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Sample records for major uranium producing

  1. Uranium producers foresee new boom

    McIntyre, H.

    1979-01-01

    The status of uranium production in Canada is reviewed. Uranium resources in Saskatchewan and Ontario are described and the role of the Cluff Lake inquiry in securing a government decision in favour of further uranium development is mentioned. There have been other uranium strikes near Kelowna, British Columbia and in the Northwest Territories. Increasing uranium demand and favourable prices are making the development of northern resources economically attractive. In fact, all uranium currently produced has been committed to domestic and export contracts so that there is considerable room for expanding the production of uranium in Canada. (T.I.)

  2. Market outlook for Australian uranium producers

    Lindsay, M.

    2001-01-01

    Recent improvements in the uranium market and political changes in Australia presented the uranium producers with their best opportunity in over 15 years. The removal of the well known 'three mines policy' by the current government has encouraged Australian producers to develop new development plans. With the expansion of the existing operations at Ranger and Olympic Dam, and the potential operations of Jabiluka, Kintyre, Koongara, Honeymoon and Beverley, Australia expects to increase annual production to 11630 t U 3 O 8 by the end of the decade. It will then join Canada as a major supplier of uranium to the world's nuclear power utilities in the 21st century. Uranium exploration, which has been virtually nonexistent over the past 15 years, has once again been reactivated. This occurred because of the change in the Government, but also because the Aboriginal groups are once more allowing exploration on their land. (author)

  3. Method for producing uranium atomic beam source

    Krikorian, O.H.

    1976-01-01

    A method is described for producing a beam of neutral uranium atoms by vaporizing uranium from a compound UM/sub x/ heated to produce U vapor from an M boat or from some other suitable refractory container such as a tungsten boat, where M is a metal whose vapor pressure is negligible compared with that of uranium at the vaporization temperature. The compound, for example, may be the uranium-rhenium compound, URe 2 . An evaporation rate in excess of about 10 times that of conventional uranium beam sources is produced

  4. Canada: The largest uranium producer

    Lowell, A.F.

    1985-01-01

    Despite all the current difficulties, previous erroneous forecasts and other mistakes, the longer term future looks good for uranium mining and for Canada's industry in particular. Saskatchewan continues to offer the most exciting new prospects, the huge and fabulously high grade Cigar Lake deposits being the most spectacular of the recent discoveries. Notwithstanding continuous mining for 30 years from Elliot Lake there still remain there significant uncommitted reserves which can be developed when the market for uranium is in better balance

  5. Method of producing thermally stable uranium carbonitrides

    Ugajin, M.; Takahashi, I.

    1975-01-01

    A thermally stable uranium carbonitride can be produced by adding tungsten and/or molybdenum in the amount of 0.2 wt percent or more, preferably 0.5 wt percent or more, to a pure uranium carbonitride. (U.S.)

  6. The uranium producing industry - its capital structure

    Duncan, I.J.

    1989-01-01

    The uranium mining industry has undergone a substantial change over the past decade. A few rather informal statistics relevant to this change have been gathered together, with particular emphasis on the corporate and capital structures which existed in the industry in the 1970s and 1980s. These data offer interesting insights on the availability of capital for new uranium mining ventures, and lead to a sketch of the finances of a hypothetical new venture. The results of this work suggest that there may be few producers likely to start work on a greenfield site in the next few years, even if the market recovers from its present doldrums. (author)

  7. Process for producing uranium oxide rich compositions from uranium hexafluoride

    DeHollander, W.R.; Fenimore, C.P.

    1978-01-01

    Conversion of gaseous uranium hexafluoride to a uranium dioxide rich composition in the presence of an active flame in a reactor defining a reaction zone is achieved by separately introducing a first gaseous reactant comprising a mixture of uranium hexafluoride and a reducing carrier gas, and a second gaseous reactant comprising an oxygen-containing gas. The reactants are separated by a shielding gas as they are introduced to the reaction zone. The shielding gas temporarily separates the gaseous reactants and temporarily prevents substantial mixing and reacting of the gaseous reactants. The flame occurring in the reaction zone is maintained away from contact with the inlet introducing the mixture to the reaction zone. After suitable treatment, the uranium dioxide rich composition is capable of being fabricated into bodies of desired configuration for loading into nuclear fuel rods. Alternatively, an oxygen-containing gas as a third gaseous reactant is introduced when the uranium hexafluoride conversion to the uranium dioxide rich composition is substantially complete. This results in oxidizing the uranium dioxide rich composition to a higher oxide of uranium with conversion of any residual reducing gas to its oxidized form

  8. METHOD OF PRODUCING URANIUM METAL BY ELECTROLYSIS

    Piper, R.D.

    1962-09-01

    A process is given for making uranium metal from oxidic material by electrolytic deposition on the cathode. The oxidic material admixed with two moles of carbon per one mole of uranium dioxide forms the anode, and the electrolyte is a mixture of from 40 to 75% of calcium fluoride or barium fluoride, 15 to 45% of uranium tetrafluoride, and from 10 to 20% of lithium fluoride or magnesium fluoride; the temperature of the electrolyte is between 1150 and 1175 deg C. (AEC)

  9. Gulf digs in to tap a major uranium orebody

    Jackson, D.

    1977-01-01

    The progress and future plans of Gulf Mineral Resources Co. for tapping and developing a major uranium orebody via two concrete-lined shafts in the Grants uranium mineral belt in New Mexico are discussed. The mineralogy of the Grants belt is discussed as it relates to the Gulf development project. Numerous pictures of the operation are included

  10. Prospects brighten for world uranium producers

    Steyn, J.

    1996-01-01

    Since the beginning of 1995, uranium spot market prices have risen by more than 67%. This has been due to supply related factors and might have been greater if world nuclear power projections had not shown virtually zero growth over the next few decades except in the Far East. Perceptions of a looming supply shortfall have been created by rapidly declining inventories, western mine production being able to meet only half of plant requirements, constraints on access to CIS supplies in the future and considerably less than anticipated uranium-equivalent supply from nuclear weapons material. Data on projected world supply and demand balances are presented. On the supply side this includes all primary production and inventories of all forms. A supply deficit of 5 million 1b, U 3 O 8 by 2010 is shown. Trade constraints, weapons stockpiles and laser enrichment, which are the most important factors affecting both the near- and longer-term uranium markets, are discussed. (UK)

  11. Uranium

    Hamdoun, N.A.

    2007-01-01

    The article includes a historical preface about uranium, discovery of portability of sequential fission of uranium, uranium existence, basic raw materials, secondary raw materials, uranium's physical and chemical properties, uranium extraction, nuclear fuel cycle, logistics and estimation of the amount of uranium reserves, producing countries of concentrated uranium oxides and percentage of the world's total production, civilian and military uses of uranium. The use of depleted uranium in the Gulf War, the Balkans and Iraq has caused political and environmental effects which are complex, raising problems and questions about the effects that nuclear compounds left on human health and environment.

  12. Adsorption of uranium on adsorbents produced from used tires

    Mahramanlioglu, M.

    2003-01-01

    Potential use of adsorbents produced from used tires for the removal of uranium from aqueous solutions is investigated. Two different adsorbents were used including char and activated carbon produced from used tires. The surface area was larger on activated carbon. Adsorption experiments were carried out as a function of time, adsorbent concentration, pH and initial concentration of uranium. The adsorption kinetics was found to follow the Lagergren equation. The rate constants of intraparticle diffusion and mass transfer coefficients were calculated. It was shown that the equilibrium data could be fitted by the Langmuir and Freundlich equations. The adsorption of uranium in the presence of different cations were also studied and the results were correlated with the ionic potential of the cations. It was demonstrated that the activated carbon produced from used tires can be considered as an adsorbent that has a commercial potential for uranium removal. (author)

  13. Performance profiles of major energy producers 1989

    1991-01-23

    Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1989 is the thirteenth annual report of the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) Financial Reporting System (FRS). The report examines financial and operating developments, with particular reference to the 23 major energy companies (the FRS companies'') required to report annually on Form EIA-28. Financial information is reported by major lines of business including oil and gas production, petroleum refining and marketing, and other energy operations. Domestic and international operations are examined separately in this report. It also traces key developments affecting the financial performance of major energy companies in 1989, as well as review of important trends.

  14. Performance profiles of major energy producers, 1991

    1992-01-01

    Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1991 is the fifteenth annual report of the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) Financial Reporting System (FRS). The report examines financial and operating developments, with particular reference to the 23 major energy companies (the FRS companies) required to report annually on Form EIA-28. It also traces key developments affecting the financial performance of major energy companies in 1991, as well as reviews important trends. Financial information is reported by major lines of business including oil and gas production, petroleum refining and marketing, and other energy operations. Domestic and international operations are examined separately in this report

  15. Performance profiles of major energy producers 1992

    1994-01-01

    Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1992 is the sixteenth annual report of the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) Financial Reporting System (FRS). The report examines financial and operating developments, with particular reference to the 25 major energy companies (the FRS companies) required to report annually on Form EIA-28. Financial information is reported by major lines of business, including oil and gas production, petroleum refining and marketing, and other energy operations. Domestic and international operations are examined separately in this report. The data are presented in the context of key energy market developments with a view toward identifying changing strategies of corporate development and measuring the apparent success of current ongoing operations

  16. Performance profiles of major energy producers 1994

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1994 is the eighteenth annual report of the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) Financial Reporting System (FRS). The report examines financial and operating developments in energy markets, with particular reference to the 24 major U.S. energy companies required to report annually on Form EIA-28. Financial information is reported by major lines of business, including oil and gas production, petroleum refining and marketing, other energy operations, and nonenergy businesses. Financial and operating results are presented in the context of energy market developments with a view toward identifying changing corporate strategies and measuring the performance of ongoing operations both in the United States and abroad.

  17. Performance profiles of major energy producers 1993

    NONE

    1995-01-01

    Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1993 is the seventeenth annual report of the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) Financial Reporting System (FRS). The report examines financial and operating developments in energy markets, with particular reference to the 25 major US energy companies required to report annually on Form EIA-28. Financial information is reported by major liens of business, including oil and gas production, petroleum refining and marketing, other energy operations, and nonenergy businesses. Financial and operating results are presented in the context of energy market developments with a view toward identifying changing corporate strategies and measuring the performance of ongoing operations both in the US and abroad. This year`s report analyzes financial and operating developments for 1993 (Part 1: Developments in 1993) and also reviews key developments during the 20 years following the Arab Oil Embargo of 1973--1974 (Part 2: Major Energy Company Strategies Since the Arab Oil Embargo). 49 figs., 104 tabs.

  18. Performance profiles of major energy producers 1996

    1998-01-01

    This publication examines developments in the operations of the major US e energy-producing companies on a corporate level, by major line of business, by major function within each line of business, and by geographic area. In 1996, 24 companies filed Form EIA-28. The analysis and data presented in this report represents the operations of the Financial Reporting System companies in the context of their worldwide operations and in the context of the major energy markets which they serve. Both energy and nonenergy developments of these companies are analyzed. Although the focus is on developments in 1996, important trends prior to that time are also featured. Sections address energy markets in 1996; key financial developments; oil and gas exploration, development, and production; downstream petroleum in 1996; coal and alternative energy; and foreign direct investment in US energy. 30 figs., 104 tabs

  19. Performance profiles of major energy producers 1996

    NONE

    1998-01-01

    This publication examines developments in the operations of the major US e energy-producing companies on a corporate level, by major line of business, by major function within each line of business, and by geographic area. In 1996, 24 companies filed Form EIA-28. The analysis and data presented in this report represents the operations of the Financial Reporting System companies in the context of their worldwide operations and in the context of the major energy markets which they serve. Both energy and nonenergy developments of these companies are analyzed. Although the focus is on developments in 1996, important trends prior to that time are also featured. Sections address energy markets in 1996; key financial developments; oil and gas exploration, development, and production; downstream petroleum in 1996; coal and alternative energy; and foreign direct investment in US energy. 30 figs., 104 tabs.

  20. Uranium leaching using mixed organic acids produced by Aspergillus niger

    Yong-dong Wang; Guang-yue Li; De-xin Ding; Zhi-xiang Zhou; Qin-wen Deng; Nan Hu; Yan Tan

    2013-01-01

    Both of culture temperature and pH value had impacts on the degree of uranium extraction through changing types and concentrations of mixed organic acids produced by Aspergillus niger, and significant interactions existed between them though pH value played a leading role. And with the change of pH value of mixed organic acids, the types and contents of mixed organic acids changed and impacted on the degree of uranium extraction, especially oxalic acid, citric acid and malic acid. The mean degree of uranium extraction rose to peak when the culture temperature was 25 deg C (76.14 %) and pH value of mixed organic acids was 2.3 (82.40 %) respectively. And the highest one was 83.09 %. The optimal culture temperature (25 deg C) of A. niger for uranium leaching was different from the most appropriate growing temperature (37 deg C). (author)

  1. Uranium

    Gabelman, J.W.; Chenoweth, W.L.; Ingerson, E.

    1981-01-01

    The uranium production industry is well into its third recession during the nuclear era (since 1945). Exploration is drastically curtailed, and many staffs are being reduced. Historical market price production trends are discussed. A total of 3.07 million acres of land was acquired for exploration; drastic decrease. Surface drilling footage was reduced sharply; an estimated 250 drill rigs were used by the uranium industry during 1980. Land acquisition costs increased 8%. The domestic reserve changes are detailed by cause: exploration, re-evaluation, or production. Two significant discoveries of deposits were made in Mohave County, Arizona. Uranium production during 1980 was 21,850 short tons U 3 O 8 ; an increase of 17% from 1979. Domestic and foreign exploration highlights were given. Major producing areas for the US are San Juan basin, Wyoming basins, Texas coastal plain, Paradox basin, northeastern Washington, Henry Mountains, Utah, central Colorado, and the McDermitt caldera in Nevada and Oregon. 3 figures, 8 tables

  2. Performance profiles of major energy producers 1992

    1994-01-13

    Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1992 is the sixteenth annual report of the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) Financial Reporting System (FRS). The report examines financial and operating developments, with particular reference to the 25 major energy companies (the FRS companies) required to report annually on Form EIA-28. Financial information is reported by major lines of business, including oil and gas production, petroleum refining and marketing, and other energy operations. Domestic and international operations are examined separately in this report. The data are presented in the context of key energy market developments with a view toward identifying changing strategies of corporate development and measuring the apparent success of current ongoing operations.

  3. Process for producing uranium carbide spheroids

    Shennan, J.V.; Ford, L.H.

    1976-01-01

    The invention deals with a method to produce UC spheroids which are filled into molded bodies of fire-proof material for fuel elements. The UC fuel particles are doubly coated: a first thin layer of pyrolytic carbon is coated at low temperature (1,200-1,400 0 C), a second layer of fire-proof material (e.g. SiC) is coated at a higher temperature (above 1,500 0 C) which holds back the fission products. The process is explained in more detail using an example. (GSCH) [de

  4. Performance profiles of major energy producers, 1997

    NONE

    1999-01-01

    The energy industry generally and petroleum and natural gas operations in particular are frequently reacting to a variety of unsettling forces. Falling oil prices, economic upswings, currency devaluations, increasingly rigorous environmental quality standards, deregulation of electricity markets, and continued advances in exploration and production technology were among the challenges and opportunities to the industry in 1997. To analyze the extent to which these and other developments have affected energy industry financial and operating performance, strategies, and industry structure, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) maintains the Financial Reporting Systems (FRS). Through Form EIA-28, major US energy companies annually report to the FRS. Financial and operating information is reported by major lines of business, including oil and gas production (upstream), petroleum refining and marketing (downstream), other energy operations, and nonenergy business. Performance Profiles of Major Producers 1997 examines the interplays of energy markets, companies` strategies, and government policies (in 1997 and in historical context) that gave rise to the results given here. The report also analyzes other key aspects of energy company financial performance as seen through the multifaceted lens provided by the FRS data and complementary data for industry overall. 41 figs., 77 tabs.

  5. Uranium

    Mackay, G.A.

    1978-01-01

    The author discusses the contribution made by various energy sources in the production of electricity. Estimates are made of the future nuclear contribution, the future demand for uranium and future sales of Australian uranium. Nuclear power growth in the United States, Japan and Western Europe is discussed. The present status of the six major Australian uranium deposits (Ranger, Jabiluka, Nabarlek, Koongarra, Yeelerrie and Beverley) is given. Australian legislation relevant to the uranium mining industry is also outlined

  6. Geology and structure of major uranium-bearing zones in India and their exploration

    Nagabhushana, J.C.; Vasudeva Rao, M.; Sahasrabudhe, G.H.; Krishnamoorthy, B.; Suryanarayana Rao, C.; Rama Rao, Y.N.

    1976-01-01

    Radiogeologic, lithostratigraphic, tectonic, and crustal evolutionary considerations have enabled the recognition of three major uranium provinces in India: the Singhbhum Province in the north-east; the Rajasthan Province in the north-west; and the Madhya Pradesh Province in central India. The paper describes the salient features of the three uranium provinces, with particular emphasis on their structural set-up, magmatectonics, and the controls of uranium mineralization, and presents a few recent case histories of individual deposits (Bagjata and Turamdih in Singhbhum, and Dhabi-Dumhat in Madhya Pradesh) discovered by integrated exploration techniques. The three uranium provinces are related to major deep-seated faults: the Singhbhum Province lies at the arcuate north-east end of the deep fault of the Eastern Ghats; the Rajasthan Province parallels the great boundary fault; and the Madhya Pradesh Province aligns with the Mahanadi-Son rift system. Some of the plausible explanations for these remarkable features are: localization of uranium ore during episodes of crustal fracturing in Precambrian times; reactivation and rejuvenation of favourable basement structures; and the role of local 'hot spots' (aided by compressional and vertical tectonics) in crustal zones anomalously enriched in the heat-producing elements. Uranium exploration strategy in India during the last three decades reveals two significant trends - the application of conventional radiometric techniques during the period 1950-65; and introduction of sophisticated methodology comprising non-radiometric geophysical techniques, emanometry, aerial and car-borne gamma-ray spectrometry, geochemical surveys, and photogeological techniques as supplements to conventional radiometry, during the period 1965-75. It is concluded that extension of such integrated exploration techniques to favourable virgin terrains in India would lead to newer and richer uranium ore discoveries. (author)

  7. Major uranium provinces: Yilgarn block and Gascoyne Province, Western Australia

    Butt, C.R.M.

    1988-01-01

    The Archaean Yilgarn Block and the adjacent Proterozoic Gascoyne Province, Western Australia, form the basement and source rocks for numerous occurrences of surficial uranium mineralization, the largest being the Yeelirrie deposit (35 million tonnes at 0.15% U 3 O 8 ). The mineralization, almost exclusively in the form of carnotite, has been deposited in the regolith and appears to be less than 1 Ma old, with some deposits still forming. The nature and distribution of the mineralization are controlled by basement and surface geology, geomorphology, hydrology and climate, being restricted to deeply weathered, semi-arid terrain with granitoid source rocks. A few small occurrences in the Gascoyne Province may be pedogenic in origin but the majority, in the north of Yilgarn Block, occur in unrejuvenated palaeodrainage channels now choked by colluvial, alluvial and chemical sediments. These sediments, which are aquifers for the present, predominantly sub-surface, drainage, can exceed 10-15 m. Uranium released from the weathering granitoids has been transported in groundwaters in uranyl carbonate complexes and precipitated as carnotite where, (i) concentrations of uranium and potassium have been elevated by evaporation and, (ii) dissolved vanadium has been oxidized to the 5-valent state. Precipitation is in calcretes and associated sediments in the drainage axes, in 'chemical deltas' where the drainages enter playas and in the playas themselves. This style of mineralization was first recognized in 1969-1970 as the result of investigations into the source of radiometric anomalies delineated by airborne surveys. The majority of discoveries have similarly been by radiometric surveys but hydrogeochemical surveys have promise and may become important in future search for blind mineralization and/or young deposits not in radioactive equilibrium. (author). 61 refs, 6 figs

  8. Performance profiles of major energy producers 1979

    1981-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to examine year-to-year developments in the operations of 26 major US energy companies on a corporate level and also by major line of energy business and by major functions within each line of business. The period covered is 1977 to 1979. Comparisons of income and investment flow are featured and related to functionally allocated net investment in place. The presentation seeks to identify similarities and dissimilarities in results across lines-of-business activity or by firm size

  9. Biogenic non-crystalline U(IV) revealed as major component in uranium ore deposits

    Bhattacharyya, Amrita; Campbell, Kate M.; Kelly, Shelly D.; Roebbert, Yvonne; Weyer, Stefan; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan; Borch, Thomas

    2017-06-01

    Historically, it is believed that crystalline uraninite, produced via the abiotic reduction of hexavalent uranium (U(VI)) is the dominant reduced U species formed in low-temperature uranium roll-front ore deposits. Here we show that non-crystalline U(IV) generated through biologically mediated U(VI) reduction is the predominant U(IV) species in an undisturbed U roll-front ore deposit in Wyoming, USA. Characterization of U species revealed that the majority (~58-89%) of U is bound as U(IV) to C-containing organic functional groups or inorganic carbonate, while uraninite and U(VI) represent only minor components. The uranium deposit exhibited mostly 238U-enriched isotope signatures, consistent with largely biotic reduction of U(VI) to U(IV). This finding implies that biogenic processes are more important to uranium ore genesis than previously understood. The predominance of a relatively labile form of U(IV) also provides an opportunity for a more economical and environmentally benign mining process, as well as the design of more effective post-mining restoration strategies and human health-risk assessment.

  10. Performance profiles of major energy producers 1995, January 1997

    NONE

    1997-02-01

    This publication examines developments in the operations of the major U.S. energy-producing companies on a corporate level, by major line of business, by major function within each line of business, and by geographic area.

  11. Performance profiles of major energy producers 1995, January 1997

    1997-01-01

    This publication examines developments in the operations of the major U.S. energy-producing companies on a corporate level, by major line of business, by major function within each line of business, and by geographic area

  12. Aerosols produced by evaporation of a uranium wire

    Morel, C.

    1968-03-01

    This work is devoted to the study of the aerosols formed when an uranium wire is evaporated in a normal or rarefied atmosphere, either with or without a drying agent. The heating of the wire can be either fast or slow. The first part is a study of aerosol production apparatus and of methods of measuring the aerosol. The second part presents the results obtained with various aerosols: the particles produced by the wire are less than one micron; during rapid heating, the granulometric distribution of the aerosol obeys a log-normal law; during slow heating, the distribution has two modes: one near 0.05 micron, the other close to 0.01 micron. (author) [fr

  13. Uranium

    Williams, R M

    1976-01-01

    Evidence of expanding markets, improved prices and the short supply of uranium became abundantly clear in 1975, providing the much needed impetus for widespread activity in all phases of uranium operations. Exploration activity that had been at low levels in recent years in Canada was evident in most provinces as well as the Northwest Territories. All producers were in the process of expanding their uranium-producing facilities. Canada's Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) by year-end had authorized the export of over 73,000 tons of U/sub 3/0/sub 8/ all since September 1974, when the federal government announced its new uranium export guidelines. World production, which had been in the order of 25,000 tons of U/sub 3/0/sub 8/ annually, was expected to reach about 28,000 tons in 1975, principally from increased output in the United States.

  14. Major geological events and uranium metallogenesis in South-west China

    Zhang Chengjiang; Xu Zhengqi; Ni Shijun; Chen Youliang

    2012-01-01

    Uranium is widely distributed in South-west China, with all types but on a not-so-large scale. South-west China is located on the combining site of several large tectonic elements and every tectonic movement has different effects on different regions. To study and clarify the correlation between the major geological events in South-west China and the Uranium metallogenesis, comprehensive research and field investigation are made besides collecting a lot of materials. Through analysis and research on the major geological events in South-west China, the evolution of those e vents is basically clarified and the events closely related with uranium mineralization are determined. It is discovered that there are several ore-forming geologic events in the geological history of South-west China; almost every major tectonic movement cycle is accompanied with uranium metallogenesis, from Jinning Movement to Chengjiang Movement, to Hercynian Movement, to Indosinian Movement. to Yanshan Movement. to Himalayan movement. Even though every major tectonic cycle is accompanied with uranium mineralization, three major geological events are generally obviously related with uranium metallogenesis, i.e. the Rodinian supercontinent breakup even in Jinning-Chengjiang Period, Yanshan Movement and Himalayan movement, in which the first one is the process of uranium pre-enrichment and provides the source of uranium. Yanshan Movement and Himalayan movement are the important processes for mineralization, mainly the hydrothermal superimposed mineralization. (authors)

  15. Planning for a major expansion of the olympic dam copper/uranium resource in South Australia

    Higgins, R. J.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Full text: The polymetallic Olympic Dam deposit in northern South Australia contains the world's largest known economic uranium resource. The current resource estimate is 3,970 million tones at 0.4 kg/t U308. Uranium is a co-product of an existing operation that also produces copper, gold and silver. Production began in 1998. Ore mined in 2006 is expected to be close to 10 million tones to produce 4,500 tonnes of uranium oxide and 220,000 tonnes of copper cathode. BHP Billiton is undertaking a pre-feasibility study into expanding annual production capacity to about 15,000 tonnes of uranium and 500,000 tonnes copper. Subject to successful completion of the pre-feasibility study and a final feasibility study, construction of the expansion could begin by early 2009, with the expanded production capacity being commissioned in 2013. The resource estimate has been significantly increased by drilling of the so-far undeveloped southern section of the orebody. Current planning indicates that this section could be mined by open pit. Ore is at depth and extends from 350 metres to about 1000 metres below surface. The existing operations facilities at Olympic Dam comprise an underground mine, and a mineral processing plant and associated infrastructure which would be expanded to support expanded mining. Major items of infrastructure could include a new powerline, water pipeline and associated coastal desalination plant, a rail link to Olympic Dam from the existing national network and further development of the Roxby Downs township (current population 4,000). The operation is regulated by an Indenture Agreement with the South Australian Government. To enable the expansion to proceed, the Indenture Agreement will be renegotiated. The operation is also regulated by the Federal Government. An Environmental Impact Statement is being developed to secure the necessary State and Federal approvals. A land access agreement is being negotiated with indigenous groups. Plans for

  16. A density functional theory study of uranium-doped thoria and uranium adatoms on the major surfaces of thorium dioxide

    Shields, Ashley E. [Department of Chemistry, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom); Santos-Carballal, David [School of Chemistry, Cardiff University, Main Building, Park Place, Cardiff CF10 3AT (United Kingdom); Leeuw, Nora H. de, E-mail: DeLeeuwN@Cardiff.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom); School of Chemistry, Cardiff University, Main Building, Park Place, Cardiff CF10 3AT (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-15

    Thorium dioxide is of significant research interest for its use as a nuclear fuel, particularly as part of mixed oxide fuels. We present the results of a density functional theory (DFT) study of uranium-substituted thorium dioxide, where we found that increasing levels of uranium substitution increases the covalent nature of the bonding in the bulk ThO{sub 2} crystal. Three low Miller index surfaces have been simulated and we propose the Wulff morphology for a ThO{sub 2} particle and STM images for the (100), (110), and (111) surfaces studied in this work. We have also calculated the adsorption of a uranium atom and the U adatom is found to absorb strongly on all three surfaces, with particular preference for the less stable (100) and (110) surfaces, thus providing a route to the incorporation of uranium into a growing thoria particle. - Highlights: • Uranium substitution in ThO{sub 2} is found to increase the covalent nature of the ionic bonding. • The (111), (110), and (100) surfaces of ThO{sub 2} are studied and the particle morphology is proposed. • STM images of the (111), (110), and (100) surfaces of ThO{sub 2} are simulated. • Uranium adsorption on the major surfaces of ThO{sub 2} is studied.

  17. Producer-consumer collaboration only way to stable future uranium market

    Marshall, P

    1976-07-01

    Points from speakers at the Uranium Institute's Symposium on supply and demand in London are presented. The main theme of the conference was that of international co-operation particularly between producers and consumers. Several delegates commented on possible constraints on production by growing governmental regulations. Among the many other topics referred to was the reliability of forecasts of uranium resources.

  18. Proterozoic rifting and major unconformities in Rajasthan, and their implications for uranium mineralisation

    Sinha-Roy, S.

    2004-01-01

    Evolution of the Precambrian terrain in Rajasthan has taken place via crustal consolidation of the basement at ca. 2.9 Ga, its cratonisation at ca. 2.5 Ga, through protracted tectonostratigraphic evolution of the Proterozoic cover sequences, following repeated rifting and Wilson cycles in the Aravalli and Delhi foldbelts. Consequently, the Proterozoic rift basins are characterised by growth faults and pull-aparts, and multitier volcanose dimentary sequences that contain a number of unconformities and stratigraphic breaks. The Archaean basement of the Mewar terrain that witnessed end-Archaean K-magmatism and ductile shearing, led to the creation of a possible uranium province, namely uranium enriched basement. This province acted as the source of remobilised uranium and its concentration at suitable multilevel structural and stratigraphic traps within the Proterozoic rift basins to give rise to unconformity-related syngenetic uranium mineralisation. Late Neoproterozoic to Pan-African tectonothermal reworking of the basement rocks produced fracture zones and caused Na-metasomatism giving rise to albitite-related uranium mineralisation. Based on an analysis of Proterozoic rift kinematics and lithofacies characteristics, five possible uranium-enriched stratigraphic horizons have been identified in the Aravalli and its equivalent sequences as well as in the North Delhi foldbelt sequences. From a regional synthesis, ten possible uranium metallogenic events, spanning ca. 2.5-0.5 Ga, are recognised in Rajasthan. These uranium events have predictive value for delineation of target areas for exploration. (author)

  19. Uranium producer region of Lagoa Real, Brazil. Guarantee of supply of uranium concentrated (DUA) for the brazilian needs

    Matos, Evandro Carele de; Franco, Jamyle Praxedes

    2008-01-01

    This work focus at the Uranium Province of Lagoa Real, notably considering the geological reserves of uranium already defined (100,000 tones of U 3 O 8 ) and the respective autonomy in providing raw material needed for making fuel elements. The province, based on geo economical parameters, supported by three main vectors (geological model/grade, mining/process route, investment/finance) has been elected to supply the required brazilian demand. Supplying of uranium for the brazilian power plants is in charge of Industrias Nucleares do Brasil - INB and is based on national production. Thus the Industrial Complex of Caetite has been implemented in the state of Bahia, aiming primarily to supply the needs of Angra 1 and Angra 2 power plants. This new production center has the capacity of producing up to 400 tones/yr. of U 3 O 8 . (author)

  20. The relationship between uranium distribution and some major crustal features in Canada

    Darnley, A.G.

    1982-01-01

    The availability of reconnaissance scale geochemical maps for large areas of Canada enables spatial associations between major crustal structures and surface uranium content to be identified. Maps of the distribution of uranium for an area greater than 2 million km 2 compiled from airborne gamma-ray spectrometry data are supplemented by maps for uranium, based on stream and lake sediment and some bore hole sampling. These are examined in relation to gravity, aeromagnetic and geological maps. The radioelement distribution can be related in detail to exposed bedrock and surface geology, but in addition there is evidence of the control of uranium distribution by major structural features which are marked by granitoids containing elevated levels of radioelements; several of these granitoids are associated with large negative Bouguer gravity anomalies. The distribution of such granitoids appears to be related to 'megashears', as in the case of the South Mountain batholith in Nova Scotia, or zones of tension. A belt of uranium enrichment, the Athabasca axis which is characterized by uraniferous granitoids with negative Bouguer gravity anomalies and associated tension faulting extends 2500 km northeastward from Edmonton, Alberta to the Melville Peninsula. This structure passes under the Athabasca basin which contains many large uranium deposits. (author)

  1. A preliminary characterisation of recovered uranium produced by MDR

    Kwon, Hyuk Il; Davison, J.; Marsh, G.

    1997-10-01

    The CANFLEX-RU fuel to be developed for the future should be verified if it has any major problems in RU handling techniques and related technology development. For this purpose, a preliminary R and D efforts on the RU handling characteristics were executed by joint effort with BNFL in following area. 1) preparation of RU powder by the MDR process 2) Compaction and sintering characteristics of RU powder 3) required special process for the production of CANFLEX-RU fuel 4) characterization of fission product residue composition in the RU powder 5) radiological characterization of RU powder and sintered pellets. Physical characterization of RU UO 2 powder and pellet produced by the MDR process were similar with those of NU UO 2 powder and pellet. The density of RU pellets, however, were higher than those of NU pellets and RU pellets showed little higher values in pore size distributions. RU contained only negligibly low concentrations of fission products and actinides. Especially, the Cs-137 content in the powder (before sintering) were undetectable and therefore would not contaminate the sintering furnace. RU pellet showed higher impurity levels, especially in the Ni content. Radioactivity on the RU powder showed about twice higher value at the surface than those of NU, but showed drastic reduction by distance and became similar at the 1 meter distance. RU pellets showed close coincidence between NU and RU at any distance. This result could be used close coincidence between NU and RU at any distance. This result could be used as a basis of the feasibility assessment on the development of CANFLEX-RU. Through basic research works on the improvement of CANFLEX-RU fabrication processes, compatibility with CANFLEX-NU fabrication process will be evaluated and analysed. (author). 4 refs

  2. A preliminary characterisation of recovered uranium produced by MDR

    Kwon, Hyuk Il [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Daeduk (Korea, Republic of); Davison, J.; Marsh, G. [British Nuclear Forum, London (United Kingdom)

    1997-10-01

    The CANFLEX-RU fuel to be developed for the future should be verified if it has any major problems in RU handling techniques and related technology development. For this purpose, a preliminary R and D efforts on the RU handling characteristics were executed by joint effort with BNFL in following area. 1) preparation of RU powder by the MDR process 2) Compaction and sintering characteristics of RU powder 3) required special process for the production of CANFLEX-RU fuel 4) characterization of fission product residue composition in the RU powder 5) radiological characterization of RU powder and sintered pellets. Physical characterization of RU UO{sub 2} powder and pellet produced by the MDR process were similar with those of NU UO{sub 2} powder and pellet. The density of RU pellets, however, were higher than those of NU pellets and RU pellets showed little higher values in pore size distributions. RU contained only negligibly low concentrations of fission products and actinides. Especially, the Cs-137 content in the powder (before sintering) were undetectable and therefore would not contaminate the sintering furnace. RU pellet showed higher impurity levels, especially in the Ni content. Radioactivity on the RU powder showed about twice higher value at the surface than those of NU, but showed drastic reduction by distance and became similar at the 1 meter distance. RU pellets showed close coincidence between NU and RU at any distance. This result could be used close coincidence between NU and RU at any distance. This result could be used as a basis of the feasibility assessment on the development of CANFLEX-RU. Through basic research works on the improvement of CANFLEX-RU fabrication processes, compatibility with CANFLEX-NU fabrication process will be evaluated and analysed. (author). 4 refs.

  3. Recovery of uranium from an irradiated solid target after removal of molybdenum-99 produced from the irradiated target

    Reilly, Sean Douglas; May, Iain; Copping, Roy; Dale, Gregory Edward

    2017-10-17

    A process for minimizing waste and maximizing utilization of uranium involves recovering uranium from an irradiated solid target after separating the medical isotope product, molybdenum-99, produced from the irradiated target. The process includes irradiating a solid target comprising uranium to produce fission products comprising molybdenum-99, and thereafter dissolving the target and conditioning the solution to prepare an aqueous nitric acid solution containing irradiated uranium. The acidic solution is then contacted with a solid sorbent whereby molybdenum-99 remains adsorbed to the sorbent for subsequent recovery. The uranium passes through the sorbent. The concentrations of acid and uranium are then adjusted to concentrations suitable for crystallization of uranyl nitrate hydrates. After inducing the crystallization, the uranyl nitrate hydrates are separated from a supernatant. The process results in the purification of uranyl nitrate hydrates from fission products and other contaminants. The uranium is therefore available for reuse, storage, or disposal.

  4. Melittin, the Major Pain-Producing Substance of Bee Venom.

    Chen, Jun; Guan, Su-Min; Sun, Wei; Fu, Han

    2016-06-01

    Melittin is a basic 26-amino-acid polypeptide that constitutes 40-60% of dry honeybee (Apis mellifera) venom. Although much is known about its strong surface activity on lipid membranes, less is known about its pain-producing effects in the nervous system. In this review, we provide lines of accumulating evidence to support the hypothesis that melittin is the major pain-producing substance of bee venom. At the psychophysical and behavioral levels, subcutaneous injection of melittin causes tonic pain sensation and pain-related behaviors in both humans and animals. At the cellular level, melittin activates primary nociceptor cells through direct and indirect effects. On one hand, melittin can selectively open thermal nociceptor transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor channels via phospholipase A2-lipoxygenase/cyclooxygenase metabolites, leading to depolarization of primary nociceptor cells. On the other hand, algogens and inflammatory/pro-inflammatory mediators released from the tissue matrix by melittin's pore-forming effects can activate primary nociceptor cells through both ligand-gated receptor channels and the G-protein-coupled receptor-mediated opening of transient receptor potential canonical channels. Moreover, subcutaneous melittin up-regulates Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 subunits, resulting in the enhancement of tetrodotoxin-resistant Na(+) currents and the generation of long-term action potential firing. These nociceptive responses in the periphery finally activate and sensitize the spinal dorsal horn pain-signaling neurons, resulting in spontaneous nociceptive paw flinches and pain hypersensitivity to thermal and mechanical stimuli. Taken together, it is concluded that melittin is the major pain-producing substance of bee venom, by which peripheral persistent pain and hyperalgesia (or allodynia), primary nociceptive neuronal sensitization, and CNS synaptic plasticity (or metaplasticity) can be readily induced and the molecular and cellular mechanisms

  5. Uranium-Molybdenum particles produced by electro-erosion

    Cabanillas, Edgardo D.; Lopez, Marisol; Pasqualini, Enrique E.; Lombardo, D. J. C.

    2003-01-01

    We have produced spheroidal U-Mo particles by the electro-erosion method using pure water as dielectric. The particles were characterised by optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS-EDAX) and X-ray diffraction. Spheroidal UO 2 particles with a peculiar distribution size were obtained with two distribution centred at 10 and 70 μm. The obtained particles have central inclusions of U and Mo compounds. (author)

  6. Uranium

    Cuney, M.; Pagel, M.; Leroy, J.

    1992-01-01

    First, this book presents the physico-chemical properties of Uranium and the consequences which can be deduced from the study of numerous geological process. The authors describe natural distribution of Uranium at different scales and on different supports, and main Uranium minerals. A great place in the book is assigned to description and classification of uranium deposits. The book gives also notions on prospection and exploitation of uranium deposits. Historical aspects of Uranium economical development (Uranium resources, production, supply and demand, operating costs) are given in the last chapter. 7 refs., 17 figs

  7. WISMUT AG: Past, present and future of the largest uranium producer in Europe

    Madel, J.

    1990-01-01

    The author gives a brief summary of WISMUT AG the largest uranium producer operating in Europe. The jointly owned German-Soviet company operates its production facilities in the southern part of the former German Democratic Republic. Given the new political and economic frame in Germany and the Soviet Union WISMUT AG will receive due recognition. Uranium exploration, mining, and milling activities are summarized from 1946-1989, and a summary of present activities and projections of future activities in the area of decontamination, restoration, and recultivation of present and abandoned mining and milling sites are noted. A statement of WISMUT AG's projected role in the international nuclear fuels market is made

  8. Direct isotope ratio measurement of uranium metal by emission spectrometry on a laser-produced plasma

    Pietsch, W.; Petit, A.; Briand, A.

    1995-01-01

    The method of Optical Emission Spectrometry on a Laser-Produced Plasma (OES/LPP) at reduced pressure has been studied for the determination of the uranium isotope ratio ( 235 U/ 238 U). Spectral profiles of the investigated transition U-II 424.437 nm show the possibility to obtain an isotopic spectral resolution in a laser-produced plasma under exactly defined experimental conditions. Spectroscopic data and results are presented. (author)

  9. Exopolysaccharide produced by Enterobacter sp. YG4 reduces uranium induced nephrotoxicity.

    K, Nagaraj; Devasya, Rekha Punchapady; Bhagwath, Arun Ananthapadmanabha

    2016-01-01

    Uranium nephrotoxicity is a health concern with very few treatment options. Bacterial exopolysaccharides (EPS) possess multiple biological activities and appear as prospective candidates for treating uranium nephrotoxicity. This study focuses on the ability of an EPS produced by a bacterial strain Enterobacter sp. YG4 to reduce uranium nephrotoxicity in vivo. This bacterium was isolated from the gut contents of a slug Laevicaulis alte (Férussac). Based on the aniline blue staining reaction and infrared spectral analysis, the EPS was identified as β-glucan and its molecular weight was 11.99×10(6)Da. The EPS showed hydroxyl radical scavenging ability and total antioxidant capacity in vitro. To assess the protection provided by the EPS against uranium nephrotoxicity, a single dose of 2mg/kg uranyl nitrate was injected intraperitoneally to albino Wistar rats. As intervention, the EPS was administered orally (100mg/kg/day) for 4 consecutive days. The rats were sacrificed on the fifth day and analyses were conducted. Increased serum creatinine and urea nitrogen levels and histopathological alterations in kidneys were observed in uranyl nitrate treated animals. All these alterations were reduced with the administration of Enterobacter sp. YG4 EPS, emphasizing a novel approach in treating uranium nephrotoxicity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Uranium

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    The article briefly discusses the Australian government policy and the attitude of political party factions towards the mining and exporting of the uranium resources in Australia. Australia has a third of the Western World's low-cost uranium resources

  11. Uranium

    Poty, B.; Cuney, M.; Bruneton, P.; Virlogeux, D.; Capus, G.

    2010-01-01

    With the worldwide revival of nuclear energy comes the question of uranium reserves. For more than 20 years, nuclear energy has been neglected and uranium prospecting has been practically abandoned. Therefore, present day production covers only 70% of needs and stocks are decreasing. Production is to double by 2030 which represents a huge industrial challenge. The FBR-type reactors technology, which allows to consume the whole uranium content of the fuel, is developing in several countries and will ensure the long-term development of nuclear fission. However, the implementation of these reactors (the generation 4) will be progressive during the second half of the 21. century. For this reason an active search for uranium ores will be necessary during the whole 21. century to ensure the fueling of light water reactors which are huge uranium consumers. This dossier covers all the aspects of natural uranium production: mineralogy, geochemistry, types of deposits, world distribution of deposits with a particular attention given to French deposits, the exploitation of which is abandoned today. Finally, exploitation, ore processing and the economical aspects are presented. Contents: 1 - the uranium element and its minerals: from uranium discovery to its industrial utilization, the main uranium minerals (minerals with tetravalent uranium, minerals with hexavalent uranium); 2 - uranium in the Earth's crust and its geochemical properties: distribution (in sedimentary rocks, in magmatic rocks, in metamorphic rocks, in soils and vegetation), geochemistry (uranium solubility and valence in magmas, uranium speciation in aqueous solution, solubility of the main uranium minerals in aqueous solution, uranium mobilization and precipitation); 3 - geology of the main types of uranium deposits: economical criteria for a deposit, structural diversity of deposits, classification, world distribution of deposits, distribution of deposits with time, superficial deposits, uranium

  12. Uranium

    1982-01-01

    The development, prospecting, research, processing and marketing of South Africa's uranium industry and the national policies surrounding this industry form the headlines of this work. The geology of South Africa's uranium occurences and their positions, the processes used in the extraction of South Africa's uranium and the utilisation of uranium for power production as represented by the Koeberg nuclear power station near Cape Town are included in this publication

  13. Uranium

    Stewart, E.D.J.

    1974-01-01

    A discussion is given of uranium as an energy source in The Australian economy. Figures and predictions are presented on the world supply-demand position and also figures are given on the added value that can be achieved by the processing of uranium. Conclusions are drawn about Australia's future policy with regard to uranium (R.L.)

  14. Uranium

    Toens, P.D.

    1981-03-01

    The geological setting of uranium resources in the world can be divided in two basic categories of resources and are defined as reasonably assured resources, estimated additional resources and speculative resources. Tables are given to illustrate these definitions. The increasing world production of uranium despite the cutback in the nuclear industry and the uranium requirements of the future concluded these lecture notes

  15. Aerosols produced by evaporation of a uranium wire; Aerosols produits par evaporation d'un fil d'uranium

    Morel, C [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-03-01

    This work is devoted to the study of the aerosols formed when an uranium wire is evaporated in a normal or rarefied atmosphere, either with or without a drying agent. The heating of the wire can be either fast or slow. The first part is a study of aerosol production apparatus and of methods of measuring the aerosol. The second part presents the results obtained with various aerosols: the particles produced by the wire are less than one micron; during rapid heating, the granulometric distribution of the aerosol obeys a log-normal law; during slow heating, the distribution has two modes: one near 0.05 micron, the other close to 0.01 micron. (author) [French] Ce travail est consacre a l'etude des aerosols formes lors de l'evaporation d un fil d'uranium en atmosphere normale ou rarefiee en presence ou non de dessechant. Le chauffage du fil peut etre rapide ou lent. La premiere partie est une etude des appareils de production et des methodes de mesures de l'aerosol. La seconde partie consigne les resultats obtenus sur les differents aerosols: les particules emises par le fil sont inferieures au micron; lors d'un chauffage rapide, la repartition granulometrique de l'aerosol suit une loi log-normale; lors d un chauffage lent, la repartition presente deux modes: l'un voisin de 0.05 micron, l'autre voisin de 0.01 micron. (auteur)

  16. Characteristics of plasma in uranium atomic beam produced by electron-beam heating

    Ohba, Hironori; Shibata, Takemasa

    2000-08-01

    The electron temperature of plasma and the ion flux ratio in the uranium atomic beam produced by electron-beam heating were characterized with Langmuir probes. The electron temperature was 0.13 eV, which was lower than the evaporation surface temperature. The ion flux ratio to atomic beam flux was more than 3% at higher evaporation rates. The ion flux ratio has increased with decreasing acceleration energy of the electron-beam under constant electron-beam power. This is because of an increase of electron-beam current and a large ionization cross-section of uranium by electron-impact. It was confined that the plasma is produced by electron-impact ionization of the evaporated atoms at the evaporation source. (author)

  17. Mine design for producing 100,000 tons per day of uranium-bearing Chattanooga Shale

    Hoe, H.L.

    1979-01-01

    Chattanooga Shale, underlying some 40,000 square miles in the southeastern United States, is considered to be a potentially large, low-grade source of uranium. The area in and near Dekalb County, Tennessee, appears to be the most likely site for commercial development. This paper deals with the mine design, mining procedures, equipment requirements, and operating maintenance costs for an underground mining complex capable of producing 100,000 tons of Chattanooga Shale per day for delivery to a beneficiation process

  18. Strike-slip pull-apart process and emplacement of Xiangshan uranium-producing volcanic basin

    Qiu Aijin; Guo Lingzhi; Shu Liangshu

    2001-01-01

    Xiangshan volcanic basin is one of the famous uranium-producing volcanic basins in China. Emplacement mechanism of Xiangshan uranium-producing volcanic basin is discussed on the basis of the latest research achievements of deep geology in Xiangshan area and the theory of continental dynamics. The study shows that volcanic activity in Xiangshan volcanic basin may be divided into two cycles, and its emplacement is controlled by strike-ship pull-apart process originated from the deep regional faults. Volcanic apparatus in the first cycle was emplaced in EW-trending structure activated by clockwise strike-slipping of NE-trending deep fault, forming the EW-trending fissure-type volcanic effusion belt. Volcanic apparatus in the second cycle was emplaced at junction points of SN-trending pull-apart structure activated by sinistral strike-slipping of NE-trending deep faults and EW-trending basement faults causing the center-type volcanic magma effusion and extrusion. Moreover, the formation mechanism of large-rich uranium deposits is discussed as well

  19. Discussion on the genesis of uranium-producing pegmatite in Shangdan area

    Mingyue, Feng [Beijing Research Inst. of Uranium Geology (China)

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the characteristics of uranium-producing pematite, gneissic granodiorite metamorphic rocks of the Qinling Group in such aspects as petrochemical compositions, contents of trace elements (Rb and Sr etc.), initial ratio of strontium isotopes and assemblage types of accessory minerals. Through the comparison between U-barren pegmatite within the massif and U-producing pegmatite outside the massif, and the study on Sm and Nd isotope tracers, a viewpoint is presented that the U-producing pegmatite veins resulted from slow crystallization of granitic magma under relatively confined condition produced from the selective melting of the Qinling Group metamorphic rocks rather than residual magmatic crystallization from the late-stage magmatic differentiation of gneissic granodiorite (T{sub DM} is about 10 Ma).

  20. Uranium

    Whillans, R.T.

    1981-01-01

    Events in the Canadian uranium industry during 1980 are reviewed. Mine and mill expansions and exploration activity are described, as well as changes in governmental policy. Although demand for uranium is weak at the moment, the industry feels optimistic about the future. (LL)

  1. Soil degradation by sulfuric acid disposition on uranium producing sites in south Bulgaria

    Atanasov, I.; Gribachev, P.

    1997-01-01

    This study assesses the damage of soils caused by spills of sulfuric acid solutions used for in situ leaching of uranium at eight uranium producing (by open-cast method) sites (total area of approximately 220 ha) in the region of Momino-Rakovski (South Bulgaria). The upper soil layer is cinnamonic pseudopodzolic ( or Eutric Planosols by FAO Legend, 1974). The results of the investigation show that the sulfuric acid spills caused strong acidification of upper (0-20 cm) and subsurface (20-60 cm) soil horizons which is expressed as decreasing of pH (H 2 O) to 2.9-3.5 and increasing of exchangeable H + and Al 3+ to 18 and 32% from CEC. Acid degradation of soils is combined with reducing of organic matter content. The average concentration of the total heavy metal content in the upper soil horizon (in ppm) is: Cd=1.5; Cu=30; Pb=25; Zn=40 and U=8. No significant differences were detected between the upper and subsurface soil layers . The heavy metal concentration did not exceed the Bulgarian standards for heavy metals and uranium content of soils. But the coarse texture of the top soil layers, the lack of carbonates, The low CEC and strong acidity determine a low buffering capacity of the investigated soils and this can be considered as hazardous for plants. This indicates that a future soil monitoring should be carried out in the region together with measures for neutralizing of soil acidity

  2. Evaluation of the uranium market and its consequences in the strategy of a nuclear fuel supplier that is also a uranium producer

    Esteves, R.G.

    2005-01-01

    On January 2005, the uranium spot market price reached the value of $21.00/lbU3O8. One month before, at the end of December, the average price was $20.70/lbU3O8 and in November the spot price registered $20.50. When we review this abstract, on July 2005, the price has reached $30.00/lbU3O8. In 1984, the uranium spot price dropped below the twenties and remained so reaching meanwhile even one-digit values, even considering that the uranium offer in this period was always below the demand. The main reason for that distortion in the market was and still is, the interference of the developing countries governments after the end of the cold war The Industrias Nucleares do Brasil - INB is in an odd situation in the market of fuel suppliers due to being also a uranium producer and in short future will also be an enrichment services supplier. This peculiar position brings additional advantages due to the flexibility to play with the uranium costs versus tail assay to optimize its nuclear fuel costs. That odd position, equivalent only in the market to AREVA, allows INB to exchange uranium by SWU and vice versa according to its uranium cost (not market sell price) and in the future to the SWU's costs obtaining a better margin that can not be reached by other fuel suppliers. In the first part of this paper it is evaluated, based on the recent market information, the consequences in the 2004 uranium spot price, expected to be more emphasized during 2005. This paper also evaluate the market mechanisms for expecting the price to cross the $40/lbU3O8 in short time The market supply mechanisms used up to now to fulfil the market deficit may be interrupted in case the developing countries governments stop the availability of the non civil uranium reserves from its stockpile. Different hypotheses for supplying the primary uranium deficit in this last case are analyzed in this work and evaluated its consequences. The solution of reducing the actual tails assay used aiming at

  3. Simple method for identifying doubly ionized uranium (U III) produced in a hollow-cathode discharge

    Piyakis, K.N.; Gagne, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    We have studied by emission spectroscopy the spectral properties of doubly ionized uranium, produced in a vapor generator of hollow-cathode design, as a function of the nature of a pure fill gas (helium, neon, argon, krypton, xenon) and its pressure. The spectral intensity is found to increase with increasing ionization potential of the discharge buffer gas, except in the case of helium. Based on our preliminary results, a simple and practical method for the positive identification of the complex U III spectrum is suggested

  4. The market share of non-US uranium producers under different US embargo scenarios

    Franks, W.A.

    1988-01-01

    The imposition of US restrictions on the use of foreign uranium has a potentially far reaching impact. This analysis examines various US import restriction scenarios and their impact on the market both inside and outside the USA. Specifically, the market share that the non-US producers would lose is estimated for a 50% embargo, a 62.5% embargo, and a 100% embargo, with and without the grandfathering of US utilities' foreign contracts. These results are then compared to what the market share would have been in a free market. The increase in the US market share is also briefly discussed. (author)

  5. Research on geochronology and uranium source of sandstone-hosted uranium ore-formation in major uranium-productive basins, Northern-China

    Xia Yuliang; Liu Hanbin; Lin Jinrong; Fan Guang; Hou Yanxian

    2004-12-01

    A method is developed for correcting uranium content in uranium ore samples by considering the U-Ra equilibrium coefficient, then a U-Pb isochron is drawn up. By performing the above correction ore-formation ages of sandstone-hosted uranium mineralization which may be more realistic have been obtained. The comparative research on U-Pb isotopic ages of detritic zircon in ore-hosting sandstone and zircon in intermediate-acid igneous rocks in corresponding provenance area indicates that the ore-hosting sandstone is originated from the erosion of intermediate-acid igneous rocks and the latters are the material basis for the formation of the uranium-rich sandstone beds. On the basis of the study on U-Pb isotopic system evolution of the provenance rocks and sandstones from ore-hosting series, it is verified that the uranium sources of the sandstone-hosted uranium deposit are: the intermediate-acid igneous rocks with high content of mobile uranium, and the sandstone bodies pre-concentrated uranium. (authors)

  6. Current reality and future perspective from a major producer

    Gauthier, P.; Cassidy, R.

    2006-01-01

    Is the hydrogen economy of the future just another fish story? Absolutely not! There have been many changes affecting the energy equation over the last 10 years and conditions have changed. In this presentation, we examined the reasons why, in the very near future, hydrogen production and distribution will be increasingly visible on many industries' radar screens. Our presentation provides an overview of the fundamental energy triangle and its myriad opportunities. We will look at the excitement being generated by gasification, GTL, and the expected availability of 'cheap' hydrogen. We will seek to confirm that experimental projects are now behind us. We will demonstrate that we are ready to move rapidly towards the pre-commercial applications that will eventually provide significant savings and other benefits to a wide variety of industries. Beyond our ability to produce and deliver hydrogen, Air Liquide is an enabler of the H 2 economy. We are actively developing the H 2 architecture and infrastructure that will allow many Canadian firms - who have already demonstrated leadership in H 2 technologies - to expand their markets and grow into highly successful organizations. Air Liquide has the strength of 104 years of scientific achievement, technical excellence, and business success. The Air Liquide Group is dedicated to devoting the necessary resources - on both sides of the Atlantic and around the world - to ensure the successful implementation of a number of innovative H 2 projects. Our presentation includes a brief description of some of these projects. We think you will be surprised at their variety and impressed by how these projects are closely related to today's energy issues. We hope to convince you that the hydrogen economy of the future is filled with promise and potential. (author)

  7. 75 FR 67019 - Presidential Determination on Major Illicit Drug Transit or Major Illicit Drug Producing...

    2010-11-01

    ... and synthetic drugs including marijuana, MDMA, and methamphetamine are produced in Canada and... base, and crack cocaine, primarily from Bolivia; and marijuana. The United States recognizes Brazil's... high- potency marijuana that is trafficked to the United States. The frequent mixing of methamphetamine...

  8. 78 FR 58855 - Presidential Determination on Major Drug Transit or Major Illicit Drug Producing Countries for...

    2013-09-25

    ..., commercial, and economic factors that allow drugs to transit or be produced, even if a government has carried... occurs in the southern and western parts of the country, especially Helmand Province. Instability in... Afghan security and regional stability. Afghanistan has continued to take greater responsibility to...

