WorldWideScience

Sample records for maltophilia diffusible signal

  1. Quorum Sensing Signaling and Quenching in the Multidrug-Resistant Pathogen Stenotrophomonas maltophilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pol Huedo

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is an opportunistic Gram-negative pathogen with increasing incidence in clinical settings. The most critical aspect of S. maltophilia is its frequent resistance to a majority of the antibiotics of clinical use. Quorum Sensing (QS systems coordinate bacterial populations and act as major regulatory mechanisms of pathogenesis in both pure cultures and poly-microbial communities. Disruption of QS systems, a phenomenon known as Quorum Quenching (QQ, represents a new promising paradigm for the design of novel antimicrobial strategies. In this context, we review the main advances in the field of QS in S. maltophilia by paying special attention to Diffusible Signal Factor (DSF signaling, Acyl Homoserine Lactone (AHL responses and the controversial Ax21 system. Advances in the DSF system include regulatory aspects of DSF synthesis and perception by both rpf-1 and rpf-2 variant systems, as well as their reciprocal communication. Interaction via DSF of S. maltophilia with unrelated organisms including bacteria, yeast and plants is also considered. Finally, an overview of the different QQ mechanisms involving S. maltophilia as quencher and as object of quenching is presented, revealing the potential of this species for use in QQ applications. This review provides a comprehensive snapshot of the interconnected QS network that S. maltophilia uses to sense and respond to its surrounding biotic or abiotic environment. Understanding such cooperative and competitive communication mechanisms is essential for the design of effective anti QS strategies.

  2. Iron is a signal for Stenotrophomonas maltophilia biofilm formation, oxidative stress response, OMPs expression and virulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Adrian Garcia

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is an emerging nosocomial pathogen. In many bacteria iron availability regulates, trough the Fur system, not only iron homeostasis but also virulence. The aim of this work was to assess the role of iron on S. maltophilia biofilm formation, EPS production, oxidative stress response, OMPs regulation, quorum sensing (QS, and virulence. Studies were done on K279 and its isogenic fur mutant F60 cultured in the presence or absence of dipyridyl. This is the first report of spontaneous fur mutants obtained in S. maltophilia. F60 produced higher amounts of biofilms than K279a and CLSM analysis demonstrated improved adherence and biofilm organization. Under iron restricted conditions, K279a produced biofilms with more biomass and enhanced thickness. In addition, F60 produced higher amounts of EPS than K279a but with a similar composition, as revealed by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. With respect to the oxidative stress response, MnSOD was the only SOD isoenzyme detected in K279a. F60 presented higher SOD activity than the wt strain in planktonic and biofilm cultures, and iron deprivation increased K279a SOD activity. Under iron starvation, SDS-PAGE profile from K279a presented two iron-repressed proteins. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed homology with FepA and another putative TonB-dependent siderophore receptor of K279a. In silico analysis allowed the detection of potential Fur boxes in the respective coding genes. K279a encodes the QS diffusible signal factor (DSF. Under iron restriction K279a produced higher amounts of DSF than under iron rich condition. Finally, F60 was more virulent than K279a in the Galleria mellonella killing assay. These results put in evidence that iron levels regulate, likely through the Fur system, S. maltophilia biofilm formation, oxidative stress response, OMPs expression, DSF production and virulence.

  3. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Christine R

    2012-01-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia can cause persistent airway colonization and chronic infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. The clinical effect of chronic S. maltophilia infection is still a matter of debate. The purpose of the review is to summarize studies published during the last 1.5 years...

  4. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia responds to exogenous AHL signals through the LuxR solo SmoR (Smlt1839).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Paula; Huedo, Pol; Martinez-Servat, Sònia; Planell, Raquel; Ferrer-Navarro, Mario; Daura, Xavier; Yero, Daniel; Gibert, Isidre

    2015-01-01

    Quorum Sensing (QS) mediated by Acyl Homoserine Lactone (AHL) molecules are probably the most widespread and studied among Gram-negative bacteria. Canonical AHL systems are composed by a synthase (LuxI family) and a regulator element (LuxR family), whose genes are usually adjacent in the genome. However, incomplete AHL-QS machinery lacking the synthase LuxI is frequently observed in Proteobacteria, and the regulator element is then referred as LuxR solo. It has been shown that certain LuxR solos participate in interspecific communication by detecting signals produced by different organisms. In the case of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, a preliminary genome sequence analysis revealed numerous putative luxR genes, none of them associated to a luxI gene. From these, the hypothetical LuxR solo Smlt1839, here designated SmoR, presents a conserved AHL binding domain and a helix-turn-helix DNA binding motif. Its genomic organization-adjacent to hchA gene-indicate that SmoR belongs to the new family "LuxR regulator chaperone HchA-associated." AHL-binding assays revealed that SmoR binds to AHLs in-vitro, at least to oxo-C8-homoserine lactone, and it regulates operon transcription, likely by recognizing a conserved palindromic regulatory box in the hchA upstream region. Supplementation with concentrated supernatants from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which contain significant amounts of AHLs, promoted swarming motility in S. maltophilia. Contrarily, no swarming stimulation was observed when the P. aeruginosa supernatant was treated with the lactonase AiiA from Bacillus subtilis, confirming that AHL contributes to enhance the swarming ability of S. maltophilia. Finally, mutation of smoR resulted in a swarming alteration and an apparent insensitivity to the exogenous AHLs provided by P. aeruginosa. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that S. maltophilia senses AHLs produced by neighboring bacteria through the LuxR solo SmoR, regulating population behaviors such as swarming

  5. Meningitis due to Xanthomonas maltophilia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girijaratnakumari T

    1993-07-01

    Full Text Available During 1st week of post-operative period, a 28 year old female patient operated for left cerebellopontine angle tumor, continued to get fever. Lumbar puncture did not reveal any organisms. She responded to ciprofloxacin. Two months later, she was readmitted with signs and symptoms of meningitis. The CSF tapped on lumbar puncture grew Xanthomonas maltophilia, Gram negative bacilli, sensitive to various antibiotics, ciprofloxacin being one of them. The patient was given ciprofloxacin for 3 weeks. On follow up, a year later she was found to be asymptomatic.

  6. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia: Complicating treatment of ESBL UTI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Simit; Bandyopadhyay, Maitreyi; Chatterjee, Mitali; Banerjee, Parthajit; Poddar, Sumon; Banerjee, Debarati

    2015-01-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (S. maltophilia) is a gram-negative bacillus emerging as an opportunistic, nosocomial pathogen associated with a high mortality rate. The organism has been shown to survive several biocides used in the hospital setting. Hospital water sources can serve as a reservoir for S. maltophilia. The transmission of S. maltophilia to susceptible individuals may occur through direct contact with the source or through the hands of health care personnel. S. maltophilia is usually resistant to third-generation cephalosporins, aminoglycosides and antipseudomonal penicillins. These microorganisms are intrinsically resistant to carbapenems, and exposure to these agents has been linked to selection of S. maltophilia. There have also been reports of the organism developing resistance to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX), which was initially considered as the drug of choice for S. maltophillia infections. We describe a case of nosocomial urinary tract infection (UTI) due to S. maltophilia in a diabetic patient, which the patient developed during treatment with meropenem for UTI due to Klebsiella pneumonia that was resistant to TMP-SMX.

  7. The importance of correcting for signal drift in diffusion MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Vos, Sjoerd B; Tax, Chantal M W; Luijten, Peter R; Ourselin, Sebastien; Leemans, Alexander; Froeling, Martijn

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate previously unreported effects of signal drift as a result of temporal scanner instability on diffusion MRI data analysis and to propose a method to correct this signal drift. METHODS: We investigated the signal magnitude of non-diffusion-weighted EPI volumes in a series of diffusion-weighted imaging experiments to determine whether signal magnitude changes over time. Different scan protocols and scanners from multiple vendors were used to verify this on phantom data, a...

  8. Antibiotics resistance of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia strains ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is a resistant pathogen that can cause bacteremia, endocarditis, respiratory system, central nervous system and urinary tract infections in patients with risk factors like malignancy or neutrope- nia, use of broad-spectrum antibiotics like carbapenem or long-term hospitalization1,2.

  9. Antibiotics resistance of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia strains ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: A limited number of antibiotics are recommended for the therapy of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia infections due to therapy difficulties caused by its numerous mechanisms of resistance. Objectives: In this study conducted over a period of approximately 5 years we aimed to determine resistance rates of S.

  10. Ecthyma gangrenosum caused by Stenotrophomonas maltophilia in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ecthyma gangrenosum caused by Stenotrophomonas maltophilia in a neutropenic leukaemic infant: A case report. D K Das, S Shukla. Abstract. Ecthyma gangrenosum (EG) is a cutaneous lesion, mostly caused by pseudomonas in immunocompromised patients. Other bacterial and fungal pathogens have also been ...

  11. Continuous diffusion signal, EAP and ODF estimation via Compressive Sensing in diffusion MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlet, Sylvain L; Deriche, Rachid

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, we exploit the ability of Compressed Sensing (CS) to recover the whole 3D Diffusion MRI (dMRI) signal from a limited number of samples while efficiently recovering important diffusion features such as the Ensemble Average Propagator (EAP) and the Orientation Distribution Function (ODF). Some attempts to use CS in estimating diffusion signals have been done recently. However, this was mainly an experimental insight of CS capabilities in dMRI and the CS theory has not been fully exploited. In this work, we also propose to study the impact of the sparsity, the incoherence and the RIP property on the reconstruction of diffusion signals. We show that an efficient use of the CS theory enables to drastically reduce the number of measurements commonly used in dMRI acquisitions. Only 20-30 measurements, optimally spread on several b-value shells, are shown to be necessary, which is less than previous attempts to recover the diffusion signal using CS. This opens an attractive perspective to measure the diffusion signals in white matter within a reduced acquisition time and shows that CS holds great promise and opens new and exciting perspectives in diffusion MRI (dMRI). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Signal analysis approach to ultrasonic evaluation of diffusion bond quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Graham; Chinn, Diane

    1999-01-01

    Solid state bonds like the diffusion bond are attractive techniques for joining dissimilar materials since they are not prone to the defects that occur with fusion welding. Ultrasonic methods can detect the presence of totally unbonded regions but have difficulty sensing poor bonded areas where the substrates are in intimate contact. Standard ultrasonic imaging is based on amplitude changes in the signal reflected from the bond interface. Unfortunately, amplitude alone is not sensitive to bond quality. We demonstrated that there is additional information in the ultrasonic signal that correlates with bond quality. In our approach, we interrogated a set of dissimilar diffusion bonded samples with broad band ultrasonic signals. The signals were digitally processed and the characteristics of the signals that corresponded to bond quality were determined. These characteristics or features were processed with pattern recognition algorithms to produce predictions of bond quality. The predicted bond quality was then compared with the destructive measurement to assess the classification capability of the ultrasonic technique

  13. Modeling the diffusion magnetic resonance imaging signal inside neurons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, D V; Li, J R; Grebenkov, D S; Le Bihan, D

    2014-01-01

    The Bloch-Torrey partial differential equation (PDE) describes the complex transverse water proton magnetization due to diffusion-encoding magnetic field gradient pulses. The integral of the solution of this PDE yields the diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) signal. In a complex medium such as cerebral tissue, it is difficult to explicitly link the dMRI signal to biological parameters such as the cellular geometry or the cellular volume fraction. Studying the dMRI signal arising from a single neuron can provide insight into how the geometrical structure of neurons influences the measured signal. We formulate the Bloch-Torrey PDE inside a single neuron, under no water exchange condition with the extracellular space, and show how to reduce the 3D simulation in the full neuron to a 3D simulation around the soma and 1D simulations in the neurites. We show that this latter approach is computationally much faster than full 3D simulation and still gives accurate results over a wide range of diffusion times

  14. Intraabdominal abscess caused by Stenotrophomonas maltophilia: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toyomitsu Sawai

    Full Text Available Introduction: Stenotrophomonas maltophilia usually causes nosocomial infections, but intraabdominal abscesses or organ/space surgical site infection (SSI secondary to this organism has been rarely reported. Here, we reported a rare case of SSI that presented as intraabdominal abscess caused by S. maltophilia. Presentation of case: A 68-year-old woman presented to our hospital with transverse colon cancer. Further work up with abdominal computed tomography (CT revealed left renal cell carcinoma. Transverse colon resection and left kidney partial resection were performed. On post-operative day 10, she started to have fever at 38 °C and repeat abdominal CT showed intraabdominal abscess. Empiric treatment with piperacillin/tazobactam (TAZ/PIPC was initiated. However, fever persisted and the abscess size did not change despite 10 days of antibiotic. On post-operative day 20, drainage of intraabdominal abscess was performed. TAZ/PIPC was then shifted to meropenem (MEPM. After two days, S. maltophilia was identified in the culture of the abscess, and MEPM was shifted to minocycline (MINO. Fever disappeared after 7 days of treatment and abdominal CT after 14 days showed almost complete resolution of the abscess. Discussion: S. maltophilia is a multi-drug resistant, aerobic, non-glucose fermenting, non-sporulating, Gram-negative bacillus. S. maltophilia may cause a variety of infections, but intraabdominal abscesses as a manifestation of SSI due to this organism is relative rare. Conclusion: Although usually a non-pathogenic organism or colonizer, S. maltophilia can cause organ/space SSI in an immunocompromised host. Therefore, clinicians should be aware of the possibility that S. maltophilia may cause organ/space SSI. Keywords: Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Intraabdominal abscess, Surgical site infections

  15. Signal filtering algorithm for depth-selective diffuse optical topography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, M; Nakayama, K

    2009-01-01

    A compact filtered backprojection algorithm that suppresses the undesirable effects of skin circulation for near-infrared diffuse optical topography is proposed. Our approach centers around a depth-selective filtering algorithm that uses an inverse problem technique and extracts target signals from observation data contaminated by noise from a shallow region. The filtering algorithm is reduced to a compact matrix and is therefore easily incorporated into a real-time system. To demonstrate the validity of this method, we developed a demonstration prototype for depth-selective diffuse optical topography and performed both computer simulations and phantom experiments. The results show that the proposed method significantly suppresses the noise from the shallow region with a minimal degradation of the target signal.

  16. An epidemic process mediated by a decaying diffusing signal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faria, Fernando P; Dickman, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    We study a stochastic epidemic model consisting of elements (organisms in a community or cells in tissue) with fixed positions, in which damage or disease is transmitted by diffusing agents ('signals') emitted by infected individuals. The signals decay as well as diffuse; since they are assumed to be produced in large numbers, the signal concentration is treated deterministically. The model, which includes four cellular states (susceptible, transformed, depleted, and removed), admits various interpretations: spread of an infection or infectious disease, or of damage in a tissue in which injured cells may themselves provoke further damage, and as a description of the so-called radiation-induced bystander effect, in which the signals are molecules capable of inducing cell damage and/or death in unirradiated cells. The model exhibits a continuous phase transition between spreading and nonspreading phases. We formulate two mean-field theory (MFT) descriptions of the model, one of which ignores correlations between the cellular state and the signal concentration, and another that treats such correlations in an approximate manner. Monte Carlo simulations of the spread of infection on the square lattice yield values for the critical exponents and the fractal dimension consistent with the dynamic percolation universality class

  17. Characterization of a diffusible signaling factor from Xylella fastidiosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Ellen D; Ionescu, Michael; Chatterjee, Subhadeep; Yokota, Kenji; Trauner, Dirk; Lindow, Steven

    2013-01-08

    Cell-cell signaling in Xylella fastidiosa has been implicated in the coordination of traits enabling colonization in plant hosts as well as insect vectors. This cell density-dependent signaling has been attributed to a diffusible signaling factor (DSF) produced by the DSF synthase RpfF. DSF produced by related bacterial species are unsaturated fatty acids, but that of X. fastidiosa was thought to be different from those of other taxa. We describe here the isolation and characterization of an X. fastidiosa DSF (XfDSF) as 2(Z)-tetradecenoic acid. This compound was isolated both from recombinant Erwinia herbicola expressing X. fastidiosa rpfF and from an X. fastidiosa rpfC deletion mutant that overproduces DSF. Since an rpfF mutant is impaired in biofilm formation and underexpresses the hemagglutinin-like protein-encoding genes hxfA and hxfB, we demonstrate that these traits can be restored by ca. 0.5 µM XfDSF but not by myristic acid, the fully saturated tetradecenoic acid. A phoA-based X. fastidiosa biosensor that assesses DSF-dependent expression of hxfA or hxfB revealed a high level of molecular specificity of DSF signaling. X. fastidiosa causes diseases in many important plants, including grape, where it incites Pierce's disease. Virulence of X. fastidiosa for grape is coordinated by cell-cell signaling molecules, designated DSF (Diffusible Signaling Factor). Mutants blocked in DSF production are hypervirulent for grape, suggesting that virulence is suppressed upon DSF accumulation and that disease could be controlled by artificial elevation of the DSF level in plants. In this work, we describe the isolation of the DSF produced by X. fastidiosa and the verification of its biological activity as an antivirulence factor. We also have developed X. fastidiosa DSF biosensors to evaluate the specificity of cell-cell signaling to be investigated.

  18. Vitamin K3 Induces the Expression of the Stenotrophomonas maltophilia SmeVWX Multidrug Efflux Pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, P; Corona, F; Sánchez, M B; Martínez, J L

    2017-05-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is an opportunistic pathogen with increasing prevalence, which is able to cause infections in immunocompromised patients or in those with a previous pathology. The treatment of the infections caused by this bacterium is often complicated due to the several intrinsic antibiotic resistance mechanisms that it presents. Multidrug efflux pumps are among the best-studied mechanisms of S. maltophilia antibiotic resistance. Some of these efflux pumps have a basal expression level but, in general, their expression is often low and only reaches high levels when the local regulator is mutated or bacteria are in the presence of an effector. In the current work, we have developed a yellow fluorescent protein (YFP)-based sensor with the aim to identify effectors able to trigger the expression of SmeVWX, an efflux pump that confers resistance to quinolones, chloramphenicol, and tetracycline when it is expressed at high levels. With this purpose in mind, we tested a variety of different compounds and analyzed the fluorescence signal given by the expression of YFP under the control of the smeVWX promoter. Among the tested compounds, vitamin K 3 , which is a compound belonging to the 2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone family, is produced by plants in defense against infection, and has increasing importance in human therapy, was able to induce the expression of the SmeVWX efflux pump. In addition, a decrease in the susceptibility of S. maltophilia to ofloxacin and chloramphenicol was observed in the presence of vitamin K 3 , in both wild-type and smeW -deficient strains. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  19. Galactic diffusion and the antiproton signal of supersymmetric dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Chardonnet, P; Salati, Pierre; Taillet, R

    1996-01-01

    The leaky box model is now ruled out by measurements of a cosmic ray gradient throughout the galactic disk. It needs to be replaced by a more refined treatment which takes into account the diffusion of cosmic rays in the magnetic fields of the Galaxy. We have estimated the flux of antiprotons on the Earth in the framework of a two-zone diffusion model. Those species are created by the spallation reactions of high-energy nuclei with the interstellar gas. Another potential source of antiprotons is the annihilation of supersymmetric particles in the dark halo that surrounds our Galaxy. In this letter, we investigate both processes. Special emphasis is given to the antiproton signature of supersymmetric dark matter. The corresponding signal exceeds the conventional spallation flux below 300 MeV, a domain that will be thoroughly explored by the Antimatter Spectrometer experiment. The propagation of the antiprotons produced in the remote regions of the halo back to the Earth plays a crucial role. Depending on the e...

  20. ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE IN THE OPPORTUNISTIC PATHOGEN STENOTROPHOMONAS MALTOPHILIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Blanca Sánchez

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is an environmental bacterium found in the soil, associated with plants and animals, and in aquatic environments. It is also an opportunistic pathogen now causing an increasing number of nosocomial infections. The treatment of S. maltophilia is quite difficult given its intrinsic resistance to a number of antibiotics, and because it is able to acquire new resistances via horizontal gene transfer and mutations. Certainly, strains resistant to quinolones, cotrimoxale and/or cephalosporins - antibiotics commonly used to treat S. maltophilia infections - have emerged. The increasing number of available S. maltophilia genomes has allowed the identification and annotation of a large number of antimicrobial and heavy metal resistance genes. Most encode inactivating enzymes and efflux pumps, but information on their role in intrinsic and acquired resistance is limited. Non-typical antibiotic resistance mechanisms that also form part of the intrinsic resistome have been identified via mutant library screening. These include non-typical antibiotic resistance genes, such as bacterial metabolism genes, and non-inheritable resistant phenotypes, such as biofilm formation and persistence. Their relationships with resistance are complex and require further study.

  1. General PFG signal attenuation expressions for anisotropic anomalous diffusion by modified-Bloch equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Guoxing

    2018-05-01

    Anomalous diffusion exists widely in polymer and biological systems. Pulsed-field gradient (PFG) anomalous diffusion is complicated, especially in the anisotropic case where limited research has been reported. A general PFG signal attenuation expression, including the finite gradient pulse (FGPW) effect for free general anisotropic fractional diffusion { 0 integral modified-Bloch equation, were extended to obtain general PFG signal attenuation expressions for anisotropic anomalous diffusion. Various cases of PFG anisotropic anomalous diffusion were investigated, including coupled and uncoupled anisotropic anomalous diffusion. The continuous-time random walk (CTRW) simulation was also carried out to support the theoretical results. The theory and the CTRW simulation agree with each other. The obtained signal attenuation expressions and the three-dimensional fractional modified-Bloch equations are important for analyzing PFG anisotropic anomalous diffusion in NMR and MRI.

  2. Emergence of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia nosocomial isolates in a Saudi children?s hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Alqahtani, Jobran M.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the clinical characteristics of pediatric patients colonized or infected by Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (S. maltophilia) at a Saudi children’s hospital, to identify risk factors associated with infection, and to investigate the antimicrobial resistance patterns of this emerging pathogen. Methods: In this cross-sectional observational study, 64 non-duplicating S. maltophilia strains were isolated in Najran Maternity and Children’s Hospital, Najran, Saudi ...

  3. Hemorrhagic brain metastases with high signal intensity on diffusion-weighted MR images. A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, H.; Abe, O.; Aoki, S.; Masumoto, T.; Yoshikawa, T.; Kunimatsu, A; Hayashi, N.; Ohtomo, K. [Graduate School of Medicine, Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Radiology

    2002-11-01

    Diffusion-weighted MR imaging has been applicable to the differential diagnosis of abscesses and necrotic or cystic brain tumors. However, restricted water diffusion is not necessarily specific for brain abscess. We describe ring-enhancing metastases of lung carcinoma characterized by high signal intensity on diffusion-weighted MR images. The signal pattern probably reflected intralesional hemorrhage. The present report adds to the growing literature regarding the differential diagnosis of ring-enhancing brain lesions.

  4. Establishing the diffuse correlation spectroscopy signal relationship with blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boas, David A; Sakadžić, Sava; Selb, Juliette; Farzam, Parisa; Franceschini, Maria Angela; Carp, Stefan A

    2016-07-01

    Diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) measurements of blood flow rely on the sensitivity of the temporal autocorrelation function of diffusively scattered light to red blood cell (RBC) mean square displacement (MSD). For RBCs flowing with convective velocity [Formula: see text], the autocorrelation is expected to decay exponentially with [Formula: see text], where [Formula: see text] is the delay time. RBCs also experience shear-induced diffusion with a diffusion coefficient [Formula: see text] and an MSD of [Formula: see text]. Surprisingly, experimental data primarily reflect diffusive behavior. To provide quantitative estimates of the relative contributions of convective and diffusive movements, we performed Monte Carlo simulations of light scattering through tissue of varying vessel densities. We assumed laminar vessel flow profiles and accounted for shear-induced diffusion effects. In agreement with experimental data, we found that diffusive motion dominates the correlation decay for typical DCS measurement parameters. Furthermore, our model offers a quantitative relationship between the RBC diffusion coefficient and absolute tissue blood flow. We thus offer, for the first time, theoretical support for the empirically accepted ability of the DCS blood flow index ([Formula: see text]) to quantify tissue perfusion. We find [Formula: see text] to be linearly proportional to blood flow, but with a proportionality modulated by the hemoglobin concentration and the average blood vessel diameter.

  5. Siderophores of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia: detection and determination of their chemical nature Sideróforos de Stenotrophomonas maltophilia: detección y determinación de su naturaleza química

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos A. García; Beatriz Passerini De Rossi; Eliana Alcaraz; Carlos Vay; Mirta Franco

    2012-01-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is an emerging nosocomial pathogen. Despite the broad spectrum of syndromes associated with S. maltophilia infections, little is known about its virulence factors, including siderophore production. The aims of this work were to detect S. maltophilia siderophores and to determine their chemical nature. We studied 31 S. maltophilia isolates from device-associated infections, recovered over the period 2006-2011 at Hospital de Clínicas José de San Martin, Buenos Aires...

  6. Computed tomography findings of community-acquired Stenotrophomonas Maltophilia pneumonia in an immunocompetent patient: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Yoon Ki; Kim, Jeung Sook; Park, Seong Yeon; Oh, Jin Young; Kwon, Jae Hyun [Dongguk University Ilsan Hospital, Dongguk University College of Medicine, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (S. maltophilia) is a rare, but globally emerging gram-negative multiple-drug-resistant organism usually found in a nosocomial setting in immunocompromised patients. To our best knowledge, computed tomography (CT) features of community-acquired S. maltophilia pneumonia have not been previously reported in an immunocompetent patient. Herein, we presented the CT findings of a previous healthy 56-year-old male with S. maltophilia pneumonia.

  7. Infective endocarditis caused by Stenotrophomonas maltophilia: A report of two cases and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaik Subhani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is known for nosocomial habitat. Infective endocarditis due to this organism is rare and challenging because of resistance to multiple broad-spectrum antibiotic regimens. Early detection and appropriate antibiotic based on culture sensitivity reports are the key to its management. We report the diagnosis, treatment, and outcome of two cases of infective endocarditis caused by S. maltophilia.

  8. The Host Plant Metabolite Glucose Is the Precursor of Diffusible Signal Factor (DSF) Family Signals in Xanthomonas campestris

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Yinyue; Liu, Xiaoling; Wu, Ji'en; Lee, Jasmine; Chen, Shaohua; Cheng, Yingying; Zhang, Chunyan; Zhang, Lian-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris produces cis-11-methyl-2-dodecenoic acid (diffusible signal factor [DSF]) as a cell-cell communication signal to regulate biofilm dispersal and virulence factor production. Previous studies have demonstrated that DSF biosynthesis is dependent on the presence of RpfF, an enoyl-coenzyme A (CoA) hydratase, but the DSF synthetic mechanism and the influence of the host plant on DSF biosynthesis are still not clear. We show here that exogenous ad...

  9. Diffusible signal factor-dependent quorum sensing in pathogenic bacteria and its exploitation for disease control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow, J M

    2017-01-01

    Cell-to-cell signals of the diffusible signal factor (DSF) family are cis-2-unsaturated fatty acids of differing chain length and branching pattern. DSF signalling has been described in diverse bacteria to include plant and human pathogens where it acts to regulate functions such as biofilm formation, antibiotic tolerance and the production of virulence factors. DSF family signals can also participate in interspecies signalling with other bacteria and interkingdom signalling such as with the yeast Candida albicans. Interference with DSF signalling may afford new opportunities for the control of bacterial disease. Such strategies will depend in part on detailed knowledge of the molecular mechanisms underlying the processes of signal synthesis, perception and turnover. Here, I review both recent progress in understanding DSF signalling at the molecular level and prospects for translating this knowledge into approaches for disease control. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  10. Cooperative pathogenicity in cystic fibrosis: Stenotrophomonas maltophilia modulates Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence in mixed biofilm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arianna ePompilio

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study was undertaken in order to understand more about the interaction occurring between S. maltophilia and P. aeruginosa, which are frequently co-isolated from CF airways. For this purpose, S. maltophilia RR7 and P. aeruginosa RR8 strains, co-isolated from the lung of a chronically infected CF patient during a pulmonary exacerbation episode, were evaluated for reciprocal effect during planktonic growth, adhesion and biofilm formation onto both polystyrene and CF bronchial cell monolayer, motility, as well as for gene expression in mixed biofilms. P. aeruginosa significantly affected S. maltophilia growth in both planktonic and biofilm cultures, due to an inhibitory activity probably requiring direct contact. Conversely, no effect was observed on P. aeruginosa by S. maltophilia. Compared with monocultures, the adhesiveness of P. aeruginosa on CFBE41o- cells was significantly reduced by S. maltophilia, which probably acts by reducing P. aeruginosa's swimming motility. An opposite trend was observed for biofilm formation, confirming the findings obtained using polystyrene. When grown in mixed biofilm with S. maltophilia, P. aeruginosa significantly over-expressed aprA, and algD - codifying for protease and alginate, respectively - while the quorum sensing related rhlR and lasI genes were down-regulated. The induced alginate expression by P. aeruginosa might be responsible for the protection of S. maltophilia against tobramycin activity we observed in mixed biofilms. Taken together, our results suggest that the existence of reciprocal interference of S. maltophilia and P. aeruginosa in CF lung is plausible. In particular, S. maltophilia might confer some selective fitness advantage to P. aeruginosa under the specific conditions of chronic infection or, alternatively, increase the virulence of P. aeruginosa thus leading to pulmonary exacerbation.

  11. Expression of Sme efflux pumps and multilocus sequence typing in clinical isolates of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hye Hyun; Sung, Ji Youn; Kwon, Kye Chul; Koo, Sun Hoe

    2012-01-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia has emerged as an important opportunistic pathogen, which causes infections that are often difficult to manage because of the inherent resistance of the pathogen to a variety of antimicrobial agents. In this study, we analyzed the expressions of smeABC and smeDEF and their correlation with antimicrobial susceptibility. We also evaluated the genetic relatedness and epidemiological links among 33 isolates of S. maltophilia. In total, 33 S. maltophilia strains were isolated from patients in a tertiary hospital in Daejeon. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 11 antimicrobial agents were determined by using agar dilution method and E-test (BioMérieux, France). Real-time PCR analysis was performed to evaluate the expression of the Sme efflux systems in the S. maltophilia isolates. Additionally, an epidemiological investigation was performed using multilocus sequence typing (MLST) assays. The findings of susceptibility testing showed that the majority of the S. maltophilia isolates were resistant to β-lactams and aminoglycosides. Twenty-one clinical isolates overexpressed smeABC and showed high resistance to ciprofloxacin. Moreover, a high degree of genetic diversity was observed among the S. maltophilia isolates; 3 sequence types (STs) and 23 allelic profiles were observed. The smeABC efflux pump was associated with multidrug resistance in clinical isolates of S. maltophilia. In particular, smeABC efflux pumps appear to perform an important role in ciprofloxacin resistance of S. maltophilia. The MLST scheme for S. maltophilia represents a discriminatory typing method with stable markers and is appropriate for studying population structures.

  12. An outbreak of trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole-resistant Stenotrophomonas maltophilia meningitis associated with neuroendoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Hsun Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Stereotactic aspiration by neuroendoscopy for treatment of deep-seated intracranial hematomas is widely accepted because this procedure is minimally invasive and thereby reduces the probability of iatrogenic brain damage. Herein, we describe an outbreak of trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SXT-resistant Stenotrophomonas maltophilia meningitis, possibly from a contaminated neuroendoscopy, and review the previous use of antimicrobial therapies for this condition without TMP/SXT. This is the first reported outbreak of TMP/SXT-resistant S. maltophilia meningitis. The discussion emphasizes the importance of adequate disinfection processes before and after endoscopic neurosurgery and the use of therapeutic options other than TMP/SXT when encountering S. maltophilia meningitis.

  13. A theoretical signal processing framework for linear diffusion MRI: Implications for parameter estimation and experiment design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadarajan, Divya; Haldar, Justin P

    2017-11-01

    The data measured in diffusion MRI can be modeled as the Fourier transform of the Ensemble Average Propagator (EAP), a probability distribution that summarizes the molecular diffusion behavior of the spins within each voxel. This Fourier relationship is potentially advantageous because of the extensive theory that has been developed to characterize the sampling requirements, accuracy, and stability of linear Fourier reconstruction methods. However, existing diffusion MRI data sampling and signal estimation methods have largely been developed and tuned without the benefit of such theory, instead relying on approximations, intuition, and extensive empirical evaluation. This paper aims to address this discrepancy by introducing a novel theoretical signal processing framework for diffusion MRI. The new framework can be used to characterize arbitrary linear diffusion estimation methods with arbitrary q-space sampling, and can be used to theoretically evaluate and compare the accuracy, resolution, and noise-resilience of different data acquisition and parameter estimation techniques. The framework is based on the EAP, and makes very limited modeling assumptions. As a result, the approach can even provide new insight into the behavior of model-based linear diffusion estimation methods in contexts where the modeling assumptions are inaccurate. The practical usefulness of the proposed framework is illustrated using both simulated and real diffusion MRI data in applications such as choosing between different parameter estimation methods and choosing between different q-space sampling schemes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A clutter removal method for the Doppler ultrasound signal based on a nonlinear diffusion equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Peng; Xin Pengcheng; Bian Zhengzhong; Yu Gang

    2008-01-01

    Strong clutter components produced by stationary and slow-moving tissue structures render the lower frequency part of the spectrogram useless and degrade the accuracy of clinical ultrasound indices. An adaptive method based on the nonlinear forward-and-backward diffusion equation (FAB-DE) is proposed to remove strong clutter components from the contaminated Doppler signal. The clutter signal is extracted first by the FAB-DE accurately, in which the nonlinear diffusion coefficient function of the FAB-DE locally adjusts according to signal features and the diffusion adaptively switches between forward and backward mode. The present method has been validated by simulated and realistic pulse wave Doppler signals, and compared with the conventional high pass filter and the matching pursuit method. The simulation results, including spectrogram, mean velocity error, standard deviation of mean velocity and signal-to-clutter ratio of a decontaminated signal, demonstrate that the present FAB-DE method can remove clutter sufficiently and retain more low blood components simultaneously as compared with the other two methods. Results of the realistic Doppler blood signal, including spectrogram and low-frequency part of the spectrum, support the conclusion drawn from simulation cases

  15. Infective endocarditis caused by Stenotrophomonas maltophilia: A report of two cases and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subhani, Shaik; Patnaik, Amar N; Barik, Ramachandra; Nemani, Lalita

    2016-09-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is known for nosocomial habitat. Infective endocarditis due to this organism is rare and challenging because of resistance to multiple broad-spectrum antibiotic regimens. Early detection and appropriate antibiotic based on culture sensitivity reports are the key to its management. We report the diagnosis, treatment, and outcome of two cases of infective endocarditis caused by S. maltophilia. Copyright © 2015 Cardiological Society of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. On the nature of the NAA diffusion attenuated MR signal in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroenke, Christopher D; Ackerman, Joseph J H; Yablonskiy, Dmitriy A

    2004-11-01

    In the brain, on a macroscopic scale, diffusion of the intraneuronal constituent N-acetyl-L-aspartate (NAA) appears to be isotropic. In contrast, on a microscopic scale, NAA diffusion is likely highly anisotropic, with displacements perpendicular to neuronal fibers being markedly hindered, and parallel displacements less so. In this report we first substantiate that local anisotropy influences NAA diffusion in vivo by observing differing diffusivities parallel and perpendicular to human corpus callosum axonal fibers. We then extend our measurements to large voxels within rat brains. As expected, the macroscopic apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of NAA is practically isotropic due to averaging of the numerous and diverse fiber orientations. We demonstrate that the substantially non-monoexponential diffusion-mediated MR signal decay vs. b value can be quantitatively explained by a theoretical model of NAA confined to an ensemble of differently oriented neuronal fibers. On the microscopic scale, NAA diffusion is found to be strongly anisotropic, with displacements occurring almost exclusively parallel to the local fiber axis. This parallel diffusivity, ADCparallel, is 0.36 +/- 0.01 microm2/ms, and ADCperpendicular is essentially zero. From ADCparallel the apparent viscosity of the neuron cytoplasm is estimated to be twice as large as that of a temperature-matched dilute aqueous solution. (c) 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Biotransformation of tetracycline by a novel bacterial strain Stenotrophomonas maltophilia DT1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Yifei; Bao, Jianguo; Chang, Gaofeng; Zheng, Han; Li, Xingxing; Du, Jiangkun; Snow, Daniel; Li, Xu

    2016-11-15

    Although several abiotic processes have been reported that can transform antibiotics, little is known about whether and how microbiological processes may degrade antibiotics in the environment. This work isolated one tetracycline degrading bacterial strain, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia strain DT1, and characterized the biotransformation of tetracycline by DT1 under various environmental conditions. The biotransformation rate was the highest when the initial pH was 9 and the reaction temperature was at 30°C, and can be described using the Michaelis-Menten model under different initial tetracycline concentrations. When additional substrate was present, the substrate that caused increased biomass resulted in a decreased biotransformation rate of tetracycline. According to disk diffusion tests, the biotransformation products of tetracycline had lower antibiotic potency than the parent compound. Six possible biotransformation products were identified, and a potential biotransformation pathway was proposed that included sequential removal of N-methyl, carbonyl, and amine function groups. Results from this study can lead to better estimation of the fate and transport of antibiotics in the environment and has the potential to be utilized in designing engineering processes to remove tetracycline from water and soil. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Update on infections caused by Stenotrophomonas maltophilia with particular attention to resistance mechanisms and therapeutic options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya Ting eChang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is a Gram-negative, biofilm-forming bacterium. Although generally regarded as an organism of low virulence, S. maltophilia is an emerging multi-drug resistant opportunistic pathogen in hospital and community settings, especially among immunocompromised hosts. Risk factors associated with S. maltophilia infection include underlying malignancy, cystic fibrosis, corticosteroid or immunosuppressant therapy, the presence of an indwelling central venous catheter and exposure to broad spectrum antibiotics. In this review, we provide a synthesis of information on current global trends in S. maltophilia pathogenicity as well as updated information on the molecular mechanisms contributing to its resistance to an array of antimicrobial agents. The prevalence of S. maltophilia infection in the general population increased from 0.8%-1.4% during 1997-2003 to 1.3%-1.68% during 2007-2012. The most important molecular mechanisms contributing to its resistance to antibiotics include β-lactamase production, the expression of Qnr genes, and the presence of class 1 integrons and efflux pumps. Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMX is the antimicrobial drug of choice. Although a few studies have reported increased resistance to TMP/SMX, the majority of studies worldwide show that S. maltophilia continues to be highly susceptible. Drugs with historically good susceptibility results include ceftazidime, ticarcillin-clavulanate, and fluoroquinolones; however, a number of studies show an alarming trend

  19. A simple theoretical extension to the analysis of photothermal deflection signal for low thermal diffusivity evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravi, Jyotsna; Lekshmi, S.; Nair, K.P.R.; Rasheed, T.M.A

    2004-01-01

    A modified amplitude method to analyze the photothermal probe beam deflection signal for the determination of low thermal diffusivity values of materials is proposed. This simple theoretical model, which is an extension of the amplitude method proposed by Quelin et al., takes into account the dependence of the photothermal signal on the height of the probe beam above the sample surface which affects mirage measurements when the thermal diffusivity of the coupling medium is greater than that of the sample. The present work is similar to the modification to the phase method proposed by Bertolotti et al. for determination of low thermal diffusivity. The method can be applied irrespective of whether the sample is optically transparent or optically opaque and is independent of thickness

  20. Diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubaschewski, O.

    1983-01-01

    The diffusion rate values of titanium, its compounds and alloys are summarized and tabulated. The individual chemical diffusion coefficients and self-diffusion coefficients of certain isotopes are given. Experimental methods are listed which were used for the determination of diffusion coefficients. Some values have been taken over from other studies. Also given are graphs showing the temperature dependences of diffusion and changes in the diffusion coefficient with concentration changes

  1. Diffusible signal factor family signals provide a fitness advantage to Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris in interspecies competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yinyue; Wu, Jien; Yin, Wenfang; Li, Peng; Zhou, Jianuan; Chen, Shaohua; He, Fei; Cai, Jun; Zhang, Lian-Hui

    2016-05-01

    Diffusible signal factor (DSF) represents a new class of widely conserved quorum sensing signals, which regulates various biological functions through intra- or interspecies signaling. The previous studies identified that there is an antagonistic interaction between Xanthomonas and Bacillus species bacteria in natural ecosystem, but the detailed molecular mechanism of interspecies competition is not clear. This study showed that Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc) interfered with morphological transition and sporulation of Bacillus thuringiensis in mixed cultures, whereas abrogation of the DSF synthase RpfF reduced the interference. DSF inhibited B. thuringiensis cell division and sporulation through modulation of ftsZ, which encodes an important cell division protein in bacterial cells. In addition, RpfF is essential for production of six DSF-family signals in Xcc, which employ the same signaling pathways to regulate biological functions in Xcc and play similar effects on reduction of cell division, sporulation and antibiotic resistance of B. thuringiensis. Furthermore, abrogation of RpfF decreased the competitive capability of Xcc against B. thuringiensis on the surface of Chinese cabbage leaves. Our findings provide new insights into the role of DSF-family signals in interspecies competition and depict molecular mechanisms with which Xcc competes with B. thuringiensis. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. l-Glucitol Catabolism in Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Ac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brechtel, Elke; Huwig, Alexander; Giffhorn, Friedrich

    2002-01-01

    The carbohydrate catabolism of the bacterium Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Ac (previously named Pseudomonas sp. strain Ac), which is known to convert the unnatural polyol l-glucitol to d-sorbose during growth on the former as the sole source of carbon and energy, was studied in detail. All enzymes operating in a pathway that channels l-glucitol via d-sorbose into compounds of the intermediary metabolism were demonstrated, and for some prominent reactions the products of conversion were identified. d-Sorbose was converted by C-3 epimerization to d-tagatose, which, in turn, was isomerized to d-galactose. d-Galactose was the initial substrate of the De Ley-Doudoroff pathway, involving reactions of NAD-dependent oxidation of d-galactose to d-galactonate, its dehydration to 2-keto-3-deoxy-d-galactonate, and its phosphorylation to 2-keto-3-deoxy-d-galactonate 6-phosphate. Finally, aldol cleavage yielded pyruvate and d-glycerate 3-phosphate as the central metabolic intermediates. PMID:11823194

  3. Emergence of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia nosocomial isolates in a Saudi children's hospital. Risk factors and clinical characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqahtani, Jobran M

    2017-05-01

      To describe the clinical characteristics of pediatric patients colonized or infected by Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (S. maltophilia) at a Saudi children's hospital, to identify risk factors associated with infection, and to investigate the antimicrobial resistance patterns of this emerging pathogen.  Methods: In this cross-sectional observational study, 64 non-duplicating S. maltophilia strains were isolated  in Najran Maternity and Children's Hospital, Najran,  Saudi Arabia between January 2015 to February 2016. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed using the reference broth microdilution method.  Results: In this study, 48 (75%) isolates were identified in true infections and 16 (25%) isolates were considered colonization. The main types of S. maltophilia infection were pneumonia in 22 (45.8%) patients and bloodstream infection in 14 (29.2%) patients. The significant risk factors included exposure to invasive procedure (p=0.02), and presence of acute leukemia as an underlying disease (p=0.02). The most active antimicrobials were trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (100% sensitivity) and tigecycline (93.7% sensitivity). Conclusions: Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is an emerging nosocomial pathogen among pediatric patients. Accurate identification and susceptibility testing of this emerging pathogen are crucial for the management of infected patients and prevention of spread of this nosocomial pathogen.

  4. The host plant metabolite glucose is the precursor of diffusible signal factor (DSF) family signals in Xanthomonas campestris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yinyue; Liu, Xiaoling; Wu, Ji'en; Lee, Jasmine; Chen, Shaohua; Cheng, Yingying; Zhang, Chunyan; Zhang, Lian-Hui

    2015-04-01

    Plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris produces cis-11-methyl-2-dodecenoic acid (diffusible signal factor [DSF]) as a cell-cell communication signal to regulate biofilm dispersal and virulence factor production. Previous studies have demonstrated that DSF biosynthesis is dependent on the presence of RpfF, an enoyl-coenzyme A (CoA) hydratase, but the DSF synthetic mechanism and the influence of the host plant on DSF biosynthesis are still not clear. We show here that exogenous addition of host plant juice or ethanol extract to the growth medium of X. campestris pv. campestris could significantly boost DSF family signal production. It was subsequently revealed that X. campestris pv. campestris produces not only DSF but also BDSF (cis-2-dodecenoic acid) and another novel DSF family signal, which was designated DSF-II. BDSF was originally identified in Burkholderia cenocepacia to be involved in regulation of motility, biofilm formation, and virulence in B. cenocepacia. Functional analysis suggested that DSF-II plays a role equal to that of DSF in regulation of biofilm dispersion and virulence factor production in X. campestris pv. campestris. Furthermore, chromatographic separation led to identification of glucose as a specific molecule stimulating DSF family signal biosynthesis in X. campestris pv. campestris. (13)C-labeling experiments demonstrated that glucose acts as a substrate to provide a carbon element for DSF biosynthesis. The results of this study indicate that X. campestris pv. campestris could utilize a common metabolite of the host plant to enhance DSF family signal synthesis and therefore promote virulence. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Human cerebral cortices: signal variation on diffusion-weighted MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asao, Chiaki [Kumamoto Regional Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Kumamoto (Japan); National Hospital Organization Kumamoto Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Kumamoto (Japan); Hirai, Toshinori; Yamashita, Yasuyuki [Kumamoto University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Kumamoto (Japan); Yoshimatsu, Shunji [National Hospital Organization Kumamoto Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Kumamoto (Japan); Matsukawa, Tetsuya; Imuta, Masanori [Kumamoto Regional Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Kumamoto (Japan); Sagara, Katsuro [Kumamoto Regional Medical Center, Department of Internal Medicine, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2008-03-15

    We have often encountered high signal intensity (SI) of the cingulate gyrus and insula during diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) on neurologically healthy adults. To date, cortical signal heterogeneity on DW images has not been investigated systematically. The purpose of our study was to determine whether there is regional signal variation in the brain cortices of neurologically healthy adults on DW-MR images. The SI of the cerebral cortices on DW-MR images at 1.5 T was evaluated in 50 neurologically healthy subjects (34 men, 16 women; age range 33-84 years; mean age 57.6 years). The cortical SI in the cingulate gyrus, insula, and temporal, occipital, and parietal lobes was graded relative to the SI of the frontal lobe. Contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) on DW-MR images were compared for each cortical area. Diffusion changes were analyzed by visually assessment of the differences in appearance among the cortices on apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps. Increased SI was frequently seen in the cingulate gyrus and insula regardless of patient age. There were no significant gender- or laterality-related differences. The CNR was significantly higher in the cingulate gyrus and insula than in the other cortices (p <.01), and significant differences existed among the cortical regions (p <.001). There were no apparent ADC differences among the cortices on ADC maps. Regional signal variation of the brain cortices was observed on DW-MR images of healthy subjects, and the cingulate gyrus and insula frequently manifested high SI. These findings may help in the recognition of cortical signal abnormalities as visualized on DW-MR images. (orig.)

  6. Human cerebral cortices: signal variation on diffusion-weighted MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asao, Chiaki; Hirai, Toshinori; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Yoshimatsu, Shunji; Matsukawa, Tetsuya; Imuta, Masanori; Sagara, Katsuro

    2008-01-01

    We have often encountered high signal intensity (SI) of the cingulate gyrus and insula during diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) on neurologically healthy adults. To date, cortical signal heterogeneity on DW images has not been investigated systematically. The purpose of our study was to determine whether there is regional signal variation in the brain cortices of neurologically healthy adults on DW-MR images. The SI of the cerebral cortices on DW-MR images at 1.5 T was evaluated in 50 neurologically healthy subjects (34 men, 16 women; age range 33-84 years; mean age 57.6 years). The cortical SI in the cingulate gyrus, insula, and temporal, occipital, and parietal lobes was graded relative to the SI of the frontal lobe. Contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) on DW-MR images were compared for each cortical area. Diffusion changes were analyzed by visually assessment of the differences in appearance among the cortices on apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps. Increased SI was frequently seen in the cingulate gyrus and insula regardless of patient age. There were no significant gender- or laterality-related differences. The CNR was significantly higher in the cingulate gyrus and insula than in the other cortices (p <.01), and significant differences existed among the cortical regions (p <.001). There were no apparent ADC differences among the cortices on ADC maps. Regional signal variation of the brain cortices was observed on DW-MR images of healthy subjects, and the cingulate gyrus and insula frequently manifested high SI. These findings may help in the recognition of cortical signal abnormalities as visualized on DW-MR images. (orig.)

  7. A percolation-like model for simulating inter-cellular diffusion in the context of bystander signalling in tumour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moulton, C.R.; Fleming, A.J.; Ebert, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Despite ongoing active research, the role of the radiation bystander effect in modifying local tissue response to an ionising radiation dose remains unclear. The present study aims to provide new insight by simulating the diffusion-mediated inter-cellular communication processes in 2D and 3D cell-like structures to calculate likely signal ranges in the diffusion limited case. Random walks of individual signalling molecules were tracked between cells with inclusion of molecule-receptor interactions. The resulting diffusion anomaly is a function of cell density, signal uptake probability and the spatial arrangement of cells local to the signal origin. Uptake probability effects dominate percolation effects in disordered media. Diffu sion through 2D structures is more conducive to anomalous diffusion than diffusion through 3D structures. Values for time-dependent diffusion constants and permeability are derived for typical simulation parameters. Even at low signal uptake probabilities the communication range is restricted to a mean value of less than 100 foun owing to complete signal uptake by 600 s. This should be considered in light of the potential influence of signal relaying, flo dynamics or vasculature-mediated signalling.

  8. CLONING, SEQUENCE ANALYSIS, AND CHARACTERIZATION OF PUTATIVE BETA-LACTAMASE OF STENOTROPHOMONAS MALTOPHILIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Seng Shueh

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of current study was to explore the function of chromosomal putative beta-lactamase gene (smlt 0115 in clinical Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. Antibiotic susceptibility test (AST screening for current antimicrobial drugs was done and Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC level towards beta-lactams was determined by E-test. Putative beta-lactamase gene of S. maltophilia was amplified via PCR, with specific primers, then cloned into pET-15 expression plasmid and transformed into Escherichia coli BL21. The gene was sequenced and analyzed. The expressed protein was purified by affinity chromatography and the kinetic assay was performed. S. maltophilia ATCC 13637 was included in this experiment. Besides, a hospital strain which exhibited resistant to a series of beta-lactams including cefepime was identified via AST and MIC, hence it was named as S2 strain and was considered in this study. Sequencing result showed that putative beta-lactamase gene obtained from ATCC 13637 and S2 strains were predicted to have cephalosporinase activity by National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI blast program. Differences in the sequences of both ATCC 13637 and S2 strains were found via ClustalW alignment software. Kinetic assay proved a cephalosporinase characteristic produced by E. coli BL21 clone that overexpressed the putative beta-lactamase gene cloned under the control of an external promoter. Yet, expressed protein purified from S2 strain had high catalytic activity against beta-lactam antibiotics which was 14-fold higher than expressed protein purified from ATCC 13637 strain. This study represents the characterization analysis of putative beta-lactamase gene (smlt 0115 of S. maltophilia. The presence of the respective gene in the chromosome of S. maltophilia suggested that putative beta-lactamase gene (smlt 0115 of S. maltophilia plays a role in beta-lactamase resistance.

  9. Mathematical models for the diffusion magnetic resonance signal abnormality in patients with prion diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Figini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In clinical practice signal hyperintensity in the cortex and/or in the striatum on magnetic resonance (MR diffusion-weighted images (DWIs is a marker of sporadic Creutzfeldt–Jakob Disease (sCJD. MR diagnostic accuracy is greater than 90%, but the biophysical mechanisms underpinning the signal abnormality are unknown. The aim of this prospective study is to combine an advanced DWI protocol with new mathematical models of the microstructural changes occurring in prion disease patients to investigate the cause of MR signal alterations. This underpins the later development of more sensitive and specific image-based biomarkers. DWI data with a wide a range of echo times and diffusion weightings were acquired in 15 patients with suspected diagnosis of prion disease and in 4 healthy age-matched subjects. Clinical diagnosis of sCJD was made in nine patients, genetic CJD in one, rapidly progressive encephalopathy in three, and Gerstmann–Sträussler–Scheinker syndrome in two. Data were analysed with two bi-compartment models that represent different hypotheses about the histopathological alterations responsible for the DWI signal hyperintensity. A ROI-based analysis was performed in 13 grey matter areas located in affected and apparently unaffected regions from patients and healthy subjects. We provide for the first time non-invasive estimate of the restricted compartment radius, designed to reflect vacuole size, which is a key discriminator of sCJD subtypes. The estimated vacuole size in DWI hyperintense cortex was in the range between 3 and 10 µm that is compatible with neuropathology measurements. In DWI hyperintense grey matter of sCJD patients the two bi-compartment models outperform the classic mono-exponential ADC model. Both new models show that T2 relaxation times significantly increase, fast and slow diffusivities reduce, and the fraction of the compartment with slow/restricted diffusion increases compared to unaffected grey matter of

  10. Electric fields, weighting fields, signals and charge diffusion in detectors including resistive materials

    CERN Document Server

    Riegler, Werner

    2016-11-07

    In this report we discuss static and time dependent electric fields in detector geometries with an arbitrary number of parallel layers of a given permittivity and weak conductivity. We derive the Green's functions i.e. the field of a point charge, as well as the weighting fields for readout pads and readout strips in these geometries. The effect of 'bulk' resistivity on electric fields and signals is investigated. The spreading of charge on thin resistive layers is also discussed in detail, and the conditions for allowing the effect to be described by the diffusion equation is discussed. We apply the results to derive fields and induced signals in Resistive Plate Chambers, Micromega detectors including resistive layers for charge spreading and discharge protection as well as detectors using resistive charge division readout like the MicroCAT detector. We also discuss in detail how resistive layers affect signal shapes and increase crosstalk between readout electrodes.

  11. Electric fields, weighting fields, signals and charge diffusion in detectors including resistive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riegler, W.

    2016-01-01

    In this report we discuss static and time dependent electric fields in detector geometries with an arbitrary number of parallel layers of a given permittivity and weak conductivity. We derive the Green's functions i.e. the field of a point charge, as well as the weighting fields for readout pads and readout strips in these geometries. The effect of 'bulk' resistivity on electric fields and signals is investigated. The spreading of charge on thin resistive layers is also discussed in detail, and the conditions for allowing the effect to be described by the diffusion equation is discussed. We apply the results to derive fields and induced signals in Resistive Plate Chambers, MICROMEGAS detectors including resistive layers for charge spreading and discharge protection as well as detectors using resistive charge division readout like the MicroCAT detector. We also discuss in detail how resistive layers affect signal shapes and increase crosstalk between readout electrodes.

  12. Scaling law of diffusivity generated by a noisy telegraph signal with fractal intermittency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paradisi, Paolo; Allegrini, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    In many complex systems the non-linear cooperative dynamics determine the emergence of self-organized, metastable, structures that are associated with a birth–death process of cooperation. This is found to be described by a renewal point process, i.e., a sequence of crucial birth–death events corresponding to transitions among states that are faster than the typical long-life time of the metastable states. Metastable states are highly correlated, but the occurrence of crucial events is typically associated with a fast memory drop, which is the reason for the renewal condition. Consequently, these complex systems display a power-law decay and, thus, a long-range or scale-free behavior, in both time correlations and distribution of inter-event times, i.e., fractal intermittency. The emergence of fractal intermittency is then a signature of complexity. However, the scaling features of complex systems are, in general, affected by the presence of added white or short-term noise. This has been found also for fractal intermittency. In this work, after a brief review on metastability and noise in complex systems, we discuss the emerging paradigm of Temporal Complexity. Then, we propose a model of noisy fractal intermittency, where noise is interpreted as a renewal Poisson process with event rate r_p. We show that the presence of Poisson noise causes the emergence of a normal diffusion scaling in the long-time range of diffusion generated by a telegraph signal driven by noisy fractal intermittency. We analytically derive the scaling law of the long-time normal diffusivity coefficient. We find the surprising result that this long-time normal diffusivity depends not only on the Poisson event rate, but also on the parameters of the complex component of the signal: the power exponent μ of the inter-event time distribution, denoted as complexity index, and the time scale T needed to reach the asymptotic power-law behavior marking the emergence of complexity. In particular

  13. Biexponential signal attenuation analysis of diffusion-weighted imaging of breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, Takayuki; Naito, Kumiko; Usui, Shuji; Akiyama, Mitoshi; Murakami, Shigeru; Arihiro, Koji; Akiyama, Yuji

    2010-01-01

    In vivo, the attenuation of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) signal at high b-values is sometimes nonlinear when plotted with semilogarithmic function and is fit well by a biexponential function. Previous reports have indicated that the fast and slow component fractions of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) can be derived by biexponential fitting and that these fractions correspond to the actual diffusion components in the extra- and intracellular space. In this study, we investigated the clinical utility of DWI for the breast by performing DWI using multiple b-factors on healthy volunteers and clinical subjects, analyzing the signal by fitting it with a biexponential equation, and comparing the fitting parameters of breast lesions. We investigated 8 healthy women as normal cases and 80 female patients with a total of 100 breast tumors (42 benign, 58 malignant tumors) as clinical cases. We performed DWI using 12 b-values for the healthy cases and 6 b-values for the clinical cases, up to a maximum b-value of 3500 s/mm 2 . Decay of DWI signal of normal mammary glands, most cysts, and some fibroadenomas showed a monoexponential relationship, and conversely, that of intraductal papilloma (IDP) and malignant tumors was well fitted by a biexponential function. Comparison of parameters derived from biexponential fitting demonstrated no significant difference between benign and malignant lesions. For malignant tumor subtype, the fast component fraction of noninvasive ductal carcinoma was statistically greater than that of invasive ductal carcinoma. Although the parameters from biexponential fitting may reflect the character of tumor cellularity, because pathological diagnosis was performed with an emphasis on cell configuration or shape rather than cellularity, it was difficult to distinguish malignant from benign tumors, including many IDPs, or to distinguish tissue types using DWI signal attenuation alone. (author)

  14. Analysis of luminosity distributions of strong lensing galaxies: subtraction of diffuse lensed signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biernaux, J.; Magain, P.; Hauret, C.

    2017-08-01

    Context. Strong gravitational lensing gives access to the total mass distribution of galaxies. It can unveil a great deal of information about the lenses' dark matter content when combined with the study of the lenses' light profile. However, gravitational lensing galaxies, by definition, appear surrounded by lensed signal, both point-like and diffuse, that is irrelevant to the lens flux. Therefore, the observer is most often restricted to studying the innermost portions of the galaxy, where classical fitting methods show some instabilities. Aims: We aim at subtracting that lensed signal and at characterising some lenses' light profile by computing their shape parameters (half-light radius, ellipticity, and position angle). Our objective is to evaluate the total integrated flux in an aperture the size of the Einstein ring in order to obtain a robust estimate of the quantity of ordinary (luminous) matter in each system. Methods: We are expanding the work we started in a previous paper that consisted in subtracting point-like lensed images and in independently measuring each shape parameter. We improve it by designing a subtraction of the diffuse lensed signal, based only on one simple hypothesis of symmetry. We apply it to the cases where it proves to be necessary. This extra step improves our study of the shape parameters and we refine it even more by upgrading our half-light radius measurement method. We also calculate the impact of our specific image processing on the error bars. Results: The diffuse lensed signal subtraction makes it possible to study a larger portion of relevant galactic flux, as the radius of the fitting region increases by on average 17%. We retrieve new half-light radii values that are on average 11% smaller than in our previous work, although the uncertainties overlap in most cases. This shows that not taking the diffuse lensed signal into account may lead to a significant overestimate of the half-light radius. We are also able to measure

  15. Promiscuous Diffusible Signal Factor Production and Responsiveness of the Xylella fastidiosa Rpf System

    OpenAIRE

    Ionescu, Michael; Yokota, Kenji; Antonova, Elena; Garcia, Angelica; Beaulieu, Ellen; Hayes, Terry; Iavarone, Anthony T.; Lindow, Steven E.

    2016-01-01

    © 2016 Ionescu et al. Cell density-dependent regulation of gene expression in Xylella fastidiosa that is crucial to its switching between plant hosts and insect vectors is dependent on RpfF and its production of 2-enoic acids known as diffusible signal factor (DSF). We show that X. fastidiosa produces a particularly large variety of similar, relatively long-chain-length 2-enoic acids that are active in modulating gene expression. Both X. fastidiosa itself and a Pantoea agglomerans surrogate h...

  16. Presence of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia exhibiting high genetic similarity to clinical isolates in final effluents of pig farm wastewater treatment plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Ji; Park, Jin-Hyeong; Seo, Kun-Ho

    2018-03-01

    Although the prevalence of community-acquired Stenotrophomonas maltophilia infections is sharply increasing, the sources and likely transmission routes of this bacterium are poorly understood. We studied the significance of the presence of S. maltophilia in final effluents and receiving rivers of pig farm wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). The loads and antibiotic resistance profiles of S. maltophilia in final effluents were assessed. Antibiotic resistance determinants and biofilm formation genes were detected by PCR, and genetic similarity to clinical isolates was investigated using multilocus sequence typing (MLST). S. maltophilia was recovered from final effluents at two of three farms and one corresponding receiving river. Tests of resistance to antibiotics recommended for S. maltophilia infection revealed that for each agent, at least one isolate was classified as resistant or intermediate, with the exception of minocycline. Furthermore, multidrug resistant S. maltophilia susceptible to antibiotics of only two categories was isolated and found to carry the sul2 gene, conferring trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole resistance. All isolates carried spgM, encoding a major factor in biofilm formation. MLST revealed that isolates of the same sequence type (ST; ST189) were present in both effluent and receiving river samples, and phylogenetic analysis showed that all of the STs identified in this study clustered with clinical isolates. Moreover, one isolate (ST192) recovered in this investigation demonstrated 99.61% sequence identity with a clinical isolate (ST98) associated with a fatal infection in South Korea. Thus, the pathogenicity of the isolates reported here is likely similar to that of those from clinical environments, and WWTPs may play a role as a source of S. maltophilia from which this bacterium spreads to human communities. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the first report of S. maltophilia in pig farm WWTPs. Our results indicate that

  17. Chronic pulmonary infection with Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and lung function in patients with cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalbøge, C S; Hansen, C R; Pressler, T

    2011-01-01

    Background The clinical consequences of chronic Stenotrophomonas maltophilia infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patient are still unclear. Method All patients treated in the Copenhagen CF centre (N=278) from 1 January 2008 to 31 December 2009 were included. Each patient chronically infected with S...

  18. Disseminated Soft Tissue Infection and Sepsis with Stenotrophomonas maltophilia in a Bone Marrow Transplant Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey H Lipton

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available A 32-year-old female presented with aplastic anemia and subsequently underwent a one-antigen mismatched bone marrow transplant from her brother. She failed to engraft and a second graft was attempted. Protracted neutropenia of three months’ duration despite the use of broad spectrum antibiotics occurred. Stenotrophomonas (Xanthomonas maltophilia metastatic cellulitis developed that did not respond to appropriate antibiotics.

  19. An overview of various typing methods for clinical epidemiology of the emerging pathogen Stenotrophomonas maltophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gherardi, Giovanni; Creti, Roberta; Pompilio, Arianna; Di Bonaventura, Giovanni

    2015-03-01

    Typing of bacterial isolates has been used for decades to study local outbreaks as well as in national and international surveillances for monitoring newly emerging resistant clones. Despite being recognized as a nosocomial pathogen, the precise modes of transmission of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia in health care settings are unknown. Due to the high genetic diversity observed among S. maltophilia clinical isolates, the typing results might be better interpreted if also environmental strains were included. This could help to identify preventative measures to be designed and implemented for decreasing the possibility of outbreaks and nosocomial infections. In this review, we attempt to provide an overview on the most common typing methods used for clinical epidemiology of S. maltophilia strains, such as PCR-based fingerprinting analyses, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis, and multilocus sequence type. Application of the proteomic-based mass spectrometry by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight is also described. Improvements of typing methods already in use have to be achieved to facilitate S. maltophilia infection control at any level. In the near future, when novel Web-based platforms for rapid data processing and analysis will be available, whole genome sequencing technologies will likely become a highly powerful tool for outbreak investigations and surveillance studies in routine clinical practices. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Appearances of diffuse excessive high signal intensity (DEHSI) on MR imaging following preterm birth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, Anthony R.; Smith, Michael F.; Rigby, Alan S.; Wallis, Lauren I.; Whitby, Elspeth H.

