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Sample records for major hydrogeological zone

  1. UNDERSTANDING HARD ROCK HYDROGEOLOGY THROUGH AN EXPERIMENTAL HYDROGEOLOGICAL PARK IN SOUTH INDIA: Site development and investigations on the major role of the fractured zone in crystalline aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, S.; Guiheneuf, N.; Boisson, A.; Marechal, J.; Chandra, S.; Dewandel, B.; Perrin, J.

    2012-12-01

    In water stressed south India most of the groundwater used for irrigation is pumped from crystalline rocks aquifers. In those structures groundwater flow dominantly occur in a shallow higher-permeability zone that overlies a deeper lower-permeability zone hosting little flow. The fractured zone of the weathering profile plays an important role for groundwater. In order to understand clearly this impact on water availability and quality changes the Experimental Hydrogeological Park at Choutuppal, Andhra Pradesh, India is developed in the framework of the SORE H+ network. Several hydraulic tests (injection, flowmeter profiles, single-packer tests…) and geophysical measurements (ERT, Borehole logging…) are carried out on the site in order to characterize the depth-dependence of hydrodynamic parameters in the Indian Archean granite. Specific investigation on a borewell through packer tests demonstrate that the most conductive part of the aquifer corresponds to the upper part of the fractured layer, located just below the saprolite bottom, between 15 meters and 20 meters depth. There is no highly conductive fracture beyond 20 meters depth and no indication for any conductive fracture beyond 25 meters depth. Packer tests show that the upper part of the fractured layer (15-20 m depth) is characterized by a good vertical connectivity. On the contrary, the tests carried out below 20 m depth show no vertical connectivity at all. The geometry of the fracture network and associated hydrodynamic parameters are in agreement with the conceptual model of hard-rock aquifers that derive its properties from weathering processes. The general existence of such a highly conductive structure at the top of the fractured zone has a great impact on water prospection and exploitation in such crystalline aquifers.

  2. HYDROGEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    <正>20111225 Chen Luwang(School of Resource and Environmental Engineering,Hefei University of Technology,Hefei 230009,China);Gui Herong The Standard Type Trace Elements and the Discriminant Model of Water Bursting Source in the Linhuan Coal District(Hydrogeology and Engineering Geology,ISSN1000-3665,CN11-2202/P,37(3),2010,p.17-22,2 illus.,2 tables,11 refs.)Key words:mine environment,water gushing,Anhui It is of great academic and practical significance that hydrogeological information during the sign time of water bursting is captured by means of standard type trace elements which can trace hydrogeological features of different aquifers.On the basis of these standard type trace elements,a Bayes linear discriminant model of water bursting source is built.

  3. HYDROGEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    20150507Gao Dongdong(State Key Laboratory of Geohazard Prevention and Geoenvironment Protection,Chengdu University of Technology,Chengdu 610059,China);Wu Yong Water Cycle and Groundwater Recharge of Small Watershed Rainfall Process in a Mountain Forest System(Hydrogeology and Engineering Geology,ISSN1000-3665,CN11-2202/P,41(1),2014,p.7-14,4illus.,9tables,32refs.)Key words:hydrologic cycle,groundwater recharge,Sichuan Province

  4. HYDROGEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>20080542 Cao Wenbing(School of Water Resources and Environment,China University of Geosciences,Beijing 100083,China);Wan Li Experiments on Osmosis through Clayey Soil under the Condition of Variable Water Levels(Hydrogeology & Engineering Geology,ISSN1000-3665,CN11-2202/P,33(2),2006,p.118-122,6 illus.,1 table,3 refs.,with English abstract)

  5. Hydrogeology of the unsaturated zone, North Ramp area of the Exploratory Studies Facility, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousseau, J.P.; Kwicklis, E.M.; Gillies, D.C. [eds.

    1999-03-01

    Yucca Mountain, in southern Nevada, is being investigated by the US Department of Energy as a potential site for a repository for high-level radioactive waste. This report documents the results of surface-based geologic, pneumatic, hydrologic, and geochemical studies conducted during 1992 to 1996 by the US Geological Survey in the vicinity of the North Ramp of the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) that are pertinent to understanding multiphase fluid flow within the deep unsaturated zone. Detailed stratigraphic and structural characteristics of the study area provided the hydrogeologic framework for these investigations. Shallow infiltration is not discussed in detail in this report because the focus in on three major aspects of the deep unsaturated-zone system: geologic framework, the gaseous-phase system, and the aqueous-phase system. However, because the relation between shallow infiltration and deep percolation is important to an overall understanding of the unsaturated-zone flow system, a summary of infiltration studies conducted to date at Yucca Mountain is provided in the section titled Shallow Infiltration. This report describes results of several Site Characterization Plan studies that were ongoing at the time excavation of the ESF North Ramp began and that continued as excavation proceeded.

  6. INVESTIGATION OF HYDROGEOLOGIC MAPPING TO DELINEATE PROTECTION ZONES AROUND SPRINGS: REPORT OF TWO CASE STUDIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methods commonly used to delineate protection zones for water-supply wells are often not directly applicable for springs. This investigation focuses on the use of hydrogeologic mapping methods to identify physical and hydrologic features that control ground-water flow to springs...

  7. Fault Zone Hydrogeology of Crystalline and Sedimentary Aquifers in Arid Regions: The Case Sinai Peninsula, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, M.; Mohamed, L.; Sultan, M.; Farag, A. Z. A.

    2015-12-01

    Structural control on the groundwater flow in arid regions is still poorly understood. Understanding the distribution of structural discontinuities (i.e. faults, joints and shear zones), their cross cutting relationships, and their relation with the regional hydraulic gradient are critical for deciphering the complexity of water resources distribution in the highly fractured crystalline and sedimentary aquifers in Sinai. In order to achieve that, we conducted an integrated approach using remote sensing, geophysical and hydrogeological datasets: (1) identification of the spatial and temporal rainfall events using Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) data; (2) delineation of major faults and shear zones using Landsat 8 and ASTER image ratioing, geological datasets and field investigation; (3) generation of a normalized difference ratio image using Envisat radar images before and after the rain events to identify preferential water-channeling discontinuities in the crystalline terrain; (4) validation of the water-channeling discontinuities using Very Low Frequency (VLF) method; (5) generation of regional groundwater flow and isotopic (18O and 2H ) distribution maps for the sedimentary aquifer and an approximation flow map for the crystalline aquifer; (6) developing a conceptual model for the groundwater flow in the fractured crystalline and sedimentary aquifers; (7) testing the model accuracy using Vertical Electrical Sounding (VES) method in seven locations. Our findings include: (1) in the crystalline aquifer, discontinuities that are sub-parallel to groundwater flow direction act as preferred pathways for groundwater flow, whereas those that intersect groundwater flow directions at high angles act as barriers causing considerable groundwater accumulations at the upstream side; (2) in the sedimentary aquifer, high angle E-W discontinuities (i.e. Themed shear zone and Sinai Hinge Belt) cause a considerable groundwater elevation, redirection of the groundwater

  8. Hydrogeology of the unsaturated zone, North Ramp area of the Exploratory Studies Facility, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, Joseph P.; Kwicklis, Edward M.; Gillies, Daniel C.; Rousseau, Joseph P.; Kwicklis, Edward M.; Gillies, Daniel C.

    1999-01-01

    Yucca Mountain, in southern Nevada, is being investigated by the U.S. Department of Energy as a potential site for a repository for high-level radioactive waste. This report documents the results of surface-based geologic, pneumatic, hydrologic, and geochemical studies conducted during 1992 to 1996 by the U.S. Geological Survey in the vicinity of the North Ramp of the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) that are pertinent to understanding multiphase fluid flow within the deep unsaturated zone. Detailed stratigraphic and structural characteristics of the study area provided the hydrogeologic framework for these investigations. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that gas flow and liquid flow within the welded tuffs of the unsaturated zone occur primarily through fractures. Fracture densities are highest in the Tiva Canyon welded (TCw) and Topopah Spring welded (TSw) hydrogeologic units. Although fracture density is much lower in the intervening nonwelded and bedded tuffs of the Paintbrush nonwelded hydrogeologic unit (PTn), pneumatic and aqueous-phase isotopic evidence indicates that substantial secondary permeability is present locally in the PTn, especially in the vicinity of faults. Borehole air-injection tests indicate that bulk air-permeability ranges from 3.5x10-14 to 5.4x10-11 square meters for the welded tuffs and from 1.2x10-13 to 3.0x10-12 square meters for the non welded and bedded tuffs of the PTn. Analyses of in-situ pneumatic-pressure data from monitored boreholes produced estimates of bulk permeability that were comparable to those determined from the air-injection tests. In many cases, both sets of estimates are two to three orders of magnitude larger than estimates based on laboratory analyses of unfractured core samples. The in-situ pneumatic-pressure records also indicate that the unsaturated-zone pneumatic system consists of four subsystems that coincide with the four major hydrogeologic units of the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain. In

  9. Vadose Zone Hydrogeology Data Package for Hanford Assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Last, George V.; Freeman, Eugene J.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Fayer, Michael J.; Gee, Glendon W.; Nichols, William E.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Horton, Duane G.

    2006-06-01

    This data package documents the technical basis for selecting physical and geochemical parameters and input values that will be used in vadose zone modeling for Hanford assessments. This work was originally conducted as part of the Characterization of Systems Task of the Groundwater Remediation Project managed by Fluor Hanford, Inc., Richland, Washington, and revised as part of the Characterization of Systems Project managed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL). This data package describes the geologic framework, the physical, hydrologic, and contaminant transport properties of the geologic materials, and deep drainage (i.e., recharge) estimates, and builds on the general framework developed for the initial assessment conducted using the System Assessment Capability (SAC) (Bryce et al. 2002). The general approach for this work was to update and provide incremental improvements over the previous SAC data package completed in 2001. As with the previous SAC data package, much of the data and interpreted information were extracted from existing documents and databases. Every attempt was made to provide traceability to the original source(s) of the data or interpretations.

  10. Hydrogeologic Framework Model for the Saturated Zone Site Scale flow and Transport Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. Miller

    2004-11-15

    The purpose of this report is to document the 19-unit, hydrogeologic framework model (19-layer version, output of this report) (HFM-19) with regard to input data, modeling methods, assumptions, uncertainties, limitations, and validation of the model results in accordance with AP-SIII.10Q, Models. The HFM-19 is developed as a conceptual model of the geometric extent of the hydrogeologic units at Yucca Mountain and is intended specifically for use in the development of the ''Saturated Zone Site-Scale Flow Model'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170037]). Primary inputs to this model report include the GFM 3.1 (DTN: MO9901MWDGFM31.000 [DIRS 103769]), borehole lithologic logs, geologic maps, geologic cross sections, water level data, topographic information, and geophysical data as discussed in Section 4.1. Figure 1-1 shows the information flow among all of the saturated zone (SZ) reports and the relationship of this conceptual model in that flow. The HFM-19 is a three-dimensional (3-D) representation of the hydrogeologic units surrounding the location of the Yucca Mountain geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The HFM-19 represents the hydrogeologic setting for the Yucca Mountain area that covers about 1,350 km2 and includes a saturated thickness of about 2.75 km. The boundaries of the conceptual model were primarily chosen to be coincident with grid cells in the Death Valley regional groundwater flow model (DTN: GS960808312144.003 [DIRS 105121]) such that the base of the site-scale SZ flow model is consistent with the base of the regional model (2,750 meters below a smoothed version of the potentiometric surface), encompasses the exploratory boreholes, and provides a framework over the area of interest for groundwater flow and radionuclide transport modeling. In depth, the model domain extends from land surface to the base of the regional groundwater flow model (D'Agnese et al. 1997 [DIRS 100131], p 2). For the site

  11. Fault zone hydrogeologic properties and processes revealed by borehole temperature monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, P. M.; Brodsky, E. E.

    2015-12-01

    High-resolution borehole temperature monitoring can provide valuable insight into the hydrogeologic structure of fault zones and transient processes that affect fault zone stability. Here we report on results from a subseafloor temperature observatory within the Japan Trench plate boundary fault. In our efforts to interpret this unusual dataset, we have developed several new methods for probing hydrogeologic properties and processes. We illustrate how spatial variations in the thermal recovery of the borehole after drilling and other spectral characteristics provide a measure of the subsurface permeability architecture. More permeable zones allow for greater infiltration of cool drilling fluids, are more greatly thermally disturbed, and take longer to recover. The results from the JFAST (Japan Trench Fast Drilling Project) observatory are consistent with geophysical logs, core data, and other hydrologic observations and suggest a permeable damage zone consisting of steeply dipping faults and fractures overlays a low-permeability clay-rich plate boundary fault. Using high-resolution time series data, we have also developed methods to map out when and where fluid advection occurs in the subsurface over time. In the JFAST data, these techniques reveal dozens of transient earthquake-driven fluid pulses that are spatially correlated and consistently located around inferred permeable areas of the fault damage zone. These observations are suspected to reflect transient fluid flow driven by pore pressure changes in response to dynamic and/or static stresses associated with nearby earthquakes. This newly recognized hydrologic phenomenon has implications for understanding subduction zone heat and chemical transport as well as the redistribution of pore fluid pressure which influences fault stability and can trigger other earthquakes.

  12. Coupled semivariogram uncertainty of hydrogeological and geophysical data on capture zone uncertainty analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, A.; Tsai, F.T.-C.; White, C.D.; Willson, C.S.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates capture zone uncertainty that relates to the coupled semivariogram uncertainty of hydrogeological and geophysical data. Semivariogram uncertainty is represented by the uncertainty in structural parameters (range, sill, and nugget). We used the beta distribution function to derive the prior distributions of structural parameters. The probability distributions of structural parameters were further updated through the Bayesian approach with the Gaussian likelihood functions. Cokriging of noncollocated pumping test data and electrical resistivity data was conducted to better estimate hydraulic conductivity through autosemivariograms and pseudo-cross-semivariogram. Sensitivities of capture zone variability with respect to the spatial variability of hydraulic conductivity, porosity and aquifer thickness were analyzed using ANOVA. The proposed methodology was applied to the analysis of capture zone uncertainty at the Chicot aquifer in Southwestern Louisiana, where a regional groundwater flow model was developed. MODFLOW-MODPATH was adopted to delineate the capture zone. The ANOVA results showed that both capture zone area and compactness were sensitive to hydraulic conductivity variation. We concluded that the capture zone uncertainty due to the semivariogram uncertainty is much higher than that due to the kriging uncertainty for given semivariograms. In other words, the sole use of conditional variances of kriging may greatly underestimate the flow response uncertainty. Semivariogram uncertainty should also be taken into account in the uncertainty analysis. ?? 2008 ASCE.

  13. Hydrogeological characterisation and modelling of deformation zones and fracture domains, Forsmark modelling stage 2.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Follin, Sven (SF GeoLogic AB, Taeby (SE)); Leven, Jakob (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (SE)); Hartley, Lee; Jackson, Peter; Joyce, Steve; Roberts, David; Swift, Ben (Serco Assurance, Harwell (GB))

    2007-09-15

    The work reported here collates the structural-hydraulic information gathered in 21 cored boreholes and 32 percussion-drilled boreholes belonging to Forsmark site description, modelling stage 2.2. The analyses carried out provide the hydrogeological input descriptions of the bedrock in Forsmark needed by the end users Repository Engineering, Safety Assessment and Environmental Impact Assessment; that is, hydraulic properties of deformation zones and fracture domains. The same information is also needed for constructing 3D groundwater flow models of the Forsmark site and surrounding area. The analyses carried out render the following conceptual model regarding the observed heterogeneity in deformation zone transmissivity: We find the geological division of the deterministically modelled deformation zones into eight categories (sets) useful from a hydrogeological point of view. Seven of the eight categories are steeply dipping, WNW, NW, NNW, NNE, NE, ENE and EW, and on is gently dipping, G. All deformation zones, regardless of orientation (strike and dip), are subjected to a substantial decrease in transmissivity with depth. The data gathered suggest a contrast of c. 20,000 times for the uppermost one kilometre of bedrock, i.e. more than four orders of magnitude. The hydraulic properties below this depth are not investigated. The lateral heterogeneity is also substantial but more irregular in its appearance. For instance, for a given elevation and deformation zone category (orientation), the spatial variability in transmissivity within a particular deformation zone appears to be as large as the variability between all deformation zones. This suggests that the lateral correlation length is shorter than the shortest distance between two adjacent observation points and shorter than the category spacing. The observation that the mean transmissivity of the gently-dipping deformation zones is c. one to two orders of magnitude greater than the mean transmissivities of all

  14. Critical zone study in Korea: integration of hydrogeology, mineralogy, sedimentology and molecular biogeochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. Y.; Kwon, K.; Jo, K. N.; Lee, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    Critical Zone (CZ) is the topmost layer of the Earth ranging from the vegetation canopy down to the soil, groundwater, and bedrock that sustains our ecosystem including human life. This CZ is being greatly influenced by the climate change and anthropogenic forces. We introduce the Critical Zone Frontier Research Laboratory (CFRL), a critical zone research lab recently funded by the Korean government for 2015-2020. The objective of CFRL is to unravel the relationships between climate and CZ changes to propose a prediction model for future responses of CZ to climate change. For this ultimate goal, we establish multiple CZ observatories in Kangwon areas and investigate soil, groundwater, and cave environments by integration of hydrogeology, mineralogy, sedimentology and molecular biogeochemistry. This study will enhance our understanding about CZ and local resolution of a climate change model. This research is financially supported by the Basic Research Laboratory Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning.

  15. Hydrogeological properties of fault zones in a karstified carbonate aquifer (Northern Calcareous Alps, Austria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, H.; Schröckenfuchs, T. C.; Decker, K.

    2016-08-01

    This study presents a comparative, field-based hydrogeological characterization of exhumed, inactive fault zones in low-porosity Triassic dolostones and limestones of the Hochschwab massif, a carbonate unit of high economic importance supplying 60 % of the drinking water of Austria's capital, Vienna. Cataclastic rocks and sheared, strongly cemented breccias form low-permeability (3 % and permeabilities >1,000 mD form high-permeability domains. With respect to fault-zone architecture and rock content, which is demonstrated to be different for dolostone and limestone, four types of faults are presented. Faults with single-stranded minor fault cores, faults with single-stranded permeable fault cores, and faults with multiple-stranded fault cores are seen as conduits. Faults with single-stranded impermeable fault cores are seen as conduit-barrier systems. Karstic carbonate dissolution occurs along fault cores in limestones and, to a lesser degree, dolostones and creates superposed high-permeability conduits. On a regional scale, faults of a particular deformation event have to be viewed as forming a network of flow conduits directing recharge more or less rapidly towards the water table and the springs. Sections of impermeable fault cores only very locally have the potential to create barriers.

  16. Hydrogeological impact of fault zones on a fractured carbonate aquifer, Semmering (Austria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayaud, Cyril; Winkler, Gerfried; Reichl, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Fault zones are the result of tectonic processes and are geometrical features frequently encountered in carbonate aquifer systems. They can hamper the fluid migration (hydrogeological barriers), propagate the movement of fluid (draining conduits) or be a combination of both processes. Numerical modelling of fractured carbonate aquifer systems is strongly bound on the knowledge of a profound conceptual model including geological and tectonic settings such as fault zones. In further consequence, numerical models can be used to evaluate the conceptual model and its introduced approximations. The study was conducted in a fractured carbonate aquifer built up by permomesozoic dolo/limestones of the Semmering-Wechsel complex in the Eastern Alps (Austria). The aquifer has an assumed thickness of about 200 m and dips to the north. It is covered by a thin quartzite layer and a very low permeable layer of quartz-phyllite having a thickness of up to several hundred meters. The carbonate layer crops out only in the southern part of the investigation area, where it receives autogenic recharge. The geological complexity affects some uncertainties related to the extent of the model area, which was determined to be about 15 km². Three vertical fault zones cross the area approximately in a N-S direction. The test site includes an infrastructural pilot tunnel gallery of 4.3 km length with two pumping stations, respectively active since August 1997 and June 1998. The total pumping rate is about 90 l/s and the drawdown data were analysed analytically, providing a hydraulic conductivity of about 5E-05 m/s for the carbonate layer. About 120 m drawdown between the initial situation and situation with pumping is reported by piezometers. This led to the drying up of one spring located at the southern border of the carbonates. A continuum approach using MODFLOW-2005 was applied to reproduce numerically the observed aquifer behaviour and investigate the impact of the three fault zones. First

  17. Hydrogeology of Nevada

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set consists of hydrogeology for the State of Nevada. Consolidated rocks and unconsolidated sediments are the two major hydrogeologic units. Consolidated...

  18. Hydrogeologic analysis of the saturated-zone ground-water system, under Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridrich, C. J.; Dudley, W. W.; Stuckless, J. S.

    1994-02-01

    The configuration of the southward-sloping water table under Yucca Mountain is dominated by an abrupt decline of 300 m over a distance of less than 2 km. This northeast-striking zone of large hydraulic gradient (of 0.15 or more) separates an area of moderate gradient (of about 0.015) to the north from an area of very small gradient (0.0001) to the south. The position of the large gradient does not correlate well with any evident geologic feature in the upper 0.5 km of the mountain, but we suggest that buried geologic features are present that can explain all the geohydrologic observations. The three areas of differing hydraulic gradient under Yucca Mountain are parts of hydrogeologic domains that extend more than 70 km to the northeast. On a regional basis, the moderate and very small gradients generally correspond to areas underlain by exceptionally thick Tertiary volcanic sections and a highly transmissive Paleozoic carbonate aquifer, respectively. The regional large gradient and water-table decline are spatially associated with a contact in the Paleozoic rocks between clastic rocks and carbonates. This contact marks a large abrupt drop in the effective base of the hydrologic system because it is the upgradient boundary of the deep carbonate aquifer, which has a thickness of 5 km. An aeromagnetic high follows the regional-scale domain of large gradient under northern Yucca Mountain from outcrops of a magnetite-bearing clastic confining unit to the east, indicating that the regional correlation of the steep water-table decline with the upgradient boundary of the deep carbonate aquifer may extend to Yucca Mountain. Five additional features may be related to an explanation for the large hydraulic gradient: (1) anomalously low heat flow has been measured deep in the volcanic section south of the water-table decline, suggesting underflow of cool water in the deep carbonate aquifer; (2) the lower tuff sequence, of 0.5-1 km in thickness, which underlies most of Yucca

  19. Scoping studies on the effect of quaternary climate change on the hydrogeology in the Sellafield potential repository zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heathcote, J.A. [Entec UK Ltd., Shrewsbury (United Kingdom)

    1997-04-01

    The present investigations in the vicinity of the Sellafield potential repository zone have provided data on groundwater pressure and salinity to a depth of some 2000 m, for a section extending from the hills to the east of the zone, to the coast. As part of the process of demonstrating the suitability of the site for a deep repository, work has been undertaken to reconcile these observations of pressure and salinity with an understanding of the hydrogeology of the site. It is considered possible that the long glacial history of the site may in part be responsible for present observations. This work documents some preliminary studies to determine the possible magnitude of such glacial effects. 4 refs, 2 figs.

  20. Structural and hydrogeological features of Pleistocene shear zones in the area of Rome (Central Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Faccenna

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available The last tectonic episode observed in the Latium Tyrrhenian margin (Central Italy, few km cast of Rome, is represented by a set of middIe-upper Pleistocene N-S shear zones, characterised by complex geometric and kinematic setting. The easternmost of these shear zones displays a strike-slip component of motion and is located at the boundary between the Apennine carbonate chain and the volcanic areas. The distribution of travertine deposits and hydrothermal springs suggests that this fault zone acts as an impermeable barrier for lateral flow derived from superficial karstic circuit, and as a preferential upwelling surface for deep hydrothermal fluids. We propose that high fluid pressure could develop inside these fault zones favouring the reactivation of buried pre-existing crustal discontinuities and the local re-orientation of the stress field, as testified by the geometry and the kinematics of the surface fault pattern.

  1. Hydrogeology, chemical characteristics, and water sources and pathways in the zone of contribution of a public-supply well in San Antonio, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musgrove, MaryLynn; Fahlquist, Lynne; Stanton, Gregory P.; Houston, Natalie A.; Lindgren, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    In 2001, the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program of the U.S. Geological Survey initiated a series of studies on the transport of anthropogenic and natural contaminants (TANC) to public-supply wells (PSWs). The main goal of the TANC project was to better understand the source, transport, and receptor factors that control contaminant movement to PSWs in representative aquifers of the United States. Regional- and local-scale study areas were selected from within existing NAWQA study units, including the south-central Texas Edwards aquifer. The local-scale TANC study area, nested within the regional-scale NAWQA study area, is representative of the regional Edwards aquifer. The PSW selected for study is within a well field of six production wells. Although a single PSW was initially selected, because of constraints of well-field operation, samples were collected from different wells within the well field for different components of the study. Data collected from all of the well-field wells were considered comparable because of similar well construction, hydrogeology, and geochemistry. An additional 38 PSWs (mostly completed in the confined part of the aquifer) were sampled throughout the regional aquifer to characterize water quality. Two monitoring well clusters, with wells completed at different depths, were installed to the east and west of the well field (the Zarzamora and Timberhill monitoring well clusters, respectively). One of the monitoring wells was completed in the overburden to evaluate potential hydrologic connectivity with the Edwards aquifer. Geophysical and flowmeter logs were collected from one of the well-field PSWs to determine zones of contribution to the wellbore. These contributing zones, associated with different hydrogeologic units, were used to select monitoring well completion depths and groundwater sample collection depths for depth-dependent sampling. Depth-dependent samples were collected from the PSW from three different

  2. Geological and hydrogeological conditions of the Aigion seismic active fault zone (Deep Geodynamic Laboratory Corinth) based on borehole data and hydraulic tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rettenmaier, D.; Giurgea, V.; Pizzino, L.; Unkel, I.; Hoetzl, H.; Foerster, A.; Quattrocchi, F.; Nikas, K.

    2003-04-01

    The Gulf of Corinth and the northern part of the Peloponnesus/Greece, an area of asymmetric graben structure, step faults and tilted blocks, is one of the most active seismic zones in the world. Six major faults are known to be most responsible for the historic and present seismic activities in the area of Aigion. Our study focuses preliminarily on the area around the Aigion fault, whose trace runs E-W through the harbour of Aigion. Investigations of the stratigraphic sequence, tectonic structure and hydrogeologic conditions of the southern Corinth graben shoulder and first drilling activities there, have started in summer 2001. From July until September 2002 the International Continental Deep Drilling Project (ICDP) and the EU Project DGLab-Gulf of Corinth drilled the AIG10 borehole in the harbour of Aigion to a total depth of 1001 m. Our investigations in this ICDP/EU framework are aimed at studying the thermal-hydraulic conditions on the southern graben shoulder. Here we report the first results on sampling and hydraulic testing. The deep AIG10 borehole has successfully cored in approx. 760 m depth the fault plane, which separates fractured radiolarite in the hanging wall from highly fractured and karstified platy, micritic limestone (Olonos-Pindos Unit) in the footwall. A complete lithologic section is now available through the monitoring of cuttings and cores, which built a major cornerstone for defining an integrated regional tectonic and geologic model. Several pumping tests and hydrochemical investigations made in the region of Aigion and especially in the AIG10 borehole deliver together with geophysical borehole logging the database for a thermo-hydraulic heat flow model. The pumping test AIG10C in the conglomerates of the graben sediments show a hydraulic conductivity of about 2 x 10E-5 m/s - 3 x 10E-4 m/s at a depth of approximately 211 m. The result was a residual drawdown, which indicates a closed hydraulic system between the semi-permeable Aigion

  3. Selenium in groundwater and its contribution towards daily dietary Se intake under different hydrogeological zones of Punjab, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhillon, Karaj S.; Dhillon, Surjit K.

    2016-02-01

    More than 750 groundwater samples collected from different hydrological zones of Punjab state in India were analysed for selenium and some quality parameters to determine suitability of groundwater for irrigation and drinking purpose. Selenium content varied from 0.01 to 35.6 μg L-1. Average Se content in groundwater was the highest in Northeastern Siwalik foothill zone (NSFZ) followed by Central zone (CZ) and Southwestern zone (SWZ). Majority of the water samples contained water contained >20 μg Se L-1 which is considered unsuitable for irrigation of crops. On the basis of pH, 42% of the samples were unfit for drinking in SWZ, 41% in CZ and 6% in NSFZ. Only in SWZ, 24% of the samples with high total dissolved salts were unfit for drinking and 18% unfit for irrigation purpose due to high EC. Selenium content in groundwater was inversely related to depth of water and the degree of relationship was higher for NSFZ (r = -0.342∗∗) followed by CZ (r = -0.157∗) and SWZ (r = -0.126∗). Depending on the amount of water consumed from 2 to 5 L, average Se intake varied from 1.66 to 6.39 μg d-1 and its contribution towards the recommended daily Se allowance ranged from 3.0% to 11.6% for women and 2.4% to 9.1% for men. Among the grain samples, 94% of wheat and 46% of rice contained Se above the deficiency limit of 100 μg kg-1. Thus, the residents in the study area primarily consuming wheat grains and drinking groundwater are getting adequate supply of Se. Among the materials tested for decreasing Se from drinking waters, scrap iron fillings showed potential for commercial use.

  4. Hydrogeological characterization of shallow-depth zone for CO2 injection and leak test at a CO2 environmental monitoring site in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. S.; Kim, T. W.; Kim, H. H.; Ha, S. W.; Jeon, W. T.; Lee, K. K.

    2015-12-01

    The main goal of the this study is to evaluate the importance of heterogeneities in controlling the field-scale transport of CO2 are originated from the CO2 injected at saturated zone below the water table for monitoring and prediction of CO2 leakage from a reservoir. Hydrogeological and geophysical data are collected to characterize the site, prior to conducting CO2 injection experiment at the CO2 environmental monitoring site at Eumseong, Korea. The geophysical data were acquired from borehole electromagnetic flowmeter tests, while the hydraulic data were obtained from pumping tests, slug tests, and falling head permeability tests. Total of 13 wells to perform hydraulic and geophysical test are established along groundwater flow direction in regular sequence, revealed by the results of borehole electromagnetic flowmeter test. The results of geophysical tests indicated that hydraulic gradient is not identical with the topographic gradient. Groundwater flows toward the uphill direction in the study area. Then, the hydraulic tests were conducted to identify the hydraulic properties of the study site. According to the results of pumping and slug tests at the study site, the hydraulic conductivity values show ranges between 4.75 x 10-5 cm/day and 9.74 x 10-5 cm/day. In addition, a portable multi-level sampling and monitoring packer device which remains inflated condition for a long period developed and used to isolate designated depths to identify vertical distribution of hydrogeological characteristics. Hydrogeological information obtained from this study will be used to decide the injection test interval of CO2-infused water and gaseous CO2. Acknowledgement: Financial support was provided by "R&D Project on Environmental Mangement of Geologic CO2 Storage" from the KEITI (Project Number: 2014001810003).

  5. Areal extent, hydrogeologic characteristics, and possible origins of the carbonate rock Newburg Zone (Middle-Upper Silurian) in Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobel, M.L.; Bugliosi, E.F.

    1991-01-01

    The zone occurs in carbonate rocks of Middle to Late Silurian age across much of Ohio. Known also to well drillers as the "Second Water' in the "Big Lime' carbonate sequence, the Newburg zone is a source of hydrocarbons in northeast Ohio, brines in southeast Ohio, and a widespread source of water over much of west-central Ohio. Close to recharge areas, the quality of the water is comparable to that of the overlying carbonate rocks; thus, the Newburg zone warrants further investigation as a source of water for domestic use. Theories for the porosity and permeabilty of the Newburg zone include: 1) deposition of carbonate or quartz sand along an erosional surface and later lithified to porous and permeable sandstone; 2) dissolution of fossils within Silurian reef complexes; 3) fracture-induced porosity along thrust faults developed during the Alleghenian orogeny; and 4) a combination of these processes. -from Authors

  6. Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Lester J.; Dixon, Joann F.

    2015-01-01

    Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system were developed to define an updated hydrogeologic framework as part of the U.S. Geological Survey Groundwater Resources Program. The dataset contains structural surfaces depicting the top and base of the aquifer system, its major and minor hydrogeologic units and zones, geophysical marker horizons, and the altitude of the 10,000-milligram-per-liter total dissolved solids boundary that defines the approximate fresh and saline parts of the aquifer system. The thicknesses of selected major and minor units or zones were determined by interpolating points of known thickness or from raster surface subtraction of the structural surfaces. Additional data contained include clipping polygons; regional polygon features that represent geologic or hydrogeologic aspects of the aquifers and the minor units or zones; data points used in the interpolation; and polygon and line features that represent faults, boundaries, and other features in the aquifer system.

  7. Using GA-Ridge regression to select hydro-geological parameters influencing groundwater pollution vulnerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jae Joon; Kim, Young Min; Yoo, Keunje; Park, Joonhong; Oh, Kyong Joo

    2012-11-01

    For groundwater conservation and management, it is important to accurately assess groundwater pollution vulnerability. This study proposed an integrated model using ridge regression and a genetic algorithm (GA) to effectively select the major hydro-geological parameters influencing groundwater pollution vulnerability in an aquifer. The GA-Ridge regression method determined that depth to water, net recharge, topography, and the impact of vadose zone media were the hydro-geological parameters that influenced trichloroethene pollution vulnerability in a Korean aquifer. When using these selected hydro-geological parameters, the accuracy was improved for various statistical nonlinear and artificial intelligence (AI) techniques, such as multinomial logistic regression, decision trees, artificial neural networks, and case-based reasoning. These results provide a proof of concept that the GA-Ridge regression is effective at determining influential hydro-geological parameters for the pollution vulnerability of an aquifer, and in turn, improves the AI performance in assessing groundwater pollution vulnerability.

  8. Hydrogeology of a zone of secondary permeability in the surficial aquifer of eastern Palm Beach County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swayze, L.J.; Miller, W.L.

    1984-01-01

    The surficial aquifer is the primary source of freshwater for the heavily developed coastal area in eastern Palm Beach County, Florida. Well fields are generally located in a discontinuous zone of higher secondary permeability, the northernmost extension of the Biscayne aquifer in the surficial aquifer, that extends from the Juno Beach area south to Broward County and varies in width from about 4 to 15 miles. The zone was formed by varying dissolution of aquifer limestone materials during Pleistocene age changes in sea level, and ranges in depth from about sea level to 220 feet below sea level. Because of proximity to the Atlantic Ocean and saltwater estuaries, the aquifer is susceptible to saltwater intrusion. Ground water to the west of the zone of higher secondary permeability is of poor quality. The ground water is calcium bicarbonate dominant. Dissolved solids, calcium carbonate hardness, and chloride are greatest along the saltwater intruded coastline and in the western part of the study area where diluted residual seawater exists. Total organic carbon increases inland due to infiltration of rainwater through thicker layers of organic soils. Ground-water levels in the surficial aquifer in eastern Palm Beach County are strongly influenced by controlled levels in canals. In March 1981, after 12 months of below average rainfall, ground-water levels ranged from about 2 feet above sea level along the coast to nearly 21 feet above sea level 15 miles inland in the northwest section of the study area. (USGS)

  9. Recent geodynamics of major strike-slip zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir G. Trifonov

    2015-09-01

    In all of the cases mentioned above, strike-slip deformation was expressed only or mainly during strong earthquakes. At other times, the rate of its accumulation was small and the dominant stress conditions led to transverse shortening, rarely resulting in local lengthening of the tectonic zone. These variations are caused by the tectonic peculiarities of these zones. The sinistral component of the deformation is related to the shift of the Arabian Plate relative to the African one, but also the transverse component is related to the continental slope and is expressed by the Coastal range shortening that exists in the El Ghab segment zone. There is not only a dextral deformation component, but also a transverse component, expressed by shortening of the Fergana and Talas ranges existing in the Talas-Fergana fault zone. In both zones, the shortening component became appreciable or dominant when the strike-slip deformation rate decreased. Similar, but more local, relationships were expressed in the epicentral area of the 2003 Altai earthquake and in the Western Palmyrides.

  10. Uranium transport around the reactor zone at Bangombé and Okélobondo (Oklo): examples of hydrogeological and geochemical model integration and data evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurban, I.; Laaksoharju, M.; Madé, B.; Ledoux, E.

    2003-03-01

    The sites at Bangombé and Okélobondo (Oklo) in Gabon provide a unique opportunity to study the behaviour of products from natural nuclear reactions in the vicinity of reactor zones which were active around two billion years ago. The Commission of the European Communities initiated the Oklo Natural Analogue Programme. One of the principal aims was to study indications of present time migration of elements from the reactor zones under ambient conditions. The hydrogeological and hydrochemical data from the Oklo sites were modelled in order to better understand the geochemical behaviour of radionuclides in the natural system, by using independent models and by comparing the modelling outcome. Two modelling approaches were used: M3 code (hydrochemical mixing and mass balance model), developed by the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) and HYTEC (reactive transport model) developed by Ecole des Mines de Paris. Two different reactor zones were studied: Bangombé, a shallow site, the reactor being at 11 m depth, and OK84 at Okélobondo, situated at about 450 m depth, more comparable with a real repository location. This allowed the validation of modelling tools in two different sedimentary environments: one shallow, with a more homogeneous layering situated in an area of meteoric alteration, and the other offering the opportunity to study radionuclide migration from the reaction zone over a distance of 450 m through very heterogeneous sedimentary layers. The modeling results indicate that the chemical reactions retarding radionuclide transport are very different at the two sites. At Bangombé, the decomposition of organic material consumes oxygen and at Okélobondo the oxygen is consumed by inorganic reactions resulting, in both cases, in uranium retardation. Both modelling approaches (statistic with M3 code and deterministic with HYTEC code) could describe this situation. The goal of this exercise is to test codes which can help to describe and

  11. Classification of hydrogeologic areas and hydrogeologic flow systems in the basin and range physiographic province, southwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anning, David W.; Konieczki, Alice D.

    2005-01-01

    The hydrogeology of the Basin and Range Physiographic Province in parts of Arizona, California, New Mexico, Utah, and most of Nevada was classified at basin and larger scales to facilitate information transfer and to provide a synthesis of results from many previous hydrologic investigations. A conceptual model for the spatial hierarchy of the hydrogeology was developed for the Basin and Range Physiographic Province and consists, in order of increasing spatial scale, of hydrogeologic components, hydrogeologic areas, hydrogeologic flow systems, and hydrogeologic regions. This hierarchy formed a framework for hydrogeologic classification. Hydrogeologic areas consist of coincident ground-water and surface-water basins and were delineated on the basis of existing sets of basin boundaries that were used in past investigations by State and Federal government agencies. Within the study area, 344 hydrogeologic areas were identified and delineated. This set of basins not only provides a framework for the classification developed in this report, but also has value for regional and subregional purposes of inventory, study, analysis, and planning throughout the Basin and Range Physiographic Province. The fact that nearly all of the province is delineated by the hydrogeologic areas makes this set well suited to support regional-scale investigations. Hydrogeologic areas are conceptualized as a control volume consisting of three hydrogeologic components: the soils and streams, basin fill, and consolidated rocks. The soils and streams hydrogeologic component consists of all surface-water bodies and soils extending to the bottom of the plant root zone. The basin-fill hydrogeologic component consists of unconsolidated and semiconsolidated sediment deposited in the structural basin. The consolidated-rocks hydrogeologic component consists of the crystalline and sedimentary rocks that form the mountain blocks and basement rock of the structural basin. Hydrogeologic areas were

  12. Managing spatial development in zones undergoing major structural changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spasić Nenad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Paper considers different aspects of spatial development management in the zones characterized by significant spatial interventions, whose consequences are structural changes in usage of space, social and economic development, environmental and ambient quality. Those are, above all, big mining regions, zones of big water accumulations and main infrastructure corridors. Paper deals with normative, institutional and organizational assumptions for managing spatial development, planning approaches, construction and spatial arrangement, searching and structuring data basis and development of information system, system of indicators and monitoring system. Special attention is given to balance and synchronization of activities during compilation of study, planning and technical documentation, as well as procedures of considering and enacting appropriate decisions by competent authorities on national, regional and local level.

  13. Some thoughts on seismotectonics of major earthquake occurrence zones in China%Some thoughts on seismotectonics of major earthquake occurrence zones in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Ping; Huang Guangsi; Yang Mei'e

    2011-01-01

    A major earthquake occurrence zone means a place where M ≥6 events have occurred since the Holocene and similar shocks may happen again in the future. The dynamic context of the major earthquake occurrence zones in China is primarily associated with the NNE-directed push of the India plate, next with the westward subduction of the Pacific plate. The Chinese mainland is a grand mosaic structure of many crust blocks bounded by faults and sutures. When it is suffered from boundary stresses, deformation takes place along these faults or sutures while the block interiors remain relatively stable or intact. Since the Quaternary, for example, left slip on the Xianshuihe-Xiaojiang fault zone in southwestern China has produced a number of fault-depression basins in extensional areas during periods Q1 and Q2. In the Q3, the change of stress orientation and enhancement of tectonic movement made faults of varied trends link each other, and continued to be active till present day, producing active fanlt zones in this region. Usually major earthquakes occur at some special locations on these active fault zones. During these events, in the epicenter areas experience intensive deformation character- ized by large-amplitude rise and fall of neighboring sections, generation of horst-graben systems and dammed rivers. The studies on palaeoearthquakes suggest that major shocks of close magnitudes often repeated for several times at a same place. By comparison of the Chi-Chi, Taiwan event in 1999 and Yuza, Yunnan event in 1955, including contours of accelerations and intensities, destruction of buildings, and in contrast to the Xigeda formation in southwestern China, a sandwich model is established to account for the mechanism of deformation caused by major earthquakes. This model consists of three layers, i.e. the two walls of a fault and the ruptured zone intercalated between them. This ruptured zone is just the loci where stress is built up and released, and serves as a channel for

  14. Hydrogeology, water chemistry, and transport processes in the zone of contribution of a public-supply well in Albuquerque, New Mexico, 2007-9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bexfield, Laura M.; Jurgens, Bryant C.; Crilley, Dianna M.; Christenson, Scott C.

    2012-01-01

    The National Water-Quality Assessment Program (NAWQA) of the U.S. Geological Survey began a series of groundwater studies in 2001 in representative aquifers across the Nation in order to increase understanding of the factors that affect transport of anthropogenic and natural contaminants (TANC) to public-supply wells. One of 10 regional-scale TANC studies was conducted in the Middle Rio Grande Basin (MRGB) in New Mexico, where a more detailed local-scale study subsequently investigated the hydrogeology, water chemistry, and factors affecting the transport of contaminants in the zone of contribution of one 363-meter (m) deep public-supply well in Albuquerque. During 2007 through 2009, samples were collected for the local-scale study from 22 monitoring wells and 3 public-supply (supply) wells for analysis of major and trace elements, arsenic speciation, nutrients, dissolved organic carbon, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), dissolved gases, stable isotopes, and tracers of young and old water. To study groundwater chemistry and ages at various depths within the aquifer, the monitoring wells were divided into three categories: (1) each shallow well was screened across the water table or had a screen midpoint within 18.3 m of the water level in the well; (2) each intermediate well had a screen midpoint between about 27.1 and 79.6 m below the water level in the well; and (3) each deep well had a screen midpoint about 185 m or more below the water level in the well. The 24-square-kilometer study area surrounding the "studied supply well" (SSW), one of the three supply wells, consists of primarily urban land within the MRGB, a deep alluvial basin with an aquifer composed of unconsolidated to moderately consolidated deposits of sand, gravel, silt, and clay. Conditions generally are unconfined, but are semiconfined at depth. Groundwater withdrawals for public supply have substantially changed the primary direction of flow from northeast to southwest under predevelopment

  15. Land subsidence in major cities of Central Mexico: Interpreting InSAR-derived land subsidence mapping with hydrogeological data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellazzi, Pascal; Arroyo-Domínguez, Norma; Martel, Richard; Calderhead, Angus I.; Normand, Jonathan C. L.; Gárfias, Jaime; Rivera, Alfonso

    2016-05-01

    Significant structural damages to urban infrastructures caused by compaction of over-exploited aquifers are an important problem in Central Mexico. While the case of Mexico City has been well-documented, insight into land subsidence problems in other cities of Central Mexico is still limited. Among the cities concerned, we present and discuss the cases of five of them, located within the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB): Toluca, Celaya, Aguascalientes, Morelia, and Queretaro. Applying the SBAS-InSAR method to C-Band RADARSAT-2 data, five high resolution ground motion time-series were produced to monitor the spatio-temporal variations of displacements and fracturing from 2012 to 2014. The study presents recent changes of land subsidence rates along with concordant geological and water data. It aims to provide suggestions to mitigate future damages to infrastructure and to assist in groundwater resources management. Aguascalientes, Celaya, Morelia and Queretaro (respectively in order of decreasing subsidence rates) are typical cases of fault-limited land subsidence of Central Mexico. It occurs as a result of groundwater over-exploitation in lacustrine and alluvial deposits covering highly variable bedrock topography, typical of horst-graben geological settings. Aguascalientes and Toluca show high rates of land subsidence (up to 10 cm/yr), while Celaya and Morelia show lower rates (from 2 to 5 cm/yr). Comparing these results with previous studies, it is inferred that the spatial patterns of land subsidence have changed in the city of Toluca. This change appears to be mainly controlled by the spatial heterogeneity of compressible sediments since no noticeable change occurred in groundwater extraction and related drawdown rates. While land subsidence of up to 8 cm/yr has been reported in the Queretaro Valley before 2011, rates inferior to 1 cm/yr are measured in 2013-2014. The subsidence has been almost entirely mitigated by major changes in the water management

  16. Final Technical Report - Integrated Hydrogeophysical and Hydrogeologic Driven Parameter Upscaling for Dual-Domain Transport Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shafer, John M

    2012-11-05

    The three major components of this research were: 1. Application of minimally invasive, cost effective hydrogeophysical techniques (surface and borehole), to generate fine scale (~1m or less) 3D estimates of subsurface heterogeneity. Heterogeneity is defined as spatial variability in hydraulic conductivity and/or hydrolithologic zones. 2. Integration of the fine scale characterization of hydrogeologic parameters with the hydrogeologic facies to upscale the finer scale assessment of heterogeneity to field scale. 3. Determination of the relationship between dual-domain parameters and practical characterization data.

  17. Major Function Oriented Zone: New Method of Spatial Regulation for Reshaping Regional Development Pattern in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Jie; SUN Wei; ZHOU Kan; CHEN Dong

    2012-01-01

    Newest planning methods implemented by Chinese government are promoting a coordinated regional development and shaping an orderly spatial structure by applying the regulation of territorial function.This article analyzes the problems of spatial planning and regional strategy caused by the wrongly-set primary goal of economic development; it states that the three-fold objective of competitiveness,sustainability,and welfare fairness shall be the principal for China to implement the spatial regulation in the new era; it discusses about theoretical thoughts and technology framework of conducting the 'Major Function Oriented Zone' based on their different major functions that each region plays in urbanization and industrialization,ecological constructions,grain productions,and protection of natural and cultural heritages; it introduces the new concept of 'Major Function Oriented Zone' that include the major functions category,the stereo regional equilibrium mode,the two-level zoning specification,and the territorial development intensity; it offers a zoning scheme that defines development-optimized and development-prioritized zones as regions with massive urbanization and industrialization,development-restricted zones as ecological constructing or grain producing regions,development-prohibited zones as natural and cultural heritage protecting regions; and finally it addresses the main obstacle for implementing 'Major Function Oriented Zone',which is the institutional arrangement of the supreme goal of high GDP growth rate that is currently being implemented.

  18. Hydrogeologic Architecture of the San Andreas Fault near the Logan Quarry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, L.; Brodsky, E. E.; Erskine, J.; Fulton, P. M.; Carter, R.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogeologic properties of fault zones are critical to the faulting processes; however, they are not well understood and difficult to measure in situ. Recording the tidal response of water level is a useful method to measure the in-situ properties. We utilize an array of wells near the San Andreas Fault zone in the Logan Quarry to study the fault zone hydrogeologic architecture by measuring the water tidal response. The measured specific storage and permeability show that there is a localized zone near the fault with higher specific storage and larger permeability than the surrounding region. This change of properties might be related to the fault zone fracture distribution. Surprisingly, the change of the specific storage is the clearest signal. The inferred compliance contrast is consistent with prior estimates of elastic moduli change in the near-fault environment, but the hydrogeologic effects of the compliance change have never before been measured on a major active fault. The observed specific storage structure implies that the fault zone plays an important role in permeability enhancement by seismic shaking. In addition, the measured diffusivity is about 10-2 m2/s, which is comparable to the post-earthquake hydraulic diffusivity measured on the Wenchuan Earthquake Fault. This observed high diffusivity with little variability inside the fault zone might suggest the accumulated pore pressure during interseismic period distributes over a broad region.

  19. 77 FR 37324 - Safety Zone; Major Motion Picture Filming, Cape Fear River; Wilmington, NC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-21

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Major Motion Picture Filming, Cape Fear... will be performed on the river during the filming of this motion picture. DATES: This rule is effective... performed during the filming of a major motion picture. The filming will involve fast-paced,...

  20. 77 FR 40513 - Safety Zone; Major Motion Picture Filming, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Southport, NC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-10

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Major Motion Picture Filming, Atlantic... associated with the stunts that will be performed on the river during the filming of this motion picture... associated with the stunts that will be performed during the filming of a major motion picture. The...

  1. Bedrock Hydrogeology - Site investigation SFR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oehman, Johan [Geosigma AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Bockgaard, Niclas [Golder Assoes AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Follin, Sven [SF GeoLogic AB, Taeby (Sweden)

    2012-06-15

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) has conducted site investigations for a planned extension of the existing final repository for short-lived radioactive waste (SFR). This report presents an integrated analysis and interpretation of the historic data from the existing SFR (1980 - 1986), as well as, from the recent investigations for the planned extension of SFR (2008 - 2009). The primary objective is to establish a conceptual hydrogeological model of the bedrock for safety assessment and design analyses. Analyses and interpretations of all (old and new) hydraulic data are analysed with regard to the recently developed geological deformation zone model of the SFR model domain (Curtis et al. 2011). The methodology used by Curtis et al. (2011) has focussed on magnetic anomalies and deformation zone intercepts with ground surface greater than 300 m. In the hydrogeological modelling, however, it has been considered important to also explore the occurrence and characteristics of shallow horizontal to sub-horizontal structures (sheet joints) inside the SFR model domain. Such structures are of considerable importance for the hydrogeology in the uppermost c. 150 m of bedrock in SDM-Site Forsmark; hence the term Shallow Bedrock Aquifer was used to emphasise their hydraulic significance. In this study, the acronym SBA-structure is used for horizontal structures identified in the hydrogeological modelling. In addition to the predominantly steeply dipping geological deformation zones, eight so-called SBA-structures are modelled deterministically in the hydrogeological model. The SBA-structures are envisaged as hydraulically heterogeneous and composed of clusters of minor gently dipping to horizontal fractures rather than extensive single features. A type of structures that is partly included in the definition of the SBA-structures is the Unresolved Possible Deformations Zone (Unresolved PDZ) intercepts identified by Curtis et al. (2011). The Unresolved

  2. DS926 Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina -- Extent lines for permeable zones of the intermediate aquifer system and Brunswick aquifer system

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system were developed to define an updated hydrogeologic framework as part...

  3. DS926 Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina -- Polygon extent of the BZ region of the Oldsmar permeable zone

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system were developed to define an updated hydrogeologic framework as part...

  4. DS926 Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina -- Polygon regions depicting saline areas within the first permeable zone below the LISAPCU

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system were developed to define an updated hydrogeologic framework as part...

  5. DS926 Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina -- Clipping boundary extent for the Oldsmar permeable zone

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system were developed to define an updated hydrogeologic framework as part...

  6. DS926 Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina -- Contours for the top of the Oldsmar permeable zone

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system were developed to define an updated hydrogeologic framework as part...

  7. DS926 Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina -- Clipping boundary extent for the first permeable zone below the LISAPCU

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system were developed to define an updated hydrogeologic framework as part...

  8. DS926 Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina, Frequency of closed depressions in relation to major springs in study area

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system were developed to define an updated hydrogeologic framework as part...

  9. Extraterrestrial hydrogeology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Victor R.; Dohm, James M.; Fairén, Alberto G.; Ferré, Ty P. A.; Ferris, Justin C.; Miyamoto, Hideaki; Schulze-Makuch, Dirk

    2005-03-01

    Subsurface water processes are common for planetary bodies in the solar system and are highly probable for exoplanets (planets outside the solar system). For many solar system objects, the subsurface water exists as ice. For Earth and Mars, subsurface saturated zones have occurred throughout their planetary histories. Earth is mostly clement with the recharge of most groundwater reservoirs from ample precipitation during transient ice- and hot-house conditions, as recorded through the geologic and fossilized records. On the other hand, Mars is mostly in an ice-house stage, which is interrupted by endogenic-driven activity. This activity catastrophically drives short-lived hydrological cycling and associated climatic perturbations. Regional aquifers in the Martian highlands that developed during past, more Earth-like conditions delivered water to the northern plains. Water was also cycled to the South Polar Region during changes in climate induced by endogenic activity and/or by changes in Mars' orbital parameters. Venus very likely had a warm hydrosphere for hundreds of millions of years, before the development of its current extremely hot atmosphere and surface. Subsequently, Venus lost its hydrosphere as solar luminosity increased and a run-away moist greenhouse took effect. Subsurface oceans of water or ammonia-water composition, induced by tidal forces and radiogenic heating, probably occur on the larger satellites Europa, Ganymede, Callisto, Titan, and Triton. Tidal forces operating between some of the small bodies of the outer solar system could also promote the fusion of ice and the stability of inner liquid-water oceans. Les processus de subsurface impliquant l'eau sont communs pour les corps planétaires du système solaire et sont très probables sur les exoplanètes (planètes en dehors du système solaire). Pour plusieurs objets du systèmes solaire, l'eau de subsurface est présente sous forme de glace. Pour la Terre et Mars, les zones saturées de

  10. HYDROGEOLOGY & ENGINEERING GEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    <正>(1) HYDROGEOLOGY 20051014 Duan Yonghou (China Institute of Geo - Environment Monitoring, Beijing ) ; Wang Jiabin Groundwater Resources and Its Sustainable Development in Tianjin, China ( Hydrogeology & Engineering Geology, ISSN 1000-3665, CN11-2202/P, 31(3), 2004, p. 29 -39, 8 illus. , 7 tables, 8 refs. , with English abstract) Key words: water supply, groundwater resources, Tianjin

  11. Editors' message--Hydrogeology Journal in 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Clifford; Olcott, Perry; Schneider, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Hydrogeology Journal appeared in six issues containing a total of 710 pages and 48 major articles, including 31 Papers and 14 Reports, as well as some Technical Notes and Book Reviews. The number of submitted manuscripts continues to increase. The final issue of 2003 also contained the annual volume index. Hydrogeology Journal (HJ) is an international forum for hydrogeology and related disciplines and authors in 2003 were from about 28 countries. Articles advanced hydrogeologic science and described hydrogeologic systems in many regions worldwide. These articles focused on a variety of general topics and on studies of hydrogeology in 24 countries: Afghanistan, Algeria, Argentina, Australia, Bangladesh, Belgium, Canada, Chile, China, Denmark, France, India, Italy, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nigeria, Norway, Portugal, Russia, South Africa, Switzerland, Turkey, and U.S.A. The Guest Editor of the 2003 HJ theme issue on “Hydromechanics in Geology and Geotechnics”, Ove Stephansson, assembled a valuable collection of technical reviews and research papers from eminent authors on important aspects of the subject area.

  12. Fold-to-Fault Progression of a Major Thrust Zone Revealed in Horses of the North Mountain Fault Zone, Virginia and West Virginia, USA

    OpenAIRE

    Orndorff, Randall C.

    2012-01-01

    The method of emplacement and sequential deformation of major thrust zones may be deciphered by detailed geologic mapping of these important structures. Thrust fault zones may have added complexity when horse blocks are contained within them. However, these horses can be an important indicator of the fault development holding information on fault-propagation folding or fold-to-fault progression. The North Mountain fault zone of the Central Appalachians, USA, was studied in order to better und...

  13. SRP baseline hydrogeologic investigation: Aquifer characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strom, R.N.; Kaback, D.S.

    1992-03-31

    An investigation of the mineralogy and chemistry of the principal hydrogeologic units and the geochemistry of the water in the principal aquifers at Savannah River Site (SRS) was undertaken as part of the Baseline Hydrogeologic Investigation. This investigation was conducted to provide background data for future site studies and reports and to provide a site-wide interpretation of the geology and geochemistry of the Coastal Plain Hydrostratigraphic province. Ground water samples were analyzed for major cations and anions, minor and trace elements, gross alpha and beta, tritium, stable isotopes of hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon, and carbon-14. Sediments from the well borings were analyzed for mineralogy and major and minor elements.

  14. How do olivines record magmatic events? Insights from major and trace element zoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Maisonneuve, C. Bouvet; Costa, F.; Huber, C.; Vonlanthen, P.; Bachmann, O.; Dungan, M. A.

    2016-06-01

    Reconciling the diverse records of magmatic events preserved by multiple crystals and minerals in the same sample is often challenging. In the case of basaltic-andesites from Volcán Llaima (Chile), Mg zoning in olivine is always simpler than Ca zoning in plagioclase. A model that explains a number of chemical patterns is that Llaima magmas stall in the upper crust, where they undergo decompression crystallization and form crystal-mush bodies. Frequent magma inputs from deeper reservoirs provide the potential for remobilization and eruption. The records of multiple recharge events in Llaima plagioclase versus an apparent maximum of one such event in coexisting olivine are addressed by using trace element zoning in olivine phenocrysts. We have integrated elements that (1) respond to changes in magma composition due to recharge or mixing (Mg, Fe, Ni, Mn, ±Ca), with (2) elements that are incorporated during rapid, disequilibrium crystal growth (P, Ti, Sc, V, Al). A more complex history is obtained when these elements are evaluated considering their partition coefficients, diffusivities, and crystal growth rates. The olivine archive can then be reconciled with the plagioclase archive of magma reservoir processes. Olivine (and plagioclase) phenocrysts may experience up to three or more recharge events between nucleation and eruption. Diffusion modeling of major and trace element zoning in two dimensions using a new lattice Boltzmann model suggests that recharge events occur on the order of months to a couple of years prior to eruption, whereas crystal residence times are more likely to be on the order of a few years to decades.

  15. Tsunami potential assessment based on rupture zones, focal mechanisms and repeat times of strong earthquakes in the major Atlantic-Mediterranean seismic fracture zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agalos, Apostolos; Papadopoulos, Gerassimos A.; Kijko, Andrzej; Papageorgiou, Antonia; Smit, Ansie; Triantafyllou, Ioanna

    2016-04-01

    In the major Atlantic-Mediterranean seismic fracture zone, extended from Azores islands in the west to the easternmost Mediterranean Sea in the east, including the Marmara and Black Seas, a number of 22 tsunamigenic zones have been determined from historical and instrumental tsunami documentation. Although some tsunamis were produced by volcanic activity or landslides, the majority of them was generated by strong earthquakes. Since the generation of seismic tsunamis depends on several factors, like the earthquake size, focal depth and focal mechanism, the study of such parameters is of particular importance for the assessment of the potential for the generation of future tsunamis. However, one may not rule out the possibility for tsunami generation in areas outside of the 22 zones determined so far. For the Atlantic-Mediterranean seismic fracture zone we have compiled a catalogue of strong, potentially tsunamigenic (focal depth less than 100 km) historical earthquakes from various data bases and other sources. The lateral areas of rupture zones of these earthquakes were determined. Rupture zone is the area where the strain after the earthquake has dropped substantially with respect the strain before the earthquake. Aftershock areas were assumed to determine areas of rupture zones for instrumental earthquakes. For historical earthquakes macroseismic criteria were used such as spots of higher-degree seismic intensity and of important ground failures. For the period of instrumental seismicity, focal mechanism solutions from CMT, EMMA and other data bases were selected for strong earthquakes. From the geographical distribution of seismic rupture zones and the corresponding focal mechanisms in the entire Atlantic-Mediterranean seismic fracture zone we determined potentially tsunamigenic zones regardless they are known to have produced seismic tsunamis in the past or not. An attempt has been made to calculate in each one of such zones the repeat times of strong

  16. The Sefwi-Comoé belt Ghana/Ivory Coast : a major crustal shear zone ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessell, Mark

    2010-05-01

    The Palaeoproterozoic Sefwi-Comoé region that straddles Ghana and the Ivory Coast in West Africa has been characterised as resulting from a combination of compression and simple shear during late synkinematic leucogranite intrusion. The analysis of regional geophysical datasets allows us to better define the geometry of the major lithostratigraphic packages and their structural contacts in this region. This analysis reveals a series of well defined leucogranites intrusions enveloped by high strain zones. Recent finite element modelling of two-phase aggregates has shown that we can analyse the geometry of these systems both in terms of their finite defomation and their mechanical contrast. We interpret the geometries we see in the Sefwi-Comoé region as reflecting the activity of a major crustal deformation zone which was dominated by simple shear. The comparison with the modelling suggests a finite shear strain of approximately 5 gamma, which in turn implies a lateral displacement of 400 km across the belt. Our analysis suggests that the leucogranites were already acting as more rigid bodies during the (dextral?) shearing, suggesting that their emplacement was predominantly pre-kinematic, and which has implications for their potential subsequent remobilization by gravitational forces.

  17. [Spatial variability and management zone of soil major nutrients in tobacco fields in Qiannan mountainous region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, De-Chuan; Luo, Hong-Xiang; Song, Ze-Min; Guo, Guang-Dong; Chen, Yong-An; Li, Yu-Xiang; Jiang, Yu-Ping; Li, Zhang-Hai

    2014-06-01

    Spatial variability and management zone of soil major nutrients in tobacco fields in Qian-nan mountainous region were analyzed using geostatistics and fuzzy c-mean algorithm. Results indicated that the level of soil organic matter (OM) was moderate, and alkalytic nitrogen (AN), available phosphorus (AP) and available potassium (AK) were rich according to tobacco soil nutrient classification standards. Coefficients of variation (CV) of OM, AN, AP and AK were moderate. Contents of OM, AN, AP and AK fitted log-normal distributions. Correlation analysis showed moderate correlations between OM and AN, AP and AK. OM and AN were best described by Gaussian semivariogram models, while AP and AK were described by exponential models. The four nutrients displayed moderate spatial autocorrelation. There were significant differences among lag distances of four soil nutrients. OM, AN, AP and AK in the majority of studied regions varied at moderate to very rich levels, and deficiencies of OM, AN, AP and AK only accounted for 0.93%, 0.53%, 0.24% and 7.91% of the total studied region, respectively. Based on the results, the studied region was divided into two management zones (MZ), namely MZ1 and MZ2, accounting for 69. 8% and 30. 2% of the studied region respectively. The soil levels of OM, AN, AP and AK in MZ1 were significantly lower than those in MZ2 (P < 0.01).

  18. SRP baseline hydrogeologic investigation, Phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bledsoe, H.W.

    1987-11-01

    As discussed in the program plan for the Savannah River Plant (SRP) Baseline Hydrogeologic Investigation, this program has been implemented for the purpose of updating and improving the current state of knowledge and understanding of the hydrogeologic systems underlying the Savannah River Plant (SRP). The objective of the program is to install a series of observation well clusters (wells installed in each major water bearing formation at the same site) at key locations across the plant site in order to: (1) provide detailed information on the lithology, stratigraphy, and groundwater hydrology, (2) provide observation wells to monitor the groundwater quality, head relationships, gradients, and flow paths.

  19. Thicknesses of hydrogeologic units used in the hydrogeologic framework and transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A digital three-dimensional hydrogeologic framework model (HFM) represents the geometry and extent of hydrogeologic units (HGUs) and major structures in the Death...

  20. Surface altitudes of hydrogeologic units used in the hydrogeologic framework and transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A digital three-dimensional (3D) hydrogeologic framework model (HFM) represents the geometry and extent of hydrogeologic units (HGUs) and major structures in the...

  1. Surface altitudes of hydrogeologic units used in the hydrogeologic framework and transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A digital three-dimensional (3D) hydrogeologic framework model (HFM) represents the geometry and extent of hydrogeologic units (HGUs) and major structures in the...

  2. Thicknesses of hydrogeologic units used in the hydrogeologic framework and transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A digital three-dimensional hydrogeologic framework model (HFM) represents the geometry and extent of hydrogeologic units (HGUs) and major structures in the Death...

  3. Bedrock Hydrogeology - Groundwater flow modelling. Site investigation SFR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oehman, Johan [Geosigma AB, Uppsala (Sweden); Follin, Sven [SF GeoLogic AB, Taeby (Sweden); Oden, Magnus [SKB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-05-15

    The hydrogeological model developed for the SFR extension project (PSU) consists of 40 geologically modelled deformation zones (DZ) and 8 sub-horizontal structural-hydraulic features, called SBAstructures, not defined in the geological model. However, some of the SBA-structures coincide with what is defined as unresolved possible deformation zones (Unresolved PDZ) in the geological modelling. In addition, the hydrogeological model consists of a stochastic discrete fracture network (DFN) model intended for the less fractured rock mass volumes (fracture domains) between the zones and the SBA-structures, and a stochastic fracture model intended to handle remaining Unresolved PDZs in the geological modelling not modelled as SBA-structures in the hydrogeological modelling. The four structural components of the bedrock in the hydrogeological model, i.e. DZ, SBA, Unresolved PDZ and DFN, are assigned hydraulic properties in the hydrogeological model based on the transmissivities interpreted from single-hole hydraulic tests. The main objective of the present work is to present the characteristics of the hydrogeological model with regard to the needs of the forthcoming safety assessment SR-PSU. In concrete words, simulated data are compared with measured data, i.e. hydraulic heads in boreholes and tunnel inflow to the existing repository (SFR). The calculations suggest that the available data for flow model calibration cannot be used to motivate a substantial adjustment of the initial hydraulic parameterisation (assignment of hydraulic properties) of the hydrogeological model. It is suggested that uncertainties in the hydrogeological model are studied in the safety assessment SR-PSU by means of a large number of calculation cases. These should address hydraulic heterogeneity of deterministic structures (DZ and SBA) and realisations of stochastic fractures/fracture networks (Unresolved PDZ and DFN) within the entire SFR Regional model domain.

  4. Fold-to-fault progression of a major thrust zone revealed in horses of the North Mountain fault zone, Virginia and West Virginia, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orndorff, Randall C.

    2012-01-01

    The method of emplacement and sequential deformation of major thrust zones may be deciphered by detailed geologic mapping of these important structures. Thrust fault zones may have added complexity when horse blocks are contained within them. However, these horses can be an important indicator of the fault development holding information on fault-propagation folding or fold-to-fault progression. The North Mountain fault zone of the Central Appalachians, USA, was studied in order to better understand the relationships of horse blocks to hanging wall and footwall structures. The North Mountain fault zone in northwestern Virginia and eastern panhandle of West Virginia is the Late Mississippian to Permian Alleghanian structure that developed after regional-scale folding. Evidence for this deformation sequence is a consistent progression of right-side up to overturned strata in horses within the fault zone. Rocks on the southeast side (hinterland) of the zone are almost exclusively right-side up, whereas rocks on the northwest side (foreland) of the zone are almost exclusively overturned. This suggests that the fault zone developed along the overturned southeast limb of a syncline to the northwest and the adjacent upright limb of a faulted anticline to the southeast.

  5. Fold-to-Fault Progression of a Major Thrust Zone Revealed in Horses of the North Mountain Fault Zone, Virginia and West Virginia, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randall C. Orndorff

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The method of emplacement and sequential deformation of major thrust zones may be deciphered by detailed geologic mapping of these important structures. Thrust fault zones may have added complexity when horse blocks are contained within them. However, these horses can be an important indicator of the fault development holding information on fault-propagation folding or fold-to-fault progression. The North Mountain fault zone of the Central Appalachians, USA, was studied in order to better understand the relationships of horse blocks to hanging wall and footwall structures. The North Mountain fault zone in northwestern Virginia and eastern panhandle of West Virginia is the Late Mississippian to Permian Alleghanian structure that developed after regional-scale folding. Evidence for this deformation sequence is a consistent progression of right-side up to overturned strata in horses within the fault zone. Rocks on the southeast side (hinterland of the zone are almost exclusively right-side up, whereas rocks on the northwest side (foreland of the zone are almost exclusively overturned. This suggests that the fault zone developed along the overturned southeast limb of a syncline to the northwest and the adjacent upright limb of a faulted anticline to the southeast.

