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Sample records for major spinal surgery

  1. Continuous spinal anesthesia versus combined spinal epidural block for major orthopedic surgery: prospective randomized study

    Luiz Eduardo Imbelloni

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVES: In major orthopedic surgery of the lower limbs, continuous spinal anesthesia (CSA and combined spinal epidural anesthesia (CSE are safe and reliable anesthesia methods. In this prospective randomized clinical study, the blockading properties and side effects of CSA were compared with single interspace CSE, among patients scheduled for major hip or knee surgery. DESIGN AND SETTING: Prospective clinical study conducted at the Institute for Regional Anesthesia, Hospital de Base, São José do Rio Preto. METHODS: 240 patients scheduled for hip arthroplasty, knee arthroplasty or femoral fracture treatment were randomly assigned to receive either CSA or CSE. Blockades were performed in the lateral position at the L3-L4 interspace. Puncture success, technical difficulties, paresthesia, highest level of sensory and motor blockade, need for complementary doses of local anesthetic, degree of technical difficulties, cardiocirculatory changes and postdural puncture headache (PDPH were recorded. At the end of the surgery, the catheter was removed and cerebrospinal fluid leakage was evaluated. RESULTS: Seven patients were excluded (three CSA and four CSE. There was significantly lower incidence of paresthesia in the CSE group. The resultant sensory blockade level was significantly higher with CSE. Complete motor blockade occurred in 110 CSA patients and in 109 CSE patients. Arterial hypotension was observed significantly more often in the CSE group. PDPH was observed in two patients of each group. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that both CSA and CSE provided good surgical conditions with low incidence of complications. The sensory blockade level and hemodynamic changes were lower with CSA.

  2. Omphalocele, exstrophy of cloaca, imperforate anus, and spinal defect complex, multiple major reconstructive surgeries needed

    Nada Neel

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available OEIS complex is a rare combination of serious birth defects including omphalocele, exstrophy of cloaca, imperforate anus, and spinal defects. The aim of managements has shifted from merely providing survival to improve patient outcomes and quality of life with higher level of physical and social independence. Multiple complicated reconstructive surgeries always needed for achieving the goals of treatment. In this case report, we aimed to present our surgical approach for this rare abnormality to achieve functionally and socially acceptable outcome.

  3. [Incidence and risk factors of venous thromboembolism in major spinal surgery with no chemical or mechanical prophylaxis].

    Rojas-Tomba, F; Gormaz-Talavera, I; Menéndez-Quintanilla, I E; Moriel-Durán, J; García de Quevedo-Puerta, D; Villanueva-Pareja, F

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the incidence of venous thromboembolism in spine surgery with no chemical and mechanical prophylaxis, and to determine the specific risk factors for this complication. A historical cohort was analysed. All patients subjected to major spinal surgery, between January 2010 and September 2014, were included. No chemical or mechanical prophylaxis was administered in any patient. Active mobilisation of lower limbs was indicated immediately after surgery, and early ambulation started in the first 24-48 hours after surgery. Clinically symptomatic cases were confirmed by Doppler ultrasound of the lower limbs or chest CT angiography. A sample of 1092 cases was studied. Thromboembolic events were observed in 6 cases (.54%); 3 cases (.27%) with deep venous thrombosis and 3 cases (.27%) with pulmonary thromboembolism. A lethal case was identified (.09%). There were no cases of major bleeding or epidural haematoma. The following risk factors were identified: a multilevel fusion at more than 4 levels, surgeries longer than 130 minutes, patients older than 70 years of age, hypertension, and degenerative scoliosis. There is little scientific evidence on the prevention of thromboembolic events in spinal surgery. In addition to the disparity of prophylactic methods indicated by different specialists, it is important to weigh the risk-benefit of intra- and post-operative bleeding, and even the appearance of an epidural haematoma. Prophylaxis should be assessed in elderly patients over 70 years old, who are subjected to surgeries longer than 130 minutes, when 4 or more levels are involved. Copyright © 2015 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. Remote cerebellar hemorrhage after lumbar spinal surgery

    Cevik, Belma; Kirbas, Ismail; Cakir, Banu; Akin, Kayihan; Teksam, Mehmet

    2009-01-01

    Background: Postoperative remote cerebellar hemorrhage (RCH) as a complication of lumbar spinal surgery is an increasingly recognized clinical entity. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of RCH after lumbar spinal surgery and to describe diagnostic imaging findings of RCH. Methods: Between October 1996 and March 2007, 2444 patients who had undergone lumbar spinal surgery were included in the study. Thirty-seven of 2444 patients were scanned by CT or MRI due to neurologic symptoms within the first 7 days of postoperative period. The data of all the patients were studied with regard to the following variables: incidence of RCH after lumbar spinal surgery, gender and age, coagulation parameters, history of previous arterial hypertension, and position of lumbar spinal surgery. Results: The retrospective study led to the identification of two patients who had RCH after lumbar spinal surgery. Of 37 patients who had neurologic symptoms, 29 patients were women and 8 patients were men. CT and MRI showed subarachnoid hemorrhage in the folia of bilateral cerebellar hemispheres in both patients with RCH. The incidence of RCH was 0.08% among patients who underwent lumbar spinal surgery. Conclusion: RCH is a rare complication of lumbar spinal surgery, self-limiting phenomenon that should not be mistaken for more ominous pathologic findings such as hemorrhagic infarction. This type of bleeding is thought to occur secondary to venous infarction, but the exact pathogenetic mechanism is unknown. CT or MRI allowed immediate diagnosis of this complication and guided conservative management.

  5. Role of allografts in spinal surgery

    Aziz Nather

    1999-01-01

    With development of more tissue banks in the region and internationally, allografts are increasingly being used in orthopaedic surgery including spinal surgery. Two groups of patients will particularly benefit from the use of allografts. The first group is young children in whom iliac crest is cartilaginous and cannot provide sufficient quantity of autografts. The second is the elderly where bones from iliac crest are porotic and fatty. Allografts are used to fulfill two distinct functions in Spinal Surgery. One is to act as a buttress for anterior spinal surgery using cortical allografts. The other is to enhance fusion for posterior spinal surgery. Up to December 1997, 71 transplantations have been performed using allografts from NUH Tissue Bank. Anterior Spinal Surgery has been performed in 15 cases. The indications are mainly Trauma-Burst Fractures and Spinal Secondaries to the Spine. All cases are in thoracic and thoracolumbar region. Allografts used are deep frozen and freeze-dried cortical allografts. Femur is used for thoraco-lumbar region and humerus for upper thoracic region. Instrumentation used ranged from anterior devices (Canada, DCP, Synergy etc) to posterior devices (ISOLA). Deep frozen allografts and more recently freeze-dried allografts are preferred especially for osteoporotic spines. Cortical allografts are packed with autografts from ribs in the medullary canal. Allograft-autograft composites are always used to ensure better incorporation. Postero-lateral fusion has been performed for 56 cases. The indications include congenital and idiopathic scoliosis, degenerative stenosis, degenerative spondylolisthesis, spondylolytic spondylolisthesis, fracture-dislocation, osteoporotic burst fracture, spinal secondaries with cord compression and traumatic spondylolisthesis. Deep frozen bone allografts are used in combination with patient's own autografts from spinous processes to provide a 50% mix. Instrumentation used include Hartshill, Steffee, Isola

  6. Neuroimaging for spine and spinal cord surgery

    Koyanagi, Izumi [Hokkaido Neurosurgical Memorial Hospital (Japan); Iwasaki, Yoshinobu; Hida, Kazutoshi

    2001-01-01

    Recent advances in neuroimaging of the spine and spinal cord are described based upon our clinical experiences with spinal disorders. Preoperative neuroradiological examinations, including magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and computerized tomography (CT) with three-dimensional reconstruction (3D-CT), were retrospectively analyzed in patients with cervical spondylosis or ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (130 cases), spinal trauma (43 cases) and intramedullary spinal cord tumors (92 cases). CT scan and 3D-CT were useful in elucidating the spine pathology associated with degenerative and traumatic spine diseases. Visualization of the deformity of the spine or fracture-dislocation of the spinal column with 3D-CT helped to determine the correct surgical treatment. MR imaging was most important in the diagnosis of both spine and spinal cord abnormalities. The axial MR images of the spinal cord were essential in understanding the laterality of the spinal cord compression in spinal column disorders and in determining surgical approaches to the intramedullary lesions. Although non-invasive diagnostic modalities such as MR imaging and CT scans are adequate for deciding which surgical treatment to use in the majority of spine and spinal cord disorders, conventional myelography is still needed in the diagnosis of nerve root compression in some cases of cervical spondylosis. (author)

  7. Perioperative Vision Loss in Cervical Spinal Surgery.

    Gabel, Brandon C; Lam, Arthur; Chapman, Jens R; Oskouian, Rod J; Nassr, Ahmad; Currier, Bradford L; Sebastian, Arjun S; Arnold, Paul M; Hamilton, Steven R; Fehlings, Michael G; Mroz, Thomas E; Riew, K Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Retrospective multicenter case series. To assess the rate of perioperative vision loss following cervical spinal surgery. Medical records for 17 625 patients from 21 high-volume surgical centers from the AOSpine North America Clinical Research Network who received cervical spine surgery (levels from C2 to C7) between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2011, inclusive, were reviewed to identify occurrences of vision loss following surgery. Of the 17 625 patients in the registry, there were 13 946 patients assessed for the complication of blindness. There were 9591 cases that involved only anterior surgical approaches; the remaining 4355 cases were posterior and/or circumferential fusions. There were no cases of blindness or vision loss in the postoperative period reported during the sampling period. Perioperative vision loss following cervical spinal surgery is exceedingly rare.

  8. Sexual and reproductive function in spinal cord injury and spinal surgery patients

    Theodore H. Albright

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Sexual and reproductive health is important quality of life outcomes, which can have a major impact on patient satisfaction. Spinal pathology arising from trauma, deformity, and degenerative disease processes may be detrimental to sexual and reproductive function. Furthermore, spine surgery may impact sexual and reproductive function due to post-surgical mechanical, neurologic, and psychological factors. The aim of this paper is to provide a concise evidence-based review on the impact that spine surgery and pathology can have on sexual and reproductive function. A review of published literature regarding sexual and reproductive function in spinal injury and spinal surgery patients was performed. We have found that sexual and reproductive dysfunction can occur due to numerous etiological factors associated with spinal pathology. Numerous treatment options are available for those patients, depending on the degree of dysfunction. Spine surgeons and non-operative healthcare providers should be aware of the issues surrounding sexual and reproductive function as related to spine pathology and spine surgery. It is important for spine surgeons to educate their patients on the operative risks that spine surgery encompasses with regard to sexual dysfunction, although current data examining these topics largely consists of level IV data.

  9. FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH INFECTIONS IN SPINAL SURGERY

    ANA MARÍA MORALES LÓPEZ

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To identify the factors associated with postoperative infections in spinal surgery. Methods: Descriptive, retrospective, cross-sectional study conducted in the spine surgery department of the Medical Unit of High Specialty (UMAE at the Hospital of Traumatology and Orthopedics Lomas Verdes, Mexican Institute of Social Security (IMSS between January 01, 2013 and June 30, 2014 through medical records of the service and the records of clinical care. Data were gathered in accordance with the records of patients with infection after spinal surgery. The factors considered were age group, etiologic agent, surgical site, type of treatment, bleeding volume and pharmacotherapy. Frequency and descriptive statistic was conducted. The rank sum test with the Wilcoxon test for a single sample was performed in different measurements; Pearson's correlation was calculated and all p<0.05 values were considered significant. Results: The sample was composed of 14 patients of which 11 were female (78.6% and 3 male (21.4% with predominance of surgical area in the lumbar and dorsolumbar region. There was a significant correlation between the surgical time and the amount of bleeding with p<0.001. Conclusions: It was clear that the infections present in patients after spinal surgery are multifactorial. However, in this study the correlation between time of surgery and bleeding amount had the highest importance and relevance.

  10. Sexual and reproductive function in spinal cord injury and spinal surgery patients

    Theodore H. Albright; Zachary Grabel; J. Mason DePasse; Mark A. Palumbo; Alan H. Daniels

    2015-01-01

    Sexual and reproductive health is important quality of life outcomes, which can have a major impact on patient satisfaction. Spinal pathology arising from trauma, deformity, and degenerative disease processes may be detrimental to sexual and reproductive function. Furthermore, spine surgery may impact sexual and reproductive function due to post-surgical mechanical, neurologic, and psychological factors. The aim of this paper is to provide a concise evidence-based review on the impact that sp...

  11. Thoracic spinal anesthesia is safe for patients undergoing abdominal cancer surgery

    Ellakany, Mohamed Hamdy

    2014-01-01

    Aim: A double-blinded randomized controlled study to compare discharge time and patient satisfaction between two groups of patients submitted to open surgeries for abdominal malignancies using segmental thoracic spinal or general anesthesia. Background: Open surgeries for abdominal malignancy are usually done under general anesthesia, but many patients with major medical problems sometimes can’t tolerate such anesthesia. Regional anesthesia namely segmental thoracic spinal anesthesia may be b...

  12. Driving Safety after Spinal Surgery: A Systematic Review.

    Alhammoud, Abduljabbar; Alkhalili, Kenan; Hannallah, Jack; Ibeche, Bashar; Bajammal, Sohail; Baco, Abdul Moeen

    2017-04-01

    This study aimed to assess driving reaction times (DRTs) after spinal surgery to establish a timeframe for safe resumption of driving by the patient postoperatively. The MEDLINE and Google Scholar databases were analyzed according to the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis) Statement for clinical studies that investigated changes in DRTs following cervical and lumbar spinal surgery. Changes in DRTs and patients' clinical presentation, pathology, anatomical level affected, number of spinal levels involved, type of intervention, pain level, and driving skills were assessed. The literature search identified 12 studies that investigated postoperative DRTs. Six studies met the inclusion criteria; five studies assessed changes in DRT after lumbar spine surgery and two studies after cervical spina surgery. The spinal procedures were selective nerve root block, anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, and lumbar fusion and/ordecompression. DRTs exhibited variable responses to spinal surgery and depended on the patients' clinical presentation, spinal level involved, and type of procedure performed. The evidence regarding the patients' ability to resume safe driving after spinal surgery is scarce. Normalization of DRT or a return of DRT to pre-spinal intervention level is a widely accepted indicator for safe driving, with variable levels of statistical significance owing to multiple confounding factors. Considerations of the type of spinal intervention, pain level, opioid consumption, and cognitive function should be factored in the assessment of a patient's ability to safely resume driving.

  13. Smartphone apps for spinal surgery: is technology good or evil?

    Robertson, Greg A J; Wong, Seng Juong; Brady, Richard R; Subramanian, Ashok S

    2016-05-01

    The increased utilization of smartphones together with their downloadable applications (apps) provides opportunity for doctors, including spinal surgeons, to integrate such technology into clinical practice. However, the clinical reliability of the medical app sector remains questionable. We reviewed available apps themed specifically towards spinal surgery and related conditions and assessed the level of medical professional involvement in their design and content. The most popular smartphone app stores (Android, Apple, Blackberry, Windows, Samsung, Nokia) were searched for spinal surgery-themed apps, using the disease terms Spinal Surgery, Back Surgery, Spine, Disc Prolapse, Sciatica, Radiculopathy, Spinal Stenosis, Scoliosis, Spinal Fracture and Spondylolisthesis. A total of 78 individual spinal surgery themed apps were identified, of which there were six duplicates (N = 72). According to app store classifications, there were 57 (79 %) medical themed apps, 11 (15 %) health and fitness themed apps, 1 (1 %) business and 3 (4 %) education themed apps. Forty-five (63 %) apps were available for download free of charge. For those that charged access, the prices ranged from £0.62 to £47.99. Only 44 % of spinal surgery apps had customer satisfaction ratings and 56 % had named medical professional involvement in their development or content. This is the first study to specifically address the characteristics of apps related to spinal surgery. We found that nearly half of spinal surgery apps had no named medical professional involvement, raising concerns over app content and evidence base for their use. We recommend increased regulation of spinal surgical apps to improve the accountability of app content.

  14. Intracranial epidural hemorrhage during lumbar spinal surgery.

    Imajo, Yasuaki; Kanchiku, Tsukasa; Suzuki, Hidenori; Yoshida, Yuichiro; Nishida, Norihiro; Goto, Hisaharu; Suzuki, Michiyasu; Taguchi, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    The authors report a case of intracranial epidural hemorrhage (ICEH) during spinal surgery. We could not find ICEH, though we recorded transcranial electrical stimulation motor evoked potentials (TcMEPs). A 35-year-old man was referred for left anterior thigh pain and low back pain that hindered sleep. Sagittal T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging revealed an intradural tumor at L3-L4 vertebral level. We performed osteoplastic laminectomy and en bloc tumor resection. TcMEPs were intraoperatively recorded at the bilateral abductor digiti minimi (ADM), quadriceps, tibialis anterior and abductor hallucis. When we closed a surgical incision, we were able to record normal TcMEPs in all muscles. The patient did not fully wake up from the anesthesia. He had right-sided unilateral positive ankle clonus 15 min after surgery in spite of bilateral negative of ankle clonus preoperatively. Emergent brain computed tomography scans revealed left epidural hemorrhage. The hematoma was evacuated immediately via a partial craniotomy. There was no restriction of the patient's daily activities 22 months postoperatively. We should pay attention to clinical signs such as headache and neurological findgings such as DTR and ankle clonus for patients with durotomy and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage. Spine surgeons should know that it was difficult to detect ICEH by monitoring with TcMEPs.

  15. Radiographic Predictors for Mechanical Failure After Adult Spinal Deformity Surgery

    Hallager, Dennis W; Karstensen, Sven; Bukhari, Naeem

    2017-01-01

    spinal deformity surgery range 12% to 37% in literature. Although the importance of spinal and spino-pelvic alignment is well documented for surgical outcome and ideal alignment has been proposed as sagittal vertical axis (SVA) lordosis (LL) = pelvic incidence ± 9...

  16. A Financial Analysis for a Spinal Surgery Specialized Treatment Service

    Maley, Lance

    1997-01-01

    ... area surrounding the hospital. The alternatives were to reimburse civilian health care providers for spinal surgery using money provided by Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Uniformed Services (CHAMPUS...

  17. Iatrogenic Spinal Cord Injury Resulting From Cervical Spine Surgery.

    Daniels, Alan H; Hart, Robert A; Hilibrand, Alan S; Fish, David E; Wang, Jeffrey C; Lord, Elizabeth L; Buser, Zorica; Tortolani, P Justin; Stroh, D Alex; Nassr, Ahmad; Currier, Bradford L; Sebastian, Arjun S; Arnold, Paul M; Fehlings, Michael G; Mroz, Thomas E; Riew, K Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Retrospective cohort study of prospectively collected data. To examine the incidence of iatrogenic spinal cord injury following elective cervical spine surgery. A retrospective multicenter case series study involving 21 high-volume surgical centers from the AOSpine North America Clinical Research Network was conducted. Medical records for 17 625 patients who received cervical spine surgery (levels from C2 to C7) between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2011, were reviewed to identify occurrence of iatrogenic spinal cord injury. In total, 3 cases of iatrogenic spinal cord injury following cervical spine surgery were identified. Institutional incidence rates ranged from 0.0% to 0.24%. Of the 3 patients with quadriplegia, one underwent anterior-only surgery with 2-level cervical corpectomy, one underwent anterior surgery with corpectomy in addition to posterior surgery, and one underwent posterior decompression and fusion surgery alone. One patient had complete neurologic recovery, one partially recovered, and one did not recover motor function. Iatrogenic spinal cord injury following cervical spine surgery is a rare and devastating adverse event. No standard protocol exists that can guarantee prevention of this complication, and there is a lack of consensus regarding evaluation and treatment when it does occur. Emergent imaging with magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography myelography to evaluate for compressive etiology or malpositioned instrumentation and avoidance of hypotension should be performed in cases of intraoperative and postoperative spinal cord injury.

  18. A major QTL controls susceptibility to spinal curvature in the curveback guppy

    Dreyer Christine

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the genetic basis of heritable spinal curvature would benefit medicine and aquaculture. Heritable spinal curvature among otherwise healthy children (i.e. Idiopathic Scoliosis and Scheuermann kyphosis accounts for more than 80% of all spinal curvatures and imposes a substantial healthcare cost through bracing, hospitalizations, surgery, and chronic back pain. In aquaculture, the prevalence of heritable spinal curvature can reach as high as 80% of a stock, and thus imposes a substantial cost through production losses. The genetic basis of heritable spinal curvature is unknown and so the objective of this work is to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL affecting heritable spinal curvature in the curveback guppy. Prior work with curveback has demonstrated phenotypic parallels to human idiopathic-type scoliosis, suggesting shared biological pathways for the deformity. Results A major effect QTL that acts in a recessive manner and accounts for curve susceptibility was detected in an initial mapping cross on LG 14. In a second cross, we confirmed this susceptibility locus and fine mapped it to a 5 cM region that explains 82.6% of the total phenotypic variance. Conclusions We identify a major QTL that controls susceptibility to curvature. This locus contains over 100 genes, including MTNR1B, a candidate gene for human idiopathic scoliosis. The identification of genes associated with heritable spinal curvature in the curveback guppy has the potential to elucidate the biological basis of spinal curvature among humans and economically important teleosts.

  19. Ileus Following Adult Spinal Deformity Surgery.

    Durand, Wesley M; Ruddell, Jack H; Eltorai, Adam E M; DePasse, J Mason; Daniels, Alan H

    2018-05-23

    Postoperative ileus (POI) is a common complication after spine surgery, with particularly high rates after adult spinal deformity surgery (ASD). Few investigations have been conducted, however, on predictors of POI following ASD. The objective of this investigation was to determine risk factors for POI in patients undergoing ASD. We also sought to determine the association between POI and in-hospital mortality, length of stay, and total charges. Data were obtained from the National/Nationwide Inpatient Sample, years 2010 - 2014. ASD patients aged ≥26 years-old were selected using ICD-9-CM codes. Multiple logistic and linear regression were utilized. In total, 59,410 patients were included in the analysis. 7.4% of patients experienced POI. On adjusted analysis, the following variables were associated with increased risk of POI: male sex (OR 1.43, CI 1.10 - 1.85), anterior surgical approach (OR 1.78, CI 1.22 - 2.60), 9+ levels fused (OR 1.84, CI 1.24 - 2.73), electrolyte disorders (OR 2.70, CI 2.15 - 3.39), and pathologic weight loss (OR 1.94, CI 1.08 - 3.46). POI was associated with significantly longer length of stay (+39%, CI 29% - 51%) and higher total charges (+23%, CI 14% - 31%). Risk factors for POI were identified. Patients suffering from ileus exhibited 2.9 days longer length of stay and ∼$80,000 higher total charges. These results may be applied clinically to identify patients at risk of POI and to consider addressing modifiable risk factors preoperatively. Future studies should be conducted with additional data to develop models capable of accurately predicting and preventing POI. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Delayed spinal extradural hematoma following thoracic spine surgery and resulting in paraplegia: a case report

    Parthiban Chandra JKB

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Postoperative spinal extradural hematomas are rare. Most of the cases that have been reported occured within 3 days of surgery. Their occurrence in a delayed form, that is, more than 72 hours after surgery, is very rare. This case is being reported to enhance awareness of delayed postoperative spinal extradural hematomas. Case presentation We report a case of acute onset dorsal spinal extradural hematoma from a paraspinal muscular arterial bleed, producing paraplegia 72 hours following surgery for excision of a spinal cord tumor at T8 level. The triggering mechanism was an episode of violent twisting movement by the patient. Fresh blood in the postoperative drain tube provided suspicion of this complication. Emergency evacuation of the clot helped in regaining normal motor and sensory function. The need to avoid straining of the paraspinal muscles in the postoperative period is emphasized. Conclusion Most cases of postoperative spinal extradural hematomas occur as a result of venous bleeding. However, an arterial source of bleeding from paraspinal muscular branches causing extradural hematoma and subsequent neurological deficit is underreported. Undue straining of paraspinal muscles in the postoperative period after major spinal surgery should be avoided for at least a few days.

  1. Pain prevalence and trajectories following pediatric spinal fusion surgery

    Sieberg, Christine B.; Simons, Laura E.; Edelstein, Mark R.; DeAngelis, Maria R.; Pielech, Melissa; Sethna, Navil; Hresko, M. Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Factors contributing to pain following surgery are poorly understood with previous research largely focused on adults. With approximately 6 million children undergoing surgery each year8, there is a need to study pediatric persistent postsurgical pain. The present study includes patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis undergoing spinal fusion surgery enrolled in a prospective, multi-centered registry examining post-surgical outcomes. The Scoliosis Research Society Questionnaire- Version...

  2. Iatrogenic Spinal Cord Injury Resulting From Cervical Spine Surgery

    Daniels, Alan H.; Hart, Robert A.; Hilibrand, Alan S.; Fish, David E.; Wang, Jeffrey C.; Lord, Elizabeth L.; Buser, Zorica; Tortolani, P. Justin; Stroh, D. Alex; Nassr, Ahmad; Currier, Bradford L.; Sebastian, Arjun S.; Arnold, Paul M.; Fehlings, Michael G.; Mroz, Thomas E.

    2017-01-01

    Study Design: Retrospective cohort study of prospectively collected data. Objective: To examine the incidence of iatrogenic spinal cord injury following elective cervical spine surgery. Methods: A retrospective multicenter case series study involving 21 high-volume surgical centers from the AOSpine North America Clinical Research Network was conducted. Medical records for 17?625 patients who received cervical spine surgery (levels from C2 to C7) between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2011,...

  3. The 100 most cited papers in spinal deformity surgery: a bibliometric analysis

    Shane C. O’Neill

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Spinal deformity is a condition that has been recognized for many millennia. There have been major advances in the treatment of spinal deformity in recent years and studies outlining new ideas can inspire others to further advance the speciality. The number of citations a paper receives may indicate the influence of that paper. It is therefore important that we evaluate and analyze the most cited works in our field. The aim of this study is to identify the 100 most cited papers relevant to spinal deformity surgery in the literature. A search through the Thomson Reuters Web of ScienceTM for citations related to spinal deformity surgery was performed. The number of citations, mean citation number (total number citations/years since publication, journal, authors, year of publication and country of origin of the top 100 papers was recorded. The top 100 papers were cited a combined 17,646 times, ranging from 453 to 112. The majority of papers originated from the United States (71 and were published in 20 different journals. The decade 1990-1999 was the most prolific, with 36 of the 100 papers published during this time. Papers pertaining to the management of scoliosis (49 were the most common. This study identifies the top 100 most cited papers in the field of spinal deformity surgery. While citation is not a specific marker of the scientific quality of a paper, it is a surrogate for the influence a paper has had on the orthopedic community. This list of papers provides an invaluable resource for both those in training and those actively practicing and involved in the further development of spinal deformity surgery.

  4. The 100 most cited papers in spinal deformity surgery: a bibliometric analysis.

    O'Neill, Shane C; Butler, Joseph S; McGoldrick, Niall; O'Leary, Robert; Synnott, Keith

    2014-10-27

    Spinal deformity is a condition that has been recognized for many millennia. There have been major advances in the treatment of spinal deformity in recent years and studies outlining new ideas can inspire others to further advance the speciality. The number of citations a paper receives may indicate the influence of that paper. It is therefore important that we evaluate and analyze the most cited works in our field. The aim of this study is to identify the 100 most cited papers relevant to spinal deformity surgery in the literature. A search through the Thomson Reuters Web of Science™ for citations related to spinal deformity surgery was performed. The number of citations, mean citation number (total number citations/years since publication), journal, authors, year of publication and country of origin of the top 100 papers was recorded. The top 100 papers were cited a combined 17,646 times, ranging from 453 to 112. The majority of papers originated from the United States (71) and were published in 20 different journals. The decade 1990-1999 was the most prolific, with 36 of the 100 papers published during this time. Papers pertaining to the management of scoliosis (49) were the most common. This study identifies the top 100 most cited papers in the field of spinal deformity surgery. While citation is not a specific marker of the scientific quality of a paper, it is a surrogate for the influence a paper has had on the orthopedic community. This list of papers provides an invaluable resource for both those in training and those actively practicing and involved in the further development of spinal deformity surgery.

  5. Enhanced Recovery After Surgery Protocols in Major Urologic Surgery

    Natalija Vukovic

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the reviewThe analysis of the components of enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS protocols in urologic surgery.Recent findingsERAS protocols has been studied for over 20 years in different surgical procedures, mostly in colorectal surgery. The concept of improving patient care and reducing postoperative complications was also applied to major urologic surgery and especially procedure of radical cystectomy. This procedure is technically challenging, due to a major surgical resection and high postoperative complication rate that may reach 65%. Several clinical pathways were introduced to improve perioperative course and reduce the length of hospital stay. These protocols differ from ERAS modalities in other surgeries. The reasons for this are longer operative time, increased risk of perioperative transfusion and infection, and urinary diversion achieved using transposed intestinal segments. Previous studies in this area analyzed the need for mechanical bowel preparation, postoperative nasogastric tube decompression, as well as the duration of urinary drainage. Furthermore, the attention has also been drawn to perioperative fluid optimization, pain management, and bowel function.SummaryNotwithstanding partial resemblance between the pathways in major urologic surgery and other pelvic surgeries, there are still scarce guidelines for ERAS protocols in urology, which is why further studies should assess the importance of preoperative medical optimization, implementation of thoracic epidural anesthesia and analgesia, and perioperative nutritional management.

  6. Preliminary development of augmented reality systems for spinal surgery

    Nguyen, Nhu Q.; Ramjist, Joel M.; Jivraj, Jamil; Jakubovic, Raphael; Deorajh, Ryan; Yang, Victor X. D.

    2017-02-01

    Surgical navigation has been more actively deployed in open spinal surgeries due to the need for improved precision during procedures. This is increasingly difficult in minimally invasive surgeries due to the lack of visual cues caused by smaller exposure sites, and increases a surgeon's dependence on their knowledge of anatomical landmarks as well as the CT or MRI images. The use of augmented reality (AR) systems and registration technologies in spinal surgeries could allow for improvements to techniques by overlaying a 3D reconstruction of patient anatomy in the surgeon's field of view, creating a mixed reality visualization. The AR system will be capable of projecting the 3D reconstruction onto a field and preliminary object tracking on a phantom. Dimensional accuracy of the mixed media will also be quantified to account for distortions in tracking.

  7. Navigation and Robotics in Spinal Surgery: Where Are We Now?

    Overley, Samuel C; Cho, Samuel K; Mehta, Ankit I; Arnold, Paul M

    2017-03-01

    Spine surgery has experienced much technological innovation over the past several decades. The field has seen advancements in operative techniques, implants and biologics, and equipment such as computer-assisted navigation and surgical robotics. With the arrival of real-time image guidance and navigation capabilities along with the computing ability to process and reconstruct these data into an interactive three-dimensional spinal "map", so too have the applications of surgical robotic technology. While spinal robotics and navigation represent promising potential for improving modern spinal surgery, it remains paramount to demonstrate its superiority as compared to traditional techniques prior to assimilation of its use amongst surgeons.The applications for intraoperative navigation and image-guided robotics have expanded to surgical resection of spinal column and intradural tumors, revision procedures on arthrodesed spines, and deformity cases with distorted anatomy. Additionally, these platforms may mitigate much of the harmful radiation exposure in minimally invasive surgery to which the patient, surgeon, and ancillary operating room staff are subjected.Spine surgery relies upon meticulous fine motor skills to manipulate neural elements and a steady hand while doing so, often exploiting small working corridors utilizing exposures that minimize collateral damage. Additionally, the procedures may be long and arduous, predisposing the surgeon to both mental and physical fatigue. In light of these characteristics, spine surgery may actually be an ideal candidate for the integration of navigation and robotic-assisted procedures.With this paper, we aim to critically evaluate the current literature and explore the options available for intraoperative navigation and robotic-assisted spine surgery. Copyright © 2016 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons.

  8. Adolescents' perceptions of music therapy following spinal fusion surgery.

    Kleiber, Charmaine; Adamek, Mary S

    2013-02-01

    To explore adolescents' memories about music therapy after spinal fusion surgery and their recommendations for future patients. Spinal fusion for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis is one of the most painful surgeries performed. Music therapy is shown to decrease postoperative pain in children after minor surgery. In preparation for developing a preoperative information program, we interviewed adolescents who had spinal fusion and postoperative music therapy to find out what they remembered and what they recommended for future patients. Eight adolescents who had spinal fusion for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis were interviewed about their experiences. For this qualitative study, the investigators independently used thematic analysis techniques to formulate interpretive themes. Together they discussed their ideas and assigned overall meanings to the information. The eight participants were 13-17 years of age and had surgery between 2-24 months previously. The overarching themes identified from the interviews were relaxation and pain perception, choice and control, therapist interaction and preoperative information. Participants stated that music therapy helped with mental relaxation and distraction from pain. It was important to be able to choose the type of music for the therapy and to use self-control to focus on the positive. Their recommendation was that future patients should be provided with information preoperatively about music therapy and pain management. Participants recommended a combination of auditory and visual information, especially the experiences of previous patients who had spinal fusion and music therapy. Music provided live at the bedside by a music therapist was remembered vividly and positively by most of the participants. The presence of a music therapist providing patient-selected music at the bedside is important. Methods to introduce adolescents to music therapy and how to use music for relaxation should be developed and tested. © 2012

  9. Systematic review of 3D printing in spinal surgery: the current state of play.

    Wilcox, Ben; Mobbs, Ralph J; Wu, Ai-Min; Phan, Kevin

    2017-09-01

    Three-dimensional printing (3DP), also known as "Additive Manufacturing", is a rapidly growing industry, particularly in the area of spinal surgery. Given the complex anatomy of the spine and delicate nature of surrounding structures, 3DP has the potential to aid surgical planning and procedural accuracy. We perform a systematic review of current literature on the applications of 3DP in spinal surgery. Six electronic databases were searched for original published studies reporting cases or outcomes for 3DP surgical models, guides or implants for spinal surgery. The findings of these studies were synthesized and summarized. These searches returned a combined 2,411 articles. Of these, 54 were included in this review. 3DP is currently used for surgical planning, intra-operative surgical guides, customised prostheses as well as "Off-the-Shelf" implants. The technology has the potential for enhanced implant properties, as well as decreased surgical time and better patient outcomes. The majority of the data thus far is from low-quality studies with inherent biases linked with the excitement of a new field. As the body of literature continues to expand, larger scale studies to evaluate advantages and disadvantages, and longer-term follow up will enhance our knowledge of the effect 3DP has in spinal surgery. In addition, issues such as financial impact, time to design and print, materials selection and bio-printing will evolve as this rapidly expanding field matures.

  10. Reduced collagen accumulation after major surgery

    Jorgensen, L N; Kallehave, F; Karlsmark, T

    1996-01-01

    .01)). This decline was significantly higher in the six patients who had a postoperative infection (median 3.02 (range -0.06 to 6.14) versus 0.36 (range -1.56 to 12.60) micrograms/cm, P = 0.02). This study shows that major surgery is associated with impairment of subcutaneous collagen accumulation in a test wound...

  11. A spatial registration method for navigation system combining O-arm with spinal surgery robot

    Bai, H.; Song, G. L.; Zhao, Y. W.; Liu, X. Z.; Jiang, Y. X.

    2018-05-01

    The minimally invasive surgery in spinal surgery has become increasingly popular in recent years as it reduces the chances of complications during post-operation. However, the procedure of spinal surgery is complicated and the surgical vision of minimally invasive surgery is limited. In order to increase the quality of percutaneous pedicle screw placement, the O-arm that is a mobile intraoperative imaging system is used to assist surgery. The robot navigation system combined with O-arm is also increasing, with the extensive use of O-arm. One of the major problems in the surgical navigation system is to associate the patient space with the intra-operation image space. This study proposes a spatial registration method of spinal surgical robot navigation system, which uses the O-arm to scan a calibration phantom with metal calibration spheres. First, the metal artifacts were reduced in the CT slices and then the circles in the images based on the moments invariant could be identified. Further, the position of the calibration sphere in the image space was obtained. Moreover, the registration matrix is obtained based on the ICP algorithm. Finally, the position error is calculated to verify the feasibility and accuracy of the registration method.

  12. Ambulatory surgery with chloroprocaine spinal anesthesia: a review

    Ghisi D

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Daniela Ghisi, Stefano Bonarelli Department of Anaesthesia and Postoperative Intensive Care, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna, Italy Abstract: Spinal anesthesia is a reliable and safe technique for procedures of the lower extremities. Nevertheless, some of its characteristics may limit its use for ambulatory surgery, including delayed ambulation, risk of urinary retention, and pain after block regression. The current availability of short-acting local anesthetics has renewed interest for this technique also in the context of short- and ultra-short procedures. Chloroprocaine (CP is an amino-ester local anesthetic with a very short half-life. It was introduced and has been successfully used for spinal anesthesia since 1952. Sodium bisulfite was then added as a preservative after 1956. The drug was then abandoned in the 1980s for several reports of neurological deficits in patients receiving accidentally high doses of intrathecal CP during epidural labor analgesia. Animal studies have proven the safety of the preservative-free formulation, which has been extensively evaluated in volunteer studies as well as in clinical practice with a favorable profile in terms of both safety and efficacy. In comparison with bupivacaine, 2-chloroprocaine (2-CP showed faster offset times to end of anesthesia, unassisted ambulation, and discharge from hospital. These findings suggests that 2-CP may be a suitable alternative to low doses of long-acting local anesthetics in ambulatory surgery. Its safety profile also suggests that 2-CP could be a valid substitute for intrathecal short- and intermediate-acting local anesthetics, such as lidocaine and mepivacaine – often causes of transient neurological symptoms. In this context, literature suggests a dose ranging between 30 and 60 mg of 2-CP for procedures lasting 60 minutes or less, while 10 mg is considered the no-effect dose. The present review describes recent evidence about 2-CP as an anesthetic agent for

  13. Neurologic Outcomes of Complex Adult Spinal Deformity Surgery

    Lenke, Lawrence G; Fehlings, Michael G; Shaffrey, Christopher I

    2016-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Prospective, multicenter, international observational study. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate motor neurologic outcomes in patients undergoing surgery for complex adult spinal deformity (ASD). SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: The neurologic outcomes after surgical correction for ASD have been...... and 16.42% showed an improvement. At 6 months, 10.82% patients showed a decline in preoperative LEMS, 20.52% improvement, and 68.66% maintenance. This was a significant change compared with 6 weeks and at discharge. CONCLUSION: Although complex ASD surgery can restore neurologic function in patients...

  14. The minimally invasive spinal deformity surgery algorithm: a reproducible rational framework for decision making in minimally invasive spinal deformity surgery.

    Mummaneni, Praveen V; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Lenke, Lawrence G; Park, Paul; Wang, Michael Y; La Marca, Frank; Smith, Justin S; Mundis, Gregory M; Okonkwo, David O; Moal, Bertrand; Fessler, Richard G; Anand, Neel; Uribe, Juan S; Kanter, Adam S; Akbarnia, Behrooz; Fu, Kai-Ming G

    2014-05-01

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) is an alternative to open deformity surgery for the treatment of patients with adult spinal deformity. However, at this time MIS techniques are not as versatile as open deformity techniques, and MIS techniques have been reported to result in suboptimal sagittal plane correction or pseudarthrosis when used for severe deformities. The minimally invasive spinal deformity surgery (MISDEF) algorithm was created to provide a framework for rational decision making for surgeons who are considering MIS versus open spine surgery. A team of experienced spinal deformity surgeons developed the MISDEF algorithm that incorporates a patient's preoperative radiographic parameters and leads to one of 3 general plans ranging from MIS direct or indirect decompression to open deformity surgery with osteotomies. The authors surveyed fellowship-trained spine surgeons experienced with spinal deformity surgery to validate the algorithm using a set of 20 cases to establish interobserver reliability. They then resurveyed the same surgeons 2 months later with the same cases presented in a different sequence to establish intraobserver reliability. Responses were collected and tabulated. Fleiss' analysis was performed using MATLAB software. Over a 3-month period, 11 surgeons completed the surveys. Responses for MISDEF algorithm case review demonstrated an interobserver kappa of 0.58 for the first round of surveys and an interobserver kappa of 0.69 for the second round of surveys, consistent with substantial agreement. In at least 10 cases there was perfect agreement between the reviewing surgeons. The mean intraobserver kappa for the 2 surveys was 0.86 ± 0.15 (± SD) and ranged from 0.62 to 1. The use of the MISDEF algorithm provides consistent and straightforward guidance for surgeons who are considering either an MIS or an open approach for the treatment of patients with adult spinal deformity. The MISDEF algorithm was found to have substantial inter- and

  15. Thoracic spinal anesthesia is safe for patients undergoing abdominal cancer surgery.

    Ellakany, Mohamed Hamdy

    2014-01-01

    A double-blinded randomized controlled study to compare discharge time and patient satisfaction between two groups of patients submitted to open surgeries for abdominal malignancies using segmental thoracic spinal or general anesthesia. Open surgeries for abdominal malignancy are usually done under general anesthesia, but many patients with major medical problems sometimes can't tolerate such anesthesia. Regional anesthesia namely segmental thoracic spinal anesthesia may be beneficial in such patients. A total of 60 patients classified according to American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) as class II or III undergoing surgeries for abdominal malignancy, like colonic or gastric carcinoma, divided into two groups, 30 patients each. Group G, received general anesthesia, Group S received a segmental (T9-T10 injection) thoracic spinal anesthesia with intrathecal injection of 2 ml of hyperbaric bupivacaine 0.5% (10 mg) and 20 ug fentanyl citrate. Intraoperative monitoring, postoperative pain, complications, recovery time, and patient satisfaction at follow-up were compared between the two groups. Spinal anesthesia was performed easily in all 30 patients, although two patients complained of paraesthesiae, which responded to slight needle withdrawal. No patient required conversion to general anesthesia, six patients required midazolam for anxiety and six patients required phenylephrine and atropine for hypotension and bradycardia, recovery was uneventful and without sequelae. The two groups were comparable with respect to gender, age, weight, height, body mass index, ASA classification, preoperative oxygen saturation and preoperative respiratory rate and operative time. This preliminary study has shown that segmental thoracic spinal anesthesia can be used successfully and effectively for open surgeries for abdominal malignancies by experienced anesthetists. It showed shorter postanesthesia care unit stay, better postoperative pain relief and patient satisfaction than

  16. Spinal Anesthesia with Isobaric Tetracaine in Patients with Previous Lumbar Spinal Surgery

    Kim, Soo Hwan; Jeon, Dong-Hyuk; Chang, Chul Ho; Lee, Sung-Jin

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Previous lumbar spinal surgery (PLSS) is not currently considered as a contraindication for regional anesthesia. However, there are still problems that make spinal anesthesia more difficult with a possibility of worsening the patient's back pain. Spinal anesthesia using combined spinal-epidural anesthesia (CSEA) in elderly patients with or without PLSS was investigated and the anesthetic characteristics, success rates, and possible complications were evaluated. Materials and Methods Fifty patients without PLSS (Control group) and 45 patients with PLSS (PLSS group) who were scheduled for total knee arthroplasty were studied prospectively. A CSEA was performed with patients in the left lateral position, and 10 mg of 0.5% isobaric tetracaine was injected through a 27 G spinal needle. An epidural catheter was then inserted for patient controlled analgesia. Successful spinal anesthesia was defined as adequate sensory block level more than T12. The number of skin punctures and the onset time were recorded, and maximal sensory block level (MSBL), time to 2-segment regression, success rate and complications were observed. Results The success rate of CSEA in Control group and PLSS group was 98.0%, and 93.3%, respectively. The median MSBL in PLSS group was higher than Control group [T4 (T2-L1) vs. T6 (T3-T12)] (p < 0.001). There was a significant difference in the number of patients who required ephedrine for the treatment of hypotension in PLSS group (p = 0.028). Conclusion The success rate of CSEA in patients with PLSS was 93.3%, and patients experienced no significant neurological complications. The MSBL can be higher in PLSS group than Control group. PMID:19430559

  17. National audit of post-operative management in spinal surgery

    Dicken Ben

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is some evidence from a Cochrane review that rehabilitation following spinal surgery may be beneficial. Methods We conducted a survey of current post-operative practice amongst spinal surgeons in the United Kingdom in 2002 to determine whether such interventions are being included routinely in the post-operative management of spinal patients. The survey included all surgeons who were members of either the British Association of Spinal Surgeons (BASS or the Society for Back Pain Research. Data on the characteristics of each surgeon and his or her current pattern of practice and post-operative care were collected via a reply-paid postal questionnaire. Results Usable responses were provided by 57% of the 89 surgeons included in the survey. Most surgeons (79% had a routine post-operative management regime, but only 35% had a written set of instructions that they gave to their patients concerning this. Over half (55% of surgeons do not send their patients for any physiotherapy after discharge, with an average of less than two sessions of treatment organised by those that refer for physiotherapy at all. Restrictions on lifting, sitting and driving showed considerable inconsistency both between surgeons and also within the recommendations given by individual surgeons. Conclusion Demonstrable inconsistencies within and between spinal surgeons in their approaches to post-operative management can be interpreted as evidence of continuing and significant uncertainty across the sub-speciality as to what does constitute best care in these areas of practice. Conducting further large, rigorous, randomised controlled trials would be the best method for obtaining definitive answers to these questions.

  18. Function after spinal treatment, exercise and rehabilitation (FASTER): improving the functional outcome of spinal surgery.

    McGregor, A H; Doré, C J; Morris, T P; Morris, S; Jamrozik, K

    2010-01-26

    The life-time incidence of low back pain is high and diagnoses of spinal stenosis and disc prolapse are increasing. Consequently, there is a steady rise in surgical interventions for these conditions. Current evidence suggests that while the success of surgery is incomplete, it is superior to conservative interventions. A recent survey indicates that there are large differences in the type and intensity of rehabilitation, if any, provided after spinal surgery as well as in the restrictions and advice given to patients in the post-operative period. This trial will test the hypothesis that functional outcome following two common spinal operations can be improved by a programme of post-operative rehabilitation that combines professional support and advice with graded active exercise and/or an educational booklet based on evidence-based messages and advice. The study design is a multi-centre, factorial, randomised controlled trial with patients stratified by surgeon and operative procedure. The trial will compare the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a rehabilitation programme and an education booklet for the postoperative management of patients undergoing discectomy or lateral nerve root decompression, each compared with "usual care"using a 2 x 2 factorial design. The trial will create 4 sub-groups; rehabilitation-only, booklet-only, rehabilitation-plus-booklet, and usual care only. The trial aims to recruit 344 patients, which equates to 86 patients in each of the four sub-groups. All patients will be assessed for functional ability (through the Oswestry Disability Index - a disease specific functional questionnaire), pain (using visual analogue scales), and satisfaction pre-operatively and then at 6 weeks, 3, 6 and 9 months and 1 year post-operatively. This will be complemented by a formal analysis of cost-effectiveness. This trial will determine whether the outcome of spinal surgery can be enhanced by either a post-operative rehabilitation programme or an

  19. Minimally Invasive Spinal Surgery with Intraoperative Image-Guided Navigation

    Terrence T. Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present our perioperative minimally invasive spine surgery technique using intraoperative computed tomography image-guided navigation for the treatment of various lumbar spine pathologies. We present an illustrative case of a patient undergoing minimally invasive percutaneous posterior spinal fusion assisted by the O-arm system with navigation. We discuss the literature and the advantages of the technique over fluoroscopic imaging methods: lower occupational radiation exposure for operative room personnel, reduced need for postoperative imaging, and decreased revision rates. Most importantly, we demonstrate that use of intraoperative cone beam CT image-guided navigation has been reported to increase accuracy.

  20. Plasma fibronectin in patients undergoing major surgery

    Sallam, M.H.M.

    2003-01-01

    Plasma fibronectin in patients undergoing major surgery had been determined before and after operation. The study was done on 15 patients and 15 normal healthy individuals. The study revealed that patients subjected to major operation, their fibronectin level was normal before operation followed by reduction one day post-operation. After one week, fibronectin level raised again nearly to the pre-operations levels. The probable mechanisms of fibronectin in healing processes were discussed. Fibronectin (FN) is a family of structurally and immunologically related high molecular weight glycoproteins that are present in many cell surfaces, in extracellular fluids, in connective tissues and in most membranes. Interaction with certain discrete extracellular substances, such as a glucosaminoglycans (e.g. heparin), fibrin and collagen and with cell surface structure seem to account for many of its biological activities, among which are regulation of adhesion, spreading and locomotion (Mosesson and amrani, 1980). The concentration of Fn in human plasma decreases after extensive destruction such as that occurs in major surgery, burns or other trauma. This decrease has been generally though to be due to increased consumption of soluble plasma Fn in opsonization of particulate and soluble debris from circulation by the reticuloendothelial (RE) system. Fn rapidly appears in injury areas, in experimentally induced blisters, wounded and epithelium tissues (Petersen et al., 1985). Fn accumulates at times of increased vascular permeability and it is produced by cell of blood vessels in response to injury

  1. The presentation, incidence, etiology, and treatment of surgical site infections after spinal surgery.

    Pull ter Gunne, A.F.; Mohamed, A.S.; Skolasky, R.L.; Laarhoven, C.J.H.M. van; Cohen, D.B.

    2010-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Descriptive, retrospective cohort analysis. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the presentation, etiology, and treatment of surgical site infections (SSI) after spinal surgery. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: SSI after spine surgery is frequently seen. Small case control studies have been published

  2. Combined spinal epidural anesthesia in achondroplastic dwarf for femur surgery

    Rochana Girish Bakhshi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Achondroplasia is the commonest form of short-limbed dwarfism and occurs in 1:26,000- 40,000 live births. This is an autosomal dominant disorder with abnormal endochondral ossification whereas periosteal and intramembranous ossification are normal. The basic abnormality is a disturbance of cartilage formation mainly at the epiphyseal growth plates and at the base of the skull. The anesthetic management of achondroplastic dwarfs is a challenge to the anesthesiologist. Both regional as well as general anesthesia have their individual risks and consequences. We report a case of an achondroplastic dwarf in whom combined spinal epidural anesthesia was used for fixation of a fractured femur. The patient had undergone previous femur surgery under general anesthesia since he had been informed that spinal anesthesia could be very problematic. There was no technical difficulty encountered during the procedure and an adequate level was achieved with low-dose local anesthetics without any problem. Postoperative pain relief was offered for three consecutive postoperative days using epidural tramadol. We discuss the anesthetic issues and highlight the role of combined spinal epidural anesthesia with low-dose local anesthetics in this patient. This approach also helped in early ambulation and postoperative pain relief.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging in patients with progressive myelopathy following spinal surgery.

    Avrahami, E; Tadmor, R; Cohn, D F

    1989-01-01

    Thirty one patients with insidious progressive myelopathy 2 to 8 years following surgery of the cervical spine were subjected to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In 15 patients operated on for vascular malformations or intramedullary tumours, syringomyelia and cystic lesions of the spinal cord were shown. Seven of these patients also showed a combination of a recurrent tumour and spinal atrophy. Out of 16 patients who had surgery for herniated disc or spinal stenosis of the cervical spine, f...

  4. Intrathecal morphine attenuates acute opioid tolerance secondary to remifentanil infusions during spinal surgery in adolescents

    Tripi PA

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Paul A Tripi,1 Matthew E Kuestner,1 Connie S Poe-Kochert,2 Kasia Rubin,1 Jochen P Son-Hing,2 George H Thompson,2 Joseph D Tobias3 1Division of Pediatric Anesthesiology, 2Division of Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery, Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, 3Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH, USA Introduction: The unique pharmacokinetic properties of remifentanil with a context-sensitive half-life unaffected by length of infusion contribute to its frequent use during anesthetic management during posterior spinal fusion in children and adolescents. However, its intraoperative administration can lead to increased postoperative analgesic requirements, which is postulated to be the result of acute opioid tolerance with enhancement of spinal N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor function. Although strategies to prevent or reduce tolerance have included the coadministration of longer acting opioids or ketamine, the majority of these studies have demonstrated little to no benefit. The current study retrospectively evaluates the efficacy of intrathecal morphine (ITM in preventing hyperalgesia following a remifentanil infusion.Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 54 patients undergoing posterior spinal fusion with segmental spinal instrumentation, to evaluate the effects of ITM on hyperalgesia from remifentanil. Patients were divided into two groups based on whether they did or did not receive remifentanil during the surgery: no remifentanil (control group (n=27 and remifentanil (study group (n=27. Data included demographics, remifentanil dose and duration, Wong–Baker visual analog scale postoperative pain scores, and postoperative intravenous morphine consumption in the first 48 postoperative hours.Results: The demographics of the two study groups were similar. There were no differences in the Wong–Baker visual analog

  5. Neurophysiological detection of impending spinal cord injury during scoliosis surgery.

    Schwartz, Daniel M; Auerbach, Joshua D; Dormans, John P; Flynn, John; Drummond, Denis S; Bowe, J Andrew; Laufer, Samuel; Shah, Suken A; Bowen, J Richard; Pizzutillo, Peter D; Jones, Kristofer J; Drummond, Denis S

    2007-11-01

    Despite the many reports attesting to the efficacy of intraoperative somatosensory evoked potential monitoring in reducing the prevalence of iatrogenic spinal cord injury during corrective scoliosis surgery, these afferent neurophysiological signals can provide only indirect evidence of injury to the motor tracts since they monitor posterior column function. Early reports on the use of transcranial electric motor evoked potentials to monitor the corticospinal motor tracts directly suggested that the method holds great promise for improving detection of emerging spinal cord injury. We sought to compare the efficacy of these two methods of monitoring to detect impending iatrogenic neural injury during scoliosis surgery. We reviewed the intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring records of 1121 consecutive patients (834 female and 287 male) with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (mean age, 13.9 years) treated between 2000 and 2004 at four pediatric spine centers. The same group of experienced surgical neurophysiologists monitored spinal cord function in all patients with use of a standardized multimodality technique with the patient under total intravenous anesthesia. A relevant neurophysiological change (an alert) was defined as a reduction in amplitude (unilateral or bilateral) of at least 50% for somatosensory evoked potentials and at least 65% for transcranial electric motor evoked potentials compared with baseline. Thirty-eight (3.4%) of the 1121 patients had recordings that met the criteria for a relevant signal change (i.e., an alert). Of those thirty-eight patients, seventeen showed suppression of the amplitude of transcranial electric motor evoked potentials in excess of 65% without any evidence of changes in somatosensory evoked potentials. In nine of the thirty-eight patients, the signal change was related to hypotension and was corrected with augmentation of the blood pressure. The remaining twenty-nine patients had an alert that was related directly to a

  6. Complications associated with prone positioning in elective spinal surgery.

    DePasse, J Mason; Palumbo, Mark A; Haque, Maahir; Eberson, Craig P; Daniels, Alan H

    2015-04-18

    Complications associated with prone surgical positioning during elective spine surgery have the potential to cause serious patient morbidity. Although many of these complications remain uncommon, the range of possible morbidities is wide and includes multiple organ systems. Perioperative visual loss (POVL) is a well described, but uncommon complication that may occur due to ischemia to the optic nerve, retina, or cerebral cortex. Closed-angle glaucoma and amaurosis have been reported as additional etiologies for vision loss following spinal surgery. Peripheral nerve injuries, such as those caused by prolonged traction to the brachial plexus, are more commonly encountered postoperative events. Myocutaneous complications including pressure ulcers and compartment syndrome may also occur after prone positioning, albeit rarely. Other uncommon positioning complications such as tongue swelling resulting in airway compromise, femoral artery ischemia, and avascular necrosis of the femoral head have also been reported. Many of these are well-understood and largely avoidable through thoughtful attention to detail. Other complications, such as POVL, remain incompletely understood and thus more difficult to predict or prevent. Here, the current literature on the complications of prone positioning for spine surgery is reviewed to increase awareness of the spectrum of potential complications and to inform spine surgeons of strategies to minimize the risk of prone patient morbidity.

  7. Percutaneous Iliac Screws for Minimally Invasive Spinal Deformity Surgery

    Michael Y. Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Adult spinal deformity (ASD surgeries carry significant morbidity, and this has led many surgeons to apply minimally invasive surgery (MIS techniques to reduce the blood loss, infections, and other peri-operative complications. A spectrum of techniques for MIS correction of ASD has thus evolved, most recently the application of percutaneous iliac screws. Methods. Over an 18 months 10 patients with thoracolumbar scoliosis underwent MIS surgery. The mean age was 73 years (70% females. Patients were treated with multi-level facet osteotomies and interbody fusion using expandable cages followed by percutaneous screw fixation. Percutaneous iliac screws were placed bilaterally using the obturator outlet view to target the ischial body. Results. All patients were successfully instrumented without conversion to an open technique. Mean operative time was 302 minutes and the mean blood loss was 480 cc, with no intraoperative complications. A total of 20 screws were placed successfully as judged by CT scanning to confirm no bony violations. Complications included: two asymptomatic medial breaches at T10 and L5, and one patient requiring delayed epidural hematoma evacuation. Conclusions. Percutaneous iliac screws can be placed safely in patients with ASD. This MIS technique allows for successful caudal anchoring to stress-shield the sacrum and L5-S1 fusion site in long-segment constructs.

  8. Cost Implications of Primary Versus Revision Surgery in Adult Spinal Deformity.

    Qureshi, Rabia; Puvanesarajah, Varun; Jain, Amit; Kebaish, Khaled; Shimer, Adam; Shen, Francis; Hassanzadeh, Hamid

    2017-08-01

    Adult spinal deformity (ASD) is an important problem to consider in the elderly. Although studies have examined the complications of ASD surgery and have compared functional and radiographic results of primary surgery versus revision, no studies have compared the costs of primary procedures with revisions. We assessed the in-hospital costs of these 2 surgery types in patients with ASD. The PearlDiver Database, a database of Medicare records, was used in this study. Mutually exclusive groups of patients undergoing primary or revision surgery were identified. Patients in each group were queried for age, sex, and comorbidities. Thirty-day readmission rates, 30-day and 90-day complication rates, and postoperative costs of care were assessed with multivariate analysis. For analyses, significance was set at P average reimbursement of the primary surgery cohort was $57,078 ± $30,767. Reimbursement of revision surgery cohort was $52,999 ± $27,658. The adjusted difference in average costs between the 2 groups is $4773 ± $1069 (P day and 90-day adjusted difference in cost of care when sustaining any of the major medical complications in primary surgery versus revision surgery was insignificant. Patients undergoing primary and revision corrective procedures for ASD have similar readmission rates, lengths of stays, and complication rates. Our data showed a higher cost of primary surgery compared with revision surgery, although costs of sustaining postoperative complications were similar. This finding supports the decision to perform revision procedures in patients with ASD when indicated because neither outcomes nor costs are a hindrance to correction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Impact of obesity on lumbar spinal surgery outcomes.

    Cao, Junming; Kong, Lingde; Meng, Fantao; Zhang, Yingze; Shen, Yong

    2016-06-01

    Controversy exists regarding the effect of obesity on surgical outcomes and complications following lumbar spinal surgery. A systematic electronic literature review of all relevant studies through to June 2015 was performed using the PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane library databases. Pooled risk ratios (RR) or standardised mean differences (SMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using random or fixed effects models. The Newcastle-Ottawa Scale was used to evaluate the methodological quality, and Stata 11.0 was used to analyse data (StataCorp, College Station, TX, USA). Significant differences between obese and non-obese patients were found for operation time (SMD, -0.273; 95%CI, -0.424 to -0.121), blood loss (SMD, -0.265; 95%CI, -0.424 to -0.107), surgical site infections (RR, 0.610; 95%CI, 0.446 to 0.834), and nerve injury (RR, 0.188; 95%CI, 0.042 to 0.841). Deep vein thrombosis, dural tear, revision surgery, and mortality were not significantly differences between the two groups (Pinfections and nerve injuries. However, the results of this meta-analysis should be interpreted with caution due to heterogeneity amongst the included studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Intravenous dex medetomidine or propofol adjuvant to spinal anesthesia in total knee replacement surgery

    AlOweidi, A.S.; Al-Mustafa, M.M.; Alghanem, S.M.; Qudaisat, Y.; Halaweh, S.A.; Massad, I.M.; Al Ajlouni, J.M; Mas'ad, D. F.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare effect of intravenous dex medetomidine with the intravenous propofol adjuvant to spinal intrathecal anesthesia on the duration of spinal anesthesia and hemodynamic parameters during total knee replacement surgery. Supplementation of spinal anesthesia with intravenous dexemedetomidine or propofol produces good sedation levels without significant clinical hemodynamic changes. Adding dex medetomidine produces significantly longer sensory and motor block than propofol . (authors).

  11. Gossypiboma complicated with paraspinal abscess and lumbar sinus: An uncommon complication of posterior lumbar spinal surgery

    Sahoo, Ranjan Kumar; Tripathy, Pradipta; Das, Pulin Bihari; Mohapatra, Debahuti

    2017-01-01

    A 42-year-old female presented with the complaint of purulent discharging sinus over posterior lumbar area following one month of lumbar spinal surgery for prolapsed intervertebral disc. Gossypiboma complicated with paraspinal abscess and sinus track formation over posterior lumbar area was diagnosed in magnetic resonance imaging which was confirmed in re- exploration of lumbar spinal operative site.

  12. Corticobulbar motor evoked potentials from tongue muscles used as a control in cervical spinal surgery

    Dong-Gun Kim

    Full Text Available Objective: Motor evoked potentials (MEPs changes might be caused to the non-surgically induced factors during cervical spinal surgery. Therefore, control MEPs recorded cranially to the exit of the C5 root are highly recommendable in cervical spinal surgery. We studied whether corticobulbar MEPs (C-MEPs from tongue muscle could be used as a control MEPs in cervical spinal surgery. Methods: Twenty-five consecutive cervical spinal surgeries were analyzed. Stimulation of motor area for tongue was done by subcutaneous electrodes placed at C3/C4 (10–20 EEG System, and recording was done from both sides of tongue. Results: C-MEPs were recorded successfully 24 out of the 25 (96% tested patients. Forty-six out of fifty MEPs (92% from tongue muscles were monitorable from the baseline. In two patients, we could obtain only unilateral C-MEPs. Mean MEPs latencies obtained from the left and right side of the tongue were 11.5 ± 1 ms and 11.5 ± 0.8 ms, respectively. Conclusions: Monitoring C-MEPs from tongue muscles might be useful control in cervical spinal surgery. They were easily elicited and relatively free from phenomenon of peripheral stimulation of the hypoglossal nerves. Significance: This is first study to identify the usefulness of C-MEPs as a control of cervical spinal surgery. Keywords: Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring, Motor-evoked potential, Corticospinal tract, Corticobulbar MEPs, Hypoglossal nerve

  13. Systemic and Topical Use of Tranexamic Acid in Spinal Surgery: A Systematic Review

    Winter, Sebastian F.; Santaguida, Carlo; Wong, Jean; Fehlings, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Combination of narrative and systematic literature reviews. Objectives Massive perioperative blood loss in complex spinal surgery often requires blood transfusions and can negatively affect patient outcome. Systemic use of the antifibrinolytic agent tranexamic acid (TXA) has become widely used in the management of surgical bleeding. We review the clinical evidence for the use of intravenous TXA as a hemostatic agent in spinal surgery and discuss the emerging role for its complementary use as a topical agent to reduce perioperative blood loss from the surgical site. Through a systematic review of published and ongoing investigations on topical TXA for spinal surgery, we wish to make spine practitioners aware of this option and to suggest opportunities for further investigation in the field. Methods A narrative review of systemic TXA in spinal surgery and topical TXA in surgery was conducted. Furthermore, a systematic search (using PRISMA guidelines) of PubMed (MEDLINE), EMBASE, and Cochrane CENTRAL databases as well as World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, ClinicalTrials.gov (National Institutes of Health), and International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial Number registries was conducted to identify both published literature and ongoing clinical trials on topical TXA in spinal surgery. Results Of 1,631 preliminary search results, 2 published studies were included in the systematic review. Out of 285 ongoing clinical trials matching the search criteria, a total of 4 relevant studies were included and reviewed. Conclusion Intravenous TXA is established as an efficacious hemostatic agent in spinal surgery. Use of topical TXA in surgery suggests similar hemostatic efficacy and potentially improved safety as compared with intravenous TXA. For spinal surgery, the literature on topical TXA is sparse but promising, warranting further clinical investigation and consideration as a clinical option in cases with

  14. Cervical spondylosis with spinal cord encroachment: should preventive surgery be recommended?

    Murphy Donald R

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been stated that individuals who have spondylotic encroachment on the cervical spinal cord without myelopathy are at increased risk of spinal cord injury if they experience minor trauma. Preventive decompression surgery has been recommended for these individuals. The purpose of this paper is to provide the non-surgical spine specialist with information upon which to base advice to patients. The evidence behind claims of increased risk is investigated as well as the evidence regarding the risk of decompression surgery. Methods A literature search was conducted on the risk of spinal cord injury in individuals with asymptomatic cord encroachment and the risk and benefit of preventive decompression surgery. Results Three studies on the risk of spinal cord injury in this population met the inclusion criteria. All reported increased risk. However, none were prospective cohort studies or case-control studies, so the designs did not allow firm conclusions to be drawn. A number of studies and reviews of the risks and benefits of decompression surgery in patients with cervical myelopathy were found, but no studies were found that addressed surgery in asymptomatic individuals thought to be at risk. The complications of decompression surgery range from transient hoarseness to spinal cord injury, with rates ranging from 0.3% to 60%. Conclusion There is insufficient evidence that individuals with spondylotic spinal cord encroachment are at increased risk of spinal cord injury from minor trauma. Prospective cohort or case-control studies are needed to assess this risk. There is no evidence that prophylactic decompression surgery is helpful in this patient population. Decompression surgery appears to be helpful in patients with cervical myelopathy, but the significant risks may outweigh the unknown benefit in asymptomatic individuals. Thus, broad recommendations for decompression surgery in suspected at-risk individuals cannot be made

  15. The evolution of spinal surgery in the west of Ireland, 2005-2013.

    O’Sullivan, M D

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the changes in both the short and long term, in the trends within the practice of spinal surgery in Galway University Hospitals (GUH) over a seven year period, January 2005 – January 2013. The absolute number of spinal surgery cases has increased from 147 in 2005, to 257 cases by 2013. Multiple level spine surgery accounts for 51% (131) of all cases by 2013, which is an increase from 31% (45) in 2005. On analysis of the trends within spinal surgery during the study period, a statistically significant (p<0.05) increase in all aspects of spinal surgery was noted, with the exception of surgeries for single level, lumbar and infection pathology respectively. The average waiting time for lumbar decompression and instrumentation climbed for an average of 1.3 months in 2008 to 12.1 months by 2012.The volume and complexity of spinal surgery has increased during the study period, in the West of Ireland.

  16. Complications related to the use of spinal cord stimulation for managing persistent postoperative neuropathic pain after lumbar spinal surgery.

    Shamji, Mohammed F; Westwick, Harrison J; Heary, Robert F

    2015-10-01

    OBJECT Structural spinal surgery yields improvement in pain and disability for selected patients with spinal stenosis, spondylolisthesis, or a herniated intervertebral disc. A significant fraction of patients exhibit persistent postoperative neuropathic pain (PPNP) despite technically appropriate intervention, and such patients can benefit from spinal cord stimulation (SCS) to alleviate suffering. The complication profile of this therapy has not been systematically assessed and, thus, was the goal of this review. METHODS A comprehensive literature search was performed to identify prospective cohorts of patients who had PPNP following structurally corrective lumbar spinal surgery and who underwent SCS device implantation. Data about study design, technique of SCS lead introduction, and complications encountered were collected and analyzed. Comparisons of complication incidence were performed between percutaneously and surgically implanted systems, with the level of significance set at 0.05. RESULTS Review of 11 studies involving 542 patients formed the basis of this work: 2 randomized controlled trials and 9 prospective cohorts. Percutaneous implants were used in 4 studies and surgical implants were used in 4 studies; in the remainder, the types were undefined. Lead migration occurred in 12% of cases, pain at the site of the implantable pulse generator occurred in 9% of cases, and wound-related complications occurred in 5% of cases; the latter 2 occurred more frequently among surgically implanted devices. CONCLUSIONS Spinal cord stimulation can provide for improved pain and suffering and for decreased narcotic medication use among patients with PPNP after lumbar spinal surgery. This study reviewed the prospective studies forming the evidence base for this therapy, to summarize the complications encountered and, thus, best inform patients and clinicians considering its use. There is a significant rate of minor complications, many of which require further surgical

  17. Subdural and Cerebellar Hematomas Which Developed after Spinal Surgery: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Ufuk Utku

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar hemorrhage following a spinal surgery is extremely rare; however, considering the localization, it can cause major clinical manifestations. While it is considered that these types of bleedings occur secondary to a venous infarct, the pathogenesis is still unclear. A 57-year-old male patient who underwent a laminectomy by exposing T12-L5 and had pedicle screws placed for ankylosing spondylitis developed a CSF leak due to a 2 mm dural tear. A hemorrhage with parallel streaks on the left cerebellar hemisphere was seen in CT scan, and a thin subdural hematoma at right frontotemporal region was seen on cranial MRI, performed after the patient developed intense headache, nausea, vomiting, and stiff neck in the early postoperative period. In this paper, a case of cerebellar and subdural hematomas following a spinal surgery is discussed with its clinical and radiologic findings.

  18. A break-even analysis of major ear surgery.

    Wasson, J D; Phillips, J S

    2015-10-01

    To determine variables which affect cost and profit for major ear surgery and perform a break-even analysis. Retrospective financial analysis. UK teaching hospital. Patients who underwent major ear surgery under general anaesthesia performed by the senior author in main theatre over a 2-year period between dates of 07 September 2010 and 07 September 2012. Income, cost and profit for each major ear patient spell. Variables that affect major ear surgery profitability. Seventy-six patients met inclusion criteria. Wide variation in earnings, with a median net loss of £-1345.50 was observed. Income was relatively uniform across all patient spells; however, theatre time of major ear surgery at a cost of £953.24 per hour varied between patients and was the main determinant of cost and profit for the patient spell. Bivariate linear regression of earnings on theatre time identified 94% of variation in earnings was due to variation in theatre time (r = -0.969; P break-even time for major ear surgery of 110.6 min. Theatre time was dependent on complexity of procedure and number of OPCS4 procedures performed, with a significant increase in theatre time when three or more procedures were performed during major ear surgery (P = 0.015). For major ear surgery to either break-even or return a profit, total theatre time should not exceed 110 min and 36 s. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Accuracy of navigated pedicle screw insertion by a junior spine surgeon without spinal surgery experience

    Yamazaki, Hironori; Kotani, Toshiaki; Motegi, Hiroyuki; Nemoto, Tetsuharu; Koshi, Takana; Nagahara, Ken; Minami, Syohei

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate pedicle screw placement accuracy during navigated surgery by a junior spine surgeon who had no spinal surgery experience. A junior spine surgeon with no spinal surgery experience implanted a total of 137 pedicle screws by using a navigation system. Postoperative computerized tomography was performed to evaluate screw placement, and the pedicle perforation rate was 2.2%. There were no neurologic or vascular complications related to the pedicle screws. The results demonstrated that pedicle screws can be placed safely and effectively by a junior spine surgeon who has no spinal surgery experience when instructed by a senior spine surgeon. The results of this study suggest that navigation can be used as a surgical training tool for junior spine surgeons. (author)

  20. Unilateral Approach for Bilateral Decompression of Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: A Minimal Invasive Surgery

    Usman, M.; Ali, M.; Khanzada, K.; Haq, N.U.; Aman, R.; Ali, M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess the feasibility and efficacy of a novel, minimally invasive spinal surgery technique for the correction of lumbar spinal stenosis involving unilateral approach for bilateral decompression. Study Design: Cross-sectional observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Neurosurgery Department of PGMI, Lady Reading Hospital, Peshawar, from January to December 2010. Methodology: A total of 60 patients with lumbar stenosis were randomly assigned to undergo either a conventional laminectomy (30 patients, Group A), or a unilateral approach (30 patients, Group B). Clinical outcomes was measured using the scale of Finneson and Cooper. All the data was collected by using a proforma and different parameters were assessed for a minimum follow-up period of three months. Data was analyzed by descriptive statistics using SPSS software version 17. Results: Adequate decompression was achieved in all patients. Compared with patients in the conventional laminectomy group, patients who received the novel procedure (unilateral approach) had a reduced mean duration of hospital stay, a faster recovery rate and majority of the patients (88.33%) had an excellent to fair operative result according to the Finneson and Cooper scale. Five major complications occurred in all patient groups, 2 patients had unintended dural rent and 2 wound dehiscence each and fifth patient had worsening of symptoms. There was no mortality in the series. Conclusion: The ultimate goal of the unilateral approach to treat lumbar spinal stenosis is to achieve adequate decompression of the neural elements. An additional benefit of a minimally invasive approach is adequate preservation of vertebral stability, as it requires only minimal muscle trauma, preservation of supraspinous/intraspinous ligament complex and spinous process, therefore, allows early mobilization. This also shortens the hospital stay, reduces postoperative back pain, and leads to satisfactory outcome. (author)

  1. Efficiency of spinal anesthesia versus general anesthesia for lumbar spinal surgery: a retrospective analysis of 544 patients

    Pierce JT

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available John T Pierce,1 Guy Kositratna,2 Mark A Attiah,1 Michael J Kallan,3 Rebecca Koenigsberg,1 Peter Syre,1 David Wyler,4 Paul J Marcotte,1 W Andrew Kofke,1,2 William C Welch1 1Department of Neurosurgery, 2Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, 3Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 4Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, Neurosurgery, Jefferson Hospital of Neuroscience, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia PA, USA Background: Previous studies have shown varying results in selected outcomes when directly comparing spinal anesthesia to general in lumbar surgery. Some studies have shown reduced surgical time, postoperative pain, time in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU, incidence of urinary retention, postoperative nausea, and more favorable cost-effectiveness with spinal anesthesia. Despite these results, the current literature has also shown contradictory results in between-group comparisons. Materials and methods: A retrospective analysis was performed by querying the electronic medical record database for surgeries performed by a single surgeon between 2007 and 2011 using procedural codes 63030 for diskectomy and 63047 for laminectomy: 544 lumbar laminectomy and diskectomy surgeries were identified, with 183 undergoing general anesthesia and 361 undergoing spinal anesthesia (SA. Linear and multivariate regression analyses were performed to identify differences in blood loss, operative time, time from entering the operating room (OR until incision, time from bandage placement to exiting the OR, total anesthesia time, PACU time, and total hospital stay. Secondary outcomes of interest included incidence of postoperative spinal hematoma and death, incidence of paraparesis, plegia, post-dural puncture headache, and paresthesia, among the SA patients. Results: SA was associated with significantly lower operative time, blood loss, total anesthesia time, time

  2. Comparison of the effects and complications of unilateral spinal anesthesia versus standard spinal anesthesia in lower-limb orthopedic surgery

    Seyyed Mostafa Moosavi Tekye

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A restricted sympathetic block during spinal anesthesia may minimize hemodynamic changes. This prospective randomized study compared unilateral and bilateral spinal anesthesia with respect to the intra- and postoperative advantages and complications of each technique. Material and methods: Spinal anesthesia was induced with 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine and a 25-G Quincke needle (Dr. J in two groups of patients with physical status ASA I-II who had been admitted for orthopedic surgeries. In group A, dural puncture was performed with the patient in a seated position using 2.5 cm3 of hyperbaric bupivacaine. Each patient was then placed in the supine position. In group B, dural puncture was performed with the patient in the lateral decubitus position with 1.5 cm3 of hyperbaric bupivacaine. The lower limb was the target limb. The speed of injection was 1 mL/30 s, and the duration of time spent in the lateral decubitus position was 20 min. Results: The demographic data were similar in both groups. The time to the onset of the sensory and motor block was significantly shorter in group A (p = 0.00. The duration of motor and sensory block was shorter in group B (p < 0.05. The success rate for unilateral spinal anesthesia in group B was 94.45%. In two patients, the spinal block spread to the non-dependent side. The incidence of complications (nausea, headache, and hypotension was lower in group B (p = 0.02. Conclusion: When unilateral spinal anesthesia was performed using a low-dose, low-volume and low-flow injection technique, it provides adequate sensory-motor block and helps to achieve stable hemodynamic parameters during orthopedic surgery on a lower limb. Patients were more satisfied with this technique as opposed to the conventional approach. Furthermore, this technique avoids unnecessary paralysis on the non-operated side.