    2010-01-01

    Diffuse damage to the periventricular white matter has recently been suggested to be a cause of the cognitive deficits seen following preterm birth. It is unclear whether this form of injury can be visualised on MR imaging, but one group has described diffuse excessive high signal intensity (DEHSI) as a possible form of diffuse white matter injury. This finding is dependant on window imaging and the subjective assessment of the reviewer, but little data have been published on the degree of subjectivity on its appearance among raters. To assess the subjectivity of DEHSI on conventional and ultrafast T2-weighted MR imaging following preterm birth. An observational study of 40 preterm infants who had MR imaging of the brain around term-equivalent age, including conventional fast spin-echo (FSE) and ultrafast single-shot fast spin-echo (SSFSE) T2-weighted sequences in the axial plane. Images were anonymised and scored twice by four observers for the presence of DEHSI. Inter- and intra-observer agreement were calculated. Sixty-five percent of conventional and 100% of the ultrafast images were of diagnostic quality. DEHSI was noted in between 0% and 69.2% of conventional images and 27.5-90% of the ultrafast images. Inter- and intra-observer agreement ranged from none to moderate. The visual appearances of DEHSI on conventional FSE and ultrafast SSFSE T2-W images are highly subjective, limiting its clinical application. (orig.)

  1. Appearances of diffuse excessive high signal intensity (DEHSI) on MR imaging following preterm birth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Anthony R. [Sheffield Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Neonatology, Jessop Wing, Sheffield (United Kingdom); University of Sheffield, Academic Unit of Radiology, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield (United Kingdom); University of Sheffield, Department of Academic Radiology, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Smith, Michael F. [Sheffield Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Neonatology, Jessop Wing, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Rigby, Alan S. [University of Hull, Postgraduate Medical Centre, Castle Hill Hospital, East Yorkshire (United Kingdom); Wallis, Lauren I.; Whitby, Elspeth H. [University of Sheffield, Academic Unit of Radiology, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    2010-08-15

    Diffuse damage to the periventricular white matter has recently been suggested to be a cause of the cognitive deficits seen following preterm birth. It is unclear whether this form of injury can be visualised on MR imaging, but one group has described diffuse excessive high signal intensity (DEHSI) as a possible form of diffuse white matter injury. This finding is dependant on window imaging and the subjective assessment of the reviewer, but little data have been published on the degree of subjectivity on its appearance among raters. To assess the subjectivity of DEHSI on conventional and ultrafast T2-weighted MR imaging following preterm birth. An observational study of 40 preterm infants who had MR imaging of the brain around term-equivalent age, including conventional fast spin-echo (FSE) and ultrafast single-shot fast spin-echo (SSFSE) T2-weighted sequences in the axial plane. Images were anonymised and scored twice by four observers for the presence of DEHSI. Inter- and intra-observer agreement were calculated. Sixty-five percent of conventional and 100% of the ultrafast images were of diagnostic quality. DEHSI was noted in between 0% and 69.2% of conventional images and 27.5-90% of the ultrafast images. Inter- and intra-observer agreement ranged from none to moderate. The visual appearances of DEHSI on conventional FSE and ultrafast SSFSE T2-W images are highly subjective, limiting its clinical application. (orig.)

  2. Diffuse phalangeal signal abnormality on magnetic resonance imaging: phalangeal microgeodic disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radhakrishnan, Rupa; Emery, Kathleen H.; Merrow, Arnold C. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Phalangeal microgeodic disease is a rare and benign self-limited condition involving the phalanges, often in the setting of cold exposure, with characteristic MR imaging abnormalities. Radiographic case descriptions are predominantly from Asia and Europe, with only seven cases using MR to characterize phalangeal microgeodic disease. In this study we describe the MR imaging appearance of unusual and striking phalangeal signal abnormality compatible with phalangeal microgeodic disease at our institution in North America. We retrospectively reviewed cases presenting at our institution with unusual or unexplained phalangeal signal abnormalities between 2001 and 2014. We reviewed the MR imaging appearances in conjunction with radiographs and any other available imaging investigations. Of 189 examinations reviewed during the study period, 8 imaging studies in 6 patients met the study inclusion criteria. Signal abnormality was present in 57 of 112 phalanges (51%), frequently involving the distal phalanges (70%, 28 of 40), followed by the middle phalanges (56%, 18 of 32) and the proximal phalanges (28%, 11 of 40). The pattern of involvement was most commonly diaphysis (38%), followed by metaphysis (32%) and epiphysis (30%). The extent of MR signal abnormality was greater than that suspected based on clinical presentation or on radiographs. The presence of unexplained diffuse characteristic marrow involvement of multiple painful phalanges on MR images, often in the setting of cold exposure, should raise the possibility of phalangeal microgeodic disease. Consideration of this diagnosis based on MR findings would lead to a more conservative management and avoid unnecessary invasive diagnostic procedures. (orig.)

  3. Evaluation of scale invariance in physiological signals by means of balanced estimation of diffusion entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenqing; Qiu, Lu; Xiao, Qin; Yang, Huijie; Zhang, Qingjun; Wang, Jianyong

    2012-11-01

    By means of the concept of the balanced estimation of diffusion entropy, we evaluate the reliable scale invariance embedded in different sleep stages and stride records. Segments corresponding to waking, light sleep, rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, and deep sleep stages are extracted from long-term electroencephalogram signals. For each stage the scaling exponent value is distributed over a considerably wide range, which tell us that the scaling behavior is subject and sleep cycle dependent. The average of the scaling exponent values for waking segments is almost the same as that for REM segments (˜0.8). The waking and REM stages have a significantly higher value of the average scaling exponent than that for light sleep stages (˜0.7). For the stride series, the original diffusion entropy (DE) and the balanced estimation of diffusion entropy (BEDE) give almost the same results for detrended series. The evolutions of local scaling invariance show that the physiological states change abruptly, although in the experiments great efforts have been made to keep conditions unchanged. The global behavior of a single physiological signal may lose rich information on physiological states. Methodologically, the BEDE can evaluate with considerable precision the scale invariance in very short time series (˜102), while the original DE method sometimes may underestimate scale-invariance exponents or even fail in detecting scale-invariant behavior. The BEDE method is sensitive to trends in time series. The existence of trends may lead to an unreasonably high value of the scaling exponent and consequent mistaken conclusions.

  4. Intercellular signaling via cyclic GMP diffusion through gap junctions restarts meiosis in mouse ovarian follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuhaibar, Leia C; Egbert, Jeremy R; Norris, Rachael P; Lampe, Paul D; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O; Thunemann, Martin; Wen, Lai; Feil, Robert; Jaffe, Laurinda A

    2015-04-28

    Meiosis in mammalian oocytes is paused until luteinizing hormone (LH) activates receptors in the mural granulosa cells of the ovarian follicle. Prior work has established the central role of cyclic GMP (cGMP) from the granulosa cells in maintaining meiotic arrest, but it is not clear how binding of LH to receptors that are located up to 10 cell layers away from the oocyte lowers oocyte cGMP and restarts meiosis. Here, by visualizing intercellular trafficking of cGMP in real-time in live follicles from mice expressing a FRET sensor, we show that diffusion of cGMP through gap junctions is responsible not only for maintaining meiotic arrest, but also for rapid transmission of the signal that reinitiates meiosis from the follicle surface to the oocyte. Before LH exposure, the cGMP concentration throughout the follicle is at a uniformly high level of ∼2-4 μM. Then, within 1 min of LH application, cGMP begins to decrease in the peripheral granulosa cells. As a consequence, cGMP from the oocyte diffuses into the sink provided by the large granulosa cell volume, such that by 20 min the cGMP concentration in the follicle is uniformly low, ∼100 nM. The decrease in cGMP in the oocyte relieves the inhibition of the meiotic cell cycle. This direct demonstration that a physiological signal initiated by a stimulus in one region of an intact tissue can travel across many layers of cells via cyclic nucleotide diffusion through gap junctions could provide a general mechanism for diverse cellular processes.

  5. MR diffusion weighted imaging with background signal suppression in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ming; Zhang Bing; Zhou Zhengyang; Yu Haiping; Yuan Lei; Zhu Bin

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To explore the feasibility of echo planar imaging with short time inversion recovery (STIR-EPI) diffusion weighted imaging with background signal (DWIBS) suppression in breast cancer. Methods: The diffusion weighted imaging (DWI)with background suppression (b=800 mm 2 /s) was performed in 26 patients with breast cancer. Apparent diffusion coefficient(ADC) of all lesions were measured and compared. 3D maximum intensity projection (3D-MIP)and reverse black and white technique were used to show the lesions. DWI and DWIBS were performed and compared for the detection of breast cancer. Randomized blocks analysis of variance was used for the ADC values in different breast tissues, the ADC values in breast cancer and benign lesion were compared using t test. The paired chi square test was used for the detection rate of breast cancer in two different imaging methods. Results: Most of the breast cancers were hyperintense on DWI (b=800 mm 2 /s). The ADC value of cancer tissue was (0.93±0.25) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s, tumor necrosis was (2.06±0.17) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s, normal breast tissue was (1.92±0.23) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s and metastatic lymph node was (1.10±0.14) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s and the differences were statistically significant between two structures (P 2 =8.307, P 2 = 12.235, P -3 mm 2 /s and benign lesion (2.15±0.53) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s had significant statistical differences (t=8.626,P<0.05). Conclusion: Diffusion weighted MRI with background suppression can detect more lesions than DWI and can be potentially applied for the detection of the breast cancer combining the ADC value. (authors)

  6. Isolamento e caracterização de Pseudomonas maltophilia (Hugh & Ryschenkow, 1960 de material clínico humano, na cidade do Rio de Janeiro Isolating and characterization of Pseudomonas maltophilia (Hugh & Ryschenkow, 1960 from human clinical specimens, in Rio de Janeiro, Guanabara, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altair A. Zebral

    1973-01-01

    Full Text Available Os autores estudaram as propriedades morfo-bioquímicas e a sensibilidade às substâncias antimicrobianas, de uma nova e rara espécie de Pseudomonas, a Pseudomonas maltophilia (Hugh & Ryschenkow, 1960, isolada de secração vaginal. Como características marcantes, dentre mais de 65 testadas, as amostras estudadas mostraram ser: oxidase negativa e lisina descarboxilase positiva; produziram desoxiribonuclease e um pigmento escuro que se difunde no meio; atacaram oxidativamente a maltose tanto em meio complexo nitrogenado como em meio de Hugh & Leifson e hidrolisaram a esculina. As amostras foram sensíveis ao cloranfenicol, gentamicina, kanamicina, colistin e gabromicina.The authors have studied the morpho-biochemical properties and the sensibility at antimicrobial drugs, of specie of Pseudomonas, the Pseudomonas maltophilia, (Hugh & Ryschenkow, 1960, isolated from vaginal secretion. Since important characteristics among more of sixty-five tested, the strains studied show to be: oxidase negative and lysine decarboxylase positive; to present deoxyrononuclease activity and produced a diffusible brown pigment: acid was produced by oxidation of maltose as much in nitrogenous complex medium as in Hugh & Leifson medium and they hydrolise the esculin. the strains was sensible, for the colistin chloranfenicol, gabromycin, gentamycin and nalidix acid.

  7. The inactivation of RNase G reduces the Stenotrophomonas maltophilia susceptibility to quinolones by triggering the heat shock response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra eBernardini

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Quinolone resistance is usually due to mutations in the genes encoding bacterial topoisomerases. However different reports have shown that neither clinical quinolone resistant isolates nor in vitro obtained S. maltophilia mutants present mutations in such genes. The mechanisms so far described consist on efflux pumps' overexpression. Our objective is to get information on novel mechanisms of S. maltophilia quinolone resistance. For this purpose, a transposon-insertion mutant library was obtained in S. maltophilia D457.. One mutant presenting reduced susceptibility to nalidixic acid was selected. Inverse PCR showed that the inactivated gene encodes RNase G. Complementation of the mutant with wild-type RNase G allele restored the susceptibility to quinolones. Transcriptomic and real-time RT-PCR analyses showed that several genes encoding heat-shock response proteins were expressed at higher levels in the RNase defective mutant than in the wild-type strain. In agreement with this situation, heat-shock reduces the S. maltophilia susceptibility to quinolone. We can then conclude that the inactivation of the RNase G reduces the susceptibility of S. maltophilia to quinolones, most likely by regulating the expression of heat-shock response genes. Heat-shock induces a transient phenotype of quinolone resistance in S. maltophilia.

  8. Evaluation of a Stenotrophomonas maltophilia bacteremia cluster in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipients using whole genome sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Kampmeier

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stenotrophomonas maltophilia ubiquitously occurs in the hospital environment. This opportunistic pathogen can cause severe infections in immunocompromised hosts such as hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT recipients. Between February and July 2016, a cluster of four patients on the HSCT unit suffered from S. maltophilia bloodstream infections (BSI. Methods For epidemiological investigation we retrospectively identified the colonization status of patients admitted to the ward during this time period and performed environmental monitoring of shower heads, shower outlets, washbasins and toilets in patient rooms. We tested antibiotic susceptibility of detected S. maltophilia isolates. Environmental and blood culture samples were subjected to whole genome sequence (WGS-based typing. Results Of four patients with S. maltophlilia BSI, three were found to be colonized previously. In addition, retrospective investigations revealed two patients being colonized in anal swab samples but not infected. Environmental monitoring revealed one shower outlet contaminated with S. maltophilia. Antibiotic susceptibility testing of seven S. maltophlia strains resulted in two trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole resistant and five susceptible isolates, however, not excluding an outbreak scenario. WGS-based typing did not result in any close genotypic relationship among the patients’ isolates. In contrast, one environmental isolate from a shower outlet was closely related to a single patient’s isolate. Conclusion WGS-based typing successfully refuted an outbreak of S. maltophilia on a HSCT ward but uncoverd that sanitary installations can be an actual source of S. maltophilia transmissions.

  9. The preliminary study of MR diffusion weighted imaging with background body signal suppression on pulmonary diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Huawei; Cheng Jiejun; Xu Jianrong; Lu Qing; Ge Xin; Li Lei

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate maximum intensity projection (MIP) images and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of MR diffusion weighted imaging with background body signal suppression (DWIBS) on pulmonary diseases. Methods: Sixty-one patients with pulmonary diseases underwent DWlBS. The findings in three dimensional(3D) MIP image were observed and the ADC values of diseased region were measured. The diagnostic value of DWIBS on pulmonary diseases was evaluated. Results: Lung cancer and inflammatory disease were all demonstrated as dense intensity area on DWIBS. The mean ADC value of central lung cancer was (1.05±0.23) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s. The mean ADC value of peripheral lung cancer was (1.10 ± 0.17) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s. The mean ADC value of the inflammatory disease was (1.69 ± 0.29) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s. The mean ADC value had significant difference between peripheral lung cancer and the inflammatory disease (P<0.05). The MR sensitivity, specificity and accuracy in diagnosing the pulmonary diseases with DWIBS (86.84%, 82.60%, 85.24%, respectively) was higher than conventional MRI(78.94%, 78.26%, and 78.68%, respectively). Conclusion: DWIBS can demonstrate clearly the lesion's shape with 3D display. The quantitative measurement of ADC values is feasible. DWIBS may be a potential diagnostic method for differentiation on pulmonary diseases. (authors)

  10. Biopesticide activity of sugarcane associated rhizobacteria: Ochrobactrum intermedium strain NH-5 and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia strain NH-300 against red rot under field conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Nadeem HASSAN

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Colletotrichum falcatum is the major fungal pathogen causing sugarcane red rot. Four antagonistic bacterial strains exhibiting biocontrol activity against this pathogen in greenhouse conditions were characterized for production of different antifungal metabolites and biocontrol determinants to elucidate the mechanism of action involved in their antagonistic activity. The strains were also evaluated under field conditions to assess their biocontrol potential. All the strains produced hydrogen cyanide (HCN, and volatile and diffusible antibiotics. In addition, the Ochrobactrum intermedium strain NH-5 produced siderophores and the broad spectrum antibiotic 2, 4-diacetylphloroglucinol (2,4-DAPG; Pseudomonas sp. NH-203 produced siderophores, and Pseudomonas sp. NH-276 produced protease. Two strains, Ochrobactrum intermedium NH-5 and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia NH-300, exhibited good biocontrol activity, suppressing red rot by 44–52% on two sugarcane varieties, SPF-234 and Co-1148, in field experiments. The strains gave consistent results in three consecutive years and showed potential to be used as biopesticides.

  11. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia in a university hospital of traditional Chinese medicine: molecular epidemiology and antimicrobial resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, S; Yang, L; Liu, H; Gao, F

    2017-07-01

    Stenotrophomona maltophilia has emerged as an important opportunistic pathogen that is highly antibiotic resistant. Analysis of antibiotic susceptibilities, drug-resistant gene profiles and molecular typing of S. maltophilia was undertaken in a university hospital of traditional Chinese medicine in East China. Resistance to sulphamethoxazole (SXT) was found to be an indicator of multi-drug resistance. SXT resistance was mediated by sul and dfrA genes in integrons, especially class 1. Some evidence of clonal dissemination was found, indicating the occurrence of cross-transmission of antibiotic-resistant strains within the hospital. This underscores the need for effective control and prevention measures in hospitals. Copyright © 2017 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. An outbreak of trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole-resistant Stenotrophomonas maltophilia meningitis associated with neuroendoscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Ching-Hsun Wang; Shih-Wei Hsu; Tung-Han Tsai; Ning-Chi Wang

    2014-01-01

    Stereotactic aspiration by neuroendoscopy for treatment of deep-seated intracranial hematomas is widely accepted because this procedure is minimally invasive and thereby reduces the probability of iatrogenic brain damage. Herein, we describe an outbreak of trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SXT)-resistant Stenotrophomonas maltophilia meningitis, possibly from a contaminated neuroendoscopy, and review the previous use of antimicrobial therapies for this condition without TMP/SXT. This is the f...

  13. The isolation and characterization of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia T4-like bacteriophage DLP6.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle L Peters

    Full Text Available Increasing isolation of the extremely antibiotic resistant bacterium Stenotrophomonas maltophilia has caused alarm worldwide due to the limited treatment options available. A potential treatment option for fighting this bacterium is 'phage therapy', the clinical application of bacteriophages to selectively kill bacteria. Bacteriophage DLP6 (vB_SmoM-DLP6 was isolated from a soil sample using clinical isolate S. maltophilia strain D1571 as host. Host range analysis of phage DLP6 against 27 clinical S. maltophilia isolates shows successful infection and lysis in 13 of the 27 isolates tested. Transmission electron microscopy of DLP6 indicates that it is a member of the Myoviridae family. Complete genome sequencing and analysis of DLP6 reveals its richly recombined evolutionary history, featuring a core of both T4-like and cyanophage genes, which suggests that it is a member of the T4-superfamily. Unlike other T4-superfamily phages however, DLP6 features a transposase and ends with 229 bp direct terminal repeats. The isolation of this bacteriophage is an exciting discovery due to the divergent nature of DLP6 in relation to the T4-superfamily of phages.

  14. Transient global amnesia: increased signal intensity in the right hippocampus on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsui, M.; Sakamoto, S.; Ishii, K. [Division of Neuroimaging Research, Hyogo Institute for Aging Brain and Cognitive Disorders (Japan); Imamura, T.; Kazui, H.; Mori, E. [Division of Clinical Neurosciences, Hyogo Institute for Aging Brain and Cognitive Disorders, Hyogo (Japan)

    2002-03-01

    We report on a patient with pure transient global amnesia (TGA) whose magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a small region of increased signal intensity in the right hippocampus on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). DWI was sensitive and useful for evaluating the early stage of TGA and might help to explain the pathophysiology of TGA. (orig.)

  15. Transient global amnesia: increased signal intensity in the right hippocampus on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, M.; Sakamoto, S.; Ishii, K.; Imamura, T.; Kazui, H.; Mori, E.

    2002-01-01

    We report on a patient with pure transient global amnesia (TGA) whose magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a small region of increased signal intensity in the right hippocampus on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). DWI was sensitive and useful for evaluating the early stage of TGA and might help to explain the pathophysiology of TGA. (orig.)

  16. High signal in bone marrow at diffusion-weighted imaging with body background suppression (DWIBS) in healthy children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ording Mueller, Lil-Sofie; Avenarius, Derk [University Hospital North Norway, Department of Radiology, Tromsoe (Norway); Olsen, Oeystein E. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-15

    In our experience, diffusion-weighted imaging with body background suppression (DWIBS) is hard to interpret in children who commonly have foci of restricted diffusion in their skeletons unrelated to pathology, sometimes in an asymmetrical pattern. This raises serious concern about the accuracy of DWIBS in cancer staging in children. To describe the signal distribution at DWIBS in the normal developing lumbar spine and pelvic skeleton. Forty-two healthy children underwent an MR DWIBS sequence of the abdomen and pelvis. An axial short-tau inversion-recovery (STIR) echo-planar imaging (EPI) pulse sequence was used. Two radiologists did a primary review of the images and based on these preliminary observations, separate scoring systems for the lumbar spine, pelvis and proximal femoral epiphyses/femoral heads were devised. Visual evaluation of the images was then performed by the two radiologists in consensus. The scoring was repeated separately 2 months later by a third radiologist. Restricted diffusion was defined as areas of high signal compared to the background. Coronal maximum intensity projection (MIP) reformats were used to assess the vertebral bodies. For the pelvis, the extension of high signal for each bone was given a score of 0 to 4. Cohen's Kappa interobserver agreement coefficients of signal distribution and asymmetry were calculated. All children had areas of high signal, both within the lumbar vertebral bodies and within the pelvic skeleton. Three patterns of signal distribution were seen in the lumbar spine, but no specific pattern was seen in the pelvis. There was a tendency toward a reduction of relative area of high signal within each bone with age, but also a widespread interindividual variation. Restricted diffusion is a normal finding in the pelvic skeleton and lumbar spine in children with an asymmetrical distribution seen in 48% of normal children in this study. DWIBS should be used with caution for cancer staging in children as this could

  17. High signal in bone marrow at diffusion-weighted imaging with body background suppression (DWIBS) in healthy children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ording Mueller, Lil-Sofie; Avenarius, Derk; Olsen, Oeystein E.

    2011-01-01

    In our experience, diffusion-weighted imaging with body background suppression (DWIBS) is hard to interpret in children who commonly have foci of restricted diffusion in their skeletons unrelated to pathology, sometimes in an asymmetrical pattern. This raises serious concern about the accuracy of DWIBS in cancer staging in children. To describe the signal distribution at DWIBS in the normal developing lumbar spine and pelvic skeleton. Forty-two healthy children underwent an MR DWIBS sequence of the abdomen and pelvis. An axial short-tau inversion-recovery (STIR) echo-planar imaging (EPI) pulse sequence was used. Two radiologists did a primary review of the images and based on these preliminary observations, separate scoring systems for the lumbar spine, pelvis and proximal femoral epiphyses/femoral heads were devised. Visual evaluation of the images was then performed by the two radiologists in consensus. The scoring was repeated separately 2 months later by a third radiologist. Restricted diffusion was defined as areas of high signal compared to the background. Coronal maximum intensity projection (MIP) reformats were used to assess the vertebral bodies. For the pelvis, the extension of high signal for each bone was given a score of 0 to 4. Cohen's Kappa interobserver agreement coefficients of signal distribution and asymmetry were calculated. All children had areas of high signal, both within the lumbar vertebral bodies and within the pelvic skeleton. Three patterns of signal distribution were seen in the lumbar spine, but no specific pattern was seen in the pelvis. There was a tendency toward a reduction of relative area of high signal within each bone with age, but also a widespread interindividual variation. Restricted diffusion is a normal finding in the pelvic skeleton and lumbar spine in children with an asymmetrical distribution seen in 48% of normal children in this study. DWIBS should be used with caution for cancer staging in children as this could lead

  18. Emergence of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia nosocomial isolates in a Saudi children’s hospital. Risk factors and clinical characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jobran M. Alqahtani

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To describe the clinical characteristics of pediatric patients colonized or infected by Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (S. maltophilia at a Saudi children’s hospital, to identify risk factors associated with infection, and to investigate the antimicrobial resistance patterns of this emerging pathogen. Methods: In this cross-sectional observational study, 64 non-duplicating S. maltophilia strains were isolated in Najran Maternity and Children’s Hospital, Najran, Saudi Arabia between January 2015 to February 2016. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed using the reference broth microdilution method. Results: In this study, 48 (75% isolates were identified in true infections and 16 (25% isolates were considered colonization. The main types of S. maltophilia infection were pneumonia in 22 (45.8% patients and bloodstream infection in 14 (29.2% patients. The significant risk factors included exposure to invasive procedure (p=0.02, and presence of acute leukemia as an underlying disease (p=0.02. The most active antimicrobials were trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (100% sensitivity and tigecycline (93.7% sensitivity. Conclusions: Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is an emerging nosocomial pathogen among pediatric patients. Accurate identification and susceptibility testing of this emerging pathogen are crucial for the management of infected patients and prevention of spread of this nosocomial pathogen.

  19. Promiscuous Diffusible Signal Factor Production and Responsiveness of the Xylella fastidiosa Rpf System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionescu, Michael; Yokota, Kenji; Antonova, Elena; Garcia, Angelica; Beaulieu, Ellen; Hayes, Terry; Iavarone, Anthony T; Lindow, Steven E

    2016-07-19

    Cell density-dependent regulation of gene expression in Xylella fastidiosa that is crucial to its switching between plant hosts and insect vectors is dependent on RpfF and its production of 2-enoic acids known as diffusible signal factor (DSF). We show that X. fastidiosa produces a particularly large variety of similar, relatively long-chain-length 2-enoic acids that are active in modulating gene expression. Both X. fastidiosa itself and a Pantoea agglomerans surrogate host harboring X. fastidiosa RpfF (XfRpfF) is capable of producing a variety of both saturated and unsaturated free fatty acids. However, only 2-cis unsaturated acids were found to be biologically active in X. fastidiosa X. fastidiosa produces, and is particularly responsive to, a novel DSF species, 2-cis-hexadecanoic acid that we term XfDSF2. It is also responsive to other, even longer 2-enoic acids to which other taxa such as Xanthomonas campestris are unresponsive. The 2-enoic acids that are produced by X. fastidiosa are strongly affected by the cellular growth environment, with XfDSF2 not detected in culture media in which 2-tetradecenoic acid (XfDSF1) had previously been found. X. fastidiosa is responsive to much lower concentrations of XfDSF2 than XfDSF1. Apparently competitive interactions can occur between various saturated and unsaturated fatty acids that block the function of those agonistic 2-enoic fatty acids. By altering the particular 2-enoic acids produced and the relative balance of free enoic and saturated fatty acids, X. fastidiosa might modulate the extent of DSF-mediated quorum sensing. X. fastidiosa, having a complicated lifestyle in which it moves and multiplies within plants but also must be vectored by insects, utilizes DSF-based quorum sensing to partition the expression of traits needed for these two processes within different cells in this population based on local cellular density. The finding that it can produce a variety of DSF species in a strongly

  20. Siderophores of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia: detection and determination of their chemical nature Sideróforos de Stenotrophomonas maltophilia: detección y determinación de su naturaleza química

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. García

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is an emerging nosocomial pathogen. Despite the broad spectrum of syndromes associated with S. maltophilia infections, little is known about its virulence factors, including siderophore production. The aims of this work were to detect S. maltophilia siderophores and to determine their chemical nature. We studied 31 S. maltophilia isolates from device-associated infections, recovered over the period 2006-2011 at Hospital de Clínicas José de San Martin, Buenos Aires, Argentina, and the strain K279a, whose genome has been fully sequenced. The production of siderophores was screened by the chrome azurol S (CAS agar assay, previously modified to detect siderophores in this species. When grown on modified CAS agar plates, all the clinical isolates and K279a were CAS-positive for siderophore production. In order to determine the chemical nature of siderophores, the Csáky (hydroxamate-type and Arnow (catechol-type assays were used. All S. maltophilia isolates produced catechol-type siderophores, but hydroxamate-type siderophores were not detected.Stenotrophomonas maltophilia es un patógeno nosocomial emergente. A pesar de la variedad de infecciones que produce, poco se conoce acerca de sus factores de virulencia, incluida la producción de sideróforos. Nuestros objetivos fueron detectar sideróforos de S. maltophilia y determinar su naturaleza química. Se estudiaron 31 aislamientos provenientes de infecciones asociadas al uso de dispositivos médicos y la cepa K279a, cuyo genoma ha sido completamente secuenciado. Los aislamientos provenientes de infecciones se obtuvieron de pacientes asistidos en el Hospital de Clínicas José de San Martín (Buenos Aires, Argentina en el período 2006- 2011. Como método de tamizaje se empleó la técnica chrome azurol S (CAS en placa, luego de implementar una modificación para detectar sideróforos en esta especie. Dicha modificación permitió detectar la producción de sider

  1. Promiscuous Diffusible Signal Factor Production and Responsiveness of the Xylella fastidiosa Rpf System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Ionescu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Cell density-dependent regulation of gene expression in Xylella fastidiosa that is crucial to its switching between plant hosts and insect vectors is dependent on RpfF and its production of 2-enoic acids known as diffusible signal factor (DSF. We show that X. fastidiosa produces a particularly large variety of similar, relatively long-chain-length 2-enoic acids that are active in modulating gene expression. Both X. fastidiosa itself and a Pantoea agglomerans surrogate host harboring X. fastidiosa RpfF (XfRpfF is capable of producing a variety of both saturated and unsaturated free fatty acids. However, only 2-cis unsaturated acids were found to be biologically active in X. fastidiosa. X. fastidiosa produces, and is particularly responsive to, a novel DSF species, 2-cis-hexadecanoic acid that we term XfDSF2. It is also responsive to other, even longer 2-enoic acids to which other taxa such as Xanthomonas campestris are unresponsive. The 2-enoic acids that are produced by X. fastidiosa are strongly affected by the cellular growth environment, with XfDSF2 not detected in culture media in which 2-tetradecenoic acid (XfDSF1 had previously been found. X. fastidiosa is responsive to much lower concentrations of XfDSF2 than XfDSF1. Apparently competitive interactions can occur between various saturated and unsaturated fatty acids that block the function of those agonistic 2-enoic fatty acids. By altering the particular 2-enoic acids produced and the relative balance of free enoic and saturated fatty acids, X. fastidiosa might modulate the extent of DSF-mediated quorum sensing.

  2. Expression and Functions of CreD, an Inner Membrane Protein in Stenotrophomonas maltophilia

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Hsin-Hui; Lin, Yi-Tsung; Chen, Wei-Ching; Huang, Yi-Wei; Chen, Shiang-Jiuun; Yang, Tsuey-Ching

    2015-01-01

    CreBC is a highly conserved two-component regulatory system (TCS) in several gram-negative bacteria, including Escherichia coli, Aeromonas spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. CreD is a conserved gene that encodes a predicted inner-membrane protein and is located near the creBC loci. Activation of CreBC increases creD expression; therefore, creD expression is generally used as a measure of CreBC activation in E. coli, Aeromonas spp., and P. aeruginosa systems. In th...

  3. Experimental investigation of concentration and stable isotopes signals during organic contaminants back diffusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Biao; Nika, Chrysanthi-Elisabeth; Rolle, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    -dichloroethene (cis-DCE) as model contaminant and we investigated its back diffusion from an impermeable source into a permeable saturated layer, in which advection-dominated flow conditions were established. We used concentration and stable chlorine isotope measurements to investigate the plumes originated by cis...... and stable isotope gradients in the flow-through setup. In particular, steep concentration and stable isotope gradients were observed at the outlet. Lateral isotope gradients corresponding to chlorine isotope fractionation up to 20‰ were induced by cis-DCE back diffusion and subsequent advection......-dominated transport in all flow-through experiments. A numerical modeling approach, tracking individually all chlorine isotopologues, based on the accurate parameterization of local dispersion, as well as on the values of aqueous diffusion coefficients and diffusion-induced isotope fractionation from a previous study...

  4. Effects of signal modulation and coloured cross-correlation of coloured noises on the diffusion of a harmonic oscillator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Li; Zhang Liang-Ying; Cao Li

    2009-01-01

    The diffusion in a harmonic oscillator driven by coloured noises ζ(t) and η(t) with coloured cross-correlation in which one of the noises is modulated by a biased periodic signal is investigated. The exact expression of diffusion coefficient d as a function of noise parameter, signal parameter, and oscillator frequency is derived. The findings in this paper are as follows. 1) The curves of d versus noise intensity D and d versus noises cross-correlation time τ_3 exist as two different phases. The transition between the two phases arises from the change of the cross-correlation coefficient λ of the two Orustein-Uhlenbeck (O-U) noises. 2) Changing the value of τ3, the curves of d versus Q, the intensity of colored noise that is modulated by the signal, can transform from a phase having a minimum to a monotonic phase. 3)Changing the value of signal amplitude A, d versus Q curves can transform from a phase having a minimum to a monotonic phase. The above-mentioned results demonstrate that a like noise-induced transition appears in the model.

  5. Effects of signal modulation and coloured cross-correlation of coloured noises on the diffusion of a harmonic oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Liu; Li, Cao; Liang-Ying, Zhang

    2009-01-01

    The diffusion in a harmonic oscillator driven by coloured noises ζ(t) and η(t) with coloured cross-correlation in which one of the noises is modulated by a biased periodic signal is investigated. The exact expression of diffusion coefficient d as a function of noise parameter, signal parameter, and oscillator frequency is derived. The findings in this paper are as follows. 1) The curves of d versus noise intensity D and d versus noises cross-correlation time τ 3 exist as two different phases. The transition between the two phases arises from the change of the cross-correlation coefficient λ of the two Ornstein–Uhlenbeck (O-U) noises. 2) Changing the value of τ 3 , the curves of d versus Q, the intensity of colored noise that is modulated by the signal, can transform from a phase having a minimum to a monotonic phase. 3) Changing the value of signal amplitude A, d versus Q curves can transform from a phase having a minimum to a monotonic phase. The above-mentioned results demonstrate that a like noise-induced transition appears in the model. (general)

  6. Reduction of Hexavalent Chromium and Detection of Chromate Reductase (ChrR in Stenotrophomonas maltophilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Baldiris

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available An Gram negative strain of S. maltophilia, indigenous to environments contaminated by Cr(VI and identified by biochemical methods and 16S rRNA gene analysis, reduced chromate by 100%, 98–99% and 92% at concentrations in the 10–70, 80–300, and 500 mg/L range, respectively at pH 7 and temperature 37 °C. Increasing concentrations of Cr(VI in the medium lowered the growth rate but could not be directly correlated with the amount of Cr(VI reduced. The strain also exhibited multiple resistance to antibiotics and tolerance and resistance to various heavy metals (Ni, Zn and Cu, with the exception of Hg. Hexavalent chromium reduction was mainly associated with the soluble fraction of the cell evaluated with crude cell-free extracts. A protein of molecular weight around 25 kDa was detected on SDS-PAGE gel depending on the concentration of hexavalent chromium in the medium (0, 100 and 500 mg/L. In silico analysis in this contribution, revealed the presence of the chromate reductase gene ChrR in S. maltophilia, evidenced through a fragment of around 468 bp obtained experimentally. High Cr(VI concentration resistance and high Cr(VI reducing ability of the strain make it a suitable candidate for bioremediation.

  7. Evolution of Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging Signal Abnormality in Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease, With Histopathological Correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenmenger, Laura; Porter, Marie-Claire; Carswell, Christopher J; Thompson, Andrew; Mead, Simon; Rudge, Peter; Collinge, John; Brandner, Sebastian; Jäger, Hans R; Hyare, Harpreet

    2016-01-01

    Prion diseases represent the archetype of brain diseases caused by protein misfolding, with the most common subtype being sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD), a rapidly progressive dementia. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) has emerged as the most sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequence for the diagnosis of sCJD, but few studies have assessed the evolution of MRI signal as the disease progresses. To assess the natural history of the MRI signal abnormalities on DWI in sCJD to improve our understanding of the pathogenesis and to investigate the potential of DWI as a biomarker of disease progression, with histopathological correlation. Gray matter involvement on DWI was assessed among 37 patients with sCJD in 26 cortical and 5 subcortical subdivisions per hemisphere using a semiquantitative scoring system of 0 to 2 at baseline and follow-up. A total brain score was calculated as the summed scores in the individual regions. In 7 patients, serial mean diffusivity measurements were obtained. Age at baseline MRI, disease duration, atrophy, codon 129 methionine valine polymorphism, Medical Research Council Rating Scale score, and histopathological findings were documented. The study setting was the National Prion Clinic, London, England. All participants had a probable or definite diagnosis of sCJD and had at least 2 MRI studies performed during the course of their illness. The study dates were October 1, 2008 to April 1, 2012. The dates of our analysis were January 19 to April 20, 2012. Correlation of regional and total brain scores with disease duration. Among the 37 patients with sCJD in this study there was a significant increase in the number of regions demonstrating signal abnormality during the study period, with 59 of 62 regions showing increased signal intensity (SI) at follow-up, most substantially in the caudate and putamen (P disease duration (r = 0.47, P = .003 at baseline and r = 0.35, P = .03 at follow-up), and the left

  8. Comparative Analysis of Signal Intensity and Apparent Diffusion Coefficient at Varying b-values in the Brain : Diffusion Weighted-Echo Planar Image (T2 and FLAIR) Sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Jong Kap; Im, Jung Yeol

    2009-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) has been demonstrated to be a practical method for the diagnosis of various brain diseases such as acute infarction, brain tumor, and white matter disease. In this study, we used two techniques to examine the average signal intensity (SI) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of the brains of patients who ranged in age from 10 to 60 years. Our results indicated that the average SI was the highest in amygdala (as derived from DWI), whereas that in the cerebrospinal fluid was the lowest. The average ADC was the highest in the cerebrospinal fluid, whereas the lowest measurement was derived from the pons. The average SI and ADC were higher in T 2 -DW-EPI than in FLAIR-DW-EPI. The higher the b-value, the smaller the average difference in both imaging techniques; the lower the b-value, the greater the average difference. Also, comparative analysis of the brains of patients who had experienced cerebral infarction showed no distinct lesion in the general MR image over time. However, there was a high SI in apparent weighted images. Analysis of other brain diseases (e.g., bleeding, acute, subacute, chronic infarction) indicated SI variance in accordance with characteristics of the two techniques. The higher the SI, the lower the ADC. Taken together, the value of SI and ADC in accordance with frequently occurring areas and various brain disease varies based on the b-value and imaging technique. Because they provide additional useful information in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with various brain diseases through signal recognition, the proper imaging technique and b-value are important for the detection and interpretation of subacute stroke and other brain diseases.

  9. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia virulence and specific variations in trace elements during acute lung infection: implications in cystic fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arianna Pompilio

    Full Text Available Metal ions are necessary for the proper functioning of the immune system, and, therefore, they might have a significant influence on the interaction between bacteria and host. Ionic dyshomeostasis has been recently observed also in cystic fibrosis (CF patients, whose respiratory tract is frequently colonized by Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. For the first time, here we used an inductively mass spectrometry method to perform a spatial and temporal analysis of the pattern of changes in a broad range of major trace elements in response to pulmonary infection by S. maltophilia. To this, DBA/2 mouse lungs were comparatively infected by a CF strain and by an environmental one. Our results showed that pulmonary ionomic profile was significantly affected during infection. Infected mice showed increased lung levels of Mg, P, S, K, Zn, Se, and Rb. To the contrary, Mn, Fe, Co, and Cu levels resulted significantly decreased. Changes of element concentrations were correlated with pulmonary bacterial load and markers of inflammation, and occurred mostly on day 3 post-exposure, when severity of infection culminated. Interestingly, CF strain - significantly more virulent than the environmental one in our murine model - provoked a more significant impact in perturbing pulmonary metal homeostasis. Particularly, exposure to CF strain exclusively increased P and K levels, while decreased Fe and Mn ones. Overall, our data clearly indicate that S. maltophilia modulates pulmonary metal balance in a concerted and virulence-dependent manner highlighting the potential role of the element dyshomeostasis during the progression of S. maltophilia infection, probably exacerbating the harmful effects of the loss of CF transmembrane conductance regulator function. Further investigations are required to understand the biological significance of these alterations and to confirm they are specifically caused by S. maltophilia.

  10. A fast random walk algorithm for computing diffusion-weighted NMR signals in multi-scale porous media: A feasibility study for a Menger sponge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grebenkov, Denis S.; Nguyen, Hang T.; Li, Jing-Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    A fast random walk (FRW) algorithm is adapted to compute diffusion-weighted NMR signals in a Menger sponge which is formed by multiple channels of broadly distributed sizes and often considered as a model for soils and porous materials. The self-similar structure of a Menger sponge allows for rapid simulations that were not feasible by other numerical techniques. The role of multiple length scales on diffusion-weighted NMR signals is investigated. (authors)

  11. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia with histopathological features mimicking cutaneous gamma/delta T-cell lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Kash

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of cutaneous Stenotrophomonas maltophilia infection which presented with clinical and histopathological findings that mimicked a gamma/delta (γδ T-cell lymphoma. In this case, tissue culture of the biopsy specimen was key to determining the diagnosis and allowing appropriate treatment with oral trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole and topical silvadene. A prompt complete resolution of lesions was observed following antibiotic treatment, with no recurrence of disease over the last 5 years, supporting an infectious rather than malignant etiology. In our patient, radiation therapy was indicated based on the misdiagnosis of γδ T-cell lymphoma, which was supported both clinically and histopathologically. However, tissue culture in this case avoided unnecessary radiation exposure and highlights the role of tissue culture in the evaluation of the biopsy of an undiagnosed cutaneous lesion.

  12. Genotypic and Phenotypic Characterization of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Strains from a Pediatric Tertiary Care Hospital in Serbia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haowa Madi

    Full Text Available Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is an environmental bacterium and an opportunistic pathogen usually associated with healthcare-associated infections, which has recently been recognized as a globally multi-drug resistant organism. The aim of this study was genotyping and physiological characterization of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia isolated in a large, tertiary care pediatric hospital in Belgrade, Serbia, hosting the national reference cystic fibrosis (CF center for pediatric and adult patients.We characterized 42 strains of cystic fibrosis (CF and 46 strains of non-cystic fibrosis (non-CF origin isolated from 2013 to 2015 in order to investigate their genetic relatedness and phenotypic traits. Genotyping was performed using sequencing of 16S rRNA gene, Pulse Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE and Multi locus sequencing typing (MLST analysis. Sensitivity to five relevant antimicrobial agents was determined, namely trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMX, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin and tetracycline. Surface characteristics, motility, biofilm formation and adhesion to mucin were tested in all strains. Statistical approach was used to determine correlations between obtained results.Most of the isolates were not genetically related. Six new sequence types were determined. Strains were uniformly sensitive to all tested antimicrobial agents. The majority of isolates (89.8% were able to form biofilm with almost equal representation in both CF and non-CF strains. Swimming motility was observed in all strains, while none of them exhibited swarming motility. Among strains able to adhere to mucin, no differences between CF and non-CF isolates were observed.High genetic diversity among isolates implies the absence of clonal spread within the hospital. Positive correlation between motility, biofilm formation and adhesion to mucin was demonstrated. Biofilm formation and motility were more pronounced among non-CF than CF isolates.

  13. Aflatoxin B1 Degradation by Stenotrophomonas Maltophilia and Other Microbes Selected Using Coumarin Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiangui Niu

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1 is one of the most harmful mycotoxins in animal production and food industry. A safe, effective and environmentally sound detoxification method is needed for controlling this toxin. In this study, 65 samples were screened from various sources with vast microbial populations using a newly developed medium containing coumarin as the sole carbon source. Twenty five single-colony bacterial isolates showing AFB1 reduction activity in a liquid culture medium were selected from the screen. Isolate 35-3, obtained from tapir feces and identified to be Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, reduced AFB1 by 82.5% after incubation in the liquid medium at 37 °C for 72 h. The culture supernatant of isolate 35-3 was able to degrade AFB1 effectively, whereas the viable cells and cell extracts were far less effective. Factors influencing AFB1 degradation by the culture supernatant were investigated. Activity was reduced to 60.8% and 63.5% at 20 °C and 30 °C, respectively, from 78.7% at 37 °C. The highest degradation rate was 84.8% at pH 8 and the lowest was only 14.3% at pH 4.0. Ions Mg2+ and Cu2+ were activators for AFB1 degradation, howeverï��Œion Zn2+ was a strong inhibitor. Treatments with proteinase K, proteinase K plus SDS and heating significantly reduced or eradicated the degradation activity of the culture supernatant. The results indicated that the degradation of AFB1 by S. maltophilia 35-3 was enzymatic and could have a great potential in industrial applications.

  14. Intracellular signaling by diffusion: can waves of hydrogen peroxide transmit intracellular information in plant cells?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Christian L.; Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Møller, Ian Max

    2012-01-01

    of the physical and biochemical conditions in plant cells. As model system, we use a H(2)O(2) signal originating at the plasma membrane (PM) and spreading through the cytosol. We consider two maximally simple types of signals, isolated pulses and harmonic oscillations. First we consider the basic limits......Amplitude- and frequency-modulated waves of Ca(2+) ions transmit information inside cells. Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS), specifically hydrogen peroxide, have been proposed to have a similar role in plant cells. We consider the feasibility of such an intracellular communication system in view...

  15. Prevalence of Smqnr and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants in clinical isolates of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia from Japan: novel variants of Smqnr

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kanamori

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is an important pathogen in healthcare-associated infections. S. maltophilia may contain Smqnr, a quinolone resistance gene encoding the pentapeptide repeat protein, which confers low-level quinolone resistance upon expression in a heterologous host. We investigated the prevalence of Smqnr and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR determinants in S. maltophilia isolates from Japan. A total of 181 consecutive and nonduplicate clinical isolates of S. maltophilia were collected from four areas of Japan. The antimicrobial susceptibility profiles for these strains were determined. PCR was conducted for Smqnr and PMQR genes, including qnrA, qnrB, qnrC, qnrS, aac(6′-Ib and qepA. PCR products for Smqnr and aac(6′-Ib were sequenced. For the S. maltophilia isolates containing Smqnr, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE was performed using XbaI. Resistance rates to ceftazidime, levofloxacin, trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole, chloramphenicol and minocycline were 67.4%, 6.1%, 17.7%, 8.8% and 0%, respectively. The minimum inhibitory concentration required to inhibit the growth of 50% and 90% of organisms were 0.5 and 2 mg/L for moxifloxacin but 1 and 4 mg/L for levofloxacin, respectively. Smqnr was detected in 104 of the 181 S. maltophilia isolates (57.5%, and the most frequent was Smqnr6, followed by Smqnr8 and Smqnr11. Eleven novel variants from Smqnr48 to Smqnr58 were detected. The 24 Smqnr-containing S. maltophilia isolates were typed by PFGE and divided into 21 unique types. Nine S. maltophilia isolates (5.0% carried aac(6′-Ib-cr. No qnr or qepA genes were detected. This study describes a high prevalence of Smqnr and novel variants of Smqnr among S. maltophilia from Japan. Continuous antimicrobial surveillance and further molecular epidemiological studies on quinolone resistance in S. maltophilia are needed.

  16. Predictive Studies Suggest that the Risk for the Selection of Antibiotic Resistance by Biocides Is Likely Low in Stenotrophomonas maltophilia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Blanca Sánchez

    Full Text Available Biocides are used without restriction for several purposes. As a consequence, large amounts of biocides are released without any control in the environment, a situation that can challenge the microbial population dynamics, including selection of antibiotic resistant bacteria. Previous work has shown that triclosan selects Stenotrophomonas maltophilia antibiotic resistant mutants overexpressing the efflux pump SmeDEF and induces expression of this pump triggering transient low-level resistance. In the present work we analyze if two other common biocides, benzalkonium chloride and hexachlorophene, trigger antibiotic resistance in S. maltophilia. Bioinformatic and biochemical methods showed that benzalkonium chloride and hexachlorophene bind the repressor of smeDEF, SmeT. Only benzalkonium chloride triggers expression of smeD and its effect in transient antibiotic resistance is minor. None of the hexachlorophene-selected mutants was antibiotic resistant. Two benzalkonium chloride resistant mutants presented reduced susceptibility to antibiotics and were impaired in growth. Metabolic profiling showed they were more proficient than their parental strain in the use of some dipeptides. We can then conclude that although bioinformatic predictions and biochemical studies suggest that both hexachlorophene and benzalkonium chloride should induce smeDEF expression leading to transient S. maltophilia resistance to antibiotics, phenotypic assays showed this not to be true. The facts that hexachlorophene resistant mutants are not antibiotic resistant and that the benzalkonium chloride resistant mutants presenting altered susceptibility to antibiotics were impaired in growth suggests that the risk for the selection (and fixation of S. maltophilia antibiotic resistant mutants by these biocides is likely low, at least in the absence of constant selection pressure.

  17. Friends or foes: can we make a distinction between beneficial and harmful strains of the Stenotrophomonas maltophilia complex?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Gabriele; Martinez, Jose L

    2015-01-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is an emerging multi-drug-resistant global opportunistic pathogen of environmental, mainly plant-associated origin. It is also used as a biocontrol or stress protecting agent for crops in sustainable agricultural as well as in bioremediation strategies. In order to establish effective protocols to distinguish harmless from harmful strains, our discussion must take into consideration the current data available surrounding the ecology, evolution and pathogenicity of the species complex. The mutation rate was identified as one of several possible criteria for strain plasticity, but it is currently impossible to distinguish beneficial from harmful S. maltophilia strains. This may compromise the possibility of the release and application for environmental biotechnology of this bacterial species. The close relative S. rhizophila, which can be clearly differentiated from S. maltophilia, provides a harmless alternative for biotechnological applications without human health risks. This is mainly because it is unable to growth at the human body temperature, 37(∘)C due to the absence of heat shock genes and a potentially temperature-regulated suicide mechanism.

  18. Discrete diffusion models to study the effects of Mg2+ concentration on the PhoPQ signal transduction system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das Sajal K

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The challenge today is to develop a modeling and simulation paradigm that integrates structural, molecular and genetic data for a quantitative understanding of physiology and behavior of biological processes at multiple scales. This modeling method requires techniques that maintain a reasonable accuracy of the biological process and also reduces the computational overhead. This objective motivates the use of new methods that can transform the problem from energy and affinity based modeling to information theory based modeling. To achieve this, we transform all dynamics within the cell into a random event time, which is specified through an information domain measure like probability distribution. This allows us to use the “in silico” stochastic event based modeling approach to find the molecular dynamics of the system. Results In this paper, we present the discrete event simulation concept using the example of the signal transduction cascade triggered by extra-cellular Mg2+ concentration in the two component PhoPQ regulatory system of Salmonella Typhimurium. We also present a model to compute the information domain measure of the molecular transport process by estimating the statistical parameters of inter-arrival time between molecules/ions coming to a cell receptor as external signal. This model transforms the diffusion process into the information theory measure of stochastic event completion time to get the distribution of the Mg2+ departure events. Using these molecular transport models, we next study the in-silico effects of this external trigger on the PhoPQ system. Conclusions Our results illustrate the accuracy of the proposed diffusion models in explaining the molecular/ionic transport processes inside the cell. Also, the proposed simulation framework can incorporate the stochasticity in cellular environments to a certain degree of accuracy. We expect that this scalable simulation platform will be able to model

  19. Effects of optical attenuation, heat diffusion, and acoustic coherence in photoacoustic signals produced by nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alba-Rosales, J. E.; Ramos-Ortiz, G.; Escamilla-Herrera, L. F.; Reyes-Ramírez, B.; Polo-Parada, L.; Gutiérrez-Juárez, G.

    2018-04-01

    The behavior of the photoacoustic signal produced by nanoparticles as a function of their concentration was studied in detail. As the concentration of nanoparticles is increased in a sample, the peak-to-peak photoacoustic amplitude increases linearly up to a certain value, after which an asymptotic saturated behavior is observed. To elucidate the mechanisms responsible for these observations, we evaluate the effects of nanoparticles concentration, the optical attenuation, and the effects of heat propagation from nano-sources to their surroundings. We found that the saturation effect of the photoacoustic signal as a function of the concentration of nanoparticles is explained by a combination of two different mechanisms. As has been suggested previously, but not modeled correctly, the most important mechanism is attributed to optical attenuation. The second mechanism is due to an interference destructive process attributed to the superimposition of the photoacoustic amplitudes generated for each nanoparticle, and this explanation is reinforced through our experimental and simulations results; based on this, it is found that the linear behavior of the photoacoustic amplitude could be restricted to optical densities ≤0.5.

  20. Evolutionary Genetic Analysis Uncovers Multiple Species with Distinct Habitat Preferences and Antibiotic Resistance Phenotypes in the Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz E. Ochoa-Sánchez

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The genus Stenotrophomonas (Gammaproteobacteria has a broad environmental distribution. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is its best known species because it is a globally emerging, multidrug-resistant (MDR, opportunistic pathogen. Members of this species are known to display high genetic, ecological and phenotypic diversity, forming the so-called S. maltophilia complex (Smc. Heterogeneous resistance and virulence phenotypes have been reported for environmental Smc isolates of diverse ecological origin. We hypothesized that this heterogeneity could be in part due to the potential lumping of several cryptic species in the Smc. Here we used state-of-the-art phylogenetic and population genetics methods to test this hypothesis based on the multilocus dataset available for the genus at pubmlst.org. It was extended with sequences from complete and draft genome sequences to assemble a comprehensive set of reference sequences. This framework was used to analyze 108 environmental isolates obtained in this study from the sediment and water column of four rivers and streams in Central Mexico, affected by contrasting levels of anthropogenic pollution. The aim of the study was to identify species in this collection, defined as genetically cohesive sequence clusters, and to determine the extent of their genetic, ecological and phenotypic differentiation. The multispecies coalescent, coupled with Bayes factor analysis was used to delimit species borders, together with population genetic structure analyses, recombination and gene flow estimates between sequence clusters. These analyses consistently revealed that the Smc contains at least 5 significantly differentiated lineages: S. maltophilia and Smc1 to Smc4. Only S. maltophilia was found to be intrinsically MDR, all its members expressing metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs. The other Smc lineages were not MDR and did not express MBLs. We also obtained isolates related to S. acidaminiphila, S. humi and S. terrae. They

  1. Adhesion of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Delftia acidovorans, and Achromobacter xylosoxidans to Contact Lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijay, Ajay Kumar; Willcox, Mark D P

    2017-09-26

    Contact lens cases become contaminated with microbes during use. We wished to compare the adhesion of uncommon bacterial contaminants isolated from lens cases to contact lenses with and without organic soil. Strains of Delftia acidovorans (001), Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (002 and 006), and Achromobacter xylosoxidans (001) isolated from contact lens cases (test strains) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Paer1) isolated from eyes at the time of infiltrative response (control strain) were used. Bacteria were grown and resuspended in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) or 10% organic soil (heat-killed Saccharomyces cerevisiae resuspended in complement inactivated bovine serum). Two silicone hydrogel (senofilcon A and comfilcon A) and one hydrogel lens (etafilcon A) lens materials were used. Bacteria (1.0×10 and 1.0×10 colony-forming units/mL; CFU/mL) adhered to lenses for 24 hr and the numbers of bacteria adherent to each lens type (with and without organic soil) were estimated by culture. All the four test strains adhered in significantly greater numbers to contact lenses after incubation in inoculum prepared with organic soil compared with PBS-D. acidovorans 001 (0.7 log10 CFU; P0.05). Achromobacter xylosoxidans 001 (PBacteria that are commonly found in contact lens cases adhered to contact lenses in relatively high numbers in the presence of organic soil. This might indicate that a similar phenomenon occurs in the presence of tears. This may facilitate their transfer from the lens to the cornea and the production of corneal infiltrates.

  2. Using optical fibers with different modes to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of diffuse correlation spectroscopy flow-oximeter measurements

    OpenAIRE

    He, Lian; Lin, Yu; Shang, Yu; Shelton, Brent J.; Yu, Guoqiang

    2013-01-01

    The dual-wavelength diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) flow-oximeter is an emerging technique enabling simultaneous measurements of blood flow and blood oxygenation changes in deep tissues. High signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is crucial when applying DCS technologies in the study of human tissues where the detected signals are usually very weak. In this study, single-mode, few-mode, and multimode fibers are compared to explore the possibility of improving the SNR of DCS flow-oximeter measure...

  3. Characteristic signal changes in the pontine base on T2- and multishot diffusion-weighted images in spinocerebellar ataxia type 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, M.; Kawanami, T.; Ohshima, H.; Hosoya, T.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to demonstrate characteristic signal changes of the pontine base on T2-weighted images of patients with SCA 1, and to elucidate the relationship between abnormal high-intensities of the pontine base on T2-weighted images and the findings on multishot diffusion-weighted images. We assessed abnormal signals of the pontine base on T2-weighted images from 50 controls and six patients with SCA 1 diagnosed by genetic analysis. At the same time, we evaluated the degeneration of the transverse pontine fibers in the pontine base by multishot diffusion-weighted imaging. A midline high-intensity was seen in the pontine base on T2-weighted images in two of the 50 controls and five of the six patients with SCA 1. The midline high-intensity had a sensitivity of 83.3% for patients and a specificity of 96.0% for controls. Multishot diffusion-weighted imaging demonstrated the degeneration - the amorphous-pattern signal - of the transverse pontine fibers in four (66.7%) of the six patients. In the other two patients, the zebra-pattern signal was seen in the pontine base. The midline high-intensity on T2-weighted images appears to be one of characteristic MRI findings of SCA 1. Multishot diffusion-weighted imaging suggested that the midline high-intensity should reflect the degeneration of the transverse pontine fibers. (orig.)

  4. Shades of white : diffusion properties of T1- and FLAIR-defined white matter signal abnormalities differ in stages from cognitively normal to dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riphagen, Joost M.; Gronenschild, Ed HBM; Salat, David H.; Freeze, Whitney M.; Ivanov, Dimo; Clerx, Lies; Verhey, Frans R. J.; Aalten, Pauline; Jacobs, Heidi I. L.

    The underlying pathology of white matter signal abnormalities (WMSAs) is heterogeneous and may vary dependent on the magnetic resonance imaging contrast used to define them. We investigated differences in white matter diffusivity as an indicator for white matter integrity underlying WMSA based on

  5. Signal intensity changes of normal brain at varying high b-value diffusion-weighted images using 3.0T MR scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jin Hee; Sohn, Chul Ho; Choi, Jin Soo

    2003-01-01

    Using diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI), to evaluate the signal intensity characteristics of normal adult brain as diffusion gradient strength (b value) increases from 1,000 to 3,000 s/mm 2 . Twenty-one healthy volunteers with neither neurologic symptoms nor pathologic findings at axial and sagittal T2-weighted MR imaging were involved in this study. All images were obtained with a 3.0T MR scanner. Six sets of spin-echo echo-planar images were acquired in the axial plane using progressively increasing strengths of diffusion-sensitizing gradients (corresponding to b values of 0, 1,000, 1,500, 2,000, 2,500, and 3,000 s/mm 2 ). All imaging parameters other than TE remained constant. Changes in normal white-gray matter signal intensity observed at variable b-value DWI were qualitatively analysed, and the signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) in six anatomic regions (frontal and parietal white matter, genu and splenium corporis callosi, the posterior limb of the internal capsule, and the thalamus) quantitatively, and the ratios were averaged and compared with the average SNR of 1,000 s/mm DWI. As gradient strength increased from 1,000 to 3,000 s/mm 2 , both gray-and white-matter structures diminished in signal intensity, and images obtained at a b value of 3,000 s/mm 2 appeared very noisy. White matter became progressively hyperintense to gray matter as the diffusion sensitizing gradient increased, especially at the centrum semiovale, the posterior limb of the internal capsule, and the splenium corporis callosi, but the genu corporis callosi; showed exceptional intermediate low signal intensity. At quantitative assessment, the signal-to-noise ratio decreased as the diffusion sensitizing gradient increased. Relative to the images obtained at a b value of 1,000 s/mm 2 , average SNRs were 0.71 (b=1,500 s/mm 2 ), 0.52 (b=2,000 s/mm 2 ), 0.41 (b=2,500 s/mm 2 ), 0.33 (b=3,000 s/mm 2 ). As the diffusion sensitizing gradient increased, the signal-to-noise ratio of brain structures

  6. Production of Xylella fastidiosa diffusible signal factor in transgenic grape causes pathogen confusion and reduction in severity of Pierce's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindow, Steven; Newman, Karyn; Chatterjee, Subhadeep; Baccari, Clelia; Lavarone, Anthony T; Ionescu, Michael

    2014-03-01

    The rpfF gene from Xylella fastidiosa, encoding the synthase for diffusible signal factor (DSF), was expressed in 'Freedom' grape to reduce the pathogen's growth and mobility within the plant. Symptoms in such plants were restricted to near the point of inoculation and incidence of disease was two- to fivefold lower than in the parental line. Both the longitudinal and lateral movement of X. fastidiosa in the xylem was also much lower. DSF was detected in both leaves and xylem sap of RpfF-expressing plants using biological sensors, and both 2-Z-tetradecenoic acid, previously identified as a component of X. fastidiosa DSF, and cis-11-methyl-2-dodecenoic acid were detected in xylem sap using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. A higher proportion of X. fastidiosa cells adhered to xylem vessels of the RpfF-expressing line than parental 'Freedom' plants, reflecting a higher adhesiveness of the pathogen in the presence of DSF. Disease incidence in RpfF-expressing plants in field trials in which plants were either mechanically inoculated with X. fastidiosa or subjected to natural inoculation by sharpshooter vectors was two- to fourfold lower in than that of the parental line. The number of symptomatic leaves on infected shoots was reduced proportionally more than the incidence of infection, reflecting a decreased ability of X. fastidiosa to move within DSF-producing plants.

  7. Clinical Implications of Diffuse Excessive High Signal Intensity (DEHSI on Neonatal MRI in School Age Children Born Extremely Preterm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Broström

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the brain carried out during the neonatal period shows that 55-80% of extremely preterm infants display white matter diffuse excessive high signal intensity (DEHSI. Our aim was to study differences in developmental outcome at the age of 6.5 years in children born extremely preterm with and without DEHSI.This was a prospective cohort study of 83 children who were born in Stockholm, Sweden, between 2004 and 2007, born at gestational age of < 27 weeks + 0 days and who underwent an MRI scan of their brain at term equivalent age. The outcome measures at 6.5 years included testing 66 children with the modified Touwen neurology examination, the Movement Assessment Battery for Children 2, the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Fourth Edition, Beery Visual-motor Integration test-Sixth Edition, and the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. Group-wise comparisons were done between children with and without DEHSI using Student t-test, Mann Whitney U test, Chi square test and regression analysis.DEHSI was detected in 39 (59% of the 66 children who were assessed at 6.5 years. The presence of DEHSI was not associated with mild neurological dysfunction, scores on M-ABC assessment, cognition, visual-motor integration, or behavior at 6.5 years.The presence of qualitatively defined DEHSI on neonatal MRI did not prove to be a useful predictor of long-term impairment in children born extremely preterm.

