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Sample records for malaysian medical council

  1. Proceedings in a disciplinary action at the Malaysian Medical Council.

    Mahmud, M N

    2005-08-01

    Members of the medical profession are expected to be well aware and abide by the revised code of ethics adopted by the Malaysian Medical Council on 9th December 1986. Under the Act Council may, in the exercise of its disciplinary jurisdiction, impose punishments related to misconduct or malpractices. When a complaint or information is made against any practitioner, the President shall forward such complaint to the Chairman of the Preliminary Investigation Committee. The procedure of the disciplinary inquiry is not exactly like those in the court of law but the same principle of justice is adhered to and all evidence used to make a decision must only be those that are admissible in accordance with the rule of evidence.

  2. Malaysian Journal of Medical Sciences’ Publishing Report (2014–2015)

    Zulkapli, Nour Azimah; Sobi, Suhana; Mohd Zubaidi, Nor Azlina; Abdullah, Jafri Malin

    2016-01-01

    The Malaysian Journal of Medical Sciences (MJMS) has conducted a simple analysis of its scholarly publication, based on the auto-generated data compiled from ScholarOne Manuscripts™, an innovative, web-based, submission and peer-review workflow solution for scholarly publishers. The performance of the MJMS from 2014–2015 is reported on in this editorial, with a focus on the pattern of manuscript submission, geographical contributors and the acceptance-rejection rate. The total number of manuscript submissions has increased from 264 in 2014, to 272 in 2015. Malaysians are the main contributors to the MJMS. The total number of manuscript rejections following the review process was 79 (29.9%) in 2014, increasing to 92 (33.8%) the following year, in accordance with the exacting quality control criteria applied by the journal’s editor to the submitted manuscripts. PMID:27660539

  3. Malaysian Journal of Medical Sciences Striving towards Visibility

    GHAZLI, Nur Farahin; ABDULLAH, Jafri Malin

    2013-01-01

    The Malaysian Journal of Medical Sciences has in its 25 years “Silver Jubilee” achieved another milestone of being visible to the biomedical community when it was accepted in PubMed. The journal aim to increase its readership so as to increase impact in the biomedical field amongst its Asian readers despite having a high rejection rate. This was done to maintain quality of the manuscripts published over the years. PubMed listing should enable more manuscripts to be cited as its the leading biomedical journal for the Asian community. PMID:24043990

  4. Curricular trends in Malaysian medical schools: innovations within.

    Azila, Nor Mohd Adnan; Rogayah, Jaafar; Zabidi-Hussin, Zabidi Azhar Mohd Hussin

    2006-09-01

    Various curricular innovations were adopted by medical schools worldwide in an attempt to produce medical graduates that could meet future healthcare needs of society locally and globally. This paper presents findings on curricular approaches implemented in Malaysian medical schools, in trying to meet those needs. Information was obtained from published records, responses from various questionnaires, personal communication and involvement with curricular development. Curricular innovations tended to be implemented in new medical schools upon their establishment. Established medical schools seemed to implement these innovations much later. Curricular trends appear to move towards integration, student-centred and problem-based learning as well as community-oriented medical education, with the Student-centred learning, Problem-based learning, Integrated teaching, Community-based education, Electives and Systematic programme (SPICES) model used as a reference. The focus is based on the premise that although the short-term aim of undergraduate medical education in Malaysia is to prepare graduates for the pre-registration house officer year, they must be able to practise and make decisions independently and be sensitive to the needs of the country's multiracial, multi-religious, and often remote communities. In most cases, curricular planning starts with a prescriptive model where planners focus on several intended outcomes. However, as the plan is implemented and evaluated it becomes descriptive as the planners reassess the internal and external factors that affect outcomes. A common trend in community-oriented educational activities is evident, with the introduction of interesting variations, to ensure that the curriculum can be implemented, sustained and the intended outcomes achieved.

  5. Medical students' attitudes toward abortion education: Malaysian perspective.

    Nai-peng Tey

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Abortion is a serious public health issue, and it poses high risks to the health and life of women. Yet safe abortion services are not readily available because few doctors are trained to provide such services. Many doctors are unaware of laws pertaining to abortion. This article reports survey findings on Malaysian medical students' attitudes toward abortion education and presents a case for including abortion education in medical schools. METHODS AND RESULTS: A survey on knowledge of and attitudes toward abortion among medical students was conducted in two public universities and a private university in Malaysia in 2011. A total of 1,060 students returned the completed questionnaires. The survey covered about 90% of medical students in Years 1, 3, and 5 in the three universities. About 90% of the students wanted more training on the general knowledge and legal aspects of abortion, and pre-and post-abortion counseling. Overall, 75.9% and 81.0% of the students were in favor of including in medical education the training on surgical abortion techniques and medical abortion, respectively. Only 2.4% and 1.7% were opposed to the inclusion of training of these two methods in the curriculum. The remaining respondents were neutral in their stand. Desire for more abortion education was associated with students' pro-choice index, their intention to provide abortion services in future practice, and year of study. However, students' attitudes toward abortion were not significantly associated with gender, type of university, or ethnicity. CONCLUSIONS: Most students wanted more training on abortion. Some students also expressed their intention to provide abortion counseling and services in their future practice. Their desire for more training on abortion should be taken into account in the new curriculum. Abortion education is an important step towards making available safe abortion services to enable women to exercise their reproductive rights.

  6. Anatomy learning styles and strategies among Jordanian and Malaysian medical students: the impact of culture on learning anatomy.

    Mustafa, Ayman G; Allouh, Mohammed Z; Mustafa, Intisar G; Hoja, Ibrahim M

    2013-07-01

    The study aims to investigate anatomy learning styles and strategies of Jordanian and Malaysian medical students at the Jordan University of Science and Technology. The study is a cross-sectional questionnaire-based study. Students' responses for the questionnaire were numerically coded, and the results were analyzed to reveal statistically significant differences between Jordanian and Malaysian students. The results showed that Jordanian medical students were less interested in using cadavers in learning anatomy than Malaysian medical students. However, similar to their Malaysian counterparts, they prefer to employ other tools to learn anatomy like plastinated models and Internet-based resources. In addition to the aforementioned tools, Malaysian students were more interested in using cross-sectional images and making their own revision cards. Both Jordanian and Malaysian medical students were more interested in learning anatomy through clinical cases, and by system rather than by region. Moreover, it was revealed that Jordanian medical students learn anatomy more efficiently when they formulate a general view of a particular topic. Both Jordanian and Malaysian medical students also relied on reciting definitions and memorizing facts to learn anatomy. The study also reported significant differences between Jordanian and Malaysian students' perspectives on learning anatomy. The findings of the study suggest that Jordanian and Malaysian medical students posses different cultures of learning. Jordanian anatomy instructors need to consider these different learning cultures when they prepare their instructional methods and teaching materials to fulfill the educational needs of their culturally diverse students.

  7. Psychometric properties of the mentor behaviour scale in a sample of Malaysian medical students

    Jamilah A.M. Mohammad, MEd

    2018-02-01

    Conclusion: MBS demonstrates a satisfactory level of construct validity and a high level of internal consistency in measuring supportive mentor behaviours in a medical school setting. This result suggests that MBS can be used as a mentorship evaluation tool for feedback in the context of a Malaysian medical school.

  8. Modifying the Medical Research Council grading system through Rasch analyses

    Vanhoutte, Els Karla; Faber, Catharina Gerritdina; van Nes, Sonja Ingrid; Jacobs, Bart Casper; van Doorn, Pieter Antoon; van Koningsveld, Rinske; Cornblath, David Reid; van der Kooi, Anneke Jelly; Cats, Elisabeth Aviva; van den Berg, Leonard Hendrik; Notermans, Nicolette Claudia; van der Pol, Willem Lodewijk; Hermans, Mieke Catharina Elisabeth; van der Beek, Nadine Anna Maria Elisabeth; Gorson, Kenneth Craig; Eurelings, Marijke; Engelsman, Jeroen; Boot, Hendrik; Meijer, Ronaldus Jacobus; Lauria, Giuseppe; Tennant, Alan; Merkies, Ingemar Sergio José; Barreira, A. A.; Bennett, D.; van den Bergh, P. Y. K.; Bril, V.; Devigili, G.; Hadden, R. D.; Hahn, A. F.; Hartung, H.-P.; Hughes, R. A. C.; Illa, I.; Katzberg, H.; Léger, J.-M.; Lewis, R. A.; Lunn, M. P. T.; Nascimento, O. J. M.; Nobile-Orazio, E.; Padua, L.; Pouget, J.; Reilly, M. M.; van Schaik, I.; Smith, B.; de Visser, M.; Walk, D.

    2012-01-01

    The Medical Research Council grading system has served through decades for the evaluation of muscle strength and has been recognized as a cardinal feature of daily neurological, rehabilitation and general medicine examination of patients, despite being respectfully criticized due to the unequal

  9. Modifying the Medical Research Council grading system through Rasch analyses

    E.K. Vanhoutte (Els); C.G. Faber (Carin); S.I. van Nes (Sonja); B.C. Jacobs (Bart); P.A. van Doorn (Pieter); R. van Koningsveld (Rinske); D.R. Cornblath (David); A.J. Kooj (Anneke); E.A. Cats (Elisabeth); L.H. van den Berg (Leonard); N.C. Notermans (Nicolette); W.L. van der Pol (Ludo); M.C.E. Hermans; N.A.M.E. van der Beek (Nadine); K.C. Gorson (Kenneth); M. Eurelings (Marijke); L. Engelsman (Lyda); H. Boot (Hendrik); R.J. Meijer (Ron); G. Lauria (Giuseppe); C. Tennant (Christopher); I.S.J. Merkies (Ingemar)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe Medical Research Council grading system has served through decades for the evaluation of muscle strength and has been recognized as a cardinal feature of daily neurological, rehabilitation and general medicine examination of patients, despite being respectfully criticized due to the

  10. Interdisciplinary and inter-institutional differences in learning preferences among Malaysian medical and health sciences students

    REBECCA S.Y. WONG

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The learner-centred approach in medical and health sciences education makes the study of learning preferences relevant and important. This study aimed to investigate the interdisciplinary, interinstitutional, gender and racial differences in the preferred learning styles among Malaysian medical and health sciences students in three Malaysian universities, namely SEGi University (SEGi, University of Malaya (UM and Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman (UTAR. It also investigated the differences in the preferred learning styles of these students between high achievers and non-high achievers. Methods: This cross-sectional study was carried out on medical and health sciences students from three Malaysian universities following the approval of the Research and Ethics Committee, SEGi University. Purposive sampling was used and the preferred learning styles were assessed using the VARK questionnaire. The questionnaire was validated prior to its use. Three disciplines (medicine, pharmacy and dentistry were chosen based on their entry criteria and some similarities in their course structure. The three participating universities were Malaysian universities with a home-grown undergraduate entry medical program and students from a diverse cultural and socioeconomic background. The data were analysed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS software, version 22. VARK subscale scores were expressed as mean±standard deviation. Comparisons of the means were carried out using t-test or ANOVA. A p value of 0.05. Conclusion: This study gives an insight into the learner characteristics of more than one medical school in Malaysia. Such multi-institutional studies are lacking in the published literature and this study gives a better representation of the current situation in the learning preferences among medical students in Malaysia.

  11. Interdisciplinary and inter-institutional differences in learning preferences among Malaysian medical and health sciences students.

    Wong, Rebecca S Y; Siow, Heng Loke; Kumarasamy, Vinoth; Shaherah Fadhlullah Suhaimi, Nazrila

    2017-10-01

    The learner-centred approach in medical and health sciences education makes the study of learning preferences relevant and important. This study aimed to investigate the interdisciplinary, inter-institutional, gender and racial differences in the preferred learning styles among Malaysian medical and health sciences students in three Malaysian universities, namely SEGi University (SEGi), University of Malaya (UM) and Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman (UTAR). It also investigated the differences in the preferred learning styles of these students between high achievers and non-high achievers. This cross-sectional study was carried out on medical and health sciences students from three Malaysian universities following the approval of the Research and Ethics Committee, SEGi University. Purposive sampling was used and the preferred learning styles were assessed using the VARK questionnaire. The questionnaire was validated prior to its use. Three disciplines (medicine, pharmacy and dentistry) were chosen based on their entry criteria and some similarities in their course structure. The three participating universities were Malaysian universities with a home-grown undergraduate entry medical program and students from a diverse cultural and socioeconomic background. The data were analysed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software, version 22. VARK subscale scores were expressed as mean+standard deviation. Comparisons of the means were carried out using t-test or ANOVA. A p value of 0.05). This study gives an insight into the learner characteristics of more than one medical school in Malaysia. Such multi-institutional studies are lacking in the published literature and this study gives a better representation of the current situation in the learning preferences among medical students in Malaysia.

  12. Neuroscience and Brain Science Special Issue begins in the Malaysian Journal of Medical Sciences

    ABDULLAH, Jafri Malin

    2014-01-01

    The Malaysian Journal of Medical Sciences and the Orient Neuron Nexus have amalgated to publish a yearly special issue based on neuro- and brain sciences. This will hopefully improve the quality of peer-reviewed manuscripts in the field of fundamental, applied, and clinical neuroscience and brain science from Asian countries. One focus of the Universiti Sains Malaysia is to strengthen neuroscience and brain science, especially in the field of neuroinformatics. PMID:25941457

  13. An Overview of Governance and Accountability of Tahfiz Institutions in Malaysian: Religious Councils Perspective

    Bani Hamidah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tahfiz education is one of the popular streams of education in Malaysia and well accepted by Muslim community. Originally the education is being offered in “pondok”, a traditional religious school. Developing through times, it is now also being offered in tahfiz centers as well as in modern tahfiz institutions. These entities specialize in producing tahfiz graduates who can memorize and recite the whole Al-Quran and more than 91% of them are privately owned. The applicability of good governance and accountability measures is indeed highly desirable in these Islamic entities as it deals with the responsibility in fulfilling sacred religious obligation. Though the number of tahfiz education providers (TEP has grown up tremendously from only 58 in 1999 to 278 in 2011, literatures on governance and accountability of TEP are still lacking as the areas are rarely examined directly. The lacking may lead to unfavorable inferences that TEP are behaving in the manners contrary to the interest of the stakeholders. An ideally accountable governance of tahfiz centers will gain trust from parents and various stakeholders and will indicate the achievement in fulfilling one of the objective of Maqasid Shariah to preserve and promote the religious faith through preserving the memorization and knowledge of Al Quran (the primary source of Islamic Law by the huffaz. The objective of this research is to investigate external governance mechanism and the accountability of Tahfiz centers as viewed by religious regulatory bodies. A qualitative research approach is undertaken by interviewing representatives from selected State Islamic Religious Councils, State Islamic Foundation and National Religious Departments in Malaysia. Using thematic analysis, findings of this study revealed that there are two-tier governance infrastructures of tahfiz institutions in Malaysia. However, the enforcement of the governance structure is still at infancy level. The accountability

  14. Breaking into the International Arena: Malaysian Journal of Medical Sciences publishing Report 2013

    GHAZLI, Nur Farahin; ABDULLAH, Jafri Malin

    2014-01-01

    The most recent Malaysian Journal of Medical Sciences (MJMS)–MyCite report has shown that it has achieved a level becoming of a leading national medical science journal. This editorial reports on submission and acceptance rates of MJMS throughout the year 2013 and their geographical contributors. Our rejection rate of 29.76% with a 21.95% withdrawal rate because of poor quality of content and data as well as plagiarism indicates the seriousness of this journal to maintain the integrity and quality of it’s scientific data. PMID:25246830

  15. Country perspective on medical tourism: the Malaysian experience.

    Abd Manaf, Noor Hazilah; Hussin, Husnayati; Jahn Kassim, Puteri Nemie; Alavi, Rokiah; Dahari, Zainurin

    2015-01-01

    The study seeks to explore the perception of international patients on Malaysia as a medical tourism destination country, as well as overall patient satisfaction, perceived value and future intention for repeat treatment and services. Self-administered questionnaire was the main method of data collection. The survey covered major private hospitals in medical tourists' states in the country, namely, Penang, Melaka, Selangor and Kuala Lumpur. Convenience sampling was used due to the condition of patients as respondents. Indonesian patients formed the largest majority of international patients in the country. Five dimensions of medical tourism in Malaysia was identified, namely, hospital and staff, country factor, combining tourism and health services, cost saving and insurance and unavailability of treatment. Of these, hospital and staff was found to be the most important factor for the patients. Perception of value, overall satisfaction and intention for future treatment was also found to be high. This indicates that Malaysia is on the right footing in this burgeoning industry. Findings from the study will enable policy-makers to better position Malaysia as a medical tourist destination country. Medical tourism is a recent phenomenon and very little empirical research has been carried out at the patient level. This study is one of the first few studies which seek to explore medical tourism from the perspective of the patients themselves.

  16. Malaysian Journal of Medical Sciences: A Step Forward towards an International Journal

    Ghazli, Nur Farahin; Che Annual, Norfatiha; Abdullah, Jafri Malin

    2015-01-01

    In 1986, the Malaysian Journal of Medical Sciences (MJMS) began as the small and newly established journal Diagnosa, established by the Universiti Sains Malaysia School of Medicine. After 28 years in the publishing industry, we have received the honor of a listing as a local journal in the Emerging Sources Citation Index (ESCI) created by Thomson Reuters (TR) to spotlight emerging high-quality scientific publications. The editorial team of MJMS looks forward to the next step in the march of progress toward the status of an international journal. PMID:28223878

  17. Effective Communication Barriers in Clinical Teaching among Malaysian Medical Students in Zagazig Faculty of Medicine (Egypt).

    Abass, Marwa Ahmed; Said, Nagwa Samy; Zahed, Eman Salah El; Hussein, Wafaa Fawzy; Hamid, Omaima Ibrahim Abdel

    2015-12-01

    effective communication in a clinical environment plays a vital role in patient assessment and treatment. The aim of this study was to understand the experiences of Malaysian medical students concerning communication barriers during clinical practice. The goal was to provide answers for three important research questions, i.e., 1) Are communication barriers an impediment to Malaysian students during clinical teaching? 2) What is the nature of the language barriers that the students encounter? and 3) What are the best ways of reducing these barriers during clinical teaching? The qualitative method was used to conduct the research, and open-ended questionnaires were used to collect the data. The study was conducted on 95 fourth-, fifth-, and sixth-year students, 80% of whom completed the study. Medical students from Malaysia who have limited knowledge of the Arabic language experience some difficulties in communicating with staff members, patients, and nurses during their clinical practices. Successful orientation of students to the language used in the clinical environment will help the students overcome the communication barriers they encounter during their clinical practices.

  18. A Study on Scalp Hair Health and Hair Care Practices among Malaysian Medical Students.

    Nayak, B Satheesha; Ann, Chua Yuet; Azhar, Azeldeen Bin; Ling, Emily Chan Su; Yen, Wong Hui; Aithal, P Ashwini

    2017-01-01

    Scalp care is essential because it determines the health and condition of the hair and prevents the diseases of scalp and hair. The objectives of our study were to correlate race and hair types, to determine the awareness of hair care among Malaysian medical students, and to distinguish the factors that affect the health of hair and scalp. It was a cross-sectional study wherein validated questionnaires were given to 240 medical undergraduate students who belonged to three ethnic races of Malaysia, i.e., Chinese, Malay, and Malaysian Indians after their informed consent. The results were then analyzed using percentage statistics. Chinese students had comparatively healthier scalp without dandruff. Most Chinese and Indians had silky type of hair while Malay had dry, rough hair. Chinese and Indians colored their hair and used various styling methods; while among the Malays, this percentage was very less. Regarding hair care practices, males used only shampoo and females used shampoo and conditioner for hair wash. Students also faced dietary and examination-related stress. Results indicate that there exist morphological differences in hair among the studied population. Since most students color their hair and employ various hairstyling methods, they should be educated regarding best hair care practices to improve their scalp hair condition and health.

  19. 78 FR 27407 - Council on Graduate Medical Education; Notice of Meeting

    2013-05-10

    .... Work on the Council's 21st report on the restructuring of graduate medical education will finish. The... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Council on Graduate Medical Education; Notice of Meeting In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory...

  20. 75 FR 14447 - Council on Graduate Medical Education; Notice of Meeting

    2010-03-25

    ... . COGME will join the National Advisory Council on Nursing Education and Practice (NACNEP), the Advisory... Graduate Medical Education; Notice of Meeting In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory...: Council on Graduate Medical Education (COGME). Dates and Times: April 22, 2010, 8:30 a.m.-4:15 p.m. EST...

  1. Knowledge, Attitudes and Preventive Efforts of Malaysian Medical Students Regarding Exposure to Environmental Tobacco and Cigarette Smoking.

    Frisch, Ann Stirling; Kurtz, Margot; Shamsuddin, Khadijah

    1999-01-01

    Study examines changes in knowledge, attitudes, and preventive efforts of Malaysian students concerning cigarette smoking and environmental exposure to tobacco smoke from their first pre-clinical year in medical school until their final clinical year. Although there were significant improvements in knowledge about smoking and environmental…

  2. Oral Health Education for Medical Students: Malaysian and Australian Students' Perceptions of Educational Experience and Needs.

    Ahmad, Mas S; Abuzar, Menaka A; Razak, Ishak A; Rahman, Sabariah A; Borromeo, Gelsomina L

    2017-09-01

    Education in oral health is important to prepare future medical professionals for collaborative roles in maintaining patients' oral health, an important component of general health and well-being. The aims of this study were to determine the perceptions of medical students in Malaysia and Australia of the quality of their training in oral health care and their perceptions of their professional role in maintaining the oral health of their patients. A survey was administered in the classroom with final-year Malaysian (n=527; response rate=79.3%) and Australian (n=455; response rate: 60%) medical students at selected institutions in those countries. In the results, most of these medical students reported encountering patients with oral health conditions including ulcers, halitosis, and edentulism. A majority in both countries reported believing they should advise patients to obtain regular dental check-ups and eat a healthy diet, although they reported feeling less than comfortable in managing emergency dental cases. A high percentage reported they received a good education in smoking cessation but not in managing dental trauma, detecting cancerous lesions, or providing dietary advice in oral disease prevention. They expressed support for inclusion of oral health education in medical curricula. These students' experience with and perceptions of oral health care provide valuable information for medical curriculum development in these two countries as well as increasing understanding of this aspect of interprofessional education and practice now in development around the world.

  3. The Malaysian Medication Adherence Scale (MALMAS): Concurrent Validity Using a Clinical Measure among People with Type 2 Diabetes in Malaysia

    Chung, Wen Wei; Chua, Siew Siang; Lai, Pauline Siew Mei; Morisky, Donald E.

    2015-01-01

    Medication non-adherence is a prevalent problem worldwide but up to today, no gold standard is available to assess such behavior. This study was to evaluate the psychometric properties, particularly the concurrent validity of the English version of the Malaysian Medication Adherence Scale (MALMAS) among people with type 2 diabetes in Malaysia. Individuals with type 2 diabetes, aged 21 years and above, using at least one anti-diabetes agent and could communicate in English were recruited. The ...

  4. Social and psychological factors affecting eating habits among university students in a Malaysian medical school: a cross-sectional study

    Ganasegeran, Kurubaran; Al-Dubai, Sami AR; Qureshi, Ahmad M; Al-abed, Al-abed AA; AM, Rizal; Aljunid, Syed M

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Eating habits have been a major concern among university students as a determinant of health status. The aim of this study was to assess the pattern of eating habits and its associated social and psychological factors among medical students. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted among 132 medical students of pre-clinical phase at a Malaysian university. A self-administered questionnaire was used which included questions on socio-demography, anthropometry, eating ha...

  5. Associations of pass-fail outcomes with psychological health of first-year medical students in a malaysian medical school.

    Yusoff, Muhamad S B

    2013-02-01

    The demanding and intense environment of medical training can create excessive pressures on medical students that eventually lead to unfavorable consequences, either at a personal or professional level. These consequences can include poor academic performance and impaired cognitive ability. This study was designed to explore associations between pass-fail outcome and psychological health parameters (i.e. stress, anxiety, and depression symptoms). A cross-sectional study was conducted on a cohort of first-year medical students in a Malaysian medical school. The depression anxiety stress scale 21-item assessment (DASS-21) was administered to them right after the final paper of the first-year final examination. Their final examination outcomes (i.e. pass or fail) were traced by using their student identity code (ID) through the Universiti Sains Malaysia academic office. A total of 194 (98.0%) of medical students responded to the DASS-21. An independent t-test showed that students who passed had significantly lower stress, anxiety, and depression symptoms than those who failed the first-year final examination (P passed the examination. Those who experienced high stress levels were more likely to fail than those who did not. Reducing the psychological distress of medical students prior to examination may help them to perform better in the examination.

  6. 75 FR 79006 - Council on Graduate Medical Education; Notice of Meeting

    2010-12-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Council on Graduate Medical Education; Notice of Meeting In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), notice is hereby given of the following meeting: Name: Council on Graduate...

  7. 75 FR 34464 - Council on Graduate Medical Education; Notice of Meeting

    2010-06-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Council on Graduate Medical Education; Notice of Meeting In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), notice is hereby given of the following meeting: Name: Council on Graduate...

  8. Associations of Pass-Fail Outcomes with Psychological Health of First-Year Medical Students in a Malaysian Medical School

    Muhamad S. B. Yusoff

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The demanding and intense environment of medical training can create excessive pressures on medical students that eventually lead to unfavorable consequences, either at a personal or professional level. These consequences can include poor academic performance and impaired cognitive ability. This study was designed to explore associations between pass-fail outcome and psychological health parameters (i.e. stress, anxiety, and depression symptoms. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on a cohort of first-year medical students in a Malaysian medical school. The depression anxiety stress scale 21-item assessment (DASS-21 was administered to them right after the final paper of the first-year final examination. Their final examination outcomes (i.e. pass or fail were traced by using their student identity code (ID through the Universiti Sains Malaysia academic office. Results: A total of 194 (98.0% of medical students responded to the DASS-21. An independent t-test showed that students who passed had significantly lower stress, anxiety, and depression symptoms than those who failed the first-year final examination (P <0.05. Those who experienced moderate to high stress were at 2.43 times higher risk for failing the examination than those who experienced normal to mild stress. Conclusion: Medical students whofailed in the final examination had higher psychological distress than those who passed the examination. Those who experienced high stress levels were more likely to fail than those who did not. Reducing the psychological distress of medical students prior to examination may help them to perform better in the examination.

  9. Are medical educators following General Medical Council guidelines on obesity education: if not why not?

    2013-01-01

    Background Although the United Kingdom’s (UK’s) General Medical Council (GMC) recommends that graduating medical students are competent to discuss obesity and behaviour change with patients, it is difficult to integrate this education into existing curricula, and clinicians report being unprepared to support patients needing obesity management in practice. We therefore aimed to identify factors influencing the integration of obesity management education within medical schools. Methods Twenty-seven UK and Irish medical school educators participated in semi-structured interviews. Grounded theory principles informed data collection and analysis. Themes emerging directly from the dataset illustrated key challenges for educators and informed several suggested solutions. Results Factors influencing obesity management education included: 1) Diverse and opportunistic learning and teaching, 2) Variable support for including obesity education within undergraduate medical programmes, and 3) Student engagement in obesity management education. Findings suggest several practical solutions to identified challenges including clarifying recommended educational agendas; improving access to content-specific guidelines; and implementing student engagement strategies. Conclusions Students’ educational experiences differ due to diverse interpretations of GMC guidelines, educators’ perceptions of available support for, and student interest in obesity management education. Findings inform the development of potential solutions to these challenges which may be tested further empirically. PMID:23578257

  10. Mental health literacy towards depression among non-medical students at a Malaysian university.

    Khan, Tahir M; Sulaiman, Syed A; Hassali, Mohamed A

    2010-03-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to evaluate the knowledge and perception of depression among students of University Sains Malaysia (USM), in Penang, Peninsular Malaysia.Method Face-to-face interviews were conducted using a pre-validated 21-item questionnaire among students at USM.Results A total of 500 respondents participated in the survey comprising 24.6% (n=123) males and 75.4% (n=377) females. Half (50.0%, n=250) were Malays, followed by Chinese (44.0%, n=220) and Indians (6.0%, n=30). Whilst exploring the respondents' knowledge of the symptoms of depression, it was found that Chinese females had a comparatively better knowledge (P=0.058) of the symptoms of depression in comparison with Malays and Indians. Overall, social issues were attributed as the possible cause of depression. A cursory knowledge level was observed regarding medication for depression. Female students were more inclined towards the use of alternative and traditional medicines. However, with regard to seeking professional help, consultation with a psychiatrist was preferred by the majority.Conclusion Overall, a moderate level of knowledge about the symptoms of depression and a cursory knowledge of its therapy were observed. Those with personal experience of depression had better knowledge of the symptoms and therapy. Alternative treatments and traditional medicines were also favoured. There is a risk that this may affect the ability of Malaysian youths to seek evidence-based mental health care.

  11. 76 FR 30950 - Council on Graduate Medical Education; Notice of Meeting

    2011-05-27

    ... Council on Graduate Medical Education (COGME) was authorized by Congress in 1986 to provide an ongoing...), the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions, and the House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce. The topic of discussion for this meeting is graduate medical education...

  12. Study on personality dimension negative emotionality affecting academic achievement among Malaysian medical students studying in Malaysia and overseas

    Bhagat V

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Vidya Bhagat,1 Mainul Haque,2 Nordin Bin Simbak,1 Kamarudin Jaalam3 1Faculty of Medicine, Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, Jalan Sultan Mahmud, Kuala Terengganu, Malaysia; 2Faculty of Medicine and Defense Health, National Defence University of Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 3USM-KLE International Medical Program, Belgaum, Karnataka, India Abstract: Personality dimension negative emotionality is known to be associated with academic achievement. The present study focuses on the influence of negative emotionality (neuroticism on the medical students’ academic achievements. The main objective of this study was to ascertain the negative emotionality scores among the first year Malaysian medical students studying in Malaysia and India, further to find out the association between negative emotionality and their academic achievements. The current study sample includes 60 first year Malaysian medical students from Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, Malaysia, and USM-KLE IMP, Belgaum, India. They were selected by convenient sampling technique. The Medico-Psychological questionnaire was used to find out the negative emotionality scores among the students and these scores were compared with academic scores. The data were analyzed using SPSS- 20. Thus, the study result goes with the prediction that there is a significant correlation between academic achievement and negative emotionality. We concluded that negative emotionality has a negative impact on medical student’s academic achievement regardless of the fact whether they study in their own country or overseas. Keywords: academic achievement, negative emotionality, Malay, medical students, Malaysia

  13. Study on personality dimension negative emotionality affecting academic achievement among Malaysian medical students studying in Malaysia and overseas

    Bhagat, Vidya; Haque, Mainul; Simbak, Nordin Bin; Jaalam, Kamarudin

    2016-01-01

    Personality dimension negative emotionality is known to be associated with academic achievement. The present study focuses on the influence of negative emotionality (neuroticism) on the medical students’ academic achievements. The main objective of this study was to ascertain the negative emotionality scores among the first year Malaysian medical students studying in Malaysia and India, further to find out the association between negative emotionality and their academic achievements. The current study sample includes 60 first year Malaysian medical students from Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, Malaysia, and USM-KLE IMP, Belgaum, India. They were selected by convenient sampling technique. The Medico-Psychological questionnaire was used to find out the negative emotionality scores among the students and these scores were compared with academic scores. The data were analyzed using SPSS- 20. Thus, the study result goes with the prediction that there is a significant correlation between academic achievement and negative emotionality. We concluded that negative emotionality has a negative impact on medical student’s academic achievement regardless of the fact whether they study in their own country or overseas. PMID:27354836

  14. Introduction to Medical Research Council Delivery Plan during 2009 to 2014

    2011-01-01

    @@ Introduction The Medical Research Foundation is the Medical Research Council's (MRC) independently managed charity.It receives funds from the giving public to support medical research, training, public engagement and dissemination of knowledge.Since it was first established in 1920, the MRC has been able to accept charitable bequests, endowments and donations from the public to contribute towards the costs of the research that it undertakes.The MRC registered these charitable funds with the Charity Commission in the late 1960's and its charity - the Medical Research Foundation-has been successfully supporting medical research for over 80 years.

  15. The Malaysian Journal of Medical Sciences in Its 18th Year: A Look at the Journal’s Growth

    Abdul Latiff, Dahlia; Irfan, Mohamad; Jafri Malin, Abdullah

    2012-01-01

    As a small—although growing—journal based in Malaysia, the Malaysian Journal of Medical Sciences (MJMS) has faced several challenges in the past, such as promoting our journal as well as making sure our article bank does not go empty. However, we strive to improve ourselves by taking all means necessary to increase the quantity and, most importantly, quality of our publications, as well as to increase our journal’s visibility and citability. This editorial will focus on MJMS statistics throughout 2011—where MJMS turned 18—as well as future plans for our journal. PMID:22973132

  16. Patient Care Physician Supply and Requirements: Testing COGME Recommendations. Council on Graduate Medical Education, Eighth Report.

    Council on Graduate Medical Education.

    This report reassesses recommendations made by the Council on Graduate Medical Education in earlier reports which had, beginning in 1992, addressed the problems of physician oversupply. In this report physician supply and requirements are examined in the context of a health care system increasingly dominated by managed care. Patterns of physician…

  17. 78 FR 801 - National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC); Notice of Federal Advisory...

    2013-01-04

    ...The NHTSA announces a meeting of NEMSAC to be held in the Metropolitan Washington, DC, area. This notice announces the date, time, and location of the meeting, which will be open to the public. The purpose of NEMSAC, a nationally recognized council of emergency medical services representatives and consumers, is to provide advice and recommendations regarding Emergency Medical Services (EMS) to DOT's NHTSA and to the Federal Interagency Committee on EMS (FICEMS).

  18. Shifting subjects of health-care: placing "medical tourism" in the context of Malaysian domestic health-care reform.

    Ormond, Meghann

    2011-01-01

    "Medical tourism" has frequently been held to unsettle naturalised relationships between the state and its citizenry. Yet in casting "medical tourism" as either an outside "innovation" or "invasion," scholars have often ignored the role that the neoliberal retrenchment of social welfare structures has played in shaping the domestic health-care systems of the "developing" countries recognised as international medical travel destinations. While there is little doubt that "medical tourism" impacts destinations' health-care systems, it remains essential to contextualise them. This paper offers a reading of the emergence of "medical tourism" from within the context of ongoing health-care privatisation reform in one of today's most prominent destinations: Malaysia. It argues that "medical tourism" to Malaysia has been mobilised politically both to advance domestic health-care reform and to cast off the country's "underdeveloped" image not only among foreign patient-consumers but also among its own nationals, who are themselves increasingly envisioned by the Malaysian state as prospective health-care consumers.

  19. The General Medical Council: frame of reference or arbiter of morals?

    Hill, D

    1977-01-01

    Many members of the public think of the General Medical Council (GMC) as the body which tries doctors: the doctors' law courts, as it were. And, except in the more sober of newspapers and news reports, the 'offences ' which receive the most publicity are those concerning alleged improper relations between doctors and patients. Professor Sir Denis Hill, in the following paper, which he read in the spring of this year to the annual conference of the London Medical Group devoted to a discussion of human sexuality, chose to examine the whole function of the General Medical Council as a frame of moral reference for doctors. Judging allegations of professional misconduct by doctors is the function of the Council's Disciplinary Committee. Judging sexual misconduct forms only a small part of their work. The GMC's responsibility covers the whole notion of morals and morality as it concerns doctors in their professional work. Sir Denis Hill stresses the modern thinking that morality must be learned and that attitudes are always shifting as society alters its norms of what is moral conduct. That is not to say that all that was previously considered not to be moral has now become acceptable but rather that other concepts have entered the field of moral debate. Therefore the GMC must constantly review the frame of reference it offers to doctors and the public may be surprised to learn that that process is never static. Sir Denis Hill in this paper is speaking personally and not as a member of the General Medical Council or of any of that body's special committees. PMID:926129

  20. Investigating the psychometric properties of the Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy in a sample of Malaysian medical students

    Spasenoska M

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Marija Spasenoska,1 Shane Costello,1 Brett Williams2 1Faculty of Education, 2Department of Community Emergency Health and Paramedic Practice, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia Objective: The purpose of this present study was to investigate the psychometric properties of the Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy – student version (JSPE-S. Subjects and methods: This study recruited 193 Malaysian medical students enrolled in year one and year two studies. A principal-component analysis with Varimax rotation was conducted. Procrustes rotation was used to confirm the item to model fit, which allows for a comparison of actual structure against an ideal hypothesized structure. Items were systematically removed based on low communalities of < 0.3 and poor loading of items onto components. Results: A two-component solution was found, comprised of “perspective taking” and “compassionate care”. Following item removal, eleven items remained. A Procrustes analysis revealed that this eleven-item measure demonstrated an excellent model fit. A possible third component was identified, though is not recommended for use, due to construct underrepresentation. Conclusion: This study found the Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy fitted best to a two-component model using eleven items. Item, component, and overall congruence were very high, and scale reliabilities were adequate. The results of this study suggest that the eleven-item, two-component solution demonstrates excellent psychometric properties and structural validity in a Malaysian medical student population. Future research could consider using the short eleven-item measure in both student and health care profession samples to investigate the role of empathy in health care. Keywords: empathy, medical students, psychometrics

  1. Provision of undergraduate otorhinolaryngology teaching within General Medical Council approved UK medical schools: what is current practice?

    Khan, M M; Saeed, S R

    2012-04-01

    Despite longstanding concern, provision of undergraduate ENT teaching has not improved in response to the aims of the UK General Medical Council's initiative Tomorrow's Doctors. Previous studies have demonstrated poor representation of ENT within the undergraduate curriculum. We aimed to identify current practice in order to establish undergraduate ENT experience across UK medical schools, a timely endeavour in light of the General Medical Council's new 2011-2013 education strategy. Questionnaires were sent to ENT consultants, medical school deans and students. All schools with a clinical curriculum were anonymously represented. Our outcome measures were the provision of mandatory or optional ENT placements, and their duration and content. A compulsory ENT placement was available to over half (53 per cent) of the students. Ten of the 26 participating schools did not offer an ENT attachment. The mean mandatory placement was 8 days. Overall, 38 per cent of students reported a satisfactory compulsory ENT placement. Most ENT consultants questioned considered that newly qualified doctors were not proficient in managing common ENT problems that did not require specialist referral. Little improvement in the provision of undergraduate ENT teaching was demonstrated. An increase in the proportion of students undertaking ENT training is necessary. Time and curriculum constraints on medical schools mean that optimisation of available resources is required.

  2. The evaluation of the causes of complaint to Khorramabad Medical Council Organization from 2006 to 2011

    sedighe Nadri

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background : Complaint against physicians is one of the problems that every physician may be subjected to it during practice. According to the existing statistics, the number of complaints is increasing in Iran. Identification of these causes may be effective in preventing such complaints. This research was conducted to identify the causes of complaints made to the Medical Council Organization of Khorramabad from 2006 to 2011. Materials and Methods: This study is descriptive cross-sectional and retrospective. To carry out the research, all of the complaints to the Medical Council Organization of Khorramabad from early 2006 to 2011, were studied. The required data were transferred from the files to the questionnaires. Finally, the collected data were entered into statistical software and analyzed with statistical tests. Results: In this research, 260 complaints made to the Medical Council Organization of Khorramabad were studied. A major part of the complaints was made against public hospitals(68.8%. The highest cause of complaints was recklessness(55.4%, while the lowest state was neglecting public regulations(21%. Of the 260 cases of complaints investigated by the preliminary committee, 80 cases (30.8% were recognized as negligence and 180 cases (69.2% were considered as non-negligence. According to the disciplinary committee, of the 260 cases, 61 cases (23.5% were recognized as negligence and 199 cases (76.5% were considered as non-negligence. Conclusion: Observing medical ethics and career commitment, establishing proper communication by physicians and treatment staff with patients and their companions, lack of exaggerating the treatment results, continuous study and updating medical knowledge, physician’s adequate skill and experience, lack of applying the methods which he has never passed their training courses, proper selection of patients, and obtaining the informed consent of patients and aquittance may lead to reduce the number of

  3. The hazards to man of nuclear and allied radiations. A second report to the Medical Research Council

    NONE

    1960-12-01

    In March, 1955, the Prime Minister requested that the Medical Research Council should appoint an independent committee to report on the medical and genetic aspects of nuclear radiation and in the following month the Council appointed us members of such a committee, under the chairmanship of Sir Harold Himsworth, to undertake this task. In June, 1956, our Report to the Medical Research Council (Cmd. 9780) was presented to Parliament by the Lord President of the Council. In the following months our Genetics Panel met twice for the primary purpose of putting forward further recommendations for research and in June, 1958, we ourselves, at the Council's request, met again in full session to prepare a statement (Cmnd. 508) on the Report of the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation. During the whole of this period the subject has been kept under regular review by various standing committees of the Council. We ourselves met again in November, 1959, following a request from the Medical Research Council that we should prepare a further considered statement of the position in this field and the report which follows is the result of this request.

  4. The hazards to man of nuclear and allied radiations. A second report to the Medical Research Council

    1960-12-01

    In March, 1955, the Prime Minister requested that the Medical Research Council should appoint an independent committee to report on the medical and genetic aspects of nuclear radiation and in the following month the Council appointed us members of such a committee, under the chairmanship of Sir Harold Himsworth, to undertake this task. In June, 1956, our Report to the Medical Research Council (Cmd. 9780) was presented to Parliament by the Lord President of the Council. In the following months our Genetics Panel met twice for the primary purpose of putting forward further recommendations for research and in June, 1958, we ourselves, at the Council's request, met again in full session to prepare a statement (Cmnd. 508) on the Report of the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation. During the whole of this period the subject has been kept under regular review by various standing committees of the Council. We ourselves met again in November, 1959, following a request from the Medical Research Council that we should prepare a further considered statement of the position in this field and the report which follows is the result of this request

  5. Social and psychological factors affecting eating habits among university students in a Malaysian medical school: a cross-sectional study.

    Ganasegeran, Kurubaran; Al-Dubai, Sami A R; Qureshi, Ahmad M; Al-abed, Al-abed A A; Am, Rizal; Aljunid, Syed M

    2012-07-18

    Eating habits have been a major concern among university students as a determinant of health status. The aim of this study was to assess the pattern of eating habits and its associated social and psychological factors among medical students. A cross sectional study was conducted among 132 medical students of pre-clinical phase at a Malaysian university. A self-administered questionnaire was used which included questions on socio-demography, anthropometry, eating habits and psychosocial factors. Mean (± SD) age of the respondents was 22.7 (± 2.4) years and (the age) ranged from 18 to 30 years. More than half had regular meals and breakfast (57.6% &, 56.1% respectively). Majority (73.5%) consumed fruits less than three times per week, 51.5% had fried food twice or more a week and 59.8% drank water less than 2 liters daily. Eating habits score was significantly low among younger students (18-22 years), smokers, alcohol drinkers and those who did not exercise. (peating habits (peating because of feeling happy' were significantly associated with eating habits score (phealthy eating habits. Social and psychological factors were important determinants of eating habits among medical students.

  6. Social and psychological factors affecting eating habits among university students in a Malaysian medical school: a cross-sectional study

    Ganasegeran Kurubaran

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eating habits have been a major concern among university students as a determinant of health status. The aim of this study was to assess the pattern of eating habits and its associated social and psychological factors among medical students. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted among 132 medical students of pre-clinical phase at a Malaysian university. A self-administered questionnaire was used which included questions on socio-demography, anthropometry, eating habits and psychosocial factors. Results Mean (±SD age of the respondents was 22.7 (±2.4 years and (the age ranged from 18 to 30 years. More than half had regular meals and breakfast (57.6% &, 56.1% respectively. Majority (73.5% consumed fruits less than three times per week, 51.5% had fried food twice or more a week and 59.8% drank water less than 2 liters daily. Eating habits score was significantly low among younger students (18–22 years, smokers, alcohol drinkers and those who did not exercise. (ppp Conclusion Most of the students in this study had healthy eating habits. Social and psychological factors were important determinants of eating habits among medical students.

  7. The Malaysian Medication Adherence Scale (MALMAS: Concurrent Validity Using a Clinical Measure among People with Type 2 Diabetes in Malaysia.

    Wen Wei Chung

    Full Text Available Medication non-adherence is a prevalent problem worldwide but up to today, no gold standard is available to assess such behavior. This study was to evaluate the psychometric properties, particularly the concurrent validity of the English version of the Malaysian Medication Adherence Scale (MALMAS among people with type 2 diabetes in Malaysia. Individuals with type 2 diabetes, aged 21 years and above, using at least one anti-diabetes agent and could communicate in English were recruited. The MALMAS was compared with the 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8 to assess its convergent validity while concurrent validity was evaluated based on the levels of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C. Participants answered the MALMAS twice: at baseline and 4 weeks later. The study involved 136 participants. The MALMAS achieved acceptable internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha=0.565 and stable reliability as the test-retest scores showed fair correlation (Spearman's rho=0.412. The MALMAS has good correlation with the MMAS-8 (Spearman's rho=0.715. Participants who were adherent to their anti-diabetes medications had significantly lower median HbA1C values than those who were non-adherence (7.90 versus 8.55%, p=0.032. The odds of participants who were adherent to their medications achieving good glycemic control was 3.36 times (95% confidence interval: 1.09-10.37 of those who were non-adherence. This confirms the concurrent validity of the MALMAS. The sensitivity of the MALMAS was 88.9% while its specificity was 29.6%. The findings of this study further substantiates the reliability and validity of the MALMAS, in particular its concurrent validity and sensitivity for assessing medication adherence of people with type 2 diabetes in Malaysia.

  8. Medical devices and the Middle East: market, regulation, and reimbursement in Gulf Cooperation Council states

    Howard JJ

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Jason J Howard Division of Paediatric Orthopaedics, Department of Surgery, Sidra Medical and Research Center, Doha, Qatar Abstract: With some of the richest economies in the world, the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC is undergoing rapid growth not only in its population but also in health care expenditure. Despite the GCC's abundance of hydrocarbon-based wealth, the drivers of the medical device industry in the GCC are still in flux, with gains yet to be made in areas of infrastructure, regulation, and reimbursement. However, the regional disease burden, expanding health insurance penetration, increasing privatization, and a desire to attract skilled expatriate health care providers have led to favorable conditions for the medical device market in the GCC. The purpose of this article is to investigate the current state of the GCC medical device industry, with respect to market, regulation, and reimbursement, paying special attention to the three largest medical device markets: Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, and Qatar. The GCC would seem to represent fertile ground for the development of medical technologies, especially those in line with the regional health priorities of the respective member states. Keywords: medical devices, regulation, reimbursement, Middle East 

  9. Medical Students' Knowledge about Alcohol and Drug Problems: Results of the Medical Council of Canada Examination

    Kahan, Meldon; Midmer, Deana; Wilson, Lynn; Borsoi, Diane

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To determine knowledge of a national sample of medical students about substance withdrawal, screening and early intervention, medical and psychiatric complications of addiction, and treatment options. Methods: Based on learning objectives developed by medical faculty, twenty-two questions on addictions were included in the 1998 Canadian…

  10. Translation and psychometric analysis of the Malaysian version of medication understanding and use self-efficacy scale (m-muse) for diabetes mellitus

    Safaa A Al Abboud; Sohail Ahmad; Mohamed B.L Bidin; Nahlah E Ismail

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Enhancing diabetes self-efficacy (SE) level can improve the self-management behaviour in patients living with diabetes mellitus (DM). This study aimed to translate and assess the psychometric properties of Malaysian version of diabetes Medication Understanding and Use Self-Efficacy Scale (M-MUSE). Methods: Following the translation of English version of MUSE to Malay language using established international standard translation guidelines, 252 adult diabetics (≥ 18 years old; DM...

  11. Undergraduate medical education in the Gulf Cooperation Council: a multi-countries study (Part 1).

    Hamdy, H; Telmesani, A W; Al Wardy, N; Abdel-Khalek, N; Carruthers, G; Hassan, F; Kassab, S; Abu-Hijleh, M; Al-Roomi, K; O'malley, K; El Din Ahmed, M G; Raj, G A; Rao, G M; Sheikh, K

    2010-01-01

    The Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries have witnessed over the last 40 years a rapid and major social, cultural, and economic transformation. The development of medical education in the region is relatively new, dating from the late 1960s. An important goal among the medical colleges in the region is to graduate national physicians who can populate the healthcare service of each country. The aim of this study is to provide understanding of undergraduate medical education in each of the six GCC countries and the challenges that each face. This is a descriptive cross-sectional study. Fourteen senior medical faculty were requested to submit information about undergraduate medical education in their own countries, focusing on its historical background, student selection, curriculum, faculty, and challenges. The information provided was about 27 medical colleges: 16 from the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA), five from the United Arab Emirates (UAE), two from the Kingdom of Bahrain, two from Sultanate of Oman, one from Kuwait, and one from the State of Qatar. It was found that older colleges are reviewing their curriculum while new colleges are developing their programs following current trends in medical education, particularly problem-based learning and integrated curricula. The programs as described 'on paper' look good but what needs to be evaluated is the curriculum 'in action'. Faculty development in medical education is taking place in most of the region's medical colleges. The challenges reported were mainly related to shortages of faculty, availability of clinical training facilities and the need to more integration with the National Health Care services. Attention to quality, standards, and accreditation is considered essential by all colleges.

  12. Undergraduate medical education in the Gulf Cooperation Council: a multi-countries study (Part 2).

    Hamdy, H; Telmesani, A W; Wardy, N Al; Abdel-Khalek, N; Carruthers, G; Hassan, F; Kassab, S; Abu-Hijleh, M; Al-Roomi, K; O'Malley, K; El Din Ahmed, M G; Raj, G A; Rao, G M; Sheikh, J

    2010-01-01

    The Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries have witnessed over the last 40 years a rapid and major social, cultural, and economic transformation. The development of medical education in the region is relatively new, dating from the late 1960s. An important goal among the medical colleges in the region is to graduate national physicians who can populate the healthcare service of each country. The aim of this study is to provide understanding of undergraduate medical education in each of the six GCC countries and the challenges that each face. This is a descriptive cross-sectional study. Fourteen senior medical faculty were requested to submit information about undergraduate medical education in their own countries, focusing on its historical background, student selection, curriculum, faculty, and challenges. The information provided was about 27 medical colleges: 16 from the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA), five from the United Arab Emirates, two from the Kingdom of Bahrain, two from Sultanate of Oman, one from Kuwait and one from the State of Qatar. It was found that older colleges are reviewing their curriculum while new colleges are developing their programs following current trends in medical education particularly problem-based learning and integrated curricula. The programs as described 'on paper' look good but what needs to be evaluated is the curriculum 'in action'. Faculty development in medical education is taking place in most of the region's medical colleges. The challenges reported were mainly related to shortages of faculty, availability of clinical training facilities, and the need to more integration with the National Health Care services. Attention to quality, standards, and accreditation is considered essential by all colleges.

  13. Medical devices and the Middle East: market, regulation, and reimbursement in Gulf Cooperation Council states.

    Howard, Jason J

    2014-01-01

    With some of the richest economies in the world, the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) is undergoing rapid growth not only in its population but also in health care expenditure. Despite the GCC's abundance of hydrocarbon-based wealth, the drivers of the medical device industry in the GCC are still in flux, with gains yet to be made in areas of infrastructure, regulation, and reimbursement. However, the regional disease burden, expanding health insurance penetration, increasing privatization, and a desire to attract skilled expatriate health care providers have led to favorable conditions for the medical device market in the GCC. The purpose of this article is to investigate the current state of the GCC medical device industry, with respect to market, regulation, and reimbursement, paying special attention to the three largest medical device markets: Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, and Qatar. The GCC would seem to represent fertile ground for the development of medical technologies, especially those in line with the regional health priorities of the respective member states.

