory mammary carcinoma that can be used for the comparative

  10. Lentiviral Transduction of Mammary Stem Cells for Analysis of Gene Function during Development and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welm, Bryan E.; Dijkgraaf, Gerrit J. P.; Bledau, Anita S.; Welm, Alana L.; Werb, Zena

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY The mouse mammary gland is the only epithelial organ capable of complete regeneration upon orthotopic transplantation, making it ideally suited for in vivo gene function studies through viral mediated gene delivery. A hurdle that has challenged the widespread adoption of this technique has been the inability to transduce mammary stem cells effectively. We have overcome this limitation by infecting total primary mammary epithelial cells in suspension with high titer lentiviruses. Transduced cells gave rise to all major cell types of the mammary gland, and were capable of clonal outgrowth and functional differentiation in serial transplants. To demonstrate that this method is a valuable alternative to developing transgenic animals, we used lentiviral-mediated Wnt-1 overexpression to replicate MMTV-Wnt-1 mammary phenotypes and used a dominant-negative Xenopus Suppressor of Hairless to reveal a requirement for Notch signaling during ductal morphogenesis. Importantly, this method is also applicable to transduction of cells from other tissues. PMID:18371425

  11. Canine Mammary Cancer Stem Cells are Radio- and Chemo- Resistant and Exhibit an Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition Phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Argyle

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Canine mammary carcinoma is the most common cancer among female dogs and is often fatal due to the development of distant metastases. In humans, solid tumors are made up of heterogeneous cell populations, which perform different roles in the tumor economy. A small subset of tumor cells can hold or acquire stem cell characteristics, enabling them to drive tumor growth, recurrence and metastasis. In veterinary medicine, the molecular drivers of canine mammary carcinoma are as yet undefined. Here we report that putative cancer stem cells (CSCs can be isolated form a canine mammary carcinoma cell line, REM134. We show that these cells have an increased ability to form tumorspheres, a characteristic of stem cells, and that they express embryonic stem cell markers associated with pluripotency. Moreover, canine CSCs are relatively resistant to the cytotoxic effects of common chemotherapeutic drugs and ionizing radiation, indicating that failure of clinical therapy to eradicate canine mammary cancer may be due to the survival of CSCs. The epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT has been associated with cancer invasion, metastasis, and the acquisition of stem cell characteristics. Our results show that canine CSCs predominantly express mesenchymal markers and are more invasive than parental cells, indicating that these cells have a mesenchymal phenotype. Furthermore, we show that canine mammary cancer cells can be induced to undergo EMT by TGFβ and that these cells have an increased ability to form tumorspheres. Our findings indicate that EMT induction can enrich for cells with CSC properties, and provide further insight into canine CSC biology.

  12. Mammary Cancer and Activation of Transposable Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    SV40Tag is transcriptionally activated during pregnancy and lactation , and the mice are predisposed to develop mammary cancer after 3 pregnancies...and lactations . Using this model, populations of marked cells can be collected for integrated analysis of gene expression, promoter usage, and DNA...completed over the first 6 months on the job . Training included mouse husbandry and colony management, mammary cell isolations in preparation for

  13. Kinetics of mammary clonogenic cells and rat mammary cancer induction by X-rays or fission neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamiya, Kenji [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. for Radiation Biology and Medicine; Higgins, P.D.; Tanner, M.A.; Gould, M.N.; Clifton, K.H.

    1999-12-01

    Following the hormonal treatment of rats with high prolactin levels and glucocorticoid deficiency (Prl+/Glc-) for 48 days (Day +48), total recoverable mammary DNA was increased by more than sevenfold, tritiated thymidine uptake by nearly fourfold, and total mammary clonogens by about fivefold. Irradiation with 4, 40, and 80 cGy X-rays on Day +48 increased total mammary carcinomas per rat-day-at-risk linearly with dose, and 40 and 80 cGy significantly decreased first carcinoma latency. A dose of 40 cGy X-rays before hormone treatment (Day -1) yielded tumor latencies and frequencies insignificantly different from unirradiated controls but significantly different from those when the dose was given on Day +48. Total carcinomas per rat-day-at-risk were fitted better by a function of dose to the power 0.4 than by a linear function after exposure to 1, 10. and 20 cGy fission neutrons, and 10 and 20 cGy significantly shortened the time to appearance of the first cancer. In contrast to results with X-rays, 10 cGy neutrons on Day -1 yielded tumor frequencies and latencies insignificantly different from 10 cGy neutrons on Day +48. The carcinogenic action of X-rays, but not of neutrons, was thus influenced by total clonogen numbers and/or proliferation rates. (author)

  14. Exercise-induced muscle-derived cytokines inhibit mammary cancer cell growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hojman, Pernille; Dethlefsen, Christine; Brandt, Claus

    2011-01-01

    Regular physical activity protects against the development of breast and colon cancer, since it reduces the risk of developing these by 25-30%. During exercise, humoral factors are released from the working muscles for endocrinal signaling to other organs. We hypothesized that these myokines...... mediate some of the inhibitory effects of exercise on mammary cancer cell proliferation. Serum and muscles were collected from mice after an exercise bout. Incubation with exercise-conditioned serum inhibited MCF-7 cell proliferation by 52% and increased caspase activity by 54%. A similar increase...... proliferation by 42%, increase caspase activity by 46%, and induce apoptosis. Blocking OSM signaling with anti-OSM antibodies reduced the induction of caspase activity by 51%. To verify that OSM was a myokine, we showed that it was significantly upregulated in serum and in three muscles, tibialis cranialis...

  15. Mammary Stem/Progenitor Cells and Cancer Susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    compartment as evidenced by co-staining with antibodies to cytokeratin 8 and BrdU, a thymidine analog that was injected 4 hours prior to euthanasia to...Degrees supported: one doctoral student support, training in progress Cell lines, tissue repositories, animal models, etc.: none Funding applied for

  16. Amplification of tumor inducing putative cancer stem cells (CSCs) by vitamin A/retinol from mammary tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Rohit B. [Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Wang, Qingde [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Khillan, Jaspal S., E-mail: khillan@pitt.edu [Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States)

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •Vitamin A supports self renewal of putative CSCs from mammary tumors. •These cells exhibit impaired retinol metabolism into retinoic acid. •CSCs from mammary tumors differentiate into mammary specific cell lineages. •The cells express mammary stem cell specific CD29 and CD49f markers. •Putative CSCs form highly metastatic tumors in NOD SCID mouse. -- Abstract: Solid tumors contain a rare population of cancer stem cells (CSCs) that are responsible for relapse and metastasis. The existence of CSC however, remains highly controversial issue. Here we present the evidence for putative CSCs from mammary tumors amplified by vitamin A/retinol signaling. The cells exhibit mammary stem cell specific CD29{sup hi}/CD49f{sup hi}/CD24{sup hi} markers, resistance to radiation and chemo therapeutic agents and form highly metastatic tumors in NOD/SCID mice. The cells exhibit indefinite self renewal as cell lines. Furthermore, the cells exhibit impaired retinol metabolism and do not express enzymes that metabolize retinol into retinoic acid. Vitamin A/retinol also amplified putative CSCs from breast cancer cell lines that form highly aggressive tumors in NOD SCID mice. The studies suggest that high purity putative CSCs can be isolated from solid tumors to establish patient specific cell lines for personalized therapeutics for pre-clinical translational applications. Characterization of CSCs will allow understanding of basic cellular and molecular pathways that are deregulated, mechanisms of tumor metastasis and evasion of therapies that has direct clinical relevance.

  17. The mammary cellular hierarchy and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakes, Samantha R; Gallego-Ortega, David; Ormandy, Christopher J

    2014-11-01

    Advances in the study of hematopoietic cell maturation have paved the way to a deeper understanding the stem and progenitor cellular hierarchy in the mammary gland. The mammary epithelium, unlike the hematopoietic cellular hierarchy, sits in a complex niche where communication between epithelial cells and signals from the systemic hormonal milieu, as well as from extra-cellular matrix, influence cell fate decisions and contribute to tissue homeostasis. We review the discovery, definition and regulation of the mammary cellular hierarchy and we describe the development of the concepts that have guided our investigations. We outline recent advances in in vivo lineage tracing that is now challenging many of our assumptions regarding the behavior of mammary stem cells, and we show how understanding these cellular lineages has altered our view of breast cancer.

  18. Regulation of Wnt signaling activity for growth suppression induced by quercetin in 4T1 murine mammary cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Haesung; Seo, Eun-Min; Sharma, Ashish R; Ganbold, Bilguun; Park, Jongbong; Sharma, Garima; Kang, Young-Hee; Song, Dong-Keun; Lee, Sang-Soo; Nam, Ju-Suk

    2013-10-01

    Quercetin is a promising chemopreventive agent against cancer that inhibits tumor progression by inducing cell cycle arrest and promoting apoptotic cell death. Recently, the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway has been implicated in mammary tumorigenesis, where its abnormal activation is associated with the development of breast cancer. Thus, the objective of this study was to examine the biological activities of quercetin against mammary cancer cells, and to determine whether quercetin could regulate the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Quercetin showed dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth and induced apoptosis in 4T1 cells. Treatment of 20 µM quercetin suppressed ~50% of basal TopFlash luciferase activity. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of quercetin on the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway was confirmed by the reduced stabilization of the β-catenin protein. Among various antagonists screened for the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, the expression of DKK1, 2 and 3 was induced after treatment with 20 µM of quercetin. Stimulation with recombinant DKK1 protein, showed suppressive cell growth of mammary cancer cells instead of quercetin. When 4T1 cells were treated with recombinant Wnt3a or LiCl along with quercetin, both stimulators for the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway were able to restore the suppressed cell viability by quercetin. Thus, our data suggest that quercetin exerts its anticancer activity through the downregulation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling activity. These results indicate for the first time that quercetin decreases cell viability and induces apoptosis in murine mammary cancer cells, which is possibly mediated by DKK-dependent inhibition of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. In conclusion, our findings suggest that quercetin has great potential value as chemotherapeutic agent for cancer treatment, especially in breast cancer controlled by Wnt/β-catenin signaling activity.

  19. Transcriptomic profile of two canine mammary cancer cell lines with different proliferative and anti-apoptotic potential

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krol, M.; Skierski, J.; Rao, N.A.; Hellmen, E.; Mol, J.A.; Motyl, T.

    2009-01-01

    J Physiol Pharmacol. 2009 May;60 Suppl 1:95-106. Transcriptomic profile of two canine mammary cancer cell lines with different proliferative and anti-apoptotic potential. Krol M, Pawlowski KM, Skierski J, Rao NA, Hellmen E, Mol JA, Motyl T. Department of Physiological Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary

  20. Characterization of cell lines derived from breast cancers and normal mammary tissues for the study of the intrinsic molecular subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prat, Aleix; Karginova, Olga; Parker, Joel S; Fan, Cheng; He, Xiaping; Bixby, Lisa; Harrell, J Chuck; Roman, Erick; Adamo, Barbara; Troester, Melissa; Perou, Charles M

    2013-11-01

    Five molecular subtypes (luminal A, luminal B, HER2-enriched, basal-like, and claudin-low) with clinical implications exist in breast cancer. Here, we evaluated the molecular and phenotypic relationships of (1) a large in vitro panel of human breast cancer cell lines (BCCLs), human mammary fibroblasts (HMFs), and human mammary epithelial cells (HMECs); (2) in vivo breast tumors; (3) normal breast cell subpopulations; (4) human embryonic stem cells (hESCs); and (5) bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). First, by integrating genomic data of 337 breast tumor samples with 93 cell lines we were able to identify all the intrinsic tumor subtypes in the cell lines, except for luminal A. Secondly, we observed that the cell lines recapitulate the differentiation hierarchy detected in the normal mammary gland, with claudin-low BCCLs and HMFs cells showing a stromal phenotype, HMECs showing a mammary stem cell/bipotent progenitor phenotype, basal-like cells showing a luminal progenitor phenotype, and luminal B cell lines showing a mature luminal phenotype. Thirdly, we identified basal-like and highly migratory claudin-low subpopulations of cells within a subset of triple-negative BCCLs (SUM149PT, HCC1143, and HCC38). Interestingly, both subpopulations within SUM149PT were enriched for tumor-initiating cells, but the basal-like subpopulation grew tumors faster than the claudin-low subpopulation. Finally, claudin-low BCCLs resembled the phenotype of hMSCs, whereas hESCs cells showed an epithelial phenotype without basal or luminal differentiation. The results presented here help to improve our understanding of the wide range of breast cancer cell line models through the appropriate pairing of cell lines with relevant in vivo tumor and normal cell counterparts.

  1. CD44+/CD24- Cancer Stem Cells Are Associated With Higher Grade of Canine Mammary Carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, K S; Jang, Y G; Shin, J I; Kim, N H; Lim, H Y; Lee, S M; Kim, J H; Sur, J H

    2015-11-01

    The CD44+/CD24- phenotype identifies cancer stem cell (CSC) properties in canine mammary carcinoma (MC); however, the histopathological features associated with this phenotype remain to be elucidated. Here, we determined whether the CD44+/CD24- phenotype was associated with hormonal receptor (HR; estrogen receptor [ER] and/or progesterone receptor [PR]) status and/or triple (ER, PR, and human epithelial growth factor receptor 2)-negative (TN) subtype; conventional histological evaluation was also performed. We found that, as single markers, both CD44+ and CD24+ were associated with less aggressive histological types, low grade, and a non-TN subtype; both markers were associated with HR positivity. On the other hand, a CD44+/CD24- phenotype was associated with higher grade of carcinoma. Therefore, our results suggest that immunohistochemical phenotyping for CD44/CD24 is useful for the evaluation of tumor behavior as well as CSC-like properties in canine MCs.

  2. Contribution of xanthine oxidoreductase to mammary epithelial and breast cancer cell differentiation in part modulates inhibitor of differentiation-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fini, Mehdi A; Monks, Jenifer; Farabaugh, Susan M; Wright, Richard M

    2011-09-01

    Loss of xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) has been linked to aggressive breast cancer in vivo and to breast cancer cell aggressiveness in vitro. In the present study, we hypothesized that the contribution of XOR to the development of the normal mammary gland may underlie its capacity to modulate breast cancer. We contrasted in vitro and in vivo developmental systems by differentiation marker and microarray analyses. Human breast cancer microarray was used for clinical outcome studies. The role of XOR in differentiation and proliferation was examined in human breast cancer cells and in a mouse xenograft model. Our data show that XOR was required for functional differentiation of mammary epithelial cells both in vitro and in vivo. Poor XOR expression was observed in a mouse ErbB2 breast cancer model, and pharmacologic inhibition of XOR increased breast cancer tumor burden in mouse xenograft. mRNA microarray analysis of human breast cancer revealed that low XOR expression was significantly associated with time to tumor relapse. The opposing expression of XOR and inhibitor of differentiation-1 (Id1) during HC11 differentiation and mammary gland development suggested a potential functional relationship. While overexpression of Id1 inhibited HC11 differentiation and XOR expression, XOR itself modulated expression of Id1 in differentiating HC11 cells. Overexpression of XOR both inhibited Id1-induced proliferation and -stimulated differentiation of Heregulin-β1-treated human breast cancer cells. These results show that XOR is an important functional component of differentiation whose diminished expression contributes to breast cancer aggressiveness, and they support XOR as both a breast cancer biomarker and a target for pharmacologic activation in therapeutic management of aggressive breast cancer.

  3. Tumor microenvironment regulates metastasis and metastasis genes of mouse MMTV-PymT mammary cancer cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werbeck, J L; Thudi, N K; Martin, C K; Premanandan, C; Yu, L; Ostrowksi, M C; Rosol, T J

    2014-07-01

    Metastasis is the primary cause of death in breast cancer patients, yet there are challenges to modeling this process in vivo. The goal of this study was to analyze the effects of injection site on tumor growth and metastasis and gene expression of breast cancer cells in vivo using the MMTV-PymT breast cancer model (Met-1 cells). Met-1 cells were injected into 5 sites (subcutaneous, mammary fat pad, tail vein, intracardiac, and intratibial), and tumors and metastases were monitored using bioluminescent imaging and confirmed with gross necropsy and histopathology. Met-1 tumors were analyzed based on morphology and changes in gene expression in each tissue microenvironment. There were 6 permissible sites of Met-1 tumor growth (mammary gland, subcutis, lung, adrenal gland, ovary, bone). Met-1 cells grew faster in the subcutis compared to mammary fat pad tumors (highest Ki-67 index). Morphologic differences were evident in each tumor microenvironment. Finally, 7 genes were differentially expressed in the Met-1 tumors in the 6 sites of growth or metastasis. This investigation demonstrates that breast cancer progression and metastasis are regulated by not only the tumor cells but also the experimental model and unique molecular signals from the tumor microenvironment.

  4. Spontaneously immortalised bovine mammary epithelial cells exhibit a distinct gene expression pattern from the breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Qianqian

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spontaneous immortalisation of cultured mammary epithelial cells (MECs is an extremely rare event, and the molecular mechanism behind spontaneous immortalisation of MECs is unclear. Here, we report the establishment of a spontaneously immortalised bovine mammary epithelial cell line (BME65Cs and the changes in gene expression associated with BME65Cs cells. Results BME65Cs cells maintain the general characteristics of normal mammary epithelial cells in morphology, karyotype and immunohistochemistry, and are accompanied by the activation of endogenous bTERT (bovine Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase and stabilisation of the telomere. Currently, BME65Cs cells have been passed for more than 220 generations, and these cells exhibit non-malignant transformation. The expression of multiple genes was investigated in BME65Cs cells, senescent BMECs (bovine MECs cells, early passage BMECs cells and MCF-7 cells (a human breast cancer cell line. In comparison with early passage BMECs cells, the expression of senescence-relevant apoptosis-related gene were significantly changed in BME65Cs cells. P16INK4a was downregulated, p53 was low expressed and Bax/Bcl-2 ratio was reversed. Moreover, a slight upregulation of the oncogene c-Myc, along with an undetectable level of breast tumor-related gene Bag-1 and TRPS-1, was observed in BME65Cs cells while these genes are all highly expressed in MCF-7. In addition, DNMT1 is upregulated in BME65Cs. These results suggest that the inhibition of both senescence and mitochondrial apoptosis signalling pathways contribute to the immortality of BME65Cs cells. The expression of p53 and p16INK4a in BME65Cs was altered in the pattern of down-regulation but not "loss", suggesting that this spontaneous immortalization is possibly initiated by other mechanism rather than gene mutation of p53 or p16INK4a. Conclusions Spontaneously immortalised BME65Cs cells maintain many characteristics of normal BMEC cells and

  5. Ectopic runx2 expression in mammary epithelial cells disrupts formation of normal acini structure: implications for breast cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratap, Jitesh; Imbalzano, Karen M; Underwood, Jean M; Cohet, Nathalie; Gokul, Karthiga; Akech, Jacqueline; van Wijnen, Andre J; Stein, Janet L; Imbalzano, Anthony N; Nickerson, Jeffrey A; Lian, Jane B; Stein, Gary S

    2009-09-01

    The transcription factor Runx2 is highly expressed in breast cancer cells compared with mammary epithelial cells and contributes to metastasis. Here we directly show that Runx2 expression promotes a tumor cell phenotype of mammary acini in three-dimensional culture. Human mammary epithelial cells (MCF-10A) form polarized, growth-arrested, acini-like structures with glandular architecture. The ectopic expression of Runx2 disrupts acini formation, and electron microscopic ultrastructural analysis revealed the absence of lumens. Characterization of the disrupted acini structures showed increased cell proliferation (Ki-67 positive cells), decreased apoptosis (Bcl-2 induction), and loss of basement membrane formation (absence of beta(4) integrin expression). In complementary experiments, inhibition of Runx2 function in metastatic MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells by stable expression of either short hairpin RNA-Runx2 or a mutant Runx2 deficient in subnuclear targeting resulted in reversion of acini to more normal structures and reduced tumor growth in vivo. These novel findings provide direct mechanistic evidence for the biological activity of Runx2, dependent on its subnuclear localization, in promoting early events of breast cancer progression and suggest a molecular therapeutic target.

  6. Functional Characteristics of Tumor-Associated Protein Spot14 and Interacting Proteins in Mouse Mammary Epithelial and Breast Cancer Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    Interacting Proteins in Mouse Mammary Epithelial and Breast Cancer Cell Lines PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Michael C. Rudolph, B.A...Spot14 and Interacting Proteins in Mouse Mammary Epithelial and 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-08-1-0596 Breast Cancer Cell Lines 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...S14 and to identify potential S14 interacting proteins that confer its function. Body The overarching goals of this proposal are to examine the

  7. Distinct stem cells contribute to mammary gland development and maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Keymeulen, Alexandra; Rocha, Ana Sofia; Ousset, Marielle; Beck, Benjamin; Bouvencourt, Gaëlle; Rock, Jason; Sharma, Neha; Dekoninck, Sophie; Blanpain, Cédric

    2011-10-09

    The mammary epithelium is composed of several cell lineages including luminal, alveolar and myoepithelial cells. Transplantation studies have suggested that the mammary epithelium is maintained by the presence of multipotent mammary stem cells. To define the cellular hierarchy of the mammary gland during physiological conditions, we performed genetic lineage-tracing experiments and clonal analysis of the mouse mammary gland during development, adulthood and pregnancy. We found that in postnatal unperturbed mammary gland, both luminal and myoepithelial lineages contain long-lived unipotent stem cells that display extensive renewing capacities, as demonstrated by their ability to clonally expand during morphogenesis and adult life as well as undergo massive expansion during several cycles of pregnancy. The demonstration that the mammary gland contains different types of long-lived stem cells has profound implications for our understanding of mammary gland physiology and will be instrumental in unravelling the cells at the origin of breast cancers.

  8. Isoform-specific function of calpains in cell adhesion disruption: studies in postlactational mammary gland and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Fernández, Lucía; Ferrer-Vicens, Iván; García, Concha; Oltra, Sara S; Zaragozá, Rosa; Viña, Juan R; García-Trevijano, Elena R

    2016-09-15

    Cleavage of adhesion proteins is the first step for physiological clearance of undesired cells during postlactational regression of the mammary gland, but also for cell migration in pathological states such as breast cancer. The intracellular Ca(2+)-dependent proteases, calpains (CAPNs), are known to cleave adhesion proteins. The isoform-specific function of CAPN1 and CAPN2 was explored and compared in two models of cell adhesion disruption: mice mammary gland during weaning-induced involution and breast cancer cell lines according to tumor subtype classification. In both models, E-cadherin, β-catenin, p-120, and talin-1 were cleaved as assessed by western blot analysis. Both CAPNs were able to cleave adhesion proteins from lactating mammary gland in vitro Nevertheless, CAPN2 was the only isoform found to co-localize with E-cadherin in cell junctions at the peak of lactation. CAPN2/E-cadherin in vivo interaction, analyzed by proximity ligation assay, was dramatically increased during involution. Calpain inhibitor administration prevented the cytosolic accumulation of truncated E-cadherin cleaved by CAPN2. Conversely, in breast cancer cells, CAPN2 was restricted to the nuclear compartment. The isoform-specific expression of CAPNs and CAPN activity was dependent on the breast cancer subtype. However, CAPN1 and CAPN2 knockdown cells showed that cleavage of adhesion proteins and cell migration was mediated by CAPN1, independently of the breast cancer cell line used. Data presented here suggest that the subcellular distribution of CAPN1 and CAPN2 is a major issue in target-substrate recognition; therefore, it determines the isoform-specific role of CAPNs during disruption of cell adhesion in either a physiological or a pathological context.

  9. The 18-kDa translocator protein (TSPO disrupts mammary epithelial morphogenesis and promotes breast cancer cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoting Wu

    Full Text Available Mitochondria play important roles in cancer progression and have emerged as viable targets for cancer therapy. Increasing levels of the outer mitochondrial membrane protein, 18-kDa translocator protein (TSPO, are associated with advancing breast cancer stage. In particular, higher TSPO levels are found in estrogen receptor (ER-negative breast tumors, compared with ER-positive tumors. In this study, we sought to define the roles of TSPO in the acquisition of breast cancer malignancy. Using a three-dimensional Matrigel culture system, we determined the impact of elevated TSPO levels on mammary epithelial morphogenesis. Our studies demonstrate that stable overexpression of TSPO in mammary epithelial MCF10A acini drives proliferation and provides partial resistance to luminal apoptosis, resulting in enlarged acinar structures with partially filled lumen that resemble early stage breast lesions leading to breast cancer. In breast cancer cell lines, TSPO silencing or TSPO overexpression significantly altered the migratory activity. In addition, we found that combination treatment with the TSPO ligands (PK 11195 or Ro5-4864 and lonidamine, a clinical phase II drug targeting mitochondria, decreased viability of ER-negative breast cancer cell lines. Taken together, these data demonstrate that increases in TSPO levels at different stages of breast cancer progression results in the acquisition of distinct properties associated with malignancy. Furthermore, targeting TSPO, particularly in combination with other mitochondria-targeting agents, may prove useful for the treatment of ER-negative breast cancer.

  10. The 18-kDa translocator protein (TSPO) disrupts mammary epithelial morphogenesis and promotes breast cancer cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaoting; Gallo, Kathleen A

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria play important roles in cancer progression and have emerged as viable targets for cancer therapy. Increasing levels of the outer mitochondrial membrane protein, 18-kDa translocator protein (TSPO), are associated with advancing breast cancer stage. In particular, higher TSPO levels are found in estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast tumors, compared with ER-positive tumors. In this study, we sought to define the roles of TSPO in the acquisition of breast cancer malignancy. Using a three-dimensional Matrigel culture system, we determined the impact of elevated TSPO levels on mammary epithelial morphogenesis. Our studies demonstrate that stable overexpression of TSPO in mammary epithelial MCF10A acini drives proliferation and provides partial resistance to luminal apoptosis, resulting in enlarged acinar structures with partially filled lumen that resemble early stage breast lesions leading to breast cancer. In breast cancer cell lines, TSPO silencing or TSPO overexpression significantly altered the migratory activity. In addition, we found that combination treatment with the TSPO ligands (PK 11195 or Ro5-4864) and lonidamine, a clinical phase II drug targeting mitochondria, decreased viability of ER-negative breast cancer cell lines. Taken together, these data demonstrate that increases in TSPO levels at different stages of breast cancer progression results in the acquisition of distinct properties associated with malignancy. Furthermore, targeting TSPO, particularly in combination with other mitochondria-targeting agents, may prove useful for the treatment of ER-negative breast cancer.

  11. Generation of breast cancer stem cells by steroid hormones in irradiated human mammary cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Vares

    Full Text Available Exposure to ionizing radiation was shown to result in an increased risk of breast cancer. There is strong evidence that steroid hormones influence radiosensitivity and breast cancer risk. Tumors may be initiated by a small subpopulation of cancer stem cells (CSCs. In order to assess whether the modulation of radiation-induced breast cancer risk by steroid hormones could involve CSCs, we measured by flow cytometry the proportion of CSCs in irradiated breast cancer cell lines after progesterone and estrogen treatment. Progesterone stimulated the expansion of the CSC compartment both in progesterone receptor (PR-positive breast cancer cells and in PR-negative normal cells. In MCF10A normal epithelial PR-negative cells, progesterone-treatment and irradiation triggered cancer and stemness-associated microRNA regulations (such as the downregulation of miR-22 and miR-29c expression, which resulted in increased proportions of radiation-resistant tumor-initiating CSCs.

  12. The potential role of COX-2 in cancer stem cell-mediated canine mammary tumor initiation: an immunohistochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jian; Zhang, Di; Xie, Fuqiang; Lin, Degui

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that cancer stem cells (CSCs) are responsible for tumor initiation and maintenance. Additionally, it is becoming apparent that cyclooxygenase (COX) signaling is associated with canine mammary tumor development. The goals of the present study were to investigate COX-2 expression patterns and their effect on CSC-mediated tumor initiation in primary canine mammary tissues and tumorsphere models using immunohistochemistry. Patterns of COX-2, CD44, octamer-binding transcription factor (Oct)-3/4, and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression were examined in malignant mammary tumor (MMT) samples and analyzed in terms of clinicopathological characteristics. COX-2 and Oct-3/4 expression was higher in MMTs compared to other histological samples with heterogeneous patterns. In MMTs, COX-2 expression correlated with tumor malignancy features. Significant associations between COX-2, CD44, and EGFR were observed in low-differentiated MMTs. Comparative analysis showed that the levels of COX-2, CD44, and Oct-3/4 expression varied significantly among TSs of three histological grades. Enhanced COX-2 staining was consistently observed in TSs. Similar levels of staining intensity were found for CD44 and Oct-3/4, but EGFR expression was weak. Our findings indicate the potential role of COX-2 in CSC-mediated tumor initiation, and suggest that COX-2 inhibition may help treat canine mammary tumors by targeting CSCs.

  13. Genetic Susceptibility to Estrogen-Induced Mammary Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-11-01

    mammary glands were reflected in mammary histology. (A and E) Thin sections from Fig. 3. E2 induced pituitary growth and hyperprolactinemia similarly in...with E2 5 (33%) exhibited a normal DNA profile where the great for 12 wk induced pituitary growth and hyperprolactinemia in majority of cells displayed...etal. , " terone, or PRL. Hyperprolactinemia has been shown to be sufficient to induce mammary cancer in certain strains of mouse 1 , (29-31) and rat

  14. KISS1R induces invasiveness of estrogen receptor-negative human mammary epithelial and breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetkovic, Donna; Dragan, Magdalena; Leith, Sean J; Mir, Zuhaib M; Leong, Hon S; Pampillo, Macarena; Lewis, John D; Babwah, Andy V; Bhattacharya, Moshmi

    2013-06-01

    Kisspeptins (KPs), peptide products of the KISS1 metastasis-suppressor gene, are endogenous ligands for a G protein-coupled receptor (KISS1R). KISS1 acts as a metastasis suppressor in numerous human cancers. However, recent studies have demonstrated that an increase in KISS1 and KISS1R expression in patient breast tumors correlates with higher tumor grade and metastatic potential. We have shown that KP-10 stimulates invasion of estrogen receptor α (ERα)-negative MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells via transactivation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Here, we report that either KP-10 treatment of ERα-negative nonmalignant mammary epithelial MCF10A cells or expression of KISS1R in MCF10A cells induced a mesenchymal phenotype and stimulated invasiveness. Similarly, exogenous expression of KISS1R in ERα-negative SKBR3 breast cancer cells was sufficient to trigger invasion and induced extravasation in vivo. In contrast, KP-10 failed to transactivate EGFR or stimulate invasiveness in the ERα-positive MCF7 and T47D breast cancer cells. This suggested that ERα negatively regulates KISS1R-dependent breast cancer cell migration, invasion, and EGFR transactivation. In support of this, we found that these KP-10-induced effects were ablated upon exogenous expression of ERα in the MDA-MB-231 cells, by down-regulating KISS1R expression. Lastly, we have identified IQGAP1, an actin cytoskeletal binding protein as a novel binding partner of KISS1R, and have shown that KISS1R regulates EGFR transactivation in breast cancer cells in an IQGAP1-dependent manner. Overall, our data strongly suggest that the ERα status of mammary cells dictates whether KISS1R may be a novel clinical target for treating breast cancer metastasis.

  15. The Proliferative Activity of Mammary Epithelial Cells in Normal Tissue Predicts Breast Cancer Risk in Premenopausal Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Sung Jin; Oh, Hannah; Peterson, Michael A; Almendro, Vanessa; Hu, Rong; Bowden, Michaela; Lis, Rosina L; Cotter, Maura B; Loda, Massimo; Barry, William T; Polyak, Kornelia; Tamimi, Rulla M

    2016-04-01

    The frequency and proliferative activity of tissue-specific stem and progenitor cells are suggested to correlate with cancer risk. In this study, we investigated the association between breast cancer risk and the frequency of mammary epithelial cells expressing p27, estrogen receptor (ER), and Ki67 in normal breast tissue. We performed a nested case-control study of 302 women (69 breast cancer cases, 233 controls) who had been initially diagnosed with benign breast disease according to the Nurses' Health Studies. Immunofluorescence for p27, ER, and Ki67 was performed on tissue microarrays constructed from benign biopsies containing normal mammary epithelium and scored by computational image analysis. We found that the frequency of Ki67(+) cells was positively associated with breast cancer risk among premenopausal women [OR = 10.1, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.12-48.0]. Conversely, the frequency of ER(+) or p27(+) cells was inversely, but not significantly, associated with subsequent breast cancer risk (ER(+): OR = 0.70, 95% CI, 0.33-1.50; p27(+): OR = 0.89, 95% CI, 0.45-1.75). Notably, high Ki67(+)/low p27(+) and high Ki67(+)/low ER(+) cell frequencies were significantly associated with a 5-fold higher risk of breast cancer compared with low Ki67(+)/low p27(+) and low Ki67(+)/low ER(+) cell frequencies, respectively, among premenopausal women (Ki67(hi)/p27(lo): OR = 5.08, 95% CI, 1.43-18.1; Ki67(hi)/ER(lo): OR = 4.68, 95% CI, 1.63-13.5). Taken together, our data suggest that the fraction of actively cycling cells in normal breast tissue may represent a marker for breast cancer risk assessment, which may therefore impact the frequency of screening procedures in at-risk women. Cancer Res; 76(7); 1926-34. ©2016 AACR.

  16. The Balance of Cell Surface and Soluble Type III TGF-β Receptor Regulates BMP Signaling in Normal and Cancerous Mammary Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine E. Gatza

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs are members of the TGF-β superfamily that are over-expressed in breast cancer, with context dependent effects on breast cancer pathogenesis. The type III TGF-β receptor (TβRIII mediates BMP signaling. While TβRIII expression is lost during breast cancer progression, the role of TβRIII in regulating BMP signaling in normal mammary epithelium and breast cancer cells has not been examined. Restoring TβRIII expression in a 4T1 murine syngeneic model of breast cancer suppressed Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation and inhibited the expression of the BMP transcriptional targets, Id1 and Smad6, in vivo. Similarly, restoring TβRIII expression in human breast cancer cell lines or treatment with sTβRIII inhibited BMP-induced Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation and BMP-stimulated migration and invasion. In normal mammary epithelial cells, shRNA-mediated silencing of TβRIII, TβRIII over-expression, or treatment with sTβRIII inhibited BMP-mediated phosphorylation of Smad1/5/8 and BMP induced migration. Inhibition of TβRIII shedding through treatment with TAPI-2 or expression of a non-shedding TβRIII mutant rescued TβRIII mediated inhibition of BMP induced Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation and BMP induced migration and/or invasion in both in normal mammary epithelial cells and breast cancer cells. Conversely, expression of a TβRIII mutant, which exhibited increased shedding, significantly reduced BMP-mediated Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation, migration, and invasion. These data demonstrate that TβRIII regulates BMP-mediated signaling and biological effects, primarily through the ligand sequestration effects of sTβRIII in normal and cancerous mammary epithelial cells and suggest that the ratio of membrane bound versus sTβRIII plays an important role in mediating these effects.

  17. Hippo pathway in mammary gland development and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Peiguo; Feng, Jing; Chen, Ceshi

    2015-01-01

    Accumulated evidence suggests that the Hippo signaling pathway plays crucial roles in mammary gland development and breast cancer. Key components of the Hippo pathway regulate breast epithelial cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and stemness. Additionally, the Hippo pathway regulates breast tumor growth, metastasis, and drug resistance. It is expected that the Hippo pathway will provide novel therapeutic targets for breast cancer. This review will discuss and summarize the roles of several core components of the Hippo pathway in mammary gland development and breast cancer.

  18. Ink4a/Arf(-/-) and HRAS(G12V) transform mouse mammary cells into triple-negative breast cancer containing tumorigenic CD49f(-) quiescent cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kai, K; Iwamoto, T; Kobayashi, T; Arima, Y; Takamoto, Y; Ohnishi, N; Bartholomeusz, C; Horii, R; Akiyama, F; Hortobagyi, G N; Pusztai, L; Saya, H; Ueno, N T

    2014-01-23

    Intratumoral heterogeneity within individual breast tumors is a well-known phenomenon that may contribute to drug resistance. This heterogeneity is dependent on several factors, such as types of oncogenic drivers and tumor precursor cells. The purpose of our study was to engineer a mouse mammary tumor model with intratumoral heterogeneity by using defined genetic perturbations. To achieve this, we used mice with knockout (-/-) of Ink4a/Arf, a tumor suppressor locus; these mice are known to be susceptible to non-mammary tumors such as fibrosarcoma. To induce mammary tumors, we retrovirally introduced an oncogene, HRAS(G12V), into Ink4a/Arf(-/-) mammary cells in vitro, and those cells were inoculated into syngeneic mice mammary fat pads. We observed 100% tumorigenesis. The tumors formed were negative for estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and HER2. Further, they had pathological features similar to those of human triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) (for example, pushing borders, central necrosis). The tumors were found to be heterogeneous and included two subpopulations: CD49f(-) quiescent cells and CD49f(+)cells. Contrary to our expectation, CD49f(-) quiescent cells had high tumor-initiating potential and CD49f(+)cells had relatively low tumor-initiating potential. Gene expression analysis revealed that CD49f(-) quiescent cells overexpressed epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition-driving genes, reminiscent of tumor-initiating cells and claudin-low breast cancer. Our animal model with intratumoral heterogeneity, derived from defined genetic perturbations, allows us to test novel molecular targeted drugs in a setting that mimics the intratumoral heterogeneity of human TNBC.

  19. Bipotent mammary stem cells: now in amazing 3D

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Amerongen, R.

    2014-01-01

    For many decades, developmental biologists and cancer researchers alike have been trying to understand the relationship between the basal and luminal cell compartments in the mouse mammary epithelium. Delineating the mammary stem and progenitor cell hierarchy will provide fundamental knowledge of ho

  20. The role of maintenance proteins in the preservation of epithelial cell identity during mammary gland remodeling and breast cancer initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coradini, Danila; Oriana, Saro

    2014-02-01

    During normal postnatal mammary gland development and adult remodeling related to the menstrual cycle, pregnancy, and lactation, ovarian hormones and peptide growth factors contribute to the delineation of a definite epithelial cell identity. This identity is maintained during cell replication in a heritable but DNA-independent manner. The preservation of cell identity is fundamental, especially when cells must undergo changes in response to intrinsic and extrinsic signals. The maintenance proteins, which are required for cell identity preservation, act epigenetically by regulating gene expression through DNA methylation, histone modification, and chromatin remodeling. Among the maintenance proteins, the Trithorax (TrxG) and Polycomb (PcG) group proteins are the best characterized. In this review, we summarize the structures and activities of the TrxG and PcG complexes and describe their pivotal roles in nuclear estrogen receptor activity. In addition, we provide evidence that perturbations in these epigenetic regulators are involved in disrupting epithelial cell identity, mammary gland remodeling, and breast cancer initiation.

  1. Research on the Changes of Endocrine Hormones in Mammary Cancer and Hyperplasia of Mammary Glands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Chengqi

    2002-01-01

    Objective Based on a comparison of endocrine hormones between patients of mammary cancer and those of hyperplasia of mammary glands, a preliminary analysis of the interaction between endocrine hormones and the immune system was oonducted. Methods The experiment involved 50 cases of mammary cancer and hyperplasia of mammary glands each.Blood samples were taken from pre - menopausal and menopausal patients; six kinds of hypophyseal hommones(PRL, GH, TSH,ACTH, FSH and LH) and three kinds of sex hormones ( E2,P and T) were subjected to RIA tests.Results Wilcoxon matchpaired assay and normal approximation of the experiment indicated that the FSH level before pre - menopause and the ACTH level during menopause in patients with mammary canoer were higher that those of patients suffering hyperplasia of mamary glands. Conclusion Statistics show the the normal rhythm between endocrine hormones and the immune system is disrupted in mammary cancer patients, the feedback mechanism of the hypothalamo- hypophyseal- adrenal system is maladjusted,resulting in inhibition of the immune function. Female hormones induce the gene mutation and the sensitivity of the cells is increased, resulting in a significant acceleration of the hyperplasia of cancer cells.

  2. Global gene expression profiles of canine macrophages and canine mammary cancer cells grown as a co-culture in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Król Magdalena

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Solid tumours comprise various cells, including cancer cells, resident stromal cells, migratory haemopoietic cells and other. These cells regulate tumour growth and metastasis. Macrophages constitute probably the most important element of all interactions within the tumour microenvironment. However, the molecular mechanism, that guides tumour environment, still remains unknown. Exploring the underlying molecular mechanisms that orchestrate these phenomena has been the aim of our study. A co-culture of canine mammary cancer cells and macrophages was established and maintained for 72 hrs. Having sorted the cells, gene expression in cancer cells and macrophages, using DNA microarrays, was examined. The results were confirmed using real-time qPCR and confocal microscopy. Moreover, their ability for migration and invasion has been assessed. Results Microarray analysis showed that the up-regulated genes in the cancer cell lines are involved in 15 highly over-manifested pathways. The pathways that drew our diligent attention included: the inflammation pathway mediated by chemokine and cytokine, the Toll receptor signalling pathway and the B cell activation. The up-regulated genes in the macrophages were involved in only 18 significantly over-manifested pathways: the angiogenesis, the p53 pathway feedback loops2 and the Wnt signalling pathway. The microarray analysis revealed that co-culturing of cancer cells with macrophages initiated the myeloid-specific antigen expression in cancer cells, as well as cytokine/chemokine genes expression. This finding was confirmed at mRNA and protein level. Moreover, we showed that macrophages increase cancer migration and invasion. Conclusions The presence of macrophages in the cancer environment induces acquisition of the macrophage phenotype (specific antigens and chemokines/cytokines expression in cancer cells. We presumed that cancer cells also acquire other myeloid features, such as

  3. Decreased autocrine EGFR signaling in metastatic breast cancer cells inhibits tumor growth in bone and mammary fat pad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, Nicole K; Mohammad, Khalid S; Gilmore, Jennifer L; Crismore, Erin; Bruzzaniti, Angela; Guise, Theresa A; Foley, John

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer metastasis to bone triggers a vicious cycle of tumor growth linked to osteolysis. Breast cancer cells and osteoblasts express the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and produce ErbB family ligands, suggesting participation of these growth factors in autocrine and paracrine signaling within the bone microenvironment. EGFR ligand expression was profiled in the bone metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells (MDA-231), and agonist-induced signaling was examined in both breast cancer and osteoblast-like cells. Both paracrine and autocrine EGFR signaling were inhibited with a neutralizing amphiregulin antibody, PAR34, whereas shRNA to the EGFR was used to specifically block autocrine signaling in MDA-231 cells. The impact of these was evaluated with proliferation, migration and gene expression assays. Breast cancer metastasis to bone was modeled in female athymic nude mice with intratibial inoculation of MDA-231 cells, and cancer cell-bone marrow co-cultures. EGFR knockdown, but not PAR34 treatment, decreased osteoclasts formed in vitro (p<0.01), reduced osteolytic lesion tumor volume (p<0.01), increased survivorship in vivo (p<0.001), and resulted in decreased MDA-231 growth in the fat pad (p<0.01). Fat pad shEGFR-MDA-231 tumors produced in nude mice had increased necrotic areas and decreased CD31-positive vasculature. shEGFR-MDA-231 cells also produced decreased levels of the proangiogenic molecules macrophage colony stimulating factor-1 (MCSF-1) and matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9), both of which were decreased by EGFR inhibitors in a panel of EGFR-positive breast cancer cells. Thus, inhibiting autocrine EGFR signaling in breast cancer cells may provide a means for reducing paracrine factor production that facilitates microenvironment support in the bone and mammary gland.

  4. Decreased autocrine EGFR signaling in metastatic breast cancer cells inhibits tumor growth in bone and mammary fat pad.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole K Nickerson

    Full Text Available Breast cancer metastasis to bone triggers a vicious cycle of tumor growth linked to osteolysis. Breast cancer cells and osteoblasts express the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR and produce ErbB family ligands, suggesting participation of these growth factors in autocrine and paracrine signaling within the bone microenvironment. EGFR ligand expression was profiled in the bone metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells (MDA-231, and agonist-induced signaling was examined in both breast cancer and osteoblast-like cells. Both paracrine and autocrine EGFR signaling were inhibited with a neutralizing amphiregulin antibody, PAR34, whereas shRNA to the EGFR was used to specifically block autocrine signaling in MDA-231 cells. The impact of these was evaluated with proliferation, migration and gene expression assays. Breast cancer metastasis to bone was modeled in female athymic nude mice with intratibial inoculation of MDA-231 cells, and cancer cell-bone marrow co-cultures. EGFR knockdown, but not PAR34 treatment, decreased osteoclasts formed in vitro (p<0.01, reduced osteolytic lesion tumor volume (p<0.01, increased survivorship in vivo (p<0.001, and resulted in decreased MDA-231 growth in the fat pad (p<0.01. Fat pad shEGFR-MDA-231 tumors produced in nude mice had increased necrotic areas and decreased CD31-positive vasculature. shEGFR-MDA-231 cells also produced decreased levels of the proangiogenic molecules macrophage colony stimulating factor-1 (MCSF-1 and matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9, both of which were decreased by EGFR inhibitors in a panel of EGFR-positive breast cancer cells. Thus, inhibiting autocrine EGFR signaling in breast cancer cells may provide a means for reducing paracrine factor production that facilitates microenvironment support in the bone and mammary gland.

  5. Sclerotium rolfsii lectin induces stronger inhibition of proliferation in human breast cancer cells than normal human mammary epithelial cells by induction of cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savanur, Mohammed Azharuddin; Eligar, Sachin M; Pujari, Radha; Chen, Chen; Mahajan, Pravin; Borges, Anita; Shastry, Padma; Ingle, Arvind; Kalraiya, Rajiv D; Swamy, Bale M; Rhodes, Jonathan M; Yu, Lu-Gang; Inamdar, Shashikala R

    2014-01-01

    Sclerotium rolfsii lectin (SRL) isolated from the phytopathogenic fungus Sclerotium rolfsii has exquisite binding specificity towards O-linked, Thomsen-Freidenreich (Galβ1-3GalNAcα1-Ser/Thr, TF) associated glycans. This study investigated the influence of SRL on proliferation of human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 and ZR-75), non-tumorigenic breast epithelial cells (MCF-10A) and normal mammary epithelial cells (HMECs). SRL caused marked, dose-dependent, inhibition of proliferation of MCF-7 and ZR-75 cells but only weak inhibition of proliferation of non-tumorigenic MCF-10A and HMEC cells. The inhibitory effect of SRL on cancer cell proliferation was shown to be a consequence of SRL cell surface binding and subsequent induction of cellular apoptosis, an effect that was largely prevented by the presence of inhibitors against caspases -3, -8, or -9. Lectin histochemistry using biotin-labelled SRL showed little binding of SRL to normal human breast tissue but intense binding to cancerous tissues. In conclusion, SRL inhibits the growth of human breast cancer cells via induction of cell apoptosis but has substantially less effect on normal epithelial cells. As a lectin that binds specifically to a cancer-associated glycan, has potential to be developed as an anti-cancer agent.

  6. Sclerotium rolfsii Lectin Induces Stronger Inhibition of Proliferation in Human Breast Cancer Cells than Normal Human Mammary Epithelial Cells by Induction of Cell Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savanur, Mohammed Azharuddin; Eligar, Sachin M.; Pujari, Radha; Chen, Chen; Mahajan, Pravin; Borges, Anita; Shastry, Padma; Ingle, Arvind.; Kalraiya, Rajiv D.; Swamy, Bale M.; Rhodes, Jonathan M.; Yu, Lu-Gang; Inamdar, Shashikala R.

    2014-01-01

    Sclerotium rolfsii lectin (SRL) isolated from the phytopathogenic fungus Sclerotium rolfsii has exquisite binding specificity towards O-linked, Thomsen-Freidenreich (Galβ1-3GalNAcα1-Ser/Thr, TF) associated glycans. This study investigated the influence of SRL on proliferation of human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 and ZR-75), non-tumorigenic breast epithelial cells (MCF-10A) and normal mammary epithelial cells (HMECs). SRL caused marked, dose-dependent, inhibition of proliferation of MCF-7 and ZR-75 cells but only weak inhibition of proliferation of non-tumorigenic MCF-10A and HMEC cells. The inhibitory effect of SRL on cancer cell proliferation was shown to be a consequence of SRL cell surface binding and subsequent induction of cellular apoptosis, an effect that was largely prevented by the presence of inhibitors against caspases -3, -8, or -9. Lectin histochemistry using biotin-labelled SRL showed little binding of SRL to normal human breast tissue but intense binding to cancerous tissues. In conclusion, SRL inhibits the growth of human breast cancer cells via induction of cell apoptosis but has substantially less effect on normal epithelial cells. As a lectin that binds specifically to a cancer-associated glycan, has potential to be developed as an anti-cancer agent. PMID:25364905

  7. Molecular profiling of human mammary gland links breast cancer risk to a p27(+) cell population with progenitor characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Sibgat; Almendro, Vanessa; Merino, Vanessa F; Wu, Zhenhua; Maruyama, Reo; Su, Ying; Martins, Filipe C; Fackler, Mary Jo; Bessarabova, Marina; Kowalczyk, Adam; Conway, Thomas; Beresford-Smith, Bryan; Macintyre, Geoff; Cheng, Yu-Kang; Lopez-Bujanda, Zoila; Kaspi, Antony; Hu, Rong; Robens, Judith; Nikolskaya, Tatiana; Haakensen, Vilde D; Schnitt, Stuart J; Argani, Pedram; Ethington, Gabrielle; Panos, Laura; Grant, Michael; Clark, Jason; Herlihy, William; Lin, S Joyce; Chew, Grace; Thompson, Erik W; Greene-Colozzi, April; Richardson, Andrea L; Rosson, Gedge D; Pike, Malcolm; Garber, Judy E; Nikolsky, Yuri; Blum, Joanne L; Au, Alfred; Hwang, E Shelley; Tamimi, Rulla M; Michor, Franziska; Haviv, Izhak; Liu, X Shirley; Sukumar, Saraswati; Polyak, Kornelia

    2013-07-03

    Early full-term pregnancy is one of the most effective natural protections against breast cancer. To investigate this effect, we have characterized the global gene expression and epigenetic profiles of multiple cell types from normal breast tissue of nulliparous and parous women and carriers of BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. We found significant differences in CD44(+) progenitor cells, where the levels of many stem cell-related genes and pathways, including the cell-cycle regulator p27, are lower in parous women without BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations. We also noted a significant reduction in the frequency of CD44(+)p27(+) cells in parous women and showed, using explant cultures, that parity-related signaling pathways play a role in regulating the number of p27(+) cells and their proliferation. Our results suggest that pathways controlling p27(+) mammary epithelial cells and the numbers of these cells relate to breast cancer risk and can be explored for cancer risk assessment and prevention.

  8. Mammary gland stem cells: More puzzles than explanations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Suneesh Kaimala; Suneesh Kaimala; Satish Kumar

    2012-06-01

    Mammary gland stem cells (MaSC) have not been identified in spite of extensive research spanning over several decades. This has been primarily due to the complexity of mammary gland structure and its development, cell heterogeneity in the mammary gland and the insufficient knowledge about MaSC markers. At present, Lin–CD29hiCD49fhiCD24+/modSca-1– cells of the mammary gland have been reported to be enriched with MaSCs. We suggest that the inclusion of stem cell markers like Oct4, Sox2, Nanog and the mammary gland differentiation marker BRCA-1 may further narrow down the search for MaSCs. In addition, we have discussed some of the other unresolved puzzles on the mammary gland stem cells, such as their similarities and/or differences with mammary cancer stem cells, use of milk as source of mammary stem cells and the possibility of in vitro differentiation of embryonic stem (ES) cells into functional mammary gland structures in this review. Nevertheless, it is the lack of identity for a MaSC that is curtailing the advances in some of the above and other related areas.

  9. A mammary repopulating cell population characterized in mammary anlagen reveals essential mammary stroma for morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jiazhe; Xue, Kai; She, Ji; Ding, Fangrong; Li, Song; Shangguan, Rulan; Dai, Yunping; Du, Liying; Li, Ning

    2014-09-10

    The cells with mammary repopulating capability can achieve mammary gland morphogenesis in a suitable cellular microenvironment. Using cell surface markers of CD24, CD29 and CD49f, mouse mammary repopulating unit (MRU) has been identified in adult mammary epithelium and late embryonic mammary bud epithelium. However, embryonic MRU remains to be fully characterized at earlier mammary anlagen stage. Here we isolated discrete populations of E14.5 mouse mammary anlagen cells. Only Lin(-)CD24(med)CD29(+) cell population was predicted as E14.5 MRU by examining their capacities of forming mammosphere and repopulating cleared mammary fat pad in vivo. However, when we characterized gene expressions of this E14.5 cell population by comparing with adult mouse MRU (Lin(-)CD24(+)CD29(hi)), the gene profiling of these two cell populations exhibited great differences. Real-time PCR and immunostaining assays uncovered that E14.5 Lin(-)CD24(med)CD29(+) cell population was a heterogeneous stroma-enriched cell population. Then, limiting dilutions and single-cell assays also confirmed that E14.5 Lin(-)CD24(med)CD29(+) cell population possessed low proportion of stem cells. In summary, heterogeneous Lin(-)CD24(med)CD29(+) cell population exhibited mammary repopulating ability in E14.5 mammary anlagen, implying that only suitable mammary stroma could enable mammary gland morphogenesis, which relied on the interaction between rare stem cells and microenvironment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. ΔNp63 promotes stem cell activity in mammary gland development and basal-like breast cancer by enhancing Fzd7 expression and Wnt signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Rumela; Wei, Yong; Hwang, Julie; Hang, Xiang; Andres Blanco, Mario; Choudhury, Abrar; Tiede, Benjamin; Romano, Rose-Anne; DeCoste, Christina; Mercatali, Laura; Ibrahim, Toni; Amadori, Dino; Kannan, Nagarajan; Eaves, Connie J; Sinha, Satrajit; Kang, Yibin

    2014-10-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that cancer is populated and maintained by tumour-initiating cells (TICs) with stem-like properties similar to those of adult tissue stem cells. Despite recent advances, the molecular regulatory mechanisms that may be shared between normal and malignant stem cells remain poorly understood. Here we show that the ΔNp63 isoform of the Trp63 transcription factor promotes normal mammary stem cell (MaSC) activity by increasing the expression of the Wnt receptor Fzd7, thereby enhancing Wnt signalling. Importantly, Fzd7-dependent enhancement of Wnt signalling by ΔNp63 also governs tumour-initiating activity of the basal subtype of breast cancer. These findings establish ΔNp63 as a key regulator of stem cells in both normal and malignant mammary tissues and provide direct evidence that breast cancer TICs and normal MaSCs share common regulatory mechanisms.

  11. Mammary Cancer and Activation of Transposable Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    transcriptionally activated during pregnancy and lactation , and the mice are predisposed to develop mammary cancer after a minimum of 3 pregnancies and...pregnancy and lactation . After 3 pregnancies and lactations , but not after 1 pregnancy and lactation , females develop mammary cancers at an average...mated females per experimental condition (1 or 3 pregnancies/ lactations . 5 breeding strategy to develop triple transgenic cancer -prone and control

  12. Slugging their way to immortality: driving mammary epithelial cells into a stem cell-like state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soady, Kelly; Smalley, Matthew J

    2012-09-10

    Delineating the molecular factors that define and maintain the mammary stem cell state is vital for understanding normal development and tumourigenesis. A recent study by Guo and colleagues identifies two master transcriptional regulators of mammary stem cells, Slug and Sox9, ectopic expression of which confers stem cell attributes on differentiated mammary epithelial cells. Slug and Sox9 expression was also shown to determine in vivo metastatic potential of human breast cancer cell lines. Understanding these factors in the context of normal lineage differentiation is an important step toward elucidating the mammary epithelial cell hierarchy and the origins of cancer stem cells.

  13. Notch in mammary gland development and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Politi, Katerina; Feirt, Nikki; Kitajewski, Jan

    2004-10-01

    Notch signaling has been implicated in many processes including cell fate determination and oncogenesis. In mice, the Notch1 and Notch4 genes are both targets for insertion and rearrangement by the mouse mammary tumor virus and these mutations promote epithelial mammary tumorigenesis. Moreover, expression of a constitutively active form of Notch4 in mammary epithelial cells inhibits epithelial differentiation and leads to tumor formation in this organ. These data implicate the Notch pathway in breast tumorigenesis and provide the foundation for future experiments that will aid in our understanding of the role of Notch in human breast cancer development. Here, we review studies of mammary tumorigenesis induced by Notch in mouse and in vitro culture models providing evidence that Notch activation is a causal factor in human breast cancer.