  8. [Diagnostic efficiency of decline rate of signal intensity and apparent diffusion coefficient with different b values for differentiating benign and malignant breast lesions on diffusion-weighted 3.0T magnetic resonance imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jing; Liu, Wanhua; Ye, Yuanyuan; Wang, Rui; Li, Fengfang; Peng, Chengyu

    2014-06-17

    To investigate the diagnostic efficiency of decline rate of signal intensity and apparent diffusion coefficient with different b values for differentiating benign and malignant breast lesions on diffusion-weighted 3.0 T magnetic resonance imaging. A total of 152 patients with 162 confirmed histopathologically breast lesions (85 malignant and 77 benign) underwent 3.0 T diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Four b values (0, 400, 800 and 1 000 s/mm²) were used. The signal intensity and ADC values of breast lesions were measured respectively. The signal intensity decline rate (SIDR) and apparent diffusion coefficient decline rate (ADCDR) were calculated respectively. SIDR = (signal intensity of lesions with low b value-signal intensity of lesions with high b value)/signal intensity of lesions with low b value, ADCDR = (ADC value of lesions with low b value-ADC value of lesions with high b value) /ADC value of lesions with low b value. The independent sample t-test was employed for statistical analyses and the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve for evaluating the diagnosis efficiency of SIDR and ADCDR values. Significant differences were observed in SIDR between benign and malignant breast lesions with b values of 0-400, 400-800 and 800-1 000 s/mm². The sensitivities of SIDR for differentiating benign and malignant breast lesions were 61.2%, 68.2% and 67.1%, the specificities 74.0%, 85.7% and 67.5%, the diagnosis accordance rates 67.3%, 76.5% and 67.3%, the positive predictive values 72.2%, 84.1% and 69.5% and the negative predictive values 63.3%, 71.0% and 65.0% respectively. Significant differences were observed in ADCDR between benign and malignant breast lesions with b values of 400-800 s/mm² and 800-1 000 s/mm². The sensitivities of SDR for differentiating benign and malignant breast lesions were 80.0% and 65.9%, the specificities 72.7% and 65.0%, the diagnostic accordance rates 76.5% and 65.4%, the positive predictive values 76.4% and 67

  9. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging reflects activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 during focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-juan Wu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT is a unique protein family that binds to DNA, coupled with tyrosine phosphorylation signaling pathways, acting as a transcriptional regulator to mediate a variety of biological effects. Cerebral ischemia and reperfusion can activate STATs signaling pathway, but no studies have confirmed whether STAT activation can be verified by diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI in rats after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion. Here, we established a rat model of focal cerebral ischemia injury using the modified Longa method. DWI revealed hyperintensity in parts of the left hemisphere before reperfusion and a low apparent diffusion coefficient. STAT3 protein expression showed no significant change after reperfusion, but phosphorylated STAT3 expression began to increase after 30 minutes of reperfusion and peaked at 24 hours. Pearson correlation analysis showed that STAT3 activation was correlated positively with the relative apparent diffusion coefficient and negatively with the DWI abnormal signal area. These results indicate that DWI is a reliable representation of the infarct area and reflects STAT phosphorylation in rat brain following focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion.

  10. Evaluation of dual-source parallel RF excitation for diffusion-weighted whole-body MR imaging with background body signal suppression at 3.0 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mürtz, Petra; Kaschner, Marius; Träber, Frank; Kukuk, Guido M; Büdenbender, Sarah M; Skowasch, Dirk; Gieseke, Jürgen; Schild, Hans H; Willinek, Winfried A

    2012-11-01

    To evaluate the use of dual-source parallel RF excitation (TX) for diffusion-weighted whole-body MRI with background body signal suppression (DWIBS) at 3.0 T. Forty consecutive patients were examined on a clinical 3.0-T MRI system using a diffusion-weighted (DW) spin-echo echo-planar imaging sequence with a combination of short TI inversion recovery and slice-selective gradient reversal fat suppression. DWIBS of the neck (n=5), thorax (n=8), abdomen (n=6) and pelvis (n=21) was performed both with TX (2:56 min) and with standard single-source RF excitation (4:37 min). The quality of DW images and reconstructed inverted maximum intensity projections was visually judged by two readers (blinded to acquisition technique). Signal homogeneity and fat suppression were scored as "improved", "equal", "worse" or "ambiguous". Moreover, the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were measured in muscles, urinary bladder, lymph nodes and lesions. By the use of TX, signal homogeneity was "improved" in 25/40 and "equal" in 15/40 cases. Fat suppression was "improved" in 17/40 and "equal" in 23/40 cases. These improvements were statistically significant (p3.0 T with respect to signal homogeneity and fat suppression, reduced scan time by approximately one-third, and did not influence the measured ADC values. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Understanding and eliminating artifact signals from diffusely scattered pump beam in measurements of rough samples by time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Bo [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National University of Singapore, 9 Engineering Drive 1, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Koh, Yee Kan, E-mail: mpekyk@nus.edu.sg [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National University of Singapore, 9 Engineering Drive 1, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Centre of Advanced 2D Materials, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore)

    2016-06-15

    Time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR) is a pump-probe technique frequently applied to measure the thermal transport properties of bulk materials, nanostructures, and interfaces. One of the limitations of TDTR is that it can only be employed to samples with a fairly smooth surface. For rough samples, artifact signals are collected when the pump beam in TDTR measurements is diffusely scattered by the rough surface into the photodetector, rendering the TDTR measurements invalid. In this paper, we systemically studied the factors affecting the artifact signals due to the pump beam leaked into the photodetector and thus established the origin of the artifact signals. We find that signals from the leaked pump beam are modulated by the probe beam due to the phase rotation induced in the photodetector by the illumination of the probe beam. As a result of the modulation, artifact signals due to the leaked pump beam are registered in TDTR measurements as the out-of-phase signals. We then developed a simple approach to eliminate the artifact signals due to the leaked pump beam. We verify our leak-pump correction approach by measuring the thermal conductivity of a rough InN sample, when the signals from the leaked pump beam are significant. We also discuss the advantages of our new method over the two-tint approach and its limitations. Our new approach enables measurements of the thermal conductivity of rough samples using TDTR.

  12. Genome Sequence of a Multidrug-Resistant Strain of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia with Carbapenem Resistance, Isolated from King Abdullah Medical City, Makkah, Saudi Arabia

    KAUST Repository

    Abdel-Haleem, Alyaa M.; Rchiad, ‍ Zineb; Khan, Babar Khalid; Abdallah, Abdallah; Naeem, Raeece; Nikhat Sheerin, Shalam; Solovyev, Victor; Ahmed, Abdalla; Pain, Arnab

    2015-01-01

    The emergence and spread of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria have been regarded as major challenges among health care-associated infections worldwide. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of an MDR Stenotrophomonas maltophilia strain isolated in 2014 from King Abdulla Medical City, Makkah, Saudi Arabia.

  13. Genome Sequence of a Multidrug-Resistant Strain of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia with Carbapenem Resistance, Isolated from King Abdullah Medical City, Makkah, Saudi Arabia

    KAUST Repository

    Abdel-Haleem, Alyaa M.

    2015-10-15

    The emergence and spread of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria have been regarded as major challenges among health care-associated infections worldwide. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of an MDR Stenotrophomonas maltophilia strain isolated in 2014 from King Abdulla Medical City, Makkah, Saudi Arabia.

  14. Neuro-developmental outcome at 18 months in premature infants with diffuse excessive high signal intensity on MR imaging of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, Anthony; Whitby, Elspeth; Paley, Martyn; Wilkinson, Stuart; Smith, Michael; Alladi, Sathya

    2011-01-01

    Diffuse excessive high signal intensity (DEHSI) may represent damage to the white matter in preterm infants, but may be best studied alongside quantitative markers. Limited published data exists on its neuro-developmental implications. The purpose of this study was to assess whether preterm children with DEHSI at term-corrected age have abnormal neuro-developmental outcome. This was a prospective observational study of 67 preterm infants with MRI of the brain around term-equivalent age, including diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). Images were reported as being normal, overtly abnormal or to show DEHSI. A single observer placed six regions of interest in the periventricular white matter and calculated the apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC). DEHSI was defined as (1) high signal on T2-weighted images alone, (2) high signal with raised ADC values or (3) raised ADC values independent of visual appearances. The neuro-development was assessed around 18 months' corrected age using the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development (3rd Edition). Standard t tests compared outcome scores between imaging groups. No statistically significant difference in neuro-developmental outcome scores was seen between participants with normal MRI and DEHSI, regardless of which definition was used. Preterm children with DEHSI have similar neuro-developmental outcome to those with normal brain MRI, even if the definition includes objective markers alongside visual appearances. (orig.)

  15. Effect of gadolinium injection on diffusion-weighted imaging with background body signal suppression (DWIBS) imaging of breast lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschetta, Marco; Telegrafo, Michele; Rella, Leonarda; Stabile Ianora, Amato Antonio; Angelelli, Giuseppe

    2014-12-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging with background body signal suppression (DWIBS) provides both qualitative and quantitative imaging of breast lesions and are usually performed before contrast material injection (CMI). This study aims to assess whether the administration of gadolinium significantly affects DWIBS imaging. 200 patients were prospectively evaluated by MRI with STIR, TSE-T2, pre-CMI DWIBS, contrast enhanced THRIVE-T1 and post-CMI DWIBS sequences. Pre and post-CMI DWIBS were analyzed searching for the presence of breast lesions and calculating the ADC value. ADC values of ≤1.44×10(-3) mm(2)/s were considered suspicious for malignancy. This analysis was then compared with the histological findings. Sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic accuracy (DA), positive predictive value (PPV) and negative (NPV) were calculated for both sequences and represented by ROC analysis. Pre and post-CMI ADC values were compared by using the paired t test. In 150/200 (59%) patients, pre and post-CMI DWIBS indicated the presence of breast lesions, 53 (35%) with ADC values of >1.44×10(-3) mm(2)/s and 97 (65%) with ADC≤1.44×10(-3) mm(2)/s. Pre-CMI and post-DWIBS sequences obtained the same sensitivity, specificity, DA, PPV and NPV values of 97%, 83%, 89%, 79% and 98%. The mean ADC value of benign lesions was 1.831±0.18×10(-3) mm(2)/s before and 1.828±0.18×10(-3) mm(2)/s after CMI. The mean ADC value of the malignant lesions was 1.146±0.16×10(-3) mm(2)/s before and 1.144±0.16×10(-3) mm(2)/s after CMI. No significant difference was found between pre and post CMI ADC values (p>0.05). DWIBS imaging is not influenced by CMI. Breast MR protocol could be modified by placing DWIBS after dynamic contrast enhanced sequences in order to maximize patient cooperation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Toward quantitative fast diffusion kurtosis imaging with b-values chosen in consideration of signal-to-noise ratio and model fidelity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Yen-Shu; Yang, Shun-Chung; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Wu, Wen-Chau

    2018-02-01

    Diffusion kurtosis (DK) imaging is a variant of conventional diffusion magnetic resonance (MR) imaging that allows assessment of non-Gaussian diffusion. Fast DK imaging expedites the procedure by decreasing both scan time (acquiring the minimally required number of b-values) and computation time (obviating least-square curve fitting). This study aimed to investigate the applicability of fast DK imaging for both cerebral gray matter and white matter as a quantitative method. Seventeen healthy volunteers were recruited and each provided written informed consent before participation. On a 3-Tesla clinical MR system, diffusion imaging was performed with 12 b-values ranging from 0 to 4000 s/mm 2 . Diffusion encoding was along three orthogonal directions (slice selection, phase encoding, and frequency encoding) in separate series. Candidate b-values were chosen by first determining the maximum b-value (b max ) in the context of signal-to-noise ratio and then assessing the model fidelity for all b-value combinations within b max . Diffusion coefficient (D) and diffusion kurtosis coefficient (K) were derived from these candidates and assessed for their dependence on b-value combination. Our data suggested b max to be 2200 s/mm 2 as a trade-off between the percentage (~80%) of voxels statistically detectable against background and the sensitivity to non-Gaussian diffusion in both gray matter and white matter. The measurement dependence on b-value was observed predominantly in areas with a considerable amount of cerebrospinal fluid. In most gray matter and white matter, b-value combinations do not cause statistical difference in the calculated D and K. For fast DK imaging to be quantitatively applicable in both gray matter and white matter, b max should be chosen to ensure adequate signal-to-noise ratio in the majority of gray/white matter and the two nonzero b-values should be chosen in consideration of model fidelity to mitigate the dependence of derived indices on b

  17. Evaluation of dual-source parallel RF excitation for diffusion-weighted whole-body MR imaging with background body signal suppression at 3.0 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muertz, Petra, E-mail: petra.muertz@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn (Germany); Kaschner, Marius, E-mail: marius.kaschner@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn (Germany); Traeber, Frank, E-mail: frank.traeber@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn (Germany); Kukuk, Guido M., E-mail: guido.kukuk@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn (Germany); Buedenbender, Sarah M., E-mail: sarah_m_buedenbender@yahoo.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn (Germany); Skowasch, Dirk, E-mail: dirk.skowasch@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Medicine, University of Bonn (Germany); Gieseke, Juergen, E-mail: juergen.gieseke@philips.com [Philips Healthcare, Best (Netherlands); Department of Radiology, University of Bonn (Germany); Schild, Hans H., E-mail: hans.schild@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn (Germany); Willinek, Winfried A., E-mail: winfried.willinek@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn (Germany)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the use of dual-source parallel RF excitation (TX) for diffusion-weighted whole-body MRI with background body signal suppression (DWIBS) at 3.0 T. Materials and methods: Forty consecutive patients were examined on a clinical 3.0-T MRI system using a diffusion-weighted (DW) spin-echo echo-planar imaging sequence with a combination of short TI inversion recovery and slice-selective gradient reversal fat suppression. DWIBS of the neck (n = 5), thorax (n = 8), abdomen (n = 6) and pelvis (n = 21) was performed both with TX (2:56 min) and with standard single-source RF excitation (4:37 min). The quality of DW images and reconstructed inverted maximum intensity projections was visually judged by two readers (blinded to acquisition technique). Signal homogeneity and fat suppression were scored as 'improved', 'equal', 'worse' or 'ambiguous'. Moreover, the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were measured in muscles, urinary bladder, lymph nodes and lesions. Results: By the use of TX, signal homogeneity was 'improved' in 25/40 and 'equal' in 15/40 cases. Fat suppression was 'improved' in 17/40 and 'equal' in 23/40 cases. These improvements were statistically significant (p < 0.001, Wilcoxon signed-rank test). In five patients, fluid-related dielectric shading was present, which improved remarkably. The ADC values did not significantly differ for the two RF excitation methods (p = 0.630 over all data, pairwise Student's t-test). Conclusion: Dual-source parallel RF excitation improved image quality of DWIBS at 3.0 T with respect to signal homogeneity and fat suppression, reduced scan time by approximately one-third, and did not influence the measured ADC values.

  18. A general framework to quantify the effect of restricted diffusion on the NMR signal with applications to double pulsed field gradient NMR experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozarslan, Evren; Shemesh, Noam; Basser, Peter J

    2009-03-14

    Based on a description introduced by Robertson, Grebenkov recently introduced a powerful formalism to represent the diffusion-attenuated NMR signal for simple pore geometries such as slabs, cylinders, and spheres analytically. In this work, we extend this multiple correlation function formalism by allowing for possible variations in the direction of the magnetic field gradient waveform. This extension is necessary, for example, to incorporate the effects of imaging gradients in diffusion-weighted NMR imaging scans and in characterizing anisotropy at different length scales via double pulsed field gradient (PFG) experiments. In cylindrical and spherical pores, respectively, two- and three-dimensional vector operators are employed whose form is deduced from Grebenkov's results via elementary operator algebra for the case of cylinders and the Wigner-Eckart theorem for the case of spheres. The theory was validated by comparison with known findings and with experimental double-PFG data obtained from water-filled microcapillaries.

  19. A general framework to quantify the effect of restricted diffusion on the NMR signal with applications to double pulsed field gradient NMR experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özarslan, Evren; Shemesh, Noam; Basser, Peter J.

    2009-03-01

    Based on a description introduced by Robertson, Grebenkov recently introduced a powerful formalism to represent the diffusion-attenuated NMR signal for simple pore geometries such as slabs, cylinders, and spheres analytically. In this work, we extend this multiple correlation function formalism by allowing for possible variations in the direction of the magnetic field gradient waveform. This extension is necessary, for example, to incorporate the effects of imaging gradients in diffusion-weighted NMR imaging scans and in characterizing anisotropy at different length scales via double pulsed field gradient (PFG) experiments. In cylindrical and spherical pores, respectively, two- and three-dimensional vector operators are employed whose form is deduced from Grebenkov's results via elementary operator algebra for the case of cylinders and the Wigner-Eckart theorem for the case of spheres. The theory was validated by comparison with known findings and with experimental double-PFG data obtained from water-filled microcapillaries.

  20. A review of the methods for signal estimation in stochastic diffusion leaky integrate-and-fire neuronal models

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lánský, Petr; Ditlevsen, S.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 99, 4-5 (2008), s. 253-262 ISSN 0340-1200 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC554; GA AV ČR(CZ) 1ET400110401 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : parameter estimation * stochastic diffusion neuronal model Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.935, year: 2008

  1. Diffusible Signal Factor (DSF) Synthase RpfF of Xylella fastidiosa Is a Multifunction Protein Also Required for Response to DSF

    OpenAIRE

    Ionescu, Michael; Baccari, Clelia; Da Silva, Aline Maria; Garcia, Angelica; Yokota, Kenji; Lindow, Steven E.

    2013-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa, like related Xanthomonas species, employs an Rpf cell-cell communication system consisting of a diffusible signal factor (DSF) synthase, RpfF, and a DSF sensor, RpfC, to coordinate expression of virulence genes. While phenotypes of a ΔrpfF strain in Xanthomonas campestris could be complemented by its own DSF, the DSF produced by X. fastidiosa (XfDSF) did not restore expression of the XfDSF-dependent genes hxfA and hxfB to a ΔrpfF strain of X. fastidiosa, suggesting that Rp...

  2. Increased signal intensity of prostate lesions on high b-value diffusion-weighted images as a predictive sign of malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quentin, Michael; Schimmoeller, Lars; Antoch, Gerald; Blondin, Dirk; Arsov, Christian; Rabenalt, Robert; Albers, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The evaluation of lesions detected in prostate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with increased signal intensity (SI) on high b-value diffusion-weighted images as a sign of malignancy. One hundred and three consecutive patients with prostate MRI examination and MRI-guided in-bore biopsy were retrospectively included in the study. MRI-guided in-bore biopsy histologically confirmed prostate cancer in 50 patients (n = 92 lesions). The other 53 patients (n = 122 lesions) had negative bioptical results. In patients with histologically confirmed prostate cancer, 46 of the 92 lesions had visually increased SI on the high b-value images compared with the peripheral zone (SI = +27 ± 16%) or the central gland (SI = +37 ± 19%, P < 0.001 respectively). In patients with a negative biopsy, ten of the 122 lesions had visually increased SI (compared with the peripheral zone, SI = +29 ± 18%, and with the central gland, SI = +41 ± 15%, P < 0.001 respectively). Neither the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values nor the Gleason Score of lesions with increased SI were significantly different from lesions without increased SI. Visually increased SI on the high b-value images of diffusion-weighted imaging using standard b-values is a sign of malignancy but can occasionally also be a feature of benign lesions. However, it does not indicate more aggressive tumours. (orig.)

  3. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia isolated from patients exposed to invasive devices in a university hospital in Argentina: molecular typing, susceptibility and detection of potential virulence factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaraz, Eliana; Garcia, Carlos; Papalia, Mariana; Vay, Carlos; Friedman, Laura; Passerini de Rossi, Beatriz

    2018-05-25

    The aim of this work was to investigate the presence of selected potential virulence factors, susceptibility and clonal relatedness among 63 Stenotrophomonas maltophilia isolates recovered from patients exposed to invasive devices in a university hospital in Argentina between January 2004 and August 2012. Genetic relatedness was assessed by enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus PCR (ERIC-PCR) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Isolates were characterized by antimicrobial resistance, the presence and/or expression of potential virulence determinants, and virulence in the Galleria mellonella model.Results/Key findings. ERIC-PCR generated 52 fingerprints, and PFGE added another pattern. Resistance to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (6.35 %), levofloxacin (9.52 %) and ciprofloxacin (23.80 %) was detected. All isolates were susceptible to minocycline. All isolates were lipase, protease and siderophore producers, while all but Sm61 formed biofilms. However, 11/63 isolates did not amplify the major extracellular protease-coding gene (stmPr1). Sm61 is an stmPr1-negative isolate, and showed (as did Sm13 and the reference strain K279a) strong proteolysis and siderophore production, and high resistance to hydrogen peroxide. The three isolates were virulent in the G. mellonella model, while Sm10, a low-resistance hydrogen peroxide stmPr1-negative isolate, and weak proteolysis and siderophore producer, was not virulent. This is the first epidemiological study of the clonal relatedness of S. maltophilia clinical isolates in Argentina. Great genomic diversity was observed, and only two small clusters of related S. maltophilia types were found. Minocycline and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole were the most active agents. S. maltophilia virulence in the G. mellonella model is multifactorial, and further studies are needed to elucidate the role of each potential virulence factor.

  4. Abundance of the Quorum-Sensing Factor Ax21 in Four Strains of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Correlates with Mortality Rate in a New Zebrafish Model of Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Ferrer-Navarro

    Full Text Available Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is a Gram-negative pathogen with emerging nosocomial incidence. Little is known about its pathogenesis and the genomic diversity exhibited by clinical isolates complicates the study of pathogenicity and virulence factors. Here, we present a strategy to identify such factors in new clinical isolates of S. maltophilia, incorporating an adult-zebrafish model of S. maltophilia infection to evaluate relative virulence coupled to 2D difference gel electrophoresis to explore underlying differences in protein expression. In this study we report upon three recent clinical isolates and use the collection strain ATCC13637 as a reference. The adult-zebrafish model shows discrimination capacity, i.e. from very low to very high mortality rates, with clinical symptoms very similar to those observed in natural S. maltophilia infections in fish. Strain virulence correlates with resistance to human serum, in agreement with previous studies in mouse and rat and therefore supporting zebrafish as a replacement model. Despite its clinical origin, the collection strain ATCC13637 showed obvious signs of attenuation in zebrafish, with null mortality. Multilocus-sequence-typing analysis revealed that the most virulent strains, UV74 and M30, exhibit the strongest genetic similitude. Differential proteomic analysis led to the identification of 38 proteins with significantly different abundance in the three clinical strains relative to the reference strain. Orthologs of several of these proteins have been already reported to have a role in pathogenesis, virulence or resistance mechanisms thus supporting our strategy. Proof of concept is further provided by protein Ax21, whose abundance is shown here to be directly proportional to mortality in the zebrafish infection model. Indeed, recent studies have demonstrated that this protein is a quorum-sensing-related virulence factor.

  5. Biological Functions of ilvC in Branched-Chain Fatty Acid Synthesis and Diffusible Signal Factor Family Production in Xanthomonas campestris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Huai Li

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In bacteria, the metabolism of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs is tightly associated with branched-chain fatty acids (BCFAs synthetic pathways. Although previous studies have reported on BCFAs biosynthesis, more detailed associations between BCAAs metabolism and BCFAs biosynthesis remain to be addressed. In this study, we deleted the ilvC gene, which encodes ketol-acid reductoisomerase in the BCAAs synthetic pathway, from the Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc genome. We characterized gene functions in BCFAs biosynthesis and production of the diffusible signal factor (DSF family signals. Disruption of ilvC caused Xcc to become auxotrophic for valine and isoleucine, and lose the ability to synthesize BCFAs via carbohydrate metabolism. Furthermore, ilvC mutant reduced the ability to produce DSF-family signals, especially branched-chain DSF-family signals, which might be the main reason for Xcc reduction of pathogenesis toward host plants. In this report, we confirmed that BCFAs do not have major functions in acclimatizing Xcc cells to low temperatures.

  6. Diffusion-weighted whole-body MR imaging with background body signal suppression: a feasibility study at 3.0 Tesla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muertz, Petra; Krautmacher, Carsten; Traeber, Frank; Schild, Hans H.; Willinek, Winfried A.; Gieseke, Juergen

    2007-01-01

    The purpose was to provide a diffusion-weighted whole-body magnetic resonance (MR) imaging sequence with background body signal suppression (DWIBS) at 3.0 Tesla. A diffusion-weighted spin-echo echo-planar imaging sequence was combined with the following methods of fat suppression: short TI inversion recovery (STIR), spectral attenuated inversion recovery (SPAIR), and spectral presaturation by inversion recovery (SPIR). Optimized sequences were implemented on a 3.0- and a 1.5-Tesla system and evaluated in three healthy volunteers and six patients with various lesions in the neck, chest, and abdomen on the basis of reconstructed maximum intensity projection images. In one patient with metastases of malignant melanoma, DWIBS was compared with 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). Good fat suppression for all regions and diagnostic image quality in all cases could be obtained at 3.0 Tesla with the STIR method. In comparison with 1.5 Tesla, DWIBS images at 3.0 Tesla were judged to provide a better lesion-to-bone tissue contrast. However, larger susceptibility-induced image distortions and signal intensity losses, stronger blurring artifacts, and more pronounced motion artifacts degraded the image quality at 3.0 Tesla. A good correlation was found between the metastases as depicted by DWIBS and those as visualized by FDG-PET. DWIBS is feasible at 3.0 Tesla with diagnostic image quality. (orig.)

  7. Diffusible signal factor (DSF) synthase RpfF of Xylella fastidiosa is a multifunction protein also required for response to DSF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionescu, Michael; Baccari, Clelia; Da Silva, Aline Maria; Garcia, Angelica; Yokota, Kenji; Lindow, Steven E

    2013-12-01

    Xylella fastidiosa, like related Xanthomonas species, employs an Rpf cell-cell communication system consisting of a diffusible signal factor (DSF) synthase, RpfF, and a DSF sensor, RpfC, to coordinate expression of virulence genes. While phenotypes of a ΔrpfF strain in Xanthomonas campestris could be complemented by its own DSF, the DSF produced by X. fastidiosa (XfDSF) did not restore expression of the XfDSF-dependent genes hxfA and hxfB to a ΔrpfF strain of X. fastidiosa, suggesting that RpfF is involved in XfDSF sensing or XfDSF-dependent signaling. To test this conjecture, rpfC and rpfF of X. campestris were replaced by those of X. fastidiosa, and the contribution of each gene to the induction of a X. campestris DSF-dependent gene was assessed. As in X. fastidiosa, XfDSF-dependent signaling required both X. fastidiosa proteins RpfF and RpfC. RpfF repressed RpfC signaling activity, which in turn was derepressed by XfDSF. A mutated X. fastidiosa RpfF protein with two substitutions of glutamate to alanine in its active site was incapable of XfDSF production yet enabled a response to XfDSF, indicating that XfDSF production and the response to XfDSF are two separate functions in which RpfF is involved. This mutant was also hypervirulent to grape, demonstrating the antivirulence effects of XfDSF itself in X. fastidiosa. The Rpf system of X. fastidiosa is thus a novel example of a quorum-sensing signal synthase that is also involved in the response to the signal molecule that it synthesizes.

  8. Diffuse excessive high signal intensity in low-risk preterm infants at term-equivalent age does not predict outcome at 1 year: a prospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitner, Yael [Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Centre, Child Development Centre, Dana-Dwek Children' s Hospital, Tel Aviv (Israel); Tel Aviv University, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv (Israel); Weinstein, Maya [Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Centre, Functional Brain Centre, The Wohl Institute for Advanced Imaging, Tel Aviv (Israel); Bar Ilan University, Department of Psychology, Gonda Multidisciplinary Brain Research Centre, Ramat-Gan (Israel); Myers, Vicki [Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Centre, Functional Brain Centre, The Wohl Institute for Advanced Imaging, Tel Aviv (Israel); Uliel, Shimrit; Geva, Karen [Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Centre, Child Development Centre, Dana-Dwek Children' s Hospital, Tel Aviv (Israel); Berger, Irit; Marom, Ronella [Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Centre, Department of Neonatology, Lis Maternity Hospital, Tel Aviv (Israel); Tel Aviv University, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv (Israel); Bashat, Dafna Ben [Tel Aviv University, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv (Israel); Tel Aviv University, Sagol School of Neuroscience, Tel Aviv (Israel); Ben-Sira, Liat [Tel Aviv University, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv (Israel); Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Tel Aviv (Israel); Geva, Ronny [Bar Ilan University, Department of Psychology, Gonda Multidisciplinary Brain Research Centre, Ramat-Gan (Israel); Gross-Tsur, Varda [Shaare-Zedek Medical Centre, Neuropediatric Unit, Jerusalem (Israel)

    2014-08-15

    The outcome of premature infants with only diffuse excessive high signal intensity (DEHSI) is not clear. We explored the relationship between DEHSI, white matter (WM) diffusion characteristics, perinatal characteristics, and neurobehavioral outcome at 1 year in a homogenous group of preterm infants without major brain abnormalities. Fifty-eight preterm infants, gestational age 29 ± 2.6 weeks, underwent an MRI at term-equivalent age (TEA). Griffiths Mental Developmental Scales, neurological assessment, and Parental Stress Index (PSI) were performed at 1 year corrected age. These measures were compared between preterm infants according to DEHSI classification (none, mild, moderate). Diffusion tensor imaging was used in major WM volumes of interest to objectively measure the degree of WM maturation. No significant differences were detected in the perinatal risk characteristics, neurobehavioral outcome, and PSI at 1 year between infants with different DEHSI classifications. In infants with DEHSI, increased axial and radial diffusivities were detected in the optic radiations, centrum semiovale, and posterior limb of the internal capsule, indicating less advanced maturation of the WM. Significant correlations were detected between the time interval from birth to MRI and the WM microstructure in infants without DEHSI. DEHSI in premature infants is neither a predictive measure for short-term adverse neurobehavioral outcome nor related to perinatal risk characteristics. Extrauterine exposure time had a differential effect on WM maturational trajectories in infants with DEHSI compared to those without. We suggest DEHSI may represent an alteration in WM maturational characteristics. Further follow-up studies may verify later consequences of DEHSI in premature infants. (orig.)

  9. Diffuse excessive high signal intensity in low-risk preterm infants at term-equivalent age does not predict outcome at 1 year: a prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitner, Yael; Weinstein, Maya; Myers, Vicki; Uliel, Shimrit; Geva, Karen; Berger, Irit; Marom, Ronella; Bashat, Dafna Ben; Ben-Sira, Liat; Geva, Ronny; Gross-Tsur, Varda

    2014-01-01

    The outcome of premature infants with only diffuse excessive high signal intensity (DEHSI) is not clear. We explored the relationship between DEHSI, white matter (WM) diffusion characteristics, perinatal characteristics, and neurobehavioral outcome at 1 year in a homogenous group of preterm infants without major brain abnormalities. Fifty-eight preterm infants, gestational age 29 ± 2.6 weeks, underwent an MRI at term-equivalent age (TEA). Griffiths Mental Developmental Scales, neurological assessment, and Parental Stress Index (PSI) were performed at 1 year corrected age. These measures were compared between preterm infants according to DEHSI classification (none, mild, moderate). Diffusion tensor imaging was used in major WM volumes of interest to objectively measure the degree of WM maturation. No significant differences were detected in the perinatal risk characteristics, neurobehavioral outcome, and PSI at 1 year between infants with different DEHSI classifications. In infants with DEHSI, increased axial and radial diffusivities were detected in the optic radiations, centrum semiovale, and posterior limb of the internal capsule, indicating less advanced maturation of the WM. Significant correlations were detected between the time interval from birth to MRI and the WM microstructure in infants without DEHSI. DEHSI in premature infants is neither a predictive measure for short-term adverse neurobehavioral outcome nor related to perinatal risk characteristics. Extrauterine exposure time had a differential effect on WM maturational trajectories in infants with DEHSI compared to those without. We suggest DEHSI may represent an alteration in WM maturational characteristics. Further follow-up studies may verify later consequences of DEHSI in premature infants. (orig.)

  10. Comparative Analysis of Signal Intensity and Apparent Diffusion Coefficient at Varying b-values in the Brain : Diffusion Weighted-Echo Planar Image (T{sub 2} and FLAIR) Sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Jong Kap [Dept. of Radiology, Cheomdan Medical Center, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Im, Jung Yeol [Dept. of Digital Management Information Graduate School of Nambu Univesity, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-09-15

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) has been demonstrated to be a practical method for the diagnosis of various brain diseases such as acute infarction, brain tumor, and white matter disease. In this study, we used two techniques to examine the average signal intensity (SI) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of the brains of patients who ranged in age from 10 to 60 years. Our results indicated that the average SI was the highest in amygdala (as derived from DWI), whereas that in the cerebrospinal fluid was the lowest. The average ADC was the highest in the cerebrospinal fluid, whereas the lowest measurement was derived from the pons. The average SI and ADC were higher in T{sub 2}-DW-EPI than in FLAIR-DW-EPI. The higher the b-value, the smaller the average difference in both imaging techniques; the lower the b-value, the greater the average difference. Also, comparative analysis of the brains of patients who had experienced cerebral infarction showed no distinct lesion in the general MR image over time. However, there was a high SI in apparent weighted images. Analysis of other brain diseases (e.g., bleeding, acute, subacute, chronic infarction) indicated SI variance in accordance with characteristics of the two techniques. The higher the SI, the lower the ADC. Taken together, the value of SI and ADC in accordance with frequently occurring areas and various brain disease varies based on the b-value and imaging technique. Because they provide additional useful information in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with various brain diseases through signal recognition, the proper imaging technique and b-value are important for the detection and interpretation of subacute stroke and other brain diseases.

  11. Delineation of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia isolates from cystic fibrosis patients by fatty acid methyl ester profiles and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectra using hierarchical cluster analysis and principal component analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidigal, Pedrina Gonçalves; Mosel, Frank; Koehling, Hedda Luise; Mueller, Karl Dieter; Buer, Jan; Rath, Peter Michael; Steinmann, Joerg

    2014-12-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is an opportunist multidrug-resistant pathogen that causes a wide range of nosocomial infections. Various cystic fibrosis (CF) centres have reported an increasing prevalence of S. maltophilia colonization/infection among patients with this disease. The purpose of this study was to assess specific fingerprints of S. maltophilia isolates from CF patients (n = 71) by investigating fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) through gas chromatography (GC) and highly abundant proteins by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), and to compare them with isolates obtained from intensive care unit (ICU) patients (n = 20) and the environment (n = 11). Principal component analysis (PCA) of GC-FAME patterns did not reveal a clustering corresponding to distinct CF, ICU or environmental types. Based on the peak area index, it was observed that S. maltophilia isolates from CF patients produced significantly higher amounts of fatty acids in comparison with ICU patients and the environmental isolates. Hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) based on the MALDI-TOF MS peak profiles of S. maltophilia revealed the presence of five large clusters, suggesting a high phenotypic diversity. Although HCA of MALDI-TOF mass spectra did not result in distinct clusters predominantly composed of CF isolates, PCA revealed the presence of a distinct cluster composed of S. maltophilia isolates from CF patients. Our data suggest that S. maltophilia colonizing CF patients tend to modify not only their fatty acid patterns but also their protein patterns as a response to adaptation in the unfavourable environment of the CF lung. © 2014 The Authors.

  12. Ectopic Expression of Xylella fastidiosa rpfF Conferring Production of Diffusible Signal Factor in Transgenic Tobacco and Citrus Alters Pathogen Behavior and Reduces Disease Severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caserta, R; Souza-Neto, R R; Takita, M A; Lindow, S E; De Souza, A A

    2017-11-01

    The pathogenicity of Xylella fastidiosa is associated with its ability to colonize the xylem of host plants. Expression of genes contributing to xylem colonization are suppressed, while those necessary for insect vector acquisition are increased with increasing concentrations of diffusible signal factor (DSF), whose production is dependent on RpfF. We previously demonstrated that transgenic citrus plants ectopically expressing rpfF from a citrus strain of X. fastidiosa subsp. pauca exhibited less susceptibility to Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri, another pathogen whose virulence is modulated by DSF accumulation. Here, we demonstrate that ectopic expression of rpfF in both transgenic tobacco and sweet orange also confers a reduction in disease severity incited by X. fastidiosa and reduces its colonization of those plants. Decreased disease severity in the transgenic plants was generally associated with increased expression of genes conferring adhesiveness to the pathogen and decreased expression of genes necessary for active motility, accounting for the reduced population sizes achieved in the plants, apparently by limiting pathogen dispersal through the plant. Plant-derived DSF signal molecules in a host plant can, therefore, be exploited to interfere with more than one pathogen whose virulence is controlled by DSF signaling.

  13. The truncate mutation of Notch2 enhances cell proliferation through activating the NF-κB signal pathway in the diffuse large B-cell lymphomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinxia Zhang

    Full Text Available The Notch2 is a critical membrane receptor for B-cell functions, and also displays various biological roles in lymphoma pathogenesis. In this article, we reported that 3 of 69 (4.3% diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCLs exhibited a truncate NOTCH2 mutation at the nucleotide 7605 (G/A in the cDNA sequence, which led to partial deletion of the C-terminal of PEST (proline-, glutamic acid-, serine- and threonine-rich domain. The truncate Notch2 activated both the Notch2 and the NF-κB signals and promoted the proliferation of B-cell lymphoma cell lines, including DLBCL and Burkitt's lymphoma cell lines. Moreover, the ectopic proliferation was completely inhibited by ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (PDTC, an NF-κB inhibitor. Simultaneously, PDTC also reduced the expression level of Notch2. Based on these results, we conclude that the Notch2 receptor with PEST domain truncation enhances cell proliferation which may be associated with the activation of the Notch2 and the NF-κB signaling. Our results are expected to provide a possible target for new DLBCL therapies by suppressing the Notch2 and the NF-κB signaling.

  14. Pilot study of a novel tool for input-free automated identification of transition zone prostate tumors using T2- and diffusion-weighted signal and textural features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stember, Joseph N; Deng, Fang-Ming; Taneja, Samir S; Rosenkrantz, Andrew B

    2014-08-01

    To present results of a pilot study to develop software that identifies regions suspicious for prostate transition zone (TZ) tumor, free of user input. Eight patients with TZ tumors were used to develop the model by training a Naïve Bayes classifier to detect tumors based on selection of most accurate predictors among various signal and textural features on T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps. Features tested as inputs were: average signal, signal standard deviation, energy, contrast, correlation, homogeneity and entropy (all defined on T2WI); and average ADC. A forward selection scheme was used on the remaining 20% of training set supervoxels to identify important inputs. The trained model was tested on a different set of ten patients, half with TZ tumors. In training cases, the software tiled the TZ with 4 × 4-voxel "supervoxels," 80% of which were used to train the classifier. Each of 100 iterations selected T2WI energy and average ADC, which therefore were deemed the optimal model input. The two-feature model was applied blindly to the separate set of test patients, again without operator input of suspicious foci. The software correctly predicted presence or absence of TZ tumor in all test patients. Furthermore, locations of predicted tumors corresponded spatially with locations of biopsies that had confirmed their presence. Preliminary findings suggest that this tool has potential to accurately predict TZ tumor presence and location, without operator input. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Persistent Organic Pollutants Induced Protein Expression and Immunocrossreactivity by Stenotrophomonas maltophilia PM102: A Prospective Bioremediating Candidate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piyali Mukherjee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel bacterium capable of growth on trichloroethylene as the sole carbon source was identified as Stenotrophomonas maltophilia PM102 by 16S rDNA sequencing (accession number of NCBI GenBank: JQ797560. In this paper, we report the growth pattern, TCE degradation, and total proteome of this bacterium in presence of various other carbon sources: toluene, phenol, glucose, chloroform, and benzene. TCE degradation was comparatively enhanced in presence of benzene. Densitometric analysis of the intracellular protein profile revealed four proteins of 78.6, 35.14, 26.2, and 20.47 kDa while the extracellular protein profile revealed two distinct bands at 14 kDa and 11 kDa that were induced by TCE, benzene, toluene, and chloroform but absent in the glucose lane. A rabbit was immunised with the total protein extracted from the bacteria grown in 0.2% TCE + 0.2% peptone. Antibody preadsorbed on proteins from peptone grown PM102 cells reacted with a single protein of 35.14 kDa (analysed by MALDI-TOF-mass-spectrometry from TCE, benzene, toluene, or chloroform grown cells. No reaction was seen for proteins of PM102 grown with glucose. The PM102 strain was immobilised in calcium alginate beads, and TCE degradation by immobilised cells was almost double of that by free cells. The beads could be reused 8 times.

  16. Incidentally detected enhancing lesions found in breast MRI: analysis of apparent diffusion coefficient and T2 signal intensity significantly improves specificity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arponen, Otso; Masarwah, Amro; Taina, Mikko [Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio University Hospital, Diagnostic Imaging Centre, Department of Clinical Radiology, PO Box 1777, Kuopio (Finland); Kuopio University Hospital, University of Eastern Finland, Institute of Clinical Medicine, School of Medicine, Department of Clinical Radiology, PO Box 1777, Kuopio (Finland); Sutela, Anna; Koenoenen, Mervi; Hakumaeki, Juhana; Sudah, Mazen [Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio University Hospital, Diagnostic Imaging Centre, Department of Clinical Radiology, PO Box 1777, Kuopio (Finland); Sironen, Reijo [Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio University Hospital, Department of Pathology, PO Box 1777, Kuopio (Finland); Kuopio University Hospital, University of Eastern Finland, Institute of Clinical Medicine, School of Medicine, Clinical Pathology and Forensic Medicine, PO Box 1777, Kuopio (Finland); University of Eastern Finland, Cancer Center of Eastern Finland, Kuopio (Finland); Vanninen, Ritva [Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio University Hospital, Diagnostic Imaging Centre, Department of Clinical Radiology, PO Box 1777, Kuopio (Finland); Kuopio University Hospital, University of Eastern Finland, Institute of Clinical Medicine, School of Medicine, Department of Clinical Radiology, PO Box 1777, Kuopio (Finland); University of Eastern Finland, Cancer Center of Eastern Finland, Kuopio (Finland)

    2016-12-15

    To evaluate the value of adding T2- and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) to the BI-RADS registered classification in MRI-detected lesions. This retrospective study included 112 consecutive patients who underwent 3.0T structural breast MRI with T2- and DWI on the basis of EUSOMA recommendations. Morphological and kinetic features, T2 signal intensity (T2 SI) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) findings were assessed. Thirty-three (29.5 %) patients (mean age 57.0 ± 12.7 years) had 36 primarily MRI-detected incidental lesions of which 16 (44.4 %) proved to be malignant. No single morphological or kinetic feature was associated with malignancy. Both low T2 SI (P = 0.009) and low ADC values (≤0.87 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}s{sup -1}, P < 0.001) yielded high specificity (80.0 %/80.0 %). The BI-RADS classification supplemented with information from DWI and T2-WI improved the diagnostic performance of the BI-RADS classification as sensitivity remained 100 % and specificity improved from 30 % to 65.0 %. The numbers of false positive lesions declined from 39 % (N = 14) to 19 % (N = 7). MRI-detected incidental lesions may be challenging to characterize as they have few specific malignancy indicating features. The specificity of MRI can be improved by incorporating T2 SI and ADC values into the BI-RADS assessment. (orig.)

  17. MR evaluation of breast lesions obtained by diffusion-weighted imaging with background body signal suppression (DWIBS) and correlations with histological findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschetta, Marco; Telegrafo, Michele; Rella, Leonarda; Capolongo, Arcangela; Stabile Ianora, Amato Antonio; Angelelli, Giuseppe

    2014-07-01

    Diffusion imaging represents a new imaging tool for the diagnosis of breast cancer. This study aims to investigate the role of diffusion-weighted MRI with background body signal suppression (DWIBS) for evaluating breast lesions. 90 patients were prospectively evaluated by MRI with STIR, TSE-T2, contrast enhanced THRIVE-T1 and DWIBS sequences. DWIBS were analyzed searching for the presence of breast lesions and calculating the ADC value. ADC values of ≤1.44×10(-3)mm(2)/s were considered suspicious for malignancy. This analysis was then compared with the histological findings. Sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic accuracy (DA), positive predictive value (PPV) and negative (NPV) were calculated. In 53/90 (59%) patients, DWIBS indicated the presence of breast lesions, 16 (30%) with ADC values of >1.44 and 37 (70%) with ADC≤1.44. The comparison with histology showed 25 malignant and 28 benign lesions. DWIBS sequences obtained sensitivity, specificity, DA, PPV and NPV values of 100, 82, 87, 68 and 100%, respectively. DWIBS can be proposed in the MRI breast protocol representing an accurate diagnostic complement. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Importance of a diffusion-dominant small volume to activate cell-secreted soluble factor signaling in embryonic stem cell culture in microbioreactors: a mathematical model based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Mohammad Mahfuz; Fujii, Teruo; Sakai, Yasuyuki

    2013-07-01

    In our previous studies, we observed that cell-secreted BMP4 had a prominent influence on mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) behaviors in a membrane-based two-chambered microbioreactor (MB), but not in a macro-scale culture (6-well plate/6WP). In this study, we investigated how the physical aspects of these cultures regulated BMP4 signaling by developing mathematical models of the cultures. The models estimated signaling activity in the cultures by considering size of the undifferentiated mESC colonies and their growth, diffusion of BMP4, and BMP4 trafficking process in the colonies. The models successfully depicted measured profile of BMP4 concentration in the culture medium which was two times higher in the MB than that in the 6WP during 5-day culture. The models estimated that, owing to the small volume and the membrane, cells were exposed to a higher BMP4 concentration in the top chamber of the MB than that in the 6WP culture. The higher concentration of BMP4 induced a higher concentration of BMP4-bound receptor in the colony in the MB than in the 6WP, thereby leading to the higher activation of BMP4 signaling in the MB. The models also predicted that the size of the MB, but not that of the 6WP, was suitable for maximizing BMP4 accumulation and upregulating its signaling. This study will be helpful in analyzing culture systems, designing microfluidic devices for controlling ESC or other cell behavior. Copyright © 2013 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. A small diffusible signal molecule is responsible for the global control of virulence and exoenzyme production in the plant pathogen Erwinia carotovora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirhonen, M; Flego, D; Heikinheimo, R; Palva, E T

    1993-06-01

    Virulence of the plant pathogen Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora is dependent on the production and secretion of a complex arsenal of plant cell wall-degrading enzymes. Production of these exoenzymes is controlled by a global regulatory mechanism. A virulent mutants in one of the regulatory loci, expI, show a pleiotropic defect in the growth phase-dependent transcriptional activation of exoenzyme gene expression. The expI gene encodes a 26 kDa polypeptide that is structurally and functionally related to the luxI gene product of Vibrio fischeri. Functional similarity of expI and luxI has been demonstrated by reciprocal genetic complementation experiments. LuxI controls bioluminescence in V.fischeri in a growth phase-dependent manner by directing the synthesis of the diffusible autoinducer, N-(3-oxohexanoyl) homoserine lactone. E.c. subsp. carotovora expI+ strains or Escherichia coli harboring the cloned expI gene excrete a small diffusible signal molecule that complements the expI mutation of Erwinia as well as a luxI mutation of V.fischeri. This extracellular complementation can also be achieved by E.coli harboring the luxI gene from V.fischeri or by adding the synthetic V.fischeri autoinducer. Both the production of the plant tissue-macerating exoenzymes and the ability of the bacteria to propagate in planta are restored in expI mutants by autoinducer addition. These data suggest that the same signal molecule is employed in control of such diverse processes as virulence in a plant pathogen and bioluminescence in a marine bacterium, and may represent a general mechanism by which bacteria modulate gene expression in response to changing environmental conditions.

  20. Using optical fibers with different modes to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of diffuse correlation spectroscopy flow-oximeter measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lian; Lin, Yu; Shang, Yu; Shelton, Brent J.; Yu, Guoqiang

    2013-03-01

    The dual-wavelength diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) flow-oximeter is an emerging technique enabling simultaneous measurements of blood flow and blood oxygenation changes in deep tissues. High signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is crucial when applying DCS technologies in the study of human tissues where the detected signals are usually very weak. In this study, single-mode, few-mode, and multimode fibers are compared to explore the possibility of improving the SNR of DCS flow-oximeter measurements. Experiments on liquid phantom solutions and in vivo muscle tissues show only slight improvements in flow measurements when using the few-mode fiber compared with using the single-mode fiber. However, light intensities detected by the few-mode and multimode fibers are increased, leading to significant SNR improvements in detections of phantom optical property and tissue blood oxygenation. The outcomes from this study provide useful guidance for the selection of optical fibers to improve DCS flow-oximeter measurements.

  1. Biofilm formation by Stenotrophomonas maltophilia isolates from device-associated nosocomial infections Formación de biopelículas por aislamientos de Stenotrophomonas maltophilia recuperados de infecciones nosocomiales asociadas al uso de dispositivos médicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Passerini De Rossi

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Medical devices are often colonized by bacteria which may cause severe infections. The aim of this work was to evaluate biofilm formation by S. maltophilia isolates from device-associated nosocomial infections. The 13 local isolates exhibited different capacities of biofilm formation on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces. All isolates formed strong biofilms in polystyrene microplates, while strong, moderate or weak biofilms were detected in borosilicate (BS or polypropylene (PP tubes. The proficiency of biofilm formation was better evaluated by the level of crystal violet staining expressed relative to the final culture density. The microscopic analysis of biofilms formed on glass coverslips revealed the presence of a matrix of exopolysaccharides and microcolonies typical of biofilm architecture. Isolates with increased adhesion to BS showed larger microcolonies. According to our results, twitching correlated well with attachment to the three abiotic surfaces tested, while swimming only showed a slight correlation with biofilm formation on PP. Poor correlation was observed between cell surface hydrophobicity and biofilm formation. One of the highest biofilm-producing isolates adhered to urethral catheters of different materials, and exhibited an increased resistance to oxidative stress, one of the common stresses encountered by bacteria during the infection process due to the immune response.El objetivo de este trabajo fue evaluar la formación de biopelículas por parte de aislamientos de Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. Los 13 aislamientos locales evaluados mostraron diferente capacidad de formar biopelículas en superficies hidrofílicas e hidrofóbicas. Todos ellos formaron biopelículas fuertes en microplacas de poliestireno (PS, mientras que se observaron biopelículas fuertes, moderadas o débiles en tubos de borosilicato (BS o polipropileno (PP. La medida del cristal violeta unido a la biopelícula expresada en función de la densidad

  2. Identification of electrode respiring, hydrocarbonoclastic bacterial strain Stenotrophomonas maltophilia MK2 highlights the untapped potential for environmental bioremediation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnaveni Venkidusamy

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Electrode respiring bacteria (ERB possess a great potential for many biotechnological applications such as microbial electrochemical remediation systems (MERS because of their exoelectrogenic capabilities to degrade xenobiotic pollutants. Very few ERB have been isolated from MERS, those exhibited a bioremediation potential towards organic contaminants. Here we report once such bacterial strain, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia MK2, a facultative anaerobic bacterium isolated from a hydrocarbon fed MERS, showed a potent hydrocarbonoclastic behavior under aerobic and anaerobic environments. Distinct properties of the strain MK2 were anaerobic fermentation of the amino acids, electrode respiration, anaerobic nitrate reduction and the ability to metabolize n-alkane components (C8-C36 of petroleum hydrocarbons including the biomarkers, pristine and phytane. The characteristic of diazoic dye decolorization was used as a criterion for pre-screening the possible electrochemically active microbial candidates. Bioelectricity generation with concomitant dye decolorization in MERS showed that the strain is electrochemically active. In acetate fed microbial fuel cells, maximum current density of 273±8 mA/m2 (1000Ω was produced (power density 113±7 mW/m2 by strain MK2 with a coulombic efficiency of 34.8 %. Further, the presence of possible alkane hydroxylase genes (alkB and rubA in the strain MK2 indicated that the genes involved in hydrocarbon degradation are of diverse origin. Such observations demonstrated the potential of facultative hydrocarbon degradation in contaminated environments. Identification of such a novel petrochemical hydrocarbon degrading ERB is likely to offer a new route to the sustainable bioremedial process of source zone contamination with simultaneous energy generation through MERS.

  3. Antibacterial and cytotoxic efficacy of extracellular silver nanoparticles biofabricated from chromium reducing novel OS4 strain of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Oves

    Full Text Available Biofabricated metal nanoparticles are generally biocompatible, inexpensive, and ecofriendly, therefore, are used preferably in industries, medical and material science research. Considering the importance of biofabricated materials, we isolated, characterized and identified a novel bacterial strain OS4 of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (GenBank: JN247637.1. At neutral pH, this Gram negative bacterial strain significantly reduced hexavalent chromium, an important heavy metal contaminant found in the tannery effluents and minings. Subsequently, even at room temperature the supernatant of log phase grown culture of strain OS4 also reduced silver nitrate (AgNO3 to generate nanoparticles (AgNPs. These AgNPs were further characterized by UV-visible, Nanophox particle size analyzer, XRD, SEM and FTIR. As evident from the FTIR data, plausibly the protein components of supernatant caused the reduction of AgNO3. The cuboid and homogenous AgNPs showed a characteristic UV-visible peak at 428 nm with average size of ~93 nm. The XRD spectra exhibited the characteristic Bragg peaks of 111, 200, 220 and 311 facets of the face centred cubic symmetry of nanoparticles suggesting that these nanoparticles were crystalline in nature. From the nanoparticle release kinetics data, the rapid release of AgNPs was correlated with the particle size and increasing surface area of the nanoparticles. A highly significant antimicrobial activity against medically important bacteria by the biofabricated AgNPs was also revealed as decline in growth of Staphylococcus aureus (91%, Escherichia coli (69% and Serratia marcescens (66% substantially. Additionally, different cytotoxic assays showed no toxicity of AgNPs to liver function, RBCs, splenocytes and HeLa cells, hence these particles were safe to use. Therefore, this novel bacterial strain OS4 is likely to provide broad spectrum benefits for curing chromium polluted sites, for biofabrication of AgNPs and ultimately in the

  4. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging for the initial characterization of non-fatty soft tissue tumors: correlation between T2 signal intensity and ADC values

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gondim Teixeira, Pedro Augusto [Service d' Imagerie Guilloz, CHU Nancy, Nancy (France); Universite de Lorraine, IADI, UMR S 947, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Gay, Frederique; Blum, Alain [Service d' Imagerie Guilloz, CHU Nancy, Nancy (France); Chen, Bailiang; Felblinger, Jacques [Universite de Lorraine, IADI, UMR S 947, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Zins, Marie [University Versailles St-Quentin, Versailles (France); Inserm, Centre for research in Epidemiology and Population Health (CESP), U1018, Villejuif (France); Sirveaux, Francois [Centre Chirurgical Emile Galle, Service de Chirurgie Traumatologique et Orthopedique, Nancy (France)

    2016-02-15

    To evaluate the performance of quantitative diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) correlated with T2 signal in differentiating non-fatty benign from malignant tumors. A total of 76 patients with a histologically confirmed non-fatty soft tissue tumors (46 benign and 30 malignant) were prospectively included in this ethics committee approved study. All patients signed an informed consent and underwent MRI with DWI with two b values (0 and 600). ADC values from the solid components of these tumors were obtained and were correlated with the lesion's signal intensity on T2-weighted fat-saturated sequences. ADC values were obtained from adjacent normal muscle to allow calculation of tumor/muscle ADC ratios. There were 58 hyperintense and 18 iso or hypointense lesions. All hypointense lesions were benign. The mean ADC values for benign and malignant tumors were 1.47 ± 0.54 x 10{sup -3} and 1.17 ± 0.38 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s respectively (p < 0.005). The mean ADC ratio in benign iso or hypointense tumors was significantly lower than that of hyperintense ones (0.76 ± 0.21 versus 1.58 ± 0.82 - p < 0.0001). An ADC ratio lower than 0.915 was highly specific for malignancy (96.4 %), whereas an ADC ratio higher than 1.32 was highly sensitive for benign lesions (90 %). ADC analysis can be useful in the initial characterization of T2 hyperintense non-fatty soft tissue masses, although this technique alone is not likely to change patient management. (orig.)

  5. Apparent diffusion coefficient and vascular signal fraction measurements with magnetic resonance imaging: feasibility in metastatic ovarian cancer at 3 Tesla. Technical development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sala, Evis; Priest, Andrew N.; Kataoka, Masako; Graves, Martin J.; Joubert, Ilse; Lomas, David J.; McLean, Mary A.; Griffiths, John R.; Crawford, Robin A.F.; Jimenez-Linan, Mercedes; Earl, Helena M.; Brenton, James D.

    2010-01-01

    This prospective study aims to evaluate the feasibility of DWI at 3 Tesla in patients with advanced ovarian cancer and investigate the differences in vascular signal fraction (VSF) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values between primary ovarian mass and metastatic disease. Twenty patients with suspected advanced ovarian carcinoma were enrolled in the study. High-resolution T2W FRFSE images were used to confirm the position of three marker lesions: primary ovarian mass, omental cake and peritoneal deposit. Multislice DWI was acquired in a single breath-hold using multiple b-values. The three marker lesions were outlined by an experienced radiologist on ADC and VSF maps. Ovarian lesions showed the highest ADC values. The mean ADC value for peritoneal deposits was significantly lower than for both ovarian lesions (p = 0.03) and omental cake (p = 0.03). The VSF for omental cake was significantly higher than for ovarian lesions (p = 0.01) and peritoneal deposits (p = 0.04). There was a significant positive correlation between ADC and VSF for peritoneal deposits (p = 0.04). DWI in advanced ovarian cancer is feasible at 3 T. There are significant differences in baseline ADC and VSF values between ovarian cancer, omental cake and peritoneal deposits that may explain the mixed treatment response that occurs at different disease sites. (orig.)

  6. Evaluation of light scattering properties and chromophore concentrations in skin tissue based on diffuse reflectance signals at isosbestic wavelengths of hemoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokokawa, Takumi; Nishidate, Izumi

    2016-04-01

    We investigate a method to evaluate light-scattering properties and chromophore concentrations in human skin tissue through diffuse reflectance spectroscopy using the reflectance signals acquired at isosbestic wavelengths of hemoglobin (420, 450, 500, and 585 nm). In the proposed method, Monte Carlo simulation-based empirical formulas are used to specify the scattering parameters of skin tissue, such as the scattering amplitude a and the scattering power b, as well as the concentration of melanin C m and the total blood concentration C tb. The use of isosbestic wavelengths of hemoglobin enables the values of C m, C tb, a, and b to be estimated independently of the oxygenation of hemoglobin. The spectrum of the reduced scattering coefficient is reconstructed from the scattering parameters. Experiments using in vivo human skin tissues were performed to confirm the feasibility of the proposed method for evaluating the changes in scattering properties and chromophore concentrations in skin tissue. The experimental results revealed that light scattering is significantly reduced by the application of a glycerol solution, which indicates an optical clearing effect due to osmotic dehydration and the matching of the refractive indices of scatterers in the epidermis.

  7. Phenotype overlap in Xylella fastidiosa is controlled by the cyclic di-GMP phosphodiesterase Eal in response to antibiotic exposure and diffusible signal factor-mediated cell-cell signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Alessandra A; Ionescu, Michael; Baccari, Clelia; da Silva, Aline M; Lindow, Steven E

    2013-06-01

    Eal is an EAL domain protein in Xylella fastidiosa homologous to one involved in resistance to tobramycin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. EAL and HD-GYP domain proteins are implicated in the hydrolysis of the secondary messenger bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric GMP (cyclic di-GMP). Cell density-dependent communication mediated by a Diffusible Signal Factor (DSF) also modulates cyclic di-GMP levels in X. fastidiosa, thereby controlling the expression of virulence genes and genes involved in insect transmission. The possible linkage of Eal to both extrinsic factors such as antibiotics and intrinsic factors such as quorum sensing, and whether both affect virulence, was thus addressed. Expression of eal was induced by subinhibitory concentrations of tobramycin, and an eal deletion mutant was more susceptible to this antibiotic than the wild-type strain and exhibited phenotypes similar to those of an rpfF deletion mutant blocked in DSF production, such as hypermotility, reduced biofilm formation, and hypervirulence to grape. Consistent with that, the rpfF mutant was more susceptible than the wild-type strain to tobramycin. Therefore, we propose that cell-cell communication and antibiotic stress can apparently lead to similar modulations of cyclic di-GMP in X. fastidiosa, resulting in similar phenotypes. However, the effect of cell density is dominant compared to that of antibiotic stress, since eal is suppressed by RpfF, which may prevent inappropriate behavioral changes in response to antibiotic stress when DSF accumulates.

  8. Evaluation of diffuse diseases of the upper abdominal organs by MRI. Determination of a normal range in signal intensity ratio of each organ to the renal medulla in T1- and T2-weighted images and evaluation of diffuse diseases of an organ by using it

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsuhashi, Hiroshi

    1995-01-01

    Diffuse diseases of the upper abdominal organs, including the liver, spleen, pancreas, and vertebral marrow, were evaluated by using signal intensity ratio of each organ to the renal medulla in T1- and T2-weighted images. Conventional T1- and T2-weighted images were obtained in 1.5 T MR system in 203 persons, including 122 controls and 81 patients with a diffuse disease in the upper abdominal organ. In controls, though there was neither sexual nor age difference in signal intensity ratios of the liver and pancreas, those of the spleen and vertebral marrow showed sexual and age difference, respectively. A normal range of signal intensity ratio of each organ in each image was determined in each decade of each sex by using controls. The signal intensity ratio of the liver was significantly low in T1- and T2-weighted images in patients with abundant iron deposit and within normal limits in patients with liver cirrhosis or scant iron deposit. The signal intensity ratio of the liver was significantly high only in a T2-weighted image in patients with fatty deposit in the liver, which was suspected to be due to inflammatory change in the liver with fatty deposit. The signal intensity ratios of the spleen, pancreas, and vertebral marrow were significantly low only in a T2-weighted image in patients with iron metabolic disturbance. The signal intensity ratio of the pancreas was significantly high in 40% of patients with acute and/or chronic pancreatitis, which was more sensitive in detection of pancreatitis than data in other studies. it can be concluded that the signal intensity ratio of each organ to the renal medulla in T1- and T2-weighted images is useful for detection of diffuse diseases of the upper abdominal organs by using the normal range in each decade of each sex. (S.Y.)

  9. Microembolic signal monitoring and the prediction of thromboembolic events following coil embolization of unruptured intracranial aneurysms: diffusion-weighted imaging correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Jae-Hoon; Park, Jaechan; Kang, Dong-Hun; Kim, Yong-Won; Kim, Yong-Sun

    2015-01-01

    Microembolic signal (MES) monitoring with transcranial Doppler ultrasonography (TCD) may allow for early prediction of thromboembolisms following endovascular coiling of unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIAs). However, the method has not gained widespread use and may benefit from correlation with diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) of acute ischemic lesions after coiling. This purposed to evaluate the relationship between MESs and DWI-positive lesions more precisely. We conducted a prospective study on 45 consecutive patients. TCD was performed over the artery that is dependent on the site of aneurysm, but seven patients (15.6 %) could not be examined due to the lack of an adequate cranial window. Consequently, 38 patients were available to detect MESs immediately (MES-1) and 24 h (MES-2) after coiling for UIAs. We also checked DWI 1 day after the coiling and analyzed correlations between the TCD and DWI findings. MES-1 and MES-2 were positive in 25 (65.7 %) and 14 (36.8 %) patients, respectively. DWI-positive lesions were seen in 20 (52.6 %) patients, and only 1 (2.6 %) patient was symptomatic. MES-1 and MES-2 were strongly correlated with the number of DWI-positive lesions (Spearman's correlation coefficient = 0.79 and 0.70, P < 0.01 and P < 0.01, respectively). Additionally, there was a significant correlation between MES-1 and MES-2 (Spearman's correlation coefficient = 0.70). Based upon the significant correlation between MES and DWI findings, MES may have a role for early detection of ischemic complications after coiling of UIAs. In addition, future study for further validation with clinical application seems requiring. (orig.)