  3. Intrinsic Vertebral Markers for Spinal Level Localization in Anterior Cervical Spine Surgery: A Preliminary Report.

    Jha, Deepak Kumar; Thakur, Anil; Jain, Mukul; Arya, Arvind; Tripathi, Chandrabhushan; Kumari, Rima; Kushwaha, Suman

    2016-12-01

    Prospective clinical study. To observe the usefulness of anterior cervical osteophytes as intrinsic markers for spinal level localization (SLL) during sub-axial cervical spinal surgery via the anterior approach. Various landmarks, such as the mandibular angle, hyoid bone, thyroid cartilage, first cricoid ring, and C6 carotid tubercle, are used for gross cervical SLL; however, none are used during cervical spinal surgery via the anterior approach. We present our preliminary assessment of SLL over anterior vertebral surfaces (i.e., intrinsic markers) in 48 consecutive cases of anterior cervical spinal surgeries for the disc-osteophyte complex (DOC) in degenerative diseases and granulation or tumor tissue associated with infectious or neoplastic diseases, respectively, at an ill-equipped center. This prospective study on patients undergoing anterior cervical surgery for various sub-axial cervical spinal pathologies aimed to evaluate the feasibility and accuracy of SLL via intraoperative palpation of disease-related morphological changes on anterior vertebral surfaces visible on preoperative midline sagittal T1/2-weighted magnetic resonance images. During a 3-year period, 48 patients (38 males,10 females; average age, 43.58 years) who underwent surgery via the anterior approach for various sub-axial cervical spinal pathologies, including degenerative disease (n= 42), tubercular infection (Pott's disease; n=3), traumatic prolapsed disc (n=2), and a metastatic lesion from thyroid carcinoma (n=1), comprised the study group. Intrinsic marker palpation yielded accurate SLL in 79% of patients (n=38). Among those with degenerative diseases (n=42), intrinsic marker palpation yielded accurate SLL in 76% of patients (n=32). Intrinsic marker palpation is an attractive potential adjunct for SLL during cervical spinal surgeries via the anterior approach in well-selected patients at ill-equipped centers (e.g., those found in developing countries). This technique may prove helpful

  4. Segmental thoracic spinal has advantages over general anesthesia for breast cancer surgery

    Elakany, Mohamed Hamdy; Abdelhamid, Sherif Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Background: Thoracic spinal anesthesia has been used for laparoscopic cholecystectomy and abdominal surgeries, but not in breast surgery. The present study compared this technique with general anesthesia in breast cancer surgeries. Materials and Methods: Forty patients were enrolled in this comparative study with inclusion criteria of ASA physical status I-III, primary breast cancer without known extension beyond the breast and axillary nodes, scheduled for unilateral mastectomy with axillary...

  5. Characteristics of patients who survived 2 years after surgery for spinal metastases : Can we avoid inappropriate patient selection?

    Verlaan, Jorrit Jan; Choi, David; Versteeg, Anne; Albert, Todd; Arts, Mark; Balabaud, Laurent; Bunger, Cody; Buchowski, Jacob Maciej; Chung, Chung Kee; Coppes, Maarten Hubert; Crockard, Hugh Alan; Depreitere, Bart; Fehlings, Michael George; Harrop, James; Kawahara, Norio; Kim, Eun Sang; Lee, Chong Suh; Leung, Yee; Liu, Zhongjun; Martin-Benlloch, Antonio; Massicotte, Eric Maurice; Mazel, Christian; Meyer, Bernhard; Peul, Wilco; Quraishi, Nasir A.; Tokuhashi, Yasuaki; Tomita, Katsuro; Ulbricht, Christian; Wang, Michael; Oner, F. Cumhur

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Survival after metastatic cancer has improved at the cost of increased presentation with metastatic spinal disease. For patients with pathologic spinal fractures and/or spinal cord compression, surgical intervention may relieve pain and improve quality of life. Surgery is generally

  6. Spinal Cord Subependymoma Surgery : A Multi-Institutional Experience.

    Yuh, Woon Tak; Chung, Chun Kee; Park, Sung-Hye; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Lee, Sun-Ho; Kim, Kyoung-Tae

    2018-03-01

    A spinal cord subependymoma is an uncommon, indolent, benign spinal cord tumor. It is radiologically similar to a spinal cord ependymoma, but surgical findings and outcomes differ. Gross total resection of the tumor is not always feasible. The present study was done to determine the clinical, radiological and pathological characteristics of spinal cord subependymomas. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of ten spinal cord subependymoma patients (M : F=4 : 6; median 38 years; range, 21-77) from four institutions. The most common symptoms were sensory changes and/or pain in eight patients, followed by motor weakness in six. The median duration of symptoms was 9.5 months. Preoperative radiological diagnosis was ependymoma in seven and astrocytoma in three. The tumors were located eccentrically in six and were not enhanced in six. Gross total resection of the tumor was achieved in five patients, whereas subtotal or partial resection was inevitable in the other five patients due to a poor dissection plane. Adjuvant radiotherapy was performed in two patients. Neurological deterioration occurred in two patients; transient weakness in one after subtotal resection and permanent weakness after gross total resection in the other. Recurrence or regrowth of the tumor was not observed during the median 31.5 months follow-up period (range, 8-89). Spinal cord subependymoma should be considered when the tumor is located eccentrically and is not dissected easily from the spinal cord. Considering the rather indolent nature of spinal cord subependymomas, subtotal removal without the risk of neurological deficit is another option.

  7. Plasma osmotic changes during major abdominal surgery.

    Malone, R A; McLeavey, C A; Arens, J F

    1977-12-01

    Fluid balance across the capillary membrane is maintained normally by a balance of hydrostatic and colloid osmotic pressures (COP). In 12 patients having major intra-abdominal procedures, the COP was followed during the operative and immediate postoperative periods. The patients' intraoperative fluid management consisted of replacing shed blood with blood and following Shires' concept of crystalloid replacement. Significant decreases in COP to approximately two thirds of the initial value occurred in patients having intra-abdominal procedures versus only a 10 percent decrease in those having peripheral procedures (greater than .001). As a result of this decrease in COP, the balance between hydrostatic and colloid osmotic pressures is lost and risk of pulmonary intersitial edema is increased.

  8. Segmental thoracic spinal has advantages over general anesthesia for breast cancer surgery.

    Elakany, Mohamed Hamdy; Abdelhamid, Sherif Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Thoracic spinal anesthesia has been used for laparoscopic cholecystectomy and abdominal surgeries, but not in breast surgery. The present study compared this technique with general anesthesia in breast cancer surgeries. Forty patients were enrolled in this comparative study with inclusion criteria of ASA physical status I-III, primary breast cancer without known extension beyond the breast and axillary nodes, scheduled for unilateral mastectomy with axillary dissection. They were randomly divided into two groups. The thoracic spinal group (S) (n = 20) underwent segmental thoracic spinal anesthesia with bupivacaine and fentanyl at T5-T6 interspace, while the other group (n = 20) underwent general anesthesia (G). Intraoperative hemodynamic parameters, intraoperative complications, postoperative discharge time from post-anesthesia care unit (PACU), postoperative pain and analgesic consumption, postoperative adverse effects, and patient satisfaction with the anesthetic techniques were recorded. Intraoperative hypertension (20%) was more frequent in group (G), while hypotension and bradycardia (15%) were more frequent in the segmental thoracic spinal (S) group. Postoperative nausea (30%) and vomiting (40%) during PACU stay were more frequent in the (G) group. Postoperative discharge time from PACU was shorter in the (S) group (124 ± 38 min) than in the (G) group (212 ± 46 min). The quality of postoperative analgesia and analgesic consumption was better in the (S) group. Patient satisfaction was similar in both groups. Segmental thoracic spinal anesthesia has some advantages when compared with general anesthesia and can be considered as a sole anesthetic in breast cancer surgery with axillary lymph node clearance.

  9. Safety of continuing aspirin therapy during spinal surgery: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Zhang, Chenggui; Wang, Guodong; Liu, Xiaoyang; Li, Yang; Sun, Jianmin

    2017-11-01

    Questions whether to continue or discontinue aspirin administration in the perioperative period of spinal surgery has not been systematically evaluated. The present systematic review is carried out to assess the impact of continuing aspirin administration on the bleeding and cardiovascular events in perispinal surgery period. Studies were retrieved through MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Springer Link Databases (search terms, aspirin, continue or discontinue, and spinal fusion), bibliographies of the articles retrieved, and the authors' reference files. We included studies that enrolled patients who underwent spinal surgery who were anticoagulated with aspirin alone and that reported bleeding or cardiovascular events as an outcome. Study quality was assessed using a validated form. 95% confidence interval (95% CI) was pooled to give summary estimates of bleeding and cardiovascular risk. We identified 4 studies assessing bleeding risk associated with aspirin continuation or cardiovascular risk with aspirin discontinuation during spinal surgery. The continuation of aspirin will not increase the risk of blood loss during the spinal surgery (95% CI, -111.72 to -0.59; P = .05). Also, there was no observed increase in the operative time (95% CI, -33.29 to -3.89; P = .01) and postoperative blood transfusion (95% CI, 0.00-0.27; P = .05). But as for the cardiovascular risk without aspirin continuation and mean hospital length of stay with aspirin continuation, we did not get enough samples to make an accurate decision about their relations with aspirin. Patients undergoing spinal surgery with continued aspirin administration do not have an increased risk for bleeding. In addition, there is no observed increase in the operation time and postoperative blood transfusion.

  10. Return to work after spinal stenosis surgery and the patient’s quality of life

    Aleksandra Truszczyńska; Kazimierz Rąpała; Olaf Truszczyński; Adam Tarnowski; Stanisław Łukawski

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The return to work of patients who undergo spinal surgery poses important medical and social challenge. Objectives: 1) To establish whether patients who undergo spinal stenosis surgery later return to work. 2) To establish the patient's attitude towards employment. 3) To assess the quality of life of the patients and its influence on their attitude to work. Materials and Methods: The study population consisted of 58 patients aged from 21 to 80 years (the mean age was 52.33±14.12...

  11. Does thromboprophylaxis prevent venous thromboembolism after major orthopedic surgery?

    Evrim Eylem Akpinar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Pulmonary embolism (PE is an important complication of major orthopedic surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE and factors influencing the development of VTE in patients undergoing major orthopedic surgery in a university hospital. METHODS: Patients who underwent major orthopedic surgery (hip arthroplasty, knee arthroplasty, or femur fracture repair between February of 2006 and June of 2012 were retrospectively included in the study. The incidences of PE and deep vein thrombosis (DVT were evaluated, as were the factors influencing their development, such as type of operation, age, and comorbidities. RESULTS: We reviewed the medical records of 1,306 patients. The proportions of knee arthroplasty, hip arthroplasty, and femur fracture repair were 63.4%, 29.9%, and 6.7%, respectively. The cumulative incidence of PE and DVT in patients undergoing major orthopedic surgery was 1.99% and 2.22%, respectively. Most of the patients presented with PE and DVT (61.5% and 72.4%, respectively within the first 72 h after surgery. Patients undergoing femur fracture repair, those aged ≥ 65 years, and bedridden patients were at a higher risk for developing VTE. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that VTE was a significant complication of major orthopedic surgery, despite the use of thromboprophylaxis. Clinicians should be aware of VTE, especially during the perioperative period and in bedridden, elderly patients (≥ 65 years of age.

  12. Clinical study on lorazepam for treating postoperative pain of wound after spinal meningioma surgery

    Yi-peng WANG

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To estimate the effect of lorazepam in relieving postoperative wound pain and anxiety after spinal meningioma surgery. Methods A total of 106 patients underwent spinal meningioma resection with endotracheal general anesthesia. They were randomly divided into lorazepam group (N = 53 and control group (N = 53. Patients in lorazepam group were given lorazepam 0.50 mg one night before surgery and 6 h after surgery, while control group were given compound vitamin B at the same time. Operation time, intraoperative bleeding and wound healing after surgery were recorded. McCormick grade and Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS were used to evaluate the spinal function and anxiety. At 48 h after surgery, Visual Analogue Scale (VAS was used to evaluate the degree of postoperative pain. Results All patients underwent tumor total resection, and spent the perioperative period safely. No complications such as infection happened. Neurological function were relieved to varying degrees and there was no worsening case. Compared with control group, SAS score in lorazepam group was significantly decreased at 48 h after surgery (P = 0.000. Compared with before surgery, SAS score in lorazepam group was significantly decreased at 48 h after surgery (P = 0.000. The VAS score at 48 h after surgery in lorazepam group was significantly lower than control group [(5.40 ± 1.24 score vs. (7.15 ± 1.12 score; t = 7.593, P = 0.000]. Conclusions Lorazepam as an antianxiety agent can effectively relieve postoperative pain after spinal meningioma resection. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2017.12.011

  13. Predictors of Health-Related Quality-of-Life After Complex Adult Spinal Deformity Surgery

    Carreon, Leah Y.; Glassman, Steven D.; Shaffrey, Christopher I.

    2017-01-01

    , treatment effectiveness is assessed by the extent to which the procedure improves a patient's health-related quality of life (HRQOL). This is especially true in patients with complex adult spinal deformity. Methods The data set from the Scoli-Risk-1 study was queried for patients with complete 2-year SF-36......Study Design Longitudinal cohort. Objectives To identify variables that predict 2-year Short Form-36 Physical Composite Summary Score (SF-36PCS) and the Scoliosis Research Society-22R (SRS22-R) Total score after surgery for complex adult spinal deformity. Summary of Background Data Increasingly...... = .049) and type of neurologic complication (p = .068). Factors predictive of 2-year SRS-22R Total scores were maximum preoperative Cobb angle (p = .001) and the number of serious adverse events (p = .071). Conclusions Factors predictive of lower 2-year HRQOLs after surgery for complex adult spinal...

  14. Taylor Approach of Spinal Anaesthesia in a case of Ankylosing Spondylitis for Hip Fracture Surgery

    Urmila Palaria

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS is a chronic inflammatory rheumatic disease primarily affecting the axial joints manifesting as stiffnesss of the spine. Patient with ankylosing spondylitis is a challenge to anaesthesiologists in terms of airway management and neuraxial blocks. Modified paramedian approach (Taylor approach of spinal anaesthesia can be used as an alternative to technically difficult cases in patients undergoing lower limb surgeries.

  15. The value of comparative research in major day surgery.

    Llop-Gironés, Alba; Vergara-Duarte, Montse; Sánchez, Josep Anton; Tarafa, Gemma; Benach, Joan

    2017-05-19

    To measure time trends in major day surgery rates according to hospital ownership and other hospital characteristics among the providers of the public healthcare network of Catalonia, Spain. Data from the Statistics of Health Establishments providing Inpatient Care. A generalized linear mixed model with Gaussian response and random intercept and random slopes. The greatest growth in the rate of major day surgery was observed among private for-profit hospitals: 42.9 (SD: 22.5) in 2009 versus 2.7 (SD: 6.7) in 1996. These hospitals exhibited a significant increase in major day surgery compared to public hospitals (coefficient 2; p-value <0.01) CONCLUSIONS: The comparative evaluation of hospital performance is a decisive tool to ensure that public resources are used as rationally and efficiently as possible. Copyright © 2017 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. [Current status of thoracoscopic surgery for thoracic and lumbar spine. Part 2: treatment of the thoracic disc hernia, spinal deformities, spinal tumors, infections and miscellaneous].

    Verdú-López, Francisco; Beisse, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    Thoracoscopic surgery or video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) of the thoracic and lumbar spine has evolved greatly since it appeared less than 20 years ago. It is currently used in a large number of processes and injuries. The aim of this article, in its two parts, is to review the current status of VATS of the thoracic and lumbar spine in its entire spectrum. After reviewing the current literature, we developed each of the large groups of indications where VATS takes place, one by one. This second part reviews and discusses the management, treatment and specific thoracoscopic technique in thoracic disc herniation, spinal deformities, tumour pathology, infections of the spine and other possible indications for VATS. Thoracoscopic surgery is in many cases an alternative to conventional open surgery. The transdiaphragmatic approach has made endoscopic treatment of many thoracolumbar junction processes possible, thus widening the spectrum of therapeutic indications. These include the treatment of spinal deformities, spinal tumours, infections and other pathological processes, as well as the reconstruction of injured spinal segments and decompression of the spinal canal if lesion placement is favourable to antero-lateral approach. Good clinical results of thoracoscopic surgery are supported by growing experience reflected in a large number of articles. The degree of complications in thoracoscopic surgery is comparable to open surgery, with benefits in regard to morbidity of the approach and subsequent patient recovery. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  17. The impact of sarcopenia on the results of lumbar spinal surgery

    Hiroyuki Inose

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: As the population ages, the number of lumbar spinal surgeries performed on sarcopenic patients will increase. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of sarcopenia and evaluated its impact on the results of lumbar spinal surgery. Methods: This study included 2 groups: One group consisted of patients who underwent whole-body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA scanning before the option of undergoing surgery for lumbar spinal disease (LSD group and a second group consisted of patients underwent DXA scanning for osteoporosis screening under hospital watch at the geriatric medicine department (control group. In order to evaluate the impact of sarcopenia on the clinical outcome of lumbar spinal surgery, the Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA score, the recovery rate based on the JOA score, and visual analogue scale (VAS scores for lower back pain, lower extremity pain, and lower extremity numbness were compared within the LSD group. Results: The prevalence of sarcopenia showed no statistical difference between groups (control group, 50.7%; LSD group, 46.5%. In the LSD group, while the changes in VAS scores showed no statistical difference between the nonsarcopenia subgroup and sarcopenia subgroup, the sarcopenia subgroup demonstrated inferior JOA scores and recovery rates at the final follow-up when compared with the nonsarcopenia subgroup (P < 0.05. Conclusions: This study demonstrated a high prevalence of sarcopenia among the elderly populations in Japan and a negative impact of sarcopenia on clinical outcomes after lumbar spinal surgery. Keywords: Lumbar canal stenosis, Sarcopenia

  18. Transversus Abdominis Plane Catheter Bolus Analgesia after Major Abdominal Surgery

    Nils Bjerregaard

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Transversus abdominis plane (TAP blocks have been shown to reduce pain and opioid requirements after abdominal surgery. The aim of the present case series was to demonstrate the use of TAP catheter injections of bupivacaine after major abdominal surgery. Methods. Fifteen patients scheduled for open colonic resection surgery were included. After induction of anesthesia, bilateral TAP catheters were placed, and all patients received a bolus dose of 20 mL bupivacaine 2.5 mg/mL with epinephrine 5 μg/mL through each catheter. Additional bolus doses were injected bilaterally 12, 24, and 36 hrs after the first injections. Supplemental pain treatment consisted of paracetamol, ibuprofen, and gabapentin. Intravenous morphine was used as rescue analgesic. Postoperative pain was rated on a numeric rating scale (NRS, 0–10 at regular predefined intervals after surgery, and consumption of intravenous morphine was recorded. Results. The TAP catheters were placed without any technical difficulties. NRS scores were ≤3 at rest and ≤5 during cough at 4, 8, 12, 18, 24, and 36 hrs after surgery. Cumulative consumption of intravenous morphine was 28 (23–48 mg (median, IQR within the first 48 postoperative hours. Conclusion. TAP catheter bolus injections can be used to prolong analgesia after major abdominal surgery.

  19. Association of decision-making in spinal surgery with specialty and emotional involvement-the Indications in Spinal Surgery (INDIANA) survey.

    Sollmann, Nico; Morandell, Carmen; Albers, Lucia; Behr, Michael; Preuss, Alexander; Dinkel, Andreas; Meyer, Bernhard; Krieg, Sandro M

    2018-03-01

    Although recent trials provided level I evidence for the most common degenerative lumbar spinal disorders, treatment still varies widely. Thus, the Indications in Spinal Surgery (INDIANA) survey explores whether decision-making is influenced by specialty or personal emotional involvement of the treating specialist. Nationwide, neurosurgeons and orthopedic surgeons specialized in spine surgery were asked to answer an Internet-based questionnaire with typical clinical patient cases of lumbar disc herniation (DH), lumbar spinal stenosis (SS), and lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis (SL). The surgeons were assigned to counsel a patient or a close relative, thus creating emotional involvement. This was achieved by randomly allocating the surgeons to a patient group (PG) and relative group (RG). We then compared neurosurgeons to orthopedic surgeons and the PG to the RG regarding treatment decision-making. One hundred twenty-two spine surgeons completed the questionnaire (response rate 78.7%). Regarding DH and SS, more conservative treatment among orthopedic surgeons was shown (DH: odds ratio [OR] 4.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.7-9.7, p = 0.001; SS: OR 3.9, CI 1.8-8.2, p emotional involvement (PG vs. RG) did not affect these results for any of the three cases (DH: p = 0.213; SS: p = 0.097; SL: p = 0.924). The high response rate indicates how important the issues raised by this study actually are for dedicated spine surgeons. Moreover, there are considerable variations in decision-making for the most common degenerative lumbar spinal disorders, although there is high-quality data from large multicenter trials available. Emotional involvement, though, did not influence treatment recommendations.

  20. Transforaminal Percutaneous Endoscopic Discectomy and Foraminoplasty after Lumbar Spinal Fusion Surgery.

    Wu, Jian-Jun; Chen, Hui-Zhen; Zheng, Changkun

    2017-07-01

    The most common causes of pain following lumbar spinal fusions are residual herniation, or foraminal fibrosis and foraminal stenosis that is ignored, untreated, or undertreated. The original surgeon may advise his patient that nothing more can be done in his opinion that the nerve was visually decompressed by the original surgery. Post-operative imaging or electrophysiological assessment may be inadequate to explain all the reasons for residual or recurrent symptoms. Treatment of failed lumbar spinal fusions by repeat traditional open revision surgery usually incorporates more extensive decompression causing increased instability and back pain. The authors, having limited their practice to endoscopic surgery over the last 10 years, report on their experience gained during that period to relieve pain by transforaminal percutaneous endoscopic revision of lumbar spinal fusions. To assess the effectiveness of transforaminal percutaneous endoscopic discectomy and foraminoplasty in patients with pain after lumbar spinal fusion. Retrospective study. Inpatient surgery center. Sixteen consecutive patients with pain after lumbar spinal fusions presenting with back and leg pain that had supporting imaging diagnosis of foraminal stenosis and/or residual/recurrent disc herniation, or whose pain complaint was supported by relief from diagnostic and therapeutic injections, were offered percutaneous transforaminal endoscopic discectomy and foraminoplasty over a repeat open procedure. Each patient sought consultation following a transient successful, partially successful or unsuccessful open lumbar spinal fusions treatment for disc herniation or spinal stenosis. Endoscopic foraminoplasty was also performed to either decompress the bony foramen in the case of foraminal stenosis, or to allow for endoscopic visual examination of the affected traversing and exiting nerve roots in the axilla. The average follow-up time was 30.3 months, minimum 12 months. Outcome data at each visit

  1. Patient-perceived surgical indication influences patient expectations of surgery for degenerative spinal disease.

    Wilson, Thomas J; Franz, Eric; Vollmer, Carolyn F; Chang, Kate W-C; Upadhyaya, Cheerag; Park, Paul; Yang, Lynda J-S

    2017-06-01

    Patients frequently have misconceptions regarding diagnosis, surgical indication, and expected outcome following spinal surgery for degenerative spinal disease. In this study, we sought to understand the relationship between patient-perceived surgical indications and patient expectations. We hypothesized that patients reporting appendicular symptoms as a primary surgical indication would report a higher rate of having expectations met by surgery compared to those patients reporting axial symptoms as a primary indication. Questionnaires were administered to patients who had undergone surgery for degenerative spinal disease at 2 tertiary care institutions. Questions assessed perception of the primary indication for undergoing surgery (radicular versus axial), whether the primary symptom improved after surgery, and whether patient expectations were met with surgery. Outcomes of interest included patient-reported symptomatic improvement following surgery and expectations met by surgery. Various factors were assessed for their relationship to these outcomes of interest. There were 151 unique survey respondents. Respondents were nearly split between having a patient-perceived indication for surgery as appendicular symptoms (55.6%) and axial symptoms (44.4%). Patient-perceived surgical indication being appendicular symptoms was the only factor predictive of patient-reported symptomatic improvement in our logistic regression model (OR 2.614; 95% CI 1.218-5.611). Patient-perceived surgical indication being appendicular symptoms (OR 3.300; 95% CI 1.575-6.944) and patient-reported symptomatic improvement (OR 33.297; 95% CI 12.186-90.979) were predictive of patients reporting their expectations met with surgery in both univariate and multivariate logistic regression modeling. We found that patient-reported appendicular symptoms as the primary indication for surgery were associated with a higher rate of both subjective improvement following surgery and having expectations met

  2. New Insight in Loss of Gut Barrier during Major Non-Abdominal Surgery.

    Joep P M Derikx

    Full Text Available Gut barrier loss has been implicated as a critical event in the occurrence of postoperative complications. We aimed to study the development of gut barrier loss in patients undergoing major non-abdominal surgery.Twenty consecutive children undergoing spinal fusion surgery were included. This kind of surgery is characterized by long operation time, significant blood loss, prolonged systemic hypotension, without directly leading to compromise of the intestines by intestinal manipulation or use of extracorporeal circulation. Blood was collected preoperatively, every two hours during surgery and 2, 4, 15 and 24 hours postoperatively. Gut mucosal barrier was assessed by plasma markers for enterocyte damage (I-FABP, I-BABP and urinary presence of tight junction protein claudin-3. Intestinal mucosal perfusion was measured by gastric tonometry (P(rCO2, P(r-aCO2-gap. Plasma concentration of I-FABP, I-BABP and urinary expression of claudin-3 increased rapidly and significantly after the onset of surgery in most children. Postoperatively, all markers decreased promptly towards baseline values together with normalisation of MAP. Plasma levels of I-FABP, I-BABP were significantly negatively correlated with MAP at (1/2 hour before blood sampling (-0.726 (p<0.001, -0.483 (P<0.001, respectively. Furthermore, circulating I-FABP correlated with gastric mucosal P(rCO2, P(r-aCO2-gap measured at the same time points (0.553 (p = 0.040, 0.585 (p = 0.028, respectively.This study shows the development of gut barrier loss in children undergoing major non-abdominal surgery, which is related to preceding hypotension and mesenterial hypoperfusion. These data shed new light on the potential role of peroperative circulatory perturbation and intestinal barrier loss.

  3. New Insight in Loss of Gut Barrier during Major Non-Abdominal Surgery

    Derikx, Joep P. M.; van Waardenburg, Dick A.; Thuijls, Geertje; Willigers, Henriëtte M.; Koenraads, Marianne; van Bijnen, Annemarie A.; Heineman, Erik; Poeze, Martijn; Ambergen, Ton; van Ooij, André; van Rhijn, Lodewijk W.; Buurman, Wim A.

    2008-01-01

    Background Gut barrier loss has been implicated as a critical event in the occurrence of postoperative complications. We aimed to study the development of gut barrier loss in patients undergoing major non-abdominal surgery. Methodology/Principal Findings Twenty consecutive children undergoing spinal fusion surgery were included. This kind of surgery is characterized by long operation time, significant blood loss, prolonged systemic hypotension, without directly leading to compromise of the intestines by intestinal manipulation or use of extracorporeal circulation. Blood was collected preoperatively, every two hours during surgery and 2, 4, 15 and 24 hours postoperatively. Gut mucosal barrier was assessed by plasma markers for enterocyte damage (I-FABP, I-BABP) and urinary presence of tight junction protein claudin-3. Intestinal mucosal perfusion was measured by gastric tonometry (PrCO2, Pr-aCO2-gap). Plasma concentration of I-FABP, I-BABP and urinary expression of claudin-3 increased rapidly and significantly after the onset of surgery in most children. Postoperatively, all markers decreased promptly towards baseline values together with normalisation of MAP. Plasma levels of I-FABP, I-BABP were significantly negatively correlated with MAP at ½ hour before blood sampling (−0.726 (p<0.001), −0.483 (P<0.001), respectively). Furthermore, circulating I-FABP correlated with gastric mucosal PrCO2, Pr-aCO2-gap measured at the same time points (0.553 (p = 0.040), 0.585 (p = 0.028), respectively). Conclusions/Significance This study shows the development of gut barrier loss in children undergoing major non-abdominal surgery, which is related to preceding hypotension and mesenterial hypoperfusion. These data shed new light on the potential role of peroperative circulatory perturbation and intestinal barrier loss. PMID:19088854

  4. Morbidity associated with heparin therapy in spinal surgery patients with cardiovascular diseases

    Sawakami, Kimihiko; Ishikawa, Seiichi; Ito, Takui

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate morbidity associated with heparin therapy in spinal surgery patients. The management of patients on anticoagulant therapy who undergo spinal surgery is becoming a common clinical problem. Although guidelines for the management of gastrointestinal endoscopy patients on heparin therapy have been published, spinal surgery may lead to specific complications, especially because of heparin therapy. However, only few studies have examined the clinical significance of heparin therapy in spinal surgery patients. The subjects of this study were 116 consecutive patients who were on anticoagulant or antiplatelet therapy. This says that all of the patients were receiving heparin or another anticoagunt. The patients were divided into 2 groups: a group that received heparin therapy before and after surgery (H group, n=25) and a group that did not receive heparin therapy (NH group, n=91). The results of clinical examinations and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the 2 groups were compared. There were no significant differences between the 2 groups in baseline data. Comorbidities in both groups included valvular heart disease, atrial fibrillation, angina pectoris/myocardial infarction, and cerebral infarction. Mean intraoperative and postoperative blood loss in the H group were 324 ml and 536 ml, respectively, and the corresponding values in the NH group were 431 ml and 449 ml, respectively. MRI of all patients was performed within 10 days after surgery and T2-weighted images in the axial plane were examined for evidence of an epidural hematoma. Although the proportion of patients with an epidural hematoma, detected by MRI was higher in the H group than in the NH group (71% vs. 64%), none of the patients in either group required revision surgery because of intolerable pain or muscle weakness. Thrombocytopenia and skin necrosis were observed as complications of the heparin therapy in 1 patient in the H group (4%). The rate of

  5. Intraoperative Death During Cervical Spinal Surgery: A Retrospective Multicenter Study.

    Wang, Jeffrey C; Buser, Zorica; Fish, David E; Lord, Elizabeth L; Roe, Allison K; Chatterjee, Dhananjay; Gee, Erica L; Mayer, Erik N; Yanez, Marisa Y; McBride, Owen J; Cha, Peter I; Arnold, Paul M; Fehlings, Michael G; Mroz, Thomas E; Riew, K Daniel

    2017-04-01

    A retrospective multicenter study. Routine cervical spine surgeries are typically associated with low complication rates, but serious complications can occur. Intraoperative death is a very rare complication and there is no literature on its incidence. The purpose of this study was to determine the intraoperative mortality rates and associated risk factors in patients undergoing cervical spine surgery. Twenty-one surgical centers from the AOSpine North America Clinical Research Network participated in the study. Medical records of patients who received cervical spine surgery from January 1, 2005, to December 31, 2011, were reviewed to identify occurrence of intraoperative death. A total of 258 patients across 21 centers met the inclusion criteria. Most of the surgeries were done using the anterior approach (53.9%), followed by posterior (39.1%) and circumferential (7%). Average patient age was 57.1 ± 13.2 years, and there were more male patients (54.7% male and 45.3% female). There was no case of intraoperative death. Death during cervical spine surgery is a very rare complication. In our multicenter study, there was a 0% mortality rate. Using an adequate surgical approach for patient diagnosis and comorbidities may be the reason how the occurrence of this catastrophic adverse event was prevented in our patient population.

  6. The correlation between evoked spinal cord potentials and magnetic resonance imaging before Surgery in cervical spondylotic myelopathy

    Akashi, Kosuke; Kanchiku, Tsukasa; Taguchi, Toshihiko; Kato, Yoshihiko; Imajo, Yasuaki; Suzuki, Hidenori

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to clarify the correlation between electrophysiological examination and MRI diagnosis. Twenty-four patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy were examined with magnetic resonance imaging and evoked spinal cord potentials (ESCPs) before surgery. In all the patients, only the intervertebral level was symptomatic, as shown by ESCPs. ESCPs following median nerve stimulation (MN-ESCPs), transcranial electric stimulation (TCE-ESCPs), and spinal cord stimulation (Spinal-ECSPs) were recorded. The patients were grouped into two groups as follows: group A, all ESCPs were abnormal; group B, normal spinal cord stimulation. Spinal cord transverse area and compression ratio (central and 1/4-lateral anteroposterior diameter divided by transverse diameter) were measured on T1-weighted axial imaging, with abnormal ESCPs as indicators of spinal cord morphology. Central and 1/4-lateral compression ratio was significantly lower in group A. Spinal cord morphology of magnetic resonance imaging is useful for functional diagnosis. (author)

  7. Circadian distribution of sleep phases after major abdominal surgery

    Gogenur, I.; Wildschiotz, G.; Rosenberg, J.

    2008-01-01

    Background. It is believed that the severely disturbed night-time sleep architecture after surgery is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity with rebound of rapid eye movement (REM). The daytime sleep pattern of patients after major general surgery has not been investigated before. We...... nights after operation. Sleep was scored independently by two blinded observers and the recordings were reported as awake, light sleep (LS, stages I and II), slow wave sleep (SWS, stages III and IV), and REM sleep. Results. There was significantly increased REM sleep (P=0.046), LS (P=0.020), and reduced...... time awake (P=0.016) in the postoperative daytime period compared with the preoperative daytime period. Five patients had REM sleep during the daytime after surgery. Three of these patients did not have REM sleep during the preceding postoperative night. There was significantly reduced night-time REM...

  8. Can povidone-iodine solution be used safely in a spinal surgery?

    Chang, Fang-Yeng; Chang, Ming-Chau; Wang, Shih-Tien; Yu, Wing-Kwang; Liu, Chien-Lin; Chen, Tain-Hsiung

    2006-06-01

    Intra-operative incidental contamination of surgical wounds is not rare. Povidone-iodine solution can be used to disinfect surgical wounds. Although povidone-iodine is a good broad-spectrum disinfecting agent, it has occasionally been reported to have a negative effect on wound healing and bone union. Therefore, its safety in a spinal surgery is unclear. A prospective, single-blinded, randomized study was accordingly conducted to evaluate the safety of povidone-iodine solution in spinal surgeries. Ascertained herein was the effect of wound irrigation with diluted povidone-iodine solution on wound healing, infection rate, fusion status and clinical outcome of spinal surgeries. From January 2002 to August 2003, 244 consecutive cases undergoing primary instrumented lumbosacral posterolateral fusion due to degenerative spinal disorder with segmental instability had been collected and randomly divided into two groups: the study group (120 cases, 212 fusion levels) and the control group (124 cases, 223 fusion levels). Excluded were those patients with a prior spinal surgery, spinal trauma, malignant tumor, infectious spondylitis, rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, metabolic bone disease, skeletal immaturity or with an immunosuppressive treatment. In the former group, wounds were irrigated with 0.35% povidone-iodine solution followed by normal saline solution just before the bone-grafting and instrumentation procedure. However, only with normal saline solution in the latter. All the operations were done by the same surgeon with a standard technique. All the patients were treated in the same postoperative fashion as well. Later on, wound healing, infection rate, spinal bone fusion and clinical outcome were evaluated in both groups. A significant improvement of back and leg pain scores, modified Japanese Orthopedic Association function scores (JOA) and ambulatory capacity have been observed in both groups. One hundred and seven patients in the study group and one

  9. Poetry and narrative therapy for anxiety about spinal surgery | Naidu ...

    This case study presents the use of poetry in psychotherapy with an adolescent girl, Buhle (a pseudonym), who needed surgery to correct a curvature of her spine due to adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. She experienced anxiety which prevented surgeons from doing the procedure. Psychotherapists used narrative therapy to ...

  10. Routine surgery in addition to chemotherapy for treating spinal tuberculosis

    Jutte, PC; Van Loenhout-Rooyackers, JH; Loenhout-Rooyackers, J.H.

    2006-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis is generally curable with chemotherapy, but there is controversy in the literature about the need for surgical intervention in the one to two per cent of people with tuberculosis of the spine. Objectives To compare chemotherapy plus surgery with chemotherapy alone for

  11. Prevalence of Internet use amongst an elective spinal surgery outpatient population.

    Baker, Joseph F; Devitt, Brian M; Kiely, Paul D; Green, James; Mulhall, Kevin J; Synnott, Keith A; Poynton, Ashley R

    2010-10-01

    Nationally 62% of individuals in Ireland have internet access. Previous published work has suggested that internet use is higher among those with low back pain. We aimed to determine the levels of internet access and use amongst an elective spinal outpatient population and determine what characteristics influence these. We distributed a self-designed questionnaire to patients attending elective spinal outpatient clinics. Data including demographics, history of surgery, number of visits, level of satisfaction with previous consultations, access to the internet, possession of health insurance, and details regarding use of the internet to research one's spinal complaint were collected. 213 patients completed the questionnaire. 159 (75%) had access to the internet. Of this group 48 (23%) used the internet to research their spinal condition. Increasing age, higher education level, and possession of health insurance were all significantly associated with access to the internet (p internet use while possession of insurance weakly predicted non-use (p internet access is consistent with national statistics and use is comparable to previous reports. Approximately, one quarter of outpatients will use the internet to research their spinal condition. Should we use this medium to disseminate information we need to be aware some groups may not have access.

  12. Prevalence of Internet use amongst an elective spinal surgery outpatient population.

    Baker, Joseph F

    2010-10-01

    Nationally 62% of individuals in Ireland have internet access. Previous published work has suggested that internet use is higher among those with low back pain. We aimed to determine the levels of internet access and use amongst an elective spinal outpatient population and determine what characteristics influence these. We distributed a self-designed questionnaire to patients attending elective spinal outpatient clinics. Data including demographics, history of surgery, number of visits, level of satisfaction with previous consultations, access to the internet, possession of health insurance, and details regarding use of the internet to research one\\'s spinal complaint were collected. 213 patients completed the questionnaire. 159 (75%) had access to the internet. Of this group 48 (23%) used the internet to research their spinal condition. Increasing age, higher education level, and possession of health insurance were all significantly associated with access to the internet (p < 0.05). A higher education level predicted greater internet use while possession of insurance weakly predicted non-use (p < 0.05). In our practice, internet access is consistent with national statistics and use is comparable to previous reports. Approximately, one quarter of outpatients will use the internet to research their spinal condition. Should we use this medium to disseminate information we need to be aware some groups may not have access.

  13. Pleural Effusion in Spinal Deformity Correction Surgery- A Report of 28 Cases in a Single Center.

    Weiqiang Liang

    Full Text Available To analyze the occurrence, risk factors, treatment and prognosis of postoperative pleural effusion after spinal deformity correction surgery.The clinical and imaging data of 3325 patients undergoing spinal deformity correction were collected from the database of our hospital. We analyzed the therapeutic process of the 28 patients who had postoperative pleural effusion, and we identified the potential risk factors using logistic regression.Among the 28 patients with postoperative pleural effusion, 24 (85.7% suffered from hemothorax, 2 (7.1% from chylothorax, and 2 (7.1% from subarachnoid-pleural fistula. The pleural effusion occurred on the convex side in 19 patients (67.9%, on the concave side in 4 patients (14.3%, and on both sides in 4 patients (14.3%. One patient with left hemothorax was diagnosed with kyphosis. The treatment included conservative clinical observation for 5 patients and chest tube drainage for 23 patients. One patient also underwent thoracic duct ligation and pleurodesis. All of these treatments were successful. Logistic regression analysis showed that adult patients(≥18 years old, congenital scoliosis, osteotomy and thoracoplasty were risk factors for postoperative pleural effusion in spinal deformity correction surgery.The incidence of postoperative pleural effusion in spinal deformity correction surgery was approximately 0.84% (28/3325, and hemothorax was the most common type. Chest tube drainage treatment was usually successful, and the prognosis was good. Adult patients(≥18 years old, congenital scoliosis, and had undergone osteotomy or surgery with thoracoplasty were more likely to suffer from postoperative pleural effusion.

  14. Clinical Evidence for Spinal Cord Stimulation for Failed Back Surgery Syndrome (FBSS): Systematic Review.

    Kapural, Leonardo; Peterson, Erika; Provenzano, David A; Staats, Peter

    2017-07-15

    A systematic review. A systematic literature review of the clinical data from prospective studies was undertaken to assess the efficacy of spinal cord stimulation (SCS) in the treatment of failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS) in adults. For patients with unrelenting back pain due to mechanical instability of the spine, degenerative disc disease, spinal injury, or deformity, spinal surgery is a well-accepted treatment option; however, even after surgical intervention, many patients continue to experience chronic back pain that can be notoriously difficult to treat. Clinical evidence suggests that for patients with FBSS, repeated surgery will not likely offer relief. Additionally, evidence suggests long-term use of opioid pain medications is not effective in this population, likely presents additional complications, and requires strict management. A systematic literature review was performed using several bibliographic databases, prospective studies in adults using SCS for FBSS were included. SCS has been shown to be a safe and efficacious treatment for this patient population. Recent technological developments in SCS offer even greater pain relief to patients' refractory to other treatment options, allowing patients to regain functionality and improve their quality of life with significant reductions in pain. N/A.

  15. Osteoconductive hydroxyapatite coated PEEK for spinal fusion surgery

    Hahn, Byung-Dong, E-mail: cera72@kims.re.kr [Functional Ceramics Group, Korea Institute of Materials Science, 797 Changwon-daero, Seongsan-gu, Changwon, Gyeong-Nam, 641-010 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Dong-Soo; Choi, Jong-Jin; Ryu, Jungho; Yoon, Woon-Ha; Choi, Joon-Hwan; Kim, Jong-Woo; Ahn, Cheol-Woo [Functional Ceramics Group, Korea Institute of Materials Science, 797 Changwon-daero, Seongsan-gu, Changwon, Gyeong-Nam, 641-010 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyoun-Ee [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, San 56-1 Sillim-Dong, Gwanak-gu, Seoul, 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Byung-Ho; Jung, In-Kwon [GENOSS, Gyeonggi R and DB Center, Iui-dong, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do, 443-270 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) has attracted much interest as biomaterial for interbody fusion cages due to its similar stiffness to bone and good radio-transparency for post-op visualization. Hydroxyapatite (HA) coating stimulates bone growth to the medical implant. The objective of this work is to make an implant consisting of biocompatible PEEK with an osteoconductive HA surface for spinal or orthopedic applications. Highly dense and well-adhered HA coating was developed on medical-grade PEEK using aerosol deposition (AD) without thermal degradation of the PEEK. The HA coating had a dense microstructure with no cracks or pores, and showed good adhesion to PEEK at adhesion strengths above 14.3 MPa. The crystallinity of the HA coating was remarkably enhanced by hydrothermal annealing as post-deposition heat-treatment. In addition, in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility of PEEK, in terms of cell adhesion morphology, cell proliferation, differentiation, and bone-to-implant contact ratio, were remarkably enhanced by the HA coating through AD.

  16. Osteoconductive hydroxyapatite coated PEEK for spinal fusion surgery

    Hahn, Byung-Dong; Park, Dong-Soo; Choi, Jong-Jin; Ryu, Jungho; Yoon, Woon-Ha; Choi, Joon-Hwan; Kim, Jong-Woo; Ahn, Cheol-Woo; Kim, Hyoun-Ee; Yoon, Byung-Ho; Jung, In-Kwon

    2013-01-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) has attracted much interest as biomaterial for interbody fusion cages due to its similar stiffness to bone and good radio-transparency for post-op visualization. Hydroxyapatite (HA) coating stimulates bone growth to the medical implant. The objective of this work is to make an implant consisting of biocompatible PEEK with an osteoconductive HA surface for spinal or orthopedic applications. Highly dense and well-adhered HA coating was developed on medical-grade PEEK using aerosol deposition (AD) without thermal degradation of the PEEK. The HA coating had a dense microstructure with no cracks or pores, and showed good adhesion to PEEK at adhesion strengths above 14.3 MPa. The crystallinity of the HA coating was remarkably enhanced by hydrothermal annealing as post-deposition heat-treatment. In addition, in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility of PEEK, in terms of cell adhesion morphology, cell proliferation, differentiation, and bone-to-implant contact ratio, were remarkably enhanced by the HA coating through AD.

  17. Osteoconductive hydroxyapatite coated PEEK for spinal fusion surgery

    Hahn, Byung-Dong; Park, Dong-Soo; Choi, Jong-Jin; Ryu, Jungho; Yoon, Woon-Ha; Choi, Joon-Hwan; Kim, Jong-Woo; Ahn, Cheol-Woo; Kim, Hyoun-Ee; Yoon, Byung-Ho; Jung, In-Kwon

    2013-10-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) has attracted much interest as biomaterial for interbody fusion cages due to its similar stiffness to bone and good radio-transparency for post-op visualization. Hydroxyapatite (HA) coating stimulates bone growth to the medical implant. The objective of this work is to make an implant consisting of biocompatible PEEK with an osteoconductive HA surface for spinal or orthopedic applications. Highly dense and well-adhered HA coating was developed on medical-grade PEEK using aerosol deposition (AD) without thermal degradation of the PEEK. The HA coating had a dense microstructure with no cracks or pores, and showed good adhesion to PEEK at adhesion strengths above 14.3 MPa. The crystallinity of the HA coating was remarkably enhanced by hydrothermal annealing as post-deposition heat-treatment. In addition, in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility of PEEK, in terms of cell adhesion morphology, cell proliferation, differentiation, and bone-to-implant contact ratio, were remarkably enhanced by the HA coating through AD.

  18. Antimicrobial prophylaxis related to otorhinolaryngology elective major surgery

    Perez Lopez, Gladys; Morejon Garcia, Moises; Alvarez Cespedes, Belkis

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION. Antimicrobial prophylaxis decreases the surgical infections, but its indiscriminate use to favors the increment of infection rates and the bacterial resistance is much more probable in presence of antibiotics. The aim of present research was to evaluate the results of antibiotic prophylaxis in the otorhinolaryngology elective major surgery. METHODS. A retrospective-descriptive research was made on the prophylactic use of antibiotics in this type of surgery in the Otorhinolaryngology Service of the ''Comandant Manuel Fajardo'' during 6 years (2001-2006). Sample included 661 patients and the following variables were studied: sex, age and therapeutic response criteria (satisfactory and non-satisfactory). According to the intervention complexity oral antibiotic or parenteral prophylaxis was administered carrying out a surgical hound site culture. RESULTS. There was a predominance of male sex (54,1%) and the 31 and 62 age group. The 41,90% of patients operated on required antibiotic prophylaxis. The was a 7,9% of surgical wound infections. The more frequent microorganisms were Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterobacter and Escherichia. In head and neck oncology surgeries infection average was high (42,3%). Torpid course was due to concurrence of infection risk factors. There were neither adverse events nor severe complications. CONCLUSIONS. In Otorhinolaryngology, antimicrobial prophylaxis works against a wide variety of microorganisms but not in the Oncology surgeries. (author)

  19. Dehydration and fluid volume kinetics before major open abdominal surgery.

    Hahn, R G; Bahlmann, H; Nilsson, L

    2014-11-01

    Assessment of dehydration in the preoperative setting is of potential clinical value. The present study uses urine analysis and plasma volume kinetics, which have both been validated against induced changes in body water in volunteers, to study the incidence and severity of dehydration before open abdominal surgery begins. Thirty patients (mean age 64 years) had their urine analysed before major elective open abdominal surgery for colour, specific weight, osmolality and creatinine. The results were scored and the mean taken to represent a 'dehydration index'. Thereafter, the patients received an infusion of 5 ml/kg of Ringer's acetate intravenously for over 15 min. Blood was sampled for 70 min and the blood haemoglobin concentration used to estimate the plasma volume kinetics. Distribution of fluid occurred more slowly (P dehydrated as compared with euhydrated patients. The dehydration index indicated that the fluid deficit in these patients corresponded to 2.5% of the body weight, whereas the deficit in the others was 1%. In contrast, the 11 patients who later developed postoperative nausea and vomiting had a very short elimination half-life, only 9 min (median, P dehydration before major surgery was modest as evidenced both by urine sampling and volume kinetic analysis. © 2014 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Return to sports after surgery to correct adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: a survey of the Spinal Deformity Study Group.

    Lehman, Ronald A; Kang, Daniel G; Lenke, Lawrence G; Sucato, Daniel J; Bevevino, Adam J

    2015-05-01

    There are no guidelines for when surgeons should allow patients to return to sports and athletic activities after spinal fusion for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). Current recommendations are based on anecdotal reports and a survey performed more than a decade ago in the era of first/second-generation posterior implants. To identify current recommendations for return to sports and athletic activities after surgery for AIS. Questionnaire-based survey. Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis after corrective surgery. Type and time to return to sports. A survey was administered to members of the Spinal Deformity Study Group. The survey consisted of surgeon demographic information, six clinical case scenarios, three different construct types (hooks, pedicle screws, hybrid), and questions regarding the influence of lowest instrumented vertebra (LIV) and postoperative physical therapy. Twenty-three surgeons completed the survey, and respondents were all experienced expert deformity surgeons. Pedicle screw instrumentation allows earlier return to noncontact and contact sports, with most patients allowed to return to running by 3 months, both noncontact and contact sports by 6 months, and collision sports by 12 months postoperatively. For all construct types, approximately 20% never allow return to collision sports, whereas all surgeons allow eventual return to contact and noncontact sports regardless of construct type. In addition to construct type, we found progressively distal LIV resulted in more surgeons never allowing return to collision sports, with 12% for selective thoracic fusion to T12/L1 versus 33% for posterior spinal fusion to L4. Most respondents also did not recommend formal postoperative physical therapy (78%). Of all surgeons surveyed, there was only one reported instrumentation failure/pullout without neurologic deficit after a patient went snowboarding 2 weeks postoperatively. Modern posterior instrumentation allows surgeons to recommend earlier return

  1. Ambulatory major surgery of benign tumors of the thyroid gland

    Luzardo Silveira, Ernesto Manuel; Eirin Aranno, Juana Elisa

    2011-01-01

    A descriptive and prospective study on the practice of ambulatory major surgery to eliminate benign tumours of the thyroid gland, was carried out in the General Surgery Service of 'Dr. Joaquin Castillo Duany' Teaching Clinical Surgical Hospital in Santiago de Cuba during the years 1996-2008, both included, through a previous clinical evaluation of 74 patients in the Endocrinology Outpatient Department, where it was decided that they could definitely have a surgical treatment. The female sex, the age groups from 31 to 45 years, the hemithyroidectomy as surgical technique, acupuncture as analgesic procedure and the follicular adenoma as cytohistological result prevailed in the case material. Mild complications occurred in 5 members of the sample, but recovery was absolute in all, so that even 72 of them were discharged before the 24 hours. Due to its good acceptance, this surgical method is beneficial for patient and hospital institutions.(author)

  2. NUTRITIONAL STATUS, VITAMIN D AND NASAL COLONIZATION IN SPINAL SURGERY

    Diego Benone dos Santos

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: Evaluate the nutritional status, vitamin D, the serum albumin, and the nasal colonization by bacteria in a Brazilian population sample that included specifically patients undergoing spine surgery Methods: The serum albumin and vitamin D tests were performed on blood samples; nasal microbiological research was performed by swab and demographic information was collected. We studied the correlation between the tests and gender and age groups of patients. Results: Seventy-five patients were included. Of this total, 74 patients underwent testing of albumin levels, 64 of vitamin D and 41 underwent nasal swab. The mean of serum albumin was 3.76 g/dl (SD = 0.53 g/dl; 70.3% of subjects were considered normal and 29.7% showed hypoalbuminemia. Regarding vitamin D, the mean was 16.64 ng/ml (SD: 7.43 ng/ml; 64.1% of patients were considered deficient, 32.8% insufficient, and 3.1% were considered normal. There was significant difference between albumin and age (p=0.007, being that the greater the age, the lower the albumin. Hypoalbuminemia was significantly more frequent over 60 years (p<0.001. There was no correlation between vitamin D or nasal swab and age (p=0.603 and 0.725, respectively. The correlation between the tests and gender showed no significant difference in any of the parameters. Conclusion: The serum albumin and vitamin D levels and results of nasal swab were presented for a Brazilian sample of patients undergoing spine surgery. It was found correlation between hypoalbuminemia (inferring malnutrition and age group of patients. Almost all the patients had some degree of vitamin D deficiency, with no correlation with age.

  3. The comparison of combined femoral-sciatic nerve block with spinal anesthesia at lower extremity surgery

    Selim Almaz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In this study, we aimed to compare the spinal anesthesia technique with combined femoral-sciatic block technique in patients undergoing lower limb surgery. Methods: In this study, after obtaining the approval of the Dicle University Faculty of Medicine Ethics Committee, scheduled for elective lower extremity surgery, the ASA 1-2 groups, between the ages of 18-65, 60 patients were enrolled. Study was planned as a prospective, randomized and controlled. Patients were randomly divided into 2 groups as the spinal anesthesia (Group S and combined sciatic-femoral nerve block (Group CSF to be. Results: Demographic data similar between the groups (p> 0.05. The implementation period of the technique was long in the Group CSF compared with in the Group S (p <0.001. Surgery delivery time was shorter in the Group S compared with in the Group CSF (p <0.001. The time of motor block occurrence was longer in the Group CSF compared with in the Group S (p <0.001. The duration of motor block was long in the Group CSF compared with in the Group S (p <0.001. Conclusion: The each of two methods is safe and effective in lower extremity orthopedic surgery, but the application of peripheral nerve block to provide the long-term advantages such as postoperative analgesia and reducing postoperative analgesic consumption. J Clin Exp Invest 2014; 5 (2: 443-446

  4. Systematic review and meta-analysis of perioperative intravenous tranexamic acid use in spinal surgery.

    Baohui Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tranexamic acid (TXA is well-established as a versatile oral, intramuscular, and intravenous (IV antifibrinolytic agent. However, the efficacy of IV TXA in reducing perioperative blood transfusion in spinal surgery is poorly documented. METHODOLOGY: We conducted a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs and quasi-randomized (qi-RCTs trials that included patients for various spinal surgeries, such as adolescent scoliosis surgery administered with perioperative IV TXA according to Cochrane Collaboration guidelines using electronic PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Embase databases. Additional journal articles and conference proceedings were manually located by two independent researchers. RESULTS: Totally, nine studies were included, with a total sample size of 581 patients. Mean blood loss was decreased in patients treated with perioperative IV TXA by 128.28 ml intraoperatively (ranging from 33.84 to 222.73 ml, 98.49 ml postoperatively (ranging from 83.22 to 113.77 ml, and 389.21 ml combined (ranging from 177.83 to 600.60 ml. The mean volume of transfused packed cells were reduced by 134.55 ml (ranging 51.64 to 217.46 (95% CI; P = 0.0001. Overall, the number of patients treated with TXA who required blood transfusions was lower by 35% than that of patients treated with the comparator and who required blood transfusions (RR 0.65; 95% CI; 0.53 to 0.85; P<0.0001, I(2 = 0%. A dose-independent beneficial effect of TXA was observed, and confirmed in subgroup and sensitivity analyses. A total of seven studies reported DVT data. The study containing only a single DVT case was not combined. CONCLUSIONS: The blood loss was reduced in spinal surgery patients with perioperative IV TXA treatment. Also the percentage of spinal surgery patients who required blood transfusion was significantly decreased. Further evaluation is required to confirm our findings before TXA can be safely used in patients

  5. Combined spinal epidural anesthesia during colon surgery in a high-risk patient: case report.

    Imbelloni, Luiz Eduardo; Fornasari, Marcos; Fialho, José Carlos

    2009-01-01

    Combined spinal epidural anesthesia (CSEA) has advantages over single injection epidural or subarachnoid blockades. The objective of this report was to present a case in which segmental subarachnoid block can be an effective technique for gastrointestinal surgery with spontaneous respiration. Patient with physical status ASA III, with diabetes mellitus type II, hypertension, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was scheduled for resection of a right colon tumor. Combined spinal epidural block was performed in the T5-T6 space and 8 mg of 0.5% isobaric bupivacaine with 50 microg of morphine were injected in the subarachnoid space. The epidural catheter (20G) was introduced four centimeters in the cephalad direction. Sedation was achieved with fractionated doses of 1 mg of midazolam (total of 6 mg). A bolus of 25 mg of 0.5% bupivacaine was administered through the catheter two hours after the subarachnoid block. Vasopressors and atropine were not used. This case provides evidence that segmental spinal block can be the anesthetic technique used in gastrointestinal surgeries with spontaneous respiration.

  6. Remifentanil in combination with ketamine versus remifentanil in spinal fusion surgery--a double blind study.

    Hadi, B A; Al Ramadani, R; Daas, R; Naylor, I; Zelkó, R

    2010-08-01

    This study is aimed at conducting a program for two different anesthetic methods used during a spinal fusion surgery to ensure better intra-operative hemodynamic stability and post-operative pain control. A prospective, randomized, double blind study in patients scheduled for spinal fusion surgery, who were randomly allocated to two groups, G1 and G2, (n = 15 per group), class I-II ASA, was carried out. Both groups received pre-operatively midazolam, followed intra-operatively by propofol, sevoflurane, atracurium, and either remifentanil infusion 0.2 microg/kg/min (G1), or the same dose of remifentanil infusion and low doses of ketamine infusion 1 microg/kg/min (G2) anesthetics, antidote medication and post-operative morphine doses. HR, MAP, vital signs, surgical bleeding, urine output, duration of surgery and duration of anesthesia were recorded. In a 24-h recovery period in a post-anesthesia care unit (PACU) the recovery time, the first pain score and analgesic requirements were measured. Intra-operative HR and arterial BP were significantly less (p < 0.05) in G1 as compared to G2. In the PACU the first pain scores were significantly less (p < 0.05) in G2 than in G1. The time for the first patient analgesia demand dose was greater in G2, as also morphine consumption which was greater in G1 than G2 (p < 0.05). Other results were the same. None of the patients had any adverse drug reaction. Adding low doses of ketamine hydrochloride could be a routine therapy to improve the hemodynamic stability and reduce the post-operative morphine consumption during spinal fusion surgery.

  7. Spinal cord compression secondary to extramedullary hematopoiesis: A rareness in a young adult with thalassemia major.

    Fareed, Shehab; Soliman, Ashraf T; De Sanctis, Vincenzo; Kohla, Samah; Soliman, Dina; Khirfan, Diala; Tambuerello, Adriana; Talaat, Mohamed; Nashwan, Abdulqadir; Caparrotti, Palmira; Yassin, Mohamed A

    2017-08-23

    We report a case of a thalassemia major male patient with back pain associated to severe weakness in lower extremities resulting in the ability to ambulate only with assistance. An urgent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of  thoracic and lumbosacral spine was requested. A posterior intraspinal extradural mass lesion compressing the spinal cord at the level of thoracic T5-8 was present, suggesting an extramedullary hematopoietic centre, compressing the spinal cord. He was treated successfully with thalassemia major alone. The patient was treated with blood transfusion, dexamethasone, morphine and paracetamol, followed by radiotherapy in 10 fractions to the spine (daily fraction of 2Gy from T3 to T9, total dose 20 Gy). His pain and neurologic examination quickly improved. A new MRI of the spine, one week after radiotherapy, showed an improvement of the extramedullary hematopoietic mass compression. In conclusion, EMH should be considered in every patient with ineffective erythropoiesis and spinal cord symptoms. MRI is the most effective method of demonstrating EMH. The rapid recognition and treatment can dramatically alleviate symptoms. There is still considerable controversy regarding indications, benefits, and risks of each of modality of treatment due to the infrequency of this disorder.

  8. Perioperative factors associated with pressure ulcer development after major surgery

    2018-01-01

    Background Postoperative pressure ulcers are important indicators of perioperative care quality, and are serious and expensive complications during critical care. This study aimed to identify perioperative risk factors for postoperative pressure ulcers. Methods This retrospective case-control study evaluated 2,498 patients who underwent major surgery. Forty-three patients developed postoperative pressure ulcers and were matched to 86 control patients based on age, sex, surgery, and comorbidities. Results The pressure ulcer group had lower baseline hemoglobin and albumin levels, compared to the control group. The pressure ulcer group also had higher values for lactate levels, blood loss, and number of packed red blood cell (pRBC) units. Univariate analysis revealed that pressure ulcer development was associated with preoperative hemoglobin levels, albumin levels, lactate levels, intraoperative blood loss, number of pRBC units, Acute Physiologic and Chronic Health Evaluation II score, Braden scale score, postoperative ventilator care, and patient restraint. In the multiple logistic regression analysis, only preoperative low albumin levels (odds ratio [OR]: 0.21, 95% CI: 0.05–0.82; P pressure ulcer development. A receiver operating characteristic curve was used to assess the predictive power of the logistic regression model, and the area under the curve was 0.88 (95% CI: 0.79–0.97; P pressure ulcer development after surgery. PMID:29441175

  9. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... spinal cord injury? play_arrow What kind of surgery is common after a spinal cord injury? play_ ... How soon after a spinal cord injury should surgery be performed? play_arrow Is it common to ...

  10. Role of oral gabapentin as preemptive adjuvant with spinal anesthesia for postoperative pain in patients undergoing surgeries under spinal anesthesia

    Roshan Lal Gogna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: The study was undertaken to evaluate postoperative benefit in patients administered tablet gabapentin as premedication with the primary outcome determining the effect on duration of analgesia with total analgesic requirement and measurement of postoperative sedation scores as our secondary outcomes. Methods: The study was a prospective randomized observational study in sixty patients undergoing surgeries in spinal anesthesia (SA. Patients were randomly assigned into two groups. Group A (n = 30 patients received tablet gabapentin (600 mg while Group B (n = 30 received a placebo (Vitamin B complex orally 2 h before surgery. Postoperative pain was managed with intravenous tramadol 2 mg/kg. Postoperative monitoring and assessment included pain assessment every 2 h with Numeric Rating Scale (0–10 for 12 h and then at 24 h. Results: On comparison of intergroup data, the duration of analgesia was prolonged in Group A (288.79 ± 38.81 min as compared to Group B (218.67 ± 37.62 min with P (0.0001. Total opioid requirement was higher in placebo group as compared to the Group A (P = 0.025. Statistical difference in mean (standard deviation pain score at 24 h was statistically significant (P = 0.0002. Sedation scores were significantly higher in Group A at 2 and 4 h post-SA. Conclusion: Single dose of gabapentin administered 2 h before surgery provides better pain control as compared to placebo. It prolongs the duration of analgesia, reduces the total analgesic requirement during the postoperative period.

  11. [Benefits of epidural analgesia in major neonatal surgery].

    Gómez-Chacón, J; Encarnación, J; Couselo, M; Mangas, L; Domenech, A; Gutiérrez, C; García Sala, C

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe and evaluate the benefits of epidural anesthesia in major surgery neonatal. We have performed a matched case-control (2:1) study of patients undergoing neonatal major surgery (NMSs) who received intra-and postoperative epidural anesthesia (EA) and controls with conventional general anesthesia. The matching criteria were age, weight and baseline pathology. EA was administered by caudal puncture and epidural catheter placed with ultrasound support. Levobupivacaine was selected as anesthetic drug. The time to extubation, intestinal transit time, type of analgesia and complications were studied. This study is based on 11 cases (2 esophageal atresia, 2 diaphragmatic hernias, 1 necrotizing enterocolitis, 3 intestinal atresia, 2 anorectal malformation and 1 bladder exstrophy) and 22 controls. We observed statistically significant differences in time to extubation (95% CI OR 12 1.99 to 72.35; Chi2 p = 0.004, Mann U Whytney p = 0.013) and intestinal transit time (Mann Whitney U p analgesia. Therefore we believe that the intra-and postoperative EA helps improve postoperative management in neonates and should be preferred in centers where this technique is available.

  12. Spinal Epidural Hematoma after Thoracolumbar Posterior Fusion Surgery without Decompression for Thoracic Vertebral Fracture

    Tsuyoki Minato

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a rare case of spinal epidural hematoma (SEH after thoracolumbar posterior fusion without decompression surgery for a thoracic vertebral fracture. A 42-year-old man was hospitalized for a thoracic vertebral fracture caused by being sandwiched against his back on broken concrete block. Computed tomography revealed a T12 dislocation fracture of AO type B2, multiple bilateral rib fractures, and a right hemopneumothorax. Four days after the injury, in order to promote early orthostasis and to improve respiratory status, we performed thoracolumbar posterior fusion surgery without decompression; the patient had back pain but no neurological deficits. Three hours after surgery, he complained of acute pain and severe weakness of his bilateral lower extremities; with allodynia below the level of his umbilicus, postoperative SEH was diagnosed. We performed immediate revision surgery. After removal of the hematoma, his symptoms improved gradually, and he was discharged ambulatory one month after revision surgery. Through experience of this case, we should strongly consider the possibility of preexisting SEH before surgery, even in patients with no neurological deficits. We should also consider perioperative coagulopathy in patients with multiple trauma, as in this case.

  13. The "shadow sign": a radiographic differentiation of stainless steel versus titanium spinal instrumentation in spine surgery.

    Jones-Quaidoo, Sean M; Novicoff, Wendy; Park, Andrew; Arlet, Vincent

    2011-12-01

    Stainless steel spinal instrumentation has been supplanted in recent years by titanium instrumentation. Knowing whether stainless steel or titanium was used in a previous surgery can guide clinical decision making processes, but frequently the clinician has no way to know what type of metal was used. We describe the radiographic "shadow sign," in which superimposed titanium rods and screws remain radiolucent enough that the contour of the underlying components can be seen on a lateral radiograph, whereas superimposed stainless steel rods and screws are completely radiopaque. This technique was evaluated using a retrospective, randomized, and blinded radiographic comparison of titanium and stainless steel spinal instrumentation. The objective was to determine whether the "shadow sign" can reliably differentiate titanium from stainless steel spinal instrumentation. Lateral radiographs from 16 cases of posterior spinal instrumentation (6 titanium, 6 stainless steel, and 2 replicates of each to assess intraobserver reliability) were randomly selected from a database of cases performed for pediatric scoliosis in a university setting from 2005 to 2009. The cases were randomized then shown to 19 orthopaedic surgery residents, 1 spine fellow, and 2 spine attendings. After the "shadow sign" was described, the surgeons were asked to determine what type of metal each implant was made of. The κ value for both stainless steel and titanium versus the gold standard was 0.83 [standard error (SE) = 0.053], indicating excellent agreement. The κ value for agreement between raters was 0.71 (SE = 0.016) and the κ value for agreement within raters was 0.70 (SE = 0.016), both of which indicated substantial agreement. The "shadow sign" can help a clinician differentiate titanium from stainless steel spinal instrumentation based on radiographic appearance alone. Furthermore, our study reveals that the level of experience in diagnosing spinal lateral radiographs also enhances the use of

  14. Timing, severity of deficits, and clinical improvement after surgery for spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas.

    Safaee, Michael M; Clark, Aaron J; Burkhardt, Jan-Karl; Winkler, Ethan A; Lawton, Michael T

    2018-04-20

    OBJECTIVE Spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas (dAVFs) are rare vascular abnormalities caused by arteriovenous shunting. They often form at the dural root sleeve between a radicular feeding artery and draining medullary vein causing venous congestion and edema, decreased perfusion, and ischemia of the spinal cord. Treatment consists of either surgical ligation of the draining vein or selective embolization via an endovascular approach. There is a paucity of data on which modality provides more durable and effective outcomes. METHODS The authors performed a retrospective review of a prospectively maintained database by the senior author to assess clinical outcomes in patients undergoing surgical treatment of spinal dAVFs. Preoperative and postoperative motor and Aminoff-Logue Scale (ALS) scores were collected. RESULTS A total of 41 patients with 44 spinal dAVFs were identified, with a mean patient age of 64 years. The mean symptom duration was 14 months, with weakness (82%), urinary symptoms (47%), and sensory symptoms (29%) at presentation. The fistula locations were as follows: 30 thoracic, 9 lumbar, 3 sacral, and 2 cervical. Five patients had normal motor and ALS scores at presentation. Among the remaining 36 patients with motor deficits or abnormal gait and micturition at presentation, 78% experienced an improvement while the remaining 22% continued to be stable. There was a trend toward improved outcomes in patients with shorter symptom duration; mean symptom duration among patients with clinical improvement was 13 months compared with 22 months among those without improvement. Additionally, rates of improvement were higher for lower thoracic and lumbosacral dAVFs (85% and 83%) compared with those in the upper thoracic spine (57%). No patient developed recurrent fistulas or worsening neurological deficits. CONCLUSIONS Surgery is associated with excellent outcomes in the treatment of spinal dAVFs. Early diagnosis and treatment are critical, with a trend toward

  15. D-dimer in the diagnosis of thromboembolic disease after spinal surgery

    Oyama, Motohiko; Saita, Kazuo; Iijima, Yuki; Ueda, Yusuke; Endo, Teruaki

    2010-01-01

    The plasma D-dimer levels of 136 patients (80 men and 56 women, mean age 63.9 years) who underwent spinal surgery in our hospital were measured on pod 3 and pod 7, as a method of screening for thromboembolic disease. A D-dimer cut off value of 10 μg/dl was used and only the patients with higher values were examined by CT. No patients had symptomatic thromboembolic disease. On pod 7 the D-dimer levels of 14 patients was above 10 μg/dl, but only 2 of them were detected in asymptomatic pulmonary embolism. Both of them had undergone anterior fusion surgery, and no deep venous thrombosis was detected in the lower extremities. Anticoagulation therapy with heparin and warfarin was started immediately, and the patients were discharged symptom-free. Another methods of thromboprophylaxis in addition to traditional mechanical thromboprophylaxis, such as by wearing compression stockings and foot pumps, may be necessary after anterior spinal surgery. (author)

  16. Fast spin-echo MR assessment of patients with poor outcome following spinal cervical surgery

    Wu, W.; Thuomas, K.AA.; Hedlund, R.; Leszniewski, W.; Vavruch, L.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of the investigation was to evaluate poor outcome following spinal cervical surgery. A total of 146 consecutive patients operated with anterior discectomy and fusion (ADF) with the Cloward technique were investigated. Clinical notes, plain radiography, CT, and fast spin-echo (FSE) images were retrospectively evaluated. Some 30% of the patients had unsatisfactory clinical results within 12 months after surgery; 13% had initial improvement followed by deterioration of the preoperative symptoms, while 14.4% were not improved or worsened. Disc herniation and bony stenosis above, below, or at the fused level were the most common findings. In 45% of patients, surgery failed to decompress the spinal canal. In only 4 patients was no cause of remaining myelopathy and/or radiculopathy found. FSE demonstrated a large variety of pathological findings in the patients with poor clinical outcome after ADF. Postoperatively, patients with good clinical outcome had a lower incidence of pathological changes. FSE is considered the primary imaging modality for the cervical spine. However, CT is a useful complement in the axial projection to visualize bone changes. (orig.)

  17. Perforation and bacterial contamination of microscope covers in lumbar spinal decompressive surgery.

    Osterhoff, Georg; Spirig, José; Klasen, Jürgen; Kuster, Stefan P; Zinkernagel, Annelies S; Sax, Hugo; Min, Kan

    2014-01-01

    To determine the integrity of microscope covers and bacterial contamination at the end of lumbar spinal decompressive surgery. A prospective study of 25 consecutive lumbar spinal decompressions with the use of a surgical microscope was performed. For detection of perforations, the microscope covers were filled with water at the end of surgery and the presence of water leakage in 3 zones (objective, ocular and control panel) was examined. For detection of bacterial contamination, swabs were taken from the covers at the same locations before and after surgery. Among the 25 covers, 1 (4%) perforation was observed and no association between perforation and bacterial contamination was seen; 3 (4%) of 75 smears from the 25 covers showed post-operative bacterial contamination, i.e. 2 in the ocular zone and 1 in the optical zone, without a cover perforation. The incidence of microscope cover perforation was very low and was not shown to be associated with bacterial contamination. External sources of bacterial contamination seem to outweigh the problem of contamination due to failure of cover integrity. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. [Management of spinal metastasis by minimal invasive surgery technique: Surgical principles, indications: A literature review].

    Toquart, A; Graillon, T; Mansouri, N; Adetchessi, T; Blondel, B; Fuentes, S

    2016-06-01

    Spinal metastasis are getting more frequent. This raises the question of pain and neurological complications, which worsen the functional and survival prognosis of this oncological population patients. The surgical treatment must be the most complete as possible: to decompress and stabilize without delaying the management of the oncological disease. Minimal invasive surgery techniques are by definition, less harmful on musculocutaneous plan than opened ones, with a comparable efficiency demonstrated in degenerative and traumatic surgery. So they seem to be applicable and appropriate to this patient population. We detailed different minimal invasive techniques proposed in the management of spinal metastasis. For this, we used our experience developed in degenerative and traumatic pathologies, and we also referred to many authors, establishing a literature review thanks to Pubmed, Embase. Thirty eight articles were selected and allowed us to describe different techniques: percutaneous methods such as vertebro-/kyphoplasty and osteosynthesis, as well as mini-opened surgery, through a posterior or anterior way. We propose a surgical approach using these minimal invasive techniques, first according to the predominant symptom (pain or neurologic failure), then characteristics of the lesions (number, topography, type…) and the deformity degree. Whatever the technique, the main goal is to stabilize and decompress, in order to maintain a good quality of life for these fragile patients, without delaying the medical management of the oncological disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Isolated long thoracic nerve paralysis - a rare complication of anterior spinal surgery: a case report

    Ameri Ebrahim

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Isolated long thoracic nerve injury causes paralysis of the serratus anterior muscle. Patients with serratus anterior palsy may present with periscapular pain, weakness, limitation of shoulder elevation and scapular winging. Case presentation We present the case of a 23-year-old woman who sustained isolated long thoracic nerve palsy during anterior spinal surgery which caused external compressive force on the nerve. Conclusion During positioning of patients into the lateral decubitus position, the course of the long thoracic nerve must be attended to carefully and the nerve should be protected from any external pressure.