  14. CA 15–3 cell lines and tissue expression in canine mammary cancer and the correlation between serum levels and tumour histological grade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuali Elisabetta

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammary tumours are the most common malignancy diagnosed in female dogs and a significant cause of mortality and morbidity in this species. Carbohydrate antigen (CA 15–3 is a mucinous glycoprotein aberrantly over-expressed in human mammary neoplasms and one of the most widely used serum tumour markers in women with breast cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the antigenic analogies of human and canine CA 15–3 and to assess its expression in canine mammary cancer tissues and cell lines. Immunohistochemical expression of CA 15–3 was evaluated in 7 canine mammary cancer cell lines and 50 malignant mammary tumours. As a positive control, the human breast carcinoma cell line MCF7 and tissue were used. To assess CA 15–3 staining, a semi-quantitative method was applied. To confirm the specificity and cross-reactivity of an anti-human CA 15–3 antibody to canine tissues, an immunoblot analysis was performed. We also investigated serum CA 15–3 activity to establish whether its expression could be assigned to several tumour characteristics to evaluate its potential use as a serum tumour marker in the canine mammary oncology field. Results Immunocytochemical analysis revealed CA 15–3 expression in all examined canine mammary cancer cell lines, whereas its expression was confirmed by immunoblot only in the most invasive cells (CMT-W1, CMT-W1M, CMT-W2 and CMT-W2M. In the tissue, an immunohistochemical staining pattern was observed in 34 (68% of the malignant tumours. A high statistical correlation (p = 0.0019 between serum CA 15–3 levels and the degree of tumour proliferation and differentiation was shown, which indicates that the values of this serum marker increase as the tumour stage progresses. Conclusions The results of this study reveal that CA 15–3 is expressed in both canine mammary tumour cell lines and tissues and that serum levels significantly correlate with the histological grade of the

  15. A review of mammary ductoscopy in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Daigo; Tanaka, Kanji

    2004-01-01

    Breast carcinoma and hyperplasia are thought to start in the lining of the breast duct. Mammary ductoscopy is an emerging technique allowing direct visual access of the ductal system of the breast through the nipple. This article reviews and discusses the utility of mammary ductoscopy. Abnormalities can be identified successfully by mammary ductoscopy, and intraductal biopsy can be used when the tumor is a polypoid type. Ductal lavage using microcatheters is effective in identifying malignant cells in high-risk women and this has stimulated interest in exploring the role of mammary ductoscopy in breast cancer screening. Mammary ductoscopy combined with ductal lavage may have a role in the management of patients with nipple discharge, the guiding of breast-conserving surgery for cancer, and in screening for high-risk women. The addition of molecular and genetic analysis of cells obtained by mammary ductoscopy are likely to enhance the use of this technique. Mammary ductoscopy techniques are safe and appear useful for detecting abnormalities in the breast. The additional molecular biologic study or ductal lavage may enhance the ability to direct and limit subsequent surgery when removing the offending lesions.

  16. Role of p53 Mammary Epithelial Cell Senescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-05-01

    AD Award Number: DAMD17-02-1-0509 TITLE: Role of p53 Mammary Epithelial Cell Senescence PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Goberdhan P. Dimri, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ...type and However, Mucl , K-18, and ASMA were not expressed in luminal cell type groups [12,68]. Interestingly, a significant cells present in...13,17,27], the has also attracted a great interest in the field of breast cancer candidate mammary stem cells appear to be ESA+, Mucl -, research, and

  17. A hypoxic signature marks tumors formed by disseminated tumor cells in the BALB-neuT mammary cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Msaki, Aichi; Pastò, Anna; Curtarello, Matteo; Arigoni, Maddalena; Barutello, Giuseppina; Calogero, Raffaele Adolfo; Macagno, Marco; Cavallo, Federica; Amadori, Alberto; Indraccolo, Stefano

    2016-05-31

    Metastasis is the final stage of cancer progression. Some evidence indicates that tumor cell dissemination occurs early in the natural history of cancer progression. Disseminated tumor cells (DTC) have been described in the bone marrow (BM) of cancer patients as well as in experimental models, where they correlate with later development of metastasis. However, little is known about the tumorigenic features of DTC obtained at different time points along tumor progression. Here, we found that early DTC isolated from BM of 15-17 week-old Her2/neu transgenic (BALB-neuT) mice were not tumorigenic in immunodeficient mice. In contrast, DTC-derived tumors were easily detectable when late DTC obtained from 19-22 week-old BALB-neuT mice were injected. Angiogenesis, which contributes to regulate tumor dormancy, appeared dispensable to reactivate late DTC, although it accelerated growth of secondary DTC tumors. Compared with parental mammary tumors, gene expression profiling disclosed a distinctive transcriptional signature of late DTC tumors which was enriched for hypoxia-related transcripts and was maintained in ex-vivo cell culture. Altogether, these findings highlight a different tumorigenic potential of early and late DTC in the BALB-neuT model and describe a HIF-1α-related transcriptional signature in DTC tumors, which may render DTC angiogenesis-competent, when placed in a favourable environment.

  18. Overexpression of Id1 in transgenic mice promotes mammary basal stem cell activity and breast tumorigenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Dong-Hui; Park, Ji-Hye; Lee, Jeong-Yeon; Won, Hee-Young; Jang, Ki-Seok; MIN, KYUENG-WHAN; Jang, Si-Hyong; Woo, Jong-Kyu; Oh, Seung Hyun; Kong, Gu

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitor of differentiation/DNA binding (Id)1 is a crucial regulator of mammary development and breast cancer progression. However, its effect on stemness and tumorigenesis in mammary epithelial cells remains undefined. Herein, we demonstrate that Id1 induces mammary tumorigenesis by increasing normal and malignant mammary stem cell (MaSC) activities in transgenic mice. MaSC-enriched basal cell expansion and increased self-renewal and in vivo regenerative capacity of MaSCs are observed in th...

  19. Extracellular vesicles from women with breast cancer promote an epithelial-mesenchymal transition-like process in mammary epithelial cells MCF10A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo-Hernandez, Octavio; Gonzales-Vazquez, Cristina; Cortes-Reynosa, Pedro; Reyes-Uribe, Emmanuel; Chavez-Ocaña, Sonia; Reyes-Hernandez, Octavio; Sierra-Martinez, Mónica; Salazar, Eduardo Perez

    2015-12-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) mediate many stages of tumor progression including angiogenesis, escape from immune surveillance, and extracellular matrix degradation. We studied whether EVs from plasma of women with breast cancer are able to induce an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process in mammary epithelial cells MCF10A. Our findings demonstrate that EVs from plasma of breast cancer patients induce a downregulation of E-cadherin expression and an increase of vimentin and N-cadherin expression. Moreover, EVs induce migration and invasion, as well as an increase of NFκB-DNA binding activity and MMP-2 and MMP-9 secretions. In summary, our findings demonstrate, for the first time, that EVs from breast cancer patients induce an EMT-like process in human mammary non-tumorigenic epithelial cells MCF10A.

  20. The Immune System as a New Possible Cell Target for AFP 464 in a Spontaneous Mammary Cancer Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callero, Mariana A; Rodriguez, Cristina E; Sólimo, Aldana; Bal de Kier Joffé, Elisa; Loaiza Perez, Andrea I

    2017-02-16

    Aminoflavone (AFP 464, NSC 710464), an antitumor agent which recently entered phase II clinical trials, acts against estrogen-positive breast cancer (ER +). AFP 464, which has a unique mechanism of action by activating aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) signaling pathway, decreased tumor size and growth rate in the estrogen dependent, Tamoxifen-sensitive spontaneous M05 mouse model. Considering that AhR has recently emerged as a physiological regulator of the innate and adaptive immune responses, we investigated whether AFP 464 modulates the immune response in our mouse model. Studies on the effect of AFP 464 on the immune system were carried in BALB/c mice bearing M05 semi-differentiated mammary adenocarcinomas that express estrogen and progesterone receptors. Splenic cells and tumor inflammatory infiltrates were studied by cytometric analyses. The modulation of splenocytes cytotoxic activity by AFP 464 was also evaluated. We further investigated the effects of AFP 464 on peritoneal macrophages by evaluating metalloproteinase, arginase and iNOS activities. We found that AFP 464 increased splenic cytotoxic activity, diminished the number of systemic and local Treg lymphocytes and MDSCs, and induced a M1 phenotype in peritoneal macrophages of M05 tumor bearing mice. Therefore, we conclude that AFP 464 modulates immune response which collaborates with its anti-tumor activity. Our results place the immune system as a novel target for this anti-cancer agent to strengthen the rationale for its inclusion in breast cancer treatment regimens. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Mammary adipocytes stimulate breast cancer invasion through metabolic remodeling of tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan Yuan; Attané, Camille; Milhas, Delphine; Dirat, Béatrice; Dauvillier, Stéphanie; Guerard, Adrien; Gilhodes, Julia; Lazar, Ikrame; Alet, Nathalie; Laurent, Victor; Le Gonidec, Sophie; Hervé, Caroline; Bost, Frédéric; Ren, Guo Sheng; Bono, Françoise; Escourrou, Ghislaine; Prentki, Marc; Nieto, Laurence; Valet, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    In breast cancer, a key feature of peritumoral adipocytes is their loss of lipid content observed both in vitro and in human tumors. The free fatty acids (FFAs), released by adipocytes after lipolysis induced by tumor secretions, are transferred and stored in tumor cells as triglycerides in lipid droplets. In tumor cell lines, we demonstrate that FFAs can be released over time from lipid droplets through an adipose triglyceride lipase–dependent (ATGL-dependent) lipolytic pathway. In vivo, ATGL is expressed in human tumors where its expression correlates with tumor aggressiveness and is upregulated by contact with adipocytes. The released FFAs are then used for fatty acid β-oxidation (FAO), an active process in cancer but not normal breast epithelial cells, and regulated by coculture with adipocytes. However, in cocultivated cells, FAO is uncoupled from ATP production, leading to AMPK/acetyl-CoA carboxylase activation, a circle that maintains this state of metabolic remodeling. The increased invasive capacities of tumor cells induced by coculture are completely abrogated by inhibition of the coupled ATGL-dependent lipolysis/FAO pathways. These results show a complex metabolic symbiosis between tumor-surrounding adipocytes and cancer cells that stimulate their invasiveness, highlighting ATGL as a potential therapeutic target to impede breast cancer progression. PMID:28239646

  2. Dietary Regulation of PTEN Signaling and Mammary Tumor Initiating Cells: Implications for Breast Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    the end stages of at least two different lines of genetic evolution. J Pathol 2001;194:165–70. [9] Polyak K. Is breast tumor progression really...Gupta GP, Massague J. Cancer metastasis: building a framework. Cell 2006;127: 679–95. [18] Polyak K, Haviv I, Campbell IG. Co-evolution of tumor cells...409–418. 7. Polyak ,K. (2007) Breast cancer: origins and evolution. J. Clin. Invest., 117, 3155–3163. 8. Troisi,R. et al. (2007) Exploring the

  3. Mammary stem cells have myoepithelial cell properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prater, Michael D.; Petit, Valérie; Russell, I. Alasdair; Giraddi, Rajshekhar; Shehata, Mona; Menon, Suraj; Schulte, Reiner; Kalajzic, Ivo; Rath, Nicola; Olson, Michael F.; Metzger, Daniel; Faraldo, Marisa M.; Deugnier, Marie-Ange; Glukhova, Marina A.; Stingl, John

    2014-01-01

    Contractile myoepithelial cells dominate the basal layer of the mammary epithelium and are considered to be differentiated cells. However, we observe that up to 54% of single basal cells can form colonies when seeded into adherent culture in the presence of agents that disrupt acin-myosin interactions, and on average, 65% of the single-cell-derived basal colonies can repopulate a mammary gland when transplanted in vivo. This indicates that a high proportion of basal myoepithelial cells can give rise to a mammary repopulating unit (MRU). We demonstrate that myoepithelial cells, flow-sorted using 2 independent myoepithelial-specific reporter strategies, have MRU capacity. Using an inducible lineage tracing approach we follow the progeny of α-smooth muscle actin-expressing myoepithelial cells and show that they function as long-lived lineage-restricted stem cells in the virgin state and during pregnancy. PMID:25173976

  4. Mammary stem cells have myoepithelial cell properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prater, Michael D; Petit, Valérie; Alasdair Russell, I; Giraddi, Rajshekhar R; Shehata, Mona; Menon, Suraj; Schulte, Reiner; Kalajzic, Ivo; Rath, Nicola; Olson, Michael F; Metzger, Daniel; Faraldo, Marisa M; Deugnier, Marie-Ange; Glukhova, Marina A; Stingl, John

    2014-10-01

    Contractile myoepithelial cells dominate the basal layer of the mammary epithelium and are considered to be differentiated cells. However, we observe that up to 54% of single basal cells can form colonies when seeded into adherent culture in the presence of agents that disrupt actin-myosin interactions, and on average, 65% of the single-cell-derived basal colonies can repopulate a mammary gland when transplanted in vivo. This indicates that a high proportion of basal myoepithelial cells can give rise to a mammary repopulating unit (MRU). We demonstrate that myoepithelial cells, flow-sorted using two independent myoepithelial-specific reporter strategies, have MRU capacity. Using an inducible lineage-tracing approach we follow the progeny of myoepithelial cells that express α-smooth muscle actin and show that they function as long-lived lineage-restricted stem cells in the virgin state and during pregnancy.

  5. Control of TCF-4 expression by VDR and vitamin D in the mouse mammary gland and colorectal cancer cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcy E Beildeck

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The vitamin D receptor (VDR pathway is important in the prevention and potentially in the treatment of many cancers. One important mechanism of VDR action is related to its interaction with the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway. Agonist-bound VDR inhibits the oncogenic Wnt/beta-catenin/TCF pathway by interacting directly with beta-catenin and in some cells by increasing cadherin expression which, in turn, recruits beta-catenin to the membrane. Here we identify TCF-4, a transcriptional regulator and beta-catenin binding partner as an indirect target of the VDR pathway. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this work, we show that TCF-4 (gene name TCF7L2 is decreased in the mammary gland of the VDR knockout mouse as compared to the wild-type mouse. Furthermore, we show 1,25(OH2D3 increases TCF-4 at the RNA and protein levels in several human colorectal cancer cell lines, the effect of which is completely dependent on the VDR. In silico analysis of the human and mouse TCF7L2 promoters identified several putative VDR binding elements. Although TCF7L2 promoter reporters responded to exogenous VDR, and 1,25(OH2D3, mutation analysis and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, showed that the increase in TCF7L2 did not require recruitment of the VDR to the identified elements and indicates that the regulation by VDR is indirect. This is further confirmed by the requirement of de novo protein synthesis for this up-regulation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Although it is generally assumed that binding of beta-catenin to members of the TCF/LEF family is cancer-promoting, recent studies have indicated that TCF-4 functions instead as a transcriptional repressor that restricts breast and colorectal cancer cell growth. Consequently, we conclude that the 1,25(OH2D3/VDR-mediated increase in TCF-4 may have a protective role in colon cancer as well as diabetes and Crohn's disease.

  6. Milk fat conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) inhibits growth of human mammary MCF-7 cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, M; Devery, R; Lawless, F; Murphy, J; Stanton, C

    The relationship between growth and the antioxidant enzyme defence system in human MCF-7 (breast) cancer cells treated with bovine milk fat enriched with conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) was studied. Milk enriched in CLA was obtained from cows on pasture supplemented with full fat rapeseeds and full fat soyabeans (1). Cell number decreased up to 90% (p milk fat yielding CLA concentrations between 16.9 and 22.6 ppm. Growth suppression and prooxidant effects of milk fat CLA were independent of the variable composition of the milk fat samples, suggesting that CLA was the active ingredient in milk fat responsible for the cytotoxic effect. Mixtures containing isomers of CLA (c9, t11-, t10, c12-, c11, t13- and minor amounts of other isomers) and linoleic acid (LA) at similar concentrations to the milk fat samples were as effective at inhibiting growth and stimulating peroxidation of MCF-7 cells as the milk fatty acids. Incubation of the cells with the c9, t11 CLA isomer (20 ppm) or the mixture of CLA isomers (20 ppm) for 8 days resulted in a 60% decrease (p milk fat than the c9, t11 synthetic CLA isomer. Superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities were induced in MCF-7 cells exposed to milk fat (containing 16.9-22.6 ppm CLA) over 8 days. The data indicate that milk fat triglyceride-bound CLA, consisting primarily of the c9, t11 isomer, was cytotoxic towards MCF-7 cells.

  7. A MYC-Driven Change in Mitochondrial Dynamics Limits YAP/TAZ Function in Mammary Epithelial Cells and Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Eyss, Björn; Jaenicke, Laura A; Kortlever, Roderik M; Royla, Nadine; Wiese, Katrin E; Letschert, Sebastian; McDuffus, Leigh-Anne; Sauer, Markus; Rosenwald, Andreas; Evan, Gerard I; Kempa, Stefan; Eilers, Martin

    2015-12-14

    In several developmental lineages, an increase in MYC expression drives the transition from quiescent stem cells to transit-amplifying cells. We show that MYC activates a stereotypic transcriptional program of genes involved in cell growth in mammary epithelial cells. This change in gene expression indirectly inhibits the YAP/TAZ co-activators, which maintain the clonogenic potential of these cells. We identify a phospholipase of the mitochondrial outer membrane, PLD6, as the mediator of MYC activity. MYC-dependent growth strains cellular energy resources and stimulates AMP-activated kinase (AMPK). PLD6 alters mitochondrial fusion and fission dynamics downstream of MYC. This change activates AMPK, which in turn inhibits YAP/TAZ. Mouse models and human pathological data show that MYC enhances AMPK and suppresses YAP/TAZ activity in mammary tumors.

  8. The effect of deletion of cyclooxygenase-2, prostaglandin receptor EP2, or EP4 in bone marrow cells on osteoclasts induced by mouse mammary cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Katsuhiro; Akatsu, Takuhiko; Kugai, Nobuo; Pilbeam, Carol C; Raisz, Lawrence G

    2003-11-01

    The inducible prostaglandin (PG) synthesis enzyme, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), is involved in osteoclast (OC) formation in cocultures of mouse mammary cancer cell lines (MMT060562 or BALB/c-MC) and bone marrow cells through production of PGE(2). There are four PGE(2) receptors but only the EP2 and EP4 receptors are reported to be important for OC formation. We have investigated the role of COX-2, EP2 receptor, and EP4 receptor in marrow cells for osteoclastogenesis in cocultures of cancer cells and bone marrow cells. We cocultured cancer cell lines with bone marrow cells from COX-2 knockout (-/-), EP2 -/- or EP4 -/- mice compared to wild-type mice. In addition, an EP4 receptor antagonist (EP4 RA) was added in some cocultures. Disruption of COX-2 gene in bone marrow cells had no effect on PGE(2) production and OC formation in cocultures with MMT060562, while it abrogated PGE(2) production and OC formation in cocultures with BALB/c-MC. Disruption of the EP2 gene in bone marrow cells had no effect on OC formation in the cocultures, while disruption of the EP4 gene in bone marrow cells abrogated OC formation in the cocultures. Furthermore, EP4 RA suppressed OC formation and prevented the increase in receptor activator of nuclear factor kappaB ligand (RANKL) mRNA levels in the cocultures. We conclude that COX-2 in cancer cells is responsible for PGE(2) and OC production in cocultures with MMT060562, while COX-2 in bone marrow cells, not cancer cells, is responsible for PGE(2) and OC production in cocultures with BALB/c-MC, and EP4 receptors are essential for OC formation in both cocultures.

  9. The gene expression profiles of canine mammary cancer cells grown with carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs as a co-culture in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Król Magdalena

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is supposed that fibroblasts present in tumour microenvironment increase cancer invasiveness and its ability to metastasize but the mechanisms have not been clearly defined yet. Thus, the current study was designed to assess changes in gene expression in five various cancer cell lines grown as a co-culture with the carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs in vitro. Results A carcinoma-associated fibroblast cell line was isolated from a canine mammary cancer. Then, a co-culture of cancer cells with the CAFs was established and maintained for 72 hrs. Having sorted the cells, a global gene expression in cancer cells using DNA microarrays was examined. The analysis revealed an up-regulation of 100 genes and a down-regulation of 106 genes in the cancer cells grown as a co-culture with the CAFs in comparison to control conditions. The PANTHER binomial statistics tool was applied to determine statistically over-manifested pathways (p Conclusion The results of the current study showed that the co-culturing of cancer cells and the CAFs caused significant changes to the cancer gene expression. The presence of the CAFs in a microenvironment of cancer cells promotes adhesion, angiogenesis and EMT.

  10. Analysis of microRNA expression in canine mammary cancer stem-like cells indicates epigenetic regulation of transforming growth factor-beta signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybicka, A; Mucha, J; Majchrzak, K; Taciak, B; Hellmen, E; Motyl, T; Krol, M

    2015-02-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) display both unique self-renewal ability as well as the ability to differentiate into many kinds of cancer cells. They are supposed to be responsible for cancer initiation, recurrence and drug resistance. Despite the fact that a variety of methods are currently employed in order to target CSCs, little is known about the regulation of their phenotype and biology by miRNAs. The aim of our study was to assess miRNA expression in canine mammary cancer stem-like cells (expressing stem cell antigen 1, Sca-1; CD44 and EpCAM) sorted from canine mammary tumour cell lines (CMT-U27, CMT-309 and P114). In order to prove their stem-like phenotype, we conducted a colony formation assay that confirmed their ability to form colonies from a single cell. Profiles of miRNA expression were investigated using Agilent custom-designed microarrays. The results were further validated by real-time rt-PCR analysis of expression of randomly selected miRNAs. Target genes were indicated and analysed using Kioto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) and BioCarta databases. The results revealed 24 down-regulated and nine up-regulated miRNAs in cancer stem-like cells compared to differentiated tumour cells. According to KEGG and BioCarta databases, target genes (n=240) of significantly down-regulated miRNAs were involved in transforming growth factor-beta signaling, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) signaling pathway, anaplastic lymphoma receptor tyrosine kinase (ALK) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma, coactivator 1 alpha (PGC1A) pathways. The analysis of single-gene overlapping with different pathways showed that the most important genes were: TGFBR1, TGFBR2, SOS1, CHUK, PDGFRA, SMAD2, MEF2A, MEF2C and MEF2D. All of them are involved in tumor necrosis factor-beta signaling and may indicate its important role in cancer stem cell biology. Increased expression of TGFBR2, SMAD2, MEF2A and MEF2D in canine mammary cancer stem-like cells was further

  11. The role of maintenance proteins in the preservation of epithelial cell identity during mammary gland remodeling and breast cancer initiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Danila Coradini; Saro Oriana

    2014-01-01

    During normal postnatal mammary gland development and adult remodeling related to the menstrual cycle, pregnancy, and lactation, ovarian hormones and peptide growth factors contribute to the delineation of a definite epithelial cellidentity. This identity is maintained during cellreplication in a heritable but DNA-independent manner. The preservation of cellidentity is fundamental, especialy when cels must undergo changes in response to intrinsic and extrinsic signals. The maintenance proteins, which are required for cellidentity preservation, act epigenetically by regulating gene expression through DNA methylation, histone modification, and chromatin remodeling. Among the maintenance proteins, the Trithorax (TrxG) and Polycomb (PcG) group proteins are the best characterized. In this review, we summarize the structures and activities of the TrxG and PcG complexes and describe their pivotal roles in nuclear estrogen receptor activity. In addition, we provide evidence that perturbations in these epigenetic regulators are involved in disrupting epithelial cellidentity, mammary gland remodeling, and breast cancer initiation.

  12. RUNX2 in mammary gland development and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Nicola; McDonald, Laura; Morris, Joanna S; Cameron, Ewan R; Blyth, Karen

    2013-06-01

    Runx2 is best known as an essential factor in osteoblast differentiation and bone development but, like many other transcription factors involved in development, is known to operate over a much wider tissue range. Our understanding of these other aspects of Runx2 function is still at a relatively early stage and the importance of its role in cell fate decisions and lineage maintenance in non-osseous tissues is only beginning to emerge. One such tissue is the mammary gland, where Runx2 is known to be expressed and participate in the regulation of mammary specific genes. Furthermore, differential and temporal expression of this gene is observed during mammary epithelial differentiation in vivo, strongly indicative of an important functional role. Although the precise nature of that role remains elusive, preliminary evidence hints at possible involvement in the regulation of mammary stem and/or progenitor cells. As with many genes important in regulating cell fate, RUNX2 has also been linked to metastatic cancer where in some established breast cell lines, retention of expression is associated with a more invasive phenotype. More recently, expression analysis has been extended to primary breast cancers where high levels of RUNX2 align with a specific subtype of the disease. That RUNX2 expression correlates with the so called "Triple Negative" subtype is particularly interesting given the known cross talk between Runx2 and estrogen receptor signaling pathways. This review summaries our current understanding of Runx2 in mammary gland development and cancer, and postulates a role that may link both these processes.

  13. Developing a Novel Mouse Model for Breast Cancer by Targeting Oncogenes to Mammary Progenitor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-04-01

    1260. Swope D, Harrell JC, Mahato D and Korach KS. (2002). Pietras RJ, Arboleda J, Reese DM, Wongvipat N, Pegram Gene, 294, 239-247. MD, Ramos L...sporadic cancers. Nat Rev Cancer 2004;4:814-19. (28) Paladini RD, Takahashi K, Bravo NS, Coulombe PA. On- (45) Andrechek ER, Hardy WR, Laing MA, Muller WJ

  14. Sox10 Regulates Stem/Progenitor and Mesenchymal Cell States in Mammary Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Dravis

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available To discover mechanisms that mediate plasticity in mammary cells, we characterized signaling networks that are present in the mammary stem cells responsible for fetal and adult mammary development. These analyses identified a signaling axis between FGF signaling and the transcription factor Sox10. Here, we show that Sox10 is specifically expressed in mammary cells exhibiting the highest levels of stem/progenitor activity. This includes fetal and adult mammary cells in vivo and mammary organoids in vitro. Sox10 is functionally relevant, as its deletion reduces stem/progenitor competence whereas its overexpression increases stem/progenitor activity. Intriguingly, we also show that Sox10 overexpression causes mammary cells to undergo a mesenchymal transition. Consistent with these findings, Sox10 is preferentially expressed in stem- and mesenchymal-like breast cancers. These results demonstrate a signaling mechanism through which stem and mesenchymal states are acquired in mammary cells and suggest therapeutic avenues in breast cancers for which targeted therapies are currently unavailable.

  15. Interplay between progesterone and prolactin in mammary development and implications for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Heather J; Ormandy, Christopher J

    2012-06-24

    Progesterone and prolactin remodel mammary morphology during pregnancy by acting on the mammary epithelial cell hierarchy. The roles of each hormone in mammary development have been well studied, but evidence of signalling cross-talk between progesterone and prolactin is still emerging. Factors such as receptor activator of NFkB ligand (RANKL) may integrate signals from both hormones to orchestrate their joint actions on the epithelial cell hierarchy. Common targets of progesterone and prolactin signalling are also likely to integrate their pro-proliferative actions in breast cancer. Therefore, a thorough understanding of the interplay between progesterone and prolactin in mammary development may reveal therapeutic targets for breast cancer. This review summarises our understanding of Pg and PRL action in mammary gland development before focusing on molecular mechanisms of signalling cross-talk and the implications for breast cancer. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Cellular quiescence in mammary stem cells and breast tumor stem cells: got testable hypotheses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmes, David C; DiRenzo, James

    2009-03-01

    Cellular quiescence is a state of reversible cell cycle arrest and has more recently been shown to be a blockade to differentiation and to correlate with resistance to cancer chemotherapeutics and other xenobiotics; features that are common to adult stem cells and possibly tumor stem cells. The biphasic kinetics of mammary regeneration, coupled to its cyclic endocrine control suggest that mammary stem cells most likely divide during a narrow window of the regenerative cycle and return to a state of quiescence. This would enable them to retain their proliferative capacity, resist differentiation signals and preserve their prolonged life span. There is accumulating evidence that mammary stem cells and other adult stem cells utilize quiescence for this purpose, however the degree to which tumor stem cells do so is largely unknown. The retained proliferative capacity of mammary stem cells likely enables them to accumulate and harbor mutations that lead to breast cancer initiation. However it is currently unclear if these causative lesions lead to defective or deranged quiescence in mammary stem cells. Evidence of such effects could potentially lead to the development of diagnostic systems that monitor mammary stem cell quiescence or activation. Such systems may be useful for the evaluation of patients who are at significant risk of breast cancer. Additionally quiescence has been postulated to contribute to therapeutic resistance and tumor recurrence. This review aims to evaluate what is known about the mechanisms governing cellular quiescence and the role of tumor stem cell quiescence in breast cancer recurrence.

  17. Alterations of EGFR, p53 and PTEN that mimic changes found in basal-like breast cancer promote transformation of human mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Maira M; Hopkins, Benjamin D; Saal, Lao H; Parsons, Ramon E

    2013-03-01

    Breast cancer can be classified into different molecular subtypes with varying clinical and pathological characteristics. The basal-like breast cancer subtype represents one of the most aggressive and lethal types of breast cancer, and due to poor mechanistic understanding, it lacks targeted therapy. Many basal-like breast cancer patient samples display alterations of established drivers of cancer development, including elevated expression of EGFR, p53 inactivating mutations and loss of expression of the tumor suppressor PTEN; however, their contribution to human basal-like breast cancer pathogenesis remains ill-defined. Using non-transformed human mammary epithelial cells, we set out to determine whether altering EGFR, p53 and PTEN in different combinations could contribute to basal-like breast cancer progression through transformation of cells. Altering PTEN in combination with either p53 or EGFR in contrast to any of the single alterations caused increased growth of transformed colonies in soft agar. Concomitantly modifying all three genes led to the highest rate of cellular proliferation and the greatest degree of anchorage-independent colony formation. Results from our effort to engineer a model of BBC expressing alterations of EGFR, p53 and PTEN suggest that these changes are cooperative and likely play a causal role in basal-like breast cancer pathogenesis. Consideration should be given to targeting EGFR and restoring p53 and PTEN signaling simultaneously as a strategy for treatment of this subtype of breast cancer.

  18. Isolation of Estrogen Regulated Genes from MCF-7 Human Mammary Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-07-13

    dramatic example of an anri-oncogene. The neoplastic phenotype of retinoblastoma, prostate cancer, or osteosarcoma can be suppressed by introducing an...which is down-regulated by esttogen tteattnent), and was kindly made avaUable by Dr Carl Dieffenbach and Dr. Robert Silverman (Department of Radiology

  19. Human mammary microenvironment better regulates the biology of human breast cancer in humanized mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ming-Jie; Wang, Jue; Xu, Lu; Zha, Xiao-Ming; Zhao, Yi; Ling, Li-Jun; Wang, Shui

    2015-02-01

    During the past decades, many efforts have been made in mimicking the clinical progress of human cancer in mouse models. Previously, we developed a human breast tissue-derived (HB) mouse model. Theoretically, it may mimic the interactions between "species-specific" mammary microenvironment of human origin and human breast cancer cells. However, detailed evidences are absent. The present study (in vivo, cellular, and molecular experiments) was designed to explore the regulatory role of human mammary microenvironment in the progress of human breast cancer cells. Subcutaneous (SUB), mammary fat pad (MFP), and HB mouse models were developed for in vivo comparisons. Then, the orthotopic tumor masses from three different mouse models were collected for primary culture. Finally, the biology of primary cultured human breast cancer cells was compared by cellular and molecular experiments. Results of in vivo mouse models indicated that human breast cancer cells grew better in human mammary microenvironment. Cellular and molecular experiments confirmed that primary cultured human breast cancer cells from HB mouse model showed a better proliferative and anti-apoptotic biology than those from SUB to MFP mouse models. Meanwhile, primary cultured human breast cancer cells from HB mouse model also obtained the migratory and invasive biology for "species-specific" tissue metastasis to human tissues. Comprehensive analyses suggest that "species-specific" mammary microenvironment of human origin better regulates the biology of human breast cancer cells in our humanized mouse model of breast cancer, which is more consistent with the clinical progress of human breast cancer.

  20. Roles of Breast Cancer Susceptibility Genes BRCA’s in Mammary Epithelial Cell Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    associated factor 3 - 3.0 IFNAR1 AA133989 interferon (alpha, beta and omega) receptor 1 -3.1 PDXK AW449022 pyridoxal ( pyridoxine , vitamin B6...IFNAR1 AA133989 Interferon (, , and ) receptor 1 3.1 PDXK AW449022 Pyridoxal ( pyridoxine , vitamin B6) kinase 4.0 HTATIP2 BC002439 HIV-1 Tat...evaluate the risk of breast cancer. N Engl J Med 336, 1409-1415. 26 Cullmann, G., Fien, K., Kobayashi, R., and Stillman, B. (1995). Characterization

  1. Palm tocotrienols decrease levels of pro-angiogenic markers in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and murine mammary cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaduray, Kanga Rani; Radhakrishnan, Ammu K; Kutty, Methil Kannan; Nesaretnam, Kalanithi

    2012-01-01

    Anti-angiogenic therapy is widely being used to halt tumour angiogenesis. In this study, the anti-angiogenic activity of palm tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF) and its individual components (γ- and δ-tocotrienol) were first investigated in vitro in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and 4T1 mouse mammary cancer cells. Results showed reduced levels of Interkeukin (IL)-8 and IL-6, two pro-angiogenic cytokines in HUVEC treated with palm tocotrienols compared with α-tocopherol (α-T) and control cells (P < 0.05). The production of IL-8 and IL-6 was lowest in δ-tocotrienol (δ-T3)-treated cells followed by γ-tocotrienol (γ-T3) and TRF. There was significant (P < 0.05) reduction in IL-8 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production in 4T1 cells treated with TRF or δ-T3. There was decreased expression of VEGF and its receptors; VEGF-R1 (fms-like tyrosine kinase, Flt-1) and VEGF-R2 (Kinase-insert-domain-containing receptor, KDR/Flk-2) in tumour tissues excised from mice supplemented with TRF were observed. There was also decreased expression of VEGF-R2 in lung tissues of mice supplemented with TRF. These observations correlate with the smaller tumour size recorded in the tocotrienol-treated mice. This study confirms previous observations that palm tocotrienols exhibit anti-angiogenic properties that may inhibit tumour progression.

  2. Interactions between exosomes from breast cancer cells and primary mammary epithelial cells leads to generation of reactive oxygen species which induce DNA damage response, stabilization of p53 and autophagy in epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujoy Dutta

    Full Text Available Exosomes are nanovesicles originating from multivesicular bodies and are released by all cell types. They contain proteins, lipids, microRNAs, mRNAs and DNA fragments, which act as mediators of intercellular communications by inducing phenotypic changes in recipient cells. Tumor-derived exosomes have been shown to play critical roles in different stages of tumor development and metastasis of almost all types of cancer. One of the ways by which exosomes affect tumorigenesis is to manipulate the tumor microenvironments to create tumor permissive "niches". Whether breast cancer cell secreted exosomes manipulate epithelial cells of the mammary duct to facilitate tumor development is not known. To address whether and how breast cancer cell secreted exosomes manipulate ductal epithelial cells we studied the interactions between exosomes isolated from conditioned media of 3 different breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-231, T47DA18 and MCF7, representing three different types of breast carcinomas, and normal human primary mammary epithelial cells (HMECs. Our studies show that exosomes released by breast cancer cell lines are taken up by HMECs, resulting in the induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS and autophagy. Inhibition of ROS by N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC led to abrogation of autophagy. HMEC-exosome interactions also induced the phosphorylation of ATM, H2AX and Chk1 indicating the induction of DNA damage repair (DDR responses. Under these conditions, phosphorylation of p53 at serine 15 was also observed. Both DDR responses and phosphorylation of p53 induced by HMEC-exosome interactions were also inhibited by NAC. Furthermore, exosome induced autophagic HMECs were found to release breast cancer cell growth promoting factors. Taken together, our results suggest novel mechanisms by which breast cancer cell secreted exosomes manipulate HMECs to create a tumor permissive microenvironment.

  3. Interactions between exosomes from breast cancer cells and primary mammary epithelial cells leads to generation of reactive oxygen species which induce DNA damage response, stabilization of p53 and autophagy in epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Sujoy; Warshall, Case; Bandyopadhyay, Chirosree; Dutta, Dipanjan; Chandran, Bala

    2014-01-01

    Exosomes are nanovesicles originating from multivesicular bodies and are released by all cell types. They contain proteins, lipids, microRNAs, mRNAs and DNA fragments, which act as mediators of intercellular communications by inducing phenotypic changes in recipient cells. Tumor-derived exosomes have been shown to play critical roles in different stages of tumor development and metastasis of almost all types of cancer. One of the ways by which exosomes affect tumorigenesis is to manipulate the tumor microenvironments to create tumor permissive "niches". Whether breast cancer cell secreted exosomes manipulate epithelial cells of the mammary duct to facilitate tumor development is not known. To address whether and how breast cancer cell secreted exosomes manipulate ductal epithelial cells we studied the interactions between exosomes isolated from conditioned media of 3 different breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-231, T47DA18 and MCF7), representing three different types of breast carcinomas, and normal human primary mammary epithelial cells (HMECs). Our studies show that exosomes released by breast cancer cell lines are taken up by HMECs, resulting in the induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and autophagy. Inhibition of ROS by N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) led to abrogation of autophagy. HMEC-exosome interactions also induced the phosphorylation of ATM, H2AX and Chk1 indicating the induction of DNA damage repair (DDR) responses. Under these conditions, phosphorylation of p53 at serine 15 was also observed. Both DDR responses and phosphorylation of p53 induced by HMEC-exosome interactions were also inhibited by NAC. Furthermore, exosome induced autophagic HMECs were found to release breast cancer cell growth promoting factors. Taken together, our results suggest novel mechanisms by which breast cancer cell secreted exosomes manipulate HMECs to create a tumor permissive microenvironment.

  4. Human mammary fibroblasts stimulate invasion of breast cancer cells in a three-dimensional culture and increase stroma development in mouse xenografts

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    Olsen Charlotta J

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Tumour phenotype is regulated in a complex fashion as a result of interactions between malignant cells and the tumour stroma. Fibroblasts are the most abundant and perhaps most active part of the tumour stroma. A better understanding of the changes that occur in fibroblasts in response to the presence of malignant cells may lead to the development of new strategies for cancer treatment. We explored the effects of fibroblasts on the growth and invasion of mammary carcinoma tumour cells in vitro and in vivo. Methods In order to analyse secreted factors that affect invasive abilities of breast cancer cells we co-cultured human mammary fibroblasts (HMF3s and cancer cells (MCF7S1 in three-dimensional (3D growth conditions devoid of heterogeneous cell-cell contact. To study the possible influence of fibroblasts on MCF7S1 cancer cell growth in vivo we co-injected HMF3s and MCF7S1 cells in Balb/c nu/nu mice. Results In 3D co-culture both HMF3s and MCF7S1 cells demonstrated enhanced invasion into a Matrigel matrix. This was correlated with enhanced expression of the metastasis promoting S100A4 protein in fibroblasts, stimulation of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2 activity, and enhanced secretion of a range of different cytokines. Orthotopic injection of oestrogen-dependent MCF7S1 cancer cells together with fibroblasts showed stimulation of tumour growth in mice without an external oestrogen supply. The resulting tumours were characterized by increased development of extracellular matrix, as well as an increase of murine S100A4 concentration and activity of MMP-2 in the tumour interstitial fluid. Conclusion Stimulation of the invasive phenotype of tumour cells in 3D co-cultures with fibroblasts could be correlated with increased production of S100A4 and MMP-2. We propose that enhanced development of mouse host-derived tumour stroma in a MCF7S1 co-injection xenograft model leads to oestrogen independency and is triggered by the

  5. Mammary Cancer and Activation of Transposable Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    derived adipo- cytes and ADS-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (ADS-iPSCs) (19) and primary mouse ES cells to isolated sperm and oocytes (20). We...Mesendoderm 2353 765 051 59 5 92% H9-IMR90 5875 7 669 782 605 58 91% oocyte - ES cell (mouse) 4727 1 204 883 334 25 93% sperm - ES cell (mouse) 4580 4 364 748...engineered mouse model in which a specific mammary cell population is fluorescently marked upon initial transcriptional activation of the SV40 large T

  6. Of Microenvironments and Mammary Stem Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaBarge, Mark A; Petersen, Ole W; Bissell, Mina J

    2007-06-01

    In most adult tissues there reside pools of stem and progenitor cells inside specialized microenvironments referred to as niches. The niche protects the stem cells from inappropriate expansion and directs their critical functions. Thus guided, stem cells are able to maintain tissue homeostasis throughout the ebb and flow of metabolic and physical demands encountered over a lifetime. Indeed, a pool of stem cells maintains mammary gland structure throughout development, and responds to the physiological demands associated with pregnancy. This review discusses how stem cells were identified in both human and mouse mammary glands; each requiring different techniques that were determined by differing biological needs and ethical constraints. These studies together create a robust portrait of mammary gland biology and identify the location of the stem cell niche, elucidate a developmental hierarchy, and suggest how the niche might be manipulated for therapeutic benefit.

  7. Boldine Inhibits Mouse Mammary Carcinoma In Vivo and Human MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomšík, Pavel; Mičuda, Stanislav; Muthná, Darina; Čermáková, Eva; Havelek, Radim; Rudolf, Emil; Hroch, Miloš; Kadová, Zuzana; Řezáčová, Martina; Ćmielová, Jana; Živný, Pavel

    2016-11-01

    Boldine is an aporphine alkaloid widely consumed in the folk medicine of some regions. Its anticancer potential has been shown but not yet elucidated. We compared the antitumor effect of orally and parenterally applied boldine in mice bearing solid Ehrlich tumor. We also explored the effects of boldine on breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7 cells in vitro. Repeated i. p. injections of 30, 60, or 90 mg boldine/kg, either alone or combined with doxorubicin, slowed tumor growth in vivo. The latter two doses also prolonged the post-therapeutic survival of the mice. When fed food supplemented with boldine at a dose of 90 mg/kg, the tumor-bearing mice survived significantly longer, but there was no effect on tumor size. Interestingly, continuous p. o. administration did not produce detectable levels of boldine in plasma or tissue samples, in contrast to high but short-lived concentrations after i. p. injections. There was neither antagonism nor synergism between boldine and doxorubicin, except a possible synergism of i. p. boldine 90 mg/kg combined with doxorubicin when compared with doxorubicin alone.Boldine was cytotoxic to MCF-7 cells and reduced their viability and proliferation in vitro. Exposure to boldine decreased bromodeoxyuridine incorporation and histone H3 phosphorylation but did not induce apoptosis. Boldine treatment resulted in p38, ERK, and JNK activation in the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in a dose-dependent manner. Since bioavailability in mice seems to be different from that reported in rats, pharmacokinetic studies in humans are needed to evaluate the role of boldine in the beneficial effects of Boldo infusions. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. c-Jun N-terminal kinase 2 prevents luminal cell commitment in normal mammary glands and tumors by inhibiting p53/Notch1 and breast cancer gene 1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, Michael A; Ebelt, Nancy D; Pfefferle, Adam D; Perou, Charles M; Van Den Berg, Carla Lynn

    2015-05-20

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease with several subtypes carrying unique prognoses. Patients with differentiated luminal tumors experience better outcomes, while effective treatments are unavailable for poorly differentiated tumors, including the basal-like subtype. Mechanisms governing mammary tumor subtype generation could prove critical to developing better treatments. C-Jun N-terminal kinase 2 (JNK2) is important in mammary tumorigenesis and tumor progression. Using a variety of mouse models, human breast cancer cell lines and tumor expression data, studies herein support that JNK2 inhibits cell differentiation in normal and cancer-derived mammary cells. JNK2 prevents precocious pubertal mammary development and inhibits Notch-dependent expansion of luminal cell populations. Likewise, JNK2 suppresses luminal populations in a p53-competent Polyoma Middle T-antigen tumor model where jnk2 knockout causes p53-dependent upregulation of Notch1 transcription. In a p53 knockout model, JNK2 restricts luminal populations independently of Notch1, by suppressing Brca1 expression and promoting epithelial to mesenchymal transition. JNK2 also inhibits estrogen receptor (ER) expression and confers resistance to fulvestrant, an ER inhibitor, while stimulating tumor progression. These data suggest that therapies inhibiting JNK2 in breast cancer may promote tumor differentiation, improve endocrine therapy response, and inhibit metastasis.

  9. Notch3 marks clonogenic mammary luminal progenitor cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafkas, Daniel; Rodilla, Veronica; Huyghe, Mathilde; Mourao, Larissa; Kiaris, Hippokratis; Fre, Silvia

    2013-10-14

    The identity of mammary stem and progenitor cells remains poorly understood, mainly as a result of the lack of robust markers. The Notch signaling pathway has been implicated in mammary gland development as well as in tumorigenesis in this tissue. Elevated expression of the Notch3 receptor has been correlated to the highly aggressive "triple negative" human breast cancer. However, the specific cells expressing this Notch paralogue in the mammary gland remain unknown. Using a conditionally inducible Notch3-CreERT2(SAT) transgenic mouse, we genetically marked Notch3-expressing cells throughout mammary gland development and followed their lineage in vivo. We demonstrate that Notch3 is expressed in a highly clonogenic and transiently quiescent luminal progenitor population that gives rise to a ductal lineage. These cells are capable of surviving multiple successive pregnancies, suggesting a capacity to self-renew. Our results also uncover a role for the Notch3 receptor in restricting the proliferation and consequent clonal expansion of these cells.

  10. CRIPTO/GRP78 Signaling Maintains Fetal and Adult Mammary Stem Cells Ex Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin T. Spike

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the extracellular signaling factors that govern mammary stem cell behavior. Here, we identify CRIPTO and its cell-surface receptor GRP78 as regulators of stem cell behavior in isolated fetal and adult mammary epithelial cells. We develop a CRIPTO antagonist that promotes differentiation and reduces self-renewal of mammary stem cell-enriched populations cultured ex vivo. By contrast, CRIPTO treatment maintains the stem cell phenotype in these cultures and yields colonies with enhanced mammary gland reconstitution capacity. Surface expression of GRP78 marks CRIPTO-responsive, stem cell-enriched fetal and adult mammary epithelial cells, and deletion of GRP78 from adult mammary epithelial cells blocks their mammary gland reconstitution potential. Together, these findings identify the CRIPTO/GRP78 pathway as a developmentally conserved regulator of fetal and adult mammary stem cell behavior ex vivo, with implications for the stem-like cells found in many cancers.

  11. CRIPTO/GRP78 Signaling Maintains Fetal and Adult Mammary Stem Cells Ex Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spike, Benjamin T.; Kelber, Jonathan A.; Booker, Evan; Kalathur, Madhuri; Rodewald, Rose; Lipianskaya, Julia; La, Justin; He, Marielle; Wright, Tracy; Klemke, Richard; Wahl, Geoffrey M.; Gray, Peter C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Little is known about the extracellular signaling factors that govern mammary stem cell behavior. Here, we identify CRIPTO and its cell-surface receptor GRP78 as regulators of stem cell behavior in isolated fetal and adult mammary epithelial cells. We develop a CRIPTO antagonist that promotes differentiation and reduces self-renewal of mammary stem cell-enriched populations cultured ex vivo. By contrast, CRIPTO treatment maintains the stem cell phenotype in these cultures and yields colonies with enhanced mammary gland reconstitution capacity. Surface expression of GRP78 marks CRIPTO-responsive, stem cell-enriched fetal and adult mammary epithelial cells, and deletion of GRP78 from adult mammary epithelial cells blocks their mammary gland reconstitution potential. Together, these findings identify the CRIPTO/GRP78 pathway as a developmentally conserved regulator of fetal and adult mammary stem cell behavior ex vivo, with implications for the stem-like cells found in many cancers. PMID:24749068

  12. Overexpression of Id1 in transgenic mice promotes mammary basal stem cell activity and breast tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong-Hui; Park, Ji-Hye; Lee, Jeong-Yeon; Won, Hee-Young; Jang, Ki-Seok; Min, Kyueng-Whan; Jang, Si-Hyong; Woo, Jong-Kyu; Oh, Seung Hyun; Kong, Gu

    2015-07-10

    Inhibitor of differentiation/DNA binding (Id)1 is a crucial regulator of mammary development and breast cancer progression. However, its effect on stemness and tumorigenesis in mammary epithelial cells remains undefined. Herein, we demonstrate that Id1 induces mammary tumorigenesis by increasing normal and malignant mammary stem cell (MaSC) activities in transgenic mice. MaSC-enriched basal cell expansion and increased self-renewal and in vivo regenerative capacity of MaSCs are observed in the mammary glands of MMTV-Id1 transgenic mice. Furthermore, MMTV-Id1 mice develop ductal hyperplasia and mammary tumors with highly expressed basal markers. Id1 also increases breast cancer stem cell (CSC) population and activity in human breast cancer lines. Moreover, the effects of Id1 on normal and malignant stem cell activities are mediated by the Wnt/c-Myc pathway. Collectively, these findings provide in vivo genetic evidence of Id1 functions as an oncogene in breast cancer and indicate that Id1 regulates mammary basal stem cells by activating the Wnt/c-Myc pathway, thereby contributing to breast tumor development.

  13. Prediction of Breast Cancer Risk by Aberrant Methylation in Mammary Duct Lavage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-01

    DNA was extracted from two aneuploid tumor cells lines ( cervical cancer cell line HeLa [13] and breast cancer cell line HCC1806 [14]), two diploid...Breast Cancer Res Treat 2000;61:139–43. [4] Kersting M, Friedl C, Kraus A, Behn M, Pankow W, Schuermann M. Differential frequencies of p16 (INK4a) promoter...DAMD17-01-1-0421 TITLE: Prediction of Breast Cancer Risk by Aberrant Methylation in Mammary Duct Lavage PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR

  14. Bovine mammary stem cells: Cell biology meets production agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammary stem cells (MaSC) provide for net growth, renewal and turnover of mammary epithelial cells, and are therefore potential targets for strategies to increase production efficiency. Appropriate regulation of MaSC can potentially benefit milk yield, persistency, dry period management and tissue ...

  15. Estrogen receptor beta growth-inhibitory effects are repressed through activation of MAPK and PI3K signalling in mammary epithelial and breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotrim, C Z; Fabris, V; Doria, M L; Lindberg, K; Gustafsson, J-Å; Amado, F; Lanari, C; Helguero, L A

    2013-05-09

    Two thirds of breast cancers express estrogen receptors (ER). ER alpha (ERα) mediates breast cancer cell proliferation, and expression of ERα is the standard choice to indicate adjuvant endocrine therapy. ERbeta (ERβ) inhibits growth in vitro; its effects in vivo have been incompletely investigated and its role in breast cancer and potential as alternative target in endocrine therapy needs further study. In this work, mammary epithelial (EpH4 and HC11) and breast cancer (MC4-L2) cells with endogenous ERα and ERβ expression and T47-D human breast cancer cells with recombinant ERβ (T47-DERβ) were used to explore effects exerted in vitro and in vivo by the ERβ agonists 2,3-bis (4-hydroxy-phenyl)-propionitrile (DPN) and 7-bromo-2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-1,3-benzoxazol-5-ol (WAY). In vivo, ERβ agonists induced mammary gland hyperplasia and MC4-L2 tumour growth to a similar extent as the ERα agonist 4,4',4''-(4-propyl-(1H)-pyrazole-1,3,5-triyl) trisphenol (PPT) or 17β-estradiol (E2) and correlated with higher number of mitotic and lower number of apoptotic features. In vitro, in MC4-L2, EpH4 or HC11 cells incubated under basal conditions, ERβ agonists induced apoptosis measured as upregulation of p53 and apoptosis-inducible factor protein levels and increased caspase 3 activity, whereas PPT and E2 stimulated proliferation. However, when extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK ½) were activated by co-incubation with basement membrane extract or epidermal growth factor, induction of apoptosis by ERβ agonists was repressed and DPN induced proliferation in a similar way as E2 or PPT. In a context of active ERK ½, phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3K)/RAC-alpha serine/threonine-protein kinase (AKT) signalling was necessary to allow proliferation stimulated by ER agonists. Inhibition of MEK ½ with UO126 completely restored ERβ growth-inhibitory effects, whereas inhibition of PI3K by LY294002 inhibited ERβ-induced proliferation. These

  16. Fibronectin production by human mammary cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stampfer, M.R. (Univ. of California, Berkeley); Vlodavsky, I.; Smith, H.S.; Ford, R.; Becker, F.F.; Riggs, J.

    1981-01-01

    Human mammary cells were examined for the presence of the high-molecular-weight surface glycoprotein fibronectin. Early passage mammary epithelial cell and fibroblast cultures from both carcinomas and normal tissues were tested for the presence of cell-associated fibronectin by immunofluorescence microscopy and for the synthesis and secretion of fibronectin by specific immunoprecipitation of metabolically labeled protein. In vivo frozen sections of primary carcinomas and normal tissues were tested for the localization of fibronectin by immunofluorescence microscopy. In contrast to the extensive fibrillar networks of fibronectin found in the fibroblast cultures, the epithelial cell cultures from both tissue sources displayed a pattern of cell-associated fibronectin characterizd by powdery, punctate staining. However, the cultured epithelial cells, as well as the fibroblasts, secreted large quantities of fibronectin into the medium. Putative myoepithelial cells also displayed extensive fibrillar networks of fibronectin. The difference in cell-associated fibronectin distribution between the epithelial cells and the fibroblasts and putative myoepithelial cells provided a simple means of quantitating stromal and myoepithelial cell contamination of the mammary epithelial cells in culture. In vivo, normal tissues showed fibronectin primarily localized in the basement membrane surrounding the epithelial cells and in the stroma. Most primary carcinomas displayed powdery, punctate staining on the epithelial cells in addition to the fibronectin present in the surrounding stroma.

  17. A Comparative Approach of Tumor-Associated Inflammation in Mammary Cancer between Humans and Dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Isabel Carvalho

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Infiltrating cells of the immune system are widely accepted to be generic constituents of tumor microenvironment. It has been well established that the development of mammary cancer, both in humans and in dogs, is associated with alterations in numbers and functions of immune cells at the sites of tumor progression. These tumor infiltrating immune cells seem to exhibit exclusive phenotypic and functional characteristics and mammary cancer cells can take advantage of signaling molecules released by them. Cancer related inflammation has an important role in mammary carcinogenesis, contributing to the acquisition of core hallmark capabilities that allow cancer cells to survive, proliferate, and disseminate. Indeed, recent studies in human breast cancer and in canine mammary tumors have identified a growing list of signaling molecules released by inflammatory cells that serve as effectors of their tumor-promoting actions. These include the COX-2, the tumor EGF, the angiogenic VEGF, other proangiogenic factors, and a large variety of chemokines and cytokines that amplify the inflammatory state. This review describes the intertwined signaling pathways shared by T-lymphocytic/macrophage infiltrates and important tissue biomarkers in both human and dog mammary carcinogenesis.

  18. A Comparative Approach of Tumor-Associated Inflammation in Mammary Cancer between Humans and Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Maria Isabel; Silva-Carvalho, Ricardo; Pires, Isabel; Prada, Justina; Bianchini, Rodolfo; Jensen-Jarolim, Erika; Queiroga, Felisbina L

    2016-01-01

    Infiltrating cells of the immune system are widely accepted to be generic constituents of tumor microenvironment. It has been well established that the development of mammary cancer, both in humans and in dogs, is associated with alterations in numbers and functions of immune cells at the sites of tumor progression. These tumor infiltrating immune cells seem to exhibit exclusive phenotypic and functional characteristics and mammary cancer cells can take advantage of signaling molecules released by them. Cancer related inflammation has an important role in mammary carcinogenesis, contributing to the acquisition of core hallmark capabilities that allow cancer cells to survive, proliferate, and disseminate. Indeed, recent studies in human breast cancer and in canine mammary tumors have identified a growing list of signaling molecules released by inflammatory cells that serve as effectors of their tumor-promoting actions. These include the COX-2, the tumor EGF, the angiogenic VEGF, other proangiogenic factors, and a large variety of chemokines and cytokines that amplify the inflammatory state. This review describes the intertwined signaling pathways shared by T-lymphocytic/macrophage infiltrates and important tissue biomarkers in both human and dog mammary carcinogenesis.

  19. EGFR signaling pathways are wired differently in normal 184A1L5 human mammary epithelial and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speth, Zachary; Islam, Tanzila; Banerjee, Kasturi; Resat, Haluk

    2017-03-29

    Because of differences in the downstream signaling patterns of its pathways, the role of the human epidermal growth factor family of receptors (HER) in promoting cell growth and survival is cell line and context dependent. Using two model cell lines, we have studied how the regulatory interaction network among the key proteins of HER signaling pathways may be rewired upon normal to cancerous transformation. We in particular investigated how the transcription factor STAT3 and several key kinases' involvement in cancer-related signaling processes differ between normal 184A1L5 human mammary epithelial (HME) and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer epithelial cells. Comparison of the responses in these cells showed that normal-to-cancerous cellular transformation causes a major re-wiring of the growth factor initiated signaling. In particular, we found that: i) regulatory interactions between Erk, p38, JNK and STAT3 are triangulated and tightly coupled in 184A1L5 HME cells, and ii) STAT3 is only weakly associated with the Erk-p38-JNK pathway in MDA-MB-231 cells. Utilizing the concept of pathway substitution, we predicted how the observed differences in the regulatory interactions may affect the proliferation/survival and motility responses of the 184A1L5 and MDA-MB-231 cells when exposed to various inhibitors. We then validated our predictions experimentally to complete the experiment-computation-experiment iteration loop. Validated differences in the regulatory interactions of the 184A1L5 and MDA-MB-231 cells indicated that instead of inhibiting STAT3, which has severe toxic side effects, simultaneous inhibition of JNK together with Erk or p38 could be a more effective strategy to impose cell death selectively to MDA-MB-231 cancer cells while considerably lowering the side effects to normal epithelial cells. Presented analysis establishes a framework with examples that would enable cell signaling researchers to identify the signaling network structures which can be used to

  20. Direct visualization of macrophage-assisted tumor cell intravasation in mammary tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyckoff, Jeffrey B; Wang, Yarong; Lin, Elaine Y; Li, Jiu-feng; Goswami, Sumanta; Stanley, E Richard; Segall, Jeffrey E; Pollard, Jeffrey W; Condeelis, John

    2007-03-15

    Although the presence of macrophages in tumors has been correlated with poor prognosis, until now there was no direct observation of how macrophages are involved in hematogenous metastasis. In this study, we use multiphoton microscopy to show, for the first time, that tumor cell intravasation occurs in association with perivascular macrophages in mammary tumors. Furthermore, we show that perivascular macrophages of the mammary tumor are associated with tumor cell intravasation in the absence of local angiogenesis. These results show that the interaction between macrophages and tumor cells lying in close proximity defines a microenvironment that is directly involved in the intravasation of cancer cells in mammary tumors.