  6. Source Mechanisms of Destructive Tsunamigenic Earthquakes occurred along the Major Subduction Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yolsal-Çevikbilen, Seda; Taymaz, Tuncay; Ulutaş, Ergin

    2016-04-01

    Subduction zones, where an oceanic plate is subducted down into the mantle by tectonic forces, are potential tsunami locations. Many big, destructive and tsunamigenic earthquakes (Mw > 7.5) and high amplitude tsunami waves are observed along the major subduction zones particularly near Indonesia, Japan, Kuril and Aleutan Islands, Gulf of Alaska, Southern America. Not all earthquakes are tsunamigenic; in order to generate a tsunami, the earthquake must occur under or near the ocean, be large, and create significant vertical movements of the seafloor. It is also known that tsunamigenic earthquakes release their energy over a couple of minutes, have long source time functions and slow-smooth ruptures. In this study, we performed point-source inversions by using teleseismic long-period P- and SH- and broad-band P-waveforms recorded by the Federation of Digital Seismograph Networks (FDSN) and the Global Digital Seismograph Network (GDSN) stations. We obtained source mechanism parameters and finite-fault slip distributions of recent destructive ten earthquakes (Mw ≥ 7.5) by comparing the shapes and amplitudes of long period P- and SH-waveforms, recorded in the distance range of 30° - 90°, with synthetic waveforms. We further obtained finite-fault rupture histories of those earthquakes to determine the faulting area (fault length and width), maximum displacement, rupture duration and stress drop. We applied a new back-projection method that uses teleseismic P-waveforms to integrate the direct P-phase with reflected phases from structural discontinuities near the source, and customized it to estimate the spatio-temporal distribution of the seismic energy release of earthquakes. Inversion results exhibit that recent tsunamigenic earthquakes show dominantly thrust faulting mechanisms with small amount of strike-slip components. Their focal depths are also relatively shallow (h < 40 km). As an example, the September 16, 2015 Illapel (Chile) earthquake (Mw: 8.3; h: 26 km

  7. HYDROGEOLOGY & ENGINEERING GEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    <正>(1) HYDROGEOLOGY20041696 Bian Jinyu (Department of Earth Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu); Fang Rui Analysis of Controlling Factors of Ground water Quality in Yancheng Area, Jiangsu Province, China (Hydrogeolo gy & Engineering Geology, ISSN 1000 -3665, CN11-2202/P, 30(5), 2003, p. 56 - 60, 1 illus. , 4 tables, 5 refs. ) Key words: groundwater quality evaluation, Jiangsu Province

  8. HYDROGEOLOGY & ENGINEERING GEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>(1) HYDROGEOLOGY 20072166 Chen Liqun(Institute of Geographical Sciences and Natural Resources Research,CAS,Beijing 100101,China);Liu Changming Impact of Climate on Runoff in the Source Regions of the Yellow River(Earth Science Frontiers,ISSN1005-2321,CN11-3370,13(5),2006,p.321-329,14 illus.,3 tables,10 refs.,with English abstract)

  9. Hydrogeology, Water Chemistry, and Factors Affecting the Transport of Contaminants in the Zone of Contribution of a Public-Supply Well in Modesto, Eastern San Joaquin Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurgens, Bryant C.; Burow, Karen R.; Dalgish, Barbara A.; Shelton, Jennifer L.

    2008-01-01

    Ground-water chemistry in the zone of contribution of a public-supply well in Modesto, California, was studied by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program's topical team for Transport of Anthropogenic and Natural Contaminants (TANC) to supply wells. Twenty-three monitoring wells were installed in Modesto to record baseline hydraulic information and to collect water-quality samples. The monitoring wells were divided into four categories that represent the chemistry of different depths and volumes of the aquifer: (1) water-table wells were screened between 8.5 and 11.7 m (meter) (28 and 38.5 ft [foot]) below land surface (bls) and were within 5 m (16 ft) of the water table; (2) shallow wells were screened between 29 and 35 m (95 and 115 ft) bls; (3) intermediate wells were screened between 50.6 and 65.5 m (166 and 215 ft) bls; and (4) deep wells are screened between 100 to 106 m (328 and 348 ft) bls. Inorganic, organic, isotope, and age-dating tracers were used to characterize the geochemical conditions in the aquifer and understand the mechanisms of mobilization and movement of selected constituents from source areas to a public-supply well. The ground-water system within the study area has been significantly altered by human activities. Water levels in monitoring wells indicated that horizontal movement of ground water was generally from the agricultural areas in the northeast towards a regional water-level depression within the city in the southwest. However, intensive pumping and irrigation recharge in the study area has caused large quantities of ground water to move vertically downward within the regional and local flow systems. Analysis of age tracers indicated that ground-water age varied from recent recharge at the water table to more than 1,000 years in the deep part of the aquifer. The mean age of shallow ground water was determined to be between 30 and 40 years. Intermediate ground water was determined to be a mixture

  10. Structural analysis and magmatism characterization of the Major Gercino shear zone, Santa Catarina State, Brazil; Analise estrutural e caracterizacao do magmatismo da zona de cisalhamento Major Gercino, SC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passarelli, Claudia Regina

    1996-12-31

    This work describes the geometric and kinematic characteristics of the Major Gercino Shear Zone (MGSZ) in the Canelinha-Garcia area. This shear zone is one of the major lineaments that affect all southern Brazilian precambrian terrains. In Santa Catarina State, it separates, along its whole extension, the supracrustal rocks of the Brusque belt (northern part) from the Granitoid belt (southern). This zone is characterized by a regional NE trend and a dextral sense of movement where ductile-brittle structures predominate. The MGSZ is composed of two mylonitic belts separated by granitoid rocks probably associated to the development of the shear zone. Both shear zones show cataclastic to ultra mylonitic rocks, but mylonites and protomylonites conditions at high strain rate. The calc-alkaline granitoids present in the area can be grouped in two granitoid associations with meta to peraluminous affinities. The Rolador Granitoid Association is characterized by grayish porphyritic biotite-monzogranites and the Fernandes Granitoid Association by coarsed-grained to porphyritic pinkish amphibole-syenogranites. The U-Pb and Rb-Sr ages range from 670 to 590 Ma with the Sr{sup 87} / Sr{sup 86} initial ratios suggesting a crustal contribution in the generation of these rocks. The importance of the pure shear component is also emphasized by the results of the Fry method. Many z axes of the strain ellipses are at high angle to the shear foliation. Symmetric porphyroclasts also corroborate this hypothesis. The micaceous minerals formed during the shear development indicate K-Ar ages around 555 {+-} 15 Ma. Brittle reactivations of the shear zone have been placed by K-Ar in fine-fraction materials at Triassic time (215 {+-} 15 Ma.) 220 refs., 107 figs., 18 tabs., 4 maps

  11. Conceptual hydrogeological model of volcanic Easter Island (Chile) after chemical and isotopic surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Christian; Custodio, Emilio

    2008-11-01

    Most human activities and hydrogeological information on small young volcanic islands are near the coastal area. There are almost no hydrological data from inland areas, where permanent springs and/or boreholes may be rare or nonexistent. A major concern is the excessive salinity of near-the-coast wells. Obtaining a conceptual hydrogeological model is crucial for groundwater resources development and management. Surveys of water seepages and rain for chemical and environmental isotope contents may provide information on the whole island groundwater flow conditions, in spite of remaining geological and hydrogeological uncertainties. New data from Easter Island (Isla de Pascua), in the Pacific Ocean, are considered. Whether Easter Island has a central low permeability volcanic “core” sustaining an elevated water table remains unknown. Average recharge is estimated at 300-400 mm/year, with a low salinity of 15-50 mg/L Cl. There is an apron of highly permeable volcanics that extends to the coast. The salinity of near-the-coast wells, >1,000 mg/L Cl, is marine in origin. This is the result of a thick mixing zone of island groundwater and encroached seawater, locally enhanced by upconings below pumping wells. This conceptual model explains what is observed, in the absence of inland boreholes and springs.

  12. Space Geodetic Constraints on the Structure and Properties of Compliant Damage Zones Around Major Crustal Faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fialko, Y.

    2004-12-01

    Geologic and seismologic studies of large crustal faults indicate that the fault interface that accommodates most of seismic slip is often surrounded by heavily damaged material characterized by high crack density and reduced seismic velocities. Recently such damage zones were imaged by space geodetic observations. I present results of Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) observations of deformation across kilometer-wide compliant fault zones in response to nearby earthquakes. In particular, a number of faults in the Eastern California Shear Zone, including the Calico, Rodman, Pinto Mountain, and Lenwood faults, were strained by both the 1992 Landers and the 1999 Hector Mine earthquakes. Analysis of deformation on these faults indicates that the fault zone displacements depend on the magnitude, but are independent of the sign of the co-seismic stress changes, implying a linearly elastic deformation. Other examples include faults adjacent to the North Anatolian fault (Turkey) that were strained by the 1999 Izmit earthquake. Analytic and numerical (finite element) modeling of the observed deformation suggests that the compliant fault zones have width of 1-2 km, depth extent of several km (or greater), and reductions in the effective shear modulus of about a factor of two. Stacked interferometric data from the Eastern California Shear Zone spannig a time period of more than 10 years reveal time-dependent (post- or inter-seismic) deformation on some of the inferred compliant fault zones. In particular, the fault zone associated with the Pinto Mountain fault was subsiding over several years following the Landers eartquake, with the total amplitude of subsidence comparable to the amplitude of the co-seismically-induced uplift. This behavior may be indicative of the poro-elastic deformation of the fluid-saturated fault zone.

  13. Hydrogeology of the Jharia Coal Field, India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choubey, V.D.; Sankaranarayana, I. (Indian School of Mines, Dhanbad (India). Dept. of Applied Geology)

    1990-07-01

    The Jharia Coalfield is a part of an east-west trending intracratonic Gondwana basin in eastern India. This paper presents the results of a comprehensive research programme to understand the hydrogeological setting and the aquifer characteristics. Water table in weathered zone is observed to fluctuate cyclically with seasons and suggests shallow ground water flow system. Aquifer parameters obtained by pumping tests are relatively low and these formations are classified as poor aquifers. The small volumes of water in coal mines are directly related to poor hydraulic conductivity of the rocks associated with coal. 12 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Weathering of the New Albany Shale, Kentucky, USA: I. Weathering zones defined by mineralogy and major-element composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, M.L.W.; Breit, G.N.

    2009-01-01

    Comprehensive understanding of chemical and mineralogical changes induced by weathering is valuable information when considering the supply of nutrients and toxic elements from rocks. Here minerals that release and fix major elements during progressive weathering of a bed of Devonian New Albany Shale in eastern Kentucky are documented. Samples were collected from unweathered core (parent shale) and across an outcrop excavated into a hillside 40 year prior to sampling. Quantitative X-ray diffraction mineralogical data record progressive shale alteration across the outcrop. Mineral compositional changes reflect subtle alteration processes such as incongruent dissolution and cation exchange. Altered primary minerals include K-feldspars, plagioclase, calcite, pyrite, and chlorite. Secondary minerals include jarosite, gypsum, goethite, amorphous Fe(III) oxides and Fe(II)-Al sulfate salt (efflorescence). The mineralogy in weathered shale defines four weathered intervals on the outcrop-Zones A-C and soil. Alteration of the weakly weathered shale (Zone A) is attributed to the 40-a exposure of the shale. In this zone, pyrite oxidization produces acid that dissolves calcite and attacks chlorite, forming gypsum, jarosite, and minor efflorescent salt. The pre-excavation, active weathering front (Zone B) is where complete pyrite oxidation and alteration of feldspar and organic matter result in increased permeability. Acidic weathering solutions seep through the permeable shale and evaporate on the surface forming abundant efflorescent salt, jarosite and minor goethite. Intensely weathered shale (Zone C) is depleted in feldspars, chlorite, gypsum, jarosite and efflorescent salts, but has retained much of its primary quartz, illite and illite-smectite. Goethite and amorphous FE(III) oxides increase due to hydrolysis of jarosite. Enhanced permeability in this zone is due to a 14% loss of the original mass in parent shale. Denudation rates suggest that characteristics of Zone C

  15. Investigation of the large scale regional hydrogeological situation at Beberg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartley, L. [AEA Technology, Harwell (United Kingdom); Boghammar, A.; Grundfelt, B. [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1998-12-01

    The present study forms part of the large-scale groundwater flow studies within the SR 97 project. The site of interest is Beberg which is based on data from the Finnsjoen site. To understand the groundwater flow and salinity at present it is necessary to consider the history of the Finnsjoen site over the last few thousand years. A numerical approach is developed to model a situation of transient variable density flow on a regional scale. The model is considered a reasonable representation of the real situation at the site, since it is consistent with the current conceptual understanding of the site and predictions of salinity are in broad agreement with field observations. The effects of post-glacial uplift on the hydrogeological conditions are considered. It is assumed that about 9,000-4,000 years BP the rock was completely infiltrated by saline groundwaters during the periods when the Yoldia and Litorina Seas covered the Finnsjoen area. The model represents the interval from the end of this period up to the present day. During which time the recharge of fresh water in the form of rainfall flushed or displaced saline water from the near-surface. Many variants on the basis conceptual model are considered both to calibrate the model against field data and to quantify the sensitivities of groundwater pathways. The present study shows that: Salinity and transient processes are very important in determining groundwater pathways in the deep rock. Salinity drives flow downwards increasing the length of pathways and groundwater travel times. A high contrast in hydraulic conductivity between major structures and the rock mass results in the fracture zones being the dominant flow paths, in particular Zone 1 and Imundbo. There are two distinct flow paths. In the east of the hypothetical repository the path is short along Zone 1, for the west the path is longer through the rock mass. Fracture zones are flushed of salt on a time-scale of 10-100 years. For the rock mass it

  16. Hydrogeologic Case Studies (Seattle, WA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  17. Conflicts in Africa and Major Powers: Proxy Wars, Zones of Influence or Provocative Instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry Rowlings Tafotie

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses the different nature of conflicts that have occurred in Africa since the end of Cold War. A special attention is given to the role of external factors in the process of conflict evolution and the escalation of violence on the African continent. In effect, this paper demonstrates through a critical examination of the meaning of proxy war as, zone of influence or provocation of instability as a strategy and an analysis of its employment by the United States and China, France etc. in Africa. The new potential confrontation between the United States and China as in Sudan, France in its former coloniesis not only based on a clash of world views about the structure and nature of international relations and security but largely over the control of strategically vital energy resources based in Africa. The authors conclude that this ultimately creates permanent tensions or bitter conflicts between the actors and African populations as a factor that have negative impact on the peace and stability of continent. According to the context of superpower conflict strategies, this paper critically examines, zone of influence, provoking of instability or proxy war as a viable national strategy of nuclear armed great powers in advancing and/or defending their global national interests in a bipolar/multipolar international system.

  18. The Activity of Major Faults and the Hydrothermal Alteration Zone at Tianchi Volcano of Changbaishan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Mingjun; Gu Menglin; Sun Zhenguo; Wei Haiquan; Jin Bolu

    2004-01-01

    It is found by field investigation that the near horizontal top surface of the brown or brick-red hydrothermal alteration zone varies obviously in elevation at different sections of the same layer on the caldera's inner wall of Tianchi, with that at the north section near the Tianwen Peak about 110 m higher than that at the south near the Jiangjun Peak in Korea. The top surface of the hydrothermal alteration zone can be taken as key horizon to tectonic movement. The difference indicates that the total uplift height of the NW wall of the Liudaogou-TianchiJingfengshan fault, the principal fault trending NE at Tianchi, is bigger than that of the SE wall ever since the occurrence of hydrothermal alteration. This also explains why the topography in the northwest side of Tianchi is steeper and with more developed river system than in the southeast. The uplifting of the northeastern wall is bigger than that of the southwest along the principal NW-trend fault, namely, the Baishanzhen-Tianchi-Jince fault. It is observed from characters of hydrothermal alteration and the palaeoresiduum, that the recent vertical movement rate along the principal NE-trend fault is larger than that of the principal NW-trend fault. The two faults intersect at Tianchi, dividing the volcano into 4 blocks, with the uplift magnitudes decreasing successively in the order of the north, the west, the east and the south block. The biggest uplift of the north block corresponds well to the shallow magma batch in the north of Tianchi observed by DSS and telluric electromagnetic sounding, and etc.and they may be related with the causes.

  19. Development of a three-dimensional site-scale model for the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittwer, C.S.; Bodvarsson, G.S. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Earth Sciences Div., Berkeley (United States); Chornack, M.P.; Flint, A.L.; Flint, L.E.; Lewis, B.D.; Spengler, R.W. [U.S. Geological Survey, Denver (United States); Rautmann, C.A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Technical Integration Div., Albuquerque (United States)

    1994-12-31

    A three-dimensional model of moisture flow within the highly heterogeneous, porous and fractured tuffs of the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain is being developed. This site-scale model covers an area of about 30 km{sup 2} and is bounded by major faults at the east and west. A detailed numerical grid has been developed based on the locations of boreholes, on the spatial distribution of different infiltration zones, hydrogeological units and water level data, and on the offset of the volcanic tuffs due to major faults. Hydrogeologic contour-and isopachs maps, are presented for the different infiltration zones, and for the base of the Tiva Canyon, the Paintbrush, and the Topopah Spring hydrogeological units. One- and two-dimensional simulations have been performed using the TOUGH2 computer code to test the geometry and the accuracy of the model-grid, which consists of about 5000 gridblocks distributed among 17 non-uniform vertical layers representing the four main hydrogeological units of the unsaturated zone. (author) 11 figs., 1 tab., 21 refs.

  20. Major Crustal Fault Zone Trends and Their Relation to Mineral Belts in the North-Central Great Basin, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Brian D.; Sampson, Jay A.; Williams, Jackie M.

    2007-01-01

    The Great Basin physiographic province covers a large part of the western United States and contains one of the world's leading gold-producing areas, the Carlin Trend. In the Great Basin, many sedimentary-rock-hosted disseminated gold deposits occur along such linear mineral-occurrence trends. The distribution and genesis of these deposits is not fully understood, but most models indicate that regional tectonic structures play an important role in their spatial distribution. Over 100 magnetotelluric (MT) soundings were acquired between 1994 and 2001 by the U.S. Geological Survey to investigate crustal structures that may underlie the linear trends in north-central Nevada. MT sounding data were used to map changes in electrical resistivity as a function of depth that are related to subsurface lithologic and structural variations. Two-dimensional (2-D) resistivity modeling of the MT data reveals primarily northerly and northeasterly trending narrow 2-D conductors (1 to 30 ohm-m) extending to mid-crustal depths (5-20 km) that are interpreted to be major crustal fault zones. There are also a few westerly and northwesterly trending 2-D conductors. However, the great majority of the inferred crustal fault zones mapped using MT are perpendicular or oblique to the generally accepted trends. The correlation of strike of three crustal fault zones with the strike of the Carlin and Getchell trends and the Alligator Ridge district suggests they may have been the root fluid flow pathways that fed faults and fracture networks at shallower levels where gold precipitated in favorable host rocks. The abundant northeasterly crustal structures that do not correlate with the major trends may be structures that are open to fluid flow at the present time.

  1. Hydrographic and hydrogeological basin of Entre-Ribeiros: probable recharge zone delimitation and environmental impact assessment Bacia hidrográfica e hidrogeológica de Entre-Ribeiros: zonas prováveis de recarga e análise dos impactos ambientais históricos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor V. Vasconcelos

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The probable recharge zone delimitation of Entre-Ribeiros Basin (Northwest of the state of Minas Gerais / Brazil is proposed in this study. The delimitation is based upon stratigraphy, geomorphology, geo-environmental domains and hydrogeology studies. Combining the recharge zone map with the land use variation between 1975 and 2008, the occupation trends of possible recharge zones are identified. Concluding, the environmental impacts for this basin are discussed.Apresenta-se uma proposta de delimitação das prováveis zonas de recarga da Bacia Hidrográfica de Entre-Ribeiros (Noroeste de Minas Gerais/Brasil. A delimitação teve como subsídio estudos de litoestratigrafia, geomorfologia, unidades geoambientais e hidrogeologia. A partir da delimitação proposta, e conjugando-se à análise da ocupação do solo entre o período de 1975 a 2008, procura-se identificar as tendências de ocupação das zonas prováveis de recarga. Por fim, tecem-se comentários sobre os impactos ambientais decorrentes da ocupação dessas áreas.

  2. Cloud attenuation studies of the six major climatic zones of Africa for Ka and V satellite system design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Temidayo Victor Omotosho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-GB X-NONE X-NONE Cloud cover statistics, cloud base and top height, cloud temperature, frequency of precipitation, freezing height, total cloud liquid water content (TCLWC and cloud attenuation data have been obtained for the six major climatic zones of Africa. The present results reveal a strong positive correlation between the monthly distribution of low cloud cover, cloud top height, cloud temperature, and frequency of precipitation in the six zones. The cumulative distribution of the TCLWC derived from radiosonde measurement in each climatic zone shows a departure from the TCLWC recommended by the ITU Study Group 3 data, with an exceedance percentage difference of 32% to 90% occurring 0.01% to 10% of the time. The underestimation of the TCLWC is greatest in the tropical rain forest. A comparison of the cloud attenuation cumulative distribution in the Ka and V bands reveals that the International Telecommunication Union – Region (ITU-R is an intergovernmental organization that develops rain model based on collected data around the world. This model underestimates the cloud attenuation in all of the six climatic zones by 2.0 dB and 4.7 dB for the arid Sahara desert, 1.3 dB and 3.0 dB in semi-arid North Africa, 1.3 dB and 1.5 dB in savannah North Africa, 2.0 dB and 3.6 dB in the tropical rain forest, 1.3 dB and 2.9 dB in savannah South Africa and 0.9 dB and 2.6 dB in semi-arid South Africa, respectively, at 30 and 50 GHz. Overall, the cloud attenuation in the tropical rain-forest zone is very high because of the high annual total cloud cover (98%, high annual frequency of precipitation (4.5, low annual clear sky amount (8%, high cloud depth (10,937 m, high 0°C isotherm height (4.7 km, high TCLWC (4.0 kg/m2 at 0.01% and low seasonal cloud base height (356 m.

  3. Defining Hydrogeological Boundaries for Mountain Front Recharge (MFR) Predictions in Multi-Catchment Mountainous Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilson-Welch, L. A.; Allen, D. M.

    2010-12-01

    Cross-catchment groundwater flow in mountainous watersheds results from the development of local, intermediate, and regional groundwater flow pathways in multi-catchment systems. As such, hydrogeological analysis (e.g. water balance calculations and numerical modelling) to assess contributions of groundwater to mountain front recharge (MFR) must consider the choice of boundaries based on hydrological divides. Numerical 3-dimensional hydrogeological modelling was completed using FeFlow (DHI-WASY), for conceptual regional-scale multi-catchment systems; extending from a watershed boundary to a mountain front. The modelled systems were designed to represent major ridge and valley configurations observed in mountainous watersheds including: nested, adjacent, disconnected, non-parallel, and parallel catchments. Both homogeneous and heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity scenarios were simulated; with the heterogeneous scenario including a shallow zone of higher hydraulic conductivity bedrock overlying less permeable bedrock. The influence of cross-catchment flow in the development of groundwater flow pathways contributing to MFR was examined. The results provide a basis for identifying topographic scenarios where contributions to MFR may originate outside hydrological divides. This understanding will contribute to improving MFR predictions using both the numerical modelling approach and the water balance approach.

  4. Coupled hydrogeological and solute transport, visualisation and supportive detailed reaction modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molinero, Jorge; Arcos, David; Duro, Lara (Amphos XXI Consulting S.L., Barcelona (Spain))

    2008-08-15

    This report summarises the main findings achieved by spatial analysis of hydrochemical information using 3D visualisation techniques with the available Forsmark 2.3 hydrochemical database. A major improvement compared with previous versions is that the current visualisation tool can handle the Fracture Domain geometries of the site, which is useful for integration of hydrochemical data with current geological-hydrogeological conceptual models. It is seen that computed M3 mixing fractions show a spatial distribution qualitatively correlated with key hydrochemical signatures, such as strontium (for Deep Saline), magnesium (for Littorina), 18O and 2H (for Glacial) and tritium (for Modified meteoric). It is worth noting that the most saline waters with the highest Deep Saline signatures are located at deformation zones adjacent to the strongly foliated rocks, which constitute fracture domains FFM04 and FFM05, out of the target area. Maximum glacial signatures are also located outside the target area. In general terms, it is seen that hydrochemical spatial distribution is consistent with the current hydrogeological conceptual model, where the 'shallow bedrock aquifer' would be responsible for the observed preservation of Littorina signatures down to a depth of 150-200 m

  5. Quantification of Submarine Groundwater Discharge Using a Radon (222-Rn) Mass Balance and Hydrogeological Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petermann, Eric; Stollberg, Reiner; Scholten, Jan; Knöller, Kay; Schubert, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Apart from river and surface water runoff subsurface discharge of groundwater plays a key role in coastal water and matter budgets. Two major forms of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) can be distinguished: (i) pure freshwater discharge from continental aquifers that are connected to the coastal sea driven by a positive hydraulic gradient (fresh SGD) and (ii) re-circulation of seawater that has penetrated permeable coastal sediments (re-circulated SGD), e.g. driven by tidal pumping. The localization of SGD zones and the quantification of SGD fluxes is of high interest for coastal water management due to potential threats related to SGD, namely (i) the detrimental impact of discharging nutrient- or contaminant-laden groundwater on coastal seawater quality, an aspect that is of relevance along coastlines which are impacted by agriculture, industry or intense urbanization, and (ii) the loss of freshwater to the ocean, an issue that is of major relevance in all coastal areas with (seasonally) limited freshwater availability. In this work, we discuss estimates for the total (fresh + re-circulated) SGD fluxes derived from a mass balance of the radioactive noble gas radon (222-Rn) with estimates of fresh SGD fluxes derived by hydrogeological modelling. The precision of the mass balance results depends on the adequate determination of the mass balance source and sink terms. These terms are calculated based on field observations of environmental tracers (salinity, δ18O, 222-Rn, 223-Ra, 224-Ra, 226-Ra) in seawater and porewater, as well as on meteorological data. The numerical hydrogeological model estimates groundwater flow based on groundwater monitoring data, river flow data, groundwater recharge estimates, tidal dynamics, and density effects along the freshwater/seawater interface. We compare these two independent methodological approaches of SGD flux estimation, discuss results regarding their relevance for the regional water balance and reason the implications of

  6. Geophysical modeling and geochemical analysis for hydrogeologic assessment of the Steamboat Hills area, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skalbeck, John David

    2001-07-01

    Three studies constitute the hydrogeologic assessment of the Steamboat Hills area, Washoe County, Nevada. Geophysical modeling and geochemical analysis are used to assess the hydrogeologic connection between a fractured bedrock geothermal system used to produce electrical power and surrounding alluvial aquifer basins used for municipal drinking water supply. Understanding the hydrogeologic connection between these two water resources is important for long-term management of these resources. Coupled 2.75-D forward modeling of multiple gravity and aeromagnetic profiles constrained by geological and physical properties (density, magnetic susceptibility, remanent magnetic) data yields a detailed 3-D geologic model of the geothermal system and the alluvial basins. A new method is presented for modeling the geothermal reservoir based on altered physical properties of host rock that yields a reservoir volume estimate that is double the previously assumed volume. The configuration of the modeled geothermal reservoir suggests that a previously unrecognized thermal water up-flow zone may exist along the west flank of the Steamboat Hills. Model results delineate the elevation and thickness of geologic units that can be used in numerical modeling of groundwater flow, planning exploration drilling, and evaluating fully 3-D forward modeling software. The Steamboat Hills geothermal resource area offers an excellent opportunity to test an exploration strategy using magnetics. A zone of demagnetized rock within the geothermal resource area resulting from thermochemical alteration due to thermal water flow along faults and fractures is apparent as an aeromagnetic low anomaly. Anomalously low ground magnetic data delineate a fault that conducts thermal water from the geothermal system to an alluvial aquifer. Vertical magnetic susceptibility from core measurements yields an average value for altered granodiorite used in forward modeling. Permeable fractures and a major fault zone

  7. An integrated theoretical and practical approach for teaching hydrogeology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonomi, Tullia; Fumagalli, Letizia; Cavallin, Angelo

    2013-04-01

    Hydrogeology as an earth science intersects the broader disciplines of geology, engineering, and environmental studies but it does not overlap fully with any of them. It is focused on its own range of problems and over time has developed a rich variety of methods and approaches. The resolution of many hydrogeological problems requires knowledge of elements of geology, hydraulics, physics and chemistry; moreover in recent years the knowledge of modelling techniques has become a necessary ability. Successful transfer of all this knowledge to the students depends on the breadth of material taught in courses, the natural skills of the students and any practical experience the students can obtain. In the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences of the University of Milano-Bicocca, the teaching of hydrogeology is developed in three inter-related courses: 1) general hydrogeology, 2) applied hydrogeology, 3) groundwater pollution and remediation. The sequence focuses on both groundwater flux and contaminant transport, supplemented by workshops involving case studies and computer labs, which provide the students with practical translation of the theoretical aspects of the science into the world of work. A second key aspect of the program utilizes the students' skill at learning through online approaches, and this is done through three approaches: A) by developing the courses on a University e-learning platform that allows the students to download lectures, articles, and teacher comments, and to participate in online forums; B) by carring out exercises through computer labs where the student analyze and process hydrogeological data by means of different numerical codes, that in turn enable them to manage databases and to perform aquifer test analysis, geostatistical analysis, and flux and transport modelling both in the unsaturated and saturated zone. These exercises are of course preceded by theoretical lectures on codes and software, highlighting their features and

  8. Role of structural inheritances and major transfer fault-zones in the tectonic history of the Alboran Basin (Western Mediterranean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comas, Menchu; Crespo-Blanc, Ana; Balanya, Juan Carlos

    2014-05-01

    reorganization (N-S shortening) of the basin, which encompass wrench tectonics, margin rotations, sub-basin inversions, bending of former extensional structures, and further shale-tectonics. The recent NW-SE and NE-SW trending conjugate wrench-fault system that bound the actual structural domains observed offshore locates over major transfer-faults zones from the Miocene extension. The rotated segments of basin-margins and concomitant structural bending, as well as changes in the tectonic regimen of the transfer-fault systems are expressive of the aftermath of superimposed extensional and compressional processes in the Alboran Basin. The spatial and temporary evolution of the tectonic deformation documented by geological and geophysical observables in the Alboran Sea basin provides new insights into the critical role of the tectonic heritage and major transfer fault-zones in the geodynamic history of the GAS. Acknowledgements: This study was supported by projects RNM-3713, RNM-215, CTM2009-07715 and CGL2009-11384 (MINECO, JA, and FEDER founds, Spain).

  9. Evaluating the patterns of spatiotemporal trends of root zone soil moisture in major climate regions in East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohaib, Muhammad; Kim, Hyunglok; Choi, Minha

    2017-08-01

    Root zone soil moisture (RZSM) is a crucial variable in land-atmosphere interactions. Evaluating the spatiotemporal trends and variability patterns of RZSM are essential for discerning the anthropogenic and climate change effects on the regional and global hydrological cycles. In this study, the trends of RZSM, computed by the exponential filter from the European Space Agency's Climate Change Initiative soil moisture, were evaluated in major climate regions of East Asia from 1982 to 2014. Moreover, the trends of RZSM were compared to the trends of precipitation (P), skin temperature (Tskin), and actual evapotranspiration (AET) to investigate how they influence the RZSM trends in each climate region. Drying trends were predominant in arid and continental regions, whereas wetting trends were found in the tropical and temperate regions. The increasing trends of Tskin and AET cause drying in arid and continental regions, whereas in tropical regions, these cause wetting trends, which might be due to convective P. In temperate regions, despite decreasing P and increasing Tskin, the RZSM trend was increasing, attributed to the intensive irrigation activities in these regions. This is probably the first time to analyze the long-term trends of RZSM in different climate regions. Hence, the results of this study will improve our understanding of the regional and global hydrological cycles. Despite certain limitations, the results of this study may be useful for improving and developing climate models and predicting long-term vast scale natural disasters such as drought, dust outbreaks, floods, and heat waves.

  10. Compilation of data used for the analysis of the geological and hydrogeological DFN models. Site descriptive modelling SDM-Site Laxemar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermanson, Jan; Fox, Aaron; Oehman, Johan (Golder Associates (Sweden)); Rhen, Ingvar (SWECO (Sweden))

    2008-08-15

    This report provides an overview and compilation of the various data that constitutes the basis for construction of the geological and hydrogeological discrete feature network (DFN) models as part of model version SDM-Site Laxemar. This includes a review of fracture data in boreholes and in outcrop. Furthermore, the basis for the construction of lineament maps is given as well as a review of the hydraulic test data from cored and percussion-drilled boreholes. An emphasis is put on graphical representation of borehole logs in the form of composites of geological, hydrogeological and even hydrogeochemical data in the case of cored boreholes. One major contribution is a compilation of characteristics of minor local deformation zones (MDZs) identified in cored boreholes. Basic orientation data and fracture intensity data are presented as a function of depth for individual boreholes. The coupling between hydrogeological data and geological data is further refined in plots of Posiva flow log (PFL) data vs. geological single hole interpretation data

  11. Hydrogeology of the Western Amazon Aquifer System (WAAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosário, Fátima Ferreira do; Custodio, Emilio; Silva, Gerson Cardoso da, Jr.

    2016-12-01

    The Western Amazon Aquifer System (WAAS), as defined and proposed in the present work, encompasses an area of about 2.0·106 km2 located in the northwestern portion of South America. Published and unpublished data were used to define WAAS boundaries and main hydrogeologic characteristics. Petroleum industry data, environmental data, and other diverse thematic data were compiled for this study according to the data's origin. The analysis, treatment and integration of available data allowed us to define the WAAS as a multilayered aquifer system comprised of the Tertiary Solimões Aquifer System (SAS) and the Cretaceous Tikuna Aquifer System (TAS). The thick clay-rich basal strata of the SAS appear to confine the TAS. The SAS is widely used for both domestic and industrial purposes, providing good quality freshwater. The TAS has varying water quality: it contains freshwater near its recharge areas in the Sub-Andean fault belt zone, brackish to brine water in the Sub-Andean basins, and salty water in the Solimões Basin (Brazil). The interpretation and conclusions provided by an increasing understanding of the area's hydrogeology resulting from this work made it possible to propose an improved and new WAAS regional hydrogeologic conceptual model with data and descriptions not previously available. Some surprising results have been later confirmed as true by looking at unpublished reports, logs and field notes. Therefore, this work resulted in new findings and settled the basis for future works, especially for the poorly understood TAS.

  12. Marine hydrogeology: recent accomplishments and future opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, A. T.

    2005-03-01

    Marine hydrogeology is a broad-ranging scientific discipline involving the exploration of fluid-rock interactions below the seafloor. Studies have been conducted at seafloor spreading centers, mid-plate locations, and in plate- and continental-margin environments. Although many seafloor locations are remote, there are aspects of marine systems that make them uniquely suited for hydrologic analysis. Newly developed tools and techniques, and the establishment of several multidisciplinary programs for oceanographic exploration, have helped to push marine hydrogeology forward over the last several decades. Most marine hydrogeologic work has focused on measurement or estimation of hydrogeologic properties within the shallow subsurface, but additional work has emphasized measurements of local and global fluxes, fluid source and sink terms, and quantitative links between hydrogeologic, chemical, tectonic, biological, and geophysical processes. In addition to summarizing selected results from a small number of case studies, this paper includes a description of several new experiments and programs that will provide outstanding opportunities to address fundamental hydrogeologic questions within the seafloor during the next 20-30 years. L'hydrogéologie marine est une large discipline scientifique impliquant l' exploration des interactions entre les fluides et les roches sous les fonds marins. Des études ont été menées dans les différents environnements sous-marins (zone abyssale, plaque océanique, marges continentales). Bien que de nombreux fonds marins soient connus, il existe des aspects des systèmes marins qui les rendent inadaptés à l'analyse hydrologique. De nouveaux outils et techniques, et la mise en oeuvre de nombreux programmes multidisciplinaires d'exploration océanographique, ont aidé à pousser en avant l'hydrogéologie marine ces dix dernières années. La plus part des études hydrogéologiques se sont concentrées jusqu'à présent sur la mesure ou

  13. SRS Geology/Hydrogeology Environmental Information Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denham, M.E.

    1999-08-31

    The purpose of the Savannah River Site Geology and Hydrogeology Environmental Information Document (EID) is to provide geologic and hydrogeologic information to serve as a baseline to evaluate potential environmental impacts. This EID is based on a summary of knowledge accumulated from research conducted at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and surrounding areas.

  14. Hydrogeology and water quality of the Leetown area, West Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozar, Mark D.; McCoy, Kurt J.; Weary, David J.; Field, Malcolm S.; Pierce, Herbert A.; Schill, William Bane; Young, John A.

    2008-01-01

    characterize the quality of water and the hydraulic properties of the aquifer. Surface geophysical surveys provided a 3-dimensional view of bedrock resistivity in order to assess geologic and lithologic controls on ground-water flow. Borehole geophysical surveys were conducted in monitoring wells to assess the storage and movement of water in subsurface fractures. Numerous single-well, multi-well, and straddle packer aquifer tests and step-drawdown tests were conducted to define the hydraulic properties of the aquifer and to assess the role of bedrock fractures and solution conduits in the flow of ground water. Water samples collected from wells and springs were analyzed to assess the current quality of ground water and provide a baseline for future assessment. Microbiological sampling of wells for indicator bacteria and human and animal DNA provided an analysis of agricultural and suburban development impacts on ground-water quality. Light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data were analyzed to develop digital elevation models (DEMs) for assessing sinkhole distribution, to provide elevation data for development of a ground-water flow model, and to assess the distribution of major fractures and faults in the Leetown area. The flow of ground water in the study area is controlled by lithology and geologic structure. Bedrock, especially low permeability units such as the shale Martinsburg Formation and the Conococheague Limestone, act as barriers to water flowing down gradient and across bedding. This retardation of cross-strike flow is especially pronounced in the Leetown area, where bedding typically dips at steep angles. Highly permeable fault and fracture zones that disrupt the rocks in cross-strike directions provide avenues through which ground water can flow laterally across or through strata of low primary permeability. Significant strike parallel thrust faults and cross-strike faults typically coincide with larger solution conduits and act as drains for the more pervasive

  15. Lithostratigraphic contact – a significant site for hydrogeological investigation in crystalline fractured-rock terrains

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tapas Acharya; Rajesh Prasad

    2017-02-01

    Estimating the hydrogeologic control of fractured aquifers in hard crystalline and metamorphosed rocks is challenging due to complexity in the development of secondary porosity. The present study in the Precambrian metamorphic terrain in and around the Balarampur of Purulia district, West Bengal, India, aims to estimate the hydrogeologic significance of lithostratigraphic contacts using fracture characteristics obtained from surface bedrock exposures supported by hydrological data from the existing dugwells. This study involves the domain-wise analysis of the frequencies of fractures that control the fractureporosity.The domain-wise study reveals higher fracture-frequencies adjacent to the lithostratigraphic contacts. The concurrence of lithostratigraphic contacts with the occurrences of high-discharging wells and also with the deep weathered zone in low-lying areas is clearly established, thus assigning the lithostratigraphic contact as hydrogeologically significant. An increase in frequencies of the fractures within the ‘influence zone’ of the lithocontact, is clearly visible. Among those fractures, particularly, which make the angle greater than the ‘limiting angle’ with the lithocontact are characterised by increased frequencies. However, brittle rocks like quartz biotite granite gneisses, phyllite and epidiorite show high porosity of fracture, within the ‘influence zone’ of the lithostratigraphic contact. Enhanced deepening of the weathered-zone at lower topographic region may perhaps be a plausible explanation for this increased fracture-porosity at lithocontact to assign it as a hydrogeologically significant transmissive zone within fractured rocks.

  16. HYDROGEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    <正>20102620 Chen Chuanfang(Southeastern Fujian Geology Party of Fujian Province,Quanzhou 362021,China)Preestimation of Flowing Yield from the Mine Pits of the Pantian Minefield in Anxi County,Fujian Province(Geology of Fujian,ISSN1001-3970,CN35-1080/P,28(4),2009,p.315-319,1 illus.,2 tables,with English abstract)Key words:estimating water yield of mine,Fujian

  17. HYDROGEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    <正>20110546 Chen Chuanfang(Southeastern Geology Party of Fujian Province,Quanzhou 362021,China)Primary Influencing Factors of Mine Drainage in the Karst Area of the Pantian Iron Minefield,Fujian Province(Geology of Fujian,ISSN1001-3970,CN35-1080/P,29(1),2010,p.42-45,1 illus.)Key words:mine drainage,Fujian Province The Pantian marble and iron mining area in Anxi County has the mixture conditio

  18. HYDROGEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>20081223 Chen Jiansheng(State Key Laboratory of Hydrology-Water Resources and Hydraulic Engineering,Hohai University,Nanjing 210098,China);Zhao Xia Isotope Method for Confined Groundwater Recharge of the Lower Reaches of the Heihe Riv

  19. HYDROGEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    <正>20131276 Chen Dengqi (Guizhou Institute of Geological Engineering Exploration , Guiyang 550008 , China); Song Xiaoqing The Reasons of Sifangjing Karst Spring Drying-Up in Zhijin of Guizhou Province (Guizhou Geology , ISSN1000-5943 , CN52-1059/P , 29 (2), 2012 , p.94-98 , 2illus. , 6refs.) Key words : karst water

  20. HYDROGEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    <正>20141756 Chen Ruige(Mathematical College,China University of Geosciences,Beijing100083,China);Zhou Xun Numerical Simulation of Groundwater Level Fluctuation in a Coastal Confined Aquifer with Sloping Initial Groundwater Level Induced by the Tide(Geological Bulletin of China,ISSN1671-2552,CN11-4648/P,32(7),2013,p.1099-1104,6 illus.,16 refs.) Key words:confined water,groundwater level

  1. HYDROGEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    20151960 Cao Chongben(No.114 Geological Party,Guizhou Bureau of Geology and Mineral Exploration and Development,Zunyi563000,China);Zhou Shien Building and Significance of Karst Reservoir Structure Resistivity Model in Geophysical Water Exploration

  2. Hydrogeology of Webb County, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Rebecca B.

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Webb County, in semiarid South Texas on the U.S.-Mexico border, is a region confronted by increasing stresses on natural resources. Laredo (fig. 1), the largest city in Webb County (population 193,000 in 2000), was one of the 10 fastest-growing metropolitan areas in the country during 1990-2000 (Perry and Mackun, 2001). Commercial and industrial activities have expanded throughout the region to support the maquiladora industry (manufacturing plants in Mexico) along the border and other growth as a result of the passage of the North American Free Trade Agreement. The Rio Grande currently (2002) is the primary source of public water supply for Laredo and other cities along the border in Webb County (fig. 1). Other cities, such as Bruni and Mirando City in the southeastern part of the county, rely on ground-water supplies to meet municipal demands. Increased water demand associated with development and population growth in the region has increased the need for the City of Laredo and Webb County to evaluate alternative water sources to meet future demand. Possible options include (1) supplementing the surface-water supply with ground water, and (2) applying artificial storage and recovery (ASR) technology to recharge local aquifers. These options raise issues regarding the hydraulic capability of the aquifers to store economically substantial quantities of water, current or potential uses of the resource, and possible effects on the quality of water resulting from mixing ground water with alternative source waters. To address some of these issues, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the City of Laredo, began a study in 1996 to assess the ground-water resources of Webb County. A hydrogeologic study was conducted to review and analyze available information on the hydrogeologic units (aquifers and confining units) in Webb County, to locate available wells in the region with water-level and water-quality information from the aquifers, and

  3. Gravimetry contributions to the study of the complex western Haouz aquifer (Morocco): Structural and hydrogeological implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouikri, Ibtissam; el Mandour, Abdennabi; Jaffal, Mohammed; Baudron, Paul; García-Aróstegui, José-Luis; Manar, Ahmed; Casas, Albert

    2016-03-01

    This study provides new elements that illustrate the benefits of combining gravity, structural, stratigraphic and piezometric data for hydrogeological purposes. A combined methodology was applied to the western Haouz aquifer (Morocco), one of the main sources of water for irrigation and human consumption in the Marrakech region. First, a residual anomaly map was calculated from the Bouguer anomaly data. The computed map provided information on the ground density variation, revealing a strong control by a regional gradient. We then used various filtering techniques to delineate the major geological structures such as faults and basins: vertical and horizontal derivatives and upward continuation. This technique highlighted news structures and provided information on their dip. The gravity anomalies perfectly delineated the basement uplifts and the sedimentary thickening in depressions and grabens. The interpretation of gravimetric filtering, geological and hydrogeological data then highlighted two types of groundwater reservoirs, an unconfined aquifer hosted in conglomeratic mio-pliocene and quaternary rocks, covering the entire western Haouz and a deep confined aquifer contained in cenomanian-turonian limestone and eocene dolomitic formations in the south. Combining piezometric and residual anomaly maps revealed that groundwater flow and storage was in perfect agreement with the structures showing a negative anomaly, while structures with positive anomalies corresponded to groundwater divides. The study of gravity gradient zones by contact analysis enhanced the existing structural pattern of the study area and highlighted new structures, mainly oriented N70 and N130. The results of this study present a common framework and provide a notable step forward in the knowledge of the geometry and the groundwater flow pattern of the western Haouz aquifer, and will serve as a solid basis for a better water resource management.

  4. River bank filtration as a dynamic biogeochemical and hydrogeological system: a three-year study of the spatial evolution with time of reduced zones in the Capdenac-Gare alluvial aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourg, A. C.; Kedziorek, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    Alluvial aquifers are abundantly solicited for obtaining drinking water because of easy access to groundwater (shallow depth of the water table) and significant recharge by the nearby river. Transit of river water through the "alluvial system" (river bank and aquifer alluvium) to the pumping wells is expected to filter undesirable constituents coming from the river (organic matter, bacteria and viruses, heavy metals, organic pollutants…). This porous system is not only a physical and geochemical filter but also a biogeochemical reactor. The degradation of organic matter brought by infiltrating river water "fuels" the biogeochemical engine that drives redox reactions in the reactor and can induce local and temporary reducing conditions. This can be either beneficial (denitrification) or detrimental (dissolution of Mn and Fe) to the quality of the water pumped. A well field in the alluvial plain of the Lot River (France) was studied for 3 years. The origin of the water sampled in wells and piezometers (river versus aquifer was identified using chloride as a natural tracer. In many wells located close to the river bank, the water chemistry varies seasonally, with high summer temperature and low summer dissolved oxygen and nitrate. Even though dissolved manganese tends to show high summer concentrations different trends are observed , the peak manganese concentration increasing or decreasing with the years depending on the well location. The bacterial activity and its degradation of infiltrated dissolved organic carbon creates the seasonal reduced zone (best indicated by the dissolution of manganese, the third electron acceptor after dissolved oxygen and nitrate). At mid-survey, due to the deterioration of the water quality (increasing manganese concentrations) in some pumped wells, two of them were abandoned and three new ones drilled. The pumping pattern changed significantly and new groundwater flow lines were established. The amplitude of the reduction of

  5. Hydrogeologic Constraints on Yucatan's Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doehring, D O; Butler, J H

    1974-11-15

    The Republic of Mexico has an ambitious and effective national water program. The Secretaria de Recursos Hidraulicos (SRH), whose director has cabinet rank in the federal government, is one of the most professionally distinguished government agencies of its kind in the Americas. Resources for the Future, Inc., has been assisting the World Bank with a water planning study which the Bank is undertaking jointly with the Mexican government. The study is intended to provide guidelines for the development of government policies and projects designed to bring about the most efficient use of Mexico's water resources. However, to date, their study has not been directed toward the growing problems of the northern Yucatáan Peninsula which are discussed here. LeGrand (13) suggested that man has inherited a harsh environment in carbonate terranes. In the case of the northern Yucatán Peninsula, the physical environment creates a set of hydrogeologic constraints to future economic and social development. Planning for intermediate and long-range land use on the peninsula must be related directly to the limited and fragile groundwater source. Continued contamination will make future aquifer management a difficult challenge for federal, state, and territorial agencies. We conclude that any strategy for long-range land use in the study area should include establishment of a regional aquifermonitoring network for long-term measurements of key hydrogeologic parameters, including precipitation, evapotranspiration, water table elevations, and water quality. Information from this network would flow into a central facility for storage, interpretation, and analysis. At present the SRH is collecting some of these data. Expansion of the existing program to provide sound information for regional planning will greatly benefit present as well as future generations. If such a program is implemented, it will represent a model for regional planning in other tropical and subtropical karstic

  6. Imprint of Southern Red Sea Major Tectonic Zone In A New Bouguer Anomaly Map of Southern Yemen Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blecha, V.

    A new Bouguer anomaly map of western part of southern Yemen margin has been compiled. Densities of rock samples from main geological units (Precambrian base- ment, Mesozoic sediments, Tertiary volcanites) have been measured and used for grav- ity modeling. Regional gravity map indicates decrease of thickness of continental crust from volcanites of the Yemen Trap Series towards the coast of the Gulf of Aden. Most remarkable feature in the map of residual anomalies is a positive anomaly over the Dhala graben. The Dhala graben is a prominent geological structure in the area of study trending parallel to the Red Sea axis. Gravity modeling on a profile across the Dhala graben presumes intrusive plutonic rocks beneath the graben. There are two other areas in the southwestern tip of Arabia, which have essentially the same struc- tural position as the Dhala graben: the Jabal Tirf volcanic rift zone in the southern Saudi Arabia and Jabal Hufash extensional zone in northern Yemen. All three areas extend along the line trending parallel to the Red Sea axis with length of about 500 km. The line coincides with the axis of Afar (Danakil) depression after Arabia is shifted and rotated back to Africa. These facts imply conclusion that the Oligocene - Early Miocene magmatic activity on the Jabal Tirf - Dhala lineament is related to the same original deep tectonic zone, forming present-day Afar depression and still active.

  7. SRP baseline hydrogeologic investigation: Aquifer characterization. Groundwater geochemistry of the Savannah River Site and vicinity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strom, R.N.; Kaback, D.S.

    1992-03-31

    An investigation of the mineralogy and chemistry of the principal hydrogeologic units and the geochemistry of the water in the principal aquifers at Savannah River Site (SRS) was undertaken as part of the Baseline Hydrogeologic Investigation. This investigation was conducted to provide background data for future site studies and reports and to provide a site-wide interpretation of the geology and geochemistry of the Coastal Plain Hydrostratigraphic province. Ground water samples were analyzed for major cations and anions, minor and trace elements, gross alpha and beta, tritium, stable isotopes of hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon, and carbon-14. Sediments from the well borings were analyzed for mineralogy and major and minor elements.

  8. Geology and hydrogeology of the Florida Keys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halley, Robert B.; Vacher, H. L.; Shinn,

    1997-01-01

    This chapter discusses the geology and hydrogeology of the Florida Keys, and focuses on the islands formed of Pleistocene limestone. These islands, which are crossed when driving from Miami to Key West, are typically regarded as "the Florida Keys." The outstanding and fragile character of ecosystems on and around the Florida Keys has prompted State and Federal efforts to protect and preserve the remaining public portions of the region. The Florida Keys were largely ignored during the sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth centuries, although the waters just offshore provided a major shipping thoroughfare to and from the New World. The Florida Keys are now recognized as one of the great recreational and environmental resources of the United States. The islands are outposts of a laid-back, tropical resort culture that has as its foundation warmth and clear water. A significant part of the attraction is fishing, diving, and boating around the area's coral reefs, which the islands protect. But the reefs were not always so highly valued. The Florida Keys that have protected the reefs for millennia, may now be the source of the agents that may accomplish what Agassiz thought was beyond man's power a century ago.

  9. An integrated hydrogeological study to support sustainable development and management of groundwater resources: a case study from the Precambrian Crystalline Province, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhnure, Pandith; Peddi, Nageshwar Rao; Allani, Damodar Rao

    2016-03-01

    The rapid expansion of agriculture, industries and urbanization has triggered unplanned groundwater development leading to severe stress on groundwater resources in crystalline rocks of India. With depleting resources from shallow aquifers, end users have developed resources from deeper aquifers, which have proved to be counterproductive economically and ecologically. An integrated hydrogeological study has been undertaken in the semi-arid Madharam watershed (95 km2) in Telangana State, which is underlain by granites. The results reveal two aquifer systems: a weathered zone (maximum 30 m depth) and a fractured zone (30-85 m depth). The weathered zone is unsaturated to its maximum extent, forcing users to tap groundwater from deeper aquifers. Higher orders of transmissivity, specific yield and infiltration rates are observed in the recharge zone, while moderate orders are observed in an intermediate zone, and lower orders in the discharge zone. This is due to the large weathering-zone thickness and a higher sand content in the recharge zone than in the discharge zone, where the weathered residuum contains more clay. The NO3 - concentration is high in shallow irrigation wells, and F- is high in deeper wells. Positive correlation is observed between F- and depth in the recharge zone and its proximity. Nearly 50 % of groundwater samples are unfit for human consumption and the majority of irrigation-well samples are classed as medium to high risk for plant growth. Both supply-side and demand-side measures are recommended for sustainable development and management of this groundwater resource. The findings can be up-scaled to other similar environments.

  10. Nomenclature of regional hydrogeologic units of the Southeastern Coastal Plain aquifer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J.A.; Renken, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    Clastic sediments of the Southeastern Coastal Plain aquifer system can be divided into four regional aquifers separated by three regional confining units. The four regional aquifers have been named for major rivers that cut across their outcrop areas and expose the aquifer materials. From youngest to oldest, the aquifers are called the Chickasawhay River, Pearl River, Chattahoochee River, and Black Warrior River aquifers, and the regional confining units separating them are given the same name as the aquifer they overlie. Most of the regional hydrogeologic units are subdivided within each of the four States that comprise the study area. Correlation of regional units is good with hydrogeologic units delineated by a similar regional study to the west and southwest. Because of complexity created by a major geologic structure to the northeast of the study area and dramatic facies change from clastic to carbonate strata to the southeast, correlation of regional hydrogeologic units is poor in these directions. (Author 's abstract)

  11. Warning system for hydrogeological hazards in Campania (Southern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biafore, Mauro; Cristiano, Luigi; Gentile, Salvatore; Gentilella, Matteo; Giannattasio, Maurizio; Napoli, Francesca

    2010-05-01

    Campania is the Italian region with the highest population density (419 inhabitants/km2). Almost 20% of its territory (13669 km2) is affected by significant hydrogeological hazards, with related loss scenarios in almost 12% of it. The most critical hydrogeological hazard scenarios are those triggered by extreme rainfall events with duration ranging from a few tens of minutes up 72 hours: flood loss scenarios are expected in catchments with spatial extent from a few Km2 up to 5000 km2; shallow landslides and mudflows are also triggered by rainfall events within a broad range of time scales. This study presents a warning system for hydrogeological hazards, which has been operating in Campania since 2005, designed for mitigating losses due to extreme rainfall events. The warning system is structured into two stages: the meteorological forecasting stage and the hydrological monitoring stage. In the first stage, after evaluating rainfall forecasts provided by numerical weather prediction models (with a forecasting time up to 48 hours), warning messages are issued to the local municipalities grouped in 8 warning zones. Critical rainfall events are identified by three different alert levels, according to their forecasted spatial and temporal extents, each corresponding to a category of expected hazard scenarios at regional level. During the second stage, the dynamic evolution of the hydrological events is monitored by a real-time network of river stage and rain gauges, which are employed to compute one or more precursors for each loss scenario. Loss scenarios have been classified according to the temporal and spatial scales of the corresponding precursors, in order to deal with the difficulties related to the occurrence of significantly different hazard scenarios during the same rainfall event. Three threshold values have been identified for each precursor, corresponding to given hazard and alert levels. As a precursor exceeds a threshold value, warning messages are

  12. The Slip History and Source Statistics of Major Slow Slip Events along the Cascadia Subduction Zone from 1998 to 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, H.; Schmidt, D. A.

    2008-12-01

    We estimate the time dependent slip distribution of 16 prominent slow slip events along the northern half of the Cascadia subduction zone from 1998 to 2008. We process continuous GPS data from the PBO, PANGA and WCDA networks from the past decade using GAMIT/GLOBK processing package. Transient surface displacements are interpreted as slip on the plate interface using the Extended Network Inversion Filter. Of these 16 events, 10 events are centered north of Puget Sound, 4 events are resolved around the Columbia River and 1 event is located near Cape Blanco. The February 2003 event is complex, extending from Portland to southern Vancouver Island. Other smaller events beneath Northern Vancouver Island, Oregon and Northern California are not well resolved because of the limited station coverage. We identify two characteristic segments based on the along-strike extent of individual transient slip events in northern Washington. One segment is centered around Port Angeles. Another segment is between the Columbia River and the southern end of Puget Sound. The propagation direction of slow slip events is variable from one event to the next. The maximum cumulative slip for these 16 events is ~ 27 cm, which is centered beneath Port Angeles. This indicates that the strain release by transient slip is not uniform along-strike. In northwestern Washington where cumulative slip is a maximum, the subduction zone bends along-strike and dip of the plate is lower compared to the north and south. We hypothesize that the geometry of the slab plays an important role for focusing transient strain release at this location along the subduction zone. We explore the relationship of source parameters of slow slip using our catalogue of 16 events. The estimated moment magnitude ranges between 6.1 and 6.7. The average stress drop of 0.06-0.1 MPa is nearly two orders of magnitude smaller than that found for normal earthquakes (1-10 MPa). Standard earthquakes follow a scaling relationship where

  13. Dry steam feed zones and silica scaling as major controls of total flow enthalpy at Cerro Prieto, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beall, J.J. [Calpine Corp., Santa Rosa, CA (United States); Ledesma, A.P.; Dios Ocampo, J. de [Constructora y Perforadora Latina S.A., Baja California (Mexico)

    1997-12-31

    Enthalpy and chloride data for Cerro Prieto well fluids define a mixing line between original reservoir liquid (1,300-1,500 J/g, 9,000-11,000 ppm Cl) and superheated steam (2870 J/g, 0 ppm Cl). The mixing relationship establishes that dry steam feed zones contribute to the total fluid flow of many wells. Fluids produced from newly completed or worked over wells often show rapid movement in either direction along the enthalpy-chloride mixing line. The direction of movement along the enthalpy-chloride mixing line depends upon whether increased formation boiling (increasing the dry steam flow to the well) or silica scaling in the formation and on the surface of the well bore (which inhibits the flow of dry steam) is the dominant process.

  14. Water-Resources Data and Hydrogeologic Setting at the Raleigh Hydrogeologic Research Station, Wake County, North Carolina, 2005-2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSwain, Kristen Bukowski; Bolich, Richard E.; Chapman, Melinda J.; Huffman, Brad A.

    2009-01-01

    Water-resources data were collected to describe the hydrologic conditions at the Raleigh hydrogeologic research station, located in the Piedmont Physiographic Province of North Carolina. Data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and the North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Division of Water Quality, from May 2005 through September 2007 are presented in this report. Three well clusters and four piezometers were installed at the Raleigh hydrogeologic research station along an assumed flow path from recharge to discharge areas. Each well cluster includes four wells to monitor the regolith, transition zone, and shallow and deep bedrock. Borehole, surface, and waterborne geophysics were conducted to examine the lithology and physical properties of the bedrock and to determine the aerial extent of near vertical diabase dikes. Slug tests were conducted in the wells at each cluster to determine the hydraulic conductivity of the formation tapped by each well. Periodic water-level altitudes were measured in all wells and in four piezometers. Continuous hourly water levels were measured in wells for variable periods of time during the study, and a surface-water gage collected 15-minute stage data from April to June 2006. In October 2005 and April 2006, water-quality samples were collected from a tributary and in all wells at the Raleigh hydrogeologic research station. Continuous water-quality data were collected hourly in three wells from December 2005 through January 2007 and every 15 minutes in the tributary from May to June 2006. In August 2006, streambed temperatures and drive-point ground-water samples were collected across lines of section spanning the Neuse River.

  15. Regional hydrogeological simulations using CONECTFLOW. Preliminary site description. Laxemar sub area - version 1.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartley, Lee; Hunter, Fiona; Jackson, Peter; McCarthy, Rachel [Serco Assurance, Risley (United Kingdom); Gylling, Bjoern; Marsic, Niko [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2006-04-15

    The main objective of this study is to support the development of a preliminary Site Description of the Laxemar subarea on a regional-scale based on the available data of November 2004 (Data Freeze L1.2). A more specific objective of this study is to assess the role of both known and less quantified hydrogeological conditions in determining the present-day distribution of saline groundwater in the Laxemar subarea on a regional-scale. An improved understanding of the palaeo-hydrogeology is necessary in order to gain credibility for the Site Description in general and the hydrogeological description in particular. This is to serve as a basis for describing the present hydrogeological conditions on a local-scale, as well as predictions of future hydrogeological conditions. Another objective is to assess the flow-paths from the local-scale model domain, based on the present-day flow conditions, to assess the distribution of discharge and recharge areas connected to the flow at the approximate repository depth to inform the Preliminary Safety Evaluation. Significant new features incorporated in the modelling include: a depth variation in hydraulic properties within the deformation zones; a dependence on rock domain and depth in the rock mass properties in regional-scale models; a more detailed model of the overburden in terms of a layered system of spatially variable thickness made up of several different types of Quaternary deposits has been implemented; and several variants on the position of the watertable have been tried. The motivation for introducing a dependence on rock domain was guided by the hydrogeological interpretation with the aim of honouring the observed differences in hydraulic properties measured at the boreholes.

  16. Dissolved organic carbon and major and trace elements in peat porewater of sporadic, discontinuous, and continuous permafrost zones of western Siberia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Raudina

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Mobilization of dissolved organic carbon (DOC and related trace elements (TEs from the frozen peat to surface waters in the permafrost zone is expected to enhance under ongoing permafrost thaw and active layer thickness (ALT deepening in high-latitude regions. The interstitial soil solutions are efficient tracers of ongoing bio-geochemical processes in the critical zone and can help to decipher the intensity of carbon and metals migration from the soil to the rivers and further to the ocean. To this end, we collected, across a 640 km latitudinal transect of the sporadic to continuous permafrost zone of western Siberia peatlands, soil porewaters from 30 cm depth using suction cups and we analyzed DOC, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC, and 40 major elements and TEs in 0.45 µm filtered fraction of 80 soil porewaters. Despite an expected decrease in the intensity of DOC and TE mobilization from the soil and vegetation litter to the interstitial fluids with the increase in the permafrost coverage and a decrease in the annual temperature and ALT, the DOC and many major and trace elements did not exhibit any distinct decrease in concentration along the latitudinal transect from 62.2 to 67.4° N. The DOC demonstrated a maximum of concentration at 66° N, on the border of the discontinuous/continuous permafrost zone, whereas the DOC concentration in peat soil solutions from the continuous permafrost zone was equal to or higher than that in the sporadic/discontinuous permafrost zone. Moreover, a number of major (Ca, Mg and trace (Al, Ti, Sr, Ga, rare earth elements (REEs, Zr, Hf, Th elements exhibited an increasing, not decreasing, northward concentration trend. We hypothesize that the effects of temperature and thickness of the ALT are of secondary importance relative to the leaching capacity of peat, which is in turn controlled by the water saturation of the peat core. The water residence time in peat pores also plays a role in enriching the

  17. THE DISTRIBUTION OF ORGANIC CARBON IN MAJOR COMPONENTS OF FORESTS LOCATED IN FIVE LIFE ZONES OF VENEZUELA

    Science.gov (United States)

    One of the major uncertainties concerning the role of tropical forests in the global carbon cycle is the lack of adequate data on the carbon content of all their components. The goal of this study was to contribute to filling this data gap by estimating the quantity of carbon in ...

  18. Hydrogeology and simulation of ground-water flow in the thick regolith-fractured crystalline rock aquifer system of Indian Creek basin, North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Charles C.; Smith, Douglas G.; Eimers, Jo Leslie

    1997-01-01

    The Indian Creek Basin in the southwestern Piedmont of North Carolina is one of five type areas studied as part of the Appalachian Valleys-Piedmont Regional Aquifer-System analysis. Detailed studies of selected type areas were used to quantify ground-water flow characteristics in various conceptual hydrogeologic terranes. The conceptual hydrogeologic terranes are considered representative of ground-water conditions beneath large areas of the three physiographic provinces--Valley and Ridge, Blue Ridge, and Piedmont--that compose the Appalachian Valleys-Piedmont Regional Aquifer-System Analysis area. The Appalachian Valleys-Piedmont Regional Aquifer-System Analysis study area extends over approximately 142,000 square miles in 11 states and the District of Columbia in the Appalachian highlands of the Eastern United States. The Indian Creek type area is typical of ground-water conditions in a single hydrogeologic terrane that underlies perhaps as much as 40 percent of the Piedmont physiographic province. The hydrogeologic terrane of the Indian Creek model area is one of massive and foliated crystalline rocks mantled by thick regolith. The area lies almost entirely within the Inner Piedmont geologic belt. Five hydrogeologic units occupy major portions of the model area, but statistical tests on well yields, specific capacities, and other hydrologic characteristics show that the five hydrogeologic units can be treated as one unit for purposes of modeling ground-water flow. The 146-square-mile Indian Creek model area includes the Indian Creek Basin, which has a surface drainage area of about 69 square miles. The Indian Creek Basin lies in parts of Catawba, Lincoln, and Gaston Counties, North Carolina. The larger model area is based on boundary conditions established for digital simulation of ground-water flow within the smaller Indian Creek Basin. The ground-water flow model of the Indian Creek Basin is based on the U.S. Geological Survey?s modular finite

  19. Measuring coordination of economy-society and resource environment based on major function oriented zoning: a case study of Pearl River Delta

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Zhong-quan; WANG Zhang-jun

    2010-01-01

    A reasonable coordination degree assessment of the social-economic development level and the resource-environment quality level are essential to identify the key factors of the development,and vital to deter-mine the approprtate development strategy and achieve sustainable development.The major function oriented zoning plays a role in spatial coordination mainly by spatial guidance and restriction,so.the proposal of major function oriented zoning gives a new train of thought to generate a coordination evaluation of economy-society and the resource-environment system.From the view of major function oriented zoning that considers resource environmental bearing capacity,existing development density and development potential,this paper constructs an index system and model of coordination evaluation with a case study on Pearl River Delta.The results have shown:(1)It can reveal the conflicts of economic-social development and resource-environment quality to accurately consider resource environmental bearing capacity,existing development density and development potential;(2)The coordination degree between social-economy system and resource-environment system in Pearl River Delta continued to decline in the past 10 years.The spatial extent of coordination evolves from coordination in the whole Pearl River Delta to imbalance in the core areas,and at present,the uncoordinated areas have already diffused from core areas to the outlying regions;(3)Most regions of the Pearl River Delta are in uncoordinated condition when considering the coordination degree of economic-social development and resourceenvironment quality,not as coordinated as some scholars considered.

  20. Teaching hydrogeology: a review of current practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Gleeson

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogeology is now taught in a broad spectrum of departments and institutions to students with diverse backgrounds. Successful instruction in hydrogeology thus requires a variety of pedagogical approaches depending on desired learning outcomes and the background of students. We review the pedagogical literature in hydrogeology to highlight recent advances and analyze a 2005 survey among 68 hydrogeology instructors. The literature and survey results suggest there are only ~ 15 topics that are considered crucial by most hydrogeologists and > 100 other topics that are considered crucial by some hydrogeologists. The crucial topics focus on properties of aquifers and fundamentals of groundwater flow, and should likely be part of all undergraduate hydrogeology courses. Other topics can supplement and support these crucial topics, depending on desired learning outcomes. Classroom settings continue to provide a venue for emphasizing fundamental knowledge. However, recent pedagogical advances are biased towards field and laboratory instruction with a goal of bolstering experiential learning. Field methods build on the fundamentals taught in the classroom and emphasize the collection of data, data uncertainty, and the development of vocational skills. Laboratory and computer-based exercises similarly build on theory, and offer an opportunity for data analysis and integration. The literature suggests curricula at all levels should ideally balance field, laboratory, and classroom pedagogy into an iterative and integrative whole. An integrated, iterative and balanced approach leads to greater student motivation and advancement of theoretical and vocational knowledge.

  1. Teaching hydrogeology: a review of current practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleeson, T.; Allen, D. M.; Ferguson, G.