  9. Uranium

    Perkin, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    Developments in the Australian uranium industry during 1980 are reviewed. Mine production increased markedly to 1841 t U 3 O 8 because of output from the new concentrator at Nabarlek and 1131 t of U 3 O 8 were exported at a nominal value of $37.19/lb. Several new contracts were signed for the sale of yellowcake from Ranger and Nabarlek Mines. Other developments include the decision by the joint venturers in the Olympic Dam Project to sink an exploration shaft and the release of an environmental impact statement for the Honeymoon deposit. Uranium exploration expenditure increased in 1980 and additions were made to Australia's demonstrated economic uranium resources. A world review is included

  10. Adsorption of uranium from aqueous solution using biochar produced by hydrothermal carbonization

    Zhi-bin Zhang; East China Institute of Technology, Fuzhou; China University of Geosciences, Wuhan; China University of Geosciences, Wuhan; Xiao-hong Cao; Yun-hai Liu; East China Institute of Technology, Fuzhou; Ping Liang; East China Institute of Technology, Fuzhou; China University of Geosciences, Wuhan

    2013-01-01

    The ability of biochar produced by hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) has been explored for the removal and recovery of uranium from aqueous solutions. The micro-morphology and structure of HTC were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The influences of different experimental parameters such as solution pH, initial concentration, contact time, ionic strength and temperature on adsorption were investigated. The HTC showed the highest uranium sorption capacity at initial pH of 6.0 and contact time of 50 min. Adsorption kinetics was better described by the pseudo-second-order model and adsorption process could be well defined by the Langmuir isotherm. The thermodynamic parameters, ΔGdeg(298 K), ΔHdeg and ΔSdeg were determined to be -14.4, 36.1 kJ mol -1 and 169.7 J mol -1 K -1 , respectively, which demonstrated the sorption process of HTC towards U(VI) was feasible, spontaneous and endothermic in nature. The adsorbed HTC could be effectively regenerated by 0.05 mol/L HCl solution for the removal and recovery of U(VI). Complete removal (99.9 %) of U(VI) from 1.0 L industry wastewater containing 15.0 mg U(VI) ions was possible with 2.0 g HTC. (author)

  11. Some parameters of uranium hexafluoride plasma produced by products of nuclear reaction

    Batyrbekov, G.A.; Belyakova, Eh.A.

    1996-01-01

    The probe experimental results of investigation of uranium hexafluoride plasma produced in the centre of nuclear reactor core were demonstrated. Study of uranium hexafluoride plasma is continued by the following reasons: a possibility of U F 6 utilization as nuclear fuel, the utilization of U F 6 as volume source o ionization, search of active laser media compatible with U F 6 that is complicated by lack of constant rates data for most of plasma-chemical reactions with U F 6 and his dissociation products. Cylindrical probe volt-ampere characteristics (VAC) measured in U F 6 plasma at pressure 20 Torr and different thermal neutron fluxes and have following features: -firstly, it is possible to choose a linear part in the field of small positive potentials of probe (0-1) V; - secondary, ion branches of VAC have typical break which current of satiation corresponds to; -thirdly, probe VAC measured at small values of thermal neutron flux density are symmetrical. Diagnostics approaches were used for interpretation VAC of probe. The values of satiation current and linear part of electron branch were calculated, and such plasma parameters as conductivity, diffusion coefficient values of positive and negative ions were determined. The resonance recharge cross section was estimated on diffusion coefficient value

  12. Uranium

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    Recent decisions by the Australian Government will ensure a significant expansion of the uranium industry. Development at Roxby Downs may proceed and Ranger may fulfil two new contracts but the decision specifies that apart from Roxby Downs, no new mines should be approved. The ACTU maintains an anti-uranium policy but reaction to the decision from the trade union movement has been muted. The Australian Science and Technology Council (ASTEC) has been asked by the Government to conduct an inquiry into a number of issues relating to Australia's role in the nuclear fuel cycle. The inquiry will examine in particular Australia's nuclear safeguards arrangements and the adequacy of existing waste management technology. In two additional decisions the Government has dissociated itself from a study into the feasibility of establishing an enrichment operation and has abolished the Uranium Advisory Council. Although Australian reserves account for 20% of the total in the Western World, Australia accounts for a relatively minor proportion of the world's uranium production

  13. Uranium

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    The French Government has decided to freeze a substantial part of its nuclear power programme. Work has been halted on 18 reactors. This power programme is discussed, as well as the effect it has on the supply of uranium by South Africa

  14. Uranium occurrence in major rock types by fission-track mapping

    Ledger, E.G.; Bomber, B.J.; Schaftenaar, W.E.; Tieh, T.T.

    1984-01-01

    Microscopic occurrence of uranium has been determined in about 50 igneous rocks from various location, and in a genetically unrelated sandstone from south Texas. Precambrian granites from the Llano uplift of central Texas contain from a few ppm uranium (considered normal) to over 100 ppm on a whole-rock basis. In granite, uranium is concentrated in: (1) accessory minerals including zircon, biotite, allanite, Fe-Ti oxides, and altered sphene, (2) along grain boundaries and in microfractures by precipitation from deuteric fluids, and (3) as point sources (small inclusions) in quartz and feldspars. Tertiary volcanic rocks from the Davis Mountains of west Texas include diverse rock types from basalt to rhyolite. Average uranium contents increase from 1 ppm in basalts to 7 ppm in rhyolites. Concentration occurs: (1) in iron-titanium-oxides, zircon, and rutile, (2) in the fine-grained groundmass as uniform and point-source concentrations, and (3) as late uranium in cavities associated with banded, silica-rich material. Uranium in ore-grade sandstone is concentrated to more than 3%. Specific occurrences include (1) leucoxene and/or anatase, (2) opaline and calcite cements, (3) mud clasts and altered volcanic rock fragments, and (4) in a few samples, as silt-size uranium- and molybdenum-rich spheres. Uranium content is quite low in pyrite, marcasite, and zeolites

  15. Effects of bacterial action on waste rock producing acid drainage in the Brazilian first uranium mine

    Rey-Silva, Daniela V.F.M.; Oliveira, Alexandre P. de; Geraldo, Bianca; Campos, Michele B.; Azevedo, Heliana de; Barreto, Rodrigo P.; Souza-Santos, Marcio L. de

    2009-01-01

    This work is an evolution of the methodology showed in the paper 'Study of waste of waste rock piles producing acid drainage in the Brazilian first uranium mine', also submitted for INAC2009. Therefore, the present work also related to the determination of chemical species leaching from waste rock pile 4 (WRP4) of the Uranium Mine and Milling Facility located in the Pocos de Caldas Plateau, as well as the generation of acid waters. With the previous experimental setup, it has been observed that not only water and available oxygen are significant to pyrite oxidation reaction, but bacterial activity as well. As a first approach, the present work addresses the same experiment, but now testing without the influence of bacterial action. Therefore, the new methodology and experimental setup is now capable of determining the acidity of water in contact with material from the WRP4 and the concentration of chemical species dissolved as function of time. Such would also show the extent of bacterial action interference on the pyrite oxidation reaction. Results are based on mass balances comparing concentrations of chemical species in the waste rock before the experiment and in the waste rock plus the remaining water after the experiment. In addition, the evolution of the pH and EMF (electromotive force) values along with chemical species quantified through the experiment are presented through graphics. That is followed by discussions on the significance of such results in terms of concentration of the involved chemical species. The present work has also shown the need of improving the injection of air into the system. A more sophisticated experimental setup should be assembled in the near future, which would allow the quantification of differences between experimental tests with and without bacterial action. (author)

  16. Assay of uranium in crude diuranate cakes and MgF2 slag produced at the natural uranium conversion plants by γ-ray spectrometry

    Kalsi, P.C.; Iyer, R.H.

    1993-01-01

    A transmission-corrected γ-ray counting method has been employed for the assay of uranium in crude Na 2 U 2 O 7 cakes produced at the Uranium Conversion Facilities. A 3''*3'' NaI(Tl) detector was used in conjunction with a 400-channel analyzer. The observed count rate of the 1 MeV γ-ray emitted by the 238 U in the sample was corrected for sample self-attenuation, measured with a 65 Zn (γ-energy ≅ 1115 keV) transmission source. A calibration factor determined by measuring a standard of known amount of radioactive material in the same form and geometry as the unknown sample was used to convert the transmission corrected count rate to the amount of uranium in the weighed sample. Another γ-spectrometric method is described for the assay of the U-content in the MgF 2 slag produced during the magnesiothermic reduction of UF 4 to U-metal ingots at the natural U-conversion plant. (author) 8 refs.; 3 figs.; 1 tab

  17. Uranium. Resources, production and demand

    1997-01-01

    The events characterising the world uranium market in the last several years illustrate the persistent uncertainly faced by uranium producers and consumers worldwide. With world nuclear capacity expanding and uranium production satisfying only about 60 per cent of demand, uranium stockpiles continue to be depleted at a high rate. The uncertainty related to the remaining levels of world uranium stockpiles and to the amount of surplus defence material that will be entering the market makes it difficult to determine when a closer balance between uranium supply and demand will be reached. Information in this report provides insights into changes expected in uranium supply and demand until well into the next century. The 'Red Book', jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency, is the foremost reference on uranium. This world report is based on official information from 59 countries and includes compilations of statistics on resources, exploration, production and demand as of 1 January 1997. It provides substantial new information from all of the major uranium producing centres in Africa, Australia, Eastern Europe, North America and the New Independent States, including the first-ever official reports on uranium production in Estonia, Mongolia, the Russian Federation and Uzbekistan. It also contains an international expert analysis of industry statistics and worldwide projections of nuclear energy growth, uranium requirements and uranium supply

  18. Uranium in Canada

    1985-09-01

    In 1974 the Minister of Energy, Mines and Resources (EMR) established a Uranium Resource Appraisal Group (URAG) within EMR to audit annually Canada's uranium resources for the purpose of implementing the federal government's uranium export policy. A major objective of this policy was to ensure that Canadian uranium supplies would be sufficient to meet the needs of Canada's nuclear power program. As projections of installed nuclear power growth in Canada over the long term have been successively revised downwards (the concern about domestic security of supply is less relevant now than it was 10 years ago) and as Canadian uranium supply capabilities have expanded significantly. Canada has maintained its status as the western world's leading exporter of uranium and has become the world's leading producer. Domestic uranium resource estimates have increased to 551 000 tonnes U recoverable from mineable ore since URAG completed its last formal assessment (1982). In 1984, Canada's five primary uranium producers employed some 5800 people at their mining and milling operations, and produced concentrates containing some 11 170 tU. It is evident from URAG's 1984 assessment that Canada's known uranium resources, recoverable at uranium prices of $150/kg U or less, are more than sufficient to meet the 30-year fuelling requirements of those reactors that are either in opertaion now or committed or expected to be in-service by 1995. A substantial portion of Canada's identified uranium resources, recoverable within the same price range, is thus surplus to Canadian needs and available for export. Sales worth close to $1 billion annually are assured. Uranium exploration expenditures in Canada in 1983 and 1984 were an estimated $41 million and $35 million, respectively, down markedly from the $128 million reported for 1980. Exploration drilling and surface development drilling in 1983 and 1984 were reported to be 153 000 m and 197 000 m, respectively, some 85% of which was in

  19. Uranium exploration

    De Voto, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    This paper is a review of the methodology and technology that are currently being used in varying degrees in uranium exploration activities worldwide. Since uranium is ubiquitous and occurs in trace amounts (0.2 to 5 ppm) in virtually all rocks of the crust of the earth, exploration for uranium is essentially the search of geologic environments in which geologic processes have produced unusual concentrations of uranium. Since the level of concentration of uranium of economic interest is dependent on the present and future price of uranium, it is appropriate here to review briefly the economic realities of uranium-fueled power generation. (author)

  20. World uranium production in 1995

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    For the first time since the political and economic opening of the former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe, world uranium production actually increased in 1995. Preliminary estimates for 1996 continue this trend, indicating additional (if slight) production increases over 1995 levels. Natural uranium production increased by about 5% in 1995 to 34,218 tons uranium or 89 Mlbs U3O8. This is an increase of approximately 1700 tons of uranium or 4.3 Mlbs of U3O8 over the updated 1994 quantities. Data is presented for each of the major uranium producing countries, for each of the world's largest uranium mines, for each of the world's largest corporate producers, and for major regions of the world

  1. Uranium

    Battey, G.C.; McKay, A.D.

    1988-01-01

    Production for 1986 was 4899 t U 3 O 8 (4154 t U), 30% greater than in 1985, mainly because of a 39% increase in production at Ranger. Exports for 1986 were 4166 t U 3 O 8 at an average f.o.b. unit value of $40.57/lb U 3 O 8 . Private exploration expenditure for uranium in Australia during the 1985-86 fiscal year was $50.2 million. Plans were announced to increase the nominal capacity of the processing plant at Ranger from 3000 t/year U 3 O 8 to 4500 t and later to 6000 t/year. Construction and initial mine development at Olympic Dam began in March. Production is planned for mid 1988 at an annual rate of 2000 t U 3 O 8 , 30 000 t Cu, and 90 000 oz (2800 kg) Au. The first long-term sales agreement was concluded in September 1986. At the Manyingee deposit, testing of the alkaline solution mining method was completed, and the treatment plant was dismantled. Spot market prices (in US$/lb U 3 O 8 ) quoted by Nuexco were generally stable. From January-October the exchange value fluctuated from US$17.00-US$17.25; for November and December it was US$16.75. Australia's Reasonably Assured Resources of uranium recoverable at less than US$80/kg U at December 1986 were estimated as 462 000 t U, 3000 t U less than in 1985. This represents 30% of the total low-cost RAR in the WOCA (World Outside the Centrally Planned Economy Areas) countries. Australia also has 257 000 t U in the low-cost Estimated Additional Resources Category I, 29% of the WOCA countries' total resources in this category

  2. Uranium conversion

    Oliver, Lena; Peterson, Jenny; Wilhelmsen, Katarina

    2006-03-01

    FOI, has performed a study on uranium conversion processes that are of importance in the production of different uranium compounds in the nuclear industry. The same conversion processes are of interest both when production of nuclear fuel and production of fissile material for nuclear weapons are considered. Countries that have nuclear weapons ambitions, with the intention to produce highly enriched uranium for weapons purposes, need some degree of uranium conversion capability depending on the uranium feed material available. This report describes the processes that are needed from uranium mining and milling to the different conversion processes for converting uranium ore concentrate to uranium hexafluoride. Uranium hexafluoride is the uranium compound used in most enrichment facilities. The processes needed to produce uranium dioxide for use in nuclear fuel and the processes needed to convert different uranium compounds to uranium metal - the form of uranium that is used in a nuclear weapon - are also presented. The production of uranium ore concentrate from uranium ore is included since uranium ore concentrate is the feed material required for a uranium conversion facility. Both the chemistry and principles or the different uranium conversion processes and the equipment needed in the processes are described. Since most of the equipment that is used in a uranium conversion facility is similar to that used in conventional chemical industry, it is difficult to determine if certain equipment is considered for uranium conversion or not. However, the chemical conversion processes where UF 6 and UF 4 are present require equipment that is made of corrosion resistant material

  3. Annex 4 - Task 08/13 final report, Producing the binary uranium alloys with alloying components Al, Mo, Zr, Nb, and B

    Lazarevic, Dj.

    1961-01-01

    Due to reactivity of uranium in contact with the gasses O 2 , N 2 , H 2 , especially under higher temperatures uranium processing is always done in vacuum or inert gas. Melting, alloying and casting is done in high vacuum stoves. This report reviews the type of furnaces and includes detailed description of the electric furnace for producing uranium alloys which is available in the Institute

  4. Major constituent quantitative determination in uranium alloys by coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry and X ray fluorescence wavelength dispersive spectrometry

    Oliveira, Luis Claudio de; Silva, Adriana Mascarenhas Martins da; Gomide, Ricardo Goncalves; Silva, Ieda de Souza

    2013-01-01

    A wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WD-XRF) spectrometric method for determination of major constituents elements (Zr, Nb, Mo) in Uranium/Zirconium/Niobium and Uranium/Molybdenum alloy samples were developed. The methods use samples taken in the form of chips that were dissolved in hot nitric acid and precipitate particles melted with lithium tetraborate and dissolved in hot nitric acid and finally analyzed as a solution. Studies on the determination by inductively coupled plasma optic emission spectrometry (ICP OES) using matched matrix in calibration curve were developed. The same samples solution were analyzed in both methods. The limits of detection (LOD), linearity of the calibrations curves, recovery study, accuracy and precision of the both techniques were carried out. The results were compared. (author)

  5. Method and device to produce pourable, directly pressable uranium dioxide powder. Verfahren und Vorrichtung zur Herstellung von rieselfaehigem, direkt verpressbarem Urandioxid-Pulver

    Boerner, P.; Isensee, H.J.; Vietzke, H.

    1978-08-17

    The uranium dioxide powder is produced from uranium peroxide which is obtained by continuous precipitation of uranyl nitrate solutions. By varying the precipitation conditions, one can exactly adjust the desired properties of the UO/sub 2/ powder, there is no 'post sintering'. The individual process steps are shown in detail.

  6. Assessment of major and trace elements in soil and sediments from Osamu Utsumi Uranium mine by WDXRF

    Guilhen, Sabine N.; Oliveira, Fernando Mendes de; Cotrim, Marycel E.B.; Sakata, Solange K.; Scapin, Marcos A., E-mail: sksakata@ipen.br, E-mail: snguilhen@ipen.br, E-mail: mecotrim@ipen.br, E-mail: mascapin@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Filho, Walter S., E-mail: scassiotti@inb.gov.br [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil (UTM/INB), Caldas, MG (Brazil). Unidade de Tratamento de Minerios

    2015-07-01

    From 1982 to 1995, the Brazilian Nuclear Industries (INB) extracted and processed uranium from the Osamu Utsumi mine, located in Caldas (Minas Gerais/Brazil). After the operations were suspended in the mine, INB was convened to meet national regulatory requirements for decommissioning the mine. Several studies have since been initiated in order to support a safe and responsible closure of the mine. In this context, this work aims to establish and validate a non-destructive methodology for quantitative simultaneous determination of major and minor constituents in soil and sediments from Osamu Utsumi uranium mine by wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (WDXRF). The method was validated in accordance to the criteria established by INMETRO (Brazilian's National Institute of Metrology, Quality and Technology). The precision and accuracy achieved are statistically comparable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology's standard reference material, SRM 2709a. The results showed significantly higher amounts of rare-earth elements and uranium in sediment samples, most likely because of the leaching process occurring in the pit's surroundings. This process is promoted by the acid mine drainage (AMD) that solubilized the elements present in the tailings throughout the mine's area. The solubilized elements end up accumulating in the pit water and further depositing up in the sediment. (author)

  7. Assessment of major and trace elements in soil and sediments from Osamu Utsumi Uranium mine by WDXRF

    Guilhen, Sabine N.; Oliveira, Fernando Mendes de; Cotrim, Marycel E.B.; Sakata, Solange K.; Scapin, Marcos A.; Filho, Walter S.

    2015-01-01

    From 1982 to 1995, the Brazilian Nuclear Industries (INB) extracted and processed uranium from the Osamu Utsumi mine, located in Caldas (Minas Gerais/Brazil). After the operations were suspended in the mine, INB was convened to meet national regulatory requirements for decommissioning the mine. Several studies have since been initiated in order to support a safe and responsible closure of the mine. In this context, this work aims to establish and validate a non-destructive methodology for quantitative simultaneous determination of major and minor constituents in soil and sediments from Osamu Utsumi uranium mine by wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (WDXRF). The method was validated in accordance to the criteria established by INMETRO (Brazilian's National Institute of Metrology, Quality and Technology). The precision and accuracy achieved are statistically comparable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology's standard reference material, SRM 2709a. The results showed significantly higher amounts of rare-earth elements and uranium in sediment samples, most likely because of the leaching process occurring in the pit's surroundings. This process is promoted by the acid mine drainage (AMD) that solubilized the elements present in the tailings throughout the mine's area. The solubilized elements end up accumulating in the pit water and further depositing up in the sediment. (author)

  8. Physical characteristics and solubility of long-lived airborne particulates in uranium producing and manufacturing facilities Phase IV - Part III

    Robertson, R.; Stuart, D.C.

    1995-08-01

    The rates of dissolution in simulated lung fluid of uranium, thorium-230, radium-226 and lead-210 from six aerosol samples associated with mining operations at Cluff Lake, Saskatchewan were determined. Parallel studies were carried out for uranium aerosol samples collected directly on open-face filters at the Port Hope refinery and from four aerosol samples generated in the laboratory from yellowcake dusts obtained from the Blind River mill in Ontario. Bulk dusts were collected from surfaces in workplace locations. These dusts were resuspended in the laboratory and collected on glass fibre substrates using cascade impactor sampling methods. Two particle size fractions, less than 7 microns and 7-10 microns were collected. In all, 18 samples were subjected to parallel extractions by simulated lung fluid under continuous flow, at 37 deg C at pH 7.4, over a period of 66 days. For each extraction, 10 lung fluid fractions were collected at predetermined intervals and analyzed for uranium to estimate uranium dissolution rates as a function of time. For the Cluff Lake ore dust samples, analyses and dissolution rates estimates for thorium-230, radium-226 and lead-210 were also performed. The samples taken from Cluff Lake were found to be relatively insoluble. Uranium dissolution rates of about 20% were measured over 66 days. No measurable Th-228 dissolution was found during the experiments. Ra-226 and Pb-210 were most soluble as a fine particulate (less than 7 μm), with complete dissolution for some samples. Aerosol samples from Blind River and Port Hope were more readily soluble (complete dissolution over 66 days). The Blind River aerosols dissolved more slowly than the Port Hope aerosols. In both cases, the majority of the dissolution occurred within the first week. There was no effect of particle size on dissolution rate. (author). 12 refs., 6 tabs., 1 fig

  9. Jabiluka uranium project

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    The Jabiluka uranium and gold deposit located in the Northern Territory of Australia is the world's largest known primary uranium deposits and as such has the potential to become one of the most important uranium projects in the world. Despite the financial and structural challenges facing the major owner Pancontinental Mining Limited and the changing political policies in Australia, Jabiluka is well situated for development during the 1990's. With the availability of numerous financial and development alternatives, Jabiluka could, by the turn of the century, take its rightful place among the first rank of world uranium producers. The paper discusses ownership, location, property rights, licensing, environmental concerns, marketing and development, capital costs, royalties, uranium policy considerations, geologic exploration history, regional and site geology, and mining and milling operations

  10. Uranium in Canada: Billion-dollar industry

    Whillans, R.T.

    1989-01-01

    In 1988, Canada maintained its position as the world's leading producer and exporter of uranium; five primary uranium producers reported concentrate output containing 12,400 MT of uranium, or about one-third of Western production. Uranium shipments made by these producers in 1988 exceeded 13,200 MT, worth Canadian $1.1 billion. Because domestic requirements represent only 15% of current Canadian output, most of Canada's uranium production is available for export. Despite continued market uncertainty in 1988, Canada's uranium producers signed new sales contracts for some 14,000 MT, twice the 1987 level. About 90% of this new volume is with the US, now Canada's major uranium customer. The recent implementation of the Canada/US Free Trade agreement brings benefits to both countries; the uranium industries in each can now develop in an orderly, free market. Canada's uranium industry was restructured and consolidated in 1988 through merger and acquisition; three new uranium projects advanced significantly. Canada's new policy on nonresident ownership in the uranium mining sector, designed to encourage both Canadian and foreign investment, should greatly improve efforts to finance the development of recent Canadian uranium discoveries

  11. Worldwide developments in uranium

    Hoellen, E.E.

    1987-01-01

    World uranium production will continue to change in most major producing nations. Canadian production will increase and will be increasingly dominated by western producers as eastern Canadian high-cost production declines. Australian production will increase as major projects come into operation before 2000. US production will stabilize through the end of the century. South African production will be dependent upon the worldwide support for economic sanctions. China's entry into the world market injects yet another variable into the already cloudy supply picture. Many risks and uncertainties will face uranium producers through the 1980s. Recognizing that the uranium industry is not a fast-growing market, many existing and potential producers are seeking alternate investment courses, causing a restructuring of the world uranium production industry in ways not anticipated even a few years ago. During the restructuring process, world uranium production will most likely continue to exceed uranium consumption, resulting in a further buildup of world uranium inventories. Inventory sales will continue to redistribute this material. As inventory selling runs its course, users will turn to normal sources of supply, stimulating additional production to meet needs. Stimulation in the form of higher prices will be determined by how fast producers are willing and able to return to the market. Production costs are expected to have an increasing impact as it has become apparent that uranium resources are large in comparison to projected consumption. Conversely, security-of-supply issues have seemed to be of decreasing magnitude as Canada, Australia, and other non-US producers continue to meet delivery commitments

  12. Uranium mining

    Cheeseman, E.W.

    1980-01-01

    The international uranium market appears to be currently over-supplied with a resultant softening in prices. Buyers on the international market are unhappy about some of the restrictions placed on sales by the government, and Canadian sales may suffer as a result. About 64 percent of Canada's shipments come from five operating Ontario mines, with the balance from Saskatchewan. Several other properties will be producing within the next few years. In spite of the adverse effects of the Three Mile Island incident and the default by the T.V.A. of their contract, some 3 600 tonnes of new uranium sales were completed during the year. The price for uranium had stabilized at US $42 - $44 by mid 1979, but by early 1980 had softened somewhat. The year 1979 saw the completion of major environmental hearings in Ontario and Newfoundland and the start of the B.C. inquiry. Two more hearings are scheduled for Saskatchewan in 1980. The Elliot Lake uranium mining expansion hearings are reviewed, as are other recent hearings. In the production of uranium for nuclear fuel cycle, environmental matters are of major concern to the industry, the public and to governments. Research is being conducted to determine the most effective method for removing radium from tailings area effluents. Very stringent criteria are being drawn up by the regulatory agencies that must be met by the industry in order to obtain an operating licence from the AECB. These criteria cover seepages from the tailings basin and through the tailings retention dam, seismic stability, and both short and long term management of the tailings waste management area. (auth)

  13. Recovering of uranium from phosphoric acid produced by the wet process

    Barreiro, A.J.; Lyon, W.L.; Holleman, R.A.; Randell, C.C.

    1977-01-01

    Process for recovering uranium as from an aqueous solution of phosphoric acid arising from a wet process, with a scrubbing agent essentially composed of a hydrocarbon whose boiling point is situated between 150 0 C and 300 0 C, which reacts with the contaminents formed in the sludge in the phosphoric acid, in an efficient enough quantity to wash the contamination products forming the phosphoric acid sludge, give a sludge phase and a purified phosphoric acid phase, after which the sludge phase is extracted [fr

  14. Quantification of trace level of fluoride content in uranium oxide produced by deconversion of HEX gas by ion chromatography

    Unnikrishnan, E.K.; Padmakumar, P.R.; Shanmugavelu, P.; Sudhakar, T.M.; Bhowmik, A.

    2015-01-01

    Fluoride content in nuclear fuel is detrimental due to its corrosion behavior with cladding material. It is essential to monitor and control the fluoride concentration in nuclear material at various processing stages. Deconversion of upgraded HEX gas is carried out to produce uranium oxide. The performance of the deconversion process of HEX gas is evaluated for which trace level of fluoride concentration accompanying uranium oxide is considered as a marker. An analytical method has been developed for testing the uranium oxide produced from deconversion process of HEX gas. The method involves sample pretreatment followed by analysis using ion chromatography. The test method was validated for its performance using in house synthetic uranyl fluoride (UO 2 F 2 ) standard solutions prepared with different level of fluoride content. The results are in agreement with the expected values with the recovery in the range of 80-95%. This method has been successfully implemented for routine analysis of samples at our lab. Since UO 2 F 2 reference material is not available to validate this method, in house UO 2 F 2 standards were prepared from U 3 O 8 prepared from nuclear grade uranyl nitrate solution. UO 2 F 2 standards were prepared by converting U 3 O 8 to UO 2 F 2 by the addition of HF followed by H 2 O 2 at 200°C on a hot plate. The entire yellow colored UO 2 F 2 was dissolved in nano pure water and recrystallised several times to ensure that all free HF is removed. The crystals dried in air oven at 120° for three hours. Samples containing 1000 mg kg -1 fluoride prepared from this UO 2 F 2 , and subsequently from this sample containing 5 mg kg -1 to 35 mg kg -1 fluoride samples were prepared and analysed against fluoride CRM and the fluoride concentration obtained was analysed

  15. Recycling of nuclear matters. Myths and realities. Calculation of recycling rate of the plutonium and uranium produced by the French channel of spent fuel reprocessing

    Coeytaux, X.; Schneider, M.

    2000-05-01

    The recycling rate of plutonium and uranium are: from the whole of the plutonium separated from the spent fuel ( inferior to 1% of the nuclear matter content) attributed to France is under 50% (under 42 tons on 84 tons); from the whole of plutonium produced in the French reactors is less than 20% (42 tons on 224 tons); from the whole of the uranium separated from spent fuels attributed to France is about 10 % (1600 tons on 16000 tons); from the whole of the uranium contained in the spent fuel is slightly over 5%. (N.C.)

  16. Risk analysis and evaluation of agricultural drought disaster in the major grain-producing areas, China

    Zongtang Xie; Jiuping Xu; Yanfei Deng

    2016-01-01

    The analysis and evaluation of agricultural drought risk can assist in reducing regional disasters and agricultural drought losses. Because of the uncertainties and incomplete agricultural drought information, this paper employed an information diffusion technology and information matrix to identify a drought disaster risk distribution and to quantify the relationship between the annual drought-affected rate and the grain production losses in China's major grain-producing areas. From the asse...

  17. Oil and gas technology transfer activities and potential in eight major producing states. Volume 1

    1993-07-01

    In 1990, the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (the Compact) performed a study that identified the structure and deficiencies of the system by which oil and gas producers receive information about the potential of new technologies and communicate their problems and technology needs back to the research community. The conclusions of that work were that major integrated companies have significantly more and better sources of technology information than independent producers. The majors also have significantly better mechanisms for communicating problems to the research and development (R&D) community. As a consequence, the Compact recommended analyzing potential mechanisms to improve technology transfer channels for independents and to accelerate independents acceptance and use of existing and emerging technologies. Building on this work, the Compact, with a grant from the US Department Energy, has reviewed specific technology transfer organizations in each of eight major oil producing states to identify specific R&D and technology transfer organizations, characterize their existing activities, and identify potential future activities that could be performed to enhance technology transfer to oil and gas producers. The profiles were developed based on information received from organizations,follow-up interviews, site visit and conversations, and participation in their sponsored technology transfer activities. The results of this effort are reported in this volume. In addition, the Compact has also developed a framework for the development of evaluation methodologies to determine the effectiveness of technology transfer programs in performing their intended functions and in achieving desired impacts impacts in the producing community. The results of that work are provided in a separate volume.

  18. Hopanoid-producing bacteria in the Red Sea include the major marine nitrite-oxidizers

    Kharbush, Jenan J

    2018-04-10

    Hopanoids, including the extended side chain-containing bacteriohopanepolyols (BHPs), are bacterial lipids found abundantly in the geological record and across Earth\\'s surface environments. However, the physiological roles of this biomarker remain uncertain, limiting interpretation of their presence in current and past environments. Recent work investigating the diversity and distribution of hopanoid producers in the marine environment implicated low-oxygen regions as important loci of hopanoid production, and data from marine oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) suggested that the dominant hopanoid producers in these environments are nitrite-utilizing organisms, revealing a potential connection between hopanoid production and the marine nitrogen cycle. Here we use metagenomic data from the Red Sea to investigate the ecology of hopanoid producers in an environmental setting that is biogeochemically distinct from those investigated previously. The distributions of hopanoid production and nitrite oxidation genes in the Red Sea are closely correlated, and the majority of hopanoid producers are taxonomically affiliated with the major marine nitrite oxidizers, Nitrospinae and Nitrospirae. These results suggest that the relationship between hopanoid production and nitrite oxidation is conserved across varying biogeochemical conditions in dark ocean microbial ecosystems.

  19. Hopanoid-producing bacteria in the Red Sea include the major marine nitrite-oxidizers

    Kharbush, Jenan J; Thompson, Luke R; Haroon, Mohamed; Knight, Rob; Aluwihare, Lihini I

    2018-01-01

    Hopanoids, including the extended side chain-containing bacteriohopanepolyols (BHPs), are bacterial lipids found abundantly in the geological record and across Earth's surface environments. However, the physiological roles of this biomarker remain uncertain, limiting interpretation of their presence in current and past environments. Recent work investigating the diversity and distribution of hopanoid producers in the marine environment implicated low-oxygen regions as important loci of hopanoid production, and data from marine oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) suggested that the dominant hopanoid producers in these environments are nitrite-utilizing organisms, revealing a potential connection between hopanoid production and the marine nitrogen cycle. Here we use metagenomic data from the Red Sea to investigate the ecology of hopanoid producers in an environmental setting that is biogeochemically distinct from those investigated previously. The distributions of hopanoid production and nitrite oxidation genes in the Red Sea are closely correlated, and the majority of hopanoid producers are taxonomically affiliated with the major marine nitrite oxidizers, Nitrospinae and Nitrospirae. These results suggest that the relationship between hopanoid production and nitrite oxidation is conserved across varying biogeochemical conditions in dark ocean microbial ecosystems.

  20. Characterisation and dissolution of depleted uranium aerosols produced during impacts of kinetic energy penetrators against a tank

    Chazel, V.; Gerasimo, P.; Debouis, V.; Laroche, P.; Paquet, F

    2003-07-01

    Aerosols produced during impacts of depleted uranium (DU) penetrators against the glacis (sloping armour) and the turret of a tank were sampled. The concentration and size distribution were determined. Activity median aerodynamic diameters were 1 {mu}m (geometric standard deviation, s{sub g} = 3.7) and 2 {mu}m (s{sub g} = 2.5), respectively, for glacis and turret. The mean air concentration was 120 Bq m{sup -3}, i.e. 8.5 mg m{sup -3} of DU. Filters analysed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X ray diffraction showed two types of particles (fine particles and large molten particles) composed mainly of a mixture of uranium and aluminium. The uranium oxides were mostly U{sub 3}O{sub 8}, UO{sub 2.25} and probably UO{sub 3.01} and a mixed compound of U and Al. The kinetics of dissolution in three media (HCO{sub 3}{sup -}, HCl and Gamble's solution) were determined using in-vitro tests. The slow dissolution rates were respectively slow, and intermediate between slow and moderate, and the rapid dissolution fractions were mostly intermediate between moderate and fast. According to the in-vitro results for Gamble's solution, and based on a hypothetical single acute inhalation of 90 Bq, effective doses integrated up to 1 y after incorporation were 0.54 and 0.56 mSv respectively, for aerosols from glacis and turret. In comparison, the ICRP limits are 20 mSv y{sup -1} for workers and 1 mSv y{sup -1} for members of public. A kidney concentration of approximately 0.1 {mu}g U g{sup -1} was predicted and should not, in this case, lead to kidney damage. (author)

  1. Characterisation and dissolution of depleted uranium aerosols produced during impacts of kinetic energy penetrators against a tank

    Chazel, V.; Gerasimo, P.; Debouis, V.; Laroche, P.; Paquet, F.

    2003-01-01

    Aerosols produced during impacts of depleted uranium (DU) penetrators against the glacis (sloping armour) and the turret of a tank were sampled. The concentration and size distribution were determined. Activity median aerodynamic diameters were 1 μm (geometric standard deviation, s g = 3.7) and 2 μm (s g = 2.5), respectively, for glacis and turret. The mean air concentration was 120 Bq m -3 , i.e. 8.5 mg m -3 of DU. Filters analysed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X ray diffraction showed two types of particles (fine particles and large molten particles) composed mainly of a mixture of uranium and aluminium. The uranium oxides were mostly U 3 O 8 , UO 2.25 and probably UO 3.01 and a mixed compound of U and Al. The kinetics of dissolution in three media (HCO 3 - , HCl and Gamble's solution) were determined using in-vitro tests. The slow dissolution rates were respectively slow, and intermediate between slow and moderate, and the rapid dissolution fractions were mostly intermediate between moderate and fast. According to the in-vitro results for Gamble's solution, and based on a hypothetical single acute inhalation of 90 Bq, effective doses integrated up to 1 y after incorporation were 0.54 and 0.56 mSv respectively, for aerosols from glacis and turret. In comparison, the ICRP limits are 20 mSv y -1 for workers and 1 mSv y -1 for members of public. A kidney concentration of approximately 0.1 μg U g -1 was predicted and should not, in this case, lead to kidney damage. (author)

  2. Characterisation and dissolution of depleted uranium aerosols produced during impacts of kinetic energy penetrators against a tank.

    Chazel, V; Gerasimo, P; Dabouis, V; Laroche, P; Paquet, F

    2003-01-01

    Aerosols produced during impacts of depleted uranium (DU) penetrators against the glacis (sloping armour) and the turret of a tank were sampled. The concentration and size distribution were determined. Activity median aerodynamic diameters were 1 microm (geometric standard deviation, sigma(g) = 3.7) and 2 microm (sigma(g) = 2.5), respectively, for glacis and turret. The mean air concentration was 120 Bq m(-3), i.e. 8.5 mg m(-3) of DU. Filters analysed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X ray diffraction showed two types of particles (fine particles and large molten particles) composed mainly of a mixture of uranium and aluminium. The uranium oxides were mostly U3O8, UO2.25 and probably UO3.01 and a mixed compound of U and Al. The kinetics of dissolution in three media (HCO3-, HCl and Gamble's solution) were determined using in-vitro tests. The slow dissolution rates were respectively slow, and intermediate between slow and moderate, and the rapid dissolution fractions were mostly intermediate between moderate and fast. According to the in-vitro results for Gamble's solution, and based on a hypothetical single acute inhalation of 90 Bq, effective doses integrated up to 1 y after incorporation were 0.54 and 0.56 mSv, respectively, for aerosols from glacis and turret. In comparison, the ICRP limits are 20 mSv y(-1) for workers and 1 mSv y(-1) for members of the public. A kidney concentration of approximately 0.1 microg U g(-1) was predicted and should not, in this case, lead to kidney damage.

  3. Uranium in Canada

    1987-09-01

    Canadian uranium exploration and development efforts in 1985 and 1986 resulted in a significant increase in estimates of measured uranium resources. New discoveries have more than made up for production during 1985 and 1986, and for the elimination of some resources from the overall estimates, due to the sustained upward pressure on production costs and the stagnation of uranium prices in real terms. Canada possesses a large portion of the world's uranium resources that are of current economic interest and remains the major focus of inter-national uranium exploration activity. Expenditures for uranium exploration in Canada in 1985 and 1986 were $32 million and $33 million, respectively. Although much lower than the $130 million total reported for 1979, expenditures for 1987 are forecast to increase. Exploration and surface development drilling in 1985 and 1986 were reported to be 183 000 m and 165σ2 000 m, respectively, 85 per cent of which was in Saskatchewan. Canada has maintained its position as the world's leading producer and exporter of uranium. By the year 2000, Canada's annual uranium requirements will be about 2 100 tU. Canada's known uranium resources are more than sufficient to meet the 30-year fuel requirements of those reactors in Canada that are either in operation now or expected to be in service by the late 1990s. A substantial portion of Canada's identified uranium resources is thus surplus to Canadian needs and available for export. Annual sales currently approach $1 billion, of which exports account for 85 per cent. Forward domestic and export contract commitments totalled 73 000 tU and 62 000 tU, respectively, as of early 1987

  4. Uranium's slide - and the long haul back

    Pavitt, E.

    1982-01-01

    This paper gives a detailed account of the origin and development of the SA uranium industry. Mr. Pavitt dealt with the present state of the nuclear-power industry (a matter of concern to major uranium producers of the world) and their applications, their usefullness and public opinion towards nuclear weapons

  5. Uranium industry annual, 1986

    1987-01-01

    Uranium industry data collected in the EIA-858 survey provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of annual activities of the industry and include some information about industry plans over the next several years. This report consists of two major sections. The first addresses uranium raw materials activities and covers the following topics: exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment. The second major section is concerned with the following uranium marketing activities: uranium purchase commitments, uranium prices, procurement arrangements, uranium imports and exports, enrichment services, inventories, secondary market activities utility market requirements and related topics

  6. Study of waste rock piles producing acid drainage in the Brazilian first uranium mine

    Oliveira, Alexandre P. de; Rey-Silva, Daniela V.F.M.; Barreto, Rodrigo P.; Souza-Santos, Marcio L. de; Veronesi, Luciano da S.

    2009-01-01

    The Uranium Mine and Milling Facility located in the Pocos de Caldas Plateau stopped operating since mid-1990's and remediation actions for the mine areas are going to take place in the near future. However, environmental concerns should be addressed such as acid mine drainage (AMD) in the waste rock piles (WRPs), pit mine, and tailing dam, all driven by pyrite oxidation reactions. The AMD process leaches both heavy metals and radionuclides pollutants through the soil. This work shows the methodology applied for the determination of chemical species leaching from WRP4 as well the generation of acid waters. An experimental setup has been assembled to determine the acidity of water in contact with samples of material from the WRP4. Results are presented along a list of chemical species found in the remaining water. That is followed by discussions regarding its pH and chemical composition measured during the experiments. It has been observed that not only water and available oxygen are significant to the pyrite oxidation reaction, but also bacterial activity. This last effect should be addressed in the near future. Moreover, various important aspects regarding the experimental setup were noticed and are addressed as propositions for the continuation of the present work. (author)

  7. Risk analysis and evaluation of agricultural drought disaster in the major grain-producing areas, China

    Zongtang Xie

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The analysis and evaluation of agricultural drought risk can assist in reducing regional disasters and agricultural drought losses. Because of the uncertainties and incomplete agricultural drought information, this paper employed an information diffusion technology and information matrix to identify a drought disaster risk distribution and to quantify the relationship between the annual drought-affected rate and the grain production losses in China's major grain-producing areas. From the assessment results, provincial drought disaster risk spatial distribution maps for each major grain-producing area in China were obtained. These risk patterns showed that the probability of drought fell when the annual drought-covered rate and the annual drought-affected rate increased, and that the high risk areas were located primarily in China's northern and central provinces. These results can provide the basis for the development of effective drought mitigation strategies which would be able to inform possible drought situations and allow for easier decision-making on drought resistance strategies. The fuzzy relationship between the annual drought-affected rate and the drought-caused grain production losses provides vital information for the development of disaster compensation plans. Furthermore, the results of this study indicated that the proposed methods had superior detection stability and higher precision. We hope that by conducting such agricultural drought risk analysis, the results are able to provide the basis for the development of drought mitigation strategies to reduce future losses.

  8. Country analysis briefs: 1994. Profiles of major world energy producers, consumers, and transport centers

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    Country Analysis Briefs: 1994 is a compilation of country profiles prepared by the Energy Markets and Contingency Information Division (EMCID) of the Office of Energy Markets and End Use. EMCID maintains Country Analysis Briefs (CABs) for specific countries or geographical areas that are important to world energy markets. As a general rule, CABs are prepared for all members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), major non-OPEC oil producers (i.e., the North Sea, Russia), major energy transit areas (i.e., Ukraine), and other areas of current interest to energy analysts and policy makers. As of January 1995, EMCID maintained over 40 CABs, updated on an annual schedule and subject to revision as events warrant. This report includes 25 CABs updated during 1994. All CABs contain a profile section, a map showing the country`s location, and a narrative section. The profile section includes outlines of the country`s economy, energy sector, and environment. The narrative provides further information and discussion of these topics. Some CABs also include a detailed map displaying locations of major oil and gas fields, pipelines, ports, etc. These maps were created as a result of special individual requests and so are not typically a standard feature of the CABs. They are presented here wherever available as a supplement to the information contained in the CABs.

  9. Developments in uranium in 1982

    Chenoweth, W.L.

    1983-01-01

    Slippage in demand, increasing costs, and low spot market prices continued to influence the uranium industry during 1982. The supply of uranium exceeds the current demand and, as a result, exploration for uranium declined in the United States for the fourth straight year. During 1982, 92 companies spent $73.86 million on uranium exploration, including 6.1 million ft of surface drilling. This drilling was done mainly in the producing areas and in the areas of recent discoveries. During the year, a significant discovery was announced in south-central Virginia, the first major discovery in the eastern United States. Production of uranium concentrate declined in 1982, when 1,343 short tons of uranium oxide were produced. Numerous mines and 4 mills were closed during the year. Domestic uranium reserves, as calculated by the Department of Energy, decreased during 1982, mainly because of increasing production costs and the lack of exploration to find new reserves. Exploration for uranium in foreign countries also declined during 1982. Canada and Australia continue to dominate the long-term supply

  10. Uranium enrichment

    1989-01-01

    GAO was asked to address several questions concerning a number of proposed uranium enrichment bills introduced during the 100th Congress. The bill would have restructured the Department of Energy's uranium enrichment program as a government corporation to allow it to compete more effectively in the domestic and international markets. Some of GAO's findings discussed are: uranium market experts believe and existing market models show that the proposed DOE purchase of a $750 million of uranium from domestic producers may not significantly increase production because of large producer-held inventories; excess uranium enrichment production capacity exists throughout the world; therefore, foreign producers are expected to compete heavily in the United States throughout the 1990s as utilities' contracts with DOE expire; and according to a 1988 agreement between DOE's Offices of Nuclear Energy and Defense Programs, enrichment decommissioning costs, estimated to total $3.6 billion for planning purposes, will be shared by the commercial enrichment program and the government

  11. Recovery of thorium and uranium from monazite processing Liquor produced by INB/Caldas, M G, by solvent extraction

    Amaral, Janubia Cristina Braganca da Silva

    2006-01-01

    This work describes the study of thorium and uranium recovery from sulfuric liquor generated in chemical monazite treatment by solvent extraction technique. The sulfuric liquor was produced by Industries Nuclear of Brazil - INB, Caldas - Minas Gerais State. The study was carried out in two steps: in the first the process variable were investigated through discontinuous experiments; in the second, the parameters were optimized by continuous solvent extraction experiments. The influence of the following process variables was investigated: type and concentration of extracting agents, contact time between phases and aqueous/organic volumetric ratio. Extractants used in this study included: Primene J M-T, Primene 81-R, Alamine 336 and Aliquat 336. Thorium and uranium were simultaneously extracted by a mixture of Primene J M-T and Alamine 336, into Exxsol D-100. The stripping was carried out by hydrochloric acid (HCl) 2.0 mol/L. The study was carried out at room temperature. After selected the best process conditions, two continuous experiments of extraction and stripping were carried out. In the first experiment a mixture of 0.15 mol/L Primene J M-T and 0.05 mol/L Alamine 336 were used. The second experiment was carried out using 0.15 mol/L Primene J M-T and 0.15 mol/L Alamine 336. Four extraction stages and five stripping stages were used in both experiments. The first experiment showed a ThU 2 and U 3 O 8 content in loaded strip solution of 34.3 g/L and 1.49 g/L respectively and 0.10 g/L Th) 2 and 0.05 g/L U 3 O 8 in the raffinate. In the second experiment a loaded strip solution with 29.3 g/L ThO 2 and 0.94 g/L U 3 O 8 was obtained. In this experiment, the metals content in raffinate was less than 0.001 g/L, indicating a thorium recovery over 99.9% and uranium recovery of 99.4%. (author)

  12. Pyrophoricity of uranium in long-term storage environments

    Solbrig, C.W.; Krsul, J.R.; Olsen, D.N.

    1994-01-01

    A corrosion cycle for uranium is postulated which can be used to assess whether a given storage situation might produce fire hazards and/or continual uranium corrosion. A significant reaction rate of uranium and moisture occurs at room temperature which produces uranium oxide and hydrogen. If the hydrogen cannot escape, it will react slowly with uranium to form uranium hydride. The hydride is pyrophoric at room temperature when exposed to air. Either the hydrogen or the hydride can produce a dangerous situation as demonstrated by two different incidents described here. Long-term corrosion will occur even if the normal precautions are taken as is demonstrated by the long-term storage of stainless steel clad uranium fuel plates. The major initiator of these problems is attributed to any moisture condensed on the metal or any brought in by the cover gas. The postulated corrosion cycle is used to suggest ways to circumvent these problems

  13. Old dumps of uranium mining

    Gatzweiler, R.; Mager, D.

    1993-01-01

    The production of natural uranium through mining and milling results in large volumes of low-level radioactive waste, mainly in mine dumps and mill tailings. Hazards which relate to abandoned uranium production sites and environmental remediation approaches are described in reference to the Wismut case. During the period 1947 to 1990 the former Soviet-German Wismut Corporation produced about 200 000 t of uranium from several deposits in Thuringia and Saxonia within a relatively small and densely populated area. These activities resulted in major land disturbance and other environmental damage. Restoration problems are highlighted. (orig.)

  14. Fish as major carbonate mud producers and missing components of the tropical carbonate factory

    Perry, Chris T.; Salter, Michael A.; Harborne, Alastair R.; Crowley, Stephen F.; Jelks, Howard L.; Wilson, Rod W.

    2011-01-01

    Carbonate mud is a major constituent of recent marine carbonate sediments and of ancient limestones, which contain unique records of changes in ocean chemistry and climate shifts in the geological past. However, the origin of carbonate mud is controversial and often problematic to resolve. Here we show that tropical marine fish produce and excrete various forms of precipitated (nonskeletal) calcium carbonate from their guts ("low" and "high" Mg-calcite and aragonite), but that very fine-grained (mostly 4 mole % MgCO3) are their dominant excretory product. Crystallites from fish are morphologically diverse and species-specific, but all are unique relative to previously known biogenic and abiotic sources of carbonate within open marine systems. Using site specific fish biomass and carbonate excretion rate data we estimate that fish produce ~6.1 x 106 kg CaCO3/year across the Bahamian archipelago, all as mud-grade (the marine carbonate factories function both today and in the past.

  15. A producer's perspective on the viability of the U.S. uranium industry

    Beck, M.K.

    1986-01-01

    Even without import restrictions, there are U.S. production centers that can effectively compete with worldwide supply sources on a marginal cost basis. In order to be in operation when needed, producers projected to start up prior to 1990 need to secure contracts within the next year or two to provide sufficient lead time to bring the required facilities into operation. Now is the most opportune time to enter into a long-term contract with a U.S. supplier. Spot market prices have most likely bottomed out, as evidenced by the recent moderate increases in spot price indices. There are a few U.S. traditional mines that have low operating costs and can offer competitive terms. Due to their generally lower production costs in situ operations appear to offer the best near-term opportunity for new contracts with terms that would be competitive with those being offered by non-U.S. producers in the current market situation

  16. Uranium production, the United States perspective

    Glasier, G.E.

    1984-06-01

    U.S. uranium production appears to be headed for a level of approximately one quarter of the peak production of the early 1980's. In a free world market the majority of the U.S. production capability is noncompetitive and unnecessary to supply the free world's demand. Those world producers which can produce into the competitive uranium market of the present and the foreseeable future will be sufficient to supply the uranium needs of the world for the next ten to fifteen years. Thus, the U.S. production industry once the leading producer in the world will not regain nor approach that status in the foreseeable future

  17. Uranium 2009: Resources, Production and Demand

    2010-01-01

    With several countries currently building nuclear power plants and planning the construction of more to meet long-term increases in electricity demand, uranium resources, production and demand remain topics of notable interest. In response to the projected growth in demand for uranium and declining inventories, the uranium industry - the first critical link in the fuel supply chain for nuclear reactors - is boosting production and developing plans for further increases in the near future. Strong market conditions will, however, be necessary to trigger the investments required to meet projected demand. The 'Red Book', jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency, is a recognised world reference on uranium. It is based on information compiled in 40 countries, including those that are major producers and consumers of uranium. This 23. edition provides a comprehensive review of world uranium supply and demand as of 1 January 2009, as well as data on global uranium exploration, resources, production and reactor-related requirements. It provides substantive new information from major uranium production centres around the world, as well as from countries developing production centres for the first time. Projections of nuclear generating capacity and reactor-related uranium requirements through 2035 are also featured, along with an analysis of long-term uranium supply and demand issues

  18. Uranium industry annual 1985

    1986-11-01

    This report consists of two major sections. The first addresses uranium raw materials activities and covers the following topics: exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment. The second major section is concerned with the following uranium marketing activities: uranium purchase commitments, uranium prices, procurement arrangements, uranium imports and exports, enrichment services, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and related topics. A glossary and appendices are included to assist the reader in interpreting the substantial array of statistical data in this report and to provide background information about the survey

  19. Achieving a Carbon Neutral Society without Industry Contraction in the Five Major Steel Producing Countries

    Kyunsuk Choi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed the direct and indirect CO2 emissions of the energy-intensive basic metals industry, in particular steels, using the distributions of various energy sources, including coal/peat, oil, and electricity, from an input–output table. An analysis of five major steel producing countries indicated that direct CO2 emissions increased 1.4-fold and that indirect CO2 emissions increased by more than two-fold between 1995 and 2010. The elasticity of the CO2 emissions and the total energy costs indicated that Korea, Japan, and Germany are sensitive to energy sources from the electric power industry, whereas China and the US are more sensitive to energy sources pertaining to the coal and oil industry. Using the available forest area and photosynthesis, the potential neutralization ability of CO2 was estimated using the eco-CO2 index. The US yielded the highest CO2 neutralization ability of 66.1%, whereas Korea yielded a CO2 neutralization ability of 15%. Future trends of the 2030 eco-CO2 index revealed China and Korea will rapidly lose their neutralization ability resulting in a net negative neutralization ability if left unabated. The significant decline in the eco-CO2 index for the basic metals industry may be inhibited by utilizing bamboo wood charcoal for pulverized coal injection (PCI in the steelmaking process.

  20. Civilian inventories of plutonium and highly enriched uranium

    Albright, D.

    1987-01-01

    In the future, commercial laser isotope enrichment technologies, currently under development, could make it easier for national to produce highly enriched uranium secretly. The head of a US firm that is developing a laser enrichment process predicts that in twenty years, major utilities and small countries will have relatively small, on-site, laser-based uranium enrichment facilities. Although these plants will be designed for the production of low enriched uranium, they could be modified to produce highly enriched uranium, an option that raises the possibility of countries producing highly enriched uranium in small, easily hidden facilities. Against this background, most of this report describes the current and future quantities of plutonium and highly enriched uranium in the world, their forms, the facilities in which they are produced, stored, and used, and the extent to which they are transported. 5 figures, 10 tables

  1. Uranium 2009 resources, production and demand

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Paris

    2010-01-01

    With several countries currently building nuclear power plants and planning the construction of more to meet long-term increases in electricity demand, uranium resources, production and demand remain topics of notable interest. In response to the projected growth in demand for uranium and declining inventories, the uranium industry – the first critical link in the fuel supply chain for nuclear reactors – is boosting production and developing plans for further increases in the near future. Strong market conditions will, however, be necessary to trigger the investments required to meet projected demand. The "Red Book", jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency, is a recognised world reference on uranium. It is based on information compiled in 40 countries, including those that are major producers and consumers of uranium. This 23rd edition provides a comprehensive review of world uranium supply and demand as of 1 January 2009, as well as data on global ur...

  2. Uranium price reporting systems

    1987-09-01

    This report describes the systems for uranium price reporting currently available to the uranium industry. The report restricts itself to prices for U 3 O 8 natural uranium concentrates. Most purchases of natural uranium by utilities, and sales by producers, are conducted in this form. The bulk of uranium in electricity generation is enriched before use, and is converted to uranium hexafluoride, UF 6 , prior to enrichment. Some uranium is traded as UF 6 or as enriched uranium, particularly in the 'secondary' market. Prices for UF 6 and enriched uranium are not considered directly in this report. However, where transactions in UF 6 influence the reported price of U 3 O 8 this influence is taken into account. Unless otherwise indicated, the terms uranium and natural uranium used here refer exclusively to U 3 O 8 . (author)

  3. Overview of Canada's uranium industry

    Lowell, A.F.

    1982-06-01

    This paper places Canada's uranium industry in its international context. Most uranium, except that produced in the United States, is traded internationally. A brief history of the industry worldwide is given to show how the principal producing areas have fared to date. The industry is young, highly cyclical, and still far from achieving stability. Uranium is a single end-use commodity, entirely dependent on the generation of electricity in nuclear stations, and is without price elasticity: lowering the price does not increase demand. The typical nuclear fuel processing chain has not encouraged or led to much vertical integration. Uranium is subject to more governmental control than any other commodity. The principal market is located in the industrial countries of western Europe, the United States, Canada, and the far east. The uranium supply-demand situation is reviewed, including the current and near-term oversupply and the longer term outlook to 1995. The major negative impact of reactor cancellations and deferments in the United States is discussed. Because of the difficulty in getting reactors on line, it has become easier to forecast the demand for uranium over the next 10 years. It is more difficult to predict how that demand will be met from the more than ample competing sources. Canada's potential for supplying a significant portion of this demand is considered in relation to producers and potential new producers in other countries

  4. Trace metal distribution and mobility in drill cuttings and produced waters from Marcellus Shale gas extraction: Uranium, arsenic, barium

    Phan, Thai T.; Capo, Rosemary C.; Stewart, Brian W.; Graney, Joseph R.; Johnson, Jason D.; Sharma, Shikha; Toro, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Distributions of U, As, and Ba in Marcellus Shale were determined. • As is primarily associated with sulfide minerals, Ba with exchange sites. • Most U is in the silicate minerals, but up to 20% is partitioned into carbonate. • Low [U] and [As] in produced water are consistent with reducing downhole conditions. • Proper waste management should account for potential mobilization of U and As. - Abstract: Development of unconventional shale gas wells can generate significant quantities of drilling waste, including trace metal-rich black shale from the lateral portion of the drillhole. We carried out sequential extractions on 15 samples of dry-drilled cuttings and core material from the gas-producing Middle Devonian Marcellus Shale and surrounding units to identify the host phases and evaluate the mobility of selected trace elements during cuttings disposal. Maximum whole rock concentrations of uranium (U), arsenic (As), and barium (Ba) were 47, 90, and 3333 mg kg −1 , respectively. Sequential chemical extractions suggest that although silicate minerals are the primary host for U, as much as 20% can be present in carbonate minerals. Up to 74% of the Ba in shale was extracted from exchangeable sites in the shale, while As is primarily associated with organic matter and sulfide minerals that could be mobilized by oxidation. For comparison, U and As concentrations were also measured in 43 produced water samples returned from Marcellus Shale gas wells. Low U concentrations in produced water (<0.084–3.26 μg L −1 ) are consistent with low-oxygen conditions in the wellbore, in which U would be in its reduced, immobile form. Arsenic was below detection in all produced water samples, which is also consistent with reducing conditions in the wellbore minimizing oxidation of As-bearing sulfide minerals. Geochemical modeling to determine mobility under surface storage and disposal conditions indicates that oxidation and/or dissolution of U

  5. Vitrification of HLW produced by uranium/molybdenum fuel reprocessing in cogema's cold crucible melter

    Quang, R. Do; Petitjean, V.; Hollebeque, F.; Pinet, O.; Flament, T.; Prodhomme, A.; Dalcorso, J. P.