  1. Bone Morphogenetic Proteins stimulate mammary fibroblasts to promote mammary carcinoma cell invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Owens

    Full Text Available Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMPs are secreted cytokines that are part of the Transforming Growth Factor β (TGFβ superfamily. BMPs have been shown to be highly expressed in human breast cancers, and loss of BMP signaling in mammary carcinomas has been shown to accelerate metastases. Interestingly, other work has indicated that stimulation of dermal fibroblasts with BMP can enhance secretion of pro-tumorigenic factors. Furthermore, treatment of carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs derived from a mouse prostate carcinoma with BMP4 was shown to stimulate angiogenesis. We sought to determine the effect of BMP treatment on mammary fibroblasts. A large number of secreted pro-inflammatory cytokines and matrix-metallo proteases (MMPs were found to be upregulated in response to BMP4 treatment. Fibroblasts that were stimulated with BMP4 were found to enhance mammary carcinoma cell invasion, and these effects were inhibited by a BMP receptor kinase antagonist. Treatment with BMP in turn elevated pro-tumorigenic secreted factors such as IL-6 and MMP-3. These experiments demonstrate that BMP may stimulate tumor progression within the tumor microenvironment.

  2. Breast cancer detection using mammary ductoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauter, Edward

    2005-06-01

    Mammary ductoscopy (MD) has been used as a tool to evaluate the breast for cancer for over 10 years. MD allows the direct visualization of the duct lumen, providing a more targeted approach to the diagnosis of disease arising in the ductal system, since the lesion can be visualized and samples collected in the area of interest. Initial studies of MD evaluated women with pathologic spontaneous nipple discharge (PND), while more recent reports are also using MD to assess women without PND for the presence of breast cancer. Cytologic assessment of MD is highly specific but less sensitive in the detection of breast cancer. Nonetheless, a MD sample from a breast with PND may rarely undergo cytologic review and be interpreted as consistent with malignancy, only later to undergo surgical resection demonstrating benign pathology. For this reason, PND specimens interpreted as malignant on cytologic review require histopathologic confirmation prior to instituting therapy. Additional sample evaluation using image or molecular analysis may improve the sensitivity and specificity of MD in breast cancer detection.

  3. Key signalling nodes in mammary gland development and cancer. Mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling in experimental models of breast cancer progression and in mammary gland development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyte, Jacqueline; Bergin, Orla; Bianchi, Alessandro; McNally, Sara; Martin, Finian

    2009-01-01

    Seven classes of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) intracellular signalling cascades exist, four of which are implicated in breast disease and function in mammary epithelial cells. These are the extracellular regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 pathway, the ERK5 pathway, the p38 pathway and the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway. In some forms of human breast cancer and in many experimental models of breast cancer progression, signalling through the ERK1/2 pathway, in particular, has been implicated as being important. We review the influence of ERK1/2 activity on the organised three-dimensional association of mammary epithelial cells, and in models of breast cancer cell invasion. We assess the importance of epidermal growth factor receptor family signalling through ERK1/2 in models of breast cancer progression and the influence of ERK1/2 on its substrate, the oestrogen receptor, in this context. In parallel, we consider the importance of these MAPK-centred signalling cascades during the cycle of mammary gland development. Although less extensively studied, we highlight the instances of signalling through the p38, JNK and ERK5 pathways involved in breast cancer progression and mammary gland development.

  4. Adeno-associated virus type 2 infection activates caspase dependent and independent apoptosis in multiple breast cancer lines but not in normal mammary epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tandon Apurva

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In normal cells proliferation and apoptosis are tightly regulated, whereas in tumor cells the balance is shifted in favor of increased proliferation and reduced apoptosis. Anticancer agents mediate tumor cell death via targeting multiple pathways of programmed cell death. We have reported that the non-pathogenic, tumor suppressive Adeno-Associated Virus Type 2 (AAV2 induces apoptosis in Human Papillomavirus (HPV positive cervical cancer cells, but not in normal keratinocytes. In the current study, we examined the potential of AAV2 to inhibit proliferation of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-468 (both weakly invasive, as well as MDA-MB-231 (highly invasive human breast cancer derived cell lines. As controls, we used normal human mammary epithelial cells (nHMECs isolated from tissue biopsies of patients undergoing breast reduction surgery. Results AAV2 infected MCF-7 line underwent caspase-independent, and MDA-MB-468 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines underwent caspase-dependent apoptosis. Death of MDA-MB-468 cells was marked by caspase-9 activation, whereas death of MDA-MB-231 cells was marked by activation of both caspase-8 and caspase-9, and resembled a mixture of apoptotic and necrotic cell death. Cellular demise was correlated with the ability of AAV2 to productively infect and differentially express AAV2 non-structural proteins: Rep78, Rep68 and Rep40, dependent on the cell line. Cell death in the MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 lines coincided with increased S phase entry, whereas the MDA-MB-468 cells increasingly entered into G2. AAV2 infection led to decreased cell viability which correlated with increased expression of proliferation markers c-Myc and Ki-67. In contrast, nHMECs that were infected with AAV2 failed to establish productive infection or undergo apoptosis. Conclusion AAV2 regulated enrichment of cell cycle check-point functions in G1/S, S and G2 phases could create a favorable environment for Rep protein expression. Inherent Rep associated

  5. Mammary fat of breast cancer: gene expression profiling and functional characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fengliang; Gao, Sheng; Chen, Fei; Fu, Ziyi; Yin, Hong; Lu, Xun; Yu, Jing; Lu, Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Mammary fat is the main composition of breast, and is the most probable candidate to affect tumor behavior because the fat produces hormones, growth factors and adipokines, a heterogeneous group of signaling molecules. Gene expression profiling and functional characterization of mammary fat in Chinese women has not been reported. Thus, we collected the mammary fat tissues adjacent to breast tumors from 60 subjects, among which 30 subjects had breast cancer and 30 had benign lesions. We isolated and cultured the stromal vascular cell fraction from mammary fat. The expression of genes related to adipose function (including adipogenesis and secretion) was detected at both the tissue and the cellular level. We also studied mammary fat browning. The results indicated that fat tissue close to malignant and benign lesions exhibited distinctive gene expression profiles and functional characteristics. Although the mammary fat of breast tumors atrophied, it secreted tumor growth stimulatory factors. Browning of mammary fat was observed and browning activity of fat close to malignant breast tumors was greater than that close to benign lesions. Understanding the diversity between these two fat depots may possibly help us improve our understanding of breast cancer pathogenesis and find the key to unlock new anticancer therapies.

  6. Mammary fat of breast cancer: gene expression profiling and functional characterization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengliang Wang

    Full Text Available Mammary fat is the main composition of breast, and is the most probable candidate to affect tumor behavior because the fat produces hormones, growth factors and adipokines, a heterogeneous group of signaling molecules. Gene expression profiling and functional characterization of mammary fat in Chinese women has not been reported. Thus, we collected the mammary fat tissues adjacent to breast tumors from 60 subjects, among which 30 subjects had breast cancer and 30 had benign lesions. We isolated and cultured the stromal vascular cell fraction from mammary fat. The expression of genes related to adipose function (including adipogenesis and secretion was detected at both the tissue and the cellular level. We also studied mammary fat browning. The results indicated that fat tissue close to malignant and benign lesions exhibited distinctive gene expression profiles and functional characteristics. Although the mammary fat of breast tumors atrophied, it secreted tumor growth stimulatory factors. Browning of mammary fat was observed and browning activity of fat close to malignant breast tumors was greater than that close to benign lesions. Understanding the diversity between these two fat depots may possibly help us improve our understanding of breast cancer pathogenesis and find the key to unlock new anticancer therapies.

  7. Radiogenic transformation of human mammary epithelial cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, T. C.; Georgy, K. A.; Tavakoli, A.; Craise, L. M.; Durante, M.

    1996-01-01

    Cancer induction by space radiations is a major concern for manned space exploration. Accurate assessment of radiation risk at low doses requires basic understanding of mechanism(s) of radiation carcinogenesis. For determining the oncogenic effects of ionizing radiation in human epithelial cells, we transformed a mammary epithelial cell line (185B5), which was immortalized by benzo(a)pyrene, with energetic heavy ions and obtained several transformed clones. These transformed cells showed growth properties on Matrigel similar to human mammary tumor cells. To better understand the mechanisms of radiogenic transformation of human cells, we systematically examined the alterations in chromosomes and cancer genes. Among 16 autosomes examined for translocations, by using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique, chromosomes 3, 12, 13, 15, 16, and 18 appeared to be normal in transformed cells. Chromosomes 1, 4, 6, 8, and 17 in transformed cells, however, showed patterns different from those in nontransformed cells. Southern blot analyses indicated no detectable alterations in myc, ras, Rb, or p53 genes. Further studies of chromosome 17 by using in situ hybridization with unique sequence p53 gene probe and a centromere probe showed no loss of p53 gene in transformed cells. Experimental results from cell fusion studies indicated that the transforming gene(s) is recessive. The role of genomic instability and tumor suppressor gene(s) in radiogenic transformation of human breast cells remains to be identified.

  8. Mammary Development and Breast Cancer: A Wnt Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Qing Cissy Yu; Verheyen, Esther M.; Yi Arial Zeng

    2016-01-01

    The Wnt pathway has emerged as a key signaling cascade participating in mammary organogenesis and breast oncogenesis. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge of how the pathway regulates stem cells and normal development of the mammary gland, and discuss how its various components contribute to breast carcinoma pathology.

  9. Mammary stem cells and the differentiation hierarchy: current status and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visvader, Jane E.; Stingl, John

    2014-01-01

    The mammary epithelium is highly responsive to local and systemic signals, which orchestrate morphogenesis of the ductal tree during puberty and pregnancy. Based on transplantation and lineage tracing studies, a hierarchy of stem and progenitor cells has been shown to exist among the mammary epithelium. Lineage tracing has highlighted the existence of bipotent mammary stem cells (MaSCs) in situ as well as long-lived unipotent cells that drive morphogenesis and homeostasis of the ductal tree. Moreover, there is accumulating evidence for a heterogeneous MaSC compartment comprising fetal MaSCs, slow-cycling cells, and both long-term and short-term repopulating cells. In parallel, diverse luminal progenitor subtypes have been identified in mouse and human mammary tissue. Elucidation of the normal cellular hierarchy is an important step toward understanding the “cells of origin” and molecular perturbations that drive breast cancer. PMID:24888586

  10. Differential gene expression pattern in human mammary epithelial cells induced by realistic organochlorine mixtures described in healthy women and in women diagnosed with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero, Javier; Henríquez-Hernández, Luis Alberto; Luzardo, Octavio P; Pestano, José; Zumbado, Manuel; Boada, Luis D; Valerón, Pilar F

    2016-03-30

    Organochlorine pesticides (OCs) have been associated with breast cancer development and progression, but the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are not well known. In this work, we evaluated the effects exerted on normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) by the OC mixtures most frequently detected in healthy women (H-mixture) and in women diagnosed with breast cancer (BC-mixture), as identified in a previous case-control study developed in Spain. Cytotoxicity and gene expression profile of human kinases (n=68) and non-kinases (n=26) were tested at concentrations similar to those described in the serum of those cases and controls. Although both mixtures caused a down-regulation of genes involved in the ATP binding process, our results clearly indicate that both mixtures may exert a very different effect on the gene expression profile of HMEC. Thus, while BC-mixture up-regulated the expression of oncogenes associated to breast cancer (GFRA1 and BHLHB8), the H-mixture down-regulated the expression of tumor suppressor genes (EPHA4 and EPHB2). Our results indicate that the composition of the OC mixture could play a role in the initiation processes of breast cancer. In addition, the present results suggest that subtle changes in the composition and levels of pollutants involved in environmentally relevant mixtures might induce very different biological effects, which explain, at least partially, why some mixtures seem to be more carcinogenic than others. Nonetheless, our findings confirm that environmentally relevant pollutants may modulate the expression of genes closely related to carcinogenic processes in the breast, reinforcing the role exerted by environment in the regulation of genes involved in breast carcinogenesis.

  11. Bovine mammary stem cells: new perspective for dairy science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martignani, E; Cravero, D; Miretti, S; Accornero, P; Baratta, M

    2014-01-01

    Mammary stem cells provide opportunities for the cyclic remodelling of the bovine mammary gland. Therefore, understanding the character and regulation of mammary stem cells is important for increasing animal health and productivity. The exciting possibility that stem cell expansion can influence milk production is currently being investigated by several researchers. In fact, appropriate regulation of mammary stem cells could hopefully benefit milk yield, persistency of lactation, dry period management and tissue repair. Accordingly, we and others have attempted to characterize and regulate the function of bovine mammary stem cells. However, research on mammary stem cells requires tissue biopsies, which represents a limitation for the management of animal welfare. Interestingly, different studies recently reported the identification of putative mammary stem cells in human breast milk. The possible identification of primitive cell types within cow's milk may provide a non-invasive source of relevant mammary cells for a wide range of applications. In this review, we have summarized the main achievements in this field for dairy cow science and described the interesting perspectives open to manipulate milk persistency during lactation and to cope with oxidative stress during the transition period by regulating mammary stem cells.

  12. Mammary epithelial cell: Influence of extracellular matrix composition and organization during development and tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kass, Laura; Erler, Janine T.; Dembo, Micah; Weaver, Valerie M.

    2009-01-01

    Stromal–epithelial interactions regulate mammary gland development and are critical for the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. The extracellular matrix, which is a proteinaceous component of the stroma, regulates mammary epithelial growth, survival, migration and differentiation through a repertoire of transmembrane receptors, of which integrins are the best characterized. Integrins modulate cell fate by reciprocally transducing biochemical and biophysical cues between the cell and the extracellular matrix, facilitating processes such as embryonic branching morphogenesis and lactation in the mammary gland. During breast development and cancer progression, the extracellular matrix is dynamically altered such that its composition, turnover, processing and orientation change dramatically. These modifications influence mammary epithelial cell shape, and modulate growth factor and hormonal responses to regulate processes including branching morphogenesis and alveolar differentiation. Malignant transformation of the breast is also associated with significant matrix remodeling and a progressive stiffening of the stroma that can enhance mammary epithelial cell growth, perturb breast tissue organization, and promote cell invasion and survival. In this review, we discuss the role of stromal–epithelial interactions in normal and malignant mammary epithelial cell behavior. We specifically focus on how dynamic modulation of the biochemical and biophysical properties of the extracellular matrix elicit a dialogue with the mammary epithelium through transmembrane integrin receptors to influence tissue morphogenesis, homeostasis and malignant transformation. PMID:17719831

  13. Dysfunctional telomeres promote genomic instability and metastasis in the absence of telomerase activity in oncogene induced mammary cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojovic, Bojana; Crowe, David L

    2013-02-01

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein that maintains the ends of chromosomes (telomeres). In normal cells lacking telomerase activity, telomeres shorten with each cell division because of the inability to completely synthesize the lagging strand. Critically shortened telomeres elicit DNA damage responses and limit cellular division and lifespan, providing an important tumor suppressor function. Most human cancer cells express telomerase which contributes significantly to the tumor phenotype. In human breast cancer, telomerase expression is predictive of clinical outcomes such as lymph node metastasis and survival. In mouse models of mammary cancer, telomerase expression is also upregulated. Telomerase overexpression resulted in spontaneous mammary tumor development in aged female mice. Increased mammary cancer also was observed when telomerase deficient mice were crossed with p53 null mutant animals. However, the effects of telomerase and telomere length on oncogene driven mammary cancer have not been completely characterized. To address these issues we characterized neu proto-oncogene driven mammary tumor formation in G1 Terc-/- (telomerase deficient with long telomeres), G3 Terc-/- (telomerase deficient with short telomeres), and Terc+/+ mice. Telomerase deficiency reduced the number of mammary tumors and increased tumor latency regardless of telomere length. Decreased tumor formation correlated with increased apoptosis in Terc deficient tumors. Short telomeres dramatically increased lung metastasis which correlated with increased genomic instability, and specific alterations in DNA copy number and gene expression. We concluded that short telomeres promote metastasis in the absence of telomerase activity in neu oncogene driven mammary tumors.

  14. Mammary fibroadenoma with pleomorphic stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abid, Najla; Kallel, Rim; Ellouze, Sameh; Mellouli, Manel; Gouiaa, Naourez; Mnif, Héla; Boudawara, Tahia

    2015-01-01

    The presence of enlarged and pleomorphic nuclei is usually regarded as a feature of malignancy, but it may on occasion be seen in benign lesions such as mammary fibroadenomas. We present such a case of fibroadenoma occurring in a 37-year-old woman presenting with a self-palpable right breast mass. Histological examination of the tumor revealed the presence of multi and mononucleated giant cells with pleomorphic nuclei. The recognition of the benign nature of these cells is necessary for differential diagnosis from malignant lesions of the breast. fibroadenoma - pleomorphic stromal cells - atypia - breast.

  15. Reconstitution of mammary epithelial morphogenesis by murine embryonic stem cells undergoing hematopoietic stem cell differentiation.

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    Shuxian Jiang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mammary stem cells are maintained within specific microenvironments and recruited throughout lifetime to reconstitute de novo the mammary gland. Mammary stem cells have been isolated through the identification of specific cell surface markers and in vivo transplantation into cleared mammary fat pads. Accumulating evidence showed that during the reformation of mammary stem cell niches by dispersed epithelial cells in the context of the intact epithelium-free mammary stroma, non-mammary epithelial cells may be sequestered and reprogrammed to perform mammary epithelial cell functions and to adopt mammary epithelial characteristics during reconstruction of mammary epithelium in regenerating mammary tissue in vivo. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To examine whether other types of progenitor cells are able to contribute to mammary branching morphogenesis, we examined the potential of murine embryonic stem (mES cells, undergoing hematopoietic differentiation, to support mammary reconstitution in vivo. We observed that cells from day 14 embryoid bodies (EBs under hematopoietic differentiation condition, but not supernatants derived from these cells, when transplanted into denuded mammary fat pads, were able to contribute to both the luminal and myoepithelial lineages in branching ductal structures resembling the ductal-alveolar architecture of the mammary tree. No teratomas were observed when these cells were transplanted in vivo. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data provide evidence for the dominance of the tissue-specific mammary stem cell niche and its role in directing mES cells, undergoing hematopoietic differentiation, to reprogram into mammary epithelial cells and to promote mammary epithelial morphogenesis. These studies should also provide insights into regeneration of damaged mammary gland and the role of the mammary microenvironment in reprogramming cell fate.

  16. BRCA1 controls the cell division axis and governs ploidy and phenotype in human mammary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhengcheng; Kannan, Nagarajan; Nemirovsky, Oksana; Chen, Helen; Connell, Marisa; Taylor, Brian; Jiang, Jihong; Pilarski, Linda M; Fleisch, Markus C; Niederacher, Dieter; Pujana, Miguel Angel; Eaves, Connie J; Maxwell, Christopher A

    2017-05-16

    BRCA1 deficiency may perturb the differentiation hierarchy present in the normal mammary gland and is associated with the genesis of breast cancers that are genomically unstable and typically display a basal-like transcriptome. Oriented cell division is a mechanism known to regulate cell fates and to restrict tumor formation. We now show that the cell division axis is altered following shRNA-mediated BRCA1 depletion in immortalized but non-tumorigenic, or freshly isolated normal human mammary cells with graded consequences in progeny cells that include aneuploidy, perturbation of cell polarity in spheroid cultures, and a selective loss of cells with luminal features. BRCA1 depletion stabilizes HMMR abundance and disrupts cortical asymmetry of NUMA-dynein complexes in dividing cells such that polarity cues provided by cell-matrix adhesions were not able to orient division. We also show that immortalized mammary cells carrying a mutant BRCA1 allele (BRCA1 185delAG/+) reproduce many of these effects but in this model, oriented divisions were maintained through cues provided by CDH1+ cell-cell junctions. These findings reveal a previously unknown effect of BRCA1 suppression on mechanisms that regulate the cell division axis in proliferating, non-transformed human mammary epithelial cells and consequent downstream effects on the mitotic integrity and phenotype control of their progeny.

  17. Mammary phenotypic expression induced in epidermal cells by embryonic mammary mesenchyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, G R; Young, P; Christov, K; Guzman, R; Nandi, S; Talamantes, F; Thordarson, G

    1995-01-01

    The goal of this research was to establish methods for inducing mammary epithelial differentiation from nonmammary epithelium. For this purpose, mid-ventral or dorsal epidermis (skin epithelium; SKE) from 13-day rat or mouse embryos was associated with 13-day embryonic mouse mammary mesenchyme (mammary gland mesenchyme; MGM) (mouse MGM+rat or mouse SKE). The resultant MGM+SKE recombinants as well as controls (homotypic mouse mammary recombinants, homotypic mouse skin recombinants and mouse mammary mesenchyme by itself) were grafted under the renal capsule of syngeneic or athymic female nude mouse hosts. Most female hosts were induced to undergo lactogenesis by grafting an adult pituitary which elicited a state of hyperprolactinemia. Tissue recombinants of mouse MGM+rat or mouse SKE grown for 1 month in vivo formed a hair-bearing keratinized skin from which mammary ductal structures extended into the mesenchyme. The ducts were composed of columnar luminal epithelial cells as well as basal, actin-positive myoepithelial cells. When grown in pituitary-grafted hosts, the ductal epithelial cells expressed casein and alpha-lactalbumin as judged by immunocytochemistry. The expression of caseins in MGM+SKE recombinants was confirmed by Western blot. The epithelial cells in mouse MGM+rat SKE recombinants expressing milk proteins were shown to be rat cells while the surrounding connective tissue was composed of mouse cells based upon staining with Hoechst dye 33258. Using mammary-specific markers, these studies confirmed the earlier morphological studies of Propper and unequivocally demonstrated for the first time that embryonic mammary mesenchyme can induce morphological and functional mammary differentiation from nonmammary epithelium.

  18. MTA family of transcriptional metaregulators in mammary gland morphogenesis and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rajesh R; Kumar, Rakesh

    2007-09-01

    Since breast cancer and its associated metastasis are a global health problem and a major cause of mortality among women, research efforts to understand the development, morphogenesis, and functioning of the mammary gland are a high priority. Myriad signaling pathways, transcription factors, and associated transcriptional coregulators have been identified in both normal functioning and neoplastic transformation of the mammary gland. The discovery of the metastasis tumor antigen 1 (MTA1) gene, its overexpression in cancer and metastasis and its subsequent identification as an integral part of the chromatin remodeling complex heralded extensive research on its physiological role. Subsequent identification of additional gene family members, namely MTA1s, MTA2, and MTA3, and their functions in the cell has resulted in the establishment of the significance of the MTA family. The role of these proteins in modulating hormonal responses in normal mammary glands and in breast cancer has resulted in their identification as important molecular markers and potential therapeutic targets.

  19. Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Mammary Gland in Domestic Cat

    OpenAIRE

    Filgueira, Kilder Dantas; Reche Junior,Archivaldo

    2012-01-01

    Background: In the feline species, 80% to 93% of neoplasias in the mammary gland are malignant, being the majority carcinomas. Among them, there is the mammary squamous cell carcinoma, which amounts to a very rare neoplasm in the domestic cat, with considerable potential for malignancy. This study aimed to report a case of squamous cell mammary carcinoma in the feline species. Case: A female cat, mixed breed, ten years old, presented history of skin lesion. The cat had been spayed two years b...

  20. Integrated extracellular matrix signaling in mammary gland development and breast cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jieqing; Xiong, Gaofeng; Trinkle, Christine; Xu, Ren

    2014-09-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM), a major component of the cellular microenvironment, plays critical roles in normal tissue morphogenesis and disease progression. Binding of ECM to membrane receptor proteins, such as integrin, discoidin domain receptors, and dystroglycan, elicits biochemical and biomechanical signals that control cellular architecture and gene expression. These ECM signals cooperate with growth factors and hormones to regulate cell migration, differentiation, and transformation. ECM signaling is tightly regulated during normal mammary gland development. Deposition and alignment of fibrillar collagens direct migration and invasion of mammary epithelial cells during branching morphogenesis. Basement membrane proteins are required for polarized acinar morphogenesis and milk protein expression. Deregulation of ECM proteins in the long run is sufficient to promote breast cancer development and progression. Recent studies demonstrate that the integrated biophysical and biochemical signals from ECM and soluble factors are crucial for normal mammary gland development as well as breast cancer progression.

  1. Vulnerability of Normal Human Mammary Epithelial Cells to Oncogenic Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    algorithm for CpG-island detection. BMC Bioinformatics 7: 446. 17. Gardiner-Garden M, Frommer M (1987) CpG islands in vertebrate genomes. J Mol Biol...it does not have a CpG island according to the original criteria (Gardiner-Garden and Frommer 1987). H3K4me3 and H3Ac are present in miR-205...culture of normal human mammary epithelial cells. Cancer Res 69: 7557–7568. Gardiner-GardenM, Frommer M. 1987. CpG islands in vertebrate genomes. J Mol

  2. Resident macrophages influence stem cell activity in the mammary gland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gyorki, D.E.; Asselin-Labat, M.L.; Rooijen, van N.; Lindeman, G.J.; Visvader, J.E.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Macrophages in the mammary gland are essential for morphogenesis of the ductal epithelial tree and have been implicated in promoting breast tumor metastasis. Although it is well established that macrophages influence normal mammopoiesis, the mammary cell types that these accessory cells

  3. Immunohistochemical analysis of oxidative stress and DNA repair proteins in normal mammary and breast cancer tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nardulli Ann M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the course of normal cellular metabolism, oxygen is consumed and reactive oxygen species (ROS are produced. If not effectively dissipated, ROS can accumulate and damage resident proteins, lipids, and DNA. Enzymes involved in redox regulation and DNA repair dissipate ROS and repair the resulting damage in order to preserve a functional cellular environment. Because increased ROS accumulation and/or unrepaired DNA damage can lead to initiation and progression of cancer and we had identified a number of oxidative stress and DNA repair proteins that influence estrogen responsiveness of MCF-7 breast cancer cells, it seemed possible that these proteins might be differentially expressed in normal mammary tissue, benign hyperplasia (BH, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS and invasive breast cancer (IBC. Methods Immunohistochemistry was used to examine the expression of a number of oxidative stress proteins, DNA repair proteins, and damage markers in 60 human mammary tissues which were classified as BH, DCIS or IBC. The relative mean intensity was determined for each tissue section and ANOVA was used to detect statistical differences in the relative expression of BH, DCIS and IBC compared to normal mammary tissue. Results We found that a number of these proteins were overexpressed and that the cellular localization was altered in human breast cancer tissue. Conclusions Our studies suggest that oxidative stress and DNA repair proteins not only protect normal cells from the damaging effects of ROS, but may also promote survival of mammary tumor cells.

  4. Removal of sialic acid from the surface of human MCF-7 mammary cancer cells abolishes E-cadherin-dependent cell-cell adhesion in an aggregation assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deman, J J; Van Larebeke, N A; Bruyneel, E A; Bracke, M E; Vermeulen, S J; Vennekens, K M; Mareel, M M

    1995-09-01

    MCF-7 human breast cancer cells express E-cadherin and show, at least in some circumstances, E-cadherin-dependent cell-cell adhesion (Bracke et al., 1993). The MCF-7/AZ variant spontaneously displays E-cadherin-dependent fast aggregation; in the MCF-7/6 variant, E-cadherin appeared not to be spontaneously functional in the conditions of the fast aggregation assay, but function could be induced by incubation of the suspended cells in the presence of insulinlike growth factor I (IGF-I) (Bracke et al., 1993). E-cadherin from MCF-7 cells was shown to contain sialic acid. Treatment with neuraminidase was shown to remove this sialic acid, as well as most of the sialic acid present at the cell surface. Applied to MCF-7/AZ, and MCF-7/6 cells, pretreatment with neuraminidase abolished spontaneous as well as IGF-I induced, E-cadherin-dependent fast cell-cell adhesion of cells in suspension, as measured in the fast aggregation assay. Treatment with neuraminidase did not, however, inhibit the possibly different, but equally E-cadherin-mediated, process of cell-cell adhesion of MCF-7 cells on a flat plastic substrate as assessed by determining the percentage of cells remaining isolated (without contact with other cells) 24 h after plating.

  5. A Role for T-Lymphocytes in Human Breast Cancer and in Canine Mammary Tumors

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    Maria Isabel Carvalho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammation in the tumor microenvironment has a prominent role in carcinogenesis and benefits the proliferation and survival of malignant cells, promoting angiogenesis and metastasis. Mammary tumors are frequently infiltrated by a heterogeneous population of immune cells where T-lymphocytes have a great importance. Interestingly, similar inflammatory cell infiltrates, cytokine and chemokine expression in humans and canine mammary tumors were recently described. However, in both species, despite all the scientific evidences that appoint for a significant role of T-lymphocytes, a definitive conclusion concerning the effectiveness of T-cell dependent immune mechanisms has not been achieved yet. In the present review, we describe similarities between human breast cancer and canine mammary tumors regarding tumor T-lymphocyte infiltration, such as relationship of TILs and mammary tumors malignancy, association of ratio CD4+/ CD8+ T-cells with low survival rates, promotion of tumor progression by Th2 cells actions, and association of great amounts of Treg cells with poor prognostic factors. This apparent parallelism together with the fact that dogs develop spontaneous tumors in the context of a natural immune system highlight the dog as a possible useful biological model for studies in human breast cancer immunology.

  6. Huntingtin Regulates Mammary Stem Cell Division and Differentiation

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    Salah Elias

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the mechanisms of mitotic spindle orientation during mammary gland morphogenesis. Here, we report the presence of huntingtin, the protein mutated in Huntington’s disease, in mouse mammary basal and luminal cells throughout mammogenesis. Keratin 5-driven depletion of huntingtin results in a decreased pool and specification of basal and luminal progenitors, and altered mammary morphogenesis. Analysis of mitosis in huntingtin-depleted basal progenitors reveals mitotic spindle misorientation. In mammary cell culture, huntingtin regulates spindle orientation in a dynein-dependent manner. Huntingtin is targeted to spindle poles through its interaction with dynein and promotes the accumulation of NUMA and LGN. Huntingtin is also essential for the cortical localization of dynein, dynactin, NUMA, and LGN by regulating their kinesin 1-dependent trafficking along astral microtubules. We thus suggest that huntingtin is a component of the pathway regulating the orientation of mammary stem cell division, with potential implications for their self-renewal and differentiation properties.

  7. Resveratrol, but not EGCG, in the diet suppresses DMBA-induced mammary cancer in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whitsett Timothy

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Despite the advent of new and aggressive therapeutics, breast cancer remains a leading killer among women; hence there is a need for the prevention of this disease. Several naturally occurring polyphenols have received much attention for their health benefits, including anti-carcinogenic properties. Two of these are resveratrol, a component of red grapes, and epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG, the major catechin found in green tea. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that these two polyphenols protect against chemically-induced mammary cancer by modulating mammary gland architecture, cell proliferation, and apoptosis. Female Sprague-Dawley CD rats were exposed to either resveratrol (1 g/kg AIN-76A diet, EGCG (0.065% in the drinking water, or control diet (AIN-76A for the entirety of their life starting at birth. At 50 days postpartum, rats were treated with 60 mg dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA/kg body weight to induce mammary cancer. Resveratrol, but not EGCG, suppressed mammary carcinogenesis (fewer tumors per rat and longer tumor latency. Analysis of mammary whole mounts from 50-day-old rats revealed that resveratrol, but not EGCG, treatment resulted in more differentiated lobular structures. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU incorporation studies showed that resveratrol treatment caused a significant reduction in proliferative cells in mammary terminal ductal structures at 50 days postpartum, making them less susceptible to carcinogen insult. The epithelial cells of terminal end buds in the mammary glands of resveratrol-treated rats also showed an increase in apoptotic cells compared to the control or EGCG-treated rats as measured by a DNA fragmentation assay. At the given doses, resveratrol treatment resulted in a serum resveratrol concentration of 2.00 μM, while treatment with EGCG resulted in a serum EGCG concentration of 31.06 nM. 17β-Estradiol, progesterone, and prolactin concentrations in the serum were not significantly affected

  8. Internal Mammary and Medial Supraclavicular Irradiation in Breast Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poortmans, P.M.P.; Collette, S.; Kirkove, C.; Limbergen, E. van; Budach, V.; Struikmans, H.; Collette, L.; Fourquet, A.; Maingon, P.; Valli, M.; Winter, K. De; Marnitz, S.; Barillot, I.; Scandolaro, L.; Vonk, E.; Rodenhuis, C.; Marsiglia, H.; Weidner, N.; Tienhoven, G. van; Glanzmann, C.; Kuten, A.; Arriagada, R.; Bartelink, H.; Bogaert, W. Van den

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The effect of internal mammary and medial supraclavicular lymph-node irradiation (regional nodal irradiation) added to whole-breast or thoracic-wall irradiation after surgery on survival among women with early-stage breast cancer is unknown. METHODS: We randomly assigned women who had a

  9. Characterization of spheres derived from canine mammary gland adenocarcinoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michishita, Masaki; Akiyoshi, Rui; Yoshimura, Hisashi; Katsumoto, Takuo; Ichikawa, Hitoshi; Ohkusu-Tsukada, Kozo; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Sasaki, Nobuo; Takahashi, Kimimasa

    2011-10-01

    There is increasing evidence for the presence of cancer stem cells in several solid tumors, and these cancer stem cells have a potential role in tumor initiation, aggression, and recurrence. The stem cell-like properties of spheres derived from canine mammary tumors remain largely elusive. We attempted to induce sphere formation using four cell lines of canine mammary adenocarcinoma, and characterized the spheres derived from a CHMp line in vitro and in vivo. The CHMp-derived spheres showed predominantly CD44+CD24- population, higher expression of stem cell-related genes, such as CD133, Notch3 and MDR, and higher resistance to doxorubicin compared with the CHMp-derived adherent cells. Xenograft transplantations in nude mice demonstrated that only 1 × 10(4)sphere cells were sufficient for tumor formation. Use of the sphere assay on these sphere-derived tumors showed that sphere-forming cells were present in the tumors, and were maintained in serial transplantation. We propose that spheres derived from canine mammary adenocarcinoma cell lines possess a potential characteristic of cancer stem cells. Spheres derived from canine mammary tumors could be a powerful tool with which to investigate novel therapeutic drugs and to elucidate the molecular and cellular mechanisms that underlie tumorigenesis.

  10. The Transcriptional Repressor ZNF503/Zeppo2 Promotes Mammary Epithelial Cell Proliferation and Enhances Cell Invasion*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahi, Payam; Slorach, Euan M.; Wang, Chih-Yang; Chou, Jonathan; Lu, Angela; Ruderisch, Aline; Werb, Zena

    2015-01-01

    The NET (nocA, Nlz, elB, TLP-1) subfamily of zinc finger proteins is an important mediator during developmental processes. The evolutionary conserved zinc finger protein ZNF503/Zeppo2 (zinc finger elbow-related proline domain protein 2, Zpo2) plays critical roles during embryogenesis. We found that Zpo2 is expressed in adult tissue and examined its function. We found that ZPO2 is a nuclearly targeted transcriptional repressor that is expressed in mammary epithelial cells. Elevated Zpo2 levels increase mammary epithelial cell proliferation. Zpo2 promotes cellular invasion through down-regulation of E-cadherin and regulates the invasive phenotype in a RAC1-dependent manner. We detect elevated Zpo2 expression during breast cancer progression in a MMTV-PyMT transgenic mouse model. Tumor transplant experiments indicated that overexpression of Zpo2 in MMTV-PyMT mammary tumor cell lines enhances lung metastasis. Our findings suggest that Zpo2 plays a significant role in mammary gland homeostasis and that deregulation of Zpo2 may promote breast cancer development. PMID:25538248

  11. Simvastatin exhibits antiproliferative effects on spheres derived from canine mammary carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Cristian G; Olivares, Araceli; Stoore, Caroll

    2015-05-01

    Mammary cancer is the most frequent type of tumor in the female canine. Treatments are mainly limited to surgery and chemotherapy; however, these tumors may develop clinical recurrence, metastasis and chemoresistance. The existence of a subpopulation of cancer cells with stemness features called cancer stem-like cells, may explain in part these characteristics of tumor progression. The statins, potent blockers of cholesterol synthesis, have also shown antitumor effects on cancer mammary cells, changes mediated by a decrease in the isoprenylation of specific proteins. Few studies have shown that simvastatin, a lipophilic statin, sensitizes cancer stem-like cells eliminating drug resistance. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of simvastatin on spheres derived from CF41.Mg canine mammary tumor cells, which were characterized by phenotypic and functional analyses. Spheres exhibited characteristics of stemness, primarily expressing a CD44⁺/CD24⁻/low phenotype, displaying auto-renewal and relative chemoresistance. Exposure to simvastatin induced a decrease in the sphere-forming capacity and cell viability, accompanied by a concentration- and time-dependent increase in caspase-3/7 activity. In addition, modulation of β-catenin and p53 expression was observed. Simvastatin triggered a synergistic effect with doxorubicin, sensitizing the spheres to the cytotoxic effect exerted by the drug. Invasiveness of spheres was decreased in response to simvastatin and this effect was counteracted by the presence of geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate. Our results suggest that simvastatin targets canine mammary cancer stem-like cells, supporting its therapeutical application as a novel agent to treat canine mammary cancer.

  12. Raloxifene inhibits tumor growth and lymph node metastasis in a xenograft model of metastatic mammary cancer

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    Li Zhong-Lian

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effects of raloxifene, a novel selective estrogen receptor modulator, were studied in a mouse metastatic mammary cancer model expressing cytoplasmic ERα. Methods Mammary tumors, induced by inoculation of syngeneic BALB/c mice with BJMC3879luc2 cells, were subsequently treated with raloxifene at 0, 18 and 27 mg/kg/day using mini-osmotic pumps. Results In vitro study demonstrated that the ERα in BJMC3879luc2 cells was smaller (between 50 and 64 kDa than the normal-sized ERα (66 kDa and showed cytoplasmic localization. A statistically significant but weak estradiol response was observed in this cell line. When BJMC3879luc2 tumors were implanted into mice, the ERα mRNA levels were significantly higher in females than in males. In vitro studies showed that raloxifene induced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest in the G1-phase and a decrease in the cell population in the S-phase. In animal experiments, tumor volumes were significantly suppressed in the raloxifene-treated groups. The multiplicity of lymph node metastasis was significantly decreased in the 27 mg/kg group. Levels of apoptosis were significantly increased in the raloxifene-treated groups, whereas the levels of DNA synthesis were significantly decreased in these groups. No differences in microvessel density in tumors were observed between the control and raloxifene-treated groups. The numbers of dilated lymphatic vessels containing intraluminal tumor cells were significantly reduced in mammary tumors in the raloxifene-treated groups. The levels of ERα mRNA in mammary tumors tended to be decreased in the raloxifene-treated groups. Conclusion These results suggest that the antimetastatic activity of raloxifene in mammary cancer expressing cytoplasmic ERα may be a crucial finding with clinical applications and that raloxifene may be useful as an adjuvant therapy and for the chemoprevention of breast cancer development.

  13. Raman spectra of normal and cancerous mouse mammary gland tissue using near infrared excitation energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Vaman; Serhatkulu, G. K.; Dai, H.; Shukla, N.; Weber, R.; Thakur, J. S.; Freeman, D. C.; Pandya, A. K.; Auner, G. W.; Naik, R.; Miller, R. F.; Cao, A.; Klein, M. D.; Rabah, R.

    2006-03-01

    Raman spectra of normal mammary gland tissues, malignant mammary gland tumors, and lymph nodes have been recorded using fresh tissue from mice. Tumors were induced in mice by subcutaneously injecting 4T1 BALB/c mammary tumor (a highly malignant) cell line. The Raman spectra were collected using the same tissues that were examined by histopathology for determining the cancerous/normal state of the tissue. Differences in various peak intensities, peak shifts and peak ratios were analyzed to determine the Raman spectral features that differentiate mammary gland tumors from non-tumorous tissue. Tissues that were confirmed by pathology as cancerous (tumors) show several distinctive features in the Raman spectra compared to the spectra of the normal tissues. For example, the cancerous tissues show Raman peaks at 621, 642, 1004, 1032, 1175 and 1208 cm-1 that are assignable to amino acids containing aromatic side-chains such as phenylalanine, tryptophan and tyrosine. Further, the cancerous tissues show a greatly reduced level of phospholipids compared to the normal tissues. The Raman spectral regions that are sensitive to pathologic alteration in the tissue will be discussed.

  14. The role of mammary ductoscopy in breast cancer: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapenhas-Valdes, Edna; Feldman, Sheldon M; Boolbol, Susan K

    2008-12-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed malignancy among American women. It is the second most common cause of cancer death. Genetic analysis using comparative genetic hybridization (CGH) has shown evidence that the majority of breast cancers, approximately 85%, begin in the ductal epithelium with normal cells progressing to atypia and finally to carcinoma. Mammary ductoscopy, also referred to as the intraductal approach, is a new tool that allows direct visualization of the breast ductal system. It enables one to sample the ductal epithelium and may allow identification of early changes cytologically as well as potentially play an important role in aiding surgical excision. This may aid in detection of breast masses long before they are palpable or visible via mammography. Mammary ductoscopy may have a role in the evaluation of women with nipple discharge, high-risk women, or limiting the amount of tissue removed in breast conservation surgery for cancer.

  15. Derivation of myoepithelial progenitor cells from bipotent mammary stem/progenitor cells.

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    Xiangshan Zhao

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence that breast and other cancers originate from and are maintained by a small fraction of stem/progenitor cells with self-renewal properties. Recent molecular profiling has identified six major subtypes of breast cancer: basal-like, ErbB2-overexpressing, normal breast epithelial-like, luminal A and B, and claudin-low subtypes. To help understand the relationship among mammary stem/progenitor cells and breast cancer subtypes, we have recently derived distinct hTERT-immortalized human mammary stem/progenitor cell lines: a K5(+/K19(- type, and a K5(+/K19(+ type. Under specific culture conditions, bipotent K5(+/K19(- stem/progenitor cells differentiated into stable clonal populations that were K5(-/K19(- and exhibit self-renewal and unipotent myoepithelial differentiation potential in contrast to the parental K5(+/K19(- cells which are bipotent. These K5(-/K19(- cells function as myoepithelial progenitor cells and constitutively express markers of an epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT and show high invasive and migratory abilities. In addition, these cells express a microarray signature of claudin-low breast cancers. The EMT characteristics of an un-transformed unipotent mammary myoepithelial progenitor cells together with claudin-low signature suggests that the claudin-low breast cancer subtype may arise from myoepithelial lineage committed progenitors. Availability of immortal MPCs should allow a more definitive analysis of their potential to give rise to claudin-low breast cancer subtype and facilitate biological and molecular/biochemical studies of this disease.

  16. A role of ghrelin in canine mammary carcinoma cells proliferation, apoptosis and migration

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    Majchrzak Kinga

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ghrelin is a natural ligand of the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R. They are often co-expressed in multiple human tumors and related cancer cell lines what can indicate that the ghrelin/GHS-R axis may have an important role in tumor growth and progression. However, a role of ghrelin in canine tumors remains unknown. Thus, the aim of our study was two-fold: (1 to assess expression of ghrelin and its receptor in canine mammary cancer and (2 to examine the effect of ghrelin on carcinoma cells proliferation, apoptosis, migration and invasion. The expression of ghrelin and its receptor in canine mammary cancer tissues and cell lines (isolated from primary tumors and their metastases was examined using Real-time qPCR and immunohistochemistry. For apoptosis analysis the Annexin V and propidium iodide dual staining was applied whereas cell proliferation was evaluated by MTT assay and BrdU incorporation test. The influence of ghrelin on cancer cells migration and invasion was assessed using Boyden chamber assays and wound healing assay. Results The highest expression of ghrelin was observed in metastatic cancers whereas the lowest expression of ghrelin receptor was detected in tumors of the 3rd grade of malignancy. Higher expression of ghrelin and its receptor was detected in cancer cell lines isolated from metastases than in cell lines isolated from primary tumors. In vitro experiments demonstrated that exposure to low doses of ghrelin stimulates cellular proliferation, inhibits apoptosis and promotes motility and invasion of canine mammary cancer cells. Growth hormone secretagogue receptor inhibitor ([D-Lys3]-GHRP6 as well as RNA interference enhances early apoptosis. Conclusion The presence of ghrelin and GHS-R in all of the examined canine mammary tumors may indicate their biological role in cancer growth and development. Our experiments conducted in vitro confirmed that ghrelin promotes cancer development and

  17. Transcriptional repressor Tbx3 is required for the hormone-sensing cell lineage in mammary epithelium.

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    Kamini Kunasegaran

    Full Text Available The transcriptional repressor Tbx3 is involved in lineage specification in several tissues during embryonic development. Germ-line mutations in the Tbx3 gene give rise to Ulnar-Mammary Syndrome (comprising reduced breast development and Tbx3 is required for mammary epithelial cell identity in the embryo. Notably Tbx3 has been implicated in breast cancer, which develops in adult mammary epithelium, but the role of Tbx3 in distinct cell types of the adult mammary gland has not yet been characterized. Using a fluorescent reporter knock-in mouse, we show that in adult virgin mice Tbx3 is highly expressed in luminal cells that express hormone receptors, and not in luminal cells of the alveolar lineage (cells primed for milk production. Flow cytometry identified Tbx3 expression already in progenitor cells of the hormone-sensing lineage and co-immunofluorescence confirmed a strict correlation between estrogen receptor (ER and Tbx3 expression in situ. Using in vivo reconstitution assays we demonstrate that Tbx3 is functionally relevant for this lineage because knockdown of Tbx3 in primary mammary epithelial cells prevented the formation of ER+ cells, but not luminal ER- or basal cells. Interestingly, genes that are repressed by Tbx3 in other cell types, such as E-cadherin, are not repressed in hormone-sensing cells, highlighting that transcriptional targets of Tbx3 are cell type specific. In summary, we provide the first analysis of Tbx3 expression in the adult mammary gland at a single cell level and show that Tbx3 is important for the generation of hormone-sensing cells.

  18. ErbB/EGF signaling and EMT in mammary development and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Katharine M; Booth, Brian W; Hendrix, Mary J C; Salomon, David S; Strizzi, Luigi

    2010-06-01

    Activation of the ErbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases via cognate Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF)-like peptide ligands constitutes a major group of related signaling pathways that control proliferation, survival, angiogenesis and metastasis of breast cancer. In this respect, clinical trials with various ErbB receptor blocking antibodies and specific tyrosine kinase inhibitors have proven to be partially efficacious in the treatment of this heterogeneous disease. Induction of an embryonic program of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in breast cancer, whereupon epithelial tumor cells convert to a more mesenchymal-like phenotype, facilitates the migration, intravasation, and extravasation of tumor cells during metastasis. Breast cancers which exhibit properties of EMT are highly aggressive and resistant to therapy. Activation of ErbB signaling can regulate EMT-associated invasion and migration in normal and malignant mammary epithelial cells, as well as modulating discrete stages of mammary gland development. The purpose of this review is to summarize current information regarding the role of ErbB signaling in aspects of EMT that influence epithelial cell plasticity during mammary gland development and tumorigenesis. How this information may contribute to the improvement of therapeutic approaches in breast cancer will also be addressed.

  19. MMTV-PyMT and Derived Met-1 Mouse Mammary Tumor Cells as Models for Studying the Role of the Androgen Receptor in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christenson, Jessica L; Butterfield, Kiel T; Spoelstra, Nicole S; Norris, John D; Josan, Jatinder S; Pollock, Julie A; McDonnell, Donald P; Katzenellenbogen, Benita S; Katzenellenbogen, John A; Richer, Jennifer K

    2017-04-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) has a faster rate of metastasis compared to other breast cancer subtypes, and no effective targeted therapies are currently FDA-approved. Recent data indicate that the androgen receptor (AR) promotes tumor survival and may serve as a potential therapeutic target in TNBC. Studies of AR in disease progression and the systemic effects of anti-androgens have been hindered by the lack of an AR-positive (AR+) immunocompetent preclinical model. In this study, we identified the transgenic MMTV-PyMT (mouse mammary tumor virus-polyoma middle tumor-antigen) mouse mammary gland carcinoma model of breast cancer and Met-1 cells derived from this model as tools to study the role of AR in breast cancer progression. AR protein expression was examined in late-stage primary tumors and lung metastases from MMTV-PyMT mice as well as in Met-1 cells by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Sensitivity of Met-1 cells to the AR agonist dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and anti-androgen therapy was examined using cell viability, migration/invasion, and anchorage-independent growth assays. Late-stage primary tumors and lung metastases from MMTV-PyMT mice and Met-1 cells expressed abundant nuclear AR protein, while negative for estrogen and progesterone receptors. Met-1 sensitivity to DHT and AR antagonists demonstrated a reliance on AR for survival, and AR antagonists inhibited invasion and anchorage-independent growth. These data suggest that the MMTV-PyMT model and Met-1 cells may serve as valuable tools for mechanistic studies of the role of AR in disease progression and how anti-androgens affect the tumor microenvironment.

  20. The gene desert mammary carcinoma susceptibility locus Mcs1a regulates Nr2f1 modifying mammary epithelial cell differentiation and proliferation.

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    Bart M G Smits

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies have revealed that many low-penetrance breast cancer susceptibility loci are located in non-protein coding genomic regions; however, few have been characterized. In a comparative genetics approach to model such loci in a rat breast cancer model, we previously identified the mammary carcinoma susceptibility locus Mcs1a. We now localize Mcs1a to a critical interval (277 Kb within a gene desert. Mcs1a reduces mammary carcinoma multiplicity by 50% and acts in a mammary cell-autonomous manner. We developed a megadeletion mouse model, which lacks 535 Kb of sequence containing the Mcs1a ortholog. Global gene expression analysis by RNA-seq revealed that in the mouse mammary gland, the orphan nuclear receptor gene Nr2f1/Coup-tf1 is regulated by Mcs1a. In resistant Mcs1a congenic rats, as compared with susceptible congenic control rats, we found Nr2f1 transcript levels to be elevated in mammary gland, epithelial cells, and carcinoma samples. Chromatin looping over ∼820 Kb of sequence from the Nr2f1 promoter to a strongly conserved element within the Mcs1a critical interval was identified. This element contains a 14 bp indel polymorphism that affects a human-rat-mouse conserved COUP-TF binding motif and is a functional Mcs1a candidate. In both the rat and mouse models, higher Nr2f1 transcript levels are associated with higher abundance of luminal mammary epithelial cells. In both the mouse mammary gland and a human breast cancer global gene expression data set, we found Nr2f1 transcript levels to be strongly anti-correlated to a gene cluster enriched in cell cycle-related genes. We queried 12 large publicly available human breast cancer gene expression studies and found that the median NR2F1 transcript level is consistently lower in 'triple-negative' (ER-PR-HER2- breast cancers as compared with 'receptor-positive' breast cancers. Our data suggest that the non-protein coding locus Mcs1a regulates Nr2f1, which is a candidate

  1. Bovine mammary stem cells: Transcriptome profiling and the stem cell niche

    Science.gov (United States)

    Identification and transcriptome analysis of mammary stem cells (MaSC) are important steps toward understanding the molecular basis of mammary epithelial growth, homeostasis and tissue repair. Our objective was to evaluate the molecular profiles of four categories of cells within the bovine mammary ...

  2. Differentiation of mammary stem cells in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barraclough, R; Rudland, P S

    1989-03-01

    The fully differentiated cells of the rat mammary parenchyma, the ductal epithelial, alveolar, and myoepithelial cells, are distinguished by their ultrastructure and by their accumulation of immunocytochemically detectable marker proteins. The different cell types probably develop from primative ductal structures called terminal end buds, which are present in the developing rat mammary glands, and these structures contain relatively undifferentiated cells. Clonal epithelial stem cell lines, obtained from normal rat mammary glands or benign mammary tumors, differentiate under appropriate conditions along a pathway to droplet-cell/doming cultures of primative alveolarlike cells. Under different culture conditions, the epithelial stem cells differentiate along a separate pathway to myoepitheliallike cells. They accumulate some of the specific marker proteins of myoepithelial cells in vivo, including type IV collagen, laminin, and Thy-1 antigen. In addition, these myoepitheliallike cells in culture contain an abundance of a potential calcium-binding protein, p9Ka, which also occurs in myoepithelial cells of histological sections from mammary glands. The accumulation of type IV collagen, laminin, Thy-1, and p9Ka occurs asynchronously along the pathway to the myoepitheliallike cells in vitro. Furthermore, the steady-state levels of these different marker proteins arise by alterations in the controls at the transcriptional, the posttranscriptional processing, and the translational stages of their production. These results suggest a stepwise control of synthesis of myoepithelial cell marker proteins, and in the case of p9Ka and Thy-1 antigen, this altered control may arise through their possession of novel transcriptional promoters.

  3. Evaluation of MCF10A as a Reliable Model for Normal Human Mammary Epithelial Cells.

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    Ying Qu

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women and a leading cause of cancer-related deaths for women worldwide. Various cell models have been developed to study breast cancer tumorigenesis, metastasis, and drug sensitivity. The MCF10A human mammary epithelial cell line is a widely used in vitro model for studying normal breast cell function and transformation. However, there is limited knowledge about whether MCF10A cells reliably represent normal human mammary cells. MCF10A cells were grown in monolayer, suspension (mammosphere culture, three-dimensional (3D "on-top" Matrigel, 3D "cell-embedded" Matrigel, or mixed Matrigel/collagen I gel. Suspension culture was performed with the MammoCult medium and low-attachment culture plates. Cells grown in 3D culture were fixed and subjected to either immunofluorescence staining or embedding and sectioning followed by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence staining. Cells or slides were stained for protein markers commonly used to identify mammary progenitor and epithelial cells. MCF10A cells expressed markers representing luminal, basal, and progenitor phenotypes in two-dimensional (2D culture. When grown in suspension culture, MCF10A cells showed low mammosphere-forming ability. Cells in mammospheres and 3D culture expressed both luminal and basal markers. Surprisingly, the acinar structure formed by MCF10A cells in 3D culture was positive for both basal markers and the milk proteins β-casein and α-lactalbumin. MCF10A cells exhibit a unique differentiated phenotype in 3D culture which may not exist or be rare in normal human breast tissue. Our results raise a question as to whether the commonly used MCF10A cell line is a suitable model for human mammary cell studies.

  4. Elf5 inhibits the epithelial-mesenchymal transition in mammary gland development and breast cancer metastasis by transcriptionally repressing Snail2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Rumela; Hwang, Julie; Andres Blanco, Mario; Wei, Yong; Lukačišin, Martin; Romano, Rose-Anne; Smalley, Kirsten; Liu, Song; Yang, Qifeng; Ibrahim, Toni; Mercatali, Laura; Amadori, Dino; Haffty, Bruce G; Sinha, Satrajit; Kang, Yibin

    2012-11-01

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a complex process that occurs during organogenesis and in cancer metastasis. Despite recent progress, the molecular pathways connecting the physiological and pathological functions of EMT need to be better defined. Here we show that the transcription factor Elf5, a key regulator of mammary gland alveologenesis, controls EMT in both mammary gland development and metastasis. We uncovered this role for Elf5 through analyses of Elf5 conditional knockout animals, various in vitro and in vivo models of EMT and metastasis, an MMTV-neu transgenic model of mammary tumour progression and clinical breast cancer samples. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Elf5 suppresses EMT by directly repressing the transcription of Snail2, a master regulator of mammary stem cells and a known inducer of EMT. These findings establish Elf5 not only as a key cell lineage regulator during normal mammary gland development, but also as a suppressor of EMT and metastasis in breast cancer.

  5. Social isolation induces autophagy in the mouse mammary gland: link to increased mammary cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumis, Allison; Cook, Katherine L; Andrade, Fabia O; Hu, Rong; Kidney, Emma; Zhang, Xiyuan; Kim, Dominic; Carney, Elissa; Nguyen, Nguyen; Yu, Wei; Bouker, Kerrie B; Cruz, Idalia; Clarke, Robert; Hilakivi-Clarke, Leena

    2016-10-01

    Social isolation is a strong predictor of early all-cause mortality and consistently increases breast cancer risk in both women and animal models. Because social isolation increases body weight, we compared its effects to those caused by a consumption of obesity-inducing diet (OID) in C57BL/6 mice. Social isolation and OID impaired insulin and glucose sensitivity. In socially isolated, OID-fed mice (I-OID), insulin resistance was linked to reduced Pparg expression and increased neuropeptide Y levels, but in group-housed OID fed mice (G-OID), it was linked to increased leptin and reduced adiponectin levels, indicating that the pathways leading to insulin resistance are different. Carcinogen-induced mammary tumorigenesis was significantly higher in I-OID mice than in the other groups, but cancer risk was also increased in socially isolated, control diet-fed mice (I-C) and G-OID mice compared with that in controls. Unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling (GRP78; IRE1) was upregulated in the mammary glands of OID-fed mice, but not in control diet-fed, socially isolated I-C mice. In contrast, expression of BECLIN1, ATG7 and LC3II were increased, and p62 was downregulated by social isolation, indicating increased autophagy. In the mammary glands of socially isolated mice, but not in G-OID mice, mRNA expressions of p53 and the p53-regulated autophagy inducer Dram1 were upregulated, and nuclear p53 staining was strong. Our findings further indicated that autophagy and tumorigenesis were not increased in Atg7(+/-) mice kept in social isolation and fed OID. Thus, social isolation may increase breast cancer risk by inducing autophagy, independent of changes in body weight.

  6. The chemokine receptor CCR7 promotes mammary tumorigenesis through amplification of stem-like cells.

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    Boyle, S T; Ingman, W V; Poltavets, V; Faulkner, J W; Whitfield, R J; McColl, S R; Kochetkova, M

    2016-01-07

    The chemokine receptor CCR7 is widely implicated in breast cancer pathobiology. Although recent reports correlated high CCR7 levels with more advanced tumor grade and poor prognosis, limited in vivo data are available regarding its specific function in mammary gland neoplasia and the underlying mechanisms involved. To address these questions we generated a bigenic mouse model of breast cancer combined with CCR7 deletion, which revealed that CCR7 ablation results in a considerable delay in tumor onset as well as significantly reduced tumor burden. Importantly, CCR7 was found to exert its function by regulating mammary cancer stem-like cells in both murine and human tumors. In vivo experiments showed that loss of CCR7 activity either through deletion or pharmacological antagonism significantly decreased functional pools of stem-like cells in mouse primary mammary tumors, providing a mechanistic explanation for the tumor-promoting role of this chemokine receptor. These data characterize the oncogenic properties of CCR7 in mammary epithelial neoplasia and point to a new route for therapeutic intervention to target evasive cancer stem cells.