    2012-07-01

    Hydrogeology is now taught in a broad spectrum of departments and institutions to students with diverse backgrounds. Successful instruction in hydrogeology thus requires a variety of pedagogical approaches depending on desired learning outcomes and the background of students. We review the pedagogical literature in hydrogeology to highlight recent advances and analyze a 2005 survey among 68 hydrogeology instructors. The literature and survey results suggest there are only ~ 15 topics that are considered crucial by most hydrogeologists and > 100 other topics that are considered crucial by some hydrogeologists. The crucial topics focus on properties of aquifers and fundamentals of groundwater flow, and should likely be part of all undergraduate hydrogeology courses. Other topics can supplement and support these crucial topics, depending on desired learning outcomes. Classroom settings continue to provide a venue for emphasizing fundamental knowledge. However, recent pedagogical advances are biased towards field and laboratory instruction with a goal of bolstering experiential learning. Field methods build on the fundamentals taught in the classroom and emphasize the collection of data, data uncertainty, and the development of vocational skills. Laboratory and computer-based exercises similarly build on theory, and offer an opportunity for data analysis and integration. The literature suggests curricula at all levels should ideally balance field, laboratory, and classroom pedagogy into an iterative and integrative whole. An integrated, iterative and balanced approach leads to greater student motivation and advancement of theoretical and vocational knowledge.

  2. Hydrogeological challenges through gender approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lorenzo, Maria Rosaria; Saltari, Davide; Di Giacomo, Tullia Valeria

    2017-04-01

    Women and Men play a different role in the society, tied from the differences (physical, biological, somatic, etc…) typical of each one. In the last decades, more gender approach has been introduced in a number of fields including the hydrogeological risk. Experiences, needs and potential of each one, women and men, covers both the risk reduction before the occurrence of extreme events (vulnerability assessment and prediction of the expected risk), then in the next emergency and intervention in follow-up actions to the overcoming of the event for the return to everyday life. The response of the extreme hydrological events are also subordinated from gender participation and it is closely related from other aspects, as natural disasters (flood events), gender inequalities and urban floodings. These aspects are also scheduled by the different approaches: a woman focuses different primary and social aspects than a man. How women can help organizations offering new 'policies' and government is the main aspect to be considered and how a gender approach can mitigate disasters to hydrological risk. It depends on some factors: gender inequalities (gender perception and sensibility), importance of natural disasters and urban floodings. Gender inequalities can match both in the natural disasters and urban floodings in a relevant way. ICT solutions can also give a helpful framework to accelerate and focus the quicker condition to get the better approach and solution. Gender has a particular significant, explanatory variable in disaster research. Many studies, show how women have higher mortality and morbidity rates than men during natural disasters, especially in lower income countries. In the aftermath disasters, at the same time, specific responsibilities on women are imposed from the gendered division of labour. Furthermore gender differences are sometimes attributed to traditional women's roles, discrimination, lower physical strength, nutritional deficiencies, etc. as

  3. Hydrogeologic inferences from geophysical and geologic investigation of the Standard Mine site, Elk Basin, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minsley, B. J.; Caine, J. S.; Ball, L. B.; Burton, B.; Curry-Elrod, E.; Manning, A. H.; Verplanck, P. L.

    2009-12-01

    Geophysical and geologic data were collected at the Standard Mine in Elk Basin near Crested Butte, CO, to improve our understanding of the hydrogeologic controls in the basin and how they influence surface and groundwater interactions with nearby mine workings. The Tertiary Ohio Creek and Wasatch formations are the bedrock geologic units; both are primarily sandstones, but with differences in weathering and fracturing. Dikes, near-vertical normal faults, and polymetallic quartz veins with varying degrees of lateral continuity cut the sedimentary units. The net impact of these features, along with basin topography, makes it difficult to predict the behavior of the surface and groundwater systems. This integrated study utilizes geologic observations to help constrain subsurface information obtained from the analysis of surface geophysical measurements. This is a critical step toward using the geophysical data in a meaningful hydrogeologic framework. The approach combines the benefit of direct, but sparse, field observations with spatially continuous, but indirect, measurements of physical properties through the use of geophysics. Surface geophysical data includes electrical resistivity profiles aimed at imaging variability in subsurface structural properties and fluid content; self-potentials, which are sensitive to mineralized zones at this site and, to a lesser extent, shallow flow patterns; and magnetic measurements, which provide information on lateral variability in near-surface geologic features, although the minerals at this site are not strongly magnetized. Downhole caliper and optical televiewer logs were acquired in one well and provide valuable information on fracture properties. Field geologic observations include hand sample mineralogy and detailed mapping and characterization of faults, joints, and veins. Analyses of representative rock samples include magnetic susceptibility, mercury injection capillary pressure, semi-quantitative x-ray diffraction

  4. Engineering Geological Considerations in Tunnelling through Major Tectonic Thrust Zones - Cases along the Egnatia Motorway, Northern Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinos, Vassilios P.; Aggistalis, Georgios; Kazilis, Nikolaos

    Tunnelling through tectonic shear zones is always a challenge due to the geometrical complexity and the presence of poor quality rock masses with high variability in their occurrence. Based on the experience from the Egnatia motorway, in Northern Greece, the paper aims to give some general concepts, on the main failure mechanisms of the deformed materials and discuss guidelines for the design. Two case studies are presented, the first when the rock mass is brecciated derived from brittle rocks and the second when the rock mass is sheared from the compression of weak rocks with plastic characters. In the first case the rock mass is composed of interlocking angular pieces of strong rock and can exhibit satisfactory stability under confined conditions. Unless immediate support is provided, the cohesionless rock mass does ravel in tunnel excavation. In the second case heavily sheared clayey flysch exhibits squeezing behaviour even under tens of meters of overburden. In this case there is a variability of the material and it is not suggested to provide a number of support categories for each of the erratically alternating various geotechnical conditions that may be present but it is preferable to design an excavation and support system and sequence which are capable to deal with the worst anticipated conditions.

  5. Prevalence, risk factors, and major bacterial causes of camel mastitis in Borana Zone, Oromia Regional State, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regassa, Alemayehu; Golicha, Gelma; Tesfaye, Dawit; Abunna, Fufa; Megersa, Bekele

    2013-10-01

    A cross-sectional study was carried out from November 2010 up to April 2011 to estimate mastitis prevalence and associated risk factors and to assess its bacterial causes in traditionally managed camels in Borana Zone, Southern Ethiopia. Thus, 348 lactating camels were examined clinically, and subclinical cases were checked with California mastitis test (CMT). The overall prevalence of mastitis was 44.8 % (156/348), comprising clinical (19, 5.4 %) and subclinical (137, 39.4 %) cases. The quarter level prevalence of mastitis was 24.0 % (334/1,392). Of the total 1,392 examined teats, 30 were blind, and hence, from the 1,362 non-blind CMT-examined teats, 22.3 % (304/1,362) were CMT positive. Of the 304 CMT-positive samples, 264 were culture positive (197 Gram-positive, 41 Gram-negative, and 26 mixed isolates), and 40 were culture negative. The prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus was found to be the highest at both the animal (12.8 %, 39/304) and quarter level (2.9 %, 39/1,362). Regression analysis revealed higher likelihood of mastitis occurrence among camels from Dharito (OR = 3.4, 95 % confidence interval (CI) = 1.8, 6.4), Gagna (OR = 3.4, 95 % CI = 1.8, 6.5), and Haro Bake (OR = 2.6, 95 % CI = 1.3, 5.1) than camels from Surupha. Likewise, there was higher chance of mastitis occurrence among camels at the early lactation stage (OR = 2.3, 95 % CI = 1.1, 4.6) and camels with udder/teat lesions (OR = 13.7, 95 % CI = 1.7, 109.4) than among camels at late lactation stage and camels with healthy udder/teats, respectively. In conclusion, this study reveals the current status of camel mastitis in Southern Ethiopia.

  6. Uncertainty in geological and hydrogeological data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Nilsson

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Uncertainty in conceptual model structure and in environmental data is of essential interest when dealing with uncertainty in water resources management. To make quantification of uncertainty possible is it necessary to identify and characterise the uncertainty in geological and hydrogeological data. This paper discusses a range of available techniques to describe the uncertainty related to geological model structure and scale of support. Literature examples on uncertainty in hydrogeological variables such as saturated hydraulic conductivity, specific yield, specific storage, effective porosity and dispersivity are given. Field data usually have a spatial and temporal scale of support that is different from the one on which numerical models for water resources management operate. Uncertainty in hydrogeological data variables is characterised and assessed within the methodological framework of the HarmoniRiB classification.

  7. SRP Baseline Hydrogeologic Investigation, Phase 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bledsoe, H.W.

    1988-08-01

    The SRP Baseline Hydrogeologic Investigation was implemented for the purpose of updating and improving the knowledge and understanding of the hydrogeologic systems underlying the SRP site. Phase III, which is discussed in this report, includes the drilling of 7 deep coreholes (sites P-24 through P-30) and the installation of 53 observation wells ranging in depth from approximately 50 ft to more than 970 ft below the ground surface. In addition to the collection of geologic cores for lithologic and stratigraphic study, samples were also collected for the determination of physical characteristics of the sediments and for the identification of microorganisms.

  8. Hydrogeology and groundwater availability in Clarke County, Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelms, David L.; Moberg, Roger M.

    2010-01-01

    The prolonged drought between 1999 and 2002 drew attention in Clarke County, Virginia, to the quantity and sustainability of its groundwater resources. The groundwater flow systems of the county are complex and are controlled by the extremely folded and faulted geology that underlies the county. A study was conducted between October 2002 and October 2008 by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Clarke County, Virginia, to describe the hydrogeology and groundwater availability in the county and to establish a long-term water monitoring network. The study area encompasses approximately 177 square miles and includes the carbonate and siliciclastic rocks of the Great Valley section of the Valley and Ridge Physiographic Province and the metamorphic rocks of the Blue Ridge Physiographic Province (Blue Ridge). High-yielding wells generally tend to cluster along faults, within lineament zones, and in areas of tight folding throughout the county. Water-bearing zones are generally within 250 feet (ft) of land surface; however, median depths are slightly deeper for the hydrogeologic units of the Blue Ridge than for those of the Great Valley section of the county. Total water-level fluctuations between October 2002 and October 2008 ranged from 2.86 to 87.84 ft across the study area, with an average of 24.15 ft. Generally, water-level fluctuations were greatest near hydrologic divides, in isolated elevated areas, and in the Opequon Creek Basin. Seasonally, water-level highs occur in the early spring at the end of the major groundwater recharge period and lows occur in late autumn when evapotranspiration rates begin to decrease. An overall downward trend in water levels between 2003 and 2008, which closely follows a downward trend in annual precipitation over the same period, was observed in a majority of wells in the Great Valley and in some of the wells in the Blue Ridge. Water-level fluctuations in the Blue Ridge tend to follow current meteorological conditions, and

  9. Using multiple geochemical tracers to characterize the hydrogeology of the submarine spring off Crescent Beach, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarzenski, P.W.; Reich, C.D.; Spechler, R.M.; Kindinger, J.L.; Moore, W.S.

    2001-01-01

    A spectacular submarine spring is located about 4 km east of Crescent Beach, FL, in the Atlantic Ocean. The single vent feature of Crescent Beach Spring provides a unique opportunity to examine onshore-offshore hydrogeologic processes, as well as point source submarine ground water discharge. The Floridan aquifer system in northeastern Florida consists of Tertiary interspersed limestone and dolomite strata. Impermeable beds confine the water-bearing zones under artesian pressure. Miocene and younger confining strata have been eroded away at the vent feature, enabling direct hydrologic communication of Eocene ground water with coastal bottom waters. The spring water had a salinity of 6.02, which was immediately diluted by ambient seawater during advection/mixing. The concentration of major solutes in spring water and onshore well waters confirm a generalized easterly flow direction of artesian ground water. Nutrient concentrations were generally low in the reducing vent samples, and the majority of the total nitrogen species existed as NH3. The submarine ground water tracers, Rn-222 (1174 dpm I-1, dpm), methane (232 nM) and barium (294.5 nM) were all highly enriched in the spring water relative to ambient seawater. The concentrations of the reverse redox elements U, V and Mo were expectedly low in the submarine waters. The strontium isotope ratio of the vent water (87Sr/86Sr = 0.70798) suggests that the spring water contain an integrated signature indicative of Floridan aquifer system ground water. Additional Sr isotopic ratios from a series of surficial and Lower Floridan well samples suggest dynamic ground water mixing, and do not provide clear evidence for a single hydrogeologic water source at the spring vent. In this karst-dominated aquifer, such energetic mixing at the vent feature is expected, and would be facilitated by conduit and fractured flow. Radium isotope activities were utilized to estimate flow-path trajectories and to provide information on

  10. Hydrogeologic Setting and Ground-Water Flow in the Leetown Area, West Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozar, Mark D.; Weary, David J.; Paybins, Katherine S.; Pierce, Herbert A.

    2007-01-01

    The Leetown Science Center is a research facility operated by the U.S. Geological Survey that occupies approximately 455-acres near Kearneysville, Jefferson County, West Virginia. Aquatic and fish research conducted at the Center requires adequate supplies of high-quality, cold ground water. Three large springs and three production wells currently (in 2006) supply water to the Center. The recent construction of a second research facility (National Center for Cool and Cold Water Aquaculture) operated by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and co-located on Center property has placed additional demands on available water resources in the area. A three-dimensional steady-state finite-difference ground-water flow model was developed to simulate ground-water flow in the Leetown area and was used to assess the availability of ground water to sustain current and anticipated future demands. The model also was developed to test a conceptual model of ground-water flow in the complex karst aquifer system in the Leetown area. Due to the complexity of the karst aquifer system, a multidisciplinary research study was required to define the hydrogeologic setting. Geologic mapping, surface- and borehole-geophysical surveys, stream base-flow surveys, and aquifer tests were conducted to provide the hydrogeologic data necessary to develop and calibrate the model. It would not have been possible to develop a numerical model of the study area without the intensive data collection and methods developments components of the larger, more comprehensive hydrogeologic investigation. Results of geologic mapping and surface-geophysical surveys verified the presence of several prominent thrust faults and identified additional faults and other complex geologic structures (including overturned anticlines and synclines) in the area. These geologic structures are known to control ground-water flow in the region. Results of this study indicate that cross-strike faults and fracture zones are major

  11. Hydrogeologic framework of western Cape Cod, Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masterson, John P.; Stone, Byron D.; Walter, Donald A.; Savoie, Jennifer G.

    1997-01-01

    The aquifer of western Cape Cod consists of several hydrogeologic units composed of sand, gravel, silt, and clay (fig. 1) that were deposited during the late Wisconsinan glaciation of New England. The aquifer is a shallow, unconfined hydrologic system in which ground-water flows radially outward from the apex of the ground-water mound near the center of the peninsula toward the coast (fig.2). The aquifer is the sole source of water supply for the towns of Bourne, Sandwich, Falmouth, and Mashpee, and the Massachusetts Military Reservation (MMR).Previous geologic studies summarized the characteristics and relative ages of the glacial moraines and meltwater deposits and the relation of these sediments to the extent of the ice-sheet lobes during the last glaciation of southern New England (Oldale and Barlow, 1986; Hartshorn and others, 1991). Hydrogeologic studies in western Cape Cod characterized the shallow regional ground-water-flow system (LeBlanc and others, 1986) and analyzed simulated responses of the aquifer to changes in hydrologic stresses (Guswa and LeBlanc, 1985; Barlow and Hess, 1993; Masterson and Barlow, 1994; and Masterson and others, 1996). Recent concerns about widespread ground-water contamination, especially from sources on the MMR, have resulted in extensive investigations to characterize the local hydrogeology of the aquifer near the MMR (ABB Environmental Services, 1992). Masterson and others (1996) illustrated the strong influence of geology on ground-water flow and the importance of characterizing the hydrogeology to predict the migration of the contaminant plumes beneath the MMR.This report, a product of a cooperative study between the National Guard Bureau and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), characterizes the regional hydrogeology of the western Cape Cod aquifer on the basis of surficial glacial geology previously described by Mather and others (1940) and Oldale and Barlow (1986), and presents a new analysis of the subsurface hydrogeology

  12. Fault Hydrogeology Characterization for a Civil Infrastructure Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sholley, M. G.; Waterman, M. K.; Attanayake, P. M.

    2011-12-01

    hydrogeology associated with the Arrowhead Spring fault system was required because elevated groundwater temperatures and adverse chemistry posed a risk for tunneling. Standard investigation techniques were employed including borings, geologic mapping with trenching, resistivity surveys, installation and monitoring of observation wells, and assessment of surface water features in the area. A detailed geological model was constructed based on the drilling, mapping and resistivity surveys, but due to the fractured nature of the rock, water level measurements provided little insight into the groundwater flow regime. Under these circumstances, the hydrochemistry proved to be significant. Through the use of the expanded Durov plot, the major ion chemistry contributed to characterization of different water types, their origin, the delineation of the geothermal regime, and the influence of the fault on the groundwater regime. The combination of geological and hydrochemical characterization led to an understanding of the hydrogeology associated with the Arrowhead Springs Fault, and potential impacts to construction as a result of the characterization.

  13. Linking major and trace element headwater stream concentrations to DOC release and hydrologic conditions in a bog and peaty riparian zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broder, Tanja; Biester, Harald

    2017-04-01

    Peatlands and organic-rich riparian zones are known to export large amounts of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to surface water. In organic-rich, acidic headwater streams main carriers for element export are dissolved organic matter (DOM) and organic-iron complexes. In this environment DOM might also act as major carrier for metals, which otherwise may have a low solubility. This study examines annual and short term event-based variations of major and trace elements in a headwater catchment. Patterns are used to trace hydrological pathways and element sources under different hydrologic preconditions. Furthermore, it elucidates the importance of DOC as carrier of different elements in a bog and a peaty riparian catchment. The study was conducted in a small headwater stream draining an ombrotrophic peatland with an adjacent forested area with peaty riparian soils in the Harz Mountains (Germany). Discharge sampling was conducted weekly at two sites from snowmelt to begin of snowfall and in high resolution during selected discharge events in 2013 and 2014. Element concentrations were measured by means of ICP-MS and ICP-OES. A PCA was performed for each site and for annual and event datasets. Results show that a large number of element concentrations strongly correlate with DOC concentrations at the bog site. Even elements like Ca and Mg, which are known to have a low affinity to DOC. Congruently, the first principal component integrates the DOC pattern (element loadings > 0.8: Ca, Fe, Mg, Mn, Zn, As, Sr, Cd, DOC) and explained about 35 % of total variance and even 50 % during rain events (loadings > 0.8: Al, Ca, Fe, Mg, Mn, Zn, Li, Co, As, Sr, Cd, Pb, DOC). The study cannot verify that all correlating elements bind to DOC. It is likely that also a common mobilization pattern in the upper peat layer by plant decomposition causes the same response to changes in hydrologic pathways. Additionally, a low mineral content and an enrichment of elements like Fe and Mn in the

  14. Enzymatic activities and arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization of Plantago lanceolata and Plantago major in a soil root zone under heavy metal stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gucwa-Przepióra, Ewa; Nadgórska-Socha, Aleksandra; Fojcik, Barbara; Chmura, Damian

    2016-03-01

    The objectives of the present field study were to examine the soil enzyme activities in the soil root zones of Plantago lanceolata and Plantago major in different heavy metal contaminated stands. Moreover, the investigations concerned the intensity of root endophytic colonization and metal bioaccumulation in roots and shoots. The investigated Plantago species exhibited an excluder strategy, accumulating higher metal content in the roots than in the shoots. The heavy metal accumulation levels found in the two plantain species in this study were comparable to other plants suggested as phytostabilizers; therefore, the selected Plantago species may be applied in the phytostabilization of heavy metal contaminated areas. The lower level of soil enzymes (dehydrogenase, urease, acid, and alkaline phosphatase) as well as the higher bioavailability of metals in the root zone soil of the two plantain species were found in an area affected by smelting activity, where organic matter content in the soil was also the smallest. Mycorrhizal colonization on both species in the contaminated area was similar to colonization in non-contaminated stands. However, the lowest arbuscule occurrence and an absence of dark septate endophytes were found in the area affected by the smelting activity. It corresponded with the lowest plant cover observed in this stand. The assessment of enzyme activity, mycorrhizal colonization, and the chemical and physical properties of soils proved to be sensitive to differences between sites and between Plantago species.

  15. Three decadal inputs of total organic carbon from four major coastal river basins to the summer hypoxic zone of the Northern Gulf of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Songjie; Xu, Y Jun

    2015-01-15

    This study investigated long-term (1980-2009) yields and variability of total organic carbon (TOC) from four major coastal rivers in Louisiana entering the Northern Gulf of Mexico where a large-area summer hypoxic zone has been occurring since the middle 1980s. Two of these rivers drain agriculture-intensive (>40%) watersheds, while the other two rivers drain forest-pasture dominated (>50%) watersheds. The study found that these rivers discharged a total of 13.0×10(4)t TOC annually, fluctuating from 5.9×10(4) to 22.8×10(4)t. Seasonally, the rivers showed high TOC yield during the winter and early spring months, corresponding to the seasonal trend of river discharge. While river hydrology controlled TOC yields, land use has played an important role in fluxes, seasonal variations, and characteristics of TOC. The findings fill in a critical information gap of quantity and quality of organic carbon transport from coastal watersheds to one of the world's largest summer hypoxic zones.

  16. Hydrogeologic framework and geologic structure of the Floridan aquifer system and intermediate confining unit in the Lake Okeechobee area, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Ronald S.

    2014-01-01

    The successful implementation of aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) as a water-management tool requires detailed information on the hydrologic and hydraulic properties of the potential water storage zones. This report presents stratigraphic and hydrogeologic sections of the upper part of the Floridan aquifer system and the overlying confining unit or aquifer system in the Lake Okeechobee area, and contour maps of the upper contacts of the Ocala Limestone and the Arcadia Formation, which are represented in the sections. The sections and maps illustrate hydrogeologic factors such as confinement of potential storage zones, the distribution of permeability within the zones, and geologic features that may control the efficiency of injection, storage, and recovery of water, and thus may influence decisions on ASR activities in areas of interest to the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan.

  17. 主体功能区生态补偿模型初探%Study on ecological compensation model for Major Function Oriented Zones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐梦月; 陈江龙; 高金龙; 叶欠

    2012-01-01

    Reasonable scientific ecological compensation mechanisms that balance different interests are critical to a successful implementation of Major Function Oriented Zone (MFOZ) plan. Current studies on ecological compensation standard of MFOZ are relatively deficient. This study divided the four MFOZs in China into two groups and analyzed three classical ecological compensation theories. The two MFOZ groups were development and protection zones and three classical theories were ecological environment value theory, externality theory and public goods theory. On the basis of "protector to profit, beneficiary to compensate", an ecological compensation model was constructed. The model also took into account the willingness of the development zones to pay, and the ecological benefits and ecosystem services of the protection zones to contribute along with its influence scope. Ecological footprint and ecosystem service-driven gravity model were used to establish the compensation model for MFOZ. The four steps that accounted for the eco-compensation mechanism included compensation standard, compensation fund, distribution plan and implementation mode. Development zones paid ecological compensations to protection zones via financial payments by governments to realize the model objectives. The study also suggested funding from multiple sources, implementation of diverse and diverse participants. It was of urgent theoretical and practical importance to establish ecological compensation model that facilitated the realization of the objectives of MFOZ plan. It was also recommended that implementation of a sound ecological compensation model would encourage ecological protection, limit vandalism and provide scientific basis for balanced differential region development.%本文将我国四大主体功能区分为开发型区域与保护型区域两大类,在分析生态补偿的生态环境价值论、外部性理论和公共产品理论三大经典基础理论的基础上,依据

  18. Hydrogeological and environmental impact of coal mining, Jharia coalfield, India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choubey, V.D. (Indian School of Mines, Dhanbad (India). Dept. of Applied Geology)

    The Jharia coalfield is the most important and active mining region in India, it experiences groundwater inflow and affects groundwater levels in overlying aquifers, and it provides the basis for a conceptual model of the hydrogeological impacts of coal mining. The several sandstone aquifers of the overburden are separated by aquitards that limit vertical hydraulic connection, but the inflow responds to seasonal events and seems to be linked to shallow groundwater behaviour. The mine drainage behaviour suggests a hydraulic connection between the mine and the shallower groundwater system. The greatest declines are directly above the panels, with an immediate response to coal mining. The inflow is localized by natural and induced fracture zones and is mostly into recent workings. The groundwater behaviour is controlled by hydraulic property changes caused by mine-induced fracturing. The hydrological and chemical qualities of the shallow groundwater regime in 13 mining collieries in Mukunda Block have been investigated. Water samples were collected from 30 shallow monitoring dug wells. Rainfall, runoff, and infiltration rates have been calculated in the area. The water-quality plottings were used to interpret the distribution of individual chemical parameters and in predicting the water quality. The underground mine water has been classified as: (1) unconfined groundwater in the calcareous siltstone and sandstone - its composition in Na, Ca, SO{sub 4} and Na-MgHCO{sub 3} with moderate total dissolved solids (TDS)200-1480 ppm; (2) the deep groundwater originating from the coal seams and associated sediments in the near-surface environments - this is a Na-HCO{sub 3} water with higher TDS; and (3) spoil dump waters are essentially Na-HCO{sub 3} with high TDS. This article presents some hydrologic results and conclusions relating to the hydrogeological and environmental impacts of the coal mining in the Jharia coalfield. 19 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Hydrogeological modelling. Final Report - Volume 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Townley, L.R.; Trefry, M.G.; Barr, A.D. [CSIRO Div of Water Resources, PO Wembley, WA (Australia); Braumiller, S. [Univ of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept of Hydrology and Water Resources; Kawanishi, M. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Abiko-Shi, Chiba-Ken (Japan)] [and others

    1992-12-31

    This volume describes hydrogeological modelling carried out as part of the Alligator Rivers Analogue Project. Hydrogeology has played a key integrating role in the Project, largely because water movement is believed to have controlled the evolution of the Koongarra uranium Orebody and therefore affects field observations of all types at all scales. Aquifer testing described uses the concept of transmissivity in its interpretation of aquifer response to pumping. The concept of an aquifer, a layer transmitting significant quantities of water in a mainly horizontal direction, seems hard to accept in an environment as heterogeneous as that at Koongarra. But modelling of aquifers both in one dimension and two dimensionally in plan has contributed significantly to our understanding of the site. A one-dimensional model with three layers (often described as a quasi two dimensional model) was applied to flow between the Fault and Koongarra Creek. Being a transient model, this model was able to show that reverse flows can indeed occur back towards the Fault, but only if there is distributed recharge over the orebody as well as a mechanism for the Fault, or a region near the Fault, to remove water from the simulated cross-section. The model also showed clearly that the response of the three-layered system, consisting of a highly weathered zone, a fractured transmissive zone and a less conductive lower schist zone, is governed mainly by the transmissivity and storage coefficient of the middle layer. The storage coefficient of the higher layer has little effect. A two-dimensional model in plan used a description of anisotropy to show that reverse flows can also occur even without a conducting Fault. Modelling of a three-dimensional region using discrete fractures showed that it is certainly possible to simulate systems like that observed at Koongarra, but that large amounts of data are probably needed to obtain realistic descriptions of the fracture networks. Inverse modelling

  20. Volatile (sulphur and chlorine), major, and trace element geochemistry of mafic to intermediate tephras from the Chilean Southern Volcanic Zone (33-43°S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehrmann, Heidi; Hoernle, Kaj; Jacques, Guillaume; Garbe-Schönberg, Dieter; Schumann, Kai; Mahlke, Julia; Lara, Luis E.

    2014-10-01

    Here we present the first systematic investigation of volatile geochemistry along the Southern Volcanic Zone (SVZ) of Chile. Holocene olivine-hosted melt inclusions in the most mafic tephras sampled from 16 volcanoes along the volcanic front of the SVZ between 33°S and 43°S were analysed for pre-eruptive sulphur, chlorine, and major element contents. These results are combined with trace element compositions of the host whole rocks. The highest fractionation-corrected gas contents occur in the least-degassed melt inclusions from small monogenetic cones of Los Hornitos, Cabeza de Vaca, and Apagado from both the transitional and the southern-central SVZ, reaching ~3,000 μg/g S and 1,400 μg/g Cl, while the lowest abundances of ~1,100 μg/g S and ~600 μg/g Cl were found in the central SVZ at Volcán Lonquimay, Volcán Llaima, and Volcán Villarrica. Chlorine co-varies with trace element indicators for the degree of melting and/or source enrichment, such that the lowest Cl contents are found in high-degree melts from the most depleted mantle sources. The size of the volcanic edifices correlates inversely with Cl abundances in the melt. This could reflect more extensive degassing during ascent through the complex magma plumbing systems beneath the stratovolcanoes or greater dilution during larger degrees of melting of more depleted sources, or a combination of these factors. Compared to other subduction zones, the SVZ melt inclusions exhibit Cl and S abundances in the same range as most of those from the Central American and those from the Marianas arcs.

  1. Inhomogeneous Shearing Around Major Shear Zone: Evidence From the Magnetic Fabric of Late-Panafrican Plutons in the Tuareg Shield (Algeria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, B.; Derder, M. E.; Bayou, B.; Guemache, M.; Nouar, O.; Ouabadi, A.; Djellit, H.; Amenna, M.; Hemmi, A.

    2007-05-01

    Teg Orak and Tihaliouine are Late-Panafrican granitic intrusions situated in the Tuareg shield, northwest of Tamanrasset. Both plutons are located close to the 4°50 accident, one of the N-S major shear zone cutting the Hoggar. They are constituted of several granitic facies, indicating differentiation and multiphase intrusion. They show only very locally preferred visible orientation of their minerals. Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility (AMS) was determined on samples collected along cross-sections in the Teg Orak (349 samples for 43 sites) and Tihaliouine (160 samples for 21 sites) plutons. At Tihaliouine, the AMS presents relatively scattered directions, with magnetic foliation having often strike similar to that of the plutons border. At Teg Orak, samples collected in the north-western part of the pluton present also AMS rather in relation with orientation of the pluton border. For all the other samples, including those from an aplitic dyke crossing the granite and whatever the facies of the granite, the fabric is very coherent. Magnetic lineation is subhorizontal, striking NW-SE. Magnetic foliation plunges to the NE on the north-eastern part of the plutons, has a weak dip in the central part and plunges to the SW in the south-western part. This disposition indicates deformation of the eastern part of the granite during late magmatic stages in relation with dextral strike-slip movement along the shear zone. Tihaliouine and western Teg Orak (mainly with fabric related with magma flow) intruded within older granite while eastern part of Teg Orak (with fabric related to deformation) is located within diorites and metamorphic rocks. In the Teg Orak - Tihaliouine area, granitic host-rocks acted therefore as a rigid block, protecting the studied plutons from the effect of regional deformation, while metamorphic and more basic plutonic rocks had a more deformable behavior and allowed intrusion strain.

  2. HYDROGEOLOGICAL AND HYDROCHEMICAL FEATURES OF KALNIK MASSIF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinko Mraz

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Kalničko gorje consists of Cretaceous – Holocene sediments, which can be in hydrogeological sense classified in three hydrogeological units: (1 northern area from central massive of Kalnik, consists of Cretaceous and low Miocene impermeable and low permeable sediments which are hydrogeological barrier and low permeable Cretaceous eruptive sediments ; (2 Kalnik massive consists of Paleogen and Baden permeable carbonate – clastic sediments, which are aquifer; (3 southern Kalnik area consists of Neogene low permeable sediments and Quaternary medium permeable unconsolidated deposits. In the hydrogelogical units are several aquifers types: (i Paleogen carbonate aquifer consists of limestone – dolomite breccia and this is the most important aquifer in the Kalnik area; (ii Baden carbonate aquifer consists of lithothamnium, lithothamnium limestone, sandstone and breccia-conglomerate and it has high permeability, especially through the karst morphological features; (iii Quaternary alluvial aquifers – the most important is in the valley of the Kamešnica river and it’s permeability varies from poor to good depending on granulometric properties; (iv Cretaceous eruptive aquifer from which in the Apatovac area is abstraction of mineral water. The aquifers of the Kalnik area are very vulnerable considering the hydrogeological properties of the area. Nevertheless, physical, physicalchemical, and chemical properties of groundwater in the Kalnik area are showing that waters are of very good quality. The reasons of good quality of waters are that the area is poorly populated and there is no potential pollutant. The area is very valuable and important natural resource for water supply of whole region. In the future it is necessary to provide good protection and sustainable water management to obtain today’s good quality and quantity of groundwater (the paper is published in Croatian.

  3. Hydrogeology, waste disposal, science and politics: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Link, P.K. [ed.

    1994-07-01

    A total of 48 papers were presented at the Engineering Geology and Geotechnical Engineering 30th Symposium. These papers are presented in this proceedings under the following headings: site characterization--Pocatello area; site characterization--Boise Area; site assessment; Idaho National Engineering Laboratory; geophysical methods; remediation; geotechnical engineering; and hydrogeology, northern and western Idaho. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  4. Recent hydrogeologic study of the Vis island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janislav Kapelj

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The Vis Island belongs to the group of the Middle Dalmatian islands. It comprises an area of about 90.2 km2. Morphologically, three belts of highlands and two depressions with karst poljes are significant. The highest point on the island is Hum with 587 m a.s.l. theisland’s water supply is organized from the water-supply station “Korita”, situated in the central part of island, in tectonically formed depression. There are two additional capturedobjects: the well K-1 above the Komiža town and the spring “Pizdica”. The most important hydrogeological role on the island have two hydrogeological barriers, one in the KomižaBay, completely made of impermeable igneous and clastic rocks, and another one, the recently recognized relative barrier in the area of Dra~evo, Plisko and Velo polje. Since the island karst aquifer is in permanent dynamic relation with seawater, classical geologic,structural and hydrogeologic investigations have been performed with application of hydrogeochemical methods taking into account the natural chemical tracer content of groundwater and its variations in different hydrologic and vegetation conditions. Precipitationregime is very unfavorable with regard to the recharging of island’s aquifer, because dry periods are usually very long. During the summer tourist season, when the number of inhabitants and fresh water consumption considerably increase, amounts of island’sgroundwater suitable for water supply and irrigation rapidly decrease. Sometimes, insufficient quantity of fresh water on the Vis Island causes restrictions. Concerning the development of tourist potential and the present agricultural activities, summer lack ofwater is a serious restrictive factor. Some results of the performed hydrogeological study, important as a basis for island’s fresh water potential assessment, will be presented.

  5. The physical hydrogeology of ore deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingebritsen, Steven E.; Appold, M.S.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrothermal ore deposits represent a convergence of fluid flow, thermal energy, and solute flux that is hydrogeologically unusual. From the hydrogeologic perspective, hydrothermal ore deposition represents a complex coupled-flow problem—sufficiently complex that physically rigorous description of the coupled thermal (T), hydraulic (H), mechanical (M), and chemical (C) processes (THMC modeling) continues to challenge our computational ability. Though research into these coupled behaviors has found only a limited subset to be quantitatively tractable, it has yielded valuable insights into the workings of hydrothermal systems in a wide range of geologic environments including sedimentary, metamorphic, and magmatic. Examples of these insights include the quantification of likely driving mechanisms, rates and paths of fluid flow, ore-mineral precipitation mechanisms, longevity of hydrothermal systems, mechanisms by which hydrothermal fluids acquire their temperature and composition, and the controlling influence of permeability and other rock properties on hydrothermal fluid behavior. In this communication we review some of the fundamental theory needed to characterize the physical hydrogeology of hydrothermal systems and discuss how this theory has been applied in studies of Mississippi Valley-type, tabular uranium, porphyry, epithermal, and mid-ocean ridge ore-forming systems. A key limitation in the computational state-of-the-art is the inability to describe fluid flow and transport fully in the many ore systems that show evidence of repeated shear or tensional failure with associated dynamic variations in permeability. However, we discuss global-scale compilations that suggest some numerical constraints on both mean and dynamically enhanced crustal permeability. Principles of physical hydrogeology can be powerful tools for investigating hydrothermal ore formation and are becoming increasingly accessible with ongoing advances in modeling software.

  6. Hydrogeologic and water-quality data for the explosive experimental area, Naval Surface Warfare Center, Dahlgren Site, Dahlgren, Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, E.C.; Bell, C.F.

    1995-01-01

    Hydrogeologic and water-quality data were collected at the Explosive Experimental Area, Naval Surface Warfare Center, Dahlgren Site at Dahlgren, Virginia, as part of a hydrogeologic assessment of the shallow aquifer system begun in 1993. The U.S. Geological Survey conducted this study to provide the U.S. Navy with hydrogeologic data to aid in the evaluation of the effects from remediation of contaminated sites and to protect against additional contamination. This report describes the ground-water observation- well network, hydrogeologic, and water-quality data collected between October 1993 and April 1995. The report includes a description of the locations and construction of 28 observation wells on the Explosive Experimental Area. Hydrogeologic data include lithologic logs, geophysical logs, and vertical hydraulic conductivity measurements of selected core intervals. Hydrologic data include synoptic and hourly measurements of ground-water levels, and observation-well slug tests to determine horizontal hydraulic conductivity. Water-quality data include analyses of major dissolved constituents in ground water and surface water.

  7. Relation of water chemistry of the Edwards aquifer to hydrogeology and land use, San Antonio Region, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buszka, Paul M.

    1987-01-01

    Water-chemistry data from the Edwards aquifer for 1976-85, consisting of nearly 1,500 chemical analyses from 280 wells and 3 springs, were used to statistically evaluate relations among ground-water chemistry, hydrogeology, and land use. Five land uses associated with sampled wells were classified on the basis of published information and field surveys. Four major subareas of the aquifer were defined to reflect the relative susceptibility of ground water to contamination originating from human activities using hydrogeologic and tritium data.

  8. Faulting and groundwater in a desert environment: constraining hydrogeology using time-domain electromagnetic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedrosian, Paul A.; Burgess, Matthew K.; Nishikawa, Tracy

    2013-01-01

    Within the south-western Mojave Desert, the Joshua Basin Water District is considering applying imported water into infiltration ponds in the Joshua Tree groundwater sub-basin in an attempt to artificially recharge the underlying aquifer. Scarce subsurface hydrogeological data are available near the proposed recharge site; therefore, time-domain electromagnetic (TDEM) data were collected and analysed to characterize the subsurface. TDEM soundings were acquired to estimate the depth to water on either side of the Pinto Mountain Fault, a major east-west trending strike-slip fault that transects the proposed recharge site. While TDEM is a standard technique for groundwater investigations, special care must be taken when acquiring and interpreting TDEM data in a twodimensional (2D) faulted environment. A subset of the TDEM data consistent with a layered-earth interpretation was identified through a combination of three-dimensional (3D) forward modelling and diffusion time-distance estimates. Inverse modelling indicates an offset in water table elevation of nearly 40 m across the fault. These findings imply that the fault acts as a low-permeability barrier to groundwater flow in the vicinity of the proposed recharge site. Existing production wells on the south side of the fault, together with a thick unsaturated zone and permeable near-surface deposits, suggest the southern half of the study area is suitable for artificial recharge. These results illustrate the effectiveness of targeted TDEM in support of hydrological studies in a heavily faulted desert environment where data are scarce and the cost of obtaining these data by conventional drilling techniques is prohibitive.

  9. A hydrogeological conceptual model of the Suio hydrothermal area (central Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saroli, Michele; Lancia, Michele; Albano, Matteo; Casale, Anna; Giovinco, Gaspare; Petitta, Marco; Zarlenga, Francesco; dell'Isola, Marco

    2017-09-01

    A hydrogeological conceptual model has been developed that describes the hydrothermal system of Suio Terme (central Italy). The studied area is located along the peri-Tyrrhenian zone of the central Apennines, between the Mesozoic and Cenozoic carbonate platform sequences of the Aurunci Mountains and the volcanic sequences of the Roccamonfina. A multi-disciplinary approach was followed, using new hydrogeological surveys, the interpretation of stratigraphic logs of boreholes and water wells, and geophysical data—seismic sections, shear-wave velocity (Vs) crustal model and gravimetric model. The collected information allowed for construction of a conceptual hydrogeological model and characterization of the hydrothermal system. The Suio hydrothermal system is strongly influenced by the Eastern Aurunci hydrostructure. Along the southeastern side, the top of the hydrostructure sinks to -1,000 m relative to sea level via a series of normal faults which give origin to the Garigliano graben. Geological and hydrogeological data strongly suggest the propagation and mixing of hot fluids, with cold waters coming from the shallow karst circuit. The aquitard distribution, the normal tectonic displacements and the fracturing of the karst hydrostructure strongly influence the hydrothermal basin. Carbon dioxide and other gasses play a key role in the whole circuit, facilitating the development of the hydrothermal system. The current level of knowledge suggests that the origin of the Suio hydrothermalism is the result of interaction between the carbonate reservoir of the Eastern Aurunci Mountains and the hot and deep crust of this peri-Tyrrhenian sector, where the Roccamonfina volcano represents the shallowest expression.

  10. Allocating risk capital for a brownfields redevelopment project under hydrogeological and financial uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Soonyoung; Unger, Andre J A; Parker, Beth; Kim, Taehee

    2012-06-15

    In this study, we defined risk capital as the contingency fee or insurance premium that a brownfields redeveloper needs to set aside from the sale of each house in case they need to repurchase it at a later date because the indoor air has been detrimentally affected by subsurface contamination. The likelihood that indoor air concentrations will exceed a regulatory level subject to subsurface heterogeneity and source zone location uncertainty is simulated by a physics-based hydrogeological model using Monte Carlo realizations, yielding the probability of failure. The cost of failure is the future value of the house indexed to the stochastic US National Housing index. The risk capital is essentially the probability of failure times the cost of failure with a surcharge to compensate the developer against hydrogeological and financial uncertainty, with the surcharge acting as safety loading reflecting the developers' level of risk aversion. We review five methodologies taken from the actuarial and financial literature to price the risk capital for a highly stylized brownfield redevelopment project, with each method specifically adapted to accommodate our notion of the probability of failure. The objective of this paper is to develop an actuarially consistent approach for combining the hydrogeological and financial uncertainty into a contingency fee that the brownfields developer should reserve (i.e. the risk capital) in order to hedge their risk exposure during the project. Results indicate that the price of the risk capital is much more sensitive to hydrogeological rather than financial uncertainty. We use the Capital Asset Pricing Model to estimate the risk-adjusted discount rate to depreciate all costs to present value for the brownfield redevelopment project. A key outcome of this work is that the presentation of our risk capital valuation methodology is sufficiently generalized for application to a wide variety of engineering projects. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier

  11. A hydrogeological conceptual model of the Suio hydrothermal area (central Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saroli, Michele; Lancia, Michele; Albano, Matteo; Casale, Anna; Giovinco, Gaspare; Petitta, Marco; Zarlenga, Francesco; dell'Isola, Marco

    2017-03-01

    A hydrogeological conceptual model has been developed that describes the hydrothermal system of Suio Terme (central Italy). The studied area is located along the peri-Tyrrhenian zone of the central Apennines, between the Mesozoic and Cenozoic carbonate platform sequences of the Aurunci Mountains and the volcanic sequences of the Roccamonfina. A multi-disciplinary approach was followed, using new hydrogeological surveys, the interpretation of stratigraphic logs of boreholes and water wells, and geophysical data—seismic sections, shear-wave velocity (Vs) crustal model and gravimetric model. The collected information allowed for construction of a conceptual hydrogeological model and characterization of the hydrothermal system. The Suio hydrothermal system is strongly influenced by the Eastern Aurunci hydrostructure. Along the southeastern side, the top of the hydrostructure sinks to -1,000 m relative to sea level via a series of normal faults which give origin to the Garigliano graben. Geological and hydrogeological data strongly suggest the propagation and mixing of hot fluids, with cold waters coming from the shallow karst circuit. The aquitard distribution, the normal tectonic displacements and the fracturing of the karst hydrostructure strongly influence the hydrothermal basin. Carbon dioxide and other gasses play a key role in the whole circuit, facilitating the development of the hydrothermal system. The current level of knowledge suggests that the origin of the Suio hydrothermalism is the result of interaction between the carbonate reservoir of the Eastern Aurunci Mountains and the hot and deep crust of this peri-Tyrrhenian sector, where the Roccamonfina volcano represents the shallowest expression.

  12. Site investigation SFR. Hydrogeological modelling of SFR. Model version 0.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oehman, Johan (Golder Associates AB (Sweden)); Follin, Sven (SF GeoLogic (Sweden))

    2010-01-15

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) has conducted site investigations for a planned extension of the existing final repository for short-lived radioactive waste (SFR). A hydrogeological model is developed in three model versions, which will be used for safety assessment and design analyses. This report presents a data analysis of the currently available hydrogeological data from the ongoing Site Investigation SFR (KFR27, KFR101, KFR102A, KFR102B, KFR103, KFR104, and KFR105). The purpose of this work is to develop a preliminary hydrogeological Discrete Fracture Network model (hydro-DFN) parameterisation that can be applied in regional-scale modelling. During this work, the Geologic model had not yet been updated for the new data set. Therefore, all analyses were made to the rock mass outside Possible Deformation Zones, according to Single Hole Interpretation. Owing to this circumstance, it was decided not to perform a complete hydro-DFN calibration at this stage. Instead focus was re-directed to preparatory test cases and conceptual questions with the aim to provide a sound strategy for developing the hydrogeological model SFR v. 1.0. The presented preliminary hydro-DFN consists of five fracture sets and three depth domains. A statistical/geometrical approach (connectivity analysis /Follin et al. 2005/) was performed to estimate the size (i.e. fracture radius) distribution of fractures that are interpreted as Open in geologic mapping of core data. Transmissivity relations were established based on an assumption of a correlation between the size and evaluated specific capacity of geologic features coupled to inflows measured by the Posiva Flow Log device (PFL-f data). The preliminary hydro-DFN was applied in flow simulations in order to test its performance and to explore the role of PFL-f data. Several insights were gained and a few model technical issues were raised. These are summarised in Table 5-1

  13. Hydrogeology of the Islamic Republic of Mauritania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedel, Michael J.; Finn, Carol

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogeologic maps were constructed for the Islamic Republic of Mauritania. The ground-water flow system in the country can best be described as two interconnected regional systems: the porous Continental Terminal coastal system and the interior, fractured sedimentary Taoudeni Basin system. In these systems, ground-water flow occurs in fill deposits and carbonate, clastic, metasedimentary, and metavolcanic rocks. Based on an evaluation of the potentiometric surface, there are three areas of ground-water recharge in the Taoudeni Basin system. One region occurs in the northwest at the edge of the Shield, one occurs to the south overlying the Tillites, and one is centered at the city of Tidjikdja. In contrast to the flow system in the Taoudeni Basin, the potentiometric surfaces reveal two areas of discharge in the Continental Terminal system but no localized recharge areas; the recharge is more likely to be areal. In addition to these recharge and discharge areas, ground water flows across the country's borders. Specifically, ground water from the Atlantic Ocean flows into Mauritania, transporting dissolved sodium from the west as a salt water intrusion, whereas fresh ground water discharges from the east into Mali. To the north, there is a relatively low gradient with inflow of fresh water to Mauritania, whereas ground-water flow discharges to the Senegal River to the south. A geographical information system (GIS) was used to digitize, manage, store, and analyze geologic data used to develop the hydrogeologic map. The data acquired for map development included existing digital GIS files, published maps, tabulated data in reports and public-access files, and the SIPPE2 Access database. Once in digital formats, regional geologic and hydrologic features were converted to a common coordinate system and combined into one map. The 42 regional geologic map units were then reclassified into 13 hydrogeologic units, each having considerable lateral extent and distinct

  14. Visualizing geoelectric - Hydrogeological parameters of Fadak farm at Najaf Ashraf by using 2D spa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khafaji, Wadhah Mahmood Shakir; Al-Dabbagh, Hayder Abdul Zahra

    2016-12-01

    A geophysical survey achieved to produce an electrical resistivity grid data of 23 Schlumberger Vertical Electrical Sounding (VES) points distributed across the area of Fadak farm at Najaf Ashraf province in Iraq. The current research deals with the application of six interpolation methods used to delineate subsurface groundwater aquifer properties. One example of such features is the delineation of high and low groundwater hydraulic conductivity (K). Such methods could be useful in predicting high (K) zones and predicting groundwater flowing directions within the studied aquifer. Interpolation methods were helpful in predicting some aquifer hydrogeological and structural characteristics. The results produced some important conclusions for any future groundwater investment.

  15. Visualizing geoelectric – Hydrogeological parameters of Fadak farm at Najaf Ashraf by using 2D spa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wadhah Mahmood Shakir Al-Khafaji

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A geophysical survey achieved to produce an electrical resistivity grid data of 23 Schlumberger Vertical Electrical Sounding (VES points distributed across the area of Fadak farm at Najaf Ashraf province in Iraq. The current research deals with the application of six interpolation methods used to delineate subsurface groundwater aquifer properties. One example of such features is the delineation of high and low groundwater hydraulic conductivity (K. Such methods could be useful in predicting high (K zones and predicting groundwater flowing directions within the studied aquifer. Interpolation methods were helpful in predicting some aquifer hydrogeological and structural characteristics. The results produced some important conclusions for any future groundwater investment.

  16. Regional hydrogeological simulations for Forsmark - numerical modelling using DarcyTools. Preliminary site description Forsmark area version 1.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-12-15

    fractures. It comprises, among other things, a fracture network generator, algorithms for the computation of finite-volume (block-size) properties and a multi-rate diffusion model. It is noted that some of the components of DarcyTools are not used in the work reported here as they are still under development or subjected to testing and verification. The main observations of the hydrogeological DFN and block-scale analyses with DarcyTools are as follows: There were several difficulties in applying the global geological DFN to the hydraulic tests. The main difficulty stemmed from significant variations in fracture intensities and the proportions of sets between boreholes making it difficult to use an averaged, global, geological DFN model when matching hydraulic tests in a specific borehole. Due to the spatial variability of the fracture properties and the few flow anomalies a number of bedrock volumes lateral flow jointly with the ConnectFlow Team. For the work presented in this report the following volumes were defined: Volume A above the gently dipping deformation zone ZFMNE00A2 (A2) below c 100 m depth. Volume B below A2 between 220-360 m depth. Volume C below A2 between 100-220 m depth. Volume D below A2 below c 360-400 m depth (target volume). A major observation from the hydrogeological DFN analysis of Volumes A-D is that it is possible to come to different results concerning the connected fracture area per unit volume when calibrating against the measured borehole fracture intensity depending on the value used for the minimum fracture size of the power-law size distribution. In conclusion, the reference fracture size is a key parameter of considerable importance for the outcome of the approach used. A direct correlation between transmissivity and length appears to be a workable hypothesis but the simulations conducted suggest a considerable variability between different volumes as well as between realisations within a fixed volume due to the spatial variations in

  17. Assessment of leakage from an engineered reservoir using hydrogeological tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smerdon, B.D.; Mendoza, C.A. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada); McCann, A.; Kraushar, C. [Omni-McCann Consultants Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada); Nilson, A. [Alberta Infrastructure, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    Seepage from earth-filled dams can be determined using steady-state, cross sectional, flow net analysis or transient response to fluid pressure within dam construction materials. This paper described the methods used to quantify leakage from a surface-water reservoir (Pine Coulee) located in southern Alberta. The methods included buried valley aquifer tests, three-dimensional groundwater flow simulations and stable isotope water samples. The aquifer tests were conducted when the reservoir was maintained at leaking elevation as well as when it was at non-leaking elevation. When the reservoir was leaking, the results showed a recharge boundary condition in the aquifer. When the reservoir was not leaking, a barrier boundary was present. To verify field-measured parameters and to determine the hydraulic properties and location of the leakage zone, three-dimensional groundwater flow simulations were calibrated to the datasets. Stable isotopes confirmed the seepage of reservoir water to the aquifer. Seepage rates and the required aquifer pumping rates to control aquifer water levels were predicted by the model. The results were in good agreement with field observations since relief well installation. The use of hydrogeological tools proved to be diagnostic and predictive in assessing the subsurface dynamics associated with man-made reservoirs. 15 refs., 2 tabs., 6 figs.

  18. Development of hydrogeological modelling tools based on NAMMU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsic, N. [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Hartley, L.; Jackson, P.; Poole, M. [AEA Technology, Harwell (United Kingdom); Morvik, A. [Bergen Software Services International AS, Bergen (Norway)

    2001-09-01

    A number of relatively sophisticated hydrogeological models were developed within the SR 97 project to handle issues such as nesting of scales and the effects of salinity. However, these issues and others are considered of significant importance and generality to warrant further development of the hydrogeological methodology. Several such developments based on the NAMMU package are reported here: - Embedded grid: nesting of the regional- and site-scale models within the same numerical model has given greater consistency in the structural model representation and in the flow between scales. Since there is a continuous representation of the regional- and site-scales the modelling of pathways from the repository no longer has to be contained wholly by the site-scale region. This allows greater choice in the size of the site-scale. - Implicit Fracture Zones (IFZ): this method of incorporating the structural model is very efficient and allows changes to either the mesh or fracture zones to be implemented quickly. It also supports great flexibility in the properties of the structures and rock mass. - Stochastic fractures: new functionality has been added to IFZ to allow arbitrary combinations of stochastic or deterministic fracture zones with the rock-mass. Whether a fracture zone is modelled deterministically or stochastically its statistical properties can be defined independently. - Stochastic modelling: efficient methods for Monte-Carlo simulation of stochastic permeability fields have been implemented and tested on SKB's computers. - Visualisation: the visualisation tool Avizier for NAMMU has been enhanced such that it is efficient for checking models and presentation. - PROPER interface: NAMMU outputs pathlines in PROPER format so that it can be included in PA workflow. The developed methods are illustrated by application to stochastic nested modelling of the Beberg site using data from SR 97. The model properties were in accordance with the regional- and site

  19. Cities at risk: status of Italian planning system in reducing seismic and hydrogeological risks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grazia Di Giovanni

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Italy and its urban systems are under high seismic and hydrogeological risks. The awareness about the role of human activities in the genesis of disasters is achieved in the scientific debate, as well as the role of urban and regional planning in reducing risks. The paper reviews the state of Italian major cities referred to hydrogeological and seismic risk by: 1 extrapolating data and maps about seismic hazard and landslide risk concerning cities with more than 50.000 inhabitants and metropolitan contexts, and 2 outlining how risk reduction is framed in Italian planning system (at national and regional levels. The analyses of available data and the review of the normative framework highlight the existing gaps in addressing risk reduction: nevertheless a wide knowledge about natural risks afflicting Italian territory and an articulated regulatory framework, the available data about risks are not exhaustive, and risk reduction policies and multidisciplinary pro-active approaches are only partially fostered and applied.

  20. Determining the groundwater potential recharge zone and karst springs catchment area: Saldoran region, western Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karami, Gholam Hossein; Bagheri, Rahim; Rahimi, Fahimeh

    2016-12-01

    Assessing the groundwater recharge potential zone and differentiation of the spring catchment area are extremely important to effective management of groundwater systems and protection of water quality. The study area is located in the Saldoran karstic region, western Iran. It is characterized by a high rate of precipitation and recharge via highly permeable fractured karstic formations. Pire-Ghar, Sarabe-Babaheydar and Baghe-rostam are three major karstic springs which drain the Saldoran anticline. The mean discharge rate and electrical conductivity values for these springs were 3, 1.9 and 0.98 m3/s, and 475, 438 and 347 μS/cm, respectively. Geology, hydrogeology and geographical information system (GIS) methods were used to define the catchment areas of the major karstic springs and to map recharge zones in the Saldoran anticline. Seven major influencing factors on groundwater recharge rates (lithology, slope value and aspect, drainage, precipitation, fracture density and karstic domains) were integrated using GIS. Geology maps and field verification were used to determine the weights of factors. The final map was produced to reveal major zones of recharge potential. More than 80 % of the study area is terrain that has a recharge rate of 55-70 % (average 63 %). Evaluating the water budget of Saldoran Mountain showed that the total volume of karst water emerging from the Saldoran karst springs is equal to the total annual recharge on the anticline. Therefore, based on the geological and hydrogeological investigations, the catchment area of the mentioned karst springs includes the whole Saldoran anticline.

  1. Determining the groundwater potential recharge zone and karst springs catchment area: Saldoran region, western Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karami, Gholam Hossein; Bagheri, Rahim; Rahimi, Fahimeh

    2016-08-01

    Assessing the groundwater recharge potential zone and differentiation of the spring catchment area are extremely important to effective management of groundwater systems and protection of water quality. The study area is located in the Saldoran karstic region, western Iran. It is characterized by a high rate of precipitation and recharge via highly permeable fractured karstic formations. Pire-Ghar, Sarabe-Babaheydar and Baghe-rostam are three major karstic springs which drain the Saldoran anticline. The mean discharge rate and electrical conductivity values for these springs were 3, 1.9 and 0.98 m3/s, and 475, 438 and 347 μS/cm, respectively. Geology, hydrogeology and geographical information system (GIS) methods were used to define the catchment areas of the major karstic springs and to map recharge zones in the Saldoran anticline. Seven major influencing factors on groundwater recharge rates (lithology, slope value and aspect, drainage, precipitation, fracture density and karstic domains) were integrated using GIS. Geology maps and field verification were used to determine the weights of factors. The final map was produced to reveal major zones of recharge potential. More than 80 % of the study area is terrain that has a recharge rate of 55-70 % (average 63 %). Evaluating the water budget of Saldoran Mountain showed that the total volume of karst water emerging from the Saldoran karst springs is equal to the total annual recharge on the anticline. Therefore, based on the geological and hydrogeological investigations, the catchment area of the mentioned karst springs includes the whole Saldoran anticline.

  2. Bedrock hydrogeology Forsmark. Site descriptive modelling, SDM-Site Forsmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Follin, Sven (SF GeoLogic AB, Taeby (Sweden))

    2008-12-15

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) has conducted site investigations at two different locations, the Forsmark and Laxemar-Simpevarp areas, with the objective of siting a final repository for spent nuclear fuel according to the KBS-3 concept. Site characterisation should provide all data required for an integrated evaluation of the suitability of the investigated site and an important component in the characterisation work is the development of a hydrogeological model. The hydrogeological model is used by repository engineering to design the underground facility and to develop a repository layout adapted to the site. It also provides input to the safety assessment. Another important use of the hydrogeological model is in the environmental impact assessment. This report presents the understanding of the hydrogeological conditions of the bedrock at Forsmark reached following the completion of the surface-based investigations and provides a summary of the bedrock hydrogeological model and the underlying data supporting its development. It constitutes the main reference on bedrock hydrogeology for the site descriptive model concluding the surface-based investigations at Forsmark, SDM-site, and is intended to describe the hydraulic properties and hydrogeological conditions of the bedrock at the site and to give the information essential for demonstrating understanding

  3. Behavior of major and trace elements upon weathering of peridotites in New Caledonia : A possible site on ultramafic rocks for the Critical Zone Exploration Network (CZEN) ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juillot, Farid; Fandeur, D.; Fritsch, E.; Morin, G.; Ambrosi, J. P.; Olivi, L.; Cognigni, A.; Hazemann, J. L.; Proux, O.; Webb, S.; Brown, G. E., Jr.

    2010-05-01

    ). However, these high concentration of potentially toxic elements can represent a serious hazard for the environmental quality of the Caledonian ecosystem which is a '' biodiversity hotspot' (Myers, 2000), which emphasize the strong need for characterizing the natural cycling of these elements upon weathering of ultramafic rocks. To reach this goal, we have studied the mineralogical distribution, crystal-chemistry and mass balance modelling of major (Si, Mg, Al, Fe, Mn) and trace elements (Ni, Cr and Co) in the freely-drained weathering profile developed in the serpentinized harzburgites of Mt Koniambo (West Coast of New Caledonia). Results show that both hydrothermal and meteoric processes contributed to the vertical differentiation of this freely drained weathering profiles in serpentinized ultramafic rocks. Finally, they also emphasize the importance of both redox reactions and interactions with Mn- and Fe-oxyhydroxydes (Fandeur et al., 2009a; 2009b) to explain the opposite behavior observed between very mobile Ni and almost immobile Cr (Fandeur et al., 2010). These results bring new insights on the geochemical behavior of trace elements upon weathering of ultramafic rocks under tropical conditions leading to the formation of supergene ore deposits. They also emphasize the interest of such a weathering site on ultramafic rocks under tropical climate to complemente the reference sites of the Critical Zone Exploration Network (CZEN). References Cluzel D., Aitchinson J.C. and Picard C. (2001) Tectonic accretion and underplating of mafic terranes in the Late Eocene intraoceanic fore-arc of New-Caledonia (Southwest Pacific): geodynamic implications. Tectonophysics, 340, 23-59. Coleman, R.G. (1977) Ophiolites: Ancient oceanic lithosphere?: Berlin, Germany, Springer-Verlag, 229p. Fandeur D., Juillot F., Morin G., Olivi L., Cognigni A., Fialin M., Coufignal F., Ambrosi J.P., Guyot F. and Fritsch E. (2009a). Synchrotron-based speciation of chromium in an Oxisol from New

  4. Integrated Hydrogeological Model of the General Separations Area. Volume 1: hydrogeologic framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, M.K. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Smits, A.D.; Hawkins, K.L.; Flach, G.P.

    1997-08-01

    This report models the Gordon aquifer, the Gordon confining unit, and the `lower` aquifer zone, `tan clay` confining zone, and `upper` aquifer zone of the Water Table aquifer. The report presents structure-contour and isopach maps of each unit.

  5. Feedbacks Between Numerical and Analytical Models in Hydrogeology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlotnik, V. A.; Cardenas, M. B.; Toundykov, D.; Cohn, S.

    2012-12-01

    Hydrogeology is a relatively young discipline which combines elements of Earth science and engineering. Mature fundamental disciplines (e.g., physics, chemistry, fluid mechanics) have centuries-long history of mathematical modeling even prior to discovery of Darcy's law. Thus, in hydrogeology, relatively few classic analytical models (such those by Theis, Polubarinova-Kochina, Philip, Toth, Henry, Dagan, Neuman) were developed by the early 1970's. The advent of computers and practical demands refocused mathematical models towards numerical techniques. With more diverse but less mathematically-oriented training, most hydrogeologists shifted from analytical methods to use of standardized computational software. Spatial variability in internal properties and external boundary conditions and geometry, and the added complexity of chemical and biological processes will remain major challenges for analytical modeling. Possibly, analytical techniques will play a subordinate role to numerical approaches in many applications. On the other hand, the rise of analytical element modeling of groundwater flow is a strong alternative to numerical models when data demand and computational efficiency is considered. The hallmark of analytical models - transparency and accuracy - will remain indispensable for scientific exploration of complex phenomena and for benchmarking numerical models. Therefore, there will always be feedbacks and complementarities between numerical and analytical techniques, as well as a certain ideological schism among various views to modeling. We illustrate the idea of feedbacks by reviewing evolution of Joszef Toth's analytical model of gravity driven flow systems. Toth's (1963) approach was to reduce the flow domain to a rectangle which allowed for closed-form solution of the governing equations. Succeeding numerical finite-element models by Freeze and Witherspoon (1966-1968) explored the effects of geometry and heterogeneity on regional groundwater flow

  6. Flow and transport in Riparian Zones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jannick Kolbjørn

    of riparian zones are extended by accounting for the effect of flooding and a key result is that flooding enhances nitrate removal given the right hydrogeological characteristics. Moreover the re-established riparian zones were characterized to understand the effects of flooding on subsurface hydrological......) and easurements of discharge to the river by seepage meter and river bed temperatures. The numerical model was used to simulate how observed dynamic seasonal flooding affects groundwater flow paths, residence times, and formation of zones with flow stagnation, all of which are key aspects in evaluating...

  7. Hydrogeologic Areas of the Southwest Principal Aquifer (SWPA) study

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This raster dataset represents the boundaries of the hydrogeologic areas of the Southwest Principal Aquifer (SWPA) study of the National Water Quality Assessment...

  8. Hydrogeological DFN modelling using structural and hydraulic data from KLX04. Preliminary site description Laxemar subarea - version 1.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Follin, Sven [SF GeoLogic AB, Taeby (Sweden); Stigsson, Martin [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Svensson, Urban [Computer-aided Fluid Engineering AB, Norrkoeping (Sweden)

    2006-04-15

    SKB is conducting site investigations for a high-level nuclear waste repository in fractured crystalline rocks at two coastal areas in Sweden. The two candidate areas are named Forsmark and Simpevarp. The site characterisation work is divided into two phases, an initial site investigation phase (ISI) and a complete site investigation phase (CSI). The results of the ISI phase are used as a basis for deciding on the subsequent CSI phase. On the basis of the CSI investigations a decision is made as to whether detailed characterisation will be performed (including sinking of a shaft). An integrated component in the site characterisation work is the development of site descriptive models. These comprise basic models in three dimensions with an accompanying text description. Central in the modelling work is the geological model which provides the geometrical context in terms of a model of deformation zones and the less fractured rock mass between the zones. Using the geological and geometrical description models as a basis, descriptive models for other disciplines (surface ecosystems, hydrogeology, hydrogeochemistry, rock mechanics, thermal properties and transport properties) will be developed. Great care is taken to arrive at a general consistency in the description of the various models and assessment of uncertainty and possible needs of alternative models. The main objective of this study is to support the development of a hydrogeological DFN model (Discrete Fracture Network) for the Preliminary Site Description of the Laxemar area on a regional-scale (SDM version L1.2). A more specific objective of this study is to assess the propagation of uncertainties in the geological DFN modelling reported for L1.2 into the groundwater flow modelling. An improved understanding is necessary in order to gain credibility for the Site Description in general and the hydrogeological description in particular. The latter will serve as a basis for describing the present

  9. Hydrogeological Framework Model for Dhaka Regional Groundwater Flow System (DGFS), Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firoz, Abm; Marandi, Andres; Schüth, Christoph; Ribbe, Lars

    2017-04-01

    (130-110 ka BP) and Cycle 3 >220 ka BP respectively. Based on data from more than 500 bore holes with an average depth of around 220 M, in which highest depth was 500 meter below sea level, a 3D hydrogeological framework model has been developed. The model provides a detail insight into the spatial variability of geological and sedimentological properties at different depths. The HGUs change for different geographic regions represented in the 3D framework model based on stratigraphic changes in the geologic units. To approximate the hydrologic effects of spatially varying material properties, different hydraulic conductivities were applied to different zones based on their hydraulic connectivities and geological setup. This model can serve as the basis for a regional groundwater flow model with more advanced data and information, which incorporate the geological and sedimentological information. This will help the decision makers of Dhaka region for effective management of groundwater resources

  10. 土地利用分区与主体功能区协调的实证研究——以环鄱阳湖区为例%STUDY ON LAND USE ZONING IN THE REGION AROUND POYANG LAKE BASED-ON MAJOR FUNCTION ORIENTED ZONING.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟海燕; 赵小敏; 黄宏胜

    2011-01-01

    There are important theoretic and practical significances for coordinating land use zoning and major function oriented zoning because it is good to keep orderly development within its spatial area and carry out differential land use management. The relation of land use zoning and major fimction oriented zoning are analyzed by zoning purposes, contents, targets and methods. So the coordinating should be put in practice in strategic layer. This paper takes the region around Poyang Lake as a study case and implements some researches as following: first, the attribute assignment regulars of land use zones based on main function zoning were established. Secondly, on the basis of a series of map including major function oriented zoning map, land use map, land suitability evaluation map and so on, the land use zoning map of region around Poyang Lake was obtained by using overlay analysis and spatial cluster analysis in ArcGIS9.2. The region around Poyang Lake was divided into 4 kinds of land use zones including farming land use area, ecological forestry land use area, urban and industrial land use area and wetland reserve area. Subsequently, land use control measures were proposed corresponding different land use zones. The result of researches shows that land use zoning based on major function zoning are good to practice the zoning results and achieve regional function control.%协调土地利用分区与主体功能区对于指导区域空间有序开发、实现区域土地利用的差异化管理具有重要的理论和现实意义。首先从分区目标、分区内容、分区指标和分区方法等4方面分析了主体功能区和土地利用分区的关系,指出两者的协调应在战略层面实施;然后以环鄱阳湖区为例进行实证研究:根据研究区主体功能分区图、土地利用现状图、土地适宜性评价结果图等,通过制定基于主体功能区的土地利用分区属性赋值规则,在ArcGIS9.2中进行叠置分

  11. Hydrogeology in North America: past and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narasimhan, T. N.

    2005-03-01

    This paper is a retrospective on the evolution of hydrogeology in North America over the past two centuries, and a brief speculation of its future. The history of hydrogeology is marked by developments in many different fields such as groundwater hydrology, soil mechanics, soil science, economic geology, petroleum engineering, structural geology, geochemistry, geophysics, marine geology, and more recently, ecology. The field has been enriched by the contributions of distinguished researchers from all these fields. At present, hydrogeology is in transition from a state of discovering new resources and exploiting them efficiently for maximum benefit, to one of judicious management of finite, interconnected resources that are vital for the sustenance of humans and other living things. The future of hydrogeology is likely to be dictated by the subtle balance with which the hydrological, erosional, and nutritional cycles function, and the decision of a technological society to either adapt to the constraints imposed by the balance, or to continue to exploit hydrogeological systems for maximum benefit. Although there is now a trend towards ecological and environmental awareness, human attitudes could change should large parts of the populated world be subjected to the stresses of droughts that last for many decades. Cet article est une rétrospective de l'évolution de l'hydrogéologie en Amérique du Nord sur les deux derniers siècles, et une brève évaluation de son futur. L'histoire de l'hydrogéologie est marquée par le développement de plusieurs techniques de terrain telles, l'hydrologie des eaux souterraines, la mécanique des sols, les sciences du sol, la géologie économique, l' ingénierie pétrolière, la géologie structurale, la géochimie, la géophysique, la géologie marine et plus récemment l'écologie. La science a été enrichie par la contribution de plusieurs chercheurs distingués, provenant de toutes ces branches. A présent, l

  12. Hydrogeological Characterization of the Middle Magdalena Valley - Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenas, Maria Cristina; Riva, Monica; Donado, Leonardo David; Guadagnini, Alberto

    2017-04-01

    We provide a detailed hydrogeological characterization of the complex aquifer system of the Middle Magdalena Valley, Colombia. The latter is comprised by 3 sub-basins within which 7 blocks have been identified for active exploration and potential production of oil and gas. As such, there is a critical need to establish modern water resources management practices in the area to accommodate the variety of social, environmental and industrial needs. We do so by starting from a detailed hydrogeological characterization of the system and focus on: (a) a detailed hydrogeological reconnaissance of the area leading to the definition of the main hydrogeological units; (b) the collection, organization and analysis of daily climatic data from 39 stations available in the region; and (c) the assessment of the groundwater flow circulation through the formulation of a conceptual and a mathematical model of the subsurface system. Groundwater flow is simulated in the SAM 1.1 aquifer located in the Middle Magdalena Valley with the objective of showing and evaluating alternative conceptual hydrogeological modeling alternatives. We focus here on modeling results at system equilibrium (i.e., under steady-state conditions) and assess the value of available information in the context of the candidate modeling strategies we consider. Results of our modeling effort are conducive to the characterization of the distributed hydrogeological budget and the assessment of critical areas as a function of the conceptualization of the system functioning and data avilability.