    2003-01-01

    The performance of the vitrification process currently used in the La Hague commercial reprocessing plants has been continuously improved during more than ten years of operation. In parallel COGEMA (industrial Operator), the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) and SGN (respectively COGEMA's R and D provider and Engineering) have developed the cold crucible melter vitrification technology to obtain greater operating flexibility, increased plant availability and further reduction of secondary waste generated during operations. The cold crucible is a compact water-cooled melter in which the radioactive waste and the glass additives are melted by direct high frequency induction. The cooling of the melter produces a solidified glass layer that protects the melter's inner wall from corrosion. Because the heat is transferred directly to the melt, high operating temperatures can be achieved with no impact on the melter itself. COGEMA plans to implement the cold crucible technology to vitrify high level liquid waste from reprocessed spent U-Mo-Sn-Al fuel (used in gas cooled reactor). The cold crucible was selected for the vitrification of this particularly hard-to-process waste stream because it could not be reasonably processed in the standard hot induction melters currently used at the La Hague vitrification facilities : the waste has a high molybdenum content which makes it very corrosive and also requires a special high temperature glass formulation to obtain sufficiently high waste loading factors (12% in molybdenum). A special glass formulation has been developed by the CEA and has been qualified through lab and pilot testing to meet standard waste acceptance criteria for final disposal of the U-Mo waste. The process and the associated technologies have been also being qualified on a full-scale prototype at the CEA pilot facility in Marcoule. Engineering study has been integrated in parallel in order to take into account that the Cold Crucible should be installed

  6. Vitrification of HLW Produced by Uranium/Molybdenum Fuel Reprocessing in COGEMA's Cold Crucible Melter

    Do Quang, R.; Petitjean, V.; Hollebecque, F.; Pinet, O.; Flament, T.; Prod'homme, A.

    2003-01-01

    The performance of the vitrification process currently used in the La Hague commercial reprocessing plants has been continuously improved during more than ten years of operation. In parallel COGEMA (industrial Operator), the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) and SGN (respectively COGEMA's R and D provider and Engineering) have developed the cold crucible melter vitrification technology to obtain greater operating flexibility, increased plant availability and further reduction of secondary waste generated during operations. The cold crucible is a compact water-cooled melter in which the radioactive waste and the glass additives are melted by direct high frequency induction. The cooling of the melter produces a solidified glass layer that protects the melter's inner wall from corrosion. Because the heat is transferred directly to the melt, high operating temperatures can be achieved with no impact on the melter itself. COGEMA plans to implement the cold crucible technology to vitrify high level liquid waste from reprocessed spent U-Mo-Sn-Al fuel (used in gas cooled reactor). The cold crucible was selected for the vitrification of this particularly hard-to-process waste stream because it could not be reasonably processed in the standard hot induction melters currently used at the La Hague vitrification facilities : the waste has a high molybdenum content which makes it very corrosive and also requires a special high temperature glass formulation to obtain sufficiently high waste loading factors (12 % in molybdenum). A special glass formulation has been developed by the CEA and has been qualified through lab and pilot testing to meet standard waste acceptance criteria for final disposal of the U-Mo waste. The process and the associated technologies have been also being qualified on a full-scale prototype at the CEA pilot facility in Marcoule. Engineering study has been integrated in parallel in order to take into account that the Cold Crucible should be installed

  7. Genetic Diversity in Fusarium graminearum from a Major Wheat-Producing Region of Argentina

    Giuseppina Mulè

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The Fusarium graminearum species complex (FGSC is a group of mycotoxigenic fungi that are the primary cause of Fusarium head blight (FHB of wheat worldwide. The distribution, frequency of occurrence, and genetic diversity of FGSC species in cereal crops in South America is not well understood compared to some regions of Asia, Europe and North America. Therefore, we examined the frequency and genetic diversity of a collection of 183 FGSC isolates recovered from wheat grown during multiple growing seasons and across a large area of eastern Argentina, a major wheat producing region in South America. Sequence analysis of the translation elongation factor 1−α and β-tubulin genes as well as Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP analyses indicated that all isolates were the FGSC species F. graminearum sensu stricto. AFLP analysis resolved at least 11 subgroups, and all the isolates represented different AFLP haplotypes. AFLP profile and geographic origin were not correlated. Previously obtained trichothecene production profiles of the isolates revealed that the 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol chemotype was slightly more frequent than the 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol chemotype among the isolates. These data extend the current understanding of FGSC diversity and provide further evidence that F. graminearum sensu stricto is the predominant cause of FHB in the temperate main wheat-growing area of Argentina. Moreover, two isolates of F. crookwellense and four of F. pseudograminearum were also recovered from wheat samples and sequenced. The results also suggest that, although F. graminearum sensu stricto was the only FGSC species recovered in this study, the high level of genetic diversity within this species should be considered in plant breeding efforts and development of other disease management strategies aimed at reducing FHB.

  8. Descriptive models of major uranium deposits in China - Some results of the Workshop on Uranium Resource Assessment sponsored by the International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, Austria, in cooperation with China National Nuclear Corporation, Beijing, and the U.S. Geological Survey, Denver, Colorado, and Reston, Virginia

    Finch, W.I.; Feng, S.; Zuyi, C.; McCammon, R.B.

    1993-01-01

    Four major types of uranium deposits occur in China: granite, volcanic, sandstone, and carbonaceous-siliceous-pelitic rock. These types are major sources of uranium in many parts of the world and account for about 95 percent of Chinese production. Descriptive models for each of these types record the diagnostic regional and local geologic features of the deposits that are important to genetic studies, exploration, and resource assessment. A fifth type of uranium deposit, metasomatite, is also modeled because of its high potential for production. These five types of uranium deposits occur irregularly in five tectonic provinces distributed from the northwest through central to southern China. ?? 1993 Oxford University Press.

  9. Method for converting uranium oxides to uranium metal

    Duerksen, W.K.

    1988-01-01

    A method for converting uranium oxide to uranium metal is described comprising the steps of heating uranium oxide in the presence of a reducing agent to a temperature sufficient to reduce the uranium oxide to uranium metal and form a heterogeneous mixture of a uranium metal product and oxide by-products, heating the mixture in a hydrogen atmosphere at a temperature sufficient to convert uranium metal in the mixture to uranium hydride, cooling the resulting uranium hydride-containing mixture to a temperature sufficient to produce a ferromagnetic transition in the uranium hydride, magnetically separating the cooled uranium hydride from the mixture, and thereafter heating the separated uranium hydride in an inert atmosphere to a temperature sufficient to convert the uranium hydride to uranium metal

  10. Determination of average fission fraction produced by 14 MeV neutrons in assemblies with large volume of depleted uranium

    Wang Dalun; Li Benci; Wang Xiuchun; Li Yijun; Zhang Shaohua; He Yongwu

    1991-07-01

    The average fission fraction of 238 U caused by 14 MeV neutrons in assemblies with large volume depleted uranium has been determined. The measured value of p f 238U (R ∞ depleted ) 14 was 0.897 ± 0.036. Measurements were also completed for neutron flux distribution and average fission fraction of 235 U isotope in depleted uranium sphere. Values of p f 238U (R depleted ) have been obtained by using a series of uranium spheres. For a sphere with Φ 600 the p f 23 '8 U (R 300 depleted ) is 0.823 ± 0.041, the density of depleted uranium assembly is 18.8g/cm 3 and total weight of assembly is about 2.8t

  11. Uranium industry framework

    Riley, K.

    2008-01-01

    The global uranium market is undergoing a major expansion due to an increase in global demand for uranium, the highest uranium prices in the last 20 years and recognition of the potential greenhouse benefits of nuclear power. Australia holds approximately 27% of the world's uranium resources (recoverable at under US$80/kg U), so is well placed to benefit from the expansion in the global uranium market. Increasing exploration activity due to these factors is resulting in the discovery and delineation of further high grade uranium deposits and extending Australia's strategic position as a reliable and safe supplier of low cost uranium.

  12. Competency test for selecting majors to produce competitive vocational graduates in industry

    Jiwa Permana Agus Aan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available President of Indonesia, Jokowi reoriented vocational school graduate toward demand driven graduates that is graduates who have certificate and skill required by industry. The initial stage of the new student on vocational school is choosing a major. At first step, students often confuse in choosing the majors they want. The mistake of choosing a department will be a set beck to the motivation of learning and skill, later will impade students future career. Thus competence test is needed to helping them in choosing the majors according to their competence. The solution to this problem is to conduct online competency tests for new students. The Results of research with 60 responden, 78% corresponds stated that the majors they were in match with their interests. Then the remaining 22% did not match. But the result of the competency assessment of students in match with the majors of is 40% and 60% of students need counseling for selection majors.

  13. Uranium conversion; Urankonvertering

    Oliver, Lena; Peterson, Jenny; Wilhelmsen, Katarina [Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI), Stockholm (Sweden)

    2006-03-15

    FOI, has performed a study on uranium conversion processes that are of importance in the production of different uranium compounds in the nuclear industry. The same conversion processes are of interest both when production of nuclear fuel and production of fissile material for nuclear weapons are considered. Countries that have nuclear weapons ambitions, with the intention to produce highly enriched uranium for weapons purposes, need some degree of uranium conversion capability depending on the uranium feed material available. This report describes the processes that are needed from uranium mining and milling to the different conversion processes for converting uranium ore concentrate to uranium hexafluoride. Uranium hexafluoride is the uranium compound used in most enrichment facilities. The processes needed to produce uranium dioxide for use in nuclear fuel and the processes needed to convert different uranium compounds to uranium metal - the form of uranium that is used in a nuclear weapon - are also presented. The production of uranium ore concentrate from uranium ore is included since uranium ore concentrate is the feed material required for a uranium conversion facility. Both the chemistry and principles or the different uranium conversion processes and the equipment needed in the processes are described. Since most of the equipment that is used in a uranium conversion facility is similar to that used in conventional chemical industry, it is difficult to determine if certain equipment is considered for uranium conversion or not. However, the chemical conversion processes where UF{sub 6} and UF{sub 4} are present require equipment that is made of corrosion resistant material.

  14. Method of preparation of uranium nitride

    Kiplinger, Jaqueline Loetsch; Thomson, Robert Kenneth James

    2013-07-09

    Method for producing terminal uranium nitride complexes comprising providing a suitable starting material comprising uranium; oxidizing the starting material with a suitable oxidant to produce one or more uranium(IV)-azide complexes; and, sufficiently irradiating the uranium(IV)-azide complexes to produce the terminal uranium nitride complexes.

  15. Feasibility studies to establish at the Kazakhstan Ulba metallurgical plant the manufacturing capability to produce low-enriched uranium certified reference materials

    Kuzminski, Jozef [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nesuhoff, J [NBL; Cratto, P [NBL; Pfennigwerth, G [Y12 NATIONAL SEC. COMPLEX; Mikhailenko, A [ULBA METALLURGICAL PLANT; Maliutina, I [ULBA METALLURGICAL PLANT; Nations, J [GREGG PROTECTION SERVICES

    2009-01-01

    One of the salient features of the transition plan that the United States Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) is presently implementing in the Former Soviet Union countries is the availability of uranium certified reference materials for calibration of nondestructive assay (NDA) measurement equipment. To address this challenge, DOE/NNSA and U.S. national laboratories have focused their cooperative efforts on establishing a reliable source for manufacturing, certifying, and supplying of such standards. The Ulba Metallurgical Plant (UMP), Kazakhstan, which processes large quantities of low-enriched uranium to produce ceramic fuel pellets for nuclear-powered reactors, is well situated to become a key supplier of low-enriched uranium certified reference materials for the country and Central Asia region. We have recently completed Phase I of a feasibility study to establish at UMP capabilities of manufacturing these standards. In this paper we will discuss details of a proposed methodology for uranium down-blending, material selection and characterization, and a proposed methodology of measurement by destructive (DA) and non-destructive (NDA) analysis to form a database for material certification by the competent State authorities in the Republic of Kazakhstan. In addition, we will discuss the prospect for manufacturing of such standards at UMP.

  16. Uranium: a basic evaluation

    Crull, A.W.

    1978-01-01

    All energy sources and technologies, including uranium and the nuclear industry, are needed to provide power. Public misunderstanding of the nature of uranium and how it works as a fuel may jeopardize nuclear energy as a major option. Basic chemical facts about uranium ore and uranium fuel technology are presented. Some of the major policy decisions that must be made include the enrichment, stockpiling, and pricing of uranium. Investigations and lawsuits pertaining to uranium markets are reviewed, and the point is made that oil companies will probably have to divest their non-oil energy activities. Recommendations for nuclear policies that have been made by the General Accounting Office are discussed briefly

  17. The giant Alum Shale polymetallic deposits of Jämtland, Sweden – A major potential low cost supplier of uranium for the future

    Beeson, R.; Goodall, W.

    2014-01-01

    uranium, and 66% of the nickel indicate the suitability of the Shale to this technology. These extractions can be obtained at coarse crush sizes up to 25 mm. This result demonstrated the potential to utilise a coarse-crushed low-cost bacterial heap leach operation for the Häggån material. Bacterial heap leaching is widely applied in the copper industry, particularly in Chile. A scoping study completed by Aura Energy has suggested that a notional 30 Mtpa operation would produce approximately 3077 tU (8 Mlbs of U_3O_8) per annum, plus other metals. Such a project has a Net Present Value of $1.85 billion, and a rate of return of 49%. Operating costs estimated by the Scoping Study, after co-product credits, are within the lower quartile of the WNA uranium producers cost curve. Aura Energy has estimated operating costs at smaller throughputs between 3.5 and 7.5 Mtpa, and these remain below $25.00/lb. (author)

  18. Domestic uranium exploration activities

    Chenoweth, W.L.

    1980-01-01

    Uranium exploration in the United States reached its alltime high in 1978 when the chief exploration indicator, surface drilling, totaled 47 million feet. In 1979, however, total drilling declined to 41 million feet, and during the first 8 months of 1980 the trend continued, as surface drilling was 27% less than for the same period in 1979. The total drilling for 1980 now is expected to be below 30 million feet, far less than the 39.4 million feet planned by industry at the beginning of the year. Falling uranium prices, the uncertainties of future uranium demand, rising costs, and the possibility of stiff foreign competition are the prime causes for the current reduction in domestic uranium exploration. Uranium exploration in the United States continues to be concentrated in the vicinity of major producing areas such as the San Juan Basin, Wyoming Basins, Texas Coastal Plain, Paradox Basin, and northeastern Washington, and in areas of recent discoveries including the Henry Mountains, Utah, the McDermitt caldera in Nevada and Oregon, and central Colorado. The distributions, by location, of total surface drilling for 1979 and the first half of 1980 are presented

  19. Australia: uranium and nuclear policy

    Crick, R.

    1991-01-01

    Australia's uranium and nuclear policies have gone through several stages of development since the commercialisation of the industry. The early stages laid the foundations and built the superstructure of Australia's uranium development, export and safeguards policies. The uranium industry and other governments have understood the nature and operation of these policies. An important aim of this paper will be to explain the design and current construction stage of policies. This needs to be done against the background of broader industry developments. Within the past twelve months (1989/90) there have been dramatic changes, both within Australia and internationally, which have affected the uranium market. Internationally, we have seen the spot price indicators for uranium fall to an all time low. Within Australia, we have seen the removal of the fixed floor price requirement for the sale of Australia uranium. This was replaced by a requirement that contract prices reflect the market. This change in policy allowed the outcome of several major long-term contract renegotiations to be approved. It also allowed Australian producers to secure several new long-term contracts, despite the overall depressed state of the market. The 'three mines' policy remains in place although only two, Ranger in Northern Territory and Olympic Dare in Southern Australia are currently operating. The biggest unknown is the extent of future uranium demand. (author)

  20. Projections on the future of the natural uranium industry

    Ishido, Akio

    1995-01-01

    This discussion looks at the future of the uranium industry and considers what type of procurement policy should be adopted. Viewing the future as an extension of the present, it is possible that supplies of natural uranium will begin to run short around 2015. However, natural uranium will have more resources available than petroleum. If rising uranium prices reinvigorate exploration and lead to the discovery of new uranium deposits, future shortages will be unlikely. Nonetheless, with structural changes expected in the world economy, the nature of natural uranium transactions will no doubt change, thereby increasing the present element of uncertainty that much more. At the same time, the oligopolistic situation created by today's major producers will intensify. Based on these projections, the author has reassessed Japan's past procurement policy of government exploration/development support combined with private-sector uranium purchasing and finds this shared risk approach to be the best. (author)

  1. Probabilistic risk assessment of veterinary medicines applied to four major aquaculture species produced in ASIA

    Rico, A.; Brink, van den P.J.

    2014-01-01

    Aquaculture production constitutes one of the main sources of pollution with veterinary medicines into the environment. About 90% of the global aquaculture production is produced in Asia and the potential environmental risks associated with the use of veterinary medicines in Asian aquaculture have

  2. Uranium - resources development and availability

    1983-01-01

    Australia possesses a major portion of the world's low cost uranium and it is confidently expected that further exploration will delineate yet more reserves. The level of such exploration and the rate of development of new production will remain critically dependent on world market developments. For the foreseeable future all development will be dedicated to supplying the export market. Australian government policies for uranium take account of both domestic and international concerns. With Australia, the policies act to protect the interests of the Aboriginal people affected by uranium production. In response to national interests and concerns, foreign investment in uranium production ventures is regulated in a manner which requires Australian control but allows a measure of foreign equity. Environmental concerns are recognized and projects may only be approved after comprehensive environmental protection procedures have been complied with. Without these policies public acceptability, which provides the foundations for long-term stability of the industry, would be prejudiced. On the world scene, Australia's safeguards policy serves to support international nuclear safeguards and, in particular, to honour its obligations under the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. Export policy requires that reasonable sales contract conditions apply and that fair negotiated market prices are obtained for Australia's uranium. Australia's recent re-emergence as a major producer and exporter of uranium is convincing testimony to the success of these policies. (author)

  3. Non-Renewable Energy and Macroeconomic Efficiency of Seven Major Oil Producing Economies in Africa

    Awodumi Olabanji Benjamin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This study adopted two-stage DEA to estimate the technical efficiency scores and assess the impact of the two most important components of fossil fuel associated with oil production on macroeconomic efficiency of Seven oil producing African countries during 2005-2012. Our results showed that increasing the consumption of natural gas would improve technical efficiency. Furthermore, increasing the share of fossil fuel in total energy consumption has negative effect on the efficiency of the economies of the top African oil producers. Also, we found that increasing the consumption of primary energy improves efficiency in these economies. We therefore, recommend that governments and other stakeholders in the energy industry should adopt inclusive strategies that will promote the use of natural gas in the short term. However, in the long-run, efforts should be geared towards increasing the use of primary energy, thereby reducing the percentage share of fossil fuel in total energy consumption.

  4. Evaluation of different glycoforms of honeybee venom major allergen phospholipase A2 (Api m 1) produced in insect cells

    Blank, Simon; Seismann, Henning; Plum, Melanie

    2011-01-01

    Allergic reactions to hymenoptera stings are one of the major reasons for IgE-mediated anaphylaxis. However, proper diagnosis using venom extracts is severely affected by molecular cross-reactivity. In this study recombinant honeybee venom major allergen phospholipase A2 (Api m 1) was produced......-derived recombinant Api m 1 with defined CCD phenotypes might provide further insights into hymenoptera venom IgE reactivities and contribute to an improved diagnosis of hymenoptera venom allergy....

  5. Thermal reactions of uranium metal, UO 2, U 3O 8, UF 4, and UO 2F 2 with NF 3 to produce UF 6

    McNamara, Bruce; Scheele, Randall; Kozelisky, Anne; Edwards, Matthew

    2009-11-01

    This paper demonstrates that NF 3 fluorinates uranium metal, UO 2, UF 4, UO 3, U 3O 8, and UO 2F 2·2H 2O to produce the volatile UF 6 at temperatures between 100 and 550 °C. Thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis reaction profiles are described that reflect changes in the uranium fluorination/oxidation state, physiochemical effects, and instances of discrete chemical speciation. Large differences in the onset temperatures for each system investigated implicate changes in mode of the NF 3 gas-solid surface interaction. These studies also demonstrate that NF 3 is a potential replacement fluorinating agent in the existing nuclear fuel cycle and in actinide volatility reprocessing.

  6. Uranium 2007: resources, production and demand

    2008-01-01

    With several countries building nuclear power plants and many more considering the use of nuclear power to produce electricity in order to meet rising demand, the uranium industry has become the focus of considerable attention. In response to rising demand and declining inventories, uranium prices have increased dramatically in recent years. As a result, the uranium industry is undergoing a significant revival, bringing to an end a period of over 20 years of under investment. The ''Red Book'', jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency, is a recognised world reference on uranium. It is based on official information received from 40 countries. This 22. edition provides a comprehensive review of world uranium supply and demand as of 1. January 2007, as well as data on global uranium exploration, resources, production and reactor-related requirements. It provides substantive new information from major uranium production centres in Africa, Australia, Central Asia, Eastern Europe and North America. Projections of nuclear generating capacity and reactor-related uranium requirements through 2030 are also featured, along with an analysis of long-term uranium supply and demand issues. (author)

  7. Uranium 2007: resources, production and demand

    2008-01-01

    With several countries building nuclear power plants and many more considering the use of nuclear power to produce electricity in order to meet rising demand, the uranium industry has become the focus of considerable attention. In response to rising demand and declining inventories, uranium prices have increased dramatically in recent years. As a result, the uranium industry is undergoing a significant revival, bringing to an end a period of over 20 years of under investment. The ''Red Book'', jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency, is a recognised world reference on uranium. It is based on official information received from 40 countries. This second edition provides a comprehensive review of world uranium supply and demand as of first January 2007, as well as data on global uranium exploration, resources, production and reactor-related requirements. It provides substantive new information from major uranium production centres in Africa, Australia, Central Asia, Eastern Europe and North America. Projections of nuclear generating capacity and reactor-related uranium requirements through 2030 are also featured, along with an analysis of long-term uranium supply and demand issues. (author)

  8. 10 CFR 74.33 - Nuclear material control and accounting for uranium enrichment facilities authorized to produce...

    2010-01-01

    ... and special nuclear material in the accounting records are based on measured values; (3) A measurement... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Nuclear material control and accounting for uranium... Section 74.33 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) MATERIAL CONTROL AND ACCOUNTING OF SPECIAL...

  9. Review of international classification systems for uranium resources

    Wang Wenyou

    2007-01-01

    The two primary classification systems for uranium resources in common use in the whole world are described. These uranium resource classification systems were developed under two distinct philosophies, it implies two very different processes, criteria, terms and definitions from which the systems evolved and were implemented. However, the two primary systems are all based on two considerations: the degree of geological confidence and the degree of economic attractiveness based on cost of producing the resource. The uranium resource classification methods currently used in most major uranium producing countries have all a bearing on the two aforesaid classification systems. The disparity exists only in the way or practice of classifying and estimating the uranium resources for reasons of different political and economical systems in various countries. The harmonization of these resource classification systems for uranium can be realized with the economic integration on a global scale. (authors)

  10. Uranium: one utility's outlook

    Gass, C.B.

    1983-01-01

    The perspective of the Arizona Public Service Company (APS) on the uncertainty of uranium as a fuel supply is discussed. After summarizing the history of nuclear power and the uranium industries, a projection is made for the future uranium market. An uncrtain uranium market is attributed to various determining factors that include international politics, production costs, non-commercial government regulation, production-company stability, and questionable levels of uranium sales. APS offers its solutions regarding type of contract, choice of uranium producers, pricing mechanisms, and aids to the industry as a whole. 5 references, 10 figures, 1 table

  11. Physical characteristics and solubility of long-lived airborne particulates in uranium producing and manufacturing facilities. Phase III - Part II

    Robertson, R.; Stuart, D.C.; Stothers, M.A.

    1995-08-01

    The rates of dissolution in simulated lung fluid of uranium from aerosols associated with various stages of the yellowcake manufacturing process have been studied. Dusts were collected from eight workplace locations. Each dust sample was resuspended in the laboratory and collected on glass fibre substrates using cascade impactor sampling methods. The two particle size fractions collected were less than 7 microns and 10-7 microns. Each sample was prepared in duplicate. In all, 32 aerosol samples were prepared for solubility extraction studies. The aerosol-bearing filters were subjected to parallel extractions by simulated lung fluid under continuous flow, at 37 deg C at pH 7.4, over a period of 68.5 days. Ten lung fluid fractions were collected at predetermined time intervals and analyzed to allow estimates of uranium dissolution rates as a function of time. After completion of the 68.5 day simulated lung fluid extraction, the residual samples were subjected to a more aggressive nitric acid extraction for 48 hours. The fraction of uranium dissolved over the first 12 hours varied from 27% to 98% for seven of the eight yellowcake samples. For these yellowcake samples, the fractions of uranium dissolved over the first 36 hours and over the full 68.5 days ranged from 49% to 99% and 80% to 100% respectively. The eighth sample was a calcined yellowcake. The rate of dissolution for the calcined yellowcake was less than 4.5% over the first 12 hours and less than 10% over 68.5 days. No influence of particle size on the rate of dissolution was found. Most of the uranium was dissolved by the simulated lung fluid for seven of the eight yellowcake samples. As a result, the nitric acid extraction of the residual samples had little effect on these seven samples. The nitric acid extraction of the calcined sample, which was found to be relatively insoluble in simulated lung fluid, dissolved a further 21% to 36.1% of the uranium. (author). 9 refs., 6 tabs., 1 fig

  12. The usage of electron beam to produce radio isotopes through the uranium fission by γ-rays and neutrons

    Bunatyan, G.G.; Nikolenko, V.G.; Popov, A.V.

    2010-01-01

    We treat the production of desirable radio isotopes due to the 238 U photo-fission by the bremsstrahlung induced in converter by an initial electron beam provided by a linear electron accelerator. We consider as well the radio isotope production through the 238 U fission by the neutrons that stem in the 238 U sample irradiated by that bremsstrahlung. The yield of the most applicable radio isotope 99 Mo is calculated. We correlate the findings acquired in the work presented with those obtained by treating the nuclear photo-neutron reaction. Menace of the plutonium contamination of an irradiated uranium sample because of the neutron capture by 238 U is considered. As we get convinced, the photo-neutron production of radio isotopes proves to be more practicable than the production by the uranium photo- and neutron-fission. Both methods are certain to be brought into action due to usage of the electron beam provided by modern linear accelerators

  13. Physical characteristics and solubility of long-lived airborne particulates in uranium producing and manufacturing facilities. Phase III - Part I

    Robertson, R.

    1995-08-01

    The rates of dissolution in simulated lung fluid of uranium and radium-226 from aerosols associated with various operations at a mill in the Elliot Lake area of Ontario have been studied. Dust samples were collected from seven workplace locations. Each dust sample was re-suspended in the laboratory and sampled by a cascade impactor. The four particle size ranges were: 10-7 micron, 7-3 micron, 3-1 micron and less than 1 micron. In all, 28 aerosol samples were collected on cascade impactor substrates. For each dust sample, the two largest particle size fractions were combined into a single sample for extraction by simulated lung fluid. Similarly, the two smaller particle size fractions were combined. In all, 14 combined aerosol samples and a blank filter were subjected to parallel extractions by simulated lung fluid under continuous flow, at 37 deg C at pH 7.4, over a period of 63.5 days. For each aerosol sample, eight lung fluid fractions were collected at pre-determined intervals and analyzed to allow estimates of the rates of dissolution of uranium and radium-226 as a function of time. The total uranium dissolution for the dust samples taken from the yellowcake operations ranged from 22.7% to 55.3%. The other samples indicated a total uranium dissolution ranging from 6.7% to 41.4%. The dissolution rates for radium-226 in the ore-related aerosols ranged from 2.6% to 4.7%. (author). 8 refs., 6 tabs., 1 fig

  14. Uranium mining in Australia

    Mackay, G.A.

    1978-01-01

    Western world requirements for uranium based on increasing energy consumption and a changing energy mix, will warrant the development of Australia's resources. By 1985 Australian mines could be producing 9500 tonnes of uranium oxide yearly and by 1995 the export value from uranium could reach that from wool. In terms of benefit to the community the economic rewards are considerable but, in terms of providing energy to the world, Australias uranium is vital

  15. Comparative characteristics of grain classifications of soft wheat of Kazakhstan and major grain-producing countries

    D. A. Shaimerdenova

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Soft wheat is one of the most important crops, grown in more than 130 countries. To date, one-fifth of the world's wheat, or about 150 million tons a year, is sold on international markets. In the world trade traditionally dominated by the US, Australia, Canada and Argentina. Kazakhstan, being on the 15th place in the production of wheat grain, is among the first ten exporters - in 2017 the country exported about 8 million tons to the amount of 1.5 billion dollars. USA, then, as potential export opportunities are much higher, as evidenced by annual carryover stocks at 3 million tons. According to experts, considerable differences in the classification of wheat grain used in Kazakhstan and in other countries participating in the grain market and the methods for assessing the technological dignity indicators (TDs laid down in the classifications are a significant obstacle to increasing the export potential of wheat grains. In view of this, an analysis was made of grain classifications of wheat grains used in the most important grain producing countries, TD indicators were determined, methods for their evaluation, and differences were revealed. It is established that in countries that are stable in the quantitative and qualitative characteristics of grain, an insignificant list of TD indicators is adopted, while they characterize the physical quality and state of the grain, which may indicate a general suitability for grinding. It is determined that in Russia and Kazakhstan, in determining the contamination, such an indicator as dockage is not taken into account. Comparative tests of different methods of sampling and determination of contamination have been carried out, and correlation coefficients have been established between indicators of contamination determined by different methods.

  16. The chronic toxicity of sodium bicarbonate, a major component of coal bed natural gas produced waters

    Farag, Aïda M.; Harper, David D.

    2014-01-01

    Sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) is the principal salt in coal bed natural gas produced water from the Powder River Structural Basin, Wyoming, USA, and concentrations of up to 3000 mg NaHCO3/L have been documented at some locations. No adequate studies have been performed to assess the chronic effects of NaHCO3 exposure. The present study was initiated to investigate the chronic toxicity and define sublethal effects at the individual organism level to explain the mechanisms of NaHCO3 toxicity. Three chronic experiments were completed with fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas), 1 with white suckers (Catostomus commersoni), 1 with Ceriodaphnia dubia, and 1 with a freshwater mussel, (Lampsilis siliquoidea). The data demonstrated that approximately 500 mg NaHCO3/L to 1000 mg NaHCO3/L affected all species of experimental aquatic animals in chronic exposure conditions. Freshwater mussels were the least sensitive to NaHCO3 exposure, with a 10-d inhibition concentration that affects 20% of the sample population (IC20) of 952 mg NaHCO3/L. The IC20 for C. dubia was the smallest, at 359 mg NaHCO3/L. A significant decrease in sodium–potassium adenosine triphosphatase (Na+/K+ ATPase) together with the lack of growth effects suggests that Na+/K+ ATPase activity was shut down before the onset of death. Several histological anomalies, including increased incidence of necrotic cells, suggested that fish were adversely affected as a result of exposure to >450 mg NaHCO3/L.

  17. PROCESS OF RECOVERING URANIUM

    Carter, J.M.; Larson, C.E.

    1958-10-01

    A process is presented for recovering uranium values from calutron deposits. The process consists in treating such deposits to produce an oxidlzed acidic solution containing uranium together with the following imparities: Cu, Fe, Cr, Ni, Mn, Zn. The uranium is recovered from such an impurity-bearing solution by adjusting the pH of the solution to the range 1.5 to 3.0 and then treating the solution with hydrogen peroxide. This results in the precipitation of uranium peroxide which is substantially free of the metal impurities in the solution. The peroxide precipitate is then separated from the solution, washed, and calcined to produce uranium trioxide.

  18. State of competition and petroleum firm participation in the US uranium industry

    Guerrieri, U.; Hogarty, T.

    1980-01-01

    This report analyzes the state of competition in the US uranium industry and the effects of petroleum firm participation on that competition. The analysis is based primarily on data derived from a 1979 API survey of uranium producers. Pior work on the subject was performed by API, the Federal Trade Commission, the Department of Justice, and National Economic Research Associates. The uranium industry principally serves electric utilities. The three phases of this industry studied in this report are exploration, ore mining, and uranium concentrate production. The major findings with respect to the state of competition in the uranium industry are discussed

  19. Uranium 1999. Resources, production and demand

    2000-01-01

    In recent years, the world uranium market has been characterised by an imbalance between demand and supply and persistently depressed uranium prices. World uranium production currently satisfies between 55 and 60 per cent of the total reactor-related requirements, while the rest of the demand is met by secondary sources including the conversion of excess defence material and stockpiles, primarily from Eastern Europe. Although the future availability of these secondary sources remains unclear, projected low-cost production capability is expected to satisfy a considerable part of demand through to 2015. Information in this report provides insights into changes expected in uranium supply and demand over the next 15 years. The 'Red Book', jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency, is the foremost world reference on uranium. It is based on official information from 49 countries and includes compilations of statistics on resources, exploration, production and demand as of 1 January 1999. It provides substantial new information from all of the major uranium producing centres in Africa, Australia, Eastern Europe, North America and the New Independent States. It also contains an international expert analysis of industry statistics and world-wide projections of nuclear energy growth, uranium requirements and uranium supply. (authors)

  20. Critical review of uranium resources and production capability to 2020

    1998-08-01

    This report was prepared to assess the changing uranium supply and demand situation as well as the adequacy of uranium resources and the production capability to supply uranium concentrate to meet reactor demand through 2020. Uranium production has been meeting only 50 to 60 percent of the world requirements with the balance met from sale of excess inventory offered on the market at low prices. It is generally agreed by most specialists that the end of the excess inventory is approaching. With inventory no longer able to meet the production shortfall it is necessary to significantly expand uranium production to fill an increasing share of demand. Non-production supplies of uranium, such as the blending of highly enriched uranium (HEU) warheads to produce low enriched reactor fuel and reprocessing of spent fuel, are also expected to grow in importance as a fuel source. This analysis addresses three major concerns as follows: adequacy of resources to meet projected demand; adequacy of production capability to produce the uranium; and market prices to sustain production to fill demand. This analysis indicates uranium mine production to be the primary supply providing about 76 to 78 percent of cumulative needs through 2020. Alternative sources supplying the balance, in order of relative importance are: (1) low enriched uranium (LEU) blended from 500 tonnes of highly enriched uranium (HEU) Russian weapons, plus initial US Department of Energy (US DOE) stockpile sales (11 to 13%); (2) reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel (6%) and; (3) utility and Russian stockpiles. Further this report gives uranium production profiles by countries: CIS producers (Kazakhstan, Russian Federation, Ukraine, Uzbekistan) and other producers (Australia, Canada, China, Gabon, Mongolia, Namibia, Niger, South Africa, United States of America)

  1. Bibliography on Saskatchewan uranium inquiries and the northern and global impact of the uranium industry

    Harding, J.; Forgay, B.; Gianoli, M.

    1988-01-01

    In recent years Saskatchewan, Canada has become the major site for the expansion of the world-wide uranium industry. Largely due to the higher concentration of ore in the province and reduced exploitation elsewhere, by 1984 Canada had become the world's leading non-communist producer of uranium. This expansion has remained one of the most controversial political and ecological issues in Saskatchewan for nearly a decade. What follows is a comprehensive bibliography on the Saskatchewan uranium mining inquiries that paralleled the growth of this industry in the province and on the northern and global impact of the uranium industry. It is the culmination of more than three years of research including in-depth content analysis of transcripts of uranium mining inquiries held in Saskatchewan between 1977-1980

  2. Uranium - a challenging mining business

    Stadelhofer, J.W.; Wedig, M.J.

    2007-01-01

    The main application of uranium is its use as a fuel for the nuclear electricity generation. Presently about 68,000 t (177 mill. lbs) of uranium are annually required, of which 41,500 (108 mill. lbs) are provided from fresh mine production whereas 26,500 t (69 mill. lbs) are stock drawdown supplies from civil or military sources. Two-thirds of production are recovered by underground mining and about 75% (30,350 t) of the world's uranium mine production are extracted from top ten mines. All major uranium mining companies are making efforts to enlarge their production capacities: The paramount Cameco's Cigar Lake project has been delayed due to mine water inflow. Production is expected to commence by latest in 2010; the nameplate capacity of 6000 t/a should be reached in 2011. AREVA reported plans to invest about Euro 500 to 600 mill. to double its uranium production by 2010. In 2006 Denison Mines and International Uranium Corporation announced that they have entered into an agreement to merge the two companies in order to create a mid-tier, North American-focused uranium producer with the potential annual production of more than 5.5 mill. lbs of U 3 O 8 by 2010. The skyrocketing global electricity demand, growing public acceptance and more favourable policies have initiated a new round of global development of the nuclear industry. Against this backdrop, about 30,000 t/a to 40,000 t/a of additional mine production will be required within the upcoming 20 years to substitute secondary uranium supplies and to meet the expected increased demand; new start-up junior mining companies (e.g. Paladin) will contribute to this increased production. (orig.)

  3. PRODUCTION OF URANIUM METAL BY CARBON REDUCTION

    Holden, R.B.; Powers, R.M.; Blaber, O.J.

    1959-09-22

    The preparation of uranium metal by the carbon reduction of an oxide of uranium is described. In a preferred embodiment of the invention a charge composed of carbon and uranium oxide is heated to a solid mass after which it is further heated under vacuum to a temperature of about 2000 deg C to produce a fused uranium metal. Slowly ccoling the fused mass produces a dendritic structure of uranium carbide in uranium metal. Reacting the solidified charge with deionized water hydrolyzes the uranium carbide to finely divide uranium dioxide which can be separated from the coarser uranium metal by ordinary filtration methods.

  4. South Australia, uranium enrichment

    1976-02-01

    The Report sets out the salient data relating to the establishment of a uranium processing centre at Redcliff in South Australia. It is conceived as a major development project for the Commonwealth, the South Australian Government and Australian Industry comprising the refining and enrichment of uranium produced from Australian mines. Using the data currently available in respect of markets, demand, technology and possible financial return from overseas sales, the project could be initiated immediately with hexafluoride production, followed rapidly in stages by enrichment production using the centrifuge process. A conceptual development plan is presented, involving a growth pattern that would be closely synchronised with the mining and production of yellowcake. The proposed development is presented in the form of an eight-and-half-year programme. Costs in this Report are based on 1975 values, unless otherwise stated. (Author)

  5. Western Canada uranium perspective

    Lloyd, R.E.

    1984-01-01

    The current situation in the exploration for uranium in British Columbia, the Yukon, the Northwest Territories, and Saskatchewan is reviewed. A moratorium on exploration has been in effect in British Columbia since 1980; it is due to expire in 1987. Only the Blizzard deposit appears to have any economic potential. The Lone Gull discovery in the Thelon Basin of the Northwest Territories has proven reserves of more than 35 million pounds U 3 O 8 grading 0.4%. Potentially prospective areas of the northern Thelon Basin lie within a game sanctuary and cannot be explored. Exploration activity in Saskatchewan continues to decline from the peak in 1980. Three major deposits - Cluff Lake, Rabbit Lake and Key Lake - are in production. By 1985 Saskatchewan will produce 58% of Canada's uranium, and over 13% of the western world's output. (L.L.) (3 figs, 2 tabs.)

  6. Lithology and uranium potential of Jurassic formations in the San Ysidro--Cuba and majors ranch areas, northwestern New Mexico

    Santos, E.S.

    1975-01-01

    The aggregate thickness of sedimentary rocks of Jurassic age near the eastern and southeastern margin of the San Juan Basin in Sandoval County, N. Mex., is about 1150 feet (350 metres). The Entrada Sandstone is the base. The Entrada Sandstone, 97 to 227 feet (30 to 69 m) thick, consists of red and brown siltstone and fine-grained sandstone and brown and white sandstone. The Todilto Formation, 5 to 125 feet (1.5 to 38 m) thick, consists of a limestone unit and a massive white gypsum unit. The Summerville Formation, 0 to 50 feet (0 to 15 m) thick, consists of variegated, interstratified mudstone, claystone, siltstone, and sandstone. The Morrison Formation, 750 to 870 feet (229 to 265 m) thick, is divided into three members. The Recapture Member consists mainly of red and white color-banded fine-grained sandstone. The Westwater Canyon and Brushy Basin Members consist mainly of red and green mudstone interstratified with grayish-orange arkosic sandstone. The upper unit of the Brushy Basin Member is called the Jackpile sandstone, a name of economic usage. Most of the sandstone in the Morrison Formation above the Recapture Member in the area studied is considered to be a potential host for uranium ore deposits. (auth)

  7. Possible Impact of Climate Change on the Quality of Apples from the Major Producing Areas of China

    Zhenjiang Qu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Meteorological conditions are important environmental factors affecting apple quality. To understand the possible impact of climate change on the apple quality of the major producing areas in China and assess the quality of major apple species (e.g., Fuji, Ralls, and Golden Delicious, we studied the variation trends and abrupt change characteristics of six major climate factors affecting seven physicochemical indices of apple quality across five apple regions, including the Loess Plateau, Bohai Bay, the Old Course of the Yellow River, Southwest Highlands, and Xinjiang, using statistical methods, meteorological indices, and the ArcGIS analysis tool based on the meteorological observational data from 1961 to 2013. The results show that the spatial and temporal distributions of annual average temperature, annual sunshine duration, average summer temperature, summer diurnal temperature range, and average summer relative humidity all significantly changed (except annual precipitation and that abrupt changes occurred. The annual temperatures and average summer temperatures in the Loess Plateau apple region and the Liaoning producing region of Bohai Bay increased within optimal ranges. In addition, for high-value regions, the hours of sunshine decreased, helping to improve the fruit shape index, sugar-acid ratio, and vitamin C (VC content. Relatively high temperatures continued to increase to high values which remained lower than the optimal upper limit; the diurnal temperature range continued to decrease; and the sunshine hours significantly decreased within the optimal range, which might have worsened fruit hardness, soluble sugar, and peel anthocyanin in the producing regions of Southwest Shandong of Bohai Bay, Southeast Hebei of the Old Course of the Yellow River, Northern Anhui, and Jiangsu. In the production regions of the Yun-Gui plateau in the Southwest highlands, increased summer temperature and the diurnal temperature range were both within

  8. Strong demand for natural uranium

    Kalinowski, P.

    1975-01-01

    The Deutsches Atomforum and the task group 'fuel elements' of the Kerntechnische Gesellschaft had organized an international two-day symposium in Mainz on natural uranium supply which was attended by 250 experts from 20 countries. The four main themes were: Demand for natural uranium, uranium deposits and uranium production, attitude of the uranium producing countries, and energy policy of the industrial nations. (orig./AK) [de

  9. Uranium enrichment

    Rae, H.K.; Melvin, J.G.

    1988-06-01

    Canada is the world's largest producer and exporter of uranium, most of which is enriched elsewhere for use as fuel in LWRs. The feasibility of a Canadian uranium-enrichment enterprise is therefore a perennial question. Recent developments in uranium-enrichment technology, and their likely impacts on separative work supply and demand, suggest an opportunity window for Canadian entry into this international market. The Canadian opportunity results from three particular impacts of the new technologies: 1) the bulk of the world's uranium-enrichment capacity is in gaseous diffusion plants which, because of their large requirements for electricity (more than 2000 kW·h per SWU), are vulnerable to competition from the new processes; 2) the decline in enrichment costs increases the economic incentive for the use of slightly-enriched uranium (SEU) fuel in CANDU reactors, thus creating a potential Canadian market; and 3) the new processes allow economic operation on a much smaller scale, which drastically reduces the investment required for market entry and is comparable with the potential Canadian SEU requirement. The opportunity is not open-ended. By the end of the century the enrichment supply industry will have adapted to the new processes and long-term customer/supplier relationships will have been established. In order to seize the opportunity, Canada must become a credible supplier during this century

  10. ERA's Ranger uranium mine

    Davies, W.

    1997-01-01

    Energy Resource of Australia (ERA) is a public company with 68% of its shares owned by the Australian company North Limited. It is currently operating one major production centre - Ranger Mine which is 260 kilometres east of Darwin, extracting and selling uranium from the Ranger Mine in the Northern Territory to nuclear electricity utilities in Japan, South Korea, Europe and North America. The first drum of uranium oxide from Ranger was drummed in August 1981 and operations have continued since that time. ERA is also in the process of working towards obtaining approvals for the development of a second mine - Jabiluka which is located 20 kilometres north of Ranger. The leases of Ranger and Jabiluka adjoin. The Minister for the Environment has advised the Minister for Resources and Energy that there does not appear to be any environmental issue which would prevent the preferred Jabiluka proposal from proceeding. Consent for the development of ERA's preferred option for the development of Jabiluka is being sought from the Aboriginal Traditional Owners. Ranger is currently the third largest producing uranium mine in the world producing 4,237 tonnes of U 3 O 8 in the year to June 1997

  11. Maternal effects on male weaponry: female dung beetles produce major sons with longer horns when they perceive higher population density

    Buzatto Bruno A

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maternal effects are environmental influences on the phenotype of one individual that are due to the expression of genes in its mother, and are expected to evolve whenever females are better capable of assessing the environmental conditions that their offspring will experience than the offspring themselves. In the dung beetle Onthophagus taurus, conditional male dimorphism is associated with alternative reproductive tactics: majors fight and guard females whereas minors sneak copulations. Furthermore, variation in dung beetle population density has different fitness consequences for each male morph, and theory predicts that higher population density might select for a higher frequency of minors and/or greater expenditure on weaponry in majors. Because adult dung beetles provide offspring with all the nutritional resources for their development, maternal effects strongly influence male phenotype. Results Here we tested whether female O. taurus are capable of perceiving population density, and responding by changing the phenotype of their offspring. We found that mothers who were reared with other conspecifics in their pre-mating period produced major offspring that had longer horns across a wider range of body sizes than the major offspring of females that were reared in isolation in their pre-mating period. Moreover, our results indicate that this maternal effect on male weaponry does not operate through the amount of dung provided by females to their offspring, but is rather transmitted through egg or brood mass composition. Finally, although theory predicts that females experiencing higher density might produce more minor males, we found no support for this, rather the best fitting models were equivocal as to whether fewer or the same proportions of minors were produced. Conclusions Our study describes a new type of maternal effect in dung beetles, which probably allows females to respond to population density adaptively

  12. Uranium production

    Jones, J.Q.

    1981-01-01

    The domestic uranium industry is in a state of stagflation. Costs continue to rise while the market for the product remains stagnant. During the last 12 months, curtailments and closures of mines and mills have eliminated over 5000 jobs in the industry, plus many more in those industries that furnish supplies and services. By January 1982, operations at four mills and the mines that furnish them ore will have been terminated. Other closures may follow, depending on cost trends, duration of current contracts, the degree to which mills have been amortized, the feasibility of placing mines on standby, the grade of the ore, and many other factors. Open-pit mines can be placed on standby without much difficulty, other than the possible cost of restoration before all the ore has been removed. There are a few small, dry, underground mines that could be mothballed; however, the major underground producers are wet sandstone mines that in most cases could not be reopened after a prolonged shutdown; mills can be mothballed for several years. Figure 8 shows the location of all the production centers in operation, as well as those that have operated or are on standby. Table 1 lists the same production centers plus those that have been deferred, showing nominal capacity of conventional mills in tons of ore per calendar day, and the industry production rate for those mills as of October 1, 1981

  13. International uranium supply to the US market

    Bonny, J.

    1987-01-01

    The 1980s have seen a major redistribution of global uranium production. Since 1984, the first full year of production from the Key Lake Mine, Canada has displaced the US as the world's largest uranium producer. Uranium production in the US has stabilized in the range of 10 to 15 million lb U 3 O 8 per year, having declined from a peak of over 43 million lb in 1980. Production from Africa and Europe has declined slightly, and Australia, with the startup of Ranger Mine, has emerged as a significant producer. The main factors that have affected the distribution of production aside from price and demand are ore grades and production costs, currency exchange rates, long-term contracts, and tied supply. It is interesting to examine uranium supply and demand for the North American continent. In 1980 and 1981, North American production was more than twice reactor requirements. By 1985, however, requirements were only slightly lower than production, a situation that has persisted into 1987. Indeed, given the export commitments by Canadian and US producers to Europe and Asia, it is apparent that the US must import uranium from other countries. The relative balance in North American supply and demand suggests that free trade between Canada and the US for both uranium and conversion services would be beneficial to both countries

  14. LukMF′ is the major secreted leukocidin of bovine Staphylococcus aureus and is produced in vivo during bovine mastitis

    Vrieling, Manouk; Boerhout, Eveline M.; van Wigcheren, Glenn F.; Koymans, Kirsten J.; Mols-Vorstermans, Tanja G.; de Haas, Carla J. C.; Aerts, Piet C.; Daemen, Ineke J. J. M.; van Kessel, Kok P. M.; Koets, Ad P.; Rutten, Victor P. M. G.; Nuijten, Piet J.M.; van Strijp, Jos A. G.; Benedictus, Lindert

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major human and animal pathogen and a common cause of mastitis in cattle. S. aureus secretes several leukocidins that target bovine neutrophils, crucial effector cells in the defence against bacterial pathogens. In this study, we investigated the role of staphylococcal leukocidins in the pathogenesis of bovine S. aureus disease. We show that LukAB, in contrast to the γ-hemolysins, LukED, and LukMF′, was unable to kill bovine neutrophils, and identified CXCR2 as a bovine receptor for HlgAB and LukED. Furthermore, we assessed functional leukocidin secretion by bovine mastitis isolates and observed that, although leukocidin production was strain dependent, LukMF′ was most abundantly secreted and the major toxin killing bovine neutrophils. To determine the role of LukMF′ in bovine mastitis, cattle were challenged with high (S1444) or intermediate (S1449, S1463) LukMF′-producing isolates. Only animals infected with S1444 developed severe clinical symptoms. Importantly, LukM was produced in vivo during the course of infection and levels in milk were associated with the severity of mastitis. Altogether, these findings underline the importance of LukMF′ as a virulence factor and support the development of therapeutic approaches targeting LukMF′ to control S. aureus mastitis in cattle. PMID:27886237

  15. Possible uranium sources of Streltsovsky uranium ore field

    Zhang Lisheng

    2005-01-01

    The uranium deposit of the Late Jurassic Streltsovaky caldera in Transbaikalia of Russia is the largest uranium field associated with volcanics in the world, its uranium reserves are 280 000 t U, and it is the largest uranium resources in Russia. About one third of the caldera stratigraphic pile consists of strongly-altered rhyolites. Uranium resources of the Streltsovsky caldera are much larger than any other volcanic-related uranium districts in the world. Besides, the efficiency of hydrothermal alteration, uranium resources appear to result from the juxtaposition of two major uranium sources; highly fractionated peralkaline rhyolites of Jurassic age in the caldera, and U-rich subalkaline granites of Variscan age in the basement in which the major uranium-bearing accessory minerals were metamict at the time of the hydrothermal ore formation. (authors)

  16. Uranium Supply Strategy of China

    Gao Shangxiong; Zhang Decun; Zhang Yi

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: With the rapid development of nuclear power in the next few years, uranium demand will increase accordingly. Overseas uranium development will be the major channel to meet the future requirement of NPP demand in China.

  17. Three core concepts for producing uranium-233 in commercial pressurized light water reactors for possible use in water-cooled breeder reactors

    Conley, G.H.; Cowell, G.K.; Detrick, C.A.; Kusenko, J.; Johnson, E.G.; Dunyak, J.; Flanery, B.K.; Shinko, M.S.; Giffen, R.H.; Rampolla, D.S.

    1979-12-01

    Selected prebreeder core concepts are described which could be backfit into a reference light water reactor similar to current commercial reactors, and produce uranium-233 for use in water-cooled breeder reactors. The prebreeder concepts were selected on the basis of minimizing fuel system development and reactor changes required to permit a backfit. The fuel assemblies for the prebreeder core concepts discussed would occupy the same space envelope as those in the reference core but contain a 19 by 19 array of fuel rods instead of the reference 17 by 17 array. An instrument well and 28 guide tubes for control rods have been allocated to each prebreeder fuel assembly in a pattern similar to that for the reference fuel assemblies. Backfit of these prebreeder concepts into the reference reactor would require changes only to the upper core support structure while providing flexibility for alternatives in the type of fuel used

  18. Emission of light charged particles from fragments produced on fission of uranium nuclei by 153 MeV protons and 1700 MeV negative pions

    Belovitzky, G.E.; Shteingrad, O.M.

    2000-01-01

    The mechanism underlying the emission of light charged particles (LCP) with Z = 1, 2 from fragments produced in fission of uranium nuclei by 153 MeV protons and 1700 MeV negative pions was studied. It was found that LCP accompanying the fission by pions are emitted from non-accelerated fragments immediately after the fission, whereas in the case of 153 MeV protons, the LCP are emitted from the accelerated heavy fragments. The number of LCP emitted in the course of pion-induced fission is 0.7 per fission event, which exceeds by a factor of 30 the corresponding number for 153 MeV protons [ru

  19. The Toxicity of Depleted Uranium

    Briner, Wayne

    2010-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) is an emerging environmental pollutant that is introduced into the environment primarily by military activity. While depleted uranium is less radioactive than natural uranium, it still retains all the chemical toxicity associated with the original element. In large doses the kidney is the target organ for the acute chemical toxicity of this metal, producing potentially lethal tubular necrosis. In contrast, chronic low dose exposure to depleted uranium may not produce a c...

  20. Review of uranium in Australia: its geology, exploration and world significance

    Shepard, J; Gaskell, J L; Spaargaren, F A; Butler, R D; Francis, T; Ross, J

    1973-01-01

    The aim of this report is to review and classify all known Australian uranium occurrences, to compare them with world-wide deposits and on this basis, derive conclusions on the uranium potential in various Australian geological environments. In an introductory section the properties, uses, chemistry, mineralogy and processing of uranium are summarised. An outline of modern prospecting techniques applicable in different geological environments is also presented. Foreign uranium deposits are classified and briefly discussed. World supply and demand to the year 2000 is analysed and the importance of Australia as a major uranium producer is considered. Uranium occurrences and deposits in all States are described in detail, and potential uraniferous geological environments are reviewed. A large scale map is presented which delineates these environments and indicates areas considered to be the most prospective. Conclusions are drawn and recommendations made concerning the selection of areas which are considered to hold the most promise for the discovery of further uranium deposits.

  1. Attributing impacts to emissions traced to major fossil energy and cement producers over specific historical time periods

    Ekwurzel, B.; Frumhoff, P. C.; Allen, M. R.; Boneham, J.; Heede, R.; Dalton, M. W.; Licker, R.

    2017-12-01

    Given the progress in climate change attribution research over the last decade, attribution studies can inform policymakers guided by the UNFCCC principle of "common but differentiated responsibilities." Historically this has primarily focused on nations, yet requests for information on the relative role of the fossil energy sector are growing. We present an approach that relies on annual CH4 and CO2 emissions from production through to the sale of products from the largest industrial fossil fuel and cement production company records from the mid-nineteenth century to present (Heede 2014). Analysis of the global trends with all the natural and human drivers compared with a scenario without the emissions traced to major carbon producers over full historical versus select periods of recent history can be policy relevant. This approach can be applied with simple climate models and earth system models depending on the type of climate impacts being investigated. For example, results from a simple climate model, using best estimate parameters and emissions traced to 90 largest carbon producers, illustrate the relative difference in global mean surface temperature increase over 1880-2010 after removing these emissions from 1980-2010 (29-35%) compared with removing these emissions over 1880-2010 (42-50%). The changing relative contributions from the largest climate drivers can be important to help assess the changing risks for stakeholders adapting to and reducing exposure and vulnerability to regional climate change impacts.