  10. Signal-to-noise assessment for diffusion tensor imaging with single data set and validation using a difference image method with data from a multicenter study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhiyue J., E-mail: jerry.wang@childrens.com [Department of Radiology, Children' s Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75235 and Department of Radiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States); Chia, Jonathan M. [Clinical Science, Philips Healthcare, Cleveland, Ohio 44143 (United States); Ahmed, Shaheen; Rollins, Nancy K. [Department of Radiology, Children' s Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75235 and Department of Radiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: To describe a quantitative method for determination of SNR that extracts the local noise level using a single diffusion data set. Methods: Brain data sets came from a multicenter study (eight sites; three MR vendors). Data acquisition protocol required b = 0, 700 s/mm{sup 2}, fov = 256 × 256 mm{sup 2}, acquisition matrix size 128 × 128, reconstruction matrix size 256 × 256; 30 gradient encoding directions and voxel size 2 × 2 × 2 mm{sup 3}. Regions-of-interest (ROI) were placed manually on the b = 0 image volume on transverse slices, and signal was recorded as the mean value of the ROI. The noise level from the ROI was evaluated using Fourier Transform based Butterworth high-pass filtering. Patients were divided into two groups, one for filter parameter optimization (N = 17) and one for validation (N = 10). Six white matter areas (the genu and splenium of corpus callosum, right and left centrum semiovale, right and left anterior corona radiata) were analyzed. The Bland–Altman method was used to compare the resulting SNR with that from the difference image method. The filter parameters were optimized for each brain area, and a set of “global” parameters was also obtained, which represent an average of all regions. Results: The Bland–Altman analysis on the validation group using “global” filter parameters revealed that the 95% limits of agreement of percent bias between the SNR obtained with the new and the reference methods were −15.5% (median of the lower limit, range [−24.1%, −8.9%]) and 14.5% (median of the higher limits, range [12.7%, 18.0%]) for the 6 brain areas. Conclusions: An FT-based high-pass filtering method can be used for local area SNR assessment using only one DTI data set. This method could be used to evaluate SNR for patient studies in a multicenter setting.

  11. Diffuse axonal injury: detection of changes in anisotropy of water diffusion by diffusion-weighted imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, J.H.M.; Tsui, E.Y.K.; Yuen, M.K.; Peh, W.C.G.; Fong, D.; Fok, K.F.; Leung, K.M.; Fung, K.K.L.

    2003-01-01

    Myelinated axons of white matter demonstrate prominent directional differences in water diffusion. We performed diffusion-weighted imaging on ten patients with head injury to explore the feasibility of using water diffusion anisotropy for quantitating diffuse axonal injury. We showed significant decrease in diffusion anisotropy indices in areas with or without signal abnormality on T2 and T2*-weighted images. We conclude that the water diffusion anisotropy index a potentially useful, sensitive and quantitative way of diagnosing and assessing patients with diffuse axonal injury. (orig.)

  12. Relationship of the CreBC two-component regulatory system and inner membrane protein CreD with swimming motility in Stenotrophomonas maltophilia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Hui Huang

    Full Text Available The CreBC two-component system (TCS is a conserved regulatory system found in Escherichia coli, Aeromonas spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. In this study, we determined how CreBC TCS regulates secreted protease activities and swimming motility using creB, creC, and creBC in-frame deletion mutants (KJΔCreB, KJΔCreC, and KJΔBC of S. maltophilia KJ. Compared to wild-type KJ, KJΔCreB had a comparable secreted protease activity; however, the secreted protease activities were obviously reduced in KJΔCreC and KJΔBC, suggesting that CreC works together with another unidentified response regulator (not CreB to regulate secreted protease activity. Single gene inactivation of creB or creC resulted in mutants with an enhanced swimming motility, and this phenotype was exacerbated in a double mutant KJΔBC. To elucidate the underlying mechanism responsible for the ΔcreBC-mediated swimming enhancement, flagella morphology observation, RNA-seq based transcriptome assay, qRT-PCR, and membrane integrity and potential assessment were performed. Flagella morphological observation ruled out the possibility that swimming enhancement was due to altered flagella morphology. CreBC inactivation upregulated the expression of creD and flagella-associated genes encoding the basal body- and motor-associated proteins. Furthermore, KJΔBC had an increased membrane susceptibility to Triton X-100 and CreD upregulation in KJΔBC partially alleviated the compromise of membrane integrity. The impact of creBC TCS on bacterial membrane potential was assessed by carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazine (CCCP50 concentration at which 50% of bacterial swimming is inhibited. CCCP50 of wild-type KJ increased when creBC was deleted, indicating an association between the higher membrane potential of KJΔBC cells and enhanced motility. Upregulation of the basal body- and motor-associated genes of flagella in KJΔBC cells may explain the increased

  13. Synthetic Peptides Derived from Bovine Lactoferricin Exhibit Antimicrobial Activity against E. coli ATCC 11775, S. maltophilia ATCC 13636 and S. enteritidis ATCC 13076

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataly De Jesús Huertas Méndez

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Linear, dimeric, tetrameric, and cyclic peptides derived from lactoferricin B–containing non-natural amino acids and the RWQWR motif were synthesized, purified, and characterized using RP-HPLC, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, and circular dichroism. The antibacterial activity of peptides against Escherichia coli ATCC 11775, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia ATCC 13636, and Salmonella enteritidis ATCC 13076 was evaluated. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC were determined. The synthetic bovine lactoferricin exhibited antibacterial activity against E. coli ATCC 11775 and S. enteritidis ATCC 13076. The dimeric peptide (RRWQWR2K-Ahx exhibited the highest antibacterial activity against the tested bacterial strain. The monomeric, cyclic, tetrameric, and palindromic peptides containing the RWQWR motif exhibited high and specific activity against E. coli ATCC 11775. The results suggest that short peptides derived from lactoferricin B could be considered as potential candidates for the development of antibacterial agents against infections caused by E. coli.

  14. Synthetic Peptides Derived from Bovine Lactoferricin Exhibit Antimicrobial Activity against E. coli ATCC 11775, S. maltophilia ATCC 13636 and S. enteritidis ATCC 13076.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertas Méndez, Nataly De Jesús; Vargas Casanova, Yerly; Gómez Chimbi, Anyelith Katherine; Hernández, Edith; Leal Castro, Aura Lucia; Melo Diaz, Javier Mauricio; Rivera Monroy, Zuly Jenny; García Castañeda, Javier Eduardo

    2017-03-12

    Linear, dimeric, tetrameric, and cyclic peptides derived from lactoferricin B-containing non-natural amino acids and the RWQWR motif were synthesized, purified, and characterized using RP-HPLC, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, and circular dichroism. The antibacterial activity of peptides against Escherichia coli ATCC 11775, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia ATCC 13636, and Salmonella enteritidis ATCC 13076 was evaluated. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) were determined. The synthetic bovine lactoferricin exhibited antibacterial activity against E. coli ATCC 11775 and S. enteritidis ATCC 13076. The dimeric peptide (RRWQWR)₂K-Ahx exhibited the highest antibacterial activity against the tested bacterial strain. The monomeric, cyclic, tetrameric, and palindromic peptides containing the RWQWR motif exhibited high and specific activity against E. coli ATCC 11775. The results suggest that short peptides derived from lactoferricin B could be considered as potential candidates for the development of antibacterial agents against infections caused by E. coli .

  15. Synthesis of Chitin Oligosaccharides Using Dried Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Cells Containing a Transglycosylation Reaction-Catalyzing β-N-Acetylhexosaminidase as a Whole-Cell Catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehara, Asaki; Takahashi, Narumi; Moriyama, Mei; Hirano, Takako; Hakamata, Wataru; Nishio, Toshiyuki

    2018-02-01

    Bacterial strain NYT501, which we previously isolated from soil, was identified as Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, and it was confirmed that this strain produces an intracellular β-N-acetylhexosaminidase exhibiting transglycosylation activity. Several properties of this enzyme were characterized using a partially purified enzyme preparation. Using N,N'-diacetylchitobiose (GlcNAc) 2 and N,N',N″-triacetylchitotriose (GlcNAc) 3 as substrates and dried cells of this bacterium as a whole-cell catalyst, chitin oligosaccharides of higher degrees of polymerization were synthesized. (GlcNAc) 3 was generated from (GlcNAc) 2 as the major transglycosylation product, and a certain amount of purified sample of the trisaccharide was obtained. By contrast, in the case of the reaction using (GlcNAc) 3 as a substrate, the yield of higher-degree polymerization oligosaccharides was comparatively low.

  16. Anisotropy in "isotropic diffusion" measurements due to nongaussian diffusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Sune Nørhøj; Olesen, Jonas Lynge; Ianuş, Andrada

    2017-01-01

    Designing novel diffusion-weighted NMR and MRI pulse sequences aiming to probe tissue microstructure with techniques extending beyond the conventional Stejskal-Tanner family is currently of broad interest. One such technique, multidimensional diffusion MRI, has been recently proposed to afford...... model-free decomposition of diffusion signal kurtosis into terms originating from either ensemble variance of isotropic diffusivity or microscopic diffusion anisotropy. This ability rests on the assumption that diffusion can be described as a sum of multiple Gaussian compartments, but this is often...

  17. Correlated diffusion imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Alexander; Glaister, Jeffrey; Cameron, Andrew; Haider, Masoom

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death in the male population. Fortunately, the prognosis is excellent if detected at an early stage. Hence, the detection and localization of prostate cancer is crucial for diagnosis, as well as treatment via targeted focal therapy. New imaging techniques can potentially be invaluable tools for improving prostate cancer detection and localization. In this study, we introduce a new form of diffusion magnetic resonance imaging called correlated diffusion imaging, where the tissue being imaged is characterized by the joint correlation of diffusion signal attenuation across multiple gradient pulse strengths and timings. By taking into account signal attenuation at different water diffusion motion sensitivities, correlated diffusion imaging can provide improved delineation between cancerous tissue and healthy tissue when compared to existing diffusion imaging modalities. Quantitative evaluation using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, tissue class separability analysis, and visual assessment by an expert radiologist were performed to study correlated diffusion imaging for the task of prostate cancer diagnosis. These results are compared with that obtained using T2-weighted imaging and standard diffusion imaging (via the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC)). Experimental results suggest that correlated diffusion imaging provide improved delineation between healthy and cancerous tissue and may have potential as a diagnostic tool for cancer detection and localization in the prostate gland. A new form of diffusion magnetic resonance imaging called correlated diffusion imaging (CDI) was developed for the purpose of aiding radiologists in cancer detection and localization in the prostate gland. Preliminary results show CDI shows considerable promise as a diagnostic aid for radiologists in the detection and localization of prostate cancer

  18. Signal characteristics of focal bone marrow lesions in patients with multiple myeloma using whole body T1w-TSE, T2w-STIR and diffusion-weighted imaging with background suppression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommer, Gregor; Bongartz, Georg; Winter, Leopold [University of Basel Hospital, Department of Radiology, Basel (Switzerland); Klarhoefer, Markus; Lenz, Claudia; Scheffler, Klaus [University of Basel Hospital, Department of Radiology, Division of Radiological Physics, Basel (Switzerland)

    2011-04-15

    This study analyses the diagnostic potential of Diffusion-Weighted Imaging with Background Suppression (DWIBS) in the detection of focal bone marrow lesions from multiple myeloma. The signal and contrast properties of DWIBS are evaluated in correlation with the serum concentration of M-component (MC) and compared with established T1- and T2-weighted sequences. Data from 103 consecutive studies in 81 patients are analysed retrospectively. Signal intensities and apparent Diffusion Coefficients (ADC) of 79 focal lesions in the lumbar spine or pelvis of 38 patients are determined and contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR) is calculated. Data from patients with low (<20 g/L) and high (>20 g/dL) MC are evaluated separately. Signal intensities of focal myeloma lesions on T2w-STIR vary significantly depending on the MC, which leads to a loss in CNR in patients with high MC. No signal variation is observed for T1w-TSE and DWIBS. The CNR values provided by DWIBS in patients with high MC are slightly higher than those of T2w-STIR. ADC values in patients with low MC are significantly higher than in patients with high MC. Whole-body DWIBS has the potential to improve the conspicuity of focal myeloma lesions and provides additional biological information by ADC quantification. (orig.)

  19. Direct measurement of the signal intensity of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging for preoperative grading and treatment guidance for brain gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Chun Wu

    2012-11-01

    Conclusion: The proposed method – direct measuring of tumor signal intensity of DWI on PACS monitors – is feasible for grading gliomas in clinical neuro-oncology imaging services and has a high level of reliability and reproducibility.

  20. Copper Enhanced Monooxygenase Activity and FT-IR Spectroscopic Characterisation of Biotransformation Products in Trichloroethylene Degrading Bacterium: Stenotrophomonas maltophilia PM102

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piyali Mukherjee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Stenotrophomonas maltophilia PM102 (NCBI GenBank Acc. no. JQ797560 is capable of growth on trichloroethylene as the sole carbon source. In this paper, we report the purification and characterisation of oxygenase present in the PM102 isolate. Enzyme activity was found to be induced 10.3-fold in presence of 0.7 mM copper with a further increment to 14.96-fold in presence of 0.05 mM NADH. Optimum temperature for oxygenase activity was recorded at 36∘C. The reported enzyme was found to have enhanced activity at pH 5 and pH 8, indicating presence of two isoforms. Maximum activity was seen on incubation with benzene compared to other substrates like TCE, chloroform, toluene, hexane, and petroleum benzene. Km and Vmax for benzene were 3.8 mM and 340 U/mg/min and those for TCE were 2.1 mM and 170 U/mg/min. The crude enzyme was partially purified by ammonium sulphate precipitation followed by dialysis. Zymogram analysis revealed two isoforms in the 70% purified enzyme fraction. The activity stain was more prominent when the native gel was incubated in benzene as substrate in comparison to TCE. Crude enzyme and purified enzyme fractions were assayed for TCE degradation by the Fujiwara test. TCE biotransformation products were analysed by FT-IR spectroscopy.

  1. Molecular cloning, purification, and characterization of a novel polyMG-specific alginate lyase responsible for alginate MG block degradation in Stenotrophomas maltophilia KJ-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Su In; Kim, Hee Sook [Kyungsung Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Food Science and Biotechnology; Choi, Sung Hee; Lee, Eun Yeol [Kyung Hee Univ., Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2012-09-15

    A gene for a polyMG-specific alginate lyase possessing a novel structure was identified and cloned from Stenotrophomas maltophilia KJ-2 by using PCR with homologous nucleotide sequences-based primers. The recombinant alginate lyase consisting of 475 amino acids was purified on Ni-Sepharose column and exhibited the highest activity at pH 8 and 40 C. Interestingly, the recombinant alginate lyase was expected to have a similar catalytic active site of chondroitin B lyase but did not show chondroitin lyase activity. In the test of substrate specificity, the recombinant alginate lyase preferentially degraded the glycosidic bond of polyMG-block than polyM-block and polyG-block. The chemical structures of the degraded alginate oligosaccharides were elucidated to have mannuronate (M) at the reducing end on the basis of NMR analysis, supporting that KJ-2 polyMG-specific alginate lyase preferably degraded the glycosidic bond in M-G linkage than that in G-M linkage. The KJ-2 polyMG-specific alginate lyase can be used in combination with other alginate lyases for a synergistic saccharification of alginate. (orig.)

  2. Biogenic SeNPs from Bacillus mycoides SelTE01 and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia SelTE02: Characterization with reference to their associated organic coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piacenza, Elena; Bulgarini, Alessandra; Lampis, Silvia; Vallini, Giovanni; Turner, Raymond J.

    2017-08-01

    The exploitation of biological systems (i.e. plants, fungi and bacteria) for the production of nanomaterials relies on their ability to bioconvert toxic metal(loid) ions into their less toxic and bioavailable elemental states forming mainly nanoparticles (NPs) or nanorods (NRs). Further, these methods of nanomaterial production are nowadays recognized as eco-friendly alternatives to the chemical synthesis processes. A common feature among the so-called biogenic nanomaterials is the presence of an organic layer surrounding them. However, we are just learning the existing relation between biogenic nanostructures and their organic material. Our work is focused on the study of bacterial strains for the production of selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs) as end product of selenite (SeO32 -) bioconversion. In this context, our previous reports described the ability of two bacteria, namely Bacillus mycoides SelTE01 and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia SelTE02, to generate SeNPs, which were surrounded by organic material. Here, the potential role of this organic material as stabilizing agent of SeNPs was investigated altering both the bacteria cells culturing and the SeNPs extraction procedure, in order to understand the interaction between these two elements in suspension. As a result, SeNPs produced by both bacterial strains showed the tendency to aggregate when subjected to the treatments tested, suggesting an involvement of the surrounding organic material in their stabilization in suspension.

  3. Conservative diffusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlen, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    In Nelson's stochastic mechanics, quantum phenomena are described in terms of diffusions instead of wave functions. These diffusions are formally given by stochastic differential equations with extremely singular coefficients. Using PDE methods, we prove the existence of solutions. This reult provides a rigorous basis for stochastic mechanics. (orig.)

  4. Effects of Endobacterium (Stenotrophomonas maltophilia on Pathogenesis-Related Gene Expression of Pine Wood Nematode (Bursaphelenchus xylophilus and Pine Wilt Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long-Xi He

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Pine wilt disease (PWD caused by the pine wood nematode (PWN, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, is responsible for devastating epidemics in pine trees in Asia and Europe. Recent studies showed that bacteria carried by the PWN might be involved in PWD. However, the molecular mechanism of the interaction between bacteria and the PWN remained unclear. Now that the whole genome of B. xylophilus (Bursaphelenchus xylophilus is published, transcriptome analysis is a unique method to study the role played by bacteria in PWN. In this study, the transcriptome of aseptic B. xylophilus, B. xylophilus treated with endobacterium (Stenotrophomonas maltophilia NSPmBx03 and fungus B. xylophilus were sequenced. We found that 61 genes were up-regulated and 830 were down-regulated in B. xylophilus after treatment with the endobacterium; 178 genes were up-regulated and 1122 were down-regulated in fungus B. xylophilus compared with aseptic B. xylophilus. Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes analyses were used to study the significantly changed biological functions and pathways for these differentially expressed genes. Many pathogenesis-related genes, including glutathinone S-transferase, pectate lyase, ATP-binding cassette transporter and cytochrome P450, were up-regulated after B. xylophilus were treated with the endobacterium. In addition, we found that bacteria enhanced the virulence of PWN. These findings indicate that endobacteria might play an important role in the development and virulence of PWN and will improve our understanding of the regulatory mechanisms involved in the interaction between bacteria and the PWN.

  5. Effects of Endobacterium (Stenotrophomonas maltophilia) on Pathogenesis-Related Gene Expression of Pine Wood Nematode (Bursaphelenchus xylophilus) and Pine Wilt Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Long-Xi; Wu, Xiao-Qin; Xue, Qi; Qiu, Xiu-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Pine wilt disease (PWD) caused by the pine wood nematode (PWN), Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, is responsible for devastating epidemics in pine trees in Asia and Europe. Recent studies showed that bacteria carried by the PWN might be involved in PWD. However, the molecular mechanism of the interaction between bacteria and the PWN remained unclear. Now that the whole genome of B. xylophilus (Bursaphelenchus xylophilus) is published, transcriptome analysis is a unique method to study the role played by bacteria in PWN. In this study, the transcriptome of aseptic B. xylophilus, B. xylophilus treated with endobacterium (Stenotrophomonas maltophilia NSPmBx03) and fungus B. xylophilus were sequenced. We found that 61 genes were up-regulated and 830 were down-regulated in B. xylophilus after treatment with the endobacterium; 178 genes were up-regulated and 1122 were down-regulated in fungus B. xylophilus compared with aseptic B. xylophilus. Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes analyses were used to study the significantly changed biological functions and pathways for these differentially expressed genes. Many pathogenesis-related genes, including glutathinone S-transferase, pectate lyase, ATP-binding cassette transporter and cytochrome P450, were up-regulated after B. xylophilus were treated with the endobacterium. In addition, we found that bacteria enhanced the virulence of PWN. These findings indicate that endobacteria might play an important role in the development and virulence of PWN and will improve our understanding of the regulatory mechanisms involved in the interaction between bacteria and the PWN. PMID:27231904

  6. Regulation by SoxR of mfsA, Which Encodes a Major Facilitator Protein Involved in Paraquat Resistance in Stenotrophomonas maltophilia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kriangsuk Srijaruskul

    Full Text Available Stenotrophomonas maltophilia MfsA (Smlt1083 is an efflux pump in the major facilitator superfamily (MFS. Deletion of mfsA renders the strain more susceptible to paraquat, but no alteration in the susceptibility levels of other oxidants is observed. The expression of mfsA is inducible upon challenge with redox cycling/superoxide-generating drug (paraquat, menadione and plumbagin treatments and is directly regulated by SoxR, which is a transcription regulator and sensor of superoxide-generating agents. Analysis of mfsA expression patterns in wild-type and a soxR mutant suggests that oxidized SoxR functions as a transcription activator of the gene. soxR (smlt1084 is located in a head-to-head fashion with mfsA, and these genes share the -10 motif of their promoter sequences. Purified SoxR specifically binds to the putative mfsA promoter motifs that contain a region that is highly homologous to the consensus SoxR binding site, and mutation of the SoxR binding site abolishes binding of purified SoxR protein. The SoxR box is located between the putative -35 and -10 promoter motifs of mfsA; and this position is typical for a promoter in which SoxR acts as a transcriptional activator. At the soxR promoter, the SoxR binding site covers the transcription start site of the soxR transcript; thus, binding of SoxR auto-represses its own transcription. Taken together, our results reveal for the first time that mfsA is a novel member of the SoxR regulon and that SoxR binds and directly regulates its expression.

  7. Diffusion, confusion and functional MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Bihan, Denis

    2012-01-01

    Diffusion MRI has been introduced in 1985 and has had a very successful life on its own. While it has become a standard for imaging stroke and white matter disorders, the borders between diffusion MRI and the general field of fMRI have always remained fuzzy. First, diffusion MRI has been used to obtain images of brain function, based on the idea that diffusion MRI could also be made sensitive to blood flow, through the intra-voxel incoherent motion (IVIM) concept. Second, the IVIM concept helped better understand the contribution from different vasculature components to the BOLD fMRI signal. Third, it has been shown recently that a genuine fMRI signal can be obtained with diffusion MRI. This 'DfMRI' signal is notably different from the BOLD fMRI signal, especially for its much faster response to brain activation both at onset and offset, which points out to structural changes in the neural tissues, perhaps such as cell swelling, occurring in activated neural tissue. This short article reviews the major steps which have paved the way for this exciting development, underlying how technical progress with MRI equipment has each time been instrumental to expand the horizon of diffusion MRI toward the field of fMRI. (authors)

  8. Discovery and validation of the tumor-suppressive function of long noncoding RNA PANDA in human diffuse large B-cell lymphoma through the inactivation of MAPK/ERK signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yingjun; Zhang, Mingzhi; Xu, Huanan; Wang, Yifei; Li, Zhaoming; Chang, Yu; Wang, Xinhuan; Fu, Xiaorui; Zhou, Zhiyuan; Yang, Siyuan; Wang, Bei; Shang, Yufeng

    2017-09-22

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related mortality, and responds badly to existing treatment. Thus, it is of urgent need to identify novel prognostic markers and therapeutic targets of DLBCL. Recent studies have shown that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) play an important role in the development of cancer. By using the next generation HiSeq sequencing assay, we determined lncRNAs exhibiting differential expression between DLBCL patients and healthy controls. Then, RT-qPCR was performed for identification in clinical samples and cell materials, and lncRNA PANDA was verified to be down-regulated in DLBCL patients and have considerable diagnostic potential. In addition, decreased serum PANDA level was correlated to poorer clinical outcome and lower overall survival in DLBCL patients. Subsequently, we determined the experimental role of lncRNA PANDA in DLBCL progression. Luciferase reporter assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay suggested that lncRNA PANDA was induced by p53 and p53 interacts with the promoter region of PANDA. Cell functional assay further indicated that PANDA functioned as a tumor suppressor gene through the suppression of cell growth by a G0/G1 cell cycle arrest in DLBCL. More importantly, Cignal Signal Transduction Reporter Array and western blot assay showed that lncRNA PANDA inactivated the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway. In conclusion, our integrated approach demonstrates that PANDA in DLBCL confers a tumor suppressive function through inhibiting cell proliferation and silencing MAPK/ERK signaling pathway. Thus, PANDA may be a promising therapeutic target for patients with DLBCL.

  9. Simultaneous multi-slice echo planar diffusion weighted imaging of the liver and the pancreas: Optimization of signal-to-noise ratio and acquisition time and application to intravoxel incoherent motion analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boss, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.boss@usz.ch [Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland); Barth, Borna; Filli, Lukas; Kenkel, David; Wurnig, Moritz C. [Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland); Piccirelli, Marco [Institute of Neuroradiology, University Hospital of Zurich (Switzerland); Reiner, Caecilia S. [Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland)

    2016-11-15

    Purpose: To optimize and test a diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) echo-planar imaging (EPI) sequence with simultaneous multi-slice (SMS) excitation in the liver and pancreas regarding acquisition time (TA), number of slices, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), image quality (IQ), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) quantitation accuracy, and feasibility of intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) analysis. Materials and methods: Ten healthy volunteers underwent DWI of the upper abdomen at 3T. A SMS DWI sequence with CAIPIRINHA unaliasing technique (acceleration factors 2/3, denoted AF2/3) was compared to standard DWI-EPI (AF1). Four schemes were evaluated: (i) reducing TA, (ii) keeping TA identical with increasing number of averages, (iii) increasing number of slices with identical TA (iv) increasing number of b-values for IVIM. Acquisition schemes i-iii were evaluated qualitatively (reader score) and quantitatively (ADC values, SNR). Results: In scheme (i) no differences in SNR were observed (p = 0.321 − 0.038) with reduced TA (AF2 increase in SNR/time 75.6%, AF3 increase SNR/time 102.4%). No SNR improvement was obtained in scheme (ii). Increased SNR/time could be invested in acquisition of more and thinner slices or higher number of b-values. Image quality scores were stable for AF2 but decreased for AF3. Only for AF3, liver ADC values were systematically lower. Conclusion: SMS-DWI of the liver and pancreas provides substantially higher SNR/time, which either may be used for shorter scan time, higher slice resolution or IVIM measurements.

  10. Simultaneous multi-slice echo planar diffusion weighted imaging of the liver and the pancreas: Optimization of signal-to-noise ratio and acquisition time and application to intravoxel incoherent motion analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boss, Andreas; Barth, Borna; Filli, Lukas; Kenkel, David; Wurnig, Moritz C.; Piccirelli, Marco; Reiner, Caecilia S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To optimize and test a diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) echo-planar imaging (EPI) sequence with simultaneous multi-slice (SMS) excitation in the liver and pancreas regarding acquisition time (TA), number of slices, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), image quality (IQ), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) quantitation accuracy, and feasibility of intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) analysis. Materials and methods: Ten healthy volunteers underwent DWI of the upper abdomen at 3T. A SMS DWI sequence with CAIPIRINHA unaliasing technique (acceleration factors 2/3, denoted AF2/3) was compared to standard DWI-EPI (AF1). Four schemes were evaluated: (i) reducing TA, (ii) keeping TA identical with increasing number of averages, (iii) increasing number of slices with identical TA (iv) increasing number of b-values for IVIM. Acquisition schemes i-iii were evaluated qualitatively (reader score) and quantitatively (ADC values, SNR). Results: In scheme (i) no differences in SNR were observed (p = 0.321 − 0.038) with reduced TA (AF2 increase in SNR/time 75.6%, AF3 increase SNR/time 102.4%). No SNR improvement was obtained in scheme (ii). Increased SNR/time could be invested in acquisition of more and thinner slices or higher number of b-values. Image quality scores were stable for AF2 but decreased for AF3. Only for AF3, liver ADC values were systematically lower. Conclusion: SMS-DWI of the liver and pancreas provides substantially higher SNR/time, which either may be used for shorter scan time, higher slice resolution or IVIM measurements.

  11. Fractional Diffusion Equations and Anomalous Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelista, Luiz Roberto; Kaminski Lenzi, Ervin

    2018-01-01

    Preface; 1. Mathematical preliminaries; 2. A survey of the fractional calculus; 3. From normal to anomalous diffusion; 4. Fractional diffusion equations: elementary applications; 5. Fractional diffusion equations: surface effects; 6. Fractional nonlinear diffusion equation; 7. Anomalous diffusion: anisotropic case; 8. Fractional Schrödinger equations; 9. Anomalous diffusion and impedance spectroscopy; 10. The Poisson–Nernst–Planck anomalous (PNPA) models; References; Index.

  12. TH-AB-209-03: Overcoming Resolution Limitations of Diffuse Optical Signals in X-Ray Induced Luminescence (XIL) Imaging Via Selective Plane Illumination and 2D Deconvolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quigley, B; Smith, C; La Riviere, P [Department of Radiology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the resolution and sensitivity of XIL imaging using a surface radiance simulation based on optical diffusion and maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) image reconstruction. XIL imaging seeks to determine the distribution of luminescent nanophosphors, which could be used as nanodosimeters or radiosensitizers. Methods: The XIL simulation generated a homogeneous slab with optical properties similar to tissue. X-ray activated nanophosphors were placed at 1.0 cm depth in the tissue in concentrations of 10{sup −4} g/mL in two volumes of 10 mm{sup 3} with varying separations between each other. An analytical optical diffusion model determined the surface radiance from the photon distributions generated at depth in the tissue by the nanophosphors. The simulation then determined the detected luminescent signal collected with a f/1.0 aperture lens and back-illuminated EMCCD camera. The surface radiance was deconvolved using a MLEM algorithm to estimate the nanophosphors distribution and the resolution. To account for both Poisson and Gaussian noise, a shifted Poisson imaging model was used in the deconvolution. The deconvolved distributions were fitted to a Gaussian after radial averaging to measure the full width at half maximum (FWHM) and the peak to peak distance between distributions was measured to determine the resolving power. Results: Simulated surface radiances for doses from 1mGy to 100 cGy were computed. Each image was deconvolved using 1000 iterations. At 1mGy, deconvolution reduced the FWHM of the nanophosphors distribution by 65% and had a resolving power is 3.84 mm. Decreasing the dose from 100 cGy to 1 mGy increased the FWHM by 22% but allowed for a dose reduction of a factor of 1000. Conclusion: Deconvolving the detected surface radiance allows for dose reduction while maintaining the resolution of the nanophosphors. It proves to be a useful technique in overcoming the resolution limitations of diffuse optical imaging in

  13. Diffusion bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, R.C.

    1976-01-01

    A method is described for joining beryllium to beryllium by diffusion bonding. At least one surface portion of at least two beryllium pieces is coated with nickel. A coated surface portion is positioned in a contiguous relationship with another surface portion and subjected to an environment having an atmosphere at a pressure lower than ambient pressure. A force is applied on the beryllium pieces for causing the contiguous surface portions to abut against each other. The contiguous surface portions are heated to a maximum temperature less than the melting temperature of the beryllium, and the applied force is decreased while increasing the temperature after attaining a temperature substantially above room temperature. A portion of the applied force is maintained at a temperature corresponding to about maximum temperature for a duration sufficient to effect the diffusion bond between the contiguous surface portions

  14. Multipassage diffuser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalis, A.; Rouviere, R.; Simon, G.

    1976-01-01

    A multipassage diffuser having 2p passages comprises a leak-tight cylindrical enclosure closed by a top cover and a bottom end-wall, parallel porous tubes which are rigidly assembled in sectors between tube plates and through which the gas mixture flows, the tube sectors being disposed at uniform intervals on the periphery of the enclosure. The top tube plates are rigidly fixed to an annular header having the shape of a half-torus and adapted to communicate with the tubes of the corresponding sector. Each passage is constituted by a plurality of juxtaposed sectors in which the mixture circulates in the same direction, the header being divided into p portions limited by radial partition-walls and each constituting two adjacent passages. The diffuser is provided beneath the bottom end-wall with p-1 leak-tight chambers each adapted to open into two different portions of the header, and with two collector-chambers each fitted with a nozzle for introducing the gas mixture and discharging the fraction of the undiffused mixture. By means of a central orifice formed in the bottom end-wall the enclosure communicates with a shaft for discharging the diffused fraction of the gas mixture

  15. Thermal diffusivity effect in opto-thermal skin measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, P; Imhof, R E; Cui, Y; Ciortea, L I; Berg, E P

    2010-01-01

    We present our latest study on the thermal diffusivity effect in opto-thermal skin measurements. We discuss how thermal diffusivity affects the shape of opto-thermal signal, and how to measure thermal diffusivity in opto-thermal measurements of arbitrary sample surfaces. We also present a mathematical model for a thermally gradient material, and its corresponding opto-thermal signal. Finally, we show some of our latest experimental results of this thermal diffusivity effect study.

  16. Structure of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia FeoA complexed with zinc: a unique prokaryotic SH3-domain protein that possibly acts as a bacterial ferrous iron-transport activating factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Yi-Che; Chin, Ko-Hsin; Hung, Hui-Chih; Shen, Gwan-Han; Wang, Andrew H.-J.; Chou, Shan-Ho

    2010-01-01

    The crystal structure of FeoA from Stenotrophomonas maltophilia has been determined to a resolution of 1.7 Å using an Se single-wavelength anomalous dispersion (Se-SAD) approach and revealed a unique dimer cross-linked by two zinc ions and six chloride ions. Iron is vital to the majority of prokaryotes, with ferrous iron believed to be the preferred form for iron uptake owing to its much better solubility. The major route for bacterial ferrous iron uptake is found to be via an Feo (ferrous iron-transport) system comprising the three proteins FeoA, FeoB and FeoC. Although the structure and function of FeoB have received much attention recently, the roles played by FeoA and FeoC have been little investigated to date. Here, the tertiary structure of FeoA from Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (Sm), a vital opportunistic pathogen in immunodepressed hosts, is reported. The crystal structure of SmFeoA has been determined to a resolution of 1.7 Å using an Se single-wavelength anomalous dispersion (Se-SAD) approach. Although SmFeoA bears low sequence identity to eukaryotic proteins, its structure is found to adopt a eukaryotic SH3-domain-like fold. It also bears weak similarity to the C-terminal SH3 domain of bacterial DtxR (diphtheria toxin regulator), with some unique characteristics. Intriguingly, SmFeoA is found to adopt a unique dimer cross-linked by two zinc ions and six anions (chloride ions). Since FeoB has been found to contain a G-protein-like domain with low GTPase activity, FeoA may interact with FeoB through the SH3–G-protein domain interaction to act as a ferrous iron-transport activating factor

  17. Xanthomonas campestris RpfB is a Fatty Acyl-CoA Ligase Required to Counteract the Thioesterase Activity of the RpfF Diffusible Signal Factor (DSF) Synthase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Hongkai; Yu, Yonghong; Dong, Huijuan; Wang, Haihong; Cronan, John E.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY In Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc), the proteins encoded by the rpf (regulator of pathogenicity factor) gene cluster produce and sense a fatty acid signal molecule called diffusible signaling factor (DSF, 2(Z)-11-methyldodecenoic acid). RpfB was reported to be involved in DSF processing and was predicted to encode an acyl-CoA ligase. We report that RpfB activates a wide range of fatty acids to their CoA esters in vitro. Moreover, RpfB can functionally replace the paradigm bacterial acyl-CoA ligase, Escherichia coli FadD, in the E. coli β-oxidation pathway and deletion of RpfB from the Xcc genome results in a strain unable to utilize fatty acids as carbon sources. An essential RpfB function in the pathogenicity factor pathway was demonstrated by the properties of a strain deleted for both the rpfB and rpfC genes. The ΔrpfB ΔrpfC strain grew poorly and lysed upon entering stationary phase. Deletion of rpfF, the gene encoding the DSF synthetic enzyme, restored normal growth to this strain. RpfF is a dual function enzyme that synthesizes DSF by dehydration of a 3-hydroxyacyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) fatty acid synthetic intermediate and also cleaves the thioester bond linking DSF to ACP. However, the RpfF thioesterase activity is of broad specificity and upon elimination of its RpfC inhibitor RpfF attains maximal activity and its thioesterase activity proceeds to block membrane lipid synthesis by cleavage of acyl-ACP intermediates. This resulted in release of the nascent acyl chains to the medium as free fatty acids. This lack of acyl chains for phospholipid synthesis results in cell lysis unless RpfB is present to counteract the RpfF thioesterase activity by catalyzing uptake and activation of the free fatty acids to give acyl-CoAs that can be utilized to restore membrane lipid synthesis. Heterologous expression of a different fatty acid activating enzyme, the Vibrio harveyi acyl-ACP synthetase, replaced RpfB in counteracting the effects of

  18. Computational Diffusion MRI : MICCAI Workshop

    CERN Document Server

    Grussu, Francesco; Ning, Lipeng; Tax, Chantal; Veraart, Jelle

    2018-01-01

    This volume presents the latest developments in the highly active and rapidly growing field of diffusion MRI. The reader will find numerous contributions covering a broad range of topics, from the mathematical foundations of the diffusion process and signal generation, to new computational methods and estimation techniques for the in-vivo recovery of microstructural and connectivity features, as well as frontline applications in neuroscience research and clinical practice. These proceedings contain the papers presented at the 2017 MICCAI Workshop on Computational Diffusion MRI (CDMRI’17) held in Québec, Canada on September 10, 2017, sharing new perspectives on the most recent research challenges for those currently working in the field, but also offering a valuable starting point for anyone interested in learning computational techniques in diffusion MRI. This book includes rigorous mathematical derivations, a large number of rich, full-colour visualisations and clinically relevant results. As such, it wil...

  19. Quantum diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habib, S.

    1994-01-01

    We consider a simple quantum system subjected to a classical random force. Under certain conditions it is shown that the noise-averaged Wigner function of the system follows an integro-differential stochastic Liouville equation. In the simple case of polynomial noise-couplings this equation reduces to a generalized Fokker-Planck form. With nonlinear noise injection new ''quantum diffusion'' terms rise that have no counterpart in the classical case. Two special examples that are not of a Fokker-Planck form are discussed: the first with a localized noise source and the other with a spatially modulated noise source

  20. Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer Request Permissions Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 10/2017 What is hereditary diffuse gastric cancer? Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) is a rare ...

  1. Diffusion tensor optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Daniel L.; Blackmon, Richard L.; Oldenburg, Amy L.

    2018-01-01

    In situ measurements of diffusive particle transport provide insight into tissue architecture, drug delivery, and cellular function. Analogous to diffusion-tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI), where the anisotropic diffusion of water molecules is mapped on the millimeter scale to elucidate the fibrous structure of tissue, here we propose diffusion-tensor optical coherence tomography (DT-OCT) for measuring directional diffusivity and flow of optically scattering particles within tissue. Because DT-OCT is sensitive to the sub-resolution motion of Brownian particles as they are constrained by tissue macromolecules, it has the potential to quantify nanoporous anisotropic tissue structure at micrometer resolution as relevant to extracellular matrices, neurons, and capillaries. Here we derive the principles of DT-OCT, relating the detected optical signal from a minimum of six probe beams with the six unique diffusion tensor and three flow vector components. The optimal geometry of the probe beams is determined given a finite numerical aperture, and a high-speed hardware implementation is proposed. Finally, Monte Carlo simulations are employed to assess the ability of the proposed DT-OCT system to quantify anisotropic diffusion of nanoparticles in a collagen matrix, an extracellular constituent that is known to become highly aligned during tumor development.

  2. Demonstration of non-Gaussian restricted diffusion in tumor cells using diffusion-time dependent diffusion weighted MR contrast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuva Roaldsdatter Hope

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The diffusion weighted imaging (DWI technique enables quantification of water mobility for probing microstructural properties of biological tissue, and has become an effective tool for collecting information about the underlying pathology of cancerous tissue. Measurements using multiple b-values have indicated a bi-exponential signal attenuation, ascribed to fast (high ADC and slow (low ADC diffusion components. In this empirical study, we investigate the properties of the diffusion time (∆ - dependent components of the diffusion-weighted (DW signal in a constant b-value experiment. A Xenograft GBM mouse was imaged using ∆ = 11 ms, 20 ms, 40 ms, 60 ms and b=500-4000 s/mm2 in intervals of 500s/mm2. Data was corrected for EPI distortions and the ∆-dependence on the DW signal was measured within three regions of interest (intermediate- and high-density tumor regions and normal appearing brain tissue regions (NAB. In this empirical study we verify the assumption that the slow decaying component of the DW-signal is non-Gaussian and dependent on ∆, consistent with restricted diffusion of the intracellular space. As the DW-signal as a function of ∆ is specific to restricted diffusion, manipulating ∆ at constant b-value (cb provides a complementary and direct approach for separating the restricted from the hindered diffusion component. Our results show that only tumor tissue signal of our data demonstrate ∆-dependence, based on a bi-exponential model with a restricted diffusion component, we successfully estimated the restricted ADC, signal volume fraction and cell size within each tumor ROI.

  3. Diffusion MRI findings in phenylketonuria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sener, R.N. [Dept. of Radiology, Ege Univ. Hospital, Izmir (Turkey)

    2003-12-01

    Two patients with phenylketonuria were studied who were under dietary control since infancy, and who were mentally normal. Diffusion MRI was obtained using a spin-echo, echo-planar sequence with a gradient strength of 30 mT/m at 1.5 T. A trace sequence (TR=5700 ms, and TE=139 ms) was used, acquired in 22 s. Heavily diffusion-weighted (b=1000 mm{sup 2}/s) images, and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values from automatically generated ADC maps were studied. There were two different patterns in these two patients, restricted and increased diffusion patterns. Restricted diffusion pattern consisted of high-signal on b=1000 s/mm{sup 2} images with low ADC values ranging from 0.46 to 0.57 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s. Increased diffusion pattern consisted of normal b=1000 s/mm{sup 2} images with high ADC values ranging from 1.37 to 1.63 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s. It is likely that these values reflected presence of two different histopathological changes in phenylketonuria or reflected different stages of the same disease. (orig.)

  4. Diffusion MRI findings in phenylketonuria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sener, R.N.

    2003-01-01

    Two patients with phenylketonuria were studied who were under dietary control since infancy, and who were mentally normal. Diffusion MRI was obtained using a spin-echo, echo-planar sequence with a gradient strength of 30 mT/m at 1.5 T. A trace sequence (TR=5700 ms, and TE=139 ms) was used, acquired in 22 s. Heavily diffusion-weighted (b=1000 mm 2 /s) images, and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values from automatically generated ADC maps were studied. There were two different patterns in these two patients, restricted and increased diffusion patterns. Restricted diffusion pattern consisted of high-signal on b=1000 s/mm 2 images with low ADC values ranging from 0.46 to 0.57 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s. Increased diffusion pattern consisted of normal b=1000 s/mm 2 images with high ADC values ranging from 1.37 to 1.63 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s. It is likely that these values reflected presence of two different histopathological changes in phenylketonuria or reflected different stages of the same disease. (orig.)

  5. Diffusion archeology for diffusion progression history reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefer, Emre; Kingsford, Carl

    2016-11-01

    Diffusion through graphs can be used to model many real-world processes, such as the spread of diseases, social network memes, computer viruses, or water contaminants. Often, a real-world diffusion cannot be directly observed while it is occurring - perhaps it is not noticed until some time has passed, continuous monitoring is too costly, or privacy concerns limit data access. This leads to the need to reconstruct how the present state of the diffusion came to be from partial diffusion data. Here, we tackle the problem of reconstructing a diffusion history from one or more snapshots of the diffusion state. This ability can be invaluable to learn when certain computer nodes are infected or which people are the initial disease spreaders to control future diffusions. We formulate this problem over discrete-time SEIRS-type diffusion models in terms of maximum likelihood. We design methods that are based on submodularity and a novel prize-collecting dominating-set vertex cover (PCDSVC) relaxation that can identify likely diffusion steps with some provable performance guarantees. Our methods are the first to be able to reconstruct complete diffusion histories accurately in real and simulated situations. As a special case, they can also identify the initial spreaders better than the existing methods for that problem. Our results for both meme and contaminant diffusion show that the partial diffusion data problem can be overcome with proper modeling and methods, and that hidden temporal characteristics of diffusion can be predicted from limited data.

  6. The 1.1 Å resolution structure of a periplasmic phosphate-binding protein from Stenotrophomonas maltophilia: a crystallization contaminant identified by molecular replacement using the entire Protein Data Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, Ronan; Waterman, David G; Hopper, David J; Coates, Leighton; Taylor, Graham; Guo, Jingxu; Coker, Alun R; Erskine, Peter T; Wood, Steve P; Cooper, Jonathan B

    2016-08-01

    During efforts to crystallize the enzyme 2,4-dihydroxyacetophenone dioxygenase (DAD) from Alcaligenes sp. 4HAP, a small number of strongly diffracting protein crystals were obtained after two years of crystal growth in one condition. The crystals diffracted synchrotron radiation to almost 1.0 Å resolution and were, until recently, assumed to be formed by the DAD protein. However, when another crystal form of this enzyme was eventually solved at lower resolution, molecular replacement using this new structure as the search model did not give a convincing solution with the original atomic resolution data set. Hence, it was considered that these crystals might have arisen from a protein impurity, although molecular replacement using the structures of common crystallization contaminants as search models again failed. A script to perform molecular replacement using MOLREP in which the first chain of every structure in the PDB was used as a search model was run on a multi-core cluster. This identified a number of prokaryotic phosphate-binding proteins as scoring highly in the MOLREP peak lists. Calculation of an electron-density map at 1.1 Å resolution based on the solution obtained with PDB entry 2q9t allowed most of the amino acids to be identified visually and built into the model. A BLAST search then indicated that the molecule was most probably a phosphate-binding protein from Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (UniProt ID B4SL31; gene ID Smal_2208), and fitting of the corresponding sequence to the atomic resolution map fully corroborated this. Proteins in this family have been linked to the virulence of antibiotic-resistant strains of pathogenic bacteria and with biofilm formation. The structure of the S. maltophilia protein has been refined to an R factor of 10.15% and an Rfree of 12.46% at 1.1 Å resolution. The molecule adopts the type II periplasmic binding protein (PBP) fold with a number of extensively elaborated loop regions. A fully dehydrated phosphate

  7. Excess Entropy and Diffusivity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Graphics. Excess Entropy and Diffusivity. Excess entropy scaling of diffusivity (Rosenfeld,1977). Analogous relationships also exist for viscosity and thermal conductivity.

  8. Diffusing diffusivity: Rotational diffusion in two and three dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Rohit; Sebastian, K. L.

    2017-06-01

    We consider the problem of calculating the probability distribution function (pdf) of angular displacement for rotational diffusion in a crowded, rearranging medium. We use the diffusing diffusivity model and following our previous work on translational diffusion [R. Jain and K. L. Sebastian, J. Phys. Chem. B 120, 3988 (2016)], we show that the problem can be reduced to that of calculating the survival probability of a particle undergoing Brownian motion, in the presence of a sink. We use the approach to calculate the pdf for the rotational motion in two and three dimensions. We also propose new dimensionless, time dependent parameters, αr o t ,2 D and αr o t ,3 D, which can be used to analyze the experimental/simulation data to find the extent of deviation from the normal behavior, i.e., constant diffusivity, and obtain explicit analytical expressions for them, within our model.

  9. Diffusion in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiwari, G.P.; Kale, G.B.; Patil, R.V.

    1999-01-01

    The article presents a brief survey of process of diffusion in solids. It is emphasised that the essence of diffusion is the mass transfer through the atomic jumps. To begin with formal equations for diffusion coefficient are presented. This is followed by discussions on mechanisms of diffusion. Except for solutes which form interstitial solid solution, diffusion in majority of cases is mediated through exchange of sites between an atom and its neighbouring vacancy. Various vacancy parameters such as activation volume, correlation factor, mass effect etc are discussed and their role in establishing the mode of diffusion is delineated. The contribution of dislocations and grain boundaries in diffusion process is brought out. The experimental determination of different types of diffusion coefficients are described. Finally, the pervasive nature of diffusion process in number of commercial processes is outlined to show the importance of diffusion studies in materials science and technology. (author)

  10. Abnormal diffusion-weighted MRI in medulloblastoma: does it reflect small cell histology?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotsenas, A.L.; Roth, T.C.; Manness, W.K.; Faerber, E.N.

    1999-01-01

    A 12-year-old boy presented with the classic CT and MRI findings of medulloblastoma and the unusual finding of increased signal on diffusion MRI. The small-cell histology of medulloblastoma may account for the increased signal seen on diffusion MRI. Diffusion MRI with echoplanar technique may be useful in evaluation of these tumors and metastatic disease. (orig.)

  11. Diffusion weighted imaging by MR method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horikawa, Yoshiharu; Naruse, Shoji; Ebisu, Toshihiko; Tokumitsu, Takuaki; Ueda, Satoshi; Tanaka, Chuzo; Higuchi, Toshihiro; Umeda, Masahiro.

    1993-01-01

    Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging is a recently developed technique used to examine the micromovement of water molecules in vivo. We have applied this technique to examine various kinds of brain diseases, both experimentally and clinically. The calculated apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in vivo showed reliable values. In experimentally induced brain edema in rats, the pathophysiological difference of the type of edema (such as cytotoxic, and vasogenic) could be differentiated on the diffusion weighted MR images. Cytotoxic brain edema showed high intensity (slower diffusion) on the diffusion weighted images. On the other hand, vasogenic brain edema showed a low intensity image (faster diffusion). Diffusion anisotropy was demonstrated according to the direction of myelinated fibers and applied motion proving gradient (MPG). This anisotropy was also demonstrated in human brain tissue along the course of the corpus callosum, pyramidal tract and optic radiation. In brain ischemia cases, lesions were detected as high signal intensity areas, even one hour after the onset of ischemia. Diffusion was faster in brain tumor compared with normal brain. Histological differences were not clearly reflected by the ADC value. In epidermoid tumor cases, the intensity was characteristically high, was demonstrated, and the cerebrospinal fluid border was clearly demonstrated. New clinical information obtainable with this molecular diffusion method will prove to be useful in various clinical studies. (author)

  12. Diffusion archeology for diffusion progression history reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Sefer, Emre; Kingsford, Carl

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion through graphs can be used to model many real-world processes, such as the spread of diseases, social network memes, computer viruses, or water contaminants. Often, a real-world diffusion cannot be directly observed while it is occurring — perhaps it is not noticed until some time has passed, continuous monitoring is too costly, or privacy concerns limit data access. This leads to the need to reconstruct how the present state of the diffusion came to be from partial d...

  13. White matter biomarkers from diffusion MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nørhøj Jespersen, Sune

    2018-06-01

    As part of an issue celebrating 2 decades of Joseph Ackerman editing the Journal of Magnetic Resonance, this paper reviews recent progress in one of the many areas in which Ackerman and his lab has made significant contributions: NMR measurement of diffusion in biological media, specifically in brain tissue. NMR diffusion signals display exquisite sensitivity to tissue microstructure, and have the potential to offer quantitative and specific information on the cellular scale orders of magnitude below nominal image resolution when combined with biophysical modeling. Here, I offer a personal perspective on some recent advances in diffusion imaging, from diffusion kurtosis imaging to microstructural modeling, and the connection between the two. A new result on the estimation accuracy of axial and radial kurtosis with axially symmetric DKI is presented. I moreover touch upon recently suggested generalized diffusion sequences, promising to offer independent microstructural information. We discuss the need and some methods for validation, and end with an outlook on some promising future directions.

  14. Diffusion tensor imaging in spinal cord compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Wei; Qin, Wen; Hao, Nanxin; Wang, Yibin; Zong, Genlin

    2012-01-01

    Background Although diffusion tensor imaging has been successfully applied in brain research for decades, several main difficulties have hindered its extended utilization in spinal cord imaging. Purpose To assess the feasibility and clinical value of diffusion tensor imaging and tractography for evaluating chronic spinal cord compression. Material and Methods Single-shot spin-echo echo-planar DT sequences were scanned in 42 spinal cord compression patients and 49 healthy volunteers. The mean values of the apparent diffusion coefficient and fractional anisotropy were measured in region of interest at the cervical and lower thoracic spinal cord. The patients were divided into two groups according to the high signal on T2WI (the SCC-HI group and the SCC-nHI group for with or without high signal). A one-way ANOVA was used. Diffusion tensor tractography was used to visualize the morphological features of normal and impaired white matter. Results There were no statistically significant differences in the apparent diffusion coefficient and fractional anisotropy values between the different spinal cord segments of the normal subjects. All of the patients in the SCC-HI group had increased apparent diffusion coefficient values and decreased fractional anisotropy values at the lesion level compared to the normal controls. However, there were no statistically significant diffusion index differences between the SCC-nHI group and the normal controls. In the diffusion tensor imaging maps, the normal spinal cord sections were depicted as fiber tracts that were color-encoded to a cephalocaudal orientation. The diffusion tensor images were compressed to different degrees in all of the patients. Conclusion Diffusion tensor imaging and tractography are promising methods for visualizing spinal cord tracts and can provide additional information in clinical studies in spinal cord compression

  15. Complex diffusion process for noise reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nadernejad, Ehsan; Barari, A.

    2014-01-01

    equations (PDEs) in image restoration and de-noising prompted many researchers to search for an improvement in the technique. In this paper, a new method is presented for signal de-noising, based on PDEs and Schrodinger equations, named as complex diffusion process (CDP). This method assumes that variations...... for signal de-noising. To evaluate the performance of the proposed method, a number of experiments have been performed using Sinusoid, multi-component and FM signals cluttered with noise. The results indicate that the proposed method outperforms the approaches for signal de-noising known in prior art....

  16. Signal Words

    Science.gov (United States)

    SIGNAL WORDS TOPIC FACT SHEET NPIC fact sheets are designed to answer questions that are commonly asked by the ... making decisions about pesticide use. What are Signal Words? Signal words are found on pesticide product labels, ...

  17. Spin-diffusions and diffusive molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Brittan; Luskin, Mitchell; Plecháč, Petr; Simpson, Gideon

    2017-12-01

    Metastable configurations in condensed matter typically fluctuate about local energy minima at the femtosecond time scale before transitioning between local minima after nanoseconds or microseconds. This vast scale separation limits the applicability of classical molecular dynamics (MD) methods and has spurned the development of a host of approximate algorithms. One recently proposed method is diffusive MD which aims at integrating a system of ordinary differential equations describing the likelihood of occupancy by one of two species, in the case of a binary alloy, while quasistatically evolving the locations of the atoms. While diffusive MD has shown itself to be efficient and provide agreement with observations, it is fundamentally a model, with unclear connections to classical MD. In this work, we formulate a spin-diffusion stochastic process and show how it can be connected to diffusive MD. The spin-diffusion model couples a classical overdamped Langevin equation to a kinetic Monte Carlo model for exchange amongst the species of a binary alloy. Under suitable assumptions and approximations, spin-diffusion can be shown to lead to diffusive MD type models. The key assumptions and approximations include a well-defined time scale separation, a choice of spin-exchange rates, a low temperature approximation, and a mean field type approximation. We derive several models from different assumptions and show their relationship to diffusive MD. Differences and similarities amongst the models are explored in a simple test problem.

  18. Diffusion in reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorov, G.B.; Smirnov, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    The monograph contains a brief description of the principles underlying the theory of diffusion, as well as modern methods of studying diffusion. Data on self-diffusion and diffusion of impurities in a nuclear fuel and fissionable materials (uranium, plutonium, thorium, zirconium, titanium, hafnium, niobium, molybdenum, tungsten, beryllium, etc.) is presented. Anomalous diffusion, diffusion of components, and interdiffusion in binary and ternary alloys were examined. The monograph presents the most recent reference material on diffusion. It is intended for a wide range of researchers working in the field of diffusion in metals and alloys and attempting to discover new materials for application in nuclear engineering. It will also be useful for teachers, research scholars and students of physical metallurgy

  19. Diffusion in flowing gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reus, K.W.

    1979-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the back-diffusion method of calculating the mutual diffusion coefficient of two gases. The applicability of this method for measuring diffusion coefficients at temperatures up to 1300 K is considered. A further aim of the work was to make a contribution to the description of the interatomic potential energy of noble gases at higher energies as a function of the internuclear distance. This was achieved with the measured diffusion coefficients, especially with those for high temperatures. (Auth.)

  20. Diffusion Under Geometrical Constraint

    OpenAIRE

    Ogawa, Naohisa

    2014-01-01

    Here we discus the diffusion of particles in a curved tube. This kind of transport phenomenon is observed in biological cells and porous media. To solve such a problem, we discuss the three dimensional diffusion equation with a confining wall forming a thinner tube. We find that the curvature appears in a effective diffusion coefficient for such a quasi-one-dimensional system. As an application to higher dimensional case, we discuss the diffusion in a curved surface with ...

  1. Diffuse ceiling ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Chen

    Diffuse ceiling ventilation is an innovative ventilation concept where the suspended ceiling serves as air diffuser to supply fresh air into the room. Compared with conventional ventilation systems, diffuse ceiling ventilation can significantly reduce or even eliminate draught risk due to the low...

  2. Modeling dendrite density from magnetic resonance diffusion measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Sune Nørhøj; Kroenke, CD; Østergaard, Leif

    2007-01-01

    in this model: (i) the dendrites and axons, which are modeled as long cylinders with two diffusion coefficients, parallel (DL) and perpendicular (DT) to the cylindrical axis, and (ii) an isotropic monoexponential diffusion component describing water diffusion within and across all other structures, i.......e., in extracellular space and glia cells. The model parameters are estimated from 153 diffusion-weighted images acquired from a formalin-fixed baboon brain. A close correspondence between the data and the signal model is found, with the model parameters consistent with literature values. The model provides......Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) provides a noninvasive tool to probe tissue microstructure. We propose a simplified model of neural cytoarchitecture intended to capture the essential features important for water diffusion as measured by NMR. Two components contribute to the NMR signal...

  3. Thermal diffusion (1963); Diffusion thermique (1963)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemarechal, A [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-07-01

    This report brings together the essential principles of thermal diffusion in the liquid and gaseous phases. The macroscopic and molecular aspects of the thermal diffusion constant are reviewed, as well as the various measurement method; the most important developments however concern the operation of the CLUSIUS and DICKEL thermo-gravitational column and its applications. (author) [French] Ce rapport rassemble les principes essentiels de la diffusion thermique en phase liquide et en phase gazeuse. Les aspects macroscopique et moleculaire de la constante de diffusion thermique sont passes en revue ainsi que ses differentes methodes de mesure; mais les developpements les plus importants concernent le fonctionnement de ls colonne thermogravitationnelle de CLUSIUS et DICKEL et ses applications. (auteur)

  4. Fractional diffusion equations and anomalous diffusion

    CERN Document Server

    Evangelista, Luiz Roberto

    2018-01-01

    Anomalous diffusion has been detected in a wide variety of scenarios, from fractal media, systems with memory, transport processes in porous media, to fluctuations of financial markets, tumour growth, and complex fluids. Providing a contemporary treatment of this process, this book examines the recent literature on anomalous diffusion and covers a rich class of problems in which surface effects are important, offering detailed mathematical tools of usual and fractional calculus for a wide audience of scientists and graduate students in physics, mathematics, chemistry and engineering. Including the basic mathematical tools needed to understand the rules for operating with the fractional derivatives and fractional differential equations, this self-contained text presents the possibility of using fractional diffusion equations with anomalous diffusion phenomena to propose powerful mathematical models for a large variety of fundamental and practical problems in a fast-growing field of research.

  5. Water diffusion to assess meat microstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laghi, Luca; Venturi, Luca; Dellarosa, Nicolò; Petracci, Massimiliano

    2017-12-01

    In the quest for setting up rapid methods to evaluate water retention ability of meat microstructures, time domain nuclear magnetic resonance (TD-NMR) has gained a prominent role, due to the possibility to observe water located outside the myofibrils, easily lost upon storage or cooking. Diffusion weighted signals could be used to monitor the shape and dimension of the pores in which water is confined, thus boosting the information offered by TD-NMR. The work outlines a parsimonious model to describe relative abundance and diffusion coefficient of intra and extra myofibrillar water populations, exchange rate between them, diameter of the myofibrillar cells. To test our model, we registered diffusion and T 2 weighted NMR signals at 20MHz on fresh meat from pectoralis major muscle of 100days old female turkey. We then purposely altered water distribution and myofibrils shape by means of freezing. The model predicted nicely the consequences of the imposed modifications. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Imaging brain microstructure with diffusion MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexander, Daniel C; Dyrby, Tim B; Nilsson, Markus

    2018-01-01

    This article gives an overview of microstructure imaging of the brain with diffusion MRI and reviews the state of the art. The microstructure-imaging paradigm aims to estimate and map microscopic properties of tissue using a model that links these properties to the voxel scale MR signal. Imaging ...

  7. Signal-shot echo-planner diffusion-weighted MR imaging at 3T and 1.5T for differentiation of benign vertebral fracture edema and tumor infiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hee Jin; Lee, So Yeon; Rho, Myung Ho; Chung, Eun Chul; Kim, Mi Sung; Kwon, Heon Ju; Youn, In Young [Dept. of Radiology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    To compare the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value using single-shot echo-planar imaging sequences at 3T and 1.5T for differentiation of benign fracture edema and tumor infiltration of the vertebral body. A total of 46 spinal examinations were included in the 1.5T MRI group, and a total of 40 spinal examinations were included in the 3T MRI group. The ADC values of the lesion were measured and calculated. The diagnostic performance of the conventional MR image containing sagittal T2-weighted fat saturated image and each diffusion weighted image (DWI) with an ADC value with different b values were evaluated. The mean ADC value of the benign lesions was higher than that of the malignant lesions on 1.5T and 3T (p < 0.05). The sensitivity of the diagnostic performance was higher with an additional DWI in both 1.5T and 3T, but the sensitivities were similar with the addition of b values of 400 and 1000. The specificities of the diagnostic performances did not show significant differences (p value > 0.05). The diagnostic accuracies were higher when either of the DWIs (b values of 400 and 1000) was added to routine MR image for 1.5T and 3T. Statistical differences between 1.5T and 3T or between b values of 400 and 1000 were not seen. The ADC values of the benign lesions were significantly higher than those of the malignant lesions on 1.5T and 3T. There was no statistically significant difference in the diagnostic performances when either of the DWIs (b values of 400 and 1000) was added to the routine MR image for 1.5T and 3T.

  8. Diffusion in molybdenum disilicide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salamon, M.; Mehrer, H.

    2005-01-01

    The diffusion behaviour of the high-temperature material molybdenum disilicide (MoSi 2 ) was completely unknown until recently. In this paper we present studies of Mo self-diffusion and compare our present results with our already published studies of Si and Ge diffusion in MoSi 2 . Self-diffusion of molybdenum in monocrystalline MoSi 2 was studied by the radiotracer technique using the radioisotope 99 Mo. Deposition of the radiotracer and serial sectioning after the diffusion anneals to determine the concentration-depth profiles was performed using a sputtering device. Diffusion of Mo is a very slow process. In the entire temperature region investigated (1437 to 2173 K), the 99 Mo diffusivities in both principal directions of the tetragonal MoSi 2 crystals obey Arrhenius laws, where the diffusion perpendicular to the tetragonal axis is faster by two to three orders of magnitude than parallel to it. The activation enthalpies for diffusion perpendicular and parallel to the tetragonal axis are Q perpendicular to = 468 kJ mol -1 (4.85 eV) and Q parallel = 586 kJ mol -1 (6.07 eV), respectively. Diffusion of Si and its homologous element Ge is fast and is mediated by thermal vacancies of the Si sublattice of MoSi 2 . The diffusion of Mo is by several orders of magnitude slower than the diffusion of Si and Ge. This large difference suggests that Si and Mo diffusion are decoupled and that the diffusion of Mo likely takes place via vacancies on the Mo sublattice. (orig.)