  14. Evaluation of potentially inappropriate medications among older residents of Malaysian nursing homes.

    Chen, Li Li; Tangiisuran, Balamurugan; Shafie, Asrul Akmal; Hassali, Mohamed Azmi Ahmad

    2012-08-01

    There is an increasing evidence of medicines related issues such as inappropriate prescribing among older people. Inappropriate prescribing is an important risk factor for adverse drug reactions and hospitalizations in the older people. To assess and characterize the prevalence of Potentially Inappropriate Medications (PIMs) in nursing home care in Malaysia as defined by Screening Tool of Older Peoples Prescriptions (STOPP) and Beers criteria. Four Nursing Homes situated in Penang, Malaysia. A multicenter and cross-sectional study was conducted over 2 months period at four large non-governmental organizations nursing homes in Penang, Malaysia. The study population included older residents (≥65 years old) taking at least one medication. Residents who had been diagnosed with dementia or taking anti dementia drugs, delirium, too frail or refused to give consent were excluded. Demographic, clinical data and concurrent medications were collected through direct interview and also by reviewing medical records. STOPP and Beers criteria were applied in the medical review to screen for PIMs. Potentially Inappropriate Medication using STOPP and Beers criteria. Two hundred eleven residents were included in the study with the median age of 77 (inter quartile range (IQR) 72-82) years. Median number of prescription medicines was 4 (IQR 1-14). STOPP identified less residents (50 residents, 23.7 %) being prescribed on PIMs compared with Beers criteria (69 residents, 32.7 %) (p older residents living in the nursing homes and are associated with number of medications and longer nursing home stay. Further research is warranted to study the impact of PIMs towards health related outcomes in these elderly.

  15. Withdrawing and withholding medical treatment: a comparative study between the Malaysian, English and Islamic law.

    Kassim, Puteri Nemie Jahn; Adeniyi, Omipidan Bashiru

    2010-09-01

    The permissibility and lawfulness of withdrawing and withholding medical treatment has attracted considerable debates and criticisms, as the legal issues are drawn into entering the slippery slope of euthanasia. Proponents of "sanctity of life" views that withdrawing and withholding medical treatment with knowledge that death would result is still within the sphere of euthanasia, whereas proponents of "quality of life" argue that it is not, as death is not intended. Their arguments maintain that for patients who are totally dependant on machines to ensure the work of some bodily functions, living may amount to little more than survival as dying is prolonged. Furthermore, the prolonging of life of the dying patient has profound implications on patients themselves, their relatives, dependants and medical providers. Thus, withdrawing and withholding medical treatment would not only respect a patient's right to self-determination, by allowing them to die in their underlying condition, but will ensure that medical providers are able to concentrate on more worthwhile treatments. This paper discusses the intractable difficulties with the moral distinction between withholding and withdrawing treatment and euthanasia, as well as makes a comparative study between the present state of law in Malaysia and England on this issue. The paper further highlights the differences between civil law and Islamic law in this controversial area.

  16. [The Ethics and Deontology division of the French National Council of Medical Doctors, eight years of activity, 1993-2001].

    Hoerni, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    The activity of the division of Ethics and deontology of the French National council of medical doctors is analysed by its former president (1993-2001). Among a lot of topics, a new version of the professionnal Code of deontology and patients' information were the main subjects of reflection and action.

  17. Empathy levels among first year Malaysian medical students: an observational study

    Williams B

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Brett Williams,1 Sivalal Sadasivan,2 Amudha Kadirvelu,2 Alexander Olaussen11Department of Community Emergency Health and Paramedic Practice, Melbourne, Australia; 2Jeffrey Cheah School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Sunway Campus, Selangor, MalaysiaBackground: The literature indicates that medical practitioners experience declining empathy levels in clinical practice. This highlights the need to educate medical students about empathy as an attribute early in the academic curriculum. The objective of this study was to evaluate year one students' self-reported empathy levels following a 2-hour empathy workshop at a large medical school in Malaysia.Methods: Changes in empathy scores were examined using a paired repeated-measures t-test in this prospective before and after study.Results: Analyzing the matched data, there was a statistically significant difference and moderate effect size between mean empathy scores before and 5 weeks after the workshop (112.08±10.67 versus 117.93±13.13, P<0.0001, d=0.48 using the Jefferson Scale Physician Empathy (Student Version.Conclusion: The results of this observational study indicate improved mean self-reported empathy scores following an empathy workshop.Keywords: empathy, medical students, Malaysia

  18. Utilization of information technology in medical education: a questionnaire survey of students in a Malaysian institution.

    Nurjahan, M I; Lim, T A; Yeong, S W; Foong, A L S; Ware, J

    2002-12-01

    The objective of this survey was to obtain a self-reported assessment of the use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) by medical students at the International Medical University, Malaysia. Students' perceived skills and extent of usage of ICT were evaluated using a questionnaire. Chi-square analysis were performed to ascertain the association between variables. Further statistical testing using Chi-square test for trend was done when one of the variables was ordered, and Spearman rank correlation when both variables were ordered. Overall, (98%) of students responded to the questionnaire. Twenty seven students (5.7%) did not use a computer either in the university or at home. Most students surveyed reported adequate skills at word processing (55%), e-mailing (78%) and surfing the internet (67%). The results suggests that in order to increase the level of computer literacy among medical students, positive steps would need to be taken, for example the formal inclusion of ICT instruction in the teaching of undergraduate medicine. This will enhance medical students' ability to acquire, appraise, and use information in order to solve clinical and other problems quickly and efficiently in the course of their studies, and more importantly when they graduate.

  19. Validity of Simulation-Based Assessment for Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Milestone Achievement.

    Isaak, Robert S; Chen, Fei; Martinelli, Susan M; Arora, Harendra; Zvara, David A; Hobbs, Gene; Stiegler, Marjorie P

    2018-01-25

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requires biannual evaluation of anesthesiology residents on 25 subcompetency milestones. Some milestone domains are particularly challenging to repeatedly and reliably observe during clinical care. Simulation-Based Milestones Assessment (SBMA) may help overcome these challenges. However, few studies have examined the external validation of simulation assessment scores (ie, the relationships between simulation-based assessment scores and other standard measures of ability) for milestones. This study analyzed whether SBMA scores (1) discriminate by postgraduate year, (2) improve over time, and (3) correlate with traditional measures of performance. This is a retrospective analysis of 55 residents' SBMA data from 30 scenarios for two academic years. Each scenario was evaluated for time-in-training discrimination. Scenarios were then analyzed for SBMA scoring trends over time, and SBMA scores were compared with residents' clinical evaluations. Twenty-four SBMA scenarios discriminated by postgraduate year. Repeated measure analysis of variance showed statistically significant between-session score improvements (F (3, 54) = 17.79, P Medical Education milestone competencies.

  20. Knowledge and attitude on sex among medical students of a Malaysian university: a comparison study.

    Sidi, Hatta; Loh, Sit Fong; Mahadevan, Raynuha; Puteh, Sharifah Ezat Wan; Musa, Ramli; Wong, Chia Yee; Hadi, Ammar Amsyar Abdul; Sa'aid, Siti Hajara; Amali, Zulfahmi; Abidin, Murnira; Das, Srijit; Saharom, Mohamed Hatta; Zakaria, Hazli

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between clinical/socio-demographic factors with knowledge and attitude on sex among medical students of the National University of Malaysia (UKM). A cross-sectional study assessing 452 students using a self-administered questionnaire of knowledge and attitude was performed and had a response rate of 80%. The majority of respondents were Malays (56%), females (57.5%), lived in urban areas (66.4%), had a median family income of RM3000 and perceived themselves as moderately religious (60%). The overall score on knowledge about sex was 21.7 of 35 (a higher score indicates better knowledge about sex). It was noted that 73.2% of students felt that they did not receive adequate training in medical school to deal with patients' sexuality and sexual problems, while 51.5% felt uncomfortable talking to patients about these issues. Students in the clinical year were more knowledgeable than those in pre-clinical years (22.67 versus 20.71, P students had a satisfactory level of knowledge on sex (>22 marks [median score]). The students' attitude on sex was considered conservative as the majority of them disagreed on premarital sex, masturbation, abortion, homosexuality and oral sex. Gender and religiosity have a large influence on attitudes on controversial sexual issues, whereas clinical status plays a small role. Knowledge on sex among UKM medical students is inadequate and their attitudes on sex are considered conservative. Integration of sexual medicine and health modules in the medical curriculum is crucial for students to more effectively address patients' sexual problems and promote non-judgmental attitudes towards patients. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  1. Evaluation of doctors? performance as facilitators in basic medical science lecture classes in a new Malaysian medical school

    Ismail, Salwani; Salam, Abdus; Alattraqchi, Ahmed G; Annamalai, Lakshmi; Chockalingam, Annamalai; Elena, Wan Putri; Rahman, Nor Iza A; Abubakar, Abdullahi Rabiu; Haque, Mainul

    2015-01-01

    Salwani Ismail,1 Abdus Salam,2 Ahmed G Alattraqchi,1 Lakshmi Annamalai,1 Annamalai Chockalingam,1 Wan Putri Elena,3 Nor Iza A Rahman,1 Abdullahi Rabiu Abubakar,1 Mainul Haque1 1Faculty of Medicine, Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, Kuala Terengganu, Terengganu, Malaysia; 2Department of Medical Education, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 3School of Health Sciences, Health Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Kubang Kerian, Kelantan, Malaysia Background: Dida...

  2. Evaluation of doctors' performance as facilitators in basic medical science lecture classes in a new Malaysian medical school

    Ismail S

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Salwani Ismail,1 Abdus Salam,2 Ahmed G Alattraqchi,1 Lakshmi Annamalai,1 Annamalai Chockalingam,1 Wan Putri Elena,3 Nor Iza A Rahman,1 Abdullahi Rabiu Abubakar,1 Mainul Haque1 1Faculty of Medicine, Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, Kuala Terengganu, Terengganu, Malaysia; 2Department of Medical Education, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 3School of Health Sciences, Health Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Kubang Kerian, Kelantan, Malaysia Background: Didactic lecture is the oldest and most commonly used method of teaching. In addition, it is considered one of the most efficient ways to disseminate theories, ideas, and facts. Many critics feel that lectures are an obsolete method to use when students need to perform hands-on activities, which is an everyday need in the study of medicine. This study evaluates students' perceptions regarding lecture quality in a new medical school. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study conducted of the medical students of Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin. The study population was 468 preclinical medical students from years 1 and 2 of academic year 2012–2013. Data were collected using a validated instrument. There were six different sections of questions using a 5-point Likert scale. The data were then compiled and analyzed, using SPSS version 20. Results: The response rate was 73%. Among 341 respondents, 30% were male and 70% were female. Eighty-five percent of respondents agree or strongly agree that the lectures had met the criteria with regard to organization of lecture materials. Similarly, 97% of students agree or strongly agree that lecturers maintained adequate voices and gestures. Conclusion: Medical students are quite satisfied with the lecture classes and the lectures. However, further research is required to identify student-centered teaching and learning methods to promote active learning. Keywords: lecture, effectiveness, evaluation, undergraduate medical

  3. Psychometric analysis of the Swedish version of the General Medical Council's multi source feedback questionnaires.

    Olsson, Jan-Eric; Wallentin, Fan Yang; Toth-Pal, Eva; Ekblad, Solvig; Bertilson, Bo Christer

    2017-07-10

    To determine the internal consistency and the underlying components of our translated and adapted Swedish version of the General Medical Council's multisource feedback questionnaires (GMC questionnaires) for physicians and to confirm which aspects of good medical practice the latent variable structure reflected. From October 2015 to March 2016, residents in family medicine in Sweden were invited to participate in the study and to use the Swedish version to perform self-evaluations and acquire feedback from both their patients and colleagues. The validation focused on internal consistency and construct validity. Main outcome measures were Cronbach's alpha coefficients, Principal Component Analysis, and Confirmatory Factor Analysis indices. A total of 752 completed questionnaires from patients, colleagues, and residents were analysed. Of these, 213 comprised resident self-evaluations, 336 were feedback from residents' patients, and 203 were feedback from residents' colleagues. Cronbach's alpha coefficients of the scores were 0.88 from patients, 0.93 from colleagues, and 0.84 in the self-evaluations. The Confirmatory Factor Analysis validated two models that fit the data reasonably well and reflected important aspects of good medical practice. The first model had two latent factors for patient-related items concerning empathy and consultation management, and the second model had five latent factors for colleague-related items, including knowledge and skills, attitude and approach, reflection and development, teaching, and trust. The current Swedish version seems to be a reliable and valid tool for formative assessment for resident physicians and their supervisors. This needs to be verified in larger samples.

  4. Otolaryngology Resident Education and the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Core Competencies: A Systematic Review.

    Faucett, Erynne A; Barry, Jonnae Y; McCrary, Hilary C; Saleh, Ahlam A; Erman, Audrey B; Ishman, Stacey L

    2018-04-01

    To date, there have been no reports in the current literature regarding the use of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) core competencies in otolaryngology residency training. An evaluation may help educators address these core competencies in the training curriculum. To examine the quantity and nature of otolaryngology residency training literature through a systematic review and to evaluate whether this literature aligns with the 6 core competencies. A medical librarian assisted in a search of all indexed years of the PubMed, Embase, Education Resources Information Center (via EBSCOhost), Cochrane Library (Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Cochrane Methodology Register), Thomson Reuters Web of Science (Science Citation Index Expanded, Social Sciences Citation Index Expanded, Conference Proceedings Citation Index-Science, and Conference Proceedings Citation Index-Social Science and Humanities), Elsevier Scopus, and ClinicalTrials.gov databases to identify relevant English-language studies. Included studies contained original human data and focused on otolaryngology resident education. Data regarding study design, setting, and ACGME core competencies addressed were extracted from each article. Initial searches were performed on May 20, 2015, and updated on October 4, 2016. In this systematic review of 104 unique studies, interpersonal communication skills were reported 15 times; medical knowledge, 48 times; patient care, 44 times; practice-based learning and improvement, 31 times; professionalism, 15 times; and systems-based practices, 10 times. Multiple studies addressed more than 1 core competency at once, and 6 addressed all 6 core competencies. Increased emphasis on nonclinical core competencies is needed, including professionalism, interpersonal and communication skills, and systems-based practices in the otolaryngology residency training curriculum. A formal curriculum

  5. Internal medicine rounding practices and the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education core competencies.

    Shoeb, Marwa; Khanna, Raman; Fang, Margaret; Sharpe, Brad; Finn, Kathleen; Ranji, Sumant; Monash, Brad

    2014-04-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) has established the requirement for residency programs to assess trainees' competencies in 6 core domains (patient care, medical knowledge, practice-based learning, interpersonal skills, professionalism, and systems-based practice). As attending rounds serve as a primary means for educating trainees at academic medical centers, our study aimed to identify current rounding practices and attending physician perceived capacity of different rounding models to promote teaching within the ACGME core competencies. We disseminated a 24-question survey electronically using educational and hospital medicine leadership mailing lists. We assessed attending physician demographics and the frequency with which they used various rounding models, as defined by the location of the discussion of the patient and care plan: bedside rounds (BR), hallway rounds (HR), and card-flipping rounds (CFR). Using the ACGME framework, we assessed the perceived educational value of each model. We received 153 completed surveys from attending physicians representing 34 institutions. HR was used most frequently for both new and established patients (61% and 43%), followed by CFR for established patients (36%) and BR for new patients (22%). Most attending physicians indicated that BR and HR were superior to CFR in promoting the following ACGME competencies: patient care, systems-based practice, professionalism, and interpersonal skills. HR is the most commonly employed rounding model. BR and HR are perceived to be valuable for teaching patient care, systems-based practice, professionalism, and interpersonal skills. CFR remains prevalent despite its perceived inferiority in promoting teaching across most of the ACGME core competencies. © 2014 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  6. Academic standards and changing patterns of medical school admissions: a Malaysian study.

    Tan, C M

    1990-07-01

    Changing social demands made it necessary for the Medical Faculty of the University of Malaya to accommodate students with a wider range of academic experience than before. However, teachers sought to achieve comparable academic standards to those in the West by striving to maintain a close resemblance to the Western model of medical education in other respects. As a result teachers failed to adapt their teaching methods, assessment techniques and curriculum design to meet the educational needs of the students, thus compromising academic standards. Many students lack basic academic skills and do not know how to learn effectively. In order to help students overcome their learning difficulties innovative teaching was required during the first year at university, designed to foster the joint development of knowledge and basic skills. In the case of less well-prepared students who lack self-confidence, a caring and supportive learning environment is crucial to the achievement of meaningful learning. Lecturers needed to become facilitators of learning rather than transmitters of knowledge. However, teachers' objective to retain international recognition of the degree, which presumably reflected the importance of teaching, was not operationalized in terms of its incentive structure such that teachers were constrained not to try to fill the new roles demanded of them. It was assumed that academic distinction accrued through scientific research was essential for the achievement of academic excellence. However, under the prevailing circumstances the two aims were mutually exclusive and incompatible and teaching quality deteriorated.

  7. Evaluation of doctors' performance as facilitators in basic medical science lecture classes in a new Malaysian medical school.

    Ismail, Salwani; Salam, Abdus; Alattraqchi, Ahmed G; Annamalai, Lakshmi; Chockalingam, Annamalai; Elena, Wan Putri; Rahman, Nor Iza A; Abubakar, Abdullahi Rabiu; Haque, Mainul

    2015-01-01

    Didactic lecture is the oldest and most commonly used method of teaching. In addition, it is considered one of the most efficient ways to disseminate theories, ideas, and facts. Many critics feel that lectures are an obsolete method to use when students need to perform hands-on activities, which is an everyday need in the study of medicine. This study evaluates students' perceptions regarding lecture quality in a new medical school. This was a cross-sectional study conducted of the medical students of Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin. The study population was 468 preclinical medical students from years 1 and 2 of academic year 2012-2013. Data were collected using a validated instrument. There were six different sections of questions using a 5-point Likert scale. The data were then compiled and analyzed, using SPSS version 20. The response rate was 73%. Among 341 respondents, 30% were male and 70% were female. Eighty-five percent of respondents agree or strongly agree that the lectures had met the criteria with regard to organization of lecture materials. Similarly, 97% of students agree or strongly agree that lecturers maintained adequate voices and gestures. Medical students are quite satisfied with the lecture classes and the lectures. However, further research is required to identify student-centered teaching and learning methods to promote active learning.

  8. Lexical analysis of the Code of Medical Ethics of the Federal Council of Medicine.

    Andrade, Edson de Oliveira; Andrade, Edson de Oliveira

    2016-04-01

    The Code of Medical Ethics (CME) of the Federal Council of Medicine is the legal document that exposes the moral discourse of Brazilian physicians to society and the profession. It is a set of propositions based on which doctors say they are committed to values of conduct aimed at fair and proper professional practice. To verify through lexical analysis of the CME corpus if the goals presented in the arguments of the resolution that established the code are properly addressed in these regulations. This is a quantitative and qualitative study of descriptive nature, aiming at a lexical analysis of the CME. The lexical analysis was performed using a method of Top-Down Hierarchical Classification of vocabulary, as described by Reinert in 1987, assuming that words used in similar contexts are associated with a single lexical world. In addition to the analysis of results, an improved representation of the charts related with Factorial and Similitude Analyses was made. Six clusters were extracted, leading to the identification of three major branches: health care, professional practice and research. These branches revolve around the figures of physician and patient. The similitude analysis revealed a complementarity status between these two figures. The lexical analysis showed that the purposes contained in the resolution that established the CME were adequately represented in the document body.

  9. Trends in Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Accreditation for Subspecialty Fellowship Training in Plastic Surgery.

    Silvestre, Jason; Serletti, Joseph M; Chang, Benjamin

    2018-05-01

    The purposes of this study were to (1) determine the proportion of plastic surgery residents pursuing subspecialty training relative to other surgical specialties, and (2) analyze trends in Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education accreditation of plastic surgery subspecialty fellowship programs. The American Medical Association provided data on career intentions of surgical chief residents graduating from 2014 to 2016. The percentage of residents pursuing fellowship training was compared by specialty. Trends in the proportion of accredited fellowship programs in craniofacial surgery, hand surgery, and microsurgery were analyzed. The percentage of accredited programs was compared between subspecialties with added-certification options (hand surgery) and subspecialties without added-certification options (craniofacial surgery and microsurgery). Most integrated and independent plastic surgery residents pursued fellowship training (61.8 percent versus 49.6 percent; p = 0.014). Differences existed by specialty from a high in orthopedic surgery (90.8 percent) to a low in colon and rectal surgery (3.2 percent). From 2005 to 2015, the percentage of accredited craniofacial fellowship programs increased, but was not significant (from 27.8 percent to 33.3 percent; p = 0.386). For hand surgery, the proportion of accredited programs that were plastic surgery (p = 0.755) and orthopedic surgery (p = 0.253) was stable, whereas general surgery decreased (p = 0.010). Subspecialty areas with added-certification options had more accredited fellowships than those without (100 percent versus 19.2 percent; p < 0.001). There has been slow adoption of accreditation among plastic surgery subspecialty fellowships, but added-certification options appear to be highly correlated.

  10. Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Surgery Resident Operative Logs: The Last Quarter Century.

    Drake, Frederick Thurston; Aarabi, Shahram; Garland, Brandon T; Huntington, Ciara R; McAteer, Jarod P; Richards, Morgan K; Zern, Nicole Kansier; Gow, Kenneth W

    2017-05-01

    To describe secular trends in operative experience for surgical trainees across an extended period using the most comprehensive data available, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) case logs. Some experts have expressed concern that current trainees are inadequately prepared for independent practice. One frequently mentioned factor is whether duty hours' restrictions (DHR) implemented in 2003 and 2004 contributed by reducing time spent in the operating room. A dataset was generated from annual ACGME reports. Operative volume for total major cases (TMC), defined categories, and four index laparoscopic procedures was evaluated. TMC dropped after implementation of DHR but rebounded after a transition period (949 vs 946 cases, P = nonsignificance). Abdominal cases increased from 22% of overall cases to 31%. Alimentary cases increased from 21% to 26%. Trauma and vascular surgery substantially decreased. For trauma, this drop took place well before DHR. The decrease in vascular surgery also began before DHR but continued afterward as well: 148 cases/resident in the late 1990s to 107 currently. Although total operative volume rebounded after implementation of DHR, diversity of operative experienced narrowed. The combined increase in alimentary and abdominal cases is nearly 13%, over a half-year's worth of operating in 5-year training programs. Bedrock general surgery cases-trauma, vascular, pediatrics, and breast-decreased. Laparoscopic operations have steadily increased. If the competence of current graduates has, in fact, diminished. Our analysis suggests that operative volume is not the problem. Rather, changing disease processes, subspecialization, reductions in resident autonomy, and technical innovation challenge how today's general surgeons are trained.

  11. Historic day for Malaysian consumers.

    Kaur, S R

    1993-04-01

    The Malaysian Medical Association, the Malaysian Dental Association, the Malaysian Pharmaceutical Society, and the Federation of Malaysian Consumer Associations have introduced and endorsed the Charter for Patient Rights. The Charter recognized that health care is a basic human right, regardless of race, religion, social status, and ability to pay. Further, consumers have the right to seek medical care in both the public and private sectors. The Charter also includes the right to a second opinion, one's own medical records, and explanation before receiving any medical treatment and concerning the risks of treatment, compensation for negligence, and adequate information. Malaysia is the second Asian country to have such a charter, South Korea being the first. The UK also has a Patients Charter. The rest of Europe is also moving to adopt such a charter. The private sector, which serves only those who can afford them, provides most health care services in developing countries. Thus, a large private sector threatens the elderly, unemployed, rural poor, and the mentally ill in these countries. The supply of these services is a marketable commodity which physicians and health care professionals own and sell. The medical community has planned, formulated, implemented, and monitored health services in most of these countries. Therefore, the private sector is a major obstacle to health for all. The Charter helps to break down the barrier by informing both physicians and their patients of their rights and responsibilities.

  12. Nurse Level of Education, Quality of Care and Patient Safety in the Medical and Surgical Wards in Malaysian Private Hospitals: A Cross-sectional Study.

    Abdul Rahman, Hamzah; Jarrar, Mu'taman; Don, Mohammad Sobri

    2015-04-23

    Nursing knowledge and skills are required to sustain quality of care and patient safety. The numbers of nurses with Bachelor degrees in Malaysia are very limited. This study aims to predict the impact of nurse level of education on quality of care and patient safety in the medical and surgical wards in Malaysian private hospitals. A cross-sectional survey by questionnaire was conducted. A total 652 nurses working in the medical and surgical wards in 12 private hospitals were participated in the study. Multistage stratified simple random sampling performed to invite nurses working in small size (less than 100 beds), medium size (100-199 beds) and large size (over than 200) hospitals to participate in the study. This allowed nurses from all shifts to participate in this study. Nurses with higher education were not significantly associated with both quality of care and patient safety. However, a total 355 (60.9%) of respondents participated in this study were working in teaching hospitals. Teaching hospitals offer training for all newly appointed staff. They also provide general orientation programs and training to outline the policies, procedures of the nurses' roles and responsibilities. This made the variances between the Bachelor and Diploma nurses not significantly associated with the outcomes of care. Nursing educational level was not associated with the outcomes of care in Malaysian private hospitals. However, training programs and the general nursing orientation programs for nurses in Malaysia can help to upgrade the Diploma-level nurses. Training programs can increase their self confidence, knowledge, critical thinking ability and improve their interpersonal skills. So, it can be concluded that better education and training for a medical and surgical wards' nurses is required for satisfying client expectations and sustaining the outcomes of patient care.

  13. Fostering evidence-based quality improvement for patient-centered medical homes: Initiating local quality councils to transform primary care.

    Stockdale, Susan E; Zuchowski, Jessica; Rubenstein, Lisa V; Sapir, Negar; Yano, Elizabeth M; Altman, Lisa; Fickel, Jacqueline J; McDougall, Skye; Dresselhaus, Timothy; Hamilton, Alison B

    Although the patient-centered medical home endorses quality improvement principles, methods for supporting ongoing, systematic primary care quality improvement have not been evaluated. We introduced primary care quality councils at six Veterans Health Administration sites as an organizational intervention with three key design elements: (a) fostering interdisciplinary quality improvement leadership, (b) establishing a structured quality improvement process, and (c) facilitating organizationally aligned frontline quality improvement innovation. Our evaluation objectives were to (a) assess design element implementation, (b) describe implementation barriers and facilitators, and (c) assess successful quality improvement project completion and spread. We analyzed administrative records and conducted interviews with 85 organizational leaders. We developed and applied criteria for assessing design element implementation using hybrid deductive/inductive analytic techniques. All quality councils implemented interdisciplinary leadership and a structured quality improvement process, and all but one completed at least one quality improvement project and a toolkit for spreading improvements. Quality councils were perceived as most effective when service line leaders had well-functioning interdisciplinary communication. Matching positions within leadership hierarchies with appropriate supportive roles facilitated frontline quality improvement efforts. Two key resources were (a) a dedicated internal facilitator with project management, data collection, and presentation skills and (b) support for preparing customized data reports for identifying and addressing practice level quality issues. Overall, quality councils successfully cultivated interdisciplinary, multilevel primary care quality improvement leadership with accountability mechanisms and generated frontline innovations suitable for spread. Practice level performance data and quality improvement project management support

  14. Evaluating Coding Accuracy in General Surgery Residents' Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Procedural Case Logs.

    Balla, Fadi; Garwe, Tabitha; Motghare, Prasenjeet; Stamile, Tessa; Kim, Jennifer; Mahnken, Heidi; Lees, Jason

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) case log captures resident operative experience based on Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes and is used to track operative experience during residency. With increasing emphasis on resident operative experiences, coding is more important than ever. It has been shown in other surgical specialties at similar institutions that the residents' ACGME case log may not accurately reflect their operative experience. What barriers may influence this remains unclear. As the only objective measure of resident operative experience, an accurate case log is paramount in representing one's operative experience. This study aims to determine the accuracy of procedural coding by general surgical residents at a single institution. Data were collected from 2 consecutive graduating classes of surgical residents' ACGME case logs from 2008 to 2014. A total of 5799 entries from 7 residents were collected. The CPT codes entered by residents were compared to departmental billing records submitted by the attending surgeon for each procedure. Assigned CPT codes by institutional American Academy of Professional Coders certified abstract coders were considered the "gold standard." A total of 4356 (75.12%) of 5799 entries were identified in billing records. Excel 2010 and SAS 9.3 were used for analysis. In the event of multiple codes for the same patient, any match between resident codes and billing record codes was considered a "correct" entry. A 4-question survey was distributed to all current general surgical residents at our institution for feedback on coding habits, limitations to accurate coding, and opinions on ACGME case log representation of their operative experience. All 7 residents had a low percentage of correctly entered CPT codes. The overall accuracy proportion for all residents was 52.82% (range: 43.32%-60.07%). Only 1 resident showed significant improvement in accuracy during his/her training (p = 0

  15. 78 FR 49332 - National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC); Notice of Federal Advisory...

    2013-08-13

    ... Departments of Transportation, Homeland Security, and Health & Human Services (4) Presentation and discussion... Public Good and Essential Service b. Research in Prehospital Care: Models for Success c. Emerging Digital.... Improving Internal NEMSAC Processes e. Safety (7) Other Business of the Council (8) Public Comment Period (3...

  16. 76 FR 64952 - Council on Graduate Medical Education; Notice of Meeting

    2011-10-19

    ..., Education, Labor and Pensions, and the House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce. At this... Health, Education, Labor and Pensions of the Senate; and the Committee on Energy and Commerce of the... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Council on...

  17. 76 FR 64174 - National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC); Notice of Federal Advisory...

    2011-10-17

    ... from NHTSA Office of EMS. (5) Presentation of the Draft Culture of Safety Strategy. (6) Federal Partner Update. (7) Public Comment Period. (8) Business of the Council. Wednesday, December 14, 2011 (1... Emerging Issues. (4) Unfinished Business/Continued Discussion from Previous Day. (5) Next Steps and Adjourn...

  18. 76 FR 51122 - National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC); Notice of Federal Advisory...

    2011-08-17

    ... Minutes of last Meeting. (4) Update from NHTSA Office of EMS. (5) Presentation of the Draft Culture of...) Public Comment Period. (8) Business of the Council. Thursday, September 8, 2011 (1) Presentations from... of New and Emerging Issues. (5) Unfinished Business/Continued Discussion from Previous Day. (6) Next...

  19. Translation and psychometric analysis of the Malaysian version of medication understanding and use self-efficacy scale (m-muse for diabetes mellitus

    Safaa A Al Abboud

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Enhancing diabetes self-efficacy (SE level can improve the self-management behaviour in patients living with diabetes mellitus (DM. This study aimed to translate and assess the psychometric properties of Malaysian version of diabetes Medication Understanding and Use Self-Efficacy Scale (M-MUSE. Methods: Following the translation of English version of MUSE to Malay language using established international standard translation guidelines, 252 adult diabetics (≥ 18 years old; DM type 1 or 2 attending the Endocrine Clinic at Hospital Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, were recruited in this cross-sectional study. After testing the face and content validity, the psychometric properties of the final M-MUSE were evaluated using the Classical Test Theory (CTT for reliability (Cronbach’s alpha (α and intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC and construct validity (factor analysis (FA. Results: The semantic and conceptual problems in M-MUSE were identified and modified by a qualified professional translation committee. The final version showed good reliability values for internal consistency (Cronbach’s α = 0.89 and one month test-retest reliability (ICC = 0.72. The Bartlett’s test of sphericity and the Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin tests proved the suitability of M-MUSE for factor analysis. The extracted single component M-MUSE (eigenvalue > 1 explained a total variance of 57.58% with an eigenvalue of 4.60. The two factor structures; namely taking medication (item # 1, 6, 7 and 8 and learning about medication (item # 2, 3, 4 and 5 explained a total variance of 59.25% with good factor loading values (ranged from 0.63 to 0.89 for taking medication, and 0.66 to 0.83 for learning about medication. Conclusion: The M-MUSE appears to be a linguistically reliable and valid measure that is conceptually equivalent to the original version. The M-MUSE can be used in Malaysian healthcare settings to evaluate the SE in understanding and using prescribed

  20. The State of Human Anatomy Teaching in the Medical Schools of Gulf Cooperation Council Countries: Present and future perspectives.

    Habbal, Omar

    2009-04-01

    Available literature on medical education charts an emerging trend in the field of anatomy. In the past decade, assisted by innovations in informatics and the paradigm shift in medical education, the hands-on experience of cadaver dissection has progressively become a relic of the past. Within the context of the situation in Gulf Cooperation Council countries, this paper compares the traditional teaching approach with the modern one that tends to emphasise technical gadgetry, virtual reality and plastic models rather than hands-on-experience to impart knowledge and skill. However, cadaver-based learning is an important building block for the future physician and surgeon since clinical astuteness is likely to rely on skills gained from hands-on experience rather than the tendency to learning through virtual reality found in modern curricula.

  1. COGME 1995 Physician Workforce Funding Recommendations for Department of Health and Human Services' Programs. Council on Graduate Medical Education, 7th Report.

    Council on Graduate Medical Education.

    This report presents specific recommendations to the Department of Health and Human Services and Congress from the Council on Graduate Medical Education that address Medicare's direct and indirect graduate medical education (GME) payments and the monies allocated by the Public Health Service that is targeted toward physician education and primary…

  2. Comparison of Indian Council for Medical Research and Lunar Databases for Categorization of Male Bone Mineral Density.

    Singh, Surya K; Patel, Vivek H; Gupta, Balram

    2017-06-19

    The mainstay of diagnosis of osteoporosis is dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scan measuring areal bone mineral density (BMD) (g/cm 2 ). The aim of the present study was to compare the Indian Council of Medical Research database (ICMRD) and the Lunar ethnic reference database of DXA scans in the diagnosis of osteoporosis in male patients. In this retrospective study, all male patients who underwent a DXA scan were included. The areal BMD (g/cm 2 ) was measured at either the lumbar spine (L1-L4) or the total hip using the Lunar DXA machine (software version 8.50) manufactured by GE Medical Systems (Shanghai, China). The Indian Council of Medical Research published a reference data for BMD in the Indian population derived from the population-based study conducted in healthy Indian individuals, which was used to analyze the BMD result by Lunar DXA scan. The 2 results were compared for various values using statistical software SPSS for Windows (version 16; SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL). A total 238 male patients with a mean age of 57.2 yr (standard deviation ±15.9) were included. Overall, 26.4% (66/250) and 2.8% (7/250) of the subjects were classified in the osteoporosis group according to the Lunar database and the ICMRD, respectively. Out of the 250 sites of the DXA scan, 28.8% (19/66) and 60.0% (40/66) of the cases classified as osteoporosis by the Lunar database were reclassified as normal and osteopenia by ICMRD, respectively. In conclusion, the Indian Council of Medical Research data underestimated the degree of osteoporosis in male subjects that might result in deferring of treatment. In view of the discrepancy, the decision on the treatment of osteoporosis should be based on the multiple fracture risk factors and less reliably on the BMD T-score. Copyright © 2017 The International Society for Clinical Densitometry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Determinants of medication adherence among adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus in three Malaysian public health clinics: a cross-sectional study.

    Chew, Boon-How; Hassan, Noor-Hasliza; Sherina, Mohd-Sidik

    2015-01-01

    Medication adherence (MA) in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) is associated with improved disease control (glycated hemoglobin, blood pressure, and lipid profile), lower rates of death and diabetes-related complications, increased quality of life, and decreased health care resource utilization. However, there is a paucity of data on the effect of diabetes-related distress, depression, and health-related quality of life on MA. This study examined factors associated with MA in adults with T2D at the primary care level. This was a cross-sectional study conducted in three Malaysian public health clinics, where adults with T2D were recruited consecutively in 2013. We used the 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) to assess MA as the main dependent variable. In addition to sociodemographic data, we included diabetes-related distress, depressive symptoms, and health-related quality of life as independent variables. Independent association between the MMAS-8 score and its determinants was done using generalized linear models with a gamma distribution and log link function. The participant response rate was 93.1% (700/752). The majority were female (52.8%), Malay (52.9%), and married (79.1%). About 43% of patients were classified as showing low MA (MMAS-8 score health care providers in public health clinics should focus on MA counselling for adult T2D patients who are younger, have a higher income, and symptoms of depression.

  4. 78 FR 16679 - Center for Drug Evaluation and Research Medical Policy Council; Request for Comments

    2013-03-18

    ... consistent, predictable communication of medical policy decisions to the public through guidance, notice and... protection, (6) bioresearch monitoring, (7) good clinical practice, (8) counter-terrorism drug development...

  5. The revised guidelines of the Medical Council of India for academic promotions: Need for a rethink

    Aggarwal, Rakesh; Gogtay, Nithya; Kumar, Rajeev; Sahni, Peush

    2015-01-01

    Note: This editorial is being published simultaneously in the Indian Heart Journal, Indian Journal of Anaesthesia, Indian Journal of Gastroenterology, Indian Journal of Medical Ethics, Indian Journal of Medical Microbiology, Indian Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology, Indian Journal of Pharmacology, Indian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology, Indian Journal of Urology, Indian Pediatrics, International Journal of Health Research &...

  6. Achieving Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education duty hours compliance within advanced surgical training: a simulation-based feasibility assessment.

    Obi, Andrea; Chung, Jennifer; Chen, Ryan; Lin, Wandi; Sun, Siyuan; Pozehl, William; Cohn, Amy M; Daskin, Mark S; Seagull, F Jacob; Reddy, Rishindra M

    2015-11-01

    Certain operative cases occur unpredictably and/or have long operative times, creating a conflict between Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) rules and adequate training experience. A ProModel-based simulation was developed based on historical data. Probabilistic distributions of operative time calculated and combined with an ACGME compliant call schedule. For the advanced surgical cases modeled (cardiothoracic transplants), 80-hour violations were 6.07% and the minimum number of days off was violated 22.50%. There was a 36% chance of failure to fulfill any (either heart or lung) minimum case requirement despite adequate volume. The variable nature of emergency cases inevitably leads to work hour violations under ACGME regulations. Unpredictable cases mandate higher operative volume to ensure achievement of adequate caseloads. Publically available simulation technology provides a valuable avenue to identify adequacy of case volumes for trainees in both the elective and emergency setting. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Estimating Renal Function in the Elderly Malaysian Patients Attending Medical Outpatient Clinic: A Comparison between Creatinine Based and Cystatin-C Based Equations

    Maisarah Jalalonmuhali

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. To assess the performance of different GFR estimating equations, test the diagnostic value of serum cystatin-C, and compare the applicability of cystatin-C based equation with serum creatinine based equation for estimating GFR (eGFR in comparison with measured GFR in the elderly Malaysian patients. Methods. A cross-sectional study recruiting volunteered patients 65 years and older attending medical outpatient clinic. 51 chromium EDTA (51Cr-EDTA was used as measured GFR. The predictive capabilities of Cockcroft-Gault equation corrected for body surface area (CGBSA, four-variable Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (4-MDRD, and Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI equations using serum creatinine (CKD-EPIcr as well as serum cystatin-C (CKD-EPIcys were calculated. Results. A total of 40 patients, 77.5% male, with mean measured GFR 41.2±18.9 ml/min/1.73 m2 were enrolled. Mean bias was the smallest for 4-MDRD; meanwhile, CKD-EPIcr had the highest precision and accuracy with lower limit of agreement among other equations. CKD-EPIcys equation did not show any improvement in GFR estimation in comparison to CKD-EPIcr and MDRD. Conclusion. The CKD-EPIcr formula appears to be more accurate and correlates better with measured GFR in this cohort of elderly patients.

  8. Estimating Renal Function in the Elderly Malaysian Patients Attending Medical Outpatient Clinic: A Comparison between Creatinine Based and Cystatin-C Based Equations.

    Jalalonmuhali, Maisarah; Elagel, Salma Mohamed Abouzriba; Tan, Maw Pin; Lim, Soo Kun; Ng, Kok Peng

    2018-01-01

    To assess the performance of different GFR estimating equations, test the diagnostic value of serum cystatin-C, and compare the applicability of cystatin-C based equation with serum creatinine based equation for estimating GFR (eGFR) in comparison with measured GFR in the elderly Malaysian patients. A cross-sectional study recruiting volunteered patients 65 years and older attending medical outpatient clinic. 51 chromium EDTA ( 51 Cr-EDTA) was used as measured GFR. The predictive capabilities of Cockcroft-Gault equation corrected for body surface area (CGBSA), four-variable Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (4-MDRD), and Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equations using serum creatinine (CKD-EPIcr) as well as serum cystatin-C (CKD-EPIcys) were calculated. A total of 40 patients, 77.5% male, with mean measured GFR 41.2 ± 18.9 ml/min/1.73 m 2 were enrolled. Mean bias was the smallest for 4-MDRD; meanwhile, CKD-EPIcr had the highest precision and accuracy with lower limit of agreement among other equations. CKD-EPIcys equation did not show any improvement in GFR estimation in comparison to CKD-EPIcr and MDRD. The CKD-EPIcr formula appears to be more accurate and correlates better with measured GFR in this cohort of elderly patients.

  9. Shifting subjects of health-care: Placing 'medical tourism' in the context of Malaysian domestic health-care reform

    Ormond, M.E.

    2011-01-01

    Medical tourism’ has frequently been held to unsettle naturalised relationships between the state and its citizenry. Yet in casting ‘medical tourism’ as either an outside ‘innovation’ or ‘invasion’, scholars have often ignored the role that the neoliberal retrenchment of social welfare structures

  10. International Medical Graduates. Immigration Law and Policy and the U.S. Physician Workforce. Council on Graduate Medical Education Resource Paper. A COGME Panel Discussion (Washington, DC, March 12, 1996).

    Health Resources and Services Administration (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD. Bureau of Health Professions.

    This report includes presentations and discussions by the Council on Graduate Medical Education (COGME) addressing issues related to the current supply of physicians in the United States and the role of international medical graduates (IMGs). The presentations focused on the following areas: the exchange visitor program and the use of waivers, the…

  11. Are the General Medical Council's Tests of Competence fair to long standing doctors? A retrospective cohort study.

    Mehdizadeh, Leila; Sturrock, Alison; Dacre, Jane

    2015-04-21

    The General Medical Council's Fitness to Practise investigations may involve a test of competence for doctors with performance concerns. Concern has been raised about the suitability of the test format for doctors who qualified before the introduction of Single Best Answer and Objective Structured Clinical Examination assessments, both of which form the test of competence. This study explored whether the examination formats used in the tests of competence are fair to long standing doctors who have undergone fitness to practise investigation. A retrospective cohort design was used to determine an association between year of primary medical qualification and doctors' test of competence performance. Performance of 95 general practitioners under investigation was compared with a group of 376 volunteer doctors. We analysed performance on knowledge test, OSCE overall, and three individual OSCE stations using Spearman's correlation and regression models. Doctors under investigation performed worse on all test outcomes compared to the comparison group. Qualification year correlated positively with performance on all outcomes except for physical examination (e.g. knowledge test r = 0.48, p fitness to practise investigation performed less well on the test of competence than their more recently qualified peers under investigation. The performance of the comparator group tended to stay consistent irrespective of year qualified. Our results suggest that the test format does not disadvantage early qualified doctors. We discuss findings in relation to the GMC's fitness to practise procedures and suggest alternative explanations for the poorer performance of long standing doctors under investigation.

  12. Evaluating the Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education core clinical competencies: techniques and feasibility in a urology training program.

    Miller, David C; Montie, James E; Faerber, Gary J

    2003-10-01

    We describe several traditional and novel techniques for teaching and evaluating the Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) core clinical competencies in a urology residency training program. The evolution and underpinnings of the ACGME Outcome Project were reviewed. Several publications related to the evaluation of clinical competencies as well as current assessment techniques at our institution were also analyzed. Several tools for the assessment of clinical competencies have been developed and refined in response to the ACGME Outcome project. Standardized patient encounters and expanded patient satisfaction surveys may prove useful with regard to assessing resident professionalism, patient care and communication skills. A feasible and possibly undervalued technique for evaluating a number of core competencies is the implementation of formal written appraisals of the nature and quality of resident performance at departmental conferences. The assessment of competency in practice based learning and systems based practice may be achieved through innovative exercises, such as practice guideline development, that assess the evidence for various urologic interventions as well as the financial and administrative aspects of such care. We describe several contemporary methods for teaching and evaluating the core clinical competencies in a urology training program. While the techniques described are neither comprehensive nor feasible for every program, they nevertheless provide an important starting point for a meaningful exchange of ideas in the urological graduate medical education community.

  13. SU-A-BRA-00: Education Council Symposium: Revitalizing Your Medical Physics Classroom: Some Examples and Thoughts from the Trenches

    2016-01-01

    Vic Montemayor - No one has been more passionate about improving the quality and effectiveness of the teaching of Medical Physics than Bill Hendee. It was in August of 2008 that the first AAPM Workshop on Becoming a Better Teacher of Medical Physics was held, organized and run by Bill Hendee. This was followed up in July of 2010 with a summer school on the same topic, again organized by Bill. There has been continued interest in alternate approaches to teaching medical physics since those initial gatherings. The momentum established by these workshops is made clear each year in the annual Innovation in Medical Physics Education session, which highlights work being done in all forms of medical physics education, from one-on-one residencies or classroom presentations to large-scale program revisions and on-line resources for international audiences. This symposium, presented on behalf of the Education Council, highlights the work of three finalists from past Innovation in Education sessions. Each will be presenting their approaches to and innovations in teaching medical physics. It is hoped that audience members interested in trying something new in their teaching of medical physics will find some of these ideas and approaches readily applicable to their own classrooms. Rebecca Howell - The presentation will discuss ways to maximize classroom learning, i.e., increasing the amount of material covered while also enhancing students’ understanding of the broader implications of the course topics. Specifically, the presentation will focus on two teaching methodologies, project based learning and flip learning. These teaching methods will be illustrated using an example of graduate medical physics course where both are used in conjunction with traditional lectures. Additionally, the presentation will focus on our experience implementing these methods including challenges that were overcome. Jay Burmeister - My presentation will discuss the incorporation of active

  14. SU-A-BRA-00: Education Council Symposium: Revitalizing Your Medical Physics Classroom: Some Examples and Thoughts from the Trenches

    NONE

    2016-06-15

    Vic Montemayor - No one has been more passionate about improving the quality and effectiveness of the teaching of Medical Physics than Bill Hendee. It was in August of 2008 that the first AAPM Workshop on Becoming a Better Teacher of Medical Physics was held, organized and run by Bill Hendee. This was followed up in July of 2010 with a summer school on the same topic, again organized by Bill. There has been continued interest in alternate approaches to teaching medical physics since those initial gatherings. The momentum established by these workshops is made clear each year in the annual Innovation in Medical Physics Education session, which highlights work being done in all forms of medical physics education, from one-on-one residencies or classroom presentations to large-scale program revisions and on-line resources for international audiences. This symposium, presented on behalf of the Education Council, highlights the work of three finalists from past Innovation in Education sessions. Each will be presenting their approaches to and innovations in teaching medical physics. It is hoped that audience members interested in trying something new in their teaching of medical physics will find some of these ideas and approaches readily applicable to their own classrooms. Rebecca Howell - The presentation will discuss ways to maximize classroom learning, i.e., increasing the amount of material covered while also enhancing students’ understanding of the broader implications of the course topics. Specifically, the presentation will focus on two teaching methodologies, project based learning and flip learning. These teaching methods will be illustrated using an example of graduate medical physics course where both are used in conjunction with traditional lectures. Additionally, the presentation will focus on our experience implementing these methods including challenges that were overcome. Jay Burmeister - My presentation will discuss the incorporation of active

  15. Determinants of medication adherence among adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus in three Malaysian public health clinics: a cross-sectional study

    Chew BH

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Boon-How Chew,1 Noor-Hasliza Hassan,2 Mohd-Sidik Sherina3 1Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 2Klinik Kesihatan Dengkil, Ministry of Health, 3Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Malaysia Abstract: Medication adherence (MA in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D is associated with improved disease control (glycated hemoglobin, blood pressure, and lipid profile, lower rates of death and diabetes-related complications, increased quality of life, and decreased health care resource utilization. However, there is a paucity of data on the effect of diabetes-related distress, depression, and health-related quality of life on MA. This study examined factors associated with MA in adults with T2D at the primary care level. This was a cross-sectional study conducted in three Malaysian public health clinics, where adults with T2D were recruited consecutively in 2013. We used the 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8 to assess MA as the main dependent variable. In addition to sociodemographic data, we included diabetes-related distress, depressive symptoms, and health-related quality of life as independent variables. Independent association between the MMAS-8 score and its determinants was done using generalized linear models with a gamma distribution and log link function. The participant response rate was 93.1% (700/752. The majority were female (52.8%, Malay (52.9%, and married (79.1%. About 43% of patients were classified as showing low MA (MMAS-8 score <6. Higher income (adjusted odds ratio 0.90 and depressive symptoms (adjusted odds ratio 0.99 were significant independent determinants of medication non-adherence in young adults with T2D. Low MA in adults with T2D is a prevalent problem. Thus, primary health care providers in public health clinics should focus on MA counselling for adult T2D patients who are

  16. The electronic residency application service application can predict accreditation council for graduate medical education competency-based surgical resident performance.

    Tolan, Amy M; Kaji, Amy H; Quach, Chi; Hines, O Joe; de Virgilio, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Program directors often struggle to determine which factors in the Electronic Residency Application Service (ERAS) application are important in the residency selection process. With the establishment of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) competencies, it would be important to know whether information available in the ERAS application can predict subsequent competency-based performance of general surgery residents. This study is a retrospective correlation of data points found in the ERAS application with core competency-based clinical rotation evaluations. ACGME competency-based evaluations as well as technical skills assessment from all rotations during residency were collected. The overall competency score was defined as an average of all 6 competencies and technical skills. A total of77 residents from two (one university and one community based university-affiliate) general surgery residency programs were included in the analysis. Receiving honors for many of the third year clerkships and AOA membership were associated with a number of the individual competencies. USMLE scores were predictive only of Medical Knowledge (p = 0.004). Factors associated with higher overall competency were female gender (p = 0.02), AOA (p = 0.06), overall number of honors received (p = 0.04), and honors in Ob/Gyn (p = 0.03) and Pediatrics (p = 0.05). Multivariable analysis showed honors in Ob/Gyn, female gender, older age, and total number of honors to be predictive of a number of individual core competencies. USMLE scores were only predictive of Medical Knowledge. The ERAS application is useful for predicting subsequent competency based performance in surgical residents. Receiving honors in the surgery clerkship, which has traditionally carried weight when evaluating a potential surgery resident, may not be as strong a predictor of future success. Copyright © 2010 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  17. Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Core Competencies at a Community Teaching Hospital: Is There a Gap in Awareness?

    Al-Temimi, Mohammed; Kidon, Michael; Johna, Samir

    2016-01-01

    Reports evaluating faculty knowledge of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) core competencies in community hospitals without a dedicated residency program are uncommon. Faculty evaluation regarding knowledge of ACGME core competencies before a residency program is started. Physicians at the Kaiser Permanente Fontana Medical Center (N = 480) were surveyed for their knowledge of ACGME core competencies before starting new residency programs. Knowledge of ACGME core competencies. Fifty percent of physicians responded to the survey, and 172 (71%) of respondents were involved in teaching residents. Of physicians who taught residents and had complete responses (N = 164), 65 (39.7%) were unsure of their knowledge of the core competencies. However, most stated that they provided direct teaching to residents related to the knowledge, skills, and attitudes stated in each of the 6 competencies as follows: medical knowledge (96.3%), patient care (95.7%), professionalism (90.7%), interpersonal and communication skills (86.3%), practice-based learning (85.9%), and system-based practice (79.6%). Physician specialty, years in practice (1-10 vs > 10), and number of rotations taught per year (1-6 vs 7-12) were not associated with knowledge of the competencies (p > 0.05); however, full-time faculty (teaching 10-12 rotations per year) were more likely to provide competency-based teaching. Objective assessment of faculty awareness of ACGME core competencies is essential when starting a residency program. Discrepancy between knowledge of the competencies and acclaimed provision of competency-based teaching emphasizes the need for standardized teaching methods that incorporate the values of these competencies.

  18. Research priorities in Maternal, Newborn, & Child Health & Nutrition for India: An Indian Council of Medical Research-INCLEN Initiative

    Narendra K Arora

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In India, research prioritization in Maternal, Newborn, and Child Health and Nutrition (MNCHN themes has traditionally involved only a handful of experts mostly from major cities. The Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR-INCLEN collaboration undertook a nationwide exercise engaging faculty from 256 institutions to identify top research priorities in the MNCHN themes for 2016-2025. The Child Health and Nutrition Research Initiative method of priority setting was adapted. The context of the exercise was defined by a National Steering Group (NSG and guided by four Thematic Research Subcommittees. Research ideas were pooled from 498 experts located in different parts of India, iteratively consolidated into research options, scored by 893 experts against five pre-defined criteria (answerability, relevance, equity, investment and innovation and weighed by a larger reference group. Ranked lists of priorities were generated for each of the four themes at national and three subnational (regional levels [Empowered Action Group & North-Eastern States, Southern and Western States, & Northern States (including West Bengal]. Research priorities differed between regions and from overall national priorities. Delivery domain of research which included implementation research constituted about 70 per cent of the top ten research options under all four themes. The results were endorsed in the NSG meeting. There was unanimity that the research priorities should be considered by different governmental and non-governmental agencies for investment with prioritization on implementation research and issues cutting across themes.