  2. Canadian experience with uranium tailings disposal

    Culver, K.B.

    1982-06-01

    During the first years of uranium production in Canada uranium tailings were discharged directly into valleys or lakes near the mill. Treatment with barium chloride to precipitate radium began in 1965 at the Nordic Mine at Elliot Lake, Ontario. In the mid-60s and early 70s water quality studies indicated that discharges from uranium tailings areas were causing degradation to the upper part of the Serpent River water system. Studies into acid generation, revegetation, and leaching of radium were initiated by the mining companies and resulted in the construction of treatment plants at a number of sites. Abandoned tailings sites were revegetated. At hearings into the expansion of the Elliot Lake operations the issue of tailings management was a major item for discussion. As a result federal and provincial agencies developed guidelines for the siting and development of urnaium tailings areas prior to issuing operating licences. Western Canadian uranium producers do not have the acid generation problem of the Elliot Lake operations. The Rabbit Lake mill uses settling ponds followed by filtration. High-grade tailings from Cluff Lake are sealed in concrete and buried. Uranium producers feel that the interim criteria developed by the Atomic Energy Control Board, if adopted, would have a harmful effect on the viability of the Canadian uranium industry

  3. Radium-226 and head-210 in agriculture products produced on the environs of the uranium mine and mill at the Pocos de Caldas plateau in Minas Gerais

    Vasconcellos, L.M.H.; Amaral, E.C.S.; Vianna, M.E.C.M.; Franca, E.P.

    1986-01-01

    Radium-226 and Lead-210 in agriculture products produced on the environs of the uranium mine and mill at the Pocos de Caldas Plateau in Minas Gerais. As a complement to the pre-operational environmental monitoring program of the Brazilian first uranium mine and mill, a survey of 226 Ra and 210 Pb in agriculture products, and in the corresponding soils, were carried out in the Pocos de Caldas Plateu. The survey intended to determine site specific transfer factors, in order to better estimate radiation doses on the population, resulting from the plant operation. In local soils, 226 Ra and 210 Pb have similar concentrations. The average contents are comparable to the values found in areas of normal radioactivity, but the maximum values are higher by one order of magnitude. In the vegetables analyzed (beans, carrot, corn and potato), 226 Ra concentrations are slightly higher than those of 210 Pb, and the maximum values are also one order of magnitude greater than in normal regions. For both radionuclides, the average soil-to-plant transfer factors are of the order of 10 -3 and 10 -2 when related to total and to exchangeable content soil, respectively. These results led to the conclusion that 226 Ra and 210 Pb have similar importance, concerning the population exposure via the foodstuff ingestion pathway. Therefore, it was recommended to carry on routine monitoring program for both radionuclides in the main agriculture crops. However, the naturally elevated radionuclide concentrations, in some local vegetables, will decrease the sensivity for detecting for detecting small increments resulting from the plant operation. (Author) [pt

  4. Uranium evaluation and mining techniques

    1980-01-01

    accurate, comprehensive, and understandable appraisal of the world's potential uranium resources, and the ability to discover, develop and produce these resources within an acceptable time frame are absolutely essential to making meaningful decisions in relation to the future supply of nuclear fuel. Therefore, the methods used to appraise undiscovered uranium resources were examined and compared in the light of the needs of the world nuclear power industry as a whole. Notable among these methods is one based on interactive genetic models. It is currently being developed to reduce the amount of subjectivity inherent in most of the currently used appraisal techniques The goal is to use more geologic data and depend less on the intuition and experience of the estimator. The more esoteric statistical techniques based on past production rates, prices, rates of increase or decrease in reported reserves or resources, etc., while of unknown or unproved value, were not discussed at the symposium. The symposium provided a forum for discussion of closely related subjects as well. One of the major problems in reporting internationally in uranium resources is classification of the resources into various categories and defining those categories. Conceptually, among earth scientists, there is general agreement, but defining these concepts is a difficult task. At least three organizations have undertaken to develop classifications and definitions to satisfy the needs of international reporting. Two of these were described at the symposium. (The third has been used by the joint NEA/IAEA Working Party on Uranium Resources but was not described.) The techniques of winning uranium from its several sources include, besides mining by conventional open pit or underground methods, in situ leaching of low-grade ores in special environments, and from ores left in mines In addition, virtually all marine phosphates contain some uranium that can be recovered as a by-product in the manufacture of

  5. Bacterial diversity and composition in major fresh produce growing soils affected by physiochemical properties and geographic locations

    Ma, Jincai [Key Laboratory of Groundwater Resources and Environment, Ministry of Education, Jilin University, Changchun 130021 (China); USDA-ARS U. S. Salinity Laboratory, Riverside, CA 92507 (United States); Ibekwe, A. Mark, E-mail: Mark.Ibekwe@ars.usda.gov [USDA-ARS U. S. Salinity Laboratory, Riverside, CA 92507 (United States); Yang, Ching-Hong [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); Crowley, David E. [Department of Environmental Sciences, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Microbial diversity of agricultural soils has been well documented, but information on leafy green producing soils is limited. In this study, we investigated microbial diversity and community structures in 32 (16 organic, 16 conventionally managed soils) from California (CA) and Arizona (AZ) using pyrosequencing, and identified factors affecting bacterial composition. Results of detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) and dissimilarity analysis showed that bacterial community structures of conventionally managed soils were similar to that of organically managed soils; while the bacterial community structures in soils from Salinas, California were different (P < 0.05) from those in soils from Yuma, Arizona and Imperial Valley, California. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) and artificial neural network (ANN) analysis of bacterial community structures and soil variables showed that electrical conductivity (EC), clay content, water-holding capacity (WHC), pH, total nitrogen (TN), and organic carbon (OC) significantly (P < 0.05) correlated with microbial communities. CCA based variation partitioning analysis (VPA) showed that soil physical properties (clay, EC, and WHC), soil chemical variables (pH, TN, and OC) and sampling location explained 16.3%, 12.5%, and 50.9%, respectively, of total variations in bacterial community structure, leaving 13% of the total variation unexplained. Our current study showed that bacterial community composition and diversity in major fresh produce growing soils from California and Arizona is a function of soil physiochemical characteristics and geographic distances of sampling sites. - Highlights: • Geographic distance was the most significant factor affecting microbial composition. • Physical and chemical properties significantly impacted microbial communities. • Higher numbers of OTUs were observed in organic soils than in convention soils.

  6. Bacterial diversity and composition in major fresh produce growing soils affected by physiochemical properties and geographic locations

    Ma, Jincai; Ibekwe, A. Mark; Yang, Ching-Hong; Crowley, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Microbial diversity of agricultural soils has been well documented, but information on leafy green producing soils is limited. In this study, we investigated microbial diversity and community structures in 32 (16 organic, 16 conventionally managed soils) from California (CA) and Arizona (AZ) using pyrosequencing, and identified factors affecting bacterial composition. Results of detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) and dissimilarity analysis showed that bacterial community structures of conventionally managed soils were similar to that of organically managed soils; while the bacterial community structures in soils from Salinas, California were different (P < 0.05) from those in soils from Yuma, Arizona and Imperial Valley, California. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) and artificial neural network (ANN) analysis of bacterial community structures and soil variables showed that electrical conductivity (EC), clay content, water-holding capacity (WHC), pH, total nitrogen (TN), and organic carbon (OC) significantly (P < 0.05) correlated with microbial communities. CCA based variation partitioning analysis (VPA) showed that soil physical properties (clay, EC, and WHC), soil chemical variables (pH, TN, and OC) and sampling location explained 16.3%, 12.5%, and 50.9%, respectively, of total variations in bacterial community structure, leaving 13% of the total variation unexplained. Our current study showed that bacterial community composition and diversity in major fresh produce growing soils from California and Arizona is a function of soil physiochemical characteristics and geographic distances of sampling sites. - Highlights: • Geographic distance was the most significant factor affecting microbial composition. • Physical and chemical properties significantly impacted microbial communities. • Higher numbers of OTUs were observed in organic soils than in convention soils

  7. Fengycin produced by Bacillus subtilis 9407 plays a major role in the biocontrol of apple ring rot disease.

    Fan, Haiyan; Ru, Jinjiang; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Qi; Li, Yan

    2017-06-01

    Apple ring rot, caused by Botryosphaeria dothidea, is a serious apple disease in China. Bacillus subtilis 9407 was isolated from healthy apples and showed strong antifungal activity against B. dothidea. To identify the primary antifungal compound of B. subtilis 9407 and determine its role in controlling apple ring rot, a transposon mutant library was constructed using TnYLB-1, and a mutant completely defective in antifungal activity was obtained. The gene inactivated in the antifungal activity mutant had 98.5% similarity to ppsB in B. subtilis subsp. subtilis str. 168, which encodes one of the five synthetases responsible for synthesizing fengycin. A markerless ppsB deletion mutant was constructed. Compared with the wild-type strain, lipopeptide crude extracts from ΔppsB showed almost no inhibition of B. dothidea mycelial growth. Furthermore, fengycin-like lipopeptides (retention factor 0.1-0.2) that exhibited antifungal activity against B. dothidea were observed in the wild-type strain by thin-layer chromatography (TLC)-bioautography analysis, but not in ΔppsB. Semipreparative reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) detection revealed that ΔppsB lost the ability to synthesize fengycin. These results suggest that ppsB is responsible for synthesizing fengycin and that fengycin is the major antifungal compound produced by B. subtilis 9407 against B. dothidea. Moreover, a biocontrol assay showed that the control efficacy of ΔppsB was reduced by half compared with the wild-type strain, indicating that fengycin plays a major role in controlling apple ring rot disease. This is the first report on the use of a B. subtilis strain as a potential biological control agent to control apple ring rot disease by the production of fengycin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Uranium extraction by complexation with siderophores

    Bahamonde Castro, Cristina

    One of the major concerns of energy production is the environmental impact associated with the extraction of natural resources. Nuclear energy fuel is obtained from uranium, an abundant and naturally occurring element in the environment, but the currently used techniques for uranium extraction leave either a significant fingerprint (open pit mines) or a chemical residue that alters the pH of the environment (acid or alkali leaching). It is therefore clear that a new and greener approach to uranium extraction is needed. Bioleaching is one potential alternative. In bioleaching, complexants naturally produced from fungi or bacteria may be used to extract the uranium. In the following research, the siderophore enterobactin, which is naturally produced by bacteria to extract and solubilize iron from the environment, is evaluated to determine its potential for complexing with uranium. To determine whether enterobactin could be used for uranium extraction, its acid dissociation and its binding strength with the metal of interest must be determined. Due to the complexity of working with radioactive materials, lanthanides were used as analogs for uranium. In addition, polyprotic acids were used as structural and chemical analogs for the siderophore during method development. To evaluate the acid dissociation of enterobactin and the subsequent binding constants with lanthanides, three different analytical techniques were studied including: potentiometric titration, UltraViolet Visible (UV-Vis) spectrophotometry and Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC). After evaluation of three techniques, a combination of ITC and potentiometric titrations was deemed to be the most viable way for studying the siderophore of interest. The results obtained from these studies corroborate the ideal pH range for enterobactin complexation to the lanthanide of interest and pave the way for determining the strength of complexation relative to other naturally occurring metals. Ultimately, this

  9. Disposal and reclamation of southwestern coal and uranium wastes

    Wewerka, E.M.

    1979-01-01

    The types of solid wastes and effluents produced by the southwestern coal and uranium mining and milling industries are considered, and the current methods for the disposal and reclamation of these materials discussed. The major means of disposing of the solid wastes from both industries is by land fill or in some instances ponding. Sludges or aqueous wastes are normally discharged into settling and evaporative ponds. Basic reclamation measures for nearly all coal and uranium waste disposal sites include solids stabilization, compacting, grading, soil preparation, and revegetation. Impermeable liners and caps are beginning to be applied to disposal sites for some of the more harmful coal and uranium waste materials

  10. Australia and uranium

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    A brief justification of the Australian Government's decision to mine and export Australian Uranium is presented along with a description of the Alligator River Region in the Northern Territory where the major mines are to be located. Aboriginal interests and welfare in the region, the proposed Kakadu National Park and the economic benefits resulting from uranium development are also briefly covered. (J.R.)

  11. Geochemical exploration for uranium

    1988-01-01

    This Technical Report is designed mainly to introduce the methods and techniques of uranium geochemical exploration to exploration geologists who may not have had experience with geochemical exploration methods in their uranium programmes. The methods presented have been widely used in the uranium exploration industry for more than two decades. The intention has not been to produce an exhaustive, detailed manual, although detailed instructions are given for a field and laboratory data recording scheme and a satisfactory analytical method for the geochemical determination of uranium. Rather, the intention has been to introduce the concepts and methods of uranium exploration geochemistry in sufficient detail to guide the user in their effective use. Readers are advised to consult general references on geochemical exploration to increase their understanding of geochemical techniques for uranium

  12. Uranium industry in the USSR

    Nikipelov, B.V.; Chernov, A.G.

    1990-01-01

    A brief historical account of the Soviet production of natural and enriched uranium is given. The geological and geographical location of major uranium deposits are mentioned. The processing of natural ores including in-situ leaching (ISL) is also briefly described. Gas centrifuges play a large part in uranium enrichment. The role of Techsnabexport for the export of nuclear materials is explained

  13. Producers give prices a boost

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    Uranium producers came alive in August, helping spot prices crack the $8.00 barrier for the first time since March. The upper end of NUKEM's price range actually finished the month at $8.20. Scrambling to fulfill their long-term delivery contracts, producers dominate the market. In the span of three weeks, five producers came out for 2 million lbs U3O8, ultimately buying nearly 1.5 million lbs. One producer accounted for over half this volume. The major factor behind rising prices was that producers required specific origins to meet contract obligations. Buyers willing to accept open origins created the lower end of NUKEM's price range

  14. Feasibility of Producing Molybdenum-99 on a Small Scale Using Fission of Low Enriched Uranium or Neutron Activation of Natural Molybdenum

    2015-01-01

    This publication documents the work performed within the IAEA coordinated research project (CRP) on Developing Techniques for Small Scale Indigenous Molybdenum-99 Production Using LEU Fission or Neutron Activation. The project allowed participating institutions to receive training and information on aspects necessary for starting production of molybdenum-99 ( 99 Mo) on a small scale, that is, to become national level producers of this medical isotope. Stable production of 99Mo is one of the most pressing issues facing the nuclear community at present, because the medical isotope technetium-99m ( 99m Tc), which decays from 99 Mo, is one of the most widely used radionuclides in diagnostic imaging and treatment around the world. In the past five years, there have been widespread shortages of 99 Mo owing to the limited number of producers, many of which use ageing facilities. To assist in stabilizing the production of 99Mo, and to promote the use of production methods that do not rely on the use of highly enriched uranium (HEU), the IAEA initiated the abovementioned CRP on small scale 99Mo production using low enriched uranium (LEU) fission or neutron activation methods. The intention was to enable participating institutions to gain the knowledge necessary to become national level producers of 99Mo in the event of further global shortages. Some of the institutions that participated in the CRP have continued their work on 99 Mo production, and are enlisting the assistance of other CRP members and the IAEA’s technical cooperation programme to set up a small scale production capability. In total, the CRP was active for six years, and concluded in December 2011. During the CRP, fourteen IAEA Member States took part; four research coordination meetings were held, and four workshops were held on operational aspects of 99 Mo production, LEU target fabrication and waste management. Most participants carried out work related to the entire production process, from target

  15. Spectral measurements of few-electron uranium ions produced and trapped in a high-energy electron beam ion trap

    Beiersdorfer, P.

    1994-01-01

    Measurements of 2s l/2 -2p 3/2 electric dipole and 2p 1/2 -2p 3/2 magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole transitions in U 82+ through U 89+ have been made with a high-resolution crystal spectrometer that recorded the line radiation from stationary ions produced and trapped in a high-energy electron beam ion trap. From the measurements we infer -39.21 ± 0.23 eV for the QED contribution to the 2s 1/2 -2p 3/2 transition energy of lithiumlike U 89+ . A comparison between our measurements and various computations illustrates the need for continued improvements in theoretical approaches for calculating the atomic structure of ions with two or more electrons in the L shell

  16. Political economy of African uranium and its role in international markets. Final report. International energy studies program

    Lynch, M.C.; Neff, T.L.

    1982-03-01

    The history of uranium development in Africa is briefly summarized. Today there are 4 major uranium producing countries in Africa: Gabon, Niger, Namibia, and South Africa. These nations have the possibility of political instability. In addition, the uranium market has undergone a series of radical changes over the past decade. How these African nations have responded to this changing market, and how their roles in the international market relate to domestic political and economic factors are the topics of this report

  17. Depleted uranium

    Huffer, E.; Nifenecker, H.

    2001-02-01

    This document deals with the physical, chemical and radiological properties of the depleted uranium. What is the depleted uranium? Why do the military use depleted uranium and what are the risk for the health? (A.L.B.)

  18. The economics of uranium demand

    Owen, A.D.

    1983-01-01

    The major characteristics of the demand for uranium are identified, and a number of factors which determine the actual level of uranium requirements of the nuclear power industry are discussed. Since the role of inventories is central to the process of short-term price formation, by comparing projections of uranium production and apparent consumption, the relative level of total inventories is calculated and an assessment is made of its likely impact on the uranium market during the 1980s. (author)

  19. Uranium industry annual 1993

    1994-09-01

    Uranium production in the United States has declined dramatically from a peak of 43.7 million pounds U 3 O 8 (16.8 thousand metric tons uranium (U)) in 1980 to 3.1 million pounds U 3 O 8 (1.2 thousand metric tons U) in 1993. This decline is attributed to the world uranium market experiencing oversupply and intense competition. Large inventories of uranium accumulated when optimistic forecasts for growth in nuclear power generation were not realized. The other factor which is affecting U.S. uranium production is that some other countries, notably Australia and Canada, possess higher quality uranium reserves that can be mined at lower costs than those of the United States. Realizing its competitive advantage, Canada was the world's largest producer in 1993 with an output of 23.9 million pounds U 3 O 8 (9.2 thousand metric tons U). The U.S. uranium industry, responding to over a decade of declining market prices, has downsized and adopted less costly and more efficient production methods. The main result has been a suspension of production from conventional mines and mills. Since mid-1992, only nonconventional production facilities, chiefly in situ leach (ISL) mining and byproduct recovery, have operated in the United States. In contrast, nonconventional sources provided only 13 percent of the uranium produced in 1980. ISL mining has developed into the most cost efficient and environmentally acceptable method for producing uranium in the United States. The process, also known as solution mining, differs from conventional mining in that solutions are used to recover uranium from the ground without excavating the ore and generating associated solid waste. This article describes the current ISL Yang technology and its regulatory approval process, and provides an analysis of the factors favoring ISL mining over conventional methods in a declining uranium market

  20. Uranium industry annual 1993

    1994-09-01

    Uranium production in the United States has declined dramatically from a peak of 43.7 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (16.8 thousand metric tons uranium (U)) in 1980 to 3.1 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (1.2 thousand metric tons U) in 1993. This decline is attributed to the world uranium market experiencing oversupply and intense competition. Large inventories of uranium accumulated when optimistic forecasts for growth in nuclear power generation were not realized. The other factor which is affecting U.S. uranium production is that some other countries, notably Australia and Canada, possess higher quality uranium reserves that can be mined at lower costs than those of the United States. Realizing its competitive advantage, Canada was the world`s largest producer in 1993 with an output of 23.9 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (9.2 thousand metric tons U). The U.S. uranium industry, responding to over a decade of declining market prices, has downsized and adopted less costly and more efficient production methods. The main result has been a suspension of production from conventional mines and mills. Since mid-1992, only nonconventional production facilities, chiefly in situ leach (ISL) mining and byproduct recovery, have operated in the United States. In contrast, nonconventional sources provided only 13 percent of the uranium produced in 1980. ISL mining has developed into the most cost efficient and environmentally acceptable method for producing uranium in the United States. The process, also known as solution mining, differs from conventional mining in that solutions are used to recover uranium from the ground without excavating the ore and generating associated solid waste. This article describes the current ISL Yang technology and its regulatory approval process, and provides an analysis of the factors favoring ISL mining over conventional methods in a declining uranium market.

  1. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Newcastle NTMS Quadrangle, Wyoming, including concentrations of forty-two additional elements

    Goff, S.J.; Sandoval, W.F.; Gallimore, D.L.; Talcott, C.L.; Martinez, R.G.; Minor, M.E.; Mills, C.F.

    1980-06-01

    Water and sediment samples were collected and each water sample was analyzed for U, and each sediment sample was analyzed for 43 elements, including U and Th. Uranium concentrations in water samples range from below the detection limit of 0.02 ppB to 702.26 ppB and have a median of 1.73 ppB and a mean of 11.76 ppB. Water samples containing high uranium concentrations generally are associated with known uranium mining activity or units known to be uranium bearing. About one-third of the water samples containing high uranium concentrations were collected from locations within the Pumpkin Buttes and Turnercrest-Ross Districts. Nearly half of the water samples containing high uranium concentrations were collected from locations just west of the Monument Hill and Highland Flats-Box Creek Districts. Similar anomalous uranium concentrations in this region have been reported updip from Exxon's Highland uranium deposits. High uranium concentrations were also found associated with the Lance Creek-Old Woman Anticline District. Uranium concentrations in sediment samples range from 1.14 to 220.70 ppM and have a median of 3.37 ppM and a mean of 4.03 ppM. Throughout the major uranium mining districts of the Powder River Basin, sediment samples with high uranium concentrations were collected from dry streams located near wells producing water samples with high uranium concentrations. High uranium concentrations were also found associated with the Lance Creek oil field where uranium mineralization is known in the White River formation. High uranium concentrations were also found in sediment samples in areas where uranium mineralization is not known. These samples are from dry streams in areas underlain by the White River formation, the Niobrara formation, and the Pierre, Carlisle, Belle Fourche, and Mowry shales

  2. The U.S. uranium industry

    Glasier, G.E.

    1987-01-01

    This presentation concentrates on the future of the U.S. uranium industry in light of potential embargo legislation and the uranium producers' lawsuit. The author discusses several possible resolutions which would lead to a more certain and possibly stable uranium market. The probability of one or more Six possible actions which would effect the uranium industry are addressed

  3. Uranium in South Africa: 1983 assessment of resources and production

    1984-06-01

    NUCOR assesses South Africa's uranium resource and production capabilities on an ongoing basis. Assessments are carried out in close co-operation with the mining companies and the Government Mining Engineer. In carrying out this evaluation, the classification recommended by the NEA/IAEA Working Party on Uranium Resources is followed. In order to preserve company confidentiality, the details of the findings are released in summary form only. Within South Africa, uranium occurrences are found in Precambrian quartz-pebble conglomerates, Precambrian alkaline complexes, Cambrian to Precambrian granite gneisses, Permo-Triassic sandstones and coal, and Recent to Tertiary surficial formations. South Africa's uranium resources were reassessed during 1983 and the total recoverable resources in the Reasonably Assured and Estimated Additional Resource categories recoverable at less than $130/kg U were estimated to be 460 000 t U. This represents a decrease of 13,4% when compared with the 1981 assessment. South Africa's uranium production for 1983 amounted to 6 060 t U, a 4,21 % increase over the 1982 production of 5 816 t U. Ninety-seven percent of the production is derived from the Witwatersrand quartz-pebble conglomerates, the rest being produced as a by-product of copper mining at Palabora. South Africa maintained its position as a major low-cost uranium producer, holding 14% of the WOCA uranium resources, and during 1982 it produced 14% of WOCA's uranium. In making future production capability projections it may be safely concluded that South Africa would be able to produce uranium at substantial levels well into the next century

  4. Uranium production from phosphates

    Ketzinel, Z.; Folkman, Y.

    1979-05-01

    According to estimates of the world's uranium consumption, exploitation of most rich sources is expected by the 1980's. Forecasts show that the rate of uranium consumption will increase towards the end of the century. It is therefore desirable to exploit poor sources not yet in use. In the near future, the most reasonable source for developing uranium is phosphate rock. Uranium reserves in phosphates are estimated at a few million tons. Production of uranium from phosphates is as a by-product of phosphate rock processing and phosphoric acid production; it will then be possible to save the costs incurred in crushing and dissolving the rock when calculating uranium production costs. Estimates show that the U.S. wastes about 3,000 tons of uranium per annum in phosphoric acid based fertilisers. Studies have also been carried out in France, Yugoslavia and India. In Israel, during the 1950's, a small plant was operated in Haifa by 'Chemical and Phosphates'. Uranium processes have also been developed by linking with the extraction processes at Arad. Currently there is almost no activity on this subject because there are no large phosphoric acid plants which would enable production to take place on a reasonable scale. Discussions are taking place about the installation of a plant for phosphoric acid production utilising the 'wet process', producing 200 to 250,000 tons P 2 O 5 per annum. It is necessary to combine these facilities with uranium production plant. (author)

  5. Experimental leaching of uranium from tuffaceous rocks

    Goodell, P.C.; Trentham, R.C.

    1980-07-01

    The premise to be tested in this work is that felsic volcanic rocks particularly ash-flow tuffs, can serve as source rocks for certain uranium deposits. The applicability of this idea to several geologic environments is investigated. A genetic model is developed dealing with the behavior of uranium during and subsequent to ash-flow tuff deposition. It is based upon previously described investigations, geologic logic, data presented here, and speculation. Ash-flow tuff sequences described in the literature show significant alkali element variation, particularly in thick tuff units. Some variation is attributed to initial magma variations, whereas additional change may be produced during cooling and degassing of the tuff. Uranium variations have been documented in tuff sequences which are assumed to represent magmatic compositions. Uranium may be released during the initial degassing, during hydrothermal alteration, and/or during later diagenesis. Experimental studies have been designed and carried out to simulate natural leaching conditions such as might occur during diagenesis. Synthetic ground waters have been pumped through pulverized uraniferous vitrophyres. Major and minor element contents have been determined. The most significant chemical changes take place quickly, within a matter of days. Several starting and product leachant solutions were analyzed fluorimetrically for uranium. They show significant increases in uranium contents, from less than 1 ppB at the start to greater than 10 ppB maximu. Such leachant solutions might be significant transport agents of uranium given geologic time. Leaching at low temperatures appears to involve a thin surface reaction and diffusion layer. Both dissolution and ion exchange influence the leachant composition. It is also concluded that glassy ash-flow tuffs may serve as uranium source rocks during low temperature diagenetic changes

  6. Uranium exploration, mining and ore enrichment techniques

    Fuchs, H.D.; Wentzlau, D.

    1985-01-01

    The paper describes the different types of uranium deposits and their importance. It is shown that during the present depressed uranium market situation, mainly high grade deposits such as unconformity-related deposits can be mined economically. The different successive exploration steps are outlined including methods used for uranium. Uranium mining does not greatly differ from normal mining, but the uranium metallurgy needs its own specialized but already classic technology. Only a relative small amount of uranium can be expected from projects where uranium is produced by in situ leach methods or by extraction from phosphoric acid. A short summary of investment costs and operating costs is given for an average uranium mine. The last chapter deals with the definition of different reserve categories and outlines the uranium reserves of the western world including the uranium production (1983) and the expected uranium production capacity for 1985 and 1990. (orig.) [de

  7. Annex 4 - Task 08/13 final report, Producing the binary uranium alloys with alloying components Al, Mo, Zr, Nb, and B; Prilog 4 - Zavrsni izvestaj o podzadatku 08/13, Dobijanje binarnih legura urana sa legirajucim komponentama Al, Mo, Zr, Nb i B

    Lazarevic, Dj [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1961-12-15

    Due to reactivity of uranium in contact with the gasses O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, especially under higher temperatures uranium processing is always done in vacuum or inert gas. Melting, alloying and casting is done in high vacuum stoves. This report reviews the type of furnaces and includes detailed description of the electric furnace for producing uranium alloys which is available in the Institute.

  8. World uranium markets: an update

    Connor, M.J.

    1983-01-01

    The current state of the world's uranium market and its effect on US nuclear-fueled utilities is discussed. Major uranium-related issues that will confront US utility nuclear fuel managers in the coming years are presented, emphasizing the perspectives of supply, demand, world market adjustment, and US market restrictions on imports. It is stated that the US market is essential by non-US producers to help equilibrate an otherwise excessive supply which would cause chaos in the market. To avoid another ten-year boom/bust cycle, the US is urged to reexamine its position on long-term contracts - which permit greater price stability in contrast to the spot market and its price fluctuations. 13 figures, 6 tables

  9. Australia's Uranium and thorium resources and their global significance

    Lambert, I.B.; McKay, A.; Miezitis, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Full text: Australia's world-leading uranium endowment appears to result from the emplacement of uranium enriched felsic igneous rocks in three major periods during the geological evolution of the continent. Australia has over 27% of the world's total reasonably assured uranium resources (RAR) recoverable at < US$80/kgU (which approximates recent uranium spot prices). Olympic Dam is the largest known uranium deposit, containing approximately 19% of global RAR (and over 40% of global inferred resources) recoverable at < US$80/kg U; the uranium is present at low concentrations and the viability of its recovery is underpinned by co-production of copper and gold. Most of Australia's other identified resources are within Ranger, Jabiluka, Koongarra, Kintyre and Yeelirrie, the last four of which are not currently accessible for mining. In 2004, Australia's three operating uranium mines - Ranger, Olympic Dam, and Beverley -produced 22% of global production. Canada was the only country to produce more uranium (29%) and Kazakhstan (9%) ranked third. Considerably increased uranium production has been recently foreshadowed from Australia (through developing a large open pit at Olympic Dam), Canada (mainly through opening of the Cigar Lake mine), and Kazakhstan (developing several new in situ leach mines). These increases should go a long way towards satisfying demand from about 2010. Olympic Dam has sufficient resources to sustain such increased production over many decades. Thorium is expected to be used in some future generations of nuclear reactors. Australia also has major (but incompletely quantified) resources of this commodity, mainly in heavy mineral sands deposits and associated with alkaline igneous rocks. It is inevitable that the international community will be looking increasingly to Australia to sustain its vital role in providing fuels for future nuclear power generation, given its world-leading identified resources, considerable potential for new

  10. Vaal Reefs South uranium plant

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    The Vaal Reefs mining complex, part of the Anglo American Corporation, is the largest gold and uranium producing complex in the world, being South Africa's principal producer, accounting for about a quarter of the country's uranium production. Vaal Reefs South uranium plant in the Orkney district was recently officially opened by Dr AJA Roux, the retiring president of the Atomic Energy Board and chairman of the Uranium Enrichment Corporation and will increase the country's uranium production. In the field of technology, and particularly processing technology, South Africa has shown the world unprecedented technology achievement in the field of uranium extraction from low grade ores and the development of the unique uranium enrichment process. New technical innovations that have been incorporated in this new plant are discussed

  11. PROCESS FOR PREPARING URANIUM METAL

    Prescott, C.H. Jr.; Reynolds, F.L.

    1959-01-13

    A process is presented for producing oxygen-free uranium metal comprising contacting iodine vapor with crude uranium in a reaction zone maintained at 400 to 800 C to produce a vaporous mixture of UI/sub 4/ and iodine. Also disposed within the maction zone is a tungsten filament which is heated to about 1600 C. The UI/sub 4/, upon contacting the hot filament, is decomposed to molten uranium substantially free of oxygen.

  12. Uranium resources in New Mexico

    McLemore, V.T.; Chenoweth, W.L.

    1989-01-01

    For nearly three decades (1951-1980), the Grants uranium district in northwestern New Mexico produced more uranium than any other district in the world. The most important host rocks containing economic uranium deposits in New Mexico are sandstones within the Jurassic Morrison Formation. Approximately 334,506,000 lb of U 3 O 8 were produced from this unit from 1948 through 1987, accounting for 38% of the total uranium production from the US. All of the economic reserves and most of the resources in New Mexico occur in the Morrison Formation. Uranium deposits also occur in sandstones of Paleozoic, Triassic, Cretaceous, Tertiary, and Quaternary formations; however, only 468,680 lb of U 3 O 8 or 0.14% of the total production from New Mexico have been produced from these deposits. Some of these deposits may have a high resource potential. In contrast, almost 6.7 million lb of U 3 O 8 have been produced from uranium deposits in the Todilto Limestone of the Wanakah Formation (Jurassic), but potential for finding additional economic uranium deposits in the near future is low. Other uranium deposits in New Mexico include those in other sedimentary rocks, vein-type uranium deposits, and disseminated magmatic, pegmatitic, and contact metasomatic uranium deposits in igneous and metamorphic rocks. Production from these deposits have been insignificant (less than 0.08% of the total production from New Mexico), but there could be potential for medium to high-grade, medium-sized uranium deposits in some areas. Total uranium production from New Mexico from 1948 to 1987 amounts to approximately 341,808,000 lb of U 3 O 8 . New Mexico has significant uranium reserves and resources. Future development of these deposits will depend upon an increase in price for uranium and lowering of production costs, perhaps by in-situ leaching techniques

  13. The uranium market 1980 - 1990

    Darmayan, Philippe

    1980-01-01

    The Supply and Demand Committee of the Uranium Institute was established to monitor continuously information and developments bearing on the uranium market and to publish from time to time reports giving its views on the supply and demand outlook. The last Uranium institute supply and demand report was published in July 1979 and a summary was given by Mr. Erkes at the last Uranium Institute symposium. Its main conclusions were that from 1979 to 1990 the flexibilities of the market were such as to offer adequate scope to producers and consumers of uranium to ensure a balance between supply and demand. Is that conclusion still valid one and a half years later [fr

  14. Uranium enriched granites in Sweden

    Wilson, M.R.; Aakerblom, G.

    1980-01-01

    Granites with uranium contents higher than normal occur in a variety of geological settings in the Swedish Precambrian, and represent a variety of granite types and ages. They may have been generated by (1) the anatexis of continental crust (2) processes occurring at a much greater depth. They commonly show enrichement in F, Sn, W and/or Mo. Only in one case is an important uranium mineralization thought to be directly related to a uranium-enriched granite, while the majority of epigenetic uranium mineralizations with economic potential are related to hydrothermal processes in areas where the bedrock is regionally uranium-enhanced. (Authors)

  15. Uranium supply and demand, 1980-1995: a Uranium Institute analysis

    Erkes, P.; Clements, A.; Lloyd, B.; Darmayan, P.

    1982-01-01

    A major factor affecting the growth of the uranium market has reduced global economic growth, leading to a reduced demand for electricity and a lack of urgency regarding the need for new generating capacity. Factors influencing the demand for uranium are commitments to enrichment contracts, stockpiles and procurement policies, nuclear capacity forecasts. The present over supply, caused by the oil price rise of the early 1970's is likely to persist into the mid 1980's. Supply and demand should reach a balance in the second half of the 1980's or early 1990's. Economic incentives must be available to producers to encourage future exploration and mine development. (U.K.)

  16. Trends in uranium supply

    Hansen, M [International Atomic Energy Agency, Division of Nuclear Power and Reactors, Nuclear Materials and Fuel Cycle Section, Vienna (Austria)

    1976-07-01

    Prior to the development of nuclear power, uranium ores were used to a very limited extent as a ceramic colouring agent, as a source of radium and in some places as a source of vanadium. Perhaps before that, because of the bright orange and yellow colours of its secondary ores, it was probably used as ceremonial paint by primitive man. After the discovery of nuclear fission a whole new industry emerged, complete with its problems of demand, resources and supply. Spurred by special incentives in the early years of this new nuclear industry, prospectors discovered over 20 000 occurrences of uranium in North America alone, and by 1959 total world production reached a peak of 34 000 tonnes uranium from mines in South Africa, Canada and United States. This rapid growth also led to new problems. As purchases for military purposes ended, government procurement contracts were not renewed, and the large reserves developed as a result of government purchase incentives, in combination with lack of substantial commercial market, resulted in an over-supply of uranium. Typically, an over-supply of uranium together with national stockpiling at low prices resulted in depression of prices to less than $5 per pound by 1971. Although forecasts made in the early 1970's increased confidence in the future of nuclear power, and consequently the demand for uranium, prices remained low until the end of 1973 when OPEC announced a very large increase in oil prices and quite naturally, prices for coal also rose substantially. The economics of nuclear fuel immediately improved and prices for uranium began to climb in 1974. But the world-wide impact of the OPEC decision also produced negative effects on the uranium industry. Uranium production costs rose dramatically, as did capital costs, and money for investment in new uranium ventures became more scarce and more expensive. However, the uranium supply picture today offers hope of satisfactory development in spite of the many problems to be

  17. Trends in uranium supply

    Hansen, M.

    1976-01-01

    Prior to the development of nuclear power, uranium ores were used to a very limited extent as a ceramic colouring agent, as a source of radium and in some places as a source of vanadium. Perhaps before that, because of the bright orange and yellow colours of its secondary ores, it was probably used as ceremonial paint by primitive man. After the discovery of nuclear fission a whole new industry emerged, complete with its problems of demand, resources and supply. Spurred by special incentives in the early years of this new nuclear industry, prospectors discovered over 20 000 occurrences of uranium in North America alone, and by 1959 total world production reached a peak of 34 000 tonnes uranium from mines in South Africa, Canada and United States. This rapid growth also led to new problems. As purchases for military purposes ended, government procurement contracts were not renewed, and the large reserves developed as a result of government purchase incentives, in combination with lack of substantial commercial market, resulted in an over-supply of uranium. Typically, an over-supply of uranium together with national stockpiling at low prices resulted in depression of prices to less than $5 per pound by 1971. Although forecasts made in the early 1970's increased confidence in the future of nuclear power, and consequently the demand for uranium, prices remained low until the end of 1973 when OPEC announced a very large increase in oil prices and quite naturally, prices for coal also rose substantially. The economics of nuclear fuel immediately improved and prices for uranium began to climb in 1974. But the world-wide impact of the OPEC decision also produced negative effects on the uranium industry. Uranium production costs rose dramatically, as did capital costs, and money for investment in new uranium ventures became more scarce and more expensive. However, the uranium supply picture today offers hope of satisfactory development in spite of the many problems to be

  18. 3d-4p x-ray spectrum emitted by highly ionized uranium from a laser-produced plasma in the 3.8<λ<4.4-A wavelength range

    Mandelbaum, P.; Seely, J.F.; Kania, D.R.; Kauffman, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    This work extends a previous analysis of the x-ray spectrum of a laser-produced uranium plasma [P. Mandelbaum et al., Phys. Rev. A 44, 5752 (1991)] to the longer-wavelength range (3.8 +65 ) through As-like (U +59 ) isoelectronic sequences are identified in the spectrum, in good agreement with the previous analysis of the spectrum emitted at shorter wavelengths

  19. Uranium market issues and outlook

    Julian, L.C.

    1989-01-01

    The market for uranium has become increasingly international in scope. This trend is expected to continue, with additional sources of competitive supply entering the market. The decrease in constant-dollar uranium prices over the past 11-12 years has realigned competitive supply sources. Implementation of the US-Canada Free Trade Agreement in 1989 is a significant event in its implications for future trade patterns. Namibian independence from South Africa would open additional markets for Rossing production. Decisions by the government of Australia concerning the three mine policy and the floor price for contracts are crucial in the development of supply in that country. Uranium from China and the USSR may become increasingly available and acceptable to some worldwide buyers. Over the long run, the competitive status of the US with respect to certain foreign producers will probably depend more on the success of US producers in minimizing costs or using unconventional mining techniques, such as in-situ leach where feasible, than on legislative measures. Investment in promising areas outside of the US is a potential avenue to be explored for profitable ventures. Price formation is dependent on a number of interacting supply-and-demand factors. Future price movement will be the major factor determining which production centers will be competitive

  20. Development of 99Mo isotope production targets employing uranium metal foils

    Hofman, G.L.; Wiencek, T.C.; Wood, E.L.; Snelgrove, J.L.

    1997-01-01

    The Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor Program has continued its effort in the past 3 yr to develop use of low-enriched uranium (LEU) to produce the fission product 99 Mo. This work comprises both target and chemical processing development and demonstration. Two major target systems are now being used to produce 99 Mo with highly enriched uranium-one employing research reactor fuel technology (either uranium-aluminum alloy or uranium aluminide-aluminum dispersion) and the other using a thin deposit of UO 2 on the inside of a stainless steel (SST) tube. This paper summarizes progress in irradiation testing of targets based on LEU uranium metal foils. Several targets of this type have been irradiated in the Indonesian RSG-GAS reactor operating at 22.5 MW

  1. CD4(+) T cells producing interleukin (IL)-17, IL-22 and interferon-? are major effector T cells in nickel allergy

    Dyring Andersen, Beatrice; Skov, Lone; Løvendorf, Marianne B

    2013-01-01

    the frequencies of CD4(+) , CD8(+) and γδ T cells producing IL-17, IL-22 and interferon (IFN)-γ in the blood and skin from nickel-allergic patients. Patients/materials/methods Blood samples were collected from 14 patients and 17 controls, and analysed by flow cytometry. Biopsies were taken from 5 patients and 6......-allergic patients, there was massive cellular infiltration dominated by CD4(+) T cells producing IL-17, IL-22 and IFN-γ in nickel-challenged skin but not in vehicle-challenged skin. Conclusion CD4(+) T cells producing IL-17, IL-22 and IFN-γ are important effector cells in the eczematous reactions of nickel......Background It has been suggested that interleukin (IL)-17 and IL-22 play important roles in the elicitation of human allergic contact dermatitis; however, the frequencies of T cell subtypes producing IL-17 and IL-22 in human allergic contact dermatitis are unknown. Objectives To determine...

  2. LukMF′ is the major secreted leukocidin of bovine Staphylococcus aureus and is produced in vivo during bovine mastitis

    Vrieling, Manouk; Boerhout, Eveline M.; Van Wigcheren, Glenn F.; Koymans, Kirsten J.; Mols-Vorstermans, Tanja G.; de Haas, Carla J C; Aerts, Piet C.; Daemen, Ineke J J M; van Kessel, Kok P M; Koets, Ad P.; Rutten, Victor P M G; Nuijten, Piet J M; Van Strijp, Jos A G; Benedictus, Lindert

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major human and animal pathogen and a common cause of mastitis in cattle. S. aureus secretes several leukocidins that target bovine neutrophils, crucial effector cells in the defence against bacterial pathogens. In this study, we investigated the role of staphylococcal

  3. LukMF' is the major secreted leukocidin of bovine Staphylococcus aureus and is produced in vivo during bovine mastitis

    Vrieling, Manouk; Boerhout, Eveline M; van Wigcheren, Glenn F; Koymans, Kirsten J; Mols-Vorstermans, Tanja G; de Haas, Carla J C; Aerts, Piet C; Daemen, Ineke J J M; van Kessel, Kok P M; Koets, Ad P|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/194306992; Rutten, Victor P M G|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/092848028; Nuijten, Piet J M; van Strijp, Jos A G; Benedictus, Lindert|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/37157742X

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major human and animal pathogen and a common cause of mastitis in cattle. S. aureus secretes several leukocidins that target bovine neutrophils, crucial effector cells in the defence against bacterial pathogens. In this study, we investigated the role of staphylococcal

  4. LukMF′ is the major secreted leukocidin of bovine Staphylococcus aureus and is produced in vivo during bovine mastitis

    Vrieling, Manouk; Boerhout, Eveline M.; Wigcheren, Van Glenn F.; Koymans, Kirsten J.; Mols-Vorstermans, Tanja G.; Haas, de Carla J.C.; Aerts, Piet C.; Daemen, Ineke J.J.M.; Kessel, Van Kok P.M.; Koets, Ad P.; Rutten, Victor P.M.G.; Nuijten, Piet J.M.; Strijp, van Jos A.G.; Benedictus, Lindert

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major human and animal pathogen and a common cause of mastitis in cattle. S. aureus secretes several leukocidins that target bovine neutrophils, crucial effector cells in the defence against bacterial pathogens. In this study, we investigated the role of staphylococcal

  5. Uranium: Memories of the Little Big Horn

    White, G. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    In this work the author discusses the future of the uranium industry. The author believes that uranium prices are unlikely to rise to a level that predicates the rebirth of the uranium industry, and doubts that U.S. production of uranium will exceed 30 to 35 percent of U.S. requirements. The author doubts that the U.S. government will take any action toward protecting the U.S. uranium production industry, but he does believe that a U.S. uranium production industry will survive and include in-situ and by product producers and producers with higher grades and rigorous cost control

  6. The Impact of Commodity Price Shocks in a Major Producing Economy. The Case of Copper and Chile

    Michael Pedersen

    2015-01-01

    The present study analyzes how copper price shocks affect macroeconomic variables in Chile, which is the largest producer in the world of this commodity. It is taken into account that shocks with different sources may have different impacts and a separation is made between supply, demand, and specific copper demand shocks. The empirical analysis is based on a structural VAR model, where shocks are identified by sign restrictions, i.e. restrictions are imposed on impulse-response functions. In...

  7. Lawrence Livermore Laboratory concept for uranium recovery from seawater

    Gregg, D.; Wang, F.

    1980-01-01

    The Lawrence Livermore Laboratory concept for uranium recovery from seawater involves the following process steps: (1) produce activated carbon via a coal gasification plant; (2) contact activated carbon sorbent with seawater using a settling process (no pumping of seawater); (3) vacuum activated carbon from sea floor; (4) gasify or burn activated carbon (further concentrating the uranium in the ash); (5) extract the uranium from the rich ash ore by conventional techniques. The process advantages are: (1) eliminates seawater pumping, the need for an illuent, and the need for a fresh water wash; (2) should result in much lower capital investment and regional process energy. Major process issues are: (1) uranium loading on activated carbon; (2) activated carbon modifications required to improve the sorbtion performance; (3) activated carbon particle size needed to meet system requirements; (4) minimization of sorbent losses when contacted with seawater

  8. Uranium recovery from AVLIS slag

    D'Agostino, A.E.; Mycroft, J.R.; Oliver, A.J.; Schneider, P.G.; Richardson, K.L.

    2000-01-01

    Uranium metal for the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) project was to have been produced by the magnesiothermic reduction of uranium tetrafluoride. The other product from this reaction is a magnesium fluoride slag, which contains fine and entrained natural uranium as metal and oxide. Recovery of the uranium through conventional mill leaching would not give a magnesium residue free of uranium but to achieve more complete uranium recovery requires the destruction of the magnesium fluoride matrix and liberation of the entrapped uranium. Alternate methods of carrying out such treatments and the potential for recovery of other valuable byproducts were examined. Based on the process flowsheets, a number of economic assessments were performed, conclusions were drawn and the preferred processing alternatives were identified. (author)

  9. Yellowcake processing in uranium recovery

    Paul, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    This information relates to the recovery of uranium from uranium peroxide yellowcake produced by precipitation with hydrogen peroxide. The yellowcake is calcined at an elevated temperature to effect decomposition of the yellowcake to uranium oxide with the attendant evolution of free oxygen. The calcination step is carried out in the presence of a reducing agent which reacts with the free oxygen, thus retarding the evolution of chlorine gas from sodium chloride in the yellowcake. Suitable reducing agents include ammonia producing compounds such as ammonium carbonate and ammonium bicarbonate. Ammonium carbonate and/or ammonium bicarbonate may be provided in the eluant used to desorb the uranium from an ion exchange column

  10. Yellowcake processing in uranium recovery

    Paul, J.M.

    1981-10-06

    This information relates to the recovery of uranium from uranium peroxide yellowcake produced by precipitation with hydrogen peroxide. The yellowcake is calcined at an elevated temperature to effect decomposition of the yellowcake to uranium oxide with the attendant evolution of free oxygen. The calcination step is carried out in the presence of a reducing agent which reacts with the free oxygen, thus retarding the evolution of chlorine gas from sodium chloride in the yellowcake. Suitable reducing agents include ammonia producing compounds such as ammonium carbonate and ammonium bicarbonate. Ammonium carbonate and/or ammonium bicarbonate may be provided in the eluant used to desorb the uranium from an ion exchange column.

  11. Argentinian uranium production

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    A profit-making process for the exploitation of low grade uranium is presented. The process of lixiviation will be used, which will make it possible to obtain a final product whose humidity level will not exceed 10% and whose uranium oxide content will be no less than 68%. The operations of the plant are described. The plant can produce between 100 and 150 t of U 3 O 8 /yr in the form of yellow cake

  12. Uranium - the nuclear fuel

    Smith, E.E.N.

    1976-01-01

    A brief history is presented of Canadian uranium exploration, production, and sales. Statistics show that Canada is a good customer for its own uranium due to a rapidly expanding nuclear power program. Due to an average 10 year lag between commencement of exploration and production, and with current producers sold out through 1985, it is imperative that exploration efforts be increased. (E.C.B.)

  13. Draft genome sequences of Escherichia coli O113:H21 strains recovered from a major produce-production region in California

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli is a foodborne and waterborne pathogen and is responsible for outbreaks of human gastroenteritis. This report documents the draft genome sequences of seven O113:H21 strains recovered from livestock, wildlife, and soil samples collected in a major agricultural r...

  14. The Namibian uranium mining model

    Swiegers, Wotan; Tibinyane, Axel

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: • Namibia wishes to be a world class producer of Uranium and a prosperous country to achieve the Nation’s 2030 Vision. • The Government and the Uranium Industry formed a Smart Partnership to protect our ‘Brand’. • The Government and the Uranium Industry are committed to implement ‘world best practices’. • Namibia will be guided by the IAEA and the WNA.

  15. US uranium market developments

    Krusiewski, S.V.; Patterson, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    Domestic uranium delivery commitments have risen significantly since January 1979, with the bulk of deliveries scheduled after 1990. Much of the long-term procurement will be obtained from captive production. However, buyers have adjusted their delivery schedules in the near term, deferring some procurement to later years, including a portion of planned captive production. Under current commitments, US imports of foreign uranium in the 1981 to 1985 period will be greater than our exports of domestic uranium. The anticipated supply of domestic uranium through 1985 is clearly more than adequate to fill the probable US demand in the meantime, uranium producers are continuing their efforts to increase future domestic supply by their considerable investments in new or expanded mine and mill facilities. Since January 1980, average contract prices including market-price settlements, for 1980 uranium deliveries have increased slightly, but average market-price settlements made this year have decreased by several dollars. While the general trend of US uranium prices has been upward since we began reporting price data in 1973, some reductions in average prices for future deliveries appeared in 1980. The softening of prices for new procurement can be expected to be increasingly apparent in future surveys

  16. Production of uranium dioxide

    Hart, J.E.; Shuck, D.L.; Lyon, W.L.

    1977-01-01

    A continuous, four stage fluidized bed process for converting uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) to ceramic-grade uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) powder suitable for use in the manufacture of fuel pellets for nuclear reactors is disclosed. The process comprises the steps of first reacting UF 6 with steam in a first fluidized bed, preferably at about 550 0 C, to form solid intermediate reaction products UO 2 F 2 , U 3 O 8 and an off-gas including hydrogen fluoride (HF). The solid intermediate reaction products are conveyed to a second fluidized bed reactor at which the mol fraction of HF is controlled at low levels in order to prevent the formation of uranium tetrafluoride (UF 4 ). The first intermediate reaction products are reacted in the second fluidized bed with steam and hydrogen at a temperature of about 630 0 C. The second intermediate reaction product including uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) is conveyed to a third fluidized bed reactor and reacted with additional steam and hydrogen at a temperature of about 650 0 C producing a reaction product consisting essentially of uranium dioxide having an oxygen-uranium ratio of about 2 and a low residual fluoride content. This product is then conveyed to a fourth fluidized bed wherein a mixture of air and preheated nitrogen is introduced in order to further reduce the fluoride content of the UO 2 and increase the oxygen-uranium ratio to about 2.25

  17. Surficial origin of North American pitchblende and related uranium deposits

    Langford, F.F.

    1977-01-01

    The ubiquitous association of pitchblende uranium deposits with terrestrial sediments is believed to be the natural result of formation of the orebodies by surficial processes operating under continental conditions. The major uranium deposits of North America illustrate this. The quartz-pebble conglomerate uranium deposits of Elliot Lake, Ontario, have thorium-rich uranium minerals that indicate a detrital origin. With the development of an oxygenic atmosphere before 1,700 m.y. ago, uranium was transported in solution in meteoric surface and near-surface ground water, and produced pitchblende veins in fractures in the basement and in lava flows in terrestrial environments. This accounts for the closee association of fluvial sediments with the pitchblende deposits at Beaverlodge, Rabbit Lake, Baker Lake, and Great Bear Lake, Canada. The development of land plants about 300 m.y. ago produced favorable environments within the terrestrial sandstones themselves, and resulted in the tabular uranium orebodies of the Colorado Plateau. The close relation of tabular orebodies to sedimentation is apparent when compared to recent fluvial sedimentation. In Wyoming, the stratigraphic restriction of the boundary-roll deposits to a few zones in Eocene rocks results from their being remobilized tabular deposits

  18. Uranium deposits in Africa

    Wilpolt, R.H.; Simov, S.D.

    1979-01-01

    Africa is not only known for its spectacular diamond, gold, copper, chromium, platinum and phosphorus deposits but also for its uranium deposits. At least two uranium provinces can be distinguished - the southern, with the equatorial sub-province; and the south Saharan province. Uranium deposits are distributed either in cratons or in mobile belts, the first of sandstone and quartz-pebble conglomerate type, while those located in mobile belts are predominantly of vein and similar (disseminated) type. Uranium deposits occur within Precambrian rocks or in younger platform sediments, but close to the exposed Precambrian basement. The Proterozoic host rocks consist of sediments, metamorphics or granitoids. In contrast to Phanerozoic continental uranium-bearing sediments, those in the Precambrian are in marginal marine facies but they do contain organic material. The geology of Africa is briefly reviewed with the emphasis on those features which might control the distribution of uranium. The evolution of the African Platform is considered as a progressive reduction of its craton area which has been affected by three major Precambrian tectonic events. A short survey on the geology of known uranium deposits is made. However, some deposits and occurrences for which little published material is available are treated in more detail. (author)

  19. Uranium production economics in Australia

    Sorentino, C.M.R.; Butler, R.D.; Thomas, C.M.; McIlveen, G.R.; Huxlin, M.E.

    1990-02-01

    This review of the economics of production of uranium in Australia provides a detailed description of eleven important uranium deposits including capital and production costs estimates and supply curves. For each mine a detailed assessment has been made of its potential production capacity to the year 2000. Socio-economic factors that play an all-too-important role in the Australian uranium industry are extensively reviewed to provide an insight into the factors affecting Australia's ability to supply. The study is based on a detailed computer-based economic engineering model where all major costs such as labor, consumables and capital recovery charges are analyzed for each mine, and levellised break-even prices determined. It is argued that at the present low market prices, the three on-going operations are profitable, and at least three other deposits could be brought to viable production, given the necessary Government approval. Several other deposits appear to be marginal at the set Australian export floor price of US$26 per pound. Annual production could be raised from about 6,000 tonnes of U 3 O 8 to 16,000 tonnes by the turn of century, with the development of three additional deposits. It is concluded that, if Australian producers were allowed to compete freely on the international market, annual production would pass the 10,000 tonne/annum mark between 1995 and 2000. 35 figs., 38 tabs., 81 refs

  20. Precise coulometric titration of uranium in a high-purity uranium metal and in uranium compounds

    Tanaka, Tatsuhiko; Yoshimori, Takayoshi

    1975-01-01

    Uranium in uranyl nitrate, uranium trioxide and a high-purity uranium metal was assayed by the coulometric titration with biamperometric end-point detection. Uranium (VI) was reduced to uranium (IV) by solid bismuth amalgam in 5M sulfuric acid solution. The reduced uranium was reoxidized to uranium (VI) with a large excess of ferric ion at a room temperature, and the ferrous ion produced was titrated with the electrogenerated manganese(III) fluoride. In the analyses of uranium nitrate and uranium trioxide, the results were precise enough when the error from uncertainty in water content in the samples was considered. The standard sample of pure uranium metal (JAERI-U4) was assayed by the proposed method. The sample was cut into small chips of about 0.2g. Oxides on the metal surface were removed by the procedure shown by National Bureau of Standards just before weighing. The mean assay value of eleven determinations corrected for 3ppm of iron was (99.998+-0.012) % (the 95% confidence interval for the mean), with a standard deviation of 0.018%. The proposed coulometric method is simple and permits accurate and precise determination of uranium which is matrix constituent in a sample. (auth.)

  1. Developments in uranium in 1986

    Chenoweth, W.L.

    1987-01-01

    Imported uranium and low prices continued to plague the domestic uranium industry and, as a result, the Secretary of Energy declared the domestic industry to be nonviable for the second straight year. Uranium exploration expenditures in the US declined for the eighth consecutive year. In 1986, an estimated $19 million was spent on uranium exploration, including 1.9 million ft of surface drilling. This drilling was done mainly in producing areas and in areas of recent discoveries. Production of uranium concentrate increased in 1986, when 13.8 million lb of uranium oxide (U 3 O 8 ) were produced, a 22% increase over 1985. Uranium produced as the result of solution mining and as the by-product of phosphoric acid production accounted for about 37% of the total production in the US. At the end of 1986, only 6 uranium mills were operating in the US. Canada continued to dominate the world market. The development under way at the huge Olympic Dam deposit in Australia will increase that country's production. US uranium production is expected to show a small decrease in 1987. 3 figures, 2 tables

  2. Distribution of uranium-bearing phases in soils from Fernald

    Buck, E.C.; Brown, N.R.; Dietz, N.L.