  13. Chemical Hydrogeology: Fifty Years of Advances, Breakthroughs, and Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusseau, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    Chemical hydrogeology focuses on the composition, properties, and biogeochemical processes inherent to water in subsurface environments. Multiple avenues of research coalesced in the 1960's to foment the development of chemical hydrogeology as a distinct field. In the intervening 50 years, chemical hydrogeology principles have been applied to innumerable issues and problems, and concomitantly, the field has continually experienced advances, breakthroughs, and innovations in theory, analysis, and application. An overarching theme to chemical hydrogeology in both theory and application is integration--- integration of disciplines (interdisciplinary, multidisciplinary), integration of approaches (theoretical, experimental, analytical), and integration of scales (spatial, temporal). Chemical hydrogeology has never been more relevant and more challenged as today, as we face critical issues related to for example water scarcity and availability of clean water, impacts of energy development, production and storage, and human interactions with ecosystem services. This presentation will illustrate recent advances in chemical hydrogeology, ranging from application of advanced imaging for characterization of pore-scale multiphase systems to integrated physical and biogeochemical assessments of field-scale contaminant transport.

  14. Calibrating Vadose Zone Models with Time-Lapse Gravity Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Lars; Hansen, A. B.; Looms, M. C.

    2009-01-01

    hydrogeological parameters. These studies focused on the saturated zone with specific yield as the most prominent target parameter. Any change in storage in the vadose zone has been considered as noise. Our modeling results show a measureable change in gravity from the vadose zone during a forced infiltration...... experiment on 10m by 10m grass land. Simulation studies show a potential for vadose zone model calibration using gravity data in conjunction with other geophysical data, e.g. cross-borehole georadar. We present early field data and calibration results from a forced infiltration experiment conducted over 30...... days and discuss the potential for gravity measurements in vadose zone model parameter estimation....

  15. Hydrogeologic framework and salinity distribution of the Floridan aquifer system of Broward County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Ronald S.; Cunningham, Kevin J.

    2014-01-01

    Concerns about water-level decline and seawater intrusion in the surficial Biscayne aquifer, currently the principal source of water supply to Broward County, prompted a study to refine the hydrogeologic framework of the underlying Floridan aquifer system to evaluate its potential as an alternative source of supply. This report presents cross sections that illustrate the stratigraphy and hydrogeology in eastern Broward County; maps of the upper surfaces and thicknesses of several geologic formations or units within the Floridan aquifer system; and maps of two of the potentially productive water-bearing zones within the system, the Upper Floridan aquifer and the Avon Park permeable zone. An analysis of data on rock depositional textures, associated pore networks, and flow zones in the Floridan aquifer system shows that groundwater moves through the system in two ways. These data support a conceptual, dual-porosity model of the system wherein groundwater moves either as concentrated flow in discrete, thin bedding-plane vugs or zones of vuggy megaporosity, or as diffuse flow through rocks with primarily interparticle and moldic-particle porosity. Because considerable exchange of groundwater may occur between the zones of vuggy and matrix-dominated porosity, understanding the distribution of that porosity and flow zone types is important to evaluating the suitability of the several units within the Floridan aquifer system for managing the water through practices such as aquifer storage and recovery (ASR). The salinity of the water in the Floridan aquifer system is highest in the central part of the study area, and lower toward the north and south. Although salinity generally increases with depth, in the western part of the study area a zone of relatively high saline water is perched above water of lower salinity in the underlying Avon Park permeable zone. Overall, the areas of highest salinity in the aquifer system coincide with those with the lowest estimated

  16. Preliminary evaluation of the hydrogeologic system in Owens Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danskin, W.R.

    1988-01-01

    A preliminary, two-layer, steady-state, groundwater flow model was used to evaluate present data and hydrologic concepts of Owens Valley, California. Simulations of the groundwater system indicate that areas where water levels are most affected by changes in recharge and discharge are near toes of alluvial fans and along the edge of permeable volcanic deposits. Sensitivity analysis for each model parameter shows that steady state simulations are most sensitive to uncertainties in evapotranspiration rates. Tungsten Hills, Poverty Hills, and Alabama Hills were found to act as virtually impermeable barriers to groundwater flow. Accurate simulation of the groundwater system between Bishop and Lone Pine appears to be possible without simulating the groundwater system in Round Valley, near Owens Lake, or in aquifer materials more than 1,000 ft below land surface. Although vast amounts of geologic and hydrologic data have been collected for Owens Valley, many parts of the hydrogeologic system have not been defined with sufficient detail to answer present water management questions. Location and extent of geologic materials that impede the vertical movement of water are poorly documented. The likely range of aquifer characteristics, except vertical hydraulic conductivity, is well known, but spatial distribution of these characteristics is not well documented. A set of consistent water budgets is needed, including one for surface water, groundwater, and the entire valley. The largest component of previous water budgets (evapotranspiration) is largely unverified. More definitive estimates of local gains and losses for Owens River are needed. Although groundwater pumpage from each well is measured, the quantity of withdrawal from different zones of permeable material has not been defined. (USGS)

  17. Hydrogeology - HYDROGEOL_SETTINGS_IN: Hydrogeologic Terrains and Settings of Indiana (Indiana Geological Survey, 1:100,000, Polygon Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — HYDROGEOL_SETTINGS_IN is a polygon shapefile that shows hydrogeologic terrains and settings of Indiana. The methodology of the investigation and definitions of terms...

  18. Residence time, mineralization processes and groundwater origin within a carbonate coastal aquifer with a thick unsaturated zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoni, S.; Huneau, F.; Garel, E.; Vergnaud-Ayraud, V.; Labasque, T.; Aquilina, L.; Jaunat, J.; Celle-Jeanton, H.

    2016-09-01

    This study aims at establishing groundwater residence times, identifying mineralization processes and determining groundwater origins within a carbonate coastal aquifer with thick unsaturated zone and lying on a granitic depression. A multi-tracer approach (major ions, SiO2, Br-, Ba+, Sr2+, 18O, 2H, 13C, 3H, Ne, Ar) combined with a groundwater residence time determination using CFCs and SF6 allows defining the global setting of the study site. A typical mineralization conditioned by the sea sprays and the carbonate matrix helped to validate the groundwater weighted residence times from using a binary mixing model. Terrigenic SF6 excesses have been detected and quantified, which permits to identify a groundwater flow from the surrounding fractured granites towards the lower aquifer principally. The use of CFCs and SF6 as a first hydrogeological investigation tool is possible and very relevant despite the thick unsaturated zone and the hydraulic connexion with a granitic environment.

  19. Photogrammetry in Experiments for Hydrogeological Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barazzetti, L.; Scaioni, M.; Feng, T.; Qiao, G.; Lu, P.; Tong, X.; Li, R.

    2013-01-01

    The construction of scaled-down simulation platforms is largely used to support investigations for the assessment of hydrological risk. Achieved outcomes can be integrated and assimilated to numerical analyses for the study of unstable slope collapse, debris transport, and hydrological modeling in general. During design of such simulation platforms, a relevant role has to be given to the spatial sensor network (SSN) to deploy, which is in charge of collecting geo-referenced, quantitative information during experiments. Photogrammetry (including 3D imaging sensors) can play an important role in SSN owing to its capability of collecting 2D images and 3D point clouds data covering wide surfaces without any contact. Different kinds of metric measurements can be then extracted from datasets. The aim of this paper is to give an overview and some examples on the potential of photogrammetry in hydrogeological experiments. After a general introduction on a few preliminary issues (sensors, calibration, ground reference, usage of imaging or ranging sensors), potential applications are classified into 2D and 3D categories. Examples are focused on a scaled-down landslide simulation platform developed at Tongji University (Shanghai, P. R. China).

  20. Hydrogeological assessment of the Thar lignite prospect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, R.N.; Stace, R. [Nottingham Centre of Geomechanics (United Kingdom). Dept. of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering; Pathan, A.G. [Mehran Univ. of Engineering and Technology, Shahrood (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Faculty of Mining, Petroleum and Geophysics; Atkins, A.S. [Staffordshire Univ., Stafford (United Kingdom). Faculty of Computing, Engineering and Technology

    2010-07-01

    This paper described a hydrogeological appraisal conducted at a proposed mine site in the Thar lignite field in Pakistan. The field contains an estimate 9 billion tonnes of lignite reserves. Three aquifers surrounding the lignite seams are inducing pore pressure in the rock mass and creating hazardous conditions at the site's high wall slopes. Groundwater inflow predictions were conducted using a finite element-based software package. The study was conducted to calculate dewatering quantities in order to ensure stability during excavation activities. Pumping tests conducted in boreholes at the bottom aquifer were used to determine permeability coefficients. Pumping rates from the 3 aquifers were calculated using the equivalent well approach. Results of the simulations were used to predict groundwater inflow from the bottom aquifer to the fully penetrating pit of the mine under steady state flow conditions. Results of the study indicated that 20 pumping out wells equipped with 150 mm diameter motor pumps will be required over a period of 10 years to achieve an overall dewatering rate of 0.6 m{sup 3}/s for the top aquifer. High head borehole pumps are needed for the intermediate and bottom-confined aquifers. 6 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs.

  1. PHOTOGRAMMETRY IN EXPERIMENTS FOR HYDROGEOLOGICAL RISK ASSESSMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Barazzetti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The construction of scaled-down simulation platforms is largely used to support investigations for the assessment of hydrological risk. Achieved outcomes can be integrated and assimilated to numerical analyses for the study of unstable slope collapse, debris transport, and hydrological modeling in general. During design of such simulation platforms, a relevant role has to be given to the spatial sensor network (SSN to deploy, which is in charge of collecting geo-referenced, quantitative information during experiments. Photogrammetry (including 3D imaging sensors can play an important role in SSN owing to its capability of collecting 2D images and 3D point clouds data covering wide surfaces without any contact. Different kinds of metric measurements can be then extracted from datasets. The aim of this paper is to give an overview and some examples on the potential of photogrammetry in hydrogeological experiments. After a general introduction on a few preliminary issues (sensors, calibration, ground reference, usage of imaging or ranging sensors, potential applications are classified into 2D and 3D categories. Examples are focused on a scaled-down landslide simulation platform developed at Tongji University (Shanghai, P. R. China.

  2. 2101-M Pond hydrogeologic characterization report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chamness, M.A.; Luttrell, S.P.; Bates, D.J.; Martin, W.J.

    1990-09-01

    This report documents information collected by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory {sup (a)} at the request of Westinghouse Hanford Company. Presented in this report is the interpretation of the hydrogeologic environment at the 2101-M Pond, located in the 200-East Area of the Hanford Site. This information and its accompanying interpretation were derived from sampling and testing activities associated with the installation of four ground-water monitoring wells, in addition to data gathered from several previously existing wells. The new monitoring wells were installed as part of a groundwater monitoring program initiated in 1988. The four new monitoring wells were installed around the 2101-M Pond between May 23 and August 27, 1988. Geologic sampling, aquifer testing, and initial ground-water sampling were performed during the installation of these wells. Laboratory analyses of the sediment samples for particle size, calcium carbonate content, and selected natural and contaminant constituents were performed. A full year of quarterly ground-water sampling and the first statistical analysis of background and downgradient data have also been performed. 112 refs., 49 figs., 18 tabs.

  3. Hydrogeology of Montserrat review and new insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brioch Hemmings

    2015-03-01

    New hydrological insights for the region: A new groundwater recharge model predicts whole island recharge of 266 mm/year, between 10% and 20% of annual rainfall. Core scale permeability tests reveal ranges from 10−14 to 10−12 m2 for volcaniclastic rocks with coarse matrix, to a minimum of 10−18 m2 for andesitic lavas and volcaniclastics with fine or altered matrix. Analysis of historical pumping tests on aquifers in reworked, channel and alluvial sediment indicate permeabilities ∼10−10 m2. Springs at elevations between 200 and 400 m above mean sea level on Centre Hills currently discharge over 45 L/s. High discharge require a reasonably laterally continuous low permeability body. Contrasting conceptual models are presented to illustrate two potential hydrogeological scenarios. New field observations also reveal systematic spatial variations in spring water temperature and specific electrical conductivity indicating that meteoric waters supplying the springs are mixed with a deeper groundwater source at some sites.

  4. Hydrogeological Issues Concerning the Thar Lignite Prospect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. N. Singh

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper is concerned with the hydrogeological appraisal of the proposed mining operations in theThar lignite field in Sindh, Pakistan. The Thar coalfield covers an area of approximately 9000km2 andcontains three lignite seams lying at depth of 130m to 250 m. In the Thar lignite field, the presence ofthree main aquifers induces pore pressure in the rock mass surrounding the lignite seams and makes highwall slopes potentially unsafe. It is, therefore, necessary to dewater the rock mass before commencingmining excavations. The paper describes the proposed mine dewatering scheme to facilitatedepressurising of the rock mass surrounding the mining excavations. Inflow prediction of groundwater tothe surface mining excavation was carried out using a SEEP/W finite element software package. Thesimulation results show that the ground water inflow from the Top aquifer is 114m3/d, from theIntermediate confined aquifer is 141m3/d and from the Bottom confined aquifer is 1.28 x 105 m3 /d. Theseresults were compared with the analytical solutions which indicated that the relative error of estimation ofinflow quantities varies from 3.4 % to 6.4%.

  5. Thermal ground water flow systems in the thrust zone in southeastern Idaho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ralston, D.R.

    1983-05-01

    The results of a regional study of thermal and non-thermal ground water flow systems in the thrust zone of southern Idaho and western Wyoming are presented. The study involved hydrogeologic and hydrochemical data collection and interpretation. Particular emphasis was placed on analyzing the role that thrust zones play in controlling the movement of thermal and non-thermal fluids.

  6. Effects of hydrogeological properties on sea-derived benzene transport in unconfined coastal aquifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei-Ci; Ni, Chuen-Fa; Tsai, Chia-Hsing; Wei, Yi-Ming

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents numerical investigations on quantifying the hydrodynamic effects of coastal environment factors, including tidal fluctuations, beach slopes, hydraulic conductivity, and hydraulic gradients on sea-derived benzene transport in unconfined coastal aquifers. A hydrologic transport and mixed geochemical kinetic/equilibrium reactions in saturated-unsaturated media model was used to simulate the spatial and temporal behaviors of the density flow and benzene transport for various hydrogeological conditions. Simulation results indicated that the tidal fluctuations lead to upper saline plumes (USPs) near the groundwater and seawater interfaces. Such local circulation zones trapped the seaward benzene plumes and carried them down in aquifers to the depth depending on the tide amplitudes and beach slopes across the coastal lines. Comparisons based on different tidal fluctuations, beach slopes, hydraulic conductivity, and hydraulic gradient were systematically conducted and quantified. The results indicated that areas with USPs increased with the tidal amplitude and decreased with the increasing beach slope. However, the variation of hydraulic conductivity and hydraulic gradient has relatively small influence on the patterns of flow fields in the study. The increase of the USP depths was linearly correlated with the increase of the tidal amplitudes. The benzene reactive transport simulations revealed that the plume migrations are mainly controlled by the local flow dynamics and constrained in the USP circulation zones. The self-cleaning process of a coastal aquifer is time-consuming, typically requiring double the time of the contamination process that the benzene plume reach the bottom of a USP circulation zone. The presented systematic analysis can provide useful information for rapidly evaluating seaward contaminants along a coastal line with available hydrogeological properties.

  7. Bathymetric preference of four major genera of rectilinear benthic foraminifera within oxygen minimum zone in Arabian Sea off central west coast of India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abhijit Mazumder; Rajiv Nigam

    2014-04-01

    Fifty two surface sediment samples collected from the region off Goa, central west coast of India from water depths of 15–3300 m were analyzed with special emphasis on foraminiferal content. Rectilinear benthic foraminiferal morphogroup shows a high relative abundance within Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ), both shallow marine (50–60 m water depth) and intermediate to deep water (150–1500 m water depth). We gave special emphasis on four rectilinear foraminiferal genera, namely Fursenkoina, Bolivina, Bulimina and Uvigerina to observe their individual distribution among OMZ. We found genus Fursenkoina predominates at the shallow water OMZ, within the water depth zone of 50–60 m. Within 150–1500 m water depth, which is considered as intermediate to deep water OMZ in this region, genus Uvigerina shows its highest abundance above 1000 m water depth, whereas genus Bulimina shows its affinity with deeper water environment (< 1000 m water depth). Genus Bolivina does not show any such depth preference, except its higher abundance in only intermediate to deep water OMZ. This depth differentiation among four rectilinear benthic foraminiferal genera presents the basic data for palaeoclimatic study based on the extent and intensity of OMZ along with the palaeobathymetry study.

  8. Hydrogeologic Framework of the Yakima River Basin Aquifer System, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccaro, J.J.; Jones, M.A.; Ely, D.M.; Keys, M.E.; Olsen, T.D.; Welch, W.B.; Cox, S.E.

    2009-01-01

    The Yakima River basin aquifer system underlies about 6,200 square miles in south-central Washington. The aquifer system consists of basin-fill deposits occurring in six structural-sedimentary basins, the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG), and generally older bedrock. The basin-fill deposits were divided into 19 hydrogeologic units, the CRBG was divided into three units separated by two interbed units, and the bedrock was divided into four units (the Paleozoic, the Mesozoic, the Tertiary, and the Quaternary bedrock units). The thickness of the basin-fill units and the depth to the top of each unit and interbed of the CRBG were mapped. Only the surficial extent of the bedrock units was mapped due to insufficient data. Average mapped thickness of the different units ranged from 10 to 600 feet. Lateral hydraulic conductivity (Kh) of the units varies widely indicating the heterogeneity of the aquifer system. Average or effective Kh values of the water-producing zones of the basin-fill units are on the order of 1 to 800 ft/d and are about 1 to 10 ft/d for the CRBG units as a whole. Effective or average Kh values for the different rock types of the Paleozoic, Mesozoic, and Tertiary units appear to be about 0.0001 to 3 ft/d. The more permeable Quaternary bedrock unit may have Kh values that range from 1 to 7,000 ft/d. Vertical hydraulic conductivity (Kv) of the units is largely unknown. Kv values have been estimated to range from about 0.009 to 2 ft/d for the basin-fill units and Kv values for the clay-to-shale parts of the units may be as small as 10-10 to 10-7 ft/d. Reported Kv values for the CRBG units ranged from 4x10-7 to 4 ft/d. Variations in the concentrations of geochemical solutes and the concentrations and ratios of the isotopes of hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon in groundwater provided information on the hydrogeologic framework and groundwater movement. Stable isotope ratios of water (deuterium and oxygen-18) indicated dispersed sources of groundwater recharge to

  9. Flowing with the changing needs of hydrogeology instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleeson, T.; Allen, D. M.; Ferguson, G.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogeology is now taught in a broad spectrum of departments and institutions to students with diverse backgrounds. Successful instruction in hydrogeology thus requires a variety of pedagogical approaches depending on desired learning outcomes and the diverse background of students. We review the pedagogical literature in hydrogeology to highlight recent advances and analyze a 2005 survey of 68 hydrogeology instructors. The literature and survey results suggest there are ~15 topics that are considered crucial by most hydrogeologists and >100 other topics that are considered crucial by some hydrogeologists. The crucial topics focus on properties of aquifers and fundamentals of groundwater flow, and should likely be part of all undergraduate hydrogeology courses. Other topics can supplement and support these crucial topics, depending on desired learning outcomes. Classroom settings continue to provide a venue for emphasizing fundamental knowledge. However, recent pedagogical advances are biased towards field and laboratory instruction with a goal of bolstering experiential learning. Field methods build on the fundamentals taught in the classroom and emphasize the collection of data, data uncertainty, and the development of vocational skills. Laboratory and computer-based exercises similarly build on theory, and offer an opportunity for data analysis and integration. The literature suggests curricula at all levels should ideally balance field, laboratory, and classroom pedagogy into an iterative and integrative whole. An integrated approach leads to greater student motivation and advancement of theoretical and vocational knowledge.

  10. Flowing with the changing needs of hydrogeology instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Gleeson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogeology is now taught in a broad spectrum of departments and institutions to students with diverse backgrounds. Successful instruction in hydrogeology thus requires a variety of pedagogical approaches depending on desired learning outcomes and the diverse background of students. We review the pedagogical literature in hydrogeology to highlight recent advances and analyze a 2005 survey of 68 hydrogeology instructors. The literature and survey results suggest there are ~15 topics that are considered crucial by most hydrogeologists and >100 other topics that are considered crucial by some hydrogeologists. The crucial topics focus on properties of aquifers and fundamentals of groundwater flow, and should likely be part of all undergraduate hydrogeology courses. Other topics can supplement and support these crucial topics, depending on desired learning outcomes. Classroom settings continue to provide a venue for emphasizing fundamental knowledge. However, recent pedagogical advances are biased towards field and laboratory instruction with a goal of bolstering experiential learning. Field methods build on the fundamentals taught in the classroom and emphasize the collection of data, data uncertainty, and the development of vocational skills. Laboratory and computer-based exercises similarly build on theory, and offer an opportunity for data analysis and integration. The literature suggests curricula at all levels should ideally balance field, laboratory, and classroom pedagogy into an iterative and integrative whole. An integrated approach leads to greater student motivation and advancement of theoretical and vocational knowledge.

  11. Characterization of the hydrogeology and stress state in the vicinity of the homestake mine, Lead, SD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebenhack, Johnathan Foss

    changed the hydrology and stress state in the vicinity of the Homestake mine. Dewatering reduces the hydraulic head and changes the flow systems in the vicinity of the mine. Four major hydrogeologic zones are recognized: 1.) a Shallow Flow System in the upper few hundred meters that dominates recharge and discharge to streams, 2.) a Recharge Capture Zone where water that has entered the region as recharge since mining began is captured by the mine, 3.) a Storage Capture Zone where water from storage in the host rock around the mine is captured, and 4.) a Mine Workings Zone where rock has been removed. Water enters the system at the top of the Shallow Flow System and either discharges to the streams or flows downward and becomes recharge to the lower capture zones. The Recharge Capture Zone grows with time as regions of storage are depleted and new recharge enters, and eventually it is assumed that the entire capture zone for the mine will become the Recharge Capture Zone. Fluxes from the Shallow Flow System to the Recharge Capture Zone typically range from 1x10-9 to 4x10-9 m/s. The largest recharge fluxes from the Shallow Flow System to the Recharge Capture Zone occur above the shallowest portions of the mine. Recharge flux also occurs above areas adjacent to the mine, and when projected to the surface the Recharge Capture Zone creates a roughly elliptical shape that is 6 km x 3.6 km. The Storage Capture Zone extends out beyond and below the Recharge Capture Zone and when projected to the surface creates a roughly elliptical region that is approximately 8.3 km x 6.6 km and extends down to depths of almost 5 km. Hydraulic heads and flow paths have been affected beyond the Storage Capture Zone but this water had not reached the mine by 135 years and therefore these regions are not included in the capture zones. The model was calibrated using in-situ stress data at various points in the mine to improve its ability to estimate the stress state and mechanical deformation

  12. Python-Based Applications for Hydrogeological Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khambhammettu, P.

    2013-12-01

    Python is a general-purpose, high-level programming language whose design philosophy emphasizes code readability. Add-on packages supporting fast array computation (numpy), plotting (matplotlib), scientific /mathematical Functions (scipy), have resulted in a powerful ecosystem for scientists interested in exploratory data analysis, high-performance computing and data visualization. Three examples are provided to demonstrate the applicability of the Python environment in hydrogeological applications. Python programs were used to model an aquifer test and estimate aquifer parameters at a Superfund site. The aquifer test conducted at a Groundwater Circulation Well was modeled with the Python/FORTRAN-based TTIM Analytic Element Code. The aquifer parameters were estimated with PEST such that a good match was produced between the simulated and observed drawdowns. Python scripts were written to interface with PEST and visualize the results. A convolution-based approach was used to estimate source concentration histories based on observed concentrations at receptor locations. Unit Response Functions (URFs) that relate the receptor concentrations to a unit release at the source were derived with the ATRANS code. The impact of any releases at the source could then be estimated by convolving the source release history with the URFs. Python scripts were written to compute and visualize receptor concentrations for user-specified source histories. The framework provided a simple and elegant way to test various hypotheses about the site. A Python/FORTRAN-based program TYPECURVEGRID-Py was developed to compute and visualize groundwater elevations and drawdown through time in response to a regional uniform hydraulic gradient and the influence of pumping wells using either the Theis solution for a fully-confined aquifer or the Hantush-Jacob solution for a leaky confined aquifer. The program supports an arbitrary number of wells that can operate according to arbitrary schedules. The

  13. Hydrogeologic Prospection With Vlf (very Low Frequency) In A Low Potential Hard Rock Aquifer Near Beja (south Portugal)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque, J.

    The use of geophysics prospection in hydrogeology is widely used as a way to find groundwater under difficult hydrogeologic potential rocks. The porphyric rocks lay- ered in the northern part of Beja city, are the most unproductive regional aquifer. Usu- ally this aquifer has an upper layer of 5 to 15 meters deep of weathered rock and a second layer build by fractures rock till 30 metres deep. Above this deep the probabil- ity to find groundwater is extremely low. For instance it is a very superficial aquifer that usually accomplish the topographic surface. The water use is essential for human purposes and here are used mainly for human and cattle supply. In order verify the goodness of a geophysic method and at the same time to supply a large farm called Herdade da Apariça, it was performed the geophysical method of Very Low Frequency (VLF-EM) with ABEM (WADI) equipment, in three areas previously defined by inter- pretation of aerial photography, as zones that have relative hydrogeological potential. It was performed a total of 5 profiles with 1970 m. The geophysic prospecting and hydrogeologic research allowed to drill 5 boreholes, being 4 extraction wells and 1 piezometric well. The productivity of the abstraction wells are between 2,000 L/h and 10,000 L/h, which is a very good yield when compared with the other yield values get from wells inside this aquifer. VLF proved in this conditions to be an essential tool to increment the tax success of drilling wells.

  14. Hydrogeologic framework and selected components of the groundwater budget for the upper Umatilla River Basin, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Nora B.; Ely, Kate; Mehta, Smita; Stonewall, Adam J.; Risley, John C.; Hinkle, Stephen R.; Conlon, Terrence D.

    2017-05-31

    Executive SummaryThis report presents a summary of the hydrogeology of the upper Umatilla River Basin, Oregon, based on characterization of the hydrogeologic framework, horizontal and vertical directions of groundwater flow, trends in groundwater levels, and components of the groundwater budget. The conceptual model of the groundwater flow system integrates available data and information on the groundwater resources of the upper Umatilla River Basin and provides insights regarding key hydrologic processes, such as the interaction between the groundwater and surface water systems and the hydrologic budget.The conceptual groundwater model developed for the study area divides the groundwater flow system into five hydrogeologic units: a sedimentary unit, three Columbia River basalt units, and a basement rock unit. The sedimentary unit, which is not widely used as a source of groundwater in the upper basin, is present primarily in the lowlands and consists of conglomerate, loess, silt and sand deposits, and recent alluvium. The Columbia River Basalt Group is a series of Miocene flood basalts that are present throughout the study area. The basalt is uplifted in the southeastern half of the study area, and either underlies the sedimentary unit, or is exposed at the surface. The interflow zones of the flood basalts are the primary aquifers in the study area. Beneath the flood basalts are basement rocks composed of Paleogene to Pre-Tertiary sedimentary, volcanic, igneous, and metamorphic rocks that are not used as a source of groundwater in the upper Umatilla River Basin.The major components of the groundwater budget in the upper Umatilla River Basin are (1) groundwater recharge, (2) groundwater discharge to surface water and wells, (3) subsurface flow into and out of the basin, and (4) changes in groundwater storage.Recharge from precipitation occurs primarily in the upland areas of the Blue Mountains. Mean annual recharge from infiltration of precipitation for the upper

  15. Pesticide residue evaluation in major staple food items of Ethiopia using the QuEChERS method: a case study from the Jimma Zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekonen, Seblework; Ambelu, Argaw; Spanoghe, Pieter

    2014-06-01

    Samples of maize, teff, red pepper, and coffee (green bean and coffee bean with pulp) were collected from a local market in the Jimma Zone, Ethiopia. Samples were analyzed for the occurrence of cypermethrin, permethrin, deltamethrin, chlorpyrifos ethyl, DTT and its metabolites, and endosulfan (α, β). In the analytical procedure, the QuEChERS (Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged and Safe) extraction methodology with dispersive solid phase extraction clean up (d-SPE) technique was applied. Validation of the QuEChERS method was satisfactory. Recovery percentages of most pesticides were in the range of 70% to 120%, with good repeatability (%relative standard deviation coffee bean. Residues of DDT in coffee pulp significantly differed (p < 0.01) from other food items except for red pepper. The concentration of pesticides in the food items varied from 0.011 mg/kg to 1.115 mg/kg. All food items contained 1 or more pesticides. Two-thirds of the samples had residues below corresponding maximum residue limits, and the remaining one-third of samples were above the maximum residue limits. These results indicate the need for a good pesticide monitoring program to evaluate consumer risk for the Ethiopian people.

  16. Evaluation of intrinsic groundwater vulnerability to pollution: COP method for pilot area of Carrara hydrogeological system (Northern Tuscany, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldi, B.; Guastaldi, E.; Rossetto, R.

    2009-04-01

    During the characterization of the Apuan Alps groundwater body ( "Corpo Idrico Sotterraneo Significativo", briefly CISS) (Regione Toscana, 2007) the intrinsic vulnerability has been evaluated for Carrara hydrogeological system (Northern Tuscany, Italy) by means of COP method, developed within COST 620 European Action (Zwalhlen, 2003). This system is both characterized by large data availability and it is considered an highly risky zone since groundwater protection problems (turbidity of the tapped spring waters and hydrocarbons contamination) and anthropic activity (marble quarries). The study area, 20 Km2large, has high relief energy, with elevations ranging from 5 to 1700 m amsl in almost 5 km. Runoff is scarce except during heavy rainfall; due to the presence of carbonate rocks infiltration is high: groundwater discharge at 155-255 m amsl. The area is located in the north-western part of Apuan Alps Metamorphic Complex, characterized by carbonate and non-carbonate rocks belonging to the non-metamorphic Tuscan Units (Carnic-Oligocene), Mesozoic Succession, Middle-Triassic Succession, and metamorphic Paleozoic rocks. The main geological structure of the area is the Carrara Syncline, constituted prevalently by dolostones, marbles and cherty limestones. These carbonate formations define several moderately to highly productive hydrogeological units, characterized by fissured and karst flow. Hydrogeological system may be subdivided in two different subsets, because of both geo-structural set up and area conformation. However, these are hydrogeologically connected since anisotropy and fractures of karst groundwater. The southern boundary of Carrara hydrogeological system shows important dammed springs, defined by low productive units of Massa Unit (Cambriano?-Carnic). COP methodology for evaluating intrinsic vulnerability of karst groundwater is based on three main factors for the definition of vulnerability itself: COPIndex = C (flow Concentration) *O (Overlying layers

  17. Physical property and Textural transition across the Unconformity and Major Seismic Reflectors in the Upper plate of the Costa Rica Subduction zone offshore Osa Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamahashi, M.; Screaton, E.; Tanikawa, W.; Hashimoto, Y.; Martin, K. M.; Saito, S.; Kimura, G.

    2014-12-01

    At the Costa Rica subduction zone offshore Osa Peninsula, the Cocos plate and Cocos Ridge subduct under the Caribbean plate along the Middle America Trench, creating active seismicity. In this region, the Caribbean plate is characterized by a well-consolidated, high velocity framework material beneath the slope sediments, but the nature of the upper plate material is yet unknown. During Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 334 and 344, the unconformity between the slope sediments (Unit 1) and upper plate material (Units 2 and 3) consisting of lithic sedimentary units was penetrated at mid-slope Site 1380. In the current study, to characterize the compaction behavior of the upper plate material, we investigate the physical properties, texture and composition of the sediments at Site 1380 by conducting microstructural observations, resistivity measurements, particle size analyses, X-ray fluorescence and X-ray diffraction analyses. The microstructures of sediments observed through the microscope tend to develop dense and cohesive textures in low porosity sediments, and particle size changes across several unconformities. In particular, the small particle-sized lithic fragments compose larger bodies and form cohesive structures. The cross correlation between measured particle size and shipboard porosity show negative correlation especially at Unit 2, indicating that larger sized particles form smaller or fewer pores. From the results of XRF and XRD analyses, we found that Al, K, Ti tend to concentrate in the higher porosity sediments of Unit 1, whereas Si, Ca, P, Mg, Na, and Mn concentrate in the lower porosity sediments of Unit 2 and 3. The higher concentration in Mg, Na, Mn, Si may be due to minerals such as chlorite, serpentine, amphibole, and sodium manganese. The crossplots between porosity and element concentration show negative correlations in Mg, Na, and Mn with porosity, suggesting that the minerals rich in these elements may relate with the

  18. Results of monitoring at Olkiluoto in 2013. Hydrology and hydrogeology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaittinen, T.; Ahokas, H.; Komulainen, J.; Nummela, J.; Pentti, E.; Turku, J. [Poeyry Finland Oy, Vantaa (Finland); Karvonen, T. [WaterHope, Helsinki (Finland); Aro, S.

    2014-12-15

    The impact of the construction of ONKALO is monitored by measuring and observing numerous different parameters related to hydrology, geochemistry, environment, rock mechanics and foreign materials. The Hydrological Monitoring Programme consists of the following parameters: groundwater level, hydraulic head, flow conditions in open drillholes, transverse flow, hydraulic conductivity, groundwater salinity (in situ EC), precipitation (including snow), sea-water level, surface flow (runoff), infiltration, ground frost, leakages in tunnels, and water balance in the tunnel system and in Korvensuo Reservoir. This Report focuses on hydrogeological parameters. Other parameters, like precipitation, ground frost etc. will be reported in the Monitoring Report of Environment. Updated monitoring program was introduced in the beginning of 2012. The updated program will be used for the period before repository operation. Only minor changes were implemented. Monitoring has been carried out according to plan. This Report presents the results for the year 2013. Excavation of the access tunnel was completed in 2012. Demonstration tunnels 3 and 4 were excavated and central tunnel 1 was continued from chainage 4366-22 m to chainage 4366-60 m in 2013. Total inflow into ONKALO down to chainage 4580 m including shaft ONK-KU2 down to level -437 m was on average 35 l/min in 2013. The mapping of water leakages and moisture conditions on the tunnel walls and the ceiling has been continued. The general pattern of leakages has remained similar during the construction of ONKALO. Most significant differences are caused by seasonal effects like condensation of warm ventilation air on tunnel walls and ceiling. The changes observed in the groundwater level in observation tubes in the overburden and in shallow drillholes in the bedrock are not necessarily caused by the construction of ONKALO. However, weak indications of a local decrease in groundwater level have been observed. Effects on the head

  19. Hydrogeology of Cibola County, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, J.A.; Rankin, D.R.

    1995-01-01

    The hydrogeology of Cibola County, New Mexico, was evaluated to determine the occurrence, availability, and quality of ground-water resources. Rocks of Precambrian through Quaternary age are present in Cibola County. Most rocks are sedimentary in origin except for Precambrian igneous and metamorphic rocks exposed in the Zuni Uplift and Tertiary and Quaternary basalts in northern and central parts of the county. The most productive aquifers in the county include (youngest to oldest) Quaternary deposits, sandstones in the Mesaverde Group, the Dakota-Zuni-Bluff aquifer, the Westwater Canyon aquifer, the Todilto- Entrada aquifer, sandstone beds in the Chinle Formation, and the San Andres-Glorieta aquifer. Unconsolidated sand, silt, and gravel form a mantle ranging from a few inches to 150 to 200 feet over much of the bedrock in Cibola County. Well yields range from 5 to 1,110 gallons per minute. Dissolved-solids concentrations of ground water range from 200 to more than 5,200 milligrams per liter. Calcium, magnesium, bicarbonate, and sulfate are the predominant ions in ground water in alluvial material. The Mesaverde Group mainly occurs in three areas of the county. Well yields range from less than 1 to 12 gallons per minute. The predominant ions in water from wells in the Mesaverde Group are calcium, sodium, and bicarbonate. The transition from calcium-predominant to sodium-predominant water in the southwestern part of the county likely is a result of ion exchange. Wells completed in the Dakota-Zuni-Bluff aquifer yield from 1 to 30 gallons per minute. Dissolved-solids concentrations range from 220 to 2,000 milligrams per liter in water from 34 wells in the western part of the county. Predominant ions in the ground water include calcium, sodium, sulfate, and bicarbonate. Calcium predominates in areas where the aquifer is exposed at the surface or is overlain with alluvium. Sandstones in the Chinle Formation yield from 10 to 300 gallons per minute to wells in the Grants

  20. A Comparison of the Nitrogen Gas Excess Versus the Fixed Nitrogen Deficit in Two Major Oxygen Deficient Zones of the World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devol, A. H.; Chang, B. X.

    2006-12-01

    This study compares the nitrogen gas excesses in the oxygen deficient zones (ODZs) of the Eastern Tropical South Pacific (ETSP) and the Arabian Sea. These are two of the three largest ODZs in the world. In the near absence of oxygen, heterotrophic denitrification is the dominant form of respiration in these regions which, coupled to the sheer vastness of the ODZs, makes them a globally significant sink of marine fixed nitrogen. Thus, understanding how nitrogen is cycled in the ODZs is important to understanding the global nitrogen cycle. We measured profiles of nitrogen gas and argon concentrations through the ODZs of the ETSP and the Arabian Sea in the fall of 2005 and 2004, respectively. Nitrogen gas concentrations were normalized to argon concentrations to eliminate variations due to physical changes in the water mass. Any nitrogen gas in excess of the background nitrogen gas concentration was interpreted to be from denitrification. In the Arabian Sea ODZ, we found the nitrogen gas excess up to 18 uM N. Using stoichiometric relationships of nitrate and phosphate specific to the Arabian Sea, previous workers have estimated the nitrate deficit in the Arabian Sea ODZ to be no more than 12 uM N, which is only two-thirds of the nitrogen gas excess. In the ODZ of the ETSP, we found the nitrogen gas excess to be 15 uM N and the estimated nitrate deficit to be comparable, which suggests that in the ETSP, the nitrogen gas excess may be accounted for by the nitrate deficit. In the Arabian Sea ODZ, however, there is 50% more nitrogen in the excess than can be accounted for by the nitrate deficit. Several explanations are possible for this discrepancy, but probably the most significant is the likely greater contribution of nitrogen fixation to the overall productivity of the Arabian Sea compared to the ETSP. Nitrogen fixing bacteria are known to have an elevated N:P relative to the assumed near-Redfieldian organic matter falling into the ODZ. Nitrogen fixation has been

  1. Hydrochemical-isotopic and hydrogeological conceptual model of the Las Tres Vı´rgenes geothermal field, Baja California Sur, México

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portugal, E.; Birkle, P.; Barragán R, R. M.; Arellano G, V. M.; Tello, E.; Tello, M.

    2000-09-01

    Based on geological, structural, hydrochemical and isotopic data, a hydrogeological conceptual model for the geothermal reservoir, shallow wells and springs at the Las Tres Vı´rgenes geothermal field and its surroundings is proposed. The model explains the genesis of different types of thermal and cold groundwater in the NW (El Azufre Valley, Las Tres Vı´rgenes and Aguajito complex), NE (Reforma complex) and S (Sierra Mezquital) areas. Shallow groundwater of sulfate type in the NW zone is explained by the rise of CO 2-H 2S vapor from a shallow magma chamber and the subsequent heating up of a shallow aquifer. Vertical communication between the reservoir and the surface is facilitated by a series of extensional, NW-SE-trending normal faults, forming the graben structures of the Santa Rosalı´a Basin. Low-permeability characteristics of the geological formations of the study area support the hypothesis of a fracture and fault-dominated, subterranean-flow circulation system. The Na- (Cl-HCO 3) composition of springs in the NE and SE zones indicates influence of ascending geothermal fluids, facilitated by radial fault systems of the Reforma caldera and probably the existence of a shallow magma chamber. Close to the surface, the rising geothermal fluids are mixed up with meteoric water from a shallow aquifer. The Las Tres Vı´rgenes and the Reforma complex are separated by younger, N-S-trending lateral shearing faults, such as the Cimarrón fault; such disposition explains the genesis of different hydrogeological flow regimes on both sides. HCO 3-type surface water from the southern zone between San Ignacio and Mezquital is of typical meteoric origin, with no influence of geothermal fluids. Due to arid climatic conditions in the study zone, recent recharge in the geothermal area seems improbable; thus, recent interaction between the surface and the geothermal reservoir can be excluded. Furthermore, isotopic and hydrochemical data exclude the presence of marine

  2. Distributed Temperature Sensing as a downhole tool in hydrogeology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bense, V.F.; Read, T.; Bour, O.; Borgne, Le T.; Coleman, T.; Krause, S.; Chalari, A.; Mondanos, M.; Ciocca, F.; Selker, J.S.

    2016-01-01

    Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) technology enables downhole temperature monitoring to study hydrogeological processes at unprecedentedly high frequency and spatial resolution. DTS has been widely applied in passive mode in site investigations of groundwater flow, in-well flow, and subsurfac

  3. Mapping of major diseases and devising prevention and control regimen to common diseases in cattle and shoats in Dassenech district of South Omo Zone, South-Western Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molla, Bereket; Delil, Faris

    2015-01-01

    Livestock production system, particularly in pastoral areas, is mainly constrained by rampant livestock diseases and seasonal feed and water shortages. In areas like Dassenech, bordering Kenya and South Sudan, this risks are pronounced due to the unavailability of appropriate prevention and control. The research was conducted with the objectives of identifying major rampant diseases and designing appropriate prevention and control strategies. A cross-sectional study was employed, conducted using both participatory epidemiology and conventional veterinary investigation. Spatial and temporal occurrence of diseases was assessed. The major five diseases in bovine were contagious bovine pleuro pneumonia (CBPP), septicemic pasteurellosis, anthrax, foot and mouth disease (FMD), and black leg, in that order of importance. Similarly, in ovine, "unknown recent disease," pneumonic pasteurellosis, brucellosis, peste des petits ruminants (PPR), and septicemic pasteurellosis were ranked, starting from the most important whereas in caprine PPR, contagious caprine pleuro pneumonia (CCPP), goat pox, brucellosis, and pneumonic pasteurellosis were ranked in that order of importance. The seroprevalence in bovine were found to be 97, 10, 18, and 15% for septicemic pasteurelosis, CBPP, FMD, and brucellosis, respectively. The seroprevalence of septicemic pasteurelosis, PPR, and brucellosis was 86, 49, and 3%, respectively, in ovine. The seroprevalence of caprine sera for CCPP, PPR, and brucellosis were 87, 42, and 0%, respectively. The prevention and control regimen, vaccination against CBPP, should be at the beginning of wet season, whereas, for FMD, it should be at the end of wet season in bovine. Brucellosis for bovine, if has to be applied, should be at the beginning of dry season. PPR vaccination for ovine should be at the beginning of wet season whereas, for caprine, it should be just before start of dry season. Furthermore, the efficacy of aforementioned vaccines and its protocol

  4. Geophysical characterization of Hydrogeological processes at the catchment scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores Orozco, Adrian; Gallistl, Jakob; Schlögel, Ingrid; Chwatal, Werner; Oismüller, Markus; Blöschl, Günter

    2016-04-01

    The characterization of hydrogeological properties in the subsurface with high resolution across space and time scales is critical to improve our understanding of water flow and transport processes. However, to date, hydrogeological investigations are mainly performed through well-tests or the analysis of samples, thus, limiting the spatial resolution of the investigation. To properly capture heterogeneities in the subsurface controlling surface-groundwater interactions, modern hydrogeological studies require the development of innovative investigation techniques that permit to gain continuous information about subsurface state with high spatial and temporal resolution at different scales: from the pore-space all the way to the catchment. To achieve this, we propose the conduction of geophysical surveys, in particular field-scale Spectral Induced Polarization (SIP) imaging measurements. SIP images provide information about the complex electrical conductivity (CEC), which is controlled by important hydrogeological parameters, such as porosity, water content and the chemical properties of the pore-water. Here, we present imaging results collected at the catchment scale (approximately 66 ha), which permitted to gain detailed information about the spatial variability of hydrogeological parameters at different scales. The heterogeneities observed in the geophysical images revealed consistency with independent information collected at the study area. In addition to this, and taking into account that different geophysical methods yield information about different properties and at diverse scales, interpretation of the SIP images was improved by incorporation of complementary measurements, such as: ElectroMagnetic Induction (EMI), Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR), Multichannel Analysis of Surface-Waves (MASW) and Seismic Refraction-Reflection (SRR).

  5. Hydrogeological conceptual model for Guarani Aquifer System: A tool for management; Modelo hidrogeologico conceptual del Sistema Acuifero Guarani (SAG): una herramienta para la gestion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gastmans, D.; Veroslavsky, G.; Kiang Cahng, H.; Caetano-Chang, M. R.; Nogueira Pressinotti, M. M.

    2012-11-01

    The Guarani aquifer system (GAS) extends beneath the territories of Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay and Uruguay and thus represents a typical example of a transboundary aquifer. The GAS is an important source of drinking water for the population living within its area. Because of differences in the legal norms concerning water resources in these four countries, an urgently required legal framework for the shared management of the groundwater is currently being drawn up. Within this context, the conceptual regional hydrogeological model should be used as an important tool to delineate shared actions, particularly in regions where the groundwater flow is transboundary. The GAS is considered to be a continuous aquifer made up of Mesozoic continental clastic sedimentary rocks that occur in the Parana and Chacoparanense sedimentary basins, and is bounded at its base by a Permo-Eotriassic regional unconformity and at the top by lower-Cretaceous basaltic lava. The groundwater flow shows a regional trend from N to S along the main axis of these basins. With regard to the major tectonic structures of these sedimentary basins, various main hydrodynamic domains can be distinguished, such as the Ponta Grossa arch and the Asuncion-Rio Grande dorsal. Regional recharge areas are primarily located in the eastern and northern outcrop areas, whilst the western end of the GAS, the Mato Grosso do Sul, contains zones of local recharge and regional discharge. Transboundary flow is observed in areas confined to the national borders of the four countries. Nevertheless, due to the groundwater residence times in the GAS special management actions are called for to prevent over-exploitation, particularly in the confined zones of the aquifer. (Author)

  6. Hydrogeologic Modeling at the Sylvania Corning FUSRAP Site - 13419

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewy, Ann [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Kansas City District (United States); Heim, Kenneth J. [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New England District (United States); McGonigal, Sean T.; Talimcioglu, Nazmi M. [The Louis Berger Group, Inc. (United States)

    2013-07-01

    A comparative groundwater hydrogeologic modeling analysis is presented herein to simulate potential contaminant migration pathways in a sole source aquifer in Nassau County, Long Island, New York. The source of contamination is related to historical operations at the Sylvania Corning Plant ('Site'), a 9.49- acre facility located at 70, 100 and 140 Cantiague Rock Road, Town of Oyster Bay in the westernmost portion of Hicksville, Long Island. The Site had historically been utilized as a nuclear materials manufacturing facility (e.g., cores, slug, and fuel elements) for reactors used in both research and electric power generation in early 1950's until late 1960's. The Site is contaminated with various volatile organic and inorganic compounds, as well as radionuclides. The major contaminants of concern at the Site are tetrachloroethene (PCE), trichloroethene (TCE), nickel, uranium, and thorium. These compounds are present in soil and groundwater underlying the Site and have migrated off-site. The Site is currently being investigated as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The main objective of the current study is to simulate the complex hydrogeologic features in the region, such as numerous current and historic production well fields; large, localized recharge basins; and, multiple aquifers, and to assess potential contaminant migration pathways originating from the Site. For this purpose, the focus of attention was given to the underlying Magothy formation, which has been impacted by the contaminants of concern. This aquifer provides more than 90% of potable water supply in the region. Nassau and Suffolk Counties jointly developed a three-dimensional regional groundwater flow model to help understand the factors affecting groundwater flow regime in the region, to determine adequate water supply for public consumption, to investigate salt water intrusion in localized areas, to evaluate the impacts of regional

  7. Geology and hydrogeology of northern Guam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barner, W.L. [ICF Kaiser Engineers, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Recent site characterization activities on the northern portion of the island of Guam have provided data challenging the perception of expected rapid flow within the karst ground water system. The main water bearing formations consist of Tertiary and Quaternary age coralline reef limestones of the Barrigada and Mariana formations. The Barrigada formation lies on top of the underlying Tertiary aged volcanics, and the younger Mariana formation overlies and onlaps the Barrigada formation as a vertical and transgressional facies, changing from a deep to a shallow water depositional sequence. Rain water rapidly infiltrates through the limestone recharging the fresh water aquifer. Conditions that affect the occurrence and extent of the fresh water aquifer are: tidal fluctuations, storm surges, stratigraphic settings, and karstification of the limestone. Evidence from boreholes drilled inland and near the coast suggest karstification has occurred between the phreatic and vadose zone at a depth of approximately 150 meters below ground surface, and within the transition zone between the fresh and salt water interface, near sea level. Although one might expect a rapid flow system in this karst aquifer, non-flashy responses on water levels in wells, and current results from a dye tracing study, suggest ground water movement is indicative of diffuse porous flow. However, flow velocity within the vadose zone has been found to be several times that occurring within the aquifer and it is very difficult to predict the direction of movement. Andersen Air Force Base, located on the northern portion of the island of Guam, has been operating since World War II after re-capturing the island from the Japanese in 1944. In the intervening years, sanitary and industrial wastes have been disposed in various trenches, borrow pits, quarries, and sinkholes. Potential ground water degradation may result if hazardous substances, in the form of leachate, are released from these disposal areas.

  8. Hydrogeology and results of injection tests at waste-injection test sites in Pinellas County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, John J.

    1982-01-01

    Potential benefits or hazards to freshwater resources could result from subsurface injection of treated wastewater. Recognizing this, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Pinellas County and the city of St. Petersburg, undertook an evaluation of the hydrogeology and injection of wastewater at proposed test sites on the Pinellas peninsula. The injection sites are underlain by sedimentary rocks ranging in age from Cretaceous to Pleistocene. Lower Eocene carbonate rocks were penetrated to a maximum depth of 3,504 feet and were found to have relatively low water yields. The most permeable part of the investigated section was in rocks of middle Eocene age within the Floridan aquifer. At the injection sites, the Floridan aquifer was subdivided into four permeable zones and three semiconfining beds. The test injection zone is within the Avon Park Limestone, the most productive of the identified permeable zones, with a transmissivity of about 1,000,000 feet squared per day. Two semiconfining beds are above the injection zone in the Suwannee Limestone and Ocala Limestone and have vertical hydraulic conductivities estimated to range from about 0.1 to 1 foot per day where these beds do not contain clay. Limited fresh ground-water supplies exist in the Floridan aquifer within the Pinellas peninsula. At all test sites, chloride concentration in the injection zone ranged from 19,000 to 20,000 milligrams per liter. Injection tests ranging in duration from 3 to 91.1 days were run at three different sites. Pressure buildup occurred in permeable zones above and below the injection zone during these tests. Calculated pressure buildup in observation wells close to and at some distance from the test wells was typically less than 1 pound per square inch. Injection and formation water will probably move slowly through the semiconfining bed overlying the injection zone, and long-term injection tests will be needed to determine the effectiveness of these beds to retard flow. The

  9. Using hydrochemistry, tracers and isotopes to analyze hydrogeological dynamics and eutrophication processes in coastal lagoons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menció, Anna; Mas-Pla, Josep; Quintana, Xavier D.

    2016-04-01

    Wetlands and coastal lagoons in Mediterranean areas have recently been the focus of an increasing interest due to the degradation of their ecological status in terms of declining biodiversity, alteration of ecological functioning and limitation of the ecosystem services they provide. Accordingly, the Horizon 2020 Programme of the European Union has set, as one of its priorities, to prevent a further degradation of these ecosystems and to recover their ecological functioning. The aim of this project is to analyze the hydrogeological dynamics in the Pletera coastal lagoons (NE, Spain) as a basis to propose guidelines for their sustainable management. Thus, monthly hydrochemical (with major ions, nutrients and tracers) and isotopic (δ18OH2O and δD) campaigns have been conducted, from November 2014 to October 2015, to determine the hydrogeological dynamics of the Pletera lagoons. In addition, in some of the sampling campaigns δ34SSO4, δ18OSO4, δ15NNO3 and δ18ONO3 have also been analyzed to determine the origin of eutrophication problems observed in these lagoons, mainly caused by nitrogen compounds. Project founded by MEC CGL-2014-57215-C4-2R and LIFE 13 NAT/ES/001001

  10. Regional hydrogeological simulations for Forsmark - numerical modelling using CONNECTFLOW. Preliminary site description Forsmark area - version 1.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartley, Lee; Cox, Ian; Hunter, Fiona; Jackson, Peter; Joyce, Steve; Swift, Ben [Serco Assurance, Risley (United Kingdom); Gylling, Bjoern; Marsic, Niko [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2005-05-01

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) carries out site investigations in two different candidate areas in Sweden with the objective of describing the in-situ conditions for a bedrock repository for spent nuclear fuel. The site characterisation work is divided into two phases, an initial site investigation phase (IPLU) and a complete site investigation phase (KPLU). The results of IPLU are used as a basis for deciding on a subsequent KPLU phase. On the basis of the KPLU investigations a decision is made as to whether detailed characterisation will be performed (including sinking of a shaft). An integrated component in the site characterisation work is the development of site descriptive models. These comprise basic models in three dimensions with an accompanying text description. Central in the modelling work is the geological model, which provides the geometrical context in terms of a model of deformation zones and the rock mass between the zones. Using the geological and geometrical description models as a basis, descriptive models for other geo-disciplines (hydrogeology, hydro-geochemistry, rock mechanics, thermal properties and transport properties) will be developed. Great care is taken to arrive at a general consistency in the description of the various models and assessment of uncertainty and possible needs of alternative models. Here, a numerical model is developed on a regional-scale (hundreds of square kilometres) to understand the zone of influence for groundwater flow that affects the Forsmark area. Transport calculations are then performed by particle tracking from a local-scale release area (a few square kilometres) to identify potential discharge areas for the site and using greater grid resolution. The main objective of this study is to support the development of a preliminary Site Description of the Forsmark area on a regional-scale based on the available data of 30 June 2004 and the previous Site Description. A more specific

  11. Artificial recharge of groundwater: hydrogeology and engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouwer, Herman

    2002-02-01

    Artificial recharge of groundwater is achieved by putting surface water in basins, furrows, ditches, or other facilities where it infiltrates into the soil and moves downward to recharge aquifers. Artificial recharge is increasingly used for short- or long-term underground storage, where it has several advantages over surface storage, and in water reuse. Artificial recharge requires permeable surface soils. Where these are not available, trenches or shafts in the unsaturated zone can be used, or water can be directly injected into aquifers through wells. To design a system for artificial recharge of groundwater, infiltration rates of the soil must be determined and the unsaturated zone between land surface and the aquifer must be checked for adequate permeability and absence of polluted areas. The aquifer should be sufficiently transmissive to avoid excessive buildup of groundwater mounds. Knowledge of these conditions requires field investigations and, if no fatal flaws are detected, test basins to predict system performance. Water-quality issues must be evaluated, especially with respect to formation of clogging layers on basin bottoms or other infiltration surfaces, and to geochemical reactions in the aquifer. Clogging layers are managed by desilting or other pretreatment of the water, and by remedial techniques in the infiltration system, such as drying, scraping, disking, ripping, or other tillage. Recharge wells should be pumped periodically to backwash clogging layers. Electronic supplementary material to this paper can be obtained by using the Springer LINK server located at http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10040-001-0182-4.

  12. Hydrogeological characterization of the Heletz Sands Reservoir, Heletz (Israel) as a preliminary step towards CO2 injection experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensabat, Jacob; Niemi, Auli; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Sharma, Prabhakar; Carrera, Jesus; Sauter, Martin; Tatomir, Alexandru; Ghergut, Julia; Pezard, Philippe; Edlman, Katriona; Brauchler, Ralf

    2013-04-01

    Hydrogeological characterization of the Heletz Sands Reservoir, Heletz (Israel) as a preliminary step towards CO2 injection experiments One the major components of the EU-FP7 funded MUSTANG project is to conduct a highly controlled series of CO2 injection experiments, aimed at determining field values of key CO2 trapping mechanisms such as dissolution and residual trapping and to establish a comprehensive and consistent dataset for model validation. Prior to injecting CO2 there is a need to achieve a sufficient degree of hydrogeological characterization of the reservoir. In what follows we present a sequence of hydrologic tests to be conducted at Heletz and their expected contribution to the understanding relevant hydrogeology. These include: 1) Chemical characterization of the formation fluid; 2) Flowing Fluid Electrical Conductivity log, aimed at determining the vertical variability of the reservoir permeability in the near well vicinity; 3) Water pulse and pumping tests, aimed at determining the reservoir scale hydraulic properties; 4) Thermal test, aimed at determining the value of the heat transfer coefficient from the reservoir to the borehole fluid, which is responsible for the heating of injected fluid in the borehole; 5) two-well injection and pumping of water and tracers test, in order to determine the impact of heterogeneity on the hydraulic parameters and to identify preferential flow paths in the reservoir. This paper presents the design and planning of the experiments, the results obtained in field and a preliminary interpretation.

  13. 鄂尔多斯主体功能区划分及其土地可持续利用模式分析%A Study on Major Function-Oriented Zoning and Sustainable Land Use Patterns of Ordos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒙吉军; 艾木入拉; 刘洋

    2011-01-01

    主体功能区划分和土地可持续利用模式设计,对解决我国经济快速发展过程中社会经济和生态环境之间出现的矛盾具有重要的意义。选取位于我国北方农牧交错带的鄂尔多斯市为研究区,以全市52个乡(镇、苏木)作为基本研究单元,采用研究区2008年数据,基于资源环境承载力、现有开发密度和区域发展潜力,从土地资源、水资源、矿产资源、生态安全度、土地利用强度、水资源开发强度、矿产资源开发强度、区位优势、科技潜力和经济活力等构建了主体功能区划分的指标体系,并运用变异系数法确定各指标权重,最终采用聚类分析与三维魔方图相结合的方法,将鄂尔多斯主体功能区划分为优化开发区、I级重点开发区、Ⅱ级重点开发区、限制开发区和禁止开发区,提出了五类主体功能区的协调发展机制和各功能区未来发展定位。分别选择各主体功能区内部的典型乡镇,优化开发区的达拉特旗树林召镇、I级重点开发区的伊金霍洛旗乌兰木伦镇、Ⅱ级重点开发区的乌审旗苏力德苏木和限制开发区的鄂托克旗阿尔巴斯苏木,基于1978年、1988年、2000年和2008年土地覆被数据,通过近30年来的土地利用变化和景观格局的分析,结合主体功能区的总体定位提出了土地可持续利用模式。结果对推进当地生态重建和促进土地可持续利用提供科学的支撑。%Major function-oriented zoning(MFOZ) and design of sustainable land use patterns are of great significance to ease the contradictions between the economy and the environment over the course of rapid development in China.The authors investigated Ordos City in a farming-grazing transitional zone of northern China,with 52 townships being selected as the fundamental planning units.Based on economic and statistical data of 2008 and considering resources and environmental capacity

  14. Mining hydrogeological data from existing AEM datasets for mineral Mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menghini, Antonio; Viezzoli, Andrea; Teatini, Pietro; Cattarossi, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    Large amount of existing Airborne Electromagnetic (AEM) data are potentially available all over the World. Originally acquired for mining purposes, AEM data traditionally do not get processed in detail and inverted: most of the orebodies can be easily detected by analyzing just the peak anomaly directly evidenced by voltage values (the so-called "bump detection"). However, the AEM acquisitions can be accurately re-processed and inverted to provide detailed 3D models of resistivity: a first step towards hydrogeological studies and modelling. This is a great opportunity especially for the African continent, where the detection of exploitable groundwater resources is a crucial issue. In many cases, a while after AEM data have been acquired by the mining company, Governments become owners of those datasets and have the opportunity to develop detailed hydrogeological characterizations at very low costs. We report the case in which existing VTEM (Versatile Time Domain Electromagnetic - Geotech Ltd) data, originally acquired to detect gold deposits, are used to improve the hydrogeological knowledge of a roughly 50 km2 pilot-test area in Sierra Leone. Thanks to an accurate processing workflow and an advanced data inversion, based on the Spatially Constrained Inversion (SCI) algorithm, we have been able to resolve the thickness of the regolith aquifer and the top of the granitic-gneiss or greenstone belt bedrock. Moreover, the occurrence of different lithological units (more or less conductive) directly related to groundwater flow, sometimes having also a high chargeability (e.g. in the case of lateritic units), has been detailed within the regolith. The most promising areas to drill new productive wells have been recognized where the bedrock is deeper and the regolith thickness is larger. A further info that was considered in hydrogeological mapping is the resistivity of the regolith, provided that the most permeable layers coincide with the most resistive units. The

  15. 3D hydrogeological model of the Lower Yarmouk Gorge, Jordan Rift Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magri, Fabien; Inbar, Nimrod; Möller, Peter; Raggad, Marwan; Rödiger, Tino; Rosenthal, Eliahu; Shentsis, Izabela; Tzoufka, Kalliopi; Siebert, Christian

    2017-04-01

    The Lower Yarmouk Gorge (LYG) lies on the eastern margin of the lower Jordan Rift Valley (JRV), bounded to the south by the Ajlun and to the north by the Golan Heights. It allows the outflow of the Yarmouk drainage basin and flow into the Jordan River, a few kilometers south of Lake Tiberias. The main aquifer system of the LYG is built mostly of Cretaceous sandstones and carbonates confined by Maastrichtian aquiclude. Fissures allow hydraulic connections between the major water-bearing formations from Quaternary to Upper Cretaceous age. It is supposed that the gorge acts as the mixing zone of two crossing flow pathways: N-S from the Hermon Mountains and from the Ajlun Dome, and E-W from Jebel al Arab Mountain in Syria (also known as Huran Plateau or Yarmouk drainage basin). As a result, several springs can be found within the gorge. These are characterized by widespread temperatures (20 - 60 °C) which indicate that, beside the complex regional flow, also ascending thermal waters control the hydrologic behavior of the LYG. Previous simulations based on a conceptual simplified 3D model (Magri et al., 2016) showed that crossing flow paths result from the coexistence of convection, that can develop for example along NE-SW oriented faults within the gorge or in permeable aquifers below Maastrichtian aquiclude, and additional flow fields that are induced by the N-S topographic gradients. Here we present the first 3D hydrogeological model of the entire LYG that includes structural features based on actual logs and interpreted seismic lines from both Israeli and Jordanian territories. The model distinguishes seven units from upper Eocene to the Lower Triassic, accounting for major aquifers, aquicludes and deep-cutting faults. Recharges are implemented based on the numerical representation developed by Shentsis (1990) that considers relationships between mean annual rain and topographic elevation. The model reveals that topography-driven N-S and E-W flows strongly control

  16. Italy the hydrogeological risk is growing; Belpaese, cresce il rischio idrogeologico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aligi Pasquare' , F. [ANPA, Dipt. Strategie Integrate, Promozione, Comunicazione, Rome (Italy)

    2000-12-01

    More and more urgent, especially of late, is the need to plan nationwide, integrated strategy to prevent and control hydrogeological crises. And great efforts have been made in this direction by the National Environmental Protection Agency (ANPA) which, starting in 1998 (year of the so-called Sarno law) tasked itself with reducing and preventing the hydrogeological risk by monitoring the structural works defending the soil. However, there are still too many dramatic events in Italy due, indeed, to exceptional rainfalls but at times also to problems in the hydraulic and zoning systems of the afflicted areas, to incorrect occupation of the land or to a lack of protective work. Making fundamental the technical and scientific support that the ANPA-ARPA system offers in this context to national, regional and local authorities. [Italian] Si fa sempre piu' pressante, soprattutto negli ultimi tempi, la necessita' di pianificare strategie integrate di intervento sul territorio per la prevenzione e il controllo delle crisi idrogeologiche. E grande e' l'impegno dimostrato in questo senso dall'Agenzia Nazionale per la Protezione dell'Ambiente che, a partire dal 1998, anno della cosidetta Legge Sarno, si e' assunta il compito di ridurre e prevenire il rischio idrogeologico attraverso il monitoraggio delle opere strutturali di difesa del suolo. Si contano purtroppo pero' ancora troppi eventi drammatici nel nostro Paese, dovuti si' alle eccezionali precipitazioni atmosferiche, ma talvolta anche a problemi di sistemazione idraulico-urbanistica nelle aree colpite, alla scorretta occupazione del territorio o alla mancanza di opere di salvaguardia. Risulta quindi fondamentale il supporto tecnico e scientifico che il sistema ANPA-ARPA offre, in questo contesto, alle Autorita' nazionali, regionali e locali.

  17. Groundwater development effects on different scale hydrogeological systems using head, hydrochemical and isotopic data and implications for water resources management: The Selva basin (NE Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folch, A.; Menció, A.; Puig, R.; Soler, A.; Mas-Pla, J.