  7. Use of a Novel Embryonic Mammary Stem Cell Gene Signature to Improve Human Breast Cancer Diagnostics and Therapeutic Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    SMART -seq 2 protocol to prepare cDNA libraries . Sequencing of these libraries is currently in progress. 2g. Cells will be sorted using population...cell capture and library preparation system to improve reproducibility in the generation of gene expression profiles from individual fMaSC. These...each predicted a higher likelihood of response, while stromal and luminal features predicted a lower response rate. D) The list of genes in the fMaSC

  8. A bcl-xS adenovirus selectively induces apoptosis in transformed cells compared to normal mammary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumantran, V N; Lee, D S; Woods Ignatoski, K M; Ethier, S P; Wicha, M S

    2000-01-01

    Oncogenes which drive the cell cycle, such as c-myc, can sensitize cells to apoptosis. This suggests the possibility that the expression of genes such as bcl-2 or bcl-xL is required to inhibit apoptosis induced by oncogene expression. We hypothesized that inhibition of Bcl-2/Bcl-xL by the pro-apoptotic Bcl-xS protein, would result in selective induction of apoptosis in mammary carcinoma cells compared to their nontransformed counterparts. Therefore, we compared the effects of Bcl-xS expression delivered by a bcl-xS adenovirus (bcl-xS-Adv) vector, on viability and apoptosis of nontransformed versus transformed mammary epithelial cells. We report that c-myc-transformed murine mammary cells are extremely sensitive to apoptosis induced by the bcl-xS adenovirus (bcl-xS-Adv) vector, whereas immortalized, nontransformed murine mammary cells are relatively resistant to apoptosis induced by this vector. Likewise, human mammary epithelial cells transduced with c-erbB-2 were more sensitive to apoptosis induced by the bcl-xS vector than the nontransformed parental cells. Similar results were obtained when we tested the effects of bcl-xS adenoviral infection on primary normal human mammary epithelial cells and SUM-190 PT cells, (a c-erbB-2 over-expressing human mammary carcinoma cell line) grown on Matrigel. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that inhibition of Bcl-2/Bcl-xL can result in selective killing of cancer cells compared to their nontransformed counterparts.

  9. In vivo fluorescence imaging reveals the promotion of mammary tumorigenesis by mesenchymal stromal cells.

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    Chien-Chih Ke

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are multipotent adult stem cells which are recruited to the tumor microenvironment (TME and influence tumor progression through multiple mechanisms. In this study, we examined the effects of MSCs on the tunmorigenic capacity of 4T1 murine mammary cancer cells. It was found that MSC-conditioned medium increased the proliferation, migration, and efficiency of mammosphere formation of 4T1 cells in vitro. When co-injected with MSCs into the mouse mammary fat pad, 4T1 cells showed enhanced tumor growth and generated increased spontaneous lung metastasis. Using in vivo fluorescence color-coded imaging, the interaction between GFP-expressing MSCs and RFP-expressing 4T1 cells was monitored. As few as five 4T1 cells could give rise to tumor formation when co-injected with MSCs into the mouse mammary fat pad, but no tumor was formed when five or ten 4T1 cells were implanted alone. The elevation of tumorigenic potential was further supported by gene expression analysis, which showed that when 4T1 cells were in contact with MSCs, several oncogenes, cancer markers, and tumor promoters were upregulated. Moreover, in vivo longitudinal fluorescence imaging of tumorigenesis revealed that MSCs created a vascularized environment which enhances the ability of 4T1 cells to colonize and proliferate. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that the promotion of mammary cancer progression by MSCs was achieved through the generation of a cancer-enhancing microenvironment to increase tumorigenic potential. These findings also suggest the potential risk of enhancing tumor progression in clinical cell therapy using MSCs. Attention has to be paid to patients with high risk of breast cancer when considering cell therapy with MSCs.

  10. Macrophages: Regulators of the Inflammatory Microenvironment during Mammary Gland Development and Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Nicholas J; Chuntova, Pavlina; Schwertfeger, Kathryn L

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are critical mediators of inflammation and important regulators of developmental processes. As a key phagocytic cell type, macrophages evolved as part of the innate immune system to engulf and process cell debris and pathogens. Macrophages produce factors that act directly on their microenvironment and also bridge innate immune responses to the adaptive immune system. Resident macrophages are important for acting as sensors for tissue damage and maintaining tissue homeostasis. It is now well-established that macrophages are an integral component of the breast tumor microenvironment, where they contribute to tumor growth and progression, likely through many of the mechanisms that are utilized during normal wound healing responses. Because macrophages contribute to normal mammary gland development and breast cancer growth and progression, this review will discuss both resident mammary gland macrophages and tumor-associated macrophages with an emphasis on describing how macrophages interact with their surrounding environment during normal development and in the context of cancer.

  11. A new immunization and treatment strategy for mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) associated cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braitbard, Ori; Roniger, Maayan; Bar-Sinai, Allan; Rajchman, Dana; Gross, Tamar; Abramovitch, Hillel; Ferla, Marco La; Franceschi, Sara; Lessi, Francesca; Naccarato, Antonio Giuseppe; Mazzanti, Chiara M.; Bevilacqua, Generoso; Hochman, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV) causes mammary carcinoma or lymphoma in mice. An increasing body of evidence in recent years supports its involvement also in human sporadic breast cancer. It is thus of importance to develop new strategies to impair the development, growth and metastasis of MMTV-associated cancers. The signal peptide of the envelope precursor protein of this virus: MMTV-p14 (p14) is an excellent target for such strategies, due to unique characteristics distinct from its regular endoplasmic reticulum targeting function. These include cell surface expression in: murine cancer cells that harbor the virus, human breast cancer (MCF-7) cells that ectopically express p14, as well as cultured human cells derived from an invasive ductal breast carcinoma positive for MMTV sequences. These findings support its use in signal peptide-based immune targeting. Indeed, priming and boosting mice with p14 elicits a specific anti-signal peptide immune response sufficient for protective vaccination against MMTV-associated tumors. Furthermore, passive immunization using a combination of anti-p14 monoclonal antibodies or the transfer of T-cells from immunized mice (Adoptive Cell Transfer) is also therapeutically effective. With reports demonstrating involvement of MMTV in human breast cancer, we propose the immune-mediated targeting of p14 as a strategy for prevention, treatment and diagnosis of MMTV-associated cancers. PMID:26934560

  12. [Controversy about internal mammary chain irradiation in breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennequin, C; Fourquet, A

    2014-10-01

    Irradiation of lymph nodes areas after surgery of breast cancer, and specifically of the internal mammary chain, is an open question, frequently discussed. Three randomised trials (French, European-EORTC, Canadian) have been recently published or presented. The French trial did not show any benefit for internal mammary chain irradiation, but it was probably underpowered. The EORTC and Canadian trials demonstrated an improvement in overall survival after lymph nodes irradiation, including the internal mammary chain. The absolute benefit is 1.6% (hazard ratio-0.88 in a recent meta-analysis). Because this benefit is limited, it is important to define the characteristics of the patients who may benefit from this irradiation. Analyses of the randomized trials are not complete, and it is difficult at this moment to accurately define this population. However, cardiac and pulmonary toxicity of lymph nodes irradiation is well known. For each patient, evaluation of the potential late toxicity must be evaluated and so an accurate dosimetry for critical organs must be performed: the indication of internal mammary chain irradiation depends of the benefit/risk ratio. Copyright © 2014 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Nutritional regulation of mammary cell apoptosis in lactating ewes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Colitti

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in understanding the control of the mammary cell population now offer new insights to understand the decline in milk yield of dairy animals, which has long been a biological conundrum for the mammary biologists. Evidence indicates that change in mammary cell number is the result of an imbalance between cell proliferation and cell removal and that this is a principal cause of declining production (Stefanon et al., 2001. Further, it suggests that the persistency of lactation, the rate of decline in milk yield with stage of lactation, is strongly influenced by the rate of cell death by apoptosis in the lactating gland (Wilde et al., 1997. The most significant advance in understanding the cell biology underpinning persistency of lactation has come from the demonstration that cell loss during lactation occurs by apoptosis. Several researches obtained in cell cultures in mouse and rat have indicated that gene expression and cellular activities are modulated by the reactive oxygen species..........

  14. Mammary gland development: cell fate specification, stem cells and the microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inman, Jamie L; Robertson, Claire; Mott, Joni D; Bissell, Mina J

    2015-03-15

    The development of the mammary gland is unique: the final stages of development occur postnatally at puberty under the influence of hormonal cues. Furthermore, during the life of the female, the mammary gland can undergo many rounds of expansion and proliferation. The mammary gland thus provides an excellent model for studying the 'stem/progenitor' cells that allow this repeated expansion and renewal. In this Review, we provide an overview of the different cell types that constitute the mammary gland, and discuss how these cell types arise and differentiate. As cellular differentiation cannot occur without proper signals, we also describe how the tissue microenvironment influences mammary gland development.

  15. Mammary gland involution as an immunotherapeutic target for postpartum breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornetti, Jaime; Martinson, Holly A; Betts, Courtney B; Lyons, Traci R; Jindal, Sonali; Guo, Qiuchen; Coussens, Lisa M; Borges, Virginia F; Schedin, Pepper

    2014-07-01

    Postpartum mammary gland involution has been identified as tumor-promotional and is proposed to contribute to the increased rates of metastasis and poor survival observed in postpartum breast cancer patients. In rodent models, the involuting mammary gland microenvironment is sufficient to induce enhanced tumor cell growth, local invasion, and metastasis. Postpartum involution shares many attributes with wound healing, including upregulation of genes involved in immune responsiveness and infiltration of tissue by immune cells. In rodent models, treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) ameliorates the tumor-promotional effects of involution, consistent with the immune milieu of the involuting gland contributing to tumor promotion. Currently, immunotherapy is being investigated as a means of breast cancer treatment with the purpose of identifying ways to enhance anti-tumor immune responses. Here we review evidence for postpartum mammary gland involution being a uniquely defined 'hot-spot' of pro-tumorigenic immune cell infiltration, and propose that immunotherapy should be explored for prevention and treatment of breast cancers that arise in this environment.

  16. Immunohistochemical characterization of mammary squamous cell carcinoma of the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassi, Francesco; Sarli, Giuseppe; Brunetti, Barbara; Morandi, Federico; Benazzi, Cinzia

    2008-11-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the mammary gland is rare in both veterinary and human medicine. Whereas human metaplastic and squamous variants are known, the objectives of the current study were to ascertain the presence of such entities in canine mammary tumors and to distinguish them from other (epidermal, sweat gland) squamous tumors that may develop in the same area. A panel of antibodies (anti-cytokeratin [CK] 19, CK 14, CK 5/6, pancytokeratin, and vimentin) was used on 18 mammary gland malignancies with squamous features and 16 malignant skin tumors (11 squamous cell carcinomas of the skin and 5 sweat glands). Fifteen of the 18 mammary carcinomas were classified as metaplastic carcinomas, and the remaining 3 were classified as squamous cell carcinomas. The 2 most useful markers to establish the histogenesis of mammary tumors were pancytokeratin and CK 19. All other antibodies were equally expressed (CK 14 and 5/6) in all histotypes. The antibody panel discriminated primary epidermal squamous tumors (pancytokeratin positive and CK 19 negative) from gland-derived squamous neoplasms (pancytokeratin positive and CK 19 positive) but failed to distinguish primary mammary tumors from other squamous tumors of glandular origin.

  17. Regulation of mammary stem/progenitor cells by PTEN/Akt/beta-catenin signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Korkaya

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent evidence suggests that many malignancies, including breast cancer, are driven by a cellular subcomponent that displays stem cell-like properties. The protein phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN is inactivated in a wide range of human cancers, an alteration that is associated with a poor prognosis. Because PTEN has been reported to play a role in the maintenance of embryonic and tissue-specific stem cells, we investigated the role of the PTEN/Akt pathway in the regulation of normal and malignant mammary stem/progenitor cell populations. We demonstrate that activation of this pathway, via PTEN knockdown, enriches for normal and malignant human mammary stem/progenitor cells in vitro and in vivo. Knockdown of PTEN in normal human mammary epithelial cells enriches for the stem/progenitor cell compartment, generating atypical hyperplastic lesions in humanized NOD/SCID mice. Akt-driven stem/progenitor cell enrichment is mediated by activation of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway through the phosphorylation of GSK3-beta. In contrast to chemotherapy, the Akt inhibitor perifosine is able to target the tumorigenic cell population in breast tumor xenografts. These studies demonstrate an important role for the PTEN/PI3-K/Akt/beta-catenin pathway in the regulation of normal and malignant stem/progenitor cell populations and suggest that agents that inhibit this pathway are able to effectively target tumorigenic breast cancer cells.

  18. Autophagy regulates keratin 8 homeostasis in mammary epithelial cells and in breast tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongara, Sameera; Kravchuk, Olga; Teplova, Irina; Lozy, Fred; Schulte, Jennifer; Moore, Dirk; Barnard, Nicola; Neumann, Carola A.; White, Eileen; Karantza, Vassiliki

    2010-01-01

    Autophagy is activated in response to cellular stressors and mediates lysosomal degradation and recycling of cytoplasmic material and organelles as a temporary cell survival mechanism. Defective autophagy is implicated in human pathology, as disruption of protein and organelle homeostasis enables disease-promoting mechanisms such as toxic protein aggregation, oxidative stress, genomic damage and inflammation. We previously showed that autophagy-defective immortalized mouse mammary epithelial cells (iMMECs) are susceptible to metabolic stress, DNA damage and genomic instability. We now report that autophagy deficiency was associated with ER and oxidative stress, and deregulation of p62-mediated keratin homeostasis in mammary cells and allograft tumors and in mammary tissues from genetically engineered mice. In human breast tumors, high phospho(Ser73)-K8 levels inversely correlated with Beclin 1 expression. Thus, autophagy preserves cellular fitness by limiting ER and oxidative stress, a function potentially important in autophagy-mediated suppression of mammary tumorigenesis. Furthermore, autophagy regulates keratin homeostasis in the mammary gland via a p62-dependent mechanism. High phospho(Ser73)-K8 expression may be a marker of autophagy functional status in breast tumors and, as such, could have therapeutic implications for breast cancer patients. PMID:20530580

  19. Estrogen receptor coregulators and pioneer factors: The orchestrators of mammary gland cell fate and development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bramanandam eManavathi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The 17-beta estradiol (E2, a steroid hormone, which play critical role in various cellular processes such as cell proliferation, differentiation, migration and apoptosis, is essential for reproduction and mammary gland development. E2 actions are mediated by two classical nuclear hormone receptors, estrogen receptor alpha and beta (ERs. The activity of ERs depends on the coordinate activity of ligand binding, posttranslational modification, and importantly their interaction with their partner proteins called ‘coregulators’. Because majority of breast cancers are ERalpha positive and coregulators are proved to be crucial for ER transcriptional activity, an increased interest in the field has led to the identification of a large number of coregulators. In the last decade, gene knockout studies using mouse models provided impetus to our further understanding of the role of these coregulators in mammary gland development. Several coregulators appear to be critical for terminal end bud formation, ductal branching and alveologenesis during mammary gland development. The emerging studies support that, in addition to these coregulators, the other ER partner proteins ‘pioneering factors’ also seems to contribute significantly to E2 signaling and mammary cell fate. This review discusses emerging themes in coregulator- and pioneering factor-mediated action on ER functions, particularly their role in mammary gland cell fate and development.

  20. Cholesterol superlattice modulates CA4P release from liposomes and CA4P cytotoxicity on mammary cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venegas, Berenice; Zhu, Weiwei; Haloupek, Nicole B; Lee, Janet; Zellhart, Elizabeth; Sugár, István P; Kiani, Mohammad F; Chong, Parkson Lee-Gau

    2012-05-02

    Liposomal drugs are a useful alternative to conventional drugs and hold great promise for targeted delivery in the treatment of many diseases. Most of the liposomal drugs on the market or under clinical trials include cholesterol as a membrane stabilizing agent. Here, we used liposomal CA4P, an antivascular drug, to demonstrate that cholesterol content can actually modulate the release and cytotoxicity of liposomal drugs in a delicate and predictable manner. We found that both the rate of the CA4P release from the interior aqueous compartment of the liposomes to the bulk aqueous phase and the extent of the drug's cytotoxicity undergo a biphasic variation, as large as 50%, with liposomal cholesterol content at the theoretically predicted C(r), e.g., 22.0, 22.2, 25.0, 33.3, 40.0, and 50.0 mol % cholesterol for maximal superlattice formation. It appears that at C(r), CA4P can be released from the liposomes more readily than at non-C(r), probably due to the increased domain boundaries between superlattice and nonsuperlattice regions, which consequently results in increased cytotoxicity. The idea that the increased domain boundaries at C(r) would facilitate the escape of molecules from membranes was further supported by the data of dehydroergosterol transfer from liposomes to MβCD. These results together show that the functional importance of sterol superlattice formation in liposomes can be propagated to distal targeted cells and reveal a new, to our knowledge, mechanism for how sterol content and membrane lateral organization can control the release of entrapped or embedded molecules in membranes.

  1. Perinatal exposure to bisphenol a increases adult mammary gland progesterone response and cell number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayyanan, Ayyakkannu; Laribi, Ouahiba; Schuepbach-Mallepell, Sonia; Schrick, Christina; Gutierrez, Maria; Tanos, Tamara; Lefebvre, Gregory; Rougemont, Jacques; Yalcin-Ozuysal, Ozden; Brisken, Cathrin

    2011-11-01

    Bisphenol A [BPA, 2,2,-bis (hydroxyphenyl) propane] is one of the highest-volume chemicals produced worldwide. It is detected in body fluids of more than 90% of the human population. Originally synthesized as an estrogenic compound, it is currently utilized to manufacture food and beverage containers resulting in uptake with food and drinks. There is concern that exposure to low doses of BPA, defined as less than or equal to 5 mg/kg body weight /d, may have developmental effects on various hormone-responsive organs including the mammary gland. Here, we asked whether perinatal exposure to a range of low doses of BPA is sufficient to alter mammary gland hormone response later on in life, with a possible impact on breast cancer risk. To mimic human exposure, we added BPA to the drinking water of C57/Bl6 breeding pairs. Analysis of the mammary glands of their daughters at puberty showed that estrogen-dependent transcriptional events were perturbed and the number of terminal end buds, estrogen-induced proliferative structures, was altered in a dose-dependent fashion. Importantly, adult females showed an increase in mammary epithelial cell numbers comparable to that seen in females exposed to diethylbestrol, a compound exposure to which was previously linked to increased breast cancer risk. Molecularly, the mRNAs encoding Wnt-4 and receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand, two key mediators of hormone function implicated in control of mammary stem cell proliferation and carcinogenesis, showed increased induction by progesterone in the mammary tissue of exposed mice. Thus, perinatal exposure to environmentally relevant doses of BPA alters long-term hormone response that may increase the propensity to develop breast cancer.

  2. Field cancerization in mammary carcinogenesis - Implications for prevention and treatment of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivenbark, Ashley G; Coleman, William B

    2012-12-01

    The natural history of breast cancer unfolds with the development of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in normal breast tissue, and evolution of this pre-invasive neoplasm into invasive cancer. The mechanisms that drive these processes are poorly understood, but evidence from the literature suggests that mammary carcinogenesis may occur through the process of field cancerization. Clinical observations are consistent with the idea that (i) DCIS may arise in a field of altered breast epithelium, (ii) narrow surgical margins do not remove the entire altered field (contributing to recurrence and/or disease progression), and (iii) whole-breast radiation therapy is effective in elimination of the residual field of altered cells adjacent to the resected DCIS. Molecular studies suggest that the field of altered breast epithelial cells may carry cancer-promoting genetic mutations (or other molecular alterations) or cancer promoting epimutations (oncogenic alterations in the epigenome). In fact, most breast cancers develop through a succession of molecular events involving both genetic mutations and epimutations. Hence, in hereditary forms of breast cancer, the altered field reflects the entire breast tissue which is composed of cells with a predisposing molecular lesion (such as a BRCA1 mutation). In the example of a BRCA1-mutant patient, it is evident that local resection of a DCIS lesion or localized but invasive cancer will not result in elimination of the altered field. In sporadic breast cancer patients, the mechanistic basis for the altered field may not be so easily recognized. Nonetheless, identification of the nature of field cancerization in a given patient may guide clinical intervention. Thus, patients with DCIS that develops in response to an epigenetic lesion (such as a hypermethylation defect affecting the expression of tumor suppressor genes) might be treated with epigenetic therapy to normalize the altered field and reduce the risk of secondary occurrence of

  3. Differential HIF-1α and HIF-2α Expression in Mammary Epithelial Cells during Fat Pad Invasion, Lactation, and Involution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Påhlman

    Full Text Available The development and functional cycle of the mammary gland involves a number of processes that are caricatured by breast cancer cells during invasion and metastasis. Expression of the hypoxia-inducible transcription factors HIF-1 and HIF-2 has been associated with metastatic, poor prognosis, and high-grade breast cancers. Since hypoxia affects normal epithelial differentiation, we hypothesise that HIFs are important for normal breast epithelial development and regeneration as well as cancer initiation and progression. Here, we investigated the expression of the oxygen-sensitive HIF-alpha subunits during mouse mammary gland development, lactation, and involution. In breast epithelial cells, HIF-1α was expressed during early development, prior to cell polarisation. In contrast, expression of HIF-2α occurred later and was restricted to a subpopulation of luminal epithelial cells in the lactating gland. Mammary gland involution is a developmental stage that involves extensive tissue remodelling with cell death but survival of tissue stem/progenitor cells. At this stage, HIF-2α, but little HIF-1α, was expressed in CK14-positive epithelial cells. The temporal but differential expression of the HIF-alpha subunits during the mammary gland life cycle indicates that their expression is controlled by additional factors to hypoxia. Further functional studies of the roles of these proteins in the mammary gland and breast cancer are warranted.

  4. Culture models of human mammary epithelial cell transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stampfer, Martha R.; Yaswen, Paul

    2000-11-10

    Human pre-malignant breast diseases, particularly ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS)3 already display several of the aberrant phenotypes found in primary breast cancers, including chromosomal abnormalities, telomerase activity, inactivation of the p53 gene and overexpression of some oncogenes. Efforts to model early breast carcinogenesis in human cell cultures have largely involved studies in vitro transformation of normal finite lifespan human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) to immortality and malignancy. We present a model of HMEC immortal transformation consistent with the know in vivo data. This model includes a recently described, presumably epigenetic process, termed conversion, which occurs in cells that have overcome stringent replicative senescence and are thus able to maintain proliferation with critically short telomeres. The conversion process involves reactivation of telomerase activity, and acquisition of good uniform growth in the absence and presence of TFGB. We propose th at overcoming the proliferative constraints set by senescence, and undergoing conversion, represent key rate-limiting steps in human breast carcinogenesis, and occur during early stage breast cancer progression.

  5. MicroRNA expression in canine mammary cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggs, R Michelle; Wright, Zachary M; Stickney, Mark J; Porter, Weston W; Murphy, Keith E

    2008-08-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are 18-22-nt noncoding RNAs that are involved in post-transcriptional regulation of genes. Oncomirs, a subclass of miRNAs, include genes whose expression, or lack thereof, are associated with cancers. Until the last decade, the domestic dog was an underused model for the study of various human diseases that have genetic components. The dog exhibits marked genetic and physiologic similarity to the human, thereby making it an excellent model for study and treatment of various hereditary diseases. Furthermore, because the dog presents with distinct, spontaneously occurring mammary tumors, it may serve as a model for genetic analysis and treatments of humans with malignant breast tumors. Because miRNAs have been found to act as both tumor suppressors and oncogenes in several different cancers, expression patterns of ten miRNAs (miR-15a, miR-16, miR-17-5p, miR-21, miR-29b, miR-125b, miR-145, miR-155, miR-181b, let-7f) known to be associated with human breast cancers were compared to malignant canine mammary tumors (n = 6) and normal canine mammary tissue (n = 10). Resulting data revealed miR-29b and miR-21 to have a statistically significant (p pattern of expression as in the human, except for miR-145 which does not show a difference in expression between the normal and cancerous canine samples. In addition, when analyzed according to specific cancer phenotypes, miR-15a and miR-16 show a significant downregulation in canine ductal carcinomas while miRsR-181b, -21, -29b, and let-7f show a significant upregulation in canine tubular papillary carcinomas.

  6. The role of the microenvironment in mammary gland development and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyak, Kornelia; Kalluri, Raghu

    2010-11-01

    The mammary gland is composed of a diverse array of cell types that form intricate interaction networks essential for its normal development and physiologic function. Abnormalities in these interactions play an important role throughout different stages of tumorigenesis. Branching ducts and alveoli are lined by an inner layer of secretory luminal epithelial cells that produce milk during lactation and are surrounded by contractile myoepithelial cells and basement membrane. The surrounding stroma comprised of extracellular matrix and various cell types including fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and infiltrating leukocytes not only provides a scaffold for the organ, but also regulates mammary epithelial cell function via paracrine, physical, and hormonal interactions. With rare exceptions breast tumors initiate in the epithelial compartment and in their initial phases are confined to the ducts but this barrier brakes down with invasive progression because of a combination of signals emitted by tumor epithelial and various stromal cells. In this article, we overview the importance of cellular interactions and microenvironmental signals in mammary gland development and cancer.

  7. Genomic profiling of murine mammary tumors identifies potential personalized drug targets for p53-deficient mammary cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam D. Pfefferle

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Targeted therapies against basal-like breast tumors, which are typically ‘triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs’, remain an important unmet clinical need. Somatic TP53 mutations are the most common genetic event in basal-like breast tumors and TNBC. To identify additional drivers and possible drug targets of this subtype, a comparative study between human and murine tumors was performed by utilizing a murine Trp53-null mammary transplant tumor model. We show that two subsets of murine Trp53-null mammary transplant tumors resemble aspects of the human basal-like subtype. DNA-microarray, whole-genome and exome-based sequencing approaches were used to interrogate the secondary genetic aberrations of these tumors, which were then compared to human basal-like tumors to identify conserved somatic genetic features. DNA copy-number variation produced the largest number of conserved candidate personalized drug targets. These candidates were filtered using a DNA-RNA Pearson correlation cut-off and a requirement that the gene was deemed essential in at least 5% of human breast cancer cell lines from an RNA-mediated interference screen database. Five potential personalized drug target genes, which were spontaneously amplified loci in both murine and human basal-like tumors, were identified: Cul4a, Lamp1, Met, Pnpla6 and Tubgcp3. As a proof of concept, inhibition of Met using crizotinib caused Met-amplified murine tumors to initially undergo complete regression. This study identifies Met as a promising drug target in a subset of murine Trp53-null tumors, thus identifying a potential shared driver with a subset of human basal-like breast cancers. Our results also highlight the importance of comparative genomic studies for discovering personalized drug targets and for providing a preclinical model for further investigations of key tumor signaling pathways.

  8. Mammary epithelial cells isolated from milk are a valuable, non-invasive source of mammary transcripts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion eBoutinaud

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Milk is produced in the udder by mammary epithelial cells (MEC. Milk contains MEC, which are gradually exfoliated from the epithelium during lactation. Isolation of MEC from milk using immunomagnetic separation may be a useful non-invasive method to investigate transcriptional regulations in ruminants’ udder. This review aims to describe the process of isolating MEC from milk, to provide an overview on the studies that use this method to analyze gene expression by qRT PCR and to evaluate the validity of this method by analysing and comparing the results between studies. In several goat and cow studies, consistent reductions in alpha-lactalbumin mRNA levels during once-daily milking (ODM and in SLC2A1 mRNA level during feed restriction are observed. The effect of ODM on alpha-lactalbumin mRNA level was similarly observed in milk isolated MEC and mammary biopsy. Moreover, we and others showed decreasing alpha-lactalbumin and increasing BAX mRNA levels with advanced stages of lactation in dairy cows and buffalo. The relevance of using the milk-isolated MEC method to analyze mammary gene expression is proven, as the transcript variations were also consistent with milk yield and composition variations under the effect of different factors such as prolactin inhibition or photoperiod. . However, the RNA from milk-isolated MEC is particularly sensitive to degradation. This could explain the differences obtained between milk-isolated MEC and mammary biopsy in two studies where gene expression was compared using qRT-PCR or RNA Sequencing analyses. As a conclusion, when the RNA quality is conserved, MEC isolated from milk are a valuable, non-invasive source of mammary mRNA to study various factors that impact milk yield and composition (ODM, feeding level, endocrine status, photoperiod modulation and stage of lactation.

  9. Neem leaf extract inhibits mammary carcinogenesis by altering cell proliferation, apoptosis, and angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arumugam, Arunkumar; Agullo, Pamela; Boopalan, Thiyagarajan; Nandy, Sushmita; Lopez, Rebecca; Gutierrez, Christina; Narayan, Mahesh; Rajkumar, Lakshmanaswamy

    2014-01-01

    Plant-based medicines are useful in the treatment of cancer. Many breast cancer patients use complementary and alternative medicine in parallel with conventional treatments. Neem is historically well known in Asia and Africa as a versatile medicinal plant with a wide spectrum of biological activities. The experiments reported herein determined whether the administration of an ethanolic fraction of Neem leaf (EFNL) inhibits progression of chemical carcinogen-induced mammary tumorigenesis in rat models. Seven-week-old female Sprague Dawley rats were given a single intraperitoneal injection of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU). Upon the appearance of palpable mammary tumors, the rats were divided into vehicle-treated control groups and EFNL-treated groups. Treatment with EFNL inhibited MNU-induced mammary tumor progression. EFNL treatment was also highly effective in reducing mammary tumor burden and in suppressing mammary tumor progression even after the cessation of treatment. Further, we found that EFNL treatment effectively upregulated proapoptotic genes and proteins such as p53, B cell lymphoma-2 protein (Bcl-2)-associated X protein (Bax), Bcl-2-associated death promoter protein (Bad) caspases, phosphatase and tensin homolog gene (PTEN), and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). In contrast, EFNL treatment caused downregulation of anti-apoptotic (Bcl-2), angiogenic proteins (angiopoietin and vascular endothelial growth factor A [VEGF-A]), cell cycle regulatory proteins (cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinase 2 [Cdk2], and Cdk4), and pro-survival signals such as NFκB, mitogen-activated protein kinase 1 (MAPK1). The data obtained in this study demonstrate that EFNL exert a potent anticancer effect against mammary tumorigenesis by altering key signaling pathways.

  10. Genotype x diet interactions in mice predisposed to mammary cancer: II. Tumors and metastasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gordon, Ryan R; Hunter, Kent W; Merrill, Michele La

    2008-01-01

    effects of diet on mammary tumor and metastases phenotypes, mapping of tumor/metastasis modifier genes, and the interaction between dietary fat levels and effects of cancer modifiers. Results demonstrate that animals fed a high-fat diet are not only more likely to experience decreased mammary cancer...

  11. Maternal high fat diet promotion of mammary tumor risk in adult progeny is associated with early expansion of mammary cancer stem-like cells and increased maternal oxidative environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many adult chronic diseases might be programmed during early life by maternal nutritional history. Here, we evaluated effects of maternal high fat diet on mammary gland development and tumor formation in adult progeny. Female Wnt-1 transgenic mice exposed to high fat (HFD, 45% kcal fat) or control C...

  12. Intraductal approach to breast cancer: the role of mammary ductoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmane, Vinay

    2010-09-01

    Mammary ductoscopy is a recent advance enabling direct visualisation and sampling of human mammary ducts using a micro endoscope. The majority of pre malignant and malignant changes in the breast arise from the epithelium lining the duct lobular unit, and access to this region by ductoscopy has the potential to revolutionise breast cancer diagnosis and treatment. The ability to sample ductal epithelium may allow identification of early malignant and pre-malignant cytological changes and assist surgical excision, facilitating diagnosis of non palpable cancer before detection on current imaging modalities. Presently, there are three main indications for ductoscopy in clinical practice viz. determining extent of resection for breast cancer, assessment of high risk individuals and in the management of patients with pathological nipple discharge. Our initial experience with ductoscopy in patients with nipple discharge undergoing surgery has been rewarding. Ductoscopy was feasible in 92% of patients. Abnormal findings on ductoscopy were associated with DCIS in 37% and DCIS with early invasive breast cancer in 21%, while normal ductoscopy correlated with a normal pathological assessment.

  13. Quantification of epithelial cell differentiation in mammary glands and carcinomas from DMBA- and MNU-exposed rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Sharma

    Full Text Available Rat mammary carcinogenesis models have been used extensively to study breast cancer initiation, progression, prevention, and intervention. Nevertheless, quantitative molecular data on epithelial cell differentiation in mammary glands of untreated and carcinogen-exposed rats is limited. Here, we describe the characterization of rat mammary epithelial cells (RMECs by multicolor flow cytometry using antibodies against cell surface proteins CD24, CD29, CD31, CD45, CD49f, CD61, Peanut Lectin, and Thy-1, intracellular proteins CK14, CK19, and FAK, along with phalloidin and Hoechst staining. We identified the luminal and basal/myoepithelial populations and actively dividing RMECs. In inbred rats susceptible to mammary carcinoma development, we quantified the changes in differentiation of the RMEC populations at 1, 2, and 4 weeks after exposure to mammary carcinogens DMBA and MNU. DMBA exposure did not alter the percentage of basal or luminal cells, but upregulated CD49f (Integrin α6 expression and increased cell cycle activity. MNU exposure resulted in a temporary disruption of the luminal/basal ratio and no CD49f upregulation. When comparing DMBA- or MNU-induced mammary carcinomas, the RMEC differentiation profiles are indistinguishable. The carcinomas compared with mammary glands from untreated rats, showed upregulation of CD29 (Integrin β1 and CD49f expression, increased FAK (focal adhesion kinase activation especially in the CD29hi population, and decreased CD61 (Integrin β3 expression. This study provides quantitative insight into the protein expression phenotypes underlying RMEC differentiation. The results highlight distinct RMEC differentiation etiologies of DMBA and MNU exposure, while the resulting carcinomas have similar RMEC differentiation profiles. The methodology and data will enhance rat mammary carcinogenesis models in the study of the role of epithelial cell differentiation in breast cancer.

  14. Development of new therapy for canine mammary cancer with recombinant measles virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichiro Shoji

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic virotherapy is a promising treatment strategy for cancer. We previously generated a recombinant measles virus (rMV-SLAMblind that selectively uses a poliovirus receptor-related 4 (PVRL4/Nectin4 receptor, but not signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM. We demonstrated that the virus exerts therapeutic effects against human breast cancer cells. Here, we examined the applicability of rMV-SLAMblind to treating canine mammary cancers (CMCs. We found that the susceptibilities of host cells to rMV-SLAMblind were dependent on canine Nectin-4 expression. Nectin-4 was detected in four of nine CMC cell lines. The rMV-SLAMblind efficiently infected those four Nectin-4-positive cell lines and was cytotoxic for three of them (CF33, CHMm, and CTBm. In vivo experiment showed that the administration of rMV-SLAMblind greatly suppressed the progression of tumors in mice xenografted with a CMC cell line (CF33. Immunohistochemistry revealed that canine Nectin-4 was expressed in 45% of canine mammary tumors, and the tumor cells derived from one clinical specimen were efficiently infected with rMV-SLAMblind. These results suggest that rMV-SLAMblind infects CMC cells and displays antitumor activity in vitro, in xenografts, and ex vivo. Therefore, oncolytic virotherapy with rMV-SLAMblind can be a novel method for treating CMCs.

  15. Genes involved in immortalization of human mammary cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stampfer, Martha R.; Yaswen, Paul

    2001-09-27

    Breast cancer progression is characterized by inappropriate cell growth. Normal cells cease growth after a limited number of cell divisions--a process called cellular senescence-while tumor cells may acquire the ability to proliferate indefinitely (immortality). Inappropriate expression of specific oncogenes in a key cellular signaling pathway (Ras, Raf) can promote tumorigenicity in immortal cells, while causing finite lifespan cells to undergo a rapid senescence-like arrest. We have studied when in the course of transformation of cultured human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC), the response to overexpressed oncogenic Raf changes from being tumor-suppressive to tumor enhancing, and what are the molecular underpinnings of this response. Our data indicate: (1) HMEC acquire the ability to maintain growth in the presence of oncogenic Raf not simply as a consequence of overcoming senescence, but as a result of a newly discovered step in the process of immortal transformation uncovered by our lab, termed conversion. Immortal cells that have not undergone conversion (e.g., cells immortalized by exogenous introduction of the immortalizing enzyme, telomerase) remain growth inhibited. (2) Finite lifespan HMEC growth arrest in response to oncogenic Raf using mediators of growth inhibition that are very different from those used in response to oncogenic Raf by rodent cells and certain other human cell types, including the connective tissue cells from the same breast tissue. While many diverse cell types appear to have in common a tumor-suppressive response to this oncogenic signal, they also have developed multiple mechanisms to elicit this response. Understanding how cancer cells acquire the crucial capacity to be immortal and to abrogate normal tumor-suppressive mechanisms may serve both to increase our understanding of breast cancer progression, and to provide new targets for therapeutic intervention. Our results indicate that normal HMEC have novel means of enforcing a Raf

  16. Imbalance between apoptosis and cell proliferation during early stages of mammary gland carcinogenesis in ACI rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutanzi, Kristy R.; Koturbash, Igor [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, AB, T1K3M4 (Canada); Bronson, Roderick T. [Department of Pathology, Harvard Medical School, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Pogribny, Igor P., E-mail: igor.pogribny@fda.hhs.gov [Division of Biochemical Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Kovalchuk, Olga, E-mail: olga.kovalchuk@uleth.ca [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, AB, T1K3M4 (Canada)

    2010-12-10

    Estrogen and ionizing radiation are well-documented human breast carcinogens, yet the exact mechanisms of their deleterious effects on mammary gland remain to be discerned. Here we analyze the balance between cellular proliferation and apoptosis in the mammary glands of rats exposed to estrogen and X-ray radiation and the combined action of these carcinogenic agents. For the first time, we show that combined exposure to estrogen and radiation has a synergistic effect on cell proliferation in the mammary glands of ACI rats, as evidenced by a substantially greater magnitude of cell proliferation, especially after 12 and 18 weeks of treatment, when compared to mammary glands of rats exposed to estrogen or radiation alone. We also demonstrate that an imbalance between cell proliferation and apoptosis, rather than enhanced cell proliferation or apoptosis suppression alone, may be a driving force for carcinogenesis. Our studies further suggest that compromised functional activity of p53 may be one of the mechanisms responsible for the proliferation/apoptosis imbalance. In sum, the results of our study indicate that evaluation of the extent of cell proliferation and apoptosis before the onset of preneoplastic lesions may be a potential biomarker of breast cancer risk after exposure to breast carcinogens.

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  7. File list: ALL.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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    Full Text Available ALL.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells mm9 All antigens Breast Mammary stem cells SRX1...85841,SRX188640,SRX191028,SRX213393,SRX213410,SRX213404,SRX185809,SRX185869,SRX213407 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells.bed ...

  8. File list: Pol.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Breast Mammary stem cells ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells.bed ...

  9. File list: Oth.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells mm9 TFs and others Breast Mammary stem cells ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells.bed ...

  10. File list: His.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells mm9 Histone Breast Mammary stem cells SRX213393...,SRX213410,SRX185869,SRX185809,SRX213404,SRX213407 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells.bed ...

  11. File list: Unc.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells mm9 Unclassified Breast Mammary stem cells http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells.bed ...

  12. File list: DNS.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells mm9 DNase-seq Breast Mammary stem cells SRX1910...28,SRX188640 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells.bed ...

  13. File list: His.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells mm9 Histone Breast Mammary stem cells SRX213393...,SRX213410,SRX213404,SRX185809,SRX185869,SRX213407 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells.bed ...

  14. File list: Pol.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Breast Mammary stem cells ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells.bed ...

  15. File list: Pol.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Breast Mammary stem cells ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells.bed ...

  16. File list: Oth.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells mm9 TFs and others Breast Mammary stem cells ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells.bed ...

  17. File list: ALL.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells mm9 All antigens Breast Mammary stem cells SRX1...91028,SRX188640,SRX213393,SRX213410,SRX213404,SRX213407,SRX185869,SRX185809,SRX185841 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells.bed ...

  18. File list: Unc.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells mm9 Unclassified Breast Mammary stem cells http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells.bed ...

  19. File list: Unc.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells mm9 Unclassified Breast Mammary stem cells http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells.bed ...

  20. File list: InP.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_cells mm9 Input control Breast Mammary cells SRX403481,SRX...187517,SRX187512,SRX403484 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_cells.bed ...

  1. File list: Pol.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Breast Mammary cells SRX187510,SR...X852566,SRX187515,SRX852567 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_cells.bed ...

  2. File list: InP.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_cells mm9 Input control Breast Mammary cells SRX403481,SRX...187517,SRX187512,SRX403484 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_cells.bed ...

  3. File list: His.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_cells mm9 Histone Breast Mammary cells SRX187511,SRX187516...,SRX403479,SRX403480 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_cells.bed ...

  4. File list: His.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_cells mm9 Histone Breast Mammary cells SRX187511,SRX187516...,SRX403480,SRX403479 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_cells.bed ...

  5. File list: His.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_cells mm9 Histone Breast Mammary cells SRX187511,SRX187516...,SRX403480,SRX403479 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_cells.bed ...

  6. File list: Oth.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_cells mm9 TFs and others Breast Mammary cells SRX187508,SR...X187509,SRX187514,SRX403482,SRX403483,SRX852562,SRX852565,SRX187513,SRX852563,SRX852564 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_cells.bed ...

  7. File list: InP.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_cells mm9 Input control Breast Mammary cells SRX403481,SRX...187512,SRX187517,SRX403484 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_cells.bed ...

  8. File list: Oth.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_cells mm9 TFs and others Breast Mammary cells SRX187508,SR...X187509,SRX187514,SRX403482,SRX403483,SRX852565,SRX852562,SRX852563,SRX187513,SRX852564 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_cells.bed ...

  9. File list: His.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_cells mm9 Histone Breast Mammary cells SRX187511,SRX187516...,SRX403480,SRX403479 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_cells.bed ...

  10. File list: DNS.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells mm9 DNase-seq Breast Mammary epithelial c...ells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells.bed ...

  11. File list: Oth.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells mm9 TFs and others Breast Mammary epithel...ial cells SRX424872,SRX330636,SRX330635 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells.bed ...

  12. File list: His.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells mm9 Histone Breast Mammary epithelial cel...ls SRX031075,SRX403485,SRX396749,SRX403486,SRX031213 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells.bed ...

  13. File list: DNS.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells mm9 DNase-seq Breast Mammary stem cells SRX1886...40,SRX191028 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells.bed ...

  14. File list: ALL.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells mm9 All antigens Breast Mammary stem cells SRX1...88640,SRX191028,SRX213393,SRX213410,SRX185869,SRX185809,SRX185841,SRX213404,SRX213407 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells.bed ...

  15. File list: ALL.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_cells mm9 All antigens Breast Mammary cells SRX187508,SRX1...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_cells.bed ...

  16. File list: ALL.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_cells mm9 All antigens Breast Mammary cells SRX187511,SRX1...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_cells.bed ...

  17. File list: DNS.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells mm9 DNase-seq Breast Mammary epithelial c...ells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells.bed ...

  18. File list: Unc.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells mm9 Unclassified Breast Mammary epithelia...l cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells.bed ...

  19. File list: DNS.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells mm9 DNase-seq Breast Mammary epithelial c...ells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells.bed ...

  20. File list: Oth.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells mm9 TFs and others Breast Mammary epithel...ial cells SRX424872,SRX330636,SRX330635 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells.bed ...

  1. File list: His.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells mm9 Histone Breast Mammary epithelial cel...ls SRX031075,SRX403485,SRX396749,SRX403486,SRX031213 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells.bed ...

  2. File list: Unc.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells mm9 Unclassified Breast Mammary epithelia...l cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells.bed ...

  3. File list: Pol.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Breast Mammary epithel...ial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells.bed ...

  4. File list: His.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells mm9 Histone Breast Mammary epithelial cel...ls SRX403485,SRX396749,SRX403486,SRX031075,SRX031213 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells.bed ...

  5. File list: Unc.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells mm9 Unclassified Breast Mammary epithelia...l cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells.bed ...

  6. File list: DNS.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells mm9 DNase-seq Breast Mammary epithelial c...ells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells.bed ...

  7. File list: His.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells mm9 Histone Breast Mammary epithelial cel...ls SRX031075,SRX403485,SRX396749,SRX403486,SRX031213 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells.bed ...

  8. File list: Pol.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Breast Mammary epithel...ial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells.bed ...

  9. File list: Unc.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells mm9 Unclassified Breast Mammary epithelia...l cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells.bed ...

  10. File list: Pol.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Breast Mammary epithel...ial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells.bed ...

  11. File list: Oth.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells mm9 TFs and others Breast Mammary epithel...ial cells SRX424872,SRX330636,SRX330635 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells.bed ...

  12. File list: Oth.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells mm9 TFs and others Breast Mammary epithel...ial cells SRX424872,SRX330635,SRX330636 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells.bed ...

  13. File list: Pol.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Breast Mammary epithel...ial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells.bed ...

  14. Oleanolic Acid, a Compound Present in Grapes and Olives, Protects against Genotoxicity in Human Mammary Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Sánchez-Quesada

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Oleanolic acid (AO and maslinic acid (MA are constituents of the skins of different fruits, including olives and white or red grapes. Although both compounds are known to have beneficial properties against different types of cancers, thus far, there are no studies about their chemopreventive effects in human breast cancer. Thus, we sought to elucidate whether both compounds possess chemopreventive activity. Two cell lines of human breast cancer cells and one noncancerous human mammary epithelial cells were used to determine the effects of OA and MA. The results showed that OA inhibited the proliferation and increased the oxidative stress of highly invasive cells. Additionally, OA decreased oxidative stress and oxidative damage to the DNA in human mammary epithelial cells. These results suggest that OA could act as a chemopreventive agent in human breast cancer and could inhibit the proliferation of highly invasive breast cancer cells.

  15. Metastatic canine mammary carcinomas can be identified by a gene expression profile that partly overlaps with human breast cancer profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hummel Michael

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Similar to human breast cancer mammary tumors of the female dog are commonly associated with a fatal outcome due to the development of distant metastases. However, the molecular defects leading to metastasis are largely unknown and the value of canine mammary carcinoma as a model for human breast cancer is unclear. In this study, we analyzed the gene expression signatures associated with mammary tumor metastasis and asked for parallels with the human equivalent. Methods Messenger RNA expression profiles of twenty-seven lymph node metastasis positive or negative canine mammary carcinomas were established by microarray analysis. Differentially expressed genes were functionally characterized and associated with molecular pathways. The findings were also correlated with published data on human breast cancer. Results Metastatic canine mammary carcinomas had 1,011 significantly differentially expressed genes when compared to non-metastatic carcinomas. Metastatic carcinomas had a significant up-regulation of genes associated with cell cycle regulation, matrix modulation, protein folding and proteasomal degradation whereas cell differentiation genes, growth factor pathway genes and regulators of actin organization were significantly down-regulated. Interestingly, 265 of the 1,011 differentially expressed canine genes are also related to human breast cancer and, vice versa, parts of a human prognostic gene signature were identified in the expression profiles of the metastatic canine tumors. Conclusions Metastatic canine mammary carcinomas can be discriminated from non-metastatic carcinomas by their gene expression profiles. More than one third of the differentially expressed genes are also described of relevance for human breast cancer. Many of the differentially expressed genes are linked to functions and pathways which appear to be relevant for the induction and maintenance of metastatic progression and may represent new therapeutic

  16. Columnar cell lesions of the canine mammary gland: pathological features and immunophenotypic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassali Geovanni D

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been suggested that columnar cell lesions indicate an alteration of the human mammary gland involved in the development of breast cancer. They have not previously been described in canine mammary gland. The aim of this paper is describe the morphologic spectrum of columnar cell lesions in canine mammary gland specimens and their association with other breast lesions. Methods A total of 126 lesions were subjected to a comprehensive morphological review based upon the human breast classification system for columnar cell lesions. The presence of preinvasive (epithelial hyperplasia and in situ carcinoma and invasive lesions was determined and immunophenotypic analysis (estrogen receptor (ER, progesterone receptor (PgR, high molecular weight cytokeratin (34βE-12, E-cadherin, Ki-67, HER-2 and P53 was perfomed. Results Columnar cell lesions were identified in 67 (53.1% of the 126 canine mammary glands with intraepithelial alterations. They were observed in the terminal duct lobular units and characterized at dilated acini may be lined by several layers of columnar epithelial cells with elongated nuclei. Of the columnar cell lesions identified, 41 (61.2% were without and 26 (38.8% with atypia. Association with ductal hyperplasia was observed in 45/67 (67.1%. Sixty (89.5% of the columnar cell lesions coexisted with neoplastic lesions (20 in situ carcinomas, 19 invasive carcinomas and 21 benign tumors. The columnar cells were ER, PgR and E-cadherin positive but negative for cytokeratin 34βE-12, HER-2 and P53. The proliferation rate as measured by Ki-67 appeared higher in the lesions analyzed than in normal TDLUs. Conclusions Columnar cell lesions in canine mammary gland are pathologically and immunophenotypically similar to those in human breast. This may suggest that dogs are a suitable model for the comparative study of noninvasive breast lesions.

  17. Role of peptidylarginine deiminase 2 (PAD2) in mammary carcinoma cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horibata, Sachi; Rogers, Katherine E; Sadegh, David; Anguish, Lynne J; McElwee, John L; Shah, Pragya; Thompson, Paul R; Coonrod, Scott A

    2017-05-26

    Penetration of the mammary gland basement membrane by cancer cells is a crucial first step in tumor invasion. Using a mouse model of ductal carcinoma in situ, we previously found that inhibition of peptidylarginine deiminase 2 (PAD2, aka PADI2) activity appears to maintain basement membrane integrity in xenograft tumors. The goal of this investigation was to gain insight into the mechanisms by which PAD2 mediates this process. For our study, we modulated PAD2 activity in mammary ductal carcinoma cells by lentiviral shRNA-mediated depletion, lentiviral-mediated PAD2 overexpression, or PAD inhibition and explored the effects of these treatments on changes in cell migration and cell morphology. We also used these PAD2-modulated cells to test whether PAD2 may be required for EGF-induced cell migration. To determine how PAD2 might promote tumor cell migration in vivo, we tested the effects of PAD2 inhibition on the expression of several cell migration mediators in MCF10DCIS.com xenograft tumors. In addition, we tested the effect of PAD2 inhibition on EGF-induced ductal invasion and elongation in primary mouse mammary organoids. Lastly, using a transgenic mouse model, we investigated the effects of PAD2 overexpression on mammary gland development. Our results indicate that PAD2 depletion or inhibition suppresses cell migration and alters the morphology of MCF10DCIS.com cells. In addition, we found that PAD2 depletion suppresses the expression of the cytoskeletal regulatory proteins RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42 and also promotes a mesenchymal to epithelial-like transition in tumor cells with an associated increase in the cell adhesion marker, E-cadherin. Our mammary gland organoid study found that inhibition of PAD2 activity suppresses EGF-induced ductal invasion. In vivo, we found that PAD2 overexpression causes hyperbranching in the developing mammary gland. Together, these results suggest that PAD2 plays a critical role in breast cancer cell migration. Our findings that EGF

  18. Isolation of stem-like cells from spontaneous feline mammary carcinomas: Phenotypic characterization and tumorigenic potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbieri, Federica; Wurth, Roberto [Section of Pharmacology, Dept. of Internal Medicine Di.M.I., and Center of Excellence for Biomedical Research - University of Genova, Viale Benedetto XV, 2, 16132 Genova (Italy); Ratto, Alessandra; Campanella, Chiara; Vito, Guendalina [Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale del Piemonte, Liguria e Valle D' Aosta, National Reference Center of Veterinary and Comparative Oncology (CEROVEC), Piazza Borgo Pila, 16129, Genova (Italy); Thellung, Stefano [Section of Pharmacology, Dept. of Internal Medicine Di.M.I., and Center of Excellence for Biomedical Research - University of Genova, Viale Benedetto XV, 2, 16132 Genova (Italy); Daga, Antonio [Laboratory of Translational Oncology, IRCCS Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria San Martino - IST- Istituto Nazionale Ricerca sul Cancro, L.go R. Benzi, 10, 16132 Genova Italy (Italy); Cilli, Michele [Animal Facility, IRCCS Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria San Martino - IST- Istituto Nazionale Ricerca sul Cancro, L.go R. Benzi, 10, 16132 Genova Italy (Italy); Ferrari, Angelo [Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale del Piemonte, Liguria e Valle D' Aosta, National Reference Center of Veterinary and Comparative Oncology (CEROVEC), Piazza Borgo Pila, 16129, Genova (Italy); Florio, Tullio, E-mail: tullio.florio@unige.it [Section of Pharmacology, Dept. of Internal Medicine Di.M.I., and Center of Excellence for Biomedical Research - University of Genova, Viale Benedetto XV, 2, 16132 Genova (Italy)

    2012-04-15

    Current carcinogenesis theory states that only a small subset of tumor cells, the cancer stem cells or tumor initiating cells (TICs), are responsible for tumor formation and progression. Human breast cancer-initiating cells have been identified as CD44-expressing cells, which retain tumorigenic activity and display stem cell-like properties. Spontaneous feline mammary carcinoma (FMC) is an aggressive cancer, which shows biological similarities to the human tumor counterpart. We report the isolation and phenotypic characterization of FMC-derived stem/progenitor cells, showing in vitro self-renewal, long-lasting proliferation and in vivo tumorigenicity. Twenty-one FMC samples were collected, histologically classified and characterized for the expression of Ki67, EGFR, ER-{alpha} and CD44, by immunohistochemistry. By culture in stem cell permissive conditions, we isolated, from 13 FMCs, a CD44-positive subpopulation able to survive and proliferate in vitro as mammospheres of different sizes and morphologies. When injected in NOD/SCID mice, FMC stem-like cells initiate tumors, generating cell heterogeneity and recapitulating the original histotype. In serum-containing medium, spheroid cells showed differentiation properties as shown by morphological changes, the loss of CD44 expression and tumorigenic potential. These data show that stem-defined culture of FMC enriches for TICs and validate the use of these cells as a suitable model for comparative oncology studies of mammary biology and testing therapeutic strategies aimed at eradicating TICs. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Feline mammary carcinoma contain a sub-population of stem-like cells expressing CD44 Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These grow as spheres in serum-free medium and self-renew Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Isolated stem-like cancer cells initiate tumor in immunodeficient mice Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Xenografted tumors are phenotypically similar to the original tumor Black

  19. Silencing of Kv4.1 potassium channels inhibits cell proliferation of tumorigenic human mammary epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Soo Hwa [Laboratories of Veterinary Pharmacology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University, San 56-1 Sillim-Dong Kwanak-Gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Changsun [Department of Food and Nutrition, College of Human Ecology, Chung-Ang University, Anseong, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Seong-Geun; Yarishkin, Oleg V. [Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Young Min; Kim, Jae Gon [Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, Konkuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); O' Grady, Scott M. [Department of Physiology, 495 Animal Science/Veterinary Medicine Bldg., St. Paul, University of Minnesota, MN (United States); Yoon, Kyong-Ah [Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Kyung-Sun [Veterinary Public Health, College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University, San 56-1 Sillim-Dong Kwanak-Gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Pan Dong [Laboratories of Veterinary Pharmacology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University, San 56-1 Sillim-Dong Kwanak-Gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, So Yeong, E-mail: leeso@snu.ac.kr [Laboratories of Veterinary Pharmacology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University, San 56-1 Sillim-Dong Kwanak-Gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-06-26

    Potassium channel activity has been shown to facilitate cell proliferation in cancer cells. In the present study, the role of Kv4.1 channels in immortal and tumorigenic human mammary epithelial cells was investigated. Kv4.1 protein expression was positively correlated with tumorigenicity. Moreover, transfection with siRNAs targeting Kv4.1 mRNA suppressed proliferation of tumorigenic mammary epithelial cells. Experiments using mRNA isolated from human breast cancer tissues revealed that the level of Kv4.1 mRNA expression varied depending on the stage of the tumor. Kv4.1 protein expression increased during stages T2 and T3 compared to normal tissue. These results demonstrated that Kv4.1 plays a role in proliferation of tumorigenic human mammary epithelial cells. In addition, elevated Kv4.1 expression may be useful as a diagnostic marker for staging mammary tumors and selective blockers of Kv4.1 may serve to suppress tumor cell proliferation.