  19. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) assessment test scores corresponding to modified Medical Research Council grades among COPD patients.

    Lee, Chang-Hoon; Lee, Jinwoo; Park, Young Sik; Lee, Sang-Min; Yim, Jae-Joon; Kim, Young Whan; Han, Sung Koo; Yoo, Chul-Gyu

    2015-09-01

    In assigning patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) to subgroups according to the updated guidelines of the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease, discrepancies have been noted between the COPD assessment test (CAT) criteria and modified Medical Research Council (mMRC) criteria. We investigated the determinants of symptom and risk groups and sought to identify a better CAT criterion. This retrospective study included COPD patients seen between June 20, 2012, and December 5, 2012. The CAT score that can accurately predict an mMRC grade ≥ 2 versus COPD patients, the percentages of patients classified into subgroups A, B, C, and D were 24.5%, 47.2%, 4.2%, and 24.1% based on CAT criteria and 49.3%, 22.4%, 8.9%, and 19.4% based on mMRC criteria, respectively. More than 90% of the patients who met the mMRC criteria for the 'more symptoms group' also met the CAT criteria. AUROC and CART analyses suggested that a CAT score ≥ 15 predicted an mMRC grade ≥ 2 more accurately than the current CAT score criterion. During follow-up, patients with CAT scores of 10 to 14 did not have a different risk of exacerbation versus those with CAT scores COPD patients.

  20. Science councils in South Africa

    Scholes, RJ

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available for Scien- tific and Industrial Research (CSIR), the Medical Research Council, Agricultural Research Council, Human Sciences Research Council, Council for Geosciences, Mintek, and the Nuclear Energy Corporation of SA. Legally, it includes the National... with social or commercial impact is long and uncer- tain, and becomes more and more expen- sive the closer the development gets to implementation. It is hard for a single organization to span this entire contin- uum effectively—it requires ‘interfacial...

  1. Radiological emergency: Malaysian preparedness and response

    Yusof, M. A. W.; Ali, H. M.

    2011-01-01

    Planning and preparation in advance for radiological emergencies can help to minimise potential public health and environmental threats if and when an actual emergency occurs. During the planning process, emergency response organisations think through how they would respond to each type of incident and the resources that will be needed. In Malaysia, planning, preparation for and response to radiological emergencies involve many parties. In the event of a radiological emergency and if it is considered a disaster, the National Security Council, the Atomic Energy Licensing Board and the Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia) will work together with other federal agencies, state and local governments, first responders and international organisations to monitor the situation, contain the release, and clean up the contaminated site. Throughout the response, these agencies use their protective action guidelines. This paper discusses Malaysian preparedness for, and response to, any potential radiological emergency. (authors)

  2. Effects of Brief Psychoeducational Program on Stigma in Malaysian Pre-clinical Medical Students: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Fernandez, Aaron; Tan, Kit-Aun; Knaak, Stephanie; Chew, Boon How; Ghazali, Sazlina Shariff

    2016-12-01

    If presented with serious mental illness (SMI), individuals' low help-seeking behaviors and poor adherence to treatment are associated with negative stereotypes and attitudes of healthcare providers. In this study, we examined the effects of a brief psychoeducational program on reducing stigma in pre-clinical medical students. One hundred and two pre-clinical medical students (20-23 years old) were randomly assigned to face-to-face contact + educational lecture (n = 51) condition or video-based contact + educational lecture (n = 51) condition. Measures of pre-clinical medical students' mental illness-related stigma using the Opening Minds Stigma Scale for Health Care Providers (OMS-HC) were administered at pre-, post-treatment, and 1-month follow-up. A 2 (condition: face-to-face contact + educational lecture, video-based contact + educational lecture) by 3 (time: pre-treatment, post-treatment, and 1-month follow-up) mixed model MANOVA was conducted on the Attitudes, Disclosure and Help-Seeking, and Social Distance OMS-HC subscales. Participants' scores on all subscales changed significantly across time, regardless of conditions. To determine how participants' scores changed significantly over time on each subscale, Bonferroni follow-up comparisons were performed to access pairwise differences for the main effect of time. Specifically, pairwise comparisons produced a significant reduction in Social Distance subscale between pre-treatment and post-treatment and between pre-treatment and 1-month follow-up, and a significant increase between post-treatment and 1-month follow-up, regardless of conditions. With respect to the Attitudes and Disclosure and Help-Seeking subscales, pairwise comparisons produced a significant reduction in scores between pre-treatment and post-treatment and a significant increase between post-treatment and 1-month follow-up. Our findings provide additional evidence that educational lecture on mental illness, coupled

  3. General health mediates the relationship between loneliness, life satisfaction and depression. A study with Malaysian medical students.

    Swami, Viren; Chamorro-Premuzic, Tomas; Sinniah, Dhachayani; Maniam, Thambu; Kannan, Kumaraswami; Stanistreet, Debbi; Furnham, Adrian

    2007-02-01

    To examine the associations between life satisfaction, loneliness, general health and depression among 172 medical students in Malaysia. Participants completed a questionnaire battery, which included the 12-item General Health Questionnaire, Beck's Depression Inventory, the Revised UCLA Loneliness Scale and the Satisfaction With Life Scale. Life satisfaction was negatively and significantly correlated with suicidal attitudes, loneliness and depression; and positively with health, which was negatively and significantly correlated with depression and loneliness. Self-concept was negatively correlated with loneliness and depression, depression was positively and significantly correlated with loneliness. Mediational analyses showed that the effects of loneliness and life dissatisfaction on depression were fully mediated by health. Even though less satisfied, and particularly lonelier, individuals are more likely to report higher levels of depression, this is only the case because both higher loneliness and life dissatisfaction are associated with poorer health. These results are discussed in terms of their implications for the diagnosis and treatment of mental health disorders in developing nations.

  4. Factors associated with intern noncompliance with the 2003 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's 30-hour duty period requirement.

    Maloney, Christopher G; Antommaria, Armand H Matheny; Bale, James F; Ying, Jian; Greene, Tom; Srivastava, Rajendu

    2012-07-13

    In 2003 the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education mandated work hour restrictions. Violations can results in a residency program being cited or placed on probation. Recurrent violations could results in loss of accreditation. We wanted to determine specific intern and workload factors associated with violation of a specific mandate, the 30-hour duty period requirement. Retrospective review of interns' performance against the 30-hour duty period requirement during inpatient ward rotations at a pediatric residency program between June 24, 2008 and June 23, 2009. The analytical plan included both univariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses. Twenty of the 26 (77%) interns had 80 self-reported episodes of continuous work hours greater than 30 hours. In multivariable analysis, noncompliance was inversely associated with the number of prior inpatient rotations (odds ratio: 0.49, 95% confidence interval (0.38, 0.64) per rotation) but directly associated with the total number of patients (odds ratio: 1.30 (1.10, 1.53) per additional patient). The number of admissions on-call, number of admissions after midnight and number of discharges post-call were not significantly associated with noncompliance. The level of noncompliance also varied significantly between interns after accounting for intern experience and workload factors. Subject to limitations in statistical power, we were unable to identify specific intern characteristics, such as demographic variables or examination scores, which account for the variation in noncompliance between interns. Both intern and workload factors were associated with pediatric intern noncompliance with the 30-hour duty period requirement during inpatient ward rotations. Residency programs must develop information systems to understand the individual and experience factors associated with noncompliance and implement appropriate interventions to ensure compliance with the duty hour regulations.

  5. Involvement of consumers in studies run by the Medical Research Council Clinical Trials Unit: Results of a survey

    Vale Claire L

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We aimed to establish levels of consumer involvement in randomised controlled trials (RCTs, meta-analyses and other studies carried out by the UK Medical Research Council (MRC Clinical Trials Unit across the range of research programs, predominantly in cancer and HIV. Methods Staff responsible for studies that were included in a Unit Progress Report (MRC CTU, April 2009 were asked to complete a semi-structured questionnaire survey regarding consumer involvement. This was defined as active involvement of consumers as partners in the research process and not as subjects of that research. The electronic questionnaires combined open and closed questions, intended to capture quantitative and qualitative information on whether studies had involved consumers; types of activities undertaken; recruitment and support; advantages and disadvantages of involvement and its perceived impact on aspects of the research. Results Between October 2009 and April 2010, 138 completed questionnaires (86% were returned. Studies had been conducted over a 20 year period from 1989, and around half were in cancer; 30% in HIV and 20% were in other disease areas including arthritis, tuberculosis and blood transfusion medicine. Forty-three studies (31% had some consumer involvement, most commonly as members of trial management groups (TMG [88%]. A number of positive impacts on both the research and the researcher were identified. Researchers generally felt involvement was worthwhile and some felt that consumer involvement had improved the credibility of the research. Benefits in design and quality, trial recruitment, dissemination and decision making were also perceived. Researchers felt they learned from consumer involvement, albeit that there were some barriers. Conclusions Whilst most researchers identified benefits of involving consumers, most of studies included in the survey had no involvement. Information from this survey will inform the development

  6. Pathology Informatics Essentials for Residents: A flexible informatics curriculum linked to Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education milestones

    Henricks, Walter H; Karcher, Donald S; Harrison, James H; Sinard, John H; Riben, Michael W; Boyer, Philip J; Plath, Sue; Thompson, Arlene; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2016-01-01

    Context: Recognition of the importance of informatics to the practice of pathology has surged. Training residents in pathology informatics have been a daunting task for most residency programs in the United States because faculty often lacks experience and training resources. Nevertheless, developing resident competence in informatics is essential for the future of pathology as a specialty. Objective: The objective of the study is to develop and deliver a pathology informatics curriculum and instructional framework that guides pathology residency programs in training residents in critical pathology informatics knowledge and skills and meets Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Informatics Milestones. Design: The College of American Pathologists, Association of Pathology Chairs, and Association for Pathology Informatics formed a partnership and expert work group to identify critical pathology informatics training outcomes and to create a highly adaptable curriculum and instructional approach, supported by a multiyear change management strategy. Results: Pathology Informatics Essentials for Residents (PIER) is a rigorous approach for educating all pathology residents in important pathology informatics knowledge and skills. PIER includes an instructional resource guide and toolkit for incorporating informatics training into residency programs that vary in needs, size, settings, and resources. PIER is available at http://www.apcprods.org/PIER (accessed April 6, 2016). Conclusions: PIER is an important contribution to informatics training in pathology residency programs. PIER introduces pathology trainees to broadly useful informatics concepts and tools that are relevant to practice. PIER provides residency program directors with a means to implement a standardized informatics training curriculum, to adapt the approach to local program needs, and to evaluate resident performance and progress over time. PMID:27563486

  7. Involvement of consumers in studies run by the Medical Research Council Clinical Trials Unit: results of a survey.

    Vale, Claire L; Thompson, Lindsay C; Murphy, Claire; Forcat, Silvia; Hanley, Bec

    2012-01-13

    We aimed to establish levels of consumer involvement in randomised controlled trials (RCTs), meta-analyses and other studies carried out by the UK Medical Research Council (MRC) Clinical Trials Unit across the range of research programs, predominantly in cancer and HIV. Staff responsible for studies that were included in a Unit Progress Report (MRC CTU, April 2009) were asked to complete a semi-structured questionnaire survey regarding consumer involvement. This was defined as active involvement of consumers as partners in the research process and not as subjects of that research. The electronic questionnaires combined open and closed questions, intended to capture quantitative and qualitative information on whether studies had involved consumers; types of activities undertaken; recruitment and support; advantages and disadvantages of involvement and its perceived impact on aspects of the research. Between October 2009 and April 2010, 138 completed questionnaires (86%) were returned. Studies had been conducted over a 20 year period from 1989, and around half were in cancer; 30% in HIV and 20% were in other disease areas including arthritis, tuberculosis and blood transfusion medicine. Forty-three studies (31%) had some consumer involvement, most commonly as members of trial management groups (TMG) [88%]. A number of positive impacts on both the research and the researcher were identified. Researchers generally felt involvement was worthwhile and some felt that consumer involvement had improved the credibility of the research. Benefits in design and quality, trial recruitment, dissemination and decision making were also perceived. Researchers felt they learned from consumer involvement, albeit that there were some barriers. Whilst most researchers identified benefits of involving consumers, most of studies included in the survey had no involvement. Information from this survey will inform the development of a unit policy on consumer involvement, to guide future

  8. COPD exacerbations associated with the modified Medical Research Council scale and COPD assessment test among Humana Medicare members

    Pasquale MK

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Margaret K Pasquale,1 Yihua Xu,1 Christine L Baker,2 Kelly H Zou,3 John G Teeter,4 Andrew M Renda,5 Cralen C Davis,1 Theodore C Lee,6 Joel Bobula2 1Comprehensive Health Insights, Inc., Humana Inc., Louisville, KY, 2Outcomes and Evidence, Global Health & Value, Pfizer Inc., 3Statistical Center for Outcomes, Real-World and Aggregate Data, Global Innovative Pharma Business, Pfizer Inc., New York, NY, 4Global Medical Development, Global Innovative Pharma Business, Pfizer Inc., Groton, CT, 5Retail Strategy & Execution, Humana Inc., Louisville, KY, 6Global Medical Affairs, Global Innovative Pharma Business, Pfizer Inc., New York, NY, USA Background: The Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease guidelines recommend assessment of COPD severity, which includes symptomatology using the modified Medical Research Council (mMRC or COPD assessment test (CAT score in addition to the degree of airflow obstruction and exacerbation history. While there is great interest in incorporating symptomatology, little is known about how patient reported symptoms are associated with future exacerbations and exacerbation-related costs.Methods: The mMRC and CAT were mailed to a randomly selected sample of 4,000 Medicare members aged >40 years, diagnosed with COPD (≥2 encounters with International Classification of Dis­eases-9th Edition Clinical Modification: 491.xx, 492.xx, 496.xx, ≥30 days apart. The exacerbations and exacerbation-related costs were collected from claims data during 365-day post-survey after exclusion of members lost to follow-up or with cancer, organ transplant, or pregnancy. A logistic regression model estimated the predictive value of exacerbation history and symptomatology on exacerbations during follow-up, and a generalized linear model with log link and gamma distribution estimated the predictive value of exacerbation history and symptomatology on exacerbation-related costs.Results: Among a total of 1,159 members who returned the

  9. Impact of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education work-hour regulations on neurosurgical resident education and productivity.

    Jagannathan, Jay; Vates, G Edward; Pouratian, Nader; Sheehan, Jason P; Patrie, James; Grady, M Sean; Jane, John A

    2009-05-01

    Recently, the Institute of Medicine examined resident duty hours and their impact on patient safety. Experts have suggested that reducing resident work hours to 56 hours per week would further decrease medical errors. Although some reports have indicated that cutbacks in resident duty hours reduce errors and make resident life safer, few authors have specifically analyzed the effect of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) duty-hour limits on neurosurgical resident education and the perceived quality of training. The authors have evaluated multiple objective surrogate markers of resident performance and quality of training to determine the impact of the 80-hour workweek. The United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Step 1 data on neurosurgical applicants entering ACGME-accredited programs between 1998 and 2007 (before and after the implementation of the work-hour rules) were obtained from the Society of Neurological Surgeons. The American Board of Neurological Surgery (ABNS) written examination scores for this group of residents were also acquired. Resident registration for and presentations at the American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS) annual meetings between 2002 and 2007 were examined as a measure of resident academic productivity. As a case example, the authors analyzed the distribution of resident training hours in the University of Virginia (UVA) neurosurgical training program before and after the institution of the 80-hour workweek. Finally, program directors and chief residents in ACGME-accredited programs were surveyed regarding the effects of the 80-hour workweek on patient care, resident training, surgical experience, patient safety, and patient access to quality care. Respondents were also queried about their perceptions of a 56-hour workweek. Despite stable mean USMLE Step 1 scores for matched applicants to neurosurgery programs between 2000 and 2008, ABNS written examination scores for residents

  10. Emotional maturity of medical students impacting their adult learning skills in a newly established public medical school at the east coast of Malaysian Peninsula.

    Bhagat, Vidya; Haque, Mainul; Bin Abu Bakar, Yasrul Izad; Husain, Rohayah; Khairi, Che Mat

    2016-01-01

    Emotional maturity (EM) is defined as the ability of an individual to respond to situations, control emotions, and behave in an adult manner when dealing with others. EM is associated with adult learning skill, which is an important aspect of professional development as stated in the principles of andragogy. These principles are basically a characteristic feature of adult learning, which is defined as "the entire range of formal, non-formal, and informal learning activities that are undertaken by adults after an initial education and training, which result in the acquisition of new knowledge and skills". The purpose of this study is to find out the influence of EM on adult learning among Years I and II medical students of Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin (UniSZA). The study population included preclinical medical students of UniSZA from Years I and II of the academic session 2015/2016. The convenient sampling technique was used to select the sample. Data were collected using "EM scale" to evaluate emotional level and adult learning scale to assess the adult learning scores. Out of 120 questionnaires, only six response sheets were not complete and the remaining 114 (95%) were complete. Among the study participants, 23.7% (27) and 76.3% (87) were males and females, respectively. The data were then compiled and analyzed using SPSS Version 22. The Pearson's correlation method was used to find the significance of their association. The results revealed a significant correlation between EM and adult learning scores ( r =0.40, p <0.001). Thus, the study result supports the prediction, and based on the current findings, it can be concluded that there is a significant correlation between EM and adult learning and it has an effect on the students. Medical faculty members should give more emphasis on these aspects to produce health professionals. Henceforward, researchers can expect with optimism that the country will create more rational medical doctors.

  11. Emotional maturity of medical students impacting their adult learning skills in a newly established public medical school at the east coast of Malaysian Peninsula

    Bhagat, Vidya; Haque, Mainul; Bin Abu Bakar, Yasrul Izad; Husain, Rohayah; Khairi, Che Mat

    2016-01-01

    Emotional maturity (EM) is defined as the ability of an individual to respond to situations, control emotions, and behave in an adult manner when dealing with others. EM is associated with adult learning skill, which is an important aspect of professional development as stated in the principles of andragogy. These principles are basically a characteristic feature of adult learning, which is defined as “the entire range of formal, non-formal, and informal learning activities that are undertaken by adults after an initial education and training, which result in the acquisition of new knowledge and skills”. The purpose of this study is to find out the influence of EM on adult learning among Years I and II medical students of Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin (UniSZA). The study population included preclinical medical students of UniSZA from Years I and II of the academic session 2015/2016. The convenient sampling technique was used to select the sample. Data were collected using “EM scale” to evaluate emotional level and adult learning scale to assess the adult learning scores. Out of 120 questionnaires, only six response sheets were not complete and the remaining 114 (95%) were complete. Among the study participants, 23.7% (27) and 76.3% (87) were males and females, respectively. The data were then compiled and analyzed using SPSS Version 22. The Pearson’s correlation method was used to find the significance of their association. The results revealed a significant correlation between EM and adult learning scores (r=0.40, p<0.001). Thus, the study result supports the prediction, and based on the current findings, it can be concluded that there is a significant correlation between EM and adult learning and it has an effect on the students. Medical faculty members should give more emphasis on these aspects to produce health professionals. Henceforward, researchers can expect with optimism that the country will create more rational medical doctors. PMID:27790052

  12. Theory of Change: a theory-driven approach to enhance the Medical Research Council's framework for complex interventions.

    De Silva, Mary J; Breuer, Erica; Lee, Lucy; Asher, Laura; Chowdhary, Neerja; Lund, Crick; Patel, Vikram

    2014-07-05

    The Medical Research Councils' framework for complex interventions has been criticized for not including theory-driven approaches to evaluation. Although the framework does include broad guidance on the use of theory, it contains little practical guidance for implementers and there have been calls to develop a more comprehensive approach. A prospective, theory-driven process of intervention design and evaluation is required to develop complex healthcare interventions which are more likely to be effective, sustainable and scalable. We propose a theory-driven approach to the design and evaluation of complex interventions by adapting and integrating a programmatic design and evaluation tool, Theory of Change (ToC), into the MRC framework for complex interventions. We provide a guide to what ToC is, how to construct one, and how to integrate its use into research projects seeking to design, implement and evaluate complex interventions using the MRC framework. We test this approach by using ToC within two randomized controlled trials and one non-randomized evaluation of complex interventions. Our application of ToC in three research projects has shown that ToC can strengthen key stages of the MRC framework. It can aid the development of interventions by providing a framework for enhanced stakeholder engagement and by explicitly designing an intervention that is embedded in the local context. For the feasibility and piloting stage, ToC enables the systematic identification of knowledge gaps to generate research questions that strengthen intervention design. ToC may improve the evaluation of interventions by providing a comprehensive set of indicators to evaluate all stages of the causal pathway through which an intervention achieves impact, combining evaluations of intervention effectiveness with detailed process evaluations into one theoretical framework. Incorporating a ToC approach into the MRC framework holds promise for improving the design and evaluation of complex

  13. Emotional maturity of medical students impacting their adult learning skills in a newly established public medical school at the east coast of Malaysian Peninsula

    Bhagat V

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Vidya Bhagat,1 Mainul Haque,2 Yasrul Izad Bin Abu Bakar,3 Rohayah Husain,1 Che Mat Khairi1 1The Unit of Psychological Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, Kuala Terengganu, Terengganu, Malaysia; 2The Unit of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine and Defense Health, National Defense University of Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 3The Unit of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, Kuala Terengganu, Terengganu, Malaysia Abstract: Emotional maturity (EM is defined as the ability of an individual to respond to situations, control emotions, and behave in an adult manner when dealing with others. EM is associated with adult learning skill, which is an important aspect of professional development as stated in the principles of andragogy. These principles are basically a characteristic feature of adult learning, which is defined as “the entire range of formal, non-formal, and informal learning activities that are undertaken by adults after an initial education and training, which result in the acquisition of new knowledge and skills”. The purpose of this study is to find out the influence of EM on adult learning among Years I and II medical students of Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin (UniSZA. The study population included preclinical medical students of UniSZA from Years I and II of the academic session 2015/2016. The convenient sampling technique was used to select the sample. Data were collected using “EM scale” to evaluate emotional level and adult learning scale to assess the adult learning scores. Out of 120 questionnaires, only six response sheets were not complete and the remaining 114 (95% were complete. Among the study participants, 23.7% (27 and 76.3% (87 were males and females, respectively. The data were then compiled and analyzed using SPSS Version 22. The Pearson’s correlation method was used to find the significance of their association. The results revealed a significant

  14. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education resident duty hour new standards: history, changes, and impact on staffing of intensive care units.

    Pastores, Stephen M; O'Connor, Michael F; Kleinpell, Ruth M; Napolitano, Lena; Ward, Nicholas; Bailey, Heatherlee; Mollenkopf, Fred P; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2011-11-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education recently released new standards for supervision and duty hours for residency programs. These new standards, which will affect over 100,000 residents, take effect in July 2011. In response to these new guidelines, the Society of Critical Care Medicine convened a task force to develop a white paper on the impact of changes in resident duty hours on the critical care workforce and staffing of intensive care units. A multidisciplinary group of professionals with expertise in critical care education and clinical practice. Relevant medical literature was accessed through a systematic MEDLINE search and by requesting references from all task force members. Material published by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and other specialty organizations was also reviewed. Collaboratively and iteratively, the task force corresponded by electronic mail and held several conference calls to finalize this report. The new rules mandate that all first-year residents work no more than 16 hrs continuously, preserving the 80-hr limit on the resident workweek and 10-hr period between duty periods. More senior trainees may work a maximum of 24 hrs continuously, with an additional 4 hrs permitted for handoffs. Strategic napping is strongly suggested for trainees working longer shifts. Compliance with the new Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education duty-hour standards will compel workflow restructuring in intensive care units, which depend on residents to provide a substantial portion of care. Potential solutions include expanded utilization of nurse practitioners and physician assistants, telemedicine, offering critical care training positions to emergency medicine residents, and partnerships with hospitalists. Additional research will be necessary to evaluate the impact of the new standards on patient safety, continuity of care, resident learning, and staffing in the intensive care unit.

  15. Predictive value of grade point average (GPA), Medical College Admission Test (MCAT), internal examinations (Block) and National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) scores on Medical Council of Canada qualifying examination part I (MCCQE-1) scores.

    Roy, Banibrata; Ripstein, Ira; Perry, Kyle; Cohen, Barry

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether the pre-medical Grade Point Average (GPA), Medical College Admission Test (MCAT), Internal examinations (Block) and National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) scores are correlated with and predict the Medical Council of Canada Qualifying Examination Part I (MCCQE-1) scores. Data from 392 admitted students in the graduating classes of 2010-2013 at University of Manitoba (UofM), College of Medicine was considered. Pearson's correlation to assess the strength of the relationship, multiple linear regression to estimate MCCQE-1 score and stepwise linear regression to investigate the amount of variance were employed. Complete data from 367 (94%) students were studied. The MCCQE-1 had a moderate-to-large positive correlation with NBME scores and Block scores but a low correlation with GPA and MCAT scores. The multiple linear regression model gives a good estimate of the MCCQE-1 (R2 =0.604). Stepwise regression analysis demonstrated that 59.2% of the variation in the MCCQE-1 was accounted for by the NBME, but only 1.9% by the Block exams, and negligible variation came from the GPA and the MCAT. Amongst all the examinations used at UofM, the NBME is most closely correlated with MCCQE-1.

  16. Malaysian NDT standards

    Khazali Mohd Zin

    2001-01-01

    In order to become a developed country, Malaysia needs to develop her own national standards. It has been projected that by the year 2020, Malaysia requires about 8,000 standards (Department of Standard Malaysia). Currently more than 2,000 Malaysian Standards have been gazette by the government which considerably too low before tire year 2020. NDT standards have been identified by the standard working group as one of the areas to promote our national standards. In this paper the author describes the steps taken to establish the Malaysian very own NDT standards. The project starts with the establishment of radiographic standards. (Author)

  17. Transcultural Diabetes Nutrition Algorithm: A Malaysian Application

    Hussein, Zanariah; Hamdy, Osama; Chin Chia, Yook; Lin Lim, Shueh; Kumari Natkunam, Santha; Hussain, Husni; Yeong Tan, Ming; Sulaiman, Ridzoni; Nisak, Barakatun; Chee, Winnie Siew Swee; Marchetti, Albert; Hegazi, Refaat A.; Mechanick, Jeffrey I.

    2013-01-01

    Glycemic control among patients with prediabetes and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) in Malaysia is suboptimal, especially after the continuous worsening over the past decade. Improved glycemic control may be achieved through a comprehensive management strategy that includes medical nutrition therapy (MNT). Evidence-based recommendations for diabetes-specific therapeutic diets are available internationally. However, Asian patients with T2D, including Malaysians, have unique disease characteris...

  18. Council Districts

    Town of Cary, North Carolina — View the location of the Town of Cary’s four Town Council districts.Please note that one district, District A, is split into two geo-spatial areas. One area is in...

  19. Shielding of Medical Radiation Facilities - National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements Reports No. 147 and No. 151

    KASE, K.R.

    2008-01-01

    The National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements of the United States (NCRP) has issued two reports in the past 18 months that provide methods and data for designing shielding for diagnostic radiological imaging and radiation therapy facilities. These reports update previous publications on this subject with revised methods that take into account new technologies, results from measurements and new data that have been published in the last 30 years. This paper gives a brief summary of the contents of these reports, the methods recommended for determining the shielding required and the data provided to aid in the calculations

  20. Malaysian Cinema, Asian Film

    Heide, van der William

    2002-01-01

    This title series departs from traditional studies of national cinema by accentuating the intercultural and intertextual links between Malaysian films and Asian (as well as European and American) film practices. Using cross-cultural analysis, the author characterizes Malaysia as a pluralist society

  1. SU-B-BRF-01: Professional Council Symposium: The Evolving US Healthcare Delivery Model, How Will the Medical Physics Profession Be Impacted and How Should We Respond?

    Halvorsen, P; Shine, K; White, G

    2014-01-01

    The United States' healthcare delivery model is undergoing significant change. Insurance and reimbursement models are rapidly evolving, federal allocations are shifting from specialty services to preventive and generalpractice services, and Accountable Care Organizations are gaining in prominence. One area of focus is on the perceived over-utilization of expensive services such as advanced imaging and, in some cases, radiation therapy. Reimbursement incentives are increasingly aimed at quality metrics, leading to an increased interest in the core concepts of High Reliability Organizations. With the shift in federal resources away from specialty services and the increasing prominence of Accountable Care Organizations, we will likely be challenged to re-assess our traditional model for delivering medical physics services. Medical physicists have a unique combination of education and training in physics principles, radiation physics applications in medicine, human anatomy, as well as safety analysis and quality control methods. An effective medical physicist recognizes that to advance the institution's mission, the medical physicist must join other professional leaders within the institution to provide clear direction and perspective for the entire team. To do that, we must first recognize the macro changes in our healthcare delivery system and candidly assess how the medical physics practice model can evolve in a prudent way to support the institution's objectives while maintaining the traditionally high level of quality and safety. This year's Professional Council Symposium will explore the many facets of the changing healthcare system and its potential impact on medical physics. Dr. Shine will provide an overview of the developing healthcare delivery and reimbursement models, with a focus on how the physician community has adapted to the changing objectives. Mr. White will describe recent changes in the reimbursement patterns for both imaging

  2. SU-B-BRF-01: Professional Council Symposium: The Evolving US Healthcare Delivery Model, How Will the Medical Physics Profession Be Impacted and How Should We Respond?

    Halvorsen, P [Lahey Clinic, Burlington, MA (United States); Shine, K [Austin, TX (United States); White, G [Colorado Associates in Medical Phys, Colorado Springs, CO (United States)

    2014-06-15

    The United States' healthcare delivery model is undergoing significant change. Insurance and reimbursement models are rapidly evolving, federal allocations are shifting from specialty services to preventive and generalpractice services, and Accountable Care Organizations are gaining in prominence. One area of focus is on the perceived over-utilization of expensive services such as advanced imaging and, in some cases, radiation therapy. Reimbursement incentives are increasingly aimed at quality metrics, leading to an increased interest in the core concepts of High Reliability Organizations. With the shift in federal resources away from specialty services and the increasing prominence of Accountable Care Organizations, we will likely be challenged to re-assess our traditional model for delivering medical physics services. Medical physicists have a unique combination of education and training in physics principles, radiation physics applications in medicine, human anatomy, as well as safety analysis and quality control methods. An effective medical physicist recognizes that to advance the institution's mission, the medical physicist must join other professional leaders within the institution to provide clear direction and perspective for the entire team. To do that, we must first recognize the macro changes in our healthcare delivery system and candidly assess how the medical physics practice model can evolve in a prudent way to support the institution's objectives while maintaining the traditionally high level of quality and safety. This year's Professional Council Symposium will explore the many facets of the changing healthcare system and its potential impact on medical physics. Dr. Shine will provide an overview of the developing healthcare delivery and reimbursement models, with a focus on how the physician community has adapted to the changing objectives. Mr. White will describe recent changes in the reimbursement patterns for both imaging

  3. Design and development of a film-based intervention about teenage men and unintended pregnancy: Applying the Medical Research Council framework in practice.

    Aventin, Aine

    2014-11-15

    Following the UK Medical Research Council\\'s (MRC) guidelines for the development and evaluation of complex interventions, this study aimed to design, develop and optimise an educational intervention about young men and unintended teenage pregnancy based around an interactive film. The process involved identification of the relevant evidence base, development of a theoretical understanding of the phenomenon of unintended teenage pregnancy in relation to young men, and exploratory mixed methods research. The result was an evidence-based, theory-informed, user-endorsed intervention designed to meet the much neglected pregnancy education needs of teenage men and intended to increase both boys\\' and girls\\' intentions to avoid an unplanned pregnancy during adolescence. In prioritising the development phase, this paper addresses a gap in the literature on the processes of research-informed intervention design. It illustrates the application of the MRC guidelines in practice while offering a critique and additional guidance to programme developers on the MRC prescribed processes of developing interventions. Key lessons learned were: (1) know and engage the target population and engage gatekeepers in addressing contextual complexities; (2) know the targeted behaviours and model a process of change; and (3) look beyond development to evaluation and implementation.

  4. Education, training and continuing professional development for the medical physicist - The EFOMP view in relation to EC Council directives

    Lamm, I.L.

    2001-01-01

    The European Federation of Organisations for Medical Physics, EFOMP, is an umbrella organisation for National Medical Physics Organisations. One of the main objectives of EFOMP is to harmonise and promote the best practice of Medical Physics within Europe. To accomplish this goal, EFOMP has presented various recommendations and guidelines in a number of Policy Statements, unanimously adopted by EFOMP Member Organisations. Policy Statement No 9, 'Radiation Protection of the Patient in Europe: The Training of the Medical Physics Expert in Radiation Physics or Radiation Technology', is the EFOMP response to the Medical Exposure Directive, 97/43/Euratom. Here EFOMP presents its recommendations on the role and the competence requirements of the Medical Physics Expert, defined in this Directive, together with recommendations on education, training and Continuing Professional Development. The previous Directive 96/29/Euratom, the Basic Safety Standards Directive, defines a 'Qualified Expert' in the radiation protection of workers and the general public. EFOMP has an ongoing discussion on the interpretation of the competence requirements of the Qualified Expert in medical practice. The EFOMP approach to achieve harmonisation in the qualification of the Medical Physicist is to encourage the establishment of education and training schemes according to EFOMP recommendations. (author)

  5. The Medical Research Council (UK)/Uganda Virus Research Institute Uganda Research Unit on AIDS--'25 years of research through partnerships'.

    Kaleebu, P; Kamali, A; Seeley, J; Elliott, A M; Katongole-Mbidde, E

    2015-02-01

    For the past 25 years, the Medical Research Council/Uganda Virus Research Institute Uganda Research Unit on AIDS has conducted research on HIV-1, coinfections and, more recently, on non-communicable diseases. Working with various partners, the research findings of the Unit have contributed to the understanding and control of the HIV epidemic both in Uganda and globally, and informed the future development of biomedical HIV interventions, health policy and practice. In this report, as we celebrate our silver jubilee, we describe some of these achievements and the Unit's multidisciplinary approach to research. We also discuss the future direction of the Unit; an exemplar of a partnership that has been largely funded from the north but led in the south. © 2014 The Authors. Tropical Medicine & International Health Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Implementing falls prevention research into policy and practice: an overview of a new National Health and Medical Research Council Partnership Grant.

    Lord, Stephen R; Delbaere, Kim; Tiedemann, Anne; Smith, Stuart T; Sturnieks, Daina L

    2011-06-01

    Preventing falls and fall-related injuries among older people is an urgent public health challenge. This paper provides an overview of the background to and research planned for a 5-year National Health and Medical Research Council Partnership Grant on implementing falls prevention research findings into policy and practice. This program represents a partnership between key Australian falls prevention researchers, policy makers and information technology companies which aims to: (1) fill gaps in evidence relating to the prevention of falls in older people, involving new research studies of risk factor assessment and interventions for falls prevention; (2) translate evidence into policy and practice, examining the usefulness of new risk-identification tools in clinical practice; and (3) disseminate evidence to health professionals working with older people, via presentations, new evidence-based guidelines, improved resources and learning tools, to improve the workforce capacity to prevent falls and associated injuries in the future.

  7. The Malaysian experience

    Aldon, E.T.

    1997-01-01

    Integrated farming has long been practiced in Malaysia, not only to provide protein requirements needed by the family, but also as a source of income. With fish being promoted on a larger scale, the Malaysian government is providing farmers with financial assistance and hands-on training on fish culture and rice production. Systems of fodder-fish integrated farming and fish-livestock farming in mine ponds are outlined.

  8. Malaysian mental health law.

    Khan, Nusrat N; Yahya, Badi'ah; Abu Bakar, Abd Kadir; Ho, Roger C

    2015-05-01

    The Malaysian Mental Health Act 2001 did not come into effect until the Mental Health Regulations 2010 came into force. The Act provides a framework for the delivery of comprehensive care, treatment, control, protection and rehabilitation of those with mental disorders. The Act governs the establishment of private and government psychiatric hospitals, psychiatric nursing homes and community mental health centres. This paper outlines the provisions of the Act and the Regulations.

  9. Council Session

    CERN PhotoLab

    1977-01-01

    From face, 1st raw: Erich Lohrmann, Sergio Fubini, Léon Van Hove, John Adams (Directors-General), Paul Levaux (President of the Council) Hans-Otto Wüster, Franco Bonaudi, Robert Lévy-Mandel and 2nd raw, centre: Patrick Mollet, Eliane de Modzelewska, Jean-Marie Dufour

  10. Enhancing Malaysian Teachers' Assessment Literacy

    Lian, Lim Hooi; Yew, Wun Thiam; Meng, Chew Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Currently, in order to reform the Malaysian education system, there have been a number of education policy initiatives launched by the Malaysian Ministry of Education (MOE). All these initiatives have encouraged and inculcated teaching and learning for creativity, critical, innovative and higher-order thinking skills rather than conceptual…

  11. Investigating sensitivity, specificity, and area under the curve of the Clinical COPD Questionnaire, COPD Assessment Test, and Modified Medical Research Council scale according to GOLD using St George's Respiratory Questionnaire cutoff 25 (and 20) as reference

    Tsiligianni, Ioanna G.; Alma, Harma J.; de Jong, Corina; Jelusic, Danijel; Wittmann, Michael; Schuler, Michael; Schultz, Konrad; Kollen, Boudewijn J.; van der Molen, Thys; Kocks, Janwillem W. H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In the GOLD (Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease) strategy document, the Clinical COPD Questionnaire (CCQ), COPD Assessment Test (CAT), or modified Medical Research Council (mMRC) scale are recommended for the assessment of symptoms using the cutoff points of CCQ >= 1,

  12. Council dinner

    1980-01-01

    Jean Teillac (President of the Council) gives the speech. The occasion was the end-of-term of Leon Van Hove and John Adams as Research and Executive Director-General, respectively, to be succeeded by Herwig Schopper. The venue was the Hotel Beau-Rivage in Geneva. Beside Jean Teillac are (on the left) G.H. Stafford and Mme Van Hove, (on the right) Mme Schopper.

  13. Academic Health Center Psychology Representation to the Council of Faculty and Academic Societies (CFAS) of the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC).

    Cubic, Barbara A; Shaffer, Laura A

    2017-06-01

    This paper outlines the perspectives of the two currently appointed representatives of the Association of Psychologists in Academic Health Centers (APAHC) to the Council of Faculty and Academic Societies (CFAS) of the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC). The authors focus on why it is important for psychologists, especially those in academic health centers (AHCs), to be part of CFAS. The goal of the paper is to demonstrate how involvement in organizations like the AAMC helps AHC psychologists serve as ambassadors for psychology in AHCs and assists AHC psychologists in staying fluent regarding hot topics within academic medicine. The first author is a more senior member of APAHC, and so reflects the perspective of long-serving APAHC members; the second author reflects the perspectives of newer generations of APAHC members, those who have been active in APAHC for 10 years or less. The authors discuss their experiences being at national CFAS meetings. They describe meeting events including presentations such as those by national policy experts and scholars; and speed mentoring with medical residents from the AAMC Organization of Resident Representatives. Of special importance has been their opportunities for informal conversations with the AAMC's President and CEO, Board Chair, and Chief Public Policy Officer. They also have participated in networking functions that encourage interdisciplinary knowledge sharing and relationship building.

  14. Malaysian traditional medicine: the usage of marine resources as a ...

    indicate that some of the marine resources are used as a food as well as to treat heart disease. Finally, the findings of this study will help demystify traditional medical practices in Malaysia and assist academicians in understanding the Malaysian culture of traditional medicine. Keywords: Marine resources; heart disease; ...

  15. Management of heatstroke in Malaysian pilgrims in Saudi Arabia.

    Merican, M I

    1989-09-01

    Heat stroke is hardly seen in Malaysia. However, it occurs commonly in Saudi Arabia during the Haj season. Many Malaysian pilgrims are affected every year and some die. Having faced this environmental hazard for eight years, the Malaysian Medical Mission, sent each year to look after our pilgrims, modified its treatment strategy in 1988 and successfully decreased the overall morbidity and mortality of affected patients without the use of sophisticated equipment. A brief account of the management of 17 cases seen in 1988 is given. Only one died following treatment. The rest recovered fully without any residual neurological deficit or other complications.

  16. Belongingness in the workplace: a study of Malaysian nurses' experiences.

    Mohamed, Z; Newton, J M; McKenna, L

    2014-03-01

    The need to belong has been proposed as the most basic need for human psychological well-being. Lack of belongingness has been associated with stress, anxiety and lack of esteem. Social and psychological functioning in the workplace has been linked to nurses' interconnection with others and their perceptions of belongingness. To explore factors contributing to Malaysian nurses' sense of belonging in the workplace. A descriptive questionnaire survey of registered nurses (n = 437) working in two Malaysian hospitals was conducted in 2011. Previously validated questionnaires translated into the Malay language were used. Data were analysed using SPSS 19.0. Nurses enhanced their sense of belonging through acceptance, 'fitting in', respect and group harmony. There were no specific demographic factors contributing to the nurses' perceptions. The findings suggest that these priorities for belongingness were contextually influenced by factors such as elements of Malaysian culture, the nature of nurses' teamwork and stereotypical values on the nursing profession. Data were collected in only two hospitals. Experiences of nurses in other hospitals and areas of Malaysia may not be similar. The influence of Malaysian culture in this study raises issues about utilization of a measurement scale developed in Western cultures, which may not directly accord with cultural values of an Eastern ethnicity. Aspects of belongingness in Malaysian nurses reflect those of nurses elsewhere. However, there are specific cultural influences at play. Therefore, development of a measurement scale based on Eastern culture would help in increasing understanding of workplace practices among these groups. Workplaces that perpetuate an environment that is not conducive to generating a sense of belonging may have an untoward impact on care delivery. Healthcare policies need to ensure patient care has a focus on engaging practitioners within multidisciplinary teams. © 2013 International Council of

  17. Surgical training, duty-hour restrictions, and implications for meeting the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education core competencies: views of surgical interns compared with program directors.

    Antiel, Ryan M; Van Arendonk, Kyle J; Reed, Darcy A; Terhune, Kyla P; Tarpley, John L; Porterfield, John R; Hall, Daniel E; Joyce, David L; Wightman, Sean C; Horvath, Karen D; Heller, Stephanie F; Farley, David R

    2012-06-01

    To describe the perspectives of surgical interns regarding the implications of the new Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) duty-hour regulations for their training. We compared responses of interns and surgery program directors on a survey about the proposed ACGME mandates. Eleven general surgery residency programs. Two hundred fifteen interns who were administered the survey during the summer of 2011 and a previously surveyed national sample of 134 surgery program directors. Perceptions of the implications of the new duty-hour restrictions on various aspects of surgical training, including the 6 ACGME core competencies of graduate medical education, measured using 3-point scales (increase, no change, or decrease). Of 215 eligible surgical interns, 179 (83.3%) completed the survey. Most interns believed that the new duty-hour regulations will decrease continuity with patients (80.3%), time spent operating (67.4%), and coordination of patient care (57.6%), while approximately half believed that the changes will decrease their acquisition of medical knowledge (48.0%), development of surgical skills (52.8%), and overall educational experience (51.1%). Most believed that the changes will improve or will not alter other aspects of training, and 61.5% believed that the new standards will decrease resident fatigue. Surgical interns were significantly less pessimistic than surgery program directors regarding the implications of the new duty-hour restrictions on all aspects of surgical training (P training under the new paradigm of duty-hour restrictions have significant concerns about the effect of these regulations on the quality of their training.

  18. Faculty Development for Medical School Community-Based Faculty: A Council of Academic Family Medicine Educational Research Alliance Study Exploring Institutional Requirements and Challenges.

    Drowos, Joanna; Baker, Suzanne; Harrison, Suzanne Leonard; Minor, Suzanne; Chessman, Alexander W; Baker, Dennis

    2017-08-01

    Community-based faculty play a large role in training medical students nationwide and require faculty development. The authors hypothesized that positive relationships exist between clerkships paying preceptors and requiring faculty development, and between protected clerkship directors' time and delivering face-to-face preceptor training, as well as with the number or length of community-based preceptor visits. Through under standing the quantity, delivery methods, barriers, and institutional support for faculty development provided to community-based preceptors teaching in family medicine clerkships, best practices can be developed. Data from the 2015 Council of Academic Family Medicine's Educational Research Alliance survey of Family Medicine Clerkship Directors were analyzed. The cross-sectional survey of clerkship directors is distributed annually to institutional representatives of U.S. and Canadian accredited medical schools. Survey questions focused on the requirements, delivery methods, barriers, and institutional support available for providing faculty development to community-based preceptors. Paying community-based preceptors was positively correlated with requiring faculty development in family medicine clerkships. The greatest barrier to providing faculty development was community-based preceptor time availability; however, face-to-face methods remain the most common delivery strategy. Many family medicine clerkship directors perform informal or no needs assessment in developing faculty development topics for community-based faculty. Providing payment to community preceptors may allow schools to enhance faculty development program activities and effectiveness. Medical schools could benefit from constructing a formal curriculum for faculty development, including formal preceptor needs assessment and program evaluation. Clerkship directors may consider recruiting and retaining community-based faculty by employing innovative faculty development delivery

  19. Design and development of a film-based intervention about teenage men and unintended pregnancy: applying the Medical Research Council framework in practice.

    Aventin, Áine; Lohan, Maria; O'Halloran, Peter; Henderson, Marion

    2015-04-01

    Following the UK Medical Research Council's (MRC) guidelines for the development and evaluation of complex interventions, this study aimed to design, develop and optimise an educational intervention about young men and unintended teenage pregnancy based around an interactive film. The process involved identification of the relevant evidence base, development of a theoretical understanding of the phenomenon of unintended teenage pregnancy in relation to young men, and exploratory mixed methods research. The result was an evidence-based, theory-informed, user-endorsed intervention designed to meet the much neglected pregnancy education needs of teenage men and intended to increase both boys' and girls' intentions to avoid an unplanned pregnancy during adolescence. In prioritising the development phase, this paper addresses a gap in the literature on the processes of research-informed intervention design. It illustrates the application of the MRC guidelines in practice while offering a critique and additional guidance to programme developers on the MRC prescribed processes of developing interventions. Key lessons learned were: (1) know and engage the target population and engage gatekeepers in addressing contextual complexities; (2) know the targeted behaviours and model a process of change; and (3) look beyond development to evaluation and implementation. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of the new Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education work hour rules on surgical interns: a prospective study in a community teaching hospital.

    Kamine, Tovy Haber; Barron, Rebecca J; Lesicka, Agnieszka; Galbraith, John D; Millham, Frederick H; Larson, Janet

    2013-02-01

    On July 1, 2011, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) eliminated 30-hour call in an attempt to improve resident wakefulness. We surveyed interns on the Newton Wellesley Hospital (NWH) surgery service before and after the transition from Q4 overnight call to a night float schedule. For 15 weeks, interns completed weekly surveys including the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). The service changed to a night float schedule after 3 weeks (ie, first to 3-4 and then to 6 nights in a row). The average ESS score rose from 9.8 ± 5.2 to 14.9 ± 3.1 and 14.4 ± 4.5 (P = .042) on the 3/4 and 6/1 schedules, respectively. Interns were more likely to be abnormally tired on either night float schedule (relative risk = 2.86; 95% confidence interval, 1.17-6.97, P = .029). The new ACGME work hours increased the ESS scores among interns at NWH and caused interns to be more tired than interns on the Q4 schedule. This is likely caused by the multiple nights of poor sleep without a post-call day to make up sleep. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Definition of Terms Used in Limitation of Treatment and Providing Palliative Care at the End of Life: The Indian Council of Medical Research Commission Report

    Salins, Naveen; Gursahani, Roop; Mathur, Roli; Iyer, Shivakumar; Macaden, Stanley; Simha, Nagesh; Mani, Raj Kumar; Rajagopal, M. R.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Indian hospitals, in general, lack policies on the limitation of inappropriate life-sustaining interventions at the end of life. To facilitate discussion, preparation of guidelines and framing of laws, terminologies relating to the treatment limitation, and providing palliative care at the end-of-life care (EOLC) need to be defined and brought up to date. Methodology: This consensus document on terminologies and definitions of terminologies was prepared under the aegis of the Indian Council of Medical Research. The consensus statement was created using Nominal Group and Delphi Method. Results: Twenty-five definitions related to the limitations of treatment and providing palliative care at the end of life were created by reviewing existing international documents and suitably modifying it to the Indian sociocultural context by achieving national consensus. Twenty-five terminologies defined within the scope of this document are (1) terminal illness, (2) actively dying, (3) life-sustaining treatment, (4) potentially inappropriate treatment, (5) cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), (6) do not attempt CPR, (7) withholding life-sustaining treatment, (8) withdrawing life-sustaining treatment, (9) euthanasia (10) active shortening of the dying process, (11) physician-assisted suicide, (12) palliative care, (13) EOLC, (14) palliative sedation, (15) double effect, (16) death, (17) best interests, (18) health-care decision-making capacity, (19) shared decision-making, (20) advance directives, (21) surrogates, (22) autonomy, (23) beneficence, (24) nonmaleficence, and (25) justice.

  2. From bricks to buildings: adapting the Medical Research Council framework to develop programs of research in simulation education and training for the health professions.

    Haji, Faizal A; Da Silva, Celina; Daigle, Delton T; Dubrowski, Adam

    2014-08-01

    Presently, health care simulation research is largely conducted on a study-by-study basis. Although such "project-based" research generates a plethora of evidence, it can be chaotic and contradictory. A move toward sustained, thematic, theory-based programs of research is necessary to advance knowledge in the field. Recognizing that simulation is a complex intervention, we present a framework for developing research programs in simulation-based education adapted from the Medical Research Council (MRC) guidance. This framework calls for an iterative approach to developing, refining, evaluating, and implementing simulation interventions. The adapted framework guidance emphasizes: (1) identification of theory and existing evidence; (2) modeling and piloting interventions to clarify active ingredients and identify mechanisms linking the context, intervention, and outcomes; and (3) evaluation of intervention processes and outcomes in both the laboratory and real-world setting. The proposed framework will aid simulation researchers in developing more robust interventions that optimize simulation-based education and advance our understanding of simulation pedagogy.

  3. Peer chart audits: A tool to meet Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education (ACGME competency in practice-based learning and improvement

    Patel Sangnya

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education (ACGME supports chart audit as a method to track competency in Practice-Based Learning and Improvement. We examined whether peer chart audits performed by internal medicine residents were associated with improved documentation of foot care in patients with diabetes mellitus. Methods A retrospective electronic chart review was performed on 347 patients with diabetes mellitus cared for by internal medicine residents in a university-based continuity clinic from May 2003 to September 2004. Residents abstracted information pertaining to documentation of foot examinations (neurological, vascular, and skin from the charts of patients followed by their physician peers. No formal feedback or education was provided. Results Significant improvement in the documentation of foot exams was observed over the course of the study. The percentage of patients receiving neurological, vascular, and skin exams increased by 20% (from 13% to 33% (p = 0.001, 26% (from 45% to 71% (p Conclusion Peer chart audits performed by residents in the absence of formal feedback were associated with improved documentation of the foot exam in patients with diabetes mellitus. Although this study suggests that peer chart audits may be an effective tool to improve practice-based learning and documentation of foot care in diabetic patients, evaluating the actual performance of clinical care was beyond the scope of this study and would be better addressed by a randomized controlled trial.

  4. SPORTS WATCHING CULTURE AMONG MALAYSIANS

    Gunathevan Elumalai; Mohd Salleh Aman; Cassendra Gilbert; Muhammad Mat Yusof; Ahmad Tajuddin Othman; Lim Khong Chiu; Mohd Sofian Omar Fauzee; Hamdan Mohd Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ardent sports watching will lead an individual to engage in sports and recreational activities continuously, while it also creates a sports culture among Malaysians. Sports watching culture is actually an intellectual activity. It is capable of evaluating behaviour, moral values and the level of appreciation of every spectator. Methods: This survey was conducted to identify the sports viewing culture among Malaysians. A cluster sampling method was used to select 6000 respondent...