  20. Comparison of Total Calcium Level during General and Spinal Anesthesia in Gynecologic Abdominal Surgeries

    Katayoun Haryalchi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available  Background: Calcium (Ca+2 plays an important role in many biophysiological mechanisms .The present study was carried out to assess alterations in total serum calcium level before and after operations in consider to the type of anesthesia. Materials and Methods: This descriptive study was conducted on 74 women who candidate for gynecological abdominal operations during one year at Al-zahra maternity Hospital in Rasht, Iran. The patients underwent General Anesthesia (GA (N=37 or Spinal Anesthesia (SA (N=37 randomly. Blood samples (2 cc, were obtained an hour before the anesthesia and two hours after that. The blood samples had been sent to the laboratory for analyzing .Total serum calcium level, magnesium (Mg and albumin level were measured by photometric methods. Inferential statistic was analyzed with the Vilkson non-parametric and Pearson's correlation test. P-values less than 0.05 have been considered as significant different. Results: There was a significant trend to decrease in calcium levels after all gynecological abdominal operations, but there was a significant correlation between General anesthesia (GA and reduction of serum calcium level (p=0.026 . Therefore, General Anesthesia (GA is accompanied by more calcium reduction than Spinal Anesthesia (SA. Conclusion: Serum Calcium levels tend to decrease after all gynecological abdominal surgeries, but General Anesthesia (GA is accompanied by more calcium reduction than Spinal one. It needs to further specific studies, to illustrate association between different methods of anesthesia and Ca+2 changes.

  1. Prognostic Factors for Satisfaction After Decompression Surgery for Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

    Paulsen, Rune Tendal; Bouknaitir, Jamal Bech; Fruensgaard, Søren

    2018-01-01

    : To present clinical outcome data and identify prognostic factors related to patient satisfaction 1 yr after posterior decompression surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis. METHOD: This multicenter register study included 2562 patients. Patients were treated with various types of posterior decompression. Patients...... with previous spine surgery or concomitant fusion were excluded. Patient satisfaction was analyzed for associations with age, sex, body mass index, smoking status, duration of pain, number of decompressed vertebral levels, comorbidities, and patient-reported outcome measures, which were used to quantify....... CONCLUSION: This study found smoking, long duration of leg pain, and cancerous and neurological disease to be associated with patient dissatisfaction, whereas good walking capacity at baseline was positively associated with satisfaction after 1 yr....

  2. 90-day Readmission After Lumbar Spinal Fusion Surgery in New York State Between 2005 and 2014: A 10-year Analysis of a Statewide Cohort.

    Baaj, Ali A; Lang, Gernot; Hsu, Wei-Chun; Avila, Mauricio J; Mao, Jialin; Sedrakyan, Art

    2017-11-15

    MINI: We assessed 90-day readmission and evaluated risk factors associated with readmission after lumbar spinal fusion surgery in New York State. The overall 90-day readmission rate was 24.8%. Age, sex, race, insurance, procedure, number of operated spinal levels, health service area, and comorbidities are major risk factors for 90-day readmission. Retrospective cohort study. The aim of this study was to assess 90-day readmission and evaluate risk factors associated with readmission after lumbar fusion in New York State. Readmission is becoming an important metric for quality and efficiency of health care. Readmission and its predictors following spine surgery are overall poorly understood and limited evidence is available specifically in lumbar fusion. The New York Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System (SPARCS) was utilized to capture patients undergoing lumbar fusion from 2005 to 2014. Temporal trend of 90-day readmission was assessed using Cochran-Armitage test. Logistic regression was used to examine predictors associated with 90-day readmission. There were 86,869 patients included in this cohort study. The overall 90-day readmission rate was 24.8%. On a multivariable analysis model, age (odds ratio [OR] comparing ≥75 versus New York-Pennsylvania border: 0.67, 95% CI: 0.61-0.73), and comorbidity, i.e., coronary artery disease (OR: 1.26, 95% CI: 1.19-1.33) were significantly associated with 90-day readmission. Directions of the odds ratios for these factors were consistent after stratification by procedure type. Age, sex, race, insurance, procedure, number of operated spinal levels, HSA, and comorbidities are major risk factors for 90-day readmission. Our study allows risk calculation to determine high-risk patients before undergoing spinal fusion surgery to prevent early readmission, improve quality of care, and reduce health care expenditures. 3.

  3. Wound management with vacuum-assisted closure in postoperative infections after surgery for spinal stenosis

    Karaaslan F

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Fatih Karaaslan,1 Şevki Erdem,2 Musa Ugur Mermerkaya11Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Bozok University Medical School, Yozgat, Turkey; 2Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Haydarpasa Numune Training Hospital, Istanbul, TurkeyObjective: To evaluate the results of negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT in the treatment of surgical spinal site infections.Materials and methods: The use of NPWT in postoperative infections after dorsal spinal surgery (transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion plus posterior instrumentation was studied retrospectively. From February 2011 to January 2012, six patients (females out of 317 (209 females; 108 males were readmitted to our clinic with surgical site infections on postoperative day 14 (range 9–19 and were treated with debridement, NPWT, and antibiotics. We evaluated the clinical and laboratory data, including the ability to retain the spinal hardware and recurrent infections.Results: The incidence of deep postoperative surgical site infection was six (1.89% patients (females out of 317 patients (209 females; 108 males at 1 year. All patients completed their wound NPWT regimen successfully. An average of 5.1 (range 3–8 irrigation and debridement sessions was performed before definitive wound closure. The mean follow-up period was 13 (range 12–16 months. No patient had a persistent infection requiring partial or total hardware removal. The hospital stay infection parameters normalized within an average of 4.6 weeks.Conclusion: The study illustrates the usefulness of NPWT as an effective adjuvant treatment option for managing complicated deep spinal surgical wound infections.Keywords: surgical infection, NPWT, VAC, TLIF

  4. Characteristics and clinical aspects of patients with spinal cord injury undergoing surgery

    João Simão de Melo-Neto

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To identify the characteristics of patients with spinal cord injury (SCI undergoing surgery. METHODS: Previously, 321 patients with SCI were selected. Clinical and socio-demographic variables were collected. RESULTS: A total of 211 patients were submitted to surgery. Fall and injuries in the upper cervical and lumbosacral regions were associated with conservative treatment. Patients with lesions in the lower cervical spine, worse neurological status, and unstable injuries were associated with surgery. Individuals undergoing surgery were associated with complications after treatment. The authors assessed whether age influenced the characteristics of patients submitted to surgery. Subjects with <60 years of age were associated with motorcycle accidents and the morphologies of injury were fracture-dislocation. Elderly individuals were associated to fall, SCI in the lower cervical spine and the morphology of injury was listhesis. Subsequently, the authors analyzed the gender characteristics in these patients. Women who suffered car accidents were associated to surgery. Women were associated with paraparesis and the morphologic diagnosis was fracture-explosion, especially in the thoracolumbar transition and lumbosacral regions. Men who presented traumatic brain injury and thoracic trauma were related to surgery. These individuals had a worse neurological status and were associated to complications. Men and the cervical region were most affected, thereby, these subjects were analyzed separately (n= 92. The presence of complications increased the length of hospital stay. The simultaneous presence of morphological diagnosis, worst neurological status, tetraplegia, sensory, and motor alterations were associated with complications. Pneumonia and chest trauma were associated with mortality. CONCLUSION: These factors enable investments in prevention, rehabilitation, and treatment.

  5. [Combined spinal epidural anesthesia during endoprosthetic surgeries for bone tumors in old-age children].

    Matinian, N V; Saltanov, A I

    2005-01-01

    Thirty-five patients (ASA II-III) aged 12 to 17 years, diagnosed as having osteogenic sarcoma and Ewing's sarcoma localizing in the femur and tibia, were examined. Surgery was performed as sectoral resection of the affected bone along with knee joint endoprosthesis. Surgical intervention was made under combined spinal and epidural anesthesia (CSEA) with sedation, by using the methods for exact dosing of propofol (6-4 mg/kg x h). During intervention, a child's respiration remains is kept spontaneous with oxygen insufflation through a nasal catheter. CSEA was performed in two-segmental fashion. The epidural space was first catheterized. After administration of a test dose, 0.5% marcaine spinal was injected into dermatomas below the subarachnoidal space, depending on body weight (3.0-4.0 ml). Sensory blockade developed following 3-5 min and lasted 90-120 min, thereafter a local anesthetic (bupivacaine) or its mixture plus promedole was epidurally administered. ??Anesthesia was effective in all cases, motor blockade. During surgery, there was a moderate arterial hypotension that did not require the use of vasopressors. The acid-alkali balance suggested the adequacy of spontaneous respiration. The only significant complication we observed was atony of the bladder that requires its catheterization till the following day. An epidural catheter makes it possible to effect adequate postoperative analgesia.

  6. Management of temporary urinary retention after arthroscopic knee surgery in low-dose spinal anesthesia: development of a simple algorithm.

    Luger, Thomas J; Garoscio, Ivo; Rehder, Peter; Oberladstätter, Jürgen; Voelckel, Wolfgang

    2008-06-01

    In practice, trauma and orthopedic surgery during spinal anesthesia are often performed with routine urethral catheterization of the bladder to prevent an overdistention of the bladder. However, use of a catheter has inherent risks. Ultrasound examination of the bladder (Bladderscan) can precisely determine the bladder volume. Thus, the aim of this study was to identify parameters indicative of urinary retention after low-dose spinal anesthesia and to develop a simple algorithm for patient care. This prospective pilot study approved by the Ethics Committee enrolled 45 patients after obtaining their written informed consent. Patients who underwent arthroscopic knee surgery received low-dose spinal anesthesia with 1.4 ml 0.5% bupivacaine at level L3/L4. Bladder volume was measured by urinary bladder scanning at baseline, at the end of surgery and up to 4 h later. The incidence of spontaneous urination versus catheterization was assessed and the relative risk for catheterization was calculated. Mann-Whitney test, chi(2) test with Fischer Exact test and the relative odds ratio were performed as appropriate. *P 300 ml postoperatively had a 6.5-fold greater likelihood for urinary retention. In the management of patients with short-lasting spinal anesthesia for arthroscopic knee surgery we recommend monitoring bladder volume by Bladderscan instead of routine catheterization. Anesthesiologists or nurses under protocol should assess bladder volume preoperatively and at the end of surgery. If bladder volume is >300 ml, catheterization should be performed in the OR. Patients with a bladder volume of 500 ml.

  7. Hemostatic function to regulate perioperative bleeding in patients undergoing spinal surgery: A prospective observational study.

    Atsushi Kimura

    Full Text Available Although bleeding is a common complication of surgery, routine laboratory tests have been demonstrated to have a low ability to predict perioperative bleeding. Better understanding of hemostatic function during surgery would lead to identification of high-risk patients for bleeding. Here, we aimed to elucidate hemostatic mechanisms to determine perioperative bleeding. We prospectively enrolled 104 patients undergoing cervical spinal surgery without bleeding diathesis. Blood sampling was performed just before the operation. Volumes of perioperative blood loss were compared with the results of detailed laboratory tests assessing primary hemostasis, secondary hemostasis, and fibrinolysis. Platelet aggregations induced by several agonists correlated with each other, and only two latent factors determined inter-individual difference. Platelet aggregability independently determined perioperative bleeding. We also identified low levels of plasminogen-activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1 and α2-plasmin inhibitor to be independent risk factors for intraoperative and postoperative bleeding, respectively. Most important independent factor to determine postoperative bleeding was body weight. Of note, obese patients with low levels of PAI-1 became high-risk patients for bleeding during surgery. Our data suggest that bleeding after surgical procedure may be influenced by inter-individual differences of hemostatic function including platelet function and fibrinolysis, even in the patients without bleeding diathesis.

  8. Venous Thromboembolism: A Comparison of Chronic Spinal Cord Injury and General Surgery Patients in a Metropolitan Veterans Affairs Hospital.

    Moore, Ryan M; Rimler, Jonathan; Smith, Brian R; Wirth, Garrett A; Paydar, Keyianoosh Z

    2016-11-01

    Venous thromboembolic events result in significant morbidity, mortality, and costly therapeutic interventions. As medical resource allocation strategies are becoming more pervasive, appropriate risk stratification and prophylactic regimens are essential. Previous studies have shown a decreased incidence of perioperative venous thromboembolism in the chronic spinal cord injury population. The question remains of whether chronic spinal cord injury is protective against venous thromboembolism. A retrospective review of all cases involving chronic spinal cord injury patients who underwent plastic and reconstructive surgery operations (n = 424) and general surgery patients (n = 777) with a primary outcome of deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism within 90 days of surgery was performed. The incidence of postoperative deep venous thrombosis in the control and spinal cord injury groups was 1.7 percent and 0.2 percent, respectively (p = 0.027). However, such significance was not observed with regard to postoperative pulmonary embolism incidence (p = 0.070). Collectively, the incidence of postoperative venous thromboembolism-specifically, deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism-was significantly greater in the general surgery population (p = 0.014). A nearly 10-fold increased risk of venous thromboembolism was seen among the control group (1.9 percent versus 0.2 percent) despite administration of optimal prophylaxis. This study demonstrates a profoundly low incidence of venous thromboembolism among chronic spinal cord injury patients compared with general surgery patients. Future efforts to elucidate how chronic spinal cord injury confers a protective mechanism may potentially influence the evolution of venous thromboembolism prevention guidelines, and spark the development of alternative prophylactic agents or customized application of prevention efforts.

  9. Sagittal imbalance in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis and outcomes after simple decompression surgery.

    Shin, E Kyung; Kim, Chi Heon; Chung, Chun Kee; Choi, Yunhee; Yim, Dahae; Jung, Whei; Park, Sung Bae; Moon, Jung Hyeon; Heo, Won; Kim, Sung-Mi

    2017-02-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is the most common lumbar degenerative disease, and sagittal imbalance is uncommon. Forward-bending posture, which is primarily caused by buckling of the ligamentum flavum, may be improved via simple decompression surgery. The objectives of this study were to identify the risk factors for sagittal imbalance and to describe the outcomes of simple decompression surgery. This is a retrospective nested case-control study PATIENT SAMPLE: This was a retrospective study that included 83 consecutive patients (M:F=46:37; mean age, 68.5±7.7 years) who underwent decompression surgery and a minimum of 12 months of follow-up. The primary end point was normalization of sagittal imbalance after decompression surgery. Sagittal imbalance was defined as a C7 sagittal vertical axis (SVA) ≥40 mm on a 36-inch-long lateral whole spine radiograph. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify the risk factors for sagittal imbalance. Bilateral decompression was performed via a unilateral approach with a tubular retractor. The SVA was measured on serial radiographs performed 1, 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. The prognostic factors for sagittal balance recovery were determined based on various clinical and radiological parameters. Sagittal imbalance was observed in 54% (45/83) of patients, and its risk factors were old age and a large mismatch between pelvic incidence and lumbar lordosis. The 1-year normalization rate was 73% after decompression surgery, and the median time to normalization was 1 to 3 months. Patients who did not experience SVA normalization exhibited low thoracic kyphosis (hazard ratio [HR], 1.04; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02-1.10) (pimbalance was observed in more than 50% of LSS patients, but this imbalance was correctable via simple decompression surgery in 70% of patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Acute onset of intracranial subdural hemorrhage five days after spinal anesthesia for knee arthroscopic surgery: a case report

    Hagino Tetsuo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Spinal anesthesia is a widely used general purpose anesthesia. However, serious complications, such as intracranial subdural hemorrhage, can rarely occur. Case presentation We report the case of a 73-year-old Japanese woman who had acute onset of intracranial subdural hemorrhage five days after spinal anesthesia for knee arthroscopic surgery. Conclusion This case highlights the need to pay attention to acute intracranial subdural hemorrhage as a complication after spinal anesthesia. If the headache persists even in a supine position or nausea occurs abruptly, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging of the brain should be conducted. An intracranial subdural hematoma may have a serious outcome and is an important differential diagnosis for headache after spinal anesthesia.

  11. Biomechanical implications of lumbar spinal ligament transection.

    Von Forell, Gregory A; Bowden, Anton E

    2014-11-01

    Many lumbar spine surgeries either intentionally or inadvertently damage or transect spinal ligaments. The purpose of this work was to quantify the previously unknown biomechanical consequences of isolated spinal ligament transection on the remaining spinal ligaments (stress transfer), vertebrae (bone remodelling stimulus) and intervertebral discs (disc pressure) of the lumbar spine. A finite element model of the full lumbar spine was developed and validated against experimental data and tested in the primary modes of spinal motion in the intact condition. Once a ligament was removed, stress increased in the remaining spinal ligaments and changes occurred in vertebral strain energy, but disc pressure remained similar. All major biomechanical changes occurred at the same spinal level as the transected ligament, with minor changes at adjacent levels. This work demonstrates that iatrogenic damage to spinal ligaments disturbs the load sharing within the spinal ligament network and may induce significant clinically relevant changes in the spinal motion segment.

  12. Return to work after spinal stenosis surgery and the patient's quality of life.

    Truszczyńska, Aleksandra; Rąpała, Kazimierz; Truszczyński, Olaf; Tarnowski, Adam; Łukawski, Stanisław

    2013-06-01

    The return to work of patients who undergo spinal surgery poses important medical and social challenge. 1) To establish whether patients who undergo spinal stenosis surgery later return to work. 2) To establish the patient's attitude towards employment. 3) To assess the quality of life of the patients and its influence on their attitude to work. The study population consisted of 58 patients aged from 21 to 80 years (the mean age was 52.33±14.12). There were 29 women (50%) and 29 men (50%) in the group. The patients' quality of life was measured by the use of the WHOQOL-BREF instrument. Individual interviews were conducted 3 to 8 months (a mean of 5.72 months ±1.6) after the surgery. 1) Although 13 patients (22.3%) returned to work, 44 (75.9%) did not, these being manual workers of vocational secondary education. 2) Almost half of the patients (27 patients, i.e. 44%) intend to apply for disability pension, 16 patients (27.6%) consider themselves unfit to work, 22 patients (37.9%) do not feel like working again. 3) The quality of life of the patients decreased. Domain scores for the WHOQOL-BREF are transformed to a 0-100 scale. The mean physical health amounted to 60.67 (±16.31), the mean psychological health was 58.78 (±16.01), while the mean social relations with family and friends were 59.91 (±20.69), and the mean environment 59.62 (±12.48). 1) A total of 75% of the patients operated for lumbar spinal stenosis do not return to their preoperative work. Difficulties in returning to work and decreased quality of life are associated with female sex, lower-level education, hard physical work and low income. 2) Physical health, psychological health, social relations and environment decreased to the mean of approximately 60. 3) The quality of life of the patients who did return to work was similar to that of healthy people.

  13. Return to work after spinal stenosis surgery and the patient’s quality of life

    Aleksandra Truszczyńska

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The return to work of patients who undergo spinal surgery poses important medical and social challenge. Objectives: 1 To establish whether patients who undergo spinal stenosis surgery later return to work. 2 To establish the patient's attitude towards employment. 3 To assess the quality of life of the patients and its influence on their attitude to work. Materials and Methods: The study population consisted of 58 patients aged from 21 to 80 years (the mean age was 52.33±14.12. There were 29 women (50% and 29 men (50% in the group. The patients' quality of life was measured by the use of the WHOQOL-BREF instrument. Individual interviews were conducted 3 to 8 months (a mean of 5.72 months ±1.6 after the surgery. Results: 1 Although 13 patients (22.3% returned to work, 44 (75.9% did not, these being manual workers of vocational secondary education. 2 Almost half of the patients (27 patients, i.e. 44% intend to apply for disability pension, 16 patients (27.6% consider themselves unfit to work, 22 patients (37.9% do not feel like working again. 3 The quality of life of the patients decreased. Domain scores for the WHOQOL-BREF are transformed to a 0-100 scale. The mean physical health amounted to 60.67 (±16.31, the mean psychological health was 58.78 (±16.01, while the mean social relations with family and friends were 59.91 (±20.69, and the mean environment 59.62 (±12.48. Conclusions: 1 A total of 75% of the patients operated for lumbar spinal stenosis do not return to their preoperative work. Difficulties in returning to work and decreased quality of life are associated with female sex, lower-level education, hard physical work and low income. 2 Physical health, psychological health, social relations and environment decreased to the mean of approximately 60. 3 The quality of life of the patients who did return to work was similar to that of healthy people.

  14. Ambulation and survival following surgery in elderly patients with metastatic epidural spinal cord compression.

    Itshayek, Eyal; Candanedo, Carlos; Fraifeld, Shifra; Hasharoni, Amir; Kaplan, Leon; Schroeder, Josh E; Cohen, José E

    2017-12-28

    Metastatic epidural spinal cord compression (MESCC) is a disabling consequence of disease progression. Surgery can restore/preserve physical function, improving access to treatments that increase duration of survival; however, advanced patient age may deter oncologists and surgeons from considering surgical management. Evaluate the duration of ambulation and survival in elderly patients following surgical decompression of MESCC. Retrospective file review of a prospective database, under IRB waiver of informed consent, of consecutive patients treated in an academic tertiary care medical center from 8/2008-3/2015. Patients ≥65 years presenting neurological and/or radiological signs of cord compression due to metastatic disease, who underwent surgical decompression. Duration of ambulation and survival. Patients underwent urgent multidisciplinary evaluation and surgery. Ambulation and survival were compared with age, pre- and postoperative neurological (American Spinal Injury Association [ASIA] Impairment Scale [AIS]) and performance status (Karnofsky Performance Status [KPS], and Tokuhashi Score using Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests, Pearson correlation coefficient, Cox regression model, log rank analysis, and Kaplan Meir analysis. 40 patients were included (21 male, 54%; mean age 74 years, range 65-87). Surgery was performed a mean 3.8 days after onset of motor symptoms. Mean duration of ambulation and survival were 474 (range 0-1662) and 525 days (range 11-1662), respectively; 53% of patients (21/40) survived and 43% (17/40) retained ambulation for ≥1 year. There was no significant relationship between survival and ambulation for patients aged 65-69, 70-79, or 80-89, although Kaplan Meier analysis suggested stratification. There was a significant relationship between duration of ambulation and pre- and postoperative AIS (p=0.0342, p=0.0358, respectively) and postoperative KPS (p=0.0221). Tokuhashi score was not significantly related to duration of

  15. THE COMPARISON OF HYPERBARIC BUPIVACAINE AND ROPIVACAINE USAGE IN SPINAL ANESTHESIA AT HIP AND LOWER EXTREMITY SURGERY

    Aynur sahin

    2013-03-01

    Conclusion: Ropivacaine and bupivacaine usage in hip and lower extremity surgery may provide hemodynamic stability, therefore we suggest that ropivacaine and bupivacaine are safe to use in spinal anesthesia for this kind of processes. [J Contemp Med 2013; 3(1.000: 36-41

  16. Changes in retinal nerve fiber layer thickness after spinal surgery in the prone position: a prospective study

    Gencer, Baran; Cosar, Murat; Tufan, Hasan Ali; Kara, Selcuk; Arikan, Sedat; Akman, Tarik; Kiraz, Hasan Ali; Comez, Arzu Taskiran; Hanci, Volkan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Changes in ocular perfusion play an important role in the pathogenesis of ischemic optic neuropathy. Ocular perfusion pressure is equal to mean arterial pressure minus intraocular pressure. The aim of this study was to evaluate the changes in the intraocular pressure and the retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in patients undergoing spinal surgery in the prone position. ...

  17. Quality of life in children and adolescents undergoing spinal deformity surgery.

    McKean, Greg M; Tsirikos, Athanasios I

    2017-01-01

    Quality of life measurements evaluate surgical results from patients' reported outcomes. To assess the impact of spinal deformity treatment using the Scoliosis Research Society-22 questionnaire. SRS-22 data was collected in 545 consecutive patients (425 females-120 males) pre-operatively, 6-, 12- and 24-months post-operatively. Variables included type and age of surgery (mean: 15.14 ± 2.07 years), gender, diagnosis and year of surgery. Age at surgery was divided in: 10-12, 13-15, and 15-19 years. Mean pre-operative SRS-22 scores for the whole group were: function 3.77 ± 0.75; pain 3.7 ± 0.97; self-image 3.14 ± 0.66; mental health 3.86 ± 0.77; total 3.62 ± 0.66. Mean 2-year post-operative scores were: function 4.39 ± 0.42; pain 4.59 ± 0.56; self-image 4.39 ± 0.51; mental health 4.43 ± 0.56; satisfaction 4.81 ± 0.40; total 4.52 ± 0.37 (padolescents.

  18. Relaxation Training and Postoperative Music Therapy for Adolescents Undergoing Spinal Fusion Surgery.

    Nelson, Kirsten; Adamek, Mary; Kleiber, Charmaine

    2017-02-01

    Spinal fusion for idiopathic scoliosis is one of the most painful surgeries experienced by adolescents. Music therapy, utilizing music-assisted relaxation with controlled breathing and imagery, is a promising intervention for reducing pain and anxiety for these patients. It can be challenging to teach new coping strategies to post-operative patients who are already in pain. This study evaluated the effects of introducing music-assisted relaxation training to adolescents before surgery. Outcome measures were self-reported pain and anxiety, recorded on 0-10 numeric rating scale, and observed behavioral indicators of pain and relaxation. The training intervention was a 12-minute video about music-assisted relaxation with opportunities to practice before surgery. Forty-four participants between the ages of 10 and 19 were enrolled. Participants were randomly assigned to the experimental group that watched the video at the preoperative visit or to the control group that did not watch the video. All subjects received a music therapy session with a board certified music therapist on post-operative day 2 while out of bed for the first time. Pain and anxiety were significantly reduced from immediately pre-therapy to post-therapy (paired t-test; p). Copyright © 2016 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Does minimal access tubular assisted spine surgery increase or decrease complications in spinal decompression or fusion?

    Fourney, Daryl R; Dettori, Joseph R; Norvell, Daniel C; Dekutoski, Mark B

    2010-04-20

    Systematic review. The purpose of this review was to attempt to answer the following 2 clinical questions: (1) Does minimal access tubular assisted spine surgery (MAS) decrease the rate of complications in posterior thoracolumbar decompression and/or fusion surgery compared with traditional open techniques? (2) What strategies to reduce the risk of complications in MAS have been shown to be effective? The objective of minimal access spine surgery is to reduce damage to surrounding tissues while accomplishing the same goals as conventional surgery. Patient demand and marketing for MAS is driven by the perception of better outcomes, although the purported advantages remain unproven. Whether the risk of complications is affected by minimal access techniques is unknown. A systematic review of the English language literature was undertaken for articles published between 1990 and July 2009. Electronic databases and reference lists of key articles were searched to identify published studies that compared the rate of complications after MAS to a control group that underwent open surgery. Single-arm studies were excluded. Two independent reviewers assessed the strength of literature using GRADE criteria assessing quality, quantity, and consistency of results. Disagreements were resolved by consensus. From the 361 articles identified, 13 met a priori criteria and were included for review. All of the studies evaluated only lumbar spine surgery. The single large randomized study showed less favorable results for MAS discectomy, but no significant difference in complication rates. The quality of the other studies, particularly for fusion surgery, was low. Overall, the rates of reoperation, dural tear, cerebrospinal fluid leak, nerve injury, and infection occurred in similar proportions between MAS and open surgery. Blood loss was reduced in MAS fusion; however, the quality of those studies was very low. Operation time and hospital length of stay was variable across studies

  20. Dose optimisation for intraoperative cone-beam flat-detector CT in paediatric spinal surgery

    Petersen, Asger Greval; Eiskjaer, Soeren; Kaspersen, Jon

    2012-01-01

    During surgery for spinal deformities, accurate placement of pedicle screws may be guided by intraoperative cone-beam flat-detector CT. The purpose of this study was to identify appropriate paediatric imaging protocols aiming to reduce the radiation dose in line with the ALARA principle. Using O-arm registered (Medtronic, Inc.), three paediatric phantoms were employed to measure CTDI w doses with default and lowered exposure settings. Images from 126 scans were evaluated by two spinal surgeons and scores were compared (Kappa statistics). Effective doses were calculated. The recommended new low-dose 3-D spine protocols were then used in 15 children. The lowest acceptable exposure as judged by image quality for intraoperative use was 70 kVp/40 mAs, 70 kVp/80 mAs and 80 kVp/40 mAs for the 1-, 5- and 12-year-old-equivalent phantoms respectively (kappa = 0,70). Optimised dose settings reduced CTDI w doses 89-93%. The effective dose was 0.5 mSv (91-94,5% reduction). The optimised protocols were used clinically without problems. Radiation doses for intraoperative 3-D CT using a cone-beam flat-detector scanner could be reduced at least 89% compared to manufacturer settings and still be used to safely navigate pedicle screws. (orig.)

  1. Major Cardiac Events After Non-cardiac Surgery.

    Sousa, Gabriela; Lopes, Ana; Reis, Pedro; Carvalho, Vasco; Santos, Alice; Abelha, Fernando José

    2016-08-01

    Postoperative cardiovascular complications might be difficult to assess and are known to be associated with longer hospital stay and increased costs as well as higher morbidity and mortality rates. The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictors for major cardiac events (MCE) after non-cardiac surgery. The study included 4398 patients who were admitted to the Surgical Intensive Care Unit between January 1, 2006 and July 19, 2013. Acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II score and simplified acute physiology score (SAPS II) were calculated, and all variables entered as parameters were evaluated independently. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the independent factors for MCE. A total of 107 people experienced MCE. The independent predictors for postoperative MCE were higher fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) (odds ratio [OR] 38.97; 95 % confidence interval [CI] 10.81-140.36), history of ischemic heart disease (OR 3.38; 95 % CI 2.12-5.39), history of congestive heart disease (OR 2.39; 95 % CI 1.49-3.85), history of insulin therapy for diabetes (OR 2.93; 95 % CI 1.66-5.19), and increased SAPS II (OR 1.03; 95 % CI 1.01-1.05). Having a MCE was associated with a longer length of stay in the surgical intensive care unit (OR 1.01, 95 % CI 1.00-1.01). FiO2, ischemic heart disease, congestive heart disease, insulin therapy for diabetes, SAPS II, and length of stay in the surgical intensive care unit were independent predictors for MCE.

  2. Cost-effectiveness of surgery plus radiotherapy versus radiotherapy alone for metastatic epidural spinal cord compression

    Thomas, Kenneth C.; Nosyk, Bohdan; Fisher, Charles G.; Dvorak, Marcel; Patchell, Roy A.; Regine, William F.; Loblaw, Andrew; Bansback, Nick; Guh, Daphne; Sun, Huiying; Anis, Aslam

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: A recent randomized clinical trial has demonstrated that direct decompressive surgery plus radiotherapy was superior to radiotherapy alone for the treatment of metastatic epidural spinal cord compression. The current study compared the cost-effectiveness of the two approaches. Methods and Materials: In the original clinical trial, clinical effectiveness was measured by ambulation and survival time until death. In this study, an incremental cost-effectiveness analysis was performed from a societal perspective. Costs related to treatment and posttreatment care were estimated and extended to the lifetime of the cohort. Weibull regression was applied to extrapolate outcomes in the presence of censored clinical effectiveness data. Results: From a societal perspective, the baseline incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was found to be $60 per additional day of ambulation (all costs in 2003 Canadian dollars). Using probabilistic sensitivity analysis, 50% of all generated ICERs were lower than $57, and 95% were lower than $242 per additional day of ambulation. This analysis had a 95% CI of -$72.74 to 309.44, meaning that this intervention ranged from a financial savings of $72.74 to a cost of $309.44 per additional day of ambulation. Using survival as the measure of effectiveness resulted in an ICER of $30,940 per life-year gained. Conclusions: We found strong evidence that treatment of metastatic epidural spinal cord compression with surgery in addition to radiotherapy is cost-effective both in terms of cost per additional day of ambulation, and cost per life-year gained

  3. Teriparatide versus low-dose bisphosphonates before and after surgery for adult spinal deformity in female Japanese patients with osteoporosis.

    Seki, Shoji; Hirano, Norikazu; Kawaguchi, Yoshiharu; Nakano, Masato; Yasuda, Taketoshi; Suzuki, Kayo; Watanabe, Kenta; Makino, Hiroto; Kanamori, Masahiko; Kimura, Tomoatsu

    2017-08-01

    Complications of adult spinal deformity surgery are problematic in osteoporotic individuals. We compared outcomes between Japanese patients treated perioperatively with teriparatide vs. low-dose bisphosphonates. Fifty-eight osteoporotic adult Japanese female patients were enrolled and assigned to perioperative teriparatide (33 patients) and bisphosphonate (25 patients) groups in non-blinded fashion. Pre- and post-operative X-ray and computed tomography imaging were used to assess outcome, and rates were compared between the groups and according to age. Pain scores and Oswestry Disability Indices (ODI) were calculated before and 2 years after surgery. Adjacent vertebral fractures and implant failure, fusion failure, and poor pain and ODI outcomes were significantly more common in the bisphosphonates group than the teriparatide group. Perioperative administration of teriparatide is more effective than that of low-dose bisphosphonates in preventing complications and maintaining fusion rates in osteoporotic Japanese females with spinal deformities undergoing surgery.

  4. Evaluation of lung volumes, vital capacity and respiratory muscle strength after cervical, thoracic and lumbar spinal surgery.

    Oliveira, Marcio Aparecido; Vidotto, Milena Carlos; Nascimento, Oliver Augusto; Almeida, Renato; Santoro, Ilka Lopes; Sperandio, Evandro Fornias; Jardim, José Roberto; Gazzotti, Mariana Rodrigues

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that physiopathological changes to the respiratory system can occur following thoracic and abdominal surgery. Laminectomy is considered to be a peripheral surgical procedure, but it is possible that thoracic spinal surgery exerts a greater influence on lung function. The aim of this study was to evaluate the pulmonary volumes and maximum respiratory pressures of patients undergoing cervical, thoracic or lumbar spinal surgery. Prospective study in a tertiary-level university hospital. Sixty-three patients undergoing laminectomy due to diagnoses of tumors or herniated discs were evaluated. Vital capacity, tidal volume, minute ventilation and maximum respiratory pressures were evaluated preoperatively and on the first and second postoperative days. Possible associations between the respiratory variables and the duration of the operation, surgical diagnosis and smoking status were investigated. Vital capacity and maximum inspiratory pressure presented reductions on the first postoperative day (20.9% and 91.6%, respectively) for thoracic surgery (P = 0.01), and maximum expiratory pressure showed reductions on the first postoperative day in cervical surgery patients (15.3%; P = 0.004). The incidence of pulmonary complications was 3.6%. There were reductions in vital capacity and maximum respiratory pressures during the postoperative period in patients undergoing laminectomy. Surgery in the thoracic region was associated with greater reductions in vital capacity and maximum inspiratory pressure, compared with cervical and lumbar surgery. Thus, surgical manipulation of the thoracic region appears to have more influence on pulmonary function and respiratory muscle action.

  5. Surgery and Anesthesia Exposure Is Not a Risk Factor for Cognitive Impairment After Major Noncardiac Surgery and Critical Illness

    Hughes, Christopher G; Patel, Mayur B; Jackson, James C; Girard, Timothy D; Geevarghese, Sunil K; Norman, Brett C; Thompson, Jennifer L; Chandrasekhar, Rameela; Brummel, Nathan E; May, Addison K; Elstad, Mark R; Wasserstein, Mitzi L; Goodman, Richard B; Moons, Karel G; Dittus, Robert S; Ely, E Wesley; Pandharipande, Pratik P; MIND-ICU, BRAIN-ICU investigators

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine whether surgery and anesthesia exposure is an independent risk factor for cognitive impairment after major noncardiac surgery associated with critical illness. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Postoperative cognitive impairment is a prevalent individual

  6. No effect of melatonin to modify surgical-stress response after major vascular surgery

    Kücükakin, B.; Wilhelmsen, M.; Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2010-01-01

    A possible mechanism underlying cardiovascular morbidity after major vascular surgery may be the perioperative ischaemia-reperfusion with excessive oxygen-derived free-radical production and increased levels of circulating inflammatory mediators. We examined the effect of melatonin infusion during...... surgery and oral melatonin treatment for 3 days after surgery on biochemical markers of oxidative and inflammatory stress....

  7. Tramadol Versus Low Dose Tramadol-paracetamol for Patient Controlled Analgesia During Spinal Vertebral Surgery

    Esad Emir

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Pain intensity may be high in the postoperative period after spinal vertebral surgery. The aim of the study was to compare the effectiveness and cost of patient controlled analgesia (PCA with tramadol versus low dose tramadol-paracetamol on postoperative pain. A total of 60 patients were randomly divided into two groups. One group received 1.5 mg/kg tramadol (Group T while the other group received 0.75 mg/kg tramadol plus 1 g of paracetamol (Group P intravenously via a PCA device immediately after surgery and the patients were transferred to a recovery room, Tramadol was continuously infused at a rate of 0.5 mL/h in both groups, at a dose of 10 mg/mL in Group T and 5 mg/mL in Group P. The bolus and infusion programs were adjusted to administer a 1 mL bolus dose of tramadol with a lock time of 10 minutes. In Group P, 1 g of paracetamol was injected intravenously every 6 hours. The four-point nausea scale, numeric rating scale for pain assessment, Ramsey sedation scale, blood pressure, heart rate, respiration rate, peripheral oxygen saturation values and side effects were recorded at 0, 15 and 30 minutes, and at 1, 2, 4, 6, 12, 18 and 24 hours. The time to reach an Aldrete score of 9 was also recorded. A cost analysis for both groups was performed. In Group P, the numeric rating scale scores were significantly lower than that in Group T at 0 and 15 minutes. The number of side effects, additional analgesic requirement and the total dose of tramadol were lower in Group P than in Group T. However, the total cost of postoperative analgesics was significantly higher in Group P than in Group T (p < 0.001. We conclude that PCA using tramadol-paracetamol could be used safely for postoperative pain relief after spinal vertebral surgery, although at a higher cost than with tramadol alone.

  8. Changes in retinal nerve fiber layer thickness after spinal surgery in the prone position: a prospective study

    Baran Gencer

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Changes in ocular perfusion play an important role in the pathogenesis of ischemic optic neuropathy. Ocular perfusion pressure is equal to mean arterial pressure minus intraocular pressure. The aim of this study was to evaluate the changes in the intraocular pressure and the retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in patients undergoing spinal surgery in the prone position. METHODS: This prospective study included 30 patients undergoing spinal surgery. Retinal nerve fiber layer thickness were measured one day before and after the surgery by using optical coherence tomography. Intraocular pressure was measured by tonopen six times at different position and time-duration: supine position (baseline; 10 min after intubation (Supine 1; 10 (Prone 1, 60 (Prone 2, 120 (Prone 3 min after prone position; and just after postoperative supine position (Supine 2. RESULTS: Our study involved 10 male and 20 female patients with the median age of 57 years. When postoperative retinal nerve fiber layer thickness measurements were compared with preoperative values, a statistically significant thinning was observed in inferior and nasal quadrants (p = 0.009 and p = 0.003, respectively. We observed a statistically significant intraocular pressure decrease in Supine 1 and an increase in both Prone 2 and Prone 3 when compared to the baseline. Mean arterial pressure and ocular perfusion pressure were found to be significantly lower in Prone 1, Prone 2 and Prone 3, when compared with the baseline. CONCLUSIONS: Our study has shown increase in intraocular pressure during spinal surgery in prone position. A statistically significant retinal nerve fiber layer thickness thinning was seen in inferior and nasal quadrants one day after the spinal surgery.

  9. CORRELATION BETWEEN NUTRITIONAL STATUS AND CLINICAL RESULTS IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING SPINAL SURGERY

    SAMUEL MACHADO MARTINS

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To investigate the relationship between preoperative vitamin D and albumin levels and postoperative quality of life in patients undergoing spinal surgery. Methods: Patients undergoing thoracic and lumbar spine surgery were evaluated in this prospective study. Their vitamin D and albumin levels were assessed before surgery and quality of life was measured by two questionnaires, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI and Scoliosis Research Society - 22 (SRS-22, one year after the procedure. Data on infection occurrence and healing time were collected. Preoperative nutritional values and patients’ quality of life were analyzed using the chi-square test and ANOVA for albumin and vitamin D, respectively. The relationship among nutritional status, healing time, and the occurrence of infection was evaluated by the Pearson correlation coefficient. Results: Forty-six patients were included and their mean nutritional values were 19.1 (6.6 ng/mL for vitamin D and 3.9 (0.6 g/dL for albumin [mean (standard deviation]. No association was found between vitamin D and quality of life of patients measured by ODI (p=0.534 and SRS-22 (p=0.739 questionnaires. There was also no association between albumin levels and quality of life measured by ODI (p=0.259 and SRS-22 (p=0.076 questionnaires. No correlation was found between the healing time or occurrence of infection and nutritional values. Conclusions: There was no association between vitamin D and albumin levels and the surgical result, according to the patient’s perception, besides the occurrence of complications with the surgical wound.

  10. Correlation between cervical lordosis and adjacent segment pathology after anterior cervical spinal surgery.

    Lee, Soo Eon; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Kim, Hyun Jib

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the incidence and risk factors for adjacent segment pathology (ASP) after anterior cervical spinal surgery. Fourteen patients (12 male, mean age 47.1 years) who underwent single-level cervical disk arthroplasty (CDA group) and 28 case-matched patients (24 male, mean age 53.6 years) who underwent single-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF group) were included. Presence of radiologic ASP (RASP) was based on observed changes in anterior osteophytes, disks, and calcification of the anterior longitudinal ligament on lateral radiographs. The mean follow-up period was 43.4 months in the CDA group and 44.6 months in the ACDF group. At final follow-up, ASP was observed in 5 (35.7%) CDA patients and 16 (57.1%) ACDF patients (p = 0.272). The interval between surgery and ASP development was 33.8 months in the CDA group and 16.3 months in the ACDF group (p = 0.046). The ASP risk factor analysis indicated postoperative cervical angle at C3-7 being more lordotic in non-ASP patients in both groups. Restoration of lordosis occurred in the CDA group regardless of the presence of ASP, but heterotopic ossification development was associated with the presence of ASP in the CDA group. And the CDA group had significantly greater clinical improvements than those in the ACDF group when ASP was present. In both CDA and ACDF patients, RASP developed, but CDA was associated with a delay in ASP development. A good clinical outcome was expected in CDA group, even when ASP developed. Restoration of cervical lordosis was an important factor in anterior cervical spine surgery.

  11. Retrospective analysis of the use of amniotic membranes and xenografts in spinal surgery and anterior cranial fossa operations

    Jafri Malim Abdullah

    1999-01-01

    To determine the suitability of amniotic membrane an bovine bone xenografts for the use in spinal surgery and anterior cranial for a generations. Fifteen patients with anterior cranial fossa defects and spinal bone fractures received bovine bone xenografts and 10 patients with meningomyeloceles received amniotic membranes (produced by the Malaysian National Tissue Bank) were analysed retrospectively. Clinical criterias like fever, signs of inflammation, breakdown of graft implant, non specific reaction to the nervous tissue were analysed haematological and radiologically. All patients who received the bovine grafts and amniotic membranes did not show any evidence of inflammation or fever. There were no graft implant breakdowns. There was no radiological or clinical evidence of specific or non specific reaction to the nervous tissue after 12-36 months followup Amniotic membranes and bovine xenografts may be used in the healing and reconstruction of spinal and cranial defects. Despite no evidence of rejection and infection after 36 months, a long term followup is still needed

  12. Immunostaining for Homer reveals the majority of excitatory synapses in laminae I?III of the mouse spinal dorsal horn

    Gutierrez-Mecinas, Maria; Kuehn, Emily D.; Abraira, Victoria E.; Polg?r, Erika; Watanabe, Masahiko; Todd, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    The spinal dorsal horn processes somatosensory information before conveying it to the brain. The neuronal organization of the dorsal horn is still poorly understood, although recent studies have defined several distinct populations among the interneurons, which account for most of its constituent neurons. All primary afferents, and the great majority of neurons in laminae I–III are glutamatergic, and a major factor limiting our understanding of the synaptic circuitry has been the difficulty i...

  13. Best practice in major elective rectal/pelvic surgery: enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS)

    Segelman, Josefin; Nygren, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    Within traditional clinical care, the postoperative recovery after pelvic/rectal surgery has been slow with high morbidity and long hospital stay. The enhanced recovery after surgery program is a multimodal approach to perioperative care designed to accelerate recovery and safely reduce hospital stay. This review will briefly summarize optimal perioperative care, before, during and after surgery in this group of patients and issues related to implementation and audit.

  14. Semuloparin for prevention of venous thromboembolism after major orthopedic surgery

    Lassen, M R; Fisher, W; Mouret, P

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Semuloparin is a novel ultra-low-molecular-weight heparin under development for venous thromboembolism (VTE) prevention in patients at increased risk, such as surgical and cancer patients. OBJECTIVES: Three Phase III studies compared semuloparin and enoxaparin after major orthopedic...... was to be performed between days 7 and 11. The primary efficacy endpoint was a composite of any deep vein thrombosis, non-fatal pulmonary embolism or all-cause death. Safety outcomes included major bleeding, clinically relevant non-major (CRNM) bleeding, and any clinically relevant bleeding (major bleeding plus CRNM...

  15. Efficacy of transverse tripolar spinal cord stimulator for the relief of chronic low back pain from failed back surgery.

    Buvanendran, Asokumar; Lubenow, Timothy J

    2008-01-01

    Failed back surgery syndrome is a common clinical entity for which spinal cord stimulation has been found to be an effective mode of analgesia, but with variable success rates. To determine if focal stimulation of the dorsal columns with a transverse tripolar lead might achieve deeper penetration of the electrical stimulus into the spinal cord and therefore provide greater analgesia to the back. Case report. We describe a 42-year-old female with failed back surgery syndrome that had greater back pain than leg pain. The tripolar lead configuration was achieved by placing percutaneously an octapolar lead in the spinal midline followed by 2 adjacent quadripolar leads, advanced to the T7-T10 vertebral bodies. Tripolar stimulation pattern resulted in more than 70% pain relief in this patient during the screening trial, while stimulation of one or 2 electrodes only provided 20% pain relief. After implantation of a permanent tripolar electrode system with a single rechargeable battery, the pain relief was maintained for one year. This is case report describing a case of a patient with chronic low back pain with a diagnosis of failed back surgery syndrome in which transverse tripolar stimulation using an octapolar and 2 quadripolar leads appeared to be beneficial. The transverse tripolar system consists of a central cathode surrounded by anodes, using 3 leads. This arrangement may contribute to maximum dorsal column stimulation with minimal dorsal root stimulation and provide analgesia to the lower back.

  16. Efficacy and Safety of Transdermal Buprenorphine versus Oral Tramadol/Acetaminophen in Patients with Persistent Postoperative Pain after Spinal Surgery.

    Lee, Jae Hyup; Kim, Jin-Hyok; Kim, Jin-Hwan; Kim, Hak-Sun; Min, Woo-Kie; Park, Ye-Soo; Lee, Kyu-Yeol; Lee, Jung-Hee

    2017-01-01

    Control of persistent pain following spinal surgery is an unmet clinical need. This study compared the efficacy and safety of buprenorphine transdermal system (BTDS) to oral tramadol/acetaminophen (TA) in Korean patients with persistent, moderate pain following spinal surgery. Open-label, interventional, randomized multicenter study. Adults with persistent postoperative pain (Numeric Rating Scale [NRS] ≥ 4 at 14-90 days postsurgery) were enrolled. Patients received once-weekly BTDS ( n = 47; 5  μ g/h titrated to 20  μ g/h) or twice-daily TA ( n = 40; tramadol 37.5 mg/acetaminophen 325 mg, one tablet titrated to 4 tablets) for 6 weeks. The study compared pain reduction with BTDS versus TA at week 6. Quality of life (QoL), treatment satisfaction, medication compliance, and adverse events (AEs) were assessed. At week 6, both groups reported significant pain reduction (mean NRS change: BTDS -2.02; TA -2.76, both P pain following spinal surgery, BTDS is an alternative to TA for reducing pain and supports medication compliance. This trial is registered with Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01983111.

  17. [Low-dose hypobaric spinal anesthesia for anorectal surgery in jackknife position: levobupivacaine-fentanyl compared to lidocaine-fentanyl].

    de Santiago, J; Santos-Yglesias, J; Girón, J; Jiménez, A; Errando, C L

    2010-11-01

    To compare the percentage of patients who were able to bypass the postoperative intensive care recovery unit after selective spinal anesthesia with lidocaine-fentanyl versus levobupivacaine-fentanyl for anorectal surgery in jackknife position. Randomized double-blind clinical trial comparing 2 groups of 30 patients classified ASA 1-2. One group received 18 mg of 0.6% lidocaine plus 10 microg of fentanyl while the other group received 3 mg of 0.1% levobupivacaine plus 10 microg of fentanyl. Intraoperative variables were time of start of surgery, maximum extension of sensory blockade, requirement for rescue analgesics, and hemodynamic events. The level of sensory blockade was recorded at 5, 10, and 15 minutes after the start of surgery and at the end of the procedure. The degrees of postoperative motor blockade and proprioception were recorded, as were the results of the Romberg test and whether or not the patient was able to bypass the postoperative recovery unit. Also noted were times of start of ambulation and discharge, complications, and postoperative satisfaction. Intraoperative variables did not differ significantly between groups, and all patients in both groups bypassed the postoperative recovery unit. Times until walking and discharge home, complications, and overall satisfaction after surgery were similar in the 2 groups. Both spinal anesthetic solutions provide effective, selective anesthesia and are associated with similar rates of recovery care unit bypass after anorectal surgery in jackknife position.

  18. Perioperative blood loss and diclofenac in major arthroplastic surgery

    Ljiljana Gvozdenović

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Contemporary literature indicates precaution over the perioperative use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, since they can potentially increase perioperative blood loss related to their mechanism of action. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on perioperative blood loss undergoing hip arthroplasty and its correlation with general and regional anesthesia.Methods: This prospective study included 120 patients who had undergone elective unilateral total hip arthroplasty. Patients were allocated into four groups. Groups 1 and 2 were pretreated with diclofenac and operated in general and regional anesthesia. Group 3 and 4 weren’t pretreated with any non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug and were, as well, operated in general and regional anesthesia. Diclofenac was administered orally two times a day 75 mg (total 150 mg and also as intramuscular injection (75 mg preoperatively and 12 hours later on a day of surgery.Results: The perioperative blood loss in the rst 24 hours showed an increase of 29.4% in the diclofenac group operated in general anesthesia and increase of 26.8% in patients operated in regional anesthesia (P < 0.05 compared to control group. Statistical data evaluation of patients operated in general anesthesia compared to regional anesthesia, the overall blood loss in the rst 24 h after surgery, showed an increase of 6.4% in the diclofenac group and increase of 3.6% in placebo group. This was not statistically significant.Conclusion: Pretreatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (diclofenac before elective unilateral total hip arthroplasty increases the perioperative blood loss signficantly. Early discontinuation of non-selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is advised.

  19. Significance and function of different spinal collateral compartments following thoracic aortic surgery: immediate versus long-term flow compensation.

    Meffert, Philipp; Bischoff, Moritz S; Brenner, Robert; Siepe, Matthias; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Kari, Fabian A

    2014-05-01

    Iatrogenic paraplegia has been accompanying cardiovascular surgery since its beginning. As a result, surgeons have been developing many theories about the exact mechanisms of this devastating complication. Thus, the impact of single arteries that contribute to the spinal perfusion is one of the most discussed subjects in modern surgery. The subsequent decision of reattachment or the permanent disconnection of these intercostal arteries divides the surgical community. On the one hand, the anatomical or vascular approach pleads for the immediate reimplantation to reconstruct the anatomical situation. On the other hand, the decision of the permanent disconnection aims at avoiding stealing phenomenon away from the spinal vascular network. This spinal collateral network can be described as consisting of three components-the intraspinal and two paraspinal compartments-that feed the nutrient arteries of the spinal cord. The exact functional impact of the different compartments of the collateral network remains poorly understood. In this review, the function of the intraspinal compartment in the context of collateral network principle as an immediate emergency backup system is described. The exact structure and architectural principles of the intraspinal compartment are described. The critical parameters with regard to the risk of postoperative spinal cord ischaemia are the number of anterior radiculomedullary arteries (ARMAs) and the distance between them in relation to the longitudinal extent of aortic disease. The paraspinal network as a sleeping reserve is proposed as the long-term backup system. This sleeping reserve has to be activated by arteriogenic stimuli. These are presented briefly, and prior findings regarding arteriogenesis are discussed in the light of the collateral network concept. Finally, the role of preoperative visualization of the ARMAs in order to evaluate the risk of postoperative paraplegia is emphasized.

  20. Effectiveness of radiation therapy without surgery in metastatic spinal cord compression: final results from a prospective trial

    Maranzano, Ernesto; Latini, Paolo

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: In assessing effectiveness of radiation therapy (RT) in metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC), we performed a prospective trial in which patients with this complication were generally treated with RT plus steroids, and surgery was reserved for selected cases. Methods and Materials: Two hundred seventy-five consecutive patients with MSCC entered this protocol. Twenty (7%) underwent surgery plus RT, another 255 received RT alone. Of all eligible patients, 25 (10%) early deaths and 21 (8%) entering a feasibility study of RT without steroids, were not evaluable. Of the 209 evaluable cases, 110 were females and 99 males, and median age was 62 years. Median follow-up was 49 months (range, 13 to 88) and treatment consisted of 30 Gy RT (using two different schedules) together with steroids (standard or high doses, depending on motor deficit severity). Response was assessed according to back pain and motor and bladder function before and after therapy. Results: Back pain total response rate was 82% (complete or partial response or stable pain, 54, 17, or 11%, respectively). About three-fourths of the patients (76%) achieved full recovery or preservation of walking ability and 44% with sphincter dysfunction improved. Early diagnosis was the most important response predictor so that a large majority of patients able to walk and with good bladder function maintained these capacities. When diagnosis was late, tumors with favorable histologies (i.e., myeloma, breast, and prostate carcinomas) above all responded to RT. Duration of response was also influenced by histology. Favorable histologies are associated to higher median response (myeloma, breast, and prostate carcinomas, 16, 12, and 10 months, respectively). Median survival time was 6 months, with a 28% probability of survival for 1 year. Survival time was longer for patients able to walk before and/or after RT, those with favourable histologies, and females. There was agreement between patient survival and

  1. Predicting mortality in damage control surgery for major abdominal ...

    has increased the survival rate after major trauma to over. 50%.1-6. The term ... Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) for Windows, ver- sion 12.0 (SAS .... J Surg 2004; 91: 1095-1101. 8. American College of Surgeon's Committee on Trauma. Advanced Trauma. Life Support Manual. Chicago: ACS, 1997: 11-242. Table Iv.

  2. Merits of exercise therapy before and after major surgery

    Hoogeboom, T.J.; Dronkers, J.J.; Hulzebos, E.H.J.; Meeteren, N.L.U. van

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Advances in medical care have led to an increasing elderly population. Elderly individuals should be able to participate in society as long as possible. However, with an increasing age their adaptive capacity gradually decreases, specially before and after major life events (like

  3. What is the role of autologous blood transfusion in major spine surgery?

    Kumar, Naresh; Chen, Yongsheng; Nath, Chinmoy; Liu, Eugene Hern Choon

    2012-06-01

    Major spine surgery is associated with significant blood loss, which has numerous complications. Blood loss is therefore an important concern when undertaking any major spine surgery. Blood loss can be addressed by reducing intraoperative blood loss and replenishing perioperative blood loss. Reducing intraoperative blood loss helps maintain hemodynamic equilibrium and provides a clearer operative field during surgery. Homologous blood transfusion is still the mainstay for replenishing blood loss in major spine surgery across the world, despite its known adverse effects. These significant adverse effects can be seen in up to 20% of patients. Autologous blood transfusion avoids the risks associated with homologous blood transfusion and has been shown to be cost-effective. This article reviews the different methods of autologous transfusion and focuses on the use of intraoperative cell salvage in major spine surgery. Autologous blood transfusion is a proven alternative to homologous transfusion in major spine surgery, avoiding most, if not all of these adverse effects. However, autologous blood transfusion rates in major spine surgery remain low across the world. Autologous blood transfusion may obviate the need for homologous transfusion completely. We encourage spine surgeons to consider autologous blood transfusion wherever feasible.

  4. Laparoscopy in major abdominal emergency surgery seems to be a safe procedure

    Nielsen, Liv Bjerre Juul; Tengberg, Line Toft; Bay-Nielsen, Morten

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Laparoscopy is well established in the majority of elective procedures in abdominal surgery. In contrast, it is primarily used in minor surgery such as appendectomy or cholecystectomy in the emergent setting. This study aimed to analyze the safety and effectiveness of a laparoscopic...

  5. Adult spinal deformity treated with minimally invasive surgery. Description of surgical technique, radiological results and literature review.

    Domínguez, I; Luque, R; Noriega, M; Rey, J; Alía, J; Urda, A; Marco, F

    The prevalence of adult spinal deformity has been increasing exponentially over time. Surgery has been credited with good radiological and clinical results. The incidence of complications is high. MIS techniques provide good results with fewer complications. This is a retrospective study of 25 patients with an adult spinal deformity treated by MIS surgery, with a minimum follow-up of 6 months. Radiological improvement was SVA from 5 to 2cm, coronal Cobb angle from 31° to 6°, and lumbar lordosis from 18° to 38°. All of these parameters remained stable over time. We also present the complications that appeared in 4 patients (16%). Only one patient needed reoperation. We describe the technique used and review the references on the subject. We conclude that the MIS technique for treating adult spinal deformity has comparable results to those of the conventional techniques but with fewer complications. Copyright © 2017 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. The effect of milrinone on induced hypotension in elderly patients during spinal surgery: a randomized controlled trial.

    Hwang, Wonjung; Kim, Eunsung

    2014-08-01

    Induced hypotension is widely used intraoperatively to reduce blood loss and to improve the surgical field during spinal surgery. To determine the effect of milrinone on induced hypotension during spinal surgery in elderly patients. Prospective randomized clinical trial. Forty patients, 60 to 70 years old, ASA I-II, who underwent elective lumbar fusion surgery. Intraoperative hemodynamics, blood loss, hourly urine output, and grade of surgical field. All patients were randomized to group M or N. The study drug was infused after perivertebral muscle retraction until complete interbody fusion. In group M, 50 μg/kg/min of milrinone was infused over 10 minutes as a loading dose followed by 0.6 μg/kg/min of milrinone as a continuous dose. In group N, an identical volume of normal saline was infused in the same fashion. This study was not funded by commercial or other sponsorship and the authors confirm no conflicts of interest, financial or otherwise. During infusion of the study drug, the systolic and mean blood pressures were maintained within adequate limits of induced hypotension in group M. Intraoperative blood loss was 445.0±226.5 mL in group M and 765.0±339.2 mL in group N (p=.001). Hourly urine output was 1.4±0.6 mL in group M and 0.8±0.2 mL in group N (pmilrinone is useful for induced hypotension in elderly patients during spinal surgery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The comparative study of epidural levobupivacaine and bupivacaine in major abdominal surgeries

    Ali Uzuner

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions: The results of our study suggest that same concentration of epidural levobupivacaine and bupivacaine with fentanyl provide stable postoperative analgesia and both were found safe for the patients undergoing major abdominal surgery.

  8. Understanding suicide and disability through three major disabling conditions: Intellectual disability, spinal cord injury, and multiple sclerosis.

    Giannini, Margaret J; Bergmark, Brian; Kreshover, Samantha; Elias, Eileen; Plummer, Caitlin; O'Keefe, Eileen

    2010-04-01

    Disability is not a category of disease but rather relates to the physical, sensory, cognitive, and/or mental disorders that substantially limit one or more major life activities. These functional limitations have been found to be predictive of suicide, with psychiatric comorbidities increasing the risk for suicide. Enormous gaps exist in the understanding of the relationship between disability and suicide. We reviewed the current literature addressing the prevalence of and risk factors for suicide among persons with three major disabling conditions and identify priorities for future research. We performed a literature review investigating the relationship between three major disabilities (intellectual disability, spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis) and suicide. To ensure thorough evaluation of the available literature, we searched PubMed, the Cochrane Library, and Google Scholar with terms including "suicide," "disability," "intellectual disability," "spinal cord injury," "multiple sclerosis," and permutations thereof. By this method we evaluated 110 articles and included 21 in the review. Suicide rates are significantly higher among persons with multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury than in the general population. A more nuanced picture of suicide rates and risk factors exists for the intellectual disability population, in which it appears that rates of suicide risk factors are higher than among the general population while suicide rates may be lower. The highest rates of suicide are reported among study populations of persons with multiple sclerosis, followed by persons with spinal cord injury, and then individuals with intellectual disability. Suicide among persons with disabilities is a complex and pressing public health concern. Urgent research priorities include (1) valid estimates of suicide rates among persons with disabilities by age cohort; (2) assessment of the predictive importance of suicide risk factors; and (3) determination of best

  9. The effect of anesthesia type on the postoperative complications of major lower extremity surgery

    Murat Bakış; Sinem Sarı; Ayhan Öznur Cillimoğlu; Özgür Özbey; Bakiye Uğur; Mustafa Oğurlu

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Regional anesthesia is preferred more than general anesthesia in major lower extremity surgery. In our study, we aimed to investigate the relationship incidence of complications between regional anesthesia and general anesthesia in major surgery. Method: A total of 372 patients who underwent total hip or knee replacement from 1 January 2009 to 31 December 2012 were evaluated retrospectively in the study. The number of patients undergoing general anesthesia and regional anesthesi...

  10. Advantages and Disadvantages of Adult Spinal Deformity Surgery and Its Impact on Health-Related Quality of Life.

    Yoshida, Go; Boissiere, Louis; Larrieu, Daniel; Bourghli, Anouar; Vital, Jean Marc; Gille, Olivier; Pointillart, Vincent; Challier, Vincent; Mariey, Remi; Pellisé, Ferran; Vila-Casademunt, Alba; Perez-Grueso, Francisco Javier Sánchez; Alanay, Ahmet; Acaroglu, Emre; Kleinstück, Frank; Obeid, Ibrahim

    2017-03-15

    Prospective multicenter study of adult spinal deformity (ASD) surgery. To clarify the effect of ASD surgery on each health-related quality of life (HRQOL) subclass/domain. For patients with ASD, surgery offers superior radiological and HRQOL outcomes compared with nonoperative care. HRQOL may, however, be affected by surgical advantages related to corrective effects, yielding adequate spinopelvic alignment and stability or disadvantages because of long segment fusion. The study included 170 consecutive patients with ASD from a multicenter database with more than 2-year follow-up period. We analyzed each HRQOL domain/subclass (short form-36 items, Oswestry Disability Index, Scoliosis Research Society-22 [SRS-22] questionnaire), and radiographic parameters preoperatively and at 1 and 2 years postoperatively. We divided the patients into two groups each based on lowest instrumented vertebra (LIV; above L5 or S1 to ilium) or surgeon-determined preoperative pathology (idiopathic or degenerative). Improvement rate (%) was calculated as follows: 100 × |pre.-post.|/preoperative points (%) (+, advantages; -, disadvantages). The scores of all short form-36 items and SRS-22 subclasses improved at 1 and 2 years after surgery, regardless of LIV location and preoperative pathology. Personal care and lifting in Oswestry Disability Index were, however, not improved after 1 year. These disadvantages were correlated to sagittal modifiers of SRS-Schwab classification similar to other HRQOL. The degree of personal care disadvantage mainly depended on LIV location and preoperative pathology. Although personal care improved after 2 years postoperatively, no noticeable improvements in lifting were recorded. HRQOL subclass analysis indicated two disadvantages of ASD surgery, which were correlated to sagittal radiographic measures. Fusion to the sacrum or ilium greatly restricted the ability to stretch or bend, leading to limited daily activities for at least 1 year postoperatively

  11. Tokuhashi Scoring System has limited applicability in the majority of patients with spinal cord compression secondary to vertebral metastasis

    Matheus Fernandes de Oliveira

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Spine is the primary bone site affected by systemic metastasis. Although there are scales that attempt to manage these patients, their real applicability is unknown. The Tokuhashi Scoring System (TSS is a widely used prognostic tool. At the time of treatment, the data necessary to complete TSS may be incomplete, making its application impossible. Objective To evaluate the number of TSS scores completed by the time the clinical therapeutic decision was made. Methods From July 2010 to January 2012, we selected patients who were diagnosed with spinal metastases. Results Sixty spinal metastasis patients (21 female, 39 male were evaluated between July 2010 and January 2012. At the time of the treatment decision, only 25% of the patients had completed the TSS items. Conclusion In the majority of patients with vertebral metastasis, TSS variables cannot be applied.

  12. Effect of cooled hyperbaric bupivacaine on unilateral spinal anesthesia success rate and hemodynamic complications in inguinal hernia surgery.

    Tomak, Yakup; Erdivanli, Basar; Sen, Ahmet; Bostan, Habib; Budak, Ersel Tan; Pergel, Ahmet

    2016-02-01

    We hypothesized that cooling hyperbaric bupivacaine from 23 to 5 °C may limit the intrathecal spread of bupivacaine and therefore increase the success rate of unilateral spinal anesthesia and decrease the rate of hemodynamic complications. A hundred patients scheduled for elective unilateral inguinal hernia surgery were randomly allocated to receive 1.8 ml of 0.5 % hyperbaric bupivacaine intrathecally at either 5 °C (group I, n = 50) or at 23 °C (group II, n = 50). Following spinal block at the L2-3 interspace, the lateral decubitus position was maintained for 15 min. Unilateral spinal anesthesia was assessed and confirmed at 15 and 30 min. The levels of sensory and motor block on the operative side were evaluated until complete resolution. The rate of unilateral spinal anesthesia at 15 and 30 min was significantly higher in group I (p = 0.015 and 0.028, respectively). Hypotensive events and bradycardia were significantly rarer in group I (p = 0.014 and 0.037, respectively). The density and viscosity of the solution at 5 °C was significantly higher than at 23 °C (p < 0.0001). Compared with group II, sensory block peaked later in group I (17.4 vs 12.6 min) and at a lower level (T9 vs T7), and two-segment regression of sensory block (76.4 vs 84.3 min) and motor block recovery was shorter (157.6 vs 193.4 min) (p < 0.0001). Cooling of hyperbaric bupivacaine to 5 °C increased the density and viscosity of the solution and the success rate of unilateral spinal anesthesia, and decreased the hemodynamic complication rate.

  13. General or Spinal Anaesthetic for Vaginal Surgery in Pelvic Floor Disorders (GOSSIP): a feasibility randomised controlled trial.

    Purwar, B; Ismail, K M; Turner, N; Farrell, A; Verzune, M; Annappa, M; Smith, I; El-Gizawy, Zeiad; Cooper, J C

    2015-08-01

    Spinal anaesthesia (SA) and general anaesthesia (GA) are widely used techniques for vaginal surgery for pelvic floor disorders with inconclusive evidence of the superiority of either. We conducted a randomised controlled trial (RCT) to assess the feasibility of a full scale RCT aiming to examine the effect of anaesthetic mode for vaginal surgery on operative, patient reported and length of hospital stay (LOHS) outcomes. Patients undergoing vaginal surgery, recruited through a urogynaecology service in a University teaching hospital, were randomised to receive either GA or SA. Patients were followed up for 12 weeks postoperatively. Pain was measured on a visual analogue scale; nausea was assessed with a four-point verbal rating scale. Patient's subjective perception of treatment outcome, quality of life (QoL) and functional outcomes were assessed using the International Consultation on Incontinence Modular Questionnaire (ICIQ) on vaginal symptoms and the SF-36 questionnaire. Sixty women were randomised, 29 to GA and 31 to SA. The groups were similar in terms of age and type of vaginal surgery performed. No statistically significant differences were noted between the groups with regard to pain, nausea, quality of life (QoL), functional outcomes as well as length of stay in the postoperative recovery room, use of analgesia postoperatively and LOHS. This study has demonstrated that a full RCT is feasible and should focus on the length of hospital stay in a subgroup of patients undergoing vaginal surgery where SA may help to facilitate enhanced recovery or day surgery.

  14. Comparative evaluation of femoral nerve block and intravenous fentanyl for positioning during spinal anaesthesia in surgery of femur fracture

    Ashok Jadon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Spinal anaesthesia is the preferred technique to fix fracture of the femur. Extreme pain does not allow ideal positioning for this procedure. Intravenous fentanyl and femoral nerve block are commonly used techniques to reduce the pain during position for spinal anaesthesia however; results are conflicting regarding superiority of femoral nerve block over intravenous fentanyl. Aims: We conducted this study to compare the analgesic effect provided by femoral nerve block (FNB and intra- venous (IV fentanyl prior to positioning for central neuraxial block in patients undergoing surgery for femur fracture. Patients and Methods: In this randomized prospective study 60 patients scheduled for fracture femur operation under spinal were included. Patients were distributed in two groups through computer generated random numbers table; Femoral nerve block group (FNB and Intravenous fentanyl group (FENT. In FNB group patients received FNB guided by a peripheral nerve stimulator (Stimuplex; B Braun, Melsungen, AG 5 minutes prior to positioning. 20mL, 1.5% lidocaine with adrenaline (1:200,000 was injected incrementally after a negative aspiration test. Patients in the fentanyl group received injection fentanyl 1 μg/kg IV 5 mins prior to positioning. Spinal block was performed and pain scores before and during positioning were recorded. Statistical analysis was done with Sigmaplot version-10 computer software. Student t-test was applied to compare the means and P < 0.05 was taken as significant. Results: VAS during positioning in group FNB: 0.57 ± 0.31 versus FENT 2.53 ± 1.61 (P = 0.0020. Time to perform spinal anesthesia in group FNB: 15.33 ± 1.64 min versus FENT 19.56 ± 3.09 min (P = 0.000049. Quality of patient positioning for spinal anesthesia in group FNB 2.67± 0.606 versus FENT 1.967 ± 0.85 (P = 0.000027. Patient acceptance was less in group FENT (P = 0.000031. Conclusion: Femoral nerve block provides better analgesia, patient

  15. Comparison between sevoflurane and desflurane on emergence and recovery characteristics of children undergoing surgery for spinal dysraphism

    Priyanka Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Rapid recovery is desirable after neurosurgery as it enables early post-operative neurological evaluation and prompt management of complications. Studies have been rare comparing the recovery characteristics in paediatric neurosurgical patients. Hence, this study was carried out to compare the effect of sevoflurane and desflurane anaesthesia on emergence and extubation in children undergoing spinal surgery. Methods: Sixty children, aged 1-12 years, undergoing elective surgery for lumbo-sacral spinal dysraphism were enrolled. Anaesthesia was induced with sevoflurane using a face mask. The children were then randomised to receive either sevoflurane or desflurane with oxygen and nitrous oxide, fentanyl (1 μg/kg/h and rocuronium. The anaesthetic depth was guided by bispectral index (BIS ® monitoring with a target BIS ® between 45 and 55. Perioperative data with regard to demographic profile, haemodynamics, emergence and extubation times, modified Aldrete score (MAS, pain (objective pain score, agitation (Cole′s agitation score, time to first analgesic and complications, thereof, were recorded. Statistical analysis was done using STATA 11.2 (StataCorp., College Station, TX, USA and data are presented as median (range or mean ± standard deviation. Results: The demographic profile, haemodynamics, MAS, pain and agitation scores and time to first analgesic were comparable in between the two groups (P > 0.05. The emergence time was shorter in desflurane group (2.75 [0.85-12] min as compared to sevoflurane (8 [2.5-14] min (P < 0.0001. The extubation time was also shorter in desflurane group (3 [0.8-10] min as compared to the sevoflurane group (5.5 [1.2-14] min (P = 0.0003. Conclusion: Desflurane provided earlier tracheal extubation and emergence as compared to sevoflurane in children undergoing surgery for lumbo-sacral spinal dysraphism.

  16. Efficacy and Safety of Transdermal Buprenorphine versus Oral Tramadol/Acetaminophen in Patients with Persistent Postoperative Pain after Spinal Surgery

    Jae Hyup Lee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Control of persistent pain following spinal surgery is an unmet clinical need. This study compared the efficacy and safety of buprenorphine transdermal system (BTDS to oral tramadol/acetaminophen (TA in Korean patients with persistent, moderate pain following spinal surgery. Methods. Open-label, interventional, randomized multicenter study. Adults with persistent postoperative pain (Numeric Rating Scale [NRS] ≥ 4 at 14–90 days postsurgery were enrolled. Patients received once-weekly BTDS (n=47; 5 μg/h titrated to 20 μg/h or twice-daily TA (n=40; tramadol 37.5 mg/acetaminophen 325 mg, one tablet titrated to 4 tablets for 6 weeks. The study compared pain reduction with BTDS versus TA at week 6. Quality of life (QoL, treatment satisfaction, medication compliance, and adverse events (AEs were assessed. Findings. At week 6, both groups reported significant pain reduction (mean NRS change: BTDS −2.02; TA −2.76, both P<0.0001 and improved QoL (mean EQ-5D index change: BTDS 0.10; TA 0.19, both P<0.05. The BTDS group achieved better medication compliance (97.8% versus 91.0%. Incidence of AEs (26.1% versus 20.0% and adverse drug reactions (20.3% versus 16.9% were comparable between groups. Implications. For patients with persistent pain following spinal surgery, BTDS is an alternative to TA for reducing pain and supports medication compliance. This trial is registered with Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01983111.

  17. Can Tranexamic Acid Reduce Blood Loss during Major Cardiac Surgery? A Pilot Study.

    Compton, Frances; Wahed, Amer; Gregoric, Igor; Kar, Biswajit; Dasgupta, Amitava; Tint, Hlaing

    2017-09-01

    We examined the effectiveness of tranexamic acid in preventing intraoperative blood loss during major cardiac surgery. Out of initial 81 patients undergoing major cardiac surgery (both coronary artery bypass and valve repair procedures) at our teaching hospital, sixty-seven patients were selected for this study. We compared estimated blood loss, decrease in percent hemoglobin and hematocrit following surgery between two groups of patients (none of them received any blood product during surgery), one group receiving no tranexamic acid (n=17) and another group receiving tranexamic acid (n=25). In the second study, we combined these patients with patients receiving modest amounts of blood products (1-2 unit) and compared these parameters between two groups of patients (25 patients received no tranexamic acid, 42 patients received tranexamic acid). In patients who received no blood product during surgery, those who received no tranexamic acid showed statistically significant (independent t-test two tailed at p tranexamic acid (mean: 987.2 mL, SD: 459.9, n=25). We observed similar results when the patients receiving no blood products and patients receiving modest amount of blood products were combined based on the use of tranexamic acid or not. No statistically significant difference was observed in percent reduced hemoglobin or hematocrit following surgery in any group of patients. We conclude that intraoperative antifibrinolytic therapy with tranexamic acid does not reduce intraoperative blood loss during major cardiac surgery which contradicts popular belief. © 2017 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  18. Rate of perioperative neurological complications after surgery for cervical spinal cord stimulation.