  20. Age-dependent change in biological characteristics of stem cells in radiation-induced mammary carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimada, Yoshiya; Nishimura, Mayumi; Kakinuma, Shizuko; Imaoka, Tatsuhiko [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa, Chiba (Japan); Yasukawa-Barnes, Jane; Gould, Michael N.; Clifton, Kelly H. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Department of Human Oncology, Madison, WI (United States)

    2003-07-01

    If you ask what types of cells are the targets for carcinogenesis, a popular answer would be that cancer arises from stem cells. Stem cells are cells that are capable of both self-renewal and generation of differentiated progenies. If the hypothesis of 'cancer as stem cell disease' is correct, the risk of carcinogenesis should be a function of the number of stem cells and their responsiveness of carcinogen-induced damage. In the present study, we addressed the feasibility of this hypothesis using the rat mammary carcinogenesis model. One of the important conclusions emerging from studies on atomic bomb survivors concerns age-related changes in the susceptibility to breast cancer. The relative risk of breast cancer is very high among women exposed to ionizing radiation before or during puberty, and it decreases thereafter. Little information is available, however, on age-related changes in the radiobiological nature of mammary stem cells. We examined age-associated changes in the number of mammary stem-like cells (clonogens) and their susceptibility to radiation in terms of cell death and carcinogenic initiation frequency. The results were as follows. (1) During the prepubertal period, the total number of mammary clonogens per rat increased exponentially with a population doubling time of {approx}4 days. After puberty, the doubling time lengthened to {approx}30 days. The total number of clonogens in abdominal and inguinal mammary glands was {approx}200 in 2-week-old rats, while it was {approx}5600 in 8-week-old rats. (2) The survival curves of clonogenic cells after irradiation indicated that radiation sensitivity of the cells before and during puberty was much higher than after puberty. (3) The initiation frequency of the clonogens from prepubertal rats after 5 Gy irradiation was four times higher than that of the clonogens from post-pubertal rats. These results suggest that changes in the number of stem cells and their radiobiological characteristics

  1. Epimorphin Functions as a Key Morphoregulator for Mammary Epithelial Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirai, H.; Lochter, A.; Galosy, S.; Koshida, S.; Niwa, S.; Bissell, M.J.

    1997-10-13

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and EGF have been reported to promote branching morphogenesis of mammary epithelial cells. We now show that it is epimorphin that is primarily responsible for this phenomenon. In vivo, epimorphin was detected in the stromal compartment but not in lumenal epithelial cells of the mammary gland; in culture, however, a subpopulation of mammary epithelial cells produced significant amounts of epimorphin. When epimorphin-expressing epithelial cell clones were cultured in collagen gels they displayed branching morphogenesis in the presence of HGF, EGF, keratinocyte growth factor, or fibroblast growth factor, a process that was inhibited by anti-epimorphin but not anti-HGF antibodies. The branch length, however, was roughly proportional to the ability of the factors to induce growth. Accordingly, epimorphin-negative epithelial cells simply grew in a cluster in response to the growth factors and failed to branch. When recombinant epimorphin was added to these collagen gels, epimorphin-negative cells underwent branching morphogenesis. The mode of action of epimorphin on morphogenesis of the gland, however, was dependent on how it was presented to the mammary cells. If epimorphin was overexpressed in epimorphin-negative epithelial cells under regulation of an inducible promoter or was allowed to coat the surface of each epithelial cell in a nonpolar fashion, the cells formed globular, alveoli-like structures with a large central lumen instead of branching ducts. This process was enhanced also by addition of HGF, EGF, or other growth factors and was inhibited by epimorphin antibodies. These results suggest that epimorphin is the primary morphogen in the mammary gland but that growth factors are necessary to achieve the appropriate cell numbers for the resulting morphogenesis to be visualized.

  2. Citrus flavonoid naringenin reduces mammary tumor cell viability, adipose mass, and adipose inflammation in obese ovariectomized mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Jia-Yu; Banh, Taylor; Hsiao, Yung-Hsuan; Cole, Rachel M; Straka, Shana R; Yee, Lisa D; Belury, Martha A

    2017-09-01

    Obesity-related metabolic dysregulation may be a link between obesity and postmenopausal breast cancer. Naringenin, a flavonoid abundant in grapefruits, displays beneficial effects on metabolic health and tumorigenesis. Here, we assessed the effects of naringenin on mammary tumor cell growth in vitro and in obese ovariectomized mice. Naringenin inhibited cell growth, increased phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), down-regulated CyclinD1 expression, and induced cell death in E0771 mammary tumor cells. Obese ovariectomized mice were fed a high-fat (HF), high-fat diet with low naringenin (LN; 1% naringenin) or high-fat diet with high naringenin (HN; 3% naringenin) for 2 weeks and then implanted with E0771 cells in mammary adipose tissue. Three weeks after tumor cell implantation, naringenin accumulation in tumor was higher than that in mammary adipose tissue in HN mice. HN decreased body weight, adipose mass, adipocyte size, α-smooth muscle actin mRNA in mammary adipose tissue, and mRNA of inflammatory cytokines in both mammary and perigonadal adipose tissues. Compared with mice fed HF diet, HN delayed growth of tumors early but did not alter final tumor weight. Naringenin reduces adiposity and ameliorates adipose tissue inflammation, with a moderate inhibitory effect on tumor growth in obese ovariectomized mice. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Hugl1 and Hugl2 in mammary epithelial cells: polarity, proliferation, and differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atlantis Russ

    Full Text Available Loss of epithelial polarity is described as a hallmark of epithelial cancer. To determine the role of Hugl1 and Hugl2 expression in the breast, we investigated their localization in human mammary duct tissue and the effects of expression modulation in normal and cancer cell lines on polarity, proliferation and differentiation. Expression of Hugl1 and Hugl2 was silenced in both MCF10A cells and Human Mammary Epithelial Cells and cell lines were grown in 2-D on plastic and in 3-D in Matrigel to form acini. Cells in monolayer were compared for proliferative and phenotypic changes while acini were examined for differences in size, ability to form a hollow lumen, nuclear size and shape, and localization of key domain-specific proteins as a measure of polarity. We detected overlapping but distinct localization of Hugl1 and Hugl2 in the human mammary gland, with Hugl1 expressed in both luminal and myoepithelium and Hugl2 largely restricted to myoepithelium. On a plastic surface, loss of Hugl1 or Hugl2 in normal epithelium induced a mesenchymal phenotype, and these cells formed large cellular masses when grown in Matrigel. In addition, loss of Hugl1 or Hugl2 expression in MCF10A cells resulted in increased proliferation on Matrigel, while gain of Hugl1 expression in tumor cells suppressed proliferation. Loss of polarity was also observed with knockdown of either Hugl1 or Hugl2, with cells growing in Matrigel appearing as a multilayered epithelium, with randomly oriented Golgi and multiple enlarged nuclei. Furthermore, Hugl1 knock down resulted in a loss of membrane identity and the development of cellular asymmetries in Human Mammary Epithelial Cells. Overall, these data demonstrate an essential role for both Hugl1 and Hugl2 in the maintenance of breast epithelial polarity and differentiated cell morphology, as well as growth control.

  4. Effects of age and parity on mammary gland lesions and progenitor cells in the FVB/N-RC mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raafat, Ahmed; Strizzi, Luigi; Lashin, Karim; Ginsburg, Erika; McCurdy, David; Salomon, David; Smith, Gilbert H; Medina, Daniel; Callahan, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The FVB/N mouse strain is extensively used in the development of animal models for breast cancer research. Recently it has been reported that the aging FVB/N mice develop spontaneous mammary lesions and tumors accompanied with abnormalities in the pituitary glands. These observations have a great impact on the mouse models of human breast cancer. We have developed a population of inbred FVB/N mice (designated FVB/N-RC) that have been genetically isolated for 20 years. To study the effects of age and parity on abnormalities of the mammary glands of FVB/N-RC mice, twenty-five nulliparous and multiparous (3-4 pregnancies) females were euthanized at 16-22 months of age. Examination of the mammary glands did not reveal macroscopic evidence of mammary gland tumors in either aged-nulliparous or multiparous FVB/N-RC mice (0/25). However, histological analysis of the mammary glands showed rare focal nodules of squamous changes in 2 of the aged multiparous mice. Mammary gland hyperplasia was detected in 8% and 71% of the aged-nulliparous and aged-multiparous mice, respectively. Epithelial contents and serum levels of triiodothyronine were significantly higher in the experimental groups than the 14-wk-old control mice. Immuno-histochemical staining of the pituitary gland pars distalis showed no difference in prolactin staining between the control and the aged mice. Tissue transplant and dilution studies showed no effect of age and/or parity on the ability of putative progenitor cells present among the injected mammary cells to repopulate a cleared fat pad and develop a full mammary gland outgrowth. This FVB/N-RC mouse substrain is suitable to develop mouse models for breast cancer.

  5. Effects of age and parity on mammary gland lesions and progenitor cells in the FVB/N-RC mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Raafat

    Full Text Available The FVB/N mouse strain is extensively used in the development of animal models for breast cancer research. Recently it has been reported that the aging FVB/N mice develop spontaneous mammary lesions and tumors accompanied with abnormalities in the pituitary glands. These observations have a great impact on the mouse models of human breast cancer. We have developed a population of inbred FVB/N mice (designated FVB/N-RC that have been genetically isolated for 20 years. To study the effects of age and parity on abnormalities of the mammary glands of FVB/N-RC mice, twenty-five nulliparous and multiparous (3-4 pregnancies females were euthanized at 16-22 months of age. Examination of the mammary glands did not reveal macroscopic evidence of mammary gland tumors in either aged-nulliparous or multiparous FVB/N-RC mice (0/25. However, histological analysis of the mammary glands showed rare focal nodules of squamous changes in 2 of the aged multiparous mice. Mammary gland hyperplasia was detected in 8% and 71% of the aged-nulliparous and aged-multiparous mice, respectively. Epithelial contents and serum levels of triiodothyronine were significantly higher in the experimental groups than the 14-wk-old control mice. Immuno-histochemical staining of the pituitary gland pars distalis showed no difference in prolactin staining between the control and the aged mice. Tissue transplant and dilution studies showed no effect of age and/or parity on the ability of putative progenitor cells present among the injected mammary cells to repopulate a cleared fat pad and develop a full mammary gland outgrowth. This FVB/N-RC mouse substrain is suitable to develop mouse models for breast cancer.

  6. Immortalized bovine mammary epithelial cells express stem cell markers and differentiate in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Han; Zheng, Nan; Gao, Haina; Dai, Wenting; Zhang, Yangdong; Li, Songli; Wang, Jiaqi

    2016-08-01

    The bovine mammary epithelial cell is a secretory cell, and its cell number and secretory activity determine milk production. In this study, we immortalized a bovine mammary epithelial cell line by SV40 large T antigen gene using a retrovirus based on Chinese Holstein primary mammary epithelial cells (CMEC) cultured in vitro. An immortalized bovine mammary epithelial cell line surpassed the 50-passage mark and was designated the CMEC-H. The immortalized mammary epithelial cells grew in close contact with each other and exhibited the typical cobblestone morphology characteristic with obvious boundaries. The telomerase expression of CMEC-H has consistently demonstrated the presence of telomerase activity as an immortalized cell line, but the cell line never induced tumor formation in nude mice. CMEC-H expressed epithelial (cytokeratins CK7, CK8, CK18, and CK19), mesenchymal (vimentin), and stem/progenitor (CD44 and p63) cell markers. The induced expression of milk proteins, αS1 -casein, β-casein, κ-casein, and butyrophilin, indicated that CMEC-H maintained the synthesis function of the mammary epithelial cells. The established immortalized bovine mammary epithelial cell line CMEC-H is capable of self-renewal and differentiation and can serve as a valuable reagent for studying the physiological mechanism of the mammary gland.

  7. Caveolin-1 (P132L), a common breast cancer mutation, confers mammary cell invasiveness and defines a novel stem cell/metastasis-associated gene signature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonuccelli, Gloria; Casimiro, Mathew C; Sotgia, Federica; Wang, Chenguang; Liu, Manran; Katiyar, Sanjay; Zhou, Jie; Dew, Elliott; Capozza, Franco; Daumer, Kristin M; Minetti, Carlo; Milliman, Janet N; Alpy, Fabien; Rio, Marie-Christine; Tomasetto, Catherine; Mercier, Isabelle; Flomenberg, Neal; Frank, Philippe G; Pestell, Richard G; Lisanti, Michael P

    2009-05-01

    Here we used the Met-1 cell line in an orthotopic transplantation model in FVB/N mice to dissect the role of the Cav-1(P132L) mutation in human breast cancer. Identical experiments were performed in parallel with wild-type Cav-1. Cav-1(P132L) up-regulated the expression of estrogen receptor-alpha as predicted, because only estrogen receptor-alpha-positive patients have been shown to harbor Cav-1(P132L) mutations. In the context of primary tumor formation, Cav-1(P132L) behaved as a loss-of-function mutation, lacking any tumor suppressor activity. In contrast, Cav-1(P132L) caused significant increases in cell migration, invasion, and experimental metastasis, consistent with a gain-of-function mutation. To identify possible molecular mechanism(s) underlying this invasive gain-of-function activity, we performed unbiased gene expression profiling. From this analysis, we show that the Cav-1(P132L) expression signature contains numerous genes that have been previously associated with cell migration, invasion, and metastasis. These include i) secreted growth factors and extracellular matrix proteins (Cyr61, Plf, Pthlh, Serpinb5, Tnc, and Wnt10a), ii) proteases that generate EGF and HGF (Adamts1 and St14), and iii) tyrosine kinase substrates and integrin signaling/adapter proteins (Akap13, Cdcp1, Ddef1, Eps15, Foxf1a, Gab2, Hs2st1, and Itgb4). Several of the P132L-specific genes are also highly expressed in stem/progenitor cells or are associated with myoepithelial cells, suggestive of an epithelial-mesenchymal transition. These results directly support clinical data showing that patients harboring Cav-1 mutations are more likely to undergo recurrence and metastasis.

  8. Unplanned irradiation of internal mammary lymph nodes in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanyilmaz, Gul; Aktan, Meryem; Koc, Mehmet; Demir, Hikmettin; Demir, Lütfi Saltuk

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the incidental dose to the internal mammary chain (IMC) in patients treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, to estimate the predictors affecting the magnitude of IMC receiving dose and to determine the predictive role of clinical parameters on survival. Between 2009 and 2015, 348 patients undergoing RT for breast cancer were retrospectively analyzed. All patients underwent our department's routine procedure for breast cancer. The internal mammary lymph nodes were contoured according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) concensus. Based on each patient's dose-volume histograms, the mean doses (D mean) to internal mammary gland were analyzed. Overall survival and disease-free survival were also evaluated. The median follow-up time was 38 (range 3-80) months. The D mean to IMC was 32.8 Gy and the dose delivered to IMC showed a greater coverage in modified radical mastectomy (MRM) group compared with breast conserving surgery (34.6 vs 26.7 Gy). The T-stage of tumor and the N-stage of tumor affected the incidental dose to IMC. The tumor size, the number of involved lymph nodes, the percentage of involved lymph nodes, hormonal status, advanced T-stage and advanced N-stage were the prognostic factors that affect survival. The IMC received meaningful incidental irradiation dose when treated with two opposite tangential fields and ipsilateral supraclavicular fossa with a single anterior field. The real effect of incidental dose on survival and the hypothesis about the benefit of incidental irradiation of IMC should be examined in clinical studies.

  9. File list: ALL.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells mm9 All antigens Breast Mammary epithelia...SRX031066,SRX031214,SRX396750 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells.bed ...

  10. File list: ALL.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells mm9 All antigens Breast Mammary epithelia...SRX396750,SRX031066,SRX031214 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells.bed ...

  11. File list: ALL.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells mm9 All antigens Breast Mammary epithelia...SRX396750,SRX031066,SRX031214 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells.bed ...

  12. Transcription factors link mouse WAP-T mammary tumors with human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Benjamin; Streichert, Thomas; Wegwitz, Florian; Gevensleben, Heidrun; Klätschke, Kristin; Wagener, Christoph; Deppert, Wolfgang; Tolstonog, Genrich V

    2013-03-15

    Mouse models are important tools to decipher the molecular mechanisms of mammary carcinogenesis and to mimic the respective human disease. Despite sharing common phenotypic and genetic features, the proper translation of murine models to human breast cancer remains a challenging task. In a previous study we showed that in the SV40 transgenic WAP-T mice an active Met-pathway and epithelial-mesenchymal characteristics distinguish low- and high-grade mammary carcinoma. To assign these murine tumors to corresponding human tumors we here incorporated the analysis of expression of transcription factor (TF) coding genes and show that thereby a more accurate interspecies translation can be achieved. We describe a novel cross-species translation procedure and demonstrate that expression of unsupervised selected TFs, such as ELF5, HOXA5 and TFCP2L1, can clearly distinguish between the human molecular breast cancer subtypes--or as, for example, expression of TFAP2B between yet unclassified subgroups. By integrating different levels of information like histology, gene set enrichment, expression of differentiation markers and TFs we conclude that tumors in WAP-T mice exhibit similarities to both, human basal-like and non-basal-like subtypes. We furthermore suggest that the low- and high-grade WAP-T tumor phenotypes might arise from distinct cells of tumor origin. Our results underscore the importance of TFs as common cross-species denominators in the regulatory networks underlying mammary carcinogenesis.

  13. TIMP3 regulates mammary epithelial apoptosis with immune cell recruitment through differential TNF dependence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo V Hojilla

    Full Text Available Post-lactation mammary involution is a homeostatic process requiring epithelial apoptosis and clearance. Given that the deficiency of the extracellular metalloproteinase inhibitor TIMP3 impacts epithelial apoptosis and heightens inflammatory response, we investigated whether TIMP3 regulates these distinct processes during the phases of mammary gland involution in the mouse. Here we show that TIMP3 deficiency leads to TNF dysregulation, earlier caspase activation and onset of mitochondrial apoptosis. This accelerated first phase of involution includes faster loss of initiating signals (STAT3 activation; TGFβ3 concurrent with immediate luminal deconstruction through E-cadherin fragmentation. Epithelial apoptosis is followed by accelerated adipogenesis and a greater macrophage and T-cell infiltration in Timp3(-/- involuting glands. Crossing in Tnf deficiency abrogates caspase 3 activation, but heightens macrophage and T-cell influx into Timp3(-/- glands. The data indicate that TIMP3 differentially impacts apoptosis and inflammatory cell influx, based on involvement of TNF, during the process of mammary involution. An understanding of the molecular factors and wound healing microenvironment of the postpartum mammary gland may have implications for understanding pregnancy-associated breast cancer risk.

  14. Trypanosoma cruzi extracts elicit protective immune response against chemically induced colon and mammary cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubillos, Luis; Freire, Teresa; Berriel, Edgardo; Chiribao, María Laura; Chiale, Carolina; Festari, María Florencia; Medeiros, Andrea; Mazal, Daniel; Rondán, Mariella; Bollati-Fogolín, Mariela; Rabinovich, Gabriel A; Robello, Carlos; Osinaga, Eduardo

    2016-04-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan parasite that causes Chagas' disease, has anticancer effects mediated, at least in part, by parasite-derived products which inhibit growth of tumor cells. We investigated whether immunity to T. cruzi antigens could induce antitumor activity, using two rat models which reproduce human carcinogenesis: colon cancer induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH), and mammary cancer induced by N-nitroso-N-methylurea (NMU). We found that vaccination with T. cruzi epimastigote lysates strongly inhibits tumor development in both animal models. Rats immunized with T. cruzi antigens induce activation of both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and splenocytes from these animals showed higher cytotoxic responses against tumors as compared to rats receiving adjuvant alone. Tumor-associated immune responses included increasing number of CD11b/c(+) His48(-) MHC II(+) cells corresponding to macrophages and/or dendritic cells, which exhibited augmented NADPH-oxidase activity. We also found that T. cruzi lysate vaccination developed antibodies specific for colon and mammary rat cancer cells, which were capable of mediating antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) in vitro. Anti-T. cruzi antibodies cross-reacted with human colon and breast cancer cell lines and recognized 41/60 (68%) colon cancer and 38/63 (60%) breast cancer samples in a series of 123 human tumors. Our results suggest that T. cruzi antigens can evoke an integrated antitumor response involving both the cellular and humoral components of the immune response and provide novel insights into the understanding of the intricate relationship between parasite infection and tumor growth.

  15. Cell and Molecular Biology of Ataxia Telangiectasia Heterozygous Human Mammary Epithelial Cells Irradiated in Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Robert C.

    2001-01-01

    Autologous isolates of cell types from obligate heterozygotes with the autosomal disorder ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T)were used to begin a tissue culture model for assessing pathways of radiation-induced cancer formation in this target tissue. This was done by establishing cultures of stromal fibroblasts and long-term growth human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) in standard 2-dimensional tissue culture in order to establish expression of markers detailing early steps of carcinogenesis. The presumptive breast cancer susceptibility of A-T heterozygotes as a sequel to damage caused by ionizing radiation provided reason to study expression of markers in irradiated HMEC. Findings from our study with HMEC have included determination of differences in specific protein expression amongst growth phase (e.g., log vs stationary) and growth progression (e.g., pass 7 vs pass 9), as well as differences in morphologic markers within populations of irradiated HMEC (e.g., development of multinucleated cells).

  16. Cell and Molecular Biology of Ataxia Telangiectasia Heterozygous Human Mammary Epithelial Cells Irradiated in Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Robert C.

    2001-01-01

    Autologous isolates of cell types from obligate heterozygotes with the autosomal disorder ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T)were used to begin a tissue culture model for assessing pathways of radiation-induced cancer formation in this target tissue. This was done by establishing cultures of stromal fibroblasts and long-term growth human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) in standard 2-dimensional tissue culture in order to establish expression of markers detailing early steps of carcinogenesis. The presumptive breast cancer susceptibility of A-T heterozygotes as a sequel to damage caused by ionizing radiation provided reason to study expression of markers in irradiated HMEC. Findings from our study with HMEC have included determination of differences in specific protein expression amongst growth phase (e.g., log vs stationary) and growth progression (e.g., pass 7 vs pass 9), as well as differences in morphologic markers within populations of irradiated HMEC (e.g., development of multinucleated cells).

  17. Proliferation of Estrogen Receptor alpha Positive Mammary Epithelial Cells is Restrained by TGFbeta1 in Adult Mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewan, Kenneth B.R.; Oketch-Rabah, Hellen A.; Ravani, Shraddha A.; Shyamala, G.; Moses, Harold L.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2005-03-03

    Transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF{beta}1) is a potent inhibitor of mammary epithelial proliferation. In human breast, estrogen receptor {alpha} (ER{alpha}) cells rarely co-localize with markers of proliferation, but their increased frequency correlates with breast cancer risk. To determine whether TGF{beta}1 is necessary for the quiescence of ER{alpha}-positive population, we examined mouse mammary epithelial gland at estrus. Approximately 35% of cells showed TGF{beta}1 activation, which co-localized with nuclear receptor-phosphorylated Smad 2/3, indicating that TGF{beta} signaling is autocrine. Furthermore, nuclear Smad co-localized with nuclear ER{alpha}. To test whether TGF{beta} was functional, we examined genetically engineered mice with different levels of TGF{beta}1. ER{alpha} co-localization with markers of proliferation (i.e. Ki-67 or BrdU) at estrus was significantly increased in the mammary glands of Tgf{beta}1 C57/bl/129SV heterozygote mice. This relationship was maintained following pregnancy, but was absent at puberty. Conversely, mammary epithelial expression of constitutively active TGF{beta}1 via the MMTV promoter suppressed proliferation of ER{alpha} positive cells. Thus, TGF{beta}1 activation functionally restrains ER{alpha} positive cells from proliferating in adult mammary gland. Accordingly, we propose that TGF{beta}1 dysregulation may promote proliferation of ER{alpha} positive cells associated with breast cancer risk in humans.

  18. Evidence of a Genomic Biomarker in Normal Human Epithelial Mammary Cell Line, MCF-10A, That Is Absent in the Human Breast Cancer Cell Line, MCF-7

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    Brian H. Crawford

    2006-01-01

    MCF-7 cells, it was transfected into MCF-7 cells. There were observable changes in the morphology of the transfected cells. These changes included an increase in cell elongation and a decrease in cell aggregation.

  19. Associated expressions of FGFR-2 and FGFR-3: from mouse mammary gland physiology to human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerliani, Juan P; Vanzulli, Silvia I; Piñero, Cecilia Pérez; Bottino, María C; Sahores, Ana; Nuñez, Myriam; Varchetta, Romina; Martins, Rubén; Zeitlin, Eduardo; Hewitt, Stephen M; Molinolo, Alfredo A; Lanari, Claudia; Lamb, Caroline A

    2012-06-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) are tyrosine kinase receptors which have been implicated in breast cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate FGFR-1, -2, -3, and -4 protein expressions in normal murine mammary gland development, and in murine and human breast carcinomas. Using immunohistochemistry and Western blot, we report a hormonal regulation of FGFR during postnatal mammary gland development. Progestin treatment of adult virgin mammary glands resulted in changes in localization of FGFR-3 from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, while treatment with 17-β-estradiol induced changes in the expressions and/or localizations of FGFR-2 and -3. In murine mammary carcinomas showing different degrees of hormone dependence, we found progestin-induced increased expressions, mainly of FGFR-2 and -3. These receptors were constitutively activated in hormone-independent variants. We studied three luminal human breast cancer cell lines growing as xenografts, which particularly expressed FGFR-2 and -3, suggesting a correlation between hormonal status and FGFR expression. Most importantly, in breast cancer samples from 58 patients, we found a strong association (P FGFR-2 and -3 expressions and a weaker correlation of each receptor with estrogen receptor expression. FGFR-4 correlated with c-erbB2 over expression. We conclude that FGFR-2 and -3 may be mechanistically linked and can be potential targets for treatment of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer patients.

  20. Self-organization is a dynamic and lineage-intrinsic property of mammary epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chanson, L. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (Switzerland). Inst. of Bioengineering; Brownfield, D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Div.; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Bioengineering; Garbe, J. C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Div.; Kuhn, I. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Div.; Stampfer, M. R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Div.; Bissell, M. J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Div.; LaBarge, M. A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Div.

    2011-02-07

    Loss of organization is a principle feature of cancers; therefore it is important to understand how normal adult multilineage tissues, such as bilayered secretory epithelia, establish and maintain their architectures. The self-organization process that drives heterogeneous mixtures of cells to form organized tissues is well studied in embryology and with mammalian cell lines that were abnormal or engineered. Here we used a micropatterning approach that confined cells to a cylindrical geometry combined with an algorithm to quantify changes of cellular distribution over time to measure the ability of different cell types to self-organize relative to each other. Using normal human mammary epithelial cells enriched into pools of the two principal lineages, luminal and myoepithelial cells, we demonstrated that bilayered organization in mammary epithelium was driven mainly by lineage-specific differential E-cadherin expression, but that P-cadherin contributed specifically to organization of the myoepithelial layer. Disruption of the actomyosin network or of adherens junction proteins resulted in either prevention of bilayer formation or loss of preformed bilayers, consistent with continual sampling of the local microenvironment by cadherins. Together these data show that self-organization is an innate and reversible property of communities of normal adult human mammary epithelial cells.

  1. Lentivirus-Mediated Oncogene Introduction into Mammary Cells In Vivo Induces Tumors

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    Stefan K. Siwko

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available We recently reported the introduction of oncogene-expressing avian retroviruses into somatic mammary cells in mice susceptible to infection by transgenic expression of tva, encoding the receptor for subgroup A avian leukosis-sarcoma virus (ALSV. Because ALSV-based vectors poorly infect nondividing cells, they are inadequate for studying carcinogenesis initiated from nonproliferative cells (e.g., stem cells. Lentivirus pseudotyped with the envelope protein of ALSV infects nondividing TVA-producing cells in culture but has not previously been tested for introducing genes in vivo. Here, we demonstrate that these vectors infected mammary cells in vivo when injected into the mammary ductal lumen of mice expressing tva under the control of the keratin 19 promoter. Furthermore, intraductal injection of this lentiviral vector carrying the polyoma middle T antigen gene induced atypical ductal hyperplasia and ductal carcinoma in situ-like premalignant lesions in 30 days and palpable invasive tumors at a median latency of 3.3 months. Induced tumors were a mixed epithelial/myoepithelial histologic diagnosis, occasionally displayed squamous metaplasia, and were estrogen receptor-negative. This work demonstrates the first use of a lentiviral vector to introduce oncogenes for modeling cancer in mice, and this vector system may be especially suitable for introducing genetic alterations into quiescent cells in vivo.

  2. Self-organization is a dynamic and lineage-intrinsic property of mammary epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanson, Lea; Brownfield, Douglas; Garbe, James C.; Kuhn, Irene; Stampfer, Martha R.; Bissell, Mina J.; LaBarge, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Loss of organization is a principle feature of cancers; therefore it is important to understand how normal adult multilineage tissues, such as bilayered secretory epithelia, establish and maintain their architectures. The self-organization process that drives heterogeneous mixtures of cells to form organized tissues is well studied in embryology and with mammalian cell lines that were abnormal or engineered. Here we used a micropatterning approach that confined cells to a cylindrical geometry combined with an algorithm to quantify changes of cellular distribution over time to measure the ability of different cell types to self-organize relative to each other. Using normal human mammary epithelial cells enriched into pools of the two principal lineages, luminal and myoepithelial cells, we demonstrated that bilayered organization in mammary epithelium was driven mainly by lineage-specific differential E-cadherin expression, but that P-cadherin contributed specifically to organization of the myoepithelial layer. Disruption of the actomyosin network or of adherens junction proteins resulted in either prevention of bilayer formation or loss of preformed bilayers, consistent with continual sampling of the local microenvironment by cadherins. Together these data show that self-organization is an innate and reversible property of communities of normal adult human mammary epithelial cells. PMID:21300877

  3. Ink4a/Arf −/− and HRAS(G12V) transform mouse mammary cells into triple-negative breast cancer containing tumorigenic CD49f− quiescent cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kai, Kazuharu; Iwamoto, Takayuki; Kobayashi, Takashi; Arima, Yoshimi; Takamoto, Yayoi; Ohnishi, Nobuyuki; Bartholomeusz, Chandra; Horii, Rie; Akiyama, Futoshi; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.; Pusztai, Lajos; Saya, Hideyuki; Ueno, Naoto T.

    2013-01-01

    Intratumoral heterogeneity within individual breast tumors is a well-known phenomenon that may contribute to drug resistance. This heterogeneity is dependent on several factors, such as types of oncogenic drivers and tumor precursor cells. The purpose of our study was to engineer a mouse mammary tumor model with intratumoral heterogeneity by using defined genetic perturbations. To achieve this, we used mice with knockout (−/−) of Ink4a/Arf, a tumor suppressor locus; these mice are known to be...

  4. Analysis of Contractility and Invasion Potential of Two Canine Mammary Tumor Cell Lines

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    Kaisa Rajakylä

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells are surrounded by a mechanically and biochemically distinct microenvironment that undergoes dynamic changes throughout the neoplastic progression. During this progression, some cancer cells acquire abnormal characteristics that potentiate their escape from the primary tumor site, to establish secondary tumors in distant organs. Recent studies with several human cancer cell lines have shown that the altered physical properties of tumor cells, such as their ability to apply high traction forces to the surroundings, are directly linked with their potential to invade and metastasize. To test the hypothetical interconnection between actomyosin-mediated traction forces and invasion potential within 3D-microenvironment, we utilized two canine mammary tumor cell lines with different contractile properties. These cell lines, canine mammary tumor (CMT-U27 and CMT-U309, were found to have distinct expression patterns of lineage-specific markers and organization of actin-based structures. In particular, CMT-U309 carcinoma cells were typified by thick contractile actomyosin bundles that exerted high forces to their environment, as measured by traction force microscopy. These high contractile forces also correlated with the prominent invasiveness of the CMT-U309 cell line. Furthermore, we found high contractility and 3D-invasion potential to be dependent on the activity of 5′AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK, as blocking AMPK signaling was found to reverse both of these features. Taken together, our findings implicate that actomyosin forces correlate with the invasion potential of the studied cell lines.

  5. Development and characterization of a novel rat model of estrogen-induced mammary cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennison, Kirsten L; Samanas, Nyssa Becker; Harenda, Quincy Eckert; Hickman, Maureen Peters; Seiler, Nicole L; Ding, Lina; Shull, James D

    2015-04-01

    The ACI rat model of 17β-estradiol (E2)-induced mammary cancer is highly relevant for use in establishing the endocrine, genetic, and environmental bases of breast cancer etiology and identifying novel agents and strategies for preventing breast cancer. E2 treatment rapidly induces mammary cancer in female ACI rats and simultaneously induces pituitary lactotroph hyperplasia and adenoma. The pituitary tumors can result in undesired morbidity, which compromises long-term studies focused on mammary cancer etiology and prevention. We have defined the genetic bases of susceptibility to E2-induced mammary cancers and pituitary tumors and have utilized the knowledge gained in these studies to develop a novel inbred rat strain, designated ACWi, that retains the high degree of susceptibility to E2-induced mammary cancer exhibited by ACI rats, but lacks the treatment-related morbidity associated with pituitary lactotroph hyperplasia/adenoma. When treated with E2, female ACWi rats developed palpable mammary cancer at a median latency of 116 days, an incidence of 100% by 161 days and exhibited an average of 15.6 mammary tumors per rat following 196 days of treatment. These parameters did not differ from those observed for contemporaneously treated ACI rats. None of the E2-treated ACWi rats were killed before the intended experimental end point due to any treatment-related morbidity other than mammary cancer burden, whereas 20% of contemporaneously treated ACI rats exhibited treatment-related morbidity that necessitated premature killing. The ACWi rat strain is well suited for use by those in the research community, focusing on breast cancer etiology and prevention.

  6. Trichostatin A inhibits beta-casein expression in mammary epithelial cells

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    Pujuguet, Philippe; Radisky, Derek; Levy, Dinah; Lacza, Charlemagne; Bissell, Mina J.

    2002-02-22

    Many aspects of cellular behavior are affected by information derived from association of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and with cell membrane receptors. When cultured in the presence of laminin-containing ECM and prolactin (Prl), normal mammary epithelial cells express the milk protein beta-casein. Previously, we defined the minimal ECM- and Prl-responsive enhancer element BCE-1 from the upstream region of the beta-casein gene. We also found that BCE-1 was only active when stably integrated into chromatin, and that trichostatin A (TSA), a reagent that leads to alterations in chromatin structure, was able to activate the integrated enhancer element. We now show that endogenous b-casein gene, which is controlled by a genetic assembly that is highly similar to that of BCE-1 and which is also activated by incubation in ECM and Prl, is instead inhibited by TSA. We provide evidence that the differing response of b-casein and BCE-1 to TSA is neither due to an unusual effect of TSA on mammary epithelial cells, nor to secondary consequences from the expression of a separate gene, nor to a particular property of the BCE-1 construct. As a component of this investigation, we also showed that ECM could mediate rapid histone deacetylation in mammary epithelial cells. These results are discussed in combination with previous work showing that TSA mediates the differentiation of many types of cancer cells but inhibits differentiation of some nonmalignant cell types.

  7. Immunohistochemical detection of tumour cell proliferation and intratumoural microvessel density in canine malignant mammary tumours

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    Sennazli Gulbin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the correlation between different histological types and grades of canine malignant mammary tumours, tumour cell proliferation and their angiogenic activity using immunohistochemical markers. Mammary tissue samples from 47 bitches with mammary cancer were evaluated. The expression of cellular proliferation marker Ki-67 and endothelial marker Von Willebrand’s factor (vWF were immunohistochemically demonstrated. The tumours with the highest Ki-67 and vWF expressions were found to share similar histomorphological features. Simple solid carcinoma had the highest levels of Ki-67, vWF, and higher histological grade while complex carcinomas, osteosarcomas, and carcinosarcomas had the lowest ones. The differences between the expressions of Ki-67 and vWF in different tumour types were considered to be of great importance in determination of biological behaviour and prognosis of these tumours. This study is one of the few studies that evaluate these differences among the subtypes of malignant canine mammary tumours

  8. FoxM1 Regulates Mammary Luminal Cell Fate

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    Janai R. Carr

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Elevated expression of FoxM1 in breast cancer correlates with an undifferentiated tumor phenotype and a negative clinical outcome. However, a role for FoxM1 in regulating mammary differentiation was not known. Here, we identify another function of FoxM1, the ability to act as a transcriptional repressor, which plays an important role in regulating the differentiation of luminal epithelial progenitors. Regeneration of mammary glands with elevated levels of FoxM1 leads to aberrant ductal morphology and expansion of the luminal progenitor pool. Conversely, knockdown of FoxM1 results in a shift toward the differentiated state. FoxM1 mediates these effects by repressing the key regulator of luminal differentiation, GATA-3. Through association with DNMT3b, FoxM1 promotes methylation of the GATA-3 promoter in an Rb-dependent manner. This study identifies FoxM1 as a critical regulator of mammary differentiation with significant implications for the development of aggressive breast cancers.

  9. Involvement of Different networks in mammary gland involution after the pregnancy/lactation cycle: Implications in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaragozá, Rosa; García-Trevijano, Elena R; Lluch, Ana; Ribas, Gloria; Viña, Juan R

    2015-04-01

    Early pregnancy is associated with a reduction in a woman's lifetime risk for breast cancer. However, different studies have demonstrated an increase in breast cancer risk in the years immediately following pregnancy. Early and long-term risk is even higher if the mother age is above 35 years at the time of first parity. The proinflammatory microenvironment within the mammary gland after pregnancy renders an "ideal niche" for oncogenic events. Signaling pathways involved in programmed cell death and tissue remodeling during involution are also activated in breast cancer. Herein, the major signaling pathways involved in mammary gland involution, signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT3), nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ), and retinoid acid receptors (RARs)/retinoid X receptors (RXRs), are reviewed as part of the complex network of signaling pathways that crosstalk in a contextual-dependent manner. These factors, also involved in breast cancer development, are important regulatory nodes for signaling amplification after weaning. Indeed, during involution, p65/p300 target genes such as MMP9, Capn1, and Capn2 are upregulated. Elevated expression and activities of these proteases in breast cancer have been extensively documented. The role of these proteases during mammary gland involution is further discussed. MMPs, calpains, and cathepsins exert their effect by modification of the extracellular matrix and intracellular proteins. Calpains, activated in the mammary gland during involution, cleave several proteins located in cell membrane, lysosomes, mitochondria, and nuclei favoring cell death. Besides, during this period, Capn1 is most probably involved in the modulation of preadipocyte differentiation through chromatin remodeling. Calpains can be implicated in cell anchoring loss, providing a proper microenvironment for tumor growth. A better understanding of the role of any of these proteases in tumorigenesis may

  10. Expression of Mn-Superoxide Dismutase Gene in Nontumorigenic and Tumorigenic Human Mammary Epithelial Cells

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    Sutapa Mukhopadhyay

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD, localized at the mitochondrial matrix, has the ability to protect cells against oxidative damage. It has been reported that low levels of Mn-SOD gene expression cause the development of certain kind of tumors. On the other hand, overexpression of Mn-SOD gene may play an important role in the development of cancer. In our study, we find that Mn-SOD activity was higher in nonaggressive (MCF-7 and aggressive (BT-549 and 11-9-14 breast cancer cell lines compared to that of nontumorigenic (MCF-12A and MCF-12F mammary epithelial cell lines. We also observed an increased expression of Mn-SOD gene in cancerous cell lines. The elevated level of SOD activity in nonaggressive and aggressive breast epithelial cell lines was associated with some changes in nucleotide sequence.

  11. Screening and analysis of breast cancer genes regulated by the human mammary microenvironment in a humanized mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Mingjie; Wang, Jue; Ling, Lijun; Xue, Dandan; Wang, Shui; Zhao, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Tumor microenvironments play critical regulatory roles in tumor growth. Although mouse cancer models have contributed to the understanding of human tumor biology, the effectiveness of mouse cancer models is limited by the inability of the models to accurately present humanized tumor microenvironments. Previously, a humanized breast cancer model in severe combined immunodeficiency mice was established, in which human breast cancer tissue was implanted subcutaneously, followed by injection of human breast cancer cells. It was demonstrated that breast cancer cells showed improved growth in the human mammary microenvironment compared with a conventional subcutaneous mouse model. In the present study, the novel mouse model and microarray technology was used to analyze changes in the expression of genes in breast cancer cells that are regulated by the human mammary microenvironment. Humanized breast and conventional subcutaneous mouse models were established, and orthotopic tumor cells were obtained from orthotopic tumor masses by primary culture. An expression microarray using Illumina HumanHT-12 v4 Expression BeadChip and database analyses were performed to investigate changes in gene expression between tumors from each microenvironment. A total of 94 genes were differentially expressed between the primary cells cultured from the humanized and conventional mouse models. Significant upregulation of genes that promote cell proliferation and metastasis or inhibit apoptosis, such as SH3-domain binding protein 5 (BTK-associated), sodium/chloride cotransporter 3 and periostin, osteoblast specific factor, and genes that promote angiogenesis, such as KIAA1618, was also noted. Other genes that restrain cell proliferation and accelerate cell apoptosis, including tripartite motif containing TRIM36 and NES1, were downregulated. The present results revealed differences in various aspects of tumor growth and metabolism between the two model groups and indicated the functional

  12. Epstein-Barr Virus Infection of Mammary Epithelial Cells Promotes Malignant Transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hai; Luo, Man-Li; Desmedt, Christine; Nabavi, Sheida; Yadegarynia, Sina; Hong, Alex; Konstantinopoulos, Panagiotis A; Gabrielson, Edward; Hines-Boykin, Rebecca; Pihan, German; Yuan, Xin; Sotirious, Christos; Dittmer, Dirk P; Fingeroth, Joyce D; Wulf, Gerburg M

    2016-07-01

    Whether the human tumor virus, Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV), promotes breast cancer remains controversial and a potential mechanism has remained elusive. Here we show that EBV can infect primary mammary epithelial cells (MECs) that express the receptor CD21. EBV infection leads to the expansion of early MEC progenitor cells with a stem cell phenotype, activates MET signaling and enforces a differentiation block. When MECs were implanted as xenografts, EBV infection cooperated with activated Ras and accelerated the formation of breast cancer. Infection in EBV-related tumors was of a latency type II pattern, similar to nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). A human gene expression signature for MECs infected with EBV, termed EBVness, was associated with high grade, estrogen-receptor-negative status, p53 mutation and poor survival. In 11/33 EBVness-positive tumors, EBV-DNA was detected by fluorescent in situ hybridization for the viral LMP1 and BXLF2 genes. In an analysis of the TCGA breast cancer data EBVness correlated with the presence of the APOBEC mutational signature. We conclude that a contribution of EBV to breast cancer etiology is plausible, through a mechanism in which EBV infection predisposes mammary epithelial cells to malignant transformation, but is no longer required once malignant transformation has occurred.

  13. Epstein–Barr Virus Infection of Mammary Epithelial Cells Promotes Malignant Transformation

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    Hai Hu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Whether the human tumor virus, Epstein–Barr Virus (EBV, promotes breast cancer remains controversial and a potential mechanism has remained elusive. Here we show that EBV can infect primary mammary epithelial cells (MECs that express the receptor CD21. EBV infection leads to the expansion of early MEC progenitor cells with a stem cell phenotype, activates MET signaling and enforces a differentiation block. When MECs were implanted as xenografts, EBV infection cooperated with activated Ras and accelerated the formation of breast cancer. Infection in EBV-related tumors was of a latency type II pattern, similar to nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC. A human gene expression signature for MECs infected with EBV, termed EBVness, was associated with high grade, estrogen-receptor-negative status, p53 mutation and poor survival. In 11/33 EBVness-positive tumors, EBV-DNA was detected by fluorescent in situ hybridization for the viral LMP1 and BXLF2 genes. In an analysis of the TCGA breast cancer data EBVness correlated with the presence of the APOBEC mutational signature. We conclude that a contribution of EBV to breast cancer etiology is plausible, through a mechanism in which EBV infection predisposes mammary epithelial cells to malignant transformation, but is no longer required once malignant transformation has occurred.

  14. Signalling pathways implicated in early mammary gland morphogenesis and breast cancer.

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    Beatrice Howard

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Specification of mammary epithelial cell fate occurs during embryogenesis as cells aggregate to form the mammary anlage. Within the embryonic mammary bud, a population of epithelial cells exists that will subsequently proliferate to form a ductal tree filling the stromal compartment, and which can produce milk upon terminal differentiation after birth. Subsequently, these structures can be remodelled and returned to a basal state after weaning before regenerating in future pregnancies. The plasticity of the mammary epithelial cell, and its responsiveness to hormone receptors, facilitates this amazing biological feat, but aberrant signalling may also result in unintended consequences in the form of frequent malignancies. Reflecting this intimate connection, a considerable number of signalling pathways have been implicated in both mammary gland morphogenesis and carcinogenesis.

  15. Expression and function of the protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor J (PTPRJ) in normal mammary epithelial cells and breast tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Chanel E; Askarian Amiri, Marjan E; Wronski, Ania; Dinger, Marcel E; Crawford, Joanna; Ovchinnikov, Dmitry A; Vargas, Ana Cristina; Reid, Lynne; Simpson, Peter T; Song, Sarah; Wiesner, Christiane; French, Juliet D; Dave, Richa K; da Silva, Leonard; Purdon, Amy; Andrew, Megan; Mattick, John S; Lakhani, Sunil R; Brown, Melissa A; Kellie, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    The protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor J, PTPRJ, is a tumor suppressor gene that has been implicated in a range of cancers, including breast cancer, yet little is known about its role in normal breast physiology or in mammary gland tumorigenesis. In this paper we show that PTPRJ mRNA is expressed in normal breast tissue and reduced in corresponding tumors. Meta-analysis revealed that the gene encoding PTPRJ is frequently lost in breast tumors and that low expression of the transcript associated with poorer overall survival at 20 years. Immunohistochemistry of PTPRJ protein in normal human breast tissue revealed a distinctive apical localisation in the luminal cells of alveoli and ducts. Qualitative analysis of a cohort of invasive ductal carcinomas revealed retention of normal apical PTPRJ localization where tubule formation was maintained but that tumors mostly exhibited diffuse cytoplasmic staining, indicating that dysregulation of localisation associated with loss of tissue architecture in tumorigenesis. The murine ortholog, Ptprj, exhibited a similar localisation in normal mammary gland, and was differentially regulated throughout lactational development, and in an in vitro model of mammary epithelial differentiation. Furthermore, ectopic expression of human PTPRJ in HC11 murine mammary epithelial cells inhibited dome formation. These data indicate that PTPRJ may regulate differentiation of normal mammary epithelia and that dysregulation of protein localisation may be associated with tumorigenesis.

  16. Unraveling the microenvironmental influences on the normal mammary gland and induction and progression of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weigelt, Britta; Bissell, Mina J.

    2008-06-26

    The normal mammary gland and invasive breast cancer are both complex 'organs' composed of multiple cell types as well as extracellular matrix (ECM) in three-dimensional (3D) space. Conventionally, both normal and malignant breast cells are studied in vitro as two-dimensional (2D) monolayers of epithelial cells, which results in the loss of structure and tissue function. Many laboratories are now investigating regulation of signaling function in normal mammary gland using 3D cultures. However, it is important also to assay malignant breast cells ex vivo in a physiologically relevant environment to more closely mimic tumor architecture, signal transduction regulation and tumor behavior in vivo. Here we present the potential of these 3D models for drug testing, target validation and guidance of patient selection for clinical trials. We argue also that in order to get full insight into the biology of the normal and malignant breast, and to create in vivo-like models for therapeutic approaches in humans, we need to continue to create more complex heterotypic models to approach the full context the cells encounter in the human body.

  17. Demethylation of Cancer/Testis Antigens and CpG ODN Stimulation Enhance Dendritic Cell and Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Function in a Mouse Mammary Model

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    Jun-Zhong Sun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cancer/testis antigens (CTAs are ideal targets for cancer immunotherapy in virtue of their restricted expression profile in normal tissues. However, CTA-targeted immunotherapy has been rather disappointing clinical setting for CTAs are downregulated by cytosine-phosphate-guanosine (CpG methylation in their promoter regions, so that tumor cells have low immunogenicity. Methods. We reinduced mouse CTA P1A through demethylation process and generated P1A-specific cytotoxic lymphocytes (CTLs by immunizing BALB/c (H-2d mice with dendritic cells pulsed with a P1A-specific peptide and CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN immune adjuvant. Results. We found that demethylation and CpG ODN immune adjuvant stimulation facilitated DC maturation and enhanced the allogenic capacity of P1A-specific CTLs against target cells both in vitro and in vivo. Conclusions. Our results suggested that CTA induction and immune adjuvant stimulation is a feasible strategy in cancer immunotherapy.

  18. Mammary epithelial morphogenesis and early breast cancer. Evidence of involvement of basal components of the RNA Polymerase I transcription machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, Stefano; Wierzbicki, Andrzej J; Sacchi, Nicoletta

    2016-09-16

    Upregulation of RNA Polymerase (Pol I)-mediated transcription of rRNA and increased ribogenesis are hallmarks of breast cancer. According to several datasets, including The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), amplification/upregulation of genes encoding for basal components of the Pol I transcriptional machinery is frequent at different breast cancer stages. Here we show that knock down of the RNA polymerase I-specific transcription initiation factor RRN3 (TIF-IA) in breast cancer cells is sufficient to reduce rRNA synthesis and inhibit cell proliferation, and second that stable ectopic expression of RRN3 in human mammary epithelial (HME1) cells, by increasing rRNA transcription, confers increased sensitivity to the anti-proliferative effects of a selective Pol I inhibitor. Further, RRN3-overexpressing HME1 cells, when grown in in vitro 3-dimensional (3D) culture, develop into morphologically aberrant acinar structures lacking a lumen and filled with proliferative cells, thus acquiring a morphology resembling in situ ductal breast cancer lesions (DCIS). Consequently, interference with RRN3 control of Pol I transcription seems capable of both compromising mammary epithelial morphogenetic processes at early breast cancer stages, and driving breast cancer progression by fostering proliferation.

  19. Characterization of nitrogen mustard formamidopyrimidine adduct formation of bis(2-chloroethyl)ethylamine with calf thymus DNA and a human mammary cancer cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruppi, Francesca; Hejazi, Leila; Christov, Plamen P; Krishnamachari, Sesha; Turesky, Robert J; Rizzo, Carmelo J

    2015-09-21

    A robust, quantitative ultraperformance liquid chromatography ion trap multistage scanning mass spectrometric (UPLC/MS(3)) method was established to characterize and measure five guanine adducts formed by reaction of the chemotherapeutic nitrogen mustard (NM) bis(2-chloroethyl)ethylamine with calf thymus (CT) DNA. In addition to the known N7-guanine (NM-G) adduct and its cross-link (G-NM-G), the ring-opened formamidopyrimidine (FapyG) monoadduct (NM-FapyG) and cross-links in which one (FapyG-NM-G) or both (FapyG-NM-FapyG) guanines underwent ring-opening to FapyG units were identified. Authentic standards of all adducts were synthesized and characterized by NMR and mass spectrometry. These adducts were quantified in CT DNA treated with NM (1 μM) as their deglycosylated bases. A two-stage neutral thermal hydrolysis was developed to mitigate the artifactual formation of ring-opened FapyG adducts involving hydrolysis of the cationic adduct at 37 °C, followed by hydrolysis of the FapyG adducts at 95 °C. The limit of quantification values ranged between 0.3 and 1.6 adducts per 10(7) DNA bases when the equivalent of 5 μg of DNA hydrolysate was assayed on column. The principal adduct formed was the G-NM-G cross-link, followed by the NM-G monoadduct; the FapyG-NM-G cross-link adduct; and the FapyG-NM-FapyG was below the limit of detection. The NM-FapyG adducts were formed in CT DNA at a level ∼20% that of the NM-G adduct. NM-FapyG has not been previously quanitified, and the FapyG-NM-G and FapyG-NM-FapyG adducts have not been previously characterized. Our validated analytical method was then applied to measure DNA adduct formation in the MDA-MB-231 mammary tumor cell line exposed to NM (100 μM) for 24 h. The major adduct formed was NM-G (970 adducts per 10(7) bases), followed by G-NM-G (240 adducts per 10(7) bases), NM-FapyG (180 adducts per 10(7) bases), and, last, the FapyG-NM-G cross-link adduct (6.0 adducts per 10(7) bases). These lesions are expected to

  20. Distinct effects of EGFR ligands on human mammary epithelial cell differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrani Mukhopadhyay

    Full Text Available Based on gene expression patterns, breast cancers can be divided into subtypes that closely resemble various developmental stages of normal mammary epithelial cells (MECs. Thus, understanding molecular mechanisms of MEC development is expected to provide critical insights into initiation and progression of breast cancer. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR and its ligands play essential roles in normal and pathological mammary gland. Signals through EGFR is required for normal mammary gland development. Ligands for EGFR are over-expressed in a significant proportion of breast cancers, and elevated expression of EGFR is associated with poorer clinical outcome. In the present study, we examined the effect of signals through EGFR on MEC differentiation using the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT-immortalized human stem/progenitor MECs which express cytokeratin 5 but lack cytokeratin 19 (K5(+K19(- hMECs. As reported previously, these cells can be induced to differentiate into luminal and myoepithelial cells under appropriate culture conditions. K5(+K19(- hMECs acquired distinct cell fates in response to EGFR ligands epidermal growth factor (EGF, amphiregulin (AREG and transforming growth factor alpha (TGFα in differentiation-promoting MEGM medium. Specifically, presence of EGF during in vitro differentiation supported development into both luminal and myoepithelial lineages, whereas cells differentiated only towards luminal lineage when EGF was replaced with AREG. In contrast, substitution with TGFα led to differentiation only into myoepithelial lineage. Chemical inhibition of the MEK-Erk pathway, but not the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K-AKT pathway, interfered with K5(+K19(- hMEC differentiation. The present data validate the utility of the K5(+K19(- hMEC cells for modeling key features of human MEC differentiation. This system should be useful in studying molecular/biochemical mechanisms of human MEC differentiation.

  1. Conditionally reprogrammed normal and transformed mouse mammary epithelial cells display a progenitor-cell-like phenotype.

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    Francisco R Saenz

    Full Text Available Mammary epithelial (ME cells cultured under conventional conditions senesce after several passages. Here, we demonstrate that mouse ME cells isolated from normal mammary glands or from mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV-Neu-induced mammary tumors, can be cultured indefinitely as conditionally reprogrammed cells (CRCs on irradiated fibroblasts in the presence of the Rho kinase inhibitor Y-27632. Cell surface progenitor-associated markers are rapidly induced in normal mouse ME-CRCs relative to ME cells. However, the expression of certain mammary progenitor subpopulations, such as CD49f+ ESA+ CD44+, drops significantly in later passages. Nevertheless, mouse ME-CRCs grown in a three-dimensional extracellular matrix gave rise to mammary acinar structures. ME-CRCs isolated from MMTV-Neu transgenic mouse mammary tumors express high levels of HER2/neu, as well as tumor-initiating cell markers, such as CD44+, CD49f+, and ESA+ (EpCam. These patterns of expression are sustained in later CRC passages. Early and late passage ME-CRCs from MMTV-Neu tumors that were implanted in the mammary fat pads of syngeneic or nude mice developed vascular tumors that metastasized within 6 weeks of transplantation. Importantly, the histopathology of these tumors was indistinguishable from that of the parental tumors that develop in the MMTV-Neu mice. Application of the CRC system to mouse mammary epithelial cells provides an attractive model system to study the genetics and phenotype of normal and transformed mouse epithelium in a defined culture environment and in vivo transplant studies.

  2. Transcriptomic response of goat mammary epithelial cells to Mycoplasma agalactiae challenge – a preliminary study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ogorevc, Jernej; Mihevc, Sonja Prpar; Hedegaard, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma agalactiae (Ma) is one of the main aetiological agents of intramammary infections in small ruminants, causing contagious agalactia. To better understand the underlying disease patterns a primary goat mammary epithelial cell (pgMEC) culture was established from the mammary tissue......, steroid metabolism, fatty acid metabolism, apoptosis signalling, transcription regulation, and cell cycle regulation. Based on the results we suggest that mammary epithelial cells in vivo contribute to the immune system by the induced expression of cytokines and other chemotactic agents, activation...

  3. Incidental radiation to uninvolved internal mammary lymph nodes in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Divya; Frakes, Jessica; Scott, Jacob; Opp, Daniel; Johnson, Carol; Song, Juhee; Harris, Eleanor

    2015-06-01

    Routine treatment of clinically uninvolved internal mammary nodes in breast cancer patients requiring post-mastectomy radiation therapy is controversial. The purpose of this study was to measure the incidental radiation dose to the internal mammary lymph nodes not included in the planning target volume (PTV) in women with breast cancer receiving post-mastectomy radiation therapy. This retrospective protocol utilized CT-based 3D conformal treatment plans. Fifty consecutive patients were included in the analysis: 25 left breast and 25 right breast patients. 3D conformal treatment plans chest wall tangent fields and matched supraclavicular were used. All plans were prescribed to a total dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions to the chest wall and 46 Gy in 23 fractions to the supraclavicular field. The internal mammary node chain was intentionally not included in the target volume. For purposes of this study, internal mammary vessels were contoured following the Radiation Therapy Oncologist Group atlas with a 7-mm PTV expansion, utilizing original CT simulation images. The internal mammary nodes were contoured in between the first 3 and first 5 intercostal spaces for comparison. Percent volume of internal mammary node PTV receiving 95 % of the prescribed dose (47.5 Gy) with 7-mm expansion and first 5 intercostal spaces for all patients was 25.2 % (range 0.04-97.6 %, standard deviation (SD) 23.5). The mean internal mammary node dose for all patients was 24.98 Gy (range 3.54-55.93 Gy, SD 16). Results of this study suggest the incidental dose to the internal mammary nodes does not achieve clinically significant therapeutic levels in post-mastectomy breast cancer patients treated with standard 3D conformal radiation therapy chest wall irradiation. If risk factors for microscopic involvement are present, internal mammary nodes must be specifically included in target volumes in order to be adequately treated.