    2011-06-01

    SummaryHydrogeological resources in regional, large-scale groundwater systems are conditioned by their specific geological setting, which defines their capacity to supply human demand and their potential to recover from human-induced stress factors such as water withdrawal. In this paper, the hydrogeology of a range-and-basin hydrogeological system is described, based on potentiometric, hydrochemical and isotopic data, in order to fulfill a twofold objective: to characterize the alteration brought about in the hydrogeological system by intensive groundwater withdrawal, where tectonic elements such as fault zones play a significant role in the flow behaviour, and to define groundwater hydrodynamics under current human pressures as a necessary step to achieve appropriate groundwater management. Hydraulic head data indicate the relationships between geological formations in the range areas and the sedimentary infill of the basin. In this set-up, fault zones and a fracture network have a direct effect on the recharge, and allow upward vertical flow from the basement to the sedimentary aquifers. Hydrochemical and isotopic data support this observation. The use of fluoride and nitrate as tracers for the contribution of deep and shallow flow systems provides a detailed portrait of the effects of pumping on the flow path distribution. Isotopic data depict seasonal trends in the water captured by wells. In this connection, we can differentiate between two distinct flow systems: a regional, large-scale, longer residence time system, originating in the surrounding ranges, and a local flow system constituted by infiltration in the lower areas of the basin. The two systems, with specific water qualities, contribute differently to the resources that are withdrawn, and their specific contributions, in the frame of the basin water budget, determine the potential for present sustainable water exploitation.

  18. Problems of hydrogeology and engineering geology in black coal mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sztelak, J.

    1989-03-01

    Reviews topics discussed in 11 papers presented at the conference in the hydrogeology and engineering geology session. Three subgroups of topics were distinguished: environmental protection, surface waters and surface protection. One paper dealt with protection of a bath peat deposit from infiltration of saline mine waters from a settling pond. Other papers considered mine water recirculation, dumping slurries in rock body by injection through boreholes, hydrogeological damage caused to surface waters by mining operations, water bearing levels at 700-1,500 m depth, content of radioactive isotopes (uranium 234 and 238) in Carboniferous waters, draining water from the Jurassic water bearing level in the Lublin coal basin, rock burst criteria and forecasting, and slope stability.

  19. Application of GIS in hydrogeology and engineering geology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Mihalová

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogeology as a specific science discipline has a multi spectral interest focused to officiating sources in drink water and utilization water and also in area aimed for pure mineral water sources. Although engineering geology works exercise with piece of knowledge, geosciences are focused to territorial planning, investment construction and protection environment. Application of GIS in appointed problems purvey possibility quality, quick and high special analysis appointed problems and take advantage all accessible quality and quantity related information of water focused to hydrogeology, as to occurrence varied basement soil, appropriate for building activity, possibly appointed for protection. Solution of this probleme is on first name terms definite interest area, as to adjudication sources focused economic significance state.

  20. Hydrogeology and predevelopment flow in the Texas Gulf Coast aquifer systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, Paul D.

    1988-01-01

    A multilayered ground-water flow system exists in the Coastal Plain sediments of Texas. The Tertiary and Quaternary clastic deposits have an area! extent of 128,000 square miles onshore and in the Gulf of Mexico. Two distinct aquifer systems are recognized for the sediments, which range in thickness from a few feet to more than 12,000 feet. The older system the Texas coastal uplands aquifer system consists of four aquifers and two confining units in the Wilcox and Claiborne Groups. It is bounded from below by the practically impermeable Midway confining unit or by the top of the geopressured zone. It is bounded from above by the poorly permeable Vicksburg-Jackson confining unit, which separates it from the younger coastal lowlands aquifer system. The coastal lowlands aquifer system consists of five permeable zones and two confining units that range in age from Oligocene to Holocene. The hydrogeologic units of both systems are exposed in bands that parallel the coastline. The units dip and thicken toward the Gulf.

  1. Hydrogeological activity of lineaments in Yaoundé Cameroon region using remote sensing and GIS techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Teikeu Assatse

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Though Yaoundé zone is characterized by abundant rains, access to safe drinking water becomes a difficult activity, because of climate change and pollution caused by human activities. Lineament zones on the earth’s surface are important elements in understanding the dynamics of the subsurface fluid flow. However, good exposures of these features are always lacking in some areas around Yaoundé, characterized by thick alteration. During field surveys these conditions, in many cases, hinder the proper characterization of such features. Therefore, an approach that identifies the regional lineaments on remote-sensing images (Landsat Thematic Mapper and shaded digital terrain models, with its large scale synoptic coverage, could be promising. This paper aims to the structural organization of lineament network in the crystalline basement of Yaoundé from remote sensing data and characterize them by statistical and geostatistical techniques. The results were validated on the basis of the geological maps, the hydrogeological maps and the outcrop data. Statistical analysis of the lineaments network shows a distribution along the N0–10, N20–30, N40–60 and N140–150. The correlation between the productivity of high yield wells and the closest lineament confirms that these lineaments are surface traces of regional discontinuities and act as main groundwater flow paths.

  2. Developing Hydrogeological Site Characterization Strategies based on Human Health Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Barros, F.; Rubin, Y.; Maxwell, R. M.

    2013-12-01

    In order to provide better sustainable groundwater quality management and minimize the impact of contamination in humans, improved understanding and quantification of the interaction between hydrogeological models, geological site information and human health are needed. Considering the joint influence of these components in the overall human health risk assessment and the corresponding sources of uncertainty aid decision makers to better allocate resources in data acquisition campaigns. This is important to (1) achieve remediation goals in a cost-effective manner, (2) protect human health and (3) keep water supplies clean in order to keep with quality standards. Such task is challenging since a full characterization of the subsurface is unfeasible due to financial and technological constraints. In addition, human exposure and physiological response to contamination are subject to uncertainty and variability. Normally, sampling strategies are developed with the goal of reducing uncertainty, but less often they are developed in the context of their impacts on the overall system uncertainty. Therefore, quantifying the impact from each of these components (hydrogeological, behavioral and physiological) in final human health risk prediction can provide guidance for decision makers to best allocate resources towards minimal prediction uncertainty. In this presentation, a multi-component human health risk-based framework is presented which allows decision makers to set priorities through an information entropy-based visualization tool. Results highlight the role of characteristic length-scales characterizing flow and transport in determining data needs within an integrated hydrogeological-health framework. Conditions where uncertainty reduction in human health risk predictions may benefit from better understanding of the health component, as opposed to a more detailed hydrogeological characterization, are also discussed. Finally, results illustrate how different dose

  3. Coastal hydrogeological system of Mar Piccolo (Taranto, Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuffianò, L E; Basso, A; Casarano, D; Dragone, V; Limoni, P P; Romanazzi, A; Santaloia, F; Polemio, M

    2016-07-01

    The Mar Piccolo basin is an internal sea basin located along the Ionian coast (Southern Italy), and it is surrounded primarily by fractured carbonate karstic environment. Because of the karstic features, the main continental water inflow is from groundwater discharge. The Mar Piccolo basin represents a peculiar and sensitive environment and a social emergency because of sea water and sediment pollution. This pollution appears to be caused by the overlapping effects of dangerous anthropogenic activities, including heavy industries and commercial and navy dockyards. The paper aims to define the contribution of subaerial and submarine coastal springs to the hydrological dynamic equilibrium of this internal sea basin. A general approach was defined, including a hydrogeological basin border assessment to detect inflowing springs, detailed geological and hydrogeological conceptualisation, in situ submarine and subaerial spring measurements, and flow numerical modelling. Multiple sources of data were obtained to define a relevant geodatabase, and it contained information on approximately 2000 wells, located in the study area (1600 km(2)). The conceptualisation of the hydrogeological basin, which is 978 km(2) wide, was supported by a 3D geological model that interpolated 716 stratigraphic logs. The variability in hydraulic conductivity was determined using hundreds of pumping tests. Five surveys were performed to acquire hydro-geochemical data and spring flow-yield measurements; the isotope groundwater age was assessed and used for model validation. The mean annual volume exchanged by the hydrogeological basin was assessed equal to 106.93 10(6) m(3). The numerical modelling permitted an assessment of the mean monthly yield of each spring outflow (surveyed or not), travel time, and main path flow.

  4. Preliminary Hydrogeologic Characterization Results from the Wallula Basalt Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B.P. McGrail; E. C. Sullivan; F. A. Spane; D. H. Bacon; G. Hund; P. D. Thorne; C. J. Thompson; S. P. Reidel; F. S. Colwell

    2009-12-01

    The DOE's Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership has completed drilling the first continental flood basalt sequestration pilot borehole to a total depth (TD) of 4,110 feet on the Boise White Paper Mill property at Wallula, Washington. Site suitability was assessed prior to drilling by the 2007-2008 acquisition, processing and analysis of a four-mile, five-line three component seismic swath, which was processed as a single data-dense line. Analysis of the seismic survey data indicated a composite basalt formation thickness of {approx}8,000 feet and absence of major geologic structures (i.e., faults) along the line imaged by the seismic swath. Drilling of Wallula pilot borehole was initiated on January 13, 2009 and reached TD on April 6, 2009. Based on characterization results obtained during drilling, three basalt breccia zones were identified between the depth interval of 2,716 and 2,910 feet, as being suitable injection reservoir for a subsequent CO2 injection pilot study. The targeted injection reservoir lies stratigraphically below the massive Umtanum Member of the Grande Ronde Basalt, whose flow-interior section possesses regionally recognized low-permeability characteristics. The identified composite injection zone reservoir provides a unique and attractive opportunity to scientifically study the reservoir behavior of three inter-connected reservoir intervals below primary and secondary caprock confining zones. Drill cuttings, wireline geophysical logs, and 31one-inch diameter rotary sidewall cores provided geologic data for characterization of rock properties. XRF analyses of selected rock samples provided geochemical characterizations of the rocks and stratigraphic control for the basalt flows encountered by the Wallula pilot borehole. Based on the geochemical results, the pilot borehole was terminated in the Wapshilla Ridge 1 flow of the Grande Ronde Basalt Formation. Detailed hydrologic test characterizations of 12 basalt interflow

  5. Reconnaissance of the Hydrogeology of Ta'u, American Samoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izuka, Scot K.

    2005-01-01

    Analysis of existing data and information collected on a reconnaissance field visit supports a conceptual model of ground-water occurrence in Ta'u, American Samoa, in which a thin freshwater lens exists in a predominantly high-permeability aquifer that receives high rates of recharge. Because the freshwater lens is thin throughout most of the island, the productivity of wells, especially those near the coast where the lens is the thinnest, is likely to be limited by saltwater intrusion. The landfill in northwestern Ta'u is closer to the north coast of the island than to any of the existing or proposed well sites. Although this may indicate that ground water beneath the landfill would flow away from the existing and proposed well sites, this interpretation may change depending on the hydraulic properties of a fault and rift zone in the area. Of four plausible scenarios tested with a numerical ground-water flow model, only one scenario indicated that ground water from beneath the landfill would flow toward the existing and proposed well sites; the analysis does not, however, assess which of the four scenarios is most plausible. The analysis also does not consider the change in flow paths that will result from ground-water withdrawals, dispersion of contaminants during transport by ground water, other plausible hydrogeologic scenarios, transport of contaminants by surface-water flow, or that sources of contamination other than the landfill may exist. Accuracy of the hydrologic interpretations in this study is limited by the relatively sparse data available for Ta'u. Understanding water resources on Ta'u can be advanced by monitoring rainfall, stream-flow, evaporation, ground-water withdrawals, and water quality, and with accurate surveys of measuring point elevations for all wells and careful testing of well-performance. Assessing the potential for contaminants in the landfill to reach existing and proposed well sites can be improved with additional information on the

  6. Hydrogeologic and Hydraulic Characterization of the Surficial Aquifer System, and Origin of High Salinity Groundwater, Palm Beach County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Ronald S.; Wacker, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies of the hydrogeology of the surficial aquifer system in Palm Beach County, Florida, have focused mostly on the eastern one-half to one-third of the county in the more densely populated coastal areas. These studies have not placed the hydrogeology in a framework in which stratigraphic units in this complex aquifer system are defined and correlated between wells. Interest in the surficial aquifer system has increased because of population growth, westward expansion of urbanized areas, and increased utilization of surface-water resources in the central and western areas of the county. In 2004, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the South Florida Water Management District, initiated an investigation to delineate the hydrogeologic framework of the surficial aquifer system in Palm Beach County, based on a lithostratigraphic framework, and to evaluate hydraulic properties and characteristics of units and permeable zones within this framework. A lithostratigraphic framework was delineated by correlating markers between all wells with data available based primarily on borehole natural gamma-ray geophysical log signatures and secondarily, lithologic characteristics. These correlation markers approximately correspond to important lithostratigraphic unit boundaries. Using the markers as guides to their boundaries, the surficial aquifer system was divided into three main permeable zones or subaquifers, which are designated, from shallowest to deepest, zones 1, 2, and 3. Zone 1 is above the Tamiami Formation in the Anastasia and Fort Thompson Formations. Zone 2 primarily is in the upper part or Pinecrest Sand Member of the Tamiami Formation, and zone 3 is in the Ochopee Limestone Member of the Tamiami Formation or its correlative equivalent. Differences in the lithologic character exist between these three zones, and these differences commonly include differences in the nature of the pore space. Zone 1 attains its greatest thickness (50 feet or more

  7. The effect of subsurface military detonations on vadose zone hydraulic conductivity, contaminant transport and aquifer recharge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lewis, J.; Burman, J.; Edlund, C.; Simonsson, L.; Berglind, R.; Leffler, P.; Qvarfort, U.; Thiboutot, S.; Ampleman, G.; Meuken, D.; Duvalois, W.; Martel, R.; Sjöström, J.

    2013-01-01

    Live fire military training involves the detonation of explosive warheads on training ranges. The purpose of this experiment is to evaluate the hydrogeological changes to the vadose zone caused by military training with high explosive ammunition. In particular, this study investigates artillery ammu

  8. Hydrogeology of the Helena Valley-fill aquifer system, west-central Montana. Water resources investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briar, D.W.; Madison, J.P.

    1992-01-01

    The report, which presents the study results, describes the hydrogeology of the valley-fill aquifer system. Specific objectives were to: describe the geometry and the hydraulic characteristics of the aquifer system; define the potentiometric surface and the direction of ground-water flow; locate and quantify sources of ground-water recharge and discharge including surface- and ground-water interactions; and characterize the water quality in terms of susceptibility of the aquifer system to contamination and in terms of concentrations, distribution, and sources of major ions, trace elements, and organic compounds. The results of the study will be useful to the development of a comprehensive management program for the use and protection of the ground-water resources of the Helena Valley.

  9. Modelling of future hydrogeological conditions at SFR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmen, L.G.; Stigsson, M. [Golder Associates, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2001-03-01

    The purpose is to estimate the future groundwater movements at the SFR repository and to produce input to the quantitative safety assessment of the SFR. The future flow pattern of the groundwater is of interest, since components of the waste emplaced in a closed and abandoned repository will dissolve in the groundwater and be transported by the groundwater to the ground surface. The study is based on a system analysis approach. Three-dimensional models were devised of the studied domain. The models include the repository tunnels and the surrounding rock mass with fracture zones. The formal models used for simulation of the groundwater flow are three-dimensional mathematical descriptions of the studied hydraulic system. The studied domain is represented on four scales - regional, local, semi local and detailed - forming four models with different resolutions: regional, local, semi local and detailed models. The local and detailed models include a detailed description of the tunnel system at SFR and of surrounding rock mass and fracture zones. In addition, the detailed model includes description of the different structures that take place inside the deposition tunnels. At the area studied, the shoreline will retreat due to the shore level displacement; this process is included in the models. The studied period starts at 2000 AD and continues until a steady state like situation is reached for the surroundings of the SFR at ca 6000 AD. The models predict that as long as the sea covers the ground above the SFR, the regional groundwater flow as well as the flow in the deposition tunnels are small. However, due to the shore level displacement the shoreline (the sea) will retreat. Because of the retreating shoreline, the general direction of the groundwater flow at SFR will change, from vertical upward to a more horizontal flow; the size of the groundwater flow will be increased as well. The present layout of the SFR includes five deposition tunnels: SILO, BMA, BLA, BTF1

  10. 青松井田水文地质特征分析%Hydrogeological condition analysis of Qingsong minefield

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾芳

    2015-01-01

    介绍了青松井田的概况,结合断层带、矿井的水文地质特征分析,对矿井的充水因素进行了论述,认为矿区的主要充水水源为新生界松散层第四系及古滑坡孔隙水、二叠系煤系地层砂岩裂隙水、采空区老窑积水,充水通道主要为断层破碎带和采矿冒落裂隙带。由于峨眉山玄武岩的阻隔,茅口组灰岩强含水层对矿井开采没有影响。矿床属裂隙充水为主、水文地质条件中等的矿床。%This paper introduced the general circumstance of Qingsong minefield, combining with hydrogeological feature analysis of faulted zone and mine, mine water filling factors had been discussed, Cenozoic loose bed Quaternary, ancient landslide pore water, Permian coal-bearing strata sandstone fissure water and mine worked-out area gob water are the main water filling sources, the main water filling channels mainly are the shattered fault zones and mining caving fracturation zones.Because the obstructing of Mountain Emei basalt, there is no impact on mining from strong Maokou Formation aquifer.The mineral deposit belongs to mainly fissure water filling and moderate hydrogeological condition mineral deposit.

  11. Hydrogeology and hydrologic conditions of the Ozark Plateaus aquifer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Phillip D.; Knierim, Katherine J.; Breaker, Brian K.; Westerman, Drew A.; Clark, Brian R.

    2016-11-23

    The hydrogeology and hydrologic characteristics of the Ozark Plateaus aquifer system were characterized as part of ongoing U.S. Geological Survey efforts to assess groundwater availability across the Nation. The need for such a study in the Ozark Plateaus physiographic province (Ozark Plateaus) is highlighted by increasing demand on groundwater resources by the 5.3 million people of the Ozark Plateaus, water-level declines in some areas, and potential impacts of climate change on groundwater availability. The subject study integrates knowledge gained through local investigation within a regional perspective to develop a regional conceptual model of groundwater flow in the Ozark Plateaus aquifer system (Ozark system), a key phase of groundwater availability assessment. The Ozark system extends across much of southern Missouri and northwestern and north-central Arkansas and smaller areas of southeastern Kansas and northeastern Oklahoma. The region is one of the major karst landscapes in the United States, and karst aquifers are predominant in the Ozark system. Groundwater flow is ultimately controlled by aquifer and confining unit lithologies and stratigraphic relations, geologic structure, karst development, and the character of surficial lithologies and regolith mantle. The regolith mantle is a defining element of Ozark Plateaus karst, affecting recharge, karst development, and vulnerability to surface-derived contaminants. Karst development is more advanced—as evidenced by larger springs, hydraulic characteristics, and higher well yields—in the Salem Plateau and in the northern part of the Springfield Plateau (generally north of the Arkansas-Missouri border) as compared with the southern part of the Springfield Plateau in Arkansas, largely due to thinner, less extensive regolith and purer carbonate lithology.Precipitation is the ultimate source of all water to the Ozark system, and the hydrologic budget for the Ozark system includes inputs from recharge

  12. Hydrogeologic processes in saline systems: Playas, sabkhas, and saline lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yechieli, Y.; Wood, W.W.

    2002-01-01

    Pans, playas, sabkhas, salinas, saline lakes, and salt flats are hydrologically similar, varying only in their boundary conditions. Thus, in evaluating geochemical processes in these systems, a generic water and solute mass-balance approach can be utilized. A conceptual model of a coastal sabkha near the Arabian Gulf is used as an example to illustrate the various water and solute fluxes. Analysis of this model suggests that upward flux of ground water from underlying formations could be a major source of solutes in the sabkha, but contribute only a small volume of the water. Local rainfall is the main source of water in the modeled sabkha system with a surprisingly large recharge-to-rainfall ratio of more than 50%. The contribution of seawater to the solute budget depends on the ratio of the width of the supratidal zone to the total width and is generally confined to a narrow zone near the shoreline of a typical coastal sabkha. Because of a short residence time of water, steady-state flow is expected within a short time (50,000 years). The solute composition of the brine in a closed saline system depends largely on the original composition of the input water. The high total ion content in the brine limits the efficiency of water-rock interaction and absorption. Because most natural systems are hydrologically open, the chemistry of the brines and the associated evaporite deposits may be significantly different than that predicted for hydrologically closed systems. Seasonal changes in temperature of the unsaturated zone cause precipitation of minerals in saline systems undergoing evaporation. Thus, during the hot dry season months, minerals exhibit retrograde solubility so that gypsum, anhydrite and calcite precipitate. Evaporation near the surface is also a major process that causes mineral precipitation in the upper portion of the unsaturated zone (e.g. halite and carnallite), provided that the relative humidity of the atmosphere is less than the activity of water

  13. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Hydrogeological field studies. Final Report - Volume 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, S.N. [Univ of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona (United States). Dept of Hydrology and Water Resources; Marley, R.D. [D.B. Stephens and Associates Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Norris, J.R. [Hydro Geo Chem Inc., Tucson, Arizona (United States)

    1992-12-31

    The hydrogeology of the Koongarra site was interpreted primarily from long-term hydrographs, water-level maps, water injection tests, aquifer pumping tests, logs of boreholes, and chemical analyses of groundwater samples. Data have been collected over a 21-year period starting with test-drilling in 1970. The first intensive period of hydrogeologic investigations was from 1978 through 1981 and was related to anticipated exploitation of uranium ore at Koongarra. The second period was from 1986 through 1991 and was related to the international Alligator Rivers Analogue Project under the direction of the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation. The conclusion which can be drawn from the chemical data is that water moving out of the No. 1 ore deposit is diluted rapidly with recharge from the surface as it migrates down the hydraulic gradient. Most of the groundwater outside of the ore deposit does not originate from the ore deposit, and flow models which assume unmodified stream tubes extending out of the ore deposit in a downgradient direction do not reflect the true system. Water in the ore deposit itself, must come from slow upward seepage through the fault zone. Owing to the fact that this water must be at least hundreds of years old, observed fluctuations of water levels in the deposit must reflect pressure head variations induced by seasonal recharge to the overlying surficial materials. Water level fluctuations do not signify a yearly displacement of water deep in the system. Water in the deeper part of the ore must be almost static compared to obvious rapid groundwater circulation in the area around PH88. Small changes in pH, temperature and specific electrical conductivity during aquifer tests indicate a complex hydraulic system which has a variable response to pumping as a function of time. Low concentration in tritium and Carbon-14 together with high concentrations of dissolved helium in the groundwaters all suggested strongly that semi static

  14. Characterizing and Modelling Preferential Flow Path in Fractured Rock Aquifer: A Case Study at Shuangliou Fractured Rock Hydrogeology Research Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Shih-Meng; Ke, Chien-Chung; Lo, Hung-Chieh; Lin, Yen-Tsu; Huang, Chi-Chao

    2016-04-01

    On the basis of a relatively sparse data set, fractured aquifers are difficult to be characterized and modelled. The three-dimensional configuration of transmissive fractures and fracture zones is needed to be understood flow heterogeneity in the aquifer. Innovative technologies for the improved interpretation are necessary to facilitate the development of accurate predictive models of ground-water flow and solute transport or to precisely estimate groundwater potential. To this end, this paper presents a procedure for characterizing and modelling preferential flow path in the fractured rock aquifer carried out at Fractured Rock Hydrogeology Research Site in Shuangliou Forest Recreation Area, Pingtung County, Southern Taiwan. The Shuangliou well field is a 40 by 30-meter area consisting of 6 wells (one geological well, one pumping well and four hydrogeological testing wells). The bedrock at the site is mainly composed of slate and intercalated by meta-sandstone. The overburden consists of about 5.6 m of gravel deposits. Based on results of 100 m geological borehole with borehole televiewer logging, vertical flow logging and full-wave sonic logging, high transmissivity zones in the bedrock underlying the well field were identified. One of transmissivity zone (at the depths of 30~32 m) and its fracture orientation(N56/54) selected for devising a multiple well system with 4 boreholes (borehole depths :45m, 35m, 35m and 25m, respectively), which were utilized to perform cross-borehole flow velocity data under the ambient flow and pumped flow conditions to identify preferential flow paths. Results from the cross-borehole test show the preferential flow pathways are corresponding to the predicted ones. Subsequently, a 3-D discrete fracture network model based on outcrop data was generated by the FracMan code. A validation between observed and simulated data has proved that the present model can accurately predict the hydrogeological properties (e.g., number of fractures

  15. Hydrogeological investigation of shallow aquifers in an arid data-scarce coastal region (El Daba'a, northwestern Egypt)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousif, Mohamed; van Geldern, Robert; Bubenzer, Olaf

    2016-02-01

    Hydrogeological investigations in arid regions are particularly important to support sustainable development. The study area, El Daba'a in northwestern Egypt, faces scarce water resources as a result of reported climate change that particularly affects the southern Mediterranean coast and increases stress on the local groundwater reserves. This change in climate affects the area in terms of drought, over-pumping and unregulated exploration of groundwater for irrigation purposes. The hydrogeological investigation is based on a multidisciplinary data-layer analysis that includes geomorphology, geology, slope, drainage lines, soil type, structural lineaments, subsurface data, stable isotopes, and chemical analyses. The study area contains Pleistocene and middle Miocene marine limestone aquifers. Based on lithology and microfacies analysis, the middle Miocene aquifer is subdivided into two water-bearing zones. The area is affected by sets of faults and anticline folds, and these structures are associated with fractures and joints that increase permeability and facilitate the recharge of groundwater. Stable isotope data indicate that groundwater of both the Pleistocene and middle Miocene aquifers is recharged by modern precipitation. The high salinity values observed in some groundwater wells that tap both aquifers could be attributed to leaching and dissolution processes of marine salts from the aquifers' marine limestone matrix. In addition, human activities can also contribute to an increase in groundwater salinity. A future water exploration strategy, based on the results from the multidisciplinary data-layer analysis, is proposed for the area. The derived scientific approach is transferable to other arid coastal areas with comparable conditions.

  16. Hydrogeological characterization of the Nador Plio-Quaternary aquifer, Tipaza (Algeria); Caracterizacion hidrogeologica del acuifero pliocuaternario de Nador, Tipaza (Argelia)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouderbala, A.; Remini, B.; Pulido-Bosch, A.

    2014-06-01

    This paper focuses on the hydrogeological and hydrochemical knowledge of the Nador Plio-Quaternary aquifer in Tipaza, situated along the Algerian coastline. It includes the identification of the hydrodynamic aquifer, hydrogeological and piezometric characteristics and, finally, an overview of the hydro-geochemistry of the area. We carried out this study between 2008 and 2013, with piezometric and hydrochemical monitoring of 24 wells in the study area. The physicochemical analysis of water shows that 25 % of the wells in the coastal zone have values of electrical conductivity greater than 3000 μS/cm The Mg{sup 2}+/Ca{sup 2}+ ratio is also higher than one and there are sodium chloride facies due to the mix of freshwater with seawater exceeding 10 % in some places. However, the comparison of the salinity of the groundwater during the period 2008-2013 with 1988-2004 indicates that there is a low dilution due to the reduction of pumping in the aquifer after the construction of the Boukourdane dam. There has also been a more rainy period and a possible return flow from irrigation in the area. (Author)

  17. Extracting Hydrogeology from Heliborne Dual Moment Transient Electromagnetic Investigations in Geologically Divergent Terrenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, S.; Chandra, S.; Auken, E.; Verma, S. K.

    2015-12-01

    Comprehensive knowledge of aquifer system is an important requisite for its effective management in India. Geological formations are complex and variable, punctual and scarce information are not adequate to understand, asses and manage them. Continuous data acquisition, their interpretation and integration with available geological/geophysical information is the solution. Heliborne dual moment transient electromagnetic (HeliTEM) and magnetic (HeliMAG) measurements have been carried out in divergent geological terrenes in India comprising Gangetic alluvium, Tertiary sediments underlying the Thar desert, Deccan basalts and Gondwana sediments, weathered and fractured granite gneisses and schists and the coastal alluvium with Tertiary sediments. The survey was carried out using state of the art equipment SkyTEM. The paper presents a synopsis of the results of the HeliTEM surveys that have helped in obtaining continuous information on the geoelectrical nature of sub-surface. HeliTEM data were supported by a number of ground geophysical surveys. The results provide the 3D subsurface structures controlling the groundwater conditions, the regional continuity of probable aquifers, the variations in lithological character and the quality of water in terms of salinity. Specialized features pertaining to hydrogeological characteristics obtained from this study are as follows: A clear delineation of clay beds and their spatial distribution providing the multi-layered aquifer setup in the Gangetic plains. Delineation of low resistivity zones in the quartzite below the over exploited aquifers indicating the possibility of new aquifers. Presence of freshwater zones underneath the saline water aquifers in the thick and dry sands in deserts. Clear demarcation of different lava flows, mapping the structural controls and highly porous zones in the contact of basalts and Gondwanas. A complete and continuous mapping of weathered zone in crystalline hard rock areas providing information

  18. Estimation of regional hydrogeological properties for use in a hydrologic model of the Chesapeake Bay watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seck, A.; Welty, C.

    2012-12-01

    Characterization of subsurface hydrogeologic properties in three dimensions and at large scales for use in groundwater flow models can remain a challenge owing to the lack of regional data sets and scatter in coverage, type, and format of existing small-scale data sets. This is the case for the Chesapeake Bay watershed, where numerous studies have been carried out to quantify groundwater processes at small scales but limited information is available on subsurface characteristics and groundwater fluxes at regional scales. One goal of this work is to synthesize disparate information on subsurface properties for the Chesapeake Bay watershed for use in a 3D integrated ParFlow model over an area of 400,000 km2 with a horizontal resolution of 1 km and a vertical resolution of 5 m. We combined different types of data at various scales to characterize hydrostratigraphy and hydrogeological properties. The conceptual hydrogeologic model of the study area is composed of two major regions. One region extends from the Valley and Ridge physiographic province south of New York to the Piedmont physiographic province in Maryland and Virginia. This region is generally characterized by fractured rock overlain by a mantle of regolith. Soil thickness and hydraulic conductivity values were obtained from the U.S. General Soil Map (STATSGO2). Saprolite thickness was evaluated using casing depth information from well completion reports from four state agencies. Geostatistical methods were used to generalize point data to the model extent and resolution. A three-dimensional hydraulic conductivity field for fractured bedrock was estimated using a published national map of permeability and depth- varying functions from literature. The Coastal Plain of Maryland, Virginia, Delaware and New Jersey constitutes the second region and is characterized by layered sediments. In this region, the geometry of 20 aquifers and confining units was constructed using interpolation of published contour maps of

  19. Improving the consideration of hydrogeological characteristics to assess the contamination groundwater by pesticides at national scale (France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auterives, Chrystelle; Baran, Nicole; Surdyk, Nicolas

    2017-04-01

    According to the European Water Framework Directive, Member States have to conduct study of anthropogenic pressure and its impact on the status of water bodies, and to implement programs of measures in order to reverse any significant and sustained upward trend in the concentration of any pollutant. Focused on pesticides in groundwater, the aim of this work is to propose new tools to the stakeholders to identifying groundwater bodies presenting a risk of not achieving « good chemical status ». Several parameters control the transfer of a pesticide from the soil to the groundwater: climate conditions (i.e. recharge), soil and hydrogeological characteristics, pesticides physico-chemical properties. The issues of this study are (1) to take account of hydrogeology context, besides soil and pesticide physico-chemical properties relatively well studied as in registration procedure; (2) to work at national scale which involve to consider variability of land uses and practices, (hydro)geology and climate conditions. To overcome difficulties, this study proposes to identify, when data make it possible, the main driver (hydrogeology or pesticides properties) which explains transfer of pesticides into groundwater at the water body scale. This aspect is particularly innovative as, to date, hydrogeology contexts are usually not considered. Thus, for instance, timeframe of transfer in the unsaturated zone is also considered. Despite work being performed for several substances with contrasted physico-chemical properties, the outcome will be a classification of substances in different groups according to their chemical properties and their potential occurrence in groundwater. The work is based on existing data only. From French databases, BNVD (French national database of the sales of pesticides) and ADES (national French data base on groundwater resources gathering), we are able to link pesticides use and groundwater impact. As a first step, several specific pesticides were

  20. Hydrogeologic controls imposed by mechanical stratigraphy in layered rocks of the Chateauguay River Basin, a U.S.-Canada transborder aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Roger H.; Godin, Rejean; Nastev, Miroslav; Rouleau, Alain

    2007-01-01

    [1] The Châteauguay River Basin delineates a transborder watershed with roughly half of its surface area located in northern New York State and half in southern Québec Province, Canada. As part of a multidisciplinary study designed to characterize the hydrogeologic properties of this basin, geophysical logs were obtained in 12 wells strategically located to penetrate the four major sedimentary rock formations that constitute the regional aquifers. The layered rocks were classified according to their elastic properties into three primary units: soft sandstone, hard sandstone, and dolostone. Downhole measurements were analyzed to identify fracture patterns associated with each unit and to evaluate their role in controlling groundwater flow. Fracture networks are composed of orthogonal sets of laterally extensive, subhorizontal bedding plane partings and bed-delimited, subvertical joints with spacings that are consistent with rock mechanics principles and stress models. The vertical distribution of transmissive zones is confined to a few select bedding plane fractures, with soft sandstone having the fewest (one per 70-m depth) and hard sandstone the most (five per 70-m depth). Bed-normal permeability is examined using a probabilistic model that considers the lengths of flow paths winding along joints and bedding plane fractures. Soft sandstone has the smallest bed-normal permeability primarily because of its wide, geomechanically undersaturated joint spacing. Results indicate that the three formations have similar values of bulk transmissivity, within roughly an order of magnitude, but that each rock unit has its own unique system of groundwater flow paths that constitute that transmissivity.

  1. Hydrogeological modeling for improving groundwater monitoring network and strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Jay Krishna

    2016-09-01

    The research aimed to investigate a new approach for spatiotemporal groundwater monitoring network optimization using hydrogeological modeling to improve monitoring strategies. Unmonitored concentrations were incorporated at different potential monitoring locations into the groundwater monitoring optimization method. The proposed method was applied in the contaminated megasite, Bitterfeld/Wolfen, Germany. Based on an existing 3-D geological model, 3-D groundwater flow was obtained from flow velocity simulation using initial and boundary conditions. The 3-D groundwater transport model was used to simulate transport of α-HCH with an initial ideal concentration of 100 mg/L injected at various hydrogeological layers in the model. Particle tracking for contaminant and groundwater flow velocity realizations were made. The spatial optimization result suggested that 30 out of 462 wells in the Quaternary aquifer (6.49 %) and 14 out of 357 wells in the Tertiary aquifer (3.92 %) were redundant. With a gradual increase in the width of the particle track path line, from 0 to 100 m, the number of redundant wells remarkably increased, in both aquifers. The results of temporal optimization showed different sampling frequencies for monitoring wells. The groundwater and contaminant flow direction resulting from particle tracks obtained from hydrogeological modeling was verified by the variogram modeling through α-HCH data from 2003 to 2009. Groundwater monitoring strategies can be substantially improved by removing the existing spatio-temporal redundancy as well as incorporating unmonitored network along with sampling at recommended interval of time. However, the use of this model-based method is only recommended in the areas along with site-specific experts' knowledge.

  2. Geologic history and hydrogeologic units of intermontane basins of the northern Rocky Mountains, Montana and Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuck, L.K.; Briar, David W.; Clark, David W.

    1996-01-01

    The Regional Aquifer-System Analysis (RASA) program is a series of studies by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to analyze regional ground-water systems that compose a major portion of the Nation’s water supply (Sun, 1986). The Northern Rocky Mountains Intermontane Basins is one of the study regions in this national program. The main objectives of the RASA studies are to: (1) describe the ground-water systems as they exist today, (2) analyze the known changes that have led to the system's present condition, (3) combine results of previous studies in a regional analysis, where possible, and (4) provide means by which effects of future ground-water development can be estimated.The purpose of this study, which began in 1990, was to increase understanding of the hydrogeology of the intermontane basins of the Northern Rocky Mountains area. This report is Chapter Cofa three-part series and describes the quality of ground-water and surface water in the study area. Chapter A (Tück and others, 1996) describes the geologic history and generalized hydrogeologic units. Chapter B (Briar and others, 1996) describes the general distribution of ground-watcrlcwels in basin-fill deposits,Water-quality data illustrated in this report represent the distribution of concentrations and composition of dissolved solids in ground-water and surface water in the intermontane areas. The chemistry of ground and surface water in the intermontane areas is influenced by the chemical and physical nature of the rocks in the basin deposits of the valleys and surrounding bedrock in the mountains.

  3. Hydrogeologic unit map of the Piedmont and Blue Ridge provinces of North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Charles C.; Payne, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    The numerous geologic formations and rock types in the Piedmont and Blue Ridge provinces of North Carolina have been grouped into 21 hydrogeologic units on the basis of their water-bearing potential as determined from rock origin, composition, and texture. All major classes of rocks--metamorphic, igneous, and sedimentary--are present, although metamorphic rocks are the most abundant. The origin of the hydrogeologic units is indicated by the rock class or subclass (metaigneous, metavolanic, or metasedimentary). The composition of the igneous, metaigneous, and metavolcanic rocks is designated as felsic, intermediate, or mafic except for the addition in the metavolcanic group of epiclastic rocks and compositionally undifferentiated rocks. Composition is the controlling attribute in the classification of the metasedimentary units of gneiss (mafic or felsic), marble, quartzite. The other metasediments are designated primarily on the basis of texture (grain size, degree of metamorphism, and development of foliation). Sedimentary rocks occur in the Piedmont in several downfaulted basins. A computerized data file containing records from more than 6,200 wells was analyzed to determine average well yields in each of the 21 units. The well yields were adjusted to an average well depth of 154 feet and an average diameter of 6 inches, the average of all wells in the data set, to remove the variation in well yield attributed to differences in depth and diameter. Average yields range from a high of 23.6 gallons per minute for schist to a low 11.6 gallons per minute for sedimentary rocks of Triassic age.

  4. Hydrogeology and management of freshwater lenses on atoll islands: Review of current knowledge and research needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Adrian D.; Sharp, Hannah K.; Galvis, Sandra C.; Post, Vincent E. A.; Sinclair, Peter

    2017-08-01

    On atoll islands, fresh groundwater occurs as a buoyant lens-shaped body surrounded by saltwater derived from the sea, forming the main freshwater source for many island communities. A review of the state of knowledge of atoll island groundwater is overdue given their susceptibility to adverse impacts, and the task to address water access and sanitation issues within the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals framework before the year 2030. In this article, we review available literature to summarise the key processes, investigation techniques and management approaches of atoll island groundwater systems. Over fifty years of investigation has led to important advancements in the understanding of atoll hydrogeology, but a paucity of hydrogeological data persists on all but a small number of atoll islands. We find that the combined effects of buoyancy forces, complex geology, tides, episodic ocean events, strong climatic variability and human impacts create highly dynamic fresh groundwater lenses. Methods used to quantify freshwater availability range from simple empirical relationships to three-dimensional density-dependent models. Generic atoll island numerical models have proven popular in trying to unravel the individual factors controlling fresh groundwater lens behaviour. Major challenges face the inhabitants and custodians of atoll island aquifers, with rising anthropogenic stresses compounded by the threats of climate variability and change, sea-level rise, and some atolls already extracting freshwater at or above sustainability limits. We find that the study of atoll groundwater systems remains a critical area for further research effort to address persistent knowledge gaps, which lead to high uncertainties in water security issues for both island residents and surrounding environs.

  5. Hydrogeologic unit flow characterization using transition probability geostatistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Norman L; Walker, Justin R; Carle, Steven F

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a technique for applying the transition probability geostatistics method for stochastic simulation to a MODFLOW model. Transition probability geostatistics has some advantages over traditional indicator kriging methods including a simpler and more intuitive framework for interpreting geologic relationships and the ability to simulate juxtapositional tendencies such as fining upward sequences. The indicator arrays generated by the transition probability simulation are converted to layer elevation and thickness arrays for use with the new Hydrogeologic Unit Flow package in MODFLOW 2000. This makes it possible to preserve complex heterogeneity while using reasonably sized grids and/or grids with nonuniform cell thicknesses.

  6. Mine hydrogeologic conditions prospected by comprehensive geophysical exploration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing, X.; Pu, C. [Feicheng Coal Mining Bureau (China)

    1997-12-01

    Mine water gushing is one of the difficult problems puzzling mine safety. The investigation of the hydrogeological condition of the working face is a prerequisite to control effectively the water hazard and guarantee safe mining. The production practice in Feicheng Mining Bureau proved that the comprehensive geophysical survey in which the DC electrical survey, Rayleigh wave method and transient electromagnetic method are the main means, is a simple, high-speed and effective tool to detect the geological structure, water abundance of aquifer and concealed water flowing structure at the working face and the front of driving end. 1 ref., 3 figs.

  7. Hydrogeology of the Markagunt Plateau, Southwestern Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler, Lawrence E.

    2010-01-01

    The Markagunt Plateau, in southwestern Utah, lies at an altitude of about 9,500 feet and is capped primarily by Quaternary-age basalt that overlies Eocene-age freshwater limestone of the Claron Formation. Over large parts of the Markagunt Plateau, dissolution of the Claron limestone and subsequent collapse of the overlying basalt have produced a terrain characterized by sinkholes as much as 1,000 feet across and 100 feet deep. Numerous large springs discharge from the basalt and underlying limestone on the plateau, including Mammoth Spring, one of the largest springs in Utah, with a discharge that can exceed 300 cubic feet per second. Discharge from Mammoth Spring is from the Claron Formation; however, recharge to the spring largely takes place by both focused and diffuse infiltration through the basalt that caps the limestone. Results of dye tracing to Mammoth Spring indicate that recharge originates largely southwest of the spring outside of the Mammoth Creek watershed, as well as from losing reaches along Mammoth Creek. Maximum groundwater travel time to the spring from dye-tracer tests during the snowmelt runoff period was about 1 week. Specific conductance and water temperature data from the spring show an inverse relation to discharge during snowmelt runoff and rainfall events, also indicating short groundwater residence times. Results of major-ion analyses for samples collected from Mammoth and other springs on the plateau indicate calcium-bicarbonate type water containing low (less than 200 mg/L) dissolved-solids concentrations. Investigations in the Navajo Lake area along the southern margin of the plateau have shown that water losing to sinkholes bifurcates and discharges to both Cascade and Duck Creek Springs, which subsequently flow into the Virgin and Sevier River basins, respectively. Groundwater travel times to these springs, on the basis of dye tracing, were about 8.5 and 53 hours, respectively. Similarly, groundwater travel time from Duck Creek

  8. Traces of geologic and hydrogeologic cross sections used to develop the hydrogeologic framework model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital dataset defines the traces of geologic and hydrogeologic cross sections that were used in the construction of a digital three-dimensional (3D)...

  9. Traces of geologic and hydrogeologic cross sections used to develop the hydrogeologic framework model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital dataset defines the traces of geologic and hydrogeologic cross sections that were used in the construction of a digital three-dimensional (3D)...

  10. Groundwater protection of minimal water supply systems integrating simple hydrogeological information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo-Ilarri, Javier; Rodrigo-Clavero, María Elena

    2016-04-01

    According to the current EU environmental legislation, groundwater protection is one of the key issues to be addressed when new industrial activities have to be authorised. This work shows a simple methodology that could be used by local and environmental authorities in order to analyse the potential risk caused by an industrial spill on a natural environment. The methodology leads to the determination of the protection area around an extraction well system using the information given by: i) a set of local piezometers, ii) the chemical nature of the industrial spill and iii) the hydrogeological parameters of the local aquifer. The exact location of the contaminant source is not needed for the analysis. The flow equation is afterwards solved using a finite-difference approximation scheme under stationary conditions. Finally, the capture zones for different times are computed by a simple upstream advective transport model. Results on the determination of the perimeter protection area definition of a water supply system in the municipality of L'Alcora (Castellón) in Spain are shown.

  11. Regional hydrogeology of the Silurian and Ordovician sedimentary rock underlying Niagara Falls, Ontario, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novakowski, Kentner S.; Lapcevic, Patricia A.

    1988-12-01

    Due to concern over the potential for widespread groundwater contamination in the sedimentary rock underlying the Niagara Falls area, this study was done to investigate the hydrogeology of the Silurian and Ordovician stratigraphy underlying the Upper Niagara River and the Eastern Niagara Peninsula. Seven boreholes (up to 150 m deep) were drilled, instrumented with multiple packer casing, tested for permeability, sampled for inorganic and organic solutes and monitored for hydraulic head to provide data for a conceptual model of regional groundwater flow. Results show that there are at least three distinct groundwater flow regimes in the bedrock. The uppermost regime consists of fracture zones in the Guelph and Lockport Formations, within which hydraulic conductivity, hydraulic head measurements and geochemical analyses indicate active groundwater circulation primarily discharging towards the Niagara Gorge and Escarpment. Underlying the Lockport Formation are an overpressured (high hydraulic head) regime in the Clinton-Upper Cataract-Lower Queenston Formation and an underpressured (low hydraulic head) regime in the Lower Cataract-Upper Queenston Formation. In both regimes, geochemical analyses and permeability measurements indicate very old and saline groundwater which probably has undergone minimal migration since pre-Pleistocene time. The implication based on the study so far, is that potential groundwater contamination below the bottom of the Lockport Formation is probably not significant in the Niagara Falls area except adjacent to the Niagara Gorge where vertical permeability in the lower flow regimes may be enhanced.

  12. Groundwater Capture Zones

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — Source water protection areas are delineated for each groundwater-based public water supply system using available geologic and hydrogeologic information to...

  13. Regional hydrogeological simulations. Numerical modelling using ConnectFlow. Preliminary site description Simpevarp sub area - version 1.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartley, Lee; Hoch, Andrew; Hunter, Fiona; Jackson, Peter [Serco Assurance, Risley (United Kingdom); Marsic, Niko [Kemakta Konsult, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2005-02-01

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) carries out site investigations in two different candidate areas in Sweden with the objective of describing the in situ conditions for a bedrock repository for spent nuclear fuel. The two candidate areas are named Forsmark and Simpevarp. The site characterisation work is divided into two phases, an initial site investigation phase (IPLU) and a complete site investigation phase (KPLU). The results of IPLU are used as a basis for deciding on a subsequent KPLU phase. On the basis of the KPLU investigations a decision is made as to whether detailed characterisation will be performed (including sinking of a shaft).An integrated component in the site characterisation work is the development of site descriptive models. These comprise basic models in three dimensions with an accompanying text description. Central in the modelling work is the geological model which provides the geometrical context in terms of a model of deformation zones and the rock mass between the zones. Using the geological and geometrical description models as a basis, descriptive models for other geo-disciplines (hydrogeology, hydro-geochemistry, rock mechanics, thermal properties and transport properties) will be developed. Great care is taken to arrive at a general consistency in the description of the various models and assessment of uncertainty and possible needs of alternative models.Here, a numerical model is developed on a regional-scale (hundreds of square kilometres) to understand the zone of influence for groundwater flow that effects the Simpevarp area. Transport calculations are then performed by particle tracking from a local-scale release area (tens of square kilometres) to identify potential discharge areas for the site. The transport from the two site-scale release areas (a few square kilometres) at the Simpevarp site and the Laxemar site are also considered more specifically and using greater grid resolution.The main

  14. Evolution of the notion of time in hydrogeology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narasimhan, T. N.

    1986-10-01

    The AGU Hydrology Section sponsored a special session on History and Heritage of Hydrology between 8:30 A.M. and 12 noon on Monday, December 9, 1985, during the Fall Meeting at San Francisco. The session was chaired by T. N. Narasimhan of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (Berkeley, Calif.). The attendance of between 100 and 120 for each talk was indicative of a healthy interest among researchers on matters related to history.The first part of the session focused attention on the theme “The Evolution of the Notion of Time in Hydrogeology.” The last two speakers addressed topics outside of this theme. Simon Ince (University of Arizona, Tucson) presented a historical account of the contributions of 19th century French scientist Barre de Saint-Venant to transient flow of water in open channels. Olaf H. Pfannkuch (University of Minnesota, Minneapolis) presented a historical account of the Cult of Saint Barbara and the mining profession of medieval Europe. The following summary is restricted to an overview of those presentations that dealt with the evolution of the notion of time in hydrogeology.

  15. Flawed processing of airborne EM data affecting hydrogeological interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viezzoli, Andrea; Jørgensen, Flemming; Sørensen, Camilla

    2013-03-01

    Airborne electromagnetics (AEMs) is increasingly being used across the globe as a tool for groundwater and environmental management. Focus is on ensuring the quality of the source data, their processing and modeling, and the integration of results with ancillary information to generate accurate and relevant products. Accurate processing and editing of raw AEM data, the topic of this article, is one of the crucial steps in obtaining quantitative information for groundwater modeling and management. In this article, we examine the consequences that different levels of processing of helicopter transient electromagnetic method data have on the resulting electrical models and subsequently on hydrogeological models. We focus on different approaches used in the industry for processing of the raw data and show how the electrical resistivity-depth models, which is the end "geophysical" product (after data inversion) of an AEM survey, change with different levels of processing of the raw data. We then extend the study to show the impact on some of the hydrogeological parameters or models, which can be derived from the geophysical results. The consequences of improper handling of raw data to groundwater and environmental management can be significant and expensive.

  16. Proceedings of the joint Russian-American hydrogeology seminar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsang, C.F. [ed.] [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Mironenko, V. [ed.] [Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation). Inst. of Environmental Geology; Pozdniakov, S. [ed.] [Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    Hydrogeology research has been very active in both Russia and the US because of the concerns for migration of radioactive and chemical contaminants in soils and geologic formations, as well as for water problems related to mining and other industrial operations. Russian hydrogeologists have developed various analysis and field testing techniques, sometimes in parallel with US counterparts. These Proceedings come out of a Seminar held to bring together a small group (about 15) of active Russian researchers in geologic flow and transport associated with the disposal of radioactive and chemical wastes either on the soils or through deep injection wells, with a corresponding group (about 25) of American hydrogeologists. The meeting was intentionally kept small to enable informal, detailed and in-depth discussions on hydrogeological issues of common interest. Out of this interaction, the authors hope that, firstly, they will have learned from each other and secondly, that research collaborations will be established where there is the opportunity. This proceedings presents the summaries and viewgraphs from the presentations. What cannot be conveyed here is the warm and cooperative atmosphere of these interactions, both inside and outside the formal sessions, which may well lead to future collaborations.

  17. Hydrogeology of the Judith River Formation in southwestern Saskatchewan, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, David; Lypka, Morgan; Ferguson, Grant

    2017-06-01

    The Judith River Formation forms an important regional aquifer in southwestern Saskatchewan, Canada. This aquifer is used for domestic and agricultural purposes in some areas and supports oil and gas production in other areas. As a result, the available data come from a range of sources and integration is required to provide an overview of aquifer characteristics. Here, data from oil and gas databases are combined with data from groundwater resource assessments. Analysis of cores, drill-stem tests and pumping tests provide a good overview of the physical hydrogeology of the Judith River Aquifer. Water chemistry data from oil and gas databases were less helpful in understanding the chemical hydrogeology due contamination of samples and unreliable laboratory analyses. Analytical modeling of past pumping in the aquifer indicates that decreases in hydraulic head exceeding 2 m are possible over distances of 10s of kilometers. Similar decreases in head should be expected for additional large withdrawals of groundwater from the Judith River Aquifer. Long-term groundwater abstraction should be limited by low pumping rates. Higher pumping rates appear to be possible for short-term uses, such as those required by the oil and gas industry.

  18. Forensic analysis of MTBE contamination using basic hydrogeologic concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boving, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    Contamination of groundwater with petroleum hydrocarbons and additives, such as methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), is often linked to the leaking product distribution system of gas stations. In very few cases is it know if and when a leak occurred and how much product was released to the environment. In the absence of direct evidence, a careful analysis of the available data, such as contaminant breakthrough at receptor wells or discrepancies in the product inventory data, may provide evidence about the nature of the release, its timing and magnitude. Using a MTBE contamination site in the formerly glaciated New England region as an example, two possible release scenarios (slow, long-term release vs. spill) were examined. Of the two scenarios, the slow release could be ruled out as the sole source even though there was no direct evidence for a spill. The analysis of hydraulic test results together with chemical data further permitted to estimate when such an undocumented spill might have occurred. Analyses of the data also allowed these results to be compared to that of a prior transport and fate modeling study. Good agreement and consistency for contaminant travel times was confirmed. This forensic analysis demonstrates that applying basic hydrogeologic principles can aide in the reconstruction of contamination events while providing more readily understandable and defendable evidence relative to complex models. Conceptually, the approach described herein is transferable to other sites with similar hydrogeologies.

  19. Unsaturated Zone and Saturated Zone Transport Properties (U0100)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Conca

    2000-12-20

    This Analysis/Model Report (AMR) summarizes transport properties for the lower unsaturated zone hydrogeologic units and the saturated zone at Yucca Mountain and provides a summary of data from the Busted Butte Unsaturated Zone Transport Test (UZTT). The purpose of this report is to summarize the sorption and transport knowledge relevant to flow and transport in the units below Yucca Mountain and to provide backup documentation for the sorption parameters decided upon for each rock type. Because of the complexity of processes such as sorption, and because of the lack of direct data for many conditions that may be relevant for Yucca Mountain, data from systems outside of Yucca Mountain are also included. The data reported in this AMR will be used in Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) calculations and as general scientific support for various Process Model Reports (PMRs) requiring knowledge of the transport properties of different materials. This report provides, but is not limited to, sorption coefficients and other relevant thermodynamic and transport properties for the radioisotopes of concern, especially neptunium (Np), plutonium (Pu), Uranium (U), technetium (Tc), iodine (I), and selenium (Se). The unsaturated-zone (UZ) transport properties in the vitric Calico Hills (CHv) are discussed, as are colloidal transport data based on the Busted Butte UZTT, the saturated tuff, and alluvium. These values were determined through expert elicitation, direct measurements, and data analysis. The transport parameters include information on interactions of the fractures and matrix. In addition, core matrix permeability data from the Busted Butte UZTT are summarized by both percent alteration and dispersion.

  20. Development Strategies of Regional Higher Education in China in the Perspective of the Major Function Oriented Zoning%主体功能区规划下的我国区域高等教育发展战略

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张振

    2014-01-01

    Regional higher education is closely connected with the administrative area and the regional economics,which makes this study more meaningful and more pertinent. The major function oriented zoning not only influences the development of regional economics and society ,but also influences the development of higher education deeply. This article employs the non-zero-sum Game theory to study the issue of development strategies of regional higher education in the perspective of the main functional area planning. In order to realize the mutual benefit and win-win result,building the support and guarantee mechanism,building the co-head and conversation mechanism and building the resource integration and sharing mechanism are needed.%主体功能区规划是一种新的区域发展范式,它使我国的区域高等教育分工更加明晰、合作更加紧密。在主体功能区规划下,非零和博弈理论对我国区域高等教育发展战略的构建具有一定的指导意义。为了实现我国区域高等教育的互利共赢式发展,可建立区域高等教育发展的支撑与保障机制、区域高等教育发展的联席与对话机制、区域高等教育发展的资源整合与共享机制。

  1. Integrated socio-hydrogeological approach to tackle nitrate contamination in groundwater resources. The case of Grombalia Basin (Tunisia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Re, V; Sacchi, E; Kammoun, S; Tringali, C; Trabelsi, R; Zouari, K; Daniele, S

    2017-09-01

    Nitrate contamination still remains one of the main groundwater quality issues in several aquifers worldwide, despite the perduring efforts of the international scientific community to effectively tackle this problem. The classical hydrogeological and isotopic investigations are obviously of paramount importance for the characterization of contaminant sources, but are clearly not sufficient for the correct and long-term protection of groundwater resources. This paper aims at demonstrating the effectiveness of the socio-hydrogeological approach as the best tool to tackle groundwater quality issues, while contributing bridging the gap between science and society. An integrated survey, including land use, hydrochemical (physicochemical parameters and major ions) and isotopic (δ(15)NNO3 and δ(18)ONO3) analyses, coupled to capacity building and participatory activities was carried out to correctly attribute the nitrate origin in groundwater from the Grombalia Basin (North Tunisia), a region where only synthetic fertilizers have been generally identified as the main source of such pollution. Results demonstrates that the basin is characterized by high nitrate concentrations, often exceeding the statutory limits for drinking water, in both the shallow and deep aquifers, whereas sources are associated to both agricultural and urban activities. The public participation of local actors proved to be a fundamental element for the development of the hydrogeological investigation, as it permitted to obtain relevant information to support data interpretation, and eventually guaranteed the correct assessment of contaminant sources in the studied area. In addition, such activity, if adequately transferred to regulators, will ensure the effective adoption of management practices based on the research outcomes and tailored on the real needs of the local population, proving the added value to include it in any integrated investigation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  2. Hydrogeological model of the territory of Kowsar hydraulic project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orekhov Vyacheslav Valentinovich

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical hydrogeology model of the territory of Kowsar Project was created with account for the results of the engineering surveys and hydro geological monitoring, which was conducted in the process of Kowsar Project construction. In order to create the model in the present work a universal computer system Ansys was used, which implements the finite element method and solid modeling technology, allowing to solve the filtration problem with the use of thermal analogy. The three-dimensional geometric model was built with use of the principle “hard body” modeling, which displays the main line of the territory relief, including the created water reservoir, geological structure (anticline Duk and the main lithological complexes developed within the territory. In the limestone mass As here is a zone characterized by water permeability on territory of Kowsar Project, and a layer characterized by seepage feeding, which occurs outside the considered territory. The water reservoir is a source of the change of hydro geological situation. The results of field observations witness, that the levels of underground waters within the area of the main structures reacts almost instantly on the water level change in the water reservoir; the delay period of levels change is not more than 1,5…2,0 weeks at maximum distance from the water reservoir. These particularities of the hydro geological regime allow using the steady-state scheme of the decision of forecast problems. The mass of limestone As, containing the structures of the Kowsar Project, is not homogeneous and anisotropy in its seepage characteristics. The heterogeneity is conditioned by exogenous influence on the mass up to the depth of 100…150 m. The seepage anisotropy of the mass is expressed by the difference of water permeability of the mass along and across the layers for almost one order. The structures of Kowsar Project is presented by a dam, grouting curtain on axis of the dam and

  3. Incorporating Fuzzy Systems Modeling and Possibility Theory in Hydrogeological Uncertainty Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faybishenko, B.

    2008-12-01

    Hydrogeological predictions are subject to numerous uncertainties, including the development of conceptual, mathematical, and numerical models, as well as determination of their parameters. Stochastic simulations of hydrogeological systems and the associated uncertainty analysis are usually based on the assumption that the data characterizing spatial and temporal variations of hydrogeological processes are random, and the output uncertainty is quantified using a probability distribution. However, hydrogeological systems are often characterized by imprecise, vague, inconsistent, incomplete or subjective information. One of the modern approaches to modeling and uncertainty quantification of such systems is based on using a combination of statistical and fuzzy-logic uncertainty analyses. The aims of this presentation are to: (1) present evidence of fuzziness in developing conceptual hydrogeological models, and (2) give examples of the integration of the statistical and fuzzy-logic analyses in modeling and assessing both aleatoric uncertainties (e.g., caused by vagueness in assessing the subsurface system heterogeneities of fractured-porous media) and epistemic uncertainties (e.g., caused by the selection of different simulation models) involved in hydrogeological modeling. The author will discuss several case studies illustrating the application of fuzzy modeling for assessing the water balance and water travel time in unsaturated-saturated media. These examples will include the evaluation of associated uncertainties using the main concepts of possibility theory, a comparison between the uncertainty evaluation using probabilistic and possibility theories, and a transformation of the probabilities into possibilities distributions (and vice versa) for modeling hydrogeological processes.

  4. Importance of Hydrogeological Conditions on Open-loop Geothermal System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, D.; Bae, G.; Kim, S.; Lee, K.

    2013-12-01

    The open-loop geothermal system has been known as an eco-friendly, energy-saving, and cost-efficient alternative for the cooling and heating of buildings with directly using the relatively stable temperature of groundwater. Thus, hydrogeological properties of aquifer, such as hydraulic conductivity and storage, must be important in the system application. The study site is located near Han-river, Korea, and because of the well-developed alluvium it might be a typical site appropriate to this system requiring an amount of groundwater. In this study, the first objective of numerical experiments was to find the best distributions of pumping and injection wells suitable to the hydrogeological conditions of the site for the efficient and sustainable system operation. The aquifer has a gravel layer at 15m depth below the ground surface and the river and the agricultural field, which may be a potential contaminant source, are located at the west and east sides, respectively. Under the general conditions that the regional groundwater flows from the east to the river, the locally reversed well distribution, locating the pumping well at upgradient and the injection well at downgradient of the regional flow, was most sustainable. The gravel layer with high hydraulic conductivity caused a little drawdown despite of an amount of pumping and allowed to stably reinject the used groundwater in all the cases, but it provided a passage transferring the injected heat to the pumping well quickly, particularly in the cases locating the injection well at the upgradient. This thermal interference was more severe in the cases of the short distance between the wells. The high conductive layer is also a reason that the seasonal role conversion of wells for the aquifer thermal energy storage was ineffective in this site. Furthermore, the well distribution vertical to the regional groundwater flow was stable, but not best, and, thus, it may be a good choice in the conditions that the regional

  5. The Greenland Analogue Project (GAP). Literature review of hydrogeology/ hydrogeochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallroth, Thomas; Lokrantz, Hanna; Rimsa, Andrius (Bergab Consulting Geologists, Goeteborg (Sweden))

    2010-09-15

    This report is produced as part of the Greenland Analogue Project (GAP), carried out as a collaboration project with the Canadian Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO), Posiva Oy and the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co (SKB). The overall aim of the project is to improve the current understanding of hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical processes associated with continental-scale glacial periods including with the presence of permafrost and the advance/retreat of ice sheets. The project will focus on studying how an ice sheet affects groundwater flow and water chemistry around a deep geological repository in crystalline bedrock. The Greenland Analogue Project consists of three active sub-projects (A-C) with individual objectives. Field studies are conducted in the Kangerlussuaq region, in central Western Greenland. Sub-projects A and B collectively aim at improving the understanding of ice sheet hydrology by combining investigations on surface water processes with ice sheet drilling and instrumentation. In sub-project C, the penetration of glacial melt water into the bedrock, groundwater flow and the chemical composition of water will be studied. Main planned activities in sub-project C include drilling of a deep borehole in front of the ice sheet, in which different downhole surveys, sampling and monitoring will be carried out. The primary aim of this report is to review available information about hydrogeology and hydrogeochemistry in central Western Greenland, with special emphasis on the area around Kangerlussuaq. The relevant information about this area is however very limited, and it was decided to extend the review to briefly include studies made in other regions with similar conditions in terms of geology, climate and glaciology. The number of published studies made in other areas with glaciers, ice sheets or permafrost is very large, and the review and list of references in this report is far from complete. It is also obvious that both

  6. Status and understanding of groundwater quality in the San Diego Drainages Hydrogeologic Province, 2004: California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Michael T.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the approximately 3,900-square-mile (mi2) San Diego Drainages Hydrogeologic Province (hereinafter San Diego) study unit was investigated from May through July 2004 as part of the Priority Basin Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The study unit is located in southwestern California in the counties of San Diego, Riverside, and Orange. The GAMA Priority Basin Project is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The GAMA San Diego study was designed to provide a statistically robust assessment of untreated-groundwater quality within the primary aquifer systems. The assessment is based on water-quality and ancillary data collected by the USGS from 58 wells in 2004 and water-quality data from the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database. The primary aquifer systems (hereinafter referred to as the primary aquifers) were defined by the depth interval of the wells listed in the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database for the San Diego study unit. The San Diego study unit consisted of four study areas: Temecula Valley (140 mi2), Warner Valley (34 mi2), Alluvial Basins (166 mi2), and Hard Rock (850 mi2). The quality of groundwater in shallow or deep water-bearing zones may differ from that in the primary aquifers. For example, shallow groundwater may be more vulnerable to surficial contamination than groundwater in deep water-bearing zones. This study had two components: the status assessment and the understanding assessment. The first component of this study-the status assessment of the current quality of the groundwater resource-was assessed by using data from samples analyzed for volatile organic compounds (VOC), pesticides, and naturally occurring inorganic constituents, such as major ions and trace elements. The status assessment is intended to

  7. Chemical parameters as natural tracers in hydrogeology: a case study of Louros karst system, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsanou, K.; Lambrakis, N.; D'Alessandro, W.; Siavalas, G.

    2017-03-01

    The Louros Basin hosts one of the most important karst systems of Epirus Prefecture (Greece) and plays a key role in supplying three counties with drinking water. Aiming to investigate the origin of groundwater and its flow patterns, a multi-tracer approach was used to describe and evaluate the hydrogeology of the system. Therefore, 271 surface water and groundwater samples were collected and analyzed for physicochemical parameters, major ions, and trace and rare earth elements, as well as stable isotopes (δ18O and δ2H). These data provided meaningful tracing of the water origin, water-rock interaction processes, and relationships among the aquifers. In particular, the elaboration of the major ions supported by the distribution of rare earth elements indicated that there are three aquifers located at different levels hosted in the Senonian and Pantokrator limestone formations. These aquifers are hydraulically interconnected by a cascade and constitute the Louros karst system which is drained by the homonymous river. Hydrochemical and isotopic data revealed that the Louros karst system is isolated from the adjacent northern Ioannina Basin and it is being recharged by precipitation. Higher groundwater salinity, where present, is mainly associated with increased water-rock interaction due to longer and deeper hydrologic flow, favoring the dissolution of evaporitic, carbonate and phosphate minerals.

  8. Summary of hydrogeologic conditions at Aberg, Beberg and Ceberg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, D.; Gurban, I. [INTERA KB, Sollentuna (Sweden); Rhen, I. [VBB Viak AB (Sweden)

    1997-10-01

    This report is a compilation of existing data and descriptions for use in the hydrogeologic modelling of three hypothetical sites for a nuclear waste repository in Sweden. It provides modelling teams with preliminary conceptual models, parameter values and uncertainties for inputs to numerical flow and transport models on the regional and site scales. Its primary objective is to provide consistent data sets and conceptual models so that the results of performance assessment modelling will be as comparable as possible. Where possible, this report also provides alternative conceptual models that should be evaluated as part of the modelers` sensitivity analysis. The information contained in this report is taken from several key sources, including the SKB SICADA database, the Swedish Geological Survey well database, the SKB Geographic Information System, the Swedish Land Survey databases, and published SKB reports. 148 refs, 25 tabs, 60 figs.

  9. Calibration of the hydrogeological model of the Baltic Artesian Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virbulis, J.; Klints, I.; Timuhins, A.; Sennikovs, J.; Bethers, U.

    2012-04-01

    Let us consider the calibration issue for the Baltic Artesian Basin (BAB) which is a complex hydrogeological system in the southeastern Baltic with surface area close to 0.5 million square kilometers. The model of the geological structure contains 42 layers including aquifers and aquitards. The age of sediments varies from Cambrian up to the Quaternary deposits. The finite element method model was developed for the calculation of the steady state three-dimensional groundwater flow with free surface. No-flow boundary conditions were applied on the rock bottom and the side boundaries of BAB, while simple hydrological model is applied on the surface. The level of the lakes, rivers and the sea is fixed as constant hydraulic head. Constant mean value of 70 mm/year was assumed as an infiltration flux elsewhere and adjusted during the automatic calibration process. Averaged long-term water extraction was applied at the water supply wells. The calibration of the hydrogeological model is one of the most important steps during the model development. The knowledge about the parameters of the modeled system is often insufficient, especially for the large regional models, and a lack of geometric and hydraulic conductivity data is typical. The quasi-Newton optimization method L-BFGS-B is used for the calibration of the BAB model. Model is calibrated on the available water level measurements in monitoring wells and level measurements in boreholes during their installation. As the available data is not uniformly distributed over the covered area, weight coefficient is assigned to each borehole in order not to overestimate the clusters of boreholes. The year 2000 is chosen as the reference year for the present time scenario and the data from surrounding years are also taken into account but with smaller weighting coefficients. The objective function to be minimized by the calibration process is the weighted sum of squared differences between observed and modeled piezometric heads

  10. Progress in Geo-Electrical Methods for Hydrogeological Mapping?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Niels

    2014-01-01

    In most of the 20th century the geo-electrical methods were primarily used for groundwater exploration and the application of the methods were normally followed by a borehole, and a moment of truth. In this process the use of DC (direct current) soundings have been developed to a high grade...... of excellence. In the last 25 years the geo-electrical methods are more used in connection with groundwater protection and planning, and new methods, as transient electromagnetic (TEM) soundings, have been developed that provide more measurements per hour. In Denmark this change is very explicit, and a paper....... The test area was earlier mapped by DC-soundings, so it is possible to test the methods against each other. It is concluded that well performed DC-soundings with a Schlumberger configuration still provide the best base for hydrogeological mapping...