  9. Basic consideration of diffusion/perfusion imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamagawa, Yoichi; Kimura, Hirohiko; Matsuda, Tsuyoshi; Kawamura, Yasutaka; Nakatsugawa, Shigekazu; Ishii, Yasushi; Sakuma, Hajime; Tsukamoto, Tetsuji.

    1990-01-01

    In magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), microscopic motion of biological system such as molecular diffusion of water and microcirculation of blood in the capillary network (perfusion) has been proposed to cause signal attenuation as an intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM). Quantitative imaging of the IVIM phenomenon was attempted to generate from a set of spin-echo (SE) sequences with or without sensitization by motion probing gradient (MPG). The IVIM imaging is characterized by a parameter, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), which is an integration of both the diffusion and the perfusion factor on voxel-by-voxel basis. Hard ware was adjusted to avoid image artifact mainly produced by eddy current. Feasibility of the method was tested using bottle phantom filled with water at different temperature and acetone, and the calculated ADC values of these media corresponded well with accepted values of diffusion. The method was then applied to biological system to investigate mutual participation of diffusion/perfusion on the ADC value. The result of tumor model born on nude mouse suggested considerable participation of perfusion factor which immediately disappeared after sacrificing the animal. Meanwhile, lower value of sacrificed tissue without microcirculation was suggested to have some restriction of diffusion factor by biological tissue. To substantiate the restriction effect on the diffusion, a series of observation have made on a fiber phantom, stalk of celory with botanical fibers and human brain with nerve fibers, in applying unidirectional MPG along the course of these banch of fiber system. The directional restriction effect of diffusion along the course of fiber (diffusion anisotrophy) was clearly visualized as directional change of ADC value. The present method for tissue characterization by diffusion/perfusion on microscopic level will provide a new insight for evaluation of functional derangement in human brain and other organs. (author)

  10. Purulent meningitis with unusual diffusion-weighted MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, M.; Takayama, Y.; Yamashita, H.; Noguchi, M.; Sagoh, T.

    2002-01-01

    We describe unusual findings obtained by diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a patient with acute purulent meningitis caused by penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae. Along cerebral convexities and the Sylvian fissure, multiple small intense lesions showed high signal intensity in these sequences. This may be the first report of diffusion-weighted in purulent meningitis

  11. ATP signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novak, Ivana

    2016-01-01

    The Department of Biology at the University of Copenhagen explains the function of ATP signalling in the pancreas......The Department of Biology at the University of Copenhagen explains the function of ATP signalling in the pancreas...

  12. MR imaging of diffuse thyroid disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Masaaki; Fujii, Koichi; Ohnishi, Takuya; Higashikawa, Motoki; Araki, Yutaka; Hamada, Tatsumi; Ishida, Osamu

    1996-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 38 diffuse goiters, including 30 chronic thyroiditis and 8 Basedow disease. MR findings were analyzed as to degree of swelling, margin, internal structures including homogeneity and low intensity bands. With regard to signal intensity, thyroid-muscle-signal intensity ratios on T1 and T2-weighted images were measured in 19 normal thyroid glands, 30 chronic thyroiditis and 8 Basedow disease. Additionally thyroid-muscle-signal intensity ratios were compared between 19 hypothyroid glands and 11 euthyroid glands in chronic thyroiditis. Chronic thyroiditis tended to show lobulated margins, inhomogeneous intensity, and low intensity bands connecting with vessels or not. Basedow disease tended to display smooth margins, inhomogeneous intensity and low intensity bands connecting with vessels. Thyroid-muscle-signal intensity ratios of Basedow disease and chronic thyroiditis were significantly higher than those of normal thyroid gland at all sequences. In chronic thyroiditis thyroid-muscle-signal intensity ratios of euthyroid glands were significantly higher than those of hypothyroid glands. MR imaging could reflect pathologic features of diffuse goiters. Moreover, MR imaging is potentially contributory to speculate about thyroid function and degree of serious condition in diffuse thyroid disorders. (author)

  13. Metric diffusion along foliations

    CERN Document Server

    Walczak, Szymon M

    2017-01-01

    Up-to-date research in metric diffusion along compact foliations is presented in this book. Beginning with fundamentals from the optimal transportation theory and the theory of foliations; this book moves on to cover Wasserstein distance, Kantorovich Duality Theorem, and the metrization of the weak topology by the Wasserstein distance. Metric diffusion is defined, the topology of the metric space is studied and the limits of diffused metrics along compact foliations are discussed. Essentials on foliations, holonomy, heat diffusion, and compact foliations are detailed and vital technical lemmas are proved to aide understanding. Graduate students and researchers in geometry, topology and dynamics of foliations and laminations will find this supplement useful as it presents facts about the metric diffusion along non-compact foliation and provides a full description of the limit for metrics diffused along foliation with at least one compact leaf on the two dimensions.

  14. Gaseous diffusion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrett, G.A.; Shacter, J.

    1978-01-01

    A gaseous diffusion system is described comprising a plurality of diffusers connected in cascade to form a series of stages, each of the diffusers having a porous partition dividing it into a high pressure chamber and a low pressure chamber, and means for combining a portion of the enriched gas from a succeeding stage with a portion of the enriched gas from the low pressure chamber of each stage and feeding it into one extremity of the high pressure chamber thereof

  15. Inpainting using airy diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorduy Hernandez, Sara

    2015-09-01

    One inpainting procedure based on Airy diffusion is proposed, implemented via Maple and applied to some digital images. Airy diffusion is a partial differential equation with spatial derivatives of third order in contrast with the usual diffusion with spatial derivatives of second order. Airy diffusion generates the Airy semigroup in terms of the Airy functions which can be rewritten in terms of Bessel functions. The Airy diffusion can be used to smooth an image with the corresponding noise elimination via convolution. Also the Airy diffusion can be used to erase objects from an image. We build an algorithm using the Maple package ImageTools and such algorithm is tested using some images. Our results using Airy diffusion are compared with the similar results using standard diffusion. We observe that Airy diffusion generates powerful filters for image processing which could be incorporated in the usual packages for image processing such as ImageJ and Photoshop. Also is interesting to consider the possibility to incorporate the Airy filters as applications for smartphones and smart-glasses.

  16. Diffusion in compacted betonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muurinen, A.; Rantanen, J.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this report is to collect the literature bearing on the diffusion in compacted betonite, which has been suggested as possible buffer material for the disposal of spent fuel. Diffusion in a porous, water-saturated material is usually described as diffusion in the pore-water where sorption on the solid matter can delay the migration in the instationary state. There are also models which take into consideration that the sorbed molecules can also move while being sorbed. Diffusion experiments in compacted bentonite have been reported by many authors. Gases, anions, cations and actinides have been used as diffusing molecules. The report collects the results and the information on the measurement methods. On the basis of the results can be concluded that different particles possibly follow different diffusion mechanisms. The parameters which affect the diffusion seem to be for example the size, the electric charge and the sorption properties of the diffusing molecule. The report also suggest the parameters to be used in the diffusion calculation of the safety analyses of spent fuel disposal. (author)

  17. Hepatic hemangioma: Correlation of enhancement types with diffusion-weighted MR findings and apparent diffusion coefficients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goshima, Satoshi [Department of Radiology, Gifu University Hospital, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1194 (Japan)], E-mail: gossy@par.odn.ne.jp; Kanematsu, Masayuki [Department of Radiology, Gifu University Hospital, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1194 (Japan); Department of Radiology Services, Gifu University Hospital, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1194 (Japan); Kondo, Hiroshi [Department of Radiology, Gifu University Hospital, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1194 (Japan); Yokoyama, Ryujiro; Kajita, Kimihiro [Department of Radiology Services, Gifu University Hospital, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1194 (Japan); Tsuge, Yusuke [Department of Radiology, Gifu University Hospital, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1194 (Japan); Shiratori, Yoshimune [Department of Medical Informatics, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu (Japan); Onozuka, Minoru [Department of Physiology and Neuroscience, Kanagawa Dental College, Yokosuka (Japan); Moriyama, Noriyuki [Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tsukiji (Japan)

    2009-05-15

    Purpose: To correlate hepatic hemangioma enhancement types in gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) images with diffusion-weighted MR findings and apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs). Materials and methods: Respiratory-triggered diffusion-weighted MR images (TR/TE, 2422/46 ms; parallel imaging factor, 2; b factor, 500 s/mm{sup 2}; number of averaging, 6) obtained in 35 patients with 44 hepatic hemangiomas diagnosed by gadolinium-enhanced MR and by follow-up imaging were retrospectively evaluated. Hemangiomas were classified into three enhancement types based on gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging findings: type I, early-enhancement type; type II, peripheral nodular enhancement type; type III, delayed enhancement type. Two blinded readers qualitatively assessed lesion sizes and signal intensities on T2-weighted turbo spin-echo and diffusion-weighted images. The ADCs of hemangiomas were also measured. Results: No significant difference was observed between the three enhancement types in terms of signal intensities on T2-weighted images. Signal intensities on diffusion-weighted images were lower in the order type I to III (P < .01), and mean ADCs were 2.18 x 10{sup -3}, 1.86 x 10{sup -3}, and 1.71 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s for types I, II, and III, respectively (P < .01). No correlation was found between lesion sizes and ADCs. Conclusion: Hepatic hemangiomas were found to have enhancement type dependent signal intensities and ADCs on diffusion-weighted MR images. Further studies will have to substantiate that these diffusion patterns might reflect intratumoral blood flow or perfusion.

  18. Discrimination of thermal diffusivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergmann Tiest, W.M.; Kappers, A.M.L.

    2009-01-01

    Materials such as wood or metal which are at equal temperatures are perceived to be of different ‘coldness’ due to differences in thermal properties, such as the thermal diffusivity. The thermal diffusivity of a material is a parameter that controls the rate with which heat is extracted from the

  19. Diffusion Based Photon Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjøth, Lars; Fogh Olsen, Ole; Sporring, Jon

    2007-01-01

    . To address this problem we introduce a novel photon mapping algorithm based on nonlinear anisotropic diffusion. Our algorithm adapts according to the structure of the photon map such that smoothing occurs along edges and structures and not across. In this way we preserve the important illumination features......, while eliminating noise. We call our method diffusion based photon mapping....

  20. Diffusion Based Photon Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjøth, Lars; Olsen, Ole Fogh; Sporring, Jon

    2006-01-01

    . To address this problem we introduce a novel photon mapping algorithm based on nonlinear anisotropic diffusion. Our algorithm adapts according to the structure of the photon map such that smoothing occurs along edges and structures and not across. In this way we preserve the important illumination features......, while eliminating noise. We call our method diffusion based photon mapping....

  1. Adaptation and Cultural Diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormrod, Richard K.

    1992-01-01

    Explores the role of adaptation in cultural diffusion. Explains that adaptation theory recognizes the lack of independence between innovations and their environmental settings. Discusses testing and selection, modification, motivation, and cognition. Suggests that adaptation effects are pervasive in cultural diffusion but require a broader, more…

  2. Modelling of Innovation Diffusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkadiusz Kijek

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the publication of the Bass model in 1969, research on the modelling of the diffusion of innovation resulted in a vast body of scientific literature consisting of articles, books, and studies of real-world applications of this model. The main objective of the diffusion model is to describe a pattern of spread of innovation among potential adopters in terms of a mathematical function of time. This paper assesses the state-of-the-art in mathematical models of innovation diffusion and procedures for estimating their parameters. Moreover, theoretical issues related to the models presented are supplemented with empirical research. The purpose of the research is to explore the extent to which the diffusion of broadband Internet users in 29 OECD countries can be adequately described by three diffusion models, i.e. the Bass model, logistic model and dynamic model. The results of this research are ambiguous and do not indicate which model best describes the diffusion pattern of broadband Internet users but in terms of the results presented, in most cases the dynamic model is inappropriate for describing the diffusion pattern. Issues related to the further development of innovation diffusion models are discussed and some recommendations are given. (original abstract

  3. Thermal diffusion (1963)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemarechal, A.

    1963-01-01

    This report brings together the essential principles of thermal diffusion in the liquid and gaseous phases. The macroscopic and molecular aspects of the thermal diffusion constant are reviewed, as well as the various measurement method; the most important developments however concern the operation of the CLUSIUS and DICKEL thermo-gravitational column and its applications. (author) [fr

  4. Diffusion of Botulinum Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew A. Brodsky

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is generally agreed that diffusion of botulinum toxin occurs, but the extent of the spread and its clinical importance are disputed. Many factors have been suggested to play a role but which have the most clinical relevance is a subject of much discussion.Methods: This review discusses the variables affecting diffusion, including protein composition and molecular size as well as injection factors (e.g., volume, dose, injection method. It also discusses data on diffusion from comparative studies in animal models and human clinical trials that illustrate differences between the available botulinum toxin products (onabotulinumtoxinA, abobotulinumtoxinA, incobotulinumtoxinA, and rimabotulinumtoxinB.Results: Neither molecular weight nor the presence of complexing proteins appears to affect diffusion; however, injection volume, concentration, and dose all play roles and are modifiable. Both animal and human studies show that botulinum toxin products are not interchangeable, and that some products are associated with greater diffusion and higher rates of diffusion-related adverse events than others.Discussion: Each of the botulinum toxins is a unique pharmacologic entity. A working knowledge of the different serotypes is essential to avoid unwanted diffusion-related adverse events. In addition, clinicians should be aware that the factors influencing diffusion may range from properties intrinsic to the drug to accurate muscle selection as well as dilution, volume, and dose injected.

  5. Diffusion in Coulomb crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughto, J; Schneider, A S; Horowitz, C J; Berry, D K

    2011-07-01

    Diffusion in Coulomb crystals can be important for the structure of neutron star crusts. We determine diffusion constants D from molecular dynamics simulations. We find that D for Coulomb crystals with relatively soft-core 1/r interactions may be larger than D for Lennard-Jones or other solids with harder-core interactions. Diffusion, for simulations of nearly perfect body-centered-cubic lattices, involves the exchange of ions in ringlike configurations. Here ions "hop" in unison without the formation of long lived vacancies. Diffusion, for imperfect crystals, involves the motion of defects. Finally, we find that diffusion, for an amorphous system rapidly quenched from Coulomb parameter Γ=175 to Coulomb parameters up to Γ=1750, is fast enough that the system starts to crystalize during long simulation runs. These results strongly suggest that Coulomb solids in cold white dwarf stars, and the crust of neutron stars, will be crystalline and not amorphous.

  6. Atomic diffusion in stars

    CERN Document Server

    Michaud, Georges; Richer, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    This book gives an overview of atomic diffusion, a fundamental physical process, as applied to all types of stars, from the main sequence to neutron stars. The superficial abundances of stars as well as their evolution can be significantly affected. The authors show where atomic diffusion plays an essential role and how it can be implemented in modelling.  In Part I, the authors describe the tools that are required to include atomic diffusion in models of stellar interiors and atmospheres. An important role is played by the gradient of partial radiative pressure, or radiative acceleration, which is usually neglected in stellar evolution. In Part II, the authors systematically review the contribution of atomic diffusion to each evolutionary step. The dominant effects of atomic diffusion are accompanied by more subtle effects on a large number of structural properties throughout evolution. One of the goals of this book is to provide the means for the astrophysicist or graduate student to evaluate the importanc...

  7. Degenerate nonlinear diffusion equations

    CERN Document Server

    Favini, Angelo

    2012-01-01

    The aim of these notes is to include in a uniform presentation style several topics related to the theory of degenerate nonlinear diffusion equations, treated in the mathematical framework of evolution equations with multivalued m-accretive operators in Hilbert spaces. The problems concern nonlinear parabolic equations involving two cases of degeneracy. More precisely, one case is due to the vanishing of the time derivative coefficient and the other is provided by the vanishing of the diffusion coefficient on subsets of positive measure of the domain. From the mathematical point of view the results presented in these notes can be considered as general results in the theory of degenerate nonlinear diffusion equations. However, this work does not seek to present an exhaustive study of degenerate diffusion equations, but rather to emphasize some rigorous and efficient techniques for approaching various problems involving degenerate nonlinear diffusion equations, such as well-posedness, periodic solutions, asympt...

  8. Oxygen diffusion in monazite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherniak, D. J.; Zhang, X. Y.; Nakamura, M.; Watson, E. B.

    2004-09-01

    We report measurements of oxygen diffusion in natural monazites under both dry, 1-atm conditions and hydrothermal conditions. For dry experiments, 18O-enriched CePO4 powder and monazite crystals were sealed in Ag-Pd capsules with a solid buffer (to buffer at NNO) and annealed in 1-atm furnaces. Hydrothermal runs were conducted in cold-seal pressure vessels, where monazite grains were encapsulated with 18O-enriched water. Following the diffusion anneals, oxygen concentration profiles were measured with Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) using the reaction 18O(p,α)15N. Over the temperature range 850-1100 °C, the Arrhenius relation determined for dry diffusion experiments on monazite is given by: Under wet conditions at 100 MPa water pressure, over the temperature range 700-880 °C, oxygen diffusion can be described by the Arrhenius relationship: Oxygen diffusion under hydrothermal conditions has a significantly lower activation energy for diffusion than under dry conditions, as has been found the case for many other minerals, both silicate and nonsilicate. Given these differences in activation energies, the differences between dry and wet diffusion rates increase with lower temperatures; for example, at 600 °C, dry diffusion will be more than 4 orders of magnitude slower than diffusion under hydrothermal conditions. These disparate diffusivities will result in pronounced differences in the degree of retentivity of oxygen isotope signatures. For instance, under dry conditions (presumably rare in the crust) and high lower-crustal temperatures (∼800 °C), monazite cores of 70-μm radii will preserve O isotope ratios for about 500,000 years; by comparison, they would be retained at this temperature under wet conditions for about 15,000 years.

  9. Signaling aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Staaden, Moira J; Searcy, William A; Hanlon, Roger T

    2011-01-01

    From psychological and sociological standpoints, aggression is regarded as intentional behavior aimed at inflicting pain and manifested by hostility and attacking behaviors. In contrast, biologists define aggression as behavior associated with attack or escalation toward attack, omitting any stipulation about intentions and goals. Certain animal signals are strongly associated with escalation toward attack and have the same function as physical attack in intimidating opponents and winning contests, and ethologists therefore consider them an integral part of aggressive behavior. Aggressive signals have been molded by evolution to make them ever more effective in mediating interactions between the contestants. Early theoretical analyses of aggressive signaling suggested that signals could never be honest about fighting ability or aggressive intentions because weak individuals would exaggerate such signals whenever they were effective in influencing the behavior of opponents. More recent game theory models, however, demonstrate that given the right costs and constraints, aggressive signals are both reliable about strength and intentions and effective in influencing contest outcomes. Here, we review the role of signaling in lieu of physical violence, considering threat displays from an ethological perspective as an adaptive outcome of evolutionary selection pressures. Fighting prowess is conveyed by performance signals whose production is constrained by physical ability and thus limited to just some individuals, whereas aggressive intent is encoded in strategic signals that all signalers are able to produce. We illustrate recent advances in the study of aggressive signaling with case studies of charismatic taxa that employ a range of sensory modalities, viz. visual and chemical signaling in cephalopod behavior, and indicators of aggressive intent in the territorial calls of songbirds. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Estimation and calibration of the water isotope differential diffusion length in ice core records

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wel, G.; Fischer, H.; Oerter, H.; Meyer, H.; Meijer, H. A. J.

    2015-01-01

    Palaeoclimatic information can be retrieved from the diffusion of the stable water isotope signal during firnification of snow. The diffusion length, a measure for the amount of diffusion a layer has experienced, depends on the firn temperature and the accumulation rate. We show that the estimation

  11. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging for detection of extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, Xing-Yu; Chen, Hong-Wei; Cai, Song; Bao, Jian; Tang, Qun-Feng; Wu, Li-Yuan; Fang, Xiang-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To measure the sensitivity of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and determine the most appropriate b value for DWI; to explore the correlation between the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value and the degree of extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma differentiation. Methods: Preoperative diffusion-weighted imaging and magnetic resonance examinations were performed for 31 patients with extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. Tumor ADC values were measured, and the signal-to-noise ratio, contrast-to-noise ratio, and signal-intensity ratio between the diffusion-weighted images with various b values as well as the T2-weighted images were calculated. Pathologically confirmed patients were pathologically graded to compare the ADC value with different b values of tumor at different degrees of differentiation, and the results were statistically analyzed by using the Friedman test. Results: A total of 29 cases of extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma were detected by DWI. As the b value increased, tumor signal-to-noise ratio and contrast-to-noise ratio between the tumor and normal liver gradually decreased, but the tumor signal-intensity ratio gradually increased. When b = 800 s/mm 2 , contrast-to-noise ratio between tumor and normal liver, tumor signal-intensity ratio, and tumor signal-to-noise ratio of diffusion-weighted images were all higher than those of T2-weighted images; the differences were statistically significant (P 2 was the best in DWI of extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma; the lesion ADC value declined as the degree of cancerous tissue differentiation decreased.

  12. Probing the diffuse interstellar medium with diffuse interstellar bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodorus van Loon, Jacco; Bailey, Mandy; Farhang, Amin; Javadi, Atefeh; Khosroshahi, Habib

    2015-08-01

    For a century already, a large number of absorption bands have been known at optical wavelengths, called the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs). While their carriers remain unidentified, the relative strengths of these bands in various environments make them interesting new probes of the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM). We present the results from two large, dedicated campaigns to map the ISM using DIBs measured in the high signal-to-noise spectra of hundreds of early-type stars: [1] in and around the Local Bubble using ESO's New Technology Telescope and the Isaac Newton Telescope, and [2] across both Magellanic Clouds using the Very Large Telescope and the Anglo-Australian Telescope. We discuss the implications for the structure and dynamics of the ISM, as well as the constraints these maps place on the nature of the carriers of the DIBs. Partial results have appeared in the recent literature (van Loon et al. 2013; Farhang et al. 2015a,b; Bailey, PhD thesis 2014) with the remainder being prepared for publication now.

  13. Diffuse interstellar clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    The author defines and discusses the nature of diffuse interstellar clouds. He discusses how they contribute to the general extinction of starlight. The atomic and molecular species that have been identified in the ultraviolet, visible, and near infrared regions of the spectrum of a diffuse cloud are presented. The author illustrates some of the practical considerations that affect absorption line observations of interstellar atoms and molecules. Various aspects of the theoretical description of diffuse clouds required for a full interpretation of the observations are discussed

  14. Infrared diffuse interstellar bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galazutdinov, G. A.; Lee, Jae-Joon; Han, Inwoo; Lee, Byeong-Cheol; Valyavin, G.; Krełowski, J.

    2017-05-01

    We present high-resolution (R ˜ 45 000) profiles of 14 diffuse interstellar bands in the ˜1.45 to ˜2.45 μm range based on spectra obtained with the Immersion Grating INfrared Spectrograph at the McDonald Observatory. The revised list of diffuse bands with accurately estimated rest wavelengths includes six new features. The diffuse band at 15 268.2 Å demonstrates a very symmetric profile shape and thus can serve as a reference for finding the 'interstellar correction' to the rest wavelength frame in the H range, which suffers from a lack of known atomic/molecular lines.

  15. Self diffusion in tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mundy, J.N.; Rothman, S.J.; Lam, N.Q.; Nowicki, L.J.; Hoff, H.A.

    1978-01-01

    The lack of understanding of self-diffusion in Group VI metals together with the wide scatter in the measured values of tungsten self-diffusion has prompted the present measurements to be made over a wide temperature range (1/2Tsub(m) to Tsub(m)). The diffusion coefficients have been measured in the temperature range 1430-2630 0 C. The present measurements show non-linear Arrhenius behavior but a reliable two-exponential fit of the data should await further measurements. (Auth.)

  16. Signal detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tholomier, M.

    1985-01-01

    In a scanning electron microscope, whatever is the measured signal, the same set is found: incident beam, sample, signal detection, signal amplification. The resulting signal is used to control the spot luminosity with the observer cathodoscope. This is synchronized with the beam scanning on the sample; on the cathodoscope, the image in secondary electrons, backscattered electrons,... of the sample surface is reconstituted. The best compromise must be found between a register time low enough to remove eventual variations (under the incident beam) of the nature of the observed phenomenon, and a good spatial resolution of the image and a signal-to-noise ratio high enough. The noise is one of the basic limitations of the scanning electron microscope performance. The whose measurement line must be optimized to reduce it [fr

  17. Diffusion of Wilson loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brzoska, A.M.; Lenz, F.; Thies, M.; Negele, J.W.

    2005-01-01

    A phenomenological analysis of the distribution of Wilson loops in SU(2) Yang-Mills theory is presented in which Wilson loop distributions are described as the result of a diffusion process on the group manifold. It is shown that, in the absence of forces, diffusion implies Casimir scaling and, conversely, exact Casimir scaling implies free diffusion. Screening processes occur if diffusion takes place in a potential. The crucial distinction between screening of fundamental and adjoint loops is formulated as a symmetry property related to the center symmetry of the underlying gauge theory. The results are expressed in terms of an effective Wilson loop action and compared with various limits of SU(2) Yang-Mills theory

  18. Diffusion between evolving interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juntunen, Janne; Merikoski, Juha

    2010-01-01

    Diffusion in an evolving environment is studied by continuous-time Monte Carlo simulations. Diffusion is modeled by continuous-time random walkers on a lattice, in a dynamic environment provided by bubbles between two one-dimensional interfaces driven symmetrically towards each other. For one-dimensional random walkers constrained by the interfaces, the bubble size distribution dominates diffusion. For two-dimensional random walkers, it is also controlled by the topography and dynamics of the interfaces. The results of the one-dimensional case are recovered in the limit where the interfaces are strongly driven. Even with simple hard-core repulsion between the interfaces and the particles, diffusion is found to depend strongly on the details of the dynamical rules of particles close to the interfaces.

  19. On Diffusion and Permeation

    KAUST Repository

    Peppin, Stephen S. L.

    2009-01-01

    concentrations they form a nearly rigid porous glass through which the fluid permeates. The theoretically determined pressure drop is nonlinear in the diffusion regime and linear in the permeation regime, in quantitative agreement with experimental measurements

  20. Diffusing Best Practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pries-Heje, Jan; Baskerville, Richard

    2014-01-01

    approach. The study context is a design case in which an organization desires to diffuse its best practices across different groups. The design goal is embodied in organizational mechanisms to achieve this diffusion. The study used Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) as a kernel theory. The artifacts...... resulting from the design were two-day training workshops conceptually anchored to TBP. The design theory was evaluated through execution of eight diffusion workshops involving three different groups in the same company. The findings indicate that the match between the practice and the context materialized...... that the behavior will be effective). These two factors were especially critical if the source context of the best practice is qualitatively different from the target context into which the organization is seeking to diffuse the best practice....

  1. Detection of diffusible substances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warembourg, M [Lille-1 Univ., 59 - Villeneuve-d' Ascq (France)

    1976-12-01

    The different steps of a radioautographic technique for the detection of diffusible substances are described. Using this radioautographic method, the topographic distribution of estradiol-concentrating neurons was studied in the nervous system and pituitary of the ovariectomized mouse and guinea-pig. A relatively good morphological preservation of structures can be ascertained on sections from unfixed, unembedded tissues prepared at low temperatures and kept-under relatively low humidity. The translocation or extraction of diffusible substances is avoided by directly mounting of frozen sections on dried photographic emulsion. Since no solvent is used, this technique excludes the major sources of diffusion artifacts and permits to be in favourable conditions for the localization of diffusible substances.

  2. On Diffusion and Permeation

    KAUST Repository

    Peppin, Stephen S. L.

    2009-01-01

    Diffusion and permeation are discussed within the context of irreversible thermodynamics. A new expression for the generalized Stokes-Einstein equation is obtained which links the permeability to the diffusivity of a two-component solution and contains the poroelastic Biot-Willis coefficient. The theory is illustrated by predicting the concentration and pressure profiles during the filtration of a protein solution. At low concentrations the proteins diffuse independently while at higher concentrations they form a nearly rigid porous glass through which the fluid permeates. The theoretically determined pressure drop is nonlinear in the diffusion regime and linear in the permeation regime, in quantitative agreement with experimental measurements. © 2009 Walter de Gruyter, Berlin, New York.

  3. Drift-Diffusion Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Banoo

    1998-01-01

    equation in the discrete momentum space. This is shown to be similar to the conventional drift-diffusion equation except that it is a more rigorous solution to the Boltzmann equation because the current and carrier densities are resolved into M×1 vectors, where M is the number of modes in the discrete momentum space. The mobility and diffusion coefficient become M×M matrices which connect the M momentum space modes. This approach is demonstrated by simulating electron transport in bulk silicon.

  4. Product ion diffusion in flowing afterglows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, M J; Stock, H M.P. [University Coll. of Wales, Aberystwyth (UK). Dept. of Physics

    1975-11-11

    An analysis of the variation of product ion signals in flowing after-glow experiments is presented. It is shown that under certain conditions the relative variation of a single product ion yields not only the total reaction rate coefficients but also the ambipolar diffusion coefficient of the product ion in the buffer gas. Theory is compared with experiment for a number of ion-molecule and Penning reactions.

  5. Advanced manufacturing: Technology diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tesar, A.

    1995-12-01

    In this paper we examine how manufacturing technology diffuses rom the developers of technology across national borders to those who do not have the capability or resources to develop advanced technology on their own. None of the wide variety of technology diffusion mechanisms discussed in this paper are new, yet the opportunities to apply these mechanisms are growing. A dramatic increase in technology diffusion occurred over the last decade. The two major trends which probably drive this increase are a worldwide inclination towards ``freer`` markets and diminishing isolation. Technology is most rapidly diffusing from the US In fact, the US is supplying technology for the rest of the world. The value of the technology supplied by the US more than doubled from 1985 to 1992 (see the Introduction for details). History shows us that technology diffusion is inevitable. It is the rates at which technologies diffuse to other countries which can vary considerably. Manufacturers in these countries are increasingly able to absorb technology. Their manufacturing efficiency is expected to progress as technology becomes increasingly available and utilized.

  6. Now consider diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dungey, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    The authors want to talk about future work, but first he will reply to Stan Cowley's comment on his naivety in believing in the whole story to 99% confidence in '65, when he knew about Fairfield's results. Does it matter whether you make the right judgment about theories? Yes, it does, particularly for experimentalists perhaps, but also for theorists. The work you do later depends on the judgment you've made on previous work. People have wasted a lot of time developing on insecure or even wrong foundations. Now for future work. One mild surprise the authors have had is that they haven't heard more about diffusion, in two contexts. Gordon Rostoker is yet to come and he may talk about particles getting into the magnetosphere by diffusion. Lots of noise is observed and so diffusion must happen. If time had not been short, the authors were planning to discuss in a handwaving way what sort of diffusion mechanisms one might consider. The other aspect of diffusion he was going to talk about is at the other end of things and is velocity diffusion, which is involved in anomalous resistivity

  7. Diffusion tensor MR microscopy of tissues with low diffusional anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajd, Franci; Mattea, Carlos; Stapf, Siegfried; Sersa, Igor

    2016-06-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging exploits preferential diffusional motion of water molecules residing within tissue compartments for assessment of tissue structural anisotropy. However, instrumentation and post-processing errors play an important role in determination of diffusion tensor elements. In the study, several experimental factors affecting accuracy of diffusion tensor determination were analyzed. Effects of signal-to-noise ratio and configuration of the applied diffusion-sensitizing gradients on fractional anisotropy bias were analyzed by means of numerical simulations. In addition, diffusion tensor magnetic resonance microscopy experiments were performed on a tap water phantom and bovine articular cartilage-on-bone samples to verify the simulation results. In both, the simulations and the experiments, the multivariate linear regression of the diffusion-tensor analysis yielded overestimated fractional anisotropy with low SNRs and with low numbers of applied diffusion-sensitizing gradients. An increase of the apparent fractional anisotropy due to unfavorable experimental conditions can be overcome by applying a larger number of diffusion sensitizing gradients with small values of the condition number of the transformation matrix. This is in particular relevant in magnetic resonance microscopy, where imaging gradients are high and the signal-to-noise ratio is low.

  8. Ecthyma gangrenosum caused by Stenotrophomonas maltophilia in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ecthyma gangrenosum (EG) is a well- described skin lesion, mostly seen in immunocompromised patients. The lesion characteristically progresses rapidly from small indurated papulovesicles to necrotic ulcers with surrounding erythema and a central black eschar.[1]. Although rare, the presence of EG is indicative of ...

  9. Lead diffusion in monazite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardes, E.

    2006-06-01

    Proper knowledge of the diffusion rates of lead in monazite is necessary to understand the U-Th-Pb age anomalies of this mineral, which is one of the most used in geochronology after zircon. Diffusion experiments were performed in NdPO 4 monocrystals and in Nd 0.66 Ca 0.17 Th 0.17 PO 4 polycrystals from Nd 0.66 Pb 0.17 Th 0.17 PO 4 thin films to investigate Pb 2+ + Th 4+ ↔ 2 Nd 3+ and Pb 2+ ↔ Ca 2+ exchanges. Diffusion annealings were run between 1200 and 1500 Celsius degrees, at room pressure, for durations ranging from one hour to one month. The diffusion profiles were analysed using TEM (transmission electronic microscopy) and RBS (Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy). The diffusivities extracted for Pb 2+ + Th 4+ ↔ 2 Nd 3+ exchange follow an Arrhenius law with parameters E equals 509 ± 24 kJ mol -1 and log(D 0 (m 2 s -1 )) equals -3.41 ± 0.77. Preliminary data for Pb 2+ ↔ Ca 2+ exchange are in agreement with this result. The extrapolation of our data to crustal temperatures yields very slow diffusivities. For instance, the time necessary for a 50 μm grain to lose all of its lead at 800 Celsius degrees is greater than the age of the Earth. From these results and other evidence from the literature, we conclude that most of the perturbations in U-Th-Pb ages of monazite cannot be attributed to lead diffusion, but rather to interactions with fluids. (author)

  10. Diffusion Influenced Adsorption Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Toshiaki; Seki, Kazuhiko

    2015-08-27

    When the kinetics of adsorption is influenced by the diffusive flow of solutes, the solute concentration at the surface is influenced by the surface coverage of solutes, which is given by the Langmuir-Hinshelwood adsorption equation. The diffusion equation with the boundary condition given by the Langmuir-Hinshelwood adsorption equation leads to the nonlinear integro-differential equation for the surface coverage. In this paper, we solved the nonlinear integro-differential equation using the Grünwald-Letnikov formula developed to solve fractional kinetics. Guided by the numerical results, analytical expressions for the upper and lower bounds of the exact numerical results were obtained. The upper and lower bounds were close to the exact numerical results in the diffusion- and reaction-controlled limits, respectively. We examined the validity of the two simple analytical expressions obtained in the diffusion-controlled limit. The results were generalized to include the effect of dispersive diffusion. We also investigated the effect of molecular rearrangement of anisotropic molecules on surface coverage.

  11. Bicarbonate diffusion through mucus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, E H; Miller, J; Engel, E

    1995-09-01

    The mucus layer overlying duodenal epithelium maintains a pH gradient against high luminal acid concentrations. Despite these adverse conditions, epithelial surface pH remains close to neutrality. The exact nature of the gradient-forming barrier remains unknown. The barrier consists of mucus into which HCO3- is secreted. Quantification of the ability of HCO3- to establish and maintain the gradient depends on accurate measurement of this ion's diffusion coefficient through mucus. We describe new experimental and mathematical methods for diffusion measurement and report diffusion coefficients for HCO3- diffusion through saline, 5% mucin solutions, and rat duodenal mucus. The diffusion coefficients were 20.2 +/- 0.10, 3.02 +/- 0.31, and 1.81 +/- 0.12 x 10(-6) cm2/s, respectively. Modeling of the mucobicarbonate layer with this latter value suggests that for conditions of high luminal acid strength the neutralization of acid by HCO3- occurs just above the epithelial surface. Under these conditions the model predicts that fluid convection toward the lumen could be important in maintaining the pH gradient. In support of this hypothesis we were able to demonstrate a net luminal fluid flux of 5 microliters.min-1.cm-2 after perfusion of 0.15 N HCl in the rat duodenum.

  12. Cumulant expansions for measuring water exchange using diffusion MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Lipeng; Nilsson, Markus; Lasič, Samo; Westin, Carl-Fredrik; Rathi, Yogesh

    2018-02-01

    The rate of water exchange across cell membranes is a parameter of biological interest and can be measured by diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI). In this work, we investigate a stochastic model for the diffusion-and-exchange of water molecules. This model provides a general solution for the temporal evolution of dMRI signal using any type of gradient waveform, thereby generalizing the signal expressions for the Kärger model. Moreover, we also derive a general nth order cumulant expansion of the dMRI signal accounting for water exchange, which has not been explored in earlier studies. Based on this analytical expression, we compute the cumulant expansion for dMRI signals for the special case of single diffusion encoding (SDE) and double diffusion encoding (DDE) sequences. Our results provide a theoretical guideline on optimizing experimental parameters for SDE and DDE sequences, respectively. Moreover, we show that DDE signals are more sensitive to water exchange at short-time scale but provide less attenuation at long-time scale than SDE signals. Our theoretical analysis is also validated using Monte Carlo simulations on synthetic structures.

  13. Cesium diffusion in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, R.B. III; Davis, W. Jr.; Sutton, A.L. Jr.

    1980-05-01

    Experiments on diffusion of 137 Cs in five types of graphite were performed. The document provides a completion of the report that was started and includes a presentation of all of the diffusion data, previously unpublished. Except for data on mass transfer of 137 Cs in the Hawker-Siddeley graphite, analyses of experimental results were initiated but not completed. The mass transfer process of cesium in HS-1-1 graphite at 600 to 1000 0 C in a helium atmosphere is essentially pure diffusion wherein values of (E/epsilon) and ΔE of the equation D/epsilon = (D/epsilon) 0 exp [-ΔE/RT] are about 4 x 10 -2 cm 2 /s and 30 kcal/mole, respectively

  14. Apparatus for diffusion separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nierenberg, W.A.; Pontius, R.B.

    1976-01-01

    The method of testing the separation efficiency of porous permeable membranes is described which comprises causing a stream of a gaseous mixture to flow into contact with one face of a finely porous permeable membrane under such conditions that a major fraction of the mixture diffuses through the membrane, maintaining a rectangular cross section of the gaseous stream so flowing past said membrane, continuously recirculating the gas that diffuses through said membrane and continuously withdrawing the gas that does not diffuse through said membrane and maintaining the volume of said recirculating gas constant by continuously introducing into said continuously recirculating gas stream a mass of gas equivalent to that which is continuously withdrawn from said gas stream and comparing the concentrations of the light component in the entering gas, the withdrawn gas and the recirculated gas in order to determine the efficiency of said membrane

  15. Diffusion in flexible pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brogaard Kristensen, S.

    2000-06-01

    This report describes the work done on modelling and simulation of the complex diffusion of gas through the wall of a flexible pipe. The diffusion and thus the pressure in annulus depends strongly on the diffusion and solubility parameters of the gas-polymer system and on the degree of blocking of the outer surface of the inner liner due to pressure reinforcements. The report evaluates the basis modelling required to describe the complex geometries and flow patterns. Qualitatively results of temperature and concentration profiles are shown in the report. For the program to serve any modelling purpose in 'real life' the results need to be validated and possibly the model needs corrections. Hopefully, a full-scale test of a flexible pipe will provide the required temperatures and pressures in annulus to validate the models. (EHS)

  16. Distributed Control Diffusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Ulrik Pagh

    2007-01-01

    . Programming a modular, self-reconfigurable robot is however a complicated task: the robot is essentially a real-time, distributed embedded system, where control and communication paths often are tightly coupled to the current physical configuration of the robot. To facilitate the task of programming modular....... This approach allows the programmer to dynamically distribute behaviors throughout a robot and moreover provides a partial abstraction over the concrete physical shape of the robot. We have implemented a prototype of a distributed control diffusion system for the ATRON modular, self-reconfigurable robot......, self-reconfigurable robots, we present the concept of distributed control diffusion: distributed queries are used to identify modules that play a specific role in the robot, and behaviors that implement specific control strategies are diffused throughout the robot based on these role assignments...

  17. Diffuse Ceiling Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Chen; Yu, Tao; Heiselberg, Per Kvols

    cooling capacity, energy saving, low investment cost and low noise level; while the limitations include condensation risk and the limit on the room geometry. Furthermore, the crucial design parameters are summarized and their effects on the system performance are discussed. In addition to the stand...... is not well structured with this system. These become the motivations in developing the design guide. This design guide aims to establish a systematic understanding of diffuse ceiling ventilation and provide assistance in designing of such a system. The guide is targeted at design engineers, architects...... and manufacturers and the users of diffuse ceiling technology. The design guide introduces the principle and key characteristics of room air distribution with diffuse ceiling ventilation. It provides an overview of potential benefit and limitations of this technology. The benefits include high thermal comfort, high...

  18. Diffusion and mass transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Vrentas, James S

    2013-01-01

    The book first covers the five elements necessary to formulate and solve mass transfer problems, that is, conservation laws and field equations, boundary conditions, constitutive equations, parameters in constitutive equations, and mathematical methods that can be used to solve the partial differential equations commonly encountered in mass transfer problems. Jump balances, Green’s function solution methods, and the free-volume theory for the prediction of self-diffusion coefficients for polymer–solvent systems are among the topics covered. The authors then use those elements to analyze a wide variety of mass transfer problems, including bubble dissolution, polymer sorption and desorption, dispersion, impurity migration in plastic containers, and utilization of polymers in drug delivery. The text offers detailed solutions, along with some theoretical aspects, for numerous processes including viscoelastic diffusion, moving boundary problems, diffusion and reaction, membrane transport, wave behavior, sedime...

  19. Diffusion in flexible pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brogaard Kristensen, S

    2000-06-01

    This report describes the work done on modelling and simulation of the complex diffusion of gas through the wall of a flexible pipe. The diffusion and thus the pressure in annulus depends strongly on the diffusion and solubility parameters of the gas-polymer system and on the degree of blocking of the outer surface of the inner liner due to pressure reinforcements. The report evaluates the basis modelling required to describe the complex geometries and flow patterns. Qualitatively results of temperature and concentration profiles are shown in the report. For the program to serve any modelling purpose in 'real life' the results need to be validated and possibly the model needs corrections. Hopefully, a full-scale test of a flexible pipe will provide the required temperatures and pressures in annulus to validate the models. (EHS)

  20. Diffusion-weighted MRI in the diagnosis of intracranial hematomas

    OpenAIRE

    Şanlı, Davut; Ünal, Özkan; Bora, Aydın; Beyazal, Mehmet; Yavuz, Alpaslan; Avcu, Serhat

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. To determinate the diagnostic value of diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) in intracerebral hematomas, epidural hematomas, subdural hematomas, and subarachnoid hemorrhage, and to assess the contribution of diffusion signal characteristics in the differentiation of hematoma stages. In this prospective study, consecutive 67 patients (range: 3-89 years), 35 (18 men 17 women) with intracerebral hematoma, 18 (10 men 8 women) with subdural hematoma, 2 (1 man 1 woman) with epidural hematom...

  1. Platoon Dispersion Analysis Based on Diffusion Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badhrudeen Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Urbanization and gro wing demand for travel, causes the traffic system to work ineffectively in most urban areas leadin g to traffic congestion. Many approaches have been adopted to address this problem, one among them being the signal co-ordination. This can be achieved if the platoon of vehicles that gets discharged at one signal gets green at consecutive signals with minimal delay. However, platoons tend to get dispersed as they travel and this dispersion phenomenon should be taken into account for effective signal coordination. Reported studies in this area are from the homogeneous and lane disciplined traffic conditions. This paper analyse the platoon dispersion characteristics under heterogeneous and lane-less traffic conditions. Out of the various modeling techniques reported, the approach based on diffusion theory is used in this study. The diffusion theory based models so far assumed thedata to follow normal distribution. However, in the present study, the data was found to follow lognormal distribution and hence the implementation was carried out using lognormal distribution. The parameters of lognormal distribution were calibrated for the study condition. For comparison purpose, normal distribution was also calibrated and the results were evaluated. It was foun d that model with log normal distribution performed better in all cases than the o ne with normal distribution.

  2. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging of intracranial tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bydder, G.M.; Baudouin, C.J.; Steiner, R.E.; Hajnal, J.V.; Young, I.R.

    1991-01-01

    This paper assesses the effect of anisotropic diffusion weighting on the appearances of cerebral tumors as well as vasogenic and interstitial edema. Diffusion weighting produced a reduction in signal intensity in all or part of the tumors in the majority of cases. However, a relative increase in signal intensity was apparent in four cases. The decrease in signal intensity in vasogenic edema depended on the site and direction of gradient sensitization. Marked increase in conspicuity between tumor and edema was apparent in three cases. Changes in interstitial edema depended in detail in fiber direction. Differentiation between tumor and edema can be improved with diffusion-weighted imaging. Anisotropic change is seen in both vasogenic and interstitial edema

  3. The Trouble with Diffusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.T. DeHoff

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenological formalism, which yields Fick's Laws for diffusion in single phase multicomponent systems, is widely accepted as the basis for the mathematical description of diffusion. This paper focuses on problems associated with this formalism. This mode of description of the process is cumbersome, defining as it does matrices of interdiffusion coefficients (the central material properties that require a large experimental investment for their evaluation in three component systems, and, indeed cannot be evaluated for systems with more than three components. It is also argued that the physical meaning of the numerical values of these properties with respect to the atom motions in the system remains unknown. The attempt to understand the physical content of the diffusion coefficients in the phenomenological formalism has been the central fundamental problem in the theory of diffusion in crystalline alloys. The observation by Kirkendall that the crystal lattice moves during diffusion led Darken to develop the concept of intrinsic diffusion, i.e., atom motion relative to the crystal lattice. Darken and his successors sought to relate the diffusion coefficients computed for intrinsic fluxes to those obtained from the motion of radioactive tracers in chemically homogeneous samples which directly report the jump frequencies of the atoms as a function of composition and temperature. This theoretical connection between tracer, intrinsic and interdiffusion behavior would provide the basis for understanding the physical content of interdiffusion coefficients. Definitive tests of the resulting theoretical connection have been carried out for a number of binary systems for which all three kinds of observations are available. In a number of systems predictions of intrinsic coefficients from tracer data do not agree with measured values although predictions of interdiffusion coefficients appear to give reasonable agreement. Thus, the complete

  4. Nonlinear diffusion equations

    CERN Document Server

    Wu Zhuo Qun; Li Hui Lai; Zhao Jun Ning

    2001-01-01

    Nonlinear diffusion equations, an important class of parabolic equations, come from a variety of diffusion phenomena which appear widely in nature. They are suggested as mathematical models of physical problems in many fields, such as filtration, phase transition, biochemistry and dynamics of biological groups. In many cases, the equations possess degeneracy or singularity. The appearance of degeneracy or singularity makes the study more involved and challenging. Many new ideas and methods have been developed to overcome the special difficulties caused by the degeneracy and singularity, which

  5. Phase transformation and diffusion

    CERN Document Server

    Kale, G B; Dey, G K

    2008-01-01

    Given that the basic purpose of all research in materials science and technology is to tailor the properties of materials to suit specific applications, phase transformations are the natural key to the fine-tuning of the structural, mechanical and corrosion properties. A basic understanding of the kinetics and mechanisms of phase transformation is therefore of vital importance. Apart from a few cases involving crystallographic martensitic transformations, all phase transformations are mediated by diffusion. Thus, proper control and understanding of the process of diffusion during nucleation, g

  6. Ambipolar diffusion in plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, T.L. da.

    1987-01-01

    Is this thesis, a numerical method for the solution of the linear diffusion equation for a plasma containing two types of ions, with the possibility of charge exchange, has been developed. It has been shown that the decay time of the electron and ion densities is much smaller than that in a plasma containing only a single type of ion. A non-linear diffusion equation, which includes the effects of an external electric field varying linearly in time, to describe a slightly ionized plasma has also been developed. It has been verified that the decay of the electron density in the presence of such an electric field is very slow. (author)

  7. Diffusion MR Imaging of Postoperative Bilateral Acute Ischemic Optic Neuropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Ju Young; Lee, In Ho; Song, Chang June; Hwang, Hee Youn

    2012-01-01

    A 57-year-old woman experienced bilateral acute ischemic optic neuropathy after spine surgery. Routine MR imaging sequence, T2-weighted image, showed subtle high signal intensity on bilateral optic nerves. A contrast-enhanced T1 weighted image showed enhancement along the bilateral optic nerve sheath. Moreover, diffusion-weighted image (DWI) and an apparent diffusion coefficient map showed markedly restricted diffusion on bilateral optic nerves. Although MR findings of T2-weighted and contrast enhanced T1-weighted images may be nonspecific, the DWI finding of cytotoxic edema of bilateral optic nerves will be helpful for the diagnosis of acute ischemic optic neuropathy after spine surgery.

  8. Diffusion MR Imaging of Postoperative Bilateral Acute Ischemic Optic Neuropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ju Young; Lee, In Ho; Song, Chang June [Chungnam National University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Hee Youn [Eulji University Hospital, Daejeon(Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    A 57-year-old woman experienced bilateral acute ischemic optic neuropathy after spine surgery. Routine MR imaging sequence, T2-weighted image, showed subtle high signal intensity on bilateral optic nerves. A contrast-enhanced T1 weighted image showed enhancement along the bilateral optic nerve sheath. Moreover, diffusion-weighted image (DWI) and an apparent diffusion coefficient map showed markedly restricted diffusion on bilateral optic nerves. Although MR findings of T2-weighted and contrast enhanced T1-weighted images may be nonspecific, the DWI finding of cytotoxic edema of bilateral optic nerves will be helpful for the diagnosis of acute ischemic optic neuropathy after spine surgery.

  9. Signal Processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    Signal processing techniques, extensively used nowadays to maximize the performance of audio and video equipment, have been a key part in the design of hardware and software for high energy physics detectors since pioneering applications in the UA1 experiment at CERN in 1979

  10. Diffusion tensor smoothing through weighted Karcher means

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, Owen; Chen, Jun; Paul, Debashis; Peng, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) quantifies the spatial distribution of water Diffusion at each voxel on a regular grid of locations in a biological specimen by Diffusion tensors– 3 × 3 positive definite matrices. Removal of noise from DTI is an important problem due to the high scientific relevance of DTI and relatively low signal to noise ratio it provides. Leading approaches to this problem amount to estimation of weighted Karcher means of Diffusion tensors within spatial neighborhoods, under various metrics imposed on the space of tensors. However, it is unclear how the behavior of these estimators varies with the magnitude of DTI sensor noise (the noise resulting from the thermal e!ects of MRI scanning) as well as the geometric structure of the underlying Diffusion tensor neighborhoods. In this paper, we combine theoretical analysis, empirical analysis of simulated DTI data, and empirical analysis of real DTI scans to compare the noise removal performance of three kernel-based DTI smoothers that are based on Euclidean, log-Euclidean, and affine-invariant metrics. The results suggest, contrary to conventional wisdom, that imposing a simplistic Euclidean metric may in fact provide comparable or superior noise removal, especially in relatively unstructured regions and/or in the presence of moderate to high levels of sensor noise. On the contrary, log-Euclidean and affine-invariant metrics may lead to better noise removal in highly structured anatomical regions, especially when the sensor noise is of low magnitude. These findings emphasize the importance of considering the interplay of sensor noise magnitude and tensor field geometric structure when assessing Diffusion tensor smoothing options. They also point to the necessity for continued development of smoothing methods that perform well across a large range of scenarios. PMID:25419264

  11. Diffusion in building wakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsdell, J.V.

    1988-03-01

    Straight-line Gaussian models adequately describe atmospheric diffusion for many applications. They have been modified for use in estimating diffusion in building wakes by adding terms that include projected building area and by redefining the diffusion coefficients so that the coefficients have minimum values that are related to building dimensions. In a recent study, Ramsdell reviewed the building-wake dispersion models used by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in its control room habitability assessments. The review included comparison of model estimates of centerline concentrations with concentrations observed in experiments at seven nuclear reactors. In general, the models are conservative in that they tend to predict concentrations that are greater than those actually observed. However, the models show little skill in accounting for variations in the observed concentrations. Subsequently, the experimental data and multiples linear regression techniques have been used to develop a new building wake diffusion model. This paper describes the new building wake model and compares it with other models. 8 refs., 2 figs

  12. Osmosis and Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sack, Jeff

    2005-01-01

    OsmoBeaker is a CD-ROM designed to enhance the learning of diffusion and osmosis by presenting interactive experimentation to the student. The software provides several computer simulations that take the student through different scenarios with cells, having different concentrations of solutes in them.

  13. Diffusion Based Photon Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjøth, Lars; Sporring, Jon; Fogh Olsen, Ole

    2008-01-01

    . To address this problem, we introduce a photon mapping algorithm based on nonlinear anisotropic diffusion. Our algorithm adapts according to the structure of the photon map such that smoothing occurs along edges and structures and not across. In this way, we preserve important illumination features, while...

  14. Bronnen van diffuse bodembelasting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lijzen JPA; Ekelenkamp A; LBG; DGM/BO

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this study was to support the policy on preventive soil protection with information on the diffuse (non-local) emissions to soil and the influence on future soil quality. This study is related to inventories on (potential) sources of local soil pollution (e.g. industrial areas,

  15. Diffusion in glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mubarak, A S

    1991-12-31

    Rutherford backscattering spectromertry technique (RBS) was used to characterize and investigate the depth distribution profiles of Ca-impurities of Ca-doped soda-time glass. The purposely added Ca-impurities were introduced inti the glass matrix by a normal ion exchange diffusion process. The measurements and analysis were performed using 2 MeV {sup 2}He{sup +} ions supplied from the University of Jordan Van de Graff acceierator (JOVAG). The normalized concetration versus depth profile distributions for the Ca-imourities were determined, both theoretically and experimentally. The theoretical treatment was carried out by setting up and soiving the diffusion equation under the conditions of the experiment. The resulting profiles are characterized by a compiementary error function. the theoretical treeatment was extended to include the various methods of enhancing the diffusion process, e.g. using an electric field. The diffusion coefficient, assumed constant, of the Ca-impurities exchanged in the soda-lime glass was determined to be 1.23 x 10{sup 13} cm{sup 2}/s. A comparison between theoretically and experimentally determined profiles is made and commented at, where several conclusions are drawn and suggestions for future work are mentioned. (author). 38 refs., 21 figs., 10 Tabs.

  16. Diffusion or bulk flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulz, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    is currently matter of discussion, called passive symplasmic loading. Based on the limited material available, this review compares the different loading modes and suggests that diffusion is the driving force in apoplasmic loaders, while bulk flow plays an increasing role in plants having a continuous...

  17. Multienergy anomalous diffuse scattering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kopecký, Miloš; Fábry, Jan; Kub, Jiří; Lausi, A.; Busetto, E.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 100, č. 19 (2008), 195504/1-195504/4 ISSN 0031-9007 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100100529 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : diffuse scattering * x-rays * structure determination Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 7.180, year: 2008

  18. Diffuse Ceiling Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Chen; Yu, Tao; Heiselberg, Per Kvols

    with conventional ventilation systems (mixing or displacement ventilation), diffuse ceiling ventilation can significantly reduce or even eliminate draught risk in the occupied zone. Moreover, this ventilation system presents a promising opportunity for energy saving, because of the low pressure loss, extended free...

  19. Diffuse Ceiling Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Chen; Heiselberg, Per; Nielsen, Peter V.

    2014-01-01

    As a novel air distribution system, diffuse ceiling ventilation combines the suspended acoustic ceiling with ventilation supply. Due to the low-impulse supply from the large ceiling area, the system does not generate draught when supplying cold air. However, heat sources play an important role...

  20. Diffusion in ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Pelleg, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    This textbook provides an introduction to changes that occur in solids such as ceramics, mainly at high temperatures, which are diffusion controlled, as well as presenting research data. Such changes are related to the kinetics of various reactions such as precipitation, oxidation and phase transformations, but are also related to some mechanical changes, such as creep. The book is composed of two parts, beginning with a look at the basics of diffusion according to Fick's Laws. Solutions of Fick’s second law for constant D, diffusion in grain boundaries and dislocations are presented along with a look at the atomistic approach for the random motion of atoms. In the second part, the author discusses diffusion in several technologically important ceramics. The ceramics selected are monolithic single phase ones, including: A12O3, SiC, MgO, ZrO2 and Si3N4. Of these, three refer to oxide ceramics (alumina, magnesia and zirconia). Carbide based ceramics are represented by the technologically very important Si-ca...

  1. Asymmetric cortical high signal on diffusion weighted-MRI in a case of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease Hipersinal cortical assimétrico na ressonância magnética na imagem em difusão em caso de doença de Creutzfeldt-Jakob

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Nitrini

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available High signal in the cerebral cortex and/or basal ganglia on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI has been described as a good diagnostic marker for sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD. We report a case of sCJD with atypical clinical evolution and unusual DW-MRI findings. A 53-year-old man was seen with a 2-year history of a rapidly progressive dementia and cerebellar ataxia. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis, including the test for 14-3-3 protein, was normal. EEG did not show periodic activity. However, DW-MRI showed gyriform hyperintensity involving practically the entire cortical ribbon of the left hemisphere, whilst being limited to the posterior cingulate gyrus in the right hemisphere. DNA analysis showed no mutations or insertions in the prion protein gene, and homozigozity for methionine in codon 129. A subsequent brain biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of CJD. Thus, high signal on DW-MRI may be limited to the cerebral cortex and may present a very asymmetric distribution in sCJD.Hipersinal no cortex cerebral e/ou nos gânglios da base observado com a técnica de difusão da ressonância magnética (RM-DIF tem sido descrito como bom marcador diagnóstico da doença de Creutzfeldt-Jakob esporádica (DCJe. Relatamos caso de DCJe com evolução clínica atípica e achados incomuns na RM-DIF. Homem de 53 anos foi examinado com história de dois anos de demência rapidamente progressiva e ataxia cerebelar. Exame do líquido cefalorraqueano, incluindo pesquisa da proteína 14-3-3, foi normal; EEG não revelou atividade periódica; RM-DIF mostrou hiperintensidade nos giros que afetava quase inteiramente o manto cortical do hemisfério cerebral esquerdo e que no hemisfério direito se limitava à parte posterior do giro cíngulo. Análise do DNA revelou ausência de mutação ou de inserção no gene da proteína priônica e a presença de homozigose para metionina no códon 129. Biópsia cerebral confirmou o diagnóstico de DCJ

  2. Oxygen diffusion in zircon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, E. B.; Cherniak, D. J.

    1997-05-01

    Oxygen diffusion in natural, non-metamict zircon was characterized under both dry and water-present conditions at temperatures ranging from 765°C to 1500°C. Dry experiments were performed at atmospheric pressure by encapsulating polished zircon samples with a fine powder of 18O-enriched quartz and annealing the sealed capsules in air. Hydrothermal runs were conducted in cold-seal pressure vessels (7-70 MPa) or a piston cylinder apparatus (400-1000 MPa) on zircon samples encapsulated with both 18O-enriched quartz and 18O water. Diffusive-uptake profiles of 18O were measured in all samples with a particle accelerator, using the 18O(p, α) 15N reaction. For dry experimental conditions at 1100-1500°C, the resulting oxygen diffusivities (24 in all) are well described by: D dry (m 2/s) = 1.33 × 10 -4exp(-53920/T) There is no suggestion of diffusive anisotropy. Under wet conditions at 925°C, oxygen diffusion shows little or no dependence upon P H 2O in the range 7-1000 MPa, and is insensitive to total pressure as well. The results of 27 wet experiments at 767-1160°C and 7-1000 MPa can be described a single Arrhenius relationship: D wet (m 2/s) = 5.5 × 10 -12exp(-25280/T) The insensitivity of oxygen diffusion to P H 2O means that applications to geologic problems can be pursued knowing only whether the system of interest was 'wet' (i.e., P H 2O > 7MPa ) or 'dry'. Under dry conditions (presumably rare in the crust), zircons are extremely retentive of their oxygen isotopic signatures, to the extent that δ 18O would be perturbed at the center of a 200 μm zircon only during an extraordinarily hot and protracted event (e.g., 65 Ma at 900°C). Under wet conditions, δ 18O may or may not be retained in the central regions of individual crystals, cores or overgrowth rims, depending upon the specific thermal history of the system.

  3. The Pearson diffusions: A class of statistically tractable diffusion processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forman, Julie Lyng; Sørensen, Michael

    The Pearson diffusions is a flexible class of diffusions defined by having linear drift and quadratic squared diffusion coefficient. It is demonstrated that for this class explicit statistical inference is feasible. Explicit optimal martingale estimating func- tions are found, and the corresponding...

  4. Microstructural changes in ischemic cortical gray matter predicted by a model of diffusion-weighted MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vestergaard-Poulsen, Peter; Hansen, Brian; Ostergaard, Leif; Jakobsen, Rikke

    2007-09-01

    To understand the diffusion attenuated MR signal from normal and ischemic brain tissue in order to extract structural and physiological information using mathematical modeling, taking into account the transverse relaxation rates in gray matter. We fit our diffusion model to the diffusion-weighted MR signal obtained from cortical gray matter in healthy subjects. Our model includes variable volume fractions, intracellular restriction effects, and exchange between compartments in addition to individual diffusion coefficients and transverse relaxation rates for each compartment. A global optimum was found from a wide range of parameter permutations using cluster computing. We also present simulations of cell swelling and changes of exchange rate and intracellular diffusion as possible cellular mechanisms in ischemia. Our model estimates an extracellular volume fraction of 0.19 in accordance with the accepted value from histology. The absolute apparent diffusion coefficient obtained from the model was similar to that of experiments. The model and the experimental results indicate significant differences in diffusion and transverse relaxation between the tissue compartments and slow water exchange. Our model reproduces the signal changes observed in ischemia via physiologically credible mechanisms. Our modeling suggests that transverse relaxation has a profound influence on the diffusion attenuated MR signal. Our simulations indicate cell swelling as the primary cause of the diffusion changes seen in the acute phase of brain ischemia. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Interpolation of diffusion weighted imaging datasets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyrby, Tim B; Lundell, Henrik; Burke, Mark W

    2014-01-01

    anatomical details and signal-to-noise-ratio for reliable fibre reconstruction. We assessed the potential benefits of interpolating DWI datasets to a higher image resolution before fibre reconstruction using a diffusion tensor model. Simulations of straight and curved crossing tracts smaller than or equal......Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) is used to study white-matter fibre organisation, orientation and structural connectivity by means of fibre reconstruction algorithms and tractography. For clinical settings, limited scan time compromises the possibilities to achieve high image resolution for finer...... interpolation methods fail to disentangle fine anatomical details if PVE is too pronounced in the original data. As for validation we used ex-vivo DWI datasets acquired at various image resolutions as well as Nissl-stained sections. Increasing the image resolution by a factor of eight yielded finer geometrical...

  6. Quantifying brain microstructure with diffusion MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novikov, Dmitry S.; Jespersen, Sune N.; Kiselev, Valerij G.

    2016-01-01

    the potential to quantify the relevant length scales for neuronal tissue, such as the packing correlation length for neuronal fibers, the degree of neuronal beading, and compartment sizes. The second avenue corresponds to the long-time limit, when the observed signal can be approximated as a sum of multiple non......-exchanging anisotropic Gaussian components. Here the challenge lies in parameter estimation and in resolving its hidden degeneracies. The third avenue employs multiple diffusion encoding techniques, able to access information not contained in the conventional diffusion propagator. We conclude with our outlook...... on the future research directions which can open exciting possibilities for developing markers of pathology and development based on methods of studying mesoscopic transport in disordered systems....