  5. Theory of Change: a theory-driven approach to enhance the Medical Research Council's framework for complex interventions

    2014-01-01

    Background The Medical Research Councils’ framework for complex interventions has been criticized for not including theory-driven approaches to evaluation. Although the framework does include broad guidance on the use of theory, it contains little practical guidance for implementers and there have been calls to develop a more comprehensive approach. A prospective, theory-driven process of intervention design and evaluation is required to develop complex healthcare interventions which are more likely to be effective, sustainable and scalable. Methods We propose a theory-driven approach to the design and evaluation of complex interventions by adapting and integrating a programmatic design and evaluation tool, Theory of Change (ToC), into the MRC framework for complex interventions. We provide a guide to what ToC is, how to construct one, and how to integrate its use into research projects seeking to design, implement and evaluate complex interventions using the MRC framework. We test this approach by using ToC within two randomized controlled trials and one non-randomized evaluation of complex interventions. Results Our application of ToC in three research projects has shown that ToC can strengthen key stages of the MRC framework. It can aid the development of interventions by providing a framework for enhanced stakeholder engagement and by explicitly designing an intervention that is embedded in the local context. For the feasibility and piloting stage, ToC enables the systematic identification of knowledge gaps to generate research questions that strengthen intervention design. ToC may improve the evaluation of interventions by providing a comprehensive set of indicators to evaluate all stages of the causal pathway through which an intervention achieves impact, combining evaluations of intervention effectiveness with detailed process evaluations into one theoretical framework. Conclusions Incorporating a ToC approach into the MRC framework holds promise for

  6. Contributions of Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR) in the area of Medicinal plants/Traditional medicine.

    Tandon, Neeraj; Yadav, Satyapal Singh

    2017-02-02

    Medicinal plants belong to the oldest known health care products that have been used by human beings all over the world and are major components of the formulations used in indigenous system of medicine practiced in many countries. Besides, finding place as health supplements, nutraceuticals, cosmetics, herbal tea etc. there has been a global insurgence of interest, including India, leading to enormous research/activities in the area of medicinal plants. The article is aimed to provide the effort and initiatives of ICMR towards research on medicinal plants and its contributions on consolidation of Indian research on medicinal plants that are very relevant and important in the national context. The various initiatives undertaken by ICMR on research on traditional medicines/medicinal plants in the past are reviewed and documented in this article. The multi-disciplinary, multicentric research initiatives of ICMR have resulted in validation of traditional treatment Kshaarasootra (medicated Ayurvedic thread) for anal fistula, Vijayasar (heart wood of Pterocarpus marsupium Roxb.) for diabetes mellitus, encouraging micro- and macrofilaricidal activity of Shakotak (stem bark of Streblus asper Lour.) in experimental studies an iridoid glycosides fraction isolated from root/rhizomes of Picrorhiza kurroa Royle ex Benth. (designated as Picroliv) for viral hepatitis. Other developmental and compilation of research works on Indian medicinal plants have resulted in publications of the thirteen volumes of quality standards, comprising of 449 Indian medicinal plants; three volumes of 90 phytochemical reference standards; fifteen volumes of review monographs on 4167 medicinal plant species; and one publication each on perspectives of Indian medicinal plants for management of liver disorders, lymphatic filariasis and diabetes mellitus (details available at http://www.icmr.nic.in/mpsite). The ICMR efforts assume special significance in the light of multifaceted use of medicinal plants

  7. Determinants of medication adherence among adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus in three Malaysian public health clinics: a cross-sectional study

    Chew BH; Hassan NH; Sherina MS

    2015-01-01

    Boon-How Chew,1 Noor-Hasliza Hassan,2 Mohd-Sidik Sherina3 1Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 2Klinik Kesihatan Dengkil, Ministry of Health, 3Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Malaysia Abstract: Medication adherence (MA) in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) is associated with improved disease control (glycated hemoglobin, blood pressure, and lipid pro...

  8. Factors associated with intern noncompliance with the 2003 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education’s 30-hour duty period requirement

    Maloney Christopher G

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2003 the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education mandated work hour restrictions. Violations can results in a residency program being cited or placed on probation. Recurrent violations could results in loss of accreditation. We wanted to determine specific intern and workload factors associated with violation of a specific mandate, the 30-hour duty period requirement. Methods Retrospective review of interns’ performance against the 30-hour duty period requirement during inpatient ward rotations at a pediatric residency program between June 24, 2008 and June 23, 2009. The analytical plan included both univariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses. Results Twenty of the 26 (77% interns had 80 self-reported episodes of continuous work hours greater than 30 hours. In multivariable analysis, noncompliance was inversely associated with the number of prior inpatient rotations (odds ratio: 0.49, 95% confidence interval (0.38, 0.64 per rotation but directly associated with the total number of patients (odds ratio: 1.30 (1.10, 1.53 per additional patient. The number of admissions on-call, number of admissions after midnight and number of discharges post-call were not significantly associated with noncompliance. The level of noncompliance also varied significantly between interns after accounting for intern experience and workload factors. Subject to limitations in statistical power, we were unable to identify specific intern characteristics, such as demographic variables or examination scores, which account for the variation in noncompliance between interns. Conclusions Both intern and workload factors were associated with pediatric intern noncompliance with the 30-hour duty period requirement during inpatient ward rotations. Residency programs must develop information systems to understand the individual and experience factors associated with noncompliance and implement appropriate interventions to

  9. Calibrating the Medical Council of Canada's Qualifying Examination Part I using an integrated item response theory framework: a comparison of models and designs.

    De Champlain, Andre F; Boulais, Andre-Philippe; Dallas, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research was to compare different methods of calibrating multiple choice question (MCQ) and clinical decision making (CDM) components for the Medical Council of Canada's Qualifying Examination Part I (MCCQEI) based on item response theory. Our data consisted of test results from 8,213 first time applicants to MCCQEI in spring and fall 2010 and 2011 test administrations. The data set contained several thousand multiple choice items and several hundred CDM cases. Four dichotomous calibrations were run using BILOG-MG 3.0. All 3 mixed item format (dichotomous MCQ responses and polytomous CDM case scores) calibrations were conducted using PARSCALE 4. The 2-PL model had identical numbers of items with chi-square values at or below a Type I error rate of 0.01 (83/3,499 or 0.02). In all 3 polytomous models, whether the MCQs were either anchored or concurrently run with the CDM cases, results suggest very poor fit. All IRT abilities estimated from dichotomous calibration designs correlated very highly with each other. IRT-based pass-fail rates were extremely similar, not only across calibration designs and methods, but also with regard to the actual reported decision to candidates. The largest difference noted in pass rates was 4.78%, which occurred between the mixed format concurrent 2-PL graded response model (pass rate= 80.43%) and the dichotomous anchored 1-PL calibrations (pass rate= 85.21%). Simpler calibration designs with dichotomized items should be implemented. The dichotomous calibrations provided better fit of the item response matrix than more complex, polytomous calibrations.

  10. Calibrating the Medical Council of Canada’s Qualifying Examination Part I using an integrated item response theory framework: a comparison of models and designs

    Andre F. De Champlain

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this research was to compare different methods of calibrating multiple choice question (MCQ and clinical decision making (CDM components for the Medical Council of Canada’s Qualifying Examination Part I (MCCQEI based on item response theory. Methods: Our data consisted of test results from 8,213 first time applicants to MCCQEI in spring and fall 2010 and 2011 test administrations. The data set contained several thousand multiple choice items and several hundred CDM cases. Four dichotomous calibrations were run using BILOG-MG 3.0. All 3 mixed item format (dichotomous MCQ responses and polytomous CDM case scores calibrations were conducted using PARSCALE 4. Results: The 2-PL model had identical numbers of items with chi-square values at or below a Type I error rate of 0.01 (83/3,499 or 0.02. In all 3 polytomous models, whether the MCQs were either anchored or concurrently run with the CDM cases, results suggest very poor fit. All IRT abilities estimated from dichotomous calibration designs correlated very highly with each other. IRT-based pass-fail rates were extremely similar, not only across calibration designs and methods, but also with regard to the actual reported decision to candidates. The largest difference noted in pass rates was 4.78%, which occurred between the mixed format concurrent 2-PL graded response model (pass rate= 80.43% and the dichotomous anchored 1-PL calibrations (pass rate= 85.21%. Conclusion: Simpler calibration designs with dichotomized items should be implemented. The dichotomous calibrations provided better fit of the item response matrix than more complex, polytomous calibrations.

  11. Late Gastrointestinal Toxicity After Dose-Escalated Conformal Radiotherapy for Early Prostate Cancer: Results From the UK Medical Research Council RT01 Trial (ISRCTN47772397)

    Syndikus, Isabel; Morgan, Rachel C.; Sydes, Matthew R.; Graham, John D.; Dearnaley, David P.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: In men with localized prostate cancer, dose-escalated conformal radiotherapy (CFRT) improves efficacy outcomes at the cost of increased toxicity. We present a detailed analysis to provide further information about the incidence and prevalence of late gastrointestinal side effects. Methods and Materials: The UK Medical Research Council RT01 trial included 843 men with localized prostate cancer, who were treated for 6 months with neoadjuvant radiotherapy and were randomly assigned to either 64-Gy or 74-Gy CFRT. Toxicity was evaluated before CFRT and during long-term follow-up using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grading, the Late Effects on Normal Tissue: Subjective, Objective, Management (LENT/SOM) scale, and Royal Marsden Hospital assessment scores. Patients regularly completed Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy--Prostate (FACT-P) and University of California, Los Angeles, Prostate Cancer Index (UCLA-PCI) questionnaires. Results: In the dose-escalated group, the hazard ratio (HR) for rectal bleeding (LENT/SOM grade ≥2) was 1.55 (95% CI, 1.17-2.04); for diarrhea (LENT/SOM grade ≥2), the HR was 1.79 (95% CI, 1.10-2.94); and for proctitis (RTOG grade ≥2), the HR was 1.64 (95% CI, 1.20-2.25). Compared to baseline scores, the prevalence of moderate and severe toxicities generally increased up to 3 years and than lessened. At 5 years, the cumulative incidence of patient-reported severe bowel problems was 6% vs. 8% (standard vs. escalated, respectively) and severe distress was 4% vs. 5%, respectively. Conclusions: There is a statistically significant increased risk of various adverse gastrointestinal events with dose-escalated CFRT. This remains at clinically acceptable levels, and overall prevalence ultimately decreases with duration of follow-up.

  12. The May 26, 1999 Resolution of the Joint Meeting of the Board of the Radiation Diagnosis and Radiation Therapy Section, Academic Council, Ministry of Health of Russia, the X-ray Diagnosis Ad Hoc Commission, Interdepartmental Scientific Council for Medical Radiology and Radiation Medicine, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, and the Executive Committee, Russian Association of Radiologists

    Kharchenko, V.P.; Rozhkova, N.I.; Vlasov, P.V.

    2000-01-01

    The text of the May 26, 1999 Resolution of the joint meeting of the Board of the Radiation Diagnosis and Radiation Therapy Section of the Ministry of Health of Russia with the X-ray Diagnostics Ad Hoc Problem Commission of the Intergovernmental Scientific Council for Medical Radiology and Radiation Medicine of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences and the Executive Committee of Russian Association of Radiologists is presented. It is noted that in spite of the fact that the intervention radiology as an independent branch has not yet been formed, separate developments, aimed at application of invasive interventions under the control of radiodiagnostic methods are carried out in the area of bronco pulmonology, gastroenterology, mammology, gynecology, urology, oncology above 30 years and steps in legalization of this trend are also undertaken. Absence of statistical documentation on technical and staff provision of therapeutical-prophylactic establishments as well as unified terminology is noted. The tasks aimed at broader introduction of intervention radiology in Russia are set up [ru

  13. Malaysian perceptions of China

    Ibrahim Abu Bakar

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Malasia que consistía en Malaya, Sabah, Sarawak y Singapur ganó su independencia de los Británicos el 16 de septiembre de 1963. Malaya ganó su independencia de los británicos el 31 de agosto de 1957. En 1965 Singapur era independiente de Malasia. Malasia es una democracia parlamentaria y capitalista. Por otra parte, es una nación multi-religiosa y multirracial. Malasia ha sido poblada por los Malays, los Chinos, los Indios y otros. Los Malays son musulmanes y el Islam es la religión de la federación de Malasia. La nación tiene una larga historia con China pero esa nunca colonizó ningún área en Malasia. Los estados occidentales, fundamentalmente Portugueses y Olandeses colonizaron ciertas áreas en Malasia y luego los Británicos colonizaron la entera región. La percepción malasiana de China está influenciada por muchos factores internos y externos tales como el factor ideologico-político, el desarrollo económico así como las relaciones y la diplomacia nacionales, regionales e internacionales. Este breve artículo presenta la percepción malasiana de China desde un punto de vista cultural, político y económico._____________ABSTRACT:Malaysia consisting of Malaya, Sabah, Sarawak and Singapore gained her independence from the British on 16 September 1963. Malaya gained her independence from the British on 31 August 1957. In 1965 Singapore was independent from Malaysia. Malaysia is a parliamentary democratic and capitalistic nation. Moreover, Malaysia is a multi-religious and multiracial nation. Malaysia has been populated by the Malays, Chinese, Indians and others. The Malays are Muslims and Islam is the religion of the Federation of Malaysia. Malaysia has a very long history with China but China never colonized any area in Malaysia. The Western nations namely the Portuguese and the Dutch colonized certain areas in Malaysia and then the British colonized the whole Malaysia. Malaysian perceptions of China are influenced by many

  14. Changing trend of viral hepatitis -- 'A twenty one year report from Pakistan medical research council research centre, Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre, Karachi'

    Ahmed, W.; Qureshi, H.; Arif, A.; Alam, S.E.

    2010-01-01

    To determine the frequency and pattern of Hepatitis B and C over the past twenty one years, in a liver research unit of Karachi. Retrospective analysis of the records of PMRC, Research Centre, Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre, Karachi, from 1987 to 2007 were reviewed. A special flow sheet was made where information of all patients with viral liver disease was entered. Patients having complete information of viral markers were included in the analysis. Cases with HBsAg, Anti HBc IgM positive and raised ALT were considered as acute Hepatitis B. HBs Ag/ Anti HBc IgG positive were considered as chronic Hepatitis B. Delta antibody positive with or without HBsAg were considered as Delta Hepatitis. Anti HCV positive and raised ALT more than ten times for less than 6 months were considered as acute Hepatitis C, whereas Anti HCV and HCV-RNA positive with or without raised ALT for more than six months were considered as chronic Hepatitis C. Anti HEV IgM and Anti HAV IgM positive were considered as acute Hepatitis E and A respectively. A total of 5193 cases fulfilling all criteria of viral hepatitis were seen in the past 21 years. Of the total 3247 (62.5 %) were males and 1946 (37.5 %) females giving a male to female ratio of 1.7:1 Hepatitis C was the most common infection seen in 2896 cases (55.8 %), followed by Hepatitis B in 1691 cases (32.6 %). Seventy five percent cases of Hepatitis B were males and 25 % females while 55% Hepatitis C cases were males and 45 % females. Hepatitis B was seen a decade earlier in different age groups than hepatitis C. Overall, out of the total 5193 cases, 2294 (44.2%) were of chronic hepatitis, 1430 (27.5%) cirrhosis, 1083 (20.8%) carriers and 346 (6.7%) had acute hepatitis (hepatitis B; 214 (61.8%), hepatitis C; 21 (6.0%). While hepatitis B and hepatitis C both were present in 3 (1.3%). Hepatitis E was 70 (20.2%) hepatitis A 12 (3.5%) and all markers were negative in 26 (7.5%) cases). Forty cases (0.8%) were of Hepatocellular carcinoma

  15. Transcultural diabetes nutrition algorithm: a malaysian application.

    Hussein, Zanariah; Hamdy, Osama; Chin Chia, Yook; Lin Lim, Shueh; Kumari Natkunam, Santha; Hussain, Husni; Yeong Tan, Ming; Sulaiman, Ridzoni; Nisak, Barakatun; Chee, Winnie Siew Swee; Marchetti, Albert; Hegazi, Refaat A; Mechanick, Jeffrey I

    2013-01-01

    Glycemic control among patients with prediabetes and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) in Malaysia is suboptimal, especially after the continuous worsening over the past decade. Improved glycemic control may be achieved through a comprehensive management strategy that includes medical nutrition therapy (MNT). Evidence-based recommendations for diabetes-specific therapeutic diets are available internationally. However, Asian patients with T2D, including Malaysians, have unique disease characteristics and risk factors, as well as cultural and lifestyle dissimilarities, which may render international guidelines and recommendations less applicable and/or difficult to implement. With these thoughts in mind, a transcultural Diabetes Nutrition Algorithm (tDNA) was developed by an international task force of diabetes and nutrition experts through the restructuring of international guidelines for the nutritional management of prediabetes and T2D to account for cultural differences in lifestyle, diet, and genetic factors. The initial evidence-based global tDNA template was designed for simplicity, flexibility, and cultural modification. This paper reports the Malaysian adaptation of the tDNA, which takes into account the epidemiologic, physiologic, cultural, and lifestyle factors unique to Malaysia, as well as the local guidelines recommendations.

  16. Transcultural Diabetes Nutrition Algorithm: A Malaysian Application

    Zanariah Hussein

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycemic control among patients with prediabetes and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D in Malaysia is suboptimal, especially after the continuous worsening over the past decade. Improved glycemic control may be achieved through a comprehensive management strategy that includes medical nutrition therapy (MNT. Evidence-based recommendations for diabetes-specific therapeutic diets are available internationally. However, Asian patients with T2D, including Malaysians, have unique disease characteristics and risk factors, as well as cultural and lifestyle dissimilarities, which may render international guidelines and recommendations less applicable and/or difficult to implement. With these thoughts in mind, a transcultural Diabetes Nutrition Algorithm (tDNA was developed by an international task force of diabetes and nutrition experts through the restructuring of international guidelines for the nutritional management of prediabetes and T2D to account for cultural differences in lifestyle, diet, and genetic factors. The initial evidence-based global tDNA template was designed for simplicity, flexibility, and cultural modification. This paper reports the Malaysian adaptation of the tDNA, which takes into account the epidemiologic, physiologic, cultural, and lifestyle factors unique to Malaysia, as well as the local guidelines recommendations.

  17. Transcultural Diabetes Nutrition Algorithm: A Malaysian Application

    Hamdy, Osama; Chin Chia, Yook; Lin Lim, Shueh; Kumari Natkunam, Santha; Yeong Tan, Ming; Sulaiman, Ridzoni; Nisak, Barakatun; Chee, Winnie Siew Swee; Marchetti, Albert; Hegazi, Refaat A.; Mechanick, Jeffrey I.

    2013-01-01

    Glycemic control among patients with prediabetes and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) in Malaysia is suboptimal, especially after the continuous worsening over the past decade. Improved glycemic control may be achieved through a comprehensive management strategy that includes medical nutrition therapy (MNT). Evidence-based recommendations for diabetes-specific therapeutic diets are available internationally. However, Asian patients with T2D, including Malaysians, have unique disease characteristics and risk factors, as well as cultural and lifestyle dissimilarities, which may render international guidelines and recommendations less applicable and/or difficult to implement. With these thoughts in mind, a transcultural Diabetes Nutrition Algorithm (tDNA) was developed by an international task force of diabetes and nutrition experts through the restructuring of international guidelines for the nutritional management of prediabetes and T2D to account for cultural differences in lifestyle, diet, and genetic factors. The initial evidence-based global tDNA template was designed for simplicity, flexibility, and cultural modification. This paper reports the Malaysian adaptation of the tDNA, which takes into account the epidemiologic, physiologic, cultural, and lifestyle factors unique to Malaysia, as well as the local guidelines recommendations. PMID:24385984

  18. NOTES ON MALAYSIAN CYPERACEAE

    J. H. KERN

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This is the first paper of a series, in which preparatory to a moreomprehensive treatment for "Flora Malesiana," some noteworthy Malayian Cyperaceae will be dealt with. It is based on the material of this family in the Herbaria at Bogor (BO, Leiden (L, and Singapore (S. My sincere thanks are extended to the Directors of these institutions for giving me the opportunity to study their rich collections. In 1935—36 Kiikenthal's excellent monograph on the genus Cyperusn Engler's "Pflanzenreich" appeared. Unfortunately that author revised only a few specimens of the herbaria already mentioned, so that the basis or the distribution of the genus in Malaysia, as given in his invaluable work, compares unfavourably with that of the species of other regions. Kiikenthal's delimitation of the genus is readily accepted; in general his arrangement of the species is also followed, although I cannot agree with Kiikenthal's assertion that his system should be in close accordance withhe genetic development of the genus.On the whole only the synonymy important for the Malaysian regions given below. For a more complete account the reader is referred to Kiikenthal's monograph, in which of course the literature of merely regional interest could not always be fully considered. The accompanying plates are part of a series, drawn under my supervision by two of the draughtsmen of Herbarium Bogoriense, Sukirnoand Md. Anwar.

  19. Decision support using anesthesia information management system records and accreditation council for graduate medical education case logs for resident operating room assignments.

    Wanderer, Jonathan P; Charnin, Jonathan; Driscoll, William D; Bailin, Michael T; Baker, Keith

    2013-08-01

    Our goal in this study was to develop decision support systems for resident operating room (OR) assignments using anesthesia information management system (AIMS) records and Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) case logs and evaluate the implementations. We developed 2 Web-based systems: an ACGME case-log visualization tool, and Residents Helping in Navigating OR Scheduling (Rhinos), an interactive system that solicits OR assignment requests from residents and creates resident profiles. Resident profiles are snapshots of the cases and procedures each resident has done and were derived from AIMS records and ACGME case logs. A Rhinos pilot was performed for 6 weeks on 2 clinical services. One hundred sixty-five requests were entered and used in OR assignment decisions by a single attending anesthesiologist. Each request consisted of a rank ordered list of up to 3 ORs. Residents had access to detailed information about these cases including surgeon and patient name, age, procedure type, and admission status. Success rates at matching resident requests were determined by comparing requests with AIMS records. Of the 165 requests, 87 first-choice matches (52.7%), 27 second-choice matches (16.4%), and 8 third-choice matches (4.8%) were made. Forty-three requests were unmatched (26.1%). Thirty-nine first-choice requests overlapped (23.6%). Full implementation followed on 8 clinical services for 8 weeks. Seven hundred fifty-four requests were reviewed by 15 attending anesthesiologists, with 339 first-choice matches (45.0%), 122 second-choice matches (16.2%), 55 third-choice matches (7.3%), and 238 unmatched (31.5%). There were 279 overlapping first-choice requests (37.0%). The overall combined match success rate was 69.4%. Separately, we developed an ACGME case-log visualization tool that allows individual resident experiences to be compared against case minimums as well as resident peer groups. We conclude that it is feasible to use ACGME case

  20. Perceived sources of stress among Malaysian dental students

    Babar, Muneer G.; Hasan, Syed S.; Ooi, Yong J.; Ahmed, Syed I.; Wong, Pei S.; Ahmad, Siti F.; MNM-Rosdy, Nik M.; Malik, Normaliza A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The study objectives were to identify the stress levels and to explore the impact of students' year of study and gender on the perceived sources of stress among Malaysian dental students. Methods This was a cross-sectional study involving dental students from year one to year five from private and public universities in Malaysia. The study was formally approved by the Research and Ethics Committee, International Medical University Malaysia. Dental Environment Stress (DES) questionn...

  1. MH17: the Malaysian experience.

    Khoo, L S; Hasmi, A H; Abdul Ghani Aziz, S A; Ibrahim, M A; Mahmood, M S

    2016-04-01

    A disaster is a natural or man-made (or technological) hazard resulting in an event of substantial extent causing significant physical damage or destruction, loss of life, or drastic change to the environment. It is a phenomenon that can cause damage to life and property and destroy the economic, social and cultural life of the people; and overwhelms the capacity of the community to cope with the event. The recent tragic aviation accidents in 2014 involving Malaysia Airlines flights MH370 and MH17 shocked the world in an unprecedented manner. This paper focuses on the Malaysian experience in the MH17 mission in Ukraine as well as the first ever international Disaster Victim Identification (DVI) operation for the Malaysian DVI team. The DVI operations in Hilversum, the Netherlands were well described in stages. The Netherlands' Landelijk Team Forensische Opsporing as the lead DVI team in Hilversum operated systematically, ensuring the success of the whole mission. This paper discusses the lessons learned by the Malaysian team on proper DVI structure, inter- and intra-agency cooperation, facilities planning and set up, logistics and health and safety aspects, as well as effective communication and collaboration with other international delegates. Several issues and challenges faced by the Malaysian team were also documented. In addition, the authors shared views, opinions and recommendations for a more comprehensive DVI operation in the future.

  2. Inclusion in Malaysian Integrated Preschools

    Sukumaran, Sailajah; Loveridge, Judith; Green, Vanessa A.

    2015-01-01

    Inclusive education has been introduced through a number of policy developments in Malaysia over the last 10 years but there is little research investigating the extent and nature of inclusive education for preschoolers with special educational needs (SEN). This study surveyed both regular and special education teachers in Malaysian integrated…

  3. National Safety Council

    ... work, in homes and communities, and on the road through leadership, research, education and advocacy. NSC Newsletter Sign up for our newsletter! Like Us on Facebook National Safety Council © National Safety Council. All rights reserved. Contact ...

  4. APA Council Reports.

    2017-10-01

    At the fall component meetings of the American Psychiatric Association in Arlington, Va., September 13-16, 2017, the APA councils heard reports from their components. Following are summaries of the activities of the councils and their components.

  5. The effect of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Duty Hours Policy on plastic surgery resident education and patient care: an outcomes study.

    Basu, Chandrasekhar Bob; Chen, Li-Mei; Hollier, Larry H; Shenaq, Saleh M

    2004-12-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Work-Hours Duty Policy became effective on July 1, 2003, mandating the reduction of resident duty work hours. The Baylor College of Medicine Multi-Institutional Integrated Plastic Surgery Program instituted a resident duty work-hours policy on July 1, 2002 (1 year ahead of the national mandate). Outcomes data are needed to facilitate continuous improvements in plastic surgical residency training while maintaining high-quality patient care. To assess the effect of this policy intervention on plastic surgery resident education as measured through the six core competencies and patient/resident safety, the investigators surveyed all categorical plastic surgery residents 6 months after implementation of the policy. This work represents the first empiric study investigating the effect of duty hours reduction on plastic surgery training and education. The categorical plastic surgery residents at the Baylor College of Medicine Multi-Institutional Integrated Plastic Surgery Program completed a 68-item survey on a five-point Likert scale (1 = strongly disagree to 5 = strongly agree). Residents were asked to rate multiple parameters based on the ACGME six core competencies, including statements on patient care and clinical/operative duties, resident education, resident quality of life, and resident perceptions on this policy. All surveys were completed anonymously. The sample size was n = 12 (program year 3 through program year 6), with a 100 percent response rate. Univariate and bivariate statistical analysis was conducted with SPSS version 10.0 statistical software. Specifically, interquartile deviations were used to find consensus among resident responses to each statement. Descriptive statistics indicated higher percentages of agreement on a majority of statements in three categories, including patient care and clinical/operative duties, academic duties, and resident quality of life. Using interquartile

  6. Using the Medical Research Council framework for the development and evaluation of complex interventions in a theory-based infant feeding intervention to prevent childhood obesity: the baby milk intervention and trial.

    Lakshman, Rajalakshmi; Griffin, Simon; Hardeman, Wendy; Schiff, Annie; Kinmonth, Ann Louise; Ong, Ken K

    2014-01-01

    We describe our experience of using the Medical Research Council framework on complex interventions to guide the development and evaluation of an intervention to prevent obesity by modifying infant feeding behaviours. We reviewed the epidemiological evidence on early life risk factors for obesity and interventions to prevent obesity in this age group. The review suggested prevention of excess weight gain in bottle-fed babies and appropriate weaning as intervention targets; hence we undertook systematic reviews to further our understanding of these behaviours. We chose theory and behaviour change techniques that demonstrated evidence of effectiveness in altering dietary behaviours. We subsequently developed intervention materials and evaluation tools and conducted qualitative studies with mothers (intervention recipients) and healthcare professionals (intervention deliverers) to refine them. We developed a questionnaire to assess maternal attitudes and feeding practices to understand the mechanism of any intervention effects. In addition to informing development of our specific intervention and evaluation materials, use of the Medical Research Council framework has helped to build a generalisable evidence base for early life nutritional interventions. However, the process is resource intensive and prolonged, and this should be taken into account by public health research funders. This trial is registered with ISRTCN: 20814693 Baby Milk Trial.

  7. Using the Medical Research Council Framework for the Development and Evaluation of Complex Interventions in a Theory-Based Infant Feeding Intervention to Prevent Childhood Obesity: The Baby Milk Intervention and Trial

    Rajalakshmi Lakshman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. We describe our experience of using the Medical Research Council framework on complex interventions to guide the development and evaluation of an intervention to prevent obesity by modifying infant feeding behaviours. Methods. We reviewed the epidemiological evidence on early life risk factors for obesity and interventions to prevent obesity in this age group. The review suggested prevention of excess weight gain in bottle-fed babies and appropriate weaning as intervention targets; hence we undertook systematic reviews to further our understanding of these behaviours. We chose theory and behaviour change techniques that demonstrated evidence of effectiveness in altering dietary behaviours. We subsequently developed intervention materials and evaluation tools and conducted qualitative studies with mothers (intervention recipients and healthcare professionals (intervention deliverers to refine them. We developed a questionnaire to assess maternal attitudes and feeding practices to understand the mechanism of any intervention effects. Conclusions. In addition to informing development of our specific intervention and evaluation materials, use of the Medical Research Council framework has helped to build a generalisable evidence base for early life nutritional interventions. However, the process is resource intensive and prolonged, and this should be taken into account by public health research funders. This trial is registered with ISRTCN: 20814693 Baby Milk Trial.

  8. The European Federation of Organisations for Medical Physics. Policy Statement No. 7.1: The roles, responsibilities and status of the medical physicist including the criteria for the staffing levels in a Medical Physics Department approved by EFOMP Council on 5th February 2016.

    Evans, Stephen; Christofides, Stelios; Brambilla, Marco

    2016-04-01

    This EFOMP Policy Statement is an amalgamation and an update of the EFOMP Policy Statements No. 2, 4 and 7. It presents guidelines for the roles, responsibilities and status of the medical physicist together with recommended minimum staffing levels. These recommendations take into account the ever-increasing demands for competence, patient safety, specialisation and cost effectiveness of modern healthcare services, the requirements of the European Union Council Directive 2013/59/Euratom laying down the basic safety standards for protection against the dangers arising from exposure to ionising radiation, the European Commission's Radiation Protection Report No. 174: "Guidelines on medical physics expert", as well as the relevant publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency. The provided recommendations on minimum staffing levels are in very good agreement with those provided by both the European Commission and the International Atomic Energy Agency. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. SPORTS WATCHING CULTURE AMONG MALAYSIANS

    Gunathevan Elumalai

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ardent sports watching will lead an individual to engage in sports and recreational activities continuously, while it also creates a sports culture among Malaysians. Sports watching culture is actually an intellectual activity. It is capable of evaluating behaviour, moral values and the level of appreciation of every spectator. Methods: This survey was conducted to identify the sports viewing culture among Malaysians. A cluster sampling method was used to select 6000 respondents from 30 million Malaysian population. Respondents were selected from urban (50% and rural areas (50%. Ethnically 56% were Malays, Sarawak and Sabah natives were 11%, Chinese 25% and finally Indians 7%. The respondents age categories were 12 to 19 years (30%, 20 to 25 years (50%, 56 and above (20%. A questionnaire developed by the research team was used to collect data. The quantitative data were analysed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS version 21.0 for windows. Results: The findings indicate that from 5864 respondents who answered the questionnaire in full, a total of 4553 people or 77.6% watch sporting events, while a total of 1311 people or 22.4% have stated not watching any sports activities. Comparison by gender showed that 85.2% of the 2482 males watch sports events while among the female 70.2% of the 2071 watch sports events. In the category of those who do not watch, the female are higher at 29.8% than the males at 14.8%. In terms of ethnicity the Malays 80.2%. Chinese 64.6%, Indians 81.9%, natives of Sabah 94.0%, natives of Sarawak 77.6% like to watch sports events. Residential locations showed no significant differences as 78.7% of urban respondents watch sports events compared to 76.8% of rural communities. Conclusion: The findings indicated that majority of Malaysians having fun in watching sports activities. Gender still plays a role in the involvement and enjoyment of sports events either as a player or supporter. Ethnicity

  10. Biotechnology issues in four Malaysian mainstream newspapers ...

    Biotechnology has been identified as the new engine of growth for the transformation of Malaysia into a developed nation by 2020. The objective of this paper is to analyze the impact of National Policy on biotechnology on media reporting in four Malaysian newspapers. Towards this end, a content analysis of four Malaysian ...

  11. Rhythmic patterning in Malaysian and Singapore English.

    Tan, Rachel Siew Kuang; Low, Ee-Ling

    2014-06-01

    Previous work on the rhythm of Malaysian English has been based on impressionistic observations. This paper utilizes acoustic analysis to measure the rhythmic patterns of Malaysian English. Recordings of the read speech and spontaneous speech of 10 Malaysian English speakers were analyzed and compared with recordings of an equivalent sample of Singaporean English speakers. Analysis was done using two rhythmic indexes, the PVI and VarcoV. It was found that although the rhythm of read speech of the Singaporean speakers was syllable-based as described by previous studies, the rhythm of the Malaysian speakers was even more syllable-based. Analysis of the syllables in specific utterances showed that Malaysian speakers did not reduce vowels as much as Singaporean speakers in cases of syllables in utterances. Results of the spontaneous speech confirmed the findings for the read speech; that is, the same rhythmic patterning was found which normally triggers vowel reductions.

  12. ITER council proceedings: 1996

    1997-01-01

    Records of the 10. ITER Council Meeting (IC-10), held on 26-27 July 1996, in St. Petersburg, Russia, and the 11. ITER Council Meeting (IC-11) held on 17-18 December 1996, in Tokyo, Japan, are presented, giving essential information on the evolution of the ITER Engineering Design Activities (EDA) and the cost review and safety analysis. Figs, tabs

  13. European works councils

    Knudsen, Herman Lyhne

    2004-01-01

    The theme addressed by this artcle is the opportunities for European Works Councils of gaining influence on corporate decisions in multinational companies.......The theme addressed by this artcle is the opportunities for European Works Councils of gaining influence on corporate decisions in multinational companies....

  14. ITER council proceedings: 1992

    1994-01-01

    At the signing of the ITER EDA Agreement on July, 1992, each of the Parties presented to the Director General the names of their designated members of the ITER Council. Upon receiving those names, the Director General stated that the ITER Engineering Design Activities were ''ready to begin''. The next step in this process was the convening of the first meeting of the ITER Council. The first meeting of the Council, held in Vienna, was opened by Director General Hans Blix. The second meeting was held in Moscow, the formal seat of the Council. This volume presents records of these first two Council meetings and, together with the previous volumes on the text of the Agreement and Protocol 1 and the preparations for their signing respectively, represents essential information on the evolution of the ITER EDA

  15. Quality system in Malaysian National Tissue Bank

    Go Boon Thong; Firdaus, M. N.; Abd Rani Shamsudin

    1999-01-01

    Quality System in Malaysian National Tissue Bank is based on the Quality Manual which has been drawn up by the chairman, who is the Dean, School of Medical Sciences. The Quality Manual include general standard for Tissue Banking in University Science of Malaysia which describe and explain a set of general standard similar to the EATB standard. The primary aim of the quality system is to produce a safe and effective tissue graft for successful clinical use and to ensure the safety of tissue bank operators. The Quality Manual also related the role of a Technical Manual, which explain the standard of technical aspect of tissue bank in a Quality Assurance. The safe working environment and Good Laboratory Practice is highlight in Quality System. Documentation of tissue bank activities is the key to the administration to tissue bank. Finally Quality System in tissue banking will never be complete without a Tissue Bank Auditing System which allow the tissue bank coordinator and staff to look into the problem and further enhance the progress of the tissue bank

  16. The Challenges of Malaysian Dry Ports Development

    Jagan Jeevan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the functions and challenges of dry ports development in Malaysia through 11 face-to-face interviews with dry port stakeholders. The findings reveal that Malaysian dry ports are developed to accelerate national and international business, to activate intermodalism in the nation, to promote regional economic development and to enhance seaport competitiveness. Malaysian dry ports perform the function of transport and logistics, information processing, seaports and value-added services. Challenges facing Malaysian dry ports include insufficient railway tracks, unorganized container planning on the rail deck, highly dependent on single mode of transportation, poor recognition from the seaport community, and competition from localized seaports. This paper further indicates strategies for coping with these challenges and identifies future opportunities for Malaysian dry ports development.

  17. Local learning processes in Malaysian industry

    Wangel, Arne

    1999-01-01

    Local learning processes are a vital part of any dynamic assimilation of transferred technology. The paper raises the question about the interaction between the training paradigms, which transnational corporations introduce in their subsidiaries in Malaysia and the specific basis for learning...... of Malaysian labour. Experiences from Malaysian industry indicate that local learning processes are shaped, among other things, by the concept of knowledge in a particular training programme, labour market structures, and learning cultures....

  18. ITER council proceedings: 2001

    2001-01-01

    Continuing the ITER EDA, two further ITER Council Meetings were held since the publication of ITER EDA documentation series no, 20, namely the ITER Council Meeting on 27-28 February 2001 in Toronto, and the ITER Council Meeting on 18-19 July in Vienna. That Meeting was the last one during the ITER EDA. This volume contains records of these Meetings, including: Records of decisions; List of attendees; ITER EDA status report; ITER EDA technical activities report; MAC report and advice; Final report of ITER EDA; and Press release

  19. Elections to Staff Council

    Saff Association

    2013-01-01

    2013 Elections to Staff Council   Vote! Make your voice heard and be many to elect the new Staff Council. More details on the elections can be found on the Staff Association web site (https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/elections-2013).   Timetable elections Monday 28 October to Monday 11 November, 12:00 am voting Monday 18 and Monday 25 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 19 November, Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 3 December, first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure is monitored by the Election Committee.

  20. Suicidal ideation among Malaysian adolescents.

    Ahmad, NoorAni; Cheong, Siew Man; Ibrahim, Nurashikin; Rosman, Azriman

    2014-09-01

    Adolescence is the time of greatest risk for the first onset of suicidal behaviors. This study aimed to identify the risk and protective factors associated with suicidal ideation among Malaysian adolescents. Data from the 2012 Malaysia Global School-based Student Health Survey, a nationwide study using a 2-stage cluster sampling design, were analyzed. The survey used a self-administered validated bilingual questionnaire and the Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale. The prevalence of suicidal ideation was 7.9%. Analysis revealed that suicidal ideation was positively associated with depression, anxiety, stress, substance use, being bullied, and being abused at home, either physically or verbally. In addition, suicidal ideation was significantly higher among females and among the Indians and Chinese. Having close friends and married parents were strongly protective against suicidal ideation. Understanding the risk and protective factors is important in providing comprehensive management for suicidal ideation. © 2014 APJPH.

  1. Medicare Appeals Council Decisions

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Decisions of the Departmental Appeals Board's Medicare Appeals Council involving claims for entitlement to Medicare and individual claims for Medicare coverage and...

  2. Allegheny County Council Districts

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset portrays the boundaries of the County Council Districts in Allegheny County. The dataset is based on municipal boundaries and City of Pittsburgh ward...

  3. The Swedish Research Councils' Laboratory progress report for 1975

    Rudstam, G.

    1976-01-01

    The Swedish Research Councils' Laboratory herewith presents its progress report for 1975. The report summarizes the current projects carried out by the research groups working at the laboratory. The very efficient assistance of the staff of the laboratory is greatfully acknowledged. The laboratory has been financially supported by the Atomic Research Council, the Medical Research Council, the Natural Science Research Council, and the Board of Technical Development. Valuable support in various ways has also been given by the Atomic Energy Company (AB Atomenergi). (author)

  4. ITER council proceedings: 1995

    1996-01-01

    Records of the 8. ITER Council Meeting (IC-8), held on 26-27 July 1995, in San Diego, USA, and the 9. ITER Council Meeting (IC-9) held on 12-13 December 1995, in Garching, Germany, are presented, giving essential information on the evolution of the ITER Engineering Design Activities (EDA) and the ITER Interim Design Report Package and Relevant Documents. Figs, tabs

  5. ITER council proceedings: 1998

    1999-01-01

    This volume contains documents of the 13th and the 14th ITER council meeting as well as of the 1st extraordinary ITER council meeting. Documents of the ITER meetings held in Vienna and Yokohama during 1998 are also included. The contents include an outline of the ITER objectives, the ITER parameters and design overview as well as operating scenarios and plasma performance. Furthermore, design features, safety and environmental characteristics are given

  6. News from Council

    2015-01-01

    Today concludes a very busy week for Council. As you’ll have seen from the press release this morning, Council elected a new President, who will take up his mandate on 1 January along with the new management team, which was also approved by Council yesterday.   You’ll find full details of the incoming Director-General’s management team and structures here. Completing the configuration for the immediate future, Council also approved the medium term plan, along with the budget for 2016. In other Council business, two complete applications for Associate Membership were discussed. Following an earlier letter, India’s complete application was received and considered by Council. Consequently, a fact-finding mission has been established to report back before the end of the year. A new application was also received from Azerbaijan, with a fact-finding mission to be established. India’s involvement with CERN goes back to the 1970s, and the country...

  7. Assessing cultural intelligence of Malaysian expatriates in Netherlands

    Using purposive sampling method, a total of 320 questionnaires were distributed via email to Malaysian expatriates in Hague, Netherlands. Results from multiple regression analysis indicate that personality traits of agreeableness, openness and extraversion are significant to Malaysian expatriate's cultural intelligence.

  8. Internalization of Malaysian mathematical and computer science journals

    Zainab, A. N.

    2008-01-01

    The internationalization characteristics of two Malaysian journals, Bulletin of the Malaysian Mathematical Sciences Society ( indexed by ISI) and the Malaysian Journal of Computer Science ( indexed by Inspec and Scopus) is observed. All issues for the years 2000 to 2007 were looked at to obtain the following information, (i) total articles published between 2000 and 2007; (ii) the distribution of foreign and Malaysian authors publishing in the journals; (iii) the distribution of articles by c...

  9. Medical faculty's views and experiences of parental leave: a collaborative study by the Gender Issues Committee, Council of Ontario Faculties of Medicine.

    Phillips, S P; Richardson, B; Lent, B

    2000-01-01

    To examine medical faculty's actual and ideal parental leave arrangements with the aim of informing policy decisions. Leave lengths, effect on career, financial arrangements, and availability of temporary replacements were explored. All medical faculty (6387) in Ontario, Canada were surveyed by mail and asked about parental leave experiences since 1990. Responses of men and women were compared as were those of leave takers and the entire group. Thirty-two percent (n = 996) of the 3107 respondents were women and 68% (n = 2067) were men. Ninety-eight percent (n = 317) of new mothers had taken maternity leave, while only 21% (n = 159) of new fathers had. Both paid and unpaid leave was generally shorter than that allowed by law or identified as ideal. Parental leave had a somewhat negative effect on the careers of all faculty. Women were more worried than men about the effect of their absence on colleagues' work and more generous with ideal leave length and funding. Temporary replacement of leave takers was central to an effective leave policy. Institutional and academic culture may cause new parents to take suboptimal leave despite legislation allowing more. A change in the work environment is required for medicine to offer its teachers what it teaches--that infants benefit from nurturing, nursing, and stability early in life.

  10. Challenges and Opportunities in Establishing and Maintaining Newborn Screening in a Rural Area of Andhra Pradesh - Task Force Study by Indian Council of Medical Research.

    Radha Rama Devi, A; Ananthalakshmi, Y; Srimannarayana Rao, K

    2018-02-19

    The primary objective was to evaluate the feasibility of setting up newborn screening in rural areas in India. Secondary objective was to enhance the knowledge and awareness towards early detection of diseases by newborn screening, management of the affected baby and to impart genetic counseling. Awareness programs were conducted at different mandals in the district for the medical practioners during the preparatory phase of the Task Force Project. Educative lectures and clinical meetings regarding the importance and relevance of newborn screening were held every 3 months initially and half yearly later. Families were counselled during antenatal check-ups. Good co-operation was obtained from medical doctors and their willingness to participate in sample collection from the hospitals. Families accepted screening after an initial period of resistance. The fact that screening of this kind will help their babies made a positive impact. Many families started promoting newborn screening to their friends and relations. Confirmation of diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up were satisfactory with almost negligible number of cases lost to follow-up. With proper planning and commitment on the part of health authorities, it is possible to implement newborn screening in rural areas in India as well.

  11. Medical Students and informed consent: A consensus statement prepared by the Faculties of Medical and Health Science of the Universities of Auckland and Otago, Chief Medical Officers of District Health Boards, New Zealand Medical Students' Association and the Medical Council of New Zealand.

    Bagg, Warwick; Adams, John; Anderson, Lynley; Malpas, Phillipa; Pidgeon, Grant; Thorn, Michael; Tulloch, David; Zhong, Cathy; Merry, Alan F

    2015-05-15

    To develop a national consensus statement to promote a pragmatic, appropriate and unified approach to seeking consent for medical student involvement in patient care. A modified Delphi technique was used to develop the consensus statement involving stakeholders. Feedback from consultation and each stakeholder helped to shape the final consensus statement. The consensus statement is a nationally-agreed statement concerning medical student involvement in patient care, which will be useful for medical students, health care professionals and patients.

  12. A report from Council

    2014-01-01

    The June meeting of Council is always a very busy one, having approval of the next year’s budget and the MTP as fixed agenda points. This year in addition, we had discussions on enlargement, as well as on the pension fund. I’d like to use this message to bring you up to date on all of those matters.   I’ll begin with the good news that the 2015 budget and MTP were recommended for approval by Finance Committee on Wednesday, and approved by Council on Thursday. This is extremely good news, and a solid vote of confidence from Council in the current economic situation. Coupled with that, I am pleased to report that at the half way stage of 2014, some 89% of budget contributions for the year have been received. Turning now to enlargement, I can inform you that the task force that went to Pakistan came back with a positive report, and as a consequence Council has authorised us to finalise discussion with Pakistan for Associate Membership. Council also authoris...

  13. Hydrotherapy: An innovative treatment for obese Malaysians

    Noordin, M. Hazim M.; Ahmad, Hartini; Baharin, Shamsuddin

    2015-12-01

    Malaysia is ranked as a country with the most obese population in the Southeast Asia region, and placed sixth in the Asia Pacific. Obesity does not only influence the persons' mobility and quality of health, but could also link to medical leaves and absenteeism affecting the overall workforce productivity and efficiency. Routine physical activity is essential for good health and it is particularly important for those who are trying to lose weight or to maintain a healthy weight. However, it is disheartening to note that only 32.6 percent Malaysians above the age of 15 are involved in physical exercise or vigorous sports. There is an emergence of many types of hydrotherapy system, which are either active or passive and these can be at hospital settings, public places or in individual homes. Such hydrotherapy, if properly programmed can promote the physical activity amongst the obese in Malaysia. Current research on the use of active and passive hydrotherapy for obesity treatment was carried out. Subjects of both sexes and diverse age ranges, immersed themselves in a heated pool within hospital setting and in a bath tubs with high energy turbulent movement of medium temperature water. These hydrotherapy sessions provide a form of physical exercise in water as compared to on the land exercise. The findings of the hydrotherapy sessions have shown encouraging results. Quantitative data was analysed, with the help of descriptive statistics and paired sample t-test. Qualitative data was analysed manually with help of thematic analysis and specialised qualitative assessment software. This study reveals that hydrotherapy has improved patient's mobility, flexibility and exercise capability. Results reveal the reduction in the weight of subjects, with both quantitative and qualitative data results show that Hydrotherapy improved the quality of life in term of body pain reduction and general health improvement. Therefore, it can be concluded that the hydrotherapy can be seen

  14. "Conclusions about exposure to ETS and health that will be unhelpful to us": how the tobacco industry attempted to delay and discredit the 1997 Australian National Health and Medical Research Council report on passive smoking.

    Trotter, L; Chapman, S

    2003-12-01

    Major reviews of the health effects of passive smoking have been subjected to tobacco industry campaigns to refute the scientific evidence. Following the 1992 US Environmental Protection Agency review, the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) initiated a review of the health effects of passive smoking. At the time of this review, evidence that environmental tobacco smoke causes disease was being increasingly accepted in courts of law and voluntary adoption of smoking restrictions was rapidly growing. To demonstrate how the tobacco industry attempted to delay and discredit the publication of a report on passive smoking that the tobacco industry anticipated to contain recommendations that would be unfavourable to their business. A search of tobacco industry documents on the Master Settlement Agreement websites was conducted using the terms and acronyms representative of the NHMRC review. The tobacco industry sought to impede the progress of the NHMRC Working Party by launching an intensive campaign to delay and discredit the report. The main strategies used were attempts to criticise the science, extensive use of Freedom of Information provisions to monitor all activity of the group, legal challenges, ad hominem attacks on the credibility of the Working Party members, rallying support from industry allies, and influencing public opinion through the media. The Australian tobacco industry deliberately impeded the NHMRC Working Party's progress and successfully prevented the publication of the report's recommendations. The tobacco industry's motivation and capacity to disrupt the advancement of scientific knowledge and policy in tobacco control should be recognised and anticipated.

  15. ITER Council proceedings: 1993

    1994-01-01

    Records of the third ITER Council Meeting (IC-3), held on 21-22 April 1993, in Tokyo, Japan, and the fourth ITER Council Meeting (IC-4) held on 29 September - 1 October 1993 in San Diego, USA, are presented, giving essential information on the evolution of the ITER Engineering Design Activities (EDA), such as the text of the draft of Protocol 2 further elaborated in ''ITER EDA Agreement and Protocol 2'' (ITER EDA Documentation Series No. 5), recommendations on future work programmes: a description of technology R and D tasks; the establishment of a trust fund for the ITER EDA activities; arrangements for Visiting Home Team Personnel; the general framework for the involvement of other countries in the ITER EDA; conditions for the involvement of Canada in the Euratom Contribution to the ITER EDA; and other attachments as parts of the Records of Decision of the aforementioned ITER Council Meetings

  16. ITER council proceedings: 1993

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    Records of the third ITER Council Meeting (IC-3), held on 21-22 April 1993, in Tokyo, Japan, and the fourth ITER Council Meeting (IC-4) held on 29 September - 1 October 1993 in San Diego, USA, are presented, giving essential information on the evolution of the ITER Engineering Design Activities (EDA), such as the text of the draft of Protocol 2 further elaborated in ``ITER EDA Agreement and Protocol 2`` (ITER EDA Documentation Series No. 5), recommendations on future work programmes: a description of technology R and D tastes; the establishment of a trust fund for the ITER EDA activities; arrangements for Visiting Home Team Personnel; the general framework for the involvement of other countries in the ITER EDA; conditions for the involvement of Canada in the Euratom Contribution to the ITER EDA; and other attachments as parts of the Records of Decision of the aforementioned ITER Council Meetings.

  17. Perceived sources of stress among Malaysian dental students.

    Babar, Muneer G; Hasan, Syed S; Ooi, Yong J; Ahmed, Syed I; Wong, Pei S; Ahmad, Siti F; Mnm-Rosdy, Nik M; Malik, Normaliza A

    2015-05-02

    The study objectives were to identify the stress levels and to explore the impact of students' year of study and gender on the perceived sources of stress among Malaysian dental students. This was a cross-sectional study involving dental students from year one to year five from private and public universities in Malaysia. The study was formally approved by the Research and Ethics Committee, International Medical University Malaysia. Dental Environment Stress (DES) questionnaire was used for data collection and the gathered data were analyzed using SPSS® version 18. The Kruskal-Wallis and the Mann-Whitney U tests were used to compare stress items across various academic years and universities. A total of five hundred and twenty nine (529) students participated in this study. Fear of failing the course at the end of year exams (mean stress level=5.57); concerns regarding completion of clinical work (mean=5.30); and examination results and grades (mean=5.27) were found as top stressors among dental students. Female students had higher stress scores than males with respect to personal issues, academic performance, educational environment and learning of clinical skills. Students from public universities had higher stress scores than their counterparts from private universities. The Malaysian dental students reported higher levels of stress. Present study identified stressors affecting dental students' academic life, and highlights the importance of stress management programs and other measures to minimize the impact of stress on both academic and personal lives of the students.