  11. Application of TEM in hydrogeological prospecting of mining district

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lid Shu-cai; Liu Zhi-xin; Jang Zhi-hai [China University of Milling & Technology, Xuzhou (China). School of Resource and Earth Science

    2005-07-15

    Exploration of small structures and their transmissivity is very important in coal mining geology. The 3D seismic method is mainly applied in detecting geological structures while the electrical method is mainly applied in detecting structures which are filled with water. In this paper the principle, the field procedure, the method of data processing and interpretation are introduced. The TEM combining with 3D seismic method is applied in hydrogeological prospecting of mining district. The result indicates that the combination of TEM and seismic method can solve, to some extent, the problem of multi-solution, improve the detecting precision, and provide reliable hydro-geophysical information for the prevention and control of water disaster in coal mines. 10 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Using Vertical Electrical Soundings for Characterizing Hydrogeological and Tectonic Settings in Deir El-Adas Area, Yarmouk Basin, Syria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Fares, Walid

    2016-06-01

    The present study is aimed at characterizing the subsurface geological and tectonic structure in Deir El-Adas area, by using Vertical Electrical Sounding survey (VES) and hydrogeological investigations, in order to determine the causes of the failure for the majority of the wells drilled in the area. The survey data was treated in three different approaches including direct VES inversion, pseudo-2D method and horizontal profiling, in order to maximize the reliability of the data interpretation. The results revealed the presence of a local faulted anticline structure at the top of the Paleogene formation, underneath the basaltic outcrops where Deir El-Adas village is situated. The appearance of this subsurface anticline structure has complicated the local hydro-geological situation, and most likely led to limitation of the groundwater recharge in the area. Moreover, the performed piezometric and discharge maps indicated the presence of a notable groundwater watershed, in addition to feeble water productivity of the wells drilled adjacent to Deir El-Adas, mostly related to the subsurface geological and tectonic settings in the area.

  13. Stresses and Shear Fracture Zone of Jinshazhou Tunnel Surrounding Rock in Rich Water Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Jun-jie; LOU Xiao-ming

    2008-01-01

    Field evidence has shown that large-scale and unstable discontinuous planes in the rock mass surrounding tunnels in rich water region are probably generated after excavation. The tunnel surrounding rock was divided into three zones, including elastic zone, plastic damage zone and shear fracture zone fof assessing the stability of the tunnel surrounding rock. By local hydrogeology, the stresses of surrounding rock of Jinshazhou circular tunnel was analyzed and the stress solutions on the elastic and plastic damage zones were obtained by applying the theories of fluid-solid coupling and elasto-plastic damage mechanics. The shear fracture zone generated by joints was studied and its range was determined by using Mohr-Coulomb strength criterion. Finally, the correctness of the theoretical results was validated by comparing the scopes of shear fracture zones calculated in this paper with those from literature.

  14. 云南省地域主体功能区划分实践及反思%The application and reflection of major function oriented zoning in Yunnan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马仁锋; 王筱春; 张猛; 刘修通; 李文婧; 韩博

    2011-01-01

    During the 11th Five-Year Plan period (2006--2010), land development in Yunnan Province is spatially divided into four types of major function regions. According to each region's function, the government makes practical regional policies to promote region- al development and lead to rational distribution of population and economy. This paper discusses the application and reflection of Major Function Oriented Zoning (MF()Z) of Yunnan Province to provide theoretical and methodological information. This paper also focuses on the problems and solutions in the process of MFOZ at national level. Regarding the spatial differentiation of natural environment, the population agglomeration and the economic development foundation, transportation are the leading factors in regional eco nomic development, opportunities or challenges of ethnic ~ geopolitical issues in Yunnan Province. We had comprehensive evaluation of resources ~ environment which are carried out at county level, constructed the exercisable method at practice level and research route. The research route is based on 'judging overall situation the leading factor synthe sis index evaluation--consultation and negotiation about the MFOZ program (draft) by participatory methods-compiling a planning'. This paper puts forward the demarcation thought of MFOZ for mountainous provinces. Firstly, we regionalize the prohibited development region from all the Label Place areas as the main body. Secondly, we have screened the leading factors which can support sustainable development in Yunnan Province, used the leading factor-synthesis index evaluation to divide the land into three regions: Optimal Development Region, Key Develop ment Region and Restrictive Development Region. Thirdly, we also construct the special & characteristic function development area around border land in Yunnan Province based on comprehensive evaluation of opportunities or challenges of ethnic & geopolitical issues of Yunnan

  15. Fractured-aquifer hydrogeology from geophysical logs: Brunswick group and Lockatong Formation, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Roger H.; Senior, Lisa A.; Decker, Edward R.

    2000-01-01

    The Brunswick Group and the underlying Lockatong Formation are composed of lithified Mesozoic sediments that constitute part of the Newark Basin in southeastern Pennsylvania. These fractured rocks form an important regional aquifer that consists of gradational sequences of shale, siltstone, and sandstone, with fluid transport occurring primarily in fractures. An extensive suite of geophysical logs was obtained in seven wells located at the borough of Lansdale, Pennsylvania, in order to better characterize the areal hydrogeologic system and provide guidelines for the refinement of numerical ground water models. Six of the seven wells are approximately 120 m deep and the seventh extends to a depth of 335 m. Temperature, fluid conductivity, and flowmeter logs are used to locate zones of fluid exchange and to quantify transmissivities. Electrical resistivity and natural gamma logs together yield detailed stratigraphic information, and digital acoustic televiewer data provide magnetically oriented images of the borehole wall from which almost 900 fractures are identified.Analyses of the geophysical data indicate that the aquifer penetrated by the deep well can be separated into two distinct structural domains, which may, in turn, reflect different mechanical responses to basin extension by different sedimentary units:1. In the shallow zone (above 125 m), the dominant fracture population consists of gently dipping bedding plane partings that strike N46°E and dip to the northwest at about 11 degrees. Fluid flow is concentrated in the upper 80 m along these subhorizontal fractures, with transmissivities rapidly diminishing in magnitude with depth.2. The zone below 125 m marks the appearance of numerous high-angle fractures that are orthogonal to the bedding planes, striking parallel but dipping steeply southeast at 77 degrees.This secondary set of fractures is associated with a fairly thick (approximately 60 m) high-resistivity, low-transmissivity sandstone unit that is

  16. Hydrogeology, ground-water movement, and subsurface storage in the Floridan aquifer system in southern Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Frederick W.

    1989-01-01

    The Floridan aquifer system of southern Florida is composed chiefly of carbonate rocks that range in age from early Miocene to Paleocene. The top of the aquifer system in southern Florida generally is at depths ranging from 500 to 1,000 feet, and the average thickness is about 3,000 feet. It is divided into three general hydrogeologic units: (1) the Upper Floridan aquifer, (2) the middle confining unit, and (3) the Lower Floridan aquifer. The Upper Floridan aquifer contains brackish ground water, and the Lower Floridan aquifer contains salty ground water that compares chemically to modern seawater. Zones of high permeability are present in the Upper and Lower Floridan aquifers. A thick, cavernous dolostone in the Lower Floridan aquifer, called the Boulder Zone, is one of the most permeable carbonate units in the world (transmissivity of about 2.5 x 107 feet squared per day). Ground-water movement in the Upper Floridan aquifer is generally southward from the area of highest head in central Florida, eastward to the Straits of Florida, and westward to the Gulf of Mexico. Distributions of natural isotopes of carbon and uranium generally confirm hydraulic gradients in the Lower Floridan aquifer. Groundwater movement in the Lower Floridan aquifer is inland from the Straits of Florida. The concentration gradients of the carbon and uranium isotopes indicate that the source of cold saltwater in the Lower Floridan aquifer is seawater that has entered through the karat features on the submarine Miami Terrace near Fort Lauderdale. The relative ages of the saltwater suggest that the rate of inland movement is related in part to rising sea level during the Holocene transgression. Isotope, temperature, and salinity anomalies in waters from the Upper Floridan aquifer of southern Florida suggest upwelling of saltwater from the Lower Floridan aquifer. The results of the study support the hypothesis of circulating relatively modern seawater and cast doubt on the theory that the

  17. Vadose zone transport field study: Detailed test plan for simulated leak tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AL Ward; GW Gee

    2000-06-23

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Groundwater/Vadose Zone Integration Project Science and Technology initiative was created in FY 1999 to reduce the uncertainty associated with vadose zone transport processes beneath waste sites at DOE's Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. This information is needed not only to evaluate the risks from transport, but also to support the adoption of measures for minimizing impacts to the groundwater and surrounding environment. The principal uncertainties in vadose zone transport are the current distribution of source contaminants and the natural heterogeneity of the soil in which the contaminants reside. Oversimplified conceptual models resulting from these uncertainties and limited use of hydrologic characterization and monitoring technologies have hampered the understanding contaminant migration through Hanford's vadose zone. Essential prerequisites for reducing vadose transport uncertainly include the development of accurate conceptual models and the development or adoption of monitoring techniques capable of delineating the current distributions of source contaminants and characterizing natural site heterogeneity. The Vadose Zone Transport Field Study (VZTFS) was conceived as part of the initiative to address the major uncertainties confronting vadose zone fate and transport predictions at the Hanford Site and to overcome the limitations of previous characterization attempts. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is managing the VZTFS for DOE. The VZTFS will conduct field investigations that will improve the understanding of field-scale transport and lead to the development or identification of efficient and cost-effective characterization methods. Ideally, these methods will capture the extent of contaminant plumes using existing infrastructure (i.e., more than 1,300 steel-cased boreholes). The objectives of the VZTFS are to conduct controlled transport experiments at well-instrumented field sites at

  18. Surface altitude of hydrogeologic layers of the Atlantic Coastal Plain of North and South Carolina

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — PP1773_unit_alt_grid is a polygon shapefile of surface altitudes for 16 hydrogeologic units as described in report Professional Paper 1773. Surface altitudes were...

  19. Hydrogeology, Kennedy-Jenks groundwater recharge report, Published in 2004, Washoe County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Hydrogeology dataset, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2004. It is described as 'Kennedy-Jenks groundwater recharge...

  20. Thickness of the Upper Hell Creek hydrogeologic unit in the Powder River structural basin

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data represent the thickness, in feet, of the Upper Hell Creek hydrogeologic unit in the Powder River basin. The data are presented as ASCII text files that...

  1. Thickness of the middle Fort Union hydrogeologic unit in the Williston structural basin

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data represent the thickness, in feet, of the middle Fort Union hydrogeologic unit in the Williston structural basin. The data are presented as ASCII text...

  2. Altitude of the top of the middle Fort Union hydrogeologic unit in the Williston structural basin

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data represent the altitude, in feet above North American Vertical Datum of 1988 (NAVD88), of the middle Fort Union hydrogeologic unit in the Williston...

  3. Thickness of the Upper Hell Creek hydrogeologic unit in the Williston structural basin

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data represent the thickness, in feet, of the Upper Hell Creek hydrogeologic unit in the Williston structural basin. The data are presented as ASCII text...

  4. Altitude of the top of the Upper Hell Creek hydrogeologic unit in the Williston structural basin

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data represent the altitude, in feet above North American Vertical Datum of 1988 (NAVD88), of the Upper Hell Creek hydrogeologic unit in the Williston...

  5. Thickness of the middle Fort Union hydrogeologic unit in the Powder River structural basin

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data represent the thickness, in feet, of the middle Fort Union hydrogeologic unit in the Powder River basin. The data are presented as ASCII text files that...

  6. A Surficial Hydrogeologic Framework for the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The hydrogeologic framework was developed from a combination of the physiography and the predominant texture of surficial geologic units in the Mid-Atlantic Coastal...

  7. Hydrogeologic map of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital dataset represents the surface hydrogeology of an approximately 45,000 square-kilometer area of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system...

  8. Hydrogeologic Provinces for California based upon established groundwater basins and watershed polygons.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Ten hydrogeologic provinces of California are represented by a region- class feature called "provinces" within this digital data set. These provinces were identified...

  9. Hydrogeology, navrock, Published in 2009, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Washington County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Hydrogeology dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2009. It is described as 'navrock'. Data...

  10. Hydrogeology, naquifer, Published in 2009, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Washington County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Hydrogeology dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2009. It is described as 'naquifer'....

  11. The efficiency of the use of penetration nuclear logging in hydrogeology and engineering geology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferronsky, V.I. (AN SSSR, Moscow (USSR). Water Problems Inst.); Griaznov, T.A.; Selivanov, L.V. (All-Union Research Inst. for Hydrogeology and Engineering Geology, Moscow (USSR))

    1992-03-01

    The latest developments in equipment and techniques for nuclear and combined non-nuclear logging in friable unconsolidated deposits, including marine bottom sediments are described. The effectiveness of these techniques in hydrogeological and engineering geological investigations is discussed. (Author).

  12. Anthropogenic wetlands due to over-irrigation of desert areas; A challenging hydrogeological investigation with extensive geophysical input

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behroozmand, A. A.; Teatini, P.; Pedersen, J. B. B.; Auken, E.; Tosatto, O.; Christiansen, A. V.

    2015-12-01

    During the last century, many large irrigation projects have been initiated in arid lands worldwide. Despite a tremendous increase in food production, a common problem when characterizing these zones is land degradation in form of waterlogging. As results, large volumes of water are lost due to surplus irrigation in regions where water availability is extremely challenging for both population survival and economic development. The Nubariya depression, Western Desert (Egypt), is a clear example of this mechanism. Following the reclamation of desert lands for agricultural production, an artificial brackish and contaminated lake developed in the area in the late 1990s and presently extends for about 2.5 km2. Available data provide evidence of a simultaneous general deterioration of the groundwater system. With the main objectives of understanding the hydrological evolution of the area, characterizing the hydrogeological setting and developing scenarios for artificial aquifer remediation and recharge, an extensive hydrogeophysical investigation was carried out in this challenging environment using Magnetic Resonance Sounding (MRS, also called surface NMR) and ground-based Transient EM (TEM). The integrated interpretation of the geophysical surveys, properly calibrated with a number of boreholes, provides a clear hydrogeological picture of the upper 100 m sedimentary structure, in terms of both lithology and groundwater quality. The information is then used to set up a regional groundwater flow and a local density-dependent flow and transport numerical model to reproduce the past evolution of the aquifer system and develop a few scenarios for artificial aquifer recharge using the treated waters provided by a nearby waste-water treatment plant. The research outcomes point the hydrological challenges that emerge for an effective management of water resources in reclaimed desert areas and highlight the effectiveness of integrating advanced geophysical and modeling

  13. Observations on Faults and Associated Permeability Structures in Hydrogeologic Units at the Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prothro, Lance B.; Drellack, Sigmund L.; Haugstad, Dawn N.; Huckins-Gang, Heather E.; Townsend, Margaret J.

    2009-03-30

    Observational data on Nevada Test Site (NTS) faults were gathered from a variety of sources, including surface and tunnel exposures, core samples, geophysical logs, and down-hole cameras. These data show that NTS fault characteristics and fault zone permeability structures are similar to those of faults studied in other regions. Faults at the NTS form complex and heterogeneous fault zones with flow properties that vary in both space and time. Flow property variability within fault zones can be broken down into four major components that allow for the development of a simplified, first approximation model of NTS fault zones. This conceptual model can be used as a general guide during development and evaluation of groundwater flow and contaminate transport models at the NTS.

  14. Geophysical research methods for hydrogeology and engineering geology. Geofizicheskie metody issledovaniy v gidrogeologii i inzhenernoy geologii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gribanov, B.I.

    1978-01-01

    This collection, prepared and published by GIDROINGED (Institute of and Engineering (Tashkent)), contains new methodologies developed by the Institute's hydrogeological service. These methods are geared toward increasing the geological and economic effectiveness of geophysical methods used during complex hydrogeological research. These articles examine ways to increase the volume of beneficial information obtained while providing monetary savings in the areas of surface and bore hole geophysics. Examples are given of the practical use of such methods.

  15. Hydrogeology and Aquifer Storage and Recovery Performance in the Upper Floridan Aquifer, Southern Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Ronald S.; Alvarez-Zarikian, Carlos A.

    2007-01-01

    Well construction, hydraulic well test, ambient water-quality, and cycle test data were inventoried and compiled for 30 aquifer storage and recovery facilities constructed in the Floridan aquifer system in southern Florida. Most of the facilities are operated by local municipalities or counties in coastal areas, but five sites are currently being evaluated as part of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan. The relative performance of all sites with adequate cycle test data was determined, and compared with four hydrogeologic and design factors that may affect recovery efficiency. Testing or operational cycles include recharge, storage, and recovery periods that each last days or months. Cycle test data calculations were made including the potable water (chloride concentration of less than 250 milligrams per liter) recovery efficiency per cycle, total recovery efficiency per cycle, and cumulative potable water recovery efficiencies for all of the cycles at each site. The potable water recovery efficiency is the percentage of the total amount of potable water recharged for each cycle that is recovered; potable water recovery efficiency calculations (per cycle and cumulative) were the primary measures used to evaluate site performance in this study. Total recovery efficiency, which is the percent recovery at the end of each cycle, however, can be substantially higher and is the performance measure normally used in the operation of water-treatment plants. The Upper Floridan aquifer of the Floridan aquifer system currently is being used, or planned for use, at 29 of the aquifer storage and recovery sites. The Upper Floridan aquifer is continuous throughout southern Florida, and its overlying confinement is generally good; however, the aquifer contains brackish to saline ground water that can greatly affect freshwater storage and recovery due to dispersive mixing within the aquifer. The hydrogeology of the Upper Floridan varies in southern Florida; confinement

  16. GIS-based hydrogeological databases and groundwater modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogu, Radu Constantin; Carabin, Guy; Hallet, Vincent; Peters, Valerie; Dassargues, Alain

    2001-12-01

    Reliability and validity of groundwater analysis strongly depend on the availability of large volumes of high-quality data. Putting all data into a coherent and logical structure supported by a computing environment helps ensure validity and availability and provides a powerful tool for hydrogeological studies. A hydrogeological geographic information system (GIS) database that offers facilities for groundwater-vulnerability analysis and hydrogeological modelling has been designed in Belgium for the Walloon region. Data from five river basins, chosen for their contrasting hydrogeological characteristics, have been included in the database, and a set of applications that have been developed now allow further advances. Interest is growing in the potential for integrating GIS technology and groundwater simulation models. A "loose-coupling" tool was created between the spatial-database scheme and the groundwater numerical model interface GMS (Groundwater Modelling System). Following time and spatial queries, the hydrogeological data stored in the database can be easily used within different groundwater numerical models. Résumé. La validité et la reproductibilité de l'analyse d'un aquifère dépend étroitement de la disponibilité de grandes quantités de données de très bonne qualité. Le fait de mettre toutes les données dans une structure cohérente et logique soutenue par les logiciels nécessaires aide à assurer la validité et la disponibilité et fournit un outil puissant pour les études hydrogéologiques. Une base de données pour un système d'information géographique (SIG) hydrogéologique qui offre toutes les facilités pour l'analyse de la vulnérabilité des eaux souterraines et la modélisation hydrogéologique a été établi en Belgique pour la région Wallonne. Les données de cinq bassins de rivières, choisis pour leurs caractéristiques hydrogéologiques différentes, ont été introduites dans la base de données, et un ensemble d

  17. West Siberian basin hydrogeology - regional framework for contaminant migration from injected wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foley, M.G.

    1994-05-01

    Nuclear fuel cycle activities of the former Soviet Union (FSU) have resulted in massive contamination of the environment in western Siberia. We are developing three-dimensional numerical models of the hydrogeology and potential contaminant migration in the West Siberian Basin. Our long-term goal at Pacific Northwest Laboratory is to help determine future environmental and human impacts given the releases that have occurred to date and the current waste management practices. In FY 1993, our objectives were to (1) refine and implement the hydrogeologic conceptual models of the regional hydrogeology of western Siberia developed in FY 1992 and develop the detailed, spatially registered digital geologic and hydrologic databases to test them, (2) calibrate the computer implementation of the conceptual models developed in FY 1992, and (3) develop general geologic and hydrologic information and preliminary hydrogeologic conceptual models relevant to the more detailed models of contaminated site hydrogeology. Calibration studies of the regional hydrogeologic computer model suggest that most precipitation entering the ground-water system moves in the near-surface part of the system and discharges to surface waters relatively near its point of infiltration. This means that wastes discharged to the surface and near-surface may not be isolated as well as previously thought, since the wastes may be carried to the surface by gradually rising ground waters.

  18. A hydrogeologic map of the Death Valley region, Nevada, and California, developed using GIS techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faunt, C.C.; D`Agnese, F.A.; Turner, A.K.

    1997-12-31

    In support of Yucca Mountain site characterization studies, a hydrogeologic framework was developed, and a hydrogeologic map was constructed for the Death Valley region. The region, covering approximately 100,000 km{sup 2} along the Nevada-California border near Las Vegas, is characterized by isolated mountain ranges juxtaposed against broad, alluvium-filled valleys. Geologic conditions are typical of the Basin and Range Province; a variety of sedimentary and igneous intrusive and extrusive rocks have been subjected to both compressional and extensional deformation. The regional ground-water flow system can best be described as a series of connected intermontane basins in which ground-water flow occurs in basin-fill deposits, carbonate rocks, clastic rocks, and volcanic rocks. Previous investigations have developed more site-specific hydrogeologic relationships; however, few have described all the lithologies within the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system. Information required to characterize the hydrogeologic units in the region was obtained from regional geologic maps and reports. Map data were digitized from regional geologic maps and combined into a composite map using a geographic information system. This map was simplified to show 10 laterally extensive hydrogeologic units with distinct hydrologic properties. The hydraulic conductivity values for the hydrogeologic units range over 15 orders of magnitude due to the variability in burial depth and degree of fracturing.

  19. Sandia National Laboratories site-wide hydrogeologic characterization project calendar year 1992 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowson, D.; Gibson, J.D.; Haase, C.S.; Holt, R.; Hyndman, D.; Krumhansl, J.; Lauffer, F.; McCord, J.P.; McCord, J.T.; Neel, D. [and others

    1993-10-01

    The Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) Site-Wide Hydrogeologic Characterization (SWHC) project has been implemented as part of the SNL/NM Environmental Restoration (ER) Program to develop the regional hydrogeologic framework and baseline for the approximately 100 mi of Kirtland Air Force Base (KAFB) and adjacent withdrawn public lands upon which SNL/NM has performed research and development activities. Additionally, the SWHC project will investigate and characterize generic hydrogeologic issues associated with the 172 ER sites owned by SNL/NM across its facilities on KAFB. As called for in the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B permit agreement between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as the permitter and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and SNL/NM as the permittees, an annual report is to be prepared by the SWHC project team. This document serves two primary purposes: (1) to identify and describe the conceptual framework for the hydrogeologic system underlying SNL/NM and (2) to describe characterization activities undertaken in the preceding year that add to our understanding (reduce our uncertainties) regarding the conceptual and quantitative hydrogeologic framework. This SWHC project annual report focuses primarily on purpose 1, providing a summary description of the current {open_quotes}state of knowledge{close_quotes} of the Sandia National Laboratories/Kirtland Air Force Base (SNL/KAFB) hydrogeologic setting.

  20. Hydrogeology and simulation of ground-water flow, Picatinny Arsenal and vicinity, Morris County, New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronin, L.M.; Rice, D.E.

    1996-01-01

    Ground-water flow in glacial sediments and bedrock at Picatinny Arsenal, N.J., was simulated by use of a three-dimensional finite-difference ground- water-flow model. The modeled area includes a 4.3-square-mile area that extends from Picatinny Lake to the Rockaway River. Most of the study area is bounded by the natural hydrologic boundaries of the ground-water system. eophysical logs, lithologic logs, particle-size data, and core data from selected wells and surface geophysical data were analyzed to define the hydrogeologic framework. Hydrogeologic sections and thickness maps define six permeable and three low-permeability layers that are represented in the model as aquifers and confining units, respectively. Hydrologic data incorporated in the model include a rate of recharge from precipitation of 22 inches per year, estimated from long-term precipitation records and estimates of evapotranspiration. Additional recharge from infiltration along valleys was estimated from measured discharge of springs along the adjacent valley walls and from estimates of runoff from upland drainage that flows to the valley floor. Horizontal and vertical hydraulic conductivities of permeable and low-permeability layers were estimated from examination of aquifer-test data, gamma-ray logs, borehole cuttings, and previously published data. Horizontal hydraulic conductivities in glacial sediments range from 10 to 380 feet per day. Vertical hydraulic conductivities of the low-permeability layers range from 0.01 to 0.7 feet per day. The model was calibrated by simulating steady-state conditions during 1989-93 and by closely matching simulated and measured ground-water levels, vertical ground-water-head differences, and streamflow gain and loss. Simulated steady-state potentiometric- surface maps produced for the six permeable layers indicate that ground water in the unconfined material within Picatinny Arsenal flows predominantly toward the center of the valley, where it discharges to Green

  1. Characterization of the hydrogeology of the sacred Gihon Spring, Jerusalem: a deteriorating urban karst spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiel, Ronit Benami; Grodek, Tamir; Frumkin, Amos

    2010-09-01

    The Gihon Spring, Jerusalem, is important for the major monotheistic religions. Its hydrogeology and hydrochemistry is studied here in order to understand urbanization effects on karst groundwater resources, and promote better water management. High-resolution monitoring of the spring discharge, temperature and electrical conductivity, was performed, together with chemical and bacterial analysis. All these demonstrate a rapid response of the spring to rainfall events and human impact. A complex karst system is inferred, including conduit flow, fissure flow and diffuse flow. Electrical conductivity, Na+ and K+ values (2.0 mS/cm, 130 and 50 mg/l respectively) are very high compared to other nearby springs located at the town margins (0.6 mS/cm, 15 and <1 mg/l respectively), indicating considerable urban pollution in the Gihon area. The previously cited pulsating nature of the spring was not detected during the present high-resolution monitoring. This phenomenon may have ceased due to additional water sources from urban leakage and irrigation feeding the spring. The urbanization of the recharge catchment thus affects the spring water dramatically, both chemically and hydrologically. Appropriate measures should therefore be undertaken to protect the Gihon Spring and other karst aquifers threatened by rapid urbanization.

  2. Identification of groundwater prospective zones by using remote sensing and geoelectrical methods in Jharia and Raniganj coalfields, Dhanbad district, Jharkhand state

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Basudeo Rai; A Tiwari; V S Dubey

    2005-10-01

    The Dhanbad district in Jharkhand faces acute water scarcity and is chronically drought-prone. The groundwater resources in the area have not been fully exploited.The present study was undertaken to evaluate the groundwater prospective zones.Landsat-5 Multi Spectral Scanner (MSS)data of band 2 and band 4 and false colour composite (FCC)of band 2,3,4 were interpreted visually to differentiate different hydromorphogeological units and to delineate the major trends of lineaments.The different geomorphic features identified are linear ridges, residual hills,and pediplain,buried pediment and dissected pediplain,besides lineaments.The study shows that the pediplain and buried pediments are promising zones for groundwater prospecting.The occurrence and movement of groundwater is restricted to the unconsolidated material, weathered and fractured rocks.For the selection of tube well sites,geoelectrical resistivity investigations have been carried out at the sites,which were found suitable based on hydro-geomorphological and hydrogeological studies.Twenty-six Vertical Electrical Soundings (VES) have been carried out by using Schlumberger electrode con figuration,which have brought out 3 to 7 layered sub-surface layers.The resistivity of water-bearing weathered/fractured rocks varies from 120 –150 ohmm.The integrated studies have revealed that the blue colour zones are most promising for groundwater exploration and dug wells may be dug up to depths of 30 ± 5m.

  3. 3D characterization of the critical zone within a basaltic catchment using an airborne electromagnetic survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Marc; Join, Jean-Lambert; Wendling, Valentin; Aunay, Bertrand

    2017-04-01

    Shield volcano islands come from the succession of constructive phases and destructive phases. In this complex geological setting, weathering and paleo-weathering profiles have a major impact on the critical zone hydrology. Nevertheless those underground structures are difficult to characterize, which leads to a leak of understanding of the water balance, infiltration, and ground water flows. Airborne transient electromagnetic method, as SkyTEM dispositive, allows to proceed regional 3D resistivity mapping with almost no topographic and vegetation limitations with an investigation depth higher than 300 m. Electromagnetics results are highly sensitive to conductive layers depending of clay content, water content and water mineralization. Skytem investigations are useful to characterize the thickness of the weathering profile and its lateral variations among large areas. In addition, it provides precise information about buried valleys and paleo-weathering of older lavas flows which control preferential groundwater flows. The French Geological Survey (BRGM) conducted a SkyTEM survey over Reunion Island (2500 km2). This survey yields on a dense 3D resistivity mapping. This continuous information is used to characterize the critical zone of the experimental watershed of Rivière des Pluies. A wide range of weathering profiles has been identified. Their variations are highly dependent of lava flow ages. Furthermore, 3D resistivity model highlights buried valleys characterized by specific weathering due to groundwater flows. Hydrogeological implication is a partitioning of groundwater flows in three different reservoirs: (i) deep basal aquifer, (ii) perched aquifers and (iii) superficial flows. The two latter behaviors have been characterized and mapped above our experimental watershed. The 3D manner of airborne electromagnetics results allows describing the continuity of weathering and alteration structures. The identification of specific groundwater flow paths provides

  4. Hydrogeologic framework of fractured sedimentary rock, Newark Basin, New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacombe, Pierre J.; Burton, William C.

    2010-01-01

    The hydrogeologic framework of fractured sedimentary bedrock at the former Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC), Trenton, New Jersey, a trichloroethylene (TCE)-contaminated site in the Newark Basin, is developed using an understanding of the geologic history of the strata, gamma-ray logs, and rock cores. NAWC is the newest field research site established as part of the U.S. Geological Survey Toxic Substances Hydrology Program, Department of Defense (DoD) Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program, and DoD Environmental Security Technology Certification Program to investigate contaminant remediation in fractured rock. Sedimentary bedrock at the NAWC research site comprises the Skunk Hollow, Byram, and Ewing Creek Members of the Lockatong Formation and Raven Rock Member of the Stockton Formation. Muds of the Lockatong Formation that were deposited in Van Houten cycles during the Triassic have lithified to form the bedrock that is typical of much of the Newark Basin. Four lithotypes formed from the sediments include black, carbon-rich laminated mudstone, dark-gray laminated mudstone, light-gray massive mudstone, and red massive mudstone. Diagenesis, tectonic compression, off-loading, and weathering have altered the rocks to give some strata greater hydraulic conductivity than other strata. Each stratum in the Lockatong Formation is 0.3 to 8 m thick, strikes N65 degrees E, and dips 25 degrees to 70 degrees NW. The black, carbon-rich laminated mudstone tends to fracture easily, has a relatively high hydraulic conductivity and is associated with high natural gamma-ray count rates. The dark-gray laminated mudstone is less fractured and has a lower hydraulic conductivity than the black carbon-rich laminated mudstone. The light-gray and the red massive mudstones are highly indurated and tend to have the least fractures and a low hydraulic conductivity. The differences in gamma-ray count rates for different mudstones allow gamma-ray logs to be used to correlate and

  5. Major Sponsors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Chinese Society of Rare Earths Director General: Prof. Tel: 86 10 62182748 Fax: 86 10 62173501 Treibacher Industrie AG President: Mr. Reinhard Iro Managing Director Responsible For RE Business: Mr. Alexander Bouvier Tel:0043 4262 505 570 Fax:0043 4262 2898 AMR Technologies Inc. President: Peter V. Gundy Tel: 001 416 3678588 Fax: 001 416 3675471 Rhodia Electronics & Catalysis Vice President: Zhu Mingyue Tel: 86 21 54422630 Fax: 86 21 54422302 Baotou Rare Earth Hi-Tech Development Zone Director: Prof. Su Wenq...

  6. New insights into the structure of Om Ali-Thelepte basin, central Tunisia, inferred from gravity data: Hydrogeological implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harchi, Mongi; Gabtni, Hakim; El Mejri, Hatem; Dassi, Lassaad; Mammou, Abdallah Ben

    2016-08-01

    This work presents new results from gravity data analyses and interpretation within the Om Ali-Thelepte (OAT) basin, central Tunisia. It focuses on the hydrogeological implication, using several qualitative and quantitative techniques such as horizontal gradient, upward continuation and Euler deconvolution on boreholes log data, seismic reflection data and electrical conductivity measurements. The structures highlighted using the filtering techniques suggest that the Miocene aquifer of OAT basin is cut by four major fault systems that trend E-W, NE-SW, NW-SE and NNE-SSW. In addition, a NW-SE gravity model established shows the geometry of the Miocene sandstone reservoir and the Upper Cretaceous limestone rocks. Moreover, the superimposition of the electrical conductivity and the structural maps indicates that the low conductivity values of sampled water from boreholes are located around main faults.

  7. Hydrogeologic controls on ground-water and contaminant discharge to the Columbia River near the Hanford Townsite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luttrell, S.P.; Newcomer, D.R.; Teel, S.S.; Vermeul, V.R.

    1992-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to quantify ground-water and contaminant discharge to the Columbia River in the Hanford Townsite vicinity. The primary objectives of the work are to: describe the hydrogeologic setting and controls on ground-water movement and contaminant discharge to the Columbia River; understand the river/aquifer relationship and its effects on contaminant discharge to the Columbia River; quantify the ground-water and contaminant mass discharge to the Columbia River; and provide data that may be useful for a three-dimensional model of ground-water flow and contaminant transport in the Hanford Townsite study area. The majority of ground-water contamination occurs within the unconfined aquifer; therefore, ground-water and contaminant discharge from the unconfined aquifer is the emphasis of this study. The period of study is primarily from June 1990 through March 1992.

  8. Hydrogeological-Geophysical Methods for Subsurface Site Characterization - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, Yoram

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this research project is to increase water savings and show better ecological control of natural vegetation by developing hydrogeological-geophysical methods for characterizing the permeability and content of water in soil. The ground penetrating radar (GPR) tool was developed and used as the surface geophysical method for monitoring water content. Initial results using the tool suggest that surface GPR is a viable technique for obtaining precision volumetric water content profile estimates, and that laboratory-derived petrophysical relationships could be applied to field-scale GPR data. A field-scale bacterial transport study was conducted within an uncontaminated sandy Pleistocene aquifer to evaluate the importance of heterogeneity in controlling the transport of bacteria. Geochemical, hydrological, geological, and geophysical data were collected to characterize the site prior to and after chemical and bacterial injection experiments. Study results shows that, even within the fairly uniform shallow marine deposits of the narrow channel focus area, heterogeneity existed that influenced the chemical tracer transport over lateral distances of a few meters and vertical distances of less than a half meter. The interpretation of data suggest that the incorporation of geophysical data with limited hydrological data may provide valuable information about the stratigraphy, log conductivity values, and the spatial correlation structure of log conductivity, which have traditionally been obtainable only by performing extensive and intrusive hydrological sampling.

  9. Hydrogeologic data for the northern Rocky Mountains intermontane basins, Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutton, DeAnn M.; Lawlor, Sean M.; Briar, D.W.; Tresch, R.E.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey began a Regional Aquifer- System Analysis of the Northern Rocky Mountains Intermontane Basins of western Montana and central and central and northern Idaho in 1990 to establish a regional framework of information for aquifers in 54 intermontane basins in an area of about 77,500 square miles. Selected hydrogeologic data have been used as part of this analysis to define the hydro- logic systems. Records of 1,376 wells completed in 31 of the 34 intermontane basins in the Montana part of the study area are tabulated in this report. Data consist of location, alttiude of land surface, date well constructed, geologic unit, depth of well, diameter of casing, type of finish, top of open interval, primary use of water, water level, date water level measured, discharge, specific capacity, source of discharge data, type of log available, date water-quality parameters measured, specific conductance, pH, and temperature. Hydrographs for selected wells also are included. Locations of wells and basins are shown on the accompanying plate.

  10. Hydrogeology of the Canal Creek area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveros, J.P.; Vroblesky, D.A.

    1989-01-01

    Geologic and borehole geophysical logs made at 77 sites show that the hydrogeologic framework of the study area consists of a sequence of unconsolidated sediments typical of the Coastal Plain of Maryland. Three aquifers and two confining units were delineated within the study area. From the surface down, they are: (1) the surficial aquifer; (2) the upper confining unit; (3) the Canal Creek aquifer; (4) the lower confining unit; and (5) the lower confined aquifer. The aquifer materials range from fine sand to coarse sand and gravel. Clay lenses were commonly found interfingered with the sand, isolating parts of the aquifers. All the units are continuous throughout the study area except for the upper confining unit, which crops out within the study area but is absent in updip outcrops. The unit also is absent within a Pleistocene paleochannel, where it has been eroded. The surficial and Canal Creek aquifers are hydraulically connected where the upper confining unit is absent, and a substantial amount of groundwater may flow between the two aquifers. Currently, no pumping stresses are known to affect the aquifers within the study area. Under current conditions, downward vertical hydraulic gradients prevail at topographic highs, and upward gradients typically prevail near surface-water bodies. Regionally, the direction of groundwater flow in the confined aquifers is to the east and southeast. Significant water level fluctuations correspond with seasonal variations in rainfall, and minor daily fluctuations reflect tidal cycles. (USGS)

  11. The deep hydrogeologic flow system underlying the Oak Ridge Reservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nativ, R. [Hebrew Univ., Jerusalem (IL); Hunley, A.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1993-07-01

    The deep hydrogeologic system underlying the Oak Ridge Reservation contains some areas contaminated with radionuclides, heavy metals, nitrates, and organic compounds. The groundwater at that depth is saline and has previously been considered stagnant. On the basis of existing and newly collected data, the nature of flow of the saline groundwater and its potential discharge into shallow, freshwater systems was assessed. Data used for this purpose included (1) spatial and temporal pressures and hydraulic heads measured in the deep system, (2) hydraulic parameters of the formations in question, (3) spatial temperature variations, and (4) spatial and temporal chemical and isotopic composition of the saline groundwater. In addition, chemical analyses of brine in adjacent areas in Tennessee, Kentucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia were compared with the deep water underlying the reservation to help assess the origin of the brine. Preliminary conclusions suggest that the saline water contained at depth is old but not isolated (in terms of recharge and discharge) from the overlying active and freshwater-bearing units. The confined water (along with dissolved solutes) moves along open fractures (or man-made shortcuts) at relatively high velocity into adjacent, more permeable units. Groundwater volumes involved in this flow probably are small.

  12. Hydrogeology of the Clifton Park area, Saratoga County, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Richard J.

    1985-01-01

    The hydrogeology of the 75-square mile Clifton Park suburban area near Albany, N.Y., is presented in six maps at 1:24,000 scale. The maps show: (1) location of wells and test holes; (2) bedrock topography; (3) surficial geology and geologic sections; (4) saturated thickness of the confined aquifer; (5) generalized soil permeability; and (6) land use. The aquifers in the Clifton Park area serve approximately 22,000 people through 32 public distribution systems. Average daily pumpage from these systems is approximately 1.85 million gallons per day. The most productive aquifer is the Colonie Channel aquifer, a confined, buried bedrock channel aquifer of glacial material from which wells may yield more than 500 gallons per minute. A water-table aquifer of fine sand is present over most of the area and is separated from the confined aquifer by a thick sequence of lacustrine silt and clay. Recharge to the confined aquifer occurs primarily where kame-delta deposits that are exposed at land surface are hydraulically connected to the buried aquifer. Saturated thickness of the confined aquifer varies from less than 5 feet to approximately 70 feet. In recharge areas, where the aquifer is locally under water-table conditions, saturated thickness may exceed 100 feet. Pumping interference between wells tapping the confined aquifer has been observed over distances of 3/4 mile. (USGS)

  13. Solute transport modelling in a coupled water and heat flow system applied to cold regions hydrogeology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frampton, Andrew; Destouni, Georgia

    2016-04-01

    In cold regions, flow in the unsaturated zone is highly dynamic with seasonal variability and changes in temperature, moisture, and heat and water fluxes, all of which affect ground freeze-thaw processes and influence transport of inert and reactive waterborne substances. In arctic permafrost environments, near-surface groundwater flow is further restricted to a relatively shallow and seasonally variable active layer, confined by perennially frozen ground below. The active layer is typically partially saturated with ice, liquid water and air, and is strongly dependent on seasonal temperature fluctuations, thermal forcing and infiltration patterns. Here there is a need for improved understanding of the mechanisms controlling subsurface solute transport in the partially saturated active layer zone. Studying solute transport in cold regions is relevant to improve the understanding of how natural and anthropogenic pollution may change as activities in arctic and sub-arctic regions increase. It is also particularly relevant for understanding how dissolved carbon is transported in coupled surface and subsurface hydrological systems under climate change, in order to better understand the permafrost-hydrological-carbon climate feedback. In this contribution subsurface solute transport under surface warming and degrading permafrost conditions is studied using a physically based model of coupled cryotic and hydrogeological flow processes combined with a particle tracking method. Changes in subsurface water flows and solute transport travel times are analysed for different modelled geological configurations during a 100-year warming period. Results show that for all simulated cases, the minimum and mean travel times increase non-linearly with warming irrespective of geological configuration and heterogeneity structure. The travel time changes are shown to depend on combined warming effects of increase in pathway length due to deepening of the active layer, reduced transport

  14. Hydrogeologic and Hydrochemical Studies in a Semi-arid Watershed in Northern Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretzschmar, T.; Vazquez, R.; Hinojosa, A.

    2006-12-01

    Within the Baja California panhandle exist quite a significant number of valleys which hydrogeology conditions are of great importance for the communities of the region. The Guadalupe Valley for example, located 30 km Northeast of Ensenada, hosts an important wine industry which presents a mayor factor for agriculture and tourism in Baja California. The irrigation is carried out basically by groundwater extracted from quaternary sediments filling this post-Miocene depression. Besides the intensive usage of the water by the wine industry in the Guadalupe Valley, the local waterworks installed in 1985 a gallery of 10 wells extracting around 320 l/s or 30 % of the total water extraction in the valley to supply the city of Ensenada with drinking water. A total of more than 500 wells with a combined annual consumption of about 28 Mio m3 are at the moment active in the valley. In the arid portions of northern Mexico Mountain front recharge presents an important recharge source for the alluvial aquifers. Other important sources directly related to precipitation are direct infiltration, recharge by surface water runoff in the arroyos as well as by active fault systems. The principal recharge sources for the Guadalupe Valley aquifer are the Sierra Juárez and the Guadalupe River. To be able to address the state of equilibrium of aquifer, recharge estimates for the watershed were calculated determining the runoff/infiltration relationships obtained by curve number determinations combined with the interpretation of satellite images. These results were integrated into an evaluation and hydrologic modeling of the hydrologic data pointing towards differences of up to over 50 percent in the recharge estimation in comparison to earlier studies carried out in the area. Furthermore hydrochemical and isotopic studies were carried out to show the effects of the excessive ground water extraction on the water quality of the aquifer. The hydrochemical data indicate that intense use of

  15. Groundwater-Quality Impacts from Natural-Gas Wellbore Leakage: Numerical Sensitivity Analysis of Hydrogeologic, Geostatistical, and Source-Term Parameterization at Varying Depths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, A. K.; McCray, J. E.; Singha, K.

    2016-12-01

    The development of directional drilling and stimulation of reservoirs by hydraulic fracturing has transformed the energy landscape in the U.S. by making recovery of hydrocarbons from shale formations not only possible but economically viable. Activities associated with hydraulic fracturing present a set of water-quality challenges, including the potential for impaired groundwater quality. In this project, we use a three-dimensional, multiphase, multicomponent numerical model to investigate hydrogeologic conditions that could lead to groundwater contamination from natural gas wellbore leakage. This work explores the fate of methane that enters a well annulus, possibly from an intermediate formation or from the production zone via a flawed cement seal, and leaves the annulus at one of two depths: at the elevation of groundwater or below a freshwater aquifer. The latter leakage scenario is largely ignored in the current scientific literature, where focus has been on leakage directly into freshwater aquifers, despite modern regulations requiring steel casings and cement sheaths at these depths. We perform a three-stage sensitivity analysis, examining (1) hydrogeologic parameters of media surrounding a methane leakage source zone, (2) geostatistical variations in intrinsic permeability, and (3) methane source zone pressurization. Results indicate that in all cases methane reaches groundwater within the first year of leakage. To our knowledge, this is the first study to consider natural gas wellbore leakage in the context of multiphase flow through heterogeneous permeable media; advantages of multiphase modeling include more realistic analysis of methane vapor-phase relative permeability as compared to single-phase models. These results can be used to inform assessment of aquifer vulnerability to hydrocarbon wellbore leakage at varying depths.

  16. Hydrogeologic Conditions at the DUSEL Mid-level Campus and Implications for Large Cavern Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinig, W. T.; Popielak, R. S.; Stetler, L. D.

    2010-12-01

    conceptual hydrogeologic model for the mid-level campus including poorly connected fractures, medium to high pressures, and low flow rates was postulated based on the 2009 data combined with historical inflow and hydraulic conductivity measurements. Ongoing data collection in late 2009 and 2010 support this conceptual model. The conceptual hydrogeologic model indicates that inflows to the planned large excavations will be relatively low, although groundwater pressure approaching 14 MPa may be encountered. The drainage systems for the new excavations will primarily serve as pressure relief, with additional diffusion of potential high pressures and low groundwater fluxes provided by micro-fractured yield zones around the perimeters of the excavations. The drainage systems are not expected to handle large flow rates, consistent with the experience during Homestake operational days and conditions observed in the chamber that housed the Davis neutrino experiment for nearly 40 years.

  17. Geodatabase compilation of hydrogeologic, remote sensing, and water-budget-component data for the High Plains aquifer, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Natalie A.; Gonzales-Bradford, Sophia L.; Flynn, Amanda T.; Qi, Sharon L.; Peterson, Steven M.; Stanton, Jennifer S.; Ryter, Derek W.; Sohl, Terry L.; Senay, Gabriel B.

    2013-01-01

    The High Plains aquifer underlies almost 112 million acres in the central United States. It is one of the largest aquifers in the Nation in terms of annual groundwater withdrawals and provides drinking water for 2.3 million people. The High Plains aquifer has gained national and international attention as a highly stressed groundwater supply primarily because it has been appreciably depleted in some areas. The U.S. Geological Survey has an active program to monitor the changes in groundwater levels for the High Plains aquifer and has documented substantial water-level changes since predevelopment: the High Plains Groundwater Availability Study is part of a series of regional groundwater availability studies conducted to evaluate the availability and sustainability of major aquifers across the Nation. The goals of the regional groundwater studies are to quantify current groundwater resources in an aquifer system, evaluate how these resources have changed over time, and provide tools to better understand a systems response to future demands and environmental stresses. The purpose of this report is to present selected data developed and synthesized for the High Plains aquifer as part of the High Plains Groundwater Availability Study. The High Plains Groundwater Availability Study includes the development of a water-budget-component analysis for the High Plains completed in 2011 and development of a groundwater-flow model for the northern High Plains aquifer. Both of these tasks require large amounts of data about the High Plains aquifer. Data pertaining to the High Plains aquifer were collected, synthesized, and then organized into digital data containers called geodatabases. There are 8 geodatabases, 1 file geodatabase and 7 personal geodatabases, that have been grouped in three categories: hydrogeologic data, remote sensing data, and water-budget-component data. The hydrogeologic data pertaining to the northern High Plains aquifer is included in three separate

  18. Geology and hydrogeology of the Dammam Formation in Kuwait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Awadi, E.; Mukhopadhyay, A.; Al-Senafy, M. N.

    The Dammam Formation of Middle Eocene age is one of the major aquifers containing useable brackish water in Kuwait. Apart from the paleokarst zone at the top, the Dammam Formation in Kuwait consists of 150-200m of dolomitized limestone that is subdivided into three members, on the basis of lithology and biofacies. The upper member consists of friable chalky dolomicrite and dolomite. The middle member is mainly laminated biomicrite and biodolomicrite. The lower member is nummulitic limestone with interlayered shale toward the base. Geophysical markers conform to these subdivisions. Core analyses indicate that the upper member is the most porous and permeable of the three units, as confirmed by the distribution of lost-circulation zones. The quality of water in the aquifer deteriorates toward the north and east. A potentiometric-head difference exists between the Dammam Formation and the unconformably overlying Kuwait Group; this difference is maintained by the presence of an intervening aquitard. Résumé La formation de Damman, d'âge Éocène moyen, est l'un des principaux aquifères du Koweit, contenant de l'eau saumâtre utilisable. A part dans sa partie supérieure où existe un paléokarst, la formation de Damman au Koweit est constituée par 150 à 200m de calcaires dolomitisés, divisés en trois unités sur la base de leur lithologie et de biofaciès. L'unité supérieure est formée d'une dolomicrite crayeuse et friable et d'une dolomie. L'unité médiane est pour l'essentiel une biomicrite laminée et une biodolomicrite. L'unité inférieure est un calcaire nummulitique avec des intercalations argileuses vers la base. Les marqueurs géophysiques sont conformes à ces subdivisions. Les analyses de carottes montrent que l'unité supérieure est la plus poreuse et la plus perméable des trois. La répartition des zones d'écoulement souterrain confirment ces données. La qualité de l'eau dans l'aquifère se dégrade en direction du nord et de l'est. Une

  19. HYDROGEOLOGY & ENGINEERING GEOLOGY HYDROGEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>Abstract:20070581 Chen Jingsheng (College of Environmental Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China); Wang Feiyue Geochemistry of Water Quality of the Yellow River Basin (Earth Science Frontiers, ISSN1005-2321, CN11-3370, 13(1), 2006, p.58-73, 27 illus., 4 tables, 13 refs., with English abstract) Key words: water quality, Yellow River

  20. Microbiological and hydrogeological assessment of groundwater in southern Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Giglio, Osvalda; Barbuti, Giovanna; Trerotoli, Paolo; Brigida, Silvia; Calabrese, Angelantonio; Di Vittorio, Giuseppe; Lovero, Grazia; Caggiano, Giuseppina; Uricchio, Vito Felice; Montagna, Maria Teresa

    2016-11-01

    This study represents the first investigation of microbiological groundwater pollution as a function of aquifer type and season for the Apulia region of southern Italy. Two hundred and seven wells were randomly selected from those monitored by the Regional Agency for Environmental Protection for emergency use. Both compulsory (Escherichia coli, Total Coliform, and Enterococci) and optional (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella spp., Heterotrophic Plate Count at 37 and 22 °C) microbiological parameters were assessed regularly at these wells. Groundwater from only 18 of the 207 (8.7 %) wells was potable; these all draw from karst-fissured aquifers. The remaining 189 wells draw from karst-fissured (66.1 %) or porous (33.9 %) aquifers. Of these, 82 (43.4 %) tested negative for Salmonella spp. and P. aeruginosa, while 107 (56.6 %) tested positive for P. aeruginosa (75.7 %), Salmonella spp. (10.3 %), or for both Salmonella spp. and P. aeruginosa (14 %). A logistic regression model shows that the probability of potable groundwater depends on both season and aquifer type. Typically, water samples were more likely to be potable in autumn-winter than in spring-summer periods (odds ratio, OR = 2.1; 95 % confidence interval, 95 % CI = 1.6-2.7) and from karst-fissured rather than porous aquifers (OR = 5.8; 95 % CI = 4.4-7.8). Optional parameters only showed a seasonal pattern (OR = 2.6; 95 % CI = 1.7-3.9). Clearly, further investigation of groundwater microbiological aspects should be carried out to identify the risks of fecal contamination and to establish appropriate protection methods, which take into account the hydrogeological and climatic characteristics of this region.

  1. Major Roads

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This data set contains roadway centerlines for major roads (interstates and trunk highways) found on the USGS 1:24,000 mapping series. These roadways are current...

  2. Major Links.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Tona

    1995-01-01

    Provides electronic mail addresses for resources and discussion groups related to the following academic majors: art, biology, business, chemistry, computer science, economics, health sciences, history, literature, math, music, philosophy, political science, psychology, sociology, and theater. (AEF)

  3. Digital Polygon Model Grid of the Hydrogeologic Framework of Bedrock Units for a Simulation of Groundwater Flow for the Lake Michigan Basin

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The hydrogeologic framework for the Lake Michigan Basin model was developed by grouping the bedrock geology of the study area into hydrogeologic units on the basis...

  4. DS926 Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina -- Key well sites

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system were developed to define an updated hydrogeologic framework as part...

  5. Hydrogeological conceptual model development and numerical modelling using CONNECTFLOW, Forsmark modelling stage 2.3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Follin, Sven (SF GeoLogic AB, Taeby (Sweden)); Hartley, Lee; Jackson, Peter; Roberts, David (Serco TAP (United Kingdom)); Marsic, Niko (Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2008-05-15

    Three versions of a site descriptive model (SDM) have been completed for the Forsmark area. Version 0 established the state of knowledge prior to the start of the site investigation programme. Version 1.1 was essentially a training exercise and was completed during 2004. Version 1.2 was a preliminary site description and concluded the initial site investigation work (ISI) in June 2005. Three modelling stages are planned for the complete site investigation work (CSI). These are labelled stage 2.1, 2.2 and 2.3, respectively. An important component of each of these stages is to address and continuously try to resolve discipline-specific uncertainties of importance for repository engineering and safety assessment. Stage 2.1 included an updated geological model for Forsmark and aimed to provide a feedback from the modelling working group to the site investigation team to enable completion of the site investigation work. Stage 2.2 described the conceptual understanding and the numerical modelling of the bedrock hydrogeology in the Forsmark area based on data freeze 2.2. The present report describes the modelling based on data freeze 2.3, which is the final data freeze in Forsmark. In comparison, data freeze 2.3 is considerably smaller than data freeze 2.2. Therefore, stage 2.3 deals primarily with model confirmation and uncertainty analysis, e.g. verification of important hypotheses made in stage 2.2 and the role of parameter uncertainty in the numerical modelling. On the whole, the work reported here constitutes an addendum to the work reported in stage 2.2. Two changes were made to the CONNECTFLOW code in stage 2.3. These serve to: 1) improve the representation of the hydraulic properties of the regolith, and 2) improve the conditioning of transmissivity of the deformation zones against single-hole hydraulic tests. The changes to the modelling of the regolith were made to improve the consistency with models made with the MIKE SHE code, which involved the introduction

  6. Hydrogeochemical characterisation of groundwater in a small watershed in a discontinuous permafrost zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochand, Marion; Molson, John; Barth, Johannes A. C.; van Geldern, Robert; Lemieux, Jean-Michel; Fortier, Richard; Therrien, René

    2017-04-01

    Impacts of climate change can already be seen in northern regions. However, the influence of increasing temperature and permafrost degradation on groundwater dynamics is still poorly understood. This study aims to improve knowledge on hydrogeological interactions in degrading permafrost environments using hydrogeochemical characterisation of groundwater. This study is being conducted in a small 2-km2 watershed, in a discontinuous permafrost zone located close to the Inuit community of Umiujaq, on the eastern shore of Hudson Bay in northern Québec, Canada. Two aquifers are being investigated, an unconfined shallow sandy aquifer located in the upper part of the watershed, and a deeper confined aquifer in sands and gravels located below the permafrost mounds. Precipitation, stream and surface water as well as ice-rich permafrost lenses were also sampled during field investigations. Various hydrogeochemical tracers including major ions, water stable isotopes (δ18OH2O and δ2HH2O), carbon phases (DIC, DOC, POC), their stable carbon isotopes (δ13C) and dating tracers (radiocarbon, tritium-helium and CFC/SF6) were analyzed. This characterisation has contributed to further understanding groundwater origin, evolution and residence time in the watershed. Preliminary results show that groundwater has a mainly Ca-HCO3 geochemical signature, typical for young and poorly evolved water. Furthermore, sample mineralisation is low, and is likely linked to limited bedrock weathering caused by short residence times, slow reaction rates as well as low levels of dissolved CO2 due to suppressed biological activity in the catchment. Inter-annual variation of major ions in the deeper aquifer is low. All groundwater samples have significant tritium concentrations, around 8.5 TU, reflecting modern recharge. Ice-rich permafrost lenses within the top four meters of permafrost have a water stable isotope signature close to modern precipitation and groundwater. This indicates that either

  7. The role of porous matrix in water flow regulation within a karst unsaturated zone: an integrated hydrogeophysical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrière, Simon D.; Chalikakis, Konstantinos; Danquigny, Charles; Davi, Hendrik; Mazzilli, Naomi; Ollivier, Chloé; Emblanch, Christophe

    2016-05-01

    Some portions of the porous rock matrix in the karst unsaturated zone (UZ) can contain large volumes of water and play a major role in water flow regulation. The essential results are presented of a local-scale study conducted in 2011 and 2012 above the Low Noise Underground Laboratory (LSBB - Laboratoire Souterrain à Bas Bruit) at Rustrel, southeastern France. Previous research revealed the geological structure and water-related features of the study site and illustrated the feasibility of specific hydrogeophysical measurements. In this study, the focus is on hydrodynamics at the seasonal and event timescales. Magnetic resonance sounding (MRS) measured a high water content (more than 10 %) in a large volume of rock. This large volume of water cannot be stored in fractures and conduits within the UZ. MRS was also used to measure the seasonal variation of water stored in the karst UZ. A process-based model was developed to simulate the effect of vegetation on groundwater recharge dynamics. In addition, electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) monitoring was used to assess preferential water pathways during a rain event. This study demonstrates the major influence of water flow within the porous rock matrix on the UZ hydrogeological functioning at both the local (LSBB) and regional (Fontaine de Vaucluse) scales. By taking into account the role of the porous matrix in water flow regulation, these findings may significantly improve karst groundwater hydrodynamic modelling, exploitation, and sustainable management.

  8. The role of porous matrix in water flow regulation within a karst unsaturated zone: an integrated hydrogeophysical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrière, Simon D.; Chalikakis, Konstantinos; Danquigny, Charles; Davi, Hendrik; Mazzilli, Naomi; Ollivier, Chloé; Emblanch, Christophe

    2016-11-01

    Some portions of the porous rock matrix in the karst unsaturated zone (UZ) can contain large volumes of water and play a major role in water flow regulation. The essential results are presented of a local-scale study conducted in 2011 and 2012 above the Low Noise Underground Laboratory (LSBB - Laboratoire Souterrain à Bas Bruit) at Rustrel, southeastern France. Previous research revealed the geological structure and water-related features of the study site and illustrated the feasibility of specific hydrogeophysical measurements. In this study, the focus is on hydrodynamics at the seasonal and event timescales. Magnetic resonance sounding (MRS) measured a high water content (more than 10 %) in a large volume of rock. This large volume of water cannot be stored in fractures and conduits within the UZ. MRS was also used to measure the seasonal variation of water stored in the karst UZ. A process-based model was developed to simulate the effect of vegetation on groundwater recharge dynamics. In addition, electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) monitoring was used to assess preferential water pathways during a rain event. This study demonstrates the major influence of water flow within the porous rock matrix on the UZ hydrogeological functioning at both the local (LSBB) and regional (Fontaine de Vaucluse) scales. By taking into account the role of the porous matrix in water flow regulation, these findings may significantly improve karst groundwater hydrodynamic modelling, exploitation, and sustainable management.

  9. Geology and hydrogeology of the Čemernica mountain massif, Western Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milenić Dejan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The mountain massif of Čemernica, Western Serbia, is an orogenic feature of the Inner Dinarides. Hitherto, hydrogeological prospecting of the Massif was all on a regional scale, not detailed. Only scanty data, previously collected, were mappable on a scale larger than 1:100 000. The 2005 to 2008 research of the Čemernica Mountain Massif included geological and hydrogeological reconnaissance and mapping, the employment of remote sensing, a geophysical survey, the monitoring of quantitative and qualitative groundwater variation parameters, etc. The groundwaters of Čemernica are a large potential resource of water supply to multiple users. This paper is a contribution to the study of the geology and hydrogeology of the Čemernica Mountain Massif.

  10. Analysis of vadose zone tritium transport from an underground storage tank release using numerical modeling and geostatistics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, K.H.

    1997-09-01

    Numerical and geostatistical analyses show that the artificial smoothing effect of kriging removes high permeability flow paths from hydrogeologic data sets, reducing simulated contaminant transport rates in heterogeneous vadose zone systems. therefore, kriging alone is not recommended for estimating the spatial distribution of soil hydraulic properties for contaminant transport analysis at vadose zone sites. Vadose zone transport if modeled more effectively by combining kriging with stochastic simulation to better represent the high degree of spatial variability usually found in the hydraulic properties of field soils. However, kriging is a viable technique for estimating the initial mass distribution of contaminants in the subsurface.

  11. Reef and nonreef aquifers - A comparison of hydrogeology and geochemistry, northwestern Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnoebelen, D.J.; Krothe, N.C.

    1999-01-01

    The principal bedrock aquifer system across much of Indiana consists of carbonate rocks of Silurian and Devonian age. The Silurian-Devonian aquifer system is used extensively for irrigation in northwestern Indiana and is approximately 170 m thick. Reef and nonreef carbonate aquifers in northwestern Indiana were assessed using hydrogeology (lithology, geophysical logs, aquifer tests) and geochemistry (major ions and stable isotopes). The study showed differences in water quantity and quality between the reef and nonreef aquifers. The reef aquifer had few shales, abundant fossiliferous material (up to 100 m thick), and high porosities (10 to 15%). The nonreef aquifer had abundant shales, less fossiliferous material (a few meters thick), and low porosities. Total transmissivities at the reef sites were 697 m2/d, (meters squared per day) and 4831 m2/d, compared to 46 m2/d at the nonreef site. Flowpaths in the nonreef aquifer were associated with fractures and poorly connected moldic porosity with larger fractures and better connected vuggy porosity in the reef aquifer. Water chemistry data for the nonreef aquifer showed mean concentrations of sodium (235 mg/L [milligrams per liter]), sulfate (160 mg/L), sulfide (13 mg/L), fluoride (2.7 mg/L), and dissolved solids (635 mg/L) approximately two to five times larger when compared to mean concentrations in the reef aquifer. Ground water at the nonreef site was classified as a sodium-bicarbonate type while that at the reef sites was calcium-magnesium bicarbonate. The oxygen/deuterium isotope data indicates recharge from modern precipitation and not Pleistocene-age recharge.The principal bedrock aquifer system across much of Indiana consists of carbonate rocks of Silurian and Devonian age. The Silurian-Devonian aquifer system is used extensively for irrigation in northwestern Indiana and is approximately 170 m thick. Reef and nonreef carbonate aquifers in northwestern Indiana were assessed using hydrogeology (lithology

  12. AGU Chapman Conference Hydrogeologic Processes: Building and Testing Atomistic- to Basin-Scale Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, B. [American Geophysical Union, Washington, DC (United States)

    1994-12-31

    This report presents details of the Chapman Conference given on June 6--9, 1994 in Lincoln, New Hampshire. This conference covered the scale of processes involved in coupled hydrogeologic mass transport and a concept of modeling and testing from the atomistic- to the basin- scale. Other topics include; the testing of fundamental atomic level parameterizations in the laboratory and field studies of fluid flow and mass transport and the next generation of hydrogeologic models. Individual papers from this conference are processed separately for the database.

  13. Hydrogeology of the Owego-Apalachin Elementary School Geothermal Fields, Tioga County, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, John H.; Kappel, William M.

    2015-12-22

    The hydrogeology of the Owego-Apalachin Elementary School geothermal fields, which penetrate saline water and methane in fractured upper Devonian age bedrock in the Owego Creek valley, south-central New York, was characterized through the analysis of drilling and geophysical logs, water-level monitoring data, and specific-depth water samples. Hydrogeologic insights gained during the study proved beneficial for the design of the geothermal drilling program and protection of the overlying aquifer during construction, and may be useful for the development of future geothermal fields and other energy-related activities, such as drilling for oil and natural gas in similar fractured-bedrock settings.

  14. Fracture Analysis of the Ribeirao Preto Basalts, SP: Application for Developing a Conceptual Hydrogeological Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amélia João Fernandes

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The study of the physical geology and geochemistry of the Ribeirão Preto basalts was part of a hydrogeologicalresearch, which aimed to investigate the recharge of the Guarani Aquifer System (SAG through the basalts of the SerraGeral Aquifer (ASG, a project shortly named FRATASG. In addition to the hydrogeological research, a detailed geologicalinvestigation was conducted to develop a conceptual model of groundwater fl ow in complex aquifers, as is the case ofthe fractured basalts of the ASG. Therefore, this study included a thorough structural survey and analysis of horizontaland subvertical fractures, which resulted in the identifi cation of four tectonic events. It was concluded that the verticalgroundwater flow is important up to 10 m in depth and, secondarily, up to 25 m. Horizontal fl ow, more evident up to thedepth of 50 m, predominates and occurs along sub-horizontal fractures, which occur mainly at the contact between basalts2 and 3 and in its vicinity. Because the great majority of subvertical fractures do not propagate into the vesicular layers,which occur at the basalt contacts, it is suggested that these layers act as regional hydraulic barriers, and greatly hamperthe recharge of the SAG through the ASG. As a consequence, groundwater flow in the basalt stack is of stratabound type,as it occurs mainly along the basalt contacts. Based on diagnostic features of the fl ow, it is proposed in this study that the vertical flow,which crosses the basalt stack reaching the SAG, is local and probably occurs along NE structures.

  15. Hydrogeology and hydrogeochemistry at a site of strategic importance: the Pareja Limno-reservoir drainage basin (Guadalajara, central Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Navarro, Eugenio; Sastre-Merlín, Antonio; Vicente, Rosa; Martínez-Pérez, Silvia

    2014-08-01

    A small calcareous basin in central Spain was studied to establish the role of groundwater in the Pareja Limno-reservoir. Limno-reservoirs aim to preserve a constant water level in the riverine zone of large reservoirs to mitigate the impacts arising from their construction. Groundwater flow contribution (mean 60 %) was derived by recharge estimation. In situ measurements (spring discharge, electrical conductivity and sulfate) were undertaken and spring discharge was compared with a drought index. Twenty-eight springs were monitored and three hydrogeological units (HGUs) were defined: a carbonate plateau (HGU1), the underlying aquitard (HGU2), and the gypsum-enriched HGU3. HGU1 is the main aquifer and may play a role in the preservation of the limno-reservoir water level. Hydrogeochemical sampling was conducted and the code PHREEQC used to describe the main geochemical processes. Weathering and dissolution of calcite and gypsum seem to control the hydrogeochemical processes in the basin. Water progresses from Ca2+-HCO3 - in the upper basin to Ca2+-SO4 2- in the lower basin, where HGU3 outcrops. A clear temporal pattern was observed in the limno-reservoir, with salinity decreasing in winter and increasing in summer. This variation was wider at the river outlet, but the mixing of the river discharge with limno-reservoir water buffered it.

  16. Long-range properties and data validity for hydrogeological time series: The case of the Paglia river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausloos, Marcel; Cerqueti, Roy; Lupi, Claudio

    2017-03-01

    This paper explores a large collection of about 377,000 observations, spanning more than 20 years with a frequency of 30 min, of the streamflow of the Paglia river, in central Italy. We analyze the long-term persistence properties of the series by computing the Hurst exponent, not only in its original form but also under an evolutionary point of view by analyzing the Hurst exponents over a rolling windows basis. The methodological tool adopted for the persistence is the detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA), which is classically known as suitable for our purpose. As an ancillary exploration, we implement a control on the data validity by assessing if the data exhibit the regularity stated by Benford's law. Results are interesting under different viewpoints. First, we show that the Paglia river streamflow exhibits periodicities which broadly suggest the existence of some common behavior with El Niño and the North Atlantic Oscillations: this specifically points to a (not necessarily direct) effect of these oceanic phenomena on the hydrogeological equilibria of very far geographical zones: however, such an hypothesis needs further analyses to be validated. Second, the series of streamflows shows an antipersistent behavior. Third, data are not consistent with Benford's law: this suggests that the measurement criteria should be opportunely revised. Fourth, the streamflow distribution is well approximated by a discrete generalized Beta distribution: this is well in accordance with the measured streamflows being the outcome of a complex system.

  17. Hydrogeologic framework of LaSalle County, Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Robert T.; Bailey, Clinton R.