  7. Chansporter complexes in cell signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Geoffrey W

    2017-09-01

    Ion channels facilitate diffusion of ions across cell membranes for such diverse purposes as neuronal signaling, muscular contraction, and fluid homeostasis. Solute transporters often utilize ionic gradients to move aqueous solutes up their concentration gradient, also fulfilling a wide variety of tasks. Recently, an increasing number of ion channel-transporter ('chansporter') complexes have been discovered. Chansporter complex formation may overcome what could otherwise be considerable spatial barriers to rapid signal integration and feedback between channels and transporters, the ions and other substrates they transport, and environmental factors to which they must respond. Here, current knowledge in this field is summarized, covering both heterologous expression structure/function findings and potential mechanisms by which chansporter complexes fulfill contrasting roles in cell signaling in vivo. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  8. Urban diffusion problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanna, S.R.

    1976-01-01

    It is hoped that urban diffusion models of air pollutants can eventually confidently be used to make major decisions, such as in planning the layout of a new industrial park, determining the effects of a new highway on air quality, or estimating the results of a new automobile emissions exhaust system. The urban diffusion model itself should be able to account for point, line, and area sources, and the local aerodynamic effects of street canyons and building wakes. Removal or transformations due to dry or wet deposition and chemical reactions are often important. It would be best if the model included meteorological parameters such as wind speed and temperature as dependent variables, since these parameters vary significantly when air passes from rural surfaces over urban surfaces

  9. Diffused Religion and Prayer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Cipriani

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available It is quite likely that the origins of prayer are to be found in ancient mourning and bereavement rites. Primeval ritual prayer was codified and handed down socially to become a deep-rooted feature of people’s cultural behavior, so much so, that it may surface again several years later, in the face of death, danger, need, even in the case of relapse from faith and religious practice. Modes of prayer depend on religious experience, on relations between personal prayer and political action, between prayer and forgiveness, and between prayer and approaches to religions. Various forms of prayer exist, from the covert-hidden to the overt-manifest kind. How can they be investigated? How can one, for instance, explore mental prayer? These issues regard the canon of diffused religion and, therefore, of diffused prayer.

  10. Magnetic diffuse scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cable, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    The diffuse scattering of neutrons from magnetic materials provides unique and important information regarding the spatial correlations of the atoms and the spins. Such measurements have been extensively applied to magnetically ordered systems, such as the ferromagnetic binary alloys, for which the observed correlations describe the magnetic moment fluctuations associated with local environment effects. With the advent of polarization analysis, these techniques are increasingly being applied to study disordered paramagnetic systems such as the spin-glasses and the diluted magnetic semiconductors. The spin-pair correlations obtained are essential in understanding the exchange interactions of such systems. In this paper, we describe recent neutron diffuse scattering results on the atom-pair and spin-pair correlations in some of these disordered magnetic systems. 56 refs

  11. Diffusion in heterogeneous lattices

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tarasenko, Alexander; Jastrabík, Lubomír

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 256, č. 17 (2010), s. 5137-5144 ISSN 0169-4332 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN301370701; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : lattice- gas systems * diffusion * Monte Carlo simulations Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.795, year: 2010

  12. Diffusion bonding techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, R.D.

    1978-01-01

    The applications of diffusion bonding at the General Electric Neutron Devices Department are briefly discussed, with particular emphasis on the gold/gold or gold/indium joints made between metallized alumina ceramic parts in the vacuum switch tube and the crystal resonator programs. Fixtures which use the differential expansion of dissimilar metals are described and compared to one that uses hydraulic pressure to apply the necessary bonding force

  13. Enrichment by diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mezin, M.

    1976-01-01

    The report presents an introduction to general basic principles of the gaseous diffusion process for the separation of uranium isotopes. Dealt with are: a) theoretical background and basic considerations of separation work and production costs, b) construction of a single separation stage and a multistage plant, c) the components of a plant and the optimization factors, d) cost factors. The text is illustrated by instructive diagrammes and flow charts. (RB) [de

  14. Surface diffusion of sorbed radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, J.A.; Bond, K.A.

    1991-01-01

    Surface diffusion has in the past been invoked to explain rates of radionuclide migration which were greater than those predicted. Results were generally open to interpretation but the possible existence of surface diffusion, whereby sorbed radionuclides could potentially migrate at much enhanced rates, necessitated investigation. In this work through-diffusion experiments have shown that although surface diffusion does exist for some nuclides, the magnitude of the phenomenon is not sufficient to affect repository safety assessment modelling. (author)

  15. Diffusion in cladding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anand, M.S.; Pande, B.M.; Agarwala, R.P.

    1992-01-01

    Aluminium has been used as a cladding material in most research reactors because its low neutron absorption cross section and ease of fabrication. However, it is not suitable for cladding in power reactors and as such zircaloy-2 is normally used as a clad because it can withstand high temperature. It has low neutron absorption cross section, good oxidation, corrosion, creep properties and possesses good mechanical strength. With the passage of time, further development in this branch of science took place and designers started looking for better neutron economy and less hydrogen pickup in PHW reactors. The motion of fission products in the cladding material could pose a problem after long operation. In order to understand their behaviour under reactor environment, it is essential to study first the diffusion under normal conditions. These studies will throw light on the interaction of defects with impurities which would in turn help in understanding the mechanism of diffusion. In this article, it is intended to discuss the diffusion behaviour of impurities in cladding materials.(i.e. aluminium, zircaloy-2, zirconium-niobium alloy etc.). (author). 94 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  16. Comparison of non-Gaussian and Gaussian diffusion models of diffusion weighted imaging of rectal cancer at 3.0 T MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guangwen; Wang, Shuangshuang; Wen, Didi; Zhang, Jing; Wei, Xiaocheng; Ma, Wanling; Zhao, Weiwei; Wang, Mian; Wu, Guosheng; Zhang, Jinsong

    2016-12-09

    Water molecular diffusion in vivo tissue is much more complicated. We aimed to compare non-Gaussian diffusion models of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) including intra-voxel incoherent motion (IVIM), stretched-exponential model (SEM) and Gaussian diffusion model at 3.0 T MRI in patients with rectal cancer, and to determine the optimal model for investigating the water diffusion properties and characterization of rectal carcinoma. Fifty-nine consecutive patients with pathologically confirmed rectal adenocarcinoma underwent DWI with 16 b-values at a 3.0 T MRI system. DWI signals were fitted to the mono-exponential and non-Gaussian diffusion models (IVIM-mono, IVIM-bi and SEM) on primary tumor and adjacent normal rectal tissue. Parameters of standard apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), slow- and fast-ADC, fraction of fast ADC (f), α value and distributed diffusion coefficient (DDC) were generated and compared between the tumor and normal tissues. The SEM exhibited the best fitting results of actual DWI signal in rectal cancer and the normal rectal wall (R 2  = 0.998, 0.999 respectively). The DDC achieved relatively high area under the curve (AUC = 0.980) in differentiating tumor from normal rectal wall. Non-Gaussian diffusion models could assess tissue properties more accurately than the ADC derived Gaussian diffusion model. SEM may be used as a potential optimal model for characterization of rectal cancer.

  17. Solute diffusivity in undisturbed soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægdsmand, Mette; Møldrup, Per; Schjønning, Per

    2012-01-01

    Solute diffusivity in soil plays a major role in many important processes with relation to plant growth and environmental issues. Soil solute diffusivity is affected by the volumetric water content as well as the morphological characteristics of water-filled pores. The solute diffusivity in intact...

  18. Integrin Signalling

    OpenAIRE

    Schelfaut, Roselien

    2005-01-01

    Integrins are receptors presented on most cells. By binding ligand they can generate signalling pathways inside the cell. Those pathways are a linkage to proteins in the cytosol. It is known that tumor cells can survive and proliferate in the absence of a solid support while normal cells need to be bound to ligand. To understand why tumour cells act that way, we first have to know how ligand-binding to integrins affect the cell. This research field includes studies on activation of proteins b...

  19. Diffusion of Zonal Variables Using Node-Centered Diffusion Solver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, T B

    2007-08-06

    Tom Kaiser [1] has done some preliminary work to use the node-centered diffusion solver (originally developed by T. Palmer [2]) in Kull for diffusion of zonal variables such as electron temperature. To avoid numerical diffusion, Tom used a scheme developed by Shestakov et al. [3] and found their scheme could, in the vicinity of steep gradients, decouple nearest-neighbor zonal sub-meshes leading to 'alternating-zone' (red-black mode) errors. Tom extended their scheme to couple the sub-meshes with appropriate chosen artificial diffusion and thereby solved the 'alternating-zone' problem. Because the choice of the artificial diffusion coefficient could be very delicate, it is desirable to use a scheme that does not require the artificial diffusion but still able to avoid both numerical diffusion and the 'alternating-zone' problem. In this document we present such a scheme.

  20. Particle diffusion in a spheromak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyerhofer, D.D.; Levinton, F.M.; Yamada, M.

    1988-01-01

    The local carbon particle diffusion coefficient was measured in the Proto S-1/C spheromak using a test particle injection scheme. When the plasma was not in a force-free Taylor state, and when there were pressure gradients in the plasma, the particle diffusion was five times that predicted by Bohm and was consistent with collisional drift wave diffusion. The diffusion appears to be driven by correlations of the fluctuating electric field and density. During the decay phase of the discharge when the plasma was in the Taylor state, the diffusion coefficient of the carbon was classical. 23 refs., 4 figs

  1. Advanced diffusion processes and phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Öchsner, Andreas; Belova, Irina

    2014-01-01

    This topical volume on Advanced Diffusion Processes and Phenomena addresses diffusion in a wider sense of not only mass diffusion but also heat diffusion in fluids and solids. Both diffusion phenomena play an important role in the characterization of engineering materials and corresponding structures. Understanding these different transport phenomena at many levels, from atomistic to macro, has therefore long attracted the attention of many researchers in materials science and engineering and related disciplines. The present topical volume captures a representative cross-section of some of the

  2. Measuring methods of matrix diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muurinen, A.; Valkiainen, M.

    1988-03-01

    In Finland the spent nuclear fuel is planned to be disposed of at large depths in crystalline bedrock. The radionuclides which are dissolved in the groundwater may be able to diffuse into the micropores of the porous rock matrix and thus be withdrawn from the flowing water in the fractures. This phenomenon is called matrix diffusion. A review over matrix diffusion is presented in the study. The main interest is directed to the diffusion of non-sorbing species. The review covers diffusion experiments and measurements of porosity, pore size, specific surface area and water permeability

  3. Multi-Shell Hybrid Diffusion Imaging (HYDI) at 7 Tesla in TgF344-AD Transgenic Alzheimer Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Daianu, Madelaine; Jacobs, Russell E.; Weitz, Tara M.; Town, Terrence C.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) is widely used to study microstructural characteristics of the brain. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and high-angular resolution imaging (HARDI) are frequently used in radiology and neuroscience research but can be limited in describing the signal behavior in composite nerve fiber structures. Here, we developed and assessed the benefit of a comprehensive diffusion encoding scheme, known as hybrid diffusion imaging (HYDI), composed of 300 DWI volumes acquired a...

  4. Underwater navigation using diffusion-based trajectory observers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jouffroy, Jerome; Opderbecke, Jan

    2007-01-01

    This paper addresses the issue of estimating underwater vehicle trajectories using gyro-Doppler (body-fixed velocities) and acoustic positioning signals (earth-fixed positions). The approach consists of diffusion-based observers processing a whole trajectory segment at a time, allowing the consid...

  5. Molecular diffusion of stable water isotopes in polar firn as a proxy for past temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holme, Christian; Gkinis, Vasileios; Vinther, Bo M.

    2018-03-01

    Polar precipitation archived in ice caps contains information on past temperature conditions. Such information can be retrieved by measuring the water isotopic signals of δ18O and δD in ice cores. These signals have been attenuated during densification due to molecular diffusion in the firn column, where the magnitude of the diffusion is isotopologue specific and temperature dependent. By utilizing the differential diffusion signal, dual isotope measurements of δ18O and δD enable multiple temperature reconstruction techniques. This study assesses how well six different methods can be used to reconstruct past surface temperatures from the diffusion-based temperature proxies. Two of the methods are based on the single diffusion lengths of δ18O and δD , three of the methods employ the differential diffusion signal, while the last uses the ratio between the single diffusion lengths. All techniques are tested on synthetic data in order to evaluate their accuracy and precision. We perform a benchmark test to thirteen high resolution Holocene data sets from Greenland and Antarctica, which represent a broad range of mean annual surface temperatures and accumulation rates. Based on the benchmark test, we comment on the accuracy and precision of the methods. Both the benchmark test and the synthetic data test demonstrate that the most precise reconstructions are obtained when using the single isotope diffusion lengths, with precisions of approximately 1.0 °C . In the benchmark test, the single isotope diffusion lengths are also found to reconstruct consistent temperatures with a root-mean-square-deviation of 0.7 °C . The techniques employing the differential diffusion signals are more uncertain, where the most precise method has a precision of 1.9 °C . The diffusion length ratio method is the least precise with a precision of 13.7 °C . The absolute temperature estimates from this method are also shown to be highly sensitive to the choice of fractionation factor

  6. Use and abuse of diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwiotek, A.; Grzywna, Z.J.

    2005-01-01

    Diffusion in a bounded region (or diffusive mass transport) can be seen from at least three platforms: - chemistry of he Fick's equation; - chemical engineering. To pose a particular problem we have to provide some additional conditions (initial conditions, boundary conditions and further). As we understood it in all cases diffusion is considered in an open region (in other words in one phase). Chemical engineering however brings an idea of 'diffusion' between phases. We claim that there isn't diffusion between phases. One can only consider mass transport between phases. Mass transport (or transfer in chemical engineering jargon) from one phase to another composes of: diffusion in first phase partition at an interface diffusion in second phase. (author)

  7. Diffusion in amorphous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iotov, Mihail S.

    The goals of this research are twofold: First, to develop methods and tools for studying problems in chemistry, material science and biology, as well as accurate prediction of the properties of structures and materials of importance to those fields. Second, use those tools to apply the methods to practical problems. In terms of methodology development this thesis focuses on two topics: One: Development of a massively parallel computer program to perform electronic, atomic, molecular levels simulations of problems in chemistry, material science and biology. This computer program uses existing and emerging hardware platforms and parallel tools and is based on decades long research in computer modeling and algorithms. We report on that development in Chapter 3. Two: Development of tools for Molecular Dynamics simulation and methods and tools for course-grained meso-scale modeling of transport properties and especially diffusion of gas penetrants in polymers. We have formulated a new method for extracting coarse-grained information from short (0.2-0.5 nanoseconds [ns]) MD simulations and use this in a meso-scale simulation to calculate diffusion constants in polymer matrices. This is a grid-based method, which calculates the average probability of each grid point of being a void and performs constrained and biased Monte Carlo (MC) dynamics to reach much longer time regimes than possible in MD. The MC method mimics the three regimes of mean square deviation (MSD) behavior seen in MD, thus accounting for the proper mobility of the voids and the compressibility of the polymer matrix. Theoretical discussions and justification for the method is presented in chapter 6. Initial results on He diffusion in a low-density polyethylene (PE) matrix are presented in chapter 7. The behavior at different temperatures follows closely the trend observed from calibrating long term MD for this particular system.

  8. Diffusion in silicon isotope heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silvestri, Hughes Howland [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The simultaneous diffusion of Si and the dopants B, P, and As has been studied by the use of a multilayer structure of isotopically enriched Si. This structure, consisting of 5 pairs of 120 nm thick natural Si and 28Si enriched layers, enables the observation of 30Si self-diffusion from the natural layers into the 28Si enriched layers, as well as dopant diffusion from an implanted source in an amorphous Si cap layer, via Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS). The dopant diffusion created regions of the multilayer structure that were extrinsic at the diffusion temperatures. In these regions, the Fermi level shift due to the extrinsic condition altered the concentration and charge state of the native defects involved in the diffusion process, which affected the dopant and self-diffusion. The simultaneously recorded diffusion profiles enabled the modeling of the coupled dopant and self-diffusion. From the modeling of the simultaneous diffusion, the dopant diffusion mechanisms, the native defect charge states, and the self- and dopant diffusion coefficients can be determined. This information is necessary to enhance the physical modeling of dopant diffusion in Si. It is of particular interest to the modeling of future electronic Si devices, where the nanometer-scale features have created the need for precise physical models of atomic diffusion in Si. The modeling of the experimental profiles of simultaneous diffusion of B and Si under p-type extrinsic conditions revealed that both species are mediated by neutral and singly, positively charged Si self-interstitials. The diffusion of As and Si under extrinsic n-type conditions yielded a model consisting of the interstitialcy and vacancy mechanisms of diffusion via singly negatively charged self-interstitials and neutral vacancies. The simultaneous diffusion of P and Si has been modeled on the basis of neutral and singly negatively charged self-interstitials and neutral and singly

  9. Planar Dirac diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leo, Stefano de; Rotelli, Pietro

    2009-01-01

    We present the results of the planar diffusion of a Dirac particle by step and barrier potentials, when the incoming wave impinges at an arbitrary angle with the potential. Except for right-angle incidence this process is characterized by the appearance of spin flip terms. For the step potential, spin flip occurs for both transmitted and reflected waves. However, we find no spin flip in the transmitted barrier result. This is surprising because the barrier result may be derived directly from a two-step calculation. We demonstrate that the spin flip cancellation indeed occurs for each ''particle'' (wave packet) contribution. (orig.)

  10. Radon diffusion chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pretzsch, G.; Boerner, E.; Lehmann, R.; Sarenio, O.

    1986-01-01

    The invention relates to the detection of radioactive gases emitting alpha particles like radon, thoron and their alpha-decaying daughters by means of a diffusion chamber with a passive detector, preferably with a solid state track detector. In the chamber above and towards the detector there is a single metallized electret with negative polarity. The distance between electret and detector corresponds to the range of the alpha particles of radon daughters in air at the most. The electret collects the positively charged daughters and functions as surface source. The electret increases the sensitivity by the factor 4

  11. Diffuse esophageal spasm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, D.J.; Chen, Y.M.; Hewson, E.G.; Richter, J.E.; Wu, W.C.; Gelfand, D.W.; Castell, D.O.

    1988-01-01

    Radiologic and manometric findings were correlated in 17 patients with diffuse esophageal spasm (DES). All patients initially had chest pain and/or dysphagia and had a manometric diagnosis of DES. Mean percentage of normal peristalsis manometrically was 46% (range, 20%-80%). Based on radiologic examination, an esophageal motor disorder consistent with DES was diagnosed in 12 of 17 patients, and there was one misinterpretation of achalasia. Radiologic detection was not related significantly to the percentage of peristalsis seen on manometric examination. Mean esophageal wall thickness as measured radiographically in patients with DES was 2.6 mm, compared with 2.5 mm in 17 individuals with normal results of manometry

  12. Elemental diffusion in stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michaud, Georges; Montmerle, Thierry

    1977-01-01

    This paper is dealing with the origin of the elements in the universe. The scheme of nucleosynthesis is kept to explain the stellar generation of helium, carbon, etc... from the initial hydrogen; but a nonlinear theory is then elaborated to account for the anomalous abundances which were observed. The chemical elements would diffuse throughout the outer layers of a star under the action of the opposite forces of gravitation and radiation. This theory, with completing the nucleosynthesis, would contribute to give a consistent scheme of the elemental origin and abundances [fr

  13. Multipath diffuse routing over heterogeneous mesh networks of web devices and sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vitale, G.; Stassen, M.L.A.; Colak, S.B.; Pronk, V.; Macq, B.; Quisquater, J.-.J.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we present a new data flow algorithm based on physical diffusion for dense device networks needed for future ubiquitous communications. This diffuse data routing concept is based on multi-path signal propagation aided with adaptive beam-forming methods. Adaptation for beam-forming at

  14. An exploration into diffusion tensor imaging in the bovine ocular lens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan eVaghefi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We describe our development of the diffusion tensor imaging modality for the bovine ocular lens. Diffusion gradients were added to a spin-echo pulse sequence and the relevant parameters of the sequence were refined to achieve good diffusion weighting in the lens tissue, which demonstrated heterogeneous regions of diffusive signal attenuation. Decay curves for b-value (loosely summarizes the strength of diffusion weighting and TE (determines the amount of MRI-obtained signal were used to estimate apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC and T2 in different lens regions. The ADCs varied by over an order of magnitude and revealed diffusive anisotropy in the lens. Up to 30 diffusion gradient directions, and 8 signal acquisition averages, were applied to lenses in culture in order to improve maps of diffusion tensor eigenvalues, equivalent to ADC, across the lens. From these maps, fractional anisotropy maps were calculated and compared to known spatial distributions of anisotropic molecular fluxes in the lens. This comparison suggested new hypotheses and experiments to quantitatively assess models of circulation in the avascular lens.

  15. Diffusion in Solids Fundamentals, Methods, Materials, Diffusion-Controlled Processes

    CERN Document Server

    Mehrer, Helmut

    2007-01-01

    Diffusion is a vital topic in solid-state physics and chemistry, physical metallurgy and materials science. Diffusion processes are ubiquitous in solids at elevated temperatures. A thorough understanding of diffusion in materials is crucial for materials development and engineering. This book first gives an account of the central aspects of diffusion in solids, for which the necessary background is a course in solid state physics. It then provides easy access to important information about diffuson in metals, alloys, semiconductors, ion-conducting materials, glasses and nanomaterials. Several diffusion-controlled phenomena, including ionic conduction, grain-boundary and dislocation pipe diffusion, are considered as well. Graduate students in solid-state physics, physical metallurgy, materials science, physical and inorganic chemistry or geophysics will benefit from this book as will physicists, chemists, metallurgists, materials engineers in academic and industrial research laboratories.

  16. Apparatus for diffusion separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nierenberg, W.A.

    1976-01-01

    A diffuser separator apparatus is described which comprises a plurality of flow channels in a single stage. Each of said channels has an inlet port and an outlet port and a constant cross sectional area between said ports. At least a portion of the defining surface of each of said channels is a diffusion separation membrane, and each of said channels is a different cross sectional area. Means are provided for connecting said channels in series so that each successive channel of said series has a smaller cross sectional area than the previous channel of said series. Also provided are a source of gaseous mixture, individual means for flowing said gaseous mixture to the inlet port of each of said channels, gas receiving and analyzing means, individual means for flowing gas passing from each of said outlet ports and means for flowing gas passing through said membranes to said receiving and analyzing means, and individual means for connecting the outlet port of each channel with the inlet port of the channel having the next smaller cross sectional area

  17. The diffusion of microfinance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Abhijit; Chandrasekhar, Arun G; Duflo, Esther; Jackson, Matthew O

    2013-07-26

    To study the impact of the choice of injection points in the diffusion of a new product in a society, we developed a model of word-of-mouth diffusion and then applied it to data on social networks and participation in a newly available microfinance loan program in 43 Indian villages. Our model allows us to distinguish information passing among neighbors from direct influence of neighbors' participation decisions, as well as information passing by participants versus nonparticipants. The model estimates suggest that participants are seven times as likely to pass information compared to informed nonparticipants, but information passed by nonparticipants still accounts for roughly one-third of eventual participation. An informed household is not more likely to participate if its informed friends participate. We then propose two new measures of how effective a given household would be as an injection point. We show that the centrality of the injection points according to these measures constitutes a strong and significant predictor of eventual village-level participation.

  18. Diffuse infiltrative lung disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niden, A.H.; Mishkin, F.S.

    1984-01-01

    The authors discuss their approach to the diagnosis and management of patients with DILD. Gallium scans play a central role in this process. Not only do they help them decide whom to biopsy, but also where to biopsy. The scans can be used for the early detection of disease in a high-risk population, for following the progression and regression of disease, for the regulation of medication, and for the evaluation of therapy. Bronchoalveolar lung lavage appears to be equally sensitive. However, patients are less willing to undergo repeated fiberoptic bronchoscopies than lung scans. Both tests may prove useful, one complementing the other. Gallium imaging has also been utilized by the authors in select patients with questionable diffuse lung infiltrates roentgenographically or with a normal chest roentgenogram, chronic respiratory symptoms, and abnormal pulmonary function studies. An abnormal gallium lung scan in these clinical situations helps them select which patients have a diffuse active pulmonary process meriting transbronchial biopsies. This has proven to be of particular value in the management of older patients

  19. Diffusion microscopist simulator - The development and application of a Monte Carlo simulation system for diffusion MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, C.H.

    2011-09-01

    Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) has made a significant breakthrough in neurological disorders and brain research thanks to its exquisite sensitivity to tissue cyto-architecture. However, as the water diffusion process in neuronal tissues is a complex biophysical phenomena at molecular scale, it is difficult to infer tissue microscopic characteristics on a voxel scale from dMRI data. The major methodological contribution of this thesis is the development of an integrated and generic Monte Carlo simulation framework, 'Diffusion Microscopist Simulator' (DMS), which has the capacity to create 3D biological tissue models of various shapes and properties, as well as to synthesize dMRI data for a large variety of MRI methods, pulse sequence design and parameters. DMS aims at bridging the gap between the elementary diffusion processes occurring at a micrometric scale and the resulting diffusion signal measured at millimetric scale, providing better insights into the features observed in dMRI, as well as offering ground-truth information for optimization and validation of dMRI acquisition protocols for different applications. We have verified the performance and validity of DMS through various benchmark experiments, and applied to address particular research topics in dMRI. Based on DMS, there are two major application contributions in this thesis. First, we use DMS to investigate the impact of finite diffusion gradient pulse duration (delta) on fibre orientation estimation in dMRI. We propose that current practice of using long delta, which is enforced by the hardware limitation of clinical MRI scanners, is actually beneficial for mapping fibre orientations, even though it violates the underlying assumption made in q-space theory. Second, we employ DMS to investigate the feasibility of estimating axon radius using a clinical MRI system. The results suggest that the algorithm for mapping the direct microstructures is applicable to dMRI data acquired from

  20. Effects of MR parameter changes on the quantification of diffusion anisotropy and apparent diffusion coefficient in diffusion tensor imaging: Evaluation using a diffusional anisotropic phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang Joon; Choi, Choong Gon; Kim, Jeong Kon [Dept. of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Sung Cheol [Dept. of Biostatistics, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Ha Kyu [Dept. of Radiology, East-West Neomedical Center, Kyung Hee University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eun Ju [Clinical Scientist, MR, Philips Healthcare, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    To validate the usefulness of a diffusional anisotropic capillary array phantom and to investigate the effects of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) parameter changes on diffusion fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) using the phantom. Diffusion tensor imaging of a capillary array phantom was performed with imaging parameter changes, including voxel size, number of sensitivity encoding (SENSE) factor, echo time (TE), number of signal acquisitions, b-value, and number of diffusion gradient directions (NDGD), one-at-a-time in a stepwise-incremental fashion. We repeated the entire series of DTI scans thrice. The coefficients of variation (CoV) were evaluated for FA and ADC, and the correlation between each MR imaging parameter and the corresponding FA and ADC was evaluated using Spearman's correlation analysis. The capillary array phantom CoVs of FA and ADC were 7.1% and 2.4%, respectively. There were significant correlations between FA and SENSE factor, TE, b-value, and NDGD, as well as significant correlations between ADC and SENSE factor, TE, and b-value. A capillary array phantom enables repeated measurements of FA and ADC. Both FA and ADC can vary when certain parameters are changed during diffusion experiments. We suggest that the capillary array phantom can be used for quality control in longitudinal or multicenter clinical studies.

  1. Diffusion and perfusion imaging of bone marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biffar, Andreas; Dietrich, Olaf; Sourbron, Steven; Duerr, Hans-Roland; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Baur-Melnyk, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    In diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI), the observed MRI signal intensity is attenuated by the self-diffusion of water molecules. DWI provides information about the microscopic structure and organization of a biological tissue, since the extent and orientation of molecular motion is influenced by these tissue properties. The most common method to measure perfusion in the body using MRI is T1-weighted dynamic contrast enhancement (DCE-MRI). The analysis of DCE-MRI data allows determining the perfusion and permeability of a biological tissue. DWI as well as DCE-MRI are established techniques in MRI of the brain, while significantly fewer studies have been published in body imaging. In recent years, both techniques have been applied successfully in healthy bone marrow as well as for the characterization of bone marrow alterations or lesions; e.g., DWI has been used in particular for the differentiation of benign and malignant vertebral compression fractures. In this review article, firstly a short introduction to diffusion-weighted and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI is given. Non-quantitative and quantitative approaches for the analysis of DWI and semiquantitative and quantitative approaches for the analysis of DCE-MRI are introduced. Afterwards a detailed overview of the results of both techniques in healthy bone marrow and their applications for the diagnosis of various bone-marrow pathologies, like osteoporosis, bone tumors, and vertebral compression fractures are described.

  2. Apparent diffusion coefficient measurements in progressive supranuclear palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohshita, T.; Oka, M.; Imon, Y.; Yamaguchi, S.; Mimori, Y.; Nakamura, S. [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-09-01

    We measured the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), using diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and signal intensity on T2-weighted MRI in the cerebral white matter of patients with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and age-matched normal subjects. In PSP, ADC in the prefrontal and precentral white matter was significantly higher than in controls. There was no significant difference in signal intensity on T2-weighted images. The ADC did correlate with signal intensity. The distribution of the elevation of ADC may be the consequence of underlying pathological changes, such as neurofibrillary tangles or glial fibrillary tangles in the cortex. Our findings suggest that ADC measurement might be useful for demonstrating subtle neuropathological changes. (orig.)

  3. Spatially Different Tissue-Scale Diffusivity Shapes ANGUSTIFOLIA3 Gradient in Growing Leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawade, Kensuke; Tanimoto, Hirokazu; Horiguchi, Gorou; Tsukaya, Hirokazu

    2017-09-05

    The spatial gradient of signaling molecules is pivotal for establishing developmental patterns of multicellular organisms. It has long been proposed that these gradients could arise from the pure diffusion process of signaling molecules between cells, but whether this simplest mechanism establishes the formation of the tissue-scale gradient remains unclear. Plasmodesmata are unique channel structures in plants that connect neighboring cells for molecular transport. In this study, we measured cellular- and tissue-scale kinetics of molecular transport through plasmodesmata in Arabidopsis thaliana developing leaf primordia by fluorescence recovery assays. These trans-scale measurements revealed biophysical properties of diffusive molecular transport through plasmodesmata and revealed that the tissue-scale diffusivity, but not the cellular-scale diffusivity, is spatially different along the leaf proximal-to-distal axis. We found that the gradient in cell size along the developmental axis underlies this spatially different tissue-scale diffusivity. We then asked how this diffusion-based framework functions in establishing a signaling gradient of endogenous molecules. ANGUSTIFOLIA3 (AN3) is a transcriptional co-activator, and as we have shown here, it forms a long-range signaling gradient along the leaf proximal-to-distal axis to determine a cell-proliferation domain. By genetically engineering AN3 mobility, we assessed each contribution of cell-to-cell movement and tissue growth to the distribution of the AN3 gradient. We constructed a diffusion-based theoretical model using these quantitative data to analyze the AN3 gradient formation and demonstrated that it could be achieved solely by the diffusive molecular transport in a growing tissue. Our results indicate that the spatially different tissue-scale diffusivity is a core mechanism for AN3 gradient formation. This provides evidence that the pure diffusion process establishes the formation of the long-range signaling

  4. Confinement and diffusion in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McWilliams, R.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of electric field fluctuations on confinement and diffusion in tokamak is discussed. Based on the experimentally determined cross-field turbolent diffusion coefficient, D∼3.7*cT e /eB(δn i /n i ) rms which is also derived by a simple theory, the cross-field diffusion time, tp=a 2 /D, is calculated and compared to experimental results from 51 tokamak for standard Ohmic operation

  5. Regularized spherical polar fourier diffusion MRI with optimal dictionary learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jian; Jiang, Tianzi; Deriche, Rachid; Shen, Dinggang; Yap, Pew-Thian

    2013-01-01

    Compressed Sensing (CS) takes advantage of signal sparsity or compressibility and allows superb signal reconstruction from relatively few measurements. Based on CS theory, a suitable dictionary for sparse representation of the signal is required. In diffusion MRI (dMRI), CS methods proposed for reconstruction of diffusion-weighted signal and the Ensemble Average Propagator (EAP) utilize two kinds of Dictionary Learning (DL) methods: 1) Discrete Representation DL (DR-DL), and 2) Continuous Representation DL (CR-DL). DR-DL is susceptible to numerical inaccuracy owing to interpolation and regridding errors in a discretized q-space. In this paper, we propose a novel CR-DL approach, called Dictionary Learning - Spherical Polar Fourier Imaging (DL-SPFI) for effective compressed-sensing reconstruction of the q-space diffusion-weighted signal and the EAP. In DL-SPFI, a dictionary that sparsifies the signal is learned from the space of continuous Gaussian diffusion signals. The learned dictionary is then adaptively applied to different voxels using a weighted LASSO framework for robust signal reconstruction. Compared with the start-of-the-art CR-DL and DR-DL methods proposed by Merlet et al. and Bilgic et al., respectively, our work offers the following advantages. First, the learned dictionary is proved to be optimal for Gaussian diffusion signals. Second, to our knowledge, this is the first work to learn a voxel-adaptive dictionary. The importance of the adaptive dictionary in EAP reconstruction will be demonstrated theoretically and empirically. Third, optimization in DL-SPFI is only performed in a small subspace resided by the SPF coefficients, as opposed to the q-space approach utilized by Merlet et al. We experimentally evaluated DL-SPFI with respect to L1-norm regularized SPFI (L1-SPFI), which uses the original SPF basis, and the DR-DL method proposed by Bilgic et al. The experiment results on synthetic and real data indicate that the learned dictionary produces

  6. Diffuse scattering of neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novion, C.H. de.

    1981-02-01

    The use of neutron scattering to study atomic disorder in metals and alloys is described. The diffuse elastic scattering of neutrons by a perfect crystal lattice leads to a diffraction spectrum with only Bragg spreads. the existence of disorder in the crystal results in intensity and position modifications to these spreads, and above all, to the appearance of a low intensity scatter between Bragg peaks. The elastic scattering of neutrons is treated in this text, i.e. by measuring the number of scattered neutrons having the same energy as the incident neutrons. Such measurements yield information on the static disorder in the crystal and time average fluctuations in composition and atomic displacements [fr

  7. Diffuse lung disease: Pneumoconioses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLoud, T.C.

    1987-01-01

    This paper begins with a discussion of the 1980 International Labour Organization classification of the pneumoconioses. Emphasis is on the common pneumoconioses, that is, silicosis, coalworker's pneumoconiosis, and asbestos-related pleural and parenchymal disease. Examples of the five radiographic forms of silicosis-simple and complicated silicosis, Caplan syndrome, silicotuberculosis, and acute silicosis- are presented, and the differential diagnoses are discussed. Discussion of asbestos-related disease included pleural manifestations such as plaques, diffuse pleural thickening, and asbestos pleural effusion as well as asbestosis and malignancies associated with asbestos exposure, such as bronchogenic carcinoma and malignant mesothelioma. Although the standard radiographic findings are stressed, the use of CT in the diagnosis of pneumoconiosis and the staging of dust-related malignancies is also discussed

  8. On Diffusive Climatological Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffel, D. H.; Drazin, P. G.

    1981-11-01

    A simple, zonally and annually averaged, energy-balance climatological model with diffusive heat transport and nonlinear albedo feedback is solved numerically. Some parameters of the model are varied, one by one, to find the resultant effects on the steady solution representing the climate. In particular, the outward radiation flux, the insulation distribution and the albedo parameterization are varied. We have found an accurate yet simple analytic expression for the mean annual insolation as a function of latitude and the obliquity of the Earth's rotation axis; this has enabled us to consider the effects of the oscillation of the obliquity. We have used a continuous albedo function which fits the observed values; it considerably reduces the sensitivity of the model. Climatic cycles, calculated by solving the time-dependent equation when parameters change slowly and periodically, are compared qualitatively with paleoclimatic records.

  9. Diffuse parenchymal lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Tomassetti

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Between September 2015 and August 2016 there were >1500 publications in the field of diffuse parenchymal lung diseases (DPLDs. For the Clinical Year in Review session at the European Respiratory Society Congress that was held in London, UK, in September 2016, we selected only five articles. This selection, made from the enormous number of published papers, does not include all the relevant studies that will significantly impact our knowledge in the field of DPLDs in the near future. This review article provides our personal view on the following topics: early diagnosis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, current knowledge on the multidisciplinary team diagnosis of DPLDs and the diagnostic role of transbronchial cryobiopsy in this diagnostic setting, insights on the new entity of interstitial pneumonia with autoimmune features, and new therapeutic approaches for scleroderma-related interstitial lung disease.

  10. Convergence of Nelson diffusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dell'Antonio, G.; Posilicano, A.

    1991-01-01

    Let ψ t , ψ t n , n≥1, be solutions of Schroedinger equations with potentials form-bounded by -1/2 Δ and initial data in H 1 (R d ). Let P, P n , n≥1, be the probability measures on the path space Ω=C(R + , R d ) given by the corresponding Nelson diffusions. We show that if {ψ t n } n≥1 converges to ψ t in H 2 (R d ), uniformly in t over compact intervals, then {P n } n≥1 converges to P in total variation. Moreover, if the potentials are in the Kato class K d , we show that the above result follows from H 1 -convergence of initial data, and K d -convergence of potentials. (orig.)

  11. Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Post, Rachel S; Vogelaar, Ingrid P; Carneiro, Fátima

    2015-01-01

    Germline CDH1 mutations confer a high lifetime risk of developing diffuse gastric (DGC) and lobular breast cancer (LBC). A multidisciplinary workshop was organised to discuss genetic testing, surgery, surveillance strategies, pathology reporting and the patient's perspective on multiple aspects......, including diet post gastrectomy. The updated guidelines include revised CDH1 testing criteria (taking into account first-degree and second-degree relatives): (1) families with two or more patients with gastric cancer at any age, one confirmed DGC; (2) individuals with DGC before the age of 40 and (3...... the high mortality associated with invasive disease, prophylactic total gastrectomy at a centre of expertise is advised for individuals with pathogenic CDH1 mutations. Breast cancer surveillance with annual breast MRI starting at age 30 for women with a CDH1 mutation is recommended. Standardised endoscopic...

  12. The diffuse interstellar medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Donald P.

    1990-01-01

    The last 20 years of the efforts to understand the diffuse ISM are reviewed, with recent changes of fundamental aspects being highlighted. Attention is given to the interstellar pressure and its components, the weight of the ISM, the midplane pressure contributions, and pressure contributions at 1 kpc. What velocity dispersions, cosmic ray pressure, and magnetic field pressure that can be expected for a gas in a high magnetic field environment is addressed. The intercloud medium is described, with reference to the work of Cox and Slavin (1989). Various caveats are discussed and a number of areas for future investigation are identified. Steps that could be taken toward a successful phase segregation model are discussed.

  13. Nonlocal diffusion and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Bucur, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Working in the fractional Laplace framework, this book provides models and theorems related to nonlocal diffusion phenomena. In addition to a simple probabilistic interpretation, some applications to water waves, crystal dislocations, nonlocal phase transitions, nonlocal minimal surfaces and Schrödinger equations are given. Furthermore, an example of an s-harmonic function, its harmonic extension and some insight into a fractional version of a classical conjecture due to De Giorgi are presented. Although the aim is primarily to gather some introductory material concerning applications of the fractional Laplacian, some of the proofs and results are new. The work is entirely self-contained, and readers who wish to pursue related subjects of interest are invited to consult the rich bibliography for guidance.

  14. MHD diffuser model test program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Idzorek, J J

    1976-07-01

    Experimental results of the aerodynamic performance of seven candidate diffusers are presented to assist in determining their suitability for joining an MHD channel to a steam generator at minimum spacing. The three dimensional diffusers varied in area ratio from 2 to 3.8 and wall half angle from 2 to 5 degrees. The program consisted of five phases: (1) tailoring a diffuser inlet nozzle to a 15 percent blockage; (2) comparison of isolated diffusers at enthalpy ratios 0.5 to 1.0 with respect to separation characteristics and pressure recovery coefficients; (3) recording the optimum diffuser exit flow distribution; (4) recording the internal flow distribution within the steam generator when attached to the diffuser; and (5) observing isolated diffuser exhaust dynamic characteristics. The 2 and 2-1/3 degree half angle rectangular diffusers showed recovery coefficients equal to 0.48 with no evidence of flow separation or instability. Diffusion at angles greater than these produced flow instabilities and with angles greater than 3 degrees random flow separation and reattachment.

  15. MHD diffuser model test program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idzorek, J.J.

    1976-07-01

    Experimental results of the aerodynamic performance of seven candidate diffusers are presented to assist in determining their suitability for joining an MHD channel to a steam generator at minimum spacing. The three dimensional diffusers varied in area ratio from 2 to 3.8 and wall half angle from 2 to 5 degrees. The program consisted of five phases: (1) tailoring a diffuser inlet nozzle to a 15 percent blockage; (2) comparison of isolated diffusers at enthalpy ratios 0.5 to 1.0 with respect to separation characteristics and pressure recovery coefficients; (3) recording the optimum diffuser exit flow distribution; (4) recording the internal flow distribution within the steam generator when attached to the diffuser; and (5) observing isolated diffuser exhaust dynamic characteristics. The 2 and 2-1/3 degree half angle rectangular diffusers showed recovery coefficients equal to 0.48 with no evidence of flow separation or instability. Diffusion at angles greater than these produced flow instabilities and with angles greater than 3 degrees random flow separation and reattachment

  16. Diffusion rates for elevated releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsdell, J.V.

    1983-11-01

    A search of the literature related to diffusion from elevated sources has determined that an adequate data base exists for use in developing parameterizations for estimating diffusion rates for material released from free standing stacks at nuclear power plants. A review of published data analyses indicates that a new parameterization of horizontal diffusion rates specifically for elevated releases is not likely to significantly change the magnitudes of horizontal diffusion coefficients on the average. However, the uncertainties associated with horizontal diffusion coefficient estimates under any given set of atmospheric conditions could be reduced by a new parameterization. Similarly, a new parameterization of vertical diffusion rates would be unlikely to significantly alter the magnitudes of diffusion coefficients for unstable atmospheric conditons. However, for neutral and stable atmospheric conditions, a new parameterization of vertical diffusion rates might increase vertical diffusion coefficients significantly. The increase would move ground-level time-integrated concentration maxima closer to the plant and would increase the maxima. 55 references, 2 figures, 4 tables

  17. Diffuse scattering in Ih ice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wehinger, Björn; Krisch, Michael; Bosak, Alexeï; Chernyshov, Dmitry; Bulat, Sergey; Ezhov, Victor

    2014-01-01

    Single crystals of ice Ih, extracted from the subglacial Lake Vostok accretion ice layer (3621 m depth) were investigated by means of diffuse x-ray scattering and inelastic x-ray scattering. The diffuse scattering was identified as mainly inelastic and rationalized in the frame of ab initio calculations for the ordered ice XI approximant. Together with Monte-Carlo modelling, our data allowed reconsidering previously available neutron diffuse scattering data of heavy ice as the sum of thermal diffuse scattering and static disorder contribution. (paper)

  18. Diffusion of condenser water discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwakiri, Toshio

    1977-01-01

    Thermal and nuclear power stations in Japan are mostly located in coastal area, and the cooling water is discharged into sea as warm water. Recently, large interest is taken in this matter, and it is desirable to predict the diffusion of warm discharge accurately and to take effective measures for lowering the temperature. As for the methods of predicting the diffusion of warm discharge, simplified estimation, mathematical analysis and hydrographical model experiment are used corresponding to objects and conditions. As for the measures to lower temperature, the method of discharging warm water into deep sea bottom was confirmed to be very effective. In this paper, the phenomena of diffusion of warm discharge in sea, the methods of predicting the diffusion of warm discharge, and the deep sea discharge as the measure for lowering temperature are outlined. The factors concerning the diffusion of warm discharge in sea are the conditions of discharge, topography and sea state, and the diffusion is roughly divided into mixing diffusion in the vicinity of warm water outlet and eddy diffusion in distant region. It is difficult to change artificially the conditions of diffusion in distant region, and the measures of raising the rate of dilution in near region are effective, therefore the deep sea discharge is adopted. (Kako, I.)

  19. Diffusion effects in undulator radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilya Agapov

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Quantum diffusion effects in undulator radiation in semiclassical approximation are considered. Short-term effects on the electron beam motion are discussed and it is shown that approaches based on diffusion approximation with drift-diffusion coefficients derived from undulator or bending magnet radiation spectrum, and on Poisson statistics with radiation spectrum defined by the local beding field, all lead to similar results in terms of electron energy spread for cases of practical interest. An analytical estimate of the influence of quantum diffusion on the undulator radiation spectrum is derived.

  20. Sodium diffusion in boroaluminosilicate glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smedskjaer, Morten M.; Zheng, Qiuju; Mauro, John C.

    2011-01-01

    of isothermal sodium diffusion in BAS glasses by ion exchange, inward diffusion, and tracer diffusion experiments. By varying the [SiO2]/[Al2O3] ratio of the glasses, different structural regimes of sodium behavior are accessed. We show that the mobility of the sodium ions decreases with increasing [SiO2]/[Al2O......Understanding the fundamentals of alkali diffusion in boroaluminosilicate (BAS) glasses is of critical importance for advanced glass applications, e.g., the production of chemically strengthened glass covers for personal electronic devices. Here, we investigate the composition dependence...

  1. Greedy algorithms for diffuse optical tomography reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dileep, B. P. V.; Das, Tapan; Dutta, Pranab K.

    2018-03-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a noninvasive imaging modality that reconstructs the optical parameters of a highly scattering medium. However, the inverse problem of DOT is ill-posed and highly nonlinear due to the zig-zag propagation of photons that diffuses through the cross section of tissue. The conventional DOT imaging methods iteratively compute the solution of forward diffusion equation solver which makes the problem computationally expensive. Also, these methods fail when the geometry is complex. Recently, the theory of compressive sensing (CS) has received considerable attention because of its efficient use in biomedical imaging applications. The objective of this paper is to solve a given DOT inverse problem by using compressive sensing framework and various Greedy algorithms such as orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP), compressive sampling matching pursuit (CoSaMP), and stagewise orthogonal matching pursuit (StOMP), regularized orthogonal matching pursuit (ROMP) and simultaneous orthogonal matching pursuit (S-OMP) have been studied to reconstruct the change in the absorption parameter i.e, Δα from the boundary data. Also, the Greedy algorithms have been validated experimentally on a paraffin wax rectangular phantom through a well designed experimental set up. We also have studied the conventional DOT methods like least square method and truncated singular value decomposition (TSVD) for comparison. One of the main features of this work is the usage of less number of source-detector pairs, which can facilitate the use of DOT in routine applications of screening. The performance metrics such as mean square error (MSE), normalized mean square error (NMSE), structural similarity index (SSIM), and peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR) have been used to evaluate the performance of the algorithms mentioned in this paper. Extensive simulation results confirm that CS based DOT reconstruction outperforms the conventional DOT imaging methods in terms of

  2. Turing instability in reaction-diffusion systems with nonlinear diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zemskov, E. P., E-mail: zemskov@ccas.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Dorodnicyn Computing Center (Russian Federation)

    2013-10-15

    The Turing instability is studied in two-component reaction-diffusion systems with nonlinear diffusion terms, and the regions in parametric space where Turing patterns can form are determined. The boundaries between super- and subcritical bifurcations are found. Calculations are performed for one-dimensional brusselator and oregonator models.

  3. Molecular exchange of n-hexane in zeolite sieves studied by diffusion-diffusion and T{sub 1}-diffusion nuclear magnetic resonance exchange spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neudert, Oliver; Stapf, Siegfried; Mattea, Carlos, E-mail: carlos.mattea@tu-ilmenau.de [Fachgebiet Technische Physik II/Polymerphysik, Institute of Physics, Technische Universitaet Ilmenau, PO Box 100 565, 98684 Ilmenau (Germany)

    2011-03-15

    Molecular exchange properties and diffusion of n-hexane embedded in a bimodal pore structure with characteristic length scales in the order of nano and micrometres, respectively, formed by packing of zeolite particles, are studied. Two-dimensional (2D) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) diffusion correlation experiments together with relaxation-diffusion correlation experiments are performed at low magnetic field using a single-sided NMR scanner. The exchange time covers a range from 10{sup -3} to 10{sup -1} s. The molecular exchange properties are modulated by transport inside the zeolite particles. Different exchange regimes are observed for molecules starting from different positions inside the porous sample. The influence of the spin-lattice relaxation properties of the fluid molecules inside the zeolite particles on the signal intensity is also studied. A Monte Carlo simulation of the exchange process is performed and is used to support the analysis of the experimental data.

  4. Parametric dictionary learning for modeling EAP and ODF in diffusion MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlet, Sylvain; Caruyer, Emmanuel; Deriche, Rachid

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we propose an original and efficient approach to exploit the ability of Compressed Sensing (CS) to recover diffusion MRI (dMRI) signals from a limited number of samples while efficiently recovering important diffusion features such as the ensemble average propagator (EAP) and the orientation distribution function (ODF). Some attempts to sparsely represent the diffusion signal have already been performed. However and contrarly to what has been presented in CS dMRI, in this work we propose and advocate the use of a well adapted learned dictionary and show that it leads to a sparser signal estimation as well as to an efficient reconstruction of very important diffusion features. We first propose to learn and design a sparse and parametric dictionary from a set of training diffusion data. Then, we propose a framework to analytically estimate in closed form two important diffusion features: the EAP and the ODF. Various experiments on synthetic, phantom and human brain data have been carried out and promising results with reduced number of atoms have been obtained on diffusion signal reconstruction, thus illustrating the added value of our method over state-of-the-art SHORE and SPF based approaches.

  5. Use of glow discharge in measurement of diffusion profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baudin, Guy

    1976-05-01

    The composition of a glow discharge plasma is a good image of the composition of the surface being erroded without fusion. The depth of metal eated away is a linear function of time in 10 to 60μ range, that is too say between 2 and 20 minutes after lightning of the lamp. So measuring the emission of the discharge is function of time gives the diffusion profile of elements either by measuring instantaneous signal or by integrating during short periods of time for weak concentration. Examples of application for diffusion of N 2 and C in steel will be given [fr

  6. The Measurement of Thermal Diffusivity in Conductor and Insulator by Photodeflection Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achathongsuk, U.; Rittidach, T.; Tipmonta, P.; Kijamnajsuk, P.; Chotikaprakhan, S.

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to estimate thermal diffusivities of high thermal diffusivity bulk material as well as low thermal diffusivity bulk material by using many types of fluid such as Ethyl alcohol and water. This method is studied by measuring amplitude and phase of photodeflection signal in various frequency modulations. The experimental setup consists of two laser lines: 1) a pump laser beams through a modulator, varied frequency, controlled by lock-in amplifier and focused on sample surface by lens. 2) a probe laser which parallels with the sample surface and is perpendicular to the pump laser beam. The probe laser deflection signal is obtained by a position sensor which controlled by lock-in amplifier. Thermal diffusivity is calculated by measuring the amplitude and phase of the photodeflection signal and compared with the thermal diffusivity of a standard value. The thermal diffusivity of SGG agrees well with the literature but the thermal diffusivity of Cu is less than the literature value by a factor of ten. The experiment requires further improvement to measure the thermal diffusivity of Cu. However, we succeed in using ethyl alcohol as the coupling medium instead of CCl4 which is highly toxic.

  7. Quorum signaling and sensing by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swords, W Edward

    2012-01-01

    Quorum signals are diffusible factors produced by bacteria that coordinate communal responses. For nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi), a series of recent papers indicate that production and sensing of quorum signals are determinants of biofilm formation/maturation and persistence in vivo. In this mini-review I will summarize the current knowledge about quorum signaling/sensing by this organism, and identify specific topics for additional study.

  8. Quorum signaling and sensing by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Edward Swords

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Quorum signals are diffusible factors produced by bacteria that coordinate communal responses. For Haemophilus influenzae, a series of recent papers indicate that production and sensing of quorum signals are determinants of biofilm formation/maturation and persistence in vivo. In this mini-review I will summarize the current knowledge about quorum signaling/sensing by H. influenzae, and identify specific topics for additional study.

  9. Models of diffuse solar radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boland, John; Ridley, Barbara [Centre for Industrial and Applied Mathematics, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes Boulevard, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095 (Australia); Brown, Bruce [Department of Statistics and Applied Probability, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117546 (Singapore)

    2008-04-15

    For some locations both global and diffuse solar radiation are measured. However, for many locations, only global is measured, or inferred from satellite data. For modelling solar energy applications, the amount of radiation on a tilted surface is needed. Since only the direct component on a tilted surface can be calculated from trigonometry, we need to have diffuse on the horizontal available. There are regression relationships for estimating the diffuse on a tilted surface from diffuse on the horizontal. Models for estimating the diffuse radiation on the horizontal from horizontal global that have been developed in Europe or North America have proved to be inadequate for Australia [Spencer JW. A comparison of methods for estimating hourly diffuse solar radiation from global solar radiation. Sol Energy 1982; 29(1): 19-32]. Boland et al. [Modelling the diffuse fraction of global solar radiation on a horizontal surface. Environmetrics 2001; 12: 103-16] developed a validated model for Australian conditions. We detail our recent advances in developing the theoretical framework for the approach reported therein, particularly the use of the logistic function instead of piecewise linear or simple nonlinear functions. Additionally, we have also constructed a method, using quadratic programming, for identifying values that are likely to be erroneous. This allows us to eliminate outliers in diffuse radiation values, the data most prone to errors in measurement. (author)

  10. Osmosis and Diffusion Conceptual Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Kathleen M.; Williams, Kathy S.; Lineback, Jennifer Evarts

    2011-01-01

    Biology student mastery regarding the mechanisms of diffusion and osmosis is difficult to achieve. To monitor comprehension of these processes among students at a large public university, we developed and validated an 18-item Osmosis and Diffusion Conceptual Assessment (ODCA). This assessment includes two-tiered items, some adopted or modified…

  11. The diffusion of constitutional rights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goderis, B.V.G.; Versteeg, M.

    Constitutions are commonly regarded as uniquely national products, shaped by domestic ideals and politics. This paper develops and empirically investigates a novel hypothesis, which is that constitutions are also shaped by transnational influence, or “diffusion.” Constitutional rights can diffuse

  12. Diffusion measurements by Raman spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne Brunsgaard; Shapiro, Alexander; Berg, Rolf W.

    Poster "Diffusion measurements by Raman spectroscopy", See poster at http://www.kemi.dtu.dk/~ajo/rolf/petroday2004.ppt......Poster "Diffusion measurements by Raman spectroscopy", See poster at http://www.kemi.dtu.dk/~ajo/rolf/petroday2004.ppt...

  13. Consequences of Diffusion of Innovations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goss, Kevin F.

    1979-01-01

    The article traces evolution of diffusion theory; illustrates undesirable consequences in a cross-cultural setting, reviews criticisms of several scholars; considers distributional effects and unanticipated consequences for potential ameliorative impact on diffusion theory; and codifies these factors into a framework for research into consequences…

  14. Enhancement of diffusers BRDF accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otter, Gerard; Bazalgette Courrèges-Lacoste, Gregory; van Brug, Hedser; Schaarsberg, Jos Groote; Delwart, Steven; del Bello, Umberto

    2017-11-01

    This paper reports the result of an ESA study conducted at TNO to investigate properties of various diffusers. Diffusers are widely used in space instruments as part of the on-board absolute calibration. Knowledge of the behaviour of the diffuser is therefore most important. From measurements of launched instruments in-orbit it has been discovered that when a diffuser is used in the vacuum of space the BRDF can change with respect to the one in ambient conditions. This is called the air/vacuum effect and has been simulated in this study by measuring the BRDF in a laboratory in ambient as well as vacuum conditions. Another studied effect is related to the design parameters of the optical system and the scattering properties of the diffuser. The effect is called Spectral Features and is a noise like structure superimposed on the diffuser BRDF. Modern space spectrometers, which have high spectral resolution and/or a small field of view (high spatial resolution) are suffering from this effect. The choice of diffuser can be very critical with respect to the required absolute radiometric calibration of an instrument. Even if the Spectral Features are small it can influence the error budget of the retrieval algorithms for the level 2 products. in this presentation diffuser trade-off results are presented and the Spectral Features model applied to the optical configuration of the MERIS instrument is compared to in-flight measurements of MERIS.

  15. Study of the diffusion of some emulsions in the human skin by pulsed photoacoustic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahjomri, F; Benamar, N; Chatri, E; Leblanc, R M

    2003-01-01

    We previously used pulsed photoacoustic spectroscopy (PPAS) to quantify sunscreen diffusion into human skin, and suggested a methodology to evaluate the time and the depth diffusion profile. These results were obtained by the analysis of the photoacoustic maximum response signal P max decrease, the time delay t max and the Fourier transform representation of the photoacoustic signal. In this study we present the results obtained for diffusion of four typical emulsions used in sunscreen compositions that show, for the first time, a particular behaviour for one of these emulsions due to a chemical reaction inside the skin during the diffusion process. This result provides a particularly interesting technique through the PPAS, to evaluate in situ the eventual chemical reactions that can occur during drug diffusion into human skin

  16. Diffusion-weighted imaging in acute demyelinating myelopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zecca, Chiara; Cereda, Carlo; Tschuor, Silvia; Staedler, Claudio; Nadarajah, Navarajah; Bassetti, Claudio L.; Gobbi, Claudio; Wetzel, Stephan; Santini, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) has become a reference MRI technique for the evaluation of neurological disorders. Few publications have investigated the application of DWI for inflammatory demyelinating lesions. The purpose of the study was to describe diffusion-weighted imaging characteristics of acute, spinal demyelinating lesions. Six consecutive patients (two males, four females; aged 28-64 years) with acute spinal cord demyelinating lesions were studied in a prospective case series design from June 2009 to October 2010. We performed magnetic resonance imaging studies from 2 to 14 days from symptom onset on the patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (n = 3) or clinically isolated syndrome (n = 3). Main outcome measures were diffusion-weighted imaging and apparent diffusion coefficient pattern (ADC) of acute spinal cord demyelinating lesions. All spinal lesions showed a restricted diffusion pattern (DWI+/ADC-) with a 24% median ADC signal decrease. A good correlation between clinical presentation and lesion site was observed. Acute demyelinating spinal cord lesions show a uniform restricted diffusion pattern. Clinicians and neuro-radiologists should be aware that this pattern is not necessarily confirmatory for an ischaemic aetiology. (orig.)

  17. Diffusion-weighted imaging in acute demyelinating myelopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zecca, Chiara; Cereda, Carlo; Tschuor, Silvia; Staedler, Claudio; Nadarajah, Navarajah; Bassetti, Claudio L.; Gobbi, Claudio [Ospedale Regionale di Lugano, Servizio di Neurologia e Neuroradiologia, Neurocenter of Southern Switzerland, Lugano (Switzerland); Wetzel, Stephan [Swiss Neuro Institute (SNI), Abteilung fuer Neuroradiologie, Hirslanden Klinik Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland); Santini, Francesco [University of Basel Hospital, Division of Radiological Physics, Basel (Switzerland)

    2012-06-15

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) has become a reference MRI technique for the evaluation of neurological disorders. Few publications have investigated the application of DWI for inflammatory demyelinating lesions. The purpose of the study was to describe diffusion-weighted imaging characteristics of acute, spinal demyelinating lesions. Six consecutive patients (two males, four females; aged 28-64 years) with acute spinal cord demyelinating lesions were studied in a prospective case series design from June 2009 to October 2010. We performed magnetic resonance imaging studies from 2 to 14 days from symptom onset on the patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (n = 3) or clinically isolated syndrome (n = 3). Main outcome measures were diffusion-weighted imaging and apparent diffusion coefficient pattern (ADC) of acute spinal cord demyelinating lesions. All spinal lesions showed a restricted diffusion pattern (DWI+/ADC-) with a 24% median ADC signal decrease. A good correlation between clinical presentation and lesion site was observed. Acute demyelinating spinal cord lesions show a uniform restricted diffusion pattern. Clinicians and neuro-radiologists should be aware that this pattern is not necessarily confirmatory for an ischaemic aetiology. (orig.)

  18. Diffusion weighted MR imaging in the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, T.; Schweigerer-Schroeter, G.; Wellnitz, J.; Wuerstle, T.

    2000-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is one of the best methods in diagnosis of multiple sclerosis, particularly in disclosure of active demyelinating lesions. Aim of this study was to compare diffusion weighted imaging and contrast enhancement in the detection of active lesions. A MR study with a contrast enhanced T1-weighted pulse sequence with magnetization transfer presaturation and a diffusion weighted echoplanar pulse sequence (b=1000 s/mm 2 ) was performed in 17 patients (11 women, 6 men) with multiple sclerosis. 29 of 239 lesions showed an increased signal intensity in diffusion weighted imaging, 24 lesions a contrast enhancement, but only 16 lesions were visible in both pulse sequences. In patients with short clinical symptomatology significant more lesions could be detected with diffusion-weighted pulse sequence in comparison to patients with long standing symptomatology showing more lesions with contrast enhancement. Hence it is likely, that both pulse sequences detect different histopathologic changes. The early detection of demyelinating lesions in diffusion weighted imaging is attributed to the extracellular edema, however the contrast enhancement is caused by a blood brain barrier abnormality. It can be expected that diffusion weighted imaging will have a high impact on imaging of multiple sclerosis not only in therapeutic trials, but also in clinical routine. (orig.) [de

  19. Microstructural changes in ischemic cortical gray matter predicted by a model of diffusion-weighted MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard-Poulsen, Peter; Hansen, Brian; Østergaard, Leif

    2007-01-01

    compartment. A global optimum was found from a wide range of parameter permutations using cluster computing. We also present simulations of cell swelling and changes of exchange rate and intracellular diffusion as possible cellular mechanisms in ischemia. RESULTS: Our model estimates an extracellular volume...... compartments and slow water exchange. Our model reproduces the signal changes observed in ischemia via physiologically credible mechanisms. CONCLUSION: Our modeling suggests that transverse relaxation has a profound influence on the diffusion attenuated MR signal. Our simulations indicate cell swelling...... model to the diffusion-weighted MR signal obtained from cortical gray matter in healthy subjects. Our model includes variable volume fractions, intracellular restriction effects, and exchange between compartments in addition to individual diffusion coefficients and transverse relaxation rates for each...

  20. Addimer diffusions on Si(100)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Gun Do; Wang, C. Z.; Lu, Z. Y.; Ho, K. M.

    1999-01-01

    The diffusion pathways along the trough and between the trough and the dimer row on the Si(100) surface are investigated by tight-binding molecular dynamics calculations using the environment dependent tight-binding silicon potential and by ab initio calculations using the Car-Parrinello method. The studies discover new diffusion pathways consisting of rotation of addimer. The calculated energy barrier are in excellent agreement with experiment. The rotational diffusion pathway between the trough and the dimer row is much more energetically favorable than other diffusion pathways by parallel and perpendicular addimer. The new pathway along the trough is nearly same as the energy barrier of the diffusion pathway by dissociation of the addimer

  1. Application of polycrystalline diffusion barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsymbal, V.A.; Kolupaev, I.N.

    2010-01-01

    Degradation of contacts of the electronic equipment at the raised temperatures is connected with active diffusion redistribution of components contact - metalized systems (CMS) and phase production on interphase borders. One of systems diffusion barriers (DB) are polycrystalline silicide a film, in particular silicides of the titan. Reception disilicide the titan (TiSi 2 ) which on the parameters is demanded for conditions of microelectronics from known silicides of system Ti-Si, is possible as a result of direct reaction of a film of the titan and a substrate of silicon, and at sedimentation of layer Ti-Si demanded stoichiometric structure. Simultaneously there is specific problem polycrystalline diffusion a barrier (PDB): the polycrystalline provides structural balance and metastability film disilicide, but leaves in it borders of grains - easy local ways of diffusion. In clause the analysis diffusion permeability polycrystalline and polyphase DB is made and recommendations for practical methods of increase of blocking properties PDB are made.