  18. ITER council proceedings: 1997

    1997-01-01

    This volume of the ITER EDA Documentation Series presents records of the 12th ITER Council Meeting, IC-12, which took place on 23-24 July, 1997 in Tampere, Finland. The Council received from the Parties (EU, Japan, Russia, US) positive responses on the Detailed Design Report. The Parties stated their willingness to contribute to fulfil their obligations in contributing to the ITER EDA. The summary discussions among the Parties led to the consensus that in July 1998 the ITER activities should proceed for additional three years with a general intent to enable an efficient start of possible, future ITER construction

  19. Malaysian Affordability Housing Policies Revisited

    Samad Diwa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Housing has always been a significant aspiration of family expression and distinctly priciest investment by household. It plays a momentous role in the country’s economy and so central to the societal well-being that is emplaced in the United Nation Universal declaration of Human rights. Yet in developed and developing world alike, cities struggle to provide decent housing for lower and middle income population. The provision of affordable housing is a major policy concern around the world with Malaysia being no exception; rising income hardly keep pace with price hike of housing unit and housing interventions has majorly concentrated on demand side leading to a non-responsive supply sector. Therefore, this paper highlights affordable housing issues pertaining Malaysia. It formulates Malaysian Map of affordability and conducts an evaluation of global housing schemes to better identify policy priorities for Malaysia. It’s significant to harmonize supply and demand side factors in the housing market to ensure that housing supply fits the needs of citizens based on the location, price and target group. In case of Malaysia supply oriented initiative are of urgency in short and medium run. This must be supported by long term demand side schemes in parallel. Convergence of these two factors is essential for a balanced equilibrium and obtaining affordability.

  20. Prediction of Malaysian monthly GDP

    Hin, Pooi Ah; Ching, Soo Huei; Yeing, Pan Wei

    2015-12-01

    The paper attempts to use a method based on multivariate power-normal distribution to predict the Malaysian Gross Domestic Product next month. Letting r(t) be the vector consisting of the month-t values on m selected macroeconomic variables, and GDP, we model the month-(t+1) GDP to be dependent on the present and l-1 past values r(t), r(t-1),…,r(t-l+1) via a conditional distribution which is derived from a [(m+1)l+1]-dimensional power-normal distribution. The 100(α/2)% and 100(1-α/2)% points of the conditional distribution may be used to form an out-of sample prediction interval. This interval together with the mean of the conditional distribution may be used to predict the month-(t+1) GDP. The mean absolute percentage error (MAPE), estimated coverage probability and average length of the prediction interval are used as the criterions for selecting the suitable lag value l-1 and the subset from a pool of 17 macroeconomic variables. It is found that the relatively better models would be those of which 2 ≤ l ≤ 3, and involving one or two of the macroeconomic variables given by Market Indicative Yield, Oil Prices, Exchange Rate and Import Trade.

  1. The current practice of mentoring across Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education – International accredited programs in Qatar from faculty and trainees perspectives

    Suliman, Shireen; Al-Mohammed, Ahmed; Al Mohanadi, Dabia; Allen, Margaret; Bylund, Carma L

    2018-01-01

    Purpose Mentoring plays a vital role in academic productivity, personal development, and career guidance for students, residents, fellows, and junior faculty. A culture of mentoring is spreading across residency and fellowship training programs in Hamad Medical Corporation, the main teaching tertiary care facility in Qatar. However, there is insufficient knowledge about the current practice of mentoring in these programs. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study by surveying all faculty and trainees in all residency and fellowship training programs in Qatar. Each completed a web-based questionnaire that asked about the current experience, self-efficacy and measures of improvement of the current practice of mentoring across training programs. Results A total of 393/650 faculty members (61%), 187/250 fellows (74%), and 405/650 residents (62%) responded to the two surveys. Most (74% of faculty members) reported being current mentors, while 67% of residents and fellows reported that they currently have mentors. Faculty who received training in mentoring and those who had an established formal mentoring program in their departments were more likely to enroll in mentoring than others (86%, Pmentoring initiative in their departments were to develop a structured mentoring program and to train the mentors. Content analysis revealed participants’ confusion differentiating between the terms mentoring and supervision. Conclusion Based on the current study, many existing mentoring relationships have an evident confusion between supervision and mentoring roles. Developing structured mentoring program and training both faculty and trainees in mentoring is recommended to improve the current practice of mentoring within the training programs. PMID:29416385

  2. Factors Affecting Hypertension among the Malaysian Elderly

    Eshkoor, Sima Ataollahi; Hamid, Tengku Aizan; Shahar, Suzana; Ng, Chee Kyun; Mun, Chan Yoke

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is a common chronic disease in the elderly. This study aimed to determine the effects of age, ethnicity, gender, education, marital status, nutritional parameters, and blood elements on the risk of high blood pressure in the Malaysian elderly. This research was conducted on a group of 2322 non-institutionalized Malaysian elderly. The hierarchy binary logistic regression analysis was applied to estimate the risk of hypertension in respondents. Approximately, 45.61% of subjects had hypertension. The findings indicated that the female gender (Odds ratio (OR) = 1.54), an increase in body weight (OR = 1.61), and an increase in the blood levels of albumin (OR = 1.51), glucose (OR = 1.92), and triglycerides (OR = 1.27) significantly increased the risk of hypertension in subjects (p Malaysian elderly. In addition, an increase in both dietary carbohydrates and blood cholesterol level decreased hypertension in subjects. PMID:29367559

  3. Repositioning Strategy for Malaysian Companies Internationalization

    Ismi Rajiani

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The rise of the emerging-market countries offers both developing and developed countries a unique opportunity to gain the benefits of a truly international economy. Consequently, it is imper- ative to advance our knowledge of emerging-market countries MNC emergence and competitive- ness including Malaysian firms on how will they position their products strategically. Based on the framework of Porter’s Generic Strategy, this paper is composed of price/ volume segments and im- pacts on product strategy theory. The aim is to identify crucial triggering cues and focus areas for Malaysian companies and measure what role these play in different segments. This study argues that some Malaysian companies will reposition themselves strategically when internationalizing and that they will focus on other factors or triggering cues when doing so not merely adapting the prevalent price leadership strategy.

  4. Managing Political Information: A Malaysian Perspective

    Jamilah Ahmad

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In the development of democratization and the expression of civil and political rights of Malaysian citizens, the pattern of control developed by the regime that is currently in power (Barisan Nasional for the last 50 years in the mass media began to reap the resistance and tend to be ineffective. Malaysian citizens began to demand the Malaysian government to change the pattern of political information management. In addition, the mass media alone is expected to play a more significant role as an intermediary agent in supporting the process of transparency and accountability of government policy. This article shows that the openness of public information is a prerequisite for political democracy in Malaysia to help the government minimize the mis-management of governance policies, especially in finance and resource management.

  5. Drivers for Cleaner Production in Malaysian Industry

    Wangel, Arne

    2003-01-01

    This working paper tries to piece together information on regulatory initiatives promoting cleaner production (CP) in Malaysian industry, as well as points of discussion on environmental performance in the sector. It draws upon initial data collection by the team of the research project ‘A Study...... on Promotion and Implementation of Cleaner Production Practices in Malaysian Industry - Development of a National Program and Action Plan for Promotion of Cleaner Production’, which is coordinated by Institute of Environmental and Resource Management, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia; the objective of this study...... is ‘to formulate, establish and develop a comprehensive "National Cleaner Production Promotion Program" for Malaysia’....

  6. Nuclear Security in Action at Malaysian Borders

    Dahlstrom Danielle

    2013-01-01

    ''For Malaysia, trade has to be a transparent'', explained Raja Adnan, the Director General of the Malaysian Atomic Energy Licensing Board (AELB). ''Goods are imported and exported, not just between two countries, but are in transit between several countries. Nuclear security measures help to guarantee open trade and makes sure that everyone is trading responsibly,'' emphasized Adnan. Officials from AELB prepare for a joint Indonesian-Malaysian exercise in effective border control by reviewing their national standard operating procedures (SOPs) on nuclear security, which were developed in close coordination with the IAEA

  7. Statewide Suicide Prevention Council

    State Employees Statewide Suicide Prevention Council DHSS State of Alaska Home Divisions and Agencies National Suicide Prevention Lifeline Alaska Community Mental Health Centers National Survivors of Suicide Meetings Presentations 2010 Alaska Statewide Suicide Prevention Summit: Mending the Net Connect with us on

  8. International fusion research council

    Belozerov, A.N.

    1977-01-01

    A brief history of the International Fusion Research Council (IFRC) is given and the minutes of the 1976 meeting in Garching are summarized. At the Garching meeting, the IFRC evaluated the quality of papers presented at recent IAEA conferences on plasma physics and controlled thermonuclear research, and made recommendations on the organization and timing of future meetings on nuclear fusion

  9. Elections to Staff Council

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    Elections to fill all seats in the Staff Council are being organized this month. The voting takes place from the 31st of October to the 14th of November, at noon. As you may have noted when reading Echo, many issues concerning our employment conditions are on the agenda of the coming months and will keep the next Staff Council very busy. So, make your voice heard and take part in the elections for a new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will be representing you over the next two years and they will doubtless appreciate your gratitude. Every member of the Staff Association will have received an email containing a link to the webpage which will allow voting. If you are a member of the Staff Association and you did not receive such an email, please contact the Staff Association secretariat (staff.association@cern.ch). Do not forget to vote * * * * * * * Vote Make your voice heard and be many to elect the new Staff Council. More details on the election...

  10. Council Membership Directory 1969.

    Council of Organizations Serving the Deaf, Washington, DC.

    Information is provided on the purposes, goals, functions, membership, board of directors, calendar of events, publications, and names and addresses of the officers or executive committees of 19 national organizations serving the deaf. Organizations included are the Council of Organizations Serving the Deaf, Alexander Graham Bell Association for…

  11. Councils of Urgent Studies

    Cellarius, Richard A.; Platt, John

    1972-01-01

    Discusses the role of national or international coordinating councils in focusing research on solutions of major human problems. Presents a taxonomy of 25 areas under the major heading: Physical Technology and Engineering; Biotechnology; Behavior and Personal Relations; National Social Structures; World Structure; and Channels of Effectiveness.…

  12. Report from Council

    2015-01-01

    This week’s Council meeting was dominated by discussions about the long-term, sustainable future of CERN. Key points are progress on the Medium-Term Plan, the successful LHC restart, and enlargement.   The budget proposed by management for 2016 was well received, as were the measures to mitigate against the recent change in exchange rates. These items will be put to the vote in September. Discussions on CERN staff employment conditions were conducted in a constructive atmosphere this week, and will continue in future Council meetings. The Council also clearly voiced its congratulations for the smooth and successful start of LHC run 2, coming on top of a clear run of spectacular scientific and technological successes over recent years. In the current climate of austerity, these developments are a strong endorsement from the Council. Nevertheless, it would be disingenuous of me to pretend that everything is rosy. There has been an air of unease at CERN over recent months, which was v...

  13. Overview of Breast Cancer in Malaysian Women: A Problem with Late Diagnosis

    Abdullah N. Hisham

    2004-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among Malaysian women. There is a marked geographical difference in the worldwide incidence of breast cancer, with a higher incidence in developed countries compared to developing countries. From 1998 to 2001, new cases of breast cancer presenting to the breast clinics at Hospital Kuala Lumpur and University Malaya Medical Centre, Malaysia, were reviewed; the race, age and stage at presentation were analysed. Of 774 cases seen in Hospital Kuala Lumpur, ...

  14. 77 FR 2275 - Manufacturing Council

    2012-01-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Manufacturing Council AGENCY... candidate's proven experience in promoting, developing and marketing programs in support of manufacturing... participating in Council meetings and events are responsible for their travel, living and other personal...

  15. 76 FR 33244 - Manufacturing Council

    2011-06-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Manufacturing Council AGENCY... experience in promoting, developing and marketing programs in support of manufacturing industries, in job... Council meetings and events are responsible for their travel, living and other personal expenses. Meetings...

  16. Food irradiation development: Malaysian perspective

    Zainon Othman

    1997-01-01

    Malaysia recognised the potential of food irradiation as a technology that can contribute to solving some preservation problems associated with local agricultural produce. Research studies in this technology were initiated in late 1970s and since 1985, all activities pertaining to R and D applications, adoption and technology transfer of food irradiation were coordinated by The National Working Committee on Food Irradiation which comprises of members from research institutes, universities, regulatory agencies and consumer association. To date, technical feasibility studies conducted on 7 food items / agricultural commodities of economic importance demonstrated the efficacy of irradiation in extending shelf-life, improving hygienic quality and overcoming quarantine barriers in trade. Presently, 1 multipurpose Co-60 irradiator (I MCi), 2 gammacells and an electron beam machine (3 MeV) are available at MINT for research and commercial runs. The Malaysian Standards on Guidelines for Irradiation of Food was formulated in 1992 to facilitate application by local food industries. However, Malaysia has not yet commercially adopt the technology. Among many factors contributing to the situation is the apparent lack of interest by food industries and consumers. Consumer attitude study indicated majority of consumers are still unaware of the benefits of the technology and expressed concern for the safety of process and irradiated products due to limited knowledge and adverse publicity by established consumer groups. Although the food processors indicate positive attitude towards food irradiation, there remain many factors delaying its commercial application such as limited knowledge, cost-benefit, logistics and consumer acceptance. On the regulatory aspect, approval is required from the Director-General of Ministry of Health prior to application of irradiation on food and sale of irradiated food but efforts are being geared towards approving irradiation of certain food

  17. State of progress in Malaysian plant Taxonomy

    NN,

    1948-01-01

    Dr H.C.D. de Wit started a revision of Malaysian Bauhinia, this being part of his work on the Caesalpiniaceae of Malaysia; he is working in the Eijksherbarium, Leyden, Holland. Mr R.A. Blakelock, is revising the genus Evonymus at the Roy. Bot. Gardens, Kew-Surrey.

  18. Educational Transition of East Malaysian Distance Learners.

    Saw, K. G.; Awang, M. N.; Idrus, R. M.; Atan, H.; Azli, N. A.; Jaafar, I.; Rahman, Z. A.; Latiff, Z. A.

    1999-01-01

    Describes results of a study of the changing perceptions of East Malaysian distance learners studying at the Universiti Sains Malaysia. Highlights include students' perceptions of their study skills; and the impact of their studies on other areas of their life, including social obligations, recreation, families, health, finances, work, and…

  19. Malaysian Students' Motivation towards Physics Learning

    Saleh, Salmiza

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this survey study was to examine the level of Malaysian students' motivation with regards to the learning of Physics at the secondary school level, and its influencing factors. The study was carried out on 337 Form Four students who took Physics as a subject, from six schools in a northern state of Malaysia--three from urban areas,…

  20. Malaysian Children's Attitudes towards Learning Music

    Ghazali, Ghaziah Mohd.; McPherson, Gary E.

    2009-01-01

    A sample of 1060 Malaysian children were surveyed in order to examine differences in their motivation to study music in school and to learn a musical instrument outside of school. Adopting the expectancy-value motivation theory, the children were asked questions concerning their perception of music as being important, useful, interesting,…

  1. Biotechnology issues in four Malaysian mainstream newspapers

    Jane

    2011-09-30

    Sep 30, 2011 ... Biotechnology has been identified as the new engine of growth for the transformation of Malaysia into a developed nation by 2020. The objective of this paper is to analyze the impact of National Policy on biotechnology on media reporting in four Malaysian newspapers. Towards this end, a content analysis.

  2. Prepositions and ESL Learners: the Malaysian Scenario

    Norwati Roslim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a review of the literature on prepositions with a focus on definitions and main difficulties faced by Malaysian students. It further highlights recommendations about the role of syllabus designers, textbook writers and teachers in meeting these challenges. It is hoped that this article could provide a platform for any further studies on prepositions.

  3. Malaysian water sector reform : policy and performance

    Kim, C.T.

    2012-01-01

    One of the measures that can help developing countries in meeting Target 10 of the Millennium Development Goals – halving the number of people without access to water and adequate sanitation by 2015 – is through a water sector reform. In this research the Malaysian water sector reform is

  4. Eclectic Model in the Malaysian Education System

    Othman, Nooraini; Mohamad, Khairul Azmi; Ilmuwan, Yayasan

    2011-01-01

    The present work aims at analysing the adoption of eclectic model in the Malaysian education system. The analysis is specifically looked from the angle of Islam and the Muslims. Malaysia has a long history of education system developments, from pre to post independence of the country. From what was initially traditional, modernity later came to…

  5. An investigation of whether factors associated with short-term attrition change or persist over ten years: data from the Medical Research Council Cognitive Function and Ageing Study (MRC CFAS

    Chatfield Mark

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Factors associated with the loss of participants in long-term longitudinal studies of ageing, due to refusal or moves, have been discussed less than those with short term follow-up. Methods In a population-based study of cognition and ageing (the Medical Research Council Cognitive Function and Ageing Study (MRC CFAS, factors associated with dropout due to refusal and moving in the first follow-up period (over two years are compared with factors associated with dropout over ten years. Participants at 10-year follow-up are compared with their age-standardised baseline contemporaries. Results Some consistent trends are found over the longer term. Refusers tended to have poorer cognition, less years of education, not have a family history of dementia and be women. Characteristics of people who moved differed between waves, but the oldest and people in worse health moved more. When surviving and responding individuals at ten years are compared with those of the same age at baseline many differences are found. Individuals of lower social class, education, cognitive ability, in residential care, with sight/hearing problems and poor/fair self-reported health are less likely to be seen after 10 years of follow-up. Individuals report more health problems when they participate in multiple interviews. Conclusion The characteristics of refusers in the longer term are similar to those refusing to participate over the shorter term. Long-term follow-up studies will under represent the disadvantaged and disabled but represent full health status of participating individuals better. There are advantages and disadvantages to both short-term and long-term follow-up.

  6. Addiction research centres and the nurturing of creativity: The Alcohol & Drug Abuse Research Unit at the South African Medical Research Council - strengthening substance abuse research and policy in South Africa.

    Parry, Charles; Morojele, Neo; Myers, Bronwyn; Plüddemann, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The Alcohol and Drug Abuse Research Unit (ADARU) was established at the South African Medical Research Council (MRC) at the beginning of 2001, although its origins lie in the activities of the Centre for Epidemiological Research in Southern Africa and other MRC entities. Initial challenges included attracting external funding, recruiting new staff, developing the skills of junior staff, publishing in international journals and building national and international collaborative networks. ADARU currently comprises a core staff of 33 members who work on 22 projects spanning substance use epidemiology and associated consequences, intervention studies with at-risk populations and services research. A large component of this portfolio focuses on the link between alcohol and other drug use and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) risk behaviour, with funding from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Junior staff members are encouraged to develop independent research interests and pursue PhD studies. Research outputs, such as the 20 papers that were published in 2010 and the 35 conference presentations from that year, form an important part of the unit's research translation activities. We engage actively with policy processes at the local, provincial, national and international levels, and have given particular attention to alcohol policy in recent years. The paper includes an analysis of major challenges currently facing the unit and how we are attempting to address them. It ends with some thoughts on what the unit intends doing to enhance the quality of its research, the capacity of its staff and its international standing. © 2011 The Authors, Addiction © 2011 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  7. Models and impact of patient and public involvement in studies carried out by the Medical Research Council Clinical Trials Unit at University College London: findings from ten case studies.

    South, Annabelle; Hanley, Bec; Gafos, Mitzy; Cromarty, Ben; Stephens, Richard; Sturgeon, Kate; Scott, Karen; Cragg, William J; Tweed, Conor D; Teera, Jacqueline; Vale, Claire L

    2016-07-29

    Patient and public involvement (PPI) in studies carried out by the UK Medical Research Council Clinical Trials Unit (MRC CTU) at University College London varies by research type and setting. We developed a series of case studies of PPI to document and share good practice. We used purposive sampling to identify studies representing the scope of research at the MRC CTU and different approaches to PPI. We carried out semi-structured interviews with staff and patient representatives. Interview notes were analysed descriptively to categorise the main aims and motivations for involvement; activities undertaken; their impact on the studies and lessons learned. We conducted 19 interviews about ten case studies, comprising one systematic review, one observational study and 8 randomised controlled trials in HIV and cancer. Studies were either open or completed, with start dates between 2003 and 2011. Interviews took place between March and November 2014 and were updated in summer 2015 where there had been significant developments in the study (i.e. if the study had presented results subsequent to the interview taking place). A wide range of PPI models, including representation on trial committees or management groups, community engagement, one-off task-focused activities, patient research partners and participant involvement had been used. Overall, interviewees felt that PPI had a positive impact, leading to improvements, for example in the research question; study design; communication with potential participants; study recruitment; confidence to carry out or complete a study; interpretation and communication of results; and influence on future research. A range of models of PPI can benefit clinical studies. Researchers should consider different approaches to PPI, based on the desired impact and the people they want to involve. Use of multiple models may increase the potential impacts of PPI in clinical research.

  8. Knowledge Management In Malaysian Nuclear Agency: The first 40 years

    Habibah Adnan; Norzehan Ngadiron; Iberahim Ali

    2012-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of nuclear knowledge management practices in Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia) in the first 40 years of its operation. Nuclear Malaysia is established in 1972 and its main responsibility is to promote the application of nuclear technology in various socioeconomic sectors including industry, medical, agriculture, manufacturing, health, radiation safety and the environment. Nuclear Malaysia's core competency is R and D in nuclear science and technology. The explanation emphasizes on the activities and challenges in implementing NKM at the Nuclear Malaysia and in particular; nuclear knowledge management practices, the needs for Nuclear Malaysia to strengthen his KM activities and the evolvement and development of KM to enhance the ability of the organization. (Author)

  9. Medications (for IBS)

    Full Text Available ... J. Lembo, MD, Instructor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Division of Gastroenterology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, ... About IFFGD Our Mission Awareness Activities Advocacy Activities Research Leadership Industry Council Contact us IBS Treatment Working ...

  10. UN human rights council

    Vuksanović Mlrjana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the structure, mechanisms, practices and perspectives of the Human Rights Council, the UN body that, at universal level is the most important body in this area. Introductory section provides for a brief overview of the origins of human rights and the work of the Commission on Human Rights, in whose jurisdiction were questions of human rights before the establishment of the Council. After the introductory section the author gives an analysis of the structure, objectives, mandate and main procedures for the protection of human rights within the united Nations. In the final section the authorpoints out the advantages of this authority and criticism addressed to it, with emphasis on the possibility and the need for its reform.

  11. Highlights: Spring Council Meeting

    Council members present at the May 24, 1981, meeting were Keiiti Aki, Steven Burges (for Jim Wallis), Peter S. Eagleson, E. R. Engdahl, Charles E. Helsley, James R. Heirtzler, Carl Kisslinger, Leslie H. Meredith, Chris N. K. Mooers, Norman F. Ness, Marcia M. Neugebauer, James J. O'Brien, Richard Rapp, Carl Sagan, James C. Savage, Joseph V. Smith, Fred Spilhaus, Donald L. Turcotte, James A. Van Allen, J. Tuzo Wilson, and Jay Winston (for Elmar R. Reiter until his arrival at 6:50 P.M.). David Strangway, representing the Canadian Geophysical Union, and Peter Steinhauser, representing the European Geophysical Society, were special observers at the meeting. Council meetings are open, and a number of section secretaries, committee chairmen, journal editors, and other members attended. The following major actions were adopted by the Council:The experiment of publishing oceanography and lower-atmosphere papers in JGR Green issues alternate to those containing upper-atmosphere papers will be continued through 1982. From preliminary indications the experiment seems to be working, but a full year of data, including a renewal cycle, is needed to assess the success of the experiment. Final decision will be made prior to the 1983 dues notices.

  12. DECLARATION TO COUNCIL

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    One year ago, the Staff Association, together with the CERN-ESO Pensioners' Association, organized a staff meeting in front of this building to express our concern about certain actions of this Committee. Today we deem it necessary to come before you and convey in person, dear delegates, the concerns and worries of the staff. Indeed, the last 18 months we have observed a tendency of Council to take matters, in particular in the field of pensions, into its own hands, bypassing established governance structures, which Council has itself put into place. As a result, the Director General was prevented from playing his essential role of intermediary between staff and Council, an essential element of the established social dialogue. The creation of CERN in 1954 was very much based on the willingness of many countries of the old Continent to share resources to create a joint fundamental physics laboratory. The emphasis was on sharing resources for the common good to allow European scientists to engage in...

  13. Council Chamber exhibition

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    To complete the revamp of CERN’s Council Chamber, a new exhibition is being installed just in time for the June Council meetings.   Panels will showcase highlights of CERN’s history, using some of the content prepared for the exhibitions marking 50 years of the PS, which were displayed in the main building last November. The previous photo exhibition in the Council Chamber stopped at the 1970s. To avoid the new panels becoming quickly out of date, photos are grouped together around specific infrastructures, rather than following a classic time-line. “We have put the focus on the accelerators – the world-class facilities that CERN has been offering researchers over the years, from the well-known large colliders to the lesser-known smaller facilities,” says Emma Sanders, who worked on the content. The new exhibition will be featured in a future issue of the Bulletin with photos and an interview with Fabienne Marcastel, designer of the exhibit...

  14. Elections to Staff Council

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    Elections to fill all seats in the Staff Council are being organized this month. The voting takes place from the 28 of October to the 11th of November, at noon. As you may have noted when reading Echo, many issues concerning our employment conditions are on the agenda of the coming months, and in particular the Five-yearly-Review 2015, subject of the questionnaire that you probably recently filled out. All this will keep the next Staff Council very busy indeed. So, make your voice heard and take part in the elections for a new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will be representing you over the next two years and they will doubtless appreciate your gratitude. Every member of the Staff Association will have received an email containing a link to the webpage which will allow voting. If you are a member of the Staff Association and you did not receive such an email, please contact the Staff Association secretariat (staff.association@cern.ch). Do not forget to v...

  15. Using the Medical Research Council framework for development and evaluation of complex interventions in a low resource setting to develop a theory-based treatment support intervention delivered via SMS text message to improve blood pressure control.

    Bobrow, Kirsten; Farmer, Andrew; Cishe, Nomazizi; Nwagi, Ntobeko; Namane, Mosedi; Brennan, Thomas P; Springer, David; Tarassenko, Lionel; Levitt, Naomi

    2018-01-23

    Several frameworks now exist to guide intervention development but there remains only limited evidence of their application to health interventions based around use of mobile phones or devices, particularly in a low-resource setting. We aimed to describe our experience of using the Medical Research Council (MRC) Framework on complex interventions to develop and evaluate an adherence support intervention for high blood pressure delivered by SMS text message. We further aimed to describe the developed intervention in line with reporting guidelines for a structured and systematic description. We used a non-sequential and flexible approach guided by the 2008 MRC Framework for the development and evaluation of complex interventions. We reviewed published literature and established a multi-disciplinary expert group to guide the development process. We selected health psychology theory and behaviour change techniques that have been shown to be important in adherence and persistence with chronic medications. Semi-structured interviews and focus groups with various stakeholders identified ways in which treatment adherence could be supported and also identified key features of well-regarded messages: polite tone, credible information, contextualised, and endorsed by identifiable member of primary care facility staff. Direct and indirect user testing enabled us to refine the intervention including refining use of language and testing of interactive components. Our experience shows that using a formal intervention development process is feasible in a low-resource multi-lingual setting. The process enabled us to pre-test assumptions about the intervention and the evaluation process, allowing the improvement of both. Describing how a multi-component intervention was developed including standardised descriptions of content aimed to support behaviour change will enable comparison with other similar interventions and support development of new interventions. Even in low

  16. Meta-synthesis exploring barriers to health seeking behaviour among Malaysian breast cancer patients.

    Yu, Foo Qing; Murugiah, Muthu Kumar; Khan, Amer Hayat; Mehmood, Tahir

    2015-01-01

    Barriers to health seeking constitute a challenging issue in the treatment of breast cancer. The current meta- synthesis aimed to explore common barriers to health seeking among Malaysian breast cancer patients. From the systematic search, nine studies were found meeting the inclusion criteria. Data extraction revealed that health behavior towards breast cancer among Malaysia women was influenced by knowledge, psychological, sociocultural and medical system factors. In terms of knowledge, most of the Malaysian patients were observed to have cursory information and the reliance on the information provided by media was limiting. Among psychological factors, stress and sense of denial were some of the common factors leading to delay in treatment seeking. Family member's advice, cultural beliefs towards traditional care were some of the common sociocultural factors hindering immediate access to advanced medical diagnosis and care. Lastly, the delay in referral was one of the most common health system-related problems highlighted in most of the studies. In conclusion, there is an immediate need to improve the knowledge and understanding of Malaysian women towards breast cancer. Mass media should liaise with the cancer specialists to disseminate accurate and up-to-date information for the readers and audience, helping in modification of cultural beliefs that hinder timing health seeking. However, such intervention will not improve or rectify the health system related barriers to treatment seeking. Therefore, there is an immediate need for resource adjustment and training programs among health professional to improve their competency and professionalism required to develop an efficient health system.

  17. Formation process of Malaysian modern architecture under influence of nationalism

    宇高, 雄志; 山崎, 大智

    2001-01-01

    This paper examines the Formation Process of Malaysian Modern Architecture under Influence of Nationalism,through the process of independence of Malaysia. The national style as "Malaysian national architecture" which hasengaged on background of political environment under the post colonial situation. Malaysian urban design is alsodetermined under the balance of both of ethnic culture and the national culture. In Malaysia, they decided to choosethe Malay ethnic culture as the national culture....

  18. FACTORS INFLUENCING YIELD SPREADS OF THE MALAYSIAN BONDS

    Norliza Ahmad; Joriah Muhammad; Tajul Ariffin Masron

    2009-01-01

    Malaysian bond market is developing rapidly but not much is understood in terms of macroeconomic factors that could influence the yield spread of the Ringgit Malaysian denominated bonds. Based on a multifactor model, this paper examines the impact of four macroeconomic factors namely: Kuala Lumpur Composite Index (KLCI), Industry Production Index (IPI), Consumer Price Index (CPI) and interest rates (IR) on bond yield spread of the Malaysian Government Securities (MGS) and Corporate Bonds (CBs...

  19. Sociotechnical factors influencing unsafe use of hospital information systems: A qualitative study in Malaysian government hospitals.

    Salahuddin, Lizawati; Ismail, Zuraini; Hashim, Ummi Rabaah; Raja Ikram, Raja Rina; Ismail, Nor Haslinda; Naim Mohayat, Mohd Hariz

    2018-03-01

    The objective of this study is to identify factors influencing unsafe use of hospital information systems in Malaysian government hospitals. Semi-structured interviews with 31 medical doctors in three Malaysian government hospitals implementing total hospital information systems were conducted between March and May 2015. A thematic qualitative analysis was performed on the resultant data to deduce the relevant themes. A total of five themes emerged as the factors influencing unsafe use of a hospital information system: (1) knowledge, (2) system quality, (3) task stressor, (4) organization resources, and (5) teamwork. These qualitative findings highlight that factors influencing unsafe use of a hospital information system originate from multidimensional sociotechnical aspects. Unsafe use of a hospital information system could possibly lead to the incidence of errors and thus raises safety risks to the patients. Hence, multiple interventions (e.g. technology systems and teamwork) are required in shaping high-quality hospital information system use.

  20. Public health council

    1979-01-01

    The internal matters of the council are reported followed by reports from the individual committees. These include committees of radiation hygiene, food irradiation, the disposal of radioactive waste and the classification of isotope laboratories, guide-lines for radiation protection in hospitals and clinics, isotope laboratories, legal liability for radiation accidents, nuclear heart stimulators, computer tomography, supplementary advice about nuclear energy, combustion furnace for radioactive waste, and experiments with radioactive materials on testees. Each report describes the setting up of the committee, the members, its function with a short description of the work completed in 1977. (Auth.)

  1. Investigating sensitivity, specificity, and area under the curve of the Clinical COPD Questionnaire, COPD Assessment Test, and Modified Medical Research Council scale according to GOLD using St George's Respiratory Questionnaire cutoff 25 (and 20 as reference

    Tsiligianni IG

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Ioanna G Tsiligianni,1,2 Harma J Alma,1,2 Corina de Jong,1,2 Danijel Jelusic,3 Michael Wittmann,3 Michael Schuler,4 Konrad Schultz,3 Boudewijn J Kollen,1 Thys van der Molen,1,2 Janwillem WH Kocks1,2 1Department of General Practice, 2GRIAC Research Institute, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands; 3Klinik Bad Reichenhall, Center for Rehabilitation, Pulmonology and Orthopedics, Bad Reichenhall, 4Department of Medical Psychology, Psychotherapy and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany Background: In the GOLD (Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease strategy document, the Clinical COPD Questionnaire (CCQ, COPD Assessment Test (CAT, or modified Medical Research Council (mMRC scale are recommended for the assessment of symptoms using the cutoff points of CCQ ≥1, CAT ≥10, and mMRC scale ≥2 to indicate symptomatic patients. The current study investigates the criterion validity of the CCQ, CAT and mMRC scale based on a reference cutoff point of St George’s Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ ≥25, as suggested by GOLD, following sensitivity and specificity analysis. In addition, areas under the curve (AUCs of the CCQ, CAT, and mMRC scale were compared using two SGRQ cutoff points (≥25 and ≥20.Materials and methods: Two data sets were used: study A, 238 patients from a pulmonary rehabilitation program; and study B, 101 patients from primary care. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC curves were used to assess the correspondence between the recommended cutoff points of the questionnaires.Results: Sensitivity, specificity, and AUC scores for cutoff point SGRQ ≥25 were: study A, 0.99, 0.43, and 0.96 for CCQ ≥1, 0.92, 0.48, and 0.89 for CAT ≥10, and 0.68, 0.91, and 0.91 for mMRC ≥2; study B, 0.87, 0.77, and 0.9 for CCQ ≥1, 0.76, 0.73, and 0.82 for CAT ≥10, and 0.21, 1, and 0.81 for mMRC ≥2. Sensitivity, specificity, and AUC scores for

  2. Job satisfaction of Malaysian registered nurses: a qualitative study.

    Atefi, Narges; Abdullah, Khatijah L; Wong, Li P

    2016-01-01

    Job satisfaction is an important factor in health care settings. Strong empirical evidence supports a causal relationship between job satisfaction, patient safety and quality of care. However, there have not been any studies exploring the job satisfaction of Malaysian nurses. The main purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to explore the factors related to feelings of job satisfaction as well as job dissatisfaction experienced by registered nurses in Malaysia. A convenient sample of 46 Malaysian nurses recruited from a large hospital (number of beds = 895) participated in the study. A total of seven focus group discussions were conducted with nurses from surgical, medical and critical care wards. A semi-structured interview guide was used to facilitate the interviews, which were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and checked. The transcripts were used as data and were analysed using a thematic approach. The study identified three main themes that influenced job satisfaction: (1) nurses' personal values and beliefs; (2) work environment factors and (3) motivation factors. Concerning the nurses' personal values and beliefs, the ability to help people made the nurses felt honoured and happy, which indirectly contributed to job satisfaction. For work environment factors, team cohesion, benefit and reward, working conditions play an important role in the nurses' job satisfaction. Motivation factors, namely, professional development and clinical autonomy contributed to job satisfaction. It is important for nurse leaders to provide more rewards, comfortable work environments and to understand issues that affect nurses' job satisfaction. Our findings highlight the importance of factors that can improve nurses' job satisfaction. The study provides basic information for hospital administrators in planning effective and efficient policies to improve nursing job satisfaction in order to increase the quality of patient care and decrease nursing turnover. © 2014

  3. Workshop on postgraduate training in nuclear medicine in Europe, Innsbruck, April 1984, sponsored by the Council of Europe, the Society of Nuclear Medicine Europe and the Medical Faculty of the University of Innsbruck

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    The aims of the workshop were the following ones: 1) to give a definition of the actual status of Nuclear Medicine in Europe and existing postgraduate training programs, 2) to provide a training catalogue in Nuclear Medicine which must be realistic and yet adequate and which can be implemented in all Member states of the Council of Europe, 3) to achieve a conclusion which could serve as recommendation for the European authorities in Strasbourg and should hopefully lead to appropriate legal actions by the governments represented at the Council of Europe. (orig./MG)

  4. Drivers for Malaysian SMEs to Go Green

    M. Krishna Moorthy; Peter a/l Yacob; Mahendra Kumar a/l Chelliah; Lawrence Arokiasamy

    2012-01-01

    Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) around the world have little knowledge about environmental management and do not understand the concept of environmental management. The concept of green is still very new to Malaysian SME owners/managers, although many green conferences, seminars and campaigns have been carried out for quite some time. The concept for green process and products in Malaysia is at the infancy stage. The drivers of environmental behavior in SMEs are relatively under-researche...

  5. Malaysian Economic Development: Looking Backwards and Forward

    Hal Hill

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides an analytical and forward-looking overview of Malaysian economic development. Looking back over its 53 years of Independence, we identify the key stylized facts to include the country's generally rapid economic growth and structural change; its consistent openness, especially for merchandize trade and foreign direct investment; its creditable record of macroeconomic management; its consistently high inequality, in spite of the developing world's most consistently implement...

  6. Religiosity, Ethical Judgments and Malaysian Muslim Students

    Rusnah Muhamad

    2014-01-01

    Culture is often cited as one of the powerful determinants in shaping the personality and behaviour of individuals. Religion, being an important element of culture, is seen as playing an important role in determining how people behave in certain situations. Various authors have suggested religion as an important dimension in Malaysian ethical behaviour studies especially for the Malays. Yet this construct is generally ignored or incorporated into other constructs. This study investigates the ...

  7. Internationalisation of the Malaysian Wooden Furniture Industry

    Zhao, LiXu

    2016-01-01

    Malaysia has a strong market share in wooden furniture and the witnessed fast growth made it a leading furniture exporter. Currently, Malaysia is the 8th largest furniture export country. As an export dominated industry, the wooden furniture industry occupies a significant position in the Malaysian economic development. Since the industry is a challenged and deteriorating in global competition, the research objective is to evaluate the present situation and find out strategies on how to impro...

  8. News from Council

    2016-01-01

    With this message I would like to share with you some highlights of this week’s Council meetings.   A major topic was the approval of CERN’s Medium Term Plan (MTP) 2017-2021, along with the budget for 2017. In approving the document, Council expressed its very strong support for the research programme the MTP outlines for the coming years.  Another important topic this week was the formal approval of the High Luminosity LHC project, HL-LHC. This comes as extremely good news not only for CERN, but also for particle physics globally. HL-LHC is the top priority of the European Strategy for Particle Physics in its 2013 update, and is part of the 2016 roadmap of the European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures, ESFRI. It was also identified as a priority in the US P5 strategy process, and in Japan’s strategic vision for the field. It secures CERN’s future until 2035, and ensures that we will achieve the maximum scientific return on the investment...

  9. Drugs and devices: audit and accreditation the Malaysian Practice

    Eisha Abdul Rahman; Anis Ahmad

    1999-01-01

    The Malaysian Drugs Control Authority (DCA) implemented the licensing scheme in April 1992 under the Control of Drugs and Cosmetics Regulations 1984. Premises that need be licensed are those involved in any part of the process of production products or bringing the products to their final state, including storage, processing, assembling, sterilising, packaging, testing, labelling and releasing for sale. A total of 64 manufacturers producing prescription medicines, over-the-counter (OTC) drugs and cosmetics products, and another 61 for traditional medicines, have been licensed. Compliance to Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) which focuses on product safety, purity, efficacy and identity, is a pre-requisite for licensing. The GMP guidelines for pharmaceuticals lay down several pertinent elements such as quality management, personnel, premises and equipment, documentation, production, quality control, contract manufacture, complaints and product recall, and self-inspection. Audits are regularly carried out for the purposes of licensing, certification, surveillance, investigations, and verification. Medical devices, encompassing an enormous range of technologies and application, are however not covered by the above mentioned Regulation. A separate new Bill for Medical Devices will be introduced, as targeted under 7th Malaysia Plan. Although currently not regulated, medical device manufacturers are committed towards quality system management in order to penetrate the international market. Hence, the need to establish quality system standards that comply with EN 46001/2, similar to that ISO 9001/2 requirements. Unlike GMP, which is a regulatory standard, ISO 9001/2 is merely a voluntary certification. The key elements dwell mainly on process management, process improvement, customer interfaces and system administration or control. There are significant similarities between GMP requirements for pharmaceutical and quality system for medical devices. However there are also

  10. Electrolyte profile of Malaysian mothers' milk.

    Alaudeen, S; Muslim, N; Faridah, K; Azman, A; Arshat, H

    1988-12-01

    The influence of socioeconomic status (ethnicity, income and parity) on electrolyte composition (sodium and potassium) in human milk is little known. We have thus quantitatively analyzed approximately 700 samples of milk (1-90 days postpartum) obtained from healthy Malaysian mothers' (Malay, Chinese and Indians) of full term infants. Results show that the mean concentration (mmol/l) of sodium is highest (48.2+or-1.7, Mean+or-SEM) in the Malaysian mothers' colostrum and this value decreased by 30% in their transitional milk and remained constant throughout subsequent days of lactation (mature milk). Ethnically, it is found that the level of sodium in colostrum of Malay and Chinese mothers were similar while the Indian mothers' colostrum showed apparently higher value (52.7+or-3.4 mmol/l) that is statistically insignificant. The transitional milk of all 3 ethnic groups studied exhibited similar levels of sodium. On subsequent days of lactation (mature milk) the Malay mothers exhibited lowest concentration (25.9+or-2.6 mmol/l) of sodium that is significantly (P0.05) different from that of Chinese and Indian mothers. Income and parity do not significantly affect the sodium level in Malaysian mothers' milk during all stages of lactation studied. The level of potassium, however did not change significantly with days of lactation. Like sodium, potassium too was not influenced by income and parity. (Author's).

  11. Are Malaysian Children Achieving Dietary Guideline Recommendations?

    Koo, Hui Chin; Poh, Bee Koon; Lee, Shoo Thien; Chong, Kar Hau; Bragt, Marjolijn C E; Abd Talib, Ruzita

    2016-07-01

    A large body of epidemiological data has demonstrated that diet quality follows a sociodemographic gradient. Little is known, however, about food group intake patterns among Malaysian children. This study aimed to assess consumption pattern of 7 food groups, including cereals/grains, legumes, fruits, vegetables, fish, meat/poultry, and milk/dairy products, among children 7 to 12 years of age. A total of 1773 children who participated in SEANUTS Malaysia and who completed the Food Frequency Questionnaire were included in this study. A greater proportion of children aged 10 to 12 years have an inadequate intake of cereals/grains, meat/poultry, legumes, and milk/dairy products compared with children 7 to 9 years old. With the exception of meat/poultry, food consumption of Malaysian children did not meet Malaysian Dietary Guidelines recommendations for the other 6 food groups, irrespective of sociodemographic backgrounds. Efforts are needed to promote healthy and balanced dietary habits, particularly for foods that fall short of recommended intake level. © 2016 APJPH.

  12. Factors Affecting Hypertension among the Malaysian Elderly

    Sima Ataollahi Eshkoor

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is a common chronic disease in the elderly. This study aimed to determine the effects of age, ethnicity, gender, education, marital status, nutritional parameters, and blood elements on the risk of high blood pressure in the Malaysian elderly. This research was conducted on a group of 2322 non-institutionalized Malaysian elderly. The hierarchy binary logistic regression analysis was applied to estimate the risk of hypertension in respondents. Approximately, 45.61% of subjects had hypertension. The findings indicated that the female gender (Odds ratio (OR = 1.54, an increase in body weight (OR = 1.61, and an increase in the blood levels of albumin (OR = 1.51, glucose (OR = 1.92, and triglycerides (OR = 1.27 significantly increased the risk of hypertension in subjects (p < 0.05. Conversely, an increase in both dietary carbohydrates (OR = 0.74, and blood cholesterol level (OR = 0.42 significantly reduced the risk of hypertension in samples (p < 0.05. Furthermore, the results showed that ethnicity was a non-relevant factor to increase the risk of hypertension in subjects. It was concluded that female gender, an increase in body weight, and an increase in the blood levels of glucose, triglycerides, and albumin enhanced the risk of high blood pressure in the Malaysian elderly. In addition, an increase in both dietary carbohydrates and blood cholesterol level decreased hypertension in subjects.

  13. LAUGHING AT OURSELVES: REFLECTING MALAYSIAN ETHNIC DISPARITIES

    SWAGATA SINHA ROY

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Malaysia’s various ethnic groups make interesting study both sociologically and culturally. With such a heady mix of cultural elements to explore, it is often natural that the many groups stumble upon ‘rare gems’ that reflect their ‘Malaysianess’. Have Malaysians really ever appreciated the many and varied aspects of culture that they are seemingly suddenly thrown into? Do we embrace these happily or are we constantly rejecting them? Fortunately, through the medium of film, we are, from time to time, allowed to reflect on our obvious similarities and even more apparent disparities. In this paper, we explore the culture and perceptions of people from the major ethnic groups that are the human base of this very country. When was it we have last laughed at ourselves … heartily? Nasi Lemak 2.0 provides an interesting, if not disturbing insight into the workings of the Malaysian ‘mind’. Nasi Lemak 2.0 was released on 8th September 2011 and impacted a whole generation of Malaysians. The characters have been well chosen and have done a wonderful job of being representations of the various communities in this nation. Ethnocentrism is a reality and often rears its head, ‘ugly’ or otherwise in several situations. Are we able to grapple with the levels of ethnocentrism that we encounter? These are some of the issues that will trigger much debate and discussion among ourselves and perhaps also reflect our cores.

  14. Malaysian English: An Instrumental Analysis of Vowel Contrasts

    Pillai, Stefanie; Don, Zuraidah Mohd.; Knowles, Gerald; Tang, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    This paper makes an instrumental analysis of English vowel monophthongs produced by 47 female Malaysian speakers. The focus is on the distribution of Malaysian English vowels in the vowel space, and the extent to which there is phonetic contrast between traditionally paired vowels. The results indicate that, like neighbouring varieties of English,…

  15. Young Adult Literature in the Malaysian Secondary School

    Govindarajoo, Mallika V.; Mukundan, Jayakaran

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the results of a study on the experience of the Malaysian secondary school student with Young Adult Literature in the English language classroom. The study aimed to determine the extent to which the Malaysian secondary school student identified with the young adult protagonists and issues in the novels which have been…

  16. National space legislation : future perspectives for Malaysian Space Law

    Saari, Che Zuhaida Binti

    2014-01-01

    This research studies the future perspectives for Malaysian space law. It aims at demonstrating the development of Malaysian outer space activities inclusive of her status with respect to United Nations space conventions and her membership of international and regional space-related organizations.

  17. Self-Access Language Learning for Malaysian University Students

    Tse, Andrew Yau Hau

    2012-01-01

    Just a few Malaysian universities offer self-access language learning activities to students. The objective of this study is to investigate if self-access learning can promote self-directed or autonomous learning in a public Malaysian technical university. Data collection is by means of interviewing the Director, lecturers, and students in a…

  18. Lexical Borrowing from Chinese Languages in Malaysian English

    Imm, Tan Siew

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores how contact between English and Chinese has resulted in the incorporation of Chinese borrowings into the lexicon of Malaysian English (ME). Using a corpus-based approach, this study analyses a comprehensive range of borrowed features extracted from the Malaysian English Newspaper Corpus (MEN Corpus). Based on the contexts of…

  19. Malaysian and American Students' Perceptions of Research Ethics

    Bowman, Laura L.; Anthonysamy, Angela

    2006-01-01

    Differences in perceptions of research ethics between Malaysian and American students were assessed using a questionnaire that measured perceptions of voluntary informed consent for adults and children, assessment of the risk/benefit ratio, issues of deception, and issues of privacy and confidentiality. As predicted, Malaysian students had less…

  20. Language Learning Motivation among Malaysian Pre-University Students

    Muftah, Muneera; Rafik-Galea, Shameem

    2013-01-01

    The study describes and examines Malaysian pre-university students' integrative and instrumental motivation toward learning English language. In this study, 182 non-English major students in one of the Malaysian public universities are selected to fill out a questionnaire reflecting their attitudes and motivation towards learning English. The…

  1. The Quest for Strategic Malaysian Quality National Primary School Leaders

    Ali, Hairuddin Mohd

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the nine-point strategic leadership characteristics of Malaysian Quality National Primary School Leaders (QNPSL) and to indicate the implications of these findings for the current educational management and leadership practices in their quest for Malaysian quality education.…

  2. Shelf life assessment of Malaysian Pangasius sutchi during cold ...

    Malaysian Pangasius sutchi concerning the marketing sector from the point of view ... Patin (Pangasius sutchi) is a popular freshwater fish used as food in ... remaining shelf life allows a processor or a retailer to plan the length of time a product can be ... While consumption has increased, the Malaysian fisheries industry.

  3. Analysis of mercury in Malaysian herbal preparations | Ang | Journal ...

    The rhizome of Smilax luzonensis is eaten as an aphrodisiac in the Malaysian community. This study was conducted to analyse the mercury content of 100 pharmaceutical dosage forms of S. luzonensis that were purchased in the Malaysian market, using cold vapour atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Results show that ...

  4. 40 CFR 1508.6 - Council.

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Council. 1508.6 Section 1508.6 Protection of Environment COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY TERMINOLOGY AND INDEX § 1508.6 Council. Council means the Council on Environmental Quality established by title II of the Act. ...

  5. Oral health quality-of-life among undergraduate Malaysian dental students.

    Harsh, P; Arunima, C; Manoj, K

    2012-06-01

    To assess the oral health quality of life among Malaysian dental students using the Oral Impacts on Daily Performance (OIDP) scale. Malaysian dental students of Melaka Manipal Medical College, Manipal campus, Manipal University, Manipal answered a structured questionnaire recording the demographic characteristics, behavioral characteristics and eight items of OIDP. The mean OIDP ADD and OIDP SC scores were respectively, 4.10 (sd = 5.16, range 8 - 40) and 2. 3 (sd = 2.3, range 0-8). A total of 50%, 32.9% and 28.6% of the dental students confirmed difficulties with eating, cleaning teeth and sleeping and relaxing, respectively. Statistically significant relationships were observed between OIDP (ultimate oral impact) and a count of non-clinical oral health indicators representing the second (intermediate) levels of oral impact. Logistic regression analysis revealed that dental students who were dissatisfied with their oral health had greater oral impact than their counterparts. The odds ratios for satisfaction with oral health, dental visits and frequency of brushing teeth were respectively 1.74 (0.58-5.32), 0.59 (0.11-3.24) and 1.33 (0.41-4.30). The study reports the Oral Impact on Daily Performance among Malaysian dental students and provides evidence of importance of social and behavioral characteristics in shaping dental students response.

  6. ITER council proceedings: 2000

    2001-01-01

    No ITER Council Meetings were held during 2000. However, two ITER EDA Meetings were held, one in Tokyo, January 19-20, and one in Moscow, June 29-30. The parties participating in these meetings were those that partake in the extended ITER EDA, namely the EU, the Russian Federation, and Japan. This document contains, a/o, the records of these meetings, the list of attendees, the agenda, the ITER EDA Status Reports issued during these meetings, the TAC (Technical Advisory Committee) reports and recommendations, the MAC Reports and Advice (also for the July 1999 Meeting), the ITER-FEAT Outline Design Report, the TAC Reports and Recommendations both meetings), Site requirements and Site Design Assumptions, the Tentative Sequence of technical Activities 2000-2001, Report of the ITER SWG-P2 on Joint Implementation of ITER, EU/ITER Canada Proposal for New ITER Identification

  7. Trump revives National Space Council

    Johnston, Hamish

    2017-08-01

    US president Donald Trump has signed an executive order to re-establish the US National Space Council. The 12-member council will include key government officials with an interest in space exploration, including NASA’s acting administrator Robert Lightfoot and the secretaries of state, commerce and defence.

  8. An Overview of Governance and Accountability of Tahfiz Institutions in Malaysian: Religious Councils Perspective

    Bani Hamidah; Jaaffar Mohd Yassir; Katan Maheran; Mohd Noor Abd Halim

    2017-01-01

    Tahfiz education is one of the popular streams of education in Malaysia and well accepted by Muslim community. Originally the education is being offered in “pondok”, a traditional religious school. Developing through times, it is now also being offered in tahfiz centers as well as in modern tahfiz institutions. These entities specialize in producing tahfiz graduates who can memorize and recite the whole Al-Quran and more than 91% of them are privately owned. The applicability of good governan...