    Chan, Andrew K; Winkler, Ethan A; Jacques, Line

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE Cervical spinal cord stimulation (cSCS) is used to treat pain of the cervical region and upper extremities. Case reports and small series have shown a relatively low risk of complication after cSCS, with only a single reported case of perioperative spinal cord injury in the literature. Catastrophic cSCS-associated spinal cord injury remains a concern as a result of underreporting. To aid in preoperative counseling, it is necessary to establish a minimum rate of spinal cord injury and surgical complication following cSCS. METHODS The Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) is a stratified sample of 20% of all patient discharges from nonfederal hospitals in the United States. The authors identified discharges with a primary procedure code for spinal cord stimulation (ICD-9 03.93) associated with a primary diagnosis of cervical pathology from 2002 to 2011. They then analyzed short-term safety outcomes including the presence of spinal cord injury and neurological, medical, and general perioperative complications and compared outcomes using univariate analysis. RESULTS Between 2002 and 2011, there were 2053 discharges for cSCS. The spinal cord injury rate was 0.5%. The rates of any neurological, medical, and general perioperative complications were 1.1%, 1.4%, and 11.7%, respectively. There were no deaths. CONCLUSIONS In the largest series of cSCS, the risk of spinal cord injury was higher than previously reported (0.5%). Nonetheless, this procedure remains relatively safe, and physicians may use these data to corroborate the safety of cSCS in an appropriately selected patient population. This may become a key treatment option in an increasingly opioid-dependent, aging population.

  19. Efficacy of Early Surgery for Neurological Improvement in Spinal Cord Injury without Radiographic Evidence of Trauma in the Elderly.

    Inoue, Tomoo; Suzuki, Shinsuke; Endo, Toshiki; Uenohara, Hiroshi; Tominaga, Teiji

    2017-09-01

    The optimal timing for surgery for patients with spinal cord injury without radiographic evidence of trauma (SCIWORET) remains unclear. This is especially true in the elderly, given that most studies are done with younger patients to avoid age-related comorbidities. We aimed to compare the efficacy of early (24 hours postinjury) surgery in patients with SCIWORET aged ≥65 years. We identified patients aged ≥65 years who underwent surgery for SCIWORET between January 1995 and February 2016. The primary outcome was a change in the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score at discharge, with a recovery of >50% defined as a favorable neurologic outcome. Logistic regression analysis was performed, and model fit was assessed using the Hosmer-Lemeshow test. Eighty patients aged ≥65 years with SCIWORET underwent surgery were enrolled. Favorable neurologic outcomes were seen in 43.3% of those who underwent early surgery, but only in 18.0% of those who underwent late surgery. Logistic regression analysis, adjusted for age, sex, comorbidities (Charlson Comorbidity Index), and JOA score, revealed that early surgery independently predicted favorable outcomes (odds ratio, 4.06; 95% confidence interval, 1.25-13.20), with excellent calibration (Hosmer-Lemeshow, P = 0.857). The present study indicated that early surgery within 24 hours of injury for elderly patients with SCIWORET could lead to more favorable neurologic improvements. We believe that chronological age alone should not be considered sufficient justification to deny patients early surgical decompression for SCIWORET. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Mental health treatment after major surgery among Vietnam-era Veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Tsan, Jack Y; Stock, Eileen M; Greenawalt, David S; Zeber, John E; Copeland, Laurel A

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine mental health treatment use among Vietnam Veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder and determine whether undergoing major surgery interrupted mental health treatment or increased the risk of psychiatric hospitalization. Using retrospective data from Veterans Health Administration's electronic medical record system, a total of 3320 Vietnam-era surgery patients with preoperative posttraumatic stress disorder were identified and matched 1:4 with non-surgical patients with posttraumatic stress disorder. The receipt of surgery was associated with a decline in overall mental health treatment and posttraumatic stress disorder-specific treatment 1 month following surgery but not during any subsequent month thereafter. Additionally, surgery was not associated with psychiatric admission. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. 10 kHz High-Frequency Spinal Cord Stimulation for Chronic Axial Low Back Pain in Patients With No History of Spinal Surgery: A Preliminary, Prospective, Open Label and Proof-of-Concept Study.

    Al-Kaisy, Adnan; Palmisani, Stefano; Smith, Thomas E; Pang, David; Lam, Khai; Burgoyne, William; Houghton, Russell; Hudson, Emma; Lucas, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    To explore the effectiveness of 10 kHz high frequency spinal cord stimulation (HF10 therapy) treatment of chronic low back pain in patients who have not had spinal surgery. Patients with chronic low back pain without prior spinal surgery were evaluated by a team of spine surgeons to rule out any spinal pathology amenable to surgical interventions and by a multidisciplinary pain team to confirm eligibility for the study. After a successful (>50% back pain reduction) trial of HF10 therapy, enrolled subjects underwent permanent system implantation and were followed-up one year post-implant. About 95% of the enrolled subjects (20/21) received the permanent system. At 12 months post-implant, both back pain VAS score and ODI were significantly reduced compared with baseline values (by 73% and 48%, respectively); an estimated quality-adjusted life year gain of 0.47 and a reduction in opioid use by 64% was observed. Four more patients among those unable to work at baseline due to back pain were employed at 12 months post-implant. There were no serious adverse events. HF10 therapy may provide significant back pain relief, reduction in disability, improvement quality of life, and reduction in opioid use in chronic low back pain not resulting from spinal surgery. © 2016 The Authors. Neuromodulation: Technology at the Neural Interface published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Neuromodulation Society.

  2. Effect of general anesthesia and major versus minor surgery on late postoperative episodic and constant hypoxemia

    Rosenberg, J; Oturai, P; Erichsen, C J

    1994-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the relative contribution of general anesthesia alone and in combination with the surgical procedure to the pathogenesis of late postoperative hypoxemia. DESIGN: Open, controlled study. SETTING: University hospital. PATIENTS: 60 patients undergoing major abdominal...... surgery and 16 patients undergoing middle ear surgery, both with comparable general anesthesia. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Patients were monitored with continuous pulse oximetry on one preoperative night and the second postoperative night. Significant episodic or constant hypoxemia did not occur...... on the second postoperative night following middle ear surgery and general anesthesia, but severe episodic and constant hypoxemia did occur on the second postoperative after major abdominal surgery and general anesthesia. CONCLUSIONS: General anesthesia in itself is not an important factor in the development...

  3. Prospective multicenter surveillance and risk factor analysis of deep surgical site infection after posterior thoracic and/or lumbar spinal surgery in adults.

    Ogihara, Satoshi; Yamazaki, Takashi; Maruyama, Toru; Oka, Hiroyuki; Miyoshi, Kota; Azuma, Seiichi; Yamada, Takashi; Murakami, Motoaki; Kawamura, Naohiro; Hara, Nobuhiro; Terayama, Sei; Morii, Jiro; Kato, So; Tanaka, Sakae

    2015-01-01

    Surgical site infection is a serious and significant complication after spinal surgery and is associated with high morbidity rates, high healthcare costs and poor patient outcomes. Accurate identification of risk factors is essential for developing strategies to prevent devastating infections. The purpose of this study was to identify independent risk factors for surgical site infection among posterior thoracic and/or lumbar spinal surgery in adult patients using a prospective multicenter surveillance research method. From July 2010 to June 2012, we performed a prospective surveillance study in adult patients who had developed surgical site infection after undergoing thoracic and/or lumbar posterior spinal surgery at 11 participating hospitals. Detailed preoperative and operative patient characteristics were prospectively recorded using a standardized data collection format. Surgical site infection was based on the definition established by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A total of 2,736 consecutive adult patients were enrolled, of which 24 (0.9%) developed postoperative deep surgical site infection. Multivariate regression analysis indicated four independent risk factors. Preoperative steroid therapy (P = 0.001), spinal trauma (P = 0.048) and gender (male) (P = 0.02) were statistically significant independent patient-related risk factors, whereas an operating time ≥3 h (P operating time ≥3 h were independent risk factors for deep surgical site infection after thoracic and/or lumbar spinal surgery in adult patients. Identification of these risk factors can be used to develop protocols aimed at decreasing the risk of surgical site infection.

  4. Intraoperative radiation exposure in spinal scoliosis surgery for pediatric patients using the O-arm® imaging system.

    Kobayashi, Kazuyoshi; Ando, Kei; Ito, Kenyu; Tsushima, Mikito; Morozumi, Masayoshi; Tanaka, Satoshi; Machino, Masaaki; Ota, Kyotaro; Ishiguro, Naoki; Imagama, Shiro

    2018-05-01

    The O-arm ® navigation system allows intraoperative CT imaging that can facilitate highly accurate instrumentation surgery, but radiation exposure is higher than with X-ray radiography. This is a particular concern in pediatric surgery. The purpose of this study is to examine intraoperative radiation exposure in pediatric spinal scoliosis surgery using O-arm. The subjects were 38 consecutive patients (mean age 12.9 years, range 10-17) with scoliosis who underwent spinal surgery with posterior instrumentation using O-arm. The mean number of fused vertebral levels was 11.0 (6-15). O-arm was performed before and after screw insertion, using an original protocol for the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine doses. The average scanning range was 6.9 (5-9) intervertebral levels per scan, with 2-7 scans per patient (mean 4.0 scans). Using O-arm, the dose per scan was 92.5 (44-130) mGy, and the mean total dose was 401 (170-826) mGy. This dose was 80.2% of the mean preoperative CT dose of 460 (231-736) mGy (P = 0.11). The total exposure dose and number of scans using intraoperative O-arm correlated strongly and significantly with the number of fused levels; however, there was no correlation with the patient's height. As the fused range became wider, several scans were required for O-arm, and the total radiation exposure became roughly the same as that in preoperative CT. Use of O-arm in our original protocol can contribute to reduction in radiation exposure.

  5. Hyperbaric Versus Isobaric Bupivacaine for Spinal Anesthesia: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis for Adult Patients Undergoing Noncesarean Delivery Surgery.

    Uppal, Vishal; Retter, Susanne; Shanthanna, Harsha; Prabhakar, Christopher; McKeen, Dolores M

    2017-11-01

    It is widely believed that the choice between isobaric bupivacaine and hyperbaric bupivacaine formulations alters the block characteristics for the conduct of surgery under spinal anesthesia. The aim of this study was to systematically review the comparative evidence regarding the effectiveness and safety of the 2 formulations when used for spinal anesthesia for adult noncesarean delivery surgery. Key electronic databases were searched for randomized controlled trials, excluding cesarean delivery surgeries under spinal anesthesia, without any language or date restrictions. The primary outcome measure for this review was the failure of spinal anesthesia. Two independent reviewers selected the studies and extracted the data. Results were expressed as relative risk (RR) or mean differences (MDs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Seven hundred fifty-one studies were identified between 1946 and 2016. After screening, there were 16 randomized controlled clinical trials, including 724 participants, that provided data for the meta-analysis. The methodological reporting of most studies was poor, and appropriate judgment of their individual risk of bias elements was not possible. There was no difference between the 2 drugs regarding the need for conversion to general anesthesia (RR, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.08-4.41; P = .62; I = 0%), incidence of hypotension (RR, 1.15; 95% CI, 0.69-1.92; P = .58; I = 0%), nausea/vomiting (RR, 0.29; 95% CI, 0.06-1.32; P = .11; I = 7%), or onset of sensory block (MD = 1.7 minutes; 95% CI, -3.5 to 0.1; P = .07; I = 0%). The onset of motor block (MD = 4.6 minutes; 95% CI, 7.5-1.7; P = .002; I = 78%) was significantly faster with hyperbaric bupivacaine. Conversely, the duration of motor (MD = 45.2 minutes; 95% CI, 66.3-24.2; P bupivacaine. Both hyperbaric bupivacaine and isobaric bupivacaine provided effective anesthesia with no difference in the failure rate or adverse effects. The hyperbaric formulation allows for a relatively rapid motor block onset

  6. Hypobaric spinal anaesthesia with bupivacaine (0.1%) gives selective sensory block for ano-rectal surgery.

    Maroof, M; Khan, R M; Siddique, M; Tariq, M

    1995-08-01

    Twenty adult male patients undergoing anorectal surgery in the jackknife position under spinal anaesthesia were studied for the anaesthetic properties of 5 ml hypobaric 0.1% bupivacaine. The patients were positioned in the prone, jack-knife position with a pillow under the hips and with an operating table break angulation of 30 degrees with head down tilt of 20 degrees. In this position a 25-gauge Quincke spinal needle was inserted intrathecally through L3-4 and 5 ml solution, prepared by mixing 1 ml bupivacaine 0.5% with 4 ml of distilled water with a specific gravity of 1.001 at 20 degrees C, was given over 15-20 sec. Onset time, progression and upper level of sensory blockade evaluated by pin prick, and the extent of motor block (1 = full motor movement at ankle and knee joint, 2 = restricted motor movements, 3 = full motor block, no movements) were measured at one minute intervals for the first five minutes, then every five minutes for 30 min. The number of dermatomes blocked was also noted. The median level of cephalad sensory blockage was of L1, with a range from T10-L3. On average, nine dermatomes were blocked (range 7-12). Motor blockade was not observed in any patient. Changes in heart rate and blood pressure were minimal. The average duration of postoperative analgesia was 339.5 +/- 182.9 min. Post-spinal headache was not observed in any patients. In conclusion, 5 ml intrathecal hypobaric bupivacaine, 0.1%, provided excellent perioperative analgesia without motor blockade and haemodynamic stability in patients undergoing anorectal surgery in jackknife position.

  7. Spinal cord contusion.

    Ju, Gong; Wang, Jian; Wang, Yazhou; Zhao, Xianghui

    2014-04-15

    Spinal cord injury is a major cause of disability with devastating neurological outcomes and limited therapeutic opportunities, even though there are thousands of publications on spinal cord injury annually. There are two major types of spinal cord injury, transaction of the spinal cord and spinal cord contusion. Both can theoretically be treated, but there is no well documented treatment in human being. As for spinal cord contusion, we have developed an operation with fabulous result.

  8. Outcomes following major emergency gastric surgery: the importance of specialist surgeons.

    Khan, O A; McGlone, E R; Mercer, S J; Somers, S S; Toh, S K C

    2015-01-01

    The increasing subspecialisation of general surgeons in their elective work may result in problems for the provision of expert care for emergency cases. There is very little evidence of the impact of subspecialism on outcomes following emergency major upper gastrointestinal surgery. This prospective study investigated whether elective subspecialism of general surgeon is associated with a difference in outcome following major emergency gastric surgery. Between February 1994 and June 2010, the data from all emergency major gastric procedures (defined as patients who underwent laparotomy within 12 hours of referral to the surgical service for bleeding gastroduodenal ulcer and/or undergoing major gastric resection) was prospectively recorded. The sub-specialty interest of operating surgeon was noted and related to post-operative outcomes. Over the study period, a total of 63 major gastric procedures were performed of which 23 (37%) were performed by specialist upper gastrointestinal (UGI) consultants. Surgery performed by a specialist UGI surgeon was associated with a significantly lower surgical complication (4% vs. 28% of cases; p=0.04) and in-patient mortality rate (22% vs. 50%; p=0.03). Major emergency gastric surgery has significantly better clinical outcomes when performed by a specialist UGI surgeon. These results have important implications for provision of an emergency general surgical service. Copyright© Acta Chirurgica Belgica.

  9. Contemporary spinal cord protection during thoracic and thoracoabdominal aortic surgery and endovascular aortic repair

    Etz, Christian D; Weigang, Ernst; Hartert, Marc

    2015-01-01

    devastating complication. The aim of this position paper is to provide physicians with broad information regarding spinal cord blood supply, to share strategies for shortening intraprocedural spinal cord ischaemia and to increase spinal cord tolerance to transitory ischaemia through detection of ischaemia...... publications available in the PubMed database, which are cohort studies, experimental research reports, case reports, reviews, short series and meta-analyses. Individual chapters of this position paper were assigned and after delivery harmonized by Christian D. Etz, Ernst Weigang and Martin Czerny....... Consequently, further writing assignments were distributed within the group and delivered in August 2014. The final version was submitted to the EJCTS for review in September 2014....

  10. The role of minimally invasive spine surgery in the management of pyogenic spinal discitis

    Mazda K Turel

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: MIS surgery provides an opportunity for early pain relief in patients with discitis, osteomyelitis, spondylodiscitis, and/or epidural abscess by directly addressing the primary cause of pain. MIS surgery for discitis provides a higher diagnostic yield to direct antibiotic treatment. MIS surgery results in good long-term recovery.

  11. Impact of sagittal spinopelvic alignment on clinical outcomes after decompression surgery for lumbar spinal canal stenosis without coronal imbalance.

    Hikata, Tomohiro; Watanabe, Kota; Fujita, Nobuyuki; Iwanami, Akio; Hosogane, Naobumi; Ishii, Ken; Nakamura, Masaya; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Matsumoto, Morio

    2015-10-01

    The object of this study was to investigate correlations between sagittal spinopelvic alignment and improvements in clinical and quality-of-life (QOL) outcomes after lumbar decompression surgery for lumbar spinal canal stenosis (LCS) without coronal imbalance. The authors retrospectively reviewed data from consecutive patients treated for LCS with decompression surgery in the period from 2009 through 2011. They examined correlations between preoperative or postoperative sagittal vertical axis (SVA) and radiological parameters, clinical outcomes, and health-related (HR)QOL scores in patients divided according to SVA. Clinical outcomes were assessed according to Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) and visual analog scale (VAS) scores. Health-related QOL was evaluated using the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ) and the JOA Back Pain Evaluation Questionnaire (JOABPEQ). One hundred nine patients were eligible for inclusion in the study. Compared to patients with normal sagittal alignment prior to surgery (Group A: SVA imbalance (Group B: SVA ≥ 50 mm) had significantly smaller lumbar lordosis and thoracic kyphosis angles and larger pelvic tilt. In Group B, there was a significant decrease in postoperative SVA compared with the preoperative SVA (76.3 ± 29.7 mm vs. 54.3 ± 39.8 mm, p = 0.004). The patients in Group B with severe preoperative sagittal imbalance (SVA > 80 mm) had residual sagittal imbalance after surgery (82.8 ± 41.6 mm). There were no significant differences in clinical and HRQOL outcomes between Groups A and B. Compared to patients with normal postoperative SVA (Group C: SVA imbalance. Decompression surgery improved the SVA value in patients with preoperative sagittal imbalance; however, the patients with severe preoperative sagittal imbalance (SVA > 80 mm) had residual imbalance after decompression surgery. Both clinical and HRQOL outcomes were negatively affected by postoperative residual sagittal imbalance.

  12. The outcome and survival of palliative surgery in thoraco-lumbar spinal metastases: contemporary retrospective cohort study

    Nemelc, R.M.; Stadhouder, A.; van Royen, B.J.; Jiya, T.U.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate outcome and survival and to identify prognostic variables for patients surgically treated for spinal metastases. Methods A retrospective study was performed on 86 patients, surgically treated for spinal metastases. Preoperative analyses of the ASIA and spinal instability

  13. Results of the 2015 Scoliosis Research Society Survey on Single Versus Dual Attending Surgeon Approach for Adult Spinal Deformity Surgery.

    Scheer, Justin K; Sethi, Rajiv K; Hey, Lloyd A; LaGrone, Michael O; Keefe, Malla; Aryan, Henry E; Errico, Thomas J; Deviren, Vedat; Hart, Robert A; Lafage, Virginie; Schwab, Frank; Daubs, Michael D; Ames, Christopher P

    2017-06-15

    An electronic survey administered to Scoliosis Research Society (SRS) membership. To characterize surgeon practices and views regarding the use of two attending surgeons for adult spinal deformity (ASD) surgery. The use of two experienced attending surgeons can decrease the operative time, estimated blood loss, and perioperative complication rates. However, the current practice patterns for the use of two attending surgeons remains unknown. An electronic, 27-question survey regarding single/dual attending surgeons was administered to the SRS membership. Determinants included: surgeon/practice demographics, assistant type/level of training, and questions regarding use of two attending surgeons. Overall reporting and comparisons between groups were made: US versus international, academic versus private practice, and experience 15 years. A total of 199 surgeons responded from 27 different countries. Overall and between the groups, the respondents significantly reported believing that two attending spine surgeons improves safety, decreases complications, and improves outcomes (P < 0.01). Approximately, 67.3% reported using a second attending ≤25% of the time (33.2% do not), and 24.1% use one ≥51% of the time (similar between groups); 51.1% that have a second attending feel it's limited by reimbursement and access concerns and 71.9% have difficulty getting the second attending reimbursed. 72.3% use a second attending for ALL of the following reasons (no difference between groups): "it's safer/reduces complications," "it decreases operative time," "it decreases blood loss," "it results in improved outcomes," "it's less work and stress for me." If reimbursement was equal/assured for a second attending, 67.5% would use one "more often" or "always." The respondents feel that having a second attending surgeon improves patient care, however most do not use one often. Reasons include reimbursement/access concerns and the majority would use one if reimbursement was

  14. The beneficial effect of Batroxobin on blood loss reduction in spinal fusion surgery

    Hu, Hui-Min; Chen, Li; Frary, Charles Edward

    2015-01-01

    Objective Our objective was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of Batroxobin on blood loss during spinal operations. Methods After obtaining approval from the ethics committee at the hospital along with informed written consent, we performed a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study w...

  15. Cervical Retrograde Spinal Cord Stimulation Lead Placement to Treat Failed Back Surgery Syndrome: A Case Report

    Helmond, N. van; Kardaszewski, C.N.; Chapman, K.B.

    2017-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation is an effective treatment modality for refractory neuropathic pain conditions, but the placement of leads can be challenging due to unforeseen anatomical variations. We used a retrograde C7-T1 approach to place a lead at the bottom of T8 in a patient suffering from failed

  16. Major reduction in 30-day mortality after elective colorectal cancer surgery

    Iversen, Lene Hjerrild; Ingeholm, Peter; Gögenur, Ismail

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: For years, the outcome of colorectal cancer (CRC) surgery has been inferior in Denmark compared to its neighbouring countries. Several strategies have been initiated in Denmark to improve CRC prognosis. We studied whether there has been any effect on postoperative mortality based...... on the information from a national database. METHODS: Patients who underwent elective major surgery for CRC in the period 2001-2011 were identified in the national Danish Colorectal Cancer Group database. Thirty-day mortality rates were calculated and factors with impact on mortality were identified using logistic...... the study period. CONCLUSION: The 30-day mortality rate after elective major surgery for CRC has decreased significantly in Denmark in the past decade. Laparoscopic surgical approach was associated with a reduction in mortality in colon cancer....

  17. Estimating the effective radiation dose imparted to patients by intraoperative cone-beam computed tomography in thoracolumbar spinal surgery.

    Lange, Jeffrey; Karellas, Andrew; Street, John; Eck, Jason C; Lapinsky, Anthony; Connolly, Patrick J; Dipaola, Christian P

    2013-03-01

    Observational. To estimate the radiation dose imparted to patients during typical thoracolumbar spinal surgical scenarios. Minimally invasive techniques continue to become more common in spine surgery. Computer-assisted navigation systems coupled with intraoperative cone-beam computed tomography (CT) represent one such method used to aid in instrumented spinal procedures. Some studies indicate that cone-beam CT technology delivers a relatively low dose of radiation to patients compared with other x-ray-based imaging modalities. The goal of this study was to estimate the radiation exposure to the patient imparted during typical posterior thoracolumbar instrumented spinal procedures, using intraoperative cone-beam CT and to place these values in the context of standard CT doses. Cone-beam CT scans were obtained using Medtronic O-arm (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN). Thermoluminescence dosimeters were placed in a linear array on a foam-plastic thoracolumbar spine model centered above the radiation source for O-arm presets of lumbar scans for small or large patients. In-air dosimeter measurements were converted to skin surface measurements, using published conversion factors. Dose-length product was calculated from these values. Effective dose was estimated using published effective dose to dose-length product conversion factors. Calculated dosages for many full-length procedures using the small-patient setting fell within the range of published effective doses of abdominal CT scans (1-31 mSv). Calculated dosages for many full-length procedures using the large-patient setting fell within the range of published effective doses of abdominal CT scans when the number of scans did not exceed 3. We have demonstrated that single cone-beam CT scans and most full-length posterior instrumented spinal procedures using O-arm in standard mode would likely impart a radiation dose within the range of those imparted by a single standard CT scan of the abdomen. Radiation dose increases

  18. A benefit-risk review of systemic haemostatic agents - Part 1 : In major surgery

    Fraser, Ian S.; Porte, Robert J.; Kouides, Peter A.; Lukes, Andrea S.

    2008-01-01

    Systemic haemostatic agents play an important role in the management of blood loss during major surgery where significant blood loss is likely and their use has increased in recent times as a consequence of demand for blood products outstripping supply and the risks associated with transfusions.

  19. Effect of Tranexamic Acid on Blood Loss, D-Dimer, and Fibrinogen Kinetics in Adult Spinal Deformity Surgery.

    Pong, Ryan P; Leveque, Jean-Christophe A; Edwards, Alicia; Yanamadala, Vijay; Wright, Anna K; Herodes, Megan; Sethi, Rajiv K

    2018-05-02

    Antifibrinolytics such as tranexamic acid reduce operative blood loss and blood product transfusion requirements in patients undergoing surgical correction of scoliosis. The factors involved in the unrelenting coagulopathy seen in scoliosis surgery are not well understood. One potential contributor is activation of the fibrinolytic system during a surgical procedure, likely related to clot dissolution and consumption of fibrinogen. The addition of tranexamic acid during a surgical procedure may mitigate the coagulopathy by impeding the derangement in D-dimer and fibrinogen kinetics. We retrospectively studied consecutive patients who had undergone surgical correction of adult spinal deformity between January 2010 and July 2016 at our institution. Intraoperative hemostatic data, surgical time, estimated blood loss, and transfusion records were analyzed for patients before and after the addition of tranexamic acid to our protocol. Each patient who received tranexamic acid and met inclusion criteria was cohort-matched with a patient who underwent a surgical procedure without tranexamic acid administration. There were 17 patients in the tranexamic acid cohort, with a mean age of 60.7 years, and 17 patients in the control cohort, with a mean age of 60.9 years. Estimated blood loss (932 ± 539 mL compared with 1,800 ± 1,029 mL; p = 0.005) and packed red blood-cell transfusions (1.5 ± 1.6 units compared with 4.0 ± 2.1 units; p = 0.001) were significantly lower in the tranexamic acid cohort. In all single-stage surgical procedures that met inclusion criteria, the rise of D-dimer was attenuated from 8.3 ± 5.0 μg/mL in the control cohort to 3.3 ± 3.2 μg/mL for the tranexamic acid cohort (p tranexamic acid cohort to 60.6 ± 35.1 mg/dL (p = 0.004). In patients undergoing spinal surgery, intravenous administration of tranexamic acid is effective at reducing intraoperative blood loss. Monitoring of D-dimer and fibrinogen during spinal surgery suggests that tranexamic acid

  20. Global analysis of sagittal spinal alignment in major deformities: correlation between lack of lumbar lordosis and flexion of the knee.

    Obeid, Ibrahim; Hauger, Olivier; Aunoble, Stéphane; Bourghli, Anouar; Pellet, Nicolas; Vital, Jean-Marc

    2011-09-01

    It has become well recognised that sagittal balance of the spine is the result of an interaction between the spine and the pelvis. Knee flexion is considered to be the last compensatory mechanism in case of sagittal imbalance, but only few studies have insisted on the relationship between spino-pelvic parameters and lower extremity parameters. Correlation between the lack of lumbar lordosis and knee flexion has not yet been established. A retrospective study was carried out on 28 patients with major spinal deformities. The EOS system was used to measure spinal and pelvic parameters and the knee flexion angle; the lack of lumbar lordosis was calculated after prediction of lumbar lordosis with two different formulas. Correlation analysis between the different measured parameters was performed. Lumbar lordosis correlated with sacral slope (r = -0.71) and moderately with knee flexion angle (r = 0.42). Pelvic tilt correlated moderately with knee flexion angle (r = 0.55). Lack of lumbar lordosis correlated best with knee flexion angle (r = 0.72 and r = 0.63 using the two formulas, respectively). Knee flexion as a compensatory mechanism to sagittal imbalance was well correlated to the lack of lordosis and, depending on the importance of the former parameter, the best procedure to correct sagittal imbalance could be chosen.

  1. Do elderly patients benefit from surgery in addition to radiotherapy for treatment of metastatic spinal cord compression?

    Rades, D.; Huttenlocher, S.; Evers, J.N.; Bajrovic, A.; Karstens, J.H.; Rudat, V.; Schild, S.E.

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of elderly cancer patients has gained importance. One question regarding the treatment of metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) is whether elderly patients benefit from surgery in addition to radiotherapy? In attempting to answer this question, we performed a matched-pair analysis comparing surgery followed by radiotherapy to radiotherapy alone. Data from 42 elderly (age > 65 years) patients receiving surgery plus radiotherapy (S + RT) were matched to 84 patients (1:2) receiving radiotherapy alone (RT). Groups were matched for ten potential prognostic factors and compared regarding motor function, local control, and survival. Additional matched-pair analyses were performed for the subgroups of patients receiving direct decompressive surgery plus stabilization of involved vertebrae (DDSS, n = 81) and receiving laminectomy (LE, n = 45). Improvement of motor function occurred in 21% after S + RT and 24% after RT (p = 0.39). The 1-year local control rates were 81% and 91% (p = 0.44), while the 1-year survival rates were 46% and 39% (p = 0.71). In the matched-pair analysis of patients receiving DDSS, improvement of motor function occurred in 22% after DDSS + RT and 24% after RT alone (p = 0.92). The 1-year local control rates were 95% and 89% (p = 0.62), and the 1-year survival rates were 54% and 43% (p = 0.30). In the matched-pair analysis of patients receiving LE, improvement of motor function occurred in 20% after LE + RT and 23% after RT alone (p = 0.06). The 1-year local control rates were 50% and 92% (p = 0.33). The 1-year survival rates were 32% and 32% (p = 0.55). Elderly patients with MSCC did not benefit from surgery in addition to radiotherapy regarding functional outcome, local control of MSCC, or survival. (orig.)

  2. Hybrid surgery-radiosurgery therapy for metastatic epidural spinal cord compression: A prospective evaluation using patient-reported outcomes.

    Barzilai, Ori; Amato, Mary-Kate; McLaughlin, Lily; Reiner, Anne S; Ogilvie, Shahiba Q; Lis, Eric; Yamada, Yoshiya; Bilsky, Mark H; Laufer, Ilya

    2018-05-01

    Patient-reported outcomes (PRO) represent an important measure of cancer therapy effect. For patients with metastatic epidural spinal cord compression (MESCC), hybrid therapy using separation surgery and stereotactic radiosurgery preserves neurologic function and provides tumor control. There is currently a paucity of data reporting PRO after such combined modality therapy for MESCC. Delineation of hybrid surgery-radiosurgery therapy effect on PRO validates the hybrid approach as an effective therapy resulting in meaningful symptom relief. Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) and MD Anderson Symptom Inventory-Spine Tumor (MDASI-SP), PROs validated in the cancer population, were prospectively collected. Patients with MESCC who underwent separation surgery followed by stereotactic radiosurgery were included. Separation surgery included a posterolateral approach without extensive cytoreductive tumor excision. A median postoperative radiosurgery dose of 2700 cGy was delivered. The change in PRO 3 months after the hybrid therapy represented the primary study outcome. Preoperative and postoperative evaluations were analyzed using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test for matched pairs. One hundred eleven patients were included. Hybrid therapy resulted in a significant reduction in the BPI items "worst" and "right now" pain ( P < .0001), and in all BPI constructs (severity, interference with daily activities, and pain experience, P < .001). The MDASI-SP demonstrated reduction in spine-specific pain severity and interference with general activity ( P < .001), along with decreased symptom interference ( P < .001). Validated PRO instruments showed that in patients with MESCC, hybrid therapy with separation surgery and radiosurgery results in a significant decrease in pain severity and symptom interference. These prospective data confirm the benefit of hybrid therapy for treatment of MESCC and should facilitate referral of patients with MESCC for surgical evaluation.

  3. Major surgery in an osteosarcoma patient refusing blood transfusion: case report.

    Dhanoa, Amreeta; Singh, Vivek A; Shanmugam, Rukmanikanthan; Rajendram, Raja

    2010-11-08

    We describe an unusual case of osteosarcoma in a Jehovah's Witness patient who underwent chemotherapy and major surgery without the need for blood transfusion. This 16-year-old girl presented with osteosarcoma of the right proximal tibia requiring proximal tibia resection, followed by endoprosthesis replacement. She was successfully treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and surgery with the support of haematinics, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, recombinant erythropoietin and intraoperative normovolaemic haemodilution. This case illustrates the importance of maintaining effective, open communication and exploring acceptable therapeutic alternative in the management of these patients, whilst still respecting their beliefs.

  4. The case for restraint in spinal surgery: does quality management have a role to play?

    Deyo, Richard A; Mirza, Sohail K

    2009-08-01

    Most quality improvement efforts in surgery have focused on the technical quality of care provided, rather than whether the care was indicated, or could have been provided with a safer procedure. Because risk is inherent in any procedure, reducing the number of unnecessary operations is an important issue in patient safety. In the case of lumbar spine surgery, several lines of evidence suggest that, in at least some locations, there may be excessively high surgery rates. This evidence comes from international comparisons of surgical rates; study of small area variations within countries; increasing surgical rates in the absence of new indications; comparisons of surgical outcomes between geographic areas with high or low surgical rates; expert opinion; the preferences of well-informed patients; and increasing rates of repeat surgery. From a population perspective, reducing unnecessary surgery may have a greater impact on complication rates than improving the technical quality of surgery that is performed. Evidence suggests this may be true for coronary bypass surgery in the US and hysterectomy rates in Canada. Though similar studies have not been done for spine surgery, wide geographic variations in surgical rates suggest that this could be the case for spine surgery as well. We suggest that monitoring geographic variations in surgery rates may become an important aspect of quality improvement, and that rates of repeat surgery may bear special attention. Patient registries can help in this regard, if they are very complete and rigorously maintained. They can provide data on surgical rates; offer post-marketing surveillance for new surgical devices and techniques; and help to identify patient subgroups that may benefit most from certain procedures.

  5. Longitudinal and Temporal Associations Between Daily Pain and Sleep Patterns After Major Pediatric Surgery.

    Rabbitts, Jennifer A; Zhou, Chuan; Narayanan, Arthi; Palermo, Tonya M

    2017-06-01

    Approximately 20% of children develop persistent pain after major surgery. Sleep disruption has been implicated as a predictor of children's acute postsurgical pain. However, perioperative sleep patterns have not been longitudinally assessed, and the role of sleep in persistence of postsurgical pain has not been explored. We aimed to examine sleep patterns over 4 months in children having major surgery, and temporal relationships between daily sleep and pain. Sixty children age 10 to 18 (mean = 14.7) years having major surgery completed 7 days of actigraphy sleep monitoring (sleep duration, efficiency), twice daily electronic diaries (sleep quality, pain intensity, medication use), and validated questionnaires at presurgery, 2 weeks, and 4 months postsurgery. Generalized linear models, controlling for age, sex, naps, and medication, showed sleep quality (β [B] = -.88, P sleep quality was significantly associated with greater next day pain intensity (B = -.15, P = .005). Sleep duration and efficiency were not associated with subsequent pain; daytime pain was not associated with subsequent sleep. Findings suggest sleep quality may be an important target for intervention after surgery in children; research is needed to understand how other sleep parameters may relate to recovery. This study assessed longitudinal sleep patterns over 4 months after major pediatric surgery using actigraphy, diaries, and validated measures. Sleep quality and efficiency were significantly reduced at 2 weeks. Poorer sleep quality was associated with greater next day pain intensity suggesting that sleep quality may be an important target for intervention. Copyright © 2017 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Changes in lymphocyte subpopulations and adhesion/activation molecules following endotoxemia and major surgery

    Toft, P; Hokland, Marianne; Hansen, Tom Giedsing

    1995-01-01

    Major surgery as well as endotoxin-induced sepsis is accompanied by lymphocytopenia in peripheral blood. The purpose of this study was to investigate the redistribution of lymphocyte subpopulations and adhesion/activation molecules on lymphocytes. Twenty-four rats were included in the investigation....... Eight rats received an intraperitoneal injection of E. coli endotoxin (2 mg kg-1), eight rats had a sham operation performed while eight rats received isotonic saline and served as a control group. Blood samples were obtained by making an incision in the tail before and 2 and 5 h after surgery...... or administration of endotoxin or saline. After isolation of lymphocytes by gradient centrifugation, flow-cytometric immunophenotyping was performed using CD2, CD3, CD4, CD8, CD11/CD18, CD20, CD44 and MHC II monoclonal antibodies. Endotoxemia and surgery were both accompanied by increased serum cortisol...

  7. No effect of melatonin to modify surgical-stress response after major vascular surgery: a randomised placebo-controlled trial

    Kücükakin, B; Wilhelmsen, M; Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2010-01-01

    A possible mechanism underlying cardiovascular morbidity after major vascular surgery may be the perioperative ischaemia-reperfusion with excessive oxygen-derived free-radical production and increased levels of circulating inflammatory mediators. We examined the effect of melatonin infusion during...... surgery and oral melatonin treatment for 3 days after surgery on biochemical markers of oxidative and inflammatory stress....

  8. Postprandial ghrelin suppression is exaggerated following major surgery; implications for nutritional recovery

    Bloom Stephen R

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Meeting patients' nutritional requirements and preventing malnutrition is a challenge following major surgical procedures. The role of ghrelin in nutritional recovery after non-gastrointestinal major surgery is unknown. We used coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG as an example of anticipated good recovery post major surgery. Seventeen patients undergoing CABG (mean ± SEM: 70.1 ± 2.2 yrs, BMI 29.1 ± 1.4 kg/m2, 15 male underwent fasting and postprandial (45 mins after standard test breakfast blood sampling pre-operatively (day 0, post-operatively (day 6 and at follow-up (day 40. Changes in food intake, biochemical and anthropometric markers of nutritional status were recorded. A comparison was made to 17 matched healthy controls (70.6 ± 2.3 yrs, BMI 28.4 ± 1.3 kg/m2. We observed significantly increased post-operative and follow-up fasting ghrelin concentrations compared with pre-operatively (pre-op. 402 ± 42 pmol/L vs post-op. 642 ± 97 pmol/L vs follow-up 603 ± 94 pmol/L (ANOVA p p Our data support the hypothesis that prolonged changes in fasting and postprandial plasma ghrelin concentrations are associated with impaired nutritional recovery after CABG. These findings reinforce the need to investigate ghrelin in other patients groups undergoing major surgery.

  9. Major League pitching workload after primary ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction and risk for revision surgery.

    Keller, Robert A; Mehran, Nima; Marshall, Nathan E; Okoroha, Kelechi R; Khalil, Lafi; Tibone, James E; Moutzouros, Vasilios

    2017-02-01

    Literature has attempted to correlate pitching workload with risk of ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) injury; however, limited data are available in evaluating workload and its relationship with the need for revision reconstruction in Major League Baseball (MLB) pitchers. We identified 29 MLB pitchers who underwent primary UCL reconstruction surgery and subsequently required revision reconstruction and compared them with 121 MLB pitchers who underwent primary reconstruction but did not later require revision surgery. Games pitched, pitch counts, and innings pitched were evaluated and compared for the seasons after returning from primary reconstruction and for the last season pitched before undergoing revision surgery. The difference in workload between pitchers who did and did not require revision reconstruction was not statistically significant in games pitched, innings pitched, and MLB-only pitch counts. The one significant difference in workload was in total pitch counts (combined MLB and minor league), with the pitchers who required revision surgery pitching less than those who did not (primary: 1413.6 pitches vs. revision: 959.0 pitches, P = .04). In addition, pitchers who required revision surgery underwent primary reconstruction at an early age (22.9 years vs. 27.3 years, P risk for injury after primary UCL reconstruction. However, correlations of risk may be younger age and less MLB experience at the time of the primary reconstruction. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. The Clinical Impact of Cardiology Consultation Prior to Major Vascular Surgery.

    Davis, Frank M; Park, Yeo June; Grey, Scott F; Boniakowski, Anna E; Mansour, M Ashraf; Jain, Krishna M; Nypaver, Timothy; Grossman, Michael; Gurm, Hitinder; Henke, Peter K

    2018-01-01

    To understand statewide variation in preoperative cardiology consultation prior to major vascular surgery and to determine whether consultation was associated with differences in perioperative myocardial infarction (poMI). Medical consultation prior to major vascular surgery is obtained to reduce perioperative risk. Despite perceived benefit of preoperative consultation, evidence is lacking specifically for major vascular surgery on the effect of preoperative cardiac consultation. Patient and clinical data were obtained from a statewide vascular surgery registry between January 2012 and December 2014. Patients were risk stratified by revised cardiac risk index category and compared poMI between patients who did or did not receive a preoperative cardiology consultation. We then used logistic regression analysis to compare the rate of poMI across hospitals grouped into quartiles by rate of preoperative cardiology consultation. Our study population comprised 5191 patients undergoing open peripheral arterial bypass (n = 3037), open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (n = 332), or endovascular aneurysm repair (n = 1822) at 29 hospitals. At the patient level, after risk-stratification by revised cardiac risk index category, there was no association between cardiac consultation and poMI. At the hospital level, preoperative cardiac consultation varied substantially between hospitals (6.9%-87.5%, P 66%) had a reduction in poMI (OR, 0.52; confidence interval: 0.28-0.98; P cardiology consultation for vascular surgery varies greatly between institutions, and does not appear to impact poMI at the patient level. However, reduction of poMI was noted at the hospitals with the highest rate of preoperative cardiology consultation as well as a variety of medical services, suggesting that other hospital culture effects play a role.

  11. Incidence and Risk Factors for Major Hematomas in Aesthetic Surgery: Analysis of 129,007 Patients.

    Kaoutzanis, Christodoulos; Winocour, Julian; Gupta, Varun; Ganesh Kumar, Nishant; Sarosiek, Konrad; Wormer, Blair; Tokin, Christopher; Grotting, James C; Higdon, K Kye

    2017-10-16

    Postoperative hematomas are one of the most frequent complications following aesthetic surgery. Identifying risk factors for hematoma has been limited by underpowered studies from single institution experiences. To examine the incidence and identify independent risk factors for postoperative hematomas following cosmetic surgery utilizing a prospective, multicenter database. A prospectively enrolled cohort of patients who underwent aesthetic surgery between 2008 and 2013 was identified from the CosmetAssure database. Primary outcome was occurrence of major hematomas requiring emergency room visit, hospital admission, or reoperation within 30 days of the index operation. Univariate and multivariate analysis was used to identify potential risk factors for hematomas including age, gender, body mass index (BMI), smoking, diabetes, type of surgical facility, procedure by body region, and combined procedures. Of 129,007 patients, 1180 (0.91%) had a major hematoma. Mean age (42.0 ± 13.0 years vs 40.9 ± 13.9 years, P hematomas. Males suffered more hematomas than females (1.4% vs 0.9%, P Hematoma rates were higher in patients undergoing combined procedures compared to single procedures (1.1% vs 0.8%, P hematoma included age (Relative Risk [RR] 1.01), male gender (RR 1.98), the procedure being performed in a hospital setting rather than an office-based setting (RR 1.68), combined procedures (RR 1.35), and breast procedures rather than the body/extremity and face procedures (RR 1.81). Major hematoma is the most common complication following aesthetic surgery. Male patients and those undergoing breast or combined procedures have a significantly higher risk of developing hematomas. 2. © 2017 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com

  12. Fragmentation of Care after Surgical Discharge: Non-Index Readmission after Major Cancer Surgery

    Zheng, Chaoyi; Habermann, Elizabeth B; Shara, Nawar M; Langan, Russell C; Hong, Young; Johnson, Lynt B; Al-Refaie, Waddah B

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Despite national emphasis on care coordination, little is known about how fragmentation affects cancer surgery outcomes. Our study examines a specific form of fragmentation in post-discharge care—readmission to a hospital different from the location of the operation—and evaluates its causes and consequences among patients readmitted after major cancer surgery. STUDY DESIGN We used the State Inpatient Database of California (2004 to 2011) to identify patients who had major cancer surgery and their subsequent readmissions. Logistic models were used to examine correlates of non-index readmissions and to assess associations between location of readmission and outcomes, measured by in-hospital mortality and repeated readmission. RESULTS Of 9,233 readmissions within 30 days of discharge after major cancer surgery, 20.0% occurred in non-index hospitals. Non-index readmissions were associated with emergency readmission (odds ratio [OR] = 2.63; 95% CI, 2.26–3.06), rural residence (OR = 1.81; 95% CI, 1.61–2.04), and extensive procedures (eg hepatectomy vs proctectomy; OR = 2.77; CI, 2.08–3.70). Mortality was higher during non-index readmissions than index readmissions independent of patient, procedure, and hospital factors (OR = 1.31; 95% CI, 1.03–1.66), but was mitigated by adjusting for conditions present at readmission (OR = 1.24; 95% CI, 0.98–1.58). Non-index readmission predicted higher odds of repeated readmission within 60 days of discharge from the first readmission (OR = 1.16; 95% CI, 1.02–1.32), independent of all covariates. CONCLUSIONS Non-index readmissions constitute a substantial proportion of all readmissions after major cancer surgery. They are associated with more repeated readmissions and can be caused by severe surgical complications and increased travel burden. Overcoming disadvantages of non-index readmissions represents an opportunity to improve outcomes for patients having major cancer surgery. PMID:27016905

  13. Seasonal Variations in the Risk of Reoperation for Surgical Site Infection Following Elective Spinal Fusion Surgery: A Retrospective Study Using the Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination Database.

    Ohya, Junichi; Chikuda, Hirotaka; Oichi, Takeshi; Kato, So; Matsui, Hiroki; Horiguchi, Hiromasa; Tanaka, Sakae; Yasunaga, Hideo

    2017-07-15

    A retrospective study of data abstracted from the Diagnosis Procedure Combination (DPC) database, a national representative database in Japan. The aim of this study was to examine seasonal variations in the risk of reoperation for surgical site infection (SSI) following spinal fusion surgery. Although higher rates of infection in the summer than in other seasons were thought to be caused by increasing inexperience of new staff, high temperature, and high humidity, no studies have examined seasonal variations in the risk of SSI following spinal fusion surgery in the country where medical staff rotation timing is not in summer season. In Japan, medical staff rotation starts in April. We retrospectively extracted the data of patients who were admitted between July 2010 and March 2013 from the DPC database. Patients were included if they were aged 20 years or older and underwent elective spinal fusion surgery. The primary outcome was reoperation for SSI during hospitalization. We performed multivariate analysis to clarify the risk factors of primary outcome with adjustment for patient background characteristics. We identified 47,252 eligible patients (23,659 male, 23,593 female). The mean age of the patients was 65.4 years (range, 20-101 yrs). Overall, reoperation for SSI occurred in 0.93% of the patients during hospitalization. The risk of reoperation for SSI was significantly higher in April (vs. February; odds ratio, 1.93; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-3.43, P = 0.03) as well as other known risk factors. In subgroup analysis with stratification for type of hospital, month of surgery was identified as an independent risk factor of reoperation for SSI among cases in an academic hospital, although there was no seasonal variation among those in a nonacademic hospital. This study showed that month of surgery is a risk factor of reoperation for SSI following elective spinal fusion surgery, nevertheless, in the country where medical staff rotation timing is not in

  14. [A case of emergency surgery in a patient with bronchial asthma under continuous spinal anesthesia].

    Noda, Keiichi; Ryo, Kenshu; Nakamoto, Ai

    2003-10-01

    A 78-year-old male, observed for bronchial asthma, underwent two emergency operations within eight days. The first operation was performed under general anesthesia with tracheal intubation. Anesthesia was maintained by sevoflurane-oxygen and continuous infusion of propofol in combination with epidural injection of lidocaine. During the operation, respiratory sound was almost clear. But wheezing occurred as he awoke after discontinuation of the anesthetics. He needed ventilatory support for three days for status asthmatics. The second operation was performed under continuous spinal anesthesia using hypobaric tetracaine and hyperbaric bupivacaine. No ventilatory support was necessary after the operation and he was discharged uneventfully.

  15. Post-operative analgesia for major abdominal surgery and its effectiveness in a tertiary care hospital

    Aliya Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: Epidural, PCIA and opioid infusions are used for pain relief after major abdominal surgeries at our hospital. Although there is limited drug availability, regular assessments and appropriate dose adjustments by acute pain management service (APMS and use of multimodal analgesia led to a high level of patient satisfaction. We recommend that feedback to the primary anesthesiologists by APMS is of utmost importance to enable improvement in practice.

  16. Cosmetic surgery volume and its correlation with the major US stock market indices.

    Gordon, Chad R; Pryor, Landon; Afifi, Ahmed M; Benedetto, Paul X; Langevin, C J; Papay, Francis; Yetman, Randall; Zins, James E

    2010-01-01

    As a consumer-driven industry, cosmetic plastic surgery is subject to ebbs and flows as the economy changes. There have been many predictions about the short, intermediate, and long-term impact on cosmetic plastic surgery as a result of difficulties in the current economic climate, but no studies published in the literature have quantified a direct correlation. The authors investigate a possible correlation between cosmetic surgery volume and the economic trends of the three major US stock market indices. A volume analysis for the time period from January 1992 to October 2008 was performed (n = 7360 patients, n = 8205 procedures). Four cosmetic procedures-forehead lift (FL), rhytidectomy (Rh), breast augmentation (BA), and liposuction (Li)-were chosen; breast reduction (BRd), breast reconstruction (BRc), and carpal tunnel release (CTR) were selected for comparison. Case volumes for each procedure and fiscal quarter were compared to the trends of the S&P 500, Dow Jones (DOW), and NASDAQ (NASD) indices. Pearson correlation statistics were used to evaluate a relationship between the market index trends and surgical volume. P values indices. FL (n =312) only correlated to the NASD (P = .021) and did not reach significance with the S&P 500 (P = .077) or DOW (P = .14). BRd and BRc demonstrated a direct correlation to two of the three stock market indices, whereas CTR showed an inverse (ie, negative) correlation to two of the three indices. This study, to our knowledge, is the first to suggest a direct correlation of four cosmetic and two reconstructive plastic surgery procedures to the three major US stock market indices and further emphasizes the importance of a broad-based plastic surgery practice in times of economic recession.

  17. A systematic review and meta-analysis of the effect of prophylactic tranexamic acid treatment in major benign uterine surgery

    Topsoee, Märta F; Settnes, Annette; Ottesen, Bent

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The value of tranexamic acid (TA) treatment as bleeding prophylaxis in major uterine surgery is unclear. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the antihemorrhagic effect of prophylactic TA treatment in major benign uterine surgery. SEARCH STRATEGY: PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, and Web of Science...

  18. Intraperitoneal And Incisional Bupivacaine Analgesia For Major Abdominal/Gynecologic Surgery: A Placebocontrolled

    R. Azarfarin

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Background:Postoperative pain is an important surgical problem. Recent studies in pain pathophysiology have led to the hypothesis that with perioperative administration of analgesics (pre-emptive analgesia it may be possible to prevent or reduce postoperative pain. This study was planned to investigate the efficacy of pre-emptive analgesia on postoperative pain after major gynecologic abdominal surgeries. Methods: In this prospective, double-blinded, randomized, and placebocontrolled trial, 60 ASA physical status I and II patients undergoing major abdominal gynecologic surgeries were randomized to receive 45 mL of bupivacaine 0.375% or 45mL of normal saline; 30 mL and 15 mL of the treatment solution was administered into the peritoneal cavity and incision, respectively, before wound closure. The pain score of the patients was evaluated by the visual analogue scale (VAS on awakening, and at 6, 12, and 24h after surgery. Time to first analgesia request and total analgesic requirements in the first 24h were recorded. Results: Pain scores were significantly higher in the placebo group than in the bupivacaine group on awakening (5.98±1.01 v.s 1.05±1.05; p<0.001, and at 6h after surgery (5.37±0.85 vs. 2.51±1.02; p<0.001. First request to analgesia was significantly longer in the bupivacaine patients than in the placebo group (5.87±3.04 h vs.1.35±0.36; p<0.001.Meperidine consumption over 24h was 96.00 ±17.53 mg in the placebo group compared with 23.28 ±14.89 mg in the bupivacaine patients (p<0.001.Conclusion:A combination of intraperitoneal and incisional bupivacaine infiltration at the end of abdominal gynecologic surgeries reduces postoperative pain on awakening and for 6 hours after surgery, and provides significant opioidsparing analgesia for 24 h after gynecologic abdominal surgeries.

  19. THE SIGNIFICANCE OF CUMULATIVE WATER BALANCE IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF EARLY COMPLICATIONS AFTER MAJOR ABDOMINAL SURGERY.

    Musaeva, T S; Karipidi, M K; Zabolotskikh, I B

    2016-11-01

    a comprehensive assessment of the water balance on the basis of daily, cumulative balance and 10% of the body weight gain and their role in the development of early complications after major abdominal surgery. A retrospective study of the perioperative period in 150 patients who underwent major abdomi- nal surgery was performed. The physical condition of the patients corresponded to ASA 3 class. The average age was 46 (38-62) years. The following stages ofresearch: an analysis of daily balance and cumulative balance in complicated and uncomplicated group and their role in the development of complications; the timing of development ofcomplications and possible relationship with fluid overload and the development of complications; changes in the level of albumin within 10 days of the postoperative period. The analysis of complications didn't show significant differences between complicated and uncomplicated groups according to the water balance during the surgery and by the end of the first day. When constructing the area under the ROC curve (A UROC) low resolution ofthe balance in intraoperative period and the first day and the balance on the second day to predict complications was shown. Significant diferences according to the cumulative balance was observed from the third day of the postoperative period Also with the third day of the postoperative period there is a good resolution for prediction ofpostoperative complications according to the cumulative balance with the cut-offpoint > of 50,7 ml/kg. the excessive infusion therapy is a predictor of adverse outcome in patients after major abdominal surgery. Therefore, after 3 days of postoperative period it is important to maintain mechanisms for the excretion of excess fluid or limitations of infusion therapy.

  20. RNAseq Analyses Identify Tumor Necrosis Factor-Mediated Inflammation as a Major Abnormality in ALS Spinal Cord.

    David G Brohawn

    Full Text Available ALS is a rapidly progressive, devastating neurodegenerative illness of adults that produces disabling weakness and spasticity arising from death of lower and upper motor neurons. No meaningful therapies exist to slow ALS progression, and molecular insights into pathogenesis and progression are sorely needed. In that context, we used high-depth, next generation RNA sequencing (RNAseq, Illumina to define gene network abnormalities in RNA samples depleted of rRNA and isolated from cervical spinal cord sections of 7 ALS and 8 CTL samples. We aligned >50 million 2X150 bp paired-end sequences/sample to the hg19 human genome and applied three different algorithms (Cuffdiff2, DEseq2, EdgeR for identification of differentially expressed genes (DEG's. Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA and Weighted Gene Co-expression Network Analysis (WGCNA identified inflammatory processes as significantly elevated in our ALS samples, with tumor necrosis factor (TNF found to be a major pathway regulator (IPA and TNFα-induced protein 2 (TNFAIP2 as a major network "hub" gene (WGCNA. Using the oPOSSUM algorithm, we analyzed transcription factors (TF controlling expression of the nine DEG/hub genes in the ALS samples and identified TF's involved in inflammation (NFkB, REL, NFkB1 and macrophage function (NR1H2::RXRA heterodimer. Transient expression in human iPSC-derived motor neurons of TNFAIP2 (also a DEG identified by all three algorithms reduced cell viability and induced caspase 3/7 activation. Using high-density RNAseq, multiple algorithms for DEG identification, and an unsupervised gene co-expression network approach, we identified significant elevation of inflammatory processes in ALS spinal cord with TNF as a major regulatory molecule. Overexpression of the DEG TNFAIP2 in human motor neurons, the population most vulnerable to die in ALS, increased cell death and caspase 3/7 activation. We propose that therapies targeted to reduce inflammatory TNFα signaling may be

  1. Initial investigation of 18F-NaF PET/CT for identification of vertebral sites amenable to surgical revision after spinal fusion surgery

    Quon, Andrew; Iagaru, Andrei; Dodd, Robert; Abreu, Marcelo Rodrigues de; Sprinz, Clarice; Hennemann, Sergio; Alves Neto, Jose Maria

    2012-01-01

    A pilot study was performed in patients with recurrent back pain after spinal fusion surgery to evaluate the ability of 18 F-NaF PET/CT imaging to correctly identify those requiring surgical intervention and to locate a site amenable to surgical intervention. In this prospective study 22 patients with recurrent back pain after spinal surgery and with equivocal findings on physical examination and CT were enrolled for evaluation with 18 F-NaF PET/CT. All PET/CT images were prospectively reviewed with the primary objective of identifying or ruling out the presence of lesions amenable to surgical intervention. The PET/CT results were then validated during surgical exploration or clinical follow-up of at least 15 months. Abnormal 18 F-NaF foci were found in 16 of the 22 patients, and surgical intervention was recommended. These foci were located at various sites: screws, cages, rods, fixation hardware, and bone grafts. In 6 of the 22 patients no foci requiring surgical intervention were found. Validation of the results by surgery (15 patients) or on clinical follow-up (7 patients) showed that 18 F-NaF PET/CT correctly predicted the presence of an abnormality requiring surgical intervention in 15 of 16 patients and was falsely positive in 1 of 16. In this initial investigation, 18 F-NaF PET/CT imaging showed potential utility for evaluation of recurrent symptoms after spinal fusion surgery by identifying those patients requiring surgical management. (orig.)

  2. Persistently High Hip Circumference after Bariatric Surgery Is a Major Hurdle to Successful Hip Replacement

    Menachem M. Meller

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of class III obesity (BMI≥40 kg/m2 in black women is 18%. As class III obesity leads to hip joint deterioration, black women frequently present for orthopedic care. Weight loss associated with bariatric surgery should lead to enhanced success of hip replacements. However, we present a case of a black woman who underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass with the expectation that weight loss would make her a better surgical candidate for hip replacement. Her gastric bypass was successful as her BMI declined from 52.0 kg/m2 to 33.7 kg/m2. However, her hip circumference after weight loss remained persistently high. Therefore, at surgery the soft tissue tunnel geometry presented major challenges. Tunnel depth and immobility of the soft tissue interfered with retractor placement, tissue reflection, and surgical access to the acetabulum. Therefore a traditional cup placement could not be achieved. Instead, a hemiarthroplasty was performed. After surgery her pain and reliance on external support decreased. But her functional independence never improved. This case demonstrates that a lower BMI after bariatric surgery may improve the metabolic profile and decrease anesthesia risk, but the success of total hip arthroplasties remains problematic if fat mass in the operative field (i.e., high hip circumference remains high.

  3. Treatment effect, postoperative complications, and their reasons in juvenile thoracic and lumbar spinal tuberculosis surgery.

    He, Qing-Yi; Xu, Jian-Zhong; Zhou, Qiang; Luo, Fei; Hou, Tianyong; Zhang, Zehua

    2015-10-01

    Fifty-four juvenile cases under 18 years of age with thoracic and lumbar spinal tuberculosis underwent focus debridement, deformity correction, bone graft fusion, and internal fixation. The treatment effects, complications, and reasons were analyzed retrospectively. There were 54 juvenile cases under 18 years of age with thoracolumbar spinal tuberculosis. The average age was 9.2 years old, and the sample comprised 38 males and 16 females. The disease types included 28 thoracic cases, 17 thoracolumbar cases, and 9 lumbar cases. Nerve function was evaluated with the Frankel classification. Thirty-six cases were performed with focus debridement and deformity correction and were supported with allograft or autograft in mesh and fixed with pedicle screws from a posterior approach. Eight cases underwent a combined anterior and posterior surgical approach. Nine cases underwent osteotomy and deformity correction, and one case received focus debridement. The treatment effects, complications, and bone fusions were tracked for an average of 52 months. According to the Frankel classification, paralysis was improved from 3 cases of B, 8 cases of C, 18 cases of D, and 25 cases of E preoperatively. This improvement was found in 3 cases of C, 6 cases of D, and 45 cases of E at a final follow-up postoperatively. No nerve dysfunction was aggravated. VAS was improved from 7.8 ± 1.7 preoperatively to 3.2 ± 2.1 at final follow-up postoperatively. ODI was improved from 77.5 ± 17.3 preoperatively to 28.4 ± 15.9 at final follow-up postoperatively. Kyphosis Cobb angle improved from 62.2° ± 3.7° preoperatively to 37° ± 2.4° at final follow-up postoperatively. Both of these are significant improvements, and all bone grafts were fused. Complications related to the operation occurred in 31.5% (17/54) of cases. Six cases suffered postoperative aggravated kyphosis deformity, eight cases suffered proximal kyphosis deformity, one case suffered pedicle penetration

  4. Transcranial magnetic stimulation in the semi-quantitative, pre-operative assessment of patients undergoing spinal deformity surgery.

    Glasby, Michael A; Tsirikos, Athanasios I; Henderson, Lindsay; Horsburgh, Gillian; Jordan, Brian; Michaelson, Ciara; Adams, Christopher I; Garrido, Enrique

    2017-08-01

    To compare measurements of motor evoked potential latency stimulated either magnetically (mMEP) or electrically (eMEP) and central motor conduction time (CMCT) made pre-operatively in conscious patients using transcranial and intra-operatively using electrical cortical stimulation before and after successful instrumentation for the treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. A group initially of 51 patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis aged 12-19 years was evaluated pre-operatively in the outpatients' department with transcranial magnetic stimulation. The neurophysiological data were then compared statistically with intra-operative responses elicited by transcranial electrical stimulation both before and after successful surgical intervention. MEPs were measured as the cortically evoked compound action potentials of Abductor hallucis. Minimum F-waves were measured using conventional nerve conduction methods and the lower motor neuron conduction time was calculated and this was subtracted from MEP latency to give CMCT. Pre-operative testing was well tolerated in our paediatric/adolescent patients. No neurological injury occurred in any patient in this series. There was no significant difference in the values of mMEP and eMEP latencies seen pre-operatively in conscious patients and intra-operatively in patients under anaesthetic. The calculated quantities mCMCT and eCMCT showed the same statistical correlations as the quantities mMEP and eMEP latency. The congruency of mMEP and eMEP and of mCMCT and eCMCT suggests that these measurements may be used comparatively and semi-quantitatively for the comparison of pre-, intra-, and post-operative spinal cord function in spinal deformity surgery.

  5. Effects of Multilevel Facetectomy and Screw Density on Postoperative Changes in Spinal Rod Contour in Thoracic Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis Surgery.

    Terufumi Kokabu

    Full Text Available Flattening of the preimplantation rod contour in the sagittal plane influences thoracic kyphosis (TK restoration in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS surgery. The effects of multilevel facetectomy and screw density on postoperative changes in spinal rod contour have not been documented. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of multilevel facetectomy and screw density on changes in spinal rod contour from before implantation to after surgical correction of thoracic curves in patients with AIS prospectively. The concave and convex rod shapes from patients with thoracic AIS (n = 49 were traced prior to insertion. Postoperative sagittal rod shape was determined by computed tomography. The angle of intersection of the tangents to the rod end points was measured. Multiple stepwise linear regression analysis was used to identify variables independently predictive of change in rod contour (Δθ. Average Δθ at the concave and convex side were 13.6° ± 7.5° and 4.3° ± 4.8°, respectively. The Δθ at the concave side was significantly greater than that of the convex side (P < 0.0001 and significantly correlated with Risser sign (P = 0.032, the preoperative main thoracic Cobb angle (P = 0.031, the preoperative TK angle (P = 0.012, and the number of facetectomy levels (P = 0.007. Furthermore, a Δθ at the concave side ≥14° significantly correlated with the postoperative TK angle (P = 0.003, the number of facetectomy levels (P = 0.021, and screw density at the concave side (P = 0.008. Rod deformation at the concave side suggests that corrective forces acting on that side are greater than on the convex side. Multilevel facetectomy and/or screw density at the concave side have positive effects on reducing the rod deformation that can lead to a loss of TK angle postoperatively.

  6. NUTRITIONAL ASSESSMENT IN PATIENTS PREDICTED TO MAJOR ABDOMINAL SURGERY AT THE GENERAL HOSPITAL CELJE

    Ernest Novak

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Malnutrition has serious implications for recovery after surgery. Early detection of malnutrition with nutritional support minimizes postoperative complications. Nutritional assessment tools need to be simple and suitable for use in everyday practice. In our study we wanted to determine, how many patients might benefit from nutritional support.Methods. From April to August 1999 fifty consecutively admitted patients predicted to major abdominal surgery have been examined. We used Mini nutritional assessment (MNA, Buzby’s nutrition risk index (NRI, blood albumin level and weight loss in the last 3 months period prior to the examination, to assess nutritional status.Results. We examined 50 patients (27 males and 23 females, age 76.5 ± 16.5 and confirmed malnutrition in 40% of patients with MNA and serum albumin level. The increased risk for nutrition-associated complications was confirmed by NRI and weight loss in 44%.Conclusions. A confident diagnosis of malnutrition and increased risk for nutrition-associated complications can be established by using a combination of simple methods like MNA, NRI, weight loss and serum albumin level. Almost half of the patients admitted for major abdominal surgery in General hospital Celje suffer from malnutrition and they may benefit with early nutritional intervention.

  7. Multifilament Cable Wire versus Conventional Wire for Sternal Closure in Patients Undergoing Major Cardiac Surgery

    You Na Oh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stainless steel wiring remains the most popular technique for primary sternal closure. Recently, a multifilament cable wiring system (Pioneer Surgical Technology Inc., Marquette, MI, USA was introduced for sternal closure and has gained wide acceptance due to its superior resistance to tension. We aimed to compare conventional steel wiring to multifilament cable fixation for sternal closure in patients undergoing major cardiac surgery. Methods: Data were collected retrospectively on 1,354 patients who underwent sternal closure after major cardiac surgery, using either the multifilament cable wiring system or conventional steel wires between January 2009 and October 2010. The surgical outcomes of these two groups of patients were compared using propensity score matching based on 18 baseline patient characteristics. Results: Propensity score matching yielded 392 pairs of patients in the two groups whose baseline profiles showed no significant differences. No significant differences between the two groups were observed in the rates of early mortality (2.0% vs. 1.3%, p=0.578, major wound complications requiring reconstruction (1.3% vs. 1.3%, p>0.99, minor wound complications (3.6% vs. 2.0%, p=0.279, or mediastinitis (0.8% vs. 1.0%, p=1.00. Patients in the multifilament cable group had fewer sternal bleeding events than those in the conventional wire group, but this tendency was not statistically significant (4.3% vs. 7.4%, p=0.068. Conclusion: The surgical outcomes of sternal closure using multifilament cable wires were comparable to those observed when conventional steel wires were used. Therefore, the multifilament cable wiring system may be considered a viable option for sternal closure in patients undergoing major cardiac surgery.

  8. Multifilament Cable Wire versus Conventional Wire for Sternal Closure in Patients Undergoing Major Cardiac Surgery.

    Oh, You Na; Ha, Keong Jun; Kim, Joon Bum; Jung, Sung-Ho; Choo, Suk Jung; Chung, Cheol Hyun; Lee, Jae Won

    2015-08-01

    Stainless steel wiring remains the most popular technique for primary sternal closure. Recently, a multifilament cable wiring system (Pioneer Surgical Technology Inc., Marquette, MI, USA) was introduced for sternal closure and has gained wide acceptance due to its superior resistance to tension. We aimed to compare conventional steel wiring to multifilament cable fixation for sternal closure in patients undergoing major cardiac surgery. Data were collected retrospectively on 1,354 patients who underwent sternal closure after major cardiac surgery, using either the multifilament cable wiring system or conventional steel wires between January 2009 and October 2010. The surgical outcomes of these two groups of patients were compared using propensity score matching based on 18 baseline patient characteristics. Propensity score matching yielded 392 pairs of patients in the two groups whose baseline profiles showed no significant differences. No significant differences between the two groups were observed in the rates of early mortality (2.0% vs. 1.3%, p=0.578), major wound complications requiring reconstruction (1.3% vs. 1.3%, p>0.99), minor wound complications (3.6% vs. 2.0%, p=0.279), or mediastinitis (0.8% vs. 1.0%, p=1.00). Patients in the multifilament cable group had fewer sternal bleeding events than those in the conventional wire group, but this tendency was not statistically significant (4.3% vs. 7.4%, p=0.068). The surgical outcomes of sternal closure using multifilament cable wires were comparable to those observed when conventional steel wires were used. Therefore, the multifilament cable wiring system may be considered a viable option for sternal closure in patients undergoing major cardiac surgery.

  9. Imaging of small bowel-related complications following major abdominal surgery

    Sandrasegaran, Kumaresan; Maglinte, Dean D.T.

    2005-01-01

    To recognize and document the small bowel reactions following major abdominal surgery is an important key for a correct diagnosis. Usually, plain abdominal radiography is the initial imaging examination requested in the immediate postoperative period, whereas gastrointestinal contrast studies are used to look for specific complications. In some countries, especially in Europe, sonography is widely employed to evaluate any acute affection of the abdomen. CT is commonly used to assess postoperative abdominal complications; in our institution also CT enteroclysis is often performed, to provide additional important informations. Radiologist should be able to diagnose less common types of obstruction, such as afferent loop, closed loop, strangulating obstruction as well as internal hernia. This knowledge may assume a critical importance for surgeons to decide on therapy. In this article, we focus our attention on the imaging (particularly CT) in small bowel complications following abdominal surgery

  10. The peri-operative cytokine response in infants and young children following major surgery

    Hansen, Tom Giedsing; Tønnesen, Else Kirstine; Andersen, J B

    1998-01-01

    The peri-operative cytokine response was studied in 13 infants and young children undergoing major surgery. All children were anaesthetized with a combined general and epidural anaesthetic technique, followed by post-operative epidural analgesia with bupivacaine and fentanyl. Blood samples were...... taken before and after surgery, 24 h post-operatively, and finally, when the children were mobilized and had regained gastrointestinal function. Plasma samples were analysed for tumour necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1 alpha, interleukin-1 beta, interleukin-6, interferon-gamma, interleukin-10...... and the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist. The cytokine responses were highly variable. Overall, no significant changes between pre- and post-operative plasma concentrations were found. Tumour necrosis factor-alpha and the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist were detectable in all children, and a trend towards an early...

  11. Enhanced Recovery Implementation in Major Gynecologic Surgeries: Effect of Care Standardization.

    Modesitt, Susan C; Sarosiek, Bethany M; Trowbridge, Elisa R; Redick, Dana L; Shah, Puja M; Thiele, Robert H; Tiouririne, Mohamed; Hedrick, Traci L

    2016-09-01

    To examine implementing an enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) protocol for women undergoing major gynecologic surgery at an academic institution and compare surgical outcomes before and after implementation. Two ERAS protocols were developed: a full pathway using regional anesthesia for open procedures and a light pathway without regional anesthesia for vaginal and minimally invasive procedures. Enhanced recovery after surgery pathways included extensive preoperative counseling, carbohydrate loading and oral fluids before surgery, multimodal analgesia with avoidance of intravenous opioids, intraoperative goal-directed fluid resuscitation, and immediate postoperative feeding and ambulation. A before-and-after study design was used to compare clinical outcomes, costs, and patient satisfaction. Complications and risk-adjusted length of stay were drawn from the American College of Surgeons' National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database. On the ERAS full protocol, 136 patients were compared with 211 historical controls and the median length of stay was reduced (2.0 compared with 3.0 days; P=.007) despite an increase in National Surgical Quality Improvement Program-predicted length of stay (2.5 compared with 2.0 days; P=.009). Reductions were seen in median intraoperative morphine equivalents (0.3 compared with 12.7 mg; Pcontrols and demonstrated decreased intraoperative and postoperative morphine equivalents (0.0 compared with 13.0 mg; Pcontrol, nurses keeping patients informed, and staff teamwork; 30-day total hospital costs were significantly decreased in both ERAS groups. Implementation of ERAS protocols in gynecologic surgery was associated with a substantial decrease in intravenous fluids and morphine administration coupled with reduction in length of stay for open procedures combined with improved patient satisfaction and decreased hospital costs.

  12. Feasibility of real-time location systems in monitoring recovery after major abdominal surgery.

    Dorrell, Robert D; Vermillion, Sarah A; Clark, Clancy J

    2017-12-01

    Early mobilization after major abdominal surgery decreases postoperative complications and length of stay, and has become a key component of enhanced recovery pathways. However, objective measures of patient movement after surgery are limited. Real-time location systems (RTLS), typically used for asset tracking, provide a novel approach to monitoring in-hospital patient activity. The current study investigates the feasibility of using RTLS to objectively track postoperative patient mobilization. The real-time location system employs a meshed network of infrared and RFID sensors and detectors that sample device locations every 3 s resulting in over 1 million data points per day. RTLS tracking was evaluated systematically in three phases: (1) sensitivity and specificity of the tracking device using simulated patient scenarios, (2) retrospective passive movement analysis of patient-linked equipment, and (3) prospective observational analysis of a patient-attached tracking device. RTLS tracking detected a simulated movement out of a room with sensitivity of 91% and specificity 100%. Specificity decreased to 75% if time out of room was less than 3 min. All RTLS-tagged patient-linked equipment was identified for 18 patients, but measurable patient movement associated with equipment was detected for only 2 patients (11%) with 1-8 out-of-room walks per day. Ten patients were prospectively monitored using RTLS badges following major abdominal surgery. Patient movement was recorded using patient diaries, direct observation, and an accelerometer. Sensitivity and specificity of RTLS patient tracking were both 100% in detecting out-of-room ambulation and correlated well with direct observation and patient-reported ambulation. Real-time location systems are a novel technology capable of objectively and accurately monitoring patient movement and provide an innovative approach to promoting early mobilization after surgery.

  13. Postoperative analgesia after major spine surgery: patient-controlled epidural analgesia versus patient-controlled intravenous analgesia.