    1993-01-01

    Electron beam techniques have been used to characterize uranium-contaminated soils and the Fernald Site, Ohio. Uranium particulates have been deposited on the soil through chemical spills and from the operation of an incinerator plant on the site. The major uranium phases have been identified by electron microscopy as uraninite, autunite, and uranium phosphite [U(PO 3 ) 4 ]. Some of the uranium has undergone weathering resulting in the redistribution of uranium within the soil

  3. Uranium in South Africa

    Ford, M.A.

    1993-01-01

    The history, sources, mineralogy, extraction metallurgy, conversion, and enrichment of uranium in South Africa is reviewed. Over the past 40 years extraction plants were built at 27 sites, and over 140 kt of uranium have been produced. Older plants have had to adapt to changing market conditions, no single technology has had the opportunity to become entrenched, and the costs have been reduced to a third of those of the original flowsheet. The research efforts aimed at developing the country's nuclear raw materials have been particularly rewarding, as they have enabled South Africa to become a world leader in the extraction of uranium from low-grade ores and to develop methods for uranium enrichment and the production of nuclear fuels. 43 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs

  4. The uranium market prospects

    Lloyd, R.

    1981-01-01

    A historical analysis of the uranium market points out the cyclical nature of the market and suggests that the spot price, exploration levels, and mill capacity utilization rate are dependent on economic factors. An examination of the current uranium market suggests that the effects of the forecasted surplus supply, the diminishing returns in exploration and the long lead times and high costs of development may mean that future production levels are uncertain. The general prospects for the uranium industry are also uncertain because of barriers to trade, environmental regulations and public opinion. The paper concludes that by the use of long term contracts, appropriate inventory policy and greater discussion between producers and consumers the prospects for the uranium market can be made more certain and further imbalances in demand and supply can be avoided. (author)

  5. Preparation of uranium-230 as a new uranium tracer

    Hashimoto, T.; Kido, K.; Sotobayashi, T.

    1977-01-01

    A uranium isotope, 230 U(T=20.8 d), was produced from the 231 Pa(γ,n) 230 Pa→viaβ - decay 230 U process with a bremsstrahlung irradiation on a protactinium target. After standing for about one month to obtain a maximal growth of 230 U, the uranium was chemically purified, applying an ion-exchange method. The purity of the 230 U obtained was examined with alpha spectrometry and an intrinsic alpha peak due to 230 U as a new uranium tracer in an alpha spectrometric analysis of uranium isotopes is described. (author)

  6. Fluvial sedimentology of a major uranium-bearing sandstone - A study of the Westwater Canyon member of the Morrison Formation, San Juan Basin, New Mexico

    Turner-Peterson, C.E.

    1986-01-01

    The Westwater Canyon Member of the Morrison Formation, the main ore-bearing sandstone in the San Juan basin, consists of a sequence of vertically stacked braided stream deposits. Three fluvial units within the sequence can be delineated in the basin. Volcanic pebbles are abundant in the middle fluvial unit, in a zone that forms a crude time line. A pronounced thickening of sandstone in the Westwater Canyon Member north of Gallup, once believed to be the apex of a large alluvial fan, is now thought to merely reflect a greater accumulation of sediment in response to downwarping of the basin in that area. Provenance studies suggest that highlands that contributed detritus to Westwater Canyon streams were located several hundred kilometers to the west and southwest of the San Juan basin, and thus fan apices would also have been several hundred kilometers upstream. The fluvial units recognized in the basin may well be coalesced distal fan deposits, but are probably best interpreted as vertically stacked braided steam sequences. Facies changes in fine-grained interbeds of the Westwater Canyon probably have greater significance in terms of localizing ore than any special attribute of the fluvial sandstones themselves. Uranium ore generally occurs in sandstones that are interbedded with greenish-gray lacustrine mudstones. Pore waters that were expelled from these mudstones are thought to have been the source of the pore-filling organic matter (humate) associated with primary uranium ore in nearby sandstones

  7. Taxonomic classification of world map units in crop producing areas of Argentina and Brazil with representative US soil series and major land resource areas in which they occur

    Huckle, H. F. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    The most probable current U.S. taxonomic classification of the soils estimated to dominate world soil map units (WSM)) in selected crop producing states of Argentina and Brazil are presented. Representative U.S. soil series the units are given. The map units occurring in each state are listed with areal extent and major U.S. land resource areas in which similar soils most probably occur. Soil series sampled in LARS Technical Report 111579 and major land resource areas in which they occur with corresponding similar WSM units at the taxonomic subgroup levels are given.

  8. Uranium from German nuclear power projects of the 1940s - a nuclear forensic investigation

    Mayer, Klaus; Wallenius, Maria; Luetzenkirchen, Klaus; Horta, Joan; Nicholl, Adrian; Rasmussen, Gert; Belle, Pieter van; Varga, Zsolt [European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), Karlsruhe (Germany); Buda, Razvan; Erdmann, Nicole [European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), Karlsruhe (Germany); Institut fuer Kernchemie, Universitaet Mainz (Germany); Kratz, Jens-Volker; Trautmann, Norbert [Institut fuer Kernchemie, Universitaet Mainz (Germany); Fifield, L. Keith; Tims, Stephen G. [Department of Nuclear Physics, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT (Australia); Froehlich, Michaela B. [Department of Nuclear Physics, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT (Australia); Universitaet Wien, Fakultaet fuer Chemie, Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie, Vienna (Austria); Steier, Peter [Universitaet Wien, Fakultaet fuer Physik, Isotopenforschung und Kernphysik, Vienna (Austria)

    2015-11-02

    Here we present a nuclear forensic study of uranium from German nuclear projects which used different geometries of metallic uranium fuel. Through measurement of the {sup 230}Th/{sup 234}U ratio, we could determine that the material had been produced in the period from 1940 to 1943. To determine the geographical origin of the uranium, the rare-earth-element content and the {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio were measured. The results provide evidence that the uranium was mined in the Czech Republic. Trace amounts of {sup 236}U and {sup 239}Pu were detected at the level of their natural abundance, which indicates that the uranium fuel was not exposed to any major neutron fluence. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. Uranium from German nuclear power projects of the 1940s - a nuclear forensic investigation

    Mayer, Klaus; Wallenius, Maria; Luetzenkirchen, Klaus; Horta, Joan; Nicholl, Adrian; Rasmussen, Gert; Belle, Pieter van; Varga, Zsolt; Buda, Razvan; Erdmann, Nicole; Kratz, Jens-Volker; Trautmann, Norbert; Fifield, L. Keith; Tims, Stephen G.; Froehlich, Michaela B.; Steier, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Here we present a nuclear forensic study of uranium from German nuclear projects which used different geometries of metallic uranium fuel. Through measurement of the 230 Th/ 234 U ratio, we could determine that the material had been produced in the period from 1940 to 1943. To determine the geographical origin of the uranium, the rare-earth-element content and the 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratio were measured. The results provide evidence that the uranium was mined in the Czech Republic. Trace amounts of 236 U and 239 Pu were detected at the level of their natural abundance, which indicates that the uranium fuel was not exposed to any major neutron fluence. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. US uranium market developments

    Krusiewski, S.V.; Thomas, D.C.

    1981-01-01

    Domestic uranium delivery commitments for the 1981 to 1990 period reached a peak in the July 1980 survey and then declined in the January 1981 survey and again in the July 1981 survey. However, there are sizable sales contracts through the mid-1980s. In the latter part of this decade, unfilled requirements increase which can provide a needed market for domestic producers. Older contracts are helping to keep the average contract prices, including market price settlements, rather stable. However, average market price settlements decreased from data reported in January 1981, but some of these deliveries represent settlement of litigation. Foreign uranium procurement is scheduled to exceed deliveries of US uranium to foreign buyers in the 1981 to 1990 period. However, the actual use of foreign uranium has been quite low as US enrichment services customers have preferred to buy US uranium. Based on over four and one-half years of data, only about 7% foreign uranium has been brought to the Department of Energy for enrichment. Inventories of natural and enriched uranium in buyers' hands continue to increase. This is a concern to the uranium-producing industry. However, the industry should not be concerned about DOE-owned inventories, which are needed to supply Government requirements. There is absolutely no plan to dispose of DOE inventories on the commercial market. Capital expenditures reached a peak of $800 million in 1979. This decreased to $780 million in 1980, although higher expenditures were planned for the year. A very sharp reduction in plans for 1981, from $830 to $450 million, has been reported. A further reduction to $350 million is planned for 1982. However, it is interesting to note that the planned expenditures for 1982 are above the expenditures for 1975, a period of industury expansion

  11. Uranium complex recycling method of purifying uranium liquors

    Elikan, L.; Lyon, W.L.; Sundar, P.S.

    1976-01-01

    Uranium is separated from contaminating cations in an aqueous liquor containing uranyl ions. The liquor is mixed with sufficient recycled uranium complex to raise the weight ratio of uranium to said cations preferably to at least about three. The liquor is then extracted with at least enough non-interfering, water-immiscible, organic solvent to theoretically extract about all of the uranium in the liquor. The organic solvent contains a reagent which reacts with the uranyl ions to form a complex soluble in the solvent. If the aqueous liquor is acidic, the organic solvent is then scrubbed with water. The organic solvent is stripped with a solution containing at least enough ammonium carbonate to precipitate the uranium complex. A portion of the uranium complex is recycled and the remainder can be collected and calcined to produce U 3 O 8 or UO 2

  12. The significance of zircon characteristic and its uranium concentration in evaluation of uranium metallogenetic prospect

    Li Yaosong; Zhu Jiechen; Xia Yuliang

    1992-02-01

    Zircon characteristic and its relation to uranium metallogenetic process have been studied on the basis of physics properties and chemical compositions. It is indicated that the colour of zircon crystal is related to uranium concentration; on the basis of method of zircon population type of Pupin J.P., the sectional plan of zircon population type has been designed, from which result that zircon population type of uranium-producing rock body is distributed mainly in second section, secondly in fourth section; U in zircon presents synchronous increase trend with Th, Hf and Ta; the uranium concentration in zircon from uranium-producing geologic body increases obviously and its rate of increase is more than that of the uranium concentration in rock; the period, in which uranium concentration in zircon is increased, is often related to better uranium-producing condition in that period of this area. 1785 data of the average uranium concentration in zircon have been counted and clear regularity has been obtained, namely the average uranium concentrations in zircon in rich uranium-producing area, rock, geologic body and metallogenetic zone are all higher than that in poor or no uranium-producing area, rock, geologic body and metallogenetic zone. This shows that the average uranium concentration in zircon within the region in fact reflects the primary uranium-bearing background in region and restricts directly follow-up possibility of uranium mineralization. On the basis of this, the uranium source conditions of known uranium metallogenetic zones and prospective provinces have been discussed, and the average uranium concentrations in zircon from magmatic rocks for 81 districts have been contrasted and graded, and some districts in which exploration will be worth doing further are put forward

  13. Uranium: the nuclear fuel. [Canada

    Smith, E E.N. [Eldorado Nuclear Ltd., Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    1976-05-01

    A brief history is presented of Canadian uranium exploration, production, and sales. Statistics show that Canada is a good customer for its own uranium due to a rapidly expanding nuclear power program. Due to an average 10 year lag between commencement of exploration and production, and with current producers sold out through 1985, it is imperative that exploration efforts be increased.

  14. Laser excitation spectroscopy of uranium

    Solarz, R.W.

    1976-01-01

    Laser excitation spectroscopy, recently applied to uranium enrichment research at LLL, has produced a wealth of new and vitally needed information about the uranium atom and its excited states. Among the data amassed were a large number of cross sections, almost a hundred radiative lifetimes, and many level assignments. Rydberg states, never before observed in uranium or any of the actinides, have been measured and cataloged. This work puts a firm experimental base under laser isotope separation, and permits a choice of the laser frequencies most appropriate for practical uranium enrichment

  15. Market for natural uranium conversion. Commercial aspect

    Durret, L.F.

    1986-01-01

    The main activity of COMURHEX is the conversion into uranium hexafluoride of uranium concentrates from mines and owned by electricity producers. Capacities of the 5 uranium converters in the Western World are compared. About 50% of COMUREX turnover is exported. Evolution of the market and of stockpile are reviewed [fr

  16. Czechoslovak uranium

    Pluskal, O.

    1992-01-01

    Data and knowledge related to the prospecting, mining, processing and export of uranium ores in Czechoslovakia are presented. In the years between 1945 and January 1, 1991, 98,461.1 t of uranium were extracted. In the period 1965-1990 the uranium industry was subsidized from the state budget to a total of 38.5 billion CSK. The subsidies were put into extraction, investments and geologic prospecting; the latter was at first, ie. till 1960 financed by the former USSR, later on the two parties shared costs on a 1:1 basis. Since 1981 the prospecting has been entirely financed from the Czechoslovak state budget. On Czechoslovak territory uranium has been extracted from deposits which may be classified as vein-type deposits, deposits in uranium-bearing sandstones and deposits connected with weathering processes. The future of mining, however, is almost exclusively being connected with deposits in uranium-bearing sandstones. A brief description and characteristic is given of all uranium deposits on Czechoslovak territory, and the organization of uranium mining in Czechoslovakia is described as is the approach used in the world to evaluate uranium deposits; uranium prices and actual resources are also given. (Z.S.) 3 figs

  17. Australian uranium: the boomerang brand

    Borton, D.

    1988-01-01

    An overview of the status of each of the existing three sites of mining activity and the major sites of exploration for uranium in Australia is provided. It is intended to be a source of useful information for all people involved in debating the issues of uranium mining. 1 map., ills

  18. Application of probabilistic event attribution in the summer heat extremes in the western US to emissions traced to major industrial carbon producers

    Mera, R. J.; Allen, M. R.; Mote, P.; Ekwurzel, B.; Frumhoff, P. C.; Rupp, D. E.

    2015-12-01

    Heat waves in the western US have become progressively more severe due to increasing relative humidity and nighttime temperatures, increasing the health risks of vulnerable portions of the population, including Latino farmworkers in California's Central Valley and other socioeconomically disadvantaged communities. Recent research has shown greenhouse gas emissions doubled the risk of the hottest summer days during the 2000's in the Central Valley, increasing public health risks and costs, and raising the question of which parties are responsible for paying these costs. It has been argued that these costs should not be taken up solely by the general public through taxation, but that additional parties can be considered, including multinational corporations who have extracted and marketed a large proportion of carbon-based fuels. Here, we apply probabilistic event attribution (PEA) to assess the contribution of emissions traced to the world's 90 largest major industrial carbon producers to the severity and frequency of these extreme heat events. Our research uses very large ensembles of regional climate model simulations to calculate fractional attribution of policy-relevant extreme heat variables. We compare a full forcings world with observed greenhouse gases, sea surface temperatures and sea ice extent to a counter-factual world devoid of carbon pollution from major industrial carbon producers. The results show a discernable fraction of record-setting summer temperatures in the western US during the 2000's can be attributed to emissions sourced from major carbon producers.

  19. Optimization of uranium leach mining

    Schecter, R.S.; Bommer, P.M.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of well pattern and well spacing on uranium recovery and oxidant utilization are considered. As expected, formation permeability heterogeneities and anisotropies are found to be important issues requiring careful consideration; however, it also is shown that the oxidant efficiency and the produced uranium solution concentrations are sensitive to the presence of other minerals competing with uranium for oxidant. If the Damkohler number for competing minerals, which measures the speed of the reaction, exceeds that for uranium, the competing mineral will have to be oxidized completely to recover a large proportion of the uranium. If the Damkohler number is smaller, it may be possible to achieve considerable selectivity for uranium by adjusting the well spacing. 9 refs

  20. The Toxicity of Depleted Uranium

    Wayne Briner

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Depleted uranium (DU is an emerging environmental pollutant that is introduced into the environment primarily by military activity. While depleted uranium is less radioactive than natural uranium, it still retains all the chemical toxicity associated with the original element. In large doses the kidney is the target organ for the acute chemical toxicity of this metal, producing potentially lethal tubular necrosis. In contrast, chronic low dose exposure to depleted uranium may not produce a clear and defined set of symptoms. Chronic low-dose, or subacute, exposure to depleted uranium alters the appearance of milestones in developing organisms. Adult animals that were exposed to depleted uranium during development display persistent alterations in behavior, even after cessation of depleted uranium exposure. Adult animals exposed to depleted uranium demonstrate altered behaviors and a variety of alterations to brain chemistry. Despite its reduced level of radioactivity evidence continues to accumulate that depleted uranium, if ingested, may pose a radiologic hazard. The current state of knowledge concerning DU is discussed.

  1. Recovery of uranium from lignites

    Hurst, F.J.

    1980-01-01

    Uranium in raw lignite is associated with the organic matter and is readily soluble in acid (and carbonate) solutions. However, beneficiation techniques were not successful for concentrating the uranium or removing part of the reagent-consuming materials. Once the lignite was heated, the uranium became much less soluble in both acid and carbonate solutions, and complete removal of carbon was required to convert it back to a soluble form. Proper burning improves acid-leaching efficiency; that is, it reduces the reagent consumption and concentrates the uranium, thereby reducing plant size for comparable uranium throughput, and it eliminates organic fouling of leach liquors. Restrictions are necessary during burning to prevent the uranium from becoming refractory. The most encouraging results were obtained by flash-burning lignite at 1200 to 1300 0 C and utilizing the released SO 2 to supplement the acid requirement. The major acid consumers were aluminum and iron

  2. Recovering uranium from phosphoric acid

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    Wet-process phosphoric acid contains a significant amount of uranium. This uranium totals more than 1,500 tons/yr in current U.S. acid output--and projections put the uranium level at 8,000 tons/yr in the year 2000. Since the phosphoric acid is a major raw material for fertilizers, uranium finds its way into those products and is effectively lost as a resource, while adding to the amount of radioactive material that can contaminate the food chain. So, resource-conservation and environmental considerations both make recovery of the uranium from phosphoric acid desirable. This paper describes the newly developed process for recovering uranium from phosphoric acid by using solvent-extraction technique. After many extractants had been tested, the researchers eventually selected the combination of di (2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (DEPA) and trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO) as the most suitable. The flowscheme of the process is included

  3. International uranium market

    Neff, T.L.; Jacoby, H.D.

    1980-12-01

    Discussed in this report are 1) how one might think about uranium demand, resources and supply, 2) how producers and consumers see the market and are likely to behave, including specifics about export and import commitments, and 3) how these actors are brought together in the international market. The general conclusion is that much of current anxiety about future uranium supply results primarily from a brief but difficult period in the mid- to late-1970's; and that current conditions and trends are favorable (at least to consumers) that there is now little basis for concern. Inventories contractual positions and producer commitments--when compared with realistic (or even unrealistic) demand estimates--imply a buyer's market for at least the next decade. The result will be considerable increases in market flexibility and resilience to shock, and real prices that are low relative to those of the past few years. There is a need to reconsider assumptions about desired directions of technological development, for many current programs were planned in an era of pessimism about uranium supply and process. Similar questions must be raided about nonproliferation policies that depend on some level of control of fuel supplies by the industrial nations. With a soft and more diversified uranium market, leverage that may have existed in the past is rapidly being eroded. Finally, as world prices turn soft, there may be significant problems created for U.S. uranium producers, who have relatively high costs in relation to several large-scale foreign suppliers

  4. Canadian uranium policy and resource appraisal

    Merlin, H.B.

    1976-01-01

    This paper reviews the history of uranium production in Canada, leading up to the turn-around from a buyer's to a seller's market in early 1974. The specific objectives of Canada's new uranium policy, announced in that year, are then spelled out and explained. The paper also describes the producing uranium deposits in Canada, the definition of uranium resources and projected production capacity. Finally, there is a section on the proposed laws governing non-resident ownership provisions in the industry. (author)

  5. Uranium 2003 resources, production and demand

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Paris

    2004-01-01

    Uranium 2003: Resources, Production and Demand paints a detailed statistical profile of the world uranium industry in the areas of exploration, resource estimates, production and reactor-related requirements. It provides substantial new information from all major uranium production centres in Africa, Australia, Eastern Europe and North America and for the first time, a report for Turkmenistan. Also included are international expert analyses and projections of nuclear generating capacity and reactor-related uranium requirements through 2020.

  6. The Supply of Medical Radioisotopes. Policy Options for Ensuring Long-term Supply Security of Molybdenum-99 and/or Technetium-99m Produced Without Highly Enriched Uranium Targets

    Westmacott, Chad; Cameron, Ron

    2012-01-01

    Following the shortages of the key medical radioisotopes, molybdenum-99 ( 99 Mo) and its daughter technetium-99m (' 99m Tc), the OECD-Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) created the High-level Group on the Security of Supply of Medical Radioisotopes (HLG-MR). Since 2009, this group has identified the reasons for the isotope shortages and developed a policy approach to address the challenges to a long-term secure supply of these important medical isotopes. On top of the ongoing concerns related to long-term reliability, all current long-term major 99 Mo-producing nations have agreed to convert to using low-enriched uranium (LEU) targets for the production of 99 Mo. This decision was made based on important nonproliferation reasons; however, the conversion will have potential impacts on the global supply chain - both in terms of costs and available capacity. Recognising that conversion is important and will occur, and also recognising the need to ensure a long-term secure supply of 99 Mo/' 99m Tc, the NEA, along with stakeholders, examined potential policy options that could be used by to ensure a reliable supply of 99 Mo and/or ' 99m Tc produced without highly enriched uranium (HEU), consistent with the time frames and policies of the HLG-MR. This discussion paper provides the various policy options available to governments to encourage a reliable supply of 99 Mo and/or ' 99m Tc produced without HEU. The examination of these options was done through the lens of ensuring a reliable supply, consistent with the time frames and policies of the HLG-MR. The options described in this document are meant to meet this objective by taking one of three general actions: - Making the option of purchasing or producing non-HEU-based 99 Mo and/or ' 99m Tc more attractive. - Making the option of purchasing or producing HEU-based 99 Mo and/or ' 99m Tc less attractive. - Limiting access to HEU-based 99 Mo and/or ' 99m Tc. This paper presents the options in each category and provides some views

  7. Uranium ores

    Poty, B.; Roux, J.

    1998-01-01

    The processing of uranium ores for uranium extraction and concentration is not much different than the processing of other metallic ores. However, thanks to its radioactive property, the prospecting of uranium ores can be performed using geophysical methods. Surface and sub-surface detection methods are a combination of radioactive measurement methods (radium, radon etc..) and classical mining and petroleum prospecting methods. Worldwide uranium prospecting has been more or less active during the last 50 years, but the rise of raw material and energy prices between 1970 and 1980 has incited several countries to develop their nuclear industry in order to diversify their resources and improve their energy independence. The result is a considerable increase of nuclear fuels demand between 1980 and 1990. This paper describes successively: the uranium prospecting methods (direct, indirect and methodology), the uranium deposits (economical definition, uranium ores, and deposits), the exploitation of uranium ores (use of radioactivity, radioprotection, effluents), the worldwide uranium resources (definition of the different categories and present day state of worldwide resources). (J.S.)

  8. Uranium market

    Rubini, L.A.; Asem, M.A.D.

    1990-01-01

    The historical development of the uranium market is present in two periods: The initial period 1947-1970 and from 1970 onwards, with the establishment of a commercial market. The world uranium requirements are derived from the corresponding forecast of nuclear generating capacity, with, particular emphasis to the brazilian requirements. The forecast of uranium production until the year 2000 is presented considering existing inventories and the already committed demand. The balance between production and requirements is analysed. Finally the types of contracts currently being used and the development of uranium prices in the world market are considered. (author)

  9. Uranium enrichment

    1990-01-01

    This report looks at the following issues: How much Soviet uranium ore and enriched uranium are imported into the United States and what is the extent to which utilities flag swap to disguise these purchases? What are the U.S.S.R.'s enriched uranium trading practices? To what extent are utilities required to return used fuel to the Soviet Union as part of the enriched uranium sales agreement? Why have U.S. utilities ended their contracts to buy enrichment services from DOE?

  10. Uranium and nuclear market, the horizon post-Fukushima

    Lelièvre, F.

    2014-01-01

    Post-Fukushima, most countries have confirmed the importance of nuclear in their energy mix. We are seeing a level of new reactor construction unparalleled in decades with 61 nuclear power plants under construction and 5 plants under completion around the world. Global nuclear capacity is expected to increase by 50% over the next two decades. And more reactors mean more demand for uranium. However, uranium industry is currently grappling with near-term challenges, particularly in the form of depressed uranium prices. Recently several uranium producers announced production delays or cancellations in response to low prices, including major suppliers. As the current price levels, including long-term prices, are not sufficient to stimulate new production, future supplies are in question due to the long-lead nature of uranium mine development. Despite the near- to medium-term issues of our industry, the fundamentals of the uranium market remain strong over the long term - and these are the drivers of the Areva’s mining growth strategy over the coming years. (author)

  11. Uranium and thorium recovery in thorianite ore-preliminary results

    Gaiotte, Joao V.M. [Universidade Federal de Alfenas, Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil); Villegas, Raul A.S.; Fukuma, Henrique T., E-mail: rvillegas@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: htfukuma@cnen.gov.br [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Lab. de Pocos de Caldas

    2011-07-01

    This work presents the preliminary results of the studies aiming to develop a hydrometallurgical process to produce uranium and thorium concentrates from thorianite ore from Amapa State, Brazil. This process comprises two major parts: acid leaching and Th/U recovery using solvent extraction strategies. Thorianite ore has a typical composition of 60 - 70% of thorium, 8 - 10% lead and 7 - 10% uranium. Sulfuric acid leaching operational conditions were defined as follows: acid/ore ratio 7.5 t/t, ore size below 65 mesh (Tyler), 2 hours leaching time and temperature of 100 deg C. Leaching tests results showed that uranium and thorium recovery exceeded 95%, whereas 97% of lead ore content remained in the solid form. Uranium and thorium simultaneous solvent extraction is necessary due to high sulfate concentration in the liquor obtained from leaching, so the Primene JM-T primary anime was used for this extraction step. Aqueous raffinate from extraction containing sulfuric acid was recycled to the leaching step, reducing acid uptake around 60%, to achieve a net sulfuric acid consumption of 3 t/t of ore. Uranium and thorium simultaneous stripping was performed using sodium carbonate solution. In the aqueous stripped it was added sulfuric acid at pH 1.5, followed by a second solvent extraction step using the tertiary amine Alamine 336. The following stripping step was done with a solution of sodium chloride, resulting in a final solution of 23 g L-1 uranium. (author)

  12. Reaction of uranium and the fluorocarbon FC-75

    Young, R. H.

    1985-04-01

    Because of criticality concerns with water cooling in enriched uranium upgrading, a fluorocarbon has been evaluated as a replacement coolant for internal module components in the Plasma Separation Process (PSP). The interaction of bulk uranium and of powdered uranium with FC-75 has been investigated at temperatures between 200 and 700 C. The gas pressure and the metal temperature were monitored as a function of time. Modest temperature changes of 50 to 100 C were observed for the bulk uranium/fluorocarbon reaction. Much larger changes (up to 1000 C) were noted for the reaction involving high surface area uranium powder. These temperature transients, particularly for the powdered uranium reaction, were short-lived ( 10 seconds) and indicative of the formation of a protective layer of reaction products. Analysis of residual gas products by infrared spectroscopy indicated that one potentially serious hazard, UF6, was not present; however, several small toxic fluorocarbons were produced by thermolysis and/or reaction. X-ray diffraction analysis of the residual solids indicated UF4 and UO2 were the major solid products.

  13. Uranium in Canada

    1989-01-01

    In 1988 Canada's five uranium producers reported output of concentrate containing a record 12,470 metric tons of uranium (tU), or about one third of total Western world production. Shipments exceeded 13,200 tU, valued at $Cdn 1.1 billion. Most of Canada's uranium output is available for export for peaceful purposes, as domestic requirements represent about 15 percent of production. The six uranium marketers signed new sales contracts for over 11,000 tU, mostly destined for the United States. Annual exports peaked in 1987 at 12,790 tU, falling back to 10,430 tU in 1988. Forward domestic and export contract commitments were more than 70,000 tU and 60,000 tU, respectively, as of early 1989. The uranium industry in Canada was restructured and consolidated by merger and acquisition, including the formation of Cameco. Three uranium projects were also advanced. The Athabasca Basin is the primary target for the discovery of high-grade low-cost uranium deposits. Discovery of new reserves in 1987 and 1988 did not fully replace the record output over the two-year period. The estimate of overall resources as of January 1989 was down by 4 percent from January 1987 to a total (measured, indicated and inferred) of 544,000 tU. Exploration expenditures reached $Cdn 37 million in 1987 and $59 million in 1988, due largely to the test mining programs at the Cigar Lake and Midwest projects in Saskatchewan. Spot market prices fell to all-time lows from 1987 to mid-1989, and there is little sign of relief. Canadian uranium production capability could fall below 12,000 tU before the late 1990s; however, should market conditions warrant output could be increased beyond 15,000 tU. Canada's known uranium resources are more than sufficient to meet the 30-year fuel requirements of those reactors in Canada that are now or are expected to be in service by the late 1990s. There is significant potential for discovering additional uranium resources. Canada's uranium production is equivalent, in

  14. Recoil properties of antimony isotopes produced by the reaction of 570 MeV and 18.2 GeV protons with uranium

    Hagebø, E

    1969-01-01

    Using the method of thick target and thick catchers, the ranges and other recoil properties of 13 (12) antimony isotopes between A = 115 and A = 131 (130) have been measured for the reaction of 570 MeV (18·2 GeV) protons with uranium. The kinetic energies T are almost independent of product mass number at 570 MeV but show a strong dependence at 18·2 GeV, the lightest isotopes having only about half the kinetic energy of the heavy ones. \\\\ \\\\The cascade deposition energies for production of antimony isotopes are almost equal at 570 MeV and 18·2 GeV and fit well to straight lines of the form E$^{∗}$ (A, Z) = E$^{∗}$ (A$_{0}$, Z) + b(A − A$_{0}$). Exceptions are the cascade deposition energies for $^{115}$Sb and $^{116}$Sb which seem to be somewhat too high at 18·2 GeV. By comparison with other work it seems that the slope $b$ of these lines is independent of product element, target and of proton irradiation energy above 450 MeV. \\\\ \\\\If we assume at 570 MeV, that the fissioning nucleus is a uranium ...

  15. Development of the Alligator Rivers uranium deposits

    Bath, L.J.; Farthing, J.W.; Warner, R.K.

    1980-01-01

    The Alligator Rivers Uranium Province in the Northern Territory of Australia has proven uranium deposits at Jabiluka, Ranger, Koongarra and Nabarlek which contain more than 80% of the country's low-cost reasonably assured uranium resources estimated to be 290,000 t U. Following the Government's decision in 1977 to proceed with the further development of Australia's uranium resources, the region is destined to become a major producer of U 3 O 8 for export. At the time of the decision provision was made for strict controls to protect the environment, the granting of Aboriginal land rights and the creation of a major national park. The paper describes the progress made to achieve these objectives. The open-cut mining methods to be used at Ranger, Koongarra and Nabarlek are described, as well as the underground mining operations proposed for Jabiluka. Each of the treatment plants will use the conventional acid leach, solvent extraction purification process for uranium recovery. The characteristics of the treatment operations are outlined. The water-management schemes, tailings disposal methods and procedures for environment protection are also discussed. The proposed initial production capacities of the operations are: Jabiluka 2540 (expanding to 7630 in the fifth year of production); Ranger 2540 (expanding to 5080 when commercially practicable); Koongarra 850; and Nabarlek 920 t U/a. Both Nabarlek and Ranger have been granted Government development approval and construction is proceeding at each site with the expectation that normal commercial production will commence towards the end of 1980 and 1981, respectively. Planning for the Jabiluka and Koongarra projects has reached an advanced stage; each are undergoing environmental procedures and will have to reach agreement with the Aboriginals on environmental and other matters before site work can commence. (author)

  16. Separation of uranium isotopes

    Ehrfeld, W.; Ehrfeld, U.

    1977-01-01

    In the nuclear fuel cycle, uranium enrichment is not a principal problem of technological feasibility. Several processes exist for producing LWR fuel and the enrichment method can be selected in consideration of economical, environmental, and political aspects. To date, the gaseous diffusion process constitutes the major part of enrichment capacity. This process has been well demonstrated for over 30 years and, as a matter of fact, no major technological and economical progress is to be expected in the future. Because of their comparatively high development potential, the centrifuge and the separation nozzle method may become increasingly favorable in economics. The development of the centrifuge process which is superior by its low specific energy consumption aims at technological improvements. In the separation nozzle process which offers the advantage of a comparatively simple technology a further reduction of the specific energy consumption is to be expected because of the thermodynamically favorable separation mechanism of this process. Laser isotope separation methods are still on the laboratory scale, although large financial funds have been spent. (orig.) [de

  17. Global Uranium And Thorium Resources: Are They Adequate To Satisfy Demand Over The Next Half Century?

    Lambert, I. B.

    2012-04-01

    This presentation will consider the adequacy of global uranium and thorium resources to meet realistic nuclear power demand scenarios over the next half century. It is presented on behalf of, and based on evaluations by, the Uranium Group - a joint initiative of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency, of which the author is a Vice Chair. The Uranium Group produces a biennial report on Uranium Resources, Production and Demand based on information from some 40 countries involved in the nuclear fuel cycle, which also briefly reviews thorium resources. Uranium: In 2008, world production of uranium amounted to almost 44,000 tonnes (tU). This supplied approximately three-quarters of world reactor requirements (approx. 59,000 tU), the remainder being met by previously mined uranium (so-called secondary sources). Information on availability of secondary sources - which include uranium from excess inventories, dismantling nuclear warheads, tails and spent fuel reprocessing - is incomplete, but such sources are expected to decrease in market importance after 2013. In 2008, the total world Reasonably Assured plus Inferred Resources of uranium (recoverable at less than 130/kgU) amounted to 5.4 million tonnes. In addition, it is clear that there are vast amounts of uranium recoverable at higher costs in known deposits, plus many as yet undiscovered deposits. The Uranium Group has concluded that the uranium resource base is more than adequate to meet projected high-case requirements for nuclear power for at least half a century. This conclusion does not assume increasing replacement of uranium by fuels from reprocessing current reactor wastes, or by thorium, nor greater reactor efficiencies, which are likely to ameliorate future uranium demand. However, progressively increasing quantities of uranium will need to be mined, against a backdrop of the relatively small number of producing facilities around the world, geopolitical uncertainties and

  18. Inhalation of uranium nanoparticles: respiratory tract deposition and translocation to secondary target organs in rats.

    Petitot, Fabrice; Lestaevel, Philippe; Tourlonias, Elie; Mazzucco, Charline; Jacquinot, Sébastien; Dhieux, Bernadette; Delissen, Olivia; Tournier, Benjamin B; Gensdarmes, François; Beaunier, Patricia; Dublineau, Isabelle

    2013-03-13

    Uranium nanoparticles (fuel cycle and during remediation and decommissioning of nuclear facilities. Explosions and fires in nuclear reactors and the use of ammunition containing depleted uranium can also produce such aerosols. The risk of accidental inhalation of uranium nanoparticles by nuclear workers, military personnel or civilian populations must therefore be taken into account. In order to address this issue, the absorption rate of inhaled uranium nanoparticles needs to be characterised experimentally. For this purpose, rats were exposed to an aerosol containing 10⁷ particles of uranium per cm³ (CMD=38 nm) for 1h in a nose-only inhalation exposure system. Uranium concentrations deposited in the respiratory tract, blood, brain, skeleton and kidneys were determined by ICP-MS. Twenty-seven percent of the inhaled mass of uranium nanoparticles was deposited in the respiratory tract. One-fifth of UO₂ nanoparticles were rapidly cleared from lung (T(½)=2.4 h) and translocated to extrathoracic organs. However, the majority of the particles were cleared slowly (T(½)=141.5 d). Future long-term experimental studies concerning uranium nanoparticles should focus on the potential lung toxicity of the large fraction of particles cleared slowly from the respiratory tract after inhalation exposure. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Uranium mining

    Lange, G.

    1975-01-01

    The winning of uranium ore is the first stage of the fuel cycle. The whole complex of questions to be considered when evaluating the profitability of an ore mine is shortly outlined, and the possible mining techniques are described. Some data on uranium mining in the western world are also given. (RB) [de

  20. Separation of uranium isotopes

    Porter, J.T.

    1980-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are disclosed for separation of uranium isotopes by selective isotopic excitation of photochemically reactive uranyl salt source material at cryogenic temperatures, followed by chemical separation of selectively photochemically reduced U+4 thereby produced from remaining uranyl source material

  1. Report from the Uranium Supply Committee

    1980-12-01

    Based on studies of world uranium supply made by NEA, IAEA and other national and international bodies the Danish Uranium Supply Committee has examined the uranium supply situation. The Committee concludes that there will be no lack of natural uranium in a period until year 2025 provided that more advanced and uranium economic reactors will be effiective from the beginning of the 21th century. However it will be necessary to discover new resources and to use low-grade uranium resources. Through long term contracts with the users the uranium producers should be urged to continue their production. The Committee recommends that uranium prospecting in Greenland continues in order to get a through knowledge of Greenlandic resources. The establishment of further reprocessing capacity should be speeded up, whereas the Committee do not foresee any shortages with regard to enrichment, conversion, and fuel element production. (BP)

  2. Uranium metal production by molten salt electrolysis

    Takasawa, Yutaka

    1999-01-01

    Atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) is a promising uranium enrichment technology in the next generation. Electrolytic reduction of uranium oxides into uranium metal is proposed for the preparation of uranium metal as a feed material for AVLIS plant. Considering economical performance, continuos process concept and minimizing the amount of radioactive waste, an electrolytic process for producing uranium metal directly from uranium oxides will offer potential advantages over the existing commercial process. Studies of uranium metal by electrolysis in fluoride salts (BaF 2 -LiF-UF 4 (74-11-15 w/o) at 1150-1200degC, using both a laboratory scale apparatus and an engineering scale one, and continuous casting of uranium metal were carried out in order to decide the optimum operating conditions and the design of the industrial electrolytic cells. (author)

  3. Uranium resources

    1976-01-01

    This is a press release issued by the OECD on 9th March 1976. It is stated that the steep increases in demand for uranium foreseen in and beyond the 1980's, with doubling times of the order of six to seven years, will inevitably create formidable problems for the industry. Further substantial efforts will be needed in prospecting for new uranium reserves. Information is given in tabular or graphical form on the following: reasonably assured resources, country by country; uranium production capacities, country by country; world nuclear power growth; world annual uranium requirements; world annual separative requirements; world annual light water reactor fuel reprocessing requirements; distribution of reactor types (LWR, SGHWR, AGR, HWR, HJR, GG, FBR); and world fuel cycle capital requirements. The information is based on the latest report on Uranium Resources Production and Demand, jointly issued by the OECD's Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) and the International Atomic Energy Agency. (U.K.)

  4. Uranium purchasers reassert their influence

    Braatz, U.

    1976-01-01

    The growing uranium requirement in the Western world in the long run can be met only by a participation of the electricity generating industry and the governments of the participating countries in the development costs of new deposits, according to statements by leading representatives of the uranium producers and consumers at a symposium organized by the Uranium Institute in the summer of 1976. On the other hand, the uranium market is likely to get under more and more pressure because of the delays in nuclear power programs worldwide. It is probable that the price of uranium will soon have reached its peak for a long time to come. Uranium producers also will have to bear in mind that a price policy which makes the use of uranium unattractive compared with other sources of energy could well result in a situation in which the largest uranium consumers would build more conventional thermal power stations to bridge the time to commercial introduction of fast breeder reactors. (orig.) [de

  5. Uranium 2007 resources, production and demand

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Paris

    2008-01-01

    Based on official information received from 40 countries, Uranium 2007 provides a comprehensive review of world uranium supply and demand as of 1st January 2007, as well as data on global uranium exploration, resources, production and reactor-related requirements. It provides substantive new information from major uranium production centres in Africa, Australia, Central Asia, Eastern Europe and North America. Projections of nuclear generating capacity and reactor-related uranium requirements through 2030 are also featured, along with an analysis of long-term uranium supply and demand issues. It finds that with rising demand and declining inventories, uranium prices have increased dramatically in recent years. As a result, the uranium industry is undergoing a significant revival, bringing to an end a period of over 20 years of underinvestment.

  6. Uranium and nuclear issues

    1983-01-01

    This seminar focussed on the major issues affecting the future of the entire nuclear fuel cycle. In particular it covered issues bearing on the formation of public policy in relation to the use of uranium as an energy source: economic risk, industrial risks, health effects, site selection, environmental issues, and public acceptance

  7. Modulation of allergic immune responses by mucosal application of recombinant lactic acid bacteria producing the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1.

    Daniel, C; Repa, A; Wild, C; Pollak, A; Pot, B; Breiteneder, H; Wiedermann, U; Mercenier, A

    2006-07-01

    Probiotic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are able to modulate the host immune system and clinical trials have demonstrated that specific strains have the capacity to reduce allergic symptoms. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the potential of recombinant LAB producing the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1 for mucosal vaccination against birch pollen allergy. Recombinant Bet v 1-producing Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactococcus lactis strains were constructed. Their immunogenicity was compared with purified Bet v 1 by subcutaneous immunization of mice. Intranasal application of the live recombinant strains was performed to test their immunomodulatory potency in a mouse model of birch pollen allergy. Bet v 1 produced by the LAB was recognized by monoclonal anti-Bet v 1 and IgE antibodies from birch pollen-allergic patients. Systemic immunization with the recombinant strains induced significantly lower IgG1/IgG2a ratios compared with purified Bet v 1. Intranasal pretreatment led to reduced allergen-specific IgE vs enhanced IgG2a levels and reduced interleukin (IL)-5 production of splenocytes in vitro, indicating a shift towards non-allergic T-helper-1 (Th1) responses. Airway inflammation, i.e. eosinophils and IL-5 in lung lavages, was reduced using either Bet v 1-producing or control strains. Allergen-specific secretory IgA responses were enhanced in lungs and intestines after pretreatment with only the Bet v 1-producing strains. Mucosal vaccination with live recombinant LAB, leading to a shift towards non-allergic immune responses along with enhanced allergen-specific mucosal IgA levels offers a promising approach to prevent systemic and local allergic immune responses.

  8. Uranium supply and demand

    Spriggs, M J

    1976-01-01

    Papers were presented on the pattern of uranium production in South Africa; Australian uranium--will it ever become available; North American uranium resources, policies, prospects, and pricing; economic and political environment of the uranium mining industry; alternative sources of uranium supply; whither North American demand for uranium; and uranium demand and security of supply--a consumer's point of view. (LK)

  9. Overview of uranium exploration, 1974 to 1981

    Chenoweth, W.L.

    1981-01-01

    During the seven years covered by this paper, uranium exploration in the United States was concentrated in the vicinity of major producing areas such as the San Juan Basin, the Wyoming Basins, the Texas Coastal Plain, the Paradox Basin, and northeastern Washington. Discoveries announced during the period in the Henry Mountains, Utah, the McDermitt caldera in Nevada and Oregon, and in central Colorado, triggered great increases in exploration in those areas. Exploration expenditures in nonsandstone environments during these seven years amounted to $270 million, or 18% of total exploration expenditures. The short-term exploration picture is grim; much depends on an upswing in the market. However, the authors believe that the long-term outlook is bright, with many promising areas not yet fully explored. Unfortunately, most of these areas will not be explored until uranium market conditions improve greatly

  10. PRODUCTION OF URANIUM TUBING

    Creutz, E.C.

    1958-04-15

    The manufacture of thin-walled uranium tubing by the hot-piercing techique is described. Uranium billets are preheated to a temperature above 780 d C. The heated billet is fed to a station where it is engaged on its external surface by three convex-surfaced rotating rollers which are set at an angle to the axis of the billet to produce a surface friction force in one direction to force the billet over a piercing mandrel. While being formed around the mandrel and before losing the desired shape, the tube thus formed is cooled by a water spray.

  11. Restrictions on the transnational movement of uranium

    Rowden, M.A.; Kraemer, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    This paper analyses the United States policy on uranium imports. Recently, the US has moved closer to placing legislative restrictions on enrichment by DOE of foreign-origin uranium and has imposed a ban on the import of South African uranium ore and uranium oxide. American uranium producers have also sought relief in the courts against competition from abroad. The impetus for these events comes from a glut of uranium on world markets coupled with the existence of uranium mines outside the US with significant cost advantages over US producers. The remedies sought by the latter, if adopted, hold the potential for broad disruption of significant commercial interests in international trade in nuclear materials and could adversely affect US nonproliferation objectives (NEA) [fr

  12. Uranium 2005 Resources, Production and Demand

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Paris. Nuclear Energy Agency

    2006-01-01

    Published every other year, Uranium Resources, Production, and Demand, or the "Red Book" as it is commonly known, is jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency. It is the recognised world reference on uranium and is based on official information received from 43 countries. This 21st edition presents the results of a thorough review of world uranium supplies and demand as of 1st January 2005 and provides a statistical profile of the world uranium industry in the areas of exploration, resource estimates, production and reactor-related requirements. It provides substantial new information from all major uranium production centres in Africa, Australia, Central Asia, Eastern Europe and North America. Projections of nuclear generating capacity and reactor-related uranium requirements through 2025 are provided as well as a discussion of long-term uranium supply and demand issues. This edition focuses on recent price and production increases that could signal major c...

  13. Uranium 2014 resources, production and demand

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Paris

    2014-01-01

    Published every other year, Uranium Resources, Production, and Demand, or the "Red Book" as it is commonly known, is jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency. It is the recognised world reference on uranium and is based on official information received from 43 countries. It presents the results of a thorough review of world uranium supplies and demand and provides a statistical profile of the world uranium industry in the areas of exploration, resource estimates, production and reactor-related requirements. It provides substantial new information from all major uranium production centres in Africa, Australia, Central Asia, Eastern Europe and North America. Long-term projections of nuclear generating capacity and reactor-related uranium requirements are provided as well as a discussion of long-term uranium supply and demand issues. This edition focuses on recent price and production increases that could signal major changes in the industry.

  14. Australia's uranium export potential

    Mosher, D.V.

    1981-01-01

    During the period 1954-71 in Australia approximately 9000 MT of U 3 O 8 was produced from five separate localities. Of this, 7000 MT was exported to the United Kingdom and United States and the balance stockpiled by the Australian Atomic Energy Commission (AAEC). Australia's uranium ore reserves occur in eight deposits in three states and the Northern Territory. However, 83% of Australia's reserves are contained in four deposits in lower Proterozoic rocks in the East Alligator River region of the Northern Territory. The AAEC has calculated Australia's recoverable uranium reserves by eliminating estimated losses during the mining and milling of the ores. AAEC has estimated reasonably assured resources of 289,000 MT of uranium at a recovery cost of less than US$80 per kilogram uranium. The companies have collectively announced a larger ore reserve than the Australian Atomic Energy Commission. This difference is a result of the companies adopting different ore reserve categories. On August 25, 1977, the federal government announced that Australia would develop its uranium resources subject to stringent environmental controls, recognition of Aboriginal Land Rights, and international safeguards. Australian uranium production should gradually increase from 1981 onward, growing to 10,000 to 15,000 MT by 1985-86. Further increases in capacity may emerge during the second half of the 1980s when expansion plans are implemented. Exploration for uranium has not been intensive due to delays in developing the existing deposits. It is likely that present reserves can be substantially upgraded if more exploration is carried out. 6 figures, 3 tables

  15. Uranium exploration in Australia

    Battey, G.C.; Hawkins, B.W.

    1977-01-01

    As a result of exploration which recommenced in 1966 Australia's uranium reserves increased from 6,200 tonnes in 1967 to 227,000 tonnes uranium by June 1976. Most discoveries in the early 1950's were made by prospectors. The increase in reserves during the past decade is the result of exploration by companies utilising improved technology in areas selected as geologically favourable. These reserves were established at relatively low cost. In the Alligator Rivers Uranium Province the ''vein'' type deposits at Jabiluka, Ranger, Koongarra and Nabarlek contain 17% of the world's reserves. Most of these discoveries resulted from the investigation of airborne radiometric anomalies but cover over the prospective host rocks will necessitate the future use of costlier and more indirect exploration techniques. There was exploration for sandstone type uranium deposits in most of Australia's sedimentary basins. The greatest success was achieved in the Lake Frome Basin in South Australia. Other deposits were found in the Ngalia and Amadeus Basins in Central Australia and in the Westmoreland area, N.W. Queensland. A major uranium deposit was found in an unusual environment at Yeelirrie, Western Australia where carnotite occurs in a caliche and clay host which fills a shallow, ancient drainage channel. Although caliche occurrences are relatively widespread on the Precambrian shield no other economic deposit has been found. Recent discoveries in the Georgetown area of Queensland indicate the presence of another uranium province but it is too early to assess its potential. The ore occurs in clastic sediments at the base of a volcanic sequence overlying a Precambrian basement. Several companies which have established large uranium reserves have a number of additional attractive prospects. Exploration activity in Australia in 1975 was at a lower level than in previous years, but the potential for discovering further deposits is considered to be high

  16. Uranium deposits of Zaire

    Kitmut, D.; Malu wa Kalenga

    1979-01-01

    Since April 1960, following the closing of the Shinkolobwe mine, the Republic of Zaire has ceased to be a producer of uranium. Nevertheless, Gecamines (Generale des carrieres et mines du Zaire), a wholly state-owned company, is continuing its research on uranium occurrences which have been discovered in its concession in the course of aerial radiometric prospecting. The most recent campaign was the one carried out in 1969 and 1972 by Hunting Company. On-the-ground verification of these shows has not yet resulted in the discovery of a workable deposit. There are other sectors cutting across Zaire which might well contain uranium deposits: this is true of the sedimentary phosphates of the region of Lower Zaire as well as of the frontier region between Zaire and the Central African Empire. However, no detailed exploration work has yet been carried out. (author)

  17. Uranium dioxide calcining apparatus

    Cole, E.A.; Peterson, R.S.

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to an improved continuous calcining apparatus for consistently and controllably producing from calcinable reactive solid compounds of uranium, such as ammonium diuranate, uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) having an oxygen to uranium ratio of less than 2.2. The apparatus comprises means at the outlet end of a calciner kiln for receiving hot UO 2 , means for cooling the UO 2 to a temperature of below 100 deg C and conveying the cooled UO 2 to storage or to subsequent UO 2 processing apparatus where it finally comes into contact with air, the means for receiving cooling and conveying being sealed to the outlet end of the calciner and being maintained full of UO 2 and so operable as to exclude atmospheric oxygen from coming into contact with any UO 2 which is at elevated temperatures where it would readily oxidize, without the use of extra hydrogen gas in said means. (author)

  18. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Australia

    1977-08-01

    In Australia most exploration for uranium has been conducted by companies and individuals. The geological mapping and airborne radiometric surveying conducted by the BMR is made available to interested persons. Exploration for uranium in Australia can be divided into two periods - 1947 to 1961 and 1966-1977. During the first period the Commonwealth Government introduced measures to encourage uranium exploration including a system of rewards for the discovery of uranium ore. This reward system resulted in extensive activity by prospectors particularly in the known mineral fields. Equipped with a Geiger counter or scintillometer, individuals with little or no experience in prospecting could compete with experienced prospectors and geologists. During this period several relative small uranium deposits were discovered generally by prospectors who found outcropping mineralisation. The second phase of uranium exploration in Australia began in 1966 at which time reserves amounted to only 6,200 tonnes of uranium and by 3 977 reserves had been increased to 289,000 tonnes. Most of the exploration was done by companies with substantial exploration budgets utilising more advanced geological and geophysical techniques. In the field of airborne radiometer the development of multi-channel gamma ray spectrometers with large volume crystal detectors increased the sensitivity of the tool as a uranium detector and resulted in several major discoveries. Expenditure or exploration for uranium increased from 1966 to 1971 but has declines in recent years. After listing the major geological elements of Australia, its uranium production and resources are discussed. During the period 1954-71 the total production of uranium concentrate in Australia amounted to 7,780 tonnes of uranium, and was derived from deposits at Rum Jungle (2,990 tonnes U) and the South Alligator River (610 tonnes U) in the Northern Territory, Mary Kathleen (3,460 tonnes U) in Queensland and Radium Hill (720 tonnes U

  19. Uranium extraction in phosphoric acid

    Araujo Figueiredo, C. de

    1984-01-01

    Uranium is recovered from the phosphoric liquor produced from the concentrate obtained from phosphorus-uraniferous mineral from Itataia mines (CE, Brazil). The proposed process consists of two extraction cycles. In the first one, uranium is reduced to its tetravalent state and then extracted by dioctylpyrophosphoric acid, diluted in Kerosene. Re-extraction is carried out with concentrated phosphoric acid containing an oxidising agent to convert uranium to its hexavalent state. This extract (from the first cycle) is submitted to the second cycle where uranium is extracted with DEPA-TOPO (di-2-hexylphosphoric acid/tri-n-octyl phosphine oxide) in Kerosene. The extract is then washed and uranium is backextracted and precipitated as commercial concentrate. The organic phase is recovered. Results from discontinuous tests were satisfactory, enabling to establish operational conditions for the performance of a continuous test in a micro-pilot plant. (Author) [pt

  20. Inhalation hazards to uranium miners

    Cross, F.T.

    1986-01-01

    This project is investigating levels of uranium mine air contaminants, using both large and small experimental animals to model human respiratory system diseases. Lung cancer and deaths by degenerative lung disease have reached epidemic proportions among uranium miners, but the cause-effect relationships for these diseases are based on inadequate epidemiological data. This project identifies uranium mine air agents or combinations of agents (both chemical and radiological), and their exposure levels, that produce respiratory tract lesions, including respiratory epithelial carcinoma, pneumoconiosis, and emphysema. Histopathologic data from serially sacrificed rats are reported for approximately 20- to 640- working-level-month (WLM) radon-daughter exposures delivered at one-tenth the rate of previous exposures. Exposure of male rats to radon daughters and uranium ore dust continues, along with exposure of male and female beagle dogs to uranium ore dust alone

  1. Uranium market and resources

    Capus, G.; Arnold, T.

    2005-01-01

    Under the combined effect of various factors, such as interrogations related to facing the climatic changes, the increasing prices of oil versus announced decrease of its resources, the major geopolitical evolution and the remarkable development of Asia, we live nowadays a revival of nuclear power in the very front of stage. In tis context, the following question is posed: could the nuclear fission be a sustainable source of energy when taking into consideration the availability of uranium resources? The article aims at pinpointing the knowledge we have about the world uranium resources, their limits of uncertainty and the relation between knowledge resources and market evolution. To conclude, some susceptible tracks are proposed to improve the using process of uranium resources particularly in softening the impact of high prices

  2. Uranium, depleted uranium, biological effects; Uranium, uranium appauvri, effets biologiques

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    Physicists, chemists and biologists at the CEA are developing scientific programs on the properties and uses of ionizing radiation. Since the CEA was created in 1945, a great deal of research has been carried out on the properties of natural, enriched and depleted uranium in cooperation with university laboratories and CNRS. There is a great deal of available data about uranium; thousands of analyses have been published in international reviews over more than 40 years. This presentation on uranium is a very brief summary of all these studies. (author)

  3. Uranium toxicology

    Ferreyra, Mariana D.; Suarez Mendez, Sebastian

    1997-01-01

    In this paper are presented the methods and procedures optimized by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) for the determination of: natural uranium mass, activity of enriched uranium in samples of: urine, mucus, filters, filter heads, rinsing waters and Pu in urine, adopted and in some cases adapted, by the Environmental Monitoring and Internal Dosimetry Laboratory. The analyzed material corresponded to biological and environmental samples belonging to the staff professionally exposed that work in plants of the nuclear fuel cycle. For a better comprehension of the activities of this laboratory, it is included a brief description of the uranium radiochemical toxicity and the limits internationally fixed to preserve the workers health

  4. Uranium-enriched granites in Sweden

    Wilson, M.R.; Aakerblom, G.