    2016-10-28

    Water-supply needs in LaSalle County in northern Illinois are met by surface water and groundwater. Water-supply needs are expected to increase to serve future residential and mining uses. Available information on water use, geology, surface-water and groundwater hydrology, and water quality provides a hydrogeologic framework for LaSalle County that can be used to help plan the future use of the water resources.The Illinois, Fox, and Vermilion Rivers are the primary surface-water bodies in LaSalle County. These and other surface-water bodies are used for wastewater disposal in the county. The Vermilion River is used as a drinking-water supply in the southern part of the county. Water from the Illinois and Fox Rivers also is used for the generation of electric power.Glacial drift aquifers capable of yielding sufficient water for public supply are expected to be present in the Illinois River Valley in the western part of the county, the Troy Bedrock Valley in the northwestern part of the county, and in the Ticona Bedrock Valley in the south-central part of the county. Glacial drift aquifers capable of yielding sufficient water for residential supply are present in most of the county, although well yield often needs to be improved by using large-diameter wells. Arsenic concentrations above health-based standards have been detected in some wells in this aquifer. These aquifers are a viable source for additional water supply in some areas, but would require further characterization prior to full development.Shallow bedrock deposits comprising the sandstone units of the Ancell Group, the Prairie du Chien Group, dolomite of the Galena and Platteville Groups, and Silurian-aged dolomite are utilized for water supply where these units are at or near the bedrock surface or where overlain by Pennsylvanian-aged deposits. The availability of water from the shallow bedrock deposits depends primarily on the geologic unit analyzed. All these deposits can yield sufficient water for

  18. Combined Estimation of Hydrogeologic Conceptual Model and Parameter Uncertainty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Philip D.; Ye, Ming; Neuman, Shlomo P.; Cantrell, Kirk J.

    2004-03-01

    The objective of the research described in this report is the development and application of a methodology for comprehensively assessing the hydrogeologic uncertainties involved in dose assessment, including uncertainties associated with conceptual models, parameters, and scenarios. This report describes and applies a statistical method to quantitatively estimate the combined uncertainty in model predictions arising from conceptual model and parameter uncertainties. The method relies on model averaging to combine the predictions of a set of alternative models. Implementation is driven by the available data. When there is minimal site-specific data the method can be carried out with prior parameter estimates based on generic data and subjective prior model probabilities. For sites with observations of system behavior (and optionally data characterizing model parameters), the method uses model calibration to update the prior parameter estimates and model probabilities based on the correspondence between model predictions and site observations. The set of model alternatives can contain both simplified and complex models, with the requirement that all models be based on the same set of data. The method was applied to the geostatistical modeling of air permeability at a fractured rock site. Seven alternative variogram models of log air permeability were considered to represent data from single-hole pneumatic injection tests in six boreholes at the site. Unbiased maximum likelihood estimates of variogram and drift parameters were obtained for each model. Standard information criteria provided an ambiguous ranking of the models, which would not justify selecting one of them and discarding all others as is commonly done in practice. Instead, some of the models were eliminated based on their negligibly small updated probabilities and the rest were used to project the measured log permeabilities by kriging onto a rock volume containing the six boreholes. These four

  19. Groundwater geochemistry of the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico: Constraints on stratigraphy and hydrogeology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Eugene; Paytan, Adina; Pedersen, Bianca; Velazquez-Oliman, Guadalupe

    2009-03-01

    SummaryWe report 87Sr/ 86Sr and ion concentrations of sulfate, chloride, and strontium in the groundwater of the northern and central Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. Correlation between these data indicates that ejecta from the 65.95 m.y. old Chicxulub impact crater have an important effect on hydrogeology, geomorphology, and soil development of the region. Ejecta are present at relatively shallow subsurface depths in north-central Yucatan and at the surface along the Rio Hondo escarpment in southeast Quintana Roo, where they are referred to as the Albion Formation. Anhydrite/gypsum (and by inference celestite) are common in impact ejecta clasts and in beds and cements of overlying Paleocene and Lower Eocene rocks cored around the margin of the crater. The sulfate-rich minerals that are found in rocks immediately overlying the impact ejecta blanket, may either be partially mobilized from the ejecta layer itself or may have been deposited after the K/T impact event in an extensive pre-Oligocene shallow sea. These deposits form a distinctive sedimentary package that can be easily traced by the Eocene-Cretaceous 87Sr/ 86Sr signal. A distinct Sr isotopic signature and high SO 4/Cl ratios are observed in groundwater of northwestern and north-central Yucatan that interacts with these rocks. Moreover, the distribution of the gypsum-rich stratigraphic unit provides a solution-enhanced subsurface drainage pathway for a broad region characterized by dissolution features (poljes) extending from Chetumal, Quintana Roo to Campeche, Campeche. The presence of gypsum quarries in the area is also consistent with a sulfate-rich stratigraphic "package" that includes ejecta. The distinctive chemistry of groundwater that has been in contact with evaporite/ejecta can be used to trace flow directions and confirms a groundwater divide in the northern Peninsula. Information about groundwater flow directions and about deep subsurface zones of high permeability is useful for groundwater and

  20. Natural Arsenic Pollution of Groundwater in Mining Zones of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armienta, M. A.; Rodriguez, R.; Villasennor, G.; Romero, F.; Talavera, O.; Ceniceros, N.; Aguayo, A.; Cruz, O.

    2007-05-01

    Arsenic concentrations exceeding drinking-water standards have been measured in groundwater of various areas of Mexico. This is a relevant public health problem since groundwater supplies most drinking water of the country. Although a natural source has been proposed as the cause of water contamination at most sites, the specific processes releasing As have only been identified in a few aquifers. The geological characteristics of Mexico including volcanic, geothermal, and highly mineralized zones constitute favorable environments for As occurrence. Furthermore, As-abundance in bedrock has lead Mexico to be one of the major world As-producers. As-bearing minerals like arsenopyrite, scorodite, mimetite, adamite, tennantite and nickeline can be found in several zones. Besides, arsenic may be a minor component of Fe, Ag, Cu, Pb, Zn, and Au ores. While thousands of people have been chronically exposed to As, arsenic-related health effects have been documented only for residents at some Mexican locations, like Comarca Lagunera, Zimapan, and Acambaro. Water-rock interactions may release As to water in mining areas, but ore extraction and processing produce surface wastes that can also release As to groundwater. Investigations developed in two historical mining zones revealed different As contents in groundwater. At Zimapan, a semi-arid area about 250 km NE of Mexico City, abundant arsenopyrite and hydrogeological conditions produced high As concentrations in deep wells exploited for drinking water supply. Oxidation and dissolution of As-bearing minerals mainly arsenopyrite, scorodite and tennantite released As to the fractured deep limestone aquifer. In addition, mining operations polluted shallow wells. In contrast, low levels of As were detected in wells near mine tailings in the warm sub-humid zone of Taxco, Guerrero. To explain those differences, the mineralogy and the geochemical processes occurring in tailings at both areas were studied. Results showed that besides

  1. A multidisciplinary geological and geophysical approach to define structural and hydrogeological implications of the Molinaccio spring (Spello, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercoli, Maurizio; Pauselli, Cristina; Forte, Emanuele; Di Matteo, Lucio; Mazzocca, Massimiliano; Frigeri, Alessandro; Federico, Costanzo

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, a multidisciplinary geological and geophysical approach has been applied in the complex area of Molinaccio spring (Spello, Umbria, Central Italy) to: 1) understand the large-scale geologic and tectonic structure of the area; 2) define the hydrogeological behavior of the various formations in relationship with the identified structural elements; 3) highlight at small-scale the tectonic structures and their relationships with the water caption tunnel, which is the draining structure of a still working, ancient Roman aqueduct giving water to the village of Spello and to the surrounding plain. Our approach includes different techniques like Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) and Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT), direct geological investigations, archaeological studies, GIS data collection and integration. The GPR data revealed, in the area of the water-caption tunnel, two main tectonic structures, both also confirmed by ERT data: the presence of a zone (maximum 2 m wide), interpreted as a normal fault area and an overthrust that puts in contact the permeable Scaglia Rossa limestone (Early Turonian-Middle Eocene), and the Scaglia Variegata-Cinerea marly limestones (Middle Eocene-Upper Oligocene) on the footwall, characterized by lower hydraulic permeability. Using some rough information available on the sub-surface path of the tunnel, that shows a sharp bend after a long straight course, together with the geophysical images, was possible to describe how Romans built the tunnel: they probably followed the wet outcropping rock during the excavation, and changed abruptly the dig direction when they intercepted the normal fault area, aligning then the excavation along its strike. This latter result is important also because recently a multidisciplinary project has been developed to restore and exploit the entire water supply structure, which is not only a well-preserved example of Roman remains with high archaeological value, but also a vital

  2. Fast terrain modelling for hydrogeological risk mapping and emergency management: the contribution of high-resolution satellite SAR imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nascetti

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Geomatic tools fast terrain modelling play a relevant role in hydrogeological risk mapping and emergency management. Given their complete independence from logistic constraints on the ground (as for airborne data collection, illumination (daylight, and weather (clouds conditions, synthetic aperture radar (SAR satellite systems may provide important contributions in terms of digital surface models (DSMs and digital elevation models (DEMs. For this work we focused on the potential of high-resolution SAR satellite imagery for DSM generation using an interferometric (InSAR technique and using a revitalized radargrammetric stereomapping approach. The goal of this work was just methodological. Our goal was to illustrate both the fundamental advantages and drawbacks of the radargrammetric approach with respect to the InSAR technique for DSM generation, and to outline their possible joint role in hydrogeological risk mapping and emergency management. Here, it is worth mentioning that radargrammetry procedures are independent of image coherence (unlike the interferometric approach and phase unwrapping, as well as of parsimony (only a few images are necessary. Therefore, a short time is required for image collection (from tens of minutes to a few hours, thanks to the independence from illumination and weather. The most relevant obstacles of the technique are speckle and the lack of texture impact on image matching, as well as the well-known deformations of SAR imagery (layover and foreshortening, which may produce remarkable difficulties with complex morphologies and that must be accounted for during acquisition planning. Here, we discuss results obtained with InSAR and radargrammetry applied to a COSMO-SkyMed SpotLight triplet (two stereopairs suited for radargrammetry and InSAR, sharing one common image acquired over suburbs of San Francisco (United States, which are characterized by mixed morphology and land cover. We mainly focused on urban areas and

  3. Description of climate, surface hydrology, and near-surface hydrogeology. Preliminary site description. Forsmark area - version 1.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Per-Olof [Artesia Grundvattenkonsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Werner, Kent [SWECO VIAK AB/Golder Associates AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Bosson, Emma; Berglund, Sten [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Juston, John [DBE Sweden, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2005-06-15

    conductive zones shown to exist in the upper bedrock. The sediment stratigraphy of lakes and wetlands is crucial for their function as discharge areas for groundwater. Low-permeable sediments will restrict the discharge and result in a relocation of the discharge to areas where such sediments are missing. Concerning the interactions between surface water and groundwater, it may also be noted that comparisons between measured lake water levels and groundwater levels below and around lakes indicate that the lakes in some cases may act as sources of groundwater recharge. Specifically, observations from Lake Bolundsfjaerden and Lake Eckarfjaerden show that such conditions were at hand during the dry summer of 2003. However, whether the observed water level relations correspond to significant water fluxes depends also on the hydrogeological properties of the lake sediments and the underlying Quaternary deposits. 'Old' water with high chloride content has been found below Lake Bolundsfjaerden, Lake Eckarfjaerden and Lake Gaellsbotraesket. These observations can either be interpreted as the result of a continuous discharge of deep water, or as evidence of more or less stagnant water below the lakes. Furthermore, the relations between the sea water level and the water levels in Lake Norra Bassaengen, Lake Bolundsfjaerden and Lake Lillfjaerden show that inflow of sea water can occur during periods of high sea water levels. The results from the hydrological GIS modelling support the assumptions and conclusions in the descriptive model. The flow model is highly sensitive to the topography, as this is the only parameter determining the flow pattern. Consequently, the simulated locations of recharge and discharge areas are strongly influenced by the local topography. In addition, the flat topography implies that small errors in the topographical model (the Digital Elevation Model, DEM) may have large effects on the modelled flow pattern. Ditches, diverted water courses and

  4. Numerical simulations of the impact of hydraulic anisotropy and anthropogenic activities on the complex hydrogeological system of the Lower Yarmouk Gorge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzoufka, Kalliopi; Siebert, Christian; Rödiger, Tino; Inbar, Nimrod; Shalev, Eyal; Möller, Peter; Raggad, Marwan; Rosenthal, Eliahu; Magri, Fabien

    2017-04-01

    Transient numerical simulations of coupled fluid flow and heat transport processes were conducted, to investigate (i) the impact of hydraulic anisotropy on a complex hydrogeological system and (ii) the anomalous geothermal gradient in the Upper Cretaceous (A7/B2) aquifer of the Lower Yarmouk Gorge (LYG). The N-S directed geological profile starts on the basalt-covered Golan Heights, crosses the LYG and ends at the Jordanian Ajloun Plateau. Heated fresh groundwaters ascend within the LYG from the confined A7/B2 limestone aquifer through artesian Meizar wells and artesian Muhkeibeh well field. A hydrogeological study based on high frequency water-table measurements at the Meizar wells suggested strong impact of abstraction at the Mukheibeh wells on the hydraulic head distribution north of the LYG (Shalev et al., 2015). Contrastingly, hydrochemical investigations conducted in the area concluded that recharge areas of the A7/B2 aquifer are: (i) the foothills of Mountain Hermon, (ii) the Ajloun Plateau and (iii) the Syrian Hauran Plateau, indicating the presence of a zone of high-hydraulic anisotropy along the main LYG axis. Due to this still debatable hydraulic feature, flow along the LYG principle axis is enhanced whilst flow perpendicular to it is constrained (Siebert et al., 2014). In agreement, transient simulations based on a NW-SE profile supported further the hypothesis of a structural feature existent (Magri et al., 2015). The modeled profile cross-cuts the heterogeneous zone and hence the heterogeneity was implemented as an impermeable zone by employing the Equivalent Porous Media approach. Initial 2D models managed to successfully reproduce the natural hydraulic head and temperature distributions. In subsequent simulations, by implementing Meizar abstraction rates, results revealed that mixed convection explains the anomalous temperature gradient in the area as temperature patterns of these simulations are in accordance with a temperature-depth borehole

  5. The Pliocene Yafo Formation in Israel: Hydrogeologically inert or active?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avisar, D.; Rosenthal, E.; Shulman, H.; Zilberbrand, M.; Flexer, A.; Kronfeld, J.; Ben Avraham, Z.; Fleischer, L.

    For several decades the ``Saqiye beds'' (later renamed Yafo Formation) underlying the Coastal Plain aquifer (Kurkar Group) aquifer of Israel, were regarded as an extremely thick, tectonically undisturbed, and absolutely impervious aquiclude. Following intensive groundwater exploitation from the overlying Kurkar Group aquifer, brackish and saline waters were locally encountered in the lower parts of this aquifer and always at the contact with the underlying Yafo Formation aquiclude. The present study revealed that this aquiclude is not a uniform and impervious rock unit, but rather an alternation of pervious and impervious strata within the Yafo Formation containing highly pressured fluids of different - mostly high - salinities. The permeable beds are at an angular unconformity and in direct contact with the overlying Kurkar Group aquifer. The Yafo Formation and the underlying and overlying rock units are dislocated by numerous fault systems, which facilitate accessibility of brines into the Kurkar Group aquifer. The mobilization of the saline fluids and their injection into the Kurkar Group aquifer could be due either to diffusion of saline fluids occurring in the permeable horizons of the Petah Tiqva Member through the clays of the Yafo Formation or to their upconing following intensive pumping in the Coastal Plain aquifer. It could have also been caused by up-dip movement of saline water as the result of overpressure generated by major accumulation of gas in the permeable horizons. Another possible mechanism could be hydraulic contact with pressurized brines up-flowing along fault zones from deep-seated Jurassic or Cretaceous reservoirs. The squeezing of saline interstitial water from the clays of the Yafo Formation into the overlying Kurkar Group aquifer, is of secondary importance for groundwater salinization (its input is comparable with salt input from rain). Depuis longtemps, les «couches de Saqiye», nommées maintenant formation de Yafo, constituant le

  6. Zoning Districts, Zoning, Published in 2002, Freelance.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Zoning Districts dataset, was produced all or in part from Hardcopy Maps information as of 2002. It is described as 'Zoning'. Data by this publisher are often...

  7. Radar facies of unconsolidated sediments in The Netherlands : A radar stratigraphy interpretation method for hydrogeology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overmeeren, R.A. van

    1998-01-01

    Since 1990, The Netherlands Institute of Applied Geoscience TNO has been carrying out ground penetrating radar (GPR) measurements to assess the potential for imaging and characterising different hydrogeological targets in more than 30 pilot areas in The Netherlands. The experience gained by

  8. Inventory and review of existing PRISM hydrogeologic data for the Islamic Republic of Mauritania, Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedel, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    The USGS entered into an agreement with the Mauritania Ministry of Mines and Industry to inventory and review the quality of information collected as part of the Project for Strengthening of the Institutions in the Mining Sector (PRISM). Whereas the PRISM program collected geophysical, geochemical, geological, satellite, and hydrogeologic information, this report focuses on an inventory and review of available hydrogeologic data provided to the USGS in multiple folders, files, and formats. Most of the information pertained to the hydrogeologic setting and the water budget of evaporation, evapotranspiration, and precipitation in the Choum-Zouerate area in northwestern Mauritania, and the country of Mauritania itself. Other information about the quantity and quality of groundwater was found in the relational Access database. In its present form, the limited hydrogeologic information was not amenable to conducting water balance, geostatistical, and localized numerical modeling studies in support of mineral exploration and development. Suggestions are provided to remedy many of the data's shortcomings, such as performing quality assurance on all SIPPE2 data tables and sending questionnaires to appropriate agencies, mining and other companies to populate the database with additional meteorology, hydrology, and groundwater data.

  9. Waterborne toxoplasmosis investigated and analyzed under hydrogeological assessment: new data and perspectives for further research

    Science.gov (United States)

    We present a set of data on human and chicken Toxoplasma gondii seroprevalence that was investigated and analyzed in light of groundwater vulnerability information in an area of endemic waterborne toxoplasmosis in Brazil. Hydrogeological assessment was undertaken to conduct water collection from wel...

  10. Linking Physical and Numerical Modelling in Hydrogeology Using Sand Tank Experiments and Comsol Multiphysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singha, Kamini; Loheide, Steven P., II

    2011-01-01

    Visualising subsurface processes in hydrogeology and building intuition for how these processes are controlled by changes in forcing is hard for many undergraduate students. While numerical modelling is one way to help undergraduate students explore outcomes of multiple scenarios, many codes are not user-friendly with respect to defining domains,…

  11. Inventory and Review of Existing PRISM Hydrogeologic Data for the Islamic Republic of Mauritania, Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedel, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    The USGS entered into an agreement with the Mauritania Ministry of Mines and Industry to inventory and review the quality of information collected as part of the Project for Strengthening of the Institutions in the Mining Sector (PRISM). Whereas the PRISM program collected geophysical, geochemical, geological, satellite, and hydrogeologic information, this report focuses on an inventory and review of available hydrogeologic data provided to the USGS in multiple folders, files, and formats. Most of the information pertained to the hydrogeologic setting and the water budget of evaporation, evapotranspiration, and precipitation in the Choum-Zouerate area in northwestern Mauritania, and the country of Mauritania itself. Other information about the quantity and quality of groundwater was found in the relational Access database. In its present form, the limited hydrogeologic information was not amenable to conducting water balance, geostatistical, and localized numerical modeling studies in support of mineral exploration and development. Suggestions are provided to remedy many of the data's shortcomings, such as performing quality assurance on all SIPPE2 data tables and sending questionnaires to appropriate agencies, mining and other companies to populate the database with additional meteorology, hydrology, and groundwater data.

  12. Hydrogeologic framework refinement, ground-water flow and storage, water-chemistry analyses, and water-budget components of the Yuma area, southwestern Arizona and southeastern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Jesse E.; Land, Michael; Faunt, Claudia C.; Leake, S.A.; Reichard, Eric G.; Fleming, John B.; Pool, D.R.

    2006-01-01

    The ground-water and surface-water system in the Yuma area in southwestern Arizona and southeastern California is managed intensely to meet water-delivery requirements of customers in the United States, to manage high ground-water levels in the valleys, and to maintain treaty-mandated water-quality and quantity requirements of Mexico. The following components in this report, which were identified to be useful in the development of a ground-water management model, are: (1) refinement of the hydrogeologic framework; (2) updated water-level maps, general ground-water flow patterns, and an estimate of the amount of ground water stored in the mound under Yuma Mesa; (3) review and documentation of the ground-water budget calculated by the Bureau of Reclamation, U.S. Department of the Interior (Reclamation); and (4) water-chemistry characterization to identify the spatial distribution of water quality, information on sources and ages of ground water, and information about the productive-interval depths of the aquifer. A refined three-dimensional digital hydrogeologic framework model includes the following hydrogeologic units from bottom to top: (1) the effective hydrologic basement of the basin aquifer, which includes the Pliocene Bouse Formation, Tertiary volcanic and sedimentary rocks, and pre-Tertiary metamorphic and plutonic rocks; (2) undifferentiated lower units to represent the Pliocene transition zone and wedge zone; (3) coarse-gravel unit; (4) lower, middle, and upper basin fill to represent the upper, fine-grained zone between the top of the coarse-gravel unit and the land surface; and (5) clay A and clay B. Data for the refined model includes digital elevation models, borehole lithology data, geophysical data, and structural data to represent the geometry of the hydrogeologic units. The top surface of the coarse-gravel unit, defined by using borehole and geophysical data, varies similarly to terraces resulting from the down cutting of the Colorado River. Clay A

  13. Zone refining of cadmium and related characterization

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N R Munirathnam; D S Prasad; Ch Sudheer; J V Rao; T L Prakash

    2005-06-01

    We present the zone refining results of cadmium using horizontal resistive zone refiner under constant flow of moisture free hydrogen gas. The boron impurity in cadmium can be avoided using quartz (GE 214 grade) boat in lieu of high pure graphite boat. The analytical results using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICPOES) show that majority of the impurities are less than the detection limits. Comparatively, zinc is the most difficult impurity element to remove in cadmium matrix by zone refining.

  14. Hydrogeologic Assessment of the 4-S Land and Cattle CompanyRanch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.

    2006-04-10

    Hydrogeological assessment of the 4-S Land and Cattle Company (4-S Ranch) was conducted using a combination of field investigations and a survey of available literature from nearby agricultural water districts and other entities. The 4-S Ranch has been able to meet most of its own water needs providing irrigated pasture for beef cattle by an active program of shallow groundwater pumping in these miconfined aquifer above the Corcoran Clay. Comparison of groundwater pumping on the 4-S Ranch property with groundwater pumping in the adjacent Merquin and Stevinson Water Districts shows great similarity in the well screened depths and the quality of the groundwater produced by the well fields. The pump yield for the eight active production wells on the 4-S property are comparable to the production and drainage wells in the adjacent water districts. Like these Districts the 4-S Ranch lies close to the Valley trough in a historic discharge area. The 4-S Ranch is unique in that it is bounded and bisected by several major water conveyance facilities including Bear Creek. Although the large number of potential recharge structures would suggest significant groundwater conjunctive use potential the major well field development has occurred along the length of the Eastside Canal. The Eastside Canal is known to be leaky above the ''A'' Clay the Canal passes through sandy areas and experiences significant groundwater seepage. This seepage can be intercepted by adjacent groundwater wells. Pumping adjacent to, and along the alignment of the Canal, may induce higher rates of seepage from the Eastside Canal. Groundwater quality below and adjacent to the Eastside Canal is very good, reflecting the origin of this diverted water from the Merced River. Most of the pumpage occurs in a depth interval between 30 ft and 130 ft. Safe yield estimates made using the available data show that the 4-S Ranch has sufficient resources to meet its own needs. Further exploitation of

  15. Hydrogeologic Assessment of the 4-S Land and Cattle CompanyRanch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.

    2006-04-10

    Hydrogeological assessment of the 4-S Land and Cattle Company (4-S Ranch) was conducted using a combination of field investigations and a survey of available literature from nearby agricultural water districts and other entities. The 4-S Ranch has been able to meet most of its own water needs providing irrigated pasture for beef cattle by an active program of shallow groundwater pumping in these miconfined aquifer above the Corcoran Clay. Comparison of groundwater pumping on the 4-S Ranch property with groundwater pumping in the adjacent Merquin and Stevinson Water Districts shows great similarity in the well screened depths and the quality of the groundwater produced by the well fields. The pump yield for the eight active production wells on the 4-S property are comparable to the production and drainage wells in the adjacent water districts. Like these Districts the 4-S Ranch lies close to the Valley trough in a historic discharge area. The 4-S Ranch is unique in that it is bounded and bisected by several major water conveyance facilities including Bear Creek. Although the large number of potential recharge structures would suggest significant groundwater conjunctive use potential the major well field development has occurred along the length of the Eastside Canal. The Eastside Canal is known to be leaky above the ''A'' Clay the Canal passes through sandy areas and experiences significant groundwater seepage. This seepage can be intercepted by adjacent groundwater wells. Pumping adjacent to, and along the alignment of the Canal, may induce higher rates of seepage from the Eastside Canal. Groundwater quality below and adjacent to the Eastside Canal is very good, reflecting the origin of this diverted water from the Merced River. Most of the pumpage occurs in a depth interval between 30 ft and 130 ft. Safe yield estimates made using the available data show that the 4-S Ranch has sufficient resources to meet its own needs. Further exploitation of

  16. Hydrogeological and geochemical overview of the karst aquifers in the Apuan Alps (Northwestern Tuscany, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matia Menichini

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Apuan Alps, in north-western Tuscany (Italy, have a very complex geological structure. For this reason karst springs show very different behaviours according to the geological setting of aquifer systems. More than 80 springs are fed by carbonate aquifers; flow rates (Q range from 10 to 1600 L/s, in average, temperatures range from 8 to 15 °C. Deep and very slow groundwater flow feed some low-thermal springs (20-30 °C. Major karst springs (Q > 100 L/s are concentrated in two altimetry ranges, one from 200 to 300 m a.s.l. in the seaward side (SW-NW and a second one from 500 to 600 m a.s.l. on the inner (NE-SE side of the mountain range. Most of the springs are the final destination of large karst systems developed in meta-dolomite and marbles characterized by a very rapid flow. Some springs have a regular regime and are fed by bathyphreatic systems in metamorphic rocks or by carbonate aquifers with a major contribution of fissured drainage in non-metamorphic rocks. Large physical-chemical variations, both in space and time, are observed as a consequence of lithological heterogeneity, mixing processes and hydrodynamic conditions. Most waters are of the Ca-HCO3 type, but Ca-SO4 and Na-Cl facies are also present. A wide range of electrical conductivity is recorded, with values between 0.1 μS/cm and 10 μS/cm. Significant differences in the average isotopic signature (e.g. δ18O from -5.5 to -8.5‰ of the “base-flow” are registered due to the variability of hydrogeological basins dimension and their distribution in terms of altitude range and side. In some cases, springs with similar chemical features and located close to each other, point out very different isotopes signature, thus highlighting complicated flow path of groundwater. Furthermore, different seasonal evolutions of isotopic signatures are registered.

  17. Hydrogeological study of the intensely exploited aquifer of the Santa Croce leather-producing district, Tuscany (central Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Sergio; Doveri, Marco; Cortecci, Gianni; Amadori, Michele

    2011-05-01

    A hydrogeological study was undertaken to define the groundwater circulation in the Santa Croce area (Tuscany, central Italy) where the existing multilayered aquifer has long been intensively exploited. Investigations carried out on about 150 wells revealed the existence of a deep piezometric depression (to 20 m below sea level) which drains groundwater from the entire surrounding area. Samples from about 70 water points, collected twice in 2007, were analysed for major elements and stable isotope composition. Three major groups of waters, which mix in the study area, have been distinguished: (1) waters of the Ca-Mg-HCO3 type mainly flowing along the Arno River Plain; (2) waters of the Na-K-Cl/Ca-Mg-HCO3-SO4, type with SO4 content up to 275 mg/L, inflowing from the Pisane Hills; (3) relatively high-salinity waters mainly of the Na-HCO3 type which, with Cl concentrations up to 750 mg/L, likely arise from a normal fault located at the foot of the northern hills. The characteristics of the different components are greatly affected by significant modifying processes such as cation exchange and sulfate reduction. The achieved conceptual model suggests the southern hills as the main recharging area of the aquifer system from which water circulation, characterized by pathways of different length and depth, develops.

  18. Site-Scale Saturated Zone Flow Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Zyvoloski

    2003-12-17

    The purpose of this model report is to document the components of the site-scale saturated-zone flow model at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, in accordance with administrative procedure (AP)-SIII.lOQ, ''Models''. This report provides validation and confidence in the flow model that was developed for site recommendation (SR) and will be used to provide flow fields in support of the Total Systems Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the License Application. The output from this report provides the flow model used in the ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'', MDL-NBS-HS-000010 Rev 01 (BSC 2003 [162419]). The Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport model then provides output to the SZ Transport Abstraction Model (BSC 2003 [164870]). In particular, the output from the SZ site-scale flow model is used to simulate the groundwater flow pathways and radionuclide transport to the accessible environment for use in the TSPA calculations. Since the development and calibration of the saturated-zone flow model, more data have been gathered for use in model validation and confidence building, including new water-level data from Nye County wells, single- and multiple-well hydraulic testing data, and new hydrochemistry data. In addition, a new hydrogeologic framework model (HFM), which incorporates Nye County wells lithology, also provides geologic data for corroboration and confidence in the flow model. The intended use of this work is to provide a flow model that generates flow fields to simulate radionuclide transport in saturated porous rock and alluvium under natural or forced gradient flow conditions. The flow model simulations are completed using the three-dimensional (3-D), finite-element, flow, heat, and transport computer code, FEHM Version (V) 2.20 (software tracking number (STN): 10086-2.20-00; LANL 2003 [161725]). Concurrently, process-level transport model and methodology for calculating radionuclide transport in the saturated zone at Yucca

  19. Hydrogeologic and geospatial data for the assesment of focused recharge to the Carbonate-Rock Aquifer in Genesee County, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, James E.; Kappel, William M.

    2010-01-01

    Existing hydrogeologic and geospatial data useful for the assessment of focused recharge to the carbonate-rock aquifer in the central part of Genesee County, NY, were compiled from numerous local, State, and Federal agency sources. Data sources utilized in this pilot study include available geospatial datasets from Federal and State agencies, interviews with local highway departments and the Genesee County Soil and Water Conservation District, and an initial assessment of karst features through the analysis of ortho-photographs, with minimal field verification. The compiled information is presented in a series of county-wide and quadrangle maps. The county-wide maps present generalized hydrogeologic conditions including distribution of geologic units, major faults, and karst features, and bedrock-surface and water-table configurations. Ten sets of quadrangle maps of the area that overlies the carbonate-rock aquifer present more detailed and additional information including distribution of bedrock outcrops, thin and (or) permeable soils, and karst features such as sinkholes and swallets. Water-resource managers can utilize the information summarized in this report as a guide to their assessment of focused recharge to, and the potential for surface contaminants to reach the carbonate-rock aquifer.

  20. The fault pattern in the northern Negev and southern Coastal Plain of Israel and its hydrogeological implications for groundwater flow in the Judea Group aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberger, G.; Rosenthal, E.

    1994-03-01

    On the basis of a broadly expanding data base, the hydrogeological properties of the Judea Group sequence in the northern Negev and southern Coastal Plain of Israel have been reassessed. The updated subsurface model is based on data derived from water- and oil-wells and on recent large-scale geophysical investigations. A new regional pattern of the reassessed geological through the subsurface of the study area has been revealed. In view of the reassessed geological and hydrological subsurface setting, it appears that the Judea Group aquifer should not be regarded as one continuous and undisturbed hydrological unit; owing to the occurrence of regional faults, its subaquifers are locally interconnected. These subaquifers, which contain mainly high-quality water, are juxtaposed, as a result of faulting, against Kurnub Group sandstones containing brackish paleowater. The latter Group is faulted against late Jurassic formations containing highly saline groundwater. In the Beer Sheva area, the Judea Group aquifer is vertically displaced against the Senonian and Eocene Mt. Scopus and Avdat Groups, which also contain brackish and saline water. In the southern Coastal Plain, major faults locally dissect also the Pleistocene Kurkar Group, facilitating inflow of Mg-rich groundwater deriving from Judea Group dolomites. The new geological evidence and its hydrogeological implications provide new solutions for previously unexplained salinization phenomena.

  1. Hydrogeologic investigation and establishment of a permanent multi-observational well network in Aiken, Allendale, and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina. Eight-year interim report (1986-1994). Volume 1 cluster-site description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gellici, J.A.; Reed, R.H.; Logan, W.R.; Aadland, R.K.; Simones, G.C.

    1995-05-01

    The South Carolina Department of Natural Resources, Water Resources Division (SCWRD), in collaboration with the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) is conducting a hydrogeologic investigation of the ground-water system(s) peripheral to the Savannah River Site. The study area is located in the Southeastern Coastal Plain hydrogeologic province in Aiken, Allendale and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina. Ground-water movement, quality, and availability are being evaluated in order to better protect and manage this valuable regional resource. The investigation involves a well-cluster system comparable to the one constructed on the SRS. Cluster sites are situated outside the SRS on the basis of study objectives, proximity to the plant`s borders, land availability, and for the optimization of hydrogeologic control. One to three wells are completed into each major aquifer, and at each cluster site, at least one borehole is continuously cored and geophysically logged from land surface to at least 10 feet into unweathered bedrock. Data collected from the ongoing study include 146 paleontologic and palynologic age dates, 100 x-ray diffraction analyses of clay and bulk mineralogy, 442 sieve analyses, 6,040 feet of detailed core description, mineral composition and porosity determined from thin-section analyses, and continuous water-level data. This report is a compilation and interpretation of the {open_quotes}C-well{close_quotes} data that have been generated from the project and that will be used to model and characterize the aquifers and confining units in the region.

  2. Impact of hydrogeological and geomechanical properties on surface uplift at a CO2 injection site: Parameter estimation and uncertainty quantification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, P.; Yoon, H.; Martinez, M. J.; Bishop, J. E.; Arnold, B. W.; Bryant, S.

    2013-12-01

    It is essential to couple multiphase flow and geomechanical response in order to predict a consequence of geological storage of CO2. In this study, we estimate key hydrogeologic features to govern the geomechanical response (i.e., surface uplift) at a large-scale CO2 injection project at In Salah, Algeria using the Sierra Toolkit - a multi-physics simulation code developed at Sandia National Laboratories. Importantly, a jointed rock model is used to study the effect of postulated fractures in the injection zone on the surface uplift. The In Salah Gas Project includes an industrial-scale demonstration of CO2 storage in an active gas field where CO2 from natural gas production is being re-injected into a brine-filled portion of the structure downdip of the gas accumulation. The observed data include millimeter scale surface deformations (e.g., uplift) reported in the literature and injection well locations and rate histories provided by the operators. Our preliminary results show that the intrinsic permeability and Biot coefficient of the injection zone are important. Moreover pre-existing fractures within the injection zone affect the uplift significantly. Estimation of additional (i.e., anisotropy ratio) and coupled parameters will help us to develop models, which account for the complex relationship between mechanical integrity and CO2 injection-induced pressure changes. Uncertainty quantification of model predictions will be also performed using various algorithms including null-space Monte Carlo and polynomial-chaos expansion methods. This work will highlight that our coupled reservoir and geomechanical simulations associated with parameter estimation can provide a practical solution for designing operating conditions and understanding subsurface processes associated with the CO2 injection. This work is supported as part of the Center for Frontiers of Subsurface Energy Security, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office

  3. Caldecott 4th bore tunnel project: influence of ground water flows and inflows triggered by tectonic fault zones?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhuber, G.; G. Neuhuber1, W. Klary1, A. Nitschke1, B. Thapa2, Chris Risden3, T. Crampton4, D. Zerga5

    2011-12-01

    The 4th Bore is a highway tunnel on California State Route 24 currently under construction. The 4th Bore is undertaken by the California State Department of Transportation (CALTRANS) and the Contra Costa County Transportation Commission (CCTC) to alleviate traffic congestion on SR24 connecting the cities of Oakland and Orinda in the San Francisco East Bay Area. The cost for the 4th Bore is estimated at $ 390.8 Mill. The 3,249 ft long 4th Bore tunnel will have excavated dimensions of approximately 40 ft height and 49 ft width. A total of 7 cross passages will run between the 3rd and the new 4th bore. Geology and Hydrogeology: The project is located in the Oakland Berkeley Hills of the SF Bay Area. The Caldecott Tunnels lie within the easterly assemblage of the Hayward fault zone province which consists of a sequence of sedimentary and volcanic rocks that accumulated in the interval between about 16 and 8.4 Ma (Miocene). The basal rocks of these Tertiary deposits consist of deep marine basin sediments of the Monterey Group. These rocks are overlain uncomfortably by an interbedded sequence of terrestrial sediments (Orinda Formation) and volcanic rocks (Moraga Formation). The Tertiary rocks have been folded into large amplitude, NW trending folds that are cut by N trending strike and slip faults. The SF Bay Region, which is crossed by 4 major faults (San Gregorio, San Andreas, Hayward, and Calaveras), is considered one of the more seismically active regions of the world. The active Hayward fault lies 0.9mi to the west of the Caldecott Tunnels and is the closest major fault to the project area. The tunnel is at the moment under top heading construction: West Portal (360ft) and East Portal (1,968.5ft). While major faults typically influence groundwater flow, characterization of such influences is extremely difficult because of the heterogeneity of the hydraulic systems and the different lithological parameters and influences. Four major inactive fault zones striking

  4. Peak metamorphic temperatures from Raman Spectroscopy on Carbonaceous Matter (RSCM) and δ18O and δ13C (carb) isotope composition of a major mélange zone in the South Norwegian Caledonides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakob, Johannes; Beyssac, Olivier; Boulvais, Philippe; Andersen, Torgeir B.

    2016-04-01

    A mélange in southern Norway comprises a matrix of garnet, mica- and black carbonaceous schists and phyllites of abyssal origin, interlayered with originally coarser grained siliciclastic metasediments, serpentinite conglomerates and sandstones, solitary metaperidotites and thin slivers of gneisses. Several models for the formation of the mélange have been suggested, including formation as a) an ophiolitic mélange formed during ophiolite obduction, b) an unconformable post-obduction transgressive sequence or c) a mélange formed during hyperextension along the pre-Caledonian margin of Baltica. In the past, the mélange has therefore not been treated as one single tectonic unit, but has been assigned to various tectonic positions with both outboard Iapetus and inboard Baltican origins. In this study we argue that the mélange occupies a tectonostratigraphic position below major Baltican basement nappe-complexes previously assigned to the Middle Allochthon. Furthermore, we present new consistent results on the peak metamorphic temperatures (T ˜ 500° C), based on RSCM, and a characteristic δ18Ocarb isotope composition (11-15.5 ‰ SMOW), both consistent for more than 250 km along strike of the mélange. δ13Ccarb values fall within three clusters around 1, - 2 , and - 7 ‰ (PDB), respectively. The stable isotope investigation presented here was carried out in order to explore if pre-Caledonian isotope signatures in various generations of carbonate veins and the early Ordovician fossils at Otta, could have been preserved through a later Caledonian metamorphic overprint. The results presented here however, suggest that re-equilibration of the carbonates took place in the Silurian, most likely coeval with peak metamorphism of ˜ 500° C at ˜ 420 Ma, and the main fabric development close to the base of the nappe-stack. Re-equilibration of the carbonates was assisted by the presence a pervasive static fluid, allowing for oxygen isotope exchange with the surrounding

  5. Hydrogeology of the gray limestone aquifer in southern Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Ronald S.; Cunningham, Kevin J.

    2000-01-01

    Results from 35 new test coreholes and aquifer-test, water-level, and water-quality data were combined with existing hydrogeologic data to define the extent, thickness, hydraulic properties, and degree of confinement of the gray limestone aquifer in southern Florida. This aquifer, previously known to be present only in southeastern Florida (Miami-Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach Counties) below, and to the west of, the Biscayne aquifer, extends over most of central-south Florida, including eastern and central Collier County and southern Hendry County; it is the same as the lower Tamiami aquifer to the north, and it becomes the water-table aquifer and the upper limestone part of the lower Tamiami aquifer to the west. The aquifer generally is composed of gray, shelly, lightly to moderately cemented limestone with abundant shell fragments or carbonate sand, abundant skeletal moldic porosity, and minor quartz sand. The gray limestone aquifer comprises the Ochopee Limestone of the Tamiami Formation, and, in some areas, the uppermost permeable part of an unnamed formation principally composed of quartz sand. Underlying the unnamed formation is the Peace River Formation of the upper Hawthorn Group, the top of which is the base of the surficial aquifer system. Overlying the aquifer and providing confinement in much of the area is the Pinecrest Sand Member of the Tamiami Formation. The thickness of the aquifer is comparatively uniform, generally ranging from 30 to 100 feet. The unnamed formation part of the aquifer is up to 20 feet thick. The Ochopee Limestone accumulated in a carbonate ramp depositional system and contains a heterozoan carbonate-particle association. The principal rock types of the aquifer are pelecypod lime rudstones and floatstones and permeable quartz sands and sandstones. The pore types are mainly intergrain and separate vug (skeletal-moldic) pore spaces. The rock fabric and associated primary and secondary pore spaces combine to form a dual diffuse

  6. Altitude of the top of the middle Fort Union hydrogeologic unit in the Powder River structural basin

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data represent the altitude, in feet above North American Vertical Datum of 1988 (NAVD88), of the middle Fort Union hydrogeologic unit in the Powder River...

  7. Altitude of the top of the Upper Hell Creek hydrogeologic unit in the Powder River structural basin

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data represent the altitude, in feet above North American Vertical Datum of 1988 (NAVD88), of the Upper Hell Creek hydrogeologic unit in the Powder River...

  8. Hydrogeology and hydrochemistry of groundwater-dominated lakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazmierczak, Jolanta

    , while deeper groundwater by-passes the lake by flowing underneath the gyttja sediments and discharges at the eastern sandy shore, where groundwater springs and high discharge zones (HDZ) are observed. Hydrogeochemical tracers were successfully used for estimating the general discharge distribution...... at a 25-m-wide sandy lakebed, while surface runoff from the western and southern seepage faces delivers approximately 65%. The simulated seepage rates are an acceptable approximation of the average fluxes measured with seepage meters on the eastern shore. Seepage measurements and the observation...... bottom and heterogeneities in the hydraulic properties of the lakebed have a significant influence on the groundwater flow patterns and discharge dynamics. Part of the groundwater flowing from the west and south is forced to discharge at wetlands/seepage faces at the western and southern lake shores...

  9. Anthropogenic wetlands due to over-irrigation of desert areas: a challenging hydrogeological investigation with extensive geophysical input from TEM and MRS measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behroozmand, Ahmad Ali; Teatini, Pietro; Bjergsted Pedersen, Jesper; Auken, Esben; Tosatto, Omar; Vest Christiansen, Anders

    2017-03-01

    During the last century, many large irrigation projects were carried out in arid lands worldwide. Despite a tremendous increase in food production, a common problem when characterizing these zones is land degradation in the form of waterlogging. A clear example of this phenomenon is in the Nubariya depression in the Western Desert of Egypt. Following the reclamation of desert lands for agricultural production, an artificial brackish and contaminated pond started to develop in the late 1990s, which at present extends for about 2.5 km2. The available data provide evidence of a simultaneous general deterioration of the groundwater system. An extensive hydrogeophysical investigation was carried out in this challenging environment using magnetic resonance sounding (MRS) and ground-based time-domain electromagnetic (TEM) techniques with the following main objectives: (1) understanding the hydrological evolution of the area; (2) characterizing the hydrogeological setting; and (3) developing scenarios for artificial aquifer remediation and recharge. The integrated interpretation of the geophysical surveys provided a hydrogeological picture of the upper 100 m sedimentary setting in terms of both lithological distribution and groundwater quality. The information is then used to set up (1) a regional groundwater flow and (2) a local density-dependent flow and transport numerical model to reproduce the evolution of the aquifer system and develop a few scenarios for artificial aquifer recharge using the treated water provided by a nearby wastewater treatment plant. The research outcomes point to the hydrological challenges that emerge for the effective management of water resources in reclaimed desert areas, and they highlight the effectiveness of using advanced geophysical and modeling methodologies.

  10. How fault zones impact regional permeability and groundwater systems: insights from global database of fault zone studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scibek, J.; McKenzie, J. M.; Gleeson, T.

    2014-12-01

    Regional and continental scale groundwater flow models derive aquifer permeability distributions from datasets based on hydraulic tests and calibrated local and regional flow models, however, much of this data does not account for barrier/conduit effects of fault zones, local and regional geothermal flow cells, and other fault-controlled flow systems. In this study we researched and compiled fault zone permeability and conceptual permeability models in different geologic settings from published multidisciplinary literature (structural- and hydro-geology, engineering geology of tunnels and mines, and geothermal projects among others). The geospatial database focuses on data-rich regions such as North America, Europe, and Japan. Regionalization of the dominant conceptual models of fault zones was regionalized based on geological attributes and tested conceptually with simple numerical models, to help incorporate the effect of fault zones on regional to continental flow models. Results show that for large regional and continental scale flow modeling, the fault zone data can be generalized by geology to determine the relative importance of fault conduits vs fault barriers, which can be converted to effective anisotropy ratios for large scale flow, although local fault-controlled flow cells in rift zones require appropriate upscaling. The barrier/conduit properties of fault zones are present in all regions and rock types, and the barrier effect must be properly conceptualized in large scale flow models. The fault zone data from different geologic disciplines have different biases (e.g. outcrop studies, deep drillhole tests, tunnels, etc.) depending on scale of hydraulic tests. Finally, the calibrated recharge estimates for fault controlled flow systems may be lower than for unfaulted flow systems due to predominant barrier (regional anisotropy or permeability reduction), suggesting a "scaling effect" on recharge estimates.

  11. Hazard connected to railway tunnel construction in karstic area: applied geomorphological and hydrogeological surveys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Casagrande

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In a mature karstic system, the realisation of galleries using the methodology of railway tunnel boring machine (TBM involves particular problems due to the high risk of interference with groundwater (often subject to remarkable level variations and with cavities and/or thick fill deposits. In order to define groundwater features it is necessary to investigate both hydrodynamic and karstification. To define and quantify the karst phenomenon in the epikarst of the Trieste Karst (Italy, an applied geomorphological approach has been experimented with surface and cavity surveys. The surface surveys have contributed to determining the potential karst versus the different outcropping lithologies and to define the structural setting of the rocky mass also through the realisation of geostructural stations and the survey of the main lines thanks to photo-interpretation. Moreover, all the dolines and the cavities present in the area interested by the gallery have been studied by analysing the probable extension of caves and/or of the secondary fill deposits and by evaluating the different genetic models. In an area 900m large and 27km long, which has been studied because of the underground karst, there are 41 dolines having diameters superior to 100m and 93 dolines whose diameters range between 100 and 50m; the dolines whose diameters are inferior to 50m are 282. The entrances of known and registered cavities in the cadastre records are 520. The hypogeal surveys have shown 5 typologies in which it has been possible to group all the cavities present in a hypothetical intersection with the excavation. The comparison between surface and hypogeal structural data and the direction of development of cavities has allowed for the definition of highly karstified discontinuity families, thus having a higher risk. The comparison of the collected data has enabled to identify the lithologies and areas having major risk and thus to quantify the probability of

  12. Hydrogeology of the Schodack-Kinderhook Area, Renssealaer and Columbia Counties, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Richard J.

    1999-01-01

    Two glaciodeltaic outwash terraces in southern Rensselaer and northern Columbia Counties, known locally as the Schodack and Kinderhook terraces, consist of ice-contact and outwash sand and gravel and together form a regional, unconfined, stratified-drift aquifer with a combined area of 18.75 square miles. The hydrogeology of these aquifers is summarized on four maps at 1:24,000 scale, that depict (1) locations of wells and test holes, (2) surficial geology, (3) altitude of the water table, and (4) altitude of the bedrock surface.Both terraces are associated with a thin and probably discontinuous confined aquifer consisting of beds of glaciofluvial sand and gravel derived from the outwash deltas that form the two terraces. The confined aquifer is overlain by thick deposits of lacustrine silt and clay. Consultants? estimates of average hydraulic conductivity, based on aquifer tests conducted at four test wells screened in thicker sections of the confined aquifer, range from 430 to 2,360 ft/d (feet per day), with a mean of 1,150 ft/d. The mean estimate of hydraulic conductivity derived from specific-capacity data from 16 test wells screened in confined and unconfined sections of the aquifer is 640 ft/d.Reported yields for domestic wells completed in unconfined sections of the Schodack and Kinderhook terrace aquifers average 16.1 and 18.3 gal/min (gallons per minute), respectively, and reported yields of domestic wells completed in hydraulically confined sections of these terraces average 15.3 and 12.8 gal/ min, respectively. Yields from public-supply wells screened in the confined sections of the Schodack Terrace aquifer range from 50 to 1,050 gal/min and average 305 gal/min. Average annual recharge to the Schodack Terrace aquifer and adjacent upland till deposits, as estimated in a 1960 U.S. Geological Survey study, were 16.3 and 7.1 inches per square mile, respectively. Bedrock that underlies the study area has been highly modified by tectonic activity, differential

  13. Nitrate pollution from agriculture in different hydrogeological zones of the regional groundwater flow system in the North China Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianyao; Tang, Changyuan; Sakura, Yasuo; Yu, Jingjie; Fukushima, Yoshihiro

    2005-06-01

    A survey of the quality of groundwater across a broad area of the North China Plain, undertaken in 1998 to 2000, indicates that nitrate pollution is a serious problem affecting the drinking water for a vast population. The use of nitrogen (N)-fertilizer in agriculture has greatly increased over the past 20 years to meet the food needs of the rapidly expanding population. During the study, 295 water samples were collected from wells and springs to determine the water chemistry and the extent of nitrate pollution. High concentrations of nitrate, especially in a recharge area along the western side, but also in the vicinity of Beijing and locally in other parts of the plain, pose a serious problem for the drinking water supply. In places, the nitrate concentration exceeds the maximum for safe drinking water of 45 mg/L. The intense use of N-fertilizer and the widespread use of untreated groundwater for crop irrigation contribute greatly to the problem, but no doubt the disposal of industrial and municipal waste into streams and infiltrating the aquifer also contribute to the problem; however, the lack of data prevents evaluation of those sources. In the recharge area, nitrate is found at depths of as much as 50 m. Near Beijing, relatively high concentrations of nitrate occur at depths of as much as 80 m. In the discharge area, in the vicinity of the Yellow River, high concentrations of nitrate occur at depths of <8 m.

  14. Geophysical and hydrogeological characterisation of the impacts of on-site wastewater treatment discharge to groundwater in a poorly productive bedrock aquifer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donohue, Shane [School of Planning, Architecture and Civil Engineering, Queen' s University Belfast, David Keir Building, Stranmillis Road, Belfast BT9 5AG, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); McCarthy, Valerie; Rafferty, Patrick [Department of Applied Sciences, Dundalk Institute of Technology, Dublin Road, Dundalk (Ireland); Orr, Alison; Flynn, Raymond [School of Planning, Architecture and Civil Engineering, Queen' s University Belfast, David Keir Building, Stranmillis Road, Belfast BT9 5AG, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-01

    Contaminants discharging from on-site wastewater treatment systems (OSWTSs) can impact groundwater quality, threatening human health and surface water ecosystems. Risk of negative impacts becomes elevated in areas of extreme vulnerability with high water tables, where thin unsaturated intervals limit vadose zone attenuation. A combined geophysical/hydrogeological investigation into the effects of an OSWTS, located over a poorly productive aquifer (PPA) with thin subsoil cover, aimed to characterise effluent impacts on groundwater. Groundwater, sampled from piezometers down-gradient of the OSWTS percolation area displayed spatially erratic, yet temporally consistent, contaminant distributions. Electrical resistivity tomography identified an area of gross groundwater contamination close to the percolation area and, when combined with seismic refraction and water quality data, indicated that infiltrating effluent reaching the water table discharged to a deeper more permeable zone of weathered shale resting on more competent bedrock. Subsurface structure, defined by geophysics, indicated that elevated chemical and microbiological contaminant levels encountered in groundwater samples collected from piezometers, down-gradient of sampling points with lower contaminant levels, corresponded to those locations where piezometers were screened close to the weathered shale/competent rock interface; those immediately up-gradient were too shallow to intercept this interval, and thus the more impacted zone of the contaminant plume. Intermittent occurrence of faecal indicator bacteria more than 100 m down gradient of the percolation area suggested relatively short travel times. Study findings highlight the utility of geophysics as part of multidisciplinary investigations for OSWTS contaminant plume characterisation, while also demonstrating the capacity of effluent discharging to PPAs to impact groundwater quality at distance. Comparable geophysical responses observed in similar

  15. A Multifaceted Sampling Approach to Better Understanding Biogeochemical and Hydrogeological Controls on Uranium Mobility at a Former Uranium Mill Tailings Site in Riverton, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dam, W. L.; Johnson, R. H.; Campbell, S.; Bone, S. E.; Noel, V.; Bargar, J.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding uranium mobility in subsurface environments is not trivial. Obtaining sufficient data to accurately represent soil and aquifer characteristics can require unique approaches that evolve with added site knowledge. At Riverton, the primary source of uranium mill tailings remaining from ore processing was removed but contaminant plumes have persisted longer than predicted by groundwater modeling. What are the primary mechanisms controlling plume persistence? DOE is conducting new characterization studies to assist our understanding of underlying biogeochemical and hydrogeological mechanisms affecting secondary sources. A variety of field sampling techniques are being sequentially employed including augering, trenching, pore water sampling, and installing multi-level wells. In August 2012, vadose zone soil samples from 34 locations and groundwater from 103 boreholes were collected with Geoprobe ® direct push rods. Lower than expected uranium concentrations in composited shallow soils indicated the need for more focused and deeper samples. In May 2014, soil samples containing evaporites were collected along the bank of the Little Wind River; elevated uranium concentrations in evaporite minerals correlated with plume configurations and reflect contaminated groundwater discharge at the river. In September 2014, hand anger samples collected by the river and oxbow lake also indicated the presence of organic rich zones containing elevated uranium (>50 mg/kg). Subsequent samples collected from five backhoe trenches in May 2015 revealed a highly heterogeneous vadose zone composed of clay, silt, sand and cobbles containing evaporites and organic rich zones which may interact with groundwater plumes.Plans for August 2015 include sonic drilling to obtain continuous cores from the surface down to the base of the surficial aquifer with multi-level monitoring wells constructed in each borehole to assess vertical variation in groundwater chemistry. Temporary well

  16. Hydrogeology and simulation of ground-water flow at the Gettysburg Elevator Plant Superfund Site, Adams County, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Dennis J.; Goode, Daniel J.; Risser, Dennis W.

    2000-01-01

    Ground water in Triassic-age sedimentary fractured-rock aquifers in the area of Gettysburg, Pa., is used as drinking water and for industrial and commercial supply. In 1983, ground water at the Gettysburg Elevator Plant was found by the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Resources to be contaminated with trichloroethene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and other synthetic organic compounds. As part of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency?s Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, 1980 process, a Remedial Investigation was completed in July 1991, a method of site remediation was issued in the Record of Decision dated June 1992, and a Final Design Report was completed in May 1997. In cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in the hydrogeologic assessment of the site remediation, the U.S. Geological Survey began a study in 1997 to determine the effects of the onsite and offsite extraction wells on ground-water flow and contaminant migration from the Gettysburg Elevator Plant. This determination is based on hydrologic and geophysical data collected from 1991 to 1998 and on results of numerical model simulations of the local ground-water flow-system. The Gettysburg Elevator Site is underlain by red, green, gray, and black shales of the Heidlersburg Member of the Gettysburg Formation. Correlation of natural-gamma logs indicates the sedimentary rock strike about N. 23 degrees E. and dip about 23 degrees NW. Depth to bedrock onsite commonly is about 6 feet but offsite may be as deep as 40 feet. The ground-water system consists of two zones?a thin, shallow zone composed of soil, clay, and highly weathered bedrock and a thicker, nonweathered or fractured bedrock zone. The shallow zone overlies the bedrock zone and truncates the dipping beds parallel to land surface. Diabase dikes are barriers to ground-water flow in the bedrock zone. The ground-water system is generally confined or semi-confined, even at shallow depths. Depth

  17. Hydrogeologic study and underground drainage test; Estudio hidrogeologico y ensayo de drenaje de labores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1999-09-01

    Pauline mine belongs to the company Minero Siderurgica de Ponferrada, S. A., and is an underground mountain mine located in west area of Villablino colliery, in the north of Spain. Water invasion caused serious troubles in faces when the working level went deeper, in the new mining areas. Water invasion caused serious troubles in faces the working level went deeper, in the new mining areas. In order to get control on this problems, the present Hydrogeologic Study and Underground Drainage Test was carry out, with the double aim of quantifying the amount of water to be pumped in future and of minimizing the undesirable effects of water invasions in underground mining. The development of the hydrogeologic study states some alternative solutions for draining, focussing on a reliable forecasting of the quantity of water to be exhausted and the means to be undertaken in order to minimize pump costs. These options were technically and economically evaluated and the more feasible recommended. (Author)

  18. Hydrogeologic study and underground drainage test; Estudio Hidrogeologico y Ensayo de Drenaje de Labores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    Pauline mine belongs to the company Minero Siderurgica de Ponferrada, S. A., and is an underground mountain mine located in west area of Villablino colliery, in the north of Spain. Water invasion caused serious troubles in faces when the working level went deeper, in the new mining areas. In order to get control on this problems, the present HYDROGEOLOGIC STUDY AND UNDERGROUND DRAINAGE TEST was carry out, with the double aim of quantifying the amount of water to be pumped in future and of minimizing the undesirable effects of water invasions in underground mining. The development of the hydrogeologic study states some alternative solutions for draining, focusing on a reliable forecasting of the quantity of water to be exhausted and the means to be undertaken in order to minimize pump costs. These options were technically and economically evaluated and the more feasible recommended.

  19. Hydrogeologic Framework in Three Drainage Basins in the New Jersey Pinelands, 2004-06

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Richard L.; Reilly, Pamela A.; Watson, Kara M.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the New Jersey Pinelands Commission, began a multi-phase hydrologic investigation in 2004 to characterize the hydrologic system supporting the aquatic and wetland communities of the New Jersey Pinelands area (Pinelands). The Pinelands is an ecologically diverse area in the southern New Jersey Coastal Plain underlain by the Kirkwood-Cohansey aquifer system. The demand for ground water from this aquifer system is increasing as local development increases. To assess the effects of ground-water withdrawals on Pinelands stream and wetland water levels, three drainage basins were selected for detailed hydrologic assessments, including the Albertson Brook, McDonalds Branch and the Morses Mill Stream basins. Study areas were defined surrounding the three drainage basins to provide sub-regional hydrogeologic data for the ground-water flow modeling phase of this study. In the first phase of the hydrologic assessments, a database of hydrogeologic information and a hydrogeologic framework model for each of the three study areas were produced. These framework models, which illustrate typical hydrogeologic variations among different geographic subregions of the Pinelands, are the structural foundation for predictive ground-water flow models to be used in assessing the hydrologic effects of increased ground-water withdrawals. During 2004-05, a hydrogeologic database was compiled using existing and new geophysical and lithologic data including suites of geophysical logs collected at 7 locations during the drilling of 21 wells and one deep boring within the three study areas. In addition, 27 miles of ground-penetrating radar (GPR) surface geophysical data were collected and analyzed to determine the depth and extent of shallow clays in the general vicinity of the streams. On the basis of these data, the Kirkwood-Cohansey aquifer system was divided into 7 layers to construct a hydrogeologic framework model for each study area. These

  20. Hydrogeology and water quality in the Snake River alluvial aquifer at Jackson Hole Airport, Jackson, Wyoming, September 2008-June 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Peter R.

    2010-01-01

    The hydrogeology and water quality of the Snake River alluvial aquifer, at the Jackson Hole Airport in northwest Wyoming, was studied by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Jackson Hole Airport Board and the Teton Conservation District during September 2008-June 2009. Hydrogeologic conditions were characterized using data collected from 14 Jackson Hole Airport wells. Groundwater levels are summarized in this report and the direction of groundwater flow, hydraulic gradients, and estimated groundwater velocity rates in the Snake River alluvial aquifer underlying the study area are presented. Analytical results of chemical, dissolved gas, and stable isotopes are presented and summarized. Seasonally, the water table at Jackson Hole Airport was lowest in early spring and reached its peak in July, with an increase of 12 to 14 feet between April and July 2009. Groundwater flow was predominantly horizontal but had the hydraulic potential for downward flow. The direction of groundwater flow was from the northeast to the west-southwest. Horizontal groundwater velocities within the Snake River alluvial aquifer at the airport were estimated to be about 26 to 66 feet per day. This indicates that the traveltime from the farthest upgradient well to the farthest downgradient well was approximately 53 to 138 days. This estimate only describes the movement of groundwater because some solutes may move at a rate much slower than groundwater flow through the aquifer. The quality of the water in the alluvial aquifer generally was considered good. The alluvial aquifer was a fresh, hard to very hard, calcium carbonate type water. No constituents were detected at concentrations exceeding U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Maximum Contaminant Levels, and no anthropogenic compounds were detected at concentrations greater than laboratory reporting levels. The quality of groundwater in the alluvial aquifer generally was suitable for domestic and other uses; however, dissolved

  1. Interactive Three-Dimensional Visualization for Digital Hydrogeologic Framework Models: GeoWall Presentation of the Grand Canyon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, L. E.; Springer, A. E.

    2002-12-01

    Population and water use in northern Arizona are expected to double over the next fifty years. This trend, which takes in to consideration visitors to Grand Canyon National Park (over 4.4 million in 2001), makes water resource management one of the most important issues facing this high desert region. The complicated and politically charged question of how increased pumping will affect Grand Canyon springs has prompted managers to request the construction of predictive groundwater models for the large regional aquifer. To effectively implement an acceptable management plan incorporating these ground water model predictions, many stakeholders must be involved in the discussion, and they all must have a realistic understanding of the complex, but data-poor hydrogeologic system surrounding the Grand Canyon. One way to facilitate such a discussion is through the use of a GeoWall, which combines new projection technology, fast graphics cards and Linux PCs into a low cost, three-dimensional computer projection system. An interactive hydrogeologic GeoWall visualization was developed for the eastern Grand Canyon region, allowing resource managers, park visitors, and employees the opportunity to view the geologic and hydrologic resources hidden behind the canyon walls. This visualization technique will help to facilitate public discussions about the groundwater resources of the Grand Canyon and the impact that development may have on them. The most dramatic expressions of Grand Canyon ground water are the major springs issuing from dissolution-enhanced faults and fractures in the carbonate Redwall-Muav aquifer where it is exposed on the Canyon walls. Two of these springs are particularly important as both water supplies and cultural resources; Roaring Springs on the North Rim of the Grand Canyon is the sole water supply for the Park, and Havasu Springs on the South Rim is the water source for the Havasupai Indian Tribe. Municipalities and residents across northern Arizona

  2. Simulation of hydrodynamic effects of salt rejection due to permafrost. Hydrogeological numerical model of density-driven mixing, at a regional scale, due to a high salinity pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidstrand, Patrik [BERGAB, Goeteborg (Sweden); Svensson, Urban [CFE AB, Norrkoeping (Sweden); Follin, Sven [SF GeoLogic AB, Taeby (Sweden)

    2006-10-15

    The main objective of this study is to support the safety assessment of the investigated candidate sites concerning hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical issues related to permafrost. However, a more specific objective of the study is to improve the assessment of processes in relation to permafrost scenarios. The model is based on a mathematical model that includes Darcy velocities, mass conservation, matrix diffusion, and salinity distribution. Gravitational effects are thus fully accounted for. A regional groundwater flow model (POM v1.1, Simpevarp) was used as basis for the simulations. The main results of the model include salinity distributions in time. The general conclusion is that density-driven mixing processes are contained within more permeable deformation zones and that these processes are fast as compared with preliminary permafrost growth rates. The results of the simulation suggest that a repository volume in the rock mass in-between the deterministic deformation zones, approximately 150 m below the permafrost will not experience a high salinity situation due to the salt rejection process.

  3. Water geochemistry and hydrogeology of the shallow aquifer at Roosevelt Hot Springs, southern Utah: A hot dry rock prospect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vuataz, F.D.; Goff, F.

    1987-12-01

    On the western edge of the geothermal field, three deep holes have been drilled that are very hot but mostly dry. Two of them (Phillips 9-1 and Acord 1-26 wells) have been studied by Los Alamos National Laboratory for the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) resources evaluation program. A review of data and recommendations have been formulated to evaluate the HDR geothermal potential at Roosevelt. The present report is directed toward the study of the shallow aquifer of the Milford Valley to determine if the local groundwater would be suitable for use as make-up water in an HDR system. This investigation is the result of a cooperative agreement between Los Alamos and Phillips Petroleum Co., formerly the main operator of the Roosevelt Hot Springs Unit. The presence of these hot dry wells and the similar setting of the Roosevelt area to the prototype HDR site at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, make Roosevelt a very good candidate site for creation of another HDR geothermal system. This investigation has two main objectives: to assess the water geochemistry of the valley aquifer, to determine possible problems in future make-up water use, such as scaling or corrosion in the wells and surface piping, and to assess the hydrogeology of the shallow groundwaters above the HDR zone, to characterize the physical properties of the aquifer. These two objectives are linked by the fact that the valley aquifer is naturally contaminated by geothermal fluids leaking out of the hydrothermal reservoir. In an arid region where good-quality fresh water is needed for public water supply and irrigation, nonpotable waters would be ideal for an industrial use such as injection into an HDR energy extraction system. 50 refs., 10 figs., 10 tabs.

  4. Origin of VC-only plumes from naturally enhanced dechlorination in a peat-rich hydrogeologic setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippini, Maria; Amorosi, Alessandro; Campo, Bruno; Herrero-Martìn, Sara; Nijenhuis, Ivonne; Parker, Beth L.; Gargini, Alessandro

    2016-09-01

    The occurrence of vinyl chloride (VC) is often a main concern at sites contaminated with chlorinated solvents due to its high degree of toxicity and carcinogenicity. VC occurrence in aquifers is most often related to the degradation of higher chlorinated ethenes or ethanes and it is generally detected in plumes along with parent contaminants. However, specific combination of stratigraphic, hydrogeologic and geochemical conditions can enhance the degradation of parents and lead to the formation of plumes almost entirely composed of VC (i.e. VC-only plumes). This paper investigates the causes of VC-only plumes in the aquifers below the city of Ferrara (northern Italy) by combining multiple lines of evidence. The City of Ferrara is located on an alluvial lowland, built by the River Po, and is made up of alternating unconsolidated sandy aquifer and silt-clay aquitard deposits of fluvial origin. This region has been strongly impacted by prior industrial activities, with the occurrence of chlorinated compounds at several sites. VC-only plumes with uncertain source location were found at two contaminated sites. The source zone of a third plume composed of chloroethenes from PCE to VC was investigated for high resolution depositional facies architecture and contaminant distribution (contaminant concentration and Compound Specific Isotope Analysis - CSIA). The investigation suggested that degradation of PCE and TCE takes place during contaminant migration through peat-rich (swamp) layers related to the Holocene transgression, which locally act as a "reactor" for stimulating degradation with the accumulation of VC in the strongly reducing environment of the peat. Regional-scale stratigraphic architecture showed the ubiquitous occurrence of swamp layers at distinct stratigraphic levels in the investigated system and their apparent linkage to the in situ creation of the VC-only plumes.

  5. hydrogeological map of kabo sheet 80 nw topographical sheet 1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    Kabo is one of the major towns in Kano state and lies on ... water shortage problems even though with about four earthly dams in the area ... tropical wet and dry climate, coded Aw according to. Koppen's ..... Concrete lined in the village. W14.

  6. Ground-water heat pumps: an examination of hydrogeologic, environmental, legal, and economic factors affecting their use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armitage, D M; Bacon, D J; Massey-Norton, J T; Miller, J D

    1980-11-12

    Groundwater is attractive as a potential low-temperature energy source in residential space-conditioning applications. When used in conjuncton with a heat pump, ground water can serve as both a heat source (for heating) and a heat sink (for cooling). Major hydrogeologic aspects that affect system use include groundwater temperature and availability at shallow depths as these factors influence operational efficiency. Ground-water quality is considered as it affects the performance and life-expectancy of the water-side heat exchanger. Environmental impacts related to groundwater heat pump system use are most influenced by water use and disposal methods. In general, recharge to the subsurface (usually via injection wells) is recommended. Legal restrictions on system use are often stricter at the municipal and county levels than at state and Federal levels. Although Federal regulations currently exist, the agencies are not equipped to regulate individual, domestic installations. Computer smulations indicate that under a variety of climatologic conditions, groundwater heat pumps use less energy than conventional heating and cooling equipment. Life-cycle cost comparisons with conventional equipment depend on alternative system choices and well cost options included in the groundwater heat pump system.