    Schenk, Michael R; Putzier, Michael; Kügler, Bjoern; Tohtz, Stephan; Voigt, Kristina; Schink, Tania; Kox, Wolfgang J; Spies, Claudia; Volk, Thomas

    2006-11-01

    Spinal fusion surgery causes severe postoperative pain, hampering reconvalescense. We investigated the efficacy of patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) in a prospective, double-blind, randomized, controlled comparison with patient-controlled IV analgesia (PCIA). After lumbar anterior-posterior fusion receiving an epidural catheter intraoperatively, 72 patients were given either PCEA (ropivacaine 0.125% and sufentanil 1.0 microg/mL at 14 mL/h; bolus: 5 mL; lockout time: 15 min) and IV placebo or PCIA (morphine 2.0 mg/mL; bolus: 3 mg; lockout time: 15 min) and epidural placebo. Pain levels (visual analog scale 0-10), functional capabilities (turning in bed, standing, and walking), analgesic consumption, and side effects were evaluated until 72 h after surgery. Fourteen patients were excluded by predetermined criteria, leaving 58 patients for data analysis. Pain levels at rest and during mobilization were significantly lower in the PCEA when compared with that in the PCIA group throughout the study period (P turn in bed was achieved earlier in the PCEA group (P Patients in the PCEA group were significantly more satisfied with pain therapy (P patient satisfaction when compared with PCIA after spinal fusion surgery.

  14. Burden of Geriatric Events Among Older Adults Undergoing Major Cancer Surgery.

    Tan, Hung-Jui; Saliba, Debra; Kwan, Lorna; Moore, Alison A; Litwin, Mark S

    2016-04-10

    Most malignancies are diagnosed in older adults who are potentially susceptible to aging-related health conditions; however, the manifestation of geriatric syndromes during surgical cancer treatment is not well quantified. Accordingly, we sought to assess the prevalence and ramifications of geriatric events during major surgery for cancer. Using Nationwide Inpatient Sample data from 2009 to 2011, we examined hospital admissions for major cancer surgery among elderly patients (ie, age ≥ 65 years) and a referent group age 55 to 64 years. From these observations, we identified geriatric events that included delirium, dehydration, falls and fractures, failure to thrive, and pressure ulcers. We then estimated the collective prevalence of these events according to age, comorbidity, and cancer site and further explored their relationship with other hospital-based outcomes. Within a weighted sample of 939,150 patients, we identified at least one event in 9.2% of patients. Geriatric events were most common among patients age ≥ 75 years, with a Charlson comorbidity score ≥ 2, and who were undergoing surgery for cancer of the bladder, ovary, colon and/or rectum, pancreas, or stomach (P geriatric event had a greater likelihood of concurrent complications (odds ratio [OR], 3.73; 95% CI, 3.55 to 3.92), prolonged hospitalization (OR, 5.47; 95% CI, 5.16 to 5.80), incurring high cost (OR, 4.97; 95% CI, 4.58 to 5.39), inpatient mortality (OR, 3.22; 95% CI, 2.94 to 3.53), and a discharge disposition other than home (OR, 3.64; 95% CI, 3.46 to 3.84). Many older patients who receive cancer-directed surgery experience a geriatric event, particularly those who undergo major abdominal surgery. These events are linked to operative morbidity, prolonged hospitalization, and more expensive health care. As our population ages, efforts focused on addressing conditions and complications that are more common in older adults will be essential to delivering high-quality cancer care. © 2016 by

  15. A comparison of dexamethasone, ondansetron, and dexamethasone plus ondansetron as prophylactic antiemetic and antipruritic therapy in patients receiving intrathecal morphine for major orthopedic surgery.

    Szarvas, Szilvia

    2012-02-03

    In a prospective, double-blinded, randomized trial, we evaluated the efficacy of IV (a) dexamethasone 8 mg, (b) ondansetron 8 mg, and (c) dexamethasone 8 mg plus ondansetron 4 mg for the prevention of postoperative nausea, vomiting (PONV), and pruritus in 130 (ASA physical status I to III) patients undergoing elective major orthopedic surgery after spinal anesthesia with hyperbaric 0.5% bupivacaine and intrathecal morphine. After spinal anesthesia, patients were randomized to one of three groups. Failure of PONV prophylaxis in the 24-h postoperative period occurred more frequently in patients who received dexamethasone alone (29 of 40; 73%) compared with those who received either ondansetron alone (23 of 47; 49%) (P = 0.02) or dexamethasone plus ondansetron together (19 of 43; 44%)(P = 0.01). There was no difference in the incidence of failure of prophylaxis of pruritus (70%, 72%, and 70% in dexamethasone 8 mg, ondansetron 8 mg, and dexamethasone 8 mg plus ondansetron 4 mg, respectively) (P > 0.1) in the 24-h postoperative period. We conclude that the administration of dexamethasone 8 mg with ondansetron 4 mg has no added benefit compared with ondansetron 8 mg alone in the prophylaxis of PONV and pruritus. IMPLICATIONS: Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) and pruritus are common side effects after spinal opioid administration. In this study, dexamethasone 8 mg plus ondansetron 4 mg was as effective as ondansetron 8 mg. The administration of dexamethasone alone was associated with a frequent incidence of PONV, demonstrating a lack of efficacy. This has important cost implications.

  16. Analysis of Patients with Myelopathy due to Benign Intradural Spinal Tumors with Concomitant Lumbar Degenerative Diseases Misdiagnosed and Erroneously Treated with Lumbar Surgery.

    Lu, Kang; Wang, Hao-Kuang; Liliang, Po-Chou; Yang, Chih-Hui; Yen, Cheng-Yo; Tsai, Yu-Duan; Chen, Po-Yuan; Chye, Cien-Leong; Wang, Kuo-Wei; Liang, Cheng-Loong; Chen, Han-Jung

    2017-09-01

    When a cervical or thoracic benign intradural spinal tumor (BIST) coexists with lumbar degenerative diseases (LDD), diagnosis can be difficult. Symptoms of BIST-myelopathy can be mistaken as being related to LDD. Worse, an unnecessary lumbar surgery could be performed. This study was conducted to analyze cases in which an erroneous lumbar surgery was undertaken in the wake of failure to identify BIST-associated myelopathy. Cases were found in a hospital database. Patients who underwent surgery for LDD first and then another surgery for BIST removal within a short interval were studied. Issues investigated included why the BISTs were missed, how they were found later, and how the patients reacted to the unnecessary lumbar procedures. Over 10 years, 167 patients received both surgeries for LDD and a cervical or thoracic BIST. In 7 patients, lumbar surgery preceded tumor removal by a short interval. Mistakes shared by the physicians included failure to detect myelopathy and a BIST, and a hasty decision for lumbar surgery, which soon turned out to be futile. Although the BISTs were subsequently found and removed, 5 patients believed that the lumbar surgery was unnecessary, with 4 patients expressing regrets and 1 patient threatening to take legal action against the initial surgeon. Concomitant symptomatic LDD and BIST-associated myelopathy pose a diagnostic challenge. Spine specialists should refrain from reflexively linking leg symptoms and impaired ability to walk to LDD. Comprehensive patient evaluation is fundamental to avoid misdiagnosis and wrong lumbar surgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Surgery Goes Social: The Extent and Patterns of Social Media Utilization by Major Trauma, Acute and Critical Care Surgery Societies.

    Khalifeh, Jawad M; Kaafarani, Haytham M A

    2017-01-01

    The evolving influence of social media in trauma, acute, and critical care surgery (TACCS) cannot be ignored. We sought to investigate the extent and patterns of use of social networks by major regional, national and international TACCS societies. The two leading social networking sites, Facebook (FB) and Twitter (TW), were thoroughly examined for the presence of official accounts for each of the major TACCS societies. An official FB or TW account was defined as one which has a blue verified badge and/or is linked the society's official website. For societies with confirmed official accounts, the extent and patterns of use of the two platforms were systematically examined over a 2-week period through: (1) manual inspection of the societies' FB and TW pages, (2) the SQLite database containing downloaded samples of posts, and (3) the TW analytics database, symplur.com. Standardized social media metrics were calculated for each society. Posted content was categorized as being: (1) society news updates, (2) event announcements, or (3) general medical information. From a total of 64 TACCS societies, only 27 (42%) had FB and/or TW accounts. Ten out of the 12 American societies had accounts compared to 13/39 of European, 2/9 of Australasian, and 0/2 of international societies. For the societies with social media presence, the mean numbers of monthly tweets and FB posts per society were 22 and 8, respectively. We summarize the FB and TW activity of the studied TACCS societies. Most tweets/posts were society news updates and event announcements intended to the society's constituents not the general public. A text cloud was constructed to summarize the major featured topics. Less than half of the TACCS societies are currently using social media; those that do are arguably underutilizing its potential. Non-American societies in particular lag behind in their use of social networking.

  18. Multiple-hook fixation in revision spinal deformity surgery for patients with a previous multilevel fusion mass: technical note and preliminary outcomes.

    Liu, Ning; Wood, Kirkham B

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVE A previous multilevel fusion mass encountered during revision spinal deformity surgery may obscure anatomical landmarks, making instrumentation unworkable or incurring substantial blood loss and operative time. This study introduced a surgical technique of multiple-hook fixation for fixating previous multilevel fusion masses in revision spinal deformity surgeries and then evaluated its outcomes. METHODS Patients with a previous multilevel fusion mass who underwent revision corrective surgery down to the lumbosacral junction were retrospectively studied. Multiple hooks were used to fixate the fusion mass and linked to distal pedicle screws in the lumbosacral-pelvic complex. Radiological and clinical outcomes were evaluated. RESULTS The charts of 8 consecutive patients with spinal deformity were retrospectively reviewed (7 women, 1 man; mean age 56 years). The primary diagnoses included flat-back deformity (6 cases), thoracolumbar kyphoscoliosis (1 case), and lumbar spondylosis secondary to a previous scoliosis fusion (1 case). The mean follow-up duration was 30.1 months. Operations were performed at T3/4-ilium (4 cases), T7-ilium (1 case), T6-S1 (1 case), T12-S1 (1 case), and T9-L5 (1 case). Of 8 patients, 7 had sagittal imbalance preoperatively, and their mean C-7 plumb line improved from 10.8 ± 2.9 cm preoperatively to 5.3 ± 3.6 cm at final follow-up (p = 0.003). The mean lumbar lordosis of these patients at final follow-up was significantly greater than that preoperatively (35.2° ± 12.6° vs 16.8° ± 11.8°, respectively; p = 0.005). Two perioperative complications included osteotomy-related leg weakness in 1 patient and a stitch abscess in another. CONCLUSIONS The multiple-hook technique provides a viable alternative option for fixating a previous multilevel fusion mass in revision spinal deformity surgery.

  19. The effect of anesthesia type on the postoperative complications of major lower extremity surgery

    Murat Bakış

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Regional anesthesia is preferred more than general anesthesia in major lower extremity surgery. In our study, we aimed to investigate the relationship incidence of complications between regional anesthesia and general anesthesia in major surgery. Method: A total of 372 patients who underwent total hip or knee replacement from 1 January 2009 to 31 December 2012 were evaluated retrospectively in the study. The number of patients undergoing general anesthesia and regional anesthesia was respectively 118 and 254. If the patient has a history of more than one hip or knee replacements we were included only the first operation in the study. Postoperative complications were investigated over the course of 30 days. Patients' age, sex, type of operation (unilateral, bilateral, whether additional disease, postoperative complications were evaluated. Results: There were no difference for patients' age, sex and in terms of additional diseases. 92 patients general anesthesia and 135 patients regional anesthesia were performed to the patients who underwent total hip replacement, and 26 general anesthesia and 119 regional anesthesia is applied to patients who underwent total knee replacement (p=0.001. Postoperative complications are examined none of patients had no cardiac attack. Pulmonary embolism and death were found 7 in general anesthesia and 2 in regional anesthesia. Surgical site infection was found in 9 patients undergoing general anesthesia and 7 patients undergoing regional anesthesia and difference was statistically significant. Conclusion: In our clinic, regional and general anesthesia in patients undergoing major lower limb surgery applications observe significant difference in terms of complications during the postoperative period of 1 month.

  20. Myocardial injury after surgery is a risk factor for weaning failure from mechanical ventilation in critical patients undergoing major abdominal surgery.

    Shu Li

    Full Text Available Myocardial injury after noncardiac surgery (MINS is a newly proposed concept that is common among adults undergoing noncardiac surgery and associated with substantial mortality. We analyzed whether MINS was a risk factor for weaning failure in critical patients who underwent major abdominal surgery.This retrospective study was conducted in the Department of Critical Care Medicine of Peking University People's Hospital. The subjects were all critically ill patients who underwent major abdominal surgery between January 2011 and December 2013. Clinical and laboratory parameters during the perioperative period were investigated. Backward stepwise regression analysis was performed to evaluate MINS relative to the rate of weaning failure. Age, hypertension, chronic renal disease, left ventricular ejection fraction before surgery, Acute Physiologic and Chronic Health Evaluation II score, pleural effusion, pneumonia, acute kidney injury, duration of mechanical ventilation before weaning and the level of albumin after surgery were treated as independent variables.This study included 381 patients, of whom 274 were successfully weaned. MINS was observed in 42.0% of the patients. The MINS incidence was significantly higher in patients who failed to be weaned compared to patients who were successfully weaned (56.1% versus 36.5%; P<0.001. Independent predictive factors of weaning failure were MINS, age, lower left ventricular ejection fraction before surgery and lower serum albumin level after surgery. The MINS odds ratio was 4.098 (95% confidence interval, 1.07 to 15.6; P = 0.04. The patients who were successfully weaned had shorter hospital stay lengths and a higher survival rate than those who failed to be weaned.MINS is a risk factor for weaning failure from mechanical ventilation in critical patients who have undergone major abdominal surgery, independent of age, lower left ventricular ejection fraction before surgery and lower serum albumin levels after

  1. Association between baseline cognitive impairment and postoperative delirium in elderly patients undergoing surgery for adult spinal deformity.

    Adogwa, Owoicho; Elsamadicy, Aladine A; Vuong, Victoria D; Fialkoff, Jared; Cheng, Joseph; Karikari, Isaac O; Bagley, Carlos A

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Postoperative delirium is common in elderly patients undergoing spine surgery and is associated with a longer and more costly hospital course, functional decline, postoperative institutionalization, and higher likelihood of death within 6 months of discharge. Preoperative cognitive impairment may be a risk factor for the development of postoperative delirium. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between baseline cognitive impairment and postoperative delirium in geriatric patients undergoing surgery for degenerative scoliosis. METHODS Elderly patients 65 years and older undergoing a planned elective spinal surgery for correction of adult degenerative scoliosis were enrolled in this study. Preoperative cognition was assessed using the validated Saint Louis University Mental Status (SLUMS) examination. SLUMS comprises 11 questions, with a maximum score of 30 points. Mild cognitive impairment was defined as a SLUMS score between 21 and 26 points, while severe cognitive impairment was defined as a SLUMS score of ≤ 20 points. Normal cognition was defined as a SLUMS score of ≥ 27 points. Delirium was assessed daily using the Confusion Assessment Method (CAM) and rated as absent or present on the basis of CAM. The incidence of delirium was compared in patients with and without baseline cognitive impairment. RESULTS Twenty-two patients (18%) developed delirium postoperatively. Baseline demographics, including age, sex, comorbidities, and perioperative variables, were similar in patients with and without delirium. The length of in-hospital stay (mean 5.33 days vs 5.48 days) and 30-day hospital readmission rates (12.28% vs 12%) were similar between patients with and without delirium, respectively. Patients with preoperative cognitive impairment (i.e., a lower SLUMS score) had a higher incidence of postoperative delirium. One- and 2-year patient reported outcomes scores were similar in patients with and without delirium. CONCLUSIONS

  2. Thoracic epidural analgesia reduces myocardial injury in ischemic patients undergoing major abdominal cancer surgery

    Mohamad MF

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Mohamad Farouk Mohamad,1 Montaser A Mohammad,1 Diab F Hetta,1 Eman Hasan Ahmed,2 Ahmed A Obiedallah,3 Alaa Ali M Elzohry1 1Department of Anesthesia, ICU and Pain Relief, 2Department of Clinical Pathology, South Egypt Cancer Institute, 3Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Assiut University, Arab Republic of Egypt Background and objectives: Major abdominal cancer surgeries are associated with significant perioperative mortality and morbidity due to myocardial ischemia and infarction. This study examined the effect of perioperative patient controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA on occurrence of ischemic cardiac injury in ischemic patients undergoing major abdominal cancer surgery.Patients and methods: One hundred and twenty patients (American Society of Anesthesiologists grade II and III of either sex were scheduled for elective upper gastrointestinal cancer surgeries. Patients were allocated randomly into two groups (60 patients each to receive, besides general anesthesia: continuous intra and postoperative intravenous (IV infusion with fentanyl for 72 h postoperatively (patient controlled intravenous analgesia [PCIA] group or continuous intra and postoperative epidural infusion with bupivacaine 0.125% and fentanyl (PCEA group for 72 h postoperatively. Perioperative hemodynamics were recorded. Postoperative pain was assessed over 72 h using visual analog scale (VAS. All patients were screened for occurrence of myocardial injury (MI by electrocardiography, echocardiography, and cardiac troponin I serum level. Other postoperative complications as arrhythmia, deep venous thrombosis (DVT, pulmonary embolism, pneumonia, and death were recorded.Results: There was a significant reduction in overall adverse cardiac events (myocardial injury, arrhythmias, angina, heart failure and nonfatal cardiac arrest in PCEA group in comparison to PCIA group. Also, there was a significant reduction in dynamic VAS pain score in group PCEA in comparison

  3. Morbidly obese patient with obstructive sleep apnoea for major spine surgery: An anaesthetic challenge

    Shruti Redhu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Morbidly obese patients with clinical features of obstructive sleep apnoea can present a myriad of challenges to the anaesthesiologists which must be addressed to minimise the perioperative risks. Initiation of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP therapy early in the pre- and post-operative period along with appropriate anaesthetic planning is of paramount importance in such patients. This case report emphasises the usefulness of CPAP therapy, even for a short duration, to minimise morbidity, improve recovery and hasten early discharge from the hospital after major surgery.

  4. Surgery on spinal epidural metastases (SEM) in renal cell carcinoma: a plea for a new paradigm.

    Bakker, Nicolaas A; Coppes, Maarten H; Vergeer, Rob A; Kuijlen, Jos M A; Groen, Rob J M

    2014-09-01

    Prediction models for outcome of decompressive surgical resection of spinal epidural metastases (SEM) have in common that they have been developed for all types of SEM, irrespective of the type of primary tumor. It is our experience in clinical practice, however, that these models often fail to accurately predict outcome in the individual patient. To investigate whether decision making could be optimized by applying tumor-specific prediction models. For the proof of concept, we analyzed patients with SEM from renal cell carcinoma that we have operated on. Retrospective chart analysis 2006 to 2012. Twenty-one consecutive patients with symptomatic SEM of renal cell carcinoma. Predictive factors for survival. Next to established predictive factors for survival, we analyzed the predictive value of the Motzer criteria in these patients. The Motzer criteria comprise a specific and validated risk model for survival in patients with renal cell carcinoma. After multivariable analysis, only Motzer intermediate (hazard ratio [HR] 17.4, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.82-166, p=.01) and high risk (HR 39.3, 95% CI 3.10-499, p=.005) turned out to be significantly associated with survival in patients with renal cell carcinoma that we have operated on. In this study, we have demonstrated that decision making could have been optimized by implementing the Motzer criteria next to established prediction models. We, therefore, suggest that in future, in patients with SEM from renal cell carcinoma, the Motzer criteria are also taken into account. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Incidence of major vascular events after cardiac surgery: impact of preoperative monitoring with troponin and electrocardiogram

    Sandra M Quiroga; Juan C Villar; Luz X, Martinez

    2009-01-01

    Recent demographic changes have led to an increased risk of major vascular events among patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery. Troponin and electrocardiogram monitoring would further identify these major vascular events. Methods: we prospectively collected data on eligible patients (non-selected individuals aged 45 or older undergoing non-cardiac surgery under general or regional anesthesia in two hospitals in Bucaramanga, with expected length of stay longer than 24 hours) during a time-interrupted series,before and after postoperative diagnostic monitoring (blinded assessment of troponin T and electrocardiograms ignoring clinical data). For the period before the intervention (usual clinical care),two independent reviewers extracted clinical information from clinical histories (of all eligible patients from 3 randomly-selected months of 2005). For the period after diagnostic monitoring, we followed 100 consecutive eligible patients. Primary outcome was a composite of major vascular events within hospital, including myocardial infarction (defined as any troponin elevation associated with electrocardiographic changes suggesting ischemia, regardless of symptoms). Results: we included 534 clinical charts and 100 prospective surgical patients (mean age 62.2, SD 12.9 years; 56% women). The more frequent surgical procedures were orthopedics (26.8%) followed by abdominal (20.2%).The incidence of major vascular events recorded in clinical charts was 2.8%, compared with 7% among monitored patients (p=0,071). All four myocardial infarctions identified among the later group were silent. Conclusion: postoperative monitoring with troponin and electrocardiography identified a higher proportion of major vascular events, mainly silent myocardial infarctions.

  6. Differential Effects of Intraoperative Positive End-expiratory Pressure (PEEP) on Respiratory Outcome in Major Abdominal Surgery Versus Craniotomy

    de Jong, Myrthe A C; Ladha, Karim S; Melo, Marcos F Vidal

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In this study, we examined whether (1) positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) has a protective effect on the risk of major postoperative respiratory complications in a cohort of patients undergoing major abdominal surgeries and craniotomies, and (2) the effect of PEEP is differed......: Within the entire study population (major abdominal surgeries and craniotomies), we found an association between application of PEEP ≥5 cmH2O and a decreased risk of postoperative respiratory complications compared with PEEP 5 cmH2O was associated with a significant lower...... undergoing major abdominal surgery. Our data suggest that default mechanical ventilator settings should include PEEP of 5-10 cmH2O during major abdominal surgery....

  7. Comparison of harmonic blade versus traditional approach in canine patients undergoing spinal decompressive surgery for naturally occurring thoracolumbar disk extrusion.

    Bianca F Hettlich

    Full Text Available To assess feasibility of the harmonic Osteovue blade (HOB for use in the soft tissue approach for dogs undergoing hemilaminectomy and to compare outcomes between dogs undergoing HOB or traditional approach (TRAD.A prospective randomized clinical trial was performed using 20 client-owned dogs with thoracolumbar intervertebral disk extrusion requiring hemilaminectomy. Dogs were randomly assigned to HOB or TRAD. Neurologic function and pain scores were assessed pre-operatively. Intraoperative blood loss and surgical approach time as well as postoperative pain and wound healing scores were recorded. Additionally, neurologic recovery and owner perceived quality of life were recorded at day 10 and 30 postoperative.There was no significant difference in sex distribution, weight, age, preoperative neurological grade and pain score, and perioperative outcome measures between groups. Intraoperative total blood loss was minimal for HOB and TRAD (median: 0 ml (range 0-9 and 2.2 ml (range 0-6.8, respectively; p = 0.165 and approach times were similar (median: 7 min (range 5-12 and 8 min (range 5-13, respectively; p = 0.315. While changes in wound healing scores were similar, changes in postoperative pain scores and neurological function were significantly improved in the HOB compared to the TRAD group. Postoperative complications in the HOB group consisted of automutilation of part of the incision and development of a small soft, non-painful subcutaneous swelling in 1 dog each.The HOB is a safe and effective tool for the soft tissue approach for routine spinal surgery in dogs and is associated with decreased pain and increased neurological function post-surgery.

  8. Medical clerks in a national university hospital: improving the quality of medical care with a focus on spinal surgery.

    Kobayashi, Kazuyoshi; Ando, Kei; Noda, Makiko; Ishiguro, Naoki; Imagama, Shiro

    2018-02-01

    In our institution, which is a national university hospital, medical clerks were introduced in 2009 to improve the doctor's working environment. Seventeen clerks were assigned to 9 separate departments and the work content differed greatly among departments, but sufficient professional work was not done efficiently. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of the work of medical clerks on improvement of medical quality in recent years. In 2011, we established a central clerk desk on our outpatient floor to improve efficiency and centralize the clerk work. Since 2013, periodic education of clerks on spine disease has been provided by spine doctors, and this has facilitated sharing of information on spinal surgery from diagnosis to surgical treatment. This has allowed medical clerks to ask patients questions, leading to more efficient medical treatment and a potential reduction of doctors' work. In 2016, a revision of the insurance system by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare of Japan increased the amount of medical work that clerks can perform, and it became possible to increase the number of medical clerks. Currently, we have 30 medical clerks, and this has allowed establishment of new clerk desks in other departments to handle patients. A training curriculum will be developed to reduce the burden on doctors further and to improve the quality of medical treatment.

  9. Spinal Cord Stimulation in Failed Back Surgery Syndrome: Effects on Posture and Gait—A Preliminary 3D Biomechanical Study

    L. Brugliera

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied 8 patients with spinal cord stimulation (SCS devices which had been previously implanted to treat neuropathic chronic pain secondary to Failed Back Surgery Syndrome. The aim of our study was to investigate the effects of SCS on posture and gait by means of clinical scales (Short Form Health Survey-36, Visual Analogue Scale for pain, and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and instrumented evaluation with 3D Gait Analysis using a stereophotogrammetric system. The latter was performed with the SCS device turned both OFF and ON. We recorded gait and posture using the Davis protocol and also trunk movement during flexion-extension on the sagittal plane, lateral bending on the frontal plane, and rotation on the transversal plane. During and 30 minutes after the stimulation, not only the clinical scales but also spatial-temporal gait parameters and trunk movements improved significantly. Improvement was not shown under stimulation-OFF conditions. Our preliminary data suggest that SCS has the potential to improve posture and gait and to provide a window of pain-free opportunity to optimize rehabilitation interventions.

  10. The effects of music, white noise, and ambient noise on sedation and anxiety in patients under spinal anesthesia during surgery.

    Ilkkaya, Nazan Koylu; Ustun, Faik Emre; Sener, Elif Bengi; Kaya, Cengiz; Ustun, Yasemin Burcu; Koksal, Ersin; Kocamanoglu, Ismail Serhat; Ozkan, Fatih

    2014-10-01

    To compare effects of music, white noise, and ambient (background) noise on patient anxiety and sedation. Open, parallel, and randomized controlled trial. Seventy-five patients aged 18 to 60 years who were scheduled for surgical procedures under spinal anesthesia were randomly assigned to ambient noise (Group O), white noise (Group B), or music groups (Group M). We evaluated patients' anxiety and sedation levels via the Observer's Assessment of Alertness/Sedation (OAA/S) scale and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) questionnaire. At 5 minutes before surgery, the STAI-State Anxiety Inventory (SA) value was significantly lower in Group M than the other groups. At 30-minute recovery, Group M showed significantly lower STAI-SA values than the other groups. Patient satisfaction was highest in Group M. OAA/S values were not significantly different between groups during any period (P > .05). We suggest that patient-selected music reduces perioperative anxiety and contributes to patient satisfaction during the perioperative period. Copyright © 2014 American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Haemodilution study in major orthopaedic surgery experience as a technique of blood conservation.

    Liaw, Y; Boon, P; Deshpande, S

    1994-08-01

    Haemodilution and auto-transfusion were carried out in 103 consecutive patients having major orthopaedic surgery. The records of 99 patients were available for retrospective assessment of this technique. Fifty-six per cent of the patients did not require any homologous blood transfusion. Homologous blood transfusion was given to 44% of the patients, who used up 99 units of blood in their entire hospital stay. There was no morbidity such as transfusion reaction, infection, decrease in platelets or re-operation for bleeding associated with the procedure, although there was one death secondary to myocardial infarction. This technique offered an alternative method to reduce the use of homologous blood transfusion in major orthopaedic operations.

  12. Perioperative dexketoprofen or lornoxicam administration for pain management after major orthopedic surgery: a randomized, controlled study.

    Sivrikoz, Nükhet; Koltka, Kemalettin; Güresti, Ece; Büget, Mehmet; Sentürk, Mert; Özyalçın, Süleyman

    2014-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are recommended for multimodal postoperative pain management. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the postoperative pain relief and opioid-sparing effects of dexketoprofen and lornoxicam after major orthopedic surgery. After obtaining ethical committee approval and informed consent, 120 patients undergoing elective hip or knee replacement under general anesthesia were randomized to receive two intravenous injections of 50 mg dexketoprofen (GD), 8 mg lornoxicam (GL) or saline as placebo (GP) intravenously. Postoperatively, patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) morphine was started as a 0.01 mg.kg-1 bolus dose, with lockout time of 10 minutes without continuous infusion. Pain assessment was made using the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) at rest or during movement at postoperative 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, and 24 hours. The three groups were similar in terms of age, gender, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) class, number of patients who underwent hip or knee surgery, weight, height, and operation duration. Patients in GD and GL demonstrated significantly reduced pain scores at rest and active motion compared to GP, with lower scores in the dexketoprofen group. Patients in GD and GL used significantly less morphine in the postoperative period compared to GP. The total morphine consumption of patients in GD was lower than in GL. Intravenous application of 50 mg dexketoprofen twice a day and 8 mg lornoxicam twice a day improved analgesia and decreased morphine consumption following major orthopedic surgery. When the two active drugs were compared, it was found that dexketoprofen was superior to lornoxicam in terms of analgesic efficacy and opioid consumption.

  13. Efficacy and safety of venous thromboembolism prophylaxis with apixaban in major orthopedic surgery

    Werth S

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Sebastian Werth, Kai Halbritter, Jan Beyer-WestendorfCenter for Vascular Medicine and Department of Medicine III, Division of Angiology, University Hospital “Carl Gustav Carus” Dresden, Dresden, GermanyAbstract: Over the last 15 years, low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWHs have been accepted as the “gold standard” for pharmaceutical thromboprophylaxis in patients at high risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE in most countries around the world. Patients undergoing major orthopedic surgery (MOS represent a population with high risk of VTE, which may remain asymptomatic or become symptomatic as deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism. Numerous trials have investigated LMWH thromboprophylaxis in this population and demonstrated high efficacy and safety of these substances. However, LMWHs have a number of disadvantages, which limit the acceptance of patients and physicians, especially in prolonged prophylaxis up to 35 days after MOS. Consequently, new oral anticoagulants (NOACs were developed that are of synthetic origin and act as direct and very specific inhibitors of different factors in the coagulation cascade. The most developed NOACs are dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and apixaban, all of which are approved for thromboprophylaxis in MOS in a number of countries around the world. This review is focused on the pharmacological characteristics of apixaban in comparison with other NOACs, on the impact of NOAC on VTE prophylaxis in daily care, and on the management of specific situations such as bleeding complications during NOAC therapy.Keywords: major orthopedic surgery, apixaban, dabigatran, edoxaban, rivaroxaban, deep vein thrombosis, venous thromboembolism, VTE prophylaxis

  14. Depression Subscale of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale applied preoperatively in spinal surgery

    Asdrubal Falavigna

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the accuracy of the Depression Subscale of Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-D in spine surgery, comparing it to Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. METHODS: In a cross-sectional study, the HADS-D and the BDI were applied to patients undergoing spine surgery for lumbar (n=139 or cervical spondylosis (n=17. Spearman correlation tests for HADS-D and BDI were applied. The internal consistency of HADS-D was estimated by Cronbach's alpha coefficient. RESULTS: According to the BDI, the prevalence of depression was of 28.8% (n=45. The Spearman r coefficient between HADS-D and BDI was 0.714 (p10, there was a sensitivity of 71.1%, specificity of 95.4%, and positive likelihood-ratio of 15.78. CONCLUSIONS: HADS-D showed a strong correlation with BDI and good reliability. HADS-D is a good alternative for screening depression and assessing its severity.

  15. Is hospital information system relevant to detect surgical site infection? Findings from a prospective surveillance study in posterior instrumented spinal surgery.

    Boetto, J; Chan-Seng, E; Lonjon, G; Pech, J; Lotthé, A; Lonjon, N

    2015-11-01

    Spinal instrumentation has a high rate of surgical site infection (SSI), but results greatly vary depending on surveillance methodology, surgical procedures, or quality of follow-up. Our aim was to study true incidence of SSI in spinal surgery by significant data collection, and to compare it with the results obtained through the hospital information system. This work is a single center prospective cohort study that included all patients consecutively operated on for spinal instrumentation by posterior approach over a six-month period regardless the etiology. For all patients, a "high definition" prospective method of surveillance was performed by the infection control (IC) department during at least 12 months after surgery. Results were then compared with findings from automatic surveillance though the hospital information system (HIS). One hundred and fifty-four patients were included. We found no hardly difference between "high definition" and automatic surveillance through the HIS, even if HIS tended to under-estimate the infection rate: rate of surgical site infection was 2.60% and gross SSI incidence rate via the hospital information system was 1.95%. Smoking and alcohol consumption were significantly related to a SSI. Our SSI rates to reflect the true incidence of infectious complications in posterior instrumented adult spinal surgery in our hospital and these results were consistent with the lower levels of published infection rate. In-house surveillance by surgeons only is insufficiently sensitive. Further studies with more patients and a longer inclusion time are needed to conclude if SSI case detection through the HIS could be a relevant and effective alternative method. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. The Impact of Two Different Transfusion Strategies on Patient Immune Response during Major Abdominal Surgery: A Preliminary Report

    Theodoraki, Kassiani; Markatou, Maria; Rizos, Demetrios; Fassoulaki, Argyro

    2014-01-01

    Blood transfusion is associated with well-known risks. We investigated the difference between a restrictive versus a liberal transfusion strategy on the immune response, as expressed by the production of inflammatory mediators, in patients subjected to major abdominal surgery procedures. Fifty-eight patients undergoing major abdominal surgery were randomized preoperatively to either a restrictive transfusion protocol or a liberal transfusion protocol (with transfusion if hemoglobin dropped be...

  17. Minimally Invasive Spine Surgery in Small Animals.

    Hettlich, Bianca F

    2018-01-01

    Minimally invasive spine surgery (MISS) seems to have many benefits for human patients and is currently used for various minor and major spine procedures. For MISS, a change in access strategy to the target location is necessary and it requires intraoperative imaging, special instrumentation, and magnification. Few veterinary studies have evaluated MISS for canine patients for spinal decompression procedures. This article discusses the general requirements for MISS and how these can be applied to veterinary spinal surgery. The current veterinary MISS literature is reviewed and suggestions are made on how to apply MISS to different spinal locations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Impact of neurosurgeon specialization on patient outcomes for intracranial and spinal surgery: a retrospective analysis of the Nationwide Inpatient Sample 1998-2009.

    McCutcheon, Brandon A; Hirshman, Brian R; Gabel, Brandon C; Heffner, Michael W; Marcus, Logan P; Cole, Tyler S; Chen, Clark C; Chang, David C; Carter, Bob S

    2018-05-01

    OBJECTIVE The subspecialization of neurosurgical practice is an ongoing trend in modern neurosurgery. However, it remains unclear whether the degree of surgeon specialization is associated with improved patient outcomes. The authors hypothesized that a trend toward increased neurosurgeon specialization was associated with improved patient morbidity and mortality rates. METHODS The Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) was used (1998-2009). Patients were included in a spinal analysis cohort for instrumented spine surgery involving the cervical spine ( International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification [ICD-9-CM] codes 81.31-81.33, 81.01-81.03, 84.61-84.62, and 84.66) or lumbar spine (codes 81.04-81.08, 81.34-81.38, 84.64-84.65, and 84.68). A cranial analysis cohort consisted of patients receiving a parenchymal excision or lobectomy operation (codes 01.53 and 01.59). Surgeon specialization was measured using unique surgeon identifiers in the NIS and defined as the proportion of a surgeon's total practice dedicated to cranial or spinal cases. RESULTS A total of 46,029 and 231,875 patients were identified in the cranial and spinal analysis cohorts, respectively. On multivariate analysis in the cranial analysis cohort (after controlling for overall surgeon volume, patient demographic data/comorbidities, hospital characteristics, and admitting source), each percentage-point increase in a surgeon's cranial specialization (that is, the proportion of cranial cases) was associated with a 0.0060 reduction in the log odds of patient mortality (95% CI 0.0034-0.0086) and a 0.0042 reduction in the log odds of morbidity (95% CI 0.0032-0.0052). This resulted in a 15% difference in the predicted probability of mortality for neurosurgeons at the 75th versus the 25th percentile of cranial specialization. In the spinal analysis cohort, each percentage-point increase in a surgeon's spinal specialization was associated with a 0.0122 reduction in the log odds of

  19. Assessment of outcome in patients undergoing surgery for intradural spinal tumor using the multidimensional patient-rated Core Outcome Measures Index and the modified McCormick Scale.

    Bellut, David; Burkhardt, Jan-Karl; Mannion, Anne F; Porchet, François

    2015-08-01

    OBJECT The aim of this study was to evaluate outcome in patients undergoing surgical treatment for intradural spinal tumor using a patient-oriented, self-rated, outcome instrument and a physician-based disease-specific instrument. METHODS Prospectively collected data from 63 patients with intradural spinal tumor were analyzed in relation to scores on the multidimensional patient-rated Core Outcome Measures Index (COMI) and the physician-rated modified McCormick Scale, before and at 3 and 12 months after surgery. RESULTS There was no statistically significant difference between the scores on the modified McCormick Scale preoperatively and at the 3-month follow-up, though there was a trend for improvement (p = 0.073); however, comparisons between the scores determined preoperatively and at the 12-month follow-up, as well as 3- versus 12-month follow-ups, showed a statistically significant improvement in each case (p 0.05) up to 12 months postoperatively. In contrast, the overall COMI score, "worst pain," quality of life, and social disability not only showed a significant reduction from before surgery to 3 months after surgery (p 0.05), but did show a significant improvement (p = 0.011) from 3 months to 12 months after surgery. At the 3- and 12-month follow-ups, 85.2% and 83.9% of patients, respectively, declared that the surgical procedure had helped/helped a lot; 95.1% and 95.2%, respectively, declared that they were satisfied/very satisfied with their care. CONCLUSIONS COMI is a feasible tool to use in the evaluation of baseline symptoms and outcome in patients undergoing surgery for intradural spinal tumor. COMI was able to detect changes in outcome at 3 months after surgery (before changes were apparent on the modified McCormick Scale) and on later postoperative follow-up. The COMI subdomains are valuable for monitoring the patient's reintegration into society and the work environment. The addition of an item that specifically covers neurological deficits may

  20. [Comparison between hypo- and hyperglucidic diets on protein sparing in major visceral surgery (author's transl)].

    Caillard, B; Bourdois, M; Freysz, M; Baguet, G; Laurin, S; Chalmond, B; Desgres, J; Ahouangbevi, A

    1981-01-01

    The authors compare the protein sparing effect of two diets, exclusively intravenous, including the same protein intake, but a different caloric intake, 21 calories/gm nitrogen for diet "A" (20 cases); 138 calories/gm nitrogen for diet "B" (20 cases). This has been observed during the six post-operative days of major visceral surgery: oesophagectomy, total gastrectomy, colic or rectocolic exeresis, sequestrectomy for acute pancreatitis, lots having been drawn for the diets. Daily nitrogen balances have been made and plasmatic and urinary levels of amino-acids have been measured before surgery and on the third and fifth post-operative days. Statistical exploitation is done by variance analysis (linear model of three factors) with a 99% confidence ratio: 1) Patient factor has no influence whatsoever on cumulative nitrogen balance. 2) Time factor arises only on the fourth post-operative day and only in the hypocaloric diet, leading to catabolism. 3) Metabolic condition is determinant. On no cancerous disease, superiority of hypercaloric diet is well demonstrated. On cancerous disease, nitrogen loss is only significantly different on 4th and 5th post-operative day: hypercaloric diet gives a better nitrogen balance.

  1. Informed decision-making in elective major vascular surgery: analysis of 145 surgeon-patient consultations.

    Etchells, Edward; Ferrari, Michel; Kiss, Alex; Martyn, Nikki; Zinman, Deborah; Levinson, Wendy

    2011-06-01

    Prior studies show significant gaps in the informed decision-making process, a central goal of surgical care. These studies have been limited by their focus on low-risk decisions, single visits rather than entire consultations, or both. Our objectives were, first, to rate informed decision-making for major elective vascular surgery based on audiotapes of actual physician-patient conversations and, second, to compare ratings of informed decision-making for first visits to ratings for multiple visits by the same patient over time. We prospectively enrolled patients for whom vascular surgical treatment was a potential option at a tertiary care outpatient vascular surgery clinic. We audio-taped all surgeon-patient conversations, including multiple visits when necessary, until a decision was made. Using an existing method, we evaluated the transcripts for elements of decision-making, including basic elements (e.g., an explanation of the clinical condition), intermediate elements (e.g., risks and benefits) and complex elements (e.g., uncertainty around the decision). We analyzed 145 surgeon-patient consultations. Overall, 45% of consultations contained complex elements, whereas 23% did not contain the basic elements of decision-making. For the 67 consultations that involved multiple visits, ratings were significantly higher when evaluating all visits (50% complex elements) compared with evaluating only the first visit (33% complex elements, p decision-making over multiple visits yielded different results than analyzing decision-making for single visits.

  2. Interdisciplinary Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy as Part of Lumbar Spinal Fusion Surgery Rehabilitation: Experience of Patients With Chronic Low Back Pain.

    Lindgreen, Pil; Rolving, Nanna; Nielsen, Claus Vinther; Lomborg, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    Patients receiving lumbar spinal fusion surgery often have persisting postoperative pain negatively affecting their daily life. These patients may be helped by interdisciplinary cognitive-behavioral therapy which is recognized as an effective intervention for improving beneficial pain coping behavior, thereby facilitating the rehabilitation process of patients with chronic pain. The purpose of this study was to describe the lived experience of patients recovering from lumbar spinal fusion surgery and to explore potential similarities and disparities in pain coping behavior between receivers and nonreceivers of interdisciplinary cognitive-behavioral group therapy. We conducted semistructured interviews with 10 patients; 5 receiving cognitive-behavioral therapy in connection with their lumbar spinal fusion surgery and 5 receiving usual care. We conducted a phenomenological analysis to reach our first aim and then conducted a comparative content analysis to reach our second aim. Patients' postoperative experience was characterized by the need to adapt to the limitations imposed by back discomfort (coexisting with the back), need for recognition and support from others regarding their pain, a relatively long rehabilitation period during which they "awaited the result of surgery", and ambivalence toward analgesics. The patients in both groups had similar negative perception of analgesics and tended to abstain from them to avoid addiction. Coping behavior apparently differed among receivers and nonreceivers of interdisciplinary cognitive-behavioral group therapy. Receivers prevented or minimized pain by resting before pain onset, whereas nonreceivers awaited pain onset before resting. The postoperative experience entailed ambivalence, causing uncertainty, worry and insecurity. This ambivalence was relieved when others recognized the patient's pain and offered support. Cognitive-behavioral therapy as part of rehabilitation may have encouraged beneficial pain coping

  3. Higher success rate with transcranial electrical stimulation of motor-evoked potentials using constant-voltage stimulation compared with constant-current stimulation in patients undergoing spinal surgery.

    Shigematsu, Hideki; Kawaguchi, Masahiko; Hayashi, Hironobu; Takatani, Tsunenori; Iwata, Eiichiro; Tanaka, Masato; Okuda, Akinori; Morimoto, Yasuhiko; Masuda, Keisuke; Tanaka, Yuu; Tanaka, Yasuhito

    2017-10-01

    During spine surgery, the spinal cord is electrophysiologically monitored via transcranial electrical stimulation of motor-evoked potentials (TES-MEPs) to prevent injury. Transcranial electrical stimulation of motor-evoked potential involves the use of either constant-current or constant-voltage stimulation; however, there are few comparative data available regarding their ability to adequately elicit compound motor action potentials. We hypothesized that the success rates of TES-MEP recordings would be similar between constant-current and constant-voltage stimulations in patients undergoing spine surgery. The objective of this study was to compare the success rates of TES-MEP recordings between constant-current and constant-voltage stimulation. This is a prospective, within-subject study. Data from 100 patients undergoing spinal surgery at the cervical, thoracic, or lumbar level were analyzed. The success rates of the TES-MEP recordings from each muscle were examined. Transcranial electrical stimulation with constant-current and constant-voltage stimulations at the C3 and C4 electrode positions (international "10-20" system) was applied to each patient. Compound muscle action potentials were bilaterally recorded from the abductor pollicis brevis (APB), deltoid (Del), abductor hallucis (AH), tibialis anterior (TA), gastrocnemius (GC), and quadriceps (Quad) muscles. The success rates of the TES-MEP recordings from the right Del, right APB, bilateral Quad, right TA, right GC, and bilateral AH muscles were significantly higher using constant-voltage stimulation than those using constant-current stimulation. The overall success rates with constant-voltage and constant-current stimulations were 86.3% and 68.8%, respectively (risk ratio 1.25 [95% confidence interval: 1.20-1.31]). The success rates of TES-MEP recordings were higher using constant-voltage stimulation compared with constant-current stimulation in patients undergoing spinal surgery. Copyright © 2017

  4. Recombinant factor VIIa treatment for asymptomatic factor VII deficient patients going through major surgery.

    Livnat, Tami; Shenkman, Boris; Spectre, Galia; Tamarin, Ilia; Dardik, Rima; Israeli, Amnon; Rivkind, Avraham; Shabtai, Moshe; Marinowitz, Uri; Salomon, Ophira

    2012-07-01

    Factor VII deficiency is the most common among the rare autosomal recessive coagulation disorders worldwide. In factor VII deficient patients, the severity and clinical manifestations cannot be reliably determined by factor VII levels. Severe bleeding tends to occur in individuals with factor VII activity levels of 2% or less of normal. Patients with 2-10% factor VII vary between asymptomatic to severe life threatening haemorrhages behaviour. Recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa) is the most common replacement therapy for congenital factor VII deficiency. However, unlike haemophilia patients for whom treatment protocols are straight forward, in asymptomatic factor VII deficiency patients it is still debatable. In this study, we demonstrate that a single and very low dose of recombinant factor VIIa enabled asymptomatic patients with factor VII deficiency to go through major surgery safely. This suggestion was also supported by thrombin generation, as well as by thromboelastometry.

  5. Pneumomediastinum, Subcutaneous Emphysema, and Tracheal Tear in the Early Postoperative Period of Spinal Surgery in a Paraplegic Achondroplastic Dwarf

    Sinan Kahraman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Achondroplasia was first described in 1878 and is the most common form of human skeletal dysplasia. Spinal manifestations include thoracolumbar kyphosis, foramen magnum, and spinal stenosis. Progressive kyphosis can result in spinal cord compression and paraplegia due to the reduced size of spinal canal. The deficits are typically progressive, presenting as an insidious onset of paresthesia, followed by the inability to walk and then by urinary incontinence. Paraplegia can be the result of direct pressure on the cord by bone or the injury to the anterior spinal vessels by a protruding bone. Surgical treatment consists of posterior instrumentation, fusion with total wide laminectomy at stenosis levels, and anterior interbody support. Pedicle screws are preferred for spinal instrumentation because wires and hooks may induce spinal cord injury due to the narrow spinal canal. Pedicle lengths are significantly shorter, and 20–25 mm long screws are appropriate for lower thoracic and lumbar pedicles in adult achondroplastic There is no information about the appropriate length of screws for the upper thoracic pedicles. Tracheal injury due to inappropriate pedicle screw length is a rare complication. We report an extremely rare case of tracheal tear due to posterior instrumentation and its management in the early postoperative period.

  6. THE PATTERN OF LONGITUDINAL CHANGE IN SERUM CREATININE AND NINETY-DAY MORTALITY AFTER MAJOR SURGERY

    Hobson, Charles E; Pardalos, Panos

    2016-01-01

    Objective Calculate mortality risk that accounts for both severity and recovery of postoperative kidney dysfunction using the pattern of longitudinal change in creatinine. Summary Background Data Although the importance of renal recovery after acute kidney injury (AKI) is increasingly recognized, the complex association that accounts for longitudinal creatinine changes and mortality is not fully described. Methods We used routinely collected clinical information for 46,299 adult patients undergoing major surgery to develop a multivariable probabilistic model optimized for non-linearity of serum creatinine time series that calculates the risk function for ninety-day mortality. We performed a 70/30 cross validation analysis to assess the accuracy of the model. Results All creatinine time series exhibited nonlinear risk function in relation to ninety-day mortality and their addition to other clinical factors improved the model discrimination. For any given severity of AKI, patients with complete renal recovery, as manifested by the return of the discharge creatinine to the baseline value, experienced a significant decrease in the odds of dying within ninety days of admission compared to patients with partial recovery. Yet, for any severity of AKI even complete renal recovery did not entirely mitigate the increased odds of dying as patients with mild AKI and complete renal recovery still had significantly increased odds for dying compared to patients without AKI (odds ratio 1,48 (95% confidence interval 1.30-1.68). Conclusions We demonstrate the nonlinear relationship between both severity and recovery of renal dysfunction and ninety-day mortality after major surgery. We have developed an easily applicable computer algorithm that calculates this complex relationship. PMID:26181482

  7. Trends in isolated lumbar spinal stenosis surgery among working US adults aged 40-64 years, 2010-2014.

    Raad, Micheal; Donaldson, Callum J; El Dafrawy, Mostafa H; Sciubba, Daniel M; Riley, Lee H; Neuman, Brian J; Kebaish, Khaled M; Skolasky, Richard L

    2018-05-25

    OBJECTIVE Recommendations for the surgical treatment of isolated lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) (i.e., in the absence of concomitant scoliosis or spondylolisthesis) are unclear. The aims of this study were to investigate trends in the surgical treatment of isolated LSS in US adults and determine implications for outcomes. METHODS The authors analyzed inpatient and outpatient claims from the Truven Health Analytics MarketScan Commercial Claims and Encounters Database for 20,279 patients aged 40-64 years who underwent surgery for LSS between 2010 and 2014. Only patients with continuous 12-month insurance coverage after surgery were included. The rates of decompression with arthrodesis versus decompression only and of simple (1- or 2-level, single-approach) versus complex (> 2-level or combined-approach) arthrodesis were analyzed by year and geographic region. These trends were further analyzed with respect to complications, length of hospital stay, payments made to the hospital, and patient discharge status. Statistical significance was set at p < 0.05. RESULTS The proportion of patients who underwent decompression with arthrodesis compared with decompression only increased significantly and linearly from 2010 to 2014 (OR 1.08; 95% CI 1.06-1.10). Arthrodesis was more likely to be complex rather than simple with each subsequent year (OR 1.4; 95% CI 1.33-1.49). This trend was accompanied by an increased likelihood of postoperative complications (OR 1.11; 95% CI 1.02-1.21), higher costs (payments increased by a mean of US$1633 per year; 95% CI 1327-1939), and greater likelihood of being discharged to a skilled nursing facility as opposed to home (OR 1.11; 95% CI 1.03-1.20). The South and Midwest regions of the US had the highest proportions of patients undergoing arthrodesis (48% and 42%, respectively). The mean length of hospital stay did not change significantly (p = 0.324). CONCLUSIONS From 2010 to 2014, the proportion of adults undergoing decompression with

  8. Can surgery improve neurological function in penetrating spinal injury? A review of the military and civilian literature and treatment recommendations for military neurosurgeons.

    Klimo, Paul; Ragel, Brian T; Rosner, Michael; Gluf, Wayne; McCafferty, Randall

    2010-05-01

    Penetrating spinal injury (PSI), although an infrequent injury in the civilian population, is not an infrequent injury in military conflicts. Throughout military history, the role of surgery in the treatment of PSI has been controversial. The US is currently involved in 2 military campaigns, the hallmark of both being the widespread use of various explosive devices. The authors reviewed the evidence for or against the use of decompressive laminectomy to treat PSI to provide a triservice (US Army, Navy, and Air Force) consensus and treatment recommendations for military neurosurgeons and spine surgeons. A US National Library of Medicine PubMed database search that identified all literature dealing with acute management of PSI from military conflicts and civilian urban trauma centers in the post-Vietnam War period was undertaken. Nineteen retrospective case series (11 military and 8 civilian) met the study criteria. Eleven military articles covered a 20-year time span that included 782 patients who suffered either gunshot or blast-related projectile wounds. Four papers included sufficient data that analyzed the effectiveness of surgery compared with nonoperative management, 6 papers concluded that surgery was of no benefit, 2 papers indicated that surgery did have a role, and 3 papers made no comment. Eight civilian articles covered a 9-year time span that included 653 patients with spinal gunshot wounds. Two articles lacked any comparative data because of treatment bias. Two papers concluded that decompressive laminectomy had a beneficial role, 1 paper favored the removal of intracanal bullets between T-12 and L-4, and 5 papers indicated that surgery was of no benefit. Based on the authors' military and civilian PubMed literature search, most of the evidence suggests that decompressive laminectomy does not improve neurological function in patients with PSI. However, there are serious methodological shortcomings in both literature groups. For this and other reasons

  9. Considerations in Spinal Fusion Surgery for Chronic Lumbar Pain: Psychosocial Factors, Rating Scales, and Perioperative Patient Education-A Review of the Literature.

    Gaudin, Daniel; Krafcik, Brianna M; Mansour, Tarek R; Alnemari, Ahmed

    2017-02-01

    Despite widespread use of lumbar spinal fusion as a treatment for back pain, outcomes remain variable. Optimizing patient selection can help to reduce adverse outcomes. This literature review was conducted to better understand factors associated with optimal postoperative results after lumbar spinal fusion for chronic back pain and current tools used for evaluation. The PubMed database was searched for clinical trials related to psychosocial determinants of outcome after lumbar spinal fusion surgery; evaluation of commonly used patient subjective outcome measures; and perioperative cognitive, behavioral, and educational therapies. Reference lists of included studies were also searched by hand for additional studies meeting inclusion and exclusion criteria. Patients' perception of good health before surgery and low cardiovascular comorbidity predict improved postoperative physical functional capacity and greater patient satisfaction. Depression, tobacco use, and litigation predict poorer outcomes after lumbar fusion. Incorporation of cognitive-behavioral therapy perioperatively can address these psychosocial risk factors and improve outcomes. The 36-Item Short Form Health Survey, European Quality of Life five dimensions questionnaire, visual analog pain scale, brief pain inventory, and Oswestry Disability Index can provide specific feedback to track patient progress and are important to understand when evaluating the current literature. This review summarizes current information and explains commonly used assessment tools to guide clinicians in decision making when caring for patients with lower back pain. When determining a treatment algorithm, physicians must consider predictive psychosocial factors. Use of perioperative cognitive-behavioral therapy and patient education can improve outcomes after lumbar spinal fusion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Assessment of the Cross-Sectional Areas of the Psoas Major and Multifidus Muscles in Patients With Adult Spinal Deformity: A Case-Control Study.

    Banno, Tomohiro; Yamato, Yu; Hasegawa, Tomohiko; Kobayashi, Sho; Togawa, Daisuke; Oe, Shin; Mihara, Yuki; Kurosu, Kenta; Yamamoto, Naoto; Matsuyama, Yukihiro

    2017-08-01

    This is a case-control study. The present study aimed to compare the cross-sectional areas of the psoas major and multifidus muscles between elderly patients with adult spinal deformity (ASD) and age-matched and body weight-matched controls, and to evaluate the associations between the cross-sectional areas of these muscles and the severity of spinal deformity. The study included 49 female kyphosis patients with mild scoliosis (Cobb angle muscles were calculated using preoperative L4/L5 axial computed tomography images. In group D, the following spinopelvic parameters were assessed: sagittal vertical axis, pelvic tilt, pelvic incidence, lumbar lordosis, and thoracic kyphosis. The relationships between the muscle cross-sectional areas and spinopelvic parameters were evaluated. The cross-sectional area of the multifidus muscle was lower in group D than in group C. However, the cross-sectional area of the psoas major muscle was not different between the 2 groups. In multiple regression analysis, the cross-sectional area of the multifidus muscle was significantly associated with all spinopelvic parameters. The cross-sectional area of the multifidus muscle might be lower in elderly patients with ASD than in controls. In the elderly population, the severity of sagittal spinal deformity might be correlated with the cross-sectional area of the multifidus muscle. Therefore, muscle imbalances between the flexors and extensors of the spine could participate in the pathology of ASD.

  11. Pneumonia after Major Cancer Surgery: Temporal Trends and Patterns of Care

    Vincent Q. Trinh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rationale. Pneumonia is a leading cause of postoperative complication. Objective. To examine trends, factors, and mortality of postoperative pneumonia following major cancer surgery (MCS. Methods. From 1999 to 2009, patients undergoing major forms of MCS were identified using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS, a Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP subset, resulting in weighted 2,508,916 patients. Measurements. Determinants were examined using logistic regression analysis adjusted for clustering using generalized estimating equations. Results. From 1999 to 2009, 87,867 patients experienced pneumonia following MCS and prevalence increased by 29.7%. The estimated annual percent change (EAPC of mortality after MCS was −2.4% (95% CI: −2.9 to −2.0, P<0.001; the EAPC of mortality associated with pneumonia after MCS was −2.2% (95% CI: −3.6 to 0.9, P=0.01. Characteristics associated with higher odds of pneumonia included older age, male, comorbidities, nonprivate insurance, lower income, hospital volume, urban, Northeast region, and nonteaching status. Pneumonia conferred a 6.3-fold higher odd of mortality. Conclusions. Increasing prevalence of pneumonia after MCS, associated with stable mortality rates, may result from either increased diagnosis or more stringent coding. We identified characteristics associated with pneumonia after MCS which could help identify at-risk patients in order to reduce pneumonia after MCS, as it greatly increases the odds of mortality.

  12. Positive correlation of employment and psychological well-being for veterans with major abdominal surgery.

    Horner, David J; Wendel, Christopher S; Skeps, Raymond; Rawl, Susan M; Grant, Marcia; Schmidt, C Max; Ko, Clifford Y; Krouse, Robert S

    2010-11-01

    Intestinal stomas (ostomies) have been associated negatively with multiple aspects of health-related quality of life. This article examines the relationship between employment status and psychological well-being (PWB) in veterans who underwent major bowel procedures with or without ostomy. Veterans from 3 Veterans Affairs (VA) medical centers were surveyed using the City of Hope ostomy-specific questionnaire and the Short Form 36 item Veteran's version (SF-36V). Response rate was 48% (511 of 1,063). Employment and PWB relationship was assessed using multiple regression with age, income, SF-36V physical component summary (PCS), and employment status as independent variables. Employed veterans reported higher PWB compared with unemployed veterans (P = .003). Full-time workers also reported higher PWB than part-time or unemployed workers (P = .001). Ostomy was not an independent predictor of PWB. Employment among veterans after major abdominal surgery may have intrinsic value for PWB. Patients should be encouraged to return to work, or do volunteer work after recovery. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Outcome and quality of life of patients with acute kidney injury after major surgery.

    Abelha, F J; Botelho, M; Fernandes, V; Barros, H

    2009-01-01

    In postoperative critically-ill patients who develop Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) it is important to focus on survival and quality of life beyond hospital discharge. The aim of the study was to evaluate outcome and quality of life in patients that develop AKI after major surgery. This retrospective study was carried out in a Post-Anaesthesia Care Unit with five intensive care beds during 2 years. Patients were followed for the development of AKI. Preoperative characteristics, intra-operative management and outcome were evaluated. Six months after discharge, these patients were contacted to complete a Short Form-36 questionnaire (SF-36) and to have their dependency in ADL evaluated. Chi-square or Fischer's exact test were used to compare proportions between groups. A "t test" and a paired "t test" for independent groups was used for comparisons. Of 1584 patients admitted to the PACU, 1200 patients met the inclusion criteria. One hundred-fourteen patients (9.6%) met AKI criteria. Patients with AKI were more severely ill, stayed longer at the PACU. Among 71 hospital survivors at 6 months follow-up, 50 completed the questionnaires. Fifty-two percent of patients reported that their general level of health was better on the day they answered the questionnaire than 12 months earlier. Patients that met AKI criteria after surgery had worse SF-36 scores for physical function, role physical and role emotional domains. Six months after PACU discharge, patients that met AKI criteria were more dependent in I-ADL but not in P-ADL. Patients that develop AKI improved self-perception of quality of life despite having high rate of dependency in ADL tasks. For physical function and role physical domains they had worse scores than PACU patients that did not develop AKI.

  14. Rivaroxaban for venous thromboembolism prevention after major orthopedic surgery: translating trial data into routine clinical practice

    Beyer-Westendorf J

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Jan Beyer-Westendorf,1 Patrick Mouret,2 Alexander GG Turpie3 1Thrombosis Research and Angiology, Dresden University Clinic, Dresden, Germany; 2Orthopedic Clinic, Klinikum Frankfurt Höchst GmbH, Frankfurt, Germany; 3Department of Medicine, General Division, Hamilton Health Sciences, Hamilton, ON, Canada Abstract: An established standard of care for the prevention of venous thromboembolism after major orthopedic surgery has been subcutaneous low-molecular-weight heparin. The non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant rivaroxaban has demonstrated superior efficacy and similar safety to all tested regimens of enoxaparin in large Phase III clinical studies of venous thromboembolism prevention after elective hip and knee arthroplasty. Despite regulatory approval of rivaroxaban for this indication, concerns remain among physicians regarding its optimal and effective use in routine clinical practice. Real-life studies, such as XAMOS and ORTHO-TEP, are providing physicians with more information on the routine use of rivaroxaban for venous thromboembolism prevention after orthopedic surgery, helping to establish its safety and effectiveness in everyday clinical care. Among the most important issues are the risk of bleeding complications, wound healing, timing of first dose, impact of type of anesthesia on thromboprophylaxis effectiveness, patient comorbidities and comedication use, periprocedural management, associated costs, and clinical outcomes in trauma-related fractures. Many of these issues are difficult to study in randomized, double-blind, Phase III trials, and can be assessed more readily using real-life data. In particular, real-life or noninterventional studies lack many of the strict inclusion and exclusion criteria associated with Phase III trials and involve unselected patients who often present with significant comorbidities or comedication use. Keywords: anticoagulants, arthroplasty, orthopedics, rivaroxaban, thrombosis

  15. Urinary biomarkers TIMP-2 and IGFBP7 early predict acute kidney injury after major surgery.

    Ivan Gocze

    Full Text Available To assess the ability of the urinary biomarkers IGFBP7 (insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 7 and TIMP-2 (tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 2 to early predict acute kidney injury (AKI in high-risk surgical patients.Postoperative AKI is associated with an increase in short and long-term mortality. Using IGFBP7 and TIMP-2 for early detection of cellular kidney injury, thus allowing the early initiation of renal protection measures, may represent a new concept of evaluating renal function.In this prospective study, urinary [TIMP-2]×[IGFBP7] was measured in surgical patients at high risk for AKI. A predefined cut-off value of [TIMP-2]×[IGFBP7] >0.3 was used for assessing diagnostic accuracy. Perioperative characteristics were evaluated, and ROC analyses as well as logistic regression models of risk assessment were calculated with and without a [TIMP-2]×[IGFBP7] test.107 patients were included in the study, of whom 45 (42% developed AKI. The highest median values of biomarker were detected in septic, transplant and patients after hepatic surgery (1.24 vs 0.45 vs 0.47 ng/l²/1000. The area under receiving operating characteristic curve (AUC for the risk of any AKI was 0.85, for early use of RRT 0.83 and for 28-day mortality 0.77. In a multivariable model with established perioperative risk factors, the [TIMP-2]×[IGFBP7] test was the strongest predictor of AKI and significantly improved the risk assessment (p<0.001.Urinary [TIMP-2]×[IGFBP7] test sufficiently detect patients with risk of AKI after major non-cardiac surgery. Due to its rapid responsiveness it extends the time frame for intervention to prevent development of AKI.

  16. High C-Reactive Protein Predicts Delirium Incidence, Duration, and Feature Severity After Major Noncardiac Surgery.

    Vasunilashorn, Sarinnapha M; Dillon, Simon T; Inouye, Sharon K; Ngo, Long H; Fong, Tamara G; Jones, Richard N; Travison, Thomas G; Schmitt, Eva M; Alsop, David C; Freedman, Steven D; Arnold, Steven E; Metzger, Eran D; Libermann, Towia A; Marcantonio, Edward R

    2017-08-01

    To examine associations between the inflammatory marker C-reactive protein (CRP) measured preoperatively and on postoperative day 2 (POD2) and delirium incidence, duration, and feature severity. Prospective cohort study. Two academic medical centers. Adults aged 70 and older undergoing major noncardiac surgery (N = 560). Plasma CRP was measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Delirium was assessed from Confusion Assessment Method (CAM) interviews and chart review. Delirium duration was measured according to number of hospital days with delirium. Delirium feature severity was defined as the sum of CAM-Severity (CAM-S) scores on all postoperative hospital days. Generalized linear models were used to examine independent associations between CRP (preoperatively and POD2 separately) and delirium incidence, duration, and feature severity; prolonged hospital length of stay (LOS, >5 days); and discharge disposition. Postoperative delirium occurred in 24% of participants, 12% had 2 or more delirium days, and the mean ± standard deviation sum CAM-S was 9.3 ± 11.4. After adjusting for age, sex, surgery type, anesthesia route, medical comorbidities, and postoperative infectious complications, participants with preoperative CRP of 3 mg/L or greater had a risk of delirium that was 1.5 times as great (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.1-2.1) as that of those with CRP less than 3 mg/L, 0.4 more delirium days (P delirium (3.6 CAM-S points higher, P delirium (95% CI = 1.0-2.4) as those in the lowest quartile (≤127.53 mg/L), had 0.2 more delirium days (P delirium (4.5 CAM-S points higher, P delirium incidence, duration, and feature severity. CRP may be useful to identify individuals who are at risk of developing delirium. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  17. Physiotherapy Commenced Within the First Four Weeks Post-Spinal Surgery Is Safe and Effective: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Snowdon, Megan; Peiris, Casey L

    2016-02-01

    To determine whether physiotherapy commenced within the first 4 weeks post-spinal surgery is safe and effective. Electronic databases CINAHL, MEDLINE, AMED, PubMed, Embase, and PEDro were searched from the earliest date possible through May 2015. An additional trial was identified through reference list scanning. Controlled trials evaluating comprehensive physiotherapy rehabilitation commenced within 4 weeks postoperatively compared with a control group receiving no physiotherapy, standard postoperative care, rest, less active physiotherapy, or sham physiotherapy after spinal surgery of a musculoskeletal etiology. Two reviewers independently applied inclusion and exclusion criteria, with disagreements discussed until consensus could be reached. Searching identified 3162 potentially relevant articles, of which 4 trials with 250 participants met the inclusion criteria. Data were extracted using a predefined data extraction form. Methodological quality of trials was assessed independently by 2 reviewers using the Downs and Black checklist. Pooled analyses were performed using a random-effects model with inverse variance methods to calculate risk differences and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) (dichotomous outcomes), and standardized mean differences (SMDs) and 95% CIs (continuous outcomes). When compared with no or sham physiotherapy, early comprehensive physiotherapy did not increase the risk of adverse events (risk difference, -.01; 95% CI, -.07 to .05; I(2)=0%). In addition, there is moderate-quality evidence demonstrating a reduction in pain by a moderate and significant amount at 12 weeks (SMD=-.38; 95% CI, -.66 to -.10; I(2)=0%) and at 12+ months (SMD=-.30; 95% CI, -.59 to -.02; I(2)=0%). Early comprehensive physiotherapy commenced within the first 4 weeks post-spinal surgery does not increase the potential for an adverse event and leads to a moderate, statistically significant reduction in pain when compared with a control group. Copyright © 2016 American

  18. Prophylactic effects of alpha-blockers, Tamsulosin and Alfuzosin, on postoperative urinary retention in male patients undergoing urologic surgery under spinal anaesthesia.

    Akkoc, Ali; Aydin, Cemil; Topaktas, Ramazan; Kartalmis, Mahir; Altin, Selcuk; Isen, Kenan; Metin, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative urinary retention (POUR) is one of the most common complications after surgical procedures under spinal anaesthesia. Recent studies have shown the beneficial effects of alpha-adrenergic blockers in preventing POUR. The aim of this prospective study was to investigate and compare the prophylactic effects of tamsulosin and alfuzosin on POUR after urologic surgical procedures under spinal anaesthesia. A total of 180 males who underwent elective urologic surgery were included in this study. The patients were randomly allocated into three Groups. The Group I received placebo. Patients in Group II were given 0.4mg of tamsulosin orally 14 and 2 hours before surgery. Patients in Group III were given 10mg of alfuzosin ER orally 10 and 2 hours before surgery. All patients were closely followed for 24 hours postoperatively and their episodes of urinary retentions were recorded. There were 60 patients in each Group. Their mean age was 35.95±15.16 years. Fifteen patients in Group I (25%), 3 patients in Group II (5%) and 4 patients in Group III (6.7%) required catheterization because of urinary retention. In tamsulosin group and alfuzosin group, there were a significantly lower proportion of patients with POUR compared with the placebo Group (p=0.002 and p=0.006). The beneficial effects of tamsulosin and alfuzosin on POUR were similar between both Groups (p=0.697). This study suggests that the use of prophylactic tamsulosin or alfuzosin can reduce the incidence of urinary retention and the need for catheterization after urologic surgical procedures under spinal anaesthesia.

  19. Prophylactic effects of alpha-blockers, Tamsulosin and Alfuzosin, on postoperative urinary retention in male patients undergoing urologic surgery under spinal anaesthesia

    Ali Akkoc

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose Postoperative urinary retention (POUR is one of the most common complications after surgical procedures under spinal anaesthesia. Recent studies have shown the beneficial effects of alpha-adrenergic blockers in preventing POUR. The aim of this prospective study was to investigate and compare the prophylactic effects of tamsulosin and alfuzosin on POUR after urologic surgical procedures under spinal anaesthesia. Materials and Methods A total of 180 males who underwent elective urologic surgery were included in this study. The patients were randomly allocated into three Groups. The Group I received placebo. Patients in Group II were given 0.4mg of tamsulosin orally 14 and 2 hours before surgery. Patients in Group III were given 10mg of alfuzosin ER orally 10 and 2 hours before surgery. All patients were closely followed for 24 hours postoperatively and their episodes of urinary retentions were recorded. Results There were 60 patients in each Group. Their mean age was 35.95±15.16 years. Fifteen patients in Group I (25%, 3 patients in Group II (5% and 4 patients in Group III (6.7% required catheterization because of urinary retention. In tamsulosin group and alfuzosin group, there were a significantly lower proportion of patients with POUR compared with the placebo Group (p=0.002 and p=0.006. The beneficial effects of tamsulosin and alfuzosin on POUR were similar between both Groups (p=0.697. Conclusion This study suggests that the use of prophylactic tamsulosin or alfuzosin can reduce the incidence of urinary retention and the need for catheterization after urologic surgical procedures under spinal anaesthesia.

  20. Predictive Value of C-Reactive Protein for Major Complications after Major Abdominal Surgery: A Systematic Review and Pooled-Analysis.

    Jennifer Straatman

    Full Text Available Early diagnosis and treatment of complications after major abdominal surgery can decrease associated morbidity and mortality. Postoperative CRP levels have shown a strong correlation with complications. Aim of this systematic review and pooled-analysis was to assess postoperative values of CRP as a marker for major complications and construct a prediction model.A systematic review was performed for CRP levels as a predictor for complications after major abdominal surgery (MAS. Raw data was obtained from seven studies, including 1427 patients. A logit regression model assessed the probability of major complications as a function of CRP levels on the third postoperative day. Two practical cut-offs are proposed: an optimal cut-off for safe discharge in a fast track protocol and another for early identification of patients with increased risk for major complications.A prediction model was calculated for major complications as a function of CRP levels on the third postoperative day. Based on the model several cut-offs for CRP are proposed. For instance, a two cut-off system may be applied, consisting of a safe discharge criterion with CRP levels below 75 mg/L, with a negative predictive value of 97.2%. A second cut-off is set at 215 mg/L (probability 20% and serves as a predictor of complications, indicating additional CT-scan imaging.The present study provides insight in the interpretation of CRP levels after major abdominal surgery, proposing a prediction model for major complications as a function of CRP on postoperative day 3. Cut-offs for CRP may be implemented for safe early-discharge in a fast-track protocol and, secondly as a threshold for additional examinations, such as CT-scan imaging, even in absence of clinical signs, to confirm or exclude major complications. The prediction model allows for setting a cut-off at the discretion of individual surgeons or surgical departments.

  1. Consent: an event or a memory in lumbar spinal surgery? A multi-centre, multi-specialty prospective study of documentation and patient recall of consent content.

    Lo, William B; McAuley, Ciaran P; Gillies, Martin J; Grover, Patrick J; Pereira, Erlick A C

    2017-11-01

    Prospective, multi-centre, multi-specialty medical notes review and patient interview. The consenting process is an important communication tool which also carries medico-legal implications. While written consent is a pre-requisite before spinal surgery in the UK, the standard and effectiveness of the process have not been assessed previously. This study assesses standard of written consent for elective lumbar decompressive surgery for degenerative disc disease across different regions and specialties in the UK; level of patient recall of the consent content; and identifies factors which affect patient recall. Consent forms of 153 in-patients from 4 centres a, b, c, d were reviewed. Written documentation of intended benefits, alternative treatments and operative risks was assessed. Of them, 108 patients were interviewed within 24 h before or after surgeries to assess recall. The written documentation rates of the operative risks showed significant inter-centre variations in haemorrhage and sphincter disturbance (P = 0.000), but not for others. Analysis of pooled data showed variations in written documentation of risks (P recall of these risks, there was no inter-centre variation. Patients' recall of paralysis as a risk was highest (50.9%) and that of recurrence was lowest (6.5%). Patients recalled risks better than those ≥65, significantly so for infection (29.9 vs 9.7%, P = 0.027). Patients consented >14 days compared to recall for paralysis (65.2 vs 43.7%) and recurrence (17.4 vs 2.8%). Patient recall was independent of consenter grade. Overall, the standard of written consent for elective lumbar spinal decompressive surgery was sub-optimal, which was partly reflected in the poor patient recall. While consenter seniority did not affect patient recall, younger age and longer consent-to-surgery time improved it.

  2. Lumbar spinal stenosis

    Lønne, Greger; Fritzell, Peter; Hägg, Olle

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Decompression surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is the most common spinal procedure in the elderly. To avoid persisting low back pain, adding arthrodesis has been recommended, especially if there is a coexisting degenerative spondylolisthesis. However, this strategy remains con...

  3. Electrical stimulation of acupoint combinations against deep venous thrombosis in elderly bedridden patients after major surgery.

    Hou, Lili; Chen, Cuiping; Xu, Lei; Yin, Peihao; Peng, Wen

    2013-04-01

    To compare the effects of electrical stimulation of different acupoint combinations among postoperative bedridden elderly patients on hemorheology and deep venous blood flow velocity and investigate the.role of electrical stimulation against deep vein thrombosis (DVT). From November 2010 to October 2011, a total of 160 elderly bedridden patients after major surgery were divided into the conventional care group, invigorating and promoting Qi group, blood-activating and damp-eliminating group, and acupoint-combination stimulation group. Whole blood viscosity, plasma viscosity, D-dimer levels, lower limb skin temperature, lower limb circumference, and flow velocities of the external iliac vein, femoral vein, popliteal vein, and deep calf veins in all patients were documented and compared among the four groups. Whole blood viscosity, plasma viscosity, D-dimer levels, and lower limb circumference were significantly reduced in the blood-activating and damp-eliminating group compared with the conventional care group (P 0.05). Lower limb venous flow velocities were accelerated in the invigorating and promoting Qi group compared with the other groups, excluding the acupoint-combination stimulation group (P bedridden elderly patients were improved after combined electrical stimulation at Yinlingquan (SP 9) and Sanyinjiao (SP 6). Combined electrical stimulation at Zusanli (ST 36) and Taichong (LR 3), on the other hand, accelerated lower limb venous flow.