  2. Diffusion in membranes: Toward a two-dimensional diffusion map

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toppozini Laura

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For decades, quasi-elastic neutron scattering has been the prime tool for studying molecular diffusion in membranes over relevant nanometer distances. These experiments are essential to our current understanding of molecular dynamics of lipids, proteins and membrane-active molecules. Recently, we presented experimental evidence from X-ray diffraction and quasi-elastic neutron scattering demonstrating that ethanol enhances the permeability of membranes. At the QENS 2014/WINS 2014 conference we presented a novel technique to measure diffusion across membranes employing 2-dimensional quasi-elastic neutron scattering. We present results from our preliminary analysis of an experiment on the cold neutron multi-chopper spectrometer LET at ISIS, where we studied the self-diffusion of water molecules along lipid membranes and have the possibility of studying the diffusion in membranes. By preparing highly oriented membrane stacks and aligning them horizontally in the spectrometer, our aim is to distinguish between lateral and transmembrane diffusion. Diffusion may also be measured at different locations in the membranes, such as the water layer and the hydrocarbon membrane core. With a complete analysis of the data, 2-dimensional mapping will enable us to determine diffusion channels of water and ethanol molecules to quantitatively determine nanoscale membrane permeability.

  3. The magnetic diffusion of neutrons; La diffusion magnetique des neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehler, W C [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to examine briefly the diffusion of neutrons by substances, particularly by crystals containing permanent atomic or ionic magnetic moments. In other words we shall deal with ferromagnetic, antiferromagnetic, ferrimagnetic or paramagnetic crystals, but first it is necessary to touch on nuclear diffusion of neutrons. We shall start with the interaction of the neutron with a single diffusion centre; the results will then be applied to the magnetic interactions of the neutron with the satellite electrons of the atom; finally we shall discuss the diffusion of neutrons by crystals. (author) [French] Le but de ce rapport est d'examiner, brievement, la diffusion des neutrons par les substances, et surtout, par des cristaux qui contiennent des moments magnetiques atomiques ou ioniques permanents. C'est-a-dire que nous nous interesserons aux cristaux ferromagnetiques, antiferromagnetiques, ferrimagnetiques ou paramagnetiques; il nous faut cependant rappeler d'abord la diffusion nucleaire des neutrons. Nous commencerons par l'interaction du neutron avec un seul centre diffuseur; puis les resultats seront appliques aux interactions magnetiques du neutron avec les electrons satellites de l'atome; enfin nous discuterons la diffusion des neutrons par les cristaux. (auteur)

  4. Multidimensional diffusion processes

    CERN Document Server

    Stroock, Daniel W

    1997-01-01

    From the reviews: "… Both the Markov-process approach and the Itô approach … have been immensely successful in diffusion theory. The Stroock-Varadhan book, developed from the historic 1969 papers by its authors, presents the martingale-problem approach as a more powerful - and, in certain regards, more intrinsic-means of studying the foundations of the subject. […] … the authors make the uncompromising decision not "to proselytise by intimidating the reader with myriad examples demonstrating the full scope of the techniques", but rather to persuade the reader "with a careful treatment of just one problem to which they apply". […] Most of the main tools of stochastic-processes theory are used, ..but it is the formidable combination of probability theory with analysis … which is the core of the work. […] I have emphasized the great importance of the Stroock-Varadhan book. It contains a lot more than I have indicated; in particular, its many exercises conain much interesting material. For immediat...

  5. Diffusive instabilities in hyperbolic reaction-diffusion equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemskov, Evgeny P.; Horsthemke, Werner

    2016-03-01

    We investigate two-variable reaction-diffusion systems of the hyperbolic type. A linear stability analysis is performed, and the conditions for diffusion-driven instabilities are derived. Two basic types of eigenvalues, real and complex, are described. Dispersion curves for both types of eigenvalues are plotted and their behavior is analyzed. The real case is related to the Turing instability, and the complex one corresponds to the wave instability. We emphasize the interesting feature that the wave instability in the hyperbolic equations occurs in two-variable systems, whereas in the parabolic case one needs three reaction-diffusion equations.

  6. Macrolides for diffuse panbronchiolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiufang; Lu, Jing; Yang, Ming; Dong, Bi Rong; Wu, Hong Mei

    2015-01-25

    Diffuse panbronchiolitis (DPB) is a chronic airways disease predominantly affecting East Asians. Macrolides, a class of antibiotics, have been used as the main treatment for DPB, based on evidence from retrospective and non-randomised studies. To assess the efficacy and safety of macrolides for DPB. We searched CENTRAL (2014, Issue 6), MEDLINE (1966 to July week 1, 2014), EMBASE (1974 to July 2014), Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM) (1978 to July 2014), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) (1974 to July 2014), KoreaMed (1997 to July 2014) and Database of Japana Centra Revuo Medicina (1983 to July 2014). Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or quasi-RCTs assessing the effect of macrolides for DPB. Two review authors independently assessed study quality and subsequent risk of bias according to The Cochrane Collaboration's tool for assessing risk of bias. The primary outcomes were five-year survival rate, lung function and clinical response. We used risk ratios (RR) for individual trial results in the data analysis and measured all outcomes with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Only one RCT (19 participants) with significant methodological limitations was included in this review. It found that the computerised tomography images of all participants treated with a long-term, low-dose macrolide (erythromycin) improved from baseline, while the images of 71.4% of participants in the control group (with no treatment) worsened and 28.6% remained unchanged. Adverse effects were not reported. This review was previously published in 2010 and 2013. For this 2014 update, we identified no new trials for inclusion or exclusion. There is little evidence for macrolides in the treatment of DPB. We are therefore unable to make any new recommendations. It may be reasonable to use low-dose macrolides soon after diagnosis is made and to continue this treatment for at least six months, according to current guidelines.

  7. Moessbauer effect and vacancy diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunther, L.

    1976-01-01

    A dynamical theory of vacancy diffusion which was motivated by the need to explain recent experimental results for the Moessbauer spectra of Fe in Cu, Fe in Au and Fe in Al is presented. Diffusion in these systems is dominated by the vacancy mechanism, which involves strong correlations between successive jumps. The theory developed by Singwi and Sjoelander for the Moessbauer spectrum of a diffusing nucleus is therefore not applicable. The inverse of the normalized Moessbauer spectrum evaluated at zero frequency is introduced as a useful means of comparing experimental with theoretical spectral widths

  8. Simulation of multivariate diffusion bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bladt, Mogens; Finch, Samuel; Sørensen, Michael

    We propose simple methods for multivariate diffusion bridge simulation, which plays a fundamental role in simulation-based likelihood and Bayesian inference for stochastic differential equations. By a novel application of classical coupling methods, the new approach generalizes a previously...... proposed simulation method for one-dimensional bridges to the mulit-variate setting. First a method of simulating approzimate, but often very accurate, diffusion bridges is proposed. These approximate bridges are used as proposal for easily implementable MCMC algorithms that produce exact diffusion bridges...

  9. Self diffusion in isotopic fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tankeshwar, K.

    1991-01-01

    Expressions for the second and fourth frequency sum rules of the velocity auto-correlation function have been obtained for an isotopic fluid. These expressions and Mori memory function formalism have been used to study the influence of the particle mass and mole fraction on the self diffusion coefficient. Our results confirm the weak mass dependence of the self diffusion. The influence of the mole fraction of the light particles on the self diffusion constant has been found to increase for the larger particle mass. (author). 17 refs, 1 fig., 2 tabs

  10. Muon diffusion in noble metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schillaci, M.E.; Bokema, C.; Heffner, R.H.; Hutson, R.L.; Leon, M.; Olsen, C.E.; Dodds, S.A.; MacLaughlin, D.E.; Richards, P.M.

    1983-01-01

    Diffusion-induced muon depolarization in dilute AgGd and AgEr were measured in the temperature range 200-700 K and have thereby determined the muon diffusion parameters in Ag. The diffusion parameters for μ + in Cu, Ag, and Au are compared with those of hydrogen. For Ag and Au, the μ + parameters are similar to those of hydrogen, whereas for Cu, the μ + parameters are much smaller. Lattice-activated tunneling and over-barrier hopping are investigated with computational models. 15 references, 1 figure, 2 tables

  11. Muon diffusion in noble metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schillaci, M.E.; Boekema, C.; Heffner, R.H.; Hutson, R.L.; Leon, M.; Olsen, C.E.; Dodds, S.A.; MacLaughlin, D.E.; Richards, P.M.

    1982-01-01

    Diffusion-induced muon depolarization was measured in dilute AgGd and AgEr in the temperature range 200 to 700 0 K and have thereby determined the muon diffusion parameters in Ag. The diffusion parameters for μ + in Cu, Ag, and Au are compared with those of hydrogen. For Ag and Au, the μ + parameters are similar to those of hydrogen, whereas for Cu, the μ + parameters are much smaller. Lattice-activated tunneling and over-barrier hopping are investigated with computational models

  12. Reaction-diffusion systems in intracellular molecular transport and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soh, Siowling; Byrska, Marta; Kandere-Grzybowska, Kristiana; Grzybowski, Bartosz A

    2010-06-07

    Chemical reactions make cells work only if the participating chemicals are delivered to desired locations in a timely and precise fashion. Most research to date has focused on active-transport mechanisms, although passive diffusion is often equally rapid and energetically less costly. Capitalizing on these advantages, cells have developed sophisticated reaction-diffusion (RD) systems that control a wide range of cellular functions-from chemotaxis and cell division, through signaling cascades and oscillations, to cell motility. These apparently diverse systems share many common features and are "wired" according to "generic" motifs such as nonlinear kinetics, autocatalysis, and feedback loops. Understanding the operation of these complex (bio)chemical systems requires the analysis of pertinent transport-kinetic equations or, at least on a qualitative level, of the characteristic times of the constituent subprocesses. Therefore, in reviewing the manifestations of cellular RD, we also describe basic theory of reaction-diffusion phenomena.

  13. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary diffuse gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Conditions Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... Diffuse Gastric Cancer MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Gastric Cancer National Cancer ... Option Overview General Information from MedlinePlus ( ...

  14. Improved diffuser for augmenting a wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, K.M.; Gilbert, B.L.

    A diffuser for augmenting a wind turbine having means for energizing the boundary layer at several locations along the diffuser walls is improved by the addition of a short collar extending radially outward from the outlet of the diffuser.

  15. Dipy, a library for the analysis of diffusion MRI data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garyfallidis, Eleftherios; Brett, Matthew; Amirbekian, Bagrat; Rokem, Ariel; van der Walt, Stefan; Descoteaux, Maxime; Nimmo-Smith, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Diffusion Imaging in Python (Dipy) is a free and open source software project for the analysis of data from diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) experiments. dMRI is an application of MRI that can be used to measure structural features of brain white matter. Many methods have been developed to use dMRI data to model the local configuration of white matter nerve fiber bundles and infer the trajectory of bundles connecting different parts of the brain. Dipy gathers implementations of many different methods in dMRI, including: diffusion signal pre-processing; reconstruction of diffusion distributions in individual voxels; fiber tractography and fiber track post-processing, analysis and visualization. Dipy aims to provide transparent implementations for all the different steps of dMRI analysis with a uniform programming interface. We have implemented classical signal reconstruction techniques, such as the diffusion tensor model and deterministic fiber tractography. In addition, cutting edge novel reconstruction techniques are implemented, such as constrained spherical deconvolution and diffusion spectrum imaging (DSI) with deconvolution, as well as methods for probabilistic tracking and original methods for tractography clustering. Many additional utility functions are provided to calculate various statistics, informative visualizations, as well as file-handling routines to assist in the development and use of novel techniques. In contrast to many other scientific software projects, Dipy is not being developed by a single research group. Rather, it is an open project that encourages contributions from any scientist/developer through GitHub and open discussions on the project mailing list. Consequently, Dipy today has an international team of contributors, spanning seven different academic institutions in five countries and three continents, which is still growing.

  16. Preliminary study of diffusion effects in Fricke gel dosimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quiroga, A. [Centro de Investigacion y Estudios de Matematica de Cordoba, Oficina 318 FaMAF - UNC, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); Vedelago, J. [Laboratorio de Investigaciones e Instrumentacion en Fisica Aplicada a la Medicina e Imagenes por Rayos X, Laboratorio 448 FaMAF - UNC, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); Valente, M., E-mail: aiquiroga@famaf.unc.edu [Instituto de Fisica Enrique Gaviola, Oficina 102 FaMAF - UNC, Av. Luis Medina Allende, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina)

    2014-08-15

    Diffusion of ferric ions in ferrous sulfate (Fricke) gels represents one of the main drawbacks of some radiation detectors, like Fricke gel dosimeters. In practice, this disadvantage can be overcome by prompt dosimeter analysis, constraining strongly the time between irradiation and analysis. Due to required integral accuracy levels, special dedicated protocols are implemented with the aim of minimizing signal blurring due to diffusion effects. This work presents dedicated analytic modelling and numerical calculations of diffusion coefficients in Fricke gel radiation sensitive material. Samples are optically analysed by means of visible light transmission measurements capturing images with a Ccd camera provided with a monochromatic 585 nm filter corresponding to the X O-infused Fricke solution absorbance peak. Dose distributions in Fricke gels are suitably delivered in order to assess specific initial conditions further studied by periodical sample image acquisitions. In a first analytic approach, experimental data are fit with linear models in order to achieve a value for the diffusion coefficient. The second approach to the problem consists on a group of computational algorithms based on inverse problem formulation, along with suitable 2D diffusion model capable of estimating diffusion coefficients by fitting the obtained algorithm numerical solutions with the corresponding experimental data. Comparisons are performed by introducing an appropriate functional in order to analyse both experimental and numerical values. Solutions to second order diffusion equation are calculated in the framework of a dedicated method that incorporates Finite Element Method. Moreover, optimised solutions can be attained by gradient type minimisation algorithms. Knowledge about diffusion coefficient for Fricke gel radiation detector might be helpful in accounting for effects regarding elapsed time between dosimeter irradiation and further analysis. Hence, corrections might be included

  17. Preliminary study of diffusion effects in Fricke gel dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quiroga, A.; Vedelago, J.; Valente, M.

    2014-08-01

    Diffusion of ferric ions in ferrous sulfate (Fricke) gels represents one of the main drawbacks of some radiation detectors, like Fricke gel dosimeters. In practice, this disadvantage can be overcome by prompt dosimeter analysis, constraining strongly the time between irradiation and analysis. Due to required integral accuracy levels, special dedicated protocols are implemented with the aim of minimizing signal blurring due to diffusion effects. This work presents dedicated analytic modelling and numerical calculations of diffusion coefficients in Fricke gel radiation sensitive material. Samples are optically analysed by means of visible light transmission measurements capturing images with a Ccd camera provided with a monochromatic 585 nm filter corresponding to the X O-infused Fricke solution absorbance peak. Dose distributions in Fricke gels are suitably delivered in order to assess specific initial conditions further studied by periodical sample image acquisitions. In a first analytic approach, experimental data are fit with linear models in order to achieve a value for the diffusion coefficient. The second approach to the problem consists on a group of computational algorithms based on inverse problem formulation, along with suitable 2D diffusion model capable of estimating diffusion coefficients by fitting the obtained algorithm numerical solutions with the corresponding experimental data. Comparisons are performed by introducing an appropriate functional in order to analyse both experimental and numerical values. Solutions to second order diffusion equation are calculated in the framework of a dedicated method that incorporates Finite Element Method. Moreover, optimised solutions can be attained by gradient type minimisation algorithms. Knowledge about diffusion coefficient for Fricke gel radiation detector might be helpful in accounting for effects regarding elapsed time between dosimeter irradiation and further analysis. Hence, corrections might be included

  18. Diffusion-weighted MR and apparent diffusion coefficient in the evaluation of severe brain injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakahara, M.; Ericson, K.; Bellander, B.M.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To study apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps in severely brain-injured patients. Material and Methods: Four deeply comatose patients with severe brain injury were investigated with single-shot, diffusion-weighted, spin-echo echo planar imaging. The tetrahedral diffusion gradient configuration and four iterations of a set of b-values (one time of 0 mm2/s, and four times of 1000 mm2/s) were used to create isotropic ADC maps with high signal-to-noise ratio. ADC values of gray and white matter were compared among patients and 4 reference subjects. Results: one patient was diagnosed as clinically brain dead after the MR examination. The patient's ADC values of gray and white matter were significantly lower than those of 3 other brain-injured patients. In addition the ADC value of white matter was significantly lower than that of gray matter. Conclusion: The patient with fatal outcome shortly after MR examination differed significantly from other patients with severe brain injury but non-fatal outcome, with regard to ADC values in gray and white matter. This might indicate a prognostic value of ADC maps in the evaluation of traumatic brain injury

  19. Discriminating Yogurt Microstructure Using Diffuse Reflectance Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skytte, Jacob Lercke; Møller, Flemming; Abildgaard, Otto Højager Attermann

    2015-01-01

    The protein microstructure of many dairy products is of great importance for the consumers’ experience when eating the product. However, studies concerning discrimination between protein microstructures are limited. This paper presents preliminary results for discriminating different yogurt...... microstructures using hyperspectral (500-900nm) diffuse reflectance images (DRIs) – a technique potentially well suited for inline process control. Comparisons are made to quantified measures of the yogurt microstructure observed through confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM). The output signal from both...... modalities is evaluated on a 24 factorial design covering four common production parameters, which significantly change the chemistry and the microstructure of the yogurt. It is found that the DRIs can be as discriminative as the CSLM images in certain cases, however the performance is highly governed...

  20. Signal replication in a DNA nanostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Oscar; Houmadi, Said; Aimé, Jean-Pierre; Elezgaray, Juan

    2017-01-01

    Logic circuits based on DNA strand displacement reaction are the basic building blocks of future nanorobotic systems. The circuits tethered to DNA origami platforms present several advantages over solution-phase versions where couplings are always diffusion-limited. Here we consider a possible implementation of one of the basic operations needed in the design of these circuits, namely, signal replication. We show that with an appropriate preparation of the initial state, signal replication performs in a reproducible way. We also show the existence of side effects concomitant to the high effective concentrations in tethered circuits, such as slow leaky reactions and cross-activation.

  1. Autocrine signal transmission with extracellular ligand degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muratov, C B; Posta, F; Shvartsman, S Y

    2009-01-01

    Traveling waves of cell signaling in epithelial layers orchestrate a number of important processes in developing and adult tissues. These waves can be mediated by positive feedback autocrine loops, a mode of cell signaling where binding of a diffusible extracellular ligand to a cell surface receptor can lead to further ligand release. We formulate and analyze a biophysical model that accounts for ligand-induced ligand release, extracellular ligand diffusion and ligand–receptor interaction. We focus on the case when the main mode for ligand degradation is extracellular and analyze the problem with the sharp threshold positive feedback nonlinearity. We derive expressions that link the speed of propagation and other characteristics of traveling waves to the parameters of the biophysical processes, such as diffusion rates, receptor expression level, etc. Analyzing the derived expressions we found that traveling waves in such systems can exhibit a number of unusual properties, e.g. non-monotonic dependence of the speed of propagation on ligand diffusivity. Our results for the fully developed traveling fronts can be used to analyze wave initiation from localized perturbations, a scenario that frequently arises in the in vitro models of epithelial wound healing, and guide future modeling studies of cell communication in epithelial layers

  2. Autocrine signal transmission with extracellular ligand degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratov, C B; Posta, F; Shvartsman, S Y

    2009-03-01

    Traveling waves of cell signaling in epithelial layers orchestrate a number of important processes in developing and adult tissues. These waves can be mediated by positive feedback autocrine loops, a mode of cell signaling where binding of a diffusible extracellular ligand to a cell surface receptor can lead to further ligand release. We formulate and analyze a biophysical model that accounts for ligand-induced ligand release, extracellular ligand diffusion and ligand-receptor interaction. We focus on the case when the main mode for ligand degradation is extracellular and analyze the problem with the sharp threshold positive feedback nonlinearity. We derive expressions that link the speed of propagation and other characteristics of traveling waves to the parameters of the biophysical processes, such as diffusion rates, receptor expression level, etc. Analyzing the derived expressions we found that traveling waves in such systems can exhibit a number of unusual properties, e.g. non-monotonic dependence of the speed of propagation on ligand diffusivity. Our results for the fully developed traveling fronts can be used to analyze wave initiation from localized perturbations, a scenario that frequently arises in the in vitro models of epithelial wound healing, and guide future modeling studies of cell communication in epithelial layers.

  3. Atmospheric turbulence and diffusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosker, R.P. Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Division (well known in the atmospheric dispersion community as the Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Laboratory, ATDL) is one of several field facilities of NOAAs Air Resources Laboratory, headquartered in Silver Spring, Maryland. The laboratory conducts research on matters of atmospheric diffusion and turbulent exchange, concerning air quality. ATDD focuses attention on the physics of the lower atmosphere, with special emphasis on the processes contributing to atmospheric transport, dispersion, deposition, and air-surface exchange, and on the development of predictive capabilities using the results of this research. Research is directed toward issues of national and global importance related to the missions of DOE, to DOE's Oak Ridge Field Office, and to NOAA. The program is divided into four major projects: plume transport and diffusion in the planetary boundary layer, complex topography, canopy micrometeorology, and air-surface exchange

  4. Diffusion mechanisms in intermetallic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larikov, L N [ANU, Inst. Metallofiziki, Kiev (Ukraine)

    1992-08-01

    Recent research aimed at the identification of the principal mechanisms of diffusion in intermetallics is reviewed. In particular, attention is given to the effect of the type of interatomic bond on the contribution of different mechanisms to diffusion in ordered metallic compounds. Results of an analysis of experimental determinations of diffusion coefficients D(A) and D(B) in binary intermetallics (CuZn, Cu3Sn, AuCd, AgZn, AgMg, InSb, GaSb, AlSb, Fe3Al, FeAl, FeAl3, Ni3Al, Ni3Nb, FeSn, FeSn2, Ni3Sn2, Ni3Sn4, Co3Sn2, CoSn, CoSn2, and CoGa) are presented, and it is shown that the D(A)/D(B) ratio differs substantially for different diffusion mechanisms. 60 refs.

  5. Diffusion of single oxidation pond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Ruo-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The hydraulic characteristic of an oxidation pond was studied by the tracer experiment, and an empirical formula of Peclet number was obtained, which can be well applied to the model of plug flow reactor with longitudinal diffusion.

  6. Diffusion from cylindrical waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, G.F.

    1985-05-01

    The diffusion of a single component material from a finite cylindrical waste form, initially containing a uniform concentration of the material, is investigated. Under the condition that the cylinder is maintained in a well-stirred bath, expressions for the fractional inventory leached and the leach rate are derived with allowance for the possible permanent immobilization of the diffusant through its decay to a stable product and/or its irreversible reaction with the waste form matrix. The usefulness of the reported results in nuclear waste disposal applications is emphasized. The results reported herein are related to those previously derived at Oak Ridge National Laboratory by Bell and Nestor. A numerical scheme involving the partial decoupling of nested infinite summations and the use of rapidly converging rational approximants is recommended for the efficient implementation of the expressions derived to obtain reliable estimates of the bulk diffusion constant and the rate constant describing the diffusant-waste form interaction from laboratory data

  7. Diffusion coefficient for anomalous transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    A report on the progress towards the goal of estimating the diffusion coefficient for anomalous transport is given. The gyrokinetic theory is used to identify different time and length scale inherent to the characteristics of plasmas which exhibit anomalous transport

  8. Diffusion formation and psychiatric diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reith, W.; Kulikovski, J.

    2015-01-01

    The basic principle behind diffusion is Brownian motion. The diffusion parameters obtained in a clinical association provide information on the spatial distribution of water molecule mobility and, therefore, evidence of the morphological integrity of the white and grey matters of the brain. In recent years functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) could contribute to obtaining a detailed understanding of the cortical and subcortical cerebral networks. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) investigations can demonstrate the extent of anisotropy and the fiber pathways in so-called parametric images. For example, in Alzheimer's disease DTI reveals a reduced structural connectivity between the posterior cingulum and the hippocampus. This article shows examples of the application of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in psychiatric disorders. (orig.) [de

  9. System for tissue characterization using synchronous detection of diffuse reflectance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales Lopez, Orestes M.; Stolik Isakina, Suren; La Rosa Vazquez, Jose Manuel de; Valor Reed, Alma

    2016-01-01

    The development of a system for the characterization of tissues optical properties in-vivo by synchronous detection of diffuse reflectance is presented. The system comprises an exploring probe with a linear spatial arrangement of optical fibers coupled to six lasers of 650 nm wavelength and a photodiode. The system also includes a preamplifier circuit for the photodiode, a driver for the amplitude modulation of the light signal of the lasers with optical power monitoring, a digital phase splitter for reference signal generation, an amplifying circuit with digitally switch able gain, a double phase demodulation circuit, an Arduino, and a control interface developed in LabVIEW. (Author)

  10. Serial diffusion-weighted imaging in MELAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohshita, T.; Oka, M.; Imon, Y.; Watanabe, C.; Katayama, S.; Yamaguchi, S.; Kajima, T.; Mimori, Y.; Nakamura, S.

    2000-01-01

    Clinical features of mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) resemble those of cerebral infarcts, but the pathogenesis of infarct-like lesions is not fully understood. To characterise these infarct-like lesions, we studied two patients with MELAS using diffusion-weighted (DWI) MRI before and after stroke-like episodes and measured the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in the new infarct-like lesions. These gave high signal on DWI and had much higher ADC than normal-appearing regions. The ADC remained high even 30 days after a stroke-like episode then decreased in lesions, with or without abnormality as shown by conventional MRI. We speculate that early elevation of ADC in the acute or subacute phase reflects vasogenic rather than cytotoxic edema. The ADC of the lesions, which disappeared almost completely with clinical improvement, returned to normal levels, which may reflect tissue recovery without severe damage. To our knowledge, this is the first study of DWI in MELAS. (orig.)

  11. Small-signal analysis of granular semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varpula, Aapo; Sinkkonen, Juha; Novikov, Sergey, E-mail: aapo.varpula@tkk.f [Department of Micro and Nanosciences, Aalto University, PO Box 13500, FI-00076 Aalto, Espoo (Finland)

    2010-11-01

    The small-signal ac response of granular n-type semiconductors is calculated analytically using the drift-diffusion theory when electronic trapping at grain boundaries is present. An electrical equivalent circuit (EEC) model of a granular n-type semiconductor is presented. The analytical model is verified with numerical simulation performed by SILVACO ATLAS. The agreement between the analytical and numerical results is very good in a broad frequency range at low dc bias voltages.

  12. Small-signal analysis of granular semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varpula, Aapo; Sinkkonen, Juha; Novikov, Sergey

    2010-01-01

    The small-signal ac response of granular n-type semiconductors is calculated analytically using the drift-diffusion theory when electronic trapping at grain boundaries is present. An electrical equivalent circuit (EEC) model of a granular n-type semiconductor is presented. The analytical model is verified with numerical simulation performed by SILVACO ATLAS. The agreement between the analytical and numerical results is very good in a broad frequency range at low dc bias voltages.

  13. Thermal diffusivity imaging with the thermal lens microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dada, Oluwatosin O; Feist, Peter E; Dovichi, Norman J

    2011-12-01

    A coaxial thermal lens microscope was used to generate images based on both the absorbance and thermal diffusivity of histological samples. A pump beam was modulated at frequencies ranging from 50 kHz to 5 MHz using an acousto-optic modulator. The pump and a CW probe beam were combined with a dichroic mirror, directed into an inverted microscope, and focused onto the specimen. The change in the transmitted probe beam's center intensity was detected with a photodiode. The photodiode's signal and a reference signal from the modulator were sent to a high-speed lock-in amplifier. The in-phase and quadrature signals were recorded as a sample was translated through the focused beams and used to generate images based on the amplitude and phase of the lock-in amplifier's signal. The amplitude is related to the absorbance and the phase is related to the thermal diffusivity of the sample. Thin sections of stained liver and bone tissues were imaged; the contrast and signal-to-noise ratio of the phase image was highest at frequencies from 0.1-1 MHz and dropped at higher frequencies. The spatial resolution was 2.5 μm for both amplitude and phase images, limited by the pump beam spot size. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  14. Review Simulating the z = 3.35 HI 21-cm Visibility Signal for the Ooty ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This method, which models the HI signal entirely as a diffuse radiation, is completely oblivious to the dis- crete nature of the .... channels expected from the statistical. HI signal, various astrophysical foregrounds and the system noise. Similar predictions for the HI signal incorporating non-linear effects are also presented in a.

  15. Basic digital signal processing

    CERN Document Server

    Lockhart, Gordon B

    1985-01-01

    Basic Digital Signal Processing describes the principles of digital signal processing and experiments with BASIC programs involving the fast Fourier theorem (FFT). The book reviews the fundamentals of the BASIC program, continuous and discrete time signals including analog signals, Fourier analysis, discrete Fourier transform, signal energy, power. The text also explains digital signal processing involving digital filters, linear time-variant systems, discrete time unit impulse, discrete-time convolution, and the alternative structure for second order infinite impulse response (IIR) sections.

  16. Anomalous diffusion in chaotic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srokowski, T.; Ploszajczak, M.

    1994-01-01

    The anomalous diffusion is found for peripheral collision of atomic nuclei described in the framework of the molecular dynamics. Similarly as for chaotic billiards, the long free paths are the source of the long-time correlations and the anomalous diffusion. Consequences of this finding for the energy dissipation in deep-inelastic collisions and the dynamics of fission in hot nuclei are discussed (authors). 30 refs., 2 figs

  17. Diffusion processes and memory effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokshin, Anatolii V; Yulmetyev, Renat M; Haenggi, Peter

    2005-01-01

    We report the results of the numerical estimation of statistical memory effects in diffusion for two various systems: Lennard-Jones fluids and the model of the Brownian particle in a one-dimensional harmonic lattice. We have found the relation between the diffusion coefficient and the non-Markovity parameter, which is linear for the Lennard-Jones systems in liquid state. The relation between the memory measure and the excess entropy is also discussed here

  18. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging in biopsy-proven Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyo Cheol; Chang, Kee Hyun; Song In Chan; Lee, Sang Hyun; Kwon, Bae Ju; Han, Moon Hee; Kim, Sang Yun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-12-01

    To compare conventional and diffusion-weighted MR imaging in terms of their depiction of the abnormalities occurring in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. We retrospectively analyzed the findings of conventional (T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery) and diffusion-weighted MR imaging in four patients with biopsy-proven Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. The signal intensity of the lesion was classified by visual assessment as markedly high, slightly high, or isointense, relative to normal brain parenchyma. Both conventional and diffusion-weighted MR images demonstrated bilateral high signal intensity in the basal ganglia in all four patients. Cortical lesions were observed on diffusion-weighted MR images in all four, and on fluidattenuated inversion recovery MR images in one, but in no patient on T2-weighted images. Conventional MR images showed slightly high signal intensity in all lesions, while diffusion-weighted images showed markedly high signal intensity in most. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging is more sensitive than its conventional counterpart in the depiction of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and permits better detection of the lesion in both the cerebral cortices and basal ganglia.

  19. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging in biopsy-proven Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyo Cheol; Chang, Kee Hyun; Song In Chan; Lee, Sang Hyun; Kwon, Bae Ju; Han, Moon Hee; Kim, Sang Yun

    2001-01-01

    To compare conventional and diffusion-weighted MR imaging in terms of their depiction of the abnormalities occurring in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. We retrospectively analyzed the findings of conventional (T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery) and diffusion-weighted MR imaging in four patients with biopsy-proven Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. The signal intensity of the lesion was classified by visual assessment as markedly high, slightly high, or isointense, relative to normal brain parenchyma. Both conventional and diffusion-weighted MR images demonstrated bilateral high signal intensity in the basal ganglia in all four patients. Cortical lesions were observed on diffusion-weighted MR images in all four, and on fluidattenuated inversion recovery MR images in one, but in no patient on T2-weighted images. Conventional MR images showed slightly high signal intensity in all lesions, while diffusion-weighted images showed markedly high signal intensity in most. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging is more sensitive than its conventional counterpart in the depiction of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and permits better detection of the lesion in both the cerebral cortices and basal ganglia

  20. Bessel Fourier orientation reconstruction: an analytical EAP reconstruction using multiple shell acquisitions in diffusion MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinbor, Ameer Pasha; Chung, Moo K; Wu, Yu-Chien; Alexander, Andrew L

    2011-01-01

    The estimation of the ensemble average propagator (EAP) directly from q-space DWI signals is an open problem in diffusion MRI. Diffusion spectrum imaging (DSI) is one common technique to compute the EAP directly from the diffusion signal, but it is burdened by the large sampling required. Recently, several analytical EAP reconstruction schemes for multiple q-shell acquisitions have been proposed. One, in particular, is Diffusion Propagator Imaging (DPI) which is based on the Laplace's equation estimation of diffusion signal for each shell acquisition. Viewed intuitively in terms of the heat equation, the DPI solution is obtained when the heat distribution between temperatuere measurements at each shell is at steady state. We propose a generalized extension of DPI, Bessel Fourier Orientation Reconstruction (BFOR), whose solution is based on heat equation estimation of the diffusion signal for each shell acquisition. That is, the heat distribution between shell measurements is no longer at steady state. In addition to being analytical, the BFOR solution also includes an intrinsic exponential smootheing term. We illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method by showing results on both synthetic and real MR datasets.

  1. Diffusion through statically compacted clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, C.L.; Shebl, M.A.A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents experimental work on the effect of compaction on contaminant flow through clay liners. The experimental program included evaluation of soil properties, compaction, permeability and solute diffusion. A permeameter was built of non reactive materials to test samples compacted at different water contents and compactive efforts. The flow of a permeating solute, LiCl, was monitored. Effluent samples were collected for solute concentration measurements. The concentrations were measured by performing atomic adsorption tests. The analyzed results showed different diffusion characteristics when compaction conditions changed. At each compactive effort, permeability decreased as molding water content increased. Consequently, transit time (measured at relative concentration 50%) increased and diffusivity decreased. As compactive effort increased for soils compacted dry of optimum, permeability and diffusion decreased. On the other hand, as compactive effort increased for soils compacted wet of optimum, permeability and diffusivity increased. Tortuosity factor was indirectly measured from the diffusion and retardation rate. Tortuosity factor also decreased as placement water content was increased from dry of optimum to wet of optimum. Then decreases were more pronounced for low compactive effort tests. 27 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs

  2. Atmospheric diffusion of large clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, T. V. [Univ. of California, Lawrence Radiation Lab., Livermore, California (United States)

    1967-07-01

    Clouds of pollutants travel within a coordinate system that is fixed to the earth's surface, and they diffuse and grow within a coordinate system fixed to the cloud's center. This paper discusses an approach to predicting the cloud's properties, within the latter coordinate system, on space scales of a few hundred meters to a few hundred kilometers and for time periods of a few days. A numerical cloud diffusion model is presented which starts with a cloud placed arbitrarily within the troposphere. Similarity theories of atmospheric turbulence are used to predict the horizontal diffusivity as a function of initial cloud size, turbulent atmospheric dissipation, and time. Vertical diffusivity is input as a function of time and height. Therefore, diurnal variations of turbulent diffusion in the boundary layer and effects of temperature inversions, etc. can be modeled. Nondiffusive cloud depletion mechanisms, such as dry deposition, washout, and radioactive decay, are also a part of this numerical model. An effluent cloud, produced by a reactor run at the Nuclear Rocket Development Station, Nevada, is discussed in this paper. Measurements on this cloud, for a period of two days, are compared to calculations with the above numerical cloud diffusion model. In general, there is agreement. within a factor of two, for airborne concentrations, cloud horizontal area, surface air concentrations, and dry deposition as airborne concentration decreased by seven orders of magnitude during the two-day period. (author)

  3. Lead diffusion in monazite; Diffusion du plomb dans la monazite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardes, E

    2006-06-15

    Proper knowledge of the diffusion rates of lead in monazite is necessary to understand the U-Th-Pb age anomalies of this mineral, which is one of the most used in geochronology after zircon. Diffusion experiments were performed in NdPO{sub 4} monocrystals and in Nd{sub 0.66}Ca{sub 0.17}Th{sub 0.17}PO{sub 4} polycrystals from Nd{sub 0.66}Pb{sub 0.17}Th{sub 0.17}PO{sub 4} thin films to investigate Pb{sup 2+} + Th{sup 4+} {r_reversible} 2 Nd{sup 3+} and Pb{sup 2+} {r_reversible} Ca{sup 2+} exchanges. Diffusion annealings were run between 1200 and 1500 Celsius degrees, at room pressure, for durations ranging from one hour to one month. The diffusion profiles were analysed using TEM (transmission electronic microscopy) and RBS (Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy). The diffusivities extracted for Pb{sup 2+} + Th{sup 4+} {r_reversible} 2 Nd{sup 3+} exchange follow an Arrhenius law with parameters E equals 509 {+-} 24 kJ mol{sup -1} and log(D{sub 0} (m{sup 2}s{sup -1})) equals -3.41 {+-} 0.77. Preliminary data for Pb{sup 2+} {r_reversible} Ca{sup 2+} exchange are in agreement with this result. The extrapolation of our data to crustal temperatures yields very slow diffusivities. For instance, the time necessary for a 50 {mu}m grain to lose all of its lead at 800 Celsius degrees is greater than the age of the Earth. From these results and other evidence from the literature, we conclude that most of the perturbations in U-Th-Pb ages of monazite cannot be attributed to lead diffusion, but rather to interactions with fluids. (author)

  4. Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Maps of Pediatric Mass Lesions with Free-Breathing Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance: Feasibility Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, Oe.E.; Sebire, N.J.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the technical feasibility of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) mapping based on free-breathing diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance (DW-MR) outside the CNS in children. Material and Methods: Twelve children with mass lesions of varied histopathology were scanned with short-tau inversion recovery (STIR), contrast-enhanced T1-weighted (CE-T1W), and diffusion-weighted (b = 0, 500 and 1,000 s/mm 2 ) sequences. ADC maps were calculated. Lesion-to-background signal intensity ratios were measured and compared between STIR/CE-T1W/ADC overall (Friedman test) and between viable embryonal tumors and other lesions (Kruskal-Wallis test). Results: ADC maps clearly depicted all lesions. Lesion-to-background signal intensity ratios of STIR (median 3.7), CE-T1W (median 1.4), and ADC (median 1.6) showed no overall difference (chi-square = 3.846; P = 0.146), and there was no difference between viable embryonal tumors and other lesions within STIR/CE-T1W/ADC (chi-square 1.118/0.669/<0.001; P = 0.290/0.414/1.000, respectively). Conclusion: ADC mapping is feasible in free-breathing imaging of pediatric mass lesions outside the CNS using standard clinical equipment. Keywords: Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging; infants and children; neoplasms

  5. Visualization of transverse diffusion paths across fiber cells of the ocular lens by small animal MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaghefi, Ehsan; Hunter, Peter J; Jacobs, Marc D; Pontre, Beau; Donaldson, Paul J

    2009-01-01

    The sense of vision requires that light penetrate through the ocular lens. Experiments, performed and published by many research groups, have suggested that the lens, which has no blood vessels, relies on internally directed ion and water fluxes for its circulation, survival and transparency. We investigated the internal diffusive pathways of the lens in order to better understand the constraints that may be operating on directional lens fluxes. Small animal magnetic resonance imaging, including T2-weighted and diffusion tensor imaging, was used to measure tissue properties and diffusivity throughout cultured bovine lenses. A range of concentric regions of signal intensity was distinguished inside the lens, by both T2-weighted signal and mean diffusivity. Diffusivity mapping of the lens revealed novel anisotropic polar and equatorial zones of pronounced diffusivity directed transverse to the fiber cells. In contrast, an inner zone including the lens nucleus showed isotropic and weak diffusivity. Our results lend support to models of internally directed lens micro-circulation, by placing non-structural diffusive constraints on global patterns of fluid circulation

  6. Fractional order analysis of Sephadex gel structures: NMR measurements reflecting anomalous diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magin, Richard L.; Akpa, Belinda S.; Neuberger, Thomas; Webb, Andrew G.

    2011-12-01

    We report the appearance of anomalous water diffusion in hydrophilic Sephadex gels observed using pulse field gradient (PFG) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The NMR diffusion data was collected using a Varian 14.1 Tesla imaging system with a home-built RF saddle coil. A fractional order analysis of the data was used to characterize heterogeneity in the gels for the dynamics of water diffusion in this restricted environment. Several recent studies of anomalous diffusion have used the stretched exponential function to model the decay of the NMR signal, i.e., exp[-( bD) α], where D is the apparent diffusion constant, b is determined the experimental conditions (gradient pulse separation, durations and strength), and α is a measure of structural complexity. In this work, we consider a different case where the spatial Laplacian in the Bloch-Torrey equation is generalized to a fractional order model of diffusivity via a complexity parameter, β, a space constant, μ, and a diffusion coefficient, D. This treatment reverts to the classical result for the integer order case. The fractional order decay model was fit to the diffusion-weighted signal attenuation for a range of b-values (0 < b < 4000 s mm -2). Throughout this range of b values, the parameters β, μ and D, were found to correlate with the porosity and tortuosity of the gel structure.

  7. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging of the abdomen with pulse triggering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muertz, P.; Pauleit, D.; Traeber, F.; Kreft, B.P.; Schild, H.H.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to reduce the influence of motion on diffusion-weighted MR images of the abdomen by pulse triggering of single-shot sequences. Methods: Five healthy volunteers were examined both without and with finger pulse-triggering of a diffusion-weighted single-shot echo planar MR imaging sequence at 1.5 T. Series of diffusion-weighted images were acquired at different phases of the cardiac cycle by varying the time delay between finger pulse and sequence acquisition. The measurements were repeated three times. The diffusion weighted images were analysed by measuring the signal intensities and by determining the ADC values within the spleen, kidney and liver. Results: The magnitude of motion artifacts on diffusion weighted images shows a strong dependence on the trigger delay. The optimum trigger delay is found to be between 500 and 600 ms. For these values the abdominal organs appear homogeneous on all diffusion weighted images and the strongest signal intensities are detected. At optimum triggering the accuracy of the apparent diffusion coefficients is up to 10 times better than without triggering. Moreover, the standard deviation of the repeated measurements is smaller than 12% for all volunteers and for all organs. Without triggering the standard deviation is larger by a factor of 4 on average. Conclusion: Pulse triggering of single-shot sequences leads to significant reduction of motion related artifacts on diffusion weighted images of the abdomen and provides more accurate and reproducible ADC values. (orig.) [de

  8. EEG dynamical correlates of focal and diffuse causes of coma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafashan, MohammadMehdi; Ryu, Shoko; Hargis, Mitchell J; Laurido-Soto, Osvaldo; Roberts, Debra E; Thontakudi, Akshay; Eisenman, Lawrence; Kummer, Terrance T; Ching, ShiNung

    2017-11-15

    Rapidly determining the causes of a depressed level of consciousness (DLOC) including coma is a common clinical challenge. Quantitative analysis of the electroencephalogram (EEG) has the potential to improve DLOC assessment by providing readily deployable, temporally detailed characterization of brain activity in such patients. While used commonly for seizure detection, EEG-based assessment of DLOC etiology is less well-established. As a first step towards etiological diagnosis, we sought to distinguish focal and diffuse causes of DLOC through assessment of temporal dynamics within EEG signals. We retrospectively analyzed EEG recordings from 40 patients with DLOC with consensus focal or diffuse culprit pathology. For each recording, we performed a suite of time-series analyses, then used a statistical framework to identify which analyses (features) could be used to distinguish between focal and diffuse cases. Using cross-validation approaches, we identified several spectral and non-spectral EEG features that were significantly different between DLOC patients with focal vs. diffuse etiologies, enabling EEG-based classification with an accuracy of 76%. Our findings suggest that DLOC due to focal vs. diffuse injuries differ along several electrophysiological parameters. These results may form the basis of future classification strategies for DLOC and coma that are more etiologically-specific and therefore therapeutically-relevant.

  9. Drug diffusion across skin with diffusivity spatially modulated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya Arroyave, Isabel

    2014-05-01

    A diffusion and delivery model of a drug across the skin with diffusivity spatially modulated is formulated and solved analytically using computer algebra. The model is developed using one-dimensional diffusion equation with a diffusivity which is a function of position in the skin; with an initial condition which is describing that the drug is initially contained inside a therapeutic patch; with a boundary condition according to which the change in concentration in the patch is minimal, such that assumption of zero flux at the patch-skin interface is valid; and with other boundary condition according to which the microcirculation in the capillaries just below the dermis carries the drug molecules away from the site at a very fast rate, maintaining the inner concentration at 0. The model is solved analytically by the method of the Laplace transform, with Bromwich integral and residue theorem. The concentration profile of the drug in the skin is expressed as an infinite series of Bessel functions. The corresponding total amount of delivered drug is expressed as an infinite series of decreasing exponentials. Also, the corresponding effective time for the therapeutic patch is determined. All computations were performed using computer algebra software, specifically Maple. The analytical results obtained are important for understanding and improving currentapplications of therapeutic patches. For future research it is interesting to consider more general models of spatial modulation of the diffusivity and the possible application of other computer algebra software such as Mathematica and Maxima.

  10. Ion diffusion in compacted bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehikoinen, J. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1999-03-01

    In the study, a two-dimensional molecular-level diffusion model, based on a modified form of the Gouy-Chapman (GC) theory of the electrical double layers, for hydrated ionic species in compacted bentonite was developed. The modifications to the GC theory, which forms the very kernel of the diffusion model, stem from various non-conventional features: ionic hydration, dielectric saturation, finite ion-sizes and specific adsorption. The principal objectives of the study were met. With the aid of the consistent diffusion model, it is a relatively simple matter to explain the experimentally observed macroscopic exclusion for anions as well as the postulated, but greatly controversial, surface diffusion for cations. From purely theoretical grounds, it was possible to show that the apparent diffusivities of cations, anions and neutral molecules (i) do not exhibit order-or-magnitude differences, and (ii) are practically independent of the solution ionic strength used and, consequently, of the distribution coefficient, K{sub d}, unless they experience specific binding onto the substrate surface. It was also of interest to investigate the equilibrium anionic concentration distribution in the pore geometry of the GMM model as a function of the solution ionic strength, and to briefly speculate its consequences to diffusion. An explicit account of the filter-plate effect was taken by developing a computerised macroscopic diffusion model, which is based upon the very robust and efficient Laplace Transform Finite-Difference technique. Finally, the inherent limitations as well as the potential fields of applications of the models were addressed. (orig.) 45 refs.

  11. Ion diffusion in compacted bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehikoinen, J.

    1999-03-01

    In the study, a two-dimensional molecular-level diffusion model, based on a modified form of the Gouy-Chapman (GC) theory of the electrical double layers, for hydrated ionic species in compacted bentonite was developed. The modifications to the GC theory, which forms the very kernel of the diffusion model, stem from various non-conventional features: ionic hydration, dielectric saturation, finite ion-sizes and specific adsorption. The principal objectives of the study were met. With the aid of the consistent diffusion model, it is a relatively simple matter to explain the experimentally observed macroscopic exclusion for anions as well as the postulated, but greatly controversial, surface diffusion for cations. From purely theoretical grounds, it was possible to show that the apparent diffusivities of cations, anions and neutral molecules (i) do not exhibit order-or-magnitude differences, and (ii) are practically independent of the solution ionic strength used and, consequently, of the distribution coefficient, K d , unless they experience specific binding onto the substrate surface. It was also of interest to investigate the equilibrium anionic concentration distribution in the pore geometry of the GMM model as a function of the solution ionic strength, and to briefly speculate its consequences to diffusion. An explicit account of the filter-plate effect was taken by developing a computerised macroscopic diffusion model, which is based upon the very robust and efficient Laplace Transform Finite-Difference technique. Finally, the inherent limitations as well as the potential fields of applications of the models were addressed. (orig.)

  12. Gamma-butyrolactone and furan signaling systems in Streptomyces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidda, John D; Corre, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Streptomyces bacteria produce different classes of diffusible signaling molecules that trigger secondary metabolite production and/or morphological development within the cell population. The biosynthesis of gamma-butyrolactones (GBLs) and 2-alkyl-4-hydroxymethylfuran-3-carboxylic acids (AHFCAs) signaling molecules is related and involves an essential AfsA-like butenolide synthase. This chapter first describes the catalytic role of AfsA-like enzyme then provides details about methods for the discovery and characterization of potentially novel signaling molecules. In section 4, one approach for establishing the biological role of these signaling molecules is presented. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A fractal derivative model for the characterization of anomalous diffusion in magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yingjie; Ye, Allen Q.; Chen, Wen; Gatto, Rodolfo G.; Colon-Perez, Luis; Mareci, Thomas H.; Magin, Richard L.

    2016-10-01

    Non-Gaussian (anomalous) diffusion is wide spread in biological tissues where its effects modulate chemical reactions and membrane transport. When viewed using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), anomalous diffusion is characterized by a persistent or 'long tail' behavior in the decay of the diffusion signal. Recent MRI studies have used the fractional derivative to describe diffusion dynamics in normal and post-mortem tissue by connecting the order of the derivative with changes in tissue composition, structure and complexity. In this study we consider an alternative approach by introducing fractal time and space derivatives into Fick's second law of diffusion. This provides a more natural way to link sub-voxel tissue composition with the observed MRI diffusion signal decay following the application of a diffusion-sensitive pulse sequence. Unlike previous studies using fractional order derivatives, here the fractal derivative order is directly connected to the Hausdorff fractal dimension of the diffusion trajectory. The result is a simpler, computationally faster, and more direct way to incorporate tissue complexity and microstructure into the diffusional dynamics. Furthermore, the results are readily expressed in terms of spectral entropy, which provides a quantitative measure of the overall complexity of the heterogeneous and multi-scale structure of biological tissues. As an example, we apply this new model for the characterization of diffusion in fixed samples of the mouse brain. These results are compared with those obtained using the mono-exponential, the stretched exponential, the fractional derivative, and the diffusion kurtosis models. Overall, we find that the order of the fractal time derivative, the diffusion coefficient, and the spectral entropy are potential biomarkers to differentiate between the microstructure of white and gray matter. In addition, we note that the fractal derivative model has practical advantages over the existing models from the

  14. Sparse and Adaptive Diffusion Dictionary (SADD) for recovering intra-voxel white matter structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranda, Ramon; Ramirez-Manzanares, Alonso; Rivera, Mariano

    2015-12-01

    On the analysis of the Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Images, multi-compartment models overcome the limitations of the well-known Diffusion Tensor model for fitting in vivo brain axonal orientations at voxels with fiber crossings, branching, kissing or bifurcations. Some successful multi-compartment methods are based on diffusion dictionaries. The diffusion dictionary-based methods assume that the observed Magnetic Resonance signal at each voxel is a linear combination of the fixed dictionary elements (dictionary atoms). The atoms are fixed along different orientations and diffusivity profiles. In this work, we present a sparse and adaptive diffusion dictionary method based on the Diffusion Basis Functions Model to estimate in vivo brain axonal fiber populations. Our proposal overcomes the following limitations of the diffusion dictionary-based methods: the limited angular resolution and the fixed shapes for the atom set. We propose to iteratively re-estimate the orientations and the diffusivity profile of the atoms independently at each voxel by using a simplified and easier-to-solve mathematical approach. As a result, we improve the fitting of the Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance signal. The advantages with respect to the former Diffusion Basis Functions method are demonstrated on the synthetic data-set used on the 2012 HARDI Reconstruction Challenge and in vivo human data. We demonstrate that improvements obtained in the intra-voxel fiber structure estimations benefit brain research allowing to obtain better tractography estimations. Hence, these improvements result in an accurate computation of the brain connectivity patterns. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Identification of the Diffusion Parameter in Nonlocal Steady Diffusion Problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D’Elia, M., E-mail: mdelia@fsu.edu, E-mail: mdelia@sandia.gov [Sandia National Laboratories (United States); Gunzburger, M. [Florida State University (United States)

    2016-04-15

    The problem of identifying the diffusion parameter appearing in a nonlocal steady diffusion equation is considered. The identification problem is formulated as an optimal control problem having a matching functional as the objective of the control and the parameter function as the control variable. The analysis makes use of a nonlocal vector calculus that allows one to define a variational formulation of the nonlocal problem. In a manner analogous to the local partial differential equations counterpart, we demonstrate, for certain kernel functions, the existence of at least one optimal solution in the space of admissible parameters. We introduce a Galerkin finite element discretization of the optimal control problem and derive a priori error estimates for the approximate state and control variables. Using one-dimensional numerical experiments, we illustrate the theoretical results and show that by using nonlocal models it is possible to estimate non-smooth and discontinuous diffusion parameters.

  16. Retroactive signaling in short signaling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques-Alexandre Sepulchre

    Full Text Available In biochemical signaling pathways without explicit feedback connections, the core signal transduction is usually described as a one-way communication, going from upstream to downstream in a feedforward chain or network of covalent modification cycles. In this paper we explore the possibility of a new type of signaling called retroactive signaling, offered by the recently demonstrated property of retroactivity in signaling cascades. The possibility of retroactive signaling is analysed in the simplest case of the stationary states of a bicyclic cascade of signaling cycles. In this case, we work out the conditions for which variables of the upstream cycle are affected by a change of the total amount of protein in the downstream cycle, or by a variation of the phosphatase deactivating the same protein. Particularly, we predict the characteristic ranges of the downstream protein, or of the downstream phosphatase, for which a retroactive effect can be observed on the upstream cycle variables. Next, we extend the possibility of retroactive signaling in short but nonlinear signaling pathways involving a few covalent modification cycles.

  17. Diffuse and vascular hepatic diseases; Diffuse und vaskulaere Lebererkrankungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreimeyer, S.; Grenacher, L. [Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Abteilung Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2011-08-15

    In addition to focal liver lesions, diffuse and vascular disorders of the liver represent a wide spectrum of liver diseases which are from the radiological point of view often difficult or nearly impossible to diagnose. Classical diagnostic methods are computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in addition to ultrasound. Diffuse parenchymal damage caused by diseases of various etiologies is therefore difficult to evaluate because it often lacks characteristic morphological features. For hepatic steatosis, hemochromatosis/siderosis as an example of a diffuse storage disease and sarcoidosis and candidiasis as infectious/inflammatory diseases, an image-based diagnosis is appropriate in some cases. For most diffuse liver diseases, however only nonspecific changes are visualized. Vascular pathologies of the liver, such as the Budd-Chiari syndrome and portal vein thrombosis, however, can usually be diagnosed very clearly using radiology and there is also a very effective interventional radiological treatment. Chronic diseases very often culminate in liver cirrhosis which is highly associated with an increased risk of liver cancer. (orig.) [German] Neben den fokalen Leberlaesionen stellen diffuse und vaskulaere Lebererkrankungen ein weites Spektrum an Erkrankungen der Leber dar, die radiologisch oft schwer oder gar nicht diagnostizierbar sind. Klassische diagnostische Verfahren sind dabei neben dem Ultraschall die Computertomographie und die Magnetresonanztomographie. Diffuse Parenchymschaeden, bedingt durch Erkrankungen unterschiedlichster Aetiologie, sind deshalb schwierig evaluierbar, weil haeufig charakteristische bildmorphologische Merkmale fehlen. Die Steatosis hepatis, die Haemochromatose/Siderose als Beispiel der Speicherkrankheiten sowie die Sarkoidose und die Candidose als infektioes-entzuendliche Erkrankungen sind einer bildbasierten Diagnosestellung z. T. zugaenglich, bei den meisten diffusen Lebererkrankungen jedoch zeigen sich lediglich unspezifische

  18. Gaseous diffusion -- the enrichment workhorse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoemaker, J.E. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Construction of the first large-scale gaseous diffusion facility was started as part of the Manhattan Project in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, in 1943. This facility, code named ''K-25,'' began operation in January 1945 and was fully on stream by September 1945. Four additional process buildings were later added in Oak Ridge as the demand for enriched uranium escalated. New gaseous diffusion plants were constructed at Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, during this period. The three gaseous diffusion plants were the ''workhorses'' which provided the entire enriched uranium demand for the United States during the 1950s and 1960s. As the demand for enriched uranium for military purposes decreased during the early 1960s, power to the diffusion plants was curtailed to reduce production. During the 1960s, as plans for the nuclear power industry were formulated, the role of the diffusion plants gradually changed from providing highly-enriched uranium for the military to providing low-enriched uranium for power reactors

  19. Radionuclide diffusion in soils. III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cipakova, A.; Szabova, T.

    1988-01-01

    Samples were taken of five soil types for determining diffusion coefficients, namely chernozem, illimerized brown soil, degraded chernozem, gleizated brown soil and heavy loamy brown soil. 5 layers of soil having a thickness of 1 cm each were placed in diffusion columns. 20 ml of water with 0.45 MBq 85 Sr of distilled water was poured over the columns. 10 ml of distilled water was poured over the columns every 5 days for monitoring the effect of the amount of precipitation and its distribution - a similarity with rainfall in the driest month, 41 ml of distilled water was then poured over the column every 5 days or 82 ml of distilled water every 10 days - imitating the month with the highest rainfall level. The effect of salts and various concentrations of salt mixtures on the value of the diffusion coefficient were monitored in solutions of NaNO 3 , KNO 3 and Ca(NO 3 ) 2 with added activity 0.45 MGq of 85 SrCl 2 . Diffusion was monitored for 101 days. All measured values are tabulated. The smallest diffusion coefficient was found in chernozem in the presence of H 2 O and the highest value was found in illimerized brown soil in the presence of 0.15 M of KNO 3 . (E.S.). 2 tabs., 10 refs

  20. Benign compression fractures of the spine: signal patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Kyung Nam; Choi, Woo Suk; Lee, Sun Wha; Lim, Jae Hoon

    1992-01-01

    Fifteen patients with 38 compression fractures of the spine underwent magnetic resonance(MR) imaging. We retrospectively evaluated MR images in those benign compression fractures. MR images showed four patterns in T1-weighted images. MR imaging patterns were normal signal(21), band like low signal(8), low signal with preservation of peripheral portion of the body(8), and diffuse low signal through the vertebral body(1). The low signal portions were changed to high signal intensities in T2-weighted images. In 7 of 15 patients (11 compression fractures), there was a history of trauma, and the remaining 8 patients (27 compression fractures) had no history of trauma. Benign compression fractures of trauma, remained 8 patients (27 compression fractures) were non-traumatic. Benign compression fractures of the spine reveal variable signal intensities in MR imagings. These patterns of benign compression fractures may be useful in interpretation of MR imagings of the spine

  1. Intracellular calcium homeostasis and signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brini, Marisa; Calì, Tito; Ottolini, Denis; Carafoli, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    Ca(2+) is a universal carrier of biological information: it controls cell life from its origin at fertilization to its end in the process of programmed cell death. Ca(2+) is a conventional diffusible second messenger released inside cells by the interaction of first messengers with plasma membrane receptors. However, it can also penetrate directly into cells to deliver information without the intermediation of first or second messengers. Even more distinctively, Ca(2+) can act as a first messenger, by interacting with a plasma membrane receptor to set in motion intracellular signaling pathways that involve Ca(2+) itself. Perhaps the most distinctive property of the Ca(2+) signal is its ambivalence: while essential to the correct functioning of cells, Ca(2+) becomes an agent that mediates cell distress, or even (toxic) cell death, if its concentration and movements inside cells are not carefully tuned. Ca(2+) is controlled by reversible complexation to specific proteins, which could be pure Ca(2+) buffers, or which, in addition to buffering Ca(2+), also decode its signal to pass it on to targets. The most important actors in the buffering of cell Ca(2+) are proteins that transport it across the plasma membrane and the membrane of the organelles: some have high Ca(2+) affinity and low transport capacity (e.g., Ca(2+) pumps), others have opposite properties (e.g., the Ca(2+) uptake system of mitochondria). Between the initial event of fertilization, and the terminal event of programmed cell death, the Ca(2+) signal regulates the most important activities of the cell, from the expression of genes, to heart and muscle contraction and other motility processes, to diverse metabolic pathways involved in the generation of cell fuels.

  2. Diffuse sound field: challenges and misconceptions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse sound field is a popular, yet widely misused concept. Although its definition is relatively well established, acousticians use this term for different meanings. The diffuse sound field is defined by a uniform sound pressure distribution (spatial diffusion or homogeneity) and uniform...... tremendously in different chambers because the chambers are non-diffuse in variously different ways. Therefore, good objective measures that can quantify the degree of diffusion and potentially indicate how to fix such problems in reverberation chambers are needed. Acousticians often blend the concept...... of mixing and diffuse sound field. Acousticians often refer diffuse reflections from surfaces to diffuseness in rooms, and vice versa. Subjective aspects of diffuseness have not been much investigated. Finally, ways to realize a diffuse sound field in a finite space are discussed....

  3. Nonlinear Diffusion and Transient Osmosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, Akira; Rondoni, Lamberto; Botrugno, Antonio; Pizzi, Marco

    2011-01-01

    We investigate both analytically and numerically the concentration dynamics of a solution in two containers connected by a narrow and short channel, in which diffusion obeys a porous medium equation. We also consider the variation of the pressure in the containers due to the flow of matter in the channel. In particular, we identify a phenomenon, which depends on the transport of matter across nano-porous membranes, which we call ''transient osmosis . We find that nonlinear diffusion of the porous medium equation type allows numerous different osmotic-like phenomena, which are not present in the case of ordinary Fickian diffusion. Experimental results suggest one possible candidate for transiently osmotic processes. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  4. Nitrogen diffusion in zirconium nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desmaison, J.G.; Smeltzer, W.W.

    1977-01-01

    Nitrogen diffusion in polycrystalline ZrN/sub 0.71-0.79/ spheres, 60 and 90 μm diameter, was studied by the gas-solid exchange technique using 15 N as a tracer at a nitrogen pressure of 220 torr and 1000 to 1200 0 C. These specimens were characterized by chemical analyses, density, lattice parameter, and structural measurements. The tracer diffusion coefficient can be expressed as D* (cm 2 /S) = 3.0 x 10 -10 exp (-23,000/RT). This result, when compared to a previous determination obtained in the same conditions with 254 μm thick plates, confirms that nitrogen transport in this polycrystalline solid at temperatures less than 1200 0 C is associated with a short-circuit diffusion mechanism

  5. Tracer diffusion in ternary alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahir-Kheli, R.A.

    1985-07-01

    An intuitive extension of the theory for diffusion in dynamic binary alloys given in the preceding paper is presented. This theory has also received an independent derivation, based on more formal procedures, by Holdsworth and Elliott. We present Monte Carlo estimates for diffusion correlation factors, fsup(A), fsup(B), and fsup(C) and compare them with the theory. The agreement between the theoretical results and the Monte Carlo estimates for the correlation factors of the slow particles, i.e., fsup(C) and fsup(B), is found to be generally good. In contrast, for the correlation factor, fsup(A), referring to the diffusion coefficient of fast particles in the system, the theoretical results are found to be systematically lower by a small but resolvable margin. It is suggested that this is occasioned by the neglect of spatial constraints on the scattering of coupled tracer-background particle field pairs. (author)

  6. Emissivity of discretized diffusion problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Densmore, Jeffery D.; Davidson, Gregory; Carrington, David B.

    2006-01-01

    The numerical modeling of radiative transfer by the diffusion approximation can produce artificially damped radiation propagation if spatial cells are too optically thick. In this paper, we investigate this nonphysical behavior at external problem boundaries by examining the emissivity of the discretized diffusion approximation. We demonstrate that the standard cell-centered discretization produces an emissivity that is too low for optically thick cells, a situation that leads to the lack of radiation propagation. We then present a modified boundary condition that yields an accurate emissivity regardless of cell size. This modified boundary condition can be used with a deterministic calculation or as part of a hybrid transport-diffusion method for increasing the efficiency of Monte Carlo simulations. We also discuss the range of applicability, as a function of cell size and material properties, when this modified boundary condition is employed in a hybrid technique. With a set of numerical calculations, we demonstrate the accuracy and usefulness of this modified boundary condition

  7. Diffusion in inhomogeneous polymer membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasargod, Sameer S.; Adib, Farhad; Neogi, P.