  4. Epigenetic reprogramming governs EcSOD expression during human mammary epithelial cell differentiation, tumorigenesis and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teoh-Fitzgerald, M L; Fitzgerald, M P; Zhong, W; Askeland, R W; Domann, F E

    2014-01-16

    Expression of the antioxidant enzyme EcSOD in normal human mammary epithelial cells was not recognized until recently. Although expression of EcSOD was not detectable in non-malignant human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) cultured in conventional two-dimensional (2D) culture conditions, EcSOD protein expression was observed in normal human breast tissues, suggesting that the 2D-cultured condition induces a repressive status of EcSOD gene expression in HMEC. With the use of laminin-enriched extracellular matrix (lrECM), we were able to detect expression of EcSOD when HMEC formed polarized acinar structures in a 3D-culture condition. Repression of the EcSOD-gene expression was again seen when the HMEC acini were sub-cultured as a monolayer, implying that lrECM-induced acinar morphogenesis is essential in EcSOD-gene activation. We have further shown the involvement of DNA methylation in regulating EcSOD expression in HMEC under these cell culture conditions. EcSOD mRNA expression was strongly induced in the 2D-cultured HMEC after treatment with a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor. In addition, epigenetic analyses showed a decrease in the degree of CpG methylation in the EcSOD promoter in the 3D versus 2D-cultured HMEC. More importantly, >80% of clinical mammary adenocarcinoma samples showed significantly decreased EcSOD mRNA and protein expression levels compared with normal mammary tissues and there is an inverse correlation between the expression levels of EcSOD and the clinical stages of breast cancer. Combined bisulfite restriction analysis analysis of some of the tumors also revealed an association of DNA methylation with the loss of EcSOD expression in vivo. Furthermore, overexpression of EcSOD inhibited breast cancer metastasis in both the experimental lung metastasis model and the syngeneic mouse model. This study suggests that epigenetic silencing of EcSOD may contribute to mammary tumorigenesis and that restoring the extracellular superoxide scavenging

  5. Characterizing cancer cells with cancer stem cell-like features in 293T human embryonic kidney cells

    OpenAIRE

    Buchholz Thomas A; Lacerda Lara; Xu Wei; Robertson Fredika; Ueno Naoto T; Lucci Anthony; Landis Melissa D; Rodriguez Angel A; Li Li; Cohen Evan; Gao Hui; Krishnamurthy Savitri; Zhang Xiaomei; Debeb Bisrat G; Cristofanilli Massimo

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Since the first suggestion of prospectively identifiable cancer stem cells in solid tumors, efforts have been made to characterize reported cancer stem cell surrogates in existing cancer cell lines, and cell lines rich with these surrogates have been used to screen for cancer stem cell targeted agents. Although 293T cells were derived from human embryonic kidney, transplantation of these cells into the mammary fat pad yields aggressive tumors that self-renew as evidenced b...

  6. Potential reduction of contralateral second breast-cancer risks by prophylactic mammary irradiation: validation in a breast-cancer-prone mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Shuryak

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Long-term breast-cancer survivors have a highly elevated risk (1 in 6 at 20 years of contralateral second breast cancer. This high risk is associated with the presence of multiple pre-malignant cell clones in the contralateral breast at the time of primary breast cancer diagnosis. Mechanistic analyses suggest that a moderate dose of X-rays to the contralateral breast can kill these pre-malignant clones such that, at an appropriate Prophylactic Mammary Irradiation (PMI dose, the long-term contralateral breast cancer risk in breast cancer survivors would be considerably decreased. AIMS: To test the predicted relationship between PMI dose and cancer risk in mammary glands that have a high risk of developing malignancies. METHODS: We tested the PMI concept using MMTV-PyVT mammary-tumor-prone mice. Mammary glands on one side of each mouse were irradiated with X-rays, while those on the other side were shielded from radiation. The unshielded mammary glands received doses of 0, 4, 8, 12 and 16 Gy in 4-Gy fractions. RESULTS: In high-risk mammary glands exposed to radiation doses designed for PMI (12 and 16 Gy, tumor incidence rates were respectively decreased by a factor of 2.2 (95% CI, 1.1-5.0 at 12 Gy, and a factor of 3.1 (95% CI, 1.3-8.3 at 16 Gy, compared to those in the shielded glands that were exposed to very low radiation doses. The same pattern was seen for PMI-exposed mammary glands relative to zero-dose controls. CONCLUSIONS: The pattern of cancer risk reduction by PMI was consistent with mechanistic predictions. Contralateral breast PMI may thus have promise as a spatially targeted breast-conserving option for reducing the current high risk of contralateral second breast cancers. For estrogen-receptor positive primary tumors, PMI might optimally be used concomitantly with systemically delivered chemopreventive drugs such as tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors, while for estrogen-receptor negative tumors, PMI might be used alone.

  7. Binding of transcobalamin II by human mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkins, Y; Lönnerdal, B

    2001-01-01

    The presence of nutrient binders in milk may have an important role during milk production and may influence the nutrient's bioavailability to the infant. Human milk and plasma contain at least two types of vitamin B12 binders: transcobalamin II (TCII) and haptocorrin (Hc). Vitamin B12 in milk is exclusively bound to Hc (Hc-B12). In plasma, the major vitamin B12 binding protein that is responsible for delivering absorbed vitamin B12 to most tissues and cells is TCII (TCII-B12). Currently, little is known about the route of secretion of vitamin B12 into human milk. It is possible that a receptor-mediated pathway is involved, since maternal vitamin B12 supplementation increases the amount of the vitamin secreted into human milk if the mother's vitamin B12 consumption is low, but remains unchanged if her intake is adequate. In this study, we investigated the process by which the mammary gland acquires vitamin B12 from maternal circulation, whether as a free vitamin or as a Hc-B12 or TCII-B12 complex. TCII was purified from plasma incubated with [57Co]vit B12 (B12*), while Hc was purified from whey incubated with B12*. Both proteins were separated by fast protein liquid chromatography using gel filtration and anion-exchange columns. Purity of the separated proteins was assessed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Binding studies were carried out on a monolayer of normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) at 4 degrees C using free B12* and TCII-B12* and Hc-B12* complexes. Minimal binding of free B12* and Hc-B12* to HMEC was observed; however, HMEC exhibited a high affinity for the TCII-B12* complex. This study suggests that a specific cell surface receptor for the TCII-B12 complex exists in the mammary gland. It is possible that once vitamin B12 is in the mammary gland it is transferred to Hc (which may be synthesized by the mammary gland) and then secreted into milk as a Hc-B12 complex.

  8. Canonical Wnt Signaling as a Specific Marker of Normal and Tumorigenic Mammary Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    mammary epithelium impacts glandular development . We found ductal abnormali ties; however, the phenotype was not as severe as expected. Approximately...In previous reports we have clearly showed that cells w ith activated canonical Wnt signaling are present within the mammary epithelium starting at...Wnt1 transgenic cells. We generated a mouse line in which ~-catenin is conditionally deleted in the mammary epithelium of MMTV-Wnt1 transgenic

  9. SCA-1 Identifies the Tumor-Initiating Cells in Mammary Tumors of BALB-neuT Transgenic Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Grange

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells, initiating and sustaining the tumor process, have been isolated in human and murine breast cancer using different cell markers. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the presence and characteristics of stem/tumor-initiating cells in the model of the mouse mammary neoplasia driven by the activated form of rat Her-2/neu oncogene (BALB-neuT mice. For this purpose, we generated tumor spheres from primary spontaneous BALB-neuT tumors. Tumor sphere cultures were characterized for clonogenicity, self-renewal, and ability to differentiate in epithelial/myoepithelial cells of the mammary gland expressing basal and luminal cytokeratins and alpha-smooth muscle actin. In addition, tumor spheres were more resistant to doxorubicin compared with parental tumor cells. In the attempt to identify a selected marker for the sphere-generating cells, we found that Sca-1+ cells, present in tumors or enriched in mammospheres, and not CD24+ or CD29+ cells, were responsible for the sphere generation in vitro. Moreover, cells from the tumor spheres showed an increased tumor-generating ability in respect to the epithelial tumor cells. Sca-1+ sorted cells or clonal mammospheres derived from a Sca-1+ cell showed a superimposable tumor-initiating ability. The data of the present study indicate that a Sca-1+ population derived from mammary BALB-neuT tumors is responsible for sphere generation in culture and for initiating tumors in vivo.

  10. Cellular Mechanisms in Regulating Mammary Cell Turnover During Lactation and Dry Period in Dairy Cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, J V; Theil, P K; Sørensen, M T

    2008-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in regulating mammary cell turnover during the pregnancy-lactaion cycle in dairy cows are unclear. The objective of present experiment was to describe expression of genes encoding proteins known to be involved in pathways regulating mammary cell proliferation, apoptosis......, differentiation, cell survival, and tissue remodeling....

  11. c-Myc Transforms Human Mammary Epithelial Cells through Repression of the Wnt Inhibitors DKK1 and SFRP1▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowling, Victoria H.; D'Cruz, Celina M.; Chodosh, Lewis A.; Cole, Michael D.

    2007-01-01

    c-myc is frequently amplified in breast cancer; however, the mechanism of myc-induced mammary epithelial cell transformation has not been defined. We show that c-Myc induces a profound morphological transformation in human mammary epithelial cells and anchorage-independent growth. c-Myc suppresses the Wnt inhibitors DKK1 and SFRP1, and derepression of DKK1 or SFRP1 reduces Myc-dependent transforming activity. Myc-dependent repression of DKK1 and SFRP1 is accompanied by Wnt target gene activation and endogenous T-cell factor activity. Myc-induced mouse mammary tumors have repressed SFRP1 and increased expression of Wnt target genes. DKK1 and SFRP1 inhibit the transformed phenotype of breast cancer cell lines, and DKK1 inhibits tumor formation. We propose a positive feedback loop for activation of the c-myc and Wnt pathways in breast cancer. PMID:17485441

  12. Analysis of tumor heterogeneity and cancer gene networks using deep sequencing of MMTV-induced mouse mammary tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiaan Klijn

    Full Text Available Cancer develops through a multistep process in which normal cells progress to malignant tumors via the evolution of their genomes as a result of the acquisition of mutations in cancer driver genes. The number, identity and mode of action of cancer driver genes, and how they contribute to tumor evolution is largely unknown. This study deployed the Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV as an insertional mutagen to find both the driver genes and the networks in which they function. Using deep insertion site sequencing we identified around 31000 retroviral integration sites in 604 MMTV-induced mammary tumors from mice with mammary gland-specific deletion of Trp53, Pten heterozygous knockout mice, or wildtype strains. We identified 18 known common integration sites (CISs and 12 previously unknown CISs marking new candidate cancer genes. Members of the Wnt, Fgf, Fgfr, Rspo and Pdgfr gene families were commonly mutated in a mutually exclusive fashion. The sequence data we generated yielded also information on the clonality of insertions in individual tumors, allowing us to develop a data-driven model of MMTV-induced tumor development. Insertional mutations near Wnt and Fgf genes mark the earliest "initiating" events in MMTV induced tumorigenesis, whereas Fgfr genes are targeted later during tumor progression. Our data shows that insertional mutagenesis can be used to discover the mutational networks, the timing of mutations, and the genes that initiate and drive tumor evolution.

  13. The biology of progesterone receptor in the normal mammary gland and in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obr, Alison E; Edwards, Dean P

    2012-06-24

    This paper reviews work on progesterone and the progesterone receptor (PR) in the mouse mammary gland that has been used extensively as an experimental model. Studies have led to the concept that progesterone controls proliferation and morphogenesis of the luminal epithelium in a tightly orchestrated manner at distinct stages of development by paracrine signaling pathways, including receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL) as a major paracrine factor. Progesterone also drives expansion of stem cells by paracrine signals to generate progenitors required for alveologenesis. During mid-to-late pregnancy, progesterone has another role to suppress secretory activation until parturition mediated in part by crosstalk between PR and prolactin/Stat5 signaling to inhibit induction of milk protein gene expression, and by inhibiting tight junction closure. In models of hormone-dependent mouse mammary tumors, the progesterone/PR signaling axis enhances pre-neoplastic progression by a switch from a paracrine to an autocrine mode of proliferation and dysregulation of the RANKL signaling pathway. Limited experiments with normal human breast show that progesterone/PR signaling also stimulates epithelial cell proliferation by a paracrine mechanism; however, the signaling pathways and whether RANKL is a major mediator remains unknown. Work with human breast cancer cell lines, patient tumor samples and clinical studies indicates that progesterone is a risk factor for breast cancer and that alteration in progesterone/PR signaling pathways contributes to early stage human breast cancer progression. However, loss of PR expression in primary tumors is associated with a less differentiated more invasive phenotype and worse prognosis, suggesting that PR may limit later stages of tumor progression.

  14. A multifunctional 3D co-culture system for studies of mammary tissue morphogenesis and stem cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Jonathan J; Davidenko, Natalia; Caffarel, Maria M; Cameron, Ruth E; Watson, Christine J

    2011-01-01

    Studies on the stem cell niche and the efficacy of cancer therapeutics require complex multicellular structures and interactions between different cell types and extracellular matrix (ECM) in three dimensional (3D) space. We have engineered a 3D in vitro model of mammary gland that encompasses a defined, porous collagen/hyaluronic acid (HA) scaffold forming a physiologically relevant foundation for epithelial and adipocyte co-culture. Polarized ductal and acinar structures form within this scaffold recapitulating normal tissue morphology in the absence of reconstituted basement membrane (rBM) hydrogel. Furthermore, organoid developmental outcome can be controlled by the ratio of collagen to HA, with a higher HA concentration favouring acinar morphological development. Importantly, this culture system recapitulates the stem cell niche as primary mammary stem cells form complex organoids, emphasising the utility of this approach for developmental and tumorigenic studies using genetically altered animals or human biopsy material, and for screening cancer therapeutics for personalised medicine.

  15. A multifunctional 3D co-culture system for studies of mammary tissue morphogenesis and stem cell biology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan J Campbell

    Full Text Available Studies on the stem cell niche and the efficacy of cancer therapeutics require complex multicellular structures and interactions between different cell types and extracellular matrix (ECM in three dimensional (3D space. We have engineered a 3D in vitro model of mammary gland that encompasses a defined, porous collagen/hyaluronic acid (HA scaffold forming a physiologically relevant foundation for epithelial and adipocyte co-culture. Polarized ductal and acinar structures form within this scaffold recapitulating normal tissue morphology in the absence of reconstituted basement membrane (rBM hydrogel. Furthermore, organoid developmental outcome can be controlled by the ratio of collagen to HA, with a higher HA concentration favouring acinar morphological development. Importantly, this culture system recapitulates the stem cell niche as primary mammary stem cells form complex organoids, emphasising the utility of this approach for developmental and tumorigenic studies using genetically altered animals or human biopsy material, and for screening cancer therapeutics for personalised medicine.

  16. Runx1 stabilizes the mammary epithelial cell phenotype and prevents epithelial to mesenchymal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Deli; Messier, Terri L; Tye, Coralee E; Dobson, Jason R; Fritz, Andrew J; Sikora, Kenneth R; Browne, Gillian; Stein, Janet L; Lian, Jane B; Stein, Gary S

    2017-03-14

    Runx1 is a well characterized transcription factor essential for hematopoietic differentiation and Runx1 mutations are the cause of leukemias. Runx1 is highly expressed in normal epithelium of most glands and recently has been associated with solid tumors. Notably, the function of Runx1 in the mammary gland and how it is involved in initiation and progression of breast cancer is still unclear. Here we demonstrate the consequences of Runx1 loss in normal mammary epithelial and breast cancer cells. We first observed that Runx1 is decreased in tumorigenic and metastatic breast cancer cells. We also observed loss of Runx1 expression upon induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in MCF10A (normal-like) cells. Furthermore depletion of Runx1 in MCF10A cells resulted in striking changes in cell shape, leading to mesenchymal cell morphology. The epithelial phenotype could be restored in breast cancer cells by re-expressing Runx1. Analyses of breast tumors and patient data revealed that low Runx1 expression is associated with poor prognosis and decreased survival. We addressed mechanisms for the function of Runx1 in maintaining the epithelial phenotype and find Runx1 directly regulates E-cadherin; and serves as a downstream transcription factor mediating TGFβ signaling. We also observed through global gene expression profiling of growth factor depleted cells that induction of EMT and loss of Runx1 is associated with activation of TGFβ and WNT pathways. Thus these findings have identified a novel function for Runx1 in sustaining normal epithelial morphology and preventing EMT and suggest Runx1 levels could be a prognostic indicator of tumor progression.

  17. Chemo Resistance of Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-01

    components [53]. A role for Wnt signaling in stem cell self-renewal of mammary stem cells was suggested by recent studies of Alexander and colleagues...autocrine mechanism for constitutive Wnt pathway activation in human cancer cells. Cancer Cell 2004, 6:497-506. 54. Liu BY, McDermott SP, Khwaja SS, Alexander ...helping with the Western blotting, the University of Michigan Cancer Center Flow Cytometry and Vector Core Facilities, and Dr. Graham W. Neill for

  18. A novel mouse model for non-invasive single marker tracking of mammary stem cells in vivo reveals stem cell dynamics throughout pregnancy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin J Tiede

    Full Text Available Mammary stem cells (MaSCs play essential roles for the development of the mammary gland and its remodeling during pregnancy. However, the precise localization of MaSCs in the mammary gland and their regulation during pregnancy is unknown. Here we report a transgenic mouse model for luciferase-based single marker detection of MaSCs in vivo that we used to address these issues. Single transgene expressing mammary epithelial cells were shown to reconstitute mammary glands in vivo while immunohistochemical staining identified MaSCs in basal and luminal locations, with preponderance towards the basal position. By quantifying luciferase expression using bioluminescent imaging, we were able to track MaSCs non-invasively in individual mice over time. Using this model to monitor MaSC dynamics throughout pregnancy, we found that MaSCs expand in both total number and percentage during pregnancy and then drop down to or below baseline levels after weaning. However, in a second round of pregnancy, this expansion was not as extensive. These findings validate a powerful system for the analysis of MaSC dynamics in vivo, which will facilitate future characterization of MaSCs during mammary gland development and breast cancer.

  19. The biology of zinc transport in mammary epithelial cells: implications for mammary gland development, lactation, and involution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Nicholas H; Hennigar, Stephen R; Kiselyov, Kirill; Kelleher, Shannon L

    2014-03-01

    Zinc plays a critical role in a vast array of cellular functions including gene transcription, protein translation, cell proliferation, differentiation, bioenergetics, and programmed cell death. The mammary gland depends upon tight coordination of these processes during development and reproduction for optimal expansion, differentiation, and involution. For example, zinc is required for activation of matrix metalloproteinases, intracellular signaling cascades such as MAPK and PKC, and the activation of both mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis and lysosomal-mediated cell death. In addition to functional needs, during lactation the mammary gland must balance providing optimal zinc for cellular requirements with the need to secrete a substantial amount of zinc into milk to meet the requirements of the developing neonate. Finally, the mammary gland exhibits the most profound example of programmed cell death, which is driven by both apoptotic and lysosomal-mediated cell death. Two families of zinc-specific transporters regulate zinc delivery for these diverse functions. Members of the ZIP family of zinc transporters (ZIP1-14) import zinc into the cytoplasm from outside the cell or from subcellular organelles, while members of the ZnT family (ZnT1-10) export zinc from the cytoplasm. Recently, the ion channel transient receptor potential mucolipin 1 (TRPML1) has also been implicated in zinc transport. Herein, we review our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms through which mammary epithelial cells utilize zinc with a focus on the transport of zinc into discrete subcellular organelles for specific cellular functions during mammary gland development, lactation, and involution.

  20. Comparison of the transcriptpmes of long-tern label retaining-cells and C cells microdissected from mammary epithelium: an initial study to character potential stem/progenitor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammary stem cells (MaSC) account for the cell lineage of mammary epithelia and provide for mammary growth, development and tissue homeostasis. The presence of MaSC was clearly demonstrated by the generation of an entire mammary gland from a single cell implanted into epithelium-ablated mammary fat...

  1. Identification of Cytoplasmic Proteins Interacting with the Mammary Cell Transforming Domain of Ese-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    2005). Additionally, 3’ polymorphisms of Ets1 are associated with different clinical manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus (Sullivan et al...of mammary epithelial cell growth [24]. In postnatal mammary glands, ETS factors have been shown to have key roles in pregnancy -induced, PRL- mediated...mammary gland lobuloalveolar development and milk production and in breast tumorigenesis. In the early phase of pregnancy , a proliferative phase of

  2. Mammary stem cells: Novel markers and novel approaches to increase lactation efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammary stem cells (MaSC) provide for net growth, renewal and turnover of mammary epithelial cells, and are therefore potential targets for strategies to increase production efficiency. Appropriate regulation of MaSC can potentially benefit milk yield, persistency, dry period management and tissue r...

  3. Effects of putrescine, cadaverine, spermine, spermidine and beta-phenylethylamine on cultured bovine mammary epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fusi, Eleonora; Baldi, Antonella; Cheli, Federica

    2008-01-01

    A bovine mammary epithelial cell line (BME-UV1) and three-dimensional collagen primary bovine organoids were used to evaluate the effects of cadaverine, putrescine, spermine, spermicline and beta-phenylethylamine on mammary epithelial cells. Each biogenic amine was diluted in several concentratio...

  4. Effects of putrescine, cadaverine, spermine, spermidine and beta-phenylethylamine on cultured bovine mammary epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fusi, Eleonora; Baldi, Antonella; Cheli, Federica

    2008-01-01

    A bovine mammary epithelial cell line (BME-UV1) and three-dimensional collagen primary bovine organoids were used to evaluate the effects of cadaverine, putrescine, spermine, spermicline and beta-phenylethylamine on mammary epithelial cells. Each biogenic amine was diluted in several concentratio...

  5. Does cancer start in the womb? altered mammary gland development and predisposition to breast cancer due to in utero exposure to endocrine disruptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Ana M; Brisken, Cathrin; Schaeberle, Cheryl; Sonnenschein, Carlos

    2013-06-01

    We are now witnessing a resurgence of theories of development and carcinogenesis in which the environment is again being accepted as a major player in phenotype determination. Perturbations in the fetal environment predispose an individual to disease that only becomes apparent in adulthood. For example, gestational exposure to diethylstilbestrol resulted in clear cell carcinoma of the vagina and breast cancer. In this review the effects of the endocrine disruptor bisphenol-A (BPA) on mammary development and tumorigenesis in rodents is used as a paradigmatic example of how altered prenatal mammary development may lead to breast cancer in humans who are also widely exposed to it through plastic goods, food and drink packaging, and thermal paper receipts. Changes in the stroma and its extracellular matrix led to altered ductal morphogenesis. Additionally, gestational and lactational exposure to BPA increased the sensitivity of rats and mice to mammotropic hormones during puberty and beyond, thus suggesting a plausible explanation for the increased incidence of breast cancer.

  6. Identification of mammary epithelial cells subject to chronic oxidative stress in mammary epithelium of young women and teenagers living in USA: implication for breast carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisz, Judith; Shearer, Debra A; Murata, Erin; Patrick, Susan D; Han, Bing; Berg, Arthur; Clawson, Gary A

    2012-01-15

    Current knowledge of changes in the mammary epithelium relevant to breast carcinogenesis is limited to when histological changes are already present because of a lack of biomarkers needed to identify where such molecular changes might be ongoing at earlier during the of decades-long latent stages of breast carcinogenesis. Breast reduction tissues from young women and teenagers, representative of USA's high breast cancer incidence population, were studies using immunocytochemistry and targeted PCR arrays in order to learn whether a marker of chronic oxidative-stress [protein adducts of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4HNE)] can identify where molecular changes relevant to carcinogenesis might be taking place prior to any histological changes. 4HNE-immunopositive (4HNE+) mammary epithelial cell-clusters were identified in breast tissue sections from most women and from many teenagers (ages 14-30 y) and, in tissues from women ages 17-27 y with many vs. few 4HNE+ cells, the expression of 30 of 84 oxidative-stress associated genes was decreased and only one was increased > 2-fold. This is in contrast to increased expression of many of these genes known to be elicited by acute oxidative-stress. The findings validate using 4HNE-adducts to identify where molecular changes of potential relevance to carcinogenesis are taking place in histologically normal mammary epithelium and highlight differences between responses to acute vs. chronic oxidative-stress. We posit that the altered gene expression in 4HNE+ tissues reflect adaptive responses to chronic oxidative-stress that enable some cells to evade mechanisms that have evolved to prevent propagation of cells with oxidatively-damaged DNA and to accrue heritable changes needed to establish a cancer.

  7. New methods in mammary gland development and cancer: proteomics, epigenetics, symmetric division and metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Bentires-Alj, Mohamed; Glukhova, Marina; Hynes, Nancy; Vivanco, Maria dM.

    2012-01-01

    The European Network for Breast Development and Cancer (ENBDC) meeting on 'Methods in Mammary Gland Development and Cancer' has become an annual international rendezvous for scientists with interests in the normal and neoplastic breast. The fourth meeting in this series, held in April in Weggis, Switzerland, focused on proteomics, epigenetics, symmetric division, and metastasis.

  8. Characterization of Human Mammary Epithelial Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    breast is highly expressed by luminal epithelial cells and is less expressed by basal cells19,20. In contrast, CD49f (a6 integrin) has an inverse pattern...mouse stretched on its back. The hose and nose cone from the anesthetic vaporizer are securely attached to one side of the plate, and a heated pad is...the mouse by a nose cone. Check that the mouse has reached surgical anesthesia by loss of pedal withdrawal reflex . ! cautIon Institutional review

  9. Characterization of mammary adenocarcinomas in male rats after N-methyl-N-nitrosourea exposure--Potential for human male breast cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizawa, Katsuhiko; Yuki, Michiko; Kinoshita, Yuichi; Emoto, Yuko; Yuri, Takashi; Shikata, Nobuaki; Elmore, Susan A; Tsubura, Airo

    2016-05-01

    The frequency of breast cancer in men is extremely rare, reported to be less than 1% and there is currently no available animal model for male mammary tumors. We compared the characteristics of various immunohistochemical markers in N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced mammary adenocarcinomas in male and female Crj:CD(SD)IGS rats including: estrogen receptor α (ER), progesterone receptor (PgR), androgen receptor (AR), receptor tyrosine-protein kinase erbB-2 (HER2), GATA binding protein 3 (GATA3), and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Female mammary adenocarcinomas were strongly positive in the nuclei of tumor cells for PCNA and ER (100%) with only 60% and 53% expressing PgR and GATA3, respectively. 100% of male adenocarcinomas also exhibited strongly positive expression in the nuclei of tumor cells for PCNA, with 25% expressing AR and only 8% showing positivity for ER. Male carcinomas did not express PgR or GATA3 and none of the tumors, male or female, were positive for HER2. Based on the observed ER and PgR positivity and HER2 negativity within these tumors, MNU-induced mammary adenocarcinomas in female rats appear to be hormonally dependent, similar to human luminal A type breast cancer. In contrast, MNU-induced mammary adenocarcinomas in male rats showed no reactivity for ER, PgR, HER2 or GATA3, suggesting no hormonal dependency. Both male and female adenocarcinomas showed high proliferating activity by PCNA immunohistochemistry. Based on our literature review, human male breast cancers are mainly dependent on ER and/or PgR, therefore the biological pathogenesis of MNU-induced male mammary cancer in rats may differ from that of male breast cancer in humans.

  10. Human mammary progenitor cell fate decisions are productsof interactions with combinatorial microenvironments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    LaBarge, Mark A.; Nelson, Celeste M.; Villadsen, René

    2009-01-01

    as constellations of signaling molecules; and these were used in conjunction with physiologically relevant 3 dimensional human breast cultures. Both immortalized and primary human breast progenitors were analyzed. We report on the functional ability of those proteins of the mammary gland that maintain quiescence...... combinations of cell-extrinsic mammary gland proteins and ECM molecules that imposed specific cell fates on bipotent human mammary progenitor cells.Micropatterned cell culture surfaces were fabricated to distinguish between the instructive effects of cell-cell versus cell-ECM interactions, as well...

  11. Using Mouse Mammary Tumor Cells to Teach Core Biology Concepts: A Simple Lab Module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIlrath, Victoria; Trye, Alice; Aguanno, Ann

    2015-06-18

    Undergraduate biology students are required to learn, understand and apply a variety of cellular and molecular biology concepts and techniques in preparation for biomedical, graduate and professional programs or careers in science. To address this, a simple laboratory module was devised to teach the concepts of cell division, cellular communication and cancer through the application of animal cell culture techniques. Here the mouse mammary tumor (MMT) cell line is used to model for breast cancer. Students learn to grow and characterize these animal cells in culture and test the effects of traditional and non-traditional chemotherapy agents on cell proliferation. Specifically, students determine the optimal cell concentration for plating and growing cells, learn how to prepare and dilute drug solutions, identify the best dosage and treatment time course of the antiproliferative agents, and ascertain the rate of cell death in response to various treatments. The module employs both a standard cell counting technique using a hemocytometer and a novel cell counting method using microscopy software. The experimental procedure lends to open-ended inquiry as students can modify critical steps of the protocol, including testing homeopathic agents and over-the-counter drugs. In short, this lab module requires students to use the scientific process to apply their knowledge of the cell cycle, cellular signaling pathways, cancer and modes of treatment, all while developing an array of laboratory skills including cell culture and analysis of experimental data not routinely taught in the undergraduate classroom.

  12. Mammary cancer promotion by ovarian hormones involves IGFR/AKT/mTOR signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arumugam, Arunkumar; Parada, Jacqueline; Rajkumar, Lakshmanaswamy

    2012-06-01

    In a previous study, we observed that N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced mammary lesions are promoted to overt mammary cancers by exogenous administration of estradiol (E) and progesterone (P). The purpose of the present study was to identify the early molecular events occurring during the hormonal promotion of mammary carcinogenesis and persistent activation of molecular pathways responsible for tumor growth. Seven-week-old female Copenhagen (COP) rats, which are resistant to MNU-induced mammary carcinogenesis, were intraperitoneally administered a single dose of MNU (50 mg/kg body weight). Six weeks after carcinogen administration, the rats were treated with E+P, killed at 15th week and 43rd week to obtain mammary lesions and tumor tissues and the molecular analysis were performed. Quantitative RT-PCR experiments showed increased mRNA expression of Igfr, Grb2, Sos1, and Shc1 in mammary lesions and tumors. Immunoblot data also showed increased protein levels of IGFR, GRB2 and SHC1 in mammary lesions and tumors, which is in correlation with their respective RT-PCR data. Activation of AKT and ERK1/2 were up regulated in E+P treated mammary lesions and tumors. Molecular analysis of mTOR pathway proteins revealed increased phosphorylation of p70S6K and 4EBP1 in the hormone treated tumors indicating the activation of mTOR signaling. E+P treatment reduced the protein expression of BAX and increased BCL2 expression along with down regulation of active caspase 3 and 8. Together, these data demonstrate that ovarian hormones promote the lesions to mammary tumors by enhancing IGFR and Akt/mTOR signaling along with inhibition of apoptotic stimuli.

  13. File list: InP.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. File list: NoD.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  3. File list: NoD.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  4. A Spectrum of Monoclonal Antibodies Reactive with Human Mammary Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colcher, D.; Horan Hand, P.; Nuti, M.; Schlom, J.

    1981-05-01

    Splenic lymphocytes of mice, immunized with membrane-enriched fractions of metastatic human mammary carcinoma tissues, were fused with the NS-1 non-immunoglobulin-secreting murine myeloma cell line. This resulted in the generation of hybridoma cultures secreting immunoglobulins reactive in solid-phase radioimmunoassays with extracts of metastatic mammary carcinoma cells from involved livers, but not with extracts of apparently normal human liver. As a result of further screening of immunoglobulin reactivities and double cloning of cultures, 11 monoclonal antibodies were chosen that demonstrated reactivities with human mammary tumor cells and not with apparently normal human tissues. These monoclonal antibodies could be placed into at least five major groups on the basis of their differential binding to the surface of various live human mammary tumor cells in culture, to extracts of mammary tumor tissues, or to tissue sections of mammary tumor cells studied by the immunoperoxidase technique. Whereas a spectrum of reactivities to mammary tumors was observed with the 11 monoclonal antibodies, no reactivity was observed to apparently normal cells of the following human tissues: breast, lymph node, lung, skin, testis, kidney, thymus, bone marrow, spleen, uterus, thyroid, intestine, liver, bladder, tonsils, stomach, prostate, and salivary gland. Several of the antibodies also demonstrated a ``pancarcinoma'' reactivity, showing binding to selected non-breast carcinomas. None of the monoclonal antibodies showed binding to purified ferritin or carcinoembryonic antigen. Monoclonal antibodies of all five major groups, however, demonstrated binding to human metastatic mammary carcinoma cells both in axillary lymph nodes and at distal sites.

  5. The dog as a natural animal model for study of the mammary myoepithelial basal cell lineage and its role in mammary carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasotto, R; Goldschmidt, M H; Castagnaro, M; Carnier, P; Caliari, D; Zappulli, V

    2014-01-01

    Basal-like tumours constitute 2-18% of all human breast cancers (HBCs). These tumours have a basal myoepithelial phenotype and it has been hypothesized that they originate from either myoepithelial cells or mammary progenitor cells. They are heterogeneous in morphology, clinical presentation, outcome and response to therapy. Canine mammary carcinomas (CMCs) have epidemiological and biological similarities to HBCs, are frequently biphasic and are composed of two distinct neoplastic populations (epithelial and myoepithelial). The present study evaluates the potential of CMCs as a natural model for basal-like HBCs. Single and double immunohistochemistry was performed on serial sections of 10 normal canine mammary glands and 65 CMCs to evaluate expression of cytokeratin (CK) 8/18, CK5, CK14, α-smooth muscle actin (SMA), calponin (CALP), p63 and vimentin (VIM). The tumours were also evaluated for Ki67 and human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER)-2 expression. A hierarchical model of cell differentiation was established, similar to that for the human breast. We hypothesized that progenitor cells (CK5(+), CK14(+), p63(+) and VIM(+)) differentiate into terminally-differentiated luminal glandular (CK8/18(+)) and myoepithelial (CALP(+), SMA(+) and VIM(+)) cells via intermediary luminal glandular cells (CK5(+), CK14(+) and CK8/CK18(+)) and intermediary myoepithelial cells (CK5(+), CK14(+), p63(+), SMA(+), CALP(+) and VIM(+)). Neoplastic myoepithelial cells in canine complex carcinomas had labelling similar to that of terminally-differentiated myoepithelial cells, while those of carcinomas-and-malignant myoepitheliomas with a more aggressive biological behaviour (i.e. higher frequency of vascular/lymph node invasion and visceral metastases and higher risk of tumour-related death) were comparable with intermediary myoepithelial cells and had significantly higher Ki67 expression. The majority of CMCs examined were negative for expression of HER-2. The biphasic appearance of

  6. The Cain and Abl of epithelial-mesenchymal transition and transforming growth factor-β in mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allington, Tressa M; Schiemann, William P

    2011-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) normally inhibits breast cancer development by preventing mammary epithelial cell (MEC) proliferation, by inducing MEC apoptosis, and by creating cell microenvironments that maintain MEC homeostasis and prevent their uncontrolled growth and motility. Mammary tumorigenesis elicits dramatic alterations in MEC architecture and microenvironment integrity, which collectively counteract the tumor-suppressing activities of TGF-β and enable its stimulation of breast cancer invasion and metastasis. How malignant MECs overcome the cytostatic actions imposed by normal microenvironments and TGF-β, and how abnormal microenvironments conspire with TGF-β to stimulate the development and progression of mammary tumors remains largely undefined. These knowledge gaps have prevented science and medicine from implementing treatments effective in simultaneously targeting abnormal cellular microenvironments, and in antagonizing the oncogenic activities of TGF-β in developing and progressing breast cancers. c-Abl is a ubiquitously expressed nonreceptor protein tyrosine kinase that essentially oversees all aspects of cell physiology, including the regulation of cell proliferation, migration and adhesion, as well as that of cell survival. Thus, the biological functions of c-Abl are highly reminiscent of those attributed to TGF-β, including the ability to function as either a suppressor or promoter of tumorigenesis. Interestingly, while dysregulated Abl activity clearly promotes tumorigenesis in hematopoietic cells, an analogous role for c-Abl in regulating solid tumor development, including those of the breast, remains controversial. Here, we review the functions of c-Abl in regulating breast cancer development and progression, and in alleviating the oncogenic activities of TGF-β and its stimulation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition during mammary tumorigenesis.

  7. Selective release of microRNA species from normal and malignant mammary epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy Pigati

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs in body fluids are candidate diagnostics for a variety of conditions and diseases, including breast cancer. One premise for using extracellular miRNAs to diagnose disease is the notion that the abundance of the miRNAs in body fluids reflects their abundance in the abnormal cells causing the disease. As a result, the search for such diagnostics in body fluids has focused on miRNAs that are abundant in the cells of origin. Here we report that released miRNAs do not necessarily reflect the abundance of miRNA in the cell of origin. We find that release of miRNAs from cells into blood, milk and ductal fluids is selective and that the selection of released miRNAs may correlate with malignancy. In particular, the bulk of miR-451 and miR-1246 produced by malignant mammary epithelial cells was released, but the majority of these miRNAs produced by non-malignant mammary epithelial cells was retained. Our findings suggest the existence of a cellular selection mechanism for miRNA release and indicate that the extracellular and cellular miRNA profiles differ. This selective release of miRNAs is an important consideration for the identification of circulating miRNAs as biomarkers of disease.

  8. SNORD-host RNA Zfas1 is a regulator of mammary development and a potential marker for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askarian-Amiri, Marjan E; Crawford, Joanna; French, Juliet D; Smart, Chanel E; Smith, Martin A; Clark, Michael B; Ru, Kelin; Mercer, Tim R; Thompson, Ella R; Lakhani, Sunil R; Vargas, Ana C; Campbell, Ian G; Brown, Melissa A; Dinger, Marcel E; Mattick, John S

    2011-05-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are increasingly recognized to play major regulatory roles in development and disease. To identify novel regulators in breast biology, we identified differentially regulated lncRNAs during mouse mammary development. Among the highest and most differentially expressed was a transcript (Zfas1) antisense to the 5' end of the protein-coding gene Znfx1. In vivo, Zfas1 RNA is localized within the ducts and alveoli of the mammary gland. Zfas1 intronically hosts three previously undescribed C/D box snoRNAs (SNORDs): Snord12, Snord12b, and Snord12c. In contrast to the general assumption that noncoding SNORD-host transcripts function only as vehicles to generate snoRNAs, knockdown of Zfas1 in a mammary epithelial cell line resulted in increased cellular proliferation and differentiation, while not substantially altering the levels of the SNORDs. In support of an independent function, we also found that Zfas1 is extremely stable, with a half-life >16 h. Expression analysis of the SNORDs revealed these were expressed at different levels, likely a result of distinct structures conferring differential stability. While there is relatively low primary sequence conservation between Zfas1 and its syntenic human ortholog ZFAS1, their predicted secondary structures have similar features. Like Zfas1, ZFAS1 is highly expressed in the mammary gland and is down-regulated in breast tumors compared to normal tissue. We propose a functional role for Zfas1/ ZFAS1 in the regulation of alveolar development and epithelial cell differentiation in the mammary gland, which, together with its dysregulation in human breast cancer, suggests ZFAS1 as a putative tumor suppressor gene.

  9. Pubertal bisphenol A exposure alters murine mammary stem cell function leading to early neoplasia in regenerated glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Danhan; Gao, Hui; Bandyopadhyay, Abhik; Wu, Anqi; Yeh, I-Tien; Chen, Yidong; Zou, Yi; Huang, Changjiang; Walter, Christi A; Dong, Qiaoxiang; Sun, Lu-Zhe

    2014-04-01

    Perinatal exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) has been shown to cause aberrant mammary gland morphogenesis and mammary neoplastic transformation. Yet, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. We tested the hypothesis that mammary glands exposed to BPA during a susceptible window may lead to its susceptibility to tumorigenesis through a stem cell-mediated mechanism. We exposed 21-day-old Balb/c mice to BPA by gavage (25 μg/kg/d) during puberty for 3 weeks, and a subset of animals were further challenged with one oral dose (30 mg/kg) of 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) at 2 months of age. Primary mammary cells were isolated at 6 weeks, and 2 and 4 months of age for murine mammary stem cell (MaSC) quantification and function analysis. Pubertal exposure to the low-dose BPA increased lateral branches and hyperplasia in adult mammary glands and caused an acute increase of MaSC in 6-week-old glands and a delayed increase of luminal progenitors in 4-month-old adult gland. Most importantly, pubertal BPA exposure altered the function of MaSC from different age groups, causing early neoplastic lesions in their regenerated glands similar to those induced by DMBA exposure, which indicates that MaSCs are susceptible to BPA-induced transformation. Deep sequencing analysis on MaSC-enriched mammospheres identified a set of aberrantly expressed genes associated with early neoplastic lesions in patients with human breast cancer. Thus, our study for the first time shows that pubertal BPA exposure altered MaSC gene expression and function such that they induced early neoplastic transformation.

  10. Optimization and characterization of an in vitro bovine mammary cell culture system to study regulation of milk protein synthesis and mammary differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talhouk, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    A long term bovine mammary cell culture system that maintains normal mammary cell function was established and optimized to study milk protein synthesis and secretion and mammary differentiation. This culture system used bovine mammary acini isolated from developing or lactating mammary gland by enzymatic dissociation, and cryopreserved until thawed and plated for growth in vitro for these studies. Cells in M199 with lactogenic hormones {plus minus} fetal calf serum (FCS) were cultured on plastic, 100ul and 500ul type I collagen, and Matrigel, or embedded within type I collagen. Cell morphology, cell number, and total TCA-precipitable {sup 35}S-labelled proteins were monitored. Milk protein ({alpha}{sub s,1}-casein, lactoferrin (LF), {alpha}-lactalbumin, and {beta}-lactoglobulin) secretion and intracellular levels were determined by an ELISA assay.

  11. Altered differentiation and paracrine stimulation of mammary epithelial cell proliferation by conditionally activated Smoothened.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visbal, Adriana P; LaMarca, Heather L; Villanueva, Hugo; Toneff, Michael J; Li, Yi; Rosen, Jeffrey M; Lewis, Michael T

    2011-04-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling network is critical for patterning and organogenesis in mammals, and has been implicated in a variety of cancers. Smoothened (Smo), the gene encoding the principal signal transducer, is overexpressed frequently in breast cancer, and constitutive activation in MMTV-SmoM2 transgenic mice caused alterations in mammary gland morphology, increased proliferation, and changes in stem/progenitor cell number. Both in transgenic mice and in clinical specimens, proliferative cells did not usually express detectable Smo, suggesting the hypothesis that Smo functioned in a non-cell autonomous manner to stimulate proliferation. Here, we employed a genetically tagged mouse model carrying a Cre-recombinase-dependent conditional allele of constitutively active Smo (SmoM2) to test this hypothesis. MMTV-Cre- or adenoviral-Cre-mediated SmoM2 expression in the luminal epithelium, but not in the myoepithelium, was required for the hyper-proliferative phenotypes. High levels of proliferation were observed in cells adjacent or in close-proximity to Smo expressing cells demonstrating that SmoM2 expressing cells were stimulating proliferation via a paracrine or juxtacrine mechanism. In contrast, Smo expression altered luminal cell differentiation in a cell-autonomous manner. SmoM2 expressing cells, purified by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) via the genetic fluorescent tag, expressed high levels of Ptch2, Gli1, Gli2, Jag2 and Dll-1, and lower levels of Notch4 and Hes6, in comparison to wildtype cells. These studies provide insight into the mechanism of Smo activation in the mammary gland and its possible roles in breast tumorigenesis. In addition, these results also have potential implications for the interpretation of proliferative phenotypes commonly observed in other organs as a consequence of hedgehog signaling activation.

  12. Modulation of glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1 expression levels alters mouse mammary tumor cell growth in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian D Young

    Full Text Available Tumor cells exhibit an altered metabolism characterized by elevated aerobic glycolysis and lactate secretion which is supported by an increase in glucose transport and consumption. We hypothesized that reducing or eliminating the expression of the most prominently expressed glucose transporter(s would decrease the amount of glucose available to breast cancer cells thereby decreasing their metabolic capacity and proliferative potential.Of the 12 GLUT family glucose transporters expressed in mice, GLUT1 was the most abundantly expressed at the RNA level in the mouse mammary tumors from MMTV-c-ErbB2 mice and cell lines examined. Reducing GLUT1 expression in mouse mammary tumor cell lines using shRNA or Cre/Lox technology reduced glucose transport, glucose consumption, lactate secretion and lipid synthesis in vitro without altering the concentration of ATP, as well as reduced growth on plastic and in soft agar. The growth of tumor cells with reduced GLUT1 expression was impaired when transplanted into the mammary fat pad of athymic nude mice in vivo. Overexpression of GLUT1 in a cell line with low levels of endogenous GLUT1 increased glucose transport in vitro and enhanced growth in nude mice in vivo as compared to the control cells with very low levels of GLUT1.These studies demonstrate that GLUT1 is the major glucose transporter in mouse mammary carcinoma models overexpressing ErbB2 or PyVMT and that modulation of the level of GLUT1 has an effect upon the growth of mouse mammary tumor cell lines in vivo.

  13. ADA3 regulates normal and tumor mammary epithelial cell proliferation through c-MYC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Nicolas I; Sharma, Gayatri; Zhao, Xiangshan; Mirza, Sameer; Srivastava, Shashank; Dave, Bhavana J; Aleskandarany, Mohammed; Rakha, Emad; Mohibi, Shakur; Band, Hamid; Band, Vimla

    2016-11-16

    We have established the critical role of ADA3 as a coactivator of estrogen receptor (ER), as well as its role in cell cycle progression. Furthermore, we showed that ADA3 is predominantly nuclear in mammary epithelium, and in ER+, but is cytoplasmic in ER- breast cancers, the latter correlating with poor survival. However, the role of nuclear ADA3 in human mammary epithelial cells (hMECs), and in ER+ breast cancer cells, as well as the importance of ADA3 expression in relation to patient prognosis and survival in ER+ breast cancer have remained uncharacterized. We overexpressed ADA3 in hMECs or in ER+ breast cancer cells and assessed the effect on cell proliferation. The expression of ADA3 was analyzed then correlated with the expression of various prognostic markers, as well as survival of breast cancer patients. Overexpression of ADA3 in ER- hMECs as well as in ER+ breast cancer cell lines enhanced cell proliferation. These cells showed increased cyclin B and c-MYC, decreased p27 and increased SKP2 levels. This was accompanied by increased mRNA levels of early response genes c-FOS, EGR1, and c-MYC. Analysis of breast cancer tissue specimens showed a significant correlation of ADA3 nuclear expression with c-MYC expression. Furthermore, nuclear ADA3 and c-MYC expression together showed significant correlation with tumor grade, mitosis, pleomorphism, NPI, ER/PR status, Ki67 and p27 expression. Importantly, within ER+ cases, expression of nuclear ADA3 and c-MYC also significantly correlated with Ki67 and p27 expression. Univariate Kaplan Meier analysis of four groups in the whole, as well as the ER+ patients showed that c-MYC and ADA3 combinatorial phenotypes showed significantly different breast cancer specific survival with c-MYC-high and ADA3-Low subgroup had the worst outcome. Using multivariate analyses within the whole cohort and the ER+ subgroups, the significant association of ADA3 and c-MYC expression with patients' outcome was independent of tumor grade

  14. Research advancement of mouse mammary stem cell%鼠乳腺干细胞研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    豆晓伟; 刘瑞

    2008-01-01

    乳腺干细胞是乳腺组织内可以自我更新的细胞亚群,具有分化成导管、腺泡和肌上皮细胞的能力.近年来,多个实验室通过不同的方法确认乳腺干细胞,包括细胞表面标记Sca-1、Hoechst溢出实验、CD24、CD31-CD45-Ter119-CD24+CD29hi等,为阐明乳腺干细胞的自我更新机制,设计有效的乳腺癌治疗方法提供了新的工具.%Mammary stem cell is the subpopulation in mamnlary gland,capable of self-renewal and dif-ferentiating into ductal,alveolar and myoepithelial cells.Recently,several laboratories have employed various methods identifying mammary stem cells,including Sca-1,Hoechst dye efflux,CD24,CD3 1-CIM5-Terl19- CD24+CD29hi and so on.which offer a useful tool to elucidate the mechanism of mammary slem cell self-renew- al and design more effective therapies of mammary cancer.

  15. CXCR4 expression in feline mammary carcinoma cells: evidence of a proliferative role for the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrari Angelo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammary tumours frequently develop in female domestic cats being highly malignant in a large percentage of cases. Chemokines regulate many physiological and pathological processes including organogenesis, chemotaxis of inflammatory cells, as well as tumour progression and metastasization. In particular, the chemokine/receptor pair SDF-1/CXCR4 has been involved in the regulation of metastatic potential of neoplastic cells, including breast cancer. The aim of this study was the immunohistochemical defininition of the expression profile of CXCR4 in primary and metastatic feline mammary carcinomas and the evaluation of the role of SDF-1 in feline mammary tumour cell proliferation. Results A total of 45 mammary surgical samples, including 33 primary tumours (31 carcinomas and 2 adenomas, 6 metastases, and 4 normal mammary tissues were anlyzed. Tumor samples were collected from a total number of 26 animals, as in some cases concurrent occurrence of neoplasm in more than one mammary gland was observed. Tissues were processed for standard histological examination, and all lesions were classified according to the World Health Organization criteria. CXCR4 expression in neoplastic cells was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. The level of CXCR4 immunoreactivity was semi-quantitatively estimated as CXCR4 score evaluating both the number of positive cells and the intensity of staining. Six primary, fibroblast-free primary cultures were obtained from fresh feline mammary carcinomas and characterized by immunofluorescence for CXCR4 and malignant mammary cell marker expression. SDF-1-dependent in vitro proliferative effects were also assayed. CXCR4 expression was observed in 29 out of 31 malignant tissues with a higher CXCR4 score observed in 4 out of 6 metastatic lesions than in the respective primary tumours. In 2 benign lesions analyzed, only the single basaloid adenoma showed a mild positive immunostaining against CXCR4. Normal tissue did

  16. c-Myc affects mRNA translation, cell proliferation and progenitor cell function in the mammary gland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trumpp Andreas

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The oncoprotein c-Myc has been intensely studied in breast cancer and mouse mammary tumor models, but relatively little is known about the normal physiological role of c-Myc in the mammary gland. Here we investigated functions of c-Myc during mouse mammary gland development using a conditional knockout approach. Results Generation of c-mycfl/fl mice carrying the mammary gland-specific WAPiCre transgene resulted in c-Myc loss in alveolar epithelial cells starting in mid-pregnancy. Three major phenotypes were observed in glands of mutant mice. First, c-Myc-deficient alveolar cells had a slower proliferative response at the start of pregnancy, causing a delay but not a block of alveolar development. Second, while milk composition was comparable between wild type and mutant animals, milk production was reduced in mutant glands, leading to slower pup weight-gain. Electron microscopy and polysome fractionation revealed a general decrease in translational efficiency. Furthermore, analysis of mRNA distribution along the polysome gradient demonstrated that this effect was specific for mRNAs whose protein products are involved in milk synthesis. Moreover, quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed decreased levels of ribosomal RNAs and ribosomal protein-encoding mRNAs in mutant glands. Third, using the mammary transplantation technique to functionally identify alveolar progenitor cells, we observed that the mutant epithelium has a reduced ability to repopulate the gland when transplanted into NOD/SCID recipients. Conclusion We have demonstrated that c-Myc plays multiple roles in the mouse mammary gland during pregnancy and lactation. c-Myc loss delayed, but did not block proliferation and differentiation in pregnancy. During lactation, lower levels of ribosomal RNAs and proteins were present and translation was generally decreased in mutant glands. Finally, the transplantation studies suggest a role

  17. Lgr5-Expressing Cells Are Sufficient and Necessary for Postnatal Mammary Gland Organogenesis

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    Vicki Plaks

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mammary epithelial stem cells are vital to tissue expansion and remodeling during various phases of postnatal mammary development. Basal mammary epithelial cells are enriched in Wnt-responsive cells and can reconstitute cleared mammary fat pads upon transplantation into mice. Lgr5 is a Wnt-regulated target gene and was identified as a major stem cell marker in the small intestine, colon, stomach, and hair follicle, as well as in kidney nephrons. Here, we demonstrate the outstanding regenerative potential of a rare population of Lgr5-expressing (Lgr5+ mammary epithelial cells (MECs. We found that Lgr5+ cells reside within the basal population, are superior to other basal cells in regenerating functional mammary glands (MGs, are exceptionally efficient in reconstituting MGs from single cells, and exhibit regenerative capacity in serial transplantations. Loss-of-function and depletion experiments of Lgr5+ cells from transplanted MECs or from pubertal MGs revealed that these cells are not only sufficient but also necessary for postnatal mammary organogenesis.

  18. On the possible role of mammary-derived growth hormone in human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thijssen, Jos H H

    2009-12-01

    The incidence of breast cancer has risen worldwide, especially in countries where it used to be low, very probably as a result of economic prosperity and changes in life-style. In women, the available data have resulted in the concept of progression from normal breast development to cancer through precursor lesions sensitive to hormones and growth factors that can be produced locally in the mammary gland, acting as paracrine or autocrine stimulating agents. The local endocrine environment in the breast can be different from the situation in the circulation. In the dog, growth hormone (GH) can be produced locally in the mammary glands and its production can be stimulated by progestins. This GH probably plays a paracrine role in the progesterone-induced proliferation and differentiation of mammary epithelium. There is increasing evidence that the local mammary progestin/GH-axis is operational not only in dogs but also in human breast cancer. No data are yet available on the production of mammary-derived GH in women.

  19. Effects of xanthosine in isoform switch and splice variants of expressed genes in mammary epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although intramammary xanthosine (XS) treatment was reported to increase the mammary stem cell population and milk yield in bovine and caprine, underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. The goal of this study was to evaluate effects of XS treatment on the mammary transcriptome in early-lactati...

  20. The major bovine mastitis pathogens have different cell tropisms in cultures of bovine mammary gland cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammers, A.; Vorstenbosch, van C.J.; Erkens, J.H.F.; Smith, H.E.

    2001-01-01

    We previously showed that Staphylococcus aureus cells adhered mainly to an elongated cell type, present in cultures of bovine mammary gland cells. Moreover. we showed that this adhesion was mediated by binding to fibronectin. The same in vitro model was used here, to study adhesion of other importan

  1. The major bovine mastitis pathogens have different cell tropisms in cultures of bovine mammary gland cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammers, A.; Vorstenbosch, van C.J.; Erkens, J.H.F.; Smith, H.E.

    2001-01-01

    We previously showed that Staphylococcus aureus cells adhered mainly to an elongated cell type, present in cultures of bovine mammary gland cells. Moreover. we showed that this adhesion was mediated by binding to fibronectin. The same in vitro model was used here, to study adhesion of other

  2. The Mammary Epithelial Cell Secretome and its Regulation by Signal Transduction Pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, Jon M.; Waters, Katrina M.; Kathmann, Loel E.; Camp, David G.; Wiley, H. S.; Smith, Richard D.; Thrall, Brian D.

    2008-02-01

    Extracellular proteins released by mammary epithelial cells are critical mediators of cell communication, proliferation and organization, yet the actual spectrum of proteins released by any given cell (the secretome) is poorly characterized. To define the set of proteins secreted by human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC), we combined analytical and computational approaches to define a secretome protein set based upon probable biological significance. Analysis of HMEC-conditioned medium by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry resulted in identification of 889 unique proteins, of which 151 were found to be specifically enriched in the extracellular compartment when compared with a database of proteins expressed in whole HMEC lysates. Additional high mass accuracy analysis revealed 36 proteins whose extracellular abundance increased after treatment with phorbol ester (PMA), a protein kinase C agonist and general secretagogue. Many of the PMA stimulated proteins have been reported to be aberrantly expressed in human cancers and appear to be co-regulated as multigene clusters. By inhibiting PMA-mediated transactivation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a pathway critically required for normal HMEC function, we found that the secretion of specific matrix metalloproteases were also coordinately regulated through EGFR transactivation. This study demonstrates a tiered strategy by which extracellular proteins can be identified and progressively assigned to classes of increasing confidence and regulatory importance.

  3. Review: Animal models of N-Methyl-N-nitrosourea-induced mammary cancer and retinal degeneration with special emphasis on therapeutic trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubura, Airo; Lai, Yen-Chang; Miki, Hisanori; Sasaki, Tomo; Uehara, Norihisa; Yuri, Takashi; Yoshizawa, Katsuhiko

    2011-01-01

    N-Methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) is a direct-acting alkylating agent that interacts with DNA. Accumulation of mutations may enhance cancer risk in target organs or cause cell death in susceptible tissues or cells when excessive DNA damage is not repaired. MNU targets various organs in a variety of animal species. MNU-induced carcinogenesis can be used as organ-specific animal models for human cancer, and MNU has been most extensively utilized for the induction of mammary cancer in rats. MNU-induced rat mammary tumors possess many similarities to those of human breast cancer, and the model is utilized for screening cancer modulators. MNU-induced cell disruption is also seen in several organs and tissues, especially when MNU is applied before maturity. However, photoreceptor cells in adults are highly sensitive to MNU, which causes cell death due to apoptosis. MNU-induced photoreceptor apoptosis mimics human retinitis pigmentosa and can be used for studies of therapeutic intervention. In this review, the targets of MNU in various animal species are described, and special emphasis is given to therapeutic trials against MNU-induced mammary cancer and retinal degeneration in animal models.