  4. Age-related postoperative morphine requirements in children following major surgery--an assessment using patient-controlled analgesia (PCA)

    Hansen, Tom Giedsing; Henneberg, Steen Winther; Hole, P

    1996-01-01

    To investigate if small children require less morphine for postoperative analgesia than do older children and adolescents we analysed the morphine consumption pattern of 28 consecutive children on intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) following major surgery. The median age-specific morp......To investigate if small children require less morphine for postoperative analgesia than do older children and adolescents we analysed the morphine consumption pattern of 28 consecutive children on intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) following major surgery. The median age...

  5. Endothelial dysfunction in the early postoperative period after major colon cancer surgery

    Ekeloef, S; Larsen, M H H; Schou-Pedersen, A M V

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Evidence suggests that endothelial dysfunction in the early postoperative period promotes myocardial injury after non-cardiac surgery. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of colon cancer surgery on endothelial function and the association with the l-arginine-nitric oxide...... was attenuated in the first days after colon cancer surgery indicating acute endothelial dysfunction. Endothelial dysfunction correlated with disturbances in the L-arginine - nitric oxide pathway. Our findings provide a rationale for investigating the hypothesized association between acute endothelial...... dysfunction and cardiovascular complications after non-cardiac surgery. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: NCT02344771....

  6. Endothelial dysfunction in the early postoperative period after major colon cancer surgery

    Ekeløf, Sara; Larsen, Mikkel Hjordt; Schou-Pedersen, Anne Marie Voigt

    2017-01-01

    Background. Evidence suggests that endothelial dysfunction in the early postoperative period promotes myocardial injury after non-cardiac surgery. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of colon cancer surgery on endothelial function and the association with the l-arginine-nitric oxide...... was attenuated in the first days after colon cancer surgery indicating acute endothelial dysfunction. Endothelial dysfunction correlated with disturbances in the L-arginine – nitric oxide pathway. Our findings provide a rationale for investigating the hypothesized association between acute endothelial...... dysfunction and cardiovascular complications after non-cardiac surgery. Clinical trial registration. NCT02344771....

  7. Spinal tumors

    Goethem, J.W.M. van; Hauwe, L. van den; Oezsarlak, Oe.; Schepper, A.M.A. de; Parizel, P.M.

    2004-01-01

    Spinal tumors are uncommon lesions but may cause significant morbidity in terms of limb dysfunction. In establishing the differential diagnosis for a spinal lesion, location is the most important feature, but the clinical presentation and the patient's age and gender are also important. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging plays a central role in the imaging of spinal tumors, easily allowing tumors to be classified as extradural, intradural-extramedullary or intramedullary, which is very useful in tumor characterization. In the evaluation of lesions of the osseous spine both computed tomography (CT) and MR are important. We describe the most common spinal tumors in detail. In general, extradural lesions are the most common with metastasis being the most frequent. Intradural tumors are rare, and the majority is extramedullary, with meningiomas and nerve sheath tumors being the most frequent. Intramedullary tumors are uncommon spinal tumors. Astrocytomas and ependymomas comprise the majority of the intramedullary tumors. The most important tumors are documented with appropriate high quality CT or MR images and the characteristics of these tumors are also summarized in a comprehensive table. Finally we illustrate the use of the new World Health Organization (WHO) classification of neoplasms affecting the central nervous system

  8. Efficacy of tranexamic acid in reducing blood loss in posterior lumbar spine surgery for degenerative spinal stenosis with instability: a retrospective case control study

    Endres Stefan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Degenerative spinal stenosis and instability requiring multilevel spine surgery has been associated with large blood losses. Factors that affect perioperative blood loss include time of surgery, surgical procedure, patient height, combined anterior/posterior approaches, number of levels fused, blood salvage techniques, and the use of anti-fibrinolytic medications. This study was done to evaluate the efficacy of tranexamic acid in reducing blood loss in spine surgery. Methods This retrospective case control study includes 97 patients who had to undergo surgery because of degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis and instability. All operations included spinal decompression, interbody fusion and posterior instrumentation (4-5 segments. Forty-six patients received 1 g tranexamic acid intravenous, preoperative and six hours and twelve hours postoperative; 51 patients without tranexamic acid administration were evaluated as a control group. Based on the records, the intra- and postoperative blood losses were measured by evaluating the drainage and cell saver systems 6, 12 and 24 hours post operation. Additionally, hemoglobin concentration and platelet concentration were reviewed. Furthermore, the number of red cell transfusions given and complications associated with tranexamic acid were assessed. Results The postoperative hemoglobin concentration demonstrated a statistically significant difference with a p value of 0.0130 showing superiority for tranexamic acid use (tranexamic acid group: 11.08 g/dl, SD: 1.68; control group: 10.29 g/dl, SD: 1.39. The intraoperative cell saver volume and drainage volume after 24 h demonstrated a significant difference as well, which indicates a less blood loss in the tranexamic acid group than the control group. The postoperative drainage volume at12 hours showed no significant differences; nor did the platelet concentration Allogenic blood transfusion (two red cell units was needed for eight patients

  9. Surgical management of spinal intramedullary tumors: radical and safe strategy for benign tumors.

    Takami, Toshihiro; Naito, Kentaro; Yamagata, Toru; Ohata, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Surgery for spinal intramedullary tumors remains one of the major challenges for neurosurgeons, due to their relative infrequency, unknown natural history, and surgical difficulty. We are sure that safe and precise resection of spinal intramedullary tumors, particularly encapsulated benign tumors, can result in acceptable or satisfactory postoperative outcomes. General surgical concepts and strategies, technical consideration, and functional outcomes after surgery are discussed with illustrative cases of spinal intramedullary benign tumors such as ependymoma, cavernous malformation, and hemangioblastoma. Selection of a posterior median sulcus, posterolateral sulcus, or direct transpial approach was determined based on the preoperative imaging diagnosis and careful inspection of the spinal cord surface. Tumor-cord interface was meticulously delineated in cases of benign encapsulated tumors. Our retrospective functional analysis of 24 consecutive cases of spinal intramedullary ependymoma followed for at least 6 months postoperatively demonstrated a mean grade on the modified McCormick functional schema of 1.8 before surgery, deteriorating significantly to 2.6 early after surgery ( 6 months after surgery). The risk of functional deterioration after surgery should be taken into serious consideration. Functional deterioration after surgery, including neuropathic pain even long after surgery, significantly affects patient quality of life. Better balance between tumor control and functional preservation can be achieved not only by the surgical technique or expertise, but also by intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring, vascular image guidance, and postoperative supportive care. Quality of life after surgery should inarguably be given top priority.

  10. Effects of opium addiction on level of sensory block in spinal anesthesia with bupivacaine for lower abdomen and limb surgery: a case-control study.

    Karbasy, Seyyed Hasan; Derakhshan, Pooya

    2014-12-01

    In clinical practice, the level of sensory block in spinal anesthesia in opium abusers is lower than that in non-abusers because of adaptive changes caused by opium use. The aim of this study was to investigate the level of sensory block resulting from the intrathecal administration of 0.5% bupivacaine in opium abuser patients undergoing lower extremity and lower abdominal surgeries. A total of 100 patients who were candidates of elective lower extremity orthopedic and lower abdominal surgeries were recruited and assigned to two groups based on their history of opium addiction (Case or control). Both groups underwent the same anesthesia procedure and pinprick test was used to assess the level of anesthesia. No statistically significant difference was observed between groups regarding age, duration of the surgery, and type of surgery. The frequency of addiction was higher in males than in females. The level of sensory block at three minutes was significantly lower in the opium abuser group (P = 0.006). The mean time to achieve T10 sensory block was 10.33 ± 5.79 minutes in the opium abusers and 6.89 ± 3.88 minutes in the controls (P = 0.001). The level of the highest sensory block was lower in the opium abuser group (P = 0.002). The findings of this study suggested that after induction of spinal anesthesia with intrathecal administration of bupivacaine, chronic opium abusers would have a lower level of sensory block in comparison with patients without a history of opium abuse.

  11. Aesthetic Breast Surgery and Concomitant Procedures: Incidence and Risk Factors for Major Complications in 73,608 Cases.

    Gupta, Varun; Yeslev, Max; Winocour, Julian; Bamba, Ravinder; Rodriguez-Feo, Charles; Grotting, James C; Higdon, K Kye

    2017-05-01

    Major complications following aesthetic breast surgery are uncommon and thus assessment of risk factors is challenging. To determine the incidence and risk factors of major complications following aesthetic breast surgery and concomitant procedures. A prospective cohort of patients who enrolled into the CosmetAssure (Birmingham, AL) insurance program and underwent aesthetic breast surgery between 2008 and 2013 was identified. Major complications (requiring reoperation, readmission, or emergency room visit) within 30 days of surgery were recorded. Risk factors including age, smoking, body mass index (BMI), diabetes, type of surgical facility, and combined procedures were evaluated. Among women, augmentation was the most common breast procedure (n = 41,651, 58.6%) followed by augmentation-mastopexy, mastopexy, and reduction. Overall, major complications occurred in 1.46% with hematoma (0.99%) and infection (0.25%) being most common. Augmentation-mastopexy had a higher risk of complications, particularly infection (relative risk [RR] 1.74, P procedures. Age was the only significant predictor for hematomas (RR 1.01, P procedures or abdominoplasty performed alone. Among men, correction of gynecomastia was the most common breast procedure (n = 1613, 64.6%) with a complication rate of 1.80% and smoking as a risk factor (RR 2.73, P = 0.03). Incidence of major complications after breast cosmetic surgical procedures is low. Risk factors for major complications include increasing age and BMI. Combining abdominoplasty with any breast procedure increases the risk of major complications. 2. © 2017 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com

  12. Cervicobrachialgia after spinal surgery.

    Breivik, Harald

    2014-12-01

    A case of cervicobrachialgia is presented in which the patient expressed fear of becoming addicted to opioids. Alternative analgesic approaches including anticonvulsants, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), and physical therapy are discussed. This report is adapted from paineurope 2014; Issue 2, ©Haymarket Medical Publications Ltd, and is presented with permission. Paineurope is provided as a service to pain management by Mundipharma International, LTD and is distributed free of charge to healthcare professionals in Europe. Archival issues can be accessed via the website: http://www.paineurope.com at which European health professionals can register online to receive copies of the quarterly publication.

  13. Perioperative risk factors for postoperative pneumonia after major oral cancer surgery: A retrospective analysis of 331 cases.

    Xu, Jieyun; Hu, Jing; Yu, Pei; Wang, Weiwang; Hu, Xingxue; Hou, Jinsong; Fang, Silian; Liu, Xiqiang

    2017-01-01

    Postoperative pneumonia (POP) is common and results in prolonged hospital stays, higher costs, increased morbidity and mortality. However, data on the incidence and risk factors of POP after oral and maxillofacial surgery are rare. This study aims to identify perioperative risk factors for POP after major oral cancer (OC) surgery. Perioperative data and patient records of 331 consecutive subjects were analyzed in the period of April 2014 to March 2016. We individually traced each OC patient for a period to discharge from the hospital or 45 days after surgery, whichever occur later. The incidence of POP after major OC surgery with free flap construction or major OC surgery was 11.6% or 4.5%, respectively. Patient-related risk factors for POP were male sex, T stage, N stage, clinical stage and preoperative serum albumin level. Among the investigated procedure-related variables, incision grade, mandibulectomy, free flap reconstruction, tracheotomy, intraoperative blood loss, and the length of the operation were shown to be associated with the development of POP. Postoperative hospital stay was also significantly related to increased incidence of POP. Using a multivariable logistic regression model, we identified male sex, preoperative serum albumin level, operation time and postoperative hospital stay as independent risk factors for POP. Several perioperative risk factors can be identified that are associated with POP. At-risk oral cancer patients should be subjected to intensified postoperative pulmonary care.

  14. Perioperative risk factors for postoperative pneumonia after major oral cancer surgery: A retrospective analysis of 331 cases.

    Jieyun Xu

    Full Text Available Postoperative pneumonia (POP is common and results in prolonged hospital stays, higher costs, increased morbidity and mortality. However, data on the incidence and risk factors of POP after oral and maxillofacial surgery are rare. This study aims to identify perioperative risk factors for POP after major oral cancer (OC surgery.Perioperative data and patient records of 331 consecutive subjects were analyzed in the period of April 2014 to March 2016. We individually traced each OC patient for a period to discharge from the hospital or 45 days after surgery, whichever occur later.The incidence of POP after major OC surgery with free flap construction or major OC surgery was 11.6% or 4.5%, respectively. Patient-related risk factors for POP were male sex, T stage, N stage, clinical stage and preoperative serum albumin level. Among the investigated procedure-related variables, incision grade, mandibulectomy, free flap reconstruction, tracheotomy, intraoperative blood loss, and the length of the operation were shown to be associated with the development of POP. Postoperative hospital stay was also significantly related to increased incidence of POP. Using a multivariable logistic regression model, we identified male sex, preoperative serum albumin level, operation time and postoperative hospital stay as independent risk factors for POP.Several perioperative risk factors can be identified that are associated with POP. At-risk oral cancer patients should be subjected to intensified postoperative pulmonary care.

  15. Influence of Bariatric Surgery on the Use and Pharmacokinetics of Some Major Drug Classes

    Yska, Jan Peter; van der Linde, Susanne; Tapper, Veronique V.; Apers, Jan A.; Emous, Marloes; Totte, Erik R.; Wilffert, Bob; van Roon, Eric N.

    The purpose of this review is to evaluate the influence of bariatric surgery on the use and pharmacokinetics of some frequently used drugs. A PubMed literature search was conducted. Literature was included on influence of bariatric surgery on pharmacoepidemiology and pharmacokinetics. Drug classes

  16. Pharmacokinetics and analgesic effects of intravenous propacetamol vs rectal paracetamol in children after major craniofacial surgery

    Prins, Sandra A.; van Dijk, Monique; van Leeuwen, Pim; Searle, Susan; Anderson, Brian J.; Tibboel, Dick; Mathot, Ron A. A.

    2008-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics and analgesic effects of intravenous and rectal paracetamol were compared in nonventilated infants after craniofacial surgery in a double-blind placebo controlled study. During surgery all infants (6 months-2 years) received a rectal loading dose of 40 mg.kg(-1) paracetamol 2 h

  17. Pharmacokinetics and analgesic effects of intravenous propacetamol vs rectal paracetamol in children after major craniofacial surgery

    Prins, Sandra A.; Van Dijk, Monique; Van Leeuwen, Pim; Searle, Susan; Anderson, Brian J.; Tibboel, Dick; Mathot, Ron A. A.

    Background: The pharmacokinetics and analgesic effects of intravenous and rectal paracetamol were compared in nonventilated infants after craniofacial surgery in a double-blind placebo controlled study. Methods: During surgery all infants (6 months-2 years) received a rectal loading dose of 40

  18. Role of motor-evoked potential monitoring in conjunction with temporary clipping of spinal nerve roots in posterior thoracic spine tumor surgery.

    Eleraky, Mohammed A; Setzer, Matthias; Papanastassiou, Ioannis D; Baaj, Ali A; Tran, Nam D; Katsares, Kiesha M; Vrionis, Frank D

    2010-05-01

    The vascular supply of the thoracic spinal cord depends on the thoracolumbar segmental arteries. Because of the small size and ventral course of these arteries in relation to the dorsal root ganglion and ventral root, they cannot be reliably identified during surgery by anatomic or morphologic criteria. Sacrificing them will most likely result in paraplegia. The goal of this study was to evaluate a novel method of intraoperative testing of a nerve root's contribution to the blood supply of the thoracic spinal cord. This is a clinical retrospective study of 49 patients diagnosed with thoracic spine tumors. Temporary nerve root clipping combined with motor-evoked potential (MEP) and somatosensory-evoked potential (SSEP) monitoring was performed; additionally, postoperative clinical evaluation was done and reported in all cases. All cases were monitored by SSEP and MEPs. The nerve root to be sacrificed was temporarily clipped using standard aneurysm clips, and SSEP/MEP were assessed before and after clipping. Four nerve roots were sacrificed in four cases, three nerve roots in eight cases, and two nerve roots in 22 cases. Nerve roots were sacrificed bilaterally in 12 cases. Most patients (47/49) had no changes in MEP/SSEP and had no neurological deficit postoperatively. One case of a spinal sarcoma demonstrated changes in MEP after temporary clipping of the left T11 nerve root. The nerve was not sacrificed, and the patient was neurologically intact after surgery. In another case of a sarcoma, MEPs changed in the lower limbs after ligation of left T9 nerve root. It was felt that it was a global event because of anesthesia. Postoperatively, the patient had complete paraplegia but recovered almost completely after 6 months. Temporary nerve root clipping combined with MEP and SSEP monitoring may enhance the impact of neuromonitoring in the intraoperative management of patients with thoracic spine tumors and favorably influence neurological outcome. Copyright 2010 Elsevier

  19. Utility of melatonin to treat surgical stress after major vascular surgery--a safety study

    Kücükakin, Bülent; Lykkesfeldt, Jens; Nielsen, Hans Jørgen

    2008-01-01

    of reducing oxidative damage. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the safety of various doses of melatonin administered during or after surgery and to monitor the changes in biomarkers of oxidative stress and inflammation during the pre-, intra-, and postoperative period. Six patients undergoing......Surgery for abdominal aortic aneurysm is associated with elevated oxidative stress. As an antioxidant in animal and human studies, melatonin has the potential of ameliorating some of this oxidative stress, but melatonin has never been administered to adults during surgery for the purpose......-reactive protein (CRP) were also measured for 4 days after surgery. Melatonin administration did not change hemodynamic parameters (mean arterial pressure or pulse rate) during surgery (P = 0.499 and 0.149, respectively), but oxidative stress parameters (MDA and AA) decreased significantly (P = 0.014 and 0...

  20. Utility of melatonin to treat surgical stress after major vascular surgery - a safety study

    Kücükakin, Bülent; Lykkesfeldt, Jens; Nielsen, Hans Jørgen

    2008-01-01

    of reducing oxidative damage. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the safety of various doses of melatonin administered during or after surgery and to monitor the changes in biomarkers of oxidative stress and inflammation during the pre-, intra- and postoperative period. Six patients undergoing aortic......Surgery for abdominal aortic aneurysm is associated with elevated oxidative stress. As an antioxidant in animal and human studies, melatonin has the potential of ameliorating some of this oxidative stress, but melatonin has never been administered to adults during surgery for the purpose......) were also measured for four days after surgery. Melatonin administration did not change hemodynamic parameters (mean arterial pressure or pulse rate) during surgery (P=0.499 and 0.149, respectively), but oxidative stress parameters (MDA and AA) decreased significantly (P=0.014 and 0.001, respectively...

  1. Timing of Surgery for Spinal Fractures Associated with Systemic Trauma: A Need for a Strategic and Systemic Approach.

    Koksal, Ismet; Alagoz, Fatih; Celik, Haydar; Yildirim, Ali Erdem; Akin, Tezcan; Guvenc, Yahya; Karatay, Mete; Erdem, Yavuz

    An underestimated evaluation of systemic organs in cases with spinal fractures might jeopardize the intervention for treatment and future complications with an increased morbidity and mortality are almost warranted. In the present study, a retrospective analysis of spinal fracture cases associated with systemic trauma was performed to assess surgical success. A retrospective analysis of patients with thoracolumbar fractures who were admitted to the emergency unit between September 2012 and September 2014 was used for the study. The cases were categorized according to age, sex, reason of trauma, associated trauma, neurological condition and treatment details and results were analysed using SPSS 14.0 for Windows. The most common reason of trauma is detected as falls in 101 cases (64.3%). Radiological evaluation of spinal fractures revealed a compression fracture in 106 cases (67.5%) and other fractures in 51 cases (32.5%). Surgical treatment for spinal fracture was performed in 60.5% of the cases and conservative approach was preferred in 39.5% cases. In non-compressive spinal fractures, an associated pathology like head trauma, lower extremity fracture or neurological deficit was found to be higher in incidence (p systemic condition which might be associated with decreased morbidity and mortality.

  2. 'Pseudofailure' of spinal cord stimulation for neuropathic pain following a new severe noxious stimulus: learning points from a case series of failed spinal cord stimulation for complex regional pain syndrome and failed back surgery syndrome.

    Muquit, Samiul; Moussa, Ahmad Abdelhai; Basu, Surajit

    2016-05-01

    Failure of spinal cord stimulation (SCS) may be due to hardware problems, migration of electrodes and, in the long-term, plasticity in the spinal cord with habituation to the stimulation current. We describe a series of seven patients who experienced acute therapeutic loss of SCS effects following an acute nociceptive event unrelated to primary pathology. There were no hardware problems. We called this 'Pseudofailure', as the effective stimulation returned in all patients following a period off stimulation or reprogramming. This phenomenon has not been reported previously in the literature. Over a 4-year period, we managed seven patients with this feature: four had received SCS for complex regional pain syndrome and three for failed back surgery syndrome. In all seven cases, there was cessation of the pain relief afforded by SCS following an acute painful event: four patients had trauma, two patients had domestic electric shock and one patient suffered shingles (varicella zoster infection). We excluded hardware-related problems in all cases. In two patients, SCS effects could be regained by an initial attempt at reprogramming. In the remaining five cases reprogramming was unsuccessful, and stimulation was switched off for several months before recommencing, when we discovered a return of good therapeutic effect. We conclude that SCS may seem to fail following a separate strong nociceptive stimulus. Stimulation may be regained with reprogramming or following a period with stimulation switched off. We would, therefore, advise against removal of SCS hardware in the first instance.

  3. Intra-operative remifentanil might influence pain levels in the immediate postoperative period after major abdominal surgery

    Hansen, EG; Duedahl, Tina H; Rømsing, Janne

    2005-01-01

    Remifentanil, a widely used analgesic agent in anaesthesia, has a rapid onset and short duration of action. In clinical settings, this requires an appropriate pain strategy to prevent unacceptable pain in the post-operative period. The aim of this study was to investigate whether remifentanil had...... any impact on post-operative pain and opioid consumption after major abdominal surgery....

  4. Does postoperative 'M' technique (R) massage with or without mandarin oil reduce infants' distress after major craniofacial surgery?

    de Jong, Marjan; Lucas, Cees; Bredero, Hansje; van Adrichem, Leon; Tibboel, Dick; van Dijk, Monique

    2012-01-01

    de jong m., lucas c., bredero h., van adrichem l., tibboel d. & van dijk m. (2011) Does postoperative M technique (R) massage with or without mandarin oil reduce infants distress after major craniofacial surgery? Journal of Advanced Nursing68(6), 17481757. Abstract Aim. This article is a report of a

  5. Validity of the Fine Motor Area of the 12-Month Ages and Stages Questionnaire in Infants Following Major Surgery

    Smith, Cally; Wallen, Margaret; Walker, Karen; Bundy, Anita; Rolinson, Rachel; Badawi, Nadia

    2012-01-01

    The Ages and Stages Questionnaires (ASQ) are parent-report screening tools to identify infants at risk of developmental difficulties. The purpose of this study was to examine validity and internal reliability of the fine motor developmental area of the ASQ, 2nd edition (ASQ2-FM) for screening 12-month-old infants following major surgery. The…

  6. Risk factors for postoperative delirium in patients undergoing major head and neck cancer surgery: a meta-analysis.

    Zhu, Yun; Wang, Gangpu; Liu, Shengwen; Zhou, Shanghui; Lian, Ying; Zhang, Chenping; Yang, Wenjun

    2017-06-01

    Postoperative delirium is common after extensive surgery. This study aimed to collate and synthesize published literature on risk factors for delirium in patients with head and neck cancer surgery. Three databases were searched (MEDLINE, Embase, and Cochrane Library) between January 1987 and July 2016. The Newcastle Ottawa Scale (NOS) was adopted to evaluate the study quality. Pooled odds ratios or mean differences for individual risk factors were estimated using the Mantel-Haenszel and inverse-variance methods. They provided a total of 1940 patients (286 with delirium and 1654 without), and predominantly included patients undergoing head and neck cancer surgery. The incidence of postoperative delirium ranged from 11.50% to 36.11%. Ten statistically significant risk factors were identified in pooled analysis. Old age, age >70 years, male sex, duration of surgery, history of hypertension, blood transfusions, tracheotomy, American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status grade at least III, flap reconstruction and neck dissection were more likely to sustain delirium after head and neck cancer surgery. Delirium is common in patients undergoing major head neck cancer surgery. Several risk factors were consistently associated with postoperative delirium. These factors help to highlight patients at risk of developing delirium and are suitable for preventive action. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  7. Health-Related Quality of Life, Cachexia and Overall Survival After Major Upper Abdominal Surgery: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    Aahlin, E K; Tranø, G; Johns, N; Horn, A; Søreide, J A; Fearon, K C; Revhaug, A; Lassen, K

    2017-03-01

    Major upper abdominal surgery is often associated with reduced health-related quality of life and reduced survival. Patients with upper abdominal malignancies often suffer from cachexia, represented by preoperative weight loss and sarcopenia (low skeletal muscle mass) and this might affect both health-related quality of life and survival. We aimed to investigate how health-related quality of life is affected by cachexia and how health-related quality of life relates to long-term survival after major upper abdominal surgery. From 2001 to 2006, 447 patients were included in a Norwegian multicenter randomized controlled trial in major upper abdominal surgery. In this study, six years later, these patients were analyzed as a single prospective cohort and survival data were retrieved from the National Population Registry. Cachexia was derived from patient-reported preoperative weight loss and sarcopenia as assessed from computed tomography images taken within three months preoperatively. In the original trial, self-reported health-related quality of life was assessed preoperatively at trial enrollment and eight weeks postoperatively with the health-related quality of life questionnaire Short Form 36. A majority of the patients experienced improved mental health-related quality of life and, to a lesser extent, deteriorated physical health-related quality of life following surgery. There was a significant association between preoperative weight loss and reduced physical health-related quality of life. No association between sarcopenia and health-related quality of life was observed. Overall survival was significantly associated with physical health-related quality of life both pre- and postoperatively, and with postoperative mental health-related quality of life. The association between health-related quality of life and survival was particularly strong for postoperative physical health-related quality of life. Postoperative physical health-related quality of life

  8. The prevalence of undiagnosed pre-surgical cognitive impairment and its post-surgical clinical impact in elderly patients undergoing surgery for adult spinal deformity.

    Adogwa, Owoicho; Elsamadicy, Aladine A; Lydon, Emily; Vuong, Victoria D; Cheng, Joseph; Karikari, Isaac O; Bagley, Carlos A

    2017-09-01

    Pre-existing cognitive impairment (CI) is emerging as a predictor of poor post-operative outcomes in elderly patients. Little is known about impaired preoperative cognition and outcomes after elective spine surgery in this patient population. The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of neuro CI in elderly patients undergoing deformity surgery and its impact on postoperative outcomes. Elderly subjects undergoing elective spinal surgery for correction of adult degenerative scoliosis were enrolled in this study. Pre-operative baseline cognition was assessed using the Saint Louis Mental Status (SLUMS) test. SLUMS consists of 11 questions, which can give a maximum of 30 points. Mild CI was defined as a SLUMS score between 21-26 points, while severe CI was defined as a SLUMS score of ≤20 points. Normal cognition was defined as a SLUMS score of ≥27 points. Complication rates, duration of hospital stay, and 30-day readmission rates were compared between patients with and without baseline CI. Eighty-two subjects were included in this study, with mean age of 73.26±6.08 years. Fifty-seven patients (70%) had impaired cognition at baseline. The impaired cognition group had the following outcomes: increased incidence of one or more postoperative complications (39% vs. 20%), higher incidence of delirium (20% vs. 8%), and higher rate of discharge institutionalization at skilled nursing or acute rehab facilities (54% vs. 30%). The length of hospital stay and 30-day hospital readmission rates were similar between both cohorts (5.33 vs. 5.48 days and 12.28% vs. 12%, respectively). CI is highly prevalent in elderly patients undergoing surgery for adult degenerative scoliosis. Impaired cognition before surgery was associated with higher rates of post-operative delirium, complications, and discharge institutionalization. CI assessments should be considered in the pre-operative evaluations of elderly patients prior to surgery.

  9. Differential changes in free and total insulin-like growth factor I after major, elective abdominal surgery

    Skjærbæk, Christian; Frystyk, Jan; Ørskov, Hans

    1998-01-01

    Major surgery is accompanied by extensive proteolysis of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3). Proteolysis of IGFBP-3 is generally believed to increase IGF bioavailability due to a diminished affinity of the IGFBP-3 fragments for IGFs. We have investigated 18 patients...... undergoing elective ileo-anal J-pouch surgery. Patients were randomized to treatment with GH (12 IU/day; n = 9) or placebo (n = 9) from 2 days before to 7 days after operation. Free IGF-I and IGF-II were measured by ultrafiltration of serum, and IGFBP-3 proteolytic activity was determined by a [125I...

  10. Perioperative bleeding and blood transfusion are major risk factors for venous thromboembolism following bariatric surgery.

    Nielsen, Alexander W; Helm, Melissa C; Kindel, Tammy; Higgins, Rana; Lak, Kathleen; Helmen, Zachary M; Gould, Jon C

    2018-05-01

    Morbidly obese patients are at increased risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE) after bariatric surgery. Perioperative chemoprophylaxis is used routinely with bariatric surgery to decrease the risk of VTE. When bleeding occurs, routine chemoprophylaxis is often withheld due to concerns about inciting another bleeding event. We sought to evaluate the relationship between perioperative bleeding and postoperative VTE in bariatric surgery. The American College of Surgeons-National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) dataset between 2012 and 2014 was queried to identify patients who underwent bariatric surgery. Gastric bypass (n = 28,145), sleeve gastrectomy (n = 30,080), bariatric revision (n = 324), and biliopancreatic diversion procedures (n = 492) were included. Univariate and multivariate regressions were used to determine perioperative factors predictive of postoperative VTE within 30 days in patients who experience a bleeding complication necessitating transfusion. The rate of bleeding necessitating transfusion was 1.3%. Bleeding was significantly more likely to occur in gastric bypass compared to sleeve gastrectomy (1.6 vs. 1.0%) (p surgeries, increased age, length of stay, operative time, and comorbidities including hypertension, dyspnea with moderate exertion, partially dependent functional status, bleeding disorder, transfusion prior to surgery, ASA class III/IV, and metabolic syndrome increased the perioperative bleeding risk (p Bariatric surgery patients who receive postoperative blood transfusion are at a significantly increased risk for VTE. The etiology of VTE in those who are transfused is likely multifactorial and possibly related to withholding chemoprophylaxis and the potential of a hypercoagulable state induced by the transfusion. In those who bleed, consideration should be given to reinitiating chemoprophylaxis when safe, extending treatment after discharge, and screening ultrasound.

  11. Comparison of caudal ropivacaine-morphine and paravertebral catheter for major upper abdominal surgery in infants.

    Sato, Makoto; Iida, Takafumi; Kikuchi, Chika; Sasakawa, Tomoki; Kunisawa, Takayuki

    2017-05-01

    The caudal epidural block is one of the most commonly used regional anesthetic techniques in children. Administration of morphine via caudal injection enables analgesia, even for upper abdominal surgery. The thoracic paravertebral block has also been successfully used to treat perioperative pain during upper abdominal procedures in pediatric patients. In the current study, we compared the two regional techniques for upper abdominal surgery in infants to determine whether one of them was preferable to the other. Consecutive patients under 12 months of age who underwent upper abdominal surgery were retrospectively divided according to the chosen postoperative analgesia: Group C, caudal ropivacaine-morphine; Group P, paravertebral catheter. We analyzed the following outcomes: requirement for additional analgesics, pain scores, need for mechanical ventilation and oxygen dosage, postoperative blood pressure and heart rate, time to pass first stool, time until first full meal, and complications. Twenty-one consecutive patients were included: 10 in Group C and 11 in Group P. Median age at surgery was 80 (47.5-270.0) and 84.5 (34.3-287.5) days, respectively. No difference was found between the two groups in requirement for additional analgesics at 24 h after surgery (median 1 in Group C vs 1 in Group P, P = 0.288, 95% CI: -2 to 1). BOPS pain scores were only lower in Group P when compared to Group C at 24 h after surgery (median 1 vs 2, P = 0.041, 95% CI: -2 to 0). None of the patients had perioperative complications. In this small series, there was no significant difference between caudal ropivacaine-morphine and paravertebral catheter for postoperative care in infants undergoing upper abdominal surgery. Further prospective studies are needed to compare the efficacy and incidence of complications of caudal block and paravertebral catheter for postoperative analgesia. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Does a paresthesia during spinal needle insertion indicate intrathecal needle placement?

    Pong, Ryan P; Gmelch, Benjamin S; Bernards, Christopher M

    2009-01-01

    Paresthesias are relatively common during spinal needle insertion, however, the clinical significance of the paresthesia is unknown. A paresthesia may result from needle-to-nerve contact with a spinal nerve in the epidural space, or, with far lateral needle placement, may result from contact with a spinal nerve within the intervertebral foramen. However, it is also possible and perhaps more likely, that paresthesias occur when the spinal needle contacts a spinal nerve root within the subarachnoid space. This study was designed to test this latter hypothesis. Patients (n = 104) scheduled for surgery under spinal anesthesia were observed during spinal needle insertion. If a paresthesia occurred, the needle was fixed in place and the stylet removed to observe whether cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flowed from the hub. The presence of CSF was considered proof that the needle had entered the subarachnoid space. Paresthesias occurred in 14/103 (13.6%) of patients; 1 patient experienced a paresthesia twice. All paresthesias were transient. Following a paresthesia, CSF was observed in the needle hub 86.7% (13/15) of the time. Our data suggest that the majority of transient paresthesias occur when the spinal needle enters the subarachnoid space and contacts a spinal nerve root. Therefore, when transient paresthesias occur during spinal needle placement it is appropriate to stop and assess for the presence of CSF in the needle hub, rather than withdraw and redirect the spinal needle away from the side of the paresthesia as some authors have suggested.

  13. A comparison of effect of preemptive use of oral gabapentin and pregabalin for acute post-operative pain after surgery under spinal anesthesia

    Bafna, Usha; Rajarajeshwaran, Krishnamoorthy; Khandelwal, Mamta; Verma, Anand Prakash

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims: Preemptive analgesia is an antinociceptive treatment that prevents establishment of altered processing of afferent input. Pregabalin has been claimed to be more effective in preventing neuropathic component of acute nociceptive pain of surgery. We conducted a study to compare the effect of oral gabapentin and pregabalin with control group for post-operative analgesia Materials and Methods: A total of 90 ASA grade I and II patients posted for elective gynecological surgeries were randomized into 3 groups (group A, B and C of 30 patients each). One hour before entering into the operation theatre the blinded drug selected for the study was given with a sip of water. Group A- received identical placebo capsule, Group B- received 600mg of gabapentin capsule and Group C — received 150 mg of pregabalin capsule. Spinal anesthesia was performed at L3-L4 interspace and a volume of 3.5 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine heavy injected over 30sec through a 25 G spinal needle. VAS score at first rescue analgesia, mean time of onset of analgesia, level of sensory block at 5min and 10 min interval, onset of motor block, total duration of analgesia and total requirement of rescue analgesia were observed as primary outcome. Hemodynamics and side effects were recorded as secondary outcome in all patients. Results: A significantly longer mean duration of effective analgesia in group C was observed compared with other groups (P < 0.001). The mean duration of effective analgesia in group C was 535.16 ± 32.86 min versus 151.83 ± 16.21 minutes in group A and 302.00 ± 24.26 minutes in group B. The mean numbers of doses of rescue analgesia in the first 24 hours in group A, B and C was 4.7 ± 0.65, 4.1 ±0.66 and 3.9±0.614. (P value <0.001). Conclusion: We conclude that preemptive use of gabapentin 600mg and pregabalin 150 mg orally significantly reduces the postoperative rescue analgesic requirement and increases the duration of postoperative analgesia in patients undergoing

  14. Chitin Oligosaccharide (COS) Reduces Antibiotics Dose and Prevents Antibiotics-Caused Side Effects in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis (AIS) Patients with Spinal Fusion Surgery.

    Qu, Yang; Xu, Jinyu; Zhou, Haohan; Dong, Rongpeng; Kang, Mingyang; Zhao, Jianwu

    2017-03-14

    Antibiotics are always considered for surgical site infection (SSI) in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) surgery. However, the use of antibiotics often causes the antibiotic resistance of pathogens and side effects. Thus, it is necessary to explore natural products as drug candidates. Chitin Oligosaccharide (COS) has anti-inflammation and anti-bacteria functions. The effects of COS on surgical infection in AIS surgery were investigated. A total of 312 AIS patients were evenly and randomly assigned into control group (CG, each patient took one-gram alternative Azithromycin/Erythromycin/Cloxacillin/Aztreonam/Ceftazidime or combined daily), experiment group (EG, each patient took 20 mg COS and half-dose antibiotics daily), and placebo group (PG, each patient took 20 mg placebo and half-dose antibiotics daily). The average follow-up was one month, and infection severity and side effects were analyzed. The effects of COS on isolated pathogens were analyzed. SSI rates were 2%, 3% and 8% for spine wounds and 1%, 2% and 7% for iliac wound in CG, EG and PG ( p antibiotics ( p antibiotics dose and antibiotics-caused side effects in AIS patients with spinal fusion surgery by improving antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. COS should be developed as potential adjuvant for antibiotics therapies.

  15. Chitin Oligosaccharide (COS Reduces Antibiotics Dose and Prevents Antibiotics-Caused Side Effects in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis (AIS Patients with Spinal Fusion Surgery

    Yang Qu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics are always considered for surgical site infection (SSI in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS surgery. However, the use of antibiotics often causes the antibiotic resistance of pathogens and side effects. Thus, it is necessary to explore natural products as drug candidates. Chitin Oligosaccharide (COS has anti-inflammation and anti-bacteria functions. The effects of COS on surgical infection in AIS surgery were investigated. A total of 312 AIS patients were evenly and randomly assigned into control group (CG, each patient took one-gram alternative Azithromycin/Erythromycin/Cloxacillin/Aztreonam/Ceftazidime or combined daily, experiment group (EG, each patient took 20 mg COS and half-dose antibiotics daily, and placebo group (PG, each patient took 20 mg placebo and half-dose antibiotics daily. The average follow-up was one month, and infection severity and side effects were analyzed. The effects of COS on isolated pathogens were analyzed. SSI rates were 2%, 3% and 8% for spine wounds and 1%, 2% and 7% for iliac wound in CG, EG and PG (p < 0.05, respectively. COS reduces the side effects caused by antibiotics (p < 0.05. COS improved biochemical indexes and reduced the levels of interleukin (IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF alpha. COS reduced the antibiotics dose and antibiotics-caused side effects in AIS patients with spinal fusion surgery by improving antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. COS should be developed as potential adjuvant for antibiotics therapies.

  16. Hydroxyethyl Starch Reduces Coagulation Competence and Increases Blood Loss During Major Surgery

    Rasmussen, Kirsten C; Johansson, Pär I; Højskov, Michael

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated whether administration of hydroxyethyl starch (HES) 130/0.4 affects coagulation competence and influences the perioperative blood loss. BACKGROUND: Artificial colloids substitute blood volume during surgery; with the administration of HES 130/0.4 (Voluven, Fresenius...

  17. A Study of Adverse Occurrences and Major Functional Impairment Following Surgery

    2005-05-01

    elderly population, such as pulmonary embolism or wrong site surgery. We included only those surgical procedures with a prevalence of 1 percent or...disability, bedridden , incontinent, and requiring constant nursing care and attention (5). Based on information in the medical charts, nurses

  18. Evaluation of spinal cord stimulation on the symptoms of anxiety and depression and pain intensity in patients with failed back surgery syndrome.

    Robb, L P; Cooney, J M; McCrory, C R

    2017-08-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is now established as the primary treatment for failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS). Commonly, patients with chronic pain and FBSS often report symptoms of anxiety and depression resulting from this condition. These factors can modulate and amplify the pain experience, therefore, further challenging treatment success. This study examined the efficacy of SCS on alleviating the symptoms of anxiety and depression associated with chronic pain as well as pain intensity in a group of patients with FBSS. A convenience sample (n = 26) was selected for participation. Questionnaires [Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and Brief Pain Inventory Short Form (BPI-SF)] were completed and examined pre and post spinal cord implant. Analysis of the data 1 year following SCS indicates that there was a statistical significant improvement in the symptoms of depression and anxiety reported as well as pain intensity in all participants (p anxiety and depression scores on the HADS were significantly lower compared to baseline (p anxiety and depression with an associated reduction in opioid consumption.

  19. The outcome and survival of palliative surgery in thoraco-lumbar spinal metastases: contemporary retrospective cohort study.

    Nemelc, R M; Stadhouder, A; van Royen, B J; Jiya, T U

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate outcome and survival and to identify prognostic variables for patients surgically treated for spinal metastases. Methods: A retrospective study was performed on 86 patients, surgically treated for spinal metastases. Preoperative analyses of the ASIA and spinal instability neoplastic scores (SINS) were performed. Survival curves of different prognostic variables were made by Kaplan–Meier analysis and the variables entered in a Cox proportional hazards model to determine their significance on survival. The correlation between preoperative radiotherapy and postoperative wound infections was also evaluated. Results: Survival analysis was performed on 81 patients,37 women and 44 men. Five patients were excluded due to missing data. Median overall survival was 38 weeks [95 % confidence interval (CI) 27.5–48.5 weeks], with a 3-month survival rate of 81.5 %. Breast tumor had the best median survival of 127 weeks and lung tumor the worst survival of 18 weeks. Univariate analysis showed tumor type, preoperative ASIA score (p = 0.01) and visceral metastases(p = 0.18) were significant prognostic variables for survival.Colon tumors had 5.53 times hazard ratio compared to patients with breast tumor. ASIA-C score had more than 13.03 times the hazard ratio compared to patients with an ASIA-E score. Retrospective analysis of the SINS scores showed 34 patients with a score of 13–18 points, 44 patients with a score of 7–12 points, and 1 patient with a score of 6 points. Preoperative radiotherapy had no influence on the postoperative incidence of deep surgical wound infections (p = 0.37). Patients with spinal metastases had a median survival of 38 weeks postoperative. The primary tumor type and ASIA score were significant prognostic factors for survival. Preoperative radiotherapy neither had influence on survival nor did it constitute a risk for postoperative surgical wound infections.

  20. Unilateral spinal anesthesia with low dose bupivacaine and ropivacaine: hypobaric or hyperbaric solutions with fentanyl for one-day surgery?

    KALAGAC FABRIS, LADA; ŠAKIĆ ZDRAVČEVIĆ, KATARINA

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare the quality of unilateral spinal anesthesia with low dose bupivacaine and ropivacaine deluded in different baric solutions (hyperbaric / hypobaric). In our special interest was to define possibilities to use hypobaric solutions of local anesthetics if they prove to have any advantages. Methods: This prospective study was conduced over a 24-month period, enrolling eighty patients (ASA groups I, II, III) randomly divide...

  1. Routine aspiration of subglottic secretions after major heart surgery: impact on the incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia.

    Pérez Granda, M J; Barrio, J M; Hortal, J; Muñoz, P; Rincón, C; Bouza, E

    2013-12-01

    Aspiration of subglottic secretions (ASS) is recommended in patients requiring mechanical ventilation for ≥48h. We assessed the impact of the introduction of ASS routinely in all patients after major heart surgery in an ecological study comparing ventilator-acquired pneumonia (VAP) incidence, days of mechanical ventilation, and cost of antimicrobial agents before and after the implementation of ASS. Before and after the intervention the results (per 1000 days) were: VAP incidence, 23.92 vs 16.46 (P = 0.04); cost of antimicrobials, €71,384 vs €63,446 (P = 0.002); and days of mechanical ventilation, 507.5 vs 377.5 (P = 0.009). From the moment of induction of anaesthesia all patients undergoing major heart surgery should routinely receive ASS. Copyright © 2013 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Ultrasound guided pectoral nerve blockade versus thoracic spinal blockade for conservative breast surgery in cancer breast: A randomized controlled trial

    Hala M.S. ELdeen

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: In conclusion, both Pecs and TSB provide effective intraoperative anesthesia and prolonged postoperative pain relief after breast surgery, but the Pecs block is technically simple and easy to learn with few contraindications, provides hemodynamic stability, and has a low complication rate and it is therefore a safe and effective technique in performing intraoperative anesthesia and controlling postoperative pain after unilateral conservative breast surgery.

  3. Comparison of analgesic effect of intra-articular administration of levobupivacaine and clonidine versus ropivacaine and clonidine in day care knee arthroscopic surgery under spinal anesthesia

    Sudeshna Senapati

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Intra-articular (IA local anesthetics are often used for the management and prevention of pain after arthroscopic knee surgery. Clonidine prolongs the duration of local anesthetics. In this study, analgesic effect of intra-articular administration of levobupivacaine and clonidine was compared with ropivacaine and clonidine in knee joint arthroscopic surgery under spinal anesthesia. Method: 88 patients, aged between 15 to 55 years, ASA I and II undergoing knee arthroscopy under spinal anesthesia were assigned into two equal groups (n = 44 in a randomized double blind protocol. Patients in Group L received 10 ml of 0.50% levobupivacaine and 1 mcg/kg clonidine and Group R received 10 ml of 0.75% ropivacaine and 1 mcg/kg of clonidine through intra-articular route at the end of the procedure. In the post-operative period, pain intensity was assessed by VAS (Visual Analogue Scale Score recorded at 1 st , 5 th , 8 th , 12 th , 18 th post-operative hours. Duration of analgesia, total rescue analgesic dose in first 18 hours and any side effects were also recorded. Result: Group L experienced significantly longer duration of effective postoperative analgesia and lesser rescue analgesic compared to group R. Group R had higher mean VAS score at 5 th and 12 th post-operative hours (P < 0.05. No side effects were observed among the groups. Conclusion: Intra-articular administration of levobupivacaine and clonidine give better post-operative pain relief by increasing duration of analgesia, and decreasing need of rescue analgesic compared to intra-articular ropivacaine and clonidine.

  4. Gastro-oesophageal reflux in large-sized, deep-chested versus small-sized, barrel-chested dogs undergoing spinal surgery in sternal recumbency.

    Anagnostou, Tilemahos L; Kazakos, George M; Savvas, Ioannis; Kostakis, Charalampos; Papadopoulou, Paraskevi

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether an increased frequency of gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) is more common in large-sized, deep-chested dogs undergoing spinal surgery in sternal recumbency than in small-sized, barrelchested dogs. Prospective, cohort study. Nineteen small-sized, barrel-chested dogs (group B) and 26 large-sized, deep-chested dogs (group D). All animals were premedicated with intramuscular (IM) acepromazine (0.05 mg kg -1 ) and pethidine (3 mg kg -1 ) IM. Anaesthesia was induced with intravenous sodium thiopental and maintained with halothane in oxygen. Lower oesophageal pH was monitored continuously after induction of anaesthesia. Gastro-oesophageal reflux was considered to have occurred whenever pH values > 7.5 or < 4 were recorded. If GOR was detected during anaesthesia, measures were taken to avoid aspiration of gastric contents into the lungs and to prevent the development of oesophagitis/oesophageal stricture. The frequency of GOR during anaesthesia was significantly higher in group D (6/26 dogs; 23.07%) than in group B (0/19 dogs; 0%) (p = 0.032). Signs indicative of aspiration pneumonia, oesophagitis or oesophageal stricture were not reported in any of the GOR cases. In large-sized, deep-chested dogs undergoing spinal surgery in sternal recumbency, it would seem prudent to consider measures aimed at preventing GOR and its potentially devastating consequences (oesophagitis/oesophageal stricture, aspiration pneumonia). Copyright © 2016 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Clopidogrel is not associated with major bleeding complications during peripheral arterial surgery.

    Stone, David H; Goodney, Philip P; Schanzer, Andres; Nolan, Brian W; Adams, Julie E; Powell, Richard J; Walsh, Daniel B; Cronenwett, Jack L

    2011-09-01

    Persistent variation in practice surrounds preoperative clopidogrel management at the time of vascular surgery. While some surgeons preferentially discontinue clopidogrel citing a perceived risk of perioperative bleeding, others will proceed with surgery in patients taking clopidogrel for an appropriate indication. The purpose of this study was to determine whether preoperative clopidogrel use was associated with significant bleeding complications during peripheral arterial surgery. We reviewed a prospective regional vascular surgery registry recorded by 66 surgeons from 15 centers in New England from 2003 to 2009. Preoperative clopidogrel use within 48 hours of surgery was analyzed among patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy (CEA), lower extremity bypass (LEB), endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR), and open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (oAAA). Ruptured AAAs were excluded. Endpoints included postoperative bleeding requiring reoperation, as well as the incidence and volume of blood transfusion. Statistical analysis was performed using analysis of variance, Fisher exact, χ(2), and Wilcoxon rank-sum tests. Over the study interval, a total of 10,406 patients underwent surgery, including 5264 CEA, 2883 LEB, 1125 EVAR, and 1134 oAAA repair. Antiplatelet use among all patients varied, with 19% (n = 2010) taking no antiplatelet agents, 69% (n = 7132) taking aspirin (ASA) alone, 2.2% (n = 229) taking clopidogrel alone, and 9.7% (n = 1017) taking both ASA and clopidogrel. Clopidogrel alone or as dual antiplatelet therapy was most frequently used prior to CEA and least frequently prior to oAAA group (CEA 16.1%, LEB 9.0%, EVAR 6.5%, oAAA 5%). Reoperation for bleeding was not significantly different among patients based on antiplatelet regimen (none 1.5%, ASA 1.3%, clopidogrel 0.9%, ASA/clopidogrel 1.5%, P = .74). When analyzed by operation type, no difference in reoperation for bleeding was seen across antiplatelet regimens. There was also no

  6. Minimally invasive scoliosis surgery assisted by O-arm navigation for Lenke Type 5C adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: a comparison with standard open approach spinal instrumentation.

    Zhu, Weiguo; Sun, Weixiang; Xu, Leilei; Sun, Xu; Liu, Zhen; Qiu, Yong; Zhu, Zezhang

    2017-04-01

    OBJECTIVE Recently, minimally invasive scoliosis surgery (MISS) was introduced for the correction of adult scoliosis. Multiple benefits including a good deformity correction rate and fewer complications have been demonstrated. However, few studies have reported on the use of MISS for the management of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). The purpose of this study was to investigate the outcome of posterior MISS assisted by O-arm navigation for the correction of Lenke Type 5C AIS. METHODS The authors searched a database for all patients with AIS who had been treated with either MISS or PSF between November 2012 and January 2014. Levels of fusion, density of implants, operation time, and estimated blood loss (EBL) were recorded. Coronal and sagittal parameters were evaluated before surgery, immediately after surgery, and at the last follow-up. The accuracy of pedicle screw placement was assessed according to postoperative axial CT images in both groups. The 22-item Scoliosis Research Society questionnaire (SRS-22) results and complications were collected during follow-up. RESULTS The authors retrospectively reviewed the records of 45 patients with Lenke Type 5C AIS, 15 who underwent posterior MISS under O-arm navigation and 30 who underwent posterior spinal fusion (PSF). The 2 treatment groups were matched in terms of baseline characteristics. Comparison of radiographic parameters revealed no obvious difference between the 2 groups immediately after surgery or at the final follow-up; however, the MISS patients had significantly less EBL (p self-image using the SRS-22 showed significantly higher scores in the MISS group (p = 0.013 and 0.046, respectively) than in the PSF group. Postoperative CT showed high accuracy in pedicle placement in both groups. No deep wound infection, pseudarthrosis, additional surgery, implant failure, or neurological complications were recorded in either group. CONCLUSIONS Minimally invasive scoliosis surgery is an effective and safe

  7. Abdominal binders may reduce pain and improve physical function after major abdominal surgery - a systematic review

    Rothman, Josephine Philip; Gunnarsson, Ulf; Bisgaard, Thue

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Evidence for the effect of post-operative abdominal binders on post-operative pain, seroma formation, physical function, pulmonary function and increased intra-abdominal pressure among patients after surgery remains largely un-investigated. METHODS: A systematic review was conducted...... formation and physical function. RESULTS: A total of 50 publications were identified; 42 publications were excluded leaving eight publications counting a total of 578 patients for analysis. Generally, the scientific quality of the studies was poor. Use of abdominal binder revealed a non-significant tendency...... to reduce seroma formation after laparoscopic ventral herniotomy and a non-significant reduction in pain. Physical function was improved, whereas evidence supports a beneficial effect on psychological distress after open abdominal surgery. Evidence also supports that intra-abdominal pressure increases...

  8. ANAESTHESIA, POSTOPERATIVE ANALGESIA AND EARLY REHABILITATION FOR UPPER EXTREMITY BONE AND MAJOR JOINTS SURGERY

    A. V. Kurnosov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method was developed to perform prolonged brachial plexus block with almost 100% effectiveness. It was also shown in 44 patients to be 33 % safer for local complications and 11,3 % safer for general complications than common used supraclavicular Winnie block (42 patients in control group, received opiates and NSAID for post-operative analgesia. This new method of analgesia allows effective rehabilitation after elbow arthroplasty to be started on the first day after the surgery.

  9. Consensus Bundle on Prevention of Surgical Site Infections After Major Gynecologic Surgery.

    Pellegrini, Joseph E; Toledo, Paloma; Soper, David E; Bradford, William C; Cruz, Deborah A; Levy, Barbara S; Lemieux, Lauren A

    Surgical site infections are the most common complications of surgery in the United States. Of surgeries in women of reproductive age, hysterectomy is one of the most frequently performed, second only to cesarean birth. Therefore, prevention of surgical site infections in women undergoing gynecologic surgery is an ideal topic for a patient safety bundle. The primary purpose of this safety bundle is to provide recommendations that can be implemented into any surgical environment in an effort to reduce the incidence of surgical site infection. This bundle was developed by a multidisciplinary team convened by the Council on Patient Safety in Women's Health Care. The bundle is organized into four domains: Readiness, Recognition and Prevention, Response, and Reporting and Systems Learning. In addition to recommendations for practice, each of the domains stresses communication and teamwork between all members of the surgical team. Although the bundle components are designed to be adaptable to work in a variety of clinical settings, standardization within institutions is encouraged. Copyright © 2017 AWHONN, the Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Temporal plus epilepsy is a major determinant of temporal lobe surgery failures.

    Barba, Carmen; Rheims, Sylvain; Minotti, Lorella; Guénot, Marc; Hoffmann, Dominique; Chabardès, Stephan; Isnard, Jean; Kahane, Philippe; Ryvlin, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    Reasons for failed temporal lobe epilepsy surgery remain unclear. Temporal plus epilepsy, characterized by a primary temporal lobe epileptogenic zone extending to neighboured regions, might account for a yet unknown proportion of these failures. In this study all patients from two epilepsy surgery programmes who fulfilled the following criteria were included: (i) operated from an anterior temporal lobectomy or disconnection between January 1990 and December 2001; (ii) magnetic resonance imaging normal or showing signs of hippocampal sclerosis; and (iii) postoperative follow-up ≥ 24 months for seizure-free patients. Patients were classified as suffering from unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy, bitemporal epilepsy or temporal plus epilepsy based on available presurgical data. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was used to calculate the probability of seizure freedom over time. Predictors of seizure recurrence were investigated using Cox proportional hazards model. Of 168 patients included, 108 (63.7%) underwent stereoelectroencephalography, 131 (78%) had hippocampal sclerosis, 149 suffered from unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy (88.7%), one from bitemporal epilepsy (0.6%) and 18 (10.7%) from temporal plus epilepsy. The probability of Engel class I outcome at 10 years of follow-up was 67.3% (95% CI: 63.4-71.2) for the entire cohort, 74.5% (95% CI: 70.6-78.4) for unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy, and 14.8% (95% CI: 5.9-23.7) for temporal plus epilepsy. Multivariate analyses demonstrated four predictors of seizure relapse: temporal plus epilepsy (P temporal lobe surgery failure was 5.06 (95% CI: 2.36-10.382) greater in patients with temporal plus epilepsy than in those with unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy. Temporal plus epilepsy represents a hitherto unrecognized prominent cause of temporal lobe surgery failures. In patients with temporal plus epilepsy, anterior temporal lobectomy appears very unlikely to control seizures and should not be advised. Whether larger

  11. Health behavior change counseling in surgery for degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis. Part II: patient activation mediates the effects of health behavior change counseling on rehabilitation engagement.

    Skolasky, Richard L; Maggard, Anica M; Li, David; Riley, Lee H; Wegener, Stephen T

    2015-07-01

    To determine the effect of health behavior change counseling (HBCC) on patient activation and the influence of patient activation on rehabilitation engagement, and to identify common barriers to engagement among individuals undergoing surgery for degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis. Prospective clinical trial. Academic medical center. Consecutive lumbar spine surgery patients (N=122) defined in our companion article (Part I) were assigned to a control group (did not receive HBCC, n=59) or HBCC group (received HBCC, n=63). Brief motivational interviewing-based HBCC versus control (significance, Pgroup did not show improvement compared with the control group. Thematic analysis identified 3 common barriers to engagement: (1) low self-efficacy because of lack of knowledge and support (62%); (2) anxiety related to fear of movement (57%); and (3) concern about pain management (48%). The influence of HBCC on rehabilitation engagement was mediated by patient activation. Despite improvements in patient activation, one-third of patients reported low rehabilitation engagement. Addressing these barriers should lead to greater improvements in rehabilitation engagement. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A stepped strategy that aims at the nationwide implementation of the Enhanced Recovery After Surgery programme in major gynaecological surgery: study protocol of a cluster randomised controlled trial.

    de Groot, Jeanny Ja; Maessen, José Mc; Slangen, Brigitte Fm; Winkens, Bjorn; Dirksen, Carmen D; van der Weijden, Trudy

    2015-07-30

    Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) programmes aim at an early recovery after surgical trauma and consequently at a reduced length of hospitalisation. This paper presents the protocol for a study that focuses on large-scale implementation of the ERAS programme in major gynaecological surgery in the Netherlands. The trial will evaluate effectiveness and costs of a stepped implementation approach that is characterised by tailoring the intensity of implementation activities to the needs of organisations and local barriers for change, in comparison with the generic breakthrough strategy that is usually applied in large-scale improvement projects in the Netherlands. All Dutch hospitals authorised to perform major abdominal surgery in gynaecological oncology patients are eligible for inclusion in this cluster randomised controlled trial. The hospitals that already fully implemented the ERAS programme in their local perioperative management or those who predominantly admit gynaecological surgery patients to an external hospital replacement care facility will be excluded. Cluster randomisation will be applied at the hospital level and will be stratified based on tertiary status. Hospitals will be randomly assigned to the stepped implementation strategy or the breakthrough strategy. The control group will receive the traditional breakthrough strategy with three educational sessions and the use of plan-do-study-act cycles for planning and executing local improvement activities. The intervention group will receive an innovative stepped strategy comprising four levels of intensity of support. Implementation starts with generic low-cost activities and may build up to the highest level of tailored and labour-intensive activities. The decision for a stepwise increase in intensive support will be based on the success of implementation so far. Both implementation strategies will be completed within 1 year and evaluated on effect, process, and cost-effectiveness. The primary

  13. Major surgery in south India: a retrospective audit of hospital claim data from a large community health insurance programme.

    Shaikh, Maaz; Woodward, Mark; Rahimi, Kazem; Patel, Anushka; Rath, Santosh; MacMahon, Stephen; Jha, Vivekanand

    2015-04-27

    Information about use of major surgery in India is scarce. This study aims to bridge this gap by auditing hospital claims from the Rajiv Aarogyasri Community Health Insurance Scheme (RACHIS) that provides access to free tertiary care for major surgery through state-funded insurance to 68 million beneficiaries with limited household incomes-81% of population in states of Telangana and Andhra Pradesh (combined Human Development Index 0·485). Beneficiary households receive an annual coverage of INR 200 000 (US$3333) for admissions to any empanelled public or private hospital. Publicly available deidentified hospital claim data for all surgical procedures conducted between mid-2008 and mid-2012 were compiled across all 23 districts in Telangana and Andhra Pradesh. 677 332 surgical admissions (80% at private hospitals) were recorded at a mean annual rate of 259 per 100 000 beneficiaries (95% CI 235-283), excluding cataract and caesarean sections as these were not covered under the insurance programme. Men accounted for 56% of admissions. Injury was the most common cause for surgical admission (185 733; 27%) with surgical correction of long bone fractures being the most common procedure (144 997; 20%) identified in the audit. Diseases of digestive (110 922; 16%), genitourinary (82 505; 12%), and musculoskeletal system (70 053; 10%) were other leading causes for surgical admissions. Most hospital bed-days were used for injuries (584 days per 100 000 person years; 31%), digestive diseases (314 days; 17%), and musculoskeletal system (207 days; 11%), costing 19% (INR 4·4 billion), 13% (3·03 billion), and 11% (2·5 billion) of claims, respectively. Cardiovascular surgeries (53 023; 8%) alone accounted for 21% (INR 4·9 billion) of cost. Annual per capita cost of surgical claims was US$1·49 (95% CI 1·32-1·65). Our findings are limited to a population socioeconomically representative of India and other countries with low-income and middle

  14. Per-oral endoscopic myotomy: Major advance in achalasia treatment and in endoscopic surgery

    Friedel, David; Modayil, Rani; Stavropoulos, Stavros N

    2014-01-01

    Per-oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) represents a natural orifice endoscopic surgery (NOTES) approach to laparoscopy Heller myotomy (LHM). POEM is arguably the most successful clinical application of NOTES. The growth of POEM from a single center in 2008 to approximately 60 centers worldwide in 2014 with several thousand procedures having been performed attests to the success of POEM. Initial efficacy, safety and acid reflux data suggest at least equivalence of POEM to LHM, the previous gold standard for achalasia therapy. Adjunctive techniques used in the West include impedance planimetry for real-time intraprocedural luminal assessment and endoscopic suturing for challenging mucosal defect closures during POEM. The impact of POEM extends beyond the realm of esophageal motility disorders as it is rapidly popularizing endoscopic submucosal dissection in the West and spawning offshoots that use the submucosal tunnel technique for a host of new indications ranging from resection of tumors to pyloromyotomy for gastroparesis. PMID:25548473

  15. Effect of Dex medetomidine on Neuromuscular Blockade in Patients Undergoing Complex Major Abdominal or Pelvic Surgery

    El-Awady, G.A.; Abdelhalim, J.M.K.; Azer, M.S.

    2003-01-01

    Dex medetomidine is a highly selective α2 agonist with anesthetic, analgesic and sympatholytic properties. Its neuromuscular effects in humans are unknown. This study evaluates the effect of dex medetomidine on neuromuscular block and hemodynamics during thiopental/ isoflurane anesthesia for patients with complex abdominal or pelvic surgery. Patients and methods: During thiopental/isoflurane anesthesia, the rocuronium infusion rate was adjusted in 20 complex surgery patients to maintain a stable first response (T1) in the train of four sequence of 50% ± 3 of the pre-rocuronium value. Dex medetomidine was then administered by infusion pump, targeting a plasma dex medetomidine concentration of 0.6 ng/dL for 45 min. The evoked mechanical responses of the adductor pollicis responses (T1 response and T4/T1 ratio), systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and heart rate (HR) were measured during the dex medetomidine infusion using repeated measures analysis of variance. Plasma levels ranged from 0.73 to 1.38 ng/mL. Results: T1 values decreased during the infusion from 55(ρ2 to 38±9 ((ρ< 0.05). T4/Tl values did not change during the infusion. Dex medetomidine increased SBP (ρ< 0.001) and decreased HR ((ρ< 0.05) (10 min median values) during the infusion compared with values before the infusion. This study demonstrated that dex medetomidine decreased T1, increased SBP and decreased HR during thiopental/isoflurane anesthesia. Conclusion: We conclude that dex medetomidine induced direct vasoconstriction may alter pharmacokinetics of rocuronium, therefore increasing plasma rocuronium concentration. Although these effects were statistically significant, further studies should be held for understanding and characterizing the peripheral vasoconstrictive effects of a2 agonists that allow better management and determination of drug dosing regimens

  16. Breast cancer in the lower jaw after reconstructive surgery with a pectoralis major myocutaneous flap (PMMC - A case report

    Nestle-Kraemling C

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract For head and neck as well as for oromaxillofacial surgery, the use of the pectoralis major myocutaneous (PMMC flap is a standard reconstructive technique after radical surgery for cancers in this region. We report to our knowledge for the first development of breast cancer in the PMMC flap in a 79 year old patient, who had undergone several operations in the past for recurring squamous cell carcinoma of the jaw. The occurrence of a secondary malignancy within the donor tissue after flap transfer is rare, but especially in the case of transferred breast tissue and the currently high incidence of breast cancer theoretically possible. Therefore preoperative screening mammography seems advisable to exclude a preexisting breast cancer in female patients undergoing such reconstruction surgery. Therapy for breast cancer under these circumstances is individual and consists of radical tumor resection followed by radiation if applicable and a standard systemic therapeutic regimen on the background of the patients individual prognosis due to the primary cancer.

  17. Incidence, prognostic factors and impact of postoperative delirium after major vascular surgery: A meta-analysis and systematic review.

    Aitken, Sarah Joy; Blyth, Fiona M; Naganathan, Vasi

    2017-10-01

    Although postoperative delirium is a common complication and increases patient care needs, little is known about the predictors and outcomes of delirium in patients having vascular surgery. This review aimed to determine the incidence, prognostic factors and impact of postoperative delirium in vascular surgical patients. MEDLINE and EMBASE were systematically searched for articles published between January 2000 and January 2016 on delirium after vascular surgery. The primary outcome was the incidence of delirium. Secondary outcomes were contributing prognostic factors and impact of delirium. Study quality and risk of bias was assessed using the QUIPS tool for systematic reviews of prognostic studies, and MOOSE guidelines for reviews of observational studies. Quantitative analyses of extracted data were conducted using meta-analysis where possible to determine incidence of delirium and prognostic factors. A qualitative review of outcomes was performed. Fifteen articles were eligible for inclusion. Delirium incidence ranged between 5% and 39%. Meta-analysis found that patients with delirium were older than those without delirium (OR 3.6, pdelirium included increased age (OR 1.04, pdelirium. Data were limited on the impact of procedure complexity, endovascular compared to open surgery or type of anaesthetic. Postoperative delirium occurs frequently, resulting in major morbidity for vascular patients. Improved quality of prognostic studies may identify modifiable peri-operative factors to improve quality of care for vascular surgical patients.

  18. Alcohol screening and risk of postoperative complications in male VA patients undergoing major non-cardiac surgery.

    Bradley, Katharine A; Rubinsky, Anna D; Sun, Haili; Bryson, Chris L; Bishop, Michael J; Blough, David K; Henderson, William G; Maynard, Charles; Hawn, Mary T; Tønnesen, Hanne; Hughes, Grant; Beste, Lauren A; Harris, Alex H S; Hawkins, Eric J; Houston, Thomas K; Kivlahan, Daniel R

    2011-02-01

    Patients who misuse alcohol are at increased risk for surgical complications. Four weeks of preoperative abstinence decreases the risk of complications, but practical approaches for early preoperative identification of alcohol misuse are needed. To evaluate whether results of alcohol screening with the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test - Consumption (AUDIT-C) questionnaire-up to a year before surgery-were associated with the risk of postoperative complications. This is a cohort study. Male Veterans Affairs (VA) patients were eligible if they had major noncardiac surgery assessed by the VA's Surgical Quality Improvement Program (VASQIP) in fiscal years 2004-2006, and completed the AUDIT-C alcohol screening questionnaire (0-12 points) on a mailed survey within 1 year before surgery. One or more postoperative complication(s) within 30 days of surgery based on VASQIP nurse medical record reviews. Among 9,176 eligible men, 16.3% screened positive for alcohol misuse with AUDIT-C scores ≥ 5, and 7.8% had postoperative complications. Patients with AUDIT-C scores ≥ 5 were at significantly increased risk for postoperative complications, compared to patients who drank less. In analyses adjusted for age, smoking, and days from screening to surgery, the estimated prevalence of postoperative complications increased from 5.6% (95% CI 4.8-6.6%) in patients with AUDIT-C scores 1-4, to 7.9% (6.3-9.7%) in patients with AUDIT-Cs 5-8, 9.7% (6.6-14.1%) in patients with AUDIT-Cs 9-10 and 14.0% (8.9-21.3%) in patients with AUDIT-Cs 11-12. In fully-adjusted analyses that included preoperative covariates potentially in the causal pathway between alcohol misuse and complications, the estimated prevalence of postoperative complications increased significantly from 4.8% (4.1-5.7%) in patients with AUDIT-C scores 1-4, to 6.9% (5.5-8.7%) in patients with AUDIT-Cs 5-8 and 7.5% (5.0-11.3%) among those with AUDIT-Cs 9-10. AUDIT-C scores of 5 or more up to a year before surgery were

  19. Apolipoprotein E e4 allele does not increase the risk of early postoperative delirium after major surgery.

    Abelha, Fernando José; Fernandes, Vera; Botelho, Miguela; Santos, Patricia; Santos, Alice; Machado, J C; Barros, Henrique

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: A relationship between patients with a genetic predisposition to and those who develop postoperative delirium has not been yet determined. The aim of this study was to determine whether there is an association between apolipoprotein E epsilon 4 allele (APOE4) and delirium after major surgery. METHODS: Of 230 intensive care patients admitted to the post anesthesia care unit (PACU) over a period of 3 months, 173 were enrolled in the study. Patients' demographics and intra- and postoperative data were collected. Patients were followed for the development of delirium using the Intensive Care Delirium Screening Checklist, and DNA was obtained at PACU admission to determine apolipoprotein E genotype. RESULTS: Fifteen percent of patients developed delirium after surgery. Twenty-four patients had one copy of APOE4. The presence of APOE4 was not associated with an increased risk of early postoperative delirium (4% vs. 17%; P = 0.088). The presence of APOE4 was not associated with differences in any studied variables. Multivariate analysis identified age [odds ratio (OR) 9.3, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.0-43.0, P = 0.004 for age ≥65 years), congestive heart disease (OR 6.2, 95% CI 2.0-19.3, P = 0.002), and emergency surgery (OR 59.7, 95% CI 6.7-530.5, P < 0.001) as independent predictors for development of delirium. The Simplified Acute Physiology Score II (SAPS II) and The Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) were significantly higher in patients with delirium (P < 0.001 and 0.008, respectively). Hospital mortality rates of these patients was higher and they had a longer median PACU stay. CONCLUSIONS: Apolipoprotein e4 carrier status was not associated with an increased risk for early postoperative delirium. Age, congestive heart failure, and emergency surgery were independent risk factors for the development of delirium after major surgery.

  20. Perioperative Management of Patients with Inflammatory Rheumatic Diseases Undergoing Major Orthopaedic Surgery: A Practical Overview.

    Gualtierotti, Roberta; Parisi, Marco; Ingegnoli, Francesca

    2018-04-01

    Patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases often need orthopaedic surgery due to joint involvement. Total hip replacement and total knee replacement are frequent surgical procedures in these patients. Due to the complexity of the inflammatory rheumatic diseases, the perioperative management of these patients must envisage a multidisciplinary approach. The frequent association with extraarticular comorbidities must be considered when evaluating perioperative risk of the patient and should guide the clinician in the decision-making process. However, guidelines of different medical societies may vary and are sometimes contradictory. Orthopaedics should collaborate with rheumatologists, anaesthesiologists and, when needed, cardiologists and haematologists with the common aim of minimising perioperative risk in patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases. The aim of this review is to provide the reader with simple practical recommendations regarding perioperative management of drugs such as disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs, corticosteroids, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and tools for a risk stratification for cardiovascular and thromboembolic risk based on current evidence for patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases.

  1. Economic impact of clinical variability in preoperative testing for major outpatient surgery.

    Gil-Borrelli, Christian Carlo; Agustí, Salomé; Pla, Rosa; Díaz-Redondo, Alicia; Zaballos, Matilde

    2016-05-01

    With the purpose of decreasing the existing variability in the criteria of preoperative evaluation and facilitating the clinical decision-making process, our hospital has a protocol of preoperative tests to use with ASA I and ASA II patients. The aim of the study was to calculate the economic impact caused by clinicians' non-adherence to the protocol for the anaesthesiological evaluation of ASA 1 and ASA II patients. A retrospective study of costs with a random sample of 353 patients that were seen in the consultation for Anesthesiology over a period of one year. Aspects related to the costs, patient's profiles and specialties were analysed, according to the degree of fulfillment of the protocol. The lack of adherence to the the protocol was 70%. 130 chest X-rays and 218 ECG were performed without indication. This generated an excess costs of 34 € per patient. Taking into account the expenses of both tests and the attended population undergoing ambulatory surgery during the one-year period, an excess spending for the hospital of between 69.164 € and 83.312 € was estimated. Clinical variability should be reduced and the creation of synergies between the different departments should be enhanced in order to adjust the request for unnecessary complementary tests to decrease health care and to improve the quality of patient care. Copyright © 2016 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Defining Spino-Pelvic Alignment Thresholds: Should Operative Goals in Adult Spinal Deformity Surgery Account for Age?

    Lafage, Renaud; Schwab, Frank; Challier, Vincent; Henry, Jensen K; Gum, Jeffrey; Smith, Justin; Hostin, Richard; Shaffrey, Christopher; Kim, Han J; Ames, Christopher; Scheer, Justin; Klineberg, Eric; Bess, Shay; Burton, Douglas; Lafage, Virginie

    2016-01-01

    Retrospective review of prospective, multicenter database. The aim of the study was to determine age-specific spino-pelvic parameters, to extrapolate age-specific Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) values from published Short Form (SF)-36 Physical Component Score (PCS) data, and to propose age-specific realignment thresholds for adult spinal deformity (ASD). The Scoliosis Research Society-Schwab classification offers a framework for defining alignment in patients with ASD. Although age-specific changes in spinal alignment and patient-reported outcomes have been established in the literature, their relationship in the setting of ASD operative realignment has not been reported. ASD patients who received operative or nonoperative treatment were consecutively enrolled. Patients were stratified by age, consistent with published US-normative values (Norms) of the SF-36 PCS (75  y old). At baseline, relationships between between radiographic spino-pelvic parameters (lumbar-pelvic mismatch [PI-LL], pelvic tilt [PT], sagittal vertical axis [SVA], and T1 pelvic angle [TPA]), age, and PCS were established using linear regression analysis; normative PCS values were then used to establish age-specific targets. Correlation analysis with ODI and PCS was used to determine age-specific ideal alignment. Baseline analysis included 773 patients (53.7 y old, 54% operative, 83% female). There was a strong correlation between ODI and PCS (r = 0.814, P US-normative ODI by age group. Linear regression analysis (all with r > 0.510, P US-normative PCS values demonstrated that ideal spino-pelvic values increased with age, ranging from PT = 10.9 degrees, PI-LL = -10.5 degrees, and SVA = 4.1 mm for patients under 35 years to PT = 28.5 degrees, PI-LL = 16.7 degrees, and SVA = 78.1 mm for patients over 75 years. Clinically, older patients had greater compensation, more degenerative loss of lordosis, and were more pitched forward. This study demonstrated that

  3. Spinal stenosis

    Beale, S.; Pathria, M.N.; Ross, J.S.; Masaryk, T.J.; Modic, M.T.