    1995-10-01

    The dual mode sorption solubility isotherms assume, and in instances Zimm-Lundberg analysis of the solubilities show, that glassy polymers are heterogeneous and that the distribution of the solute in the polymer is also inhomogeneous. Under some conditions, the heterogeneities cannot be represented as holes. A mathematical model describing diffusion in inhomogeneous polymer membranes is presented using Cahn and Hilliard's gradient theory. The fractional mass uptake is found to be proportional to the fourth root of time rather than the square root, predicted by Fickian diffusion. This type of diffusion is classified as pseudo-Fickian. The model is compared with one experimental result available. A negative value of the persistence factor is obtained and the results are interpreted.

  8. Single Crystal Diffuse Neutron Scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Welberry

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse neutron scattering has become a valuable tool for investigating local structure in materials ranging from organic molecular crystals containing only light atoms to piezo-ceramics that frequently contain heavy elements. Although neutron sources will never be able to compete with X-rays in terms of the available flux the special properties of neutrons, viz. the ability to explore inelastic scattering events, the fact that scattering lengths do not vary systematically with atomic number and their ability to scatter from magnetic moments, provides strong motivation for developing neutron diffuse scattering methods. In this paper, we compare three different instruments that have been used by us to collect neutron diffuse scattering data. Two of these are on a spallation source and one on a reactor source.

  9. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of extraocular muscles in patients with Grave's ophthalmopathy using turbo field echo with diffusion-sensitized driven-equilibrium preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiwatashi, A; Togao, O; Yamashita, K; Kikuchi, K; Momosaka, D; Honda, H

    2018-03-20

    The purpose of this study was to correlate diffusivity of extraocular muscles, measured by three-dimensional turbo field echo (3DTFE) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging using diffusion-sensitized driven-equilibrium preparation, with their size and activity in patients with Grave's ophthalmopathy. Twenty-three patients with Grave's ophthalmopathy were included. There were 17 women and 6 men with a mean age of 55.8±12.6 (SD) years (range: 26-83 years). 3DTFE with diffusion-sensitized driven-equilibrium MR images were obtained with b-values of 0 and 500s/mm 2 . The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of extraocular muscles was measured on coronal reformatted MR images. Signal intensities of extraocular muscles on conventional MR images were compared to those of normal-appearing white matter, and cross-sectional areas of the muscles were also measured. The clinical activity score was also evaluated. Statistical analyses were performed with Pearson correlation and Mann-Whitney U tests. On 3DTFE with diffusion-sensitized driven-equilibrium preparation, the mean ADC of the extraocular muscles was 2.23±0.37 (SD)×10 -3 mm2/s (range: 1.70×10 -3 -3.11×10 -3 mm 2 /s). There was a statistically significant moderate correlation between ADC and the size of the muscles (r=0.61). There were no statistically significant correlations between ADC and signal intensity on conventional MR and the clinical activity score. 3DTFE with diffusion-sensitized driven-equilibrium preparation technique allows quantifying diffusivity of extraocular muscles in patients with Grave's ophthalmopathy. The diffusivity of the extraocular muscles on 3DTFE with diffusion-sensitized driven-equilibrium preparation MR images moderately correlates with their size. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  10. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging of cystic lesions of neurocysticercosis: a preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raffin, Luciana S.; Bacheschi, Luiz A.; Machado, Luis R.; Nobrega, Jose P.S.; Coelho, Christina; Leite, Claudia C.

    2001-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis is an endemic disease in some developing countries. It has pleomorfic clinical and imaging findings, which are variable from patient to patient. In this preliminary note, we studied the magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted images of sixteen patients presenting with cystic lesions of this disease diagnosed by clinical and laboratorial findings. All the lesions had hypointense signal and the similar apparent diffusion coefficient values as the cerebrospinal fluid. (author)

  11. Dipy, a library for the analysis of diffusion MRI data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleftherios eGaryfallidis

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Diffusion Imaging in Python (Dipy is a free and open source software projectfor the analysis of data from diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRIexperiments. dMRI is an application of MRI that can be used to measurestructural features of brain white matter. Many methods have been developed touse dMRI data to model the local configuration of white matter nerve fiberbundles and infer the trajectory of bundles connecting different parts of thebrain.Dipy gathers implementations of many different methods in dMRI, including:diffusion signal pre-processing; reconstruction of diffusion distributions inindividual voxels; fiber tractography and fiber track post-processing, analysisand visualization. Dipy aims to provide transparent implementations forall the different steps of dMRI analysis with a uniform programming interface.We have implemented classical signal reconstruction techniques, such as thediffusion tensor model and deterministic fiber tractography. In addition,cutting edge novel reconstruction techniques are implemented, such asconstrained spherical deconvolution and diffusion spectrum imaging withdeconvolution, as well as methods for probabilistic tracking and originalmethods for tractography clustering. Many additional utility functions areprovided to calculate various statistics, informative visualizations, as wellas file-handling routines to assist in the development and use of noveltechniques.In contrast to many other scientific software projects, Dipy is not beingdeveloped by a single research group. Rather, it is an open project thatencourages contributions from any scientist/developer through GitHub and opendiscussions on the project mailing list. Consequently, Dipy today has aninternational team of contributors, spanning seven different academic institutionsin five countries and three continents, which is still growing.

  12. Diffusion tensor mode in imaging of intracranial epidermoid cysts: one step ahead of fractional anisotropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolapara, Milan; Kesavadas, Chandrasekharan; Saini, Jitender; Patro, Satya Narayan; Gupta, Arun Kumar; Kapilamoorthy, Tirur Raman; Bodhey, Narendra; Radhakrishnan, V.V.

    2009-01-01

    The signal characteristics of an epidermoid on T2-weighted imaging have been attributed to the presence of increased water content within the tumor. In this study, we explore the utility of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and diffusion tensor metrics (DTM) in knowing the microstructural anatomy of epidermoid cysts. DTI was performed in ten patients with epidermoid cysts. Directionally averaged mean diffusivity (D av ), exponential diffusion, and DTM-like fractional anisotropy (FA), diffusion tensor mode (mode), linear (CL), planar (CP), and spherical (CS) anisotropy were measured from the tumor as well as from the normal-looking white matter. Epidermoid cysts showed high FA. However, D av and exponential diffusion values did not show any restriction of diffusion. Diffusion tensor mode values were near -1, and CP values were high within the tumor. This suggested preferential diffusion of water molecules along a two-dimensional geometry (plane) in epidermoid cysts, which could be attributed to the parallel-layered arrangement of keratin filaments and flakes within these tumors. Thus, advanced imaging modalities like DTI with DTM can provide information regarding the microstructural anatomy of the epidermoid cysts. (orig.)

  13. Improving CT-guided transthoracic biopsy of mediastinal lesions by diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimaraes, Marcos Duarte; TyngI, Chiang Cheng; Bitencourt, Almir Galvao Vieira; Gross, Jefferson Luiz; Zurstrassen, Charles Edouard, E-mail: marcosduarte500@gmail.com [AC Camargo Cancer Center, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Hochhegger, Bruno [Universidade Federal de Ciencias da Saude de Porto Alegre (UFCSPA), RS (Brazil). Dept. de Radiologia; Benveniste, Marcelo Felipe Kuperman; Odisio, Bruno Calazans [University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Marchiori, Edson [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Petropolis, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-11-15

    Objectives: to evaluate the preliminary results obtained using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and the apparent diffusion coefficient for planning computed tomography-guided biopsies of selected mediastinal lesions. Methods: eight patients with mediastinal lesions suspicious for malignancy were referred for computed tomography-guided biopsy. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and apparent diffusion coefficient measurement were performed to assist in biopsy planning with diffusion/computed tomography fused images. We selected mediastinal lesions that could provide discordant diagnoses depending on the biopsy site, including large heterogeneous masses, lesions associated with lung atelectasis or consolidation, lesions involving large mediastinal vessels and lesions for which the results of biopsy using other methods and histopathological examination were divergent from the clinical and radiological suspicion. Results: in all cases, the biopsy needle was successfully directed to areas of higher signal intensity on diffusion weighted sequences and the lowest apparent diffusion coefficient within the lesion (mean, 0.8 [range, 0.6–1.1]610{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s), suggesting high cellularity. All biopsies provided adequate material for specific histopathological diagnoses of four lymphomas, two sarcomas and two thymoma s. Conclusion: functional imaging tools, such as diffusion-weighted imaging and the apparent diffusion coefficient, are promising for implementation in noninvasive and imaging-guided procedures. However, additional studies are needed to confirm that mediastinal biopsy can be improved with these techniques. (author)

  14. The EZ diffusion model provides a powerful test of simple empirical effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ravenzwaaij, Don; Donkin, Chris; Vandekerckhove, Joachim

    2017-04-01

    Over the last four decades, sequential accumulation models for choice response times have spread through cognitive psychology like wildfire. The most popular style of accumulator model is the diffusion model (Ratcliff Psychological Review, 85, 59-108, 1978), which has been shown to account for data from a wide range of paradigms, including perceptual discrimination, letter identification, lexical decision, recognition memory, and signal detection. Since its original inception, the model has become increasingly complex in order to account for subtle, but reliable, data patterns. The additional complexity of the diffusion model renders it a tool that is only for experts. In response, Wagenmakers et al. (Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 14, 3-22, 2007) proposed that researchers could use a more basic version of the diffusion model, the EZ diffusion. Here, we simulate experimental effects on data generated from the full diffusion model and compare the power of the full diffusion model and EZ diffusion to detect those effects. We show that the EZ diffusion model, by virtue of its relative simplicity, will be sometimes better able to detect experimental effects than the data-generating full diffusion model.

  15. Imaging Appearance of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Encephalitis on the Diffusion Weighted Images: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Hun Cheol; Yu, In Kyu; Oh, Keon Se

    2011-01-01

    Imaging finding of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) encephalitis contain bilateral, symmetric, patchy, or diffuse increased T2WI signal intensities in the basal ganglia, cerebellum, brainstem, and centrum semiovale. In particular, the centrum semiovale is most commonly involved. Most of the HIV encephalitis cases are accompanied by brain atrophy. No previous study has reported symmetric increased signal intensity at the bilateral centrum semiovale without brain atrophy on diffusion weighted images in HIV encephalitis patients. Here, we report a case of this. We suggest that radiologists should consider the possibility of HIV encephalitis if there are symmetric increases in signal intensity at the bilateral centrum semiovale on diffusion weighted images of patients with a history of HIV infection.

  16. Self-normalizing multiple-echo technique for measuring the in vivo apparent diffusion coefficient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perman, W.H.; Gado, M.; Sandstrom, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents work to develop a new technique for quantitating the in vivo apparent diffusion/perfusion coefficient (ADC) by obtaining multiple data points from only two images with the capability to normalize the data from consecutive images, thus minimizing the effect of interimage variation. Two multiple-echo (six-to eight-echo) cardiac-gated images are obtained, one without and one with additional diffusion/perfusion encoding gradients placed about the 180 RF pulses of all but the first echo. Since the first echoes of both images have identical pulse sequence parameters, variations in signal intensity-between the first echoes represent image-to-image variation. The signal intensities of the subsequent echoes with additional diffusion/perfusion encoding gradients are then normalized by using the ratio of the first-echo signal intensities

  17. Innovation Diffusion: Assessment of Strategies within the Diffusion Simulation Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enfield, Jacob; Myers, Rodney D.; Lara, Miguel; Frick, Theodore W.

    2012-01-01

    Educators increasingly view the high level of engagement and experiential learning offered by games as a means to promote learning. However, as with any designed learning experience, player experiences should provide an accurate representation of content to be learned. In this study, the authors investigated the DIFFUSION SIMULATION GAME (DSG) to…

  18. Huang diffuse scattering of neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkel, E.; Guerard, B. v.; Metzger, H.; Peisl, J.

    1979-01-01

    Huang diffuse neutron scattering was measured for the first time on niobium with interstitially dissolved deuterium as well as on MgO after neutron irradiation and Li 7 F after γ-irradiation. With Huang diffuse scattering the strength and symmetry of the distortion field around lattice defects can be determined. Our results clearly demonstrate that this method is feasible with neutrons. The present results are compared with X-ray experiments and the advantages of using neutrons is discussed in some detail. (orig.)

  19. In situ measurement of diffusivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berne, F.; Pocachard, J.

    2004-01-01

    The mechanism of molecular diffusion controls the migration of contaminants in very low-permeability porous media, like underground facilities for the storage of hazardous waste. Determining of relevant diffusion coefficients is therefore of prime importance. A few techniques exist for in situ measurement of the quantity, but they suffer from many handicaps (duration, complexity and cost of the experiments). We propose here two innovative methods that have some potential to improve the situation. So far, we have found them feasible on the basis of design calculations and laboratory experiments. This work is presently protected by a patent. (author)

  20. In situ measurement of diffusivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berne, Ph.; Pocachard, J.

    2005-01-01

    The mechanism of molecular diffusion controls the migration of contaminants in very low-permeability porous media, like underground facilities for the storage of hazardous waste. Determining the relevant diffusion coefficients is, therefore, of prime importance. A few techniques exist for the in situ measurement of that quantity, but they suffer from many handicaps (duration, complexity and cost of the experiments). We propose here two innovative methods that have some potential to improve this situation. So far, we have found them feasible on the basis of design calculations and laboratory experiments. This work is presently protected by a patent. (author)

  1. Oxygen diffusion in cuprate superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Routbort, J.L.; Rothman, S.J.

    1995-01-01

    Superconducting properties of the cuprate superconductors depend on the oxygen content of the material; the diffusion of oxygen is thus an important process in the fabrication and application of these materials. This article reviews studies of the diffusion of oxygen in La 2-x Sr x CuO 4 , YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7- δ, YBa 2 Cu 4 O 8 , and the Bi 2 Sr 2 Ca n-1 Cu n O 2+4 (n = 1, and 2) superconductors, and attempt to elucidate the atomic mechanisms responsible

  2. Optimization of hydraulic turbine diffuser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moravec Prokop

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydraulic turbine diffuser recovers pressure energy from residual kinetic energy on turbine runner outlet. Efficiency of this process is especially important for high specific speed turbines, where almost 50% of available head is utilized within diffuser. Magnitude of the coefficient of pressure recovery can be significantly influenced by designing its proper shape. Present paper focuses on mathematical shape optimization method coupled with CFD. First method is based on direct search Nelder-Mead algorithm, while the second method employs adjoint solver and morphing. Results obtained with both methods are discussed and their advantages/disadvantages summarized.

  3. Langevin diffusions on the torus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    García-Portugués, Eduardo; Sørensen, Michael; Mardia, Kanti V.

    2018-01-01

    We introduce stochastic models for continuous-time evolution of angles and develop their estimation. We focus on studying Langevin diffusions with stationary distributions equal to well-known distributions from directional statistics, since such diffusions can be regarded as toroidal analogues......) a likelihood based on the stationary distribution; (ii) toroidal adaptations of the Euler and Shoji–Ozaki pseudo-likelihoods; (iii) a likelihood based on a specific approximation to the transition density of the wrapped normal process. A simulation study compares, in dimensions one and two, the approximate...

  4. Slaved diffusion in phospholipid bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liangfang; Granick, Steve

    2005-01-01

    The translational diffusion of phospholipids in supported fluid bilayers splits into two populations when polyelectrolytes adsorb at incomplete surface coverage. Spatially resolved measurements using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy show that a slow mode, whose magnitude scales inversely with the degree of polymerization of the adsorbate, coexists with a fast mode characteristic of naked lipid diffusion. Inner and outer leaflets of the bilayer are affected nearly equally. Mobility may vary from spot to spot on the membrane surface, despite the lipid composition being the same. This work offers a mechanism to explain how nanosized domains with reduced mobility arise in lipid membranes. PMID:15967988

  5. Some Aspects of Diffusion Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Pignedoli, A

    2011-01-01

    This title includes: V.C.A. Ferraro: Diffusion of ions in a plasma with applications to the ionosphere; P.C. Kendall: On the diffusion in the atmosphere and ionosphere; F. Henin: Kinetic equations and Brownian motion; T. Kahan: Theorie des reacteurs nucleaires: methodes de resolution perturbationnelles, interactives et variationnelles; C. Cattaneo: Sulla conduzione del calore; C. Agostinelli: Formule di Green per la diffusione del campo magnetico in un fluido elettricamente conduttore; A. Pignedoli: Transformational methods applied to some one-dimensional problems concerning the equations of t

  6. DST9-1, an ASIC for receiving and delivery of time signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuzon, J.C.

    1999-01-01

    In order to evaluate the 1.2 μ BiCMOS technology of AMS foundry the electronics department developed a full custom ASIC for time signal receiving and shaping according to our fast TDC pre-diffused ASIC. (author)

  7. Spatial Mapping of Translational Diffusion Coefficients Using Diffusion Tensor Imaging: A Mathematical Description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Anil N; Chiang, Sharon; Maletic-Savatic, Mirjana; Kasprian, Gregor; Vannucci, Marina; Lee, Wesley

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the theoretical background for diffusion weighted imaging and diffusion tensor imaging. Molecular diffusion is a random process involving thermal Brownian motion. In biological tissues, the underlying microstructures restrict the diffusion of water molecules, making diffusion directionally dependent. Water diffusion in tissue is mathematically characterized by the diffusion tensor, the elements of which contain information about the magnitude and direction of diffusion and is a function of the coordinate system. Thus, it is possible to generate contrast in tissue based primarily on diffusion effects. Expressing diffusion in terms of the measured diffusion coefficient (eigenvalue) in any one direction can lead to errors. Nowhere is this more evident than in white matter, due to the preferential orientation of myelin fibers. The directional dependency is removed by diagonalization of the diffusion tensor, which then yields a set of three eigenvalues and eigenvectors, representing the magnitude and direction of the three orthogonal axes of the diffusion ellipsoid, respectively. For example, the eigenvalue corresponding to the eigenvector along the long axis of the fiber corresponds qualitatively to diffusion with least restriction. Determination of the principal values of the diffusion tensor and various anisotropic indices provides structural information. We review the use of diffusion measurements using the modified Stejskal-Tanner diffusion equation. The anisotropy is analyzed by decomposing the diffusion tensor based on symmetrical properties describing the geometry of diffusion tensor. We further describe diffusion tensor properties in visualizing fiber tract organization of the human brain.

  8. Changes in diffusion properties of biological tissues associated with mechanical strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Kenichiro; Imae, T.; Mima, Kazuo; Sekino, Masaki; Ohsaki, Hiroyuki; Ueno, Shogo

    2007-01-01

    Mechanical strain in biological tissues causes a change in the diffusion properties of water molecules. This paper proposes a method of estimating mechanical strain in biological tissues using diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Measurements were carried out on uncompressed and compressed chicken skeletal muscles. A theoretical model of the diffusion of water molecules in muscle fibers was derived based on Tanner's equation. Diameter of the muscle fibers was estimated by fitting the model equation to the measured signals. Changes in the mean diffusivity (MD), the fractional anisotropy (FA), and diameter of the muscle fiber did not have any statistical significance. The intracellular diffusion coefficient (D int ) was changed by mechanical strain (p<.05). This method has potential applications in the quantitative evaluation of strain in biological tissues, a though it poses several technical challenges. (author)

  9. Neurotrophin signaling endosomes; biogenesis, regulation, and functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Naoya; Kuruvilla, Rejji

    2016-01-01

    In the nervous system, communication between neurons and their post-synaptic target cells is critical for the formation, refinement and maintenance of functional neuronal connections. Diffusible signals secreted by target tissues, exemplified by the family of neurotrophins, impinge on nerve terminals to influence diverse developmental events including neuronal survival and axonal growth. Key mechanisms of action of target-derived neurotrophins include the cell biological processes of endocytosis and retrograde trafficking of their Trk receptors from growth cones to cell bodies. In this review, we summarize the molecular mechanisms underlying this endosome-mediated signaling, focusing on the instructive role of neurotrophin signaling itself in directing its own trafficking. Recent studies have linked impaired neurotrophin trafficking to neurodevelopmental disorders, highlighting the relevance of neurotrophin endosomes in human health. PMID:27327126

  10. Primary Cilia, Signaling Networks and Cell Migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veland, Iben Rønn

    Primary cilia are microtubule-based, sensory organelles that emerge from the centrosomal mother centriole to project from the surface of most quiescent cells in the human body. Ciliary entry is a tightly controlled process, involving diffusion barriers and gating complexes that maintain a unique...... this controls directional cell migration as a physiological response. The ciliary pocket is a membrane invagination with elevated activity of clathrin-dependent endocytosis (CDE). In paper I, we show that the primary cilium regulates TGF-β signaling and the ciliary pocket is a compartment for CDE...... on formation of the primary cilium and CDE at the pocket region. The ciliary protein Inversin functions as a molecular switch between canonical and non-canonical Wnt signaling. In paper II, we show that Inversin and the primary cilium control Wnt signaling and are required for polarization and cell migration...

  11. Role of apparent diffusion coefficient values and diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging in differentiation between benign and malignant thyroid nodules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Incedayi, M.; Sivrioglu, A.; Mutlu, H.; Sonmez, G.; Velioglu, M.; Sildiroglu, O.; Basekim, C.; Kizilkaya, E.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Objective: The purpose of the study was to differentiate between benign and malignant thyroid nodules using nodule-spinal cord signal intensity and nodule apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) ratios on diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Materials and methods: Forty-four patients (27 females, 17 males; mean age 49) with nodules who underwent diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) were included in this study. The images were acquired with 0, 50, 400 and 1000 s/mm 2 b values. ADC maps were calculated afterwards. Fine needle aspiration biopsies (FNAB) were performed at the same day with DW-MRI acquisition. The diagnosis in patients where malignity was detected after FNAB was confirmed by histopathologic analysis of the operation material. The signal intensities of the spinal cord and the nodule were measured additionally, over b-1000 diffusion weighted images. Nodule /cord signal intensity (SI) ratios were obtained and the digital values were calculated by dividing to ADC values estimated for each nodule. Statistical analysis was performed. Results: The (nodule SI-cord SI)/nodule ADC ratio is calculated in the DW images and a statistically significant relationship was found between this ratio and the histopathology of the nodules (p<0.001). The ratio was determined as 0.27 in benign, and 0.86 in malignant lesions. The result of ROC analysis was statistically significant, and the area under Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve (100%) was considerably high. The threshold value was calculated as 0.56 according to the ROC analysis. According to this threshold value, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and accuracy rates for (nodule SI/cord SI)/ADC ratios in differentiating benign from malignant thyroid nodules are calculated as 100%, 97%, 83%, 100%, and 98%, respectively. Conclusion: We have found that (nodule/cord SI)/ nodule ADC ratio has the highest values for

  12. Model-free and analytical EAP reconstruction via spherical polar Fourier diffusion MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jian; Ghosh, Aurobrata; Jiang, Tianzi; Deriche, Rachid

    2010-01-01

    How to estimate the diffusion Ensemble Average Propagator (EAP) from the DWI signals in q-space is an open problem in diffusion MRI field. Many methods were proposed to estimate the Orientation Distribution Function (ODF) that is used to describe the fiber direction. However, ODF is just one of the features of the EAP. Compared with ODF, EAP has the full information about the diffusion process which reflects the complex tissue micro-structure. Diffusion Orientation Transform (DOT) and Diffusion Spectrum Imaging (DSI) are two important methods to estimate the EAP from the signal. However, DOT is based on mono-exponential assumption and DSI needs a lot of samplings and very large b values. In this paper, we propose Spherical Polar Fourier Imaging (SPFI), a novel model-free fast robust analytical EAP reconstruction method, which almost does not need any assumption of data and does not need too many samplings. SPFI naturally combines the DWI signals with different b-values. It is an analytical linear transformation from the q-space signal to the EAP profile represented by Spherical Harmonics (SH). We validated the proposed methods in synthetic data, phantom data and real data. It works well in all experiments, especially for the data with low SNR, low anisotropy, and non-exponential decay.

  13. Time-optimized high-resolution readout-segmented diffusion tensor imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gernot Reishofer

    Full Text Available Readout-segmented echo planar imaging with 2D navigator-based reacquisition is an uprising technique enabling the sampling of high-resolution diffusion images with reduced susceptibility artifacts. However, low signal from the small voxels and long scan times hamper the clinical applicability. Therefore, we introduce a regularization algorithm based on total variation that is applied directly on the entire diffusion tensor. The spatially varying regularization parameter is determined automatically dependent on spatial variations in signal-to-noise ratio thus, avoiding over- or under-regularization. Information about the noise distribution in the diffusion tensor is extracted from the diffusion weighted images by means of complex independent component analysis. Moreover, the combination of those features enables processing of the diffusion data absolutely user independent. Tractography from in vivo data and from a software phantom demonstrate the advantage of the spatially varying regularization compared to un-regularized data with respect to parameters relevant for fiber-tracking such as Mean Fiber Length, Track Count, Volume and Voxel Count. Specifically, for in vivo data findings suggest that tractography results from the regularized diffusion tensor based on one measurement (16 min generates results comparable to the un-regularized data with three averages (48 min. This significant reduction in scan time renders high resolution (1 × 1 × 2.5 mm(3 diffusion tensor imaging of the entire brain applicable in a clinical context.

  14. Choice of reference measurements affects quantification of long diffusion time behaviour using stimulated echoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinnijenhuis, Michiel; Mollink, Jeroen; Lam, Wilfred W; Kinchesh, Paul; Khrapitchev, Alexandre A; Smart, Sean C; Jbabdi, Saad; Miller, Karla L

    2018-02-01

    To demonstrate how reference data affect the quantification of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in long diffusion time measurements with diffusion-weighted stimulated echo acquisition mode (DW-STEAM) measurements, and to present a modification to avoid contribution from crusher gradients in DW-STEAM. For DW-STEAM, reference measurements at long diffusion times have significant b 0 value, because b = 0 cannot be achieved in practice as a result of the need for signal spoiling. Two strategies for acquiring reference data over a range of diffusion times were considered: constant diffusion weighting (fixed-b 0 ) and constant gradient area (fixed-q 0 ). Fixed-b 0 and fixed-q 0 were compared using signal calculations for systems with one and two diffusion coefficients, and experimentally using data from postmortem human corpus callosum samples. Calculations of biexponential diffusion decay show that the ADC is underestimated for reference images with b > 0, which can induce an apparent time-dependence for fixed-q 0 . Restricted systems were also found to be affected. Experimentally, the exaggeration of the diffusion time-dependent effect under fixed-q 0 versus fixed-b 0 was in a range predicted theoretically, accounting for 62% (longitudinal) and 35% (radial) of the time dependence observed in white matter. Variation in the b-value of reference measurements in DW-STEAM can induce artificial diffusion time dependence in ADC, even in the absence of restriction. Magn Reson Med 79:952-959, 2018. © 2017 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. © 2017 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of

  15. Social multimedia signals a signal processing approach to social network phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, Suman Deb

    2014-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive coverage of the state-of-the-art in understanding media popularity and trends in online social networks through social multimedia signals. With insights from the study of popularity and sharing patterns of online media, trend spread in social media, social network analysis for multimedia and visualizing diffusion of media in online social networks. In particular, the book will address the following important issues: Understanding social network phenomena from a signal processing point of view; The existence and popularity of multimedia as shared and social me

  16. Innovation and creativity : Beyond diffusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Anders Ib

    2009-01-01

    of postwar systems theory and introduce Castoriadis' philosophy as an interesting option in this regard. It proceeds in four parts: (a) First, it debates the limits of the commonplace metaphor of diffusion and adoption in today's debate on innovation. (b) Second, it will present aspects of Castoriadis...

  17. Stability of Randomly Switched Diffusions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiøler, Henrik; Leth, John-Josef; Gholami, Mehdi

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides a sufficient criterion for ε-moment stability (boundedness) and ergodicity for a class of systems comprising a finite set of diffusions among which switching is governed by a continuous time Markov chain. Stability/instability properties for each separate subsystem are assumed...

  18. Evaluating Technology Transfer and Diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozeman, Barry; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Four articles discuss the evaluation of technology transfer and diffusion: (1) "Technology Transfer at the U.S. National Laboratories: A Framework for Evaluation"; (2) "Application of Social Psychological and Evaluation Research: Lessons from Energy Information Programs"; (3) "Technology and Knowledge Transfer in Energy R and D Laboratories: An…

  19. Less Confusion in Diffusion MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tax, CMW

    2016-01-01

    With its unique ability to investigate tissue architecture and microstructure in vivo, diffusion MRI (dMRI) has gained tremendous interest and the society has been continuously triggered to develop novel dMRI image analysis approaches. With the overwhelming amount of strategies currently available

  20. Diffuse and vascular hepatic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreimeyer, S.; Grenacher, L.

    2011-01-01

    In addition to focal liver lesions, diffuse and vascular disorders of the liver represent a wide spectrum of liver diseases which are from the radiological point of view often difficult or nearly impossible to diagnose. Classical diagnostic methods are computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in addition to ultrasound. Diffuse parenchymal damage caused by diseases of various etiologies is therefore difficult to evaluate because it often lacks characteristic morphological features. For hepatic steatosis, hemochromatosis/siderosis as an example of a diffuse storage disease and sarcoidosis and candidiasis as infectious/inflammatory diseases, an image-based diagnosis is appropriate in some cases. For most diffuse liver diseases, however only nonspecific changes are visualized. Vascular pathologies of the liver, such as the Budd-Chiari syndrome and portal vein thrombosis, however, can usually be diagnosed very clearly using radiology and there is also a very effective interventional radiological treatment. Chronic diseases very often culminate in liver cirrhosis which is highly associated with an increased risk of liver cancer. (orig.) [de

  1. Memory effects in turbulent diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagorodny, A.G.; Weiland, J.; Wilhelmsson, H.

    1993-01-01

    A non-Markovian approach is proposed for the derivation of the diffusion coefficient of saturated turbulence. A memory term accounting for nonlocal coherence effects is introduced in a new attempt to describe the transition between weak and strong turbulence. The result compares favourably with recent experiments as well as mode coupling simulations of fusion plasmas. (14 refs.)

  2. Diffusion of hydrogen in yttrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorobyov, V.V.; Ryabchikov, L.N.

    1966-01-01

    In this work the diffusion coefficients of hydrogen in yttrium were determined from the rate at which the hydrogen was released from yttrium samples under a vacuum at temperatures of 450 to 850 0 C and from the quantity of hydrogen retained by yttrium at hydrogen pressures below 5 x 10 - 4 mm Hg in the same temperature range

  3. Diffusion of student business incubators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortsø, Carsten Nico Portefée; Honig, Benson; Riis, Nina Louise Fynbo

    education. Applying neo-institutional theory, we examine the development of student incubation activities in the field of general state-funded Danish universities. We review institutional pressures from the political sphere that led to the diffusion of student incubation, introducing a three-phase process...

  4. Unexpected consequences of bedload diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devauchelle, O.; Abramian, A.; Lajeunesse, E.

    2017-12-01

    Sedimentary grains transported as bedload bump and bounce on the rough bed of the river that entrains them. The succession of these random events causes bedload particles to diffuse across the flow, towards the less active areas of the bed. In a fashion reminiscent of that proposed by Parker (1978) for suspended load, this mechanism opposes gravity to maintain the banks of alluvial rivers. In fact, diffusion is so tightly linked to bedload that it appears in the most basic sediment transport experiment--the straight channel we use to calibrate transport laws. Indeed, the fixed sides of the channel cause the flow, and thus the bed shear stress, to vary across the flume. This variation induces bedload diffusion, which in turn deforms the bed. As a consequence, to reliably calibrate a transport law, we need to measure the full profiles of shear stress and bedload transport, rather than bulk-average these quantities. Unfortunately, using a larger channel does not solve the problem, as a large aspect ratio favors the growth of streaks caused by a diffusion-induced instability. Based on these observations, we propose a different design for sediment transport experiments.

  5. Quasilinear diffusion in inhomogeneous plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooley, D.L.

    1975-05-01

    The problem of inhomogeneous diffusion in a plasma is considered with emphasis on its possible application to relativistic electron beams. A one-dimensional model with a background electrostatic field is used to illustrate the basic approach, which is then extended to a two-dimensional plasma with a background magnetic field. Only preliminary results are available. (U.S.)

  6. Tiny Molybdenites Tell Diffusion Tales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, H. J.; Hannah, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    Diffusion invokes micron-scale exchange during crystal growth and dissolution in magma chambers on short time-scales. Fundamental to interpreting such data are assumptions on magma-fluid dynamics at all scales. Nevertheless, elemental diffusion profiles are used to estimate time scales for magma storage, eruption, and recharge. An underutilized timepiece to evaluate diffusion and 3D mobility of magmatic fluids is high-precision Re-Os dating of molybdenite. With spatially unique molybdenite samples from a young ore system (e.g., 1 Ma) and a double Os spike, analytical errors of 1-3 ka unambiguously separate events in time. Re-Os ages show that hydrous shallow magma chambers locally recharge and expel Cu-Mo-Au-silica as superimposed stockwork vein networks at time scales less than a few thousand years [1]. Re-Os ages provide diffusion rates controlled by a dynamic crystal mush, accumulation and expulsion of metalliferous fluid, and magma reorganization after explosive crystallization events. Importantly, this approach has broad application far from ore deposits. Here, we use Re-Os dating of molybdenite to assess time scales for generating and diffusing metals through the deep crust. To maximize opportunity for chemical diffusion, we use a continental-scale Sveconorwegian mylonite zone for the study area. A geologically constrained suite of molybdenite samples was acquired from quarry exposures. Molybdenite, previously unreported, is extremely scarce. Tiny but telling molybdenites include samples from like occurrences to assure geologic accuracy in Re-Os ages. Ages range from mid-Mesoproterozoic to mid-Neoproterozoic, and correspond to early metamorphic dehydration of a regionally widespread biotite-rich gneiss, localized melting of gneiss to form cm-m-scale K-feldspar ± quartz pods, development of vapor-rich, vuggy mm stringers that serve as volatile collection surfaces in felsic leucosomes, and low-angle (relative to foliation) cross-cutting cm-scale quartz veins

  7. WNT and DKK Determine Hair Follicle Spacing Through a Reaction-Diffusion Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sick, Stefanie; Reinker, Stefan; Timmer, Jens; Schlake, Thomas

    2006-12-01

    Mathematical reaction-diffusion models have been suggested to describe formation of animal pigmentation patterns and distribution of epidermal appendages. However, the crucial signals and in vivo mechanisms are still elusive. Here we identify WNT and its inhibitor DKK as primary determinants of murine hair follicle spacing, using a combined experimental and computational modeling approach. Transgenic DKK overexpression reduces overall appendage density. Moderate suppression of endogenous WNT signaling forces follicles to form clusters during an otherwise normal morphogenetic program. These results confirm predictions of a WNT/DKK-specific mathematical model and provide in vivo corroboration of the reaction-diffusion mechanism for epidermal appendage formation.

  8. The Role of Diffusion-Weighted MRI in Differentiation of Idiopathic Acute Transverse Myelitis and Acute Spinal Cord Infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yeo Goon; Lee, Joon Woo; Kim, Jae Hyoung; Kang, Heung Sik; Park, Kyung Seok

    2011-01-01

    To compare the diffusion characteristics of idiopathic acute transverse myelitis (ATM) and acute spinal cord infarction (SCI). Diffusion-weighted images (DWI) and an apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) map were prospectively obtained from patients diagnosed with myelopathy between February 2006 and April 2009. Inclusion criteria included 1) the presence of an intramedullary T2-high signal intensity and 2) a final diagnosis of idiopathic ATM or SCI established by one neurologist. In total, 13 patients (M : F = 8 : 5; mean age, 39.5 years; range, 29-50 years) with idiopathic ATM and seven patients (M : F = 2 : 5; mean age, 58 years; range, 48-75 years) with SCI were included in this study. Two radiologists evaluated the DWIs and ADC map in consensus. The extent of the cord signal change was also evaluated on T2-weighted sagittal images. Among the 16 patients with ATM, 14 patients showed iso-signal on an ADC map, but one case showed restricted diffusion and another showed increased diffusion on the ADC map. Among the seven patients with SCI, five patients showed restricted diffusion. Idiopathic ATM usually does not demonstrate restricted diffusion, which can be a clue to differentiate it from SCI. However, idiopathic ATM with larger segment involvement can show focal diffusion restriction.

  9. Wright-Fisher diffusion bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Robert C; Jenkins, Paul A; Spanò, Dario

    2017-10-06

    The trajectory of the frequency of an allele which begins at x at time 0 and is known to have frequency z at time T can be modelled by the bridge process of the Wright-Fisher diffusion. Bridges when x=z=0 are particularly interesting because they model the trajectory of the frequency of an allele which appears at a time, then is lost by random drift or mutation after a time T. The coalescent genealogy back in time of a population in a neutral Wright-Fisher diffusion process is well understood. In this paper we obtain a new interpretation of the coalescent genealogy of the population in a bridge from a time t∈(0,T). In a bridge with allele frequencies of 0 at times 0 and T the coalescence structure is that the population coalesces in two directions from t to 0 and t to T such that there is just one lineage of the allele under consideration at times 0 and T. The genealogy in Wright-Fisher diffusion bridges with selection is more complex than in the neutral model, but still with the property of the population branching and coalescing in two directions from time t∈(0,T). The density of the frequency of an allele at time t is expressed in a way that shows coalescence in the two directions. A new algorithm for exact simulation of a neutral Wright-Fisher bridge is derived. This follows from knowing the density of the frequency in a bridge and exact simulation from the Wright-Fisher diffusion. The genealogy of the neutral Wright-Fisher bridge is also modelled by branching Pólya urns, extending a representation in a Wright-Fisher diffusion. This is a new very interesting representation that relates Wright-Fisher bridges to classical urn models in a Bayesian setting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Turbulent diffusion of small particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margolin, L.G.

    1977-11-01

    The diffusion of small, spherical, rigid particles suspended in an incompressible turbulent fluid, but not interacting with each other, was studied. As a stochastic process, the turbulent fluid velocity field is assumed to be homogeneous, isotropic and stationary. Assuming the Stokes regime, a particle of equation of motion is used which includes only the effects of Stokes drag and a virtual mass force and an exact solution is found for the particle velocity correlation function, for all times and initial conditions, in terms of a fluid velocity correlation function measured along the motion of the particle. This shows that for times larger than a certain time scale, the particle velocity correlation becomes stationary. The effect of small shears in the fluid velocity was considered, under the additional restrictions of a certain high frequency regime for the turbulence. The shears convected past the particle much faster than the growth of the boundary layer. New force terms due to the presence of such shears are calculated and incorporated into the equation of motion. A perturbation solution to this equation is constructed, and the resultant particle velocity correlation function and diffusion coefficient are calculated. To lowest order, the particle diffusivity is found to be unaltered by the presence of small mean flow shears. The last model treated is one in which particles traverse a turbulent fluid with a large mean velocity. Among other restrictions, linearized form drag is assumed. The diffusion coefficient for such particles was calculated, and found to be much smaller than the passive scalar diffusion coefficient. This agrees within 5 percent with the experimental results of Snyder and Lumley

  11. Diffusion of oxygen in cork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lequin, Sonia; Chassagne, David; Karbowiak, Thomas; Simon, Jean-Marc; Paulin, Christian; Bellat, Jean-Pierre

    2012-04-04

    This work reports measurements of effective oxygen diffusion coefficient in raw cork. Kinetics of oxygen transfer through cork is studied at 298 K thanks to a homemade manometric device composed of two gas compartments separated by a cork wafer sample. The first compartment contains oxygen, whereas the second one is kept under dynamic vacuum. The pressure decrease in the first compartment is recorded as a function of time. The effective diffusion coefficient D(eff) is obtained by applying Fick's law to transient state using a numerical method based on finite differences. An analytical model derived from Fick's law applied to steady state is also proposed. Results given by these two methods are in close agreement with each other. The harmonic average of the effective diffusion coefficients obtained from the distribution of 15 cork wafers of 3 mm thickness is 1.1 × 10(-9) m(2) s(-1) with a large distribution over four decades. The statistical analysis of the Gaussian distribution obtained on a 3 mm cork wafer is extrapolated to a 48 mm cork wafer, which length corresponds to a full cork stopper. In this case, the probability density distribution gives a mean value of D(eff) equal to 1.6 × 10(-9) m(2) s(-1). This result shows that it is possible to obtain the effective diffusion coefficient of oxygen through cork from short time (few days) measurements performed on a thin cork wafer, whereas months are required to obtain the diffusion coefficient for a full cork stopper. Permeability and oxygen transfer rate are also calculated for comparison with data from other studies.

  12. Imaging brain microstructure with diffusion MRI: practicality and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Daniel C; Dyrby, Tim B; Nilsson, Markus; Zhang, Hui

    2017-11-29

    This article gives an overview of microstructure imaging of the brain with diffusion MRI and reviews the state of the art. The microstructure-imaging paradigm aims to estimate and map microscopic properties of tissue using a model that links these properties to the voxel scale MR signal. Imaging techniques of this type are just starting to make the transition from the technical research domain to wide application in biomedical studies. We focus here on the practicalities of both implementing such techniques and using them in applications. Specifically, the article summarizes the relevant aspects of brain microanatomy and the range of diffusion-weighted MR measurements that provide sensitivity to them. It then reviews the evolution of mathematical and computational models that relate the diffusion MR signal to brain tissue microstructure, as well as the expanding areas of application. Next we focus on practicalities of designing a working microstructure imaging technique: model selection, experiment design, parameter estimation, validation, and the pipeline of development of this class of technique. The article concludes with some future perspectives on opportunities in this topic and expectations on how the field will evolve in the short-to-medium term. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Contribution of diffusion-weighted MR imaging for predicting benignity of complex adnexal masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomassin-Naggara, Isabelle; Darai, Emile; Cuenod, Charles A.; Fournier, Laure; Toussaint, Irwin; Marsault, Claude; Bazot, Marc

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to prospectively assess the contribution of diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) for characterizing complex adnexal masses. Seventy-seven women (22-87 years old) with complex adnexal masses (30 benign and 47 malignant) underwent MR imaging including DWI before surgery. Conventional morphological MR imaging criteria were recorded in addition to b 1,000 signal intensity and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurements of cystic and solid components. Positive likelihood ratios (PLR) were calculated for predicting benignity and malignancy. The most significant criteria for predicting benignity were low b 1,000 signal intensity within the solid component (PLR = 10.9), low T2 signal intensity within the solid component (PLR = 5.7), absence of solid portion (PLR = 3.1), absence of ascites or peritoneal implants (PLR = 2.3) and absence of papillary projections (PLR = 2.3). ADC measurements did not contribute to differentiating benign from malignant adnexal masses. All masses that displayed simultaneously low signal intensity within the solid component on T2-weighted and on b 1,000 diffusion-weighted images were benign. Alternatively, the presence of a solid component with intermediate T2 signal and high b 1,000 signal intensity was associated with a PLR of 4.5 for a malignant adnexal tumour. DWI signal intensity is an accurate tool for predicting benignity of complex adnexal masses. (orig.)

  14. Contribution of diffusion-weighted MR imaging for predicting benignity of complex adnexal masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomassin-Naggara, Isabelle [Hopital Tenon, Assistance Publique Hopitaux de Pariss, Department of Radiology, Paris (France); Universite Rene Descartes, LRI-EA4062, Paris (France); Darai, Emile [Hopital Tenon, Assistance Publique Hopitaux de Pariss, Department of Gynecology-Obstetrics, Paris (France); Cuenod, Charles A.; Fournier, Laure [Universite Rene Descartes, LRI-EA4062, Paris (France); Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou (HEGP), Assistance Publique Hopitaux de Paris, Department of Radiology, Paris (France); Toussaint, Irwin; Marsault, Claude; Bazot, Marc [Hopital Tenon, Assistance Publique Hopitaux de Pariss, Department of Radiology, Paris (France)

    2009-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to prospectively assess the contribution of diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) for characterizing complex adnexal masses. Seventy-seven women (22-87 years old) with complex adnexal masses (30 benign and 47 malignant) underwent MR imaging including DWI before surgery. Conventional morphological MR imaging criteria were recorded in addition to b{sub 1,000} signal intensity and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurements of cystic and solid components. Positive likelihood ratios (PLR) were calculated for predicting benignity and malignancy. The most significant criteria for predicting benignity were low b{sub 1,000} signal intensity within the solid component (PLR = 10.9), low T2 signal intensity within the solid component (PLR = 5.7), absence of solid portion (PLR = 3.1), absence of ascites or peritoneal implants (PLR = 2.3) and absence of papillary projections (PLR = 2.3). ADC measurements did not contribute to differentiating benign from malignant adnexal masses. All masses that displayed simultaneously low signal intensity within the solid component on T2-weighted and on b{sub 1,000} diffusion-weighted images were benign. Alternatively, the presence of a solid component with intermediate T2 signal and high b{sub 1,000} signal intensity was associated with a PLR of 4.5 for a malignant adnexal tumour. DWI signal intensity is an accurate tool for predicting benignity of complex adnexal masses. (orig.)

  15. Signal sciences workshop proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candy, J.V.

    1997-05-01

    This meeting is aimed primarily at signal processing and controls. The technical program for the 1997 Workshop includes a variety of efforts in the Signal Sciences with applications in the Microtechnology Area a new program at LLNL and a future area of application for both Signal/Image Sciences. Special sessions organized by various individuals in Seismic and Optical Signal Processing as well as Micro-Impulse Radar Processing highlight the program, while the speakers at the Signal Processing Applications session discuss various applications of signal processing/control to real world problems. For the more theoretical, a session on Signal Processing Algorithms was organized as well as for the more pragmatic, featuring a session on Real-Time Signal Processing.

  16. Signal sciences workshop. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Candy, J.V.

    1997-01-01

    This meeting is aimed primarily at signal processing and controls. The technical program for the 1997 Workshop includes a variety of efforts in the Signal Sciences with applications in the Microtechnology Area a new program at LLNL and a future area of application for both Signal/Image Sciences. Special sessions organized by various individuals in Seismic and Optical Signal Processing as well as Micro-Impulse Radar Processing highlight the program, while the speakers at the Signal Processing Applications session discuss various applications of signal processing/control to real world problems. For the more theoretical, a session on Signal Processing Algorithms was organized as well as for the more pragmatic, featuring a session on Real-Time Signal Processing

  17. Propagator formalism and computer simulation of restricted diffusion behaviors of inter-molecular multiple-quantum coherences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Congbo; Chen Zhong; Cai Shuhui; Zhong Jianhui

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, behaviors of single-quantum coherences and inter-molecular multiple-quantum coherences under restricted diffusion in nuclear magnetic resonance experiments were investigated. The propagator formalism based on the loss of spin phase memory during random motion was applied to describe the diffusion-induced signal attenuation. The exact expression of the signal attenuation under the short gradient pulse approximation for restricted diffusion between two parallel plates was obtained using this propagator method. For long gradient pulses, a modified formalism was proposed. The simulated signal attenuation under the effects of gradient pulses of different width based on the Monte Carlo method agrees with the theoretical predictions. The propagator formalism and computer simulation can provide convenient, intuitive and precise methods for the study of the diffusion behaviors

  18. In vivo P-31 MR diffusion spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moonen, C.T.W.; Vanzijl, P.C.M.; LeBihan, D.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses the Stejskal-Tanner diffusion spin-echo sequence modified for the in vivo diffusion spectroscopy. The apparent diffusion constant D α was measured as a function of the diffusion time. Contrary to the results in phantom samples, a strong dependency of the D α for phosphocreatine (PCr) in the rat muscle tissue on diffusion time was observed, clearly indicating restricted diffusion effects and allowing an approximation of the size of the restricted volume (8-13 μm). This size fits well with the known dimensions of a normal muscle cell

  19. Diffraction and diffusion in room acoustics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindel, Jens Holger; Rasmussen, Birgit

    1996-01-01

    Diffraction and diffusion are two phenomena that are both related to the wave nature of sound. Diffraction due to the finite size of reflecting surfaces and the design of single reflectors and reflector arrays are discussed. Diffusion is the result of scattering of sound reflected from surfaces...... that are not plane but curved or irregular. The importance of diffusion has been demonstrated in concert halls. Methods for the design of diffusing surfaces and the development of new types of diffusers are reviewed. Finally, the importance of diffraction and diffusion in room acoustic computer models is discussed....

  20. Bayesian regularization of diffusion tensor images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Jesper; Hobolth, Asger; Østergaard, Leif

    2007-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is a powerful tool in the study of the course of nerve fibre bundles in the human brain. Using DTI, the local fibre orientation in each image voxel can be described by a diffusion tensor which is constructed from local measurements of diffusion coefficients along...... several directions. The measured diffusion coefficients and thereby the diffusion tensors are subject to noise, leading to possibly flawed representations of the three dimensional fibre bundles. In this paper we develop a Bayesian procedure for regularizing the diffusion tensor field, fully utilizing...

  1. ECG signal processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2009-01-01

    A system extracts an ECG signal from a composite signal (308) representing an electric measurement of a living subject. Identification means (304) identify a plurality of temporal segments (309) of the composite signal corresponding to a plurality of predetermined segments (202,204,206) of an ECG

  2. Optimal Signal Quality Index for Photoplethysmogram Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Elgendi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A photoplethysmogram (PPG is a noninvasive circulatory signal related to the pulsatile volume of blood in tissue and is typically collected by pulse oximeters. PPG signals collected via mobile devices are prone to artifacts that negatively impact measurement accuracy, which can lead to a significant number of misleading diagnoses. Given the rapidly increased use of mobile devices to collect PPG signals, developing an optimal signal quality index (SQI is essential to classify the signal quality from these devices. Eight SQIs were developed and tested based on: perfusion, kurtosis, skewness, relative power, non-stationarity, zero crossing, entropy, and the matching of systolic wave detectors. Two independent annotators annotated all PPG data (106 recordings, 60 s each and a third expert conducted the adjudication of differences. The independent annotators labeled each PPG signal with one of the following labels: excellent, acceptable or unfit for diagnosis. All indices were compared using Mahalanobis distance, linear discriminant analysis, quadratic discriminant analysis, and support vector machine with leave-one-out cross-validation. The skewness index outperformed the other seven indices in differentiating between excellent PPG and acceptable, acceptable combined with unfit, and unfit recordings, with overall F 1 scores of 86.0%, 87.2%, and 79.1%, respectively.

  3. Optimal Signal Quality Index for Photoplethysmogram Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgendi, Mohamed

    2016-09-22

    A photoplethysmogram (PPG) is a noninvasive circulatory signal related to the pulsatile volume of blood in tissue and is typically collected by pulse oximeters. PPG signals collected via mobile devices are prone to artifacts that negatively impact measurement accuracy, which can lead to a significant number of misleading diagnoses. Given the rapidly increased use of mobile devices to collect PPG signals, developing an optimal signal quality index (SQI) is essential to classify the signal quality from these devices. Eight SQIs were developed and tested based on: perfusion, kurtosis, skewness, relative power, non-stationarity, zero crossing, entropy, and the matching of systolic wave detectors. Two independent annotators annotated all PPG data (106 recordings, 60 s each) and a third expert conducted the adjudication of differences. The independent annotators labeled each PPG signal with one of the following labels: excellent, acceptable or unfit for diagnosis. All indices were compared using Mahalanobis distance, linear discriminant analysis, quadratic discriminant analysis, and support vector machine with leave-one-out cross-validation. The skewness index outperformed the other seven indices in differentiating between excellent PPG and acceptable, acceptable combined with unfit, and unfit recordings, with overall F 1 scores of 86.0%, 87.2%, and 79.1%, respectively.

  4. Conspicuity of diffuse axonal injury lesions on diffusion-weighted MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Toshibumi; Moritani, Toshio; Hiwatashi, Akio; Wang, Henry Z.; Shrier, David A.; Numaguchi, Yuji; Westesson, Per-Lennart A.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: (1) To detect diffuse axonal injury (DAI) lesions by diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), as compared with fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) imaging and (2) to evaluate hemorrhagic DAI lesions by b 0 images obtained from DWI, as compared with gradient-echo (GRE) imaging. Methods: We reviewed MR images of 36 patients with a diagnosis of DAI. MR imaging was performed 20 h to 14 days (mean, 3.7 days) after traumatic brain injury. We evaluated: (1) conspicuity of lesions on DWI and FLAIR and (2) conspicuity of hemorrhage in DAI lesions on b 0 images and GRE imaging. Results: DWI clearly depicted high-signal DAI lesions. The sensitivity of DWI to lesional conspicuity in DAI lesions was almost equal to that of FLAIR. The sensitivity of b 0 images to identification of hemorrhagic DAI lesions was inferior to that of GRE. Conclusion: DWI is as useful as FLAIR in detecting DAI lesions. GRE imaging is still the superior tool for the evaluation of hemorrhagic DAI

  5. Conspicuity of diffuse axonal injury lesions on diffusion-weighted MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinoshita, Toshibumi [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology, University of Rochester Medical Center, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Box 648, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States)]. E-mail: kino@grape.med.tottori-u.ac.jp; Moritani, Toshio [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology, University of Rochester Medical Center, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Box 648, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States); Hiwatashi, Akio [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology, University of Rochester Medical Center, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Box 648, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States); Wang, Henry Z. [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology, University of Rochester Medical Center, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Box 648, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States); Shrier, David A. [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology, University of Rochester Medical Center, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Box 648, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States); Numaguchi, Yuji [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology, University of Rochester Medical Center, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Box 648, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States); Westesson, Per-Lennart A. [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology, University of Rochester Medical Center, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Box 648, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States)

    2005-10-01

    Objective: (1) To detect diffuse axonal injury (DAI) lesions by diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), as compared with fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) imaging and (2) to evaluate hemorrhagic DAI lesions by b{sub 0} images obtained from DWI, as compared with gradient-echo (GRE) imaging. Methods: We reviewed MR images of 36 patients with a diagnosis of DAI. MR imaging was performed 20 h to 14 days (mean, 3.7 days) after traumatic brain injury. We evaluated: (1) conspicuity of lesions on DWI and FLAIR and (2) conspicuity of hemorrhage in DAI lesions on b{sub 0} images and GRE imaging. Results: DWI clearly depicted high-signal DAI lesions. The sensitivity of DWI to lesional conspicuity in DAI lesions was almost equal to that of FLAIR. The sensitivity of b{sub 0} images to identification of hemorrhagic DAI lesions was inferior to that of GRE. Conclusion: DWI is as useful as FLAIR in detecting DAI lesions. GRE imaging is still the superior tool for the evaluation of hemorrhagic DAI.

  6. Diffusing diffusivity: a new derivation and comparison with simulations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rohit Jain

    active media, where the relation of Eq.(1) is not valid at all times.4–6 ... tional diffusion of dumbbells in 2D porous media of stationary hard ..... reflecting boundary condition at D = 0, i.e., πeq(D) = 1. D0 .... Superdiffusion and viscoelastic vortex flows in a two- .... gator for Free, Linear, and Harmonic Potentials in the. Over- and ...

  7. Oceanic diffusion in the coastal area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rukuda, Masaaki

    1980-03-01

    Described in this paper is the eddy diffusion in the area off Tokai Village investigated by means of dye diffusion experiment and of oceanic observation. In order to assess the oceanic diffusion in coastal areas, improved methods effective in complex field were developed. The oceanic diffusion was separated in two groups, horizontal and vertical diffusion respectively. Both these diffusions are combined and their analysis together is difficult. The oceanic diffusion is thus considered separately. Instantaneous point release is the basis of horizontal diffusion analysis. Continuous release is then the overlap of numerous instantaneous releases. It was shown that the diffusion parameters derived from the results of diffusion experiment or oceanic observation vary widely with time and place and with sea conditions. A simple diffusion equation was developed from the equation of continuity. The results were in good agreement with seasonal mean horizontal distribution of river water in the sea area. The vertical observation in diffusion experiment is difficult and the vertical structure of oceanic condition is complex, so that the research on vertical diffusion generally is not advanced yet. With river water as the tracer, a method of estimating vertical diffusion parameters with a Gaussian model or one-dimensional model was developed. The vertical diffusion near sea bottom was numerically analized with suspended particles in seawater as the tracer. Diffusion was computed for each particle size, and by summing up the vertical distribution of beam attenuation coefficient was estimated. By comparing the results of estimation and those of observation the vertical diffusivity and the particle size distribution at sea bottom could be estimated. (author)

  8. Second-hand signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergenholtz, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Studies of signaling theory have traditionally focused on the dyadic link between the sender and receiver of the signal. Within a science‐based perspective this framing has led scholars to investigate how patents and publications of firms function as signals. I explore another important type...... used by various agents in their search for and assessment of products and firms. I conclude by arguing how this second‐hand nature of signals goes beyond a simple dyadic focus on senders and receivers of signals, and thus elucidates the more complex interrelations of the various types of agents...

  9. Survival probability of diffusion with trapping in cellular neurobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcman, David; Marchewka, Avi; Schuss, Zeev

    2005-09-01

    The problem of diffusion with absorption and trapping sites arises in the theory of molecular signaling inside and on the membranes of biological cells. In particular, this problem arises in the case of spine-dendrite communication, where the number of calcium ions, modeled as random particles, is regulated across the spine microstructure by pumps, which play the role of killing sites, while the end of the dendritic shaft is an absorbing boundary. We develop a general mathematical framework for diffusion in the presence of absorption and killing sites and apply it to the computation of the time-dependent survival probability of ions. We also compute the ratio of the number of absorbed particles at a specific location to the number of killed particles. We show that the ratio depends on the distribution of killing sites. The biological consequence is that the position of the pumps regulates the fraction of calcium ions that reach the dendrite.

  10. Form of multicomponent Fickian diffusion coefficients matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wambui Mutoru, J.; Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Irreversible thermodynamics establishes form of multicomponent diffusion coefficients. → Phenomenological coefficients and thermodynamic factors affect sign of diffusion coefficients. → Negative diagonal elements of diffusion coefficients matrix can occur in non-ideal mixtures. → Eigenvalues of the matrix of Fickian diffusion coefficients may not be all real. - Abstract: The form of multicomponent Fickian diffusion coefficients matrix in thermodynamically stable mixtures is established based on the form of phenomenological coefficients and thermodynamic factors. While phenomenological coefficients form a symmetric positive definite matrix, the determinant of thermodynamic factors matrix is positive. As a result, the Fickian diffusion coefficients matrix has a positive determinant, but its elements - including diagonal elements - can be negative. Comprehensive survey of reported diffusion coefficients data for ternary and quaternary mixtures, confirms that invariably the determinant of the Fickian diffusion coefficients matrix is positive.

  11. Tracer surface diffusion on UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, S.Y.; Olander, D.R.

    1983-06-01

    Surface diffusion on UO 2 was measured by the spreading of U-234 tracer on the surface of a duplex diffusion couple consisting of wafers of depleted and enriched UO 2 joined by a bond of uranium metal

  12. Diffus lungesygdom hos børn

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchvald, Frederik; Nielsen, Kim G

    2014-01-01

    Diffuse lung disease in children represents a heterogeneous group of respiratory disorders with high morbidity and mortality. Typical features include tachypnoea, failure to thrive, diffuse radiological and histopathological abnormalities. Advances in genetics and pathophysiology, combined...

  13. Enhancing Rotational Diffusion Using Oscillatory Shear

    KAUST Repository

    Leahy, Brian D.; Cheng, Xiang; Ong, Desmond C.; Liddell-Watson, Chekesha; Cohen, Itai

    2013-01-01

    Taylor dispersion - shear-induced enhancement of translational diffusion - is an important phenomenon with applications ranging from pharmacology to geology. Through experiments and simulations, we show that rotational diffusion is also enhanced

  14. Nonlinear Cross-Diffusion with Size Exclusion

    KAUST Repository

    Burger, Martin; Di Francesco, Marco; Pietschmann, Jan-Frederik; Schlake, Bä rbel

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the mathematical properties of a continuum model for diffusion of multiple species incorporating size exclusion effects. The system for two species leads to nonlinear cross-diffusion terms with double

  15. Long range diffusion of hydrogen in yttrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, I.S.; Scherrer, P.; Ross, D.K.

    1989-01-01

    The diffusion of H in single crystals of YH 0.2 is investigated by means of Quasielastic neutron scattering between 593 K and 695 K. Individual jump rates giving rise to long range and local diffusion are determined. (orig.)

  16. Theory and experiments on surface diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silvestri, W.L.

    1998-11-01

    The following topics were dealt with: adatom formation and self-diffusion on the Ni(100) surface, helium atom scattering measurements, surface-diffusion parameter measurements, embedded atom method calculations.

  17. Diffusion-weighted echo-planar MRI of lacunar infarcts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguchi, K.; Nagayoshi, T.; Watanabe, N.; Kanazawa, T.; Toyoshima, S.; Morijiri, M.; Shojaku, H.; Shimizu, M.; Seto, H.

    1998-01-01

    We studied 35 patients with lacunar infarcts, using diffusion-weighted echo-planar imaging (DW-EPI) at 1.5 T. The relative apparent diffusion coefficient ratio (ADCR) of each lesion was calculated and lesion conspicuity on DW-EPI was compared to that on images aquired with fast fluid-attenuated inversion recovery and T2-weighted fast spin-echo sequences. Acute small infarcts (within 3 days) were identified with DW-EPI as an area of decreased ADCR (range 0.33-0.87; mean 0.67) and high signal, subacute small infarcts (4-30 days) as a high-signal or isointense areas of decreased or nearly normal ADCR (0.54-0.98; 0.73), and chronic small infarcts (> 30 days) as low- or high-signal areas of nearly normal or increased ADCR (0.97-1.92; 1.32). In three patients, small infarcts of the brain stem in the hyperacute phase (within 6 h) were seen only with DW-EPI. In five patients, fresh small infarcts adjacent to multiple old infarcts could be distinguished only with DW-EPI. (orig.)

  18. Inverse diffusion theory of photoacoustics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bal, Guillaume; Uhlmann, Gunther

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyzes the reconstruction of diffusion and absorption parameters in an elliptic equation from knowledge of internal data. In the application of photoacoustics, the internal data are the amount of thermal energy deposited by high frequency radiation propagating inside a domain of interest. These data are obtained by solving an inverse wave equation, which is well studied in the literature. We show that knowledge of two internal data based on well-chosen boundary conditions uniquely determines two constitutive parameters in diffusion and Schrödinger equations. Stability of the reconstruction is guaranteed under additional geometric constraints of strict convexity. No geometric constraints are necessary when 2n internal data for well-chosen boundary conditions are available, where n is spatial dimension. The set of well-chosen boundary conditions is characterized in terms of appropriate complex geometrical optics solutions

  19. Massively parallel diffuse optical tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandusky, John V.; Pitts, Todd A.

    2017-09-05

    Diffuse optical tomography systems and methods are described herein. In a general embodiment, the diffuse optical tomography system comprises a plurality of sensor heads, the plurality of sensor heads comprising respective optical emitter systems and respective sensor systems. A sensor head in the plurality of sensors heads is caused to act as an illuminator, such that its optical emitter system transmits a transillumination beam towards a portion of a sample. Other sensor heads in the plurality of sensor heads act as observers, detecting portions of the transillumination beam that radiate from the sample in the fields of view of the respective sensory systems of the other sensor heads. Thus, sensor heads in the plurality of sensors heads generate sensor data in parallel.

  20. Devil's in the (diffuse) detail

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welberry, R.

    2006-07-01

    X-ray crystallography is an important workhorse in the world of solid-state chemistry. However, while it's a powerful tool in determining the average structure in a crystal lattice, conventional crystallography is very limited when it comes to understanding nano-scale disorder within that crystal structure. And when it comes to understanding the properties of many important materials, the devil is in the detail. X-ray diffraction is still one of the keys to understanding this finer scale structure but using it requires a capacity to read between the lines - to understand the diffuse diffraction that most crystallography ignores. Scientists at the Research School of Chemistry are leading the world in this field. Their work on modelling nano-scaled disorder using diffuse diffraction is opening up new possibilities in understanding and modifying many of our most important materials