  9. Leadership in the Reform of Malaysian Universities: Analysing the Strategic Role of the Malaysian Qualifications Agency

    Bajunid, Ibrahim Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    This paper addresses the contemporary development and reform challenges in tertiary education in Malaysia in both national and global contexts. The critical role exercised by the Malaysian Qualifications Agency in driving strategic change in higher education cultures, both in public and private universities is described and analysed. The paper…

  10. The Malaysian Intermodal Terminal System: The Implication on the Malaysian Maritime Cluster

    Mohamad Rosni Othman

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The maritime sector in Malaysia is best known globally due to the Straits of Malacca and being a nation surrounded by sea. Malaysia also has a substantial maritime industry consisting of numerous shipyards, ports and terminal faculties, ship services and a plethora of other companies and institutions with maritime oriented activities and become essential components of the Malaysia's maritime clusters. Issues such as underutilised intermodal terminals, uneven proportions in the freight transport infrastructure and road and seaport congestions prevent Malaysian seaports from achieving their full potential in serving their respective hinterlands. The key factors to improve Malaysian dry port or intermodal terminals are transport network; container planning; competition; location and, externalities. The paper does not only present the critical challenges faced by Malaysian intermodal terminals especially dry ports and the implications for seaport competency but it also provides strategies to utilise the Malaysian freight multimodal system to amplify seaports
tm performance in serving their hinterlands. As such, this may warrant policy makers to devise a comprehensive national master plan for the maritime sector in order for Malaysia to further develop her maritime industry and economies.

  11. [Population Council responsible for RU486 clinical trials in USA].

    Aguillaume, C J

    1993-04-01

    As a result of the sudden political change that came with the Clinton Administration, RU-486's manufacturer, Roussel-Uclaf, and the Population Council agreed on April 20, 1992, on the manufacture and distribution of RU-486 in the US. In the US, there are less than 1.6 million induced abortions annually. From now on, US women will be able to have a choice between medical and surgical abortion. The Population Council and Roussel-Uclaf have had a contract since 1982. The Council is solely responsible for the phase 2 clinical trial of RU-486 in the US and other countries. It must present to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) an amendment allowing it to begin phase 3 clinical trials. The Council will also lead the US medical facilities in this study. It will identify partners for future production of RU-486 and its distribution in the US. It will also submit to FDA a New Drug Application (NDA). FDA will review the scientific literature on RU-486 and evaluate all data submitted by the Population Council. There are still obstacles to be surmounted. The Population Council must demonstrate good judgment when selecting the criteria for choosing a pharmaceutical firm before a Technical Committee which will be part of a group of players promoting women's health, scientific experts, and other interested parties. It must find the necessary funds to conduct the clinical trials and prepare the NDA. Phase 3 clinical trials in the US must have at least 2000 women. They will test RU-486's efficacy, safety, and acceptability among women choosing medical abortion over surgical abortion. Since the Council operates in almost all countries in the world, has innovated contraceptive research and development activities, and has been endorsed by the UN, product approval of RU-486 in the US will affect policy in all countries concerned about abortion.

  12. Investigating sensitivity, specificity, and area under the curve of the Clinical COPD Questionnaire, COPD Assessment Test, and Modified Medical Research Council scale according to GOLD using St George's Respiratory Questionnaire cutoff 25 (and 20) as reference.

    Tsiligianni, Ioanna G; Alma, Harma J; de Jong, Corina; Jelusic, Danijel; Wittmann, Michael; Schuler, Michael; Schultz, Konrad; Kollen, Boudewijn J; van der Molen, Thys; Kocks, Janwillem Wh

    2016-01-01

    In the GOLD (Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease) strategy document, the Clinical COPD Questionnaire (CCQ), COPD Assessment Test (CAT), or modified Medical Research Council (mMRC) scale are recommended for the assessment of symptoms using the cutoff points of CCQ ≥1, CAT ≥10, and mMRC scale ≥2 to indicate symptomatic patients. The current study investigates the criterion validity of the CCQ, CAT and mMRC scale based on a reference cutoff point of St George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) ≥25, as suggested by GOLD, following sensitivity and specificity analysis. In addition, areas under the curve (AUCs) of the CCQ, CAT, and mMRC scale were compared using two SGRQ cutoff points (≥25 and ≥20). Two data sets were used: study A, 238 patients from a pulmonary rehabilitation program; and study B, 101 patients from primary care. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to assess the correspondence between the recommended cutoff points of the questionnaires. Sensitivity, specificity, and AUC scores for cutoff point SGRQ ≥25 were: study A, 0.99, 0.43, and 0.96 for CCQ ≥1, 0.92, 0.48, and 0.89 for CAT ≥10, and 0.68, 0.91, and 0.91 for mMRC ≥2; study B, 0.87, 0.77, and 0.9 for CCQ ≥1, 0.76, 0.73, and 0.82 for CAT ≥10, and 0.21, 1, and 0.81 for mMRC ≥2. Sensitivity, specificity, and AUC scores for cutoff point SGRQ ≥20 were: study A, 0.99, 0.73, and 0.99 for CCQ ≥1, 0.91, 0.73, and 0.94 for CAT ≥10, and 0.66, 0.95, and 0.94 for mMRC ≥2; study B, 0.8, 0.89, and 0.89 for CCQ ≥1, 0.69, 0.78, and 0.8 for CAT ≥10, and 0.18, 1, and 0.81 for mMRC ≥2. Based on data from these two different samples, this study showed that the suggested cutoff point for the SGRQ (≥25) did not seem to correspond well with the established cutoff points of the CCQ or CAT scales, resulting in low specificity levels. The correspondence with the mMRC scale seemed satisfactory, though not optimal. The SGRQ threshold of ≥20

  13. Malaysian Nuclear Agency: Annual report 2008

    2008-01-01

    The establishment of Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia) was mooted from idea of the then Malaysia's Deputy Prime Minister, Tun Dr. Ismail Dato Abdul Rahman, that Malaysia should play a role in the development of nuclear science and technology for peaceful purposes. The Centre for Application of Nuclear Energy (CRANE) was the entity to mark the of Malaysia's nuclear programme, focussing on manpower development for a nuclear power programme to provide an option for energy source, following the worldwide oil crisis of the early 1970s. The Cabinet officially approved the establishment of the Tun Ismail Atomic Research Centre (PUSPATI), under the Ministry of Science, Technology and the environment on 19 September 1972. The era of nuclear research in Malaysia began with the historic event signified by the Reaktor TRIGA PUSPATI reaching its first criticality on 28 June 1982. When PUSPATI was placed under the auspices of the Prime Ministers Department, it assumed the name Nuclear Energy Unit (UTN). The Nuclear Energy Unit was later placed under the Minister of Science, Technology and the Environment. In line with the national development, the institute was name Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT) on 10 August 1994. To reflect its vision, mission, objectives and activities in the challenging world, a new identity was established, and was officially named as Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia) on 28 September 2006. Nuclear Malaysia, is strategically located nearby the government administration, centre Putrajaya, and Cyberjaya. These annual report highlights all the activities that have been through by the agency in 2008. All the achievements and triumph were highlights in this annual report. It also contained all the agency planning during 2008 to fulfill the objectives, mission and vision to become main players in nuclear research in Malaysia. Finally, there also highlights some publications contribute by all the researchers from

  14. Malaysian Nuclear Agency: Annual report 2009

    2009-01-01

    The establishment of Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia) was mooted from idea of the then Malaysia's Deputy Prime Minister, Tun Dr. Ismail Dato Abdul Rahman, that Malaysia should play a role in the development of nuclear science and technology for peaceful purposes. The Centre for Application of Nuclear Energy (CRANE) was the entity to mark the of Malaysia's nuclear programme, focussing on manpower development for a nuclear power programme to provide an option for energy source, following the worldwide oil crisis of the early 1970s. The Cabinet officially approved the establishment of the Tun Ismail Atomic Research Centre (PUSPATI), under the Ministry of Science, Technology and the environment on 19 September 1972. The era of nuclear research in Malaysia began with the historic event signified by the Reaktor TRIGA PUSPATI reaching its first criticality on 28 June 1982. When PUSPATI was placed under the auspices of the Prime Ministers Department, it assumed the name Nuclear Energy Unit (UTN). The Nuclear Energy Unit was later placed under the Minister of Science, Technology and the Environment. In line with the national development, the institute was name Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT) on 10 August 1994. To reflect its vision, mission, objectives and activities in the challenging world, a new identity was established, and was officially named as Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia) on 28 September 2006. Nuclear Malaysia, is strategically located nearby the government administration, centre Putrajaya, and Cyberjaya. These annual report highlights all the activities that have been through by the agency in 2009. All the achievements and triumph were highlights in this annual report. It also contained all the agency planning during 2009 to fulfill the objectives, mission and vision to become main players in nuclear research in Malaysia. Finally, there also highlights some publications contribute by all the researchers from

  15. Malaysian Nuclear Agency; Annual report 2013

    2013-01-01

    The establishment of Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia) was mooted from idea of the then Malaysia's Deputy Prime Minister, Tun Dr. Ismail Dato Abdul Rahman, that Malaysia should play a role in the development of nuclear science and technology for peaceful purposes. The Centre for Application of Nuclear Energy (CRANE) was the entity to mark the of Malaysia's nuclear programme, focussing on manpower development for a nuclear power programme to provide an option for energy source, following the worldwide oil crisis of the early 1970s. The Cabinet officially approved the establishment of the Tun Ismail Atomic Research Centre (PUSPATI), under the Ministry of Science, Technology and the environment on 19 September 1972. The era of nuclear research in Malaysia began with the historic event signified by the Reaktor TRIGA PUSPATI reaching its first criticality on 28 June 1982. When PUSPATI was placed under the auspices of the Prime Ministers Department, it assumed the name Nuclear Energy Unit (UTN). The Nuclear Energy Unit was later placed under the Minister of Science, Technology and the Environment. In line with the national development, the institute was name Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT) on 10 August 1994. To reflect its vision, mission, objectives and activities in the challenging world, a new identity was established, and was officially named as Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia) on 28 September 2006. Nuclear Malaysia, is strategically located nearby the government administration, centre Putrajaya, and Cyberjaya. These annual report highlights all the activities that have been through by the agency in 2013. All the achievements and triumph were highlights in this annual report. It also contained all the agency planning during 2013 to fulfill the objectives, mission and vision to become main players in nuclear research in Malaysia. Finally, there also highlights some publications contribute by all the researchers

  16. Malaysian Nuclear Agency: Annual report 2010

    2010-01-01

    The establishment of Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia) was mooted from idea of the then Malaysia's Deputy Prime Minister, Tun Dr. Ismail Dato Abdul Rahman, that Malaysia should play a role in the development of nuclear science and technology for peaceful purposes. The Centre for Application of Nuclear Energy (CRANE) was the entity to mark the of Malaysia's nuclear programme, focussing on manpower development for a nuclear power programme to provide an option for energy source, following the worldwide oil crisis of the early 1970s. The Cabinet officially approved the establishment of the Tun Ismail Atomic Research Centre (PUSPATI), under the Ministry of Science, Technology and the environment on 19 September 1972. The era of nuclear research in Malaysia began with the historic event signified by the Reaktor TRIGA PUSPATI reaching its first criticality on 28 June 1982. When PUSPATI was placed under the auspices of the Prime Ministers Department, it assumed the name Nuclear Energy Unit (UTN). The Nuclear Energy Unit was later placed under the Minister of Science, Technology and the Environment. In line with the national development, the institute was name Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT) on 10 August 1994. To reflect its vision, mission, objectives and activities in the challenging world, a new identity was established, and was officially named as Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia) on 28 September 2006. Nuclear Malaysia, is strategically located nearby the government administration, centre Putrajaya, and Cyberjaya. These annual report highlights all the activities that have been through by the agency in 2010. All the achievements and triumph were highlights in this annual report. It also contained all the agency planning during 2010 to fulfill the objectives, mission and vision to become main players in nuclear research in Malaysia. Finally, there also highlights some publications contribute by all the researchers from

  17. Malaysian Nuclear Agency; Annual report 2014

    2009-01-01

    The establishment of Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia) was mooted from idea of the then Malaysia's Deputy Prime Minister, Tun Dr. Ismail Dato Abdul Rahman, that Malaysia should play a role in the development of nuclear science and technology for peaceful purposes. The Centre for Application of Nuclear Energy (CRANE) was the entity to mark the of Malaysia's nuclear programme, focussing on manpower development for a nuclear power programme to provide an option for energy source, following the worldwide oil crisis of the early 1970s. The Cabinet officially approved the establishment of the Tun Ismail Atomic Research Centre (PUSPATI), under the Ministry of Science, Technology and the environment on 19 September 1972. The era of nuclear research in Malaysia began with the historic event signified by the Reaktor TRIGA PUSPATI reaching its first criticality on 28 June 1982. When PUSPATI was placed under the auspices of the Prime Ministers Department, it assumed the name Nuclear Energy Unit (UTN). The Nuclear Energy Unit was later placed under the Minister of Science, Technology and the Environment. In line with the national development, the institute was name Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT) on 10 August 1994. To reflect its vision, mission, objectives and activities in the challenging world, a new identity was established, and was officially named as Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia) on 28 September 2006. Nuclear Malaysia, is strategically located nearby the government administration, centre Putrajaya, and Cyberjaya. These annual report highlights all the activities that have been through by the agency in 2014. All the achievements and triumph were highlights in this annual report. It also contained all the agency planning during 2014 to fulfill the objectives, mission and vision to become main players in nuclear research in Malaysia. Finally, there also highlights some publications contribute by all the researchers

  18. Malaysian Nuclear Agency; Annual report 2011

    2008-01-01

    The establishment of Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia) was mooted from idea of the then Malaysia's Deputy Prime Minister, Tun Dr. Ismail Dato Abdul Rahman, that Malaysia should play a role in the development of nuclear science and technology for peaceful purposes. The Centre for Application of Nuclear Energy (CRANE) was the entity to mark the of Malaysia's nuclear programme, focussing on manpower development for a nuclear power programme to provide an option for energy source, following the worldwide oil crisis of the early 1970s. The Cabinet officially approved the establishment of the Tun Ismail Atomic Research Centre (PUSPATI), under the Ministry of Science, Technology and the environment on 19 September 1972. The era of nuclear research in Malaysia began with the historic event signified by the Reaktor TRIGA PUSPATI reaching its first criticality on 28 June 1982. When PUSPATI was placed under the auspices of the Prime Ministers Department, it assumed the name Nuclear Energy Unit (UTN). The Nuclear Energy Unit was later placed under the Minister of Science, Technology and the Environment. In line with the national development, the institute was name Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT) on 10 August 1994. To reflect its vision, mission, objectives and activities in the challenging world, a new identity was established, and was officially named as Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia) on 28 September 2006. Nuclear Malaysia, is strategically located nearby the government administration, centre Putrajaya, and Cyberjaya. These annual report highlights all the activities that have been through by the agency in 2011. All the achievements and triumph were highlights in this annual report. It also contained all the agency planning during 2011 to fulfill the objectives, mission and vision to become main players in nuclear research in Malaysia. Finally, there also highlights some publications contribute by all the researchers from

  19. Repositioning Strategy for Malaysian Companies Internationalization

    Ismi Rajiani

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available 1024x768 The rise of the emerging-market countries offers both developing and developed countries a unique opportunity to gain the benefits of a truly international economy. Consequently, it is imperative to advance our knowledge of emerging-market countries MNC emergence and competitiveness including Malaysian firms on how will they position their products strategically? Based on the framework of Porter’s Generic Strategy this paper is composed of price/ volume segments and impacts on product strategy theory. The aim is to identify crucial triggering cues and focus areas for Malaysian companies and measure what role these play in different segments. This study argues that some Malaysian companies will reposition themselves strategically when internationalizing and that they will focus on other factors or triggering cues when doing so not merely adapting the prevalent price leadership strategy. Normal 0 false false false IN X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  20. Mood and Performance in Young Malaysian Karateka

    Wong, Rebecca S. K.; Thung, Jin Seng; Pieter, Willy

    2006-01-01

    In an attempt to test the conceptual model by Lane and Terry, the purposes of this study were 1) to assess mood states in non-depressed and depressed young karate athletes; 2) to assess mood states in relation to performance in young karate athletes. The participants were recruited from the 2004 Malaysian Games (72 males, 19.20 ± 1.16 years; 37 females, 18.78 ± 0.88 years). The athletes were divided into winners (medalists) and losers. The Brunel Mood Scale (BRUMS) was administered prior to t...

  1. News from the CERN Council

    The CERN Council today thanked the Organization’s outgoing management, and welcomed in the new. Outgoing Director General Robert Aymar, looked back on his five years at the helm, while new Director General, Rolf Heuer, presented his vision for the future. In other Council business, Romania was welcomed as a Candidate for Accession as Member State of CERN; and the groundwork was laid for a study of geographical and scientific extension of the role of CERN. Council also established the practical procedures for following projects relevant to the European Strategy for Particle Physics. Consult the complete Press Release.

  2. Divergence of iron metabolism in wild Malaysian yeast.

    Lee, Hana N; Mostovoy, Yulia; Hsu, Tiffany Y; Chang, Amanda H; Brem, Rachel B

    2013-12-09

    Comparative genomic studies have reported widespread variation in levels of gene expression within and between species. Using these data to infer organism-level trait divergence has proven to be a key challenge in the field. We have used a wild Malaysian population of S. cerevisiae as a test bed in the search to predict and validate trait differences based on observations of regulatory variation. Malaysian yeast, when cultured in standard medium, activated regulatory programs that protect cells from the toxic effects of high iron. Malaysian yeast also showed a hyperactive regulatory response during culture in the presence of excess iron and had a unique growth defect in conditions of high iron. Molecular validation experiments pinpointed the iron metabolism factors AFT1, CCC1, and YAP5 as contributors to these molecular and cellular phenotypes; in genome-scale sequence analyses, a suite of iron toxicity response genes showed evidence for rapid protein evolution in Malaysian yeast. Our findings support a model in which iron metabolism has diverged in Malaysian yeast as a consequence of a change in selective pressure, with Malaysian alleles shifting the dynamic range of iron response to low-iron concentrations and weakening resistance to extreme iron toxicity. By dissecting the iron scarcity specialist behavior of Malaysian yeast, our work highlights the power of expression divergence as a signpost for biologically and evolutionarily relevant variation at the organismal level. Interpreting the phenotypic relevance of gene expression variation is one of the primary challenges of modern genomics.

  3. Medications (for IBS)

    Full Text Available ... About IFFGD Our Mission Awareness Activities Advocacy Activities Research Leadership Industry Council Contact us IBS Treatment Working With Your Physician Treating IBS Pain IBS Diet Low-FODMAP Diet Complimentary or Alternative Treatments Medications Psychological ... Site ...

  4. Hewitt launches Research Councils UK

    2002-01-01

    "Trade and Industry Secretary Patricia Hewitt today launched 'Research Councils UK' - a new strategic partnership that will champion research in science, engineering and technology across the UK" (1 page).

  5. 75 FR 12507 - Manufacturing Council

    2010-03-16

    ... in the selection of Council members include candidates' proven experience in developing and marketing... contact information such as mailing address, fax, e-mail, fixed and mobile phone numbers and support staff...

  6. Post Fukushima tsunami simulations for Malaysian coasts

    Koh, Hock Lye, E-mail: kohhl@ucsiuniversity.edu.my [Office of Deputy Vice Chancellor for Research and Post Graduate Studies, UCSI University, Jalan Menara Gading, 56000 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Teh, Su Yean, E-mail: syteh@usm.my [School of Mathematical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Pulau Pinang (Malaysia); Abas, Mohd Rosaidi Che [Malaysian Meteorological Department, MOSTI, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2014-10-24

    The recent recurrences of mega tsunamis in the Asian region have rekindled concern regarding potential tsunamis that could inflict severe damage to affected coastal facilities and communities. The 11 March 2011 Fukushima tsunami that crippled nuclear power plants in Northern Japan has further raised the level of caution. The recent discovery of petroleum reserves in the coastal water surrounding Malaysia further ignites the concern regarding tsunami hazards to petroleum facilities located along affected coasts. Working in a group, federal government agencies seek to understand the dynamics of tsunami and their impacts under the coordination of the Malaysian National Centre for Tsunami Research, Malaysian Meteorological Department. Knowledge regarding the generation, propagation and runup of tsunami would provide the scientific basis to address safety issues. An in-house tsunami simulation models known as TUNA has been developed by the authors to assess tsunami hazards along affected beaches so that mitigation measures could be put in place. Capacity building on tsunami simulation plays a critical role in the development of tsunami resilience. This paper aims to first provide a simple introduction to tsunami simulation towards the achievement of tsunami simulation capacity building. The paper will also present several scenarios of tsunami dangers along affected Malaysia coastal regions via TUNA simulations to highlight tsunami threats. The choice of tsunami generation parameters reflects the concern following the Fukushima tsunami.

  7. 78 FR 44187 - National Women's Business Council

    2013-07-23

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION National Women's Business Council ACTION: Notice of open Federal..., and agenda for the next meeting of the National Women's Business Council (NWBC). The meeting will be... the meeting of the National Women's Business Council. The National Women's Business Council is tasked...

  8. 77 FR 40400 - National Women's Business Council

    2012-07-09

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION National Women's Business Council AGENCY: U.S. Small Business... Business Council (NWBC). The meeting will be open to the public. DATES: The meeting will be held on July 17... Business Council. The National Women's Business Council is tasked with providing policy recommendations on...

  9. Council | About IASc | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Council. The affairs and property of the Academy are administered by a Council of 20, consisting of a President, four Vice-Presidents, a Treasurer, two Secretaries, and twelve other members. The Council, with a term of three years, is elected by the Fellows triennially. Members of the Council for the period 2016 to 2018:.

  10. 76 FR 55363 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    2011-09-07

    ... Pacific Fishery Management Council's (Pacific Council) Groundfish Management Team (GMT) [[Page 55364... Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National...; telephone: (206) 526-6150. Council address: Pacific Fishery Management Council, 7700 NE Ambassador Place...

  11. 77 FR 75614 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    2012-12-21

    ... Pacific Fishery Management Council's (Pacific Council) Highly Migratory Species Management Team (HMSMT... Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National.... Council address: Pacific Fishery Management Council, 7700 NE. Ambassador Place, Suite 101, Portland, OR...

  12. 75 FR 80470 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    2010-12-22

    ... Pacific Fishery Management Council's (Council) Groundfish Management Team (GMT) will hold a working... Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National.... Council address: Pacific Fishery Management Council, 7700 NE. Ambassador Place, Suite 101, Portland, OR...

  13. Development of Malaysian women fertility index: Evidence from Shannon's entropy

    Jalil, Wan Aznie Fatihah Wan Abd; Sharif, Shamshuritawati

    2017-11-01

    A fertility rate is a measure of the average number of children a woman will have during her childbearing years. Malaysia is now facing a population crisis and the fertility rate continues to decline. This situation will have implications for the age structure of the population where percentages of senior citizens are higher than percentages of people aged below 5 years old. Malaysia is expected to reach aging population status by the year 2035. As the aging population has a very long average life expectancy, the government needs to spend a lot on medical costs for senior citizens and need to increase budgets for pensions. The government may be required to increase tax revenues to support the growing older population. The falling fertility rate requires proper control by relevant authorities, especially through planning and implementation of strategic and effective measures. Hence, this paper aims to develop a fertility index using Shannon's entropy method. The results show that Selangor, Johor, and Sarawak are among the states with the highest values of the fertility index. On the other end of the spectrum, Terengganu, W.P. Labuan, and Perlis are ranked in the last positions according to the fertility index. The information generated from the results in this study can be used as a primary source for the government to design appropriate policies to mitigate dwindling fertility rates among Malaysian women.

  14. Marketing Malaysian enterprises in Brazil: what is the government ...

    Marketing Malaysian enterprises in Brazil: what is the government doing? ... Marketing products and services abroad is essential for the new ventures growth and continuous existence. ... EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT

  15. Emergency Management for Disasters in Malaysian Hotel Industry

    AlBattat Ahmad Rasmi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to identify major emergencies that have the potential to place Malaysian hotels in emergency and disaster situations; investigate how hotels were prepared for emergencies, how they manage and overcome emergencies when occurred; and limitations and factors influencing successful emergency planning and adoption emergency management in Malaysian hotels. Face-to-face interview with managers from three, four and five star hotels from different backgrounds: local; regional; and International in Kuala Lumpur, Subang, and Putrajaya are undertaken. The result revealed that Malaysian hotels are exposed to a wide range of natural and man-made disasters. Malaysian hotels lack proactive emergency planning and a lot of constraints which impede successful emergency planning for disasters in the hotel industry in Malaysia, with emphasizing on the relevant authority’s role to demonstrate emergency management to hotels convincing them to adopt such practices, so they can be able to cope with emergencies effectively.

  16. Malaysian sign language dataset for automatic sign language ...

    Journal of Fundamental and Applied Sciences. Journal Home · ABOUT ... SL recognition system based on the Malaysian Sign Language (MSL). Implementation results are described. Keywords: sign language; pattern classification; database.

  17. 77 FR 69869 - National Advisory Council on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Advisory Council on Drug...

    2012-11-21

    ... Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Advisory Council on Drug Abuse, and National Cancer Advisory Board... Advisory Council on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Advisory Council on Drug Abuse, and National...: National Advisory Council on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Advisory Council on Drug Abuse, and...

  18. Emergency Management for Disasters in Malaysian Hotel Industry

    AlBattat Ahmad Rasmi; Mat Som Ahmad Puad; Abukhalifeh Ala`a

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to identify major emergencies that have the potential to place Malaysian hotels in emergency and disaster situations; investigate how hotels were prepared for emergencies, how they manage and overcome emergencies when occurred; and limitations and factors influencing successful emergency planning and adoption emergency management in Malaysian hotels. Face-to-face interview with managers from three, four and five star hotels from different backgrounds: local; regional; and Inte...

  19. The Malaysian Public Procurement's Prevalent System and its Weaknesses

    Rohana Othman; Husein Zakaria; Norlaili Nordin; Zamzam Shahidan; Kamaruzaman Jusoff

    2010-01-01

    Problem statement: This study examined the public procurement system as prevalent in the Malaysian government system of administration. Various aspects of public procurement are outlined including types and the processes that entail public procurement. This study also highlighted the weaknesses in the manual public procurement processes that are opened to potential abuse and mismanagement resulting in corruption. This study places the Malaysian Government public procurement system under the s...

  20. Malaysian B5 Implementation and Its Quality

    Liang, Y.C.; Loh, S.K.; Soon, L.W.; May, C.Y.

    2016-01-01

    A quality survey of 80 samples of diesel fuels (B5) from 80 retail stations throughout Peninsular Malaysia was performed. The bio diesel contents in these B5 samples were in the range of 4.61 vol. % to 5.33 vol. %. The water contents of the samples were < 200 mg kg -1 , meeting the stringent water requirements recommended by the car manufacturers. In addition, all the samples exhibited superior lubricity as indicated by a much shorter wear scar diameter compared to neat diesel. More importantly, 98 % of the samples passed the oxidation stability test (PetroOXY) with an induction period of > 65 min. Overall, the B5 diesel fuel sold was in full compliance with the Malaysian diesel fuel standard specification. (author)

  1. Revitalizing the Malaysian Trade Union Movement

    Wad, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The article takes an historic perspective on contemporary issues of trade union revival in Malaysia, focusing on the challenge of raising union density and analysing the process of organizing employees in the strategically important electronics industry. It concludes that the political support...... for transnational corporations in the electronics industry is declining. This strategic shift enables union activists to bypass enterprise and state-based unions and to establish larger, regionally based unions. However, newly organized unions have not yet overcome resistance from global corporations, nor have...... organizations prefer non-partisan engagement. In order to revitalize themselves, the unions must demonstrate to the Malaysian public that they are both relevant and important for increased productivity and that they can play a significant role in enabling Malaysia to move beyond the middle-income ‘trap’ towards...

  2. Wave power potential in Malaysian territorial waters

    Asmida Mohd Nasir, Nor; Maulud, Khairul Nizam Abdul

    2016-06-01

    Up until today, Malaysia has used renewable energy technology such as biomass, solar and hydro energy for power generation and co-generation in palm oil industries and also for the generation of electricity, yet, we are still far behind other countries which have started to optimize waves for similar production. Wave power is a renewable energy (RE) transported by ocean waves. It is very eco-friendly and is easily reachable. This paper presents an assessment of wave power potential in Malaysian territorial waters including waters of Sabah and Sarawak. In this research, data from Malaysia Meteorology Department (MetMalaysia) is used and is supported by a satellite imaginary obtained from National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and Malaysia Remote Sensing Agency (ARSM) within the time range of the year 1992 until 2007. There were two types of analyses conducted which were mask analysis and comparative analysis. Mask analysis of a research area is the analysis conducted to filter restricted and sensitive areas. Meanwhile, comparative analysis is an analysis conducted to determine the most potential area for wave power generation. Four comparative analyses which have been carried out were wave power analysis, comparative analysis of wave energy power with the sea topography, hot-spot area analysis and comparative analysis of wave energy with the wind speed. These four analyses underwent clipping processes using Geographic Information System (GIS) to obtain the final result. At the end of this research, the most suitable area to develop a wave energy converter was found, which is in the waters of Terengganu and Sarawak. Besides that, it was concluded that the average potential energy that can be generated in Malaysian territorial waters is between 2.8kW/m to 8.6kW/m.

  3. 76 FR 54216 - Pacific Fishery Management Council (Council); Work Session To Review Proposed Salmon Methodology...

    2011-08-31

    ... Fishery Management Council (Council); Work Session To Review Proposed Salmon Methodology Changes AGENCY.... ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Pacific Fishery Management Council's Salmon Technical Team (STT), Scientific and Statistical Committee (SSC) Salmon Subcommittee, and Model Evaluation...

  4. Assessment of femur length for fetal biometry in Malaysian pregnant women

    Ramli, Ramzun Maizan; Adam, Noraina; Jaafar, Mohamad Suhaimi; Rahman, Azhar Abdul; Mustafa, Iskandar Shahrim; Radzi, Yasmin; Nordin, Suriani; Kamarudin, Izyani

    2013-05-01

    The fetal biometry assessment of femur length (FL) was developed in most countries to evaluate the foetus growth. In this study, the FL values for Malaysia population were determined. A prospective study was conducted and a number of 6501 pregnant women were involved with 12372 FL data were collected, performed at antenatal care clinic of Hospital Pulau Pinang, Malaysia. The SPSS software version 17 (regression analysis and paired sample t-test) were used for analysis. The FL values of this study were constructed and rapid FL growth rate in second trimester (2.59 mm/week) than third trimester (1.43 mm/week) was observed. By ethnicity, no significant difference (p ≥ 0.05) was found between the FL values for fetuses of Malay and Indian ethnic's mother (t = -2.042), however these two groups shows significantly (p Chinese ethnic's mother (t = 4.019, 4.083; accordingly). The FL values of Malaysian resulted as significant difference with the common reference FL values from USA and UK, and also with selected Asian populations (India, China, Korea and Japan). As conclusion, it is strong suggested that medical practitioner in Malaysia should avoid in using biometry references based on other population to avoid under- or over-estimation and for accurate assessment of the fetus growth. As this study involved local Malaysian fetuses, therefore the medical practitioner can use the FL values of this study as reference value for fetus biometry assessment in Malaysia.

  5. 2011 Elections to Staff Council

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    Vote Elections to fill all seats in the Staff Council are being organized this month. Voting will begin on Monday 31 October. Make your voice heard and be many to elect the new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will  represent you over the next two years and they will doubtless appreciate your gratitude. More details on the elections can be found on the Staff Association web site. (http://association.web.cern.ch) Elections Timetable Monday 31 October, at noon start date for voting Monday 14 November, at noon closing date for voting Monday 21 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 22 and Wednesday 29 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 6 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure is monitored by the Election Committee. 

  6. Members of the State Council of Geneva

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    Luncheon hosted by the Director-General for members of the State Council of Geneva: From left to right A. Naudi; J. May; M. Carlo Lamprecht, State Council - Employement, Foreign Office and Economic Departement; M. Robert Hensler, State Chancellor; L. Maiani, CERN Director General; H.F. Hoffmann; M. Robert Cramer, State Council - Environment, Agriculture and Interior Departement; J.Van Der Boon; M. Laurent Moutinot, State Council - Installation, equipment and housing Departement; C. Détraz; C. Wyss; P. Jenni; G. Hentsch; M. Pierre-François Unger, State Council - Health and Social Action Departement; G. Stassinakis; M. Bourquin, CERN Council President.

  7. Three-dimensional facial analyses of Indian and Malaysian women.

    Kusugal, Preethi; Ruttonji, Zarir; Gowda, Roopa; Rajpurohit, Ladusingh; Lad, Pritam; Ritu

    2015-01-01

    Facial measurements serve as a valuable tool in the treatment planning of maxillofacial rehabilitation, orthodontic treatment, and orthognathic surgeries. The esthetic guidelines of face are still based on neoclassical canons, which were used in the ancient art. These canons are considered to be highly subjective, and there is ample evidence in the literature, which raises such questions as whether or not these canons can be applied for the modern population. This study was carried out to analyze the facial features of Indian and Malaysian women by using three-dimensional (3D) scanner and thus determine the prevalence of neoclassical facial esthetic canons in both the groups. The study was carried out on 60 women in the age range of 18-25 years, out of whom 30 were Indian and 30 Malaysian. As many as 16 facial measurements were taken by using a noncontact 3D scanner. Unpaired t-test was used for comparison of facial measurements between Indian and Malaysian females. Two-tailed Fisher exact test was used to determine the prevalence of neoclassical canons. Orbital Canon was prevalent in 80% of Malaysian women; the same was found only in 16% of Indian women (P = 0.00013). About 43% of Malaysian women exhibited orbitonasal canon (P = 0.0470) whereas nasoaural canon was prevalent in 73% of Malaysian and 33% of Indian women (P = 0.0068). Orbital, orbitonasal, and nasoaural canon were more prevalent in Malaysian women. Facial profile canon, nasooral, and nasofacial canons were not seen in either group. Though some canons provide guidelines in esthetic analyses of face, complete reliance on these canons is not justifiable.

  8. Growth in Malaysian Demand for Business Education--the Australian Response.

    Lewis, Philip E. T.; Pratt, Graham R.

    1996-01-01

    Increasing Malaysian demand for business education is examined from the perspective of Australia, one of the largest suppliers to the region. Topics discussed include: origins and nature of the demand; Malaysian enrollment patterns in Australia; "twinning programs," in which a Malaysian college and a foreign university collaborate to…

  9. Fiscal councils and economic volatility

    Geršl, A.; Jašová, M.; Zápal, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 3 (2014), s. 190-212 ISSN 0015-1920 Grant - others:UK(CZ) UNCE 204005/2012 Institutional support: PRVOUK-P23 Keywords : dynamic inconsistency * fiscal and monetary policy interaction * independent fiscal council Subject RIV: AH - Economic s Impact factor: 0.420, year: 2014 http://journal.fsv.cuni.cz/storage/1298_jasova.pdf

  10. A busy week for Council

    2009-01-01

    This has been a busy week for the CERN Council, and there is much to report. Firstly, I’m pleased to say that Council approved the Organization’s Medium Term Plan, and with it the budget for financial year 2010. In a time of global recession, this is a strong vote of confidence from the Member States. This meeting of Council provided an opportunity for the working group on the scientific and geographical enlargement of CERN to set out a roadmap towards its final report, which is to be made at Council’s December session this year. One part of the process over the coming months is to bring the major players in particle physics from beyond the European region into the discussion, ensuring that the working group’s recommendations lead to an optimum position for CERN and European particle physics in the global context. An indicator of the continuing attractiveness of CERN is the fact that Council has received four new applications...

  11. Council celebrates CERN Control Centre

    2006-01-01

    With the unveiling of its new sign, the CERN Control Centre was officially inaugurated on Thursday 16 March. To celebrate its startup, CERN Council members visited the sleek centre, a futuristic-looking room filled with a multitude of monitoring screens.

  12. Meeting of the ITER Council

    Drew, M.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: A meeting of the ITER Council took place in Toronto, Canada, on 27-28 February 2001 (Canada participates in the ITER EDA as an associate of the EU Party). The delegations to the Council were led by Dr. U. Finzi, Principal Advisor in charge of Fusion R and D in the Directorate-General for Research of the European Commission, Mr. T. Sugawa, Deputy Director-General of the Research and Development Bureau of the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sport, Science and Technology of Japan, and Academician E. Velikhov, President of the RRC ''Kurchatov Institute''. The European delegation was joined by Canadian experts including a representative from the Canadian Department of Natural Resources. The Council heard presentations from Dr. H. Kishimoto on the successful completion of the Explorations concerning future joint implementation of ITER, and from Dr. J.-P. Rager on the ITER International Industry Liaison Meeting held in Toronto in November 2000. Having noted statements of Parties' status, in particular concerning the readiness to start negotiations and the progress toward site offers, the Council encouraged the Parties to pursue preparations toward future implementation of ITER along the general lines proposed in the Explorers' final report. The Council also noted the readiness the of the RF and EU Parties to instruct specified current JCT members to remain at their places of assignment after the end of the EDA, in preparation for a transition to the Co-ordinated Technical Activities foreseen as support to ITER negotiations. The Council was pleased to hear that meetings with the Director of the ITER Parties' Designated Safety Representatives had started, and commended the progress toward achieving timely licensing processes with a good common understanding. The Council noted with appreciation the Director's view that no difficulties of principle in the licensing approach had been identified during the informal discussions with the regulatory representatives and

  13. News from Council - September 2016

    2016-01-01

    I would like to inform you of the main news from the Council this week. First of all, the Council congratulated CERN and the Collaborations on the superb performance of the accelerator complex and experiments. It has been a great year so far, with important physics results across the whole spectrum of the CERN research programme.   Looking forward, one of the main accomplishments from this week’s meetings is that the Council has approved the opening of a credit facility with the European Investment Bank (EIB) to cover the cash shortage during the peak years of the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) construction. This is very good news since it will allow us to carry out the work necessary for the HL-LHC without compromising the rest of the Laboratory’s scientific programme. Turning to the scientific and geographical enlargement, the Council approved the admission of India as an Associate Member State, and I very much hope that the agreement can be signed in the near future so that Indi...

  14. 77 FR 61466 - National Women's Business Council

    2012-10-09

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION National Women's Business Council AGENCY: U.S. Small Business... Business Council (NWBC). The meeting will be open to the public. DATES: The meeting will be held on October... [[Page 61467

  15. National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence

    ... Month NCADD National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence Addiction is a Disease - Treatment is Available - Recovery ... years, The National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence, Inc. (NCADD) has been a valuable resource for ...

  16. Fictionalized History: Signifying Changes to the Malaysian Nation and Identity

    Sim Chee Cheang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available As one of the cornerstones of fiction, writers often use and confront history in their claim to “reality” and “identity” in their writing. Linda Hutcheon’s claim for “a postmodern concern for the multiplicity and dispersion of truth(s; truth(s relative to the specificity of place and culture” (1988, p. 108 is relevant to the use of history in recent Malaysian literature. The multiple and varied claims of truth(s as reflected through the fictionalizing of Malaysian history is the focus of the analysis in this article, which aims to expose the social, economic, and political implications of the Malaysian identity. The analysis of three current works of fictionalized Malaysian history from the different fictional genres of comic series, children’s history, and occidental history, represents a cross section of genres that challenge the supremacy of history’s ontological claim over identity. The deliberate contestation of received Malaysian history in fictional modes acknowledges the peripheral identity structures of race, religion, and economics that are sensitive in a multiracial country such as Malaysia.

  17. Relationship between oral hygiene and gingival condition of Malaysian students

    Muhammad Arif Mohd Marsin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary etiologic agent of gingival disease was dental plaque which also involving the oral hygiene. The oral hygiene can be affected by individuals knowledge, attitude, practice, environment, and others. The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between oral hygiene and gingival condition of Malaysian students. The type of this study was cross-sectional study. The study was conducted on a total of 66 Malaysian students. The data were collected by using an examination form and clinical examination using the Loe & Sillness gingival index followed by the Loe & Sillness plaque index. The results showed that 100% of students have gingivitis with the gingival index average of 1.25 and the plaque index average of 1.85. The relationship of gingival and plaque index was analyzed by using Spearman’s Rank Correlation Coefficient test, and the score was 0.623. It is concluded that the oral hygiene status of Malaysian students was in the fair category, and all Malaysian students had a moderate gingivitis. Also, there was a relationship between the oral hygiene status and gingival condition of Malaysian students.

  18. 76 FR 62133 - National Women's Business Council

    2011-10-06

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION National Women's Business Council AGENCY: U.S. Small Business... Business Council (NWBC). The meeting will be open to the public. DATES: The meeting will be held on Monday...., Appendix 2), SBA announces the meeting of the National Women's Business Council. The National Women's...

  19. Governor's Council on Disabilities and Special Education

    State Employees Governor's Council on Disabilities and Special Education DHSS State of Alaska Home ; Governor's Council on Disabilities and Special Education Page Content Untitled Document Patrick Reinhart : follow GCDSE to 40404 The Governor's Council on Disabilities & Special Education is pleased to award

  20. 78 FR 15928 - Forestry Research Advisory Council

    2013-03-13

    ... apportionment of funds. Advisory Council Organization The Council will be comprised of not more than 20 members. The members appointed to the Council will be fairly balanced in terms of the points of view... relevancy to a membership category. Geographic balance and a balanced distribution among the categories are...

  1. Parent-School Councils in Beijing, China

    Lewis, Wayne D.; Bjork, Lars G.; Zhao, Yuru; Chi, Bin

    2011-01-01

    This exploratory study examines how schools in Beijing have responded to a Chinese national policy mandate to establish and maintain parent councils. We surveyed principals and parent council members across schools in the Beijing municipality about the establishment and functions of their schools' parent councils. Survey results provide insights…

  2. 36 CFR 801.4 - Council comments.

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Council comments. 801.4 Section 801.4 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ADVISORY COUNCIL ON HISTORIC PRESERVATION HISTORIC PRESERVATION REQUIREMENTS OF THE URBAN DEVELOPMENT ACTION GRANT PROGRAM § 801.4 Council comments. The following...

  3. 75 FR 20832 - National Coal Council

    2010-04-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY National Coal Council AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the National Coal Council (NCC). The Federal Advisory... Biomass/Coal Blending to Generate Electricity Council Business: [cir] Finance Report by Committee Chairman...

  4. 76 FR 74049 - National Coal Council

    2011-11-30

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY National Coal Council AGENCY: Office of Fossil Energy, Department of Energy..., notice is hereby given that the National Coal Council will be renewed for a two-year period beginning... general policy matters relating to coal issues. Additionally, the renewal of the Council has been...

  5. 78 FR 7424 - National Coal Council

    2013-02-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY National Coal Council AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the National Coal Council (NCC). The Federal Advisory... 2013 meeting of the National Coal Council. Agenda: 1. Opening Remarks by NCC Chairman John Eaves 2...

  6. 78 FR 71592 - National Coal Council

    2013-11-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY National Coal Council AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy..., notice is hereby given that the National Coal Council (NCC) will be renewed for a two-year period. The... matters relating to coal issues. Additionally, the renewal of the National Coal Council has been...

  7. 78 FR 23242 - National Coal Council

    2013-04-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY National Coal Council AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meetings. SUMMARY: This notice announces two meetings of the National Coal Council (NCC). The Federal...: Agenda for Thursday, May 16, 2013 1. Call to Order by John Eaves, Chairman, National Coal Council 2...

  8. 78 FR 40131 - National Petroleum Council

    2013-07-03

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY National Petroleum Council AGENCY: Office of Fossil Energy, Department of... Petroleum Council. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public... Administrative Matters Discussion of Any Other Business Properly Brought Before the National Petroleum Council...

  9. 77 FR 42297 - National Petroleum Council

    2012-07-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY National Petroleum Council AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Fossil... National Petroleum Council. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that... Matters Discussion of Any Other Business Properly Brought Before the National Petroleum Council...

  10. 76 FR 53889 - National Petroleum Council

    2011-08-30

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY National Petroleum Council AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Fossil... Petroleum Council. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public... Properly Brought Before the National, Petroleum Council, Adjournment. Public Participation: The meeting is...

  11. 76 FR 37064 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council (Council); Public Meeting

    2011-06-24

    ... meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council will convene a public meeting via webinar... meeting will be held via webinar. Council address: Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 North... Executive Director, Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; telephone: (813) 348-1630. SUPPLEMENTARY...

  12. 75 FR 31418 - Intermountain Region, Payette National Forest, Council Ranger District; Idaho; Mill Creek-Council...

    2010-06-03

    ... Ranger District; Idaho; Mill Creek--Council Mountain Landscape Restoration Project AGENCY: Forest Service... the Mill Creek--Council Mountain Landscape Restoration Project. The approximate 51,900 acre project area is located about two miles east of Council, Idaho. The Mill Creek--Council Mountain Landscape...

  13. The Development of a Green Practice Index for the Malaysian Hotel Industry

    A. K. Siti–Nabiha

    2014-03-01

    Malaysian hotels. Doing so, however, resulted in a search for green index development methods. This lead to the discovery that existing tools such as the Delphi method were not appropriate tools that could be used to develop a Malaysian green index. To address the above, the authors propose a green index development method that can be used for a  Malaysian and developing country context. Hence, in this paper, the method of developing a green practice index for the Malaysian hospitality industry, the differences and advantages of this method compared to the commonly used Delphi method and finally the Malaysian Green Practice Index for the hotel industry are presented.

  14. Ulcerative colitis in a multiracial Asian country: racial differences and clinical presentation among Malaysian patients.

    Tan, Yan-Mei; Goh, Khean-Lee

    2005-10-07

    Inflammatory bowel disease appears to be uncommon among Asians. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of ulcerative colitis (UC) in Malaysian patients and to establish the spectrum of the disease seen in Malaysian patients. Three major Asian races: Malay, Chinese, and Indian co-exist in Malaysia and we sought to determine if there were any racial differences in the prevalence and presentation of disease. Racial differences for several other gastrointestinal diseases have previously been observed and found to be extremely interesting. Data were obtained retrospectively from a review of the medical records of in- and out-patients with a diagnosis of UC at the University Hospital, Kuala Lumpur between 1985 and 1998. There were 45 confirmed cases of UC of which 3 were foreigners, who were excluded from analysis. Thirty new cases of UC were diagnosed during the study period. Their mean age at presentation was 33.0+/-10.0 years. The highest prevalence of UC was 17.9/100 000 hospital admissions in the Indians, followed by 11.2/100 000 hospital admissions in the Chinese. The lowest prevalence was 3.7/100 000 hospital admissions in the Malays. The prevalence of UC was significantly higher in the Indians and the Chinese when compared with the Malays with an OR of 4.89 (CI = 2.02-12.24; chi2 = 15.45, PMalaysia, but racial differences exist. The Indians had the highest prevalence of UC with the Chinese demonstrating the least extensive disease.

  15. Living Arrangement and Life Satisfaction in Older Malaysians: The Mediating Role of Social Support Function

    Kooshiar, Hadi; Yahaya, Nurizan; Hamid, Tengku Aizan; Abu Samah, Asnarulkhadi; Sedaghat Jou, Vajiheh

    2012-01-01

    Background This cross-sectional and correlational survey examines the association between different types of living arrangements and life satisfaction in older Malaysians, while taking into account the mediating effects of social support function. Methodology and Findings A total of 1880 of older adults were selected by multistage stratified sampling. Life satisfaction and social support were measured with the Philadelphia Geriatric Center Morale Scale and Medical Outcomes Study Social Support Survey. The result shows living with children as the commonest type of living arrangement for older adults in peninsular Malaysia. Compared to living alone, living only with a spouse especially and then co-residency with children were both associated with better life satisfaction (psocial support function (psocial support function enhanced the relation between living arrangements and life satisfaction. Conclusion This study revealed that types of living arrangement directly, and indirectly through social support function, play an important role in predicting life satisfaction for older adults in Malaysia. This study makes remarkable contributions to the Convoy model in older Malaysians. PMID:22912806

  16. Racial and socioeconomic disparities in sexual activity among older married Malaysians.

    Momtaz, Yadollah Abolfathi; Hamid, Tengku Aizan; Ibrahim, Rahimah; Akahbar, Siti Aisyah Nor

    2014-01-01

    Sexuality as an important part of life has not been well studied in Malaysia, particularly among older adults. The main aim of this study was to investigate the racial and socioeconomic differences in sexual activity among older married Malaysians. Data for this study consisting of 1036 older married adults aged 60 years and older were obtained from the nationwide community-based cross-sectional survey entitled "Determinants of Wellness among Older Malaysian: A Health Promotion Perspective", conducted in 2010. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 21 for Windows. The results showed that 57.3% (95% CI: 54.3-60.3) of the respondents (61.6% of men and 50.6% of women) had engaged in sexual intercourse during the last 12 months. The adjusted multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that ethnicity and educational attainment were independently and significantly associated with sexual activity, after controlling for the possible confounding effects of chronic medical conditions and demographic characteristics. The findings from this study do support the notion that sexuality is a lifelong need and cultural teachings and formal education may have important role in maintaining the quality of sexuality in later life. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A profile of hypertension among rural elderly Malaysians.

    Srinivas, P; Wong, K S; Chia, Y C; Poi, P J; Ebrahim, S

    1998-12-01

    The main objective of this study was to survey the prevalence of hypertension in Malaysians aged 55 years and above who responded to a public health screening campaign in Kuala Langat district, Selangor, Malaysia. The relationship between the detection, treatment and control in the study population was also examined. An epidemiological survey of the elderly was conducted in Kuala Langat, a rural district in Malaysia for a consecutive period of six weeks. The survey was conducted using a standardized questionnaire and interview by trained research assistants. The medical students and nurses were trained on the correct protocol of measuring blood pressure based on the recommendations of the British Hypertension Society. Newly detected persons with blood pressure readings 160/95 mmHg and above, were given a green card to return to the nearest health center for a further 2 visits to check his/her blood pressure. A total of 1,392 people with a mean age of 65 years and comprising of 53.1% males and 46.9% females responded to the health survey. Based on the history 335 (24.1%) of the respondents were known hypertensives and 82.1% of this hypertensive group were on regular treatment. However good control of hypertension was achieved only in 161 (48.1%) of them. Newly detected hypertension was found in 204 (14.6%) of the respondents. The overall prevalence of hypertension in our sample of respondents was 25.6%. There was no significant difference between the sexes and the races in terms of their detection, treatment and control. However there was a significant difference between the persons aged less than 65 years of age and those older than 65 years. There was a large proportion of previously known hypertensives among the survey population. Of those detected, not all were on regular medications and the majority on medications were not well controlled. Education of the public through intensive public health campaigns is vital to improve their knowledge on hypertension and

  18. The Malaysian state's response to migration.

    Pillai, P

    1999-04-01

    This paper aims to provide a profile of migration trends in Malaysia since 1970 and to analyze public policy on migration in the context of economic growth and the labor market. The discussion centers on the impact of the Asian financial crisis. There is long history of immigration to Malaysia. The development strategy of the 1970s and 1980s was to create more jobs and restructure employment to meet equity goals. Labor shortages on plantations and construction booms led to a more organized, sustained effort to import labor. Recession in the mid-1980s led to unemployment, but many Malaysians were unwilling to work on plantations, in construction, or in low paying jobs. Economic growth during 1987-96 was very high, and labor shortages spread to service and manufacturing sectors. Migration policy has shifted over the decades. Both the market and the government's promotion of export-based industrialization require access to low cost migrant labor. Public and official recognition of the large number of migrants was not made until 1995. The financial crisis in 1998 led to enforcement of a new migration policy on illegal migrants and greater outflow of migrants. The economic crisis has increased job and income inequities in the region; this encourages continued migration. It is argued that it would be best for Malaysia to maximize short-term gains while minimizing long-term economic, social, and political costs.