    1988-01-01

    The authors studied 50 patients who had spinal stenosis by means of MR imaging. All patients had undergone myelography and CT. Thirty patients underwent surgery. MR imaging included T1-weighted spin echo sequences with repetition time = 600 msec, echo time = 20 (600/20) sagittal and axial sections 4 mm thick with 2 mm gap. T2-weighted 2,000/60 axial images were obtained on 14 patients. Examinations were retrospectively evaluated for central stenosis, lateral recess narrowing, and foraminal encroachment. Measurements of sagittal, interpedicular, interfacet, and recess dimensions were made at L3-5. On MR images, 20 patients had single-level and 30 had multiple-level stenosis. There was excellent agreement between modalities with central canal stenosis, but a discrepancy in six patients with bony foraminal stenosis. MR imaging was an accurate method for assessment of lumbar stenosis, but CT appears marginally better for detection of bony foraminal stenosis in certain cases

  4. Outcome of intraoperative goal-directed therapy using Vigileo/FloTrac in high-risk patients scheduled for major abdominal surgeries: A prospective randomized trial

    Mohammed A. Elgendy

    2017-07-01

    Conclusion: The applied protocol for intraoperative GDT provided significant reduction of PO morbidities, ICU and hospital LOS but couldn‘t significantly reduce mortality rates in high risk patients scheduled for major abdominal surgeries.

  5. Predictors of pain relief following spinal cord stimulation in chronic back and leg pain and failed back surgery syndrome: a systematic review and meta-regression analysis.

    Taylor, Rod S; Desai, Mehul J; Rigoard, Philippe; Taylor, Rebecca J

    2014-07-01

    We sought to assess the extent to which pain relief in chronic back and leg pain (CBLP) following spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is influenced by patient-related factors, including pain location, and technology factors. A number of electronic databases were searched with citation searching of included papers and recent systematic reviews. All study designs were included. The primary outcome was pain relief following SCS, we also sought pain score (pre- and post-SCS). Multiple predictive factors were examined: location of pain, history of back surgery, initial level of pain, litigation/worker's compensation, age, gender, duration of pain, duration of follow-up, publication year, continent of data collection, study design, quality score, method of SCS lead implant, and type of SCS lead. Between-study association in predictive factors and pain relief were assessed by meta-regression. Seventy-four studies (N = 3,025 patients with CBLP) met the inclusion criteria; 63 reported data to allow inclusion in a quantitative analysis. Evidence of substantial statistical heterogeneity (P regression analysis showed no predictive patient or technology factors. SCS was effective in reducing pain irrespective of the location of CBLP. This review supports SCS as an effective pain relieving treatment for CBLP with predominant leg pain with or without a prior history of back surgery. Randomized controlled trials need to confirm the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of SCS in the CLBP population with predominant low back pain. © 2013 The Authors Pain Practice Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of World Institute of Pain.

  6. Intraoperative ketamine reduces immediate postoperative opioid consumption after spinal fusion surgery in chronic pain patients with opioid dependency: a randomized, blinded trial.

    Nielsen, Rikke Vibeke; Fomsgaard, Jonna Storm; Siegel, Hanna; Martusevicius, Robertas; Nikolajsen, Lone; Dahl, Jørgen Berg; Mathiesen, Ole

    2017-03-01

    Perioperative handling of surgical patients with opioid dependency represents an important clinical problem. Animal studies suggest that ketamine attenuates central sensitization and hyperalgesia and thereby reduces postoperative opioid tolerance. We hypothesized that intraoperative ketamine would reduce immediate postoperative opioid consumption compared with placebo in chronic pain patients with opioid dependency undergoing lumbar spinal fusion surgery. Primary outcome was morphine consumption 0 to 24 hours postoperatively. Secondary outcomes were acute pain at rest and during mobilization 2 to 24 hours postoperatively (visual analogue scale), adverse events, and persistent pain 6 months postoperatively. One hundred fifty patients were randomly assigned to intraoperative S-ketamine bolus 0.5 mg/kg and infusion 0.25 mg·kg·h or placebo. Postoperatively, patients received their usual opioids, paracetamol and IV patient-controlled analgesia with morphine. In the final analyses, 147 patients were included. Patient-controlled analgesia IV morphine consumption 0 to 24 hours postoperatively was significantly reduced in the ketamine group compared with the placebo group: 79 (47) vs 121 (53) mg IV, mean difference 42 mg (95% confidence interval -59 to -25), P ketamine group 6 and 24 hours postoperatively. There were no significant differences regarding acute pain, nausea, vomiting, hallucinations, or nightmares. Back pain at 6 months postoperatively compared with preoperative pain was significantly more improved in the ketamine group compared with the placebo group, P = 0.005. In conclusion, intraoperative ketamine significantly reduced morphine consumption 0 to 24 hours after lumbar fusion surgery in opioid-dependent patients. The trend regarding less persistent pain 6 months postoperatively needs further investigation.

  7. Predictors of Pain Relief Following Spinal Cord Stimulation in Chronic Back and Leg Pain and Failed Back Surgery Syndrome: A Systematic Review and Meta-Regression Analysis

    Taylor, Rod S; Desai, Mehul J; Rigoard, Philippe; Taylor, Rebecca J

    2014-01-01

    We sought to assess the extent to which pain relief in chronic back and leg pain (CBLP) following spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is influenced by patient-related factors, including pain location, and technology factors. A number of electronic databases were searched with citation searching of included papers and recent systematic reviews. All study designs were included. The primary outcome was pain relief following SCS, we also sought pain score (pre- and post-SCS). Multiple predictive factors were examined: location of pain, history of back surgery, initial level of pain, litigation/worker's compensation, age, gender, duration of pain, duration of follow-up, publication year, continent of data collection, study design, quality score, method of SCS lead implant, and type of SCS lead. Between-study association in predictive factors and pain relief were assessed by meta-regression. Seventy-four studies (N = 3,025 patients with CBLP) met the inclusion criteria; 63 reported data to allow inclusion in a quantitative analysis. Evidence of substantial statistical heterogeneity (P pain relief following SCS was noted. The mean level of pain relief across studies was 58% (95% CI: 53% to 64%, random effects) at an average follow-up of 24 months. Multivariable meta-regression analysis showed no predictive patient or technology factors. SCS was effective in reducing pain irrespective of the location of CBLP. This review supports SCS as an effective pain relieving treatment for CBLP with predominant leg pain with or without a prior history of back surgery. Randomized controlled trials need to confirm the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of SCS in the CLBP population with predominant low back pain. PMID:23834386

  8. Impact of case type, length of stay, institution type, and comorbidities on Medicare diagnosis-related group reimbursement for adult spinal deformity surgery.

    Nunley, Pierce D; Mundis, Gregory M; Fessler, Richard G; Park, Paul; Zavatsky, Joseph M; Uribe, Juan S; Eastlack, Robert K; Chou, Dean; Wang, Michael Y; Anand, Neel; Frank, Kelly A; Stone, Marcus B; Kanter, Adam S; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Mummaneni, Praveen V

    2017-12-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to educate medical professionals about potential financial impacts of improper diagnosis-related group (DRG) coding in adult spinal deformity (ASD) surgery. METHODS Medicare's Inpatient Prospective Payment System PC Pricer database was used to collect 2015 reimbursement data for ASD procedures from 12 hospitals. Case type, hospital type/location, number of operative levels, proper coding, length of stay, and complications/comorbidities (CCs) were analyzed for effects on reimbursement. DRGs were used to categorize cases into 3 types: 1) anterior or posterior only fusion, 2) anterior fusion with posterior percutaneous fixation with no dorsal fusion, and 3) combined anterior and posterior fixation and fusion. RESULTS Pooling institutions, cases were reimbursed the same for single-level and multilevel ASD surgery. Longer stay, from 3 to 8 days, resulted in an additional $1400 per stay. Posterior fusion was an additional $6588, while CCs increased reimbursement by approximately $13,000. Academic institutions received higher reimbursement than private institutions, i.e., approximately $14,000 (Case Types 1 and 2) and approximately $16,000 (Case Type 3). Urban institutions received higher reimbursement than suburban institutions, i.e., approximately $3000 (Case Types 1 and 2) and approximately $3500 (Case Type 3). Longer stay, from 3 to 8 days, increased reimbursement between $208 and $494 for private institutions and between $1397 and $1879 for academic institutions per stay. CONCLUSIONS Reimbursement is based on many factors not controlled by surgeons or hospitals, but proper DRG coding can significantly impact the financial health of hospitals and availability of quality patient care.

  9. Role of Pectoralis Major Myocutanuos Flap in Salvage Laryngeal Surgery for Prophylaxis of Pharyngocutaneuos Fistula and Reconstruction of Skin Defect

    Mebeed, A.; Hussein, H.A.; Saber, T.Kh.; Zohairy, M.A.; Lotayef, M.

    2009-01-01

    This study was carried out to minimize the incidence of pharyngocutaneous fistula (PCF) following salvage laryngeal surgery using vascularized pedicle pectoralis major myocutaneous flap (PMMC) for enhancing wound healing, rapid intake of oral feeding, reconstruction of desqauamated irradiated skin, achieving short hospital stay and protection against catastrophic blow out mortality. Patients and Methods: This case series study of sixteen patients carried out from May 2005 to July 2009, at the National Cancer Institute, Cairo University where we applied PMMC flap in salvage laryngeal surgery for those with high risk to develop complications: Patients of poor general conditions (anemia, hypoproteinaemia, diabetics) and/or poor local conditions for healing (irradiated neck, extensive local or nodal recurrence with skin desquamation, infiltration or tumor fungation which need extensive resection). Five cases had been treated with primary cobalt radiotherapy laryngeal field only and 4 cases laryngeal field with draining neck nodes, while photon therapy was given in 4 cases as laryngeal field only and 3 cases laryngeal field with draining neck nodes. All cases were squamous cell carcinoma (13 cases grade 2, 2 cases grade 3 and one case grade 1) proved before radiotherapy. Supraglottic recurrence was detected in 7 cases (43.75%) and glottis in 9 cases (56.25%). Following salvage surgery, 11 cases were staged T3 NO, Nl and N2, 3 cases were T2 NO or Nl and 2 cases were T4 N2 with skin infiltration. Tracheostomy was there in 4 cases. Results: The study included fifteen males (93.75%) and one female (6.25%), age was between 38-73 years (mean=55.5 years). Five cases were operated on as total laryngectomy with excision of skin flaps + PMMC flap, 4 cases as total laryngectomy with skin flap excision + functional block neck dissection + PMMC flap and 7 cases as total laryngectomy -f block neck dissection with skin, excision (modified radical in 4 cases and radical in 3 cases

  10. Registration of 2D C-Arm and 3D CT Images for a C-Arm Image-Assisted Navigation System for Spinal Surgery

    Chih-Ju Chang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available C-Arm image-assisted surgical navigation system has been broadly applied to spinal surgery. However, accurate path planning on the C-Arm AP-view image is difficult. This research studies 2D-3D image registration methods to obtain the optimum transformation matrix between C-Arm and CT image frames. Through the transformation matrix, the surgical path planned on preoperative CT images can be transformed and displayed on the C-Arm images for surgical guidance. The positions of surgical instruments will also be displayed on both CT and C-Arm in the real time. Five similarity measure methods of 2D-3D image registration including Normalized Cross-Correlation, Gradient Correlation, Pattern Intensity, Gradient Difference Correlation, and Mutual Information combined with three optimization methods including Powell’s method, Downhill simplex algorithm, and genetic algorithm are applied to evaluate their performance in converge range, efficiency, and accuracy. Experimental results show that the combination of Normalized Cross-Correlation measure method with Downhill simplex algorithm obtains maximum correlation and similarity in C-Arm and Digital Reconstructed Radiograph (DRR images. Spine saw bones are used in the experiment to evaluate 2D-3D image registration accuracy. The average error in displacement is 0.22 mm. The success rate is approximately 90% and average registration time takes 16 seconds.

  11. A case of deep infection after instrumentation in dorsal spinal surgery: the management with antibiotics and negative wound pressure without removal of fixation.

    Dobran, Mauro; Mancini, Fabrizio; Nasi, Davide; Scerrati, Massimo

    2017-07-28

    Until today the role of spinal instrumentation in the presence of a wound infection has been widely discussed and recently many authors leave the hardware in place with appropriate antibiotic therapy. This is a case of a 65-year-old woman suffering from degenerative scoliosis and osteoporotic multiple vertebral collapses treated with posterior dorsolumbar stabilisation with screws and rods. Four months later, skin necrosis and infection appeared in the cranial wound with exposure of the rods. A surgical procedure of debridement of the infected tissue and package with a myocutaneous trapezius muscle flap was performed. One week after surgery, negative pressure wound therapy was started on the residual skin defect. The wound healed after 2 months. The aim of this case report is to focus on the utility of this method even in the case of hardware exposure and infection. This may help avoid removing instrumentation and creating instability. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  12. Safety and effectiveness of a polyvinyl alcohol barrier in reducing risks of vascular tissue damage during anterior spinal revision surgery.

    Jeffords, Paul; Li, Jinsheng; Panchal, Deepal; Denoziere, Guilhem; Fetterolf, Donald

    2012-05-01

    This study was conducted as a controlled, prospective investigation to show the safety and efficacy of a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) device in a sheep model. To evaluate the ability of a permanent PVA hydrogel barrier to reduce the risk of potential vessel damage during anterior vertebral revision surgery, to provide a nonadhesive barrier at the surgical site, and to create a surgical revision plane of dissection. The development of scar tissue and adhesions presents a significant postoperative problem in spine surgery, where adhesion involvement of overlying structures can cause pain, neurovascular complications, and present a difficult surgical environment during revisions. The devices were implanted onto the ventral surface of exposed lumbar intervertebral discs using an anterolateral approach. One disc separated from the study site was also exposed to serve as a control. Three sheep each were then evaluated with an explant procedure at 30 and 90 days. Extensive sampling was undertaken to evaluate gross anatomic, micropathologic, and biochemical environments and properties of the device. The structural properties and appearance of the device remained intact at both 30 and 90 days. The material remained flexible, hydrophilic, and soft, without visible resorption or decomposition. The material was well tolerated by the animal, with minimal histologic signs of inflammation or rejection. Tissue planes were easily able to be localized by the surgeon attempting to locate the prior surgical site at the time of resection. The PVA vessel shield effectively protected the structures overlying the sheep spine during revision, providing a clear dissection plane for resection at repeat surgery. The overlying structures separated from the previous surgical site with no adhesion, and allowed safe separation of adjacent tissues without the use of sharp dissection.

  13. Five major controversial issues about fusion level selection in corrective surgery for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: a narrative review.

    Lee, Choon Sung; Hwang, Chang Ju; Lee, Dong-Ho; Cho, Jae Hwan

    2017-07-01

    Shoulder imbalance, coronal decompensation, and adding-on phenomenon following corrective surgery in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis are known to be related to the fusion level selected. Although many studies have assessed the appropriate selection of the proximal and distal fusion level, no definite conclusions have been drawn thus far. We aimed to assess the problems with fusion level selection for corrective surgery in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis, and to enhance understanding about these problems. This study is a narrative review. We conducted a literature search of fusion level selection in corrective surgery for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. Accordingly, we selected and reviewed five debatable topics related to fusion level selection: (1) selective thoracic fusion; (2) selective thoracolumbar-lumbar (TL-L) fusion; (3) adding-on phenomenon; (4) distal fusion level selection for major TL-L curves; and (5) proximal fusion level selection and shoulder imbalance. Selective fusion can be chosen in specific curve types, although there is a risk of coronal decompensation or adding-on phenomenon. Generally, wider indications for selective fusions are usually associated with more frequent complications. Despite the determination of several indications for selective fusion to avoid such complications, no clear guidelines have been established. Although authors have suggested various criteria to prevent the adding-on phenomenon, no consensus has been reached on the appropriate selection of lower instrumented vertebra. The fusion level selection for major TL-L curves primarily focuses on whether distal fusion can terminate at L3, a topic that remains unclear. Furthermore, because of the presence of several related factors and complications, proximal level selection and shoulder imbalance has been constantly debated and remains controversial from its etiology to its prevention. Although several difficult problems in the diagnosis and

  14. Evaluation of financial burden following complications after major surgery in France: Potential return after perioperative goal-directed therapy.

    Landais, Alain; Morel, Morgane; Goldstein, Jacques; Loriau, Jerôme; Fresnel, Annie; Chevalier, Corinne; Rejasse, Gilles; Alfonsi, Pascal; Ecoffey, Claude

    2017-06-01

    Perioperative goal-directed therapy (PGDT) has been demonstrated to improve postoperative outcomes and reduce the length of hospital stays. The objective of our analysis was to evaluate the cost of complications, derived from French hospital payments, and calculate the potential cost savings and length of hospital stay reductions. The billing of 2388 patients who underwent scheduled high-risk surgery (i.e. major abdominal, gynaecologic, urological, vascular, and orthopaedic interventions) over three years was retrospectively collected from three French hospitals (one public-teaching, one public, and one private hospital). A relationship between mortality, length of hospital stays, cost/patient, and severity scores, based mainly on postoperative complications but also on preoperative clinical status, were analysed. Statistical analysis was performed using Student's t-tests or Wilcoxon tests. Our analyses determined that a severity score of 3 or 4 was associated with complications in 90% of cases and this represented 36% of patients who, compared with those with a score of 1 or 2, were associated with significantly increased costs (€ 8205±3335 to € 22,081±16,090; Prisk surgeries per year), the potential financial savings ranged from € 40M to € 68M, not including the costs of PGDT and its implementation. Our analysis demonstrates that patients with complications are significantly more expensive to care for than those without complications. In our model, it was projected that implementing PGDT during high-risk surgery may significantly reduce healthcare costs and the length of hospital stays in France while probably improving patient access to care and reducing waiting times for procedures. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  15. An anaesthetic pre-operative assessment clinic reduces pre-operative inpatient stay in patients requiring major vascular surgery.

    O'Connor, D B

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients undergoing major vascular surgery (MVS) require extensive anaesthetic assessment. This can require extended pre-operative stays. AIMS: We investigated whether a newly established anaesthetic pre-operative assessment clinic (PAC) would reduce the pre-operative inpatient stay, avoid unnecessary investigations and facilitate day before surgery (DBS) admissions for patients undergoing MVS. PATIENT AND METHODS: One year following and preceding the establishment of the PAC the records of patients undergoing open or endovascular aortic aneurysm repair, carotid endarterectomy and infra-inguinal bypass were reviewed to measure pre-operative length of stay (LoS). RESULTS: Pre-operative LoS was significantly reduced in the study period (1.85 vs. 4.2 days, respectively, P < 0.0001). Only 12 out of 61 patients in 2007 were admitted on the DBS and this increased to 33 out of 63 patients (P = 0.0002). No procedure was cancelled for medical reasons. CONCLUSION: The PAC has facilitated accurate outpatient anaesthetic assessment for patients requiring MVS. The pre-operative in-patient stay has been significantly reduced.

  16. Intrathecal dexmedetomidine as adjuvant for spinal anaesthesia for perianal ambulatory surgeries: A randomised double-blind controlled study

    S S Nethra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: The newer trend in regional anaesthesia for ambulatory anorectal surgeries advocate use of lower dose of local anaesthetic, providing segmental block with adjuvants such as opioids and α2 agonists to prolong analgesia. The current study investigated effects of addition of 5 μg of dexmedetomidine to 6 mg of hyperbaric bupivacaine on duration of analgesia, sensory and motor block characteristics for perianal ambulatory surgeries. Methods: This study is a prospective randomised controlled double blind study. Forty adult patients between 18 and 55 years of age were divided into 2 groups. Group D received intrathecal 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine 6 mg (1.2 ml with injection dexmedetomidine 5 μg in 0.5 ml of normal saline and Group N received intrathecal 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine 6 mg (1.2 ml with 0.5 ml of normal saline. The parameters assessed were time to regression of sensory blockade, motor blockade, ambulation, time to void, first administration of analgesic. Statistical analysis was done using appropriate tests. Results: Time for regression of sensory level and time for first administration of analgesic were prolonged in Group D (430.05 ± 89.13 min, 459.8 ± 100.9 min, respectively in comparison to Group N (301.10 ± 94.86 min, 321.85 ± 95.08 min, respectively. However, the duration of motor blockade, time to ambulation, and time to void were also significantly prolonged in Group D (323.05 ± 54.58 min, 329.55 ± 54.06 min, 422.30 ± 87.59 min than in Group N (220.10 ± 63.61 min, 221.60 ± 63.84 min, 328.45 ± 113.38 min. Conclusion: Intrathecal dexmedetomidine 5 μg added to intrathecal bupivacaine 6 mg as adjuvant may not be suitable for ambulatory perianal surgeries due to prolongation of motor blockade.

  17. Hospital Blood Transfusion Patterns During Major Noncardiac Surgery and Surgical Mortality.

    Chen, Alicia; Trivedi, Amal N; Jiang, Lan; Vezeridis, Michael; Henderson, William G; Wu, Wen-Chih

    2015-08-01

    We retrospectively examined intraoperative blood transfusion patterns at US veteran's hospitals through description of national patterns of intraoperative blood transfusion by indication for transfusion in the elderly; assessment of temporal trends in the use of intraoperative blood transfusion; and relationship of institutional use of intraoperative blood transfusion to hospital 30-day risk-adjusted postoperative mortality rates.Limited data exist on the pattern of intraoperative blood transfusion by indication for transfusion at the hospital level, and the relationship between intraoperative transfusion rates and institutional surgical outcomes.Using the Department of Veterans Affairs Surgical Quality Improvement Program database, we assigned 424,015 major noncardiac operations among elderly patients (≥65 years) in 117 veteran's hospitals, from 1997 to 2009, into groups based on indication for intraoperative blood transfusion according to literature and clinical guidelines. We then examined institutional variations and temporal trends in surgical blood use based on these indications, and the relationship between these institutional patterns of transfusion and 30-day postoperative mortality.Intraoperative transfusion occurred in 38,056/424,015 operations (9.0%). Among the 64,390 operations with an indication for transfusion, there was wide variation (median: 49.9%, range: 8.7%-76.2%) in hospital transfusion rates, a yearly decline in transfusion rates (average 1.0%/y), and an inverse relationship between hospital intraoperative transfusion rates and hospital 30-day risk-adjusted mortality (adjusted mortality of 9.8 ± 2.8% vs 8.3 ± 2.1% for lowest and highest tertiles of hospital transfusion rates, respectively, P = 0.02). In contrast, for the 225,782 operations with no indication for transfusion, there was little variation in hospital transfusion rates (median 0.7%, range: 0%-3.4%), no meaningful temporal change in transfusion (average 0.0%/y), and

  18. Intravenous glucagon-like peptide 1 normalizes blood glucose after major surgery in patients with type 2 diabetes

    Meier, Juris J; Weyhe, Dirk; Michaely, Mark

    2004-01-01

    of GLP-1 (1.2 pmol x kg x min) and placebo over 8 hrs, each administered in randomized order in the fasting state. C-reactive protein concentrations of 4.9+/-4.2 mg/dL indicated a systemic inflammation. Blood was drawn in 30-min intervals for glucose (glucose oxidase), insulin, C-peptide, glucagon...... practicability and the risk of hypoglycemia. Therefore, the glucose-lowering effect of the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) was investigated in patients with type 2 diabetes after major surgery. DESIGN: Randomised clinical study. SETTING: A surgical unit of a university hospital. PATIENTS......, and GLP-1 (specific immunoassays). Statistics were done with repeated-measures analysis of variance and Duncan's post hoc tests. MAIN RESULTS: During the intravenous infusion of GLP-1, plasma glucose concentrations were significantly lowered, reaching the normoglycemic fasting glucose range within 150...

  19. Acute postoperative digitalization of patients with arteriosclerotic heart disease after major surgery. A randomized haemodynamic study and proposal for therapy.

    Bille-Brahe, N E; Engell, H C; Sørensen, M B

    1980-12-01

    Twenty patients with impaired left ventricular function during exercise, who underwent major vascular surgery for arteriosclerotic disease, were randomly digitalized in the immediate postoperative period. All patients had a smooth postoperative course. Haemodynamic measurements showed improved left ventricular function in those who received digitalis, since 60 min after full digitalization the digitalized patients had a highly significant decrease in pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) with unchanged stroke volume index (SVI) and left ventricular stroke work index (LVSWI). The same improvement in cardiac function was present the next morning. The present study provides haemodynamic data in support of clinical studies showing a beneficial effect of prophylactic digitalization in surgical patients with clinical signs of arteriosclerotic heart disease, though not in overt failure.

  20. An advance care plan decision support video before major surgery: a patient- and family-centred approach.

    Isenberg, Sarina R; Crossnohere, Norah L; Patel, Manali I; Conca-Cheng, Alison; Bridges, John F P; Swoboda, Sandy M; Smith, Thomas J; Pawlik, Timothy M; Weiss, Matthew; Volandes, Angelo E; Schuster, Anne; Miller, Judith A; Pastorini, Carolyn; Roter, Debra L; Aslakson, Rebecca A

    2018-06-01

    Video-based advanc care planning (ACP) tools have been studied in varied medical contexts; however, none have been developed for patients undergoing major surgery. Using a patient- and family-centredness approach, our objective was to implement human-centred design (HCD) to develop an ACP decision support video for patients and their family members when preparing for major surgery. The study investigators partnered with surgical patients and their family members, surgeons and other health professionals to design an ACP decision support video using key HCD principles. Adapting Maguire's HCD stages from computer science to the surgical context, while also incorporating Elwyn et al 's specifications for patient-oriented decision support tool development, we used a six-stage HCD process to develop the video: (1) plan HCD process; (2) specify where video will be used; (3) specify user and organisational requirements; (4) produce and test prototypes; (5) carry out user-based assessment; (6) field test with end users. Over 450 stakeholders were engaged in the development process contributing to setting objectives, applying for funding, providing feedback on the storyboard and iterations of the decision tool video. Throughout the HCD process, stakeholders' opinions were compiled and conflicting approaches negotiated resulting in a tool that addressed stakeholders' concerns. Our patient- and family-centred approach using HCD facilitated discussion and the ability to elicit and balance sometimes competing viewpoints. The early engagement of users and stakeholders throughout the development process may help to ensure tools address the stated needs of these individuals. NCT02489799. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  1. The Impact of Two Different Transfusion Strategies on Patient Immune Response during Major Abdominal Surgery: A Preliminary Report

    Kassiani Theodoraki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Blood transfusion is associated with well-known risks. We investigated the difference between a restrictive versus a liberal transfusion strategy on the immune response, as expressed by the production of inflammatory mediators, in patients subjected to major abdominal surgery procedures. Fifty-eight patients undergoing major abdominal surgery were randomized preoperatively to either a restrictive transfusion protocol or a liberal transfusion protocol (with transfusion if hemoglobin dropped below 7.7 g dL−1 or 9.9 g dL−1, respectively. In a subgroup of 20 patients randomly selected from the original allocation groups, blood was sampled for measurement of IL-6, IL-10, and TNFα. Postoperative levels of IL-10 were higher in the liberal transfusion group on the first postoperative day (49.82±29.07 vs. 15.83±13.22 pg mL−1, P<0.05. Peak postoperative IL-10 levels correlated with the units of blood transfused as well as the mean duration of storage and the storage time of the oldest unit transfused (r2=0.38, P=0.032, r2=0.52, P=0.007, and r2=0.68, P<0.001, respectively. IL-10 levels were elevated in patients with a more liberal red blood cell transfusion strategy. The strength of the association between anti-inflammatory IL-10 and transfusion variables indicates that IL-10 may be an important factor in transfusion-associated immunomodulation. This trial is registered under ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02020525.

  2. Survival analysis in patients with metastatic spinal disease: the influence of surgery, histology, clinical and neurologic status

    Matheus Fernandes de Oliveira

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Spine is the most common site for skeletal metastasis in patients with malignancy. Vertebral involvement quantification, neurological status, general health status and primary tumor histology are factors to set surgical planning and therapeutic targets. We evaluated the impact of general clinical and neurological status, histologic type and surgery in survival. Method : The study sample consisted of consecutive patients admitted from July 2010 to January 2013 for treatment. Results : Sixty eight patients were evaluated. 23 were female and 45 were male. Main primary neoplasic sites were: breast, prostate, lung/pleura and linfoproliferative. Thirty three out of 68 received surgical treatment, 2 received percutaneous biopsy and 33 had nonsurgical treatment. Survival : Log Rank curves revealed no statistical significant difference according to histological type, surgical approach and Frankel Score. Karnofsky Score was statistically different. Conclusion : Histological type and clinical status were statistically associated with life expectancy in vertebral metastatic disease.

  3. Estimation of the Ideal Lumbar Lordosis to Be Restored From Spinal Fusion Surgery: A Predictive Formula for Chinese Population.

    Xu, Leilei; Qin, Xiaodong; Zhang, Wen; Qiao, Jun; Liu, Zhen; Zhu, Zezhang; Qiu, Yong; Qian, Bang-ping

    2015-07-01

    A prospective, cross-sectional study. To determine the independent variables associated with lumbar lordosis (LL) and to establish the predictive formula of ideal LL in Chinese population. Several formulas have been established in Caucasians to estimate the ideal LL to be restored for lumbar fusion surgery. However, there is still a lack of knowledge concerning the establishment of such predictive formula in Chinese population. A total of 296 asymptomatic Chinese adults were prospectively recruited. The relationships between LL and variables including pelvic incidence (PI), age, sex, and body mass index were investigated to determine the independent factors that could be used to establish the predictive formula. For the validation of the current formula, other 4 reported predictive formulas were included. The absolute value of the gap between the actual LL and the ideal LL yielded by these formulas was calculated and then compared between the 4 reported formulas and the current one to determine its reliability in predicting the ideal LL. The logistic regression analysis showed that there were significant associations of LL with PI and age (R = 0.508, P < 0.001 for PI; R = 0.088, P = 0.03 for age). The formula was, therefore, established as follows: LL = 0.508 × PI - 0.088 × Age + 28.6. When applying our formula to these subjects, the gap between the predicted ideal LL and the actual LL was averaged 3.9 ± 2.1°, which was significantly lower than that of the other 4 formulas. The calculation formula derived in this study can provide a more accurate prediction of the LL for the Chinese population, which could be used as a tool for decision making to restore the LL in lumbar corrective surgery. 3.

  4. Thoracic paravertebral block versus transversus abdominis plane block in major gynecological surgery: a prospective, randomized, controlled, observer-blinded study

    Melnikov AL

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Andrey L Melnikov,1 Steinar Bjoergo,1 Ulf E Kongsgaard21Department of Anesthesiology, Division of Emergencies and Critical Care, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway; 2Department of Research and Development, Division of Emergencies and Critical Care, Oslo University Hospital and Medical Faculty, University of Oslo, Oslo, NorwayBackground and objectives: Patients undergoing abdominal surgery often receive an epidural infusion for postoperative analgesia. However, when epidural analgesia is contraindicated or unwanted, the administration of opioids is the usual means used to relieve pain. Various regional analgesia techniques used in conjunction with systemic analgesia have been reported to reduce the cumulative postoperative opioid consumption and opioid-induced side effects. The objective of this trial was to assess the effectiveness of transversus abdominis plane block and paravertebral block in women undergoing major gynecological surgery.Methods: We analyzed 58 patients scheduled for a midline vertical laparatomy due to gynecological cancer. They were all equipped with a patient-controlled postoperative analgesia pump that delivered ketobemidon. In addition, some patients were randomized to receive either a bilateral transversus abdominis plane block (n = 19 or a bilateral paravertebral block at the level of Th10 (n = 19. Both blocks were performed preoperatively as a single injection of bupivacaine.Results: Cumulative ketobemidon consumption, postoperative pain scores at rest and while coughing, and postoperative nausea and vomiting scores were assessed by a blinded observer at 2, 4, 6, 24, and 48 hours postoperatively. Both blocks were associated with significant reductions in opioid consumption and pain scores throughout the study period compared with the control patients. Postoperative nausea and vomiting scores were low in all groups, but during the early postoperative period more control group patients needed antiemetics

  5. A New Era of Minimally Invasive Surgery: Progress and Development of Major Technical Innovations in General Surgery Over the Last Decade.

    Siddaiah-Subramanya, Manjunath; Tiang, Kor Woi; Nyandowe, Masimba

    2017-10-01

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) continues to play an important role in general surgery as an alternative to traditional open surgery as well as traditional laparoscopic techniques. Since the 1980s, technological advancement and innovation have seen surgical techniques in MIS rapidly grow as it is viewed as more desirable. MIS, which includes natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) and single-incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS), is less invasive and has better cosmetic results. The technological growth and adoption of NOTES and SILS by clinicians in the last decade has however not been uniform. We look at the differences in new developments and advancement in the different techniques in the last 10 years. We also aim to explain these differences as well as the implications in general surgery for the future.

  6. An algorithmic programming approach for back pain symptoms in failed back surgery syndrome using spinal cord stimulation with a multicolumn surgically implanted epidural lead: a multicenter international prospective study.

    Rigoard, Philippe; Jacques, Line; Delmotte, Alexandre; Poon, Katherine; Munson, Russell; Monlezun, Olivier; Roulaud, Manuel; Prevost, Audrey; Guetarni, Farid; Bataille, Benoit; Kumar, Krishna

    2015-03-01

    Many studies have demonstrated the efficacy and the medical/economic value of epidural spinal cord stimulation for the treatment of "failed back surgery syndrome" (FBSS). However, the back pain component of FBSS has been recalcitrant. Recent clinical trials have suggested that multicolumn surgically implanted leads combined with enhanced programming capabilities in the newer implantable pulse generators demonstrate the ability to treat the back pain component of FBSS. The objective of our present international multicentre study is to prospectively evaluate these findings in a larger population. We conducted a prospective, nonrandomized, observational study on 76 patients with refractory FBSS, consecutively implanted with multicolumn spinal cord stimulation (SCS) between 2008 and 2011 in three neurosurgical pain management centers (Poitiers, France; Montréal, Canada; and Regina, Canada). The primary objective of this study was to prospectively analyze the effect of multicolumn lead programming on paresthesia coverage for the back pain region in these patients. The secondary objective was to assess the analgesic efficacy of this technique on the global and back pain components. Paresthesia could be induced in the lower extremities in the majority of patients with at least one of the configurations tested. Bilateral low back paresthesia was induced in 53.5% of patients, while unilateral low back paresthesia was induced in 78.9% of patients. Multicolumn configurations were statistically more effective than monocolumn configurations for all anatomic regions studied. At 6 months, 75.4% of patients receiving multicolumn stimulation (n = 57) obtained at least a 30% improvement of the back pain VAS score, while 42.1% of patients obtained at least a 50% improvement of the back pain VAS score. This study confirms the hypothesis that multicolumn SCS should be considered as an important tool in the treatment of radicular and axial pain in FBSS patients. The efficacy of this

  7. Diagnostic value of C-reactive protein to rule out infectious complications after major abdominal surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Gans, Sarah L.; Atema, Jasper J.; van Dieren, Susan; Groot Koerkamp, Bas; Boermeester, Marja A.

    2015-01-01

    Infectious complications occur frequently after major abdominal surgery and have a major influence on patient outcome and hospital costs. A marker that can rule out postoperative infectious complications (PICs) could aid patient selection for safe and early hospital discharge. C-reactive protein

  8. Application of Lean Principles to Neurosurgical Procedures: The Case of Lumbar Spinal Fusion Surgery, a Literature Review and Pilot Series.

    Liu, Jesse J; Raskin, Jeffrey S; Hardaway, Fran; Holste, Katherine; Brown, Sarah; Raslan, Ahmed M

    2018-03-14

    Delivery of higher value healthcare is an ultimate government and public goal. Improving efficiency by standardization of surgical steps can improve patient outcomes, reduce costs, and lead to higher value healthcare. Lean principles and methodology have improved timeliness in perioperative medicine; however, process mapping of surgery itself has not been performed. To apply Plan/Do/Study/Act (PDSA) cycles methodology to lumbar posterior instrumented fusion (PIF) using lean principles to create a standard work flow, identify waste, remove intraoperative variability, and examine feasibility among pilot cases. Process maps for 5 PIF procedures were created by a PDSA cycle from 1 faculty neurosurgeon at 1 institution. Plan, modularize PIF into basic components; Do, map and time components; Study, analyze results; and Act, identify waste. Waste inventories, spaghetti diagrams, and chartings of time spent per step were created. Procedural steps were broadly defined in order to compare steps despite the variability in PIF and were analyzed with box and whisker plots to evaluate variability. Temporal variabilities in duration of decompression vs closure and hardware vs closure were significantly different (P = .003). Variability in procedural step duration was smallest for closure and largest for exposure. Wastes including waiting and instrument defects accounted for 15% and 66% of all waste, respectively. This pilot series demonstrates that lean principles can standardize surgical workflows and identify waste. Though time and labor intensive, lean principles and PDSA methodology can be applied to operative steps, not just the perioperative period.

  9. Thalassemia, extramedullary hematopoiesis, and spinal cord compression: A case report.

    Bukhari, Syed Sarmad; Junaid, Muhammad; Rashid, Mamoon Ur

    2016-01-01

    Extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH) refers to hematopoiesis outside of the medulla of the bone. Chronic anemia states such as thalassemia can cause hematopoietic tissue to expand in certain locations. We report a case of spinal cord compression due to recurrent spinal epidural EMH, which was treated with a combination of surgery and radiotherapy. Pakistan has one of the highest incidence and prevalence of thalassemia in the world. We describe published literature on diagnosis and management of such cases. An 18-year-old male presented with bilateral lower limb paresis. He was a known case of homozygous beta thalassemia major. He had undergone surgery for spinal cord compression due to EMH 4 months prior to presentation. Symptom resolution was followed by deterioration 5 days later. He was operated again at our hospital with complete resection of the mass. He underwent local radiotherapy to prevent recurrence. At 2 years follow-up, he showed complete resolution of symptoms. Follow-up imaging demonstrated no residual mass. The possibility of EMH should be considered in every patient with ineffective erythropoiesis as a cause of spinal cord compression. Treatment of such cases is usually done with blood transfusions, which can reduce the hematopoietic drive for EMH. Other options include surgery, hydroxyurea, radiotherapy, or a combination of these on a case to case basis.

  10. Evaluating the Psychometric Properties and Responsiveness to Change of 3 Depression Measures in a Sample of Persons With Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury and Major Depressive Disorder.

    Williams, Ryan T; Heinemann, Allen W; Neumann, Holly Demark; Fann, Jesse R; Forchheimer, Martin; Richardson, Elizabeth J; Bombardier, Charles H

    2016-06-01

    To compare the measurement properties and responsiveness to change of the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), the Hopkins Symptom Checklist-20 (HSCL-20), and the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D) in people with spinal cord injury (SCI) diagnosed with major depressive disorder (MDD). Secondary analysis of depression symptoms measured at 6 occasions over 12 weeks as part of a randomized controlled trial of venlafaxine XR for MDD in persons with SCI. Outpatient and community settings. Individuals (N=133) consented and completed the drug trial. Eligibility criteria were age at least 18 years, traumatic SCI, and diagnosis of MDD. Venlafaxine XR. Patients completed the PHQ-9 and the HSCL-20 depression scales; clinical investigators completed the HAM-D and the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) Dissociative Disorders, which was used as a diagnostic criterion measure. All 3 instruments were improved with rating scale analysis. The HSCL-20 and the HAM-D contained items that misfit the underlying construct and that correlated weakly with the total scores. Removing these items improved the internal consistency, with floor effects increasing slightly. The HAM-D correlated most strongly with Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Dissociative Disorders diagnoses. Improvement in depression was similar on all outcome measures in both treatment and control groups. The psychometric properties of the revised depression instruments are more than adequate for routine use in adults with SCI and are responsive to clinical improvement. The PHQ-9 is the simplest instrument with measurement properties as good as or better than those of the other instruments and required the fewest modifications. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal ... Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal ...

  12. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... Animated Spinal Cord Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal ... Animated Spinal Cord Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal ...

  13. The economic implications of a multimodal analgesic regimen for patients undergoing major orthopedic surgery: a comparative study of direct costs.

    Duncan, Christopher M; Hall Long, Kirsten; Warner, David O; Hebl, James R

    2009-01-01

    Total knee and total hip arthoplasty (THA) are 2 of the most common surgical procedures performed in the United States and represent the greatest single Medicare procedural expenditure. This study was designed to evaluate the economic impact of implementing a multimodal analgesic regimen (Total Joint Regional Anesthesia [TJRA] Clinical Pathway) on the estimated direct medical costs of patients undergoing lower extremity joint replacement surgery. An economic cost comparison was performed on Mayo Clinic patients (n = 100) undergoing traditional total knee or total hip arthroplasty using the TJRA Clinical Pathway. Study patients were matched 1:1 with historical controls undergoing similar procedures using traditional anesthetic (non-TJRA) techniques. Matching criteria included age, sex, surgeon, type of procedure, and American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status (PS) classification. Hospital-based direct costs were collected for each patient and analyzed in standardized inflation-adjusted constant dollars using cost-to-charge ratios, wage indexes, and physician services valued using Medicare reimbursement rates. The estimated mean direct hospital costs were compared between groups, and a subgroup analysis was performed based on ASA PS classification. The estimated mean direct hospital costs were significantly reduced among TJRA patients when compared with controls (cost difference, 1999 dollars; 95% confidence interval, 584-3231 dollars; P = 0.0004). A significant reduction in hospital-based (Medicare Part A) costs accounted for the majority of the total cost savings. Use of a comprehensive, multimodal analgesic regimen (TJRA Clinical Pathway) in patients undergoing lower extremity joint replacement surgery provides a significant reduction in the estimated total direct medical costs. The reduction in mean cost is primarily associated with lower hospital-based (Medicare Part A) costs, with the greatest overall cost difference appearing among patients

  14. The Effects of Spinal, Inhalation, and Total Intravenous Anesthetic Techniques on Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in Arthroscopic Knee Surgery

    Müge Koşucu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To compare the effects of different anesthesia techniques on tourniquet-related ischemia-reperfusion by measuring the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA, ischemia-modified albumin (IMA and neuromuscular side effects. Methods. Sixty ASAI-II patients undergoing arthroscopic knee surgery were randomised to three groups. In Group S, intrathecal anesthesia was administered using levobupivacaine. Anesthesia was induced and maintained with sevoflurane in Group I and TIVA with propofol in Group T. Blood samples were obtained before the induction of anesthesia (t1, 30 min after tourniquet inflation (t2, immediately before (t3, and 5 min (t4, 15 min (t5, 30 min (t6, 1 h (t7, 2 h (t8, and 6 h (t9 after tourniquet release. Results. MDA and IMA levels increased significantly compared with baseline values in Group S at t2–t9 and t2–t7. MDA levels in Group T and Group I were significantly lower than those in Group S at t2–t8 and t2–t9. IMA levels in Group T were significantly lower than those in Group S at t2–t7. Postoperatively, a temporary 1/5 loss of strength in dorsiflexion of the ankle was observed in 3 patients in Group S and 1 in Group I. Conclusions. TIVA with propofol can make a positive contribution in tourniquet-related ischemia-reperfusion.

  15. Long-term outcomes of spinal cord stimulation with percutaneously introduced paddle leads in the treatment of failed back surgery syndrome and lumboischialgia.

    Logé, David; Vanneste, Sven; Vancamp, Tim; Rijckaert, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    The study aims to evaluate the long-term clinical and technical efficacy of recently developed percutaneously introducible plate electrodes for spinal cord stimulation. Twenty-one patients diagnosed with failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS) or lumboischialgia were implanted with a small profile plate-type electrode. Patients were followed-up long term and were asked at baseline, after trial, and during each follow-up visit to score their pain on a visual analog scale (VAS) for pain now, worst pain last week, least pain last week, and mean pain last week. Pain location, electrophysiologic parameters, and number of reprogrammings were collected as well. Furthermore, each patient was asked if he/she would redo the procedure post trial and at each of the follow-up visits. A total of 21 patients were prospectively followed up long term. With a mean follow-up of 40.8 months, a significant mean reduction in patient self-reported pain from baseline to postoperative of 75.79% pain reduction was seen at follow-up 1 and 62.52% at follow-up 2. A significant decrease was obtained for, respectively, pain at the present moment, VAS pain worst last week, VAS pain least last week, and VAS pain mean last week in comparison with baseline VAS scores. All patients indicated that they would redo the procedure. Percutaneous implantation of small profile paddle leads in patients with FBSS and lumboischialgia produces favorable results over the long term that are at least comparable with surgical implanted paddle leads. The percutaneous approach also allows nonsurgically trained pain physicians to introduce paddle leads. Indices like if patients would redo the procedure may be more appropriate for analyzing long-term outcomes than the arbitrarily taking 50% reduction in VAS scores. © 2013 International Neuromodulation Society.

  16. Spinal pain

    Izzo, R.; Popolizio, T.; D’Aprile, P.; Muto, M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Purpose of this review is to address the current concepts on the pathophysiology of discogenic, radicular, facet and dysfunctional spinal pain, focusing on the role of the imaging in the diagnostic setting, to potentially address a correct approach also to minimally invasive interventional techniques. • Special attention will be given to the discogenic pain, actually considered as the most frequent cause of chronic low back pain. • The correct distinction between referred pain and radicular pain contributes to give a more correct approach to spinal pain. • The pathogenesis of chronic pain renders this pain a true pathology requiring a specific management. - Abstract: The spinal pain, and expecially the low back pain (LBP), represents the second cause for a medical consultation in primary care setting and a leading cause of disability worldwide [1]. LBP is more often idiopathic. It has as most frequent cause the internal disc disruption (IDD) and is referred to as discogenic pain. IDD refers to annular fissures, disc collapse and mechanical failure, with no significant modification of external disc shape, with or without endplates changes. IDD is described as a separate clinical entity in respect to disc herniation, segmental instability and degenerative disc desease (DDD). The radicular pain has as most frequent causes a disc herniation and a canal stenosis. Both discogenic and radicular pain also have either a mechanical and an inflammatory genesis. For to be richly innervated, facet joints can be a direct source of pain, while for their degenerative changes cause compression of nerve roots in lateral recesses and in the neural foramina. Degenerative instability is a common and often misdiagnosed cause of axial and radicular pain, being also a frequent indication for surgery. Acute pain tends to extinguish along with its cause, but the setting of complex processes of peripheral and central sensitization may influence its evolution in chronic

  17. Spinal pain

    Izzo, R., E-mail: roberto1766@interfree.it [Neuroradiology Department, A. Cardarelli Hospital, Naples (Italy); Popolizio, T., E-mail: t.popolizio1@gmail.com [Radiology Department, Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza Hospital, San Giovanni Rotondo (Fg) (Italy); D’Aprile, P., E-mail: paoladaprile@yahoo.it [Neuroradiology Department, San Paolo Hospital, Bari (Italy); Muto, M., E-mail: mutomar@tiscali.it [Neuroradiology Department, A. Cardarelli Hospital, Napoli (Italy)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Purpose of this review is to address the current concepts on the pathophysiology of discogenic, radicular, facet and dysfunctional spinal pain, focusing on the role of the imaging in the diagnostic setting, to potentially address a correct approach also to minimally invasive interventional techniques. • Special attention will be given to the discogenic pain, actually considered as the most frequent cause of chronic low back pain. • The correct distinction between referred pain and radicular pain contributes to give a more correct approach to spinal pain. • The pathogenesis of chronic pain renders this pain a true pathology requiring a specific management. - Abstract: The spinal pain, and expecially the low back pain (LBP), represents the second cause for a medical consultation in primary care setting and a leading cause of disability worldwide [1]. LBP is more often idiopathic. It has as most frequent cause the internal disc disruption (IDD) and is referred to as discogenic pain. IDD refers to annular fissures, disc collapse and mechanical failure, with no significant modification of external disc shape, with or without endplates changes. IDD is described as a separate clinical entity in respect to disc herniation, segmental instability and degenerative disc desease (DDD). The radicular pain has as most frequent causes a disc herniation and a canal stenosis. Both discogenic and radicular pain also have either a mechanical and an inflammatory genesis. For to be richly innervated, facet joints can be a direct source of pain, while for their degenerative changes cause compression of nerve roots in lateral recesses and in the neural foramina. Degenerative instability is a common and often misdiagnosed cause of axial and radicular pain, being also a frequent indication for surgery. Acute pain tends to extinguish along with its cause, but the setting of complex processes of peripheral and central sensitization may influence its evolution in chronic

  18. Quality of life before reconstructive breast surgery: A preoperative comparison of patients with immediate, delayed, and major revision reconstruction.

    Rosson, Gedge D; Shridharani, Sachin M; Magarakis, Michael; Manahan, Michele A; Basdag, Basak; Gilson, Marta M; Pusic, Andrea L

    2013-05-01

    Women undergo breast reconstruction at different time-points in their cancer care; knowing patients' preoperative quality of life (QoL) is critical in the overall care of the patient with breast cancer. Our objective was to describe presurgical QoL among women undergoing immediate, delayed, or major revision breast reconstructive surgery at our institution. From March 2008 to February 2009, we administered preoperative BREAST-Q questionnaires to women who presented to our institution for breast reconstruction. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to compare patient cohorts across multiple QoL domains including body image, physical well-being, psychosocial well-being, and sexual well-being. Of the 231 patients who presented for preoperative consultation, 176 returned the questionnaire (response rate 76%; 117 from the immediate, 21 from the delayed, and 32 from the major revision reconstruction groups, plus 6 mixed or unknown). The three groups differed significantly (P < 0.05) across four of the six domains: body image (satisfaction with breasts), psychosocial well-being, sexual well-being, and physical well-being of the chest and upper body. The immediate reconstruction group had higher (better) scores than the delayed reconstruction group, which had higher (better) scores than the major revision group. These data suggest that women presenting for breast reconstruction at different stages of reconstruction have different baseline QoL. Such data may help us better understand patient selection, education, and expectations, and may lead to improved patient-surgeon communication. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Spinal Cord Stimulation

    Meier, Kaare

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is a surgical treatment for chronic neuropathic pain that is refractory to other treatment. Originally described by Shealy et al. in 1967(1), it is used to treat a range of conditions such as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS I)(2), angina pectoris(3), radicular...... pain after failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS)(4), pain due to peripheral nerve injury, stump pain(5), peripheral vascular disease(6) and diabetic neuropathy(7,8); whereas phantom pain(9), postherpetic neuralgia(10), chronic visceral pain(11), and pain after partial spinal cord injury(12) remain more...

  20. Shortened preoperative fasting time to allow oral rehydration solution clear liquid up to two hours before elective major surgery in adults

    Shah, J.N.; Maharjan, S.; Curung, R.

    2018-01-01

    To generate evidence of feasibility to allow clear liquid 2 hours before elective surgery. Study Design: Cross-sectional observational study. Place and Duration of Study: The Department of Surgery, Patan Hospital, Patan Academy of Health Sciences, Nepal, from October to December 2016. Methodology: One hundred consecutive adult elective major surgery patients of American Society of Anesthesiologist criteria 1 or 2 were enrolled. The protocol was discussed with patients, nurses, anesthetists and surgeons to allow 500 ml clear liquid (ORS) up to 0600 hours on the day of surgery to maintain minimum of 2 hours (h) nil per os (NPO) before surgery. Compliance, discomfort, nausea and vomiting were observed. Institutional review committee approved the study. Microsoft excel was used for descriptive analysis. Results: All 100 patients completed the protocol of shortened fasting time. Two patients had incomplete records and were excluded from analysis. Among the 98 patients analysed, age was 48 +-12.38 years with 74 females (75.51% of 98). There were 68 gastrointestinal, 20 urosurgery and 10 others surgeries. There was no discomfort, nausea or vomiting reported due to ORS 2-h before elective surgery. Conclusion: Preoperative clear liquid up to 2-h before elective surgery in adults is feasible and safe in our set-up to shorten the fasting time. (author)

  1. Osteoporosis and the Management of Spinal Degenerative Disease (II)

    Tomé-Bermejo, Félix; Piñera, Angel R.; Alvarez, Luis

    2017-01-01

    Osteoporosis has become a major medical problem as the aged population of the world rapidly grows. Osteoporosis predisposes patients to fracture, progressive spinal deformities, and stenosis, and is subject to be a major concern before performing spine surgery, especially with bone fusions and instrumentation. Osteoporosis has often been considered a contraindication for spinal surgery, while in some instances patients have undergone limited and inadequate procedures in order to avoid concomitant instrumentation. As the population ages and the expectations of older patients increase, the demand for surgical treatment in older patients with osteoporosis and spinal degenerative diseases becomes progressively more important. Nowadays, advances in surgical and anesthetic technology make it possible to operate successfully on elderly patients who no longer accept disabling physical conditions. This article discusses the biomechanics of the osteoporotic spine, the diagnosis and management of osteoporotic patients with spinal conditions, as well as the novel treatments, recommendations, surgical indications, strategies and instrumentation in patients with osteoporosis who need spine operations. PMID:29299490

  2. Spinal cord ischemia following thoracotomy without epidural anesthesia.

    Raz, Aeyal; Avramovich, Aharon; Saraf-Lavi, Efrat; Saute, Milton; Eidelman, Leonid A

    2006-06-01

    Paraplegia is an uncommon yet devastating complication following thoracotomy, usually caused by compression or ischemia of the spinal cord. Ischemia without compression may be a result of global ischemia, vascular injury and other causes. Epidural anesthesia has been implicated as a major cause. This report highlights the fact that perioperative cord ischemia and paraplegia may be unrelated to epidural intervention. A 71-yr-old woman was admitted for a left upper lobectomy for resection of a non-small cell carcinoma of the lung. The patient refused epidural catheter placement and underwent a left T5-6 thoracotomy under general anesthesia. During surgery, she was hemodynamically stable and good oxygen saturation was maintained. Several hours following surgery the patient complained of loss of sensation in her legs. Neurological examination disclosed a complete motor and sensory block at the T5-6 level. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed spinal cord ischemia. The patient received iv steroid treatment, but remained paraplegic. Five months following the surgery there was only partial improvement in her motor symptoms. A follow-up MRI study was consistent with a diagnosis of spinal cord ischemia. In this case of paraplegia following thoracic surgery for lung resection, epidural anesthesia/analgesia was not used. The MRI demonstrated evidence of spinal cord ischemia, and no evidence of cord compression. This case highlights that etiologies other than epidural intervention, such as injury to the spinal segmental arteries during thoracotomy, should be considered as potential causes of cord ischemia and resultant paraplegia in this surgical population.

  3. A pragmatic multi-centre randomised controlled trial of fluid loading and level of dependency in high-risk surgical patients undergoing major elective surgery: trial protocol

    Norrie John

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients undergoing major elective or urgent surgery are at high risk of death or significant morbidity. Measures to reduce this morbidity and mortality include pre-operative optimisation and use of higher levels of dependency care after surgery. We propose a pragmatic multi-centre randomised controlled trial of level of dependency and pre-operative fluid therapy in high-risk surgical patients undergoing major elective surgery. Methods/Design A multi-centre randomised controlled trial with a 2 * 2 factorial design. The first randomisation is to pre-operative fluid therapy or standard regimen and the second randomisation is to routine intensive care versus high dependency care during the early post-operative period. We intend to recruit 204 patients undergoing major elective and urgent abdominal and thoraco-abdominal surgery who fulfil high-risk surgical criteria. The primary outcome for the comparison of level of care is cost-effectiveness at six months and for the comparison of fluid optimisation is the number of hospital days after surgery. Discussion We believe that the results of this study will be invaluable in determining the future care and clinical resource utilisation for this group of patients and thus will have a major impact on clinical practice. Trial Registration Trial registration number - ISRCTN32188676

  4. The use of LiDCO based fluid management in patients undergoing hip fracture surgery under spinal anaesthesia: Neck of femur optimisation therapy - targeted stroke volume (NOTTS: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Moran Chris G

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Approximately 70,000 patients/year undergo surgery for repair of a fractured hip in the United Kingdom. This is associated with 30-day mortality of 9% and survivors have a considerable length of acute hospital stay postoperatively (median 26 days. Use of oesophageal Doppler monitoring to guide intra-operative fluid administration in hip fracture repair has previously been associated with a reduction in hospital stay of 4-5 days. Most hip fracture surgery is now performed under spinal anaesthesia. Oesophageal Doppler monitoring may be unreliable in the presence of spinal anaesthesia and most patients would not tolerate the probes. An alternative method of guiding fluid administration (minimally-invasive arterial pulse contour analysis has been shown to reduce length of stay in high-risk surgical patients but has never been studied in hip fracture surgery. Methods Single-centre randomised controlled parallel group trial. Randomisation by website using computer generated concealed tables. Setting: University hospital in UK. Participants: 128 patients with acute primary hip fracture listed for operative repair under spinal anaesthesia and aged > 65 years. Intervention: Stroke volume guided intra-operative fluid management. Continuous measurement of SV recorded by a calibrated cardiac output monitor (LiDCOplus. Maintenance fluid and 250 ml colloid boluses given to achieve sustained 10% increases in stroke volume. Control group: fluid administration at the responsible (blinded anaesthetist's discretion. The intervention terminates at the end of the surgical procedure and post-operative fluid management is at the responsible anaesthetist's discretion. Primary outcome: length of acute hospital stay is determined by a blinded team of clinicians. Secondary outcomes include number of complications and total cost of care. Funding NIHR/RfPB: PB-PG-0407-13073. Trial registration number Trial registration: Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN

  5. Global incidence and case fatality rate of pulmonary embolism following major surgery: a protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies.

    Temgoua, Mazou N; Tochie, Joel Noutakdie; Noubiap, Jean Jacques; Agbor, Valirie Ndip; Danwang, Celestin; Endomba, Francky Teddy A; Nkemngu, Njinkeng J

    2017-12-04

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a life-threatening condition common after major surgery. Although the high incidence (0.3-30%) and mortality rate (16.9-31%) of PE in patients undergoing major surgical procedures is apparent from findings of contemporary observational studies, there is a lack of a summary and meta-analysis data on the epidemiology of postoperative PE in this same regard. Hence, we propose to conduct the first systematic review to summarise existing data on the global incidence, determinants and case fatality rate of PE following major surgery. Electronic databases including MEDLINE, EMBASE, SCOPUS, WHO global health library (including LILACS), Web of Science and Google scholar from inception to April 30, 2017, will be searched for cohort studies reporting on the incidence, determinants and case fatality rate of PE occurring after major surgery. Data from grey literature will also be assessed. Two investigators will independently perform study selection and data extraction. Included studies will be evaluated for risk of bias. Appropriate meta-analytic methods will be used to pool incidence and case fatality rate estimates from studies with identical features, globally and by subgroups of major surgical procedures. Random-effects and risk ratio with 95% confidence interval will be used to summarise determinants and predictors of mortality of PE in patients undergoing major surgery. This systematic review and meta-analysis will provide the most up-to-date epidemiology of PE in patients undergoing major surgery to inform health authorities and identify further research topics based on the remaining knowledge gaps. PROSPERO CRD42017065126.

  6. Thromboprophylaxis With Apixaban in Patients Undergoing Major Orthopedic Surgery: Meta-Analysis and Trial-Sequential Analysis

    Daniel Caldeira

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Venous thromboembolism (VTE is a potentially fatal complication of orthopedic surgery, and until recently, few antithrombotic compounds were available for postoperative thromboprophylaxis. The introduction of the non–vitamin K antagonists oral anticoagulants (NOAC, including apixaban, has extended the therapeutic armamentarium in this field. Therefore, estimation of NOAC net clinical benefit in comparison with the established treatment is needed to inform clinical decision making. Objectives: Systematic review to assess the efficacy and safety of apixaban 2.5 mg twice a day versus low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWH for thromboprophylaxis in patients undergoing knee or hip replacement. Data sources: MEDLINE, Embase, and CENTRAL were searched from inception to September 2016, other systematic reviews, reference lists, and experts were consulted. Study eligibility criteria, participants, and intervention: All major orthopedic surgery randomized controlled trials comparing apixaban 2.5 mg twice daily with LMWH, reporting thrombotic and bleeding events. Data extraction: Two independent reviewers, using a predetermined form. Study appraisal and synthesis methods: The Cochrane tool to assess risk bias was used by two independent authors. RevMan software was used to estimate pooled risk ratio (RR and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI using random-effects meta-analysis. Trial sequential analysis (TSA was performed in statistical significant results to evaluate whether cumulative sample size was powered for the obtained effect. Overall confidence in cumulative evidence was assessed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE Working Group methodology. Results: Four studies comparing apixaban 2.5 mg twice daily with LMWH were included, with a total of 11.828 patients (55% undergoing knee and 45% hip replacement. The overall risk of bias across studies was low. In comparison with LMWH (all regimens

  7. Multicolumn spinal cord stimulation for significant low back pain in failed back surgery syndrome: design of a national, multicentre, randomized, controlled health economics trial (ESTIMET Study).

    Roulaud, M; Durand-Zaleski, I; Ingrand, P; Serrie, A; Diallo, B; Peruzzi, P; Hieu, P D; Voirin, J; Raoul, S; Page, P; Fontaine, D; Lantéri-Minet, M; Blond, S; Buisset, N; Cuny, E; Cadenne, M; Caire, F; Ranoux, D; Mertens, P; Naous, H; Simon, E; Emery, E; Gadan, B; Regis, J; Sol, J-C; Béraud, G; Debiais, F; Durand, G; Guetarni Ging, F; Prévost, A; Brandet, C; Monlezun, O; Delmotte, A; d'Houtaud, S; Bataille, B; Rigoard, P

    2015-03-01

    Many studies have demonstrated the efficacy of spinal cord stimulation (SCS) for chronic neuropathic radicular pain over recent decades, but despite global favourable outcomes in failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS) with leg pain, the back pain component remains poorly controlled by neurostimulation. Technological and scientific progress has led to the development of new SCS leads, comprising a multicolumn design and a greater number of contacts. The efficacy of multicolumn SCS lead configurations for the treatment of the back pain component of FBSS has recently been suggested by pilot studies. However, a randomized controlled trial must be conducted to confirm the efficacy of new generation multicolumn SCS. Évaluation médico-économique de la STImulation MEdullaire mulTi-colonnes (ESTIMET) is a multicentre, randomized study designed to compare the clinical efficacy and health economics aspects of mono- vs. multicolumn SCS lead programming in FBSS patients with radicular pain and significant back pain. FBSS patients with a radicular pain VAS score≥50mm, associated with a significant back pain component were recruited in 14 centres in France and implanted with multicolumn SCS. Before the lead implantation procedure, they were 1:1 randomized to monocolumn SCS (group 1) or multicolumn SCS (group 2). Programming was performed using only one column for group 1 and full use of the 3 columns for group 2. Outcome assessment was performed at baseline (pre-implantation), and 1, 3, 6 and 12months post-implantation. The primary outcome measure was a reduction of the severity of low back pain (bVAS reduction≥50%) at the 6-month visit. Additional outcome measures were changes in global pain, leg pain, paraesthesia coverage mapping, functional capacities, quality of life, neuropsychological aspects, patient satisfaction and healthcare resource consumption. Trial recruitment started in May 2012. As of September 2013, all 14 study centres have been initiated and 112

  8. Diagnostic value of C-reactive protein to rule out infectious complications after major abdominal surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Gans, Sarah L; Atema, Jasper J; van Dieren, Susan; Groot Koerkamp, Bas; Boermeester, Marja A

    2015-07-01

    Infectious complications occur frequently after major abdominal surgery and have a major influence on patient outcome and hospital costs. A marker that can rule out postoperative infectious complications (PICs) could aid patient selection for safe and early hospital discharge. C-reactive protein (CRP) is a widely available, fast, and cheap marker that might be of value in detecting PIC. Present meta-analysis evaluates the diagnostic value of CRP to rule out PIC following major abdominal surgery, aiding patient selection for early discharge. A systematic literature search of Medline, PubMed, and Cochrane was performed identifying all prospective studies evaluating the diagnostic value of CRP after abdominal surgery. Meta-analysis was performed according to the PRISMA statement. Twenty-two studies were included for qualitative analysis of which 16 studies were eligible for meta-analysis, representing 2215 patients. Most studies analyzed the value of CRP in colorectal surgery (eight studies). The pooled negative predictive value (NPV) improved each day after surgery up to 90% at postoperative day (POD) 3 for a pooled CRP cutoff of 159 mg/L (range 92-200). Maximum predictive values for PICs were reached on POD 5 for a pooled CRP cutoff of 114 mg/L (range 48-150): a pooled sensitivity of 86% (95% confidence interval (CI) 79-91%), specificity of 86% (95% CI 75-92%), and a positive predictive value of 64% (95% CI 49-77%). The pooled sensitivity and specificity were significantly higher on POD 5 than on other PODs (p < 0.001). Infectious complications after major abdominal surgery are very unlikely in patients with a CRP below 159 mg/L on POD 3. This can aid patient selection for safe and early hospital discharge and prevent overuse of imaging.

  9. Continuous spinal anesthesia.

    Moore, James M

    2009-01-01

    Continuous spinal anesthesia (CSA) is an underutilized technique in modern anesthesia practice. Compared with other techniques of neuraxial anesthesia, CSA allows incremental dosing of an intrathecal local anesthetic for an indefinite duration, whereas traditional single-shot spinal anesthesia usually involves larger doses, a finite, unpredictable duration, and greater potential for detrimental hemodynamic effects including hypotension, and epidural anesthesia via a catheter may produce lesser motor block and suboptimal anesthesia in sacral nerve root distributions. This review compares CSA with other anesthetic techniques and also describes the history of CSA, its clinical applications, concerns regarding neurotoxicity, and other pharmacologic implications of its use. CSA has seen a waxing and waning of its popularity in clinical practice since its initial description in 1907. After case reports of cauda equina syndrome were reported with the use of spinal microcatheters for CSA, these microcatheters were withdrawn from clinical practice in the United States but continued to be used in Europe with no further neurologic sequelae. Because only large-bore catheters may be used in the United States, CSA is usually reserved for elderly patients out of concern for the risk of postdural puncture headache in younger patients. However, even in younger patients, sometimes the unique clinical benefits and hemodynamic stability involved in CSA outweigh concerns regarding postdural puncture headache. Clinical scenarios in which CSA may be of particular benefit include patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing lower extremity surgery and obstetric patients with complex heart disease. CSA is an underutilized technique in modern anesthesia practice. Perhaps more accurately termed fractional spinal anesthesia, CSA involves intermittent dosing of local anesthetic solution via an intrathecal catheter. Where traditional spinal anesthesia involves a single injection with a

  10. An observational study of the frequency, severity, and etiology of failures in postoperative care after major elective general surgery.

    Symons, Nicholas R A; Almoudaris, Alex M; Nagpal, Kamal; Vincent, Charles A; Moorthy, Krishna

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the nature of process failures in postoperative care, to assess their frequency and preventability, and to explore their relationship to adverse events. Adverse events are common and are frequently caused by failures in the process of care. These processes are often evaluated independently using clinical audit. There is little understanding of process failures in terms of their overall frequency, relative risk, and cumulative effect on the surgical patient. Patients were observed daily from the first postoperative day until discharge by an independent surgeon. Field notes on the circumstances surrounding any nonroutine or atypical event were recorded. Field notes were assessed by 2 surgeons to identify failures in the process of care. Preventability, the degree of harm caused to the patient, and the underlying etiology of process failures were evaluated by 2 independent surgeons. Fifty patients undergoing major elective general surgery were observed for a total of 659 days of postoperative care. A total of 256 process failures were identified, of which 85% were preventable and 51% directly led to patient harm. Process failures occurred in all aspects of care, the most frequent being medication prescribing and administration, management of lines, tubes, and drains, and pain control interventions. Process failures accounted for 57% of all preventable adverse events. Communication failures and delays were the main etiologies, leading to 54% of process failures. Process failures are common in postoperative care, are highly preventable, and frequently cause harm to patients. Interventions to prevent process failures will improve the reliability of surgical postoperative care and have the potential to reduce hospital stay.

  11. The effect of aprotinin, tranexamic acid, and aminocaproic acid on blood loss and use of blood products in major pediatric surgery : A meta-analysis

    Schouten, Esther S.; van de Pol, Alma C.; Schouten, Anton N. J.; Turner, Nigel M.; Jansen, Nicolaas J. G.; Bollen, Casper W.

    Objective: Aprotinin reduces the blood loss and transfusion of blood products in children undergoing major surgery. Aprotinin has been associated with severe side effects in adults, and tranexamic acid and aminocaproic acid have been found to be safer alternatives in adults. This systematic review

  12. Displacement of popliteal sciatic nerve catheters after major foot and ankle surgery: a randomized controlled double-blinded magnetic resonance imaging study

    Hauritz, R W; Pedersen, E M; Linde, F S

    2016-01-01

    Popliteal sciatic nerve catheters (PSNCs) are associated with a high frequency of displacement. We aimed to estimate the frequency of catheter displacement after 48 h with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with PSNCs after major foot and ankle surgery randomized to catheter insertion e...

  13. Postoperative analgesia with intramuscular morphine at fixed rate versus epidural morphine or sufentanil and bupivacaine in patients undergoing major abdominal surgery

    Broekema, AA; Veen, A; Fidler, [No Value; Gielen, MJM; Hennis, PJ

    1998-01-01

    We assessed the efficacy and side effects of postoperative analgesia with three different pain regimens in 90 patients undergoing major abdominal surgery. The patients were randomly assigned to one of three groups: epidural morphine (EM) or sufentanil (ES), both combined with bupivacaine, or IM

  14. Addition of Liposome Bupivacaine to Bupivacaine HCl Versus Bupivacaine HCl Alone for Interscalene Brachial Plexus Block in Patients Having Major Shoulder Surgery

    Vandepitte, C.; Kuroda, M.; Witvrouw, R.; Anne, L.; Bellemans, J.; Corten, K.; Vanelderen, P.J.; Mesotten, D.; Leunen, I.; Heylen, M.; Boxstael, S. Van; Golebiewski, M.; Velde, M. van de; Knezevic, N.N.; Hadzic, A.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: We examined whether liposome bupivacaine (Exparel) given in the interscalene brachial plexus block lowers pain in the setting of multimodal postoperative pain management for major shoulder surgery. METHODS: Fifty-two adult patients were randomized to receive either 5 mL of

  15. Effect of perioperative beta blockade in patients with diabetes undergoing major non-cardiac surgery: randomised placebo controlled, blinded multicentre trial

    Juul, Anne Benedicte; Wetterslev, Jørn; Gluud, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the long term effects of perioperative blockade on mortality and cardiac morbidity in patients with diabetes undergoing major non-cardiac surgery. Design Randomised placebo controlled and blinded multicentre trial. Analyses were by intention to treat. Setting University...

  16. Effect of preoperative angina pectoris on cardiac outcomes in patients with previous myocardial infarction undergoing major noncardiac surgery (data from ACS-NSQIP).

    Pandey, Ambarish; Sood, Akshay; Sammon, Jesse D; Abdollah, Firas; Gupta, Ena; Golwala, Harsh; Bardia, Amit; Kibel, Adam S; Menon, Mani; Trinh, Quoc-Dien

    2015-04-15

    The impact of preoperative stable angina pectoris on postoperative cardiovascular outcomes in patients with previous myocardial infarction (MI) who underwent major noncardiac surgery is not well studied. We studied patients with previous MI who underwent elective major noncardiac surgeries within the American College of Surgeons-National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (2005 to 2011). Primary outcome was occurrence of an adverse cardiac event (MI and/or cardiac arrest). Multivariable logistic regression models evaluated the impact of stable angina on outcomes. Of 1,568 patients (median age 70 years; 35% women) with previous MI who underwent major noncardiac surgery, 5.5% had postoperative MI and/or cardiac arrest. Patients with history of preoperative angina had significantly greater incidence of primary outcome compared to those without anginal symptoms (8.4% vs 5%, p = 0.035). In secondary outcomes, reintervention rates (22.5% vs 11%, p angina. In multivariable analyses, preoperative angina was a significant predictor for postoperative MI (odds ratio 2.49 [1.20 to 5.58]) and reintervention (odds ratio 2.40 [1.44 to 3.82]). In conclusion, our study indicates that preoperative angina is an independent predictor for adverse outcomes in patients with previous MI who underwent major noncardiac surgery, and cautions against overreliance on predictive tools, for example, the Revised Cardiac Risk Index, in these patients, which does not treat stable angina and previous MI as independent risk factors during risk prognostication. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Enhanced Morbidity of Pectoralis Major Myocutaneous Flap Used for Salvage after Previously Failed Oncological Treatment and Unsuccessful Reconstructive Head and Neck Surgery

    Christiana Maria Ribeiro Salles Vanni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The reconstruction of complex cervicofacial defects arising from surgical treatment for cancer is a real challenge for head and neck surgeons, especially in salvage reconstruction surgery and/or failed previous reconstruction. The pectoralis major myocutaneous flap (PMMF has been widely used in these specific situations due to its reliability and low rate of failure or complications. Objectives. Identify factors that determine complications and influence the final outcome of the reconstructions with PMMF in salvage cancer surgery or in salvage reconstruction. Methods. A cross-sectional study design was used to evaluate a sample including 17 surgical patients treated over a period of ten years that met the inclusion criteria. Results. Reconstruction was successful in 13 cases (76.5%, with two cases of partial flap loss and no case of total loss. Complications occurred in 13 cases (76.5% and were specifically related to the flap in nine instances (52.9%. An association was identified between the development of major complications and reconstruction of the hypopharynx (=0.013 as well as in patients submitted to surgery in association with radiation therapy as a previous cancer treatment (=0.002. The former condition is also associated with major reconstruction failure (=0.018. An even lower incidence of major complications was noted in patients under the age of 53 (=0.044. Conclusion. Older patients, with hypopharyngeal defects and submitted to previous surgery plus radiation therapy, presented a higher risk of complications and reconstruction failure with PMMF.

  18. Should continuous rather than single-injection interscalene block be routinely offered for major shoulder surgery? A meta-analysis of the analgesic and side-effects profiles.