    1980-01-01

    Granites with uranium contents higher than normal occur in a variety of geological settings in the Swedish Precambrian, and represent a variety of granite types and ages. They may have been generated by the anatexis of continental crust or processes occurring at a much greater depth. They commonly show enrichment in F, Sn, W and/or Mo. Only in one case is an important uranium mineralization thought to be directly related to a uranium-enriched granite, while the majority of epigenetic uranium mineralizations with economic potential are related to hydrothermal processes in areas where the bedrock is regionally uranium-enhanced. (author)

  5. ERA`s Ranger uranium mine

    Davies, W. [Energy Resources of Australia Ltd., Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    1997-12-31

    Energy Resource of Australia (ERA) is a public company with 68% of its shares owned by the Australian company North Limited. It is currently operating one major production centre - Ranger Mine which is 260 kilometres east of Darwin, extracting and selling uranium from the Ranger Mine in the Northern Territory to nuclear electricity utilities in Japan, South Korea, Europe and North America. The first drum of uranium oxide from Ranger was drummed in August 1981 and operations have continued since that time. ERA is also in the process of working towards obtaining approvals for the development of a second mine - Jabiluka which is located 20 kilometres north of Ranger. The leases of Ranger and Jabiluka adjoin. The Minister for the Environment has advised the Minister for Resources and Energy that there does not appear to be any environmental issue which would prevent the preferred Jabiluka proposal from proceeding. Consent for the development of ERA`s preferred option for the development of Jabiluka is being sought from the Aboriginal Traditional Owners. Ranger is currently the third largest producing uranium mine in the world producing 4,237 tonnes of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} in the year to June 1997.

  6. Standard specification for uranium metal enriched to more than 15 % and less Than 20 % 235U

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2000-01-01

    1.1 This specification covers nuclear grade uranium metal that has either been processed through an enrichment plant, or has been produced by the blending of highly enriched uranium with other uranium, to obtain uranium of any 235U concentration below 20 % (and greater than 15 %) and that is intended for research reactor fuel fabrication. The scope of this specification includes specifications for enriched uranium metal derived from commercial natural uranium, recovered uranium, or highly enriched uranium. Commercial natural uranium, recovered uranium and highly enriched uranium are defined in Section 3. The objectives of this specification are to define the impurity and uranium isotope limits for commercial grade enriched uranium metal. 1.2 This specification is intended to provide the nuclear industry with a standard for enriched uranium metal which is to be used in the production of research reactor fuel. In addition to this specification, the parties concerned may agree to other appropriate conditions. ...

  7. Problems of natural uranium supply

    Huwyler, S [Eidgenoessisches Inst. fuer Reaktorforschung, Wuerenlingen (Switzerland)

    1977-11-01

    The estimated uranium reserves in the Western World and the forecast uranium requirement in this region make the supply of nuclear power stations appear guaranteed well beyond the turn of the century. At least in the next decade it will be possible to exploit the advantageous uranium reserves in low price category, provided that prospection activities are stepped up soon and production capacities are expanded in time which are not even fully utilized today. However, difficulties could arise earlier in those countries which have no uranium reserves of their own. There is an increasing tendency among uranium producing countries to link supplies of their uranium with restrictive conditions. This makes long term contractual uranium supply guarantees a most pressing matter for those countries which have no uranium of their own. Even if the delays in the addition of new nuclear power plants are likely to improve the supply situation in the next few years, supply shortages will have to be anticipated at least from the nineties onward, unless exploitation and dressing activities are expanded considerably and also low grade ores are included in the production. At the same time it appears that the use of plutonium fueled fast breeder reactors will be unavoidable in the nineties.

  8. Unconventional uranium resources in China

    Qi Fucheng; Zhang Zilong; Li Zhixing; Wang Zhiming; He Zhongbo; Wang Wenquan

    2011-01-01

    Unconventional uranium resources in China mainly include black-rock series, peat, salt lake and evaporitic rocks. Among them, uraniferous black-rock series, uraniferous phosphorite and uranium-polymetallic phosphorite connected with black-rock series are important types for the sustainable support of uranium resources in China. Down-faulting and epocontinental rift in continental margin are the most important and beneficial ore-forming environment for unconventional uranium resources of black-rock series in China and produced a series of geochemistry combinations, such as, U-Cd, U-V-Mo, U-V-Re, U-V-Ni-Mo and U-V-Ni-Mo-Re-Tl. Unconventional uranium resources of black-rock series in China is related to uranium-rich marine black-rock series which are made up of hydrothermal sedimentary siliceous rocks, siliceous phospheorite and carbonaceous-siliceous-pelitic rock and settled in the continental margin down-faulting and epicontinental rift accompanied by submarine backwash and marine volcano eruption. Hydrothermal sedimentation or exhalation sedimentary is the mechanism to form unconventional uranium resources in black-rock series or large scale uranium-polymetallic mineralization in China. (authors)

  9. Philippines targeting unconventional sources for uranium

    Reyes, R.

    2014-01-01

    The quest for uranium in the Philippines dates back in the mid–1950s and to date about 70% of the country has been systematically explored, from reconnaissance to some detailed level using the combined radiometric and geochemical survey methods. However, no major uranium deposit has been discovered so far, only some minor mineralization. Also, there is a general view that the geological environment of the Philippines is unfavourable for uranium based on the lack of similarity between the geological features of known uranium–producing districts around the world and that of the country. It is in this light that the search for uranium in the country shifted to unconventional sources. The first unconventional source of uranium (U) that is being looked into is from rare earth elements (REE)–thorium (Th) minerals. Radiometric measurements along the beaches in northern Palawan identified major REE–Th and minor U potential areas. Heavy beach and stream panned concentrate gave high values of REE and Th, including U within the Ombo and Erawan coastal areas. Preliminary evaluation conducted in these two prospective areas indicated; 1) in the Ombo area, an estimated reserve of 750 t of Th, 30,450 t of REE and 80 t of U contained in about 540,000 t of beach sand with a respective average grade of 0.14% Th, 5.64% REE and 0.015% U, and 2) in the Erawan area, an estimated total reserve of 2,200 t of Th, 113,430 t of REE and 150 t U contained in 2,450,00 t of beach sand with an average grade of 0.09% Th, 4.63% REE and 0.006% U, respectively. Major allanite and minor monazite are the minerals identified and the source of these heavy minerals is the Tertiary Kapoas granitic intrusive rocks. Another unconventional source is a base metal zone with numerous occurrences containing complex assemblages of Cu–Mo–U within the Larap–Paracale mineralized district in Camarines Norte province, in which uranium may be produced as a by–product. A private mining company conducted

  10. Rossing uranium

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    In this article the geology of the deposits of the Rossing uranium mine in Namibia is discussed. The planning of the open-pit mining, the blasting, drilling, handling and the equipment used for these processes are described

  11. Overseas uranium exploration by PNC

    Nagashima, Reiji; Iida, Yoshimasa; Shigeta, Naotaka; Takahashi, Osamu; Yamagishi, Akiko; Miyada, Hatsuho; Kobayashi, Takao

    1998-01-01

    Japan entirely depends on overseas countries for uranium resources for its nuclear electric power generation due to the lack of domestic resources. In order to secure a steady supply of natural uranium, Japanese government has implemented a long-term procurement policy through purchase contracts by private sectors, subsidizing private sectors' exploration and initial stage exploration outside the reach of private sectors' activity by PNC (Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation). The subsequent long slump in the price of uranium, however, led most of Japanese private sectors to discontinue their exploration activity. Upon this situation, PNC has pursued a little more advanced stage exploration in addition to basic research and initial stage exploration and has improved its exploration techniques to enable the discovery of deep-seated uranium ore deposits. As the result, PNC has acquired significant uranium exploration tenements and interests similar to those owned by major uranium companies such as Cameco and Cogema. PNC has also contributed to discovery of new uranium deposits. In this report, the history of PNC's activities and its role in the long-term uranium procurement policy are reviewed and it is also described about the outcome thorough its activities and future exploration trend and the tasks. (author)

  12. The uranium-plutonium breeder reactor fuel cycle

    Salmon, A.; Allardice, R.H.

    1979-01-01

    All power-producing systems have an associated fuel cycle covering the history of the fuel from its source to its eventual sink. Most, if not all, of the processes of extraction, preparation, generation, reprocessing, waste treatment and transportation are involved. With thermal nuclear reactors more than one fuel cycle is possible, however it is probable that the uranium-plutonium fuel cycle will become predominant; in this cycle the fuel is mined, usually enriched, fabricated, used and then reprocessed. The useful components of the fuel, the uranium and the plutonium, are then available for further use, the waste products are treated and disposed of safely. This particular thermal reactor fuel cycle is essential if the fast breeder reactor (FBR) using plutonium as its major fuel is to be used in a power-producing system, because it provides the necessary initial plutonium to get the system started. In this paper the authors only consider the FBR using plutonium as its major fuel, at present it is the type envisaged in all, current national plans for FBR power systems. The corresponding fuel cycle, the uranium-plutonium breeder reactor fuel cycle, is basically the same as the thermal reactor fuel cycle - the fuel is used and then reprocessed to separate the useful components from the waste products, the useful uranium and plutonium are used again and the waste disposed of safely. However the details of the cycle are significantly different from those of the thermal reactor cycle. (Auth.)

  13. Uranium, depleted uranium, biological effects

    2001-01-01

    Physicists, chemists and biologists at the CEA are developing scientific programs on the properties and uses of ionizing radiation. Since the CEA was created in 1945, a great deal of research has been carried out on the properties of natural, enriched and depleted uranium in cooperation with university laboratories and CNRS. There is a great deal of available data about uranium; thousands of analyses have been published in international reviews over more than 40 years. This presentation on uranium is a very brief summary of all these studies. (author)

  14. Uranium loans

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    When NUEXCO was organized in 1968, its founders conceived of a business based on uranium loans. The concept was relatively straightforward; those who found themselves with excess supplies of uranium would deposit those excesses in NUEXCO's open-quotes bank,close quotes and those who found themselves temporarily short of uranium could borrow from the bank. The borrower would pay interest based on the quantity of uranium borrowed and the duration of the loan, and the bank would collect the interest, deduct its service fee for arranging the loan, and pay the balance to those whose deposits were borrowed. In fact, the original plan was to call the firm Nuclear Bank Corporation, until it was discovered that using the word open-quotes Bankclose quotes in the name would subject the firm to various US banking regulations. Thus, Nuclear Bank Corporation became Nuclear Exchange Corporation, which was later shortened to NUEXCO. Neither the nuclear fuel market nor NUEXCO's business developed quite as its founders had anticipated. From almost the very beginning, the brokerage of uranium purchases and sales became a more significant activity for NUEXCO than arranging uranium loans. Nevertheless, loan transactions have played an important role in the international nuclear fuel market, requiring the development of special knowledge and commercial techniques

  15. Production, inventories and HEU in the world uranium market: Production's vital role

    Underhill, D.H.

    1997-01-01

    This paper analyses recent uranium supply and demand relationship and projects supply through 2010. The extremely depressed record low market prices have led to the ongoing annual inventory drawdown of over 25,000 t U resulting from the current 45% world production shortfall. The policy of the European Union and anti-dumping related activities in the USA are restricting imports of uranium from CIS producers to a majority of the world's nuclear utilities. These factors are reducing low priced uranium supply and forcing buyers to again obtain more of their requirements from producers. It discusses how the sale of Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) produced from of 550 t High Enriched Uranium (HEU) from Russia and Ukraine could potentially supply about 15% of world requirements through 2010. However, legislation currently being developed by the US Congress may ration the sale of this material, extending the LEU supply well into the next century. Nuclear generation capacity and its uranium requirements are projected to grow at about 1.5% through 2010. Demand for new uranium purchases is however, increasing at the much higher rate of 25-30% over the next 10-15 years. This increasing demand in the face of decreasing supply is resulting in a market recovery in which the spot price for non-CIS produced uranium has risen over 25% since October 1994. Prices will continue to increase as the market equilibrium shifts from a balance with alternative excess low priced supply to an equilibrium between production and demand. 19 refs, 14 figs, 2 tabs

  16. Formation and types of uranium deposits, uranium resources

    Dahlkamp, F.J.

    1975-01-01

    To begin with, the formation and origin of uranium deposits is described, and uranium deposits are classified into four basic categories. Of these, those that are of economic interest are described in detail with regard to their characteristic geological features, and their geographic distribution in the western world is outlined. The major facts and data regarding the geological and geochronological classification of these deposits and their size are given in tables and easy-to-interpret diagrams. (RB) [de

  17. International Training Centre, WNU — School of Uranium Production (Three Years Experience)

    Trojáček, J., E-mail: trojacek@diamo.cz [WNU-SUP. DIAMO, Straz pod Ralskem (Czech Republic)

    2014-05-15

    Following a joint meeting of the IAEA, OECD/NEA Uranium Group and the World Nuclear Association, in 2004 the shortage of skilled professional staff to support the expansion of the global uranium industry was a major topic of discussion. As a consequence of the concerns expressed at that meeting, in 2006 the World Nuclear University-School of Uranium Production was set up with the cooperation of the DIAMO State Enterprise at their site in the Czech Republic. The facility is now up and running and provides a range of technical training activities to help strengthen the skills base amongst all uranium producing countries, both current and future. The paper describes the history of the school so far and the range of activities on offer. (author)

  18. Enhancement of Extraction of Uranium from Seawater

    Al-Sheikhly, Mohamad [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Dietz, Travis [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Tsinas, Zois [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Tomaszewski, Claire [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Pazos, Ileana M. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Nigliazzo, Olga [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States); Li, Weixing [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States); Adel-Hadadi, Mohamad [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Barkatt, Aaron [Univ. of Palermo (Italy)

    2016-04-01

    Even at a concentration of 3 μg/L, the world’s oceans contain a thousand times more uranium than currently know terrestrial sources. In order to take advantage of this stockpile, methods and materials must be developed to extract it efficiently, a difficult task considering the very low concentration of the element and the competition for extraction by other atoms in seawater such as sodium, calcium, and vanadium. The majority of current research on methods to extract uranium from seawater are vertical explorations of the grafting of amidoxime ligand, which was originally discovered and promoted by Japanese studies in the late 1980s. Our study expands on this research horizontally by exploring the effectiveness of novel uranium extraction ligands grafted to the surface of polymer substrates using radiation. Through this expansion, a greater understanding of uranium binding chemistry and radiation grafting effects on polymers has been obtained. While amidoxime-functionalized fabrics have been shown to have the greatest extraction efficiency so far, they suffer from an extensive chemical processing step which involves treatment with powerful basic solutions. Not only does this add to the chemical waste produced in the extraction process and add to the method’s complexity, but it also significantly impacts the regenerability of the amidoxime fabric. The approach of this project has been to utilize alternative, commercially available monomers capable of extracting uranium and containing a carbon-carbon double bond to allow it to be grafted using radiation, specifically phosphate, oxalate, and azo monomers. The use of commercially available monomers and radiation grafting with electron beam or gamma irradiation will allow for an easily scalable fabrication process once the technology has been optimized. The need to develop a cheap and reliable method for extracting uranium from seawater is extremely valuable to energy independence and will extend the quantity of

  19. Enhancement of Extraction of Uranium from Seawater

    Al-Sheikhly, Mohamad; Dietz, Travis; Tsinas, Zois; Tomaszewski, Claire; Pazos, Ileana M.; Nigliazzo, Olga; Li, Weixing; Adel-Hadadi, Mohamad; Barkatt, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Even at a concentration of 3 @@g/L, the world@@@s oceans contain a thousand times more uranium than currently know terrestrial sources. In order to take advantage of this stockpile, methods and materials must be developed to extract it efficiently, a difficult task considering the very low concentration of the element and the competition for extraction by other atoms in seawater such as sodium, calcium, and vanadium. The majority of current research on methods to extract uranium from seawater are vertical explorations of the grafting of amidoxime ligand, which was originally discovered and promoted by Japanese studies in the late 1980s. Our study expands on this research horizontally by exploring the effectiveness of novel uranium extraction ligands grafted to the surface of polymer substrates using radiation. Through this expansion, a greater understanding of uranium binding chemistry and radiation grafting effects on polymers has been obtained. While amidoxime-functionalized fabrics have been shown to have the greatest extraction efficiency so far, they suffer from an extensive chemical processing step which involves treatment with powerful basic solutions. Not only does this add to the chemical waste produced in the extraction process and add to the method@@@s complexity, but it also significantly impacts the regenerability of the amidoxime fabric. The approach of this project has been to utilize alternative, commercially available monomers capable of extracting uranium and containing a carbon-carbon double bond to allow it to be grafted using radiation, specifically phosphate, oxalate, and azo monomers. The use of commercially available monomers and radiation grafting with electron beam or gamma irradiation will allow for an easily scalable fabrication process once the technology has been optimized. The need to develop a cheap and reliable method for extracting uranium from seawater is extremely valuable to energy independence and will extend the quantity of

  20. Uranium 2011 resources, production and demand

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Paris

    2012-01-01

    In the wake of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident, questions are being raised about the future of the uranium market, including as regards the number of reactors expected to be built in the coming years, the amount of uranium required to meet forward demand, the adequacy of identified uranium resources to meet that demand and the ability of the sector to meet reactor requirements in a challenging investment climate. This 24th edition of the “Red Book”, a recognised world reference on uranium jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency, provides analyses and information from 42 producing and consuming countries in order to address these and other questions. It offers a comprehensive review of world uranium supply and demand as well as data on global uranium exploration, resources, production and reactor-related requirements. It also provides substantive new information on established uranium production centres around the world and in countri...

  1. Uranium extraction from gold-uranium ores

    Laskorin, B.N.; Golynko, Z.Sh.

    1981-01-01

    The process of uranium extraction from gold-uranium ores in the South Africa is considered. Flowsheets of reprocessing gold-uranium conglomerates, pile processing and uranium extraction from the ores are presented. Continuous counter flow ion-exchange process of uranium extraction using strong-active or weak-active resins is noted to be the most perspective and economical one. The ion-exchange uranium separation with the succeeding extraction is also the perspective one.

  2. The decline of uranium profitability in South Africa

    NONE

    1989-06-01

    Between 1952 and 1988, the South African uranium industry produced 340 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8}-some 14 percent of total world production to date. Peak production was 16.1 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} in 1980. In 1989, uranium production will have dropped to less than eight million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} per year, and the prospects for further decreases are high. This once-booming business that has been a major contributor to South Africa`s economy is on the brink of collapse. While the policy of apartheid has caused several countries to restrict or embargo further deliveries, the uranium business has also become much less profitable. Profits from the production of uranium concentrates in South Africa exceeded 1.5 billion rand during the period 1981-1988. The trend of this profitability is shown. Inflation and low prices in combination with stabilizing exchange rates are continuing to restrict profitability. NUEXCO examines these factors and their impact on South African uranium production in detail in this article.

  3. Uranium mining: Environmental and health impacts

    Vance, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Producing uranium in a safe and environmentally responsible manner is important not only to the producers and consumers of the product, but also to society at large. Given expectations of growth in nuclear generating capacity in the coming decades - particularly in the developing world - enhancing awareness of leading practice in uranium mining is important. This was the objective of a recent NEA report entitled Managing Environmental and Health Impacts of Uranium Mining, providing a non-technical overview of the significant evolution of uranium mining practices from the time that it was first mined for military purposes until today. (author)

  4. The uranium International trade

    Gonzalez U, L.A.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is the understanding of how the present dynamic of uranium International trade is developed, the variables which fall into, the factors that are affecting and conditioning it, in order to clarify which are going to be the outlook in the future of this important resource in front of the present ecological situation and the energetic panorama of XXI Century. For this purpose, as starting point, the uranium is considered as a strategic material which importance take root in its energetic potential as alternate energy source, and for this reason in Chapter I, the general problem of raw materials, its classification and present situation in the global market is presented. In Chapter II, by means of a historical review, is explain what uranium is, how it was discovered, and how since the end of the past Century and during the last three decades of present, uranium pass of practically unknown element, to the position of a strategic raw material, which by degrees, generate an International market, owing to its utilization as a basic resource in the generation of energy. Chapter III, introduce us in the roll played by uranium, since its warlike applications until its utilization in nuclear reactors for the generation of electricity. Also is explain the reason for this change in the perception at global level. Finally, in Chapter IV we enter upon specifically in the present conditions of the International market of this mineral throughout the trends of supply and demand, the main producers, users, price dynamics, and the correlation among these economical variables and other factors of political, social and ecological nature. All of these with the purpose to found out, if there exist, a meaning of the puzzle that seems to be the uranium International trade

  5. Inhalation hazards to uranium miners

    Cross, F.T.

    1983-01-01

    This project is investigating levels or uranium mine air contaminants, using both large and small experimental animals to model human respiratory system disease. Lung cancer and deaths by degenerative lung disease have reached epidemic proportions among uranium miners, but the cause-effect relationships for these diseases are based on inadequate epidemiological data. This project identifies agents or combinations of agents (both chemical and radiological), and their exposure levels, that produce respiratory tract lesions, including respiratory epithelial carcinoma, pneumoconiosis, and emphysema

  6. Inhalation hazards to uranium miners

    Cross, F.T.

    1982-01-01

    This project is investigating levels of uranium mine air contaminants, using both large and small experimental animals to model human respiratory system disease. Lung cancer and deaths by degenerative lung disease have reached epidemic proportions among uranium miners, but the cause-effect relationships for these diseases are based on inadequate epidemiological data. This project identifies agents or combinations of agents (both chemical and radiological) and their exposure levels that produce respiratory tract lesions, including respiratory epithelial carcinoma, pneumonconiosis and emphysema

  7. The market for natural uranium

    Bauder, P.

    1981-01-01

    The natural uranium market is characterized at present by its surplus. This is essentially due to a surplus on the production line. The uranium produced is no longer taken up by the market as it was up to the middle of 1979. The object of this contribution is therefore a survey on the present availability and demand situation, as well as to discuss market mechanisms and forecast the future market trend. (orig./IHO) [de

  8. Uranium mining

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The economic and environmental sustainability of uranium mining has been analysed by Monash University researcher Dr Gavin Mudd in a paper that challenges the perception that uranium mining is an 'infinite quality source' that provides solutions to the world's demand for energy. Dr Mudd says information on the uranium industry touted by politicians and mining companies is not necessarily inaccurate, but it does not tell the whole story, being often just an average snapshot of the costs of uranium mining today without reflecting the escalating costs associated with the process in years to come. 'From a sustainability perspective, it is critical to evaluate accurately the true lifecycle costs of all forms of electricity production, especially with respect to greenhouse emissions, ' he says. 'For nuclear power, a significant proportion of greenhouse emissions are derived from the fuel supply, including uranium mining, milling, enrichment and fuel manufacture.' Dr Mudd found that financial and environmental costs escalate dramatically as the uranium ore is used. The deeper the mining process required to extract the ore, the higher the cost for mining companies, the greater the impact on the environment and the more resources needed to obtain the product. I t is clear that there is a strong sensitivity of energy and water consumption and greenhouse emissions to ore grade, and that ore grades are likely to continue to decline gradually in the medium to long term. These issues are critical to the current debate over nuclear power and greenhouse emissions, especially with respect to ascribing sustainability to such activities as uranium mining and milling. For example, mining at Roxby Downs is responsible for the emission of over one million tonnes of greenhouse gases per year and this could increase to four million tonnes if the mine is expanded.'

  9. US uranium reserves

    Hansen, M.V.

    1981-01-01

    The current low level of demand, compounded by rapidly rising costs and low prices, has caused a significant reduction in drilling for uranium in the United States, and the trend is likely to continue for a few more years. The effect on uranium reserves will be fewer additions to reserves because less exploration is being done. Further reductions will occur, especially in low-cost reserves, because of increasing costs, continuing depletion through production, and erosion through the high grading of deposits to fulfill previous contractual commitments. During the past several years, it has been necessary to increase the upper reserve cost level twice to compensate for rising costs. Rising costs are reducing the $15 reserves, the cost category corresponding most closely to the present market price, to an insignificant level. An encouraging factor related to US uranium reserves is that the US position internationally, as far as quantity is concerned, is not bad for the longer term. Also, there is a general opinion that US consumers would rather contract for domestic uranium than for foreign because of greater assurance of supply. Still another factor, nearly impossible to assess, is what effect rising costs in other countries will have on their uranium reserves. The annual conferences between the Grand Junction Area Office staff and major uranium companies provide a broad overview of the industry's perception of the future. It is not optimistic for the short term. Many companies are reducing their exploration and mining programs; some are switching to other more marketable mineral commodities, and a few are investing more heavily in foreign ventures. However, there is general optimism for the long term, and many predict a growth in demand in the mid-1980s. If the industry can survive the few lean years ahead, rising prices may restore its viability to former levels

  10. Uranium occurrences and exploration experience in India

    Chaki, A.

    2010-01-01

    As per the Indian Government laws, minerals containing uranium are classified as strategic and uranium exploration and mining is an exclusive subject of the Central Government. Exploration for atomic minerals began in India in the year 1949 and, over a period of sixty years, India has created a large pool of uranium scientists and, at present, more than 500 scientists are employed by the Government of India for exploration of atomic minerals in India. In line with other countries, India's efforts in the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s were focused in the exploration for vein-type mineralization and succeeded in the discovery in three provinces, viz. Singhbhum Shear Zone (SSZ), Jharkhand; Umra, Rajasthan and Lesser Himalayas of Uttarakhand and Himachal Pradesh. Of these, the SSZ has emerged as a major uranium province with 17 low-grade, low- to medium-tonnage deposits. Presently, the only uranium producing mines are situated in this province. Simultaneously, many uranium occurrences and deposits of QPC, vein and metasomatite types, essentially of low grade, low tonnage, were located all over the country. In the early eighties, the Cretaceous Mahadek basin in the northeastern state of Meghalaya was recognized as a potential province for sandstone-type uranium mineralization and, within a span of fifteen years, five low- to medium-grade, low-tonnage deposits were established. The 180-km long belt of Cretaceous fluviatile felspathic sandstones along the southern fringe of Shillong plateau below a moderate cover of tertiary sediments holds potential for more resources. Ground and airborne geophysical techniques are being looked at to provide vital clues on depositional controls for future sub-surface exploration. In the mean time, a major uranium province in the southern part of Proterozoic Cuddapah basin was discovered, where uranium mineralization is hosted in dolomitic limestone. The mineralization is stratabound and occurs intermittently over a strike length of nearly 160 km

  11. Uranium 2014: Resources, Production and Demand

    Vance, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Since the mid-1960's, with the co-operation of their member countries and states, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) have jointly prepared periodic updates (currently every two years) on world uranium resources, production and demand. Published by the OECD/NEA in what is commonly known as the 'Red Book', the 25. edition, released in September 2014, contains 45 national reports covering uranium producing and consuming countries and those with plans to do so. The uranium resource figures presented in the 25. edition of the Red Book are a snapshot of the situation as of 1 January 2013. Resource figures are dynamic and related to commodity prices. Despite less favourable market conditions, continued high levels of investment and associated exploration efforts have resulted in the identification of additional resources of economic interest, just as in past periods of intense exploration activity. Total identified resources (reasonably assured and inferred) as of 1 January 2013 amounted to 5 902 900 tonnes of uranium metal (tU) in the 3 O 8 ) category, an increase of 10.8% compared to 1 January 2011. In the highest cost category ( 3 O 8 ) which was reintroduced in 2009, total identified resources amounted to 7 635 200 tU, an increase of 7.6% compared to the total reported in 2011. The majority of the increases are a result of re-evaluations of previously identified resources and additions to known deposits, particularly in Australia, Canada, the People's Republic of China, the Czech Republic, Greenland, Kazakhstan and South Africa. Worldwide exploration and mine development expenditures in 2012 totalled USD 1.92 billion, a 21% increase over updated 2010 figures, despite declining market prices. Production in 2012 increased by 7.4% from 2011 to 58 816 tU and is expected to increase to over 59 500 tU in 2013. This recent growth is principally the result of increased production in Kazakhstan, which remains the world

  12. Circulating Cxcr5-Expressing Cd8+T-Cells are Major Producers of Il-21 and Associate with Limited Hiv Replication.

    Perdomo-Celis, Federico; Taborda, Natalia A; Rugeles, Maria T

    2018-04-10

    Despite advances made with the highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) in the control of the human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV) infection, a cure has not been achieved due to the persistence of viral reservoirs. The major HIV reservoirs remain in the lymphoid follicles due to, among other factors, the partial absence of CD8T-cells in these structures. Recently, lymphoid follicle-confined and circulating CD8T-cells expressing the C-X-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CXCR5) were described, possessing antiviral mechanisms which could help to control HIV replication. and methods: By flow cytometry, we characterized the phenotype and function of circulating CXCR5-expressing CD8T-cells in HIV-infected patients with natural or HAART-induced control of HIV replication. Circulating CXCR5-expressing CD8T-cells exhibited low or null expression of the C-C chemokine receptor type 7 (CCR7) and had a transitional memory phenotype. Particular redistributions of CXCR5-expressing CD8T-cells were found in HIV-infected patients, and they were partially restored by HAART. The frequency of CXCR5CCR7CD8T-cells was higher in spontaneous HIV controllers and negatively correlated with plasma HIV RNA levels. Total and HIV-specific CXCR5CD8T-cells were major producers of interleukin-21, and this function was positively associated with their interferon-γ production. Circulating CXCR5-expressing CD8T-cells are associated with low level HIV replication, could be novel correlates of protection and potentially useful in the eradication of HIV reservoirs.

  13. Uranium logging in earth formations

    Givens, W.W.

    1979-01-01

    A technique is provided for assaying the formations surrounding a borehole for uranium. A borehole logging tool cyclically irradiates the formations with neutrons and responds to neutron fluxes produced during the period of time that prompt neutrons are being produced by the neutron fission of uranium in the formations. A borehole calibration tool employs a steady-state (continuous output) neutron source, firstly, to produce a response to neutron fluxes in models having known concentrations of uranium and, secondly, to to produce a response to neutron fluxes in the formations surrounding the borehole. The neutron flux responses of the borehole calibration tool in both the model and the formations surrounding the borehole are utilized to correct the neutron flux response of the borehole logging tool for the effects of epithermal/thermal neutron moderation, scattering, and absorption within the borehole itself

  14. Locating underground uranium deposits

    Felice, P.E.

    1979-01-01

    Underground uranium deposits are located by placing wires of dosimeters each about 5 to 18 mg/cm 2 thick underground in a grid pattern. Each dosimeter contains a phosphor which is capable of storing the energy of alpha particles. In each pair one dosimeter is shielded from alpha particles with more than 18 mg/cm 2 thick opaque material but not gamma and beta rays and the other dosimeter is shielded with less than 1 mg/cm 2 thick opaque material to exclude dust. After a period underground the dosimeters are heated which releases the stored energy as light. The amount of light produced from the heavily shielded dosimeter is subtracted from the amount of light produced from the thinly shielded dosimeter to give an indication of the location and quantity of uranium underground

  15. Domestic utility attitudes toward foreign uranium supply

    1981-06-01

    The current embargo on the enrichment of foreign-origin uranium for use in domestic utilization facilities is scheduled to be removed in 1984. The pending removal of this embargo, complicated by a depressed worldwide market for uranium, has prompted consideration of a new or extended embargo within the US Government. As part of its on-going data collection activities, Nuclear Resources International (NRI) has surveyed 50 domestic utility/utility holding companies (representing 60 lead operator-utilities) on their foreign uranium purchase strategies and intentions. The most recent survey was conducted in early May 1981. A number of qualitative observations were made during the course of the survey. The major observations are: domestic utility views toward foreign uranium purchase are dynamic; all but three utilities had some considered foreign purchase strategy; some utilities have problems with buying foreign uranium from particular countries; an inducement is often required by some utilities to buy foreign uranium; opinions varied among utilities concerning the viability of the domestic uranium industry; and many utilities could have foreign uranium fed through their domestic uranium contracts (indirect purchases). The above observations are expanded in the final section of the report. However, it should be noted that two of the observations are particularly important and should be seriously considered in formulation of foreign uranium import restrictions. These important observations are the dynamic nature of the subject matter and the potentially large and imbalanced effect the indirect purchases could have on utility foreign uranium procurement

  16. Assessment of the significance of direct and indirect pollution inputs to a major salmon-producing river using polyethylene membrane devices.

    Moles, Adam; Holland, Larry; Andersson, Ole

    2006-08-01

    Conventional passive sampling devices for monitoring pollution input often prove to be cost-prohibitive when assessing large spatial and temporal scales. The Kenai River, a major salmon-producing river in Alaska (USA), served as the perfect laboratory to test the utility of polyethylene membrane devices for assessing chronic nonpoint-source inputs to a large riverine watershed. Comparison of the relative levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at a large number of locations over time allowed us to assess the significance and potential source of these compounds in the river. Concentrations of PAH were greatest near urban areas and peaked during the late winter, when streams flows and dilution were low. Vessel activity and PAH levels peaked in July and were heaviest in the lower 16 km of the river, where fishing activity was concentrated. Nearly one-third of the vessels observed on the river were powered by two-stroke engines, which release a higher proportion of unburned fuel into the water than the cleaner burning four-stroke engines. The low concentrations of hydrocarbons upriver of the boat traffic suggest very little remote delivery of these contaminants to the watershed. Polyethylene strips proved to be an excellent, low-cost tool for determining the PAH patterns in a large watershed.

  17. Uranium tailings in Canada

    Boulden, R.S.; Bragg, K.

    1982-01-01

    The last few years have produced significant changes in the way uranium tailings are managed in Canada. This is due both to the development of new technology and to changes in regulatory approach. The interrelationships between these two areas are examined with particular attention paid to the long term and the development of close-out criteria. New technological initiatives are examined including dry placement techniques, pit disposal and deep lake disposal

  18. Raw material uranium

    Arnold, O.

    1975-01-01

    In this paper some aspects are being considered, in as far as they can contribute to a better understanding of uranium as a raw material and an energy carrier, and as they can indicate the possible ways and means open to the German Federal Republic for securing this highly desirable raw material, without becoming even more dependent on the economic and political views of the producing countries, than it is the case in respect of oil. (orig.) [de

  19. Uranium mining in Saskatchewan

    Scales, M.

    2006-01-01

    The mines of northern Saskatchewan make Canada the worlds leading uranium producer in Canada supplied 29% of global demand, or 11.60 million tonnes of the metal in 2004. Here are two bright ideas - how to mine an orebody by neither pit nor underground method, and how to mine high-grade ore without miners - that Cogema and Cameco are pursuing in the Athabasca Basin

  20. Uranium and electricity

    1982-05-01

    Producing and using uranium as a fuel for the generation of electricity involves many activities and industries. Some 100,000 Canadian jobs are dependent upon the nuclear power industry. Of these, 38,000 people are employed directly by more than 100 corporations. This publication describes the components, relationships and some special aspects of 'the nuclear fuel cycle,' which includes exploration, mining, milling, refining, conversion, enrichment, fuel fabrication, reactors, and waste management

  1. Status of uranium in Brazil

    Majdalani, S.A.; Tavares, A.M.

    2001-01-01

    Uranium exploration in Brazil was started in 1952 by the Brazilian National Research Council. This led to the discovery of the first uranium deposits in Pocos de Caldas and Jacobina. These activities was later continued by the National Energy Commission/Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), formed in 1962. The founding of NUCLEBRAS at the end of 1974 marked the increasing effort of the country's uranium exploration programme. At this time only the Pocos de Caldas deposit was known with measurable resources. Due to the reorganization of the Brazilian nuclear programme in 1988, all uranium exploration in the country was stopped. By then, eight areas with uranium reserves has been identified. Brazil uranium resources in the RAR category at ≤ $80/kg U cost range are estimated to be 162,000 tonnes U, out of which 56,100 tonnes are in the ≤ $40/kg U cost range. Additional resources in the EAR-I category and the cost range ≤ 80/kg U are in the order of 100,200 tonnes U. The first production of uranium in Brazil, at the Osamu Utsumi mine (Pocos de Caldas deposit), started in 1982. Because of escalated costs and reduced demand, this activity was put on stand-by status between 1990 and 1992. The mine was restarted in 1993, but was stopped again in October 1995. The cumulative production of the mine to 1996 was 1241 tonnes U. The Lagoa Real deposit is currently being prepared as a new producing mine. (author)

  2. Airborne uranium, its concentration and toxicity in uranium enrichment facilities

    Thomas, J.; Mauro, J.; Ryniker, J.; Fellman, R.

    1979-02-01

    The release of uranium hexafluoride and its hydrolysis products into the work environment of a plant for enriching uranium by means of gas centrifuges is discussed. The maximum permissible mass and curie concentration of airborne uranium (U) is identified as a function of the enrichment level (i.e., U-235/total U), and chemical and physical form. A discussion of the chemical and radiological toxicity of uranium as a function of enrichment and chemical form is included. The toxicity of products of UF 6 hydrolysis in the atmosphere, namely, UO 2 F 2 and HF, the particle size of toxic particulate material produced from this hydrolysis, and the toxic effects of HF and other potential fluoride compounds are also discussed. Results of an investigation of known effects of humidity and temperature on particle size of UO 2 F 2 produced by the reaction of UF 6 with water vapor in the air are reported. The relationship of the solubility of uranium compounds to their toxic effects was studied. Identification and discussion of the standards potentially applicable to airborne uranium compounds in the working environment are presented. The effectiveness of High Efficiency Particulate (HEPA) filters subjected to the corrosive environment imposed by the presence of hydrogen fluoride is discussed

  3. Uranium update

    Steane, R.

    1997-01-01

    This paper is about the current uranium mining situation, especially that in Saskatchewan. Canada has a unique advantage with the Saskatchewan uranium deposits. Making the most of this opportunity is important to Canada. The following is reviewed: project development and the time and capital it takes to bring a new project into production; the supply and demand situation to show where the future production fits into the world market; and our foreign competition and how we have to be careful not to lose our opportunity. (author)

  4. Considerations and data on the uranium deposits in West-Mecsek Mountains, Hungary

    Erdi-Krausz, G.; Harsanyi, L.

    1999-01-01

    In 1987, the Government of Hungary closed the uranium mining in the Mecsek Mountain. Data are presented on the uranium reserves in the abandoned site of West-Mecsek. The history of uranium mining and the total amount of produced uranium are up to 31 December 1997 is presented. Some countries in Europe also abandon uranium mining, others develop it (Ukraine, Russia, Kazakhstan, Canada, Australia etc.). The Hungarian uranium reserves should be registered as a part of the national assets. (R.P.)

  5. Machining of uranium and uranium alloys

    Morris, T.O.

    1981-01-01

    Uranium and uranium alloys can be readily machined by conventional methods in the standard machine shop when proper safety and operating techniques are used. Material properties that affect machining processes and recommended machining parameters are discussed. Safety procedures and precautions necessary in machining uranium and uranium alloys are also covered. 30 figures

  6. Uranium price formation. Final report

    1977-10-01

    The modern uranium industry came into existence in 1946. Until 1966, its sole customer was the Atomic Energy Commission, whose needs for U 3 O 8 relative to industry capacity declined over the years. The development of the commercial market after 1965 coincided with a period of excess capacity and falling nominal and real prices. Gradually in 1973 and dramatically thereafter, market conditions changed and prices rose as utilities sought larger quantities of U 3 O 8 and longer term contracts. Questions about availability of long-run supplies were raised, given the known reserve base. The response of the supply of U 3 O 8 to incentives offered first by the AEC and later by the utilities in the context of new and developing market conventions is examined. The methodology used is microeconomic analysis, qualitatively applied to the history of price formation in the market. Because the study emphasizes the implications of the history of uranium price formation for forecasting supply response, the study presents many different kinds of data and evaluates their quality and appropriateness for forecasting. A simple, very-useful framework for analyzing the history of the market for U 3 O 8 was developed and used to describe supply responses in selected important periods of the industry's development. It is concluded that the response of supply of U 3 O 8 to rising prices or to expectations of demand growth has been impressively strong. The potential reserve inventory is large enough to meet the needs for nuclear power generation through the end of this century. The price necessary to induce producers to find and produce these reserves is uncertain, partly because of problems inherent in estimating long-run supply curves and partly because recent inflation has created major uncertainties about the cost of future supplies

  7. Inhalation hazards to uranium miners

    Cross, F.T.

    1985-01-01

    This project is investigating levels of uranium mine air contaminants, using both large and small experimental animals to model human respiratory system disease. Lung cancer and deaths by degenerative lung disease have reached epidemic proportions among uranium miners, but the cause-effect relationships for these diseases are based on inadequate epidemiological data. This project identifies agents or combinations of agents (both chemical and radiological), and their exposure levels, that produce respiratory tract lesions, including respiratory epithelial carcinoma, pneumoconiosis, and emphysema. Histopathologic data from rats are shown for approximately 300- to 10,000-working-level-month (WLM) radon-daughter exposures. Exposure of male rats to radon daughters and uranium ore dust continues, along with exposure of male and female beagle dogs to uranium ore dust alone. 4 tables

  8. Uranium refining by solvent extraction

    Kraikaew, J.; Srinuttrakul, W.

    2014-01-01

    The solvent extraction process to produce higher purity uranium from yellowcake was studied in laboratory scale. Yellowcake, which the uranium purity is around 70% and the main impurity is thorium, was obtained from monazite processing pilot plant of Rare Earth Research and Development Center in Thailand. For uranium re-extraction process, the extractant chosen was Tributylphosphate (TBP) in kerosene. It was found that the optimum concentration of TBP was 10% in kerosene and the optimum nitric acid concentration in uranyl nitrate feed solution was 4 N. An increase in concentrations of uranium and thorium in feed solution resulted in a decrease in the distribution of both components in the extractant. However, the distribution of uranium into the extractant was found to be more than that of thorium. The equilibration study of the extraction system, UO_2(NO_3)/4N HNO_3 – 10%TBP/Kerosene, was also investigated. Two extraction stages were calculated graphically from 100,000 ppm uranium concentration in feed solution input with 90% extraction efficiency and the flow ratio of aqueous phase to organic phase was adjusted to 1.0. For thorium impurity scrubbing process, 10% TBP in kerosene was loaded with uranium and minor thorium from uranyl nitrate solution prepared from yellowcake and was scrubbed with different low concentration nitric acid. The results showed that at nitric acid normality was lower than 1 N, uranium distributed well to aqueous phase. As conclusion, optimum nitric acid concentration for scrubbing process should not less than 1 N and diluted nitric acid or de-ionized water should be applied to strip uranium from organic phase in the final refining process. (author)

  9. United States uranium enrichment policies

    Roberts, R.W.

    1977-01-01

    ERDA's uranium enrichment program policies governing the manner in which ERDA's enrichment complex is being operated and expanded to meet customer requirements for separative work, research and development activities directed at providing technology alternatives for future enrichment capacity, and establishing the framework for additional domestic uranium enrichment capacity to meet the domestic and foreign nuclear industry's growing demand for enrichment services are considered. The ERDA enrichment complex consists of three gaseous diffusion plants located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Paducah, Kentucky; and Portsmouth, Ohio. Today, these plants provide uranium enrichment services for commercial nuclear power generation. These enrichment services are provided under contracts between the Government and the utility customers. ERDA's program involves a major pilot plant cascade, and pursues an advanced isotope separation technique for the late 1980's. That the United States must develop additional domestic uranium enrichment capacity is discussed

  10. The toxicology of uranium compounds

    Brickner, D.

    1988-11-01

    This review of literature presents and criticises the current knowledge relevant to risk assessment in cases of human exposure to natural uranium compounds due to industrial accidents. The major risk of high uranium exposure is renal-tubular damage which may lead to acute renal insufficiency and death. Radiation damage is not expected in these circumstances. In this review the metabolism of uranium in the body, the health effects and the possible medical treatment are discussed, with an emphasis on relatively large exposure of short duration. The current ICRP lung model does not represent all the factors affecting the kinetics of uranium oxides in the respiratory tract. The significance of these factors, not represented by the model, for risk assessment in such exposures, is not known. The current recommendations for treatment are not scientifically based. Further investigations are urgently needed to enable a rational medical preparadness

  11. The uranium market: on the road to normality?

    Max, A.; Keese, H.

    1988-01-01

    The international market for natural uranium the basic forces of supply and demand had been hampered for many years by (1) political interventions, in particular specific import and export policies of the main uranium producing countries; and (2) inflexible uranium enrichment contract policies. These obstacles to normal uranium supply and demand balance have largely been overcome in recent years. However, current legislative and judicial moves in the USA could restrict the usage of non-US origin uranium. Alternatively, the USA/Canada Free Trade Agreement, if ratified by the US Congress and the Canadian Parliament, could pave the way for a smooth development of the future uranium market. 1 fig

  12. A study on chlorination of uranium metal using ammonium chloride

    Eun, H.C.; Kim, T.J.; Jang, J.H.; Kim, G.Y.; Lee, S.J.; Hur, J.M.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the chlorination of uranium metal using ammonium chloride (NH 4 Cl) was conducted to derive an easy and simple uranium chloride production method without impurities. In thermodynamic equilibrium calculations, it was predicted that only uranium chlorides can be produced by the reactions between uranium metal and NH 4 Cl. Experimental conditions for the chlorination of uranium metal were determined using a chlorination test of cerium metal using NH 4 Cl. It was confirmed that UCl 3 and UCl 4 in the form of particles as uranium chlorination products can be obtained from the chlorination method using NH 4 Cl. (author)

  13. Fixed capital investments for the uranium soils integrated demonstration soil treatment technologies

    Douthat, D.M.; Armstrong, A.Q. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Stewart, R.N. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1995-05-01

    The development of a nuclear industry in the United States required mining, milling, and fabricating a large variety of uranium products. One of these products was purified uranium metal which was used in the Savannah River and Hanford Site reactors. Most of this feed material was produced at the United States Department of Energy (DOE) facility formerly called the Feed Materials Production Center at Fernald, Ohio. During operation of this facility, soils became contaminated with uranium from a variety of sources. To address remediation and management of uranium-contaminated soils at sites owned by DOE, the Uranium Soils Integrated Demonstration (USID) Program was formed to evaluate and compare the versatility, efficiency, and economics of various technologies that may be combined into systems designed to characterize and remediate uranium contaminated soils. The USID Program has five major tasks in developing and demonstrating these technologies. Each must be able to (1) characterize the uranium in soil, (2) decontaminate or remove uranium from soil, (3) treat or dispose of resulting waste streams, (4) meet necessary state and federal regulations, and (5) meet performance assessment objectives. The role of the performance assessment objectives is to provide the information necessary to conduct evaluations of the technologies. These performance assessments provide the basis for selecting the optimum system for remediation of large areas contaminated with uranium. One of the performance assessment tasks is to address the economics of full-scale implementation of soil treatment technologies developed by the USID Program. The cost of treating contaminated soil is one of the criteria used in the decision-making process for selecting remedial alternatives.

  14. Fixed capital investments for the uranium soils integrated demonstration soil treatment technologies

    Douthat, D.M.; Armstrong, A.Q.; Stewart, R.N.

    1995-05-01

    The development of a nuclear industry in the United States required mining, milling, and fabricating a large variety of uranium products. One of these products was purified uranium metal which was used in the Savannah River and Hanford Site reactors. Most of this feed material was produced at the United States Department of Energy (DOE) facility formerly called the Feed Materials Production Center at Fernald, Ohio. During operation of this facility, soils became contaminated with uranium from a variety of sources. To address remediation and management of uranium-contaminated soils at sites owned by DOE, the Uranium Soils Integrated Demonstration (USID) Program was formed to evaluate and compare the versatility, efficiency, and economics of various technologies that may be combined into systems designed to characterize and remediate uranium contaminated soils. The USID Program has five major tasks in developing and demonstrating these technologies. Each must be able to (1) characterize the uranium in soil, (2) decontaminate or remove uranium from soil, (3) treat or dispose of resulting waste streams, (4) meet necessary state and federal regulations, and (5) meet performance assessment objectives. The role of the performance assessment objectives is to provide the information necessary to conduct evaluations of the technologies. These performance assessments provide the basis for selecting the optimum system for remediation of large areas contaminated with uranium. One of the performance assessment tasks is to address the economics of full-scale implementation of soil treatment technologies developed by the USID Program. The cost of treating contaminated soil is one of the criteria used in the decision-making process for selecting remedial alternatives

  15. In situ leaching process for recording uranium values

    McKnight, W.M.; Timmins, T.H.; Sherry, H.S.

    1977-01-01

    A method of recovering uranium values from a subterranean deposit comprising: injecting an alkaline carbonate lixiviant into said deposit; flowing said alkaline carbonate lixiviant through said deposit to dissolve said uranium values into said lixiviant; producing said lixiviant and said dissolved uranium values from said deposit; flowing said lixiviant and said dissolved uranium values through an adsorption material to adsorp said uranium values from said lixiviant; eluting said adsorption material with an eluant of ammonium carbonate to desorb said uranium values from said adsorption material into said eluate in a concentration greater than in said lixiviant; heating said eluate and said desorbed uranium values to vaporize off ammonia and carbon dioxide therefrom, thereby causing uranium values to crystallize from the eluate; and recovering said solid uranium values

  16. Case study of forecasting uranium supply and demand

    Noritake, Kazumitsu

    1992-01-01

    PNC collects and analyzes information about uranium market trend, world uranium supply and demand, and world uranium resources potential in order to establish the strategy of uranium exploration. This paper outlines the results obtained to forecast uranium supply and demand. Our forecast indicates that 8,500 tU, accounting for one-sixth of the demand in the year 2001, must be met by uranium produced by mines to be newly developed. After 2019, demand cannot be met by the 123 mines currently in operation or expected to have gone into production by this year. The projected shortage must therefore be covered by uranium to be newly discovered. To preclude this occurrence, uranium exploration will have to be steadily continued in order to ensure future new uranium resources, to alleviate anxiety about future supply, and to prevent sharp price hikes. (author)

  17. Uranium industry annual 1996

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1996 (UIA 1996) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1996 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1987 through 1996 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2006, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. A feature article, The Role of Thorium in Nuclear Energy, is included. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

  18. Uranium industry annual 1996

    1997-04-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1996 (UIA 1996) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry's activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1996 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1987 through 1996 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2006, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. A feature article, The Role of Thorium in Nuclear Energy, is included. 24 figs., 56 tabs

  19. Uranium industry annual, 1991

    1992-10-01

    In the Uranium Industry Annual 1991, data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities including domestic uranium purchases, commitments by utilities, procurement arrangements, uranium imports under purchase contracts and exports, deliveries to enrichment suppliers, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and uranium for sale by domestic suppliers are presented in Chapter 2. A feature article entitled ''The Uranium Industry of the Commonwealth of Independent States'' is included in this report

  20. Uranium exploration in India: present status and future strategies

    Maithani, P.B.

    2011-01-01

    Exploration for Uranium in India dates back to 1949, where surveys to locate atomic minerals were initiated in the well established Copper Thrust Belt (CTB) of Singhbhum, in the present day Jharkhand state. Based on the limited understanding on uranium geology, the thrust zones of Singhbhum which were popularly known for hosting Copper mineralization were targeted presuming sympathetic relation between Copper and Uranium. Exploration for uranium over the past six decades has resulted in identifying eleven major uranium deposits distributed in varied geological environs all over the country. Apart from conventional uranium mineralization, non-conventional resources like phosphorite, black shale etc. have immense potential. Even though their uranium grades will be of lower order, their uranium content will be huge due to their extensive size. In addition to intensifying uranium exploration in potential geological domains, AMD also plans to tap the non-conventional resources which will add substantially to the resource base

  1. Acidic aqueous uranium electrodeposition for target fabrication

    Saliba-Silva, A.M.; Oliveira, E.T.; Garcia, R.H.L.; Durazzo, M.

    2013-01-01

    Direct irradiation of targets inside nuclear research or multiple purpose reactors is a common route to produce 99 Mo- 99m Tc radioisotopes. The electroplating of low enriched uranium over nickel substrate might be a potential alternative to produce targets of 235 U. The electrochemistry of uranium at low temperature might be beneficial for an alternative route to produce 99 Mo irradiation LEU targets. Electrodeposition of uranium can be made using ionic and aqueous solutions producing uranium oxide deposits. The performance of uranium electrodeposition is relatively low because a big competition with H 2 evolution happens inside the window of electrochemical reduction potential. This work explores possibilities of electroplating uranium as UO 2 2+ (Uranium-VI) in order to achieve electroplating uranium in a sufficient amount to be commercially irradiated in the future Brazilian RMB reactor. Electroplated nickel substrate was followed by cathodic current electrodeposition from aqueous UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 solution. EIS tests and modeling showed that a film formed differently in the three tested cathodic potentials. At the lower level, (-1.8V) there was an indication of a double film formation, one overlaying the other with ionic mass diffusion impaired at the interface with nickel substrate as showed by the relatively lower admittance of Warburg component. (author)

  2. In harmony with gold and uranium

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    A profile is given on Mr Clive Knobbs as managing director of Harmony gold mine. From March 1 1983 he succeeded as deputy chairman of the group's gold and uranium division, and became the Rand Mines representative on the Gold Producers Committee and the Executive Committee of the Chamber of Mines. The article also takes a look at gold and uranium mining in general

  3. The heat is on for uranium ruling

    Wilkinson, Doug.

    1991-01-01

    It is argued that Australian mining companies and industry lobby groups have been vocal on the uranium issues for years but it has often produced duck shoving by the encumbent Australian Government. Uranium has prompted widely varying responses from Labor politicians, giving more credence to the divisive nature of the issue

  4. Ailing uranium millworkers seek recognition, aid

    Ambler, M.

    1980-01-01

    Uranium millworkers who helped produce uranium for the U.S. nuclear defense program in the 1950's and 1960's are suing the federal government and uranium companies for compensation for illnesses that they believe are job-related. Symptoms of these illnesses include frequent blackouts, chronic bronchitis, asthma, constant fatigue, and susceptibility to colds. Research is being conducted to determine whether the millworkers' symptoms are due to excessive radiation exposure. Studies to date indicated that during the 1950's and early 1960's, radiation protection procedures at uranium milling facilities were extremely deficient

  5. Depleted uranium processing and fluorine extraction

    Laflin, S.T.

    2010-01-01

    Since the beginning of the nuclear era, there has never been a commercial solution for the large quantities of depleted uranium hexafluoride generated from uranium enrichment. In the United States alone, there is already in excess of 1.6 billion pounds (730 million kilograms) of DUF_6 currently stored. INIS is constructing a commercial uranium processing and fluorine extraction facility. The INIS facility will convert depleted uranium hexafluoride and use it as feed material for the patented Fluorine Extraction Process to produce high purity fluoride gases and anhydrous hydrofluoric acid. The project will provide an environmentally friendly and commercially viable solution for DUF_6 tails management. (author)

  6. The uranium market and its characteristics

    Langlois, J.-P.

    1978-01-01

    The subject is covered in sections, entitled as shown. Numerical data are indicated in parenthesis. General characteristics of the uranium market, (enrichment plant variables, fuel requirements of a 1000 MWe power plant); demand pattern (enrichment cost relationships), supply pattern; uranium price analysis, production cost (relationship between future uranium requirements and discovery rates necessary), market break-even cost (break-even uranium cost as a function of fossil fuel prices), market value (theoretical and actual supply - demand balance in uranium market, relationship between U 3 O 8 price and world production); geographic and economic distribution of producers and consumers (world resources of uranium, relationship between U 3 0 8 world production capacity and annual requirements in 1990). (U.K.)

  7. Method of purifying uranium tetrafluoride hydrate and preparing uranium (VI) peroxide hydrate using a fluoride complexing agent

    Barreiro, A.J.; Lowe, C.M.T.; Lefever, J.A.; Pyman, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    The annual production of phosphate rock, on the order of about 30-40 million tons yearly, represents several million pounds of uranium. The present invention provides a process of purifying uranium tetrafluoride hydrate to produce a uranium (VI) peroxide product meeting 'yellow cake' standards using a double precipitation procedure. A fluoride complexing agent is used in the precipitation

  8. Future of uranium enrichment

    Hosmer, C.

    1981-01-01

    The increasing amount of separative work being done in government facilities to produce low-enriched uranium fuel for nuclear utilities again raises the question: should this business-type, industrial function be burned over the private industry. The idea is being looked at by the Reagan administration, but faces problems of national security as well as from the unique nature of the business. This article suggests that a joint government-private venture combining enriching, reprocessing, and waste disposal could be the answer. Further, a separate entity using advanced laser technology to deplete existing uranium tails and lease them for fertile blankets in breeder reactors might earn substantial revenues to help reduce the national debt

  9. Uranium industry update

    Poissonnet, M.

    1994-01-01

    Canada is the world's largest producer of uranium. With stockpiles becoming depleted, new sources of production will soon be needed. Production in Ontario was expected to cease in 1996, leaving decommissioning as the main activity there. Present production in Canada is almost entirely from the Athabasca basin in Saskatchewan, and mainly from three mines, Key Lake and Rabbit Lake (both owned by Cameco and Uranerz), and Cluff Lake (owned by Cogema). Following hearings in 1993, extensions to Cluff Lake and Rabbit Lake, and a new project at McClean Lake (by Minatco) received environmental approval, while the Midwest project as presented by Denison was rejected, but Cogema was revising it (at the time of the conference). An environmental impact statement for Cigar Lake was due to be submitted to the Assessment panel in October 1994. The author regrets that discussion of 'natural analogues' has created confusion between uranium mining and nuclear waste disposal in the public mind. 2 ills

  10. Uranium 2003: resources, production and demand

    2004-01-01

    The 'Red Book', jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency, is a recognised world reference on uranium. This edition, the 20., presents the results of a thorough review of world uranium supplies and demand as of 1 January 2003 based on official information received from 43 countries. Uranium 2003: Resources, Production and Demand paints a statistical profile of the world uranium industry in the areas of exploration, resource estimates, production and reactor related requirements. It provides substantial new information from all major uranium production centres in Africa, Australia, Eastern Europe and North America and for the first time, a report for Turkmenistan. Also included are international expert analyses and projections of nuclear generating capacity and reactor-related uranium requirements through 2020. The long lead times required to bring resources into production underscore the importance of making timely decisions to pursue production capability well in advance of any supply shortfall. (author)

  11. Cordilleran metamorphic core complexes and their uranium favorability. Final report

    Coney, P.J.; Reynolds, S.J.