  19. Global Financial Crisis and Philanthropy: Malaysian Case

    Janice Lay Hui Nga

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the issue of the global financial crisis and its impacts on philanthropy and civil society organisations (CSOs in Malaysia. CSOs are popularly known as non-governmental organisations (NGOs in Malaysia. Financial crisis has caused NGOs in many countries to receive less funding. This situation may threaten and discourage voluntary works. Undoubtedly, these beneficial contributions from the NGOs are needful services to the society. This paper examines the impact of financial crisis through the lens of NGOs and philanthropy activities in Malaysia. It utilises primary and secondary data, employs a mixed method approach, and uses quantitative and qualitative data. While there are many influencing factors in this development, this paper presents several significant aspects in the Malaysian context, including the style and nature of giving, culture, religion, and political pressure. This study attempts to seek potential solutions, pathways and possible approaches beneficial to NGOs and philanthropy activities for their sustainability in facing the financial crisis and its consequences. Experiences and lessons learnt in Malaysia may well be useful and applicable to some extent in other countries.

  20. Lifestyle Practices and Obesity in Malaysian Adolescents

    Teo, Pey Sze; Nurul-Fadhilah, Abdullah; Aziz, Mohd Ezane; Hills, Andrew P.; Foo, Leng Huat

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To determine the influence of physical activity (PA) and sedentary behavior (SB) on obesity profiles of 454 Malaysian adolescents aged 12 to 19. Methods: Validated PA and SB questionnaires were used and body composition assessed using anthropometry and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Results: Gender-specific multivariate analyses showed boys with high levels of total PA and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) exhibited significantly lower levels of total body fat, percent body fat and android fat mass compared with low PA and MVPA groups, after adjusting for potential confounders. Girls with high SB levels showed significantly higher BMI, waist circumference and DXA-derived body fat indices than those at lower SB level. Multiple logistic analyses indicated that boys with low levels of total PA and MVPA had significantly greater obesity risk, 3.0 (OR 3.0; 95% CI, 1.1–8.1; p obesity, 2.9 times higher than girls at low SP levels (OR 2.8; 95% CI, 1.0–7.5; p obesity risk while high screen-based sedentary behaviors significantly adversely influenced body fat mass, particularly amongst girls when the PA level was low. PMID:24886753

  1. Radiation Protection Officer certification scheme. Malaysian experience

    Pungut, Noraishah; Razali, Noraini; Mod Ali, Noriah

    2011-01-01

    In Malaysia, the need for maintaining competency in radiation protection is emerging, focusing on the qualification of Radiation Protection Officers (RPO). Regulation 23 of Malaysian Radiation Protection (Basic Safety Standards) Regulations 1988, requires the applicant to employ an RPO, with the necessary knowledge, skill and training, enabling effective protection of individuals and minimizing danger to life, property and the environment for all activities sought to be licensed. An RPO must demonstrate the knowledge required, by attending RPO courses organised by an accredited agency and pass the RPO certification examination. Maintaining a high level of competency is crucial for future development of safe applications of ionising radiation. The major goal of training is to provide essential knowledge and skills and to foster correct attitudes on radiation protection and safe use of radiation sources. Assessment of the competency is through theoretical and practical examination. A standard criterion on the performance of the individuals evaluated has been established and only those who meet this criterion can be accepted as certified RPO. The National Committee for the Certification of Radiation Protection Officer (NCCRPO), comprising experts in various fields, is responsible to review and update requirements on competency of a certified RPO. With increasing number of candidates (i.e. 701 in 2008) and the international requirement for radioactive source security, it is incumbent upon the NCCRPO to improve the syllabus of the certification scheme. The introduction of a Radiation Protection Advisor (RPA) to provide service and advice to the radiation industry in Malaysia is also seriously considered. (author)

  2. The Malaysian Robotic Solar Observatory (P29)

    Othman, M.; Asillam, M. F.; Ismail, M. K. H.

    2006-11-01

    Robotic observatory with small telescopes can make significant contributions to astronomy observation. They provide an encouraging environment for astronomers to focus on data analysis and research while at the same time reducing time and cost for observation. The observatory will house the primary 50cm robotic telescope in the main dome which will be used for photometry, spectroscopy and astrometry observation activities. The secondary telescope is a robotic multi-apochromatic refractor (maximum diameter: 15 cm) which will be housed in the smaller dome. This telescope set will be used for solar observation mainly in three different wavelengths simultaneously: the Continuum, H-Alpha and Calcium K-line. The observatory is also equipped with an automated weather station, cloud & rain sensor and all-sky camera to monitor the climatic condition, sense the clouds (before raining) as well as to view real time sky view above the observatory. In conjunction with the Langkawi All-Sky Camera, the observatory website will also display images from the Malaysia - Antarctica All-Sky Camera used to monitor the sky at Scott Base Antarctica. Both all-sky images can be displayed simultaneously to show the difference between the equatorial and Antarctica skies. This paper will describe the Malaysian Robotic Observatory including the systems available and method of access by other astronomers. We will also suggest possible collaboration with other observatories in this region.

  3. Development and promotion of Malaysian Dietary Guidelines.

    Tee, E-Siong

    2011-01-01

    Development and promotion of dietary guidelines is one of the key activities outlined in the National Plan of Action for Nutrition of Malaysia for the prevention of nutrition-related disorders. The first official Malaysian Dietary Guidelines (MDG) was published in 1999 and was thoroughly reviewed and launched on 25 March 2010. The new MDG 2010 is a compilation of science-based nutrition and physical activity recommendations. These guidelines form the basis of consistent and scientifically sound nutrition messages for the public. There are 14 key messages and 55 recommendations, covering the whole range of food and nutrition issues, from importance of consuming a variety of foods to guidance on specific food groups, messages to encourage physical activities, consuming safe food and beverages and making effective use of nutrition information on food labels. The MDG also has an updated food pyramid. Various efforts have been made to ensure that the revised MDG is disseminated to all stakeholders. The Ministry of Health has organised a series of workshops for nutritionists and other health care professionals, and the food industry. In collaboration with other professional bodies and the private sector, the Nutrition Society of Malaysia has been promoting the dissemination and usage of the MDG to the public through a variety of formats and channels. These include the publication of a series of leaflets, educational press articles, educational booklets, as well as through educational activities for children. It is imperative to monitor the usage and evaluation of these dietary messages.

  4. Musculoskeletal injuries among Malaysian badminton players.

    Shariff, A H; George, J; Ramlan, A A

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the pattern of musculoskeletal injuries sustained by Malaysian badminton players. This is a retrospective case notes review of all badminton players who attended the National Sports Institute (NSI) Clinic, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, and were diagnosed with musculoskeletal injuries. In a two and a half year period, from January 2005 to June 2007, 469 musculoskeletal injuries were diagnosed among badminton players at the NSI Clinic. The mean age of the players who attended the clinic was 19.2 (range 13-52) years. Approximately 60 percent of the injuries occurred in players younger than 20 years of age. The majority of injuries (91.5 percent) were categorised as mild overuse injury and mostly involved the knee. The majority of the injuries sustained by badminton players in this study were due to overuse, primarily in the knee. The majority of the injuries were diagnosed in younger players and occurred during training/practice sessions. There was no difference in terms of incidence and types of injuries between the genders.

  5. 78 FR 64200 - Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    2013-10-28

    ... Caribbean Fishery Management Council's (Council) Scientific and Statistical Committee (SSC) will hold... Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National... held at the Caribbean Fishery Management Council Headquarters, located at 270 Mu[ntilde]oz Rivera...

  6. 75 FR 33245 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    2010-06-11

    ... Pacific Fishery Management Council's (Council) Groundfish Management Team (GMT) will hold a working... Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National... be held at the Pacific Fishery Management Council office, Large Conference Room, 7700 NE Ambassador...

  7. 75 FR 49890 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    2010-08-16

    ... Pacific Fishery Management Council's (Pacific Council) Coastal Pelagic Species Management Team (CPSMT) and... Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National... will be available at the following location: Pacific Fishery Management Council, Small Conference Room...

  8. Issues and Problems in Malaysian Contemporary Visual Arts

    Mohamad Faizuan Mat

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In Malaysia, there is a question in term of intellectualism activities in the context of visual epistemology. Therefore, this paper revealed the problems that linger in the Malaysian contemporary visual art scene. In fact, Malaysian contemporary artists appear to have insufficient intellectualism values and less discourse activities. The lacks of scholars in the field of visual arts create a gap in the visual arts scene in Malaysia. The question of this study was to uncover the main problems in Malaysian visual arts that led to the problem of art intellectual development. In addition, this paper presents the awareness of the valuable contributions in the intellectual development that able to enhance the communication in the art object.Keywords: art knowledge; art object; contemporary art; interpretation; perception;

  9. Assessing Quality of Working Life Among Malaysian Workers.

    Sulaiman, Nur Suffia; Choo, Wan Yuen; Mat Yassim, Abdul Rahim; Van Laar, Darren; Chinna, Karuthan; Majid, Hazreen Abdul

    2015-11-01

    The Work-Related Quality of Life Scale-2 (WRQLS-2) has been used to measure quality of working life (QOWL) in the United Kingdom. In this study, the scale was translated and normalized into Malay. The scale was translated using the back-translation method, pretesting, and pilot testing. It was conducted among health care and office workers. It was tested in 3 stages; confirmatory factor analysis at stages 1 and 3 and exploratory factor analysis at stage 2. The Malaysian WRQLS-2 had 5 factors: "General Well-Being," "Job and Career Satisfaction," "Employee Engagement," "Home-Work Interface," and "Stress at Work." The scale showed good convergent and construct validity and also reliability. Perception of good QOWL may differ because of cultural influences and varying work environments. The validated Malaysian WRQLS-2 can be used to determine the QOWL of Malaysian office and health care workers. © 2015 APJPH.

  10. Malaysian Preparation for Nuclear Power Plant Instrumentation and Control System

    Mohd Idris Taib; Nurfarhana Ayuni Joha; Kamarudin Sulaiman; Izhar Abu Hussin

    2011-01-01

    Instrumentation and Control System is required in Nuclear Power Plant for their safe and effective operation. The system is combination and integrated from detectors, actuators, analog system as well as digital system. Current design of system definitely follows of electronic as well as computer technology, with strictly follow regulation and guideline from local regulator as well as International Atomic Energy Agency. Commercial Off-The-Shelf products are extensively used with specific nucleonic instrumentation. Malaysian experiences depend on Reactor TRIGA PUSPATI Instrumentation and Control, Power Plant Instrumentation and Control as well as Process Control System. However Malaysians have capabilities to upgrade themself from Electronics, Computers, Electrical and Mechanical based. Proposal is presented for Malaysian preparation. (author)

  11. FACTORS INFLUENCING YIELD SPREADS OF THE MALAYSIAN BONDS

    Norliza Ahmad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaysian bond market is developing rapidly but not much is understood in terms of macroeconomic factors that could influence the yield spread of the Ringgit Malaysian denominated bonds. Based on a multifactor model, this paper examines the impact of four macroeconomic factors namely: Kuala Lumpur Composite Index (KLCI, Industry Production Index (IPI, Consumer Price Index (CPI and interest rates (IR on bond yield spread of the Malaysian Government Securities (MGS and Corporate Bonds (CBs for a period from January 2001 to December 2008. The findings support the expected hypotheses that CPI and IR are the major drivers that influence the changes in MGS yield spreads. However IPI and KLCI have weak and no influence on MGS yield spreads respectively Whilst IR, CPI and IPI have significant influence on the yield spreads of CB1, CB2 and CB3, KLCI has significant influence only on the CB1 yield spread but not on CB2 and CB3 yield spreads.

  12. Malaysian nurses' evaluation of transnational higher education courses.

    Arunasalam, Nirmala

    The internationalisation of higher education has led some UK and Australian universities to deliver transnational higher education (TNHE) post-registration top-up nursing degree courses in Malaysia. These are bridging courses that allow registered nurses to upgrade their diploma qualifications to degree level. What is not sufficiently explored in the literature is nurses' evaluation of these courses and the impact of TNHE qualifications. A hermeneutic phenomenology approach was used to explore the views of 18 Malaysian nurses from one Australian and two UK TNHE universities. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to enable the Malaysian nurses to evaluate the courses. Data were analysed by thematic analysis. Findings showed a gap between Malaysian and Western teaching and learning outlook, professional values and clinical practices. The data give important insights at a time when the aim of Malaysia's investment in TNHE courses is to attain a graduate workforce with changed mindsets and enhanced patient care.

  13. Control Management and Business Performances: The Malaysian Family SMEs Perspectives

    Edward Wong Sek Khin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the relationship between control management and family business performance in the Malaysian context. It has two objectives, the first being to determine the relationship of organizational credit control policy and procedures, employee development and motivation, and intelligence collection systems to subsequent collection reports in Malaysian family SMEs. The second objective is to investigate the moderating effect of participation in decision-making and work effort towards innovation and business performance. This is a descriptive study involving 90 senior executives employed in 90 Malaysian family SMEs/firms. A correlation analysis from this study confirmed previous researchers’ observations that high-level organizational commitment to credit control management is linked to improvements in business performance. The results suggest that three components – credit policy, employee development, and intelligence collection systems – are the most important predictors for the efficiency and effectiveness of credit control management.    

  14. Traditional Postpartum Practices Among Malaysian Mothers: A Review.

    Fadzil, Fariza; Shamsuddin, Khadijah; Wan Puteh, Sharifa Ezat

    2016-07-01

    To briefly describe the postpartum practices among the three major ethnic groups in Malaysia and to identify commonalities in their traditional postpartum beliefs and practices. This narrative review collated information on traditional postpartum practices among Malaysian mothers through a literature search for published research papers on traditional postpartum practices in Malaysia. This review shows that Malaysian mothers have certain postpartum practices that they considered to be important for preventing future ill health. Despite the perceived differences in intra-ethnic postpartum practices, most Malaysian mothers, although from different ethnicities, share similarities in their postpartum regimens and practices in terms of beliefs and adherence to food taboos, use of traditional postpartum massage and traditional herbs, and acknowledgment of the role of older female family members in postpartum care. Health care providers should be aware of multiethnic traditional postpartum practices and use the commonalities in these practices as part of their postpartum care regimen.

  15. 2017 Elections to Staff Council

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Make your voice heard, support your candidates! We hope that you will be many to vote and to elect the new Staff Council! By doing so, you can support and encourage the women and men, who will represent you over the next two years. The voting takes place from 23 October to 13 November, at noon at https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/elections-2017. Elections Timetable Monday 13 November, at noon Closing date for voting Tuesday 21 November and Tuesday 5 December Publication of the results in Echo Monday 27 and Tuesday 28 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 5 December (afternoon) First meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure will be monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 21 November and 5 December. Candidates for the 2017 Elections

  16. Resolution of the Staff Council

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    You were many to attend the public information meetings organised in October and we thank you for your interest. In this decision phase of the current Five-Yearly Review of our employment conditions they provided an opportunity to review the Management proposals in detail. They were a moment of exchange also on the various topics under review, and your comments were many and very valuable. Meeting on Thursday 29th October, the Staff Council discussed once more these proposals. It considered that the "package" of proposed measures is not balanced enough in its current form. It decided to formulate additional requests to the Management, relating mainly to the effects of the introduction of the proposed new career system. The resolution adopted this morning also implies that the consultation of staff, originally foreseen next week, is postponed. The staff Council will reconvene in a special session on Thursday, 5th November to reassess its position depending on the progress made regarding its d...

  17. 2015 Elections to Staff Council

    Staff Asscociation

    2015-01-01

    Make your voice heard, support your candidates! Be many to vote and to elect the new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will represent you over the next two years and they will without doubt appreciate your gratitude. The voting takes place from the 26th of October to the 9th of November, at noon at https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/elections-2015.   Elections Timetable Monday 9 November, at noon Closing date for voting Monday 16 and Monday 23 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 8 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure will be monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 16 and 24 November. Candidates for the 2015 elections

  18. [The health policy of the "Council of the People's Representatives": the German revolution 1918/1919 in medical historical perspective II: health policy as a factor of continuity and stability].

    Kratzsch, Tilman

    2005-01-01

    Most important for the events at the turn of 1918/19 was the coincidence of the revolution and the end of the war. This meant that in a very short time the troops had to be withdrawn from the front, the size of the army had to be reduced, and the wartime economy had to be transformed into a peace economy. Apart from the resulting economical and social problems, military demobilisation was closely linked with medical and health political difficulties. The revolutionary government saw itself as a provisional arrangement to ensure the unity of the state and the functioning of the German Reich. The maintenance of medical care and provision of a minimum of foodstuffs made health policy important during the months of revolution. Despite a positive balance of payments and a "health policy of continuity", the revolutionary government was unable to win the medical profession for its aims, because it failed to dispel suspicions that the medical profession was going to be socialised.

  19. The resistance councils in Uganda

    Tidemand, Per

    in the capitals. In my dissertation I propose to change that focus. Partly by paying particular attention to rural politics, partly through a discussion of democracy in a longer-term perspective using a broader definition of democracy and finally through a discussion of democracy as effective political...... participation rather than only form al rights. I shall do so by analysing the Resistance Councils (RCs) in Uganda....

  20. The Idea of a University: Rethinking the Malaysian Context

    Wan, Chang Da; Sirat, Morshidi; Razak, Dzulkifli

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the idea of a university with a specific focus in the Malaysian context. We begin the article guided by these questions—“What is a university?” and “What are universities for?”—in examining the historical and conceptual development of universities. This is followed by asking a more specific question—“What are Malaysian universities for?”—in which we discussed the overarching roles of public and private universities in this developing country. Having examined the roles of...

  1. Malaysian diaspora strategies in a globalized Muslim market

    Fischer, Johan

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores Malaysia’s efforts to develop and dominate a global market in halal (literally, ‘lawful or ‘permitted’) commodities as a diaspora strategy and how Malaysian state institutions, entrepreneurs, restaurants and middle-class groups in London respond to and are affected...... and practise Malaysian diaspora strategies in the globalized market for halal products and services. This paper is based on ethnographic material from fieldwork among state institutions, entrepreneurs, restaurants and middle-class groups in Kuala Lumpur and London, namely participant observation...

  2. 2017 Elections to Staff Council

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Make your voice heard, support your candidates! After verification by the Electoral Commission, all candidates for the elections to the Staff Council have been registered. It is now up to you, members of the Staff Association, to vote for the candidate(s) of your choice. We hope that you will be many to vote and to elect the new Staff Council! By doing so, you can support and encourage the women and men, who will represent you over the next two years. We are using an electronic voting system; all you need to do is click the link below and follow the instructions on the screen. https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/elections-2017 The deadline for voting is Monday, 13 November at midday (12 pm). Elections Timetable Monday 13 November, at noon Closing date for voting Tuesday 21 November and Tuesday 5 December Publication of the results in Echo Monday 27 and Tuesday 28 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 5 December (afternoon) First meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The ...

  3. 18 CFR 701.76 - The Water Resources Council Staff.

    2010-04-01

    ... Council Staff. 701.76 Section 701.76 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL COUNCIL ORGANIZATION Headquarters Organization § 701.76 The Water Resources Council Staff. The Water Resources Council Staff (hereinafter the Staff) serves the Council and the Chairman in the performance of...

  4. A Review of Continuing Professional Development (CPD of Training Competencies for Malaysian Mechanical Industries

    Kasman Zeti

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to review issues in continuing professional development of vocational training to the mechanical industries. The spectacle of individuals entering the labour market without relevant qualifications is common in Malaysia. There are many who choose to work instead of pursuing further education after secondary school. In the labour market, these individuals are considered to be low-skilled workers because they had no training prior to employment. The role of employers in providing training and education to employees is vital in establishing career development of employees. Employers who contributed to their employees' training funds through Human Resources Development Council would provide opportunities to increase the skills of workers. Based on the Malaysia's Development Plan of Occupational Skill, the issues and challenges that have been identified in producing skilled workers in interpersonal and technical skills. This paper provided an opportunity to examine an enterprise-based approach to skill formation for workers with basic academic qualifications. It presents an alternative scenario to institution-based Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET, which many Malaysians are familiar with. A structured curriculum development of human resources learning needs according to the job profile of the typical individual and group work which will provide a clearer perspective on knowledge, competence and skill levels of employee behavior in performing tasks will be discussed. The biggest impact on this study is to produce high skill employees concerning customer satisfaction and increased organizational productivity towards high income nations.

  5. Lifestyle Practices and Obesity in Malaysian Adolescents

    Pey Sze Teo

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine the influence of physical activity (PA and sedentary behavior (SB on obesity profiles of 454 Malaysian adolescents aged 12 to 19. Methods: Validated PA and SB questionnaires were used and body composition assessed using anthropometry and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA. Results: Gender-specific multivariate analyses showed boys with high levels of total PA and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA exhibited significantly lower levels of total body fat, percent body fat and android fat mass compared with low PA and MVPA groups, after adjusting for potential confounders. Girls with high SB levels showed significantly higher BMI, waist circumference and DXA-derived body fat indices than those at lower SB level. Multiple logistic analyses indicated that boys with low levels of total PA and MVPA had significantly greater obesity risk, 3.0 (OR 3.0; 95% CI, 1.1–8.1; p < 0.05 and 3.8-fold (OR 3.8; 95% CI, 1.4–10.1; p < 0.01, respectively, than more active boys. Only in girls with high SB level was there a significantly increased risk of obesity, 2.9 times higher than girls at low SP levels (OR 2.8; 95% CI, 1.0–7.5; p < 0.05.  Conclusions: The present findings indicate that higher PA duration and intensity reduced body fat and obesity risk while high screen-based sedentary behaviors significantly adversely influenced body fat mass, particularly amongst girls when the PA level was low.

  6. Profiles of Deanship in Malaysian Public Universities

    Parmjit Singh

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Today institutions of higher learning all around the globe are undergoing rapid transformation as they compete to survive in the ever changing global demands as a result of globalisation and internationalization. In such a scenario, there is a critical demand for heads of schools and faculties in higher education to establish a strong academic reputation and become sense makers of their organizations. The roles of deans as academic leaders encompass areas such as research, academia and administration. Realizing deans as pillars of academic scholarship, this study investigated the academic and scholarly leadership profiles of deans in Malaysian public universities. The study involved 348 randomly selected deans and senior academic administrative staff from nine public universities. Data was collected via questionnaire and semi structured interviews. The findings indicated that a majority of the respondents agreed that deans should have a good academic standing and research profile possessing at least a PhD. to act as a role model for the faculty staff. Besides that respondents indicated that research and publication should be one of the most important criteria in the selection of a dean. Results indicated that on the average, deans in Malaysia conducted at least one research project and wrote approximately 1.67 papers per year. Deans also highlighted that as academic leaders they had insufficient time to pursue their academic scholarship due to increased administrative duties; hence, they found it difficult to balance their leadership and scholarship responsibilities. More importantly this study indicated that deans as academic leaders left much to be desired.

  7. Influences on Malaysian Pharmacy Students' Career Preferences

    Kwai Chong, David Weng; Ahmadi, Keivan; Se, Wong Pei; Hassali, Mohammed Azmi; Hata, Ernieda Mohammed; Hadi, Muhammed Abdul; Sridhar, Sathvik Belagodu; Ahmed, Syed Imran; Yean, Low Bee; Efendie, Benny

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To identify and evaluate factors affecting the career preferences of fourth-year bachelor of pharmacy (BPharm) students in Malaysia in the presence of a 4-year period of mandatory government service. Methods A validated self-administered questionnaire was used in this cross-sectional study to collect data from final-year BPharm students enrolled at 3 government-funded universities and 1 private university in Malaysia. Both descriptive and inferential statistics were used for data analysis. Results Three hundred fourteen students responded (213 from public universities and 101 from the private university). Approximately 32% of public university students and 37% of private university students ranked their own interest in pharmacy as the reason for undertaking pharmacy degree studies; 40.4% of public and 19.8% of private university respondents stated that they would enter a nonpharmacy-related career upon graduation if given the choice. Public university students ranked hospital pharmacy as their choice of first career setting (4.39, p = 0.001), while private students ranked community pharmacy first (4.1, p = 0.002). On a scale of 1 to 5, salary received the highest mean score (3.9 and 4.0, p = 0.854) as the extrinsic factor most influencing their career choice. Conclusions Final-year students at Malaysian public universities were most interested in hospital pharmacy practice as their first career step upon graduation, while private university students were most interested in community pharmacy. The top 3 extrinsic factors rated as significant in selecting a career destination were salary, benefits, and geographical location. PMID:21301600

  8. Medical professionalism from a socio-cultural perspective: Evaluating medical residents communicative attitudes during the medical encounter in Malaysia

    K Ganasegeran; SAR Al-Dubai

    2014-01-01

    Context: The practice of medicine requires good communication skills to foster excellent rapport in doctor patient relationship. Reports on communication skills learning attitude among medical professionals are key essentials toward improving patient safety and quality of care. Aims: We aimed to determine factors affecting communication skills learning attitudes among medical residents in Malaysia. Settings and Design: Cross-sectional survey, in a Malaysian public health hospital. Materials a...

  9. Analysis of volatile compounds of Malaysian Tualang ( Koompassia ...

    Analysis of volatile compounds of Malaysian Tualang ( Koompassia excelsa ) honey using gas chromatography mass spectrometry. ... Other classes of chemical compounds detected included acids, aldehydes, alcohols, ketones, terpenes, furans and a miscellaneous group. Methanol yielded the highest number of extracted ...

  10. Distribution of Articles in Written Composition among Malaysian ESL Learners

    Rahim, Mia Emily Abdul; Rahim, Emma Marini Abdul; Ning, Chia Han

    2013-01-01

    The study aimed to investigate the distribution patterns of the English grammar articles (a, an, and the) as well as the distributions of their colligation patterns in written compositions of English among Malaysian ESL learners. This paper reports the results of a corpus-based study on articles used by these learners. The method used in this…

  11. Factors Affecting School Choice: What Do Malaysian Chinese Parents Want?

    Siah, Poh Chua; Christina Ong, Sook Beng; Tan, Swee Mee; Sim, Chzia Poaw; Xian Thoo, Raphael Yi

    2018-01-01

    Aiming to explore factors affecting Malaysian Chinese parents in sending their children to either national secondary schools or Chinese independent schools, 494 parents were surveyed using a questionnaire. Results showed that parents who sent their children to Chinese independent schools have different priorities compared to those who sent theirs…

  12. Predictors of Academics' Career Advancement at Malaysian Private Universities

    Arokiasamy, Lawrence; Ismail, Maimunah; Ahmad, Aminah; Othman, Jamilah

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to examine the influence of individual and organizational variables on the career advancement of academics in Malaysian private universities. Design/methodology/approach: A correlation study was conducted in six private universities. Data were collected using a structured self-administered questionnaire. The dependent…

  13. Malaysian Education Index (MEI): An Online Indexing and Repository System

    Kabilan, Muhammad Kamarul; Ismail, Hairul Nizam; Yaakub, Rohizani; Yusof, Najeemah Mohd; Idros, Sharifah Noraidah Syed; Umar, Irfan Naufal; Arshad, Muhammad Rafie Mohd.; Idrus, Rosnah; Rahman, Habsah Abdul

    2010-01-01

    This "Project Sheet" describes an on-going project that is being carried out by a group of educational researchers, computer science researchers and librarians from Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang. The Malaysian Education Index (MEI) has two main functions--(1) Online Indexing System, and (2) Online Repository System. In this brief…

  14. Readiness towards Entrepreneurship Education: Students and Malaysian Universities

    Othman, Norasmah; Hashim, Norashidah; Wahid, Hariyaty Ab

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to observe the readiness of students and the internal environment of Malaysian public universities in the implementation of entrepreneurship education. Design/methodology/approach: The authors employed a quantitative approach and the main instrument used to gauge the entrepreneurship readiness among students…

  15. Florae Malesianae Precursores IX. New Malaysian Species of Fimbristylis

    Ohwi, J.

    1955-01-01

    — During the last World War Dr Ohwi worked for several years in the Herbarium Bogoriense and compiled a preliminary revision of the Malaysian representatives of the genus Fimbristylis. The absence of any world revision, the temporary inaccessibility of type material, and of adequate literature, were

  16. Small Angle Neutron Scattering instrument at Malaysian TRIGA reactor

    Mohd, Shukri; Kassim, Razali; Mahmood, Zal Uyun [Malaysian Inst. for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT), Bangi, Kajang (Malaysia); Radiman, Shahidan

    1998-10-01

    The TRIGA MARK II Research reactor at the Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Research (MINT) was commissioned in July 1982. Since then various works have been performed to utilise the neutrons produced from this steady state reactor. One of the project involved the Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS). (author)

  17. Quality of Life of Older Malaysians Living Alone

    Yahaya, Nurizan; Abdullah, Siti Suhailah; Momtaz, Yadollah Abolfathi; Hamid, Tengku Aizan

    2010-01-01

    According to the 2000 census report, about 7% of the 1.4 million people 60 years and over in Malaysia live alone. This study investigated socioeconomic factors affecting the quality of life of this vulnerable population. Data from a subsample of the study on Mental Health and Quality of Life of Older Malaysians were used in this paper. About 10%…

  18. Malaysian Students in U.S. Colleges and Universities.

    Boyd, Alan W., Ed.; Noss, Elaine M., Ed.

    This publication is a response to the need for better understanding of the Malaysian student population studying U.S. institutions of higher education. Part 1 is an introduction to Malaysia, with two articles giving background information. The first is a history of Malaysia and the development of its education system, by Fatimah Hamid-Don of Ohio…

  19. The Significance of Malaysian Real Estate Research Agenda

    Muhammad Najib Razali

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates research agenda by the Malaysian real estate researchers (MRERs. This study adopts a deskwork approach by examining research papers published in leading real estate journals, both international and local and papers presented in main real estate conferences from 1997 to 2010. In addition, the number of research papers published and presented were also assessed from several main real estate research journals in the US, UK, Asia/Australia and Malaysia and conferences such as American Real Estate Society (ARES, European Real Estate Society (ERES, Pacific Rim Real Estate Society (PRRES, Asian Real Estate Society (AsRES and local conference; International Real Estate Research Symposium (IRERS. The study indicates that the Malaysian real estate researchers (MRERs have made a positive contribution to the global real estate research. Nevertheless, there is still more effort needed in order to compete in the global real estate research agenda. It is anticipated that this trend will change since the Malaysian government has emphasised on improving the quality of higher learning institutions' for which research and publication will be the main agenda. The contribution from MRERs will significantly improve Malaysian universities standing in global ranking.

  20. Sociolinguistic Competence and Malaysian Students' English Language Proficiency

    Muniandy, Mohan K.; Nair, Gopala Krishnan Sekharan; Shanmugam, Shashi Kumar Krishnan; Ahmad, Irma; Noor, Norashikin Binte Mohamed

    2010-01-01

    This paper aims to highlight the importance of teaching sociolinguistic competence to ESL learners in Malaysian schools. Sociolinguistic competence is the knowledge of socio cultural rules of language and of discourse. This type of competence requires an understanding of the socio context in which language is used. It is proposed that carefully…

  1. General Adjustment Influence Factor of Malaysian Construction Expatriates Executives Abroad

    Zainol Halmi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The success of Malaysian construction companies creates an opportunity to explore abroad. Past studies have shown that the difficulty of expatriates in adjusting to a new environment is the main aspect that leads to failure of assignments. The success in implementing an overseas assignment does not solely depend on an expatriate’s technical expertise. The adjustment issues such as the interaction with the host nationals, and adaptability to the host country’s culture also exert influence on the assignment. The research was conducted to identify the influence of executive expatriate general adjustment on assignment in host countries. The objective of the study was to identify adjustment influence factors relating to general adjustment abroad. Questionnaires were sent to Malaysian expatriate executives. Sixty four Malaysian expatriate executives from Malaysian construction companies overseas were involved in this study. The findings show interaction, social and living environment influences their adjustment during expatriation. Pre-departure training preparation aspects for expatriates is a good step before their departure to host countries.

  2. Investigation of Malaysian Higher Education Quality Culture and Workforce Performance

    Ali, Hairuddin Mohd; Musah, Mohammed Borhandden

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between the quality culture and workforce performance in the Malaysian higher education sector. The study also aims to test and validate the psychometric properties of the quality culture and workforce performance instruments used in the study. Design/methodology/approach: A total…

  3. Exploring the clean development mechanism: Malaysian case study

    Pedersen, Anne Rathmann

    2008-01-01

    During 2006 the CDM market in Malaysia became established and by December 2007 a total of 20 Malaysian projects had registered with the CDM Executive Board. The Kyoto Protocol defines the Annex I countries, as countries that are obliged to reduce their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and the clean...

  4. Malaysian growth centiles for children under six years old.

    Bong, Yiibonn; Shariff, Asma Ahmad; Mohamed, Abdul Majid; Merican, Amir Feisal

    2015-03-01

    Growth references are useful for the screening, assessment and monitoring of individual children as well as for evaluating various growth promoting interventions that could possibly affect a child in early life. To determine the growth centiles of Malaysian children and to establish contemporary cross-sectional growth reference charts for height and weight from birth to 6 years of age based on a representative sample of children from Malaysia. Gender- and age-specific centile curves for height and weight were derived using the Cole's LMS method. Data for this study were retrieved from Malaysian government health clinics using a two-stage stratified random sampling technique. Assessment of nutritional status was done with the SD scores (Z-scores) of WHO 2006 standards. Boys were found to be taller and heavier than girls in this study. The median length of Malaysian children was higher than the WHO 2006 standards and CDC 2000 reference. The overall prevalence of stunting and underweight were 8.3% and 9.3%, respectively. This study presents the first large-scale initiative for local reference charts. The growth reference would enable the growth assessment of a Malaysian child compared to the average growth of children in the country. It is suggested that the use of WHO 2006 Child Growth Standards should be complemented with local reference charts for a more wholesome growth assessment.

  5. Collaborative and Cooperative Learning in Malaysian Mathematics Education

    Hossain, Md. Anowar; Tarmizi, Rohani Ahmad; Ayud, Ahmad Fauzi Mohd

    2012-01-01

    Collaborative and cooperative learning studies are well recognized in Malaysian mathematics education research. Cooperative learning is used to serve various ability students taking into consideration of their level of understanding, learning styles, sociological backgrounds that develop students' academic achievement and skills, and breeze the…

  6. Changes over time in muscle fatty acid composition of Malaysian ...

    use

    2011-12-12

    Dec 12, 2011 ... Key words: Fatty acid, lipid, muscle, Malaysian mahseer, Tor tambroides. INTRODUCTION. The content of long chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. (n-3 PUFAs) differentiates fish from the other food products. These fatty acids are important beneficial nutrients for the prevention of human coronary disease,.

  7. Malaysian Private Education Quality: Application of SERVQUAL Model

    Vaz, Anthony; Mansori, Shaheen

    2013-01-01

    Intense competition among existing private education providers and the Malaysian government's relaxation of regulations for allowing international universities to open off shore campuses in Malaysia, have forced companies in the education industry to develop strategies which can help them to make their existing students satisfied and keep them…

  8. Modeling Environmental Literacy of Malaysian Pre-University Students

    Shamuganathan, Sheila; Karpudewan, Mageswary

    2015-01-01

    In this study attempt was made to model the environmental literacy of Malaysian pre-university students enrolled in a matriculation college. Students enrolled in the matriculation colleges in Malaysia are the top notch students in the country. Environmental literacy of this group is perceived important because in the future these students will be…

  9. Validity of selected cardiovascular field-based test among Malaysian ...

    Based on emerge obese problem among Malaysian, this research is formulated to validate published tests among healthy female adult. Selected test namely; 20 meter multi-stage shuttle run, 2.4km run test, 1 mile walk test and Harvard Step test were correlated with laboratory test (Bruce protocol) to find the criterion validity ...

  10. Malaysian University Students' Attitudes to Academic Dishonesty and Business Ethics

    Ahmad, Zauwiyah; Simun, Maimun; Mohammad, Junaini

    2008-01-01

    Academic dishonesty is believed to have predictive ability for subsequent behaviours in the workplace. This study adds to the literature by investigating Malaysian business students' attitudes to academic dishonesty and their attitudes to ethics issues in business. This study also explores the association between these two constructs. The form of…

  11. Short history of the Phytography of Malaysian vascular plants

    Wit, de H.C.D.

    1948-01-01

    For various reasons the space occupied by pre-Linnean Malaysian phytography in this concise history seems too large and out of proportion in comparison to the survey of post-Linnean work. Modern plant description, though based on, and derived from, ancient beginnings and traditions, maintains but

  12. MALAYSIAN WEATHER DATA (TRY) FOR ENERGY SIMULATIONS IN BUILDINGS

    Reimann, Gregers Peter

    2001-01-01

    Detailed energy simulations for buildings in Malaysia have become possible after the recent construction of a Malaysian TRY (Test Reference Year) based on 21 years of hourly weather data from Subang Meteorological Station. The climatic parameters contained in the TRY are dry bulb temperature, wet...

  13. Students' Entrepreneurial Inclination at a Malaysian Polytechnic: A Preliminary Investigation

    Yasin, Ahmad Yasruddin Md; Mahmood, Nik Abdul Aziz Nik; Jaafar, Nik Azyyati Nik

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports preliminary results of an ongoing project to examine students' inclination towards entrepreneurship at a Malaysian polytechnic. The study used a self-administered questionnaire to explore the influence of entrepreneurial intent, perceived behavioral control, self-efficacy, perceived barriers, perceived support factors and…

  14. Transforming Sustainability Development Education in Malaysian Schools through Greening Activities

    Hanifah, Mahat; Shaharudin, Idrus; Mohmadisa, Hashim; Nasir, Nayan; Yazid, Saleh

    2015-01-01

    This article aims to evaluate the practice of sustainability among Malaysian Secondary Schools involved in the Sustainable Schools Program Environmental Award (SLAAS). The research attempts to identify the SLAAS effects on teachers' and students' behaviors after direct involvement with the activities of the program. The cluster sampling technique…

  15. Evaluation of patient safety culture among Malaysian retail pharmacists: results of a self-reported survey.

    Sivanandy, Palanisamy; Maharajan, Mari Kannan; Rajiah, Kingston; Wei, Tan Tyng; Loon, Tan Wee; Yee, Lim Chong

    2016-01-01

    Patient safety is a major public health issue, and the knowledge, skills, and experience of health professionals are very much essential for improving patient safety. Patient safety and medication error are very much associated. Pharmacists play a significant role in patient safety. The function of pharmacists in the medication use process is very different from medical and nursing colleagues. Medication dispensing accuracy is a vital element to ensure the safety and quality of medication use. To evaluate the attitude and perception of the pharmacist toward patient safety in retail pharmacies setup in Malaysia. A Pharmacy Survey on Patient Safety Culture questionnaire was used to assess patient safety culture, developed by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, and the convenience sampling method was adopted. The overall positive response rate ranged from 31.20% to 87.43%, and the average positive response rate was found to be 67%. Among all the eleven domains pertaining to patient safety culture, the scores of "staff training and skills" were less. Communication openness, and patient counseling are common, but not practiced regularly in the Malaysian retail pharmacy setup compared with those in USA. The overall perception of patient safety of an acceptable level in the current retail pharmacy setup. The study revealed that staff training, skills, communication in patient counseling, and communication across shifts and about mistakes are less in current retail pharmacy setup. The overall perception of patient safety should be improved by educating the pharmacists about the significance and essential of patient safety.

  16. Statement of the Pugwash council

    1997-01-01

    In the fiftieth year since the first and only use of nuclear weapons in war, the evidence of actual progress towards the elimination of such weapons is decidedly mixed. The statement of the Pugwash council involves the following issues: agenda for a nuclear-weapon-free world; reduction of proliferation risks; monitoring, control and reducing arms trade, transfer and production; global governance as a cooperative activity of states and non-governmental organisations to address the questions of global security; security in the Asia-Pacific region; and energy-environment-development interactions

  17. Public acceptance of nuclear power among Malaysian students

    Muhamad Pauzi, Anas; Saad, Juniza Md; Arif Abu Bakar, Asyraf; Hannan Damahuri, Abdul; Syukri, Nur Syamim Mohd

    2018-01-01

    Malaysian government’s aim to include nuclear energy for electricity generation has triggered various reactions from all especially the public. The objective of this study is to have a better understanding on the knowledge, sources of information of nuclear power and sources of energy chosen by Malaysian in 20 years’ time. Besides that, we want to examine the level of acceptance and perception of Malaysian towards nuclear energy and we want to identify the correlation between public perceptions with the acceptance towards nuclear power in Malaysia, and also to study the differences between perception and acceptance of nuclear power with gender and educational level. For this research methodology, the research questions are given orally or through paper-pencil and also social networking site such as Facebook or through electronic media application such as WhatsApp and Google docs. The data were analysed using a SPSS version 22.0 (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences). Results showed that more than 50% of the respondents have the knowledge of nuclear energy. A part of from that, only 39 % are confident government can afford to build NPP in Malaysia and 41 % disagree nuclear energy is the best option for future energy. From analysis using SPSS 22 we estimate negative perception will give a negative acceptance in term of support towards the use of nuclear energy in power generation in Malaysia. There are also slight correlation that the higher the level of education of Malaysian, the more negative the perception of Malaysian in accepting nuclear energy as source of power in Malaysia. Therefore in shaping a positive acceptance of NPP in Malaysia, the authorities need to educate the people with the knowledge of nuclear in order to overcome the negative perception towards nuclear power.

  18. Notification of upcoming AGU Council meeting

    Williams, Billy

    2012-10-01

    The AGU Council will meet on Sunday, 2 December 2012, at the InterContinental Hotel in San Francisco, Calif. The meeting, which is open to all AGU members, will include discussions of AGU's new Grand Challenge Project (a project that will be introduced to members at the 2012 Fall Meeting), the proposed AGU scientific ethics policy, publishing strategies, future plans for honors and recognition, and leadership transition as new members join the Council. This year the Council experimented with a new approach to conducting business. By holding virtual meetings throughout the year, Council members have been able to act in a more timely manner and provide input on important membership and science issues on the Board of Directors' agenda. The Council Leadership Team—an elected subset of the Council—also experimented with a new approach, meeting every month to keep moving projects forward. This approach has increased communication and improved effectiveness in Council decision making.

  19. Medical Practitioners Act 2007: the increased medical record burden.

    Byrne, D

    2010-03-01

    New medical record keeping obligations are implemented by the Medical Practitioners Act (2007), effective July 2009. This audit, comprising review of 347 medical entries in 257 charts on one day, investigated compliance with the Act together with the general standard of medical record keeping. The Medical Council requirement was absent all but 3 (0.9%) of entries; there was no unique identifier or signature in 28 (8%) and 135 (39%) of entries respectively. The case for change is discussed.

  20. Factors Associated with Bone Health in Malaysian Middle-Aged and Elderly Women Assessed via Quantitative Ultrasound.

    Chin, Kok-Yong; Low, Nie Yen; Dewiputri, Wan Ilma; Ima-Nirwanaa, Soelaiman

    2017-07-06

    Risk factors for osteoporosis may vary according to different populations. We aimed to investigate the relationship between risk factors of osteoporosis and bone health indices determined via calcaneal quantitative ultrasound (QUS) in a group of Malaysian women aged 50 years or above. A cross-sectional study was performed on 344 Malaysian women recruited from a tertiary medical centre in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. They answered a self-administered questionnaire on their social-demographic details, medical history, lifestyle, and physical activity status. Their height was measured using a stadiometer, and their body composition estimated using a bioelectrical impedance device. Their bone health status was determined using a water-based calcaneal QUS device that generated three indices, namely speed of sound (SOS), broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA), and stiffness index (SI). A T-score was computed from SI values using a reference database from a mainland Chinese population. Women with three or more lifetime pregnancies, who were underweight and not drinking coffee had a significantly lower BUA. Stepwise multiple linear regression showed that SOS was predicted by age alone, BUA and SI by years since menopause, body mass index (BMI), and number of lifetime pregnancies, and T-score by years since menopause and percentage of body fat. As a conclusion, suboptimal bone health in middle-aged and elderly Malaysian women as indicated by QUS is associated with old age, being underweight, having a high body fat percentage, and a high number of lifetime pregnancies. Women having several risk factors should be monitored more closely to protect their bones against accelerated bone loss.

  1. 2015 Elections to Staff Council

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    Elections Timetable Monday 26 October, at noon Start date for voting Monday 9 November, at noon Closing date for voting Monday 16 and Monday 23 November, publication of the results in Echo Monday 23 and Tuesday 24 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 1st December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure will be monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 16 and 24 November. During its meeting of March 17 2015, the Staff Council approved the election rules, which define the allocation of seats in each department, as follows:   Number of seats in the electoral colleges Departments BE EN TE DG/DGS FP GS HR/PF IT PH Career paths AA - D 2 3 3 1 1 2 1 1 2 Career paths E - G 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 3   Global CERN Career paths AA - G 14     Number of seats for fellows representatives Global CERN 5 For more informat...

  2. 2015 Elections to Staff Council

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    Elections Timetable Monday 21 September, at noon Start date for receipt of the application Friday 16 October, at noon Closing date for receipt of the applications Monday 26 October, at noon Start date for voting Monday 9 November, at noon Closing date for voting Monday 16 and Monday 23 November, publication of the results in Echo Monday 23 and Tuesday 24 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 1st December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure will be monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 16 and 24 November. During its meeting of March 17 2015, the Staff Council approved the election rules, which define the allocation of seats in each department, as follows:   Number of seats in the electoral colleges Departments BE EN TE DG/DGS FP GS HR/PF IT PH Career paths AA - D 2 3 3 1 1 2 1 1 2 Career paths E - G 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 3   ...

  3. MOOD AND PERFORMANCE IN YOUNG MALAYSIAN KARATEKA

    Rebecca S. K. Wong

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available In an attempt to test the conceptual model by Lane and Terry, the purposes of this study were 1 to assess mood states in non-depressed and depressed young karate athletes; 2 to assess mood states in relation to performance in young karate athletes. The participants were recruited from the 2004 Malaysian Games (72 males, 19.20 ± 1.16 years; 37 females, 18.78 ± 0.88 years. The athletes were divided into winners (medalists and losers. The Brunel Mood Scale (BRUMS was administered prior to the start of competition. MANOVA was employed to treat the data, while Pearson correlations were calculated for mood states in each depressed mood group and by gender. In terms of non-depressed and depressed mood, tension in the females was higher in the depressed group (5.61 ± 3.02 vs. 3.11 ± 1.90, p = 0.026, eta2 = 0.133, as was fatigue (3.64 ± 2.61 vs. 0.89 ± 1.69, p = 0.006, eta2 = 0.199. Tension in the males was higher in the depressed group (4.41 ± 2.52 vs. 1.50 ± 1.55, p < 0.001, eta2 = 0.215, as was anger (1.43 ± 1.88 vs. 0.25 ± 1.00, p = 0.019, eta2 = 0.076. The highest associations among mood subscales were between anger and depression (r = 0.57, and between depression and fatigue ( r = 0.55 in depressed males. The female winning karateka scored higher on anger (3.08 ± 2.96 vs. 1.29 ± 2.24, p = 0.046, eta2 = 0.109. The highest correlations between mood dimensions in depressed females were between depression and anger (r = 0.85 and between depression and confusion (r = 0.85. Contrary to previous research on the influence of depression on anger, only the female winners scored higher on anger. Several negative mood dimensions were higher in both male and female depressed groups, lending some support to the conceptual model advanced by Lane and Terry

  4. 78 FR 55114 - Native American Employment and Training Council (Council) Charter; Notice of Intent To Renew

    2013-09-09

    ... equitable distribution of influence with the Council leadership; (3) opportunity for current members to take on more of a leadership role; (4) flexibility to maintain a healthy Council balance of experience and...

  5. Empowering Malaysian dentists to tobacco dependence treatment conduct.

    Nordin, Amer Siddiq Amer; Kadir, Rahimah Abdul; Yahya, Nurul Asyikin; Zakaria, Hazli; Rashid, Rusdi Abdul; Habil, Mohamed Hussain

    2014-08-01

    As a signatory to the World Health Organisation 2003 Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, Malaysia has policies in place and funded 300 public Quit clinics. Unfortunately, government dentists are not included to run tobacco dependence treatment. A cross-sectional exploratory survey was carried out to seek Malaysian dentists' opinion on their knowledge, perception and willingness to conduct tobacco dependence treatment. Participation was voluntary from those who attended a specially designed one-day, four-module workshop on tobacco cessation intervention. Data were collected using the Audience-Response-System equipment which tracked immediate responses covering four domains namely: smoking as a public health problem, smoking as an addiction, the role of dentists in the programme and confidence in conducting smoking cessation in the clinic. Sample comprised more female dentists (73.5%), mean age 33.6 (SD 8.99) years and with more than 3 years working experience. Findings indicated that the majority agreed Malaysia has a rising problem in the prevalence of smoking (71.6%) and predicted that it will affect mostly the young (81.9%). Only half of the dentists surveyed (58.9%) routinely recorded their patients' smoking habits. The majority (71.6%) believed that dentists are effective in helping their patient to stop smoking and 76.3% agreed that dentists should discuss the smoking habit with their patients; however, 60% agreed that doing so is too time consuming. In addition, only 24.7% knew of more ways to treat a smoking habit. The majority felt comfortable giving advice to patients about changing their habits (76.5%) or discussing treatment options (60.5%): 75% would opt for a combined programme of counselling and use of medication if they have to do, 15% would choose to go on counselling only, while 8% did not want to treat. In conclusion, the findings suggest that dentists have a strong potential to contribute significantly to providing smoking cessation

  6. Equality in Healthcare: The Formation and Ongoing Legacy of an LGBT Advisory Council.

    Rosa, William; Fullerton, Chelsea; Keller, Ronald

    2015-12-01

    This article provides a broad overview of the literature on lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT) health disparities and workplace discrimination, as well as the context that led to the formation of an institutional LGBT Advisory Council. The Council was developed in order to demonstrate our ongoing commitment to LGBT inclusion and to improve the lived experiences for both LGBT patients and staff. A retrospective approach is utilized to explore the LGBT Advisory Council's journey to spearhead advocacy efforts at our institution. The Council's accomplishments include taking a leadership role in obtaining nationally recognized designations such as the Healthcare Equality Index and the Magnet Exemplar for Cultural Sensitivity, as well as adding sexual orientation, gender identity, and gender expression fields to our institution's electronic medical record system. Additionally, the Council guides and promotes ongoing house-wide cultural sensitivity staff training efforts. Most recently, the Council marched as a contingency in the world's largest Pride March for the first time in institutional history. It is our hope that our Council will become an inspiration and exemplar for similar groups to form at healthcare institutions and organizations across the nation. Allowing LGBT members of each individual healthcare community the agency to determine the direction of advocacy efforts is incredibly important; however, this must be coupled with an organizational commitment on behalf of leadership to follow through on these initiatives and to provide them with the resources they need in order to be successful.

  7. 75 FR 62109 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council (Council); Public Meetings

    2010-10-07

    ... meetings. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council (GMFMC) will convene public meetings... Embassy Suites Hotel, 4914 Constitution Ave., Baton Rouge, LA 70808. Council address: Gulf of Mexico... CONTACT: Dr. Stephen Bortone, Executive Director, Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; telephone...

  8. 78 FR 12294 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council (Council); Public Meetings

    2013-02-22

    ... meetings. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico and South Atlantic Fishery Management Councils will convene a Science.... to 4 p.m. EST on Tuesday, March 12, 2013. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Gulf of Mexico.... Council address: Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 North Lois Avenue, Suite 1100, Tampa, FL...

  9. Perception of masculinity amongst young Malaysian men: a qualitative study of university students

    Fazli Khalaf, Zahra; Low, Wah Yun; Ghorbani, Behzad; Merghati Khoei, Effat

    2013-01-01

    Background Perception of Masculinity plays an important role in men?s lifestyles and health behaviors. Although, the importance of masculinity has been widely discussed in men?s health literature, very little is known about the meanings of masculinity in the Malaysian setting. This research aimed to explore the meanings of masculinity among Malaysian university men. Methods This qualitative study utilized in-depth interviews with 34 young Malaysian university men, aged 20?30?years from three ...

  10. Effects of Focus of Accounting Research on the Quality of Accounting Education in Malaysian Universities

    Kabiru Isa Dandago; Nor Azlina Binti Shaari

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews the impact of focus of research in accounting on the quality of accounting education in Malaysian Universities. Research in accounting is very important in Malaysian Universities, in particular, and the Malaysian tertiary educational institutions, in general, and it is expected that academic research in accounting would improve the quality of accounting education in the country. The study is mainly a literature review type, with some informal interviews conducted for confir...

  11. 75 FR 81971 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    2010-12-29

    ... Pacific Fishery Management Council's (Council) Highly Migratory Species Management Team (HMSMT) will hold... Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National...., Carlsbad, CA 92011; telephone: (760) 431-9440. Council address: Pacific Fishery Management Council, 7700 NE...