  4. Genome aberrations in canine mammary carcinomas and their detection in cell-free plasma DNA.

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    Julia Beck

    Full Text Available Mammary tumors are the most frequent cancers in female dogs exhibiting a variety of histopathological differences. There is lack of knowledge about the genomes of these common dog tumors. Five tumors of three different histological subtypes were evaluated. Massive parallel sequencing (MPS was performed in comparison to the respective somatic genome of each animal. Copy number and structural aberrations were validated using droplet digital PCR (ddPCR. Using mate-pair sequencing chromosomal aneuploidies were found in two tumors, frequent smaller deletions were found in one, inter-chromosomal fusions in one other, whereas one tumor was almost normal. These aberrations affect several known cancer associated genes such as cMYC, and KIT. One common deletion of the proximal end of CFA27, harboring the tumor suppressor gene PFDN5 was detected in four tumors. Using ddPCR, this deletion was validated and detected in 50% of tumors (N = 20. Breakpoint specific dPCRs were established for four tumors and tumor specific cell-free DNA (cfDNA was detected in the plasma. In one animal tumor-specific cfDNA was found >1 year after surgery, attributable to a lung metastasis. Paired-end sequencing proved that copy-number imbalances of the tumor are reflected by the cfDNA. This report on chromosomal instability of canine mammary cancers reveals similarities to human breast cancers as well as special canine alterations. This animal model provides a framework for using MPS for screening for individual cancer biomarkers with cost effective confirmation and monitoring using ddPCR. The possibility exists that ddPCR can be expanded to screening for common cancer related variants.

  5. Met induces diverse mammary carcinomas in mice and is associated with human basal breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Graveel, Carrie R.; DeGroot, Jack D.; Su, Yanli; Koeman, Julie; Dykema, Karl; Leung, Samuel; Snider, Jacqueline; Davies, Sherri R.; Swiatek, Pamela J.; Cottingham, Sandra; Watson, Mark A.; Matthew J Ellis; Sigler, Robert E.; Furge, Kyle A.; Vande Woude, George F

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the signaling pathways that drive aggressive breast cancers is critical to the development of effective therapeutics. The oncogene MET is associated with decreased survival in breast cancer, yet the role that MET plays in the various breast cancer subtypes is unclear. We describe a knockin mouse with mutationally activated Met (Metmut) that develops a high incidence of diverse mammary tumors with basal characteristics, including metaplasia, absence of progesterone receptor and E...

  6. Casein gene expression in mouse mammary epithelial cell lines: Dependence upon extracellular matrix and cell type

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina, D.; Oborn, C.J. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (USA)); Li, M.L.; Bissell, M.J. (Univ. of California, Berkeley (USA))

    1987-09-01

    The COMMA-D mammary cell line exhibits mammary-specific functional differentiation under appropriate conditions in cell culture. The cytologically heterogeneous COMMA-D parental line and the clonal lines DB-1, TA-5, and FA-1 derived from the COMMA-D parent were examined for similar properties of functional differentiation. In monolayer cell culture, the cell lines DB-1, TA-5, FA-1, and MA-4 were examined for expression of mammary-specific and epithelial-specific proteins by an indirect immunofluorescence assay. The clonal cell lines were relatively homogeneous in their respective staining properties and seemed to represent three subpopulations found in the heterogeneous parental COMMA-D lines. None of the four clonal lines appeared to represent myoepithelial cells. The cell lines were examined for expression of {beta}-casein mRNA in the presence or absence of prolactin. The inducibility of {beta}-casein in the COMMA-D cell line was further enhanced by a reconstituted basement membrane preparation enriched in laminin, collagen IV, and proteoglycans. These results support the hypothesis that the functional response of inducible mammary cell populations is a result of interaction among hormones, multiple extracellular matrix components, and specific cell types.

  7. pRb inactivation in mammary cells reveals common mechanisms for tumor initiation and progression in divergent epithelia.

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    Karl Simin

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Retinoblastoma 1 (pRb and the related pocket proteins, retinoblastoma-like 1 (p107 and retinoblastoma-like 2 (p130 (pRb(f, collectively, play a pivotal role in regulating eukaryotic cell cycle progression, apoptosis, and terminal differentiation. While aberrations in the pRb-signaling pathway are common in human cancers, the consequence of pRb(f loss in the mammary gland has not been directly assayed in vivo. We reported previously that inactivating these critical cell cycle regulators in divergent cell types, either brain epithelium or astrocytes, abrogates the cell cycle restriction point, leading to increased cell proliferation and apoptosis, and predisposing to cancer. Here we report that mouse mammary epithelium is similar in its requirements for pRb(f function; Rb(f inactivation by T(121, a fragment of SV40 T antigen that binds to and inactivates pRb(f proteins, increases proliferation and apoptosis. Mammary adenocarcinomas form within 16 mo. Most apoptosis is regulated by p53, which has no impact on proliferation, and heterozygosity for a p53 null allele significantly shortens tumor latency. Most tumors in p53 heterozygous mice undergo loss of the wild-type p53 allele. We show that the mechanism of p53 loss of heterozygosity is not simply the consequence of Chromosome 11 aneuploidy and further that chromosomal instability subsequent to p53 loss is minimal. The mechanisms for pRb and p53 tumor suppression in the epithelia of two distinct tissues, mammary gland and brain, are indistinguishable. Further, this study has produced a highly penetrant breast cancer model based on aberrations commonly observed in the human disease.

  8. A block in lineage differentiation of immortal human mammary stem / progenitor cells by ectopically-expressed oncogenes

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    Xiangshan Zhao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Emerging evidence suggests a direct role of cancer stem cells (CSCs in the development of breast cancer. In vitro cellular models that recapitulate properties of CSCs are therefore highly desirable. We have previously shown that normal human mammary epithelial cells (hMECs immortalized with human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT possess properties of mammary stem / progenitor cells. Materials and Methods: In the present study, we used this cell system to test the idea that other known hMEC-immortalizing oncogenes (RhoA, HPVE6, HPVE7, p53 mutant, and treatment with g-radiation, share with hTERT, the ability to maintain mammary stem / progenitor cells. Results: The results presented here demonstrate that similar to hMECs immortalized with hTERT, all hMEC cell lines immortalized using various oncogenic strategies express stem / progenitor cell markers. Furthermore, analyses using 2D and 3D culture assays demonstrate that all the immortal cell lines retain their ability to self-renew and to differentiate along the luminal lineage. Remarkably, the stem / progenitor cell lines generated using various oncogenic strategies exhibit a block in differentiation along the myoepithelial lineage, a trait that is retained on hTERT-immortalized stem / progenitors. The inability to differentiate along the myoepithelial lineage could be induced by ectopic mutant p53 expression in hTERT-immortalized hMEC. Conclusions: Our studies demonstrate that stem / progenitor cell characteristics of hMECs are maintained upon immortalization by using various cancer-relevant oncogenic strategies. Oncogene-immortalized hMECs show a block in their ability to differentiate along the myoepithelial lineage. Abrogation of the myoepithelial differentiation potential by a number of distinct oncogenic insults suggests a potential explanation for the predominance of luminal and rarity of myoepithelial breast cancers.

  9. Volatile organic metabolites identify patients with breast cancer, cyclomastopathy, and mammary gland fibroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Changsong; Sun, Bo; Guo, Lei; Wang, Xiaoyang; Ke, Chaofu; Liu, Shanshan; Zhao, Wei; Luo, Suqi; Guo, Zhigang; Zhang, Yang; Xu, Guowang; Li, Enyou

    2014-06-20

    The association between cancer and volatile organic metabolites in exhaled breaths has attracted increasing attention from researchers. The present study reports on a systematic study of gas profiles of metabolites in human exhaled breath by pattern recognition methods. Exhaled breath was collected from 85 patients with histologically confirmed breast disease (including 39 individuals with infiltrating ductal carcinoma, 25 individuals with cyclomastopathy and from 21 individuals with mammary gland fibroma) and 45 healthy volunteers. Principal component analysis and partial least squares discriminant analysis were used to process the final data. The volatile organic metabolites exhibited significant differences between breast cancer and normal controls, breast cancer and cyclomastopathy, and breast cancer and mammary gland fibroma; 21, 6, and 8 characteristic metabolites played decisive roles in sample classification, respectively (P fibroma patients, and patients with cyclomastopathy (P < 0.05). The identified three volatile organic metabolites associated with breast cancer may serve as novel diagnostic biomarkers.

  10. The co-factor of LIM domains (CLIM/LDB/NLI) maintains basal mammary epithelial stem cells and promotes breast tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmans, Michael L; Yu, Zhengquan; Watanabe, Kazuhide; Cam, Eric; Sun, Peng; Smyth, Padhraic; Dai, Xing; Andersen, Bogi

    2014-07-01

    Mammary gland branching morphogenesis and ductal homeostasis relies on mammary stem cell function for the maintenance of basal and luminal cell compartments. The mechanisms of transcriptional regulation of the basal cell compartment are currently unknown. We explored these mechanisms in the basal cell compartment and identified the Co-factor of LIM domains (CLIM/LDB/NLI) as a transcriptional regulator that maintains these cells. Clims act within the basal cell compartment to promote branching morphogenesis by maintaining the number and proliferative potential of basal mammary epithelial stem cells. Clim2, in a complex with LMO4, supports mammary stem cells by directly targeting the Fgfr2 promoter in basal cells to increase its expression. Strikingly, Clims also coordinate basal-specific transcriptional programs to preserve luminal cell identity. These basal-derived cues inhibit epidermis-like differentiation of the luminal cell compartment and enhance the expression of luminal cell-specific oncogenes ErbB2 and ErbB3. Consistently, basal-expressed Clims promote the initiation and progression of breast cancer in the MMTV-PyMT tumor model, and the Clim-regulated branching morphogenesis gene network is a prognostic indicator of poor breast cancer outcome in humans.

  11. Hormonal regulation of leucine catabolism in mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jian; Feng, Dingyuan; Zhang, Yongliang; Dahanayaka, Sudath; Li, Xilong; Yao, Kang; Wang, Junjun; Wu, Zhenlong; Dai, Zhaolai; Wu, Guoyao

    2013-09-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) are actively taken up and catabolized by the mammary gland during lactation for syntheses of glutamate, glutamine and aspartate. Available evidence shows that the onset of lactation is associated with increases in circulating levels of cortisol, prolactin and glucagon, but decreases in insulin and growth hormone. This study determined the effects of physiological concentrations of these hormones on the catabolism of leucine (a representative BCAA) in bovine mammary epithelial cells. Cells were incubated at 37 °C for 2 h in Krebs buffer containing 3 mM D-glucose, 0.5 mM L-leucine, L-[1-14C]leucine or L-[U-14C]leucine, and 0-50 μU/mL insulin, 0-20 ng/mL growth hormone 0-200 ng/mL prolactin, 0-150 nM cortisol or 0-300 pg/mL glucagon. Increasing extracellular concentrations of insulin did not affect leucine transamination or oxidative decarboxylation, but decreased the rate of oxidation of leucine carbons 2-6. Elevated levels of growth hormone dose dependently inhibited leucine catabolism, α-ketoisocaproate (KIC) production and the syntheses of glutamate plus glutamine. In contrast, cortisol and glucagon increased leucine transamination, leucine oxidative decarboxylation, KIC production, the oxidation of leucine 2-6 carbons and the syntheses of glutamate plus glutamine. Prolactin did not affect leucine catabolism in the cells. The changes in leucine degradation were consistent with alterations in abundances of BCAA transaminase and phosphorylated levels of branched-chain α-ketoacid dehydrogenase. Reductions in insulin and growth hormone but increases in cortisol and glucagon with lactation act in concert to stimulate BCAA catabolism for glutamate and glutamine syntheses. These coordinated changes in hormones may facilitate milk production in lactating mammals.

  12. Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus Molecular Biology and Oncogenesis

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    Susan R. Ross

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV, which was discovered as a milk‑transmitted, infectious cancer-inducing agent in the 1930s, has been used since that time as an animal model for the study of human breast cancer. Like other complex retroviruses, MMTV encodes a number of accessory proteins that both facilitate infection and affect host immune response. In vivo, the virus predominantly infects lymphocytes and mammary epithelial cells. High level infection of mammary epithelial cells ensures efficient passage of virus to the next generation. It also results in mammary tumor induction, since the MMTV provirus integrates into the mammary epithelial cell genome during viral replication and activates cellular oncogene expression. Thus, mammary tumor induction is a by-product of the infection cycle. A number of important oncogenes have been discovered by carrying out MMTV integration site analysis, some of which may play a role in human breast cancer.

  13. Embryonic stem cells are redirected to non-tumorigenic epithelial cell fate by interaction with the mammary microenvironment.

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    Corinne A Boulanger

    Full Text Available Experiments were conducted to redirect mouse Embryonic Stem (ES cells from a tumorigenic phenotype to a normal mammary epithelial phenotype in vivo. Mixing LacZ-labeled ES cells with normal mouse mammary epithelial cells at ratios of 1:5 and 1:50 in phosphate buffered saline and immediately inoculating them into epithelium-divested mammary fat pads of immune-compromised mice accomplished this. Our results indicate that tumorigenesis occurs only when normal mammary ductal growth is not achieved in the inoculated fat pads. When normal mammary gland growth occurs, we find ES cells (LacZ+ progeny interspersed with normal mammary cell progeny in the mammary epithelial structures. We demonstrate that these progeny, marked by LacZ expression, differentiate into multiple epithelial subtypes including steroid receptor positive luminal cells and myoepithelial cells indicating that the ES cells are capable of epithelial multipotency in this context but do not form teratomas. In addition, in secondary transplants, ES cell progeny proliferate, contribute apparently normal mammary progeny, maintain their multipotency and do not produce teratomas.

  14. Embryonic stem cells are redirected to non-tumorigenic epithelial cell fate by interaction with the mammary microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulanger, Corinne A; Bruno, Robert D; Mack, David L; Gonzales, Monica; Castro, Nadia P; Salomon, David S; Smith, Gilbert H

    2013-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to redirect mouse Embryonic Stem (ES) cells from a tumorigenic phenotype to a normal mammary epithelial phenotype in vivo. Mixing LacZ-labeled ES cells with normal mouse mammary epithelial cells at ratios of 1:5 and 1:50 in phosphate buffered saline and immediately inoculating them into epithelium-divested mammary fat pads of immune-compromised mice accomplished this. Our results indicate that tumorigenesis occurs only when normal mammary ductal growth is not achieved in the inoculated fat pads. When normal mammary gland growth occurs, we find ES cells (LacZ+) progeny interspersed with normal mammary cell progeny in the mammary epithelial structures. We demonstrate that these progeny, marked by LacZ expression, differentiate into multiple epithelial subtypes including steroid receptor positive luminal cells and myoepithelial cells indicating that the ES cells are capable of epithelial multipotency in this context but do not form teratomas. In addition, in secondary transplants, ES cell progeny proliferate, contribute apparently normal mammary progeny, maintain their multipotency and do not produce teratomas.

  15. Profile of Steroid Receptors and Increased Aromatase Immunoexpression in Canine Inflammatory Mammary Cancer as a Potential Therapeutic Target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Andrés, P J; Cáceres, S; Clemente, M; Pérez-Alenza, M D; Illera, J C; Peña, L

    2016-04-01

    Canine inflammatory mammary cancer (IMC) has been proposed as a model for the study of human inflammatory breast cancer (IBC). The aims of this study were to compare the immunohistochemical expression of aromatase (Arom) and several hormone receptors [estrogen receptor α (ERα), estrogen receptor β (ERβ), progesterone receptor (PR) and androgen receptor (AR)], in 21 IMC cases vs 19 non-IMC; and to study the possible effect of letrozole on canine IMC and human inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) in vitro using IPC-366 and SUM-149 cell lines. Significant elevations of the means of Arom Total Score (TS), ERβ TS and PR TS were found in the IMC group (p = 0.025, p = 0.038 and p = 0.037, respectively). Secondary IMC tumours expressed higher levels of Arom than primary IMC (p = 0.029). Non-IMC PR- tumours contained higher levels of Arom than non-IMC PR+ tumours (p = 0.007). After the addition of letrozole, the number of IMC and IBC cells dropped drastically. The overexpression of Arom found and the results obtained in vitro further support canine IMC as a model for the study of IBC and future approaches to the treatment of dogs with mammary cancer, and especially IMC, using Arom inhibitors.

  16. Induction of PTEN-p53 crosstalk in mammary epithelial cells: A novel mechanism of breast cancer prevention by the dietary factor genistein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consumption of soy foods either at an early age or for lifetime has been associated with reduced risk for developing breast cancer in humans and in animal models. However, this association continues to be controversial, and the precise mechanisms for protection remain elusive. Among the soy products...

  17. Effect of Withania somnifera root extract on spontaneous estrogen receptor-negative mammary cancer in MMTV/Neu mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazal, Kamel F; Hill, Donald L; Grubbs, Clinton J

    2014-11-01

    The cancer-preventive activity of an extract of Withania somnifera (WS) roots was examined in female transgenic (MMTV/Neu) mice that received a diet containing the extract (750 mg/kg of diet) for 10 months. Mice in the treated group (n=35) had an average of 1.66 mammary carcinomas, and mice in the control group (n=33) had 2.48, showing a reduction of 33%. The average weights of the carcinomas were 2.36 g for mice in the treated group and 2.63 g for the controls, a difference of 10%. Labeling indices for Ki67 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen marker in mammary carcinomas of the treated group were 35% and 30% lower, respectively, than those of the corresponding control group. Expression of the chemokine was reduced by 50%. These results indicate that the root extract reduced the number of mammary carcinomas that developed and reduced the rate of cell division in the carcinomas.

  18. Function of the vitamin D endocrine system in mammary gland and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, JoEllen

    2017-09-15

    The nuclear receptor for 1α,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol (1,25D), the active form of vitamin D, has anti-tumor actions in many tissues. The vitamin D receptor (VDR) is expressed in normal mammary gland and in many human breast cancers suggesting it may represent an important tumor suppressor gene in this tissue. When activated by 1,25D, VDR modulates multiple cellular pathways including those related to energy metabolism, terminal differentiation and inflammation. There is compelling pre-clinical evidence that alterations in vitamin D status affect breast cancer development and progression, while clinical and epidemiological data are suggestive but not entirely consistent. The demonstration that breast cells express CYP27B1 (which converts the precursor vitamin D metabolite 25D to the active metabolite 1,25D) and CYP24A1 (which degrades both 25D and 1,25D) provides insight into the difficulties inherent in using dietary vitamin D, sun exposure and/or serum biomarkers of vitamin D status to predict disease outcomes. Emerging evidence suggests that the normally tight balance between CYP27B1 and CYP24A1 becomes deregulated during cancer development, leading to abrogation of the tumor suppressive effects triggered by VDR. Research aimed at understanding the mechanisms that govern uptake, storage, metabolism and actions of vitamin D steroids in normal and neoplastic breast tissue remain an urgent priority. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Axillary and internal mammary sentinel lymph node biopsy in male breast cancer patients: case series and review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cao X

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Xiaoshan Cao,1,2 Chunjian Wang,1 Yanbing Liu,1 Pengfei Qiu,1 Binbin Cong,1,2 Yongsheng Wang1 1Breast Cancer Center, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Jinan, Shandong, People’s Republic of China; 2School of Medicine and Life Sciences, Jinan University-Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, Jinan, Shandong, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Male breast cancer (MBC is considered as a rare disease that accounts for less than 1% of all breast cancers, and its treatment has been based on the evidence available from female breast cancer. Axillary sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB is now regarded as the standard of care for both female and male patients without clinical and imaging evidence of axillary lymph node metastases, while internal mammary SLNB has rarely been performed. Internal mammary chain metastasis is an independent prognostic predictor. Internal mammary SLNB should be performed to complete nodal staging and guide adjuvant therapy in MBC patients with preoperative lymphoscintigraphic internal mammary chain drainage. We report both axillary and internal mammary SLNB in two cases with MBC. Internal mammary sentinel lymph node did contain metastasis in one case. Keywords: male breast cancer, internal mammary lymph node, sentinel lymph node biopsy, case report

  20. Increased levels of interleukins 8 and 10 as findings of canine inflammatory mammary cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Andrés, Paloma Jimena; Illera, Juan Carlos; Cáceres, Sara; Díez, Lucía; Pérez-Alenza, Maria Dolores; Peña, Laura

    2013-04-15

    Inflammatory mammary cancer (IMC) is a distinct form of mammary cancer that affects dogs and women [in humans, IMC is known as inflammatory breast cancer (IBC)], and is characterized by a sudden onset and an aggressive clinical course. Spontaneous canine IMC shares epidemiologic, histopathological and clinical characteristics with the disease in humans and has been proposed as the best spontaneous animal model for studying IBC, although several aspects remain unstudied. Interleukins (ILs) play an important role in cancer as potential modulators of angiogenesis, leukocyte infiltration and tumor growth. The aims of the present study were to assess serum and tumor levels of several ILs (IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10) by enzyme-immunoassay in dogs bearing benign and malignant mammary tumors, including dogs with IMC, for a better understanding of this disease. Forty-eight dogs were prospectively included. Animals consisted of 7 healthy Beagles used as donors for normal mammary glands (NMG) and serum controls (SCs), 10 dogs with hyperplasias and benign mammary tumors (HBMT), 24 with non-inflammatory malignant mammary tumors (non-IMC MMT) and 7 dogs with clinical and pathological IMC. IL-8 (serum) and IL-10 (serum and tissue homogenate) levels were higher in the dogs with IMC compared with the non-IMC MMT group. ILs were increased with tumor malignancy as follows: in tumor homogenates IL-6 levels were higher in malignant tumors (IMC and non-IMC MMT) versus HBMT and versus NMG and tumor IL-8 was increased in malignant tumors versus NMG; in serum, IL-1α and IL-8 levels were higher in the malignant groups respect to HBMT and SCs; interestingly, IL-10 was elevated only in the serum of IMC animals. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that analyzes ILs in IMC and IL-10 in canine mammary tumors. Our results indicate a role for IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10 in canine mammary malignancy and specific differences in ILs content in IMC versus non-IMC MMT that could

  1. Osteomimicry of mammary adenocarcinoma cells in vitro; increased expression of bone matrix proteins and proliferation within a 3D collagen environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel F Cox

    Full Text Available Bone is the most common site of metastasis for breast cancer, however the reasons for this remain unclear. We hypothesise that under certain conditions mammary cells possess osteomimetic capabilities that may allow them to adapt to, and flourish within, the bone microenvironment. Mammary cells are known to calcify within breast tissue and we have recently reported a novel in vitro model of mammary mineralization using murine mammary adenocarcinoma 4T1 cells. In this study, the osteomimetic properties of the mammary adenocarcinoma cell line and the conditions required to induce mineralization were characterized extensively. It was found that exogenous organic phosphate and inorganic phosphate induce mineralization in a dose dependent manner in 4T1 cells. Ascorbic acid and dexamethasone alone have no effect. 4T1 cells also show enhanced mineralization in response to bone morphogenetic protein 2 in the presence of phosphate supplemented media. The expression of several bone matrix proteins were monitored throughout the process of mineralization and increased expression of collagen type 1 and bone sialoprotein were detected, as determined by real-time RT-PCR. In addition, we have shown for the first time that 3D collagen glycosaminoglycan scaffolds, bioengineered to represent the bone microenvironment, are capable of supporting the growth and mineralization of 4T1 adenocarcinoma cells. These 3D scaffolds represent a novel model system for the study of mammary mineralization and bone metastasis. This work demonstrates that mammary cells are capable of osteomimicry, which may ultimately contribute to their ability to preferentially metastasize to, survive within and colonize the bone microenvironment.

  2. Epigenetic regulation of normal human mammary cell type-specific miRNAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vrba, Lukas [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Arizona Cancer Center; Inst. of Plant Molecular Biology, Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic). Biology Centre ASCR; Garbe, James C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Center; Stampfer, Martha R. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Arizona Cancer Center; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Center; Futscher, Bernard W. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Arizona Cancer Center and Dept. of Pharmacology & Toxicology

    2011-08-26

    Epigenetic mechanisms are important regulators of cell type–specific genes, including miRNAs. In order to identify cell type-specific miRNAs regulated by epigenetic mechanisms, we undertook a global analysis of miRNA expression and epigenetic states in three isogenic pairs of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) and human mammary fibroblasts (HMF), which represent two differentiated cell types typically present within a given organ, each with a distinct phenotype and a distinct epigenotype. While miRNA expression and epigenetic states showed strong interindividual concordance within a given cell type, almost 10% of the expressed miRNA showed a cell type–specific pattern of expression that was linked to the epigenetic state of their promoter. The tissue-specific miRNA genes were epigenetically repressed in nonexpressing cells by DNA methylation (38%) and H3K27me3 (58%), with only a small set of miRNAs (21%) showing a dual epigenetic repression where both DNA methylation and H3K27me3 were present at their promoters, such as MIR10A and MIR10B. Individual miRNA clusters of closely related miRNA gene families can each display cell type–specific repression by the same or complementary epigenetic mechanisms, such as the MIR200 family, and MIR205, where fibroblasts repress MIR200C/141 by DNA methylation, MIR200A/200B/429 by H3K27me3, and MIR205 by both DNA methylation and H3K27me3. Since deregulation of many of the epigenetically regulated miRNAs that we identified have been linked to disease processes such as cancer, it is predicted that compromise of the epigenetic control mechanisms is important for this process. Overall, these results highlight the importance of epigenetic regulation in the control of normal cell type–specific miRNA expression.

  3. Vitamin D and the mammary gland: a review on its role in normal development and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Nair; Paredes, Joana; Costa, José Luis; Ylstra, Bauke; Schmitt, Fernando

    2012-05-31

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease associated with diverse biological behaviours and clinical outcome. Although some molecular subgroups of breast cancer have a targeted therapy, the most aggressive tumours still lack a molecular target. Despite vitamin D being classically associated with the physiological role of calcium regulation and phosphate transport in bone metabolism, several studies have demonstrated a wide range of functions for this hormone, which are particularly important in the field of cancer. The mechanisms underlying the protective actions of vitamin D in cancer development are only sparsely understood, but evidence shows that vitamin D participates in cell growth regulation, apoptosis and cell differentiation. In addition, it has been implicated in the suppression of cancer cell invasion, angiogenesis and metastasis. Most of vitamin D biological actions are mediated by the vitamin D receptor and the synthesis and catabolism of this hormone are regulated by the enzymes CYP27B1 and CYP24A1. In the present review we highlight research data concerning the function of this hormone in the mammary gland, with a special focus on breast carcinogenesis. Hence, and although the available data are controversial, we consider not only updated information on the epidemiology of vitamin D in breast cancer and its potential value as a therapeutic agent or prophylactic (with an emphasis on molecular mechanisms and effectors of vitamin D action), but include data on its role in other stages of breast cancer progression as well. Accordingly, we review data on the influence of vitamin D in the development of normal breast and the expression of vitamin D-related proteins (VDR, CYP27B1 and CYP24A21) in benign mammary lesions and ductal carcinomas in situ.

  4. Study of internal mammary sentinel lymph node biopsy in breast cancer patients after neoadjuvant chemotherapy

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    Cao XS

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Xiao-Shan Cao,1,2 Bin-Bin Cong,1,2 Xiao Sun,1 Peng-Fei Qiu,1 Yong-Sheng Wang1 1Breast Cancer Center, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Jinan, Shandong, People’s Republic of China; 2School of Medicine and Life Sciences, Jinan University-Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, Jinan, Shandong, People’s Republic of ChinaInternal mammary lymph node (IMLN metastasis has a similar prognostic importance as axillary lymph nodal involvement in breast cancer patients.1 Patients with both axillary- and internal mammary-positive nodes have a very poor prognosis.2 Reliable data for internal mammary nodal metastases are reported to be present in 18%–33% (mean 23.4% of patients who have not been treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC mostly concomitant with axillary metastases, and metastases exclusively situated in the internal mammary chain occur in 2%–11% of patients,3 but limited data are available in the context of NAC.

  5. Mammary renin-angiotensin system-regulating aminopeptidase activities are modified in rats with breast cancer.

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    del Pilar Carrera, Maria; Ramírez-Expósito, Maria Jesus; Mayas, Maria Dolores; García, Maria Jesus; Martínez-Martos, Jose Manuel

    2010-12-01

    Angiotensin II in particular and/or the local renin-angiotensin system in general could have an important role in epithelial tissue growth and modelling; therefore, it is possible that it may be involved in breast cancer. In this sense, previous works of our group showed a predominating role of angiotensin II in tumoral tissue obtained from women with breast cancer. However, although classically angiotensin II has been considered the main effector peptide of the renin-angiotensin system cascade, several of its catabolism products such as angiotensin III and angiotensin IV also possess biological functions. These peptides are formed through the activity of several proteolytic regulatory enzymes of the aminopeptidase type, also called angiotensinases. The aim of this work was to analyse several specific angiotensinase activities involved in the renin-angiotensin system cascade in mammary tissue from control rats and from rats with mammary tumours induced by N-methyl-nitrosourea (NMU), which may reflect the functional status of their target peptides under the specific conditions brought about by the tumoural process. The results show that soluble and membrane-bound specific aspartyl aminopeptidase activities and membrane-bound glutamyl aminopeptidase activity increased in mammary tissue from NMU-treated animals and soluble aminopeptidase N and aminopeptidase B activities significantly decreased in mammary tissue from NMU-treated rats. These changes support the existence of a local mammary renin-angiotensin system and that this system and its putative functions in breast tissue could be altered by the tumour process, in which we suggest a predominant role of angiotensin III. All described data about the renin-angiotensin system in mammary tissue support the idea that it must be involved in normal breast tissue functions, and its disruption could be involved in one or more steps of the carcinogenesis process.

  6. BRCA1--conductor of the breast stem cell orchestra: the role of BRCA1 in mammary gland development and identification of cell of origin of BRCA1 mutant breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Niamh E; Mullan, Paul B

    2012-09-01

    Breast cancer treatment has been increasingly successful over the last 20 years due in large part to targeted therapies directed against different subtypes. However, basal-like breast cancers still represent a considerable challenge to clinicians and scientists alike since the pathogenesis underlying the disease and the target cell for transformation of this subtype is still undetermined. The considerable similarities between basal-like and BRCA1 mutant breast cancers led to the hypothesis that these cancers arise from transformation of a basal cell within the normal breast epithelium through BRCA1 dysfunction. Recently, however, a number of studies have called this hypothesis into question. This review summarises the initial findings which implicated the basal cell as the cell of origin of BRCA1 related basal-like breast cancers, as well as the more recent data which identifies the luminal progenitor cells as the likely target of transformation. We compare a number of key studies in this area and identify the differences that could explain some of the contradictory findings. In addition, we highlight the role of BRCA1 in breast cell differentiation and lineage determination by reviewing recent findings in the field and our own observations suggesting a role for BRCA1 in stem cell regulation through activation of the p63 and Notch pathways. We hope that through an increased understanding of the BRCA1 role in breast differentiation and the identification of the cell(s) of origin we can improve treatment options for both BRCA1 mutant and basal-like breast cancer subgroups.

  7. Epithelial cell differentiation regulated by MicroRNA-200a in mammary glands.

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    Kentaro Nagaoka

    Full Text Available Mammary gland epithelial cells undergo periodic cycles of proliferation, differentiation, and involution. Many studies have reported that miRNAs, which are small, non-coding RNAs, influence a variety of biological processes during posttranscriptional regulation. Here, we found that one miRNA, miR-200a, was relatively highly expressed in epithelial cell-rich organs such as mammary glands, lung, and kidney in mice. In mammary glands, miR-200a expression increased during mid-pregnancy through lactation; its expression was stimulated by lactogenic hormone treatment of mammary epithelial cells. Lactogenic hormone also induced the expression of milk protein ß-casein mRNA (a marker of cell differentiation and E-cadherin mRNA (a marker of epithelial cells. However, knockdown of miR-200a prevented increases in ß-casein and E-cadherin mRNA expression. Protein analysis revealed that E-cadherin signal was decreased and ZEB1 (a marker of EMT was increased following miR-200a knockdown. Finally, in a three-dimensional culture system modeling lumen-containing mammary ducts, miR-200a knockdown decreased the cavity formation rate and suppressed claudin-3 and par-6b expression, indicating reduced epithelial cell polarity. These observations suggest that miR-200a is important for maintaining the epithelial cell phenotype, which contributes to lactogenic hormone induction of cellular differentiation in mammary glands.

  8. The CD10 enzyme is a key player to identify and regulate human mammary stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachelard-Cascales, Elodie; Chapellier, Marion; Delay, Emmanuel; Pochon, Gaetan; Voeltzel, Thibault; Puisieux, Alain; Caron de Fromentel, Claude; Maguer-Satta, Véronique

    2010-06-01

    The major components of the mammary ductal tree are an inner layer of luminal cells, an outer layer of myoepithelial cells, and a basement membrane that separates the ducts from the underlying stroma. Cells in the outer layer express CD10, a zinc-dependent metalloprotease that regulates the growth of the ductal tree during mammary gland development. To define the steps in the human mammary lineage at which CD10 acts, we have developed an in vitro assay for human mammary lineage progression. We show that sorting for CD10 and EpCAM cleanly separates progenitors from differentiated luminal cells and that the CD10-high EpCAM-low population is enriched for early common progenitor and mammosphere-forming cells. We also show that sorting for CD10 enriches sphere-forming cells from other tissue types, suggesting that it may provide a simple tool to identify stem or progenitor populations in tissues for which lineage studies are not currently possible. We demonstrate that the protease activity of CD10 and the adhesion function of beta1-integrin are required to prevent differentiation of mammary progenitors. Taken together, our data suggest that integrin-mediated contact with the basement membrane and cleavage of signaling factors by CD10 are key elements in the niche that maintains the progenitor and stem cell pools in the mammary lineage.

  9. Lactoferrin at basal side of mouse mammary epithelium derives in part from stroma cells.

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    Pecorini, Chiara; Delpal, Serge; Truchet, Sandrine; Le Provost, Fabienne; Baldi, Antonella; Ollivier-Bousquet, Michèle

    2009-11-01

    Lactoferrin is synthesized by glandular epithelial cells and neutrophils and is also present on both sides of the mammary epithelium. We have studied the origin of lactoferrin detected in the various compartments of mouse mammary tissue. As revealed by immunogold electron microscopy, lactoferrin is present in mammary epithelial cells and in the basal region of the epithelium, associated with connective tissue and stroma cells at all physiological stages studied. A perturbation of protein synthesis or transport after in vitro treatment with cycloheximide or brefeldin A does not abrogate lactoferrin labelling in the basal region of the epithelium. The expression of lactoferrin has also been observed in the fat pads of mammary glands from mice surgically depleted of epithelial cells. The sealing of one teat for 24 h is accompanied by an increase in both the number of stroma cells and the labelling of myoepithelial cells. Thus, the lactoferrin present in the interstitial space of the mouse mammary epithelium originates in part from stroma cells. Possible roles of lactoferrin at the basal side of the mammary epithelium are discussed.

  10. Regression analysis of the initial karyometric data on tumor cells in ductal carcinoma and fibroadenoma of the mammary gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirillov, Vladimir; Akimova, Lydmila

    2010-04-01

    To reveal the differences in the parameters of the second order regression curve with a cluster of experimental points on scattergrams showing the dependence of the perimeter on the area of tumor cell nuclei between ductal carcinoma and fibroadenoma of the mammary gland. Punctate smears taken from patients with ductal carcinoma and fibroadenoma of the mammary gland with coincident histologic and cytologic conclusion were studied and selected. Karyometry of tumor cells was performed with the help of a semiautomatic computer analyzer of digital images. It has been shown that the cluster of experimental points on scattergrams showing the dependence of the perimeter on the area of tumor cell nuclei can be well described by a second order regression curve, which is a parabola. The differences in parabola parameters (coefficients of the parabola equation) characterizing the population of tumor cells in ductal carcinoma and fibroadenoma of the mammary gland were revealed. Boundary values of these parameters in the groups of comparison were ascertained. Parameters of the regression curve to a cluster of experimental points on scattergrams showing the dependence of the perimeter on the area of tumor cell nuclei can be used as an additional diagnostic criterion for breast cancer.

  11. Mammary gland development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macias, Hector; Hinck, Lindsay

    2012-01-01

    The mammary gland develops through several distinct stages. The first transpires in the embryo as the ectoderm forms a mammary line that resolves into placodes. Regulated by epithelial–mesenchymal interactions, the placodes descend into the underlying mesenchyme and produce the rudimentary ductal structure of the gland present at birth. Subsequent stages of development—pubertal growth, pregnancy, lactation, and involution—occur postnatally under the regulation of hormones. Puberty initiates branching morphogenesis, which requires growth hormone (GH) and estrogen, as well as insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1), to create a ductal tree that fills the fat pad. Upon pregnancy, the combined actions of progesterone and prolactin generate alveoli, which secrete milk during lactation. Lack of demand for milk at weaning initiates the process of involution whereby the gland is remodeled back to its prepregnancy state. These processes require numerous signaling pathways that have distinct regulatory functions at different stages of gland development. Signaling pathways also regulate a specialized subpopulation of mammary stem cells that fuel the dramatic changes in the gland occurring with each pregnancy. Our knowledge of mammary gland development and mammary stem cell biology has significantly contributed to our understanding of breast cancer and has advanced the discovery of therapies to treat this disease.

  12. Stress signaling from human mammary epithelial cells contributes to phenotypes of mammographic density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFilippis, Rosa Anna; Fordyce, Colleen; Patten, Kelley; Chang, Hang; Zhao, Jianxin; Fontenay, Gerald V; Kerlikowske, Karla; Parvin, Bahram; Tlsty, Thea D

    2014-09-15

    Telomere malfunction and other types of DNA damage induce an activin A-dependent stress response in mortal nontumorigenic human mammary epithelial cells that subsequently induces desmoplastic-like phenotypes in neighboring fibroblasts. Some characteristics of this fibroblast/stromal response, such as reduced adipocytes and increased extracellular matrix content, are observed not only in tumor tissues but also in disease-free breast tissues at high risk for developing cancer, especially high mammographic density tissues. We found that these phenotypes are induced by repression of the fatty acid translocase CD36, which is seen in desmoplastic and disease-free high mammographic density tissues. In this study, we show that epithelial cells from high mammographic density tissues have more DNA damage signaling, shorter telomeres, increased activin A secretion and an altered DNA damage response compared with epithelial cells from low mammographic density tissues. Strikingly, both telomere malfunction and activin A expression in epithelial cells can repress CD36 expression in adjacent fibroblasts. These results provide new insights into how high mammographic density arises and why it is associated with breast cancer risk, with implications for the definition of novel invention targets (e.g., activin A and CD36) to prevent breast cancer.

  13. Immunodetection of myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells in mammary carcinomas of female dogs

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    Mayara C. Rosolem

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Dendritic cells have attracted great interest from researchers as they may be used as targets of tumor immune evasion mechanisms. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the dendritic cells (DCs subpopulation in simple type mammary carcinomas in female dogs. Two groups of samples were used: the control group consisted of 18 samples of mammary tissue without changes and the tumor group with 26 simple type mammary carcinomas. In these groups, we evaluated the immunodetection of immature and mature myeloid DCs, plasmacytoid DCs and MHC-II. In mammary tumor, mature myeloid DCs predominated in the peritumoral region, while immature myeloid DCs and plasmacytoid DCs were evident in the intratumoral region. Immunostaining of MHC-II was visualized in mammary acini (control group, in tumor cells and inflammatory infiltration associated with tumors. The comparison between the control and tumor groups showed a statistically significant difference between immature myeloid DCs, mature myeloid DCs and plasmacytoid DCs. The immunodetection of MHC-II was not significant when comparing the groups. The predominance of immature DCs in the tumor group is possibly related to an inefficient immune response, promoting the development and survival of tumor cells. The presence of plasmacytoid DCs in the same group suggests a worse prognosis for female dogs with mammary tumors. Therefore, the ability of differentiation of canine dendritic cells could be influenced by neoplastic cells and by the tumor microenvironment.

  14. Slug controls stem/progenitor cell growth dynamics during mammary gland morphogenesis.

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    Mayssa Nassour

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Morphogenesis results from the coordination of distinct cell signaling pathways controlling migration, differentiation, apoptosis, and proliferation, along stem/progenitor cell dynamics. To decipher this puzzle, we focused on epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT "master genes". EMT has emerged as a unifying concept, involving cell-cell adhesion, migration and apoptotic pathways. EMT also appears to mingle with stemness. However, very little is known on the physiological role and relevance of EMT master-genes. We addressed this question during mammary morphogenesis. Recently, a link between Slug/Snai2 and stemness has been described in mammary epithelial cells, but EMT master genes actual localization, role and targets during mammary gland morphogenesis are not known and we focused on this basic question. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a Slug-lacZ transgenic model and immunolocalization, we located Slug in a distinct subpopulation covering about 10-20% basal cap and duct cells, mostly cycling cells, coexpressed with basal markers P-cadherin, CK5 and CD49f. During puberty, Slug-deficient mammary epithelium exhibited a delayed development after transplantation, contained less cycling cells, and overexpressed CK8/18, ER, GATA3 and BMI1 genes, linked to luminal lineage. Other EMT master genes were overexpressed, suggesting compensation mechanisms. Gain/loss-of-function in vitro experiments confirmed Slug control of mammary epithelial cell luminal differentiation and proliferation. In addition, they showed that Slug enhances specifically clonal mammosphere emergence and growth, cell motility, and represses apoptosis. Strikingly, Slug-deprived mammary epithelial cells lost their potential to generate secondary clonal mammospheres. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that Slug pathway controls the growth dynamics of a subpopulation of cycling progenitor basal cells during mammary morphogenesis. Overall, our data better define a

  15. Slug Controls Stem/Progenitor Cell Growth Dynamics during Mammary Gland Morphogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selmi, Abdelkader; Côme, Christophe; Faraldo, Maria-Luisa M.; Deugnier, Marie-Ange; Savagner, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Background Morphogenesis results from the coordination of distinct cell signaling pathways controlling migration, differentiation, apoptosis, and proliferation, along stem/progenitor cell dynamics. To decipher this puzzle, we focused on epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) “master genes”. EMT has emerged as a unifying concept, involving cell-cell adhesion, migration and apoptotic pathways. EMT also appears to mingle with stemness. However, very little is known on the physiological role and relevance of EMT master-genes. We addressed this question during mammary morphogenesis. Recently, a link between Slug/Snai2 and stemness has been described in mammary epithelial cells, but EMT master genes actual localization, role and targets during mammary gland morphogenesis are not known and we focused on this basic question. Methodology/Principal Findings Using a Slug–lacZ transgenic model and immunolocalization, we located Slug in a distinct subpopulation covering about 10–20% basal cap and duct cells, mostly cycling cells, coexpressed with basal markers P-cadherin, CK5 and CD49f. During puberty, Slug-deficient mammary epithelium exhibited a delayed development after transplantation, contained less cycling cells, and overexpressed CK8/18, ER, GATA3 and BMI1 genes, linked to luminal lineage. Other EMT master genes were overexpressed, suggesting compensation mechanisms. Gain/loss-of-function in vitro experiments confirmed Slug control of mammary epithelial cell luminal differentiation and proliferation. In addition, they showed that Slug enhances specifically clonal mammosphere emergence and growth, cell motility, and represses apoptosis. Strikingly, Slug-deprived mammary epithelial cells lost their potential to generate secondary clonal mammospheres. Conclusions/Significance We conclude that Slug pathway controls the growth dynamics of a subpopulation of cycling progenitor basal cells during mammary morphogenesis. Overall, our data better define a key mechanism

  16. Internal Mammary Sentinel Lymph Nodes in Breast Cancer - Effects on Disease Prognosis and Therapeutic Protocols - A Case Report

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    Sinisa Stojanoski

    2015-03-01

    CONCLUSION: Detection of internal mammary lymph node metastases improves N (nodal grading of breast cancer by selecting a high risk subgroup of patients that require adjuvant hormone therapy, chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy.

  17. Different role of COX-2 and angiogenesis in canine inflammatory and non-inflammatory mammary cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemente, Mónica; Sánchez-Archidona, Ana Rodríguez; Sardón, David; Díez, Lucía; Martín-Ruiz, Asunción; Caceres, Sara; Sassi, Francesco; Dolores Pérez-Alenza, M; Illera, Juan C; Dunner, Susana; Peña, Laura

    2013-08-01

    Human inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) and canine inflammatory mammary cancer (IMC) are the most aggressive and fatal types of mammary cancer, and both have a very poor prognosis and low survival rate. Human IBC is characterised by exacerbated angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis, and lymphangiotropism. Lymphangiotropism is also characteristic of IMC, but microvascular density (MVD) and lymphangiogenesis have not been previously studied in canine IMC. In this study immunohistochemical expression of several angiogenesis-related factors (cyclooxygenase [COX]-2, vascular endothelial growth factors A and D [VEGF-A, VEGF-D], and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 3 [VEGFR-3]), MVD, lymphatic proliferation index (LPI), and Ki-67 tumour proliferation index (PI) were studied in 21 canine IMC samples, 20 canine high-grade malignant non-IMC mammary tumours (MMTs), and four normal mammary gland samples (NMGs). All mammary neoplasms were histologically categorised as grade III. COX-2 values were also analysed by RT-PCR in seven IMCs, six MMTs and four NMGs. The expressions of COX-2, VEGF-A, and VEGF-D were significantly higher in IMC, MVD and LPI tumours, but not PI. In MMTs, COX-2 immunoexpression was significantly associated with VEGF-A, while in IMCs COX-2 was associated with VEGF-D (lymphangiogenic factor), its receptor VEGFR-3, and LPI. These results suggested that lymphangiogenic pathway stimulation isa specific role of COX-2 in IMC angiogenesis, which justifies the use of COX-2-based targeted palliative therapies in dogs. The exacerbated angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis and the increased expression of angiogenesis-related factors further support canine IMC as a natural model for the study of human IBC.

  18. Bovine mammary epithelial cells retain stem-like phenotype in long-term cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cravero, Diego; Diego, Cravero; Martignani, Eugenio; Eugenio, Martignani; Miretti, Silvia; Silvia, Miretti; Macchi, Elisabetta; Elisabetta, Macchi; Accornero, Paolo; Paolo, Accornero; Baratta, Mario; Mario, Baratta

    2014-10-01

    The detection and characterization of bovine mammary stem cells may give a better understanding of the cyclic characteristic of mammary gland development. In turn, this could potentially offer techniques to manipulate lactation yield and for regenerative medicine. We previously demonstrated that adult stem cells reside in the bovine mammary gland and possess an intrinsic regenerative potential. In vitro maintenance and expansion of this primitive population is a challenging task that could make easier the study of adult mammary stem cells. The aim of this study is to investigate this possibility. Different subpopulations of mammary epithelial cells emerge when they are cultured in two defined culture conditions. Specific cell differentiation markers as cytokeratin 18 (CK18) and cytokeratin 14 (CK14) were expressed with significant differences according to culture conditions. Vimentin, a well-known fibroblast marker was observed to increase significantly (P day 20. In both conditions, after prolonged culture (25 days) a subset of cells still retained regenerative capabilities. These cells were able to form organized pseudo-alveoli when transplanted in immunodeficient mice as shown by the expression of cytokeratin 14 (CK14), cytokeratin 18 (CK18), p63 (a mammary basal cell layer marker) and Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule (EpCAM). We also were able to observe the presence of milk proteins signal in these regenerated structures, which is a specific marker of functional mammary alveoli. Progenitor content was also analyzed in vitro through Colony-Forming Cell (CFC) assays with no substantial differences among culture conditions and time points. These results demonstrate that long-term culture of a multipotent cell subpopulation with intrinsic regenerative potential is possible.

  19. Tsc1 deficiency impairs mammary development in mice by suppression of AKT, nuclear ERα, and cell-cycle-driving proteins

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    Zhenqi Qin; Hang Zheng; Ling Zhou; Yanhua Ou; Bin Huang; Bo Yan; Zhenshu Qin; Cuilan Yang; Yongchun Su; Xiaochun Bai; Jiasong Guo; Jun Lin

    2016-01-01

    Loss of Tsc1/Tsc2 results in excess cell growth that eventually forms hamartoma in multiple organs. Our study using a mouse model with Tsc1 conditionally knockout in mammary epithelium showed that Tsc1 deficiency impaired mammary development. Phosphorylated S6 was up-regulated in Tsc1 −/− mammary epithelium, which could be reversed by rapamycin, suggesting that mTORC1 was hyperactivated in Tsc1 −/− mammary epithelium. The mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin restored the development of Tsc1 −/− mammary...

  20. Tumor-induced inflammation in mammary adipose tissue stimulates a vicious cycle of autotaxin expression and breast cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benesch, Matthew G K; Tang, Xiaoyun; Dewald, Jay; Dong, Wei-Feng; Mackey, John R; Hemmings, Denise G; McMullen, Todd P W; Brindley, David N

    2015-09-01

    Compared to normal tissues, many cancer cells overexpress autotaxin (ATX). This secreted enzyme produces extracellular lysophosphatidate, which signals through 6 GPCRs to drive cancer progression. Our previous work showed that ATX inhibition decreases 4T1 breast tumor growth in BALB/c mice by 60% for about 11 d. However, 4T1 cells do not produce significant ATX. Instead, the ATX is produced by adjacent mammary adipose tissue. We investigated the molecular basis of this interaction in human and mouse breast tumors. Inflammatory mediators secreted by breast cancer cells increased ATX production in adipose tissue. The increased lysophosphatidate signaling further increased inflammatory mediator production in adipose tissue and tumors. Blocking ATX activity in mice bearing 4T1 tumors with 10 mg/kg/d ONO-8430506 (a competitive ATX inhibitor, IC90 = 100 nM; Ono Pharma Co., Ltd., Osaka, Japan) broke this vicious inflammatory cycle by decreasing 20 inflammatory mediators by 1.5-8-fold in cancer-inflamed adipose tissue. There was no significant decrease in inflammatory mediator levels in fat pads that did not bear tumors. ONO-8430506 also decreased plasma TNF-α and G-CSF cytokine levels by >70% and leukocyte infiltration in breast tumors and adjacent adipose tissue by >50%. Hence, blocking tumor-driven inflammation by ATX inhibition is effective in decreasing tumor growth in breast cancers where the cancer cells express negligible ATX.

  1. Bisphenol A (BPA) Exposure In Utero Leads to Immunoregulatory Cytokine Dysregulation in the Mouse Mammary Gland: A Potential Mechanism Programming Breast Cancer Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Catha; Mamillapalli, Ramanaiah; Goetz, Laura G; Jorgenson, Elisa; Ilagan, Ysabel; Taylor, Hugh S

    2016-08-01

    Bisphenol-A (BPA) is a ubiquitous estrogen-like endocrine disrupting compound (EDC). BPA exposure in utero has been linked to breast cancer and abnormal mammary gland development in mice. The recent rise in incidence of human breast cancer and decreased age of first detection suggests a possible environmental etiology. We hypothesized that developmental programming of carcinogenesis may involve an aberrant immune response. Both innate and adaptive immunity play a role in tumor suppression through cytolytic CD8, NK, and Th1 T-cells. We hypothesized that BPA exposure in utero would lead to dysregulation of both innate and adaptive immunity in the mammary gland. CD1 mice were exposed to BPA in utero during gestation (days 9-21) via osmotic minipump. At 6 weeks, the female offspring were ovariectomized and estradiol was given at 8 weeks. RNA and protein were extracted from the posterior mammary glands, and the mRNA and protein levels were measured by PCR array, qRT-PCR, and western blot. In mouse mammary tissue, BPA exposure in utero significantly decreased the expression of members of the chemokine CXC family (Cxcl2, Cxcl4, Cxcl14, and Ccl20), interleukin 1 (Il1) gene family (Il1β and Il1rn), interleukin 2 gene family (Il7 receptor), and interferon gene family (interferon regulatory factor 9 (Irf9), as well as immune response gene 1 (Irg1). Additionally, BPA exposure in utero decreased Esr1 receptor gene expression and increased Esr2 receptor gene expression. In utero exposure of BPA resulted in significant changes to inflammatory modulators within mammary tissue. We suggest that dysregulation of inflammatory cytokines, both pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory, leads to a microenvironment that may promote disordered cell growth through inhibition of the immune response that targets cancer cells.

  2. Annexin A3 is a mammary marker and a potential neoplastic breast cell therapeutic target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeidan, Bashar; Jackson, Thomas R; Larkin, Samantha E T; Cutress, Ramsey I; Coulton, Gary R; Ashton-Key, Margaret; Murray, Nick; Packham, Graham; Gorgoulis, Vassilis; Garbis, Spiros D; Townsend, Paul A

    2015-08-28

    Breast cancers are the most common cancer-affecting women; critically the identification of novel biomarkers for improving early detection, stratification and differentiation from benign tumours is important for the reduction of morbidity and mortality.To identify and functionally characterise potential biomarkers, we used mass spectrometry (MS) to analyse serum samples representing control, benign breast disease (BBD) and invasive breast cancer (IDC) patients. Complementary and multidimensional proteomic approaches were used to identify and validate novel serum markers.Annexin A3 (ANX A3) was found to be differentially expressed amongst different breast pathologies. The diagnostic value of serum ANX A3 was subsequently validated by ELISA in an independent serum set representing the three groups. Here, ANX A3 was significantly upregulated in the benign disease group sera compared with other groups (P A3 was abundantly expressed in benign and to a lesser extent malignant neoplastic epithelium. Finally, we illustrated ANX A3 expression in cell culture lysates and conditioned media from neoplastic breast cell lines, and its role in neoplastic breast cell migration in vitro.This study confirms the novel role of ANX A3 as a mammary biomarker, regulator and therapeutic target.

  3. Compound exocytosis of casein micelles in mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dylewski, D P; Keenan, T W

    1983-07-01

    Ultrastructure of lactating bovine and rat mammary epithelial cells was studied with emphasis on secretory vesicle interactions. In the apical zone of the cell, adjacent secretory vesicles formed ball and socket configurations at their points of apposition. Similar configurations were formed between plasma membrane and secretory vesicle membrane. These structures may be formed by the diffusion of water between vesicles with different osmotic potentials. Frequently, vesicular chains consisting of 10 or more linked secretory vesicles were observed. Prior to the exocytotic release of casein micelles, adjacent vesicles fused through fragmentation of the ball and socket membrane. These membrane fragments and the casein micelles appeared to be secreted into the alveolar lumen after passing from one vesicle into another and finally through a pore in the apical plasma membrane. Emptied vesicular chains appeared to collapse and fragmentation of their membrane was observed. Based on these observations, we suggest that most vesicular membrane does not directly contact or become incorporated into the plasma membrane during secretion of the nonfat phase of milk.

  4. Chemoprevention of Breast Cancer by Transdermal Delivery of α-Santalol through Breast Skin and Mammary Papilla (Nipple).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Kaushalkumar; Alsharif, Fahd M; Islam, Saiful; Dwivedi, Chandradhar; Perumal, Omathanu

    2017-09-01

    Almost all breast cancers originate from epithelial cells lining the milk ducts in the breast. To this end, the study investigated the feasibility of localized transdermal delivery of α-santalol, a natural chemopreventive agent to the breast. Different α-santalol formulations (cream, solution and microemulsion) were developed and the in vitro permeability was studied using excised animal (porcine and rat) and human breast skin/mammary papilla (nipple). The in vivo biodistribution and efficacy studies were conducted in female rats. A chemical carcinogenesis model of breast cancer was used for the efficacy studies. Phospholipid based α-santalol microemulsion showed the highest penetration through the nipple and breast skin. Delivery of α-santalol through the entire breast (breast skin and nipple) in vivo in rats resulted in significantly higher concentration in the mammary gland compared to transdermal delivery through the breast skin or nipple. There was no measurable α-santalol concentration in the blood. Transdermal delivery of α-santalol reduced the tumor incidence and tumor multiplicity. Furthermore, the tumor size was significantly reduced with α-santalol treatment. The findings from this study demonstrate the feasibility of localized transdermal delivery of α-santalol for chemoprevention of breast cancer.

  5. Anticancer and Cancer Prevention Effects of Piperine-Free Piper nigrum Extract on N-nitrosomethylurea-Induced Mammary Tumorigenesis in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriwiriyajan, Somchai; Tedasen, Aman; Lailerd, Narissara; Boonyaphiphat, Pleumjit; Nitiruangjarat, Anupong; Deng, Yan; Graidist, Potchanapond

    2016-01-01

    Piper nigrum (P. nigrum) is commonly used in traditional medicine. This current study aimed to investigate the anticancer and cancer preventive activity of a piperine-free P. nigrum extract (PFPE) against breast cancer cells and N-nitrosomethylurea (NMU)-induced mammary tumorigenesis in rats. The cytotoxic effects and the mechanism of action were investigated in breast cancer cells using the MTT assay and Western blot analysis, respectively. An acute toxicity study was conducted according to the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development guideline. Female Sprague-Dawley rats with NMU-induced mammary tumors were used in preventive and anticancer studies. The results showed that PFPE inhibited the growth of luminal-like breast cancer cells more so than the basal-like ones by induction of apoptosis. In addition, PFPE exhibited greater selectivity against breast cancer cells than colorectal cancer, lung cancer, and neuroblastoma cells. In an acute toxicity study, a single oral administration of PFPE at a dose of 5,000 mg/kg body weight resulted in no mortality and morbidity during a 14-day observation period. For the cancer preventive study, the incidence of tumor-bearing rats was 10% to 20% in rats treated with PFPE. For the anticancer activity study, the growth rate of tumors in the presence of PFPE-treated groups was much slower when compared with the control and vehicle groups. The extract itself caused no changes to the biochemical and hematologic parameters when compared with the control and vehicle groups. In conclusion, PFPE had a low toxicity and a potent antitumor effect on mammary tumorigenesis in rats.