    1980-11-01

    The objective of this report is to provide a descriptive body of knowledge on Cordilleran metamorphic core complexes including their lithologic and structural characteristics, their distribution within the Cordillera, and their evolutionary history and tectonic setting. The occurrence of uranium in the context of possibility for uranium concentration is also examined. Chapter 1 is an overview of Cordilleran metamorphic core complexes which describes their physical characteristics, tectonic setting and geologic history. This overview is accompanied by a tectonic map. Chapter 2 is a discussion of the mantled gneiss dome concept. The purpose of including this work is to provide a basic history of this concept and to describe the characteristics and distribution of gneiss domes throughout the world to enable one to compare and contrast them with the metamorphic core complexes as discussed in this report. Some gneiss domes are known producers of uranium (as are also some core complexes). Chapter 3 is an examination of the effects of the core complex process on adjacent sedimentary and volcanic cover terranes. Also included is a discussion of the kinematic significance of these cover terranes as they are related to process within the cores of the complexes. Some of the cover terranes have uranium prospects in them. Chapter 4 is a detailed discussion of uranium in Cordilleran metamorphic core complexes and includes the conceptual basis for the various types of occurrences and the processes that might favor concentration of uranium. The report is supported by a 5-part Appendix. The majority of the core complexes discussed in this report either do not appear or are not recognizable on existing published geologic maps

  12. Properties, use and health effects of depleted uranium

    Aloraby, M.N.

    2010-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU), a waste product of uranium enrichment, has several civilian and military applications. It was used as armor-piercing ammunition in international military conflicts and was claimed to contribute to health problems, known as the Gulf War Syndrome. This led to renewed efforts to assess the environmental consequences and health impact of DU use. The radiological and chemical properties of DU can be compared to those of natural uranium, which is ubiquitously present in soil at a typical concentration of 3 mg/kg. Natural uranium has the same chemo toxicity, but its radiotoxicity is 60% higher. Due to low specific radioactivity and the dominance of alpha radiation no acute risk is attributed to external exposure to DU. The major risk is DU dust, generated when DU ammunition hits hard targets. After deposition on the ground, resuspension takes place, if the DU containing particle size sufficiently small. However, transfer to drinking water or locally produced food has little potential to lead to significant exposure to DU. Since poor solubility of uranium compounds and lack of information on speciation precludes the use of radioecological models for exposure assessment, bio monitoring has to be used for assessing exposed persons. With the exception of crews of military vehicles having been hit by DU penetrators, no body burdens above the range of values for natural uranium have been found. Therefore, observable health effects are not expected and residual cancer risk estimates have to be based on theoretical considerations. They appear to be very minor for all post-conflict situations, i.e. a fraction of those expected from natural radiation. (author)

  13. The uranium resources and production of Namibia

    Palfi, A.G.

    1997-01-01

    The promulgation of the Minerals (Prospecting and Mining) Act, 1992, on 1 April 1994 and the simultaneous repeal of restrictive South African legislation on reporting uranium exploration and production results, allowed the Namibian Government for the first time to present information for publication of the report ''Uranium 1995 - Resource, Production and Demand'', by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the IAEA. Namibia, one of the youngest independent nations in Africa, has a large number of uranium occurrences and deposits in several geological environments. The total estimated uranium resource amounts to about 299 thousand tonnes recoverable uranium at a cost of less than US$ 130/kg U, within the known conventional resources category. The most prominent geological type of these is the unique, granite-related uranium occurrences located in the central part of the Namib Desert. Permo-Triassic age Karoo sandstone-hosted uranium deposits were subject to only limited exploration due to the down-turn of uranium prices in the latter part of 1980s, despite they very encouraging exploration results. As only limited Karoo sandstone-covered areas were tested there is still great potential for further discoveries. The planned output of Roessing Uranium Mine at 40,000 tonnes of ore per day which results in an annual production of 4536 tonnes of uranium oxide, was achieved in 1979. In case of improved uranium market conditions, Namibia is in a strong position to increase uranium production and open up new production centres to strengthen the country's position as an important uranium producer in the world. 6 figs, 2 tabs

  14. Uranium - what role

    Grey, T.; Gaul, J.; Crooks, P.; Robotham, R.

    1980-01-01

    Opposing viewpoints on the future role of uranium are presented. Topics covered include the Australian Government's uranium policy, the status of nuclear power around the world, Australia's role as a uranium exporter and problems facing the nuclear industry

  15. Brazilian uranium exploration program

    Marques, J.P.M.

    1981-01-01

    General information on Brazilian Uranium Exploration Program, are presented. The mineralization processes of uranium depoits are described and the economic power of Brazil uranium reserves is evaluated. (M.C.K.) [pt

  16. Uranium enrichment

    1991-11-01

    This paper analyzes under four different scenarios the adequacy of a $500 million annual deposit into a fund to pay for the cost of cleaning up the Department of Energy's (DOE) three aging uranium enrichment plants. These plants are located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Paducah, Kentucky; and Portsmouth, Ohio. In summary the following was found: A fixed annual $500 million deposit made into a cleanup fund would not be adequate to cover total expected cleanup costs, nor would it be adequate to cover expected decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) costs. A $500 million annual deposit indexed to an inflation rate would likely be adequate to pay for all expected cleanup costs, including D and D costs, remedial action, and depleted uranium costs

  17. Uranium production

    Spriggs, M.

    1980-01-01

    The balance between uranium supply and demand is examined. Should new resources become necessary, some unconventional sources which could be considered include low-grade extensions to conventional deposits, certain types of intrusive rock, tuffs, and lake and sea-bed sediments. In addition there are large but very low grade deposits in carbonaceous shales, granites, and seawater. The possibility of recovery is discussed. Programmes of research into the feasibility of extraction of uranium from seawater, as a by-product from phosphoric acid production, and from copper leach solutions, are briefly discussed. Other possible sources are coal, old mine dumps and tailings, the latter being successfully exploited commercially in South Africa. The greatest constraints on increased development of U from lower grade sources are economics and environmental impact. It is concluded that apart from U as a by-product from phosphate, other sources are unlikely to contribute much to world requirements in the foreseeable future. (U.K.)

  18. Uranium enrichment

    1991-08-01

    This paper reports that in 1990 the Department of Energy began a two-year project to illustrate the technical and economic feasibility of a new uranium enrichment technology-the atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) process. GAO believes that completing the AVLIS demonstration project will provide valuable information about the technical viability and cost of building an AVLIS plant and will keep future plant construction options open. However, Congress should be aware that DOE still needs to adequately demonstrate AVLIS with full-scale equipment and develop convincing cost projects. Program activities, such as the plant-licensing process, that must be completed before a plant is built, could take many years. Further, an updated and expanded uranium enrichment analysis will be needed before any decision is made about building an AVLIS plant. GAO, which has long supported legislation that would restructure DOE's uranium enrichment program as a government corporation, encourages DOE's goal of transferring AVLIS to the corporation. This could reduce the government's financial risk and help ensure that the decision to build an AVLIS plant is based on commercial concerns. DOE, however, has no alternative plans should the government corporation not be formed. Further, by curtailing a planned public access program, which would have given private firms an opportunity to learn about the technology during the demonstration project, DOE may limit its ability to transfer AVLIS to the private sector

  19. Derived enriched uranium market

    Rutkowski, E.

    1996-01-01

    The potential impact on the uranium market of highly enriched uranium from nuclear weapons dismantling in the Russian Federation and the USA is analyzed. Uranium supply, conversion, and enrichment factors are outlined for each country; inventories are also listed. The enrichment component and conversion components are expected to cause little disruption to uranium markets. The uranium component of Russian derived enriched uranium hexafluoride is unresolved; US legislation places constraints on its introduction into the US market

  20. Uranium extraction from phosphoric acid

    Lounis, A.

    1983-05-01

    A study has been carried out for the extraction of uranium from phosphoric acid produced in Algeria. First of all, the Algerian phosphoric acid produced in Algeria by SONATRACH has been characterised. This study helped us to synthesize a phosphoric acid that enabled us to pass from laboratory tests to pilot scale tests. We have then examined extraction and stripping parameters: diluent, DZEPHA/TOPO ratio and oxidising agent. The laboratory experiments enabled us to set the optimum condition for the choice of diluent, extractant concentration, ratio of the synergic mixture, oxidant concentration, redox potential. The equilibrium isotherms lead to the determination of the number of theoretical stages for the uranium extraction and stripping of uranium, then the extraction from phosphoric acid has been verified on a pilot scale (using a mixer-settler)

  1. Inhalation hazards to uranium miners

    Cross, F.T.

    1987-01-01

    Using both large and small experimental animals, this project is investigating levels of uranium-mine air contaminants that produce respiratory system disease in miners. Lung cancer incidence and deaths from degenerative lung disease are significantly elevated among uranium miners, but the cause-effect relationships for these diseases are based on inadequate epidemiological data. This project identifies agents or combinations of agents (both chemical and radiological), and their exposure levels, that produce respiratory tract lesions, including respiratory epithelial carcinoma, pneumoconiosis, and emphysema. Histopathological data for 100-working-level (WL) exposure rates show a significant increase in lung tumor risk over 1000-WL exposure rates for comparable cumulative radon-daughter exposures. Exposure of rats to radon daughters and other contaminants continues; the exposure of beagle dogs to uranium ore dust alone was terminated. Renal function and hematology data on ore-dust-exposed dogs are reported. 1 figure, 5 tables

  2. Decommissioning: A critical component of the design for uranium tailings management facilities

    Clifton, W.A.; Barsi, R.G.; Misfeldt, G.A.

    2000-01-01

    Uranium was discovered in the Beaverlodge area of northern Saskatchewan in 1934 with the first major mill beginning operation in 1953. Little attention was paid to tailings quality or tailings management practices. With the onset of the modem uranium operations beginning in the late 1970's, it was repeatedly evident, that the public had significant concerns, particularly with respect to tailings management, that must be addressed if the developments were to be allowed to proceed. Primary considerations related to environmental protection, public safety and an assurance of the ongoing sustainable development of the region. Integrating the decommissioning of a mine/mill site into development planning from the very outset has proven to be a critical component that has contributed to the ongoing success of the Saskatchewan uranium operations. This paper will provide a case study of the evolution of the uranium tailings management technology utilized in Saskatchewan. It documents the evolution of tailings management processes and the characteristics of tailings produced by successive mines in northern Saskatchewan. It also discusses the evolution of technologies applied to management of uranium mill tailings and demonstrates how progressively increasing levels of environmental protection have been achieved during the last 47 years of uranium mill operation. The paper also shows that the planned and progressive decommissioning of an operational site is the key to: Minimizing environmental impacts; Satisfying public and regulatory concerns; Minimizing operational and decommissioning costs; Minimizing corporate liability; and Shifting public resistance to public support. (author)

  3. Decommissioning: A critical component of the design for uranium tailings management facilities

    Clifton, A.W.; Barsi, R.G.; Misfeldt, G.A.

    2002-01-01

    Uranium was discovered in the Beaverlodge area of northern Saskatchewan in 1934 with the first major mill beginning operation in 1953. Little attention was paid to tailings quality or tailings management practices. With the onset of the modern uranium operations beginning in the late 1970's, it was repeatedly evident, that the public had significant concerns, particularly with respect to tailings management, that must be addressed if the developments were to be allowed to proceed. Primary considerations related to environmental protection, public safety and an assurance of the ongoing sustainable development of the region. Integrating the decommissioning of a mine/mill site into development planning from the very outset has proven to be a critical component that has contributed to the ongoing success of the Saskatchewan uranium operations. This paper will provide a case study of the evolution of the uranium tailings management technology utilized in Saskatchewan. It documents the evolution of tailings management processes and the characteristics of tailings produced by successive mines in northern Saskatchewan. It also discusses the evolution of technologies applied to management of uranium mill tailings and demonstrates how progressively increasing levels of environmental protection have been achieved during the last 47 years of uranium mill operation. The paper also shows that the planned and progressive decommissioning of an operational site is the key to: Minimizing environmental impacts; Satisfying public and regulatory concerns; Minimizing operational and decommissioning costs; Minimizing corporate liability; and Shifting public resistance to public support. (author)

  4. Uranium production, acquisition and exploration in North America. Uran in Nordamerika: Produktion - Akquisition - Exploration

    Akin, H; Kuchelka, R

    1991-06-01

    Uranerz Exploration and Mining Limited (UEM or Uranerz), the Canadian subsidiary of Uranerzbergbau GmbH, Bonn, has become a significant producer of uranium concentrates in the world during the last 20 years. The first step in this development was the acquisition of a large share in the former Rabbit Lake deposit and mill in 1970. Five years later UEM discovered the famous Key Lake deposit, containing the Gaertner and Deilmann orebodies, which today form the basis of the single largest and probably most economic uranium mine and mill complex in the world. Recently, the acquisition of a share in the 'new' Rabit Lake mill together with major adjacent uranium deposits at Collins Bay and Eagle Point has been concluded. In the United States, where there is less hope for large rich uranium deposits to be found, Uranerz has concentrated on the development of in situ leaching technology which enables low cost production from relatively low grade deposits. The latest exploration success in Canada was achieved in the McArthur River Joint Ventures by drilling an underground uranium deposit, which can be compared with Key Lake in grade and size. This will further improve the reserve base and ensure that Uranerz will maintain its position in a growing uranium market even after the turn of the century. (orig.).

  5. Decree 3322/1971 of 23 December on the purposes of the National Uranium Enterprise

    1972-01-01

    This Decree determines the purposes of the National Uranium Enterprise set up by a Decree of 22 February 1969. In collaboration with the Junta de Energia Nuclear, the Enterprise will in particular work uranium deposits, produce uranium concentrates, enrich uranium, manufacture fuel elements, process nuclear fuel and engage in the trade of the products obtained. (NEA) [fr

  6. Uranium in a changing South Africa

    1993-05-01

    In the early 1980s, the Republic of South Africa was the world's second-largest producer of uranium, and the country historically has been a major exporter of many other important mineral resources, including gold, platinum group metals, manganese, vanadium, and gem-quality diamonds. Yet political turbulence in the latter part of the decade caused economic stress on South Africa. Apartheid, the country's disenfranchisement of the black majority, put South Africa in the international spotlight. The world responded by implementing economic sanctions against South Africa, to pressure its government into change. In the past several years, South Africa has made significant progress toward ending apartheid. As a result, many US economic sanctions previously maintained against the country have been lifted. However, economic troubles continue to plague South Africa; repealing sanctions has done little to alleviate its economic and political challenges.

  7. Uranium in a changing South Africa

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    In the early 1980s, the Republic of South Africa was the world's second-largest producer of uranium, and the country historically has been a major exporter of many other important mineral resources, including gold, platinum group metals, manganese, vanadium, and gem-quality diamonds. Yet political turbulence in the latter part of the decade caused economic stress on South Africa. Apartheid, the country's disenfranchisement of the black majority, put South Africa in the international spotlight. The world responded by implementing economic sanctions against South Africa, to pressure its government into change. In the past several years, South Africa has made significant progress toward ending apartheid. As a result, many US economic sanctions previously maintained against the country have been lifted. However, economic troubles continue to plague South Africa; repealing sanctions has done little to alleviate its economic and political challenges

  8. Uranium Industry. Annual 1984

    Lawrence, M.S.S.

    1985-01-01

    This report provides a statistical description of activities of the US uranium industry during 1984 and includes a statistical profile of the status of the industry at the end of 1984. It is based on the results of an Energy Information Administration (EIA) survey entitled ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey'' (Form EIA-858). The principal findings of the survey are summarized under two headings - Uranium Raw Materials Activities and Uranium Marketing Activities. The first heading covers exploration and development, uranium resources, mine and mill production, and employment. The second heading covers uranium deliveries and delivery commitments, uranium prices, foreign trade in uranium, inventories, and other marketing activities. 32 figs., 48 tabs

  9. Possibilities for recycling of weapon-grade uranium and plutonium and its peaceful use as reactor fuel

    Floeter, W.

    2000-01-01

    At present 90% of the energy production is based on fossil fuels. Since March 1999, however, the peaceful use of weapon-grade uranium as reactor fuel is being discussed politically. Partners of this discussion is a group of some private western companies on one side and a state-owned company of the Russian Federation (GUS) on the other. Main topic of the deal besides the winning of electrical energy is the useful disposal of the surplus on weapon-grade material of both leading nations. According to the deal, about 160,000 t of Russian uranium, expressed as natural uranium U 3 O 8 , would be processed during the next 15 years. Proven processes would be applied. Those methods are being already used in Russian facilities at low capacity rates. There are shortages in the production of low enriched uranium (LEU), because of the low capacity rates in the old facilities. The capacity should be increased by a factor of ten, but there is not enough money available in Russia for financing the remodeling of the plants. Financing should therefore probably be provided by the western clients of this deal. The limited amount of uranium produced could be furnised to the uranium market without major difficulties for the present suppliers of natural uranium. The discussions regarding the security of the details of the deal - however - are not yet finalized. (orig.) [de

  10. The latest figures on uranium

    Vance, R.

    2010-01-01

    According to the latest figures on uranium, soon to be published by the NEA, uranium resources, production and demand are all on the rise. Exploration efforts have increased recently in line with the expected expansion of nuclear energy in the coming years. Total identified resources have grown and are now sufficient to cover 100 years of supply at 2008 rates of consumption. Costs of production have, however, also increased. This article is based on the latest edition of the 'Red Book', Uranium 2009: Resources, Production and Demand, which presents the results of the most recent biennial review of world uranium market fundamentals and a statistical profile of the world uranium industry as of 1 January 2009. It contains official data provided by OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) and International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) member countries on uranium exploration, resources, production and reactor-related requirements. Projections of nuclear generating capacity and reactor-related uranium requirements through 2035 are also provided as well as a discussion of long-term uranium supply and demand issues. Despite recent declines stemming from the global financial crisis, world demand for electricity is expected to continue to grow significantly over the next several decades to meet the needs of an increasing population and economic growth. The recognition by an increasing number of governments that nuclear power can produce competitively priced, base-load electricity that is essentially free of greenhouse gas emissions, coupled with the role that nuclear can play in enhancing security of energy supply, increases the prospects for growth in nuclear generating capacity, although the magnitude of that growth remains to be determined. Regardless of the role that nuclear energy ultimately plays in meeting rising electricity demand, the uranium resource base is more than adequate to meet projected requirements. Meeting even high-case requirements to 2035 would consume less

  11. Criticality safety concerns of uranium deposits in cascade equipment

    Plaster, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    The Paducah and Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plants enrich uranium in the 235 U isotope by diffusing gaseous uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) through a porous barrier. The UF 6 gaseous diffusion cascade utilized several thousand open-quotes stagesclose quotes of barrier to produce highly enriched uranium (HEU). Historically, Portsmouth has enriched the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant's product (typically 1.8 wt% 235 U) as well as natural enrichment feed stock up to 97 wt%. Due to the chemical reactivity of UF 6 , particularly with water, the formation of solid uranium deposits occur at a gaseous diffusion plant. Much of the equipment operates below atmospheric pressure, and deposits are formed when atmospheric air enters the cascade. Deposits may also be formed from UF 6 reactions with oil, UF 6 reactions with the metallic surfaces of equipment, and desublimation of UF 6 . The major deposits form as a result of moist air in leakage due to failure of compressor casing flanges, blow-off plates, seals, expansion joint convolutions, and instrument lines. This report describes criticality concerns and deposit disposition

  12. UMTRA -- The US Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project

    Lightner, R.; Cormier, C.; Bierley, D.

    1995-01-01

    In the late 1970s, the United States (US) established the first comprehensive regulatory structure for the management, disposal, and long-term care of wastes produced from its domestic uranium processing industry. This regulatory framework was established through the passage of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978, often referred to as UMTRCA. This legislation created the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project and assigned the US Department of Energy (DOE) the lead in conducting the required remedial action at 24 designated inactive uranium ore processing sites. With the majority of these 22 sites complete, the DOE's UMTRA Project has established a distinguished reputation for safely and effectively remediating these low-level waste sites in a complex regulatory and socioeconomic environment. This paper describes the past accomplishments and current status of the UMTRA Project and discusses the DOE's plans for addressing ground water contamination associated with these sites and its commitment to continuing the long-term care and management of these disposal cells

  13. Uranium ... long-term confidence

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    Half way through 1983 the outlook for the world's uranium producers was far from bright if one takes a short term view. The readily accessible facts present a gloomy picture. The spot prices of uranium over the past few years decreased from a high of $42-$43/lb to a low of $17 in 1982. It now hovers between $23 and $24. the contract prices negotiated between producers and consumers are not so accessible but they do not reflect the spot price. The reasons why contractual uranium prices do not follow the usual dictates of supply and demand are related to the position in which uranium and associated power industries find themselves. There is public reaction with strong emotional overtones as well as much reduced expectations about the electric power needs of the world. Furthermore the supply of uranium is not guaranteed despite present over production. However the people in the industry, taking the medium- and long-term view, are not despondent

  14. Uranium in blood

    Koul, S.L.; Chadderton, L.T.

    1979-01-01

    When fission fragments pass through certain solids they leave trails of radiation damage which can be observed by transmission electron microscopy. If the solid can be chemically etched these tracks are 'developed' and brought within the resolving power of the light optical microscope. Since its introduction the etching technique has been used to reveal tracks formed due to the thermal neutron induced fission of U 235 atoms in many uranium bearing materials of both terrestrial and extraterrestrial origin. Successful experiments have been performed in determining the distribution of uranium in selected botanical species. On the basis of this most recent work it was decided to make a feasibility study of a determination of the concentration in human blood. This short report produces evidence not only that the fission track etching technique is useful for this purpose but that there are significant uranium concentration differences in blood taken from leukemia patients compared with samples taken from healthy norms. Whilst experiments of this kind generally employ direct registration of the fission fragments in the material itself, as with minerals, an alternative procedure is to employ some overlay, such as thin sheets of muscovite mica, or of a suitable plastic. In the present investigations the plastic Lexan polycarbonate (C 6 H 15 O 3 ) was selected as an overlay since it is easy to etch chemically. (author)

  15. Uranium Industry Annual, 1992

    1993-01-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry for the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and electric utility industries, and the public. The feature article, ''Decommissioning of US Conventional Uranium Production Centers,'' is included. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities including domestic uranium purchases, commitments by utilities, procurement arrangements, uranium imports under purchase contracts and exports, deliveries to enrichment suppliers, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and uranium for sale by domestic suppliers are presented in Chapter 2

  16. Uranium Industry Annual, 1992

    1993-10-28

    The Uranium Industry Annual provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry for the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and electric utility industries, and the public. The feature article, ``Decommissioning of US Conventional Uranium Production Centers,`` is included. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities including domestic uranium purchases, commitments by utilities, procurement arrangements, uranium imports under purchase contracts and exports, deliveries to enrichment suppliers, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and uranium for sale by domestic suppliers are presented in Chapter 2.

  17. A clean environment approach to uranium mining

    Grancea, Luminita

    2015-01-01

    A global and multi-faceted response to climate change is essential if meaningful and cost-effective progress is to be made in reducing the effects of climate change around the world. There is no doubt that the uranium mining sector has an important role to play in such a goal. Uranium is the raw material used to produce fuel for long-lived nuclear facilities, necessary for the generation of significant amounts of baseload low-carbon electricity for decades to come. Given expectations of growth in nuclear generating capacity and the associated uranium demand, enhancing awareness of leading practices in uranium mining is indispensable. Actors in the uranium mining sector operate in a complex world, throughout different geographies, and involving global supply chains. They manage climate-sensitive water, land and energy resources and balance the interests of various stakeholders. Managed well, uranium mining delivers sustainable value for economic growth, employment and infrastructure, with specific attention given to the preservation of the environment. In the early phases of the industry, however, downside risks existed, which created legacy environmental and health issues that still can be recalled today. This article addresses key aspects of modern uranium mining operations that have been introduced as regulations and practices have evolved in response to societal attitudes about health, safety and environmental protection. Such aspects of mine management were seldom, if ever, respected in the early stages of uranium mining. With the implementation of modern mine lifecycle parameters and regulatory requirements, uranium mining has become a leader in safety and environmental management. Today, uranium mining is conducted under significantly different circumstances and is now the most regulated and one of the safest forms of mining in the world. Experiences from modern uranium mines show that successful companies develop innovative strategies to manage all the

  18. Human Resource Development for Uranium Production Cycle

    Ganguly, C.

    2014-01-01

    Concluding Remarks & Suggestions: • HRD will be one of the major challenges in the expanding nuclear power program in countries like China and India. • China and India get uranium raw material from domestic mines and international market. In addition, China has overseas uranium property. India is also exploring the possibility of overseas Joint Venture and uranium properties. For uranium production cycle there is a need for trained geologist, mining engineers, chemical and mechanical engineers. • There is a need for introducing specialization course on “uranium production cycle” at post graduate levels in government and private universities. Overseas Utilities and private firms in India engaged in nuclear power and fuel cycle activities may like to sponsor MTech students with assurance of employment after the successful completion of the course. • The IAEA may consider to extend Technical Assistance to universities in HRD in nuclear power and fuel cycle in general and uranium production cycle in particular - IAEA workshops, with participation of international experts, on uranium geology, mining, milling and safety and best practices in uranium production cycle will be of great help. • The IAEA – UPSAT could play an important role in HRD in uranium production cycle

  19. Uranium precipitation with hydrogen peroxide

    Brown, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    Although hydrogen peroxide precipitation of uranium continues to be used primarily as means of producing a high purity yellowcake, it has also become an important process due to its superior physical properties. Processing costs such as filtering, drying and/or calcining and drumming, can be reduced. 5 refs

  20. Paper from the Uranium Institute

    Price, T.

    1976-01-01

    The problems of supply and demand in relation to uranium are considered from various points of view: the mining and producing industry and the time-scales in exploration and development; the choice between thermal and fast reactors; the forecasts of economic growth; social and political considerations. (U.K.)

  1. Detection of uranium enrichment activities using environmental monitoring techniques

    Belew, W.L.; Carter, J.A.; Smith, D.H.; Walker, R.L.

    1993-01-01

    Uranium enrichment processes have the capability of producing weapons-grade material in the form of highly enriched uranium. Thus, detection of undeclared uranium enrichment activities is an international safeguards concern. The uranium separation technologies currently in use employ UF 6 gas as a separation medium, and trace quantities of enriched uranium are inevitably released to the environment from these facilities. The isotopic content of uranium in the vegetation, soil, and water near the plant site will be altered by these releases and can provide a signature for detecting the presence of enriched uranium activities. This paper discusses environmental sampling and analytical procedures that have been used for the detection of uranium enrichment facilities and possible safeguards applications of these techniques

  2. Provision by the uranium and uranium products

    Elagin, Yu.P.

    2005-01-01

    International uranium market is converted from the buyer market into the seller market. The prices of uranium are high and the market attempts to adapt to changing circumstances. The industry of uranium enrichment satisfies the increasing demands but should to increase ots capacities. On the whole the situation is not stable and every year may change the existing position [ru

  3. Uranium recovery from slags of metallic uranium

    Fornarolo, F.; Frajndlich, E.U.C.; Durazzo, M.

    2006-01-01

    The Center of the Nuclear Fuel of the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research - IPEN finished the program of attainment of fuel development for research reactors the base of Uranium Scilicet (U 3 Si 2 ) from Hexafluoride of Uranium (UF 6 ) with enrichment 20% in weight of 235 U. In the process of attainment of the league of U 3 Si 2 we have as Uranium intermediate product the metallic one whose attainment generates a slag contend Uranium. The present work shows the results gotten in the process of recovery of Uranium in slags of calcined slags of Uranium metallic. Uranium the metallic one is unstable, pyrophoricity and extremely reactive, whereas the U 3 O 8 is a steady oxide of low chemical reactivity, what it justifies the process of calcination of slags of Uranium metallic. The calcination of the Uranium slag of the metallic one in oxygen presence reduces Uranium metallic the U 3 O 8 . Experiments had been developed varying it of acid for Uranium control and excess, nitric molar concentration gram with regard to the stoichiometric leaching reaction of temperature of the leaching process. The 96,0% income proves the viability of the recovery process of slags of Uranium metallic, adopting it previous calcination of these slags in nitric way with low acid concentration and low temperature of leaching. (author)

  4. Process for producing uranium carbide spheroids

    Shennan, J.V.; Ford, L.H.

    1977-01-01

    The invention deals with a method to fabricate UC spheroids which are filled into moulds made of refractory material for fuel elements. The UC fuel particles are double-coated: a first thin layer of pyrolytic carbon is coated at low temperature 1200-1400 0 C, a record layer of pyrolytic material (e.g. Si c) is coated at a higher temperature (above 1500 0 C) which holds back the fission products. The method is described more closely by means of an example. (GSC) [de

  5. Uranium 2016: Resources, Production and Demand

    2016-01-01

    Uranium is the raw material used to produce fuel for long-lived nuclear power facilities, necessary for the generation of significant amounts of base-load low-carbon electricity for decades to come. Although a valuable commodity, declining market prices for uranium in recent years, driven by uncertainties concerning evolutions in the use of nuclear power, have led to the postponement of mine development plans in a number of countries and to some questions being raised about future uranium supply. This 26. edition of the 'Red Book', a recognised world reference on uranium jointly prepared by the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), provides analyses and information from 49 producing and consuming countries in order to address these and other questions. The present edition provides the most recent review of world uranium market fundamentals and presents data on global uranium exploration, resources, production and reactor-related requirements. It offers updated information on established uranium production centres and mine development plans, as well as projections of nuclear generating capacity and reactor-related requirements through 2035, in order to address long-term uranium supply and demand issues. (authors)

  6. Uranium enrichment

    Mohrhauer, H.

    1982-01-01

    The separation of uranium isotopes in order to enrich the fuel for light water reactors with the light isotope U-235 is an important part of the nuclear fuel cycle. After the basic principals of isotope separation the gaseous diffusion and the centrifuge process are explained. Both these techniques are employed on an industrial scale. In addition a short review is given on other enrichment techniques which have been demonstrated at least on a laboratory scale. After some remarks on the present situation on the enrichment market the progress in the development and the industrial exploitation of the gas centrifuge process by the trinational Urenco-Centec organisation is presented. (orig.)

  7. Management of wastes containing radioactivity from mining and milling of uranium ores in Northern Australia

    Costello, J.M.

    1977-01-01

    The procedures and controls to achieve safe management of wastes containing radioactivity during the mining and processing of uranium ores are mainly site specific depending on the nature, location and distribution of the ore and gangue material. Waste rock and below-ore-grade material containing low levels of radioactivity require disposal at the mine site. In open cut mining the material is generally stockpiled above ground, with revegetation and collection of run-off water. Some material may be used to backfill open cuts. Management of these wastes requires a thorough investigation of ground water hydrology and surface soil characteristics to control dissipation of radioactive material. Dust containing radon and radioactive particulate is produced during ore milling, and dusts of ore concentrate are generated during calcination and packaging of the yellowcake product. These dusts are managed by ventilation and filtration systems, working conditions, and discharges to atmosphere will be according to the Australian Code of Practice on Radiation Protection during Mining and Milling of Uranium Ores. The chemical waste stream from leaching and processing of the uranium ores contains the majority of the radioactivity resulting from radium and its decay products. Neutralised effluent is discharged into holding ponds for settling of solids. This paper describes the nature of wastes containing radioactivity resulting from the mining and milling of uranium, and illustrates modern engineering practices and monitoring procedures to manage the wastes, as described in the Environmental Impact statement produced by Ranger Uranium Mines Proprietary Limited for public hearings

  8. Uranium resources production and demand: a forty years evaluation 'Red book retrospective'

    2007-01-01

    Uranium Resources, Production and Demand, also familiarly known as the ''Red Book'' is a biennial publication produced jointly by the NEA and the IAEA under the auspices of the joint NEA/IAEA Uranium Group. The first edition was published in 1965. The red book retrospective was undertaken to collect, analyse and publish all of the key information collected in the 20 editions of the Red Book published between 1965 and 2004. The red book gives a full historical profile of the world uranium industry in the areas of exploration, resources, reactor-related requirements, inventories and price. It provides in depth information relating to the histories of the major uranium producing countries. Thus for the first time a comprehensive look at annual and cumulative production and demand of uranium since the inception of the atomic age is possible. Expert analysis provide fresh insights into important aspects of the industry including the cost of discovery, resources to production ratios and the time to reach production after discovery. (A.L.B.)

  9. Documentation of the Uranium Market Model (UMM)

    1989-01-01

    The Uranium Market Model is used to make projections of activity in the US uranium mining and milling industry. The primary data sources were EIA, the Nuclear Assurance Corporation, and, to a lesser extent, Nuexco and Nuclear Resources International. The Uranium Market Model is a microeconomic simulation model in which uranium supplied by the mining and milling industry is provided to meet the demand for uranium by electric utilities with nuclear power plants. Uranium is measured on a U 3 O 8 (uranium oxide) equivalent basis. The model considers every major production center and utility on a worldwide basis (with Centrally Planned Economies considered in a limited way), and makes annual projections for each major uranium production and consumption region in the world. Typically, nine regions are used: the United States, Canada, Australia, South Africa, Other Africa, Europe, Latin America, the Far East, and Other. Production centers and utilities are identified as being in one of these regions. In general, the model can accommodate any user-provided set of regional definitions and data

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF HIGH-DENSITY U/AL DISPERSION PLATES FOR MO-99 PRODUCTION USING ATOMIZED URANIUM POWDER

    RYU, HO JIN; KIM, CHANG KYU; SIM, MOONSOO; PARK, JONG MAN; LEE, JONG HYUN

    2013-01-01

    Uranium metal particle dispersion plates have been proposed as targets for Molybdenum-99 (Mo-99) production to improve the radioisotope production efficiency of conventional low enriched uranium targets. In this study, uranium powder was produced by centrifugal atomization, and miniature target plates containing uranium particles in an aluminum matrix with uranium densities up to 9 g-U/cm3 were fabricated. Additional heat treatment was applied to convert the uranium particles into UAlx compou...

  11. A new era in U.S. uranium enrichment

    Longenecker, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    Complex market conditions, including lower than anticipated electrical growth rates, creation of a large spot market of enriched uranium, fluctuations in currency exchange rates, and certain political considerations, have created an unstable market for all primary producers, including the United States. In response to these conditions, the Department of Energy made significant changes to the U.S. program including the issuance of the Utility Services contract on January 18, 1984. Other major changes include redirecting research and development efforts on the advanced gas centrifuge and atomic vapor laser isotope separation processes, rescoping of the Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant project, and reevaluation of the operational mode of the three gaseous diffusion plants. Taken together, we believe these actions will retain the U.S. position of leadership in uranium enrichment. In summary, we plan to compete--through introduction of the world's most advanced, lowest cost technology and through responsiveness to our customers' needs

  12. Advanced uranium enrichment processes

    Clerc, M.; Plurien, P.

    1986-01-01

    Three advanced Uranium enrichment processes are dealt with in the report: AVLIS (Atomic Vapour LASER Isotope Separation), MLIS (Molecular LASER Isotope Separation) and PSP (Plasma Separation Process). The description of the physical and technical features of the processes constitutes a major part of the report. If further presents comparisons with existing industrially used enrichment technologies, gives information on actual development programmes and budgets and ends with a chapter on perspectives and conclusions. An extensive bibliography of the relevant open literature is added to the different subjects discussed. The report was drawn up by the nuclear research Centre (CEA) Saclay on behalf of the Commission of the European Communities

  13. Issues in uranium availability

    Schanz, J.J. Jr.; Adams, S.S.; Gordon, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this publication is to show the process by which information about uranium reserves and resources is developed, evaluated and used. The following three papers in this volume have been abstracted and indexed for the Energy Data Base: (1) uranium reserve and resource assessment; (2) exploration for uranium in the United States; (3) nuclear power, the uranium industry, and resource development

  14. Australian uranium industry

    Warner, R K

    1976-04-01

    Various aspects of the Australian uranium industry are discussed including the prospecting, exploration and mining of uranium ores, world supply and demand, the price of uranium and the nuclear fuel cycle. The market for uranium and the future development of the industry are described.

  15. Irradiated uranium reprocessing

    Gal, I.

    1961-12-01

    Task concerned with reprocessing of irradiated uranium covered the following activities: implementing the method and constructing the cell for uranium dissolving; implementing the procedure for extraction of uranium, plutonium and fission products from radioactive uranium solutions; studying the possibilities for using inorganic ion exchangers and adsorbers for separation of U, Pu and fission products

  16. Uranium processing and properties

    2013-01-01

    Covers a broad spectrum of topics and applications that deal with uranium processing and the properties of uranium Offers extensive coverage of both new and established practices for dealing with uranium supplies in nuclear engineering Promotes the documentation of the state-of-the-art processing techniques utilized for uranium and other specialty metals

  17. Recovering uranium from phosphates

    Bergeret, M [Compagnie de Produits Chimiques et Electrometallurgiques Pechiney-Ugine Kuhlmann, 75 - Paris (France)

    1981-06-01

    Processes for the recovery of the uranium contained in phosphates have today become competitive with traditional methods of working uranium sources. These new possibilities will make it possible to meet more rapidly any increases in the demand for uranium: it takes ten years to start working a new uranium deposit, but only two years to build a recovery plant.

  18. Uranium enrichment plans

    Gagne, R.W.; Thomas, D.C.

    1977-01-01

    The status of existing uranium enrichment contracts in the US is reviewed and expected natural uranium requirements for existing domestic uranium enrichment contracts are evaluated. Uncertainty in natural uranium requirements associated with requirements-type and fixed-commitment type contracts is discussed along with implementation of variable tails assay

  19. Uranium enrichment plans

    Thomas, D.C.; Gagne, R.W.

    1978-01-01

    The following topics are covered: the status of the Government's existing uranium enrichment services contracts, natural uranium requirements based on the latest contract information, uncertainty in predicting natural uranium requirements based on uranium enrichment contracts, and domestic and foreign demand assumed in enrichment planning

  20. Establishing Effective Environmental and Safety Performance Indicators: A Best Practice Approach in Uranium Production

    Rezansoff, D.; White, G.

    2010-01-01

    Cameco Corporation (Cameco), with headquarters in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, is the world's largest, low-cost uranium producer, currently supplying sufficient uranium to meet 20% of the world's demand. It is characterized by a diverse range of operations in Canada, the United States and Central Asia, for which Cameco is the majority owner and/or operator, including exploration, mining, milling, refining and conversion. Cameco had four business segments: Uranium; Conversion services; Nuclear energy generation; and Gold Also, in 2002, Cameco revised its vision statement to indicate, 'Cameco will be a dominant nuclear energy company producing uranium fuel and generating clean electricity'. Commensurate with this, Cameco has re-confirmed its overall measures of success as follows: A safe, healthy and rewarding workplace; A clean environment; Supportive communities; and Solid financial performance - all reflected in a growing return to shareholders. Like most organizations, Cameco recognizes the importance of conducting its operations in ways that promote continual improvement in environmental and safety performance. Demonstrating the environmental advantages of nuclear is a vital part of the overall best management practices approach. Detractors often try to point to the uranium production side of the nuclear fuel cycle in pursuit of trying to make the case that the nuclear option does not carry any special environmental advantage. These attempts are mostly based on performance from eras past, not modern performance. The uranium sector must be able to present its case in a modern context, which is largely based on sustainable development principles. This paper focuses on establishing environment and safety performance indicators for the uranium production and conversion aspects of Cameco's business, as well as in support of the environmental advantages of nuclear energy generation

  1. Uranium mill tailings and radon

    Hanchey, L.A.

    1981-01-01

    The major health hazard from uranium mill tailings is presumed to be respiratory cancer resulting from the inhalation of radon daughter products. A review of studies on inhalation of radon and its daughters indicates that the hazard from the tailings is extremely small. If the assumptions used in the studies are correct, one or two people per year in the US may develop cancer as a result of radon exhaled from all the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program sites. The remedial action should reduce the hazard from the tailings by a factor of about 100

  2. Australia's uranium policy: an examination

    Crook, K.A.W.; Derborough, M.A.; Diesendorf, M.; Inall, E.K.; Peaslee, D.C.; Taylor, S.R.

    1974-12-01

    The mining and export of Australian Uranium poses problems for the safety of the world that any responsible government is bound to consider. The following note lists the major problems, attempts to assess their importance, and to suggest what lines may be relevant to Australia for their solution. These problems were examined because of the concern about the appropriateness of attempting to fulfill projected world energy needs by any means; and their fulfillment, by using nuclear fuels carries special problems of biological, social and political hazards. Any development of Australia's uranium resources should be considered in this light. (author)

  3. Uranium mill tailings and radon

    Hanchey, L A

    1981-04-01

    The major health hazard from uranium mill tailings is presumed to be respiratory cancer resulting from the inhalation of radon daughter products. A review of studies on inhalation of radon and its daughters indicates that the hazard from the tailings is extremely small. If the assumptions used in the studies are correct, one or two people per year in the United States may develop cancer as a result of radon exhaled from all the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action program sites. The remedial action should reduce the hazard from the tailings by a factor of about 100.

  4. Uranium mill tailings and radon

    Hanchey, L A

    1981-01-01

    The major health hazard from uranium mill tailings is presumed to be respiratory cancer resulting from the inhalation of radon daughter products. A review of studies on inhalation of radon and its daughters indicates that the hazard from the tailings is extremely small. If the assumptions used in the studies are correct, one or two people per year in the US may develop cancer as a result of radon exhaled from all the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program sites. The remedial action should reduce the hazard from the tailings by a factor of about 100.

  5. Uranium in South Africa: 1985

    1986-03-01

    South Africa's participation in the nuclear industry was limited to the production of uranium and research, with minor commercial activities. The commissioning of the Koeberg Nuclear power station in 1984 placed South Africa firmly on the path of commercial nuclear power generation. A unique, locally developed uranium enrichment process will enable South Africa to be self-sufficient in its nuclear-fuel needs. Uranium has always been of secondary importance to gold as a target commodity in the exploration of the quartz-pebble conglomerates. In the Witwatersrand Basin it is estimated that in excess of R100 million was spent on exploration during 1985. This was spent primarily in the search for gold but as many of the gold reefs are uraniferous, new uranium resources are being discovered concurrently with those of gold. Uranium mineralization is present in rocks which encompass almost the whole of the geological history of South Africa. Significant mineralization is restricted to five fairly well-defined time periods. Each period is characterized by a distinct type or combination of types of mineralization. Resource estimates are divided into separate categories that reflect different levels of confidence in the quantities reported. The resource categories are further separated into levels of exploitability based on the estimated cost of their exploitation. A major part (87%) of South Africa's uranium resources is present as a by-product of gold in the quartz-pebble conglomerates of the Witwatersrand Basin. The uranium resources in the reasonably assured resources (RAR) and estimated additional resources - category I (EAR-I) catogories were 483 300 t U. Production during 1985 was 4880 t U. Although a production peaking at over 1200 t U/a is theoretically attainable, it is considered, from market projections, that a production ceilling of 10 000 t U/a would be more realistic

  6. Uranium in South Africa: 1987

    1988-06-01

    South Africa's participation in the nuclear industry was limited to the production of uranium and research, with minor commercial activities. The commissioning of the Koeberg Nuclear power station in 1984 placed South Africa firmly on the path of commercial nuclear power generation. A unique locally developed uranium enrichment process wil enable South Africa to be self-sufficient in its nuclear-fuel needs. Uranium has always been of secondary importance to gold as a target commodity in the exploration of the quartz-pebble conglomerates. In the Witwatersrand Basin it is estimated that in excess of R300 million was spend on exploration during 1987. This was spend primarily in the search for gold but as many of the gold reefs are uraniferous, new uranium resources are being discovered concurrently with those of gold. Uranium mineralization is present in rocks which encompass almost the whole of the geological history of South Africa. Significant mineralization is restricted to five fairly well-defined time periods. Each period is characterized by a distinct type or combination of types of mineralization. Resource estimates are divided into separate categories that reflect different levels of confidence in the quantities reported. The resource categories are further separated into levels of exploitability based on the estimated cost of their exploitation. A major part (87%) of South Africa's uranium resources is present as a by-product of gold in the quartz-pebble conglomerates of the Witwatersrand Basin. The uranium resources in the RAR and EAR-I categories were 536 500 t u. Production during 1987 was 3963 t u. Although a production peaking at over 1100 t U/a is theoretically attainable, it is considered, from market projections, that a production ceiling of 10 000 t U/a would be more realistic

  7. Uranium speciation in Fernald soils

    Morris, D.E.; Conradson, S.D.; Tait, C.D.; Chisholm-Brause, C.J.; Berg, J.; Musgrave, J.

    1992-01-01

    This report details progress made from January 1 to May 31, 1992 in this analytical support task to determine the speciation of uranium in contaminated soil samples from the Fernald Environmental Management Project site under the auspices of the Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration funded through the US DOE's Office of Technology Development. The authors' efforts have focused on characterization of soil samples collected by S.Y. Lee (Oak Ridge National Laboratory) from five locales at the Fernald site. These were chosen to sample a broad range of uranium source terms. On the basis of x-ray absorption spectroscopy data, they have determined that the majority of uranium (> 80--90%) exists in the hexavalent oxidation state for all samples examined. This is a beneficial finding from the perspective of remediation, because U(VI) species are more soluble in general than uranium species in other oxidation states. Optical luminescence data from many of the samples show the characteristic structured yellow-green emission from the uranyl (UO 2 2+ ) moiety. The luminescence data also suggest that much of the uranium in these soils is present as well-crystallized UO 2 2+ species. Some clear spectroscopic distinctions have been noted for several samples that illustrate significant differences in the speciation (1) from site to site, (2) within different horizons at the same site, and (3) within different size fractions of the soils in the same horizon at the same site. This marked heterogeneity in uranyl speciation suggests that several soil washing strategies may be necessary to reduce the total uranium concentrations within these soils to regulatory limits

  8. Reduction of uranium hexafluoride to uranium tetrafluoride

    Chang, I.S.; Do, J.B.; Choi, Y.D.; Park, M.H.; Yun, H.H.; Kim, E.H.; Kim, Y.W.

    1982-01-01

    The single step continuous reduction of uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) to uranium tetrafluoride (UF 4 ) has been investigated. Heat required to initiate and maintain the reaction in the reactor is supplied by the highly exothermic reaction of hydrogen with a small amount of elemental fluorine which is added to the uranium hexafluoride stream. When gases uranium hexafluoride and hydrogen react in a vertical monel pipe reactor, the green product, UF 4 has 2.5g/cc in bulk density and is partly contaminated by incomplete reduction products (UF 5 ,U 2 F 9 ) and the corrosion product, presumably, of monel pipe of the reactor itself, but its assay (93% of UF 4 ) is acceptable for the preparation of uranium metal with magnesium metal. Remaining problems are the handling of uranium hexafluoride, which is easily clogging the flowmeter and gas feeding lines because of extreme sensitivity toward moisture, and a development of gas nozzel for free flow of uranium hexafluoride gas. (Author)

  9. In the beginning was uranium

    Charles, D.

    1992-01-01

    This article traces the nuclear proliferation which followed Gernot Zippe's invention during the Second World War, of a gas centrifuge to extract Uranium 235 from Uranium. This rare isotope is at the core of nuclear reactors and of the atomic bomb. Despite attempts by the world's nuclear powers to prevent widespread availability of the centrifuge, it is today in use by emergent Third World countries to produce enriched uranium for weapons programmes. The gas centrifuge was developed in a Soviet camp by captured German scientists. Zippe later reconstructed his work from memory in the United States (U.S.) where it was published at the University of Virginia just before the U.S. government could impose a secrecy order. He adapted his work for the West German government to produce enriched uranium fuel for civilian power stations. This technology became the basis for the Urenco industrial consortium. The article concludes with speculation about the nuclear weapons programme in Iraq following the Gulf War, where their impressive arsenal of weapons equipment came from and how close Iraq is to producing its own bomb. (UK)

  10. Uranium - the world picture

    Silver, J.M.; Wright, W.J.

    1976-01-01

    The world resources of uranium and the future demand for uranium are discussed. The amount of uranium available depends on the price which users are prepared to pay for its recovery. As the price is increased, there is an incentive to recover uranium from lower grade or more difficult deposits. In view of this, attention is drawn to the development of the uranium industry in Australias

  11. Studies on uranium ore processing

    Kim, C.H.; Park, S.W.; Lim, J.K.; Chung, M.K.

    1981-01-01

    Chemical and chemical engineering techniques of the uranium ore processing established by France COGEMA (Compagnie Generale des Matieres Nucleaires) have been comprehensively reviewed in preparation for successful test operation of the pilot plant to be completed by the end of 1981. It was found that the amount of sulfuric acid (75 Kg/t, ore) and sodium chlorate (2.5 Kg/t, ore) recommended by COGEMA should be increased up to 100 Kg/t, ore and 10 Kg/t, ore respectively to obtain satisfactory leach of uranium for some ore samples produced at the different pits of Goesan uranium mine. Conditions of the other processes such as solvent extraction, stripping, and precipitation of yellow cake were generally agreed with the results of intensive studies done by this laboratory

  12. Energetics and dynamics of atomic uranium levels

    Miron, E.

    1978-01-01

    New methods for discovering and identifying new electronic levels of atomic uranium and measuring parameters, such as radiative lifetimes and absorption cross-sections, are described. The uranium atoms are produced within an especially designed induction-heated oven. The uranium vapor is irradiated by nitrogen laser pumped, pulsed dye lasers. The various measurements are accomplished by detection of laser induced fluorescence from selectively excited levels. 138 atomic-uranium odd levels in the region 32260-34900 cm -1 and 16 even levels in the region 49500-49900 cm -1 are reported. Unique J values are presented for 64 levels and partial assignment (two possibilities) for 42 levels. Radiative lifetimes are presented for 134 levels. Absorption cross sections were measured for 12 transitions. Isotope shifts of 17 levels are given. Cross-sections for internal excitation transfer in uranium which are induced by collisions with argon atoms, are presented for 11 levels. (author)

  13. Uranium briquettes for irradiation target

    Saliba-Silva, Adonis Marcelo; Garcia, Rafael Henrique Lazzari; Martins, Ilson Carlos; Carvalho, Elita Fontenele Urano de; Durazzo, Michelangelo, E-mail: saliba@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Direct irradiation on targets inside nuclear research or multiple purpose reactors is a common route to produce {sup 99}Mo-{sup 99m}Tc radioisotopes. Nevertheless, since the imposed limits to use LEU uranium to prevent nuclear armament production, the amount of uranium loaded in target meats has physically increased and new processes have been proposed for production. Routes using metallic uranium thin film and UAl{sub x} dispersion have been used for this purpose. Both routes have their own issues, either by bringing difficulties to disassemble the aluminum case inside hot cells or by generating great amount of alkaline radioactive liquid rejects. A potential route might be the dispersion of powders of LEU metallic uranium and nickel, which are pressed as a blend inside a die and followed by pulse electroplating of nickel. The electroplating provides more strength to the briquettes and creates a barrier for gas evolution during neutronic disintegration of {sup 235}U. A target briquette platted with nickel encapsulated in an aluminum case to be irradiated may be an alternative possibility to replace other proposed targets. This work uses pulse Ni-electroplating over iron powder briquette to simulate the covering of uranium by nickel. The following parameters were applied 10 times for each sample: 900Hz, -0.84A/square centimeters with duty cycle of 0.1 in Watts Bath. It also presented the optical microscopy analysis of plated microstructure section. (author)

  14. Uranium briquettes for irradiation target

    Saliba-Silva, Adonis Marcelo; Garcia, Rafael Henrique Lazzari; Martins, Ilson Carlos; Carvalho, Elita Fontenele Urano de; Durazzo, Michelangelo

    2011-01-01

    Direct irradiation on targets inside nuclear research or multiple purpose reactors is a common route to produce 99 Mo- 99m Tc radioisotopes. Nevertheless, since the imposed limits to use LEU uranium to prevent nuclear armament production, the amount of uranium loaded in target meats has physically increased and new processes have been proposed for production. Routes using metallic uranium thin film and UAl x dispersion have been used for this purpose. Both routes have their own issues, either by bringing difficulties to disassemble the aluminum case inside hot cells or by generating great amount of alkaline radioactive liquid rejects. A potential route might be the dispersion of powders of LEU metallic uranium and nickel, which are pressed as a blend inside a die and followed by pulse electroplating of nickel. The electroplating provides more strength to the briquettes and creates a barrier for gas evolution during neutronic disintegration of 235 U. A target briquette platted with nickel encapsulated in an aluminum case to be irradiated may be an alternative possibility to replace other proposed targets. This work uses pulse Ni-electroplating over iron powder briquette to simulate the covering of uranium by nickel. The following parameters were applied 10 times for each sample: 900Hz, -0.84A/square centimeters with duty cycle of 0.1 in Watts Bath. It also presented the optical microscopy analysis of plated microstructure section. (author)

  15. An abbreviated MLVA identifies Escherichia coli ST131 as the major extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing lineage in the Copenhagen area

    Nielsen, J B; Albayati, A; Jørgensen, Rikke Lind

    2013-01-01

    with multilocus sequence typing (MLST) for typing cefpodoxime-resistant Escherichia coli (E. coli). Further, we identified the causative resistance mechanisms and epidemiological type of infection for isolates producing extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs). A collection of E. coli resistant to cefpodoxime...... community-onset infections (COI), regardless of the ST. Patients with COI were significantly more often of female gender and younger age compared to healthcare-associated infections (HCAI) and hospital-onset infections (HOI). In conclusion, the modified MLVA is a useful tool for the rapid typing of E. coli...

  16. Uranium in tertiary stream channels, Lake Frome area, South Australia

    Brunt, D.A.

    1978-01-01

    Uranium exploration over a wide area of the Southern Frome Embayment, South Australia, has defined a number of Lower Tertiary fluvial palacochannels incised in older rocks. The buried channels contain similar stratigraphic sequences of interbedded sand, silt, and clay, probably derived from the adjacent uranium-rich Olary Province. Uranium mineralization is pervasive within two major palacochannels, and four small uranium deposits have been found in the basal sands of these channel sequences, at the margins of extensive tongues of limonitic sand. A genetic model is proposed suggesting formation by a uraniferous geochemical cell which migrated down the stream gradient and concentrated uranium on its lateral margins adjacent to the channel bank

  17. Uranium 2001: resources, production and demand

    2002-01-01

    The 'Red Book', jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency, is a recognised world reference on uranium. Its contents are based on official information received from 45 countries, supplemented by unofficial information for two others. This edition, the 19., presents the results of a thorough review of world uranium supply and demand as of 1 January 2001 and provides a statistical profile of the world uranium industry in the areas of exploration, resource estimates, production and reactor-related requirements. It provides substantial new information from all major uranium production centres in Africa, Australia, Eastern Europe and North America and, for the first time, includes a report on Tajikistan. This edition also features international expert analyses and projections of nuclear generating capacity and reactor-related uranium requirements through 2020. (authors)

  18. A Study of ext ration equilibrium in the system:phosphoric acid produced in Aqaba-uranium-0.5 M de pa-0.125M TOPO diluted in kerosene

    Al-Matar, K.A.; Rawajfeh, M.K.

    1995-01-01

    The extraction of uranium from purified wet process Jordanian phosphoric acid by synergistic solvent 0.5 M de pa and 0.125 M TOPO diluted in kerosene has been studied as a function of temperature and electro-motive force. The uranium distribution coefficient was found to be directly proportional to the electro-motive force up to a limiting point. The uranium distribution coefficient was found to decrease with temperature.Distribution coefficients for the Jordanian acid were found to be higher than those for similar acids from elsewhere.An Aqueous to Organic phase ratio (A/O) recommended for use with the Jordanian acid is 2.5. 11 refs., 6 figs., 2 tab.(Author)

  19. Uranium exploration programmes, and the outlook for the 1990s

    Underhill, D.