  12. 77 FR 74469 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    2012-12-14

    ... Pacific Fishery Management Council's (Pacific Council) Groundfish Management Team (GMT) will hold a week... Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National...) 634-2000. Council address: Pacific Fishery Management Council, 7700 NE Ambassador Place, Suite 101...

  13. 78 FR 45580 - Hispanic Council on Federal Employment

    2013-07-29

    ... OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT Hispanic Council on Federal Employment AGENCY: Office of Personnel Management. ACTION: Cancelling and re-scheduling of Council meetings. SUMMARY: The Hispanic Council on Federal Employment (Council) is cancelling the August 29, 2013 Council meeting and will hold its remaining...

  14. 78 FR 65010 - Hispanic Council on Federal Employment

    2013-10-30

    ... OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT Hispanic Council on Federal Employment AGENCY: Office of Personnel Management. ACTION: Cancelling and Re-Scheduling of Council Meetings. SUMMARY: The Hispanic Council on Federal Employment (Council) is cancelling the October 31, 2013 Council meeting and will hold its...

  15. 78 FR 12107 - Hispanic Council on Federal Employment

    2013-02-21

    ... OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT Hispanic Council on Federal Employment AGENCY: Office of Personnel Management. ACTION: Scheduling of Council Meetings. SUMMARY: The Hispanic Council on Federal Employment will hold its 2013 Council meetings on the dates and location shown below. The Council is an advisory...

  16. 77 FR 61626 - Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council

    2012-10-10

    ...-FVWF97920900000-XXX] Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior... meeting of the Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council (Council). A Federal advisory committee, the... Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council will hold a meeting. Background The Council was formed in...

  17. Individualism-Collectivism And Organisational Value Types: A Case Of Malaysian Managers

    Fauziah Noordin; Jamil Hamali

    2011-01-01

    The results showed that Malaysian managers have significantly high levels of horizontal and vertical collectivism. Vertical collectivism has significant positive relationships with collegial, meritocratic, and leadership organisational values.

  18. Section 4: National Research Council

    Arseneau, R.; Zelle, J.

    1991-01-01

    A study was carried out to produce a compendium of electric and magnetic field levels in various environments throughout Canada. The contribution of the National Research Council of Canada in cooperation with Ottawa Hydro was to study the magnetic field environment of 29 sites in the Ottawa area, including private residences, place of employment, distribution and transmission lines, and close to padmount transformers. At most sites the electric fields were too low to be measured. Magnetic fields near padmount transformers can be larger than 300 mG, however this rapidly decreases and at 3 feet from the transformers is below 20 mG. Magnetic fields of unbalanced distribution lines can be larger than the fields of balanced lines. The magnetic fields of a high voltage transmission line were measurable at distances up to 100 m from the line. Electric fields were low outside the right-of-way. 6 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  19. The Council of Psychological Advisers.

    Sunstein, Cass R

    2016-01-01

    Findings in behavioral science, including psychology, have influenced policies and reforms in many nations. Choice architecture can affect outcomes even if material incentives are not involved. In some contexts, default rules, simplification, and social norms have had even larger effects than significant economic incentives. Psychological research is helping to inform initiatives in savings, finance, highway safety, consumer protection, energy, climate change, obesity, education, poverty, development, crime, corruption, health, and the environment. No nation has yet created a council of psychological advisers, but the role of behavioral research in policy domains is likely to grow in the coming years, especially in light of the mounting interest in promoting ease and simplification ("navigability"); in increasing effectiveness, economic growth, and competitiveness; and in providing low-cost, choice-preserving approaches.

  20. 75 FR 68010 - Federal Salary Council

    2010-11-04

    ... OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT Federal Salary Council AGENCY: Office of Personnel Management. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Federal Salary Council will meet on November 19, 2010, at the... establishment or modification of locality pay areas, the coverage of salary surveys, the process of comparing...

  1. 77 FR 59026 - Federal Salary Council

    2012-09-25

    ... OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT Federal Salary Council AGENCY: Office of Personnel Management. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Federal Salary Council will meet on October 19, 2012, at the time... establishment or modification of locality pay areas, the coverage of salary surveys, the process of comparing...

  2. 78 FR 61404 - Federal Salary Council; Meeting

    2013-10-03

    ... OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT Federal Salary Council; Meeting AGENCY: Office of Personnel Management. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Federal Salary Council will meet on November 5, 2013, at... recommendations cover the establishment or modification of locality pay areas, the coverage of salary surveys, the...

  3. 78 FR 65717 - Federal Salary Council

    2013-11-01

    ... OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT Federal Salary Council AGENCY: Office of Personnel Management. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Federal Salary Council meeting originally scheduled for November... establishment or modification of locality pay areas, the coverage of salary surveys, the process of comparing...

  4. 75 FR 63215 - Federal Salary Council Meeting

    2010-10-14

    ... OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT Federal Salary Council Meeting AGENCY: Office of Personnel Management. ACTION: Notice of Meeting. SUMMARY: The Federal Salary Council will meet on October 29, 2010, at... recommendations cover the establishment or modification of locality pay areas, the coverage of salary surveys, the...

  5. 76 FR 59175 - Federal Salary Council; Meeting

    2011-09-23

    ... OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT Federal Salary Council; Meeting AGENCY: Office of Personnel Management. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Federal Salary Council will meet on November 4, 2011, at... recommendations cover the establishment or modification of locality pay areas, the coverage of salary surveys, the...

  6. 78 FR 41804 - NASA Advisory Council; Meeting.

    2013-07-11

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice: (13-077)] NASA Advisory Council; Meeting... Space Administration announces a meeting of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC). DATES: Wednesday, July 31... ADDRESSES: NASA Headquarters, Room 9H40, Program Review Center, 300 E Street SW., Washington, DC 20456 FOR...

  7. 75 FR 4588 - NASA Advisory Council; Meeting

    2010-01-28

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice 10-011] NASA Advisory Council; Meeting... Committee of the NASA Advisory Council. This will be the first meeting of this Committee. DATES: February 11, 2010--11 a.m.-1 p.m. (EST). Meet-Me-Number: 1-877-613-3958; 2939943. ADDRESSES: NASA Headquarters, 300...

  8. 76 FR 4133 - NASA Advisory Council; Meeting

    2011-01-24

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice: (11-007)] NASA Advisory Council; Meeting... Space Administration announces a meeting of the NASA Advisory Council. DATES: Thursday, February 10, 2011, 8 a.m.-5 p.m., Local Time. Friday, February 11, 2011, 8 a.m.-12 p.m., Local Time. ADDRESSES: NASA...

  9. 75 FR 5629 - NASA Advisory Council; Meeting

    2010-02-03

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice (10-019)] NASA Advisory Council; Meeting... Space Administration announces a meeting of the NASA Advisory Council. DATES: Thursday, February 18, 2010, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. EST; Friday, February 19, 2010, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., EST. ADDRESSES: NASA Headquarters...

  10. 77 FR 9997 - NASA Advisory Council; Meeting

    2012-02-21

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice (12-016)] NASA Advisory Council; Meeting... Space Administration announces a meeting of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC). DATES: Thursday, March 8, 2012, 8 a.m.-5 p.m., local time and Friday, March 9, 2012, 8 a.m.-12 p.m., local time. ADDRESSES: NASA...

  11. 75 FR 59747 - NASA Advisory Council; Meeting.

    2010-09-28

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice: (10-113)] NASA Advisory Council; Meeting. AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance... Space Administration announces a meeting of the NASA Advisory Council. DATES: Wednesday, October 6, 2010...

  12. 75 FR 4875 - NASA Advisory Council; Meeting

    2010-01-29

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice (10-015)] NASA Advisory Council; Meeting... the NASA Advisory Council. This will be the first meeting of this Committee. DATES: February 17, 2010--10 a.m.-4 p.m. (EST). ADDRESSES: NASA Headquarters, 300 E Street, SW., Washington, DC, Room CD61. FOR...

  13. Coordinating Council. Ninth Meeting: Total Quality Management

    1992-01-01

    This report summarizes the 9th meeting of the STI Coordinating Council. The council listened to the speakers' understanding of Total Quality Management (TQM) principles and heard stories of successful applications of these principles. Definitions of quality stated were focused on customer satisfaction. Reports presented by the speakers are also included.

  14. 7 CFR 1230.6 - Council.

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Council. 1230.6 Section 1230.6 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS... CONSUMER INFORMATION Pork Promotion, Research, and Consumer Information Order Definitions § 1230.6 Council...

  15. 76 FR 37873 - National Women's Business Council

    2011-06-28

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION National Women's Business Council AGENCY: U.S. Small Business... National Women's Business Council (NWBC). The meeting will be open to the public. DATE: The meeting will be... p.m. EST. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the U. S. Small Business Administration Building...

  16. 76 FR 21786 - National Women's Business Council

    2011-04-18

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION National Women's Business Council AGENCY: U.S. Small Business... Business Council (NWBC). The meeting will be open to the public. DATES: The meeting will be held on April... Russell Senate Office Building (U.S. Senate Committee on Small Business and Entrepreneurship), Washington...

  17. 78 FR 7757 - Council Coordination Committee Meeting

    2013-02-04

    ... issues of relevance to the Councils, including FY 2013 budget allocations and budget planning for FY 2014... will be held at the Sheraton Silver Spring Hotel, 8777 Georgia Avenue, Silver Spring, MD 20001... reports (continued) 11:15-12:15--Management and Budget Update FY2012: Status, Council funding FY2013...

  18. 75 FR 81232 - Council Coordination Committee Meeting

    2010-12-27

    ... issues of relevance to the Councils, including FY 2011 budget allocations and budget planning, Annual... be held at the Phoenix Park Hotel, 520 North Capitol Street, NW., Washington, DC 20001, telephone 1...:30-2:15 Performance Measures. 2:15-3:15 Budget Issues FY11: Status, Allocation, Council Grants. FY12...

  19. Health council report 'Antimicrobial growth promoters'.

    Goettsch, W; Degener, JE

    1999-01-01

    The Health Council of the Netherlands has issued a report on the risk of development of resistance among bacteria as result of the use of antibiotics as growth promotors in livestock farming. The committee appointed by the Health Council conclude that the use of antimicrobial growth promotors

  20. 77 FR 29321 - National Coal Council

    2012-05-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY National Coal Council AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the National Coal Council (NCC). The Federal Advisory...., Washington, DC 20585-1290; Telephone: 202-586-0429. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Purpose of Meeting: The Coal...

  1. 76 FR 9765 - National Coal Council

    2011-02-22

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY National Coal Council AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the National Coal Council (NCC). The Federal Advisory... Chairman Joe Hopf. Presentation by Coal Policy Committee Chairman Frank Blake on the findings and...

  2. 77 FR 2714 - National Petroleum Council

    2012-01-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY National Petroleum Council AGENCY: Office of Fossil Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of Renewal. SUMMARY: Pursuant to Section 14(a)(2)(A) of the Federal Advisory... Services Administration, notice is hereby given that the National Petroleum Council has been renewed for a...

  3. 75 FR 48320 - National Petroleum Council

    2010-08-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY National Petroleum Council AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the National Petroleum Council. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public...

  4. Evaluation of patient safety culture among Malaysian retail pharmacists: results of a self-reported survey

    Sivanandy P

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Palanisamy Sivanandy,1 Mari Kannan Maharajan,1 Kingston Rajiah,1 Tan Tyng Wei,2 Tan Wee Loon,2 Lim Chong Yee2 1Department of Pharmacy Practice, School of Pharmacy, 2School of Pharmacy, International Medical University, Wilayah Persekutuan Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Background: Patient safety is a major public health issue, and the knowledge, skills, and experience of health professionals are very much essential for improving patient safety. Patient safety and medication error are very much associated. Pharmacists play a significant role in patient safety. The function of pharmacists in the medication use process is very different from medical and nursing colleagues. Medication dispensing accuracy is a vital element to ensure the safety and quality of medication use.Objective: To evaluate the attitude and perception of the pharmacist toward patient safety in retail pharmacies setup in Malaysia.Methods: A Pharmacy Survey on Patient Safety Culture questionnaire was used to assess patient safety culture, developed by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, and the convenience sampling method was adopted.Results: The overall positive response rate ranged from 31.20% to 87.43%, and the average positive response rate was found to be 67%. Among all the eleven domains pertaining to patient safety culture, the scores of “staff training and skills” were less. Communication openness, and patient counseling are common, but not practiced regularly in the Malaysian retail pharmacy setup compared with those in USA. The overall perception of patient safety of an acceptable level in the current retail pharmacy setup.Conclusion: The study revealed that staff training, skills, communication in patient counseling, and communication across shifts and about mistakes are less in current retail pharmacy setup. The overall perception of patient safety should be improved by educating the pharmacists about the significance and essential of patient safety. Keywords

  5. Level of understanding of innovation among the Malaysian executives

    Abidin, Norkisme Zainal; Suradi, Nur Riza Mohd; Shahabuddin, Faridatulazna; Mustafa, Zainol; Ismail, Wan Rosmanira

    2014-06-01

    Innovation is among the most frequently used word in the business world today. While many businessman and executives agree that innovation is needed to sustain their long term business success, many struggle to understand the concept of innovation. This study aims to measure the understanding level of innovation among the Malaysian executives using a survey questionnaire. Questions regarding innovation were posted to the respondents and they were requested to answer either it was True or False. Each respondent was given scores for their correct answers. The score of the right answers were then categorized into low, moderate and high understanding level. Results of the survey revealed that the understanding level of innovation among the Malaysian Executives is still at moderate level thus leading to the failure of many initiatives introduced by the organization or the government.

  6. Tracking of Radioactive Sources in Malaysian Nuclear Agency

    Mohd Fazlie Abdul Rashid; Noor Fadilla Ismail; Khairuddin Mohamad Kontol; Hairul Nizam Idris; Azimawati Ahmad; Suzilawati Muhd Sarowi; Raymond, Y.T.L.

    2014-01-01

    Radioactive materials are used in Malaysian Nuclear Agency for various purposes such as research and development, calibration, tracer and irradiation. Inventory of radioactive materials is crucial for ensuring the security and control of all radioactive materials owned and used so as not to be lost or fall into the hands of people who do not have permission to possess or use it. Experience in many countries around the world proves that the improper inventory of radioactive material would lead to loss of control of radioactive materials and will eventually cause an accident of radiation exposure. Radioactive material database has been developed for the need to ensure traceability of radioactive materials in Malaysian Nuclear Agency. Records of radioactive materials are regularly updated based on the classification of the type of radionuclide, the total distribution in each building and the initial activity of radioactive sources. (author)

  7. Spirituality Moderates Hopelessness, Depression, and Suicidal Behavior among Malaysian Adolescents.

    Talib, Mansor Abu; Abdollahi, Abbas

    2017-06-01

    Suicide is an important public health problem for adolescents, and it is essential to increase our knowledge concerning the etiology of suicide among adolescent students. Therefore, this study was designed to examine the associations between hopelessness, depression, spirituality, and suicidal behavior, and to examine spirituality as a moderator between hopelessness, depression, and suicidal behavior among 1376 Malaysian adolescent students. The participants completed measures of depression, hopelessness, daily spiritual experience, and suicidal behavior. Structural equation modeling indicated that adolescent students high in hopelessness and depression, but also high in spirituality, had less suicidal behavior than others. These findings reinforce the importance of spirituality as a protective factor against hopelessness, depression, and suicidal behavior among Malaysian adolescent students.

  8. Modeling a National Collaborative Digital Library for Malaysian Secondary Schools

    N.N. Edzan

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the conceptualisation of a model for a collaborative digital library specially tailored for Malaysian secondary schools, which will support classroom teaching and learning. The move towards collaboratively building the contents of a digital library is a fairly recent trend and it simulates an environment where partners are empowered to participate in building and up keeping the knowledge contents of the system. The conceptualisation of a Malaysian digital library is in line with the governments efforts in establishing SMART schools. However, various issues such as identifying local resources, ascertaining the needs of it users, and establishing a framework to meet these needs, must be addressed before the digital library can be fully implemented. It may be approached through the establishment of test beds in a particular learning institution, before nationwide implementation.

  9. Malaysian Container Seaport-Hinterland Connectivity: Status, Challenges and Strategies

    Shu-Ling Chen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper adopts a qualitative methodology to assess the Malaysian container seaport-hinterland connectivity from the perspective of its physical properties. The findings reveal that although Malaysia's major container seaports are connected to the hinterlands through road and rail transport, they are highly dependent on road. These seaports are also connected to inland freight facilities such as dry ports and ICDs, which are positioned as transit points to help connect exporters and importers in the hinterlands to seaports as well as facilitating regional and cross-border trades. This paper suggests that the quality of hinterland connectivity of Malaysian container seaports could be improved by implementing strategies which tackle the existing challenges including overcoming an extremely imbalanced modal split, insufficient rail capacity and limited train services, increasing road congestion and the limitations of space restriction in some inland facilities.

  10. The impact of derivatives on Malaysian stock market

    Malim, M. R.; Halim, F. A.; Murad, A.; Maad, H. A.; Annuar, N. F. M.

    2017-09-01

    The essential of derivatives has been discovered by researchers over recent decade. However, the conclusions made regarding the impact of derivatives on stock market volatility remains debatable. The main objective of this study is to examine the impact of derivatives on Malaysian stock market volatility by exploring FTSE Bursa Malaysia Kuala Lumpur Composite Index Futures (BMD FKLI) using FBM KLCI as the underlying asset. Generalized Autoregressive Conditional Heteroskedasticity (GARCH) (1, 1) model was employed to realize the objective. The results have shown that the introduction of futures trading has decreased the volatility of Malaysian stock market. The volatility increased vigorously during the Asian financial crisis compared to the Global financial crisis. However, the role of futures as a risk transfer is agreed as it could improve the market by decreasing the volatility in the spot market.

  11. FACTORS INFLUENCING SEXUAL HARASSMENT IN THE MALAYSIAN WORKPLACE

    Lee Kum Chee

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the potential risks factors associated with sexually harassing behaviors within the framework of the four-factor model of sexual harassment. The factors examined are unprofessional work environment, skewed gender ratio in the workplace, knowledge of grievance procedure for sexual harassment, sexist attitudes among co-workers, privacy of workspace, physical attractiveness, dress manner of victims, job status, and sex roles. The dependent variable is incidence of sexual harassment which was evaluated using the Sexual Experience Questionnaire developed by Fitzgerald, Shullman, Bailey, Richards, Swecker, Gold, Ormerod, and Weitzman (1988. Data were collected from 657 women employees working in Malaysian organizations. The findings showed that the predictions of the four-factor model are also largely true in the case of the Malaysian workplace. The study also found that sexual harassment behaviors are fairly widespread in Malaysia.

  12. Women in the Malaysian parliament: Do they matter?

    Ummu Atiyah Ahmad Zakuan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the impact of women’s representation in the lower house (Dewan Rakyat of the Malaysian Parliament. It is an attempt to see whether women representatives in the Dewan Rakyat are able to make any impact or difference in parliament, in the context of making policy output more women-friendly. Available studies conducted mainly in the West have shown that women legislators are more responsive to women’s interest than their male counterparts, developing distinctive sets of concerns and priorities and taking leading parts in formulating policies that favour women. Through textual analysis of nine years of the Malaysian Parliament (1999-2007, this paper examines the issues that have been introduced and discussed by the women and the impact they made in parliament. It also reveals the critical actors initiating or introducing women-related issues.

  13. Conjunctions in Malaysian Secondary School English Language Textbooks

    Alicia Philip

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The present research aims to investigate the distribution pattern of conjunctions and their ranking in two different corpora, namely the Malaysian school English language Textbook Corpus (Textbook Corpus and the British National Corpus (BNC. An additional objective of the study was to find out how conjunctions had been presented in the Malaysian school English language textbooks (Forms 1-5. The method applied was qualitative content analysis. The findings indicated that coordinating conjunctions were the most frequent conjunctions that occurred in the five textbooks followed by subordinating and correlative conjunctions. The ranking of the different types of conjunctions in the Textbook Corpus was similar to that of the reference corpus, BNC. The results also indicated that the textbooks failed to present conjunctions effectively. The findings are expected to help textbook developers or language teachers in developing or adapting learning materials. Keywords: Conjunctions, Textbook evaluation, Distribution patterns

  14. Foreign Nationals as Offenders and Victims in Malaysian Crime News

    Misman Norealyna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Foreign nationals in Malaysia come from all corners of the world. They are here as migrant labour, highly skilled and professional migrants (expatriates, illegal migrants, refugees, asylum-seekers (Burmese asylum seekers with UNHCR card, forced migrants (human trafficking victims, students, and tourists. The influx of foreign nationals residing in Malaysia coincides with greater number of crime news featuring foreign nationals. This study explores the social construction of foreign nationals as the ‘other’ in the local crime news published by Malaysian newspapers. 94 news headlines and lead sentences of local crime news involving foreign nationals were identified and analysed for this study. Findings suggest that Malaysian newspapers magnify foreign nationals’ migration status in each crime news.

  15. Motivating talents in Thai and Malaysian service firms

    Lehmann, Sanne

    2009-01-01

    Talent development in Thailand and Malaysian service firms has become a prioritized human resource management practice as these societies move toward knowledge-based economies. This paper discusses talent management in the social, organizational and managerial context of firms in Thailand...... and Malaysia, and argues that such structures often counterbalance investments made in talent development. The paper concludes that new human resource management practices do not produce a difference per se. It is the mindset and attitude of various managers that makes the difference. The learning...... for practitioners is that they need to adapt existing social and organizational structures to their new human resource management practices. The paper is based mainly on qualitative interviews with human resource managers from Thai and Malaysian service firms....

  16. The Malaysian Fifth Fuel Policy: Re-strategising the Malaysian Renewable Energy Initiatives

    Maulud, A.L.; Saidi, H.

    2012-01-01

    The power industry is the most crucial and strategic sector for any country to achieve its vision. Due to the fast depletion and high cost of fossil fuel, this is now a threat to sustainable growth. Attention is now focused on renewable energies as an alternative. In Malaysia, renewable energy was included in the 8th Malaysia Plan (2000–2005) with a target of 500 MW out of the 20,000 MW total generation capacity. However, for the first 10 years (2000–2010) only 41.5 MW planting up has been achieved. This paper recommends strategies, implementation mechanism, and financial framework to ensure success of the initiatives. Some of the recommendations were currently being implemented such as the Green Technology Fund and the Fit-In-Tariff. In addition, this paper proposes the incorporation of a Malaysian Renewable Energy Development Board with wide legislative and executive powers, that would be a strong champion of the RE initiatives. Its primary function would be, inter alia, cross-ministry coordination, tariff fixation, regulating utilization of renewable biomass waste, institute fiscal incentives such as investment incentives, tax holidays, removal of barriers, and initiate government funded Research, Development and Demonstration (RD and D) initiatives.

  17. 75 FR 55745 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    2010-09-14

    ... Pacific Fishery Management Council's (Pacific Council) Coastal Pelagic Species Management Team (CPSMT) and... Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National... sardine stock assessment for 2010. Other issues relevant to Coastal Pelagic Species fisheries management...

  18. 78 FR 25955 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    2013-05-03

    ... Pacific Fishery Management Council's (Pacific Council) Highly Migratory Species Management Team (HMSMT... Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National... be implemented pursuant to the precautionary management framework for North Pacific albacore...

  19. 78 FR 77658 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    2013-12-24

    ... Pacific Fishery Management Council's (Pacific Council) Highly Migratory Species Management Team (HMSMT... Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National.... Potential changes to management measures for the west coast drift gillnet fishery. 2. Developments to...

  20. 78 FR 56659 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    2013-09-13

    ... Pacific Fishery Management Council's (Pacific Council) Groundfish Management Team (GMT) will hold a... Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National...-16 groundfish harvest specifications and management measures, long-term impact analysis, and...

  1. 78 FR 27367 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    2013-05-10

    ... Pacific Fishery Management Council's (Pacific Council) Highly Migratory Species Management Team (HMSMT... Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National... be implemented pursuant to the precautionary management framework for North Pacific albacore...

  2. 75 FR 971 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    2010-01-07

    ... Pacific Fishery Management Council's (Council) Scientific and Statistical Committee, Coastal Pelagic Species Management Team, and Groundfish Management Team will hold a working meeting, which is open to the... Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National...

  3. Determinants of Fresh Fish Purchasing Behavior Among Malaysian Consumers

    Abdullahi Farah Ahmed; Zainalabidin Mohamed and Mohd Mansor Ismail

    2011-01-01

    The study investigates demographic and attitudinal characteristics that can affect the purchase decisions of marine fish among Malaysian consumers. A survey was conducted on Kuala Lumpur households using structured questionnaires. Seven hundred respondents were randomly interviewed with regard to their buying behaviour pattern, attitude and perception on fresh marine fish consumption. The data were analyzed using a logit binary model. It was found that the size and income of the households, g...

  4. Employability Skill Acquisition among Malaysian Community College Students

    M. K. Omar; A. R. Bakar; A. Mat Rashid

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the acquisition of employability skills among Malaysian community college students. The sample size of the present study 325 students selected randomly. Employability skills were measured using an instrument developed by the Secretaryâs Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills (SCANS). The overall mean of employability skills among community college students was 3.63 (S.D. = 0.47). Thus, we consider the employability skills of community college studen...

  5. The Antecedents of Automobile Brand Loyalty: Evidence from Malaysian

    Mabkhot, Hashed Ahmed; Salleh, Salniza MD; Shaari, Hasnizam

    2016-01-01

    This study empirically examined the mediating effect of brand satisfaction on the relationship between brand image and brand loyalty among Malaysian customer toward local automobile brands. Four hypotheses were developed to test hypothesizing relationships among brand image, brand satisfaction on brand loyalty. Data collected from customers of automobile brands in north Malaysia peninsula from three states which were Kedah, Penang, and Perlis. This study applies partial least squares to a sam...

  6. The Role of Macroeconomic Fundamentals in Malaysian Post Recession Growth

    Lee, Chin

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to find out the role of macroeconomic fundamentals in Malaysian post recession growth. The selected macroeconomic variables are exports, imports, price level, money supply, interest rate, exchange rate and government expenditure. The technique of cointegration was employed to assess the long run equilibrium relationships among the variables. Then, this study performs the Granger causality tests based on VECM to establish the short run causality among the variables. The long-ru...

  7. Innovation and technical efficiency in Malaysian family manufacturing industries

    Susila Munisamy; Edward Wong Sek Khin; Chia Zi Fon

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the technical efficiency for each industry in the Malaysian manufacturing sector is estimated by using Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA). In order to pursue a balance of innovation between long-term and short-term performance strategy, we integrate the Balance Scorecard (BSC) approach with DEA. Furthermore, this paper looks at the determinants of efficiency using the Tobit regression model. In measuring the level of firms’ efficiency and innovation, the wood and wood b...

  8. Mobile learning in Malaysian schools: opportunities and challenges

    Mohamad, Mariam; Woollard, John

    2011-01-01

    This study established the emerging themes in implementing mobile learning via mobile phones to support English Language learning in Malaysian schools. The findings were gathered from English subject leaders, ICT subject leaders, head teachers and deputy head teachers from 4 schools in the United Kingdom. In addition, the study also gathered the perspectives from English subject leaders, ICT subject leaders, head teachers, deputy head teachers from 9 schools and the officers in the Ministry o...

  9. Issues and challenges in implementing mobile learning in malaysian schools

    Mohamad, Mariam; Woollard, John

    2012-01-01

    This study describes the issues and challenges in implementing mobile learning via mobile phones to support English Language learning in Malaysian schools. The findings are drawn from interviews of English subject leaders, ICT subject leaders, head teachers and deputy head teachers from 4 schools in the United Kingdom. In addition, the study also describes the perspectives from the experts in education in Malaysia. They are English subject leaders, ICT subject leaders, head teachers, deputy h...

  10. Religiosity and Volunteering Intention Among Undergraduate Malaysian Muslim Students

    Sallam A.A.A.; Abdullah S.; Ramli A.J .; Hussin N.S.; Ahmad Z.; Bahari A.

    2018-01-01

    This paper deals with the question: To what extent do religiosity characteristics, contribute to the influence of volunteering intention among Malaysian Muslim students during disasters? To answer this research question, we focused the students in public universities. The finding concerns found that religiosity increases the likelihood of volunteering intention, implying that religious affiliation of youth increases the likelihood of volunteering. This is in line with previous research, that ...

  11. A supplier selection strategy within the Malaysian telecommunications industry

    Sharif, A M; Abdul-Rahim, S; Gallear, D; Irani, Z

    2009-01-01

    The telecommunication industry in Malaysia has grown rapidly over the last 15 years, with effective supply chain management becoming increasing important within the sector. A multitude of providers and part owned Malaysian government companies, vendors and suppliers are involved in generating and creating value-adding products and services within this sector (across wireless, wireline, broadband business and consumer lines of business). This paper describes key challenges facing a major telec...

  12. An Energy Consumption Study for a Malaysian University

    Fu E. Tang

    2012-01-01

    The increase in energy demand has raised concerns over adverse impacts on the environment from energy generation. It is important to understand the status of energy consumption for institutions such as Curtin Sarawak to ensure the sustainability of energy usage, and also to reduce its costs. In this study, a preliminary audit framework was developed and was conducted around the Malaysian campus to obtain information such as the number and specifications of electrical appl...

  13. Regionalization Impact on Performance Management for Malaysian Multinational Companies

    Tan, We Chang

    2015-01-01

    Operation offshore or regionalization is one of the key strategies by many Malaysian MNCs nowadays. The purpose is to expand their business and also establish a sustainable business model. This change in business direction introduces impacts to performance management framework. If these impacts are not properly handled, it may leads to business expansion failure. The current performance management framework will have to be enhanced such that the regional needs in the performance management ar...

  14. Women in the Malaysian parliament: Do they matter?

    Ummu Atiyah Ahmad Zakuan

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the impact of women’s representation in the lower house (Dewan Rakyat) of the Malaysian Parliament. It is an attempt to see whether women representatives in the Dewan Rakyat are able to make any impact or difference in parliament, in the context of making policy output more women-friendly. Available studies conducted mainly in the West have shown that women legislators are more responsive to women’s interest than their male counterparts, developing distinctive sets of conc...

  15. Supply and Demand Model for the Malaysian Cocoa Market

    Abdel Hameed, Amna Awad; Hasanov, Akram; Idris, Nurjihan; Abdullah, Amin Mahir; Mohamed Arshad, Fatimah; Shamsudin, Mad Nasir

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates a system of supply, demand, and price equations for Malaysian cocoa using annual data over the period 1975-2008. Theoretically, in supply and demand models, the price variable is treated as endogenous. However, Hausman specification test result indicates that there is no simultaneity problem in the model. Thus, we estimate the system of equations utilizing the Seemingly Unrelated Regression (SUR) estimation technique which might be considered a more effi...

  16. E-democracy and public administrators: the Malaysian case

    Abu Bakar, Abdul Gapar

    2017-01-01

    The thesis investigates public administrators’ use of interactive Information and Communications Technologies (ICTs) in the Malaysian Federal Public Service (MFPS). It describes qualitative research which identifies the nature of e-democracy practices in policy development in the MFPS. In-depth interviews and scholarly as well as government documents provide empirical evidence. Through a survey of literature, contextual features such as absence of policy in the MFPS for e-democracy, constitut...

  17. Exploring Familial Themes in Malaysian Students’ Eating Behaviors

    Car Mun Kok

    2013-01-01

    Food-related attitudes and habits are integral to overall well-being, especially among international college students who often practice poor eating habits and experience high levels of stress from factors like school and sociocultural adjustment. Utilizing in-depth interviews, this study explored how family experiences impact food-related habits, attitudes, and beliefs of Malaysian college students in the U.S. Findings indicate that early experiences with family substantially impact current ...

  18. Representation of Business Culture in Selected Malaysian Short Stories

    Zanirah Wahab; Radzuwan Ab Rashid

    2016-01-01

    Globalisation has brought numerous changes in all aspects of life especially in the economic sector. For the past few decades, the importance of economic growth and achievement has become the “obsession” of people around the world. Malaysia is no exception to this economic globalisation whirlwind. As well-known business hub with cutting edge technologies and blooming business enterprises, economic globalisation has shifted the way Malaysian society view things or connect with one another. Thi...

  19. An empirical study of Malaysian firms' capital structure

    Zain, Sharifah Raihan Syed Mohd

    2003-01-01

    Merged with duplicate record 10026.1/821 on 27.03.2017 by CS (TIS) It is sometimes purported that one of the factors affecting a firm's value is its capital structure. The event of the 1997 Asian financial crisis was expected to affect the firms' gearing level as the firms' earnings deteriorated and the capital market collapsed. The main objective of this research is to examine empirically the determinants of the capital structure of Malaysian firms. The main additional aim is ...

  20. Safety Culture and Issue in the Malaysian Manufacturing Sector

    Ali Danish; Yusof Yusri; Adam Anbia

    2017-01-01

    . This paper highlights the Safety culture and issue in the Malaysian Manufacturing Sector and emphasis the high occupational accidents due to lack of safety culture and non-compliance of the requirements of Occupational Safety and Health Act 1994. The aim of this study is to review the occupational accidents occurrence in the Malaysia workplace since 2012-2016. Malaysia aimed to reduce the occupational accidents, the results show by DOSH increase that Occupational Noise Induced Hearing Loss ...

  1. Factors Influencing Students' Self-Concept among Malaysian Students

    Z. Ishak; S. Jamaluddin; F.P Chew

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the students’ self-concept among 16- and 17- year- old adolescents in Malaysian secondary schools. Previous studies have shown that positive self-concept played an important role in student adjustment and academic performance during schooling. This study attempts to investigate the factors influencing students’ perceptions toward their own self-concept. A total of 1168 students participated in the survey. This study utilized the CoPs (UM) instrument to measure self-concept...

  2. Belongingness: Malaysian nurses’ experiences in the clinical workplace

    Mohamed, Zainah

    2017-01-01

    The need to belong has been proposed to be the most basic need for human psychological wellbeing. Lack of belongingness has been associated with stress, anxiety, and lack of esteem. Understanding the nature of nurses’ interconnection with others and their perceptions of belongingness has been linked to social and psychological functioning in the workplace. The purpose of this mixed-methods study was to explore factors contributing to Malaysian nurses’ sense of belonging in the workplace. Reg...

  3. STIGMA IN THE SCHOOL: THE PRACTICE OF THE CLASS COUNCIL

    Paula Almeida de Castro

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The stigmatization observed at the interaction between teachers and students at Class Council meetings is the thematic of this paper. In this paper are presented the results from the ethnographic investigation at a basic public school at Rio de Janeiro. The scenario of Class Council under observation and analysis produced clues for comprehension about the pedagogical practices planned by stigmatization, medical treatment and pathologizing the students and sometimes their families as a justification for their failures at school. It was possible to observe that students that do not fit the normal standards imposed by school received a mark, a stigma, starting to be recognized for these assignments. At the teachers speech was present the control that made visible that mark to everyone who lives together with them. The results of this study provide clues to rethink the situation of vulnerability and exclusion that some students are exposed in the evaluation of the class councils, due to difficulties in their educational processes. It also offers the possibility of thinking about the difference by the difference in an inclusive school effectively.

  4. Building Digital Economy - The Research Councils Programme and the Vision

    Hand, John

    We at the Research Councils believe that there are many aspects of society and business that could be transformed by the innovative design and use of digital technologies. This has led to the Digital Economy Programme. The Digital Economy is an RCUK Cross-Research Council Programme, led by the EPSRC, but working closely with ESRC, MRC, AHRC and TSB. What is Digital Economy? Digital Economy is the novel design or use of information and communication technology to help transform the lives of individuals, society or business. All Digital Economy research involves the user community. This can include industry, government, society, charities or other groups as applicable. The research will understand the technologies and also why change is needed, what the impacts will be and who will benefit. Research in this cross-research council area can be driven by economic, social or technical need. The early involvement of the user community is vital if new technologies are to be integrated successfully into business opportunities, technical solutions or commercial products and processes. Challenges in the Digital Economy will require multi-disciplinary academic input, including, but not limited to, the arts and humanities, economic and social sciences and medical sciences, in addition to engineering and physical sciences.

  5. Self-care practices of Malaysian adults with diabetes and sub-optimal glycaemic control.

    Tan, Ming Yeong; Magarey, Judy

    2008-08-01

    To investigate the self-care practices of Malaysian adults with diabetes and sub-optimal glycaemic control. Using a one-to-one interviewing approach, data were collected from 126 diabetic adults from four settings. A 75-item questionnaire was used to assess diabetes-related knowledge and self-care practices regarding, diet, medication, physical activity and self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG). Most subjects had received advice on the importance of self-care in the management of their diabetes and recognised its importance. Sixty-seven subjects (53%) scored below 50% in their diabetes-related knowledge. Subjects who consumed more meals per day (80%), or who did not include their regular sweetened food intakes in their daily meal plan (80%), or who were inactive in daily life (54%), had higher mean fasting blood glucose levels (p=0.04). Subjects with medication non-adherence (46%) also tended to have higher fasting blood glucose levels. Only 15% of the subjects practiced SMBG. Predictors of knowledge deficit and poor self-care were low level of education (p = <0.01), older subjects (p=0.04) and Type 2 diabetes subjects on oral anti-hyperglycaemic medication (p = <0.01). There were diabetes-related knowledge deficits and inadequate self-care practices among the majority of diabetic patients with sub-optimal glycaemic control. This study should contribute to the development of effective education strategies to promote health for adults with sub-optimal diabetes control.

  6. Essential Oil Compositions of Malaysian Lauraceae: A Mini Review

    Wan Mohd Nuzul Hakimi Salleh, Farediah Ahmad * , Khong Heng Yen, Razauden Mohamed Zulkifli

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Essential oils have been largely employed for human need due to their antibacterial, antifungal and insecticidal activities. At present, approximately 3000 essential oils are known, 300 of which are commercially important. Essential oils or some of their components are used in perfumes and make-up products, sanitary products, dentistry, agriculture, as food preservers and additives, and as natural remedies. The essential oil compositions of Malaysian Lauraceae family have been investigated for many years. In the recent years, studies on the essential oils of the species have been progressing and many of them have reported interesting pharmacological activities. In this article, we summarized and updated the chemical compositions and biological activities of Malaysian Lauraceae. Throughout our literature review, only four genera which are Lindera, Beilschmiedia, Litsea, and Cinnamomum have been studied for their essential oil compositions in Malaysia. They were found to contain mainly safrole, eugenol, linalool, camphor, benzyl benzoate or cinnamaldehyde as major components. There were significant priorities to find out the details of the chemical compositions of the essential oils from Malaysian Lauraceae. Therefore, more clinical studies on the toxicity of the essential oil of the species are also crucial to ensure their safety and to assess their eligibility to be used as the sources of modern medicines.

  7. Defining Malaysian Knowledge Society: Results from the Delphi Technique

    Hamid, Norsiah Abdul; Zaman, Halimah Badioze

    This paper outlines the findings of research where the central idea is to define the term Knowledge Society (KS) in Malaysian context. The research focuses on three important dimensions, namely knowledge, ICT and human capital. This study adopts a modified Delphi technique to seek the important dimensions that can contribute to the development of Malaysian's KS. The Delphi technique involved ten experts in a five-round iterative and controlled feedback procedure to obtain consensus on the important dimensions and to verify the proposed definition of KS. The finding shows that all three dimensions proposed initially scored high and moderate consensus. Round One (R1) proposed an initial definition of KS and required comments and inputs from the panel. These inputs were then used to develop items for a R2 questionnaire. In R2, 56 out of 73 items scored high consensus and in R3, 63 out of 90 items scored high. R4 was conducted to re-rate the new items, in which 8 out of 17 items scored high. Other items scored moderate consensus and no item scored low or no consensus in all rounds. The final round (R5) was employed to verify the final definition of KS. Findings and discovery of this study are significant to the definition of KS and the development of a framework in the Malaysian context.

  8. The Idea of a University: Rethinking the Malaysian Context

    Chang Da Wan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the idea of a university with a specific focus in the Malaysian context. We begin the article guided by these questions—“What is a university?” and “What are universities for?”—in examining the historical and conceptual development of universities. This is followed by asking a more specific question—“What are Malaysian universities for?”—in which we discussed the overarching roles of public and private universities in this developing country. Having examined the roles of public and private universities, and taken into context the complexity and challenges surrounding these important societal institutions, we discuss two “experimental” initiatives in Malaysia: the APEX University (Accelerated Program for Excellence focusing on sustainability and the “humanversity”. On the one hand, these initiatives are intended to prepare and transform Malaysian universities to address not only the needs of society today, but critically, of tomorrow. On the other hand, they have implications and contributions to frame our thinking about the future ideas of a university not only in Malaysia, but regionally and globally.

  9. Representation of Business Culture in Selected Malaysian Short Stories

    Zanirah Wahab

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Globalisation has brought numerous changes in all aspects of life especially in the economic sector. For the past few decades, the importance of economic growth and achievement has become the “obsession” of people around the world. Malaysia is no exception to this economic globalisation whirlwind. As well-known business hub with cutting edge technologies and blooming business enterprises, economic globalisation has shifted the way Malaysian society view things or connect with one another. This paper explores how business culture is represented in Malaysian short stories as well as examines the stand of the writers regarding the impact of economic globalisation on their society. In doing so, this paper compares and critically analyses three - selected short stories in the light of globalisation theory. The five main characteristics of globalisation namely, internationalisation, liberalisation, universalisation, westernisation and deterritorialisation are taken into account while dissecting these literary works. From the analysis, each writer voices out similar concerns regarding the impact of economic globalisation on their society. Malaysian fictions are preoccupied with the erosion of good values and the nation’s physical changes due to economic globalisation. The parallel stand demonstrates that regardless of their ethnicity and gender, they react uniformly to the changes.

  10. Malaysian public perception towards nuclear power energy-related issues

    Misnon, Fauzan Amin; Hu, Yeoh Siong; Rahman, Irman Abd.; Yasir, Muhamad Samudi

    2017-01-01

    Malaysia had considered nuclear energy as an option for future electricity generation during the 9th Malaysia Development Plan. Since 2009, Malaysia had implemented a number of important preparatory steps towards this goal, including the establishment of Nuclear Power Corporation of Malaysia (MNPC) as first Nuclear Energy Programme Implementing Organization (NEPIO) in Malaysia. In light of the establishment of MNPC, the National Nuclear Policy was formulated in 2010 and a new comprehensive nuclear law to replace the existing Atomic Energy Licensing Act (Act 304) is currently in the pipeline. Internationally, public acceptance is generally used to gauge the acceptance of nuclear energy by the public whenever a government decides to engage in nuclear energy. A public survey was conducted in between 14 March 2016 to 10 May 2016 focusing on the Malaysian public acceptance and perception towards the implementation of nuclear energy in Malaysia. The methodology of this research was aim on finding an overview of the general knowledge, public-relation recommendation, perception and acceptance of Malaysian towards the nuclear power development program. The combination of information gathered from this study can be interpreted as an indication of the complexity surrounding the development of nuclear energy and its relationship with the unique background of Malaysian demography. This paper will focus mainly on energy-related section in the survey in comparison with nuclear energy.

  11. Phenolic acid composition and antioxidant properties of Malaysian honeys.

    Khalil, M I; Alam, N; Moniruzzaman, M; Sulaiman, S A; Gan, S H

    2011-08-01

    The phenolic acid and flavonoid contents of Malaysian Tualang, Gelam, and Borneo tropical honeys were compared to those of Manuka honey. Ferric reducing/antioxidant power assay (FRAP) and the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH) radical-scavenging activities were also quantified. All honey extracts exhibited high phenolic contents (15.21 ± 0.51- 42.23 ± 0.64 mg/kg), flavonoid contents (11.52 ± 0.27- 25.31 ± 0.37 mg/kg), FRAP values (892.15 ± 4.97- 363.38 ± 10.57 μM Fe[II]/kg), and high IC₅₀ of DPPH radical-scavenging activities (5.24 ± 0.40- 17.51 ± 0.51 mg/mL). Total of 6 phenolic acids (gallic, syringic, benzoic, trans-cinnamic, p-coumaric, and caffeic acids) and 5 flavonoids (catechin, kaempferol, naringenin, luteolin, and apigenin) were identified. Among the Malaysian honey samples, Tualang honey had the highest contents of phenolics, and flavonoids, and DPPH radical-scavenging activities. We conclude that among Malaysian honey samples, Tualang honey is the richest in phenolic acids, and flavonoid compounds, which have strong free radical-scavenging activities. © 2011 Institute of Food Technologists®

  12. 76 FR 6402 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    2011-02-04

    ... Pacific Fishery Management Council's (Pacific Council) Groundfish Essential Fish Habitat Review Committee... review of Essential Fish Habitat (EFH) descriptions for Pacific Coast groundfish species. Major topics of...

  13. The Effect of E-commerce on Malaysian Tax System: an Empirical Evidence From Academicians and Malaysian Tax Practitioners

    Palil, Mohd Rizal

    2004-01-01

    The explosion of information technology (IT) nowadays has created new phenomena in shopping activities. Consumers can easily buy products via Internet. Within a minute, the products will be delivered instantly and accurately. This scenario is known as e-commerce. The emergence of e-commerce affects consumers' shopping behavior as well as taxation system. The objective of this research is to reveal the effects of e-commerce upon Malaysian taxation system by emphasizing in scope of charge 'deri...

  14. Muslim refugees in Southeast Asia, the Malaysian response.

    Dorall, R F

    1988-01-01

    This article surveys the arrivals of Muslim refugees from countries in Southeast Asia who have not only come to Malaysia for political refuge, but who have also stayed on, in many instances integrating into the local Muslim community. The author concludes that Burmese, Thai, and Filipino Muslim refugee-cum-migrants, and the estimated 500,000 illegal Indonesian migrant workers in East and Peninsular Malaysia make the presence of economic migrants in Malaysia's towns and rural sectors a far more pressing concern to Malaysians than that posed by the arrival of genuine political refugees. Only the Indonesians present in Malaysia are consistently termed by all parties as illegal migrants and some of them have been subjected to well-publicized deportation by the Malaysian immigration authorities. Sympathy for fellow-Muslims in distress explains Malaysia's open-door policy to Muslim refugees. The Koran specifically enjoins Muslims to assist Muslim refugees who have been persecuted by others. However, the necessity to maintain regional political and military alliances, principally as a bulwark against Communism, and the Malay--Non-Malay, Muslim--Non-Muslim dichotomy in Malaysia which almost evenly divides Malaysia's 16 million population into mutually antagonistic halves, results in any overt public policy in favor of Malays and Muslims to be immediately denounced by the other half of the population as a move against the Non-Malays and Non-Muslims. Without political and media attention, the refugees live wherever they can find work, as do hundreds of thousands of mainly Indonesian illegal migrant workers. They surreptitiously get their children admitted to public schools, and through bribery, can even get Malaysian identification papers. Malaysia is a relatively tranquil haven for Malaysia's Muslim refugees compared to their homelands, but their continued stay remains dependent on the ever-present struggle for more equitable sharing of political and economic power between

  15. ITER Council tour of Clarington site

    Dautovich, D.

    2001-01-01

    The ITER Council meeting was recently held in Toronto on 27 and 28 February. ITER Canada provided local arrangements for the Council meeting on behalf of Europe as the Official host. Following the meeting, on 1 March, ITER Canada conducted a tour of the proposed ITER construction site at Charington, and the ITER Council members attended a luncheon followed by a speech by Dr. Peter Barnard, Chairman and CEO of ITER Canada, at the Empire Club of Canada. The official invitation to participate in these events came from Dr. Peter Harrison, Deputy Minister of Natural Resources Canada. This report provides a brief summary of the events on 1 March

  16. 2011 Elections to Staff Council

    Association du personnel

    2011-01-01

    Elections Timetable Starting with Echo of 26 September, posters, etc. call for applications Wednesday 26 October, at noon closing date for receipt of the application Monday 31 October, at noon start date for voting Monday 14 November, at noon closing date for voting Monday 21 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 22 and Wednesday 29 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 6 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure will be monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 21 November. In its meeting on 19 September 2011, the Electoral Commission decided on the following distribution of seats in colleges 0.1 to 0.6: Sector Department Career path AA – A – B – C – D Career path E – F – G – H Accelerators and Technology BE TE EN Electoral college 0.1 18 si&e...

  17. 2013 Elections to Staff Council

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    Elections Timetable Starting with Echo of 16 September, posters, etc. call for applications Monday 21 October, at noon closing date for receipt of the applications Monday 28 October, at noon start date for voting Monday 11 November, at noon closing date for voting Monday 18 and Monday 25 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 19 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 3 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure is monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 18 and 25 November. n its meeting on 11 September 2013, the Electoral Commission decided on the following distribution of seats in colleges O.1 to O.6: Sectors Departments Career paths AA – A – B – C – D Career paths E – F – G – H Accelerators and Technology BE TE EN Electoral college 0.1 13 si&...

  18. 2013 Elections to Staff Council

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    Elections Timetable Starting with Echo of 16 September, posters, etc. call for applications Monday 21 October, at noon closing date for receipt of the applications Monday 28 October, at noon start date for voting Monday 11 November, at noon closing date for voting Monday 18 and Monday 25 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 19 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 3 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure is monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 18 and 25 November. n its meeting on 11 September 2013, the Electoral Commission decided on the following distribution of seats in colleges O.1 to O.6: Sectors Departments Career paths AA – A – B – C – D Career paths E – F – G – H Accelerators and Technology BE TE EN Electoral colle...

  19. National Safety Council Final Report

    Norris, Karen; Shannon, Tom

    2005-01-01

    In December 1995, the National Safety Council (NSC) entered into Cooperative Agreement No.DE-FC02-96EW 12729 with the US Department of Energy (DOE) to work together over the next few years on safety and health initiatives surrounding the management of radioactive materials. As a result, three publications, including print and non-print deliverables, were developed and distributed: (1) Series of Backgrounders, Web Services for WIPP; (2) A Guide to Foreign Research Reactor Spent Fuel; and (3) A Guide to the US Department of Energy's Low-Level Radioactive Waste. DOE and its predecessor agencies have maintained a record of safe transportation of radioactive materials for more than 50 years. Thousands of shipments involving three million packages of radioactive materials are shipped each year in the United States. Historically, DOE shipments constitute less than one percent of the total radioactive material shipments; however, they comprise a significant portion (approaching 75 percent) of the curies, or amounts of radioactivity shipped annually. DOE operations and field offices are responsible for detailed planning and for ensuring full regulatory compliance for their shipments. Packaging is designed to protect workers and limit the risk to the public during transportation. DOE headquarters and program offices provide policy direction and oversight for packaging and transportation activities for their respective offices. The publications NSC produced under the agreement also included primary points of contact for external audiences, including the press, the public, and stakeholders who would not have access to DOE regulations, manuals, and practices

  20. COVERING RACE AND RELIGION: THE MOORTHY AND NYONYA TAHIR CASES IN FOUR MALAYSIAN NEWSPAPERS

    Ngu Teck Hua

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Reporting on issues like race and religion in a multi-racial and multi-religious society is not an easy media responsibility. In a country like Malaysia where racial and religious sensitivities abound, the media have to constantly tread on precarious ground, balancing between what to write and how to write it. Much of the concern over the reporting of sensitive issues stems from the belief that a wrong move may have dire consequences, as seen in the recent controversy and furore over the Prophet Muhammad caricature published in the Danish newspaper, Jyllands-Posten.This study analyses two recent racial/religious issues – M. Moorthy and Nyonya Tahir cases – as reported in the New Straits Times (NST, Utusan Malaysia (UM, Malaysia Nanban (MN and Sin Chew Daily (SCD. The former case caused a stir when there was a tussle between Moorthy’s Indian/Hindu family and the Federal Territory Islamic Affairs Council which argued that Moorthy had converted to Islam when he was alive without the family’s knowledge. The latter was a case of a Malay/Muslim woman who, while alive, had denounced Islam and lived as a Chinese practising Buddhism.This study analyses how the two race and religion-related controversial issues were treated in the various language newspapers in Malaysia. A preliminary finding showed that, true to the communal nature of the Malaysian press, there was an apparent slant in how the ethnic press covered these two issues. For instance, in terms of prominence given to the stories, SCD, while downplaying the Moorthy story, dedicated more space to the Nyonya Tahir case. Similarly, MN highlighted the Moorthy story and downplayed the Nyonya Tahir case. The different newspapers were also seen to ''favour'' the subject they covered according to the ethnicity.