    Vorobeichik, L; Brull, R; Bowry, R; Laffey, J G; Abdallah, F W

    2018-04-01

    Major shoulder surgery is associated with moderate-to-severe pain, but consensus on the optimal analgesic approach is lacking. Continuous catheter-based interscalene block (CISB) prolongs the analgesic benefits of its single-injection counterpart (SISB), but concerns over CISB complications and difficulties in interpreting comparative evidence examining major and minor shoulder procedures simultaneously, despite their differences in postoperative pain, have limited CISB popularity. This meta-analysis evaluates the CISB analgesic role and complications compared with SISB for major shoulder surgery. We retrieved randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the effects of CISB to SISB on analgesic outcomes and side-effects after major shoulder surgery. Postoperative opioid consumption at 24 h was designated as the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes included 24-48 h opioid consumption, postoperative rest and dynamic pain scores up to 72 h, time-to-first analgesic, recovery room and hospital stay durations, patient satisfaction, postoperative nausea and vomiting, respiratory function, and block-related complications. Data from 15 RCTs were pooled using random-effects modelling. Compared with SISB, CISB reduced 24- and 48-h oral morphine consumption by a weighted mean difference [95% confidence interval] of 50.9 mg [-81.6, -20.2], (P=0.001) and 44.7 mg [-80.9, -8.7], (Pshoulder surgery, without increasing side-effects, compared with SISB. The importance of CISB-related changes in respiratory indices is questionable. Copyright © 2017 British Journal of Anaesthesia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Antimicrobial prophylaxis for major head and neck surgery in cancer patients: sulbactam-ampicillin versus clindamycin-amikacin.

    Phan, M; Van der Auwera, P; Andry, G; Aoun, M; Chantrain, G; Deraemaecker, R; Dor, P; Daneau, D; Ewalenko, P; Meunier, F

    1992-09-01

    A total of 99 patients with head and neck cancer who were to undergo surgery were randomized in a prospective comparative study of sulbactam-ampicillin (1:2 ratio; four doses of 3 g of ampicillin and 1.5 g of sulbactam intravenously [i.v.] every 6 h) versus clindamycin (four doses of 600 mg i.v. every 6 h)-amikacin (two doses of 500 mg i.v. every 12 h) as prophylaxis starting at the induction of anesthesia. The two groups of evaluable patients (43 in the clindamycin-amikacin treatment group and 42 in the sulbactam-ampicillin treatment group) were comparable as far as age (mean, 57 years; range, 21 to 84 years), sex ratio (71 males, 28 females), weight (mean, 66 kg; range, 40 to 69 kg), indication for surgery (first surgery, 48 patients; recurrence, 37 patients), previous anticancer treatment (surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy), type of surgery, and stage of cancer. The overall infection rate (wound, bacteremia, and bronchopneumonia) within 20 days after surgery was 20 patients in each group. Wound infections occurred in 14 (33%) sulbactam-ampicillin-treated patients and 9 (21%) clindamycin-amikacin-treated patients (P = 0.19; not significant). The rates of bacteremia were 2 and 4%, respectively. The rates of bronchopneumonia were 14.3 and 23.2%, respectively (P was not significant). Most infections were polymicrobial, but strict anaerobes were recovered only from patients who received sulbactam-ampicillin. Antimicrobial treatment was required within 20 days after surgery for 42% of the sulbactam-ampicillin-treated patients and 44% of the clindamycin-amikacin-treated patients. By comparison with previous studies, we observed a decreased efficacy of antimicrobial prophylaxis in patients with head and neck cancer undergoing surgery because of the increased proportion of patients who were at very high risk for infection (extensive excision and plastic reconstruction in patients with recurrent stage III and IV cancers) and because of the longer duration of

  20. Predictors of surgical site infections among patients undergoing major surgery at Bugando Medical Centre in Northwestern Tanzania

    Imirzalioglu Can

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surgical site infection (SSI continues to be a major source of morbidity and mortality in developing countries despite recent advances in aseptic techniques. There is no baseline information regarding SSI in our setting therefore it was necessary to conduct this study to establish the prevalence, pattern and predictors of surgical site infection at Bugando Medical Centre Mwanza (BMC, Tanzania. Methods This was a cross-sectional prospective study involving all patients who underwent major surgery in surgical wards between July 2009 and March 2010. After informed written consent for the study and HIV testing, all patients who met inclusion criteria were consecutively enrolled into the study. Pre-operative, intra-operative and post operative data were collected using standardized data collection form. Wound specimens were collected and processed as per standard operative procedures; and susceptibility testing was done using disc diffusion technique. Data were analyzed using SPSS software version 15 and STATA. Results Surgical site infection (SSI was detected in 65 (26.0% patients, of whom 56 (86.2% and 9 (13.8% had superficial and deep SSI respectively. Among 65 patients with clinical SSI, 56(86.2% had positive aerobic culture. Staphylococcus aureus was the predominant organism 16/56 (28.6%; of which 3/16 (18.8% were MRSA. This was followed by Escherichia coli 14/56 (25% and Klebsiella pneumoniae 10/56 (17.9%. Among the Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates 9(64.3% and 8(80% were ESBL producers respectively. A total of 37/250 (14.8% patients were HIV positive with a mean CD4 count of 296 cells/ml. Using multivariate logistic regression analysis, presence of pre-morbid illness (OR = 6.1, use of drain (OR = 15.3, use of iodine alone in skin preparation (OR = 17.6, duration of operation ≥ 3 hours (OR = 3.2 and cigarette smoking (OR = 9.6 significantly predicted surgical site infection (SSI Conclusion SSI is common

  1. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available menu Understanding Spinal Cord Injury What is a Spinal Cord Injury Levels of Injury and What They Mean Animated Spinal Cord Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal ...

  2. Spinal surgery: non surgical complications

    Adele

    surgical procedure). Arterial cannulation ... Acute retinal necrosis syndrome after epidural corticos- teroid injections ... prevented, or respond to early recognition and treatment. ..... drugs should only be administered if there are no alternatives.

  3. Spinal surgery - cervical - series (image)

    ... problems include: pain that interferes with daily activities neck pain that extends (radiates) to the shoulder or arm ... done while the patient is deep asleep and pain-free (general anesthesia). For the neck (cervical spine), an incision may be made either in ...

  4. Mobile myelographic filling defects: Spinal cysticercosis

    Savoiardo, M.; Cimino, C.; Passerini, A.; La Mantia, L.

    1986-03-01

    Cysticercosis usually affects the brain and is easily demonstrated by CT. Spinal cysticercosis is much rarer and is usually diagnosed only at surgery. Myelographic demonstration of multiple rounded filling defects, some of which were mobile, allowed diagnosis of spinal extramedullary cysticercosis in an unsuspected case. The literature on spinal cysticercosis is briefly reviewed. Diagnosis is important in view of the recent development of medical treatment.

  5. Value of a step-up diagnosis plan: CRP and CT-scan to diagnose and manage postoperative complications after major abdominal surgery

    Jennifer Straatman

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative complications frequently follow major abdominal surgery and are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Early diagnosis and treatment of complications is associated with improved patient outcome. In this study we assessed the value of a step-up diagnosis plan by C-reactive protein and CT-scan (computed tomography-scan imaging for detection of postoperative complications following major abdominal surgery. An observational cohort study was conducted of 399 consecutive patients undergoing major abdominal surgery between January 2009 and January 2011. Indication for operation, type of surgery, postoperative morbidity, complications according to the Clavien-Dindo classification and mortality were recorded. Clinical parameters were recorded until 14 days postoperatively or until discharge. Regular C-reactive protein (CPR measurements in peripheral blood and on indication -enhanced CT-scans were performed. Eighty-three out of 399 (20.6 % patients developed a major complication in the postoperative course after a median of seven days (IQR 4-9 days. One hundred and thirty two patients received additional examination consisting of enhanced CT-scan imaging, and treatment by surgical reintervention or intensive care observation. CRP levels were significantly higher in patients with postoperative complications. On the second postoperative day CRP levels were on average 197.4 mg/L in the uncomplicated group, 220.9 mg/L in patients with a minor complication and 280.1 mg/L in patients with major complications (p < 0,001. CT-scan imaging showed a sensitivity of 91.7 % and specificity of 100 % in diagnosis of major complications. Based on clinical deterioration and the increase of CRP, an additional enhanced CT-scan offered clear discrimination between patients with major abdominal complications and uncomplicated patients. Adequate treatment could then be accomplished.

  6. Retrospective analysis of surgery and trans-arterial embolization for major non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Griffiths, Ewen A; McDonald, Chris R; Bryant, Robert V; Devitt, Peter G; Bright, Tim; Holloway, Richard H; Thompson, Sarah K

    2016-05-01

    With proton pump inhibitors and current sophisticated endoscopic techniques, the number of patients requiring surgical intervention for upper gastrointestinal bleeding has decreased considerably while trans-arterial embolization is being used more often. There are few direct comparisons between the effectiveness of surgery and embolization. A retrospective study of patients from two Australian teaching hospitals who had surgery or trans-arterial embolization (n = 103) for severe upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage between 2004 and 2012 was carried out. Patient demographics, co-morbidities, disease pathology, length of stay, complications, and overall clinical outcome and mortality were compared. There were 65 men and 38 women. The median age was 70 (range 36-95) years. Patients requiring emergency surgical intervention (n = 79) or trans-arterial embolization (n = 24) were compared. The rate of re-bleeding after embolization (42%) was significantly higher compared with the surgery group (19%) (P = 0.02). The requirement for further intervention (either surgery or embolization) was also higher in the embolization group (33%) compared with the surgery group (13%) (P = 0.03). There was no statistical difference in mortality between the embolization group (5/24, 20.8%) and the surgical group (13/79, 16.5%) (P = 0.75). Emergency surgery and embolization are required in 2.6% of patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Both techniques have high mortalities reflecting the age, co-morbidities and severity of bleeding in this patient group. © 2014 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  7. Increased Hyperalgesia and Proinflammatory Cytokines in the Spinal Cord and Dorsal Root Ganglion After Surgery and/or Fentanyl Administration in Rats.

    Chang, Lu; Ye, Fang; Luo, Quehua; Tao, Yuanxiang; Shu, Haihua

    2018-01-01

    Perioperative fentanyl has been reported to induce hyperalgesia and increase postoperative pain. In this study, we tried to investigate behavioral hyperalgesia, the expression of proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and the activation of microglia in the spinal cord and dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in a rat model of surgical plantar incision with or without perioperative fentanyl. Four groups of rats (n = 32 for each group) were subcutaneously injected with fentanyl at 60 μg/kg or normal saline for 4 times with 15-minute intervals. Plantar incisions were made to rats in 2 groups after the second drug injection. Mechanical and thermal nociceptive thresholds were assessed by the tail pressure test and paw withdrawal test on the day before, at 1, 2, 3, 4 hours, and on the days 1-7 after drug injection. The lumbar spinal cord, bilateral DRG, and cerebrospinal fluid of 4 rats in each group were collected to measure IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α on the day before, at the fourth hour, and on the days 1, 3, 5, and 7 after drug injection. The lumbar spinal cord and bilateral DRG were removed to detect the ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 on the day before and on the days 1 and 7 after drug injection. Rats injected with normal saline only demonstrated no significant mechanical or thermal hyperalgesia or any increases of IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α in the spinal cord or DRG. However, injection of fentanyl induced analgesia within as early as 4 hours and a significant delayed tail mechanical and bilateral plantar thermal hyperalgesia after injections lasting for 2 days, while surgical plantar incision induced a significant mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia lasting for 1-4 days. The combination of fentanyl and incision further aggravated the hyperalgesia and prolonged the duration of hyperalgesia. The fentanyl or surgical incision upregulated the expression of IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α in the

  8. Factors associated with prolonged length of stay following cardiac surgery in a major referral hospital in Oman: a retrospective observational study.

    Almashrafi, Ahmed; Alsabti, Hilal; Mukaddirov, Mirdavron; Balan, Baskaran; Aylin, Paul

    2016-06-08

    Two objectives were set for this study. The first was to identify factors influencing prolonged postoperative length of stay (LOS) following cardiac surgery. The second was to devise a predictive model for prolonged LOS in the cardiac intensive care unit (CICU) based on preoperative factors available at admission and to compare it against two existing cardiac stratification systems. Observational retrospective study. A tertiary hospital in Oman. All adult patients who underwent cardiac surgery at a major referral hospital in Oman between 2009 and 2013. 30.5% of the patients had prolonged LOS (≥11 days) after surgery, while 17% experienced prolonged ICU LOS (≥5 days). Factors that were identified to prolong CICU LOS were non-elective surgery, current congestive heart failure (CHF), renal failure, combined coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) and valve surgery, and other non-isolated valve or CABG surgery. Patients were divided into three groups based on their scores. The probabilities of prolonged CICU LOS were 11%, 26% and 28% for group 1, 2 and 3, respectively. The predictive model had an area under the curve of 0.75. Factors associated with prolonged overall postoperative LOS included the body mass index, the type of surgery, cardiopulmonary bypass machine use, packed red blood cells use, non-elective surgery and number of complications. The latter was the most important determinant of postoperative LOS. Patient management can be tailored for individual patient based on their treatments and personal attributes to optimise resource allocation. Moreover, a simple predictive score system to enable identification of patients at risk of prolonged CICU stay can be developed using data that are routinely collected by most hospitals. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  9. Spinal cord involvement in tuberculous meningitis.

    Garg, R K; Malhotra, H S; Gupta, R

    2015-09-01

    To summarize the incidence and spectrum of spinal cord-related complications in patients of tuberculous meningitis. Reports from multiple countries were included. An extensive review of the literature, published in English, was carried out using Scopus, PubMed and Google Scholar databases. Tuberculous meningitis frequently affects the spinal cord and nerve roots. Initial evidence of spinal cord involvement came from post-mortem examination. Subsequent advancement in neuroimaging like conventional lumbar myelography, computed tomographic myelography and gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance-myelography have contributed immensely. Spinal involvement manifests in several forms, like tuberculous radiculomyelitis, spinal tuberculoma, myelitis, syringomyelia, vertebral tuberculosis and very rarely spinal tuberculous abscess. Frequently, tuberculous spinal arachnoiditis develops paradoxically. Infrequently, spinal cord involvement may even be asymptomatic. Spinal cord and spinal nerve involvement is demonstrated by diffuse enhancement of cord parenchyma, nerve roots and meninges on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. High cerebrospinal fluid protein content is often a risk factor for arachnoiditis. The most important differential diagnosis of tuberculous arachnoiditis is meningeal carcinomatosis. Anti-tuberculosis therapy is the main stay of treatment for tuberculous meningitis. Higher doses of corticosteroids have been found effective. Surgery should be considered only when pathological confirmation is needed or there is significant spinal cord compression. The outcome in these patients has been unpredictable. Some reports observed excellent recovery and some reported unfavorable outcomes after surgical decompression and debridement. Tuberculous meningitis is frequently associated with disabling spinal cord and radicular complications. Available treatment options are far from satisfactory.

  10. Understanding the relationship between the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services' Hospital Compare star rating, surgical case volume, and short-term outcomes after major cancer surgery.

    Kaye, Deborah R; Norton, Edward C; Ellimoottil, Chad; Ye, Zaojun; Dupree, James M; Herrel, Lindsey A; Miller, David C

    2017-11-01

    Both the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services' (CMS) Hospital Compare star rating and surgical case volume have been publicized as metrics that can help patients to identify high-quality hospitals for complex care such as cancer surgery. The current study evaluates the relationship between the CMS' star rating, surgical volume, and short-term outcomes after major cancer surgery. National Medicare data were used to evaluate the relationship between hospital star ratings and cancer surgery volume quintiles. Then, multilevel logistic regression models were fit to examine the association between cancer surgery outcomes and both star rankings and surgical volumes. Lastly, a graphical approach was used to compare how well star ratings and surgical volume predicted cancer surgery outcomes. This study identified 365,752 patients undergoing major cancer surgery for 1 of 9 cancer types at 2,550 hospitals. Star rating was not associated with surgical volume (P cancer surgery outcomes (mortality, complication rate, readmissions, and prolonged length of stay). The adjusted predicted probabilities for 5- and 1-star hospitals were 2.3% and 4.5% for mortality, 39% and 48% for complications, 10% and 15% for readmissions, and 8% and 16% for a prolonged length of stay, respectively. The adjusted predicted probabilities for hospitals with the highest and lowest quintile cancer surgery volumes were 2.7% and 5.8% for mortality, 41% and 55% for complications, 12.2% and 11.6% for readmissions, and 9.4% and 13% for a prolonged length of stay, respectively. Furthermore, surgical volume and the star rating were similarly associated with mortality and complications, whereas the star rating was more highly associated with readmissions and prolonged length of stay. In the absence of other information, these findings suggest that the star rating may be useful to patients when they are selecting a hospital for major cancer surgery. However, more research is needed before these ratings can

  11. Clinical, magnetic resonance imaging, and histopathologic findings in 6 dogs with surgically resected extraparenchymal spinal cord hematomas.

    Hague, D W; Joslyn, S; Bush, W W; Glass, E N; Durham, A C

    2015-01-01

    Extraparenchymal spinal cord hematoma has been described in veterinary medicine in association with neoplasia, intervertebral disk disease, and snake envenomation. There are rare reports of spontaneous extraparenchymal spinal cord hematoma formation with no known cause in human medicine. Multiple cases of spontaneous extraparenchymal spinal cord hematoma have not been described previously in veterinary medicine. To describe the signalment, clinical findings, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features, and surgical outcomes in histopathologically confirmed extraparenchymal spinal cord hematomas in dogs with no identified underlying etiology. Six dogs had MRI of the spinal cord, decompressive spinal surgery, and histopathologic confirmation of extraparenchymal spinal cord hematoma not associated with an underlying cause. Multi-institutional retrospective study. Six patients had spontaneous extraparenchymal spinal cord hematoma formation. MRI showed normal signal within the spinal cord parenchyma in all patients. All hematomas had T2-weighted hyperintensity and the majority (5/6) had no contrast enhancement. All dogs underwent surgical decompression and most patients (5/6) returned to normal or near normal neurologic function postoperatively. Follow-up of the patients (ranging between 921 and 1,446 days) showed no progression of neurologic clinical signs or any conditions associated with increased bleeding tendency. Before surgery and histopathology confirming extraparenchymal hematoma, the primary differential in most cases was neoplasia, based on the MRI findings. This retrospective study reminds clinicians of the importance of the combination of advanced imaging combined with histopathologic diagnosis. The prognosis for spontaneous spinal cord extraparenchymal hematoma with surgical decompression appears to be favorable in most cases. Copyright © 2015 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  12. Pediatric spinal infections

    Raj Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The infections of the spinal axis in children are rare when compared with adults. They encompass a large spectrum of diseases ranging from relatively benign diskitis to spinal osteomyleitis and to the rapidly progressive, rare, and potentially devastating spinal epidural, subdural, and intramedullary spinal cord infections. We present a comprehensive review of the literature pertaining to these uncommon entities, in light of our experience from northern India. The most prevalent pediatric spinal infection in Indian scenario is tuberculosis, where an extradural involvement is more common than intradural. The craniovertebral junction is not an uncommon site of involvement in children of our milieu. The majority of pyogenic infections of pediatric spine are associated with congenital neuro-ectodermal defects such as congenital dermal sinus. The clinico-radiological findings of various spinal infections commonly overlap. Hence the endemicity of certain pathogens should be given due consideration, while considering the differential diagnosis. However, early suspicion, rapid diagnosis, and prompt treatment are the key factors in avoiding neurological morbidity and deformity in a growing child.

  13. Knee microfracture surgery

    Cartilage regeneration - knee ... Three types of anesthesia may be used for knee arthroscopy surgery: Medicine to relax you, and shots of painkillers to numb the knee Spinal (regional) anesthesia General anesthesia (you will be ...

  14. Simultaneous Intracranial and Spinal Subdural Hematoma: Two Case Reports

    Yoon, Chung Dae; Song, Chang Joon; Lee, Jeong Eun; Choi, Seung Won [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-02-15

    Spinal subdural hematoma is a rare disease. Simultaneous intracranial and spinal subdural hematoma is extremely rare and only 14 such cases have been reported. We report here on two cases of simultaneous intracranial and spinal subdural hematoma that occurred following a fall-down head injury and intracranial surgery, and we discuss the pathogenesis of the disease.

  15. Spinal stenosis

    ... in the spine that was present from birth Narrow spinal canal that the person was born with Herniated or slipped disk, which ... when you sit down or lean forward. Most people with spinal stenosis cannot walk for a long ... During a physical exam, your health care provider will try to ...

  16. Comparative study of the efficacy of transdermal buprenorphine patches and prolonged-release tramadol tablets for postoperative pain control after spinal fusion surgery: a prospective, randomized controlled non-inferiority trial.

    Kim, Ho-Joong; Ahn, Hyo Sae; Nam, Yunjin; Chang, Bong-Soon; Lee, Choon-Ki; Yeom, Jin S

    2017-11-01

    To compare the efficacy of a transdermal buprenorphine patch (5, 10, 15, and 20 μg/h) with that of oral tramadol (150, 200, 250, and 300 mg) for postoperative pain control after single level spinal fusion surgery. The present study (ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02416804) was a prospective, randomized controlled non-inferiority trial designed to determine the efficacy of buprenorphine TDS for alleviating postoperative pain following patient controlled analgesia (PCA) in persons underwent a single level posterior lumbar interbody fusion surgery through 1:1 allocation. The primary outcome was the Visual Analog Pain Scale (VAS) score for postoperative back pain at 7 days after surgery. The non-inferior margin of the VAS was set at δ = 1.5 points. The VAS score (primary outcome) for postoperative back pain at 7 days after surgery in the Buprenorphine group was not inferior compared to the Tramadol group. The overall changes in VAS scores for postoperative pain during follow-up assessments over a 2-week period did not differ between both groups. However, the VAS scores for postoperative pain significantly improved with time after surgery in both groups. The patterns of changes in the VAS scores for postoperative pain during the follow-up period were not significantly different between the both groups. The efficacy of buprenorphine TDS was not inferior to that of oral tramadol medication for alleviating postoperative pain in the subacute period from 72 h after surgery, following PCA administration. In addition, adverse events were similar between both groups.

  17. Neurogenic bladder in spinal cord injury patients

    Al Taweel W

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Waleed Al Taweel, Raouf SeyamDepartment of Urology, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi ArabiaAbstract: Neurogenic bladder dysfunction due to spinal cord injury poses a significant threat to the well-being of patients. Incontinence, renal impairment, urinary tract infection, stones, and poor quality of life are some complications of this condition. The majority of patients will require management to ensure low pressure reservoir function of the bladder, complete emptying, and dryness. Management typically begins with anticholinergic medications and clean intermittent catheterization. Patients who fail this treatment because of inefficacy or intolerability are candidates for a spectrum of more invasive procedures. Endoscopic managements to relieve the bladder outlet resistance include sphincterotomy, botulinum toxin injection, and stent insertion. In contrast, patients with incompetent sphincters are candidates for transobturator tape insertion, sling surgery, or artificial sphincter implantation. Coordinated bladder emptying is possible with neuromodulation in selected patients. Bladder augmentation, usually with an intestinal segment, and urinary diversion are the last resort. Tissue engineering is promising in experimental settings; however, its role in clinical bladder management is still evolving. In this review, we summarize the current literature pertaining to the pathology and management of neurogenic bladder dysfunction in patients with spinal cord injury.Keywords: neurogenic bladder, spinal cord injury, urodynamics, intestine, intermittent catheterization

  18. A pragmatic multi-centre randomised controlled trial of fluid loading in high-risk surgical patients undergoing major elective surgery--the FOCCUS study.

    Cuthbertson, Brian H; Campbell, Marion K; Stott, Stephen A; Elders, Andrew; Hernández, Rodolfo; Boyers, Dwayne; Norrie, John; Kinsella, John; Brittenden, Julie; Cook, Jonathan; Rae, Daniela; Cotton, Seonaidh C; Alcorn, David; Addison, Jennifer; Grant, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    Fluid strategies may impact on patient outcomes in major elective surgery. We aimed to study the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of pre-operative fluid loading in high-risk surgical patients undergoing major elective surgery. This was a pragmatic, non-blinded, multi-centre, randomised, controlled trial. We sought to recruit 128 consecutive high-risk surgical patients undergoing major abdominal surgery. The patients underwent pre-operative fluid loading with 25 ml/kg of Ringer's solution in the six hours before surgery. The control group had no pre-operative fluid loading. The primary outcome was the number of hospital days after surgery with cost-effectiveness as a secondary outcome. A total of 111 patients were recruited within the study time frame in agreement with the funder. The median pre-operative fluid loading volume was 1,875 ml (IQR 1,375 to 2,025) in the fluid group compared to 0 (IQR 0 to 0) in controls with days in hospital after surgery 12.2 (SD 11.5) days compared to 17.4 (SD 20.0) and an adjusted mean difference of 5.5 days (median 2.2 days; 95% CI -0.44 to 11.44; P = 0.07). There was a reduction in adverse events in the fluid intervention group (P = 0.048) and no increase in fluid based complications. The intervention was less costly and more effective (adjusted average cost saving: £2,047; adjusted average gain in benefit: 0.0431 quality adjusted life year (QALY)) and has a high probability of being cost-effective. Pre-operative intravenous fluid loading leads to a non-significant reduction in hospital length of stay after high-risk major surgery and is likely to be cost-effective. Confirmatory work is required to determine whether these effects are reproducible, and to confirm whether this simple intervention could allow more cost-effective delivery of care. Prospective Clinical Trials, ISRCTN32188676.

  19. Beneficial Effects of Early Enteral Nutrition After Major Rectal Surgery: A Possible Role for Conditionally Essential Amino Acids? Results of a Randomized Clinical Trial.

    van Barneveld, Kevin W Y; Smeets, Boudewijn J J; Heesakkers, Fanny F B M; Bosmans, Joanna W A M; Luyer, Misha D; Wasowicz, Dareczka; Bakker, Jaap A; Roos, Arnout N; Rutten, Harm J T; Bouvy, Nicole D; Boelens, Petra G

    2016-06-01

    To investigate direct postoperative outcome and plasma amino acid concentrations in a study comparing early enteral nutrition versus early parenteral nutrition after major rectal surgery. Previously, it was shown that a low plasma glutamine concentration represents poor prognosis in ICU patients. A preplanned substudy of a previous prospective, randomized, open-label, single-centre study, comparing early enteral nutrition versus early parenteral nutrition in patients at high risk of postoperative ileus after surgery for locally advanced or locally recurrent rectal cancer. Early enteral nutrition reduced postoperative ileus, anastomotic leakage, and hospital stay. Tertiary referral centre for locally advanced and recurrent rectal cancer. A total of 123 patients with locally advanced or recurrent rectal carcinoma requiring major rectal surgery. Patients were randomized (ALEA web-based external randomization) preoperatively into two groups: early enteral nutrition (early enteral nutrition, intervention) by nasojejunal tube (n = 61) or early parenteral nutrition (early parenteral nutrition, control) by jugular vein catheter (n = 62). Eight hours after the surgical procedure artificial nutrition was started in hemodynamically stable patients, stimulating oral intake in both groups. Blood samples were collected to measure plasma glutamine, citrulline, and arginine concentrations using a validated ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric method. Baseline concentrations were comparable for both groups. Directly after rectal surgery, a decrease in plasma amino acids was observed. Plasma glutamine concentrations were higher in the parenteral group than in the enteral group on postoperative day 1 (p = 0.027) and day 5 (p = 0.008). Arginine concentrations were also significantly increased in the parenteral group at day 1 (p < 0.001) and day 5 (p = 0.001). Lower plasma glutamine and arginine concentrations were measured in the enteral group, whereas a

  20. Implications of the center of rotation concept for the reconstruction of anterior column lordosis and axial preloads in spinal deformity surgery.

    Koller, Heiko; Mayer, Michael; Zenner, Juliane; Resch, Herbert; Niederberger, Alfred; Fierlbeck, Johann; Hitzl, Wolfgang; Acosta, Frank L

    2012-07-01

    In thoracolumbar deformity surgery, anterior-only approaches are used for reconstruction of anterior column failures. It is generally advised that vertebral body replacements (VBRs) should be preloaded by compression. However, little is known regarding the impact of different techniques for generation of preloads and which surgical principle is best for restoration of lordosis. Therefore, the authors analyzed the effect of different surgical techniques to restore spinal alignment and lordosis as well as the ability to generate axial preloads on VBRs in anterior column reconstructions. The authors performed a laboratory study using 7 fresh-frozen specimens (from T-3 to S-1) to assess the ability for lordosis reconstruction of 5 techniques and their potential for increasing preloads on a modified distractable VBR in a 1-level thoracolumbar corpectomy. The testing protocol was as follows: 1) Radiographs of specimens were obtained. 2) A 1-level corpectomy was performed. 3) In alternating order, lordosis was applied using 1 of the 5 techniques. Then, preloads during insertion and after relaxation using the modified distractable VBR were assessed using a miniature load-cell incorporated in the modified distractable VBR. The modified distractable VBR was inserted into the corpectomy defect after lordosis was applied using 1) a lamina spreader; 2) the modified distractable VBR only; 3) the ArcoFix System (an angular stable plate system enabling in situ reduction); 4) a lordosizer (a customized instrument enabling reduction while replicating the intervertebral center of rotation [COR] according to the COR method); and 5) a lordosizer and top-loading screws ([LZ+TLS], distraction with the lordosizer applied on a 5.5-mm rod linked to 2 top-loading pedicle screws inserted laterally into the vertebra). Changes in the regional kyphosis angle were assessed radiographically using the Cobb method. The bone mineral density of specimens was 0.72 ± 22.6 g/cm(2). The maximum regional

  1. Modern spinal instrumentation. Part 1: Normal spinal implants

    Davis, W.; Allouni, A.K.; Mankad, K.; Prezzi, D.; Elias, T.; Rankine, J.; Davagnanam, I.

    2013-01-01

    The general radiologist frequently encounters studies demonstrating spinal instrumentation, either as part of the patient's postoperative evaluation or as incidental to a study performed for another purpose. There are various surgical approaches and devices used in spinal surgery with an increased understanding of spinal and spinal implant biomechanics drives development of modern fixation devices. It is, therefore, important that the radiologist can recognize commonly used devices and identify their potential complications demonstrated on imaging. The aim of part 1 of this review is to familiarize the reader with terms used to describe surgical approaches to the spine, review the function and normal appearances of commonly used instrumentations, and understand the importance of the different fixation techniques. The second part of this review will concentrate on the roles that the different imaging techniques play in assessing the instrumented spine and the recognition of complications that can potentially occur.

  2. AnAnkle Trial study protocol: a randomised trial comparing pain profiles after peripheral nerve block or spinal anaesthesia for ankle fracture surgery

    Sort, Rune; Brorson, Stig; Gögenur, Ismail

    2017-01-01

    . The intervention is ultrasound-guided popliteal sciatic (20 mL) and saphenal nerve (8 mL) PNB with ropivacaine 7.5 mg/mL, and controls receive spinal anaesthesia (2 mL) with hyperbaric bupivacaine 5 mg/mL. Postoperatively all receive paracetamol, ibuprofen and patient-controlled intravenous morphine on demand...

  3. The lumbar lordosis index: a new ratio to detect spinal malalignment with a therapeutic impact for sagittal balance correction decisions in adult scoliosis surgery.

    Boissière, Louis; Bourghli, Anouar; Vital, Jean-Marc; Gille, Olivier; Obeid, Ibrahim

    2013-06-01

    Sagittal malalignment is frequently observed in adult scoliosis. C7 plumb line, lumbar lordosis and pelvic tilt are the main factors to evaluate sagittal balance and the need of a vertebral osteotomy to correct it. We described a ratio: the lumbar lordosis index (ratio lumbar lordosis/pelvic incidence) (LLI) and analyzed its relationships with spinal malalignment and vertebral osteotomies. 53 consecutive patients with a surgical adult scoliosis had preoperative and postoperative full spine EOS radiographies to measure spino-pelvic parameters and LLI. The lack of lordosis was calculated after prediction of theoretical lumbar lordosis. Correlation analysis between the different parameters was performed. All parameters were correlated with spinal malalignment but LLI is the most correlated parameter (r = -0.978). It is also the best parameter in this study to predict the need of a spinal osteotomy (r = 1 if LLI <0.5). LLI is a statistically validated parameter for sagittal malalignment analysis. It can be used as a mathematical tool to detect spinal malalignment in adult scoliosis and guides the surgeon decision of realizing a vertebral osteotomy for adult scoliosis sagittal correction. It can be used as well for the interpretation of clinical series in adult scoliosis.

  4. Measuring outcomes in adult spinal deformity surgery: a systematic review to identify current strengths, weaknesses and gaps in patient-reported outcome measures

    Faraj, S.S.; Hooff, M.L. Van; Holewijn, R.M.; Polly, D.W.; Haanstra, T.M.; Kleuver, M. de

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: Adult spinal deformity (ASD) causes severe disability, reduces overall quality of life, and results in a substantial societal burden of disease. As healthcare is becoming more value based, and to facilitate global benchmarking, it is critical to identify and standardize patient-reported

  5. Troponin elevations after non-cardiac, non-vascular surgery are predictive of major adverse cardiac events and mortality

    Ekeloef, S; Alamili, M; Devereaux, P J

    2016-01-01

    -analysis was conducted in January 2016 according to the Meta-analysis Of Observational Studies in Epidemiology guidelines. Both interventional and observational studies measuring troponin within the first 4 days after surgery were eligible. A systematic search was performed in PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus, and the Cochrane...

  6. Clinical assessment of peripheral perfusion to predict postoperative complications after major abdominal surgery early: A prospective observational study in adults

    M.E. van Genderen (Michel); J. Paauwe (Jaap); J. de Jonge (Jeroen); R.J.P. van der Valk (Ralf); A.A.P. Lima (Alexandre ); J. Bakker (Jan); J. van Bommel (Jasper)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Altered peripheral perfusion is strongly associated with poor outcome in critically ill patients. We wanted to determine whether repeated assessments of peripheral perfusion during the days following surgery could help to early identify patients that are more likely to

  7. Dynamic muscle O2 saturation response is impaired during major non-cardiac surgery despite goal-directed haemodynamic therapy.

    Feldheiser, A; Hunsicker, O; Kaufner, L; Köhler, J; Sieglitz, H; Casans Francés, R; Wernecke, K-D; Sehouli, J; Spies, C

    2016-03-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy combined with a vascular occlusion test (VOT) could indicate an impairment of microvascular reactivity (MVR) in septic patients by detecting changes in dynamic variables of muscle O2 saturation (StO2). However, in the perioperative context the consequences of surgical trauma on dynamic variables of muscle StO2 as indicators of MVR are still unknown. This study is a sub-analysis of a randomised controlled trial in patients with metastatic primary ovarian cancer undergoing debulking surgery, during which a goal-directed haemodynamic algorithm was applied using oesophageal Doppler. During a 3 min VOT, near-infrared spectroscopy was used to assess dynamic variables arising from changes in muscle StO2. At the beginning of surgery, values of desaturation and recovery slope were comparable to values obtained in healthy volunteers. During the course of surgery, both desaturation and recovery slope showed a gradual decrease. Concomitantly, the study population underwent a transition to a surgically induced systemic inflammatory response state shown by a gradual increase in norepinephrine administration, heart rate, and Interleukin-6, with a peak immediately after the end of surgery. Higher rates of norepinephrine and a higher heart rate were related to a faster decline in StO2 during vascular occlusion. Using near-infrared spectroscopy combined with a VOT during surgery showed a gradual deterioration of MVR in patients treated with optimal haemodynamic care. The deterioration of MVR was accompanied by the transition to a surgically induced systemic inflammatory response state. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Spinal cord injury arising in anaesthesia practice.

    Hewson, D W; Bedforth, N M; Hardman, J G

    2018-01-01

    Spinal cord injury arising during anaesthetic practice is a rare event, but one that carries a significant burden in terms of morbidity and mortality. In this article, we will review the pathophysiology of spinal cord injury. We will then discuss injuries relating to patient position, spinal cord hypoperfusion and neuraxial techniques. The most serious causes of spinal cord injury - vertebral canal haematoma, spinal epidural abscess, meningitis and adhesive arachnoiditis - will be discussed in turn. For each condition, we draw attention to practical, evidence-based measures clinicians can undertake to reduce their incidence, or mitigate their severity. Finally, we will discuss transient neurological symptoms. Some cases of spinal cord injury during anaesthesia can be ascribed to anaesthesia itself, arising as a direct consequence of its conduct. The injury to a spinal nerve root by inaccurate and/or incautious needling during spinal anaesthesia is an obvious example. But in many cases, spinal cord injury during anaesthesia is not caused by, related to, or even associated with, the conduct of the anaesthetic. Surgical factors, whether direct (e.g. spinal nerve root damage due to incorrect pedicle screw placement) or indirect (e.g. cord ischaemia following aortic surgery) are responsible for a significant proportion of spinal cord injuries that occur concurrently with the delivery of regional or general anaesthesia. © 2018 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  9. Prognosis by tumor location for pediatric spinal cord Ependymomas

    Oh, MC; Sayegh, ET; Safaee, M; Sun, MHZ; Kaur, G; Kim, JM; Aranda, D; Molinaro, AM; Gupta, N; Parsa, AT

    2013-01-01

    Object. Ependymoma is a common CNS tumor in children, with spinal cord ependymomas making up 13.1% of all ependymomas in this age group. The clinical features that affect prognosis in pediatric spinal cord ependymomas are not well understood. A comprehensive literature review was performed to determine whether a tumor location along the spinal cord is prognostically significant in children undergoing surgery for spinal cord ependymomas. Methods. A PubMed search was performed to identify all p...

  10. Anesthesia for major abdominal surgery in patients in poor physical condition. The combination of surface anesthesia with bilateral intercostal nerve block

    Safar, Peter

    2014-01-01

    An anesthetic technique for major abdominal surgery is described, which consists of liqht general anesthesia, combined with bilateral intercostal nerveblock from T6 to T11 blocks are performed just behind the midaxillary line on the unconscious patient. This technique proved to be particulary valuable for patients in very poor conditions, with is in agreement with previous experiences of other authors. The technique is easy to leam, and when some proficiency is acquired, the patient can be re...

  11. Improving Prevention, Early Recognition and Management of Acute Kidney Injury after Major Surgery: Results of a Planning Meeting with Multidisciplinary Stakeholders

    Matthew T James

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of review: Acute kidney injury (AKI is common after major surgery, and is associated with morbidity, mortality, increased length of hospital stay, and high health care costs. Although recent guidelines for AKI provide recommendations for identification of patients at risk, monitoring, diagnosis, and management of AKI, there is lack of understanding to guide successful implementation of these recommendations into clinical practice. Sources of information: We held a planning meeting with multidisciplinary stakeholders to identify barriers, facilitators, and strategies to implement recommendations for prevention, early identification, and management of AKI after major surgery. Barriers and facilitators to knowledge use for peri-operative AKI prevention and care were discussed. Findings: Stakeholders identified barriers in knowledge (how to identify high-risk patients, what criteria to use for diagnosis of AKI, attitudes (self-efficacy in preventive care and management of AKI, and behaviors (common use of diuretics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, withholding of intravenous fluids, and competing time demands in peri-operative care. Educational, informatics, and organizational interventions were identified by stakeholders as potentially useful elements for future interventions for peri-operative AKI. Limitation: Meeting participants were from a single centre. Implications: The information and recommendations obtained from this stakeholder's meeting will be useful to design interventions to improve prevention and early care for AKI after major surgery.

  12. [Lumbar spinal angiolipoma].

    Isla, Alberto; Ortega Martinez, Rodrigo; Pérez López, Carlos; Gómez de la Riva, Alvaro; Mansilla, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    Spinal angiolipomas are fairly infrequent benign tumours that are usually located in the epidural space of the thoracic column and represent 0.14% to 1.3% of all spinal tumours. Lumbar angiolipomas are extremely rare, representing only 9.6% of all spinal extradural angiolipomas. We report the case of a woman who complained of a lumbar pain of several months duration with no neurological focality and that had intensified in the last three days without her having had any injury or made a physical effort. The MR revealed an extradural mass L1-L2, on the posterior face of the medulla, decreasing the anteroposterior diameter of the canal. The patient symptoms improved after surgery. Total extirpation of the lesion is possible in most cases, and the prognosis is excellent even if the lesion is infiltrative. For this reason, excessively aggressive surgery is not necessary to obtain complete resection. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Imaging in spinal trauma

    Goethem, J.W.M. van; Maes, Menno; Oezsarlak, Oezkan; Hauwe, Luc van den; Parizel, Paul M.

    2005-01-01

    Because it may cause paralysis, injury to the spine is one of the most feared traumas, and spinal cord injury is a major cause of disability. In the USA approximately 10,000 traumatic cervical spine fractures and 4000 traumatic thoracolumbar fractures are diagnosed each year. Although the number of individuals sustaining paralysis is far less than those with moderate or severe brain injury, the socioeconomic costs are significant. Since most of the spinal trauma patients survive their injuries, almost one out of 1000 inhabitants in the USA are currently being cared for partial or complete paralysis. Little controversy exists regarding the need for accurate and emergent imaging assessment of the traumatized spine in order to evaluate spinal stability and integrity of neural elements. Because clinicians fear missing occult spine injuries, they obtain radiographs for nearly all patients who present with blunt trauma. We are influenced on one side by fear of litigation and the possible devastating medical, psychologic and financial consequences of cervical spine injury, and on the other side by pressure to reduce health care costs. A set of clinical and/or anamnestic criteria, however, can be very useful in identifying patients who have an extremely low probability of injury and who consequently have no need for imaging studies. Multidetector (or multislice) computed tomography (MDCT) is the preferred primary imaging modality in blunt spinal trauma patients who do need imaging. Not only is CT more accurate in diagnosing spinal injury, it also reduces imaging time and patient manipulation. Evidence-based research has established that MDCT improves patient outcome and saves money in comparison to plain film. This review discusses the use, advantages and disadvantages of the different imaging techniques used in spinal trauma patients and the criteria used in selecting patients who do not need imaging. Finally an overview of different types of spinal injuries is given

  14. Imaging in spinal trauma

    Goethem, J.W.M. van [Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen, University of Antwerp, Belgium, Department of Radiology, Edegem (Belgium); Algemeen Ziekenhuis Maria Middelares, Department of Radiology, Sint-Niklaas (Belgium); Maes, Menno; Oezsarlak, Oezkan; Hauwe, Luc van den; Parizel, Paul M. [Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen, University of Antwerp, Belgium, Department of Radiology, Edegem (Belgium)

    2005-03-01

    Because it may cause paralysis, injury to the spine is one of the most feared traumas, and spinal cord injury is a major cause of disability. In the USA approximately 10,000 traumatic cervical spine fractures and 4000 traumatic thoracolumbar fractures are diagnosed each year. Although the number of individuals sustaining paralysis is far less than those with moderate or severe brain injury, the socioeconomic costs are significant. Since most of the spinal trauma patients survive their injuries, almost one out of 1000 inhabitants in the USA are currently being cared for partial or complete paralysis. Little controversy exists regarding the need for accurate and emergent imaging assessment of the traumatized spine in order to evaluate spinal stability and integrity of neural elements. Because clinicians fear missing occult spine injuries, they obtain radiographs for nearly all patients who present with blunt trauma. We are influenced on one side by fear of litigation and the possible devastating medical, psychologic and financial consequences of cervical spine injury, and on the other side by pressure to reduce health care costs. A set of clinical and/or anamnestic criteria, however, can be very useful in identifying patients who have an extremely low probability of injury and who consequently have no need for imaging studies. Multidetector (or multislice) computed tomography (MDCT) is the preferred primary imaging modality in blunt spinal trauma patients who do need imaging. Not only is CT more accurate in diagnosing spinal injury, it also reduces imaging time and patient manipulation. Evidence-based research has established that MDCT improves patient outcome and saves money in comparison to plain film. This review discusses the use, advantages and disadvantages of the different imaging techniques used in spinal trauma patients and the criteria used in selecting patients who do not need imaging. Finally an overview of different types of spinal injuries is given

  15. Prominent ears: the effect of reconstructive surgery on self-esteem and social interaction in children with a minor defect compared to children with a major orthopedic defect.

    Niemelä, Birgitta Johansson; Hedlund, Anders; Andersson, Gerhard; Wahlsten, Viveka Sundelin

    2008-11-01

    In a prospective study of patients with prominent ears, the effect of reconstructive surgery on self-esteem and social interaction was examined 1 year after surgery. Of 42 patients with prominent ears aged 7 to 15 years, 21 were matched with a comparison group of orthopedic patients (leg lengthening) and a control group of schoolchildren. Psychological measures evaluated self-esteem, depression, anxiety, cognition, parents' ratings of child behavior and symptoms, and parent anxiety. Semistructured interviews with the child and parents were also conducted. The motivation to be operated on was pain, teasing, and feelings of being different. The satisfaction rate with the result of reconstructive surgery was high. The psychological measures of the prominent ears group had results close to those of the control group, although the leg lengthening group had lower self-esteem and higher depression and anxiety scores. With few exceptions, all patients had scores within the normal range on self-rating scales. Parents reported less activity at leisure time in both patient groups than in the control group. After surgery, parents reported improved behavior on the Child Behavior Checklist total problem score. Patients with minor defects had fewer self-reported psychological and behavior problems than the major defect group. Interestingly, prominent ears patients also had low activity levels. Reconstructive surgery had no adverse effect on the prominent ears patients in this interim study but rather resulted in improved well-being. It is important to investigate further the effect of reconstructive surgery on children's self-esteem and social interaction.

  16. Septic shock after posterior spinal arthrodesis on a patient with Scheuermann kyphosis and multiple body piercings.

    Tsirikos, Athanasios I; Subramanian, Ashok Sridhara

    2011-10-15

    A case report. We report septic shock as postoperative complication following an instrumented posterior spinal arthrodesis on a patient with multiple body piercings. The management of this potentially catastrophic complication and outcome of treatment is been discussed. Body piercing has become increasingly more common because of change in culture or as a fashion statement. This has been associated with local or generalized ill effects including tissue injury, skin and systemic infections, and septic shock. There is no clear guideline pathway regarding removal and reinsertion of body piercings in patients who undergo major surgery. Complications following orthopedic or spinal procedures associated with body piercing have not been reported. We reviewed the medical notes and radiographs of an adolescent patient with Scheuermann kyphosis and multiple body piercings who underwent a posterior spinal arthrodesis and developed septic shock. Septic shock developed on postoperative day 2 after reinsertion of all piercings following the patient's request. The patient became systemically very unwell and required intensive medical management, as well as a total course of antibiotics of 3 months. The piercings remained in situ. She did not develop a wound infection despite the presence of bacteremia and spinal instrumentation. The patient had no new piercings subsequent to her deformity procedure. Two and a half years after spinal surgery she reported no medical problems, had a balanced spine with no loss of kyphosis correction and no evidence of nonunion or recurrence of deformity. The development of septic shock as a result of piercing reinsertion in the postoperative period has not been previously reported. This is an important consideration to prevent potentially life-threatening complications following major spinal surgery.

  17. Nutritional risk in major abdominal surgery: NURIMAS Liver (DRKS00010923 – protocol of a prospective observational trial to evaluate the prognostic value of different nutritional scores in hepatic surgery

    Pascal Probst

    Full Text Available Background: Malnutrition is commonly known as a risk factor in surgical procedures. The nutritional status seems particularly relevant to the clinical outcome of patients undergoing hepatic resection. Thus, identifying affected individuals and taking preventive therapeutic actions before surgery is an important task. However, there are only very few studies, that investigate which existing nutritional assessment score (NAS is suited best to predict the postoperative outcome in liver surgery. Objective: Nutritional Risk in Major Abdominal Surgery (NURIMAS Liver is a prospective observational trial that analyses the predictive value of 12 different NAS for postoperative morbidity and mortality after liver resection. Methods: After admission to the surgical department of the University Hospital in Heidelberg or the municipal hospital of Karlsruhe, all patients scheduled for elective liver resection will be screened for eligibility. Participants will fill in a questionnaire and undergo a physical examination in order to evaluate nutritional status according to Nutritional Risk Index, Nutritional Risk Screening Score, Subjective Global Assessment, Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool, Mini Nutritional Assessment, Short Nutritional Assessment Questionnaire, Imperial Nutritional Screening System, Imperial Nutritional Screening System II, Nutritional Risk Classification and the ESPEN malnutrition criteria. Postoperative morbidity and mortality will be tracked prospectively throughout the postoperative course. The association of malnutrition according to each score and occurrence of at least one major complication will be analysed using both chi-squared tests and a multivariable logistic regression analysis. Already established risk factors in liver surgery will be added as covariates. Discussion: NURIMAS Liver is a bicentric, prospective observational trial. The aim of this study is to investigate the predictive value of clinical nutritional assessment

  18. Spinal injury

    ... Dallas, TX: American Red Cross; 2016. Kaji AH, Newton EJ, Hockberger RS. Spinal injuries. In: Marx JA, ... member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www. ...

  19. Prophylactic furosemide infusion decreasing early major postoperative renal dysfunction in on-pump adult cardiac surgery: a randomized clinical trial

    Fakhari S

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Solmaz Fakhari,1 Fariba Mirzaei Bavil,2 Eissa Bilehjani,1 Sona Abolhasani,3 Moussa Mirinazhad,2 Bahman Naghipour2 1Department of Anesthesiology, 2Department of Physiology, 3Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran Introduction: Acute renal dysfunction is a common complication of cardiac surgery. Furosemide is used in prevention, or treatment, of acute renal dysfunction. This study was conducted to evaluate the protective effects of intra- and early postoperative furosemide infusion on preventing acute renal dysfunction in elective adult cardiac surgery. Methods: Eighty-one patients, candidates of elective cardiac surgery, were enrolled in this study in either the furosemide (n=41 or placebo (n=40 group. Furosemide (2 mg/h or 0.9% saline was administered and continued up to 12 hours postoperatively. We measured serum creatinine (Scr at preoperative and on the second and fifth postoperative days. Then calculated estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR at these times. An increase in Scr of >0.5 mg/dL and/or >25%–50%, compared to preoperative values, was considered as acute kidney injury (AKI. In contrast, an increase in Scr by >50% and/or the need for hemodialysis was regarded as acute renal failure (ARF. At the end we compared the AKI or ARF incidence between the two groups. Results: On the second and fifth postoperative days, Scr was lower, and the eGFR was higher in the furosemide group. AKI incidence was similar in the two groups (11 vs 12 cases; P-value 0.622; however, ARF rate was lower in furosemide group (1 vs 6 cases; P-value 0.044. During the study period, Scr was more stable in the furosemide group, however in the placebo group, Scr initially increased and then decreased to its preoperative value after a few days. Conclusion: This study showed that intra- and early postoperative furosemide infusion has a renal protective effect in adult cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. Although this protective effect cannot

  20. Early Versus Delayed Postoperative Feeding After Major Gynaecological Surgery and its Effects on Clinical Outcomes, Patient Satisfaction, and Length of Stay: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Balayla, Jacques; Bujold, Emmanuel; Lapensée, Louise; Mayrand, Marie-Hélène; Sansregret, Andrée

    2015-12-01

    To compare early versus delayed postoperative feeding in women undergoing major gynaecological surgery with regard to clinical outcomes, duration of postoperative stay, and patient satisfaction. We conducted a parallel-randomized controlled trial at a tertiary care centre in Montreal, Quebec, between June 2000 and July 2001. Patients undergoing major gynaecological surgery were randomized following a 1:1 allocation ratio to receive either early postoperative feeding in which oral clear fluids were begun up to six hours after surgery followed by solid foods as tolerated, or delayed postoperative feeding, in which clear fluids were begun on the first postoperative day and solid foods on the second or third day as tolerated. The primary outcomes analyzed were duration of postoperative stay and patient satisfaction. Secondary outcomes included mean time to appetite, passage of flatus, and bowel movement, as well as the presence of symptoms of paralytic ileus. A total of 119 patients were randomized; 61 patients were assigned to the early feeding group and 58 to the delayed feeding group. Demographic characteristics, including age, weight, smoking status, and prior surgical history were comparable between both groups. There was no difference in length of postoperative stay between the two groups (86.4 ± 21.0 hours in the early feeding group vs. 85.6 ± 26.2 hours in the delayed feeding group; P > 0.05). No significant difference was noted in patient satisfaction (P > 0.05). No difference was found in the frequency of postoperative ileus, mean time to appetite, passage of flatus, or first bowel movement. The introduction of early postoperative feeding appears to be safe and well tolerated by patients undergoing major gynaecological surgery. The duration of postoperative stay, patient satisfaction, and gastrointestinal symptoms are comparable between patients undergoing early or delayed postoperative feeding.

  1. Spinal infections

    Tali, E. Turgut; Gueltekin, Serap

    2005-01-01

    Spinal infections have an increasing prevalence among the general population. Definitive diagnosis based solely on clinical grounds is usually not possible and radiological imaging is used in almost all patients. The primary aim of the authors is to present an overview of spinal infections located in epidural, intradural and intramedullary compartments and to provide diagnostic clues regarding different imaging modalities, particularly MRI, to the practicing physicians and radiologists. (orig.)

  2. Spinal cysticercosis

    Goedert, A.V.; Silva, S.H.F.

    1990-01-01

    Spinal cysticercosis is an extremely uncommon condition. We have examined four patients with complaints that resembled nervous root compression by disk herniation. Myelography was shown to be an efficient method to evaluate spinal involvement, that was characterized by findings of multiple filling defect images (cysts) plus signs of adhesive arachnoiditis. One cyst was found to be mobile. Because of the recent development of medical treatment, a quick and precise diagnosis is of high importance to determine the prognosis of this condition. (author)

  3. Ringer's lactate, but not hydroxyethyl starch, prolongs the food intolerance time after major abdominal surgery; an open-labelled clinical trial.

    Li, Yuhong; He, Rui; Ying, Xiaojiang; Hahn, Robert G

    2015-05-06

    The infusion of large amounts of Ringer's lactate prolongs the functional gastrointestinal recovery time and increases the number of complications after open abdominal surgery. We performed an open-labelled clinical trial to determine whether hydroxyethyl starch or Ringer's lactate exerts these adverse effects when the surgery is performed by laparoscopy. Eighty-eight patients scheduled for major abdominal cancer surgery (83% by laparoscopy) received a first-line fluid treatment with 9 ml/kg of either 6% hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4 (Voluven) or Ringer's lactate, just after induction of anaesthesia; this was followed by a second-line infusion with 12 ml/kg of either starch or Ringer's lactate over 1 hour. Further therapy was managed at the discretion of the attending anaesthetist. Outcome data consisted of postoperative gastrointestinal recovery time, complications and length of hospital stay. The order of the infusions had no impact on the outcome. Both the administration of ≥ 2 L of Ringer's lactate and the development of a surgical complication were associated with a longer time period of paralytic ileus and food intolerance (two-way ANOVA, P food intolerance time amounted to 2 days each. The infusion of ≥ 1 L of hydroxyethyl starch did not adversely affect gastrointestinal recovery. Ringer's lactate, but not hydroxyethyl starch, prolonged the gastrointestinal recovery time in patients undergoing laparoscopic cancer surgery. Surgical complications prolonged the hospital stay.

  4. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury What is a Spinal Cord Injury Levels of Injury and What They Mean Animated Spinal ... Cord Injury What is a Spinal Cord Injury Levels of Injury and What They Mean Animated Spinal ...

  5. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation ... Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation ...

  6. Antimicrobial prophylaxis for major head and neck surgery in cancer patients: sulbactam-ampicillin versus clindamycin-amikacin.

    Phan, M; Van der Auwera, P; Andry, G; Aoun, M; Chantrain, G; Deraemaecker, R; Dor, P; Daneau, D; Ewalenko, P; Meunier, F

    1992-01-01

    A total of 99 patients with head and neck cancer who were to undergo surgery were randomized in a prospective comparative study of sulbactam-ampicillin (1:2 ratio; four doses of 3 g of ampicillin and 1.5 g of sulbactam intravenously [i.v.] every 6 h) versus clindamycin (four doses of 600 mg i.v. every 6 h)-amikacin (two doses of 500 mg i.v. every 12 h) as prophylaxis starting at the induction of anesthesia. The two groups of evaluable patients (43 in the clindamycin-amikacin treatment group a...

  7. Efficacy of a high-observation protocol in major head and neck cancer surgery: A prospective study.

    Barber, Brittany; Harris, Jeffrey; Shillington, Cameron; Rychlik, Shannon; Dort, Joseph; Meier, Michael; Estey, Angela; Elwi, Adam; Wickson, Patty; Buss, Michael; Zygun, David; Ansari, Kal; Biron, Vincent; O'Connell, Daniel; Seikaly, Hadi

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to optimize an existing clinical care pathway (CCP) for head and neck cancer with a high-observation protocol (HOP) and to determine the effect on length of intensive care unit (ICU) admission and length of stay in hospital (LOS). The HOP mandated initiation of spontaneous breathing trials before the conclusion of the surgery, weaning of sedation, and limiting mechanical ventilation. All patients with head and neck cancer undergoing primary surgery on the HOP were compared to a historical cohort regarding length of ICU admission, ICU readmissions, and LOS. Ninety-six and 52 patients were observed in "historical" and "HOP" cohorts. The length of ICU admission (1.9 vs 1.2 days; p = .021), LOS (20.3 vs 14.1 days; p = .020), and ICU readmissions (10.4% vs 1.9%; p = .013) were significantly decreased in the "HOP" cohort. Rapid weaning of sedation and limiting mechanical ventilation may contribute to a shorter length of ICU admission and LOS, as well as decreased ICU readmissions. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 39: 1689-1695, 2016. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Axillary lymph nodes and arm lymphatic drainage pathways are spared during routine complete axillary clearance in majority of women undergoing breast cancer surgery.

    Szuba, A; Chachaj, Z; Koba-Wszedybylb, M; Hawro, R; Jasinski, R; Tarkowski, R; Szewczyk, K; Bebenek, M; Forgacz, J; Jodkowska, A; Jedrzejuk, D; Janczak, D; Mrozinska, M; Pilch, U; Wozniewski, M

    2011-09-01

    Alterations in axillary lymph nodes (ALNs) after complete axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) in comparison to the preoperative status were evaluated using lymphoscintigraphy performed preoperatively and 1-6 weeks after surgery in 30 women with a new diagnosis of unilateral, invasive breast carcinoma. Analysis of lymphoscintigrams revealed that ALNs after surgery were present in 26 of 30 examined women. In comparison to preoperative status, they were visualized in the same location (12 women), in the same and additionally in different locations (9 women), or only in different locations (4 women). No lymph nodes were visualized in one woman and lymphocoele were in 4 women. Thus, after ALND, a variable number of axillary lymph nodes remain and were visualized on lymphoscintigraphy in the majority of women. The classical ALND, therefore, does not allow complete dissection and removal of axillary nodes with total disruption of axillary lymphatic pathways, accounting in part for the variable incidence and severity of lymphedema after the procedure.

  9. Changes in HbA1c levels and body mass index after successful decompression surgery in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and lumbar spinal stenosis: results of a 2-year follow-up study.

    Kim, Kyoung-Tae; Cho, Dae-Chul; Sung, Joo-Kyung; Kim, Chi Heon; Kang, Hyun; Kim, Du Hwan

    2017-02-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) can hinder a patient's physical activity, which in turn can impair glucose tolerance and body weight regulation in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM-2). Therefore, successful lumbar surgery could facilitate glycemic control and body weight regulation. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of postoperative improvement in physical activity on body mass index (BMI) and hemoglobin A 1c (HbA 1c ) level in patients with LSS and DM-2 over a 2-year follow-up period. Prospective longitudinal observational study. Patients with LSS and DM-2. Visual analogue scale (VAS) scores for back pain and leg pain, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) scores, Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scores, JOA Back Pain Evaluation Questionnaire (JOABPEQ) sections, BMI, and blood analysis for HbA 1c were carried out. A total of 119 patients were enrolled for analysis of the effect of successful decompression surgery on changes in HbA 1c levels and BMI. The VAS score, ODI score, JOA score, JOABPEQ, BMI, HbA 1c were reassessed at 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years after surgery. Additionally, correlations between changes in HbA 1c and changes in the ODI, JOA, JOABPEQs, and BMI were analyzed. The overall values of HbA1c before and at 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years after the surgery were 7.08±0.94%, 6.58±0.87%, 6.59±0.79%, and 6.59±0.79%, respectively (p-values; 6 months: .024; 1 year: .021; 2 years: .038). In the not well-controlled sugar (non-WCS) group (preoperative HbA 1c >6.5%), the difference between pre- and postoperative HbA 1c was highly statistically significant (p25) patients with DM-2 and LSS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Neurological recovery at age 92 after acute trauma and operative spinal decompression

    Hazem Eltahawy, MD, PhD, FRCS, FACS; Angela Ransom, NP; Gary Rajah, MD

    2016-01-01

    People aged > 80 years are among the fastest growing segments of most Western societies. With improved lifestyles and medical care, complex surgical interventions will be increasingly offered to elderly patients. Questions will arise about the value of performing major surgery in patients near their postulated end of life. Here, we describe a near-full neurological recovery from a profound neurological deficit that occurred as a result of a spinal fracture after a fall. To our knowledge, this...

  11. Non-traumatic spinal extradural haematoma: magnetic resonance findings

    Law, E.M.; Smith, P.J.; Fitt, G.; Hennessy, O.F. [St. Vincent`s Hospital, Fitzroy, VIC (Australia). University of Melbourne, Department of Medical Imaging

    1999-05-01

    Non-traumatic extradural spinal haematoma is an uncommon condition that is usually associated with a poor outcome. It may present acutely with signs and symptoms of major neurological dysfunction secondary to cord compression, or subacutely over a number of days or weeks with fluctuating symptoms. The exact aetiology of this condition is incompletely understood, but it is believed that the blood is venous in origin, as distinct from the arterial origin of intracranial extradural haematomas. Causes of non-traumatic extradural spinal haematoma include anticoagulation, vasculitis such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and spinal arteriovenous malformations. Conditions that may mimic an acute spinal haematoma include extradural abscess and extradural metastatic infiltration. It is important to make a diagnosis of extradural compression because surgery may offer the best hope in restoring neurological function in these patients. Imaging modalities used for the investigation of extradural haematomas include myelography, CT myelography (CTM) and MRI with or without gadolinium enhancement. The MR appearances of acute extradural abscess and extradural tumour can mimic an extradural haematoma. In subacute haematoma, owing to the magnetic properties of blood degradation products, MR is more specific in diagnosing and ageing of the haematoma. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd 11 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Model of lumbar spinal stenosis in the experiment

    Oleg Perepechai

    2015-07-01

      Abstracts The description of an experimental model of lumbar spinal stenosis on 20 rats. The experiment was symmetrical dissection of arc plates to the inside thin cortical layer plates, and then dissection of the latter. The middle part of the arc with the spinous processes of the vertebrae is separated from the rest of the arc, and articular processes. The separated middle part of the arc with yellow ligament is shifted in the ventral direction, reducing the size of the cavity of the spinal canal and fix the contacting bone edges with bone cement. Degenerative changes of the nerve roots were evaluated histologically by endoneural and epineural changes using a 7-point scale of G. Byrond and others. In the studied group of animals 7 days after spinal canal stenosis simulations appeared degenerative changes of nerve fibers, but the degree is low, and there is virtually no endoneural inflammation. The epineurium determined expressed or gross changes, indicating epineural inflammatory processes. After 1 month. There appeared dystrophic and degenerative changes of nerve fibers of the overwhelming majority (over 75%. At a later date (3 months, endoneural change remained practically the same as in the 1th month after surgery, epineural violations were preserved, there were groups and single fibroblasts as a sign of epineural fibrosis, as well as portions of connective tissue neoplasms and hyalinosis.   Keywords: lumbar spinal stenosis, an experimental model.

  13. [Analysis of surgical treatment with pectoralis major muscle flap for deep sternal infection after cardiac surgery: a case series of 189 patients].

    Liu, Dong; Wang, Wenzhang; Cai, Aibing; Han, Zhiyi; Li, Xiyuan; Ma, Jiagui

    2015-03-01

    To analyze and summarize the clinical features and experience in surgical treatment of deep sternal infection (DSWI). This was a retrospective study. From January 2008 to December 2013, 189 patients with secondary DSWI after cardiac surgery underwent the pectoralis major muscle flap transposition in our department. There were 116 male and 73 female patients. The mean age was (54 ± 21) years, the body mass index was (26. 1 ± 1. 3) kg/m2. The incidence of postoperation DSWI were after isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) in 93 patients, after other heart surgery plus CABG in 13 patients, after valve surgery in 47 patients, after thoracic aortic surgery in 16 patients, after congenital heart disease in 18 patients, and after cardiac injury in 2 patients. Clean patients' wound and extract secretions, clear the infection thoroughly by surgery and select antibiotics based on susceptibility results, and then repair the wound with appropriate muscle flap, place drain tube with negative pressure. Of all the 189 patients, 184 used isolate pectoralis, 1 used isolate rectus, and 4 used pectoralis plus rectus. The operative wounds of 179 patients were primary healing (94. 7%). Hospital discharge was postponed by 1 week for 7 patients, due to subcutaneous wound infection. Subcutaneous wound infection occurred again in 8 patients 1 week after hospital discharge, and their wounds healed after wound dressing. Nine patients (4. 7%) did not recover, due to residue of the sequestrum and costal chondritis, whom were later cured by undergoing a second treatment of debridement and pectoralis major muscle flap transposition. Eight patients died, in which 2 died of respiratory failure, 2 died of bacterial endocarditis with septicemia, 2 died of renal failure, 1 died of intraoperative bleeding leading to brain death and the 1 died of heart failure. The mortality rate was 4. 2% . The average length of postoperative hospital stay was (14 ± 5) days. The longest postoperative

  14. Predictors of perioperative major bleeding in patients who interrupt warfarin for an elective surgery or procedure: Analysis of the BRIDGE trial.

    Clark, Nathan P; Douketis, James D; Hasselblad, Vic; Schulman, Sam; Kindzelski, Andrei L; Ortel, Thomas L

    2018-01-01

    The use of low-molecular weight heparin bridge therapy during warfarin interruption for elective surgery/procedures increases bleeding. Other predictors of bleeding in this setting are not well described. BRIDGE was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of bridge therapy with dalteparin 100 IU/kg twice daily in patients with atrial fibrillation requiring warfarin interruption. Bleeding outcomes were documented from the time of warfarin interruption until up to 37 days postprocedure. Multiple logistic regression and time-dependent hazard models were used to identify major bleeding predictors. We analyzed 1,813 patients of whom 895 received bridging and 918 received placebo. Median patient age was 72.6 years, and 73.3% were male. Forty-one major bleeding events occurred at a median time of 7.0 days (interquartile range, 4.0-18.0 days) postprocedure. Bridge therapy was a baseline predictor of major bleeding (odds ratio [OR]=2.4, 95% CI: 1.2-4.8), as were a history of renal disease (OR=2.9, 95% CI: 1.4-6.0), and high-bleeding risk procedures (vs low-bleeding risk procedures) (OR=2.9, 95% CI: 1.4-5.9). Perioperative aspirin use (OR=3.6, 95% CI: 1.1-11.9) and postprocedure international normalized ratio >3.0 (OR=2.1, 95% CI: 1.5-3.1) were time-dependent predictors of major bleeding. Major bleeding was most common in the first 10 days compared with 11-37 days postprocedure (OR=3.5, 95% CI: 1.8-6.9). In addition to bridge therapy, perioperative aspirin use, postprocedure international normalized ratio >3.0, a history of renal failure, and having a high-bleeding risk procedure increase the risk of major bleeding around the time of an elective surgery/procedure requiring warfarin interruption. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Measuring and improving the quality of postoperative epidural analgesia for major abdominal surgery using statistical process control charts.

    Duncan, Fiona; Haigh, Carol

    2013-10-01

    To explore and improve the quality of continuous epidural analgesia for pain relief using Statistical Process Control tools. Measuring the quality of pain management interventions is complex. Intermittent audits do not accurately capture the results of quality improvement initiatives. The failure rate for one intervention, epidural analgesia, is approximately 30% in everyday practice, so it is an important area for improvement. Continuous measurement and analysis are required to understand the multiple factors involved in providing effective pain relief. Process control and quality improvement Routine prospectively acquired data collection started in 2006. Patients were asked about their pain and side effects of treatment. Statistical Process Control methods were applied for continuous data analysis. A multidisciplinary group worked together to identify reasons for variation in the data and instigated ideas for improvement. The key measure for improvement was a reduction in the percentage of patients with an epidural in severe pain. The baseline control charts illustrated the recorded variation in the rate of several processes and outcomes for 293 surgical patients. The mean visual analogue pain score (VNRS) was four. There was no special cause variation when data were stratified by surgeons, clinical area or patients who had experienced pain before surgery. Fifty-seven per cent of patients were hypotensive on the first day after surgery. We were able to demonstrate a significant improvement in the failure rate of epidurals as the project continued with quality improvement interventions. Statistical Process Control is a useful tool for measuring and improving the quality of pain management. The applications of Statistical Process Control methods offer the potential to learn more about the process of change and outcomes in an Acute Pain Service both locally and nationally. We have been able to develop measures for improvement and benchmarking in routine care that

  16. Secondary omental and pectoralis major double flap reconstruction following aggressive sternectomy for deep sternal wound infections after cardiac surgery

    Shirasawa Bungo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deep sternal wound infection after cardiac surgery carries high morbidity and mortality. Our strategy for deep sternal wound infection is aggressive strenal debridement followed by vacuum-assisted closure (VAC therapy and omental-muscle flap reconstrucion. We describe this strategy and examine the outcome and long-term quality of life (QOL it achieves. Methods We retrospectively examined 16 patients treated for deep sternal wound infection between 2001 and 2007. The most recent nine patients were treated with total sternal resection followed by VAC therapy and secondary closure with omental-muscle flap reconstruction (recent group; whereas the former seven patients were treated with sternal preservation if possible, without VAC therapy, and four of these patients underwent primary closure (former group. We assessed long-term quality of life after DSWI by using the Short Form 36-Item Health Survey, Version 2 (SF36v2. Results One patient died and four required further surgery for recurrence of deep sternal wound infection in the former group. The duration of treatment for deep sternal wound infection in the recent group was significantly shorter than that in previous group (63.4 ± 54.1 days vs. 120.0 ± 31.8 days, respectively; p = 0.039. Despite aggressive sternal resection, the QOL of patients treated for DSWI was only minimally compromised compared with age-, sex-, surgical procedures-matched patients without deep sternal wound infection. Conclusions Aggressive sternal debridement followed by VAC therapy and secondary closure with an omental-muscle flap is effective for deep sternal wound infection. In this series, it resulted in a lower incidence of recurrent infection, shorter hospitalization, and it did not compromise long-term QOL greatly.

  17. Late Proximal Pedicle Hook Migration Into Spinal Canal After Posterior Correction Surgery of Scoliosis Causing Neurologic Deficit: "Proximal Junctional Scoliosis"? Case Series and a Review of the Literature

    Vereijken, I.M.P.; de Kleuver, M.

    2013-01-01

    Study Design: Case series. Objectives: We describe 4 patients with proximal pedicle hook migration as a late complication (greater than 12 months postoperatively) of posterior correction surgery in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. We studied failure mechanisms and propose strategies for revision

  18. Ogilvie′s syndrome following posterior spinal arthrodesis for scoliosis

    Athanasios I Tsirikos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report Ogilvie′s syndrome following posterior spinal arthrodesis on a patient with thoracic and lumbar scoliosis associated with intraspinal anomalies. Postoperative paralytic ileus can commonly complicate scoliosis surgery. Ogilvie′s syndrome as a cause of abdominal distension and pain has not been reported following spinal deformity correction and can mimic post-surgical ileus. 12 year old female patient with double thoracic and lumbar scoliosis associated with Arnold-Chiari 1 malformation and syringomyelia. The patient underwent posterior spinal fusion from T 4 to L 3 with segmental pedicle screw instrumentation and autogenous iliac crest grafting. She developed abdominal distension and pain postoperatively and this deteriorated despite conservative management. Repeat ultrasounds and abdominal computer tomography scans ruled out mechanical obstruction. The clinical presentation and blood parameters excluded toxic megacolon and cecal volvulus. As the symptoms persisted, a laparotomy was performed on postoperative day 16, which demonstrated ragged tears of the colon and cecum. A right hemi-colectomy followed by ileocecal anastomosis was required. The pathological examination of surgical specimens excluded inflammatory bowel disease and vascular abnormalities. The patient made a good recovery following bowel surgery and at latest followup 3.2 years later she had no abdominal complaints and an excellent scoliosis correction. Ogilvie′s syndrome should be included in the differential diagnosis of postoperative ileus in patients developing prolonged unexplained abdominal distension and pain after scoliosis correction. Early diagnosis and instigation of conservative management can prevent major morbidity and mortality due to bowel ischemia and perforation.

  19. Mandibular Reconstruction Using Pectoralis Major Myocutaneous Flap and Titanium Plates after Ablative Surgery for Locally Advanced Tumors of the Oral Cavity

    El-Zohairy, M.A.F.; Mostafa, A.; Amin, A.; Abd El-Fattah, H.; Khalifa, Sh.

    2009-01-01

    The most common indication for mandible resection remains ablative surgery for cancer of the oral cavity and oropharynx. The use of vascularized bone grafts has become state-of-the-art for mandibular reconstruction. However, the high cost of such surgery may not be justified in patients with advanced disease and poor prognosis, or poor performance status. Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate outcomes of mandibular reconstruction using titanium plates covered with a pedicled pectoralis major myocutaneous flap after ablative surgery for locally advanced tumors of the oral cavity. Patients and methods: The study involves a total of 33 patients with locally advanced tumors of the oral cavity that were treated over 5 year period (2003-2008) at the National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, Egypt. Mandibular resections were performed for treatment of patients with primary oral cavity tumors invading the mandible followed by mandibular reconstruction using titanium plates covered with a pedicled pectoralis major myocutaneous flap. Results: Of 33 patients, 25 (75.75%) were males and 8 (24.25%) were females. The age ranged from 42 to 70 years (mean 52.3±5.9 years). Tongue cancer was the most common tumor, it affects 17 (51.5%) of the patients, 24 patients received post operative radiation therapy. The flap survival was 100%; partial necrosis of the flap skin was observed in 3 patients. One patient developed wound dehiscence. Oro-cutaneous fistula occurred in 5 patients that closed spontaneously. There were 4 cases of plate failure, one patient experienced plate fracture at 13 months after reconstruction. Three patients developed external plate exposure. All patients achieved good functional and acceptable aesthetic outcome. The overall cause-specific cumulative survival was 72.7% at one year and 56.1% at two years. Conclusions: Titanium plate and pedicled pectoralis major myocutaneous flap is a safe and reliable option for composite mandibular defects

  20. Suporte