    1991-01-01

    To understand the exploration patterns of the industry and forecast the outlook for the 1990s, it is necessary to understand the broad and diverse makeup of the participants, which consists of: producers, consumers, and government agencies. The most visible group, the producers, are primarily motivated by profit expectation. Their actions show a high correlation to the spot market price. The second group, consumers, are more concerned with the existence of supplier competition, diversification of supply sources, and fuel cycle economics. The last group, governments, further breaks down into importing and exporting groups. They are motivated by either assurances of supply (importing) or hard currency trade (exporting). The future uranium supply/demand balance for the major countries is shown. The sustained decline of uranium prices has resulted in drastic cuts in uranium exploration. In this paper, I will review and analyze the trends of the recent past and the outlook for the 1990s, for civilian power programmes only, not defence stockpiles; also only Western World countries and China are considered, not the USSR and Europe and limited nuclear growth is assumed with no nuclear resurgence. (author)

  20. Natural uranium

    Ammerich, Marc; Frot, Patricia; Gambini, Denis-Jean; Gauron, Christine; Moureaux, Patrick; Herbelet, Gilbert; Lahaye, Thierry; Pihet, Pascal; Rannou, Alain

    2014-08-01

    This sheet belongs to a collection which relates to the use of radionuclides essentially in unsealed sources. Its goal is to gather on a single document the most relevant information as well as the best prevention practices to be implemented. These sheets are made for the persons in charge of radiation protection: users, radioprotection-skill persons, labor physicians. Each sheet treats of: 1 - the radio-physical and biological properties; 2 - the main uses; 3 - the dosimetric parameters; 4 - the measurement; 5 - the protection means; 6 - the areas delimitation and monitoring; 7 - the personnel classification, training and monitoring; 8 - the effluents and wastes; 9 - the authorization and declaration administrative procedures; 10 - the transport; and 11 - the right conduct to adopt in case of incident or accident. This sheet deals specifically with natural uranium

  1. Suggestions for the New Social Entrepreneurship Initiative: Focus on Building a Body of Research-Proven Programs, Shown to Produce Major Gains in Education, Poverty Reduction, Crime Prevention, and Other Areas

    Coalition for Evidence-Based Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This paper outlines a possible approach to implementing the Social Entrepreneurship initiative, focused on building a body of research-proven program models/strategies, and scaling them up, so as to produce major progress in education, poverty reduction, crime prevention, and other areas. The paper summarizes the rationale for this approach, then…

  2. Another comeback for uranium

    Boyden, T.A.

    1983-01-01

    The uranium market has been unstable since private industry entered the nuclear power generating business in the early 1960s. Uranium supply has always exceeded demand throughout the Free World. In 1982, production was 106 million pounds U308 and accumulated inventory totaled over 400 million pounds; consumption was only 63 million pounds. Recent inventory selling, production cutbacks and producers buying from consumers, have led to decreasing prices and further market instability. It now appears that the market is beginning to change to a more stable situation. Current forecasts indicate that Free World demand will double by 1996, led by Europe and the US. Annual production will average about 100 million pounds during the same period. A closer balance between supply and demand should allow market prices to improve between now and 1990. The situation in the US is more complex. Consumption will increase to 35 million pounds through the 1990s while annual production is expected to decrease to about 12 million pounds, (down from a 1980 high of almost 44 million pounds) before higher prices allow a recovery to an annual production level of about 16 million pounds. The balance of US consumption will be met with imports and inventory drawdowns. Higher prices in the latter part of the decade will support a number of new solution mining projects, and allow the development of high-grade ore deposits by conventional methods. The US producer industry will survive, but will be secondary to those in Canada, South Africa and probably Australia

  3. Some major deviations for biomass determination by indirect method and estimation based on alkali consumption. [Ratio of cell mass produced and alkali consumed; diesel fuel culture medium

    Concone, B R.V.; Doin, P A; Pinto, A G

    1978-01-01

    Some factors like the variation of the liquid volume, the variation of cellular nitrogen content and the mass of cells taken with the samples during batch cultivation of microorganisms on diesel oil, were considered for the computation of the ratio between cell mass produced and the mass of alkali consumed to maintain constant the pH of the fermentation medium. The results obtained showed that if such ratios are computed with cell concentration instead of cell mass the deviations can be of the order of 27% caused by the variation of the liquid medium volume. Otherwise, the results showed also that those ratios are variable during batch cultivation on diesel oil probably because of the variations on the nitrogen content of microorganisms. The relative difference between the mass of cells measured and the mass of cells calculated from the alkali consumption curve can be of the order of 63%.

  4. Uranium as Raw Material for Nuclear Energy

    Lelek, V.

    2006-01-01

    There is lot of information bringing our attention to the problem of limited raw material resources. Fortunately uranium for nuclear energy is very concentrated source and that is why its transport brings no problems and could be realized from anywhere. Second question is if overall resources are available for current nuclear energy development. Data documenting reasons for nowadays price growth are presenting and it is clearly shown that the most probable explanation is that there is gap in new uranium mines preparation and the lot of smaller mines were closed in the period of low uranium prices. Conclusion is that there is at least for the first half of this century even for thermal reactors enough uranium. Situation could be changed if there will massive production of liquid fuel using hydrogen, produced through nuclear heating. Public information about former military uranium resources are also included. Contemporary about one half of US nuclear power-stations is using high enriched uranium diluted with natural uranium - it is expected to continue this way up to 2012. Uranium is complicated market (Authors)

  5. Biological adsorbent for water decontamination from uranium

    Jilek, R [Vyzkumny Ustav Veterinarniho Lekarstvi, Brno-Medlanky (Czechoslovakia); Fuska, J; Nemec, P [Slovenska Vysoka Skola Technicka, Bratislava (Czechoslovakia). Chemickotechnologicka Fakulta

    1978-01-01

    A study was made into the capacity of native and heat-denaturated mycelium to adsorb uranium salts from solutions and into the effect of uranium on the growth of the microorganism biomass. The presence of uranium did not inhibit the growth of Penicillium and Aspergillus strains used at a concentration of up to 5x10/sup -4/ M/dm/sup 3/. Uranium added to a nutrient medium produced complexes with phosphorus ions which were adsorbed on the surface of growing hyphae, thus the removal of the mycelium also removed uranium. The results of the experiments with denaturated mycelium of the same strains suggested that uranium was also bound to the biomass with chemical bonds so that mycelium acted as a ''multifunction ion exchanger'' from which adsorbed uranium can be removed step by step by elution. A sorbent of a three-dimensional structure could be prepared from a dried native mycelium using reinforcing resins, which prevented leakage of the biomass. Uranium sorption by biosorbents is a function of the concentration of the cation sorbed and of the pH of the solution.

  6. Uranium 2011: Resources, Production and Demand

    2012-01-01

    In the wake of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident, questions are being raised about the future of the uranium market, including as regards the number of reactors expected to be built in the coming years, the amount of uranium required to meet forward demand, the adequacy of identified uranium resources to meet that demand and the ability of the sector to meet reactor requirements in a challenging investment climate. This 24. edition of the 'Red Book', a recognised world reference on uranium jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency, provides analyses and information from 42 producing and consuming countries in order to address these and other questions. It offers a comprehensive review of world uranium supply and demand as well as data on global uranium exploration, resources, production and reactor-related requirements. It also provides substantive new information on established uranium production centres around the world and in countries developing production centres for the first time. Projections of nuclear generating capacity and reactor-related requirements through 2035, incorporating policy changes following the Fukushima accident, are also featured, along with an analysis of long-term uranium supply and demand issues

  7. Biological adsorbent for water decontamination from uranium

    Jilek, R.; Fuska, J.; Nemec, P.

    1978-01-01

    A study was made into the capacity of native and heat-denaturated mycelium to adsorb uranium salts from solutions and into the effect of uranium on the growth of the microorganism biomass. The presence of uranium did not inhibit the growth of Penicillium and Aspergillus strains used at a concentration of up to 5x10 -4 M/dm 3 . Uranium added to a nutrient medium produced complexes with phosphorus ions which were adsorbed on the surface of growing hyphae, thus the removal of the mycelium also removed uranium. The results of the experiments with denaturated mycelium of the same strains suggested that uranium was also bound to the biomass with chemical bonds so that mycelium acted as a ''multifunction ion exchanger'' from which adsorbed uranium can be removed step by step by elution. A sorbent of a three-dimensional structure could be prepared from a dried native mycelium using reinforcing resins, which prevented leakage of the biomass. Uranium sorption by biosorbents is a function of the concentration of the cation sorbed and of the pH of the solution. (author)

  8. Recent activities and trends in the uranium market

    Kwasny, R.; Lohrey, K.; Max, A.

    2006-01-01

    Implementing the large number of nuclear power plant projects worldwide presupposes a considerable increase in the production of natural uranium. Preparations have been made: Higher uranium prices stimulate investments into future mines and into uranium exploration. In some countries, the uranium industry is undergoing structural changes so as to be able to meet future requirements. The terms and conditions laid down in long-term uranium supply contracts (prices and fixed delivery volumes) provide present and future producers with the necessary security in investing and planning. The electricity utilities have accepted the shift from a former 'buyer's market' to a 'seller's market' and adapted their uranium supply strategies accordingly. Numerous uranium mines, most of them small, with relatively low uranium ore concentrations, are under construction or in the commissioning phase. However, as secondary sources (fuels not made up of fresh uranium) are gradually coming to an end, many more uranium deposits need to be found and developed to commercial maturity in order to ensure uranium supply also on the long term. The steadily growing industries in the front end and the back end of the fuel cycle have intensified concerns about the non-proliferation of nuclear fuels. However, political considerations with respect to proliferation resistant uranium supply strategies have met with scepticism right from the outset. (orig.)

  9. Bioremediation of uranium contaminated soils and wastes

    Francis, A.J.

    1998-01-01

    Contamination of soils, water, and sediments by radionuclides and toxic metals from uranium mill tailings, nuclear fuel manufacturing and nuclear weapons production is a major concern. Studies of the mechanisms of biotransformation of uranium and toxic metals under various microbial process conditions has resulted in the development of two treatment processes: (1) stabilization of uranium and toxic metals with reduction in waste volume and (2) removal and recovery of uranium and toxic metals from wastes and contaminated soils. Stabilization of uranium and toxic metals in wastes is accomplished by exploiting the unique metabolic capabilities of the anaerobic bacterium, Clostridium sp. The radionuclides and toxic metals are solubilized by the bacteria directly by enzymatic reductive dissolution, or indirectly due to the production of organic acid metabolites. The radionuclides and toxic metals released into solution are immobilized by enzymatic reductive precipitation, biosorption and redistribution with stable mineral phases in the waste. Non-hazardous bulk components of the waste volume. In the second process uranium and toxic metals are removed from wastes or contaminated soils by extracting with the complexing agent citric acid. The citric-acid extract is subjected to biodegradation to recover the toxic metals, followed by photochemical degradation of the uranium citrate complex which is recalcitrant to biodegradation. The toxic metals and uranium are recovered in separate fractions for recycling or for disposal. The use of combined chemical and microbiological treatment process is more efficient than present methods and should result in considerable savings in clean-up and disposal costs

  10. An Effort to Improve Uranium Foil Target Fabrication Technology by Single Roll Method

    Sim, Moon Soo; Lee, Jong Hyeon [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chang Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    Technetium-99({sup 99m}Tc) is the most commonly used radioisotope in nuclear medicine for diagnostic procedures. It is produced from the decay of its parent Mo-99, which is sent to the hospital or clinic in the form of a generator. Recently, all of the major providers of Mo-99 have used high-enrichment uranium (HEU) as a target material in a research and test reactor. As a part of a nonproliferation effort, the RERTR program has investigated the production of the fission isotope Mo-99 using low-enrichment uranium(LEU) instead of HEU since 1993, a parent nuclide of {sup 99m}Tc , which is a major isotope for a medical diagnosis. As uranium foils have been produced by the conventional method on a laboratory scale by a repetitive hot-rolling method with significant problems in foil quality, productivity and economic efficiency, attention has shifted to the planar flow casting(PFC) method. In KAERI, many experiments are performed using depleted uranium(DU).

  11. 77 FR 60482 - Regulatory Guide 5.67, Material Control and Accounting for Uranium Enrichment Facilities...

    2012-10-03

    ... Accounting for Uranium Enrichment Facilities Authorized To Produce Special Nuclear Material of Low Strategic... Accounting for Uranium Enrichment Facilities Authorized to Produce Special Nuclear Material of Low Strategic... and is applicable to the Paducah GDP and other uranium enrichment facilities that have been licensed...

  12. Uranium management activities

    Jackson, D.; Marshall, E.; Sideris, T.; Vasa-Sideris, S.

    2001-01-01

    One of the missions of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge Office (ORO) has been the management of the Department's uranium materials. This mission has been accomplished through successful integration of ORO's uranium activities with the rest of the DOE complex. Beginning in the 1980's, several of the facilities in that complex have been shut down and are in the decommissioning process. With the end of the Cold War, the shutdown of many other facilities is planned. As a result, inventories of uranium need to be removed from the Department facilities. These inventories include highly enriched uranium (HEU), low enriched uranium (LEU), normal uranium (NU), and depleted uranium (DU). The uranium materials exist in different chemical forms, including metals, oxides, solutions, and gases. Much of the uranium in these inventories is not needed to support national priorities and programs. (author)

  13. Uranium industry annual 1998

    1999-01-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1998 (UIA 1998) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry's activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. It contains data for the period 1989 through 2008 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey.'' Data provides a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry's activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry's plans and commitments for the near-term future. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1989 through 1998, including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment, are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2008, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, and uranium inventories, are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1998 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey'' is provided in Appendix C. The Form EIA-858 ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey'' is shown in Appendix D. For the readers convenience, metric versions of selected tables from Chapters 1 and 2 are presented in Appendix E along with the standard conversion factors used. A glossary of technical terms is at the end of the report. 24 figs., 56 tabs

  14. Uranium industry annual 1994

    1995-01-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1994 (UIA 1994) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry's activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing during that survey year. The UIA 1994 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the 10-year period 1985 through 1994 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey.'' Data collected on the ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey'' (UIAS) provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry's activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry's plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1994, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. A feature article, ''Comparison of Uranium Mill Tailings Reclamation in the United States and Canada,'' is included in the UIA 1994. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, and uranium inventories, enrichment feed deliveries (actual and projected), and unfilled market requirements are shown in Chapter 2

  15. Thermal stabilization of uranium mill tailings

    Dreesen, D.R.; Williams, J.M.; Cokal, E.J.

    1981-01-01

    The sintering of tailings at high temperatures (1200 0 C) has shown promise as a conditioning approach that greatly reduces the 222 Rn emanation of uranium mill tailings. The structure of thermally stabilized tailings has been appreciably altered producing a material that will have minimal management requirements and will be applicable to on-site processing and disposal. The mineralogy of untreated tailings is presented to define the structure of the original materials. Quartz predominates in most tailings samples; however, appreciable quantities of gypsum, clay, illite, or albites are found in some tailings. Samples from the Durango and Shiprock sites have plagioclase-type aluminosilicates and non-aluminum silicates as major components. The iron-rich vanadium tailings from the Salt Lake City site contain appreciable quantities of α-hematite and chloroapatite. The reduction in radon emanation power and changes in mineralogy as a function of sintering temperature are presented

  16. Development of uranium industry in Romania

    Iuhas, Tiberiu

    2000-01-01

    The management of the uranium resources is performed in Romania by the National Uranium Company. The tasks to be done are: 1. management and protection of rare and radioactive metal ores in the exploitation areas; 2. mining, preparation, refining and trading the radioactive ores, as well as reprocessing the uranium stock from the uranium concentrate in the national reserve; 3. performing geologic and technologic studies in the exploitation areas; 4. performing studies and projects concerning the maintenance of the present facilities and unearthing new ores; 5. building industrial facilities; 6. carrying out technological transport; 7. importation-exportation operations; 8. performing micro-production activity in experimental research units; 9. personnel training; 10. medical assistance for the personnel; 11. environment protection. The company is organized as follows: 1.three branches for uranium ore mining, located at Suceava, Bihor and Banat; 2. one branch for geologic survey, located at Magurele; 3. one branch for uranium ore preparation and concentration and for refining uranium concentrates, located at Feldioara; 4. One group for mine conservation, closure and ecology, located at Bucuresti. The final product, sintered powder of UO 2 produced at Feldioara plant, was tested in 1994 by the Canadian partner and met successfully the required standards. The Feldioara plant was certified as supplier of raw material for CANDU nuclear fuel production and as such, Romania is the only authorized producer of CANDU nuclear fuel in Europe and the second in the world, after Canada. Maintaining the uranium production in Romania is justified by the existence of uranium ore resources, the declining of natural gas resources, lower costs per kWh for electric nuclear power as compared to fossil-fuel power production, the possibility for Romania to become an important supplier of CANDU nuclear fuel, the low environmental impact and high costs for total shutdown of activity, high

  17. World uranium supply and demand: The changing market

    Underhill, D.H.; Mueller Kahle, E.

    1993-01-01

    This report provides an analysis of uranium supply and demand under the current conditions of this developing global market. While an analysis is possible, it should be borne in mind that available information is not always complete under conditions of major reorganization, and consequently some speculative assessment is required. Therefore, although this article is based on the latest information available, it should be considered as background material for further analysis rather than as an accurate forecast for the future. The level of uncertainty is particularly high regarding the future availability of nuclear materials produced in newly independent States emerging from the former Soviet Union

  18. Immunization Strategies Producing a Humoral IgG Immune Response against Devil Facial Tumor Disease in the Majority of Tasmanian Devils Destined for Wild Release

    Ruth Pye

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Devil facial tumor disease (DFTD is renowned for its successful evasion of the host immune system. Down regulation of the major histocompatabilty complex class I molecule (MHC-I on the DFTD cells is a primary mechanism of immune escape. Immunization trials on captive Tasmanian devils have previously demonstrated that an immune response against DFTD can be induced, and that immune-mediated tumor regression can occur. However, these trials were limited by their small sample sizes. Here, we describe the results of two DFTD immunization trials on cohorts of devils prior to their wild release as part of the Tasmanian Government’s Wild Devil Recovery project. 95% of the devils developed anti-DFTD antibody responses. Given the relatively large sample sizes of the trials (N = 19 and N = 33, these responses are likely to reflect those of the general devil population. DFTD cells manipulated to express MHC-I were used as the antigenic basis of the immunizations in both trials. Although the adjuvant composition and number of immunizations differed between trials, similar anti-DFTD antibody levels were obtained. The first trial comprised DFTD cells and the adjuvant combination of ISCOMATRIX™, polyIC, and CpG with up to four immunizations given at monthly intervals. This compared to the second trial whereby two immunizations comprising DFTD cells and the adjuvant combination ISCOMATRIX™, polyICLC (Hiltonol® and imiquimod were given a month apart, providing a shorter and, therefore, more practical protocol. Both trials incorporated a booster immunization given up to 5 months after the primary course. A key finding was that devils in the second trial responded more quickly and maintained their antibody levels for longer compared to devils in the first trial. The different adjuvant combination incorporating the RNAase resistant polyICLC and imiquimod used in the second trial is likely to be responsible. The seroconversion in the majority of

  19. Immunization Strategies Producing a Humoral IgG Immune Response against Devil Facial Tumor Disease in the Majority of Tasmanian Devils Destined for Wild Release

    Pye, Ruth; Patchett, Amanda; McLennan, Elspeth; Thomson, Russell; Carver, Scott; Fox, Samantha; Pemberton, David; Kreiss, Alexandre; Baz Morelli, Adriana; Silva, Anabel; Pearse, Martin J.; Corcoran, Lynn M.; Belov, Katherine; Hogg, Carolyn J.; Woods, Gregory M; Lyons, A. Bruce

    2018-01-01

    Devil facial tumor disease (DFTD) is renowned for its successful evasion of the host immune system. Down regulation of the major histocompatabilty complex class I molecule (MHC-I) on the DFTD cells is a primary mechanism of immune escape. Immunization trials on captive Tasmanian devils have previously demonstrated that an immune response against DFTD can be induced, and that immune-mediated tumor regression can occur. However, these trials were limited by their small sample sizes. Here, we describe the results of two DFTD immunization trials on cohorts of devils prior to their wild release as part of the Tasmanian Government’s Wild Devil Recovery project. 95% of the devils developed anti-DFTD antibody responses. Given the relatively large sample sizes of the trials (N = 19 and N = 33), these responses are likely to reflect those of the general devil population. DFTD cells manipulated to express MHC-I were used as the antigenic basis of the immunizations in both trials. Although the adjuvant composition and number of immunizations differed between trials, similar anti-DFTD antibody levels were obtained. The first trial comprised DFTD cells and the adjuvant combination of ISCOMATRIX™, polyIC, and CpG with up to four immunizations given at monthly intervals. This compared to the second trial whereby two immunizations comprising DFTD cells and the adjuvant combination ISCOMATRIX™, polyICLC (Hiltonol®) and imiquimod were given a month apart, providing a shorter and, therefore, more practical protocol. Both trials incorporated a booster immunization given up to 5 months after the primary course. A key finding was that devils in the second trial responded more quickly and maintained their antibody levels for longer compared to devils in the first trial. The different adjuvant combination incorporating the RNAase resistant polyICLC and imiquimod used in the second trial is likely to be responsible. The seroconversion in the majority of devils in these anti

  20. Uranium 2014: Resources, Production and Demand

    2014-01-01

    Uranium is the raw material used to fuel over 400 operational nuclear reactors around the world that produce large amounts of electricity and benefit from life cycle carbon emissions as low as renewable energy sources. Although a valuable commodity, declining market prices for uranium since the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident in 2011, driven by uncertainties concerning the future of nuclear power, have led to the postponement of mine development plans in a number of countries and raised questions about continued uranium supply. This 25. edition of the 'Red Book', a recognised world reference on uranium jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency, provides analyses and information from 45 producing and consuming countries in order to address these and other questions. It includes data on global uranium exploration, resources, production and reactor-related requirements. It offers updated information on established uranium production centres and mine development plans, as well as projections of nuclear generating capacity and reactor-related requirements through 2035, incorporating policy changes following the Fukushima accident, in order to address long-term uranium supply and demand issues. (authors)

  1. Potentiometric determination of hexavalent uranium in uranium silicide samples

    Arlegui, Oscar

    1999-01-01

    The Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission's Department of Nuclear Materials has among its projects the production of fuels elements for nuclear reactors, and, therefore, the Chemical Analysis Laboratory must have a rapid and reliable method for uranium analysis, to control the uranium concentration during each stage of the production process. For this reason the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission's Chemical Analysis Laboratory has validated a potentiometric method, which is a modification of the Davies and Gray method proposed by A.R. Eberle. This method uses the Potentiometric Titration Technique and is based on the direct and rapid reduction of uranium (VI) to Uranium (IV), in a concentrated phosphoric acid medium, with excess iron (II) used as a reducing agent. In this medium the excess iron (II) selectively oxidizes to iron (III) with nitric acid, using molybdenum (IV) as a catalyzer, the nitrous acid that is produced is eliminated by adding amidosulfuric acid. The solution is diluted with 1M sulfuric acid and the uranium (IV) obtained is titrated potentiometrically with potassium dichromate in the presence of vanadilic sulfate to obtain a better defined final titration point. The samples were softened with hydrochloric acid and nitric acid and later 50 ml were estimated in a 20% sulfuric acid medium. The analytical method was validated by comparing it with Certified Reference Material (C.R.M.) from the New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL), Metallic Uranium, CRM 112-A. The F Test and the T Test show that the value calculated is less than the tabulated value so the result is traceable to the reference material. The quantification limit, sensitivity, precision and accuracy were quantified for the method

  2. Uranium leaching by fungal metabolite

    Wang Yongdong; Li Guangyue; Ding Dexin; Hu Nan

    2012-01-01

    To explore new means of bioleaching, one strain of high-yielding fungi-Aspergillus niger which could produce organic acids was separated and purified from soil samples of uranium mine. The influence of cultural temperature, initial pH value, inoculum sizes on its growth characteristics were carried out. And the tests of uranium leaching of metabolin of Aspergillus niger were operated. On these tests, the effects of metabolin of Aspergillus niger with different pH value produced in the diverse culture temperature on uranium leaching were investigated. The results show that this strain of Aspergillus niger can grow best under the following conditions: the temperature is 37℃, the initial pH value is 7.0, the inoculum sizes is 2% (the OD value of the spores solution is 0.06). The uranium extraction effects relative to the final pH value of the cultures. and the maximum leaching rates is 83.05% when the pH value is 2.3. (authors)

  3. The discovery of uranium fission

    Brix, P.

    1990-01-01

    Uranium was discovered 200 years ago. Its radioactive character was first demonstrated in 1896 and two years later radium was extracted from uranium minerals. In 1911 studies with alpha rays from radioactive decay led to the unexpected discovery of the atomic nucleus. Exposure of beryllium to alpha rays yielded neutrons, first detected in 1932. Starting in 1934, neutron irradiation of uranium produced radioactive substances erroneously attributed to transuranium elements but with confusing properties. Painstaking experiments by chemists left no doubt on 17 December 1938 that barium was produced by these irradiations: the neutrons had split some uranium nuclei. The physics of the fission process was understood two weeks later; after a few months, neutron multiplication was found to be probable. This review deals with the eminent scientists involved, their successes, errors and disappointments, and the unexpected insights which occurred on the paths and detours of scientific research. It is, therefore, instructive also to discuss how fission was not discovered. The momentous discovery must be considered inevitable; the great tragedy was that Germany started World War II just at the time when the possibility of nuclear chain reactions and bombs became known. The consequences and anxieties that remain after 50 years of nuclear fission demand that mankind act with reason and conscience to maintain peace. (author)

  4. Foreign uranium supply. Final report

    McLeod, N.B.; Steyn, J.J.

    1978-04-01

    This report presents an assessment of the extent to which foreign uranium may be available to United States utilities in the short term (through 1980), the intermediate term (1981--1985), and the long term (1986--95). All free world foreign uranium producers and prospects are included, with particular emphasis on Australia, Canada, southern Africa, France, and French-speaking Africa. The assessment includes reserves, resources, exploration and prospects; firm and potential production capacity and prospects; national policies and relevant political and economic conditions; foreign uranium demand; etc. Conclusions are: Foreign supply capability is greater than foreign demand in the near term. The current availability of uncommitted future Australian production presents an unusual opportunity for establishing commercial relations with very substantial producers. Foreign uranium contracts represent an increase in diversity of supply and access to resources but have less assurance of supply than do domestic contracts. However, uncertainties can frequently be accommodated within an overall procurement program, thereby retaining the diversity and price advantages of foreign procurement. The practice of market pricing of contracts reduces the incentives for foreign contracting

  5. The peraluminous leucogranitic complex of St Sylvestre (France, Massif Central NW). Evolution of the crystallochemistry of mineral phases and of the geochemistry of major and trace elements. Polygenetism characterization in peraluminous granites. Implication on uranium metallogeny

    Friedrich, M.

    1983-07-01

    The main purpose of this study is to improve the knowledge of the behaviour of uranium during magmatic and late magmatic processes. In France and other part of the world the close association of uranium (Sn-W) deposits and showings with this type of granite justifies the metallogenic interest of this study. At the scale of the whole granitic complex two distinct petrological groups are redefined: the facies of Brame and St Sylvestre. Mineral paragenesis closely follow the geochemical differentiation. Abundance of uraninite and scarcity of monazite and zircon, are additional features of these samples. The opposite behaviour of monazite (typical of the less evolved facies) and uraninite (whose abundance is directly related to the degree of differentiation) suggests two conclusions. Abundance in uranium is directly related to the magmatic differentiation processes. The early crystallization of monazite and zircon and their high abundance in poorly evolved facies imply a compatible behaviour for Th, Zr and light rare earths. More detailed geochemical studies evidence heterogeneities at on hectometric and locally at a metric scale. Differentiation processes, which appear to be continuous at a kilometric scale in the St Sylvestre facies, are discontinuous at the hectometric and metric scale. Such petrogeochemical discontinuities, implying petrogenitic heterogeneities are expressed in the concept of polygenetism [fr

  6. [Spatial-temporal pattern and obstacle factors of cultivated land ecological security in major grain producing areas of northeast China: a case study in Jilin Province].

    Zhao, Hong-Bo; Ma, Yan-Ji

    2014-02-01

    According to the cultivated land ecological security in major grain production areas of Northeast China, this paper selected 48 counties of Jilin Province as the research object. Based on the PSR-EES conceptual framework model, an evaluation index system of cultivated land ecological security was built. By using the improved TOPSIS, Markov chains, GIS spatial analysis and obstacle degree models, the spatial-temporal pattern of cultivated land ecological security and the obstacle factors were analyzed from 1995 to 2011 in Jilin Province. The results indicated that, the composite index of cultivated land ecological security appeared in a rising trend in Jilin Province from 1995 to 2011, and the cultivated land ecological security level changed from being sensitive to being general. There was a pattern of 'Club Convergence' in cultivated land ecological security level in each county and the spatial discrepancy tended to become larger. The 'Polarization' trend of cultivated land ecological security level was obvious. The distributions of sensitive level and critical security level with ribbon patterns tended to be dispersed, the general security level and relative security levels concentrated, and the distributions of security level scattered. The unstable trend of cultivated land ecological security level was more and more obvious. The main obstacle factors that affected the cultivated land ecological security level in Jilin Province were rural net income per capita, economic density, the proportion of environmental protection investment in GDP, degree of machinery cultivation and the comprehensive utilization rate of industrial solid wastes.

  7. Uranium health physics

    1980-01-01

    This report contains the papers delivered at the Summer School on Uranium Health Physics held in Pretoria on the 14 and 15 April 1980. The following topics were discussed: uranium producton in South Africa; radiation physics; internal dosimetry and radiotoxicity of long-lived uranium isotopes; uranium monitoring; operational experience on uranium monitoring; dosimetry and radiotoxicity of inhaled radon daughters; occupational limits for inhalation of radon-222, radon-220 and their short-lived daughters; radon monitoring techniques; radon daughter dosimeters; operational experience on radon monitoring; and uranium mill tailings management

  8. Bioremediation of uranium contaminated Fernald soils

    Delwiche, M.E.; Wey, J.E.; Torma, A.E.

    1994-01-01

    This study investigated the use of microbial bioleaching for removal of uranium from contaminated soils. The ability of bacteria to assist in oxidation and solubilization of uranium was compared to the ability of fungi to produce complexing compounds which have the same effect. Biosorption of uranium by fungi was also measured. Soil samples were examined for changes in mineralogical properties due to these processes. On the basis of these laboratory scale studies a generalized flow sheet is proposed for bioremediation of contaminated Fernald soils

  9. Recent developments in Australia's uranium mining industry

    Lambert, I.B.; McKay, A.D.

    1998-01-01

    Australia's economic, demonstrated resources of uranium (U) at the end of 1996 amounted to 622,000 tonnes U, the largest of any country. Uranium is currently produced at two mining/milling operations in Australia - Ranger in the Alligator Rivers Region of the Northern Territory, and Olympic Dam in South Australia. Improved market conditions and recent changes to Government policies have encouraged Australian companies to commit to the expansion of existing operations and the development of new uranium mines. Australia's annual production is likely to increase from its present level of 6000 tonncs (t) U 3 O 8 to approximately 12 000 t U 3 O 8 by the year 2000. (author)

  10. Uranium and the War: The effects of depleted uranium weapons in Iraq

    Jon williams

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Army revealed in March 2003 that it dropped between 320 and 390 tons of depleted uranium during the Gulf War-the first time the material was ever used in combat-and it is estimated that more still has been dropped during the current invasion, though there have been no official counts as yet. Nuclear weapons and nuclear power plants require highly radioactive uranium, so the uranium 238 is removed from the naturally occurring uranium by a process known as enrichment. Depleted uranium is the by-product of the uranium enrichment process. Depleted uranium was a major topic of discussion during a Feb. 24 forum at Santa Cruz with speakers from the Iraq Veterans Against War (IVAW). The panel consisted of five members of the IVAW chapter in Olympia, Washington who visited Santa Cruz as part of a speaking tour of the west coast. These members of the IVAW believe that their experiences in the Gulf War were the beginnings of what will be a long-term health problem in the region. A study conducted by the Pentagon in 2002 predicted that every future battlefield will be contaminated with depleted uranium. Up-to-date health information from Iraq is difficult to come by. But a November report from Al-jazeera concluded that the cancer rate in Iraq has increased tenfold, and the number of birth defects has multiplied fivefold times since the 1991 war. The increase is believed to be caused by depleted uranium.

  11. Prospects for the Canadian uranium industry

    Runnalls, O.J.C.

    1988-01-01

    Canada became the world's largest uranium producer in 1984. That leadership position is likely to be maintained for many years into the future because of a firm production base, many undeveloped known deposits with commercial promise, and a large geological potential for new discoveries. There are some uncertainties on the horizon, principally because of restrictive actions in process within the USA, which are aimed at preserving a deteriorating domestic uranium industry. Should such actions result in import restriction, for example, there would be a negative effect on foreign producers at least in the short term. Canada may avoid such difficulties under a tentative U.S.-Canada free-trade agreement where restrictions on the import of Canadian uranium into the United States would be eliminated. Over the longer term, demand for Canada's uranium resources will grow because of the foreseen growth in the world's installed nuclear power capacity

  12. Acute toxicity of sodium bicarbonate, a major component of coal bed natural gas produced waters, to 13 aquatic species as defined in the laboratory

    Harper, David D.; Farag, Aïda M.; Skaar, Don

    2014-01-01

    Water produced during coal bed natural gas (CBNG) extraction in the Powder River Structural Basin of Wyoming and Montana (USA) may contain concentrations of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) of more than 3000 mg/L. The authors evaluated the acute toxicity of NaHCO3, also expressed as bicarbonate (HCO3−), to 13 aquatic organisms. Of the 13 species tested, 7 had a median lethal concentration (LC50) less than 2000 mg/L NaHCO3, or 1300 mg/L HCO3−. The most sensitive species were Ceriodaphnia dubia, freshwater mussels (Lampsilis siliquoidea), pallid sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus albus), and shovelnose sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus platorynchus). The respective LC50s were 989 mg/L, 1120 mg/L, 1249 mg/L, and 1430 mg/L NaHCO3, or 699 mg/L, 844 mg/L, 831 mg/L, and 1038 mg/L HCO3−. Age affected the sensitivity of fathead minnows, even within life stage. Two days posthatch, fathead minnows were more sensitive to NaHCO3 and HCO3− compared with 4-d-old fish, even though fish up to 14 d old are commonly used for toxicity evaluations. The authors recommend that ion toxicity exposures be conducted with organisms less than 24 h posthatch to ensure that experiments document the most sensitive stage of development. The results of the present study, along with historical and current research regarding the toxicity of bicarbonate, may be useful to establish regulatory standards for HCO3−.

  13. Conversion and Blending Facility highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium as metal. Revision 1

    NONE

    1995-07-05

    The mission of this Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) will be to blend surplus HEU metal and alloy with depleted uranium metal to produce an LEU product. The primary emphasis of this blending operation will be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. The blended LEU will be produced as a waste suitable for storage or disposal.

  14. Conversion and Blending Facility highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium as metal. Revision 1

    1995-01-01

    The mission of this Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) will be to blend surplus HEU metal and alloy with depleted uranium metal to produce an LEU product. The primary emphasis of this blending operation will be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. The blended LEU will be produced as a waste suitable for storage or disposal

  15. Short-term administration of an aqueous extract of kalanchoe integra var. crenata (Andr.) Cuf leaves produces no major organ damage in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Asiedu-Gyekye, Isaac J; Antwi, Daniel A; Awortwe, Charles; N'guessan, Benoit Banga; Nyarko, Alexander K

    2014-02-03

    Kalanchoe intergra (Ki) leaf extract is an orally administered multipurpose plant medicine in Ghana and other parts of the world for the treatment of ulcers, pain and adenoma of the prostate gland. There is paucity of information concerning its short-term usage. The present study is aimed at conducting histopathological and biochemical studies in a 14-day sub-acute toxicity studies using female Sprague-Dawley rats. Crude extract of Ki leaves was prepared and freeze-dried. A 14-day sub-acute toxicity studies was conducted using 2 week old nulliparous and non-pregnant female Sprague-Dawley rats (120-150g). Reconstituted Ki was administered at a dosage of 900mgkg(-1) (high dose), 300mgkg(-1) with a control group receiving an equivalent volume of distilled water (as vehicle) by gastric lavage. Histopathological studies of major organs and blood chemistry analysis were performed on blood obtained via cardiac puncture into EDTA tubes after euthanisation. There was a significant decrease in urea (p<0.016) and creatinine levels (p<0.001) in both the high and low dose groups. There was an increase in ALP levels (P=0.01) in both the high and low dose groups. ALT and AST rather decreased significantly in both the high and low dose groups (p<0.0001). Histopathological results did not show any abnormalities in all the H&E stained paraffin sections. Thus the photomicrographs of the liver, kidney and heart were within histopathological limits. Ki leaf extract is non-toxic when administered by the oral route over a time period of 14 days at the above doses. © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd All rights reserved.

  16. Enhancement of Extraction of Uranium from Seawater – Final Report

    Dietz, Travis Cameron [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Tsinas, Zois [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Tomaszewski, Claire [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Pazos, Ileana [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Nigliazzo, Olga [University of Palermo, Palermo (Italy); Li, Weixing [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Adel-Hadadi, Mohammad [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Barkatt, Aaron [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States); Al-Sheikhly, Mohamad [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2016-05-16

    Even at a concentration of 3 μg/L, the world’s oceans contain a thousand times more uranium than currently know terrestrial sources. In order to take advantage of this stockpile, methods and materials must be developed to extract it efficiently, a difficult task considering the very low concentration of the element and the competition for extraction by other atoms in seawater such as sodium, calcium, and vanadium. The majority of current research on methods to extract uranium from seawater are vertical explorations of the grafting of amidoxime ligand, which was originally discovered and promoted by Japanese studies in the late 1980s. Our study expands on this research horizontally by exploring the effectiveness of novel uranium extraction ligands grafted to the surface of polymer substrates using radiation. Through this expansion, a greater understanding of uranium binding chemistry and radiation grafting effects on polymers has been obtained. While amidoxime-functionalized fabrics have been shown to have the greatest extraction efficiency so far, they suffer from an extensive chemical processing step which involves treatment with powerful basic solutions. Not only does this add to the chemical waste produced in the extraction process and add to the method’s complexity, but it also significantly impacts the regenerability of the amidoxime fabric. The approach of this project has been to utilize alternative, commercially available monomers capable of extracting uranium and containing a carbon-carbon double bond to allow it to be grafted using radiation, specifically phosphate, oxalate, and azo monomers. The use of commercially available monomers and radiation grafting with electron beam or gamma irradiation will allow for an easily scalable fabrication process once the technology has been optimized. The need to develop a cheap and reliable method for extracting uranium from seawater is extremely valuable to energy independence, and will extend the quantity of

  17. Enhancement of Extraction of Uranium from Seawater - Final Report

    Dietz, Travis Cameron; Tsinas, Zois; Tomaszewski, Claire; Pazos, Ileana; Nigliazzo, Olga; Li, Weixing; Adel-Hadadi, Mohammad; Barkatt, Aaron; Al-Sheikhly, Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    Even at a concentration of 3 μg/L, the world's oceans contain a thousand times more uranium than currently know terrestrial sources. In order to take advantage of this stockpile, methods and materials must be developed to extract it efficiently, a difficult task considering the very low concentration of the element and the competition for extraction by other atoms in seawater such as sodium, calcium, and vanadium. The majority of current research on methods to extract uranium from seawater are vertical explorations of the grafting of amidoxime ligand, which was originally discovered and promoted by Japanese studies in the late 1980s. Our study expands on this research horizontally by exploring the effectiveness of novel uranium extraction ligands grafted to the surface of polymer substrates using radiation. Through this expansion, a greater understanding of uranium binding chemistry and radiation grafting effects on polymers has been obtained. While amidoxime-functionalized fabrics have been shown to have the greatest extraction efficiency so far, they suffer from an extensive chemical processing step which involves treatment with powerful basic solutions. Not only does this add to the chemical waste produced in the extraction process and add to the method's complexity, but it also significantly impacts the regenerability of the amidoxime fabric. The approach of this project has been to utilize alternative, commercially available monomers capable of extracting uranium and containing a carbon-carbon double bond to allow it to be grafted using radiation, specifically phosphate, oxalate, and azo monomers. The use of commercially available monomers and radiation grafting with electron beam or gamma irradiation will allow for an easily scalable fabrication process once the technology has been optimized. The need to develop a cheap and reliable method for extracting uranium from seawater is extremely valuable to energy independence, and will extend the

  18. Uranium decontamination of common metals by smelting, a review (handbook)

    Mautz, E.W.; Briggs, G.G.; Shaw, W.E.; Cavendish, J.H.

    1975-01-01

    The published and unpublished literature relating to the smelting of common metals scrap contaminated with uranium-bearing compounds has been searched and reviewed. In general, standard smelting practice produces ingots having a low uranium content, particularly for ferrous, nickel, and copper metals or alloys. Aluminum recovered from uranium contaminated scrap shows some decontamination by smelting but the uranium content is not as low as for other metals. Due to the heterogeneous nature and origin of scrap metals contaminated with uranium, information is frequently missing as to the extent of the initial contamination and the degree of decontamination obtained. The uranium content of the final cast ingots is generally all that is available. Results are summarized below by the primary composition of the uranium contaminated scrap metal. (U.S.)

  19. Status report on the development of a prompt fission neutron uranium borehole logging technique

    Smith, G.W.

    1977-05-01

    The prompt fission neutron (PFN) method of direct uranium measurement was studied. The PFN uranium logging technique measures the enhanced epithermal neutron population created by the prompt thermal fission of 235 U to assay uranium mineralization around a borehole. This neutron population exists for several hundred microseconds after a pulsed neutron source produces a burst of high energy (14 MeV) neutrons. A feasibility study established the basic relationship between the uranium concentration and the enhanced epithermal neutron count, and defined the major measurement perturbing factors. Following the feasibility study, development of a PFN prototype field probe was undertaken. A laboratory type neutron generator, the Controlatron, was modified for use in the probe. Field evaluation of the prototype system began in January 1976. Comparisons of neutron logs and natural gamma logs taken during this evaluation period clearly define many disequilibrium conditions as verified by ore grade estimates from core samples. The feasibility of the PFN logging technique to detect uranium in-situ has now been demonstrated

  20. Managing environmental and health impacts of uranium mining

    Cameron, Ron; Vance, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Producing uranium in a safe and environmentally responsible manner is not only important to the producers and consumers of the product, but to society at large. Given the projected growth in nuclear generating capacity expected in the coming decades, particularly in the developing world, awareness of leading practice uranium mining needs to be increased globally. This report provides a non-technical overview of the driving forces behind and the outcomes of the significant evolution of uranium mining practices from the time that uranium was first mined for military purposes during the Cold War until today. (authors)

  1. Recovery of uranium from crude uranium tetrafluoride

    Ghosh, S.K.; Bellary, M.P.; Keni, V.S.

    1994-01-01

    An innovative process has been developed for recovery of uranium from crude uranium tetrafluoride cake. The process is based on direct dissolution of uranium tetrafluoride in nitric acid in presence of aluminium hydroxide and use of solvent extraction for removal of fluorides and other bulk impurities to make uranium amenable for refining. It is a simple process requiring minimum process step and has advantage of lesser plant corrosion. This process can be applied for processing of uranium tetrafluoride generated from various sources like uranium by-product during thorium recovery from thorium concentrate, first stage product of uranium recovery from phosphoric acid by OPPA process and off grade uranium tetrafluoride material. The paper describes the details of the process developed and demonstrated on bench and pilot scale and its subsequent modification arising out of bulky solid waste generation. The modified process uses a lower quantity of aluminium hydroxide by allowing a lower dissolution of uranium per cycle and recycles the undissolved material to the next cycle, maintaining the overall recovery at high level. This innovation has reduced the solid waste generated by a factor of four at the cost of a slightly larger dissolution vessel and its increased corrosion rate. (author)

  2. Recovery of uranium from crude uranium tetrafluoride

    Ghosh, S K; Bellary, M P; Keni, V S [Chemical Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    1994-06-01

    An innovative process has been developed for recovery of uranium from crude uranium tetrafluoride cake. The process is based on direct dissolution of uranium tetrafluoride in nitric acid in presence of aluminium hydroxide and use of solvent extraction for removal of fluorides and other bulk impurities to make uranium amenable for refining. It is a simple process requiring minimum process step and has advantage of lesser plant corrosion. This process can be applied for processing of uranium tetrafluoride generated from various sources like uranium by-product during thorium recovery from thorium concentrate, first stage product of uranium recovery from phosphoric acid by OPPA process and off grade uranium tetrafluoride material. The paper describes the details of the process developed and demonstrated on bench and pilot scale and its subsequent modification arising out of bulky solid waste generation. The modified process uses a lower quantity of aluminium hydroxide by allowing a lower dissolution of uranium per cycle and recycles the undissolved material to the next cycle, maintaining the overall recovery at high level. This innovation has reduced the solid waste generated by a factor of four at the cost of a slightly larger dissolution vessel and its increased corrosion rate. (author). 4 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  3. A Two-Step Method to Select Major Surge-Producing Extratropical Cyclones from a 10,000-Year Stochastic Catalog

    Keshtpoor, M.; Carnacina, I.; Yablonsky, R. M.

    2016-12-01

    Extratropical cyclones (ETCs) are the primary driver of storm surge events along the UK and northwest mainland Europe coastlines. In an effort to evaluate the storm surge risk in coastal communities in this region, a stochastic catalog is developed by perturbing the historical storm seeds of European ETCs to account for 10,000 years of possible ETCs. Numerical simulation of the storm surge generated by the full 10,000-year stochastic catalog, however, is computationally expensive and may take several months to complete with available computational resources. A new statistical regression model is developed to select the major surge-generating events from the stochastic ETC catalog. This regression model is based on the maximum storm surge, obtained via numerical simulations using a calibrated version of the Delft3D-FM hydrodynamic model with a relatively coarse mesh, of 1750 historical ETC events that occurred over the past 38 years in Europe. These numerically-simulated surge values were regressed to the local sea level pressure and the U and V components of the wind field at the location of 196 tide gauge stations near the UK and northwest mainland Europe coastal areas. The regression model suggests that storm surge values in the area of interest are highly correlated to the U- and V-component of wind speed, as well as the sea level pressure. Based on these correlations, the regression model was then used to select surge-generating storms from the 10,000-year stochastic catalog. Results suggest that roughly 105,000 events out of 480,000 stochastic storms are surge-generating events and need to be considered for numerical simulation using a hydrodynamic model. The selected stochastic storms were then simulated in Delft3D-FM, and the final refinement of the storm population was performed based on return period analysis of the 1750 historical event simulations at each of the 196 tide gauges in preparation for Delft3D-FM fine mesh simulations.

  4. The ultimate disposition of depleted uranium

    Lemons, T.R. [Uranium Enrichment Organization, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1991-12-31

    Depleted uranium (DU) is produced as a by-product of the uranium enrichment process. Over 340,000 MTU of DU in the form of UF{sub 6} have been accumulated at the US government gaseous diffusion plants and the stockpile continues to grow. An overview of issues and objectives associated with the inventory management and the ultimate disposition of this material is presented.

  5. Uranium and heavy metals in phosphate fertilizers

    Khater, Ashraf E.M.; King Saud University, Riyadh

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Agricultural applications of chemical fertilizers are a worldwide practice. The specific activity of uranium-238 and heavy metals in phosphate fertilizers depends on the phosphate ore from which the fertilizer produced and on the chemical processing of the ore. Composite phosphate fertilizers samples were collected and the uranium-238 specific activity, in Bq/kg, and As, Cd, Cu, Pb, Se concentration were measured. The annual addition of these elements in soil due to soil fertilization were calculated and discussed. (author)

  6. Canadians assess the future of uranium

    Law, C.

    1980-01-01

    Some of the views expressed at a seminar held at Calgary on uranium marketing indicate the issues presently concerning Canadian uranium producers. There was apprehension that price rises might result from selling of the strategic stockpile by the Government. Long term growth prospects and the need for continuous exploration were discussed. Criticisms were also expressed of the Canadian safequard system and its tight export regulations. (U.K.)

  7. Uranium market issues 1989-2005

    Duncan, I.J.; Sellers, J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper summarizes the main conclusions of the Uranium Institute's 1989 supply and demand report. As such it represents the collective wisdom of the members of the Institute which spreads over the entire spectrum of the nuclear fuel cycle. Uranium producers, consumers, converters, enrichers, brokers and others associated with the industry all have been party to the discussion which preceded the publication of the report. As a result it uniquely reflects the views of the market's participants. (author)

  8. Uranium exploration planning and strategy

    Smith, A.Y.; Tauchid, M.

    1991-01-01

    A country may decide to begin uranium exploration for any of the following three reasons: 1. To meet the needs of a domestic nuclear power programme; 2. To supply uranium as a commodity to the world market in order to earn foreign exchange; 3. To acquire national information on the country's mineral resource planning. In any of these cases, a country must make some basic decisions regarding the means and modes whereby the uranium exploration will be carried out - by national organizations exclusively; by state organizations in joint venture with outside interests by foreign interests under the control of national regulations. Most uranium exploration is carried out following an exploration strategy in which the programme is divided into a series of steps or stages. Each of the phases is designed to eliminate areas of low potential to contain uranium deposits, while focusing attention on areas of higher potential that will be explored in greater detail at higher cost in the subsequent phase. The methods used in each phase are selected to provide the maximum information at the minimum cost so that at the end of each phase a decision can be made whether to continue to the next phase of stop. Because uranium exploration is a high cost high risk activity, governments must make decisions at the outset whether they wish to carry our the work alone and whether they can support the costs involved, or whether they wish to attract foreign investors to help absorb the costs and therefore the risks. In either case, major policy decisions are required to be made to establish the legal and fiscal environment in which the programm will be carried out. (author). 4 refs, 4 figs

  9. Human resource development for uranium production cycle

    Ganguly, C.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear fission energy is a viable option for meeting the ever increasing demand for electricity and high quality process heat in a safe, secured and sustainable manner with minimum carbon foot print and degradation of the environment. The growth of nuclear power has shifted from North America and Europe to Asia, mostly in China and India. Bangladesh, Vietnam, Indonesia, Malaysia and the United Arab Emirates are also in the process of launching nuclear power program. Natural uranium is the basic raw material for U-235 and Pu-239, the fuels for all operating and upcoming nuclear power reactors. The present generation of nuclear power reactors are mostly light water cooled and moderated reactor (LWR) and to a limited extent pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR). The LWRs and PHWRs use low enriched uranium (LEU with around 5% U-235) and natural uranium as fuel in the form of high density UO_2 pellets. The uranium production cycle starts with uranium exploration and is followed by mining and milling to produce uranium ore concentrate, commonly known as yellow cake, and ends with mine and mill reclamation and remediation. Natural uranium and its daughter products, radium and radon, are radioactive and health hazardous to varying degrees. Hence, radiological safety is of paramount importance to uranium production cycle and there is a need to review and share best practices in this area. Human Resource Development (HRD) is yet another challenge as most of the experts in this area have retired and have not been replaced by younger generation because of the continuing lull in the uranium market. Besides, uranium geology, exploration, mining and milling do not form a part of the undergraduate or post graduate curriculum in most countries. Hence, the Technical Co-operation activities of the IAEA are required to be augmented and more country specific and regional training and workshop should be conducted at different universities with the involvement of international experts

  10. Environmental issues related to uranium mining

    Gorber, D.M.; Chambers, D.B.

    1983-01-01

    This paper introduces the environmental issues (both real and perceived) associated with uranium exploration, mining, milling, and tailings management. As well, some of the issues pertaining to the closeout of uranium tailings areas are discussed. These issues have received considerable attention in Canada in public inquiries and hearings that have been held across the country. The major conclusions of some of these hearings are also noted

  11. Uranium abundance in some sudanese phosphate ores

    Adam, A.A.; Eltayeb, M.A.H.

    2009-01-01

    This work was carried out mainly to analysis of some Sudanese phosphate ores, for their uranium abundance and total phosphorus content measured as P 2 O 5 %. For this purpose, 30 samples of two types of phosphate ore from Eastern Nuba Mountains, in Sudan namely, Kurun and Uro areas were examined. In addition, the relationship between uranium and major, and trace elements were obtained, also, the natural radioactivity of the phosphate samples was measured, in order to characterize and differentiate between the two types of phosphate ores. The uranium abundance in Uro phosphate with 20.3% P 2 O 5 is five time higher than in Kurun phosphate with 26.7% P 2 O 5 . The average of uranium content was found to be 56.6 and 310 mg/kg for Kurun and Uro phosphate ore, respectively. The main elements in Kurun and Uro phosphate ore are silicon, aluminum, and phosphorus, while the most abundant trace elements in these two ores are titanium, strontium and barium. Pearson correlation coefficient revealed that uranium in Kurun phosphate shows strong positive correlation with P 2 O 5 , and its distribution is essentially controlled by the variations of P2O5 concentration, whereas uranium in Uro phosphate shows strong positive correlation with strontium, and its distribution is controlled by the variations of Sr concentration. Uranium behaves in different ways in Kurun phosphate and in Uro phosphate. Uro phosphate shows higher concentrations of all the estimated radionuclides than Kurun phosphate. According to the obtained results, it can be concluded that Uro phosphate is consider as secondary uranium source, and is more suitable for uranium recovery, because it has high uranium abundance and low P 2 O 5 %, than Kurun phosphate. (authors) [es

  12. Uranium contamination of drinking water in Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan

    Kawabata, Y.; Aparin, V.; Shiraishi, K.; Ko, S.; Yamamoto, M.; Nagaia, M.; Katayama, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Uranium is a naturally occurring radioactive metal, and is widely distributed in the Earth's crust. But it is concentrated in certain rock formations. Most of the uranium for nuclear weapon produced in the Soviet Union during the Cold War came from Central Asia. Uranium has negative effects on the human body, both as a carcinogen and as a kidney toxin. WHO (2004) prescribed that uranium concentrations in drinking water should be less than 15 mcg/l for only chemical aspects of uranium addressed. We determined high uranium concentrations in drinking water in the central region of Uzbekistan (Y. KAWABATA et al. 2004). In this area, some discharge water from farmland has higher uranium concentration. Irrigation systems Kyzyl-orda in Republic of Kazakhstan and in Karakalpakstan in the Republic of Uzbekistan have drains deeper than 5 m, in order to protect against salinization. Water in these drains can mix with ground water. In this area, ground water is used for drinking water. We investigated uranium concentrations in water in Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan. In the half of drinking water sampling points, uranium concentrations exceeded the WHO (2004) guideline level for drinking water. Uranium is a suspected carcinogen that can also have a toxic effect on kidney. However, WHO addresses only the chemical aspects of uranium by giving uranium concentrations in drinking water. The effect of uranium exposure from drinking water on people in these areas is significant. The uranium concentration in the Aral Sea was higher than that in sea water. Aral Sea is accumulating uranium. (author)

  13. Uranium mining in Australia

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    Known uranium deposits and the companies involved in uranium mining and exploration in Australia are listed. The status of the development of the deposits is outlined and reasons for delays to mining are given

  14. Uranium Processing Facility

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — An integral part of Y‑12's transformation efforts and a key component of the National Nuclear Security Administration's Uranium Center of Excellence, the Uranium...

  15. Uranium in Niger

    Gabelmann, E.

    1978-03-01

    This document presents government policy in the enhancement of uranium resources, existing mining companies and their productions, exploitation projects and economical outcome related to the uranium mining and auxiliary activities [fr

  16. Price of military uranium

    Klimenko, A.V.

    1998-01-01

    The theoretical results about optimum strategy of use of military uranium confirmed by systems approach accounts are received. The numerical value of the system approach price of the highly enriched military uranium also is given

  17. Uranium market and resources

    Capus, G.; Arnold, Th.

    2004-01-01

    The controversy about the extend of the uranium resources worldwide is still important, this article sheds some light on this topic. Every 2 years IAEA and NEA (nuclear energy agency) edit an inventory of uranium resources as reported by contributing countries. It appears that about 4.6 millions tons of uranium are available at a recovery cost less than 130 dollars per kg of uranium and a total of 14 millions tons of uranium can be assessed when including all existing or supposed resources. In fact there is enough uranium to sustain a moderate growth of the park of nuclear reactors during next decades and it is highly likely that the volume of uranium resources can allow a more aggressive development of nuclear energy. It is recalled that a broad use of the validated breeder technology can stretch the durability of uranium resources by a factor 50. (A.C.)

  18. Uranium from phosphate ores

    Hurst, F.J.

    1983-01-01

    The following topics are described briefly: the way phosphate fertilizers are made; how uranium is recovered in the phosphate industry; and how to detect covert uranium recovery operations in a phsophate plant

  19. Industrial realities: Uranium

    Thiron, H.

    1990-01-01

    In this special issue are examined ores and metals in France and in the world for 1988. The chapter on uranium gives statistical data on the uranium market: Demand, production, prices and reserves [fr

  20. Brazilian uranium deposits

    Santos, L.C.S. dos.

    1985-01-01

    Estimatives of uranium reserves carried out in Figueira, Itataia, Lagoa Real and Espinharas, in Brazil are presented. The samples testing allowed to know geological structures, and the characteristics of uranium mineralization. (M.C.F.) [pt