  7. Damaging Hydrogeological Events: A Procedure for the Assessment of Severity Levels and an Application to Calabria (Southern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommaso Caloiero

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A damaging hydrogeological event (DHE is characterized by two components: a rainfall event and a subsequent damage event, which is the result of floods and landslides triggered by rainfall. The characteristics of both events depend on climatic, geomorphological and anthropogenic factors. In this paper, a methodology to classify the severity of DHEs is presented. A chart which considers indicators of both the damage (Dscore and the daily rainfall (Rscore values recorded in the study area is proposed. According to the chart, the events are classified into four types: ordinary events, with low Dscore and Rscore values; extraordinary events, with high Rscore values but low Dscore values; catastrophic events, characterized by non-exceptional rainfall (low Rscore and severe damage (high Dscore; major catastrophic events, obtained by both high Dscore and Rscore values. Using this approach, the 2013 DHE that occurred in Calabria (Italy was classified as an ordinary event, when compared to the previous ones, even though the widespread diffusion of damage data induced the perception of high severity damage. The rainfall that triggered this event confirms the negative trend of heavy daily precipitation detected in Calabria, and the damage can be ascribed more to sub-daily than daily rainfall affecting urbanized flood-prone areas.

  8. Modeling of 3d Space-time Surface of Potential Fields and Hydrogeologic Modeling of Nuclear Waste Disposal Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shestopalov, V.; Bondarenko, Y.; Zayonts, I.; Rudenko, Y.

    extension and consolidation are identified. These data correlate with results of seismic and mining works. Hydrogeological 3D Model. The hydrogeological 3D Model de- velopment starts from the upper hydrodynamic zone, for which the data are available on hydraulic parameters. After calibration of the upper model elements, the deep part of the model is developed using data about the permeability structure of the crystalline rock massif, obtained from the 3D STSM. The results of analysis and the discrepancy of hydrodynamic regime modeling are used to refine the 3D Model for the rocks per- meability structure. This iterative process of consecutive correlation and refinement of model may be repeated many times. As a result of this technique implementation, the areas of active and very slow water exchange are found, and the system is revealed of vertically alternating zones of enhanced filtration and weak permeability. Based on these data, the sites are pre-selected, which are prospective for subsequently more detailed works on grounding the possibility of nuclear wastes isolation in geological formations. The use of the methodology described above is expedient at the stage of more detailed works, if the corresponding complex is provided of geophysical, hydro- geological, field testing and modeling investigations. Summary Successful testing of 3D STSM technology was carried out starting from 1997 till 1999 by the Ministry of Emergency Situations and Nuclear Safety of Ukraine during the realization of the project "Choosing the favorable geological structures for safe isolation of dangerous nuclear wastes of Chernobyl NPP". The performed works enabled us to draw prelim- inary 3D Space-Time Surface Model, structural-kinematic and geodynamic map of 2 the region understudy. As a result, two regions were selected, which are characterized by existence of geodynamic processes of cooling, thermal shrinkage and structural substance compression of geospace medium. Such regions seem to be the

  9. Borehole Completion and Conceptual Hydrogeologic Model for the IFRC Well Field, 300 Area, Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Horner, Jacob A.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Lanigan, David C.; Thorne, Paul D.

    2009-04-20

    A tight cluster of 35 new wells was installed over a former waste site, the South Process Pond (316-1 waste site), in the Hanford Site 300 Area in summer 2008. This report documents the details of the drilling, sampling, and well construction for the new array and presents a summary of the site hydrogeology based on the results of drilling and preliminary geophysical logging.

  10. Waterborne toxoplasmosis investigated and analysed under hydrogeological assessment: new data and perspectives for further research

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    We present a set of data on human and chicken Toxoplasma gondii seroprevalence that was investigated and analysed in light of groundwater vulnerability information in an area endemic for waterborne toxoplasmosis in Brazil. Hydrogeological assessment was undertaken to select sites for water collection from wells for T. gondii oocyst testing and for collecting blood from free-range chickens and humans for anti-T. gondii serologic testing. Serologic testing of human specimens was done using conv...

  11. Types of hydrogeological response to large-scale explosions and earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbunova, Ella; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Besedina, Alina; Martynov, Vasilii

    2017-04-01

    Hydrogeological response to anthropogenic and natural impact indicates massif properties and mode of deformation. We studied uneven-aged aquifers that had been unsealed at the Semipalatinsk testing area (Kazakhstan) and geophysical observatory "Mikhnevo" at the Moscow region (Russia). Data was collected during long-term underground water monitoring that was carried out in 1983-1989 when large-scale underground nuclear explosions were realized. Precise observations of underground water response to distant earthquakes waves passage at GPO "Mikhnevo" have been conducted since 2008. One of the goals of the study was to mark out main types of either dynamic or irreversible spatial-temporal underground water response to large-scale explosions and to compare them with those of earthquakes impact as it had been presented in different papers. As far as nobody really knows hydrogeological processes that occur at the earthquake source it's especially important to analyze experimental data of groundwater level variations that was carried close to epicenter first minutes to hours after explosions. We found that hydrogeodynamic reaction strongly depends on initial geological and hydrogeological conditions as far as on seismic impact parameters. In the near area post-dynamic variations can lead to either excess pressure dome or depression cone forming that results of aquifer drainage due to rock massif fracturing. In the far area explosion effect is comparable with the one of distant earthquake and provides dynamic water level oscillations. Precise monitoring at the "Mikhnevo" area was conducted in the platform conditions far from active faults thus we consider it as a purely calm area far from earthquake sources. Both dynamic and irreversible water level change seem to form power dependence on vertical peak ground displacement velocity due to wave passage. Further research will be aimed at transition close-to-far area to identify a criterion that determines either irreversible

  12. Summary of discrete fracture network modelling as applied to hydrogeology of the Forsmark and Laxemar sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartley, Lee; Roberts, David

    2013-04-15

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) is responsible for the development of a deep geological repository for spent nuclear fuel. The permitting of such a repository is informed by assessment studies to estimate the risks of the disposal method. One of the potential risks involves the transport of radionuclides in groundwater from defective canisters in the repository to the accessible environment. The Swedish programme for geological disposal of spent nuclear fuel has involved undertaking detailed surface-based site characterisation studies at two different sites, Forsmark and Laxemar-Simpevarp. A key component of the hydrogeological modelling of these two sites has been the development of Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) concepts of groundwater flow through the fractures in the crystalline rocks present. A discrete fracture network model represents some of the characteristics of fractures explicitly, such as their, orientation, intensity, size, spatial distribution, shape and transmissivity. This report summarises how the discrete fracture network methodology has been applied to model groundwater flow and transport at Forsmark and Laxemar. The account has involved summarising reports previously published by SKB between 2001 and 2011. The report describes the conceptual framework and assumptions used in interpreting site data, and in particular how data has been used to calibrate the various parameters that define the discrete fracture network representation of bedrock hydrogeology against borehole geologic and hydraulic data. Steps taken to confirm whether the developed discrete fracture network models provide a description of regional-scale groundwater flow and solute transport consistent with wider hydraulic tests hydrochemical data from Forsmark and Laxemar are discussed. It illustrates the use of derived hydrogeological DFN models in the simulations of the temperate period hydrogeology that provided input to radionuclide transport

  13. Reliability, sensitivity, and uncertainty of reservoir performance under climate variability in basins with different hydrogeologic settings

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated how reservoir performance varied across different hydrogeologic settings and under plausible future climate scenarios. The study was conducted in the Santiam River basin, OR, USA, comparing the North Santiam basin (NSB), with high permeability and extensive groundwater storage, and the South Santiam basin (SSB), with low permeability, little groundwater storage, and rapid runoff response. We applied projections of future temperature and precipitatio...

  14. Hydrogeological investigations of the resurgence Šumetac on the river Kolpa and its tributary area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dušan Novak

    1992-12-01

    Full Text Available Within the frame of hydrogeological investigations for the substitution of water supply plant Dolski potok dye tests have been made on two of the sinking brooks.The brooks sinking at the southern borderland of Šibje hill between Mozelj and Knežja Lipa have been color traced. The dyed water reappeared in the resurgence of Šumetac on the river Kolpa after eleven resp. three days.

  15. Teaching and learning hydrogeology using a physically-based modelling framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frampton, Andrew; Dessirier, Benoit; Pannetier, Romain

    2014-05-01

    Hydrogeology involves studying the occurrence, distribution, movement and quality of water in geological formations. Hydrogeology typically enters in the curriculum of physical geography as well as civil and environmental engineering courses, is a multidisciplinary subject which encompasses several scientific areas including mathematics, physics, geology, geochemistry and numerical analysis. For applications such as resource management, decision and policy making, and an understanding and interpretation of uncertainty and risk assessment is also necessary. Teaching hydrogeology is not only challenged by its multidisciplinary nature, but also since groundwater occurrence and movement is hidden from view in the subsurface, and is generally inaccessible to direct observation. Field experiments are often costly and time consuming, and laboratory experiments limited in scale. However, suitably designed computational systems can help address such issues by providing numerical modelling investigations of field conditions. This contribution presents results from a recent project dedicated to develop an open-source, interactive, visual numerical modelling tool for teaching/learning hydrogeology, based on current pedagogical understanding of learning in higher education. It provides physically-based groundwater flow solutions within an intuitive user-friendly interface, which does not require advanced technical skills to operate. The aim is to be able to improve student's learning by providing immediate and visual feedback on groundwater flow and contaminant transport problems. The development and implementation of the tool as part of a teaching framework to address subsurface flow concepts and phenomena is presented, discussed and evaluated. By linking theoretical problem-solving exercises with modelling tasks in a learn-by-doing approach, we further discuss how student's learning experiences can be enhanced.

  16. Hydrogeological Features and Sustainable Use of Geothermal Resources: Selected Case Studies in Italy

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Within the framework of the activities aimed at studying current and future exploitation and the related sustainability of geothermal resources, and considering the key role hydrogeology plays in the study of geothermal systems and design of installations, in October 2012 the Working Group IDROGEOTER was set-up within the IAH (International Association of Hydrogeologists) Italian Chapter. The first activity of IDROGEOTER‘s workplan is the analysis of state of the art in current use of low-to ...

  17. Development of a summer field-based hydrogeology research experience for undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singha, K.

    2011-12-01

    A critical problem in motivating and training the next generation of environmental scientists is providing them with an integrated scientific experience that fosters a depth of understanding and helps them build a network of colleagues for their future. As the education part of an NSF-funded CAREER proposal, I have developed a three-week summer research experience for undergraduate students that links their classroom education with field campaigns aiming to make partial differential equations come "alive" in a practical, applied setting focused on hydrogeologic processes. This course has been offered to freshman- to junior-level undergraduate students from Penn State and also the three co-operating Historically Black Universities (HBUs)--Jackson State University, Fort Valley State University, and Elizabeth City State University-since 2009. Broad learning objectives include applying their knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering to flow and transport processes in the field and communicating science effectively in poster and oral format. In conjunction with ongoing research about solute transport, students collected field data in the Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory in Central Pennsylvania, including slug and pumping tests, ground-penetrating radar, electrical resistivity imaging, wireline logging, and optical televiewers, among other instruments. Students conducted tracer tests, where conservative solutes are introduced into a local stream and monitored. Students also constructed numerical models using COMSOL Multiphysics, a research-grade code that can be used to model any physical system; with COMSOL, students create models without needing to be trained in computer coding. With guidance, students built basic models of fluid flow and transport to visualize how heterogeneity of hydraulic and transport properties or variations in forcing functions impact their results. The development of numerical models promoted confidence in predicting flow and

  18. Coupled hydrogeological and reactive transport modelling of the Simpevarp area (Sweden)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molinero, Jorge [Amphos XXI Consulting, S.L. Pg. de Rubi, 29-31, 08197 Valldoreix, Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: jorge.molinero@amphos21.com; Raposo, Juan R.; Galindez, Juan M. [Escola Politecnica Superior, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Campus Universitario s/n, 27002 Lugo (Spain); Arcos, David; Guimera, Jordi [Amphos XXI Consulting, S.L. Pg. de Rubi, 29-31, 08197 Valldoreix, Barcelona (Spain)

    2008-07-15

    The Simpevarp area is one of the alternative sites being considered for the deep geological disposal of high level radioactive waste in Sweden. In this paper, a coupled regional groundwater flow and reactive solute transport model of the Simpevarp area is presented that integrates current hydrogeological and hydrochemical data of the area. The model simulates the current hydrochemical pattern of the groundwater system in the area. To that aim, a conceptual hydrochemical model was developed in order to represent the dominant chemical processes. Groundwater flow conditions were reproduced by taking into account fluid-density-dependent groundwater flow and regional hydrogeologic boundary conditions. Reactive solute transport calculations were performed on the basis of the velocity field so obtained. The model was calibrated and sensitivity analyses were carried out in order to investigate the effects of heterogeneities of hydraulic conductivity in the subsurface medium. Results provided by the reactive transport model are in good agreement with much of the measured hydrochemical data. This paper emphasizes the appropriateness of the use of reactive solute transport models when water-rock interaction reactions are involved, and demonstrates what powerful tools they are for the interpretation of hydrogeological and hydrochemical data from site geological repository characterization programs, by providing a qualitative framework for data analysis and testing of conceptual assumptions in a process-oriented approach.

  19. Hydrogeologic investigation of the Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility, Wilsonville, Alabama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, F.G.; Kearl, P.M.; Mumby, M.E.; Rogers, S.

    1996-09-01

    This document describes the geology and hydrogeology at the former Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development (ACLR&D) facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. The work was conducted by personnel from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Grand Junction office (ORNL/GJ) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC). Characterization information was requested by PETC to provide baseline environmental information for use in evaluating needs and in subsequent decision-making for further actions associated with the closeout of facility operations. The hydrogeologic conceptual model presented in this report provides significant insight regarding the potential for contaminant migration from the ACLR&D facility and may be useful during other characterization work in the region. The ACLR&D facility is no longer operational and has been dismantled. The site was characterized in three phases: the first two phases were an environmental assessment study and a sod sampling study (APCO 1991) and the third phase the hydraulic assessment. Currently, a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) remedial investigation (RI) to address the presence of contaminants on the site is underway and will be documented in an RI report. This technical memorandum addresses the hydrogeologic model only.

  20. Hydrogeological Prognosis with Regard to Realisation of the New Colle Di Tenda Road Tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinzia Banzato

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The doubling of Tenda pass road tunnel jointing SW France to Piedmont (Italy was planned to penetrate a complicate rock structure in which several complex play an hydrogeologic role including carbonate-Karst aquifer between flysch impervious complexes. The main problem of the project is the presence of an hydraulic circulation feeding a spring of social and economic great importance discharging into a railroad tunnel below. Approach: The authors was charged by ANAS, Italian National Roads Authority, to execute a complete hydrogeologic prognosis of the situation that will be determinate by the excavation of the new tunnel and forecast as well as possible the hazard for the tapped spring. Results: Two years research have included a complete hydrogeologic and hydrochemical survey all the hypothesized structure feeding the spring, with several bore holes used as observation wells, the use of several monitoring device for the discharge and the chemical characters of spring, a lot of laboratory tests on cements and micro-cements and other materials used in waterproofing and sustain the rocks during the excavation and the concrete lining of the tunnel. Conclusion: The study ends with the evaluation of the vulnerability of the spring and the forecasting of contamination and depletion of the spring.

  1. Hydrogeological Study of Mangrove Areas Around Guanabara Bay, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerson Cardoso da Silva Júnior;

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The study area covers part of the mangrove belt located around Guanabara Bay, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Representing a continental-marine transition, the mangrove ecosystem is very susceptible to environmental variations and impacts. The vegetation cover plays an important role in prevention of erosion and contamination processes in those areas. An ongoing extensive research effort in the Petrochemical Complex of Duque de Caxias, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil, focuses on the man-induced changes in the physical environment (soils, groundwater flow system, type and volumes of contaminants, geochemical aspects and the consequences on the neighboring mangrove ecosystem. This article describes the importance of hydrogeological studies in mangrove areas as part of an appropriate environmental assessment, taking as an example an industrial dumping area located in that Petrochemical Complex. Field work included extensive drilling and sampling to obtain basic geological and hydrogeological parameters and data in the pilot area, such as hydraulic conductivity and piezometric heads; emphasizing the tracking of possible contamination by industrial effluents and the marine influence; validation of the conceptual model with mathematical models (numerical and analytical models was carried out. Results show the great importance of well conducted and detailed hydrogeological studies to properly address environmental problems caused by industrial plants in mangrove areas.

  2. Hydrogeologic investigation of the Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility, Wilsonville, Alabama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, F.G.; Kearl, P.M.; Mumby, M.E.; Rogers, S.

    1996-09-01

    This document describes the geology and hydrogeology at the former Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development (ACLR&D) facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. The work was conducted by personnel from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Grand Junction office (ORNL/GJ) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC). Characterization information was requested by PETC to provide baseline environmental information for use in evaluating needs and in subsequent decision-making for further actions associated with the closeout of facility operations. The hydrogeologic conceptual model presented in this report provides significant insight regarding the potential for contaminant migration from the ACLR&D facility and may be useful during other characterization work in the region. The ACLR&D facility is no longer operational and has been dismantled. The site was characterized in three phases: the first two phases were an environmental assessment study and a sod sampling study (APCO 1991) and the third phase the hydraulic assessment. Currently, a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) remedial investigation (RI) to address the presence of contaminants on the site is underway and will be documented in an RI report. This technical memorandum addresses the hydrogeologic model only.

  3. The influence of bedrock hydrogeology on catchment-scale nitrate fate and transport in fractured aquifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Alison; Nitsche, Janka; Archbold, Marie; Deakin, Jenny; Ofterdinger, Ulrich; Flynn, Raymond

    2016-11-01

    Characterising catchment scale biogeochemical processes controlling nitrate fate in groundwater constitutes a fundamental consideration when applying programmes of measures to reduce risks posed by diffuse agricultural pollutants to water quality. Combining hydrochemical analyses with nitrate isotopic data and physical hydrogeological measurements permitted characterisation of biogeochemical processes influencing nitrogen fate and transport in the groundwater in two fractured bedrock aquifers with contrasting hydrogeology but comparable nutrient loads. Hydrochemical and isotopic analyses of groundwater samples collected from moderately fractured, diffusely karstified limestone indicated nitrification controlled dissolved nitrogen fate and delivery to aquatic receptors. By contrast nitrate concentrations in groundwater were considerably lower in a low transmissivity highly lithified sandstone and pyrite-bearing shale unit with patchy subsoil cover. Geophysical and hydrochemical investigations showed shallower intervals contained hydraulically active fractures where denitrification was reflected through lower nitrogen levels and an isotopic enrichment ratio of 1.7 between δ(15)N and δ(18)O. Study findings highlight the influence of bedrock hydrogeological conditions on aqueous nitrogen mobility. Investigation results demonstrate that bedrock conditions need to be considered when implementing catchment management plans to reduce the impact of agricultural practices on the quality of groundwater and baseflow in receiving rivers. Nitrate isotopic signatures in the groundwater of a freely draining catchment underlain by a karstified aquifer and a poorly draining aquifer with a low transmissivity aquifer.

  4. Validating the regional hydrogeological models with stable isotope data in precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalvāns, Andis; Babre, Alise; Popovs, Konārds; Timuhins, Andrejs; Spalviņš, Aivars

    2016-04-01

    Stable isotopes 18O and 2H are a conservative tracer in the subsurface flow. The precipitation is the primary input in the groundwater systems, hens' there should be a positive regional correlation of the stable isotope values in the groundwater and precipitation. The local recharge peculiarities should modulate the precipitation isotope signal and introduce some noise but not eliminate the correlation completely. Modelled isotope values in the precipitation (Terzer et al. 2013) were compared to the actually observed values in the groundwater (Babre et al, in print) in the Baltic Artesian Basin, located at the South-East cost of the Baltic Sea. But positive and significant correlation was not found. Two regional hydrogeological models LAMO (Spalvins et al. 2015) and MOSYS (Virbulis et al. 2013) were used to trace the likely recharge area of the considered groundwater samples. A simple particle tracing of the LAMO produced a statistically significant, positive correlation between observed δ18O values in the relatively young groundwater (modelled residence time Prize, Naples, Italy, 8, pp. 266-276. Terzer, S., Wassenaar, L. I., Araguás-Araguás, L. J., Aggarwal, P. K., 2013. Global Isoscapes for δ18O and δ2H in Precipitation: Improved Prediction Using Regionalized Climatic Regression Models. Hydrology and Earth System Sciences 17, pp. 4713-4728 Virbulis, J., Bethers U., Saks T., Sennikovs, J., Timuhins, A., 2013. Hydrogeological Model of the Baltic Artesian Basin. Hydrogeology Journal, 21, pp. 845-862

  5. Direct Push supported geotechnical and hydrogeological characterisation of an active sinkhole area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tippelt, Thomas; Vienken, Thomas; Kirsch, Reinhard; Dietrich, Peter; Werban, Ulrike

    2017-04-01

    Sinkholes represent a natural geologic hazard in areas where soluble layers are present in the subsurface. A detailed knowledge of the composition of the subsurface and its hydrogeological and geotechnical properties is essential for the understanding of sinkhole formation and propagation. This serves as base for risk evaluation and the development of an early warning system. However, site models often depend on data from drillings and surface geophysical surveys that in many cases cannot resolve the spatial distribution of relevant hydrogeological and geotechnical parameters sufficiently. Therefore, an active sinkhole area in Münsterdorf, Northern Germany, was investigated in detail using Direct Push technology, a minimally invasive sounding method. The obtained vertical high-resolution profiles of geotechnical and hydrogeological characteristics, in combination with Direct Push based sampling and surface geophysical measurements lead to a strong improvement of the geologic site model. The conceptual site model regarding sinkhole formation and propagation will then be tested based on the gathered data and, if necessary, adapted accordingly.

  6. The use of historical data for the characterisation of multiple damaging hydrogeological events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Petrucci

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Landslides, floods and secondary floods (hereinafter called phenomena triggered by rainfall and causing extensive damage are reviewed in this paper. Damaging Hydrogeological Events (DHEs are defined as the occurrence of one or more simultaneous aforementioned phenomena. A method for the characterisation of DHEs based upon historic data is proposed. The method is aimed at assessing DHE-related hazard in terms of recurrence, severity, damage, and extent of the affected area. Using GIS, the DHEs historical and climatic data collection, the geomorphological and hydrogeological characterisation of the hit areas, the characterisation of induced damage, the evaluation of triggering rainfall return period and critical duration of each DHE were carried out. The approach was applied to a test site in Southern Italy (Calabria for validation purposes. A database was set up including data from 24 events which have occurred during an 80-year period. The spatial distribution of phenomena was analysed together with the return period of cumulative rainfall. The trend of the occurred phenomena was also compared with the climatic trend. Four main types of Damaging Hydrogeological Events were identified in the study area.

  7. A review of the hydrogeologic-geochemical model for Cerro Prieto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippmann, M.J.; Truesdell, A.H.; Halfman-Dooley, S. E.; Mañónm, A.

    1991-01-01

    With continued exploitation of the Cerro Prieto, Mexico, geothermal field, there is increasing evidence that the hydrogeologic model developed by Halfman and co-workers presents the basic features controlling the movement of geothermal fluids in the system. In mid-1987 the total installed capacity at Cerro Prieto reached 620 MWc, requiring a large rate of fluid production (more than 10,500 tonnes/hr of a brine-steam mixture; August 1988). This significant mass extraction has led to changes in reservoir thermodynamic conditions and in the chemistry of the produced fluids. Pressure drawdown has caused an increase in cold water recharge in the southern and western edges of the field, and local and general reservoir boiling in parts of the geothermal system. After reviewing the hydrogeologic and geochemical models of Cerro Prieto, the exploitation-induced cold water recharge and reservoir boiling (and plugging) observed in different areas of the field, are discussed and interpreted on the basis of these models and schematic flow models that describe the hydrogeology. ?? 1991.

  8. Overview of environmental and hydrogeologic conditions at Barrow, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, K.A.

    1994-01-01

    To assist the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) in evaluating the potential effects of environmental contamination at their facility in Barrow, Alaska, a general assessment was made of the hydrologic system is the vicinity of the installation. The City of Barrow is located approximately 16 kilometers southwest of Point Barrow, the northernmost point in Alaska, and therefore lies within the region of continuous permafrost. Migration of surface or shallow- subsurface chemical releases in this environ- ment would be largely restricted by near-surface permafrost to surface water and the upper, suprapermafrost zone of the subsurface. In the arctic climate and tundra terrain of the Barrow area, this shallow environment has a limited capacity to attenuate the effects of either physical disturbances or chemical contamination and is therefore highly susceptible to degradation. Esatkuat Lagoon, the present drink- ing water supply for the City of Barrow, is located approximately 2 kilometers from the FAA facility. This lagoon is the only practical source of drinking water available to the City of Barrow because alternative sources of water in the area are (1) frozen throughout most of the year, (2) insufficient in volume, (3) of poor quality, or (4) too costly to develop and distribute.

  9. A numerical solution for the diffusion equation in hydrogeologic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, A.L.; Healy, R.W.; Striegl, R.G.

    1989-01-01

    The documentation of a computer code for the numerical solution of the linear diffusion equation in one or two dimensions in Cartesian or cylindrical coordinates is presented. Applications of the program include molecular diffusion, heat conduction, and fluid flow in confined systems. The flow media may be anisotropic and heterogeneous. The model is formulated by replacing the continuous linear diffusion equation by discrete finite-difference approximations at each node in a block-centered grid. The resulting matrix equation is solved by the method of preconditioned conjugate gradients. The conjugate gradient method does not require the estimation of iteration parameters and is guaranteed convergent in the absence of rounding error. The matrixes are preconditioned to decrease the steps to convergence. The model allows the specification of any number of boundary conditions for any number of stress periods, and the output of a summary table for selected nodes showing flux and the concentration of the flux quantity for each time step. The model is written in a modular format for ease of modification. The model was verified by comparison of numerical and analytical solutions for cases of molecular diffusion, two-dimensional heat transfer, and axisymmetric radial saturated fluid flow. Application of the model to a hypothetical two-dimensional field situation of gas diffusion in the unsaturated zone is demonstrated. The input and output files are included as a check on program installation. The definition of variables, input requirements, flow chart, and program listing are included in the attachments. (USGS)

  10. Hydrogeologic Framework, Groundwater Movement, and Water Budget in Tributary Subbasins and Vicinity, Lower Skagit River Basin, Skagit and Snohomish Counties, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savoca, Mark E.; Johnson, Kenneth H.; Sumioka, Steven S.; Olsen, Theresa D.; Fasser, Elisabeth T.; Huffman, Raegan L.

    2009-01-01

    -flow directions in the sedimentary aquifer likely reflect local topographic relief (radial flow from bedrock highs) and more regional westward flow from the mountains to the Puget Sound. The largest groundwater-level fluctuations observed during the monitoring period (October 2006 through September 2008) occurred in wells completed in the sedimentary aquifer, and ranged from about 3 to 27 feet. Water levels in wells completed in unconsolidated hydrogeologic units exhibited seasonal variations ranging from less than 1 to about 10 feet. Synoptic streamflow measurements made in August 2007 and June 2008 indicate a total groundwater discharge to creeks in the tributary subbasin area of about 13.15 and 129.6 cubic feet per second (9,520 and 93,830 acre-feet per year), respectively. Streamflow measurements illustrate a general pattern in which the upper reaches of creeks in the study area tended to gain flow from the groundwater system, and lower creek reaches tended to lose water. Large inflows from tributaries to major creeks in the study area suggest the presence of groundwater discharge from upland areas underlain by bedrock. The groundwater system within the subbasins received an average (September 1, 2006 to August 31, 2008) of about 92,400 acre-feet or about 18 inches of recharge from precipitation a year. Most of this recharge (65 percent) discharges to creeks, and only about 3 percent is withdrawn from wells. The remaining groundwater recharge (32 percent) leaves the subbasin groundwater system as discharge to the Skagit River and Puget Sound.

  11. School Zoning, Equity and Freedom: The Case of New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCulloch, Gary

    1991-01-01

    Discusses implications of major reforms in secondary school zoning in New Zealand, highlighting freedom and equity considerations. Zoning's primary aim has changed from balancing out different schools' declared needs to emphasizing parents' rights. The new zoning provisions involve both a strong role for freedom and a weak role for equity. (72…

  12. Integrated hydrogeological model of the general separations area. Volume 2: groundwater flow model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flach, G.P.; Harris, M.K.

    1997-08-01

    This report models the Gordon aquifer, the Gordon confining unit, and the `lower` aquifer zone, `tan clay` confining zone, and `upper` aquifer zone of the Water Table aquifer. The report presents structure-contour and isopach maps of each unit.

  13. Geologic Setting and Hydrogeologic Units of the Columbia Plateau Regional Aquifer System, Washington, Oregon, and Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahle, Sue C.; Olsen, Theresa D.; Morgan, David S.

    2009-01-01

    The Columbia Plateau Regional Aquifer System (CPRAS) covers approximately 44,000 square miles of northeastern Oregon, southeastern Washington, and western Idaho. The area supports a $6 billion per year agricultural industry, leading the Nation in production of apples and nine other commodities (State of Washington Office of Financial Management, 2007; U.S. Department of Agriculture, 2007). Groundwater availability in the aquifers of the area is a critical water-resource management issue because the water demand for agriculture, economic development, and ecological needs is high. The primary aquifers of the CPRAS are basalts of the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) and overlying basin-fill sediments. Water-resources issues that have implications for future groundwater availability in the region include (1) widespread water-level declines associated with development of groundwater resources for irrigation and other uses, (2) reduction in base flow to rivers and associated effects on temperature and water quality, and (3) current and anticipated effects of global climate change on recharge, base flow, and ultimately, groundwater availability. As part of a National Groundwater Resources Program, the U.S. Geological Survey began a study of the CPRAS in 2007 with the broad goals of (1) characterizing the hydrologic status of the system, (2) identifying trends in groundwater storage and use, and (3) quantifying groundwater availability. The study approach includes documenting changes in the status of the system, quantifying the hydrologic budget for the system, updating the regional hydrogeologic framework, and developing a groundwater-flow simulation model for the system. The simulation model will be used to evaluate and test the conceptual model of the system and later to evaluate groundwater availability under alternative development and climate scenarios. The objectives of this study were to update the hydrogeologic framework for the CPRAS using the available

  14. Hydrogeologic uncertainties and policy implications: The Water Consumer Protection Act of Tucson, Arizona, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, L. G.; Matlock, W. G.; Jacobs, K. L.

    The 1995 Water Consumer Protection Act of Tucson, Arizona, USA (hereafter known as the Act) was passed following complaints from Tucson Water customers receiving treated Central Arizona Project (CAP) water. Consequences of the Act demonstrate the uncertainties and difficulties that arise when the public is asked to vote on a highly technical issue. The recharge requirements of the Act neglect hydrogeological uncertainties because of confusion between "infiltration" and "recharge." Thus, the Act implies that infiltration in stream channels along the Central Wellfield will promote recharge in the Central Wellfield. In fact, permeability differences between channel alluvium and underlying basin-fill deposits may lead to subjacent outflow. Additionally, even if recharge of Colorado River water occurs in the Central Wellfield, groundwater will become gradually salinized. The Act's restrictions on the use of CAP water affect the four regulatory mechanisms in Arizona's 1980 Groundwater Code as they relate to the Tucson Active Management Area: (a) supply augmentation; (b) requirements for groundwater withdrawals and permitting; (c) Management Plan requirements, particularly mandatory conservation and water-quality issues; and (d) the requirement that all new subdivisions use renewable water supplies in lieu of groundwater. Political fallout includes disruption of normal governmental activities because of the demands in implementing the Act. Résumé La loi de 1995 sur la protection des consommateurs d'eau de Tucson (Arizona, États-Unis) a été promulguée à la suite des réclamations des consommateurs d'eau de Tucson alimentés en eau traitée à partir à la station centrale d'Arizona (CAP). Les conséquences de cette loi montrent les incertitudes et les difficultés qui apparaissent lorsque le public est appeléà voter sur un problème très technique. Les exigences de la loi en matière de recharge négligent les incertitudes hydrogéologiques du fait de la

  15. Hydrogeological aspects and environmental concerns of the New Valley Project, Western Desert, Egypt, with special emphasis on the southern area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assaad, Fakhry A.

    1988-12-01

    The New Valley Project has been given much attention in the past 20 years especially from the hydrogeological point of view concerning groundwater utilization for the reclamation of a large area of the Western Desert. Lithological, petrophysical, and petrographical studies were conducted on four wells south of Beris Oasis, namely Beris 20, Beris 15, Beris 14, and Beris 13, and are defined by latitudes 24°25'E and 24°35'E and longitudes 30°30'N and 30°46'N. The Nubian sedimentation is of Posttectonic deposition that took place over the uplifted Precambrian granitic basement and is Lower Cretaceous, whereas the upper most variegated shales of the cap rock are Upper Cretaceous. The Nubian sandstones in the area south of Beris Oasis contain hematitic stains and/or fine granular authigenic hematite, thin laminae of brown ferruginous quartzite is also recorded denoting oxidizing conditions in the basin of deposition. Thin streaks of carbonaceous shales are met with in different depths to the south of Beris area, may be taken to denote oscillations in the sea level and accordingly its depths, and are responsible for the change in the oxidation-reduction potential during the deposition of the corresponding beds. Lithologic logs were interpreted together with the electric and micro-logs for adjustment of the shale breaks and showed that there are five water-bearing zones, named from bottom to top: A, B, C, D, and E, and are mainly unfossiliferous orthoquartzites, separated from each other by impervious beds of siltstones, shales, and clays of varying thicknesses. This zoning had been found valid in other parts of the Kharga Oases and could be applied locally in the Kharga Oases area. Mechanical analysis was performed mainly on 39 samples, of which 18 were core samples and 21 were cuttings, that were raised from four wells dug in the area south of Beris Oasis, Kharga Oases. Porosity and permeability tests were carried out on the 18 core samples only. The implication of

  16. Hydrogeology and groundwater quality of the glaciated valleys of Bradford, Tioga, and Potter Counties, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, John H.; Taylor, Larry E.; Low, Dennis J.

    1998-01-01

    -drift aquifers have specific capacities an order of magnitude greater than those completed in till and bedrock, Wells completed in unconfined stratified-drift aquifers and in bedrock aquifers have the highest and lowest median specific capacities -- 24 and 0.80 gallons per minute per foot of drawdown, respectively. Wells completed in confined stratified-drift aquifers and in till have median specific capacties of 11 and 0.87 gallons per minute per foot of drawdown, respectively. The results of 223 groundwater-quality analyses indicate two major hydrogeochemical zones: (1) a zone of unrestricted groundwater flow that contains water of the calcium bicarbonate type (this zone is found in almost all of the stratified-drift aquifers, till, and shallow bedrock systems); and (2) a zone of restricted groundwater slow that contains water of the sodium chloride type (this zone is found in the bedrock, and, in some areas, in till and confined stratified-drift aquifers). Samples pumped from wells that penetrate restricted-flow zones have median concentrations of total dissolved solids, dissolved chloride, and dissolved barium of 840 and 350 milligrams per liter, and 2,100 micrograms per liter, respectively. Excessive concentrations of iron and manganese are common in the groundwater of the study area; about 50 percent of the wells sampled contain water that has iron and manganese concentrations that exceed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency secondary maximum contaminant levels of 300 and 50 micrograms per liter, respectively. Only water in the unconfined stratified-drift aquifers and the Catskill Formation has median concentrations lower than these limits.

  17. A vadose zone Transport Processes Investigation within the glacial till at the Fernald Environmental Management Project.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwing, J. (FERMCO Technology Development, Cincinnati, OH); Roepke, Craig Senninger; Brainard, James Robert; Glass, Robert John, Jr.; Mann, Michael J. A.; Holt, Robert M.; Kriel, Kelly

    2007-08-01

    This report describes a model Transport Processes Investigation (TPI) where field-scale vadose zone flow and transport processes are identified and verified through a systematic field investigation at a contaminated DOE site. The objective of the TPI is to help with formulating accurate conceptual models and aid in implementing rational and cost effective site specific characterization strategies at contaminated sites with diverse hydrogeologic settings. Central to the TPI are Transport Processes Characterization (TPC) tests that incorporate field surveys and large-scale infiltration experiments. Hypotheses are formulated based on observed pedogenic and hydrogeologic features as well as information provided by literature searches. The field and literature information is then used to optimize the design of one or more infiltration experiments to field test the hypothesis. Findings from the field surveys and infiltration experiments are then synthesized to formulate accurate flow and transport conceptual models. Here we document a TPI implemented in the glacial till vadose zone at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) in Fernald, Ohio, a US Department of Energy (DOE) uranium processing site. As a result of this TPI, the flow and transport mechanisms were identified through visualization of dye stain within extensive macro pore and fracture networks which provided the means for the infiltrate to bypass potential aquatards. Such mechanisms are not addressed in current vadose zone modeling and are generally missed by classical characterization methods.

  18. New structural, hydrogeological and hydrothermal insights on Cumbre Vieja (La Palma, Canary Islands, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barde-Cabusson, S.; Finizola, A.; Torres, P.; Víctor Villasante-Marcos, V.; Abella, R.; Aragó, S.; Berthod, C.; Ibarra, P.; Geyer Traver, A.

    2013-12-01

    Determining the link between shallow structure and volcanism is a topic of interest in Volcanology. We carried out a geophysical study devoted to the characterization of the major structural limits influencing volcanic hydrothermal activity and underground meteoric circulations in La Palma (Canary Islands). Since 1 Ma volcanic activity concentrates at the southern half of the island, on the Cumbre Vieja volcanic rift-zone. During the 1949 eruption a N-S fault system, facing west, developed in the summit area of Cumbre Vieja. This was interpreted as the surface expression of an incipient deformation zone on the western flank. The distribution of the recent activity and faulting indicate that a discontinuity may be present beneath the western flank of Cumbre Vieja, along which a future collapse may occur. Our study, which combines the application of self-potential and soil temperature measurements, provides new information to characterize and locate the limits guiding upward or downward fluid circulation and possibly associated to future failures and potential landslides on the Cumbre Vieja rift-zone. We found a clear asymmetry of the self-potential signal between the eastern and the western flanks of Cumbre Vieja. Strong infiltration of meteoric water seems to affect most of the summit axis while we observe poor variation in the self-potential values on the western flank. This could be explained by a constant thickness of the vadose zone on this flank, i.e., the presence of an impermeable layer at constant depth. This layer could correspond to the landslide interface associated to the previous Cumbre Nueva edifice destruction, on which Cumbre Vieja is currently growing. This constant self-potential pattern is interrupted by at least one other main infiltration zone, near Tajuya volcano, at 1200 m a.s.l. on the western flank, where field observation allowed identifying a small horst-graben system. However it is not clear if this fault system results from local

  19. SPECIALIZED MAPPING OF CRUSTAL FAULT ZONES. PART 2: MAIN STAGES AND PROSPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Zh. Seminsky

    2015-09-01

    the basis analysis of the scatter of joint systems, shearing angles and other relevant information. Group II.3: construction of a circle diagram for the specified mapping site with local fault poles (Fig. 8, Б, identification of conjugated systems and dynamic settings of their formation (Fig. 2, plotting the information onto the schematic map of the location under study, and marking the transregional fault zones (Fig. 7, В–К with observation sites showing similar settings and paragenesises of local faults. Group II.4: comparison between diagrams of fault poles of local ranks with reference patterns selected according to the availability of conjugated pairs of fractures (Fig. 9, Б–Г; based on the above comparison, decision making on potential formation of a paragenesis of local faults in the strike-slip, normal and reserve/thrust fault zones (Fig. 9, Д–Ж, and delineation of boundaries of such zones in the schematic map by connecting the observation sites with similar solutions (Fig. 7, Л–Н.Stage III is aimed at interpreting and includes comprehensive analyses of mapping results and priori information, construction of a final scheme of the fault zones showing their subordination by ranks (Fig. 7, О and schemes of fault zones for various structure formation stages, showing types of faults and specific features of their internal patterns, i.e. definition of the peripheral sub-zone, sub-zones of fractures of the 2nd order and, if established, the sub-zone of the major fault (Fig. 7, Л–Н.Prospects of the special mapping method can be highlighted upon its comparison with the conventional structural methods applied in studies of faults. On the one side, the method requires time-consuming mass mea­surements and special processing of 'dumb' joints; on the other side, it provides for analyses of abundant jointing data, ensures a high level of detail in mapping of patterns of fault zones, reveals rank subordination of faults and helps to determine other

  20. Consequences of marginal drainage from a raised bog and understanding the hydrogeological dynamics as a basis for restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, Shane; Johnston, Paul

    2010-05-01

    of vertical water losses in the peat profile not confined to the bog margins. Distinct zones of groundwater seepage in the marginal drains have been mapped based on hydrochemical and stable isotopic composition of the water and occur where drains have cut into permeable subsoil beneath the peat substrate and where the potentiometric surface of the regional groundwater table is below, or coincident with, the elevation at the base of the drain. Groundwater as a ‘supporting' ecological condition is usually confined to the perimeter of a raised bog, where peat and underlying clay thin towards the margin, allowing regional groundwater and peat water to converge and mix, thereby giving rise to characteristic nutrient rich ‘lagg' zone vegetation. However, in Clara Bog West it appears there is also a connection between the regional groundwater table and the high bog. Such a connection appears to be unique to Clara Bog West as a result of the prevailing geological conditions. A succession of Carboniferous Limestone to relatively permeable glacial till deposits to low permeability lacustrine clay sediment is the predominant underlying geology of the bog. However, there are areas where the glacial till protrudes through the lacustrine clay, which ordinarily isolates the high bog from underlying groundwater, thereby engendering a dependency on regional groundwater conditions. The hydrogeological data now suggest that drainage at the bog margin has created a hydraulic connection between these ‘subsoil subcrops' and the marginal drains, developed within the same subsoil, thereby lowering the regional groundwater table, steepening the hydraulic gradient and resulting in significant water loss from the main bog body. As such, understanding this hydrogeological connection is central to restoration activities that will aim to arrest subsidence and restore water levels that are indicative for ecotope development, on the high bog. Acknowledgements Clara Restoration Group: Jan

  1. A Conceptual Model of Coupled Biogeochemical and Hydrogeological Processes Affected by In Situ Cr(VI) Bioreduction in Groundwater at Hanford 100H Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faybishenko, B.; Long, P. E.; Hazen, T. C.; Hubbard, S. S.; Williams, K. H.; Peterson, J. E.; Chen, J.; Volkova, E. V.; Newcomer, D. R.; Resch, C. T.; Cantrell, K.; Conrad, M. S.; Brodie, E. L.; Joyner, D. C.; Borglin, S. E.; Chakraborty, R. C.

    2007-05-01

    The overall objective of this presentation is to demonstrate a conceptual multiscale, multidomain model of coupling of biogeochemical and hydrogeological processes during bioremediation of Cr(VI) contaminated groundwater at Hanford 100H site. A slow release polylactate, Hydrogen Release Compound (HRCTM), was injected in Hanford sediments to stimulate immobilization of Cr(VI). The HRC injection induced a 2-order-of- magnitude increase in biomass and the onset of reducing biogeochemical conditions [e.g., redox potential decreased from +240 to -130 mV and dissolved oxygen (DO) was completely removed]. A three-well system, comprised of an injection well and upgradient and downgradient monitoring wells, was used for conducting the in situ biostimulation, one regional flow (no-pumping) tracer test, and five pumping tests along with the Br-tracer injection. Field measurements were conducted using a Br ion-selective electrode and a multiparameter flow cell to collect hourly data on temperature, pH, redox potential, electrical conductivity, and DO. Groundwater sampling was conducted by pumping through specially designed borehole water samplers. Cross-borehole radar tomography and seismic measurements were carried out to assess the site background lithological heterogeneity and the migration pathways of HRC byproducts through groundwater after the HRC injection. Several alternative approaches, including conventional and fractional advective dispersion equations and geostatistical analysis, were used to characterize hydraulic and biogeochemical transport parameters. The results of a joint inversion of cross-borehole geophysical tomography and flow-rate measurements in boreholes indicate the presence of a bimodal distribution of hydraulic conductivity for Hanford sediments. The Br- concentration double-peak BTCs curves indicate that HRC injection caused an increase in the tracer travel time (mainly in the low-permeability zone) over the period of observations of about 2 years

  2. Preliminary hydrogeologic assessment of boreholes UE-25c No. 1, UE-25c No. 2, and UE-25c No. 3, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada; Water-resources investigations report 92-4016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geldon, A.L.

    1993-12-31

    The purpose of this report is to characterize the hydrogeology of saturated tuffaceous rocks penetrated by boreholes UE-25c No. 1, UE-25c No.2, and UE-25c No. 3. These boreholes are referred to collectively in this report as the C-holes. The C-holes were drilled to perform multiwell aquifer tests and tracer tests; they comprise the only complex of closely spaced boreholes completed in the saturated zone at Yucca Mountain. Results of lithologic and geophysical logging, fracture analyses, water-level monitoring, temperature and tracejector surveys, aquifer tests, and hydrochemical sampling completed at the C-hole complex as of 1986 are assessed with respect to the regional geologic and hydrologic setting. A conceptual hydrogeological model of the Yucca Mountain area is presented to provide a context for quantitatively evaluating hydrologic tests performed at the C-hole complex as of 1985, for planning and interpreting additional hydrologic tests at the C-hole complex, and for possibly re-evaluating hydrologic tests in boreholes other than the C-holes.

  3. Hydrogeology of the Olševa massif (Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jure Krivic

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Olševa consists of highly pervious carbonates, forming a relatively big fractured and karstified aquifer. Due to its high-altitude mountainous nature, the aquifer is unpolluted and therefore has to be regarded as a potential source of drinking water for the future.The Olševa aquifer is tectonically divided into three parts. Groundwater from the two smaller aquifers, covering areas of 1,9 and 0,8 km2, located in eastern part of Ol{eva massif, flows toward Northeast into Meža river basin. In spite of several transversal faults, the rest of Olševa massif forms a relatively uniform aquifer that is conveying groundwater in westerly direction towards Rjavica valley. Rjavica valley in Austria represents the discharge area of a majority of groundwater from the main Ol{eva aquifer.

  4. Zoning Districts - Volusia County HUB Zones

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Historically Underutilized Business (HUB) Zones in Volusia County. Go to http://www.sba.gov/hubzone or contact the Department of Economic Development (386) 248-8048...

  5. Geophysical and hydrogeological characterisation of the impacts of on-site wastewater treatment discharge to groundwater in a poorly productive bedrock aquifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohue, Shane; McCarthy, Valerie; Rafferty, Patrick; Orr, Alison; Flynn, Raymond

    2015-08-01

    Contaminants discharging from on-site wastewater treatment systems (OSWTSs) can impact groundwater quality, threatening human health and surface water ecosystems. Risk of negative impacts becomes elevated in areas of extreme vulnerability with high water tables, where thin unsaturated intervals limit vadose zone attenuation. A combined geophysical/hydrogeological investigation into the effects of an OSWTS, located over a poorly productive aquifer (PPA) with thin subsoil cover, aimed to characterise effluent impacts on groundwater. Groundwater, sampled from piezometers down-gradient of the OSWTS percolation area displayed spatially erratic, yet temporally consistent, contaminant distributions. Electrical resistivity tomography identified an area of gross groundwater contamination close to the percolation area and, when combined with seismic refraction and water quality data, indicated that infiltrating effluent reaching the water table discharged to a deeper more permeable zone of weathered shale resting on more competent bedrock. Subsurface structure, defined by geophysics, indicated that elevated chemical and microbiological contaminant levels encountered in groundwater samples collected from piezometers, down-gradient of sampling points with lower contaminant levels, corresponded to those locations where piezometers were screened close to the weathered shale/competent rock interface; those immediately up-gradient were too shallow to intercept this interval, and thus the more impacted zone of the contaminant plume. Intermittent occurrence of faecal indicator bacteria more than 100m down gradient of the percolation area suggested relatively short travel times. Study findings highlight the utility of geophysics as part of multidisciplinary investigations for OSWTS contaminant plume characterisation, while also demonstrating the capacity of effluent discharging to PPAs to impact groundwater quality at distance. Comparable geophysical responses observed in similar

  6. Unsaturated zone investigation at the radioactive waste storage facility site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skuratovic, Zana; Mazeika, Jonas; Petrosius, Rimantas; Jakimaviciute-Maseliene, Vaidote [Nature Research Centre, Akademijos St. 2, LT-08412, Vilnius (Lithuania); Klizas, Petras; Mokrik, Robert [Vilnius University, M.K. Ciurlionio St. 21/27, LT-03101 Vilnius (Lithuania)

    2014-07-01

    Unsaturated zone is an important part of water circulation cycle and an integral part of many hydrological and hydrogeological factors and processes. The soils of unsaturated zone are regarded as the first natural barrier to a large extent able to limit the spread of contaminants. Nuclear waste disposal site (Maisiagala radioactive waste storage facility site) was analysed in terms of the moisture movement through the unsaturated zone. Extensive data sets of the hydraulic properties, water content and isotope composition have been collected and summarized. The main experimental and observational tasks included the collection of soil samples; determination of the physical properties and the hydraulic conductivity values of soil samples, moisture extraction from the soil sample for isotopic studies; observation of the groundwater dynamics at the Maisiagala piezometer; groundwater sampling for isotopic analysis ({sup 3}H, {sup 18}O/{sup 16}O, {sup 2}H/{sup 1}H ); and monthly precipitation isotopic analysis. Distribution features of globally widespread radionuclide tritium ({sup 3}H) and the water molecule tracer isotopes in precipitation, unsaturated zone soil moisture profiles and groundwater were determined. It was used the well-known unsaturated flow and transport model of HYDRUS-1D (Simunek et al., 2008). In this study, van Genuchten equations for the retention and conductivity estimations have been used. The retention characteristics and van Genuchten model parameters were estimated internally by HYDRUS based on the empirical equations involved in the program. Basic inputs of the tritium transport simulation are the tritium input function and meteorological variables (precipitation and potential evapotranspiration). In order to validate the representativeness of the hydraulic parameters, the model has been used to estimate the tritium distribution in the unsaturated zone, which properly represents the dynamics of the unsaturated zone. The uniformity of the daily

  7. 焦作矿区煤层气开发的水文地质条件分析%Analysis on hydrogeological condition for coal bed methane exploitation in Jiaozuo coal-mine area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付江伟; 傅雪海; 胡晓; 刘爱华

    2011-01-01

    水文地质条件对煤层气的富集高产起着重要的控制作用.在系统研究焦作矿区水文地质特征的基础上,分析了水文地质条件对煤层气赋存、渗流、运移及煤层气生产的影响.焦作矿区水文地质条件,整体上有利于煤层气的赋存,但局部地下水强径流带,煤层气以水流为载体被逸散;岩溶裂隙发育区,煤系埋藏较浅而且又接近地表水体的区域,断裂发育且有可能成为导水通道的区域,地表水可能进入煤层,不利于煤层气的开采.煤层气勘探开发选择井位时,在其他条件相同情况下,煤层气井应选择存离断层较远的稍深部位.煤层气生产应合理处理可能造成的环境地质问题.%Hydrogeological conditions play an important role in high concentration of coal-bed methane.Based on the systematic study of hydro-geological characteristics in Jiaozuo Mining Area, the influence made by hydrogeological conditions on the occurrence, seepage, migration, recoverability and production of coal bed methane was analyzed.Hydrogeological conditions in Jiaozuo are over ally beneficial to the occurrence of coal bed methane, but in the strong runoff zone with local groundwater, coal bed methane migrate taking water flow as a carrier.Karsts-cranny developing area, coal region of measures exposed or buried in shallow and also closed to the surface water, which can flow into the seam through fissures will adversely affected coal bed methane mining.More developing fractures may become the water-channels, so when we select wells for coal-bed methane exploration and development, at the same conditions of other cases, the coal bed methane wells should be selected in deeper and more distant from the site of the fault.Coal bed methane production should be reasonable to deal with potential environmental geological problems.

  8. Preliminary study on hydrogeology in tectonically active areas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowry, Thomas Stephen; Lappin, Allen R.; Gettemy, Glen L.; Jensen, Richard Pearson; Arnold, Bill Walter; James, Scott Carlton; Lee, Moo Yul; Meier, Diane A.

    2006-09-01

    This report represents the final product of a background literature review conducted for the Nuclear Waste Management Organization of Japan (NUMO) by Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA. Internationally, research of hydrological and transport processes in the context of high level waste (HLW) repository performance, has been extensive. However, most of these studies have been conducted for sites that are within tectonically stable regions. Therefore, in support of NUMO's goal of selecting a site for a HLW repository, this literature review has been conducted to assess the applicability of the output from some of these studies to the geological environment in Japan. Specifically, this review consists of two main tasks. The first was to review the major documents of the main HLW repository programs around the world to identify the most important hydrologic and transport parameters and processes relevant in each of these programs. The review was to assess the relative importance of processes and measured parameters to site characterization by interpretation of existing sensitivity analyses and expert judgment in these documents. The second task was to convene a workshop to discuss the findings of Task 1 and to prioritize hydrologic and transport parameters in the context of the geology of Japan. This report details the results and conclusions of both of these Tasks.

  9. Characterization of shallow unconsolidated aquifers in West Africa using different hydrogeological data sources as a contribution to the promotion of manual drilling and low cost techniques for groundwater exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fussi, Fabio; Fumagalli, Letizia; Bonomi, Tullia; Kane, Cheikh H.; Fava, Francesco; Di Mauro, Biagio; Hamidou, Barry; Niang, Magatte; Wade, Souleye; Colombo, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    Manual drilling refers to several drilling methods that rely on human energy to construct a borehole and complete a water supply (Danert, 2015). It can be an effective strategy to increase access to groundwater in low income countries , but manual drilling can be applied only where shallow geological layers are relatively soft and water table is not too deep. It is important therefore to identify those zones where shallow hydrogeological conditions are suitable, investigating the characteristics of shallow porous aquifers. Existing hydrogeological studies are generally focused in the characterization of deep fractures aquifers, more productive and able to ensure water supply for large settlements. Information concerning shallow porous aquifers are limited. This research has been carried out in two different study areas in West Africa (North-Western Senegal and Eastern Guinea). Aim of the research is the characterization of shallow aquifer using different methods and the identification of hydrogeological condition suitable for manual drilling implementation. Three different methods to estimate geometry and hydraulic properties of shallow unconsolidated aquifers have been used: The first method is based on the analysis of stratigraphic data obtained from borehole logs of the national water point database in both countries. The following steps have been implemented on the original information using the software TANGAFRIC, specifically designed for this study: a) identification of most frequent terms used for hydrogeological description in Senegal and Guinea database; b) definition of standard categories and manual codification of data; c) automatic extraction of average distribution of textural classes at different depth intervals in the unconsolidated aquifer; d) estimation of hydraulic parameters using conversion tables between texture and hydraulic conductivity available in the literature. . The second method is based on the interpretation of pump and recovery test

  10. Hydrogeologic framework and occurrence, movement, and chemical characterization of groundwater in Dixie Valley, west-central Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntington, Jena M.; Garcia, C. Amanda; Rosen, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Dixie Valley, a primarily undeveloped basin in west-central Nevada, is being considered for groundwater exportation. Proposed pumping would occur from the basin-fill aquifer. In response to proposed exportation, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Bureau of Reclamation and Churchill County, conducted a study to improve the understanding of groundwater resources in Dixie Valley. The objective of this report is to characterize the hydrogeologic framework, the occurrence and movement of groundwater, the general water quality of the basin-fill aquifer, and the potential mixing between basin-fill and geothermal aquifers in Dixie Valley. Various types of geologic, hydrologic, and geochemical data were compiled from previous studies and collected in support of this study. Hydrogeologic units in Dixie Valley were defined to characterize rocks and sediments with similar lithologies and hydraulic properties influencing groundwater flow. Hydraulic properties of the basin-fill deposits were characterized by transmissivity estimated from aquifer tests and specific-capacity tests. Groundwater-level measurements and hydrogeologic-unit data were combined to create a potentiometric surface map and to characterize groundwater occurrence and movement. Subsurface inflow from adjacent valleys into Dixie Valley through the basin-fill aquifer was evaluated using hydraulic gradients and Darcy flux computations. The chemical signature and groundwater quality of the Dixie Valley basin-fill aquifer, and potential mixing between basin-fill and geothermal aquifers, were evaluated using chemical data collected from wells and springs during the current study and from previous investigations. Dixie Valley is the terminus of the Dixie Valley flow system, which includes Pleasant, Jersey, Fairview, Stingaree, Cowkick, and Eastgate Valleys. The freshwater aquifer in the study area is composed of unconsolidated basin-fill deposits of Quaternary age. The basin-fill hydrogeologic unit

  11. The KINDRA H2020 Project: a knowledge inventory for hydrogeology research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petitta, Marco; Bodo, Balazs; Caschetto, Mariachiara; Correia, Victor; Cseko, Adrienn; Fernandez, Isabel; Hartai, Eva; Hinsby, Klaus; Madarasz, Tamas; Garcia Padilla, Mercedes; Szucs, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Hydrogeology-related research activities cover a wide spectrum of research areas at EU and national levels. This fact is due to the intrinsic nature of the "water" topic, representing a key-aspect of the modern society: water is not only necessary for human, biological and environmental requirements, but it is one basic "engine" of several interconnected research topics, including energy, health, climate, food, security and others as exemplified by the water-food-energy-climate nexus described by e.g. the World Economic Forum. With respect to the water cycle, the management of groundwater brings additional challenges to the implementation of the Water Framework Directive (WFD) and climate change adaptation (such as integrated transboundary management of groundwater resources). This fact is related to the nature of groundwater, which represents the "hidden" part of the water cycle, difficult to evaluate, communicate and appreciate, although it sustains the health of both humans and ecosystems as well as industrial and agricultural production. In general, groundwater has been considered mainly for its relationships with surface waters, influencing river flow, e-flows, GDE (groundwater-dependent ecosystems), pollutant fate, agricultural practices, water scarcity and others. In this framework, the importance of groundwater inside the WFD has been reinforced by the daughter directive on groundwater. In the last years, particular insights have been developed on surface waters/groundwater interactions and several related research projects have been carried out. Nevertheless, a specific focus on hydrogeology, the science branch studying groundwater, has not looked into until now, despite of its utmost importance as renewable, high-quality, naturally protected (but still vulnerable) resource. At the same time the European knowledge-base that has been acquired on this important topic is widespread into several projects, plans, actions, realized at national and fragmented

  12. Atrazine retention and degradation in the vadose zone at a till plain site in central Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayless, E.R.

    2001-01-01

    The vadose zone was examined as an environmental compartment where significant quantities of atrazine and its degradation compounds may be stored and transformed. The vadose zone was targeted because regional studies in the White River Basin indicated a large discrepancy between the mass of atrazine applied to fields and the amount of the pesticide and its degradation compounds that are measured in ground and surface water. A study site was established in a rotationally cropped field in the till plain of central Indiana. Data were gathered during the 1994 growing season to characterize the site hydrogeology and the distribution of atrazine, desethylatrazine, deisopropylatrazine, didealkylatrazine and hydroxyatrazine in runoff, pore water, and ground water. The data indicated that atrazine and its degradation compounds were transported from land surface to a depth of 1.5 m within 60 days of application, but were undetected in the saturated zone at nearby monitoring wells. A numerical model was developed, based on the field data, to provide information about processes that could retain and degrade atrazine in the vadose zone. Simulations indicated that evapotranspiration is responsible for surface directed soil-moisture flow during much of the growing season. This process causes retention and degradation of atrazine in the vadose zone. Increased residence time in the vadose zone leads to nearly complete transformation of atrazine and its degradation products to unquantified degradation compounds. As a result of mascropore flow, small quantities of atrazine and its degradation compounds may reach the saturated zone.

  13. Hydrogeologic setting, ground-water flow, and ground-water quality at the Lake Wheeler Road research station, 2001-03 : North Carolina Piedmont and Mountains Resource Evaluation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Melinda J.; Bolich, Richard E.; Huffman, Brad A.

    2005-01-01

    Results of a 2-year field study of the regolith-fractured bedrock ground-water system at the Lake Wheeler Road research station in Wake County, North Carolina, indicate both disconnection and interaction among components of the ground-water system. The three components of the ground-water system include (1) shallow, porous regolith; (2) a transition zone, including partially weathered rock, having both secondary (fractures) and primary porosity; and (3) deeper, fractured bedrock that has little, if any, primary porosity and is dominated by secondary fractures. The research station includes 15 wells (including a well transect from topographic high to low settings) completed in the three major components of the ground-water-flow system and a surface-water gaging station on an unnamed tributary. The Lake Wheeler Road research station is considered representative of a felsic gneiss hydrogeologic unit having steeply dipping foliation and a relatively thick overlying regolith. Bedrock foliation generally strikes N. 10? E. to N. 30? E. and N. 20? W. to N. 40? W. to a depth of about 400 feet and dips between 70? and 80? SE. and NE., respectively. From 400 to 600 feet, the foliation generally strikes N. 70? E. to N. 80? E., dipping 70? to 80? SE. Depth to bedrock locally ranges from about 67 to 77 feet below land surface. Fractures in the bedrock generally occur in two primary sets: low dip angle, stress relief fractures that cross cut foliation, and steeply dipping fractures parallel to foliation. Findings of this study generally support the conceptual models of ground-water flow from high to low topographic settings developed for the Piedmont and Blue Ridge Provinces in previous investigations, but are considered a refinement of the generalized conceptual model based on a detailed local-scale investigation. Ground water flows toward a surface-water boundary, and hydraulic gradients generally are downward in recharge areas and upward in discharge areas; however, local

  14. DS926 Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina -- Raster surface for transmissivity of the Upper Floridan aquifer

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system were developed to define an updated hydrogeologic framework as part...

  15. DS926 Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina -- Polygon regions depicting saline areas within the Floridan aquifer system

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system were developed to define an updated hydrogeologic framework as part...

  16. DS926 Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina -- Raster surface generated for the "freshwater" thickness of the Floridan aquifer system

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system were developed to define an updated hydrogeologic framework as part...

  17. DS926 Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina -- Extent of the sand-and-gravel aquifer of the surficial aquifer system

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system were developed to define an updated hydrogeologic framework as part...

  18. DS926 Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina, Extent of the Woodville Karst Plain

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system were developed to define an updated hydrogeologic framework as part...

  19. DS926 Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina - Positive structural features within the study area

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system were developed to define an updated hydrogeologic framework as part...

  20. DS926 Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina -- Polygon regions of the upper confining unit of the Floridan aquifer system

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system were developed to define an updated hydrogeologic framework as part...

  1. DS926 Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina -- Geologic units forming the base of the Floridan aquifer system

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system were developed to define an updated hydrogeologic framework as part...

  2. DS926 Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina -- Points for the top of the Floridan aquifer system

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system were developed to define an updated hydrogeologic framework as part...

  3. DS926 Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina -- Raster surface depicting the base of the Floridan aquifer system

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system were developed to define an updated hydrogeologic framework as part...

  4. DS926 Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina -- Geologic units forming the top of the Floridan aquifer system

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system were developed to define an updated hydrogeologic framework as part...

  5. DS926 Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina -- Point features used for the base of the Floridan aquifer system

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system were developed to define an updated hydrogeologic framework as part...

  6. DS926 Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina -- Polygon regions depicting saline areas for the APPZ

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system were developed to define an updated hydrogeologic framework as part...

  7. DS926 Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina -- Raster surface depicting the top of the APPZ

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system were developed to define an updated hydrogeologic framework as part...

  8. DS926 Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina -- Contours for the top of the APPZ

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system were developed to define an updated hydrogeologic framework as part...

  9. DS926 Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina -- Limestone boundary for the APPZ (Reese and Richardson, 2008)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system were developed to define an updated hydrogeologic framework as part...

  10. DS926 Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina -- Clipping boundary extent of the APPZ

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system were developed to define an updated hydrogeologic framework as part...

  11. DS926 Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina -- Contours for the top of the MAPCU

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system were developed to define an updated hydrogeologic framework as part...

  12. DS926 Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina -- Points where head differences were calculated across the MAPCU

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system were developed to define an updated hydrogeologic framework as part...

  13. DS926 Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina -- Raster surface depicting the thickness of the middle confining unit

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system were developed to define an updated hydrogeologic framework as part...

  14. DS926 Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina -- Polygon regions depicting the low-permeability units that overlie the Lower Floridan aquifer

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system were developed to define an updated hydrogeologic framework as part...

  15. DS926 Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina -- Raster surface depicting the top of the MAPCU

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system were developed to define an updated hydrogeologic framework as part...

  16. DS926 Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina -- Contours for top of the middle confining unit of the Floridan aquifer system

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system were developed to define an updated hydrogeologic framework as part...

  17. DS926 Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina -- Points for the thickness of the regional middle confining unit

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system were developed to define an updated hydrogeologic framework as part...

  18. DS926 Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina -- Raster surface depicting the thickness of the MAPCU

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system were developed to define an updated hydrogeologic framework as part...

  19. DS926 Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina -- Points for the top of the MAPCU

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system were developed to define an updated hydrogeologic framework as part...

  20. DS926 Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina -- Points depicting the thickness of the upper confining unit or limestone residuum

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system were developed to define an updated hydrogeologic framework as part...

  1. DS926 Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina -- Polygon region depicting the weathered limestone residuum of the Floridan aquifer system

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system were developed to define an updated hydrogeologic framework as part...

  2. DS926 Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina -- Contours for the top of the LISAPCU

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system were developed to define an updated hydrogeologic framework as part...

  3. DS926 Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina -- Points for the thickness of the MAPCU

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system were developed to define an updated hydrogeologic framework as part...

  4. DS926 Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina -- Points for the top of the Lower Floridan aquifer below the LISAPCU, constrained

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system were developed to define an updated hydrogeologic framework as part...

  5. DS926 Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina -- County boundaries for states represented in the study area

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system were developed to define an updated hydrogeologic framework as part...

  6. DS926 Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina -- Raster surface depicting the thickness of the Floridan aquifer system

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system were developed to define an updated hydrogeologic framework as part...

  7. DS926 Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina -- Thickness raster surface for surficial deposits, clipped

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system were developed to define an updated hydrogeologic framework as part...

  8. DS926 Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina -- Points for the thickness of the Bucatunna clay confining unit

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system were developed to define an updated hydrogeologic framework as part...

  9. DS926 Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina -- Raster surface depicting the thickness of residuum in southwestern Georgia and southeastern Alabama

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system were developed to define an updated hydrogeologic framework as part...

  10. DS926 Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina -- Raster surface depicting the thickness of the Bucatunna clay confining unit

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system were developed to define an updated hydrogeologic framework as part...

  11. DS926 Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina -- Points for the thickness of the OCAPLPZ

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system were developed to define an updated hydrogeologic framework as part...

  12. DS926 Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina -- Area where upper confining unit is thin or absent beneath the surficial aquifer

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system were developed to define an updated hydrogeologic framework as part...

  13. DS926 Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina -- Contours for the top of the Lower Floridan aquifer

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system were developed to define an updated hydrogeologic framework as part...

  14. DS926 Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina -- Raster surface depicting top of the Lower Floridan aquifer

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system were developed to define an updated hydrogeologic framework as part...

  15. DS926 Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina -- Points for the top of the glauconite marker horizon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system were developed to define an updated hydrogeologic framework as part...

  16. DS926 Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina -- Extent of the Floridan aquifer system

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system were developed to define an updated hydrogeologic framework as part...

  17. DS926 Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina -- Polygon regions for the 10,000 mg/l total dissolved solids boundary feature

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system were developed to define an updated hydrogeologic framework as part...

  18. DS926 Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina -- Polygons representing thickness of the upper confining unit of the Floridan aquifer system

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system were developed to define an updated hydrogeologic framework as part...

  19. DS926 Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina -- Polygon regions of low-permeability units forming the MAPCU

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system were developed to define an updated hydrogeologic framework as part...

  20. DS926 Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina -- Points for the top of the Lower Floridan aquifer below the LISAPCU

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system were developed to define an updated hydrogeologic framework as part...