  6. Identification of genes differentially expressed between benign and osteopontin transformed rat mammary epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudland Philip S

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteopontin is a secreted, integrin-binding and phosphorylated acidic glycoprotein which has an important role in tumor progression. Findings In this study, we have utilized suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH to evaluate OPN regulated gene expression, using the Rama 37 benign non-invasive rat mammary cell line and a subclone, Rama 37-OPN. Rama 37-OPN was produced by stably transfecting Rama 37 with an OPN expression vector and it demonstrates increased malignant properties in vitro. Sequence and expression array analysis of the respective cDNA libraries of over 1600 subtracted cDNA fragments revealed 982 ESTs, 45 novel sequences and 659 known genes. The known up-regulated genes in the Rama 37-OPN library code for proteins with a variety of functions including those involved in metabolism, cell adhesion and migration, signal transduction and in apoptosis. Four of the most differentially expressed genes between the benign and in vitro malignant rat mammary cell lines are tumor protein translationally controlled I (TPTI, aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT, ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM and RAN GTPase (RAN. The largest difference (ca 10,000 fold between the less aggressively (MCF-7, ZR-75 and more aggressively malignant (MDA MB 231, MDA MB 435S human breast cancer cell lines is that due to RAN, the next is that due to osteopontin itself. Conclusion The results suggest that enhanced properties associated with the malignant state in vitro induced by osteopontin may be due to, in part, overexpression of RAN GTPase and these biological results are the subject of a subsequent publication 1.

  7. [Progenotoxic shift in mammary adipose tissue (adipogenotoxicosis): association with clinical and biological characteristics of breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bershtein, L M; Kovalevskiĭ, A Iu; Poroshina, T E; Revskoĭ, S Iu; Kotov, A V; Kovalenko, I G; Tsyrlina, E V; Semiglazov, V F; Turkevich, E A; Pozharisskiĭ, K M

    2008-01-01

    The study is concerned with identification of a relationship between levels of production and accumulation of compounds capable of hormonal and progenotoxic effects in mammary fat, on the one hand, and characteristics of tumor tissue in breast cancer, on the other. Mammary fat was sampled at a distance of 1.5-2 cm from tumor edge (79 pts.). Case histories were used to provide data on clinical stage, size, grade and regional lymph node involvement. Levels were assayed of leptin, adiponectin, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha), interleukin-6 (IL-6), nitric oxide (NO), thiobarbiturate-reactive products (TBRP) and DNA oxidative damage marker (8-OH-dG) from 4hr-incubates of fat tissue culture. Mammary fat aromatase was assayed by radiometrical means while macrophage-assisted fat infiltration (CD68) and estrogen-4-hydroxylase (CYP1B1) expression were evaluated immunohistochemically. Radio-competitive and immunohistochemical methods were used to assay estrogen (ER) and progesterone (PR) receptor levels in tumor and tumor-related expression of cytokeratins 5/6 ("basal") and 7/8 ("luminal" epithelium), respectively. As far as hormonal properties of mammary fat were concerned, there were direct correlations between aromatase concentration, on the one hand, and tumor stage and size, on the other, and adiponectin secretion and CK7 expression in tumor. Besides, an inverse correlation was found between mammary fat-mediated release of leptin and adiponectin, on the one hand, and stage and regional lymph node involvement, on the other. The following main relationships were identified by comparison of the clinico-biological characteristics of tumor and markers of proinflammatory/progenotoxic properties of mammary adipose tissue: tendency toward direct correlation with IL-6 and 8-OH-dG in fat (tumor progress stage); direct correlation with TNF-alpha secretion rate (malignancy grade); lymph node involvement--tendency toward direct correlation with NO generation; CK5 expression in

  8. PTEN and p53 cross-regulation induced by soy isoflavone genistein promotes mammary epithelial cell cycle arrest and lobuloalveolar differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The tumor suppressors phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN) and p53 are closely related to the pathogenesis of breast cancer, yet pathway-specific mechanisms underlying their participation in mediating the protective actions of dietary bioactive components on breast cancer risk are poorly understood. We recently showed that dietary exposure to the soy isoflavone genistein (GEN) induced PTEN expression in mammary epithelial cells in vivo and in vitro, consistent wit...

  9. Isolation of Endothelial Cells and Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells from Internal Mammary Artery Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Stephanie C.; Bates, Michael; Parrino, Patrick E.; Woods, T. Cooper

    2007-01-01

    Analyses of vascular smooth muscle cell and endothelial cell function through tissue culture techniques are often employed to investigate the underlying mechanisms regulating cardiovascular disease. As diseases such as diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease increase a patient's risk of cardiovascular disease, the development of methods for examining the effects of these diseases on vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells is needed. Commercial sources of endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells generally provide minimal donor information and are in limited supply. This study was designed to determine if vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells could be isolated from human internal mammary arteries obtained from donors undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery. As coronary artery bypass graft surgery is a commonly performed procedure, this method would provide a new source for these cells that when combined with the donor's medical history will greatly enhance our studies of the effects of complicating diseases on vascular biology. Internal mammary artery tissue was obtained from patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Through a simple method employing two separate tissue digestions, vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells were isolated and characterized. The isolated vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells exhibited the expected morphology and were able to be passaged for further analysis. The vascular smooth muscle cells exhibited positive staining for α-smooth muscle actin and the endothelial cells exhibited positive staining for CD31. The overall purity of the isolations was > 95%. This method allows for the isolation of endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells from internal mammary arteries, providing a new tool for investigations into the interplay of vascular diseases and complicating diseases such as diabetes and kidney disease. PMID:21603530

  10. PTEN and p53 cross-regulation induced by soy isoflavone genistein promotes mammary epithelial cell cycle arrest and lobuloalveolar differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahal, Omar M; Simmen, Rosalia C M

    2010-08-01

    The tumor suppressors phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN) and p53 are closely related to the pathogenesis of breast cancer, yet pathway-specific mechanisms underlying their participation in mediating the protective actions of dietary bioactive components on breast cancer risk are poorly understood. We recently showed that dietary exposure to the soy isoflavone genistein (GEN) induced PTEN expression in mammary epithelial cells in vivo and in vitro, consistent with the breast cancer preventive effects of soy food consumption. Here, we evaluated PTEN and p53 functional interactions in the nuclear compartment of mammary epithelial cells as a mechanism for mammary tumor protection by GEN. Using the non-tumorigenic human mammary epithelial cells MCF10-A, we demonstrate that GEN increased PTEN expression and nuclear localization. We show that increased nuclear PTEN levels initiated an autoregulatory loop involving PTEN-dependent increases in p53 nuclear localization, PTEN-p53 physical association, PTEN-p53 co-recruitment to the PTEN promoter region and p53 transactivation of PTEN promoter activity. The PTEN-p53 cross talk induced by GEN resulted in increased cell cycle arrest; decreased pro-proliferative cyclin D1 and pleiotrophin gene expression and the early formation of mammary acini, indicative of GEN promotion of lobuloalveolar differentiation. Our findings provide support to GEN-induced PTEN as both a target and regulator of p53 action and offer a mechanistic basis for PTEN pathway activation to underlie the antitumor properties of dietary factors, with important implications for reducing breast cancer risk.

  11. Ligand-independent canonical Wnt activity in canine mammary tumor cell lines associated with aberrant LEF1 expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gracanin, Ana; Timmermans-Sprang, Elpetra P M; van Wolferen, Monique E; Rao, Nagesha A S; Grizelj, Juraj; Vince, Silvijo; Hellmen, Eva; Mol, Jan A

    2014-01-01

    Pet dogs very frequently develop spontaneous mammary tumors and have been suggested as a good model organism for breast cancer research. In order to obtain an insight into underlying signaling mechanisms during canine mammary tumorigenesis, in this study we assessed the incidence and the mechanism o

  12. Mammary gland density predicts the cancer inhibitory activity of the N-3 to N-6 ratio of dietary fat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zongjian; Jiang, Weiqin; McGinley, John N; Prokopczyk, Bogden; Richie, John P; El Bayoumy, Karam; Manni, Andrea; Thompson, Henry J

    2011-10-01

    This study investigated the effect of a broad range of dietary ratios of n-3:n-6 fatty acids on mammary gland density and mammary cancer risk. Cancer was induced in female rats by N-methyl-N-nitrosourea. Purified diet that provided 30% of dietary kilocalories from fat was formulated to contain ratios of n-3:n-6 fatty acids from 25:1 to 1:25. Mammary gland density was determined by digital analysis, fatty acids by gas chromatography/flame ionization detection, and other plasma analytes via ELISA. Mammary gland density was reduced dose dependently at n-3:n-6 ratios from 1:1 to 25:1 (r = -0.477, P = 0.038), with a 20.3% decrease of mammary gland density between n-3:n-6 of 1:1 versus 25:1, P effect of the n-3:n-6 ratio on plasma leptin (decreased, P = 0.005) and adiponectin (increased, P tissue function was modulated. However, neither cytokine was predictive of mammary gland density. Plasma insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) decreased with increasing dietary n-3:n-6 ratio (P = 0.004) and was predictive of the changes in mammary gland density (r = 0.362, P effects in the presence or absence of hormonal regulation of carcinogenesis, and (iii) signaling pathways regulated by IGF-I are potential targets for further mechanistic investigation.

  13. Retinoids modulate expression of the endocytic partners megalin, cubilin, and disabled-2 and uptake of vitamin D-binding protein in human mammary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlon, Timothy M; Taffany, David A; Welsh, Joellen; Rowling, Matthew J

    2008-07-01

    The major circulating form of vitamin D, 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (25D3), circulates bound to vitamin D-binding protein (DBP). Prior to activation to 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol in the kidney, the 25D3-DBP complex is internalized via receptor-mediated endocytosis, which is absolutely dependent on the membrane receptors megalin and cubilin and the adaptor protein disabled-2 (Dab2). We recently reported that mammary epithelial cells (T-47D) expressing megalin, cubilin, and Dab2 rapidly internalize DBP via endocytosis, whereas cells that do not express all 3 proteins (MCF-7) do not. The objectives of this study were to characterize megalin, cubilin, and Dab2 expression and transport of DBP in human mammary epithelial cells. Using immunoblotting and real-time PCR, we found that megalin, cubilin, and Dab2 were expressed and dose dependently induced by all-trans-retinoic acid (RA) in T-47D human breast cancer cells and that RA-treated T-47D cells exhibited enhanced DBP internalization. These are the first studies to our knowledge to demonstrate that mammary epithelial cells express megalin, cubilin, and Dab2, which are enhanced during differentiation and may explain, at least in part, our finding that receptor-mediated endocytosis of DBP is upregulated in differentiated mammary epithelial cells.

  14. Loss of sfrp1 promotes ductal branching in the murine mammary gland

    OpenAIRE

    Gauger Kelly J; Shimono Akihiko; Crisi Giovanna M; Schneider Sallie

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Secreted frizzled-related proteins (SFRPs) are a family of proteins that block the Wnt signaling pathway and loss of SFRP1 expression is found in breast cancer along with a multitude of other human cancers. Activated Wnt signaling leads to inappropriate mammary gland development and mammary tumorigenesis in mice. When SFRP1 is knocked down in immortalized non-malignant mammary epithelial cells, the cells exhibit a malignant phenotype which resembles the characteristics obs...

  15. Genotoxicity profiles in exfoliated human mammary cells recovered from lactating mothers in Istanbul; relationship with demographic and dietary factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Bayram; Sandal, Suleyman; Ayvaci, Habibe; Tug, Niyazi; Vitrinel, Ayca

    2012-12-12

    We have investigated the presence of DNA damage in human mammary epithelial cells collected from healthy lactating mothers (age, 20-35 years) who were resident in the Istanbul area. Breast milk (10ml) was collected from 30 women between one and two weeks post-partum. Demographic information (parity, breast cancer, occupation, duration of residency in Istanbul, consumption of fish, beef and poultry) was also obtained. Milk samples were diluted 1:1 with RPMI 1640 medium and centrifuged to collect cells. The cells were re-suspended and cell viability was determined by use of 0.4% trypan blue. DNA damage was assessed by use of the comet assay (alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis). Fifty cells per slide and two slides per sample were scored to evaluate DNA damage. The cells were visually classified into four categories on the basis of extent of migration: undamaged (UD), lightly damaged (LD), moderately damaged (MD) and highly damaged (HD). Total comet scores (TCS) were calculated as: 1× UD+2× LD+3× MD+4× HD. Exfoliated mammary cells of the donors showed high (TCS≥150a.u.), moderate and low DNA damage in 10 (33.3%), 8 (26.7%) and 12 (40%) mothers, respectively. There was no significant correlation between TCS for DNA damage and the duration of previous breastfeeding, parity or age. None of the mothers was vegetarian, smoker or on any medication. Meat and chicken consumption did not significantly correlate with the TCS values. Fish consumption was significantly correlated with TCS results (Spearman's rho=0.39, pmothers in Istanbul may be of dietary origin. Our experience also confirms that sampling breast milk from lactating mothers provides a valuable and non-invasive tool to study DNA damage in mammary cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparison of the Adipose and Luminal Mammary Gland Compartment as Orthotopic Inoculation Sites in a 4T1-Based Immunocompetent Preclinical Model for Triple-Negative Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenbrugge, Jonas; Breyne, Koen; Denies, Sofie; Dekimpe, Melissa; Demeyere, Kristel; De Wever, Olivier; Vermeulen, Peter; Van Laere, Steven; Sanders, Niek N; Meyer, Evelyne

    2016-12-01

    Breast tumorigenesis is classically studied in mice by inoculating tumor cells in the fat pad, the adipose compartment of the mammary gland. Alternatively, the mammary ducts, which constitute the luminal mammary gland compartment, also provide a suitable inoculation site to induce breast cancer in murine models. The microenvironments in these compartments influence tumor cell progression, yet this effect has not been investigated in an immunocompetent context. Here, we compared both mammary gland compartments as distinct inoculation sites, taking into account the immunological aspect by inoculating 4T1 tumor cells in immunocompetent mice. Following tumor cell inoculation in the adipose compartment of non-pretreated/naive, hormonally pretreated/naive and non-pretreated/lactating mice, the primary tumors developed similarly. However, a slower onset of primary tumor growth was found after inoculations in the luminal compartment of non-pretreated/lactating mice. Despite this difference in tumor development rate, metastasis to the liver and lungs was equally observed and was accompanied by lymphatic spreading of tumor cells and progressive splenomegaly with both inoculation types. Chitinase 3-like 1 (CHI3L1) and lipocalin 2 (LCN2) served as innovative biomarkers for disease progression showing increased levels in primary tumors and sera of the non-pretreated/lactating inoculation groups. A slower increase in circulating CHI3L1 but not LCN2 levels, was observed after inoculations in the luminal compartment which corroborated the slower tumor development at this inoculation site. Our results highlight the critical impact of different mammary gland compartments on tumor development in syngeneic murine models and support the use of novel tumor progression biomarkers in an immune-competent environment.

  17. In vitro expansion of the mammary stem/progenitor cell population by xanthosine treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choudhary Ratan K

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammary stem cells are critical for growth and maintenance of the mammary gland and therefore are of considerable interest for improving productivity and efficiency of dairy animals. Xanthosine treatment has been demonstrated to promote expansion of putative mammary stem cells in vivo, and hepatic and hair follicle stem cells in vitro. In the latter, xanthosine promoted the symmetrical division of hepatic and hair follicle stem cells. The objective of this study was to determine if treating primary cultures of bovine mammary epithelial cells (MEC with xanthosine increases the stem/progenitor cell population by promoting symmetrical division of mammary stem cells. Results In vitro treatment with xanthosine increased the population of MEC during the exponential phase of cell growth, reducing the doubling time from 86 h in control cultures to 60 h in xanthosine-treated cultures. The bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU labeling index and the proportion of MEC in S-phase both were increased by xanthosine treatment, indicating that increased cell accretion was due to increased cell proliferation. Analysis of daughter-pairs indicated that xanthosine promoted a shift from asymmetric to symmetric cell division. Moreover, the 30 % increase in symmetric cell division was concomitant with an increase in the proportion of MEC that were positive for a putative stem cell marker (FNDC3B and a trend toward increased telomerase activity. These results suggest that xanthosine treatment in vitro can increase cell proliferation, promote symmetric cell division and enhance stem/progenitor cell activity. Conclusions Xanthosine treatment increased the proliferation rate of bovine MEC in vitro. This was likely to be mediated by an increase in the proportion of stem/progenitor cells in the MEC population due to promotion of symmetrical stem cell division by xanthosine.

  18. Diet, Stem Cells, and Breast Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    functional connection between diet and abundance of MaSCs for breast cancer prevention . 15. SUBJECT TERMS Diet, nutrition , stem cells, Wnt-transgenic...Su et al. / Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry xx (2010) – lifelong exposure to soy-enriched diets are mammary tumor- preventive in rodent...environmental (‘dietary’) cues may expand nutritional strategies for breast cancer prevention and therapeutic interventions. Acknowledgements We thank Dr

  19. Myoepithelial cell contraction and milk ejection are impaired in mammary glands of mice lacking smooth muscle alpha-actin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haaksma, Carol J; Schwartz, Robert J; Tomasek, James J

    2011-07-01

    Mammary myoepithelial cells are specialized smooth musclelike epithelial cells that express the smooth muscle actin isoform: smooth muscle alpha-actin (ACTA2). These cells contract in response to oxytocin to generate the contractile force required for milk ejection during lactation. It is believed that ACTA2 contributes to myoepithelial contractile force generation; however, this hypothesis has not been directly tested. To evaluate the contribution of ACTA2 to mammary myoepithelial cell contraction, Acta2 null mice were utilized and milk ejection and myoepithelial cell contractile force generation were evaluated. Pups suckling on Acta2 null dams had a significant reduction in weight gain starting immediately postbirth. Cross-fostering demonstrated the lactation defect is with the Acta2 null dams. Carmine alum whole mounts and conventional histology revealed no underlying structural defects in Acta2 null mammary glands that could account for the lactation defect. In addition, myoepithelial cell formation and organization appeared normal in Acta2 null lactating mammary glands as evaluated using an Acta2 promoter-GFP transgene or phalloidin staining to visualize myoepithelial cells. However, mammary myoepithelial cell contraction in response to oxytocin was significantly reduced in isolated Acta2 null lactating mammary glands and in in vivo studies using Acta2 null lactating dams. These results demonstrate that lack of ACTA2 expression impairs mammary myoepithelial cell contraction and milk ejection and suggests that ACTA2 expression in mammary myoepithelial cells has the functional consequence of enhancing contractile force generation required for milk ejection.

  20. Embryonic stem cell gene expression signatures in the canine mammary tumor: a bioinformatics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani-Ahmadmahmudi, Mohamad

    2016-08-01

    Canine breast cancer was considered as an ideal model of comparative oncology for the human breast cancer, as there is significant overlap between biological and clinical characteristics of the human and canine breast cancer. We attempt to clarify expression profile of the embryonic stem cell (ES) gene signatures in canine breast cancer. Using microarray datasets (GSE22516 and GSE20718), expression of the three major ES gene signatures (modules or gene-sets), including Myc, ESC-like, and PRC modules, was primarily analyzed through Gene-Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) method in tumor and healthy datasets. For confirmation of the primary results, an additional 13 ES gene-sets which were categorized into four groups including ES expressed (ES exp1 and ES exp2), NOS targets (Nanog targets, Oct4 targets, Sox2 targets, NOS targets, and NOS TFs), Polycomb targets (Suz12 targets, Eed targets, H3K27 bound, and PRC2 targets), and Myc targets (Myc targets1, and Myc targets2) were tested in the tumor and healthy datasets. Our results revealed that there is a valuable overlap between canine and human breast cancer ES gene-sets expression profile, where Myc and ESC-like modules were up-regulated and PRC module was down-regulated in metastatic canine mammary gland tumors. Further analysis of the secondary gene-sets indicated overexpression of the ES expressed, NOS targets (Nanog targets, Oct4 targets, Sox2 targets, and NOS targets), and Myc targets and underexpression of the Polycomb targets in metastatic canine breast cancer.

  1. Overexpression of c-myc induces epithelial mesenchymal transition in mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kyoung Bin; Cho, Min Kyong; Lee, Won Young; Kang, Keon Wook

    2010-07-28

    The c-myc gene is frequently overexpressed in human breast cancer and its target genes are involved in tumorigenesis. Epithelial mesenchymal transitions (EMT), where cells undergo a developmental switch from a polarized epithelial phenotype to a highly motile mesenchymal phenotype, are associated with invasion and motility of cancer cells. Basal E-cadherin expression was down-regulated in c-myc overexpressing MCF10A (c-myc-MCF10A) cells compared to GFP-overexpressing MCF10A (GFP-MCF10A) cells, while N-cadherin was distinctly increased in c-myc-MCF10A cells. Given that glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3beta) and the snail axis have key roles in E-cadherin deregulation during EMT, we investigated the role of GSK-3beta/snail signaling pathways in the induction of EMT by c-myc overexpression. In contrast to GFP-MCF10A cells, both the transcriptional activity and the ubiquitination-dependent protein stability of snail were enhanced in c-myc-MCF10A cells, and this was reversed by GSK-3beta overexpression. We also found that c-myc overexpression inhibits GSK-3beta activity through activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Inhibition of ERK by dominant negative mutant transfection or chemical inhibitor significantly suppressed snail gene transcription. These results suggest that c-myc overexpression during transformation of mammary epithelial cells (MEC) is involved in EMTs via ERK-dependent GSK-3beta inactivation and subsequent snail activation.

  2. Differentiation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells to Mammary-like Organoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Qu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs can give rise to multiple cell types and hold great promise in regenerative medicine and disease-modeling applications. We have developed a reliable two-step protocol to generate human mammary-like organoids from iPSCs. Non-neural ectoderm-cell-containing spheres, referred to as mEBs, were first differentiated and enriched from iPSCs using MammoCult medium. Gene expression profile analysis suggested that mammary gland function-associated signaling pathways were hallmarks of 10-day differentiated mEBs. We then generated mammary-like organoids from 10-day mEBs using 3D floating mixed gel culture and a three-stage differentiation procedure. These organoids expressed common breast tissue, luminal, and basal markers, including estrogen receptor, and could be induced to produce milk protein. These results demonstrate that human iPSCs can be directed in vitro toward mammary lineage differentiation. Our findings provide an iPSC-based model for studying regulation of normal mammary cell fate and function as well as breast disease development.

  3. Differentiation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells to Mammary-like Organoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Ying; Han, Bingchen; Gao, Bowen; Bose, Shikha; Gong, Yiping; Wawrowsky, Kolja; Giuliano, Armando E; Sareen, Dhruv; Cui, Xiaojiang

    2017-02-14

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can give rise to multiple cell types and hold great promise in regenerative medicine and disease-modeling applications. We have developed a reliable two-step protocol to generate human mammary-like organoids from iPSCs. Non-neural ectoderm-cell-containing spheres, referred to as mEBs, were first differentiated and enriched from iPSCs using MammoCult medium. Gene expression profile analysis suggested that mammary gland function-associated signaling pathways were hallmarks of 10-day differentiated mEBs. We then generated mammary-like organoids from 10-day mEBs using 3D floating mixed gel culture and a three-stage differentiation procedure. These organoids expressed common breast tissue, luminal, and basal markers, including estrogen receptor, and could be induced to produce milk protein. These results demonstrate that human iPSCs can be directed in vitro toward mammary lineage differentiation. Our findings provide an iPSC-based model for studying regulation of normal mammary cell fate and function as well as breast disease development.

  4. Role of p53 in Mammary Epithelial Cell Senescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    Cell, 2005. 7(6): p. 505-12. 3. Collado , M., et al., Tumour biology: senescence in premalignant tumours. Nature, 2005. 436(7051): p. 642. 4... Collado , M. and M. Serrano, The power and the promise of oncogene-induced senescence markers. Nat Rev Cancer, 2006. 6(6): p. 472-6. 5. Hofseth, L.J., S.P

  5. Differentiation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells to Mammary-like Organoids

    OpenAIRE

    Ying Qu; Bingchen Han; Bowen Gao; Shikha Bose; Yiping Gong; Kolja Wawrowsky; Giuliano, Armando E.; Dhruv Sareen; Xiaojiang Cui

    2017-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can give rise to multiple cell types and hold great promise in regenerative medicine and disease-modeling applications. We have developed a reliable two-step protocol to generate human mammary-like organoids from iPSCs. Non-neural ectoderm-cell-containing spheres, referred to as mEBs, were first differentiated and enriched from iPSCs using MammoCult medium. Gene expression profile analysis suggested that mammary gland function-associated signaling ...

  6. Differentiation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells to Mammary-like Organoids

    OpenAIRE

    Qu, Ying; Han, Bingchen; Gao, Bowen; Bose, Shikha; Gong, Yiping; Wawrowsky, Kolja; Giuliano, Armando E.; Sareen, Dhruv; Cui, Xiaojiang

    2017-01-01

    Summary Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can give rise to multiple cell types and hold great promise in regenerative medicine and disease-modeling applications. We have developed a reliable two-step protocol to generate human mammary-like organoids from iPSCs. Non-neural ectoderm-cell-containing spheres, referred to as mEBs, were first differentiated and enriched from iPSCs using MammoCult medium. Gene expression profile analysis suggested that mammary gland function-associated si...

  7. Epstein-Barr virus, human papillomavirus and mouse mammary tumour virus as multiple viruses in breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy K Glenn

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The purpose of this investigation is to determine if Epstein Barr virus (EBV, high risk human papillomavirus (HPV, and mouse mammary tumour viruses (MMTV co-exist in some breast cancers. MATERIALS AND METHODS: All the specimens were from women residing in Australia. For investigations based on standard PCR, we used fresh frozen DNA extracts from 50 unselected invasive breast cancers. For normal breast specimens, we used DNA extracts from epithelial cells from milk donated by 40 lactating women. For investigations based on in situ PCR we used 27 unselected archival formalin fixed breast cancer specimens and 18 unselected archival formalin fixed normal breast specimens from women who had breast reduction surgery. Thirteen of these fixed breast cancer specimens were ductal carcinoma in situ (dcis and 14 were predominantly invasive ductal carcinomas (idc. RESULTS: EBV sequences were identified in 68%, high risk HPV sequences in 50%, and MMTV sequences in 78% of DNA extracted from 50 invasive breast cancer specimens. These same viruses were identified in selected normal and breast cancer specimens by in situ PCR. Sequences from more than one viral type were identified in 72% of the same breast cancer specimens. Normal controls showed these viruses were also present in epithelial cells in human milk - EBV (35%, HPV, 20% and MMTV (32% of 40 milk samples from normal lactating women, with multiple viruses being identified in 13% of the same milk samples. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that (i EBV, HPV and MMTV gene sequences are present and co-exist in many human breast cancers, (ii the presence of these viruses in breast cancer is associated with young age of diagnosis and possibly an increased grade of breast cancer.

  8. Peripheral serotonin regulates maternal calcium trafficking in mammary epithelial cells during lactation in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimena Laporta

    Full Text Available Lactation is characterized by massive transcellular flux of calcium, from the basolateral side of the mammary alveolar epithelium (blood into the ductal lumen (milk. Regulation of calcium transport during lactation is critical for maternal and neonatal health. The monoamine serotonin (5-HT is synthesized by the mammary gland and functions as a homeostatic regulation of lactation. Genetic ablation of tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (Tph1, which encodes the rate-limiting enzyme in non-neuronal serotonin synthesis, causes a deficiency in circulating serotonin. As a consequence maternal calcium concentrations decrease, mammary epithelial cell morphology is altered, and cell proliferation is decreased during lactation. Here we demonstrate that serotonin deficiency decreases the expression and disrupts the normal localization of calcium transporters located in the apical (PMCA2 and basolateral (CaSR, ORAI-1 membranes of the lactating mammary gland. In addition, serotonin deficiency decreases the mRNA expression of calcium transporters located in intracellular compartments (SERCA2, SPCA1 and 2. Mammary expression of serotonin receptor isoform 2b and its downstream pathways (PLCβ3, PKC and MAP-ERK1/2 are also decreased by serotonin deficiency, which might explain the numerous phenotypic alterations described above. In most cases, addition of exogenous 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan to the Tph1 deficient mice rescued the phenotype. Our data supports the hypothesis that serotonin is necessary for proper mammary gland structure and function, to regulate blood and mammary epithelial cell transport of calcium during lactation. These findings can be applicable to the treatment of lactation-induced hypocalcemia in dairy cows and can have profound implications in humans, given the wide-spread use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors as antidepressants during pregnancy and lactation.

  9. Co-cultivation of murine BMDCs with 67NR mouse mammary carcinoma cells give rise to highly drug resistant cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zänker Kurt S

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumor tissue resembles chronically inflamed tissue. Since chronic inflammatory conditions are a strong stimulus for bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs it can be assumed that recruitment of BMDCs into cancer tissue should be a common phenomenon. Several data have outlined that BMDC can influence tumor growth and metastasis, e.g., by inducing a paracrine acting feedback loop in tumor cells. Likewise, cell fusion and horizontal gene transfer are further mechanisms how BMDCs can trigger tumor progression. Results Hygromycin resistant murine 67NR-Hyg mammary carcinoma cells were co-cultivated with puromycin resistant murine BMDCs from Tg(GFPU5Nagy/J mice. Isolation of hygromycin/puromycin resistant mBMDC/67NR-Hyg cell clones was performed by a dual drug selection procedure. PCR analysis revealed an overlap of parental markers in mBMDC/67NR-Hyg cell clones, suggesting that dual resistant cells originated by cell fusion. By contrast, both STR and SNP data analysis indicated that only parental 67NR-Hyg alleles were found in mBMDC/67NR-Hyg cell clones favoring horizontal gene transfer as the mode of origin. RealTime-PCR-array analysis showed a marked up-regulation of Abcb1a and Abcb1b ABC multidrug transporters in mBMDC/67NR-Hyg clones, which was verified by Western Blot analysis. Moreover, the markedly increased Abcb1a/Abcb1b expression was correlated to an efficient Rhodamine 123 efflux, which was completely inhibited by verapamil, a well-known Abcb1a/Abcb1b inhibitor. Likewise, mBMDCs/67NR-Hyg clones revealed a marked resistance towards chemotherapeutic drugs including 17-DMAG, doxorubicin, etoposide and paclitaxel. In accordance to Rhodamine 123 efflux data, chemotherapeutic drug resistance of mBMDC/67NR-Hyg cells was impaired by verapamil mediated blockage of Abc1a/Abcb1b multidrug transporter function. Conclusion Co-cultivation of mBMDCs and mouse 67NR-Hyg mammary carcinoma cells gave rise to highly drug resistant cells. Even

  10. Inhibition of aberrant proliferation and induction of apoptosis in pre-neoplastic human mammary epithelial cells by natural phytochemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katdare, M; Osborne, M P; Telang, N T

    1998-01-01

    Aberrant proliferation and modulated apoptosis leading to impaired cellular homeostasis represent crucial early events in the multi-step carcinogenic process. Regulation of these perturbed biomarkers may predict efficacious prevention of cancer development. Present experiments on non-cancerous human mammary epithelial 184-B5 cells were designed to examine whether i) exposure to suspect environmental human carcinogen Benzo (a) pyrene (BP) alters the status of cell proliferation and apoptosis and ii) BP-induced alterations are modulated in response to select natural phytochemicals that inhibit rodent mammary tumorigenesis. Flow cytometric analysis, cellular immunoreactivity to proliferation specific and apoptosis specific gene products and anchorage-dependent colony formation represented quantitative endpoints. Cruciferous glucosinolate indole-3-carbinol (I3C), tea polyphenol (-) epigallo catechin gallate (EGCC) and soy isoflavone genistein (GEN) represented the chemopreventive test compounds. A single 24 h exposure to 39 lM BP resulted in a 50% decrease (P=0.02) in the ratio of quiescent (Q=G0) to proliferative (P=S + M) population in part due to increase in aberrantly proliferative cells. The BP-initiated cells also exhibited an 87.8% inhibition (P=0. 0001) in confluency-associated apoptosis and a concomitant decrease in cellular immunoreactivity to wild-type p53. Simultaneous treatment of cultures with BP + I3C, BP + EGCG and BP + GEN resulted in a 1.8- to 3.4-fold increase (Pp53 immunoreactivity (Pp53 dependent apoptosis.

  11. An essential role for Gα(i2) in Smoothened-stimulated epithelial cell proliferation in the mammary gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, Hugo; Visbal, Adriana P; Obeid, Nadine F; Ta, Andrew Q; Faruki, Adeel A; Wu, Meng-Fen; Hilsenbeck, Susan G; Shaw, Chad A; Yu, Peng; Plummer, Nicholas W; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Lewis, Michael T

    2015-09-15

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is critical for organogenesis, tissue homeostasis, and stem cell maintenance. The gene encoding Smoothened (SMO), the primary effector of Hh signaling, is expressed aberrantly in human breast cancer, as well as in other cancers. In mice that express a constitutively active form of SMO that does not require Hh stimulation in mammary glands, the cells near the transgenic cells proliferate and participate in hyperplasia formation. Although SMO is a seven-transmembrane receptor like G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), SMO-mediated activation of the Gli family of transcription factors is not known to involve G proteins. However, data from Drosophila and mammalian cell lines indicate that SMO functions as a GPCR that couples to heterotrimeric G proteins of the pertussis toxin (PTX)-sensitive Gαi class. Using genetically modified mice, we demonstrated that SMO signaling through G proteins occurred in the mammary gland in vivo. SMO-induced stimulation of proliferation was PTX-sensitive and required Gαi2, but not Gαi1, Gαi3, or activation of Gli1 or Gli2. Our findings show that activated SMO functions as a GPCR to stimulate proliferation in vivo, a finding that may have clinical importance because most SMO-targeted agents have been selected based largely on their ability to block Gli-mediated transcription.

  12. The Heterodimeric TWIST1-E12 Complex Drives the Oncogenic Potential of TWIST1 in Human Mammary Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Jacqueroud

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The TWIST1 embryonic transcription factor displays biphasic functions during the course of carcinogenesis. It facilitates the escape of cells from oncogene-induced fail-safe programs (senescence, apoptosis and their consequent neoplastic transformation. Additionally, it promotes the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and the initiation of the metastatic spread of cancer cells. Interestingly, cancer cells recurrently remain dependent on TWIST1 for their survival and/or proliferation, making TWIST1 their Achilles’ heel. TWIST1 has been reported to form either homodimeric or heterodimeric complexes mainly in association with the E bHLH class I proteins. These complexes display distinct, sometimes even antagonistic, functions during development and unequal prometastatic functions in prostate cancer cells. Using a tethered dimer strategy, we successively assessed the ability of TWIST1 dimers to cooperate with an activated version of RAS in human mammary epithelial cell transformation, to provide mice with the ability to spontaneously develop breast tumors, and lastly to maintain a senescence program at a latent state in several breast cancer cell lines. We demonstrate that the TWIST1-E12 complex, unlike the homodimer, is an oncogenic form of TWIST1 in mammary epithelial cells and that efficient binding of both partners is a prerequisite for its activity. The detection of the heterodimer in human premalignant lesions by a proximity ligation assay, at a stage preceding the initiation of the metastatic cascade, is coherent with such an oncogenic function. TWIST1-E protein heterodimeric complexes may thus constitute the main active forms of TWIST1 with regard to senescence inhibition over the time course of breast tumorigenesis.

  13. Endogenous Mouse Mammary Tumor Viruses (Mtv: New Roles for an Old Virus in Cancer, Infection and Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eHolt

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Mouse Mammary Tumor Viruses are beta-retroviruses that exist in both exogenous (MMTV and endogenous (Mtv forms. Exogenous MMTV is transmitted via the milk of lactating animals and is capable of inducing mammary gland tumors later in life. MMTV has provided a number of critical models for studying both viral infection as well as human breast cancer. In addition to the horizontally transmitted MMTV, most inbred mouse strains contain permanently integrated Mtv proviruses within their genome that are remnants of MMTV infection and vertically transmitted. Historically, Mtv have been appreciated for their role in shaping the T cell repertoire during thymic development via negative selection. In addition, more recent work has demonstrated a larger role for Mtv in modulating host immune responses due to its peripheral expression. The influence of Mtv on host response has been observed during experimental murine models of Polyomavirus- and ESb-induced lymphoma as well as Leishmania major and Plasmodium berghei ANKA infection. Decreased susceptibility to bacterial pathogens and virus-induced tumors has been observed among mice lacking all Mtv. We have also demonstrated a role for Mtv Sag in the expansion of regulatory T cells following chronic viral infection. The aim of this review is to summarize the latest research in the field regarding peripheral expression of Mtv with a particular focus on their role and influence on the immune system, infectious disease outcome, and potential involvement in tumor formation.

  14. The role of unfolded protein response in differentiation of mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Megumi; Koizumi, Yumiko; Hayashi, Satoko; Hanaoka, Miyuki; Tokutake, Yukako; Yonekura, Shinichi

    2017-03-18

    The accumulation of misfolded proteins in the ER provokes ER stress by increasing the demand for energy, chaperones, and other proteins that are needed to fold client proteins or to degrade unfoldable secretory cargo. This stress activates a signaling network called the unfolded protein response (UPR). However, recent accumulated data suggested that the UPR also provides important signals for regulating cell differentiation and maturation. However, the relationship between UPR and mammary gland development has not been fully elucidated. To define the involvement of the UPR in mammary gland development, mammary glands were collected from non-pregnant mice, at days 5, 10 and 15 of pregnancy, at days 1 and 7 of lactation, and the expression patterns of UPR-related genes were determined by real-time PCR. We found that the mRNA expression of ATF4 and XBP1 significant increased during pregnancy. Moreover, we found that both ATF4 and XBP1 proteins are expressed in mammary epithelial cells by immunohistological analysis. In order to know the role of ATF4 and XBP1 in the differentiation of mammary epithelial cell, we performed gene knockdown experiment using HC11 cells. We found that ATF4 or XBP1 knockdown suppressed the mRNA expression of beta-casein and lactogenic hormone receptor in differentiating HC11 cells. Our results demonstrate that XBP1 and ATF4, which are UPR-related transcription factors, directly or indirectly participate in cell differentiation mechanisms through the regulation of the expression of lactogenic hormone receptors in mouse mammary epithelial cells.

  15. Stem/progenitor cells in non-lactating versus lactating equine mammary gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaas, Jan H; Chiers, Koen; Bussche, Leen; Burvenich, Christian; Van de Walle, Gerlinde R

    2012-11-01

    The mammary gland is a highly regenerative organ that can undergo multiple cycles of proliferation, lactation, and involution. Based on the facts that (i) mammary stem/progenitor cells (MaSC) are proposed to be the driving forces behind mammary growth and function and (ii) variation exists between mammalian species with regard to physiological and pathological functioning of this organ, we believe that studying MaSC from different mammals is of great comparative interest. Over the years, important data has been gathered on MaSC of men and mice, although knowledge on MaSC in other mammals remains limited. Therefore, the aim of this work was to isolate and characterize MaSC from the mammary gland of horses. Hereby, our salient findings were that the isolated equine cells met the 2 in vitro hallmark properties of stem cells, namely the ability to self-renew and to differentiate into multiple cell lineages. Moreover, the cells were immunophenotyped using markers for CD29, CD44, CD49f, and Ki67. Finally, we propose the mammosphere assay as a valuable in vitro assay to study MaSC during different physiological phases since it was observed that equine lactating mammary gland contains significantly more mammosphere-initiating cells than the inactive, nonlactating gland (a reflection of MaSC self-renewal) and, moreover, that these spheres were significantly larger in size upon initial cultivation (a reflection of progenitor cell proliferation). Taken together, this study not only extends the current knowledge of mammary gland biology, but also benefits the comparative approach to study and compare MaSC in different mammalian species.

  16. 4T1 Murine Mammary Carcinoma Cells Enhance Macrophage-Mediated Innate Inflammatory Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Laurence Madera; Anna Greenshields; Power Coombs, Melanie R.; Hoskin, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor progression and the immune response are intricately linked. While it is known that cancers alter macrophage inflammatory responses to promote tumor progression, little is known regarding how cancers affect macrophage-dependent innate host defense. In this study, murine bone-marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) were exposed to murine carcinoma-conditioned media prior to assessment of the macrophage inflammatory response. BMDMs exposed to 4T1 mammary carcinoma-conditioned medium demonstrated...

  17. Tobacco-specific Carcinogen 4-(Methylnitrosoamino)-1-(3-pyridyl )-1-butanone(NNK) Activating ERK1/2 MAP Kinases and Stimulating Proliferation of Hmnan Mammary Epithelial Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is correlated with the development of various cancers. 4 - (Methylnitrosoamino) -1 - ( 3 -pyridyl) -1-butanone (NNK) is one of the major tobacco-specific carcinogens in the cigarette smoke, which increases the risk of breast cancer. In the present study, it was demonstrated that NNK rapidly activated ERK1 and ERK2 MAP kinases in human normal mammary epithelial cells. It was found that there are two different routes for the activation of ERK1/2with NNK. One is from nicotinic receptor nAchR to MEK1/2, and the other is from tyrosine kinase containing receptor to MEK1/2. The tobacco-specific carcinogen NNK shows a strong proliferative effect on normal human mammary epithelial cells and cancer mammary epithelial cells.

  18. Human Mammary Luminal Epithelial Cells Contain Progenitors to Myoepithelial Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pechoux, Christine; Gudjonsson, Thorarinn; Ronnov-Jessen, Lone; Bissell, Mina J; Petersen, Ole

    1999-02-01

    The origin of the epithelial and myoepithelial cells in the human breast has not been delineated. In this study we have addressed whether luminal epithelial cells and myoepithelial cells are vertically connected, i.e., whether one is the precursor for the other. We used a primary culture assay allowing preservation of basic phenotypic traits of luminal epithelial and myoepithelial cells in culture. The two cell types were then separated immunomagnetically using antibodies directed against lineage-specific cell surface antigens into at best 100% purity. The cellular identity was ascertained by cytochemistry, immunoblotting, and 2-D gel electrophoresis. Luminal epithelial cells were identified by strong expression of cytokeratins 18 and 19 while myoepithelial cells were recognized by expression of vimentin and {alpha}-smooth muscle actin. We used a previously devised culture medium (CDM4) that allows vigorous expansion of proliferative myoepithelial cells and also devised a medium (CDM6) that allowed sufficient expansion of differentiated luminal epithelial cells based on addition of hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor. The two different culture media supported each lineage for at least five passages without signs of interconversion. We used parallel cultures where we switched culture media, thus testing the ability of each lineage to convert to the other. Whereas the myoepithelial lineage showed no signs of interconversion, a subset of luminal epithelial cells, gradually, but distinctly, converted to myoepithelial cells. We propose that in the mature human breast, it is the luminal epithelial cell compartment that gives rise to myoepithelial cells rather than the other way around.

  19. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors: role of isoform gamma in the antineoplastic effect of iodine in mammary cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez-Anita, R E; Cajero-Juarez, M; Aceves, C

    2011-09-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) are ligand-activated transcription factors. Three subtypes--PPAR alpha, PPAR beta, and PPAR gamma--have been identified and are differentially expressed in tissues. Originally, they were described as molecular regulators of lipid metabolism; recently, it has been shown that they are also involved in regulating the cell cycle and apoptosis in both normal and tumoral cells. In fact, some synthetic PPAR ligands are used to treat dyslipidemia, metabolic diseases, and type 2 diabetes. Here, we review the role of PPAR gamma (PPARγ) in tumor initiation and progression, emphasizing the relationship between this isoform and the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the antineoplastic effect of iodine on mammary cancer.

  20. Saturated fatty acids stimulate and insulin suppresses CIDE-A expression in bovine mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonezawa, Tomo; Haga, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Yosuke; Katoh, Kazuo; Obara, Yoshiaki

    2009-07-10

    Cell death-inducing DNA fragmentation factor-alpha-like effector A (CIDE-A) was first identified by its sequence homology with the N-terminal domain of DNA fragmentation factor (DFF). CIDE-A negatively regulates the activity of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) in brown adipose tissue. CIDE-A and UCP1 mRNA were detected by RT-PCR in cloned bovine mammary epithelial cells (bMEC) and lactating bovine mammary glands. Physiological concentrations of saturated fatty acids (stearate and palmitate), but not unsaturated fatty acids (oleate and linoleate) induced up-regulation of CIDE-A mRNA in bMEC. Treatment with insulin (5-10 ng/ml) induced down-regulation of CIDE-A and UCP1. The expression levels of CIDE-A and UCP1 mRNA in bovine mammary glands at various stages of the lactation cycle were determined by quantitative RT-PCR analysis. CIDE-A mRNA expression at peak lactation (2 months after parturition) was significantly higher than at dry off and non-pregnancy but not late lactation. These results suggest that CIDE-A and UCP1 are regulated by insulin and/or fatty acids in mammary epithelial cells and lactating mammary glands, and thereby play an important role in lipid and energy metabolism.

  1. Postmastectomy radiation in supraclavicular and internal mammary regions of patients with breast cancer of stage II/III

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MEI Xin; GUO Xiao-mao; ZHANG Zhen; CHEN Jia-yi

    2009-01-01

    @@ Adjuvant radiotherapy plays a vital role in the treatment of breast cancer, but irradiated area was not standardized. The ipsilateral chest wall and supraclavicular regions with or without internal mammary lymph nodes were reported in patients receiving postmastectomy radiotherapy.1,2 In our study, 133 consecutive patients with breast cancer of stage II/III who had received postmastectomy radiotherapy of supraclavicular and internal mammary regions at Cancer Hospital of Fudan University were analyzed for their survival and locoregional control as well as their relative prognostic predicator.

  2. Luminal progenitors restrict their lineage potential during mammary gland development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodilla, Veronica; Dasti, Alessandro; Huyghe, Mathilde; Lafkas, Daniel; Laurent, Cécile; Reyal, Fabien; Fre, Silvia

    2015-02-01

    The hierarchical relationships between stem cells and progenitors that guide mammary gland morphogenesis are still poorly defined. While multipotent basal stem cells have been found within the myoepithelial compartment, the in vivo lineage potential of luminal progenitors is unclear. Here we used the expression of the Notch1 receptor, previously implicated in mammary gland development and tumorigenesis, to elucidate the hierarchical organization of mammary stem/progenitor cells by lineage tracing. We found that Notch1 expression identifies multipotent stem cells in the embryonic mammary bud, which progressively restrict their lineage potential during mammary ductal morphogenesis to exclusively generate an ERαneg luminal lineage postnatally. Importantly, our results show that Notch1-labelled cells represent the alveolar progenitors that expand during pregnancy and survive multiple successive involutions. This study reveals that postnatal luminal epithelial cells derive from distinct self-sustained lineages that may represent the cells of origin of different breast cancer subtypes.

  3. Luminal progenitors restrict their lineage potential during mammary gland development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Rodilla

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The hierarchical relationships between stem cells and progenitors that guide mammary gland morphogenesis are still poorly defined. While multipotent basal stem cells have been found within the myoepithelial compartment, the in vivo lineage potential of luminal progenitors is unclear. Here we used the expression of the Notch1 receptor, previously implicated in mammary gland development and tumorigenesis, to elucidate the hierarchical organization of mammary stem/progenitor cells by lineage tracing. We found that Notch1 expression identifies multipotent stem cells in the embryonic mammary bud, which progressively restrict their lineage potential during mammary ductal morphogenesis to exclusively generate an ERαneg luminal lineage postnatally. Importantly, our results show that Notch1-labelled cells represent the alveolar progenitors that expand during pregnancy and survive multiple successive involutions. This study reveals that postnatal luminal epithelial cells derive from distinct self-sustained lineages that may represent the cells of origin of different breast cancer subtypes.

  4. Identification of six potential markers for the detection of circulating canine mammary tumour cells in the peripheral blood identified by microarray analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, A; Lenze, D; Hummel, M; Kohn, B; Gruber, A D; Klopfleisch, R

    2012-01-01

    The presence of circulating tumour cells (CTCs) in the peripheral blood is a prognostic factor for survival of human breast cancer patients. CTCs in the peripheral blood of dogs with mammary tumours have not been reported definitively. The present pilot study identifies mRNA markers for CTCs by comparing the transcriptome of canine mammary carcinoma cell lines CMM26 and CMM115 and peripheral blood leucocytes (PBLs). Genes with a 200-fold or higher mRNA expression in carcinoma cell lines were tested for specificity and sensitivity to detect CTCs using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Six mRNA markers, AGR2, ATP8B1, CRYAB, F3 IRX3 and SLC1A1 were expressed in cell lines, but not PBL. All PCRs were able to detect one carcinoma cell admixed in 10(6) or more PBLs. The six mRNA markers may be suitable for detection of canine mammary CTCs and allow the analysis of their spatiotemporal distribution in dogs with mammary tumours.

  5. Anaplastic large cell lymphoma of the breast arising around mammary implant capsule: an Italian report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farace, Francesco; Bulla, Antonio; Marongiu, Francesco; Campus, Gian Vittorio; Tanda, Francesco; Lissia, Amelia; Cossu, Antonio; Fozza, Claudio; Rubino, Corrado

    2013-06-01

    Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) of the breast is a very rare nonepithelial neoplasm. In the literature, this tumor has sometimes been described in proximity of breast implants (60 implant-related ALCL reported). In 2010, a patient who had undergone a right mastectomy and tissue expander/implant reconstruction for a "ductal" carcinoma 10 years before was referred to our unit for evaluation. On examination, an enlarged reconstructed right breast was found. The reconstructed breast did not show tenderness or signs of infection, ulceration, or breakdown. Mammograms and ultrasound scan did not suggest the presence of recurrent cancer, infection, deflation of the implant, or severe capsule contracture. The patient underwent mammary implant replacement. About 3 weeks after surgery, the patient came back to our unit for a new mild enlargement of the operated breast and the implant was removed. Three months later, the patient returned with a skin lesion in the right parasternal region. A radical excisional biopsy was performed under local anesthesia and the diagnosis of ALK-1-negative ALCL was finally made. The clinical and histological diagnosis of this disease is difficult as it can often be mistaken for a simple seroma (breast enlargement), an infection, or an unspecific reaction to silicone (redness and/or tension of the skin, itching, and fever). We strongly suggest considering ALCL in any patient with a spontaneous breast seroma lasting more than 6 months after mammary prosthesis implantation. The suspicion of ALCL must be suggested to the pathologist immediately. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  6. Sequestration of human cytomegalovirus by human renal and mammary epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Twite, Nicolas [Institute for Medical Immunology, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Rue A. Bolland 8, B-6041 Charleroi (Belgium); Andrei, Graciela [Laboratory of Virology and Chemotherapy, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Rega Institute for Medical Research, KU Leuven (Belgium); Kummert, Caroline [ImmuneHealth, Rue A. Bolland 8, B-6041 Charleroi (Belgium); Donner, Catherine [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Erasme Hospital, Route de Lennik 808, 1070 Brussels (Belgium); Perez-Morga, David [Laboratory of Molecular Parasitology, Institut de Biologie et Médecine Moléculaires, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Gosselies (Belgium); De Vos, Rita [Pathology Department, U.Z. Leuven, Minderbroedersstraat 12, Leuven (Belgium); Snoeck, Robert, E-mail: Robert.Snoeck@Rega.kuleuven.be [Laboratory of Virology and Chemotherapy, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Rega Institute for Medical Research, KU Leuven (Belgium); Marchant, Arnaud, E-mail: arnaud.marchant@ulb.ac.be [Institute for Medical Immunology, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Rue A. Bolland 8, B-6041 Charleroi (Belgium); ImmuneHealth, Rue A. Bolland 8, B-6041 Charleroi (Belgium)

    2014-07-15

    Urine and breast milk represent the main routes of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) transmission but the contribution of renal and mammary epithelial cells to viral excretion remains unclear. We observed that kidney and mammary epithelial cells were permissive to HCMV infection and expressed immediate early, early and late antigens within 72 h of infection. During the first 24 h after infection, high titers of infectious virus were measured associated to the cells and in culture supernatants, independently of de novo synthesis of virus progeny. This phenomenon was not observed in HCMV-infected fibroblasts and suggested the sequestration and the release of HCMV by epithelial cells. This hypothesis was supported by confocal and electron microscopy analyses. The sequestration and progressive release of HCMV by kidney and mammary epithelial cells may play an important role in the excretion of the virus in urine and breast milk and may thereby contribute to HCMV transmission. - Highlights: • Primary renal and mammary epithelial cells are permissive to HCMV infection. • HCMV is sequestered by epithelial cells and this phenomenon does not require viral replication. • HCMV sequestration by epithelial cells is reduced by antibodies and IFN-γ.

  7. Granulocytic subset of myeloid derived suppressor cells in rats with mammary carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolen, Y.; Gunaydin, G.; Esendagli, G.; Guc, D.

    2015-01-01

    Limited knowledge is available on myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) of rat origin. We examined the myeloid cells from peripheral blood, bone marrow and spleens of healthy and mammary tumor bearing rats employing a novel immunophenotyping strategy with CD172a, HIS48, and Rp-1 antibodies. We ad

  8. Stepwise DNA Methylation Changes Are Linked to Escape from Defined Proliferation Barriers and Mammary Epithelial Cell Immortalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novak, Petr; Jensen, Taylor J.; Garbe, James C.; Stampfer, Martha R.; Futscher, Bernard W.

    2009-04-20

    The timing and progression of DNA methylation changes during carcinogenesis are not completely understood. To develop a timeline of aberrant DNA methylation events during malignant transformation, we analyzed genome-wide DNA methylation patterns in an isogenic human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) culture model of transformation. To acquire immortality and malignancy, the cultured finite lifespan HMEC must overcome two distinct proliferation barriers. The first barrier, stasis, is mediated by the retinoblastoma protein and can be overcome by loss of p16(INK4A) expression. HMEC that escape stasis and continue to proliferate become genomically unstable before encountering a second more stringent proliferation barrier, telomere dysfunction due to telomere attrition. Rare cells that acquire telomerase expression may escape this barrier, become immortal, and develop further malignant properties. Our analysis of HMEC transitioning from finite lifespan to malignantly transformed showed that aberrant DNA methylation changes occur in a stepwise fashion early in the transformation process. The first aberrant DNA methylation step coincides with overcoming stasis, and results in few to hundreds of changes, depending on how stasis was overcome. A second step coincides with immortalization and results in hundreds of additional DNA methylation changes regardless of the immortalization pathway. A majority of these DNA methylation changes are also found in malignant breast cancer cells. These results show that large-scale epigenetic remodeling occurs in the earliest steps of mammary carcinogenesis, temporally links DNA methylation changes and overcoming cellular proliferation barriers, and provides a bank of potential epigenetic biomarkers that mayprove useful in breast cancer risk assessment.

  9. Genetic mapping in mice identifies DMBT1 as a candidate modifier of mammary tumors and breast cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blackburn, Anneke C; Hill, Linda Z; Roberts, Amy L;

    2007-01-01

    Low-penetrance breast cancer susceptibility alleles seem to play a significant role in breast cancer risk but are difficult to identify in human cohorts. A genetic screen of 176 N2 backcross progeny of two Trp53(+/-) strains, BALB/c and C57BL/6, which differ in their susceptibility to mammary...

  10. RUNX2 correlates with subtype-specific breast cancer in a human tissue microarray, and ectopic expression of Runx2 perturbs differentiation in the mouse mammary gland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura McDonald

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available RUNX2, a master regulator of osteogenesis, is oncogenic in the lymphoid lineage; however, little is known about its role in epithelial cancers. Upregulation of RUNX2 in cell lines correlates with increased invasiveness and the capacity to form osteolytic disease in models of breast and prostate cancer. However, most studies have analysed the effects of this gene in a limited number of cell lines and its role in primary breast cancer has not been resolved. Using a human tumour tissue microarray, we show that high RUNX2 expression is significantly associated with oestrogen receptor (ER/progesterone receptor (PR/HER2-negative breast cancers and that patients with high RUNX2 expression have a poorer survival rate than those with negative or low expression. We confirm RUNX2 as a gene that has a potentially important functional role in triple-negative breast cancer. To investigate the role of this gene in breast cancer, we made a transgenic model in which Runx2 is specifically expressed in murine mammary epithelium under the control of the mouse mammary tumour virus (MMTV promoter. We show that ectopic Runx2 perturbs normal development in pubertal and lactating animals, delaying ductal elongation and inhibiting lobular alveolar differentiation. We also show that the Runx2 transgene elicits age-related, pre-neoplastic changes in the mammary epithelium of older transgenic animals, suggesting that elevated RUNX2 expression renders such tissue more susceptible to oncogenic changes and providing further evidence that this gene might have an important, context-dependent role in breast cancer.

  11. RUNX2 correlates with subtype-specific breast cancer in a human tissue microarray, and ectopic expression of Runx2 perturbs differentiation in the mouse mammary gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Laura; Ferrari, Nicola; Terry, Anne; Bell, Margaret; Mohammed, Zahra M; Orange, Clare; Jenkins, Alma; Muller, William J; Gusterson, Barry A; Neil, James C; Edwards, Joanne; Morris, Joanna S; Cameron, Ewan R; Blyth, Karen

    2014-05-01

    RUNX2, a master regulator of osteogenesis, is oncogenic in the lymphoid lineage; however, little is known about its role in epithelial cancers. Upregulation of RUNX2 in cell lines correlates with increased invasiveness and the capacity to form osteolytic disease in models of breast and prostate cancer. However, most studies have analysed the effects of this gene in a limited number of cell lines and its role in primary breast cancer has not been resolved. Using a human tumour tissue microarray, we show that high RUNX2 expression is significantly associated with oestrogen receptor (ER)/progesterone receptor (PR)/HER2-negative breast cancers and that patients with high RUNX2 expression have a poorer survival rate than those with negative or low expression. We confirm RUNX2 as a gene that has a potentially important functional role in triple-negative breast cancer. To investigate the role of this gene in breast cancer, we made a transgenic model in which Runx2 is specifically expressed in murine mammary epithelium under the control of the mouse mammary tumour virus (MMTV) promoter. We show that ectopic Runx2 perturbs normal development in pubertal and lactating animals, delaying ductal elongation and inhibiting lobular alveolar differentiation. We also show that the Runx2 transgene elicits age-related, pre-neoplastic changes in the mammary epithelium of older transgenic animals, suggesting that elevated RUNX2 expression renders such tissue more susceptible to oncogenic changes and providing further evidence that this gene might have an important, context-dependent role in breast cancer.